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Sample records for suspected community-acquired infections

  1. [Community-acquired respiratory infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero Vivas, J; Rubio Alonso, M; Corral, O; Pacheco, S; Agudo, E; Picazo, J J

    1997-01-01

    Respiratory infections are the most frequent reason for primary health care consultation. Although generally not severe, they are responsible for a large number of days of laboral and scholar absenteeism and an excessive use of antibiotics. The clinical and epidemiologic data of extrahospitalary infections in primary health care centers throughout Spain were collected according to the one day cut off system repeated trimestrally over one year. Data of 3,732 days of consultation were collected in which a total of 144,608 patients were attended. Of these, 20,614 had respiratory infections and 11,684 extrarespiratory infections. The most frequent processes were pharyngitis (33.7%), common cold (31.7%) followed by bronchitis (18.7%), otitis (11%), influenza (4.6%), laryngitis (4%), sinusitis (3.6%) and pneumonia (1.8%). Antibiotic treatment was prescribed in 13,488 patients (65%). The type of antibiotic was analyzed in the 11,977 patients treated for only one infection. Penicillins were the antibiotics most used followed by cephalosporins. The antibiotic prescribed was considered adequate in 70% of the 8,484 patients treated for potentially bacterial infection. A total of 3,493 patients had infection considered to be of viral etiology. Twenty-two percent of the patients attending a primary health care center presented infection and of these two out of three cases had respiratory infection. Pharyngitis and common cold were the most frequent processes observed. Two thirds of the patients consulting for respiratory infection received antibiotic treatment, with 29.2% being diagnosed with infections considered to be of viral etiology. The empiric treatment chosen for the two thirds of the potentially bacterial infections was considered as adequate.

  2. Nosocomial and Community Acquired Infections in Korle Bu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Nosocomial or hospital acquired infection has been recognized as a serious public health problem in the last twenty years. In most hospitals in Africa-South of the Sahara, although the types of community acquired infections are known, neither the magnitude, nor the common types of nosocomial infections ...

  3. Community-Acquired urinary tract infection by pseudomonas oryzihabitans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunita M Bhatawadekar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas oryzihabitans and Chrysomonas luteola has been placed in CDC group Ve2 and Ve1 respectively. These bacteria appear to be emerging pathogens. P. oryzihabitans was isolated from cases of bacteremia, CNS infections, wound infections, peritonitis, sinusitis, catheter associated infections in AIDS patient, and pneumonia. Most of the reports of P. oryzihabitans infection were of nosocomial origin in individuals with some predisposing factors. We report here a case of community acquired UTI by P. oryzihabitans in an immune-competent patient with stricture of urethra.

  4. Community-acquired bacterial bloodstream infections in HIV-infected patients: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huson, Michaëla A. M.; Stolp, Sebastiaan M.; van der Poll, Tom; Grobusch, Martin P.

    2014-01-01

    Information on community-acquired bacterial bloodstream infections (BSIs) in individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is limited. We conducted a systematic literature review. The case fraction of community-acquired bacterial BSIs in hospitalized patients is 20% and 30% in adults

  5. Higher incidence of perineal community acquired MRSA infections among toddlers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blumenthal Robert M

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A six-fold increase in pediatric MRSA infections, prompted us to examine the clinical profile of children with MRSA infections seen at Mercy Children's Hospital, Toledo, Ohio and to characterize the responsible strains. Methods Records were reviewed of pediatric patients who cultured positive for MRSA from June 1 to December 31, 2007. Strain typing by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFT and DiversiLab, SCCmec typing, and PCR-based lukSF-PV gene (encodes Panton-Valentine leukocidin, arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME and cap5 gene detection was performed. Results Chart review of 63 patients with MRSA infections revealed that 58(92% were community acquired MRSA (CAMRSA. All CAMRSA were skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI. Twenty five (43% patients were aged mec type IVa and lukSF-PV gene positive. Nearly all contained ACME and about 80% were cap5 positive. Of the 58 USA300 strains by PFT, 55(95% were also identified as USA300 via the automated repetitive sequence-based PCR method from DiversiLab. Conclusions CAMRSA SSTI of the perineum was significantly more common among toddlers and that of the extremities in older children. The infecting strains were all USA300 PFT. Further studies are needed to identify the unique virulence and colonization characteristics of USA300 strains in these infections.

  6. Atypical pathogen infection in community-acquired pneumonia.

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    Yu, Yun; Fei, Aihua

    2016-02-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a world wide cause of morbidity and mortality. The etiology of CAP is different between countries and changes over time. With the increasing incidence, atypical pathogens are attracting more and more attention all over the world. In many countries, atypical pathogens are one of the main pathogens of CAP, and even could be the most prevalent etiology in China. Atypical pathogen infections can cause multi-system complications, which leads to a worse prognosis. Although still controversial, empirical antibiotic coverage of atypical pathogens in CAP may improve outcomes, shorten length of hospitalization, reduce mortality and lower total hospitalization costs. The macrolide resistance rate of atypical pathogens, especially Mycoplasma Pneumoniae (M. Pneumoniae) is high, so fluoroquinolones or tetracyclines should be considered as alternative therapy.

  7. [Community-acquired pneumonia with atypical (mycoplasmic and chlamydial) infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubnikov, G V; Poliakova, I G; Butakova, L Iu

    2009-01-01

    To perfect prehospital diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) of atypical etiology (mycoplastic--Mp and chlamydial--Ch). Routine clinical examinations, sputum seeding, enzyme immunoassay were made in 214 patients admitted to therapeutic departments of two large Barnaul hospitals. Mp CAP was diagnosed in 21.5%, Ch CAP--in 12.1%, combination--in 7.0% patients. Sputum seeding was made in 67 patients. Of them 41.8% patients were found to have bacterial infection. Atypical infection combined with bacterial in 44.1% patients. The above combination was more frequent in patients with Ch CAP than with Mp CAP (58.8 and 29.7%, respectively). Bacterial flora was detected in 39.1% CAP patients without atypical infection. A retrospective analysis of case histories in respect of prehospital stage discovered that CAP patients with atypical infection are characterized by more frequent contact with patients with acute respiratory viral infection and workers of services sector. CAP arises primarily in autumn and winter with morbidity correlating with acute respiratory diseases morbidity. CAP with atypical infection is characterized with prodromal period, late visit to the doctor, late hospitalization, late x-ray verification of the disease especially in Ch CAP. Mp CAP is more prevalent in young patients, Ch CAP occurs most frequently in young, presenile and senile patients. The presence of the prodromal period in CAP patients with atypical infection is the cause of mistakes in outpatient diagnosis. Instead of CAP such patients are often diagnosed to have acute respiratory viral infection (54.5%) or exacerbation of chronic bronchopulmonary disease (15.9%).

  8. Tsukamurella infection: a rare cause of community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Yatin B; Goswami, Raktima; Bhanot, Nitin; Mehta, Zankhana; Simonelli, Paul

    2011-06-01

    A 79-year-old Asian man was admitted with community-acquired pneumonia. Antimycobacterial therapy was initiated when sputum smears revealed acid fast bacilli. The patient was, however, diagnosed to have pneumonia secondary to Tsukamurella spp. This is an exceedingly rare cause of pneumonia, especially in immunocompetent individuals. Clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment strategies of Tsukamurella pneumonia are discussed with a literature review.

  9. Antibiotic resistance in community-acquired urinary tract infections

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the treatment of other infections would inevitably lead to the development of resistance. S Afr Med J 1994; 84: 600-602. Antibiotic resistance is a major problem in developing countries.' There are many reasons for this, including antibiotic use in animal feeds, inappropriate prescribing and poor sanitation. Resistance rates in ...

  10. Factors associated with community-acquired urinary tract infections ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Background: Urinary tract infections (UTI) are a common medical problem affecting the general population and thus com- monly encountered in medical practice, with the global burden of UTIs at about 150 million people. Because uropathogens largely originate from colonic flora, they are easy to predict, and this is ...

  11. Factors associated with community-acquired urinary tract infections ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Urinary tract infections (UTI) are a common medical problem affecting the general population and thus commonly encountered in medical practice, with the global burden of UTIs at about 150 million people. Because uropathogens largely originate from colonic flora, they are easy to predict, and this is the ...

  12. The burden and epidemiology of community-acquired central nervous system infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erdem, H; Inan, A; Guven, E

    2017-01-01

    Risk assessment of central nervous system (CNS) infection patients is of key importance in predicting likely pathogens. However, data are lacking on the epidemiology globally. We performed a multicenter study to understand the burden of community-acquired CNS (CA-CNS) infections between 2012...

  13. Norovirus Genotypes in Hospital Settings - Differences between Nosocomial and Community-Acquired Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franck, Kristina Træholt; Nielsen, Rikke Thoft; Holzknecht, Barbara Juliane

    2015-01-01

    positive for norovirus in Denmark, 2002-2010, and to study the distribution of norovirus genotypes among inpatients with nosocomial and community-acquired norovirus infections, respectively. METHODS:  Admission and stool sampling dates from 3656 NoV infected patients were used to estimate the proportion...... of nosocomial infections. The associations between nosocomial infection and patient age, gender, and norovirus genotype GII.4 were examined. RESULTS:  Of the 3656 inpatients, 63% were classified as having nosocomial infections. Among these 9 capsid and 8 polymerase norovirus genotypes were detected whereas...... among the smaller group of inpatients with community-acquired infections, 12 capsid and 9 polymerase genotypes were detected. Nosocomial norovirus infections were associated with age ≥60 years and infections with genotype GII.4. CONCLUSION:  The majority of norovirus infections in hospitalized patients...

  14. Diabetes and Risk of Community-Acquired Respiratory Tract Infections, Urinary Tract Infections, and Bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Reimar W.; Mor, Anil

    2013-01-01

    This review provides an update on the risk of several important community-acquired infections seen in patients with diabetes: respiratory tract infections, urinary tract infections, and bacteremia. Respiratory tract infections: Recent epidemiological evidence shows a modest (1.25 to 1.75-fold) risk...... and tuberculosis. Limited data is available for diabetes and influenza, yet both influenza and pneumococcal vaccination is recommended in patients with diabetes. Urinary tract infections: The risk of asymptomatic bacteriuria and cystitis is 1.5 to 2 times increased in diabetes patients, while their risk...... factors for urinary tract infection are the same as in persons without diabetes. Bacteremia: The risk of bacteremia due to pneumococci is approximately 1.5 times increased in diabetes, similar to the increased risk for pneumonia. In comparison, diabetes is associated with 2.5 to 3 times increased risk...

  15. Antimicrobial resistance patterns in community acquired urinary tract infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilani, S.Y.H; Ahmad, N.; Shah, S.R.A.

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most frequent disease for which patients seek medical care. The antimicrobial agents causing UTI and their sensitivity patterns have remarkably changed throughout the world over the past few years. Hence, the present study was designed to explore the uropathogens and their susceptibility to various molecules in our region. Methods: This descriptive cross sectional study was conducted at Medical C Unit of Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad from January 2015 to January 2016. Patients with clinical features of UTI were evaluated using Urine R/E and Urine culture and sensitivity. Ten antibiotics were checked for susceptibility. Results were analysed using SPSS 17. Results: A total of 630 patients presented with urinary complaints. Of these, 236 patients had more than 8-10 pus cells on urine R/E. They were further evaluated using culture and sensitivity and positive culture was obtained in 75 patients. Of these 34 (45.3%) were males and 41 (54.7%) were females. E Coli was the predominant isolate being present in 49 (65.3%) patients. This was followed by Klebsiella in 9 (12%) patients. Tazobactam-piperacillin and cefoperazone-sulbactam were the most sensitive drugs having overall sensitivity of 96% and 93.3% respectively. The isolates were highly resistant to Fluoroquinolones 77.3% followed by Penicillins 72% and TMP-SMX 69.3%.Conclusion: Antibiotic sensitivity patterns have enormously changed over the past decade. Newer agents are quite efficacious but their use should be highly judicious to prevent the development of resistance to these molecules. (author)

  16. Early Chest Computed Tomography Scan to Assist Diagnosis and Guide Treatment Decision for Suspected Community-acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claessens, Yann-Erick; Debray, Marie-Pierre; Tubach, Florence; Brun, Anne-Laure; Rammaert, Blandine; Hausfater, Pierre; Naccache, Jean-Marc; Ray, Patrick; Choquet, Christophe; Carette, Marie-France; Mayaud, Charles; Leport, Catherine; Duval, Xavier

    2015-10-15

    Clinical decision making relative to community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) diagnosis is difficult. Chest radiograph is key in establishing parenchymal lung involvement. However, radiologic performance may lead to misdiagnosis, rendering questionable the use of chest computed tomography (CT) scan in patients with clinically suspected CAP. To assess whether early multidetector chest CT scan affects diagnosis and management of patients visiting the emergency department with suspected CAP. A total of 319 prospectively enrolled patients with clinically suspected CAP underwent multidetector chest CT scan within 4 hours. CAP diagnosis probability (definite, probable, possible, or excluded) and therapeutic plans (antibiotic initiation/discontinuation, hospitalization/discharge) were established by emergency physicians before and after CT scan results. The adjudication committee established the final CAP classification on Day 28. Chest radiograph revealed a parenchymal infiltrate in 188 patients. CAP was initially classified as definite in 143 patients (44.8%), probable or possible in 172 (53.8%), and excluded in 4 (1.2%). CT scan revealed a parenchymal infiltrate in 40 (33%) of the patients without infiltrate on chest radiograph and excluded CAP in 56 (29.8%) of the 188 with parenchymal infiltrate on radiograph. CT scan modified classification in 187 (58.6%; 95% confidence interval, 53.2-64.0), leading to 50.8% definite CAP and 28.8% excluded CAP, and 80% of modifications were in accordance with adjudication committee classification. Because of CT scan, antibiotics were initiated in 51 (16%) and discontinued in 29 (9%), and hospitalization was decided in 22 and discharge in 23. In CAP-suspected patients visiting the emergency unit, early CT scan findings complementary to chest radiograph markedly affect both diagnosis and clinical management. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 01574066).

  17. Norovirus Genotypes in Hospital Settings: Differences Between Nosocomial and Community-Acquired Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franck, Kristina Træholt; Nielsen, Rikke Thoft; Holzknecht, Barbara Juliane; Ersbøll, Annette Kjær; Fischer, Thea Kølsen; Böttiger, Blenda

    2015-09-15

    Norovirus (NoV) is a major cause of gastroenteritis and hospital outbreaks, leading to substantial morbidity and direct healthcare expenses as well as indirect societal costs. The aim of the study was to estimate the proportion of nosocomial NoV infections among inpatients testing positive for NoV in Denmark, 2002-2010, and to study the distribution of NoV genotypes among inpatients with nosocomial and community-acquired NoV infections, respectively. Admission and stool sampling dates from 3656 NoV-infected patients were used to estimate the proportion of nosocomial infections. The associations between nosocomial infection and patient age, sex, and NoV genotype GII.4 were examined. Of the 3656 inpatients, 63% were classified as having nosocomial infections. Among these, 9 capsid and 8 polymerase NoV genotypes were detected, whereas in the smaller group of inpatients with community-acquired infections, 12 capsid and 9 polymerase genotypes were detected. Nosocomial NoV infections were associated with age ≥60 years and infections with genotype GII.4. The majority of NoV infections in hospitalized patients were nosocomial. Nosocomial infection was mainly associated with older age but also with the specific genotype GII.4. The genotypes in community-acquired NoV infections were more heterogeneous than in nosocomial infections. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Cutaneous community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection in participants of athletic activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Philip R

    2005-06-01

    Cutaneous community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CAMRSA) has been identified in otherwise healthy individuals either with or without methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA)-associated risk factors who participate in athletic activities. The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical features of CAMRSA skin infection that occurred in university student athletes, evaluate the potential mechanisms for the transmission of MRSA infection of the skin in participants of athletic activities, and review the measures for preventing the spread of cutaneous CAMRSA infection in athletes. A retrospective chart review of the student athletes from the University of Houston whose skin lesions were evaluated at the Health Center and grew MRSA was performed. The clinical characteristics and the postulated mechanisms of cutaneous MRSA infection in the athletes were compared with those previously published in reports of CAMRSA skin infection outbreaks in other sports participants. Cutaneous CAMRSA infection occurred in seven student athletes (four women and three men) who were either weight lifters (three students) or members of a varsity sports team: volleyball (two women), basketball (one woman), and football (one man). The MRSA skin infection presented as solitary or multiple, tender, erythematous, fluctuant abscesses with surrounding cellulitis. The lesions were most frequently located in the axillary region (three weight lifters), on the buttocks (two women), or on the thighs (two women). The drainage from all of the skin lesions grew MRSA, which was susceptible to clindamycin, gentamicin, rifampin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, and vancomycin; five of the isolates were also susceptible to ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin. All of the bacterial strains were resistant to erythromycin, oxacillin, and penicillin. The cutaneous MRSA infections persisted or worsened in the six athletes who were empirically treated for methicillin-sensitive S. aureus at

  19. Quantitative culture of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, TR; Korsgaard, Jens; Møller, Jens Kjølseth

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of quantitative bacterial culture of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid obtained by fibreoptic bronchoscopy, 67 consecutive immunocompetent adult patients admitted to hospital with community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections from September 1997 to May 1998...... value for positive culture of 10(4) cfu ml(-1) the specificity of lavage culture of potential pathogenic bacteria in relation to actual lower airway infection was 100%. Therefore, quantitative bacterial culture of potential pathogenic bacteria in BAL fluid is very specific but only positive in about one...

  20. The incidence of methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus in community-acquired hand infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Patrick C; Rinker, Brian

    2009-05-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has become increasingly prevalent in hand infections. Traditionally, the empiric treatment of hand infections has involved beta-lactam antibiotics, which are ineffective against MRSA. Centers for Disease Control recommends empiric coverage of MRSA infections if the local rate of MRSA exceeds 10% to 15%. A retrospective review was performed on all patients admitted for community-acquired soft tissue infections of the hand between 2004 and 2007 at a single institution. The overall incidence of MRSA was 60%. The incidence of MRSA in healthy adults was 64%, healthy pediatric patients was 100%, immunocompromised patients was 45%, and diabetic patients was 20%. The current rates of MRSA would imply that all patients presenting with hand infections should be treated empirically for MRSA. Linezolid is the only oral antibiotic approved by the Food and Drug Administration for treating MRSA, but many studies have reported that trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole is an effective antibiotic for outpatient treatment of MRSA.

  1. [Antibiotic resistance of Escherichia coli from community-acquired urinary tract infections. What antimicrobial to use?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guajardo-Lara, Claudia Elena; González-Martínez, Pedro Mario; Ayala-Gaytán, Juan Jacobo

    2009-01-01

    Determine antibiotic resistance of community-acquired uropathogen Escherichia coli and infer therapeutic options. E. coli strains isolated from urine during a one-year period were studied. Identification and susceptibility tests were performed. A total of 652 isolates were included from patients in two institutions, a healthcare clinic 303 (46.5%) and a hospital 349 ( 53.5%). The antimicrobials with higher resistance rates were ampicillin 67.2%, trimethoprim-sulfametoxazole 59.2%, cefazolin 35.6% and ciprofloxacin 24.7%. Resistance to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and ciprofloxacin used for empiric treatment in community urinary infections is high, and there are few available treatment options.

  2. Viruses detected by systematic multiplex polymerase chain reaction in adults with suspected community-acquired pneumonia attending emergency departments in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, D; Le Floch, H; Houhou, N; Epelboin, L; Hausfater, P; Khalil, A; Ray, P; Duval, X; Claessens, Y-E; Leport, C

    2015-06-01

    Infectious agents associated with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) are under-studied. This study attempted to identify viruses from the upper respiratory tract in adults visiting emergency departments for clinically suspected CAP. Adults with suspected CAP enrolled in the ESCAPED study (impact of computed tomography on CAP diagnosis) had prospective nasopharyngeal (NP) samples studied by multiplex PCR (targeting 15 viruses and four intracellular bacteria). An adjudication committee composed of infectious disease specialists, pneumologists and radiologists blinded to PCR results reviewed patient records, including computed tomography and day 28 follow up, to categorize final diagnostic probability of CAP as definite, probable, possible, or excluded. Among the 254 patients enrolled, 78 (31%) had positive PCR, which detected viruses in 72/254 (28%) and intracellular bacteria in 8 (3%) patients. PCR was positive in 44/125 (35%) patients with definite CAP and 21/83 (25%) patients with excluded CAP. The most frequent organisms were influenza A/B virus in 27 (11%), rhinovirus in 20 (8%), coronavirus in seven (3%), respiratory syncytial virus in seven (3%) and Mycoplasma pneumoniae in eight (3%) of 254 patients. Proportion of rhinovirus was higher in patients with excluded CAP compared with other diagnostic categories (p = 0.01). No such difference was observed for influenza virus. Viruses seem common in adults attending emergency departments with suspected CAP. A concomitant clinical, radiological and biological analysis of the patient's chart can contribute to either confirm their role, or suggest upper respiratory tract infection or shedding. Their imputability and impact in early management of CAP deserve further studies. NCT01574066. Copyright © 2015 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The etiology and impact of co-infections in children hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Vikki G; Arnold, Sandra R; Bramley, Anna M; Ampofo, Krow; Williams, Derek J; Grijalva, Carlos G; Self, Wesley H; Anderson, Evan J; Wunderink, Richard G; Edwards, Kathryn M; Pavia, Andrew T; Jain, Seema; McCullers, Jonathan A

    2017-12-08

    Recognition that co-infections are common in children with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is increasing, but gaps remain in our understanding of their frequency and importance. We analyzed data from 2219 children hospitalized with CAP and compared demographics, clinical characteristics, and outcomes between groups with viruses alone, bacteria alone, or co-infections. We also assessed the frequency of selected pairings of co-detected pathogens and their clinical characteristics. 576 (26%) of the children studied had a co-infection. Children with only virus detection were younger and more likely to be black and have co-morbidities such as asthma compared to those with bacteria alone. Children with virus-bacteria co-infections had a higher frequency of leukocytosis, consolidation on chest X-ray, increased length of stay, and more frequent parapneumonic effusions, intensive care unit admission, and need for mechanical ventilation when compared to viruses alone. Virus-virus co-infections were generally comparable to single virus infections, with the exception of the need for oxygen supplementation, which was higher during the first 24 hours of hospitalization in some virus-virus pairings. Co-infections occurred in 26% of children hospitalized for CAP. Children with bacterial infections, alone or complicated by a virus, have worse outcomes than children infected with a virus alone. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Critical appraisal of ceftaroline in the management of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia and skin infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goodman JJ

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Julian J Goodman, Stanley I MartinDivision of Infectious Diseases, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USAAbstract: Ceftaroline is a novel broad-spectrum cephalosporin ß-lactam antibiotic with activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA as well as multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae among other routine Gram positive and Gram negative organisms. It has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia and acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs. Ceftaroline is approved for treatment of ABSSSI due to MRSA, however currently there are no data for pneumonia due to MRSA in humans. Herein we review the major clinical trials as well as ceftaroline microbiology, pharmacokinetics, and safety, followed by a look at further directions for investigation of this new agent.Keywords: ceftaroline, pneumonia, skin infection

  5. Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Antibiotic Treatment of Community-Acquired Urinary Tract Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, U-Syn; Lee, Seung-Ju; Yeo, Jeong Kyun; Min, Seung Ki; Lee, Heeyoung

    2018-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are infectious diseases that commonly occur in communities. Although several international guidelines for the management of UTIs have been available, clinical characteristics, etiology and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns may differ from country to country. This work represents an update of the 2011 Korean guideline for UTIs. The current guideline was developed by the update and adaptation method. This clinical practice guideline provides recommendations for the diagnosis and management of UTIs, including asymptomatic bacteriuria, acute uncomplicated cystitis, acute uncomplicated pyelonephritis, complicated pyelonephritis related to urinary tract obstruction, and acute bacterial prostatitis. This guideline targets community-acquired UTIs occurring among adult patients. Healthcare-associated UTIs, catheter-associated UTIs, and infections in immunocompromised patients were not included in this guideline. PMID:29637759

  6. Blood culture status and mortality among patients with suspected community-acquired bacteremia: a population-based cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sørensen Henrik T

    2011-05-01

    comorbidity. Conclusions Community-acquired bacteremia was associated with an increased risk of mortality in the first week of medical ward admission. Higher mortality among patients with Gram-positive and polymicrobial bacteremia compared with patients with Gram-negative bacteremia and negative cultures emphasizes the prognostic importance of these infections.

  7. Phenotypic and molecular characterization of Klebsiella spp. isolates causing community-acquired infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Garza-Ramos

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Klebsiella spp. isolates from community-acquired infections were characterized. A total of 39 Klebsiella spp. isolates were obtained from outpatients at four rural hospitals in Mexico (2013–2014. The biochemical tests identified all as being K. pneumoniae. The molecular multiplex-PCR test identified 36 (92.4% K. pneumoniae isolates and one (2.5% K. variicola isolate, and phylogenetic analysis of the rpoB gene identified two isolates (5.1% belonging to K. quasipneumoniae subsp. quasipneumoniae and K. quasivariicola. The last one was confirmed by phylogenetic analysis of six-loci concatenated genes. Mostly the isolates were multidrug resistant; however, a minority were extended-spectrum β-lactamase producing (10.2%. The extended-spectrum β-lactamase CTX-M-15 gene was identified in these isolates. Analysis of biofilm production and the hypermucoviscosity phenotype showed a total of 35 (92.3% and seven (17.9% of the isolates were positive for these phenotypes respectively. The K2 (4/39, 10.2%, K5 (2/39, 5.1% and K54 (1/39, 2.5% serotypes were identified in seven (17.9% of the isolates, and only 28.5% (2/7 hypermucoviscous isolates were positive for the K2 and K5 serotypes. In general, the sequence type (ST analysis and phylogenetic analysis of seven multilocus sequence typing loci were heterogeneous; however, ST29 was the most prevalent ST in the analysed isolates, accounting for 19% (4/21 of the total isolates. Two of the four ST29 isolates had the hypermucoviscosity phenotype. The virulence factors for fimbriae were the most prevalent, followed by siderophores. Community-acquired infections are caused by various species from Klebsiella genus, with different profiles of antibiotic resistance and heterogeneous virulence factors. Keywords: Antimicrobial susceptibility, Bacterial resistance, Cephalosporin resistance, Community infection, ESBL, Hypermucoviscosity

  8. Spread of community-acquired meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus skin and soft-tissue infection within a family: implications for antibiotic therapy and prevention.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Amir, N H

    2010-04-01

    Outbreaks or clusters of community-acquired meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) within families have been reported. We describe a family cluster of CA-MRSA skin and soft-tissue infection where CA-MRSA was suspected because of recurrent infections which failed to respond to flucloxacillin. While the prevalence of CA-MRSA is low worldwide, CA-MRSA should be considered in certain circumstances depending on clinical presentation and risk assessment. Surveillance cultures of family contacts of patients with MRSA should be considered to help establish the prevalence of CA-MRSA and to inform the optimal choice of empiric antibiotic treatment.

  9. Clinical and Laboratory Characteristics of Acute Community-Acquired Urinary Tract Infections in Adult Hospitalised Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilista Piljić

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infections (UTI cause a great number of morbidity and mortality. These infections are serious complications in pregnancy, patients with diabetes, polycystic kidneys disease, sickle cell anaemia, kidney transplant and in patients with functional or structural anomalies of the urinary tract. The aim of this investigation was to determine a dominant causative agents of UTI and some of the clinical and laboratory characteristics of acute community-acquired UTI in adult hospitalised patients. We studied 200 adult patients with acute community-acquired UTI hospitalised in the Clinic for Infectious Diseases Tuzla from January 2006 to December 2007. The patients were divided into two groups: a group of patients with E. coli UTI (147 and a group of patients with non-E. coli UTI (53. In these two groups, the symptoms and signs of illness, blood test and urine analysis results were analysed. Our results have shown that the patients with E. coli UTI frequently had fever higher than 38,5 degrees C (p<0,0001, chills (p=0,0349, headache (p=0,0499, cloudy urine (p<0,0001, proteinuria (p=0,0011 and positive nitrite-test (p=0,0002. The patients with non-E. coli UTI frequently had fever lower than 38,5 degrees C (p<0,0001 and urine specific gravity <1015 (p=0,0012. There was no significant difference in blood test results between patients with E. coli and non-E. coli UTI. These clinical and laboratory findings can lead us to early etiological diagnosis of these UTI before urine culture detection of causative agents, which takes several days. Early etiological diagnosis of the E. coli and non-E. coli UTI is necessary for an urgent administration of appropriate empirical antibiotic treatment. This is very important in prevention of irreversible kidney damage, prolonged treatment, complications, as well as recidives and chronicity of the illness.

  10. Community acquired infections among refugees leading to Intensive Care Unit admissions in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turktan, Mediha; Ak, Oznur; Erdem, Hakan; Ozcengiz, Dilek; Hargreaves, Sally; Kaya, Safak; Karakoc, Emre; Ozkan-Kuscu, Ozlem; Tuncer-Ertem, Gunay; Tekin, Recep; Birbicer, Handan; Durmus, Gul; Yilmaz, Canan; Kocak, Funda; Puca, Edmond; Rello, Jordi

    2017-05-01

    Data on the impact of refugees on Intensive Care Units (ICUs) are lacking in the literature, in particular for community-acquired (CA) infectious diseases, for which they are known to be at higher risk. We did a descriptive, multicenter study to analyze CA infections among refugee patients requiring ICU admission. Inclusion criteria were adult refugee patients admitted to an ICU due to CA infections. Anonymized data were collected between January 1, 2010 and December 30, 2015 across 10 referral centers. 29.885 patients were admitted to the ICUs in the study period. 37 patients were included the study, the majority were from Syria (n=31, 83.8%). Mean (SD) age of the patients was 45.92±20.16years. The 5-year prevalence rate was 123.8 per 100.000 patients in the ICUs. All patients had at least one comorbid condition. Forty-nine CA infections were diagnosed. The most common CA infection was pneumonia (49%) followed by urinary-tract infections (16.3%). 21 patients (56.7%) hospitalized in the ICU had trauma history. Mortality rate was high at 22 patients (59.5%) with 5 (22.7%) deaths directly attributed to CA infections. Refugees presented to ICUs with CA infections similar to the host populations (pneumonia and urinary-tract infections) but had high mortality rates (59.5%). It seems that Turkish ICUs were not congested with the refugee patients' influx for CA infections. More research needs to be done to better understand how to deliver preventative and timely health care services to this group of patients. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparative Evaluation of Cases with Community-Acquired Infective Endocarditis and Health Care-Associated Infective Endocarditis

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    Ebru Kursun

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The present study aimed to comparatively evaluate the cases with health care-associated infective endocarditis and the cases with community-acquired infective endocarditis. Material and Methods: Of the cases followed for infective endocarditis (IE, 21 (40 % had health care-associated infective endocarditis and 31 (60 % community-acquired infective endocarditis. Results: Comparing the cases with community acquired infective endocarditis and the cases with health care-associated infective endocarditis, it was determined that advanced age (58.0 +/- 15.1 years vs. 41.3+/- 14.4 years, P= 0.000, presence of chronic renal insufficiency (P= 0.001 and diabetes mellitus (P= 0.016 as concomitant diseases, being previously hospitalized (P= 0.0001, hemodialysis in terms of diagnostic and therapeutic interventions (P= 0.022, presence of central venous catheter (P= 0.022, and undergone intervention for gastrointestinal system (P= 0.060,as well as laboratory results including positive blood culture growth for S. aureus and Enterococcus (P= 0.037, and complications such as development of embolic event (P= 0.008, spondylodiscitis (P= 0.034 and stroke (P= 0.007 were statistically significantly more common in health care-associated infective endocarditis cases. Whilst mortality was higher in health care-associated infective endocarditis cases (28.6 %, it was determined that there was no statistically significant difference between the groups. Conclusion: Health care-associated infective endocarditis is a disease that is more common in the patients at advanced age, with concomitant disease and the history of exposing invasive procedures in the past for diagnostic and therapeutic purpose, and it is a disease with high morbidity and mortality that courses with serious complications [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(1.000: 91-97

  12. Prevalence and clinical presentations of atypical pathogens infection in community acquired pneumonia in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prapphal, Nuanchan; Suwanjutha, Subharee; Durongkaveroj, Pravin; Lochindarat, Sorasak; Kunakorn, Mongkol; Deerojanawong, Jitladda; Chantarojanasiri, Teerachai; Supanitayaonon, Yingsak; Janedittakarn, Pisit

    2006-09-01

    To determine the prevalence of atypical pneumonia and clinical presentations in patients with community acquired pneumonia (CAP). A prospective multi-centered study was performed in patients aged > or = 2 years with the diagnosis of CAP who were treated at seven governmental hospitals in Bangkok from December 2001 to November 2002. The diagnosis of current infection was based on > or = 4 fold rise in antibody sera or persistently high antibody titers together with the presence of DNA of M. pneumoniae or C. pneumoniae in respiratory secretion or antigen of L. pneumophila in the urine. Clinical presentations were compared between patients with atypical pneumonia and unspecified pneumonia. Of 292 patients, 18.8% had current infection with atypical respiratory pathogens (M. pneumoniae 14.0%, C. pneumoniae 3.4%, L. pneumophila 0.4% and mixed infection 1.0%). Only age at presentation was significantly associated with atypical pneumonia in adults, while absence of dyspnea, lobar consolidation, and age > or = 5 years were significant findings for atypical pneumonia in children. The present study confirms the significance of atypical pathogens in adults and children. Moreover lobar consolidation is likely to predict atypical pneumonia in childhood CAP.

  13. Optimal imaging strategy for community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus musculoskeletal infections in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Browne, Lorna P.; Cassady, Christopher I.; Krishnamurthy, Rajesh; Guillerman, R.P. [Texas Children' s Hospital, Edward B. Singleton Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Houston, TX (United States); Mason, Edward O.; Kaplan, Sheldon L. [Texas Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, Infectious Disease Service, Houston, TX (United States)

    2008-08-15

    Invasive musculoskeletal infections from community-acquired methicillin-resistant and methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (CA-SA) are increasingly encountered in children. Imaging is frequently requested in these children for diagnosis and planning of therapeutic interventions. To appraise the diagnostic efficacy of imaging practices performed for CA-SA osteomyelitis and its complications. A retrospective review was conducted of the clinical charts and imaging studies of CA-SA osteomyelitis cases since 2001 at a large children's hospital. Of 199 children diagnosed with CA-SA osteomyelitis, 160 underwent MRI examination and 35 underwent bone scintigraphy. The sensitivity of MRI and bone scintigraphy for CA-SA osteomyelitis was 98% and 53%, respectively. In all discordant cases, MRI was correct compared to bone scintigraphy. Extraosseous complications of CA-SA osteomyelitis detected only by MRI included subperiosteal abscesses (n = 77), pyomyositis (n = 43), septic arthritis (n = 31), and deep venous thrombosis (n = 12). MRI is the preferred imaging modality for the investigation of pediatric CA-SA musculoskeletal infection because it offers superior sensitivity for osteomyelitis compared to bone scintigraphy and detects extraosseous complications that occur in a substantial proportion of patients. (orig.)

  14. Pharmacokinetics of telithromycin: application to dosing in the treatment of community-acquired respiratory tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciervo, Carman A; Shi, Jun

    2005-10-01

    Telithromycin is the first ketolide anti bacterial approved for treating community-acquired pneumonia, acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis, and acute bacterial sinusitis in adults. The purpose of this article is to review the main pharmacokinetic properties of telithromycin and their application to the treatment of these infections. Sources of information were identified through a Medline search (up to March 2005). The absolute oral bioavailability of telithromycin is approximately 57%, which is unaffected by food intake. At the recommended 800 mg once-daily oral dosing regimen, telithromycin reaches a steady-state concentration of approximately 2 microg/mL in plasma and has an elimination half-life of approximately 10 hours. Telithromycin shows extensive tissue distribution and penetrates effectively into bronchopulmonary tissue and epithelial lining fluid. Since elimination of telithromycin occurs via multiple pathways--the highest proportion (70%) through metabolism--impairment of a single pathway has a limited impact on telithromycin exposure. Dose adjustments are unnecessary in elderly patients or in individuals with hepatic impairment or mild to moderate renal impairment. A reduced dose could be recommended in patients with severe renal impairment. Telithromycin is metabolized primarily in the liver, approximately half of which is via the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 system. Telithromycin AUC(0-24 h) increased by 1.5- to 2.0-fold in the presence of itraconazole and ketoconazole. Administration of telithromycin with drugs metabolized via CYP3A4 may result in increased exposure to the co-administered drug, as shown for simvastatin (5.3-fold) and midazolam (6-fold). Co-administration of telithromycin minimally increases (1.2- to 1.4-fold) exposure to theophylline, digoxin, and metoprolol. Although telithromycin does not affect the pharmacokinetics of warfarin, consideration should be given to monitoring prothrombin times/INR in patients receiving

  15. Klebsiella pneumoniae related community-acquired acute lower respiratory infections in Cambodia: Clinical characteristics and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rammaert Blandine

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In many Asian countries, Klebsiella pneumoniae (KP is the second pathogen responsible for community-acquired pneumonia. Yet, very little is known about KP etiology in ALRI in Cambodia, a country that has one of the weakest medical infrastructures in the region. We present here the first clinico-radiological description of KP community-acquired ALRI in hospitalized Cambodian patients. Methods Through ALRI surveillance in two provincial hospitals, KP was isolated from sputum and blood cultures, and identified by API20E gallery from patients ≥ 5 years-old with fever and respiratory symptoms onset ≤14 days. Antibiotics susceptibility testing was provided systematically to clinicians when bacteria were isolated. We collected patients' clinical, radiological and microbiological data and their outcome 3 months after discharge. We also compared KP-related with other bacteria-related ALRI to determine risk factors for KP infection. Results From April 2007 to December 2009, 2315 ALRI patients ≥ 5 years-old were enrolled including 587 whose bacterial etiology could be assigned. Of these, 47 (8.0% had KP infection; their median age was 55 years and 68.1% were females. Reported prior medication was high (42.5%. Patients' chest radiographs showed pneumonia (61.3% including 39% that were necrotizing, preexisting parenchyma lesions (29.5% and pleural effusions alone (4.5% and normal parenchyma (4.5%. Five patients had severe conditions on admission and one patient died during hospitalization. Of the 39 patients that were hospital discharged, 14 died including 12 within 1 month after discharge. Only 13 patients (28% received an appropriate antibiotherapy. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL - producing strains were found in 8 (17.0% patients. Female gender (Odds ratio (OR 2.1; p = 0.04 and diabetes mellitus (OR 3.1; p = 0.03 were independent risk factors for KP-related ALRI. Conclusions KP ALRI in Cambodia has high fatality rate

  16. Klebsiella pneumoniae related community-acquired acute lower respiratory infections in Cambodia: clinical characteristics and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rammaert, Blandine; Goyet, Sophie; Beauté, Julien; Hem, Sopheak; Te, Vantha; Try, Patrich Lorn; Mayaud, Charles; Borand, Laurence; Buchy, Philippe; Guillard, Bertrand; Vong, Sirenda

    2012-01-10

    In many Asian countries, Klebsiella pneumoniae (KP) is the second pathogen responsible for community-acquired pneumonia. Yet, very little is known about KP etiology in ALRI in Cambodia, a country that has one of the weakest medical infrastructures in the region. We present here the first clinico-radiological description of KP community-acquired ALRI in hospitalized Cambodian patients. Through ALRI surveillance in two provincial hospitals, KP was isolated from sputum and blood cultures, and identified by API20E gallery from patients ≥ 5 years-old with fever and respiratory symptoms onset ≤14 days. Antibiotics susceptibility testing was provided systematically to clinicians when bacteria were isolated. We collected patients' clinical, radiological and microbiological data and their outcome 3 months after discharge. We also compared KP-related with other bacteria-related ALRI to determine risk factors for KP infection. From April 2007 to December 2009, 2315 ALRI patients ≥ 5 years-old were enrolled including 587 whose bacterial etiology could be assigned. Of these, 47 (8.0%) had KP infection; their median age was 55 years and 68.1% were females. Reported prior medication was high (42.5%). Patients' chest radiographs showed pneumonia (61.3% including 39% that were necrotizing), preexisting parenchyma lesions (29.5%) and pleural effusions alone (4.5%) and normal parenchyma (4.5%). Five patients had severe conditions on admission and one patient died during hospitalization. Of the 39 patients that were hospital discharged, 14 died including 12 within 1 month after discharge. Only 13 patients (28%) received an appropriate antibiotherapy. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL) - producing strains were found in 8 (17.0%) patients. Female gender (Odds ratio (OR) 2.1; p = 0.04) and diabetes mellitus (OR 3.1; p = 0.03) were independent risk factors for KP-related ALRI. KP ALRI in Cambodia has high fatality rate, are more frequently found in women, and should be

  17. Ceftaroline Fosamil: A Review in Complicated Skin and Soft Tissue Infections and Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Lesley J

    2016-11-01

    Intravenous ceftaroline fosamil (Zinforo™), a prodrug that is rapidly converted to its active metabolite ceftaroline, is approved for use in adults and children (from 2 months of age) with complicated skin and soft tissue infections (cSSTIs) or community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). In several multinational trials, ceftaroline fosamil was an effective and generally well tolerated treatment in adult and paediatric patients with cSSTIs or CAP. In the phase 3 CANVAS trials, ceftaroline fosamil treatment was noninferior to vancomycin plus aztreonam in adults with cSSTIs. Based on a meta-analysis of three similarly designed, phase 3 trials (FOCUS 1, FOCUS 2 and an Asian trial), ceftaroline fosamil treatment was superior to ceftriaxone in adults with CAP of Pneumonia Outcomes Research Teams (PORT) risk class III or IV. Ceftaroline fosamil was also associated with high clinical cure rates in hospitalized children (aged 2 months to 17 years) with cSSTIs or CAP. With its broad spectrum of in vitro activity against clinically relevant Gram-positive [including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and drug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates] and Gram-negative pathogens implicated in cSSTIs and CAP, ceftaroline fosamil is an important treatment option for cSSTI and CAP in adults and children from the age of 2 months.

  18. Risk factors for Clostridium difficile infection in hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, James D; Akram, Ahsan R; Singanayagam, Aran; Wilcox, Mark H; Hill, Adam T

    2016-07-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is strongly associated with anti-biotic treatment, and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is the leading indication for anti-biotic prescription in hospitals. This study assessed the incidence of and risk factors for CDI in a cohort of patients hospitalized with CAP. We analysed data from a prospective, observational cohort of patients with CAP in Edinburgh, UK. Patients with diarrhoea were systematically screened for CDI, and risk factors were determined through time-dependent survival analysis. Overall, 1883 patients with CAP were included, 365 developed diarrhoea and 61 had laboratory-confirmed CDI. The risk factors for CDI were: age (hazard ratio [HR], 1.06 per year; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-1.08), total number of antibiotic classes received (HR, 3.01 per class; 95% CI, 2.32-3.91), duration of antibiotic therapy (HR, 1.09 per day; 95% CI, 1.00-1.19 and hospitalization status (HR, 13.1; 95% CI, 6.0-28.7). Antibiotic class was not an independent predictor of CDI when adjusted for these risk factors (P > 0.05 by interaction testing). These data suggest that reducing the overall antibiotic burden, duration of antibiotic treatment and duration of hospital stay may reduce the incidence of CDI in patients with CAP. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. INFECTION WITH HHV-6 OF MILITARY MEN AFFECTED BY COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA

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    Brusnik SV

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Human herpesvirus, 6 type (HHV-6 was isolated at the end of the 20th century from the blood leukocytes of patients with lymphoproliferative diseases. Serological studies conducted in different countries, indicate ubiquitylation of the HHV-6 and the existence of two antigenic variants - HHV-6A and HHV-6B. Their high tropism is determined in vitro to lymphocytic, nervous and dendritic cells of the CNS. Virus replicates in many cell, primary and passaged cultures of different origins. The reproduction cycle of HHV-6 continues on average 4-5 days forming syncytiums and intracytoplasmic and intranuclear inclusions. Significant destruction and lysis almost 90 % of infected cells is reported after 5-10 day of monitoring. The utility of experimentation investigating the role of HHV-6 in the development of acute and chronic diseases in respiratory tract is caused by the fact that many patients, particularly those with chronic diseases, have complaints to chronic fatigue, decreased performance and low-grade temperature more than 3-6 months. Several studies demonstrate the presence of HHV-6 in saliva, salivary and bronchiolar glands, in swabs from pharyngonasal cavity and gorge. Tropism of HHV-6 to oropharyngeal epithelium with the possibility of finding the virus in the saliva and swabs from pharyngonasal cavity and gorge was found at the end of 20th century. This fact gave the basis for work determining the level of infection by this pathogen in patients with infectious and inflammatory pathology of the respiratory tract. Materials and methods. Serological studies were conducted with 38 soldiers affected by community-acquired pneumonia. Most of the surveyed patients were ranged in age from 20 to 45 years old, middle age (32,5±1,5 years. Patients were in stationary treatment in the Kharkov military hospital. The criteria for inclusion in the study on the infection of HHV-6 were soldiers affected by community-acquired pneumonia with atypical course of

  20. Ceftaroline fosamil for community-acquired pneumonia and skin and skin structure infections: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hajj, Maguy Saffouh; Turgeon, Ricky D; Wilby, Kyle John

    2017-02-01

    Background Ceftaroline is a parentally administered cephalosporin that has an in vitro expanded spectrum of activity compared with other cephalosporins yet data is conflicting regarding its place in therapy. Aim of the Review To compare the efficacy and safety of ceftaroline against standard antibiotic regimens for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and complicated skin and skin structure infections (cSSSIs). Method The databases of MEDLINE, EBSCO, and Embase were searched up to June 2016. Manual review of references was completed and experts in the field were contacted for unpublished data. Randomized controlled trials of ceftaroline in CAP or cSSSI populations were included. Outcomes included clinical cure, mortality, adverse events, serious adverse events, and discontinuation due to adverse events. Meta-analysis was used to pool results for these outcomes. We performed subgroup analyses for gram positive infections in CAP and infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in cSSSIs. Risk of bias was assessed for all studies. Results Six trials (three for each indication) were included, each of which had an unclear or high risk of bias in at least one domain. For CAP, ceftaroline was significantly more efficacious in achieving clinical cure than ceftriaxone [risk ratio (RR) 1.11, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.04-1.19; I 2  = 47%]. For cSSSIs, there was no significant difference in clinical cure between ceftaroline and vancomycin plus aztreonam (RR 1.01, 95% CI 0.97-1.05; I 2  = 0%). No differences were found for overall mortality, serious adverse events, discontinuation due to adverse events, and overall adverse events. Conclusion Ceftaroline is a viable therapeutic alternative for patients with CAP and cSSSIs, yet identified risks of bias and poor external validity preclude it from being recommended as a first-line agent.

  1. Gender and Age-Dependent Etiology of Community-Acquired Urinary Tract Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Magliano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infections (UTIs are among the most frequent community-acquired infections worldwide. Escherichia coli is the most common UTI pathogen although underlying host factors such as patients’ age and gender may influence prevalence of causative agents. In this study, 61 273 consecutive urine samples received over a 22-month period from outpatients clinics of an urban area of north Italy underwent microbiological culture with subsequent bacterial identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of positive samples. A total of 13 820 uropathogens were isolated and their prevalence analyzed according to patient’s gender and age group. Overall Escherichia coli accounted for 67.6% of all isolates, followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (8.8%, Enterococcus faecalis (6.3%, Proteus mirabilis (5.2%, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (2.5%. Data stratification according to both age and gender showed E. coli isolation rates to be lower in both males aged ≥60 years (52.2%, E. faecalis and P. aeruginosa being more prevalent in this group (11.6% and 7.8%, resp., as well as in those aged ≤14 years (51.3% in whom P. mirabilis prevalence was found to be as high as 21.2%. Streptococcus agalactiae overall prevalence was found to be 2.3% although it was shown to occur most frequently in women aged between 15 and 59 years (4.1%. Susceptibility of E. coli to oral antimicrobial agents was demonstrated to be as follows: fosfomycin (72.9%, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (72.9%, ciprofloxacin (76.8%, ampicillin (48.0%, and amoxicillin/clavulanate (77.5%. In conclusion, both patients’ age and gender are significant factors in determining UTIs etiology; they can increase accuracy in defining the causative uropathogen as well as providing useful guidance to empiric treatment.

  2. Drug resistance in community-acquired respiratory tract infections: role for an emerging antibacterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Aguilar

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Lorenzo Aguilar1, María-José Giménez1, José Barberán21Microbiology Department, School of Medicine, University Complutense, Madrid; 2Infectious Diseases Department, Hospital Central de la Defensa Gomez Ulla, Madrid, SpainAbstract: The nasopharynx is the ecological niche where evolution towards resistance occurs in respiratory tract isolates. Dynamics of different bacterial populations in antibiotic-free multibacterial niches are the baseline that antibiotic treatments can alter by shifting the competitive balance in favor of resistant populations. For this reason, antibiotic resistance is increasingly being considered to be an ecological problem. Traditionally, resistance has implied the need for development of new antibiotics for which basic efficacy and safety data are required prior to licensing. Antibiotic development is mainly focused on demonstrating clinical efficacy and setting susceptibility breakpoints for efficacy prediction. However, additional information on pharmacodynamic data predicting absence of selection of resistance and of resistant subpopulations, and specific surveillance on resistance to core antibiotics (to detect emerging resistances and its link with antibiotic consumption in the community are valuable data in defining the role of a new antibiotic, not only from the perspective of its therapeutic potential but also from the ecologic perspective (countering resistances to core antibiotics in the community. The documented information on cefditoren gleaned from published studies in recent years is an example of the role for an emerging oral antibacterial facing current antibiotic resistance in community-acquired respiratory tract infections.Keywords: respiratory tract infection, antibiotic resistance, cefditoren, community

  3. Community-acquired respiratory infections are common in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma and multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavi, Noa; Avivi, Irit; Kra-Oz, Zipora; Oren, Ilana; Hardak, Emilia

    2018-02-09

    Available data suggest that respiratory infections are associated with increased morbidity and mortality in patients hospitalized due to acute leukemia and allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT). However, the precise incidence, risk factors, and severity of respiratory infection, mainly community-acquired, in patients with lymphoma and multiple myeloma (MM) are not fully determined. The current study aimed to investigate risk factors for respiratory infections and their clinical significance in patients with B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and multiple myeloma (MM) in the first year of diagnosis. Data of consecutive patients diagnosed with NHL or MM and treated at the Rambam Hematology Inpatient and Outpatient Units between 01/2011 and 03/2012 were evaluated. Information regarding anticancer treatment, incidence and course of respiratory infections, and infection-related outcomes was analyzed. One hundred and sixty episodes of respiratory infections were recorded in 103 (49%) of 211 (73-MM, 138-NHL) patients; 126 (79%) episodes were community-acquired, 47 (29%) of them required hospitalization. In univariate analysis, age respiratory infection risk (P = 0.058, 0.038, and 0.001, respectively). Ninety episodes (56% of all respiratory episodes) were examined for viral pathogens. Viral infections were documented in 25/90 (28%) episodes, 21 (84%) of them were community-acquired, requiring hospitalization in 5 (24%) cases. Anti-flu vaccination was performed in 119 (56%) patients. Two of the six patients diagnosed with influenza were vaccinated. Respiratory infections, including viral ones, are common in NHL and MM. Most infections are community-acquired and have a favorable outcome. Rapid identification of viral pathogens allows avoiding antibiotic overuse in this patient population.

  4. [Investigation of bacterial and viral etiology in community acquired central nervous system infections with molecular methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahraman, Hasip; Tünger, Alper; Şenol, Şebnem; Gazi, Hörü; Avcı, Meltem; Örmen, Bahar; Türker, Nesrin; Atalay, Sabri; Köse, Şükran; Ulusoy, Sercan; Işıkgöz Taşbakan, Meltem; Sipahi, Oğuz Reşat; Yamazhan, Tansu; Gülay, Zeynep; Alp Çavuş, Sema; Pullukçu, Hüsnü

    2017-07-01

    In this multicenter prospective cohort study, it was aimed to evaluate the bacterial and viral etiology in community-acquired central nervous system infections by standart bacteriological culture and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods. Patients hospitalized with central nervous system infections between April 2012 and February 2014 were enrolled in the study. Demographic and clinical information of the patients were collected prospectively. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples of the patients were examined by standart bacteriological culture methods, bacterial multiplex PCR (Seeplex meningitis-B ACE Detection (Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, Haemophilus influenzae, Listeria monocytogenes, Group B streptococci) and viral multiplex PCR (Seeplex meningitis-V1 ACE Detection kits herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV1), herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV2), varicella zoster virus (VZV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein Barr virus (EBV) and human herpes virus 6 (HHV6)) (Seeplex meningitis-V2 ACE Detection kit (enteroviruses)). Patients were classified as purulent meningitis, aseptic meningitis and encephalitis according to their clinical, CSF (leukocyte level, predominant cell type, protein and glucose (blood/CSF) levels) and cranial imaging results. Patients who were infected with a pathogen other than the detection of the kit or diagnosed as chronic meningitis and other diseases during the follow up, were excluded from the study. A total of 79 patients (28 female, 51 male, aged 42.1 ± 18.5) fulfilled the study inclusion criteria. A total of 46 patients were classified in purulent meningitis group whereas 33 were in aseptic meningitis/encephalitis group. Pathogens were detected by multiplex PCR in 41 patients. CSF cultures were positive in 10 (21.7%) patients (nine S.pneumoniae, one H.influenzae) and PCR were positive for 27 (58.6%) patients in purulent meningitis group. In this group one type of bacteria were detected in 18 patients (14 S.pneumoniae, two N

  5. Ceftaroline in the management of complicated skin and soft tissue infections and community acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mpenge MA

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mbiye A Mpenge,1 Alasdair P MacGowan2 1Department of Medical Microbiology, University Hospitals Bristol NHS Trust, Bristol Royal Infirmary, Bristol, England; 2Department of Medical Microbiology, North Bristol NHS Trust, Southmead Hospital, Bristol, England Abstract: Ceftaroline is a new parenteral cephalosporin approved by the European Medicines Agency (EMA and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA for the treatment of complicated skin and soft tissue infections (cSSTIs including those due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. Ceftaroline has broad-spectrum activity against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria and exerts its bactericidal effects by binding to penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs, resulting in inhibition of bacterial cell wall synthesis. It binds to PBP 2a of MRSA with high affinity and also binds to all six PBPs in Streptococcus pneumoniae. In in vitro studies, ceftaroline demonstrated potent activity against Staphylococcus aureus (including MRSA and vancomycin-intermediate isolates, Streptococcus pneumoniae (including multidrug resistant isolates, Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and many common gram-negative pathogens, excluding extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In Phase II and Phase III clinical trials, ceftaroline was noninferior to its comparator agents and demonstrated high clinical cure rates in the treatment of cSSTIs and CAP. It demonstrated favorable outcomes in patients treated for both regulatory-approved indications and unlicensed indications in a retrospective analysis. Ceftaroline is a safe and effective option for treatment in specific patient populations in which its efficacy and safety have been proven. This article reviews the challenges in the treatment of cSSTI and CAP, ceftaroline and its microbiology, pharmacology, efficacy, and safety data which support its use in

  6. Impact of amoxicillin therapy on resistance selection in patients with community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malhotra-Kumar, Surbhi; Van Heirstraeten, Liesbet; Coenen, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the effect of amoxicillin treatment on resistance selection in patients with community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial. METHODS: Patients were prescribed amoxicillin 1 g, three times daily (n = 52) or placebo (n = 50...... that recommend amoxicillin when an antibiotic is indicated for community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections.......) for 7 days. Oropharyngeal swabs obtained before, within 48 h post-treatment and at 28-35 days were assessed for proportions of amoxicillin-resistant (ARS; amoxicillin MIC ≥2 mg/L) and -non-susceptible (ANS; MIC ≥0.5 mg/L) streptococci. Alterations in amoxicillin MICs and in penicillin...

  7. Bacterial Etiology and Antibiotic Resistance Profile of Community-Acquired Urinary Tract Infections in a Cameroonian City

    OpenAIRE

    Nzalie, Rolf Nyah-tuku; Gonsu, Hortense Kamga; Koulla-Shiro, Sinata

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Community-acquired urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) are usually treated empirically. Geographical variations in etiologic agents and their antibiotic sensitivity patterns are common. Knowledge of antibiotic resistance trends is important for improving evidence-based recommendations for empirical treatment of UTIs. Our aim was to determine the major bacterial etiologies of CAUTIs and their antibiotic resistance patterns in a cosmopolitan area of Cameroon for comparison with pres...

  8. Characterization of Escherichia coli causing community acquired urinary tract infections in Mexico City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmont-Monroy, Laura; Ribas-Aparicio, Rosa María; Navarro-Ocaña, Armando; Manjarrez-Hernández, H Ángel; Gavilanes-Parra, Sandra; Aparicio-Ozores, Gerardo; Cauich-Sánchez, Patricia Isidra; Garza-Ramos, Ulises; Molina-López, José

    2017-02-01

    The O25-ST131 clone was identified within 169 uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains. The 44.8% of the 29 O25-ST131 clones detected were positive to least to one extended-spectrum β-lactamase gene. The phylogroup D was mainly found. The O25-ST131 clone appeared to be associated with community-acquired UTI in Mexico City. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Community-acquired Klebsiella pneumoniae liver abscess: an emerging infection in Ireland and Europe.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moore, R

    2013-02-05

    INTRODUCTION: Klebsiella pneumoniae has emerged as a predominant cause of community-acquired mono-microbial pyogenic liver abscess. This was first described in Taiwan and has been widely reported in Asia. This infectious entity has been described in Europe, with single case reports predominating. METHODS: We present three cases in one year from our institution in Ireland and review the European literature to date. RESULTS\\/CONCLUSION: Klebsiella pneumoniae invasive liver abscess syndrome is now emerging in Europe and notably is not restricted to individuals of Asian descent.

  10. Frequency of escherichia coli in patients with community acquired urinary tract infection and their resistance pattern against some commonly used anti bacterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, W.; Jamshed, F.; Ahmad, W.

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a very common health problem and Escherichia coli (E coli) are the most common organisms associated with community acquired UTI. Unfortunately these bacteria have developed extensive resistance against most of the commonly used anti-bacterials. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency and resistance pattern of E coli in patients of community acquired UTI in an area in northern part of Pakistan. Methods: Urine specimens were collected from patients who were clinically diagnosed as community acquired UTI. Urine routine examination (Urine RE) was done and samples positive for UTI (Pus cells >10/High Power Field) were included in the study. These samples were inoculated on Eosin Methylene Blue (EMB) agar plates and incubated at 37 degree C for 36 hours. Suspected colonies were then inoculated further on EMB plates for pure cultures of E coli characterized by certain morphological characteristics. IMViC was applied for the confirmation of E coli. In vitro antibiotic susceptibility tests of E coli were performed with standardized commercial susceptibility discs (OXOID). Results: Out of 50 specimens, positive for UTI by urine RE, 20 showed pure growth of E coli on culture (40%). The majority of the isolates (28%; n=14) were from women while only 12% (n=6) were from men. Escherichia coli showed a high rate of resistance towards Ampicillin (90%), Tetracycline (70%), Erythromycin (70%) and Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole (55%). Sparfloxacin showed better results (45%) than ciprofloxacin (50%). Out of 20 E coli isolates, two (10%) were resistant to all the antibacterials except chloramphenicol, eight isolates (40%) showed resistance to six or more than six while 14 (70%) were resistant to four or more than four drugs. Conclusion: Rate of resistance of E coli against commonly used antibacterials was quite high and majority of the strains showed multidrug resistance. (author)

  11. Oral moxifloxacin vs high-dosage amoxicillin in the treatment of mild-to-moderate, community-acquired, suspected pneumococcal pneumonia in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petitpretz, P; Arvis, P; Marel, M; Moita, J; Urueta, J

    2001-01-01

    Comparison of the efficacy and safety of moxifloxacin vs amoxicillin for treatment of mild-to-moderate, suspected pneumococcal community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in adult patients. Multinational, multicenter, double-blind, randomized study. Eighty-two centers in 20 countries (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Croatia, Czech Republic, Estonia, France, Hong Kong, Hungary, Lithuania, Mexico, Portugal, Russia, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom, and Uruguay). Four hundred eleven adults (inpatients or outpatients) with suspected pneumococcal CAP. Randomization 1:1 to moxifloxacin, 400 mg/d, or amoxicillin, 1,000 g tid, for 10 days. Primary efficacy parameter was clinical response, 3 to 5 days after therapy (end of therapy [EOT]) in the per protocol (PP) population (362 patients). The clinical success rate in the PP population was 91.5% (moxifloxacin) and 89.7% (amoxicillin; two-sided 95% confidence interval, -4.2 to 7.8%). The clinical cure rate in patients with proven pneumococcal pneumonia was similar in both treatment groups (87.8%). The bacteriologic success rate in 136 bacteriologically evaluable patients at the EOT was 89.7% (moxifloxacin) and 82.4% (amoxicillin). The bacteriologic success rate against Streptococcus pneumoniae was 89.6% (moxifloxacin) and 84.8% (amoxicillin). The frequency of adverse events was comparable in both treatment groups. Digestive symptoms were the most common drug-related adverse events in both treatment groups. Moxifloxacin was statistically at least as effective as high-dose amoxicillin for treatment of mild-to-moderate, suspected pneumococcal CAP. Moxifloxacin may be an alternative for empiric CAP treatment, especially in areas where multidrug resistance in S pneumoniae is sufficiently prevalent to preclude routine penicillin.

  12. Community-acquired carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii urinary tract infection just after marriage in a renal transplant recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solak, Y; Atalay, H; Turkmen, K; Biyik, Z; Genc, N; Yeksan, M

    2011-12-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is common in renal transplant recipients and may worsen allograft and patient survival. Many risk factors such as age, female gender, immunosuppression, comorbidity, deceased-donor kidney transplantation, and uretheral catheterization are involved in development of UTI. Acinetobacter baumannii has rarely been reported as a causative agent for development of UTI. Here, we present an unusual case of a renal transplant recipient who developed community-acquired carbapenem-resistent A. baumannii UTI. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  13. Prevalence of Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolates in Nosocomial and Community-Acquired Urinary Tract Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latifpour, Mohammad; Gholipour, Abolfazl; Damavandi, Mohammad Sadegh

    2016-03-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a family member of Enterobacteriaceae. Isolates of K. pneumoniae produce enzymes that cause decomposition of third generation cephalosporins. These enzymes are known as extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL). Resistance of K. pneumoniae to beta-lactamase antibiotics is commonly mediated by beta-lactamase genes. The aim of this study was to identify the ESBL produced by K. pneumoniae isolates that cause community-acquired and nosocomial urinary tract infections within a one-year period (2013 to 2014) in Kashani and Hajar university hospitals of Shahrekord, Iran. From 2013 to 2014, 150 strains of K. pneumoniae isolate from two different populations with nosocomial and community-acquired infections were collected. The strains were then investigated by double disk synergism and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The study population of 150 patients with nosocomial and community-acquired infections were divided to two groups of 75 each. We found that 48 of the K. pneumoniae isolates in the patients with nosocomial infection and 39 isolates in those with community-acquired infections produced ESBL. The prevalence of TEM1, SHV1 and VEB1 in ESBL-producing isolates in nosocomial patients was 24%, 29.3% and 10.6%, and in community-acquired patients, 17.3%, 22.7% and 8%, respectively. The prevalence of ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae isolate is of great concern; therefore, continuous investigation seems essential to monitor ESBL-producing bacteria in patients with nosocomial and community-acquired infections.

  14. Community acquired infections among refugees leading to Intensive Care Unit admissions in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mediha Turktan

    2017-05-01

    Conclusions: Refugees presented to ICUs with CA infections similar to the host populations (pneumonia and urinary-tract infections but had high mortality rates (59.5%. It seems that Turkish ICUs were not congested with the refugee patients’ influx for CA infections. More research needs to be done to better understand how to deliver preventative and timely health care services to this group of patients.

  15. Ceftaroline fosamil for treating skin and skin structure infections or community-acquired pneumonia in patients with renal insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggiore, Christy; Pasquale, Timothy; Cole, Phillip; Friedland, H David

    2015-01-01

    The Clinical Assessment Program and Teflaro(®) Utilization Registry (CAPTURE) is a multicenter retrospective study, conducted in the USA, describing the contemporary use of ceftaroline fosamil. Ceftaroline is primarily excreted by the kidneys and the dose should be reduced in patients with moderate to severe renal insufficiency. This article describes the clinical effectiveness of ceftaroline fosamil in the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infection (ABSSSI) or community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) patients with renal insufficiency. There were 985 ABSSSI patients and 344 CABP patients, of which 22 and 31%, respectively, had renal insufficiency. Ceftaroline fosamil was mostly administered to patients as second-line therapy. Overall clinical success was 78-91% among ABSSSI or CABP patients with renal insufficiency and, overall, >50% of patients were discharged to home. Ceftaroline fosamil is an effective treatment option for ABSSSI or CABP patients with renal insufficiency.

  16. Time-based distribution of Staphylococcus saprophyticus pulsed field gel-electrophoresis clusters in community-acquired urinary tract infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Santos de Sousa

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The epidemiology of urinary tract infections (UTI by Staphylococcus saprophyticus has not been fully characterised and strain typing methods have not been validated for this agent. To evaluate whether epidemiological relationships exist between clusters of pulsed field gel-electrophoresis (PFGE genotypes of S. saprophyticus from community-acquired UTI, a cross-sectional surveillance study was conducted in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. In total, 32 (16% female patients attending two walk-in clinics were culture-positive for S. saprophyticus. Five PFGE clusters were defined and evaluated against epidemiological data. The PFGE clusters were grouped in time, suggesting the existence of community point sources of S. saprophyticus. From these point sources, S. saprophyticus strains may spread among individuals.

  17. The increasing importance of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostino, Jason W; Ferguson, John K; Eastwood, Keith; Kirk, Martyn D

    2017-11-06

    To identify groups at risk of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection, patterns of antimicrobial resistance, and the proportion of patients with MRSA infections but no history of recent hospitalisation. Case series of 39 231 patients with S. aureus isolates from specimens processed by the Hunter New England Local Health District (HNELHD) public pathology provider during 2008-2014. Proportion of MRSA infections among people with S. aureus isolates; antimicrobial susceptibility of MRSA isolates; origin of MRSA infections (community- or health care-associated); demographic factors associated with community-associated MRSA infections. There were 71 736 S. aureus-positive specimens during the study period and MRSA was isolated from 19.3% of first positive specimens. Most patients (56.9%) from whom MRSA was isolated had not been admitted to a public hospital in the past year. Multiple regression identified that patients with community-associated MRSA were more likely to be younger (under 40), Indigenous Australians (odds ratio [OR], 2.6; 95% CI, 2.3-2.8), or a resident of an aged care facility (OR, 4.7; 95% CI, 3.8-5.8). The proportion of MRSA isolates that included the dominant multi-resistant strain (AUS-2/3-like) declined from 29.6% to 3.4% during the study period (P resistant strain decreased, new strategies for controlling infections in the community are needed to reduce the prevalence of non-multi-resistant strains.

  18. High mobility group box-1 protein in patients with suspected community-acquired infections and sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaïni, Shahin; Pedersen, Svend Stenvang; Koldkjær, Ole

    2007-01-01

    measured with a commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Procalcitonin levels were measured with a TRACE (time-resolved amplified cryptate emission) assay. Lipopolysaccharide-binding protein and interleukin-6 were measured with a chemiluminiscent immunometric assay. Soluble...

  19. Invasion and translocation of uropathogenic Escherichia coli isolated from urosepsis and patients with community-acquired urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owrangi, B; Masters, N; Kuballa, A; O'Dea, C; Vollmerhausen, T L; Katouli, M

    2018-01-16

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains are found in high numbers in the gut of patients with urinary tract infections (UTIs). We hypothesised that in hospitalised patients, UPEC strains might translocate from the gut to the blood stream and that this could be due to the presence of virulence genes (VGs) that are not commonly found in UPEC strains that cause UTI only. To test this, E. coli strains representing 75 dominant clonal groups of UPEC isolated from the blood of hospitalised patients with UTI (urosepsis) (n = 22), hospital-acquired (HA) UTI without blood infection (n = 24) and strains isolated from patients with community-acquired (CA)-UTIs (n = 29) were tested for their adhesion to, invasion and translocation through Caco-2 cells, in addition to the presence of 34 VGs associated with UPEC. Although there were no differences in the rate and degree of translocation among the groups, urosepsis and HA-UTI strains showed significantly higher abilities to adhere (P = 0.0095 and P UPEC strains, irrespective of their source, are capable of translocating through gut epithelium. However, urosepsis and HA-UTI strains have a much better ability to interact with gut epithelia and have a greater virulence potential than CA-UPEC, which allows them to cause blood infection.

  20. Socio-economic profile of patients with community-acquired skin and soft tissue infections in Delhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravishankar, Arjun; Singh, Seema; Rai, Sumit; Sharma, Naveen; Gupta, Sanjay; Thawani, Rajat

    2014-09-01

    To study the socio-demographic and clinical profile of patients with community-acquired skin and soft tissue infections (CA-SSTIs). This study was a cross sectional, observational study. Patients with CA-SSTIs (ICD-10 L00-L08) were enrolled from February to August 2013. Clinical and microbiological data of all patients were recorded. Socioeconomic status (SES) of each patient was calculated using the Modified Kuppuswamy Scale. Seventy-three patients were studied, of whom 45 had SSTIs caused by Staphylococcus aureus. Of the 45, 11 (24%) were methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and 34 (76%) were methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA). Patients with MRSA infections had significantly lower monthly income and lower educational status than those with MSSA infections. However, SES was not significantly different in the two groups. S. aureus was the most common cause of CA-SSTIs, of which, MRSA was isolated in 24% of the cases. Patients with MRSA SSTIs had significantly lesser family income and lower education levels compared to patients with MSSA SSTIs.

  1. Professional practice evaluation of emergency department prescriptions for community-acquired infections in Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahs, Iqbal; Shrayteh, Zeina; Abdulkhalek, Rima; Salameh, Pascale; Hallit, Souheil; Malaeb, Diana

    2017-11-01

    Selecting the appropriate antibiotic regimen is extremely important in improving patient outcomes, minimizing antimicrobial resistance, and reducing costs. This study was conducted to evaluate current prescribing practices for empiric antibiotics at the time of admission to the emergency department (ED) and to assess their appropriateness in Lebanon. A retrospective observational study was conducted at three different Lebanese hospitals between June and December 2016. Adult patients who received antibiotics in the ED during the study period were included. The assessment of antibiotic therapy based on adherence to international guidelines, including the choice of antibiotic, dosing, or both, was considered for analysis. A total of 258 patients who had a single diagnosis of an infectious disease were included. Adherence to international guidelines was noted in only 32.6% of cases; the frequency was highest for skin and soft tissue infections (50.0%), followed by urinary tract infections (40%). Among the different antibiotic classes, the highest percentage of drug incompatibility was for β-lactam prescriptions (70.8%). The percentage of incompatibility with guidelines for administered regimens on the basis of drug selection, dosing, or both was 53.4%, 10.3%, and 36.2%, respectively. Inappropriate antibiotic use in the ED is prevalent, and physician adherence to international guidelines for empiric antibiotic prescriptions in the ED remains low. This emphasizes the importance of monitoring the use of antibiotics in the ED, as there is growing concern for antibiotic resistance and healthcare safety. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Knowledge and perceptions about community-acquired staphylococcal infections among health care workers in Hawai'i.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Brandyn S; Tice, Alan D; Hurwitz, Eric L; Katz, Alan R

    2013-09-01

    Since the early 1990s, national rates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections have increased dramatically.1,2 Initially identified in health care settings, community-acquired MRSA is now a major public health concern. With Hawai'i's expanding S. aureus and MRSA epidemic closely approximating the national trend in inpatient and outpatient settings,7,8 a high level of knowledge and awareness among health care workers is essential to successfully control this evolving epidemic. Health care and related workers were surveyed to assess their knowledge and perceptions about staphylococcal and MRSA infections. Knowledge was estimated by demonstrated ability to correctly identify risk factors including diabetes and obesity, as well as to demonstrate awareness of a growing staphylococcal and MRSA epidemic.9,10 Perceptions were estimated by level of concern of antibiotic resistance as well as of the severity of the staphylococcal and MRSA epidemic. Variations in knowledge and perception concerning basic principles associated with S. aureus infections as well as characteristics of the evolving S. aureus and MRSA epidemic were observed among various occupations (advance clinical practitioners, nurses, public health professionals, athletic trainers, and non-medical workers) as well as work locations (hospital, community, and non-clinical community). Overall, health care and related workers in community settings demonstrated disparities in knowledge regarding S. aureus and MRSA infections. They were also more likely to misperceive this growing threat. These findings provide support for focused educational interventions targeting community health care and related workers to improve awareness of staphylococcal infections in order to successfully address and combat this evolving epidemic.

  3. Evolution of acute infection with atypical bacteria in a prospective cohort of children with community-acquired pneumonia receiving amoxicillin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento-Carvalho, Cristiana M; Xavier-Souza, Gabriel; Vilas-Boas, Ana-Luisa; Fontoura, Maria-Socorro H; Barral, Aldina; Puolakkainen, Mirja; Ruuskanen, Olli

    2017-08-01

    Atypical bacteria are treatable causative agents of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). However, there is no conclusive evidence that a child with CAP should receive empirical treatment against such agents. We assessed the possibility of association between clinical failure and acute infection by these bacteria among children with CAP treated with amoxicillin. Patients aged 2-59 months with non-severe CAP received amoxicillin during prospective follow-up. Acute and convalescent blood samples were collected. Probable acute infection by Mycoplasma pneumoniae (specific IgM antibodies), by Chlamydia pneumoniae or Chlamydia trachomatis (specific IgM antibodies and/or IgG/IgA titre change) was investigated. Outcomes were assessed during follow-up at 2, 5 and 14-28 days. Treatment failure included development of danger signs, persistent fever, tachypnoea or death. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01200706. Of 787 children, 86 (10.9%; 95% CI = 8.9%-13.3%) had acute M. pneumoniae infection. C. pneumoniae acute infection was found in 79 of 733 (10.8%; 95% CI = 8.7%-13.2%) and C. trachomatis was found in 3 of 28 (10.7%; 95% CI = 2.8%-26.5%) amoxicillin was substituted in 3.5% versus 2.7% among patients with or without acute infection by one of these bacteria ( P  =   0.6). The overall substitution rate of amoxicillin was very low. It is not necessary to give an empirical non-β-lactam antibiotic as a first-line option to treat every child between 2 and 59 months old with non-severe CAP. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Emergence of community-acquired Clostridium difficile infection: the experience of a French hospital and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Ogielska

    2015-08-01

    Conclusions: CDI can cause community-acquired diarrhoea, and CA-CDI may be more severe than HCA-CDI. Prospective studies of CDI involving people from the general community without risk factors are required to confirm this observation.

  5. Outbreak of Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Skin Infections Among a Collegiate Football Team

    OpenAIRE

    Romano, Russ; Lu, Doanh; Holtom, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Context: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was once primarily a hospital-acquired organism, but now community-acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA) is causing outbreaks among otherwise healthy sport participants.

  6. Role of outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy in the treatment of community acquired skin and soft tissue infections in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Monica; Ooi, Chee Kheong; Wong, Joshua; Zhong, Lihua; Lye, David

    2017-07-06

    Treatment of community acquired skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) is a common indication for outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (OPAT) in USA, UK and Australasia, however data from Asia are lacking. OPAT is well established within the Singapore healthcare since 2002, however, systematic use of OPAT for the treatment of SSTIs remains infrequent. In this report, we describe the treatment and outcome of patients with SSTIs referred directly from Emergency Department (ED) to OPAT for continuation of intravenous (IV) antibiotics in Singapore, thus avoiding potential hospital admission. This is a single center university hospital retrospective study of patients with SSTIs presenting to ED who were assessed to require IV antibiotics and accepted to the OPAT clinic for continuation of IV treatment. Exclusion criteria were: haemodynamic instability, uncontrolled or serious underlying co-morbidities, necessity for inpatient surgical drainage, facial cellulitis and cephalosporin allergy. Patients returned daily to the hospital’s OPAT clinic for administration of IV antibiotics and review, then switched to oral antibiotics on improvement. From 7 February 2012 to 31 July 2015, 120 patients with SSTIs were treated in OPAT. Median age was 56 years and 63% were male. Lower limbs were affected in 91%. Diabetes was present in 20%. Sixty-seven (56%) had been treated with oral antibiotics for a median duration of 3 days prior to OPAT treatment. Common symptoms were erythema (100%), swelling (96%), pain (88%) and fever (55%). Antibiotics administered were IV cefazolin with oral probenecid (71%) or IV ceftriaxone (29%) for median 3 days then oral cloxacillin (85%) for median 7 days. Clinical improvement occurred in 90%. Twelve patients (10%) were hospitalized for worsening cellulitis, with 4 patients requiring surgical drainage of abscess. Microbiological cultures from 2 patients with drained abscess grew methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and Klebsiella

  7. Antimicrobial susceptibility, risk factors and prevalence of bla cefotaximase, temoneira, and sulfhydryl variable genes among Escherichia coli in community-acquired pediatric urinary tract infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kallyadan V Nisha

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: ESBL-producing E. coli from community-acquired pediatric UTI carries more than one type of beta-lactamase coding genes correlating their increased antibiotic resistance. Aggressive infection control policy, routine screening for detecting ESBL isolates in clinical samples, and antimicrobial stewardship are the keys to prevent their dissemination in community settings.

  8. Detection of IgM and IgG antibodies to Chlamydophila pneumoniae in pediatric community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surinder Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Chlamydophila pneumoniae (C. pneumoniae is an emerging infectious agent with a spectrum of clinical manifestations including lower and upper respiratory tract infections. Aims: To investigate the role of C. pneumoniae in community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs in children using serological tests. Settings and Design: Two hundred children, age 2 months to 12 years, hospitalized for community-acquired LRTIs were investigated for C. pneumoniae etiology. Materials and Methods: We investigated 200 children hospitalized for community-acquired LRTIs, using ELISA for detecting anti-C. pneumoniae IgM and IgG antibodies. The demographic, clinical and radiological findings for C. pneumoniae antibody positive and C. pneumoniae antibody negative cases were compared. Statistical Analysis Used: Data analysis was performed by Chi-square test and Fisher′s exact tests using Epi Info (2002. Results: Clinical and radiological findings in both the groups were comparable. Serological evidence of C. pneumoniae infection was observed in 12 (6% patients; specific IgM antibodies were detected in 11 (91.67%; specific IgG antibodies in 1 (8.33% patients, while 4-fold rise in C. pneumoniae IgG antibody titers were noted in none of the patients. Conclusions: C. pneumoniae has a role in community-acquired LRTIs, even in children aged < 5 years. Serological detection using ELISA would enable pediatricians in better management of C. pneumoniae infections.

  9. Impact of amoxicillin therapy on resistance selection in patients with community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections : A randomized, placebo-controlled study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malhotra-Kumar, Surbhi; Van Heirstraeten, Liesbet; Coenen, Samuel; Lammens, Christine; Adriaenssens, Niels; Kowalczyk, Anna; Godycki-Cwirko, Maciek; Bielicka, Zuzana; Hupkova, Helena; Lannering, Christina; Mölstad, Sigvard; Fernandez-Vandellos, Patricia; Torres, Antoni; Parizel, Maxim; Ieven, Margareta; Butler, Chris C.; Verheij, Theo; Little, Paul; Goossens, Hermanon; Frimodt-Møller, Niels; Bruno, Pascale; Hering, Iris; Lemiengre, Marieke; Loens, Katherine; Malmvall, Bo Eric; Muras, Magdalena; Romano, Nuria Sanchez; Prat, Matteu Serra; Svab, Igor; Swain, Jackie; Tarsia, Paolo; Leus, Frank; Veen, Robert; Worby, Tricia

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the effect of amoxicillin treatment on resistance selection in patients with community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Methods: Patients were prescribed amoxicillin 1 g, three times daily (n = 52) or placebo (n = 50) for

  10. Population pharmacokinetics of ceftaroline in patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections or community-acquired bacterial pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wart, Scott A; Forrest, Alan; Khariton, Tatiana; Rubino, Christopher M; Bhavnani, Sujata M; Reynolds, Daniel K; Riccobene, Todd; Ambrose, Paul G

    2013-11-01

    Ceftaroline, the active form of ceftaroline fosamil, is a broad-spectrum cephalosporin antibiotic. A population pharmacokinetic (PPK) model for ceftaroline was developed in NONMEM® using data from 185 healthy subjects and 92 patients with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infection (ABSSSI). Data from 128 patients with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) were used for external model validation. Healthy subjects received 50-2,000 mg ceftaroline fosamil via intravenous (IV) infusion over 1 hour or intramuscular (IM) injection q12h or q24h. ABSSSI and CABP patients received 600 mg of ceftaroline fosamil IV over 1 hour q12h. A three-compartment model with zero-order IV or parallel first-order IM input and first-order elimination described ceftaroline fosamil PK. A two-compartment model with first-order conversion of prodrug to ceftaroline and parallel linear and saturable elimination described ceftaroline PK. Creatinine clearance was the primary determinant of ceftaroline exposure. Good agreement between the observed data and both population (r(2)  = 0.93) and individual post-hoc (r(2)  = 0.98) predictions suggests the PPK model can adequately approximate ceftaroline PK using covariate information. Such a PPK model can evaluate dose adjustments for patients with renal impairment and generate ceftaroline exposures for use in pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic assessments of efficacy in patients with ABSSSI or CABP. © 2013, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  11. Prevalence and characterisation of Staphylococcus aureus causing community-acquired skin and soft tissue infections on Java and Bali, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santosaningsih, Dewi; Santoso, Sanarto; Setijowati, Nanik; Rasyid, Harun A; Budayanti, Nyoman S; Suata, Ketut; Widhyatmoko, Dicky B; Purwono, Priyo B; Kuntaman, Kuntaman; Damayanti, Damayanti; Prakoeswa, Cita R S; Laurens, Mitchell; van Nierop, Josephine W I; Nanninga, Geraldine L; Oudenes, Neline; de Regt, Michelle; Snijders, Susan V; Verbrugh, Henri A; Severin, Juliëtte A

    2018-01-01

    To define the role of Staphylococcus aureus in community settings among patients with skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI) in Indonesia. Staphylococcus aureus were cultured from anterior nares, throat and wounds of 567 ambulatory patients presenting with SSTI. The mecA gene and genes encoding Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL; lukF-PV and lukS-PV) and exfoliative toxin (ET; eta and etb) were determined by PCR. Clonal relatedness among methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and PVL-positive S. aureus was analysed using multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) typing, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) for a subset of isolates. Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) was determined for all MRSA isolates. Moreover, determinants for S. aureus SSTI, and PVL/ET-positive vs PVL/ET-negative S. aureus were assessed. Staphylococcus aureus were isolated from SSTI wounds of 257 (45.3%) patients, eight (3.1%) of these were MRSA. Genes encoding PVL and ETs were detected in 21.8% and 17.5% of methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), respectively. PVL-positive MRSA was not detected. Nasopharyngeal S. aureus carriage was an independent determinant for S. aureus SSTI (odds ratio [OR] 1.8). Primary skin infection (OR 5.4) and previous antibiotic therapy (OR 3.5) were associated with PVL-positive MSSA. Primary skin infection (OR 2.2) was the only factor associated with ET-positive MSSA. MLVA typing revealed two more prevalent MSSA clusters. One ST1-MRSA-SCCmec type IV isolate and a cluster of ST239-MRSA-SCCmec type III were found. Community-acquired SSTI in Indonesia was frequently caused by PVL-positive MSSA, and the hospital-associated ST239-MRSA may have spread from the hospital into the community. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Community-acquired febrile urinary tract infection caused by extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing bacteria in hospitalised infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Marco, Roberto; Guillén Olmos, Elena; Bretón-Martínez, José Rafael; Giner Pérez, Lourdes; Casado Sánchez, Benedicta; Fujkova, Julia; Salamanca Campos, Marina; Nogueira Coito, José Miguel

    2017-05-01

    Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing bacteria are infrequent pathogens of urinary tract infections in children. The objective of our study was to investigate the presence, clinically associated characteristics and risk factors for acquisition of urinary tract infection/acute pyelonephritis (UTI/APN) in hospitalised children <2years old caused by community-acquired ESBL. A case-control study in a second level community hospital in Spain, in which 537 episodes of UTI/APN were investigated in a retrospective study between November 2005 and August 2014. Cases were patients with ESBL strains. For each case, four ESBL-negative controls were selected. A questionnaire with the variables of interest was completed for every patient, and the groups were compared. ESBL-positive strains were found in 19 (3,5%) cultures. Of these 16 (84%) were Escherichia coli. Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) of any grade was more frequent in the ESBL group (60 vs. 29%), although without statistical significance. Relapses were more frequent in the ESBL group (42% vs. 18%) (P=.029; OR=3.2; 95%CI: 1.09-9.5). The prevalence of UTI/APN due to ESBL-positive strains increased slightly from 2.7% in the period 2005-2009 to 4.4% in the period 2010-2014. ESBL UTI/APN were associated with more frequent relapses. VUR of any grade was twice more frequent in the ESBL group. Piperacillin/tazobactam, fosfomycin and meropenem showed an excellent activity. Aminoglycosides may be a therapeutic option, and in our patients gentamicin was the antibiotic most used. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  13. Ceftaroline fosamil: a review of its use in the treatment of complicated skin and soft tissue infections and community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frampton, James E

    2013-07-01

    Ceftaroline, the active metabolite of the prodrug ceftaroline fosamil (Zinforo, Teflaro), is an advanced-generation, parenteral cephalosporin with broad-spectrum antibacterial activity in vitro against Gram-positive bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and multidrug resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and Gram-negative bacteria, including Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis, but not Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Ceftaroline has demonstrated a low potential for the selection of resistance in vitro for drug-resistant Gram-positive organisms, including MRSA, as well as for Gram-negative respiratory pathogens. In pivotal phase III studies, intravenous ceftaroline fosamil demonstrated noninferiority to intravenous vancomycin plus aztreonam in patients hospitalized with complicated skin and soft tissue infections (cSSTIs) and intravenous ceftriaxone in patients hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) [Pneumonia Outcomes Research Team (PORT) risk class III or IV]; however, patients with CAP admitted to the intensive care unit were not evaluated. Ceftaroline fosamil was generally well tolerated in these trials, with an adverse event profile similar to that of other cephalosporins. Diarrhoea was the most commonly reported adverse event; however, the risk of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhoea with ceftaroline fosamil appeared to be low. Potential limitations of the drug include the lack of an oral formulation and the requirement for twice-daily administration. Nonetheless, ceftaroline fosamil represents an attractive option (either alone or in combination with other agents) for the initial empirical treatment of patients hospitalized with cSSTIs (including those with suspected MRSA infection) or CAP (PORT risk class III or IV) who require intravenous antimicrobial therapy. As with all antibacterial agents, ceftaroline fosamil should be used in accordance with good antimicrobial stewardship.

  14. Invasive Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a Japanese Girl with Disseminating Multiple Organ Infection: A Case Report and Review of Japanese Pediatric Cases

    OpenAIRE

    Yonezawa, Ryuta; Kuwana, Tsukasa; Kawamura, Kengo; Inamo, Yasuji

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric invasive community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) infection is very serious and occasionally fatal. This infectious disease is still a relatively rare and unfamiliar infectious disease in Japan. We report a positive outcome in a 23-month-old Japanese girl with meningitis, osteomyelitis, fasciitis, necrotizing pneumonia, urinary tract infection, and bacteremia due to CA-MRSA treated with linezolid. PCR testing of the CA-MRSA strain was positive for PVL...

  15. Clonal Diversity, Virulence Potential and Antimicrobial Resistance ofEscherichia coliCausing Community Acquired Urinary Tract Infection in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nüesch-Inderbinen, Magdalena T; Baschera, Melinda; Zurfluh, Katrin; Hächler, Herbert; Nüesch, Hansjakob; Stephan, Roger

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the clonal structure, virulence potential and antibiotic susceptibility of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) isolates causing community acquired urinary tract infection (CAUTI) in unselected primary care patients in Switzerland. Methods: We performed multilocus sequence typing, virulence factor determination, and phenotypic and genotypic antimicrobial resistance testing on 44 non-duplicate UPEC isolates. Results: Twenty-seven different sequence types (STs) were identified. Major UPEC clones were represented by 19 (43.2%) of the isolates, including E. coli ST131, ST69 (both 13.6%), ST73 (6.8%), ST10 (4.5%), ST127, ST140, (both 2.3%). Five (11.4%) isolates belonged to ST141. Aggregate virulence factor (VF) scores were highest among isolates belonging to ST127 and ST141. Overall, 50% of the isolates were susceptible to all 12 antimicrobials tested, and all isolates remained susceptible to fosfomycin and nitrofurantoin. Resistance to sulfamethoxazole and ciprofloxacin were found in 31.8, and 15.9% of the isolates, respectively. Plasmid-mediated resistance genes were detected in ST69 and ST131 and included aac(6 ' )-Ib-cr (2.3% of all isolates) bla CTX-M-14 and bla CTX-M-15 (9%), and mph(A) (13.6%). None of the isolates tested positive for mcr-1 or mcr-2 . Conclusions: Our results show that CAUTI in Switzerland is caused by a wide variety of UPEC STs for which fosfomycin remains a good treatment option. We suggest that ST141 is an emerging clone associated with UTI in the community, and warrants closer attention. Moreover, the high rate of E. coli harboring mph(A) from patients without a history of antimicrobial therapy or hospitalization indicates that UPEC is an important reservoir for mph(A) .

  16. Clonal Diversity, Virulence Potential and Antimicrobial Resistance of Escherichia coli Causing Community Acquired Urinary Tract Infection in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena T. Nüesch-Inderbinen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the clonal structure, virulence potential and antibiotic susceptibility of uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC isolates causing community acquired urinary tract infection (CAUTI in unselected primary care patients in Switzerland.Methods: We performed multilocus sequence typing, virulence factor determination, and phenotypic and genotypic antimicrobial resistance testing on 44 non-duplicate UPEC isolates.Results: Twenty-seven different sequence types (STs were identified. Major UPEC clones were represented by 19 (43.2% of the isolates, including E. coli ST131, ST69 (both 13.6%, ST73 (6.8%, ST10 (4.5%, ST127, ST140, (both 2.3%. Five (11.4% isolates belonged to ST141.Aggregate virulence factor (VF scores were highest among isolates belonging to ST127 and ST141. Overall, 50% of the isolates were susceptible to all 12 antimicrobials tested, and all isolates remained susceptible to fosfomycin and nitrofurantoin. Resistance to sulfamethoxazole and ciprofloxacin were found in 31.8, and 15.9% of the isolates, respectively. Plasmid-mediated resistance genes were detected in ST69 and ST131 and included aac(6′-Ib-cr (2.3% of all isolates blaCTX−M−14 and blaCTX−M−15 (9%, and mph(A (13.6%. None of the isolates tested positive for mcr-1 or mcr-2.Conclusions: Our results show that CAUTI in Switzerland is caused by a wide variety of UPEC STs for which fosfomycin remains a good treatment option. We suggest that ST141 is an emerging clone associated with UTI in the community, and warrants closer attention. Moreover, the high rate of E. coli harboring mph(A from patients without a history of antimicrobial therapy or hospitalization indicates that UPEC is an important reservoir for mph(A.

  17. Urinary tract infection caused by community-acquired extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing bacteria in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yun Hee; Yang, Eun Mi; Kim, Chan Jong

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) caused by resistant strains of bacteria is increasingly prevalent in children. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical characteristics and risk factors for UTI caused by community-acquired extended-spectrum β-lactamase (CA-ESBL)-producing bacteria in infants. This was a retrospective study performed over 5 years in a single Korean center. Hospitalized infants with febrile UTI were enrolled and divided into two groups (CA-ESBL vs. CA non-ESBL UTI). The yearly prevalence was calculated. Baseline characteristics and clinical course such as fever duration, laboratory and radiological findings were compared between the two groups. Risk factors associated with the CA-ESBL UTI were investigated. Among the enrolled infants (n=185), 31 (17%) had CA-ESBL UTI. The yearly prevalence of ESBL of CA-ESBL UTI increased during the study (0% in 2010, 22.2% in 2015). Infants with CA-ESBL UTI had a longer duration of fever after initiating antibiotics (2.0±1.1 vs. 1.5±0.6 days, p=0.020). Cortical defects on renal scan and early treatment failure were more frequent in CA-ESBL (64.5 vs. 42.2%, p=0.023; 22.6 vs. 4.5%, p=0.001). A logistic regression analysis revealed that urinary tract abnormalities and previous UTI were independent risk factors for CA-EBSL UTI (odds ratio, 2.7; p=0.025; 10.3; p=0.022). The incidence of UTI caused by ESBL-producing bacteria has increased in Korean infants. Recognition of the clinical course and risk factors for ESLB-producing UTI may help to determine appropriate guidelines for its management. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  18. Pneumonia - children - community acquired

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronchopneumonia - children; Community-acquired pneumonia - children; CAP - children ... Viruses are the most common cause of pneumonia in infants and children. Ways your child can get CAP include: Bacteria and viruses living in the nose, sinuses, or mouth may spread ...

  19. Spectrum and potency of ceftaroline tested against leading pathogens causing community-acquired respiratory tract infections in Europe (2010).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, David J; Flamm, Robert K; Jones, Ronald N; Sader, Helio S

    2013-01-01

    Ceftaroline, the active metabolite of the prodrug ceftaroline fosamil, is a novel cephalosporin exhibiting in vitro bactericidal activity against Gram-positive organisms, including Streptococcus pneumoniae and methicillin-susceptible and -resistant Staphylococcus aureus, as well as common Gram-negative organisms. The objective of this study was to determine the spectrum and potency of ceftaroline against recent leading pathogens causing community-acquired respiratory tract infections (CARTI) isolated in Europe. A total of 1563 isolates from the 2010 Assessing Worldwide Antimicrobial Resistance Evaluation (AWARE) Program were identified as CARTI pathogens by the infection type and/or specimen type recorded by the participating laboratory. Isolates were collected from patients in 52 medical centers located in 19 European countries (including Israel and Turkey). Susceptibility testing for ceftaroline and commonly used antimicrobials was performed by Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) broth microdilution methodology. Susceptibility interpretations for comparators were as published in CLSI and the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing guidelines, and for ceftaroline US-FDA breakpoints were also applied. Ceftaroline was very active overall against 799 S. pneumoniae (MIC(50/90,) ≤ 0.008/0.12 μg/mL) and inhibited 100.0% of all isolates at a MIC ≤ 0.5 μg/mL. Ceftaroline was very potent against penicillin-resistant (CLSI oral penicillin V breakpoints) and -intermediate S. pneumoniae (MIC(50/90), 0.12/0.25 and 0.03/0.12 μg/mL, respectively), but potency was lower than observed against penicillin-susceptible isolates (MIC(50/90), ≤ 0.008/≤ 0.008 μg/mL). Ceftaroline was also very active (MIC(50/90), ≤ 0.008/0.015 μg/mL) against 515 Haemophilus influenzae, including β-lactamase-producing strains (MIC(50/90), 0.015/0.06 μg/mL). Ceftaroline also demonstrated good activity against 205 Moraxella catarrhalis isolates (MIC(50

  20. Ceftaroline Fosamil for the Treatment of Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia Secondary to Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections or Community-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Vazquez, Jose A.; Maggiore, Christy R.; Cole, Phillip; Smith, Alexander; Jandourek, Alena; Friedland, H. David

    2014-01-01

    Background The Clinical Assessment Program and Teflaro? Utilization Registry is designed to collect information on the clinical use of ceftaroline fosamil in the Unites States. This report presents data on the treatment of patients with Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) secondary to acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs) or community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP). Methods Patients diagnosed with ABSSSI or CABP were identified through sequential review of rando...

  1. Factors associated with community-acquired urinary tract infections among adults attending assessment centre, Mulago Hospital Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabugo, Deus; Kizito, Samuel; Ashok, Dave Dhara; Graham, Kiwanuka Alexander; Nabimba, Ronald; Namunana, Sandra; Kabaka, M Richard; Achan, Beatrice; Najjuka, Florence C

    2016-12-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are a common medical problem affecting the general population and thus commonly encountered in medical practice, with the global burden of UTIs at about 150 million people. Because uropathogens largely originate from colonic flora, they are easy to predict, and this is the rationale for empirical treatment in Community Acquired-UTI (CA-UTIs). With the increasing prevalence of drug-resistant bacteria among adults with CA-UTI in Uganda, it is no longer adequate to manage CA-UTIs on empiric regimen without revising the susceptibility patterns of common CA-UTI causative agents. Thus in this study we set out to identify: The factors associated with CA-UTIs, the common uropathogens and the drug sensitivity patterns of the common uropathogens cultured. This was a cross-sectional study that was conducted in adults who presented with symptoms of a UTI at Mulago Hospital, assessment center. There were 139 patients who consented to the study and were recruited, an interviewer administered questionnaire was used to collect information from the study participants as regards demographic, social and clinical characteristics and Mid Stream Urine (MSU) samples were collected for urinalysis, culture and antibiotic susceptibility testing using the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion technique was applied to the isolates.Numeric data were summarized using measures of central tendency while the categorical data was summarized using proportions and percentages. Age, female sex and marital status were factors that were significantly associated with CA-UTIs. Fifty four (54) cultures were positive for UTI with 26 giving pure growths. The commonest uropathogen isolated was Escherichia coli at 50%, this was followed by Staphylococcus aureus at 15.4%. The sensitivity of Escherichia coli to Ampicillin and Nitrofurantoin were78.6%, 64.3% respectively, and the sensitivity of Staphylococcus aureus to ciprofloxacin, Nitrofurantoin and gentamycin were 100%, 66.7% and 66

  2. Community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassiere, H A; Niederman, M S

    1998-11-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in all age groups, especially the elderly, which is a patient population that continues to grow. Recently the spectrum and clinical picture of pneumonia has been changing as a reflection of this aging population; this requires a reassessment of and a new approach to the patient with pneumonia. Currently, pneumonia patients are classified as having either community-acquired or hospital-acquired infection rather than typical versus atypical. Patients who have CAP are categorized by age, presence of a coexisting medical illness, and the severity of the pneumonia. The rationale behind categorizing patients is to stratify them in terms of mortality risk to help determine the location of therapy (e.g., outpatient, inpatient, intensive care unit) and focus the choice of initial antimicrobial therapy. Once the decision to hospitalize a patient with pneumonia is made, the next step is to decide on an appropriate diagnostic evaluation and antibiotic therapy. Both decisions have evolved over the last several years since the publication of the American Thoracic Society's CAP guidelines. The current approach to the diagnostic work-up of pneumonia stresses a limited role of diagnostic tests and procedures. The antimicrobial regimen has now evolved into one that is empiric in nature and based on the age of the patient, the presence of coexisting medical disease, and the overall severity of the pneumonia. This process is a dynamic once because bacterial resistance to commonly used antibiotics can further complicate the course of pneumonia therapy, but the impact of resistance on outcome is less clear. Resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae to penicillin is a prime example of this growing problem, and adjustment to pneumonia therapy may be required. A difficult but not uncommon problem in pneumonia patients is slow recovery and delayed resolution of radiographic infiltrates. Factors that impact

  3. Empyema associated with community-acquired pneumonia: A Pediatric Investigator's Collaborative Network on Infections in Canada (PICNIC study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Saux Nicole

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the incidence of serious morbidity with childhood pneumonia has decreased over time, empyema as a complication of community-acquired pneumonia continues to be an important clinical problem. We reviewed the epidemiology and clinical management of empyema at 8 pediatric hospitals in a period before the widespread implementation of universal infant heptavalent pneumococcal vaccine programs in Canada. Methods Health records for children Results 251 children met inclusion criteria; 51.4% were male. Most children were previously healthy and those ≤ 5 years of age comprised 57% of the cases. The median length of hospitalization was 9 days. Admissions occurred in all months but peaked in winter. Oxygen supplementation was required in 77% of children, 75% had chest tube placement and 33% were admitted to an intensive care unit. While similarity in use of pain medication, antipyretics and antimicrobial use was observed, a wide variation in number of chest radiographs and invasive procedures (thoracentesis, placement of chest tubes was observed between centers. The most common organism found in normally sterile samples (blood, pleural fluid, lung biopsy was Streptococcus pneumoniae. Conclusion Empyema occurs most commonly in children under five years and is associated with considerable morbidity. Variation in management by center was observed. Enhanced surveillance using molecular methods could improve diagnosis and public health planning, particularly with regard to the relationship between immunization programs and the epidemiology of empyema associated with community-acquired pneumonia in children.

  4. Clinical and economic outcomes associated with community-acquired intra-abdominal infections caused by extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing bacteria in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bijie; Ye, Huifeng; Xu, Yingchun; Ni, Yuxing; Hu, Yunjian; Yu, Yunsong; Huang, Zhenfei; Ma, Larry

    2010-06-01

    To compare clinical and economic outcomes in patients with community-acquired intra-abdominal infection (IAI) due to extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing (ESBL-positive) bacteria versus non-ESBL-producing (ESBL-negative) bacteria in China. This was a retrospective chart review study of patients hospitalized with community-acquired IAI due to ESBL-positive or ESBL-negative infections caused by Escherichia coli or Klebsiella spp. Data were collected from six hospitals in China that participated in the Study for Monitoring Antibiotic Resistance Trends (SMART) during 2006-2007. Outcomes included clinical response at discharge and following first-line antibiotic, number of antibiotic agents and classes, duration of hospitalization, and overall hospitalization and intravenous antibiotic costs. Of the 85 patients included in the study, 32 (37.6%) had ESBL-positive and 53 (62.4%) had ESBL-negative infections; E. coli was responsible for 77.6% of infections. Infection resolved at discharge in 30 (93.8%) ESBL-positive and 48 (90.6%) ESBL-negative patients (P = NS). Fewer ESBL-positive patients achieved complete response following first-line antibiotics (56.3% versus 83.0%; P = 0.01). ESBL-positive patients required longer antibiotic treatment, more antibiotics, longer hospitalization (24.3 versus 14.6 days; 1.67-fold ratio; P = 0.001), and incurred higher hospitalization costs ( yen24,604 vs. yen13,788; $3604 vs. $2020; 1.78-fold ratio; P < 0.001). Patients with ESBL-positive infection had similar resolution rates at discharge compared to those with ESBL-negative infection, despite poorer first-line antibiotic response. However, ESBL-positive infection led to significantly greater hospitalization cost and intravenous antibiotic cost, and longer hospital stay.

  5. Pseudomona pseudomallei community acquired pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severiche, Diego

    1998-01-01

    This is the first published case report en Colombia about pseudomona pseudomallei community acquired pneumonia. This uncommon pathogen is from the epidemiological standpoint a very important one and medical community should be aware to look after it in those patients where no other etiological pathogen is recovered. A brief summary about epidemiology is showed, emphasizing those regions where it can be found. Likewise, comments about the differential diagnosis are important since it should be considered in those patients where tuberculosis is suspected. This is particularly representative for countries with high tuberculosis rates. Furthermore, a microbiological review is shown, emphasizing on isolation techniques, descriptions about therapeutics and other regarding treatment issues according international standards. Finally; a description about the clinical picture, laboratory findings, treatment and evolution of the case reported are shown for discussion

  6. Invasive Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a Japanese Girl with Disseminating Multiple Organ Infection: A Case Report and Review of Japanese Pediatric Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuta Yonezawa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric invasive community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA infection is very serious and occasionally fatal. This infectious disease is still a relatively rare and unfamiliar infectious disease in Japan. We report a positive outcome in a 23-month-old Japanese girl with meningitis, osteomyelitis, fasciitis, necrotizing pneumonia, urinary tract infection, and bacteremia due to CA-MRSA treated with linezolid. PCR testing of the CA-MRSA strain was positive for PVL and staphylococcal enterotoxin b and negative for ACME. SCC mec was type IVa. This case underscores the selection of effective combinations of antimicrobial agents for its treatment. We need to be aware of invasive CA-MRSA infection, which rapidly progresses with a serious clinical course, because the incidence of the disease may be increasing in Japan.

  7. Invasive Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a Japanese Girl with Disseminating Multiple Organ Infection: A Case Report and Review of Japanese Pediatric Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonezawa, Ryuta; Kuwana, Tsukasa; Kawamura, Kengo; Inamo, Yasuji

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric invasive community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) infection is very serious and occasionally fatal. This infectious disease is still a relatively rare and unfamiliar infectious disease in Japan. We report a positive outcome in a 23-month-old Japanese girl with meningitis, osteomyelitis, fasciitis, necrotizing pneumonia, urinary tract infection, and bacteremia due to CA-MRSA treated with linezolid. PCR testing of the CA-MRSA strain was positive for PVL and staphylococcal enterotoxin b and negative for ACME. SCC mec was type IVa. This case underscores the selection of effective combinations of antimicrobial agents for its treatment. We need to be aware of invasive CA-MRSA infection, which rapidly progresses with a serious clinical course, because the incidence of the disease may be increasing in Japan.

  8. Influence of HIV infection on the clinical presentation and outcome of adults with acute community-acquired pneumonia in Yaounde, Cameroon: a retrospective hospital-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yone Eric Walter

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The impact of HIV infection on the evolution of acute community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is still controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate possible differences in the clinical presentation and in-hospital outcomes of patients with CAP with and without HIV infection in a specialised service in Yaounde. Methods Medical files of 106 patients (51 men aged 15 years and above, admitted to the Pneumology service of the Yaounde Jamot Hospital between January 2008 and May 2012, were retrospectively studied. Results Sixty-two (58.5% patients were HIV infected. The median age of all patients was 40 years (interquartile range: 31.75-53 and there was no difference in the clinical and radiological profile of patients with and without HIV infection. The median leukocyte count (interquartile range was 14,600/mm3 (10,900-20,600 and 10,450/mm3 (6,400-16,850 respectively in HIV negative and HIV positive patients (p = 0.002. Median haemoglobin level (interquartile range was 10.8 g/dl (8.9-12 in HIV negative and 9.7 g/dl (8–11.6 in HIV positive patients (p = 0.025. In-hospital treatment failure on third day (39.5% vs. 25.5.1%, p = 0.137 and mortality rates (9% vs. 14.5%, p = 0.401 were similar between HIV negative and HIV positive patients. Conclusion Clinical and radiological features as well as response to treatment and in hospital fatal outcomes are similar in adult patients hospitalised with acute community-acquired pneumonia in Yaounde. In contrast, HIV infected patients tend to be more anaemic and have lower white cell counts than HIV negative patients. Larger prospective studies are needed to consolidate these findings.

  9. Spectrum and potency of ceftaroline against leading pathogens causing community-acquired respiratory tract and skin and soft tissue infections in Latin America, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flamm, Robert K; Sader, Helio S; Jones, Ronald N

    2013-01-01

    Ceftaroline, the active metabolite of the prodrug ceftaroline fosamil, is a cephalosporin with in vitro bactericidal activity against Gram-positive organisms, including methicillin-susceptible and -resistant Staphylococcus aureus, β-haemolytic and viridans group streptococci, and Streptococcus pneumoniae, as well as common Gram-negative organisms. In this study a total of 986 isolates collected in 2010 from patients in 15 medical centers in five Latin American countries from the Assessing Worldwide Antimicrobial Resistance Evaluation Program were identified as community-acquired respiratory tract or skin and soft tissue infection pathogens. Ceftaroline was the most potent agent tested against S. pneumoniae with a MIC90 value (0.12μg/mL) that was eight-fold lower than ceftriaxone, levofloxacin, and linezolid. Its spectrum of coverage (100.0% susceptible) was similar to tigecycline, linezolid, levofloxacin and vancomycin. Against Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis, ceftaroline was the most active agent tested. The activity of ceftaroline against S. aureus (including MRSA) was similar to that of vancomycin and tetracycline (MIC90, 1μg/mL) and linezolid (MIC90, 2μg/mL). The β-haemolytic streptococci exhibited 100.0% susceptibility to ceftaroline. Ceftaroline activity against Escherichia coli, Klebsiella spp., and Enterobacter spp. was similar to that of ceftriaxone and ceftazidime. These parenteral cephalosporin agents have potent activity against non-extended-spectrum β-lactamase-phenotype strains, but are not active against extended-spectrum β-lactamase-phenotype strains. These results confirm the in vitro activity of ceftaroline against pathogens common in community-acquired respiratory tract and skin and soft tissue infection in Latin America, and suggest that ceftaroline fosamil could be an important therapeutic option for these infections. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  10. Clinical and microbiological characteristics of community-acquired pneumonia in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients: a retrospective analysis of 79 HIV/AIDS patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Zhiyao; Rong, Xiajun; Cheng, Qijian; Zhou, Min; Gong, Qiming; Shi, Guochao; Wan, Huanying

    2014-07-01

    HIV infections are prevalent; however, the clinical characteristics of these patients are atypical. In the present study, we analysed 79 patients who were newly diagnosed with HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) at Ruijin Hospital between January 1998 and August 2011 to improve awareness of the physicians' diagnoses and to elucidate the risk factors for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and the progression to severe pneumonia or respiratory failure in AIDS patients. The patients were divided into a CAP group (A) and a non-CAP group (B). Furthermore, group A was divided into a severe pneumonia group (A1 ) and a non-severe pneumonia group (A2 ). The serum albumin (25.60 ± 5.31 vs 34.00 ± 6.90; P pneumonia or respiratory failure. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Antibacterial Susceptibilities of Escherichia coli from Community-Acquired Urinary Tract Infections in the Faroe Islands, Associations with Antibacterial Sales, and Comparison with Iceland and Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnussen, Marita Debess; Gislason, Hannes; Gaini, Shahin

    2018-01-01

    Currently, data on Escherichia coli antibacterial susceptibilities in the Faroe Islands are lacking. The aim was to investigate the antibacterial susceptibilities of E. coli from patients with community-acquired urinary tract infections in the Faroe Islands, correlate with antibacterial sales...... methods and criteria. Logistic regression (quasibinomial) of the antibacterial resistance proportions versus mean sales during the period of 2008-2011 was used to determine association. Nonsusceptibility to at least 1 of the 14 antibacterial drugs investigated was found in 54% of the E. coli isolates.......77 (Std. Error = 0.624, p-value = 0.002) and β1 = 0.26 (Std. Error = 0.020, p-value = 4e-7) for the steep and gradual groups, respectively. This knowledge can potentially be used to predict and control the future increase in E. coli resistance with antibacterial sales....

  12. "Population structure of drug-susceptible, -resistant and ESBL-producing Escherichia coli from community-acquired urinary tract infections"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Frederik Boetius; Nielsen, Jesper Boye; Schønning, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Escherichia coli is the most common cause of urinary tract infection (UTI). The pathogenic isolates are becoming increasingly resistant to antibiotics; with a worldwide dissemination of resistant sequence types (ST). We characterized three different uropathogenic E. coli populations...

  13. Occurrence and analysis of irp2 virulence gene in isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterobacter spp. from microbiota and hospital and community-acquired infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza Lopes, Ana Catarina; Rodrigues, Juliana Falcão; Cabral, Adriane Borges; da Silva, Maíra Espíndola; Leal, Nilma Cintra; da Silveira, Vera Magalhães; de Morais Júnior, Marcos Antônio

    2016-07-01

    Eighty-five isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterobacter spp., originating from hospital- and community-acquired infections and from oropharyngeal and faecal microbiota from patients in Recife-PE, Brazil, were analyzed regarding the presence of irp2 gene. This is a Yersinia typical gene involved in the synthesis of siderophore yersiniabactin. DNA sequencing confirmed the identity of irp2 gene in five K. pneumoniae, five Enterobacter aerogenes and one Enterobacter amnigenus isolates. To our knowledge in the current literature, this is the first report of the irp2 gene in E. amnigenus, a species considered an unusual human pathogen, and in K. pneumoniae and E. aerogenes isolates from the normal microbiota and from community infections, respectively. Additionally, the analyses of nucleotide and amino acid sequences suggest the irp2 genes derived from isolates used in this study are more closely related to that of Yersinia pestis P.CE882 than to that of Yersinia enterocolitica 8081. These data demonstrated that K. pneumoniae and Enterobacter spp. from normal microbiota and from community- and hospital-acquired infections possess virulence factors important for the establishment of extra-intestinal infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Infections by methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus community-acquired (MRSA-CA in the pediatric population in two hospitals in Popayan, Colombia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arieth Figueroa-Vargas

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the prevalence and characteristics of infections by community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA in a pediatric population in two hospitals in Popayan, Colombia. Materials and methods: We performed a cross-sectional descriptive study, conducted in two hospitals (secondary and tertiary care. We included all children (1 month to 14 years who consulted to emergency services with suggestive infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus (SA between September 2009 and August 2010. Results: 205 children consulted with possible staphylococcal infections. 89 (43, 0% met all inclusion criteria. Of these children, 62 (69.7% had positive cultures for SA and 28 (45.1% were CA-MRSA. One third of the patients had risk factors: history of antibiotic use in the past two months, trauma in the past three weeks and hospitalization in the previous year. No significant differences were found in the prevalence of CA-MRSA and risk factors between the two institutions. Conclusions: The prevalence of CA-MRSA infections is high and was similar to national and international studies.

  15. Virulence factors, antibiotic resistance phenotypes and O-serogroups of Escherichia coli strains isolated from community-acquired urinary tract infection patients in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paniagua-Contreras, Gloria Luz; Monroy-Pérez, Eric; Rodríguez-Moctezuma, José Raymundo; Domínguez-Trejo, Pablo; Vaca-Paniagua, Felipe; Vaca, Sergio

    2017-08-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains isolated from patients with community-acquired urinary tract infections (UTIs) were assessed to determine the prevalence of virulence genes, antibiotic resistance, and the O-serogroup of the strains. Consenting patients with community-acquired UTI were enrolled at Unidad Médica Familiar Number 64 (Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, Estado de Mexico, Mexico) and 321 urine samples were collected. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to assess 24 virulence genes and 14 O-serogroups. The Kirby-Bauer method was used to evaluate the antibiotic susceptibility of the isolated strains to 12 commonly used antibiotics. A total of 194 strains were identified as E. coli using standard biochemical tests, followed by PCR amplification of 16S ribosomal RNA gene. Only 58.2% of the strains belonged to the assessed 14 O-serogroups. The serogroups O25, O15, O8, and O75 were present in 20.6%, 17%, 6.1%, and 4.6% of strains, respectively. The most frequently occurring virulence genes among UPEC strains included kpsMT (92.2% strains), usp (87.1%), irp2 (79.3%), iha (64.9%), fim (61.3%), set (36%), astA (33.5%), pap (24.7%), and papGII (21.1%). In addition, 97% of the strains were multi-drug resistant (coresistance to 3-11 antibiotics). The isolated UPEC strains predominantly belonged to three serogroups (O25, O15, and O8), harboured numerous virulence genes, and are multiresistant to antibiotics. The findings of this study could be used to orient UTI treatment strategies and in epidemiological studies in Mexico. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Sequence Type 131 Subgroups O25b and O16 Among Extraintestinal Escherichia coli Isolates from Community-Acquired Urinary Tract Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefzy, Enas Mamdouh; Hassuna, Noha Anwar

    2017-03-01

    The multidrug-resistant sequence type 131 (ST131) Escherichia coli is a spreading epidemiological burden particularly among isolates resistant to fluoroquinolones. We aimed to evaluate the commonality of ST131-O25b and ST131-O16 among fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli isolates causing community-acquired urinary tract infections (UTIs) at Fayoum University Hospital, in Egypt. Ninety-two fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli isolates were subjected to multiplex PCR for detection of ST131 of either O25b or O16 subgroups. Positive isolates were then assessed for antimicrobial susceptibility and virulence genotyping. Out of 92 fluoroquinolone-resistant E. coli isolates, 56 (60.9%) isolates were O25b/O16 subgroups of ST131, including 44 (78.6%) ST131-O25b and 12 (21.4%) ST131-O16 subgroups. All the O25b/O16 ST131 isolates were sensitive to meropenem, where ST131-O25b isolates were significantly more resistant to extended spectrum cephalosporins compared to S131-O16 strains. All the O25b/O16 ST131 isolates harbored three or more of the virulence factors associated with extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli status. ST131-O16 showed a significantly higher virulence score than ST131-O25b isolates. Our results bring to highlight the emergence of O25b/O16 ST131 isolates between community acquired UTIs among Egyptian patients. This is the first report for the presence of O16 isolates in Egypt, showing a lower predominance than the O25b subgroup. The high prevalence of O25b/O16 ST131 isolates requires strict stewardship on antimicrobial use, notably fluoroquinolones, to control the endemicity of such emerging multidrug-resistant clone in the community.

  17. Hospitalization for community-acquired febrile urinary tract infection: validation and impact assessment of a clinical prediction rule.

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    Stalenhoef, Janneke E; van der Starre, Willize E; Vollaard, Albert M; Steyerberg, Ewout W; Delfos, Nathalie M; Leyten, Eliane M S; Koster, Ted; Ablij, Hans C; Van't Wout, Jan W; van Dissel, Jaap T; van Nieuwkoop, Cees

    2017-06-06

    There is a lack of severity assessment tools to identify adults presenting with febrile urinary tract infection (FUTI) at risk for complicated outcome and guide admission policy. We aimed to validate the Prediction Rule for Admission policy in Complicated urinary Tract InfeCtion LEiden (PRACTICE), a modified form of the pneumonia severity index, and to subsequentially assess its use in clinical practice. A prospective observational multicenter study for model validation (2004-2009), followed by a multicenter controlled clinical trial with stepped wedge cluster-randomization for impact assessment (2010-2014), with a follow up of 3 months. Paricipants were 1157 consecutive patients with a presumptive diagnosis of acute febrile UTI (787 in validation cohort and 370 in the randomized trial), enrolled at emergency departments of 7 hospitals and 35 primary care centers in the Netherlands. The clinical prediction rule contained 12 predictors of complicated course. In the randomized trial the PRACTICE included guidance on hospitalization for high risk (>100 points) and home discharge for low risk patients (urinary tract infection, futher improvement is necessary to reduce the occurrence of secondary hospital admissions. NTR4480 http://www.trialregister.nl/trialreg/admin/rctview.asp?TC=4480 , registered retrospectively 25 mrt 2014 (during enrollment of subjects).

  18. Therapy-refractory Panton Valentine Leukocidin-positive community-acquired methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus sepsis with progressive metastatic soft tissue infection: a case report

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    Schefold Joerg C

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report a case of fulminant multiple organ failure including the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS, haemodynamic, and renal failure due to community-acquired methicillin-sensitive Panton Valentine Leukocidin (PVL positive spa-type 284 (ST121 Staphylococcus aureus septic shock. The patient's first clinical symptom was necrotizing pneumonia. Despite organism-sensitive triple antibiotic therapy with linezolid, imipenem and clindamycin from the first day of treatment, progressive abscess formation in multiple skeletal muscles was observed. As a result, repeated surgical interventions became necessary. Due to progressive soft tissue infection, the anti-microbial therapy was changed to a combination of clindamycin and daptomycin. Continued surgical and antimicrobial therapy finally led to a stabilisation of the patients' condition. The clinical course of our patient underlines the existence of a "PVL-syndrome" which is independent of in vitro Staphylococcus aureus susceptibility. The PVL-syndrome should not only be considered in patients with soft tissue or bone infection, but also in patients with pneumonia. Such a condition, which may easily be mistaken for uncomplicated pneumonia, should be treated early, aggressively and over a long period of time in order to avoid relapsing infection.

  19. Bacterial Aetiology and Antibiotic Resistance Pattern of Community-Acquired Urinary Tract Infections in Children in a Tertiary Care Hospital in Bangladesh

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    Lazina Sharmin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Urinary tract infections (UTIs in children are among the most common bacterial infections. Community-acquired urinary tract infections (CAUTI are often treated empirically with broad-spectrum antibiotics. Pattern of aetiologic agents and their antibiotic sensitivity may vary according to geographical and regional location. So, knowledge of antibiotic resistance trends is important for improving evidence-based recommendations for empirical treatment of UTIs. Objectives: To determine the common bacterial aetiologies of CAUTIs and their antibiotic resistance patterns in a tertiary care hospital, Savar. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted at Enam Medical College Hospital, Savar from May 2016 to April 2017. We collected clean-catch mid-stream urine samples from 257 patients having clinical diagnosis of UTI and submitted to the clinical microbiology laboratory for culture and sensitivity. Results: A total of 120 (46.7% samples were positive for bacterial growth. Escherichia coli (79% was the most common pathogen, followed by Klebsiella spp. (14%. Bacterial isolates showed high prevalence of resistance to multiple antibiotics. Resistance against amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, co-trimoxazole and ciprofloxacin was higher compared to newer quinolones and aminoglycosides. Conclusion: Esch. coli and Klebsiella spp. were the predominant bacterial pathogens. The resistance pattern to commonly prescribed antibiotics was quite high and alarming.

  20. Inter-observer variation in the interpretation of chest radiographs for pneumonia in community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopstaken, R.M.; Witbraad, T.; Engelshoven, J.M.A. van; Dinant, G.J.

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To assess inter-observer variation in the interpretation of chest radiographs of individuals with pneumonia versus those without pneumonia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Chest radiographs of out-patients with a lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) were assessed for the presence of infiltrates by radiologists from three local hospitals and were reassessed by one university hospital radiologist. Various measures of inter-observer agreement were calculated. RESULTS: The observed proportional agreement was 218 in 243 patients (89.7%). Kappa was 0.53 (moderate agreement) with a 95% confidence interval of 0.37 to 0.69. The observed positive agreement (59%) was much lower than for negative agreement (94%). Kappa was considerably lower, if chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was present (κ=0.20) or Streptococcus pneumoniae (κ=-0.29) was the infective agent. CONCLUSION: The overall inter-observer agreement adjusted for chance was moderate. Inter-observer agreement in cases with pneumonia was much worse than the agreement in negative (i.e. non-pneumonia) cases. A general practitioner's selection of patients with a higher chance of having pneumonia for chest radiography would thus not improve the observer agreement

  1. Being Met as marked - patients' experiences of being infected with community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skyman, Eva; Lindahl, Berit; Bergbom, Ingegerd; Sjöström, Harrieth Thunberg; Åhrén, Christina

    2016-12-01

    It is known that patients who acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in hospitals suffer and feel as plague. Moreover, the patient interaction with nurses and physicians is described as frightening. Little is known about patient experiences after having acquired CA-MRSA concerning care and everyday life. To reveal and interpret otherwise healthy patients' lived experiences of receiving care and their everyday life after having acquired community MRSA (CA-MRSA). A phenomenological hermeneutic approach guided by Ricouer was conducted. Interviews with twelve patients were transcribed verbatim into a text. The text was analysed in three phases: naive understanding, structural analysis and comprehensive understanding to reveal a possible being in the world. In this study, this referred to what it means to be infected with CA-MRSA. The findings indicate that patients who acquired MRSA experience a changed body image. They suffer from ignorant and frightened behavior from healthcare workers, social contacts, and also of being bullied by colleagues. Despite this, patients assume great responsibility for protecting others. However, knowledgeable staff alleviate suffering and bring peace of mind to the patients. Preventing patient's feelings of being a pest, an outsider living with fear, requires urgent education and understanding about resistant bacteria and how to meet an infected patient. The results describing patients, affected with MRSA, may contribute and touch the readers to better understanding of patient's changed body image and suffering and how to mitigate these feelings. © 2016 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  2. In Vivo Bioluminescence Imaging To Evaluate Systemic and Topical Antibiotics against Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus-Infected Skin Wounds in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yi; Ramos, Romela Irene; Cho, John S.; Donegan, Niles P.; Cheung, Ambrose L.

    2013-01-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) frequently causes skin and soft tissue infections, including impetigo, cellulitis, folliculitis, and infected wounds and ulcers. Uncomplicated CA-MRSA skin infections are typically managed in an outpatient setting with oral and topical antibiotics and/or incision and drainage, whereas complicated skin infections often require hospitalization, intravenous antibiotics, and sometimes surgery. The aim of this study was to develop a mouse model of CA-MRSA wound infection to compare the efficacy of commonly used systemic and topical antibiotics. A bioluminescent USA300 CA-MRSA strain was inoculated into full-thickness scalpel wounds on the backs of mice and digital photography/image analysis and in vivo bioluminescence imaging were used to measure wound healing and the bacterial burden. Subcutaneous vancomycin, daptomycin, and linezolid similarly reduced the lesion sizes and bacterial burden. Oral linezolid, clindamycin, and doxycycline all decreased the lesion sizes and bacterial burden. Oral trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole decreased the bacterial burden but did not decrease the lesion size. Topical mupirocin and retapamulin ointments both reduced the bacterial burden. However, the petrolatum vehicle ointment for retapamulin, but not the polyethylene glycol vehicle ointment for mupirocin, promoted wound healing and initially increased the bacterial burden. Finally, in type 2 diabetic mice, subcutaneous linezolid and daptomycin had the most rapid therapeutic effect compared with vancomycin. Taken together, this mouse model of CA-MRSA wound infection, which utilizes in vivo bioluminescence imaging to monitor the bacterial burden, represents an alternative method to evaluate the preclinical in vivo efficacy of systemic and topical antimicrobial agents. PMID:23208713

  3. Dissemination of multidrug-resistant blaCTX-M-15/IncFIIk plasmids in Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates from hospital- and community-acquired human infections in Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Wejdene; Grami, Raoudha; Ben Haj Khalifa, Anis; Dahmen, Safia; Châtre, Pierre; Haenni, Marisa; Aouni, Mahjoub; Madec, Jean-Yves

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated the molecular features of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae from hospital- and community-acquired (HA/CA) infections in the region of Mahdia, Tunisia. Among 336 K. pneumoniae isolates recovered from both clinical contexts between July 2009 and December 2011, 49 and 15 were ESBL producers and originated from clinical and community sources, respectively. All isolates produced the CTX-M-15 enzyme. As shown by Southern blot on S1 nuclease treatment followed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) gels, the blaCTX-M-15 gene was carried on IncFII (n=4), IncFIIk (n=25), IncL/M (n=4), IncK (n=1), or untypeable (n=15) plasmids in HA isolates. In CA isolates, the blaCTX-M-15 gene was carried on IncFIIk (n=6), IncFII (n=1), IncHI1 (n=1), or untypeable (n=7) plasmids. In all, 23 and 11 PFGE types were found among the HA and CA isolates. Multilocus sequence typing on representative isolates shows diverse sequence types (STs), such as ST307, ST101, ST39, ST4, ST140, ST15, and ST307 in HA isolates and ST101, ST664, and ST323 in CA isolates. This study is the first comprehensive report of ESBL plasmids in K. pneumoniae from HA and CA infections in Tunisia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Worrisome high frequency of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli in community-acquired urinary tract infections: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Tokumori, Franco; Irey-Salgado, Claudia; Málaga, Germán

    2017-02-01

    There has been a sustained and dramatic increase in community-acquired urinary tract infections (CA-UTI) caused by extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing bacteria over recent years. Despite this, no studies have been performed in low- or middle-income countries. The main objective of this case-control study was to describe ESBL CA-UTI and its risk factors. Outpatients with CA-UTI seen at the Hospital Cayetano Heredia during 2015 were identified. Patients were contacted by telephone. After consent had been obtained, a questionnaire concerning previously identified risk factors was applied. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted using Stata version 13. The overall frequency of ESBL-producing Escherichia coli was 40.85%. Sixty-seven cases and 105 controls were included in this study. The following main risk factors were identified on multivariate analysis: previous antibiotic use (odds ratio (OR) 3.09), previous hospitalization (OR 2.92), and previous surgery (OR 2.75). Chronic corticosteroid use (OR 24.32, 95% confidence interval 2.39-246.92) was also identified as a risk factor. ESBL E. coli accounted for more than 40% of CA-UTIs during 2015. A history of previous hospitalization, surgery, and antibiotic use should be considered when treating this type of infection. Action should be taken to confirm these worrisome results and avoid the major consequences for public health. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Impact of amoxicillin therapy on resistance selection in patients with community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections: a randomized, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra-Kumar, Surbhi; Van Heirstraeten, Liesbet; Coenen, Samuel; Lammens, Christine; Adriaenssens, Niels; Kowalczyk, Anna; Godycki-Cwirko, Maciek; Bielicka, Zuzana; Hupkova, Helena; Lannering, Christina; Mölstad, Sigvard; Fernandez-Vandellos, Patricia; Torres, Antoni; Parizel, Maxim; Ieven, Margareta; Butler, Chris C; Verheij, Theo; Little, Paul; Goossens, Herman

    2016-11-01

    To determine the effect of amoxicillin treatment on resistance selection in patients with community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Patients were prescribed amoxicillin 1 g, three times daily (n = 52) or placebo (n = 50) for 7 days. Oropharyngeal swabs obtained before, within 48 h post-treatment and at 28-35 days were assessed for proportions of amoxicillin-resistant (ARS; amoxicillin MIC ≥2 mg/L) and -non-susceptible (ANS; MIC ≥0.5 mg/L) streptococci. Alterations in amoxicillin MICs and in penicillin-binding-proteins were also investigated. ITT and PP analyses were conducted. ARS and ANS proportions increased 11- and 2.5-fold, respectively, within 48 h post-amoxicillin treatment compared with placebo [ARS mean increase (MI) 9.46, 95% CI 5.57-13.35; ANS MI 39.87, 95% CI 30.96-48.78; P  0.1588). ARS/ANS were grouped by pbp mutations. Group 1 strains exhibited significantly lower amoxicillin resistance (mean MIC 2.8 mg/L, 95% CI 2.6-3.1) than group 2 (mean MIC 9.3 mg/L, 95% CI 8.1-10.5; P < 0.0001). Group 2 strains predominated immediately post-treatment (61.07%) and although decreased by days 28-35 (30.71%), proportions remained higher than baseline (18.70%; P = 0.0004). By utilizing oropharyngeal streptococci as model organisms this study provides the first prospective, experimental evidence that resistance selection in patients receiving amoxicillin is modest and short-lived, probably due to 'fitness costs' engendered by high-level resistance-conferring mutations. This evidence further supports European guidelines that recommend amoxicillin when an antibiotic is indicated for community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy.

  6. Distribution and antimicrobial susceptibility of bacteria from adults with community-acquired pneumonia or complicated skin and soft tissue infections in France: the nationwide French PREMIUM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leprince, C; Desroches, M; Emirian, A; Coutureau, C; Anais, L; Fihman, V; Soussy, C J; Decousser, J W

    2015-10-01

    The empirical therapy of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and complicated skin and soft tissue infections (cSSTIs) must be based on updated bacterial distribution and susceptibility data. A nationwide study consecutively collected 1288 isolates from CAP (n=467) and cSSTIs (n=821) from 18 French hospitals between 2012 and 2013. The MIC values of commonly used antimicrobial agents, including ceftaroline, were determined. Bacterial distribution featured Pneumococcus, Haemophilus influenzae, and Staphylococcus aureus for CAPs and S. aureus, β-hemolytic streptococci and Enterobacteriaceae for cSSTIs. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing indicated i) the sustained third-generation cephalosporins and levofloxacin activity against pneumococci and H. influenzae, ii) no methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus emergence among respiratory pathogens, iii) the high in vitro activity of ceftaroline against staphylococci from cSSTIs (98.7% susceptibility), and iv) the worrisome decreasing fluoroquinolone and third-generation cephalosporin susceptibilities among Enterobacteriaceae. This laboratory-based survey depicts a contrasting situation and supports the scoring of patients for the resistant pathogen risk before empirical therapy. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Characterization of SCCmec and spa types of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates from health-care and community-acquired infections in Kerman, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasihi, Yaser; Kiaei, Somayeh; Kalantar-Neyestanaki, Davood

    2017-12-01

    Spread of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates is a worldwide problem. Molecular typing is a useful tool to understand MRSA epidemiology. Herein, we determined vancomycin-resistant, SCCmec and spa types among MRSA isolates recovered from healthcare and community-acquired infections in Kerman, Iran. A total of 170 S. aureus isolates were collected from different patients who were admitted to affiliated hospitals of Kerman University of Medical science. MRSA and vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (VRSA) isolates were detected by phenotypic methods. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was used for detection of mecA, vanA and vanB genes. Staphylococcal cassette chromosomemec (SCCmec) and spa typing were used for molecular typing of among MRSA isolates. Overall, 53% of isolates were considered as MRSA. Two MRSA isolates were resistant to vancomycin and vanA was detected in only one of VRSA isolates. SCCmec type III belonged to spa types t030 and t459 which they were the dominant spa types among community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) and healthcare-acquired MRSA (HA-MRSA) isolates. Our findings showed that the SCCmec type I and III spread from hospital settings to community, although the SCCmec type IV spread from community to healthcare systems. We have also reported VRSA isolates from hospitalized patients, therefore, appropriate policies should be enforced in order to prevent the spread of antibiotic resistance isolates in hospitals settings. Copyright © 2017 Ministry of Health, Saudi Arabia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Ceftaroline fosamil as first-line versus second-line treatment for acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) or community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guervil, David J; Kaye, Keith S; Hassoun, Ali; Cole, Phillip; Huang, Xing-Yue; Friedland, H David

    2016-06-01

    The Clinical Assessment Program and Teflaro(®) Utilization Registry (CAPTURE) is a multicenter registry study of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infection (ABSSSI) and community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) patients treated with ceftaroline fosamil in the US. Data for this analysis were collected between August 2011 and February 2013 at US study centres by randomly ordered chart review. Clinical success rates among ABSSSI patients were >81% when ceftaroline fosamil was used as first- or second-line therapy, including monotherapy and concurrent therapy. Among CABP patients, clinical success rates were >77% among first-line and second-line patients and patients who received first-line concurrent therapy or second line monotherapy or concurrent therapy. For CABP patients treated with ceftaroline fosamil as first-line monotherapy, the clinical success rate was 70%. Ceftaroline fosamil is an effective treatment option for patients with ABSSSI or CABP with similar clinical success rates when used as first-line or second-line treatment.

  9. Antimicrobial resistance in bacterial pathogens among hospitalized children with community acquired lower respiratory tract infections in Dongguan, China (2011-2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaoguang; Xie, Mingyu; Li, Siping; Ye, Junqin; Peng, Qi; Ma, Qiang; Lu, Xiaomei; Zhong, Baimao

    2017-09-11

    Bacterial pathogens are a major cause of childhood community acquired lower respiratory tract infections (CA-LRTIs), and few data described the impact of antimicrobial resistance on children with CA-LRTIs. This study aims to investigate the antimicrobial resistance in common bacterial agents among hospitalized children with CA-LRTIs between 2011 and 2016 in Dongguan, China. Sputum samples were collected from hospitalized children (0-5 years old) with CA-LRTIs in Dongguan Children's Hospital. Bacterial pathogens were detected using traditional culture methods, and disc diffusion tests were used to determine antibiotic resistance. Among the 2360 samples analyzed, 342 (14.5%) were positive for bacterial infection. The most prevalent pathogen was MSSA (2.3%), followed by MRSA (1.5%), E. coli (1.7%), E. coli ESBLs (1.2%), K. pneumonia ESBLs (1.5%), K. pneumonia (1.4%) and S. pneumonia (1.3%). Of the hospitalized patients with bacteria causing of CA-LRTIs, 90.1% were less than 1-year-old. MSSA and MRSA were more commonly isolated in infants less than 3 months. E. coli, K. pneumonia and K. pneumonia ESBLs were more common bacteria causing CA-LRTIs in infants less than 1 month. Resistance levels to penicillins, fluoroquinolones, macrolides, cephalosporins, carbapenems and vancomycin varied in different bacteria. S. aureus, E coli and K. pneumonia were the common bacterial isolates recovered from chidren with CA-LTRIs during 2011-2015. Age group of under 1 year old was at a high risk of bacterial infections. Many isolates showed antibiotic resistance level was associated with antibiotic usage in clinic. Increasing surveillance of antibiotic resistance is urgently needed and develops better strategies to cure the antibiotic abuse in China.

  10. Spectrum and potency of ceftaroline against leading pathogens causing community-acquired respiratory tract and skin and soft tissue infections in Latin America, 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K. Flamm

    Full Text Available Ceftaroline, the active metabolite of the prodrug ceftaroline fosamil, is a cephalosporin with in vitro bactericidal activity against Gram-positive organisms, including methicillinsusceptible and -resistant Staphylococcus aureus, β-haemolytic and viridans group streptococci, and Streptococcus pneumoniae, as well as common Gram-negative organisms. In this study a total of 986 isolates collected in 2010 from patients in 15 medical centers in five Latin American countries from the Assessing Worldwide Antimicrobial Resistance Evaluation Program were identified as community-acquired respiratory tract or skin and soft tissue infection pathogens. Ceftaroline was the most potent agent tested against S. pneumoniae with a MIC90 value (0.12 µg/mL that was eight-fold lower than ceftriaxone, levofloxacin, and linezolid. Its spectrum of coverage (100.0% susceptible was similar to tigecycline, linezolid, levofloxacin and vancomycin. Against Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis, ceftaroline was the most active agent tested. The activity of ceftaroline against S. aureus (including MRSA was similar to that of vancomycin and tetracycline (MIC90,1 µg/mL and linezolid (MIC90,2 Jg/mL. The 1-haemolytic streptococci exhibited 100.0% susceptibility to ceftaroline. Ceftaroline activity against Escherichia coli, Klebsiella spp., and Enterobacter spp. was similar to that of ceftriaxone and ceftazidime. These parenteral cephalosporin agents have potent activity against non-extended-spectrum These parenteral cephalosporin agents have potent activity against non-extended-spectrum-lactamase-phenotype strains, but are not active against extended-spectrum β-lactamase-phenotype strains. These results confirm the in vitro activity of ceftaroline against pathogens common in communityacquired respiratory tract and skin and soft tissue infection in Latin America, and suggest that ceftaroline fosamil could be an important therapeutic option for these infections.

  11. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from skin and soft tissue infections (in a sample of Egyptian population: analysis of mec gene and staphylococcal cassette chromosome

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    Nagat Sobhy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Staphylococcus aureus has been recognized as an important pathogen associated with inpatients and community infections. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA infections commonly present as skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTIs. Treatment often includes incision and drainage with or without adjunctive antibiotics. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to identify CA-MRSA infections both phenotypically and genotypically, to determine their spectrum of antibiotic resistance, and to establish the best scheme for molecular distinction between hospital-acquired MRSA (HA-MRSA and CA-MRSA by staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec typing and detection of Panton Valentine leukocidin (PVL. MATERIALS: 50 swabs, from skin and soft tissue of infected lesions of outpatients attending the dermatology department of the Medical School, Alexandria University, were collected. Additionally, a nasal swab was taken from every participant. METHODS: Collection of swabs from the infected skin and soft tissues, followed by laboratory testing to phenotypically and genotypically identify MRSA. Also, nasal swabs were taken from every patient to identify MRSA colonization. RESULTS: Staphylococcus aureus strains were identified in 38 (76% of the 50 clinical isolates. 18 (47.37% out of the 38 S. aureus strains were resistant to oxacillin and cefoxitin discs, were penicillin binding protein 2a (PBP2a producers, and were initially diagnosed as MRSA. All of the 18 strains were definitively diagnosed as MRSA by mecA gene detection using real time PCR, while only six (33.33% strains were PVL positive. Using the sets of primers of Zhang et al.: nine (50% out of the 18 CA-MRSA strains were SCCmec type V, and one (5.56% was SCCmec type IVc. Then, using the set of primers by Oliveira et al., two (25% out of the eight untypable MRSA strains were found to be SCCmec type IV, and six (75% remained untypable. CONCLUSIONS: CA-MRSA must be considered when

  12. Focus on JNJ-Q2, a novel fluoroquinolone, for the management of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia and acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones TM

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Travis M Jones,1,2 Steven W Johnson,1,3 V Paul DiMondi,1,4 Dustin T Wilson,1,2 1Department of Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Campbell University, Buies Creek, 2Department of Pharmacy, Duke University Hospital, Durham, 3Department of Pharmacy, Forsyth Medical Center, Novant Health, Winston-Salem, 4Department of Pharmacy, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA Abstract: JNJ-Q2 is a novel, fifth-generation fluoroquinolone that has excellent in vitro and in vivo activity against a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms. In vitro studies indicate that JNJ-Q2 has potent activity against pathogens responsible for acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI and community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP, such as Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae. JNJ-Q2 also has been shown to have a higher barrier to resistance compared to other agents in the class and it remains highly active against drug-resistant organisms, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus, ciprofloxacin-resistant methicillin-resistant S. aureus, and drug-resistant S. pneumoniae. In two Phase II studies, the efficacy of JNJ-Q2 was comparable to linezolid for ABSSSI and moxifloxacin for CABP. Furthermore, JNJ-Q2 was well tolerated, with adverse event rates similar to or less than other fluoroquinolones. With an expanded spectrum of activity and low potential for resistance, JNJ-Q2 shows promise as an effective treatment option for ABSSSI and CABP. Considering its early stage of development, the definitive role of JNJ-Q2 against these infections and its safety profile will be determined in future Phase III studies. Keywords: JNJ-Q2, fluoroquinolone, ABSSSI, CABP, MRSA

  13. [Diagnosis and treatment of community-acquired urinary tract infections in adults: what has changed. Comments on the 2008 guidelines of the French Health Products Safety Agency (AFSSAPS)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, François

    2010-01-01

    This article comments on the new recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of adult patients with community-acquired urinary tract infections (UTIs), issued in 2008 by the French Health Products Safety Agency (AFSSAPS). The terms uncomplicated and complicated UTIs have been retained ; complicated UTIs are those with risk factor for complication (rather than with established complications). In women, age (>or= 65 years) is no longer considered itself a risk factor for complications. In men, cystitis must be treated as prostatitis. The bacterial levels defining UTIs have been revised, but levels below the threshold cannot be used to rule out UTI in the presence of symptoms. For uncomplicated cystitis, only fosfomycin-trometamol is recommended as a first-line treatment, essentially because of its ecological advantages (resistance uncommon, no cross resistance with other antibiotic classes, specific class, sparing others). For recurrent cystitis, prophylactic antibiotic treatment must be limited to cases when other preventive measures are impossible. For complicated cystitis, the principle is to delay antibiotic therapy until the resistance profile results are available, when possible (because of the high risk of resistance). Delay must be avoided during pregnancy, however, because of maternal-fetal risks. The strategy for uncomplicated pyelonephritis has been simplified : no plain abdominal radiography, antibiotic therapy shortened to 10-14 days (even 7 days for regimen or relay including fluoroquinolone), and no routine verification by urine culture. For prostatitis, PSA testing is not recommended during the acute phase of prostatitis, and a 14-day antibiotic regimen is enough for the easiest-to-treat infections. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Risk factors for community-acquired urinary tract infections caused by ESBL-producing enterobacteriaceae--a case-control study in a low prevalence country.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne Søraas

    Full Text Available Community-acquired urinary tract infection (CA-UTI is the most common infection caused by extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae, but the clinical epidemiology of these infections in low prevalence countries is largely unknown. A population based case-control study was conducted to assess risk factors for CA-UTI caused by ESBL-producing E. coli or K. pneumoniae. The study was carried out in a source population in Eastern Norway, a country with a low prevalence of infections caused by ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae. The study population comprised 100 cases and 190 controls with CA-UTI caused by ESBL-producing and non-ESBL-producing E. coli or K. pneumoniae, respectively. The following independent risk factors of ESBL-positive UTIs were identified: Travel to Asia, The Middle East or Africa either during the past six weeks (Odds ratio (OR = 21; 95% confidence interval (CI: 4.5-97 or during the past 6 weeks to 24 months (OR = 2.3; 95% CI: 1.1-4.4, recent use of fluoroquinolones (OR = 16; 95% CI: 3.2-80 and β-lactams (except mecillinam (OR = 5.0; 95% CI: 2.1-12, diabetes mellitus (OR = 3.2; 95% CI: 1.0-11 and recreational freshwater swimming the past year (OR = 2.1; 95% CI: 1.0-4.0. Factors associated with decreased risk were increasing number of fish meals per week (OR = 0.68 per fish meal; 95% CI: 0.51-0.90 and age (OR = 0.89 per 5 year increase; 95% CI: 0.82-0.97. In conclusion, we have identified risk factors that elucidate mechanisms and routes for dissemination of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae in a low prevalence country, which can be used to guide appropriate treatment of CA-UTI and targeted infection control measures.

  15. Ceftaroline Fosamil for the Treatment of Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia Secondary to Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections or Community-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez, Jose A; Maggiore, Christy R; Cole, Phillip; Smith, Alexander; Jandourek, Alena; Friedland, H David

    2015-01-01

    The Clinical Assessment Program and Teflaro® Utilization Registry is designed to collect information on the clinical use of ceftaroline fosamil in the Unites States. This report presents data on the treatment of patients with Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) secondary to acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs) or community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP). Patients diagnosed with ABSSSI or CABP were identified through sequential review of randomly ordered charts generated from pharmacy listings from August 2011 to February 2013. Data were collected by chart review 30 days or more after completion of ceftaroline fosamil therapy. Secondary SAB was reported in a total of 48 of 1428 evaluable patients (27 with ABSSSI, 21 with CABP). The mean (SD) patient age was 61 (15) years. At least 1 comorbidity was recorded for 74% of patients with ABSSSI and 81% with CABP. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus was isolated from 59% of patients with ABSSSI and 76% with CABP. The mean (SD) duration of ceftaroline fosamil therapy was 5.8 (4.8) days for ABSSSI and 7.0 (3.8) days for CABP. Clinical success among all patients with SAB treated with ceftaroline fosamil was 58% (52% for SAB secondary to ABSSSI, 67% for SAB secondary to CABP). Clinical success rates of methicillin-resistant S. aureus SAB were 50% (8/16) for ABSSSI and 63% (10/16) for CABP. This study supports the use of ceftaroline fosamil as a viable treatment option in hospitalized patients with SAB secondary to ABSSSI or CABP. Further studies evaluating the use of ceftaroline fosamil for the treatment of SAB are warranted.

  16. Community-acquired bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Beek, Diederik; Brouwer, Matthijs; Hasbun, Rodrigo; Koedel, Uwe; Whitney, Cynthia G.; Wijdicks, Eelco

    2016-01-01

    Meningitis is an inflammation of the meninges and subarachnoid space that can also involve the brain cortex and parenchyma. It can be acquired spontaneously in the community - community-acquired bacterial meningitis - or in the hospital as a complication of invasive procedures or head trauma

  17. Serology Enhances Molecular Diagnosis of Respiratory Virus Infections Other than Influenza in Children and Adults Hospitalized with Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yange; Sakthivel, Senthilkumar K; Bramley, Anna; Jain, Seema; Haynes, Amber; Chappell, James D; Hymas, Weston; Lenny, Noel; Patel, Anami; Qi, Chao; Ampofo, Krow; Arnold, Sandra R; Self, Wesley H; Williams, Derek J; Hillyard, David; Anderson, Evan J; Grijalva, Carlos G; Zhu, Yuwei; Wunderink, Richard G; Edwards, Kathryn M; Pavia, Andrew T; McCullers, Jonathan A; Erdman, Dean D

    2017-01-01

    Both molecular and serological assays have been used previously to determine the etiology of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). However, the extent to which these methods are correlated and the added diagnostic value of serology for respiratory viruses other than influenza virus have not been fully evaluated. Using data from patients enrolled in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Etiology of Pneumonia in the Community (EPIC) study, we compared real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and serology for the diagnosis of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), human metapneumovirus (HMPV), parainfluenza virus 1 to 3 (PIV1, PIV2, and PIV3), and adenovirus (AdV) infections. Of 5,126 patients enrolled, RT-PCR and serology test results were available for 2,023, including 1,087 children below the age of 18 years and 936 adults. For RSV, 287 (14.2%) patients were positive by RT-PCR and 234 (11.6%) were positive by serology; for HMPV, 172 (8.5%) tested positive by RT-PCR and 147 (7.3%) by serology; for the PIVs, 94 (4.6%) tested positive by RT-PCR and 92 (4.6%) by serology; and for AdV, 111 (5.5%) tested positive by RT-PCR and 62 (3.1%) by serology. RT-PCR provided the highest number of positive detections overall, but serology increased diagnostic yield for RSV (by 11.8%), HMPV (by 25.0%), AdV (by 32.4%), and PIV (by 48.9%). The method concordance estimated by Cohen's kappa coefficient (κ) ranged from good (for RSV; κ = 0.73) to fair (for AdV; κ = 0.27). Heterotypic seroresponses observed between PIVs and persistent low-level AdV shedding may account for the higher method discordance observed with each of these viruses. Serology can be a helpful adjunct to RT-PCR for research-based assessment of the etiologic contribution of respiratory viruses other than influenza virus to CAP. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Microbiology.

  18. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing of Escherichia coli strains from samples collected before and after pivmecillinam or placebo treatment of uncomplicated community-acquired urinary tract infection in women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejrnaes, Karen; Sandvang, Dorthe; Lundgren, Bettina

    2006-01-01

    The primary infecting Escherichia coli strains from 156 women with community-acquired uncomplicated urinary tract infection (UTI) randomized to pivmecillinam or placebo and the E. coli strains causing UTI at two follow-up visits were typed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE......). The finding that the majority of UTIs at follow-up are caused by the primary infecting E. coli strain supports the theory of a vaginal and rectal reservoir but could also support the recent discovery that E. coli strains are able to persist in the bladder epithelium despite appropriate antibiotic treatment......, constituting a reservoir for recurrent UTI....

  19. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing of Eschericia coli strains from samples collected before and after pivmecillinam or placebo treatment of uncomplicated community-acquired urinary tract infection in women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejrnæs, K; Sandvang, D; Lundgren, Bettina

    2006-01-01

    The primary infecting Escherichia coli strains from 156 women with community-acquired uncomplicated urinary tract infection (UTI) randomized to pivmecillinam or placebo and the E. coli strains causing UTI at two follow-up visits were typed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE......). The finding that the majority of UTIs at follow-up are caused by the primary infecting E. coli strain supports the theory of a vaginal and rectal reservoir but could also support the recent discovery that E. coli strains are able to persist in the bladder epithelium despite appropriate antibiotic treatment......, constituting a reservoir for recurrent UTI....

  20. Antibiotic Treatment Strategies for Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, Douwe F.; Van Werkhoven, Cornelis H.; Van Elden, Leontine J R; Thijsen, Steven F T; Hoepelman, Andy I M; Kluytmans, Jan A J W; Boersma, Wim G.; Compaijen, Clara J.; Van Der Wall, Eva; Prins, Jan M.; Oosterheert, Jan J.; Bonten, Marc J M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The choice of empirical antibiotic treatment for patients with clinically suspected community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) who are admitted to non-intensive care unit (ICU) hospital wards is complicated by the limited availability of evidence. We compared strategies of empirical treatment

  1. Levofloxacin Population Pharmacokinetics and Creation of a Demographic Model for Prediction of Individual Drug Clearance in Patients with Serious Community-Acquired Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Sandra L.; Drusano, George L.; Berman, Adam L.; Fowler, Cynthia L.; Chow, Andrew T.; Dornseif, Bruce; Reichl, Veronica; Natarajan, Jaya; Wong, Frankie A.; Corrado, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Population pharmacokinetic modeling is a useful approach to obtaining estimates of both population and individual pharmacokinetic parameter values. The potential for relating pharmacokinetic parameters to pharmacodynamic outcome variables, such as efficacy and toxicity, exists. A logistic regression relationship between the probability of a successful clinical and microbiological outcome and the peak concentration-to-MIC ratio (and also the area under the plasma concentration-time curve [AUC]/MIC ratio) has previously been developed for levofloxacin; however, levofloxacin assays for determination of the concentration in plasma are not readily available. We attempted to derive and validate demographic variable models to allow prediction of the peak concentration in plasma and clearance (CL) from plasma for levofloxacin. Two hundred seventy-two patients received levofloxacin intravenously for the treatment of community-acquired infection of the respiratory tract, skin or soft tissue, or urinary tract, and concentrations in plasma, guided by optimal sampling theory, were obtained. Patient data were analyzed by the Non-Parametric Expectation Maximization approach. Maximum a posteriori probability Bayesian estimation was used to generate individual parameter values, including CL. Peak concentrations were simulated from these estimates. The first 172 patients were used to produce demographic models for the prediction of CL and the peak concentration. The remaining 100 patients served as the validation group for the model. A median bias and median precision were calculated. A two-compartment model was used for the population pharmacokinetic analysis. The mean CL and the mean volume of distribution of the central compartment (V1) were 9.27 liters/h and 0.836 liter/kg, respectively. The mean values for the intercompartmental rate constants, the rate constant from the central compartment to the peripheral compartment (Kcp) and the rate constant from the peripheral

  2. The Viriato Study: Update of antimicrobial susceptibility data of bacterial pathogens from community-acquired respiratory tract infections in Portugal in 2003 and 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Melo-Cristino

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The Viriato Study is a nationwide, prospective, multicenter surveillance study of the antimicrobial susceptibility of bacterial pathogens commonly associated with community-acquired respiratory tract infections in Portugal. In 2003 and 2004 a total of 2945 isolates was recovered in the 29 laboratories that participated in the study. Testing was undertaken in a central laboratory. Of the 513 Streptococcus pyogenes strains isolated from patients with acute tonsillitis all were susceptible to penicillin and other beta-lactams but 18.9% were resistant to erythromycin, clarithromycin and azithromycin. The M phenotype dominated (67%, conferring resistance to erythromycin (MIC90 = 16 mg/L, clarythromycin and azithromycin, but susceptibility to clindamycin (MIC90 = 0.094 mg/L. From patients with lower respiratory tract infection 1,300 strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae, 829 of Haemophilus influenzae, and 303 of Moraxella catarrhalis were studied. Among S. pneumoniae isolates 18.4% were resistant to penicillin (3.5% showing high-level resistance, 7.1% to cefuroxime, 0.5% to amoxicillin and amoxicillin/clavulanate, 18.8% to erythromycin, clarithromycin and azithromycin, 14.9% to tetracycline, 16.5% to co-trimoxazol, and 0.4% to levofloxacin. Beta-lactamases were produced by 10.0% of H. influenzae and 96.4% of M. catarrhalis. In H. influenzae resistance to clarithromycin was 5.5% and to cotrimoxazole was 13.4%. Most strains were susceptible to amoxicillin/clavulanate, cefuroxime, azithromycin, tetracycline and ciprofloxacin. In M. catarrhalis resistance to co-trimoxazole was 27.1% and to tetracycline 1.0%. All strains were susceptible to amoxicillin/clavulanate, cefuroxime, clarithromycin, azithromycin and ciprofloxacin. Penicillin was the most active antimicrobial agent against S. pyogenes and amoxycillin / clavulanate and the quinolones the most active in vitro simultaneously against S. pneumoniae, H. influenza and M. catarrhalis. Resumo: O Estudo

  3. Frequency and time to onset of community-acquired respiratory tract infections in patients receiving esomeprazole: a retrospective analysis of patient-level data in placebo-controlled studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estborn, L; Joelson, S

    2015-09-01

    Debate continues on whether a causal association exists between the use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and the risk of respiratory tract infections, in particular pneumonia. To investigate the occurrence of community-acquired respiratory tract infections, including pneumonia, in patients receiving esomeprazole. A retrospective investigation of pooled data on adverse events related to respiratory tract infections, originally reported in 24 randomised, double-blind clinical studies, was conducted. The frequencies of respiratory tract infections and their relative risks were calculated retrospectively for the total patient population (9602 patients receiving esomeprazole and 5500 receiving placebo) and for sub-populations defined according to sex, age, esomeprazole dose, indication and geographical region. The cumulative frequency of first occurrence of events was calculated over 180 days. Frequencies of respiratory tract infections were similar in patients receiving esomeprazole and in those receiving placebo (any respiratory tract infection or signs/symptoms potentially indicating an respiratory tract infection, 0.278 and 0.296 patients per patient-year; lower respiratory tract infections, 0.048 and 0.058 per patient-year; pneumonia, 0.006 and 0.009 per patient-year, respectively). The relative risk for any respiratory tract infection in patients receiving esomeprazole compared with placebo was 0.94 (95% CI, 0.86-1.04). For lower respiratory tract infections, the relative risk was 0.82 (95% CI, 0.65-1.03) and for pneumonia, 0.66 (95% CI, 0.36-1.22). Sub-analyses by demographics, dose and indication yielded similar results to the overall analysis. The occurrence of respiratory tract infections was evenly distributed over time and similar in the esomeprazole and placebo groups. There is no causal association between treatment with esomeprazole and the occurrence of community-acquired respiratory tract infections, including pneumonia. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Detection of CTX-M-15 beta-lactamases in Enterobacteriaceae causing hospital- and community-acquired urinary tract infections as early as 2004, in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manyahi, Joel; Moyo, Sabrina J; Tellevik, Marit Gjerde; Ndugulile, Faustine; Urassa, Willy; Blomberg, Bjørn; Langeland, Nina

    2017-04-17

    The spread of Extended Spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) among Enterobacteriaceae and other Gram-Negative pathogens in the community and hospitals represents a major challenge to combat infections. We conducted a study to assess the prevalence and genetic makeup of ESBL-type resistance in bacterial isolates causing community- and hospital-acquired urinary tract infections. A total of 172 isolates of Enterobacteriaceae were collected in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, from patients who met criteria of community and hospital-acquired urinary tract infections. We used E-test ESBL strips to test for ESBL-phenotype and PCR and sequencing for detection of ESBL genes. Overall 23.8% (41/172) of all isolates were ESBL-producers. ESBL-producers were more frequently isolated from hospital-acquired infections (32%, 27/84 than from community-acquired infections (16%, 14/88, p Tanzania.

  5. Etiology and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of community-acquired ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Community-acquired urinary tract infections occur in individuals not admitted in hospital prior to development of the symptoms of the infection. It occurs mostly in women and caused by Escherichia coli. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of urinary tract infection among individuals residing within Jos ...

  6. Time to initial antibiotic administration, and short-term mortality among patients admitted with community-acquired severe infections with and without the presence of systemic inflammatory response syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Daniel Pilsgaard; Laursen, Christian B; Hallas, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    (SIRS) at arrival, and to ascertain whether the presence of SIRS might affect the timing of antibiotic administration. METHODS: In this retrospective follow-up study, we included all adult patients (≥15 years) presenting to a medical emergency department in the period between September 2010 and August...... 2011 with a first-time admission of community-acquired severe infection (infection with evidence of organ dysfunction), with and without SIRS at arrival. The presence of SIRS was defined as two or more of the criteria according to the American College of Chest Physicians/Society of Critical Care...... Medicine (ACCP/SCCM) definitions. Cases were identified by manual chart review using predefined criteria of infection. Data on vital signs, laboratory values and antibiotic treatment were obtained electronically. RESULTS: We included 1169 patients with infection and organ dysfunction, treated...

  7. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing of Eschericia coli strains from samples collected before and after pivmecillinam or placebo treatment of uncomplicated community-acquired urinary tract infection in women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejrnæs, K; Sandvang, D; Lundgren, Bettina

    2006-01-01

    ). The finding that the majority of UTIs at follow-up are caused by the primary infecting E. coli strain supports the theory of a vaginal and rectal reservoir but could also support the recent discovery that E. coli strains are able to persist in the bladder epithelium despite appropriate antibiotic treatment......The primary infecting Escherichia coli strains from 156 women with community-acquired uncomplicated urinary tract infection (UTI) randomized to pivmecillinam or placebo and the E. coli strains causing UTI at two follow-up visits were typed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE......). In the pivmecillinam treatment group PFGE showed that among patients having a negative urine culture at the first follow-up 77% (46/60) had a relapse with the primary infecting E. coli strain and 23% (14/60) had reinfection with a new E. coli strain at the second follow-up. Among patients having E. coli at the first...

  8. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing of Escherichia coli strains from samples collected before and after pivmecillinam or placebo treatment of uncomplicated community-acquired urinary tract infection in women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejrnaes, Karen; Sandvang, Dorthe; Lundgren, Bettina

    2006-01-01

    ). The finding that the majority of UTIs at follow-up are caused by the primary infecting E. coli strain supports the theory of a vaginal and rectal reservoir but could also support the recent discovery that E. coli strains are able to persist in the bladder epithelium despite appropriate antibiotic treatment......The primary infecting Escherichia coli strains from 156 women with community-acquired uncomplicated urinary tract infection (UTI) randomized to pivmecillinam or placebo and the E. coli strains causing UTI at two follow-up visits were typed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE......). In the pivmecillinam treatment group PFGE showed that among patients having a negative urine culture at the first follow-up 77% (46/60) had a relapse with the primary infecting E. coli strain and 23% (14/60) had reinfection with a new E. coli strain at the second follow-up. Among patients having E. coli at the first...

  9. Failure of levofloxacin treatment in community-acquired pneumococcal pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grossi Paolo

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus pneumoniae is the leading cause of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. High global incidence of macrolide and penicillin resistance has been reported, whereas fluoroquinolone resistance is uncommon. Current guidelines for suspected CAP in patients with co-morbidity factors and recent antibiotic therapy recommend initial empiric therapy using one fluoroquinolone or one macrolide associated to other drugs (amoxicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanate, broad-spectrum cephalosporins. Resistance to fluoroquinolones is determined by efflux mechanisms and/or mutations in the parC and parE genes coding for topoisomerase IV and/or gyrA and gyrB genes coding for DNA gyrase. No clinical cases due to fluoroquinolone-resistant S. pneumoniae strains have been yet reported from Italy. Case presentation A 72-year-old patient with long history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and multiple fluoroquinolone treatments for recurrent lower respiratory tract infections developed fever, increased sputum production, and dyspnea. He was treated with oral levofloxacin (500 mg bid. Three days later, because of acute respiratory insufficiency, the patient was hospitalized. Levofloxacin treatment was supplemented with piperacillin/tazobactam. Microbiological tests detected a S. pneumoniae strain intermediate to penicillin (MIC, 1 mg/L and resistant to macrolides (MIC >256 mg/L and fluoroquinolones (MIC >32 mg/L. Point mutations were detected in gyrA (Ser81-Phe, parE (Ile460-Val, and parC gene (Ser79-Phe; Lys137-Asn. Complete clinical response followed treatment with piperacillin/tazobactam. Conclusion This is the first Italian case of community-acquired pneumonia due to a fluoroquinolone-resistant S. pneumoniae isolate where treatment failure of levofloxacin was documented. Molecular analysis showed a group of mutations that have not yet been reported from Italy and has been detected only twice in Europe. Treatment with piperacillin

  10. Community-acquired bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costerus, Joost M; Brouwer, Matthijs C; Bijlsma, Merijn W; van de Beek, Diederik

    2017-02-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a medical emergency and is associated with a high disease burden. We reviewed recent progress in the management of patients with community-acquired bacterial meningitis. The worldwide burden of disease of bacterial meningitis remains high, despite the decreasing incidence following introduction of routine vaccination campaigns. Delay in diagnosis and treatment remain major concerns in the management of acute bacterial meningitis. European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases guidelines strive for a door-to-antibiotic-time less than 1 h. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has emerged as an important diagnostic tool to identify the causative organism. Point-of-care tests using fast multiplex PCR have been developed, but additional value has not been proven. Although anecdotal observations advocate pressure-based management, a randomized controlled trial will need to be performed first to determine efficacy and safety of such an aggressive treatment approach. Adjunctive dexamethasone remains the only adjunctive therapy with proven efficacy. The incidence of bacterial meningitis has been decreasing after the implementation of effective vaccines. Treatment should be administered as soon as possible and time to treatment should not exceed 1 h.

  11. Atypical pathogens causing community-acquired pneumonia in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubairi, Ali Bin Sarwar; Zafar, Afia; Salahuddin, Nawal; Haque, Ahmed Suleman; Waheed, Shahan; Khan, Javaid Ahmed

    2012-07-01

    To determine the frequency of community-acquired respiratory pathogens with special focus on atypical organisms in patients presenting to a tertiary care facility with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). The descriptive study on adult patients was conducted from February 2007 to March 2008 at the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi. It comprised 124 consenting patients of age 16 and above who presentd with a diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia. The diagnostic modalities used were based on significant changes in antibody titer or persisting high antibody titers in the case of Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chalmydia pneumoniae infections, or bacterial antigen in urine, in the case of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 infection. Pyogenic bacteria were identified on the results of respiratory secretions or blood cultures. Continuous data and categorical variables were worked out using SPSS version 15. Among the 124 patients enrolled, an etiologic agent was identified in 44 (35.4%) patients. The most common organism was Mycoplasma pneumoniae (n = 21, 17%), followed by Chlamydia pneumoniae (n = 15, 12%), Streptococcus pneumoniae (n = 9, 7%), Haemophilus influenzae (n = 2, 1.6%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 2, 1.6%) and Staphylococcus aureus (n = 1, 0.8%). Streptococcus pneumoniae was the most common organism isolated from blood cultures. No cases of Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 were identified. Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chalmydia pneumoniae are significant etiologic agents for community-acquired pneumonia occurring in Karachi. Local treatment guidelines for community-acquired pneumonia should include therapy directed specifically at these agents.

  12. A comparison of high-mobility group-box 1 protein, lipopolysaccharide-binding protein and procalcitonin in severe community-acquired infections and bacteraemia: a prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaïni, Shahin; Koldkjær, Ole; Møller, Holger J

    2007-01-01

    cell count and neutrophils) were measured with commercially available laboratory techniques. RESULTS: A total of 185 adult patients were included in the study; 154 patients fulfilled our definition of infection. Levels of HMGB1, LBP and PCT were higher in infected patients compared with a healthy...

  13. Antimicrobial susceptibility profile of community-acquired urinary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    M.S. Barry

    2017-04-28

    Apr 28, 2017 ... Antimicrobial susceptibility profile of community-acquired urinary tract infection in adults: A seven months prospective cross-sectional study in Dakar Town, Senegal. M.S. Barrya,d,∗. , B.A. Diallob, D. Kantéc, I.S. Diallod a Medical Affairs Department, Sanofi West Africa, Senegal b Department of Gynecology, ...

  14. Community-acquired Streptococcus viridans pneumonia in a healthy child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Fang-Yih; Wang, Chih-Chien; Chang, Yaw-Wen; Chen, Shyi-Jou

    2012-04-01

    Streptococcus viridans is usually considered to be nonpathogenic in healthy patients. Some strains become penicillin-resistant and cause life-threatening infections in immuno-compromised patients. We report an immunocompetent boy who had community-acquired S. viridans pneumonia that was resistant to penicillin. Clinicians should note local patterns of virulence and antibiotic resistance in S. viridans and adjust treatment strategies accordingly.

  15. Community-acquired Pneumonia in Hospitalized Urban Young ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As part of a comprehensive hospital-based study of acute lower respiratory infections (ALRI) in under-five urban Nigerian children, we sought to identify the possible clinical and investigative correlates of lobar versus bronchopneumonia, and the possible determinants of mortality in community-acquired pneumonia. Over a ...

  16. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing of Escherichia coli strains from samples collected before and after pivmecillinam or placebo treatment of uncomplicated community-acquired urinary tract infection in women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejrnaes, Karen; Sandvang, Dorthe; Lundgren, Bettina

    2006-01-01

    The primary infecting Escherichia coli strains from 156 women with community-acquired uncomplicated urinary tract infection (UTI) randomized to pivmecillinam or placebo and the E. coli strains causing UTI at two follow-up visits were typed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE......). In the pivmecillinam treatment group PFGE showed that among patients having a negative urine culture at the first follow-up 77% (46/60) had a relapse with the primary infecting E. coli strain and 23% (14/60) had reinfection with a new E. coli strain at the second follow-up. Among patients having E. coli at the first...... follow-up PFGE showed that 80% (32/40) had persistence with the primary infecting E. coli strain, 15% (6/40) had reinfection with a new E. coli strain, and 5% (2/40) had different E. coli strains at the two follow-up visits (one had reinfection followed by relapse, and the other had persistence followed...

  17. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing of Eschericia coli strains from samples collected before and after pivmecillinam or placebo treatment of uncomplicated community-acquired urinary tract infection in women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejrnæs, K; Sandvang, D; Lundgren, Bettina

    2006-01-01

    The primary infecting Escherichia coli strains from 156 women with community-acquired uncomplicated urinary tract infection (UTI) randomized to pivmecillinam or placebo and the E. coli strains causing UTI at two follow-up visits were typed using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE......). In the pivmecillinam treatment group PFGE showed that among patients having a negative urine culture at the first follow-up 77% (46/60) had a relapse with the primary infecting E. coli strain and 23% (14/60) had reinfection with a new E. coli strain at the second follow-up. Among patients having E. coli at the first...... follow-up PFGE showed that 80% (32/40) had persistence with the primary infecting E. coli strain, 15% (6/40) had reinfection with a new E. coli strain, and 5% (2/40) had different E. coli strains at the two follow-up visits (one had reinfection followed by relapse, and the other had persistence followed...

  18. Characterization of community acquired Staphylococcus aureus associated with skin and soft tissue infection in Beijing: high prevalence of PVL+ ST398.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunjiang Zhao

    Full Text Available Adult community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (CA-MSSA skin and soft tissue infection (SSTI in China is not well described. A prospective cohort of adults with SSTI was established between January 2009 and August 2010 at 4 hospitals in Beijing. Susceptibility testing and molecular typing, including multilocus sequence typing, spa, agr typing, and toxin detection were assessed for all S. aureus isolates. Overall, 501 SSTI patients were enrolled. Cutaneous abscess (40.7% was the most common infection, followed by impetigo (6.8% and cellulitis (4.8%. S. aureus accounted for 32.7% (164/501 of SSTIs. Five isolates (5/164, 3.0% were CA-MRSA. The most dominant ST in CA-MSSA was ST398 (17.6%. The prevalence of Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (pvl gene was 41.5% (66/159 in MSSA. Female, younger patients and infections requiring incision or drainage were more commonly associated with pvl-positive S. aureus (P<0.03; sec gene was more often identified in CC5 (P<0.03; seh gene was more prevalent in CC1 (P = 0.001. Importantly, ST59 isolates showed more resistance to erythromycin, clindamycin and tetracycline, and needed more surgical intervention. In conclusion, CA-MRSA infections were rare among adult SSTI patients in Beijing. Six major MSSA clones were identified and associated with unique antimicrobial susceptibility, toxin profiles, and agr types. A high prevalence of livestock ST398 clone (17.1% of all S. aureus infections was found with no apparent association to animal contact.

  19. Infecciones adquiridas en la comunidad por Staphylococcus aureus resistente a meticilina en un hospital de agudos Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections in a hospital for acute diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Palombarani

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus resistente a meticilina (SAMR es uno de los principales agentes asociados a infecciones intrahospitalarias; sin embargo, en los últimos años ha surgido como un patógeno emergente de la comunidad, causando infecciones graves, principalmente en jóvenes. Se describen 33 casos de infecciones por SAMR de origen comunitario, diagnosticadas entre mayo de 2005 y junio de 2006 en el HIGA "Eva Perón". Se estudiaron retrospectivamente los aislamientos; se confirmó la resistencia a meticilina mediante la detección del gen mecA, se investigó la presencia de genes que codifican dos factores de virulencia (leucocidina de Panton-Valentine -LPV- y g-hemolisina y el tipo de casete mec mediante PCR. Todos los pacientes se encontraban sanos previamente. Cuatro pacientes menores de 12 años presentaron bacteriemia, uno con neumonía grave y los 3 restantes con infección osteoarticular; todos los pacientes mayores de 12 años presentaron infecciones de piel y partes blandas sin compromiso sistémico. Se constató la presencia de casete mec tipo IV en todos los aislamientos; la resistencia a meticilina no se acompañó de resistencia a otros antimicrobianos; los aislamientos fueron portadores de genes que codifican para LPV y para g-hemolisina. Es importante considerar la presencia de estas cepas de origen comunitario a fin de elaborar estrategias para su correcto tratamiento.Methicillin- resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is one of the most prevalent pathogens associated with nosocomial infections. However, most recently, MRSA has arisen as an emerging community pathogen, causing serious infections, mainly among young patients. We herein describe 33 cases of infections caused by community-acquired MRSA (CMRSA, diagnosed between May 2005 and June 2006, at "Eva Perón" Hospital. The isolations were retrospectively studied. Methicillin resistance was confirmed by means of the detection of the mecA gene, and the genes for two virulence

  20. Community-acquired pneumonia among smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almirall, Jordi; Blanquer, José; Bello, Salvador

    2014-06-01

    Recent studies have left absolutely no doubt that tobacco increases susceptibility to bacterial lung infection, even in passive smokers. This relationship also shows a dose-response effect, since the risk reduces spectacularly 10 years after giving up smoking, returning to the level of non-smokers. Streptococcus pneumoniae is the causative microorganism responsible for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) most frequently associated with smoking, particularly in invasive pneumococcal disease and septic shock. It is not clear how it acts on the progress of pneumonia, but there is evidence to suggest that the prognosis for pneumococcal pneumonia is worse. In CAP caused by Legionella pneumophila, it has also been observed that smoking is the most important risk factor, with the risk rising 121% for each pack of cigarettes smoked a day. Tobacco use may also favor diseases that are also known risk factors for CAP, such as periodontal disease and upper respiratory viral infections. By way of prevention, while giving up smoking should always be proposed, the use of the pneumococcal vaccine is also recommended, regardless of the presence of other comorbidities. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. Community-acquired pneumonia; Ambulant erworbene Pneumonien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poetter-Lang, S.; Herold, C.J. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Allgemeines Krankenhaus, Wien (Austria)

    2017-01-15

    The diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is often not possible based only on the clinical symptoms and biochemical parameters. For every patient with the suspicion of CAP, a chest radiograph in two planes should be carried out. Additionally, a risk stratification for the decision between outpatient therapy or hospitalization is recommended. Based on the evaluation of the different radiological patterns as well as their extent and distribution, a rough allocation to so-called pathogen groups as well as a differentiation between viral and bacterial infections are possible; however, because different pathogens cause different patterns an accurate correlation is not feasible by relying purely on imaging. The radiological findings serve as proof or exclusion of pneumonia and can also be used to evaluate the extent of the disease (e.g. monolobular, multilobular, unilateral or bilateral). In cases of prolonged disease, suspicion of complications (e.g. pleural effusion or empyema, necrotizing pneumonia or abscess) or comorbid conditions (e.g. underlying pulmonary or mediastinal diseases) computed tomography is an important diagnostic tool in addition to chest radiography. Ultrasound is often used to diagnose pleural processes (e.g. parapneumonic effusion or pleural empyema). (orig.) [German] Anhand der klinischen Symptome und laborchemischen Befundkonstellation alleine ist es oft nicht moeglich, die Diagnose einer ambulant erworbenen Pneumonie (''community-acquired pneumonia'', CAP) zu stellen. Bei jedem Patienten mit Verdacht auf CAP sollte eine Roentgenthoraxaufnahme in 2 Ebenen angefertigt werden. Weiter muss eine Risikostratifizierung im Sinne der Entscheidung ambulante Therapie vs. Hospitalisierung erfolgen. Anhand der Analyse radiologischer Muster sowie deren Verteilung und Ausdehnung koennen eine grobe Zuordnung zu sogenannten Erregergruppen sowie eine Differenzierung zwischen viralen und bakteriellen Infektionen gelingen. Da

  2. Trend in Antibiotic Resistance of and Strains Isolated from Community Acquired Respiratory Tract Infections in Dakar, Senegal between 2005 and 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Guèye Ndiaye

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of antibiotic resistance among common respiratory pathogens is a major cause of concern worldwide. Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae are among the most common respiratory pathogens. In this study, representative samples obtained from 3 different medical centers in Dakar, Senegal were subjected to antibiotic susceptibility testing. The samples were collected from 2005 to 2008 and the data obtained was compared to establish resistance patterns between the two years (i.e. 2005–2006 to 2007–2008. S. pneumoniae exhibited a significant increase in the resistance to azithromycin and the intermediate susceptibility to penicillin G and cotrimoxazole. H. influenzae also exhibited a significant increase in resistance to azithromycin and intermediate susceptibility to chloramphenicol. None of H. influenzae samples were resistant to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, cephalosporin and fluroquinolones and most of the S. pneumoniae isolates demonstrated high susceptibility to the antibiotics tested. Results from this study will provide greater insights to antibiotic therapy during respiratory tract infections in Dakar, Senegal. This study also establishes the importance of continuous monitoring of antibiotic susceptibility patterns that are often region-specific.

  3. Trend in Antibiotic Resistance of Streptococcus Pneumoniae and Haemophilus Influenzae Strains Isolated from Community Acquired Respiratory Tract Infections in Dakar, Senegal Between 2005 and 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Guèye Ndiaye

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Development of antibiotic resistance among common respiratory pathogens is a major cause of concern worldwide. Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae are among the most common respiratory pathogens. In this study, representative samples obtained from 3 different medical centers in Dakar, Senegal were subjected to antibiotic susceptibility testing. The samples were collected from 2005 to 2008 and the data obtained was compared to establish resistance patterns between the two years (i.e. 2005–2006 to 2007–2008. S. pneumoniae exhibited a significant increase in the resistance to azithromycin and the intermediate susceptibility to penicillin G and cotrimoxazole. H. influenzae also exhibited a significant increase in resistance to azithromycin and intermediate susceptibility to chloramphenicol. None of H. influenzae samples were resistant to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, cephalosporin and fluroquinolones and most of the S. pneumoniae isolates demonstrated high susceptibility to the antibiotics tested. Results from this study will provide greater insights to antibiotic therapy during respiratory tract infections in Dakar, Senegal. This study also establishes the importance of continuous monitoring of antibiotic susceptibility patterns that are often region-specific.

  4. The prevalence of causative organisms of community-acquired urethritis in an age group at high risk for sexually transmitted infections in Korean Soldiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung Jin; Park, J K; Park, S C; Kim, Y G; Choi, H; Ko, J I; Kim, M K; Jeong, Y B; Shin, Y S

    2017-02-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the causative organisms in young male soldiers with clinical signs and symptoms after sexual contact that suggests a diagnosis of urethritis. Between June 2012 and January 2015, male patients with urethritis symptoms that had resulted from sexual contact within 3 months participated in this study. All patients were evaluated using urinalysis and were screened for Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG), Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), Ureaplasma urealyticum (UU), Mycoplasma genitalium (MG), Mycoplasma hominis (MH), herpes simplex virus (HSV) type II and Trichomonas vaginalis (TV) using multiplex PCR (mPCR) assay in order to detect sexually transmitted infections (STI) or pathogens. A total of 436 male patients aged 18-28 years were included in the study. The median age was 22.0 years. The prevalence of STI pathogens were as follows: NG in 19.0%, CT in 36.6%, UU in 24.0%, MG in 21.5%, MH in 6.1%, HSV type II in 1.6%, TV in 0.2% and indeterminate STI pathogens in 9.4%. Coinfection of NG with non-NG was detected in 5.7% of the participants, while the coinfection rates for STI pathogens were: with CT in 3.4%, with UU in 2.7%, with MG in 0.2% and with MH in 0.2%. CT was the most prevalent STI pathogen and coinfections of NG with non-NG appeared less frequently. The young male soldiers with urethritis should be administered suitable antibiotics for STI pathogens that were found by mPCR results, rather than an experimental combination of antibiotics for coinfections. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  5. Solithromycin for the treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viasus, Diego; Ramos, Oscar; Ramos, Leidy; Simonetti, Antonella F; Carratalà, Jordi

    2017-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia is a major public health problem worldwide. In recent years, there has been an increase in the frequency of resistance to the antimicrobials such as β-lactams or macrolides which have habitually been used against the causative pathogens. Solithromycin, a next-generation macrolide, is the first fluoroketolide with activity against most of the frequently isolated bacteria in community-acquired pneumonia, including typical and atypical bacteria as well as macrolide-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae. Areas covered: A detailed assessment of the literature relating to the antimicrobial activity, pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic properties, efficacy, tolerability and safety of solithromycin for the treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia Expert commentary: Recent randomized controlled phase II/III trials have demonstrated the equivalent efficacy of oral and intravenous solithromycin compared with fluoroquinolones in patients with lower mild-to-moderate respiratory infections, and have shown that systemic adverse events are comparable between solithromycin and alternative treatments. However, studies of larger populations which are able to identify infrequent adverse events are now needed to confirm these findings. On balance, current data supports solithromycin as a promising therapy for empirical treatment in adults with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia.

  6. Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannella, Hernán A; Luna, Carlos M

    2016-12-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) region. Poverty, socioeconomic factors, and malnutrition influence the incidence and outcome of CAP in LAC. In LAC, Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most frequent microorganism responsible for CAP, (incidence: 24-78%); the incidence of atypical microorganisms is similar to other regions of the world. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a growing problem in the LAC region, with the Caribbean being the second most affected area worldwide after Sub-Saharan Africa. Pneumococcal pneumonia remains the most common cause of CAP in HIV-infected patients, but Pneumocystis jirovecii and tuberculosis (TB) are also common in this population. The heterogeneity of the health care systems and social inequity between different countries in LAC, and even between different settings inside the same country, is a difficult issue. TB, including multidrug-resistant TB, is several times more common in South American and Central American countries compared with North America. Furthermore, hantaviruses circulating in the Americas (new world hantaviruses) generate a severe respiratory disease called hantavirus pulmonary syndrome, with an associated mortality as high as 50%. More than 30 hantaviruses have been reported in the Western Hemisphere, with more frequent cases registered in the southern cone (Argentina, Chile, Uruguay, Paraguay, Bolivia, and Brazil). Respiratory viruses (particularly influenza) remain an important cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly in the elderly. Low rates of vaccination (against influenza as well as pneumococcus) may heighten the risk of these infections in low- and middle-income countries. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  7. Population PK Modeling and Target Attainment Simulations to Support Dosing of Ceftaroline Fosamil in Pediatric Patients With Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections and Community-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccobene, Todd A; Khariton, Tatiana; Knebel, William; Das, Shampa; Li, James; Jandourek, Alena; Carrothers, Timothy J; Bradley, John S

    2017-03-01

    Ceftaroline, the active form of the prodrug ceftaroline fosamil, is approved for use in adults with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) or acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) in the United States and for similar indications in Europe. Pharmacokinetic (PK) data from 5 pediatric (birth to ceftaroline fosamil were combined with PK data from adults to update a population PK model for ceftaroline and ceftaroline fosamil. This model, based on a data set including 305 children, was used to conduct simulations to estimate ceftaroline exposures and percentage of time that free drug concentrations were above the minimum inhibitory concentration (%fT>MIC) for pediatric dose regimens. With dose regimens of 8 mg/kg every 8 hours (q8h) in children aged 2 months to 90% of children were predicted to achieve a target of 36% fT>MIC at an MIC of 2 mg/L, and >97% were predicted to achieve 44% fT>MIC at an MIC of 1 mg/L. Thus, high PK/pharmacodynamic target attainment would be maintained in children for targets associated with 1-log kill of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae. The predicted ceftaroline exposures for these dose regimens were similar to those in adults given 600 mg q12h ceftaroline fosamil. This work contributed to the approval of dose regimens for children aged 2 months to <18 years by the FDA and EMA, which are presented. © 2016, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  8. An unusual cause of community-acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaimie Mittal

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of fatal community-acquired pneumonia (CAP due to Acinetobacter baumannii, which is rarely reported in the northeastern United States. Previously reported cases originate from tropical and subtropical climates, and infection tends to have an aggressive course with a poor outcome. Appropriate antimicrobial therapy is crucial; however, the associated systemic inflammatory response may overwhelm host defenses, especially in patients with certain co-morbidities.

  9. Community-acquired pneumonia in older patients: does age influence systemic cytokine levels in community-acquired pneumonia?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, Emer

    2009-03-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a major cause of death in the elderly. The age-related increase in comorbid illnesses plays a part but the effect of aging on the immune response may be equally important. We aimed to evaluate patients with CAP for evidence of a muted response to infection in elderly patients admitted to hospital compared with a younger patient group.

  10. Computed tomography in children with community-acquired pneumonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andronikou, Savvas [Bristol Royal Hospital for Children and the University of Bristol, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Bristol (United Kingdom); University of Cape Town, Department of Radiology, Cape Town (South Africa); Goussard, Pierre [Tygerberg Hospital, Stellenbosch University, Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, Cape Town (South Africa); Sorantin, Erich [Medical University Graz, Department of Radiology, Graz (Austria)

    2017-10-15

    Diagnostic imaging plays a significant role in both the diagnosis and treatment of complications of pneumonia in children and chest radiography is the imaging modality of choice. Computed tomography (CT) on the other hand, is not currently a first-line imaging tool for children with suspected uncomplicated community-acquired pneumonia and is largely reserved for when complications of pneumonia are suspected or there is difficulty in differentiating pneumonia from other pathology. This review outlines the situations where CT needs to be considered in children with pneumonia, describes the imaging features of the parenchymal and pleural complications of pneumonia, discusses how CT may have a wider role in developing countries where human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and tuberculosis are prevalent, makes note of the role of CT scanning for identifying missed foreign body aspiration and, lastly, addresses radiation concerns. (orig.)

  11. Computed tomography in children with community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andronikou, Savvas; Goussard, Pierre; Sorantin, Erich

    2017-10-01

    Diagnostic imaging plays a significant role in both the diagnosis and treatment of complications of pneumonia in children and chest radiography is the imaging modality of choice. Computed tomography (CT) on the other hand, is not currently a first-line imaging tool for children with suspected uncomplicated community-acquired pneumonia and is largely reserved for when complications of pneumonia are suspected or there is difficulty in differentiating pneumonia from other pathology. This review outlines the situations where CT needs to be considered in children with pneumonia, describes the imaging features of the parenchymal and pleural complications of pneumonia, discusses how CT may have a wider role in developing countries where human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and tuberculosis are prevalent, makes note of the role of CT scanning for identifying missed foreign body aspiration and, lastly, addresses radiation concerns.

  12. Computed tomography in children with community-acquired pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andronikou, Savvas; Goussard, Pierre; Sorantin, Erich

    2017-01-01

    Diagnostic imaging plays a significant role in both the diagnosis and treatment of complications of pneumonia in children and chest radiography is the imaging modality of choice. Computed tomography (CT) on the other hand, is not currently a first-line imaging tool for children with suspected uncomplicated community-acquired pneumonia and is largely reserved for when complications of pneumonia are suspected or there is difficulty in differentiating pneumonia from other pathology. This review outlines the situations where CT needs to be considered in children with pneumonia, describes the imaging features of the parenchymal and pleural complications of pneumonia, discusses how CT may have a wider role in developing countries where human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and tuberculosis are prevalent, makes note of the role of CT scanning for identifying missed foreign body aspiration and, lastly, addresses radiation concerns. (orig.)

  13. Clinical Characteristics of Community-Acquired Viridans Streptococcal Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sun Ha; Choi, Keum-Ju; Lim, Jae-Kwang; Seo, Hyewon; Yoo, Seung-Soo; Lee, Jaehee; Lee, Shin-Yup; Kim, Chang-Ho; Park, Jae-Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background Viridans streptococci (VS) are a large group of streptococcal bacteria that are causative agents of community-acquired respiratory tract infection. However, data regarding their clinical characteristics are limited. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the clinical and radiologic features of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) with or without parapneumonic effusion caused by VS. Methods Of 455 consecutive CAP patients with or without parapneumonic effusion, VS were isolated from the blood or pleural fluid in 27 (VS group, 5.9%) patients. Streptococcus pneumoniae was identified as a single etiologic agent in 70 (control group) patients. We compared various clinical parameters between the VS group and the control group. Results In univariate analysis, the VS group was characterized by more frequent complicated parapneumonic effusion or empyema and bed-ridden status, lower incidences of productive cough, elevated procalcitonin (>0.5 ng/mL), lower age-adjusted Charlson comorbidity index score, and more frequent ground glass opacity (GGO) or consolidation on computed tomography (CT) scans. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that complicated parapneumonic effusion or empyema, productive cough, bed-ridden status, and GGO or consolidation on CT scans were independent predictors of community-acquired respiratory tract infection caused by VS. Conclusion CAP caused by VS commonly presents as complicated parapneumonic effusion or empyema. It is characterized by less frequent productive cough, more frequent bed-ridden status, and less common CT pulmonary parenchymal lesions. However, its treatment outcome and clinical course are similar to those of pneumococcal pneumonia. PMID:26175772

  14. Community-acquired pneumonia: 2012 history, mythology, and science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donowitz, Gerald R

    2013-01-01

    Pneumonia remains one of the major disease entities practicing physicians must manage. It is a leading cause of infection-related morbidity and mortality in all age groups, and a leading cause of death in those older than 65 years of age. Despite its frequency and importance, clinical questions have remained in the therapy of community-acquired pneumonia including when to start antibiotics, when to stop them, who to treat, and what agents to use. Answers to these questions have involved historical practice, mythology, and science-sometimes good science, and sometimes better science. How clinical decisions are made for patients with community-acquired pneumonia serves as an illustrative model for other problem areas of medicine and allows for insight as to how clinical decisions have been made and clinical practice established.

  15. Early diagnosis of dengue virus infection in clinically suspected cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afridi, N.K.; Ahmed, S.; Ali, N.; Khan, S.A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Comparison of real time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RTPCR) and immunoglobulin M (IgM) capture enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for diagnosis of dengue virus infection in first week of illness in clinically suspected patients of dengue fever. Study Design: Cross sectional study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of haematology, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP) Rawalpindi from Jan 2013 to Nov 2013. Material and Methods: A cross sectional study including 68 clinically suspected patients of dengue fever according to the World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. IgM capture ELISA and RT PCR for dengue virus ribonucleic acid (RNA) was performed on samples collected from patients having fever for 1 to 7 days. These were divided into two groups. Patients in group 1 presented with fever of 4 days or less, patients in group 2 had fever of 5 to 7 days duration. Results: In group 1, 72 percent of the patients were positive by RT PCR while 31 percent were positive by IgM capture ELISA. In group 2, 43 percent of the patients were positive by RT PCR while 97 percent were positive by ELISA. Conclusion: RT PCR can be used for early detection of dengue virus infection in the first few days of fever while IgM ELISA is diagnostic afterwards. (author)

  16. Some Characteristics of Patients with Community Acquired ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is a dearth of studies relating the information from the history of patients with community-acquired pneumonia to the mortality of the disease. The relationship between age, sex, occupation, marital status, smoking history, alcohol use, concomitant COPD / bronchial asthma, source of referral and the mortality of patients ...

  17. Immunomodulation in community-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remmelts, H.H.F.

    2013-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common disease with considerable morbidity and mortality, despite effective antibiotic treatment. In this thesis, we showed that the major causative microorganisms in CAP trigger distinct inflammatory response profiles in the host. While an inflammatory

  18. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic analysis to evaluate ceftaroline fosamil dosing regimens for the treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia and complicated skin and skin-structure infections in patients with normal and impaired renal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canut, A; Isla, A; Rodríguez-Gascón, A

    2015-04-01

    In this study, the probability of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic target attainment (PTA) of ceftaroline against clinical isolates causing community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) and complicated skin and skin-structure infection (cSSSI) in Europe was evaluated. Three dosing regimens were assessed: 600 mg every 12 h (q12 h) as a 1-h infusion (standard dose) or 600 mg every 8 h (q8 h) as a 2-h infusion in virtual patients with normal renal function; and 400 mg q12 h as a 1-h infusion in patients with moderate renal impairment. Pharmacokinetic and microbiological data were obtained from the literature. The PTA and the cumulative fraction of response (CFR) were calculated by Monte Carlo simulation. In patients with normal renal function, the ceftaroline standard dose (600 mg q12 h as a 1-h infusion) can be sufficient to treat CABP due to ceftazidime-susceptible (CAZ-S) Escherichia coli, CAZ-S Klebsiella pneumoniae, meticillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis (CFR>90%). However, against meticillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), the CFR was 72%. In cSSSI, the CFR was also ceftaroline 600 mg q8 h as a 2-h infusion or 400 mg q12 h as a 1-h infusion in patients with moderate renal insufficiency provided a high probability of treatment success (CFR ca. 100%) for most micro-organisms causing CABP and cSSSI, including MRSA and penicillin-non-susceptible S. pneumoniae. These results suggest that in patients with normal renal function, ceftaroline 600 mg q8 h as a 2-h infusion may be a better option than the standard dose, especially if the MRSA rate is high. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparative study of isolates from community-acquired and catheter-associated urinary tract infections with reference to biofilm-producing property, antibiotic sensitivity and multi-drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardoloi, Vishwajeet; Yogeesha Babu, K V

    2017-07-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) can be community-acquired (Com-UTI) or catheter-associated (CAUTI) and may be associated with biofilm-producing organisms. A comparative analysis of biofilm-producing property (BPP), antibiotic-sensitivity and multi-drug resistance (MDR) and their relation with the BPP of isolates from Com-UTI and CAUTI has not yet been performed and necessitated this study. (1) isolation of bacteria from CAUTI and Com-UTI and identification of their BPP, antibiotic-sensitivity and MDR status; (2) comparison of the isolates from CAUTI and Com-UTI as regards BPP, MDR status and their relation with BPP. isolates from 100 cases each of Com-UTI and CAUTI were subjected to Congo redagar (CRA) and Safranin tube tests. Antibiotic susceptibility was investigated using the disc diffusion method. Both groups were compared regarding BPP, drug sensitivity and MDR status. Statistical analyses were performed using χ2 and Fisher's exact tests. 76.19 % of isolates from Com-UTI and 60.72 % from CAUTI had BPP (P=0.0252; significant). The Safranin tube test detected more isolates with BPP than the CRA test. MDR is greater in CAUTI than Com-UTI (83.33 % versus 64.76 %; P=0.0039; significant). MDR is greater in isolates with BPP in both Com-UTI and CAUTI (76.47 and 62.35 %; non-significant). BPP was found in both Com-UTI and CAUTI. When used together, the Safranin tube test and the CRA test increased the sensitivity of detecting BPP. MDR was higher in CAUTI than Com-UTI. MDR and BPP are not interrelated or associated, especially in settings where it is not certain that isolates were obtained from a well-formed biofilm. However, this does not rule out a higher incidence or prevalence of MDR in isolates with BPP taken directly from the biofilms.

  20. Lung ultrasound for the diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Jacob A M; Andronikou, Savvas; Zar, Heather J

    2017-10-01

    Ultrasound (US) has been proposed as an alternative first-line imaging modality to diagnose community-acquired pneumonia in children. Lung US has the potential benefits over chest radiography of being radiation free, subject to fewer regulatory requirements, relatively lower cost and with immediate bedside availability of results. However, the uptake of lung US into clinical practice has been slow and it is not yet included in clinical guidelines for community-acquired pneumonia in children. The aim of this review is to give an overview of the equipment and techniques used to perform lung US in children with suspected pneumonia and the interpretation of relevant sonographic findings. We also summarise the current evidence of diagnostic accuracy and reliability of lung US compared to alternative imaging modalities in children and critically consider the strengths and limitations of lung US for use in children presenting with suspected community-acquired pneumonia.

  1. Health related quality of life in patients with community-acquired pneumococcal pneumonia in France

    OpenAIRE

    Andrade, Luiz Flavio; Saba, Grèce; Ricard, Jean-Damien; Messika, Jonathan; Gaillat, Jacques; Bonnin, Pierre; Chidiac, Christian; Illes, Hajnal-Gabriela; Laurichesse, Henri; Detournay, Bruno; Petitpretz, Patrick; de Pouvourville, Gérard

    2018-01-01

    Background Community Acquired Pneumococcal Pneumonia is a lung infection that causes serious health problems and can lead to complications and death. The aim of this study was to observe and analyze health related quality of life after a hospital episode for patients with community acquired pneumococcal pneumonia in France. Methods A total of 524 individuals were enrolled prospectively in the study and were followed for 12 months after hospital discharge. Presence of streptococcus pneumoniae ...

  2. Treatment of community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young R; Houngue, Coovi; Hall, Ronald G

    2015-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia is the sixth leading cause of death in the USA. Adherence to the 2007 Infectious Diseases Society of America/American Thoracic Society community-acquired pneumonia guidelines has been associated with improved clinical outcomes. However, choice between guideline-recommended treatments is at the discretion of the prescribing clinician. This review is intended to discuss the characteristics of these treatment options including dosing frequency, dose adjustment for renal/hepatic dysfunction, serious/common adverse events, drug interactions, lung penetration, pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic target and effect of obesity to help guide antimicrobial selection. An increasing portion of patients are receiving expanded empiric coverage for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus as recommended by the American Thoracic Society and Infectious Diseases Society of America for healthcare-associated pneumonia. However, this expanded coverage may not be achieving the desired improvements in clinical outcomes. We expect this increasingly diverse spectrum of patients with pneumonia to eventually result in the merger of these two guidelines to include all patients with pneumonia.

  3. [Ceftaroline fosamil in community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calbo, Esther; Zaragoza, Rafael

    2014-03-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common infection in developed countries and causes a large number of hospital admissions and deaths. In recent years, the incidence of this disease has increased, caused by progressive population aging. Following the introduction of the conjugate vaccine against Streptococcus pneumoniae, there have been significant epidemiological changes that require close monitoring because of the possible emergence of new patterns of resistance. This article aims to review the role of ceftaroline fosamil, a new parenteral cephalosporin with antibacterial activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive pathogens, in the treatment of pneumonia. Several in vitro and in vivo studies have shown the efficacy of ceftaroline fosamil against penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Additionally, ceftaroline has shown similar efficacy and safety to ceftriaxone in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia with severe prognosis (prognostic severity index III and IV) in two phase III clinical trials. Although a non-inferiority design was used for these clinical trials, some data suggest a superior efficacy of ceftaroline, with earlier clinical response and higher cure rate in infections caused by S. pneumoniae, making this drug particularly interesting for critically-ill patients admitted to the intensive care unit. Ceftaroline may also be considered for empirical and directed treatment of MRSA pneumonia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  4. Antimicrobial susceptibility in community-acquired bacterial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae, two bacterial pathogens commonly associated with communityacquired pneumonia. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Bacterial isolates were obtained from adults suspected to have ...

  5. Markers of infectious disease emergencies: Focus on patients with community-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jager, C.P.C.

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis we explore the potential of several biomarkers of infection in infectious disease emergencies in general with a specific focus on community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), risk factors in the development of CAP and markers of infection in CAP as well as in specific etiologic forms of CAP,

  6. Preliminary study of community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus infection in Manaus Hospital, Amazonia Region, Brazil Estudo preliminar das infeccões por Staphylococcus aureus na comunidade de um Hospital em Manaus, Região do Amazonas, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus M. Egido

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus is considered a public health problem with a strong potential for dissemination and high rates of morbidity and mortality. In this study we describe bacteriological and epidemiological characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus in Manaus (Amazon region. During the one-year study period (2000-2001, sixteen cases of acute pyogenic multiple abscess were evaluated. Community-acquired S. aureus was identified as causative agent in 10 (62.5% patients. The strains tested with antimicrobials by discs diffusion method, exhibited a high rate of sensitivity to cephalexin (100%, erythromycin (90%. Oxacillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus was 90%. No isolate was resistant to Vancomycin. To our knowledge, no series of community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus in Manaus hospital has been published. Our partial results showed a high rate of antimicrobial sensitivity among community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus in the hospital of Tropical Medicine Institute of Manaus, Amazon Region.O Staphylococcus aureus resistente a meticilina é considerado como um problema na saúde publica por seu grande potencial de disseminação e altas porcentagens de morbidade e mortalidade. No estudo descrevemos as características bacteriológicas e epidemiológicas do Staphylococcus aureus na cidade de Manaus. No período de um ano (2000-2001 avaliou-se dezesseis casos de abscessos piogênicos múltiplos. Em 10 (62,5% doentes o agente causal foi identificado como Staphylococcus aureus adquirido na comunidade O estudo das bacterias isoladas frente aos diferentes antimicrobianos, seguindo o método de difusão em disco, mostrou boa sensibilidade a cefalexina (100% e eritromicina (90%. Noventa porcento dos Staphylococcus aureus isolados foram sensíveis ao oxacilina. Nenhum dos isolados mostrou ser resistente a Vancomicina. Não temos informações sobre publicações dos Staphylococcus aureus adquiridos na comunidade em hospitais de Manaus

  7. Biomarkers in Community-Acquired Pneumonia Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voskresenska Natalja

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents information on pneumonia (P patients with features of oxidative stress (OS. Identifying features of OS in patients with P is of interest not only for diagnosis, but also for monitoring of treatment efficiency. We recruited 73 patients with community-acquired P (CAP, previously healthy adults, both males and females with mean age of 68.0 ± 15.2, hospitalised, and 61 healthy control patients matched for age. For quantitative evaluation of lipid peroxidation in CAP patients, the levels of aldehydic lipid peroxidation products like malondialdehyde (MDA and 4- hydroxynon-2-enal (HNE were quantified. Furthermore, concentrations of reduced glutathione (GSH and several antioxidant enzymes and selenium in plasma were determined. In CAP patients, decreased levels of GSH and plasma selenium were observed. Plasma levels of MDA, and HNE did significantly differ between patient and control groups. We also noted reduced activity of antioxidant enzymes, namely, glutation peroxidase and superoxide dismutase. Low antioxidant enzymes activity was associated with a more severe CAP pattern. Both GSH and antioxidant enzymes may serve as markers for inflammation-related OS in CAP patients, and measurement of these biomarkers may be a valid indentifier for its management.

  8. Towards Rational Use of Antibiotics for Suspected Secondary Infections in Buruli Ulcer Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barogui, Yves T.; Klis, Sandor; Bankole, Honore Sourou; Sopoh, Ghislain E.; Mamo, Solomon; Baba-Moussa, Lamine; Manson, Willem L.; Johnson, Roch Christian; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Stienstra, Ymkje

    2013-01-01

    Background: The emerging disease Buruli ulcer is treated with streptomycin and rifampicin and surgery if necessary. Frequently other antibiotics are used during treatment. Methods/Principal Findings: Information on prescribing behavior of antibiotics for suspected secondary infections and for

  9. Detection and serotyping of pneumococci in community acquired pneumonia patients without culture using blood and urine samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elberse, Karin; van Mens, Suzan; Cremers, Amelieke J; Meijvis, Sabine C A; Vlaminckx, Bart; de Jonge, Marien I; Meis, Jacques F; Blauwendraat, Cornelis; van de Pol, Ingrid; Schouls, Leo M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment of community acquired pneumonia (CAP) patients with antibiotics before laboratory-confirmed diagnosis leads to loss of knowledge on the causative bacterial pathogen. Therefore, an increasing number of pneumococcal infections is identified using non-culture based techniques.

  10. Respiratory viral infections in infants with clinically suspected pertussis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela E. Ferronato

    2013-11-01

    Conclusion: the results suggest that viral infection can be present in hospitalized infants with clinical suspicion of pertussis, and etiological tests may enable a reduction in the use of macrolides in some cases. However, the etiological diagnosis of respiratory virus infection, by itself, does not exclude the possibility of infection with BP.

  11. Severe community-acquired pneumonia : what's in a name?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterheert, JJ; Bonten, MJM; Hak, E; Schneider, MME; Hoepelman, AIM

    Purpose of review Formerly, patients with community-acquired pneumonia admitted to an intensive care unit were considered as having the severe form of the disease. Recently, guidelines have distinguished severe and non-severe community-acquired pneumonia based on clinical definitions. In this

  12. Community-acquired soft-tissue pyogenic abscesses in Mulago ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Clinical practice, for a long time, has dwelt on study and management of pyogenic abscesses without distinction between nosocomial and community-acquired types. This study aimed at identifying the bacteria isolated from community-acquired acute subcutaneous and soft tissue pyogenic abscesses.

  13. Atypical bacterial pathogens in community-acquired pneumonia in children: a hospital-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Jyotsna; Awasthi, Shally; Rajput, Anuradha; Tiwari, Manoj; Jain, Amita

    2009-04-01

    A total of 243 children aged one month to five years with World Health Organization defined severe community acquired pneumonia were studied for the presence of atypical bacterial pathogens: 24 were found positive for mycoplasma infection. There was no significant association with any of the clinical, laboratory and radiological variables in children with pneumonia by the atypical pathogen.

  14. Enterovirus D68-associated community-acquired pneumonia in children living in Milan, Italy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esposito, Susanna; Zampiero, Alberto; Ruggiero, Luca; Madini, Barbara; Niesters, Hubert; Principi, Nicola

    Background: An increasing number of children infected by enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) and affected by severe respiratory illness, muscle weakness and paralysis were described in the USA and Canada in 2014 Objectives: To investigate the potential involvement of EV-D68 in determining community-acquired

  15. Hospitalization costs for community-acquired pneumonia in Dutch elderly : an observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissink, Conrad E; Huijts, Susanne M; de Wit, G Ardine; Bonten, Marc J M; Mangen, Marie-Josée J

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is one of the most common infections, especially in the elderly (≥65 years). The aim of this study was to quantify hospitalization costs for CAP in different age groups and in patients with different CAP risk profiles. Secondary objectives were to

  16. Undiagnosed Diabetes Mellitus in Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Andreas Vestergaard; Faurholt-Jepsen, Daniel; Egelund, Gertrud Baunbæk

    2017-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus is an important risk factor for community-acquired pneumonia, whereas the prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes mellitus and prediabetes in patients with community-acquired pneumonia is largely unknown. We aimed to determine the prevalence of prediabetes, undiagnosed...... diabetes mellitus, and risk factors associated with undiagnosed diabetes mellitus in a large European community-acquired pneumonia cohort. Methods: This was a multicenter prospective cohort study of hospitals and private practices in Germany and Austria encompassing 1961 adults with community......-acquired pneumonia included in the German Community-Acquired Pneumonia Competence Network (CAPNETZ) study between 2007 and 2014. The prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes mellitus and prediabetes was estimated based on hemoglobin A1c measurements. Logistic regression was used to assess risk factors for undiagnosed...

  17. Factores contribuyentes al desarrollo de infecciones adquiridas en la comunidad en diabéticos tipo 2 admitidos en salas de medicina del Hospital Nacional Cayetano Heredia Factors contributing to the development of community-acquired infections in type-2 diabetics admitted to the Cayetano Heredia National Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gino Guillermo Tapia-Zegarra

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available El propósito del estudio es identificar factores contribuyentes al desarrollo de infecciones adquiridas en la comunidad en diabéticos tipo 2 hospitalizados. De tal forma, se siguió el diseño de un estudio de casos y controles no apareado. Consecuentemente, se eligieron en forma aleatoria 105 diabéticos con infección adquirida en la comunidad y 105 diabéticos con patología no infecciosa, obtenidos de los Servicios de Medicina de un hospital universitario, entre 1991 y 1998. Mediante el análisis bivariado y multivariado, se obtuvo la estimación ajustada del valor de odds ratio. Los resultados permitieron, según análisis estratificado por edad y sexo, obtener a neuropatía autonómica como factor contribuyente de infecciones urinarias (OR = 4,07. En el modelo multivariado se aisló a vasculopatía periférica (R²: 0,24 como contribuyente de infección de piel y partes blandas (OR = 6,79. Los intervalos de confianza fueron significativos y de 95% de confiabilidad. En conclusión, vasculopatía periférica y vejiga neurogénica contribuyen al desarrollo de infecciones adquiridas en la comunidad en diabéticos tipo 2 hospitalizados.This study aims to identify factors contributing to the development of community-acquired infections in hospitalized type-2 diabetics, using an unmatched case-control design. A total of 105 pairs of diabetic patients with community-acquired infections as compared to non-infectious diseases, respectively, were chosen randomly from the discharge registry of the clinical wards of a teaching hospital from 1991 to 1998. Bivariate and multivariate analysis was conducted with estimation of the adjusted odds ratio. According to stratified analysis controlling for age and sex, autonomic neuropathy proved to be a contributing factor to development of urinary tract infections (OR = 4.07. In the multivariate model, peripheral vasculopathy was isolated (R²: 0.24 as a contributing factor in the development of soft

  18. Laboratory confirmation of rubella infection in suspected measles cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Sunil R; Raut, Chandrashekhar G; Jadhav, Santoshkumar M

    2016-10-01

    As a part of measles outbreak based surveillance undertaken by the World Health Organization India, suspected measles cases were referred for the laboratory diagnosis at National Institute of Virology (NIV) Pune and NIV Unit Bengaluru. Altogether, 4,592 serum samples were referred during 2010-2015 from the States of Karnataka (n = 1,173), Kerala (n = 559), and Maharashtra (n = 2,860). Initially, serum samples were tested in measles IgM antibody EIA and samples with measles negative and equivocal results (n = 1,954) were subjected to rubella IgM antibody detection. Overall, 62.9% (2,889/4,592) samples were laboratory confirmed measles, 27.7% (542/1,954) were laboratory confirmed rubella and remaining 25.2% (1,161/4,592) were negative for measles and rubella. The measles vaccination status was available for 1,206 cases. Among the vaccinated individuals, 50.7% (612/1,206) were laboratory confirmed measles. The contribution of laboratory confirmed measles was 493 (40.8%) from Maharashtra, 90 (7.5%) from Karnataka, and 29 (2.4%) from Kerala. Since, 1/3rd of suspected measles cases were laboratory confirmed rubella, an urgent attention needed to build rubella surveillance in India. Additional efforts are required to rule out other exanthematous disease including Dengue and Chikungunya in measles and rubella negatives. J. Med. Virol. 88:1685-1689, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Severe Community-acquired Pneumonia Due to Legionella pneumophila Serogroup 6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Yu Chen

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is a common cause of sporadic community-acquired pneumonia, but culture-proven legionellosis is rarely diagnosed. There is no laboratory test for Legionnaires' disease that can detect all patients with the disease. Culture is the standard diagnostic method and should be initiated as soon as possible in suspected cases. We describe a rare case of community-acquired pneumonia caused by L. pneumophila serogroup 6. A 77-year-old man was admitted to a tertiary care hospital because of high fever, productive cough, and progressive dyspnea. Chest radiography showed bilateral pneumonia, which led to respiratory failure necessitating mechanical ventilatory support. Despite antibiotic therapy, his condition continued to deteriorate and acute renal failure also developed. Urine was negative for L. pneumophila. Culture of the sputum yielded L. pneumophila serogroup 6, although there was no elevation of the serum antibody titer. Pneumonia resolved gradually and he was extubated after treatment with levofloxacin followed by erythromycin. L. pneumophila other than serogroup 1 should be included in the differential diagnosis of patients with suspected atypical community-acquired pneumonia.

  20. Suspect Odontogenic Infection Etiology for Canine Lymphoplasmacytic Rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepaniuk, Kevin S; Gingerich, Wade

    2015-01-01

    The role of odontogenic infection as an etiology for lymphoplasmacytic rhinitis in dogs was evaluated. An association between odontogenic infection and inflammatory rhinitis was identified in 55% of cases evaluated. Odontogenic infection was unlikely or undetermined in 10% and 35% of the cases, respectively. Cases of lymphoplasmacytic rhinitis had roentgen signs associated with endodontic disease, periodontal disease, or retained tooth roots in 60%, 45%, and 25% of the cases, respectively. A collaborative team based approach assessing inflammatory nasal disease is recommended. Based on the history and signalment of the individual patient, diagnostic modalities should be chosen wisely. In some cases, oral examination and intraoral radiographs may be a more direct and cost effective approach for diagnosis and treatment of inflammatory rhinitis.

  1. Rhinovirus Viremia in Patients Hospitalized With Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaoyan; Schneider, Eileen; Jain, Seema; Bramley, Anna M; Hymas, Weston; Stockmann, Chris; Ampofo, Krow; Arnold, Sandra R; Williams, Derek J; Self, Wesley H; Patel, Anami; Chappell, James D; Grijalva, Carlos G; Anderson, Evan J; Wunderink, Richard G; McCullers, Jonathan A; Edwards, Kathryn M; Pavia, Andrew T; Erdman, Dean D

    2017-11-27

    Rhinoviruses (RVs) are ubiquitous respiratory pathogens that often cause mild or subclinical infections. Molecular detection of RVs from the upper respiratory tract can be prolonged, complicating etiologic association in persons with severe lower respiratory tract infections. Little is known about RV viremia and its value as a diagnostic indicator in persons hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Sera from RV-positive children and adults hospitalized with CAP were tested for RV by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Rhinovirus species and type were determined by partial genome sequencing. Overall, 57 of 570 (10%) RV-positive patients were viremic, and all were children aged <10 years (n = 57/375; 15.2%). Although RV-A was the most common RV species detected from respiratory specimens (48.8%), almost all viremias were RV-C (98.2%). Viremic patients had fewer codetected pathogens and were more likely to have chest retractions, wheezing, and a history of underlying asthma/reactive airway disease than patients without viremia. More than 1 out of 7 RV-infected children aged <10 years hospitalized with CAP were viremic. In contrast with other RV species, RV-C infections were highly associated with viremia and were usually the only respiratory pathogen identified, suggesting that RV-C viremia may be an important diagnostic indicator in pediatric pneumonia. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  2. Co-morbidities in children hospitalized for community acquired ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    -morbidities in children admitted for community acquired pneumonia (CAP) in ... It is recommended that the presence of comorbidity be actively looked for in children hospitalized for pneumonia, so as to effect holistic treatment, and improve the ...

  3. Mortality predictors in community-acquired pneumonia | Tanimowo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acquired pneumonia to themedicalwards of Ladoke Akintola University ofTeaching Hospital between Jan. 2003 andDec. 2005. The case notes of 65 patients admitted for community-acquired pneumoniawere studiedwith respect to their admission ...

  4. Prognostic value of lactate clearance in severe community acquired pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed, Kamel Abd Elaziz; Ahmed, Dief Abd Elgalil

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Severe community acquired pneumonia (SCAP) occurs in approximately 18–36% of all CAP and the mortality rate could be as high as 67% in patients with SCAP. Several studies have described a correlation between baseline lactate concentration and mortality of ICU patients. Aim of the work: To follow lactate clearance after admission for 24 h which could be an indicator of outcome in severe community acquired pneumonia. Patients and methods: Forty-six consecutively admitted adu...

  5. Pulmonary infiltrates during community acquired Gram-negative bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjeldsøe-Nielsen, Hans; Gjeraa, Kirsten; Berthelsen, Birgitte G

    2013-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to describe the frequency of pulmonary infiltrates on chest X-ray (CXR) during community acquired Gram-negative bacteremia at a single centre in Denmark.......The primary aim of this study was to describe the frequency of pulmonary infiltrates on chest X-ray (CXR) during community acquired Gram-negative bacteremia at a single centre in Denmark....

  6. Community-acquired acute kidney injury in adults in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adu, Dwomoa; Okyere, Perditer; Boima, Vincent; Matekole, Michael; Osafo, Charlotte

    We review recent published data on demographics, causes, diagnoses, treatment, and outcome of acute kidney injury (AKI) in Africa. A review of the incidence, etiology, diagnoses, and treatment of AKI in adults in Africa from studies published between the years 2000 and 2015. The incidence of AKI in hospitalized patients in Africa ranges from 0.3 to 1.9% in adults. Between 70 and 90% of cases of AKI are community acquired. Most patients with AKI are young with a weighted mean age of 41.3 standard deviation (SD) 9.3 years, and a male to female ratio of 1.2 : 1.0. Medical causes account for between 65 and 80% of causes of AKI. This is followed by obstetric causes in 5 - 27% of cases and surgical causes in 2 - 24% of cases. In the reported studies, between 17 and 94% of patients who needed dialysis received this. The mortality of AKI in adults in Africa ranged from 11.5 to 43.5%. Most reported cases of AKI in Africa originate in the community. The low incidence of hospital-acquired AKI is likely to be due to under ascertainment. Most patients with AKI in Africa are young and have a single precipitating cause. Prominent among these are infection, pregnancy complications and nephrotoxins. Early treatment can improve clinical outcomes.

  7. Suspected Pulmonary Infection with Trichoderma longibrachiatum after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Akagi, Tomoaki; Kawamura, Chizuko; Terasawa, Norio; Yamaguchi, Kohei; Kubo, Kohmei

    2017-01-01

    Aspergillus and Candida species are the main causative agents of invasive fungal infections in immunocompromised human hosts. However, saprophytic fungi are now increasingly being recognized as serious pathogens. Trichoderma longibrachiatum has recently been described as an emerging pathogen in immunocompromised patients. We herein report a case of isolated suspected invasive pulmonary infection with T. longibrachiatum in a 29-year-old man with severe aplastic anemia who underwent allogeneic ...

  8. Prospective open randomized study comparing efficacies and safeties of a 3-day course of azithromycin and a 10-day course of erythromycin in children with community-acquired acute lower respiratory tract infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roord, JJ; Goossens, MMHT; Kimpen, JLL; Wolf, B.H.

    1996-01-01

    The efficacies and safeties of a 3-day, 3-dose course of azithromycin (10 mg/kg of body weight per day) and a 10-day, 30-dose course of erythromycin (40 mg/kg/day) for the treatment of acute lower respiratory tract infections in children were compared in an open randomized multicenter study.

  9. Community acquired Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia in a young athlete man: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahdar, Hossein Ali; Kazemian, Hossein; Bimanand, Lida; Zahedani, Shahram Shahraki; Feyisa, Seifu Gizaw; Taki, Elahe; Havaei, Seyed Asghar; Karami-Zarandi, Morteza

    2018-04-10

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is commonly known as nosocomial infection agent but rarely previously healthy peoples infected by P. aeruginosa. Here we report community acquired pneumonia in a 27 years old athleteman. 15 published P. aeruginosa CAP case reports are reviewed.1 53.3% of patients was female and 46.67% was male. The mean age was 44 years old (SD: ±13.54). In 8 report it is mentioned that the patient was smoker. Fatality rate was 46.6% and death rate was not significantly different between selected antibiotic regimen, sex and smoking in patient's outcome. Chest strike can be a risk factor for P. aeruginosa CAP in athlete people. Our reported patient treated by ciprofloxacin 400 mg per day and healed without any Secondary complication. Fast and timelymanner diagnosis and treatment is critical in Community acquired P. aeruginosapneumonia outcome. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  10. A case of an immunocompetent young man obtaining community-acquired disseminated Nocardia brasiliensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinna; Cao, Jie; Wu, Yueqing; Wan, Nansheng; Pan, Li; Chen, Yuanbao

    2014-01-01

    Nocardiosis is a rare but severe pyogenic or granulomatous disease and caused by Nocardia that mainly infects immunocompromised patients. We report here a case of an immunocompetent 24-year-old male student with community-acquired pneumonia with asymptomatic disseminated cerebral abscess by Brasiliensis nocardiosis. The patient was fully recovered after receiving optimized antimicrobial therapy without relapse. This case suggests the health professionals such as the physicians of pulmonary, infection, neurology department and et al should always think about unusual cause of community acquired pneumonia, even in immunocompetent patients and when having pulmonary nocardiosis we should do a radiological neurological work up, even with the absence of neurological finding or symptom. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Penicillin treatment for patients with Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egelund, Gertrud Baunbæk; Jensen, Andreas Vestergaard; Andersen, Stine Bang

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a severe infection, with high mortality. Antibiotic strategies for CAP differ across Europe. The objective of the study was to describe the epidemiology of CAP in Denmark and evaluate the prognosis of patients empirically treated with penicillin......-G/V was commonly used and not associated with increased mortality in patients with mild to moderate pneumonia. Our results are in agreement with current conservative antibiotic strategy as outlined in the Danish guidelines....

  12. Severe community-acquired pneumonia caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae in young female patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milačić Nena

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma pneumonia is common agent causing community acquired pneumonia in younger population. However, the course of illness is usually benign and is rarely associated with pulmonary complications. We report a 27 years old female patient with unilateral pneumonia followed by pleural effusion and adhesions on the same side. This potential source of infection should be considered in young patients where resolution of symptoms from pneumonia is delayed.

  13. Suspected Pulmonary Infection with Trichoderma longibrachiatum after Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akagi, Tomoaki; Kawamura, Chizuko; Terasawa, Norio; Yamaguchi, Kohei; Kubo, Kohmei

    2017-01-01

    Aspergillus and Candida species are the main causative agents of invasive fungal infections in immunocompromised human hosts. However, saprophytic fungi are now increasingly being recognized as serious pathogens. Trichoderma longibrachiatum has recently been described as an emerging pathogen in immunocompromised patients. We herein report a case of isolated suspected invasive pulmonary infection with T. longibrachiatum in a 29-year-old man with severe aplastic anemia who underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation. A direct microscopic examination of sputum, bronchoaspiration, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid samples revealed the presence of fungal septate hyphae. The infection was successfully treated with 1 mg/kg/day liposomal amphotericin B.

  14. Diagnosis and Treatment of Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Karymdzhanov

    2016-02-01

    The initial antibiotic therapy of community-acquired pneumonia is carried out empirically. In the treatment of severe community-acquired pneumonia in children from 2 months to 5 years, the drug of choice is amoxicillin orally. Macrolides are the drugs of choice for children aged 5 to 16 years. In severe pneumonia, drugs of choice are amoxicillin clavulanate, 2nd–4th generation cephalosporins. In general, the duration of antibiotic therapy in the community-acquired pneumonia caused by typical bacteria is 7–10 days, by atypical bacteria — 10–14 days. In the real clinical practice, the errors associated with the choice of drug, route of administration, dosage, regimen of application, length of treatment are frequent during antibacterial therapy.

  15. The impact of community-acquired pneumonia on the health-related quality-of-life in elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangen, Marie-Josée J; Huijts, Susanne M; Bonten, Marc J M; de Wit, G Ardine

    2017-03-14

    The sustained health-related quality-of-life of patients surviving community-acquired pneumonia has not been accurately quantified. The aim of the current study was to quantify differences in health-related quality-of-life of community-dwelling elderly with and without community-acquired pneumonia during a 12-month follow-up period. In a matched cohort study design, nested in a prospective randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial on the efficacy of the 13-valent pneumococcal vaccine in community-dwelling persons of ≥65 years, health-related quality-of-life was assessed in 562 subjects hospitalized with suspected community-acquired pneumonia (i.e. diseased cohort) and 1145 unaffected persons (i.e. non-diseased cohort) matched to pneumonia cases on age, sex, and health status (EQ-5D-3L-index). Health-related quality-of-life was determined 1-2 weeks after hospital discharge/inclusion and 1, 6 and 12 months thereafter, using Euroqol EQ-5D-3L and Short Form-36 Health survey questionnaires. One-year quality-adjusted life years (QALY) were estimated for both diseased and non-diseased cohorts. Separate analyses were performed for pneumonia cases with and without radiologically confirmed community-acquired pneumonia. The one-year excess QALY loss attributed to community-acquired pneumonia was 0.13. Mortality in the post-discharge follow-up year was 8.4% in community-acquired pneumonia patients and 1.2% in non-diseased persons (p pneumonia patients, compared to non-diseased persons, but differences in health-related quality-of-life between radiologically confirmed and non-confirmed community-acquired pneumonia cases were not statistically significant. Community-acquired pneumonia was associated with a six-fold increased mortality and 16% lower quality-of-life in the post-discharge year among patients surviving hospitalization for community-acquired pneumonia, compared to non-diseased persons. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00812084 .

  16. Infección por Staphyloccus aureus resistente a la meticillina adquirido en la comunidad (SAMR-AC Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection (CA-MRSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Alberto Solar Salaverri

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta un paciente de 1 año de edad con antecedentes de salud, que desarrolló infección estafilocócica de piel y partes blandas, que lo llevó al desarrollo de shock tóxico, disfunción múltiple de órganos y muerte. Se aisló en cultivo de tejido pulmonar posmorten cepa de Staphylococcus aureus resistente a la meticillina, productor de la toxina Panton-Valantine leucocidina demostrado por caracterización molecular. Se estableció el diagnóstico anatomopatológico de sepsis generaliza y bronconeumonía necrosante bilateral.A one-year old patient with history of health problems, who developed Staphylococcus aureus-caused infection in the skin and soft tissues that led him to toxic shock, multiple organ failure and death. Methilline-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain was isolated in pulmonary tissue culture after death. This strain produced Panton-Valantine toxin called leukocidin as proved in molecular characterization. There was established the anatomic-pathological diagnosis of generalized sepsis and bilateral necrosing bronchopneumonia.

  17. [Antibiotic susceptibility of community-acquired strains ofstaphylococcus aureus in Nouakchott Region (Mauritania)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Mohamed Lemine Ould; Ghaber, Sidi Mohamed; Baba, Sidi El Wafi Ould; Maouloud, Mohamed Mahmoud Ould

    2016-01-01

    Staphilococcus aureus is a leading pathogen for humans causing a variety of infections such as skin, urinary tract and lung infections as well as sepsis. This study aims to evaluate the susceptibility of community-acquired strains of Staphylococcus aureus, isolated from various pathological products, compared with major antibiotics used in Nouakchott Region (Mauritania). We conducted a retrospective study of 281 strains of Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from various pathological products from non-hospitalized patients in the National referral hospital laboratory and in two private laboratories in the city of Nouakchott between January 2014 and August 2015. Antibiotic sensitivity was determined by disk diffusion method using agar containing Mueller-Hinton medium according to CA-SFM's recommendations. The resistance rate to penicillin G was high (96-100%). Community-acquired MRSA rate was between 25 and 26% in suppurations, 34.3% in urine cultures and 28% in sperm cultures. Macrolide -Lincosamyne-streptogramins (MLS) resistance, giving rise to the phenotype MLSb inducible, was found in 6% of urinary strains and 27% of strains isolated from suppurations. The activity of aminoglycosides was variable, amikacin was active against all strains. Cotrimoxazole activity was low (77% had resistance) and no vancomycin resistance was reported. The activity of penicillin G against Staphylococcus aureusstrains isolated in Nouakchott region is almost zero and community-acquired MRSA rate is high, accounting for 34%. This could be explained by uncontrolled use of these molecules in our country.

  18. Guiding therapy and adjunctive treatment in community-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoorenberg, S.M.C.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Despite the availability of effective antibiotics and vaccines, community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) remains the cause of significant morbidity and mortality worldwide.A major problem is that in absence of full spectrum rapid microbiology diagnostics, the antibiotic treatment at start is

  19. community acquired pneumonia or βhcg - Producing lung tumor

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    She developed signs suggestive of βhCG-producing lung tumor with metastasis to the brain and succumbed to the illness before she could be referred for further evaluations and management. Key Words: Community acquired pneumonia, βhCG-producing lung tumor, Paraneoplastic Syndrome, Oculomotor Nerve Palsy.

  20. Hydrocephalus in adults with community-acquired bacterial meningitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soemirien Kasanmoentalib, E.; Brouwer, Matthijs C.; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the occurrence, treatment, and outcome of hydrocephalus complicating community-acquired bacterial meningitis in adults. Methods: Case series from a prospective nationwide cohort study from Dutch hospitals from 2006 to 2009. Results: Hydrocephalus was diagnosed in 26 of 577

  1. Aetiology and outcome of severe community-acquired pneumonia in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To determine the aetiological agents and outcome of severe community-acquired pneumonia (SCAP) in children admitted to the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) at Kalafong Hospital, Pretoria. Patients and methods. An audit was done after a protocol was implemented to identify the aetiological agents in ...

  2. Pattern of Community Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia in Kano, North ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of the study was to determine the clinical pattern of bacterial community acquired pneumonia amongst patients admitted into medical wards in Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano. The study was a descriptive prospective study incorporating consecutive adult patients aged fifteen years and above admitted ...

  3. Community-acquired pneumonia - a clinical approach to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality. The implementation of CAP guidelines can decrease patient mortality and limit antibiotic resistance. The South African Thoracic Society (SATS) has revised its guidelines for the management of CAP in adults. This article ...

  4. Bacterial Isolates andAntibiotic Sensitivity in Community Acquired ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The objective of the studywas to determine bacterial causes of community acquired pneumonia and their antibiotic sensitivity pattern amongst patients admitted intomedicalwards inAminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano, Nigeria Methods: The study incorporated patients aged fifteen years and above admitted into ...

  5. The impact of blood glucose on community-acquired pneumonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Andreas Vestergaard; Egelund, Gertrud Baunbæk; Andersen, Stine Bang

    2017-01-01

    Hyperglycaemia is common in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and is a predictor of severe outcomes. Data are scarce regarding whether this association is affected by diabetes mellitus (DM) and also regarding its importance for severe outcomes in hospital. We determined the impact...

  6. The sensitivity status of community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Community acquired Staphylococcus aureus was isolated from various infectious sites in two private laboratories in Kano-city, Nigeria. A total of 247 (11%) Staphylococcu aureus isolates were recovered from all infectious sites except cerebro-spinal fluid. The least Staphylococcus aureus isolates were found in urine ...

  7. Risk score to stratify children with suspected serious bacterial infection: observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brent, Andrew J; Lakhanpaul, Monica; Thompson, Matthew; Collier, Jacqueline; Ray, Samiran; Ninis, Nelly; Levin, Michael; MacFaul, Roddy

    2011-04-01

    To derive and validate a clinical score to risk stratify children presenting with acute infection. Observational cohort study of children presenting with suspected infection to an emergency department in England. Detailed data were collected prospectively on presenting clinical features, laboratory investigations and outcome. Clinical predictors of serious bacterial infection (SBI) were explored in multivariate logistic regression models using part of the dataset, each model was then validated in an independent part of the dataset, and the best model was chosen for derivation of a clinical risk score for SBI. The ability of this score to risk stratify children with SBI was then assessed in the entire dataset. Final diagnosis of SBI according to criteria defined by the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health working group on Recognising Acute Illness in Children. Data from 1951 children were analysed. 74 (3.8%) had SBI. The sensitivity of individual clinical signs was poor, although some were highly specific for SBI. A score was derived with reasonable ability to discriminate SBI (area under the receiver operator characteristics curve 0.77, 95% CI 0.71 to 0.83) and risk stratify children with suspected SBI. This study demonstrates the potential utility of a clinical score in risk stratifying children with suspected SBI. Further work should aim to validate the score and its impact on clinical decision making in different settings, and ideally incorporate it into a broader management algorithm including additional investigations to further stratify a child's risk.

  8. Sensitivity, Specificity, and Positivity Predictors of the Pneumococcal Urinary Antigen Test in Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinos, Luis; Zalacain, Rafael; Menéndez, Rosario; Reyes, Soledad; Capelastegui, Alberto; Cillóniz, Catia; Rajas, Olga; Borderías, Luis; Martín-Villasclaras, Juan J; Bello, Salvador; Alfageme, Inmaculada; Rodríguez de Castro, Felipe; Rello, Jordi; Ruiz-Manzano, Juan; Gabarrús, Albert; Musher, Daniel M; Torres, Antoni

    2015-10-01

    Detection of the C-polysaccharide of Streptococcus pneumoniae in urine by an immune-chromatographic test is increasingly used to evaluate patients with community-acquired pneumonia. We assessed the sensitivity and specificity of this test in the largest series of cases to date and used logistic regression models to determine predictors of positivity in patients hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia. We performed a multicenter, prospective, observational study of 4,374 patients hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia. The urinary antigen test was done in 3,874 cases. Pneumococcal infection was diagnosed in 916 cases (21%); 653 (71%) of these cases were diagnosed exclusively by the urinary antigen test. Sensitivity and specificity were 60 and 99.7%, respectively. Predictors of urinary antigen positivity were female sex; heart rate≥125 bpm, systolic blood pressureantibiotic treatment; pleuritic chest pain; chills; pleural effusion; and blood urea nitrogen≥30 mg/dl. With at least six of all these predictors present, the probability of positivity was 52%. With only one factor present, the probability was only 12%. The urinary antigen test is a method with good sensitivity and excellent specificity in diagnosing pneumococcal pneumonia, and its use greatly increased the recognition of community-acquired pneumonia due to S. pneumoniae. With a specificity of 99.7%, this test could be used to direct simplified antibiotic therapy, thereby avoiding excess costs and risk for bacterial resistance that result from broad-spectrum antibiotics. We also identified predictors of positivity that could increase suspicion for pneumococcal infection or avoid the unnecessary use of this test.

  9. Antibiotic resistance in community-acquired urinary tract infections

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dose or short-course (3 days) antibiotic therapy.7 Single- dose therapy, although marginally less effective than conventional therapy, is cost-effective and well tolerated.' The new fluoroquinolone antibiotics (ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin and ofloxacin) are effective agents for single- dose therapy.,a Beta-Iactam antibiotics in ...

  10. Community-acquired bacterial meningitis in adults with cancer or a history of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costerus, Joost M; Brouwer, Matthijs C; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2016-03-01

    To study the incidence, clinical presentation, causative bacteria, and outcome of community-acquired bacterial meningitis in adults with cancer. We evaluated incidence and characteristics of patients with cancer included in a nationwide prospective cohort study of adults with community-acquired meningitis performed in the Netherlands from March 1, 2006, to September 31, 2014. All patients underwent a neurologic examination at hospital discharge, and outcome was graded using the Glasgow Outcome Scale. Active cancer was identified in 68 of 1,351 episodes (5%) and a history of cancer in 87 (6%). The annual incidence of community-acquired bacterial meningitis was 2.71-fold (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.68-4.36, p bacterial meningitis in patients with cancer compared to patients without cancer was similar. Patients with active cancer presented with lower leukocyte count in blood (12.1 × 10(9) cells/L vs 17.3 × 10(9) cells/L, p bacterial meningitis (odds ratio 1.85, 95% CI 1.09-3.13). One of 8 patients with community-bacterial meningitis was identified to have a history of cancer and cancer was considered active in half of these patients. Patients with active cancer present with lower CSF leukocyte counts, are more likely to be infected with L monocytogenes, and are at high risk of unfavorable outcome. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  11. Community-acquired Clostridium difficile: Epidemiology, Ribotype, Risk Factors, Hospital and Intensive Care Unit Outcomes, and Current and Emerging Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofori, Emmanuel; Ramai, Daryl; Dhawan, Monica; Mustafa, Fareeza; Gasperino, James; Reddy, Madhavi

    2018-01-30

    The epidemiological landscape of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has changed over the past 30 years. To review studies of CDI in the community setting. Electronic databases including PubMed, MEDLINE, Embase, Google Scholar, Scopus, ClinicalTrials.gov, and Cochrane Databases were searched for human studies performed between 2000 and 2017 that assessed the epidemiology, risk factors, ribotypes, hospital and intensive care unit outcomes, and management of community-acquired CDI. We also manually searched references to identify additional relevant studies. In total, 39 articles met our inclusion criteria. The incidence of community acquired CDI has almost doubled in the past decade. Approximately half of all cases of CDI are attributed to community origin. Individuals who are younger, female, in the presence of infants, frequently use proton pump inhibitors or specific classes of antibiotics, or live near farms and livestock are at higher risk for community-acquired CDI. Additionally, about 40% of all community-acquired cases require hospitalization, where severity has been linked to hypervirulent ribotypes 027 and 078 with poor outcomes. Emerging data on treatment paradigms have led to the revision of clinical guidelines and two potential vaccines in phase three clinical trials. However, ribotype specific response to current treatment strategies is lacking. Community-acquired CDI represents a growing public health threat and burden on healthcare systems. A multidisciplinary approach will be required to stem the tides. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Pharmacokinetics and Dosing of Ceftobiprole Medocaril for the Treatment of Hospital- and Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Different Patient Populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Torres; J.W. Mouton (Johan); Pea, F. (Federico)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractHospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) are among the most common infections treated in the hospital setting, and together they place a significant burden on healthcare systems. Successful management of HAP and CAP depends on rapid initiation of empirical

  13. Healthcare Proxy Awareness of Suspected Infections Among Nursing Home Residents with Advanced Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givens, Jane L.; Spinella, Sara; Ankuda, Claire K.; D’Agata, Erika; Shaffer, Michele L.; Habtemariam, Daniel; Mitchell, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Infections are common in advanced dementia. Little is known about healthcare proxy involvement in decision making regarding infections. Design Prospective cohort study Setting/Participants 362 nursing home (NH) residents with advanced dementia and their proxies in 35 Boston-area facilities. Measurements Charts were abstracted monthly (up to 12 months) for documentation of suspected infections and provider/proxy discussions for each episode. Proxies were interviewed within 8 weeks of the infection to determine their awareness and decision-making involvement. Factors associated with proxy awareness and discussion documentation were identified. Results There were 496 suspected infections; proxies were reached for interview for 395 (80%). Proxy/provider discussions were documented for 207/395 episodes (52%), yet proxies were aware of only 156/395 (39%). Proxies participated in decision-making for 89/156 (57%) episodes of which they were aware. Proxy awareness was associated with antimicrobial use (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 3.43, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.94–6.05), hospital transfer (AOR 3.00, 95% CI 1.19–7.53), infection occurrence within 30 days of death (AOR 3.32, 95% CI 1.54–7.18) and fewer days between infection and study interview (AOR 2.71, 95% CI 1.63–4.51). Discussion documentation was associated with the resident residing in a dementia special care unit (AOR 1.71, 95% CI 1.04–2.80), not on hospice (AOR 3.25, 95% CI 1.31–8.02), more provider visits (AOR 1.71, 95% CI 1.07–2.75), proxy visits > 7 hours/week (AOR 1.93, 95% CI 1.02–3.67), and episode within 30 days of death (AOR 3.99, 95% CI 1.98–8.02). Conclusion Proxies are unaware of and do not participate in decision-making for most suspected infections experienced by NH residents with advanced dementia. Proxy awareness of episodes and documentation of provider/proxy discussions are not congruent. PMID:26031905

  14. Тhe features of severe community acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avramenko I.V.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on data from a prospective analysis for the year of observation, the article presents information about the features of severe community acquired pneumonia in patients who were hospitalized at the department of pulmonology (or therapy, as well as department of the intensive care from three teaching hospitals in Dnepropetrovsk, namely "Dnipropetrovsk City Hospital №6», "Dnipropetrovsk City Hospital №2», "Dnipropetrovsk City Hospital №16», which are the clinical ones of "Dnepropetrovsk Medical Academy of the Ministry of Health Ukraine". Dependence of the severity of the condition shown on duration of illness before admission, features of season character of disease. The effect of breathing exercises on the course of the disease. The results can be the basis for a more personal approach to the development of diagnostic and therapeutic programs for patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia.

  15. Quick SOFA Scores Predict Mortality in Adult Emergency Department Patients With and Without Suspected Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Adam J; Ng, Jennifer; Thode, Henry C; Spiegel, Rory; Weingart, Scott

    2017-04-01

    The Quick Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (qSOFA) score (composed of respiratory rate ≥22 breaths/min, systolic blood pressure ≤100 mm Hg, and altered mental status) may identify patients with infection who are at risk of complications. We determined the association between qSOFA scores and outcomes in adult emergency department (ED) patients with and without suspected infection. We performed a single-site, retrospective review of adult ED patients between January 2014 and March 2015. Patients triaged to fast-track, dentistry, psychiatry, and labor and delivery were excluded. qSOFA scores were calculated with simultaneous vital signs and Modified Early Warning System scores. Patients receiving intravenous antibiotics were presumed to have suspected infection. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to explore the association between qSOFA scores and inpatient mortality, admission, and length of stay. Receiver operating characteristics curve analysis and c statistics were also calculated for ICU admission and mortality. We included 22,530 patients. Mean age was 54 years (SD 21 years), 53% were women, 45% were admitted, and mortality rate was 1.6%. qSOFA scores were associated with mortality (0 [0.6%], 1 [2.8%], 2 [12.8%], and 3 [25.0%]), ICU admission (0 [5.1%], 1 [10.5%], 2 [20.8%], and 3 [27.4%]), and hospital length of stay (0 [123 hours], 1 [163 hours], 2 [225 hours], and 3 [237 hours]). Adjusted rates were also associated with qSOFA. The c statistics for mortality in patients with and without suspected infection were similarly high (0.75 [95% confidence interval 0.71 to 0.78) and 0.70 (95% confidence interval 0.65 to 0.74), respectively. qSOFA scores were associated with inpatient mortality, admission, ICU admission, and hospital length of stay in adult ED patients likely to be admitted both with and without suspected infection and may be useful in predicting outcomes. Copyright © 2016 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by

  16. Point-of-care lung ultrasound in children with community acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Hayri Levent; Özkaya, Ahmet Kağan; Sarı Gökay, Sinem; Tolu Kendir, Özlem; Şenol, Hande

    2017-07-01

    To present lung ultrasound findings in children assessed with suspected pneumonia in the emergency department and to show the benefit of lung ultrasound in diagnosing pneumonia in comparison with chest X-rays. This observational prospective study was performed in the pediatric emergency department of a single center. Point of care lung ultrasound was performed on each child by an independent sonographer blinded to the patient's clinical and chest X-ray findings. Community acquired pneumonia was established as a final diagnosis by two clinicians based on the recommendations in the British Thoracic Society guideline. One hundred sixty children with a mean age of 3.3±4years and a median age of 1.4years (min-max 0.08-17.5years) were investigated. Final diagnosis in 149 children was community-acquired pneumonia. Lung ultrasound findings were compatible with pneumonia in 142 (95.3%) of these 149 children, while chest X-ray findings were compatible with pneumonia in 132 (88.5%). Pneumonia was confirmed with lung ultrasound in 15 of the 17 patients (11.4%) not evaluated as compatible with pneumonia at chest X-ray. While pneumonia could not be confirmed with lung ultrasound in seven (4.6%) patients, findings compatible with pneumonia were not determined at chest X-ray in two of these patients. When lung ultrasound and chest X-ray were compared as diagnostic tools, a significant difference was observed between them (p=0.041). This study shows that lung ultrasound is at least as useful as chest X-ray in diagnosing children with community-acquired pneumonia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Complementary role of gallium citrate imaging and computed tomography in the evaluation of suspected abdominal infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimshak, R.R.; Korobkin, M.; Hoffer, P.B.; Schor, R.; Hill, T.C.; Kressel, H.Y.

    1978-01-01

    Fifteen patients with a suspected abdominal abscess were examined by both gallium-67 and computed tomographic scanning. The Ga-67 scan was a useful screening examination, correctly identifying all eight cases of infection, whereas the CT scan missed one case of a pericecal phlegmon. Misdiagnosis of infection by Ga-67 scan occurred in 2/8 cases without infection but the CT scan correctly identified all noninfected patients. While this series is too small to decide whether there is any significant difference in the ability of the two procedures to suggest the correct diagnosis, it is felt that Ga-67 and subsequent CT scans may be complementary in that a Ga-67 scan can initially locate the abnormality and thus direct the CT scan, which can confirm the diagnosis or avoid a misinterpretation of the Ga-67 scan. Computed tomography also provides more anatomical detail, better location of the lesion, and demonstrates lesions noninfectious in nature

  18. Corticosteroids for all adult patients with community-acquired pneumonia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ger Rijkers

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Corticosteroid therapy as adjunctive treatment in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is a promising but controversial subject. The potentially beneficial effect of corticosteroids is based on the ability of steroids to dampen an excessive inflammatory response that often occurs in patients with CAP. This excessive inflammatory response can cause damage to the lungs and other organs, and is associated with poor outcome.

  19. Community Acquired Pneumonia Associated Fatal Secondary Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Arun Agarwal; Mudit Agarwal

    2018-01-01

    The burden of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) requiring hospitalization among adults is substantial and is a leading infectious cause of hospitalization and death. Severe CAP may rarely get complicated with secondary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH). The term hemophagocytosis refers to the pathologic finding of activated macrophages engulfing erythrocytes, leukocytes, platelets, or their precursor cells in the bone marrow, liver, or lymph nodes; this being characteristic for hemoph...

  20. The Complete Genome and Phenome of a Community-Acquired Acinetobacter baumannii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, Daniel N.; Elbourne, Liam D. H.; Hassan, Karl A.; Eijkelkamp, Bart A.; Tetu, Sasha G.; Brown, Melissa H.; Shah, Bhumika S.; Peleg, Anton Y.; Mabbutt, Bridget C.; Paulsen, Ian T.

    2013-01-01

    Many sequenced strains of Acinetobacter baumannii are established nosocomial pathogens capable of resistance to multiple antimicrobials. Community-acquired A. baumannii in contrast, comprise a minor proportion of all A. baumannii infections and are highly susceptible to antimicrobial treatment. However, these infections also present acute clinical manifestations associated with high reported rates of mortality. We report the complete 3.70 Mbp genome of A. baumannii D1279779, previously isolated from the bacteraemic infection of an Indigenous Australian; this strain represents the first community-acquired A. baumannii to be sequenced. Comparative analysis of currently published A. baumannii genomes identified twenty-four accessory gene clusters present in D1279779. These accessory elements were predicted to encode a range of functions including polysaccharide biosynthesis, type I DNA restriction-modification, and the metabolism of novel carbonaceous and nitrogenous compounds. Conversely, twenty genomic regions present in previously sequenced A. baumannii strains were absent in D1279779, including gene clusters involved in the catabolism of 4-hydroxybenzoate and glucarate, and the A. baumannii antibiotic resistance island, known to bestow resistance to multiple antimicrobials in nosocomial strains. Phenomic analysis utilising the Biolog Phenotype Microarray system indicated that A. baumannii D1279779 can utilise a broader range of carbon and nitrogen sources than international clone I and clone II nosocomial isolates. However, D1279779 was more sensitive to antimicrobial compounds, particularly beta-lactams, tetracyclines and sulphonamides. The combined genomic and phenomic analyses have provided insight into the features distinguishing A. baumannii isolated from community-acquired and nosocomial infections. PMID:23527001

  1. [Community-acquired pneumonia: risk focus and family functionality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Castillo-Sánchez, David López; Sabag-Ruiz, Enrique; Díaz-Verduzco, Manuel de Jesús; Monzón-Vega, Mario Alonso

    2006-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia is one of the five most prevalent causes of death worldwide; in Mexico, it accounts for more than 10% of the hospital admissions. To identify the risk factors and the kind of family functionality associated to community-acquired pneumonia among adult patients. With the prior authorization of the research and bioethics committees, a study of cases and controls took place, where both groups were asked about the following variables: alcohol consumption or active smoking, conditions of house and family functionality, anti-flu and anti-pneumococcal vaccination, disablement, and chronic pulmonary disease, among others. It was found that the significant variables were active smoking, disablement, pulmonary emphysema, chronic bronchitis, overcrowding at home, and alcohol consumption; and with a protective effect for this disease: a functional family and anti-pneumococcal vaccination. There are risk factors that predispose the development of community-acquired pneumonia, and that allow us to make a population profile in which some preventive strategy could diminish the frequency and lethality of this disease.

  2. Healthcare Proxy Awareness of Suspected Infections in Nursing Home Residents with Advanced Dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givens, Jane L; Spinella, Sara; Ankuda, Claire K; D'Agata, Erika; Shaffer, Michele L; Habtemariam, Daniel; Mitchell, Susan L

    2015-06-01

    To determine healthcare proxy involvement in decision-making regarding infections in individuals with advanced dementia. Prospective cohort study. Thirty-five Boston-area nursing homes (NHs). NH residents with advanced dementia and their proxies (N = 362). Charts were abstracted monthly (up to 12 months) for documentation of suspected infections and provider-proxy discussions for each episode. Proxies were interviewed within 8 weeks of the infection to determine their awareness and decision-making involvement. Factors associated with proxy awareness and discussion documentation were identified. There were 496 suspected infections; proxies were reached for interview for 395 (80%). Proxy-provider discussions were documented for 207 (52%) episodes, yet proxies were aware of only 156 (39%). Proxies participated in decision-making for 89 (57%) episodes of which they were aware. Proxy awareness was associated with antimicrobial use (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 3.43, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.94-6.05), hospital transfer (AOR = 3.00, 95% CI = 1.19-7.53), infection within 30 days of death (AOR = 3.32, 95% CI = 1.54-7.18), and fewer days between infection and study interview (AOR = 2.71, 95% CI = 1.63-4.51). Discussion documentation was associated with the resident residing in a dementia special care unit (AOR = 1.71, 95% CI = 1.04-2.80), the resident not on hospice (AOR = 3.25, 95% CI = 1.31-8.02), more provider visits (AOR = 1.71, 95% CI = 1.07-2.75), proxy visits of more than 7 h/wk (AOR = 1.93, 95% CI = 1.02-3.67), and episode within 30 days of death (AOR = 3.99, 95% CI = 1.98-8.02). Proxies are unaware of and do not participate in decision-making for most suspected infections that NH residents with advanced dementia experience. Proxy awareness of episodes and documentation of provider-proxy discussions are not congruent. © 2015, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2015, The American Geriatrics Society.

  3. CAUSES OF COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED BACTEREMIA AND PATTERNS OF ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE IN VIENTIANE, LAOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    PHETSOUVANH, RATTANAPHONE; PHONGMANY, SIMMALY; SOUKALOUN, DOUANGDAO; RASACHAK, BOUACHANH; SOUKHASEUM, VIMONE; SOUKHASEUM, SEUN; FRICHITHAVONG, KAMTHAVI; KHOUNNORATH, SENGMANIVONG; PENGDEE, BOUNTHOM; PHIASAKHA, KHAMPHONG; CHU, VANG; LUANGXAY, KHONESAVANH; RATTANAVONG, SAYADETH; SISOUK, KONKAM; KEOLOUANGKOT, VALY; MAYXAY, MAYFONG; RAMSAY, ANDREW; BLACKSELL, STUART D.; CAMPBELL, JIM; MARTINEZ-AUSSEL, BERTRAND; HEUANVONGSY, MAYBOUN; BOUNXOUEI, BOUNTHAPAANY; THAMMAVONG, CHANPHENG; SYHAVONG, BOUNKONG; STROBEL, MICHEL; PEACOCK, SHARON J.; WHITE, NICHOLAS J.; NEWTON, PAUL N.

    2008-01-01

    There is no published information on the causes of bacteremia in the Lao PDR (Laos). Between 2000 and 2004, 4512 blood culture pairs were taken from patients admitted to Mahosot Hospital, Vientiane, Laos, with suspected community-acquired bacteremia; 483 (10.7%) cultures grew a clinically significant community-acquired organism, most commonly Salmonella enterica serovar typhi (50.9%), Staphylococcus aureus (19.0%), and Escherichia coli (12.4%). S. aureus bacteremia was common among infants (69.2%), while children 1–5 years had a high frequency of typhoid (44%). Multi–drug-resistant S. Typhi was rare (6%). On multiple logistic regression analysis, typhoid was associated with younger age, longer illness, diarrhea, higher admission temperature, and lower peripheral white blood cell count than non-typhoidal bacteremia. Empirical parenteral ampicillin and gentamicin would have some activity against ∼ 88% of clinically significant isolates at a cost of US $1.4/day, an important exception being B. pseudomallei. Bacteremic infants in this setting require an anti-staphylococcal antibiotic. PMID:17124000

  4. Evaluation of Clinical and Laboratory Data in Patients with Recurrent Infections and Suspected Immunodeficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Ahanchian

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Frequent infections is among the most frequent clinical dilemmas for primary care physicians. Immunodeficiency disorders are a heterogeneous group of illnesses that predispose patients to the recurrent infections, autoimmunity and malignancies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical and laboratory data collected for the final diagnosis of patients referred with recurrent infections and suspected immunodeficiency to a local immunodeficiency clinic.   Methods: This epidemiological study was carried out between April 2010 and September 2012 at the Immunodeficiency Clinic of Mashhad. All patients with clinical manifestations of immunodeficiency who were referred to our clinic during this period of time were included in this study. 41 patients aged from 10 months to 51 years, were evaluated. Results: Forty one patients, aged between 10 months and 51 years were evaluated. Eleven patients had a primary immunodeficiency, four cases had a secondary immunodeficiency, in three patients an underlying structural disease were found, eight patients were predisposed to recurrent infections as a result of allergies and finally, fifteen cases were found to be normal individuals.   Discussion: Most patients with recurrent infection have a normal immune system. Allergic disorders are the most common predisposing factor to recurrent infection. However, as immunodeficiency disorders are potentially serious, early diagnosis can improve the quality of life and outcome and prevent severe sequels in future.

  5. Finnish guidelines for the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia and pertussis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapiainen, Terhi; Aittoniemi, Janne; Immonen, Johanna; Jylkkä, Heli; Meinander, Tuula; Nuolivirta, Kirsi; Peltola, Ville; Salo, Eeva; Seuri, Raija; Walle, Satu-Maaria; Korppi, Matti

    2016-01-01

    Evidence-based guidelines are needed to harmonise and improve the diagnostics and treatment of children's lower respiratory tract infections. Following a professional literature search, an interdisciplinary working group evaluated and graded the available evidence and constructed guidelines for the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia and pertussis. The clinical guidelines state that chest radiography is not needed if the child is diagnosed with pneumonia and treated at home. Complications should be considered if there is no improvement after antimicrobial therapy and a paroxysmal cough can indicate pertussis, which is life-threatening in unvaccinated infants and can lead to respiratory failure. ©2015 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. A case of newborn with community acquired pneumonia caused by Cupriavidus pauculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydın, Banu; Dilli, Dilek; Zenciroğlu, Ayşegül; Okumuş, Nurullah; Ozkan, Sengül; Tanır, Gönül

    2012-01-01

    Cupriavidus pauculus is a gram-negative, aerobic, non-spore forming, non-fermentative motile bacillus. The bacillus can be isolated from water, bottled mineral water, and water from ultrafiltration systems in hospital setting. C. pauculus rarely causes human infections, however it may be an infectious agent especially in immunocompromised individuals. In this report, we present the first case of community acquired pneumonia caused by C. pauculus in a previously healthy newborn who was hospitalized in neonatal intensive care unit on postnatal day 16 because of respiratory distress.

  7. [Human parechovirus-3 infection in a neonate with fever and suspected sepsis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo, C; García-García, M L; Arroyas, M; Trallero, G; Cabrerizo, M

    2014-07-01

    The human parechovirus (HPeV) are viruses of the recently described Picornaviridae family and are causing several infections in young children. The pathology associated with these viruses is beginning to emerge. The HPeV type 3, has been described particularly in association with sepsis-like febrile syndromes, meningitis and encephalitis in very young infants and neonates. We report the case of a 14-day-old girl with a fever and clinical sepsis that required hospitalization and in which HPeV-3 was identified in the cerebrospinal fluid. The blood, urine and cerebrospinal fluid bacterial cultures were negative, and the patient improved. This case illustrates the usefulness of investigating parechovirus infection in neonates with fever or suspected sepsis. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. CT-guided percutaneous spine biopsy in suspected infection or malignancy. A study of 214 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehm, J.; Veith, S.; Kauczor, H.U.; Weber, M.A.; Akbar, M.

    2016-01-01

    To retrospectively determine the effectiveness and accuracy of CT-guided percutaneous biopsy of malignant and inflammatory bone lesions of the spine and to assess the reliability of pre-biopsy CT and MRI. 214 patients with lesions of the spine, which were suspicious either for being malignant or inflammatory, underwent CT-guided biopsy for pathological and/or microbiological detection. Biopsy samples were sent for histological examination in 128/214 patients, for microbiological analysis in 17/214 patients and for both analyses in 69/214 patients. Retrospectively, the diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity/specificity of the pre-interventional imaging (CT and MRI) were determined. In addition, the influence of the biopsy on subsequent patient management was assessed. The accuracy was 94.4% for histopathological analysis and 97.7% for microbiological analysis. In 25% of cases the microbiological analysis revealed an underlying pathogen that was not significantly affected by pre-biopsy antibiotic therapy. The sensitivity/specificity of the pre-biopsy cross-sectional imaging concerning suspected malignancy was 69%/78%. For suspected infection, the sensitivity/specificity of pre-biopsy imaging was 81%/44%. In 52% of all cases, the biopsy result changed subsequent patient management. Percutaneous CT-guided spine biopsy is a useful and reliable diagnostic procedure to establish a definitive diagnosis but with a relatively low yield of microorganisms in the case of infection.

  9. CT-guided percutaneous spine biopsy in suspected infection or malignancy. A study of 214 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehm, J.; Veith, S.; Kauczor, H.U.; Weber, M.A. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Akbar, M. [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery and Rehabilitation Medicine

    2016-12-15

    To retrospectively determine the effectiveness and accuracy of CT-guided percutaneous biopsy of malignant and inflammatory bone lesions of the spine and to assess the reliability of pre-biopsy CT and MRI. 214 patients with lesions of the spine, which were suspicious either for being malignant or inflammatory, underwent CT-guided biopsy for pathological and/or microbiological detection. Biopsy samples were sent for histological examination in 128/214 patients, for microbiological analysis in 17/214 patients and for both analyses in 69/214 patients. Retrospectively, the diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity/specificity of the pre-interventional imaging (CT and MRI) were determined. In addition, the influence of the biopsy on subsequent patient management was assessed. The accuracy was 94.4% for histopathological analysis and 97.7% for microbiological analysis. In 25% of cases the microbiological analysis revealed an underlying pathogen that was not significantly affected by pre-biopsy antibiotic therapy. The sensitivity/specificity of the pre-biopsy cross-sectional imaging concerning suspected malignancy was 69%/78%. For suspected infection, the sensitivity/specificity of pre-biopsy imaging was 81%/44%. In 52% of all cases, the biopsy result changed subsequent patient management. Percutaneous CT-guided spine biopsy is a useful and reliable diagnostic procedure to establish a definitive diagnosis but with a relatively low yield of microorganisms in the case of infection.

  10. The changing face of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Kale

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is an important cause of infection, both in hospitalised patients with significant healthcare exposure and in patients without healthcare risk factors. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA are known for their rapid community transmission and propensity to cause aggressive skin and soft tissue infections and community-acquired pneumonia. The distinction between the healthcare-associated (HA-MRSA and CA-MRSA is gradually fading owing to the acquisition of multiple virulence factors and genetic elements. The movement of CA-MRSA strains into the nosocomial setting limits the utility of using clinical risk factors alone to designate community or HA status. Identification of unique genetic characteristics and genotyping are valuable tools for MRSA epidemiological studies. Although the optimum pharmacotherapy for CA-MRSA infections has not been determined, many CA-MRSA strains remain broadly susceptible to several non-β-lactam antibacterial agents. This review aimed at illuminating the characteristic features of CA-MRSA, virulence factors, changing clinical settings and molecular epidemiology, insurgence into the hospital settings and therapy with drug resistance.

  11. Community-acquired bacteremia and acute cholecystitis due to Enterobacter cloacae: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isasti Guillermo

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Enterobacter cloacae is responsible for 65-75% of all Enterobacter infections, bacteremia being the most common syndrome. The majority of infections are nosocomially acquired and in patients with predisposing factors. Case presentation We present a case of E. cloacae bacteremia secondary to acute cholecystitis in a 60-year-old man with recent diagnosis of cholelithiasis. The diagnosis was established with abdominal echography and positive blood and biliary cultures. The patient was managed successfully with cholecystectomy and antibiotic therapy. Conclusion The peculiarity of our case is the development of community-acquired bacteremia due to E. cloacae with a clear infectious focus, as a single agent isolated in several blood cultures, in a patient without severe underlying diseases, prior antimicrobial use or previous hospital admission. Although the majority of Enterobacter spp. infections are nosocomially acquired, primary bacteremia being the most common syndrome, these pathogens may also be responsible for community-acquired cases. Patients without predisposing factors may also be affected.

  12. Elderly patients with community-acquired pneumonia: optimal treatment strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiem, Ulrich; Heppner, Hans-Jürgen; Pientka, Ludger

    2011-07-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common infectious disease that still causes substantial morbidity and mortality. Elderly people are frequently affected, and several issues related to care of this condition in the elderly have to be considered. This article reviews current recommendations of guidelines with a special focus on aspects of the care of elderly patients with CAP. The most common pathogen in CAP is still Streptococcus pneumoniae, followed by other pathogens such as Haemophilus influenzae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae and Legionella species. Antimicrobial resistance is an increasing problem, especially with regard to macrolide-resistant S. pneumoniae and fluoroquinolone-resistant strains. With regard to β-lactam antibacterials, resistance by H. influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis is important, as is the emergence of multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The main management decisions should be guided by the severity of disease, which can be assessed by validated clinical risk scores such as CURB-65, a tool for measuring the severity of pneumonia based on assessment of confusion, serum urea, respiratory rate and blood pressure in patients aged ≥65 years. For the treatment of low-risk pneumonia, an aminopenicillin such as amoxicillin with or without a β-lactamase inhibitor is frequently recommended. Monotherapy with macrolides is also possible, although macrolide resistance is of concern. When predisposing factors for special pathogens are present, a β-lactam antibacterial combined with a β-lactamase inhibitor, or the combination of a β-lactam antibacterial, a β-lactamase inhibitor and a macrolide, may be warranted. If possible, patients who have undergone previous antibacterial therapy should receive drug classes not previously used. For hospitalized patients with non-severe pneumonia, a common recommendation is empirical antibacterial therapy with an aminopenicillin in combination with a β-lactamase inhibitor, or

  13. Sequential Therapy of Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Karimdzhanov

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study — to examine the effectiveness of sequential therapy of injectable and oral forms cephalosporins of II generation, cefuroxime sodium and cefprozil, in children with acute community-acquired pneumonia. We examined 53 child patients aged 6 months — 14 years with acute community-acquired pneumonia. Patients were divided into 2 groups: 1st group — 26 patients who treated with cefuroxime sodium intramuscularly, and 2nd — 27 patients who treated with cefuroxime sodium in first 3 days and then from the 4th day — with cefprozil suspension orally. Both groups of patients were comparable by forms and course of pneumonia. In the clinic to all patients were conducted conventional clinical and laboratory investigations. Complex therapy was not different in both groups. Efficacy of treatment was assessed in dynamics. When comparing the effectiveness of two antibiotic regimens (cefuroxime sodium parenterally and sequential regimen with replacement by cefprozil orally there were no differences in the dynamics of clinical course, laboratory and radiological data. Finding of the conducted investigations before treatment showed that majority of patients had clinical and radiological evidence of pneumonia: fever, cough, shortness of breath, tachycardia, physical and radiological changes in the lungs. Evaluation of treatment efficacy showed that by the end of treatment in both groups of patients there was a positive clinical and radiological dynamics of the disease, the body temperature returned to normal, symptoms of intoxication, physical changes in the lungs disappeared, focal and infiltrative changes disappeared completely. Thus, sequential therapy with cephalosporins of II generation, cefuroxime and cefprozil, in the treatment of acute community-acquired pneumonia in children is a quite effective and safe method with good tolerability and no side effects.

  14. FDG-PET/CT in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease patients with suspected cyst infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pijl, Jordy Pieter; Glaudemans, Andor W J M; Slart, Riemer H J A; Kwee, Thomas Christian

    2018-04-13

    Purpose: To determine the value of 18 F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) for diagnosing renal or hepatic cyst infection in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Methods: This retrospective single-center study included all patients with ADPKD who underwent FDG-PET/CT because of suspected cyst infection between 2010 and 2017. Results: Thirty FDG-PET/CT scans of thirty individual patients were included, of which 19 were positive for cyst infection. According to a previously established clinical and biochemical reference standard, FDG-PET/CT achieved sensitivity of 88.9%, specificity of 75.0%, positive predictive value of 84.2%, and negative predictive value of 81.8% for the diagnosis of cyst infection. In 5 cases, FDG-PET/CT suggested a different pathologic process that explained the symptoms, including pneumonia ( n = 1), generalized peritonitis ( n = 1), pancreatitis ( n = 1), colitis ( n = 1), and cholangitis ( n = 1). Total duration of hospital stay and duration between FDG-PET/CT scan and hospital discharge of patients with an FDG-PET/CT scan positive for cyst infection were significantly longer than those with a negative scan ( P = 0.005 and P = 0.009, respectively). Creatinine levels were significantly higher in patients with an FDG-PET/CT scan positive for cyst infection than in patients with a negative scan ( P = 0.015). Other comparisons of clinical parameters (age, gender, presence of fever (>38.5°C) for more than 3 days, abdominal pain, history of solid organ transplantation and nephrectomy, immune status), laboratory values (C-reactive protein level (CRP), leukocyte count, estimated glomerular filtration rate), and microbiologic results (blood and urine cultures) were not significantly different ( P = 0.13-1.00) between FDG-PET/CT-positive and -negative patients. Conclusion: FDG-PET/CT is a useful and recommendable (upfront) imaging modality for the evaluation of

  15. Population Pharmacokinetics of Meropenem in Plasma and Cerebrospinal Fluid of Infants With Suspected or Complicated Intra-abdominal Infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, P. Brian; Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael; Castro, Lisa M.; Poindexter, Brenda; Bidegain, Margarita; Weitkamp, Joern-Hendrik; Schelonka, Robert L.; Ward, Robert M.; Wade, Kelly; Valencia, Gloria; Burchfield, David; Arrieta, Antonio; Bhatt-Mehta, Varsha; Walsh, Michele; Kantak, Anand; Rasmussen, Maynard; Sullivan, Janice E.; Finer, Neil; Brozanski, Beverly S.; Sanchez, Pablo; van den Anker, John; Blumer, Jeffrey; Kearns, Gregory L.; Capparelli, Edmund V.; Anand, Ravinder; Benjamin, Daniel K.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Suspected or complicated intra-abdominal infections are common in young infants and lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Meropenem is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent with excellent activity against pathogens associated with intra-abdominal infections in this population. The

  16. [Topical problems of empiric therapy of community-acquired pneumonia in outpatient practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanova, I I; Chorbinskaya, S A; Baryshnikonva, G A; Nikiforova, N V; Pokutniy, N F; Zverkov, I V; Maslovskyi, L V; Kotenko, K V

    2016-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia is one of prevalent infectious respiratory diseases. Adequate treatment of community-acquired pneumonia, with consideration of the disease severity and microbial resistence, remains extremely topical. The article covers contemporary views of community-acquired pneumonia treatment standards. The authors described results of personal research aimed to study antibacterial treatment for community-acquired pneumonia on outpatient basis over 2004-2012, evaluated correspondence of the treatment to the national clinical recommendations.

  17. Assessment of HCV Infection in Suspected Orphans Newborns by Real-Time PCR and HCV-Core Ag-Elisa

    OpenAIRE

    Marzieh Jamalidoust; Mandana Namayandeh; Maryam Zare; Mazyar Ziyaeyan

    2015-01-01

    Background & Objective: HCV infection may be transmitted from an infected mother to her fetus in a low percentage; however, it is the most important route of infancy HCV infection. The chance of HCV transmission in HIV/HCV co-infected mothers is higher than that in HCV mono-infected ones. The aim of this study is to assess HCV infection status in orphan newborns in Shiraz, Iran by quantitative PCR assay and HCV core-Ag Elisa.Materials & Methods:  Twenty nine HCV suspected...

  18. Necrotizing community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia: an emerging problem in correctional facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohli, Nita; Kochie, Mary; Harber, Philip

    2011-03-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) skin infections have been common in prisons for more than a decade. However, CA-MRSA as a cause of pneumonia has been reported infrequently. This infection can present with flu-like symptoms and rapidly progress, possibly leading to death in a matter of days. Two cases of MRSA community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) associated with influenza-like illness in correctional officers employed in two separate prisons within the California prison system are presented. Both individuals were previously healthy, but one died of this disease. MRSA is an uncommon, but now recognized, cause of CAP. These cases are notable for their unique presentation and occurrence in non-health care, occupational settings. Prompt diagnosis and intervention by occupational health nurses and physicians are critical to improving outcomes, especially in high-risk settings such as prisons. These worksites need an effective occupational health program to manage MRSA, with adequate training for both employees and inmates.

  19. [Increasing incidence of community-acquired pneumonia caused by atypical microorganisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazón-Varela, M A; Alonso-Valle, H; Muñoz-Cacho, P; Gallo-Terán, J; Piris-García, X; Pérez-Mier, L A

    2017-09-01

    Knowing the most common microorganisms in our environment can help us to make proper empirical treatment decisions. The aim is to identify those microorganisms causing community-acquired pneumonia. An observational, descriptive and prospective study was conducted, including patients over 14 years with a clinical and radiographic diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia during a 383 consecutive day period. A record was made of sociodemographic variables, personal history, prognostic severity scales, progress, and pathogenic agents. The aetiological diagnosis was made using blood cultures, detection of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila urinary antigens, sputum culture, influenza virus and Streptococcus pyogenes detection. Categorical variables are presented as absolute values and percentages, and continuous variables as their means and standard deviations. Of the 287 patients included in the study (42% women, mean age 66±22 years), 10.45% died and 70% required hospital admission. An aetiological diagnosis was achieved in 43 patients (14.98%), with 16 microorganisms found in 59 positive samples. The most frequently isolated pathogen was Streptococcus pneumonia (24/59, 41%), followed by gram-negative enteric bacilli, Klebsiella pneumonia, Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens and Enterobacter cloacae isolated in 20% of the samples (12/59), influenza virus (5/59, 9%), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (3/59, 5%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (2/59, 3%), Moraxella catarrhalis (2/59, 3%), Legionella pneumophila (2/59, 3%), and Haemophilus influenza (2/59, 3%). Polymicrobial infections accounted for 14% (8/59). A high percentage of atypical microorganisms causing community-acquired pneumonia were found. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Changing bacteriological profile and mortality trends in community acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagar Khadanga

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There are very few and conflicting Indian data regarding the bacteriological etiology of community acquired pneumonia (CAP. Adding to this agony, there is no credible data from the eastern part of India. This is a cross-sectional study and descriptive in nature over a period of 1-year. Of the 464 cases of the study population, we could isolate aerobic bacteria in 149 patients (32.1%. Streptococcus pneumoniae has been identified as the most common organism causing CAP (68/149. Gram-negative bacilli (GNB as a group exceeded marginally over S. pneumoniae (69/149. Among GNB, Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the most common organism (31/69, followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (29/69. Staphylococcus aureus was identified in (12/149 cases. Co-amoxyclav is still the most sensitive drug for S. pneumoniae. P. aeruginosa was most sensitive to imipenam followed by piperacillin-tazobactam.

  1. Early versus late diagnosis in community-acquired bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodilsen, J; Brandt, C T; Sharew, A

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine clinical characteristics and outcome of patients with late diagnosis of community-acquired bacterial meningitis (CABM). METHODS: We conducted a chart review of all adults with proven CABM in three centres in Denmark from 1998 through to 2014. Patients were categorized...... as early diagnosis of CABM immediately on admission, or late diagnosis if CABM was not listed in referral or admission records and neither lumbar puncture nor antibiotic therapy for meningitis was considered immediately on admission. We used modified Poisson regression analysis to compute adjusted relative...... differences (p 65 years (56/113, 50% versus 67/245, 27%), neck stiffness (35/97, 36% versus 183/234, 78%), concomitant pneumonia (26/113, 23% versus 26/245, 11%), and meningococcal meningitis (6/113, 5% versus 52/245, 21%). These variables...

  2. Diagnostics for community-acquired and atypical pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustianowski, Andrew

    2012-05-01

    After decades of neglect, the importance of establishing an aetiological diagnosis for community-acquired and atypical pneumonias has increased dramatically in recent years--driven by the movement towards more rational use of antibiotics, the further spread of antimicrobial resistance, and advances in point-of-care assays that circumvent the diagnostic delays that result from the centralization of laboratories. There have been very few developments in patient sampling, or the direct visualization, culture, and serological detection of respiratory pathogens. There has, however, been significant interest in the development of improved and more clinically useful assays for the detection of pathogen nucleic acids and proteins, and also in the potential utility of the assessment of host response for tailoring therapy. The majority of patients have yet to benefit from any advances. However, nucleic acid, newer protein, and possibly host-response assays have significant potential to influence patient care in the near future.

  3. Hospital Resource Utilisation by Patients with Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCarthy, S

    2017-09-01

    Little data is available on the resource utilisation of patients admitted with Community-Acquired Pneumonia (CAP) in Ireland. A retrospective review of 50 randomly-selected patients admitted to Beaumont Hospital with CAP was undertaken. The mean length of stay of patients with CAP was 12 days (+\\/- 16 days). All patients were emergency admissions, all had a chest x-ray, a C-reactive protein blood test, and occupied a public bed at some point during admission. Common antimicrobial therapies were intravenous (IV) amoxicillin\\/clavulanic acid and oral clarithromycin; 60% received physiotherapy. The estimated mean cost of CAP per patient was €14,802.17. Costs arising from admission to hospital with CAP are substantial, but efforts can be undertaken to ensure that resources are used efficiently to improve patient care such as discharge planning and fewer in-hospital ward transfers

  4. Resistencia antimicrobiana en la infección urinaria por Escherichia coli adquirida en la comunidad: ¿Cuál antibiótico voy a usar? Antibiotic resistance of Escherichia coli from community-acquired urinary tract infections: What antimicrobial to use?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Elena Guajardo-Lara

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar la resistencia del uropatógeno comunitario más frecuente, Escherichia coli, a diversos antimicrobianos y deducir opciones de manejo empírico. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Del 14 de julio de 2005 al 13 julio de 2006 se estudiaron cepas de Escherichia coli aisladas de urocultivos de pacientes que asistieron a la consulta externa de la Clínica Nova y del Hospital San José, en Monterrey, Nuevo León, México. Se identificó la bacteria y se determinó susceptibilidad a antibióticos mediante método automatizado. Se compararon los resultados entre las dos instituciones y la frecuencia de resistencia a antimicrobianos entre mujeres de entre 15 a 50 años de edad y > 50. RESULTADOS: Se analizaron 652 urocultivos: 303 (46.5% de Clínica Nova y 349 (53.5% del Hospital San José. Las cepas aisladas fueron resistentes a ampicilina, en 67.2%; a trimetoprim-sulfametoxazol, en 59.2%; a cefazolina, en 35.6%, y a ciprofloxacino, en 24.7%. CONCLUSIONES: La resistencia a trimetoprim-sulfametoxazol y ciprofloxacino, considerados de elección en el manejo empírico de las infecciones de vías urinarias adquiridas en la comunidad, es alta. Las opciones de manejo son pocas.OBJECTIVE: Determine antibiotic resistance of community-acquired uropathogen Escherichia coli and infer therapeutic options. MATERIAL AND METHODS: E. coli strains isolated from urine during a one-year period were studied. Identification and susceptibility tests were performed. RESULTS: A total of 652 isolates were included from patients in two institutions, a healthcare clinic 303 (46.5% and a hospital 349 ( 53.5%. The antimicrobials with higher resistance rates were ampicillin 67.2%, trimethoprim-sulfametoxazole 59.2%, cefazolin 35.6% and ciprofloxacin 24.7%. CONCLUSIONS: Resistance to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and ciprofloxacin used for empiric treatment in community urinary infections is high, and there are few available treatment options.

  5. Etiologic spectrum and occurrence of coinfections in children hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wujun; Wu, Min; Zhou, Jing; Wang, Yuqing; Hao, Chuangli; Ji, Wei; Zhang, Xinxing; Gu, Wenjing; Shao, Xuejun

    2017-12-20

    Co-infections are common in childhood community acquired pneumonia (CAP). However, their etiological pattern and clinical impact remains inconclusive. Eight hundred forty-six consecutive children with CAP were evaluated prospectively for the presence of viral and bacterial pathogens. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were examined by direct immunofluorescence assay or polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for viruses. PCR of nasopharyngeal aspirates and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were performed to detect M. pneumoniae. Bacteria was detected in blood, bronchoalveolar lavage specimen, or pleural fluid by culture. Causative pathogen was identified in 70.1% (593 of 846) of the patients. The most commonly detected pathogens were respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (22.9%), human rhinovirus (HRV) (22.1%), M. pneumoniae (15.8%). Coinfection was identified in 34.6% (293 of 846) of the patients. The majority of these (209 [71.3%] of 293) were mixed viral-bacterial infections. Age pneumonia pathogens.

  6. A review of the role of Haemophilus influenzae in community-acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary PE Slack

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In an era when Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib conjugate vaccine is widely used, the incidence of Hib as a cause of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP has dramatically declined. Non-typeable H. influenzae (NTHi strains and, occasionally, other encapsulated serotypes of H. influenzae are now the cause of the majority of invasive H. influenzae infections, including bacteraemic CAP. NTHi have long been recognised as an important cause of lower respiratory tract infection, including pneumonia, in adults, especially those with underlying diseases. The role of NTHi as a cause of non-bacteraemic CAP in children is less clear. In this review the evidence for the role of NTHi and capsulated strains of H. influenzae will be examined. 

  7. A review of the role of Haemophilus influenzae in community-acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary PE Slack

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In an era when Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib conjugate vaccine is widely used, the incidence of Hib as a cause of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP has dramatically declined. Non-typeable H. influenzae (NTHi strains and, occasionally, other encapsulated serotypes of H. influenzae are now the cause of the majority of invasive H. influenzae infections, including bacteraemic CAP. NTHi have long been recognised as an important cause of lower respiratory tract infection, including pneumonia, in adults, especially those with underlying diseases. The role of NTHi as a cause of non-bacteraemic CAP in children is less clear. In this review the evidence for the role of NTHi and capsulated strains of H. influenzae will be examined.

  8. Clinical evaluation of the role of ceftaroline in the management of community acquired bacterial pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maselli DJ

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Diego J Maselli1, Juan F Fernandez1, Christine Y Whong2, Kelly Echevarria1,3, Anoop M Nambiar1,3, Antonio Anzueto1,3, Marcos I Restrepo1,3,41University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas, 2Memorial Hermann – Texas Medical Center, Houston, TX, 3South Texas Veterans Health Care System Audie l Murphy Division, San Antonio, TX, 4Veterans Evidence Research Dissemination and Implementation Center (VERDICT, San Antonio, TX, USAAbstract: Ceftaroline fosamil (ceftaroline was recently approved for the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP and complicated skin infections. This newly developed cephalosporin possesses a broad spectrum of activity against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Most importantly, ceftaroline demonstrates potent in vitro antimicrobial activity against multi-drug resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and methicillin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus. In two Phase III, double-blinded, randomized, prospective trials (FOCUS 1 and FOCUS 2, ceftaroline was shown to be non-inferior to ceftriaxone for the treatment of CAP in hospitalized patients. Ceftaroline exhibits low resistance rates and a safety profile similar to that of other cephalosporins. In this review, we will evaluate the pharmacological characteristics, safety, antimicrobial properties, and efficacy of ceftaroline and its applications in the treatment of CAP.Keywords: s. pneumoniae, s. aureus, cephalosporins, pneumonia, ceftaroline, community acquired pneumonia

  9. Clinical and laboratory profile of Zika virus infection in dengue suspected patients: A case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernanda Estofolete, Cássia; Terzian, Ana Carolina Bernardes; Parreira, Ricardo; Esteves, Aida; Hardman, Lucas; Greque, Gilmar Valdir; Rahal, Paula; Nogueira, Maurício Lacerda

    2016-08-01

    The Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging arthropod-borne virus related to the dengue virus (DENV), and shows a similar clinical profile as other arboviral diseases, such as dengue and chikungunya virus (CHIKV). Historically, ZIKV has been associated with sporadic cases of human infection, but is now responsible for outbreaks worldwide. In Brazil, cases have been reported since 2015, with some cases causing severe disease. To identify clinical symptoms of Zika in patients in Dengue suspected patients. Description of a series of cases, wherein we analyzed 100 clinical samples collected from patients who exhibited acute febrile disease for ≤5days, from January to February 2016. In this study, we report 13 cases of ZIKV infection in adults presenting dengue-like symptoms in a DENV endemic area. All patients presented with fever, with myalgia being the second most frequently observed symptom. Two patients had rashes, but none of them had conjunctivitis. Other less frequent manifestations included headache, arthralgia, diarrhea, and nausea. The co-circulation of ZIKV and DENV is a serious public health concern, since it represents both a clinical and diagnostic challenge in endemic areas, as well as in the field of travel medicine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Suspected ventilator-associated respiratory infection in severely ill patients: a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahin, Jason; Bielinski, Michael; Guichon, Celine; Flemming, Catherine; Kristof, Arnold S

    2013-10-22

    Ventilator-associated respiratory infection (VARI) is an important cause of morbidity in critically-ill patients. Clinical trials performed in heterogeneous populations have suggested there are limited benefits from invasive diagnostic testing to identify patients at risk or to target antimicrobial therapy. However, multiple patient subgroups (for example, immunocompromised, antibiotic-treated) have traditionally been excluded from randomization. We hypothesized that a prospective surveillance study would better identify patients with suspected VARI (sVARI) at high risk for adverse clinical outcomes, and who might be specifically targeted in future trials. We performed a prospective observational study in all patients ventilated for greater than 48 hours. sVARI was identified by surveillance for changes in white blood cell count, temperature, sputum, and/or new chest X-ray infiltrates. Indices of disease co-morbidity, as well as mortality, duration of mechanical ventilation, and length of hospital or ICU stay were correlated with sVARI. Of 1806 patients admitted to the ICU over 14 months, 267 were ventilated for greater than 48 hours, and 77 developed sVARI. Incidence of sVARI was associated with iatrogenic immunosuppression or admission for respiratory illness. Any sVARI, whether suspected ventilator-associated pneumonia (sVAP) or ventilator-associated tracheobronchitis (sVAT), was associated with increased length of stay and duration of mechanical ventilation. Clinical surveillance for sVARI identifies patients at risk for increased morbidity. Iatrogenically immunosuppressed patients, a subgroup previously excluded from randomized clinical trials, represent a growing proportion of the critically-ill at risk for sVARI who might be targeted for future investigations on diagnostic or therapeutic modalities.

  11. Update on community-acquired bacterial meningitis: guidance and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ettekoven, C N; van de Beek, D; Brouwer, M C

    2017-09-01

    The existing heterogeneity in diagnostic work-up and treatment strategies in bacterial meningitis was the incentive to develop a European evidence-based guideline, which was published in 2016 by the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) Study Group on Infections of the Brain (ESGIB). To summarize salient features of the guideline, identify recent developments and challenges currently faced. The ESCMID guideline, ongoing trial registries. Epidemiology, clinical symptoms, diagnostic work-up and therapy strategies of acute bacterial meningitis. The incidence of bacterial meningitis has decreased following pneumococcal and meningococcal conjugate vaccine introduction. In the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis the clinical characteristics and laboratory parameters are of limited diagnostic accuracy and therefore cerebrospinal fluid analysis remains the principal contributor to the final diagnosis. The ESCMID guideline advises to start empiric treatment within one hour of arrival in all suspected meningitis cases, and choice of antibiotics needs to be differentiated according to the patient's age, risk factors, and local resistance rates of pneumococci. Dexamethasone is the only proven adjunctive treatment and should be started together with the antibiotics. The follow-up of surviving patients should include evaluation for hearing loss and pneumococcal vaccination to prevent recurrences. Future perspectives include further development and implementation of vaccines, and new treatments aimed at further reducing the inflammatory response. Studies on implementation of the new guideline should determine adherence and evaluate whether improved prognosis can be achieved by following protocolled management strategies. Copyright © 2017 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Lack of clinical utility of urine gram stain for suspected urinary tract infection in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantey, Joseph B; Gaviria-Agudelo, Claudia; McElvania TeKippe, Erin; Doern, Christopher D

    2015-04-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common infections in children. Urine culture remains the gold standard for diagnosis, but the utility of urine Gram stain relative to urinalysis (UA) is unclear. We reviewed 312 pediatric patients with suspected UTI who had urine culture, UA, and urine Gram stain performed from a single urine specimen. UA was considered positive if ≥10 leukocytes per oil immersion field were seen or if either nitrates or leukocyte esterase testing was positive. Urine Gram stain was considered positive if any organisms were seen. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were calculated using urine culture as the gold standard. Thirty-seven (12%) patients had a culture-proven UTI. Compared to urine Gram stain, UA had equal sensitivity (97.3% versus 97.5%) and higher specificity (85% versus 74%). Empirical therapy was prescribed before the Gram stain result was known in 40 (49%) patients and after in 42 (51%) patients. The antibiotics chosen did not differ between the two groups (P=0.81), nor did they differ for patients with Gram-negative rods on urine Gram stain compared to those with Gram-positive cocci (P=0.67). From these data, we conclude that UA has excellent negative predictive value that is not enhanced by urine Gram stain and that antibiotic selection did not vary based on the urine Gram stain result. In conclusion, the clinical utility of urine Gram stain does not warrant the time or cost it requires. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Early neurovascular uncoupling in the brain during community acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosengarten, Bernhard; Krekel, Dennis; Kuhnert, Stefan; Schulz, Richard

    2012-12-12

    Sepsis leads to microcirculatory dysfunction and therefore a disturbed neurovascular coupling in the brain. To investigate if the dysfunction is also present in less severe inflammatory diseases we studied the neurovascular coupling in patients suffering from community acquired pneumonia. Patients were investigated in the acute phase of pneumonia and after recovery. The neurovascular coupling was investigated with a simultaneous electroencephalogram (EEG)-Doppler technique applying a visual stimulation paradigm. Resting EEG frequencies, visual evoked potentials as well as resting and stimulated hemodynamic responses were obtained. Disease severity was characterized by laboratory and cognitive parameters as well as related scoring systems. Data were compared to a control group. Whereas visually evoked potentials (VEP) remained stable a significant slowing and therefore uncoupling of the hemodynamic responses were found in the acute phase of pneumonia (Rate time: control group: 3.6 ± 2.5 vs. acute pneumonia: 1.6 ± 2.4 s; P early microcirculatory dysfunction in inflammatory syndromes that become evident in pre-septic conditions with a gradual decline according to disease severity.

  14. [Community acquired pneumonia in children: Outpatient treatment and prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Pérez, D; Andrés Martín, A; Tagarro García, A; Escribano Montaner, A; Figuerola Mulet, J; García García, J J; Moreno-Galdó, A; Rodrigo Gonzalo de Lliria, C; Ruiz Contreras, J; Saavedra Lozano, J

    2015-12-01

    There have been significant changes in community acquired pneumonia (CAP) in children in the last decade. These changes relate to epidemiology and clinical presentation. Resistance to antibiotics is also a changing issue. These all have to be considered when treating CAP. In this document, two of the main Spanish pediatric societies involved in the treatment of CAP in children, propose a consensus concerning therapeutic approach. These societies are the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases and the Spanish Society of Paediatric Chest Diseases. The Advisory Committee on Vaccines of the Spanish Association of Paediatrics (CAV-AEP) has also been involved in the prevention of CAP. An attempt is made to provide up-to-date guidelines to all paediatricians. The first part of the statement presents the approach to ambulatory, previously healthy children. We also review the prevention with currently available vaccines. In a next second part, special situations and complicated forms will be addressed. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Penicillin treatment for patients with Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egelund, Gertrud Baunbæk; Jensen, Andreas Vestergaard; Andersen, Stine Bang

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a severe infection, with high mortality. Antibiotic strategies for CAP differ across Europe. The objective of the study was to describe the epidemiology of CAP in Denmark and evaluate the prognosis of patients empirically treated with penicillin......-G/V monotherapy. METHODS: Retrospective cohort study including hospitalized patients with x-ray confirmed CAP. We calculated the population-based incidence, reviewed types of empiric antibiotics and duration of antibiotic treatment. We evaluated the association between mortality and treatment with empiric...... penicillin-G/V using logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: We included 1320 patients. The incidence of hospitalized CAP was 3.1/1000 inhabitants. Median age was 71 years (IQR; 58-81) and in-hospital mortality was 8%. Median duration of antibiotic treatment was 10 days (IQR; 8-12). In total 45% were treated...

  16. Community-acquired Haemophilus influenzae pneumonia--New insights from the CAPNETZ study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forstner, Christina; Rohde, Gernot; Rupp, Jan; Schuette, Hartwig; Ott, Sebastian R; Hagel, Stefan; Harrison, Nicole; Thalhammer, Florian; von Baum, Heike; Suttorp, Norbert; Welte, Tobias; Pletz, Mathias W

    2016-05-01

    We aimed to identify clinical characteristics and to assess effectiveness of different initial antibiotic regimens in adult patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) caused by Haemophilus influenzae. Characteristics were compared between patients with H. influenzae monoinfection versus CAP of other and unknown aetiology enrolled by the German prospective cohort study CAPNETZ. Impact of initial antibiotic treatment on "early clinical response" according to FDA criteria and overall clinical cure were analysed. H. influenzae was found in 176 out of 2790 patients with pathogen detection (6.3%). Characteristics significantly associated with a H. influenzae CAP (p influenzae was a common CAP pathogen, particularly in patients with previous pneumococcal vaccination and respiratory co-morbidities. Severity of illness and chronic liver disease were associated with a lower rate of "early clinical response". Copyright © 2016 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Community-Acquired MRSA Pyomyositis: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas P. Olson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA is responsible for a broad range of infections. We report the case of a 46-year-old gentleman with a history of untreated, uncomplicated Hepatitis C who presented with a 2-month history of back pain and was found to have abscesses in his psoas and right paraspinal muscles with subsequent lumbar spine osteomyelitis. Despite drainage and appropriate antibiotic management the patient's clinical condition deteriorated and he developed new upper extremity weakness and sensory deficits on physical exam. Repeat imaging showed new, severe compression of the spinal cord and cauda equina from C1 to the sacrum by a spinal epidural abscess. After surgical intervention and continued medical therapy, the patient recovered completely. This case illustrates a case of CA-MRSA pyomyositis that progressed to lumbar osteomyelitis and a spinal epidural abscess extending the entire length of the spinal canal.

  18. Community-Acquired Pneumonia and Empyema Caused by Citrobacter koseri in an Immunocompetent Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Angel Ariza-Prota

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Citrobacter species, belonging to the family Enterobacteriaceae, are environmental organisms commonly found in soil, water, and the intestinal tracts of animals and humans. Citrobacter koseri is known to be an uncommon but serious cause of both sporadic and epidemic septicemia and meningitis in neonates and young infants. Most cases reported have occurred in immunocompromised hosts. The infections caused by Citrobacter are difficult to treat with usual broad spectrum antibiotics owing to rapid generation of mutants and have been associated with high death rates in the past. We believe this is the first case described in the literature of a community-acquired pneumonia and empyema caused by Citrobacter koseri in an immunocompetent adult patient.

  19. Clinical presentation of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laibl, Vanessa R; Sheffield, Jeanne S; Roberts, Scott; McIntire, Donald D; Trevino, Sylvia; Wendel, George D

    2005-09-01

    The objective of this study was to review the presentation and management of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in pregnant women. This was a chart review of pregnant patients who were diagnosed with MRSA between January 1, 2000, and July 30, 2004. Data collected included demographic characteristics, clinical presentation, culture results, and pathogen susceptibilities. Patients' pregnancy outcomes were compared with the general obstetric population during the study period. Fifty-seven charts were available for review. There were 2 cases in 2000, 4 in 2001, 11 in 2002, 23 in 2003, and 17 through July of 2004. Comorbid conditions included human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (13%), asthma (11%), and diabetes (9%). Diagnostic culture was most commonly obtained in the second trimester (46%); however 18% of cases occurred in the postpartum period. Skin and soft tissue infections accounted for 96% of cases. The most common site for a lesion was the extremities (44%), followed by the buttocks (25%), and breast (mastitis) (23%). Fifty-eight percent of patients had recurrent episodes. Sixty-three percent of patients required inpatient treatment. All MRSA isolates were sensitive to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, vancomycin, and rifampin. Other antibiotics to which the isolates were susceptible included gentamicin (98%) and levofloxacin (84%). In comparison with the general obstetric population, patients with MRSA were more likely to be multiparous and to have had a cesarean delivery. Community-acquired MRSA is an emerging problem in our obstetric population. Most commonly, it presents as a skin or soft tissue infection that involves multiple sites. Recurrent skin abscesses during pregnancy should raise prompt investigation for MRSA. II-3.

  20. Investigation of Clinical Relevance of Bacterial Colonization in Patients With Suspected Viral Respiratory Tract Infection By Using Multiplex PCR Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedat Turhan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Numerous viral and bacterial pathogens have been reported causing acute respiratory tract infection (ARTI. Nasopharyngeal swab (NPS specimens from 351 patients (278 children, 73 adults with suspected upper and lower ARTI were submitted during the study period from Jan. 2005 to Dec. 2006. Organism-specific nucleic acids were detected using TemPlex technology (ResPlex I and II, Genaco Biomedical Products, Huntsville, AL. Amplified products were identified using a suspension array for multiplex detection performed on a Luminex 100 instrument (Luminex, Austin, TX. A total of 221 viral and bacterial respiratory agents were detected in 148 patients (135 [48.5%] of the 278 children and 13 [17.8%] of the 73 adults with suspected ARTI. A single respiratory pathogen was detected in 89 patients [25.35%], whereas mixed infection with two or three pathogens was found in 59 [16.8%] of 351 suspected patients. S. pneumonia was the most frequently isolated strain (54 [15.3%] of 351 patients, followed by H. influenzae (37 [10.5%], rhinoviruses (35 [9.9%], influenza A virus (23 [6.5%], enteroviruses (19 [5.4%], hMPV (14 [3.9%], PIV-1 (12 [3.4%], PIV-3 (11 [3.1%], RSV (10 [2.8%], and influenza B virus (6 [1.7%]. Mixed infections were more frequent in children (56 [20.1%] of 278 than adult patients (3 [4.1%] of 73 patients. The detection rate of the bacteria peaked in the spring season (37 [40.6%] of 91 bacteria, followed by winter (24 infections, autumn (18 infections and summer (12 infections. The prevalence of co-infection is ~40%, finding a much higher incidence of co-infection with more than one agent than that reported previously. [Dis Mol Med 2013; 1(1.000: 2-7

  1. Community-Acquired Pneumonia Hospitalization among Children with Neurologic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millman, Alexander J.; Finelli, Lyn; Bramley, Anna M.; Peacock, Georgina; Williams, Derek J.; Arnold, Sandra R.; Grijalva, Carlos G.; Anderson, Evan J.; McCullers, Jonathan A.; Ampofo, Krow; Pavia, Andrew T.; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Jain, Seema

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe and compare the clinical characteristics, outcomes, and etiology of pneumonia among children hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) with neurologic disorders, non-neurologic underlying conditions, and no underlying conditions. Study design Children <18 years old hospitalized with clinical and radiographic CAP were enrolled at 3 US children’s hospitals. Neurologic disorders included cerebral palsy, developmental delay, Down syndrome, epilepsy, non-Down syndrome chromosomal abnormalities, and spinal cord abnormalities. We compared the epidemiology, etiology, and clinical outcomes of CAP in children with neurologic disorders with those with non-neurologic underlying conditions, and those with no underlying conditions using bivariate, age-stratified, and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results From January 2010–June 2012, 2358 children with radiographically confirmed CAP were enrolled; 280 (11.9%) had a neurologic disorder (52.1% of these individuals also had non-neurologic underlying conditions), 934 (39.6%) had non-neurologic underlying conditions only, and 1144 (48.5%) had no underlying conditions. Children with neurologic disorders were older and more likely to require intensive care unit (ICU) admission than children with non-neurologic underlying conditions and children with no underlying conditions; similar proportions were mechanically ventilated. In age-stratified analysis, children with neurologic disorders were less likely to have a pathogen detected than children with non-neurologic underlying conditions. In multivariate analysis, having a neurologic disorder was associated with ICU admission for children ≥2 years of age. Conclusions Children with neurologic disorders hospitalized with CAP were less likely to have a pathogen detected and more likely to be admitted to the ICU than children without neurologic disorders. PMID:27017483

  2. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG suspected infection in a newborn with intrauterine growth restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowska-Krawczenko, I; Paprzycka, M; Korbal, P; Wiatrzyk, A; Krysztopa-Grzybowska, K; Polak, M; Czajka, U; Lutyńska, A

    2014-12-01

    A disseminated Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG ATCC 53103 infection was suspected in a 6 day-old newborn with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) symptoms, treated empirically with antibiotics and given L. rhamnosus GG with the aim of preventing antibiotic-associated gastrointestinal complications. The level of C-reactive protein on day 5 compared with day 2 was increased in spite of negative urine and cerebrospinal fluid cultures. The blood sampled on day 6 was found to be positive for lactobacilli, and the isolate was pre-identified as L. rhamnosus or Lactobacillus casei on day 11. The strain identity was then verified as L. rhamnosus GG through PCR and 16S rRNA sequencing. Genotyping with the rep-PCR and AFLP methods confirmed the 100% genetic similarity for both the strain isolated from patient blood and the probiotic product. The newborn became touch-sensitive, cried a lot, had worsening laboratory test results, and increased inflammation parameters, but no fever was observed. After a further 9 days of antibiotic therapy, blood cultures became negative, and laboratory tests improved on day 25. The patient was discharged from the hospital after 27 days. IUGR with a possible link to L. rhamnosus GG bacteraemia might be a new potential risk group, beside patients with organ failure, immunocompromised status and dysfunctional gut barrier mechanisms, for which safe use of probiotics needs careful attention. Universally accepted or improved guidelines for the safer administration of probiotics in risk groups are urgently needed. This report should not discourage the use of probiotics, but should highlight the need for their careful use in IUGR patients.

  3. CSF lactate for accurate diagnosis of community-acquired bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giulieri, S; Chapuis-Taillard, C; Jaton, K; Cometta, A; Chuard, C; Hugli, O; Du Pasquier, R; Bille, J; Meylan, P; Manuel, O; Marchetti, O

    2015-10-01

    CSF lactate measurement is recommended when nosocomial meningitis is suspected, but its value in community-acquired bacterial meningitis is controversial. We evaluated the diagnostic performance of lactate and other CSF parameters in a prospective cohort of adult patients with acute meningitis. Diagnostic accuracy of lactate and other CSF parameters in patients with microbiologically documented episodes was assessed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. The cut-offs with the best diagnostic performance were determined. Forty-five of 61 patients (74%) had a documented bacterial (n = 18; S. pneumoniae, 11; N. meningitidis, 5; other, 2) or viral (n = 27 enterovirus, 21; VZV, 3; other, 3) etiology. CSF parameters were significantly different in bacterial vs. viral meningitis, respectively (p bacterial from viral meningitis, with a cutoff set at 3.5 mmol/l providing 100% sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and efficiency. CSF lactate had the best accuracy for discriminating bacterial from viral meningitis and should be included in the initial diagnostic workup of this condition.

  4. Clinico-pathological study of atypical pathogens in community-acquired pneumonia: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sayed Zaki, Maysaa; Goda, Tarek

    2009-04-30

    Atypical respiratory pathogens such as Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Legionella species, and Chlamydia pneumoniae are isolated with increasing frequency from community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). This study highlights the importance of organisms responsible for CAP. One hundred consecutive patients with clinically and radiographically diagnosed CAP were evaluated from October 2005 to October 2006. Sputum, bronchoalveolar lavage, and blood samples were collected for microbiological culture. Determination was performed for specific immunoglobulin M (IgM) for Chlamydia pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila, Coxiella burnettii, adenovirus, and influenza virus. The most common isolated bacteria was Streptococcus pneumoniae (22%) followed by Haemophilus influenzae (18%). Mycoplasma pneumoniae was isolated from 5% and Legionella pneumophila was isolated from 5% of patients. The most common positive serological reaction was for Chlamydia pneumoniae (30%) and Adenovirus (30%). In the study of accuracy of determination of specific IgM for Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila compared to culture, the sensitivity was 60% and 80% respectively, specificity was 93.7 %, and 98.9 % respectively, and accuracy was 92 % and 97 % respectively. This study highlights the prominence of mixed bacterial/viral infections in lower respiratory tract infection diagnosis. Our data showed that at least 30% of our patients had concurrent infections. This observation raises two important questions: 1) whether sequential or concurrent viral and bacterial infections have a synergistic impact on the evolution of disease in children; and 2) should diagnostic batteries for any patient with CAP include methods for detecting both the typical and atypical bacterial or viral pathogens.

  5. Microbiology and prognostic factors of hospital- and community-acquired aspiration pneumonia in respiratory intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chaojie; Cheng, Zhenshun; Zhang, Li; Yang, Jiong

    2013-10-01

    Incidence of aspiration pneumonia in hospital-acquired pneumonia and community-acquired pneumonia is high; however, many features of this disease remain imprecise. Our objective was to characterize the microbial etiology and their antibiotic resistance and to determine the prognostic factors in aspiration pneumonia among patients admitted to a respiratory intensive care unit (RICU). A prospective survey was conducted in 112 patients exhibiting hospital-or community-acquired aspiration pneumonia in the RICU of a provincial general hospital from 2010-2012. Bronchoalveolar lavage sampling was collected, and then followed by standard culture and drug-sensitive test. Risk factors were analyzed by multivariate logistic analysis. One hundred twenty-eight strains were isolated in 94 patients, gram-negative bacilli (57.8%) was the predominant cultured microorganism, followed by fungus (28.9%) and gram-positive cocci (13.3%). The 5 main isolated bacteria demonstrated high and multiantibiotic resistance. The crude overall mortality was 43.8%, 50%, and 40%, respectively, in hospital- and community-acquired aspiration pneumonia group. Multivariate logistic analysis identified age older than 65 years, use of inotropic support, and ineffective initial therapy as independent risk factors of poor outcome. The predominant pathogenic bacteria of aspiration pneumonia in patients admitted to an RICU were antibiotic-resistant bacteria, and effective initial supportive management secured better prognosis. Copyright © 2013 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Community-acquired necrotizing pneumonia caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST30-SCCmecIVc-spat019-PVL positive in San Antonio de Areco, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvina Fernández

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is the first cause of skin and soft tissue infections, but can also produce severe diseases such as bacteremia, osteomyelitis and necrotizing pneumonia. Some S. aureus lineages have been described in cases of necrotizing pneumonia worldwide, usually in young, previously healthy patients. In this work, we describe a fatal case of necrotizing pneumonia due to community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus clone ST30-SCCmecIVc-spat019-PVL positive in an immunocompetent adult patient.

  7. Facteurs associes aux décès des nouveau-nés suspects d'infections ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Facteurs associes aux décès des nouveau-nés suspects d'infections bactériennes au Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Pédiatrique Charles de Gaulle de Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso. Solange Odile Yugbaré Ouédraogo, Désiré Méda, Lassina Dao, Fla Kouéta, Kam Ludovic, Ramata Ouédraogo Traoré, Diarra Yé ...

  8. Viral and bacterial aetiology of community-acquired pneumonia in adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijskens, Elisabeth G. W.; van Erkel, Adriana J. M.; Palmen, Fernand M. H.; Buiting, Anton G. M.; Kluytmans, Jan A. J. W.; Rossen, John W. A.

    BACKGROUND: Modern molecular techniques reveal new information on the role of respiratory viruses in community-acquired pneumonia. In this study, we tried to determine the prevalence of respiratory viruses and bacteria in patients with community-acquired pneumonia who were admitted to the hospital.

  9. The role of procalcitonin in adult patients with community-acquired pneumonia--a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Peter; Lindhardt, Bjarne Ørskov

    2012-01-01

    Promising results in relation to severity assessment and treatment of patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) have recently been presented from the study of procalcitonin (PCT) levels in these patients.......Promising results in relation to severity assessment and treatment of patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) have recently been presented from the study of procalcitonin (PCT) levels in these patients....

  10. ABIFLOX EFFICACY IN COMPLEX THERAPY OF PATIENTS WITH COMMUNITY ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. I. Lyadova

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of the study, during which the efficacy of levofloxacin in the treatment of patients with community-acquired pneumonia was evaluated. It was found that levofloxacin is a highly effective treatment for patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

  11. Impact of round-the-clock CSF Gram stain on empirical therapy for suspected central nervous system infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tissot, F; Prod'hom, G; Manuel, O; Greub, G

    2015-09-01

    The impact of round-the-clock cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Gram stain on overnight empirical therapy for suspected central nervous system (CNS) infections was investigated. All consecutive overnight CSF Gram stains between 2006 and 2011 were included. The impact of a positive or a negative test on empirical therapy was evaluated and compared to other clinical and biological indications based on institutional guidelines. Bacterial CNS infection was documented in 51/241 suspected cases. Overnight CSF Gram stain was positive in 24/51. Upon validation, there were two false-positive and one false-negative results. The sensitivity and specificity were 41 and 99 %, respectively. All patients but one had other indications for empirical therapy than Gram stain alone. Upon obtaining the Gram result, empirical therapy was modified in 7/24, including the addition of an appropriate agent (1), addition of unnecessary agents (3) and simplification of unnecessary combination therapy (3/11). Among 74 cases with a negative CSF Gram stain and without formal indication for empirical therapy, antibiotics were withheld in only 29. Round-the-clock CSF Gram stain had a low impact on overnight empirical therapy for suspected CNS infections and was associated with several misinterpretation errors. Clinicians showed little confidence in CSF direct examination for simplifying or withholding therapy before definite microbiological results.

  12. Determinants for hospitalization in " low-risk" community acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliyu Muktar H

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A variable decision in managing community acquired pneumonia (CAP is the initial site of care; in-patient versus outpatient. These variations persist despite comprehensive practice guidelines. Patients with a Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI score lower than seventy have low risk for complications and outpatient antibiotic management is recommended in this group. These patients are generally below the age of fifty years, non-nursing home residents, HIV negative and have no major cardiac, hepatic, renal or malignant diseases. Methods A retrospective analysis of 296 low-risk CAP patients evaluated within a year one period at St. Agnes Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland was undertaken. All patients were assigned a PSI score. 208 (70% were evaluated and discharged from the emergency department (E.D. to complete outpatient antibiotic therapy, while 88 (30% were hospitalized. Patients were sub-stratified into classes I-V according to PSI. A comparison of demographic, clinical, social and financial parameters was made between the E.D. discharged and hospitalized groups. Results Statistically significant differences in favor of the hospitalized group were noted for female gender (CI: 1.46-5.89, p= 0.0018, African Americans (CI: 0.31-0.73, p= 0.004, insurance coverage (CI: 0.19-0.63, p= 0.0034, temperature (CI: 0.04-0.09, p= 0.0001 and pulse rate (CI: 0.03-0.14, p= 0.0001. No statistically significant differences were observed between the two groups for altered mental status, hypotension, tachypnea, laboratory/radiological parameters and social indicators (p>0.05. The average length of stay for in-patients was 3.5 days at about eight time's higher cost than outpatient management. There was no difference in mortality or treatment failures between the two groups. The documentation rate and justifications for hospitalizing low risk CAP patients by admitting physicians was less than optimal. Conclusions High fever, tachycardia, female gender

  13. Pharmacotherapy and the risk for community-acquired pneumonia

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    Mody Lona

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some forms of pharmacotherapy are shown to increase the risk of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether pharmacotherapy with proton pump inhibitors (PPI, inhaled corticosteroids, and atypical antipsychotics was associated with the increased risk for CAP in hospitalized older adults with the adjustment of known risk factors (such as smoking status and serum albumin levels. Methods A retrospective case-control study of adults aged 65 years or older at a rural community hospital during 2004 and 2006 was conducted. Cases (N = 194 were those with radiographic evidence of pneumonia on admission. The controls were patients without the discharge diagnosis of pneumonia or acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD (N = 952. Patients with gastric tube feeding, ventilator support, requiring hemodialysis, metastatic diseases or active lung cancers were excluded. Results Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that the current use of inhaled corticosteroids (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 2.89, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.56-5.35 and atypical antipsychotics (AOR = 2.26, 95% CI = 1.23-4.15 was an independent risk factor for CAP after adjusting for confounders, including age, serum albumin levels, sex, smoking status, a history of congestive heart failure, coronary artery disease, and COPD, the current use of PPI, β2 agonist and anticholinergic bronchodilators, antibiotic(s, iron supplement, narcotics, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The crude OR and the AOR of PPI use for CAP was 1.41 [95% CI = 1.03 - 1.93] and 1.18 [95% CI = 0.80 - 1.74] after adjusting for the above confounders, respectively. Lower serum albumin levels independently increased the risk of CAP 1.89- fold by decreasing a gram per deciliter (AOR = 2.89, 95% CI = 2.01 - 4.16. Conclusion Our study reaffirmed that the use of inhaled corticosteroids and atypical antipsychotics was both

  14. Community-acquired pneumonia and positive urinary antigen tests: Factors associated with targeted antibiotic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mothes, A; Léotard, S; Nicolle, I; Smets, A; Chirio, D; Rotomondo, C; Tiger, F; Del Giudice, P; Perrin, C; Néri, D; Foucault, C; Della Guardia, M; Hyvernat, H; Roger, P-M

    2016-10-01

    The use of rapid microbiological tests is supported by antimicrobial stewardship policies. Targeted antibiotic therapy (TAT) for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) with positive urinary antigen test (UAT) has been associated with a favorable impact on outcome. We aimed to determine the factors associated with TAT prescription. We conducted a retrospective multicenter study including all patients presenting with CAP and positive UAT for Streptococcus pneumoniae or Legionella pneumophila from January 2010 to December 2013. Patients presenting with aspiration pneumonia, coinfection, and neutropenia were excluded. CAP severity was assessed using the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI). TAT was defined as the administration of amoxicillin for pneumococcal infection and either macrolides or fluoroquinolones (inactive against S. pneumoniae) for Legionella infection. A total of 861 patients were included, including 687 pneumococcal infections and 174 legionellosis from eight facilities and 37 medical departments. TAT was prescribed to 273 patients (32%). Four factors were found independently associated with a lower rate of TAT: a PSI score≥4 (OR 0.37), Hospital A (OR 0.41), hospitalization in the intensive care unit (OR 0.44), and cardiac comorbidities (OR 0.60). Four other factors were associated with a high rate of TAT: positive blood culture for S. pneumoniae (OR 2.32), Hospitals B (OR 2.34), E (OR 2.68), and H (OR 9.32). TAT in CAP with positive UAT was related to the hospitals as well as to patient characteristics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. etiology and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of community-acquired ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sheyin et. al

    to acute cystitis, pyelonephritis and urethritis (Fowlers, 1986). Uncomplicated UTI occurs in a normal urinary tract with no structural, functional or any underlying host illness to account for the infection, while in the complicated UTI underlying abnormality is thought to have enabled the infection to occur (Nicolle, 2005).

  16. Severe virus influenza A H1N1 related pneumonia and community-acquired pneumonia: differences in the evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardocci, Paula; Gullo, Caio Eduardo; Lobo, Suzana Margareth

    2013-01-01

    Objective To analyze the clinical, laboratory and evolution data of patients with severe influenza A H1N1 pneumonia and compare the data with that of patients with severe community-acquired bacterial pneumonia. Methods Cohort and retrospective study. All patients admitted to the intensive care unit between May 2009 and December 2010 with a diagnosis of severe pneumonia caused by the influenza A H1N1 virus were included in the study. Thirty patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia admitted within the same period were used as a control group. Severe community-acquired pneumonia was defined as the presence of at least one major severity criteria (ventilator or vasopressor use) or two minor criteria. Results The data of 45 patients were evaluated. Of these patients, 15 were infected with H1N1. When compared to the group with community-acquired pneumonia, patients from the H1N1 group had significantly lower leukocyte counts on admission (6,728±4,070 versus 16,038±7,863; p<0.05) and lower C-reactive protein levels (Day 2: 15.1±8.1 versus 22.1±10.9 mg/dL; p<0.05). The PaO2/FiO2 ratio values were lower in the first week in patients with H1N1. Patients who did not survive the H1N1 severe pneumonia had significantly higher levels of C-reactive protein and higher serum creatinine levels compared with patients who survived. The mortality rate was significantly higher in the H1N1 group than in the control group (53% versus 20%; p=0.056, respectivelly). Conclusion Differences in the leukocyte count, C-reactive protein concentrations and oxygenation profiles may contribute to the diagnosis and prognosis of patients with severe influenza A H1N1 virus-related pneumonia and community-acquired pneumonia. PMID:23917977

  17. Viruses and bacteria in sputum samples of children with community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honkinen, M; Lahti, E; Österback, R; Ruuskanen, O; Waris, M

    2012-03-01

    Few comprehensive studies have searched for viruses and bacteria in children with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). We identified 76 children hospitalized for pneumonia. Induced sputum samples were analysed for 18 viruses by antigen detection and PCR, and for six bacteria by culture and PCR. Viruses were found in 72% of samples, bacteria in 91%, and both in 66%. Rhinovirus (30%), human bocavirus (18%) and human metapneumovirus (14%) were the most commonly detected viruses. Two viruses were found in 22% of samples and three in 8%. The most common bacteria found were Streptococcus pneumoniae (50%), Haemophilus influenzae (38%), and Moraxella catarrhalis (28%). Rhinovirus-S. pneumoniae was the most commonly found combination of virus and bacterium (16%). All six children with treatment failure had both viruses and bacteria detected in the sputum. Otherwise, we found no special clinical characteristics in those with mixed viral-bacterial detections. With modern molecular diagnostic techniques, there are high rates of both viral and bacterial identification in childhood CAP. The clinical significance of mixed viral-bacterial infections remains unclear, although we found a potential association between them and treatment failure. © 2011 The Authors. Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2011 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  18. EXOME SEQUENCING REVEALS PRIMARY IMMUNODEFICIENCIES IN CHILDREN WITH COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA SEPSIS

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    Samira Asgari

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available One out of three pediatric sepsis deaths in high income countries occur in previously healthy children. Primary immunodeficiencies have been postulated to underlie fulminant sepsis, but this concept remains to be confirmed in clinical practice. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa is a common bacterium mostly associated with healthcare-related infections in immunocompromised individuals. However, in rare cases, it can cause sepsis in previously healthy children. We used exome sequencing and bioinformatic analysis to systematically search for genetic factors underpinning severe P. aeruginosa infection in the pediatric population. We collected blood samples from 11 previously healthy children, with no family history of immunodeficiency, who presented with severe sepsis due to community-acquired P. aeruginosa bacteremia. Genomic DNA was extracted from blood or tissue samples obtained intravitam or postmortem. We obtained high-coverage exome sequencing data and searched for rare loss-of-function variants. After rigorous filtrations, 12 potentially causal variants were identified. 2 out of 8 (25% fatal cases were found to carry novel pathogenic variants in primary immunodeficiency genes, including BTK and DNMT3B. This study demonstrates that exome sequencing allows to identify rare, deleterious human genetic variants responsible for fulminant sepsis in apparently healthy children. Diagnosing primary immunodeficiencies in such patients is of high relevance to survivors and affected families. We propose that unusually severe and fatal sepsis cases in previously healthy children should be considered for exome/genome sequencing to search for underlying primary immunodeficiencies.

  19. Necrotizing Pseudomonas aeruginosa Community-Acquired Pneumonia: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish Maharaj

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cavities are not typically associated with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. CAP due to P. aeruginosa is rare and even less commonly causes necrotizing pneumonia. We report a case of P. aeruginosa CAP that progressed to necrotizing pneumonia and was eventually fatal. Procalcitonin (PCT has been well investigated in guiding antibiotic therapy (especially CAP in adults. In this case, PCT at presentation and sequentially was negative. We discuss this caveat and present hypotheses as to the sensitivity and specificity of PCT and C-reactive protein (CRP in these patients. To better characterize P. aeruginosa CAP, we undertook a review of cases indexed in PubMed from 2001 to 2016 (n=9. The data reveal that risk factors for P. aeruginosa CAP include smoking, alcohol use, obstructive lung disease, sinusitis, and hot tub use. The route of infection for P. aeruginosa CAP remains unknown. One of the most interesting findings on reviewing cases was that P. aeruginosa CAP involves the right upper lobe in the vast majority. We suggest that when physicians in the community see patients with distinctly upper lobe necrotizing or cavitary pneumonia, they should consider P. aeruginosa in their differential diagnosis. Further studies are needed to clarify route of infection, role of PCT and CRP, and optimal therapy including drug and duration.

  20. Risk factors for community-acquired pneumonia in adults in Europe: a literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Antoni; Peetermans, Willy E; Viegi, Giovanni; Blasi, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Background Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) causes considerable morbidity and mortality in adults, particularly in the elderly. Methods Structured searches of PubMed were conducted to identify up-to-date information on the incidence of CAP in adults in Europe, as well as data on lifestyle and medical risk factors for CAP. Results The overall annual incidence of CAP in adults ranged between 1.07 to 1.2 per 1000 person-years and 1.54 to 1.7 per 1000 population and increased with age (14 per 1000 person-years in adults aged ≥65 years). Incidence was also higher in men than in women and in patients with chronic respiratory disease or HIV infection. Lifestyle factors associated with an increased risk of CAP included smoking, alcohol abuse, being underweight, having regular contact with children and poor dental hygiene. The presence of comorbid conditions, including chronic respiratory and cardiovascular diseases, cerebrovascular disease, Parkinson's disease, epilepsy, dementia, dysphagia, HIV or chronic renal or liver disease all increased the risk of CAP by twofold to fourfold. Conclusion A range of lifestyle factors and underlying medical conditions are associated with an increased risk of CAP in European adults. Understanding of the types of individual at greatest risk of CAP can help to ensure that interventions to reduce the risk of infection and burden of disease are targeted appropriately. PMID:24130229

  1. Prevalence and invasiveness of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: A meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shipeng Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reports suggest that the prevalence of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA has increased, and that CA-MRSA is more virulent than healthcare-associated (HA-MRSA. Aims: The aim of this study is to gain a better understanding of the invasiveness and prevalence of CA-MRSA in patients; we systematically reviewed the literature by conducting a meta-analysis. Materials and Methods: We searched the MEDLINE and PUBMED databases from the year these databases were established to January 2013. Results: The pooled CA-MRSA prevalence among 50,737 patients from 33 studies was 39.0% (range, 30.8-47.8%. The pooled CA-MRSA prevalence rates among pediatric and adult patients with MRSA infection were 50.2% (range, 37.5-62.8% and 42.3% (range, 16.4-73.3%, respectively. The pooled CA-MRSA prevalence rates of MRSA-infected patients in Asia, Europe, and North America were 23.1% (range, 12.0-39.8%, 37.4% (range, 21.1-56.4%, and 47.4% (range, 35.8-59.4%, respectively. Using the random effects model, we determined that the pooled odds ratio of invasive infections in CA- and HA-MRSA was 0.30 (95% confidence interval: 0.08-1.10; P = 0.07, test for heterogeneity P < 0.00001. Conclusions: The prevalence of CA-MRSA in MRSA infection varied with area and population. No difference in the ability to cause invasive infections was found between CA- and HA-MRSA. This finding challenges the view that CA-MRSA is more virulent than HA-MRSA.

  2. A Fatal Case of Community Acquired Cupriavidus Pauculus Pneumonia

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    Almasy Emoke

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cupriavidus pauculus is a rarely isolated non-fermentative, aerobic bacillus, which occasionally causes severe human infections, especially in immunocompromised patients. Strains have been isolated from various clinical and environmental sources.

  3. A Fatal Case of Community Acquired Cupriavidus Pauculus Pneumonia

    OpenAIRE

    Almasy Emoke; Szederjesi Janos; Rad Paul; Georgescu Anca

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Cupriavidus pauculus is a rarely isolated non-fermentative, aerobic bacillus, which occasionally causes severe human infections, especially in immunocompromised patients. Strains have been isolated from various clinical and environmental sources.

  4. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT evaluation of children and young adults with suspected spinal fusion hardware infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagrosky, Brian M. [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Children' s Hospital Colorado, 12123 E. 16th Ave., Box 125, Aurora, CO (United States); University of Colorado School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States); Hayes, Kari L.; Fenton, Laura Z. [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Children' s Hospital Colorado, 12123 E. 16th Ave., Box 125, Aurora, CO (United States); Koo, Phillip J. [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Evaluation of the child with spinal fusion hardware and concern for infection is challenging because of hardware artifact with standard imaging (CT and MRI) and difficult physical examination. Studies using {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT combine the benefit of functional imaging with anatomical localization. To discuss a case series of children and young adults with spinal fusion hardware and clinical concern for hardware infection. These people underwent FDG PET/CT imaging to determine the site of infection. We performed a retrospective review of whole-body FDG PET/CT scans at a tertiary children's hospital from December 2009 to January 2012 in children and young adults with spinal hardware and suspected hardware infection. The PET/CT scan findings were correlated with pertinent clinical information including laboratory values of inflammatory markers, postoperative notes and pathology results to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of FDG PET/CT. An exempt status for this retrospective review was approved by the Institution Review Board. Twenty-five FDG PET/CT scans were performed in 20 patients. Spinal fusion hardware infection was confirmed surgically and pathologically in six patients. The most common FDG PET/CT finding in patients with hardware infection was increased FDG uptake in the soft tissue and bone immediately adjacent to the posterior spinal fusion rods at multiple contiguous vertebral levels. Noninfectious hardware complications were diagnosed in ten patients and proved surgically in four. Alternative sources of infection were diagnosed by FDG PET/CT in seven patients (five with pneumonia, one with pyonephrosis and one with superficial wound infections). FDG PET/CT is helpful in evaluation of children and young adults with concern for spinal hardware infection. Noninfectious hardware complications and alternative sources of infection, including pneumonia and pyonephrosis, can be diagnosed. FDG PET/CT should be the first-line cross-sectional imaging study in

  5. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA: molecular background, virulence, and relevance for public health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MF Bonesso

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CoNS are frequently found in nosocomial environments as the main pathogen in several infections. In 1961, reports of nosocomial S. aureus resistant to methicillin, the drug of choice against penicillin-resistant strains, required new alternatives and vancomycin started being used to treat infections caused by methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA was first reported in 1990 affecting patients without risk factors for infection with MRSA of hospital origin. MRSA of community origin harbor the genes responsible for the synthesis of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL, a toxin associated with skin and soft tissue infections and that carries the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec type IV. CA-MRSA emergence has caused great impact on the worldwide medical community since the presence of this pathogen in patients without risk factors represents a high risk to public health.

  6. Additive value of three-phase of Tc-99m HMPAO WBC scintigraphy in patients with suspected knee prosthesis infection

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    Kim, Jin Suk; Lim, Seok Tae; Jeong, Hwan Jeong; Sohn, Myung Hee [Chonbuk National University Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    We investigated if three-phase Tc-99m HMPAO WBC scintigraphy (TP-WBC) to detect infection in patients with knee protheses has more additive values than conventional Tc-99m HMPAO WBC scintigraphy (C-WBC). Thirty patients (M: F=8: 22, Age; 69.26.2 yrs) with suspected knee prothesis infection were enrolled in our study. We performed Tc-99m HMPAO WBC scintigraphies at 4 different time points after the injection of the labeled leukocytes; Immediately after the bolus injection (perfusion phase image), 1 min (blood-pool phase image), and 1 and 3 hours (delayed static images, C-WBC). The final diagnosis of infection was based on surgical, histologic, and bacteriologic data and other follow-up studies. We compared with diagnostic performance between TP-WBC and C-WBC. Twenty patients (66.7%) finally had infected prothesis, the other ten (33.3%) didn't have it. C-WBC showed 85.0% of sensitivity, 30.0% of specificity, 70.8% of PPV, 50.0% of PNV, and 66.7% of accuracy. TP-WBC also showed 95.0% of sensitivity, 30.0% of specificity, 73.1 % of PPV, 75.0% of PNV, and 73.3% of accuracy. TP-WBC demonstrated higher sensitivity and accuracy than C-WBC. Three-phase images of Tc-99m HMPAO WBC scintigraphy may have more additive value to detect infection in patients with suspected knee prosthesis infection.

  7. Association Between Hospitalization With Community-Acquired Laboratory-Confirmed Influenza Pneumonia and Prior Receipt of Influenza Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grijalva, Carlos G; Zhu, Yuwei; Williams, Derek J; Self, Wesley H; Ampofo, Krow; Pavia, Andrew T; Stockmann, Chris R; McCullers, Jonathan; Arnold, Sandra R; Wunderink, Richard G; Anderson, Evan J; Lindstrom, Stephen; Fry, Alicia M; Foppa, Ivo M; Finelli, Lyn; Bramley, Anna M; Jain, Seema; Griffin, Marie R; Edwards, Kathryn M

    2015-10-13

    Few studies have evaluated the relationship between influenza vaccination and pneumonia, a serious complication of influenza infection. To assess the association between influenza vaccination status and hospitalization for community-acquired laboratory-confirmed influenza pneumonia. The Etiology of Pneumonia in the Community (EPIC) study was a prospective observational multicenter study of hospitalizations for community-acquired pneumonia conducted from January 2010 through June 2012 at 4 US sites. In this case-control study, we used EPIC data from patients 6 months or older with laboratory-confirmed influenza infection and verified vaccination status during the influenza seasons and excluded patients with recent hospitalization, from chronic care residential facilities, and with severe immunosuppression. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios, comparing the odds of vaccination between influenza-positive (case) and influenza-negative (control) patients with pneumonia, controlling for demographics, comorbidities, season, study site, and timing of disease onset. Vaccine effectiveness was estimated as (1 - adjusted odds ratio) × 100%. Influenza vaccination, verified through record review. Influenza pneumonia, confirmed by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction performed on nasal/oropharyngeal swabs. Overall, 2767 patients hospitalized for pneumonia were eligible for the study; 162 (5.9%) had laboratory-confirmed influenza. Twenty-eight of 162 cases (17%) with influenza-associated pneumonia and 766 of 2605 controls (29%) with influenza-negative pneumonia had been vaccinated. The adjusted odds ratio of prior influenza vaccination between cases and controls was 0.43 (95% CI, 0.28-0.68; estimated vaccine effectiveness, 56.7%; 95% CI, 31.9%-72.5%). Among children and adults hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia, those with laboratory-confirmed influenza-associated pneumonia, compared with those with pneumonia not

  8. Association between hospitalization with community acquired laboratory-confirmed influenza pneumonia and prior receipt of influenza vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grijalva, Carlos G.; Zhu, Yuwei; Williams, Derek J.; Self, Wesley H.; Ampofo, Krow; Pavia, Andrew T.; Stockmann, Chris R.; McCullers, Jonathan; Arnold, Sandra R.; Wunderink, Richard G.; Anderson, Evan J.; Lindstrom, Stephen; Fry, Alicia M.; Foppa, Ivo M.; Finelli, Lyn; Bramley, Anna M.; Jain, Seema; Griffin, Marie R.; Edwards, Kathryn M.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Few studies have evaluated the relationship between influenza vaccination and pneumonia, a serious complication of influenza infection. Objective Assess the association between influenza vaccination status and hospitalization for community-acquired laboratory-confirmed influenza pneumonia. Design, Setting and Participants The Etiology of Pneumonia in the Community (EPIC) study was a prospective observational multicenter study of hospitalizations for community-acquired pneumonia conducted from January 2010 through June 2012 in four US sites. We used EPIC study data from patients ≥6 months of age with laboratory-confirmed influenza infection and verified vaccination status during the influenza seasons, and excluded patients with recent hospitalization, from chronic care residential facilities, and with severe immunosuppression. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios, comparing the odds of vaccination between influenza-positive (cases) and influenza-negative (controls) pneumonia patients, controlling for demographics, co-morbidities, season, study site and timing of disease onset. Vaccine effectiveness was estimated as (1-odds ratio) × 100%. Exposure Influenza vaccination, verified through record review. Outcome Influenza pneumonia, confirmed by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction performed on nasal/oropharyngeal swabs. Results Overall, 2767 patients hospitalized for pneumonia were eligible for the study; 162 (5.9%) were influenza positive. Twenty-eight (17%) of 162 cases with influenza-associated pneumonia and 766 (29%) of 2605 controls with influenza-negative pneumonia had been vaccinated. The adjusted odds ratio of prior influenza vaccination between cases and controls was 0.43 (95% CI 0.28–0.68 [estimated vaccine effectiveness 56.7% (95% CI 31.9–72.5)]). Conclusions and relevance Among children and adults hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia, those with laboratory confirmed influenza

  9. Guidelines for the use of chest radiographs in community-acquired pneumonia in children and adolescents

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    Andronikou, Savvas; Lambert, Elena; Hilder, Lucy [University of Bristol, Department of Paediatric Radiology, Bristol Royal Hospital for Children, Bristol (United Kingdom); CRICBristol, Bristol (United Kingdom); Halton, Jarred; Crumley, Iona; Kosack, Cara [Medecins Sans Frontieres, Diagnostic Network, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lyttle, Mark D. [Bristol Royal Hospital for Children, Emergency Department, Bristol (United Kingdom); University of the West of England, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2017-10-15

    National guidance from the United Kingdom and the United States on community-acquired pneumonia in children states that chest radiographs are not recommended routinely in uncomplicated cases. The main reason in the ambulatory setting is that there is no evidence of a substantial impact on clinical outcomes. However clinical practice and adherence to guidance is multifactorial and includes the clinical context (developed vs. developing world), the confidence of the attending physician, the changing incidence of complications (according to the success of immunisation programs), the availability of alternative imaging (and its relationship to perceived risks of radiation) and the reliability of the interpretation of imaging. In practice, chest radiographs are performed frequently for suspected pneumonia in children. Time pressures facing clinicians at the front line, difficulties in distinguishing which children require admission, restricted bed numbers for admissions, imaging-resource limitations, perceptions regarding risk from procedures, novel imaging modalities and the probability of other causes for the child's presentation all need to be factored into a guideline. Other drivers that often weigh in, depending on the setting, include cost-effectiveness and the fear of litigation. Not all guidelines designed for the developed world can therefore be applied to the developing world, and practice guidelines require regular review in the context of new information. In addition, radiologists must improve radiographic diagnosis of pneumonia, reach consensus on the interpretive terminology that clarifies their confidence regarding the presence of pneumonia and act to replace one imaging technique with another whenever there is proof of improved accuracy or reliability. (orig.)

  10. [Ability of procalcitonin to predict bacteremia in patients with community acquired pneumonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julián-Jiménez, Agustín; Timón Zapata, Jesús; Laserna Mendieta, Emilio José; Parejo Miguez, Raquel; Flores Chacartegui, Manuel; Gallardo Schall, Pablo

    2014-04-07

    To analyze the usefulness and ability of procalcitonin (PCT) to predict the presence of bacteremia in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae) or other bacteria. This is an observational, prospective and descriptive study involving patients who were diagnosed with CAP in our Emergency Department. Data collected included socio-demographic and comorbidity variables, Charlson index, stage in the Pneumonia Severity Index and criteria of severe NAC, microbiologic studies and biomarker determinations (PCT and C reactive protein). The follow-up was carried out during 30 days to calculate the predictive power and the diagnostic performance for bacteremia caused or not by S. pneumoniae. Four hundred and seventy-four patients were finally included in the study. Blood cultures were positive in 85 individuals (17.9%) and S. pneumoniae was identified as the responsible pathogen in 75 of them (88.4%) (in 5 cases together with another agent). The area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve for PCT to predict bacteremia (caused by S. pneumoniae or not) was 0.988 (95% confidence interval 0.908-0.995; P98% and>10, respectively. The most frequently isolated serotypes of S. pneumoniae were 19A, 7F, 1 and 3. The highest mean levels of PCT were found in serotypes 7F, 19A, 3 and 1, which showed statistically significant differences with regard to the others serotypes considered (P=.008). Serotypes associated with the highest percentage of severe sepsis-septic shock, 30-days mortality and multi-lobe or bilateral affection were 3, 1 and 19A; 1, 3 and 19A; and 3, 19A and 6A, respectively. PCT had a remarkable diagnostic ability to discard or suspect bacteremia and to guide the etiology of CAP caused by S. pneumoniae. Serotypes 1, 3, 19A and 7F showed greater frequency, systemic inflammatory response and clinical severity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  11. Oseltamivir Use Among Children and Adults Hospitalized With Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oboho, Ikwo K; Bramley, Anna; Finelli, Lyn; Fry, Alicia; Ampofo, Krow; Arnold, Sandra R; Self, Wesley H; Williams, Derek J; Courtney, D Mark; Zhu, Yuwei; Anderson, Evan J; Grijalva, Carlos G; McCullers, Jonathan A; Wunderink, Richard G; Pavia, Andrew T; Edwards, Kathryn M; Jain, Seema

    2017-01-01

    Data on oseltamivir treatment among hospitalized community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) patients are limited. Patients hospitalized with CAP at 6 hospitals during the 2010-2012 influenza seasons were included. We assessed factors associated with oseltamivir treatment using logistic regression. Oseltamivir treatment was provided to 89 of 1627 (5%) children (<18 years) and 143 of 1051 (14%) adults. Among those with positive clinician-ordered influenza tests, 39 of 61 (64%) children and 37 of 48 (77%) adults received oseltamivir. Among children, oseltamivir treatment was associated with hospital A (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 2.76; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.36-4.88), clinician-ordered testing performed (aOR, 2.44; 95% CI, 1.47-5.19), intensive care unit (ICU) admission (aOR, 2.09; 95% CI, 1.27-3.45), and age ≥2 years (aOR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.16-1.76). Among adults, oseltamivir treatment was associated with clinician-ordered testing performed (aOR, 8.38; 95% CI, 4.64-15.12), hospitals D and E (aOR, 3.46-5.11; 95% CI, 1.75-11.01), Hispanic ethnicity (aOR, 2.06; 95% CI, 1.18-3.59), and ICU admission (aOR, 2.05; 95% CI, 1.34-3.13). Among patients hospitalized with CAP during influenza season, oseltamivir treatment was moderate overall and associated with clinician-ordered testing, severe illness, and specific hospitals. Increased clinician education is needed to include influenza in the differential diagnosis for hospitalized CAP patients and to test and treat patients empirically if influenza is suspected. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Infectious Diseases Society of America 2016. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  12. Guidelines for the use of chest radiographs in community-acquired pneumonia in children and adolescents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andronikou, Savvas; Lambert, Elena; Hilder, Lucy; Halton, Jarred; Crumley, Iona; Kosack, Cara; Lyttle, Mark D.

    2017-01-01

    National guidance from the United Kingdom and the United States on community-acquired pneumonia in children states that chest radiographs are not recommended routinely in uncomplicated cases. The main reason in the ambulatory setting is that there is no evidence of a substantial impact on clinical outcomes. However clinical practice and adherence to guidance is multifactorial and includes the clinical context (developed vs. developing world), the confidence of the attending physician, the changing incidence of complications (according to the success of immunisation programs), the availability of alternative imaging (and its relationship to perceived risks of radiation) and the reliability of the interpretation of imaging. In practice, chest radiographs are performed frequently for suspected pneumonia in children. Time pressures facing clinicians at the front line, difficulties in distinguishing which children require admission, restricted bed numbers for admissions, imaging-resource limitations, perceptions regarding risk from procedures, novel imaging modalities and the probability of other causes for the child's presentation all need to be factored into a guideline. Other drivers that often weigh in, depending on the setting, include cost-effectiveness and the fear of litigation. Not all guidelines designed for the developed world can therefore be applied to the developing world, and practice guidelines require regular review in the context of new information. In addition, radiologists must improve radiographic diagnosis of pneumonia, reach consensus on the interpretive terminology that clarifies their confidence regarding the presence of pneumonia and act to replace one imaging technique with another whenever there is proof of improved accuracy or reliability. (orig.)

  13. Community-acquired diarrhea associated with Clostridium difficile in an HIV-positive cancer patient: first case report in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecília L. Costa

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is the most important cause of nosocomial diarrhea, mainly associated with antibiotic use and immunodeficiency. Although, an increased incidence of community-acquired C. difficile infection (CA-CDI has been reported worldwide, this infection has been under-diagnosed in Latin America. This is the first report of a CA-CDI case in Latin America, in an HIV-positive patient with cancer.

  14. Impact of a decision-making aid for suspected urinary tract infections on antibiotic overuse in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMaughan, Darcy K; Nwaiwu, Obioma; Zhao, Hongwei; Frentzel, Elizabeth; Mehr, David; Imanpour, Sara; Garfinkel, Steven; Phillips, Charles D

    2016-04-15

    Antibiotics are highly utilized in nursing homes. The aim of the study was to test the effectiveness of a decision-making aid for urinary tract infection management on reducing antibiotic prescriptions for suspected bacteriuria in the urine without symptoms, known as asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) in twelve nursing homes in Texas. A pre- and post-test with comparison group design was used. The data was collected through retrospective chart review. The study sample included 669 antibiotic prescriptions for suspected urinary tract infections ordered for 547 nursing home residents. The main measurement for the outcome variable was whether an antibiotic was prescribed for suspected urinary tract infections with no symptoms present. Most of the prescriptions for antibiotics UTIs were written without documented symptoms - thus for asymptomatic bacteuria (ASB) (71 % during the pre-intervention period). Exposure to the decision-making aid decreased the number of prescriptions written for ASB (from 78 % to 65 % in the low-intensity homes and from 65 % to 57 % in the high-intensity homes), and decreased odds of a prescription being written for ASB (OR = 0.63, 95 % CI = 0.25 - 1.60 for low-intensity homes; OR = 0.79, 95 % CI = 0.33 - 1.88 for high-intensity homes). The odds of a prescription being written for ASB decreased significantly in homes that succeeded in implementing the decision-making aid (OR = 0.35, 95 % CI = 0.16-0.76), compared to homes with no fidelity. The decision-making aid improved antibiotic stewardship in nursing homes.

  15. Role of 'atypical pathogens' among adult hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Grace; Ip, Margaret; Lee, Nelson; Rainer, Timothy H; Man, Shin Y; Cockram, Clive S; Antonio, Gregory E; Ng, Margaret H L; Chan, Michael H M; Chau, Shirley S L; Mak, Paulina; Chan, Paul K S; Ahuja, Anil T; Sung, Joseph J Y; Hui, David S C

    2009-11-01

    Agents such as Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila are recognized as important causes of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) worldwide. This study examined the role of these 'atypical pathogens' (AP) among adult hospitalized patients with CAP. A prospective, observational study of consecutive adult CAP (clinico-radiological diagnosis) patients hospitalized during 2004-2005 was conducted. Causal organisms were determined using cultures, antigen testing and paired serology. Clinical/laboratory/radiological variables and outcomes were compared between different aetiologies, and a clinical prediction rule for AP was constructed. There were 1193 patients studied (mean age 70.8 +/- 18.0 years, men 59.3%). Causal organisms were identified in 468 (39.2%) patients: 'bacterial' (48.7%), 'viral' (26.9%), 'AP' (28.6%). The AP infections comprised Mycoplasma or Chlamydophila pneumoniae (97.8%) and co-infection with bacteria/virus (30.6%). The majority of AP infections involved elderly patients (63.4%) with comorbidities (41.8%), and more than one-third of patients were classified as 'intermediate' or 'high' risk CAP on presentation (pneumonia severity index IV-V (35.1%); CURB-65 2-5 (42.5%)). Patients with AP infections had disease severities and outcomes similar to patients with CAP due to other organisms (oxygen therapy 29.1% vs 29.8%; non-invasive ventilation 3.7% vs 3.3%; admission to the intensive care unit 4.5% vs 2.7%; length of hospitalization 6 day vs 7 day; 30-day mortality: 2.2% vs 6.0%; overall P > 0.05). Age or =38.0 degrees C, respiratory rate 130 mmol/L, leucocyte count pneumoniae and C. pneumoniae as single/co-pathogens are important causes of severe pneumonia among older adults. No reliable clinical indicators exist, so empirical antibiotic coverage for hospitalized CAP patients may need to be considered.

  16. [Atypical pathogens in adult patients admitted with community-acquired pneumonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yi-hong; Deng, Rui; Fu, Rong-rong; Li, De-zhi; Chen, Jie; Chen, Yu-sheng; Hu, Cheng-ping; Li, Jia-shu; Wang, Rui-qin; Wei, Li-ping; Zhong, Xiao-ning; Tian, Gui-zhen; Mu, Lan; Wan, Huan-ying; Yu, Qin; He, Pei; Ma, Jian-jun; Gao, Zhan-cheng

    2010-09-01

    To investigate the current status of atypical pathogen associated infections in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in adults, and their clinical attributes. Clinical data, sputum specimens from acute phase, and paired sera from acute- and convalescent-phases of CAP in 153 adult patients were collected from May 2005 to May 2008 in multiple medical centers. Chlamydia pneumoniae (Cpn) IgG antibody, and Legionella pneumophila (LP) mixed IgG, IgA and IgM antibodies were determined by indirect immuno-fluorescent assay. Mycoplasma pneumoniae (Mpn) mixed IgG, IgA and IgM antibodies were determined by passive agglutination assay. All the sputum specimens were routinely cultured for bacterial isolation. Fifty-two (34%) out of the 153 cases were diagnosed as atypical CAP per the paired serum-antibody assay. Forty-seven of the 52 atypical CAP cases were infected by one atypical pathogen, 38 with Cpn, 4 with Mpn, and 5 with LP, while 5 out of the 52 atypical CAP cases were infected by 2 pathogens, Cpn and Mpnin 2, Cpn and LP in 3 cases. Eleven cases (21.2%) out of the 52 patients with atypical pneumonia were complicated with bacterial infection. Except peripheral white blood count was significant increased in the group of typical (bacterial only) pneumonia (WBC > 10 × 10⁹)/L, P = 0.03), all the other clinical parameters did not show statistically significant difference between the typical and the atypical pneumonia groups. Our data suggest that Chlamydia pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Legionella pneumophila are common pathogens of adult CAP. Chlamydia pneumoniae might be the most frequent atypical pathogen associated with atypical CAP.

  17. PNEUMOCOCCAL CAPSULAR ANTIGEN-DETECTION AND PNEUMOCOCCAL SEROLOGY IN PATIENTS WITH COMMUNITY ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BOERSMA, WG; LOWENBERG, A; HOLLOWAY, Y; KUTTSCHRUTTER, H; SNIJDER, JAM; KOETER, GH

    1991-01-01

    Background Methods to determine the microbial cause of community acquired pneumonia include detection of pneumococcal antigen and measurement of pneumococcal capsular antibody response. Their usefulness compared with conventional microbiological techniques was investigated in patients with

  18. Risk factors for community-acquired bacterial meningitis in adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adriani, K.S.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is an inflammation of the meninges and occurs when bacteria invade the subarachnoid space. The meninges are the protective membranes that surround the brain and the spinal cord. Bacterial meningitis is a life-threatening disease because the proximity of the infection to the

  19. Outcome of community-acquired pneumonia with cardiac complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Eman Shebl

    2015-07-01

    Conclusions: Cardiac complications are common in the admitted patients with pneumonia and they are associated with increased pneumonia severity and increased cardiovascular risk, these complications adds to the risk of mortality, so optimal management of these events may reduce the burden of death associated with this infection.

  20. The incidence of epstein-barr virus primary infection among suspected patients referred to namazi hospital of shiraz, iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeini, Mahsa; Ziyaeyan, Mazyar; Asaei, Sadaf; Behzadi, Mohammad Amin

    2015-04-01

    Many children become infected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) during their childhood. Since the clinical profile of EBV primary infection is challenging, it is important to use the best diagnostic clinical means. Detection of IgM against viral capsid antigen (VCA) by ELISA has been shown to be a reliable method. This study was conducted to demonstrate the incidence of EBV primary infection, among suspected patients referred to Namazi hospital, Shiraz, Iran. The sample included 346 patients with an age range of 0 to 20 years (6.31 ± 4.66: 10.97 years). A volume of 5 mL of blood was collected from each case. The patients were divided to four age groups. The sera were tested for the presence of VCA-IgM by commercially available Anti-EBV-VCA ELISA kit. The results indicated that 104 (30.0%) of the patients were EBV VCA IgM positive, with no significant difference in the incidence of EBV primary infection between males and females. However, the incidence of infection was significantly different between age group I (0 - 5 years) and III (11 - 15 years), and also between age group I (0 - 5 years) and IV (16 - 20 years) (P < 0.05). Considering the results, accurate and on time diagnosis of EBV primary infection in both children and adolescents will help prevent unnecessary hospitalization, medication and incorrect medical decisions. In addition, this will decrease further treatment costs and related medical procedures.

  1. The clinical utility of FDG PET/CT among solid organ transplant recipients suspected of malignancy or infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wareham, Neval E.; Lundgren, J.D.; Cunha-Bang, C. da; Sengeloev, H.; Gustafsson, F.; Iversen, M.; Johannesen, H.H.; Kjaer, A.; Fischer, B.M.; Rasmussen, A.; Soerensen, S.S.

    2017-01-01

    Solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients are at high risk of developing infections and malignancies. 18 F-FDG PET/CT may enable timely detection of these diseases and help to ensure early intervention. We aimed to describe the clinical utility of FDG PET/CT in consecutive, diagnostic unresolved SOT recipients transplanted from January 2004 to May 2015. Recipients with a post-transplant FDG PET/CT performed as part of diagnostic work-up were included. Detailed chart reviews were done to extract relevant clinical information and determine the final diagnosis related to the FDG PET/CT. Based on a priori defined criteria and the final diagnosis, results from each scan were classified as true or false, and diagnostic values determined. Among the 1,814 recipients in the cohort, 145 had an FDG PET/CT performed; 122 under the indication of diagnostically unresolved symptoms with a suspicion of malignancy or infection. The remaining (N = 23) had an FDG PET/CT to follow-up on a known disease or to stage a known malignancy. The 122 recipients underwent a total of 133 FDG PET/CT scans performed for a suspected malignancy (66 %) or an infection (34 %). Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the FDG PET/CT in diagnosing these conditions were 97, 84, 87, and 96 %, respectively. FDG PET/CT is an accurate diagnostic tool for the work-up of diagnostic unresolved SOT recipients suspected of malignancy or infection. The high sensitivity and NPV underlines the potential usefulness of PET/CT for excluding malignancy or focal infections in this often complex clinical situation. (orig.)

  2. The clinical utility of FDG PET/CT among solid organ transplant recipients suspected of malignancy or infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wareham, Neval E.; Lundgren, J.D. [Rigshospitalet, Centre for Health and Infectious Disease Research (CHIP), Department of Infectious Diseases, Copenhagen (Denmark); Cunha-Bang, C. da; Sengeloev, H. [Rigshospitalet, Department of Haematology, Copenhagen (Denmark); Gustafsson, F.; Iversen, M. [Rigshospitalet, Department of Cardiology, Copenhagen (Denmark); Johannesen, H.H.; Kjaer, A.; Fischer, B.M. [Rigshospitalet, Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Copenhagen (Denmark); Rasmussen, A. [Rigshospitalet, Department of Surgical Gastroenterology, Copenhagen (Denmark); Soerensen, S.S. [Rigshospitalet, Department of Nephrology, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2017-03-15

    Solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients are at high risk of developing infections and malignancies. {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT may enable timely detection of these diseases and help to ensure early intervention. We aimed to describe the clinical utility of FDG PET/CT in consecutive, diagnostic unresolved SOT recipients transplanted from January 2004 to May 2015. Recipients with a post-transplant FDG PET/CT performed as part of diagnostic work-up were included. Detailed chart reviews were done to extract relevant clinical information and determine the final diagnosis related to the FDG PET/CT. Based on a priori defined criteria and the final diagnosis, results from each scan were classified as true or false, and diagnostic values determined. Among the 1,814 recipients in the cohort, 145 had an FDG PET/CT performed; 122 under the indication of diagnostically unresolved symptoms with a suspicion of malignancy or infection. The remaining (N = 23) had an FDG PET/CT to follow-up on a known disease or to stage a known malignancy. The 122 recipients underwent a total of 133 FDG PET/CT scans performed for a suspected malignancy (66 %) or an infection (34 %). Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the FDG PET/CT in diagnosing these conditions were 97, 84, 87, and 96 %, respectively. FDG PET/CT is an accurate diagnostic tool for the work-up of diagnostic unresolved SOT recipients suspected of malignancy or infection. The high sensitivity and NPV underlines the potential usefulness of PET/CT for excluding malignancy or focal infections in this often complex clinical situation. (orig.)

  3. Risk factors for community-acquired pneumonia among adults in Kenya: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthumbi, Esther; Lowe, Brett S; Muyodi, Cyprian; Getambu, Esther; Gleeson, Fergus; Scott, J Anthony G

    2017-01-01

    Pneumonia is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among adults worldwide; however, the risk factors for community-acquired pneumonia in Africa are not well characterized. The authors recruited 281 cases of community-acquired pneumonia and 1202 hospital controls among patients aged ≥15 years who attended Kilifi District Hospital/Coast Provincial General Hospital in Kenya between 1994 and 6. Cases were admissions with an acute illness with ≥2 respiratory signs and evidence of consolidation on a chest radiograph. Controls were patients without signs of pneumonia, frequency matched by age, sex and hospital. Risk factors related to socio-demographic factors, drug use, clinical history, contact patterns and exposures to indoor air pollution were investigated by questionnaire, anthropometric measurements and laboratory assays. Associations were evaluated using a hierarchical logistic regression model. Pneumonia was associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection (Odds Ratio [OR] 2.06, 95% CI 1.44-3.08), anemia (OR 1.91, 1.31-2.74), splenomegaly (OR 2.04, 95% CI 1.14-3.41), recent history of pneumonia (OR 4.65, 95% CI 1.66-12.5), history of pneumonia >2 years previously (OR 17.13, 95% CI 5.01-60.26), coryza in the 2 weeks preceding hospitalization (OR 2.09, 95% CI 1.44-3.03), current smoking (2.19, 95% CI 1.39-3.70), use of khat (OR 3.44, 95% CI 1.72-7.15), use of snuff (OR 2.67, 95% CI 1.35-5.49) and contact with several animal species. Presence of a Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) scar was associated with protection (OR 0.51, 95% CI 0.32-0.82). The risk factors varied significantly by sex. Pneumonia in Kenyan adults was associated with global risk factors, such as HIV and smoking, but also with specific local factors like drug use and contact with animals. Intervention strategies should account for sex-specific differences in risk factors.

  4. Risk factors for community-acquired bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundbo, Lene Fogt; Benfield, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a significant burden of disease and mortality in all age groups worldwide despite the development of effective conjugated vaccines. The pathogenesis of bacterial meningitis is based on complex and incompletely understood host-pathogen interactions. Some of these are pathogen-specific, while some are shared between different bacteria. We searched the database PubMed to identify host risk factors for bacterial meningitis caused by the pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis and Haemophilus influenzae type b, because they are three most common causative bacteria beyond the neonatal period. We describe a number of risk factors; including socioeconomic factors, age, genetic variation of the host and underlying medical conditions associated with increased susceptibility to invasive bacterial infections in both children and adults. As conjugated vaccines are available for these infections, it is of utmost importance to identify high risk patients to be able to prevent invasive disease.

  5. Risk factors for community-acquired bacterial meningitis in adults

    OpenAIRE

    Adriani, K.S.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is an inflammation of the meninges and occurs when bacteria invade the subarachnoid space. The meninges are the protective membranes that surround the brain and the spinal cord. Bacterial meningitis is a life-threatening disease because the proximity of the infection to the brain and still has a high mortality. Bacterial meningitis is described as early as the 5th century B.C. in Hippocratic writings. Organisms causing meningitis were identified in the late 19th century. ...

  6. Fastidious intracellular bacteria as causal agents of community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamoth, Frédéric; Greub, Gilbert

    2010-07-01

    Intracellular bacteria are common causes of community-acquired pneumonia that grow poorly or not at all on standard culture media and do not respond to beta-lactam antibiotic therapy. Apart from well-established agents of pneumonia such as Legionella pneumophila, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae, Chlamydia psittaci and Coxiella burnetii, some new emerging pathogens have recently been recognized, mainly Parachlamydia acanthamoebae and Simkania negevensis, two Chlamydia-related bacteria. Most of them are causes of benign and self-limited infections. However, they may cause severe pneumonia in some cases (i.e., Legionnaires' disease) and they may cause outbreaks representing a public health problem deserving prompt recognition and appropriate therapy. Although extrapulmonary manifestations are often present, no clinical features allow them to be distinguished from classical bacterial agents of pneumonia such as Streptococcus pneumoniae. Thus, specific molecular diagnostic tools are very helpful for early recognition of the offending bacteria, whereas serology often only allows retrospective or late diagnosis. Macrolides remain the best empirical treatment of intracellular respiratory pathogens, although some observational studies suggest that quinolones may be superior for the treatment of legionellosis.

  7. [Community-acquired bacteremia in adult patients attending the emergency service of a teaching hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artico, Muriel J; Rocchi, Marta; Gasparotto, Ana; Ocaña Carrizo, Valeria; Navarro, Mercedes; Mollo, Valeria; Avilés, Natalia; Romero, Vanessa; Carrillo, Sonia; Monterisi, Aída

    2012-01-01

    Bacteremia is an important cause of morbimortality. This study describes the episodes of community-acquired bacteremia in adult patients registered at our hospital. Between January 2005, and December 2009, 271 episodes were studied. The diagnostic yield of blood cultures was 13.5 %. A total of 52 % of patients were male and 48 % female. The mean age was 60. The most frequent comorbidities were: diabetes (21 %), neoplasia (18 %), cardiopathy (11 %), and HIV infection (8 %). The focus was- respiratory (21 %), urinary (15 %), cutaneous (9 %), and others (13 %). Gram-positive bacteria prevailed (51.4%). The most frequent microorganisms were Escherichia coli (25 %), Streptococcus pneumoniae (22.9 %), and Staphylococcus aureus (12.3 %). Bacteremia was polymicrobial in 7 % of the cases. Thirty three percent of E. coli isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin and 6 % to ceftazidime. Fourteen percent of S. aureus strains were resistant to oxacillin whereas only 7 % of S. pneumoniae expressed high resistance to penicillin with MICs = 2 ug/ml, according to meningitis breakpoints.

  8. Ceftaroline fosamil for the treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggiore, Christy; Vazquez, Jose A; Guervil, David J; Ramani, Ananthakrishnan; Jandourek, Alena; Cole, Phillip; Friedland, H David

    2015-01-01

    The Clinical Assessment Program and Teflaro(®) Utilization Registry (CAPTURE) is a multicenter study evaluating the clinical use of ceftaroline fosamil in patients with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) or acute bacterial skin and skin structure infection. Data were collected between August 2011 and February 2013, from 398 evaluable patients receiving treatment at 33 sites in the USA. This manuscript presents data collected from patients with CABP who received care in an intensive care unit (ICU) or in general medical wards (35% and 64% of evaluable patients, respectively). The majority of ICU and general medical ward patients had underlying comorbidities (78% and 74%, respectively), with structural lung disease being the most common (42% in the ICU and 40% in general medical wards). Patients admitted to the ICU had a longer duration of stay, a longer duration of symptoms before treatment, and a longer duration of ceftaroline fosamil therapy than did general medical ward patients. Most patients treated in the ICU and in general medical wards were given ceftaroline fosamil as second-line therapy (87% and 80%, respectively). The overall rate of clinical success for patients treated with ceftaroline fosamil was 68% in the ICU and 85% in the general medical wards. Clinical success for patients receiving ceftaroline fosamil as a second-line agent was 84% in the ICU and 86% in general medical wards. These findings indicate that ceftaroline fosamil is a viable treatment option for CABP, both in the ICU and in general medical wards.

  9. Ceftaroline fosamil for the treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udeani, George; Evans, John; Cole, Phillip; Friedland, H David

    2014-08-01

    The Clinical Assessment Program and Teflaro Utilization Registry (CAPTURE) is a multicenter study, assessing the contemporary use of ceftaroline fosamil in patients with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) or acute bacterial skin and skin structure infection. This article discusses the data collected from 528 evaluable patients with CABP, from 39 sites in the United States, between August 2011 and April 2013. The majority of patients (51%) were elderly (aged ≥ 65 years), most of whom were treated in general hospital wards (70%). Approximately one quarter of elderly patients had ≥ 2 comorbidities (26%), the most common of which was structural lung disease (51%). The majority of elderly patients received ceftaroline fosamil as second-line therapy (85%), concurrently with other antibiotics (61%). Similar patterns of ceftaroline fosamil usage were noted in younger patients (aged ceftaroline fosamil was 81% for elderly patients with CABP and 82% for younger patients. These data suggest that ceftaroline fosamil is a potentially effective treatment option for CABP in the elderly.

  10. Vitamin D Level and Risk of Community-Acquired Pneumonia and Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna J. Jovanovich

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has reported reduced serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OHD levels is associated with acute infectious illness. The relationship between vitamin D status, measured prior to acute infectious illness, with risk of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP and sepsis has not been examined. Community-living individuals hospitalized with CAP or sepsis were age-, sex-, race-, and season-matched with controls. ICD-9 codes identified CAP and sepsis; chest radiograph confirmed CAP. Serum 25(OHD levels were measured up to 15 months prior to hospitalization. Regression models adjusted for diabetes, renal disease, and peripheral vascular disease evaluated the association of 25(OHD levels with CAP or sepsis risk. A total of 132 CAP patients and controls were 60 ± 17 years, 71% female, and 86% Caucasian. The 25(OHD levels <37 nmol/L (adjusted odds ratio (OR 2.57, 95% CI 1.08–6.08 were strongly associated with increased odds of CAP hospitalization. A total of 422 sepsis patients and controls were 65 ± 14 years, 59% female, and 91% Caucasian. The 25(OHD levels <37 nmol/L (adjusted OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.11–2.77 were associated with increased odds of sepsis hospitalization. Vitamin D status was inversely associated with risk of CAP and sepsis hospitalization in a community-living adult population. Further clinical trials are needed to evaluate whether vitamin D supplementation can reduce risk of infections, including CAP and sepsis.

  11. Risk factors associated with potentially antibiotic-resistant pathogens in community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prina, Elena; Ranzani, Otavio T; Polverino, Eva; Cillóniz, Catia; Ferrer, Miquel; Fernandez, Laia; Puig de la Bellacasa, Jorge; Menéndez, Rosario; Mensa, Josep; Torres, Antoni

    2015-02-01

    To identify pathogens that require different treatments in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), we propose an acronym, "PES" (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterobacteriaceae extended-spectrum β-lactamase-positive, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus). To compare the clinical characteristics and outcomes between patients with CAP caused by PES versus other pathogens, and to identify the risk factors associated with infection caused by PES. We conducted an observational prospective study evaluating only immunocompetent patients with CAP and an established etiological diagnosis. We included patients from nursing homes. We computed a score to identify patients at risk of PES pathogens. Of the 4,549 patients evaluated, we analyzed 1,597 who presented an etiological diagnosis. Pneumonia caused by PES was identified in 94 (6%) patients, with 108 PES pathogens isolated (n = 72 P. aeruginosa, n = 15 Enterobacteriaceae extended-spectrum β-lactamase positive, and n = 21 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus). These patients were older (P = 0.001), had received prior antibiotic treatment more frequently (P associated with increased risk of 30-day mortality (adjusted odds ratio = 2.51; 95% confidence interval = 1.20-5.25; P = 0.015). The area under the curve for the score we computed was 0.759 (95% confidence interval, 0.713-0.806; P risk factors could help to identify these microbial etiologies.

  12. Mayaro fever in an HIV-infected patient suspected of having Chikungunya fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estofolete, Cássia Fernanda; Mota, Mânlio Tasso Oliveira; Vedovello, Danila; Góngora, Delzi Vinha Nunes de; Maia, Irineu Luiz; Nogueira, Maurício Lacerda

    2016-01-01

    Arboviruses impose a serious threat to public health services. We report a case of a patient returning from a work trip to the Amazon basin with myalgia, arthralgia, fever, and headache. During this travel, the patient visited riverside communities. Both dengue and Chikungunya fevers were first suspected, tested for, and excluded. Mayaro fever was then confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction followed by next-generation sequencing and phylogenetic reconstruction. The increased awareness of physicians and consequent detection of Mayaro virus in this case was only possible due a previous surveillance program with specific health personnel training about these neglected arboviruses.

  13. Microbiology and outcomes of community acquired pneumonia in non cystic-fibrosis bronchiectasis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polverino, Eva; Cilloniz, Catia; Menendez, Rosario; Gabarrus, Albert; Rosales-Mayor, Edmundo; Alcaraz, Victoria; Terraneo, Silvia; Puig de la Bella Casa, Jordi; Mensa, Josep; Ferrer, Miquel; Torres, Antoni

    2015-07-01

    It is general belief that Non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis (NCFB) is characterized by frequent community-acquired pneumonia. Nonetheless, the knowledge on clinical characteristics of CAP in NCFBE is poor and no specific recommendations are available. We aim to investigate clinical and microbiological characteristics of NCFBE patients with CAP. Prospective observational study of 3495 CAP patients (2000-2011). We found 90 (2.0%) NCFBE-CAP that in comparison with non-bronchiectatic CAP (n, 3405) showed older age (mean ± [SD], NCFBE-CAP 73 ± 14 vs. CAP 65 ± 19yrs), more vaccinations (pneumococcal: 35% vs. 14%; influenza: 60% vs. 42%), comorbidities (n ≥ 2: 43% vs. 25%), previous antibiotics (38% vs. 22%), and inhaled steroids (53% vs. 16%) (p pneumoniae was the most frequent isolate in both groups (NCFBE-CAP 44.4% vs. CAP 42.7%; p = 0.821) followed by respiratory virus, mixed infections and atypical bacteria. Considering overall frequencies of the main pathogens (including monomicrobial and mixed infections) Pseudomonas aeruginosa (15.5% vs. 2.9%; p pneumoniae, are also involved in NCFBE-CAP but P. aeruginosa and other Enterobacteriaceae were globally more frequent than in CAP. Therefore, a wide microbiological investigation should be recommended in all NCFBE-CAP cases as well as routine pneumococcal vaccination for prevention of pneumonia. Copyright © 2015 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Prevalence of antimicrobial resistant Escherichia coli from patients with suspected urinary tract infection in primary care, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordoba, Gloria; Holm, Anne; Hansen, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Background: Escherichia coli is the most common pathogen causing Urinary Tract Infections (UTI). Data from the current National Surveillance program in Denmark (DANMAP) may not accurately represent the prevalence of resistant E. coli in primary care, because only urine samples from complicated...... 485 (96%) patients. According to the European Urinalysis Standards, 261 (54%) patients had positive bacteriuria. The most common uropathogen in patients with uncomplicated (uUTI) and complicated (cUTI) urinary tract infection was E. coli 105 (69%) and 76 (70%), respectively. Eighty-two (45%) of 181 E......: Observational study carried out from December 2014 to December 2015. Thirty-nine general practices from The Capital Region of Denmark included adult patients with urinary tract symptoms and suspected UTI. All urine samples were sent to the central laboratory Statens Serum Institut (SSI). Significant bacteriuria...

  15. Does SOFA predict outcomes better than SIRS in Brazilian ICU patients with suspected infection? A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Regis Goulart; Moraes, Rafael Barberena; Lisboa, Thiago Costa; Schunemann, Daniel Pretto; Teixeira, Cassiano

    We compared the discriminatory capacity of the sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) versus the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) score for predicting ICU mortality, need for and length of mechanical ventilation, ICU stay, and hospitalization in patients with suspected infection admitted to a mixed Brazilian ICU. We performed a retrospective analysis of a longitudinal ICU database from a tertiary hospital in Southern Brazil. Patients were categorized according to whether they met the criteria for sepsis according to SOFA (variation ≥2 points over the baseline clinical condition) and SIRS (SIRS score ≥2 points). From January 2008 to December 2014, 1487 patients were admitted to the ICU due to suspected infection. SOFA ≥2 identified more septic patients than SIRS ≥2 (79.0% [n=1175] vs. 68.5% [n=1020], pSIRS ≥2 in predicting need for mechanical ventilation (AUROC=0.64 vs. 0.62, p=0.001), ICU stay>7 days (AUROC=0.65 vs. 0.63, p=0.004), and length of hospitalization >10 days (AUROC=0.61 vs. 0.59, p7 days. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Infectologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. Does SOFA predict outcomes better than SIRS in Brazilian ICU patients with suspected infection? A retrospective cohort study

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    Regis Goulart Rosa

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We compared the discriminatory capacity of the sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA versus the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS score for predicting ICU mortality, need for and length of mechanical ventilation, ICU stay, and hospitalization in patients with suspected infection admitted to a mixed Brazilian ICU. We performed a retrospective analysis of a longitudinal ICU database from a tertiary hospital in Southern Brazil. Patients were categorized according to whether they met the criteria for sepsis according to SOFA (variation ≥2 points over the baseline clinical condition and SIRS (SIRS score ≥2 points. From January 2008 to December 2014, 1487 patients were admitted to the ICU due to suspected infection. SOFA ≥2 identified more septic patients than SIRS ≥2 (79.0% [n = 1175] vs. 68.5% [n = 1020], p  7 days (AUROC = 0.65 vs. 0.63, p = 0.004, and length of hospitalization >10 days (AUROC = 0.61 vs. 0.59, p 7 days.

  17. The Influence of Pharmaceutical Care Intervention on Inpatient Community Acquired Pneumonia: A Small Randomized Single Blind Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobby Presley

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Pneumonia, one of infectious diseases, becomes a major health care problem in Indonesia. The inappropriateness use of treatment can lead to greater unexpected health outcome and prolonged length of stay. A lot of research has proved that pharmacists, as a part of health care professionals, has important role in assuring patients to get the most optimal treatment benefit. The aim of this study is to identify the influence of pharmaceutical care intervention in reducing the length of stay of inpatients community acquired pneumonia. This experimental study involved 32 subjects with community acquired pneumonia hospitalized without any other infection between 18th August and 31st December 2010. Subjects were divided into two groups, i.e. intervention and control group, by simple random sampling technique. Intervention group received pharmaceutical care services i.e. drug related problems identification and solving based on Pharmaceutical Care Network Europe Classification and therapy guideline. Both group received hospital standard care. The primary outcome of this study was length of stay. All subjects were followed until 31 December 2010. Most of drug related problems identified in this study were classified as treatment effectiveness (intervention group 76.19% and control group 81.82% and treatment cost (intervention group 23.81% and control group 18.18%. Inappropriate use of antibiotic was the main cause for this drug related problems based on the pneumonia guideline. Ceftriaxone and ciprofloxacin (28.21% were the most inappropriate used antibiotics found in this study. The mean of length of stay between intervention (6 days and control group (8 days was significantly different (P<0.05. Pharmaceutical care intervention significantly improved the length of stay of inpatients community acquired pneumonia.

  18. Bacteremic community-acquired pneumonia due to Klebsiella pneumoniae: clinical and microbiological characteristics in Taiwan, 2001-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Tsung; Jeng, Yuan-Yu; Chen, Te-Li; Fung, Chang-Phone

    2010-10-25

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is the major cause of community-acquired pyogenic infections in Taiwan. This retrospective study evaluated the clinical and microbiological characteristics of bacteremic community-acquired pneumonia due to K. pneumoniae in Taiwanese adults. The clinical characteristics of bacteremic community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in adults due to K. pneumoniae were compared to those of adults with bacteremic CAP due to Streptococcus pneumoniae at a tertiary medical center in Taiwan from 2001-2008. Risk factors for mortality of bacteremic CAP due to K. pneumoniae were analyzed. All clinical isolates of K. pneumoniae were examined for capsular serotypes, hypermucoviscosity phenotype, aerobactin and rmpA gene. K. pneumoniae was the dominant cause of bacteremic CAP and was associated with a more fulminant course and a worse prognosis than bacteremic CAP due to Streptococcus pneumoniae. Initial presentation with septic shock and respiratory failure were independent risk factors for both early and total mortality. Serotype K1 and K2 comprised around half of all isolates. There were no significant differences in the clinical characteristics of patients with bacteremic CAP due to K1/K2 and non-K1/K2 isolates. Hypermucoviscosity phenotype as well as the aerobactin and rmpA genes were highly prevalent in the K. pneumoniae isolates. K. pneumoniae continued to be the dominant cause of bacteremic CAP in Taiwanese adults during 2001-2008. Initial presentation with septic shock and respiratory failure were independent risk factors for both early and total mortality from K. pneumoniae bacteremic CAP. Serotypes K1/K2 comprised around half of all isolates, but did not predispose patients to a poor clinical outcome. Physicians should be aware of the poor prognosis of any patient with bacteremic K. pneumoniae CAP and monitor these patients more closely.

  19. Does empirical treatment of community-acquired pneumonia with fluoroquinolones delay tuberculosis treatment and result in fluoroquinolone resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis? Controversies and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Gwan-Han; Tsao, Thomas Chang-Yao; Kao, Shang-Jyh; Lee, Jen-Jyh; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Hsieh, Wei-Chung; Hsu, Gwo-Jong; Hsu, Yen-Tao; Huang, Ching-Tai; Lau, Yeu-Jun; Tsao, Shih-Ming; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2012-03-01

    The role of fluoroquinolones (FQs) as empirical therapy for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) remains controversial in countries with high tuberculosis (TB) endemicity owing to the possibility of delayed TB diagnosis and treatment and the emergence of FQ resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Although the rates of macrolide-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid-resistant Haemophilus influenzae have risen to alarming levels, the rates of respiratory FQ (RFQ) resistance amongst these isolates remain relatively low. It is reported that ca. 1-7% of CAP cases are re-diagnosed as pulmonary TB in Asian countries. A longer duration (≥ 7 days) of symptoms, a history of night sweats, lack of fever (> 38 °C), infection involving the upper lobe, presence of cavitary infiltrates, opacity in the lower lung without the presence of air, low total white blood cell count and the presence of lymphopenia are predictive of pulmonary TB. Amongst patients with CAP who reside in TB-endemic countries who are suspected of having TB, imaging studies as well as aggressive microbiological investigations need to be performed early on. Previous exposure to a FQ for >10 days in patients with TB is associated with the emergence of FQ-resistant M. tuberculosis isolates. However, rates of M. tuberculosis isolates with FQ resistance are significantly higher amongst multidrug-resistant M. tuberculosis isolates than amongst susceptible isolates. Consequently, in Taiwan and also in other countries with TB endemicity, a short-course (5-day) regimen of a RFQ is still recommended for empirical therapy for CAP patients if the patient is at low risk for TB. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  20. Significance of anaerobes and oral bacteria in community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Kei; Kawanami, Toshinori; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Noguchi, Shingo; Nagata, Shuya; Nishida, Chinatsu; Kido, Takashi; Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Taniguchi, Hatsumi; Mukae, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Molecular biological modalities with better detection rates have been applied to identify the bacteria causing infectious diseases. Approximately 10-48% of bacterial pathogens causing community-acquired pneumonia are not identified using conventional cultivation methods. This study evaluated the bacteriological causes of community-acquired pneumonia using a cultivation-independent clone library analysis of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene of bronchoalveolar lavage specimens, and compared the results with those of conventional cultivation methods. Patients with community-acquired pneumonia were enrolled based on their clinical and radiological findings. Bronchoalveolar lavage specimens were collected from pulmonary pathological lesions using bronchoscopy and evaluated by both a culture-independent molecular method and conventional cultivation methods. For the culture-independent molecular method, approximately 600 base pairs of 16S ribosomal RNA genes were amplified using polymerase chain reaction with universal primers, followed by the construction of clone libraries. The nucleotide sequences of 96 clones randomly chosen for each specimen were determined, and bacterial homology was searched. Conventional cultivation methods, including anaerobic cultures, were also performed using the same specimens. In addition to known common pathogens of community-acquired pneumonia [Streptococcus pneumoniae (18.8%), Haemophilus influenzae (18.8%), Mycoplasma pneumoniae (17.2%)], molecular analysis of specimens from 64 patients with community-acquired pneumonia showed relatively higher rates of anaerobes (15.6%) and oral bacteria (15.6%) than previous reports. Our findings suggest that anaerobes and oral bacteria are more frequently detected in patients with community-acquired pneumonia than previously believed. It is possible that these bacteria may play more important roles in community-acquired pneumonia.

  1. Clinical characteristics and outcomes of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus septic arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sian Yik Lim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We investigated the clinical characteristics, treatment patterns and outcomes of community-acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA septic arthritis. Methods: This was a retrospective chart review of CA-MRSA septic arthritis in a tertiary care hospital from 2000-2013. We compared CA-MRSA septic arthritis cases with HA-MRSA septic arthritis cases to identify important differences between the two groups. Results: We identified 11 cases of CA-MRSA septic arthritis and 34 cases of hospital-acquired methicillin-resistant SA (HA-MRSA septic arthritis. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus caused 25% of the MRSA septic arthritis cases. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus septic arthritis occurred in younger patients with fewer comorbidities or risk factors. There was no difference in initial presentation between CA-MRSA and HA-MRSA. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus patients were less likely to be treated with appropriate antibiotics initially. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus septic arthritis was associated with increased morbidity with a high percentage of patients developing poor joint outcomes or osteomyelitis complications.  Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus septic arthritis was also associated with increased utilization of health care resources due to long hospital stays, high readmissions rates, and increased requirements for rehabilitation facility placement and home health support. There was no difference in mortality, poor joint outcome, readmissions, and osteomyelitis complications between CA-MRSA septic arthritis and HA-MRSA septic arthritis. Conclusions: Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus septic arthritis is associated with increased morbidity and health care resource utilization. Increased awareness into CA-MRSA as a cause of septic

  2. Significance of anaerobes and oral bacteria in community-acquired pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei Yamasaki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Molecular biological modalities with better detection rates have been applied to identify the bacteria causing infectious diseases. Approximately 10-48% of bacterial pathogens causing community-acquired pneumonia are not identified using conventional cultivation methods. This study evaluated the bacteriological causes of community-acquired pneumonia using a cultivation-independent clone library analysis of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene of bronchoalveolar lavage specimens, and compared the results with those of conventional cultivation methods. METHODS: Patients with community-acquired pneumonia were enrolled based on their clinical and radiological findings. Bronchoalveolar lavage specimens were collected from pulmonary pathological lesions using bronchoscopy and evaluated by both a culture-independent molecular method and conventional cultivation methods. For the culture-independent molecular method, approximately 600 base pairs of 16S ribosomal RNA genes were amplified using polymerase chain reaction with universal primers, followed by the construction of clone libraries. The nucleotide sequences of 96 clones randomly chosen for each specimen were determined, and bacterial homology was searched. Conventional cultivation methods, including anaerobic cultures, were also performed using the same specimens. RESULTS: In addition to known common pathogens of community-acquired pneumonia [Streptococcus pneumoniae (18.8%, Haemophilus influenzae (18.8%, Mycoplasma pneumoniae (17.2%], molecular analysis of specimens from 64 patients with community-acquired pneumonia showed relatively higher rates of anaerobes (15.6% and oral bacteria (15.6% than previous reports. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that anaerobes and oral bacteria are more frequently detected in patients with community-acquired pneumonia than previously believed. It is possible that these bacteria may play more important roles in community-acquired pneumonia.

  3. Linezolid has unique immunomodulatory effects in post-influenza community acquired MRSA pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urvashi Bhan

    Full Text Available Post influenza pneumonia is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity, with mortality rates approaching 60% when bacterial infections are secondary to multi-drug resistant (MDR pathogens. Staphylococcus aureus, in particular community acquired MRSA (cMRSA, has emerged as a leading cause of post influenza pneumonia.Linezolid (LZD prevents acute lung injury in murine model of post influenza bacterial pneumonia.Mice were infected with HINI strain of influenza and then challenged with cMRSA at day 7, treated with antibiotics (LZD or Vanco or vehicle 6 hours post bacterial challenge and lungs and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL harvested at 24 hours for bacterial clearance, inflammatory cell influx, cytokine/chemokine analysis and assessment of lung injury.Mice treated with LZD or Vanco had lower bacterial burden in the lung and no systemic dissemination, as compared to the control (no antibiotic group at 24 hours post bacterial challenge. As compared to animals receiving Vanco, LZD group had significantly lower numbers of neutrophils in the BAL (9×10(3 vs. 2.3×10(4, p < 0.01, which was associated with reduced levels of chemotactic chemokines and inflammatory cytokines KC, MIP-2, IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-1β in the BAL. Interestingly, LZD treatment also protected mice from lung injury, as assessed by albumin concentration in the BAL post treatment with H1N1 and cMRSA when compared to vanco treatment. Moreover, treatment with LZD was associated with significantly lower levels of PVL toxin in lungs.Linezolid has unique immunomodulatory effects on host inflammatory response and lung injury in a murine model of post-viral cMRSA pneumonia.

  4. Indication for fiberoptic bronchoscopy in HIV-infected patients suspected for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orholm, M; Lundgren, Jens Dilling; Nielsen, T L

    1990-01-01

    During a six-month period, 40 consecutive fiberoptic bronchoscopic procedures including bronchoalveolar lavage, bronchial brushing and forceps biopsy were performed in local anaesthesia on 34 HIV-infected males presenting symptoms compatible with Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. In 23 examinations...

  5. The management of community-acquired pneumonia in the elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faverio, Paola; Aliberti, Stefano; Bellelli, Giuseppe; Suigo, Giulia; Lonni, Sara; Pesci, Alberto; Restrepo, Marcos I.

    2014-01-01

    Pneumonia is one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality in the elderly. The elderly population has exponentially increased in the last decades and the current epidemiological trends indicate that it is expected to further increase. Therefore, recognizing the special needs of older people is of paramount importance. In this review we address the main differences between elderly and adult patients with pneumonia. We focus on several aspects, including the atypical clinical presentation of pneumonia in the elderly, the methods to assess severity of illness, the appropriate setting of care, and the management of comorbidities. We also discuss how to approach the common complications of severe pneumonia, including acute respiratory failure and severe sepsis. Moreover, we debate whether or not elderly patients are at higher risk of infection due to multi-drug resistant pathogens and which risk factors should be considered when choosing the antibiotic therapy. We highlight the differences in the definition of clinical stability and treatment failure between adults and elderly patients. Finally, we review the main outcomes, preventive and supportive measures to be considered in elderly patients with pneumonia. PMID:24360244

  6. Accuracy of CT-guided joint aspiration in patients with suspected infection status post-total hip arthroplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomas, Xavier; Garcia-Diez, Ana Isabel; Pomes, Jaime [Universidad de Barcelona, Department of Radiology, Hospital Clinic, Barcelona (Spain); Bori, Guillem; Garcia, Sebastian; Gallart, Xavier; Martinez, Juan Carlos; Riba, Josep [Universidad de Barcelona, Department of Orthopaedics, Hospital Clinic, Barcelona (Spain); Soriano, Alex; Mensa, Josep [Universidad de Barcelona, Department of Infectious Diseases, Hospital Clinic, Barcelona (Spain); Rios, Jose [Statistical Unit de Suport a la Estadistica I Metodologia IDIBAPS, Barcelona (Spain); Almela, Manel [Universidad de Barcelona, Department of Microbiology, Hospital Clinic, Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-01-15

    To determine the accuracy of guided computed tomography aspiration in the detection of septic hip prosthesis before surgery. Sixty-three patients (35 women and 28 men; age range, 29-86 years; mean age, 71 years) with clinically suspected septic hip prosthesis were prospectively studied with independent review board (IRB) approval. Volume and microbiological cultures of aspirated fluid and several computed tomography imaging findings such as periprosthetic fluid collections, prosthetic acetabular malposition, and heterotopic ossification were analyzed. All patients underwent revision surgery and infection was finally diagnosed in 33 patients. Statistical comparative analysis was performed comparing computed tomography aspiration and surgical findings (95% CI; level of significance at P = 0.05 two-sided) with 70% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 84% accuracy, 100% positive predictive value, and 75% negative predictive value. Using Fisher's exact test, the presence of periprosthetic fluid collections (P = 0.001), prosthetic acetabular malposition (P = 0.025) and aspirated fluid volume (P = 0.009) were significantly higher in infected than in non-infected prostheses, whereas heterotopic ossification was not (P = 0.429). Computed tomography aspiration is accurate to preoperatively diagnose septic hip prosthesis on the basis of volume and bacterial cultures of aspirated joint fluid. Furthermore, imaging findings such as periprosthetic fluid collections and prosthetic acetabular malposition strongly suggest infected prosthesis. (orig.)

  7. Accuracy of CT-guided joint aspiration in patients with suspected infection status post-total hip arthroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomas, Xavier; Garcia-Diez, Ana Isabel; Pomes, Jaime; Bori, Guillem; Garcia, Sebastian; Gallart, Xavier; Martinez, Juan Carlos; Riba, Josep; Soriano, Alex; Mensa, Josep; Rios, Jose; Almela, Manel

    2011-01-01

    To determine the accuracy of guided computed tomography aspiration in the detection of septic hip prosthesis before surgery. Sixty-three patients (35 women and 28 men; age range, 29-86 years; mean age, 71 years) with clinically suspected septic hip prosthesis were prospectively studied with independent review board (IRB) approval. Volume and microbiological cultures of aspirated fluid and several computed tomography imaging findings such as periprosthetic fluid collections, prosthetic acetabular malposition, and heterotopic ossification were analyzed. All patients underwent revision surgery and infection was finally diagnosed in 33 patients. Statistical comparative analysis was performed comparing computed tomography aspiration and surgical findings (95% CI; level of significance at P = 0.05 two-sided) with 70% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 84% accuracy, 100% positive predictive value, and 75% negative predictive value. Using Fisher's exact test, the presence of periprosthetic fluid collections (P = 0.001), prosthetic acetabular malposition (P = 0.025) and aspirated fluid volume (P = 0.009) were significantly higher in infected than in non-infected prostheses, whereas heterotopic ossification was not (P = 0.429). Computed tomography aspiration is accurate to preoperatively diagnose septic hip prosthesis on the basis of volume and bacterial cultures of aspirated joint fluid. Furthermore, imaging findings such as periprosthetic fluid collections and prosthetic acetabular malposition strongly suggest infected prosthesis. (orig.)

  8. Community-acquired bacterial meningitis in alcoholic patients.

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    Martijn Weisfelt

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Alcoholism is associated with susceptibility to infectious disease, particularly bacterial pneumonia. In the present study we described characteristics in alcoholic patients with bacterial meningitis and delineate the differences with findings in non-alcoholic adults with bacterial meningitis.This was a prospective nationwide observational cohort study including patients aged >16 years who had bacterial meningitis confirmed by culture of cerebrospinal fluid (696 episodes of bacterial meningitis occurring in 671 patients. Alcoholism was present in 27 of 686 recorded episodes of bacterial meningitis (4% and alcoholics were more often male than non-alcoholics (82% vs 48%, P = 0.001. A higher proportion of alcoholics had underlying pneumonia (41% vs 11% P<0.001. Alcoholics were more likely to have meningitis due to infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae (70% vs 50%, P = 0.01 and Listeria monocytogenes (19% vs 4%, P = 0.005, whereas Neisseria meningitidis was more common in non-alcoholic patients (39% vs 4%, P = 0.01. A large proportion of alcoholics developed complications during clinical course (82% vs 62%, as compared with non-alcoholics; P = 0.04, often cardiorespiratory failure (52% vs 28%, as compared with non-alcoholics; P = 0.01. Alcoholic patients were at risk for unfavourable outcome (67% vs 33%, as compared with non-alcoholics; P<0.001.Alcoholic patients are at high risk for complications resulting in high morbidity and mortality. They are especially at risk for cardiorespiratory failure due to underlying pneumonia, and therefore, aggressive supportive care may be crucial in the treatment of these patients.

  9. Community-Acquired Bacterial Meningitis in Alcoholic Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisfelt, Martijn; de Gans, Jan; van der Ende, Arie; van de Beek, Diederik

    2010-01-01

    Background Alcoholism is associated with susceptibility to infectious disease, particularly bacterial pneumonia. In the present study we described characteristics in alcoholic patients with bacterial meningitis and delineate the differences with findings in non-alcoholic adults with bacterial meningitis. Methods/Principal Findings This was a prospective nationwide observational cohort study including patients aged >16 years who had bacterial meningitis confirmed by culture of cerebrospinal fluid (696 episodes of bacterial meningitis occurring in 671 patients). Alcoholism was present in 27 of 686 recorded episodes of bacterial meningitis (4%) and alcoholics were more often male than non-alcoholics (82% vs 48%, P = 0.001). A higher proportion of alcoholics had underlying pneumonia (41% vs 11% Pmeningitis due to infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae (70% vs 50%, P = 0.01) and Listeria monocytogenes (19% vs 4%, P = 0.005), whereas Neisseria meningitidis was more common in non-alcoholic patients (39% vs 4%, P = 0.01). A large proportion of alcoholics developed complications during clinical course (82% vs 62%, as compared with non-alcoholics; P = 0.04), often cardiorespiratory failure (52% vs 28%, as compared with non-alcoholics; P = 0.01). Alcoholic patients were at risk for unfavourable outcome (67% vs 33%, as compared with non-alcoholics; P<0.001). Conclusions/Significance Alcoholic patients are at high risk for complications resulting in high morbidity and mortality. They are especially at risk for cardiorespiratory failure due to underlying pneumonia, and therefore, aggressive supportive care may be crucial in the treatment of these patients. PMID:20161709

  10. [Clinical features and antimicrobial resistance of community-acquired pneumonia caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae in infants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Li-Yun; Wang, Ying-Jian; Li, Ji-Mei

    2012-11-01

    To study the clinical features and antimicrobial resistance of community-acquired pneumonia caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae in infants. The clinical data of 65 infants with community-acquired pneumonia caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae between 2007 and 2011 were retrospectively studied. Of the 65 infants, 37 cases (57%) were aged ≤3 months, 17 cases (26%) over 4 months, 7 cases (11%) over 7 months and 4 cases (6%) between 13 and 24 months. There were no significant differences in clinical manifestations and chest X-ray features between the infants with community-acquired pneumonia caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae and those with other bacterial pneumonia. Forty strains (62%) of ESBLs-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae were detected. Klebsiella pneumoniae was 100% sensitive to imipenem, meropenem and amikacin but resistant to penicillins and cephalosporins. The resistance rates of ESBLs-producing strains to penicillins, cephalosporins, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, ampicillin/sulbactam, compound sulfamethoxazole, gentamycin, ciprofloxacin and aztreonam were significantly higher than for non-ESBLs-producing strains. ESBLs-producing strains also showed multiple-drug resistance. Community-acquired pneumonia caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae is common in infants aged ≤3 months. ESBLs-producing strains are prevalent in community-acquired pneumonia caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae and demonstrate both high rates of drug resistance and multiple-drug resistance.

  11. The use of ertapenem for the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia in routine hospital practice: a matched cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, D; Bravo-Ferrer, J M; Seoane-Pillado, T; Vázquez-Rodríguez, P; Ramos-Merino, L; Gutiérrez-Urbón, J M; Pita, S; Llinares, P

    2016-10-01

    The clinical response to ertapenem in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) at the setting of routine hospital practice has been scarcely evaluated. We retrospectively compared CAP cases treated with ertapenem or with other standard antimicrobials (controls) at a tertiary 1,434-bed center from 2005 to 2014. Out of 6,145 patients hospitalized with CAP, 64 (1%) ertapenem-treated and 128 controls were studied (PSI IV-V 72%, mean age 73 years.). A significant higher proportion of bedridden patients (41% vs. 21%), residence in nursing homes (19% vs. 7%), previous use of antibiotics (39% vs. 29%) and necrotizing (13% vs. 1%) or complicated (36% vs. 19%) pneumonia, was observed in the ertapenem vs. non-ertapenem patients. Initial treatment with ertapenem was independently associated with an earlier resolution of signs of infection. In patients aged 65 or older the independent risks factors for mortality were: PSI score (7.0, 95%CI 1.8-27.7), bedridden status (4.6, 95%CI 1.1-20.9) and Health Care Associated Pneumonia (HCAP) (4.6, 95%CI 1.3-16.5). First-line treatment with ertapenem was an independent protector factor in this subgroup of patients (0.1, 95%CI 0.1-0.7). Ertapenem showed a superior clinical response in frail elderly patients with complicated community-acquired pneumonia, and it may be considered as a first-line therapeutic regimen in this setting.

  12. X-linked agammaglobulinemia in community-acquired pneumonia cases revealed by immunoglobulin level screening at hospital admission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vancikova, Z; Freiberger, T; Vach, W; Trojanek, M; Rizzi, M; Janda, A

    2013-11-01

    In children with primary immunodeficiencies, the onset of symptoms precedes the diagnosis and the initiation of appropriate treatment by months or years. This delay in diagnosis is due to the fact that while these disorders are rare, some of the infections seen in immunodeficient patients are common. Defective antibody production represents the largest group among these disorders, with otitis, sinusitis and pneumonia as the most frequent initial manifestation. We performed a prospective study of humoral immunity in children hospitalized due to community-acquired pneumonia in tertiary care hospital. Out of 254 patients (131 boys, 123 girls, median age 4.5 years) recruited over 3 years, we found 2 boys (age 11 and 21 months) lacking serum immunoglobulins and circulating B cells. Subsequent genetic analysis confirmed diagnosis of X-linked agammaglobulinemia. Despite their immunodeficiency, the pneumonia was uncomplicated in both patients and did not call for immunological evaluation. However, the immunoglobulin screening at admission allowed for an early diagnosis of the immunodeficiency and timely initiation of immunoglobulin substitution, the key prerequisite for a favorable course of the disease.Simple and inexpensive immuno-globulin measurement during the manage-ment of hospitalized children with community-acquired pneumonia may help in early identification of patients with compromised humoral immunity and prevent serious complications. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Community-acquired meningitis caused by a CG86 hypervirulent Klebsiella pneumoniae strain: first case report in the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melot, Bénédicte; Brisse, Sylvain; Breurec, Sébastien; Passet, Virginie; Malpote, Edith; Lamaury, Isabelle; Thiery, Guillaume; Hoen, Bruno

    2016-12-07

    Community-acquired bacterial meningitis due to Klebsiella pneumoniae has mainly been described in Southeast Asia and has a poor prognosis. Severe invasive infections caused by K. pneumoniae, including meningitis, are often due to hypervirulent strains (hvKP), which are characterized by capsular serotypes K1 and K2, a gene responsible for hypermucoviscosity, and the cluster for synthesis of the siderophore aerobactin. A 55 year old man with a history of essential hypertension, benign prostate hyperplasia, hyperlipidemia, obstructive sleep apnea, and chronic alcoholism was admitted for meningitis due to Klebsiella pneumoniae with a wild-type susceptibility profile. Its genomic features were consistent with a capsular K2 strain belonging to clonal group 86 (CG86) displaying the large virulence of Klebsiella plasmid (pLVPK) with heavy metal resistance gene clusters, aerobactin, rmpA. This is the first case of community-acquired meningitis caused by a hypervirulent strain of hvKP ever reported in the Caribbean.

  14. Impact of an evidence-based guideline on the management of community-acquired bacterial meningitis: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costerus, J M; Brouwer, M C; Bijlsma, M W; Tanck, M W; van der Ende, A; van de Beek, D

    2016-11-01

    To study the impact of an evidence-based guideline on the management of community-acquired bacterial meningitis. We performed an interrupted time series analysis in a prospective nationwide cohort study from 2006 to 2015. The guideline stresses the importance of cranial imaging before lumbar puncture (LP) in selected patients based on clinical criteria, and early treatment with amoxicillin and a third-generation cephalosporin for adults with suspected community-acquired bacterial meningitis. The guideline was published in April 2013. We included 1326 episodes before and 210 episodes after guideline introduction. Cranial imaging was performed before LP in 497 (84%) of 591 episodes with clinical criteria warranting computed tomography (CT). The guideline did not improve this (increase of 2%; 95% confidence interval (CI), -15 to 19). Without these criteria, imaging before LP occurred in 606 (67%) of 900 episodes, also without effect of the guideline (increase of 1%; 95% CI, -25 to 28). The estimate of effect of the guideline for treatment with the recommended antibiotic regimen was an increase of 19.5% (95% CI, 13.5 to 25.5), and there was a trend towards more frequent initiation of treatment before CT. There was no association between delay in antibiotic treatment due to imaging before LP and unfavourable outcome (odds ratio, 1.14; 95% CI 0.86 to 1.52). Cranial imaging is performed before LP in the majority of patients with bacterial meningitis, irrespective of guideline indications. The guideline introduction was associated with a trend towards early initiation of treatment before imaging and with increased adherence to antibiotic policy. Copyright © 2016 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Management Of Fever And Suspected Infection In Pediatric Patients With Central Venous Catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Courtney; Wang, Vincent J

    2015-12-01

    The use of indwelling central venous catheters is essential for pediatric patients who require hemodialysis, parenteral nutrition, chemotherapy, or other medications. Fever is a common chief complaint in the emergency department, and fever in a patient with a central venous catheter may be related to a common cause of fever, or it may be due to a catheter-associated bloodstream infection. Catheter-associated bloodstream infections may also lead to additional complications such as sepsis, septic shock, or septic complications including suppurative thrombophlebitis, endocarditis, osteomyelitis, septic emboli, and abscesses. Early resuscitation as well as timely and appropriate antibiotic therapy have been shown to improve outcomes. This issue focuses on the approach to fever in pediatric patients with central venous catheters and the management and disposition of patients with possible catheter-associated bloodstream infections.

  16. Antibiotic prescriptions for suspected respiratory tract infection in primary care in South America

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordoba, Gloria; Caballero, Lidia; Sandholdt, Håkon

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe and compare antibiotic prescribing patterns for primary care patients with respiratory tract infections (RTIs) in four South American countries. METHODS: This was a prospective observational study. General practitioners (GPs) from Argentina, Bolivia, Paraguay and Uruguay...... uncertainty and country variation requires greater support from the healthcare systems by providing GPs with evidence-based guidelines and tools to apply them....

  17. Routine tests and automated urinalysis in patients with suspected urinary tract infection at the ED

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middelkoop, S. J. M.; van Pelt, L. J.; Kampinga, G. A.; ter Maaten, J. C.; Stegeman, C. A.

    Background: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are frequently encountered. Diagnostics of UTI (urine dipstick, Gram stain, urine culture) lack proven accuracy and precision in the emergency department. Utility of automated urinalysis shows promise for UTI diagnosis but has not been validated. Methods:

  18. [Antifungal therapy for infants, children and adolescents with suspected or documented invasive fungal infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odio, C M

    2010-04-01

    Fungal nosocomial infections have gradually and consistently increased since the 90s.This increasing threat is closely related with the growing number of people with immune system disorders and their survival. It is also related with the destruction of their physical barriers against infection due to the use of cytotoxic drugs or invasive procedures, such is the case of cancer patients and bone marrow and solid organ transplant patients. Increased survival of patients with congenital or acquired immunodeficiency, premature babies and patients with complex congenital malformations, especially in the gastrointestinal tract, also add up to this scenario. The occurrence of yeast and filamentous fungi infections, especially of the Candida species, has been on the rise. Azole agents overuse, especially fluconazole, for the treatment and prophylaxis of fungal infections has put selective pressure on Candida spp. which resulted in an increase of non-albican species such as C. krusei, C. glabrata and C. famata, among others, as well as their growing resistance to these antifungal agents.

  19. Assessment of suspected infection of hip or knee endoprosthesis by nuclear medicine techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, M.; Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H.; Delank, K.S.

    2007-01-01

    Complications after hip endoprosthesis operation occur with a frequency of 1-2 % after primary operation and with 3-5 % after revision arthroplasty and are even more frequent after knee arthroplasty. The differentiation between aseptic loosening and bacterial infection is very important. In aseptic loosening a one-step revision is usually possible. In case of bacterial infection, all foreign material has to be removed first to allow cure from the infection. After healing and absence of bacteria a follow-up operation is possible with insertion of a new prosthesis. Diagnosis and therapy of a painful hip or knee endoprosthesis are difficult, because patient history, clinical examination, laboratory results including microbiological investigation of puncture material and results of radiological examinations may all be inconclusive. Quite a number of nuclear medicine procedures have been published in the past to help in the differentiation between aseptic loosening and bacterial infection of a painful hip or knee endoprosthesis. No single method can be regarded as excellent and without disadvantages. In the international literature the combined leucocyte-marrow imaging has been propageted as superior technique. In Germany, combined leucocyte-marrow imaging is not available in the published form. Moreover, this technique is time consuming, cost intensive and requires direct work with blood. Therefore, infection imaging with labelled antibodies or labelled fragments of antibodies may be regarded as the method of choice for most nuclear medicine physicians. With semiquantitative evaluation a comparative diagnostic accuracy may be achieved. 18 F-FDG-PET is not able to differentiate reliably between abacterial polyethylene abrasion and septic inflammation. However, with pattern recognition of the distribution of 18 F-FDG around a hip prosthesis an approach with clinically acceptable results has been published. A normal 18 F-FDG-PET can reliably exclude an infection

  20. Prevalence of non-tuberculous mycobacterial infections among tuberculosis suspects in Nigeria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gambo Aliyu

    Full Text Available Nigeria is ranked in the top five countries for tuberculosis deaths worldwide. This study investigated the mycobacterial agents associated with presumptive clinical pulmonary tuberculosis (TB in Nigeria and evaluated the pattern and frequency of mycobacterial infections over twelve calendar months period.Sputum samples from 1,603 consecutive new cases with presumptive diagnosis of TB were collected from August 2010 to July 2011. All sputum samples were incubated for detection of mycobacterial growth and those with positive acid fast bacilli (AFB growth were tested to detect mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB complex and characterized to differentiate between MTB complex species. Cultures suggestive of Non-tuberculous mycobacterial infections (NTM were sub-cultured and characterized.Of the 1,603 patients screened, 444 (28% culture-positive cases of pulmonary tuberculosis were identified. Of these, 375 (85% were due to strains of MTB complex (354 cases of M. tuberculosis, 20 M. africanum and one case of M. bovis and 69 (15% were due to infection with NTM. In contrast to the MTB complex cases, the NTM cases were more likely to have been diagnosed during the calendar months of the Harmattan dust season (OR = 2.34, 1.28-4.29; p = 0.01, and aged older than 35 years (OR = 2.77, 1.52-5.02, p = 0.0007, but less likely to have AFB identified on their sputum smear (OR = 0.06, 0.02-0.14, p<0.0001. Among those with NTM infection, cases 35 years or younger were more likely to have co-infection with HIV (3.76, 1.72-8.22; p = 0.0009 compared to those older than 35 years.The high proportion of younger patients with clinical pulmonary TB due to NTM and co-infection with HIV and the likely role of the seasonal dust exposure in the occurrence of the disease, present novel public health challenges for prevention and treatment.

  1. Etiology of childhood community acquired pneumonia and its implications for vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nascimento-Carvalho Cristiana M.C.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Pneumonia is an important cause of morbidity and mortality among children throughout the world. Vaccines are available for some organisms, but they are underutilized and/or still in development. To evaluate the potential impact of vaccines, we review studies in which the etiology of childhood community-acquired pneumonia was recorded. In North America and Europe (9 studies, the etiology of pneumonia was established in 62% of studied children (range 43%-88% by use of noninvasive specific methods for microbiologic diagnosis. The most often identified agents were S. pneumoniae (22%, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV (20%, Haemophilus influenzae (7%, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae (15%. In Africa and South America (8 studies, bacteria were recovered from 56% (range 32%-68% of severely ill children studied by lung aspirate. The most often isolated bacteria were Streptococcus pneumoniae (33% and Haemophilus influenzae (21%. A high percentage of H. influenzae strains were not serotype b. Throughout the world, children requiring hospitalization were most likely to have infection caused by pneumococcus H. influenzae or RSV. Out patients also had Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Countries in Africa and Asia recorded 2 to 10 times more children with pneumonia (7 to 40/100 annually than in the USA. Widespread use of pneumococcal and H. influenzae type b conjugate vaccines could reduce the frequency of childhood pneumonia by one-third. Further reduction will require development of non-type b H. influenzae, RSV and M. pneumoniae vaccines. This could result in a > 50% reduction of pneumonia in children. This goal should be sought and achieved as soon as possible.

  2. Oxidative stress in immunocompetent patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia. A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trefler, S; Rodríguez, A; Martín-Loeches, I; Sanchez, V; Marín, J; Llauradó, M; Romeu, M; Díaz, E; Nogués, R; Giralt, M

    2014-03-01

    A comparison was made of the oxidative stress (OS) levels of patients with either viral or bacterial severe community-acquired pneumonia (sCAP) and of patients without infection (healthy volunteers (HV) and patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI)). A prospective observational study was made. Critically ill patients with sCAP. The TBARS level was measured as an index of oxidative injury. SOD, CAT and redox glutathione system (GSH, GSSG, GR, GPx) activities were measured as reflecting antioxidant capacity. Severity of illness was assessed by the APACHE II, SOFA and SIRS scores. Thirty-seven subjects were included: 15 patients with CAP (12 of bacterial origin [BCAP] and 3 due to 2009 A/H1N1 virus [VCAP]), 10 HV and 12 AMI patients. Intensive care CAP mortality was 26.7% (n=4). Plasmatic TBARS levels were higher in CAP patients than in HV, but similar to those recorded in AMI patients. In contrast, VCAP was associated with lower TBARS levels, and some components of the glutathione redox system were higher in BCAP patients and HV. The OS levels did not differ between survivors and non-survivors. Our results suggest the occurrence of higher OS in sCAP patients compared with HV. In contrast, lower TBARS levels were observed in VCAP patients, suggesting an increase of antioxidant activity related to the redox glutathione system. However, further research involving a larger cohort is needed in order to confirm these findings. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  3. Ceftaroline fosamil for the treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia in the intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggiore C

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Christy Maggiore,1 Jose A Vazquez,2 David J Guervil,3 Ananthakrishnan Ramani,4 Alena Jandourek,5 Phillip Cole,5 H David Friedland5 1Gulf Coast Medical Center, Panama City, FL, USA; 2Medical College of Georgia, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA, USA; 3Memorial Hermann-Texas Medical Center, Houston, TX, USA; 4Mountain View Medical Practice (Columbia Memorial Hospital, Catskill, NY, USA; 5Cerexa, Inc., Oakland, CA, USA Abstract: The Clinical Assessment Program and Teflaro® Utilization Registry (CAPTURE is a multicenter study evaluating the clinical use of ceftaroline fosamil in patients with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP or acute bacterial skin and skin structure infection. Data were collected between August 2011 and February 2013, from 398 evaluable patients receiving treatment at 33 sites in the USA. This manuscript presents data collected from patients with CABP who received care in an intensive care unit (ICU or in general medical wards (35% and 64% of evaluable patients, respectively. The majority of ICU and general medical ward patients had underlying comorbidities (78% and 74%, respectively, with structural lung disease being the most common (42% in the ICU and 40% in general medical wards. Patients admitted to the ICU had a longer duration of stay, a longer duration of symptoms before treatment, and a longer duration of ceftaroline fosamil therapy than did general medical ward patients. Most patients treated in the ICU and in general medical wards were given ceftaroline fosamil as second-line therapy (87% and 80%, respectively. The overall rate of clinical success for patients treated with ceftaroline fosamil was 68% in the ICU and 85% in the general medical wards. Clinical success for patients receiving ceftaroline fosamil as a second-line agent was 84% in the ICU and 86% in general medical wards. These findings indicate that ceftaroline fosamil is a viable treatment option for CABP, both in the ICU and in general

  4. Cardiovascular Complications and Short-term Mortality Risk in Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Violi, Francesco; Cangemi, Roberto; Falcone, Marco; Taliani, Gloria; Pieralli, Filippo; Vannucchi, Vieri; Nozzoli, Carlo; Venditti, Mario; Chirinos, Julio A; Corrales-Medina, Vicente F

    2017-06-01

    Previous reports suggest that community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is associated with an enhanced risk of cardiovascular complications. However, a contemporary and comprehensive characterization of this association is lacking. In this multicenter study, 1182 patients hospitalized for CAP were prospectively followed for up to 30 days after their hospitalization for this infection. Study endpoints included myocardial infarction, new or worsening heart failure, atrial fibrillation, stroke, deep venous thrombosis, cardiovascular death, and total mortality. Three hundred eighty (32.2%) patients experienced intrahospital cardiovascular events (CVEs) including 281 (23.8%) with heart failure, 109 (9.2%) with atrial fibrillation, 89 (8%) with myocardial infarction, 11 (0.9%) with ischemic stroke, and 1 (0.1%) with deep venous thrombosis; 28 patients (2.4%) died for cardiovascular causes. Multivariable Cox regression analysis showed that intrahospital Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI) class (hazard ratio [HR], 2.45, P = .027; HR, 4.23, P < .001; HR, 5.96, P < .001, for classes III, IV, and V vs II, respectively), age (HR, 1.02, P = .001), and preexisting heart failure (HR, 1.85, P < .001) independently predicted CVEs. One hundred three (8.7%) patients died by day 30 postadmission. Thirty-day mortality was significantly higher in patients who developed CVEs compared with those who did not (17.6% vs 4.5%, P < .001). Multivariable Cox regression analysis showed that intrahospital CVEs (HR, 5.49, P < .001) independently predicted 30-day mortality (after adjustment for age, PSI score, and preexisting comorbid conditions). CVEs, mainly those confined to the heart, complicate the course of almost one-third of patients hospitalized for CAP. More importantly, the occurrence of CVEs is associated with a 5-fold increase in CAP-associated 30-day mortality. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For

  5. T cell responses in senior patients with community-acquired pneumonia related to disease severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Lu-Qin; Bi, Ying; Zhou, Shao-Wei; Chen, Zi-Dan; Wen, Jun; Shi, Jin; Mao, Ling; Wang, Ling

    2017-12-01

    Senior individuals older than 65 years of age are at a disproportionally higher risk of developing pneumonia. Impaired capacity to defend against airway infections may be one of the reasons. It is generally believed that weaker regulatory T cell responses may be beneficial to host defense against pathogens. In senior patients with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia, we investigated the frequencies and functions of regulatory T cells. Interestingly, we found that compared to age- and sex-matched healthy controls, senior pneumonia patients presented lower frequencies of Foxp3-expressing and Helios-expressing CD4 + T cells. The quantity of Foxp3 and Helios being expressed, measured by their mRNA transcription levels, was also lower in CD4 + T cells from pneumonia patients. Furthermore, following TCR and TGF-β stimulation, pneumonia patients presented impaired capacity to upregulate Foxp3 and Helios. Functional analyses revealed that CD4 + T cells from pneumonia patients secreted lower amounts of IL-10 and TGF-β, two cytokines critical to regulatory T cell-mediated suppression. Also, the expression of granzyme B and perforin, which were cytolytic molecules potentially utilized by regulatory T cells to mediate the elimination of antigen-presenting cells and effector T cells, were reduced in CD4 + CD25 + T cells from senior pneumonia patients. In addition, the CD4 + CD25 + T cells from senior pneumonia patients presented reduced capacity to suppress effector CD4 + and CD8 + T cell proliferation. Moreover, the value of pneumonia severity index was inversely correlated with several parameters of regulatory T cell function. Together, our results demonstrated that senior pneumonia patients presented a counterintuitive impairment in regulatory T cell responses that was associated with worse prognosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Impact of pre-hospital antibiotic use on community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonetti, A F; Viasus, D; Garcia-Vidal, C; Grillo, S; Molero, L; Dorca, J; Carratalà, J

    2014-09-01

    Information on the influence of pre-hospital antibiotic treatment on the causative organisms, clinical features and outcomes of patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) remains scarce. We performed an observational study of a prospective cohort of non-immunosuppressed adults hospitalized with CAP between 2003 and 2012. Patients were divided into two groups: those who had received pre-hospital antibiotic treatment for the same episode of CAP and those who had not. A propensity score was used to match patients. Of 2179 consecutive episodes of CAP, 376 (17.3%) occurred in patients who had received pre-hospital antibiotic treatment. After propensity score matching, Legionella pneumophila was more frequently identified in patients with pre-hospital antibiotic treatment, while Streptococcus pneumoniae was less common (p sensitivity and specificity of the pneumococcal urinary antigen test for diagnosing pneumococcal pneumonia were similar in the two groups. Patients with pre-hospital antibiotic treatment were less likely to present fever (p 0.02) or leucocytosis (p 0.001). Conversely, chest X-ray cavitation was more frequent in these patients (p 0.04). No significant differences were found in the frequency of patients classified into high-risk Pneumonia Severity Index classes, in intensive care unit admission, or in 30-day mortality between the groups. In conclusion, L. pneumophila occurrence was nearly three times higher in patients who received pre-hospital antibiotics. After a propensity-adjusted analysis, no significant differences were found in prognosis between study groups. Pre-hospital antibiotic use should be considered when choosing aetiological diagnostic tests and empirical antibiotic therapy in patients with CAP. © 2013 The Authors Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2013 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  7. Prevalence of antimicrobial resistant Escherichia coli from patients with suspected urinary tract infection in primary care, Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdoba, Gloria; Holm, Anne; Hansen, Frank; Hammerum, Anette M; Bjerrum, Lars

    2017-10-10

    Escherichia coli is the most common pathogen causing Urinary Tract Infections (UTI). Data from the current National Surveillance program in Denmark (DANMAP) may not accurately represent the prevalence of resistant E. coli in primary care, because only urine samples from complicated cases may be forwarded to the microbiological departments at hospitals for diagnostic examination. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of resistant E. coli to the most commonly used antimicrobial agents in primary care in a consecutive sample of patients from general practice. Observational study carried out from December 2014 to December 2015. Thirty-nine general practices from The Capital Region of Denmark included adult patients with urinary tract symptoms and suspected UTI. All urine samples were sent to the central laboratory Statens Serum Institut (SSI). Significant bacteriuria was interpreted according to the European Urinalysis Standards. Susceptibility testing was performed and interpreted according to the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) standards. From the 39 general practices 505 patients were recruited. Completed data were obtained from 485 (96%) patients. According to the European Urinalysis Standards, 261 (54%) patients had positive bacteriuria. The most common uropathogen in patients with uncomplicated (uUTI) and complicated (cUTI) urinary tract infection was E. coli 105 (69%) and 76 (70%), respectively. Eighty-two (45%) of 181 E. coli isolates were resistant to at least one of the tested antibiotics and 50 out of 82 isolates were resistant to two or more antimicrobial agents. The highest resistance-rate was found against ampicillin 34% (95% CI 24;42) in uUTI and 36% (24;46) in cUTI. There were no differences in the distribution of resistance between uncomplicated and complicated cases. The prevalence of resistance was similar to the one reported in DANMAP 2014. In E. coli from uUTI there is high resistance rates to

  8. Enterobius vermicularis infection of the liver in a patient with colorectal carcinoma with suspected liver metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furnée, Edgar J B; Spoto, Clothaire; de Graaf, Melanie J; Smakman, Niels

    2015-01-01

    A 68-year-old man diagnosed with cT3N2 adenocarcinoma of the rectum presented with a synchronous solitary liver metastasis on CT scan. Neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy was started to downstage the primary tumour. Resection of the rectal tumour followed 3 months after the last radiotherapy session and primary resection of the isolated liver lesion was performed in the intervening period. Histopathological assessment of the liver lesion, however, showed no malignancy, but did reveal a necrotic infection due to Enterobius vermicularis. This parasite is frequently found in the intestines, but only rarely infects the liver. The patient was subsequently treated with the anthelmintic drug mebendazole 100 mg once a week for 2 weeks. Histopathological assessment of the rectal specimen showed complete regression after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy without evidence of remaining E. vermicularis, suggesting pinworm eradication. The patient recovered promptly after both surgical procedures. PMID:26546623

  9. Penicillin as empirical therapy for patients hospitalised with community acquired pneumonia at a Danish hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, O; Glenthøj, Jonathan Peter; Dragsted, Ulrik Bak

    2001-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We report on the outcome of a study of patients hospitalised with community acquired pneumonia (HCAP) at a Danish university hospital. METHODOLOGY: In a retrospective study of 243 consecutive patients with radiographically verified HCAP, data on clinical and laboratory findings.......3%, respectively, p = 0.94, and the readmission rate 20.3%, 24.0%, and 14.8%, respectively; p = 0.63. CONCLUSION: Patients treated for community-acquired pneumonia at a Danish university hospital had clinical outcomes fully at height with findings from other countries, and half of the patients were successfully...

  10. Bedside Evaluation of Cerebral Energy Metabolism in Severe Community-Acquired Bacterial Meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rom Poulsen, Frantz; Schulz, Mette; Jacobsen, Anne

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mortality and morbidity have remained high in bacterial meningitis. Impairment of cerebral energy metabolism probably contributes to unfavorable outcome. Intracerebral microdialysis is routinely used to monitor cerebral energy metabolism, and recent experimental studies indicate...... that this technique may separate ischemia and non-ischemic mitochondrial dysfunction. The present study is a retrospective interpretation of biochemical data obtained in a series of patients with severe community-acquired meningitis. METHODS: Cerebral energy metabolism was monitored in 15 patients with severe...... community-acquired meningitis utilizing intracerebral microdialysis and bedside biochemical analysis. According to previous studies, cerebral ischemia was defined as lactate/pyruvate (LP) ratio >30 with intracerebral pyruvate level

  11. Hydrocephalus is a rare outcome in community-acquired bacterial meningitis in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodilsen, Jacob; Schønheyder, Henrik Carl; Nielsen, Henrik I

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Community-acquired bacterial meningitis (CABM) continues to have a high mortality rate and often results in severe sequelae among survivors. Lately, an increased effort has been focused on describing the neurological complications of meningitis including hydrocephalus. To aid...... in this field of research we set out to ascertain the risk and outcome of hydrocephalus in patients with community-acquired bacterial meningitis (CABM) in North Denmark Region. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective population-based cohort study of CABM cases above 14 years of age. Cases diagnosed during a 13...

  12. Brucella melitensis: a rarely suspected cause of infections of genitalia and the lower urinary tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Stamatiou

    Full Text Available We examined the clinical presentation and outcome of Brucellar infections of genitalia and the lower urinary tract through a review of the medical records of 10 cases of male patients with brucellar infections of the genitalia and lower urinary tract. The mean age of the patients with brucellosis was 49.2, (median 52, range 15-77 years. Eleven out of 17 patients were rural residents, 15 reported that they might have consumed unpasteurized dairy products and four reported occupational exposure. Symptoms onset was acute in almost all cases. Scrotal pain, epidedimal swelling and fever were the most common symptoms. The Wright test was positive in 13 patients, while Brucella sp. was isolated from blood cultures in six cases. Only two patients were found with abnormal liver ultrasonography. All patients underwent treatment with doxycycline and aminoglycoside for seven days and doxycycline alone for two months. Most of them responded to antibiotic therapy with rapid regression of symptoms. One patient failed to respond to therapy and presented necrotizing orchitis, as well as abscesses, which required orchectomy. Brucellar infections of the genitalia and lower urinary tract have no specific clinical presentation; the usual laboratory examination is not sufficient to diagnose this kind of infection, therefore it could easily be misdiagnosed. An analytical medical history (including overall dietary habits and recent consumption of non-pasteurized dairy products could indicate Brucelosis as would the persistence of symptoms despite a one-week antibiotic treatment. In general, patients afflicted by brucellar epididymoorchitis respond to Brucellosis antibiotic therapy, except for some rare cases that present necrotizing orchitis and require surgical treatment.

  13. [Pathogen distribution and bacterial resistance in children with severe community-acquired pneumonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yun-Yun; Luo, Rong; Fu, Zhou

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the distribution of pathogens and bacterial resistance in children with severe community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). A total of 522 children with severe CAP who were hospitalized in 2016 were enrolled as study subjects. According to their age, they were divided into infant group (402 infants aged 28 days to 1 year), young children group (73 children aged 1 to 3 years), preschool children group (35 children aged 3 to 6 years), and school-aged children group (12 children aged ≥6 years). According to the onset season, all children were divided into spring group (March to May, 120 children), summer group (June to August, 93 children), autumn group (September to November, 105 children), and winter group (December to February, 204 children). Sputum specimens from the deep airway were collected from all patients. The phoenix-100 automatic bacterial identification system was used for bacterial identification and drug sensitivity test. The direct immunofluorescence assay was used to detect seven common respiratory viruses. The quantitative real-time PCR was used to detect Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MP) and Chlamydia trachomatis (CT). Of all the 522 children with severe CAP, 419 (80.3%) were found to have pathogens, among whom 190 (45.3%) had mixed infection. A total of 681 strains of pathogens were identified, including 371 bacterial strains (54.5%), 259 viral strains (38.0%), 12 fungal strains (1.8%), 15 MP strains (2.2%), and 24 CT strains (3.5%). There were significant differences in the distribution of bacterial, viral, MP, and fungal infections between different age groups (Presistance rates of Streptococcus pneumoniae to erythromycin, tetracycline, and clindamycin reached above 85%, and the drug-resistance rates of Staphylococcus aureus to penicillin, erythromycin, and clindamycin were above 50%; they were all sensitive to vancomycin and linezolid. The drug-resistance rates of Haemophilus influenzae to cefaclor and cefuroxime were above 60%, but it was

  14. Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Children Caused by Pneumococci of MLSB- and M-Phenotype: Clinical Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya A. Ilenkova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The key to effective treatment of a bacterial infection is a rapid and proper selection of antimicrobial therapy. WHO and UNICEF developed the Global Action Plan for the Prevention and Control of Pneumonia and Diarrhoea (GAPPD aimed to elimination of the preventable causes of child death by 2025 by optimizing diagnosis and treatment. The main pneumonia agents are fastidious microorganisms that require special nutrient media and cultivation conditions that are absent in many laboratories. Due to low effectiveness of the etiological diagnosis, the choice of antibiotic therapy for pneumonia in the practice of a pediatrician is usually empirical. The article describes clinical cases of community-acquired pneumonia in children caused by strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae with a multiple antibiotic resistance. The above experience can be used by pediatricians in everyday practice.

  15. The aetiology of community-acquired pneumonia and implications for patient management.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gageldonk-Lafeber, A.B. van; Wever, P.C.; Lubben, I.M. van der; Jager, C.P. de; Meijer, A.; Vries, M.C. de; Elberse, K.; Sande, M.A.B. van der; Hoek, W. van der

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Understanding which pathogens are associated with clinical manifestation of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is important to optimise treatment. We performed a study on the aetiology of CAP and assessed possible implications for patient management in the Netherlands. METHODS: Patients

  16. Oxidative metabolism of neutrophils in patients with community-acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demidchik Lyudmila Andreevna

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available At the present time, available views show our limited knowledge of the peculiarities of the functional status of neutrophils and their metabolism in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP. The studying of changes of metabolic status of neutrophils can broaden our views about pneumonia pathogenesis and define datum points of therapeutic effect.

  17. Aetiology and resistance patterns of community-acquired pneumonia in León, Nicaragua

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matute, A J; Brouwer, W P; Hak, E; Delgado, E; Alonso, E; Hoepelman, I M

    2006-01-01

    We conducted a prevalence study to gain greater insight into the aetiology, bacterial resistance and risk factors for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in the region of León, Nicaragua. During the period from July 2002 to January 2005, all consecutive patients with signs and symptoms suggestive of

  18. Elderly patients with community-acquired pneumonia are not treated according to current guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardt Damsgaard, Tove; Klausen, Henrik Hedegaard; Christiansen, Christina

    2013-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in elderly patients, and the most important cause of death in the developed world. Optimised treatment and care will benefit patients as well as the health economy. This study investigated in-hospital compliance...... with guidelines for treatment and care of patients with CAP....

  19. Revised SWAB guidelines for antimicrobial therapy of community-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, JA; Prins, JM; Bonten, MJ; Degener, J; Janknegt, RE; Hollander, JMR; Jonkers, RE; Wijnands, WJ; Verheij, TJ; Sachs, APE; Kullberg, BJ

    The Dutch Working Party on Antibiotic Policy (SWAB) develops evidence-based guidelines, aimed at optimalisation of antibiotic use and limitation of the spread of antimicrobial resistance. A revision of the SWAB guideline for the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), published in 1998, was

  20. PNEUMOCOCCAL ANTIGEN PERSISTENCE IN SPUTUM FROM PATIENTS WITH COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BOERSMA, WG; LOWENBERG, A; HOLLOWAY, Y; KUTTSCHRUTTER, H; SNIJDER, JAM; KOETER, GH

    The purpose of this study was to establish the diagnostic value of pneumococcal capsular antigen by comparing this with the results of Gram stain and culture in representative and nonrepresentative sputa during follow-up in patients with community-acquired pneumonia. Antigen was detected by a latex

  1. Atypical coverage in community-acquired pneumonia after outpatient beta-lactam monotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Werkhoven, Cornelis H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/338003207; van de Garde, Ewoudt M W; Oosterheert, Jan Jelrik|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/234602236; Postma, Douwe F.; Bonten, Marc J.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/123144337

    2017-01-01

    Introduction In adults hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) after >48 h of outpatient beta-lactam monotherapy, coverage of atypical pathogens is recommended based on expert opinion. Methods In a post-hoc analysis of a large study of CAP treatment we included patients who received

  2. In Reply - Statin Use and Risk of Community-Acquired Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smit, Jesper; Schønheyder, Henrik C; Nielsen, Henrik

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To ascertain whether persons treated with statins experience a decreased risk of community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (CA-SAB) as compared with nonusers. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Using population-based medical registries, we conducted a case-control study including all adul...

  3. High-sensitivity cardiac troponin T predicts mortality after hospitalization for community-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vestjens, Stefan M T; Spoorenberg, Simone M C; Rijkers, Ger T.; Grutters, Jan C; ten Berg, Jurriën M; Noordzij, Peter G.; Van de Garde, Ewoudt M.W.; Bos, Willem Jan W; Biesma, Douwe H.; Endeman, Henrik; Hardeman, Hans; Heijligenberg, Rik; Meijvis, Sabine C A; Remmelts, Hilde H.F.; van Velzen-Blad, Heleen; Voorn, Paul G P

    2017-01-01

    Background and objective: Mortality after hospitalization with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is high, compared with age-matched controls. Available evidence suggests a strong link with cardiovascular disease. Our aim was to explore the prognostic value of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T

  4. Paediatric community-acquired septic shock: Results from the REPEM network study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. van de Voorde (Patrick); B. Emerson; B. Gómez (Borja); J. Willems; D. Yildizdas; I. Iglowstein; E. Kerkhof (Evelien); N. Mullen; C.R. Pinto; T. Detaille; N. Qureshi (Nadeem); J. Naud; J. de Dooy; R. van Lancker; A.G. Dupont (Alain); N. Boelsma; M. Mor; D. Walker; M. Sabbe (Marc); S. Hachimi-Idrissi; L. Da Dalt (Liviana); H. Waisman; D. Biarent; I.K. MacOnochie (Ian); H.A. Moll (Henriëtte); J. Benito (Javier)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction and purpose of the study With this study we aimed to describe a "true world" picture of severe pae-diatric 'community-acquired' septic shock and establish the feasibility of a future prospective trial on early goal-directed therapy in children. During a 6-month to 1-year

  5. A case of community-acquired Acinetobacter baumannii meningitis - has the threat moved beyond the hospital?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lowman, Warren; Kalk, Thomas; Menezes, Colin N.; John, Melanie A.; Grobusch, Martin P.

    2008-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a prolific nosocomial pathogen renowned for its multidrug-resistant nature. We report a case of community-acquired meningitis due to A. baumannii. The case highlights the potential pathogenicity of this organism and raises concerns that this highly adaptable organism may

  6. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in community-acquired pyoderma in children in South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umashankar Nagaraju

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: MRSA in community-acquired pyoderma in children was 6.5% and nasal colonization with S. aureus was 59.7% in our study. High resistance to commonly used antimicrobials in methicillin-sensitive S. aureus was also observed. Judicious use of antimicrobials is essential to control the emergence and spread of antimicrobial resistance.

  7. Predictors for individual patient antibiotic treatment effect in hospitalized community-acquired pneumonia patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simonetti, A. F.; van Werkhoven, C. H.; Schweitzer, V. A.; Viasus, D.; Carratalà, J.; Postma, D. F.; Oosterheert, J. J.; Bonten, M. J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Our objective was to identify clinical predictors of antibiotic treatment effects in hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) who were not in the intensive care unit (ICU). Methods: Post-hoc analysis of three prospective cohorts (from the Netherlands and Spain) of

  8. Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant "Staphylococcus aureus": Considerations for School Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex, Aniltta; Letizia, MariJo

    2007-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant "Staphylococcus aureus" (MRSA) is a disease-causing organism that has been present in hospital settings since the 1960s. However, a genetically distinct strain of MRSA, called community-acquired methicillin-resistant "Staphylococcus aureus" (CA-MRSA), has emerged in recent years in community settings among healthy…

  9. Prognostic factors for early clinical failure in patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogewerf, M; Oosterheert, J J; Hak, E; Hoepelman, I M; Bonten, M J M

    2006-01-01

    For patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), clinical response during the first days of treatment is predictive of clinical outcome. As risk assessments can improve the efficiency of pneumonia management, a prospective cohort study to assess clinical, biochemical and microbiological

  10. Prospective evaluation of pneumonia severity index in hospitalised patients with community-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Eerden, M. M.; de Graaff, C. S.; Bronsveld, W.; Jansen, H. M.; Boersma, W. G.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the pneumonia severity index (PSI) could adequately predict the severity of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and could be used as a severity of illness classification system. Furthermore, reasons that may influence the decision to admit low

  11. Clinical characteristics and innate immunity in patients with community-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Endeman, H.

    2009-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is the most common infectious disease requiring hospitalisation in the Western world. In spite of improving antibiotic regiments, CAP still has significant mortality. In non-immune compromised patients, Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most frequently isolated

  12. Elderly patients with community-acquired pneumonia are not treated according to current guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardt Damsgaard, Tove; Klausen, Henrik Hedegaard; Christiansen, Christina

    2013-01-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in elderly patients, and the most important cause of death in the developed world. Optimised treatment and care will benefit patients as well as the health economy. This study investigated in-hospital compliance...

  13. Comparative efficacy of amoxicillin, cefuroxime and clarithromycin in the treatment of community acquired pneumonia in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aurangzeb, B.; Hameed, A.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To compare the clinical response to amoxicillin, cefuroxime and clarithromycin in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia in children and to see the cost effectiveness of each treatment. Subjects and Methods: Patients between 3 to 72 months of age, admitted in the hospital with community acquired pneumonia, were randomly divided into three groups 1,2,3. They were started on amoxicillin, cefuroxime and clarithromycin respectively. The patients were assessed daily. If there was no clinical improvements at 48 hours the antibiotic was changed. ANOVA statistical test was applied to see the clinical response to the treatment in the three groups. Cost effectiveness of the treatment was compared. Results: There was no statistical difference in the clinical response at 48 hours of initiating treatment and discharge (p>0.01 each). The mean hospital stay in group 1 and 2 was 3.3 days and group 3 was 3.2 days respectively (p>0.01). Ninety-seven percent patients in group 1 and 3, and 95% patients in group 2 showed clinical improvement. The cost of treatment of community acquired pneumonia for 8 days was Rs. 496/-, 730/-, 1018/- for amoxicillin, clarithromycin and cefuroxime respectively. Conclusion: Amoxicillin was found in the most cost effective followed by clarithromycin and cefuroxime respectively in the treatment of non-severe and severe community-acquired pneumonia. (author)

  14. Arthritis in adults with community-acquired bacterial meningitis: a prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weisfelt, M.; van de Beek, D.; Spanjaard, L.; de Gans, J.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Although the coexistence of bacterial meningitis and arthritis has been noted in several studies, it remains unclear how often both conditions occur simultaneously. Methods: We evaluated the presence of arthritis in a prospective nationwide cohort of 696 episodes of community-acquired

  15. Testing for Coccidioidomycosis among Community-Acquired Pneumonia Patients, Southern California, USA1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Kaitlin; Xie, Fagen; Rieg, Gunter K.; Yu, Kalvin C.; Contreras, Richard; Truong, Jonathan; Fong, Kimberlee; Tseng, Hung Fu; Jacobsen, Steven J.; Mody, Rajal K.

    2018-01-01

    We conducted a cohort study to identify characteristics associated with testing for, and testing positive for, coccidioidomycosis among patients with community-acquired pneumonia in southern California, USA. Limited and delayed testing probably leads to underdiagnosis among non-Hispanic black, Filipino, or Hispanic patients and among high-risk groups, including persons in whom antimicrobial drug therapy has failed. PMID:29553315

  16. An Approach to Improve the Negative Predictive Value and Clinical Utility of Transthoracic Echocardiography in Suspected Native Valve Infective Endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivak, Joseph A; Vora, Amit N; Navar, Ann Marie; Schulte, Phillip J; Crowley, Anna Lisa; Kisslo, Joseph; Corey, G Ralph; Liao, Lawrence; Wang, Andrew; Velazquez, Eric J; Samad, Zainab

    2016-04-01

    In patients with suspected native valve infective endocarditis, current guidelines recommend initial transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) followed by transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) if clinical suspicion remains. The guidelines do not account for the quality of initial TTE or other findings that may alter the study's diagnostic characteristics. This may lead to unnecessary TEE when initial TTE was sufficient to rule out vegetation. The objective of this study was to determine if the use of a strict definition of negative results on TTE would improve the performance characteristics of TTE sufficiently to exclude vegetation. A retrospective analysis of patients at a single institution with suspected native valve endocarditis who underwent TTE followed by TEE within 7 days between January 1, 2007, and February 28, 2014, was performed. Negative results on TTE for vegetation were defined by either the standard approach (no evidence of vegetation seen on TTE) or by applying a set of strict negative criteria incorporating other findings on TTE. Using TEE as the gold standard for the presence of vegetation, the diagnostic performance of the two transthoracic approaches was compared. In total, 790 pairs of TTE and TEE were identified. With the standard approach, 661 of the transthoracic studies had negative findings (no vegetation seen), compared with 104 studies with negative findings using the strict negative approach (meeting all strict negative criteria). The sensitivity and negative predictive value of TTE for detecting vegetation were substantially improved using the strict negative approach (sensitivity, 98% [95% CI, 95%-99%] vs 43% [95% CI, 36%-51%]; negative predictive value, 97% [95% CI, 92%-99%] vs 87% [95% CI, 84%-89%]). The ability of TTE to exclude vegetation in patients is excellent when strict criteria for negative results are applied. In patients at low to intermediate risk with strict negative results on TTE, follow-up TEE may be unnecessary

  17. Amoxicillin, the Main Drug for Treating Community-Acquired Pneumonia and Otitis Media, Recommended but Often Not Followed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D. Bakradze

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Amoxicillin is the drug of choice for treating the majority of community-acquired respiratory tract infections in children, including pneumonia and acute otitis media according to both international and national guidelines. Nevertheless, the practice of not following these guidelines is widespread.Objective: Our aim was to study a range of antibiotics prescribed prior to hospitalization to children with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP and acute otitis media (AOM, and to evaluate their effectiveness.Methods. Observational study of children with hospital-verified diagnosis CAP or AOM.Results. Amoxicillin was prescribed to only 4.5% of children with CAP and 1% of patients with AOM; along with parenteral cephalosporines and amoxicillin/clavulanate in adequate doses therapy was started in 34 and 25% respectively. Other children received 3d generation oral cephalosporines or macrolides, which rendered a very low effectiveness (19 and 10% respectively. In view of a flagrant inconformity of the prescribed antibiotics and their doses to the guidelines, non-effective prescriptions were made for 72% of children with CAP and 69% — with AOM. For children with atypical pneumonia macrolides were prescribed in only 19%.Conclusion. Since amoxicillin remains the main drug for treating infections caused by an ever increasing number of resistant strains of S. pneumonia and S. pyogenes, it should be prescribed to children with CAP and AOM: its doses (as well as doses of amoxicillin/clavulanate should be not less than 45 mg/kg/d, and in risk group patients — 80–100 mg/kg/d. The pediatricians’ skills of differentiating atypical pneumonia should be improved.

  18. [Prophylaxis of Community-Acquired Pneumonia Outbreaks with Pneumococcal Polysaccharide Vaccine. Prospects Analysis for Russian Military Community].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guchev, I A; Klochkov, O I; Sinopalnikov, A I

    2016-01-01

    Pneumococcal pneumonia and other diseases caused by pneumococci still remain the main factors of high morbidity and mortality rates throughout the world. Pneumococci as the leading pathogens of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), acute otitis media and sinusitis also cause a number of other serious systemic disorders including invasive infections with high mortality in spite of the antimicrobial resistance status and adequate antimicrobials choice. Pneumococcal infections are responsible for 5-35% or more of community-acquired pneumonias. The burden of pneumonia (up to 100-200 per thousand) is recorded among military recruits in training centers. Since the specific environment of the soldiers could be carrected, their health protection requires medical surveillance. For these reasons, polysaccharide and more immunogenic conjugated pneumococcal vaccines were developed. There is now an urgent need to understand whether such vaccines are effective in military conscripts. Controversy about the effectiveness and value of the polysaccharide (PPV-23) vaccine as a CAP morbidity restriction measure still persists. There were implemented plenty of metaanalyses of pneumococcal vaccines in adults. Some of them showed that the vaccine was effective against bacteremic pneumococcal pneumonia in 'low risk' healthy adults and elders. There have been a number of poor quality observational studies in Russia where 'all pneumonia cases' were considered as an endpoint. It remains controversial whether these observational studies provide adequate evidence to justify the use of the polysaccharide vaccine in the groups of healthy young men for whom it is being advocated. In our analysis we found weak evidence supporting pneumococcal vaccination with PPV-23 for this group. Nevertheless, favorable tendency was found to immunize. It is the reason for a trail to find pharmacoepidemiological support for vaccination by novel conjugated vaccines with better immunogenicity.

  19. Community-Acquired Acute Kidney Injury: A Nationwide Survey in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yafang; Wang, Jinwei; Su, Tao; Qu, Zhen; Zhao, Minghui; Yang, Li

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to describe the burden of community-acquired acute kidney injury (AKI) in China based on a nationwide survey about AKI. Cross-sectional and retrospective study. A national sample of 2,223,230 hospitalized adult patients from 44 academic/local hospitals in Mainland China was used. AKI was defined according to the 2012 KDIGO AKI creatinine criteria or an increase or decrease in serum creatinine level of 50% during the hospital stay. Community-acquired AKI was identified when a patient had AKI that could be defined at hospital admission. The rate, cause, recognition, and treatment of community-acquired AKI were stratified according to hospital type, latitude, and economic development of the regions in which the patients were admitted. All-cause in-hospital mortality and recovery of kidney function at hospital discharge. 4,136 patients with community-acquired AKI were identified during the 2 single-month snapshots (January 2013 and July 2013). Of these, 2,020 (48.8%) had cases related to decreased kidney perfusion; 1,111 (26.9%), to intrinsic kidney disease; and 499 (12.1%), to urinary tract obstruction. In the north versus the south, more patients were exposed to nephrotoxins or had urinary tract obstructions. 536 (13.0%) patients with community-acquired AKI had indications for renal replacement therapy (RRT), but only 347 (64.7%) of them received RRT. Rates of timely diagnosis and appropriate use of RRT were higher in regions with higher per capita gross domestic product. All-cause in-hospital mortality was 7.3% (295 of 4,068). Delayed AKI recognition and being located in northern China were independent risk factors for in-hospital mortality, and referral to nephrology providers was an independent protective factor. Possible misclassification of AKI and community-acquired AKI due to nonstandard definitions and missing data for serum creatinine. The features of community-acquired AKI varied substantially in different regions of China and were closely

  20. Inpatient management of community-acquired pneumonia at the European Gaza Hospital: a clinical audit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyacoubi, Said; Abuowda, Yousef; Albarqouni, Loai; Böttcher, Bettina; Elessi, Khamis

    2018-02-21

    Disease severity scores such as CURB-65 are often used to guide the management of patients with community-acquired pneumonia. Early and adequate empirical antibiotic treatment reduces mortality. The aim of this study was to examine the severity assessment and management of patients presenting with community-acquired pneumonia at the European Gaza Hospital in the Gaza Strip and to compare this to the best available evidence. Medical records of all patients admitted to the European Gaza Hospital with a diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia between Dec 1, 2015, and March 31, 2016, were reviewed retrospectively. Clinical practice was compared with recommendations for severity assessment and the management of community-acquired pneumonia, as reported in guidelines by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence and the American Thoracic Society. Ethical approval was obtained from the General Directorate of Human Resources. 141 patients were admitted to the European Gaza Hospital with community-acquired pneumonia during the study period. Records of 41 patients were missing or could not be retrieved. The mean age of patients was 55·9 years (SD 20·2). Blood urea and nitrogen concentrations were not documented for 48 (48%) patients, and respiratory rate was not documented for 73 (73%) patients. The CURB-65 score was determined only for 12 (12%) patients. Microbiological testing was done only for two (2%) patients. Although 18 different antibiotic regimens were used, 81 (81%) patients received a β-lactam plus macrolide combination therapy, either given alone (49 [49%] patients) or with another antibiotic (32 [32%] patients), which is in line with the recommendations for patients admitted to hospital with community-acquired pneumonia. 43 (43%) patients received anti-viral drugs, and 41 (41%) patients received corticosteroids. Clinicians were poorly adherent to current standards of care in severity assessment and management of community-acquired pneumonia

  1. Community-Acquired Pneumonia: a Comparison between elderly and nonelderly patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Jafari

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Community-acquired pneumonia could be a life-threatening condition especially in elderly patients. The factors influencing the outcome in elderly patients are thought to be different from those in young adults. We compared the clinical and paraclinical profiles in elderly and nonelderly patients with community-acquired pneumonias. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, seventy nine patients who were hospitalized with community acquired pneumonia over a period of one year were included. Patients' medical records were reviewed; and data related to comorbid conditions, signs and symptoms, laboratory and radiographic findings were gathered using a checklist. Results: The clinical features, laboratory parameters and complications from pneumonia were almost similar in 41 elderly (group I, age ≥65years and 38 young (group II, age<65years subjects. Delirium was seen more in elderly group (p=0.05. The average body temperature and pulse rate were significantly higher in nonelderly group. Sixty one percent of elderly patients and 21% of young patients have Po2 less than 60 (p=0.02. Smoking (29.1%, neurological disturbances (19%, congestive heart failure (15.2%, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and diabetes mellitus (13.9% were associated comorbidities in both groups. In non elderly group, immune compromise and IV drug use were more common as underlying comorbid conditions. Two of three mortalities were due to elder patients. Conclusion: Community acquired pneumonia could have more serious clinical and abnormal laboratory features in the elderly than younger patients. Mortality rate may be higher in older patients. Comorbid conditions are frequently seen in both elderly and nonelderly patients with community acquired pneumonia, but IV drug use and immune compromise are more frequent in nonelderly patients.

  2. Community-acquired Pseudomonas aeruginosa-pneumonia in a previously healthy man occupationally exposed to metalworking fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Peixoto Ferraz de Campos

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Although the Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection is well known and frequently found in hospitals and nursing care facilities, many cases are also reported outside these boundaries. In general, this pathogen infects debilitated patients either by comorbidities or by any form of immunodeficiency. In cases of respiratory infection, tobacco abuse seems to play an important role as a risk factor. In previously healthy patients, community-acquired pneumonia (CAP with P. aeruginosa as the etiological agent is extremely rare, and unlike the cases involving immunocompromised or hospitalized patients, the outcome is severe, and is fatal in up to 61.1% of cases. Aerosolized contaminated water or solutions are closely linked to the development of respiratory tract infection. In this setting, metalworking fluids used in factories may be implicated in CAP involving previously healthy people. The authors report the case of a middle-aged man who worked in a metalworking factory and presented a right upper lobar pneumonia with a rapid fatal outcome. P. aeruginosa was cultured from blood and tracheal aspirates. The autopsy findings confirmed a hemorrhagic necrotizing pneumonia with bacteria-invading vasculitis and thrombosis. A culture of the metalworking fluid of the factory was also positive for P. aeruginosa. The pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed that both strains (blood culture and metalworking fluid were genetically indistinguishable. The authors highlight the occupational risk for the development of this P. aeruginosa-infection in healthy people.

  3. The relationships between clinical variables and renal parenchymal disease in pediatric clinically suspected urinary tract infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Lim Byun

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To evaluate the significance of clinical signs and laboratory findings as predictors of renal parenchymal lesions and vesicoureteral reflux (VUR in childhood urinary tract infection (UTI. Methods : From July 2005 to July 2008, 180 patients admitted with a first febrile UTI at the Pediatric Department of Konkuk University Hospital were included in this study. The following were the clinical variables: leukocytosis, elevated C-reactive protein (CRP, positive urine nitrite, positive urine culture, and fever duration both before and after treatment. We evaluated the relationships between clinical variables and dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA scan and voiding cystourethrography (VCUG results. Results : VCUG was performed in 148 patients; of them, 37 (25.0% had VUR: 18 (12.2% had low-grade (I-II VUR, and 19 (10.5% had high-grade (III-V VUR. Of the 95 patients who underwent DMSA scanning, 29 (30.5% had cortical defects, of which 21 (63.6% had VUR: 10 (30.3%, low-grade (I-II VUR; and 11 (33.3%, high-grade VUR. Of the 57 patients who were normal on DMSA scan, 8 (14.0% had low-grade VUR and 6 (10.5% had high-grade VUR. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the DMSA scan in predicting high-grade VUR were 64.7%, 69.9%, 33.3%, and 89.5%, respectively. Leukocytosis, elevated CRP, and prolonged fever (?#243;6 hours after treatment were significantly correlated with the cortical defects on DMSA scans and high-grade VUR. Conclusion : Clinical signs, including prolonged fever after treatment, elevated CRP, and leukocytosis, are positive predictors of acute pyelonephritis and high-grade VUR.

  4. Laboratory testing in management of patients with suspected Ebolavirus disease: infection control and safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, G L

    2015-08-01

    If routine laboratory safety precautions are followed, the risk of laboratory-acquired infection from handling specimens from patients with Ebolavirus disease (EVD) is very low, especially in the early 'dry' stage of disease. In Australia, border screening to identify travellers returning from EVD-affected west African countries during the 2014-2015 outbreak has made it unlikely that specimens from patients with unrecognised EVD would be sent to a routine diagnostic laboratory. Australian public health and diagnostic laboratories associated with hospitals designated for the care of patients with EVD have developed stringent safety precautions for EVD diagnostic and other tests likely to be required for supportive care of the sickest (and most infectious) patients with EVD, including as wide a range of point-of-care tests as possible. However, it is important that the stringent requirements for packaging, transport and testing of specimens that might contain Ebolavirus--which is a tier 1 security sensitive biology agent--do not delay the diagnosis and appropriate management of other potentially serious but treatable infectious diseases, which are far more likely causes of a febrile illness in people returning from west Africa. If necessary, urgent haematology, biochemistry and microbiological tests can be performed safely, whilst awaiting the results of EVD tests, in a PC-2 laboratory with appropriate precautions including: use of recommended personal protective equipment (PPE) for laboratory staff; handling any unsealed specimens in a class 1 or II biosafety cabinet; using only centrifuges with sealed rotors; and safe disposal or decontamination of all used equipment and laboratory waste.

  5. Development of a virus neutralisation test to detect antibodies against Schmallenberg virus and serological results in suspect and infected herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffen, Willie; Quak, Sjaak; de Boer-Luijtze, Els; Hulst, Marcel; van der Poel, Wim; Bouwstra, Ruth; Maas, Riks

    2012-08-07

    At the end of 2011, a new orthobunyavirus, tentatively named Schmallenberg virus (SBV), was discovered in Germany. This virus has since been associated with clinical signs of decreased milk production, watery diarrhoea and fever in dairy cows, and subsequently also with congenital malformations in calves, lambs and goat kids. In affected countries, initial surveillance for the infection was based on examination of malformed progeny. These suspicions were followed up by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) on brain tissue. For epidemiological purposes, a serological assay was, however, needed. A virus neutralisation test (VNT) was developed and optimized, and subsequently evaluated. This VNT has a specificity of >99% and the sensitivity is likely also very close to 100%. The assay is highly repeatable and reproducible. The final assay was used to test for antibodies in cows, ewes and does from herds known to be infected or suspected to be so. Targets for sampling in these herds were the mothers of malformed offspring. In herds with an RT-PCR confirmed SBV infection, more than 94% (190 out of 201) of the ewes and 99% (145 out of 146) of the cows were seropositive. In herds with suspicion of SBV infection based on birth of malformed offspring only (no or negative RT-PCR), more than 90% (231 out of 255) of the ewes and 95% (795 out of 834) of the cows were seropositive. In goats, on the other hand, only a low number of seropositives was found: overall 36.4%, being 16 out of 44 goats tested. Given the characteristics of this VNT, it can be used at a relative high throughput for testing of animals for export, surveillance, screening and research purposes, but can also be used as a confirmation test for commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA's) and for (relative) quantification of antibodies.Suspicions of SBV infections that were confirmed by RT-PCR were almost always confirmed by serology in cows. Due to individual

  6. Development of a virus neutralisation test to detect antibodies against Schmallenberg virus and serological results in suspect and infected herds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loeffen Willie

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background At the end of 2011, a new orthobunyavirus, tentatively named Schmallenberg virus (SBV, was discovered in Germany. This virus has since been associated with clinical signs of decreased milk production, watery diarrhoea and fever in dairy cows, and subsequently also with congenital malformations in calves, lambs and goat kids. In affected countries, initial surveillance for the infection was based on examination of malformed progeny. These suspicions were followed up by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR on brain tissue. For epidemiological purposes, a serological assay was, however, needed. Results A virus neutralisation test (VNT was developed and optimized, and subsequently evaluated. This VNT has a specificity of >99% and the sensitivity is likely also very close to 100%. The assay is highly repeatable and reproducible. The final assay was used to test for antibodies in cows, ewes and does from herds known to be infected or suspected to be so. Targets for sampling in these herds were the mothers of malformed offspring. In herds with an RT-PCR confirmed SBV infection, more than 94% (190 out of 201 of the ewes and 99% (145 out of 146 of the cows were seropositive. In herds with suspicion of SBV infection based on birth of malformed offspring only (no or negative RT-PCR, more than 90% (231 out of 255 of the ewes and 95% (795 out of 834 of the cows were seropositive. In goats, on the other hand, only a low number of seropositives was found: overall 36.4%, being 16 out of 44 goats tested. Conclusions Given the characteristics of this VNT, it can be used at a relative high throughput for testing of animals for export, surveillance, screening and research purposes, but can also be used as a confirmation test for commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA’s and for (relative quantification of antibodies. Suspicions of SBV infections that were confirmed by RT-PCR were almost

  7. Risk of heart failure after community acquired pneumonia: prospective controlled study with 10 years of follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrie, Thomas J; Minhas-Sandhu, Jasjeet K; Majumdar, Sumit R

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine the attributable risk of community acquired pneumonia on incidence of heart failure throughout the age range of affected patients and severity of the infection. Design Cohort study. Setting Six hospitals and seven emergency departments in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, 2000-02. Participants 4988 adults with community acquired pneumonia and no history of heart failure were prospectively recruited and matched on age, sex, and setting of treatment (inpatient or outpatient) with up to five adults without pneumonia (controls) or prevalent heart failure (n=23 060). Main outcome measures Risk of hospital admission for incident heart failure or a combined endpoint of heart failure or death up to 2012, evaluated using multivariable Cox proportional hazards analyses. Results The average age of participants was 55 years, 2649 (53.1%) were men, and 63.4% were managed as outpatients. Over a median of 9.9 years (interquartile range 5.9-10.6), 11.9% (n=592) of patients with pneumonia had incident heart failure compared with 7.4% (n=1712) of controls (adjusted hazard ratio 1.61, 95% confidence interval 1.44 to 1.81). Patients with pneumonia aged 65 or less had the lowest absolute increase (but greatest relative risk) of heart failure compared with controls (4.8% v 2.2%; adjusted hazard ratio 1.98, 95% confidence interval 1.5 to 2.53), whereas patients with pneumonia aged more than 65 years had the highest absolute increase (but lowest relative risk) of heart failure (24.8% v 18.9%; adjusted hazard ratio 1.55, 1.36 to 1.77). Results were consistent in the short term (90 days) and intermediate term (one year) and whether patients were treated in hospital or as outpatients. Conclusion Our results show that community acquired pneumonia substantially increases the risk of heart failure across the age and severity range of cases. This should be considered when formulating post-discharge care plans and preventive strategies, and assessing downstream episodes

  8. Risk factors for pulmonary embolism in patients preliminarily diagnosed with community-acquired pneumonia: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunfeng; Zhou, Qixing; Zou, Ying; Song, Xiaolian; Xie, Shuanshuan; Tan, Min; Zhang, Guoliang; Wang, Changhui

    2016-05-01

    D-dimer levels are increased in patients with acute pulmonary embolism (PE). However, D-dimer levels are also increased in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). The aim of this prospective cohort study was to examine the incidence and clinical features of patients preliminarily diagnosed with CAP and with increased D-dimer levels, and who finally were diagnosed with PE. Patients diagnosed with CAP and hospitalized in the Respiratory Department of the Tenth People's Hospital Affiliated to Tongji University between May 2011 and May 2013 were enrolled. D-dimer levels were measured routinely after admission. For patients with increased D-dimer levels, those suspected with PE underwent computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA). A total of 2387 patients with CAP was included: 724 (30.3 %) had increased D-dimer levels (median of 0.91 mg/L). CTPA was performed for 139 of the 724 patients (median D-dimer levels of 1.99 mg/L). Among the 139 patients, 80 were diagnosed with PE, and 59 without PE; D-dimer levels were 2.83 and 1.41 mg/L, respectively (p risk factors for PE. Presentation of PE and CAP are similar. Nevertheless, these results indicated that for hospitalized patients with CAP and elevated D-dimer levels, PE should be considered for those >60 years; with CHD, COPD, or lower limb varicosity; with chest pain, shortness of breath, hemoptysis, increased troponin I, or low fever.

  9. Prevalence and clinical features of respiratory syncytial virus in children hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia in northern Brazil

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    Lamarão Letícia

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Childhood pneumonia and bronchiolitis is a leading cause of illness and death in young children worldwide with Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV as the main viral cause. RSV has been associated with annual respiratory disease outbreaks and bacterial co-infection has also been reported. This study is the first RSV epidemiological study in young children hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP in Belém city, Pará (Northern Brazil. Methods With the objective of determining the prevalence of RSV infection and evaluating the patients’ clinical and epidemiological features, we conducted a prospective study across eight hospitals from November 2006 to October 2007. In this study, 1,050 nasopharyngeal aspirate samples were obtained from hospitalized children up to the age of three years with CAP, and tested for RSV antigen by direct immunofluorescence assay and by Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR for RSV Group identification. Results RSV infection was detected in 243 (23.1% children. The mean age of the RSV-positive group was lower than the RSV-negative group (12.1 months vs 15.5 months, pppppp Conclusion The present study highlights the relevance of RSV infection in hospitalized cases of CAP in our region; our findings warrant the conduct of further investigations which can help design strategies for controlling the disease.

  10. Inflammatory biomarkers and prediction for intensive care unit admission in severe community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Paula; Ferrer, Miquel; Martí, Verónica; Reyes, Soledad; Martínez, Raquel; Menéndez, Rosario; Ewig, Santiago; Torres, Antoni

    2011-10-01

    Increased inflammatory response is related to severity and outcome in community-acquired pneumonia, but the role of inflammatory biomarkers in deciding intensive care unit admission is unknown. We assessed the relationship between inflammatory response, prediction for intensive care unit admission, delayed intensive care unit admission, and outcome in patients with community-acquired pneumonia. Prospective clinical study. Intensive care units of two university hospitals. We included 627 ward and 58 intensive care unit patients with community-acquired pneumonia, 36 with direct and 22 with delayed intensive care unit admission. Serum levels of C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1, interleukin-6, interleukin-8, and interleukin-10 at admission. We assessed the prediction for intensive care unit admission of biomarkers and the Infectious Diseases Society of America/American Thoracic Society guidelines minor criteria for severe community-acquired pneumonia. Procalcitonin (p=.001), C-reactive protein (p=.005), tumor necrosis factor-α (p=.042), and interleukin-6 (p=.003) levels were higher in intensive care unit-admitted patients; however, the Infectious Diseases Society of America/American Thoracic Society guidelines minor severity criteria predicted better intensive care unit admission (odds ratio, 12.03; 95% confidence interval, 5.13-28.20; pintensive care unit admission compared with 14 (23%) with levels above the cutoff (p=.032). In patients initially admitted to wards, procalcitonin (p=.012) and C-reactive protein (p=.039) were higher in those 22 patients subsequently transferred to the intensive care unit after adjusting for age, comorbidities, and Pneumonia Severity Index risk class. Despite initially admitted to wards, 14 (64%) patients with delayed intensive care unit admission had already criteria for severe community-acquired pneumonia at admission compared with 73 (12%) ward patients (pintensive care unit admission

  11. Undiagnosed Diabetes Mellitus in Community-Acquired Pneumonia: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Andreas Vestergaard; Faurholt-Jepsen, Daniel; Egelund, Gertrud Baunbæk; Andersen, Stine Bang; Petersen, Pelle Trier; Benfield, Thomas; Witzenrath, Martin; Rohde, Gernot; Ravn, Pernille

    2017-11-29

    Diabetes mellitus is an important risk factor for community-acquired pneumonia, whereas the prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes mellitus and prediabetes in patients with community-acquired pneumonia is largely unknown. We aimed to determine the prevalence of prediabetes, undiagnosed diabetes mellitus, and risk factors associated with undiagnosed diabetes mellitus in a large European community-acquired pneumonia cohort. This was a multicenter prospective cohort study of hospitals and private practices in Germany and Austria encompassing 1961 adults with community-acquired pneumonia included in the German Community-Acquired Pneumonia Competence Network (CAPNETZ) study between 2007 and 2014. The prevalence of undiagnosed diabetes mellitus and prediabetes was estimated based on hemoglobin A1c measurements. Logistic regression was used to assess risk factors for undiagnosed diabetes mellitus. Fifteen percent of patients had known diabetes mellitus. Among patients without known diabetes mellitus, 5.0% had undiagnosed diabetes mellitus and 37.5% had prediabetes. Male sex (odds ratio [OR], 2.45 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.35-4.45]), body mass index ≥25 kg/m2 (OR, 2.64 [95% CI, 1.48-4.72]), and hyperglycemia at admission (6-11 mM: OR, 2.93 [95% CI, 1.54-5.60] and ≥11 mM: OR, 44.76 [95% CI, 17.58-113.98]) were associated with undiagnosed diabetes mellitus. Patients with undiagnosed diabetes mellitus had a higher 180-day mortality rate compared to patients without diabetes mellitus (12.1% vs 3.8%, respectively; P = .001). Undiagnosed diabetes mellitus was prevalent among community-acquired pneumonia. Male sex, overweight, and hyperglycemia at admission were associated with undiagnosed diabetes mellitus. The long-term mortality among patients with undiagnosed diabetes mellitus was high compared to patients without diabetes mellitus. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For

  12. Empiric antibiotic coverage of atypical pathogens for community-acquired pneumonia in hospitalized adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliakim-Raz, Noa; Robenshtok, Eyal; Shefet, Daphna; Gafter-Gvili, Anat; Vidal, Liat; Paul, Mical; Leibovici, Leonard

    2012-09-12

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is caused by various pathogens, traditionally divided into 'typical' and 'atypical'. Initial antibiotic treatment of CAP is usually empirical, customarily covering both typical and atypical pathogens. To date, no sufficient evidence exists to support this broad coverage, while limiting coverage is bound to reduce toxicity, resistance and expense. The main objective was to estimate the mortality and proportion with treatment failure using regimens containing atypical antibiotic coverage compared to those that had typical coverage only. Secondary objectives included the assessment of adverse events. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) Issue 3, 2012 which includes the Acute Respiratory Infection Group's Specialized Register, MEDLINE (January 1966 to April week 1, 2012) and EMBASE (January 1980 to April 2012). Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of adult patients hospitalized due to CAP, comparing antibiotic regimens with atypical coverage (quinolones, macrolides, tetracyclines, chloramphenicol, streptogramins or ketolides) to a regimen without atypical antibiotic coverage. Two review authors independently assessed the risk of bias and extracted data from included trials. We estimated risk ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We assessed heterogeneity using a Chi(2) test. We included 28 trials, encompassing 5939 randomized patients. The atypical antibiotic was administered as monotherapy in all but three studies. Only one study assessed a beta-lactam combined with a macrolide compared to the same beta-lactam. There was no difference in mortality between the atypical arm and the non-atypical arm (RR 1.14; 95% CI 0.84 to 1.55), RR atypical arm. The atypical arm showed an insignificant trend toward clinical success and a significant advantage to bacteriological eradication, which disappeared when evaluating methodologically high quality studies alone. Clinical success for the atypical arm

  13. Empiric antibiotic coverage of atypical pathogens for community acquired pneumonia in hospitalized adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robenshtok, E; Shefet, D; Gafter-Gvili, A; Paul, M; Vidal, L; Leibovici, L

    2008-01-23

    Community acquired pneumonia (CAP) is caused by various pathogens, traditionally divided to 'typical' and 'atypical'. Initial antibiotic treatment of CAP is usually empirical, customarily covering both typical and atypical pathogens. To date, no sufficient evidence exists to support this broad coverage, while limiting coverage is bound to reduce toxicity, resistance and expense. To assess the efficacy and need of adding antibiotic coverage for atypical pathogens in hospitalized patients with CAP, in terms of mortality and successful treatment. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2007, Issue 1) which includes the Acute Respiratory Infection Group's specialized register; MEDLINE (January 1966 to March 2007); and EMBASE (January 1980 to January 2007). Randomized trials of adult patients hospitalized due to CAP, comparing antibiotic regimens with atypical antibiotic coverage to a regimen without atypical antibiotic coverage. Two review authors independently appraised the quality of each trial and extracted the data from included trials. Relative risks (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated, assuming an intention-to-treat (ITT) basis for the outcome measures. Twenty five trials were included, encompassing 5244 randomized patients. There was no difference in mortality between the atypical arm and the non-atypical arm (RR 1.15; 95% CI 0.85 to 1.56). The atypical arm showed an insignificant trend toward clinical success and a significant advantage to bacteriological eradication, which disappeared when evaluating methodologically high-quality studies alone. Clinical success for the atypical arm was significantly higher for Legionella pneumophilae (L. pneumophilae) and non-significantly lower for pneumococcal pneumonia. There was no significant difference between the groups in the frequency of (total) adverse events, or those requiring discontinuation of treatment. However, gastrointestinal events

  14. Acute haematogenous community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus osteomyelitis in an adult: Case report and review of literature

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    Dhanoa Amreeta

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA has of late emerged as a cause of community-acquired infections among immunocompetent adults without risk factors. Skin and soft tissue infections represent the majority of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA clinical presentations, whilst invasive and life-threatening illness like necrotizing pneumonia, necrotizing fasciitis, pyomyositis, osteomyelitis and sepsis syndrome are less common. Although more widely described in the pediatric age group, the occurrence of CA-MRSA osteomyelitis in adults is an uncommonly reported entity. Case presentation We describe an invasive CA-MRSA infection in a 28 year-old previously healthy male, manifesting with bacteraemia, osteomyelitis of femur, pyomyositis and septic arthritis of the knee. Initially a preliminary diagnosis of osteosarcoma was suggested by imaging studies and patient underwent a bone biopsy. MRSA was subsequently isolated from blood cultures taken on day of admission, bone, tissue and pus cultures. Incision and drainage of abscess was performed and patient was treated with vancomycin, with fusidic acid added later. It took 6 months for the inflammatory markers to normalize, warranting 6-months of anti-MRSA therapy. Patient was a fervent deer hunter and we speculate that he acquired this infection from extensive direct contact with deer. Molecular characterization of this isolate showed that it belonged to multilocus sequence type (MLST ST30 and exhibited the staphylococcal chromosome cassette mec (SCCmec type IV, staphylococcus protein A (spa type t019, accessory gene regulator (agr type III and dru type dt10m. This strain harbored Panton-Valentine leukocidin (pvl genes together with 3 other virulent genes; sei (enterotoxin, hlg (hemolysin and fnbA (fibronectin binding protein. Conclusion This case study alerts physicians that beyond the most commonly encountered skin and soft tissue

  15. A prospective, multi centre, randomized clinical study to compare the efficacy and safety of Ertapenem 3 days versus Ampicillin - Sulbactam 3 days in the treatment of localized community acquired intra-abdominal infection. (T.E.A. Study: Three days Ertapenem vs three days Ampicillin-sulbactam

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    Gazzotti Filippo

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recommendations outlined in the latest guidelines published by the Surgical Infection Society (SIS and the Infectious Disease Society of America (IDSA regarding the proper duration of antibiotic therapy in patients with intra-abdominal infections are limited and non-specific. This ambiguity is due mainly to the lack of clinical trials on the topic of optimal duration of therapy. It is well known that the overuse of antibiotics has several important consequences such as increased treatment costs, reduced clinical efficacy, and above all, the increased emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens. Ampicillin-Sulbactam is a commonly used "first line" antibiotic for intra-abdominal infections. Ertapenem and Ampicillin-sulbactam are recommended as primary treatment agents for localized peritonitis by both the SIS and IDSA guidelines. Methods/Design This study is a prospective multi-center randomized investigation. The study will be performed in the Departments of General, Emergency, and Transplant Surgery of Sant'Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital in Bologna, Italy, in the General Surgery Department of the Ospedali Riuniti of Bergamo, Italy, and in the Trauma and Emergency Surgery Department of Maggiore Hospital in Bologna, Italy, and will be conducted by all surgeons willing to participate in the study. The inclusion period of the study will take approximately two years before the planned number of 142 enrolled patients is reached. Discussion Ertapenem and Ampicillin-sulbactam are recommended both as primary treatment agents for localized peritonitis by both the SIS and IDSA guidelines. As one of the discussed topic is the optimal duration of the antibiotic therapy and this ambiguity is due mainly to the lack of clinical trials on the topic, the present study aims for obtain precise data. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00630513

  16. A post hoc assessment of duration of protection in CAPiTA (Community Acquired Pneumonia immunization Trial in Adults)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patterson, Scott; Webber, Chris; Patton, Michael; Drews, Wayne; Huijts, Susanne M.; Bolkenbaas, Marieke; Gruber, William C.; Scott, Daniel A.; Bonten, Marc J M

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Community Acquired Pneumonia immunization Trial in Adults (CAPiTA) was conducted to evaluate 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) for the prevention of vaccine-type community-acquired pneumonia (VT-CAP) and vaccine-type invasive pneumococcal disease (VT-IPD) in adults

  17. Nosocomial and Community-Acquired Staphylococcus Aureus Bacterimias from 1980 to 1993: Impact of Intravascular Devices and Methicillin Resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.P. Steinberg; C.C. Clarke; B.O. Hackman

    1996-01-01

    textabstractThe rate of nosocomial bacteremia due to Staphylococcus aureus has increased over the past decade, but trends in community-acquired S. aureus bacteremia are less certain. This hospital-based observational study compares nosocomial and community-acquired S. aureus bacteremias during

  18. Use of proton pump inhibitors and the risk of community-acquired pneumonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulmez, Sinem Ezgi; Holm, Anette; Frederiksen, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recently, the use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) has been associated with an increased risk of pneumonia. We aimed to confirm this association and to identify the risk factors. METHODS: We conducted a population-based case-control study using data from the County of Funen, Denmark....... Cases (n=7642) were defined as all patients with a first-discharge diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia from a hospital during 2000 through 2004. We also selected 34 176 control subjects, who were frequency matched to the cases by age and sex. Data on the use of PPIs and other drugs......, on microbiological samples, on x-ray examination findings, and on comorbid conditions were extracted from local registries. Confounders were controlled by logistic regression. RESULTS: The adjusted odds ratio (OR) associating current use of PPIs with community-acquired pneumonia was 1.5 (95% confidence interval [CI...

  19. Penicillin as empirical therapy for patients hospitalised with community acquired pneumonia at a Danish hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, O; Glenthøj, Jonathan Peter; Dragsted, Ulrik Bak

    2001-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We report on the outcome of a study of patients hospitalised with community acquired pneumonia (HCAP) at a Danish university hospital. METHODOLOGY: In a retrospective study of 243 consecutive patients with radiographically verified HCAP, data on clinical and laboratory findings...... three months was 12% and the readmission rate within three months was 20%. The three treatment groups were comparable with respect to most demographic and clinical criteria at baseline. No significant differences in outcome between the groups were found: the mortality was 12.5%, 13.0%, and 10.......3%, respectively, p = 0.94, and the readmission rate 20.3%, 24.0%, and 14.8%, respectively; p = 0.63. CONCLUSION: Patients treated for community-acquired pneumonia at a Danish university hospital had clinical outcomes fully at height with findings from other countries, and half of the patients were successfully...

  20. Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation for Adult Community-Acquired Pneumonia: Outcomes and Predictors of Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Kollengode; Tan, Chuen Seng; Rycus, Peter; MacLaren, Graeme

    2017-05-01

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation is a rescue therapy used to support severe cardiorespiratory failure. Data on outcomes from severe community-acquired pneumonia in adults receiving rescue extracorporeal membrane oxygenation are mainly confined to single-center experiences or specific pathogens. We examined data from the Extracorporeal Life Support Organisation registry to identify risk factors for poor outcomes in adult patients with community-acquired pneumonia. Retrospective data analysis. Extracorporeal Life Support Organization Registry database. We collected deidentified data on adult patients (> 18 yr) receiving extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for community-acquired pneumonia between 2002 and 2012. Patients with incomplete data or brain death were excluded. The primary outcome measure was in-hospital mortality. Other measurements included demographic information, pre-extracorporeal membrane oxygenation mechanical ventilation and biochemical variables, inotrope requirements, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation mode, duration, and complications. Initial univariate analysis assessed potential associations between survival and various pre-extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation factors. Variables with p values of less than 0.1 were considered for logistic regression analysis to identify predictors of mortality. None. One thousand fifty-five patients, who satisfied inclusion criteria, were included in the final analysis. There was an increase in the number of patients cannulated per annum over the 10-year period studied. Univariate analysis identified pre-extracorporeal membrane oxygenation and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation variables associated with high mortality. Further multiple regression analysis identified certain pre-extracorporeal membrane oxygenation factors as predictors of mortality, including duration of mechanical ventilation prior to extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, lower arterial pressure, fungal

  1. [PECULIARITIES OF COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED PNEUMONIA IN CHILDREN WITH NEUROLOGICAL PATHOLOGY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubarenko, O; Kopiyka, G; Kravchenko, T; Koval, L; Gurienko, K

    2017-06-01

    Neurological disorders in children highly affect the course of pneumonia, its outcome and the development of possible complications. The aim of the study was to reveal clinical and paraclinical features of community-acquired pneumonia in younger children with neurologic pathology infantile cerebral palsy. Under observation were 37 children with community-acquired pneumonia aged 1 to 3 years that suffered from spastic forms of infantile cerebral palsy. The comparison group consisted of 30 children with community-acquired pneumonia without any concomitant neurological pathology. The age of the children in the comparison and study groups was the same. The results of the study show that the presence of infantile cerebral palsy allow to relate the child to the risk group of respiratory pathology development. The course of community-acquired pneumonia in children affected by infantile cerebral palsy is characterized by rapid progression of symptoms and severity of the condition, and the clinical picture also has a number of characteristic features. Thus, cough, local physical data, classical laboratory signs of inflammation in the form of leukocytosis with neutrophil shift were noticed significantly less often in children with infantile cerebral palsy. The debut of the disease was often accompanied by bronchial obstruction, the inflammatory process was localized in the lower parts of the lungs and often matched the side of the neurologically affected part of the body. Children with cerebral palsy required a longer hospital-stay and a prolonged course of antibiotic therapy. Therefore, the risk of pneumonia in children with infantile cerebral palsy should be taken into account at the primary stage of medical care for the creation of preventive programs.

  2. [Bacteriology of community acquired meningitis in Sfax, Tunisia (1993-2001)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maalej, S Mezghani; Kassis, M; Rhimi, F Mahjoubi; Damak, J; Hammami, A

    2006-02-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the distribution of bacteria responsible for community-acquired meningitis and the pattern of resistance of common species. All bacteriologically confirmed cases of community-acquired meningitis were recorded between 1993 and 2001. Two hundred twenty-four cases of bacterial meningitis were recorded. The most frequent species were Haemophilus influenzae and Streptococcus pneumoniae followed by Neisseria meningitidis with respectively 37.1%, 32.1%, and 10.7% of cases. The yearly distribution of these bacteria did not show any epidemic peak. Enterobacteria and group B Streptococcus were the most frequently identified pathogens in neonatal meningitis. H. influenzae was the predominant microorganism in children between one month and five years of age, (66.4%) followed by S. pneumoniae (23.5%). S. pneumoniae was the predominant bacteria responsible fore more than half of the cases over five years of age. 28.8% of H. influenzae strains produced beta-lactamase. 27.2% of S. pneumoniae strains were less susceptible to penicillin. Resistance rates for amoxicillin and cefotaxime were respectively 10.6% and 7.5%. Only one strain of N. meningitidis (4.2%) presented with a decreased susceptibility to penicillin. In our study, H. influenzae and S. pneumoniae were the main microorganisms responsible for community-acquired meningitis. High resistance rates were found for these bacteria: 28.8% of H. influenzae to ampicillin and 27.2% of S. pneumoniae to penicillin.

  3. Independent radiographic prognostic factors in patients with hospital-treated community-acquired pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelm, K.; Textor, J.; Schild, H.; Ewig, S.; Luederitz, B.; Krollmann, G.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the independent prognostic impact of the chest radiograph for mortality from community-acquired pneumonia requiring hospitalization. Methods: Chest radiographs of 67 patients with hospital-treated community-acquired pneumonia were analyzed with regard to the prognostic implications of radiographic patterns, extent and density of infiltrates, and its evolution during treatment. Results: Non-survivors had a significantly higher extent of infiltrates (p=0.008), density of infiltrates (p=0.05), and radiographic spread during follow-up within 48-72 hours (p=0.0001). In multivariate analysis, persistent or progressive infiltrates were associated with a 47fold increase, and persistent or progressive density of infiltrates with an 18fold increase in risk of mortality. The presence of both parameters could correctly predict 96% of survivors and 90% of non-survivors. Conclusions: The chest radiograph is an independent predictor of the severity of pneumonia. Both persistent or progressive infiltrates and persistent or progressive density of infiltrates are independently associated with mortality from community-acquired pneumonia. (orig.) [de

  4. Arthritis in adults with community-acquired bacterial meningitis: a prospective cohort study

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    de Gans Jan

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the coexistence of bacterial meningitis and arthritis has been noted in several studies, it remains unclear how often both conditions occur simultaneously. Methods We evaluated the presence of arthritis in a prospective nationwide cohort of 696 episodes of community-acquired bacterial meningitis, confirmed by culture of cerebrospinal fluid, which occurred in patients aged >16 years. The diagnosis of arthritis was based upon the judgment of the treating physician. To identify differences between groups Fisher exact statistics and the Mann-Whitney U test were used. Results Arthritis was recorded in 48 of 696 (7% episodes of community-acquired bacterial meningitis in adults. Joint-fluid aspirations were performed in 23 of 48 patients (48% and joint-fluid cultures yielded bacteria in 6 of 23 patients (26%. Arthritis occurred most frequently in patients with meningococcal meningitis (12%. Of the 48 patients with bacterial meningitis and coexisting arthritis, four died (8% and 10 (23% had residual joint symptoms. Conclusion Arthritis is a common manifestation in patients with community-acquired bacterial meningitis. Functional outcome of arthritis in bacterial meningitis is generally good because meningococcal arthritis is usually immune-mediated, and pneumococcal arthritis is generally less deforming than staphylococcal arthritis. Nevertheless, additional therapeutic measures should be considered if clinical course is complicated by arthritis. In patients with infectious arthritis prolonged antibiotic therapy is mandatory.

  5. Update on the prevention and control of community-acquired meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skov, Robert; Christiansen, Keryn; Dancer, Stephanie J; Daum, Robert S; Dryden, Matthew; Huang, Yhu-Chering; Lowy, Franklin D

    2012-03-01

    The rapid dissemination of community-acquired meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) since the early 2000s and the appearance of new successful lineages is a matter of concern. The burden of these infections varies widely between different groups of individuals and in different regions of the world. Estimating the total burden of disease is therefore problematic. Skin and soft-tissue infections, often in otherwise healthy young individuals, are the most common clinical manifestation of these infections. The antibiotic susceptibilities of these strains also vary, although they are often more susceptible to 'traditional' antibiotics than related hospital-acquired strains. Preventing the dissemination of these organisms throughout the general population requires a multifaceted approach, including screening and decolonisation, general hygiene and cleaning measures, antibiotic stewardship programmes and, in the future, vaccination. The current evidence on the prevention and control of CA-MRSA is appraised and summarised in this review. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  6. Accuracy of SOFA, qSOFA, and SIRS scores for mortality in cancer patients admitted to an intensive care unit with suspected infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Ramon T; Nassar, Antonio P; Caruso, Pedro

    2018-01-04

    To compare the prognostic accuracy of Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) and quick SOFA (qSOFA) with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria in critically ill cancer patients with suspected infection. Data for 450 cancer patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) in 2014 with a suspected infection were retrospectively analyzed. Sensitivity, specificity, and area under the receiver operating curve (AUC) values for SOFA, qSOFA, and SIRS criteria for ICU and hospital mortalities were calculated. Mortalities according to Sepsis-2 stratification (e.g., sepsis, severe sepsis, and septic shock) and Sepsis-3 stratification (e.g., infection, sepsis, and septic shock) were also compared. SOFA outperformed SIRS in predicting mortalities for ICU [(AUC, 0.76; 95% confidence interval (CI) 95%, 0.71-0.81) vs. (AUC, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.56-0.67), p SIRS for both settings [(AUC, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.65-0.76, p = .02) vs. (AUC, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.64-0.74; p SIRS in predicting ICU and hospital mortality for critically ill cancer patients with suspected infection. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer and the risk of hospitalisation for community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Blánaid M; Yin, Hui; Bladou, Franck; Ernst, Pierre; Azoulay, Laurent

    2017-07-01

    Androgens have been shown to influence both the immune system and lung tissue, raising the hypothesis that androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer may increase the risk of pneumonia. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine whether ADT is associated with an increased risk of hospitalisation for community-acquired pneumonia in patients with prostate cancer. This was a population-based cohort study using the United Kingdom Clinical Practice Research Datalink linked to the Hospital Episode Statistics repository. The cohort consisted of 20 310 men newly diagnosed with non-metastatic prostate cancer between 1 April 1998 and 31 March 2015. Time-dependent Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate adjusted HRs and 95% CIs for hospitalisation for community-acquired pneumonia associated with current and past use of ADT compared with non-use. During a mean follow-up of 4.3 years, there were 621 incident hospitalisations for community-acquired pneumonia (incidence rate: 7.2/1000 person-years). Current ADT use was associated with an 81% increased risk of hospitalisation for community-acquired pneumonia (12.1 vs 3.8 per 1000 person-years, respectively; HR 1.81, 95% CI 1.47 to 2.23). The association was observed within the first six months of use (HR 1.73, 95% CI 1.23 to 2.42) and remained elevated with increasing durations of use (≥25 months; HR 1.79, 95% CI 1.39 to 2.30). In contrast, past ADT use was not associated with an increased risk (HR 1.23, 95% CI 0.95 to 1.60). The use of ADT is associated with an increased risk of hospitalisation for community-acquired pneumonia in men with prostate cancer. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  8. Clinical application of T-spot test of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection for diagnosis of suspected pulmonary tuberculosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-ping SHI

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To explore the application value of T-spot test of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (T-SPOT.TB on diagnosis and differential diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis. Methods From Apr. 2014 to Dec. 2016, 700 patients with suspected pulmonary tuberculosis were collected, venous blood (5ml was drawn off and sputum was collected from each patient separately for T-SPOT.TB and pathogens identification (including TB. Chest CT, bronchoscopy brush or biopsy histopathological examination were followed up, cultivation of My. tuberculosis and of common bacteria with sputum or lavage fluid when needed. T-SPOT.TB test was performed according to the kit instruction operation. 2.5×105 peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were added into the pre- coated anti- human γ- interferon antibody, and co-incubated separately with two specific My. tuberculosis antigens, namely early secretory targeting 6 (ESAT-6 and culture filtration protein 10 (CFP-10, and then the spot forming cells (SFCs were counted. The gold standard for present study were set as follows: 1 My. tuberculosis smear positive or culture positive; 2 Clinical diagnosis (meet any one is positive. The efficacy of T-SPOT.TB on diagnosing active TB was observed, and then the optimal critical value for diagnosing active TB was determined. Patients diagnosed as active TB were divided into 4 subgroups: initial treatment group, retreatment group, smear or culture positive group, and smear or culture negative group. T-SPOT.TB was carried out to detect A and B antigen, and the difference of formed SFCs was then compared. The present study was approved by the Ethics Committee of Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region Chest Hospital. Results Of 700 cases suspected of pulmonary tuberculosis enrolled in present study, 528 out of 624 definite cases (84.6% were finally diagnosed as active tuberculosis (active TB group and 96 cases (15.4% were as without TB infection (non-TB group. Positive results of T

  9. The role of haloaerosolotherapy in immunorehabilitation of convalescents after community acquired pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olha Lemko

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Investigation of the peculiarities of different haloaerosoltherapy regimes influence (treatment with different intensity of haloaerosol load upon non-specific defense and cellular immunity at convalescents after community acquired pneumonia. Objectives: patients with community acquired pneumonia in the early convalescence period (after completing antibiotic therapy, who received treatment in conditions of artificial rock salt aerosol medium (haloaerosoltherapy. Material and Methods. 42 patients with non-severe community acquired pneumonia were examined in the early convalescence period before and after the course of haloaerosoltherapy, which was prescribed after antibacterial therapy. Immunological studies included: evaluation of phagocytic activity of neutrophils (PhAN - the percentage of phagocytic neutrophils, phagocytic number (PhN - average number of latex particles absorbed by a neutrophil; metabolism of neutrophils in the test with nitroblue tetrasolium (NBT-test spontaneous and induced, which allowed to assess the functional reserve of neutrophils (FR; calculation of cytochemical coefficient (CCC for lysosomal cationic proteins (LCP and for myeloperoxidase (MPO of neutrophils; number of T- and B-lymphocytes and their subpopulations (CD3+ -, CD4+ -, CD8+ -, CD22+ - lymphocytes, calculation the number of 0- lymphocytes and the ratio of CD4+ /CD8+ lymphocytes. Laboratory examinations were also conducted in 21 practically healthy individuals (control group. Two regimes of haloaerosoltherapy were used in recovery treatment of patients with community acquired pneumonia: treating complex №1 (TC-1 with standard haloaerosol load and with increased haloaerosol load (TC-2. Results. After completion the antibiotic therapy at patients with community acquired pneumonia the moderate inhibition of phagocytic activity of neutrophils (47,6±0,58% to 55,5±1,14% in control group remained and was accompanied with a decrease in neutrophil bactericidal

  10. Prevalência e suscetibilidades bacterianas das infecções comunitárias do trato urinário, em Hospital Universitário de Brasília, no período de 2001 a 2005 Prevalence and bacterial susceptibility of community acquired urinary tract infection in University Hospital of Brasília, 2001 to 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelle Cristina da Silva Pires

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available A infecção do trato urinário é uma das afecções mais comuns da clínica médica, sendo mandatório o conhecimento epidemiológico da mesma e do perfil de sensibilidade dos agentes etiológicos. O estudo teve como objetivo identificar os agentes etiológicos mais freqüentes e o perfil de sensibilidade aos antimicrobianos das bactérias isoladas de uroculturas de pacientes ambulatoriais atendidos no Hospital Universitário de Brasília no período de 2001 a 2005. Foram analisadas 2.433 uroculturas positivas realizadas no laboratório de microbiologia do Hospital Universitário de Brasília. A Escherichia coli foi a bactéria mais isolada (62,4%, seguida de Klebsiella pneumoniae (6,8% e Proteus mirabillis (4,7%. A Escherichia coli apresentou maior sensibilidade à amicacina (98,6%, gentamicina (96,2%, nitrofurantoína (96,3%, e às quinolonas ciprofloxacina (90,9% e norfloxacina (89,8%, com baixa sensibilidade ao sulfametoxazol-trimetoprima (50,6%. As outras bactérias apresentaram similar padrão de sensibilidade. Em conclusão, a Escherichia coli foi a bactéria mais isolada, sendo altamente sensível aos amiglicosídeos, nitrofurantoína e quinolonas.Urinary tract infection is among the most common infectious diseases in clinical medicine, and knowledge of its epidemiology and the sensitivity profile of the etiological agents is mandatory. The aim of this study was to identify the most frequent etiological agents and the profile of sensitivity to antimicrobial agents of the bacteria isolated from urine cultures from outpatients at the University Hospital of Brasília between 2001 and 2005. From analyses at the hospital’s microbiology laboratory, there were 2,433 positive urine cultures. Escherichia coli was the most commonly isolated bacteria (62.4%, followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (6.8% and Proteus mirabilis (4.7%. Escherichia coli showed the highest sensitivity to amikacin (98.6%, gentamicin (96.2%, nitrofurantoin (96.3% and the

  11. Origin and evolution of European community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegger, Marc; Wirth, Thierry; Andersen, Paal S; Skov, Robert L; De Grassi, Anna; Simões, Patricia Martins; Tristan, Anne; Petersen, Andreas; Aziz, Maliha; Kiil, Kristoffer; Cirković, Ivana; Udo, Edet E; del Campo, Rosa; Vuopio-Varkila, Jaana; Ahmad, Norazah; Tokajian, Sima; Peters, Georg; Schaumburg, Frieder; Olsson-Liljequist, Barbro; Givskov, Michael; Driebe, Elizabeth E; Vigh, Henrik E; Shittu, Adebayo; Ramdani-Bougessa, Nadjia; Rasigade, Jean-Philippe; Price, Lance B; Vandenesch, Francois; Larsen, Anders R; Laurent, Frederic

    2014-08-26

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) was recognized in Europe and worldwide in the late 1990s. Within a decade, several genetically and geographically distinct CA-MRSA lineages carrying the small SCCmec type IV and V genetic elements and the Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) emerged around the world. In Europe, the predominant CA-MRSA strain belongs to clonal complex 80 (CC80) and is resistant to kanamycin/amikacin and fusidic acid. CC80 was first reported in 1993 but was relatively rare until the late 1990s. It has since been identified throughout North Africa, the Middle East, and Europe, with recent sporadic reports in sub-Saharan Africa. While strongly associated with skin and soft tissue infections, it is rarely found among asymptomatic carriers. Methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) CC80 strains are extremely rare except in sub-Saharan Africa. In the current study, we applied whole-genome sequencing to a global collection of both MSSA and MRSA CC80 isolates. Phylogenetic analyses strongly suggest that the European epidemic CA-MRSA lineage is derived from a PVL-positive MSSA ancestor from sub-Saharan Africa. Moreover, the tree topology suggests a single acquisition of both the SCCmec element and a plasmid encoding the fusidic acid resistance determinant. Four canonical SNPs distinguish the derived CA-MRSA lineage and include a nonsynonymous mutation in accessory gene regulator C (agrC). These changes were associated with a star-like expansion into Europe, the Middle East, and North Africa in the early 1990s, including multiple cases of cross-continent imports likely driven by human migrations. With increasing levels of CA-MRSA reported from most parts of the Western world, there is a great interest in understanding the origin and factors associated with the emergence of these epidemic lineages. To trace the origin, evolution, and dissemination pattern of the European CA-MRSA clone (CC80), we sequenced a global collection

  12. Community-acquired pneumonia due to Legionella pneumophila, the utility of PCR, and a review of the antibiotics used

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    Paul Zarogoulidis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Paul Zarogoulidis1,2, Ioanna Alexandropoulou1,2, Gioulia Romanidou3, Theocharis G Konstasntinidis1,2, Eirini Terzi3, S Saridou1, Athanasios Stefanis1, Kostas Zarogoulidis1,2, TC Constantinidis1,21Regional Laboratory of Public Health, East Macedonia-Thrace, Komotini, Greece; 2Laboratory of Hygiene and Environmental Protection, Medical School, Democritus University of Thrace, Komotini, Greece; 3Department of Internal Medicine, General Municipal Hospital (“Sismanoglio” of Komotini, Komotini, GreeceIntroduction: There are at least 40 types of Legionella bacteria, half of which are capable of producing disease in humans. The Legionella pneumophila bacterium, the root cause of Legionnaires’ disease, causes 90% of legionellosis cases.Case presentation: We describe the case of a 60-year-old woman with a history of diabetes mellitus and arterial hypertension who was admitted to our hospital with fever and symptoms of respiratory infection, diarrhea, and acute renal failure. We used real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR to detect L. pneumophila DNA in peripheral blood and serum samples and urine antigen from a patient with pneumonia. Legionella DNA was detected in all two sample species when first collected.Conclusion: Since Legionella is a cause of 2% to 15% of all community-acquired pneumonias that require hospitalization, legionellosis should be taken into account in an atypical pulmonary infection and not be forgotten. Moreover, real-time PCR should be considered a useful diagnostic method.Keywords: Legionnaires’ disease, Lionella pneumophila

  13. The Use of Polymerase Chain Reaction Amplification for the Detection of Viruses and Bacteria in Severe Community-Acquired Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siow, Wen Ting; Koay, Evelyn Siew-Chuan; Lee, Chun Kiat; Lee, Hong Kai; Ong, Venetia; Ngerng, Wang Jee; Lim, Hui Fang; Tan, Adeline; Tang, Julian Wei-Tze; Phua, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Pathogens are often not identified in severe community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), and the few studies using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques for virus detection are from temperate countries. This study assesses if PCR amplification improves virus and bacteria detection, and if viral infection contributes to mortality in severe CAP in a tropical setting, where respiratory pathogens have less well-defined seasonality. In this cohort study of patients with severe CAP in an intensive care unit, endotracheal aspirates for intubated patients and nasopharyngeal swabs for non-intubated patients were sent for PCR amplification for respiratory viruses. Blood, endotracheal aspirates for intubated patients, and sputum for non-intubated patients were analysed using a multiplex PCR system for bacteria. Out of 100 patients, using predominantly cultures, bacteria were identified in 42 patients; PCR amplification increased this number to 55 patients. PCR amplification identified viruses in 32 patients. In total, only bacteria, only viruses, and both bacteria and viruses were found in 37, 14, and 18 patients, respectively. The commonest viruses were influenza A H1N1/2009 and rhinovirus; the commonest bacterium was Streptococcus pneumoniae. Hospital mortality rates for patients with no pathogens, bacterial infection, viral infection, and bacterial-viral co-infection were 16.1, 24.3, 0, and 5.6%, respectively (p = 0.10). On multivariable analysis, virus detection was associated with lower mortality (adjusted odds ratio 0.12, 95% confidence interval 0.2-0.99; p = 0.049). Viruses and bacteria were detected in 7 of 10 patients with severe CAP with the aid of PCR amplification. Viral infection appears to be independently associated with lower mortality. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Sepse por Staphylococus aureus resistente à meticilina adquirida na comunidade no sul do Brasil Sepsis due to community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in southern Brazil

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    Luciane Cristina Gelatti

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus resistente à meticilina foi inicialmente descrito como um típico microrganismo adquirido em infecções nosocomiais. No entanto, nos últimos anos Staphylococcus aureus resistente à meticilina adquirido na comunidade é causa de infecções de pele e tecidos moles, mas infecções graves como pneumonia e sepse podem ocorrer. Este relato descreve um caso de sepse em criança, complicado com pneumonia secundária a lesão em partes moles por Staphylococcus aureus resistente à meticilina adquirido na comunidade no Sul do Brasil. O paciente foi atendido em Unidade de Emergência com história de ferimento provocado por trauma em membro inferior que evoluiu para celulite, pneumonia e sepse.Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was initially described as a typical microorganism acquired in nosocomial infections. However, over recent years, community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus has been a cause of skin and soft-tissue infections. Serious infections such as pneumonia and sepsis can also occur. This report describes a case of sepsis in a child that was complicated by pneumonia secondary to soft tissue lesions that were due to community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in southern Brazil. The patient was attended at the Emergency Unit with a history of injury caused by lower-limb trauma that evolved to cellulitis, pneumonia and sepsis.

  15. Long-Term Cognitive Impairment after Hospitalization for Community-Acquired Pneumonia: a Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Timothy D; Self, Wesley H; Edwards, Kathryn M; Grijalva, Carlos G; Zhu, Yuwei; Williams, Derek J; Jain, Seema; Jackson, James C

    2018-01-26

    Recent studies suggest older patients hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia are at risk for new-onset cognitive impairment. The characteristics of long-term cognitive impairment after pneumonia, however, have not been elucidated. To characterize long-term cognitive impairment among adults of all ages hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia. Prospective cohort study. Adults without severe preexisting cognitive impairment who were hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia. At enrollment, we estimated baseline cognitive function with the Short Informant Questionnaire on Cognitive Decline in the Elderly (IQCODE). At 2- and 12-month follow-up, we assessed cognition using the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS) and tests of executive function, diagnosing cognitive impairment when results were ≥ 1.5 standard deviations below published age-adjusted means for the general population. We also identified subtypes of mild cognitive impairment using standard definitions. We assessed 58 (73%) of 80 patients who survived to 2-month follow-up and 57 (77%) of 74 who survived to 12-month follow-up. The median [range] age of survivors tested was 57 [19-97] years. Only 8 (12%) had evidence of mild cognitive impairment at baseline according to the Short IQCODE, but 21 (38%) at 2 months and 17 (30%) at 12 months had mild cognitive impairment per the RBANS. Moderate-to-severe cognitive impairment was common among adults ≥ 65 years [4/13 (31%) and 5/13 (38%) at 2 and 12 months, respectively] but also affected many of those impairment in multiple cognitive domains affected one-third of patients ≥ 65 years old and 20% of younger patients, and another third of survivors had mild cognitive impairment.

  16. Autonomic Dysfunction in Children with Acute Community-Acquired Pneumonia and the Ways of Drug Treatment

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    S.L. Nyankovsky

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the features of clinical course, intensity of toxic, asthenic syndromes, autonomic functioning in children of 7 years old with signs of community-acquired pneumonia based on instrumental autonomic testing and EEG findings. The probiotic Enterol and metabolic medication Stimol included into the treatment scheme fasten normalization of clinical, instrumental and functional parameters, reduce autonomic dysfunction, improve physical condition, adaptive opportunities, stress resistance, reduce imbalance between humoral-metabolic and central ergotropic influence, normalize responsiveness of parasympathetic nervous system and balance of autonomic modulation of cardiac rhythm, improve EEG findings.

  17. A Case of Community-Acquired Pneumonia Caused by Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Young Woong; Jung, In Young; Ahn, Mi Young; Jeon, Yong Duk; Ann, Hea Won; Ahn, Jin Young; Ku, Nam Su; Han, Sang Hoon; Choi, Jun Young; Song, Young Goo; Kim, June Myung

    2017-12-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an aerobic Gram-negative coccobacillus that causes nosocomial pneumonia in patients on mechanical ventilation or previously treated with broad-spectrum antibiotics. Nevertheless, community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) caused by A. baumannii, especially multi-drug resistant (MDR) strains, is rare. We experienced the first case of CAP caused by MDR A. baumannii in Korea in a 78-year-old man. This case shows that MDR A. baumannii can cause CAP in Korea. Copyright © 2017 by The Korean Society of Infectious Diseases and Korean Society for Chemotherapy.

  18. Community-Acquired Pneumonia Requiring Hospitalization among U.S. Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Seema; Self, Wesley H; Wunderink, Richard G; Fakhran, Sherene; Balk, Robert; Bramley, Anna M; Reed, Carrie; Grijalva, Carlos G; Anderson, Evan J; Courtney, D Mark; Chappell, James D; Qi, Chao; Hart, Eric M; Carroll, Frank; Trabue, Christopher; Donnelly, Helen K; Williams, Derek J; Zhu, Yuwei; Arnold, Sandra R; Ampofo, Krow; Waterer, Grant W; Levine, Min; Lindstrom, Stephen; Winchell, Jonas M; Katz, Jacqueline M; Erdman, Dean; Schneider, Eileen; Hicks, Lauri A; McCullers, Jonathan A; Pavia, Andrew T; Edwards, Kathryn M; Finelli, Lyn

    2015-07-30

    Community-acquired pneumonia is a leading infectious cause of hospitalization and death among U.S. adults. Incidence estimates of pneumonia confirmed radiographically and with the use of current laboratory diagnostic tests are needed. We conducted active population-based surveillance for community-acquired pneumonia requiring hospitalization among adults 18 years of age or older in five hospitals in Chicago and Nashville. Patients with recent hospitalization or severe immunosuppression were excluded. Blood, urine, and respiratory specimens were systematically collected for culture, serologic testing, antigen detection, and molecular diagnostic testing. Study radiologists independently reviewed chest radiographs. We calculated population-based incidence rates of community-acquired pneumonia requiring hospitalization according to age and pathogen. From January 2010 through June 2012, we enrolled 2488 of 3634 eligible adults (68%). Among 2320 adults with radiographic evidence of pneumonia (93%), the median age of the patients was 57 years (interquartile range, 46 to 71); 498 patients (21%) required intensive care, and 52 (2%) died. Among 2259 patients who had radiographic evidence of pneumonia and specimens available for both bacterial and viral testing, a pathogen was detected in 853 (38%): one or more viruses in 530 (23%), bacteria in 247 (11%), bacterial and viral pathogens in 59 (3%), and a fungal or mycobacterial pathogen in 17 (1%). The most common pathogens were human rhinovirus (in 9% of patients), influenza virus (in 6%), and Streptococcus pneumoniae (in 5%). The annual incidence of pneumonia was 24.8 cases (95% confidence interval, 23.5 to 26.1) per 10,000 adults, with the highest rates among adults 65 to 79 years of age (63.0 cases per 10,000 adults) and those 80 years of age or older (164.3 cases per 10,000 adults). For each pathogen, the incidence increased with age. The incidence of community-acquired pneumonia requiring hospitalization was highest among

  19. Hot Topics in Primary Care: Community-Acquired Bacterial Pneumonia: Is There Anything New?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hans

    2017-04-01

    The management of patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is an ongoing challenge in the primary care setting. This is due, in part, to the fact that management guidelines in the United States were published nearly a decade ago. Furthermore, there has been a dearth of new treatments. But that may be about to change. Management guidelines are being updated by the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) and the American Thoracic Society (ATS) and are expected to be released this summer. In addition, several new antibiotics for the treatment of CAP are on the horizon.

  20. Community-acquired multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial infective endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naha, Sowjanya; Naha, Kushal; Acharya, Vasudev; Hande, H Manjunath; Vivek, G

    2014-08-05

    We describe two cases of bacterial endocarditis secondary to multidrug-resistant Gram-negative organisms. In both cases, the diagnosis was made in accordance with the modified Duke's criteria and confirmed by histopathological analysis. Furthermore, in both instances there were no identifiable sources of bacteraemia and no history of contact with hospital or other medical services prior to the onset of symptoms. The patients were managed in similar fashion with prolonged broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy and surgical intervention and made complete recoveries. These cases highlight Gram-negative organisms as potential agents for endocarditis, as well as expose the dissemination of such multidrug-resistant bacteria into the community. The application of an integrated medical and surgical approach and therapeutic dilemmas encountered in managing these cases are described. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  1. Value of intensive diagnostic microbiological investigation in low- and high-risk patients with community-acquired pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Eerden, M. M.; Vlaspolder, F.; de Graaff, C. S.; Groot, T.; Jansen, H. M.; Boersma, W. G.

    2005-01-01

    In a prospective study to evaluate the diagnostic yield of different microbiological tests in hospitalised patients with community-acquired pneumonia, material for microbiological investigation was obtained from 262 patients. Clinical samples consisted of the following: sputum for Gram staining,

  2. Analysis of the effectiveness of physical rehabilitation according spirographic indicators in community-acquired pneumonia during convalescence

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    Y. S. Kalmykova

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : to make a program of physical rehabilitation for convalescents after community-acquired pneumonia, promotes normalization of respiratory function. The objectives of the study was to evaluate the dynamics spirographic indicators during convalescence community-acquired pneumonia. Material: the study involved 28 women aged 19 to 24 years with a diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia after convalescent. Results: the positive influence of physiotherapy based dance aerobics; morning hygienic gymnastics; therapeutic massage and physical therapy on indicators of lung volumes, ventilation and bronchial patency according spirographic research. Conclusion: in community-acquired pneumonia during the convalescence period recommended physical rehabilitation, which includes curative gymnastics based on dance aerobics, morning hygienic gymnastics, massage therapy, physiotherapy. It improves the functionality of the cardiorespiratory system, nonspecific immunity and overall physical performance level.

  3. PROGNOSTIC IMPACT OF COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED AND HOSPITAL-ACQUIRED HYPONATREMIA IN PATIENTS WITH DECOMPENSATED HEART FAILURE

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    D. Yu. Shchekochikhin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To compare prognostic impact of community-acquired and hospital-acquired hyponatremia in hospitalized patients with decompensated heart failure Material and methods. Data of 120 patients with decompensated heart failure were analyzed. Hyponatremia was defined as serum sodium concentration of 135 mmol/l or less. Several outcomes were analyzed: mortality, transfer to intensive care unit (ICU, resistance to loop diuretics and worsening renal function.Results. 13.0% of patients had community-acquired hyponatremia, 9.6% - hospital-acquired hyponatremia. Community-acquired hyponatremia was associated with increased mortality [odds ratio (OR=7.8], admission to ICU (OR=19.1 and resistance to loop diuretics (OR=4.8. Hospital-acquired hyponatremia was associated with worsening renal function (OR=12.4.Conclusion. Both, community-acquired and hospital hyponatremia have negative impact in hospitalized patients with decompensated heart failure.

  4. PROGNOSTIC IMPACT OF COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED AND HOSPITAL-ACQUIRED HYPONATREMIA IN PATIENTS WITH DECOMPENSATED HEART FAILURE

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    D. Yu. Shchekochikhin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To compare prognostic impact of community-acquired and hospital-acquired hyponatremia in hospitalized patients with decompensated heart failure Material and methods. Data of 120 patients with decompensated heart failure were analyzed. Hyponatremia was defined as serum sodium concentration of 135 mmol/l or less. Several outcomes were analyzed: mortality, transfer to intensive care unit (ICU, resistance to loop diuretics and worsening renal function.Results. 13.0% of patients had community-acquired hyponatremia, 9.6% - hospital-acquired hyponatremia. Community-acquired hyponatremia was associated with increased mortality [odds ratio (OR=7.8], admission to ICU (OR=19.1 and resistance to loop diuretics (OR=4.8. Hospital-acquired hyponatremia was associated with worsening renal function (OR=12.4.Conclusion. Both, community-acquired and hospital hyponatremia have negative impact in hospitalized patients with decompensated heart failure.

  5. Use of multiplex PCR based molecular diagnostics in diagnosis of suspected CNS infections in tertiary care setting-A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javali, Mahendra; Acharya, Purushottam; Mehta, Aneesh; John, Aju Abraham; Mahale, Rohan; Srinivasa, R

    2017-10-01

    CNS infections like meningitis and encephalitis pose enormous healthcare challenges due to mortality, sequelae and socioeconomic burden. In tertiary setting, clinical, microbiological, cytological and radiological investigations are not distinctive enough for diagnosing microbial etiology. Molecular diagnostics is filling this gap. We evaluated the clinical impact of a commercially available multiplex molecular diagnostic system - SES for diagnosing suspected CNS infections. This study was conducted in our tertiary level Neurology ICU. 110 patients admitted during Nov-2010 to April-2014 were included. CSF samples of patients clinically suspected of having CNS infections were subjected to routine investigation in our laboratory and SES test at XCyton Diagnostics. We studied the impact of SES in diagnosis of CNS infections and its efficacy in helping therapeutic management. SES showed detection rate of 42.18% and clinical specificity of 100%. It had 10 times higher detection rate than conventional tests. Streptococcus pneumoniae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis were two top bacterial pathogens. VZV was most detected viral pathogen. SES results elicited changes in therapy in both positive and negative cases. We observed superior patient outcomes as measured by GCS scale. 75% and 82.14% of the patients positive and negative on SES respectively, recovered fully. Detecting causative organism and ruling out infectious etiology remain the most critical aspect for management and prognosis of patients with suspected CNS infections. In this study, we observed higher detection rate of pathogens, target specific escalation and evidence based de-escalation of antimicrobials using SES. Institution of appropriate therapy helped reduce unnecessary use of antimicrobials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of Sofia Fluorescent immunoassay analyzer for pneumococcal urinary antigen detection in hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, Diego; López-Olaizola, Maddi; de la Caba, Idoia; Cilla, Gustavo

    2017-10-01

    The Sofia Streptococcus pneumoniae FIA® test was prospectively evaluated in non-concentrated urine samples of 106 hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia. The test detected pneumococcal urinary antigen in 24/31 (77.4%) confirmed pneumococcal community-acquired pneumonia episodes. The specificity of the test was 86.7% (92% after urine heating). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Community-acquired meningitis due to Staphylococcus capitis in the absence of neurologic trauma, surgery, or implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oud, Lavi

    2011-01-01

    Community-acquired meningitis due to coagulase-negative staphylococci in adults has been rarely reported and generally develops in patients with ventricular shunts or after neurosurgery or neurotrauma. Staphylococcus capitis is a rare cause of adult meningitis. We describe a patient with community-acquired meningitis due to S. capitis, in the absence of traditional risk factors, with atypical presentation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Spooky Suspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacifici, Lara

    2011-01-01

    This activity presents an option for covering biology content while engaging students in an investigation that highlights the spirit of Halloween. Students are engaged in the story line and have fun trying to solve the mystery kidnapping by using science skills to examine the evidence and eliminate some ghoulish suspects. (Contains 1 figure.)

  9. Risk factors for in-hospital mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes complicated by community-acquired Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chung-Huei; Tsai, Jir-Shiong; Chen, I-Wen; Hsu, Brend Ray-Sea; Huang, Miau-Ju; Huang, Yu-Yao

    2015-10-01

    Patients with diabetes are at a high risk of infection-related morbidity and mortality. Klebsiella pneumoniae bacilli are prevalent among diabetic patients, especially in Asian populations. The present study aimed to identify risk factors for in-hospital mortality among diabetic patients complicated by community-acquired K. pneumoniae bacteremia. We evaluated the clinical characteristics of 341 Taiwanese type 2 diabetic patients who were treated for community-acquired K. pneumoniae bacteremia. We then analyzed outcome predictors, and in particular comorbidities and the site of infection. The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 14.1%. Comorbid cancer was the leading factor, accounting for 32.1% of all cases of mortality. Pulmonary infection, primary bacteremia, afebrile or shock presentation and low serum albumin level were risk factors for in-hospital mortality. Regardless of comorbidities, pulmonary infection [odds ratio (OR) 10.74, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.02-57.09] and albumin level (OR 0.15, 95% CI 0.03-0.76) were the main risk predictors. The receiver operating characteristic curve indicated that a serum albumin level lower than 2.4 g/dL (71.1% sensitivity and 77.4% specificity) suggested a poor prognosis in the diabetic patients with K. pneumoniae bacteremia. In patients with pulmonary infection, the capsular serotypes of K. pneumoniae were not related to poor outcomes, and an initial presentation of blunted fever or shock were independent factors for mortality. Cancer, pulmonary infection, and low serum albumin levels were independent indicators of in-hospital mortality in the diabetic patients complicated by K. pneumoniae bacteremia. The sites of infection and host characteristics should always elicit medical attention when treating these patients. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Focal parenchymal lesions in community-acquired bacterial meningitis in adults: a clinico-radiological study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katchanov, Juri [Campus Charite Mitte, Charite, Department of Neurology, Berlin (Germany); University Hospital Charite, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Department of Neurology, Berlin (Germany); Siebert, Eberhard; Klingebiel, Randolf [Campus Charite Mitte, Charite, Department of Neuroradiology, Berlin (Germany); Endres, Matthias [Campus Charite Mitte, Charite, Department of Neurology, Berlin (Germany); Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Center for Stroke Research Berlin, Berlin (Germany)

    2009-11-15

    Here, we analyzed the frequency, morphological pattern, and imaging characteristics of focal lesions as a consequence of community-acquired bacterial meningitis. We hypothesized that diffusion-weighted imaging combined with contrast-enhanced imaging, serial scanning, and multimodal vascular studies would provide further insight into the pathological basis of such parenchymal lesions in bacterial meningitis. We reviewed clinical and imaging data (i.e., magnetic resonance tomography, magnetic resonance angiography, computed tomography angiography, digital subtraction angiography) of 68 adult patients admitted to our neurological intensive care unit between March 1998 and February 2009 with the diagnosis of community-acquired bacterial meningitis. We identified seven patients with parenchymal lesions. These lesions could be attributed to four morphological patterns: (1) territorial cerebral ischemia, (2) perforating vessels ischemia, (3) ischemia of presumed cardiac origin, and (4) isolated cortical lesions. Whereas the patterns (1) and (2) were associated with vasculopathy of large- and medium-sized vessels (as shown by cerebral vascular imaging), vessel imaging in (3) and (4) did not show abnormal findings. Our study implies that parenchymal lesions in acute bacterial meningitis are mainly ischemic and due to involvement of large-, medium-, and small-sized arteries of the brain. Diffusion-weighted imaging combined with conventional, CT-, or MR-based cerebral angiography revealed the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms in the majority of patients. Furthermore, we detected two patients with isolated bilateral cortical involvement and normal vessel imaging. These lesions might represent ischemia due to the involvement of small pial and intracortical arteries. (orig.)

  11. Advances in the causes and management of community acquired pneumonia in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderink, Richard G; Waterer, Grant

    2017-07-10

    Community acquired pneumonia remains a common cause of morbidity and mortality. Usually, the causal organism is not identified and treatment remains empiric. Recent computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging studies have challenged the accuracy of the clinical diagnosis of pneumonia, and epidemiologic studies are changing our perspective of what causes community acquired pneumonia, especially the role of viral pathogens and the frequent finding of multiple pathogens. The past decade has seen increasing overuse of empiric coverage of meticillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus and antibiotic resistant Gram negative pathogens owing to inappropriate application of guidelines for healthcare associated pneumonia. Optimal treatment remains a matter for debate, especially in very sick patients, including the role of combination antibiotic therapy and corticosteroids. Pneumonia care bundles are being defined to improve outcomes. Increased recognition of both acute and long term cardiac complications is shifting our concept of pneumonia from an acute lung disease to a multisystem problem with adverse chronic health consequences. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  12. Efficacy of ceftaroline fosamil for bacteremia associated with community-acquired bacterial pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandourek, Alena; Smith, Alexander; Llorens, Lily; Thye, Dirk A; Eckburg, Paul B; Friedland, H David

    2014-02-01

    Few publications of prospective studies have described patient outcomes in community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP)-associated bacteremia. Our objective, in performing this subgroup analysis, was to assess outcomes in subjects with CABP-associated bacteremia in 2 randomized, double-blind clinical studies comparing treatment with ceftaroline fosamil versus ceftriaxone. Our analysis summarizes baseline subject demographics, distribution of baseline pathogens isolated from blood cultures, clinical response rates at Day 4, and clinical cure rates at end of therapy and test of cure (8 to 15 days after end of therapy) in subjects with bacteremic CABP in the ceFtarOline Community-acquired pneUmonia trial vS ceftriaxone in hospitalized patients (FOCUS) studies. In the FOCUS studies, 23 of 614 patients in the ceftaroline fosamil-treated group and 22 of 614 patients in the ceftriaxone-treated group had CABP-associated bacteremia. Baseline demographics were similar between groups. Streptococcus pneumoniae was the most common baseline bloodstream isolate. For subjects with CABP-associated bacteremia, clinical response/cure rates were similar at Day 4 (60.9% vs 59.1%), end of therapy (69.6% vs 72.7%), and test of cure (69.6% vs 68.2%) for ceftaroline fosamil and ceftriaxone, respectively. In subjects with CABP-associated bacteremia, ceftaroline fosamil demonstrated similar clinical outcomes at Day 4, end of therapy, and test of cure compared with ceftriaxone.

  13. Acute versus subacute community-acquired meningitis: Analysis of 611 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Tarek; Salazar, Lucrecia; Hasbun, Rodrigo

    2017-09-01

    Community-acquired meningitis can be classified into acute and subacute presentations by the duration of illness of ≤ or >5 days, respectively. There are currently no studies comparing the clinical features, management decisions, etiologies, and outcomes between acute and subacute presentations.It is a retrospective study of adults with community-acquired meningitis hospitalized in Houston, TX between January 2005 and January 2010. An adverse clinical outcome was defined as a Glasgow Outcome Scale score of ≤4.A total of 611 patients were identified, of which 458 (75%) were acute and 153 subacute (25%). The most common etiologies were unknown in 418 (68.4%), viral in 94 (15.4%), bacterial in 47 (7.7%), fungal in 42 patients (6.9%), and other noninfectious etiologies in 6 (1%). Patients with subacute meningitis were more likely to be immunosuppressed or have comorbidities, had fungal etiologies, and had higher rates of hypoglycorrachia and abnormal neurological findings (P 65 years and abnormal neurological findings were predictive of an adverse clinical outcome in both acute and subacute meningitis, whereas fever was also a significant prognostic factor in acute meningitis. (P meningitis differ in regards to clinical presentations, etiologies, laboratory findings, and management decisions, but did not differ in rates of adverse clinical outcomes. Future studies including thoroughly investigated patients with new diagnostic molecular methods may show different results and outcomes.

  14. Focal parenchymal lesions in community-acquired bacterial meningitis in adults: a clinico-radiological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katchanov, Juri; Siebert, Eberhard; Klingebiel, Randolf; Endres, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Here, we analyzed the frequency, morphological pattern, and imaging characteristics of focal lesions as a consequence of community-acquired bacterial meningitis. We hypothesized that diffusion-weighted imaging combined with contrast-enhanced imaging, serial scanning, and multimodal vascular studies would provide further insight into the pathological basis of such parenchymal lesions in bacterial meningitis. We reviewed clinical and imaging data (i.e., magnetic resonance tomography, magnetic resonance angiography, computed tomography angiography, digital subtraction angiography) of 68 adult patients admitted to our neurological intensive care unit between March 1998 and February 2009 with the diagnosis of community-acquired bacterial meningitis. We identified seven patients with parenchymal lesions. These lesions could be attributed to four morphological patterns: (1) territorial cerebral ischemia, (2) perforating vessels ischemia, (3) ischemia of presumed cardiac origin, and (4) isolated cortical lesions. Whereas the patterns (1) and (2) were associated with vasculopathy of large- and medium-sized vessels (as shown by cerebral vascular imaging), vessel imaging in (3) and (4) did not show abnormal findings. Our study implies that parenchymal lesions in acute bacterial meningitis are mainly ischemic and due to involvement of large-, medium-, and small-sized arteries of the brain. Diffusion-weighted imaging combined with conventional, CT-, or MR-based cerebral angiography revealed the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms in the majority of patients. Furthermore, we detected two patients with isolated bilateral cortical involvement and normal vessel imaging. These lesions might represent ischemia due to the involvement of small pial and intracortical arteries. (orig.)

  15. Sex-based differences in adults with community-acquired bacterial meningitis: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, S P; Brouwer, M C; Bijlsma, M W; van der Ende, A; van de Beek, D

    2017-02-01

    To investigate sex-based differences in clinical features, causative pathogens, outcome and treatment of adult community-acquired meningitis. From January 2006 to July 2014, we prospectively investigated sex-based differences in clinical features, causative pathogens, outcome and treatment of adult community-acquired meningitis in a nationwide cohort study in the Netherlands. Sex was analysed along with known predictors of unfavourable outcome using logistic regression. We evaluated 1412 episodes of meningitis, 707 (50%) in men. Men more often presented with a history of remote head injury (41/667 (6%) versus 14/658 (2%) women, p 0.0002) or alcoholism (61/652 (9%) versus 21/660 (3%) women, p bacterial meningitis. Male sex is an independent risk factor for adverse outcome. It is possible that sex-based differences in immune reaction could determine a distinct response to corticosteroids. Copyright © 2016 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Community-acquired pneumonia in Chile: the clinical relevance in the detection of viruses and atypical bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchsinger, Vivian; Ruiz, Mauricio; Zunino, Enna; Martínez, María Angélica; Machado, Clarisse; Piedra, Pedro A; Fasce, Rodrigo; Ulloa, María Teresa; Fink, Maria Cristina; Lara, Pamela; Gebauer, Mónica; Chávez, Fernando; Avendaño, Luis F

    2013-11-01

    Adult community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a relevant worldwide cause of morbidity and mortality, however the aetiology often remains uncertain and the therapy is empirical. We applied conventional and molecular diagnostics to identify viruses and atypical bacteria associated with CAP in Chile. We used sputum and blood cultures, IgG/IgM serology and molecular diagnostic techniques (PCR, reverse transcriptase PCR) for detection of classical and atypical bacteria (Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae, Legionella pneumoniae) and respiratory viruses (adenovirus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), human metapneumovirus, influenza virus, parainfluenzavirus, rhinovirus, coronavirus) in adults >18 years old presenting with CAP in Santiago from February 2005 to September 2007. Severity was qualified at admission by Fine's pneumonia severity index. Overall detection in 356 enrolled adults were 92 (26%) cases of a single bacterial pathogen, 80 (22%) cases of a single viral pathogen, 60 (17%) cases with mixed bacterial and viral infection and 124 (35%) cases with no identified pathogen. Streptococcus pneumoniae and RSV were the most common bacterial and viral pathogens identified. Infectious agent detection by PCR provided greater sensitivity than conventional techniques. To our surprise, no relationship was observed between clinical severity and sole or coinfections. The use of molecular diagnostics expanded the detection of viruses and atypical bacteria in adults with CAP, as unique or coinfections. Clinical severity and outcome were independent of the aetiological agents detected.

  17. The Most Common Detected Bacteria in Sputum of Patients with Community Acquired Pneumonia (CAP) Treated In Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukic, Vesna; Hadzic, Armin

    2016-10-01

    Community acquired pneumonia (CAP) is the most common infective pulmonary disease. To show the most common detected bacteria in bacterial culture of sputum in patients with CAP hospitalized in Clinic for Pulmonary Diseases and TB "Podhrastovi" in four-year period: from 2012 to 2015. This is the retrospective analysis. Each patient gave sputum 3 days in a row when admitted to hospital. Sputum has been examined: bacterial culture with antibiotics sensitivity, Gram stain, Mycobacterium tuberculosis; in cases with high temperature blood cultures were done; when we were suspicious about bronchial carcinoma bronchoscopy with BAL (bronchoalveolar lavage) was done. We show analyzed patients according to age, sex, whether they had pneumonia or bronchopneumonia, bacteria isolated in sputum and in BAL. 360 patients with CAP were treated in four-year period (247 males and 113 females). 167 or 43, 39 % had pneumonia (119 males and 48 females). Number of males was significantly bigger (χ 2 = 30,186; ppneumonia. Number of patients with negative bacterial culture of sputum (154- 79, 79%) was significantly bigger than number of patients with positive culture (39- 20, 21%) (χ 2 = 68,523; ppneumoniae was significantly most common detected bacterium compared with the number of other isolated bacteria; in pneumonia (χ 2 =33,222; p<0,001) and in bronchopneumonia (χ 2 =51,231; p<0,001). It is very important to detect the bacterial cause of CAP to administrate the targeted antibiotic therapy.

  18. Investigational drugs in phase I and phase II clinical trials for the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liapikou, Adamantia; Cillóniz, Catia; Torres, Antoni

    2017-11-01

    Community acquired pneumonia is one of the main infections, remaining as a global cause of considerable morbidity and mortality. Successful treatment hinges on expedient delivery of appropriate antibiotic therapy tailored to both the likely pathogens and the severity of disease. Although antibiotic resistance is increasing and pharmaceutical companies continue to debate the profitability of introducing new antibacterial agents, an encouraging number of new molecules have recently been unveiled which target multidrug-resistant bacteria. Areas covered: Herein, the authors summarize the actual situation of novel antibiotics for CAP in phase I & II of development. For each set of compounds, the medical significance and possible clinical placement are discussed. Current treatment options from the most important international guidelines are also reviewed. Expert opinion: Our review shows that the new antibiotics in the pipeline belong to existing antibiotic classes as β-lactams, macrolides, quinolones, oxazolidinones, tetracyclines, lipoglycopeptides, and cyclic lipopeptides and a few with a narrow spectrum of activity are novel compounds directed against novel targets. With rising outpatient antibiotic resistance in pneumonia, some of the compounds discussed are being considered for more rapid advancement in the pipeline, helping to increase the number of agents in later stages of development.

  19. The upper respiratory tract microbiome of hospitalised patients with community-acquired pneumonia of unknown aetiology: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy L Wiemken

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available   The composition of the upper respiratory tract microbiome may play an important role in the development of lower respiratory tract infections. Here, we characterised the microbiome of the nasopharynx and oropharynx of hospitalised patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP with unknown aetiology in an attempt to obtain insight into the aetiology of CAP. A random sample of 10 patients hospitalised with CAP previously enrolled in a separate clinical trial (ClinicalTrials.gov registry, Study ID: NCT01248715 in which a complete microbiological workup was not able to define an aetiology were analysed in this pilot study. This larger trial (n = 1,221 enrolled patients from 9 adult hospitals in Louisville, Kentucky, USA. Nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal swabs were obtained for metagenomic analysis. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR for Streptococcus pneumoniae was performed in all patients. One patient had a distinct nasophararyngeal microbiome consisting largely of Haemophilus influenzae. This was the only patient with a negative PCR for S. pneumoniae in both nasophararyngeal and oropharyngeal specimens. Overall, substantial differences were found between nasophararyngeal and oropharyngeal microbiomes. The upper respiratory tract microbiome of only one patient suggested H. influenzae as a probable aetiology of CAP. Although this was a pilot study of only 10 patients, the presence of S. pneumoniae in the upper respiratory tract of the other 9 patients warrants further investigation.

  20. Community-Acquired Pneumonia Caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae: How Physical and Radiological Examination Contribute to Successful Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishaba, Tomoo

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is one of the most common causes of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), particularly in young adults. Vital signs are usually normal except for temperature. On physical examination, general appearance is normal compared with that of typical pneumonia such as pneumococcal pneumonia patients. Mycoplasma sometimes causes ear infections such as otitis media. It is important to distinguish between typical pneumonia and atypical pneumonia such as mycoplasma pneumonia because having the right diagnosis allows for the use of the correct antibiotic to treat CAP while preventing development of drug-resistant bacteria and also decreasing medical cost. The symptoms and diagnosis of mycoplasma pneumonia is multi-fold. Auscultation of patients can demonstrate trace late inspiratory crackles or normal alveolar sounds; however, bilateral polyphonic wheezes can sometimes be heard because of bronchiolitis. With regard to radiological findings, a chest radiogragh often shows bilateral reticulonodular or patchy consolidation in both lower lobes. Pleural effusion is rarely observed in adult cases. Immunocompetent patients tend to reveal more extensive shadowing compared with immunocompromised patients. As serological diagnostic methods are not able to offer 100% reliable diagnosis, integration of physical and radiological examination is crucial to accurately diagnose mycoplasma pneumonia. Herein, I review the typical findings from physical examination and imaging patterns of patients with mycoplasma pneumonia. PMID:27379238

  1. Severe community-acquired Enterobacter pneumonia: a plea for greater awareness of the concept of health-care-associated pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Patients with Enterobacter community-acquired pneumonia (EnCAP) were admitted to our intensive care unit (ICU). Our primary aim was to describe them as few data are available on EnCAP. A comparison with CAP due to common and typical bacteria was performed. Methods Baseline clinical, biological and radiographic characteristics, criteria for health-care-associated pneumonia (HCAP) were compared between each case of EnCAP and thirty age-matched typical CAP cases. A univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to determine factors independently associated with ENCAP. Their outcome was also compared. Results In comparison with CAP due to common bacteria, a lower leukocytosis and constant HCAP criteria were associated with EnCAP. Empiric antibiotic therapy was less effective in EnCAP (20%) than in typical CAP (97%) (p < 0.01). A delay in the initiation of appropriate antibiotic therapy (3.3 ± 1.6 vs. 1.2 ± 0.6 days; p < 0.01) and an increase in duration of mechanical ventilation (8.4 ± 5.2 vs. 4.0 ± 4.3 days; p = 0.01) and ICU stay were observed in EnCAP patients. Conclusions EnCAP is a severe infection which is more consistent with HCAP than with typical CAP. This retrospectively suggests that the application of HCAP guidelines should have improved EnCAP management. PMID:21569334

  2. Community-acquired pneumonia caused by carbapenem-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae: re-examining its prevention and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doi A

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Asako Doi,1,2 Kentaro Iwata,3 Hiroshi Takegawa,4 Kanji Miki,5 Yumi Sono,1,2 Hiroaki Nishioka,2 Jumpei Takeshita,6 Keisuke Tomii,7 Tsunekazu Haruta11Department of Infectious Diseases, 2Department of General Internal Medicine, Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital, 3Division of Infectious Diseases, Kobe University Hospital, Japan; 4Department of Laboratory Medicine, Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital, Japan; 5Hyogo Health Service Association, Hyogo, 6Foundation of Biochemical Research and Innovation, Osaka, 7Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital, Hyogo, JapanAbstract: A 73-year-old man with no significant past medical history or any history of health care visits was hospitalized for pneumonia. Sputum culture revealed multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae, even to carbapenems. The patient was later treated successfully with levofloxacin. Throat cultures from his two grandchildren revealed S. pneumoniae with the same susceptibility pattern. Analysis for resistant genes revealed gPRSP (pbp1a + pbp2x + pbp2b gene variants in both the patient and his grandchildren, none of whom had received pneumococcal vaccines of any kind. This case illustrates the importance of the emergence of carbapenem-resistant S. pneumoniae. Non-rational use of carbapenems for community-acquired infections may be counterproductive. This case also highlights the importance of pneumococcal vaccinations in children and the elderly.Keywords: carbapenem resistance, Streptococcus pneumoniae, pneumonia

  3. Community-Acquired Rotavirus Gastroenteritis Compared with Adenovirus and Norovirus Gastroenteritis in Italian Children: A Pedianet Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Donà

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Rotavirus (RV is the commonest pathogen in the hospital and primary care settings, followed by Adenovirus (AV and Norovirus (NV. Only few studies that assess the burden of RV gastroenteritis at the community level have been carried out. Objectives. To estimate incidence, disease characteristics, seasonal distribution, and working days lost by parents of RV, AV, and NV gastroenteritis leading to a family pediatrician (FP visit among children < 5 years. Methods. 12-month, observational, prospective, FP-based study has been carried out using Pedianet database. Results. RVGE incidence was 1.04 per 100 person-years with the highest incidence in the first 2 years of life. Incidences of AVGEs (1.74 and NVGEs (1.51 were slightly higher with similar characteristics regarding age distribution and symptoms. Risk of hospitalisation, access to emergency room (ER, and workdays lost from parents were not significantly different in RVGEs compared to the other viral infections. Conclusions. Features of RVGE in terms of hospitalisation length and indirect cost are lower than those reported in previous studies. Results of the present study reflect the large variability of data present in the literature. This observation underlines the utility of primary care networks for AGE surveillance and further studies on community-acquired gastroenteritis in children.

  4. Disease characteristics and management of hospitalised adolescents and adults with community-acquired pneumonia in China: a retrospective multicentre survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang; Zhou, Fei; Li, Hui; Xing, Xiqian; Han, Xiudi; Wang, Yiming; Zhang, Chunxiao; Suo, Lijun; Wang, Jingxiang; Yu, Guohua; Wang, Guangqiang; Yao, Xuexin; Yu, Hongxia; Wang, Lei; Liu, Meng; Xue, Chunxue; Liu, Bo; Zhu, Xiaoli; Li, Yanli; Xiao, Ying; Cui, Xiaojing; Li, Lijuan; Uyeki, Timothy M; Wang, Chen; Cao, Bin

    2018-02-15

    To describe the clinical characteristics and management of patients hospitalised with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in China. This was a multicentre, retrospective, observational study. 13 teaching hospitals in northern, central and southern China from 1 January 2014 to 31 December 2014 PARTICIPANTS: Information on hospitalised patients aged ≥14 years with radiographically confirmed pneumonia with illness onset in the community was collected using standard case report forms. Resource use for CAP management. Of 14 793 patients screened, 5828 with radiographically confirmed CAP were included in the final analysis. Low mortality risk patients with a CURB-65 score 0-1 and Pneumonia Severity Index risk class I-II accounted for 81.2% (4434/5594) and 56.4% (2034/3609) patients, respectively. 21.7% (1111/5130) patients had already achieved clinical stability on admission. A definite or probable pathogen was identified only in 12.7% (738/5828) patients. 40.9% (1575/3852) patients without pseudomonal infection risk factors received antimicrobial overtreatment regimens. The median duration between clinical stability to discharge was 5.0 days with 30-day mortality of 4.2%. These data demonstrated the overuse of health resources in CAP management, indicating that there is potential for improvement and substantial savings to healthcare systems in China. NCT02489578; Results. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. Radiological findings of community-acquired methicillin-resistant and methicillin-susceptible staphylococcus aureus pediatric pneumonia in Hawaii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erdem, Guliz; Bergert, Lora; Len, Kyra; Melish, Marian; Kon, Kevin; DiMauro, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus (CA-SA) infections are common among pediatric patients in Hawaii. We wanted to characterize the radiological features of methicillin-susceptible (CA-MSSA) and methicillin-resistant (CA-MRSA) staphylococcal pneumonia in Hawaiian children. We retrospectively reviewed medical records and imaging studies of children with SA pneumonia identified from 1996 through 2007. Of 40 children, 26 (65%) had CA-MRSA pneumonia and 14 patients (35%) had CA-MSSA pneumonia. CA-MRSA patients were significantly younger than CA-MSSA patients (65% younger than 1 year vs. 36% older). In a majority (62%) of CA-MRSA patients, the consolidation was unilateral; in most of the CA-MSSA cases (79%), the consolidation was bilateral. Fifty percent of the patients with CA-MRSA and 21% of those with CA-MSSA had pneumatoceles (P = 0.1). CA-MRSA patients more commonly had pleural effusions (85% vs. 64% for CA-MSSA) and pleural thickening (50% vs. 36% for CA-MSSA). This case series describes the radiologic characteristics of CA-MRSA and CA-MSSA pneumonia in children in a highly endemic area. We found that CA-MRSA pneumonias are unilateral in a majority of pediatric pneumonia cases, are more common in children 1 year or younger, and have higher rates of complications in comparison to CA-MSSA patients. (orig.)

  6. Radiological findings of community-acquired methicillin-resistant and methicillin-susceptible staphylococcus aureus pediatric pneumonia in Hawaii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdem, Guliz; Bergert, Lora; Len, Kyra; Melish, Marian [University of Hawaii, John A. Burns School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Honolulu, HI (United States); Kon, Kevin; DiMauro, Robert [Kapiolani Medical Center for Women and Children, Department of Radiology, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus (CA-SA) infections are common among pediatric patients in Hawaii. We wanted to characterize the radiological features of methicillin-susceptible (CA-MSSA) and methicillin-resistant (CA-MRSA) staphylococcal pneumonia in Hawaiian children. We retrospectively reviewed medical records and imaging studies of children with SA pneumonia identified from 1996 through 2007. Of 40 children, 26 (65%) had CA-MRSA pneumonia and 14 patients (35%) had CA-MSSA pneumonia. CA-MRSA patients were significantly younger than CA-MSSA patients (65% younger than 1 year vs. 36% older). In a majority (62%) of CA-MRSA patients, the consolidation was unilateral; in most of the CA-MSSA cases (79%), the consolidation was bilateral. Fifty percent of the patients with CA-MRSA and 21% of those with CA-MSSA had pneumatoceles (P = 0.1). CA-MRSA patients more commonly had pleural effusions (85% vs. 64% for CA-MSSA) and pleural thickening (50% vs. 36% for CA-MSSA). This case series describes the radiologic characteristics of CA-MRSA and CA-MSSA pneumonia in children in a highly endemic area. We found that CA-MRSA pneumonias are unilateral in a majority of pediatric pneumonia cases, are more common in children 1 year or younger, and have higher rates of complications in comparison to CA-MSSA patients. (orig.)

  7. The urinary antigen tests have high sensitivity in diagnosis of Pneumococcus caused community-acquired pneumonia posterior to antimicrobial therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming; Zhou, Ming; Xiao, Wei; Ai, Biao; Liu, Xuezheng; Li, Yan

    2014-11-01

    Antibiotic treatment before microbiological test significant reduces the positive rate of culture methods of Streptococcus pneumoniae. The Binax NOW S. pneumoniae immunochromatographic test (ICT) has become a more commonly used procedure to diagnose S. pneumoniae from community-acquired pneumonia in adults. However, performance of this test after empirical antimicrobial therapy is uncertain. Therefore, in this prospective study, we evaluate the impact of antimicrobial therapy on sensitivity of ICT test in 487 hospitalized adult patients. The results showed that 192 (39.4 %) and 295 (60.6 %) specimens were collected before (Group 1) or after antibiotic treatment (Group 2), respectively. S. pneumoniae was detected by ICT in 21 (10.9 %) patients in the Group 1 and 39 (13.2 %) in the Group 2 and their positive rates were not different (P > 0.05). However, The positive rate of blood and pleural fluid was declined from 5.7 to 2.7 % and sputum, from 9.9 to 4.7 % after the antibiotic treatment, respectively. This study confirmed that the ICT urinary antigen test remained to have a high sensitivity for diagnosis of pneumococcal infection after empiric antibiotic treatment was started. The ICT urinary antigen test would have a potential to guide the right choice of therapy for pneumonia in adults earlier.

  8. A Randomized, Prospective Study of Pediatric Patients With Community-acquired Pneumonia Treated With Ceftaroline Versus Ceftriaxone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannavino, Christopher R; Nemeth, Agnes; Korczowski, Bartosz; Bradley, John S; O'Neal, Tanya; Jandourek, Alena; Friedland, H David; Kaplan, Sheldon L

    2016-07-01

    Community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP) remains a major infection among children, despite the use of pneumococcal vaccination. Ceftaroline fosamil is a broad-spectrum cephalosporin antibiotic with activity against many bacteria, including Streptococcus pneumoniae (both penicillin-nonsusceptible and multidrug-resistant strains) and Staphylococcus aureus (including methicillin-resistant S. aureus). This article describes the safety, tolerability, and effectiveness of ceftaroline fosamil in the treatment of pediatric patients hospitalized with CABP, from a randomized, active-controlled, observer-blinded clinical study (registration number NCT01530763). Pediatric patients were stratified into 4 age cohorts and randomized (3:1) to receive either intravenous ceftaroline fosamil or ceftriaxone, with optional oral switch for a total treatment duration of 5-14 days. Enrollment was planned for 160 patients. Data collected included demographics, infection characteristics and pathogens. Treatment-emergent adverse events, clinical outcomes, and microbiologic responses were assessed. Ceftaroline fosamil was well tolerated. Similar percentages of patients in the ceftaroline fosamil (55/121; 45%) and ceftriaxone (18/39; 46%) groups reported treatment-emergent adverse events. Coombs seroconversion was observed in 17% of patients in the ceftaroline fosamil group; however, no evidence of hemolytic anemia or hemolysis was found. No deaths were reported during the study. Ceftaroline fosamil had similar effectiveness to ceftriaxone, with high clinical cure rates at test-of-cure in the modified intent-to-treat population (94/107; 88% and 32/36; 89%, respectively). Three documented S. aureus infections were successfully treated in the ceftaroline group, including one caused by methicillin-resistant S. aureus. The results of this study suggest that ceftaroline fosamil may be an important treatment option for pediatric patients hospitalized with CABP.

  9. Clinical spectrum and diagnostic yields ofMycoplasma pneumoniaeas a causative agent of community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Saroj; Chaudhry, Rama; Dhawan, Benu; Dey, Aparajit Ballav; Kabra, Sushil Kumar; Das, Bimal Kumar

    2018-01-01

    Infection with Mycoplasma pneumoniae ( M. pneumonia ) occurs worldwide which accounts for 15%-20% of cases of community-acquired pneumonia and indistinguishable clinically from other infectious causes of pneumonia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and to correlate it with other diagnostic methods such as culture, serology (ELISA), and conventional PCR along with the clinical signs and symptoms produced by M. pneumonia . A total of 130 patients of all age groups presenting with clinical features of lower respiratory tract infections were enrolled over a period of 1 year and 2 months in a tertiary care hospital in Delhi. M. pneumoni ae in throat swab samples was detected by real-time PCR, compared with culture, serology, conventional PCR, and clinical signs and symptoms. Univariate analyses were conducted to determine the association of M. pneumoniae infection among different categories of patients. Out of a total of 130 patients, 18 patients (14%) were positive for M. pneumoniae by any test; culture was positive in nine patients (50%), serology (IgM) in eight patients (44.4%), PCR in five patients (27.7%), and real-time PCR was positive in six patients (33.3%). Clinical signs and symptoms were higher in incidence in M. pneumoniae -positive patients. Age-matched healthy controls (30) were included in the study, and all were negative for any diagnostic test performed ( P = 0.026). It was concluded that combination of M. pneumoniae -specific testing modalities is required for the diagnosis of this etiological agent rather than a single diagnostic method.

  10. Community-acquired pneumonia requiring hospitalization among U.S. children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Seema; Williams, Derek J; Arnold, Sandra R; Ampofo, Krow; Bramley, Anna M; Reed, Carrie; Stockmann, Chris; Anderson, Evan J; Grijalva, Carlos G; Self, Wesley H; Zhu, Yuwei; Patel, Anami; Hymas, Weston; Chappell, James D; Kaufman, Robert A; Kan, J Herman; Dansie, David; Lenny, Noel; Hillyard, David R; Haynes, Lia M; Levine, Min; Lindstrom, Stephen; Winchell, Jonas M; Katz, Jacqueline M; Erdman, Dean; Schneider, Eileen; Hicks, Lauri A; Wunderink, Richard G; Edwards, Kathryn M; Pavia, Andrew T; McCullers, Jonathan A; Finelli, Lyn

    2015-02-26

    Incidence estimates of hospitalizations for community-acquired pneumonia among children in the United States that are based on prospective data collection are limited. Updated estimates of pneumonia that has been confirmed radiographically and with the use of current laboratory diagnostic tests are needed. We conducted active population-based surveillance for community-acquired pneumonia requiring hospitalization among children younger than 18 years of age in three hospitals in Memphis, Nashville, and Salt Lake City. We excluded children with recent hospitalization or severe immunosuppression. Blood and respiratory specimens were systematically collected for pathogen detection with the use of multiple methods. Chest radiographs were reviewed independently by study radiologists. From January 2010 through June 2012, we enrolled 2638 of 3803 eligible children (69%), 2358 of whom (89%) had radiographic evidence of pneumonia. The median age of the children was 2 years (interquartile range, 1 to 6); 497 of 2358 children (21%) required intensive care, and 3 (<1%) died. Among 2222 children with radiographic evidence of pneumonia and with specimens available for bacterial and viral testing, a viral or bacterial pathogen was detected in 1802 (81%), one or more viruses in 1472 (66%), bacteria in 175 (8%), and both bacterial and viral pathogens in 155 (7%). The annual incidence of pneumonia was 15.7 cases per 10,000 children (95% confidence interval [CI], 14.9 to 16.5), with the highest rate among children younger than 2 years of age (62.2 cases per 10,000 children; 95% CI, 57.6 to 67.1). Respiratory syncytial virus was more common among children younger than 5 years of age than among older children (37% vs. 8%), as were adenovirus (15% vs. 3%) and human metapneumovirus (15% vs. 8%). Mycoplasma pneumoniae was more common among children 5 years of age or older than among younger children (19% vs. 3%). The burden of hospitalization for children with community-acquired pneumonia

  11. Rapid detection of amoxicillin-susceptible Escherichia coli in fresh uncultured urine: a new tool to limit the use of broad-spectrum empirical therapy of community-acquired pyelonephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapelet, Guillaume; Corvec, Stéphane; Montassier, Emmanuel; Herbreteau, Guillaume; Berrut, Gilles; Batard, Eric; de Decker, Laure

    2016-06-01

    Because of the high prevalence of amoxicillin resistance among uropathogens, amoxicillin is not recommended as an empirical treatment of urinary tract infections (UTIs). Quick detection of an amoxicillin-susceptible Escherichia coli (ASEC) would allow prescribing amoxicillin without preliminary broad-spectrum empirical treatment in uncomplicated pyelonephritis. To quickly diagnose UTIs due to ASEC, we developed a real-time PCR that detects in fresh uncultured urine the E. coli-specific gene yccT as well as the blaTEM and blaCTX-M genes. The ASEC rapid test was considered positive if the PCR was positive for the yccT gene but negative for blaTEM and blaCTX-M. The test was compared with culture and susceptibility testing. Among 200 patients with a suspected community-acquired UTI, 61 (30.5%) had a monobacterial UTI due to ASEC. The ASEC rapid test result was obtained in 3 h 13 [95% confidence interval (CI) 3 h 12-3 h 15] and was positive for 43 patients (21.5%). Specificity and sensitivity were 97.8% (95% CI 95.8-99.8%) and 65.6% (95% CI 59.0-72.1%), respectively. Positive and negative predictive values were 93.0% (95% CI 89.5-96.5%) and 86.6% (95% CI 81.9-91.3%), respectively. Owing to its high specificity and positive predictive value, the ASEC rapid test allows the diagnosis of UTI due to ASEC only 3 h after urine sampling. A positive ASEC rapid test may be used to treat uncomplicated pyelonephritis with amoxicillin from the start, without preliminary broad-spectrum empirical treatment. The ASEC rapid test is a promising tool to spare fluoroquinolones and third-generation cephalosporins in UTIs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  12. Immunological changes in patients with community-acquired pneumonia with concomitant coronary artery disease during treatment with Simvastatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Syvolap

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available (cellular and humoral immunity, mucosal immunity, the complement system, and so on. With features of immune system in the elderly people related some of clinical problems: hypersensitivity to non- and intra-hospital infections, subacute infection that increases concomitant diseases, especially cardiovascular. Aim of this work was determination of the characteristics of immunological changes in patients with community-acquired pneumonia and concomitant coronary heart disease and their dynamics during treatment with Simvastatin. Material and methods. 50 patients with community acquired pneumonia the third group and 30 healthy individuals were included in an open prospective study. Immunogram definition was made by lymphocytes phenotyping tests rosette of particles coated with monoclonal antibodies. Immunoglobulin G, A, M were determined by radial immunodiffusion Agar gel by Mancini using monospecific sera. Also absorption capacity of the neutrophil count phagocytic index, phagocytic index, neutrophil bacterial activity by a test restore them of nitroblue tetrazolium were defined. Results. Subanalysis in patients with pneumonia with concomitant coronary artery disease, who were randomly assigned to receiving simvastatin, after treatment showed a statistically significant increase of IgG to 18.6% (p=0.02 of 9.57±4.64 to 11.36±3.7. The rest of the performance was not likely changed. After treatment of pneumonia with concomitant coronary artery disease treated and not treated with Simvastatin group the following immunogram indicators significantly differed: the relative number of lymphocytes, the number of CD8 relative and absolute number of CD22 cells, complement activity, completion of the index of phagocytosis. Thus in patients receiving Simvastatin after treatment were lower rates relative number of CD8 cells by 38% (p=0.037 – 18.2±7.38 vs 25.1±8.0; complement activity by 33% (p=0.03 – 66.9±14.8 vs 89.0±17.8; the absolute number of CD22

  13. First report of cavitary pneumonia due to community-acquired Acinetobacter pittii, study of virulence and overview of pathogenesis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larcher, Romaric; Pantel, Alix; Arnaud, Erik; Sotto, Albert; Lavigne, Jean-Philippe

    2017-07-06

    Acinetobacter pittii is a nosocomial pathogen rarely involved in community-acquired infections. We report for the first time that A. pittii can be responsible for cavitary community-acquired pneumonia and study its virulence, and discuss its pathogenesis and treatment options. A 45-year-old woman with a history of smoking and systemic lupus was admitted to Nimes University Hospital (France) with coughing and sputum lasting for three weeks. Thoracic CT scanner showed cavitary pneumonia. Broncho-alveolar lavage cultures found community-acquired Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-baumannii complex. The clinical outcome was favourable after twenty-one days of antimicrobial treatment by piperacillin/tazobactam and amikacin then cefepime. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analyses identified an A. pittii ST249. Despite the atypical clinical presentation with an unexpected partial destruction of lung parenchyma, we found very low virulence potential of the A. pittii strain with nematode killing assays and biofilm formation test. The median time required to kill 50% of the nematodes was 7 ± 0.3 days for A. pittii ST249, 7 ± 0.2 days for A. baumanii NAB ST2 and 8 ± 0.2 days for E. coli OP50, (p > 0,05). A. pittii ST249 showed significantly slower biofilm formation than A. baumanii NAB ST2: BFI = 8.83 ± 0.59 vs 3.93 ± 0.27 at 2 h (p < 0.0001), BFI = 6.3 ± 0.17 vs 1.87 ± 0.12 at 3 h (p < 0.0001) and BFI = 3.67 ± 0.41 vs 1.7 ± 0.06 after 4 h of incubation (p < 0.01). Community-acquired A. pittii should be considered as possible cause of sub-acute cavitary pneumonia particularly in a smoking and/or immunocompromised patient despite its low virulence potential.

  14. Induction of the staphylococcal proteolytic cascade by antimicrobial fatty acids in community acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Arsic

    Full Text Available Community acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA, and the USA300 strain of CA-MRSA in particular, are known for their rapid community transmission, and propensity to cause aggressive skin and soft tissue infections. To assess factors that contribute to these hallmark traits of CA-MRSA, we evaluated how growth of USA300 and production of secreted virulence factors was influenced on exposure to physiologic levels of unsaturated free fatty acids that would be encountered on the skin or anterior nares, which represent the first sites of contact with healthy human hosts. There was a sharp threshold between sub-inhibitory and inhibitory concentrations, such that 100 µM sapienic acid (C16∶1 and linoleic acid (C18∶1 were sufficient to prevent growth after 24 h incubation, while 25 µM allowed unrestricted growth, and 50 µM caused an approximate 10-12 h lag, followed by unimpeded exponential growth. Conversely, saturated palmitic or stearic acids did not affect growth at 100 µM. Although growth was not affected by 25 µM sapienic or linoleic acid, these and other unsaturated C16 and C18 fatty acids, but not their saturated counterparts, promoted robust production of secreted proteases comprising the Staphylococcal proteolytic cascade. This trait was also manifested to varying degrees in other CA-MRSA, and in genetically diverse methicillin susceptible S. aureus strains. Therefore, induction of the Staphylococcal proteolytic cascade by unsaturated fatty acids is another feature that should now be evaluated as a potential contributing factor in the aggressive nature of skin and soft tissue infections caused by USA300, and as a general virulence mechanism of S. aureus.

  15. Macrolide therapy for community-acquired pneumonia due to atypical pathogens: outcome assessment at an early time point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    File, Thomas M; Eckburg, Paul B; Talbot, George H; Llorens, Lily; Friedland, H David

    2017-08-01

    Therapy directed against atypical pathogens in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is often recommended. This post-hoc analysis evaluated the effect of addition of a macrolide to ceftaroline fosamil or ceftriaxone treatment in atypical CAP. Two phase 3, double-blind, comparative safety and efficacy studies of ceftaroline fosamil vs. ceftriaxone, FOCUS 1 and FOCUS 2, enrolled adults with CAP. Only FOCUS 1 included 24-h adjunctive clarithromycin therapy for all patients on day 1. Day 4 and test-of-cure (TOC) outcomes were compared for adjunctive vs. no adjunctive therapy. Of 1240 enrolled patients, 130 patients with CAP due to atypical pathogens alone were included (FOCUS 1, n = 64; FOCUS 2, n = 66). Among patients infected with Mycoplasma pneumoniae and/or Chlamydophila pneumoniae alone, a higher clinical response rate was observed with clarithromycin plus ceftaroline fosamil or ceftriaxone compared with treatment without additional clarithromycin at day 4 [38/49 (77.6%; FOCUS 1) vs. 24/43 (55.8%; FOCUS 2)], but not at the TOC assessment [42/49 (85.7%; FOCUS 1) vs. 41/43 (95.3%; FOCUS 2)]. In patients infected with Legionella pneumophila alone, a higher clinical response rate with adjunctive clarithromycin therapy was observed at the TOC assessment alone [12/12 (100%; FOCUS 1) vs. 14/19 (73.7%; FOCUS 2)]. The unadjusted odds ratio of a favourable clinical response at day 4 with adjunctive clarithromycin vs. no adjunctive clarithromycin was 2.4 (95% confidence interval 1.1-5.1; P = 0.0299) for all pathogens combined. These results suggest that empirical antibiotic therapy against atypical pathogens may improve early clinical response rate. This hypothesis is best evaluated in a prospective trial. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  16. Causative agent distribution and antibiotic therapy assessment among adult patients with community acquired pneumonia in Chinese urban population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yong

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge of predominant microbial patterns in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP constitutes the basis for initial decisions about empirical antimicrobial treatment, so a prospective study was performed during 2003–2004 among CAP of adult Chinese urban populations. Methods Qualified patients were enrolled and screened for bacterial, atypical, and viral pathogens by sputum and/or blood culturing, and by antibody seroconversion test. Antibiotic treatment and patient outcome were also assessed. Results Non-viral pathogens were found in 324/610 (53.1% patients among whom M. pneumoniae was the most prevalent (126/610, 20.7%. Atypical pathogens were identified in 62/195 (31.8% patients carrying bacterial pathogens. Respiratory viruses were identified in 35 (19% of 184 randomly selected patients with adenovirus being the most common (16/184, 8.7%. The nonsusceptibility of S. pneumoniae to penicillin and azithromycin was 22.2% (Resistance (R: 3.2%, Intermediate (I: 19.0% and 79.4% (R: 79.4%, I: 0%, respectively. Of patients (312 from whom causative pathogens were identified and antibiotic treatments were recorded, clinical cure rate with β-lactam antibiotics alone and with combination of a β-lactam plus a macrolide or with fluoroquinolones was 63.7% (79/124 and 67%(126/188, respectively. For patients having mixed M. pneumoniae and/or C. pneumoniae infections, a better cure rate was observed with regimens that are active against atypical pathogens (e.g. a β-lactam plus a macrolide, or a fluoroquinolone than with β-lactam alone (75.8% vs. 42.9%, p = 0.045. Conclusion In Chinese adult CAP patients, M. pneumoniae was the most prevalent with mixed infections containing atypical pathogens being frequently observed. With S. pneumoniae, the prevalence of macrolide resistance was high and penicillin resistance low compared with data reported in other regions.

  17. Clinical course of community-acquired respiratory syncytial virus pneumonia in newborns hospitalized in neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydın, Banu; Zenciroğlu, Ayşegül; Dilli, Dilek; Okumuş, Nurullah; İpek, M Sah; Aydın, Mustafa; Uzunalıç, Nuran; Hakan, Nilay; Kundak, Ahmet Afşin; Dursun, Arzu; Karadağ, Nilgün; Korukluoğlu, Gülay

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of pneumonia in infants worldwide. We aimed to evaluate the clinical course of community-acquired RSV pneumonia in newborns hospitalized in neonatal intensive care unit. All the newborns diagnosed as pneumonia were prospectively evaluated for RSV infection between November 2010 and April 2011. Fifty-four specimens of nasopharyngeal secretions were tested in parallel with the RAT and the multiplex real time polymerase chain reaction (RT- PCR). Downes' score was used to assess the disease severity in patients with pneumonia. RAT has a sensitivity of 90% and a specificity of 78.5%, as the PCR technique target assay. Four of the patients with RSV pneumonia had secundum atrial septal defect (ASD) and all of four needed mechanical ventilation support. The first day Downes' score was positively correlated with time of intravenous fluid requirement (p= 0.001, r= 0.48), total oxygen need (p= 0.000, r= 0.63), and re-enteral feeding (p= 0.001, r= 0.46). Blood pH (p= 0.031, r= 0.46) were negatively correlated with Downes' score. The second day Downes' score was higher in patients with ASD than those of without ASD (3.8 ± 2.6 vs. 2 ± 1.1, p= 0.01). The most possible risk factor for longer hospital stay was the higher second day Downes' score (p= 0.02 OR: 1.9, CI 95% (1.1-3.2). All infants were discharged from hospital in a good health. RAT is sensitive and specific in detecting RSV infections in newborns. Physicians may use Downes' score for evaluation of disease severity in infants with RSV pneumonia. In these patients, ASD has increased the disease severity.

  18. QuickSOFA is an independent predictor of 30-day mortality among patients admitted to an emergency department with suspected or documented infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Finn Erland

    department (ED). Methods. A historical cohort study among prospectively registered patients with suspected or documented infection. The admission period was from 1 November 2013 to 31 October 2014. Baseline clinical data and data for survival were obtained from a standard sepsis admission form, the patient...... records and The Danish Civil Registration System. Logistic regression analysis was used to adjust for potential confounders and to determine whether the predictive factors for death in the crude analyses were independently associated with 30-day mortality. Results. A total of 434 patients were included...

  19. Adherence to Therapeutic Guidelines for Patients with Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Australian Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.R. Adler

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly in elderly patients, and is associated with a considerable economic burden on the healthcare system. The combination of high incidence and substantial financial costs necessitate accurate diagnosis and appropriate management of patients admitted with CAP. This article will discuss the rates of adherence to clinical guidelines, the use of severity scoring tools and the appropriateness of antimicrobial prescribing for patients diagnosed with CAP. The authors maintain that awareness of national and hospital guidelines is imperative to complement the physicians’ clinical judgment with evidence-based recommendations. Increased use of pneumonia severity assessment tools and greater adherence to therapeutic guidelines will enhance concordant antimicrobial prescribing for patients with CAP. A robust and multifaceted educational intervention, in combination with antimicrobial stewardship programs, may enhance compliance of CAP guidelines in clinical practice in Australia.

  20. An audit of empiric antibiotic choice in the inpatient management of community-acquired pneumonia

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Delaney, F

    2017-04-01

    Adherence to antimicrobial guidelines for empiric antibiotic prescribing in community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) has been reported to be worryingly low. We conducted a review of empiric antibiotic prescribing for sixty consecutive adult patients admitted to the Mercy University Hospital with a diagnosis of CAP. When analysed against local antimicrobial guidelines, guideline concordant empiric antibiotics were given in only 48% of cases, lower than the average rate in comparable studies. Concordance was 100% in cases where the CURB-65 pneumonia severity assessment score, on which the guidelines are based, was documented in the medical notes. The use of excessively broad spectrum and inappropriate antibiotics is a notable problem. This study supports the theory that lack of knowledge regarding pneumonia severity assessment tools and unfamiliarity with therapeutic guidelines are key barriers to guideline adherence, which remains a significant problem despite increased focus on antimicrobial stewardship programs in Ireland

  1. Hypoglycorrhachia in adults with community-acquired meningitis: etiologies and prognostic significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrikanth, Vandana; Salazar, Lucrecia; Khoury, Nabil; Wootton, Susan; Hasbun, Rodrigo

    2015-10-01

    Hypoglycorrhachia (cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) glucose meningitis. The differential diagnosis of hypoglycorrhachia and its clinical significance was analyzed in the present study. This was a retrospective study of 620 adult patients with community-acquired meningitis (CSF white blood cell count >5 × 10(6) cells/l and absence of a CSF shunt or recent neurosurgical procedure (meningitis, 116 (19%) had hypoglycorrhachia. Etiologies of hypoglycorrhachia were idiopathic (n=40), bacterial (n=27), cryptococcal (n=26), viral (n=15), and tuberculous (n=4). Patients with hypoglycorrhachia were more likely to be immunosuppressed, have a history of intravenous drug use, and present with a vesicular or petechial rash, nausea or vomiting, nuchal rigidity, sinusitis/otitis, abnormal mental status, and focal neurological deficits compared to those patients without hypoglycorrhachia (pmeningitis. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Lung scintigraphy in differential diagnosis of peripheral lung cancer and community-acquired pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivonogov, Nikolay G.; Efimova, Nataliya Y.; Zavadovsky, Konstantin W.; Lishmanov, Yuri B.

    2016-08-01

    Ventilation/perfusion lung scintigraphy was performed in 39 patients with verified diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and in 14 patients with peripheral lung cancer. Ventilation/perfusion ratio, apical-basal gradients of ventilation (U/L(V)) and lung perfusion (U/L(P)), and alveolar capillary permeability of radionuclide aerosol were determined based on scintigraphy data. The study demonstrated that main signs of CAP were increases in ventilation/perfusion ratio, perfusion and ventilation gradient on a side of the diseased lung, and two-side increase in alveolar capillary permeability rate for radionuclide aerosol. Unlike this, scintigraphic signs of peripheral lung cancer comprise an increase in ventilation/perfusion ratio over 1.0 on a side of the diseased lung with its simultaneous decrease on a contralateral side, normal values of perfusion and ventilation gradients of both lungs, and delayed alveolar capillary clearance in the diseased lung compared with the intact lung.

  3. The role of solithromycin in the management of bacterial community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bambeke, Françoise; Tulkens, Paul M

    2016-01-01

    The fluoroketolide solithromycin is 2-fold more potent in vitro than telithromycin against pneumococci (including macrolide-resistant strains) and Haemophilus influenzae and very active on pathogens causing atypical pneumonia. In contrast, it is a 30-fold less potent inhibitor of nicotinic receptors incriminated in telithromycin toxicity. In Phase II/III trials, oral solithromycin once-daily (800 mg on day 1; 400 mg on days 2-5) proved effective and safe when compared to respiratory fluoroquinolones for the treatment of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP). A Phase III intravenous trial vs. moxifloxacin has been recently completed for the same indication. Solithromycin may restore interest in ketolides as a first-line therapy for CAPB. Solithromycin safety should nevertheless be confirmed in larger populations allowing for detection of rare adverse events.

  4. Moxifloxacin pharmacokinetic profile and efficacy evaluation in empiric treatment of community-acquired pneumonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öbrink-Hansen, Kristina; Hardlei, Tore Forsingdal; Brock, Birgitte

    2015-01-01

    the pharmacokinetic (PK) profile of moxifloxacin at 400 mg/day in 18 patients treated empirically for community-acquired pneumonia. We developed a population pharmacokinetic model to assess the potential efficacy of moxifloxacin and to simulate the maximal MICs for which recommended pharmacokinetic......-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) estimates are obtained. Moxifloxacin plasma concentrations were determined the day after therapy initiation using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography. Peak drug concentrations (Cmax) and area under the free drug concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h (fAUC0-24) values predicted...... for each patient were evaluated against epidemiological cutoff MIC values for Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and Legionella pneumophila. PK-PD targets adopted were a Cmax/MIC of ≥12.2 for all pathogens, an fAUC0-24/MIC of >34 for S. pneumoniae, and an fAUC0-24/MIC of >75 for H...

  5. Lung scintigraphy in differential diagnosis of peripheral lung cancer and community-acquired pneumonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krivonogov, Nikolay G., E-mail: kng@cardio-tomsk.ru [Research Institute of Cardiology, Kievskaya Street 111a, Tomsk, 634012 (Russian Federation); Efimova, Nataliya Y., E-mail: efimova@cardio-tomsk.ru; Zavadovsky, Konstantin W.; Lishmanov, Yuri B. [Research Institute of Cardiology, Kievskaya Street 111a, Tomsk, 634012 (Russian Federation); Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenin Avenue 30, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-02

    Ventilation/perfusion lung scintigraphy was performed in 39 patients with verified diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and in 14 patients with peripheral lung cancer. Ventilation/perfusion ratio, apical-basal gradients of ventilation (U/L(V)) and lung perfusion (U/L(P)), and alveolar capillary permeability of radionuclide aerosol were determined based on scintigraphy data. The study demonstrated that main signs of CAP were increases in ventilation/perfusion ratio, perfusion and ventilation gradient on a side of the diseased lung, and two-side increase in alveolar capillary permeability rate for radionuclide aerosol. Unlike this, scintigraphic signs of peripheral lung cancer comprise an increase in ventilation/perfusion ratio over 1.0 on a side of the diseased lung with its simultaneous decrease on a contralateral side, normal values of perfusion and ventilation gradients of both lungs, and delayed alveolar capillary clearance in the diseased lung compared with the intact lung.

  6. Community-acquired pneumonia management and outcomes in the era of health information technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecham, Ian D; Vines, Caroline; Dean, Nathan C

    2017-11-01

    Pneumonia continues to be a leading cause of hospitalization and mortality. Implementation of health information technology (HIT) can lead to cost savings and improved care. In this review, we examine the literature on the use of HIT in the management of community-acquired pneumonia. We also discuss barriers to adoption of technology in managing pneumonia, the reliability and quality of electronic health data in pneumonia research, how technology has assisted pneumonia diagnosis and outcomes research. The goal of using HIT is to develop and deploy generalizable, real-time, computerized clinical decision support integrated into usual pneumonia care. A friendly user interface that does not disrupt efficiency and demonstrates improved clinical outcomes should result in widespread adoption. © 2017 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  7. Missed low-grade infection in suspected aseptic loosening has no consequences for the survival of total hip arthroplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boot, Willemijn; Moojen, Dirk Jan F; Visser, Els; Lehr, A Mechteld; De Windt, Tommy S; Van Hellemondt, Gijs; Geurts, Jan; Tulp, Niek J A; Schreurs, B Wim; Burger, Bart J; Dhert, Wouter J A; Gawlitta, Debby; Vogely, H Charles

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Aseptic loosening and infection are 2 of the most common causes of revision of hip implants. Antibiotic prophylaxis reduces not only the rate of revision due to infection but also the rate of revision due to aseptic loosening. This suggests under-diagnosis of infections in

  8. Missed low-grade infection in suspected aseptic loosening has no consequences for the survival of total hip arthroplasty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boot, W.; Moojen, D.J.; Visser, E.; Lehr, A.M.; Windt, T.S. De; Hellemondt, G. Van; Geurts, J; Tulp, N.J.; Schreurs, B.W.; Burger, B.J.; Dhert, W.J.; Gawlitta, D.; Vogely, H.C.

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose - Aseptic loosening and infection are 2 of the most common causes of revision of hip implants. Antibiotic prophylaxis reduces not only the rate of revision due to infection but also the rate of revision due to aseptic loosening. This suggests under-diagnosis of infections in

  9. Prognostic scores and biomarkers for pediatric community-acquired pneumonia: how far have we come?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwaezuoke SN

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Samuel N Uwaezuoke,1 Adaeze C Ayuk2 1Pediatric Nephrology Firm, 2Pediatric Pulmonology Firm, Department of Pediatrics, University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Ituku-Ozalla, Enugu, Nigeria Abstract: This article aimed to review the current prognostic and diagnostic tools used for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP and highlight those potentially applicable in children with CAP. Several scoring systems have been developed to predict CAP mortality risk and serve as guides for admission into the intensive care unit. Over the years, clinicians have adopted these tools for improving site-of-care decisions because of high mortality rates in the extremes of age. The major scoring systems designed for geriatric patients include the Pneumonia Severity Index and the confusion, uremia, respiratory rate, blood pressure, age >65 years (CURB-65 rule, as well as better predictors of intensive care unit admission, such as the systolic blood pressure, multilobar chest radiography involvement, albumin level, respiratory rate, tachycardia, confusion, oxygenation and arterial pH (SMART-COP score, the Infectious Diseases Society of America/American Thoracic Society guidelines, the criteria developed by España et al as well as the systolic blood pressure, oxygenation, age and respiratory rate (SOAR criteria. Only the modified predisposition, insult, response and organ dysfunction (PIRO score has so far been applied to children with CAP. Because none of the tools is without its limitations, there has been a paradigm shift to incorporate biomarkers because they are reliable diagnostic tools and good predictors of disease severity and outcome, irrespective of age group. Despite the initial preponderance of reports on their utility in geriatric CAP, much progress has now been made in demonstrating their usefulness in pediatric CAP. Keywords: community-acquired pneumonia, children, scoring systems, biomarkers 

  10. Hydrocephalus is a rare outcome in community-acquired bacterial meningitis in adults: a retrospective analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Community-acquired bacterial meningitis (CABM) continues to have a high mortality rate and often results in severe sequelae among survivors. Lately, an increased effort has been focused on describing the neurological complications of meningitis including hydrocephalus. To aid in this field of research we set out to ascertain the risk and outcome of hydrocephalus in patients with community-acquired bacterial meningitis (CABM) in North Denmark Region. Methods We conducted a retrospective population-based cohort study of CABM cases above 14 years of age. Cases diagnosed during a 13-year period, 1998 through 2010, were identified in a laboratory register and data were acquired through patient records. Cases not confirmed by culture met other strict inclusion criteria. The diagnosis of hydrocephalus relied upon the radiologists’ reports on cranial imaging. Outcome was graded according to the Glasgow Outcome Scale at discharge from the primary admission. Long-term sequelae were based upon any subsequent hospital contacts until the end of 2011. Results Hydrocephalus was diagnosed in five of 165 episodes (3%) and all were classified as communicating. Only 120 patients had cranial imaging done and in this group the rate was 4.2%. In three cases hydrocephalus was present at admission, while two cases were diagnosed on days 44 and 99, respectively, due to altered mental status. The aetiology was either Eschericia coli (n = 2) or Streptococcus pneumoniae (n = 3). Case fatality was 60% among cases with hydrocephalus and 17% among other cases. Case fatality was similar irrespective of whether patients had a cranial CT or not. Conclusions Hydrocephalus was diagnosed in 3% of adolescent and adult cases with CABM and had a high case fatality rate in spite of specialised medical care and neurosurgical interventions. Our findings are comparable with a recent Dutch national prospective study. PMID:23855442

  11. The efficacy of {sup 99m}Tc-ciprofloxacin (infecton) imaging in suspected prosthetic infection following total knee replacement arthroplasty (pilot study)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Ho; Choi, Tae Hyun; Kim, Nam Bum [Gachon Medical School, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    The aims of this study were 1) to increase the labelling efficiency of {sup 99m}Tc-ciprofloxacin (infecton) and 2) to determine the value of infecton imaging in demonstrating infection following total knee replacement arthroplasty (TKRA). Five patients (4 female, 1 male: mean age 52.8{+-}13.5 years, both TKRA in 3 pt) with suspected prosthetic infective conditions were included. In order to increase labelling efficiency, infection was labelled with stannous tartrate instead of previousely used formamidine sulfinic acid (FSA). Immediate perfusion, 5min blood pool, 1hr, 4hr and 24hr delayed images were perfomed. All images were blindly interpreted by two independent observers with visual findings being classified according to a four-grade scale(0.1.2.3). Images graded 0 and 1, and also those regions which showed faintly increase or unchanged uptake grade on late images as compared with early images, were classified as negative; grades 2 and 3 were classified as positive. The diagnosis was confirmed by intraoperative microbiological / histological findings or by the presence of gross purulence. Labelling efficiency increased up to over 98% with formation of radiocolloid less than 1%. All of four pt with prosthetic infection showed positive infecton images but one pt with sterile loosening of prosthesis showed negative infection images. The easy availability as well as new labelling technique make infecton imaging the better option for the detection of prosthetic orthopedic infection.

  12. Retrospective analysis of multiplex polymerase chain reaction-based molecular diagnostics (SES) in 70 patients with suspected central nervous system infections: A single-center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalingam, Rama Krishnan Tiruppur Chinnappan; Chakraborty, Dipanjan

    2016-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) infections present a grave health care challenge due to high morbidity and mortality. Clinical findings and conventional laboratory assessments are not sufficiently distinct for specific etiologic diagnosis. Identification of pathogens is a key to appropriate therapy. In this retrospective observational study, we evaluated the efficacy and clinical utility of syndrome evaluation system (SES) for diagnosing clinically suspected CNS infections. This retrospective analysis included inpatients in our tertiary level neurointensive care unit (NICU) and ward from February 2010 to December 2013. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples of 70 patients, clinically suspected of having CNS infections, were subjected to routine laboratory tests, culture, imaging, and SES. We analyzed the efficacy of SES in the diagnosis of CNS infections and its utility in therapeutic decision-making. SES had a clinical sensitivity of 57.4% and clinical specificity of 95.6%. Streptococcus pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were the top two bacterial pathogens, whereas Herpes simplex virus (HSV) was the most common viral pathogen. Polymicrobial infections were detected in 32.14% of SES-positive cases. SES elicited a change in the management in 30% of the patients from initial empiric therapy. At discharge, 51 patients recovered fully while 11 patients had partial recovery. Three-month follow-up showed only six patients to have neurological deficits. In a tertiary care center, etiological microbial diagnosis is central to appropriate therapy and outcomes. Sensitive and accurate multiplex molecular diagnostics play a critical role in not only identifying the causative pathogen but also in helping clinicians to institute appropriate therapy, reduce overuse of antimicrobials, and ensure superior clinical outcomes.

  13. Diagnostic accuracy of presepsin (sCD14-ST) for prediction of bacterial infection in cerebrospinal fluid samples from children with suspected bacterial meningitis or ventriculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubljar, David; Kopitar, Andreja Natasa; Groselj-Grenc, Mojca; Suhadolc, Kristina; Fabjan, Teja; Skvarc, Miha

    2015-04-01

    Children with temporary external ventricular drains (EVD) are prone to nosocomial infections. Diagnosis of bacterial meningitis and ventriculitis in these children is challenging due to frequent blood contamination of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and the presence of chemical ventriculitis. The aim of this study was to compare diagnostic accuracy of presepsin (sCD14-ST), a novel biomarker of bacterial infection in CSF, to predict bacterial infection in comparison to the accuracy of established biomarkers like those demonstrated in biochemical analysis of CSF. We conducted a prospective study with 18 children with suspected bacterial meningitis or ventriculitis who had 66 episodes of disease. CSF samples were taken from external ventricular drainage. We measured presepsin in CSF, as well as CSF leukocyte count, glucose, and proteins. CSF was also taken to prove bacterial infection with culture methods or with 16S rRNA gene broad-range PCR (SepsiTest; Molzym, Germany). Infection was clinically confirmed in 57 (86%) episodes of suspected meningitis or ventriculitis. Chemical ventriculitis was diagnosed in 9 (14%) episodes of suspected meningitis or ventriculitis. Diagnostic accuracies presented as area under the curve (AUC) for sCD14-ST, leukocytes, and proteins measured in CSF were 0.877 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.793 to 0.961), 0.798 (95% CI, 0.677 to 0.920), and 0.857 (95% CI, 0.749 to 0.964), respectively. With CSF culture, we detected bacteria in 17 samples, compared to 37 detected with broad-range PCR. It was found that presepsin was present at a significantly higher level in children with clinically proven ventriculitis than in those without meningitis or ventriculitis. Diagnostic accuracies of presepsin were superior to those of leukocytes or proteins in CSF. Presepsin-guided 16S rRNA gene PCR could be used in everyday clinical practice to improve etiological diagnosis of meningitis and ventriculitis and to prescribe more appropriate antibiotics. Copyright

  14. Early treatment failure in concurrent dengue and mixed malaria species infection with suspected resistance to artemisinin combination therapy from a tertiary care center in Delhi: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saksena, Rushika; Matlani, Monika; Singh, Vineeta; Kumar, Amit; Anveshi, Anupam; Kumar, Dilip; Gaind, Rajni

    2017-01-01

    Concurrent dengue and mixed malaria infections in a single patient present with overlapping clinical manifestations which pose a diagnostic challenge and management dilemma in areas of common endemicities. We report a case of a young male who tested positive for both Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum along with dengue infection. He showed signs of early treatment failure to artemisinin combination therapy (artesunate with sulfadoxine+pyrimethamine). Molecular analysis for the drug resistance genes viz: chloroquine resistance ( pfcrt ), multidrug resistance ( pfmdr-1 ), sulfadoxine ( pfdhps ), pyrimethamine ( pfdhfr ), and artemisinin resistance ( keltch 13 ) was performed. A rise in parasitemia from treatment. Mutations in pfcrt , pfmdr-1 , pfdhfr , and pfdhps genes were detected as a possible cause of treatment failure. Increased severity, overlapping symptoms, and suspected resistance to treatment warrants a multidimensional diagnostic approach and diligent therapeutic monitoring.

  15. Pharmacokinetics and Dosing of Ceftobiprole Medocaril for the Treatment of Hospital- and Community-Acquired Pneumonia in Different Patient Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Antonio; Mouton, Johan Willem; Pea, Federico

    2016-12-01

    Hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP) and community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) are among the most common infections treated in the hospital setting, and together they place a significant burden on healthcare systems. Successful management of HAP and CAP depends on rapid initiation of empirical antibiotic therapy with broad-spectrum antibiotics. Ceftobiprole is a new-generation, broad-spectrum cephalosporin antibiotic for the treatment of HAP (excluding ventilator-associated pneumonia) and CAP. It displays potent in vitro activity against a broad range of pathogens important in pneumonia. This review summarizes the pharmacokinetic profile of ceftobiprole, and considers the pharmacokinetic parameters and pharmacodynamics underlying the choice of dosing regimen. Ceftobiprole shows linear pharmacokinetics after single and multiple doses and is eliminated predominantly through the kidneys. Ceftobiprole is administered as a 500 mg intravenous infusion over 2 h every 8 h, and steady-state concentrations are reached on the first day of dosing. Dose adjustment is recommended for patients with moderate or severe renal impairment and for those with end-stage renal disease. Extending the infusion time of ceftobiprole to 4 h is recommended to optimize drug exposure in critically ill patients with augmented renal clearance. However, there is no need for dose adjustments based on age, sex or ethnicity, or for patients with severe obesity. Population pharmacokinetic modelling and Monte Carlo simulations were used to determine the optimal dosing regimen for ceftobiprole in special patient populations, including paediatric patients. Future studies of ceftobiprole in patients with HAP and CAP would be of interest.

  16. Usefulness of triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 in differentiating between typical and atypical community-acquired pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    How, Chorng-Kuang; Hou, Sen-Kuang; Shih, Hsin-Chin; Yen, David Hung-Tsang; Huang, Chun-I; Lee, Chen-Hsen; Tang, Gau-Jun

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the clinical use of inflammatory marker triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells (TREM)-1 at admission for differentiating between typical and atypical bacterial community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). A prospective, noninterventional study of patients with CAP hospitalized through the emergency department was performed. Surface expression of TREM-1 was analyzed using flow cytometry on peripheral blood cells, and soluble TREM-1 (sTREM-1) concentration was determined in plasma. Eighty-eight patients with clinical suspicion of CAP were eligible. The causative pathogen was identified in 39 patients (44.3%). After excluding 4 mixed pneumonia cases, 21 typical and 14 atypical bacterial infections were enrolled. Patients with typical bacterial CAP demonstrated increased TREM-1 surface expression on monocytes and neutrophils. Median plasma sTREM-1 levels at admission were 65.2 pg/mL (range, 17.6-138.1 pg/mL) in patients with typical CAP and 25.9 pg/mL (range, 11.5-54.8 pg/mL) in patients with atypical CAP (P atypical pathogens with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.87 (95% confidence interval, 0.75-0.98). At a cutoff level of 44.2 pg/mL, sTREM-1 yielded a sensitivity of 81%, a specificity of 79%, a positive likelihood ratio of 3.79, and a negative likelihood ratio of 0.24. In newly admitted patients with CAP, determination of the TREM-1 levels may provide useful additional diagnostic information on the bacterial etiology. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Rifampin use in acute community-acquired meningitis in intensive care units: the French retrospective cohort ACAM-ICU study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretonnière, Cédric; Jozwiak, Mathieu; Girault, Christophe; Beuret, Pascal; Trouillet, Jean-Louis; Anguel, Nadia; Caillon, Jocelyne; Potel, Gilles; Villers, Daniel; Boutoille, David; Guitton, Christophe

    2015-08-26

    Bacterial meningitis among critically ill adult patients remains associated with both high mortality and frequent, persistent disability. Vancomycin was added to treatment with a third-generation cephalosporin as recommended by French national guidelines. Because animal model studies had suggested interest in the use of rifampin for treatment of bacterial meningitis, and after the introduction of early corticosteroid therapy (in 2002), there was a trend toward increasing rifampin use for intensive care unit (ICU) patients. The aim of this article is to report on this practice. Five ICUs participated in the study. Baseline characteristics and treatment data were retrospectively collected from charts of patients admitted with a diagnosis of acute bacterial meningitis during a 5-year period (2004-2008). The ICU mortality was the main outcome measure; Glasgow Outcome Scale and 3-month mortality were also assessed. One hundred fifty-seven patients were included. Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis were the most prevalent causative microorganisms. The ICU mortality rate was 15%. High doses of a cephalosporin were the most prevalent initial antimicrobial treatment. The delay between admission and administration of the first antibiotic dose was correlated with ICU mortality. Rifampin was used with a cephalosporin for 32 patients (ranging from 8% of the cohort for 2004 to 30% in 2008). Administration of rifampin within the first 24 h of hospitalization could be associated with a lower ICU survival. Statistical association between such an early rifampin treatment and ICU mortality reached significance only for patients with pneumococcal meningitis (p=0.031) in univariate analysis, but not in the logistic model. We report on the role of rifampin use for patients with community-acquired meningitis, and the results of this study suggest that this practice may be associated with lower mortality in the ICU. Nevertheless, the only independent predictors of ICU

  18. Molecular Detection and Characterization of Mycoplasma pneumoniae Among Patients Hospitalized With Community-Acquired Pneumonia in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Maureen H; Benitez, Alvaro J; Cross, Kristen E; Hicks, Lauri A; Kutty, Preeta; Bramley, Anna M; Chappell, James D; Hymas, Weston; Patel, Anami; Qi, Chao; Williams, Derek J; Arnold, Sandra R; Ampofo, Krow; Self, Wesley H; Grijalva, Carlos G; Anderson, Evan J; McCullers, Jonathan A; Pavia, Andrew T; Wunderink, Richard G; Edwards, Kathryn M; Jain, Seema; Winchell, Jonas M

    2015-09-01

    Background.  Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a common cause of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). The molecular characteristics of M pneumoniae detected in patients hospitalized with CAP in the United States are poorly described. Methods.  We performed molecular characterization of M pneumoniae in nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal swabs from children and adults hospitalized with CAP in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Etiology of Pneumonia in the Community (EPIC) study, including P1 typing, multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA), and macrolide susceptibility genotyping. Results.  Of 216 M pneumoniae polymerase chain reaction-positive specimens, 40 (18.5%) were obtained from adults and 176 (81.5%) from children. P1 type distribution differed between adults (64% type 1 and 36% type 2) and children (84% type 1, 13% type 2, and 3% variant) (P < .05) and among sites (P < .01). Significant differences in the proportions of MLVA types 4/5/7/2 and 3/5/6/2 were also observed by age group (P < .01) and site (P < .01). A macrolide-resistant genotype was identified in 7 (3.5%) specimens, 5 of which were from patients who had recently received macrolide therapy. No significant differences in clinical characteristics were identified among patients with various strain types or between macrolide-resistant and -sensitive M pneumoniae infections. Conclusions.  The P1 type 1 genotype and MLVA type 4/5/7/2 predominated, but there were differences between children and adults and among sites. Macrolide resistance was rare. Differences in strain types did not appear to be associated with differences in clinical outcomes. Whole genome sequencing of M pneumoniae may help identify better ways to characterize strains.

  19. Mannose-binding lectin and l-ficolin polymorphisms in patients with community-acquired pneumonia caused by intracellular pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kempen, Gijs; Meijvis, Sabine; Endeman, Henrik; Vlaminckx, Bart; Meek, Bob; de Jong, Ben; Rijkers, Ger; Bos, Willem Jan

    2017-05-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is the leading infectious disease requiring hospitalization in the western world. Genetic variability affecting the host response to infection may play a role in susceptibility and outcome in patients with CAP. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and l-ficolin (l-FCN) are two important activators of the complement system and they can enhance phagocytosis by opsonization. In a prospective cohort of 505 Dutch patients with CAP and 227 control participants we studied whether polymorphisms in the MBL (MBL2) and FCN (FCN2) genes influenced susceptibility and outcome. No difference in frequency of these genotypes was found between patients with CAP in general and controls. However, the +6424G>T single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in FCN2 was more common in patients with a Coxiella burnetii pneumonia (P = 0·014). Moreover, the haplotypes coding for the highest MBL serum levels (YA/YA and YA/XA) predisposed to atypical pneumonia (C. burnetii, Legionella or Chlamydia species or Mycoplasma pneumoniae) compared with controls (P = 0·016). Furthermore, patients with these haplotypes were more often bacteraemic (P = 0·019). It can therefore be concluded that MBL2 and FCN2 polymorphisms are not major risk factors for CAP in general, but that the +6424G>T SNP in the FCN2 gene predisposes to C. burnetii pneumonia. In addition, patients with genotypes corresponding with high serum MBL levels are at risk for atypical pneumonia, possibly caused by enhanced phagocytosis, thereby promoting cell entry of these intracellular bacteria. © 2016 The Authors. Immunology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Evidence of transmission of a Panton-Valentine leukocidin-positive community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clone: a family affair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocchi, P; Taccetti, G; Montagnani, C; Campana, S; Galli, L; Braggion, C; de Martino, M

    2013-12-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) may represent a serious public health problem, owing to the spread of toxin-producing lineages. The presence of genes encoding for Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) is an important virulence marker, as the clinical sequelae of PVL-positive infections are often described as more severe than those of PVL-negative S. aureus infections. To date, the presence of PVL has not appeared to be common in Italy; we describe the intrafamilial transmission of an epidemic PVL-producing CA-MRSA lineage, Southwest Pacific clone (SWP). Our data suggested that the strain circulated from the father, who was recurrently affected by a soft tissue infection, to the mother, who showed nasal colonization, and to their child, who was hospitalized with symptoms of necrotizing pneumonia. In this case, we found that a recurrent skin infection that is not normally taken into account may represent a serious threat if caused by a PVL-producing strain. Our findings may have considerable implications for strategies for infection control and treatment of methicillin-resistant S. aureus infections. © 2013 The Authors Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2013 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  1. Outcomes in elderly Danish citizens admitted with community-acquired pneumonia. Regional differences, in a public healthcare system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard Klausen, Henrik; Petersen, J; Lindhardt, T

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate regional differences in and risk factors for admission, length of stay, mortality, and readmission for community-acquired pneumonia in elderly Danish patients. METHODS: National registry study on elderly Danish citizens with an acute admission in 2009 owing to community....... RESULTS: A total of 11,332 elderly citizens were admitted with community-acquired pneumonia. Mortality during admission and 30-days from discharge were 11.6% and 16.2%, respectively. Readmission rates within 30 days of discharge were 12.3%. There were significantly differences between hospitals in length...

  2. Ceftaroline Fosamil for the Treatment of Community-Acquired Pneumonia: from FOCUS to CAPTURE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreno, Joseph J; Lodise, Thomas P

    2014-12-01

    Ceftaroline fosamil (ceftaroline hereafter) is the latest addition to the armamentarium for the treatment of patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). It is currently approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP), which is a recent FDA indication that centers on individuals with documented bacterial pneumonias that arise in the community setting. The purpose of this review is to summarize and discuss the major findings from the Phase III CAP clinical trials as well as the clinical experience with ceftaroline among patients with CAP in the "Ceftaroline Assessment Program and Teflaro(®) Utilization Registry" (CAPTURE). In its two Phase III CAP trials, ceftaroline was compared to ceftriaxone among adults with radiographically confirmed CAP requiring hospitalization who were classified as Pneumonia Outcomes Research Team (PORT) risk class III or IV. Among patients with CAP, clinical success at test of cure was 84.3% vs 77.7% (difference 6.6%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.6-11.8%) in those treated with ceftaroline and ceftriaxone, respectively, across the two Phase III clinical trials. Among patients with a culture-confirmed CABP, day 4 response rates were numerically higher, albeit non-significant, among patients that received ceftaroline vs. ceftriaxone (69.5% for ceftaroline vs. 59.4% for ceftriaxone, difference 10.1%, 95% CI, -0.6% to 20.6%). The efficacy of ceftaroline is supported by real-world observational data from CAPTURE for patients with both CAP and CABP. In addition, the CAPTURE program afforded an opportunity to assess the outcomes of patients who were excluded or limited in the original Phase III trials in a non-comparative fashion. These underrepresented patient populations with CAP included: patients that received prior antibiotics, patients in the ICU, patients with severe renal dysfunction, and those with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolated from respiratory or

  3. Bone infection in patients suspected of complicating osteomyelitis: the diagnostic value of dual isotope bone-granulocyte scintigraphy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Thora; Stentzer, Kim; Hede, Adam

    2005-01-01

    : Simultaneous dual isotope bone-granulocyte scintigraphic images were obtained in 42 consecutive patients in whom conventional X-ray, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and C-reactive protein were also available. 99mTc MDP bone and 111In labelled granulocyte imaging was obtained simultaneously. The images were...... interpreted as positive for osteomyelitis if regions of interests of pathologic 111In granulocyte accumulation included 99mTc MDP activity on the bone images (except in the spine). RESULTS: The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 84, 71 and 79%, respectively, for simultaneous, dual isotope bone......AIM: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of dual isotope bone-granulocyte scintigraphy in patients with known bone pathology clinically suspected of osteomyelitis, i.e. complicating osteomyelitis, using per-operative bacterial culture from bone as reference. METHODS...

  4. Pathogen or contaminant? Distinguishing true infection from synovial fluid culture contamination in patients with suspected septic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Mary Louise; Zhu, Clara; Byrne, Kevin; Lieber, Sarah B; Moore, Andrew; Shmerling, Robert H; Paz, Ziv

    2017-12-01

    Isolation of bacteria from synovial fluid (SF) is the gold standard for diagnosis of septic arthritis (SA). Contamination results in misdiagnosis and mismanagement. This study identifies clinical characteristics, microbiology, and outcomes of patients with contaminated SF and compares them with patients with true SA. We conducted a retrospective study including all patients aged 18 and older admitted to a single, tertiary-care hospital between 1998 and 2015 with suspected SA and positive SF cultures. Contamination cases were determined by infectious disease specialists involved in the patients' care and a clinical course inconsistent with SA. 398 patients with true SA and 22 with contaminated SF were identified. The SA group was younger (60.9 vs. 75.6 years; p < 0.01), had higher peripheral polymorphonuclear lymphocytes (78.0 vs. 69.4%; p < 0.01) and SF white blood cell count (91.7 vs. 25.6K/mL; p = 0.02), and longer mean length of stay (10.9 vs. 6.7 days; p = 0.02). The average time to positive culture was longer in the contaminated group (3.62 vs. 1.4 days; p < 0.01). The SA group was less likely to receive a new rheumatologic diagnosis within 1 year (3.0 vs. 36.4%; p < 0.01). This is the first study of its kind looking at clinical features and outcomes of patients with contaminated SF. These patients present with less severe disease, have better outcomes, and receive new rheumatologic diagnoses in more than a third of cases within 1 year. We recommend a conservative approach for patients with suspected contaminated SF, mild symptoms, and no bacterial growth within the first 48 h.

  5. [Diagnostic and prognostic power of biomarkers to improve the management of community acquired pneumonia in the emergency department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julián-Jiménez, Agustín; Timón Zapata, Jesús; Laserna Mendieta, Emilio José; Sicilia-Bravo, Isabel; Palomo-de Los Reyes, María José; Cabezas-Martínez, Angeles; Laín-Terés, Natividad; Estebaran-Martín, Josefa; Lozano-Ancín, Agustín; Cuena-Boy, Rafael

    2014-04-01

    To analyse the usefulness and performance of several biomarkers [C-reactive protein (CRP), mid-regional pro-adrenomedullin (MR-proADM), procalcitonin (PCT)] and lactate in predicting short- and medium-term mortality compared with the prognostic severity scales (PSS) usually employed for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and in assessing the aetiological suspicion of infection by Streptococcus pneumoniae and bacteraemia. Observational, prospective and analytical study was conducted on patients who were diagnosed with CAP in our emergency department (ED). The data collected included socio-demographic and comorbidity variables, Charlson index, priority level according to the Spanish Triage System (STS), stage in the Pneumonia Severity Index (PSI) and in the CURB-65 (confusion, urea, respiratory rate, blood pressure and age ≥65years), criteria of severe CAP, microbiological studies, and biomarkers determinations. The patients were followed-up for 180days to calculate the prognostic power and the diagnostic performance for bacteraemia and aetiology. A total of 127patients were finally enrolled in the study. The 30-day mortality was 10.3% (13), and 22.6% (28) at 180 days. Blood cultures were positive in 29 patients (23%) and S.pneumoniae was identified as the responsible pathogen in 28 cases (22.2%). The area under the ROC curve (AUC-ROC) for lactate and MR-proADM to predict 30-day mortality was 0.898 (95%CI: 0.824-0.973; P0.85ng/ml, the NPV and the LR+ were 96.6% and 5.89%, respectively, to predict a S.pneumoniae infection<