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Sample records for susceptible f2 seedlings

  1. Effect of seedling age on the susceptibility and early growth of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Screen house studies were conducted to test the effect of various seedling ages on the susceptibility and early growth of Meloidogyne incognita (Kofoid and White, 1919) Chitwood, 1949 infested okra Abelmoschus esculentus (L) Moench seedlings. Pure culture of M. incognita infected Celosia argentea L. cv. TLV-13 plant ...

  2. Multiple susceptibility loci for radiation-induced mammary tumorigenesis in F2[Dahl S x R]-intercross rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria L Herrera

    Full Text Available Although two major breast cancer susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, have been identified accounting for 20% of breast cancer genetic risk, identification of other susceptibility genes accounting for 80% risk remains a challenge due to the complex, multi-factorial nature of breast cancer. Complexity derives from multiple genetic determinants, permutations of gene-environment interactions, along with presumptive low-penetrance of breast cancer predisposing genes, and genetic heterogeneity of human populations. As with other complex diseases, dissection of genetic determinants in animal models provides key insight since genetic heterogeneity and environmental factors can be experimentally controlled, thus facilitating the detection of quantitative trait loci (QTL. We therefore, performed the first genome-wide scan for loci contributing to radiation-induced mammary tumorigenesis in female F2-(Dahl S x R-intercross rats. Tumorigenesis was measured as tumor burden index (TBI after induction of rat mammary tumors at forty days of age via ¹²⁷Cs-radiation. We observed a spectrum of tumor latency, size-progression, and pathology from poorly differentiated ductal adenocarcinoma to fibroadenoma, indicating major effects of gene-environment interactions. We identified two mammary tumorigenesis susceptibility quantitative trait loci (Mts-QTLs with significant linkage: Mts-1 on chromosome-9 (LOD-2.98 and Mts-2 on chromosome-1 (LOD-2.61, as well as two Mts-QTLs with suggestive linkage: Mts-3 on chromosome-5 (LOD-1.93 and Mts-4 on chromosome-18 (LOD-1.54. Interestingly, Chr9-Mts-1, Chr5-Mts-3 and Chr18-Mts-4 QTLs are unique to irradiation-induced mammary tumorigenesis, while Chr1-Mts-2 QTL overlaps with a mammary cancer susceptibility QTL (Mcs 3 reported for 7,12-dimethylbenz-[α]antracene (DMBA-induced mammary tumorigenesis in F2[COP x Wistar-Furth]-intercross rats. Altogether, our results suggest at least three distinct susceptibility QTLs for

  3. Drought stress leads to systemic induced susceptibility to a nectrotrophic fungus associated with mountain pine beetle in Pinus banksiana seedlings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer G Klutsch

    Full Text Available Conifers have complex defense responses to initial attacks by insects and pathogens that can have cascading effects on success of subsequent colonizers. However, drought can affect a plant's ability to respond to biotic agents by potentially altering the resources needed for the energetically costly production of induced defense chemicals. We investigated the impact of reduced water on induced chemical defenses of jack pine (Pinus banksiana seedlings from initial attack by biotic agents and resistance to subsequent challenge inoculation with a pathogenic fungal associate of mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae, Grosmannia clavigera. Applications of phytohormones (methyl salicylate and methyl jasmonate and G. clavigera were used for initial induction of defenses. Monoterpene concentrations varied with initial induction from fungal and phytohormone application while watering treatment had no effect. Seedlings treated with G. clavigera and methyl jasmonate had the greatest monoterpene concentrations compared to the control and methyl salicylate-treated seedlings. However, the monoterpene response to the challenge inoculation varied with watering treatments, not with prior induction treatments, with lower monoterpene concentrations in fungal lesions on seedlings in the low to moderate watering treatments compared to normal watering treatment. Furthermore, prior induction from phytohormones resulted in systemic cross-induction of resistance to G. clavigera under normal watering treatment but susceptibility under low watering treatment. Seedlings stressed by low water conditions, which also had lower stomatal conductance than seedlings in the normal watering treatment, likely allocated resources to initial defense response but were left unable to acquire further resources for subsequent responses. Our results demonstrate that drought can affect interactions among tree-infesting organisms through systemic cross-induction of susceptibility.

  4. Drought stress leads to systemic induced susceptibility to a nectrotrophic fungus associated with mountain pine beetle in Pinus banksiana seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klutsch, Jennifer G; Shamoun, Simon Francis; Erbilgin, Nadir

    2017-01-01

    Conifers have complex defense responses to initial attacks by insects and pathogens that can have cascading effects on success of subsequent colonizers. However, drought can affect a plant's ability to respond to biotic agents by potentially altering the resources needed for the energetically costly production of induced defense chemicals. We investigated the impact of reduced water on induced chemical defenses of jack pine (Pinus banksiana) seedlings from initial attack by biotic agents and resistance to subsequent challenge inoculation with a pathogenic fungal associate of mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae), Grosmannia clavigera. Applications of phytohormones (methyl salicylate and methyl jasmonate) and G. clavigera were used for initial induction of defenses. Monoterpene concentrations varied with initial induction from fungal and phytohormone application while watering treatment had no effect. Seedlings treated with G. clavigera and methyl jasmonate had the greatest monoterpene concentrations compared to the control and methyl salicylate-treated seedlings. However, the monoterpene response to the challenge inoculation varied with watering treatments, not with prior induction treatments, with lower monoterpene concentrations in fungal lesions on seedlings in the low to moderate watering treatments compared to normal watering treatment. Furthermore, prior induction from phytohormones resulted in systemic cross-induction of resistance to G. clavigera under normal watering treatment but susceptibility under low watering treatment. Seedlings stressed by low water conditions, which also had lower stomatal conductance than seedlings in the normal watering treatment, likely allocated resources to initial defense response but were left unable to acquire further resources for subsequent responses. Our results demonstrate that drought can affect interactions among tree-infesting organisms through systemic cross-induction of susceptibility.

  5. Effects of phosphorus availability and genetic variation of leaf terpene content and emission rate in Pinus pinaster seedlings susceptible and resistant to the pine weevil, Hylobius abietis

    OpenAIRE

    Blanch, J.; Sampedro, L.; Llusia, Joan; Moreira Tomé, X.; Zas Arregui, Rafael; Peñuelas, Josep

    2012-01-01

    We studied the effects of phosphorus fertilisation on foliar terpene concentrations and foliar volatile terpene emission rates in six half-sib families of Pinus pinaster Ait. seedlings. Half of the seedlings were resistant to attack of the pine weevil Hylobius abietis L., a generalist phloem feeder, and the remaining seedlings were susceptible to this insect. We hypothesised that P stress could modify the terpene concentration in the needles and thus lead to altered terpene emission patterns ...

  6. Crop Seedling Susceptibility to Armadillidium vulgare (Isopoda: Armadillidiidae) and Ommatoiulus moreletii (Diplopoda: Iulidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Josh; Macfadyen, Sarina; Hoffmann, Ary; Umina, Paul

    2017-10-16

    The isopod, Armadillidium vulgare (Latreille) (Isopoda: Armadillidiidae), and the millipede, Ommatoiulus moreletii (Lucas) (Diplopoda: Iulidae), are increasingly being reported as pests of emerging broadacre crop seedlings in southern Australia. This is thought to be due to the increased adoption of stubble retention practices, leading to increased abundance of these soil-dwelling organisms. Here, we evaluate the propensity of A. vulgare and O. moreletii to damage a range of crop seedlings. Through the combined analysis of a controlled feeding trial and field reports, we show A. vulgare is able to feed on and damage a range of pulses, legumes, cereals, and oilseeds, as emerging seedlings. O. moreletii had a more restricted range of feeding, being limited to lupin, lucerne, and canola in the feeding trial. These results are discussed in the context of developing pest management guidelines for these species. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Genetic variation in susceptibility to fusiform rust in seedlings from a wild population of loblolly pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohun B. Kinloch Jr.; Roy W. Stonecypher

    1969-01-01

    Striking genetic variation in susceptibility to fusiform rust was observed among SS controlled-pollinated (CP) and 48 wind-pollinated (WP) families from parent trees of loblolly pine selected at random in a natural forest stand in southwest Georgia. The mating design permitted statistical tests for estimating both additive and total genetic variance. WP families were...

  8. Colonization by nitrogen-fixing Frankia bacteria causes short-term increases in herbivore susceptibility in red alder (Alnus rubra) seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballhorn, Daniel J; Elias, Jacob D; Balkan, M A; Fordyce, Rachel F; Kennedy, Peter G

    2017-06-01

    Carbon allocation demands from root-nodulating nitrogen-fixing bacteria (NFB) can modulate the host plant's chemical phenotype, with strong bottom-up effects on herbivores. In contrast to well-studied rhizobia, the effects of other important NFB on plant chemistry and herbivory are much less understood. Here, combining field surveys in the Oregon Coast Range, USA with laboratory experiments, we analyzed how N2-fixing Frankia bacteria influenced plant growth, chemistry, and herbivory on Alnus rubra (red alder) seedlings. In the field, we quantified Frankia nodulation, herbivore damage, and plant size. In the laboratory, we grew seedlings with Frankia (F+), Frankia-free but nitrogen-fertilized (N+), or both uncolonized and unfertilized (F-N-) and assessed growth and leaf chemistry. We further conducted choice trials with black slugs, Arion rufus, a natural red alder herbivore. In the field, Frankia nodulation was significantly positively correlated with herbivory and negatively with seedling height. In contrast, in the lab, F+ as well as N+ seedlings were significantly taller than the F-N- controls. Seedlings from both treatments also had significantly increased leaf protein concentration compared to controls, whereas carbon-based nutritive compounds (carbohydrates) as well as leaf palatability-decreasing condensed tannins, lignin, and fiber were decreased in F+ but not in N+ treatments. In the choice assays, slugs preferred leaf material from F+ seedlings, but the effects were only significant in young leaves. Our study indicates that colonization by Frankia causes short-term ecological costs in terms of susceptibility to herbivory. However, the ubiquity of this symbiosis in natural settings suggests that these costs are outweighed by benefits beyond the seedling stage.

  9. Changes in susceptibility of beech (Fagus sylvatica) seedlings towards Phytophthora citricola under the influence of elevated atmospheric CO2 and nitrogen fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischmann, F; Raidl, S; Osswald, W F

    2010-04-01

    The growth-differentiation balance hypothesis (GDBH) predicts changes in susceptibility of plants against herbivores with changing resource availability. In the presented study we tested the validity of the GDBH for trees infected with a root pathogen. For this purpose Fagus sylvatica seedlings grown under different atmospheric CO(2)- and soil nitrogen regimes were infected with the root pathogen Phytophthora citricola. High nitrogen supply increased total biomass of beech regardless of the CO(2)-treatment, whereas elevated CO(2) enhanced biomass only in the high nitrogen treatment. The responses of beech under the different growing regimes to the Phytophthora root infection were not in line with the predictions of the GDBH. Enhanced susceptibility of beech against P. citricola was found in seedlings grown under elevated CO(2) and low nitrogen supply. Fifteen months after inoculation these plants were characterized by enhanced water use efficiency, by altered root-shoot ratios, and by enhanced specific root tip densities. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of phosphorus availability and genetic variation of leaf terpene content and emission rate in Pinus pinaster seedlings susceptible and resistant to the pine weevil, Hylobius abietis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanch, J-S; Sampedro, L; Llusià, J; Moreira, X; Zas, R; Peñuelas, J

    2012-03-01

    We studied the effects of phosphorus fertilisation on foliar terpene concentrations and foliar volatile terpene emission rates in six half-sib families of Pinus pinaster Ait. seedlings. Half of the seedlings were resistant to attack of the pine weevil Hylobius abietis L., a generalist phloem feeder, and the remaining seedlings were susceptible to this insect. We hypothesised that P stress could modify the terpene concentration in the needles and thus lead to altered terpene emission patterns relevant to plant-insect signalling. The total concentration and emission rate ranged between 5732 and 13,995 μg·g(-1) DW and between 2 and 22 μg·g(-1) DW·h(-1), respectively. Storage and emission were dominated by the isomers α- and β-pinene (77.2% and 84.2% of the total terpene amount amassed and released, respectively). In both resistant and susceptible families, P stress caused an increase of 31% in foliar terpene concentration with an associated 5-fold decrease in terpene emission rates. A higher terpene content in the leaves implies that the 'excess carbon', available under limiting growth conditions (P scarcity), is allocated to terpene production. Sensitive families showed a greater increase in terpene emission rates with increasing P concentrations, which could explain their susceptibility to H. abietis. © 2011 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  11. Changes in susceptibility of beech (Fagus sylvatica) seedlings towards Phytophthora citricola under the influence of elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} and nitrogen fertilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleischmann, F., E-mail: fleischmann@wzw.tum.d [Phytopathology of Woody Plants, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Hochanger 13, 85354 Freising (Germany); Raidl, S. [Department Biology I and GeoBioCenterLMU, Systematic Mycology, Ludwig Maximilians Universitaet Muenchen, Menzinger Strasse 67, 80638 Muenchen (Germany); Osswald, W.F. [Phytopathology of Woody Plants, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Am Hochanger 13, 85354 Freising (Germany)

    2010-04-15

    The growth-differentiation balance hypothesis (GDBH) predicts changes in susceptibility of plants against herbivores with changing resource availability. In the presented study we tested the validity of the GDBH for trees infected with a root pathogen. For this purpose Fagus sylvatica seedlings grown under different atmospheric CO{sub 2}- and soil nitrogen regimes were infected with the root pathogen Phytophthora citricola. High nitrogen supply increased total biomass of beech regardless of the CO{sub 2}-treatment, whereas elevated CO{sub 2} enhanced biomass only in the high nitrogen treatment. The responses of beech under the different growing regimes to the Phytophthora root infection were not in line with the predictions of the GDBH. Enhanced susceptibility of beech against P. citricola was found in seedlings grown under elevated CO{sub 2} and low nitrogen supply. Fifteen months after inoculation these plants were characterized by enhanced water use efficiency, by altered root-shoot ratios, and by enhanced specific root tip densities. - Susceptibility of Fagus sylvatica to the root pathogen Phytophthora citricola increased under elevated CO{sub 2}

  12. Drought and Heat Differentially Affect XTH Expression and XET Activity and Action in 3-Day-Old Seedlings of Durum Wheat Cultivars with Different Stress Susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iurlaro, Andrea; De Caroli, Monica; Sabella, Erika; De Pascali, Mariarosaria; Rampino, Patrizia; De Bellis, Luigi; Perrotta, Carla; Dalessandro, Giuseppe; Piro, Gabriella; Fry, Stephen C; Lenucci, Marcello S

    2016-01-01

    Heat and drought stress have emerged as major constraints for durum wheat production. In the Mediterranean area, their negative effect on crop productivity is expected to be exacerbated by the occurring climate change. Xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolases (XTHs) are chief enzymes in cell wall remodeling, whose relevance in cell expansion and morphogenesis suggests a central role in stress responses. In this work the potential role of XTHs in abiotic stress tolerance was investigated in durum wheat. The separate effects of dehydration and heat exposure on XTH expression and its endotransglucosylase (XET) in vitro activity and in vivo action have been monitored, up to 24 h, in the apical and sub-apical root regions and shoots excised from 3-day-old seedlings of durum wheat cultivars differing in stress susceptibility/tolerance. Dehydration and heat stress differentially influence the XTH expression profiles and the activity and action of XET in the wheat seedlings, depending on the degree of susceptibility/tolerance of the cultivars, the organ, the topological region of the root and, within the root, on the gradient of cell differentiation. The root apical region was the zone mainly affected by both treatments in all assayed cultivars, while no change in XET activity was observed at shoot level, irrespective of susceptibility/tolerance, confirming the pivotal role of the root in stress perception, signaling, and response. Conflicting effects were observed depending on stress type: dehydration evoked an overall increase, at least in the apical region of the root, of XET activity and action, while a significant inhibition was caused by heat treatment in most cultivars. The data suggest that differential changes in XET action in defined portions of the root of young durum wheat seedlings may have a role as a response to drought and heat stress, thus contributing to seedling survival and crop establishment. A thorough understanding of the mechanisms underlying

  13. Factors Affecting Survival of Longleaf Pine Seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    John S. Kush; Ralph S. Meldahl; William D. Boyer

    2004-01-01

    Longleaf pine may be managed most efficiently in large even-aged stands. Past research has shown that the effect of trees surrounding the openings (gaps) or the use of fire is a complicating factor, especially with small openings. Longleaf seedlings are considered more susceptible to fire under and nearer to standing trees, and seedling size, kind of fire, soil type,...

  14. Genetics of drought tolerance at seedling and maturity stages in Zea mays L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, N.H.; Ahsan, M.; Naveed, M.; Sadaqat, H.A.; Javed, I.

    2016-11-01

    Shortage of irrigation water at critical growth stages of maize is limiting its production worldwide. Breeding drought-tolerant cultivars is one possible solution while identification of potential genotypes is crucial for genetic improvement. To assess genetic variation for seedling-stage drought tolerance, we tested 40 inbred lines in a completely randomized design under glasshouse conditions. From these, two contrasting inbred lines were used to develop six basic generations (P1, P2, F1, F2, BC1F1, BC2F2). These populations were then evaluated in a triplicated factorial randomized complete block design under non-stressed and drought-stressed conditions. For statistical analyses, a nested block design was employed to ignore the replication effects. Significant differences (p=0.01) were recorded among the genotypes for investigated seedling-traits. Absolute values of fresh root length, fresh root weight, and dry root weight lead to select two genotypes, one tolerant (WFTMS) and one susceptible (Q66). Estimates of heritability, genetic advance, and genotypic correlation coefficients were higher and significant for most of the seedling-traits. Generation variance analysis revealed additive gene action. Narrow-sense heritability [F2 = 65; F8 = 79] revealed the same results. Generation mean analysis signified additive genetic effects in the inheritance of cob girth, non-additive for plant height, grains per ear row and grain yield per plant, and environmental for ear leaf area, cob length, grain rows per ear, biomass per plant, and 100-grain weight under drought-stressed conditions. For conferring drought-tolerance in maize, breeders can adopt the recombinant breeding strategy to pyramid the desirable genes. (Author)

  15. Compensatory and susceptive responses of cowpea genotypes to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The cowpea seedlings of the second trial were infested with five four-day-old aphids per seedling two weeks after planting. The aphids were allowed to form colonies and fed on the seedlings until symptoms of damage were observed. When the susceptible seedlings became stunted with distorted leaves and yellowing of ...

  16. Free-electron-laser studies of the relaxation of H- and D- local modes in CaF2, SrF2, and BaF2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wells, J. P. R.; Bradley, I. V.; Jones, G. D.; Pidgeon, C. R.

    2001-01-01

    We report a three-pulse, pump-probe experiment on H- and D- local modes in CaF2, SrF2, and BaF2 using the Dutch free electron laser, FELIX. The 10-K lifetimes of the H- local modes were measured as 43 +/-5, 170 +/- 15, and 212 +/- 20 ps for CaF2, SrF2, and BaF2, respectively. For D-, the

  17. Ionospheric foF2 morphology and response of F2 layer height over ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    after sunset. Around local noon, the F2 ionosphere had reached a dynamic stability with respect to losses by recombination, and production by solar radiation. A second peak (the post-noon ..... of positive and negative changes at the dawn and dusk terminal ... ity effect when F2 layer is pushed down to lower heights where ...

  18. Plan ontogeny and chemical defence : older seedlings are better defended

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elger, A.F.; Lemoine, D.G.; Fenner, M.; Hanley, M.E.

    2009-01-01

    Although patterns of seedling selection by herbivores are strongly influenced by plant age and the expression of anti-herbivore defence, it is unclear how these characteristics interact to influence seedling susceptibility to herbivory. We tracked ontogenetic changes in a range of secondary

  19. Measurements of $F2, x F3 \

    CERN Document Server

    Bodek, Arie; Adams, T; Alton, A; Arroyo, C G; Avvakumov, S; Bazarko, A O; Bernstein, R H; Bolton, T; Brau, J E; Buchholz, D A; Budd, H S; Bugel, L; Conrad, J; Drucker, R B; Fleming, B T

    2000-01-01

    We report on the extraction of the structure functions F2 and Delta xF3 = xF3nu-xF3nub from CCFR neutrino-Fe and antineutrino-Fe differential cross sections. The extraction is performed in a physics model independent (PMI) way. This first measurement for Delta xF3 which is useful in testing models of heavy charm production, is higher than current theoretical predictions. The F2 (PMI) values measured in neutrino and muon scattering are in good agreement with the predictions of Next to Leading Order PDFs (using massive charm production schemes), thus resolving the long-standing discrepancy between the two sets of data.

  20. 3D microstructuring with F2 lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toenshoff, Hans K.; von Alvensleben, Ferdinand; Ostendorf, Andreas; Koerber, Klaus; Kulik, Christian

    2000-09-01

    F2 lasers emitting radiation with a wavelength (lambda) equals 157 nm allow the direct laser based micro-structuring of materials like PTFE (e.g. Teflon) or quartz glass for MST-applications. This paper reports about the fundamental basis of controlling and modelling the structuring process and about existing tools for the 3-D micron structuring with F2 excimer lasers. The concept of three-dimensional micro-structuring is based on gradual ablation, using single laser pulses. A CNC-controlled precision machining centre with a vacuum encapsulated beam guiding system has been developed. For the material processing with F2 lasers a model of the single ablation size was qualified, which provides an exact description of the laser pulse taking the material properties, the energy density and the lateral dimensions of the single ablation into account. The non- linear characteristics between pulse geometry and process parameters were experimentally determined and implemented into software for automated NC-data generation. A special software tool makes the simulation of manufacturing micro-components possible. It is based on the complex NC-code and on the exact model of the single ablation. Using this simulation, the process parameters can be optimised before processing with a laser micro-machining centre. The described technology was verified by manufacturing 3-D micro-structures in several materials, such as quartz glass and PTFE.

  1. Seedling root targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diane L. Haase

    2011-01-01

    Roots are critical to seedling performance after outplanting. Although root quality is not as quick and simple to measure as shoot quality, target root characteristics should be included in any seedling quality assessment program. This paper provides a brief review of root characteristics most commonly targeted for operational seedling production. These are: root mass...

  2. Ionospheric foF2 morphology and response of F2 layer height over ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The F2-layer critical frequency pre-noon peak increases by a factor of 2 more than the post-noon peak as the solar activity increases. The variability coefficient (R) is ... Department of Physics, Kebbi State University of Science and Technology, P.M.B 1144, Aliero, Kebbi State, Nigeria. School of Science and Technology, ...

  3. Eastern Redcedar Seedling Assessment

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Eastern redcedar tree seedling growth in response to various soil, nitrogen, and photosynthetic radiation characteristics. This dataset is associated with the...

  4. Investigation of the Function of the Influenza A Virus PB1-F2 Protein During Infection of Swine and Human Cells with a Predominant Circulating Swine Virus Isolate

    Science.gov (United States)

    In recent years a protein referred to as PB1-F2 was discovered in a second open reading frame of the PB1 gene of many influenza A viruses. Studies have indicated that PB1-F2 may induce apoptosis of infected cells, increase susceptibility to secondary bacterial infection in mice, increase macrophage ...

  5. Hardness of CaF2 and BaF2 solid lubricants at 25 to 670 deg C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deadmore, Daniel L.; Sliney, Harold E.

    1987-01-01

    Plastic deformation is a prominent factor in determining the lubricating value of solid lubricants. Little information is available and its direct measurement is difficult so hardness, which is an indirect measure of this property was determined for fluoride solid lubricant compositions. The Vickers hardness of BaF2 and CaF2 single crystals was measured up to 670 C in a vacuum. The orientation of the BaF2 was near the (013) plane and the CaF2 was about 16 degrees from the degrees from the (1'11) plane. The BaF2 has a hardness of 83 kg/sq mm at the 25 C and 9 at the 600 C. The CaF2 is 170 at 25 C and 13 at 670 C. The decrease in hardness in the temperature range of 25 to 100 C is very rapid and amounts to 40% for both materials. Melts of BaF2 and CaF2 were made in a platinum crucible in ambient air with compositions of 50 to 100 wt% BaF2. The Vickers hardness of these polycrystalline binary compositions at 25 C increased with increasing CaF2 reaching a maximum of 150 kn/sq mm near the eutectic. The polycrystalline CaF2 was 14% softer than that of the single crystal surface and BsF2 was 30% harder than the single crystal surface. It is estimated that the brittle to ductile transition temperature for CaF2 and BaF2 is less than 100 C for the conditions present in the hardness tester.

  6. Seed-vectored endophytic bacteria modulate development of rice seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, S K; Kingsley, K; Irizarry, I; Bergen, M; Kharwar, R N; White, J F

    2017-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of the removal of indigenous bacteria from rice seeds on seedling growth and development. Here we report the presence of three indigenous endophytic bacteria in rice seeds that play important roles in modulating seedling development (shoot and root lengths, and formation of root hairs and secondary roots) and defence against pathogens. Seed-associated bacteria were removed using surface sterilization with NaOCl (bleach) followed by antibiotic treatment. When bacteria were absent, growth of seedlings in terms of root hair development and overall seedling size was less than that of seedlings that contained bacteria. Reactive oxygen staining of seedlings showed that endophytic bacteria became intracellular in root parenchyma cells and root hairs. Roots containing endophytic bacteria were seen to stain densely for reactive oxygen, while roots free of bacteria stained lightly for reactive oxygen. Bacteria were isolated and identified as Enterobacter asburiae (VWB1), Pantoea dispersa (VWB2) and Pseudomonas putida (VWB3) by 16S rDNA sequencing. Bacteria were found to produce indole acetic acid (auxins), inhibited the pathogen Fusarium oxysporum and solubilized phosphate. Reinoculation of bacteria onto seedlings derived from surface-disinfected rice and Bermuda grass seeds significantly restored seedling growth and development. Rice seeds harbour indigenous bacterial endophytes that greatly influence seedling growth and development, including root and shoot lengths, root hair formation and disease susceptibility of rice seedlings. This study shows that seeds of rice naturally harbour bacterial endophytes that play key roles in modulation of seedling development. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  7. Formation of metal nanoparticles in MgF2, CaF2 and BaF2 crystals under the electron beam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochkareva, Elizaveta S.; Sidorov, Alexander I.; Yurina, Uliana V.; Podsvirov, Oleg A.

    2017-07-01

    It is shown experimentally that electron beam action with electrons energies of 50 and 70 keV on MgF2, CaF2 and BaF2 crystals results in local formation in the crystal near-surface layer of Mg, Ca or Ba nanoparticles which possess plasmon resonance. In the case of MgF2 spheroidal nanoparticles are formed, in the cases of CaF2 and BaF2 - spherical. The formation of metal nanoparticles is confirmed by computer simulation in dipole quasistatic approximation. The dependence of absorption via electron irradiation dose is non-linear. It is caused by the increase of nanoparticles concentration and by the increase of nanoparticles sizes during irradiation. In the irradiated zones of MgF2 crystals, for irradiation doses less than 80 mC/cm2, the intense luminescence in a visible range appears. The practical application of fabricated composite materials for multilevel optical information recording is discussed.

  8. Effects of Toxic Levels of Aluminium on Seedling Parameters of Rice under Hydroponic Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bidhan ROY

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The presence of Al in the rhizosphere of rice in acid soil restricts root growth and significantly reduces crop productivity. In this study, the effects of Al (30, 60 and 90 µg/mL on seedling root growth, number of primary roots per seedling, seedling shoot length, number of leaves per seedling, seedling fresh weight, and seedling dry weight were studied. Rice genotypes were classified into three different classes, namely, tolerant, moderately tolerant, and susceptible, based on root tolerance index. The method of hydroponic culture was modified, and elaborated in the text. Toxic levels of Al in nutrient solution significantly decreased seedling root growth, number of primary roots, seedling shoot length, number of leaves per seedling, seedling fresh weight, and seedling dry weight. Few genotypes showed longer root length at 30 µg/mL Al in nutrient solutions compared with the control. High levels of Al in nutrient solutions were highly toxic for rice seedlings. Based on root tolerance index, Radhunipagal, Gobindobhog, Badshabhog, Kalobhog, UBKVR-11, UBKVR-16, UBKVR-18, Khasha and IVT4007-B were classified as tolerant genotypes, and these genotypes may be used as donors for breeding of Al-toxicity tolerance.

  9. Four different Phytophthora species that are able to infect Scots pine seedlings in laboratory conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tkaczyk Miłosz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available To investigate susceptibility of young Scots pine seedlings to four Phytophthora species: Phytophthora cactorum, Phytophthora cambivora, Phytophthora plurivora and Phytophthora pini; seven-day-old seedlings of Scots pine (15 seedlings per experiment were infected using agar plugs of the respective species. Control group also consisted of 15 seedlings and was inoculated with sterile agar plugs. Results unambiguously show that after 4.5 days, all seedlings show clear signs of infection and display severe symptoms of tissue damage and necrosis. Moreover, three and two seedlings in the P. cactorum and P. cambivora infected seedlings groups, respectively, collapsed. The length of largest necrosis measured 13.4±3.90 mm and was caused by P. cactorum. To rule out any putative contamination or infection by secondary pathogens, re-isolations of pathogens from infection sites were performed and were positive in 100% of plated pieces of infected seedlings. All re-isolations were, however, negative in the case of the control group. Detailed microscopic analyses of infected tissues of young seedlings confirmed the presence of numerous Phytophthora species inside and on the surface of infected seedlings. Therefore, our results suggest Phytophthora spp. and mainly P. cactorum and P. cambivora as aggressive pathogens of Scots pine seedlings and highlight a putative involvement of these species in the damping off of young Scots pine seedlings frequently observed in forest nurseries.

  10. Mode-locked operation of Co:MgF(2) and Ni:MgF(2) lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, B C; Moulton, P F; Mooradian, A

    1984-04-01

    Tunable, mode-locked operation of cw Co:MgF(2) and Ni:MgF(2) lasers has been demonstrated for the first reported time, and autocorrelation measurements of the pulse widths have been made. The Co:MgF(2) system has generated stable pulses over wavelengths from 1.65 to 2.01 microm and has produced pulses as short as 34 psec. The Ni:MgF(2) laser has operated over the 1.61-1.73-microm range, with pulses as short as 23 psec.

  11. Germination and emergence characteristics of triazine-susceptible and triazine-resistant biotypes of Solanum nigrum.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kremer, E.; Lotz, L.A.P.

    1998-01-01

    1. Seedling emergence patterns of triazine-susceptible and triazine-resistant Solanum nigrum in the field were studied in Wageningen, the Netherlands. Emergence patterns were similar in the first year, but in the second year resistant seedlings emerged faster and the number of resistant seedlings

  12. Shock Compression Response of Calcium Fluoride (CaF2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, Seth

    2017-06-01

    The fluorite crystal structure is a textbook lattice that is observed for many systems, such as CaF2, Mg2 Si, and CeO2. Specifically, CaF2 is a useful material for studying the fluorite system because it is readily available as a single crystal. Under static compression, CaF2 is known to have at least three solid phases: fluorite, cotunnite, and a Ni2 In phase. Along the Hugoniot CaF2 undergoes a fluorite to cotunnite phase transition, however, at higher shock pressures it is unknown whether CaF2 undergoes another solid phase transition or melts directly from the cotunnite phase. In this work, we conducted planar shock compression experiments on CaF2 using Sandia's Z-machine and a two-stage light gun up to 900 GPa. In addition, we use density functional theory (DFT) based quantum molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations to provide insight into the CaF2 state along the Hugoniot. In collaboration with: Michael Desjarlais, Ray Lemke, Patricia Kalita, Scott Alexander, Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-mission laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL850.

  13. Structure of the house dust mite allergen Der f 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Birthe R; Skov, Lars; Kastrup, Jette S

    2005-01-01

    The X-ray structure of the group 2 major allergen from Dermatophagoides farinae (Der f 2) was determined to 1.83 A resolution. The overall Der f 2 structure comprises a single domain of immunoglobulin fold with two anti-parallel beta-sheets. A large hydrophobic cavity is formed in the interior...... of Der f 2. Structural comparisons to distantly related proteins suggest a role in lipid binding. Immunoglobulin E (IgE) cross-reactivity between group 2 house dust mite major allergens can be explained by conserved surface areas representing IgE binding epitopes....

  14. Evaluation of dissolution profile similarity - Comparison between the f2, the multivariate statistical distance and the f2 bootstrapping methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paixão, Paulo; Gouveia, Luís F; Silva, Nuno; Morais, José A G

    2017-03-01

    A simulation study is presented, evaluating the performance of the f2, the model-independent multivariate statistical distance and the f2 bootstrap methods in the ability to conclude similarity between two dissolution profiles. Different dissolution profiles, based on the Noyes-Whitney equation and ranging from theoretical f2 values between 100 and 40, were simulated. Variability was introduced in the dissolution model parameters in an increasing order, ranging from a situation complying with the European guidelines requirements for the use of the f2 metric to several situations where the f2 metric could not be used anymore. Results have shown that the f2 is an acceptable metric when used according to the regulatory requirements, but loses its applicability when variability increases. The multivariate statistical distance presented contradictory results in several of the simulation scenarios, which makes it an unreliable metric for dissolution profile comparisons. The bootstrap f2, although conservative in its conclusions is an alternative suitable method. Overall, as variability increases, all of the discussed methods reveal problems that can only be solved by increasing the number of dosage form units used in the comparison, which is usually not practical or feasible. Additionally, experimental corrective measures may be undertaken in order to reduce the overall variability, particularly when it is shown that it is mainly due to the dissolution assessment instead of being intrinsic to the dosage form. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Treatment of canine pyometra and endometritis with prostaglandin F2 alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, R W; Feldman, E C; Stabenfeldt, G H

    1982-11-01

    Seventeen bitches with pyometra or postpartum endometritis were treated with prostaglandin F2 alpha. Response to the treatment included cessation of uterine discharge, decrease in uterine diameter, reduction in plasma progesterone concentration, and return of a normal leukogram. Treatment of 14 bitches was successful, and 13 of these bitches subsequently experienced estrus. Of those 13 bitches, 11 were bred and 9 became pregnant. In 2 bitches, pyometra developed again, within 6 weeks of the following estrus, illustrating that bitches so affected are susceptible to recurrence of the disease. Of 4 bitches with closed cervix, one failed to respond to treatment, and two bitches with closed cervix required ovariohysterectomy shortly after instituting treatment.

  16. Molecular CsF 5 and CsF 2 +

    KAUST Repository

    Rogachev, Andrey Yu.

    2015-06-03

    D5h star-like CsF5, formally isoelectronic with known XeF5− ion, is computed to be a local minimum on the potential energy surface of CsF5, surrounded by reasonably large activation energies for its exothermic decomposition to CsF+2F2, or to CsF3 (three isomeric forms)+F2, or for rearrangement to a significantly more stable isomer, a classical Cs+ complex of F5−. Similarly the CsF2+ ion is computed to be metastable in two isomeric forms. In the more symmetrical structures of these molecules there is definite involvement in bonding of the formally core 5p levels of Cs.

  17. Mortality, early growth, and blight occurrence in hybrid, Chinese, and American chestnut seedlings in West Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melissa Thomas-Van Gundy; Jane Bard; Jeff Kochenderfer; Paul. Berrang

    2017-01-01

    Two plantings of second (BC3F2) and third (BC3F3) backcross generations of hybrid American chestnuts established in east-central West Virginia were assessed after 4 years to determine family effects on growth and survival. Pure American and pure Chinese chestnut seedlings were...

  18. cultivated Curcuma longa seedlings

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ufuoma Uwerhiavwo

    2016-08-10

    Aug 10, 2016 ... Curcuma longa L., from the Zingiberaceae family, generally reproduces through its rhizomes, which are also utilized for therapeutic purposes because they are rich in terpenoids. Its conventional propagation has low efficiency due to the small number of seedlings and their contamination by pathogens.

  19. Prostaglandin F2alpha elevates blood pressure and promotes atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Ying; Lucitt, Margaret B; Stubbe, Jane

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about prostaglandin F(2alpha) in cardiovascular homeostasis. Prostaglandin F(2alpha) dose-dependently elevates blood pressure in WT mice via activation of the F prostanoid (FP) receptor. The FP is expressed in preglomerular arterioles, renal collecting ducts, and the hypothalamus....... Deletion of the FP reduces blood pressure, coincident with a reduction in plasma renin concentration, angiotensin, and aldosterone, despite a compensatory up-regulation of AT1 receptors and an augmented hypertensive response to infused angiotensin II. Plasma and urinary osmolality are decreased in FP KOs...

  20. Spin waves in antiferromagnetic FeF2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hutchings, M T; Rainford, B.D.; Guggenheim, H J

    1970-01-01

    Spin-wave dispersion in antiferromagnetic FeF2 has been investigated by inelastic neutron scattering using a chopper time-of-flight spectrometer. The single mode observed has a relatively flat dispersion curve rising from 53 cm-1 at the zone centre to 79 cm-1 at the zone boundary. A spin Hamilton......Spin-wave dispersion in antiferromagnetic FeF2 has been investigated by inelastic neutron scattering using a chopper time-of-flight spectrometer. The single mode observed has a relatively flat dispersion curve rising from 53 cm-1 at the zone centre to 79 cm-1 at the zone boundary. A spin...

  1. Temperature influence on diode-pumped Tm:SrF2-CaF2 laser properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šulc, Jan; Veselský, Karel; Němec, Michal; Jelínková, Helena; Doroshenko, Maxim E.; Konyushkin, Vasilii A.; Nakladov, Andrey N.; Osiko, Vjatcheslav V.

    2017-02-01

    The goal of this work was an investigation of the temperature influence (in range 77 - 300 K) on laser properties of Tm:SrF2-CaF2 solid-solution, which is suitable as a gain medium for generation of radiation at 1.8-2 μm. The tested Tm:SrF2-CaF2 sample (60 mol% CaF2, 38 mol% SrF2) was doped with 2 mol% of TmF3. The diameter of the grown boule was 10 mm. The sample was cut and optically polished parallel to growing axis. The polished sample thickness was 8.5 mm. It was fixed in temperature controlled cupreous holder, placed inside vacuum chamber of the liquid nitrogen cryostat. A fiber coupled laser diode, operating in pulsed regime (10 ms pulse length, 10 Hz repetition rate) at wavelength 764 nm, was used for longitudinal sample pumping. The 142mm long semi-hemispherical laser cavity consisted of at pumping mirror (HR @ 1:8 - 2:0 μm, HT @ 0.77 μm) and curved (r = 150mm) output coupler with a reflectivity of 92% @ 1:8 - 2:0 μm. From the results it follows that the temperature of the active medium has a strong infkuence on laser slope efficiency. The highest slope efficiency (42% in respect to absorbed power), obtained for temperature 77 K, was more than five times higher than slope efficiency for 300 K. The threshold decreased twice with the temperature lowering from 300 to 77 K. Laser output power amplitude 5.5W at wavelength 1856nm was reached for absorbed power 15.8W at 77 K.

  2. Construction of CaF2-appended PVA nanofibre scaffold

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2018-02-02

    Feb 2, 2018 ... Transmission electron microscopy results showed that many CaF2 nanoparticles were well dispersed in the PVA fibre matrix. The water- resistant ability of the scaffold was improved through intermolecular crosslinking of PVA by formaldehyde vapour. This novel material seems to be a promising scaffold for ...

  3. Segregation distortion in F2 and doubled haploid populations of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yamagishi M., Takeuchi Y., Tanaka I., Kono I., Murai K. and Yano M. 2010. Segregation distortion in F2 and doubled haploid populations of temperate japonica rice. J. Genet. 89, 237–241] fertility is caused by S gene, resulting in the distortion of.

  4. Trigonal-Bipyramidal Coordination in First Ammoniates of ZnF2: ZnF2(NH3)3 and ZnF2(NH3)2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Theresia M M; LeTonquesse, Sylvain; Alt, Nicolas S A; Schlücker, Eberhard; Niewa, Rainer

    2016-03-07

    Single crystals of ZnF2(NH3)3 and ZnF2(NH3)2 were obtained under ammonothermal conditions (250 °C, 196 MPa and 500 °C, 136 MPa). Upon thermal decomposition of both ZnF2(NH3)3 and ZnF2(NH3)2, a microcrystalline powder of ZnF2(NH3) was obtained. ZnF2(NH3)3 and ZnF2(NH3)2 represent probable intermediates in a conceivable ammonothermal synthesis of the semiconductor Zn3N2 and manifest a rare trigonal-bipyramidal coordination of F(-) and NH3 ligands around Zn(2+) according to single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Thermal analysis of all three compounds showed not only ZnF2(NH3) but also ZnF2(NH3)2 to be decomposition intermediates of ZnF2(NH3)3 prior to the formation of ZnF2. All three compounds demonstrate hydrogen bonds, as indicated by the intensities and half-widths of the bands in the vibrational spectra and by short N-H···F distances in the crystal structures of ZnF2(NH3)3 and ZnF2(NH3)2. With ZnF2(NH3)3, ZnF2(NH3)2, and ZnF2(NH3), we present the first ammoniates of ZnF2.

  5. Reducing Seed and Seedlings Pathogens Improves Longleaf Pine Seedlings Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    James P. Barnett; John M. McGilvray

    2002-01-01

    The demand for container longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) planting stock is increasing across the Lower Gulf Coastal Plain. Poor-quality seeds and seedling losses during nursery culture further constrain a limited seed supply. Improved seed efficiency will be necessary to meet the need for increased seedling production. We evaluated seed...

  6. Seed photosynthesis enhances Posidonia oceanica seedling growth

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Celdrán, David; Marín, Arnaldo

    2013-01-01

    Posidonia oceanica seeds demonstrate photosynthetic activity during germination as well as throughout seedling development, a fact which suggests that seed photosynthesis can influence seedling growth...

  7. Mid-latitude Ionospheric F2 layer at Sunrise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhumabayev, Beibit; Yakovets, Artur; Gordienko, Galina

    2017-04-01

    Ionospheric corrections, calculated from ionospheric models corrected during ground-based or transionospheric sounding, should be applied to up-to-date high-tech wireless devices, including long and superlong base-line radio interferometers and differential GPS navigation systems, in order to improve the accuracy characteristics. The introduced corrections considerably increase at high horizontal gradients of the ionospheric electron density observed at sunrise; therefore, new experimental data on the space-time characteristics of the ionospheric F2 layer, which make it possible to improve the ionosphere description accuracy during this period of the day, are undoubtedly attractive. The F2 layer behavior at sunrise was studied based on the data of vertical-incidence ionospheric sounding in a 5-min regime, performed at the Almaty Institute of the Ionosphere (76°55'E, 43°15'N) in 2000-2010 using a Parus ionosonde. The primary ionogram reduction included reading virtual heights of reflection h'(t) at several fixed working frequencies and critical frequency values (foF2). The further data processing included obtaining N(h) profiles from the ionograms, using the POLAN conversion program. The sequence of N(h) profiles made it possible to obtain the behavior of several layer parameters, including the electron density at fixed altitudes (N(t)) and at the layer maximum (NmF2) and altitudes of the layer maximum (hmF2) and bottom (hbotF2), and the electron density growth rate (N'). The N(t) variations obtained bear features typical of all measurement sessions, namely, (a) the instants of the beginning of a pronounced increase observed later on the lower altitudes; (b) the electron density growth rates (N') differ at different altitudes, and the growth rate is maximal at altitudes below the layer maximum altitude. So, based on vertical-incidence ionospheric sounding data, we indicated that the electron density at altitudes of the ionospheric F2 layer increases rapidly at

  8. F2 phenomenological test on fuel motion (Interim report). [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palm, R.G.; Fink, C.L.; Stewart, R.R.; Gehl, S.M.; Rothman, A.B.

    1976-09-01

    TREAT F-series tests are being conducted to provide data on fuel motion at accident power levels from one to about ten times design for use in development of fuel motion models. Test F2 was conducted to evaluate motion of high power fuel in a hypothetical LMFBR unprotected TUC (transient undercooling) accident. Fuel and fuel-boundary conditions following coolant boiling and dryout under TUC conditions are achieved in each F-series test with a single fuel element surrounded by a nuclear heated wall in a dry test capsule. Test F2 was conducted with a low burnup but restructured fuel element to investigate the effect of fuel vapor pressure on fuel motion. Results are presented and discussed.

  9. Radioactive contamination of BaF2 crystal scintillator

    CERN Document Server

    Polischuk, O G; Bernabei, R; Cappella, F; Caracciolo, V; Cerulli, R; Di Marco, A; Danevich, F A; Incicchitti, A; Poda, D V; Tretyak, V I

    2013-01-01

    Barium fluoride (BaF$_2$) crystal scintillators are promising detectors to search for double beta decay processes in $^{130}$Ba ($Q_{2{\\beta}}$ = 2619(3) keV) and $^{132}$Ba ($Q_{2{\\beta}}$ = 844(1) keV). The $^{130}$Ba isotope is of particular interest because of the indications on 2${\\beta}$ decay found in two geochemical experiments. The radioactive contamination of BaF$_2$ scintillation crystal with mass of 1.714 kg was measured over 113.4 hours in a low-background DAMA/R&D set-up deep underground (3600 m w.e.) at the Gran Sasso National Laboratories of INFN (LNGS, Italy). The half-life of $^{212}$Po (present in the crystal scintillator due to contamination by radium) was estimated as $T_{1/2}$ = 298.8 $\\pm$ 0.8(stat.) $\\pm$ 1.4(syst.) ns by analysis of the events pulse profiles.

  10. Prostaglandin F2 alpha in benign and malignant breast tumours.

    OpenAIRE

    Vergote, I.B.; Laekeman, G. M.; Keersmaekers, G. H.; Uyttenbroeck, F L; Vanderheyden, J S; Albertyn, G. P.; Haensch, C. F.; De Roy, G. J.; Herman, A.G.

    1985-01-01

    Prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha) was determined by radioimmunoassay in 57 breast carcinomata, 16 fibroadenomata, and 33 sclero-cystic-disease (SCD) specimens. In 41 cases of carcinoma and 10 cases of fibroadenoma, histologically non-malignant tissue was also obtained from the same breast. PGF2 alpha levels were significantly elevated in breast cancer when compared with the normal tissues and benign diseases (P less than 0.005 for each group). High PGF2 alpha levels were positively correlat...

  11. The rise in F$_{2}^{p}$ at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Ball, Richard D.; Forte, S

    1994-01-01

    We show that the rise in F_2^p at small x and large Q^2 seen at HERA is indeed the non-Regge double asymptotic scaling behaviour expected from the perturbative emission of strongly ordered hard gluons. An alternative explanation, in which there is no strong ordering, and a new hard Reggeon is generated, is also tried but found wanting: its theoretical short-comings are betrayed by its failure to properly account for the HERA data.

  12. From composites to solid solutions: modeling of ionic conductivity in the CaF2-BaF2 system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahn, Dirk; Heitjans, Paul; Maier, Joachim

    2012-05-14

    By using calcium fluorite and barium fluorite as test materials, we demonstrated that homovalent "dopants" can greatly affect ionic conductivity through locally changing the defect density. Whilst this doping is a state-of-the-art effect in the case of dopants that replace native ions of different charge (heterovalent dopants), it is a rather surprising effect at a first glance for substitutional dopants of the same charge; here, the phenomenon is not electrostatic, but elastic in nature. As a consequence of size mismatch, the smaller Ca atoms in the BaF(2) lattice favored the formation of interstitial sites that were located close to the Ca atoms, whilst doping larger Ba species into the CaF(2) phase favored vacancy formation. In terms of conductivity, and in agreement with the different mobilities, the first doping effect was favorable, whilst the other decreased conductivity. The concentration effects were formalized by a heterogeneous Frenkel reaction that was distinguished from the mean Frenkel reaction by additional (elastic) trapping that became more pronounced the lower the temperature. It was very revealing to relate this phenomenon to CaF(2)-BaF(2) multilayers and composites. In very general terms, these effects in the solid solutions were understood as being the atomistic limit of the interfacial charge-transfer that occurred at the hetero-interface of the crystallites or films, and reflected the transition from heterogeneous doping (higher-dimensional doping) to homogeneous doping (zero-dimensional doping). Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Mapping quantitative trait loci for binary trait in the F2: 3 design

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the analysis of inheritance of quantitative traits with low heritability, an F2:3 design that genotypes plants in F2 and phenotypes plants in F2:3 progeny is often used in plant genetics. Although statistical approaches for mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL) in the F2:3 design have been well developed, those for binary traits ...

  14. Determination of Ionosphere Critical Frequency f0F2,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-30

    be obtained by the method in part F. 2 2 2. Keeping 0 N and 0T constant, maximize I by a one-dimensional Fibonacci search on f 0 13 SI .,. 2 2 3...Keeping N and f constant, do Fibonacci search onN2 0 2 4. Keeping 0T and f constant, search for 0 5. Go back to step 2 and repeat until convergence is...the overlap between members of the filter band in the noise receiver, the number of degrees of freedom of the noise is raised to some unknown number

  15. Screening cotton genotypes for seedling drought tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penna Julio C. Viglioni

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to adapt a screening method previously used to assess seedling drought tolerance in cereals for use in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. and to identify tolerant accessions among a wide range of genotypes. Ninety genotypes were screened in seven growth chamber experiments. Fifteen-day-old seedlings were subjected to four 4-day drought cycles, and plant survival was evaluated after each cycle. Three cycles are probably the minimum required in cotton work. Significant differences (at the 0.05 level or lower among entries were obtained in four of the seven experiments. A "confirmation test" with entries previously evaluated as "tolerant" (high survival and "susceptible" (low survival was run. A number of entries duplicated their earlier performance, but others did not, which indicates the need to reevaluate selections. Germplasms considered tolerant included: `IAC-13-1', `IAC-RM4-SM5', `Minas Sertaneja', `Acala 1517E-1' and `4521'. In general, the technique is simple, though time-consuming, with practical value for screening a large number of genotypes. Results from the screening tests generally agreed with field information. The screening procedure is suitable to select tolerant accessions from among a large number of entries in germplasm collections as a preliminary step in breeding for drought tolerance. This research also demonstrated the need to characterize the internal lack of uniformity in growth chambers to allow for adequate designs of experiments.

  16. An interpretation of the ƒoF2 and hmF2 long-term trends in the framework of the geomagnetic control concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Mikhailov

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Earlier revealed morphological features of the foF2 and hmF2 long-term trends are interpreted in the scope of the geomagnetic control concept based on the contemporary F2-layer storm mechanisms. The F2-layer parameter trends strongly depend on the long-term varying geomagnetic activity whose effects cannot be removed from the trends using conventional indices of geomagnetic activity. Therefore, any interpretation of the foF2 and hmF2 trends should consider the geomagnetic effects as an inalienable part of the trend analysis. Periods with negative and positive foF2 and hmF2 trends correspond to the periods of increasing or decreasing geomagnetic activity with the turning points around 1955, and the end of 1960s and 1980s, where foF2 and hmF2 trends change their signs. Such variations can be explained by neutral composition, as well as temperature and thermospheric wind changes related to geomagnetic activity variations. In particular, for the period of increasing geomagnetic activity (1965–1991 positive at lower latitudes, but negative at middle and high latitudes, foF2 trends may be explained by neutral composition and temperature changes, while soft electron precipitation determines nighttime trends at sub-auroral and auroral latitudes. A pronounced dependence of the foF2 trends on geomagnetic (invariant latitude and the absence of any latitudinal dependence for the hmF2 trends are due to different dependencies of NmF2 and hmF2 on main aeronomic parameters. All of the revealed latitudinal and diurnal foF2 and hmF2 trend variations may be explained in the frame-work of contemporary F2-region storm mechanisms. The newly proposed geomagnetic storm concept used to explain F2-layer parameter long-term trends proceeds from a natural origin of the trends rather than an artificial one, related to the thermosphere cooling due to the greenhouse effect. Within this concept, instead of cooling, one should expect the thermosphere heating for the period of

  17. Seedling quality tests: chlorophyll fluoresence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary Ritchie; Thomas D. Landis

    2005-01-01

    So far in this series we have discussed the most commonly -used seedling quality tests: root growth potential, cold hardiness, and stress resistance. In this issue, we're going to talk about one of the newest test-chlorophyll fluorescence (CF). The technology for measuring CF has been in place for over 50 years but has been applied to tr?e seedling physiology only...

  18. Establishment of Ulmus pumila seedlings on steppe slopes of the northern Mongolian mountain taiga

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulamsuren, Choimaa; Hauck, Markus; Nyambayar, Suran; Osokhjargal, Dalaikhuu; Leuschner, Christoph

    2009-09-01

    The potential of Siberian elm ( Ulmus pumila) to regenerate from seeds was experimentally studied on south-facing slopes in the northern Mongolian mountain taiga. These slopes are covered with a vegetation mosaic of different steppe communities and small, savanna-like, U. pumila open woodlands. The hypothesis is tested that the xeric microclimate and high herbivore densities limit the success of seedling establishment in U. pumila and thereby prevent elm from complete encroachment of the grassland-dominated slopes. Seeds were sown and 2-yr-old seedlings were planted prior to the growing season. The water supply was manipulated by irrigation, as was the feeding pressure by caterpillars with an insecticide. Large herbivores were excluded by fencing. Seeds germinated throughout the summer, but the emerged seedlings did not survive for more than 2 or 3 weeks. Germination rates increased with increasing soil water content and decreasing soil temperatures. Many seeds were consumed by granivores. Most planted 2-yr-old seedlings survived the two growing seasons covered by the study. However, the seedlings suffered from feeding damage by insects (gypsy moth, grasshoppers) and small mammals, from nitrogen deficiency and, to a lesser degree, from drought. The results suggest that high susceptibility of newly emerged seedlings to environmental stresses is a serious bottle neck for U. pumila that prevents them from the formation of closed forests on northern Mongolia's steppe slopes, whereas the probability for seedling survival after this early stage is high.

  19. Potential production of Aspidosperma cylindrocarpon seedlings viarescue seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathália Ferreira e Silva

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Translocation of rare populations is regarded as the last resort for the conservation of species whose habitat destruction is imminent. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of two height classes and three leaf reduction intensities on growth and increases in height, stem diameter, survival, and new leaf production in seedlings of Aspidosperma cylindrocarpon (peroba obtained via rescue seedlings in a remnant of tropical semi deciduous forest. We recovered 240 individuals that were divided into two height classes (Class I-5 to 15cm and Class II-20 to 35cm and subjected to three leaf reduction intensities (0%, 50%, and 100%, which were then transported to a shade house with 50% light reduction. Measurements of height, stem diameter, and new leaf production were collected 8 times at 0, 15, 60, 75, 90, 105, 120, and 135 days, and survival rate was measured at day 135. The average survival rate was 82.9%; 77.5% for one Class I (5-15cm and 88.3% for Class II (20-35cm. Higher seedling growth was observed for the 0% leaf reduction treatment in both height classes. The leaves insertion were greater in the 100% cuts, with a decrease observed over time. It is advisable to restore A. cylindrocarpon seedlings in two height classes owing to the high survival rate, leaf appearance, and growth reported in the present study. The no-leaf reduction treatment (0% is the most viable alternative for the production of A. cylindrocarpon seedlings, via rescue seedlings.

  20. Neural-network-based prediction techniques for single station modeling and regional mapping of the foF2 and M(3000F2 ionospheric characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. D. Xenos

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, Neural-Network-based single-station hourly daily foF2 and M(3000F2 modelling of 15 European ionospheric stations is investigated. The data used are neural networks and hourly daily values from the period 1964- 1988 for training the neural networks and from the period 1989-1994 for checking the prediction accuracy. Two types of models are presented for the F2-layer critical frequency prediction and two for the propagation factor M(3000F2. The first foF2 model employs the E-layer local noon calculated daily critical frequency (foE12 and the local noon F2- layer critical frequency of the previous day. The second foF2 model, which introduces a new regional mapping technique, employs the Juliusruh neural network model and uses the E-layer local noon calculated daily critical frequency (foE12, and the previous day F2-layer critical frequency measured at Juliusruh at noon. The first M(3000F2 model employs the E-layer local noon calculated daily critical frequency (foE12, its ± 3 h deviations and the local noon cosine of the solar zenith angle (cos c12. The second model, which introduces a new M(3000F2 mapping technique, employs Juliusruh neural network model and uses the E-layer local noon calculated daily critical frequency (foE12, and the previous day F2-layer critical frequency measured at Juliusruh at noon.

  1. Mapping quantitative trait loci for binary trait in the F2:3 design

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the analysis of inheritance of quantitative traits with low heritability, an F2:3 design that genotypes plants in F2 and phe- notypes plants in F2:3 progeny is often ... to substantial cost saving. Acutally, one can arbitrarily in- ...... experiments show that the estimates for logistic analysis and the liability model are close to the ...

  2. 16 CFR Appendix F2 to Part 305 - Compact Clothes Washers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compact Clothes Washers F2 Appendix F2 to Part 305 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULE... Appendix F2 to Part 305—Compact Clothes Washers Range Information “Compact” includes all household clothes...

  3. Anomalous variations of NmF2 over the Argentine Islands: a statistical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Pavlov

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a statistical study of variations in the F2-layer peak electron density, NmF2, and altitude, hmF2, over the Argentine Islands ionosonde. The critical frequencies, foF2, and, foE, of the F2 and E-layers, and the propagation factor, M(3000F2, measured by the ionosonde during the 1957–1959 and 1962–1995 time periods were used in the statistical analysis to determine the values of NmF2 and hmF2. The probabilities to observe maximum and minimum values of NmF2 and hmF2 in a diurnal variation of the electron density are calculated. Our study shows that the main part of the maximum diurnal values of NmF2 is observed in a time sector close to midnight in November, December, January, and February exhibiting the anomalous diurnal variations of NmF2. Another anomalous feature of the diurnal variations of NmF2 exhibited during November, December, and January when the minimum diurnal value of NmF2 is mainly located close to the noon sector. These anomalous diurnal variations of NmF2 are found to be during both geomagnetically quiet and disturbed conditions. Anomalous features are not found in the diurnal variations of hmF2. The statistical study of the NmF2 winter anomaly phenomena over the Argentine Islands ionosonde was carried out. The variations in a maximum daytime value, R, of a ratio of a geomagnetically quiet daytime winter NmF2 to a geomagnetically quiet daytime summer NmF2 taken at a given UT and for approximately the same level of solar activity were studied. The conditional probability of the occurrence of R in an interval of R, the most frequent value of R, the mean expected value of R, and the conditional probability to observe the F2-region winter anomaly during a daytime period were calculated for low, moderate, and high solar activity. The calculations show that the mean expected value of R and the occurrence frequency of the F2-region winter anomaly increase with increasing solar activity.

  4. Microstructures and tribological properties of plasma sprayed WC-Co-Cu-BaF 2/CaF 2 self-lubricating wear resistant coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jianhui; Zhu, Yingchun; Ji, Heng; Zheng, Xuebing; Ruan, Qichao; Niu, Yaran; Liu, Ziwei; Zeng, Yi

    2010-06-01

    A promising WC-Co-Cu-BaF 2/CaF 2 self-lubricating wear resistant coating was deposited via atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) process by using homemade feedstock powders composed of WC-Co, Cu and BaF 2/CaF 2 eutectic. The as-prepared cermet coatings had better frictional behavior comparing with the WC-Co coating. Moreover, the often-occurred decarburization of WC in APS process was noticeably improved due to the binding of copper and BaF 2/CaF 2 phase, which not only offered effective solid lubrication, but also acted as bind phases to mend the microstructure and protected WC from decomposition. The optimized specimen contained 10 wt.% Cu and 10 wt.% BaF 2/CaF 2 in a WC-Co matrix, which had excellent frictional and wear performance. The wear mechanism of the self-lubricating wear resistant coating was discussed with the microstructures, compositions and mechanical properties of the composite materials in detail.

  5. [Mg(XeF(2))(n)()](AsF(6))(2) (n = 4, 2): first compounds of magnesium with XeF(2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramsek, Melita; Benkic, Primoz; Zemva, Boris

    2004-01-26

    The reaction between Mg(AsF(6))(2) and XeF(2) in anhydrous HF (aHF) at room temperature yields two compounds with XeF(2) bonded directly to the Mg(2+) cation: [Mg(XeF(2))(4)](AsF(6))(2); [Mg(XeF(2))(2)](AsF(6))(2). The 1:4 compound is obtained with excess XeF(2) while the 1:2 compound is prepared from stoichiometric amounts of Mg(AsF(6))(2) and XeF(2). [Mg(XeF(2))(4)](AsF(6))(2) crystallizes in an orthorhombic crystal system, space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with a = 8.698(15) A, b = 14.517(15) A, c = 15.344(16) A, V = 1937(4) A(3), and Z = 4. The octahedral coordination sphere of Mg consists of one fluorine atom from each of the four XeF(2) molecules and two fluorine atoms from the two AsF(6) units. [Mg(XeF(2))(2)](AsF(6))(2) crystallizes in the orthorhombic crystal system, space group Pbam, with a = 8.9767(10) A, b = 15.1687(18) A, c = 5.3202(6) A, V = 724.42(14) A(3), and Z = 2. The octahedral coordination sphere consists of two fluorine atoms, one from each of the two XeF(2) molecules and four fluorine atoms from the four bridging AsF(6) units.

  6. Grass seedling demography and sagebrush steppe restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. J. James; M. J. Rinella; T. Svejcar

    2012-01-01

    Seeding is a key management tool for arid rangeland. In these systems, however, seeded species often fail to establish. A recent study inWyoming big sagebrush steppe suggested that over 90% of seeded native grass individuals die before seedlings emerged. This current study examines the timing and rate of seed germination, seedling emergence, and seedling death related...

  7. Prostaglandin F2 alpha in benign and malignant breast tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergote, I B; Laekeman, G M; Keersmaekers, G H; Uyttenbroeck, F L; Vanderheyden, J S; Albertyn, G P; Haensch, C F; De Roy, G J; Herman, A G

    1985-06-01

    Prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha) was determined by radioimmunoassay in 57 breast carcinomata, 16 fibroadenomata, and 33 sclero-cystic-disease (SCD) specimens. In 41 cases of carcinoma and 10 cases of fibroadenoma, histologically non-malignant tissue was also obtained from the same breast. PGF2 alpha levels were significantly elevated in breast cancer when compared with the normal tissues and benign diseases (P less than 0.005 for each group). High PGF2 alpha levels were positively correlated with differentiation, positive oestrogen and progestagen receptor status, and low mitotic index. Tumours with good prognosis (less than 20 mm, negative lymph nodes, some degree of differentiation) showed significantly higher PGF2 alpha levels than tumours with a bad prognosis (greater than 20 mm, positive nodes and undifferentiated). A tendency for elevated PGF2 alpha levels was observed with negative lymphatic permeation, postmenopausal status, low grade of nuclear and cellular polymorphism and high degree of elastosis and fibrosis. No correlation was observed between PGF2 alpha levels and host-cell reaction. Plasma levels of 15-keto-13, 14-dihydro-PGF2 alpha were not elevated in cancer patients when compared with the SCD-group. The present study demonstrates that PGF2 alpha levels are high in tumours with good prognosis. However, since other authors have suggested that a high PGE2 production is a bad prognostic index, it is possible that conversion of PGE2 to PGF2 alpha by 9-keto-reductase explains this relationship. Nevertheless, the presented results question the unrestricted use of prostaglandin-synthesis-inhibitors in the treatment of breast cancer.

  8. The E2F2 transcription factor sustains hepatic glycerophospholipid homeostasis in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo N Maldonado

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence links metabolic signals to cell proliferation, but the molecular wiring that connects the two core machineries remains largely unknown. E2Fs are master regulators of cellular proliferation. We have recently shown that E2F2 activity facilitates the completion of liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy (PH by regulating the expression of genes required for S-phase entry. Our study also revealed that E2F2 determines the duration of hepatectomy-induced hepatic steatosis. A transcriptomic analysis of normal adult liver identified "lipid metabolism regulation" as a major E2F2 functional target, suggesting that E2F2 has a role in lipid homeostasis. Here we use wild-type (E2F2+/+ and E2F2 deficient (E2F2-/- mice to investigate the in vivo role of E2F2 in the composition of liver lipids and fatty acids in two metabolically different contexts: quiescence and 48-h post-PH, when cellular proliferation and anabolic demands are maximal. We show that liver regeneration is accompanied by large triglyceride and protein increases without changes in total phospholipids both in E2F2+/+ and E2F2-/- mice. Remarkably, we found that the phenotype of quiescent liver tissue from E2F2-/- mice resembles the phenotype of proliferating E2F2+/+ liver tissue, characterized by a decreased phosphatidylcholine to phosphatidylethanolamine ratio and a reprogramming of genes involved in generation of choline and ethanolamine derivatives. The diversity of fatty acids in total lipid, triglycerides and phospholipids was essentially preserved on E2F2 loss both in proliferating and non-proliferating liver tissue, although notable exceptions in inflammation-related fatty acids of defined phospholipid classes were detected. Overall, our results indicate that E2F2 activity sustains the hepatic homeostasis of major membrane glycerolipid components while it is dispensable for storage glycerolipid balance.

  9. Dietary fats and F2-isoprostanes: A review of the clinical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva, Marine S; Bilodeau, Jean-François; Julien, Pierre; Rudkowska, Iwona

    2017-12-12

    Evidence supports that a high dietary fat intake increases oxidative stress and the risk of diet-induced metabolic disorders such as obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. F 2 -isoprostanes (F 2 -isoP) are formed by the non-enzymatic oxidation of arachidonic acid and are widely used as reliable biomarkers of oxidative stress in clinical studies. Dietary fats may influence F 2 -isoP levels, as they (1) are metabolic substrates for their formation, (2) modify the lipid composition of tissues, and (3) affect the plasma lipoprotein concentrations which are involved in F 2 -isoP transport. This review examined the latest clinical evidence on how dietary fats can affect blood circulation and excretion of F 2 -isoP in individuals with healthy or deteriorated metabolic profiles. Clinical studies reported that saturated or monounsaturated fat-rich diets did not affect F 2 -isoP levels in adults with healthy or deteriorated metabolic profiles. Though, ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids decreased F 2 -isoP levels in numerous studies, whereas trans-fatty acids raised F 2 -isoP excretion. Yet, the reported heterogeneous results reveal important considerations, such as the health status of the participants, the biological fluids used to determine F 2 -isoP, the analytical methods employed and the specific F 2 -isoP isomers detected. Therefore, future clinical studies should be designed in order to consider these issues in the studies of the effects of fat intake on oxidative stress.

  10. F2-layer parameters long-term trends at the Argentine Islands and Port Stanley stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Danilov

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available The ionospheric sounding data at two southern hemisphere stations, the Argentine Islands and Port Stanley, are analyzed using a method previously developed by the authors. Negative trends of the critical frequency foF2 are found for both stations. The magnitudes of the trends are close to those at the corresponding (close geomagnetic latitude stations of the northern hemisphere, as considered previously by the authors. The values of the F2 layer height hmF2 absolute trends ΔhmF2 are considered. The effect of ΔhmF2 dependence on hmF2 found by Jarvis et al. (1998 is reproduced. A concept is considered that long-term changes of the geomagnetic activity may be an important (if not the only cause of all the trends of foF2 and hmF2 derived by several groups of authors. The dependence of both parameters on the geomagnetic index Ap corresponds to a smooth scheme of the ionospheric storm physics and morphology; thus, a principal cause of the foF2 and hmF2 geomagnetic trends is most probably a trend found in several publications in the number and intensity of ionospheric storms.Key words. Ionosphere (ionosphere-atmosphere interaction; ionospheric disturbances

  11. Transgenerational effects of obesity and malnourishment on diabetes risk in F2 generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanafi, Mervat Y; Saleh, Moustafa M; Saad, Mohamed I; Abdelkhalek, Taha M; Kamel, Maher A

    2016-01-01

    Transgenerational inheritance of various diseases and phenotypes has been demonstrated in diverse species and involves various epigenetic markers. Obesity and malnourishment are nutritional stresses that have effects on offspring through increasing their risk of diabetes and/or obesity. Obesity and malnourishment both affect glucose metabolism and alter oxidative stress parameters in key organs. We induced obesity and malnutrition in F0 female rats by the use of obesogenic diet and protein-deficient diet, respectively. F0 obese and malnourished females were mated with control males and their offspring (F1 generation) were maintained on control diets. The male and female F1 offspring were mated with controls and the resultant offspring (F2 generation) were maintained on control diet. Glucose-sensing markers, glucose metabolism, indicators of insulin resistance and oxidative stress parameters were assessed during fetal development and till the adulthood of the offspring. Glucose-sensing genes were significantly over-expressed in distinct fetal tissues of F2 offspring of malnourished F1 females (F2-MF1F), specifically in fetal pancreas, liver, and adipose tissue. Nuclear and mitochondrial 8-oxo-dG DNA content was significantly elevated in F2-MF1F fetal pancreas. Maternal FBG was significantly elevated in F2-MF1F and F2 offspring of obese F1 females (F2-OF1F) during pregnancy. Males and females offspring of F2-OF1 exhibited significantly elevated FBG and impaired OGTT. Offspring of F2-MF1F showed similar results, while that of F2-MF1M did not significantly deviate from controls. F2-OF1F and F2-MF1F offspring exhibited significant deviation in insulin levels and HOMA-IR levels from controls. Malnourishment has a stronger transgenerational effect through maternal line compared to obesity and malnourishment through paternal line in increasing risk of diabetes in F2 generation.

  12. Ionospheric foF2 morphology and response of F2 layer height over Jicamarca during different solar epochs and comparison with IRI-2012 model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adebesin, B O; Adekoya, B J; Ikubanni, S O; Adebiyi, S J; Adebesin, O A; Joshua, B W; Olonade, K O

    2014-01-01

    .... The relative standard deviation (V R ) was used for the analysis. The F2-layer critical frequency pre-noon peak increases by a factor of 2 more than the post-noon peak as the solar activity increases...

  13. Can there be a multi-bond between noble gas and metal? A theoretical study of F2XeMoF2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Kunqi; Sheng, Li

    2017-04-05

    A new noble gas compound containing a Xe-Mo double bond, F 2 XeMoF 2 , was theoretically constructed and studied based on DFT and ab initio calculations. The CCSD(T)-calculated Xe-Mo bond length of 2.518 Å was comparable to the standard value of 2.56 Å. The bonding energy (32.3 kcal mol -1 ) was even higher than that of the Xe-Au bond in the well-known XeAuF complex (24.1 kcal mol -1 ). The result of natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis indicates that there is a σ-bond and a π-bond between the Xe and Mo atoms in F 2 XeMoF 2 . The properties of the Xe-Mo double bond were also analyzed with the atoms in molecules (AIM) approach and natural resonance theory (NRT).

  14. Complex refractive index measurements for BaF 2 and CaF 2 via single-angle infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly-Gorham, Molly Rose K.; DeVetter, Brent M.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Cannon, Bret D.; Burton, Sarah D.; Bliss, Mary; Johnson, Timothy J.; Myers, Tanya L.

    2017-10-01

    We have re-investigated the optical constants n and k for the homologous series of inorganic salts barium fluoride (BaF2) and calcium fluoride (CaF2) using a single-angle near-normal incidence reflectance device in combination with a calibrated Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. Our results are in good qualitative agreement with most previous works. However, certain features of the previously published data near the reststrahlen band exhibit distinct differences in spectral characteristics. Notably, our measurements of BaF2 do not include a spectral feature in the ~250 cm-1 reststrahlen band that was previously published. Additionally, CaF2 exhibits a distinct wavelength shift relative to the model derived from previously published data. We confirmed our results with recently published works that use significantly more modern instrumentation and data reduction techniques

  15. Computation of the chiral condensate using N{sub f}=2 and N{sub f}=2+1+1 dynamical flavors of twisted mass fermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cichy, K. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Poznan Univ. (Poland). Faculty of Physics; Garcia-Ramos, E. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany); Jansen, K. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Shindler, A. [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). IAS; Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). IKP; Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). JCHP; Collaboration: European Twisted Mass Collaboration

    2013-12-15

    We apply the spectral projector method, recently introduced by Giusti and Luescher, to compute the chiral condensate using N{sub f}=2 and N{sub f}=2+1+1 dynamical flavors of maximally twisted mass fermions. We present our results for several quark masses at three different lattice spacings which allows us to perform the chiral and continuum extrapolations. In addition we report our analysis on the O(a) improvement of the chiral condensate for twisted mass fermions. We also study the effect of the dynamical strange and charm quarks by comparing our results for N{sub f}=2 and N{sub f}=2+1+1 dynamical flavors.

  16. Impacts of seedling herbivory on plant competition and implications for species coexistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, M. E.; Sykes, R. J.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Although the causes and consequences of seedling herbivory for plant community composition are well understood, the mechanisms by which herbivores influence plant species recruitment to the established phase remain less clear. The aim was to examine how variation in the intensity of seedling herbivory interacts with growth-defence trade-offs and herbivore feeding preferences to affect plant community development. Methods Using 14-d-old seedlings of Trifolium pratense and T. repens, relative growth and susceptibility to herbivory by the snail Helix aspersa was quantified to elucidate putative growth-defence trade-offs for these species. Then mixed assemblages of 14-d-old Trifolium seedlings were exposed to herbivory by zero, two, five or ten snails and determined how variation in the intensity of herbivory affected competitive interactions into the mature phase (as measured by total plant biomass at 120 d old). Key Results In the absence of herbivory, communities were dominated by T. pratense; a result expected on the basis that it yielded larger and presumably more competitive seedlings. However, when seedlings were exposed to herbivory, the balance of competition shifted. At low levels of herbivory (two snails), both Trifolium species contributed equally to total plant biomass. More intense herbivory (five snails) resulted in almost total mortality of T. pratense and dominance of the mature community by T. repens. The most intense herbivory (ten snails) effectively removed all seedlings from the experimental community. Conclusions The study illustrates a mechanism whereby spatio-temporal fluctuations in seedling herbivory, when coupled with species-specific variation in competitive ability and sensitivity to herbivore attack, can differentially influence plant recruitment into the mature phase. This mechanism may be a key element in our attempts to understand plant species coexistence, since fluctuations in plant recruitment are fundamental to

  17. Dipole model analysis of F2cc¯${m{F}}_2^{{m{car c}}} $ derived from the new D* data in DIS at HERA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luszczak Agnieszka

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available I analyse the new D* deep inelastic scattering data from HERA with the help of dipole models. I calculate F2cc¯${m{F}}_2^{{m{car c}}} $ from the GBW [1] and BGK [2] saturation models. I compare results with the last values determined by H1 at low Q2. I find good agreement with the data.

  18. Low-Q2 low-x Structure Function Analysis of CCFR data for F2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamminga, B. H.; Adams, T.; Alton, A.; Arroyo, C. G.; Avvakumov, S.; de Barbaro, L.; de Barbaro, P.; Bazarko, A. O.; Bernstein, R. H.; Bodek, A.; Bolton, T.; Brau, J.; Buchholz, D.; Budd, H.; Bugel, L.; Conrad, J.; Drucker, R. B.; Formaggio, J. A.; Frey, R.; Goldman, J.; Goncharov, M.; Harris, D. A.; Johnson, R. A.; Kim, J. H.; King, B. J.; Kinnel, T.; Koutsoliotas, S.; Lamm, M. J.; Marsh, W.; Mason, D.; McFarland, K. S.; McNulty, C.; Mishra, S. R.; Naples, D.; Nienaber, P.; Romosan, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Schellman, H.; Sciulli, F. J.; Seligman, W. G.; Shaevitz, M. H.; Smith, W. H.; Spentzouris, P.; Stern, E. G.; Vakili, M.; Vaitaitis, A.; Wu, V.; Yang, U. K.; Yu, J.; Zeller, G. P.; Zimmerman, E. D.

    2000-01-01

    Analyses of structure functions (SFs) from neutrino and muon deep inelastic scattering data have shown discrepancies in F2 for x < 0.1. A new SF analysis of the CCFR collaboration data examining regions in x down to x=.0015 and 0.4 < Q^2 < 1.0 is presented. Comparison to corrected charged lepton scattering results for F2 from the NMC and E665 experiments are made. Differences between muon and neutrino scattering allow that the behavior of F2 from muon scattering could be different from F2 from neutrino scattering as Q^2 approaches zero. Comparisons between F2 muon and F2 neutrino are made in this limit.

  19. Variability in the Fl and F2 region electron density during a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper investigates the variation in the F1 and F2 region electron density during a geomagnetic activity, at East Asian mid-latitude stations. In this analysis, we have employed D(foF1) and D(foF2) representing deviation of the critical frequency for the F1 and F2 ionospheric regions respectively. The F1 region appears to ...

  20. Expression and Functional Pathway Analysis of Nuclear Receptor NR2F2 in Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Shannon M.; Loomans, Holli A.; Wan, Ying-Wooi; Ghosh-Choudhury, Triparna; Coffey, Donna; Xiao, Weimin; Liu, Zhandong; Sangi-Haghpeykar, Haleh

    2013-01-01

    Context: Recent evidence implicates the orphan nuclear receptor, nuclear receptor subfamily 2, group F, member 2 (NR2F2; chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor II) as both a master regulator of angiogenesis and an oncogene in prostate and other human cancers. Objective: The objective of the study was to determine whether NR2F2 plays a role in ovarian cancer and dissect its potential mechanisms of action. Design, Setting, and Patients: We examined NR2F2 expression in healthy ovary and ovarian cancers using quantitative PCR and immunohistochemistry. NR2F2 expression was targeted in established ovarian cancer cell lines to assess the impact of dysregulated NR2F2 expression in the epithelial compartment of ovarian cancers. Results: Our results indicate that NR2F2 is robustly expressed in the stroma of healthy ovary with little or no expression in epithelia lining the ovarian surface, clefts, or crypts. This pattern of NR2F2 expression was markedly disrupted in ovarian cancers, in which decreased levels of stromal expression and ectopic epithelial expression were frequently observed. Ovarian cancers with the most disrupted patterns of NR2F2 were associated with significantly shorter disease-free interval by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Targeting NR2F2 expression in established ovarian cancer cell lines enhanced apoptosis and increased proliferation. In addition, we found that NR2F2 regulates the expression of NEK2, RAI14, and multiple other genes involved in the cell cycle, suggesting potential pathways by which dysregulated expression of NR2F2 impacts ovarian cancer. Conclusions: These results uncover novel roles for NR2F2 in ovarian cancer and point to a unique scenario in which a single nuclear receptor plays potentially distinct roles in the stromal and epithelial compartments of the same tissue. PMID:23690307

  1. Geomagnetic control of the foF2 long-term trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Mikhailov

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Further development of the method proposed by Danilov and Mikhailov is presented. The method is applied to reveal the foF2 long-term trends on 30 Northern Hemisphere ionosonde stations. Most of them show significant foF2 trends. A pronounced dependence of trend magnitude on geomagnetic (invariant latitude is confirmed. Periods of negative/positive foF2 trends corresponding to the periods of long-term increasing/decreasing geomagnetic activity are revealed for the first time. Pronounced diurnal variations of the foF2 trend magnitude are found. Strong positive foF2 trends in the post-midnight-early-morning LT sector and strong negative trends during daytime hours are found on the sub-auroral stations for the period with increasing geomagnetic activity. On the contrary middle and lower latitude stations demonstrate negative trends in the early-morning LT sector and small negative or positive trends during daytime hours for the same period. All the morphological features revealed of the foF2 trends may be explained in the framework of contemporary F2-region storm mechanisms. This newly proposed F2-layer geomagnetic storm concept casts serious doubts on the hypothesis relating the F2-layer parameter long-term trends to the thermosphere cooling due to the greenhouse effect.Key words: Ionosphere (ionosphere-atmosphere interactions; ionospheric disturbances

  2. Inheritance of emergence time and seedling growth at low temperatures in four lines of maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagles, H A

    1982-03-01

    The improvement of rate of seedling emergence and early seedling growth of maize (Zea mays L.) under cool conditions has been an objective of breeding programs in cool regions for many years. To study inheritance of emergence time, and to determine if differences in emergence time were due to differences in seedling growth, F1, F2 and backcross generations of a diallel cross of two rapidly emerging lines from CIMMYT Pool 5, 5-113 and 5-154, and two elite Corn Belt Dent lines, A619 and A632, were grown in controlled environment rooms at low temperatures.The lines from Pool 5 emerged significantly faster than A619 and A632 over a range of low temperature conditions. This difference occurred both when the lines themselves were tested and when the lines were tested as male and female parents in crosses. The Pool 5 lines converted a higher proportion of their original seed to new root and shoot tissue than did A619 and A632, indicating that they had a faster seedling growth rate. Primarily this was due to a faster loss of seed reserve, rather than a more efficient conversion process.A significant difference occurred between A619 and A632 for emergence time, but this was not due to a difference in seedling growth rate.Reciprocal differences occurred only in the F1 generation in crosses involving A619, and then marked effects could be attributed to the male parent. Reciprocal differences tended to disappear in the F2. This suggested that the genotype of the embryo and endosperm was of much greater importance than the genotype of the maternal parent in determining differences of time to emergence and seedling growth.Mid-parent heterosis occurred for time to emergence and seed loss, a measure of mean rate of utilization of seed reserve, in all crosses. High parent heterosis occurred in several crosses for these traits. High parent heterosis occurred in all crosses for efficiency of utilization of seed reserve.A generation means analysis indicated that both additive and

  3. Chiral phase transition of $N_f$=2+1 and 3 QCD at vanishing baryon chemical potential

    CERN Document Server

    Ding, Heng-Tong

    2015-01-01

    We present updated results on chiral phase structure in (2+1)-flavor ($N_f$=2+1) and 3-flavor ($N_f=3$) QCD based on the simulations using Highly Improved Staggered Quarks on lattices with temporal extent $N_\\tau$ =6 at vanishing baryon chemical potential. In $N_f$=2+1 QCD we have performed simulations with a strange quark fixed to its physical value and two degenerate light quarks whose values are adjusted to have 5 values of Goldstone pion masses in the region of 160 - 80 MeV in the continuum limit. The universal scaling behavior of chiral condensates as well as chiral susceptibilities is discussed and the tri-critical point is suggested to be located below the physical point, i.e. at smaller than physical strange quark mass. In $N_f$=3 QCD simulations with 6 different masses of 3 degenerate quarks corresponding to the Goldstone pion masses in the region of 230 - 80 MeV have also been performed. Our results suggest that the QCD transition with these values of quark masses is of crossover type and an upper b...

  4. Measurement of Inclusive $\\rho^{0}, f_{0}(980), f_{2}(1270), K^{*0}_{2}(1430)$ and $f'_{2}(1525)$ Production in $Z^0$ Decays

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Adzic, P; Ajinenko, I; Albrecht, Z; Alderweireld, T; Alekseev, G D; Alemany, R; Allmendinger, T; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Anassontzis, E G; Andersson, P; Andreazza, A; Andringa, S; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Arnoud, Y; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barbiellini, Guido; Barbier, R; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G; Baroncelli, A; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Bérat, C; Berggren, M; Bertini, D; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Bizouard, M A; Bloch, D; Blom, H M; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Boonekamp, M; Booth, P S L; Borgland, A W; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Boyko, I; Bozovic, I; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschmann, P; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Carena, F; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Chabaud, V; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Chudoba, J; Cieslik, K; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Cowell, J H; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crépé, S; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Damgaard, G; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Dolbeau, J; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Dris, M; Duperrin, A; Durand, J D; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Ellert, M; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Fayot, J; Feindt, Michael; Ferrari, P; Ferrer, A; Ferrer-Ribas, E; Fichet, S; Firestone, A; Flagmeyer, U; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Franek, B J; Frodesen, A G; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gamblin, S; Gandelman, M; García, C; Gaspar, C; Gaspar, M; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerdyukov, L N; Ghodbane, N; Gil, I; Glege, F; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Gonçalves, P; González-Caballero, I; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Grahl, J; Graziani, E; Green, C; Grimm, H J; Gris, P; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Günther, M; Guy, J; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Haider, S; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Hansen, J; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Heising, S; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Heuser, J M; Higón, E; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hughes, G J; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, P E; Joram, C; Juillot, P; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Kersevan, Borut P; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; Kiiskinen, A P; King, B J; Kinvig, A; Kjaer, N J; Klapp, O; Klein, H; Kluit, P M; Kokkinias, P; Koratzinos, M; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krammer, Manfred; Kriznic, E; Krstic, J; Krumshtein, Z; Kubinec, P; Kurowska, J; Kurvinen, K L; Lamsa, J; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Lapin, V; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Leinonen, L; Leisos, A; Leitner, R; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Lethuillier, M; Libby, J; Liko, D; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Loken, J G; Lopes, J H; López, J M; López-Fernandez, R; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Mahon, J R; Maio, A; Malek, A; Malmgren, T G M; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R P; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Mastroyiannopoulos, N; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Masik, J; Mazzucato, F; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; McPherson, G; Meroni, C; Meyer, W T; Myagkov, A; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Moch, M; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Moreau, X; Morettini, P; Morton, G A; Müller, U; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mulet-Marquis, C; Muresan, R; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Myklebust, T; Naraghi, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Nawrocki, K; Negri, P; Neufeld, N; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nikolenko, M; Nomokonov, V P; Normand, Ainsley; Nygren, A; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Orazi, G; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganoni, M; Paiano, S; Pain, R; Paiva, R; Palacios, J; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Papageorgiou, K; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Parzefall, U; Passeri, A; Passon, O; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Phillips, H T; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Piotto, E; Podobnik, T; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Rakoczy, D; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Regler, Meinhard; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Røhne, O M; Romero, A; Ronchese, P; Rosenberg, E I; Rosinsky, P; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Royon, C; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sampsonidis, D; Sannino, M; Schneider, H; Schwemling, P; Schwickerath, U; Schyns, M A E; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Sekulin, R L; Shellard, R C; Sheridan, A; Siebel, M; Simard, L C; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Smadja, G; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Sokolov, A; Sopczak, André; Sosnowski, R; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stampfer, D; Stanescu, C; Stanic, S; Stevenson, K; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Chikilev, O G; Tegenfeldt, F; Terranova, F; Thomas, J; Timmermans, J; Tinti, N; Tkatchev, L G; Todorova, S; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trochimczuk, M; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tzamarias, S; Überschär, B; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Van Vulpen, I B; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Verzi, V; Vilanova, D; Vitale, L; Vlasov, E; Vodopyanov, A S; Vollmer, C F; Voulgaris, G; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Weiser, C; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wilkinson, G R; Winter, M; Witek, M; Wolf, G; Yi, J; Yushchenko, O P; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G

    1999-01-01

    DELPHI results are presented on the inclusive production of the neutral mesons$\\rho^0$, $f_0(980)$, $f_2(1270)$, K$^{*0}_2(1430)$ and $f^{'}_2(1525)$ in hadronic Z$^0$ decays. They are based on about 2 million multihadronic events collected in 1994 and 1995, using the particle identification capabilities of the DELPHI Ring Imaging Cherenkov detectors and measured ionization losses in the Time Projection Chamber. The total production rates per hadronic Z$^0$ decay have been determined to be: $1.19 \\pm 0.10$ for $\\rho^0$; $0.164 \\pm 0.021$ for $f_0(980)$;$0.214 \\pm 0.038$ for $f_2(1270)$; 0:073 \\pm 0:023 for $K^{*0}_2 (1430)$; and 0:012 \\pm 0:006 for $f_{2}$(1525). The total production rates for all mesons and differential cross-sections for the $\\rho^{0}$, $f_{0}$(980) and $f_{2}$(1270) are compared with the results of other LEP experiments and with models.

  5. X-ray Excitation Triggers Ytterbium Anomalous Emission in CaF2:Yb but Not in SrF2:Yb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes-Currie, Rosa B; Ivanovskikh, Konstantin V; Wells, Jon-Paul R; Reid, Michael F; Gordon, Robert A; Seijo, Luis; Barandiarán, Zoila

    2017-03-16

    Materials that luminesce after excitation with ionizing radiation are extensively applied in physics, medicine, security, and industry. Lanthanide dopants are known to trigger crystal scintillation through their fast d-f emissions; the same is true for other important applications as lasers or phosphors for lighting. However, this ability can be seriously compromised by unwanted anomalous emissions often found with the most common lanthanide activators. We report high-resolution X-ray-excited optical (IR to UV) luminescence spectra of CaF2:Yb and SrF2:Yb samples excited at 8949 eV and 80 K. Ionizing radiation excites the known anomalous emission of ytterbium in the CaF2 host but not in the SrF2 host. Wave function-based ab initio calculations of host-to-dopant electron transfer and Yb(2+)/Yb(3+) intervalence charge transfer explain the difference. The model also explains the lack of anomalous emission in Yb-doped SrF2 excited by VUV radiation.

  6. Synchronous NmF2 and NmE daytime variations as a key to the mechanism of quiet-time F2-layer disturbances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Mikhailov

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The observed NmF2 and NmE variations were analyzed for the periods of positive and negative quiet-time F2-layer disturbances (Q-disturbances observed in the midlatitude daytime F2-layer to specify the mechanism of their origin. The noontime δNmF2 and δNmE deviations demonstrate a synchronous type of variation which can be explained by vertical gas motion in the thermosphere. This neutral gas motion should result in atomic abundance variations, the latter being confirmed by the Millstone Hill ISR observations for periods of positive and negative Q-disturbance events. The analysis of the ISR data has shown that atomic oxygen concentration variations are the main cause of the daytime F2-layer Q-disturbances. The auroral heating which controls the poleward thermospheric wind is considered to be the basic mechanism for the Q-disturbances, however, the specific mechanisms of positive and negative Q-disturbances are different. Some morphological features of the Q-disturbances revealed earlier are explained in the scope of the proposed concept.

  7. On the oscillator strengths of MgO and F2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Main, R.P.; Schadee, A.

    In a recent paper (R. P. Main, D. J. Carlson and R. A. DuPuis, JQSRT 7, 805 (1967)), measurements of oscillator strengths of electronic transitions in the MgO-, MgH-, and F2-molecules were reported. We point out that the results reported in that paper for F2 are almost certainly invalid, and that an

  8. Role of MgF2 on properties of glass–ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Al2O3–K2O–B2O3–F with and with- out addition of MgF2 has been investigated. Crystallization of glass sample was done by controlled thermal heat treatment at nucleation and crystallization temperatures. The results showed that MgF2 in high ...

  9. Implementing an analytical formula for calculating M(3000)F2 in the ionosonde operated in Havana

    CERN Document Server

    González, Arian Ojeda; Alazo, Katy; Calzadilla, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Determining the factor M(3000)F2 is very important for ionograms analysis obtained of Ionosonde. M(3000)F2 is the result of the maximum usable frequency (MUF), for to 3000 km distance, divided by the critical frequency of the F2 layer (FoF2). Nowadays, the graphic method to determine the M(3000)F2 is used in Havana station in the ionograms analysis. The purpose of this work is to implement an analytic method that allows us the direct obtaining of M(3000)F2, so it could be programmed and incorporated as part of ionograms elaboration process in Havana station. When is used a PC, some points in the ionogram can be determined. This dataset (f; h') are used to calculate analytically the factor M(3000)F2 . Comparison between the analytic method implemented and the old graphic method are shown. The new method is more accurate and the errors are diminished in the factor M(3000)F2.

  10. Ionospheric F2-Layer Semi-Annual Variation in Middle Latitude by Solar Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon-Kyung Park

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We examine the ionospheric F2-layer electron density variation by solar activity in middle latitude by using foF2 observed at the Kokubunji ionosonde station in Japan for the period from 1997 to 2008. The semi-annual variation of foF2 shows obviously in high solar activity (2000-2002 than low solar activity (2006-2008. It seems that variation of geomagnetic activity by solar activity influences on the semi-annual variation of the ionospheric F2-layer electron density. According to the Lomb-Scargle periodogram analysis of foF2 and Ap index, interplanetary magnetic field (IMF Bs (IMF Bz <0 component, solar wind speed, solar wind number density and flow pressure which influence the geomagnetic activity, we examine how the geomagnetic activity affects the ionospheric F2-layer electron density variation. We find that the semi-annual variation of daily foF2, Ap index and IMF Bs appear clearly during the high solar activity. It suggests that the semi-annual variation of geomagnetic activity, caused by Russell-McPherron effect, contributes greatly to the ionospheric F2-layer semi-annual electron density variation, except dynamical effects in the thermosphere.

  11. Relating 2f1 −f2 distortion product otoacoustic emission and equivalent rectangular bandwidth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anders Tornvig; Ordoñez, Rodrigo; Hammershøi, Dorte

    2015-01-01

    To explore the extent of distortion product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) toward low frequencies we measured in 21 normal-hearing human subjects its dependence on the ratio between evoking stimulus frequencies, f1 and f2, at 2f1-f2 distortion frequencies 88, 176 and 264 Hz. The "optimal" ratio evo...

  12. Determination of the ionospheric foF2 using a stand-alone GPS receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijaya, Dudy D.; Haralambous, Haris; Oikonomou, Christina; Kuntjoro, Wedyanto

    2017-09-01

    The critical frequency of ionospheric F2 layer (foF2) is a measure of the highest frequency of radio signal that may be reflected back by the F2 layer, and it is associated with ionospheric peak electron density in the F2 layer. Accurate long-term foF2 variations are usually derived from ionosonde observations. In this paper, we propose a new method to observe foF2 using a stand-alone global positioning system (GPS) receiver. The proposed method relies on the mathematical equation that relates foF2 to GPS observations. The equation is then implemented in the Kalman filter algorithm to estimate foF2 at every epoch of the observation (30-s rate). Unlike existing methods, the proposed method does not require any additional information from ionosonde observations and does not require any network of GPS receivers. It only requires as inputs the ionospheric scale height and the modeled plasmaspheric electron content, which practically can be derived from any existing ionospheric/plasmaspheric model. We applied the proposed method to estimate long-term variations of foF2 at three GPS stations located at the northern hemisphere (NICO, Cyprus), the southern hemisphere (STR1, Australia) and the south pole (SYOG, Antarctic). To assess the performance of the proposed method, we then compared the results against those derived by ionosonde observations and the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) 2012 model. We found that, during the period of high solar activity (2011-2012), the values of absolute mean bias between foF2 derived by the proposed method and ionosonde observations are in the range of 0.2-0.5 MHz, while those during the period of low solar activity (2009-2010) are in the range of 0.05-0.15 MHz. Furthermore, the root-mean-square-error (RMSE) values during high and low solar activities are in the range of 0.8-0.9 MHz and of 0.6-0.7 MHz, respectively. We also noticed that the values of absolute mean bias and RMSE between foF2 derived by the proposed method and the

  13. Synthesis, characterization of CaF2 doped silicate glass-ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Madeeha; Zia, Rehana; Mirza, Ambreen; Hussain, Tousif; Bashir, Farooq; Anjum, Safia

    2017-06-01

    This paper reports the fabrication and characterization of silicate glass-ceramics doped with (0-12mol%) CaF2. TGA-DSC analysis was carried out to determine the crystallization temperature and stability of glass measured by two glass parameters; Hruby parameter KH=(Tx-Tg)/(TL-Tx) and Weinberg parameter KW=(Tc-Tg)/TL. It was found that with CaF2 doping improved sinterability at low temperature and provided stability to the glass. The XRD pattern exhibits a single phase of combeite and doping of CaF2 cause increase in crystallite size. Microstructure of samples was also improved with CaF2 addition, pores were significantly reduced. After 15days immersion in simulated body fluid all samples developed apatite layer onto its surface. Hence, the addition of CaF2 provided bioactive glass-ceramic material having a low processing temperature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Synthesis of highly sinterable Yb: SrF2 nanopowders for transparent ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weiwei; Huang, Haijun; Mei, Bingchu; Song, Jinghong

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, ytterbium doped strontium fluoride (Yb: SrF2) nanoparticles were synthesized by direct precipitation method. High-speed centrifugation was used to separate high sintering activity of nanopowders from powders with hard aggregated and large size. Using powders at different parts of the centrifugal tube as starting powders, Yb: SrF2 transparent ceramics was fabricated by hot pressed (HP) method for the first time. Effects of morphology and particle size on the sinterability of Yb: SrF2 nanopowders were investigated. The transmittance reached 77% at the wavelength of 1200 nm and pores stilled remained in the ceramics. The spectroscopic and thermal properties of Yb: SrF2 transparent ceramics were also investigated. This paper provides an effective way to obtain well dispersed and high sinterability nanoparticles for SrF2 ceramics sintering.

  15. Morphology of the winter anomaly in NmF2 and Total Electron Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasyukevich, Yury; Ratovsky, Konstantin; Yasyukevich, Anna; Klimenko, Maksim; Klimenko, Vladimir; Chirik, Nikolay

    2017-04-01

    We analyzed the winter anomaly manifestation in the F2 peak electron density (NmF2) and Total Electron Content (TEC) based on the observation data and model calculation results. For the analysis we used 1998-2015 TEC Global Ionospheric Maps (GIM) and NmF2 ground-based ionosonde observation data from and COSMIC, CHAMP and GRACE radio occultation data. We used Global Self-consistent Model of the Thermosphere, Ionosphere, and Protonosphere (GSM TIP) and International Reference Ionosphere model (IRI-2012). Based on the observation data and model calculation results we constructed the maps of the winter anomaly intensity in TEC and NmF2 for the different solar and geomagnetic activity levels. The winter anomaly intensity was found to be higher in NmF2 than in TEC according to both observation and modeling. In this report we show the similarity and difference in winter anomaly as revealed in experimental data and model results.

  16. Synthesis and X-ray crystal structure of (OsO(3)F(2))(2)2XeOF(4) and the Raman spectra of (OsO(3)F(2))(infinity), (OsO(3)F(2))(2), and (OsO(3)F(2))(2)2XeOF(4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Michael J; Mercier, Hélène P A; Schrobilgen, Gary J

    2009-05-18

    The adduct, (OsO(3)F(2))(2)2XeOF(4), was synthesized by dissolution of the infinite chain polymer, (OsO(3)F(2))(infinity), in XeOF(4) solvent at room temperature followed by removal of excess XeOF(4) under dynamic vacuum at 0 degrees C. Continued pumping at 0 degrees C resulted in removal of associated XeOF(4), yielding (OsO(3)F(2))(2), a new low-temperature phase of OsO(3)F(2). Upon standing at 25 degrees C for 1(1)/(2) h, (OsO(3)F(2))(2) underwent a phase transition to the known monoclinic phase, (OsO(3)F(2))(infinity). The title compounds, (OsO(3)F(2))(infinity), (OsO(3)F(2))(2), and (OsO(3)F(2))(2)2XeOF(4) have been characterized by low-temperature (-150 degrees C) Raman spectroscopy. Crystallization of (OsO(3)F(2))(2)2XeOF(4) from XeOF(4) solution at 0 degrees C yielded crystals suitable for X-ray structure determination. The structural unit contains the (OsO(3)F(2))(2) dimer in which the OsO(3)F(3) units are joined by two Os---F---Os bridges having fluorine bridge atoms that are equidistant from the osmium centers (2.117(5) and 2.107(4) A). The dimer coordinates to two XeOF(4) molecules through Os-F...Xe bridges in which the Xe...F distances (2.757(5) A) are significantly less than the sum of the Xe and F van der Waals radii (3.63 A). The (OsO(3)F(2))(2) dimer has C(i) symmetry in which each pseudo-octahedral OsO(3)F(3) unit has a facial arrangement of oxygen ligands with XeOF(4) molecules that are only slightly distorted from their gas-phase C(4v) symmetry. Quantum-chemical calculations using SVWN and B3LYP methods were employed to calculate the gas-phase geometries, natural bond orbital analyses, and vibrational frequencies of (OsO(3)F(2))(2), (OsO(3)F(2))(2)2XeOF(4), XeOF(4), OsO(2)F(4), and (mu-FOsO(3)F(2))(2)OsO(3)F(-) to aid in the assignment of the experimental vibrational frequencies of (OsO(3)F(2))(2), (OsO(3)F(2))(2)2XeOF(4), and (OsO(3)F(2))(infinity). The vibrational modes of the low-temperature polymeric phase, (OsO(3)F(2))(infinity), have been

  17. POU2F2-oriented network promotes human gastric cancer metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Si-Meng; Tie, Jun; Wang, Wen-Lan; Hu, Si-Jun; Yin, Ji-Peng; Yi, Xiao-Fang; Tian, Zu-Hong; Zhang, Xiang-Yuan; Li, Meng-Bin; Li, Zeng-Shan; Nie, Yong-Zhan; Wu, Kai-Chun; Fan, Dai-Ming

    2016-09-01

    Aberrant upregulation of POU2F2 expression has been discovered in metastatic gastric cancer (GC). However, the mechanisms underlying the aberrant upregulation and the potential functions of POU2F2 remain uncertain. The role and mechanism of POU2F2 in GC metastasis were investigated in gastric epithelial cells, GC cell lines and an experimental metastasis animal model by gain of function and loss of function. Upstream and downstream targets of POU2F2 were selected by bioinformatics and identified by luciferase reporter assay, electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation PCR. The influence of miR-218 on its putative target genes (POU2F2, ROBO1 and IKK-β) and GC metastasis was further explored via in vitro and in vivo approaches. Increased POU2F2 expression was detected in metastatic GC cell lines and patient samples. POU2F2 was induced by the activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB and, in turn, regulated ROBO1 transcription, thus functionally contributing to GC metastasis. Finally, miR-218 was found to suppress GC metastasis by simultaneously mediating multiple molecules in the POU2F2-oriented network. This study demonstrated that NF-κB and the SLIT2/ROBO1 interaction network with POU2F2 as the central part may exert critical effects on tumour metastasis. Blocking the activation of the POU2F2-oriented metastasis network using miR-218 precursors exemplified a promising approach that sheds light on new strategies for GC treatment. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  18. Adaptation of Western Oak Seedlings to Yasuj Climate and Analysis of their Leaf Morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Zolfaghari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of performance and survival rate of different oak species in severe climate of Zagros forests especially under global warming can help with management, conservation and restoration of these species. So, seeds of three oak species of Zagros (Quercus branti, Q. infectoria and Q. libani were collected from Baneh forests and sown in the common gardens of Yasuj. Then, their growth parameters such as collar diameter, height, trunk volume, height and collar increment, number of leaf and survival rate were measured and recorded during the growing season (June and October for the first two years. Also, in order to find a relationship between these traits and leaf morphological and qualitative traits of seedlings, some parameters like leaf area, specific leaf area, number of sprout and branch, bending of seedlings were measured and recorded. Results showed that at early growth age, seedlings of Q. branti and Q. infectoria had the largest and smallest size, respectively. Also, Q. libani seedlings showed a lower survival rate in the second year than other studied species due to the larger seeds. Results of correlation showed that seedlings with larger leaf area, higher number of branch and less straightness had higher growth and survival rate. It can be concluded that Q. infectoria is more susceptive to the increasing period and intensity of drought than other oaks of Zagros species.

  19. Pre-damage biomass allocation and not invasiveness predicts tolerance to damage in seedlings of woody species in Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurie, Matthew H; Barton, Kasey E; Daehler, Curtis C

    2017-12-01

    Plant-herbivore interactions have been predicted to play a fundamental role in plant invasions, although support for this assertion from previous research is mixed. While plants may escape from specialist herbivores in their introduced ranges, herbivory from generalists is common. Tolerance traits may allow non-native plants to mitigate the negative consequences of generalist herbivory that they cannot avoid in their introduced range. Here we address whether tolerance to herbivory, quantified as survival and compensatory growth, is associated with plant invasion success in Hawaii and investigate traits that may enhance tolerance in seedlings, the life stage most susceptible to herbivory. In a greenhouse experiment, we measured seedling tolerance to simulated herbivory through mechanical damage (50% leaf removal) of 16 non-native woody plant species differing in invasion status (invasive vs. non-invasive). Seedlings were grown for 2 weeks following damage and analyzed for biomass to determine whether damaged plants could fully compensate for the lost leaf tissue. Over 99% of all seedlings survived defoliation. Although species varied significantly in their levels of compensation, there was no consistent difference between invasive and non-invasive species. Seedlings of 11 species undercompensated and remained substantially smaller than control seedlings 2 weeks after damage; four species were close to compensating, while one species overcompensated. Across species, compensation was positively associated with an increased investment in potential storage reserves, specifically cotyledons and roots, suggesting that these organs provide resources that help seedlings re-grow following damage. Our results add to a growing consensus that pre-damage growth patterns determine tolerance to damage, even in young seedlings which have relatively low biomass. The lack of higher tolerance in highly invasive species may suggest that invaders overcome herbivory barriers to invasion

  20. Seedling quality tests: plant moisture stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary Ritchie; Thomas D. Landis

    2005-01-01

    This is the fifth installment in our review of seedling quality tests. Here we focus on what is commonly known as "plant moisture stress" or PMS. Although PMS is not routinely used for seedling quality testing per se, it is nevertheless the most common physiological measurement made on reforestation stock. This is because the measurement itself is simple and...

  1. Plasma 8-iso-Prostaglandin F2α concentrations and outcomes after acute intracerebral hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Quan; Yu, Wen-Hua; Dong, Xiao-Qiao; Yang, Ding-Bo; Shen, Yong-Feng; Wang, Hao; Jiang, Li; Du, Yuan-Feng; Zhang, Zu-Yong; Zhu, Qiang; Che, Zhi-Hao; Liu, Qun-Jie

    2014-11-01

    Higher plasma 8-iso-Prostaglandin F2α concentrations have been associated with poor outcome of severe traumatic brain injury. We further investigated the relationships between plasma 8-iso-Prostaglandin F2α concentrations and clinical outcomes in patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhage. Plasma 8-iso-Prostaglandin F2α concentrations of 128 consecutive patients and 128 sex- and gender-matched healthy subjects were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We assessed their relationships with disease severity and clinical outcomes including 1-week mortality, 6-month mortality and unfavorable outcome (modified Rankin Scale score>2). Plasma 8-iso-Prostaglandin F2α concentrations were substantially higher in patients than in healthy controls. Plasma 8-iso-Prostaglandin F2α concentrations were positively associated with National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores and hematoma volume using a multivariate linear regression. It emerged as an independent predictor for clinical outcomes of patients using a forward stepwise logistic regression. ROC curves identified the predictive values of plasma 8-iso-Prostaglandin F2α concentrations, and found its predictive value was similar to NIHSS scores and hematoma volumes. However, it just numerically added the predictive values of NIHSS score and hematoma volume. Increased plasma 8-iso-Prostaglandin F2α concentrations are associated with disease severity and clinical outcome after acute intracerebral hemorrhage. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of 1918 PB1-F2 expression on influenza A virus infection kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Ruy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Perelson, Alan S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Amber M [UNIV OF UTAH; Adler, Frederick R [UNIV OF UTAH; Mcauley, Julie L [ST. JUDES CHILDREN RESEARCH; Mccullers, Jonathan A [ST. JUDES CHILDREN RESEARCH

    2009-01-01

    Relatively little is known about the viral factors contributing to the lethality of the 1918 pandemic, although its unparalleled virulence was likely due in part to the newly discovered PB1-F2 protein. This protein, while unnecessary for replication, increases apoptosis in monocytes, alters viral polymerase activity in vitro, and produces enhanced inflammation and increased secondary pneumonia in vivo. However, the effects the PB1-F2 protein have in vivo remain unclear. To address the mechanisms involved, we intranasally infected groups of mice with either influenza A virus PR8 or a genetically engineered virus that expresses the 1918 PB1-F2 protein on a PR8 background, PR8-PB1-F2(1918). Mice inoculated with PR8 had viral concentrations peaking at 72 hours, while those infected with PR8-PB1-F2(1918) reached peak concentrations earlier, 48 hours. Mice given PR8-PB1-F2(1918) also showed a faster decline in viral loads. We fit a mathematical model to these data to estimate parameter values and select the best model. This model supports a lower viral clearance rate and higher infected cell death rate with the PR8-PB1-F2(1918) virus, although the viral production rate may also be higher. We hypothesize that the higher PR8-PB1-F2(1918) viral titers early in an infection are due to both an increase in viral production with decreased viral clearance, and that the faster decline in the later stages of infection result from elevated cell death rates. We discuss the implications these mechanisms have during an infection with a virus expressing a virulent PBI-F2 on the possibility of a pandemic and on the importance of antiviral treatments.

  3. Earth's magnetic field effect on MUF calculation and consequences for hmF2 trend estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Ana G.; Zossi, Bruno S.; Yiğit, Erdal; Saavedra, Zenon; de Haro Barbas, Blas F.

    2017-10-01

    Knowledge of the state of the upper atmosphere, and in particular of the ionosphere, is essential in several applications such as systems used in radio frequency communications, satellite positioning and navigation. In general, these systems depend on the state and evolution of the ionosphere. In all applications involving the ionosphere an essential task is to determine the path and modifications of ray propagation through the ionospheric plasma. The ionospheric refractive index and the maximum usable frequency (MUF) that can be received over a given distance are some key parameters that are crucial for such technological applications. However, currently the representation of these parameters are in general simplified, neglecting the effects of Earth's magnetic field. The value of M(3000)F2, related to the MUF that can be received over 3000 km is routinely scaled from ionograms using a technique which also neglects the geomagnetic field effects assuming a standard simplified propagation model. M(3000)F2 is expected to be affected by a systematic trend linked to the secular variations of Earth's magnetic field. On the other hand, among the upper atmospheric effects expected from increasing greenhouse gases concentration is the lowering of the F2-layer peak density height, hmF2. This ionospheric parameter is usually estimated using the M(3000)F2 factor, so it would also carry this ;systematic trend;. In this study, the geomagnetic field effect on MUF estimations is analyzed as well as its impact on hmF2 long-term trend estimations. We find that M(3000)F2 increases when the geomagnetic field is included in its calculation, and hence hmF2, estimated using existing methods involving no magnetic field for M(3000)F2 scaling, would present a weak but steady trend linked to these variations which would increase or compensate the few kilometers decrease ( 2 km per decade) expected from greenhouse gases effect.

  4. Decomposition treatment of SO2F2 using packed bed DBD plasma followed by chemical absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Yong; Zheng, Qifeng; Liang, Xiaojiang; Gu, Dayong; Lu, Meizhen; Min, Min; Ji, Jianbing

    2013-07-16

    The technology of packed bed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma followed by a chemical absorption has been developed and was found to be an efficient way for decomposition treatment of sulfuryl fluoride (SO2F2) in simulated residual fumigant. The effects of energy density, initial SO2F2 concentration, and residence time on the removal efficiency of SO2F2 for the DBD plasma treatment alone were investigated. It was found that the SO2F2 could be removed completely when initial volume concentration, energy density, and residence time were 0.5%, 33.9 kJ/L, and 5.1 s, respectively. The removal mechanism of SO2F2 in the packed bed DBD reactor was discussed. Based on the detailed analysis of SO2F2 molecular stability and its exhaust products in the DBD plasma reactor, it was concluded that the energetic electrons generated in the packed bed DBD reactor played a key role on the removal of SO2F2, and the major decomposition products of SO2F2 detected were SO2, SiF4, and S (Sulfur). Among these products, SiF4 was formed by the F atom reacted with the filler-quartz glass beads (SiO2) in the packed bed DBD reactor. Aqueous NaOH solution was used as the chemical absorbent for the gaseous products of SO2F2 after plasma pretreatment. It was found that the gaseous products in the plasma exhaust could be absorbed and fixed by the subsequent aqueous NaOH solution.

  5. F2-isoprostanes as a biomarker of oxidative stress in the mouse bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Douglass B; Stephany, Heidi A; Ching, Christina B; Rahman, Shareena A; Tanaka, Stacy T; Thomas, John C; Pope, John C; Adams, Mark C; Brock, John W; Clark, Peter E; Hayward, Simon W; Matusik, Robert J; Milne, Ginger L

    2014-05-01

    We theorized that progressive bladder dysfunction due to clinical diagnoses such as outlet obstruction occurs as a result of cyclical oxidative stress events. We hypothesized that measurement of F2-isoprostane, a marker of lipid peroxidation, could serve as a biomarker of oxidative stress in the murine bladder. At age 5 to 6 weeks oophorectomized female mice were subjected to 1 of 2 bladder injury models, that is partial bladder outlet obstruction or acute bladder distension. The time points studied after injury included 4, 8 and 16 weeks after obstruction, and 0 to 48 hours after acute bladder distension. In a separate group short-term repetitive acute bladder distension was performed every other day for 14 days. Bladder samples were analyzed for F2-isoprostane using gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy. Mean tissue F2-isoprostane levels were compared. F2-isoprostane increased significantly after 4 weeks of partial bladder outlet obstruction from 1.46 ng/gm in controls to 2.31 ng/gm at 4 weeks (p = 0.01). Eight and 16 weeks after partial bladder outlet obstruction F2-isoprostane remained significantly elevated (2.39 and 2.48 ng/gm, respectively). Acute bladder distension resulted in a significant increase in F2-isoprostane immediately after distension compared to controls (1.6 vs 0.75 ng/gm, p = 0.04). In mice that underwent repetitive acute bladder distension F2-isoprostane did not change. Measurement of tissue F2-isoprostane in the bladder reflects the progression of oxidative stress, primarily in chronic injury models such as partial bladder outlet obstruction. The usefulness of F2-isoprostane measurements in shorter term injury models requires further study. Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Microwave, High-Resolution Infrared, and Quantum Chemical Investigations of CHBrF2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cazzoli, Gabriele; Cludi, Lino; Puzzarini, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    A combined microwave, infrared, and computational investigation of CHBrF2 is reported. For the vibrational ground state, measurements in the millimeter- and sub-millimeter-wave regions for (CHBrF2)-Br-79 and (CHBrF2)-Br-81 provided rotational and centrifugal-distortion constants up to the sextic...... analysis by high-level quantum chemical calculations at the coupled-cluster level. In this context, the importance of relativistic effects, which are of the order of 6.5% and included in the present work using second-order direct perturbation theory, needs to be emphasized for accurate predictions...

  7. Long-term trends in foF2: their estimating and origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Laštovička

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with two problems, methods of foF2 trend determination and origin of trends in foF2, both being controversial in current literature. We found that various regression-based methods and artificial neural network-based method of Yue et al. (2006 provided comparable results within uncertainties caused mainly by various ways of removing/suppressing the dominant solar cycle effect. The role of geomagnetic activity in the observed trends in foF2 was probably substantial and might be still even rather dominant in the last quarter of the 20th century.

  8. Measurement of the Hadronic Photon Structure Function $F_{2}^{\\gamma}$ at LEP2

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Buesser, K.; Burckhart, H.J.; Cammin, J.; Campana, S.; Carnegie, R.K.; Caron, B.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Cohen, I.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Dallison, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauschild, M.; Hauschildt, J.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Hensel, C.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Homer, R.J.; Horvath, D.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karapetian, G.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klein, K.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kokott, T.P.; Komamiya, S.; Kormos, Laura L.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kramer, T.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Krop, D.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Layter, J.G.; Leins, A.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Marchant, T.E.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Masetti, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.J.; McKenna, J.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Mendez-Lorenzo, P.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Moed, S.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Pooth, O.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Rick, H.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spagnolo, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Taylor, R.J.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trefzger, T.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vachon, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    2002-01-01

    The hadronic structure of the photon F2gamma is measured as a function of Bjorken x and of the photon virtuality Q2 using deep-inelastic scattering data taken by the OPAL detector at LEP at e+e- centre-of-mass energies from 183 to 209 GeV. Previous OPAL measurements of the x dependence of F2gamma are extended to an average Q2 of =780GeV2 using data in the kinematic range 0.15 < 780GeV2 using three ranges of x. As predicted by QCD, the data show positive scaling violations in F2gamma for the central x region 0.10-0.60. Several parameterisations of F2gamma are in qualitative agreement with the measurements whereas the quark-parton model prediction fails to describe the data.

  9. Improvement of MgF 2 thin coating films for laser applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perales, F.; Herrero, J. M.; Jaque, D.; de las Heras, C.

    2007-03-01

    MgF2 thin films have been deposited by physical vapor deposition on different substrates (laser crystals, a saturable absorber crystal and glasses), in order to investigate the best conditions for antireflection coatings. The relevance of using these MgF2 coatings has been evidenced by different laser gain experiments performed on different coated and uncoated elements such as Nd:CGGG, Nd:LiNbO3 and Cr4+:YAG. Then the optical properties of the MgF2 films have been systematically investigated for different annealing temperatures and ion bombardment treatments. A substantial improvement in the films transmission has been demonstrated. The obtained results are correlated to morphologic changes in the MgF2 films.

  10. A global model of the ionospheric F2 peak height based on EOF analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.-L. Zhang

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The ionospheric F2 peak height hmF2 is an important parameter that is much needed in ionospheric research and practical applications. In this paper, an attempt is made to develop a global model of hmF2. The hmF2 data, used to construct the global model, are converted from the monthly median hourly values of the ionospheric propagation factor M(3000F2 observed by ionosondes/digisondes distributed globally, based on the strong anti-correlation existed between hmF2 and M(3000F2. The empirical orthogonal function (EOF analysis method, combined with harmonic function and regression analysis, is used to construct the model. The technique used in the global modelling involves two layers of EOF analysis of the dataset. The first layer EOF analysis is applied to the hmF2 dataset which decomposed the dataset into a series of orthogonal functions (EOF base functions Ek and their associated EOF coefficients Pk. The base functions Ek represent the intrinsic characteristic variations of the dataset with the modified dip latitude and local time, the coefficients Pk represents the variations of the dataset with the universal time, season as well as solar cycle activity levels. The second layer EOF analysis is applied to the EOF coefficients Pk obtained in the first layer EOF analysis. The coefficients Ak, obtained in the second layer EOF analysis, are then modelled with the harmonic functions representing the seasonal (annual and semi-annual and solar cycle variations, with their amplitudes changing with the F10.7 index, a proxy of the solar activity level. Thus, the constructed global model incorporates the geographical location, diurnal, seasonal as well as solar cycle variations of hmF2 through the combination of EOF analysis and the harmonic function expressions of the associated EOF coefficients. Comparisons between the model results and observational data were consistent, indicating that the modelling technique used is very promising when used to

  11. 220D-F2 from Rubus ulmifolius kills Streptococcus pneumoniae planktonic cells and pneumococcal biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharmila J Talekar

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus forms organized biofilms to persist in the human nasopharynx. This persistence allows the pneumococcus to produce severe diseases such as pneumonia, otitis media, bacteremia and meningitis that kill nearly a million children every year. While bacteremia and meningitis are mediated by planktonic pneumococci, biofilm structures are present during pneumonia and otitis media. The global emergence of S. pneumoniae strains resistant to most commonly prescribed antibiotics warrants further discovery of alternative therapeutics. The present study assessed the antimicrobial potential of a plant extract, 220D-F2, rich in ellagic acid, and ellagic acid derivatives, against S. pneumoniae planktonic cells and biofilm structures. Our studies first demonstrate that, when inoculated together with planktonic cultures, 220D-F2 inhibited the formation of pneumococcal biofilms in a dose-dependent manner. As measured by bacterial counts and a LIVE/DEAD bacterial viability assay, 100 and 200 µg/ml of 220D-F2 had significant bactericidal activity against pneumococcal planktonic cultures as early as 3 h post-inoculation. Quantitative MIC's, whether quantified by qPCR or dilution and plating, showed that 80 µg/ml of 220D-F2 completely eradicated overnight cultures of planktonic pneumococci, including antibiotic resistant strains. When preformed pneumococcal biofilms were challenged with 220D-F2, it significantly reduced the population of biofilms 3 h post-inoculation. Minimum biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC50 was obtained incubating biofilms with 100 µg/ml of 220D-F2 for 3 h and 6 h of incubation. 220D-F2 also significantly reduced the population of pneumococcal biofilms formed on human pharyngeal cells. Our results demonstrate potential therapeutic applications of 220D-F2 to both kill planktonic pneumococcal cells and disrupt pneumococcal biofilms.

  12. The gluon density of the proton at low x from a QCD analysis of F$_{2}$

    CERN Document Server

    Aïd, S; Andrieu, B; Appuhn, R D; Arpagaus, M; Babaev, A; Ban, Y; Baranov, P S; Barrelet, E; Barschke, R; Bartel, Wulfrin; Barth, Monique; Bassler, U; Beck, H P; Behrend, H J; Belousov, A; Berger, C; Bernardi, G; Bernet, R; Bertrand-Coremans, G H; Besançon, M; Beyer, R; Biddulph, P; Bispham, P; Bizot, J C; Blobel, Volker; Borras, K; Botterweck, F; Boudry, V; Braemer, A; Brasse, F W; Braunschweig, W; Brisson, V; Bruncko, Dusan; Brune, C R; Buchholz, R; Buniatian, A Yu; Burke, S; Burton, M; Buschhorn, G W; Bán, J; Bähr, J; Büngener, L; Bürger, J; Büsser, F W; Campbell, A J; Carli, T; Charles, F; Charlet, M; Chernyshov, V; Clarke, D; Clegg, A B; Clerbaux, B; Colombo, M G; Contreras, J G; Cormack, C; Coughlan, J A; Courau, A; Coutures, C; Cozzika, G; Criegee, L; Cussans, D G; Cvach, J; Dagoret, S; Dainton, J B; Dau, W D; Daum, K; David, M; De Wolf, E A; Del Buono, L; Delcourt, B; Di Nezza, P; Dollfus, C; Dowell, John D; Dreis, H B; Droutskoi, A; Duboc, J; Duhm, H; Düllmann, D; Dünger, O; Ebert, J; Ebert, T R; Eckerlin, G; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eichenberger, S; Eichler, R; Eisele, Franz; Eisenhandler, Eric F; Ellison, R J; Elsen, E E; Erdmann, M; Erdmann, W; Erlichmann, H; Evrard, E; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Feeken, D; Felst, R; Feltesse, Joel; Ferencei, J; Ferrarotto, F; Flamm, K; Fleischer, M; Flieser, M; Flügge, G; Fomenko, A; Fominykh, B A; Forbush, M; Formánek, J; Foster, J M; Franke, G; Fretwurst, E; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gabathuler, K; Garvey, J; Gayler, J; Gebauer, M; Gellrich, A; Genzel, H; Gerhards, R; Glazov, A; Goerlach, U; Gogitidze, N; Goldberg, M; Goldner, D; González-Pineiro, B; Gorelov, I V; Goritchev, P A; Grab, C; Greenshaw, T J; Grindhammer, G; Gruber, A; Gruber, C; Grässler, Herbert; Grässler, R; Görlich, L; Haack, J; Haidt, Dieter; Hajduk, L; Hamon, O; Hampel, M; Hapke, M; Haynes, W J; Heatherington, J; Heinzelmann, G; Henderson, R C W; Henschel, H; Herynek, I; Hess, M F; Hildesheim, W; Hill, P; Hiller, K H; Hilton, C D; Hladky, J; Hoeger, K C; Horisberger, R P; Hudgson, V L; Huet, Patrick; Hufnagel, H; Höppner, M; Hütte, M; Ibbotson, M; Itterbeck, H; Jabiol, M A; Jacholkowska, A; Jacobsson, C; Jaffré, M; Janoth, J; Jansen, T; Johnson, D P; Johnson, L; Jung, H; Jönsson, L B; Kalmus, Peter I P; Kant, D; Kaschowitz, R; Kasselmann, P; Kathage, U; Katzy, J M; Kaufmann, H H; Kazarian, S; Kenyon, Ian Richard; Kermiche, S; Keuker, C; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Knies, G; Ko, W; Kolanoski, H; Kole, F; Kolya, S D; Korbel, V; Korn, M; Kostka, P; Kotelnikov, S K; Krasny, M W; Krehbiel, H; Krämerkämper, T; Krücker, D; Krüger, U P; Krüner-Marquis, U; Kuhlen, M; Kurca, T; Kurzhöfer, J; Kuznik, B; Köhler, T; Köhne, J H; Küster, H; Lacour, D; Lamarche, F; Lander, R; Landon, M P J; Lange, W; Lanius, P; Laporte, J F; Lebedev, A; Lehner, F; Leverenz, C; Levonian, S; Ley, C; Lindström, G; Link, J; Linsel, F; Lipinski, J; List, B; Lobo, G; Loch, P; Lohmander, H; Lomas, J W; Lubimov, V; López, G C; Lüke, D; Magnussen, N; Malinovskii, E I; Mani, S; Maracek, R; Marage, P; Marks, J; Marshall, R; Martens, J; Martin, G; Martin, R D; Martyn, H U; Martyniak, J; Masson, S; Mavroidis, A; Maxfield, S J; McMahon, S J; Mehta, A; Meier, K; Mercer, D; Merz, T; Meyer, C A; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Migliori, A; Mikocki, S; Milstead, D; Moreau, F; Morris, J V; Mroczko, E; Murín, P; Müller, G; Müller, K; Nagovitsin, V; Nahnhauer, R; Naroska, Beate; Naumann, T; Newman, P R; Newton, D; Neyret, D; Nguyen, H K; Nicholls, T C; Niebergall, F; Niebuhr, C B; Niedzballa, C; Nisius, R; Nowak, G; Noyes, G W; Nyberg-Werther, M; Oakden, M N; Oberlack, H; Obrock, U; Olsson, J E; Ozerov, D; Panaro, E; Panitch, A; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Peppel, E; Phillips, J P; Pichler, C; Pitzl, D; Pope, G; Prell, S; Prosi, R; Pérez, E; Rabbertz, K; Raupach, F; Reimer, P; Reinshagen, S; Ribarics, P; Rick, Hartmut; Riech, V; Riedlberger, J; Riess, S; Rietz, M; Rizvi, E; Robertson, S M; Robmann, P; Roloff, H E; Roosen, R; Rosenbauer, K; Rostovtsev, A A; Rouse, F; Royon, C; Rusakov, S V; Rybicki, K; Rylko, R; Rädel, G; Rüter, K; Sahlmann, N; Sankey, D P C; Schacht, P; Schiek, S; Schleif, S; Schleper, P; Schmidt, D; Schmidt, G; Schröder, V; Schuhmann, E; Schwab, B; Schöning, A; Sciacca, G F; Sefkow, F; Seidel, M; Sell, R; Semenov, A A; Shekelian, V I; Shevyakov, I; Shtarkov, L N; Siegmon, G; Siewert, U; Sirois, Y; Skillicorn, Ian O; Smirnov, P; Smith, J R; Solochenko, V; Soloviev, Yu V; Spiekermann, J; Spielman, S; Spitzer, H; Starosta, R; Steenbock, M; Steffen, P; Steinberg, R; Stella, B; Stephens, K; Stier, J; Stiewe, J; Stolze, K; Strachota, J; Straumann, U; Struczinski, W; Stösslein, U; Sutton, J P; Tapprogge, Stefan; Thiebaux, C; Thompson, G; Truöl, P; Turnau, J; Tutas, J; Uelkes, P; Usik, A; Valkár, S; Valkárová, A; Vallée, C; Van Esch, P; Van Mechelen, P; Van den Plas, D; Vartapetian, A H; Vazdik, Ya A; Verrecchia, P; Villet, G; Wacker, K; Wagener, A; Wagener, M; Walther, A; Weber, G; Weber, M; Wegener, D; Wegner, A; Wellisch, H P; West, L R; Willard, S; Winde, M; Winter, G G; Wittek, C; Wright, A E; Wulff, N; Wünsch, E; Yiou, T P; Zarbock, D; Zhang, Z; Zhokin, A S; Zimmer, M; Zimmermann, W; Zomer, F; Zuber, K; Zácek, J; de Roeck, A; von Schlippe, W

    1995-01-01

    We present a QCD analysis of the proton structure function F_2 measured by the H1 experiment at HERA, combined with data from previous fixed target experiments. The gluon density is extracted from the scaling violations of F_2 in the range 2\\cdot 10^{-4}

  13. On the Rise of the Proton Structure Function F_2 Towards Low x

    CERN Document Server

    Adloff, C.; Andrieu, B.; Anthonis, T.; Arkadov, V.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Babaev, A.; Bahr, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Bate, P.; Beglarian, A.; Behnke, O.; Beier, C.; Belousov, A.; Benisch, T.; Berger, Christoph; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J.C.; Boudry, V.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Broker, H.B.; Brown, D.P.; Bruckner, W.; Bruncko, D.; Burger, J.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Burrage, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cao, Jun; Caron, S.; Clarke, D.; Clerbaux, B.; Collard, C.; Contreras, J.G.; Coppens, Y.R.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cousinou, M.C.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; Davidsson, M.; Delcourt, B.; Delerue, N.; Demirchyan, R.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dingfelder, J.; Dixon, P.; Dodonov, V.; Dowell, J.D.; Droutskoi, A.; Dubak, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, D.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Ferron, S.; Fleischer, M.; Fleming, Y.H.; Flugge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formanek, J.; Foster, J.M.; Franke, G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garvey, J.; Gassner, J.; Gayler, Joerg; Gerhards, R.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Goldberg, M.; Goodwin, C.; Grab, C.; Grassler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, Guenter; Hadig, T.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haynes, W.J.; Heinemann, B.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hengstmann, S.; Henschel, H.; Heremans, R.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hilgers, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hladky, J.; Hoting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hurling, S.; Ibbotson, M.; Issever, C .; Jacquet, M.; Jaffre, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, D.P.; Jones, M.A.S.; Jung, H.; Kastli, H.K.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Karschnick, O.; Keil, F.; Keller, N.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kermiche, S.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Kjellberg, P.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Koblitz, B.; Kolya, S.D.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S.K.; Koutouev, R.; Koutov, A.; Krehbiel, H.; Kroseberg, J.; Kruger, K.; Kupper, A.; Kuhr, T.; Kurca, T.; Lahmann, R.; Lamb, D.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Laycock, P.; Lebailly, E.; Lebedev, A.; Leissner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindstroem, M.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Loginov, A.; Loktionova, N.; Lubimov, V.; Luders, S.; Luke, D.; Lytkin, L.; Mahlke-Kruger, H.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Malinovski, I.; Maracek, R.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martyn, H.U.; Martyniak, J.; Maxfield, S.J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, P.O.; Mikocki, S.; Milstead, D.; Mkrtchyan, T.; Mohr, R.; Mohrdieck, S.; Mondragon, M.N.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, T.; Nellen, G.; Newman, Paul R.; Nicholls, T.C.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Nix, O.; Nowak, G.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Panassik, V.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Phillips, J.P.; Pitzl, D.; Poschl, R.; Potachnikova, I.; Povh, B.; Rabbertz, K.; Radel, G.; Rauschenberger, J.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Reyna, D.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.P.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, M.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schorner, T.; Schroder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Sedlak, K.; Sefkow, F.; Chekelian, V.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Solovev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Spitzer, H.; Stamen, R.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Straumann, U.; Swart, M.; Tasevsky, M.; Chernyshov, V.; Chetchelnitski, S.; Thompson, Graham; Thompson, P.D.; Tobien, N.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, Peter; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Turney, J.E.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Udluft, S.; Urban, Marcel; Usik, A.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vassilev, S.; Vazdik, Y.; Vichnevski, A.; Wacker, K.; Wallny, R.; Waugh, B.; Weber, G.; Weber, M.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Werner, M.; Werner, N.; White, G.; Wiesand, S.; Wilksen, T.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.G.; Wissing, C.; Wobisch, M.; Wunsch, E.; Wyatt, A.C.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zomer, F.; Zsembery, J.; zur Nedden, M.

    2001-01-01

    A measurement of the derivative (d ln F_2 / d lnx)_(Q^2)= -lambda(x,Q^2) of the proton structure function F_2 is presented in the low x domain of deeply inelastic positron-proton scattering. For 5*10^(-5)=1.5 GeV^2, lambda(x,Q^2) is found to be independent of x and to increase linearly with ln(Q^2).

  14. Flashlamp excitation of NaF:F2(+) using the fluorescent transformation of pumping radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolerov, A. N.; Arzumanian, Sh. O.; Koliago, S. S.; Chirkina, K. P.; Gritsai, I. I.

    1988-11-01

    The feasibility of obtaining stimulated emission from an NaF:F2(+) crystal pumped by a xenon lamp is demonstrated. The UV component of the lamp is transformed into the F2(+) color center absorption band using a C-102 solution and a crystalline tube made of Al2O3:Ti(3+). Lasing was obtained in all of the active media, making it possible to use this laser as a multicolor spectrum analyzer.

  15. Vacuum ultraviolet photon-mediated production of [18 F]F2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzyczmonik, Anna; Keller, Thomas; Kirjavainen, Anna K; Forsback, Sarita; Solin, Olof

    2017-04-01

    The chemistry of F2 and its derivatives are amenable to facile aliphatic or aromatic substitution, as well as electrophilic addition. The main limitation in the use of [18 F]F2 for radiopharmaceutical synthesis is the low specific activity achieved by the traditional methods of production. The highest specific activities, 55 GBq/μmol, for [18 F]F2 have been achieved so far by using electrical discharge in the post-target production of [18 F]F2 gas from [18 F]CH3 F. We demonstrate that [18 F]F2 is produced by illuminating a gas mixture of neon/F2 /[18 F]CH3 F with vacuum ultraviolet photons generated by an excimer laser. We tested several illumination chambers and production conditions. The effects of the initial amount of [18 F]F- , amount of carrier F2 , and number of 193-nm laser pulses at constant power were evaluated regarding radiochemical yield and specific activity. The specific activity attained for [18 F]F2 -derived [18 F]NFSi was 10.3 ± 0.9 GBq/μmol, and the average radiochemical yield over a wide range of conditions was 6.7% from [18 F]F- . The production can be improved by optimization of the synthesis device and procedures. The use of a commercially available excimer laser and the simplicity of the process can make this method relatively easy for adaptation in radiochemistry laboratories. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Labelled Compounds and Radiopharmaceuticals Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Drought-Induced Leaf Proteome Changes in Switchgrass Seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhujia Ye

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum is a perennial crop producing deep roots and thus highly tolerant to soil water deficit conditions. However, seedling establishment in the field is very susceptible to prolonged and periodic drought stress. In this study, a “sandwich” system simulating a gradual water deletion process was developed. Switchgrass seedlings were subjected to a 20-day gradual drought treatment process when soil water tension was increased to 0.05 MPa (moderate drought stress and leaf physiological properties had expressed significant alteration. Drought-induced changes in leaf proteomes were identified using the isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ labeling method followed by nano-scale liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (nano-LC-MS/MS analysis. Additionally, total leaf proteins were processed using a combinatorial library of peptide ligands to enrich for lower abundance proteins. Both total proteins and those enriched samples were analyzed to increase the coverage of the quantitative proteomics analysis. A total of 7006 leaf proteins were identified, and 257 (4% of the leaf proteome expressed a significant difference (p < 0.05, fold change <0.6 or >1.7 from the non-treated control to drought-treated conditions. These proteins are involved in the regulation of transcription and translation, cell division, cell wall modification, phyto-hormone metabolism and signaling transduction pathways, and metabolic pathways of carbohydrates, amino acids, and fatty acids. A scheme of abscisic acid (ABA-biosynthesis and ABA responsive signal transduction pathway was reconstructed using these drought-induced significant proteins, showing systemic regulation at protein level to deploy the respective mechanism. Results from this study, in addition to revealing molecular responses to drought stress, provide a large number of proteins (candidate genes that can be employed to improve switchgrass seedling growth and

  17. Synthesis and optical characterizations of Nd, Y: CaF2 transparent ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zaichun; Mei, Bingchu; Li, Weiwei; Liu, Xiaoya; Su, Liangbi

    2017-09-01

    Highly transparent Nd, Y co-doped calcium fluoride (Nd, Y: CaF2) ceramics with different Y3+ ions doped concentrations were fabricated by hot-pressed method using Nd, Y: CaF2 nanopowders synthesized by co-precipitation method. According to the XRD calculations and SEM observations, the average grain size of nanopowders was about 22 nm. From the SEM micrograph of the nanopowders, it clearly shows that the nanoparticles exhibit nearly spherical morphology and agglomerated slightly. For 2 mm thickness sample, the transmittance of the as-fabricated Nd, Y: CaF2 (1 at.% Nd and 2 at.% Y) ceramic at 1400 nm reached up to 87%. The microstructure, absorption spectra and emission spectra of the Nd, Y: CaF2 ceramics were measured and discussed. Compared with the Nd: CaF2 ceramic, the Nd, Y: CaF2 ceramics fluorescent intensity increased drastically with the increase of Y3+ ions doped concentration.

  18. A new global model for the ionospheric F2 peak height for radio wave propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Hoque

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The F2-layer peak density height hmF2 is one of the most important ionospheric parameters characterizing HF propagation conditions. Therefore, the ability to model and predict the spatial and temporal variations of the peak electron density height is of great use for both ionospheric research and radio frequency planning and operation. For global hmF2 modelling we present a nonlinear model approach with 13 model coefficients and a few empirically fixed parameters. The model approach describes the temporal and spatial dependencies of hmF2 on global scale. For determining the 13 model coefficients, we apply this model approach to a large quantity of global hmF2 observational data obtained from GNSS radio occultation measurements onboard CHAMP, GRACE and COSMIC satellites and data from 69 worldwide ionosonde stations. We have found that the model fits to these input data with the same root mean squared (RMS and standard deviations of 10%. In comparison with the electron density NeQuick model, the proposed Neustrelitz global hmF2 model (Neustrelitz Peak Height Model – NPHM shows percentage RMS deviations of about 13% and 12% from the observational data during high and low solar activity conditions, respectively, whereas the corresponding deviations for the NeQuick model are found 18% and 16%, respectively.

  19. A new global model for the ionospheric F2 peak height for radio wave propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Hoque

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The F2-layer peak density height hmF2 is one of the most important ionospheric parameters characterizing HF propagation conditions. Therefore, the ability to model and predict the spatial and temporal variations of the peak electron density height is of great use for both ionospheric research and radio frequency planning and operation. For global hmF2 modelling we present a nonlinear model approach with 13 model coefficients and a few empirically fixed parameters. The model approach describes the temporal and spatial dependencies of hmF2 on global scale. For determining the 13 model coefficients, we apply this model approach to a large quantity of global hmF2 observational data obtained from GNSS radio occultation measurements onboard CHAMP, GRACE and COSMIC satellites and data from 69 worldwide ionosonde stations. We have found that the model fits to these input data with the same root mean squared (RMS and standard deviations of 10%. In comparison with the electron density NeQuick model, the proposed Neustrelitz global hmF2 model (Neustrelitz Peak Height Model – NPHM shows percentage RMS deviations of about 13% and 12% from the observational data during high and low solar activity conditions, respectively, whereas the corresponding deviations for the NeQuick model are found 18% and 16%, respectively.

  20. Generation of (F+2)_AH Centres in Sodium Ion Doped KCl:CO^{2-3}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaf, M.; Chihi, I.; Hamaïdia, A.; Akrmi, El.

    1996-01-01

    We demonstrate that (F+2)AH centres of KCl may be obtained from crystals doped with K{2}CO{3} and NaCl, grown by the Czochralski method in open atmosphere. The optical properties of (F+2)AH centres thus produced are exactly the same as those of (F+2)AH centres prepared by the usual technique, which involves superoxide doping and a controlled atmosphere. Nous montrons que les centres (F+2)AH de KCl peuvent être obtenus à partir de cristaux dopés par K{2}CO{3} et NaCl, fabriqués par la méthode de Czochralski à l'air libre. Les propriétés optiques des centres (F+2)AH ainsi produits sont exactement les mêmes que celles des centres (F+2)AH préparés par la technique habituelle, qui comporte le dopage par un superoxyde et l'emploi d'une atmosphère contrôlée.

  1. Statistical Models of F2 Slope in Relation to Severity of Dysarthria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yunjung; Weismer, Gary; Kent, Raymond D.; Duffy, Joseph R.

    2009-01-01

    Objective This study investigated the distribution of second-formant (F2) slopes in a relatively large number of speakers with dysarthria associated with two different underlying diseases. Patients and Methods Forty speakers with dysarthria (20 with Parkinson's disease, PD; 20 with stroke) and 5 control speakers without a history of neurological disease were asked to repeat six words (coat, hail, sigh, shoot, row and wax) 10 times. Acoustic analysis was performed to derive F2 slope, and speech intelligibility data were collected using a direct magnitude estimate technique to examine its relationship to F2 slope. Results Statistical analysis revealed that both clinical groups showed significantly reduced F2 slopes compared to healthy speakers for all words but row. No group difference was found between speakers with PD and stroke; however, different words showed varying sensitivity to the speech motor control problems. The F2 slopes of only two words, shoot and wax, were significantly correlated with scaled speech intelligibility. Conclusion The findings support the idea that distributional characteristics of acoustic variables, such as F2 slope, could be used to develop a quantitative metric of severity of speech motor control deficits in dysarthria, when the materials are appropriately selected and additional distributional characteristics are studied. PMID:19864914

  2. Controlled release fertilizer improves quality of container longleaf pine seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Kasten Dumroese; Jeff Parkhurst; James P. Barnett

    2005-01-01

    In an operational trial, increasing the amount of nitrogen (N) applied to container longleaf pine seedlings by incorporating controlled release fertilizer (CRF) into the media improved seedling growth and quality. Compared with control seedlings that received 40 mg N, seedlings receiving 66 mg N through CRF supplemented with liquid fertilizer had needles that were 4 in...

  3. Developmental reaction norms for water stressed seedlings of succulent cacti.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulises Rosas

    Full Text Available Succulent cacti are remarkable plants with capabilities to withstand long periods of drought. However, their adult success is contingent on the early seedling stages, when plants are highly susceptible to the environment. To better understand their early coping strategies in a challenging environment, two developmental aspects (anatomy and morphology in Polaskia chichipe and Echinocactus platyacanthus were studied in the context of developmental reaction norms under drought conditions. The morphology was evaluated using landmark based morphometrics and Principal Component Analysis, which gave three main trends of the variation in each species. The anatomy was quantified as number and area of xylem vessels. The quantitative relationship between morphology and anatomy in early stages of development, as a response to drought was revealed in these two species. Qualitatively, collapsible cells and collapsible parenchyma tissue were observed in seedlings of both species, more often in those subjected to water stress. These tissues were located inside the epidermis, resembling a web of collapsible-cell groups surrounding turgid cells, vascular bundles, and spanned across the pith. Occasionally the groups formed a continuum stretching from the epidermis towards the vasculature. Integrating the morphology and the anatomy in a developmental context as a response to environmental conditions provides a better understanding of the organism's dynamics, adaptation, and plasticity.

  4. Ionospheric weather: cloning missed foF2 observations for derivation of variability index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. L. Gulyaeva

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available A techique for filling the gaps of the missing F2-layer critical frequency is proposed and applied for the derivation of the ionospheric weather index, characterizing the degree of disturbance at each particular station. A daily-hourly analysis of ionosonde observations of foF2 for 16 stations at latitude range 37° to 70° N, longitudes of 10° W to 150° E, is performed during the solar minimum, 2006. Missed ionosonde observations are reconstructed by cloning data of another station. The process of gap filling considers hourly values of the F peak density NmF2 (deduced from foF2, normalized to the respective median, and assumes that this ratio remains the same for the parent and cloned data. It is shown that the correlation coefficient between cloned fcF2 and observed foF2 is greater than 0.75 for the positive and negative ionospheric disturbed days during a year at solar minimum, independent of the distance between the stations in high and middle latitudes. The quiet reference is determined as a running daily-hourly median for 27 days, preceding the day of observation calibrated for a seasonal trend with ITU-R foF2 predictions. The hourly deviation DNmF2 is defined as the logarithm of ratio of NmF2/NmF2med. A segmented logarithmic scale of the ionospheric weather index, W, is introduced, so that W=±1 refers to the quiet state, W=±2 to a moderate disturbance, W=±3 to the ionospheric storm, and W=±4 to the extreme or anomalous conditions. The catalog of the ionospheric disturbances for W exceeding ±2 at least during 3 consecutive hours is produced and presented online at the SRC and IZMIRAN web pages. It is found that the moderate disturbance is a prevailing state of the ionospheric weather for all stations. The stormy conditions comprise 1 to 20% of the times which occur more frequently at high latitudes, by night, during equinox and winter.

  5. Measurement of F_2^ccbar and F_2^bbbar at High Q^2 using the H1 Vertex Detector at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aktas, A.; Anthonis, T.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Babaev, A.; Backovic, S.; Bahr, J.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baudrand, S.; Baumgartner, S.; Becker, J.; Beckingham, M.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Berger, N.; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J.C.; Bohme, J.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brisson, V.; Broker, H.-B.; Brown, D.P.; Bruncko, D.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Caron, S.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Chekelian, V.; Contreras, J.G.; Coppens, Y.R.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; Delcourt, B.; Demirchyan, R.; De Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dingfelder, J.; Dodonov, V.; Dubak, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, W.; Essenov, S.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Finke, L.; Fleischer, M.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleming, Y.H.; Flucke, G.; Flugge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formanek, J.; Franke, G.; Frising, G.; Frisson, T.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garutti, E.; Garvey, J.; Gayler, J.; Gerhards, R.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Ginzburgskaya, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Goettlich, M.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Goyon, C.; Grab, C.; Grassler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregori, M.; Grindhammer, Guenter; Gwilliam, C.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haller, J.; Hansson, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Henschel, H.; Henshaw, O.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Heuer, R.-D.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Ibbotson, M.; Ismail, M.; Jacquet, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, D.P.; Jung, H.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Katzy, J.; Keller, N.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Knutsson, A.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Koutouev, R.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Kuckens, J.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leiner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindfeld, L.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lueders, H.; Luke, D.; Lux, T.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mangano, S.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxeld, S.J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Milstead, D.; Mohamed, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, Paul R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nozicka, M.; Oganezov, R.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Perez-Astudillo, D.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Poschl, R.; Portheault, B.; Povh, B.; Prideaux, P.; Raicevic, N.; Reimer, P.; Rimmer, A.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salvaire, F.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauvan, E.; Schatzel, S.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schneider, M.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Sedlak, K.; Sefkow, F.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Strauch, I.; Straumann, U.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, Graham; Thompson, P.D.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, Peter; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Uraev, A.; Urban, Marcel; Usik, A.; Utkin, D.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Veelken, C.; Vest, A.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Vujicic, B.; Wacker, K.; Wagner, J.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Werner, N.; Wessels, M.; Wessling, B.; Wigmore, C.; Winter, G.-G.; Wissing, Ch.; Woehrling, E.-E.; Wolf, R.; Wunsch, E.; Xella, S.; Yan, W.; Yeganov, V.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zimmermann, J.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2004-01-01

    Measurements are presented of inclusive charm and beauty cross sections in e^+p collisions at HERA for values of photon virtuality Q^2 > 150 GeV^2 and of inelasticity 0.1 < y < 0.7. The charm and beauty fractions are determined using a method based on the impact parameter, in the transverse plane, of tracks to the primary vertex, as measured by the H1 vertex detector. The data are divided into four regions in Q^2 and Bjorken x, and values for the structure functions F_2^{c\\bar{c}} and F_2^{b\\bar{b}} are obtained. The results are found to be compatible with the predictions of perturbative quantum chromodynamics.

  6. Growth of seedlings of Corymbia citriodora as a function of hydrogel use and fertilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlon Rodrigo Bernardi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Corymbia citriodora, also known as lemon eucalyptus, is one of the most cultivated species for extraction of essential oils. Seedling production for this species, however, is more difficult than for other species, considering its slower growth, higher susceptibility to disease and nutrition requirements. As regards top dressing in particular, no established routine is available so far to ensure fertilizer savings and good seedling development. Slow growth reduces seedling capability to absorb nutrients before leaching starts, and a potential alternative to that is to add water-retaining polymers to the substrate so as to facilitate absorption of the fertilizers applied and their slow release in seedling tubes. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of different fertilizer dosages, as applied to substrates containing water-retaining polymers, on the growth of Corymbia citriodora seedlings. A completely randomized design was used, with four replicates, consisting of a control treatment with routine substrate and fertilizer used by a commercial nursery, plus five treatments with top dressing dosages ranging from 80% to 20% of commercial dosage plus addition of a polymer (6 g L-1. After 126 days, seedlings were evaluated for height, stem base diameter and ratio of height to stem base diameter. After analysis, it was concluded that the use of a water-retaining polymer had a positive effect on the height, stem base diameter and ratio of shoot height to stem base diameter, and that it helped reduce by at least 20% the amount of routine fertilizer used by the commercial nursery, whether basic fertilizer or top dressing.

  7. Compact setup for the production of {sup 87}Rb |F = 2, m{sub F} = + 2〉 Bose-Einstein condensates in a hybrid trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nolli, Raffaele; Venturelli, Michela; Marmugi, Luca, E-mail: l.marmugi@ucl.ac.uk; Wickenbrock, Arne; Renzoni, Ferruccio [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-15

    We present a compact experimental apparatus for Bose-Einstein condensation of {sup 87}Rb in the |F  =  2, m{sub F} = + 2〉 state. A pre-cooled atomic beam of {sup 87}Rb is obtained by using an unbalanced magneto-optical trap, allowing controlled transfer of trapped atoms from the first vacuum chamber to the science chamber. Here, atoms are transferred to a hybrid trap, as produced by overlapping a magnetic quadrupole trap with a far-detuned optical trap with crossed beam configuration, where forced radiofrequency evaporation is realized. The final evaporation leading to Bose-Einstein condensation is then performed by exponentially lowering the optical trap depth. Control and stabilization systems of the optical trap beams are discussed in detail. The setup reliably produces a pure condensate in the |F = 2, m{sub F} = + 2〉 state in 50 s, which includes 33 s loading of the science magneto-optical trap and 17 s forced evaporation.

  8. Ostryopsis davidiana seedlings inoculated with ectomycorrhizal fungi facilitate formation of mycorrhizae on Pinus tabulaeformis seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Shu-Lan; Li, Guo-Lei; Liu, Yong; Kasten Dumroese, R; Lv, Rui-Heng

    2009-08-01

    Reforestation in China is important for reversing anthropogenic activities that degrade the environment. Pinus tabulaeformis is desired for these activities, but survival and growth of seedlings can be hampered by lack of ectomycorrhizae. When outplanted in association with Ostryopsis davidiana plants on reforestation sites, P. tabulaeformis seedlings become mycorrhizal and survival and growth are enhanced; without O. davidiana, pines often remain without mycorrhizae and performance is poorer. To better understand this relationship, we initiated an experiment using rhizoboxes that restricted root and tested the hypothesis that O. davidiana seedlings facilitated ectomycorrhizae formation on P. tabulaeformis seedlings through hyphal contact. We found that without O. davidiana seedlings, inocula of five indigenous ectomycorrhizal fungi were unable to grow and associate with P. tabulaeformis seedlings. Inocula placed alongside O. davidiana seedlings, however, resulted in enhanced growth and nutritional status of O. davidiana and P. tabulaeformis seedlings, and also altered rhizosphere pH and phosphatase activity. We speculate that these species form a common mycorrhizal network and this association enhances outplanting performance of P. tabulaeformis seedlings used for forest restoration.

  9. Solid-state NMR spectroscopic study of coordination compounds of XeF(2) with metal cations and the crystal structure of [Ba(XeF(2))(5)][AsF(6)](2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerken, Michael; Hazendonk, Paul; Iuga, Adriana; Nieboer, Jared; Tramsek, Melita; Goreshnik, Evgeny; Zemva, Boris; Zheng, Shaohui; Autschbach, Jochen

    2007-07-23

    The coordination compounds [Mg(XeF(2))(2)][AsF(6)](2), [Mg(XeF(2))(4)][AsF(6)](2), [Ca(XeF(2))(2.5)][AsF(6)](2), [Ba(XeF(2))(3)][AsF(6)](2), and [Ba(XeF(2))(5)][AsF(60](2) were characterized by solid-state (19)F and (129)Xe magic-angle spinning NMR spectroscopy. The (19)F and (129)Xe NMR data of [Mg(XeF(2))(2)][AsF(6)](2), [Mg(XeF(2)(4)][AsF(6)](2), and [Ca(XeF(2))(2.5)][AsF(6)](2) were correlated with the previously determined crystal structures. The isotropic (19)F chemical shifts and (1)J((129)Xe-(19)F) coupling constants were used to distinguish the terminal and bridging coordination modes of XeF(2). Chemical-shift and coupling-constant calculations for [Mg(XeF(2))(4)][AsF(6)](2) confirmed the assignment of terminal and bridging chemical-shift and coupling-constant ranges. The NMR spectroscopic data of [Ba(XeF(2))(3)][AsF(6)](2) and [Ba(XeF(2))(5)][AsF(6)](2) indicate the absence of any terminal XeF(2) ligands, which was verified for [Ba(XeF(2))(5)][AsF(6)](2) by its X-ray crystal structure. The adduct [Ba(XeF(2))(5)][AsF(6)](2) crystallizes in the space group Fmmm, with a = 11.6604(14) Angstrom, b = 13.658(2) Angstrom, c = 13.7802(17) Angstrom, V = 2194.5(5) Angstrom(3) at -73 degrees C, Z = 4, and R = 0.0350 and contains two crystallographically independent bridging XeF(2) molecules and one nonligating XeF(2) molecule. The AsF(6-) anions in [Mg(XeF(2))(4)][AsF(6)](2), [Ca(XeF(2))(2.5)][AsF(6)](2), [Ba(XeF(2))(3)][AsF(6)](2), and [Ba(XeF(2))(5)][AsF(6)](2) were shown to be fluxional with the fluorines-on-arsenic being equivalent on the NMR time scale, emulating perfectly octahedral anion symmetry.

  10. Virulence of Fusarium species to alfalfa seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krnjaja Vesna

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In in vitro conditions, virulence of 91 isolates of species Fusarium genus (F. oxysporum, F. solani, F. acuminatum, F. equiseti, F. arthrosporioides, F. prolifera- tum, F. avenaceum, F. semitectum, F. tricinctum, F. sporotrichioides and F. graminearum towards alfalfa seedlings was investigated. Isolates of investigated species originated from diseased alfalfa plants collected at four locations in Serbia based on symptoms of wilting caused by Fusarium and root rotting. Pathogenicity and virulence of investigated isolates of Fusarium spp. were determined by visual evaluation of inoculated seedlings of cultivar K28 in laboratory conditions. All isolated of investigated species had pathogenic effect on alfalfa seedlings which expressed symptoms such as necrosis of root, moist rotting and "melting of seedlings". Colour of necrotic root tissue varied from light brown, brown lipstick red to explicit black, depending on the Fusarium species. Strong virulence was established in 48 isolates, medium virulence in 31 and weak virulence in 12 isolates.

  11. Virulence of Fusarium species to alfalfa seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krnjaja Vesna

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In in vitro conditions, virulence of 91 isolates of species Fusarium genus (F. oxysporum, F. solani, F. acuminatum, F. equiseti, F. arthrosporioides, F. proliferatum, F. avenaceum, F. semitectum, F. tricinctum, F. sporotrichioides and F. graminearum towards alfalfa seedlings was investigated. Isolates of investigated species originated from diseased alfalfa plants collected on four locations in Serbia based on symptoms of wilting caused by fusarium and root rotting. Pathogenicity and virulence of investigated isolates of Fusarium spp. were determined by visual evaluation of inoculated seedlings of cultivars K28 in laboratory conditions. All isolated of investigated species had pathogenic effect on alfalfa seedlings, which expressed symptoms such as necrosis of root, moist rotting and "melting of seedlings". Colour of necrotic root tissue varied from light brown, brown, lipstick red to explicit black, depending on the Fusarium species. Strong virulence was established in 48 isolates, medium virulence in 31 and weak virulence in 12 isolates.

  12. Colloidal synthesis of BaF2 nanoparticles and their application as fillers in polymer nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyamurthy, Srivatsan; Tuncer, Enis; More, Karren L.; Gu, Baohua; Sauers, Isidor; Paranthaman, M. Parans

    2012-03-01

    Nanoparticles of pure and Eu-doped BaF2 have been prepared through sol-gel colloidal synthesis. In addition, BaF2-filled PMMA polymer nanocomposites were fabricated and dielectric properties were measured. The as-synthesized pure and Eu-doped BaF2 nanoparticles were analyzed by both X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy and consisted of crystalline BaF2 particles with an average diameter of 13.6 nm with a standard deviation of about ±2.4 nm. The photoluminescence properties of the pure and Eu-doped (2%, 4% and 8%) nanoparticles showed characteristic emission of Eu3+ (5D0→7F J ( J=1-4) transitions). We also measured significantly enhanced dielectric breakdown strength of up to 30% for BaF2 nanocomposites over the unfilled PMMA polymer. This study thus offers some promise of sol-gel synthesis of nanocomposite dielectrics with great potential for use as electrical insulation materials in cryogenic high-voltage applications.

  13. Colloidal synthesis of BaF2 nanoparticles and their application as fillers in polymer nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathyamurthy, Srivatsan [ORNL; Tuncer, Enis [ORNL; More, Karren Leslie [ORNL; Gu, Baohua [ORNL; Sauers, Isidor [ORNL; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Nanoparticles of pure and Eu-doped BaF2 have been prepared through sol-gel colloidal synthesis. In addition, BaF2 filled PMMA polymer nanocomposites were fabricated and dielectric properties were measured. The as-synthesized pure and Eu-doped BaF2 nanoparticles were analyzed by both X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy and consisted of crystalline BaF2 particles with an average diameter of 13.6 nm with a standard deviation of about 2.4 nm. The photoluminescence properties of the pure and Eu-doped (2%, 4% and 8%) nanoparticles showed characteristic emission of Eu3+ (5D0 7FJ (J=1-4) transitions). We also measured significantly enhanced dielectric breakdown strength of up to 30% for BaF2 nanocomposites over the unfilled PMMA polymer. This study thus offers some promise of sol-gel synthesis of nanocomposite dielectrics with great potential for use as electrical insulation materials in cryogenic high voltage applications.

  14. Measurement of the electron structure function F2e at LEP energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, J.; Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adzic, P.; Albrecht, T.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P. P.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anashkin, E.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Anjos, N.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.-D.; Arnoud, Y.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J. E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Ballestrero, A.; Bambade, P.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.; Barker, G. J.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.-H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Belous, K.; Ben-Haim, E.; Benekos, N.; Benvenuti, A.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Besson, N.; Bloch, D.; Blom, M.; Bluj, M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P. S. L.; Borisov, G.; Botner, O.; Bouquet, B.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Boyko, I.; Bracko, M.; Brenner, R.; Brodet, E.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J. M.; Buschbeck, B.; Buschmann, P.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Castro, N.; Cavallo, F.; Chapkin, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Checchia, P.; Chierici, R.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chudoba, J.; Chung, S. U.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Costa, M. J.; Crennell, D.; Cuevas, J.; D'Hondt, J.; da Silva, T.; Da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, G.; De Angelis, A.; De Boer, W.; De Clercq, C.; De Lotto, B.; De Maria, N.; De Min, A.; de Paula, L.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Simone, A.; Doroba, K.; Drees, J.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Espirito Santo, M. C.; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.; Ferrer, A.; Ferro, F.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gavillet, Ph.; Gazis, E.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Gonçalves, P.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, K.; Haug, S.; Hauler, F.; Hedberg, V.; Hennecke, M.; Hoffman, J.; Holmgren, S.-O.; Holt, P. J.; Houlden, M. A.; Jackson, J. N.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, E. K.; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, F.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B. P.; Kerzel, U.; King, B. T.; Kjaer, N. J.; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krumstein, Z.; Kucharczyk, M.; Lamsa, J.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Leinonen, L.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lopes, J. H.; Lopez, J. M.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Malek, A.; Maltezos, S.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.-C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; Mc Nulty, R.; Meroni, C.; Migliore, E.; Mitaroff, W.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Moenig, K.; Monge, R.; Montenegro, J.; Moraes, D.; Moreno, S.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, U.; Muenich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mundim, L.; Murray, W.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.; Nawrocki, K.; Nemecek, S.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nikolenko, M.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Oyanguren, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacios, J. P.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Peralta, L.; Perepelitsa, V.; Perrotta, A.; Petrolini, A.; Piedra, J.; Pieri, L.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Poireau, V.; Pol, M. E.; Polok, G.; Pozdniakov, V.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Radojicic, D.; Rebecchi, P.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rivero, M.; Rodriguez, D.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ryabtchikov, D.; Sadovsky, A.; Salmi, L.; Salt, J.; Sander, C.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schwickerath, U.; Sekulin, R.; Siebel, M.; Sisakian, A.; Slominski, W.; Smadja, G.; Smirnova, O.; Sokolov, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassov, T.; Stanitzki, M.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szumlak, T.; Szwed, J.; Tabarelli, T.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Timmermans, J.; Tkatchev, L.; Tobin, M.; Todorovova, S.; Tomé, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortosa, P.; Travnicek, P.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.-L.; Tyapkin, I. A.; Tyapkin, P.; Tzamarias, S.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; Van Dam, P.; Van Eldik, J.; van Remortel, N.; Van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Veloso, F.; Venus, W.; Verdier, P.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Washbrook, A. J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimin, N. I.; Zintchenko, A.; Zupan, M.

    2014-10-01

    The hadronic part of the electron structure function F2e has been measured for the first time, using e+e- data collected by the DELPHI experiment at LEP, at centre-of-mass energies of √{ s} = 91.2- 209.5 GeV. The data analysis is simpler than that of the measurement of the photon structure function. The electron structure function F2e data are compared to predictions of phenomenological models based on the photon structure function. It is shown that the contribution of large target photon virtualities is significant. The data presented can serve as a cross-check of the photon structure function F2γ analyses and help in refining existing parameterisations.

  15. Absence of systemic oxidative stress and increased CSF prostaglandin F2α in progressive MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lam, Magda A.; Maghzal, Ghassan J.; Khademi, Mohsen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to investigate the role of oxidative stress in the progression of multiple sclerosis (MS).  Methods: We determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry nonenzymatic (F2-isoprostanes) and enzymatic oxidation products of arachidonic acid (prostaglandin F2α [PGF2α......]) in plasma and CSF of 45 controls (other neurologic disease [OND] with no signs of inflammation) and 62 patients with MS. Oxidation products were correlated with disease severity and validated biomarkers of inflammation (chemokine ligand 13; matrix metalloproteinase-9; osteopontin) and axonal damage......, but not F2-isoprostanes, were significantly higher in patients with progressive disease than OND controls (p age (p = 0.022), although this increase could not be explained by age. CSF PGF2α decreased...

  16. A measurement of the proton structure function F$_{2}$(x,Q$^{2}$)

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, T; Andreev, V; Andrieu, B; Appuhn, R D; Arpagaus, M; Aïd, S; Babaev, A; Baranov, P S; Barrelet, E; Bartel, Wulfrin; Barth, Monique; Bassler, U; Beck, H P; Behrend, H J; Belousov, A; Berger, C; Bergstein, H; Bernardi, G; Bernet, R; Bertrand-Coremans, G H; Besançon, M; Beyer, R; Bizot, J C; Blobel, Volker; Borras, K; Botterweck, F; Boudry, V; Braemer, A; Brasse, F W; Braunschweig, W; Brisson, V; Bruncko, Dusan; Brune, C R; Buchholz, R; Buniatian, A Yu; Burke, S; Burton, M; Buschhorn, G W; Bán, J; Bähr, J; Büngener, L; Bürger, J; Büsser, F W; Campbell, A J; Carli, T; Charles, F; Chernyshov, V; Clarke, D; Clegg, A B; Clerbaux, B; Colombo, M G; Contreras, J G; Cormack, C; Coughlan, J A; Courau, A; Coutures, C; Cozzika, G; Criegee, L; Cussans, D G; Cvach, J; Dagoret, S; Dainton, J B; Danilov, M V; Dau, W D; Daum, K; David, M; De Wolf, E A; Deffur, E; Del Buono, L; Delcourt, B; Di Nezza, P; Dollfus, C; Dowell, John D; Dreis, H B; Droutskoi, A; Duboc, J; Duhm, H; Düllmann, D; Dünger, O; Ebert, J; Ebert, T R; Eckerlin, G; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eichenberger, S; Eichler, R; Eisele, Franz; Eisenhandler, Eric F; Ellison, R J; Elsen, E E; Erdmann, M; Erdmann, W; Erlichmann, H; Evrard, E; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Feeken, D; Felst, R; Feltesse, Joel; Ferencei, J; Ferrarotto, F; Flamm, K; Fleischer, M; Flieser, M; Flügge, G; Fomenko, A; Fominykh, B A; Forbush, M; Formánek, J; Foster, J M; Franke, G; Fretwurst, E; Gabathuler, Erwin; Gabathuler, K; Gamerdinger, K; Garvey, J; Gayler, J; Gebauer, M; Gellrich, A; Genzel, H; Gerhards, R; Goerlach, U; Gogitidze, N; Goldberg, M; Goldner, D; González-Pineiro, B; Gorelov, I V; Goritchev, P A; Grab, C; Greenshaw, T J; Grindhammer, G; Gruber, A; Gruber, C; Grässler, Herbert; Grässler, R; Görlich, L; Haack, J; Haidt, Dieter; Hajduk, L; Hamon, O; Hampel, M; Hanlon, E M; Hapke, M; Haynes, W J; Heatherington, J; Heinzelmann, G; Henderson, R C W; Henschel, H; Herynek, I; Hess, M F; Hildesheim, W; Hill, P; Hiller, K H; Hilton, C D; Hladky, J; Hoeger, K C; Horisberger, R P; Hudgson, V L; Huet, Patrick; Hufnagel, H; Höppner, M; Hütte, M; Ibbotson, M; Itterbeck, H; Jabiol, M A; Jacholkowska, A; Jacobsson, C; Jaffré, M; Janoth, J; Jansen, T; Johannsen, K; Johnson, D P; Johnson, L; Jung, H; Jönsson, L B; Kalmus, Peter I P; Kant, D; Kaschowitz, R; Kasselmann, P; Kathage, U; Katzy, J M; Kaufmann, H H; Kazarian, S; Kenyon, Ian Richard; Kermiche, S; Keuker, C; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Knies, G; Ko, W; Kolanoski, H; Kole, F; Kolya, S D; Korbel, V; Korn, M; Kostka, P; Kotelnikov, S K; Krasny, M W; Krehbiel, H; Krämerkämper, T; Krücker, D; Krüger, U P; Krüner-Marquis, U; Kubenka, J P; Kuhlen, M; Kurca, T; Kurzhöfer, J; Kuznik, B; Köhler, T; Köhne, J H; Küster, H; Lacour, D; Lamarche, F; Lander, R; Landon, M P J; Lange, W; Lanius, P; Laporte, J F; Lebedev, A; Leverenz, C; Levonian, S; Ley, C; Lindner, A; Lindström, G; Linsel, F; Lipinski, J; List, B; Loch, P; Lohmander, H; Lubimov, V; López, G C; Lüke, D; Magnussen, N; Malinovskii, E I; Mani, S; Maracek, R; Marage, P; Marks, J; Marshall, R; Martens, J; Martin, R D; Martyn, H U; Martyniak, J; Masson, S; Mavroidis, A; Maxfield, S J; McMahon, S J; Mehta, A; Meier, K; Mercer, D; Merz, T; Meyer, C A; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Mikocki, S; Milstead, D; Moreau, F; Morris, J V; Mroczko, E; Murín, P; Müller, G; Müller, K; Nagovitsin, V; Nahnhauer, R; Naroska, Beate; Naumann, T; Newman, P R; Newton, D; Neyret, D; Nguyen, H K; Nicholls, T C; Niebergall, F; Niebuhr, C B; Nisius, R; Nowak, G; Noyes, G W; Nyberg-Werther, M; Oakden, M N; Oberlack, H; Obrock, U; Olsson, J E; Panaro, E; Panitch, A; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Peppel, E; Phillips, J P; Pichler, C; Pitzl, D; Pope, G; Prell, S; Prosi, R; Pérez, E; Raupach, F; Reimer, P; Reinshagen, S; Ribarics, P; Rick, Hartmut; Riech, V; Riedlberger, J; Riess, S; Rietz, M; Rizvi, E; Robertson, S M; Robmann, P; Roloff, H E; Roosen, R; Rosenbauer, K; Rostovtsev, A A; Rouse, F; Royon, C; Rusakov, S V; Rybicki, K; Rylko, R; Rädel, G; Rüter, K; Sahlmann, N; Sankey, D P C; Savitsky, M M; Schacht, P; Schiek, S; Schleper, P; Schmidt, C; Schmidt, D; Schmidt, G; Schröder, V; Schuhmann, E; Schwab, B; Schwind, A; Schöning, A; Seehausen, U; Sefkow, F; Seidel, M; Sell, R; Semenov, A A; Shekelian, V I; Shevyakov, I; Shooshtari, H; Shtarkov, L N; Siegmon, G; Siewert, U; Sirois, Y; Skillicorn, Ian O; Smirnov, P; Smith, J R; Soloviev, Yu V; Spiekermann, J; Spitzer, H; Starosta, R; Steenbock, M; Steffen, P; Steinberg, R; Stella, B; Stephens, K; Stier, J; Stiewe, J; Strachota, J; Straumann, U; Struczinski, W; Stösslein, U; Sutton, J P; Sánchez, E; Tapprogge, Stefan; Taylor, R E; Thiebaux, C; Thompson, G; Truöl, P; Turnau, J; Tutas, J; Uelkes, P; Usik, A; Valkár, S; Valkárová, A; Vallée, C; Van Esch, P; Van Mechelen, P; Vartapetian, A H; Vazdik, Ya A; Vecko, M; Verrecchia, P; Villet, G; Wacker, K; Wagener, A; Wagener, M; Walker, I W; Walther, A; Weber, G; Weber, M; Wegener, D; Wegner, A; Wellisch, H P; West, L R; Willard, S; Winde, M; Winter, G G; Wright, A E; Wulff, N; Wünsch, E; Yiou, T P; Zarbock, D; Zhang, Z; Zhokin, A S; Zimmer, M; Zimmermann, W; Zomer, F; Zuber, K; Zácek, J; de Roeck, A; von Schlippe, W; Niebergall, Friedrich

    1995-01-01

    A measurement of the proton structure function F_{\\!2}(x,Q^2) is reported for momentum transfer squared Q^2 between 4.5 GeV^2 and 1600 GeV^2 and for Bjorken x between 1.8\\cdot10^{-4} and 0.13 using data collected by the HERA experiment H1 in 1993. It is observed that F_{\\!2} increases significantly with decreasing x, confirming our previous measurement made with one tenth of the data available in this analysis. The Q^2 dependence is approximately logarithmic over the full kinematic range covered. The subsample of deep inelastic events with a large pseudo-rapidity gap in the hadronic energy flow close to the proton remnant is used to measure the "diffractive" contribution to F_{\\!2}.

  17. Measurement of the electron structure function F2e at LEP energies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Abdallah

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The hadronic part of the electron structure function F2e has been measured for the first time, using e+e− data collected by the DELPHI experiment at LEP, at centre-of-mass energies of s=91.2–209.5 GeV. The data analysis is simpler than that of the measurement of the photon structure function. The electron structure function F2e data are compared to predictions of phenomenological models based on the photon structure function. It is shown that the contribution of large target photon virtualities is significant. The data presented can serve as a cross-check of the photon structure function F2γ analyses and help in refining existing parameterisations.

  18. Behavior of Parameters of Nighttime Electron Density Enhancements of the Ionospheric F2 Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovets, Artur; Gordienko, Galina

    2017-04-01

    There is known a wide class of disturbances of the F2-layer of the ionosphere, which are superimposed on the regular diurnal variations of the electron density. Different types of disturbances are characterized by different mechanisms of their generation. Traveling ionospheric disturbances appear to be the most characteristic features of the inhomogeneous structure of the ionosphere. Another type of ionospheric disturbances presents the nighttime electron density enhancements in the ionospheric F2- layer maximum (NmF2). This type of irregularities is described in numerous papers. There is a concept that, in spite of the various mechanisms of ionospheric disturbances generation a response of F2-layer parameters exhibits similar features associated with the upward lift and the simultaneous expansion of the layer and then its subsequent downward movement, including layer compression, which results in the formation of the electron density peak in the layer maximum at the moment of greatest compression. The aim of this study is a verification of this concept on the example of disturbances related with the nighttime electron density enhancements, and the definition of precise quantitative relationships between the variations of different F2-layer parameters for such disturbances. By using the data of the ionospheric vertical sounding in Almaty, (76° 55'E, 43°15'N) during 2001-2012, analysis of the behavior the F2-layer parameters during the night electron density enhancements was carried out within framework of a single concept of effects of various types of ionospheric plasma perturbations in variations of height and half-thickness of the F2-layer, accompanied by increasing and decreasing NmF2 at moments of maximum compression and expansion of the layer. For a quantitative analysis of the parameters of nighttime enhancements we have selected 20 nights characterized by low magnetic activity (Dst> - 50 nT) and evident manifestations of the nighttime electron density

  19. Desulfurizing Ability of the CaOsatd.-CaCl2-CaF2 Slags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiazhan; Kobayashi, Yoshinao

    2017-04-01

    Desulfurizing ability of the CaO-CaCl2-CaF2 slags saturated with CaO has been investigated from the viewpoint of the sulfide capacity and CaO solubility. The CaO-CaCl2-CaF2 slags containing small amounts of Cu2O and CaS were inserted in a CaO crucible with metallic copper. The CaO crucible was sealed in a nickel holder to prevent the evaporation of CaCl2, then heated up and kept at temperatures from 1573 K (1300 °C) to 1673 K (1400 °C) for 24 hours, which enabled the system inside the CaO crucible to reach the equilibrium. As expected, the sulfide capacity derived from the data obtained as well as CaO solubility of the slag increase with an increase in temperature at a constant ratio of CaCl2/CaF2. The solubility of CaO increases by the replacement of CaF2 with CaCl2, whereas the sulfide capacity slightly decreases and the activity coefficient of CaS ( γ CaS) increases. This suggests that CaF2 has stronger interaction with CaS than CaCl2. The sulfur distribution ratio between carbon-saturated iron melts and the CaO-CaCl2 slag has been calculated to be about 10 000 at 1573 K (1300 °C) using the sulfide capacity obtained, which value is still large enough even with the replacement of CaF2 by CaCl2.

  20. Investigations on transgenerational epigenetic response down the male line in F2 pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Braunschweig

    Full Text Available We investigated the nutritional effects on carcass traits, gene expression and DNA methylation in a three generation Large White pig feeding experiment. A group of experimental (E F0 boars were fed a standard diet supplemented with high amounts of methylating micronutrients whereas a control group (C of F0 boars received a standard diet. These differentially fed F0 boars sired F1 boars which then sired 60 F2 pigs. Carcass traits were compared between 36 F2 descendants of E F0 boars and 24 F2 descendants of C F0 boars. The two F2 offspring groups differed with respect to backfat percentage (P = 0.03 and tended to differ with respect to adipose tissue (P = 0.09, fat thickness at the 10(th rib (P = 0.08 and at the croup (P = 0.09 as well as percentages of shoulder (P = 0.07. Offspring from the experimental F0 boars had a higher percentage of shoulder and were leaner compared to the control group. Gene expression profiles showed significant twofold differences in mRNA level between 8 C F2 offspring and 8 E F2 offspring for 79, 64 and 53 genes for muscle, liver and kidney RNA, respectively. We found that in liver and muscle respective pathways of lipid metabolism and metabolic pathway were over-represented for the differentially expressed genes between these groups. A DNA methylation analysis in promoters of differentially expressed genes indicated a significant difference in DNA methylation at the IYD gene. If these responses on carcass traits, gene expression and DNA methylation withstand verification and can indeed be attributed to transgenerational epigenetic inheritance, it would open up pioneering application in pork production and would have implications for human health.

  1. CARROT SEED GROWING THROUGH WINTERING SEEDLINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Zvedenuk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of research work on carrot seed growing through wintering seedlings carried out at laboratory of seed studies and seed production of Transnistrian Research Institute of Agriculture, on the soil of the first terrace at the rive Dniester were presented in the article. Seed bearing plants of garden carrot ‘Krasavka’ were the object of the study. The seeds were sown to produce the seedlings on 15-16 August. In the first decade of December the plants were covered with white agrotextile with density 23g/m2 that was removed at the beginning of April. The proportion of plant that passed the winter depending on a year of cultivation was 95-100% under argotextile, and 50-80% in open plot. The plants under agrotextile reached 28 cm a high and had 5-7 well-developed leaves, while those on the open plot were at phase of active foliage growing about 10-13 cm. long. Thus, for early mechanized planting in optimal terms the wintering seedlings grown under agrotextile had the best biometrical characteristics. Moreover the outcome of carrot seedlings was 1.2-1.25 million per hectare. Such quantity of seedlings was sufficient to plant 9-10 ha of carrot plants, where the coefficient of multiplication reached 9-10, and only 3 when growing seeds through mother plant as biennial culture. Viability of seed plants grown through seedlings was 100%. Losses of plant with weight 120-150 grams from damage caused by diseases was 23%. The seed yield, when growing seedlings was 639 kg/ha, but growing through plants was 332 kg/ha. The seed outcome suitable for precise mechanized sowing through seedling growing was 77%, where seed germination was 90%, with seed fraction 1.51 and >2.0 mm. It was essentially improved their yielding characteristics. Seed outcome from this fraction obtained through planting method was 32%. The proportion of seeds in fraction 1-1.5 mm was 68%. For mechanized single-seed sowing, the seeds can be used only after mini-coating. The seed

  2. Low lying baryon spectrum with N{sub f}=2+1+1 dynamical twisted quarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drach, Vincent; Jansen, Karl [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Carbonell, Jaume; Papinutto, Mauro [UJF, CNRS/IN2P3, INPG (France). Lab. de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie; Alexandrou, Constantia [Cyprus Univ., Nicosia (Cyprus). Dept. of Physics

    2010-12-15

    We present first results on the octet and decuplet strange baryon spectrum with N{sub f}=2+1+1 twisted mass quarks. We use an Osterwalder Seiler valence strange quark with a mass tuned to the kaon and compare the results with those obtained in the unitary setup. This comparison allows to perform a first study of the lattice artefacts introduced by the mixed action approach. We investigate the effect of the strange and charm quarks in the sea by using two lattice spacings and comparing with preceding N{sub f}=2 twisted mass fermion calculations. (orig.)

  3. One-step synthesis and enhanced luminescence of Eu-doped BaF2 nanocubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Zhao, Dan; Zhang, Daisheng; Wang, Lili; Qin, Weiping

    2011-11-01

    Europium (Eu3+) doped BaF2 nanocubes were synthesized successfully by a simple method, using oleic acid (OA) as a capping agent. The structure properties were characterized by XRD, FE-SEM, and FTIR. FE-SEM analysis indicates that the prepared nanomaterials have nanocubic morphology with a side length about 150 nm and can be controlled well by adjusting OA concentration. Moreover, the photoluminescence spectra of the samples were investigated. The emission intensity of the BaF2:Eu3+ nanocubes have been enhanced greatly after modified with proper amount of OA, which is promising for new applications and optical devices.

  4. Improving Longleaf Pine Seedling Production By Controlling Seed and Seedling Pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    James P. Barnett; John M. McGilvray

    2002-01-01

    The demand for container longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) planting stock is increasing across the Lower Gulf Coastal Plain. Poor-quality seeds and seedling losses during nursery culture further constrain a limited seed supply. Improved seed efficiency will be necessary to meet the need for increased seedling production. Seed presowing treatments...

  5. Ostryopsis davidiana seedlings inoculated with ectomycorrhizal fungi facilitate formation of mycorrhizae on Pinus tabulaeformis seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu-Lan Bai; Guo-Lei Li; Yong Liu; R. Kasten Dumroese; Rui-Heng Lv

    2009-01-01

    Reforestation in China is important for reversing anthropogenic activities that degrade the environment. Pinus tabulaeformis is desired for these activities, but survival and growth of seedlings can be hampered by lack of ectomycorrhizae. When outplanted in association with Ostryopsis davidiana plants on reforestation sites, P. tabulaeformis seedlings become...

  6. Pou4f2-GFP knock-in mouse line: A model for studying retinal ganglion cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Dongwang; Yang, Xiaoyan; Sheng, Donglai; Yu, Dongliang; Liang, Guoqing; Guo, Luming; Xu, Mei; Hu, Xu; He, Daqiang; Yang, Yang; Wang, Yuying

    2016-10-01

    Pou4f2 acts as a key node in the comprehensive and step-wise gene regulatory network (GRN) and regulates the development of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Accordingly, deletion of Pou4f2 results in RGC axon defects and apoptosis. To investigate the GRN involved in RGC regeneration, we generated a mouse line with a POU4F2-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein expressed in RGCs. Co-localization of POU4F2 and GFP in the retina and brain of Pou4f2-GFP/+ heterozygote mice was confirmed using immunofluorescence analysis. Compared with those in wild-type mice, the expression patterns of POU4F2 and POU4F1 and the co-expression patterns of ISL1 and POU4F2 were unaffected in Pou4f2-GFP/GFP homozygote mice. Moreover, the quantification of RGCs showed no significant difference between Pou4f2-GFP/GFP homozygote and wild-type mice. These results demonstrated that the development of RGCs in Pou4f2-GFP/GFP homozygote mice was the same as in wild-type mice. Thus, the present Pou4f2-GFP knock-in mouse line is a useful tool for further studies on the differentiation and regeneration of RGCs. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Annual and semiannual variations in the ionospheric F2-layer: II. Physical discussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Rishbeth

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available The companion paper by Zou et al. shows that the annual and semiannual variations in the peak F2-layer electron density (NmF2 at midlatitudes can be reproduced by a coupled thermosphere-ionosphere computational model (CTIP, without recourse to external influences such as the solar wind, or waves and tides originating in the lower atmosphere. The present work discusses the physics in greater detail. It shows that noon NmF2 is closely related to the ambient atomic/molecular concentration ratio, and suggests that the variations of NmF2 with geographic and magnetic longitude are largely due to the geometry of the auroral ovals. It also concludes that electric fields play no important part in the dynamics of the midlatitude thermosphere. Our modelling leads to the following picture of the global three-dimensional thermospheric circulation which, as envisaged by Duncan, is the key to explaining the F2-layer variations. At solstice, the almost continuous solar input at high summer latitudes drives a prevailing summer-to-winter wind, with upwelling at low latitudes and throughout most of the summer hemisphere, and a zone of downwelling in the winter hemisphere, just equatorward of the auroral oval. These motions affect thermospheric composition more than do the alternating day/night (up-and-down motions at equinox. As a result, the thermosphere as a whole is more molecular at solstice than at equinox. Taken in conjunction with the well-known relation of F2-layer electron density to the atomic/molecular ratio in the neutral air, this explains the F2-layer semiannual effect in NmF2 that prevails at low and middle latitudes. At higher midlatitudes, the seasonal behaviour depends on the geographic latitude of the winter downwelling zone, though the effect of the composition changes is modified by the large solar zenith angle at midwinter. The zenith angle effect is especially important in longitudes far from the magnetic poles. Here, the downwelling occurs

  8. Analysis of the Rare Decay $B_s \\rightarrow f_2' \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ with $f_2' \\rightarrow K^+ K^-$ Final State

    CERN Document Server

    Berninghoff, Daniel Alexander

    2014-01-01

    This report describes the project that I worked on during my time as a summer student at CERN in summer 2014: A search for the rare decay $B_s \\rightarrow f_2' \\mu^+ \\mu^-$ at the LHCb experiment has been performed using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity $\\mathcal{L} = 3.0 \\text{ fb}^{-1}$. In the Standard Model (SM), this decay is highly suppressed as it proceeds via an electroweak penguin transition. New Physics (NP) effects can enter the loop and influence observables like the branching ratio $\\mathcal{B}$. A theoretical prediction of the branching ratio in the SM is given by $\\mathcal{B}_\\text{th}(B_s \\rightarrow f_2' \\mu^+ \\mu^-) = \\left( 1.8\\,^{+1.1}_{-0.7} \\right) \\cdot 10^{-7}$. We found $N_\\text{obs} = 17.2 \\pm 2.9$ signal candidates using a two dimensional mass fit which is in the same order of magnitude as the theoretical prediction $N_\\text{pred} = 15_{-7}^{+10}$. Though, further systematic effects in the analysis still have to be investigated before converting this into a reliable va...

  9. Neutral kaon mixing beyond the Standard Model with n f = 2 + 1 chiral fermions. Part 2: non perturbative renormalisation of the Δ F = 2 four-quark operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Peter A.; Garron, Nicolas; Hudspith, Renwick J.; Lehner, Christoph; Lytle, Andrew T.

    2017-10-01

    We compute the renormalisation factors ( Z-matrices) of the Δ F = 2 four-quark operators needed for Beyond the Standard Model (BSM) kaon mixing. We work with n f = 2+1 flavours of Domain-Wall fermions whose chiral-flavour properties are essential to maintain a continuum-like mixing pattern. We introduce new RI-SMOM renormalisation schemes, which we argue are better behaved compared to the commonly-used corresponding RI-MOM one. We find that, once converted to \\overline{MS} , the Z-factors computed through these RI-SMOM schemes are in good agreement but differ significantly from the ones computed through the RI-MOM scheme. The RI-SMOM Z-factors presented here have been used to compute the BSM neutral kaon mixing matrix elements in the companion paper [1]. We argue that the renormalisation procedure is responsible for the discrepancies observed by different collaborations, we will investigate and elucidate the origin of these differences throughout this work.

  10. Non-trough foF2 enhancements at near-equatorial dip latitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. Kobea

    Full Text Available Fine resolution series from three equatorial ionosondes of the IEEY network in West Africa have revealed small-scale daytime peak F2 structures, superposed on the slowly varying minimum or "trough" distribution in the ±5° magnetic latitude zone. We report this new morphology, concentrating on foF2 enhancements of two types: near-equatorial crests (which travel either northwards or southwards and magnetic field-aligned domes, whose onsets last only tens of minutes. Both types are observed to start at mid-morning or early afternoon hours. We relate their occurrence with the available variations of Vz=E × B upward drift which feeds the equatorial plasma fountain. We suggest the foF2 enhancements to be triggered by brief slow-downs of the Vz velocity near F2 peak altitude in our West African sector. Their short latitude extent differentiates them from the larger-scale tropical crest system. Further analysis of these features should lead to weather-like models of the low latitude ionosphere variations, where unstable local coupling between processes seems to be the trigger.Key words. Ionosphere (Equatorial ionosphere · Ionosphere-atmosphere interaction · Plasma temperature and density

  11. Electron cryomicroscopy reveals different F1+F2 protein States in intact parainfluenza virions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Kai; Schade, Boris; Böttcher, Christoph; Korte, Thomas; Ohlwein, Nina; Baljinnyam, Bolormaa; Veit, Michael; Herrmann, Andreas

    2008-04-01

    Electron cryomicrographs of intact parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) virions revealed two different surface structures, namely, a continuous layer and distinct individual spikes. The structure of these spikes reconstructed from intact virions was compared with known F ectodomain structures and was found to be different from the prefusion PIV5 F0 structure but, surprisingly, very similar to the human PIV3 F postfusion structure. Hence, we conclude that the individual F1+F2 spikes in intact PIV5 virions also correspond to the postfusion state. Since the observed fusion activity of PIV5 virions has to be associated with prefusion F1+F2 proteins, they have necessarily to be localized in the continuous surface structure. The data therefore strongly suggest that the prefusion state of the F1+F2 protein requires stabilization, most probably by the association with hemagglutinin-neuraminidase. The conversion of F1+F2 proteins from the prefusion toward the postfusion state while embedded in the virus membrane is topologically difficult to comprehend on the basis of established models and demands reconsideration of our current understanding.

  12. Vibrational excitation resulting from electron capture in LUMO of F 2 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 124; Issue 1. Vibrational excitation resulting from electron capture in LUMO of F2 and HCl - A treatment using the time-dependent wave packet approach. Bhavesh K Shandilya Manabendra Sarma Satrajit Adhikari Manoj K Mishra. Volume 124 Issue 1 January 2012 ...

  13. Structure and transport properties of LiF-BeF 2 mixtures ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to study the structure and dynamics of the LiF-BeF2 system over a range of compositions using the transferable rigid-ion model (TRIM). The densities obtained with the TRIM potential are approximately 17-20% lower than the experimental values while polarizable ion models ...

  14. Mapping of imprinted quantitative trait loci using immortalized F2 populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongxian Wen

    Full Text Available Mapping of imprinted quantitative trait loci (iQTLs is helpful for understanding the effects of genomic imprinting on complex traits in animals and plants. At present, the experimental designs and corresponding statistical methods having been proposed for iQTL mapping are all based on temporary populations including F2 and BC1, which can be used only once and suffer some other shortcomings respectively. In this paper, we propose a framework for iQTL mapping, including methods of interval mapping (IM and composite interval mapping (CIM based on conventional low-density genetic maps and point mapping (PM and composite point mapping (CPM based on ultrahigh-density genetic maps, using an immortalized F2 (imF2 population generated by random crosses between recombinant inbred lines or doubled haploid lines. We demonstrate by simulations that imF2 populations are very desirable and the proposed statistical methods (especially CIM and CPM are very powerful for iQTL mapping, with which the imprinting effects as well as the additive and dominance effects of iQTLs can be unbiasedly estimated.

  15. A BaF2 crystal array for high energy-ray measurements

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We shall discuss about the scientific motivation and construction of a 7 × 7 BaF2 crystal array at Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Calcutta. This detector would be used to measure high energy -ray photons from GDR decay and proton–neutron bremsstrahlung reactions at the present 88'' cyclotron and upcoming ...

  16. miR-27b inhibits gastric cancer metastasis by targeting NR2F2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingzhao Feng

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Increasing attention is focused on the down-regulation of miRNAs in cancer process. Nuclear receptor subfamily 2 (NR2F2, also known as COUP-TFII is involved in the development of many types of cancers, but its role in gastric cancer remains elusive. In this experiment, oncomine and Kaplan-meier database revealed that NR2F2 was up-regulated in gastric cancer and that the high NR2F2 expression contributed to poor survival. MicroRNA-27b was targeted and down-regulated by NR2F2 in human gastric cancer tissues and cells. The ectopic expression of miR-27b inhibited gastric cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. Assays suggested that the overexpression of miR-27b could promote MGC-803 cells’ migration and invasion and retard their metastasis to the liver. In addition, down-regulation of miR-27b enhanced GES-1 cells’ proliferation and metastasis in vitro. These findings reveal that miR-27b is a tumor suppressor in gastric cancer and a biomarker for improving patients’ survival.

  17. 17 CFR 270.17f-2 - Custody of investments by registered management investment company.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Custody of investments by....17f-2 Custody of investments by registered management investment company. (a) The securities and similar investments of a registered management investment company may be maintained in the custody of such...

  18. Vibrational excitation resulting from electron capture in LUMO of F2 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    resonance anionic Hamiltonian HAB- (AB=F2/HCl) is effected using Lanczos reduction technique followed by fast Fourier transform and the target (AB) vibrational eigenfunctions φνi (R) and φν f (R) are calculated using Fourier grid Hamiltonian method applied to potential energy (PE) curve of the neutral target. The result-.

  19. Vacuum ultraviolet Mach-Zehnder interferometer with CaF2 optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, P. L.; Lombardi, G. G.; Cardon, B. L.; Parkinson, W. H.

    1981-01-01

    CaF2 beam splitters and compensation and test cell windows have been installed in a VUV Mach-Zehnder interferometer. Results of an evaluation of their performance in the VUV, namely, a measurement of the oscillator strength (f value) of the resonance transition at atomic xenon at 146.9610 nm are reported.

  20. Elastic and magnetic effects on the infrared phonon spectra of MnF2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleck, R.; Nahas, Y.; Lobo, R. P. S. M.; Varignon, J.; Lepetit, M. B.; Nelson, C. S.; Moreira, R. L.

    2010-08-01

    We measured the temperature-dependent infrared reflectivity spectra of MnF2 between 4 and 600 K. We show that the phonon spectrum undergoes a clear renormalization at TN . The ab initio calculation we performed on this compound accurately predicts the magnitude and the direction of the changes in the phonon parameters across the antiferromagnetic transition, showing that they are mainly induced by the magnetic order. In this material, we found that the dielectric constant is mostly from phonon origin. The large change in the lattice parameters with temperature seen by x-ray diffraction as well as the A2u phonon softening below TN indicate that magnetic order induced distortions in MnF2 are compatible with the ferroelectric instabilities observed in TiO2 , FeF2 and other rutile-type fluorides. This study also shows the anomalous temperature evolution of the lower energy Eu mode in the paramagnetic phase, which can be compared to that of the B1g phonon seen by Raman spectroscopy in many isostructural materials. This was interpreted as being a precursor of a phase transition from rutile to CaCl2 structure which was observed under pressure in ZnF2 .

  1. Relationship between Kinematics, F2 Slope and Speech Intelligibility in Dysarthria Due to Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Panying; Loucks, Torrey; Kim, Heejin; Hasegawa-Johnson, Mark

    2012-01-01

    A multimodal approach combining acoustics, intelligibility ratings, articulography and surface electromyography was used to examine the characteristics of dysarthria due to cerebral palsy (CP). CV syllables were studied by obtaining the slope of F2 transition during the diphthong, tongue-jaw kinematics during the release of the onset consonant,…

  2. QTL analysis for early yield in a pseudo F 2 population of cassava ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic mapping of early bulking in a full-sib population of cassava was continued in a selfed family of 268 cassava plants derived from a single progeny of the full-sib population. The pseudo F2 population was analysed with 122 segregating SSR markers. A previously constructed linkage map of cassava consisting of 22 ...

  3. Marker aided selection for aroma in F 2 populations of rice | Kiani ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, crosses between two high yielding cultivars, Neda and Nemat with local aromatic varieties Sang tarom and Tarom deylamani were made followed by phenotypic selection for desirable individual plants in F2 populations. Then, marker aided selection was applied to genotypic selection of aromatic plants using ...

  4. Anaerobic metabolism in Brassica seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Myoung-Ryoul; Hasenstein, Karl H.

    Germination typically depends on oxidative respiration. The lack of convection under space conditions may create hypoxic or conditions during seed germination. We investigated the effect of reduced oxygen on seed germination and metabolism to understand how metabolic constraints affect seed growth and responsiveness to reorientation. Germination was completely inhibited when seeds were imbibed in the absence of oxygen; germination occurred at 5% oxygen and higher levels. Adding oxygen after 72 h resulted in immediate germination (protrusion of the radicle). Hypoxia typically activates alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH, EC 1.1.1.1) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, EC 1.1.1.27) which produce ethanol and/or L-lactate, respectively. We report on the expression of ADH1 and LDH1, and changes in total soluble sugars, starch, pH, and L-lactate in seedlings grown at 28°C in 0, 2.5, 5, 10% and ambient (21%) oxygen conditions as controls. The highest consumption (lowest level) of sugars was seen at 0% oxygen but the lowest level of starch occurred 24 h after imbibition under ambient condition. Expression levels of ADH1 in ambient oxygen condition increased within 24 h but increased threefold under hypoxic conditions; LDH1 increased up to 8-fold under hypoxia compared to controls but ADH1 and LDH1 were less expressed as the oxygen levels increased. The intracellular pH of seeds decreased as the content of L-lactate increased for all oxygen concentrations. These results indicate that germination of Brassica is sensitive to oxygen levels and that oxygen availability during germination is an important factor for metabolic activities. (Supported by NASA grant NNX10AP91G)

  5. Protein-protein docking with F(2Dock 2.0 and GB-rerank.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezaul Chowdhury

    Full Text Available Computational simulation of protein-protein docking can expedite the process of molecular modeling and drug discovery. This paper reports on our new F(2 Dock protocol which improves the state of the art in initial stage rigid body exhaustive docking search, scoring and ranking by introducing improvements in the shape-complementarity and electrostatics affinity functions, a new knowledge-based interface propensity term with FFT formulation, a set of novel knowledge-based filters and finally a solvation energy (GBSA based reranking technique. Our algorithms are based on highly efficient data structures including the dynamic packing grids and octrees which significantly speed up the computations and also provide guaranteed bounds on approximation error.The improved affinity functions show superior performance compared to their traditional counterparts in finding correct docking poses at higher ranks. We found that the new filters and the GBSA based reranking individually and in combination significantly improve the accuracy of docking predictions with only minor increase in computation time. We compared F(2 Dock 2.0 with ZDock 3.0.2 and found improvements over it, specifically among 176 complexes in ZLab Benchmark 4.0, F(2 Dock 2.0 finds a near-native solution as the top prediction for 22 complexes; where ZDock 3.0.2 does so for 13 complexes. F(2 Dock 2.0 finds a near-native solution within the top 1000 predictions for 106 complexes as opposed to 104 complexes for ZDock 3.0.2. However, there are 17 and 15 complexes where F(2 Dock 2.0 finds a solution but ZDock 3.0.2 does not and vice versa; which indicates that the two docking protocols can also complement each other.The docking protocol has been implemented as a server with a graphical client (TexMol which allows the user to manage multiple docking jobs, and visualize the docked poses and interfaces. Both the server and client are available for download. Server: http://www.cs.utexas.edu/~bajaj/cvc/software/f

  6. Protein-protein docking with F(2)Dock 2.0 and GB-rerank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Rezaul; Rasheed, Muhibur; Keidel, Donald; Moussalem, Maysam; Olson, Arthur; Sanner, Michel; Bajaj, Chandrajit

    2013-01-01

    Computational simulation of protein-protein docking can expedite the process of molecular modeling and drug discovery. This paper reports on our new F(2) Dock protocol which improves the state of the art in initial stage rigid body exhaustive docking search, scoring and ranking by introducing improvements in the shape-complementarity and electrostatics affinity functions, a new knowledge-based interface propensity term with FFT formulation, a set of novel knowledge-based filters and finally a solvation energy (GBSA) based reranking technique. Our algorithms are based on highly efficient data structures including the dynamic packing grids and octrees which significantly speed up the computations and also provide guaranteed bounds on approximation error. The improved affinity functions show superior performance compared to their traditional counterparts in finding correct docking poses at higher ranks. We found that the new filters and the GBSA based reranking individually and in combination significantly improve the accuracy of docking predictions with only minor increase in computation time. We compared F(2) Dock 2.0 with ZDock 3.0.2 and found improvements over it, specifically among 176 complexes in ZLab Benchmark 4.0, F(2) Dock 2.0 finds a near-native solution as the top prediction for 22 complexes; where ZDock 3.0.2 does so for 13 complexes. F(2) Dock 2.0 finds a near-native solution within the top 1000 predictions for 106 complexes as opposed to 104 complexes for ZDock 3.0.2. However, there are 17 and 15 complexes where F(2) Dock 2.0 finds a solution but ZDock 3.0.2 does not and vice versa; which indicates that the two docking protocols can also complement each other. The docking protocol has been implemented as a server with a graphical client (TexMol) which allows the user to manage multiple docking jobs, and visualize the docked poses and interfaces. Both the server and client are available for download. Server: http://www.cs.utexas.edu/~bajaj/cvc/software/f

  7. Protein-Protein Docking with F2Dock 2.0 and GB-Rerank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Rezaul; Rasheed, Muhibur; Keidel, Donald; Moussalem, Maysam; Olson, Arthur; Sanner, Michel; Bajaj, Chandrajit

    2013-01-01

    Motivation Computational simulation of protein-protein docking can expedite the process of molecular modeling and drug discovery. This paper reports on our new F2 Dock protocol which improves the state of the art in initial stage rigid body exhaustive docking search, scoring and ranking by introducing improvements in the shape-complementarity and electrostatics affinity functions, a new knowledge-based interface propensity term with FFT formulation, a set of novel knowledge-based filters and finally a solvation energy (GBSA) based reranking technique. Our algorithms are based on highly efficient data structures including the dynamic packing grids and octrees which significantly speed up the computations and also provide guaranteed bounds on approximation error. Results The improved affinity functions show superior performance compared to their traditional counterparts in finding correct docking poses at higher ranks. We found that the new filters and the GBSA based reranking individually and in combination significantly improve the accuracy of docking predictions with only minor increase in computation time. We compared F2 Dock 2.0 with ZDock 3.0.2 and found improvements over it, specifically among 176 complexes in ZLab Benchmark 4.0, F2 Dock 2.0 finds a near-native solution as the top prediction for 22 complexes; where ZDock 3.0.2 does so for 13 complexes. F2 Dock 2.0 finds a near-native solution within the top 1000 predictions for 106 complexes as opposed to 104 complexes for ZDock 3.0.2. However, there are 17 and 15 complexes where F2 Dock 2.0 finds a solution but ZDock 3.0.2 does not and vice versa; which indicates that the two docking protocols can also complement each other. Availability The docking protocol has been implemented as a server with a graphical client (TexMol) which allows the user to manage multiple docking jobs, and visualize the docked poses and interfaces. Both the server and client are available for download. Server: http://www.cs.utexas.edu/~bajaj/cvc/software/f

  8. Comparison of On-line and F2F Education Methods in Teaching Computer Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevinç Gülseçen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available lthough online education provides opportunities to people who traditionally do not have access to universities, there is a need for more empirical studies to gain better understanding on how to deliver quality online education, especially when the subject of the course is related with IT. Learning to program is a complicated process. This study aims to find out the difference between students’ performance in online and face-to-face (F2F settings during a computer programming in the fall semester of the year 2010. The study was conducted at the Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, Istanbul University. This online course is one of the required courses for students majoring in Mathematics. It is delivered in a learning management system developed in house through a project funded by Istanbul University. The goal is to introduce students with structured programming using the programming language C. Two topics -“Functions in C Programming” and “Loops in C Programming” - were presented to students online and F2F. The total of 62 students formed two groups: the online and F2F groups. The content analysis statistical technique is used, as well as a questionnaire consisting of open-ended questions, which performed as a data collection tool to find out the views of the students in context to the process. While some results concluded that the performance of online students was satisfactory, but that their aggregate final grade was significantly lower than that of students who took an equivalent F2F class, others arrived at a conclusion reporting that there were no significant differences in overall outcomes. In case of making transition from F2F to online mode of teaching, prepossession about a new way of teaching is always an important barrier in students’ perceptions. One of the further researches is investigation of strategies for incorporating blended learning opportunities in programming courses.

  9. Influenza A virus protein PB1-F2 exacerbates IFN-beta expression of human respiratory epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Goffic, Ronan; Bouguyon, Edwige; Chevalier, Christophe; Vidic, Jasmina; Da Costa, Bruno; Leymarie, Olivier; Bourdieu, Christiane; Decamps, Laure; Dhorne-Pollet, Sophie; Delmas, Bernard

    2010-10-15

    The PB1-F2 protein of the influenza A virus (IAV) contributes to viral pathogenesis by a mechanism that is not well understood. PB1-F2 was shown to modulate apoptosis and to be targeted by the CD8(+) T cell response. In this study, we examined the downstream effects of PB1-F2 protein during IAV infection by measuring expression of the cellular genes in response to infection with wild-type WSN/33 and PB1-F2 knockout viruses in human lung epithelial cells. Wild-type virus infection resulted in a significant induction of genes involved in innate immunity. Knocking out the PB1-F2 gene strongly decreased the magnitude of expression of cellular genes implicated in antiviral response and MHC class I Ag presentation, suggesting that PB1-F2 exacerbates innate immune response. Biological network analysis revealed the IFN pathway as a link between PB1-F2 and deregulated genes. Using quantitative RT-PCR and IFN-β gene reporter assay, we determined that PB1-F2 mediates an upregulation of IFN-β expression that is dependent on NF-κB but not on AP-1 and IFN regulatory factor-3 transcription factors. Recombinant viruses knocked out for the PB1-F2 and/or the nonstructural viral protein 1 (the viral antagonist of the IFN response) genes provide further evidence that PB1-F2 increases IFN-β expression and that nonstructural viral protein 1 strongly antagonizes the effect of PB1-F2 on the innate response. Finally, we compared the effect of PB1-F2 variants taken from several IAV strains on IFN-β expression and found that PB1-F2-mediated IFN-β induction is significantly influenced by its amino acid sequence, demonstrating its importance in the host cell response triggered by IAV infection.

  10. The fungi causin damping-off of carrot seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Nowicki

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available When 136 samples of dying carrot seedlings from several fields were analyzed Alternaria rudicina proved to be the most common seedling pathogen (41%, followed by some Fusarium species (27%, mostly F. avenaceum.The less common seedling pathogens were Pythium spp. (13%, Phoma spp.(2,5% and Botrytis cinerea (1,4%. Some other fungi (Bipolaris sorokiniana, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, Stemphylium botryosym and Ulocladium consortiale were found in less than 1% of seedlings examined.

  11. Altered Cultivar Resistance of Kimchi Cabbage Seedlings Mediated by Salicylic Acid, Jasmonic Acid and Ethylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Hee Lee

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Two cultivars Buram-3-ho (susceptible and CR-Hagwang (moderate resistant of kimchi cabbage seedlings showed differential defense responses to anthracnose (Colletotrichum higginsianum, black spot (Alternaria brassicicola and black rot (Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, Xcc diseases in our previous study. Defense-related hormones salicylic acid (SA, jasmonic acid (JA and ethylene led to different transcriptional regulation of pathogenesis-related (PR gene expression in both cultivars. In this study, exogenous application of SA suppressed basal defenses to C. higginsianum in the 1st leaves of the susceptible cultivar and cultivar resistance of the 2nd leaves of the resistant cultivar. SA also enhanced susceptibility of the susceptible cultivar to A. brassicicola. By contrast, SA elevated disease resistance to Xcc in the resistant cultivar, but not in the susceptible cultivar. Methyl jasmonate (MJ treatment did not affect the disease resistance to C. higginsianum and Xcc in either cultivar, but it compromised the disease resistance to A. brassicicola in the resistant cultivar. Treatment with 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC ethylene precursor did not change resistance of the either cultivar to C. higginsianum and Xcc. Effect of ACC pretreatment on the resistance to A. brassicicola was not distinguished between susceptible and resistant cultivars, because cultivar resistance of the resistant cultivar was lost by prolonged moist dark conditions. Taken together, exogenously applied SA, JA and ethylene altered defense signaling crosstalk to three diseases of anthracnose, black spot and black rot in a cultivar-dependent manner.

  12. Hardening fertilization and nutrient loading of conifer seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Kasten Dumroese

    2003-01-01

    Continuing to fertilize bareroot and container seedlings during the hardening process (from cessation of height growth until lifting) can improve seedling viability. The process of fertilizing during hardening has many names, but in the last decade a new term, nutrient loading, has come into use. The process of nutrient loading seedlings leads to luxury consumption...

  13. Evaluation of transplanted bare-rooted cocoa seedlings for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soaking the roots of the seedlings in water also recorded higher leaf abscission rates than those wrapped in wet mud. The seedlings whose roots were wrapped in wet mud for twenty-four hours before transplanting recorded the highest rate of leaf emergence after one year of transplanting. The uprooted seedlings soaked ...

  14. Interim Guidelines for Growing Longleaf Seedlings in Containers

    Science.gov (United States)

    James P. Barnett; Mark J. Hainds; George A. Hernandez

    2002-01-01

    The demand for container longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) planting stock continues to increase each year. A problem facing both producers and users of container seedlings is the lack of target seedling specifications. Outplanting and evaluating performance of seedlings with a range of physiological and morphological characteristics, over a...

  15. Variation in seedling morphology of Turkish fir ( Abies ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, the genetic variation of some seedling characteristics of Turkish fir was investigated. A total of 303 trees were selected from 17 plots and 10 seedlings from each tree were used. Fifteen morphological characteristics were determined, including root collar diameter, seedling height, total needle, bud length and ...

  16. Growing media trials at the Montana Conservation Seedling Nursery

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Justin

    2009-01-01

    The Montana Conservation Seedling Nursery (MCSN) in Missoula produces 750,000 container seedlings annually in containers ranging in size from 66 cm3 (4 in3) up to 61 L (16 gal) pots. The MCSN is a production facility with no research funding. When we encounter a promising idea for improving our seedlings or the efficiency of nursery operations, we rarely perform...

  17. Cotyledon persistence and seedling growth in fluted Pumpkin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Photosynthetic activity of exposed cotyledons of Telfairia occidentalis during seed germination and the growth of seedlings with removed or attached cotyledons were investigated. The experiment investigated how early cotyledon removal affects seedling growth. Seedlings from seeds germinated in light and those ...

  18. Grazing on Regeneration Sites Encourages Pine Seedling Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond D. Ratliff; Renee G. Denton

    1995-01-01

    Effects of season-long, deferred-rotation, and rest-rotation grazing, on ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.) seedling growth and herbaceous vegetation control were studied in regeneration sites at Boyd Hill, Modoc National Forest, California. Seedlings were planted in 1989. Pine seedling survival and damage did not differ, but the...

  19. The effects of a wildfire on pine seedling recruitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paula C. Gnehm; Brad Hadley

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the effects of a single arson wildfire by comparing its impact on pine seedling recruitment with that of both prescribed fire and unburned compartments. Although a t-test detected no significant difference in pine seedling recruitment (p = 0.38), the "wildfire" treatment produced 127 more seedlings than the unburned...

  20. Seed Mucilage Improves Seedling Emergence of a Sand Desert Shrub

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xuejun; Baskin, Carol C.; Baskin, Jerry M.; Liu, Guangzheng; Huang, Zhenying

    2012-01-01

    The success of seedling establishment of desert plants is determined by seedling emergence response to an unpredictable precipitation regime. Sand burial is a crucial and frequent environmental stress that impacts seedling establishment on sand dunes. However, little is known about the ecological role of seed mucilage in seedling emergence in arid sandy environments. We hypothesized that seed mucilage enhances seedling emergence in a low precipitation regime and under conditions of sand burial. In a greenhouse experiment, two types of Artemisia sphaerocephala achenes (intact and demucilaged) were exposed to different combinations of burial depth (0, 5, 10, 20, 40 and 60 mm) and irrigation regimes (low, medium and high, which simulated the precipitation amount and frequency in May, June and July in the natural habitat, respectively). Seedling emergence increased with increasing irrigation. It was highest at 5 mm sand burial depth and ceased at burial depths greater than 20 mm in all irrigation regimes. Mucilage significantly enhanced seedling emergence at 0, 5 and 10 mm burial depths in low irrigation, at 0 and 5 mm burial depths in medium irrigation and at 0 and 10 mm burial depths in high irrigation. Seed mucilage also reduced seedling mortality at the shallow sand burial depths. Moreover, mucilage significantly affected seedling emergence time and quiescence and dormancy percentages. Our findings suggest that seed mucilage plays an ecologically important role in successful seedling establishment of A. sphaerocephala by improving seedling emergence and reducing seedling mortality in stressful habitats of the sandy desert environment. PMID:22511952

  1. Production of cell wall enzymes in pepper seedlings, inoculated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pepper seedlings inoculated with arbuscular mycorrhizal AM fungus, Glomus etunicatum, produced cellulase, polygal-acturonase and pectin methylestrase enzymes. The activities of the enzymes increased as the pepper seedlings matured in age, showing that the activity of the enzymes in the seedlings was age mediated.

  2. Effect of manganese on endomycorrhizal sugar maple seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    George A. Schier; Carolyn J. McQuattie

    2002-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) toxicity may play an important role in the poor survival of seedlings in declining sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) stands in northern Pennsylvania. To determine the effect of Mn on the growth of sugar maple seedlings, 1-year-old seedlings inoculated with vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal (VAM) fungi and growing in sand-vermiculite-...

  3. F2 slope as a Perceptual Cue for the Front-Back Contrast in Standard Southern British English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chládková, Kateřina; Hamann, Silke; Williams, Daniel; Hellmuth, Sam

    2017-09-01

    Acoustic studies of several languages indicate that second-formant (F2) slopes in high vowels have opposing directions (independent of consonantal context): front [iː]-like vowels are produced with a rising F2 slope, whereas back [uː]-like vowels are produced with a falling F2 slope. The present study first reports acoustic measurements that confirm this pattern for the English variety of Standard Southern British English (SSBE), where /uː/ has shifted from the back to the front area of the vowel space and is now realized with higher midpoint F2 values than several decades ago. Subsequently, we test whether the direction of F2 slope also serves as a reliable cue to the /iː/-/uː/ contrast in perception. The findings show that F2 slope direction is used as a cue (additional to midpoint formant values) to distinguish /iː/ from /uː/ by both young and older Standard Southern British English listeners: an otherwise ambiguous token is identified as /iː/ if it has a rising F2 slope and as /uː/ if it has a falling F2 slope. Furthermore, our results indicate that listeners generalize their reliance on F2 slope to other contrasts, namely /ɛ/-/ɒ/ and /æ/-/ɒ/, even though F2 slope is not employed to differentiate these vowels in production. This suggests that in Standard Southern British English, a rising F2 seems to be perceptually associated with an abstract feature such as [+front], whereas a falling F2 with an abstract feature such as [-front].

  4. EPR study of concentration dependence in Ce, Ce : La and Ce:Y doped SrF2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dankert, O.; Vainchtein, David; Datema, H.C.; den Hartog, Hendrik

    1995-01-01

    Experimental results of an EPR-study of the concentration dependence of the doubly integrated intensity and linewidth of the signals associated with tetragonal Ce3+-F--dipoles in Sr1-xCexF2+x, Sr-1-0.005-x Ce0.005LaxF2+0.005+x and Sr-1-0.005-x Ce0.005YxF2+0.005+x are presented. Both show a nonlinear

  5. Phonons in mixed superionic fluorites (BaF2)1–x(LaF3)x

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    BaF2)1–x(LaF3)x have been investigated by applying de .... The central force constant between Ba2+–Ba2+ ions is assumed to be the same as that between F1. – –F1. – or F2. – –F2. – ions and is repre- sented by α3. Here Ze is the charge on ...

  6. Solid State compatibilities in CaO-CaO∙Al2O3-CaF2 system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiménez Molina, S.

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available In open atmosphere the two phases containing fluorine, C11A7∙CaF2 and 3CA∙CaF2, laying in the CaO-CaO∙Al2O3-CaF2 were synthesized. The synthesis of the 3CA∙CaF2 at 1.100°C was possible without loss of F, when the stoichiometric mixture of CA and CaF2 was pressed into tablets and was applied vacuum, avoiding in such a way the presence of moisture. According to TGA studies, the vapour pressure of phases containing fluorine, at 1.100°C is very low and follows this sequence: CaF2 2 11A7∙CaF2. At 1.000°C the system behaves as condensated. Verification of some compatibilities in solid state in the system CaO-CaO∙Al2O3-CaF2 at 1000°C has been done. Compatibility triangles found are the same described by Chaterjee, and different from the compatibilities given by Brisi and Rolando.Se han sintetizado en atmósfera abierta las dos fases fluoradas del sistema CaO-CaO∙Al2O3-CaF2: C11A7∙CaF2 y 3CA∙CaF2. La síntesis del 3CACaF2 a 1.100°C ha sido posible sin pérdida de F, cuando la mezcla estequiométrica de CA y CaF2 se empastilló a presión y aplicando vacío, como modo de evitar la presencia de humedad. De acuerdo con los resultados de Análisis Termogravimétrico, la presión de vapor de las fases fluoradas, a 1.100°C, es muy baja y sigue el orden: CaF2 2 11A7∙CaF2. A 1.000°C, el sistema se comporta como condensado. Se han verificado algunas relaciones de fases compatibles en estado sólido, en el sistema CaO-CaO∙Al2O3-CaF2, a 1.000°C. Las relaciones de fases compatibles que se han encontrado coinciden con aquéllas descritas por Chaterjee, y son diferentes a las encontradas por Brisi y Rolando.

  7. Measurement of the photon structure function $F_{2}^{\\gamma}$ at low x

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Beeston, C.; Behnke, T.; Bell, A.N.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bird, S.D.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bloomer, J.E.; Bobinski, M.; Bock, P.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Bouwens, B.T.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Burgard, C.; Burgin, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davies, R.; De Jong, S.; del Pozo, L.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Doucet, M.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Eatough, D.; Edwards, J.E.G.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Evans, H.G.; Evans, M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fischer, H.M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Fong, D.G.; Foucher, M.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Geddes, N.I.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Geralis, T.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giacomelli, R.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Goodrick, M.J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hajdu, C.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Hargrove, C.K.; Hart, P.A.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hillier, S.J.; Hobson, P.R.; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ingram, M.R.; Ishii, K.; Jawahery, A.; Jeffreys, P.W.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Joly, A.; Jones, C.R.; Jones, G.; Jones, M.; Jost, U.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kirk, J.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D.S.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Lahmann, R.; Lai, W.P.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S.R.; Layter, J.G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A.M.; Lefebvre, E.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Ludwig, J.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markus, C.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mincer, A.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Morii, M.; Muller, U.; Mihara, S.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nellen, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oh, A.; Oldershaw, N.J.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Palinkas, J.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Pearce, M.J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Poli, B.; Posthaus, A.; Rees, D.L.; Rigby, D.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rooke, A.; Ros, E.; Rossi, A.M.; Routenburg, P.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Ruppel, U.; Rust, D.R.; Rylko, R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schenk, P.; Schieck, J.; Schleper, P.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skillman, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Springer, Robert Wayne; Sproston, M.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stockhausen, B.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Szymanski, P.; Tafirout, R.; Talbot, S.D.; Tanaka, S.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomson, M.A.; von Torne, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A.S.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Utzat, P.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Verzocchi, M.; Vikas, P.; Vokurka, E.H.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; White, J.S.; Wilkens, B.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    1997-01-01

    Deep inelastic electron-photon scattering is studied using e+e- data collected by the OPAL detector at centre-of-mass energies sqrt{s_ee} ~ M_{Z^0}. The photon structure function F_2^gamma(x,Q^2) is explored in a Q^2 range of 1.1 to 6.6 GeV/c^2 at lower x values than ever before. To probe this kinematic region events are selected with a beam electron scattered into one of the OPAL luminosity calorimeters at scattering angles between 27 and 55 mrad. A measurement is presented of the photon structure function F_2^gamma(x,Q^2) at = 1.86 GeV^2 and 3.76 GeV^2 in five logarithmic x bins from 0.0025 to 0.2.

  8. The Importance of Magnetic Reflection Condition and Polarization Factor: Case Study of MnF2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Purwanto

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Neutron diffraction has been widely accepted as a versatile tool to investigate magnetic structure of crystalline materials, which contribute significantly to the scientific and technological advances. Starting from a general formulation of the magnetic structure factor, one can often simplify the formulation depending on the crystallographic structure and the magnetic wave propagation vector of the sample. The simplification allows magnetic moment coupling and polarization deduction without the need of the refinement process. This paper elaborates such simplification for MnF2 to provide the determination of the magnetic moment coupling and polarization direction simply based on the reflection condition and polarization factor. The determination of the magnetic structure excluding its magnitude by the reflection condition and polarization factor is much more conclusive than by any magnetic structure refinement. Furthermore, MnF2 illustrates a rare compound that has antiferromagnetic structure with zero magnetic wave propagation vector, i.e.; it has the same antiferromagnetic and crystallographic unit cell.

  9. Neuronal shot noise and Brownian 1/f2 behavior in the local field potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Milstein

    Full Text Available We demonstrate that human electrophysiological recordings of the local field potential (LFP from intracranial electrodes, acquired from a variety of cerebral regions, show a ubiquitous 1/f(2 scaling within the power spectrum. We develop a quantitative model that treats the generation of these fields in an analogous way to that of electronic shot noise, and use this model to specifically address the cause of this 1/f(2 Brownian noise. The model gives way to two analytically tractable solutions, both displaying Brownian noise: 1 uncorrelated cells that display sharp initial activity, whose extracellular fields slowly decay in time and 2 rapidly firing, temporally correlated cells that generate UP-DOWN states.

  10. Terahertz dual-band metamaterial absorber based on graphene/MgF(2) multilayer structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zhaoxian; Yin, Jianbo; Zhao, Xiaopeng

    2015-01-26

    We design an ultra-thin terahertz metamaterial absorber based on graphene/MgF(2) multilayer stacking unit cells arrayed on an Au film plane and theoretically demonstrate a dual-band total absorption effect. Due to strong anisotropic permittivity, the graphene/MgF(2) multilayer unit cells possess a hyperbolic dispersion. The strong electric and magnetic dipole resonances between unit cells make the impedance of the absorber match to that of the free space, which induces two total absorption peaks in terahertz range. These absorption peaks are insensitive to the polarization and nearly omnidirectional for the incident angle. But the absorption intensity and frequency depend on material and geometric parameters of the multilayer structure. The absorbed electromagnetic waves are finally converted into heat and, as a result, the absorber shows a good nanosecond photothermal effect.

  11. Comparative analysis of analytical solutions for F2P(x ,t ) in the DGLAP approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, D. K.; Borah, Neelakshi N. K.

    2017-01-01

    Coupled Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi equations involving singlet quark and gluon distributions are explored by a Taylor expansion at small x as two first-order partial differential equations in two variables: Bjorken x and t (t =l n Q/2Λ2). The system of equations are then solved by Lagrange's method and the method of characteristics. We obtain the proton structure function F2P(x ,t ) by combining the corresponding nonsinglet and singlet structure functions with both methods. Analytical solutions for F2P(x ,t ) thus obtained are compared with the recent data published by the H1 and ZEUS Collaborations as well as with NNPDF3.0 parametrization, and their compatibility is checked. Comparative analysis favors the analytical solution by Lagrange's method; the plausible reasons behind that are also discussed.

  12. Agraphia and acalculia after a left prefrontal (F1, F2) infarction.

    OpenAIRE

    Tohgi, H; Saitoh, K; Takahashi, S.; Takahashi, H.; Utsugisawa, K; Yonezawa, H.; Hatano, K.; Sasaki, T.

    1995-01-01

    A patient presented with agraphia and acalculia associated with a left frontal (F1, F2) infarction. He made mainly phonological but also lexical errors in writing (syllabograms), but his ability to write kanji (morphograms) was relatively preserved. Although he could add and subtract numbers, he could neither multiply nor divide them because of a difficulty in retrieving the multiplication tables and calculation procedures. Positron emission tomography showed decreased cerebral blood flow and...

  13. Composition dependence of electrical properties of ZnF2–MO–TeO2 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dielectric constant ('), loss (tan ), a.c. conductivity () of ZnF2–MO–TeO2 glasses with varying concentrations of MO (P2O5, As2O3 and Bi2O3) were measured as a function of frequency and temperature over moderately wide ranges. From the analysis of these studies along with IR spectra and DTA results of these ...

  14. New perspectives for undoped CaF2 scintillator as a threshold activation neutron detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibczynski Pawel

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present the prompt photofission neutron detection performance of undoped CaF2 scintillator using Threshold Activation Detection (TAD. The study is carried out in the frame of C-BORD Horizon 2020 project, during which an efficient toolbox for high volume freight non-intrusive inspection (NII is under development. Technologies for radiation monitoring are the part of the project. Particularly, detection of various radiological threats on country borders plays an important significant role in Homeland Security applications. Detection of illegal transfer of Special Nuclear Material (SNM - 235U, 233U and 239Pu - is particular due to the potential use for production of nuclear weapon as well as radiological dispersal device (RDD V known also as a “dirty bomb”. This technique relies on activation of 19F nuclei in the scintillator medium by fast neutrons and registration of high-energy β particles and γ-rays from the decay of reaction products. The radiation from SNM is detected after irradiation in order to avoid detector blinding. Despite the low 19F(n,α16N or 19F(n,p19O reaction cross-section, the method could be a good solution for detection of shielded nuclear material. Results obtained with the CaF2 detector were compared with the previous study done for BaF2 and 3He detector. These experimental results were obtained using 252Cf source and 9 MeV Varian Linatron M9 linear accelerator (LINAC. Finally, performance of the prompt neutron detection system based on CaF2 will be validated at Rotterdam Seaport during field trails in 2018.

  15. Temporal and spatial deviation in F2 peak parameters derived from FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sanjay; Singh, R. P.; Tan, Eng Leong; Singh, A. K.; Ghodpage, R. N.; Siingh, Devendraa

    2016-06-01

    The plasma frequency profiles derived from the Constellation of Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC) radio occultation measurements are compared with ground-based ionosonde data during the year 2013. Equatorial and midlatitude five stations located in the Northern and Southern Hemisphere are considered: Jicamarca, Jeju, Darwin, Learmonth, and Juliusruh. The aim is to validate the COSMIC-derived data with ground-based measurements and to estimate the difference in plasma frequency (which represents electron density) and height of F2 layer peak during the daytime/nighttime and during different seasons by comparing the two data sets. Analysis showed that the nighttime data are better correlated than the daytime, and the maximum difference occurs at the equatorial ionospheric anomaly (EIA) station as compared to lower and midlatitude stations during the equinox months. The difference between daytime and nighttime correlations becomes insignificant at midlatitude stations. The statistical analysis of computed errors in foF2 (hmF2) showed Gaussian nature with the most probable error range of ±15% (±10%) at the equatorial and EIA stations, ±9% (±7%) outside the EIA region which reduced to ±8% (±6%) at midlatitude stations. The reduction in error at midlatitudes is attributed to the decrease in latitudinal electron density gradients. Comparing the analyzed data during the three geomagnetic storms and quiet days of the same months, it is observed that the differences are significantly enhanced during storm periods and the magnitude of difference in foF2 increases with the intensity of geomagnetic storm.

  16. New perspectives for undoped CaF2 scintillator as a threshold activation neutron detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibczynski, Pawel; Dziedzic, Andrzej; Grodzicki, Krystian; Iwanowska-Hanke, Joanna; Moszyński, Marek; Swiderski, Lukasz; Syntfeld-Każuch, Agnieszka; Wolski, Dariusz; Carrel, Frédérick; Grabowski, Amélie; Hamel, Matthieu; Laine, Frederic; Sari, Adrien; Iovene, Alessandro; Tintori, Carlo; Fontana, Cristiano; Pino, Felix

    2018-01-01

    In this paper we present the prompt photofission neutron detection performance of undoped CaF2 scintillator using Threshold Activation Detection (TAD). The study is carried out in the frame of C-BORD Horizon 2020 project, during which an efficient toolbox for high volume freight non-intrusive inspection (NII) is under development. Technologies for radiation monitoring are the part of the project. Particularly, detection of various radiological threats on country borders plays an important significant role in Homeland Security applications. Detection of illegal transfer of Special Nuclear Material (SNM) - 235U, 233U and 239Pu - is particular due to the potential use for production of nuclear weapon as well as radiological dispersal device (RDD) V known also as a "dirty bomb". This technique relies on activation of 19F nuclei in the scintillator medium by fast neutrons and registration of high-energy β particles and γ-rays from the decay of reaction products. The radiation from SNM is detected after irradiation in order to avoid detector blinding. Despite the low 19F(n,α)16N or 19F(n,p)19O reaction cross-section, the method could be a good solution for detection of shielded nuclear material. Results obtained with the CaF2 detector were compared with the previous study done for BaF2 and 3He detector. These experimental results were obtained using 252Cf source and 9 MeV Varian Linatron M9 linear accelerator (LINAC). Finally, performance of the prompt neutron detection system based on CaF2 will be validated at Rotterdam Seaport during field trails in 2018.

  17. QTL analysis for early yield in a pseudo F2 population of cassava

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-01-18

    Jan 18, 2008 ... The F2 population was evaluated for components of early yield, namely dry root ... the principal or second most important source of calories for more ..... Trait QTL. Flanking markers. Length. (cM). Linkage group. LOD. QTL. Position (cM) PVE a d d/a. Mode. FF. Ff3. NS 928 – SSRY 153. 16.3. 3. 2.95. 0.0. 7.6.

  18. Measurement of the electron structure function F2e at LEP energies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdallah, J.; et al., [Unknown; van Vulpen, I.

    2014-01-01

    The hadronic part of the electron structure function F2e has been measured for the first time, using e+e−e+e− data collected by the DELPHI experiment at LEP, at centre-of-mass energies of √s=91.2-209.5 GeV. The data analysis is simpler than that of the measurement of the photon structure function.

  19. Effet antihypertensif de BpF2, une fraction d\\'extrait aqueux de ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ces résultats suggèrent fortement la présence de deux types de principes actifs dans cette fraction active BpF2: - les principes actifs cholinomimétiques de type muscarinique, - les principes actifs non cholinomimétiques dont la nature reste à déterminer. La présence de ces substances dans la fraction active pourrait justifier ...

  20. Growth and dissolution on the CaF 2 (111) surface observed by scanning force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Guntram; Rammensee, Werner

    1997-02-01

    Scanning force microscopy (SFM) was used for in situ growth and dissolution experiments on the CaF 2 (111) surface in various aqueous solutions in order to investigate chemical processes within the CaF 2-water interface. Apart from growth and dissolution, a further process, the formation of protrusions, takes place in the interfacial region. These protrusions are inhomogeneously distributed but uniform in height (2.5-4 nm). The areal density of protrusions depends on the pH value and degree of saturation of the solution. In addition, experiments with in situ exchanged solutions show that the areal density depends further on the sequence of application of the solutions. These and other observations indicate that surface defects which are considered to form surface hydroxyl groups lead to the formation of protrusions. Therefore, we conclude that the protrusions represent surface precipitates which consist of multinuclear calcium (aquo) hydroxo complexes connected to surface hydroxyl groups. The existence of these hydroxo complexes cannot be explained by classical equilibrium thermodynamics of bulk reactions. Their formation is enabled by the different dielectric constant in the electrical double layer. Depending on the composition of solution and the defect density, the complexes reduce the active surface area of CaF 2 and therefore affect the growth and dissolution rates.

  1. Morphology of ionospheric F2 region variability associated with sudden stratospheric warmings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sumedha; Upadhayaya, A. K.

    2017-07-01

    The effect of sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) on the F2 region ionosphere has been extensively analyzed for the major event of year 2009, apart from a few reports on other major and minor events. Morphology of ionospheric responses during SSW can be better comprehended by analyzing such warming events under different solar, geomagnetic, and meteorological conditions. We investigate the features of F2 region variability following the SSW events of 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, and 2016, using ionosonde data from the Asian region covering a broad latitudinal range from 26.6°N to 45.1°N. We find perceptible ionospheric variations in electron densities during these warming events which is accompanied by a large variation of 117% within enhancements, as compared to a meagre variation of 11% within depressions, during these events. We also examine 6 months data at these latitudes and longitudes and find that the maximum and minimum variations in F2 layer critical frequency are observed during each SSW period. The influence of quasi-stationary 16 day planetary waves is seen during these SSW events. Further, a recently proposed parameter "SSW integrated strength" by Vieira et al. (2017) to characterize SSW event with respect to ionosphere is also examined. It is seen that it does not fit well for these seven SSW events at these latitudes and longitudes.

  2. The Role of NrF2 in the Regulation of Periodontal Health and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, A V; Saigh, M Al; McCulloch, C A; Glogauer, M

    2017-08-01

    Immune-related disease tolerance is an important defense strategy that facilitates the maintenance of health in organs and tissues that are commonly colonized by bacteria. Immune tolerance to dysbiotic, tooth-borne biofilms is a poorly understood yet clinically relevant concept in the immunopathological mechanisms that are involved in the pathogenesis of periodontitis, particularly those related to neutrophil and macrophage responses. In periodontal health, neutrophils and macrophages respond to the formation of pathogenic bacterial biofilms by the production of bactericidal reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, when released in excess, ROS cause tissue damage and exacerbate inflammation. To counter these destructive responses, many cell types, including neutrophils and macrophages, launch a dedicated antioxidant system that limits the cell and tissue-damaging effects of ROS. The expression of antioxidants is primarily regulated by genetic response elements in their promoters. Here we consider the roles of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (NrF2), a transcription factor, and other key regulators of antioxidants. The concept of disease tolerance, neutrophil and macrophage-generated oxidative stress, and their relationship to the pathogenesis of periodontitis is reviewed. We focus on the regulation of NrF2 and recent evidence suggesting that NrF2 plays a central role in host protection against tissue destruction in periodontitis.

  3. Evaluation Software for BaF2 Detector Array Electronics at CSNS-WNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaxi; Cao, Ping; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Deliang; He, Bing; Qi, Xincheng; An, Qi

    2017-06-01

    The “in programming barium fluoride (BaF2) detector array” is one of the experiment facilities at China Spallation Neutron Source-White Neutron Sources, which is designed for the measurement of neutron capture cross section with high accuracy. It consists of 92 crystal elements with completely 4π solid-angle coverage, which needs 92 analog channels and 92 digitization channels for data acquisition. Accordingly, the readout electronics is comprised with four distributed readout PXIe crates, containing 46 field digitization modules (FDMs). Each FDM supports two valid channels for signal digitizing. In this paper, evaluation software is designed for evaluating the performance of BaF2 readout electronics. It focuses on evaluating the performance of data transmission, waveform digitizing, and working status monitoring. Test results show that the evaluation software can correctly acquire and assemble data from the BaF2 readout system and evaluate the analog digital converter (ADC) performance under ADC test mode. FDMs in the readout system can also be monitored and controlled by this software in real time.

  4. Quiet time F2-layer disturbances: seasonal variations of the occurrence in the daytime sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Mikhailov

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Earlier revealed seasonal/latitudinal variations of the occurrence for positive and negative F2-layer Q-disturbances have been interpreted in the framework of the present-day concept of the thermosphere-ionosphere interaction. The basic process is the solar-driven and storm-induced thermospheric circulation's interaction which varies with season and latitude. Such morphological features as clustering of negative Q-disturbances around winter solstice and the appearance of an additional occurrence of summer peak at lower latitudes, the equinoctial occurrence peaks for positive Q-disturbances and their merging to one summer peak at lower latitudes can be explained in the framework of this concept. Moreover, seasonal/latitudinal variations of the occurrence for usual storm-induced F2-layer disturbances, which exhibit quite different morphology, are also explained within this concept and this may be considered as its success. Although some types of F2-layer Q-disturbances are obviously related to the impact from below, the analyzed seasonal/latitudinal occurrence variations are shown to have their origin in the thermosphere itself.

  5. Chilling stress response of postemergent cotton seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRidder, Benjamin P; Crafts-Brandner, Steven J

    2008-11-01

    Early season development of cotton is often impaired by sudden episodes of chilling temperature. We determined the chilling response specific to postemergent 13-day-old cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. cv. Coker 100A-glandless) seedlings. Seedlings were gradually chilled during the dark period and rewarmed during the night-to-day transition. For some chilled plants, the soil temperature was maintained at control level. Plant growth, water relations and net photosynthesis (P(n)) were analyzed after one or three chilling cycles and after 3 days of recovery. Three chilling cycles led to lower relative growth rate (RGR) compared with controls during the recovery period, especially for plants with chilled shoots and roots. Treatment differences in RGR were associated with net assimilation rate rather than specific leaf area. Both chilling treatments led to loss of leaf turgor during the night-to-day transition; this effect was greater for plants with chilled compared with warm roots. Chilling-induced water stress was associated with accumulation of the osmolyte glycine betaine to the same extent for both chilling treatments. Inhibition of P(n) during chilling was related to both stomatal and non-stomatal effects. P(n) fully recovered after seedlings were returned to control conditions for 3 days. We conclude that leaf expansion during the night-to-day transition was a significant factor determining the magnitude of the chilling response of postemergent cotton seedlings.

  6. Interim Guidelines Growing Longleaf Seedlings in Containers

    Science.gov (United States)

    James P. Barnett; Mark J. Hainds; George A. Hernandez

    2002-01-01

    These interim guidelines are designed for producers and users of longleaf pine container stock. They are not meant to exclude any container product. The seedling specifications listed in the preferred category are attainable by the grower and will result in excellent field sur vival and early height growth.

  7. Nursery practices, seedling sizes, and field performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    William I. Stein

    1988-01-01

    Highlights are presented from a large cooperative study to determine the combined effects of nursery cultural practices on the initial size and subsequent field performance of 2+0 Douglas-fir seedlings. The study involved seven sources of stock produced in three different nurseries and field plantings made over 3 years on 28 sites in southwestern Oregon. Seedbed...

  8. Design issues for evaluating seedling exposure studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. Charles Peterson; A. Robert. Mickler

    1993-01-01

    Tree seedling studies, covering a wide range of experimental conditions in pollutant treatment, species, facilities, and exposure regimes, have become commonplace in forestry research for assessing the actual and potential environmental effects of air pollutants on forest ecosystems. While assuring a wide breadth of scientific information, sufficient consideration has...

  9. Germination and seedlings performance of cashew ( Anacardium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... effects of nut-sowing orientations on the germination of cashew nuts and the responses of the resultant seedlings to cotyledon removed were studied in the nursery. While cashew nuts sown flat and those with stylar-end up had highest mean germination of 91.67 % and 92.50 % respectively the nuts sown with stalked-end ...

  10. Direct-seedling pines in the south

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harold J. Derr; William F. Mann

    1971-01-01

    Direct seeding of the southern pines is a versatile reforestation technique that is being widely accepted by land managers. On many sites it is more economical than planting nursery-grown seedlings or waiting for natural reproduction. It is applicable on some sites where access, terrain, or drainage conditions make planting difficult. Commercial trials have proved it...

  11. PET imaging of glutaminolysis in tumors by 18F-(2S,4R)4-fluoroglutamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Brian P; Ploessl, Karl; Wang, Limin; Qu, Wenchao; Zha, Zhihao; Wise, David R; Chodosh, Lewis A; Belka, George; Thompson, Craig B; Kung, Hank F

    2011-12-01

    Changes in gene expression, metabolism, and energy requirements are hallmarks of cancer growth and self-sufficiency. Upregulation of the PI3K/Akt/mTor pathway in tumor cells has been shown to stimulate aerobic glycolysis, which has enabled (18)F-FDG PET tumor imaging. However, of the millions of (18)F-FDG PET scans conducted per year, a significant number of malignant tumors are (18)F-FDG PET-negative. Recent studies suggest that several tumors may use glutamine as the key nutrient for survival. As an alternative metabolic tracer for tumors, (18)F-(2S,4R)4-fluoroglutamine was developed as a PET tracer for mapping glutaminolytic tumors. A series of in vitro cell uptake and in vivo animal studies were performed to demonstrate tumor cell addiction to glutamine. Cell uptake studies of this tracer were performed in SF188 and 9L glioblastoma tumor cells. Dynamic small-animal PET studies of (18)F-(2S,4R)4-fluoroglutamine were conducted in 2 animal models: xenografts produced in F344 rats by subcutaneous injection of 9L tumor cells and transgenic mice with M/tomND spontaneous mammary gland tumors. In vitro studies showed that both transformed 9L and SF188 tumor cells displayed a high rate of glutamine uptake (maximum uptake, ≈ 16% dose/100 μg of protein). The cell uptake of (18)F-(2S,4R)4-fluoroglutamine by SF188 cells is comparable to that of (3)H-L-glutamine but higher than that of (18)F-FDG. The tumor cell uptake can be selectively blocked. Biodistribution and PET studies showed that (18)F-(2S,4R)4-fluoroglutamine localized in tumors with a higher uptake than in surrounding muscle and liver tissues. Data suggest that certain tumor cells may use glutamine for energy production. The results support that (18)F-(2S,4R)4-fluoroglutamine is selectively taken up and trapped by tumor cells. It may be useful as a novel metabolic tracer for tumor imaging.

  12. The F1-F2 vowel chart for Czech whispered vowels a, e, i, o, u.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grepl, Michal; Furst, Tomas; Pesak, Josef

    2007-12-01

    The aim of this contribution is to present the formant chart of the Czech vowels a, e, i, o, u and show that this can be achieved by means of digital methods of sound processing. A group of 35 Czech students of the Pedagogical Faculty of Palacky University was tested and a record of whispered vowels was taken from each of them. The record was digitalized and processed by the Discrete Fourier Trasform. The result is the power spectrum of the individual vocals - the graphic output consists of a plot of the relative power of individual frequencies in the original sound. The values of the first two maxima which represent the first and the second formants were determined from the graph. The values were plotted on a formant chart. Altogether, 175 spectral analyses of individual vowels were performed. In the resulting power spectrum, the first and the second formant frequencies were identified. The first formant was plotted against the second one and pure vocal formant regions were identified. Frequency bands for the Czech vowel "a" were circumscribed between 850 and 1150 Hz for first formant (F1) and between 1200 and 2000 Hz for second formant (F2). Similarly, borders of frequency band for vowel "e" they were 700 and 950 Hz for F1 and 1700 and 3000 Hz for F2. For vowel "i" 300 and 450 Hz for F1 and 2000 and 3600 Hz for F2, for vowel "o" 600 and 800 Hz for F1 and 600 and 1400 Hz for F2, for vowel "u" 100 and 400 Hz for F1 and 400 and 1200 Hz for F2. At low frequencies it is feasible to invoke the source-filter model of voice production and associate vowel identity with frequencies of the first two formants in the voice spectrum. On the other hand, subject to intonation, singing or other forms of exposed voice (such as emotional speech, focused speech), the formant regions tend to spread. In spectral analysis other frequencies dominate, so specific formant frequency bands are not easily recognizable. Although the resulting formant map is not much different from the formant

  13. Gas phase UV and IR absorption spectra of CxF2x+1CHO (x=1-4)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hashikawa, Y; Kawasaki, M; Waterland, RL

    2004-01-01

    The UV and IR spectra of CxF2x+1 CHO (x = 1-4) were investigated using computational and experimental techniques. CxF2x+1CHO (x = 1-4) have broad UV absorption features centered at 300-310 nm. The maximum absorption cross-section increases significantly and shifts slightly to the red with increas...

  14. [Ecbolic and hormonal action of synthetic prostaglandin F2a in fetal mummification in two Holstein cows (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guay, P; Lamothe, P

    1979-02-01

    Ecbolic and Hormonal Action of Synthetic Prostaglandin F(2)a in Fetal Mummification in Two Holstein CowsThe effects of treatment with synthetic prostaglandin F(2)a (500mug i.m.) to correct cases of fetal mummification in two Holstein cows are described.

  15. Can Clinical Skills Be Taught Online? Comparing Skill Development between Online and F2F Students Using a Blinded Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, Dina J.; King, Erin; Ashmore, Margaret; Stanley, Craig

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the development of clinical assessment and intervention skills between students enrolled in a face-to-face (F2F) or an asynchronous online clinical social work class. All students from three semesters of F2F (n = 74) and online (n = 78) sections of an MSW clinical class taught by the same instructor were included. Two…

  16. Elastic properties of Na2 O–ZnO–ZnF2–B2 O3 oxyfluoride glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Elastic properties of Na2O–ZnO–ZnF2–B2O3 oxyfluoride glasses with different ZnF2 concentrations have been investigated using ultrasonic velocity measurements at room temperature, at a frequency of 10 MHz. Glasses prepared by melt quenching method were suitably polished for the ultrasonic velocity measurements ...

  17. Effect of preionization, fluorine concentration, and current density on the discharge uniformity in F2 excimer laser gas mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mathew, D.; Bastiaens, Hubertus M.J.; Boller, Klaus J.; Peters, P.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    The discharge homogeneity in F2-based excimer laser gas mixtures and its dependence on various key parameters, such as the degree of preionization, preionization delay time, F2 concentration and current density, is investigated in a small x-ray preionized discharge chamber. The spatial and temporal

  18. Postfire seedling dynamics and performance in Pinus halepensis Mill. populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daskalakou, Evangelia N.; Thanos, Costas A.

    2010-09-01

    Postfire dynamics of Aleppo pine seedling density, survival and growth were assessed in five burned forests of Attica, Greece (Stamata, Villia, Avlona, Kapandriti and Agios Stefanos) through the establishment of permanent experimental plots. All emerging seedlings were tagged and their survival and growth monitored at regular intervals. Seedling density dynamics show an initial, steep increase (to maximum values 2.9-4.6 seedlings m -2) followed by a gradual decrease that levels off at the second and third postfire year (1.3-3.0 seedlings m -2); similarly, postfire seedling survival more or less stabilised at 30-50%, 2-3 years after fire. On the basis of density and mortality trends as well as relevant bibliographic data, it is predicted that very dense, mature forests (10.000 trees ha -1 or more) will be reinstated within 15-20 years. During the first 5-7 postfire years, seedling/sapling annual height followed linear trends with various yearly rates, ranging mostly between 8 and 15 cm (and 27-30 cm in two exceptional, fast growing cases). Within an individual growth season, seedling height dynamics were found to follow sigmoid curves with growth increment peaks in mid-spring. The time (on a monthly basis) of seedling emergence did not affect seedling growth or survival. On the other hand, for the first time under natural conditions, it has been shown that cotyledon number per seedling, an indirect measure of both seed size and initial photosynthetic capacity, significantly affected seedling survival but not growth. Seedlings bearing a higher number of cotyledons, presumably derived from larger seeds, showed greater survival at the end of the first postfire year than seedlings with fewer cotyledons. A postfire selective pressure, favouring large seed size, is postulated to counteract with a contrasting one, which favours small seed size, expressed during fire-free conditions.

  19. Nanocomposite containing CaF2 nanoparticles: Thermal cycling, wear and long-term water-aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Michael D.; Moreau, Jennifer L.; Levine, Eric D.; Strassler, Howard D.; Chow, Laurence C.; Xu, Hockin H. K.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Fluoride (F) releasing dental restoratives are promising to promote remineralization and combat caries. The objectives of this study were to develop nanocomposite containing calcium fluoride nanoparticles (nCaF2), and to investigate the long-term mechanical durability including wear, thermal-cycling and long-term water-aging behavior. Methods Two types of fillers were used: nCaF2 with a diameter of 53 nm, and glass particles of 1.4 μm. Four composites were fabricated with fillers of: (1) 0% nCaF2 + 65% glass; (2) 10% nCaF2 + 55% glass; (3) 20% nCaF2 + 45% glass; (4) 30% nCaF2 + 35% glass. Three commercial materials were also tested. Specimens were subjected to thermal-cycling between 5 °C and 60 °C for 105 cycles, three-body wear for 4×105 cycles, and water-aging for 2 years. Results After thermal-cycling, the nCaF2 nanocomposites had flexural strengths in the range of 100-150 MPa, five times higher than the 20-30 MPa for resin-modified glass ionomer (RMGI). The wear scar depth showed an increasing trend with increasing nCaF2 filler level. Wear of nCaF2 nanocomposites was within the range of wear for commercial controls. Water-aging decreased the strength of all materials. At 2 years, flexural strength was 94 MPa for nanocomposite with 10% nCaF2, 60 MPa with 20% nCaF2, and 48 MPa with 30% nCaF2. They are 3-6 fold higher than the 15 MPa for RMGI (p nanocomposites appeared dense and solid. Significance Combining nCaF2 with glass particles yielded nanocomposites with long-term mechanical properties that were comparable to those of a commercial composite with little F release, and much better than those of RMGI controls. These strong long-term properties, together with their F release being comparable to RMGI as previously reported, indicate that the nCaF2 nanocomposites are promising for load-bearing and caries-inhibiting restorations. PMID:22429937

  20. Differential expression of superoxide dismutase genes in aphid-stressed maize (Zea mays L. seedlings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubert Sytykiewicz

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the expression patterns of superoxide dismutase genes (sod2, sod3.4, sod9 and sodB in seedling leaves of the Zea mays L. Tasty Sweet (susceptible and Ambrozja (relatively resistant cultivars infested with one of two hemipteran species, namely monophagous Sitobion avenae F. (grain aphid or oligophagous Rhopalosiphum padi L. (bird cherry-oat aphid. Secondarily, aphid-elicited alternations in the antioxidative capacity towards DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radical in insect-stressed plants were evaluated. Comprehensive comparison of expression profiles of the four sod genes showed that both insect species evoked significant upregulation of three genes sod2, sod3.4 and sod9. However, aphid infestation affected non-significant fluctuations in expression of sodB gene in seedlings of both maize genotypes. The highest levels of transcript accumulation occurred at 8 h (sod2 and sod3.4 or 24 h (sod9 post-infestation, and aphid-induced changes in the expression of sod genes were more dramatic in the Ambrozja cultivar than in the Tasty Sweet variety. Furthermore, bird cherry-oat aphid colonization had a more substantial impact on levels of DPPH radical scavenging activity in infested host seedlings than grain aphid colonization. Additionally, Ambrozja plants infested by either hemipteran species showed markedly lower antioxidative capacity compared with attacked Tasty Sweet plants.

  1. Differential Expression of Superoxide Dismutase Genes in Aphid-Stressed Maize (Zea mays L.) Seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sytykiewicz, Hubert

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the expression patterns of superoxide dismutase genes (sod2, sod3.4, sod9 and sodB) in seedling leaves of the Zea mays L. Tasty Sweet (susceptible) and Ambrozja (relatively resistant) cultivars infested with one of two hemipteran species, namely monophagous Sitobion avenae F. (grain aphid) or oligophagous Rhopalosiphum padi L. (bird cherry-oat aphid). Secondarily, aphid-elicited alternations in the antioxidative capacity towards DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl) radical in insect-stressed plants were evaluated. Comprehensive comparison of expression profiles of the four sod genes showed that both insect species evoked significant upregulation of three genes sod2, sod3.4 and sod9). However, aphid infestation affected non-significant fluctuations in expression of sodB gene in seedlings of both maize genotypes. The highest levels of transcript accumulation occurred at 8 h (sod2 and sod3.4) or 24 h (sod9) post-infestation, and aphid-induced changes in the expression of sod genes were more dramatic in the Ambrozja cultivar than in the Tasty Sweet variety. Furthermore, bird cherry-oat aphid colonization had a more substantial impact on levels of DPPH radical scavenging activity in infested host seedlings than grain aphid colonization. Additionally, Ambrozja plants infested by either hemipteran species showed markedly lower antioxidative capacity compared with attacked Tasty Sweet plants. PMID:24722734

  2. A neural network-based foF2 model for a single station in the polar cap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athieno, R.; Jayachandran, P. T.; Themens, D. R.

    2017-06-01

    A neural network (NN) model has been developed for the critical frequency of the F2 layer (foF2) at Resolute (74.70°N, 265.10°E) using data obtained from the Space Physics Interactive Data Resource (no longer available) for the period between 1975 and 1995. This model is a first step toward addressing the discrepancies of the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) foF2 or peak electron density (NmF2) at high latitudes recently presented by Themens et al. (2014). The performance of the NN model has been evaluated using foF2 data obtained from the Canadian Advanced Digital Ionosonde at Resolute (74.75°N, 265.00°E) for the period between 2009 and 2013, in comparison with the IRI predictions. The 2012 version and the International Union of Radio Science option of IRI have been used. The NN nighttime monthly median foF2 variation demonstrates good agreement with observations compared to the IRI. The NN model is able to reproduce the enhancements in foF2 during the equinoxes and also shows an improvement during disturbed days. Root mean square errors were computed between hourly and monthly median model predictions and observations, and on the whole, the NN model seems to perform better during low solar activity and the equinoxes. The NN model shows an improvement in performance on average by 26.638% for hourly foF2 and 32.636% for monthly median foF2, compared to 7.877% obtained for the same station by the most recent NN model that attempted to predict foF2 at a polar cap station (Oyeyemi and Poole, 2005).

  3. On the biomechanics of seedling anchorage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouzy, Benoît; Edmaier, Katharina; Perona, Paolo

    2014-05-01

    We propose a minimal model for the response of vegetation to pullout constraints at early development stage. We try to capture both the average mechanical properties of the root system and the stochastic component of the uprooting process of seedlings. We identify a minimal set of relevant physical components in the purpose of quantifying the uprooting process: length of the root fibres, elastic response of the fibres and adhesion between the roots and the soil matrix. We present for validation a dataset extracted from Edmaier et al. (under revision), accounting for 98 uprooting experiments using Avena sativa L. seedlings (common oat), growing in non-cohesive sediment under controlled conditions. The corresponding root system has a very simple architecture, with three root fibres of different lengths. The response of the system to the constraint is however complex: the stress-strain signal presents sudden jumps followed by partial elastic recoveries. The analysis of the jumps and partial recoveries gives an insight into the resilience of the system. The anchorage of less mature seedlings rapidly collapses after the peak force has been reached, while more mature seedlings usually recover from partial failures. We explore this crossover with our validation dataset. The type of seedlings we study has been used in flume experiments investigating the feedbacks between the vegetation and the river morphodynamics (see for example Perona et al. (2012)). An understanding of the characteristics of the uprooting curve (maximal uprooting force and total uprooting work) of such vegetation reveals the ability of seedlings to withstand environmental constraints in terms of duration or intensity (see Edmaier et al., under revision), and is therefore helpful for planning future experiments. REFERENCES - P. Perona, P. Molnar, B. Crouzy, E. Perucca, Z. Jiang, S. McLelland, D. Wüthrich, K. Edmaier, R. Francis, C. Camporeale, et al., Biomass selection by floods and related timescales

  4. Tunability of laser based on Yb-doped hot-pressed CaF2 ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulc, Jan; Doroshenko, Maxim E.; Jelínková, Helena; Basiev, Tasoltan T.; Konyushkin, Vasilii A.; Osiko, Vyacheslav V.

    2012-06-01

    The aim of presented study was an investigation of tunability of diode pumped laser based on hot-pressed Yb:CaF2 ceramics. The tested Yb:CaF2 sample was in the form of 3.5mm thick plane-parallel face-polished plate (without AR coatings). The Yb3+ concentration was 5.5 %. A fiber (core diameter 200 μm, NA= 0.22) coupled laser diode (LIMO, HLU25F200-980) with emission at wavelength 976 nm, was used for longitudinal Yb:CaF2 pumping. The laser diode was operating in the pulsed regime (4 ms pulse length, 20 Hz repetition rate). The duty-cycle 8% ensured a low thermal load even under the maximum diode pumping power amplitude 10W (crystal sample was only air-cooled). This radiation was focused into the crystal (pumping beam waist diameter ~ 170 μm). The 145mm long semi-hemispherical laser resonator consisted of a flat pumping mirror (HR @ 1.01 - 1.09 μm, HT @ 0.97 μm) and curved (r = 150mm) output coupler with a reflectivity of ~ 98% @ 1.01 - 1.09 μm. Tuning of the ytterbium laser was accomplished by using a birefringent filter (single 1.5mm thick quartz plate) placed inside the optical resonator at the Brewster angle between the output coupler and the laser active medium. The extremely broad and smooth tuning was obtained. The laser was continuously tunable over ~ 66nm (from 1015nm to 1081 nm) and the tuning band was mostly limited by free spectral range of used birefringent filter. The tunability FWHM was 40 nm corresponding bandwidth 10 THz results in Fourier limited gaussian pulse width ~ 40 fs (FWHM). The maximum output power amplitude 0.68W was obtained at wavelength 1054nm for absorbed pump power amplitude 6W. The laser slope efficiency was 15%.

  5. F2-laser microfabrication for integrating optical circuits with microfluidic biochips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Stephen; Aitchison, J. S.; Eaton, Shane; Herman, Peter R.; Li, Jianzhao

    2004-12-01

    Lasers microprocessing is attractive for the custom fabrication of novel lab-on-a-chip designs. However, processing of glass biochips is challenging for most lasers because of the weak light interactions inherent in such transparent substrates. The F2-laser generates a high 7.9-eV photon energy that drives strong absorption in glasses, while the short 157-nm wavelength offers high-resolution patterning on the 100-nm scale. With these benefits, F2-laser ablation is well suited to the fabrication of high aspect ratio microfluidic channels and other biochip functions. F2-laser radiation also produces a strong photosensitivity response in fused silica and other glasses that enable the fabrication of buried optical waveguides, Bragg grating filters and other refractive index structures inside the glass. In this paper, we combine laser micromachining and refractive index profiling to enable single-step integration of photonic functions with microfluidic functions on a single chip. Optical waveguides were written to intercept microfluidic channels for optical sensing of cells and other bio-materials. An integrated biophotonic sensor is demonstrated for polystyrene spheres. The sensor is optically characterized for insertion loss, propagation loss, and particle sensitivity. The demonstration and analysis of this simple device offers insight into the capabilities and potential applications for laser fabricated glass lab-on-a-chip devices. Moreover, the groundwork is laid for rapid laser prototyping of custom-designed microfluidic biochips interlaced with integrated-optical circuits to define a new generation of highly functional bio-sensor and lab-on-a-chip devices.

  6. Intravaginal prostaglandin F2 alpha for the treatment of metritis and pyometra in the bitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gábor, G; Siver, L; Szenci, O

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether intravaginal prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha) would be effective for the treatment of metritis or pyometra in the bitch. Seventeen bitches with metritis or pyometra were treated with PGF2 alpha. Prostaglandin F2 alpha (150 micrograms/kg body weight) was administered once or twice daily by infusing 0.3 ml per 10 kg body wt into the vaginal lumen. Bitches were also treated with amoxicillin (15 mg/kg body wt/48 h) and/or gentamicin (4 mg/kg body wt/day) administered as intramuscular (i.m.) injections. Fifteen bitches were treated successfully with intravaginally administered PGF2 alpha for 3 to 12 days and with intramuscularly administered antibiotics for 4 to 12 days. Success of treatment was judged by cessation of vaginal discharge, the absence of fluid in the uterus as determined by ultrasonography, and the overall health status of the animal. As two bitches with pyometra showed clinical deterioration in spite of medical treatment, ovariohysterectomy was performed after the first and the second treatment, respectively. No side effects (salivation, vomiting, diarrhoea, hyperpnoea, ataxia, urination, anxiety, pupillary dilatation followed by contraction) were observed after PGF2 alpha treatment. The disease did not recur during the subsequent oestrous cycles within 12 months after the initial treatment. The results demonstrate that intravaginal administration of PGF2 alpha was effective in 13 dogs (86.6%) with metritis or pyometra, and caused no side effects. Although the study was based on a relatively small number of cases, it is concluded that prostaglandin F2 alpha can be a useful means of treating bitches with metritis or pyometra. However, in severe cases of pyometra ovariohysterectomy is needed.

  7. Next Generation Mapping of Enological Traits in an F2 Interspecific Grapevine Hybrid Family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanshan Yang

    Full Text Available In winegrapes (Vitis spp., fruit quality traits such as berry color, total soluble solids content (SS, malic acid content (MA, and yeast assimilable nitrogen (YAN affect fermentation or wine quality, and are important traits in selecting new hybrid winegrape cultivars. Given the high genetic diversity and heterozygosity of Vitis species and their tendency to exhibit inbreeding depression, linkage map construction and quantitative trait locus (QTL mapping has relied on F1 families with the use of simple sequence repeat (SSR and other markers. This study presents the construction of a genetic map by single nucleotide polymorphisms identified through genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS technology in an F2 mapping family of 424 progeny derived from a cross between the wild species V. riparia Michx. and the interspecific hybrid winegrape cultivar, 'Seyval'. The resulting map has 1449 markers spanning 2424 cM in genetic length across 19 linkage groups, covering 95% of the genome with an average distance between markers of 1.67 cM. Compared to an SSR map previously developed for this F2 family, these results represent an improved map covering a greater portion of the genome with higher marker density. The accuracy of the map was validated using the well-studied trait berry color. QTL affecting YAN, MA and SS related traits were detected. A joint MA and SS QTL spans a region with candidate genes involved in the malate metabolism pathway. We present an analytical pipeline for calling intercross GBS markers and a high-density linkage map for a large F2 family of the highly heterozygous Vitis genus. This study serves as a model for further genetic investigations of the molecular basis of additional unique characters of North American hybrid wine cultivars and to enhance the breeding process by marker-assisted selection. The GBS protocols for identifying intercross markers developed in this study can be adapted for other heterozygous species.

  8. Genetic linkage mapping in an F2 perennial ryegrass population using DArT markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomaszewski, Céline; Byrne, Stephen; Foito, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    Perennial ryegrass is the principal forage grass species used in temperate agriculture. In recent years, significant efforts have been made to develop molecular marker strategies to allow cost-effective characterization of a large number of loci simultaneously. One such strategy involves using DAr......T markers, and a DArT array has recently been developed for the Lolium-Festuca complex. In this study, we report the first use of the DArTFest array to generate a genetic linkage map based on 326 markers in a Lolium perenne F2 population, consisting of 325 genotypes. For proof of concept, the map was used...

  9. Measurement of the photon structure function F2 gamma with the L3 detector at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, Valery P.; Anselmo, F.; Arefev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Bajo, A.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldew, S.V.; Banerjee, S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Barczyk, A.; Barillere, R.; Bartalini, P.; Basile, M.; Batalova, N.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Bellucci, L.; Berbeco, R.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B.L.; Biasini, M.; Biglietti, M.; Biland, A.; Blaising, J.J.; Blyth, S.C.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bohm, A.; Boldizsar, L.; Borgia, B.; Bottai, S.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Braccini, S.; Branson, J.G.; Brochu, F.; Burger, J.D.; Burger, W.J.; Cai, X.D.; Capell, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A.; Casaus, J.; Cavallari, F.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo, M.; Chang, Y.H.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, G.; Chen, G.M.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, H.S.; Chiefari, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coignet, G.; Colino, N.; Costantini, S.; de la Cruz, B.; Cucciarelli, S.; de Asmundis, R.; Deglon, P.; Debreczeni, J.; Degre, A.; Dehmelt, K.; Deiters, K.; della Volpe, D.; Delmeire, E.; Denes, P.; DeNotaristefani, F.; De Salvo, A.; Diemoz, M.; Dierckxsens, M.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Doria, A.; Dova, M.T.; Duchesneau, D.; Duda, M.; Echenard, B.; Eline, A.; El Hage, A.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F.J.; Extermann, P.; Falagan, M.A.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Fedin, O.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J.H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P.H.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, I.; Forconi, G.; Freudenreich, K.; Furetta, C.; Galaktionov, Iouri; Ganguli, S.N.; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gataullin, M.; Gentile, S.; Giagu, S.; Gong, Z.F.; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Grimm, O.; Gruenewald, M.W.; Guida, M.; Gupta, V.K.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L.J.; Haas, D.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hebbeker, T.; Herve, Alain; Hirschfelder, J.; Hofer, H.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzner, G.; Hou, S.R.; Jin, B.N.; Jindal, P.; Jones, Lawrence W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberria, I.; Kaur, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M.N.; Kim, J.K.; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; Konig, A.C.; Kopal, M.; Koutsenko, V.; Kraber, M.; Kraemer, R.W.; Kruger, A.; Kunin, A.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Laktineh, I.; Landi, G.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Le Goff, J.M.; Leiste, R.; Levtchenko, M.; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Likhoded, S.; Lin, C.H.; Lin, W.T.; Linde, F.L.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z.A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y.S.; Luci, C.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W.G.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Mana, C.; Mans, J.; Martin, J.P.; Marzano, F.; Mazumdar, K.; McNeil, R.R.; Mele, S.; Mermod, P.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W.J.; Mihul, A.; Milcent, H.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Mohanty, G.B.; Muanza, G.S.; Muijs, A.J.M.; Musicar, B.; Musy, M.; Nagy, S.; Natale, S.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Nisati, A.; Novak, T.; Kluge, Hannelies; Ofierzynski, R.; Organtini, G.; Pal, I.; Palomares, C.; Paolucci, P.; Paramatti, R.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, Thomas Cantzon; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Pedace, M.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Piccolo, D.; Pierella, F.; Pioppi, M.; Piroue, P.A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Pothier, J.; Prokofev, D.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rahaman, Mohammad Azizur; Raics, P.; Raja, N.; Ramelli, R.; Rancoita, P.G.; Ranieri, R.; Raspereza, A.; Razis, P.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; Riemann, S.; Riles, Keith; Roe, B.P.; Romero, L.; Rosca, A.; Rosemann, C.; Rosenbleck, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Roth, Stefan; Rubio, J.A.; Ruggiero, G.; Rykaczewski, H.; Sakharov, A.; Saremi, S.; Sarkar, S.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Schafer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D.J.; Sciacca, C.; Servoli, L.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shumilov, E.; Shvorob, A.; Son, D.; Souga, C.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D.P.; Stoyanov, B.; Straessner, A.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L.Z.; Sushkov, S.; Suter, H.; Swain, J.D.; Szillasi, Z.; Tang, X.W.; Tarjan, P.; Tauscher, L.; Taylor, L.; Tellili, B.; Teyssier, D.; Timmermans, Charles; Ting, Samuel C.C.; Ting, S.M.; Tonwar, S.C.; Toth, J.; Tully, C.; Tung, K.L.; Ulbricht, J.; Valente, E.; Van de Walle, R.T.; Vasquez, R.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vetlitsky, I.; Viertel, G.; Villa, S.; Vivargent, M.; Vlachos, S.; Vodopianov, I.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobev, I.; Vorobyov, A.A.; Wadhwa, M.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.L.; Wang, Z.M.; Weber, M.; Wynhoff, S.; Xia, L.; Xu, Z.Z.; Yamamoto, J.; Yang, B.Z.; Yang, C.G.; Yang, H.J.; Yang, M.; Yeh, S.C.; Zalite, An.; Zalite, Yu.; Zhang, Z.P.; Zhao, J.; Zhu, G.Y.; Zhu, R.Y.; Zhuang, H.L.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, B.; Zoller, M.

    2005-01-01

    The e+e- -> e+e- hadrons reaction, where one of the two electrons is detected in a low polar-angle calorimeter, is analysed in order to measure the hadronic photon structure function F2gamma . The full high-energy and high-luminosity data set, collected with the L3 detector at centre-of-mass energies 189-209GeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 608/pb is used. The Q^2 range 11-34GeV^2 and the x range 0.006-0.556 are considered. The data are compared with recent parton density functions.

  10. Agraphia and acalculia after a left prefrontal (F1, F2) infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohgi, H; Saitoh, K; Takahashi, S; Takahashi, H; Utsugisawa, K; Yonezawa, H; Hatano, K; Sasaki, T

    1995-01-01

    A patient presented with agraphia and acalculia associated with a left frontal (F1, F2) infarction. He made mainly phonological but also lexical errors in writing (syllabograms), but his ability to write kanji (morphograms) was relatively preserved. Although he could add and subtract numbers, he could neither multiply nor divide them because of a difficulty in retrieving the multiplication tables and calculation procedures. Positron emission tomography showed decreased cerebral blood flow and metabolism limited to the infarct site. These findings suggest that agraphia and acalculia may occur associated with a left prefrontal lesion, and that the retrieval of arithmetic processes is modality specific. Images PMID:7745416

  11. Electrical properties and scaling behaviour of Sm doped CaF2 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The electrical properties for 20Bi2O3–60B2O3 (20−x)–CaF2–xSm2O3 glasses (0 ≤ x ≤ 2) were measured in the temperature range 297 K up to 629 K and in the frequency range 0·1–100 kHz. The d.c. and a.c. conduc- tivity values and the dielectric loss (tan δ) values were found to increase with increasing ...

  12. Effect on prostaglandin F 2 alpha on sperm motility in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grünberger, W; Maier, U; Lunglmayr, G

    1981-01-01

    The effect of prostaglandin F 2 alpha (PGF2 alpha) on sperm motility in ejaculates from 53 subfertile men was investigated. The addition of PGF2 alpha in a concentration of 25 00 ng/ml isotonic salt solution to sperm samples resulted in a highly significant (p less than 0.025) increase in sperm motility; however, only two out of three samples responded in this way, the remainder being unaffected. Mean progressive sperm motility in responders increased by 32.8% of baseline value (determined 2h after liquefaction). In higher concentrations (25 000 ng/ml aliquots), PGF2 alpha was ineffective.

  13. Evidence for a decline in the atmospheric accumulation rate of CHClF2 (CFC-22)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinsland, Curtis P.; Levine, Joel S.; Johnson, Douglas W.; Goldman, Aaron

    1989-01-01

    CHClF2 (CFC-22) is a promising substitute for atmospheric ozone damaging, fully halogenated hydrocarbons. Atmospheric CFC-22 measurements derived from ground-based solar spectra recorded between December 1980 and May 1988 are reported which show that the CFC-22 total column increased at an average annual exponential rate of 7.8 percent + or - 1.0 percent (2 sigma). Compared with other atmospheric data, these measurements indicate that CFC-22 is increasing at a more rapid rate than either CFC-11 or CFC-12, the two most abundant chlorofluorocarbons, but that the rate of CFC-22 increase is likely to have declined over the past few years.

  14. Strange and charmed baryons using N{sub f}=2 twisted mass QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papinutto, Mauro; Carbonell, Jaume [UJF, CNRS/IN2P, INPG (France). Lab. de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie; Drach, Vincent [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Alexandrou, Constantia [Cyprus Univ., Nicosia (Cyprus). Dept. of Physics

    2010-12-15

    We compute the mass spectrum for strange/charmed baryons in the partially quenched approach using N{sub f}=2 twisted mass QCD configurations. We investigate two main issues: the size of lattice artefacts using three values of the lattice spacing (the smallest of which is approximately 0.05 fm) and the dependence of baryon masses on meson (or quark) masses. We thus perform a global fit in order to extrapolate simultaneously to the continuum limit and to the physical point. We estimate the masses of {omega}{sub sss}, {xi}{sub dss}, {lambda}{sub uds}, {omega}{sub ccc}, {xi}{sub dcc}, {lambda}{sub udc}. (orig.)

  15. Instability of the local environment of Mn2+ in BaF2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbakov, V. D.

    2017-05-01

    Excitation and luminescence spectra and luminescence lifetime of Mn2+ ion in BaF2 crystals at 77 K have been investigated for the first time. Mn2+ ions in the crystal are coordinated by six and eight fluorine ions, have a trigonal environment, and form exchange-coupled pairs. Several types of centers of the Mn2+ ion are formed mainly because of the large difference in the Mn2+ and Ba2+ ionic radii, which causes instability of the local structure around the activator and its strain, and exchange striction. An increase in the impurity concentration enhances these factors, thus changing the relative concentration of various centers.

  16. Activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome by IAV virulence protein PB1-F2 contributes to severe pathophysiology and disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie L McAuley

    Full Text Available The ability for a host to recognize infection is critical for virus clearance and often begins with induction of inflammation. The PB1-F2 of pathogenic influenza A viruses (IAV contributes to the pathophysiology of infection, although the mechanism for this is unclear. The NLRP3-inflammasome has been implicated in IAV pathogenesis, but whether IAV virulence proteins can be activators of the complex is unknown. We investigated whether PB1-F2-mediated activation of the NLRP3-inflammasome is a mechanism contributing to overt inflammatory responses to IAV infection. We show PB1-F2 induces secretion of pyrogenic cytokine IL-1β by activating the NLRP3-inflammasome, contributing to inflammation triggered by pathogenic IAV. Compared to infection with wild-type virus, mice infected with reverse engineered PB1-F2-deficient IAV resulted in decreased IL-1β secretion and cellular recruitment to the airways. Moreover, mice exposed to PB1-F2 peptide derived from pathogenic IAV had enhanced IL-1β secretion compared to mice exposed to peptide derived from seasonal IAV. Implicating the NLRP3-inflammasome complex specifically, we show PB1-F2 derived from pathogenic IAV induced IL-1β secretion was Caspase-1-dependent in human PBMCs and NLRP3-dependent in mice. Importantly, we demonstrate PB1-F2 is incorporated into the phagolysosomal compartment, and upon acidification, induces ASC speck formation. We also show that high molecular weight aggregated PB1-F2, rather than soluble PB1-F2, induces IL-1β secretion. Furthermore, NLRP3-deficient mice exposed to PB1-F2 peptide or infected with PB1-F2 expressing IAV were unable to efficiently induce the robust inflammatory response as observed in wild-type mice. In addition to viral pore forming toxins, ion channel proteins and RNA, we demonstrate inducers of NLRP3-inflammasome activation may include disordered viral proteins, as exemplified by PB1-F2, acting as host pathogen 'danger' signals. Elucidating

  17. Aluminum toxicity symptoms in peach seedlings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, J.H.; Horton, B.D.; Kirkpatrick, H.C.

    1976-03-01

    Elberta (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch) peach seedlings were grown in nutrient solutions for 27 days with aluminum concentrations of 0, 222, 666 and 2000 ..mu..m concentration induced Al toxicity symptoms in leaves and severely restricted root growth. The early stage of Al toxicity was characterized by marginal chlorosis that later developed into necrotic areas that extended along the veins toward the midrib. Advanced stages of toxicity were characterized by collapse of the midrib, terminal dieback and defoliation of the seedlings which are typical symptoms of calcium deficiency in peaches. At high Al concentrations roots died back and new roots developed as irregularly shaped cylinders with constrictions and enlargements at the root apex.

  18. Evaluation of rice germplasm under salt stress at the seedling stage through SSR markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Al-Amin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Twenty eight rice germplasms were used for identification of salt tolerant rice genotypes at the seedling stage at the experimental farm and Biotechnology laboratory of the Bangladesh Institute of Nuclear Agriculture (BINA, Mymensingh during February 2009 to October 2009. Phenotyping for salinity screening of the rice genotypes was done using salinized (EC level 12 dS m-1 nutrient solution in hydroponic system. Genotypes were evaluated for salinity tolerance on 1-9 scale based on seedling growth parameters following modified Standard Evaluation Scoring (SES of IRRI. Phenotypically, on the basis of SES and % total dry matter (TDM reduction of the genotypes viz. PBSAL-614, PBSAL-613, PBSAL-730, Horkuch, S-478/3 Pokkali and PBSAL (STL-15 were found to be salt tolerant; on the other hand Iratom-24, S-653/32, S-612/32, S-604/32, S-633/32, Charnock (DA6, BINA Dhan-6 and S-608/32 were identified as salt susceptible. For genotyping, ten SSR markers were used for polymorphism, where 3 primers (RM127, RM443 and RM140 were selected for evaluation of salt tolerance. In respect of Primer RM127, 7 lines were found salt tolerant and 11 lines were moderately tolerant and 10 lines were susceptible. Nine tolerant, 9 moderately tolerant and 10 susceptible lines were found when the primer RM140 was used and primer RM443 identified 8 lines as tolerant, 9 lines as moderately tolerant and 11 lines as susceptible. Thus, the salt tolerant lines can be used in further evaluation for salinity tolerance and the SSR markers used in this study are proving valuable for identifying salt tolerant genes in marker assisted breeding.

  19. Fungi causing dying out of heather seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Kowalik

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the fungi causing dying out of one-yearold heather seedlings. Observations were carried out on: 'Amethyst', 'Annemarie', 'Colette', 'Perestroika' and 'Reini'. The shoots revealing necrotic symptoms were plated on PDA medium. 25 species of fungi were isolated. Among them Pestalotia sydowiana, Alternaria alternata, Cylindrocarpon destructans, Leptosphaeria coniothyrium and Epicoccum purpurascens were dominant, while Mammaria echinobotryoides, Phoma leveillei, Kaissleriella subalpina, Botrytis cinerea and Phytophthora cinnamomi occurred less frequently.

  20. Freeze injury to southern pine seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    David B. South

    2006-01-01

    Freeze injury to roots and shoots of pines is affected by genotype and nursery practices. Local sources of shortleaf pine and Virginia pine that are grown in nurseries in USDA hardiness Zones 6 and 7a are relatively freeze tolerant. However, loblolly pine, slash pine, and longleaf pine seedlings have been injured by a number of freeze events (0 to 24 °F) in hardiness...

  1. Susceptibility to malignant hyperthermia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snoeck, Marcus Matheus Johannes

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis the author studied the diagnostic procedures for susceptibility to malignant hyperthermia (MH), with special emphasis upon refining the biological diagnostic test and improving protocols and guidelines for investigation of MH susceptibility. MH is a pharmacogenetic disease of skeletal

  2. Photoluminescence properties of a novel red emitting Ba10F2(PO4)6:Eu3+ phosphor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, You-shun; Shi, Wei-wei; Han, Cong-lin; Kang, Yan-yan; Wang, Yan-su; Zhang, Zhi-wei

    2015-06-01

    A novel red-emitting phosphor Ba10F2(PO4)6:Eu3+ is synthesized by a high-temperature solid-state reaction. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) analysis confirms the phase formation of Ba10F2(PO4)6:Eu3+ materials. The photoluminescence excitation (PLE) and emission (PL) spectra, the concentration dependence of the emission intensity, decay curves and Commission International de I'Eclairage (CIE) of the phosphors are investigated. It is observed that Ba10F2(PO4)6:Eu3+ phosphors exhibit two dominating bands situated at 591 and 616 nm, originating from the 5D0 → 7F1 and 5D0 → 7F2 transition of the Eu3+ ion, respectively. The decay time is also determined for various concentrations of Eu3+ in Ba10F2(PO4)6:Eu3+. Crystal lattice, PL spectra and decay time analysis indicate there exist two isolated Eu3+ crystallography sites in Ba10F2(PO4)6. The calculated color coordinates lie in the red region. Therefore, Ba10F2(PO4)6:Eu3+ phosphors may be good candidates for red components in near-UV (NUV) white LEDs.

  3. Inner-shell photoionization and core-hole decay of Xe and XeF$_2$

    CERN Document Server

    Southworth, Stephen H; Picón, Antonio; Lehmann, C Stefan; Cheng, Lan; Stanton, John F

    2015-01-01

    Photoionization cross sections and partial ion yields of Xe and XeF$_2$ from Xe 3d$_{5/2}$, Xe 3d$_{3/2}$, and F 1s subshells in the 660--740 eV range are compared to explore effects of the F ligands. The Xe 3d - $\\epsilon$f continuum shape resonances dominate the photoionization cross sections of both the atom and molecule, but prominent resonances appear in the XeF$_2$ cross section due to nominal excitation of Xe 3d and F 1s electrons to the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO), a delocalized anti-bonding MO. The subshell ionization thresholds, the LUMO resonance energies and their oscillator strengths are calculated by relativistic coupled-cluster methods. Several charge states and fragment ions are produced from the atom and molecule due to alternative decay pathways from the inner-shell holes. Total and partial ion yields vary in response to the shape resonances and LUMO resonances. Previous calculations and measurements of atomic Xe 3d core-hole decay channels and our calculated results for XeF$_...

  4. Long-term trends of foF2 independent of geomagnetic activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Danilov

    Full Text Available A detailed analysis of the foF2 data at a series of ionospheric stations is performed to reveal long-term trends independent of the long-term changes in geomagnetic activity during the recent decades (nongeomagnetic trends. The method developed by the author and published earlier is used. It is found that the results for 21 out of 23 stations considered agree well and give a relative nongeomagnetic trend of -0.0012 per year (or an absolute nongeomagnetic trend of about -0.012 MHz per year for the period between 1958 and the mid-nineties. The trends derived show no dependence on geomagnetic latitude or local time, a fact confirming their independence of geomagnetic activity. The consideration of the earlier period (1948–1985 for a few stations for which the corresponding data are available provides significantly lower foF2 trends, the difference between the later and earlier periods being a factor of 1.6. This is a strong argument in favor of an anthropogenic nature of the trends derived.Key words. Ionosphere (ionosphere-atmosphere interactions; ionospheric disturbances; mid-latitude ionosphere

  5. Dynamic XRD, Shock and Static Compression of CaF2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, Patricia; Specht, Paul; Root, Seth; Sinclair, Nicholas; Schuman, Adam; White, Melanie; Cornelius, Andrew; Smith, Jesse; Sinogeikin, Stanislav

    2017-06-01

    The high-pressure behavior of CaF2 is probed with x-ray diffraction (XRD) combined with both dynamic compression, using a two-stage light gas gun, and static compression, using diamond anvil cells. We use XRD to follow the unfolding of a shock-driven, fluorite to cotunnite phase transition, on the timescale of nanoseconds. The dynamic behavior of CaF2 under shock loading is contrasted with that under static compression. This work leverages experimental capabilities at the Advanced Photon Source: dynamic XRD and shock experiments at the Dynamic Compression Sector, as well as XRD and static compression in diamond anvil cell at the High-Pressure Collaborative Access Team. These experiments and cross-platform comparisons, open the door to an unprecedented understanding of equations of state and phase transitions at the microstructural level and at different time scales and will ultimately improve our capability to simulate the behavior of materials at extreme conditions. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-mission laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  6. The effect of inhibition of prostaglandin F2 alpha synthesis on placental expulsion in the ewe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassagne, M; Barnouin, J

    1993-01-01

    Five ewes were injected with two doses of a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAI), lysine acetyl salicylate, at birth of their first lamb and one hour later, and five others were injected once only, at birth of their first lamb. A control group of six animals was constituted. The times needed for fetal expulsion and placental release were recorded. The peripheral plasma PgF2 alpha (as PGFM) levels were measured prepartum during the seven last days of gestation, at parturition, then 1 h, 2 h and 12 h after lambing. The results were compared among and within treatment groups. They indicate that the physiological increase in peripheral PGFM levels starts two days before lambing and that the level peaks at lambing. The normal decrease after parturition is emphasized by NSAI injections as detected 1 h and 2 h posttreatment (p animals 2 h after birth compared to once treated animals and the similar low levels in all three groups 12 h after birth. The fetal membranes were expelled normally in all treated and nontreated animals, but the time needed for placental expulsion in ewes injected with two doses of NSAI was longer than in controls (p PgF2 alpha appears to have a role in placental release in the ewe. PMID:8490813

  7. X-ray spectral studies of the electronic structure of uranyl fluorite UO2F2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utkin Igor O.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This work interpreted the fine X-ray photoelectron spectral structure of the low binding energy electrons (0-40 eV and X-ray O4,5(U emission spectral structure from UO2F2 taking into account the relativistic Xα discrete variation (RXα-DV calculation for the [(UO2F6]4–(D6h cluster reflecting an uranium close environment in UO2F2. The U5f electrons were shown to participate directly in the chemical bond formation. The U6p electrons were shown to participate not only information of the inner valence molecular orbitals, but also information of the outer valence molecular orbitals. The inner valence molecular orbitals sequence order in the binding energy range 12-40 eV was established. It is important for development of the technique of interatomic distance determination in the axial direction and equatorial plane of uranyl compounds on the X-ray photoelectron spectral basis.

  8. Laser characteristics of TGT-grown Nd,Y-codoped:SrF2 single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelínek, Michal; Kubeček, Václav; Su, Liangbi; Jiang, Dapeng; Ma, Fengkai; Zhang, Qian; Cao, Yuexin; Xu, Jun

    2014-05-01

    In this contribution we present spectroscopic and laser properties of TGT (temperature gradient technique) grown Nd,Y:SrF2 crystals with neodymium concentration of 0.4, 0.65 and 0.8 at.%. The absorption cross-section, fluorescence spectra and fluorescence decay time were measured. For the laser experiments, the noncoated crystal samples 3.5 or 5 mm thick were pumped by a 796 nm laser diode matching the Nd:SrF2 absorption peak. Several output couplers with reflectivity ranging from 70 to 98 % at the generated wavelength were tested. In the pulsed pumping regime (pulseduration 2 ms, frequency 10 Hz), the maximum average output power of 75 mW was obtained with the slope efficiency as high as 48 % and the optical-to-optical efficiency of 42 % with respect to the absorbed pump power. The output beam spatial profile was nearly Gaussian in both axes, oscillations started at the wavelength of 1057 nm. At higher pumping levels, the second emission line at 1050 nm appears corresponding to our fluorescence measurements. Wavelength tuning using birefringent filter from 1048 to 1070 nm is probably given by crystal-field splitting of the 4F3/2 manifold in Nd3+. True-CW laser operation was also successfully obtained at lower pumping level with the maximum output power of 90 mW using output coupler reflectivity of 98 %.

  9. Enhanced silicon oxidation in O 2 and O 2:F 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerofolini, G. F.; La Bruna, G.; Meda, L.

    1995-08-01

    Rate equations are proposed for the description of the enhanced kinetics observed in the early stages of silicon oxidation in dry O 2 at usual temperature ( T ≥ 600° C) or during the oxidation in O 2:F 2 at a moderate temperature (400-550° C). Both these equations admit as an approximate solution the time-logarithm law usually known as the Elovich isotherm, thus showing that this equation is able to describe not only oxidation at room or slightly higher temperature (as well known from the first observation of the time logarithm law in 1922), but also oxidation at much higher temperatures. The physical model advocated for explaining both the early stages of oxidation in dry O 2 and enhanced oxidation in O 2:F 2 is based on the hypothesis of weakening of the Si-Si backbonds to highly polar silicon bonds like =Si(O sbnd ) 2 or ≡Si sbnd F at the Si sbnd SiO 2 interface.

  10. Selective response of Ricinus communis seedlings to soil borne rhizoctonia infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andras Bittsanszky

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Seedlings of Ricinus communis tolerated soil-borne Rhizoctonia infection in strain dependent manner. There was no connection revealed between pathogenicity of strains and their origin or taxonomic position, however, the castor plant proved to be susceptible to most strains highly pathogenic to other host plants as well. Rhizoctonia zeae (teleomorph: Waitea circinata, a species new for European flora, was less aggressive to R. communis as the most potent R. solani strains. The effect of Rhizoctonia infection on mass accumulation of hypocotyls was more prominent than that on cotyledons. The protein content and glutathione S-transferase (GST activity increased in parallel with evolution of disease syndrome. Metalaxyl, an acetanilide type systemic anti-omycete fungicide induced locally the GST activity in R. communis cotyledons with 24 hours lag phase, and this induction was altered in the seedlings grown in Rhizoctonia infested soil by strain dependent manner. It might be concluded, that the stress response related detoxication mechanisms of plants in tolerant host/parasite pairs take effect at higher level than in highly susceptible relationships.

  11. Heterose e seus componentes em híbridos de populações F2 de milho

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Doná

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se verificar o potencial de 28 híbridos de populações F2 de milho, obtidos de um dialelo completo, juntamente com oito populações F2 parentais e duas testemunhas comerciais quanto a caracteres agronômicos e à heterose e seus componentes. Os experimentos foram desenvolvidos em 2008/2009, em Campinas, Mococa e Palmital, Estado de São Paulo, no delineamento experimental de blocos ao acaso com três repetições. Avaliaram-se os caracteres florescimento masculino, altura da espiga e produtividade de grãos, que foi corrigida para 14% de umidade e estande ideal. Efetuaram-se análises de variância individuais e conjuntas, considerando-se o modelo fixo, sendo as médias comparadas pelo Teste de Tukey, além das análises dialélicas pelo modelo de Gardner e Eberhart (1966. Verificaram-se efeitos de heterose e seus componentes altamente significativos. Considerando-se a produtividade de grãos, as populações F2AG8060, F2Fort e F2A2555 foram promissoras em combinações híbridas, com elevados valores de heterose de parental e a F2DAS2B710 com o maior efeito de parental. Houve manifestação de heterose para produtividade de grãos com destaque para o híbrido F2A2555 x F2Fort, confirmando-se o potencial produtivo de híbridos de populações F2 como alternativa para a produção comercial de milho, visando aos produtores de média a baixa tecnologia.

  12. New herbal composition (OA-F2) protects cartilage degeneration in a rat model of collagenase induced osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirmal, Pallavi S; Jagtap, Suresh D; Narkhede, Aarti N; Nagarkar, Bhagyashri E; Harsulkar, Abhay M

    2017-01-03

    Prevalence of osteoarthritis (OA) is on rise on the global scale. At present there are no satisfactory pharmacological agents for treating OA. Our previous study showed that Sida cordifolia L. and Zingiber officinale Rosc. had protective effect on cartilage. Here, we describe the effect of OA-F2, a herbal formulation prepared using combination of these two plants in alleviating OA associated symptoms in a rat model of collagenase-induced OA. OA was induced by intra-articular injection of collagenase type II in wistar rats. Diclofenac (10 mg/kg) was used as a reference control. Rats (n = 6) were divided into 6 groups: Healthy control (HC), osteoarthritic control (OAC), diclofenac (DICLO), OA-F2L (135 mg/kg), OA-F2M (270 mg/kg) and OA-F2H (540 mg/kg). The effects of the 20 days treatment were monitored by parameters like knee diameter, paw volume, paw retraction; serum C-reactive protein (CRP), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and glycosaminoglycan (GAG). Radiography and histopathology of knee joint were also studied. Additionally, gene expression was studied from isolated synovium tissue proving anti-osteoarthritic potential of OA-F2. Oral administration of OA-F2 has significantly prevented knee swelling compared to OAC; OA-F2 and DICLO, significantly reduced paw volume compared to OAC. Paw latency was remarkably increased by OA-F2 compared to OAC. OA-F2L (-0.670, p treatment for OA.

  13. iTRAQ-Based Proteomic Analysis of Ginsenoside F2 on Human Gastric Carcinoma Cells SGC7901

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Mao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ginsenoside F2 (F2, a protopanaxdiol type of saponin, was reported to inhibit human gastric cancer cells SGC7901. To better understand the molecular mechanisms of F2, an iTRAQ-based proteomics approach was applied to define protein expression profiles in SGC7901 cells in response to lower dose (20 μM and shorter duration (12 hour of F2 treatment, compared with previous study. 205 proteins were screened in terms of the change in their expression level which met our predefined criteria. Further bioinformatics and experiments demonstrated that F2 treatment downregulated PRR5 and RPS15 and upregulated RPL26, which are implicated in ribosomal protein-p53 signaling pathway. F2 also inhibited CISD2, Bcl-xl, and NLRX1, which are associated with autophagic pathway. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that F2 treatment increased Atg5, Atg7, Atg10, and PUMA, the critical downstream effectors of ribosomal protein-p53 signaling pathway, and Beclin-1, UVRAG, and AMBRA-1, the important molecules in Bcl-xl/Beclin-1 pathway. The 6 differentially abundant proteins, PRR5, CISD2, Bcl-xl, NLRX1, RPS15, and RPL26, were confirmed by western blot. Taken together, ribosomal protein-p53 signaling pathway and Bcl-xl/Beclin-1 pathway might be the most significantly regulated biological process by F2 treatment in SGC7901 cells, which provided valuable insights into the deep understanding of the molecular mechanisms of F2 for gastric cancer treatment.

  14. Susceptibility of leguminous green manure species to Rhizoctonia solani and Sclerotium rolfsii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trazilbo José de Paula Júnior

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We studied the susceptibility of species used as green manure in common bean fields to root rot (Rhizoctonia solani and southern blight (Sclerotium rolfsii. Seeds of Crotalaria breviflora, Canavalia ensiformis, Cajanus cajan, Dolichos lablab, Stizolobium cinereum, S. aterrimum, and the bean cvs. "Pérola", "Valente" and "Carnaval" were sown in soil infested by either R. solani AG-4 or S. rolfsii in greenhouse. The emergence of D. lablab seedlings in soil infested by R. solani dropped to 62%. C. breviflora, C. ensiformis and cv. "Valente" presented the lowest root rot severity. The pathogen S. rolfsii drastically reduced seedling emergence in all species; no C. cajan and S. cinereum seedling emerged. All plant species presented high southern blight severity. We conclude that leguminous crops are not suitable as green manure for areas of bean cultivation with high R. solani and S. rolfsii populations.

  15. Temperature dependence of topological susceptibility using gradient flow

    CERN Document Server

    Taniguchi, Yusuke; Kanaya, Kazuyuki; Kitazawa, Masakiyo; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Umeda, Takashi; Iwami, Ryo; Wakabayashi, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    We study temperature dependence of the topological susceptibility with the $N_{f}=2+1$ flavors Wilson fermion. We have two major interests in this paper. One is a comparison of gluonic and fermionic definitions of the topological susceptibility. Two definitions are related by the chiral Ward-Takahashi identity but their coincidence is highly non-trivial for the Wilson fermion. By applying the gradient flow both for the gauge and quark fields we find a good agreement of these two measurements. The other is a verification of a prediction of the dilute instanton gas approximation at low temperature region $T_{pc}< T<1.5T_{pc}$, for which we confirm the prediction that the topological susceptibility decays with power $\\chi_{t}\\propto(T/T_{pc})^{-8}$ for three flavors QCD.

  16. Transcriptomic analysis of host immune and cell death responses associated with the influenza A virus PB1-F2 protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronan Le Goffic

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Airway inflammation plays a major role in the pathogenesis of influenza viruses and can lead to a fatal outcome. One of the challenging objectives in the field of influenza research is the identification of the molecular bases associated to the immunopathological disorders developed during infection. While its precise function in the virus cycle is still unclear, the viral protein PB1-F2 is proposed to exert a deleterious activity within the infected host. Using an engineered recombinant virus unable to express PB1-F2 and its wild-type homolog, we analyzed and compared the pathogenicity and host response developed by the two viruses in a mouse model. We confirmed that the deletion of PB1-F2 renders the virus less virulent. The global transcriptomic analyses of the infected lungs revealed a potent impact of PB1-F2 on the response developed by the host. Thus, after two days post-infection, PB1-F2 invalidation severely decreased the number of genes activated by the host. PB1-F2 expression induced an increase in the number and level of expression of activated genes linked to cell death, inflammatory response and neutrophil chemotaxis. When generating interactive gene networks specific to PB1-F2, we identified IFN-γ as a central regulator of PB1-F2-regulated genes. The enhanced cell death of airway-recruited leukocytes was evidenced using an apoptosis assay, confirming the pro-apoptotic properties of PB1-F2. Using a NF-kB luciferase adenoviral vector, we were able to quantify in vivo the implication of NF-kB in the inflammation mediated by the influenza virus infection; we found that PB1-F2 expression intensifies the NF-kB activity. Finally, we quantified the neutrophil recruitment within the airways, and showed that this type of leukocyte is more abundant during the infection of the wild-type virus. Collectively, these data demonstrate that PB1-F2 strongly influences the early host response during IAV infection and provides new insights into the

  17. Correlation studies for B-spline modeled F2 Chapman parameters obtained from FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Limberger

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The determination of ionospheric key quantities such as the maximum electron density of the F2 layer NmF2, the corresponding F2 peak height hmF2 and the F2 scale height HF2 are of high relevance in 4-D ionosphere modeling to provide information on the vertical structure of the electron density (Ne. The Ne distribution with respect to height can, for instance, be modeled by the commonly accepted F2 Chapman layer. An adequate and observation driven description of the vertical Ne variation can be obtained from electron density profiles (EDPs derived by ionospheric radio occultation measurements between GPS and low Earth orbiter (LEO satellites. For these purposes, the six FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC (F3/C satellites provide an excellent opportunity to collect EDPs that cover most of the ionospheric region, in particular the F2 layer. For the contents of this paper, F3/C EDPs have been exploited to determine NmF2, hmF2 and HF2 within a regional modeling approach. As mathematical base functions, endpoint-interpolating polynomial B-splines are considered to model the key parameters with respect to longitude, latitude and time. The description of deterministic processes and the verification of this modeling approach have been published previously in Limberger et al. (2013, whereas this paper should be considered as an extension dealing with related correlation studies, a topic to which less attention has been paid in the literature. Relations between the B-spline series coefficients regarding specific key parameters as well as dependencies between the three F2 Chapman key parameters are in the main focus. Dependencies are interpreted from the post-derived correlation matrices as a result of (1 a simulated scenario without data gaps by taking dense, homogenously distributed profiles into account and (2 two real data scenarios on 1 July 2008 and 1 July 2012 including sparsely, inhomogeneously distributed F3/C EDPs. Moderate correlations between hmF2 and HF2 as

  18. Measurement of F_2^{c\\bar{c}} and F_2^{b\\bar{b}} at Low Q^2 and x using the H1 Vertex Detector at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aktas, A.; Anthonis, T.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Babaev, A.; Backovic, S.; Bahr, J.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baudrand, S.; Baumgartner, S.; Becker, J.; Beckingham, M.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Berger, N.; Bizot, J.C.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brisson, V.; Brown, D.P.; Bruncko, D.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Caron, S.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; De Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Ellerbrock, M.; Erdmann, W.; Essenov, S.; Falkewicz, A.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Finke, L.; Fleischer, M.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleming, Y.H.; Flucke, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Franke, G.; Frisson, T.; Gabathuler, E.; Garutti, E.; Gayler, J.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Ginzburgskaya, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Goettlich, M.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Goyon, C.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregori, M.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, Guenter; Gwilliam, C.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Hansson, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Henschel, H.; Henshaw, O.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hreus, T.; Hussain, S.; Ibbotson, M.; Ismail, M.; Jacquet, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, D.P.; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Keller, N.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Knutsson, A.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Kuckens, J.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindfeld, L.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Lueders, H.; Luke, D.; Lux, T.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mangano, S.; Marage, P.; Marshall, R.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxeld, S.J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Milstead, D.; Mladenov, D.; Mohamed, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, Paul R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nozicka, M.; Oganezov, R.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Papadopoulou, T.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Perez-Astudillo, D.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Portheault, B.; Povh, B.; Prideaux, P.; Raicevic, N.; Reimer, P.; Rimmer, A.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salvaire, F.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauvan, E.; Schatzel, S.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sedlak, K.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Strauch, I.; Straumann, U.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, Graham; Thompson, P.D.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, Peter; Tsakov, I.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Urban, Marcel; Usik, A.; Utkin, D.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Veelken, C.; Vest, A.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Vujicic, B.; Wacker, K.; Wagner, J.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Werner, N.; Wessels, M.; Wessling, B.; Wigmore, C.; Wissing, Ch.; Wolf, R.; Wunsch, E.; Xella, S.; Yan, W.; Yeganov, V.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zhu, Y.C.; Zimmermann, J.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2006-01-01

    Measurements are presented of inclusive charm and beauty cross sections in e^+p collisions at HERA for values of photon virtuality 12 \\le Q^2 \\le 60 GeV^2 and of the Bjorken scaling variable 0.0002 \\le x \\le 0.005. The fractions of events containing charm and beauty quarks are determined using a method based on the impact parameter, in the transverse plane, of tracks to the primary vertex, as measured by the H1 vertex detector. Values for the structure functions F_2^{c\\bar{c}} and F_2^{b\\bar{b}} are obtained. This is the first measurement of F_2^{b\\bar{b}} in this kinematic range. The results are found to be compatible with the predictions of perturbative quantum chromodynamics and withprevious measurements of F_2^{c\\bar{c}}.

  19. Longleaf pine bud development: influence of seedling nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. P. Barnett; D. P. Jackson; R. K. Dumroese

    2010-01-01

    A subset of seedlings from a larger study (Jackson and others 2006, 2007) were selected and evaluated for two growing seasons to relate bud development, and root-collar diameter (RCD), and height growth with three nursery fertilization rates. We chose seedlings in the 0.5 (lowest), 2.0 (mid-range), and 4.0 (highest) mg of nitrogen per seedling treatments. Buds moved...

  20. Sod cutting and soil biota effects on seedling performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weijtmans, Kim; Jongejans, Eelke; van Ruijven, Jasper

    2009-09-01

    Sod cutting (i.e. top soil removal) is a restoration management option for enhancing seedling establishment and for lowering the nutrient concentration in eutrophicated soils of nutrient-poor species-rich grasslands. Removal of the upper soil changes not only abiotic soil properties but may also affect the resident soil community. We investigated the effects of sod cutting on the establishment and performance of two endangered plant species ( Cirsium dissectum and Succisa pratensis) while simultaneously manipulating the interaction between seedlings and soil biota. In intact grassland and sod-cut areas at two localities, seedlings were grown in plastic tubes. Half of the tubes had a filter that excluded roots but allowed entry of fungal hyphae and soil microorganisms. The other tubes were closed (i.e. no contact with the surrounding soil). In a greenhouse experiment we studied the effect of soil solutions (with or without fungal tissue) from three grasslands and three sod-cut areas on seedling growth. Sod cutting had a positive net effect on seedling growth for S. pratensis. Access to (mycorrhizal) fungi and other soil biota resulted in a negative impact on seedling growth of both plant species, both in grassland and sod-cut areas. The greenhouse experiment confirmed that the soil biota in these meadows reduced seedling growth. Although sod cutting did not mitigate negative plant-soil feedback, it enhanced seedling growth, presumably by decreasing competition for light. Sod cutting is therefore very useful when seedling establishment needs to be stimulated.

  1. The quantitative and qualitative difference between a F1 hybrid of maize and its F2 generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelen, Steven; Reheul, Dirk; De Cauwer, Benny

    2004-01-01

    The majority of modern maize varieties are single F1 hybrids. The yield performance of the F2 generation is known to be inferior to the F1 yield performance. We crossed several F1 hybrids and compared these crossings, together with true F2 generations, with the original F1s. Compared to the F1 generation, biomass yield in the F2 generation dropped with -26.7%, and with -8.7% in the crossings. Ear yield dropped with -35.3% and -10.7% respectively. F2 generations had a reduced early vigour and the ear filling startedlater. The yield of some F1 diallel crosses was not significantly different from the yield of the parental F1s.

  2. A Theoretical Framework for Association Studies in F2 Family Pools Using Allele Frequencies from Genotyping-By-Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janss, Luc L; Ashraf, Bilal H; Greve-Pedersen, Morten

    In Perennial ryegrass breeding, F2's derived from parental crosses are sown in plots and phenotypes and genotypes are obtained as single measurements for the whole F2 family pool. For genotypes this means that quantitative assays must be used to obtain allele frequencies. For this purpose...... a sequencing approach to obtain Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) frequencies is considered here. In this work we develop the theoretical framework to perform association studies using allele frequencies from such F2 family pools. We show that expected allele frequencies in the F2 families will have...... individuals. This effect is caused by extreme families (homozygote x homozygote) being less frequent than extreme (homozygote) individuals. We finally consider the effects of using sequencing to obtain allele frequencies, which will cause inaccuracy in the frequency estimate due to obtaining a limited number...

  3. Kinetic Characterization of PB1-F2-Mediated Immunopathology during Highly Pathogenic Avian H5N1 Influenza Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leymarie, Olivier; Jouvion, Grégory; Hervé, Pierre-Louis; Chevalier, Christophe; Lorin, Valérie; Lecardonnel, Jérôme; Da Costa, Bruno; Delmas, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    The PB1-F2 protein encoded by influenza A viruses can contribute to virulence, a feature that is dependent of its sequence polymorphism. Whereas PB1-F2 from some H1N1 viruses were shown to exacerbate the inflammatory response within the airways, the contribution of PB1-F2 to highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) virulence in mammals remains poorly described. Using a H5N1 HPAIV strain isolated from duck and its PB1-F2 knocked-out mutant, we characterized the dynamics of PB1-F2-associated host response in a murine model of lethal pneumonia. The mean time of death was 10 days for the two viruses, allowing us to perform global transcriptomic analyses and detailed histological investigations of the infected lungs at multiple time points. At day 2 post-infection (pi), while no histopathological lesion was observed, PB1-F2 expression resulted in a significant inhibition of cellular pathways involved in macrophage activation and in a transcriptomic signature suggesting that it promotes damage to the epithelial barrier. At day 4 pi, the gene profile associated with PB1-F2 expression revealed dysfunctions in NK cells activity. At day 8 pi, PB1-F2 expression was strongly associated with increased transcription of genes encoding chemokines and cytokines implicated in the recruitment of granulocytes, as well as expression of a number of genes encoding enzymes expressed by neutrophils. These transcriptomic data were fully supported by the histopathological analysis of the mice lungs which evidenced more severe inflammatory lesions and enhanced recruitment of neutrophils in the context of PB1-F2 expression, and thus provided a functional corroboration to the insight obtained in this work. In summary, our study shows that PB1-F2 of H5N1 HPAIV markedly influences the expression of the host transcriptome in a different way than its H1N1 counterparts: H5N1 PB1-F2 first delays the initial immune response but increases the pulmonary inflammatory response during the late

  4. Transcriptional profiling of Bacillus anthracis Sterne (34F2 during iron starvation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul E Carlson

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Lack of available iron is one of many environmental challenges that a bacterium encounters during infection and adaptation to iron starvation is important for the pathogen to efficiently replicate within the host. Here we define the transcriptional response of B. anthracis Sterne (34F(2 to iron depleted conditions. Genome-wide transcript analysis showed that B. anthracis undergoes considerable changes in gene expression during growth in iron-depleted media, including the regulation of known and candidate virulence factors. Two genes encoding putative internalin proteins were chosen for further study. Deletion of either gene (GBAA0552 or GBAA1340 resulted in attenuation in a murine model of infection. This attenuation was amplified in a double mutant strain. These data define the transcriptional changes induced during growth in low iron conditions and illustrate the potential of this dataset in the identification of putative virulence determinants for future study.

  5. B{sub K}-parameter from N{sub f}=2 twisted mass lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constantinou, M. [Cyprus Univ., Nicosia (Cyprus). Dept. of Physics; Dimopoulos, P. [Roma Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica; Frezzotti, R. [Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica; INFN, Rome (IT). Dipt. di Fisica] (and others)

    2011-01-07

    We present an unquenched N{sub f} = 2 lattice computation of the B{sub K} parameter which controls K{sup 0}- anti K{sup 0} oscillations. A partially quenched setup is employed with two maximally twisted dynamical (sea) light Wilson quarks, and valence quarks of both the maximally twisted and the Osterwalder-Seiler variety. Suitable combinations of these two kinds of valence quarks lead to a lattice definition of the B{sub K} parameter which is both multiplicatively renormalizable and O(a) improved. Employing the non-perturbative RI-MOM scheme, in the continuum limit and at the physical value of the pion mass we get B{sup RGI}{sub K}=0.729{+-}0.030, a number well in line with the existing quenched and unquenched determinations. (orig.)

  6. Prostaglandin F2 alpha-induced response of the bovine ovary, oviduct (uterine tube), and uterus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, L P; Sadiku, A; Verma, O P

    1979-12-01

    Tissue strips from the ovary, (uterine tube), and oviduct, and uterus of pregnant and nonpregnant cows were tested for their contractile response to prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha). When 2.1 x 10(-6)M PGF2 alpha was added to the uterine strips, tension of tissues from pregnant cows increased sharply; however, tension in tissues from nonpregnant cows only increased moderately. Similar concentrations failed to elicit any response from oviductal tissues of either group. Unlike the uterus and the oviduct, the ovaries contracted slowly and irregularly. They responded with varying degrees of stimulation; ovaries from pregnant cows with brief and mild stimulation and ovaries from nonpregnant cows with slower and relatively stronger stimulation. Results indicate that the bovine ovary contracts rhythmically and that its sensitivity to PGF2 alpha decreases during pregnancy in contrast to the bovine uterus which becomes increasingly sensitive during pregnancy.

  7. Measurement of D^(*+-) Meson Production and F_2^c in Deep-Inelastic Scattering at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Adloff, C.; Andrieu, B.; Anthonis, T.; Arkadov, V.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Babaev, A.; Bahr, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Bate, P.; Beglarian, A.; Behnke, O.; Beier, C.; Belousov, A.; Benisch, T.; Berger, C.; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J.C.; Boudry, V.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Broker, H.B.; Brown, D.P.; Bruckner, W.; Bruncko, D.; Burger, J.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Burrage, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Campbell, A.J.; Cao, Jun; Carli, T.; Caron, S.; Clarke, D.; Clerbaux, B.; Collard, C.; Contreras, J.G.; Coppens, Y.R.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cousinou, M.C.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; Davidsson, M.; Delcourt, B.; Delerue, N.; Demirchyan, R.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dingfelder, J.; Dixon, P.; Dodonov, V.; Dowell, J.D.; Droutskoi, A.; Dubak, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, D.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Ferron, S.; Fleischer, M.; Fleming, Y.H.; Flugge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formanek, J.; Foster, J.M.; Franke, G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garvey, J.; Gassner, J.; Gayler, Joerg; Gerhards, R.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Goldberg, M.; Goodwin, C.; Grab, C.; Grassler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, Guenter; Hadig, T.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haynes, W.J.; Heinemann, B.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hengstmann, S.; Henschel, H.; Heremans, R.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hilgers, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hladky, J.; Hoting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hurling, S.; Ibbotson, M.; Issever, C .; Jacquet, M.; Jaffre, M.; Janauschek, L.; Jansen, D.M.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, D.P.; Jones, M.A.S.; Jung, H.; Kastli, H.K.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Karschnick, O.; Keil, F.; Keller, N.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kermiche, S.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Kjellberg, P.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Koblitz, B.; Kolya, S.D.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S.K.; Koutouev, R.; Koutov, A.; Krehbiel, H.; Kroseberg, J.; Kruger, K.; Kupper, A.; Kuhr, T.; Kurca, T.; Lahmann, R.; Lamb, D.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Laycock, P.; Lebailly, E.; Lebedev, A.; Leissner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindstroem, M.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Loginov, A.; Loktionova, N.; Lubimov, V.; Luders, S.; Luke, D.; Lytkin, L.; Mahlke-Kruger, H.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Malinovski, I.; Maracek, R.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martyn, H.U.; Martyniak, J.; Maxfield, S.J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Merkel, P.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, P.O.; Mikocki, S.; Milstead, D.; Mkrtchyan, T.; Mohr, R.; Mohrdieck, S.; Mondragon, M.N.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, T.; Nellen, G.; Newman, Paul R.; Nicholls, T.C.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Nix, O.; Nowak, G.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Panassik, V.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Phillips, J.P.; Pitzl, D.; Poschl, R.; Potachnikova, I.; Povh, B.; Rabbertz, K.; Radel, G.; Rauschenberger, J.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Reyna, D.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.P.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, D.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, M.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schorner, T.; Schroder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Sedlak, K.; Sefkow, F.; Chekelian, V.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Solochenko, V.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Spitzer, H.; Stamen, R.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Straumann, U.; Swart, M.; Tasevsky, M.; Tchernyshov, V.; Chetchelnitski, S.; Thompson, Graham; Thompson, P.D.; Tobien, N.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, Peter; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Turney, J.E.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Udluft, S.; Usik, A.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vassiliev, S.; Vazdik, Y.; Vichnevski, A.; Wacker, K.; Wallny, R.; Waugh, B.; Weber, G.; Weber, M.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Werner, M.; Werner, N.; White, G.; Wiesand, S.; Wilksen, T.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.G.; Wissing, C.; Wobisch, M.; Wunsch, E.; Wyatt, A.C.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zomer, F.; Zsembery, J.; zur Nedden, M.

    2002-01-01

    The inclusive production of D^{*+-}(2010) mesons in deep-inelastic scattering is studied with the H1 detector at HERA. In the kinematic region 11.5 GeV and |\\eta_(D^*)|<1.5. Single and double differential inclusive D^(*+-) meson cross sections are compared to perturbative QCD calculations in two different evolution schemes. The charm contribution to the proton structure, F_2^c(x,Q^2), is determined by extrapolating the visible charm cross section to the full phase space. This contribution is found to rise from about 10% at Q^2 = 1.5 GeV^2 to more than 25% at Q^2 = 60 GeV^2 corresponding to x values ranging from 5*10^(-5) to 3*10^(-3)$.

  8. An analysis of type F2 software measurement standards for profile surface texture parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todhunter, L. D.; Leach, R. K.; Lawes, S. D. A.; Blateyron, F.

    2017-06-01

    This paper reports on an in-depth analysis of ISO 5436 part 2 type F2 reference software for the calculation of profile surface texture parameters that has been performed on the input, implementation and output results of the reference software developed by the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). Surface texture parameters have been calculated for a selection of 17 test data files obtained from the type F1 reference data sets on offer from NPL and NIST. The surface texture parameter calculation results show some disagreements between the software methods of the National Metrology Institutes. These disagreements have been investigated further, and some potential explanations are given.

  9. Properties of Heavy Fermion in an Impurity Anderson Model with f2 Local Singlet Ground State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiina, Ryousuke

    2018-01-01

    The Fermi-liquid properties of a two-orbital impurity Anderson model with an f2 local singlet ground state is studied by the numerical renormalization group method. It is shown that a heavy-fermion (HF) state with a vanishingly small Wilson ratio is realized in the vicinity of the quantum critical point (QCP) between the local-singlet and Kondo-singlet phases. The parameter area in which the HF behavior appears is remarkably enlarged with increasing the excitation energy from the local singlet to triplet states. It is also clarified that the HF state takes place with an intermediate average occupancy of f electrons, reflecting the existence of the QCP under strong valence fluctuation. The possible application of these theoretical results to an unconventional HF state in Sm compounds is discussed.

  10. Longitudinal structure function from logarithmic slopes of F2 at low x

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroun, G. R.

    2018-01-01

    Using Laplace transform techniques, I calculate the longitudinal structure function FL(x ,Q2) from the scaling violations of the proton structure function F2(x ,Q2) and make a critical study of this relationship between the structure functions at leading order (LO) up to next-to-next-to leading order (NNLO) analysis at small x . Furthermore, I consider heavy quark contributions to the relation between the structure functions, which leads to compact formula for Nf=3 +Heavy . The nonlinear corrections to the longitudinal structure function at LO up to NNLO analysis are shown in the Nf=4 (light quark flavor) based on the nonlinear corrections at R =2 and R =4 GeV-1 . The results are compared with experimental data of the longitudinal proton structure function FL in the range of 6.5 ≤Q2≤800 GeV2 .

  11. 15-F2t-Isoprostane Concentrations and Oxidant Status in Lactating Dairy Cattle with Acute Coliform Mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavangira, V; Mangual, M J; Gandy, J C; Sordillo, L M

    2016-01-01

    Severe mammary tissue damage during acute coliform mastitis in cattle is partially caused by oxidative stress. Although considered a gold standard biomarker in some human conditions, the utility of 15-F2t-Isoprostanes (15-F2t-Isop) in detecting oxidative stress in dairy cattle has not been validated. Concentrations of 15-F2t-Isop in plasma, urine, and milk correlate with changes in oxidant status during severe coliform mastitis in cattle. Eleven lactating Holstein-Friesian dairy cows in their 3rd-6th lactation. A case-control study using cows with acute coliform mastitis and matched healthy controls were enrolled into this study. Measures of inflammation, oxidant status, and redox status in plasma and milk samples were quantified using commercial assays. Plasma, urine, and milk 15-F2t-Isop were quantified by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and ELISA assays. Data were analyzed by Wilcoxon rank sum tests (α = 0.05). Plasma 15-F2t-Isop quantified by LC-MS/MS was positively correlated with systemic oxidant status (r = 0.83; P = .01). Urine 15-F2t-Isop quantified by LC-MS/MS did not correlate with systemic oxidant status, but was negatively correlated with redox status variables (r = -0.83; P = .01). Milk 15-F2t-Isop quantified by LC-MS/MS was negatively correlated (r = -0.86; P = .007) with local oxidant status. Total 15-F2t-Isop in milk quantified by a commercial ELISA (cbELISA) was positively correlated with oxidant status in milk (r = 0.98; P cows should currently be based on the LC-MS/MS method. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  12. Effects of estrogen on the fibrosis process of intrauterine adhesions and the expression of forkhead box F2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-ping CHEN

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the effect of estrogen on the fibrosis process of intrauterine adhesions and the expression of forkhead box F2 (FoxF2. Methods Primary human endometrial stromal cells (HESCs were obtained by separation with 0.2% collagenase Ι digestion-mesh filtration-differential adherence, and identified by immunocytochemistry. HESCs affected with 10ng/ml transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1 for 48 hours. HESCs in model group were affected with 0, 10–6, 10–8, 10–10 and 10–12mol/L estrogen, the expressions of smooth muscle actin alpha (α-SMA, Collagen I (COLⅠ and FoxF2 were detected by quantitative PCR (qPCR and Western blotting. Results HESCs with high purity and good activity were obtained by using 0.2% collagenase Ι digestion-mesh filtration-differential adherence separation method. Immunocytochemistry showed positive vimentin and negative cytokeratin 18 in HESCs. The results of qPCR and Western blotting showed that the mRNA and protein expression levels of α-SMA, COLⅠ and FoxF2 were higher in model group than in control group (P0.05 in 10–10mol/L estrogen group, P0.05. Compared with the model group, the protein expression levels of α-SMA, COLⅠ and FoxF2 in 10–6, 10–8 and 10–10mol/L estrogen groups decreased, but no significant difference was found (P0.05, and of COLⅠ and FoxF2 proteins decreased (P<0.05. Conclusions The expression of FoxF2 in intrauterine adhesions is increased. Estrogen can reverse the fibrosis process of intrauterine adhesions in a certain range and inhibit the expression of FoxF2. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2017.04.10

  13. Variation with temperature of the electron attachment to SO2F2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datskos, P. G.; Christophorou, L. G.

    1989-03-01

    The total electron attachment rate constant ka(,T) for SO2F2 has been measured, in a buffer gas of N2, as a function of the mean electron energy (0.046-0.911 eV) and temperature T (300-700 K) using an electron swarm technique. From the measured ka(,T), the total electron attachment cross sections σa(ɛ,T) were determined. At 300 K the σa(ɛ,T) exhibits a maximum at ˜0.22 eV which is due to dissociative electron attachment and an increase below ˜0.1 eV which is due to the formation of parent negative ions SO2F-2 at near zero energy. At T=400 K, σa(ɛ,T) has only one main peak at ˜0.13 eV which is due only to dissociative electron attachment reflecting the depletion of the parent anions and the prevalence of the fragment negative ions as T increases. The main peak of σa(ɛ,T) shifts to lower electron energies with increasing T so that at 700 K the peak is located at ˜0.03 eV. The value, σda(ɛmax), of the total electron attachment cross section at the peak energy ɛmax increases by a factor of ˜32 as T increases from 300 to 700 K. The analysis of these results—and similar earlier work—leads to the conclusion that the increase in σda(ɛ,T) for the dissociative electron attachment processes in molecules, with increasing T results mainly from an increase with T of the internal energy (principally vibrational) of the molecule.

  14. Persistence of the planetary wave type oscillations in foF2 over Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Laštovička

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Planetary waves are oscillations of very predominantly tropospheric origin with typical periods of about 2–30 days. Their dominant zonal wave numbers are 1, 2 and 3, i.e. the waves are of large-scale (global character. The planetary wave type oscillations have been observed in the lower and middle atmosphere but also in the ionosphere, including the ionospheric F2-layer. Here, we deal only with the oscillations analyzed for four European stations over a solar cycle with the use of the Meyer and Morlet wavelet transforms. Waves with periods near 5, 10 and 16 days are studied. Only events with a duration of three wave-cycles and more are considered. The 5-day period wave events display a typical duration of 4 cycles, while 10- and 16-day wave events are less persistent, with a typical duration of about 3.5 cycles and 3 cycles, respectively. The persistence pattern in terms of number of cycles and in terms of number of days is different. In terms of number of cycles, the typical persistence of oscillations decreases with increasing period. On the other hand, in terms of number of days the typical persistence evidently increases with increasing period. The spectral distribution of event duration is too broad to allow for a reasonable prediction of event duration. Thus, the predictability of the planetary wave type oscillations in foF2 seems to be very questionable.Key words. Ionosphere (ionosphere-atmosphere interaction, mid-latitude ionosphere, ionospheric disturbances – Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (waves and tides

  15. Distinguishing between MSSM and NMSSM through ΔF=2 processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Jacky [Department of High Energy Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research,Ist Homi Bhabha road, 400 005 Mumbai (India); Paraskevas, Michael [Department of Physics, Division of Theoretical Physics, University of Ioannina,GR 45110 Ioannina (Greece)

    2016-10-25

    We study deviations between MSSM and Z{sub 3}-invariant NMSSM, with respect to their predictions in ΔF=2 processes. We find that potentially significant effects arise either from the well known double-penguin diagrams, due to the extra scalar NMSSM states, or from neutralino-gluino box contributions, due to the extended neutralino sector. Both are discussed to be effective in the large tan β regime. Enhanced genuine-NMSSM contributions in double penguins are expected for a light singlet spectrum (CP-even, CP-odd), while the magnitude of box effects is primarily controlled through singlino mixing. The latter is found to be typically subleading (but non-negligible) for λ≲0.5, however it can become dominant for λ∼O(1). We also study the low tan β regime, where a distinction between MSSM and NMSSM can come instead due to experimental constraints, acting differently on the allowed parameter space of each model. To this end, we incorporate the LHC Run-I limits from H→Z Z, A→h Z and H{sup ±}→τ ν non-observation along with Higgs observables and set (different) upper bounds for new physics contributions in ΔF=2 processes. We find that a ∼25% contribution in ΔM{sub s(d)} is still possible for MFV models, however such a large effect is nowadays severely constrained for the case of MSSM, due to stronger bounds on the charged Higgs masses.

  16. Statistical properties of the deviations of f 0 F 2 from monthly medians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Tulunay

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The deviations of hourly f 0 F 2 from monthly medians for 20 stations in Europe during the period 1958-1998 are studied. Spectral analysis is used to show that, both for original data (for each hour and for the deviations from monthly medians, the deterministic components are the harmonics of 11 years (solar cycle, 1 year and its harmonics, 27 days and 12 h 50.49 m (2nd harmonic of lunar rotation period L 2 periodicities. Using histograms for one year samples, it is shown that the deviations from monthly medians are nearly zero mean (mean < 0.5 and approximately Gaussian (relative difference range between %10 to %20 and their standard deviations are larger for daylight hours (in the range 5-7. It is shown that the amplitude distribution of the positive and negative deviations is nearly symmetrical at night hours, but asymmetrical for day hours. The positive and negative deviations are then studied separately and it is observed that the positive deviations are nearly independent of R12 except for high latitudes, but negative deviations are modulated by R12 . The 90% confidence interval for negative deviations for each station and each hour is computed as a linear model in terms of R12. After correction for local time, it is shown that for all hours the confidence intervals increase with latitude but decrease above 60N. Long-term trend analysis showed that there is an increase in the amplitude of positive deviations from monthly means irrespective of the solar conditions. Using spectral analysis it is also shown that the seasonal dependency of negative deviations is more accentuated than the seasonal dependency of positive deviations especially at low latitudes. In certain stations, it is also observed that the 4th harmonic of 1 year corresponding to a periodicity of 3 months, which is missing in f 0 F 2 data, appears in the spectra of negative variations.

  17. 2.7 μm emission in Er3+:CaF2 nanocrystals embedded oxyfluoride glass ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guobo; Fan, Shaohua; Zhang, Yuanhao; Chai, Guanqi; Ma, Zhijun; Peng, Mingying; Qiu, Jianrong; Dong, Guoping

    2013-08-15

    Using conventional melt-quenching and subsequent thermal treatment, Er(3+) doped CaF(2) transparent glass ceramic (GC) was prepared. X-ray diffraction and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy confirmed the formation and microstructure of CaF(2) nanocrystals in glass. An energy-dispersive spectrometer was used to investigate the distribution of Er(3+) ions and CaF(2) nanocrystals in glass. It was found that Er(3+) ions prefer to concentrate in the CaF(2) nanocrystals rather than in a glass matrix, and the amount of Er(3+) ions plays a key role in the formation of CaF(2) nanocrystals in a glass matrix with the Er(3+) ions as nucleating agent. An intense 2.7 μm emission due to Er(3+): I(11/2)4 → I(13/2)4 was achieved upon excitation at 980 nm with a laser diode, while the 2.7 μm emission can be neglected in the as-prepared glass counterpart, which confirmed the incorporation of Er(3+) ions into CaF(2) nanocrystals. An obvious enhancement of 2.7 μm emerged in the GC doped with 3% Er(3+) and heat-treated at 620 °C.

  18. Hydrodechlorination of Tetrachloromethane over Palladium Catalysts Supported on Mixed MgF2-MgO Carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Bonarowska

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Pd/MgO, Pd/MgF2 and Pd/MgO-MgF2 catalysts were investigated in the reaction of CCl4 hydrodechlorination. All the catalysts deactivated in time on stream, but the degree of deactivation varied from catalyst to catalyst. The MgF2-supported palladium with relatively large metal particles appeared the best catalyst, characterized by good activity and selectivity to C2-C5 hydrocarbons. Investigation of post-reaction catalyst samples allowed to find several details associated with the working state of hydrodechlorination catalysts. The role of support acidity was quite complex. On the one hand, a definite, although not very high Lewis acidity of MgF2 is beneficial for shaping high activity of palladium catalysts. The MgO-MgF2 support characterized by stronger Lewis acidity than MgF2 contributes to very good catalytic activity for a relatively long reaction period (~5 h but subsequent neutralization of stronger acid centers (by coking eliminates them from the catalyst. On the other hand, the role of acidity evolution, which takes place when basic supports (like MgO are chlorided during HdCl reactions, is difficult to assess because different events associated with distribution of chlorided support species, leading to partial or even full blocking of the surface of palladium, which plays the role of active component in HdCl reactions.

  19. Effects of provenance and seed size on seedling survival and mophology of Quercus pontica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Aksu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to investigate the effect of provenance and seed size on seedling survival and growth of Quercus pontica. The study showed that seed parameters showed significant differences among provenances. Provenance and seed size affected seedling survival and seedling morphology. Bigger seed size increased seedling survival, and also the large sized seed showed significant higher seedling height, root dry weight, shoot dry weight, and Dickson Quality Index in 1+0 seedlings.

  20. Factors affecting acorn production and germination and early growth of seedlings and seedling sprouts

    Science.gov (United States)

    David F. Olson; Stephen G. Boyce

    1971-01-01

    Acorn production is extremely variable and unpredictable. Flowering is copious, but many climatic factors influence acorn development from initiation of flowers to acorn maturity. Acorns are consumed by birds, animals, insects, and microorganisms. The establishment of seedlings is more closely related to favorable site factors than to size of crops. A majority of oaks...

  1. Planting and care of fine hardwood seedlings: Nursery production of hardwood seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglass F. Jacobs

    2003-01-01

    Access to quality tree seedlings is an essential component of a successful hardwood reforestation project. Hardwood plantations may be established by sowing seed directly to a field site, but the success of direct seeding operations has been inconsistent for many species, which indicates that more research is needed before this practice can be recommended. For...

  2. An Artificial Neural Network-Based Ionospheric Model to Predict NmF2 and hmF2 Using Long-Term Data Set of FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC Radio Occultation Observations: Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sai Gowtam, V.; Tulasi Ram, S.

    2017-11-01

    Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) are known to be capable of solving linear as well as highly nonlinear problems. Using the long-term and high-quality data set of Formosa Satellite-3/Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC, in short F3/C) from 2006 to 2015, an ANN-based two-dimensional (2-D) Ionospheric Model (ANNIM) is developed to predict the ionospheric peak parameters, such as NmF2 and hmF2. In this pilot study, the ANNIM results are compared with the original F3/C data, GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) observations as well as International Reference Ionosphere (IRI)-2016 model to assess the learning efficiency of the neural networks used in the model. The ANNIM could well predict the NmF2 (hmF2) values with RMS errors of 1.87 × 105 el/cm3 (27.9 km) with respect to actual F3/C; and 2.98 × 105 el/cm3 (40.18 km) with respect to independent GRACE data. Further, the ANNIM predictions found to be as good as IRI-2016 model with a slightly smaller RMS error when compared to independent GRACE data. The ANNIM has successfully reproduced the local time, latitude, longitude, and seasonal variations with errors ranging 15-25% for NmF2 and 10-15% for hmF2 compared to actual F3/C data, except the postsunset enhancement in hmF2. Further, the ANNIM has also captured the global-scale ionospheric phenomena such as ionospheric annual anomaly, Weddell Sea Anomaly, and the midlatitude summer nighttime anomaly. Compared to IRI-2016 model, the ANNIM is found to have better represented the fine longitudinal structures and the midlatitude summer nighttime enhancements in both the hemispheres.

  3. Influence of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate on bioaccumulation and translocation of pyrene and 1-methylpyrene in maize (Zea mays) seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haiyun; Liu, Ye; Shen, Xiaofang; Zhang, Meng; Yang, Yu; Tao, Shu; Wang, Xilong

    2017-01-01

    Influence of multiwalled carbon nanotubes with outer diameters > 50 nm (MW) and a surfactant sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS) on bioaccumulation and translocation of pyrene and 1-methylpyrene (1-CH3-pyrene) in maize seedlings in single-(F1) and bi-(F2) compound systems was investigated. Pyrene concentration in shoots was detected in all treatments in F1 and F2, ranging in 10.43-60.28 ng/g and 21.46-40.21 ng/g, respectively, and its translocation factors (TFs) ranged in 0.12-0.19 and 0.07-0.16. However, no 1-CH3-pyrene in shoots was detected from F1 and F2, indicating almost 100% suppression on its translocation from roots to shoots. SDBS at 100 mg/kg significantly enhanced pyrene bioaccumulation in roots and shoots by 43.5% and 77.4% in F1, and 21.7% in roots in F2, while showed insignificant effect on shoot concentration in F2. In contrast, SDBS at 100 mg/kg exerted no significant effect on root 1-CH3-pyrene concentration in F1 and F2. With increasing amendment level of MW from 50 to 3000 mg/kg, both pyrene and 1-CH3-pyrene concentrations in roots and shoots sharply decreased, indicating an increasing suppression on their bioaccumulation and translocation in plant. As for 3000 mg/kg MW + 100 mg/kg SDBS, root concentrations of pyrene and 1-CH3-pyrene in F1 were significantly reduced by 53.4% and 100%, while shoot concentration of pyrene was not affected, generally consistent with the trend of the corresponding bioaccumulation factors (BCFroot) and TFs. As for F2 with the same treatment, root 1-CH3-pyrene concentration declined by 68.6%, whereas pyrene bioaccumulation in roots and shoots was insignificantly affected, which were also in agreement with their BCFroot and TFs. Results of this work highlight the combined impacts of soil amendment with carbon nanotubes and surfactant on bioaccumulation and translocation of pyrene and 1-CH3-pyrene in maize seedlings in multi-pollutant exposure systems, which is important for soil pollution control and

  4. Genetic loci conditioning adult plant resistance to the Ug99 race group and seedling resistance to races TRTTF and TTTTF of the stem rust pathogen in wheat landrace CItr 15026

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat landrace CItr 15026 previously showed adult plant resistance (APR) to the Ug99 stem rust race group in Kenya and seedling resistance to Puccinia graminis f. sp tritici (Pgt) races QFCSC, TTTTF, and TRTTF. CItr 15026 was crossed to susceptible accessions LMPG-6 and Red Bobs, and 180 DH lines an...

  5. Radiation effects on Brassica seeds and seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deoli, Naresh; Hasenstein, Karl H.

    2016-07-01

    Space radiation consists of high energy charged particles and affects biological systems, but because of its stochastic, non-directional nature is difficult to replicate on Earth. Radiation damages biological systems acutely at high doses or cumulatively at low doses through progressive changes in DNA organization. These damages lead to death or cause of mutations. While radiation biology typically focuses on mammalian or human systems, little is known as to how radiation affects plants. In addition, energetic ion beams are widely used to generate new mutants in plants considering their high-LET (Linear Energy Transfer) as compared to gamma rays and X-rays. Understanding the effect of ionizing radiation on plant provides a basis for studying effects of radiation on biological systems and will help mitigate (space) radiation damage in plants. We exposed dry and imbibed Brassica rapa seeds and seedling roots to proton beams of varying qualities and compared the theoretical penetration range of different energy levels with observable growth response. We used 1, 2 and 3 MeV protons in air at the varying fluences to investigate the effect of direct irradiation on the seeds (1012 - 1015 ions/cm2) and seedlings (1013 ions/cm2). The range of protons in the tissue was calculated using Monte-Carlo based SRIM (Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter) software. The simulation and biological results indicate that ions did not penetrate the tissue of dry or hydrated seeds at all used ion energies. Therefore the entire energy was transferred to the treated tissue. Irradiated seeds were germinated vertically under dim light and roots growth was observed for two days after imbibition. The LD50 of the germination was about 2×1014 ions/cm2 and about 5×1014 ions/cm2 for imbibed and dry seeds, respectively. Since seedlings are most sensitive to gravity, the change in gravitropic behavior is a convenient means to assess radiation damage on physiological responses other than direct tissue

  6. Effect of oxygen tension on the generation of F2-isoprostanes and malondialdehyde in peroxidizing rat liver microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longmire, A W; Swift, L L; Roberts, L J; Awad, J A; Burk, R F; Morrow, J D

    1994-03-29

    Although numerous methods have been developed for the detection of lipid peroxidation, it is generally recognized that most of these lack specificity and/or sensitivity, particularly when applied to in vivo situations. We have reported recently that a series of prostaglandin F2-like compounds, termed F2-isoprostanes, are formed in vivo from the free radical catalyzed peroxidation of arachidonic acid and appear to be a useful marker of oxidant stress. Because of formation of other products of lipid peroxidation, such as alkanes and malondialdehyde (MDA), are affected by oxygen tension, which may influence their usefulness as markers of oxidant stress, we carried out a systematic study of the generation of F2-isoprostanes at various oxygen concentrations and compared these changes with the generation of MDA. The disappearance of the F2-isoprostane precursor, arachidonic acid, was used as a reference measure. Rat liver microsomes were peroxidized using an iron-ascorbate system. The incubations were carried out in sealed flasks at 37 degrees under N2 and various concentrations of O2 up to 100%. F2-isoprostanes were quantified by mass spectrometry and MDA by the thiobarbituric acid reaction. Microsomal fatty acids were measured by gas chromatography. Both MDA and F2-isoprostane formation increased in a time-dependent manner up to 15 min. Their formation correlated with a loss of polyunsaturated fatty acid and with an increase in O2 tension up to 21% O2. At oxygen tensions above 21%, MDA generation continued to increase, while F2-isoprostane generation and arachidonic acid loss did not. Levels of MDA and F2-isoprostanes increased a maximum of 65 and 9.4 times baseline values, respectively. These studies, therefore, define factors that influence the formation of F2-isoprostanes in an in vitro model of lipid peroxidation. Further, they demonstrate that higher O2 tensions do not block formation of F2-isoprostanes and validate their usefulness for assessing lipid

  7. Differential effects of aluminium on the seedling parameters of wheat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... different aluminium (Al) concentrations on the seedling parameters of wheat and the effect of malate and citrate treatments as chelates for reducing the noxious effect of Al in medium culture and seedlings of two wheat cultivars, Darab (Al sensitive) and Maroon (Al tolerant) were grown on hydroponic solution (non modified ...

  8. Sucrose metabolism and growth in transplanted loblolly pine seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi-Jean S. Sung; C.C. Black; Paul P. Kormanik

    1993-01-01

    Loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) seedling height, root collar diameter, and the specific activities of three sucrose metabolizing enzymes, namely, sucrose synthase (SS), acid invertase, and neutral invertase, were measured to assess seedling responses to transplant stress. It was concluded that i) SS was the dominant enzyme for sucrose metabolism in...

  9. Herbaceous Weed Control Improves Survival of Planted Shumard Oak Seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    A.W. Ezell; J.D. Hodges

    2002-01-01

    Shumard oak seedlings were planted on a cutoversite in the Mississippi River floodplain, which had received both chemical and mechanical site preparation treatments. Soil at the site was a commerce silt loam and the elevation was such that the area does not flood. Planting stock was 1-0, bareroot seedlings. A total of seven active herbicide treatments were applied at a...

  10. Seedling growth of Adenanthera pavonina L. in polluted soils of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The seedling growth performance of Adenanthera pavonina L. in polluted soils of different railway tracks viz. Karachi Cantt. Station, Malir Halt, Malir 15, Landhi Junction and University Campus (control) was studied under in pots under natural field conditions. The results showed that the root, shoot and seedling size, number ...

  11. Effects of hydropriming on seed germination and seedling growth in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The germination of Salvia officinalis L. (sage) seeds is a problem of great concern that may be overcome by employing seed priming techniques. Seed priming is an efficient technique for improvement of seed vigor, increasing germination and seedling growth. Little information has been reported on seedling development ...

  12. Shortleaf pine seedling production and seeding trends in Missouri

    Science.gov (United States)

    David Gwaze; Greg Hoss; Dena Biram

    2007-01-01

    The Missouri Department of Conservation operates the only nursery that supplies bare-root shortleaf pine seedlings in Missouri. Seedlings and seed have been sold to landowners since 1935. Prior to 1981 most seed was locally collected wild seed, some was purchased from neighboring states. After 1981, most of the seed for artificial regeneration was improved orchard seed...

  13. Influence of sward defoliation and soil disturbance on seedling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Development of vegetation from seed requires a seed bank, germination, emergence and subsequent seedling survival. Reports on the influence of a number of practicably feasible treatments to the vegetation and soil on emergence and survival of grass seedlings in the Southern Tall Grassveld of Natal. Illustrates with ...

  14. Change in amino acids content during germination and seedling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGORY

    2010-08-30

    Aug 30, 2010 ... In this study, cotyledons and seedlings axes were separated. Non-germinated seeds, germinated seeds and seedlings were analysed at Biozen- ... Chemicals. All solvents used were of analytical grade purchased from Merck. (Darmstadt, Germany). Water was purified by a Milli-Q water puri- fication system ...

  15. Response of fenugreek ( Trigonella foenum-graecum L.) seedlings ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the present investigation, the impact of drought and heavy metal in fenugreek was critically monitored. Fenugreek seedlings were exposed to 1- bar polyethylene glycol (PEG) solution (osmotic stress) and 10 ppm solution of HgCl2 (heavy metal). Within 3 days of seedling growth, mercury exposure induced relatively high ...

  16. Photosynthate distribution patterns in cherrybark oak seedling sprouts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian Roy Lockhart; John D. Hodges; Emile S. Gardiner; Andrew W. Ezell

    2003-01-01

    Summary We used 14C tracers to determine photosynthate distribution in cherrybark oak (Quercus pagoda Raf.) seedling sprouts following release from competing mid-story vegetation. Fall acquisition of labeled photosynthates by seedlings followed expected source--sink patterns, with root and basal stem tissues...

  17. Evaluation of Promalin to promote growth of young mangosteen seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    A major impediment to the development of a mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana L.) industry is the long pre-bearing stage that seedlings take to produce fruits. A field study was conducted to determine the effect of Promalin on the growth of mangosteen seedlings. Promalin was applied as a foliar spray...

  18. Seed germination and seedling vigour attributes of gmelina ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Seeds derived from yellow brown and brown fruits were superior in storage for germination, seedling vigour and characteristics. Treatments with powders of scent leaf, red chilli fruits and black pepper fruits resulted in superior seed germination and seedling vigour attributes over control and apron plus treatments, ...

  19. Morphological Adaptation of Cercis Griffithii Seedlings in Response ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    2017-12-03

    Dec 3, 2017 ... Morphological Adaptation of Cercis Griffithii Seedlings in Response to Progressive. Drought ... 2Department of Forest Sciences, Research Division of Natural Resources, Isfahan Agricultural and Natural Resources Research and. Education .... each seedling five leaf selection of basic randomized to using ...

  20. Seedling recruitment of Colophospermum mopane on the Highveld ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Factors controlling seedling recruitment of Colophospermum mopane (Kirk ex. Benth) Kirk ex. J. Leonard were investigated on the highveld of Zimbabwe. Seed germination and seedling survival and growth were monitored under canopy and outside canopy microhabitats for a period of 3 years. Seed germination in both ...

  1. (GPx) activity in young barley seedlings enriched with selenium

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJB_YOMI

    2011-09-21

    Sep 21, 2011 ... E-mail: guzx@njau.edu.cn. Tel/Fax: +86. 25 84396293. have been used for animal feeds and beer malts. Recently, young barley seedlings have been used as food material for people in Asian countries such as China,. Japan, and Korea. Young barley seedlings are rich in dietary fiber, chlorophyll, carotene ...

  2. Control damage by seedling debarking weevil. Technical note No. 271

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eidt, D.C.; Weaver, C.A.A.

    1993-01-01

    Technical note describing a method of controlling the damage to seedlings by the seedling debarking weevil by using nematodes. Information is given on the damage involved, the nematodes to be used, treatment methods, planting procedures, benefits and costs, and results of earlier trials.

  3. Provenances and fertilizer on early growth cedar seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Carlos Navroski

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the initial development of different provenances and the influence of base fertilizer and coverage on growth of Cedrela fissilis seedlings. Provenances of seeds were collected in Lapa, PR, Fernandes Pinheiro, PR and Itaara, RS. After germination, the seedlings were transplanted to plastic bags of 500 cm³, filled with commercial substrate. Total height (h, stem diameter (sd, and ratio h/sd seedlings were measured after 150 days of transplanting. Seedlings of Fernandes Pinheiro received basic fertilization after transplantation (0, 2, 4, 6 and 8 g dm-3  Osmocote® and cover (3 and 6 g L-1, respectively, of Peter’s® and urea. The provenance and doses of controlled-release fertilizer influenced early development of Cedrela fissilis seedlings. Itaara provenance showed better seedlings growth. Cedar seedlings showed good growth when incorporated into the substrate 5 g dm-3 Osmocote® and, in addition, applied in topdressing 3 g L-1 of Peter’s®. Urea topdressing is rarely recommended for cedar seedlings.

  4. Chemical root pruning of conifer seedlings in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnulfo Aldrete; John G. Mexal

    2002-01-01

    Many countries grow seedlings for reforestation in polybags where root spiraling and root egression can decrease seedling survival and growth following outplanting. The overall objectives of this study were to investigate the effect of chemical root pruning on root spiraling, root egression, and nursery performance of Pinus pseudostrobus, P...

  5. Seedling mineral nutrition, the root of the matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbara J. Hawkins

    2011-01-01

    Plants have the marvelous ability to take up inorganic mineral nutrients as atoms or simple molecules and process them into proteins, enzymes, and other organic forms. This paper reviews the 14 essential mineral nutrients, their roles within the plant, their target concentrations in tree seedling nursery culture, and their effects on seedling growth and performance...

  6. Photoreceptive sites in the photocontrol of oat seedling growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazimierz Madela

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of red light on the growth of coleoptiles and mesocotyles of etiolated and pre-irradiated oat seedlings was investigated. Red light (15 min. applied on whole seedlings stimulated the elongation of coleoptiles and inhibited the growth of mesocotyles both in etiolated and in pre-irradiated plants. Irradiation with red light (2 min of various 2-mm-long regions of etiolated and pre-irradiated oat seedlings was carried out in order to locate their light reception regions. On the basis of growth reactions after such treatment it was found that in completely etiolated seedlings the light reception sites involved in the stimulation of coleoptile elongation and inhibition of mesocotyle growth lie directly above and below the seedling node, whereas in pre-irradiated seedlings, in the top of the seedling. These results point to the existence of different growth photoregulation systems in etiolated and pre-irradiated oat seedlings. The role of phytochrome in these phenomena is discussed.

  7. Mycorrhizas on nursery and field seedlings of Quercus garryana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dariene Southworth; Elizabeth M. Carrington; Jonathan L. Frank; Peter Gould; Connie A. Harrington; Warren D. Devine

    2009-01-01

    Oak woodland regeneration and restoration requires that seedlings develop mycorrhizas, yet the need for this mutualistic association is often overlooked. In this study, we asked whether Quercus garryana seedlings in nursery beds acquire mycorrhizas without artificial inoculation or access to a mycorrhizal network of other ectomycorrhizal hosts. We...

  8. Exposure to welding fumes is associated with hypomethylation of the F2RL3 gene: a cardiovascular disease marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Mohammad B; Li, Huiqi; Hedmer, Maria; Tinnerberg, Håkan; Albin, Maria; Broberg, Karin

    2015-12-01

    Welders are at risk for cardiovascular disease. Recent studies linked tobacco smoke exposure to hypomethylation of the F2RL3 (coagulation factor II (thrombin) receptor-like 3) gene, a marker for cardiovascular disease prognosis and mortality. However, whether welding fumes cause hypomethylation of F2RL3 remains unknown. We investigated 101 welders (median span of working as a welder: 7 years) and 127 unexposed controls (non-welders with no obvious exposure to respirable dust at work), age range 23-60 years, all currently non-smoking, in Sweden. The participants were interviewed about their work history, lifestyle factors and diseases. Personal sampling of respirable dust was performed for the welders. DNA methylation of F2RL3 in blood was assessed by pyrosequencing of four CpG sites, CpG_2 (corresponds to cg03636183) to CpG_5, in F2RL3. Multivariable linear regression analysis was used to assess the association between exposure to welding fumes and F2RL3 methylation. Welders had 2.6% lower methylation of CpG_5 than controls (pWelding fumes exposure and previous smoking were associated with F2RL3 hypomethylation. This finding links low-to-moderate exposure to welding fumes to adverse effects on the cardiovascular system, and suggests a potential mechanistic pathway for this link, via epigenetic effects on F2RL3 expression. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  9. On the inclusion of data from solar cycle 19 to estimate F2 layer characteristic long term trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blas F. de Haro Barbas

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The effect of including solar cycle 19 (1954-1964 in ionospheric trend estimation is assessed using experimental foF2 values. The dominant influence on the F2 layer is solar EUV radiation. In fact, around 90% of inter-annual variance of ionospheric parameters, such as foF2, is explained by solar EUV proxies such as the sunspot number, Rz, and solar radio flux at 10.7 cm, F10.7. This makes necessary to filter out solar activity effects prior to long term trends estimation, which is reduced at most to the remaining 10% variance. In general solar activity is filtered assessing the residuals of a linear regression between foF2 and Rz, or between foF2 and F10.7. Solar cycle 19 is a strong cycle during which Rz and F10.7 exceeded the values beyond which the ionosphere does not respond linearly to a further increase in EUV radiation. This effect, called saturation, implies a break down of the linearity between foF2 and EUV, and results in persistent negative residuals during this period. Since solar cycle 19 is at the beginning of the time series, trends result to be positive, or less negative, than trends without considering this period. In this case the filtering process is generating a “spurious” trend in the filtered data series which may lead to erroneous conclusions. hmF2 that do not present a saturation effect is also analyzed. 

  10. Identification of Drosophila melanogaster yellow-f and yellow-f2 proteins as dopachrome-conversion enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Qian; Fang, Jianmin; Ding, Haizhen; Johnson, Jody K; Christensen, Bruce M; Li, Jianyong

    2002-11-15

    This study describes the identification of Drosophila yellow-f and yellow-f2 as dopachrome-conversion enzymes responsible for catalysing the conversion of dopachrome into 5,6-dihydroxyindole in the melanization pathway. Drosophila yellow -y gene and yellow -b, -c, -f and -f2 genes were expressed in an insect cell/baculovirus expression system and their corresponding recombinant proteins were screened for dopachrome-conversion enzyme activity. Among the yellow and yellow -related genes, the yellow -f and yellow -f2 genes were identified as the genes coding for Drosophila dopachrome-conversion enzyme based on the high activity of their recombinant proteins in catalysing the production of 5,6-dihydroxyindole from dopachrome. Both yellow-f and yellow-f2 are capable of mediating a decarboxylative structural rearrangement of dopachrome, as well as an isomerization/tautomerization of dopamine chrome and dopa methyl ester chrome. Northern hybridization revealed the transcription of yellow -f in larvae and pupae, but a high abundance of mRNA was observed in later larval and early pupal stages. In contrast, yellow-f2 transcripts were present at all stages, but high abundance of its mRNA was observed in later-stage pupae and adults. These data indicate that yellow-f and yellow-f2 complement each other during Drosophila development and that the yellow-f is involved in larval and pupal melanization, and yellow-f2 plays a major role in melanization reactions in Drosophila during later pupal and adult development. Results from this study provide the groundwork towards a better understanding of the physiological roles of the Drosophila yellow gene family.

  11. Substituting mouse transcription factor Pou4f2 with a sea urchin orthologue restores retinal ganglion cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Chai-An; Agca, Cavit; Mocko-Strand, Julie A; Wang, Jing; Ullrich-Lüter, Esther; Pan, Ping; Wang, Steven W; Arnone, Maria Ina; Frishman, Laura J; Klein, William H

    2016-03-16

    Pou domain transcription factor Pou4f2 is essential for the development of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in the vertebrate retina. A distant orthologue of Pou4f2 exists in the genome of the sea urchin (class Echinoidea) Strongylocentrotus purpuratus (SpPou4f1/2), yet the photosensory structure of sea urchins is strikingly different from that of the mammalian retina. Sea urchins have no obvious eyes, but have photoreceptors clustered around their tube feet disc. The mechanisms that are associated with the development and function of photoreception in sea urchins are largely unexplored. As an initial approach to better understand the sea urchin photosensory structure and relate it to the mammalian retina, we asked whether SpPou4f1/2 could support RGC development in the absence of Pou4f2. To answer this question, we replaced genomic Pou4f2 with an SpPou4f1/2 cDNA. In Pou4f2-null mice, retinas expressing SpPou4f1/2 were outwardly identical to those of wild-type mice. SpPou4f1/2 retinas exhibited dark-adapted electroretinogram scotopic threshold responses, indicating functionally active RGCs. During retinal development, SpPou4f1/2 activated RGC-specific genes and in S. purpuratus, SpPou4f2 was expressed in photoreceptor cells of tube feet in a pattern distinct from Opsin4 and Pax6. Our results suggest that SpPou4f1/2 and Pou4f2 share conserved components of a gene network for photosensory development and they maintain their conserved intrinsic functions despite vast morphological differences in mouse and sea urchin photosensory structures. © 2016 The Authors.

  12. Susceptibility of the corpus luteum to prostaglandin F2α in alpacas after induced ovulation with seminal plasma and GnRH

    OpenAIRE

    Mamani M., Camilo; Laboratorio de Reproducción Animal, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima; Huanca L., Wilfredo; Laboratorio de Reproducción Animal, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima; Echevarría C., Luisa; Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria y Zootecnia, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima; Cordero R., Aída; Facultad de Zootecnia, Departamento de Nutrición, Universidad Nacional Agraria La Molina, Lima; Huanca M., Willian Fahrid; Laboratorio de Reproducción Animal, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima; Limache C., Tito; Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Jorge Basadre Grohmann, Tacna

    2017-01-01

    El objetivo del presente estudio fue evaluar la susceptibilidad del cuerpo lúteo al cloprostenol sódico (análogo sintético de la PGF2a) durante el desarrollo de la fase luteal en alpacas inducidas a ovulación con plasma seminal o con GnRH. El plasma seminal se obtuvo de muestras de semen de alpaca colectadas mediante vagina artificial, y diluido en proporción 1:1 en buffer fosfato salino (PBS), centrifugado y conservado a -20 °C. Se utilizaron 96 alpacas hembras con folículo >7 mm que fuer...

  13. Association mapping utilizing diverse barley lines reveals net form net blotch seedling resistance/susceptibility loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrenophora teres f. teres is a necrotrophic fungal pathogen and the causal agent of the economically important foliar disease net form net blotch (NFNB) of barley. The deployment of effective and durable resistance against P. teres f. teres has been hindered by the complexity of quantitative resist...

  14. Analysis on Factors Affecting Seedling Establishment in Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju LUO

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Elongations of coleoptile and mesocotyl are related directly to rice seedling establishment in soil and height of plant is related to lodging in rice production. Twelve typical rice cultivars with different lengths of coleoptile and mesocotyl (long, medium and short were selected by screening the lengths of coleoptile and mesocotyl in 1500 accessions. The seedling establishments of these typical cultivars were compared under the combinations of different sowing depths and flooding durations, and two semi-dwarf varieties (G140, Zhong 96–21 with good seedling establishments and optimum mesocotyl lengths were found. The length of mesocotyl was completely fitted negative binomial distribution and the length of coleoptile was nearly fitted lognormal distribution. Analysis of the relationships among mesocotyl, coleoptile, seeding depth, flooding duration, and their interactions to seedling establishment percentage showed that there existed significant relations among mesocotyl, coleoptile, mesocotyl × coleoptile, seeding depth, flooding duration and mesocotyl × sowing depth in the experiment for seedling establishment.

  15. Effects of graphene on seed germination and seedling growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ming; Gao, Bin, E-mail: bg55@ufl.edu [University of Florida, Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering (United States); Chen, Jianjun [University of Florida, Department of Environmental Horticulture and Mid-Florida Research & Education Center (United States); Li, Yuncong [University of Florida, Soil and Water Science Department Tropical Research & Education Center (United States)

    2015-02-15

    The environmental impact of graphene has recently attracted great attention. In this work, we show that graphene at a low concentration affected tomato seed germination and seedling growth. Graphene-treated seeds germinated much faster than control seeds. Analytical results indicated that graphene penetrated seed husks. The penetration might break the husks to facilitate water uptake, resulting in faster germination and higher germination rates. At the stage of seedling growth, graphene was also able to penetrate root tip cells. Seedlings germinated from graphene-treated seeds had slightly lower biomass accumulation than the control, but exhibited significantly longer stems and roots than the control, which suggests that graphene, in contrast with other nanoparticles, had different effects on seedling growth. Taken together, our results imply that graphene played complicated roles in affecting the initial stage of seed germination and subsequent seedling growth.

  16. Responses of endogenous proline in rice seedlings under chromium exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X.Z. Yu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydroponic experiments were performed to exam the dynamic change of endogenous proline in rice seedlings exposed to potassium chromate chromium (VI or chromium nitrate chromium (III. Although accumulation of both chromium species in rice seedlings was obvious, more chromium was detected in plant tissues of rice seedlings exposed to chromium (III than those in chromium (VI, majority being in roots rather than shoots. Results also showed that the accumulation capacity of chromium by rice seedlings was positively correlated to chromium concentrations supplied in both chromium variants and the accumulation curve depicted an exponential trend in both chromium treatments over the entire period of exposure. Proline assays showed that both chromium variants induced the change of endogenous proline in shoots and roots of rice seedlings. Chromium (VI of 12.8 mg/L increased proline content significantly (p

  17. Increased F3-Isoprostanes in the Canadian Inuit Population Could Be Cardioprotective by Limiting F2-Isoprostane Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkazemi, Dalal; Jackson, Robert L; Chan, Hing Man; Kubow, Stan

    2016-09-01

    F3-isoprostanes (F3-IsoPs), derived from peroxidation of eicosapentaenoic acid (C20:5n-3), could be cardioprotective by limiting production of F2-isoprostanes (F2-IsoPs), a cardiovascular disease risk factor. The objective of the study was to determine whether the n-3-polyunsaturated (PUFA)-rich Inuit diet is associated with a lower plasma ratio of F2-IsoPs to F3-IsoPs. This was a cross-sectional observational study. The study was conducted in 36 Canadian Arctic Inuit communities. Participants included a random subset (n = 233) of Inuit adults taken from a population-based survey. Plasma F2-IsoPs and F3-IsoPs, cardiometabolic risk factors (blood lipids, C-reactive protein, blood pressure, fasting glucose) and markers of dietary exposure (erythrocyte n-3 and n-6 PUFA, blood levels of Se, mercury, polychlorinated biphenyls) were measured. Inuit aged 40 years old and older vs younger Inuit showed higher concentrations of plasma F3-IsoPs and erythrocyte n-3 PUFA and lower plasma F2-IsoPs concentrations despite having higher blood lipids, fasting glucose, systolic blood pressure, and percentage body fat. Plasma F3-IsoPs were not associated with any cardiometabolic measures. When subjects were categorized into tertiles according to total n-3 PUFA erythrocyte concentrations, F3-IsoPs increased with increasing tertiles, whereas the F2-IsoP to F3-IsoP ratio was lowest at the highest n-3 tertile. The F2-IsoP to F3-IsoP ratio was significantly predicted by C20:5n-3 (β= -.365, P = .002); C20:4n-6:C20:5n-3 (β = .056, P = .006), blood mercury (β = -.812, P =.015), blood Se (β = -1.95, P = .015), and smoking (β = .745, P = .025). Plasma F3-IsoPs were not associated with cardiometabolic risk factors previously seen with F2-IsoPs. Higher n-3 fatty acid status was associated with lower plasma F2-IsoPs and higher plasma F3-IsoPs, which provides partial explanation to the cardioprotective effects of the n-3 PUFA-rich Inuit diet.

  18. Effect of seedling stock on the early stand development and physiology of improved loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakuntala Sharma; Joshua P. Adams; Jamie L. Schuler; Robert L. Ficklin; Don C. Bragg

    2016-01-01

    This study assessed the effects of spacing and genotype on the growth and physiology of improved loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) seedlings from three distinct genotypes planted in Drew County, Arkansas (USA). Genotype had a significant effect on survival and height. Clone CF Var 1 showed greater height and survival compared to other seedlings....

  19. Amplitude and phase of distortion product otoacoustic emissions in the guinea pig in an (f1,f2) area study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Sandra; Prijs, Vera F.; Schoonhoven, Ruurd

    2003-06-01

    Lower sideband distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs), measured in the ear canal upon stimulation with two continuous pure tones, are the result of interfering contributions from two different mechanisms, the nonlinear distortion component and the linear reflection component. The two contributors have been shown to have a different amplitude and, in particular, a different phase behavior as a function of the stimulus frequencies. The dominance of either component was investigated in an extensive (f1,f2) area study of DPOAE amplitude and phase in the guinea pig, which allows for both qualitative and quantitative analysis of isophase contours. Making a minimum of additional assumptions, simple relations between the direction of constant phase in the (f1,f2) plane and the group delays in f1-sweep, f2-sweep, and fixed f2/f1 paradigms can be derived, both for distortion (wave-fixed) and reflection (place-fixed) components. The experimental data indicate the presence of both components in the lower sideband DPOAEs, with the reflection component as the dominant contributor for low f2/f1 ratios and the distortion component for intermediate ratios. At high ratios the behavior cannot be explained by dominance of either component.

  20. The 22-year cycle in the geomagnetic 27-day recurrences reflecting on the F2-layer ionization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Apostolov

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Solar cycle variations of the amplitudes of the 27-day solar rotation period reflected in the geomagnetic activity index Ap, solar radio flux F10.7cm and critical frequency foF2 for mid-latitude ionosonde station Moscow from the maximum of sunspot cycle 18 to the maximum of cycle 23 are examined. The analysis shows that there are distinct enhancements of the 27-day amplitudes for foF2 and Ap in the late declining phase of each solar cycle while the amplitudes for F10.7cm decrease gradually, and the foF2 and Ap amplitude peaks are much larger for even-numbered solar cycles than for the odd ones. Additionally, we found the same even-high and odd-low pattern of foF2 for other mid-latitude ionosonde stations in Northern and Southern Hemispheres. This property suggests that there exists a 22-year cycle in the F2-layer variability coupled with the 22-year cycle in the 27-day recurrence of geomagnetic activity.

    Key words. Ionosphere (mid-latitude ionosphere; ionosphere- magnetosphere interactions – Magnetospheric physics (solar wind-magnetosphere interactions

  1. Global model of the F2 layer peak height for low solar activity based on GPS radio-occultation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubin, V. N.; Karpachev, A. T.; Tsybulya, K. G.

    2013-11-01

    We propose a global median model SMF2 (Satellite Model of the F2 layer) of the ionospheric F2-layer height maximum (hmF2), based on GPS radio-occultation data for low solar activity periods (F10.7Aregion. Ground-based ionospheric sounding data were used for comparison and validation. Spatial dependence of hmF2 is modeled by a Legendre-function expansion. Temporal dependence, as a function of Universal Time (UT), is described by a Fourier expansion. Inputs of the model are: geographical coordinates, month and F10.7A solar activity index. The model is designed for quiet geomagnetic conditions (Kр=1-2), typical for low solar activity. SMF2 agrees well with the International Reference Ionosphere model (IRI) in those regions, where the ground-based ionosonde network is dense. Maximal difference between the models is found in the equatorial belt, over the oceans and the polar caps. Standard deviations of the radio-occultation and Digisonde data from the predicted SMF2 median are 10-16 km for all seasons, against 13-29 km for IRI-2012. Average relative deviations are 3-4 times less than for IRI, 3-4% against 9-12%. Therefore, the proposed hmF2 model is more accurate than IRI-2012.

  2. A statistical study on the F2 layer vertical variation during nighttime medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ssessanga, Nicholas; Kim, Yong Ha; Jeong, Se-Heon

    2017-03-01

    A statistical study on the relationship between the perturbation component (ΔTEC (total electron content)) and the F2 layer peak height (hmF2) during nighttime medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances is presented. The results are obtained by using a time-dependent computerized ionospheric tomography (CIT) technique. This was realized by using slant total electron content observations from a dense Global Positioning System receiver network over Japan (with more than 1000 receivers), together with a multiplicative algebraic reconstruction technique. Reconstructions from CIT were validated by using ionosonde and occultation measurements. A total of 36 different time snapshots of the ionosphere when medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (MSTIDs) were eminent were analyzed. These were obtained from a data set covering years from 2011 to 2014. The reconstructed surface wavefronts of ΔTEC and hmF2 structure were found to be aligned along the northwest-southeast direction. These results confirm that nighttime MSTIDs are driven by electrodynamic forces related to Perkins instability which explains the northwest-southeast wavefront alignment based on the F region electrodynamics. Furthermore, from the statistical analysis hmF2 varied quasiperiodically in altitude with dominant peak-to-peak amplitudes between 10 and 40 km. In addition, ΔTEC and hmF2 were 60% anticorrelated.

  3. Spontaneous polyploidy, gynogenesis and androgenesis in second generation (F2) koi Cyprinus carpio × goldfish Carassius auratus hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delomas, T A; Gomelsky, B; Anil, A; Schneider, K J; Warner, J L

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the genetics of second generation (F 2 ) koi Cyprinus carpio × goldfish Carassius auratus hybrids. Spermatozoa produced by a novel, fertile F 1 male were found to be diploid by flow-cytometric analysis. Backcross (F 1 female × C. carpio male and C. carpio female × F 1 male) juveniles were triploid, confirming that female and male F 1 hybrids both produced diploid gametes. The vast majority of surviving F 2 juveniles was diploid and small proportions were aneuploid (2·1n-2·3n and 3·1n-3·9n), triploid (3n) and tetraploid (4n). Microsatellite genotyping showed that F 2 diploids repeated either the complete maternal or the complete paternal genotype. Fish with the maternal genotype were female and fish with the paternal genotype were male. This demonstrates that F 2 diploids were the result of spontaneous gynogenesis and spontaneous androgenesis. Analysis of microsatellite inheritance and the sex ratio in F 2 crosses showed that spontaneous gynogenesis and androgenesis did not always occur in equal proportions. One cross was found to have an approximate equal number of androgenetic and gynogenetic offspring while in several other crosses spontaneous androgenesis was found to occur more frequently than spontaneous gynogenesis. © 2016 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  4. Potential applications of lipid peroxidation products - F4-neuroprostanes, F3-neuroprostanesn-6 DPA, F2-dihomo-isoprostanes and F2-isoprostanes - in the evaluation of the allograft function in renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Las Heras-Gómez, Ignacio; Medina, Sonia; Casas-Pina, Teresa; Marín-Soler, Lidia; Tomás, Anna; Martínez-Hernández, Pedro; Oger, Camille; Galano, Jean-Marie; Durand, Thierry; Jimeno, Luisa; Llorente, Santiago; Lozoya, Elena; Ferreres, Federico; Gil-Izquierdo, Ángel

    2017-03-01

    F4-neuroprostanes, F3-neuroprostanesn-6 DPA, and F2-dihomo-isoprostanes, metabolites of non-enzymatic lipid peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids [docosahexaenoic acid, n-6 docosapentanoic acid, and adrenic acid respectively], have become important biomarkers for oxidative stress in several diseases like epilepsy and alzheimer. These biomarkers and the 15-F2t-isoprostane (also known as 8-iso-PGF2α), a F2-isoprostane isomer measured as reference oxidative marker at systemic level, were analyzed by UHPLC-QqQ-MS/MS in the urine of 60 renal recipients from cadaveric donors of the Nephrology Unit of the University Hospital Virgen de la Arrixaca, at six different times during the first six months after renal transplantation, and were compared with a control group of 60 healthy subjects from the same hospital. A total of 11 metabolites were analyzed and different patterns were observed. A tendency to decrease was observed in three metabolites (4-epi-4-F3t- NeuroPn-6 DPA, ent-7(RS)-7-F2t-dihomo-IsoP, and ent-7(S)-7-F2t-dihomo-IsoP) and in our reference oxidative marker (15-F2t-IsoP) when kidney function improved and the excretion of urine proteins decreased. These results suggest that these three biomarkers of oxidative stress could be useful to assess renal function in the postransplant phase. Unfortunately, little is known about this kind of biomarker in this cohort of patients, so further investigation would be required in the clinical field to clarify the relationship between oxidative stress and the graft function, as well as the usefulness of these biomarkers as rejection markers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Synchronization of ovulation in goats using prostaglandin F2α based protocols during the breeding season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Simões

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this review was to describe the feasibility of prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α based protocols used as a tool for ovulation synchronization in cycling goats. There is a reproductive seasonality in small ruminants. However, from latitudes 45 ° towards equator, the intensity of anoestrus progressively decreases and tends to disappear in local breeds. Consequently, PGF2α or their synthetic analogues as luteolytic substances can assume a great importance in reproductive management of flocks from these regions. However, a single or double (9–11 days apart PGF2α administration provokes a good induction but a moderate synchronization of ovulations if timed artificial insemination is considered, and a significant short oestrous cycle can occur with detrimental effects on fertility rate when compared with conventional progesterone-based protocols. In order to minimize this constraint, some gonadotropinreleasing hormone-PGF2α-gonadotropin-releasing hormone (Ovsynch-based protocols and their modifications, manipulating the dominant follicles and corpora lutea, were successfully tested in goats. Similar to cows, these PGF2α based protocols seem to be a promising and more cost-effective tool for reproductive management in cycling goats.

  6. Correlation and Path Coefficient Studies in F2 Populations of Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghaffar KIANI

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This study performed to determine the association between grain yield and yield components in fifty-four selected rice genotypes at F2 populations. Results showed that traits, the panicles per plant (r = 0.751 and filled grains per panicle (r = 0.458 correlated significantly with grain yield, while grain yield was negatively associated with non-filled grains per panicle (-0.297. Path coefficient analysis revealed that grain yield was associated with panicles per plant and filled grains per panicle with the direct effects of 0.691 and 0.568, respectively. The greatest indirect effect belonged to panicle length (0.301 through filled grains per panicle. Stepwise regression analysis showed that 72.1 percent of yield variation could be explained by three characters: the panicles per plant, filled grains per panicle and panicle length. Information obtained in this study revealed that traits, the panicles per plant and filled grains per panicle, could be used as selection criteria for grain yield improvement at segregating populations of rice.

  7. Efficiency of Intravulval Lip Route of Prostaglandin F2a Administration on Estrus Synchron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Srikandakumar

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Estrus was synchronized in dairy cattle using the synthetic prostaglandin F2a (PG analog Estnunate (Coopers Animal Health Ltd., Berkhamsed, England. UK; 250 ug/ml of cloprostenol. PG was administered by two routes at two different doses, 500 ug by im route (control and 125 pg by intravulval lip (ivu route (treatment. All animals were bred by artificial insemination (AI to detected estrus using the am-pm breeding rule (BR. First service conception rate (FSCR for all dairy cows and heifers was 70% for the control and 54% for the treatment groups (P>0.05. The FSCR was also not different (P>0.05 between Holstein (HOL and Australian Milking Zebu (AMZ breeds (HOL 52% and AMZ 78%. Moreover, all the animals in this study were confirmed pregnant by the end of the breeding season. In conclusion, dairy cows and heifers can be successfully synchronized using only 125 pg of cloprostenol without impairing fertility. This dose corresponds to only one fourth of the recommended dose of 500 pg of cloprostenol by the manufacturer.

  8. Viability of Iberian x Meishan F2 newborn pigs. II. Survival analysis up to weaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casellas, J; Noguera, J L; Varona, L; Sánchez, A; Arqué, M; Piedrafita, J

    2004-07-01

    Iberian x Meishan F2 piglet's preweaning survivability was analyzed using categorical data regression procedures within the proportional hazards assumption. A frailty sire model was assumed with the litter effect treated as an additional random source of variation. Moreover, the relative birth weight within litter and the litter effect were considered time-dependent covariates that changed their values in the second day of life due to cross fostering carried out to standardize litters. Six variables had a significant effect on survivability: birth weight (P piglets (Piglets that were small in relation to their siblings (relative birth weight within litter) also suffered an increased death risk, with a hazard ratio of 1.81 (P Piglets with a rectal temperature lower than 35.4 degrees C 60 min after birth showed the highest hazard ratio (7.18; P piglet survival involves several systematic influences related to birth weight, thermoregulatory ability, and injuries suffered during gestation and farrowing. The genetic variance was small compared with those generated by the common environment, for which the genetic improvement of piglet survival seems difficult.

  9. Measurement of the Charm structure Function $F_{2}^{\\gamma},c$ of the Photon at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Amaral, P.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Busser, K.; Burckhart, H.J.; Cammin, J.; Campana, S.; Carnegie, R.K.; Caron, B.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Cohen, I.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Dallison, S.; de Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Elfgren, E.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauschild, M.; Hauschildt, J.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Hensel, C.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Homer, R.J.; Horvath, D.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karapetian, G.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klein, K.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kokott, T.P.; Komamiya, S.; Kormos, Laura L.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kramer, T.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; Von Krogh, J.; Krop, D.; Kupper, M.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Layter, J.G.; Leins, A.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Marchant, T.E.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Masetti, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.J.; McKenna, J.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Mendez-Lorenzo, P.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Moed, S.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Rick, H.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spagnolo, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Taylor, R.J.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trefzger, T.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vachon, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2002-01-01

    The production of charm quarks is studied in deep-inelastic electron-photon scattering using data recorded by the OPAL detector at LEP at normal e+e- centre-of-mass energies from 183 to 209 GeV. The charm quarks have been identified by full reconstruction of charged D* mesons using their decays into D0pi with the D0 observed in two decay modes with charged particle final states, Kpi and K3pi. The cross-section sigma(D*) for production of charged D* in the reaction e+e- -> e+e-D*X is measured in a restricted kinematical region using two bins in Bjorken x, 0.0014 e+e- ccbar X) and the charm structure function of the photon F 2,c are determined in the region 0.0014 0.1 the perturbative QCD calculation at next-to-leading order agrees perfectly with the measured cross-section. For x < 0.1 the measured cross-section is 43.8 +- 14.3 +- 6.3 +- 2.8 pb with a next-to-leading order prediction of 17.0+2.9-2.3 p.b.

  10. In-Situ F2-Region Plasma Density and Temperature Measurements from the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Victoria; Wright, Kenneth; Minow, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    The International Space Station orbit provides an ideal platform for in-situ studies of space weather effects on the mid and low latitude F-2 region ionosphere. The Floating Potential Measurement Unit (FPMU) operating on the ISS since Aug 2006. is a suite of plasma instruments: a Floating Potential Probe (FPP), a Plasma Impedance Probe (PIP), a Wide-sweep langmuir Probe (WLP), and a Narrow-sweep Langmuir Probe (NLP). This instrument package provides a new opportunity lor collaborative multi-instrument studies of the F-region ionosphere during both quiet and disturbed periods. This presentation first describes the operational parameters for each of the FPMU probes and shOWS examples of an intra-instrument validation. We then show comparisons with the plasma density and temperature measurements derived from the TIMED GUVI ultraviolet imager, the Millstone Hill ground based incoherent scatter radar, and DIAS digisondes, Finally we show one of several observations of night-time equatorial density holes demonstrating the capabilities of the probes lor monitoring mid and low latitude plasma processes.

  11. Acute ozone exposure increases plasma prostaglandin F2 alpha in ozone-sensitive human subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schelegle, E.S.; Adams, W.C.; Giri, S.N.; Siefkin, A.D.

    1989-07-01

    Twenty O/sub 3/-sensitive and /sup 2/O O/sub 3/-nonsensitive subjects participated in a study to investigate the effects of disparate O/sub 3/ sensitivity on plasma prostaglandin F2 alpha responses consequent to exposure to ambient O3 concentrations. Subjects were selected from a pool of 75 normal healthy college-aged males who had been previously exposed to 0.35 ppm O3 for 1 h at an exercising VE of 60 L/min. The selection criterion used was the observed decrement in FEV1 after the O/sub 3/ exposure: O/sub 3/-sensitive, FEV1 decrement greater than 24%; O/sub 3/-nonsensitive, FEV1 decrement less than 11%. Each subject was exposed to filtered air and to 0.20 and 0.35 ppm O/sub 3/ for 80 min while exercising at a VE of 50 L/min. These experimental protocols were divided into two 40-min sessions separated by a period of 4 to 10 min. PGF2 alpha, FVC, FEV1, and FEF25-75 were evaluated before, during, and after each protocol. SGaw and Vtg were measured before and after each protocol. Plasma PGF2 alpha was significantly increased in the O/sub 3/-sensitive group during and after the 0.35-ppm O/sub 3/ exposure.

  12. Optimized method for quantification of total F(2)-isoprostanes using gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briskey, David R; Wilson, Gary R; Fassett, Robert G; Coombes, Jeff S

    2014-03-01

    F2-isoprostanes are produced from the oxidative degradation of arachidonic acid and are considered the gold standard marker of lipid peroxidation in biological samples. We developed a liquid-liquid extraction method for the determination of total isoprostanes using negative chemical ionization gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in plasma and tissue homogenates. Incorporating liquid-liquid extraction allows for greater sample through-put than current approaches. Here we describe the protocol and include numerous trouble-shooting suggestions. The method found healthy individuals with 150-250 pg of isoprostanes per ml of plasma and end stage kidney disease patients to have the highest measured values of up to 1100 pg/ml. This assay has an accurate working linear range of 40-1000 pg of isoprostanes (100-2500 pg/ml) and an average coefficient of variance of 7%. Tissue values for healthy mice liver were 50-70 pg/μg protein. This method provides increased ion selectivity and detection capabilities with economical sample through-put. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Parameters of heavy quark effective theory from N{sub f}=2 lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blossier, Benoit [CNRS, Orsay (France). LPT; Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France); Della Morte, Michele [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik; Fritzsch, Patrick [Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Garron, Nicolas [Edinburgh Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Physics and Astronomy; Heitger, Jochen [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik 1; Simma, Hubert; Sommer, Rainer [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Tantalo, Nazario [Rome-3 Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica; INFN, Sezione di Roma (Italy)

    2012-07-15

    We report on a non-perturbative determination of the parameters of the lattice Heavy Quark Effective Theory (HQET) Lagrangian and of the time component of the heavy-light axial-vector current with N{sub f} = 2 flavors of massless dynamical quarks. The effective theory is considered at the 1/m{sub h} order, and the heavy mass m{sub h} covers a range from slightly above the charm to beyond the beauty region. These HQET parameters are needed to compute, for example, the b-quark mass, the heavy-light spectrum and decay constants in the static approximation and to order 1/m{sub h} in HQET. The determination of the parameters is done non-perturbatively. The computation reported in this paper uses the plaquette gauge action and two different static actions for the heavy quark described by HQET. For the light-quark action we choose non-perturbatively O(a)-improved Wilson fermions.

  14. The distribution of QTL additive and dominance effects in porcine F2 crosses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennewitz, J; Meuwissen, T H E

    2010-06-01

    The present study used published quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping data from three F2 crosses in pigs for 34 meat quality and carcass traits to derive the distribution of additive QTL effects as well as dominance coefficients. Dominance coefficients were calculated as the observed QTL dominance deviation divided by the absolute value of the observed QTL additive effect. The error variance of this ratio was approximated using the delta method. Mixtures of normal distributions (mixtures of normals) were fitted to the dominance coefficient using a modified EM-algorithm that considered the heterogeneous error variances of the data points. The results suggested clearly to fit one component which means that the dominance coefficients are normally distributed with an estimated mean (standard deviation) of 0.193 (0.312). For the additive effects mixtures of normals and a truncated exponential distribution were fitted. Two components were fitted by the mixtures of normals. The mixtures of normals did not predict enough QTL with small effects compared to the exponential distribution and to literature reports. The estimated rate parameter of the exponential distribution was 5.81 resulting in a mean effect of 0.172.

  15. Pyometra in Bitches Induces Elevated Plasma Endotoxin and Prostaglandin F2α Metabolite Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagman R

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Endotoxemia in bitches with pyometra can cause severe systemic effects directly or via the release of inflammatory mediators. Plasma endotoxin concentrations were measured in ten bitches suffering from pyometra with moderately to severely deteriorated general condition, and in nine bitches admitted to surgery for non-infectious reasons. Endotoxin samples were taken on five occasions before, during and after surgery. In addition, urine and uterine bacteriology was performed and hematological, blood biochemical parameters, prostaglandin F2α metabolite 15-ketodihydro-PGF2α (PG-metabolite, progesterone and oestradiol (E2-17β levels were analysed. The results confirm significantly increased plasma levels of endotoxin in bitches with pyometra and support previous reports of endotoxin involvement in the pathogenesis of the disease. Plasma concentrations of PG-metabolite were elevated in pyometra bitches and provide a good indicator of endotoxin release since the concentrations were significantly correlated to the endotoxin levels and many other hematological and chemistry parameters. The γ-globulin serum protein electrophoresis fraction and analysis of PG-metabolite can be valuable in the diagnosis of endotoxin involvement if a reliable, rapid and cost-effective test for PG-metabolite analysis becomes readily available in the future. Treatment inhibiting prostaglandin biosynthesis and related compounds could be beneficial for bitches suffering from pyometra.

  16. Longitudinal conductivity of LaF3/SrF2 multilayer heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergentev, Tikhon; Banshchikov, Alexander; Filimonov, Alexey; Koroleva, Ekaterina; Sokolov, Nikolay; Wurz, Marc Christopher

    2016-01-01

    LaF3/SrF2 multilayer heterostructures with thicknesses of individual layers in the range 5-100 nm have been grown on MgO(100) substrates using molecular beam epitaxy. The longitudinal conductivity of the films has been measured using impedance spectroscopy in the frequency range 10-1-106 Hz and a temperature range 300-570 K. The ionic DC conductivities have been determined from Nyquist impedance diagrams and activation energies from the Arrhenius-Frenkel equation. An increase of the DC conductivity has been observed to accompany decreased layer thickness for various thicknesses as small as 25 nm. The greatest conductivity has been shown for a multilayer heterostructure having thicknesses of 25 nm per layer. The structure has a conductivity two orders of magnitude greater than pure LaF3 bulk material. The increasing conductivity can be understood as a redistribution of charge carriers through the interface due to differing chemical potentials of the materials, by strong lattice-constant mismatch, and/or by formation of a solid La1-xSrxF3-x solution at the interface during the growth process.

  17. The Neutron Electric Dipole Moment using $N_f{=}2{+}1{+}1$ twisted mass fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandrou, C; Constantinou, M; Hadjiyiannakou, K; Jansen, K; Koutsou, G; Ottnad, K; Petschlies, M

    2015-01-01

    We evaluate the neutron electric dipole moment $\\vert\\vec{d}_N\\vert$ using lattice QCD techniques. The gauge configurations analysed are produced by the European Twisted Mass Collaboration using $N_f{=}2{+}1{+}1$ twisted mass fermions at one value of the lattice spacing of $a \\simeq 0.082 \\ {\\rm fm}$ and a light quark mass corresponding to $m_{\\pi} \\simeq 373 \\ {\\rm MeV}$. Our approach to extract the neutron electric dipole moment is based on the calculation of the $CP$-odd electromagnetic form factor $F_3(Q^2)$ for small values of the vacuum angle $\\theta$ in the limit of zero Euclidean momentum transfer $Q^2$. The limit $Q^2 \\to 0$ is realised either by adopting a parameterization of the momentum dependence of $F_3(Q^2)$ and performing a fit, or by employing new position space methods, which involve the elimination of the kinematical momentum factor in front of $F_3(Q^2)$. The computation in the presence of a $CP$-violating term requires the evaluation of the topological charge ${\\cal Q}$. This is computed ...

  18. Investigation of rare nuclear decays with BaF$_2$ crystal scintillator contaminated by radium

    CERN Document Server

    Belli, P; Cappella, F; Caracciolo, V; Cerulli, R; Danevich, F A; Di Marco, A; Incicchitti, A; Poda, D V; Polischuk, O G; Tretyak, V I

    2014-01-01

    The radioactive contamination of a BaF$_2$ scintillation crystal with mass of 1.714 kg was measured over 101 hours in the low-background DAMA/R&D set-up deep underground (3600 m w.e.) at the Gran Sasso National Laboratories of INFN (LNGS, Italy). The half-life of $^{212}$Po (present in the crystal scintillator due to contamination by radium) was measured as $T_{1/2}(^{212}$Po) = 298.8$\\pm$0.8(stat.)$\\pm$1.4(syst.) ns by analysis of the events' pulse profiles. The $^{222}$Rn nuclide is known as 100% decaying via emission of $\\alpha$ particle with $T_{1/2}$ = 3.82 d; however, its $\\beta$ decay is also energetically allowed with $Q_\\beta = 24\\pm21$ keV. Search for decay chains of events with specific pulse shapes characteristic for $\\alpha$ or for $\\beta/\\gamma$ signals and with known energies and time differences allowed us to set, for the first time, the limit on the branching ratio of $^{222}$Rn relatively to $\\beta$ decay as $B_\\beta 8.0$ y). Half-life limits of $^{212}$Pb, $^{222}$Rn and $^{226}$Ra rel...

  19. KIMA, PERLUKAH MENUNGGU F2 UNTUK PERDAGANGAN? SUATU KAJIAN BERDASARKAN MARKER GENETIK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estu Nugroho

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Kima (Tridagnidae merupakan salah satu komoditas air laut yang prospektif secara ekonomis, tercatat harga di Taiwan adalah $35--$142 per kg. Dalam pengembangan akuabisnis kima masih dijumpai kendala di antaranya adalah adanya aturan bahwa hanya turunan kedua atau F2 yang boleh diperdagangkan karena masuk dalam daftar CITES (Convention on Trade of Endangered Species menurut PP No. 8 tahun 1999 tentang pemanfaatan satwa. Karena pertumbuhannya yang relatif lambat serta adanya negara lain, misalnya Filipina, Fiji, dan Taiwan yang memperdagangkan hasil budidaya pada turunan F1, maka keadaan ini sangat merugikan pihak Indonesia. Kajian tentang permasalahan penurunan variasi genetik merupakan salah satu alternatif untuk mendukung adanya pelonggaran persyaratan perdagangan kima tersebut. Kajian genetika dengan menggunakan marker genetik menunjukkan bahwa tidak terjadi penurunan variasi genetik seperti yang dikuatirkan sebelumnya. Keragaman genetik pada F1 meningkat dibandingkan dengan induknya, yaitu 0,073 dan 0,023. Jarak genetik antar populasi yang diuji adalah sebesar 0,016.

  20. Plasma 8-iso-Prostaglandin F2α, a possible prognostic marker in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, De-Sheng; Yan, Min; Hassan, Muhammad; Fang, Ze-Bin; Chen, Man-Tao

    2017-06-01

    8-iso-Prostaglandin F2α (8-iso-PGF2α) is a potential biomarker of oxidative stress. This study clarified whether plasma 8-iso-PGF2α concentrations were affected and its underlying relevance to prognosis in aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH). In this prospective, observational study, a total of 170 controls and 170 aSAH patients were enrolled. Plasma 8-iso-PGF2α concentrations were detected using an ELISA. Severity was assessed by World Federation of Neurological Surgeons (WFNS) scale and modified Fisher grading scale. Clinical outcomes included 6-month mortality and poor outcome referred to as Glasgow outcome scale score of 1-3. As compared to controls, admission plasma 8-iso-PGF2α concentrations were significantly enhanced. Increased concentrations of plasma 8-iso-PGF2α correlated with WFNS scores and modified Fisher scores. 8-iso-PGF2α in plasma was an independent predictor for clinical outcomes. Under ROC curve, the predictive values of 8-iso-PGF2α concentrations resembled those of WFNS scores and modified Fisher scores for clinical outcomes. An elevation in plasma 8-iso-PGF2α concentrations is associated with the severity and poor outcome after aSAH, substantializing 8-iso-PGF2α as a potential prognostic biomarker of aSAH. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Placental Origin of Prostaglandin F2α in the Domestic Cat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta J. Siemieniuch

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the question was addressed whether the feline placenta can synthesize prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α. The PGFS protein was elevated, particularly at 2.5–3 weeks of pregnancy compared to 7-8 (P<0.05 and 8.5–9 weeks (P<0.001. Transcripts for PGFS were significantly upregulated at 2.5–3 weeks of pregnancy and then gradually declined towards the end of gestation (P<0.001. Transcripts for PTGS2 were only upregulated in placentas from queens close to term (P<0.001 compared with earlier phases. Staining of PTGS2 showed distinct positive signals in placentas obtained during the last week before labor, particularly in the strongly invading trophoblast surrounding blood vessels, and also in decidual cells. Shortly after implantation, signals for PGFS were localized in the trophoblast cells. Near term, PGFS staining was seen mainly in decidual cells. Both placental PGF2α and plasma PGFM were elevated towards the end of pregnancy (P<0.001 compared with earlier weeks of pregnancy. The content of PGF2α in extracted placenta mirrored the PGFM level in plasma of pregnant females. During late gestation there is a significant increase in PGFM levels in maternal blood and of PGF2α levels in placental tissue concomitant with an upregulation of placental PTGS2.

  2. Temperature requirements for seed germination and seedling development determine timing of seedling emergence of three monocotyledonous temperate forest spring geophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandelook, Filip; Van Assche, Jozef A

    2008-11-01

    The optimal period for seedling emergence depends on factors such as habitat preference, life cycle and geographical distribution. This research was performed to clarify the role of temperature in regulating processes leading to seedling emergence of the European continental Scilla bifolia and the Atlantic Narcissus pseudonarcissus and Hyacinthoides non-scripta. Experiments in natural conditions were performed to examine the phenology of embryo growth, seed germination in the soil and seedling emergence. Effects of temperature conditions on embryo growth, seed germination, seedling growth and leaf formation were studied in temperature-controlled incubators. In nature, embryo growth of all three species was initiated from the moment the seeds were dispersed in spring and continued during summer. A sequence of high temperature followed by a lower temperature was required to complete embryo growth and initiate germination. Seeds of H. non-scripta and N. pseudonarcissus germinated in autumn once they attained the critical E:S ratio, while seeds of S. bifolia started germinating when temperatures were low in winter. Seedlings developed normally, but slowly, only when placed in low temperature conditions (5 or 10 degrees C), resulting in a time lag between the moment of radicle protrusion and seedling emergence in the field. A continuous development of the embryo and seedlings of the three species was observed from the moment the seeds were dispersed until seedlings emerged. A sequence of high summer temperatures followed by decreasing autumn and winter temperatures was required for all developmental processes to be completed. Although a time lag occurs between radicle protrusion and seedling emergence, the term 'epicotyl dormancy' does not apply here, due to the absence of a period of developmental arrest. Timing of first seedling emergence differed between the three species and could be related to differences in geographical distribution.

  3. A 4F2-cross-point phase change memory using nano-crystalline doped GeSbTe material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaura, Norikatsu; Kinoshita, Masaharu; Tai, Mitsuharu; Ohyanagi, Takasumi; Akita, Kenichi; Morikawa, Takahiro

    2015-04-01

    This paper reports on the use of nano-crystalline doped GeSbTe, or nano-GST, to fabricate a cross-point phase change memory with 4F2 cell size and test results obtained for it. We show the characteristics of a poly-Si diode select device with a high on-off ratio and data writing in a 4F2 memory cell array. The advantages of nano-GST over conventional GeSbTe are presented in terms of neighboring disturbance and 4F2 cross-point array formation. The memory cells’ high drivability, low power, and selective write and read performances are demonstrated. The scalability of the diode current density is also presented.

  4. High-Q MgF$_2$ whispering gallery mode resonators for refractometric sensing in aqueous environment

    CERN Document Server

    Sedlmeir, Florian; Leuchs, Gerd; Schwefel, Harald G L

    2014-01-01

    We present our experiments on refractometric sensing with ultrahigh-Q, crystalline, birefringent magnesium fluoride (MgF$_2$) whispering gallery mode resonators. The difference to fused silica which is most commonly used for sensing experiments is the small refractive index of MgF$_2$ which is very close to that of water. Compared to fused silica this leads to more than 50% longer evanescent fields and a 4.25 times larger sensitivity. Moreover the birefringence amplifies the sensitivity difference between TM and TE type modes which will enhance sensing experiments based on difference frequency measurements. We estimate the performance of our resonators and compare them with fused silica theoretically and present experimental data showing the interferometrically measured evanescent decay and the sensitivity of mm-sized MgF$_2$ whispering gallery mode resonators immersed in water. They show reasonable agreement with the developed theory. Furthermore, we observe stable Q factors in water well above $1 \\times 10^...

  5. Role of Li+ ions on the luminescence properties in water dispersible mesoporous CaF2:Eu3+ nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ting; Lü, Jiantao; Li, Guoji; Huang, Yongfa

    2017-01-01

    Polyvinyl pyrrolidone- (PVP) and ethylene glycol- (EG) coated water dispersible mesoporous CaF2:Eu3+,Li+ nanocrystals were synthesized by a simple one-pot hydrothermal method. The role of Li+ ions on the morphology and spectra in the CaF2 nanocrystals have been reported. The synthesized nanocrystals were monodisperse with regular sphere-like shapes and exhibited obvious hollow mesoporous structure. The results from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy determined the successful incorporation of Eu3+ ions and Li+ ions into the CaF2 host lattice. The excitation and emission intensity of Eu3+ enhanced with Li+ concentration until 7 mol.%. The nanocrystals could disperse in water for more than a month due to the EG and PVP molecules coated over the nanocrystals.

  6. Red-F* Laser and VUV-F2 Emission Pumped at Low Pressure by Longitudinal, Lamp-Like Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Kazuyuki; Nakamura, Kenshi; Goto, Tatsumi; Jitsuno, Takahisa

    Red-fluorine-atom (Red-F* ) laser oscillation (λ = 630-780 nm) and strong fluorescence of VUV-F2 emission (λ = 157 nm) are observed in a lamp-like discharge in a longitudinal discharge excitation tube. The laser tube consists of a 30 cm long Pyrex glass pipe with an inner diameter of 2 mm, and a step-up transformer coupled directly to the discharge tube without a high-voltage switch. Excitation is produced by wall-coupled discharge. The laser pulse width is 6.1 ns at 100 Torr (13.3 kPa, with an F2 concentration of 5 %) when a slow-rising voltage pulse of -40 kV (rise time: 253 ns) is applied. VUV-F2 emission of a 24.5 ns (FWHM) pulse width was generated simultaneously with the red-F* laser.

  7. Industrial-age changes in atmospheric [CO2] and temperature differentially alter responses of faster- and slower-growing Eucalyptus seedlings to short-term drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, James D; Smith, Renee A; Ghannoum, Oula; Logan, Barry A; Phillips, Nathan G; Tissue, David T

    2013-05-01

    Climate change may alter forest composition by differentially affecting the responses of faster- and slower-growing tree species to drought. However, the combined effects of rising atmospheric CO2 concentration ([CO2]) and temperature on drought responses of trees are poorly understood. Here, we examined interactive effects of temperature (ambient, ambient + °C) and [CO2] (290, 400 and 650mu;l l(-1)) on drought responses of Eucalyptus saligna Sm. (faster-growing) and E. sideroxylon A. Cunn. ex Woolls (slower-growing) seedlings. Drought was imposed via a controlled reduction in soil water over 1-2 weeks, re-watering seedlings when leaves visibly wilted. In ambient temperature, the effect of drought on the light-saturated net photosynthetic rate (Asat) in E. saligna decreased as [CO2] increased from pre-industrial to future concentrations, but rising [CO2] did not affect the response in Eucalyptus sideroxylon. In contrast, elevated temperature exacerbated the effect of drought in reducing Asat in both species. The drought response of Asat reflected changes in stomatal conductance (gs) associated with species and treatment differences in (i) utilization of soil moisture and (ii) leaf area ratio (leaf area per unit plant dry mass). Across [CO2] and temperature treatments, E. saligna wilted at higher soil water potentials compared with E. sideroxylon. Photosynthetic recovery from drought was 90% complete 2 days following re-watering across all species and treatments. Our results suggest that E. saligna (faster-growing) seedlings are more susceptible to drought than E. sideroxylon (slower-growing) seedlings. The greater susceptibility to drought of E. saligna reflected faster drawdown of soil moisture, associated with more leaf area and leaf area ratio, and the ability of E. sideroxylon to maintain higher gs at a given soil moisture. Inclusion of a pre-industrial [CO2] treatment allowed us to conclude that susceptibility of these species to short-term drought

  8. Hypoglycemic effects of Grifola frondosa (Maitake) polysaccharides F2 and F3 through improvement of insulin resistance in diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Chun; Wu, Qingping; Xie, Yizhen; Zhang, Jumei; Tan, Jianbin

    2015-11-01

    Our laboratory has previously demonstrated that Grifola frondosa polysaccharides (GFPs) showed hypoglycemic effects. This study aimed to investigate which polysaccharide-enriched fractions of GFPs were the main active constituents, and to disclose their hypoglycemic mechanism. F2 and F3 were obtained from GFPs and their hypoglycemic effects were investigated. Fasting serum glucose (FSG) levels, fasting serum insulin (FSI) levels and a homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) were measured, and the hepatic mRNA levels of insulin receptor (IR), insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), protein tyrosine phosphatase-1B (PTP1B), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and Akt/protein kinase B (PKB) were determined by a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). The activity of IR and IRS-1 were determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and their phospho-protein levels were analyzed with western blotting. F2 and F3 significantly decreased the levels of FSG, FSI and HOMA-IR compared with a diabetic control group (P < 0.05). F2 and F3 increased the activity and mRNA levels of IR, and the latter also increased the mRNA levels of IRS-1. As for the protein levels of phospho-IR and IRS-1, both F2 and F3 increased the protein levels of IR (Try 1361), but decreased IRS-1 (Ser307). In the PI3K/Akt pathway, F3 increased the mRNA levels of PI3K and Akt, however, F2 inhibited PTP1B expression. F2 and F3 are presumed to cause an improvement in insulin resistance, triggered by the reactivation of IR and IRS-1.

  9. Elevated Genetic Diversity in an F2:6 Population of Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa) Developed through an Inter-ecotype Cross.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benlhabib, Ouafae; Boujartani, Noura; Maughan, Peter J; Jacobsen, Sven E; Jellen, Eric N

    2016-01-01

    Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa) is a seed crop of the Andean highlands and Araucanian coastal regions of South America that has recently expanded in use and production beyond its native range. This is largely due to its superb nutritional value, consisting of protein that is rich in essential amino acids along with vitamins and minerals. Quinoa also presents a remarkable degree of tolerance to saline conditions, drought, and frost. The present study involved 72 F2:6 recombinant-inbred lines and parents developed through hybridization between highland (0654) and coastal (NL-6) germplasm groups. The purpose was to characterize the quinoa germplasm developed, to assess the discriminating potential of 21 agro-morpho-phenological traits, and to evaluate the extent of genetic variability recovered through selfing. A vast amount of genetic variation was detected among the 72 lines evaluated for quantitative and qualitative traits. Impressive transgressive segregation was measured for seed yield (22.42 g/plant), while plant height and maturity had higher heritabilities (73 and 89%, respectively). Other notable characters segregating in the population included panicle and stem color, panicle form, and resistance to downy mildew. In the Principal Component analysis, the first axis explained 74% of the total variation and was correlated to plant height, panicle size, stem diameter, biomass, mildew reaction, maturation, and seed yield; those traits are relevant discriminatory characters. Yield correlated positively with panicle length and biomass. Unweighted Pair Group Method with Arithmetic Mean-based cluster analysis identified three groups: one consisting of late, mildew-resistant, high-yielding lines; one having semi-late lines with intermediate yield and mildew susceptibility; and a third cluster consisting of early to semi-late accessions with low yield and mildew susceptibility. This study highlighted the extended diversity regenerated among the 72 accessions and helped to

  10. Elevated genetic diversity in an F2:6 population of quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa developed through an inter-ecotype cross

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ouafae Benlhabib

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa is a seed crop of the Andean highlands and Araucanian coastal regions of South America that has recently expanded in use and production beyond its native range. This is largely due its superb nutritional value, consisting of protein that is rich in essential amino acids along with vitamins and minerals. Quinoa also presents a remarkable degree of tolerance to saline conditions, drought, and frost. The present study involved 72 F2:6 recombinant inbred lines (RIL and parents developed through hybridization between highland (0654 and coastal (NL-6 germplasm groups. The purpose was to characterize the quinoa germplasm developed, to assess the discriminating potential of 21 agro-morpho phenological traits, and to evaluate the extent of genetic variability recovered through selfing. A vast amount of genetic variation was detected among the 72 lines evaluated for quantitative and qualitative traits. Impressive transgressive segregation was measured for seed yield (22.42 g/plant, while plant height and maturity had higher heritabilities (73 and 89%, respectively. Other notable characters segregating in the population included panicle and stem color, panicle form, and resistance to downy mildew. In the Principal Component analysis, the first axis explained 74% of the total variation and was correlated to plant height, panicle size, stem diameter, biomass, mildew reaction, maturation, and seed yield; those traits are relevant discriminatory characters. Yield correlated positively with panicle length and biomass. UPGMA based cluster analysis identified three groups: one consisting of late, mildew-resistant, high yielding lines; one having semi-late lines with intermediate yield and mildew susceptibility; and a third cluster consisting of early to semi-late accessions with low yield and mildew susceptibility. This study highlighted the extended diversity regenerated among the 72 accessions and helped to identify potentially

  11. EVALUASI KERAGAMAN GENETIK INDUK IKAN KERAPU SUNU (Plectropomus leopardus F-1 DAN TURUNANNYA (F-2 DENGAN PENANDA mt-DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sari Budi Moria Sembiring

    2012-12-01

    pada turunannya (F-2. Hal ini dimungkinkan bahwa yuwana yang dianalisis tersebut berasal dari populasi 3 komposit haplotip induk F-1. Hasil analisis dengan program Tools for Population Genetic Analysis (TFPGA menunjukkan bahwa nilai keragaman genetik induk F-1 mengalami penurunan sebesar 20,46% terhadap turunannya (F-2, hal ini diduga karena sedikitnya jumlah induk efektif yang memijah. Dengan demikian penambahan induk efektif perlu dilakukan untuk menghindari laju penurunan keragaman genetik.

  12. Prostaglandin F2-alpha receptor (FPr expression on porcine corpus luteum microvascular endothelial cells (pCL-MVECs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forni Monica

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The corpus luteum (CL is a transient endocrine gland and prostaglandin F2-alpha is considered to be the principal luteolysin in pigs. In this species, the in vivo administration of prostaglandin F2-alpha induces apoptosis in large vessels as early as 6 hours after administration. The presence of the prostaglandin F2-alpha receptor (FPr on the microvascular endothelial cells (pCL-MVECs of the porcine corpus luteum has not yet been defined. The aim of the study was to assess FPr expression in pCL-MVECs in the early and mid-luteal phases (EL-p, ML-p, and during pregnancy (P-p. Moreover, the effectiveness of prostaglandin F2-alpha treatment in inducing pCL-MVEC apoptosis was tested. Methods Porcine CLs were collected in the EL and ML phases and during P-p. All CLs from each animal were minced together and the homogenates underwent enzymatic digestion. The pCL-MVECs were then positively selected by an immunomagnetic separation protocol using Dynabeads coated with anti-CD31 monoclonal antibody and seeded in flasks in the presence of EGM 2-MV (Microvascular Endothelial Cell Medium-2. After 4 days of culture, the cells underwent additional immunomagnetic selection and were seeded in flasks until the confluent stage. PCR Real time, western blot and immunodetection assays were utilized to assess the presence of FPr on pCL-MVEC primary cultures. Furthermore, the influence of culture time (freshly isolated, cultured overnight and at confluence and hormonal treatment (P4 and E2 on FPr expression in pCL-MVECs was also investigated. Apoptosis was detected by TUNEL assay of pCL-MVECs exposed to prostaglandin F2-alpha. Results We obtained primary cultures of pCL-MVECs from all animals. FPr mRNA and protein levels showed the highest value (ANOVA in CL-MVECs derived from the early-luteal phase. Moreover, freshly isolated MVECs showed a higher FPr mRNA value than those cultured overnight and confluent cells (ANOVA. prostaglandin F2-alpha

  13. Urban solid waste in the production of Lafoensia pacari seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan H. M. de Abreu

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study aimed to verify the potential of urban solid wastes as substrate for production of seedlings of Lafoensia pacari. Five treatments were tested, four with solid wastes and one standard substrate, namely: sewage sludge from Alegria Wastewater Treatment Plant (WTP; sewage sludge from Ilha do Governador WTP; sewage sludge from Sarapuí WTP; domestic garbage compost (Fertlurb; and a commercial substrate made of biostabilized pine bark (standard substrate. The wastes received 20% (in volume of shredded coconut fiber. At 105 days after sowing, the seedlings were evaluated for different quality parameters. Seedlings produced with Sarapuí WTP sewage sludge showed the best results in all the parameters, followed by seedlings produced with sewage sludge from Alegria and Ilha do Governador WTPs, which did not differ. Seedlings produced with domestic garbage compost showed satisfactory results, higher than the ones observed for seedlings produced with commercial substrate. The urban solid wastes with 20% of coconut fiber showed high potential and can be recommended for the composition of substrate in the production of Lafoensia pacari seedlings.

  14. Genetic diversity of seagrass seeds influences seedling morphology and biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall Hughes, A; Hanley, Torrance C; Schenck, Forest R; Hays, Cynthia G

    2016-12-01

    Genetic diversity can influence ecological processes throughout ontogeny, yet whether diversity at early life history stages is important in long-lived taxa with overlapping generations is unclear. Seagrass systems provide some of the best evidence for the ecological effects of genetic diversity among adult shoots, but we do not know if the genetic diversity of seeds and seedlings also influences seagrass ecology. We tested the effects of seagrass (Zostera marina) seed diversity and relatedness on germination success, seedling morphology, and seedling production by comparing experimental assemblages of seeds collected from single reproductive shoots ("monocultures") to assemblages of seeds collected from multiple reproductive shoots ("polycultures"). There was no difference in seedling emergence, yet seedlings from polycultures had larger shoots above and below ground than seedlings from monocultures at the end of the 1-yr experiment. Genetic relatedness of the seedlings predicted some aspects of shoot morphology, with more leaves and longer roots and shoots at intermediate levels of relatedness, regardless of seed diversity. Our results suggest that studies of only adult stages may underestimate the importance of genetic diversity if the benefits at early life history stages continue to accrue throughout the life cycle. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  15. Effects of benzoic acid and cadmium toxicity on wheat seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavita Yadav

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Benzoic acid (BA and Cd exhibit cumulative effects on plants due to their accumulation in the soil. The present study reports the effects of BA an allelochemical, Cd and their combinations on seed germination, seedling growth, biochemical parameters, and response of antioxidant enzymes in Triticum aestivum L. The experiment was conducted in sand supplemented with Hoagland nutrient solution. Benzoic acid was applied at concentrations of 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 mM with or without Cd (7 mg L-1 to observe effects of allelochemical and Cd alone and in combination on wheat. Both stresses exhibited inhibitory effect on growth and metabolism of wheat seedlings. The allelochemical in single and combined treatments with Cd decreased seedling growth as compared to Cd stress. The two stresses significantly enhanced malondialdehyde content of wheat seedlings. The activity of other antioxidant enzymes, viz. superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, ascorbate peroxidase (APX, and guaiacol peroxidase (POX were also recorded. SOD increased in seedlings under the two stresses. CAT more prominently ameliorates the toxic effects of H2O2 as compared with APX and POX and protected wheat seedlings from oxidative stress. Allelochemical buttressed the toxic effect of Cd on wheat seedlings.

  16. Production of desert rose seedlings in different potting media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronan Carlos Colombo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade the desert rose received fame in the flower market due to its striking and sculptural forms; however, the commercial production of these species is quite recent and little is known about its crop management, including substrates recommendation. The objectives of this study were to investigate the effect of different substrates on desert rose seed germination and production of its seedlings. Experiment I: freshly harvested seeds of desert rose were sown in different substrates e.g. sand, coconut fiber, semi-composted pine bark, sand + coconut fiber, semi-composted pine bark + sand and coconut fiber + semicomposted pine bark. These substrates were evaluated to study the emergence percentage of seeds, initial growth of seedlings and seedling emergence speed index (ESI. Experiment II: desert rose from the experiment I were transferred to plastic pots filled with the same substrates as in experiment I. The pH and electrical conductivity (EC of the substrates were noted every 30 days while the growth parameters of seedlings were recorded after 240 days. Results from experiment I showed higher germination rate and seedling growth in substrates containing semi-composted pine bark. Similarly, in experiment II, better quality seedlings were observed in substrates containing semi-composted pine bark. Thus, for desert rose seed germination and seedling growth, it is recommended to use substrates containing semi-composted pine bark.

  17. Genetic susceptibility of periodontitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laine, M.L.; Crielaard, W.; Loos, B.G.

    2012-01-01

    In this systematic review, we explore and summarize the peer-reviewed literature on putative genetic risk factors for susceptibility to aggressive and chronic periodontitis. A comprehensive literature search on the PubMed database was performed using the keywords ‘periodontitis’ or ‘periodontal

  18. Fourie susceptible.pmd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adipala Ekwamu

    a number of cultivars exhibited field resistance to halo blight and bacterial brown spot, all cultivars were more or less susceptible to .... Cerillos. Alubia. I. 91. 57. Kranskop. Red speckled sugar. II. 97. 63. OPS-RS1. Red speckled sugar. II. 96. 63. OPS-RS2. Red speckled sugar. I. 100. 61. OPS-RS3. Red speckled sugar. II. 97.

  19. Effects of ovariohysterectomy on prostaglandin F2alpha-induced nesting behaviour in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burne, T H; Murfitt, P J; Gilbert, C L

    Exogenously administered prostaglandin (PG) F2alpha induces behaviour similar to prepartum nest building in pregnant, pseudopregnant and nonpregnant female postpubescent pigs (Sus scrofa). These effects may be regulated by PGF2alpha-induced endocrine changes within the reproductive tract, such as those that initiate luteolysis. This study investigated the short-term effects of ovariohysterectomy on PGF2alpha-induced nesting behaviour in nonpregnant females. Cyclic 9-month-old virgin female pigs (gilts) received an oral dose (20 mg/day) of a synthetic progestogen (altrenogest; Regumate porcine, Hoechst, Milton Keynes, UK) for 18-21 days to synchronize oestrus. The gilts were then ovariohysterectomized (n=8) or sham-operated (n=7) on Days 3-8 after oestrus. They were housed individually and initially subjected to a series of control behavioural tests to establish the effect of ovariohysterectomy on their responses to the experimenters, novel objects, straw bedding and space restriction. Ovariohysterectomized gilts had a shorter latency to approach the experimenters than sham-operated animals, but there were no differences in their responses to a novel object, straw bedding or space restriction. Twelve to 16 days after oestrus, corresponding to the midluteal phase in sham-operated gilts, they were treated intramuscularly with 15 mg PGF2alpha (0.12 mg/kg, dinoprost; Lutalyse, Upjohn, Crawley, UK). PGF2alpha treatment induced a significant increase in straw gathering in ovariohysterectomized but not in sham-operated gilts. Other nesting behaviours, including rooting and pawing at straw, were induced in all animals. These results show that the uterus and ovaries are not required for the expression of PGF2alpha-induced nesting behaviour and the removal of the reproductive tract appears to have facilitated increased levels of gathering. This suggests that PGF2alpha induces luteolysis and nest building separately, and that PGF2alpha or a metabolite, may act centrally to

  20. Ionospheric foF2 anomalies during some intense geomagnetic storms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. P. Kane

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The global evolutions of foF2 anomalies were examined for three very intense geomagnetic storms, namely the Halloween events of October-November 2003 (Event X, 29–30 October 2003, Dst –401 nT; Event Y, 20–21 November 2003, Dst –472 nT, and the largest Dst storm (Event Z, 13–14 March 1989, Dst –589 nT. For Event X, troughs (negative storms were clearly seen for high northern and southern latitudes. For northern midlatitudes as well as for low latitudes, there were very strong positive effects on 29 October 2003, followed by negative effects the next day. For Event Y, there were no troughs in NH high latitudes for morning and evening hours but there were troughs for night. For midlatitudes and low latitudes, some longitudes showed strong negative effects in the early morning as expected, but some longitudes showed strong positive effects at noon and in the evening hours. Thus, there were many deviations from the model patterns. The deviations were erratic, indicating considerable local effects superposed on general patterns. A disconcerting feature was the presence of strong positive effects during the 24 h before the storm commencement. Such a feature appears only in the 24 h before the geomagnetic storm commencement but not earlier. If genuine, these could imply a prediction potential with a 24-h antecedence. For Event Z (13–14 March 1989, equinox, all stations (all latitudes and longitudes showed a very strong "negative storm" in the main phase, and no positive storms anywhere. Keywords. Ionosphere (Equatorial ionosphere – Ionospheric disturbances – Mid-latitude Ionosphere – Polar ionosphere

  1. Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy of magnons in antiferromagnetic MnF2(Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristow, Alan D.; Bas, Derek A.; Borisov, Pavel; Lederman, David

    2017-02-01

    Antiferromagnets are an important class of ordered spin systems, common in spintronic applications and providing a testbed for studying magnetism. Recently, the injection of magnons - coherent spin waves - has been explored by broadband terahertz pulses in antoferromagnets, such as MnO. Here, terahertz time-domain spectroscopy is used to detect magnon resonances in MnF2, which is a model antiferromagnet with uniaxial anisotropy and a Néel temperature of 67 K. Temperature dependence of a one-magnon resonances is examined from 5 K to 70 K. The center frequency of the one-magnon is recorded below the Néel temperature and fit to a Brillouin function. It is found that the degree of correlation between neighboring spins is j = 1.1. Namely, a weak correlation and appropriately modeled by mean-field theory befitting this simple system. From low temperature to room temperature, a two-magnon resonance is observed to broaden and strengthen as the temperature increases. Two-magnon modes arise due to zone-edge magnons being stimulated with -k and +k momenta and do not require magnetic ordering. Over this same temperature range, THz transients are used to monitor the time-of flight through the crystal, the refractive index, the internal energy and the heat capacity. Overall these quantities decrease with decreasing temperature, with behavior that falls into three regimes: a thermal dominated region above the Néel temperature, a magnetic regime below the Néel temperature; and a hyperfine interaction region at temperatures below 6 K. The latter is the first direct observation of the hyperfine interaction using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy.

  2. Geometric configurations of singularities for quadratic differential systems with total finite multiplicity $m_f=2$

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan C. Artes

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work we consider the problem of classifying all configurations of singularities, both finite and infinite of quadratic differential systems, with respect to the geometric equivalence relation defined in [3]. This relation is deeper than the topological equivalence relation which does not distinguish between a focus and a node or between a strong and a weak focus or between foci of different orders. Such distinctions are however important in the production of limit cycles close to the foci in perturbations of the systems. The notion of geometric equivalence relation of configurations of singularities allows to incorporates all these important geometric features which can be expressed in purely algebraic terms. This equivalence relation is also deeper than the qualitative equivalence relation introduced in [17]. The geometric classification of all configurations of singularities, finite and infinite, of quadratic systems was initiated in [4] where the classification was done for systems with total multiplicity $m_f$ of finite singularities less than or equal to one. In this article we continue the work initiated in [4] and obtain the geometric classification of singularities, finite and infinite, for the subclass of quadratic differential systems possessing finite singularities of total multiplicity $m_f=2$. We obtain 197 geometrically distinct configurations of singularities for this family. We also give here the global bifurcation diagram of configurations of singularities, both finite and infinite, with respect to the geometric equivalence relation, for this class of systems. The bifurcation set of this diagram is algebraic. The bifurcation diagram is done in the 12-dimensional space of parameters and it is expressed in terms of polynomial invariants. The results can therefore be applied for any family of quadratic systems in this class, given in any normal form. Determining the geometric configurations of singularities for any such

  3. Effectiveness of prostaglandin F2alpha in the initial treatment of bovine ovarian cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavatte, P M; Archbald, L F; Risco, C; Tran, T; Sumrall, D

    1993-10-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the use of prostaglandin F2alpha (PGF2alpha) in the initial treatment of ovarian cysts in dairy cattle. Two hundred and sixty three cows diagnosed cystic on palpation per rectum were randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups (A, B or C). Cows in Groups A and B were treated with 25 mg i.m.of PGF2alpha at the time of diagnosis (Day 0), while cows in Group C received 100 mug of GnRH. Seven days following initial treatment (Day 7), cows from Group A that were not observed in estrus were treated with GnRH. Cows from Groups B and C were not treated. On Day 14, all cows that had not been inseminated received PGF2alpha. A blood sample was obtained from all cows on Days 0, 7 and 14 and was analyzed for progesterone (P4) using radioimmunoassay. Incidences of estrus were recorded and cows that were more than 60 d in milk at the time of diagnosis were bred when observed in estrus. The incidence of follicular cysts on Day 0 (as defined as P4 cysts. There were significantly more cows pregnant to insemination within 7 d of initial treatment in Group B than in Groups A and C (Povarian cysts diagnosed by per rectum examination with prostaglandin (at time of diagnosis and 14 d later for cows that were not inseminated) was as effective as initial treatment with GnRH followed by prostaglandins 14 d later for cows that were not inseminated previously. Cows that were initially treated with prostaglandins also tended to become pregnant sooner.

  4. Winter injury among white fir seedlings...unusual pattern in seed source study

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. Thompson Conkle; W. J. Libby; J. L. Hamrick

    1967-01-01

    White fir seeds collected from 43 sources were sown at the Institute of Forest Genetics, Placerville, Calif. in 1963. Observations made 3 years later showed that seedlings from northern sources sustained more winter injury than did southern origin seedlings. Seedlings from low elevations were less severely damaged than seedlings from higher elevations in the same...

  5. Early field performance of Acacia koa seedlings grown under subirrigation and overhead irrigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony S. Davis; Jeremiah R. Pinto; Douglass F. Jacobs

    2011-01-01

    Koa (Acacia koa A. Gray [Fabaceae]) seedlings were grown with subirrigation and overhead irrigation systems in an effort to characterize post-nursery field performance. One year following outplanting, we found no differences in seedling height or survival, but root-collar diameter was significantly larger for subirrigated seedlings. This indicates that koa seedlings,...

  6. Winter survival of Scots pine seedlings under different snow conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domisch, Timo; Martz, Françoise; Repo, Tapani; Rautio, Pasi

    2017-10-10

    Future climate scenarios predict increased air temperatures and precipitation, particularly at high latitudes, and especially so during winter. Soil temperatures, however, are more difficult to predict, since they depend strongly on the fate of the insulating snow cover. 'Rain-on-snow' events and warm spells during winter can lead to thaw-freeze cycles, compacted snow and ice encasement, as well as local flooding. These adverse conditions could counteract the otherwise positive effects of climatic changes on forest seedling growth. In order to study the effects of different winter and snow conditions on young Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) seedlings, we conducted a laboratory experiment in which 80 1-year-old Scots pine seedlings were distributed between four winter treatments in dasotrons: ambient snow cover (SNOW), compressed snow and ice encasement (ICE), flooded and frozen soil (FLOOD) and no snow (NO SNOW). During the winter treatment period and a 1.5-month simulated spring/early summer phase, we monitored the needle, stem and root biomass of the seedlings, and determined their starch and soluble sugar concentrations. In addition, we assessed the stress experienced by the seedlings by measuring chlorophyll fluorescence, electric impedance and photosynthesis of the previous-year needles. Compared with the SNOW treatment, carbohydrate concentrations were lower in the FLOOD and NO SNOW treatments where the seedlings had almost died before the end of the experiment, presumably due to frost desiccation of aboveground parts during the winter treatments. The seedlings of the ICE treatment showed dead needles and stems only above the snow and ice cover. The results emphasize the importance of an insulating and protecting snow cover for small forest tree seedlings, and that future winters with changed snow patterns might affect the survival of tree seedlings and thus forest productivity. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved

  7. BIM LAU-PE: Seedlings in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gass, S.; Pennese, R.; Chapuis, D.; Dainesi, P.; Nebuloni, S.; Garcia, M.; Oriol, A.

    2015-09-01

    The effect of gravity on plant roots is an intensive subject of research. Sounding rockets represent a costeffective platform to study this effect under microgravity conditions. As part of the upcoming MASER 13 sounding rocket campaign, two experiments on Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings have been devised: GRAMAT and SPARC. These experiments are aimed at studying (1) the genes that are specifically switched on or off during microgravity, and (2) the position of auxin-transporting proteins during microgravity. To perform these experiments, RUAG Space Switzerland site of Nyon, in collaboration with the Swedish Space Corporation (SSC) and the University of Freiburg, has developed the BIM LAU-PE (Biolology In Microgravity Late Access Unit Plant Experiment). In the following an overview of the BIM LAU-PE design is presented, highlighting specific module design features and verifications performed. A particular emphasis is placed on the parabolic flight experiments, including results of the micro-g injection system validation.

  8. Topological susceptibility from the twisted mass Dirac operator spectrum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cichy, Krzysztof [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Poznan Univ. (Poland). Faculty of Physics; Garcia-Ramos, Elena [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany); Jansen, Karl [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Cyprus Univ., Nicosia (Cyprus). Dept. of Physics; Collaboration: European Twisted Mass Collaboration

    2013-12-15

    We present results of our computation of the topological susceptibility with N{sub f}=2 and N{sub f}= +1+1 flavours of maximally twisted mass fermions, using the method of spectral projectors. We perform a detailed study of the quark mass dependence and discretization effects. We make an attempt to confront our data with chiral perturbation theory and extract the chiral condensate from the quark mass dependence of the topological susceptibility. We compare the value with the results of our direct computation from the slope of the mode number. We emphasize the role of autocorrelations and the necessity of long Monte Carlo runs to obtain results with good precision. We also show our results for the spectral projector computation of the ratio of renormalization constants Z{sub P}/Z{sub S}.

  9. Expression Profiling of Selected Glutathione Transferase Genes in Zea mays (L.) Seedlings Infested with Cereal Aphids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sytykiewicz, Hubert; Chrzanowski, Grzegorz; Czerniewicz, Paweł; Sprawka, Iwona; Łukasik, Iwona; Goławska, Sylwia; Sempruch, Cezary

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this report was to evaluate the expression patterns of selected glutathione transferase genes (gst1, gst18, gst23 and gst24) in the tissues of two maize (Zea mays L.) varieties (relatively resistant Ambrozja and susceptible Tasty Sweet) that were colonized with oligophagous bird cherry-oat aphid (Rhopalosiphum padi L.) or monophagous grain aphid (Sitobion avenae L.). Simultaneously, insect-triggered generation of superoxide anion radicals (O2•−) in infested Z. mays plants was monitored. Quantified parameters were measured at 1, 2, 4, 8, 24, 48 and 72 h post-initial aphid infestation (hpi) in relation to the non-infested control seedlings. Significant increases in gst transcript amounts were recorded in aphid-stressed plants in comparison to the control seedlings. Maximal enhancement in the expression of the gst genes in aphid-attacked maize plants was found at 8 hpi (gst23) or 24 hpi (gst1, gst18 and gst24) compared to the control. Investigated Z. mays cultivars formed excessive superoxide anion radicals in response to insect treatments, and the highest overproduction of O2•− was noted 4 or 8 h after infestation, depending on the aphid treatment and maize genotype. Importantly, the Ambrozja variety could be characterized as having more profound increments in the levels of gst transcript abundance and O2•− generation in comparison with the Tasty Sweet genotype. PMID:25365518

  10. THE THERMODYNAMIC PROPERTIES OF MELTS OF DOUBLE SYSTEM MgO – Al2O3, MgO – SiO2, MgO – CaF2, Al2O3 – SiO2, Al2O3 – CaF2, SiO2 – CaF2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    В. Судавцова

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Methodology of prognostication of thermodynamics properties of melts is presented from the coordinatesof liquidus of diagram of the state in area of equilibria a hard component is solution, on which energies ofmixing of Gibbs are expected in the double border systems of MgO – Al2O3, MgO – SiO2, MgO – CaF2,Al2O3 – SiO2, Al2O3 - CaF2, SiO2 - CaF2. For the areas of equilibrium there is quasibinary connection(MgAl2O4, Mg2SiO4, Al6Si2O13 – a grout at calculations was used equalization of Hauffe-Wagner. Theobtained data comport with literary

  11. Tebuconazole Regulates Fatty Acid Composition of Etiolated Winter Wheat Seedlings

    OpenAIRE

    A.V. Korsukova; T.G. Gornostai; O.I. Grabelnych; N.V. Dorofeev; T.P. Pobezhimova; N.A. Sokolova; L.V. Dudareva; V.K. Voinikov

    2016-01-01

    The fatty acid composition of shoots of unhardened and hardened to cold etiolated winter wheat seedlings grown from seeds treated with tebuconazole-based protectant «Bunker» (content of tebuconazole 60 grams per liter, g/L), and the seedlings frost resistance has been studied. It is shown that treatment of winter wheat seeds by «Bunker» preparation (1,5 microliter per gram of seeds, µl/g) is accompanied by an increase of the fatty acids unsaturation in the shoots and increase of the seedlings...

  12. Fungicidal control of Lophodermium seditiosum on Pinus sylvestris seedlings in Swedish forest nurseries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenstroem, Elna [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Forest Mycology and Pathology; Arvidsson, Bernt [Svenska Skogsplantor AB, Joenkoeping (Sweden)

    2001-07-01

    During the 1990s, there were serious outbreaks of the pathogen Lophodermium seditiosum on pine seedlings in Swedish forest nurseries, even though the seedlings had been treated with the fungicide propiconazole. The present experiment was carried out to evaluate two other fungicides, fluazinam and azoxystrobin, as possible alternatives to propiconazole. In the tests, which were all carried out in the same forest nursery, seedlings were treated with either propiconazole, fluazinam. or azoxystrobin, and the proportion of needles with ascocarps of L. seditiosum and the number of ascocarps per needle were recorded over the following 2 yrs. Seedlings treated with azoxystrobin already appeared healthier than control seedlings in September of the first year, and by November all azoxystrobin-treated seedlings had fewer ascocarps per needle compared with control seedlings. In autumn of the second year, there were no ascocarps on seedlings treated with fluazinam or azoxystrobin, whereas seedlings treated with propiconazole had similar numbers of ascocarps to non-treated control seedlings.

  13. Bioatividade de produtos fitossanitários utilizados na cultura do tomateiro (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. a Trichogramma pretiosum Riley, 1879 (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae nas gerações F1 e F2 Bioactivity of pesticides used in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. crop to Trichogramma pretiosum Riley, 1879 (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae in F1 and F2 generations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo Andrade Carvalho

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available A bioatividade de dezoito produtos químicos utilizados no controle de pragas e doenças do tomateiro, sobre duas linhagens de Trichogramma pretiosum Riley, 1879 (L9=Alegre, ES e L10= Venda Nova do Imigrante, ES, nas gerações F1 e F2, foi investigada em laboratório. Ovos de Anagasta kuehniella (Zeller contendo o parasitóide em diferentes estágios de desenvolvimento (ovo-larva, pré-pupa e pupa foram tratados por meio de imersão nas respectivas caldas químicas. Os inseticidas triflumuron, clorfluazuron, deltametrina, Bacillus thuringiensis, lambdacialotrina, teflubenzuron, acefato, pirimicarb e ciromazina, e os fungicidas benomil, iprodiona, clorotalonil e dimetomorf, independente da linhagem, não reduziram a longevidade das fêmeas de T. pretiosum da geração F1. Os inseticidas abamectin, cartap, metamidofós e lambdacialotrina afetaram a razão sexual de indivíduos da geração F1, e não reduziram a taxa de emergência de parasitóides da F2, independente do estágio de desenvolvimento e da origem da população de T. pretiosum. Parasitóides de Venda Nova do Imigrante, ES (L10 mostraram-se mais susceptíveis que os de Alegre, ES (L9 aos efeitos dos compostos avaliados. De modo geral, a fase de pupa de T. pretiosum, independente da população, apresentou maior tolerância aos produtos testados. Recomenda-se a realização de novos testes para outras populações desse parasitóide que serão utilizadas no controle de pragas, pois podem responder de forma diversa aos produtos fitossanitários avaliados.The bioactivity of eighteen pesticides commonly used to pests and diseases control on tomato, in two strains of Trichogramma pretiosum Riley, 1879 (L9=Alegre, ES and L10= Venda Nova do Imigrante, ES, Brazil in F1 and F2 generations, was evaluated under laboratory conditions. The bioassays were conducted in a climatic chamber at 25 ± 2 ºC, 60 ± 10% RH and 14 hours of photophase. Eggs of Anagasta kuehniella (Zeller containing the

  14. Early transcriptome responses of the bovine midcycle corpus luteum to prostaglandin F2a includes cytokine signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    In ruminants, prostaglandin F2alpha (PGF2a)-mediated luteolysis is essential prior to estrous cycle resumption, and is a target for improving fertility. To deduce early PGF2a-provoked changes in the corpus luteum a short time-course (0.5–4 h) was performed on cows at midcycle. A microarray-determin...

  15. Effect of graphene on far-infrared transmission and absorption of FeF2 photonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ying; Zhou, Sheng; Fu, Shufang

    2017-10-01

    The influence of graphene (Gr) on the far-infrared transmission and absorption of FeF2 photonic crystals (PCs) is investigated by the forth-order transfer matrix since Gr is anisotropic when the external field is perpendicular to the surface of PCs. The numerical results show that the transmission and absorption spectra largely depend on the structural symmetry of Gr/FeF2 PCs and the position of Gr layer. The optimal structure and number of dielectric bi-layers (N) are discussed. In addition, the introduction of Gr leads to the disappearance of the defect modes in the band gap. Meanwhile, the line width of absorption around of the resonant frequencies of FeF2 has been extremely broadened, which is compared with the one of FeF2 PCs. Once N is beyond a critical value, the absorber will become the reflector. The effect of Fermi energy and external field on the absorption is also investigated.

  16. Neutron diffraction and TSDC on Ba1−xUxF2+2x solid electrolytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ouwerkerk, M.; Andersen, N. H.; Veldkamp, F. F.

    1986-01-01

    The defect structure of fluorite-type Ba1−xUxF2+2x solid solutions, which exhibit fast fluoride ion conductivity, has been investigated by quasi-elastic diffuse neutron scattering (QDNS) experiments, and thermally stimulated depolarisation current (TSDC) measurements. A comparison with model...

  17. Elastic properties of Na2 O–ZnO–ZnF2 –B2 O3 oxyfluoride glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    plex behaviour of the glass network. The results have been analysed in view of the modified borate glass net- work. Addition of ZnF2 into the pure glass seems to influence the borate network by replacement of B–O–B linkages with B–O–Zn. Keywords. Borate glasses; oxyfluoride glasses; elastic properties; dual role of Zn.

  18. Crystallization and Preliminary X-ray Analysis of Der f 2, a Potent Allergen Derived from the House Dust Mite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roeber, Dana; Achari, Aniruddha; Takai, Toshiro; Okumura, Yasushi; Scott, David L.; Curreri, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Although a number of allergens have been identified and isolated, the underlying molecular basis for the potent immune response is poorly understood. House dust mites (Dermatophugoides sp.) are particularly ubiquitous contributors to atopy in developed countries. The rhinitis, dermatitis, and asthma associated with allergic reactions to these arthropods are often caused by relatively small (125-129 amino acids) mite proteins of unclear biological function. Der f 2, a major allergen from the mite Dermatophagoides farinae, has been recombinantly expressed and characterized. The Der f 2 protein has been crystallized in our laboratory and a native data set collected at a synchrotron source. The crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group I422 with unit cell parameters of a = 95.2 Angstroms, b = 95.2 Angstroms, and c = 103.3 Angstroms. An essentially complete (97.2%) data set has been collected to 2.4 Angstroms. Attempts to solve the crystal structure of Der f 2 by molecular replacement using the available NMR coordinates for either Der f 2 or Der p 2 (the homologous protein from D. pterovssinus) failed to reveal a creditable solution.

  19. Learners' Perceptions of Blended Learning and the Roles and Interaction of f2f and Online Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims to probe into learners' perceptions of blended learning in relation to the respective roles of face-to-face learning (f2f learning) and online learning as well as their interaction in the blended EFL contexts. Questionnaires were used in the study to examine the attitudes of 296 university students towards a blended English…

  20. The global distribution of the dusk-to-nighttime enhancement of summer NmF2 at solar minimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yiding; Liu, Libo; Le, Huijun; Wan, Weixing; Zhang, Hui

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the dusk-to-nighttime enhancement (DNE) of summer NmF2 was investigated based on Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate radio occultation observations at solar minimum. The global distributions of the magnitude and the peak time of the DNE as well as the role of the DNE in NmF2 diurnal cycle were presented. The DNE mainly exists in three regions (one in the Southern Hemisphere and two in the Northern Hemisphere), and its distribution is related to geomagnetic configuration, especially in the Southern Hemisphere. For most DNEs, their peaks correspond to the maxima of NmF2 diurnal cycle. The DNEs are much more prominent in the southern than in the northern summer hemisphere; they last to later nighttime hours, have larger magnitudes, and play more important roles in NmF2 diurnal cycle in the southern than in the northern summer hemisphere. The distribution of the DNE was analyzed in terms of photoionization and the vertical plasma drift induced by neutral winds. The positive geomagnetic declinations and the smaller geomagnetic inclinations at higher geographic latitudes over the South Pacific are crucial for the prominent DNEs in the southern summer hemisphere; they result in larger upward plasma drift at higher latitudes where photoionization is still significant at sunset and evening hours.

  1. Influencia del CaF2 sobre la capacidad de reacción de crudos de cemento

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palomo, Ángel

    1982-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of a small quantity of CaF2 on the capacity of reaction of raw mixes has been studied in this paper; and for this purpose the thermal behaviours of a commercial raw mix without the addition of CaF2 were compared at different ages of clinkerization. The times required to complete the reactions at different temperatures are estimated. The mineralizer effect of fluorspar has a maximun at temperatures of clinkerization of about 1.200ºC and ages of cinkerization of about 10 minutes.En este trabajo se estudia el efecto de una pequeña cantidad de CaF2 sobre la capacidad de reacción de crudos de cemento, para lo cual se comparan los comportamientos térmicos en función del tiempo de clinkerización de un crudo comercial con y sin adición de CaF2. Se da una estimación de los tiempos necesarios para completar las reacciones a diferentes temperaturas. El efecto mineralizador del espato-fluor pasa por un máximo a temperaturas de clinkerización del orden de 1.200ºC y tiempos de clinkerización del orden de 10 minutos.

  2. Microwave, high-resolution infrared, and quantum chemical investigations of CHBrF2: ground and v4 = 1 states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzoli, Gabriele; Cludi, Lino; Puzzarini, Cristina; Stoppa, Paolo; Pietropolli Charmet, Andrea; Tasinato, Nicola; Baldacci, Agostino; Baldan, Alessandro; Giorgianni, Santi; Wugt Larsen, René; Stopkowicz, Stella; Gauss, Jürgen

    2011-02-03

    A combined microwave, infrared, and computational investigation of CHBrF(2) is reported. For the vibrational ground state, measurements in the millimeter- and sub-millimeter-wave regions for CH(79)BrF(2) and CH(81)BrF(2) provided rotational and centrifugal-distortion constants up to the sextic terms as well as the hyperfine parameters (quadrupole-coupling and spin-rotation interaction constants) of the bromine nucleus. The determination of the latter was made possible by recording of spectra at sub-Doppler resolution, achieved by means of the Lamb-dip technique, and supporting the spectra analysis by high-level quantum chemical calculations at the coupled-cluster level. In this context, the importance of relativistic effects, which are of the order of 6.5% and included in the present work using second-order direct perturbation theory, needs to be emphasized for accurate predictions of the bromine quadrupole-coupling constants. The infrared measurements focused on the ν(4) fundamental band of CH(79)BrF(2). Fourier transform investigations using a synchrotron radiation source provided the necessary resolution for the observation and analysis of the rotational structure. The spectroscopic parameters of the v(4) = 1 state were found to be close to those of the vibrational ground state, indicating that the ν(4) band is essentially unaffected by perturbations.

  3. Measurement of the Deuteron Structure Function F2 in the Resonance Region and Evaluation of Its Moments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Osipenko; G. Ricco; S. Simula; M. Battaglieri; M. Ripani; the CLAS Collaboration

    2005-06-02

    Inclusive electron scattering off the deuteron has been measured to extract the deuteron structure function F2 with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. The measurement covers the entire resonance region from the quasi-elastic peak up to the invariant mass of the final-state hadronic system W {approx} 2.7 GeV with four-momentum transfers Q2 from 0.4 to 6 (GeV/c){sup 2}. These data are complementary to previous measurements of the proton structure function F2 and cover a similar two-dimensional region of Q2 and Bjorken variable x. Determination of the deuteron F2 over a large x interval including the quasi-elastic peak as a function of Q2, together with the other world data, permit a direct evaluation of the structure function moments for the first time. By fitting the Q2 evolution of these moments with an OPE-based twist expansion we have obtained a separation of the leading twist and higher twist terms. The observed Q2 behavior of the higher twist contribution suggests a partial cancellation of different higher twists entering into the expansion with opposite signs. This cancellation, found also in the proton moments, is a manifestation of the ''duality'' phenomenon in the F2 structure function.

  4. 18F-2-Fluoro-2-Deoxy-D-Glucose Positron Emission Tomography in Staging of Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeven, J.J.M. van der; Krak, N.C.; Hoekstra, O.S.; Comans, E.F.I.; Boom, R.P.A.; Geldere, D. van; Meijer, S.; Wall, E. van der; Buter, J.; Pinedo, H.M.; Teule, G.J.J.; Lammertsma, A.A.

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE To prospectively evaluate the effect of adding whole-body 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) to conventional screening for distant metastases in patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC). PATIENTS AND METHODS All women with LABC referred for

  5. Genetic Susceptibility to Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanja Kovacic

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a complex multifocal arterial disease involving interactions of multiple genetic and environmental factors. Advances in techniques of molecular genetics have revealed that genetic ground significantly influences susceptibility to atherosclerotic vascular diseases. Besides further investigations of monogenetic diseases, candidate genes, genetic polymorphisms, and susceptibility loci associated with atherosclerotic diseases have been identified in recent years, and their number is rapidly increasing. This paper discusses main genetic investigations fields associated with human atherosclerotic vascular diseases. The paper concludes with a discussion of the directions and implications of future genetic research in arteriosclerosis with an emphasis on prospective prediction from an early age of individuals who are predisposed to develop premature atherosclerosis as well as to facilitate the discovery of novel drug targets.

  6. [Pb2F2](SeO4): a heavier analogue of grandreefite, the first layered fluoride selenate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charkin, Dmitri O.; Plokhikh, Igor V.; Zadoya, Anastasiya I.; Kazakov, Sergey M.; Zaloga, Alexander N.; Kozin, Michael S.; Depmeier, Wulf; Siidra, Oleg I.

    2017-06-01

    Co-precipitation of PbF2 and PbSeO4 in weakly acidic media results in the formation of [Pb2F2](SeO4), the selenate analogue of the naturally occurring mineral grandreefite, [Pb2F2](SO4). The new compound is monoclinic, C2/c, a = 14.0784(2) Å, b = 4.6267(1) Å, c = 8.8628(1) Å, β = 108.98(1)°, V = 545.93(1) Å3. Its structure has been refined from powder data to R B = 1.55%. From thermal studies, it is established that the compound is stable in air up to about 300 °C, after which it gradually converts into a single phase with composition [Pb2O](SeO4), space group C2/m, and lattice parameters a = 14.0332(1) Å, b = 5.7532(1) Å, c = 7.2113(1) Å, β = 115.07(1)°, V = 527.37(1) Å3. It is the selenate analogue of lanarkite, [Pb2O](SO4), and phoenicochroite, [Pb2O](CrO4), and its crystal structure was refined to R B = 1.21%. The formation of a single decomposition product upon heating in air suggests that this happens by a thermal hydrolysis mechanism, i.e., Pb2F2SeO4 + H2O (vapor) → Pb2OSeO4 + 2HF↑. This relatively low-temperature process involves complete rearrangement of the crystal structure—from a 2D architecture featuring slabs [Pb2F2]2+ formed by fluorine-centered tetrahedra into a structure characterized by 1D motifs based on [OPb2]2+ chains of oxocentered tetrahedra. The comparative crystal chemistry of the obtained anion-centered structural architectures is discussed.

  7. Exploring Genetic Factors Involved in Huntington Disease Age of Onset: E2F2 as a New Potential Modifier Gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leire Valcárcel-Ocete

    Full Text Available Age of onset (AO of Huntington disease (HD is mainly determined by the length of the CAG repeat expansion (CAGexp in exon 1 of the HTT gene. Additional genetic variation has been suggested to contribute to AO, although the mechanism by which it could affect AO is presently unknown. The aim of this study is to explore the contribution of candidate genetic factors to HD AO in order to gain insight into the pathogenic mechanisms underlying this disorder. For that purpose, two AO definitions were used: the earliest age with unequivocal signs of HD (earliest AO or eAO, and the first motor symptoms age (motor AO or mAO. Multiple linear regression analyses were performed between genetic variation within 20 candidate genes and eAO or mAO, using DNA and clinical information of 253 HD patients from REGISTRY project. Gene expression analyses were carried out by RT-qPCR with an independent sample of 35 HD patients from Basque Country Hospitals. We found suggestive association signals between HD eAO and/or mAO and genetic variation within the E2F2, ATF7IP, GRIN2A, GRIN2B, LINC01559, HIP1 and GRIK2 genes. Among them, the most significant was the association between eAO and rs2742976, mapping to the promoter region of E2F2 transcription factor. Furthermore, rs2742976 T allele patient carriers exhibited significantly lower lymphocyte E2F2 gene expression, suggesting a possible implication of E2F2-dependent transcriptional activity in HD pathogenesis. Thus, E2F2 emerges as a new potential HD AO modifier factor.

  8. Regulation of the orphan nuclear receptor Nr2f2 by the DFNA15 deafness gene Pou4f3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrysostomos Tornari

    Full Text Available Hair cells are the mechanotransducing cells of the inner ear that are essential for hearing and balance. POU4F3--a POU-domain transcription factor selectively expressed by these cells--has been shown to be essential for hair cell differentiation and survival in mice and its mutation in humans underlies late-onset progressive hearing loss (DFNA15. The downstream targets of POU4F3 are required for hair cell differentiation and survival. We aimed to identify such targets in order to elucidate the molecular pathways involved in hair cell production and maintenance. The orphan thyroid nuclear receptor Nr2f2 was identified as a POU4F3 target using a subtractive hybridization strategy and EMSA analysis showed that POU4F3 binds to two sites in the Nr2f2 5' flanking region. These sites were shown to be required for POU4F3 activation as their mutation leads to a reduction in the response of an Nr2f2 5' flanking region reporter construct to POU4F3. Immunocytochemistry was carried out in the developing and adult inner ear in order to investigate the relevance of this interaction in hearing. NR2F2 expression in the postnatal mouse organ of Corti was shown to be detectable in all sensory epithelia examined and characterised. These data demonstrate that Nr2f2 is a direct target of POU4F3 in vitro and that this regulatory relationship may be relevant to hair cell development and survival.

  9. [Pb2F2](SeO4): a heavier analogue of grandreefite, the first layered fluoride selenate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charkin, Dmitri O.; Plokhikh, Igor V.; Zadoya, Anastasiya I.; Kazakov, Sergey M.; Zaloga, Alexander N.; Kozin, Michael S.; Depmeier, Wulf; Siidra, Oleg I.

    2018-01-01

    Co-precipitation of PbF2 and PbSeO4 in weakly acidic media results in the formation of [Pb2F2](SeO4), the selenate analogue of the naturally occurring mineral grandreefite, [Pb2F2](SO4). The new compound is monoclinic, C2/ c, a = 14.0784(2) Å, b = 4.6267(1) Å, c = 8.8628(1) Å, β = 108.98(1)°, V = 545.93(1) Å3. Its structure has been refined from powder data to R B = 1.55%. From thermal studies, it is established that the compound is stable in air up to about 300 °C, after which it gradually converts into a single phase with composition [Pb2O](SeO4), space group C2/ m, and lattice parameters a = 14.0332(1) Å, b = 5.7532(1) Å, c = 7.2113(1) Å, β = 115.07(1)°, V = 527.37(1) Å3. It is the selenate analogue of lanarkite, [Pb2O](SO4), and phoenicochroite, [Pb2O](CrO4), and its crystal structure was refined to R B = 1.21%. The formation of a single decomposition product upon heating in air suggests that this happens by a thermal hydrolysis mechanism, i.e., Pb2F2SeO4 + H2O (vapor) → Pb2OSeO4 + 2HF↑. This relatively low-temperature process involves complete rearrangement of the crystal structure—from a 2D architecture featuring slabs [Pb2F2]2+ formed by fluorine-centered tetrahedra into a structure characterized by 1D motifs based on [OPb2]2+ chains of oxocentered tetrahedra. The comparative crystal chemistry of the obtained anion-centered structural architectures is discussed.

  10. Topical prostaglandin F2alpha treatment reduces collagen types I, III, and IV in the monkey uveoscleral outflow pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagara, T; Gaton, D D; Lindsey, J D; Gabelt, B T; Kaufman, P L; Weinreb, R N

    1999-06-01

    Topical prostaglandin F2alpha isopropyl ester increases uveoscleral outflow in monkeys and humans. To investigate the effects of prostaglandin F2alpha isopropyl ester with topical administration on collagen types I, III, and IV within the anterior segment tissue of monkey eyes. Eight eyes of 4 cynomolgus monkeys were evaluated. One eye of each monkey was treated with 2 microg of prostaglandin F2alpha isopropyl ester twice daily for 5 days, and intraocular pressure reduction was confirmed. These eyes were fixed in methacarn, and paraffin sections were immunostained using antibodies to collagen types I, II, or IV. To measure staining intensity, optical density (OD) was determined using 2-dimensional imaging densitometry. Mean OD scores along line segments placed over the ciliary muscle were determined. Mean+/-SD OD scores for collagen types I, III, and IV were less in the ciliary muscle of prostaglandin-treated eyes than in vehicle-treated eyes by 52%+/-7%, 45%+/-6%, and 45%+/-5%, respectively. In the sclera adjacent to the ciliary body, mean OD scores for collagen types I and III were less in prostaglandin-treated eyes, by 43%+/-32% and 45%+/-13%, respectively. The scleral stroma was minimally immunoreactive for collagen type IV. All differences were significant by the paired Student t test (Pcollagen types I, III, and IV immunoreactivity in the ciliary muscle and adjacent sclera following topical prostaglandin F2alpha isopropyl ester treatment. These reductions may contribute to the increased uveoscleral outflow observed with topical prostaglandin treatment. The cellular mechanism by which certain prostaglandins lower intraocular pressure is not known. The present study provides immunohistochemical data demonstrating that intraocular pressure reduction that occurs with topical prostaglandin F2alpha is associated with a reduction of collagens within the uveoscleral outflow pathway.

  11. INNOVATIVE SPECIFIC PRODUCTS: ORGANIC SPROUTS (MICROGREENS AND SEEDLINGS (BABY LEAVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Ivanova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The assortment of salad crops, process parameters for production of seedlings (Baby leaf and sprouts (Microgreens is presented. The principles of the selection and sale of salad crops in the local market are recommended.

  12. Effect of ponderosa pine needle litter on grass seedling survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt R. McConnell; Justin G. Smith

    1971-01-01

    Hard fescue survival rates were followed for 6 years on four different pine needle treatment plots. Needle litter had a significant effect on initial survival of fescue seedlings, but subsequent losses undoubtedly resulted from the interaction of many factors.

  13. A leaf phosphorus assay for seedlings of Acacia mangium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, J S; Simpson, R J; Sands, R

    1992-10-01

    Concentrations of extractable and total phosphorus in leaves, stem, root and nodules of 12-week-old seedlings of two provenances of Acacia mangium Willd. were analyzed to identify the fraction of phosphorus and the plant part most suitable for predicting the phosphorus nutritional status of the seedlings.For both provenances, concentrations of extractable phosphorus were more sensitive to changes in soil phosphorus status and varied less among different plant parts than concentrations of total phosphorus. Concentrations of extractable phosphorus in the youngest fully expanded leaf (Leaf 3 from the apex) and the next two older leaves correlated closely with seedling dry mass and may be used to assess the phosphorus nutritional status of Acacia mangium seedlings.

  14. Nutraceutical composition obtained from fungus-challenged soy seedlings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbruggen, M.A.; Simons, R.; Niessen, H.; Vincken, J.P.; Gruppen, H.

    2012-01-01

    Soybean seedlings and therefrom extractable compositions are described. Such compositions comprise prenylated isoflavones and at least one isoflavonoid, said isoflavonoid being selected from one of the chemical classes of isoflavones, coumestans and pterocarpans. Such compositions usually comprise

  15. Re-use of seedling containers and Fusarium circinatum association ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Re-use of seedling containers and Fusarium circinatum association with asymptomatic Pinus patula planting stock. Andrew R Morris, Gerda Fourie, Izette Greyling, Emma T Steenkamp, Nicoletta B Jones ...

  16. Identification of zygotic and nucellar seedlings in citrus interspecific ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , 67 hybrid and 160 nucellar seedlings were recognized. The results indicate that ISSR analyses are very efficient and reliable for identification of hybrids in polyembryonic citrus cultivars. Key words: Citrus, fruit breeding, molecular markers, ...

  17. Seedlings and Saplings - Spears and Didion Ranches [ds318

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — These data are the total number and average number of saplings and seedlings of trees detected from 0.05-ha circular plot habitat samples taken in 2005 at sample...

  18. Strong microsite control of seedling recruitment in tundra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graae, Bente J; Ejrnæs, Rasmus; Lang, Simone I

    2011-01-01

    The inclusion of environmental variation in studies of recruitment is a prerequisite for realistic predictions of the responses of vegetation to a changing environment. We investigated how seedling recruitment is affected by seed availability and microsite quality along a steep environmental......, the experimental seed addition showed that the microsite environment was even more important. For all species, seedling emergence peaked at the productive end of the gradient, irrespective of the adult niches realized. Disturbance promoted recruitment at all positions along the environmental gradient, not just...... at high productivity. Early seedling emergence constituted the main temporal bottleneck in recruitment for all species. Surprisingly, winter mortality was highest at what appeared to be the most benign end of the gradient. The results highlight that seedling recruitment patterns are largely determined...

  19. Seedling Canopy Reflectance Spectra, 1992-1993 (ACCP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: The reflectance spectra of Douglas-fir and bigleaf maple seedling canopies were measured. Canopies varied in fertilizer treatment and leaf area density...

  20. Marijuana Usage and Hypnotic Susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzini, Louis R.; McDonald, Roy D.

    1973-01-01

    Anonymous self-reported drug usage data and hypnotic susceptibility scores were obtained from 282 college students. Frequent marijuana users (more than 10 times) showed greater susceptibility to hypnosis than nonusers. (Author)

  1. [Double mulching application for Panax notoginseng growing seedlings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Xiao-Hong; Fang, Yan; Shi, Ya-Na; Guo, Lan-Ping; Wang, Li; Yang, Yan; Jin, Hang; Liu, Da-Hui

    2014-02-01

    In order to improve the irrigation for Panax notginseng growing seedlings, different mulching ways were carried out to investigate the effects of double mulching. Field experiment was applied to study soil moisture, soil temperature and bulk density of different mulching ways while the germination rate and seedlings growth also were investigated. Compared with the traditional single mulching with pine leaves or straw, double mulching using plastic film combined with pine leaves or straw could reduce 2/3 volumes of irrigation at the early seedling time Double mulching treatments didn't need to irrigate for 40 days from seeding to germination, and kept soil moisture and temperature steady at whole seedling time about 30% and 9.0-16.6 degrees C, respectively. The steady soil moisture and temperature benefited to resist late spring cold and germinate earlier while kept germination regularly, higher rate and seedlings quality. In contrast, single mulching using pine leaves or straw had poor soil moisture and temperature preserving, needed to irrigate every 12-day, meanwhile dropped the germination and booming time 14 days and 24-26 days, respectively, reduced germination rate about 11.3%-8.7%. However, single pine leaves mulching was better than straw mulching. In addition, though better effects of soil moisture and temperature preserving as well as earlier and higher rate of germination with single plastic films mulching had, some disadvantages had also been observed, such as daily soil temperature changed greatly, seedling bed soil hardened easily, more moss and weeds resulted difficulty in later management. To the purpose of saving water and labor as well as getting higher germination rate and seedlings quality, double mulching using plastic films combined pine leaves at the early time and single mulching removing plastic films at the later time is suggested to apply in the growing seedlings of P. notoginseng.

  2. Starch bioengineering affects cereal grain germination and seedling establishment

    OpenAIRE

    Shaik, Shahnoor Sultana; Carciofi, Massimiliano; Martens, Helle Juel; Hebelstrup, Kim; Blennow, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Cereal grain germination is central for plant early development, and efficient germination has a major role in crop propagation and malting. Endosperm starch is the prime energy reserve in germination and seedling establishment. In this study, it was hypothesized that optimized starch granule structure, and not only the endosperm starch content per se, is important for germination and seedling establishment. For that purpose, wild-type (WT), and specifically engineered degradable hyperphospho...

  3. Stimulatory effects of aluminum on growth of sugar maple seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    George A. Schier; Carolyn J. McQuattie

    2002-01-01

    To determine the effect of aluminum (Al) on sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.), seedlings were grown in sand irrigated with nutrient solution (pH 3.8) containing 0, 2.5, 5, 10, 20, or 40 mg L-1 Al. Seedling growth was enhanced at 2.5 and 5mgL-1 Al. Although higher levels of Al reduced calcium (Ca) and...

  4. Pertumbuhan Bibit Kaliandra Pada Beberapa Komposisi Media Semai Cetak Di Persemaian Dan Lapangan (Growth of Kaliandra Seedling on Different Block Seedling Media Compositions in Nursery and Field)

    OpenAIRE

    Suita, Eliya; Dede J. Sudrajat; Kurniaty, Rina

    2017-01-01

    Planting of k aliandra (Caliandra calothyrsus Meissn.) is generally carried out by preparing the seedling using polybagwith top soil media. Large quantities of polybag may pollute the forest soil because polyethylene is difficult to be degraded. The research aimed to test ten compositions of block seedling media as a growth media for kaliandra seedlings in nursery and field. The research used randomized completely design for testing the effect o f block seedling media compositions on (1) the ...

  5. Growth of white tabebuia seedlings in different substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marichel Canazza de Macedo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the white tabebuia (Tabebuia roseo-alba (Ridl. Sandwith seedlings emergence and growth in the beds according to different substrates. Two independent experiments were conducted. The emergence study was carried out in six substrates: 1- Plantmax®; 2- vermiculite; 3- sand; 4- soil + sand (1:1; 5- soil + carbonized rice husk (1:1; 6- soil + sand + carbonized rice husk (2:1:1 (v/v, and the experiment was set up according to a three-replicate randomized complete-block design. The growth study of seedlings was carried out according to a five-replicate randomized complete-block design with five substrates: 1- soil + sand (1:1; 2- soil + semi decomposed chicken manure (1:1; 3- soil + carbonized rice husk (1:1; 4- soil + sand + semi decomposed chicken manure (1:1:1; 5- soil + sand + carbonized rice husk (1:1:1 (v/v. The height results of seedling emergence, emergence speed index and the stem height were observed with Plantmax®, vermiculite, soil + carbonized rice husk and soil + sand + carbonized rice husk. The best results of seedling height, stem diameter, chlorophyll index, leaf area, root length and the stem dry mass weight and root were observed in the substrates with semi decomposed chicken manure. It is recommended the use of P, V, SC or SAC for seedling germination and emergence and SACF or SCF for seedling growth of white tabebuia.

  6. Eucalyptus obliqua seedling growth in organic vs. mineral soil horizons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Karen M.; Janos, David P.; Nichols, Scott; Bowman, David M. J. S.

    2015-01-01

    Eucalyptus obliqua, the most widespread timber tree in Tasmania, is a pioneer after fire which can eliminate the organic layer of forest soil, exposing the underlying mineral soil. We compared seedling growth, mycorrhiza formation, and mineral nutrient limitation in organic layer vs. mineral soil. We grew E. obliqua seedlings separately in pots of organic layer and mineral soil in a glasshouse. Additional treatments of organic soil only, involved fully crossed methyl-bromide fumigation and fertilization. Fertilization comprised chelated iron for 121 days after transplant (DAT) followed by soluble phosphorus. At 357 DAT, whole plant dry weight was three times greater in ambient organic than in mineral soil. In organic soil, fumigation halved ectomycorrhiza abundance and reduced seedling growth at 149 DAT, but by 357 DAT when negative effects of fumigation on seedling growth had disappeared, neither fumigation nor fertilization affected mycorrhiza abundance. Iron fertilization diminished seedling growth, but subsequent phosphorus fertilization improved it. E. obliqua seedlings grow much better in organic layer soil than in mineral soil, although phosphorus remains limiting. The prevalent forestry practice of burning to mineral soil after timber harvest exposes a poor growth medium likely only partially compensated by fire-induced mineral soil alterations. PMID:25750650

  7. Silvicultural Attempts to Induce Browse Resistance in Conifer Seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce A. Kimball

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A multiyear study was conducted to determine if soil amendment combined with topical application of elemental sulfur could be employed to reduce deer browse damage to four conifer species. Fertilizer and sulfur were applied to conifer seedlings at seven sites near Corvallis, OR. Growth and browse damage data were collected for all seedlings over a period of 17 months. Additionally, foliar concentrations of monoterpenes and simple carbohydrates were assessed in western redcedar (Thuja plicata seedlings over a period of three years. Fertilization and sulfur treatments had a moderate impact on growth and no influence on browse damage or the chemical responses. Over the course of the study, browse damage diminished while foliar monoterpene concentrations increased in redcedar. It appears that silvicultural manipulation via sulfur application and/or soil amendment cannot accelerate or alter the ontogenetical changes that may naturally defend seedlings against mammalian herbivores. In a brief trial with captive deer, redcedar browse resistance was influenced by seedling maturation, but not monoterpene content. Other maturation effects may yield significant browse protection to young seedlings.

  8. Wood formation in Abies balsamea seedlings subjected to artificial defoliation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Sergio; Simard, Sonia; Deslauriers, Annie; Morin, Hubert

    2009-04-01

    We determined the cambial sensitivity and quantified the anatomical differences in xylem of Abies balsamea (L.) Mill. seedlings subjected to artificial defoliation to simulate spruce budworm feeding. Defoliation was performed by removing two-thirds of needles of all current-year shoots for up to four consecutive growth cycles to account for inter- and intra-annual xylem formation. In Experiment 1, xylem development was studied from May to October 2005 in seedlings defoliated at the end of June. In Experiment 2, anatomical features of the xylem were measured along the tree rings formed in 2005 and 2006 during the four cycles of growth and defoliation. Control and defoliated seedlings showed similar patterns of cambial activity and timing of xylem differentiation, although fewer enlarging cells were observed in August to September in defoliated seedlings. Tree-ring widths were similar in control and defoliated seedlings, with thinner rings produced in the greenhouse in winter. No effect of defoliation on cell lumen area was observed, and effects on radial cell diameter and wall thickness were found only occasionally. The results indicate that the A. balsamea seedlings produced all the resources required to maintain stem growth during the four cycles of defoliation.

  9. Eucalyptus obliqua seedling growth in organic versus mineral soil horizons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen eBarry

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Eucalyptus obliqua, the most widespread timber tree in Tasmania, is a pioneer after fire which can eliminate the organic layer of forest soil, exposing the underlying mineral soil. We compared seedling growth, mycorrhiza formation, and mineral nutrient limitation in organic layer versus mineral soil. We grew E. obliqua seedlings separately in pots of organic layer and mineral soil in a glasshouse. Additional treatments of organic soil only, involved fully crossed methyl-bromide fumigation and fertilization. Fertilization comprised chelated iron for 121 days after transplant (DAT followed by soluble phosphorus. At 357 DAT, whole plant dry weight was three times greater in ambient organic than in mineral soil. In organic soil, fumigation halved ectomycorrhiza abundance and reduced seedling growth at 149 DAT, but by 357 DAT when negative effects of fumigation on seedling growth had disappeared, neither fumigation nor fertilization affected mycorrhiza abundance. Iron fertilization diminished seedling growth, but subsequent phosphorus fertilization improved it. E. obliqua seedlings grow much better in organic layer soil than in mineral soil, although phosphorus remains limiting. The prevalent forestry practice of burning to mineral soil after timber harvest exposes a poor growth medium likely only partially compensated by fire-induced mineral soil alterations.

  10. Eucalyptus obliqua seedling growth in organic vs. mineral soil horizons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Karen M; Janos, David P; Nichols, Scott; Bowman, David M J S

    2015-01-01

    Eucalyptus obliqua, the most widespread timber tree in Tasmania, is a pioneer after fire which can eliminate the organic layer of forest soil, exposing the underlying mineral soil. We compared seedling growth, mycorrhiza formation, and mineral nutrient limitation in organic layer vs. mineral soil. We grew E. obliqua seedlings separately in pots of organic layer and mineral soil in a glasshouse. Additional treatments of organic soil only, involved fully crossed methyl-bromide fumigation and fertilization. Fertilization comprised chelated iron for 121 days after transplant (DAT) followed by soluble phosphorus. At 357 DAT, whole plant dry weight was three times greater in ambient organic than in mineral soil. In organic soil, fumigation halved ectomycorrhiza abundance and reduced seedling growth at 149 DAT, but by 357 DAT when negative effects of fumigation on seedling growth had disappeared, neither fumigation nor fertilization affected mycorrhiza abundance. Iron fertilization diminished seedling growth, but subsequent phosphorus fertilization improved it. E. obliqua seedlings grow much better in organic layer soil than in mineral soil, although phosphorus remains limiting. The prevalent forestry practice of burning to mineral soil after timber harvest exposes a poor growth medium likely only partially compensated by fire-induced mineral soil alterations.

  11. Acclimatization and growth of ornamental pineapple seedlings under organic substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronan Carlos Colombo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The in vitro propagation techniques are commonly used to produce ornamental pineapple seedlings in commercial scale, aiming to attend the growers with genetic and sanitary quality seedlings. However, the choice of the ideal substrate is essential for the acclimatization and growth stage of the seedlings propagated by this technique, since some substrates can increase the seedling mortality and/or limit the seedling growth due to its physical and chemical characteristics. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the acclimatization of ornamental pineapple [Ananas comosus (L. Merr. var. ananassoides (Baker Coppens & Leal] on different substrates. Seedlings with approximately seven centimeters, obtained from in vitro culture, were transplanted into styrofoam trays filled with the following substrates: sphagnum; semi-composed pine bark; carbonized rice husk; sphagnum + semicomposed pine bark; sphagnum + carbonized rice husk; and semi-composed pine bark + carbonized rice husk. Each treatment was replicated five times using 10 plants. At 180 days, there were evaluated the following variables: survival percentage, plant height, number of leaves, leaf area, largest root length, and shoot and root dry matter. The substrate semi-composed pine bark + carbonized rice husk presented the lowest mean (62% for survival percentage. The semi-composed pine bark and semi-composed pine bark + carbonized rice husk treatments presented significant increments in some evaluated biometric characteristics. The semi-composed pine bark is the most favorable substrate for the A. comosus var. ananassoids acclimatization.

  12. Optimizing the transient Fast Agro-mediated Seedling Transformation (FAST) method in Catharanthus roseus seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Jessica; Goklany, Sheba; Rizvi, Noreen; Cram, Erin J; Lee-Parsons, Carolyn W T

    2014-01-01

    An Agro-mediated transformation method has been adapted in Catharanthus roseus seedlings for transient overexpression. Our results suggest that Agro-mediated methods may induce defense-related genes, which should be considered in its application. The Fast Agro-mediated Seedling Transformation (FAST) method, which involves the co-cultivation and transient transformation of young seedlings with Agrobacterium, was adapted and optimized in Catharanthus roseus. We investigated the optimal conditions for Gus expression by varying the Agrobacterium density (OD600 = 0.29 and 0.50), A. rhizogenes strain (15834 and R1000), and co-cultivation time in liquid (2, 12, or 24 h) followed by incubation time on solid media (1 or 2 days). Transformation efficiency was assessed quantitatively in terms of average GUS intensity per cotyledon surface area and percentage of cotyledons transformed. GUS staining was observed in 100% of cotyledons co-cultivated with A. rhizogenes (OD600 = 0.50) co-transformed with the Mas promoter-driven Gus and pSoup helper plasmids, in the presence of 0.01% v/v Silwet L-77 for 24 h in liquid followed by 2-days on solid media. In addition, we observed that co-cultivation with Agrobacterium strongly induced Zct1 and Orca3, two transcription factors known to regulate defense-related alkaloid biosynthesis in C. roseus. Homologous transcription factors regulate defense responses in many plant species. Therefore, possible induction of defense-related genes by Agro-mediated transformation should be a consideration in experimental design.

  13. Composition versus friction and wear behavior of plasma sprayed WC-(W,Cr)2C-Ni/Ag/BaF2-CaF2 self-lubricating composite coatings for use up to 600 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianmin; Hou, Guoliang; Chen, Jie; An, Yulong; Zhou, Huidi; Zhao, Xiaoqin; Yang, Jie

    2012-11-01

    This paper reports the composition optimization of self-lubricating composite coatings containing WC-(W,Cr)2C-Ni, silver and fluoride eutectics. Various ingredients obtained by powder blending were studied to determine their optimum content in as-prepared composite coatings. An atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) system was used to deposit promising WC-(W,Cr)2C-Ni/Ag/BaF2-CaF2 self-lubricating composite coatings. The friction and wear behavior of the composite coatings sliding against Si3N4 ball was investigated from room temperature to 600 °C. Results show that silver and fluoride eutectics can effectively reduce the friction coefficient of the coatings and the wear volume loss of counterpart balls over the whole temperature range. Thanks to the highest hardness, WC-(W,Cr)2C-Ni coating without silver and fluoride eutectics has the lowest wear rate at room temperature and 600 °C. However, it has a high friction coefficient and a very high wear rate at 200 and 400 °C, due to severe adhesion wear and fatigue wear thereat. Fortunately, introducing appropriate amount of silver and fluoride eutectics contributes to effectively reduce the wear rate of the composite coatings at 200 and 400 °C. The optimized composite coating consists of 70 wt.% WC-(W,Cr)2C-Ni, 15 wt.% Ag and 15 wt.% BaF2/CaF2, and it has excellent friction and wear performance over a wide range of temperature.

  14. Identification of trait-improving quantitative trait loci for grain yield components from a dent corn inbred line in an advanced backcross BC2F2 population and comparison with its F2:3 population in popcorn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y L; Niu, S Z; Dong, Y B; Cui, D Q; Wang, Y Z; Liu, Y Y; Wei, M G

    2007-06-01

    Normal maize germplasm could be used to improve the grain yield of popcorn inbreds. Our first objective was to locate genetic factors associated with trait variation and make first assessment on the efficiency of advanced backcross quantitative trait locus (AB-QTL) analysis for the identification and transfer of favorable QTL alleles for grain yield components from the dent corn inbred. A second objective was to compare the detection of QTL in the BC2F2 population with results using F(2:3) lines of the same parents. Two hundred and twenty selected BC2F2 families developed from a cross between Dan232 and an elite popcorn inbred N04 were evaluated for six grain yield components under two environments, and genotyped by means of 170 SSR markers. Using composite interval mapping (CIM), a total of 19 significant QTL were detected. Eighteen QTL had favorable alleles contributed by the dent corn parent Dan232. Sixteen of these favorable QTL alleles were not in the same or near marker intervals with QTL for popping characteristics. Six QTL were also detected in the F(2:3) population. Improved N04 could be developed from 210 and 208 families with higher grain weight per plant and/or 100-grain weight, respectively, and 35 families with the same or higher popping expansion volume than N04. In addition, near isogenic lines containing detected QTL (QTL-NILs) for grain weight per plant and/or 100-grain weight could be obtained from 12 families. Our study demonstrated that the AB-QTL method can be applied to identify and manipulate favorable QTL alleles from normal corn inbreds and combine QTL detection and popcorn breeding efficiently.

  15. F2 peak electron density at Millstone Hill and Hobart: Comparsion of theory and measurement at solar maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, P. G.; Torr, D. G.; Reinisch, B. W.; Gamache, R. R.; Wilkinson, P. J.

    1994-01-01

    This paper compares the observed behavior of the (F2) layer of the ionosphere at Millstone Hill and Hobart with calculations from the field line interhemispheric plasma (FLIP) model for solar maximum, solstice conditions in 1990. During the study period the daily F(sub 10.7) index varied by more than a factor of 2 (123 to 280), but the 81-day mean F(sub 10.7) (F(sub 10.7 A)) was almost constant near 190. Calculations were performed with and without the effects of vibrationally excited N2 (N(sup *)(sub 2) which affects the loss rate of atomic oxygen ions. In the case without N(sup *)(sub 2) there is generally good agreement between the model and measurement for the daytime, peak density of the F region (NmF2). Both the model and the measurement show a strong seasonal anomaly with the winter noon densities a factor of 3 to 4 greater than the summer noon densities at Millstone Hill and a factor of 2 greater at Hobart. The seasonal anomaly in the model is caused by changes in the neutral composition as given by the mass spectrometer and incoherent scatter (MSIS) 86 neutral density model. There is generally little or no increase in the observed noon NmF2 as a function of daily F(sub 10.7) except at Millstone Hill in winter. In contrast to the generally good agreement between model and data at noon, the model badly underestimates the density at night at Millstone Hill at all seasons. At Hobart the model reproduces the nighttime density variations well in both winter and summer. The international reference ionosphere (IRI) model generally provides a good representation of the average behavior of noon NmF2 and hmF2 but because the data show a lot of day-to-day variability, there are often large differences. The FLIP model is able to reproduce this variability when hmF2 is specified. The IRI model peak densities are better than the FLIP densities at night, but the IRI model does not represent the Millstone Hill summer data very well at night in 1990.

  16. Solid solubility of MgO in the calcium silicates of portland clinker. The effect of CaF2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puertas, F.

    1992-03-01

    Full Text Available The solid solubility of MgO in the calcium silicates of portland clinker has been determined by XRD and XDS. The influence that the presence of CaF2 has on said solubility has also been verified. The solid solution limit of MgO in C3S at 1275 ºC lies at about 1.0% wt, where the triclinic form II stabilizes. The presence of CaF2 does not alter the maximum value of the MgO solubilized in that silicate, although there does take place the stabilization of the triclinic polymorph II at lower MgO contents (between 0.3 - 0.6% wt. The maximum amount of solubilized MgO in βC2 at 1.050 ºC lies around 0.5% wt. This value does not change by the presence of CaF2.Se ha determinado por DRX y EDX la solubilidad sólida del MgO en los silicatos cálcicos del clínker portland. Se ha comprobado, así mismo la influencia que sobre dicha solubilidad tiene la presencia de CaF2. El límite de disolución sólida del MgO en el C3S a 1.275º C se sitúa alrededor del 1,0% en peso, estabilizándose la forma triclínica II. La presencia de CaF2 no altera el valor máximo de MgO solubilizado en este silicato, aunque si se produce la estabilización del polimorfo triclínico II a contenidos menores de MgO (entre 0,3 – 0,6% en peso. La cantidad máxima de MgO solubilizado en e/ βC2S a 1.050 ºC se sitúa en torno al 0,5% en peso. Este valor no se ve modificado por la presencia de CaF2.

  17. Effects of the recombinant allergen rDer f 2 on neuro-endocrino-immune network in asthmatic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yong-Qian; Zhou, Zhi-Xiang; Ji, You-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Severe and life-threatening side effects can occur in patients receiving allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT), and recombinant allergens made from cDNA have been used in clinical trials for ten years and appear promising for SIT. The aim of this study is to explore the effects of the recombinant allergen Der f 2 (the group 2 allergen from Dermatophagoides farinae) on the neuro-endocrino-immune network in asthmatic mice. Twenty-eight mice were divided into four groups - A, B, C and D. To induce asthma, a crude extract of D. farinae was injected intraperitoneally into the mice in groups B, C and D. Later, the crude extract or recombinant allergen rDer f 2 was given to groups C and D, respectively. Normal saline was given to groups A and B. Serum corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), corticosterone (CORT), interleukin 4 (IL-4), and interferon γ (IFN-γ) were detected by immunoassay and the pathological change of lung tissue was observed by hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining. Serum CRH, ACTH, CORT, and IFN-γ were highest in healthy group A but lowest in asthma group B. Treatment with the crude extract or recombinant allergen rDer f 2 significantly attenuated this response in asthmatic mice, but there was no difference between the two treatments (p > 0.05). Serum IL-4 was elevated in asthma group B but lowest in healthy group A. Treatment with the crude extract or recombinant allergen rDer f 2 significantly attenuated this response in asthmatic mice, but there was no significant difference between the two treatments (p > 0.05). However, lung pathology as measured histologically (Underwood Score) showed that rDer f 2-treatment was significantly better than crude extract treatment (p < 0.05). In brief, recombinant allergen Der f 2 can strengthen the function of hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, affect the balance of Th1 and Th2 cytokines, and reduce pulmonary inflammation in asthmatic mice.

  18. EFICIÊNCIA AGRONÔMICA DOS RIZÓBIOS SEMIA 6156, F 3 (4, F 2 (1, F2 - 2B, CPAC-B10 EM FEIJÃO DE PORCO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Santos de Paula Silva

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo foi validar e recomendar bactérias fixadoras de nitrogênio usadas em inoculantes comerciais na leguminosa Canavalia ensiformis. O trabalho foi conduzido durante os meses de novembro de 2013 a fevereiro 2014. O delineamento experimental foi o de blocos ao acaso com quatro repetições e com unidade experimental de 24 m2, o plantio realizado no espaçamento de 0,5 m entre sulcos, densidade de 10 sementes por metro linear, As estirpes de rizóbio avaliadas foram: SEMIA 6156, F 3 (4, F 2 (1, F2 - 2B, CPAC-B10. A primeira avaliação foi realizada aos 30 dias após a semeadura (DAS, para número e massa de nódulos frescos e secos, massa seca da parte aérea e raízes. A segunda avaliação foi realizada quando 50% das plantas estavam em florescimento, quantificando-se a massa seca das folhas e caules, massa seca total da parte aérea e análise total de macronutrientes em folhas e caule. A estirpe F 2 (1 pode realizar efetiva simbiose com as plantas de feijão de porco, promovendo ganhos no acúmulo de massa seca de parte aérea das plantas, sendo assim considerada agronomicamente eficiente e recomendada para uso em inoculantes comerciais.

  19. The Vibration Ring. Phase 1; [Seedling Fund

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asnani, Vivake M.; Krantz, Timothy L.; Delap, Damon C.; Stringer, David B.

    2014-01-01

    The vibration ring was conceived as a driveline damping device to prevent structure-borne noise in machines. It has the appearance of a metal ring, and can be installed between any two driveline components like an ordinary mechanical spacer. Damping is achieved using a ring-shaped piezoelectric stack that is poled in the axial direction and connected to an electrical shunt circuit. Surrounding the stack is a metal structure, called the compression cage, which squeezes the stack along its poled axis when excited by radial driveline forces. The stack in turn generates electrical energy, which is either dissipated or harvested using the shunt circuit. Removing energy from the system creates a net damping effect. The vibration ring is much stiffer than traditional damping devices, which allows it to be used in a driveline without disrupting normal operation. In phase 1 of this NASA Seedling Fund project, a combination of design and analysis was used to examine the feasibility of this concept. Several designs were evaluated using solid modeling, finite element analysis, and by creating prototype hardware. Then an analytical model representing the coupled electromechanical response was formulated in closed form. The model was exercised parametrically to examine the stiffness and loss factor spectra of the vibration ring, as well as simulate its damping effect in the context of a simplified driveline model. The results of this work showed that this is a viable mechanism for driveline damping, and provided several lessons for continued development.

  20. Viability and susceptibility of propagation material from coffee plants to Colletotrichum sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio Ogoshi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to verify the viability of propagation material from coffee plants descended from germplasm susceptible to blister spot disease as well as its susceptibility to Colletotrichum sp. relative to commercial coffee cultivars. In the first experiment, fruits were harvested from plants with and without symptoms of blister spot and sowed in trays containing a commercial sterilized substrate. The percentages of germinated seeds, viable plantlets and seedlings were evaluated. In diseased tissues, pathogens were isolated and identified though a pathogenicity test. In the second experiment, ten commercial cultivars and one cultivar originating from plants with blister spot were inoculated with the pathogens to assess the severity of anthracnose. Significant differences were not observed with respect to seed germination. However, the viability of plantlets and seedlings was reduced in the cultivar originating from plants with blister spot (Genotype Originated from Diseased Plants-GODP. These plants showed characteristic symptoms of blister spot, including necrosis in the leaves and hypocotyls, wilting and death. In the necrotic lesions, we observed characteristic sporulation of Colletotrichum sp. The cultivar most susceptible to anthracnose in cotyledonary leaves was Catuaí Vermelho (GODP, which presented the highest area under the disease progress curve (AUDPC. In conclusion, the viability of propagation material from coffee plants that had descended from plants with symptoms of blister spot (GODP was reduced compared with plants from other genotypes, although seed germination was not affected. Moreover, GODP species are more susceptible to Anthracnose on the cotyledonary leaves relative to the other analyzed commercial cultivars. This work is the first to report on different symptoms exhibited by seedlings originating from the seeds of plants with symptoms of blister spot..

  1. PB1-F2 Influenza A Virus Protein Adopts a β-Sheet Conformation and Forms Amyloid Fibers in Membrane Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Christophe; Al Bazzal, Ali; Vidic, Jasmina; Février, Vincent; Bourdieu, Christiane; Bouguyon, Edwige; Le Goffic, Ronan; Vautherot, Jean-François; Bernard, Julie; Moudjou, Mohammed; Noinville, Sylvie; Chich, Jean-François; Da Costa, Bruno; Rezaei, Human; Delmas, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    The influenza A virus PB1-F2 protein, encoded by an alternative reading frame in the PB1 polymerase gene, displays a high sequence polymorphism and is reported to contribute to viral pathogenesis in a sequence-specific manner. To gain insights into the functions of PB1-F2, the molecular structure of several PB1-F2 variants produced in Escherichia coli was investigated in different environments. Circular dichroism spectroscopy shows that all variants have a random coil secondary structure in aqueous solution. When incubated in trifluoroethanol polar solvent, all PB1-F2 variants adopt an α-helix-rich structure, whereas incubated in acetonitrile, a solvent of medium polarity mimicking the membrane environment, they display β-sheet secondary structures. Incubated with asolectin liposomes and SDS micelles, PB1-F2 variants also acquire a β-sheet structure. Dynamic light scattering revealed that the presence of β-sheets is correlated with an oligomerization/aggregation of PB1-F2. Electron microscopy showed that PB1-F2 forms amorphous aggregates in acetonitrile. In contrast, at low concentrations of SDS, PB1-F2 variants exhibited various abilities to form fibers that were evidenced as amyloid fibers in a thioflavin T assay. Using a recombinant virus and its PB1-F2 knock-out mutant, we show that PB1-F2 also forms amyloid structures in infected cells. Functional membrane permeabilization assays revealed that the PB1-F2 variants can perforate membranes at nanomolar concentrations but with activities found to be sequence-dependent and not obviously correlated with their differential ability to form amyloid fibers. All of these observations suggest that PB1-F2 could be involved in physiological processes through different pathways, permeabilization of cellular membranes, and amyloid fiber formation. PMID:20172856

  2. PB1-F2 influenza A virus protein adopts a beta-sheet conformation and forms amyloid fibers in membrane environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Christophe; Al Bazzal, Ali; Vidic, Jasmina; Février, Vincent; Bourdieu, Christiane; Bouguyon, Edwige; Le Goffic, Ronan; Vautherot, Jean-François; Bernard, Julie; Moudjou, Mohammed; Noinville, Sylvie; Chich, Jean-François; Da Costa, Bruno; Rezaei, Human; Delmas, Bernard

    2010-04-23

    The influenza A virus PB1-F2 protein, encoded by an alternative reading frame in the PB1 polymerase gene, displays a high sequence polymorphism and is reported to contribute to viral pathogenesis in a sequence-specific manner. To gain insights into the functions of PB1-F2, the molecular structure of several PB1-F2 variants produced in Escherichia coli was investigated in different environments. Circular dichroism spectroscopy shows that all variants have a random coil secondary structure in aqueous solution. When incubated in trifluoroethanol polar solvent, all PB1-F2 variants adopt an alpha-helix-rich structure, whereas incubated in acetonitrile, a solvent of medium polarity mimicking the membrane environment, they display beta-sheet secondary structures. Incubated with asolectin liposomes and SDS micelles, PB1-F2 variants also acquire a beta-sheet structure. Dynamic light scattering revealed that the presence of beta-sheets is correlated with an oligomerization/aggregation of PB1-F2. Electron microscopy showed that PB1-F2 forms amorphous aggregates in acetonitrile. In contrast, at low concentrations of SDS, PB1-F2 variants exhibited various abilities to form fibers that were evidenced as amyloid fibers in a thioflavin T assay. Using a recombinant virus and its PB1-F2 knock-out mutant, we show that PB1-F2 also forms amyloid structures in infected cells. Functional membrane permeabilization assays revealed that the PB1-F2 variants can perforate membranes at nanomolar concentrations but with activities found to be sequence-dependent and not obviously correlated with their differential ability to form amyloid fibers. All of these observations suggest that PB1-F2 could be involved in physiological processes through different pathways, permeabilization of cellular membranes, and amyloid fiber formation.

  3. Expression of hypoallergenic Der f 2 derivatives with altered intramolecular disulphide bonds induces the formation of novel ER-derived protein bodies in transgenic rice seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lijun; Hirose, Sakiko; Suzuki, Kazuya; Hiroi, Takachika; Takaiwa, Fumio

    2012-05-01

    House dust mites (HDM) are the most common source of indoor allergens and are associated with allergic diseases worldwide. To benefit allergic patients, safer and non-invasive mucosal routes of oral administration are considered to be the best alternative to conventional allergen-specific immunotherapy. In this study, transgenic rice was developed expressing derivatives of the major HDM allergen Der f 2 with reduced Der f 2-specific IgE reactivity by disrupting intramolecular disulphide bonds in Der f 2. These derivatives were produced specifically as secretory proteins in the endosperm tissue of seeds under the control of the endosperm-specific glutelin GluB-1 promoter. Notably, modified Der f 2 derivatives aggregated in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) lumen and were deposited in a unique protein body (PB)-like structure tentatively called the Der f 2 body. Der f 2 bodies were characterized by their intracellular localization and physico-chemical properties, and were distinct from ER-derived PBs (PB-Is) and protein storage vacuoles (PB-IIs). Unlike ER-derived organelles such as PB-Is, Der f 2 bodies were rapidly digested in simulated gastric fluid in a manner similar to that of PB-IIs. Oral administration in mice of transgenic rice seeds containing Der f 2 derivatives encapsulated in Der f 2 bodies suppressed Der f 2-specific IgE and IgG production compared with that in mice fed non-transgenic rice seeds, and the effect was dependent on the type of Der f 2 derivative expressed. These results suggest that engineered hypoallergenic Der f 2 derivatives expressed in the rice seed endosperm could serve as a basis for the development of viable strategies for the oral delivery of vaccines against HDM allergy.

  4. Inclusive production of $\\rho^{0}(770), f_0(980)$ and $f_2(1270)$ mesons in $\

    CERN Document Server

    Astier, P.; Baldisseri, A.; Baldo-Ceolin, M.; Banner, M.; Bassompierre, G.; Benslama, K.; Besson, N.; Bird, I.; Blumenfeld, Barry J.; Bobisut, F.; Bouchez, J.; Boyd, S.; Bueno, A.; Bunyatov, S.; Camilleri, L.; Cardini, A.; Cattaneo, P.W.; Cavasinni, V.; Cervera-Villanueva, A.; Collazuol, G.; Conforto, G.; Conta, C.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cousins, R.; Daniels, D.; Degaudenzi, H.; Del Prete, T.; De Santo, Antonella; Dignan, T.; Di Lella, L.; do Couto e Silva, E.; Dumarchez, J.; Ellis, Malcolm; Fazio, T.; Feldman, G.J.; Ferrari, R.; Ferrere, D.; Flaminio, V.; Fraternali, M.; Gaillard, J.M.; Gangler, E.; Geppert, D.; Gibin, D.; Gninenko, S.; Godley, A.; Gomez-Cadenas, J.J.; Gosset, J.; Gossling, C.; Gouanere, M.; Grant, A.; Graziani, G.; Guglielmi, A.; Hagner, C.; Hernando, J.; Hubbard, D.; Hurst, P.; Hyett, N.; Iacopini, E.; Joseph, C.; Juget, F.; Kirsanov, M.; Klimov, O.; Kokkonen, J.; Kovzelev, A.; Krasnoperov, A.; Kuznetsov, V.; Lacaprara, S.; Lachaud, C.; Lakic, B.; Lanza, A.; La Rotonda, L.; Laveder, M.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Levy, J.M.; Linssen, L.; Ljubicic, A.; Long, J.; Lupi, A.; Marchionni, A.; Martelli, F.; Mechain, X.; Mendiburu, J.P.; Meyer, J.P.; Mezzetto, M.; Mishra, S.R.; Moorhead, G.F.; Naumov, D.; Nedelec, P.; Nefedov, Yu.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Orestano, D.; Pastore, F.; Peak, L.S.; Pennacchio, E.; Pessard, H.; Petti, R.; Placci, A.; Polesello, G.; Pollmann, D.; Polyarush, A.; Popov, B.; Poulsen, C.; Rathouit, P.; Rico, J.; Roda, C.; Rubbia, A.; Salvatore, F.; Schahmaneche, K.; Schmidt, B.; Sevior, M.; Sillou, D.; Soler, F.J.P.; Sozzi, G.; Steele, D.; Stiegler, U.; Stipcevic, M.; Stolarczyk, T.; Tareb-Reyes, M.; Taylor, G.N.; Tereshchenko, V.; Toropin, A.; Touchard, A.M.; Tovey, S.N.; Tran, M.T.; Tsesmelis, E.; Ulrichs, J.; Vacavant, L.; Valdata-Nappi, M.; Valuev, V.; Vannucci, F.; Varvell, K.E.; Veltri, M.; Vercesi, V.; Vidal-Sitjes, G.; Vieira, J.M.; Vinogradova, T.; Weber, F.V.; Weisse, T.; Wilson, F.F.; Winton, L.J.; Yabsley, Bruce D.; Zaccone, H.; Zuber, K.; Zuccon, P.

    2001-01-01

    The inclusive production of the meson resonances $\\rho^{0}(770)$, $f_0(980)$ and $f_2(1270)$ in neutrino-nucleus charged current interactions has been studied with the NOMAD detector exposed to the wide band neutrino beam generated by 450 GeV protons at the CERN SPS. For the first time the $f_{0}(980)$ meson is observed in neutrino interactions. The statistical significance of its observation is 6 standard deviations. The presence of $f_{2}(1270)$ in neutrino interactions is reliably established. The average multiplicity of these three resonances is measured as a function of several kinematic variables. The experimental results are compared to the multiplicities obtained from a simulation based on the Lund model. In addition, the average multiplicity of $\\rho^{0}(770)$ in antineutrino - nucleus interactions is measured.

  5. The use of 18F-2-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) to label antibody fragments for immuno-PET of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidian, Mohammad; Keliher, Edmund; Dougan, Michael; Juras, Patrick K; Cavallari, Marco; Wojtkiewicz, Gregory R; Jacobsen, Johanne; Edens, Jerre G; Tas, Jeroen M G; Victora, Gabriel; Weissleder, Ralph; Ploegh, Hidde

    2015-06-24

    We generated 18F-labeled antibody fragments for PET imaging using a sortase-mediated reaction to install a transcyclooctene (TCO)-functionalized short peptide onto proteins of interest, followed by reaction with a tetrazine-labeled-18F-2-deoxyfluoroglucose (FDG). The method is rapid, robust, and site-specific (radiochemical yields >25%, not decay corrected). The availability of 18F-2-deoxyfluoroglucose avoids the need for more complicated chemistries used to generate carbon-fluorine bonds. We demonstrate the utility of the method by detecting heterotopic pancreatic tumors in mice by PET, using anti-Class II MHC single domain antibodies. We correlate macroscopic PET images with microscopic two-photon visualization of the tumor. Our approach provides easy access to 18F-labeled antibodies and their fragments at a level of molecular specificity that complements conventional18F-FDG imaging.

  6. Parameters in the estimation of the most suitable F2 population size in conventional maize (Zea mays L. breeding programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delić Nenad

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to observe differences among four sizes of the F2 populations (100, 200, 300 and 500 plants on the basis of test-crosses for grain yield according to the average values of the populations, genetic and phenotypic variances, genotypic and phenotypic coefficients of variations and broad-sense heritability. The values of genetic variance did not significantly differ over population sizes according to all possible comparisons, including the comparison of values obtained for the phenotypic variance. Furthermore, the values of broadsense heritability (67.8%-69% did not significantly vary over different F2 population sizes. Genetic variability of the observed progenies, as a principal prerequisite of successful selection, was at the satisfactory level in all population sizes.

  7. Spectroscopic characteristics, continuous-wave and mode-locking laser performances of Tm,Y:CaF2 disordered crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lingchen; Qiao, Zhen; Xie, Guoqiang; Qin, Zhipeng; Zhao, Beibei; Yu, Hao; Su, Liangbi; Ma, Jingui; Yuan, Peng; Qian, Liejia

    2017-09-04

    The spectroscopic characteristics, continuous-wave (CW) and mode-locking laser performances of Tm,Y:CaF2 disordered crystal were studied. A maximum CW output power of 586 mW was obtained with a slope efficiency of 26%. The Tm,Y:CaF2 mode-locked laser could operate in two states: single-wavelength mode locking or dual-wavelength synchronous mode locking. The single-wavelength mode-locked laser generated pulses with pulse duration of 22 ps, repetition rate of 99 MHz, and pulse energy of 1.15 nJ at 1887 nm. Alternatively, the laser could also be mode-locked simultaneously at 1880.7 nm and 1889.0 nm wavelengths. The beating modulation in autocorrelation trace shows that the dual-wavelength pulses were temporally synchronous.

  8. A modeling study of ionospheric F2-region storm effects at low geomagnetic latitudes during 17-22 March 1990

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Pavlov

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available We have presented a comparison between the modeled NmF2 and hmF2, and NmF2 and hmF2, which were observed in the low-latitude ionosphere simultaneously by the Kokubunji, Yamagawa, Okinawa, Manila, Vanimo, and Darwin ionospheric sounders, by the middle and upper atmosphere (MU radar during 17-22 March 1990, and by the Arecibo radar for the time period of 20-22 March 1990. A comparison between the electron and ion temperatures measured by the MU and Arecibo radars and those produced by the model of the ionosphere and plasmasphere is presented. The empirical zonal electric field, the meridional neutral wind taken from the HWM90 wind model, and the NRLMSISE-00 neutral temperature and densities are corrected so that the model results agree reasonably with the ionospheric sounder observations, and the MU and Arecibo radar data. It is proved that the nighttime weakening of the equatorial zonal electric field (in comparison with that produced by the empirical model of Fejer and Scherliess (1997 or Scherliess and Fejer (1999, in combination with the corrected wind-induced plasma drift along magnetic field lines, provides the development of the nighttime enhancements in NmF2 observed over Manila during 17-22 March 1990. As a result, the new physical mechanism of the nighttime NmF2 enhancement formation close to the geomagnetic equator includes the nighttime weakening of the equatorial zonal electric field and equatorward nighttime plasma drift along magnetic field lines caused by neutral wind in the both geomagnetic hemispheres. It is found that the latitudinal positions of the crests depend on the E×B drift velocity and on the neutral wind velocity. The relative role of the main mechanisms of the equatorial anomaly suppression observed during geomagnetic storms is studied for the first time in terms of storm-time variations of the model crest-to-trough ratios of the equatorial anomaly. During most of the studied time period, a total contribution from

  9. Theoretical calculations of high-pressure phases of NiF2: An ab initio constant-pressure study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kürkçü, Cihan; Merdan, Ziya; Öztürk, Hülya

    2016-12-01

    We have studied the structural properties of the antiferromagnetic NiF2 tetragonal structure with P42/ mnm symmetry using density functional theory (DFT) under rapid hydrostatic pressure up to 400 GPa. For the exchange correlation energy we used the local density approximation (LDA) of Ceperley and Alder (CA). Two phase transformations are successfully observed through the simulations. The structures of XF2-type compounds crystallize in rutile-type structure. NiF2 undergoes phase transformations from the tetragonal rutile-type structure with space group P42/ mnm to orthorhombic CaCl2-type structure with space group Pnnm and from this orthorhombic phase to monoclinic structure with space group C2/ m at 152 GPa and 360 GPa, respectively. These phase changes are also studied by total energy and enthalpy calculations. According to these calculations, we perdict these phase transformations at about 1.85 and 30 GPa.

  10. Application of alternative models to identify QTL for growth traits in an F2 Duroc x Pietrain pig resource population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rumph Janice M

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A variety of analysis approaches have been applied to detect quantitative trait loci (QTL in experimental populations. The initial genome scan of our Duroc x Pietrain F2 resource population included 510 F2 animals genotyped with 124 microsatellite markers and analyzed using a line-cross model. For the second scan, 20 additional markers on 9 chromosomes were genotyped for 954 F2 animals and 20 markers used in the first scan were genotyped for 444 additional F2 animals. Three least-squares Mendelian models for QTL analysis were applied for the second scan: a line-cross model, a half-sib model, and a combined line-cross and half-sib model. Results In total, 26 QTL using the line-cross model, 12 QTL using the half-sib model and 3 additional QTL using the combined line-cross and half-sib model were detected for growth traits with a 5% false discovery rate (FDR significance level. In the line-cross analysis, highly significant QTL for fat deposition at 10-, 13-, 16-, 19-, and 22-wk of age were detected on SSC6. In the half-sib analysis, a QTL for loin muscle area at 19-wk of age was detected on SSC7 and QTL for 10th-rib backfat at 19- and 22-wk of age were detected on SSC15. Conclusions Additional markers and animals contributed to reduce the confidence intervals and increase the test statistics for QTL detection. Different models allowed detection of new QTL which indicated differing frequencies for alternative alleles in parental breeds.

  11. Optical and structural properties of Sb2S3/MgF2 multilayers for laser applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perales, F.; Agulló-Rueda, F.; Lamela, J.; de las Heras, C.

    2008-02-01

    Multilayers of MgF2 and Sb2S3 have been obtained by physical vapour deposition on glass substrates. Changes in the optical and structural properties have been studied as a function of annealing temperature and the number of layers. A drastic variation in optical transmission, microstrain and grain size is observed at a temperature near 225 °C. A comparison of the material properties of multilayers and a monolayer is carried out.

  12. f2f and cyberbullying among children in Northern Ireland: Data from the Kids Life and Times Surveys

    OpenAIRE

    Mc Guckin, Conor

    2010-01-01

    PUBLISHED Comparatively little is known about the nature, incidence and correlates of bully/victim problems in the Northern Ireland school system. The present study examined the prevalence of self-reported experiences of bully/ victim problems (f2f and cyber), and the relationship between such experiences and levels of psychological wellbeing among representative samples of primary school pupils who participated in the 2008 and 2009 `Kids Life and Times Survey? (ARK, 2...

  13. f2f and cyberbullying among children in Northern Ireland: Data from the Kids Life and Times Surveys

    OpenAIRE

    Pauline K. Cummins; Christopher Alan Lewis; Conor Mc Guckin

    2010-01-01

    Comparatively little is known about the nature, incidence andcorrelates of bully/victim problems in the Northern Ireland school system. The present study examined the prevalence of self-reported experiences of bully/victim problems (f2f and cyber), and the relationship between such experiences and levels of psychological wellbeing among representative samples of primary school pupils who participated in the 2008 and 2009 ‘Kids Life and Times Survey’ (ARK, 2008, 2009). Bully/victim problems am...

  14. Determination of quasidiffusive phonon propagation in BaF 2 using pulse shape analysis and possible implications for particle detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg, P.; Bravin, M.; Booth, N. E.; Bruckmayer, M.; Djotni, K.; Esposito, E.; Houwman, E. P.; Kraus, H.; Salmon, G. L.

    1999-03-01

    We have shown that for quasidiffusive phonon propagation in an isotropic crystal the diffusion coefficient D= KL8/9, where K is a material constant and L is the distance between the phonon source and point of detection. We have demonstrated this is the case for BaF 2 bombarded by α-particles. This implies that pulse shape analysis may provide a mechanism to achieve position sensitivity in phonon mediated detectors.

  15. Magnetic susceptibilities of minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Sam; Brownfield, I.K.

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic separation of minerals is a topic that is seldom reported in the literature for two reasons. First, separation data generally are byproducts of other projects; and second, this study requires a large amount of patience and is unusually tedious. Indeed, we suspect that most minerals probably are never investigated for this property. These data are timesaving for mineralogists who concentrate mono-mineralic fractions for chemical analysis, age dating, and for other purposes. The data can certainly be used in the ore-beneficiation industries. In some instances, magnetic-susceptibility data may help in mineral identification, where other information is insufficient. In past studies of magnetic separation of minerals, (Gaudin and Spedden, 1943; Tille and Kirkpatrick, 1956; Rosenblum, 1958; Rubinstein and others, 1958; Flinter, 1959; Hess, 1959; Baker, 1962; Meric and Peyre, 1963; Rojas and others, 1965; and Duchesne, 1966), the emphasis has been on the ferromagnetic and paramagnetic ranges of extraction. For readers interested in the history of magnetic separation of minerals, Krumbein and Pettijohn (1938, p. 344-346) indicated nine references back to 1848. The primary purpose of this paper is to report the magnetic-susceptibility data on as many minerals as possible, similar to tables of hardness, specific gravity, refractive indices, and other basic physical properties of minerals. A secondary purpose is to demonstrate that the total and best extraction ranges are influenced by the chemistry of the minerals. The following notes are offered to help avoid problems in separating a desired mineral concentrate from mixtures of mineral grains.

  16. Alcohol increases hypnotic susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semmens-Wheeler, Rebecca; Dienes, Zoltán; Duka, Theodora

    2013-09-01

    One approach to hypnosis suggests that for hypnotic experience to occur frontal lobe activity must be attenuated. For example, cold control theory posits that a lack of awareness of intentions is responsible for the experience of involuntariness and/or the subjective reality of hypnotic suggestions. The mid-dorso-lateral prefrontal cortex and the ACC are candidate regions for such awareness. Alcohol impairs frontal lobe executive function. This study examined whether alcohol affects hypnotisability. We administered 0.8 mg/kg of alcohol or a placebo to 32 medium susceptible participants. They were subsequently hypnotised and given hypnotic suggestions. All participants believed they had received some alcohol. Participants in the alcohol condition were more susceptible to hypnotic suggestions than participants in the placebo condition. Impaired frontal lobe activity facilitates hypnotic responding, which supports theories postulating that attenuation of executive function facilitates hypnotic response, and contradicts theories postulating that hypnotic response involves enhanced inhibitory, attentional or other executive function. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Combining two Meishan F2 crosses improves the detection of QTL on pig chromosomes 2, 4 and 6

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bidanel Jean-Pierre

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In pig, a number of experiments have been set up to identify QTL and a multitude of chromosomal regions harbouring genes influencing traits of interest have been identified. However, the mapping resolution remains limited in most cases and the detected QTL are rather inaccurately located. Mapping accuracy can be improved by increasing the number of phenotyped and genotyped individuals and/or the number of informative markers. An alternative approach to overcome the limited power of individual studies is to combine data from two or more independent designs. Methods In the present study we report a combined analysis of two independent design (a French and a Dutch F2 experimental designs, with 2000 F2 individuals. The purpose was to further map QTL for growth and fatness on pig chromosomes 2, 4 and 6. Using QTL-map software, uni- and multiple-QTL detection analyses were applied separately on the two pedigrees and then on the combination of the two pedigrees. Results Joint analyses of the combined pedigree provided (1 greater significance of shared QTL, (2 exclusion of false suggestive QTL and (3 greater mapping precision for shared QTL. Conclusions Combining two Meishan x European breeds F2 pedigrees improved the mapping of QTL compared to analysing pedigrees separately. Our work was facilitated by the access to raw phenotypic data and DNA of animals from both pedigrees and the combination of the two designs with the addition of new markers allowed us to fine map QTL without phenotyping additional animals.

  18. Production of $f_{0}(980), f_{2}(1270)$ and $\\phi(1020)$ in hadronic $Z^{0}$ decay

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerstaff, K.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Betts, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Bird, S.D.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bobinski, M.; Bock, P.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Burgard, C.; Burgin, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davis, R.; De Jong, S.; del Pozo, L.A.; de Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Doucet, M.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Eatough, D.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.G.; Evans, M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Feld, L.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fischer, H.M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Fong, D.G.; Foucher, M.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Geddes, N.I.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Geralis, T.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giacomelli, R.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Goodrick, M.J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hajdu, C.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Hargrove, C.K.; Hart, P.A.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hillier, S.J.; Hobson, P.R.; Hocker, James Andrew; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Hutchcroft, D.E.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jawahery, A.; Jeffreys, P.W.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Joly, A.; Jones, C.R.; Jones, M.; Jost, U.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kirk, J.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D.S.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Lahmann, R.; Lai, W.P.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S.R.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A.M.; Lefebvre, E.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; List, B.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Ludwig, J.; Lui, D.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markopoulos, C.; Markus, C.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mincer, A.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nellen, B.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oh, A.; Oldershaw, N.J.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Palinkas, J.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Poli, B.; Posthaus, A.; Rembser, C.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rooke, A.; Rossi, A.M.; Routenburg, P.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Ruppel, U.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schleper, P.; Schmitt, B.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skillman, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Springer, Robert Wayne; Sproston, M.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stockhausen, B.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Szymanski, P.; Tafirout, R.; Talbot, S.D.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomson, M.A.; von Torne, E.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A.S.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Utzat, P.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Vikas, P.; Vokurka, E.H.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    1998-01-01

    Inclusive production of the f_0(980), f_2(1270) and \\phi(1020) resonances has been studied in a sample of 4.3 million hadronic Z^0 decays from the OPAL experiment at LEP. A coupled channel analysis has been used for the f_0 in simultaneous fits to the resonances in inclusive \\pi+\\pi- and K+K- mass spectra. Fragmentation functions are reported for the three states. Total inclusive rates are measured to be 0.141 +/- 0.007 +/- 0.011 f_0, 0.155 +/- 0.011 +/- 0.018 f_2, and 0.091 +/- 0.002 +/- 0.003 \\phi mesons per hadronic Z^0 decay. The production properties of the f_0, including those in three-jet events, are compared with those of the f_2 and \\phi, and with the Lund string model of hadron production. All measurements are consistent with the hypothesis that the f_0 is a conventional qq(bar) scalar meson.

  19. F2AC: A Lightweight, Fine-Grained, and Flexible Access Control Scheme for File Storage in Mobile Cloud Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Ren

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Current file storage service models for cloud servers assume that users either belong to single layer with different privileges or cannot authorize privileges iteratively. Thus, the access control is not fine-grained and flexible. Besides, most access control methods at cloud servers mainly rely on computationally intensive cryptographic algorithms and, especially, may not be able to support highly dynamic ad hoc groups with addition and removal of group members. In this paper, we propose a scheme called F2AC, which is a lightweight, fine-grained, and flexible access control scheme for file storage in mobile cloud computing. F2AC can not only achieve iterative authorization, authentication with tailored policies, and access control for dynamically changing accessing groups, but also provide access privilege transition and revocation. A new access control model called directed tree with linked leaf model is proposed for further implementations in data structures and algorithms. The extensive analysis is given for justifying the soundness and completeness of F2AC.

  20. Physiochemical properties of greatly enhanced photoluminescence of aqueous dispersible upconversion CaF2:Yb/Er nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Anees A; Yadav, Ranvijay; Rai, S B

    2017-06-14

    Crystal phase morphological structure and optical properties of the as-prepared upconversion CaF2:Yb/Er(core) and sequential coating of an inert crystalline material and silica layers surrounding the seed core-nanoparticles (NPs) were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), optical absorption, FTIR spectroscopy and upconversion photoluminescence spectroscopy. Owing to the unique properties of CaF2 host matrix, we realized their practical applications in biomedical science to improve the upconversion luminescence property and aqueous dispersibility. The surface coating on the seed core particles will significantly influence the structural, optical band gap energy and upconversion luminescence properties. These NPs were well-dispersed in aqueous and non-aqueous solvents to form clear colloidal solutions. The colloidal solutions of three samples show a characteristic optical absorption band in UV/Visible region. As a result, optical band gap gradually decreases after sequential growth of the inert shell and amorphous silica due to an increase in the crystalline size. Comparative upconversion luminescence analysis showed that after inert shell growth, the upconversion intensity was greatly improved, and such an improvement was found to arise from efficient suppression of surface-related deactivation from the core nanocrystals. Interestingly, growth of an inert (CaF2) shell over the seed core NPs shows intense upconversion emission lines under 980 nm NIR laser excitation, highlighting their promising applications, such as multi-analyte biolabels, staining, displays and other photonic based technological applications.

  1. PET camera performance design evaluation for BGO and BaF2 scintillators (non-time-of-flight).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, W H

    1988-03-01

    Bismuth germanate (BGO) and barium fluoride (BaF2) scintillators are presently used in positron emission tomegraphy (PET) cameras. This study evaluates the important PET performance parameters of image resolution, true sensitivity, scatter background, accidental background, and realistic maximum radioactivity in the field of view for both BGO and BaF2 in an identical non-time-of-flight, whole-body camera configuration. These performance parameters are evaluated for three phantoms simulating (a) the head, (b) whole-body cross-section and (c) heart/kidney. This study finds that the high stopping power of BGO yields higher sensitivity, higher resolution, less vignetting, better immunity from scattered gamma, and lower accident/true ratio at any dose level. The faster BaF2 timing acceptance window is traded off by its vulnerability to noncoincidental scatter-gamma which increases accidental coincidences. The BGO is found to be a better choice for non-time-of-flight systems especially with large objects which produce a lot of noncoincidental scatter-gammas. This study also found that the practical diminishing return maximum activity within the field-of-view is approximately 20-25 mCi for existing conventional cameras.

  2. Propagation of non-thermal phonons induced by α-particle bombardment in BaF2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravin, M.; Clegg, P.; Booth, N. E.; Bruckmayer, M.; Djotni, K.; Esposito, E.; Houwman, E. P.; Kraus, H.; Salmon, G. L.

    1999-02-01

    We have measured the time dependence of the flux of non-thermal phonons generated by α particles in a BaF2 single crystal of mass 1 g using a Series Array of Superconducting Tunnel Junctions. Taking advantage of the almost perfect elastic symmetry of BaF2, we approximate the equations of quasidiffusive propagation to give a simple diffusion equation characterized by an effective diffusion coefficient D=KL8/9, where K is a material constant and L the distance between the phonon source and the point of detection. We use this model to perform pulse-shape analysis on our data and show that agreement is excellent, and highly preferred over a ballistic pulse shape. The distributions of values of K determined for different lengths L are found to overlap strongly, in support of the law D=KL8/9. We suggest that pulse-shape analysis may provide an alternative to time-difference measurements to achieve position sensitivity in a phonon-mediated detector based on a BaF2 absorber.

  3. Herbivory and seedling establishment in post-fire southern California chaparral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, James N

    1983-11-01

    A caging experiment was conducted to determine the effects of herbivorous insects and small mammals on first-year establishment of Ceanothus greggii (ceanothus) and Adenostoma fasciculatum (chamise) seedlings in post-fire chaparral. Insect herbivory had no effect on either species. Observations of tagged seedlings revealed that nearly all herbivory was due to small mammals, and was preferentially greater for ceanothus. When seedlings were protected from herbivory chamise experienced higher mortality. Small-mammal herbivore pressure on ceanothus seedlings tipped the survivorship balance for unprotected seedlings in favor of chamise, allowing a relatively higher establishment of chamise seedlings during the first growing season after chaparral fire.

  4. Gene expression in plant lipid metabolism in Arabidopsis seedlings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    An-Shan Hsiao

    Full Text Available Events in plant lipid metabolism are important during seedling establishment. As it has not been experimentally verified whether lipid metabolism in 2- and 5-day-old Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings is diurnally-controlled, quantitative real-time PCR analysis was used to investigate the expression of target genes in acyl-lipid transfer, β-oxidation and triacylglycerol (TAG synthesis and hydrolysis in wild-type Arabidopsis WS and Col-0. In both WS and Col-0, ACYL-COA-BINDING PROTEIN3 (ACBP3, DIACYLGLYCEROL ACYLTRANSFERASE1 (DGAT1 and DGAT3 showed diurnal control in 2- and 5-day-old seedlings. Also, COMATOSE (CTS was diurnally regulated in 2-day-old seedlings and LONG-CHAIN ACYL-COA SYNTHETASE6 (LACS6 in 5-day-old seedlings in both WS and Col-0. Subsequently, the effect of CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED1 (CCA1 and LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY from the core clock system was examined using the cca1lhy mutant and CCA1-overexpressing (CCA1-OX lines versus wild-type WS and Col-0, respectively. Results revealed differential gene expression in lipid metabolism between 2- and 5-day-old mutant and wild-type WS seedlings, as well as between CCA1-OX and wild-type Col-0. Of the ACBPs, ACBP3 displayed the most significant changes between cca1lhy and WS and between CCA1-OX and Col-0, consistent with previous reports that ACBP3 is greatly affected by light/dark cycling. Evidence of oil body retention in 4- and 5-day-old seedlings of the cca1lhy mutant in comparison to WS indicated the effect of cca1lhy on storage lipid reserve mobilization. Lipid profiling revealed differences in primary lipid metabolism, namely in TAG, fatty acid methyl ester and acyl-CoA contents amongst cca1lhy, CCA1-OX, and wild-type seedlings. Taken together, this study demonstrates that lipid metabolism is subject to diurnal regulation in the early stages of seedling development in Arabidopsis.

  5. Assessing Posidonia oceanica seedling substrate preference: an experimental determination of seedling anchorage success in rocky vs. sandy substrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Alagna

    Full Text Available In the last decades the growing awareness of the ecological importance of seagrass meadows has prompted increasing efforts to protect existing beds and restore degraded habitats. An in-depth knowledge of factors acting as major drivers of propagule settlement and recruitment is required in order to understand patterns of seagrass colonization and recovery and to inform appropriate management and conservation strategies. In this work Posidonia oceanica seedlings were reared for five months in a land-based culture facility under simulated natural hydrodynamic conditions to identify suitable substrates for seedling anchorage. Two main substrate features were investigated: firmness (i.e., sand vs. rock and complexity (i.e., size of interstitial spaces between rocks. Seedlings were successfully grown in culture tanks, obtaining overall seedling survival of 93%. Anchorage was strongly influenced by substrate firmness and took place only on rocks, where it was as high as 89%. Anchorage occurred through adhesion by sticky root hairs. The minimum force required to dislodge plantlets attached to rocky substrates reached 23.830 N (equivalent to 2.43 kg, which would potentially allow many plantlets to overcome winter storms in the field. The ability of rocky substrates to retain seedlings increased with their complexity. The interstitial spaces between rocks provided appropriate microsites for seedling settlement, as seeds were successfully retained, and a suitable substrate for anchorage was available. In conclusion P. oceanica juveniles showed a clear-cut preference for hard substrates over the sandy one, due to the root system adhesive properties. In particular, firm and complex substrates allowed for propagule early and strong anchorage, enhancing persistence and establishment probabilities. Seedling substrate preference documented here leads to expect a more successful sexual recruitment on hard bottoms compared with soft ones. This feature could have

  6. Assessing Posidonia oceanica seedling substrate preference: an experimental determination of seedling anchorage success in rocky vs. sandy substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alagna, Adriana; Fernández, Tomás Vega; Anna, Giovanni D; Magliola, Carlo; Mazzola, Salvatore; Badalamenti, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    In the last decades the growing awareness of the ecological importance of seagrass meadows has prompted increasing efforts to protect existing beds and restore degraded habitats. An in-depth knowledge of factors acting as major drivers of propagule settlement and recruitment is required in order to understand patterns of seagrass colonization and recovery and to inform appropriate management and conservation strategies. In this work Posidonia oceanica seedlings were reared for five months in a land-based culture facility under simulated natural hydrodynamic conditions to identify suitable substrates for seedling anchorage. Two main substrate features were investigated: firmness (i.e., sand vs. rock) and complexity (i.e., size of interstitial spaces between rocks). Seedlings were successfully grown in culture tanks, obtaining overall seedling survival of 93%. Anchorage was strongly influenced by substrate firmness and took place only on rocks, where it was as high as 89%. Anchorage occurred through adhesion by sticky root hairs. The minimum force required to dislodge plantlets attached to rocky substrates reached 23.830 N (equivalent to 2.43 kg), which would potentially allow many plantlets to overcome winter storms in the field. The ability of rocky substrates to retain seedlings increased with their complexity. The interstitial spaces between rocks provided appropriate microsites for seedling settlement, as seeds were successfully retained, and a suitable substrate for anchorage was available. In conclusion P. oceanica juveniles showed a clear-cut preference for hard substrates over the sandy one, due to the root system adhesive properties. In particular, firm and complex substrates allowed for propagule early and strong anchorage, enhancing persistence and establishment probabilities. Seedling substrate preference documented here leads to expect a more successful sexual recruitment on hard bottoms compared with soft ones. This feature could have influenced P

  7. Venus Flytrap Seedlings Show Growth-Related Prey Size Specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher R. Hatcher

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula has had a conservation status of vulnerable since the 1970s. Little research has focussed on the ecology and even less has examined its juvenile stages. For the first time, reliance on invertebrate prey for growth was assessed in seedling Venus flytrap by systematic elimination of invertebrates from the growing environment. Prey were experimentally removed from a subset of Venus flytrap seedlings within a laboratory environment. The amount of growth was measured by measuring trap midrib length as a function of overall growth as well as prey spectrum. There was significantly lower growth in prey-eliminated plants than those utilising prey. This finding, although initially unsurprising, is actually contrary to the consensus that seedlings (traps < 5 mm do not catch prey. Furthermore, flytrap was shown to have prey specificity at its different growth stages; the dominant prey size for seedlings did not trigger mature traps. Seedlings are capturing and utilising prey for nutrients to increase their overall trap size. These novel findings show Venus flytrap to have a much more complex evolutionary ecology than previously thought.

  8. Polyphenolic Profile of Maize Seedlings Treated with 24-Epibrassinolide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Waisi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available High-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC combined with image analysis and pattern recognition methods were used for fingerprinting of phenolic compounds present in seedlings of two maize genotypes ZP 434 (new generation hybrid, drought tolerant and ZP 704 (older generation hybrid, drought sensitive treated with different concentrations of 24-epibrassinolide. This is the first report of TLC chromatographic profile of phenolics’ mixtures in maize seed extracts influenced by brassinosteroid phytohormones. Nine samples of shoot of seedlings for the whole concentration range of phytohormones (5.2 × 10−7–5.2 × 10−15 M, one sample of root of seedlings treated with 5.2 × 10−15 M 24-epibrassinolide, and the control samples of nontreated seedlings, for both genotypes, were analyzed. Phenolic profiles of root extracts indicate the absence of more polar compounds such as phenolic acids and glycosides present in shoot of seedlings. Also, hormones applied in higher concentrations have an inhibiting effect on the content of phenolics in ZP 434. Application of chemometric methods enables characterization of particular genotype of maize according to its phenolic profile.

  9. LIMING AND FERTILIZING FOR MAHOGANI (Switenia macrophylla King. SEEDLING FORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Franco Tucci

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The production of seedlings is one of the most important phases of the cultivation of forest species. Seedlings ofappropriate quality are fundamental in the growth and development of the species. In the production of seedlings, the substratum isfundamental for the good development of the plants. However, the subsoil in general, is acid and it contains low levels of nutritious.The acidity of the soil and the deficiency of nutrients can be corrected through liming and mineral fertilization. The objective of thepresent work was to evaluate the effect of liming and of the fertilization of the soil for the production of mahogany seedlings. Theexperiment was carried out in the period of 120 days, in the Federal University of Amazonas, UFAM. The experimental design wasrandomized complete blocks with statistical analysis in split plot. The plots were composed with eight treatments and four repetitionsand the subplots were eight sampling times of the plants. The treatments were control (natural soil, liming, corrective phosphate,fertilizing with NPK, liming + corrective phosphate, corrective phosphate + fertilizing with NPK, liming + fertilizing with NPK andliming + corrective phosphate + fertilizing with NPK. It was concluded that the associated liming and corrective phosphate and withthe fertilizing with nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium promoted the smallest levels of exchangeable aluminum and the largestlevels of calcium, magnesium, phosphorous and potassium in the soil. These levels of nutrients in the soil caused larger levels ofnutrients in the plants, providing larger growth rate. The liming, corrective phosphate and fertilizing are a fundamental practices inthe formation of mahogany seedlings.

  10. Symbiotic propagation of seedlings of Cyrtopodium glutiniferum Raddi (Orchidaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Aparecida Rodrigues Guimarães

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In nature, orchid seeds obtain the nutrients necessary for germination by degrading intracellular fungal structures formed after colonization of the embryo by mycorrhizal fungi. Protocols for asymbiotic germination of orchid seeds typically use media with high concentrations of soluble carbohydrate and minerals. However, when reintroduced into the field, seedlings obtained via asymbiotic germination have lower survival rates than do seedlings obtained via symbiotic germination. Tree fern fiber, the ideal substrate for orchid seedling acclimatization, is increasingly scarce. Here, we evaluated seed germination and protocorm development of Cyrtopodium glutiniferum Raddi cultivated in asymbiotic media (Knudson C and Murashige & Skoog and in oatmeal agar (OA medium inoculated with the mycorrhizal fungus Epulorhiza sp., using non-inoculated OA medium as a control. We also evaluated the performance of tree fern fiber, pine bark, eucalyptus bark, corncob and sawdust as substrates for the acclimatization of symbiotically propagated plants. We determined germination percentages, protocorm development and growth indices at 35 and 70 days of cultivation. Relative growth rates and the effects of substrates on mycorrhizal formation were calculated after 165 days of cultivation. Germination efficiency and growth indices were best when inoculated OA medium was used. Corncob and pine bark showed the highest percentages of colonized system roots. The OA medium inoculated with Epulorhiza sp. shows potential for C. glutiniferum seedling production. Corncob and pine bark are promising substitutes for tree fern fiber as substrates for the acclimatization of orchid seedlings.

  11. Emergence and vigor of papaya genotypes seedlings according to irradiance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana Hilda Golin Mengarda

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Luminosity influences seed emergence in the initial development of papaya plants, being necessary the identification of the ideal irradiance level for plantule establishment and formation of vigorous seedlings. This study aimed to evaluate the seed emergence and seedlings vigor of four papaya genotypes, under different irradiance levels. Carica papaya L. seeds, from the Caliman 01 hybrid, Golden THB, triple hybrid and JS12 x Waimanalo hybrid genotypes, were evaluated under four irradiance levels (60 µmol m-2 s-1, 130 µmol m-2 s-1, 580 µmol m-2 s-1 and 1,200 µmol m-2 s-1. A completely randomized design, in a 4x4 split-plot scheme, with four replications, was used. The emergence percentage and speed index were evaluated. The seedlings were measured at 45 and 120 days after sowing (DAS, concerning root and shoot length and dry matter, being calculated the root/shoot ratio and absolute growth rate at 120 DAS. The full sun affected emergence, while the low irradiance affected seedling growth. The intermediate irradiance (130 µmol m-2 s-1 and 580 µmol m-2 s-1 was more suitable to the development of papaya seedlings up to 120 DAS. The Golden THB genotype was more sensitive to high irradiance, while the Caliman 01 and JS12 x Waimanalo hybrids tolerated the full sun condition.

  12. BIOACTIVE COMPOUNDS AND ANTIOXIDANT CAPACITY FROM FIVE TYPES OF SEEDLINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florina Maria Copaciu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available After germination process, the green seedlings accumulate important quantities of bioactive compounds such as: enzymes, vitamins, minerals, chlorophylls and nutrients. The current study presents a comparison between different bioactive compounds and their antioxidant capacity, after the seedling germination and growth of five seeds (arugula, lentil, wheat, beans and mustard both on soil, in a pot (natural system, and directly on cotton wool soaked, in water (artificial system. In this study the carotenoids content and the antioxidant capacity were analysed. The data of the present study showed that the highest amount of zeaxanthin and β - carotene was found in cultivars of wheat grown in natural system, while the highest antioxidant activity was found in cultivars of wheat, lentils and beans, though in this case with no statistical differences between the systems. The results show statistical differences between the values of bioactive compounds in the five types of seedlings but also in the values obtained for the same seedlings in different systems. The best cultivars for improving the nutritional quality for human consumption are wheat seedlings followed by lentil ones.

  13. Seedling production of Tectona grandis on substrates formulated with biosolids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo André Trazzi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The industrial and urban waste can be used as a source of nutrients to contribute not only to reduce the cost of seedling production but also to reduce or solve environmental problems. This study aimed to evaluate the use of sewage sludge as substrate on the production of seedlings of Tectona grandis. Seedlings were grown in tubes with a volumetric capacity of 280 cm³, on substrates formulated with biosolids (BIO associated with rice hulls (CAC or shredded coconut fiber (FC in proportions 80:20, 60:40, 40 60, 20:80 (v:v, and also with 100% of BIO, a total of nine treatment submitted to the comparison of control treatment (commercial substrate. The formed substrates were subjected to chemical and physical analysis. Ninety days after the sub culturing, the following biometrics characteristics were analyzed: shoot height, stem diameter, dry weight of shoot and root and Dickson quality index. The results indicated that the seedlings grown on substrates formulated with BIO and CAC showed the highest average height and shoot dry mass, while those produced with BIO and FC showed the highest average collar diameter. For the production of seedlings of Tectona grandis it is advised to use a substrate with proportions of 60 or 80% of biosolids when associated with coconut fiber, and 80% of biosolids when associated with rice hulls.

  14. Influence of selected Rhizoctonia solani isolates on sugar beet seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skonieczek Paweł

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available From 2008 to 2010 the levels of sugar beet seedlings infection caused by Rhizoctonia solani were compared in laboratory tests. Seven sugar beet lines were tested: H56, H66, S2, S3, S4, S5 and S6 as well as three control cultivars: Carlos, Esperanza and Janosik. Sugar beet lines with tolerance to rhizoctoniosis and cultivars without tolerance were infected artificially by R. solani isolates: R1, R28a and R28b. These isolates belong to the second anastomosis group (AG, which is usually highly pathogenic to beet roots. The aim of the experiment was to test whether the tolerance of sugar beet genotypes to R. solani AG 2 prevents both root rot, and damping-off of seedlings, induced by the pathogen. Sugar beet lines tolerant to brown root rot in laboratory tests were significantly less sensitive to infection of the seedlings by R. solani AG 2 isolates in comparison to control cultivars. Rhizoctonia solani AG 2 isolates demonstrated considerable differences in pathogenicity against seedlings of sugar beet lines and cultivars. The strongest infection of sugar beet seedlings occurred with the isolate R28b. The greatest tolerance to infection by AG 2 isolates was found for the S5 and S3 breeding lines.

  15. Tebuconazole Regulates Fatty Acid Composition of Etiolated Winter Wheat Seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Korsukova

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The fatty acid composition of shoots of unhardened and hardened to cold etiolated winter wheat seedlings grown from seeds treated with tebuconazole-based protectant «Bunker» (content of tebuconazole 60 grams per liter, g/L, and the seedlings frost resistance has been studied. It is shown that treatment of winter wheat seeds by «Bunker» preparation (1,5 microliter per gram of seeds, µl/g is accompanied by an increase of the fatty acids unsaturation in the shoots and increase of the seedlings frost resistance (–8°C, 24 h. The most pronounced decrease in the content of saturated palmitic acid and increase in the content of unsaturated α-linolenic acid were observed during cold hardening of winter wheat seedlings grown from seeds treated by tebuconazole-based protectant. It is concluded that the seeds treatment with tebuconazole-based protectant causes changes of fatty acid composition of winter wheat seedlings to increase their frost resistance.

  16. Why are there few seedlings beneath the myrmecophyte Triplaris americana?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrea-Alcázar, Daniel M.; Simonetti, Javier A.

    2007-07-01

    We compared the relative importance of chemical alellopathy, pruning behaviour of resident ants and other non-related agents to ant-plant mutualism for seedling establishment beneath Triplaris americana L. (Polygonaceae), a myrmecophyte plant. We also included a preliminary analysis of effects of fragmentation on these ecological processes. Seeds and seedlings of Theobroma cacao L. (Sterculiaceae) were used as the target species in all experiments. Leaf-tissue extracts of the myrmecophyte plant did not inhibit germination of cacao seeds. Resident Pseudomyrmex triplarinus Weddell (Pseudomyrmecinae) ants did not remove seeds under the canopy of their host plants. The main seed consumer was the leaf-cutting ant Atta sexdens L. (Myrmicinae). Leaves of cacao seedlings were partially or totally pruned by Pseudomyrmex ants mainly in forest fragments studied. We offer evidence pointing to the possibility that the absence of seedlings beneath Triplaris may result from effects of both ant species. We discuss the benefits of pruning behaviour for the resident ant colony and the effects of ant-ant interactions on seedling establishment beneath this ant-plant system.

  17. Graphene susceptibility in Holstein model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mousavi, Hamze, E-mail: hamze.mousavi@gmail.co [Department of Physics, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nano Science and Nano Technology Research Center, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-06-15

    We study the effects of the electron-phonon interaction on the temperature dependence of the orbital magnetic susceptibility of monolayer graphene. We use the linear response theory and Green's function formalism within the Holstein Hamiltonian model. The results show that the effects of the electron-phonon interaction on the susceptibility of graphene sheet have different behaviors in two temperature regions. In the low temperature region, susceptibility increases when the electron-phonon coupling strength increases. On the other hand, the susceptibility reduces with increasing the electron-phonon coupling strength in the high temperature region. - Highlights: Effect of electron-phonon interaction on the susceptibility of graphene is studied. Linear response theory and Green's function technique in Holstein model are used. Effect of electron-phonon on susceptibility has different behaviors in two temperature regions.

  18. Topological susceptibility from slabs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bietenholz, Wolfgang [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, A.P. 70-543, Distrito Federal, C.P. 04510 (Mexico); Forcrand, Philippe de [Institute for Theoretical Physics, ETH Zürich,CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland); CERN, Physics Department, TH Unit, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Gerber, Urs [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, A.P. 70-543, Distrito Federal, C.P. 04510 (Mexico); Instituto de Física y Matemáticas, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo,Edificio C-3, Apdo. Postal 2-82, Morelia, Michoacán, C.P. 58040 (Mexico)

    2015-12-14

    In quantum field theories with topological sectors, a non-perturbative quantity of interest is the topological susceptibility χ{sub t}. In principle it seems straightforward to measure χ{sub t} by means of Monte Carlo simulations. However, for local update algorithms and fine lattice spacings, this tends to be difficult, since the Monte Carlo history rarely changes the topological sector. Here we test a method to measure χ{sub t} even if data from only one sector are available. It is based on the topological charges in sub-volumes, which we denote as slabs. Assuming a Gaussian distribution of these charges, this method enables the evaluation of χ{sub t}, as we demonstrate with numerical results for non-linear σ-models.

  19. Topological Susceptibility from Slabs

    CERN Document Server

    Bietenholz, Wolfgang; Gerber, Urs

    2015-01-01

    In quantum field theories with topological sectors, a non-perturbative quantity of interest is the topological susceptibility chi_t. In principle it seems straightforward to measure chi_t by means of Monte Carlo simulations. However, for local update algorithms and fine lattice spacings, this tends to be difficult, since the Monte Carlo history rarely changes the topological sector. Here we test a method to measure chi_t even if data from only one sector are available. It is based on the topological charges in sub-volumes, which we denote as slabs. Assuming a Gaussian distribution of these charges, this method enables the evaluation of chi_t, as we demonstrate with numerical results for non-linear sigma-models.

  20. 76 FR 59950 - Airworthiness Directives; BRP-Powertrain GMBH & CO KG 914 F2, 914 F3, and 914 F4 Reciprocating...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-28

    ... GMBH & CO KG 914 F2, 914 F3, and 914 F4 Reciprocating Engines AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration...) None. Applicability (c) This AD applies to BRP--Powertrain GMBH & CO KG 914 F2, 914 F3, and 914 F4...

  1. 17 CFR 240.12f-2 - Extending unlisted trading privileges to a security that is the subject of an initial public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Extending unlisted trading privileges to a security that is the subject of an initial public offering. 240.12f-2 Section 240.12f-2... initial public offering. (a) General provision. A national securities exchange may extend unlisted trading...

  2. Importance of the ectomycorrhizal network for seedling survival and ectomycorrhiza formation in rain forests of south Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onguene, N A; Kuyper, T W

    2002-02-01

    An investigation was undertaken at two sites south Cameroon to assess the importance of living roots of adult trees as sources of inoculum for survival, ectomycorrhizal colonisation and growth of seedlings of Paraberlinia bifoliolata. One-month-old seedlings of Paraberlinia bifoliolata, isolated from or in contact with roots of adult target trees, were transplanted in concentric circles 5, 10, 15, and 30 m away from the stem bases of four adult tree species (Afzelia bipindensis, Brachystegia cynometroides, Paraberlinia bifoliolata and Tetraberlinia bifoliolata). After 4 and 8 months, survival, ectomycorrhiza formation and seedling height were observed; plant biomass was determined after 8 months. After 4 months, there was no difference in seedling survival between seedlings in contact with roots of adult trees and isolated seedlings. The number of ectomycorrhizal seedlings was higher among seedlings in contact with adult trees than among isolated seedlings. After 8 months, both seedling survival and ectomycorrhiza formation were higher in seedlings in contact with roots than in isolated seedlings. Seedling survival and ectomycorrhiza formation were highest under Brachystegia. The fraction of surviving seedlings that had formed ectomycorrhizas was lowest under Afzelia. The fraction of surviving seedlings that were ectomycorrhizal declined monotonically towards the edge of the crown projection. Biomass of seedlings in contact with adult trees was significantly higher than that of isolated seedlings. This difference was consistent for all four tree species. The height of seedlings did not vary with the treatment.

  3. Endophytic fungi reduce leaf-cutting ant damage to seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittleston, L. S.; Brockmann, F.; Wcislo, W.; Van Bael, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    Our study examines how the mutualism between Atta colombica leaf-cutting ants and their cultivated fungus is influenced by the presence of diverse foliar endophytic fungi (endophytes) at high densities in tropical leaf tissues. We conducted laboratory choice trials in which ant colonies chose between Cordia alliodora seedlings with high (Ehigh) or low (Elow) densities of endophytes. The Ehigh seedlings contained 5.5 times higher endophyte content and a greater diversity of fungal morphospecies than the Elow treatment, and endophyte content was not correlated with leaf toughness or thickness. Leaf-cutting ants cut over 2.5 times the leaf area from Elow relative to Ehigh seedlings and had a tendency to recruit more ants to Elow plants. Our findings suggest that leaf-cutting ants may incur costs from cutting and processing leaves with high endophyte loads, which could impact Neotropical forests by causing variable damage rates within plant communities. PMID:20610420

  4. THE EFFECT OF MAGNETIC LIQUIDS IN SOME TREE SEEDLINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Creanga

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The seedlings of two tree species, the black poplar hybrid (Populus canadiensis Moench. and the pedunculate oak (Quercus robur L., among the most important for the temperate region, were treated with various concentrations of oil-ferrofluid based on natural hydrocarbons. The experiment has revealed the ferrofluid influence on the assimilatory pigments as well as on the nucleic acids (spectral measurements in young plantlets aged of 3 months. It was found that the levels of assimilatory pigments are generally diminished though the ratio chlorophyll a/chlorophyll b is generally enhanced for ferrofluid samples suggesting the seedlings sensitivity to the chemical and magnetic stimuli consistent with the ferrofuid addition. The LHC II system (Light Harvesting Complex II sensitivity to external factors might be associated with the ferrofluid influence on the young seedlings photosynthesis.

  5. Growth and nutrition of eucalyptus clones seedlings inoculated with mycorrhizal fungi

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Francisco deSousa Lima; Carla daSilva Sousa

    2014-01-01

    ... (five fungal species and five eucalyptus clones), with five replications. In general, the mycorrhizal symbiosis significantly increased the growth and nutrition of eucalyptus seedlings, when compared to the non-inoculated seedlings...

  6. Factors controlling postfire seedling establishment in southern California chaparral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, J M; Oechel, W C

    1992-04-01

    This paper discusses the interactions among prefire shrub abundance, soil moisture, and plant and animal species on postfire seedling establishment in mixed chparral in southern California. Postfire germination and survival of seedlings in a stand dominated by a facultative seeder (Adenostoma fasciculatum) and by an obligate seeder (Ceanothus greggii) were monitored for 2 years. Relative to prefire abundance, germination of C. greggii was higher than that of A. fasciculatum. Survival during the first year was also higher in C. greggii than in A. fasciculatum. During the second year, however, mortality of C. greggii was greater than that of A. fasciculatum, mostly due to a psyllid infection. Germination of A. fasciculatum was negatively related to prefire shrub abundance. C. greggii germination was not associated with prefire shrub abundance. Seedling mortality of both species was very strongly related to the depletion of soil moisture the first few months after germination. A. fasciculatum was more sensitive than C. greggii to the drying of the soil, especially in the upper levels. C. greggii seedlings had longer roots, greater root/shoot biomass ratios, higher water potentials, and a later peak in seasonal growth activity compared to A. fasciculatum. Herbs promoted greater survival of A. fasciculatum. Our results indicate that the obligate seeder species, C. greggii, is better adapted to establish seedling in chaparral by producing greater relative germination and greater seedling survival than the facultative seeder species A. fasciculatum. The greater adaptability of C. greggii to the physical environment is counteracted by interspecific interference by plant and animal interactions which tend to favor A. fasciculatum over C. greggii.

  7. Germination and seedling establishment in orchids: a complex of requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Hanne N; Dixon, Kingsley W; Jersáková, Jana; Těšitelová, Tamara

    2015-09-01

    Seedling recruitment is essential to the sustainability of any plant population. Due to the minute nature of seeds and early-stage seedlings, orchid germination in situ was for a long time practically impossible to observe, creating an obstacle towards understanding seedling site requirements and fluctuations in orchid populations. The introduction of seed packet techniques for sowing and retrieval in natural sites has brought with it important insights, but many aspects of orchid seed and germination biology remain largely unexplored. The germination niche for orchids is extremely complex, because it is defined by requirements not only for seed lodging and germination, but also for presence of a fungal host and its substrate. A mycobiont that the seedling can parasitize is considered an essential element, and a great diversity of Basidiomycota and Ascomycota have now been identified for their role in orchid seed germination, with fungi identifiable as imperfect Rhizoctonia species predominating. Specificity patterns vary from orchid species employing a single fungal lineage to species associating individually with a limited selection of distantly related fungi. A suitable organic carbon source for the mycobiont constitutes another key requirement. Orchid germination also relies on factors that generally influence the success of plant seeds, both abiotic, such as light/shade, moisture, substrate chemistry and texture, and biotic, such as competitors and antagonists. Complexity is furthermore increased when these factors influence seeds/seedling, fungi and fungal substrate differentially. A better understanding of germination and seedling establishment is needed for conservation of orchid populations. Due to the obligate association with a mycobiont, the germination niches in orchid species are extremely complex and varied. Microsites suitable for germination can be small and transient, and direct observation is difficult. An experimental approach using several

  8. Germination and seedling establishment in orchids: a complex of requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Hanne N.; Dixon, Kingsley W.; Jersáková, Jana; Těšitelová, Tamara

    2015-01-01

    Background Seedling recruitment is essential to the sustainability of any plant population. Due to the minute nature of seeds and early-stage seedlings, orchid germination in situ was for a long time practically impossible to observe, creating an obstacle towards understanding seedling site requirements and fluctuations in orchid populations. The introduction of seed packet techniques for sowing and retrieval in natural sites has brought with it important insights, but many aspects of orchid seed and germination biology remain largely unexplored. Key Considerations The germination niche for orchids is extremely complex, because it is defined by requirements not only for seed lodging and germination, but also for presence of a fungal host and its substrate. A mycobiont that the seedling can parasitize is considered an essential element, and a great diversity of Basidiomycota and Ascomycota have now been identified for their role in orchid seed germination, with fungi identifiable as imperfect Rhizoctonia species predominating. Specificity patterns vary from orchid species employing a single fungal lineage to species associating individually with a limited selection of distantly related fungi. A suitable organic carbon source for the mycobiont constitutes another key requirement. Orchid germination also relies on factors that generally influence the success of plant seeds, both abiotic, such as light/shade, moisture, substrate chemistry and texture, and biotic, such as competitors and antagonists. Complexity is furthermore increased when these factors influence seeds/seedling, fungi and fungal substrate differentially. Conclusions A better understanding of germination and seedling establishment is needed for conservation of orchid populations. Due to the obligate association with a mycobiont, the germination niches in orchid species are extremely complex and varied. Microsites suitable for germination can be small and transient, and direct observation is difficult

  9. Short communication: Estimating lactation curves for highly inhomogeneous milk yield data of an F2 population (Charolais × German Holstein).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melzer, N; Trißl, S; Nürnberg, G

    2017-11-01

    Fitting of lactation curves is a common tool to obtain the entire milk yield as well as to estimate the main curve characteristic (such as day of peak milk yield) for a lactation. These models are primarily designed for dairy cattle, but have been applied to nondairy cattle breeds and also for other species. In this study we considered milk yield data of 197 F2 crossbred cows of Charolais and German Holstein (founder breeds) for the first and the beginning of the second lactation. The F2 cows showed a high variability regarding the length of lactation, which varied between 7 and 406 d in milk for the first lactation. Thus, the data also show high variation regarding the daily and overall milk yield. To obtain complete lactation curves, we evaluated the lactation models of Ali-Schaeffer and Wilmink. To compare the 2 lactation models, we evaluated the goodness of fit using 6 evaluation criteria. The results show that the model of Ali-Schaeffer performs better on these highly inhomogeneous data, in contrast to the model of Wilmink. We discuss our findings from a statistical point of view and present possible biological reasons for the high variability regarding milk yield within the F2 population. Hence our findings may be helpful when milk yield data of crosses between dairy and beef cows (dual purpose) are investigated, whose lactation curves may not show the typical characteristics of dairy cattle. The Authors. Published by the Federation of Animal Science Societies and Elsevier Inc. on behalf of the American Dairy Science Association®. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/).

  10. Room temperature CW and QCW operation of Ho:CaF2 laser pumped by Tm:fiber laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelínek, Michal; Cvrček, Jan; Kubeček, Václav; Zhao, Beibei; Ma, Weiwei; Jiang, Dapeng; Su, Liangbi

    2017-05-01

    Laser radiation in the wavelength range around 2 μm is required for its specific properties - it is very suitable for medical applications, remote sensing, or pumping of optical parametric oscillators to generate ultrafast pulses in the mid-IR region further exploited in nonlinear optics. Crystals as YLF, YAG, LLF, and GdVO4 doped by holmium were already investigated and found suitable for the tunable laser generation around 2.1 mμ. Only a few works are devoted to the laser operation of holmium-doped fluorides as CaF2. In this work, pulsed and continuous-wave laser operation of a modified- Bridgman-grown Ho:CaF2 active crystal at room temperature is reported. A commercial 50 W 1940 nm Tm-fiber laser was used to pump a laser oscillator based on a novel 10 mm long 0.5 at.% Ho:CaF2 active crystal placed in the Peltiercooled holder. In the pulsed regime (10 ms, 10 Hz), the laser slope efficiency of 53 % with respect to the absorbed pump power was achieved. The laser generated at the central wavelength of 2085 nm with the maximum mean output power of 365 mW corresponding to the power amplitude of 3.65 W. In the continuous wave regime, the maximum output power was 1.11 W with the slope efficiency of 41 % with respect to the absorbed pump power. To our best knowledge this is the first demonstration of this laser active material operating in the CW regime at room temperature. The tuning range over 60 nm from 2034 to 2094 nm was achieved using a birefringent filter showing the possibility to develop a mode-locked laser system generating pulses in the sub-picosecond range.

  11. Agronomic performance of F1, F2 and F3 hybrids between weedy rice and transgenic glufosinate-resistant rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaoling; Wang, Zhou; Qiang, Sheng

    2011-08-01

    Studies of hybrid fitness, of which agronomic performance may be an indicator, can help in evaluating the potential for introgression of a transgene from a transgenic crop to wild relatives. The objective of this study was to assess the agronomic performance of reciprocal hybrids between two transgenic glufosinate-resistant rice lines, Y0003 and 99-t, and two weedy rice accessions, WR1 and WR2, in the greenhouse. F1 hybrids displayed heterosis in height, flag leaf area and number of spikelets per panicle. The agronomic performance of F1 between WR1 and Y0003 was not affected by crossing direction. The tiller and panicle numbers of F1 individuals were higher than their F2 counterparts. However, these traits did not change significantly from the F2 to the F3 generation or in hybrids with weedy rice as maternal or paternal plants. For all hybrids, the in vitro germination rates of fresh pollen were similar and significantly lower than those of their parents, seed sets were similar to or of lower value than those of weedy rice parents and seed shattering characteristics were partially suppressed, but the survival of hybrids over winter in the field was similar to that of weedy rice parents. All F1, F2 and F3 hybrids had similar composite agronomic performance to weedy rice parents. There was no significant decrease in the composite agronomic performance of any of the hybrids compared with weedy rice. This implies that gene flow from transgenic cultivated rice to weedy rice could occur under natural conditions. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. A Mediterranean Diet Reduces F2-Isoprostanes and Triglycerides among Older Australian Men and Women after 6 Months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Courtney Rose; Bryan, Janet; Hodgson, Jonathan M; Woodman, Richard; Murphy, Karen J

    2017-07-01

    Background: Health benefits of a Mediterranean dietary pattern have been shown. However, there are few data on the effects of increased adherence to a Mediterranean diet (MedDiet) in non-Mediterranean countries.Objective: We aimed to determine whether adherence to a MedDiet would result in changes in plasma lipids, glucose and insulin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and F2-isoprostanes (F2-IsoPs) in an Australian population.Methods: The study was a 6-mo parallel, randomized, controlled dietary intervention trial. We recruited 166 participants aged ≥65 y. Participants were stratified on body mass index, sex, and age and assigned to receive either a MedDiet or a habitual diet (HabDiet). The primary outcome was cognitive function, reported elsewhere. As secondary outcomes, assessment of fasting total, LDL, and HDL cholesterol; triglycerides (TGs); glucose; insulin; hs-CRP; and F2-IsoPs was completed at baseline and at 3 and 6 mo. The MedDiet group followed a prescribed diet containing 15-45 mL extra-virgin olive oil/d, abundant vegetables, fruit, nuts, legumes, and whole grains, as well as moderate fish, poultry, and dairy foods. Dietary intake was measured by 3-d weighed food records at baseline and at 2 and 4 mo. Results were analyzed by using linear mixed-effects models.Results: Compared with the HabDiet, the MedDiet resulted in lower TGs at 3 mo (mean difference: -0.15 mmol/L; 95% CI: -0.23, -0.07 mmol/L; P older Australians. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as ACTRN12613000602729. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  13. Two Tightly Linked Genes at the hsa1 Locus Cause Both F1 and F2 Hybrid Sterility in Rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Takahiko; Takashi, Tomonori; Ashikari, Motoyuki; Yoshimura, Atsushi; Kurata, Nori

    2016-02-01

    Molecular mechanisms of hybrid breakdown associated with sterility (F2 sterility) are poorly understood as compared with those of F1 hybrid sterility. Previously, we characterized three unlinked epistatic loci, hybrid sterility-a1 (hsa1), hsa2, and hsa3, responsible for the F2 sterility in a cross between Oryza sativa ssp. indica and japonica. In this study, we identified that the hsa1 locus contains two interacting genes, HSA1a and HSA1b, within a 30-kb region. HSA1a-j (japonica allele) encodes a highly conserved plant-specific domain of unknown function protein (DUF1618), whereas the indica allele (HSA1a-i(s)) has two deletion mutations that cause disruption of domain structure. The second gene, HSA1b-i(s), encodes an uncharacterized protein with some similarity to a nucleotide-binding protein. Homozygous introgression of indica HSA1a-i(s)-HSA1b-i(s) alleles into japonica showed female gamete abortion at an early mitotic stage. The fact that the recombinant haplotype HSA1a-j-HSA1b-i(s) caused semi-sterility in the heterozygous state with the HSA1a-i(s)-HSA1b-i(s) haplotype suggests that variation in the hsa1 locus is a possible cause of the wide-spectrum sterility barriers seen in F1 hybrids and successive generations in rice. We propose a simple genetic model to explain how a single causal mechanism can drive both F1 and F2 hybrid sterility. Copyright © 2016 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Kaon semileptonic decays with $N_f=2+1+1$ HISQ fermions and physical light-quark masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gámiz, E. [Granada U., Theor. Phys. Astrophys.; Bazavov, A. [Brookhaven; Bernard, C. [Washington U., St. Louis; DeTar, C. [Utah U.; Du, D. [Syracuse U.; El-Khadra, A. X. [Illinois U., Urbana; Freeland, E. D. [Art Inst. of Chicago; Gottlieb, Steven [Indiana U.; Heller, U. M. [APS, New York; Komijani, J. [TUM-IAS, Munich; Kronfeld, A. S. [Fermilab; Laiho, J. [Syracuse U.; Mackenzie, P. B. [Fermilab; Neil, E. T. [Colorado U.; Primer, T. [Arizona U.; Simone, J. N. [Fermilab; Sugar, R. [UC, Santa Barbara; Toussaint, D. [Arizona U.; Van de Water, R. S. [Fermilab; Zhou, Ran [Fermilab

    2016-11-13

    We discuss the reduction of errors in the calculation of the form factor $f_+^{K \\pi}(0)$ with HISQ fermions on the $N_f=2+1+1$ MILC configurations from increased statistics on some key ensembles, new data on ensembles with lattice spacings down to 0.042 fm and the study of finite-volume effects within staggered ChPT. We also study the implications for the unitarity of the CKM matrix in the first row and for current tensions with leptonic determinations of $\\vert V_{us}\\vert$.

  15. Measurement of the Proton Structure Function $F_{2}$ at low $Q^{2}$ in QED Compton Scattering at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aktas, A.; Anthonis, T.; Asmone, A.; Babaev, A.; Backovic, S.; Bahr, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baumgartner, S.; Becker, J.; Beckingham, M.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Berger, N.; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J.C.; Bohme, J.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bracinik, J.; Brisson, V.; Broker, H.-B.; Brown, D.P.; Bruncko, D.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Caron, S.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Chekelian, V.; Collard, C.; Contreras, J.G.; Coppens, Y.R.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; Delcourt, B.; Demirchyan, R.; De Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dingfelder, J.; Dodonov, V.; Dubak, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Fleischer, M.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleming, Y.H.; Flucke, G.; Flugge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formanek, J.; Franke, G.; Frising, G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garutti, E.; Garvey, J.; Gayler, J.; Gerhards, R.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Grab, C.; Grassler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregori, M.; Grindhammer, Guenter; Gwilliam, C.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haller, J.; Hansson, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Henschel, H.; Henshaw, O.; Heremans, R.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Heuer, R.-D.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Ibbotson, M.; Ismail, M.; Jacquet, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, D.P.; Jung, H.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Katzy, J.; Keller, N.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Knutsson, A.; Koblitz, B.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Koutouev, R.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kroseberg, J.; Kuckens, J.; Kuhr, T.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leiner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindfeld, L.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lueders, H.; Luke, D.; Lux, T.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mangano, S.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michine, S.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Milstead, D.; Mohamed, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morozov, I.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, Paul R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nozicka, M.; Oganezov, R.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Ossoskov, G.; Ozerov, D.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Poschl, R.; Portheault, B.; Povh, B.; Raicevic, N.; Ratiani, Z.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Rimmer, A.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauvan, E.; Schatzel, S.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, M.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Sedlak, K.; Sefkow, F.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Spitzer, H.; Stamen, R.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Strauch, I.; Straumann, U.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, Graham; Thompson, P.D.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, Peter; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Uraev, A.; Urban, Marcel; Usik, A.; Utkin, D.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Veelken, C.; Vest, A.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Wacker, K.; Wagner, J.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Werner, N.; Wessels, M.; Wessling, B.; Winter, G.-G.; Wissing, Ch.; Woehrling, E.-E.; Wolf, R.; Wunsch, E.; Xella, S.; Yan, W.; Yeganov, V.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2004-01-01

    The proton structure function F_2(x,Q^2) is measured in inelastic QED Compton scattering using data collected with the H1 detector at HERA. QED Compton events are used to access the kinematic range of very low virtualities of the exchanged photon, Q^2, down to 0.5 GeV^2, and Bjorken x up to \\sim 0.06, a region which has not been covered previously by inclusive measurements at HERA. The results are in agreement with the measurements from fixed target lepton-nucleon scattering experiments.

  16. A time-variant analysis of the 1/f^(2) phase noise in CMOS parallel LC-Tank quadrature oscillators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreani, Pietro

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a study of 1/f2 phase noise in quadrature oscillators built by connecting two differential LC-tank oscillators in a parallel fashion. The analysis clearly demonstrates the necessity of adopting a time-variant theory of phase noise, where a more simplistic, time......-invariant approach fails to explain numerical simulation results even at the qualitative level. Two topologies of 5-GHz parallel quadrature oscillators are considered, and compact but nevertheless highly general, closed-form formulas are derived for the phase noise caused by the losses in the LC...

  17. Kaon semileptonic decays with $N_f=2+1+1$ HISQ fermions and physical light-quark masses

    CERN Document Server

    Gamiz, E; Bernard, C; DeTar, C; Du, D; El-Khadra, A X; Freeland, E D; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, U M; Komijani, J; Kronfeld, A S; Laiho, J; Mackenzie, P B; Neil, E T; Primer, T; Simone, J N; Sugar, R; Toussaint, D; Van de Water, R S; Zhou, Ran

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the reduction of errors in the calculation of the form factor $f_+^{K \\pi}(0)$ with HISQ fermions on the $N_f=2+1+1$ MILC configurations from increased statistics on some key ensembles, new data on ensembles with lattice spacings down to 0.042 fm and the study of finite-volume effects within staggered ChPT. We also study the implications for the unitarity of the CKM matrix in the first row and for current tensions with leptonic determinations of $\\vert V_{us}\\vert$.

  18. Structural properties of MgF2 and ZnS in thin film and in multilayer optical coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perales, F.; de las Heras, C.; Agulló-Rueda, F.

    2008-11-01

    Different techniques of x-ray diffraction line profile analysis have been used to study the microstructural parameters of the MgF2 and ZnS thin films as well as MgF/ZnS multilayers. The crystallite size and microstrain of the samples have been estimated from x-ray diffraction by applying Scherrer, Scherrer-Wilson and Williamson-Hall formulae respectively. The effects of thermal annealing at different temperatures on the structure in the material in thin films and in multilayers are studied and compared by the three mentioned relations. Although some different values have been obtained from each expression, the same temperature tendency is observed.

  19. Computing K and D meson masses with N{sub f}=2+1+1 twisted mass lattice QCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baron, Remi [CEA, Centre de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). IRFU/Service de Physique Nucleaire; Blossier, Benoit; Boucaud, Philippe [Paris XI Univ., 91 - Orsay (FR). Lab. de Physique Theorique] (and others)

    2010-05-15

    We discuss the computation of the mass of the K and D mesons within the framework of N{sub f}=2+1+1 twisted mass lattice QCD from a technical point of view. These quantities are essential, already at the level of generating gauge configurations, being obvious candidates to tune the strange and charm quark masses to their physical values. In particular, we address the problems related to the twisted mass flavor and parity symmetry breaking, which arise when considering a non-degenerate (c,s) doublet. We propose and verify the consistency of three methods to extract the K and D meson masses in this framework. (orig.)

  20. Lattice simulations with $N_f=2+1$ improved Wilson fermions at a fixed strange quark mass

    CERN Document Server

    Bali, Gunnar S; Simeth, Jakob; Söldner, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    The explicit breaking of chiral symmetry of the Wilson fermion action results in additive quark mass renormalization. Moreover, flavour singlet and non-singlet scalar currents acquire different renormalization constants with respect to continuum regularization schemes. This complicates keeping the renormalized strange quark mass fixed when varying the light quark mass in simulations with $N_f=2+1$ sea quark flavours. Here we present and validate our strategy within the CLS (Coordinated Lattice Simulations) effort to achieve this in simulations with non-perturbatively order-$a$ improved Wilson fermions. We also determine various combinations of renormalization constants and improvement coefficients.

  1. Page 1 32 BJ Venkatachala and GNath 7° F + 7(f-a)F + B(1-F) = 2 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G. -- (Prf- a)G, --Br(UIU), F. = 2 Pri(FG - 7ſ.6). (7). The boundary conditions in the new system are. F(i,0)-f- F. G(, ) = 0; F(, ) = G(, ) = 1. (8). Here Z = 1 - exp (- a n) (d. c 0),. F=f, 7 = a(1-z), f=f(Fla) (1-z) dz +f, (9) where c is a scaling factor which provides an optimum distribution at nodal points across the boundary layer and the ...

  2. Sintering mechanism of the CaF2 on hydroxyapatite by a 10.6-l microm CO2 laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Cheng-Chei; Roan, Rong-Tai; Chen, Jeng-Huey

    2002-01-01

    Laser has been reported as a heat source for melting and re-crystallization. Occurring at about 1100 degrees C, the melting of surface dental enamel along with re-crystallization might have an assistant role in the therapy of hypersensitive tooth, apical sealing of endodontic surgery in dentistry, preventive dentistry for pit and fissure sealing, and fluoridation. For laser to be accepted in clinical applications, it is desired that, studies must show the incorporation of CaF(2) into hydroxyapatite could reduce the sintering temperature for the sake of safety. In this study, the Sharplan 20XJ CO(2) laser with 10.6- microm wavelength was set under the following parameters: power, 5 W; repetitive mode, 0.1 second; beam, focused. Fluorite was added to hydroxyapatite as a synthetic compound to lower the sintering temperature. Human dental enamel without caries was used for in vitro sintering test. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffractometer (XRD), Fourier transforming infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and differential thermal analysis/thermogravimetric analysis (DAT/TGA) were used for the investigation of sintering mechanism of CaF(2). Fusion between hexagonal shape crystals and cubic shape crystals (CaF(2)) were observed under SEM study. Hexagonal shape crystals indicated the formation of fluorapatite under XRD analysis. Under FTIR study, we examined reductions of water (3445 cm(-1)) and hydroxyl bands (3567 and 627 cm(-1)) in irradiated compounds. From the DTA pattern of synthetic compound, it showed the endothermic reaction reaching its peak point around 1180 +/- 20 degrees C. It was attributed to the phase transformation and/or initial melting. In this study, we proposed the interrelationship of the eutectics between initiator (CaF(2)) and the reaction product (calcium hydroxide) that reduced the sintering temperature. It appeared that the co-eutectics interacted to reduce the sintering temperature of hydroxyapatite below 800 degrees C and that the key

  3. Copper-Treated Containers Influence Root Development of Longleaf Pine Seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    James P. Barnett; John M. McGilvray

    2002-01-01

    Development of longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) seedlings grown in CopperblockTM containers and BC/ CFC First ChoiceTM Styrofoam blocks, with applications of Spin Out® root growth regulator, were compared to control seedlings. The copper treatments significantly changed seedling morphology; at...

  4. Monitoring the Temperature of Tree Seedlings With the Thermochron iButton Data Logger

    Science.gov (United States)

    David S. Gasvoda; Richard W. Tinus; Karen E. Burr; Andy Trent

    2002-01-01

    Tracking the temperature of tree seedlings from the nursery to the planting site can be the key to evaluating possible physiological causes of morality after seedlings are planted. Seedlings enter and leave nursery storage with easily documented levels of cold hardiness, root growth potential, and general stress tolerance (Burr 1990: Ritchie and Tanaka 1990). The...

  5. Naturally seeded versus planted ponderosa pine seedlings in group-selection openings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philip M. McDonald; Gary Fiddler; Martin Ritchie; Paula Anderson

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to determine whether natural regeneration or planted seedlings should be used in group-selection openings. The answer dependson the survival and growth rate of both types of seedlings, and that could depend on the size of the openings and the effect of trees on their edge. In thisside-by-side study, the natural pine seedlings originated...

  6. Photosynthetic light response of flooded cherrybark oak (Quercus pagoda) seedlings grown in two light regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emile S. Gardiner; Ken W. Krauss

    2001-01-01

    Two-year-old cherrybark oak (Quercus pagoda Raf.) seedlings raised in full or partial (27 percent) sunlight were flooded for 30 days to study the effects of light availability and root inundation on photosynthetic light response. Compared with seedlings receiving full sunlight, seedlings receiving partial sunlight developed leaves...

  7. Antioxidants and anti-stress compounds improve the survival of cryopreserved Arabidopsis seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cryopreservation is a safe and cost-effective tool for the long-term storage of plant germplasm. Successful cryopreservation depends on suitable cryoprotection protocol. In Arabidopsis seedlings cryopreservation, the growth ability could be partly restored in 60-h seedlings, whereas 72-h seedlings d...

  8. Tuberization and effect of age of seedlings at transplant on yield of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two experiments were carried out firstly to study the processes of development and tuber initiation in cassava seedlings, and secondly, to determine the appropriate age at which cassava seedlings should be transplanted to ensure optimum field establishment and higher yield. In the first experiment, nursed seedlings were ...

  9. Effects of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae and seed source on nursery-grown black walnut seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    B. L. Brookshire; H. E. Garrett; T. L. Robison

    2003-01-01

    A nursery study was established in Missouri to evaluate the effects of endomycorrhizal inoculation and seed source on the growth of black walnut seedlings. Inoculation, in general, resulted in seedlings with significantly larger sturdiness quotients. Glomus intraradicies was found to produce larger seedlings than Glomus etunicatus...

  10. Characterizing Betula litwinowii seedling microsites at the alpine-treeline ecotone, central Greater Caucasus Mountains, Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicole M Hughes; Daniel M. Johnson; Maia Akhalkatsi; Otar Abdaladze

    2009-01-01

    Seedling establishment is an important factor dictating the altitudinal limits of treeline species. Factors that affect seedling mortality and survival, however, have yet to be fully characterized, especially for deciduous treeline species. Here we describe microsite characteristics of successfully established Betula litwinowii seedlings at the...

  11. Microwave susceptibility experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConaghy, C.

    1984-05-29

    In certain experimental environments, systems can be affected or damaged by microwave pulses. I have conducted tests at LLNL to understand the phenomenology of microwave susceptibility of system components and subsystem components. To date, my experiments have concentrated on bipolar transistors, similar to what might be used in discrete analog circuits, and on CMOS RAM chips, which might be used in a computer memory system. I observed a decrease in failure energies for both the transistor and the integrated curcuit as I shortened the microwave pulse width. An S band (2.86 GHz) transmit/receive (T/R) tube has also been tested both at S band and at X band (8.16 GHz). The S band pulse had limitations in rise-time from zero power, which had an effect on the amount of power that could be transmitted through the T/R tube, as much as 0.7% of the incident power passed through the tube. All tests were conducted in closed-waveguide or coax test-fixtures, in contrast to the anechoic chambers utilized by other experimenters. I have used both S band and X band Klystron generators. For very high power (greater than 1 MW), I used an additional pulse-compression cavity at S band. Other subsystem components such as an X band mixer and an X band T/R tube will be tested in the future. 8 references.

  12. [Antimicrobial susceptibility cumulative reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canut-Blasco, Andrés; Calvo, Jorge; Rodríguez-Díaz, Juan Carlos; Martínez-Martínez, Luis

    2016-10-01

    Cumulative reports on antimicrobial susceptibility tests data are important for selecting empirical treatments, as an educational tool in programs on antimicrobial use, and for establishing breakpoints defining clinical categories. These reports should be based on data validated by clinical microbiologists using diagnostic samples (not surveillance samples). In order to avoid a bias derived from including several isolates obtained from the same patient, it is recommended that, for a defined period, only the first isolate is counted. A minimal number of isolates per species should be presented: a figure of >=30 isolates is statistically acceptable. The report is usually presented in a table format where, for each cell, information on clinically relevant microorganisms-antimicrobial agents is presented. Depending on particular needs, multiple tables showing data related to patients, samples, services or special pathogens can be prepared. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  13. Plant Photosynthetic Responses During Insect Effector-Triggered Plant Susceptibility and Immunity.