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Sample records for susan donaldson melody

  1. Susan Smith

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Owner

    Soveel lesers soveel lokmiddele soveel re- sponse kan gelys word om toegang tot die lees van poësie te registreer. 'n Resep om ge- trou of in ontrou na te volg, bestaan nie. Ge- lukkig nie. Susan Smith se (debuut)bundel lok my helaas nie deur die voorblad as vertrek- punt te neem nie. Aan visuele prikkelkrag gaan.

  2. Obituary: Gordon Donaldson Obituary: Gordon Donaldson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegrum, Colin; Campbell, Archie; Hampshire, Damian

    2013-07-01

    Gordon Donaldson died in Glasgow on 28 November 2012 at the age of 71. He was born in Edinburgh and brought up and educated in Glasgow, which was his home city for much of his life. He was educated first at Glasgow Academy, and then with a scholarship at Christ's College Cambridge. Here he read Natural Sciences, finishing with first class honors in Physics. He then did a PhD on tunneling in superconductors in the Mond Laboratory, supervised by John Adkins. These were interesting times, since type II superconductors had only recently been identified, and the Mond was a leading player in the physics of vortices and other quantum effects. It was headed by Pippard and Shoenberg, and colleagues around that time were Brian Josephson, John Clarke, Colin Gough and John Waldram. On finishing his PhD in 1966 Gordon went straight to a lectureship at the University of Lancaster. In 1975 during a sabbatical at the University of California, Berkeley, with John Clarke's group, Gordon co-invented thin-film gradiometers with integrated DC SQUIDs. He then moved back to Glasgow, to the Department of Applied Physics at Strathclyde University, where he founded a new research group to make and use superconducting devices, especially SQUIDs and gradiometers. From modest beginnings the group grew steadily, acquiring new facilities and members, until in the 1990s it had over 20 members and a host of collaborators from elsewhere in Glasgow and abroad. With funding from the Wellcome Trust, Gordon and colleagues at Glasgow University and the Southern General Hospital in Glasgow set up a new biomagnetism facility in 1998 on the hospital campus to use SQUID gradiometers made at Strathclyde for measurements on patients and volunteers. Another of his main research interests was the use of SQUIDs for nondestructive evaluation (NDE). This started in the days before high temperature superconductors (HTS) with wire-wound gradiometers and niobium SQUIDs, soon moving on to miniature thin-film niobium

  3. Once a physicist: Dave Donaldson

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Dave Donaldson is a professor of economics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, US, who conducts research on topics related to international and inter-regional trade in low-income countries. He grew up in Toronto, Canada and obtained an MPhys degree at the University of Oxford, UK, in 2001

  4. Dedication - Susan L Greenblatt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guberman, Steven L.

    2011-07-01

    Photo of Susan L Greenblatt Figure 1. Susan in May, 1994 This volume is dedicated to the memory of Susan L Greenblatt, the wife of Steven L Guberman. Susan attended 6 of the 8 dissociative recombination (DR) meetings. Her advice and wise counsel played a vital role in the organization of several of these meetings. The fifth meeting in Chicago in 2001 was her idea and it would not have occurred without her encouragement. Susan was always amused by the memory of the first group dinner at the second DR meeting at St Jacut in 1992. As we went around the dinner table identifying ourselves, it soon became her turn. Susan was a sociologist and after introducing herself she said: "I am not a chemist". A spontaneous chorus of attendees proclaimed "Neither are we!". Her husband and a few other chemists abstained. In 1983, Susan and I established the Institute for Scientific Research (ISR). The name was chosen so as to span sociology and chemical physics. Four years prior, an ophthalmologist had diagnosed a rare retinal condition of unknown origin and advised her to change her profession to one that did not involve reading. (She was able to read for the rest of her life.) Twenty years later we learned that the cause of the retinal and all her other health problems was a recently discovered rare mitochondrial mutation. Her experience with ophthalmologists and her life-long keen sense of injustice, led her to write a grant proposal to the US Department of Education to survey all ophthalmologists in the US to determine whether they were aware of and whether they told their patients about resources and aids that could help them to continue reading and participating in everyday activities. As part of the grant and based upon the survey results, she proposed to set up low-vision training programs for ophthalmology residents. We knew that the competition for funding was intense and included several well-known and more established organizations. Nevertheless, the proposal was funded

  5. Resilient memory for melodies: The number of intervening melodies does not influence novel melody recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herff, Steffen A; Olsen, Kirk N; Dean, Roger T

    2017-04-12

    In many memory domains, a decrease in recognition performance between the first and second presentation of an object is observed as the number of intervening items increases. However, this effect is not universal. Within the auditory domain, this form of interference has been demonstrated in word and single-note recognition, but has yet to be substantiated using relatively complex musical material such as a melody. Indeed, it is becoming clear that music shows intriguing properties when it comes to memory. This study investigated how the number of intervening items influences memory for melodies. In Experiments 1, 2, and 3, one melody was presented per trial in a continuous recognition paradigm. After each melody, participants indicated whether they had heard the melody in the experiment before by responding 'old' or 'new'. In Experiment 4, participants rated perceived familiarity for every melody without being told that melodies reoccur. In four experiments using two corpora of music, two different memory tasks, transposed and untransposed melodies, and up to 195 intervening melodies, no sign of a disruptive effect from the number of intervening melodies beyond the first was observed. We propose a new 'regenerative multiple representations' conjecture to explain why intervening items increase interference in recognition memory for most domains but not music. This conjecture makes several testable predictions and has the potential to strengthen our understanding of domain specificity in human memory, while moving one step closer to explaining the 'paradox' that is memory for melody.

  6. Donaldson-Thomas theory for Calabi-Yau 4-folds

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Yalong; Leung, Naichung Conan

    2014-01-01

    Let $X$ be a compact complex Calabi-Yau 4-fold. Under certain assumptions, we define Donaldson-Thomas type deformation invariants ($DT_{4}$ invariants) by studying moduli spaces of solutions to the Donaldson-Thomas equations on $X$. We also study sheaves counting problems on local Calabi-Yau 4-folds. We relate $DT_{4}$ invariants of $K_{Y}$ to the Donaldson-Thomas invariants of the associated Fano 3-fold $Y$. When the Calabi-Yau 4-fold is toric, we adapt the virtual localization formula to de...

  7. Susan Flannery lahkub? / Harro Puusild

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Puusild, Harro

    2008-01-01

    Ameerika teleseriaali "Vaprad ja ilusad" Stephanie Forresteri osatäitja Susan Flannery (1943) on seriaalis mänginud algusest peale s.o. 21 aastat. Lisatud intervjuu näitlejatariga. Sama ka Teleleht nr. 15, lk. 8-9 : ill

  8. Localized Donaldson-Thomas theory of surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gholampour, Amin; Sheshmani, Artan; Yau, Shing-Tung

    2017-01-01

    of the fixed locus of the moduli space with the moduli space of torsion free sheaves and the nested Hilbert schemes on S. We define the localized Donaldson-Thomas invariants of  by virtual localization in the case that  twisted by the anti-canonical bundle of S admits a nonzero global section. When pg(S)>0......Let S be a projective simply connected complex surface and  be a line bundle on S. We study the moduli space of stable compactly supported 2-dimensional sheaves on the total spaces of . The moduli space admits a ℂ∗-action induced by scaling the fibers of . We identify certain components......, in combination with Mochizuki's formulas, we are able to express the localized DT invariants in terms of the invariants of the nested Hilbert schemes defined by the authors in [GSY17a], the Seiberg-Witten invariants of S, and the integrals over the products of Hilbert schemes of points on S. When...

  9. Donaldson-Witten theory and indefinite theta functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpas, Georgios; Manschot, Jan

    2017-11-01

    We consider partition functions with insertions of surface operators of topologically twisted N=2 , SU(2) supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory, or Donaldson-Witten theory for short, on a four-manifold. If the metric of the compact four-manifold has positive scalar curvature, Moore and Witten have shown that the partition function is completely determined by the integral over the Coulomb branch parameter a, while more generally the Coulomb branch integral captures the wall-crossing behavior of both Donaldson polynomials and Seiberg-Witten invariants. We show that after addition of a \\overlineQ -exact surface operator to the Moore-Witten integrand, the integrand can be written as a total derivative to the anti-holomorphic coordinate ā using Zwegers' indefinite theta functions. In this way, we reproduce Göttsche's expressions for Donaldson invariants of rational surfaces in terms of indefinite theta functions for any choice of metric.

  10. Memory for melody and key in childhood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Glenn Schellenberg

    Full Text Available After only two exposures to previously unfamiliar melodies, adults remember the tunes for over a week and the key for over a day. Here, we examined the development of long-term memory for melody and key. Listeners in three age groups (7- to 8-year-olds, 9- to 11-year-olds, and adults heard two presentations of each of 12 unfamiliar melodies. After a 10-min delay, they heard the same 12 old melodies intermixed with 12 new melodies. Half of the old melodies were transposed up or down by six semitones from initial exposure. Listeners rated how well they recognized the melodies from the exposure phase. Recognition was better for old than for new melodies, for adults compared to children, and for older compared to younger children. Recognition ratings were also higher for old melodies presented in the same key at test as exposure, and the detrimental effect of the transposition affected all age groups similarly. Although memory for melody improves with age and exposure to music, implicit memory for key appears to be adult-like by 7 years of age.

  11. Memory for melody and key in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellenberg, E Glenn; Poon, Jaimie; Weiss, Michael W

    2017-01-01

    After only two exposures to previously unfamiliar melodies, adults remember the tunes for over a week and the key for over a day. Here, we examined the development of long-term memory for melody and key. Listeners in three age groups (7- to 8-year-olds, 9- to 11-year-olds, and adults) heard two presentations of each of 12 unfamiliar melodies. After a 10-min delay, they heard the same 12 old melodies intermixed with 12 new melodies. Half of the old melodies were transposed up or down by six semitones from initial exposure. Listeners rated how well they recognized the melodies from the exposure phase. Recognition was better for old than for new melodies, for adults compared to children, and for older compared to younger children. Recognition ratings were also higher for old melodies presented in the same key at test as exposure, and the detrimental effect of the transposition affected all age groups similarly. Although memory for melody improves with age and exposure to music, implicit memory for key appears to be adult-like by 7 years of age.

  12. Enhanced Processing of Vocal Melodies in Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Michael W.; Schellenberg, E. Glenn; Trehub, Sandra E.; Dawber, Emily J.

    2015-01-01

    Music cognition is typically studied with instrumental stimuli. Adults remember melodies better, however, when they are presented in a biologically significant timbre (i.e., the human voice) than in various instrumental timbres (Weiss, Trehub, & Schellenberg, 2012). We examined the impact of vocal timbre on children's processing of melodies.…

  13. Instantons, quivers and noncommutative Donaldson-Thomas theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cirafici, Michele, E-mail: cirafici@math.ist.utl.pt [Centro de Analise Matematica, Geometria e Sistemas Dinamicos, Departamento de Matematica, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Sinkovics, Annamaria, E-mail: A.Sinkovics@damtp.cam.ac.uk [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Szabo, Richard J., E-mail: R.J.Szabo@ma.hw.ac.uk [Department of Mathematics, Heriot-Watt University, Colin Maclaurin Building, Riccarton, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Maxwell Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2011-12-11

    We construct noncommutative Donaldson-Thomas invariants associated with abelian orbifold singularities by analyzing the instanton contributions to a six-dimensional topological gauge theory. The noncommutative deformation of this gauge theory localizes on noncommutative instantons which can be classified in terms of three-dimensional Young diagrams with a colouring of boxes according to the orbifold group. We construct a moduli space for these gauge field configurations which allows us to compute its virtual numbers via the counting of representations of a quiver with relations. The quiver encodes the instanton dynamics of the noncommutative gauge theory, and is associated to the geometry of the singularity via the generalized McKay correspondence. The index of BPS states which compute the noncommutative Donaldson-Thomas invariants is realized via topological quantum mechanics based on the quiver data. We illustrate these constructions with several explicit examples, involving also higher rank Coulomb branch invariants and geometries with compact divisors, and connect our approach with other ones in the literature.

  14. In Conversation with Susan Holtz | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-11-26

    Nov 26, 2010 ... Susan Holtz is a private consultant and Adjunct Professor in the Environmental Planning Department of the Nova Scotia College for Art and Design. As a consultant, Ms. Holtz specializes in energy, environment, and sustainable development policy, and works on related issues as a mediator and facilitator.

  15. Roberts, Dennis C. & Komives, Susan R.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enhancing Student Learning and Development in Cross-Border Higher Education, edited by. Dennis C. Roberts and Susan R. Komives, is a book that resulted from a short-term study-abroad experience between the Universities of Maryland and San Diego with the Qatar Foundation's Education City in Doha in 2010.

  16. The Prosodic Components of Speech Melody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Howard R.

    1981-01-01

    Defines speech melody, with special attention to the distinction between its prosodic and paralinguistic domains. Discusses the role of the prosodic characteristics (stress, center, juncture, pitch direction, pitch height, utterance unit, and utterance group) in producing meaning in speech. (JMF)

  17. Design package lazy susan for the fuel retrieval system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TEDESCHI, D.J.

    1999-09-10

    This is a design package that contains the details for a Lazy Susan style small tool for the Fuel Retrieval System. The Lazy Susan tool is used to help rotate an MCO Fuel Basket when loading it. This document contains requirements, development design information, tests and test reports that pertain to the production of Lazy Susan small tool.

  18. Donaldson v. Van de Kamp: cryonics, assisted suicide, and the challenges of medical science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pommer, R W

    1993-01-01

    In recent years, advances in medical science have left the legal community with a wide array of social, ethical, and legal problems previously unimaginable. Historically, legislative and judicial responses to these advances lagged behind the rapid pace of such developments. The gap between the scientist's question, "Can we do it?," and the lawyer's question, "Should/may we do it?'" is most evident in the field of cryonics, with its technique of cryonic, or cryogenic, suspension. In cryonic suspension, a legally dead but biologically viable person is preserved at an extremely low temperature until advances in medical science make it possible to revive the person and implement an effective cure. The terminally ill patient who wishes to benefit from such treatment is faced with the dilemma that present life must be ceased with hope of future recovery. As a result, the process challenges our traditional notions of death and the prospects of immortality while raising a host of concomitant legal dilemmas. Some facets of this dilemma are exemplified by Donaldson v. Van de Kamp. In Donaldson, Thomas A. Donaldson sought the declaration of a constitutional right to premortem cryonic suspension of his body and the assistance of others in achieving that state. Donaldson, a forty-six-year-old mathematician and computer software scientist, suffers from a malignant brain tumor that was diagnosed by his physicians in 1988. This tumor is inoperable and continues to grow and invade his brain tissue. Donaldson's condition will gradually deteriorate into a persistent vegetative state and will ultimately result in death. Physicians predict his probable death by August 1993. Donaldson petitioned the California courts, seeking a declaration that he had a constitutional right to achieve cryonic suspension before his natural death. His doctors believe that if Donaldson waits until his natural death to be suspended, future reanimation will be futile because the tumor will have destroyed his

  19. Pianists exhibit enhanced memory for vocal melodies but not piano melodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Michael W; Vanzella, Patrícia; Schellenberg, E Glenn; Trehub, Sandra E

    2015-01-01

    Nonmusicians remember vocal melodies (i.e., sung to la la) better than instrumental melodies. If greater exposure to the voice contributes to those effects, then long-term experience with instrumental timbres should elicit instrument-specific advantages. Here we evaluate this hypothesis by comparing pianists with other musicians and nonmusicians. We also evaluate the possibility that absolute pitch (AP), which involves exceptional memory for isolated pitches, influences melodic memory. Participants heard 24 melodies played in four timbres (voice, piano, banjo, marimba) and were subsequently required to distinguish the melodies heard previously from 24 novel melodies presented in the same timbres. Musicians performed better than nonmusicians, but both groups showed a comparable memory advantage for vocal melodies. Moreover, pianists performed no better on melodies played on piano than on other instruments, and AP musicians performed no differently than non-AP musicians. The findings confirm the robust nature of the voice advantage and rule out explanations based on familiarity, practice, and motor representations.

  20. Melody discrimination and protein fold classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert P. Bywater

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the greatest challenges in theoretical biophysics and bioinformatics is the identification of protein folds from sequence data. This can be regarded as a pattern recognition problem. In this paper we report the use of a melody generation software where the inputs are derived from calculations of evolutionary information, secondary structure, flexibility, hydropathy and solvent accessibility from multiple sequence alignment data. The melodies so generated are derived from the sequence, and by inference, of the fold, in ways that give each fold a sound representation that may facilitate analysis, recognition, or comparison with other sequences.

  1. Psychoanalytic Interpretation of Blueberries by Susan Gibb

    OpenAIRE

    Zalbidea Paniagua, Maya

    2014-01-01

    [ES] La obra de ficción digital titulada Blueberries (2009) de Susan Gibb, publicada en la ELO (Organización de literatura electrónica) invita al lector/a a viajar dentro de la mente de la protagonista para descubrir sus experiencias reales e imaginarias en las que se examinan las nociones de género, sexo, cuerpo e identidad de una mujer traumatizada. En este artículo se exploran los modos verbales y visuales en esta ficción digital breve siguiendo patrones semióticos así como se interpretan ...

  2. Effects of Music Notation Reinforcement on Aural Memory for Melodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonviri, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate effects of music notation reinforcement on aural memory for melodies. Participants were 41 undergraduate and graduate music majors in a within-subjects design. Experimental trials tested melodic memory through a sequence of target melodies, distraction melodies, and matched and unmatched answer choices.…

  3. Creative cognition, conceptual combination, and the creative writing of Stephen R. Donaldson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, T B

    2001-04-01

    This article explores the reported use of conceptual combination in Stephen R. Donaldson's development of the idea for his award-winning fantasy series. The Chronicles of Thomas Covenant the Unbeliever. Donaldson's (1991) own account is used to illustrate the general principles of a creative cognition approach to understanding creativity as well as the more specific role of the basic process of conceptual combination. The links between Donaldson's and others' anecdotal accounts of creativity and laboratory investigations are assessed. The article concludes with an argument for a "convergence" approach in which information from anecdotal accounts and laboratory studies is combined to provide a more complete picture of creative functioning than either approach alone can offer.

  4. 75 FR 38837 - Susan Harwood Training Grant Program, FY 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-06

    ...: Notification of Funding Opportunity for Susan Harwood Training Grant Program, FY 2010. Funding Opportunity No... project performance period is $250,000. DATES: Targeted Topic training grant applications must be received... Links section, and then select ``Susan Harwood Training Grant Program''. Please note that on the Harwood...

  5. Susan Lindquist: Visionary scientist and peerless mentor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevis, Brooke J

    2017-01-02

    The science universe is dimmer after one of our brightest stars, Susan Lee Lindquist, was taken by cancer on October 27, 2016. Sue was an innovative, creative, out-of-the-box scientific thinker. She had unique biological intuition-an instinct for both the way things worked and the right questions to ask to uncover new research insights. Her wide-ranging career began with the study of protein folding and molecular chaperones, and she went on to show that protein folding can have profound and unexpected biological effects on such diverse processes as cancer, evolution, and neurodegenerative disease. As Sue's laboratory manager, I would like to offer a ground-floor perspective on what made her an exceptional scientist, mentor, and leader. She created a harmonious, collegial environment where collaborative synergy fueled meaningful progress that will impact science for decades to come. © 2017 Bevis.

  6. The Brain Network Underpinning Novel Melody Creation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Bhim M; Norgaard, Martin; Quinn, Kristen M; Ampudia, Jenine; Squirek, Justin; Dhamala, Mukesh

    2016-12-01

    Musical improvisation offers an excellent experimental paradigm for the study of real-time human creativity. It involves moment-to-moment decision-making, monitoring of one's performance, and utilizing external feedback to spontaneously create new melodies or variations on a melody. Recent neuroimaging studies have begun to study the brain activity during musical improvisation, aiming to unlock the mystery of human creativity. What brain resources come together and how these are utilized during musical improvisation are not well understood. To help answer these questions, we recorded electroencephalography (EEG) signals from 19 experienced musicians while they played or imagined short isochronous learned melodies and improvised on those learned melodies. These four conditions (Play-Prelearned, Play-Improvised, Imagine-Prelearned, Imagine-Improvised) were randomly interspersed in a total of 300 trials per participant. From the sensor-level EEG, we found that there were power differences in the alpha (8-12 Hz) and beta (13-30 Hz) bands in separate clusters of frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital electrodes. Using EEG source localization and dipole modeling methods for task-related signals, we identified the locations and network activities of five sources: the left superior frontal gyrus (L SFG), supplementary motor area (SMA), left inferior parietal lobule (L IPL), right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and right superior temporal gyrus. During improvisation, the network activity between L SFG, SMA, and L IPL was significantly less than during the prelearned conditions. Our results support the general idea that attenuated cognitive control facilitates the production of creative output.

  7. Student chefs debut at Virginia Tech's Donaldson Brown Hotel and Conference Center

    OpenAIRE

    Felker, Susan B.

    2004-01-01

    The leap from graduation to that first full-time job is often daunting to college seniors, but that transition will be much easier for students in the Department of Hospitality and Tourism Management (HTM) program at Virginia Tech's Pamplin College of Business, thanks to hands-on labs at the university's Donaldson Brown Hotel and Conference Center.

  8. Fin-de-Siecle Advances in Neuroeducation: Henry Herbert Donaldson and Reuben Post Halleck

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodoridou, Zoe D.; Triarhou, Lazaros C.

    2009-01-01

    This article focuses on two early attempts at bridging neuroscience and education, made by Henry Herbert Donaldson (1857-1938), a neurologist, and Reuben Post Halleck (1859-1936), an educator. Their works, respectively entitled "The Growth of the Brain: A Study of the Nervous System in Relation to Education" (1895) and "The Education of the…

  9. Psychoanalytic Interpretation of Blueberries by Susan Gibb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya Zalbidea Paniagua

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Blueberries (2009 by Susan Gibb, published in the ELO (Electronic Literature Organization, invites the reader to travel inside the protagonist’s mind to discover real and imaginary experiences examining notions of gender, sex, body and identity of a traumatised woman. This article explores the verbal and visual modes in this digital short fiction following semiotic patterns as well as interpreting the psychological states that are expressed through poetical and technological components. A comparative study of the consequences of trauma in the protagonist will be developed including psychoanalytic theories by Sigmund Freud, Jacques Lacan and the feminist psychoanalysts: Melanie Klein and Bracha Ettinger. The reactions of the protagonist will be studied: loss of reality, hallucinations and Electra Complex, as well as the rise of defence mechanisms and her use of the artistic creativity as a healing therapy. The interactivity of the hypermedia, multiple paths and endings will be analyzed as a literary strategy that increases the reader’s capacity of empathizing with the speaker.

  10. Susan Sontag — A Forgotten Mother?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kludia Ziewiec

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses new and republished translations of Susan Sontag’s work, recently launched by the Karakter publishing house: Regarding the Pan of Others, On Photography, and Against Interpretation and Other Essays. The article focuses on the elements of Sontag’s thought that make her a forgotten mother of feminist and gender theoreticians, as well as such influential critics as Michel Foucault and Roland Barthes. The article points out to continuations of Sontag’s thought in contemporary theoretical and social projects, and to the pertinence of her critical observations on theories based on metaphysics of presence: psychoanalysis, Marxism, or hermeneutics. The article also touches upon history of war photography and related war journalism, and upon the ambivalent quality of imaging of the misery of war. It also present historical and cultural circumstances of the development of Sontag’s thought in the intellectual milieu of New York in the 1960s. The discussion recapitulates the main statements of Sontag’s essays, relating them to a wider theoretical context, which is aimed at a reappraisal of the forgotten intelectual in the history of literature.

  11. Meet EPA Scientist Susan Yee, Ph.D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan Yee, Ph.D., is an ecologist at EPA's Gulf Ecology Division. She is working on the Puerto Rico Sustainable Communities program, developing decision support tools to evaluate how alternative decisions impact coastal ecosystem goods and services

  12. The Nature and Nurture of Melody

    OpenAIRE

    Seesjärvi, Erik; Särkämö, Teppo; Vuoksimaa, Eero; Tervaniemi, Mari; Peretz, Isabelle; Kaprio, Jaakko

    2016-01-01

    Both genetic and environmental factors are known to play a role in our ability to perceive music, but the degree to which they influence different aspects of music cognition is still unclear. We investigated the relative contribution of genetic and environmental effects on melody perception in 384 young adult twins [69 full monozygotic (MZ) twin pairs, 44 full dizygotic (DZ) twin pairs, 70 MZ twins without a co-twin, and 88 DZ twins without a co-twin]. The participants performed three online ...

  13. Memory for Melody: Infants Use a Relative Pitch Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plantinga, Judy; Trainor, Laurel J.

    2005-01-01

    Pitch perception is fundamental to melody in music and prosody in speech. Unlike many animals, the vast majority of human adults store melodic information primarily in terms of relative not absolute pitch, and readily recognize a melody whether rendered in a high or a low pitch range. We show that at 6 months infants are also primarily relative…

  14. Dynamic melody recognition: distinctiveness and the role of musical expertise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailes, Freya

    2010-07-01

    The hypothesis that melodies are recognized at moments when they exhibit a distinctive musical pattern was tested. In a melody recognition experiment, point-of-recognition (POR) data were gathered from 32 listeners (16 musicians and 16 nonmusicians) judging 120 melodies. A series of models of melody recognition were developed, resulting from a stepwise multiple regression of two classes of information relating to melodic familiarity and melodic distinctiveness. Melodic distinctiveness measures were assembled through statistical analyses of over 15,000 Western themes and melodies. A significant model, explaining 85% of the variance, entered measures primarily of timing distinctiveness and pitch distinctiveness, but excluding familiarity, as predictors of POR. Differences between nonmusician and musician models suggest a processing shift from momentary to accumulated information with increased exposure to music. Supplemental materials for this article may be downloaded from http://mc.psychonomic-journals.org/content/supplemental.

  15. Nekrasov's Partition Function and Refined Donaldson-Thomas Theory: the Rank One Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balázs Szendrői

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies geometric engineering, in the simplest possible case of rank one (Abelian gauge theory on the affine plane and the resolved conifold. We recall the identification between Nekrasov's partition function and a version of refined Donaldson-Thomas theory, and study the relationship between the underlying vector spaces. Using a purity result, we identify the vector space underlying refined Donaldson-Thomas theory on the conifold geometry as the exterior space of the space of polynomial functions on the affine plane, with the (Lefschetz SL(2-action on the threefold side being dual to the geometric SL(2-action on the affine plane. We suggest that the exterior space should be a module for the (explicitly not yet known cohomological Hall algebra (algebra of BPS states of the conifold.

  16. Susan swan and the female grotesque Susan swan and the female grotesque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Bornéo Funck

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduced to readers as “the tallest woman freelance writer in Canada”, Susan Swan belongs to a generation of writers whose experimental, innovative fiction has proved vital in the contemporary project of de/re/constructing narrative practice. Her 1983 novel The Biggest Modern Woman of the World constitutes an excellent example of what critic Linda Hutcheon has termed “historiographic metafiction”—”fiction that is intensely, self-reflexively art, but is also grounded in historical, social, and political realities” (Canadian 13. As a conscious engagement with social and historical contexts, such fiction aims at destabilizing and subverting accepted patterns of belief by reconceptualizing and narrating possible subjectivities. By means of intertextuality, especially parody, it engages in an ideological critique in terms of both sexual and national politics. Introduced to readers as “the tallest woman freelance writer in Canada”, Susan Swan belongs to a generation of writers whose experimental, innovative fiction has proved vital in the contemporary project of de/re/constructing narrative practice. Her 1983 novel The Biggest Modern Woman of the World constitutes an excellent example of what critic Linda Hutcheon has termed “historiographic metafiction”—”fiction that is intensely, self-reflexively art, but is also grounded in historical, social, and political realities” (Canadian 13. As a conscious engagement with social and historical contexts, such fiction aims at destabilizing and subverting accepted patterns of belief by reconceptualizing and narrating possible subjectivities. By means of intertextuality, especially parody, it engages in an ideological critique in terms of both sexual and national politics.

  17. Right parietal cortex mediates recognition memory for melodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaal, Nora K; Javadi, Amir-Homayoun; Halpern, Andrea R; Pollok, Bettina; Banissy, Michael J

    2015-07-01

    Functional brain imaging studies have highlighted the significance of right-lateralized temporal, frontal and parietal brain areas for memory for melodies. The present study investigated the involvement of bilateral posterior parietal cortices (PPCs) for the recognition memory of melodies using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). Participants performed a recognition task before and after tDCS. The task included an encoding phase (12 melodies), a retention period, as well as a recognition phase (24 melodies). Experiment 1 revealed that anodal tDCS over the right PPC led to a deterioration of overall memory performance compared with sham. Experiment 2 confirmed the results of Experiment 1 and further showed that anodal tDCS over the left PPC did not show a modulatory effect on memory task performance, indicating a right lateralization for musical memory. Furthermore, both experiments revealed that the decline in memory for melodies can be traced back to an interference of anodal stimulation on the recollection process (remember judgements) rather than to familiarity judgements. Taken together, this study revealed a causal involvement of the right PPC for memory for melodies and demonstrated a key role for this brain region in the recollection process of the memory task. © 2015 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience published by Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Both happy and sad melodies modulate tonic human heat pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huixuan; Chen, Andrew C N

    2009-09-01

    The mechanism of music effects on pain perception remains to be elucidated. To determine which component (mood or valence) of music is more important in music-induced hypoalgesia, we compared the effects of 2 melodies with different moods (happy vs sad) but with the same degree of valence (pleasant vs unpleasant) to an affective neutral lecture and a control (baseline) on the objective and subjective responses to tonic heat pain. Our hypothesis was that if mood was the key component, the happy melody would reduce pain, whereas the sad one would exacerbate pain; and if valence is the key component, the 2 melodies would both alleviate pain. Twenty females participated in this study which consisted of 4 conditions (baseline, happy melody, sad melody, and lecture). Pain tolerance time (PTT), pain intensity, and distress dynamics and the characteristics of pain were measured. A newly devised multiple affective rating scale (MARS) was employed to assess the subjective experience of auditory perception. Both happy and sad melodies of equal valence resulted in significant lower pain ratings during the pain test and were in contrast to the mood prediction. These results indicate that the valence of music, rather than the mood it induced, appears to be the most likely mediator of the hypoalgesic effect of the different music. This article provides new evidence that the valence of music is more crucial than mood in affective pain modulation. This finding gives impetus for health professionals to manage pain more effectively in patients with proper music.

  19. Collaborative Internet Projects: An Interview with Susan Silverman about Her Passion and Hobby.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strangman, Nicole

    2002-01-01

    Outlines an interview with Susan Silverman, an instructional technology integration teacher in the Comsewogue school district in Port Jefferson Station, New York. Describes Susan's transformation from technophobe to an innovator of collaborative Internet projects. (PM)

  20. Brain responses to regular and octave-scrambled melodies: A case of predictive-coding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Globerson, Eitan; Granot, Roni; Tal, Idan; Harpaz, Yuval; Zeev-Wolf, Maor; Golstein, Abraham

    2017-03-01

    Melody recognition is an online process of evaluating incoming information and comparing this information to an existing internal corpus, thereby reducing prediction error. The predictive-coding model postulates top-down control on sensory processing accompanying reduction in prediction error. To investigate the relevancy of this model to melody processing, the current study examined early magnetoencephalogram (MEG) auditory responses to familiar and unfamiliar melodies in 25 participants. The familiar melodies followed and primed an octave-scrambled version of the same melody. The retrograde version of theses melodies served as the unfamiliar control condition. Octave-transposed melodies were included to examine the influence of pitch representation (pitch-height/pitch-chroma representation) on brain responses to melody recognition. Results demonstrate a reduction of the M100 auditory response to familiar, as compared with unfamiliar, melodies regardless of their form of presentation (condensed vs. octave-scrambled). This trend appeared to begin after the third tone of the melody. An additional behavioral study with the same melody corpus showed a similar trend-namely, a significant difference between familiarity rating for familiar and unfamiliar melodies, beginning with the third tone of the melody. These results may indicate a top-down inhibition of early auditory responses to melodies that is influenced by pitch representation. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Donaldson-Thomas Invariants of 2-Dimensional sheaves inside threefolds and modular forms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gholampour, Amin; Sheshmani, Artan

    2018-01-01

    Motivated by the S-duality conjecture, we study the Donaldson-Thomas invariants of the 2 dimensional Gieseker stable sheaves on a threefold. These sheaves are supported on the fibers of a nonsingular threefold X fibered over a nonsingular curve. In the case where X is a K3 fibration, we express t...... these invariants in terms of the Euler characteristic of the Hilbert scheme of points on the K3 fiber and the Noether-Lefschetz numbers of the fibration. We prove that a certain generating function of these invariants is a vector modular form of weight -3/2 as predicted in S-duality....

  2. For 5-Month-Old Infants, Melodies Are Social.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehr, Samuel A; Song, Lee Ann; Spelke, Elizabeth S

    2016-04-01

    For 1 to 2 weeks, 5-month-old infants listened at home to one of two novel songs with identical lyrics and rhythms, but different melodies; the song was sung by a parent, emanated from a toy, or was sung live by a friendly but unfamiliar adult first in person and subsequently via interactive video. We then tested the infants' selective attention to two novel individuals after one sang the familiar song and the other sang the unfamiliar song. Infants who had experienced a parent singing looked longer at the new person who had sung the familiar melody than at the new person who had sung the unfamiliar melody, and the amount of song exposure at home predicted the size of that preference. Neither effect was observed, however, among infants who had heard the song emanating from a toy or being sung by a socially unrelated person, despite these infants' remarkable memory for the familiar melody, tested an average of more than 8 months later. These findings suggest that melodies produced live and experienced at home by known social partners carry social meaning for infants. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. MELODI: Mining Enriched Literature Objects to Derive Intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsworth, Benjamin; Dawe, Karen; Vincent, Emma E; Langdon, Ryan; Lynch, Brigid M; Martin, Richard M; Relton, Caroline; Higgins, Julian P T; Gaunt, Tom R

    2018-01-12

    The scientific literature contains a wealth of information from different fields on potential disease mechanisms. However, identifying and prioritizing mechanisms for further analytical evaluation presents enormous challenges in terms of the quantity and diversity of published research. The application of data mining approaches to the literature offers the potential to identify and prioritize mechanisms for more focused and detailed analysis. Here we present MELODI, a literature mining platform that can identify mechanistic pathways between any two biomedical concepts. Two case studies demonstrate the potential uses of MELODI and how it can generate hypotheses for further investigation. First, an analysis of ETS-related gene ERG and prostate cancer derives the intermediate transcription factor SP1, recently confirmed to be physically interacting with ERG. Second, examining the relationship between a new potential risk factor for pancreatic cancer identifies possible mechanistic insights which can be studied in vitro. We have demonstrated the possible applications of MELODI, including two case studies. MELODI has been implemented as a Python/Django web application, and is freely available to use at [www.melodi.biocompute.org.uk].

  4. Susan Dicklitch. The Elusive Promise of NGO's | Heck | Uganda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Susan Dicklitch. The Elusive Promise of NGO's. Simon Heck. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/uj.v46i1.23044 · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about ...

  5. Automatic Phrase Continuation from Guitar and Bass guitar Melodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cherla, Srikanth; Purwins, Hendrik; Marchini, Marco

    2013-01-01

    is generated by clustering pitch values at multiple similarity thresholds. The Variance Ratio Criterion is then used to select the appropriate clustering levels in the hierarchy. Note onsets are aligned with beats, considering the estimated meter of the melody, to create a sequence of symbols that represent...... the rhythm in terms of onsets/rests and the metrical locations of their occurrence. A joint representation based on the cross-product of the pitch cluster indices and metrical locations is used to train the prediction model - the variable-length Markov chain. The melodies generated by the model were...

  6. A Wavelet-Based Approach to Pattern Discovery in Melodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    : discovering themes and sections in the JKU Patterns Development Database and determining the parent compositions of excerpts from J. S. Bach’s Two-Part Inventions (BWV 772–786). The results indicate that the new approach performs well at finding noticeable and/or important patterns in melodies...

  7. Melody Retrieval and Classification Using Biologically-Inspired Techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bountouridis, D.; Brown, Dan; Koops, Hendrik Vincent; Wiering, F.; Veltkamp, R.C.

    2017-01-01

    Retrieval and classification are at the center of Music Information Retrieval research. Both tasks rely on a method to assess the similarity between two music documents. In the context of symbolically encoded melodies, pairwise alignment via dynamic programming has been the most widely used method.

  8. Harmonic factors in the perception of tonal melodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Povel, D.J.L.; Jansen, E.L.

    2002-01-01

    By common assumption, the first step in processing a tonal melody consists in setting up the appropriate metrical and harmonic frames required for the mental representation of the sequence of tones. Focusing on the generation of a harmonic frame, this study aims (a) to discover the factors that

  9. TEST REPORT OF MOBILE SOURCE EMISSIONS CONTROL DEVICES DONALDSON COMPANY INC.SERIES 6000 DISEL OXIDATION CATALYST MUFFLER AND SPIRACLE CLOSED CRANKCASE FILTRATION SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report is on testing of a Donaldson Corp. catalytic muffler and closed crankcase filtration system for diesel trucks. It verified the emissions for these systems using low sufur and ultra low sulfur fuel.

  10. TEST REPORT OF MOBILE SOURCE EMISSIONS CONTROL DEVICES DONALDSON COMPANY INC.SERIES 6100 DIESEL OXIDATION CATALYST MUFFLER AND SPIRACLE CLOSED CRANKCASE FILTRATION SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report is on an environmental verification of the emissions characteristics of a Donaldson Corp. catalytic muffler and catalyic crankcase emissions control. It was found the systems reduced emissions.

  11. ETV-DRAFT TEST REPORT OF MOBILE SOURCE EMISSIONS CONTROL DEVICES DONALDSON COMPANY,INC. SERIES 6100 DIESEL OXIDATION CATALYST MUFFLER

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report reflects verification testing of a catalytic muffler for diesel trucks. Produced by Donaldson Corp., it was tested on low sulfur and ultra low sulfur fuel, and shown to have reduced emissions.

  12. Words and melody are intertwined in perception of sung words: EEG and behavioral evidence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reyna L Gordon

    Full Text Available Language and music, two of the most unique human cognitive abilities, are combined in song, rendering it an ecological model for comparing speech and music cognition. The present study was designed to determine whether words and melodies in song are processed interactively or independently, and to examine the influence of attention on the processing of words and melodies in song. Event-Related brain Potentials (ERPs and behavioral data were recorded while non-musicians listened to pairs of sung words (prime and target presented in four experimental conditions: same word, same melody; same word, different melody; different word, same melody; different word, different melody. Participants were asked to attend to either the words or the melody, and to perform a same/different task. In both attentional tasks, different word targets elicited an N400 component, as predicted based on previous results. Most interestingly, different melodies (sung with the same word elicited an N400 component followed by a late positive component. Finally, ERP and behavioral data converged in showing interactions between the linguistic and melodic dimensions of sung words. The finding that the N400 effect, a well-established marker of semantic processing, was modulated by musical melody in song suggests that variations in musical features affect word processing in sung language. Implications of the interactions between words and melody are discussed in light of evidence for shared neural processing resources between the phonological/semantic aspects of language and the melodic/harmonic aspects of music.

  13. Higgs at 3.5 seconds into the melody

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2012-01-01

    Listen to the music… at 3.5 into the recording you will be able to “hear” the sound of the newly discovered boson. That’s the beauty of sonification, a technique that translates dry data into beautiful melodies.   Image edit by Katarina Anthony. Sonification is a computational technique that requires enormous amounts of networking and processing power to produce results. The sonification of data presented on 4 July by the ATLAS collaboration was performed using the pan-European GÉANT network and the Grid infrastructure. The result is a melody that at 3.5 seconds reproduces the bump corresponding to the new particle. “This sonification was carried out on the same grid infrastructure used by researchers to reconstruct their data and plot their graphs,” says Domenico Vicinanza of DANTE, who led the Higgs sonification project, collaborating with Mariapaola Sorrentino of ASTRA Project (Cambridge), who contributed to the sonific...

  14. Unwrapping the Thick Coat of Armor: A Conversation with Susan Albrecht

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaff, Marilyn; Teagarden, Jim; Zabel, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Susan Albrecht's career has spanned more than 40 years. During those years she has served as an English teacher, school psychologist, behavior consultant, coordinator of services, and special education faculty member. Her contributions to the field include leadership positions with the Council for Children with Behavioral Disorders. Susan shared…

  15. Practitioner Profile: An Interview with Susan Bross, AFC®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Bross

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available

    Susan Bross is a nationally accredited financial counselor who established her private practice in 1992. She currently lives in San Rafael, California. She brings a multi-faceted background and a combination of skills to her work. As a financial counselor, she works with individuals, couples, and entrepreneurs throughout the nation to help clients develop a practical and emotionally healthy relationship with money. When asked, she will tell you that she is passionate about her work because it mirrors her own hard-won path with money. Readers of the Journal will find Ms. Bross’s approach to financial therapy inspiring. She teaches simple tools for effortless and sustainable cash flow and money management. She also guides her clients to balanced attitudes and beliefs about money and success.

  16. [The Durkheim Test. Remarks on Susan Leigh Star's Boundary Objects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gießmann, Sebastian

    2015-09-01

    The article reconstructs Susan Leigh Star's conceptual work on the notion of 'boundary objects'. It traces the emergence of the concept, beginning with her PhD thesis and its publication as Regions of the Mind in 1989. 'Boundary objects' attempt to represent the distributed, multifold nature of scientific work and its mediations between different 'social worlds'. Being addressed to several 'communities of practice', the term responded to questions from Distributed Artificial Intelligence in Computer Science, Workplace Studies and Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW), and microhistorical approaches inside the growing Science and Technology Studies. Yet the interdisciplinary character and interpretive flexibility of Star’s invention has rarely been noticed as a conceptual tool for media theory. I therefore propose to reconsider Star's 'Durkheim test' for sociotechnical media practices.

  17. Maintenance of memory for melodies: Articulation or attentional refreshing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nees, Michael A; Corrini, Ellen; Leong, Peri; Harris, Joanna

    2017-03-23

    Past research on the effects of articulatory suppression on working memory for nonverbal sounds has been characterized by discrepant findings, which suggests that multiple mechanisms may be involved in the rehearsal of nonverbal sounds. In two experiments we examined the potential roles of two theoretical mechanisms of verbal working memory-articulatory rehearsal and attentional refreshing-in the maintenance of memory for short melodies. In both experiments, participants performed a same-different melody comparison task. During an 8-s retention interval, interference tasks were introduced to suppress articulatory rehearsal, attentional refreshing, or both. In Experiment 1, only the conditions that featured articulatory suppression resulted in worse memory performance than in a control condition, and the suppression of both attentional refreshing and articulatory rehearsal concurrently did not impair memory more than articulatory suppression alone. Experiment 2 reproduced these findings and also confirmed that the locus of interference was articulatory and not auditory (i.e., the interference was not attributable to the sound of participants' own voices during articulatory suppression). Both experiments suggested that articulatory rehearsal played a role in the maintenance of melodies in memory, whereas attentional refreshing did not. We discuss potential theoretical implications regarding the mechanisms used for the rehearsal of nonverbal sounds in working memory.

  18. Something in the way she sings: enhanced memory for vocal melodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Michael W; Trehub, Sandra E; Schellenberg, E Glenn

    2012-10-01

    Across species, there is considerable evidence of preferential processing for biologically significant signals such as conspecific vocalizations and the calls of individual conspecifics. Surprisingly, music cognition in human listeners is typically studied with stimuli that are relatively low in biological significance, such as instrumental sounds. The present study explored the possibility that melodies might be remembered better when presented vocally rather than instrumentally. Adults listened to unfamiliar folk melodies, with some presented in familiar timbres (voice and piano) and others in less familiar timbres (banjo and marimba). They were subsequently tested on recognition of previously heard melodies intermixed with novel melodies. Melodies presented vocally were remembered better than those presented instrumentally even though they were liked less. Factors underlying the advantage for vocal melodies remain to be determined. In line with its biological significance, vocal music may evoke increased vigilance or arousal, which in turn may result in greater depth of processing and enhanced memory for musical details.

  19. Impaired naming of famous musical melodies is associated with left temporal polar damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfi, Amy M; Tranel, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    Previous research has shown that damage to the left temporal pole (LTP) is associated with impaired retrieval of words for unique entities, including names of famous people and landmarks. However, it is not known whether retrieving names for famous melodies is associated with the LTP. The aim of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that damage to the LTP would be associated with impaired naming of famous musical melodies. A Melody Naming Test was administered to patients with LTP damage, brain damaged comparison (BDC) patients, and normal comparison participants (NC). The test included various well-known melodies (e.g., "Pop Goes the Weasel"). After hearing each melody, participants were asked to rate their familiarity with the melody and identify it by name. LTP patients named significantly fewer melodies than BDC and NC participants. Recognition of melodies did not differ significantly between groups. The findings suggest that LTP supports retrieval of names for famous melodies. More broadly, these results extend support for the theoretical notion that LTP is important for retrieving proper names for unique concepts, irrespectively of stimulus modality or category.

  20. Susan J. Quaal: the global and local impact of a transformational leader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, L D

    1998-01-01

    To be a transformational leader in nursing, one must have forever changed the course of our practice. This article highlights the qualities of a great leader, Susan J. Quaal, PhD, APRN, CVS, CCRN. Described are examples of Susan's incredible clinical expertise and also the attributes that make her such a dynamic leader in all domains of the clinical nurse specialist role: Practitioner, educator/mentor, consultant, leader/administrator, and researcher. Interwoven in this article, you will also find the threads of humility and charity that make Susan such an extraordinary human being and a blessing to all the lives she touches.

  1. Human melody singing by bullfinches (Pyrrhula pyrrula) gives hints about a cognitive note sequence processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolai, Jürgen; Gundacker, Christina; Teeselink, Katharina; Güttinger, Hans Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    We studied human melody perception and production in a songbird in the light of current concepts from the cognitive neuroscience of music. Bullfinches are the species best known for learning melodies from human teachers. The study is based on the historical data of 15 bullfinches, raised by 3 different human tutors and studied later by Jürgen Nicolai (JN) in the period 1967-1975. These hand-raised bullfinches learned human folk melodies (sequences of 20-50 notes) accurately. The tutoring was interactive and variable, starting before fledging and JN continued it later throughout the birds' lives. All 15 bullfinches learned to sing alternately melody modules with JN (alternate singing). We focus on the aspects of note sequencing and timing studying song variability when singing the learned melody alone and the accuracy of listening-singing interactions during alternatively singing with JN by analyzing song recordings of 5 different males. The following results were obtained as follows: (1) Sequencing: The note sequence variability when singing alone suggests that the bullfinches retrieve the note sequence from the memory as different sets of note groups (=modules), as chunks (sensu Miller in Psychol Rev 63:81-87, 1956). (2) Auditory-motor interactions, the coupling of listening and singing the human melody: Alternate singing provides insights into the bird's brain melody processing from listening to the actually whistled part of the human melody by JN to the bird's own accurately singing the consecutive parts. We document how variable and correctly bullfinches and JN alternated in their singing the note sequences. Alternate singing demonstrates that melody-singing bullfinches did not only follow attentively the just whistled note contribution of the human by auditory feedback, but also could synchronously anticipate singing the consecutive part of the learned melody. These data suggest that both listening and singing may depend on a single learned human melody

  2. The Role of Tone Height, Melodic Contour, and Tone Chroma in Melody Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massaro, Dominic W.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Relationships among tone height, melodic contour, tone chroma, and recognition of recently learned melodies were investigated. Results replicated previous studies using familiar folk songs, providing evidence that melodic contour, tone chroma, and tone height contribute to recognition of both highly familiar and recently learned melodies.…

  3. Effects of melody and lyrics on mood and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousou, S D

    1997-08-01

    137 undergraduate Le Moyne College students volunteered in a study on music and its effects on mood and memory. In a 2 x 3 between-subjects design, there were 2 lyric conditions (Happy and Sad Lyrics) and 3 music conditions (No Music, Happy Music, and Sad Music). Participants were asked to listen to instrumental music or mentally to create a melody as they read lyrics to themselves. The study tested cued-recall, self-reported mood state and psychological arousal. Analysis suggested that mood of participants was influenced by the music played, not the lyrics. Results also showed those exposed to No Music had the highest score on the recall test. Personal relevance to the lyrics was not correlated with memory.

  4. Memory for melodies in unfamiliar tuning systems: Investigating effects of recency and number of intervening items.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herff, Steffen A; Olsen, Kirk N; Dean, Roger T; Prince, Jon

    2017-05-26

    In a continuous recognition paradigm, most stimuli elicit superior recognition performance when the item to be recognised is the most recent stimulus (a recency-in-memory effect). Furthermore, increasing the number of intervening items cumulatively disrupts memory in most domains. Memory for melodies composed in familiar tuning systems also shows superior recognition for the most recent melody, but no disruptive effects from the number of intervening melodies. A possible explanation has been offered in a novel regenerative multiple representations (RMR) conjecture. The RMR assumes that prior knowledge informs perception and perception influences memory representations. It postulates that melodies are perceived, thus also represented, simultaneously as integrated entities and also their components (such as pitches, pitch intervals, short phrases, and rhythm). Multiple representations of the melody components and melody as a whole can restore one another, thus providing resilience against disruptive effects from intervening items. The conjecture predicts that melodies in an unfamiliar tuning system are not perceived as integrated melodies and should: a) disrupt recency-in-memory advantages; and b) facilitate disruptive effects from the number of intervening items. We test these two predictions in three experiments. Experiments 1 and 2 show that no recency-in-memory effects emerge for melodies in an unfamiliar tuning system. In Experiment 3, disruptive effects occurred as the number of intervening items and unfamiliarity of the stimuli increased. Overall, results are coherent with the predictions of the RMR conjecture. Further investigation of the conjecture's predictions may lead to greater understanding of the fundamental relationships between memory, perception, and behavior.

  5. Motor and Audiovisual Learning Consolidate Auditory Memory of Tonally Ambiguous Melodies

    OpenAIRE

    Schiavio, A.; Timmers, R.

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the role of motor and audiovisual learning in the memorization of four\\ud tonally ambiguous melodies for piano. A total of one hundred and twenty participants divided into\\ud three groups - pianists, other musicians (non-pianists), and non-musicians - learned the melodies\\ud through either playing them on a keyboard (‘playing condition’), through performing the melodies on a\\ud piano without auditory feedback (‘silent playing condition’), through watching a vide...

  6. How the melody facilitates the message and vice versa in infant learning and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiessen, Erik D; Saffran, Jenny R

    2009-07-01

    Infants are often presented with input in which there are multiple related regularities, as is the case in musical input with both melodic and lyrical structure. Adult learners often learn more easily from complex input containing multiple correlated regularities than from simplified input. Do infants also capitalize on complexity, or instead do they benefit from simplified input? In this series of experiments, infants were presented with music in which melodic and lyrical structure predicted each other, or in which only one type of regularity was presented in isolation (melodies alone, or lyrics presented with no melody). Infants learned lyrics more easily when they were paired with a melody than when they were presented alone; similarly, they learned melodies more easily when they were paired with lyrics than when they were presented alone. There are several potential mechanisms that could explain how infants' learning is facilitated by complex input, suggesting important implications for learning in infants' natural environments.

  7. Joint research towards a better radiation protection-highlights of the Fifth MELODI Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerts, A M; Impens, N R E N; Baatout, S; Benotmane, M A; Camps, J; Dabin, J M; Derradji, H; Grosche, B; Horemans, N; Jourdain, J-R; Moreels, M; Perko, T; Quintens, R; Repussard, J; Rühm, W; Schneider, T; Struelens, L; Hardeman, F

    2014-12-01

    MELODI is the European platform dedicated to low-dose radiation risk research. From 7 October through 10 October 2013 the Fifth MELODI Workshop took place in Brussels, Belgium. The workshop offered the opportunity to 221 unique participants originating from 22 countries worldwide to update their knowledge and discuss radiation research issues through 118 oral and 44 poster presentations. In addition, the MELODI 2013 workshop was reaching out to the broader radiation protection community, rather than only the low-dose community, with contributions from the fields of radioecology, emergency and recovery preparedness, and dosimetry. In this review, we summarise the major scientific conclusions of the workshop, which are important to keep the MELODI strategic research agenda up-to-date and which will serve to establish a joint radiation protection research roadmap for the future.

  8. Scale and Contour: Two Components of a Theory of Memory for Melodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, W. Jay

    1978-01-01

    The author concentrates on two components of memory which contribute to the reproduction and recognition of melodies, namely, melodic contour and musical scale. A new experiment is reported that shows the interdependence of both components. (Author/RK)

  9. The effect of exercise-induced arousal on chosen tempi for familiar melodies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jakubowski, Kelly; Halpern, Andrea R; Grierson, Mick; Stewart, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    .... However, it is unknown whether arousal influences the mental representation of tempo (speed) for highly familiar and complex stimuli, such as well-known melodies, that have long-term representations in memory...

  10. Recognition of transposed melodies: Effects of pitch distance and harmonic distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinsmith, Abigail L; Neill, W Trammell

    2017-11-27

    People easily recognize a familiar melody in a previously unheard key, but they also retain some key-specific information. Does the recognition of a transposed melody depend on either pitch distance or harmonic distance from the initially learned instances? Previous research has shown a stronger effect of pitch closeness than of harmonic similarity, but did not directly test for an additional effect of the latter variable. In the present experiment, we familiarized participants with a simple eight-note melody in two different keys (C and D) and then tested their ability to discriminate the target melody from foils in other keys. The transpositions included were to the keys of C# (close in pitch height, but harmonically distant), G (more distant in pitch, but harmonically close), and F# (more distant in pitch and harmonically distant). Across participants, the transpositions to F# and G were either higher or lower than the initially trained melodies, so that their average pitch distances from C and D were equated. A signal detection theory analysis confirmed that discriminability (d') was better for targets and foils that were close in pitch distance to the studied exemplars. Harmonic similarity had no effect on discriminability, but it did affect response bias (c), in that harmonic similarity to the studied exemplars increased both hits and false alarms. Thus, both pitch distance and harmonic distance affect the recognition of transposed melodies, but with dissociable effects on discrimination and response bias.

  11. The effects of rhythm and melody on auditory stream segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szalárdy, Orsolya; Bendixen, Alexandra; Böhm, Tamás M; Davies, Lucy A; Denham, Susan L; Winkler, István

    2014-03-01

    While many studies have assessed the efficacy of similarity-based cues for auditory stream segregation, much less is known about whether and how the larger-scale structure of sound sequences support stream formation and the choice of sound organization. Two experiments investigated the effects of musical melody and rhythm on the segregation of two interleaved tone sequences. The two sets of tones fully overlapped in pitch range but differed from each other in interaural time and intensity. Unbeknownst to the listener, separately, each of the interleaved sequences was created from the notes of a different song. In different experimental conditions, the notes and/or their timing could either follow those of the songs or they could be scrambled or, in case of timing, set to be isochronous. Listeners were asked to continuously report whether they heard a single coherent sequence (integrated) or two concurrent streams (segregated). Although temporal overlap between tones from the two streams proved to be the strongest cue for stream segregation, significant effects of tonality and familiarity with the songs were also observed. These results suggest that the regular temporal patterns are utilized as cues in auditory stream segregation and that long-term memory is involved in this process.

  12. Textual Rhetorics and Textual Carnivals: Susan Miller and the "Subjects" of Rhetoric and Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Nedra

    1991-01-01

    Reviews two books by Susan Miller: "Rescuing the Subject: A Critical Introduction to Rhetoric and the Writer" (1989) and "Textual Carnivals: The Politics of Composition" (1991). Notes how she rereads dominant histories of rhetoric and writing instruction, argues for a theory of textuality, and illustrates how attention to…

  13. Don't Take Touch for Granted: An Interview with Susan Lederman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verry, Rene

    1998-01-01

    Presents an interview with Susan Lederman that contains a fascinating and informative overview of the recent developments in neuropsychological research concerning the sense of touch. Discusses the physiological processes that support this sensory experience and reveals them to be much more flexible, intricate, and adaptive than previously…

  14. Re-Establishing Social Studies as a Core Subject: An Interview with Susan Griffin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Susan

    2014-01-01

    NCSS Executive Director Susan Griffin was chair of the Task Force of Professional Organizations that worked with the Social Studies Assessment, Curriculum, and Instruction Collaborative (SSACI) of the Council of Chief State School Officers to initiate and guide the development of the "College, Career and Civic Life (C3) Framework for Social…

  15. Teaching Students About Stereotypes, Prejudice, and Discrimination: An Interview with Susan Fiske

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackney, Amy

    2005-01-01

    Susan T. Fiske is professor of psychology, Princeton University (PhD, Harvard University; honorary doctorate, Universite Catholique de Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium). She wrote Social Cognition (with Taylor) on how people make sense of each other. Currently, she investigates emotional prejudices (pity, contempt, envy, and pride) at cultural,…

  16. Inside the Sex Ed Studio: An Interview with Susan N. Wilson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taverner, William J.

    2007-01-01

    "Inside the Sex Ed Studio" profiles leaders in the field of sexuality education. Susan N. Wilson, former Executive Coordinator of the Network for Family Life Education, long-time advocate for sexuality education, and the driving force behind New Jersey's K-12 mandate for comprehensive sexuality education was the first such leader to be…

  17. Hippocampal sclerosis affects fMR-adaptation of lyrics and melodies in songs

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    Irene eAlonso

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Songs constitute a natural combination of lyrics and melodies, but it is unclear whether and how these two song components are integrated during the emergence of a memory trace. Network theories of memory suggest a prominent role of the hippocampus, together with unimodal sensory areas, in the build-up of conjunctive representations. The present study tested the modulatory influence of the hippocampus on neural adaptation to songs in lateral temporal areas. Patients with unilateral hippocampal sclerosis and healthy matched controls were presented with blocks of short songs in which lyrics and/or melodies were varied or repeated in a crossed factorial design. Neural adaptation effects were taken as correlates of incidental emergent memory traces. We hypothesized that hippocampal lesions, particularly in the left hemisphere, would weaken adaptation effects, especially the integration of lyrics and melodies. Results revealed that lateral temporal lobe regions showed weaker adaptation to repeated lyrics as well as a reduced interaction of the adaptation effects for lyrics and melodies in patients with left hippocampal sclerosis. This suggests a deficient build-up of a sensory memory trace for lyrics and a reduced integration of lyrics with melodies, compared to healthy controls. Patients with right hippocampal sclerosis showed a similar profile of results although the effects did not reach significance in this population. We highlight the finding that the integrated representation of lyrics and melodies typically shown in healthy participants is likely tied to the integrity of the left medial temporal lobe. This novel finding provides the first neuroimaging evidence for the role of the hippocampus during repetitive exposure to lyrics and melodies and their integration into a song.

  18. The effect of melody on the physiological responses of heel sticks pain in neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marofi, Maryam; Nikobakht, Farzaneh; Badiee, Zohreh; Golchin, Mehri

    2015-01-01

    During health care in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), infants undergo extremely painful procedures, which may cause problems, if not controlled, such as changes in the pattern of respiratory rate, heart rate, and blood oxygen saturation. The present study aimed to find the effect of melody on the physiological responses of neonates' heel stick pain. This quasi-experimental study was conducted in Alzahra Hospital (Isfahan, Iran) for 5 months. Fifty infants were selected through convenient sampling method and were randomly assigned in equal numbers to two groups (n = 25). In the melody group (intervention), a selected melody was played for the infants at a distance of 1 m from them, with a sound intensity of 65 dB, from 3 minutes before, during, and after the heel stick procedure, respectively, and their physiological responses were observed with a monitoring system and recorded at the afore-mentioned time periods. Physiological responses were also recorded in the control group (no intervention) 3 min before, during, and after the heel stick procedure, respectively. Means of respiratory and pulse rates in the melody and control groups showed a significant difference at different time points. But the mean blood oxygen saturation in the melody group showed no significant difference at different time points, although the difference was significant in the control group. The results showed that melody could maintain more balance in some physiological responses of infants, such as the respiratory rate and pulse rate during the Guthrie test. Therefore, melody is recommended to be used to prevent the destructive effects of pain in infants during painful procedures.

  19. Predicting Variation of Folk Songs: A Corpus Analysis Study on the Memorability of Melodies

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    Berit Janssen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a hypothesis-driven study on the variation of melody phrases in a collection of Dutch folk songs. We investigate the variation of phrases within the folk songs through a pattern matching method which detects occurrences of these phrases within folk song variants, and ask the question: do the phrases which show less variation have different properties than those which do? We hypothesize that theories on melody recall may predict variation, and as such, investigate phrase length, the position and number of repetitions of a given phrase in the melody in which it occurs, as well as expectancy and motif repetivity. We show that all of these predictors account for the observed variation to a moderate degree, and that, as hypothesized, those phrases vary less which are rather short, contain highly expected melodic material, occur relatively early in the melody, and contain small pitch intervals. A large portion of the variance is left unexplained by the current model, however, which leads us to a discussion of future approaches to study memorability of melodies.

  20. Predicting Variation of Folk Songs: A Corpus Analysis Study on the Memorability of Melodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Berit; Burgoyne, John A; Honing, Henkjan

    2017-01-01

    We present a hypothesis-driven study on the variation of melody phrases in a collection of Dutch folk songs. We investigate the variation of phrases within the folk songs through a pattern matching method which detects occurrences of these phrases within folk song variants, and ask the question: do the phrases which show less variation have different properties than those which do? We hypothesize that theories on melody recall may predict variation, and as such, investigate phrase length, the position and number of repetitions of a given phrase in the melody in which it occurs, as well as expectancy and motif repetivity. We show that all of these predictors account for the observed variation to a moderate degree, and that, as hypothesized, those phrases vary less which are rather short, contain highly expected melodic material, occur relatively early in the melody, and contain small pitch intervals. A large portion of the variance is left unexplained by the current model, however, which leads us to a discussion of future approaches to study memorability of melodies.

  1. The effects of timbre on melody recognition are mediated by familiarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuley, J. Devin; Ayala, Chris

    2002-11-01

    Two experiments examined the role of timbre in music recognition. In both experiments, participants rated the familiarity of a set of novel and well-known musical excerpts during a study phase and then were given a surprise old/new recognition test after a retention interval. The recognition test was comprised of the target melodies and an equal number of distractors; participants were instructed to respond yes to the targets and no to the distractors. In experiment 1, the timbre of the melodies was held constant throughout the study and then either stayed the same or switched to a different instrument sound during the test. In experiment 2, timbre varied randomly from trial to trial between the same two instruments used in experiment 1, yielding target melodies that were either mismatched or matched in their timbre. Switching timbre between study and test in experiment 1 was found to hurt the recognition of the novel melodies, but not the familiar melodies. The mediating effect of familiarity was eliminated in experiment 2 when timbre varied randomly from trial to trial rather than remaining constant. Possible reasons for the difference between studies will be discussed.

  2. Physical interaction and association by contiguity in memory for the words and melodies of songs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowder, R G; Serafine, M L; Repp, B

    1990-09-01

    Three experiments were designed to investigate two explanations for the integration effect in memory for songs (Serafine, Crowder, & Repp, 1984; Serafine, Davidson, Crowder, & Repp, 1986). The integration effect is the finding that recognition of the melody (or text) of a song is better in the presence of the text (or melody) with which it had been heard originally than in the presence of a different text (or melody). One explanation for this finding is the physical interaction hypothesis, which holds that one component of a song exerts subtle but memorable physical changes on the other component, making the latter different from what it would be with a different companion. In Experiments 1 and 2, we investigated the influence that words could exert on the subtle musical character of a melody. A second explanation for the integration effect is the association-by-contiguity hypothesis, which holds that any two events experienced in close temporal proximity may become connected in memory such that each acts as a recall cue for the other. In Experiment 3, we investigated the degree to which simultaneous presentations of spoken text with a hummed melody would induce an association between the two components. The results gave encouragement for both explanations and are discussed in terms of the distinction between encoding specificity and independent associative bonding.

  3. Foreign language learning in French speakers is associated with rhythm perception, but not with melody perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatara, Anjali; Yeung, H Henny; Nazzi, Thierry

    2015-04-01

    There has been increasing interest in links between language and music. Here, we investigate the relation between foreign language learning and music perception. We administered tests measuring melody and rhythm perception as well as a questionnaire on musical and foreign language experience to 147 monolingual French speakers. As expected, we found that musicians had better melody and rhythm perception than nonmusicians and that, among musicians, there was a positive correlation between the total number of years of music training and test scores. Crucially, we also found a positive correlation between the total number of years learning foreign languages and rhythm perception, but we found no such relation with melody perception. Moreover, the degree to which participants were better at rhythm than melody perception was also related to foreign language experience. Results suggest that both music training and learning foreign languages (primarily English, Spanish, and German in our sample) are related to French speakers' perception of rhythm, but not to their perception of melody. These results are discussed with respect to the rhythmic properties of French and suggest a common perceptual basis for rhythm in language and music. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  4. Music Information Retrieval from a Singing Voice Using Lyrics and Melody Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shozo Makino

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, several music information retrieval (MIR systems which retrieve musical pieces by the user's singing voice have been developed. All of these systems use only melody information for retrieval, although lyrics information is also useful for retrieval. In this paper, we propose a new MIR system that uses both lyrics and melody information. First, we propose a new lyrics recognition method. A finite state automaton (FSA is used as recognition grammar, and about 86% retrieval accuracy was obtained. We also develop an algorithm for verifying a hypothesis output by a lyrics recognizer. Melody information is extracted from an input song using several pieces of information of the hypothesis, and a total score is calculated from the recognition score and the verification score. From the experimental results, 95.0% retrieval accuracy was obtained with a query consisting of five words.

  5. Music Information Retrieval from a Singing Voice Using Lyrics and Melody Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzuki Motoyuki

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, several music information retrieval (MIR systems which retrieve musical pieces by the user's singing voice have been developed. All of these systems use only melody information for retrieval, although lyrics information is also useful for retrieval. In this paper, we propose a new MIR system that uses both lyrics and melody information. First, we propose a new lyrics recognition method. A finite state automaton (FSA is used as recognition grammar, and about retrieval accuracy was obtained. We also develop an algorithm for verifying a hypothesis output by a lyrics recognizer. Melody information is extracted from an input song using several pieces of information of the hypothesis, and a total score is calculated from the recognition score and the verification score. From the experimental results, 95.0 retrieval accuracy was obtained with a query consisting of five words.

  6. Music Information Retrieval from a Singing Voice Using Lyrics and Melody Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Motoyuki; Hosoya, Toru; Ito, Akinori; Makino, Shozo

    2006-12-01

    Recently, several music information retrieval (MIR) systems which retrieve musical pieces by the user's singing voice have been developed. All of these systems use only melody information for retrieval, although lyrics information is also useful for retrieval. In this paper, we propose a new MIR system that uses both lyrics and melody information. First, we propose a new lyrics recognition method. A finite state automaton (FSA) is used as recognition grammar, and about[InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] retrieval accuracy was obtained. We also develop an algorithm for verifying a hypothesis output by a lyrics recognizer. Melody information is extracted from an input song using several pieces of information of the hypothesis, and a total score is calculated from the recognition score and the verification score. From the experimental results, 95.0[InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] retrieval accuracy was obtained with a query consisting of five words.

  7. Sex Differences in Music: A Female Advantage at Recognizing Familiar Melodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Scott A; Miranda, Robbin A; Ullman, Michael T

    2016-01-01

    Although sex differences have been observed in various cognitive domains, there has been little work examining sex differences in the cognition of music. We tested the prediction that women would be better than men at recognizing familiar melodies, since memories of specific melodies are likely to be learned (at least in part) by declarative memory, which shows female advantages. Participants were 24 men and 24 women, with half musicians and half non-musicians in each group. The two groups were matched on age, education, and various measures of musical training. Participants were presented with well-known and novel melodies, and were asked to indicate their recognition of familiar melodies as rapidly as possible. The women were significantly faster than the men in responding, with a large effect size. The female advantage held across musicians and non-musicians, and across melodies with and without commonly associated lyrics, as evidenced by an absence of interactions between sex and these factors. Additionally, the results did not seem to be explained by sex differences in response biases, or in basic motor processes as tested in a control task. Though caution is warranted given that this is the first study to examine sex differences in familiar melody recognition, the results are consistent with the hypothesis motivating our prediction, namely that declarative memory underlies knowledge about music (particularly about familiar melodies), and that the female advantage at declarative memory may thus lead to female advantages in music cognition (particularly at familiar melody recognition). Additionally, the findings argue against the view that female advantages at tasks involving verbal (or verbalizable) material are due solely to a sex difference specific to the verbal domain. Further, the results may help explain previously reported cognitive commonalities between music and language: since declarative memory also underlies language, such commonalities may be

  8. Sex Differences in Music: A Female Advantage at Recognizing Familiar Melodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael T Ullman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Although sex differences have been observed in various cognitive domains, there has been little work examining sex differences in the cognition of music. We tested the prediction that women would be better than men at recognizing familiar melodies, since memories of specific melodies are likely to be learned (at least in part by declarative memory, which shows female advantages. Participants were 24 men and 24 women, with half musicians and half non-musicians in each group. The two groups were matched on age, education, and various measures of musical training. Participants were presented with well-known and novel melodies, and were asked to indicate their recognition of familiar melodies as rapidly as possible. The women were significantly faster than the men in responding, with a large effect size. The female advantage held across musicians and non-musicians, and across melodies with and without commonly associated lyrics, as evidenced by an absence of interactions between sex and these factors. Additionally, the results did not seem to be explained by sex differences in response biases, or in basic auditory or motor processes as tested in a control task. Though caution is warranted given that this is the first study to examine sex differences in familiar melody recognition, the results are consistent with the hypothesis motivating our prediction, namely that declarative memory underlies knowledge about music (particularly about familiar melodies, and that the female advantage at declarative memory may thus lead to female advantages in music cognition (particularly at familiar melody recognition. Additionally, the findings argue against the view that female advantages at tasks involving verbal (or verbalizable material are due solely to a sex difference specific to the verbal domain. Further, the results may help explain previously-reported cognitive commonalities between music and language: since declarative memory also underlies language

  9. Context-Related Melodies in Oral Culture: An Attempt to Describe Words-and-Music Relationships in Local Singing Tradition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taive Särg

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available In oral folk song traditions we often find many lyrics, but not nearly as many melodies. The terms “polyfunctionalism”, “group melodies” or “general melodies” have been used by Estonian researches to indicate the phenomenon that many lyrics were sung to only one, or a small handful, of tunes. The scarcity of melodies is supposed to be one of several related phenomena characteristic to an oral, text-centred singing culture.In this article the Estonian folk song tradition will be analysed against a quantity of melodies and their usage in the following aspects: word-and-melody relationships and context-and-melody relationships in Karksi parish (south Estonia; a singer; and native musical terms and the process of singing and (recreation.

  10. The flute melody: The experience of mystique in the contemporary context

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    Luiz Siveres

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mystique is an essential dimension of human condition which could be exercised in different ways through the relationship of a person with oneself, with others and with the transcendent. From our point of view, mystique has historically been linked to religious institutions or incorporated into spiritual experiences, disfiguring it’s specificity to be understood as an inner energy, a movement of connectivity and a light that illuminates the transcendent. In this sense we propose the metaphor of "flute melody", to express that the flute, as an instrument, identifies itself more with the institutions, the beliefs and the symbols, while the melody is closer from energy, movement and light. Isn’t intended to indicate a preference for one of these aspects, but recover the dimension of the melody, up so that the flute has recognized its own statute, valuing the coexistence, the reciprocity or the dialogical relationship between the flute and the melody. Although making reference to an original experience, on the case of Abraham, in which we found the dynamics of internalization, connection and transcendence, the text was elaborated to be a contribution for the mystical experience in the contemporary context.

  11. The Patterns of Music: Young Children Learning Mathematics through Beat, Rhythm, and Melody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geist, Kamile; Geist, Eugene A.; Kuznik, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    Research on music and music therapy suggests that math and music are related in the brain from very early in life. Musical elements such as steady beat, rhythm, melody, and tempo possess inherent mathematical principles such as spatial properties, sequencing, counting, patterning, and one-to-one correspondence. With new understanding about the…

  12. Singers' Recall for the Words and Melody of a New, Unaccompanied Song

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsborg, Jane; Sloboda, John A.

    2007-01-01

    The nature of the relationship between words and music in memory has been studied in a variety of ways, from investigations of listeners' recall for the words of songs stored in long-term memory to recall for novel information set to unfamiliar melodies. We asked singers to perform an unaccompanied song from memory following deliberate learning…

  13. 70. Surgical mitral valve replacement with modified Melody valve in children

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    Ahmed Badr Elwy

    2015-10-01

    Conclusions: The modified Melody valve is a viable option for children MV annular diameters, providing a valid alternative to existing prostheses. The technique is relatively easy and the short term result is very good. This prosthesis will be particularly attractive if maintaining competence after subsequent dilations as the child grows.

  14. Paediatric Melody® mitral valve replacement in acute endocarditis - alternative surgical-hybrid technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haponiuk, Ireneusz; Chojnicki, Maciej; Jaworski, Radosław; Steffens, Mariusz; Paczkowski, Konrad; Szofer-Sendrowska, Aneta; Paśko-Majewska, Marta; Gierat-Haponiuk, Katarzyna; Romanowicz, Anna; Szymanowicz, Wiktor

    2017-01-01

    Acute endocarditis (AE) is still rare disease in the paediatric population; nevertheless, the children suffering from AE usually need heart valve repair or replacement in emergency settings. We present a case of emergency mitral valve replacement with the use of Melody balloon expandable stented bioprosthesis in a two-year-old patient with AE and subsequent mitral (bicuspid) valve incompetence after aggressive infective destruction with the symptoms of critical multi-organ failure. The patient, with a history of rapid deterioration after two-week-long septicaemia in the course of AE, was operated urgently after initial antibiotic treatment because of huge vegetations into the mitral valve orifice. A Melody TVP 22 valve was expanded over a 16-mm TyShak balloon and implanted into a mitral position (Melody-MVR) with good result. Based on current knowledge concerning heart valve reconstructions and institutional experience, we conclude that infected mitral valve in children should be primarily repaired; nevertheless, the Melody valve could be reasonably con-sidered as a mitral prosthesis in such conditions.

  15. Music-to-Color Associations of Single-Line Piano Melodies in Non-synesthetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Stephen E; Langlois, Thomas A; Schloss, Karen B

    2016-01-01

    Prior research has shown that non-synesthetes' color associations to classical orchestral music are strongly mediated by emotion. The present study examines similar cross-modal music-to-color associations for much better controlled musical stimuli: 64 single-line piano melodies that were generated from four basic melodies by Mozart, whose global musical parameters were manipulated in tempo(slow/fast), note-density (sparse/dense), mode (major/minor) and pitch-height (low/high). Participants first chose the three colors (from 37) that they judged to be most consistent with (and, later, the three that were most inconsistent with) the music they were hearing. They later rated each melody and each color for the strength of its association along four emotional dimensions: happy/sad, agitated/calm, angry/not-angry and strong/weak. The cross-modal choices showed that faster music in the major mode was associated with lighter, more saturated, yellower (warmer) colors than slower music in the minor mode. These results replicate and extend those of Palmer et al. (2013, Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. 110, 8836-8841) with more precisely controlled musical stimuli. Further results replicated strong evidence for emotional mediation of these cross-modal associations, in that the emotional ratings of the melodies were very highly correlated with the emotional associations of the colors chosen as going best/worst with the melodies (r = 0.92, 0.85, 0.82 and 0.70 for happy/sad, strong/weak,angry/not-angry and agitated/calm, respectively). The results are discussed in terms of common emotional associations forming a cross-modal bridge between highly disparate sensory inputs.

  16. The acoustic and perceptual cues affecting melody segregation for listeners with a cochlear implant.

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    Jeremy eMarozeau

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Our ability to listen selectively to single sound sources in complex auditory environments is termed ‘auditory stream segregation.’ This ability is affected by peripheral disorders such as hearing loss, as well as plasticity in central processing such as occurs with musical training. Brain plasticity induced by musical training can enhance the ability to segregate sound, leading to improvements in a variety of auditory abilities. The melody segregation ability of 12 cochlear-implant recipients was tested using a new method to determine the perceptual distance needed to segregate a simple 4-note melody from a background of interleaved random-pitch distractor notes. In experiment 1, participants rated the difficulty of segregating the melody from distracter notes. Four physical properties of the distracter notes were changed. In experiment 2, listeners were asked to rate the dissimilarity between melody patterns whose notes differed on the four physical properties simultaneously. Multidimensional scaling analysis transformed the dissimilarity ratings into perceptual distances. Regression between physical and perceptual cues then derived the minimal perceptual distance needed to segregate the melody.The most efficient streaming cue for CI users was loudness. For the normal hearing listeners without musical backgrounds, a greater difference on the perceptual dimension correlated to the temporal envelope is needed for stream segregation in CI users. No differences in streaming efficiency were found between the perceptual dimensions linked to the F0 and the spectral envelope.Combined with our previous results in normally-hearing musicians and non-musicians, the results show that differences in training as well as differences in peripheral auditory processing (hearing impairment and the use of a hearing device influences the way that listeners use different acoustic cues for segregating interleaved musical streams.

  17. "A hint of it, with initials": adultery, textuality and publicity in Jane Austen's Lady Susan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Gillian

    2010-01-01

    In spite of Jane Austen's professed “eye” for an adulteress, comparatively little attention has been paid to adultery and divorce as themes and contexts of her fiction. Her unpublished epistolary novel Lady Susan has a distinctive status in Austen's oeuvre, recognized as being exemplary of her “style” and yet atypical of her later achievement. A neglected context for the novel is the extensive reporting of adultery trials in contemporary print culture and the moral panic concerning adultery in the 1780s and 1790s, focusing initially on the adulteress as the brazen woman of fashion and later as a figure of sentimentalized abjection. A particularly notorious case, that involving Lady Henrietta Grosvenor and George III's brother, the Duke of Cumberland, is directly alluded to in Lady Susan. The textual strategies of adultery trial literature, particularly its emphasis on indirection through the use of detail or “hint”, had a long-term influence on the development of Austen's fiction and her positioning of herself as a professional writer after the 1790s.

  18. EFFECTS OF SENSORI-MOTOR LEARNING ON MELODY PROCESSING ACROSS DEVELOPMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, Elizabeth M; James, Karin H

    2011-12-01

    Actions influence perceptions, but how this occurs may change across the lifespan. Studies have investigated how object-directed actions (e.g., learning about objects through manipulation) affect subsequent perception, but how abstract actions affect perception, and how this may change across development, have not been well studied. In the present study, we address this question, teaching children (4-7 year-olds) and adults sung melodies, with or without an abstract motor component, and using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) to determine how these melodies are subsequently processed. Results demonstrated developmental change in the motor cortices and Middle Temporal Gyrus. Results have implications for understanding sensori-motor integration in the developing brain, and may provide insight into motor learning use in some music education techniques.

  19. Simplified surgical-hybrid Melody valve implantation for paediatric mitral valve disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Michael; Dave, Hitendu; Hübler, Michael; Kretschmar, Oliver

    2015-05-01

    Children suffering from left atrioventricular valve (LAVV) disease not amenable to repair represent a significant challenge. The results of surgical reconstruction are not optimal. Valve replacement as an alternative is associated with poor results. The surgical-hybrid approach with implantation of a stented biological valve (bovine jugular vein graft, Melody valve) seems to represent a new therapeutic option. Here we demonstrate our case, the consideration and the approach to extreme clinical findings in a small child. We describe a simplified surgical-hybrid Melody valve implantation in a LAVV position. The technique of implantation is relatively simple and the immediate postoperative result very good. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  20. Efficacy of melody-based aphasia therapy may strongly depend on rhythm and conversational speech formulas

    OpenAIRE

    Benjamin Stahl

    2014-01-01

    Left-hemisphere stroke patients suffering from language and speech disorders are often able to sing entire pieces of text fluently. This finding has inspired a number of melody-based rehabilitation programs – most notable among them a treatment known as Melodic Intonation Therapy – as well as two fundamental research questions. When the experimental design focuses on one point in time (cross section), one may determine whether or not singing has an immediate effect on syllable production in p...

  1. Neural substrates for semantic memory of familiar songs: is there an interface between lyrics and melodies?

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    Yoko Saito

    Full Text Available Findings on song perception and song production have increasingly suggested that common but partially distinct neural networks exist for processing lyrics and melody. However, the neural substrates of song recognition remain to be investigated. The purpose of this study was to examine the neural substrates involved in the accessing "song lexicon" as corresponding to a representational system that might provide links between the musical and phonological lexicons using positron emission tomography (PET. We exposed participants to auditory stimuli consisting of familiar and unfamiliar songs presented in three ways: sung lyrics (song, sung lyrics on a single pitch (lyrics, and the sung syllable 'la' on original pitches (melody. The auditory stimuli were designed to have equivalent familiarity to participants, and they were recorded at exactly the same tempo. Eleven right-handed nonmusicians participated in four conditions: three familiarity decision tasks using song, lyrics, and melody and a sound type decision task (control that was designed to engage perceptual and prelexical processing but not lexical processing. The contrasts (familiarity decision tasks versus control showed no common areas of activation between lyrics and melody. This result indicates that essentially separate neural networks exist in semantic memory for the verbal and melodic processing of familiar songs. Verbal lexical processing recruited the left fusiform gyrus and the left inferior occipital gyrus, whereas melodic lexical processing engaged the right middle temporal sulcus and the bilateral temporo-occipital cortices. Moreover, we found that song specifically activated the left posterior inferior temporal cortex, which may serve as an interface between verbal and musical representations in order to facilitate song recognition.

  2. Simplified surgical-hybrid Melody® valve implantation for paediatric mitral valve disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hofmann, Michael; Dave, Hitendu; Hübler, Michael; Kretschmar, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Children suffering from left atrioventricular valve (LAVV) disease not amenable to repair represent a significant challenge. The results of surgical reconstruction are not optimal. Valve replacement as an alternative is associated with poor results. The surgical-hybrid approach with implantation of a stented biological valve (bovine jugular vein graft, Melody® valve) seems to represent a new therapeutic option. Here we demonstrate our case, the consideration and the approach to extreme clinic...

  3. Hybrid Approach to Pulmonary Valve Replacement with Melody Prosthesis Following Pulmonary Banding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Saleh, Walid K; Lin, Chun H; Breinholt, John P; Ramlawi, Basel

    2016-03-01

    We report the case of a 27-year-old Jehovah's Witness patient with severe pulmonary insufficiency and right ventricular dilatation 16 years after primary repair, who sought transcatheter therapy as a means to avoid surgery and the risk of blood product administration. A hybrid procedure involving pulmonary artery banding to a diameter amenable to fixation of a Melody valve (Medtronic Inc.) via trans-ventricular puncture was performed. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Second International MELODI Workshop on Low Dose Risk Research - Slides of the presentations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Repussard, J.; Weiss, W.; Quintana Trias, O.; Rosario Perez, M. del; Andersen, M.; Rudiger Trott, K.; Ottolenghi, A.; Smyth, V.; Graw, J.; Little, M.P.; Yonai, S.; Barcellos-Hoff, M.H.; Bouffler, S.; Chevillard, S.; Jeggo, P.; Sabatier, L.; Baatout, S.; Niwa, O.; Oesch, F.; Atkinson, M.; Averbeck, D.; Lloyd, D.; O' Neill, P.

    2011-07-01

    The MELODI (Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative) mission is to impulse low dose risk research in Europe through a strategic research agenda (SRA) and road-map of priorities. The last presentation is dedicated to the SRA and its preference research programs. The other presentations deal principally with the low-dose exposure in medical uses of ionizing radiations, radiosensitivity, radiation-induced cataracts, or epidemiology and radiobiology of cardiovascular disease. This document is composed of the slides of the presentations

  5. The Harmonic Walk: An Interactive Physical Environment to Learn Tonal Melody Accompaniment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcella Mandanici

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Harmonic Walk is an interactive physical environment designed for learning and practicing the accompaniment of a tonal melody. Employing a highly innovative multimedia system, the application offers to the user the possibility of getting in touch with some fundamental tonal music features in a very simple and readily available way. Notwithstanding tonal music is very common in our lives, unskilled people as well as music students and even professionals are scarcely conscious of what these features actually are. The Harmonic Walk, through the body movement in space, can provide all these users a live experience of tonal melody structure, chords progressions, melody accompaniment, and improvisation. Enactive knowledge and embodied cognition allow the user to build an inner map of these musical features, which can be acted by moving on the active surface with a simple step. Thorough assessment tests with musicians and nonmusicians high school students could prove the high communicative power and efficiency of the Harmonic Walk application both in improving musical knowledge and in accomplishing complex musical tasks.

  6. Abstracts of the 4th International MELODI Workshop 12 -14 September 2012, Helsinki, Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulonen, N. (ed.)

    2012-08-15

    The Fourth International MELODI Workshop is organized by STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority in Helsinki, Finland, on 12-14 September 2012. The workshop offers an update of recent low-dose research issues, and an opportunity to participate in the MELODI Low Dose Research Platform, a major step in the long term goals that the European Low-Dose Risk research intends to achieve. The main goal of MELODI is to develop and maintain a Strategic Research Agenda (SRA) in the field of low-dose radiation research, and to actively promote its implementation. DoReMi Network of Excellence funded by the European Commission is supporting the setting up of the Platform and addressing some of its research needs. In line with one of the main SRA goals, a major aim of the workshop was to set all topics in an interdisciplinary context. The Workshop abstracts cover plenary lectures as well as poster presentations related to topical discussions in breakout sessions. The theme of the first day 'Low dose risk research - state of the art' provides an introduction to the MELODI activities and the SRA and an update on recent epidemiological studies and dosimetric aspects of low dose studies. Potential implications of cardiovascular disease risk for radiation protection are also addressed. Discussion on the state-of-the art of MELODI SRA took place in three break-out groups addressing epidemiological approaches, cancer mechanisms and models and infrastructures and knowledge management. The second day 'Emerging scientific challenges' features the development of science and novel technologies, covering topics such as epigenetics, systems biology, stem cells as well as biomarkers that could be potentially used in molecular epidemiological studies. The associated breakout sessions explore the roadmap for future research, covering themes on biomarkers and biobanks, non-cancer effects, as well as low dose dosimetry and dose concept. The third day 'Integrating the

  7. In the postmodern mirror: intertextuality in Angels and Insects by Antonia Susan Byatt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buda Agata

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to analyse the novel Angels and Insects by Antonia Susan Byatt in terms of intertextual references. The author’s assumptions are based on the categorisation by Ryszard Nycz, who distinguishes three major types of intertexts: text versus text, text versus literary genre and text versus mimesis. Byatt uses intertextuality mainly to comment on the role of nature in the world, as well as to enhance the importance of human relationship with nature. Moreover, the writer moves towards literary criticism, discussing poems by famous artists, such as Alfred Tennyson or John Milton. In this way, the novel by Byatt is also an example of metafiction. All the narration techniques used by the English writer make the novel a typically postmodern work of art.

  8. Intermittent large amplitude internal waves observed in Port Susan, Puget Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, J. C.; Decker, L.

    2017-07-01

    A previously unreported internal tidal bore, which evolves into solitary internal wave packets, was observed in Port Susan, Puget Sound, and the timing, speed, and amplitude of the waves were measured by CTD and visual observation. Acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) measurements were attempted, but unsuccessful. The waves appear to be generated with the ebb flow along the tidal flats of the Stillaguamish River, and the speed and width of the resulting waves can be predicted from second-order KdV theory. Their eventual dissipation may contribute significantly to surface mixing locally, particularly in comparison with the local dissipation due to the tides. Visually the waves appear in fair weather as a strong foam front, which is less visible the farther they propagate.

  9. (REREADING INDEX CARDS: THE ARCHIVIST AS INTERPRETER IN SUSAN PUI SAN LOK'S 'NEWS'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Camacho

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Looking at susan pui san lok's projects News (2005 and RoCH (2013, this paper contemplates the notions put forward by Michel-Rolph Trouillot and Jacques Derrida on the power of archivists, not solely as guardians of documents but also as their interpreters. Taking into consideration that photographic and moving image archives present unique difficulties in their cataloguing processes, I examine silences that might be generated by a thematic classification that is not impervious to archivists' biases. Moreover, I consider if the silences created by manual processes of classification and retrieval might be surpassed through digital technologies, or if it is possible that new technologies simply create different types of silencing.

  10. Prof C. N. Yang (Physics Nobel Prize 1957) from Tsinghua University (Beijing) during his CERN Colloquium: "Thematic Melodies of Twentieth Century Theoretical Physics: Quantization, Symmetry and Phase Factor".

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    Prof C. N. Yang (Physics Nobel Prize 1957) from Tsinghua University (Beijing) during his CERN Colloquium: "Thematic Melodies of Twentieth Century Theoretical Physics: Quantization, Symmetry and Phase Factor".

  11. "I Am Not a Fairy Tale": Contextualizing Sioux Spirituality and Story Traditions in Susan Power's "The Grass Dancer"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diana, Vanessa Holford

    2009-01-01

    Standing Rock Sioux writer Susan Power's best-selling novel "The Grass Dancer" (1994) includes depictions of the supernatural and spiritual that do not conform to the Judeo-Christian or, in some cases, the atheist or rationalist worldviews of many readers. Power writes of ghost characters and haunted places, communication between the living and…

  12. 78 FR 75676 - Mark W. Dobronski and Susan K. Dobronski-Acquisition of Control Exemption-Adrian & Blissfield...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Mark W. Dobronski and Susan K. Dobronski--Acquisition of Control Exemption... Company, Lapeer Industrial Railroad Company and Jackson & Lansing Railroad Company Mark W. Dobronski and...

  13. Hybrid Melody pulmonary valve replacement in an adult with severe pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary artery aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derk, Gwendolyn; Laks, Hillel; Aboulhosn, Jamil

    2013-11-01

    A 48-year-old female with D-TGA, ventricular septal defect (VSD), pulmonary stenosis, pulmonary hypertension (PAH), and total anomalous pulmonary venous connection underwent hybrid intervention for a pulmonary artery (PA) aneurysm and replacement of a dysfunctional pulmonary valve (PV). She underwent a hemi-Mustard procedure at 9 years of age but remained cyanotic. She developed atrial fibrillation, heart failure, and functional decline at 43 years of age. A chest CT demonstrated a 6 cm PA aneurysm that upon re-imaging at 48 years had increased to 11 cm. A catheterization procedure revealed severe PS, PR, residual VSD, severe PAH with a pulmonary vascular resistance of 30 Wood units. She was evaluated and turned down for heart-lung transplantation at another institution. She was subsequently referred to our institution for heart-lung transplantation but was felt to be at unacceptably high risk given the complexity of her anatomy, imaging suggesting liver cirrhosis and liver biopsy with extensive fibrosis. After extensive discussion of risk and benefits, the patient agreed to proceed with a hybrid intervention, consisting of surgical aneurysm resection/PA repair, tricuspid valve repair; PV replacement with a Melody valve, and VSD closure. There were no complications and she was discharged home within 2 weeks. Six months post procedure, she is not on oxygen, her resting room air saturation is 94%, and echocardiography shows stable Melody valve function. This case highlights the utility of a hybrid approach in the treatment of an adult with complex congenital heart disease, heart failure and severe PAH, considered at the highest risk for adverse surgical outcomes. The short-term efficacy of the Melody valve in severe PAH is reassuring. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Artificial grammar learning of melody is constrained by melodic inconsistency: Narmour's principles affect melodic learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrmeier, Martin; Cross, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Considerable evidence suggests that people acquire artificial grammars incidentally and implicitly, an indispensable capacity for the acquisition of music or language. However, less research has been devoted to exploring constraints affecting incidental learning. Within the domain of music, the extent to which Narmour's (1990) melodic principles affect implicit learning of melodic structure was experimentally explored. Extending previous research (Rohrmeier, Rebuschat & Cross, 2011), the identical finite-state grammar is employed having terminals (the alphabet) manipulated so that melodies generated systematically violated Narmour's principles. Results indicate that Narmour-inconsistent melodic materials impede implicit learning. This further constitutes a case in which artificial grammar learning is affected by prior knowledge or processing constraints.

  15. Learning and liking of melody and harmony: further studies in artificial grammar learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loui, Psyche

    2012-10-01

    Much of what we know and love about music is based on implicitly acquired mental representations of musical pitches and the relationships between them. While previous studies have shown that these mental representations of music can be acquired rapidly and can influence preference, it is still unclear which aspects of music influence learning and preference formation. This article reports two experiments that use an artificial musical system to examine two questions: (1) which aspects of music matter most for learning, and (2) which aspects of music matter most for preference formation. Two aspects of music are tested: melody and harmony. In Experiment 1 we tested the learning and liking of a new musical system that is manipulated melodically so that only some of the possible conditional probabilities between successive notes are presented. In Experiment 2 we administered the same tests for learning and liking, but we used a musical system that is manipulated harmonically to eliminate the property of harmonic whole-integer ratios between pitches. Results show that disrupting melody (Experiment 1) disabled the learning of music without disrupting preference formation, whereas disrupting harmony (Experiment 2) does not affect learning and memory but disrupts preference formation. Results point to a possible dissociation between learning and preference in musical knowledge. Copyright © 2012 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  16. Pewarisan Ketahanan Melon (Cucumis melo L. Kultivar Melodi Gama 3 terhadap Kyuri green mottle mosaic virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budi Setiadi Daryono

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Melon (Cucumis melo L. belongs to Cucurbitaceae. Melon has high potential to be developed as main horticultural product in Indonesia. Melon is one of important foreign exchange and is the fifth biggest horticulture commodity in Indonesia. One of the problems in melon farming is mosaic disease caused by Kyuri green mottle mosaic virus (KGMMV. KGMMV infection reduces the quality and the amount of melon production. Melon farmers suffered a significant financial loss. Melodi Gama 3 (MG3 is a high yielding melon cultivar from the Genetics Laboratory, Faculty of Biology, Universitas Gadjah Mada. The use of genetically resistant melon cultivar has beneficial outcome for agriculture sector. The aim of this research was to study the resistance’s inherintance to KGMMV in MG3 melon cultivar. Two cultivars of MG3, MG3|5and MG3|8, were cultivated in the greenhouse. MAI, Glamour, Ladika, and Action melon cultivars were used as references. Resistance of KGMMV was analyzed by symptom observation and serological detection using Double Antibody Sandwich Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (DAS-ELISA. DAS-ELISA result analyzed further to establish resistance category. Description to melon cultivar phenotype variation was done. The result of this research indicates that MG3 melon cultivar is tolerant to KGMMV. The decrease of MG3 optical density was directly related with the lowering of KGMMV symptoms. The character of tolerance to KGMMV was inherited from Melodi Gama 1 (MG1 cultivar.   INTISARI   Melon (Cucumis melo L. merupakan tanaman buah yang tergolong dalam familia Cucurbitaceae. Tanaman melon berpotensi untuk dikembangkan sebagai produk unggulan hortikultura di Indonesia. Tanaman melon juga merupakan salah satu penghasil devisa penting Indonesia dan menempati urutan ke-5 dari kelompok hortikultura. Salah satu kendala yang sering dihadapi oleh petani melon adalah penyakit mosaik yang disebabkan oleh Kyuri green mottle mosaic virus (KGMMV. Infeksi KGMMV pada

  17. A Journey, the Pain of Others, and Historical Experience: Susan Silas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sendyka, Roma

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The author interprets Susan Silas' Helmbrechts walk (1998-2003, a unique series of forty-five photographs and supplementing visual and textual materials collected during the walk along the route of two hundred and twenty-five miles. The walk repeats the route which in 1945 had to undertake women prisoners from the concentration camp in Helmbrechts near Flossenbürg in their death march to Prachatice in Czech Republic. The pictures Silas takes, the people she meets, and finally the trees, the very materiality of the road become the factors of creating her own, individual memory of the event from the past. Silas selects an object from "the margins of the Holocaust" – a forgotten event that she re-presents by reacting to contemporary objects placed along the route of the event. Silas' work offers an opportunity to critically review the concept of memory landscapes (where is memory located in a landscape? and the phenomenon of dark tourism (is following in the footsteps of the prisoners a kind of pilgrimage, tourism, or therapy?. Silas problematises the question of memory, as well as examines different kinds of non-memory. Her camera is directed at locations that can be termed "the non-sites of memory."

  18. UNDERSTANDİNG SUSAN BORDO AND HER WORK; UNBEARABLE WEİGHT :FEMİNİSM, WESTERN CULTURE, BODY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ÇAĞLAR DEMİR

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Throughout history of thought, there have been many views about the women, their status in society, their struggle with patriarchy, and inequality  applied to them in all areas. There are different ways of oppression on women, such as confinement to home, inequality in wages between both sexes.  However, few scholars have written and declared their own views about how the patriarchal world and companies form women as they wish. Susan Bordo is one of  the most outstanding and distinguished feminist writers in the world who focuses on  how patriarchal capitalist understanding works on women’s body in terms of weight and weakness. According to Susan Bordo, male dominated capital world decides on women about what to wear and what to eat and women try to lose weight to be in the form men wish. State of  starving all the time leads to an illness called anorexia. The writer bases her views on the thoughts of literary critic and thinker, Foucault. The  objective of this article is to help the readers understand Susan Bordo’s views and analyse her impressive work; Unbearable Weight: Feminism, Western Culture and  the Body  and make her known in academic world.

  19. Bárbara Mujica, ed., Shakespeare and the Spanish «Comedia». Translation, Interpretation, Performance. Essays in Honor of Susan L. Fischer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro García-Reidy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Reseña de Bárbara Mujica, ed., Shakespeare and the Spanish «Comedia». Translation, Interpretation, Performance. Essays in Honor of Susan L. Fischer, Bucknell University Press, Lewisburg, 2013, 298 pp. ISBN 9781611485172.

  20. An fMRI comparison of neural activity associated with recognition of familiar melodies in younger and older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritu eSikka

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Several studies of semantic memory in non-musical domains involving recognition of items from long-term memory have shown an age-related shift from the medial temporal lobe structures to the frontal lobe. However, the effects of aging on musical semantic memory remain unexamined. We compared activation associated with recognition of familiar melodies in younger and older adults. Recognition follows successful retrieval from the musical lexicon that comprises a lifetime of learned musical phrases. We used the sparse-sampling technique in fMRI to determine the neural correlates of melody recognition by comparing activation when listening to familiar versus unfamiliar melodies, and to identify age differences. Recognition-related cortical activation was detected in the right superior temporal, bilateral inferior and superior frontal, left middle orbitofrontal, bilateral precentral, and left supramarginal gyri. Region-of-interest analysis showed greater activation for younger adults in the left superior temporal gyrus and for older adults in the left superior frontal, left angular, and bilateral superior parietal regions. Our study provides powerful evidence for these musical memory networks due to a large sample (N = 40 that includes older adults. This study is the first to investigate the neural basis of melody recognition in older adults and to compare the findings to younger adults.

  1. Simulating the Effects of Spread of Electric Excitation on Musical Tuning and Melody Identification with a Cochlear Implant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spahr, Anthony J.; Litvak, Leonid M.; Dorman, Michael F.; Bohanan, Ashley R.; Mishra, Lakshmi N.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To determine why, in a pilot study, only 1 of 11 cochlear implant listeners was able to reliably identify a frequency-to-electrode map where the intervals of a familiar melody were played on the correct musical scale. The authors sought to validate their method and to assess the effect of pitch strength on musical scale recognition in…

  2. Effect of Voice-Part Training and Music Complexity on Focus of Attention to Melody or Harmony

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lindsey R.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the possible effects of choral voice-part training/experience and music complexity on focus of attention to melody or harmony. Participants (N = 150) were members of auditioned university choral ensembles divided by voice-part (sopranos, n = 44; altos, n = 33; tenors, n = 35; basses, n = 38). The music…

  3. Exploiting Open Environmental Data using Linked Data and Cloud Computing: the MELODIES project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blower, Jon; Gonçalves, Pedro; Caumont, Hervé; Koubarakis, Manolis; Perkins, Bethan

    2015-04-01

    The European Open Data Strategy establishes important new principles that ensure that European public sector data will be released at no cost (or marginal cost), in machine-readable, commonly-understood formats, and with liberal licences enabling wide reuse. These data encompass both scientific data about the environment (from Earth Observation and other fields) and other public sector information, including diverse topics such as demographics, health and crime. Many open geospatial datasets (e.g. land use) are already available through the INSPIRE directive and made available through infrastructures such as the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS). The intention of the Open Data Strategy is to stimulate the growth of research and value-adding services that build upon these data streams; however, the potential value inherent in open data, and the benefits that can be gained by combining previously-disparate sources of information are only just starting to become understood. The MELODIES project (Maximising the Exploitation of Linked Open Data In Enterprise and Science) is developing eight innovative and sustainable services, based upon Open Data, for users in research, government, industry and the general public in a broad range of societal and environmental benefit areas. MELODIES (http://melodiesproject.eu) is a European FP7 project that is coordinated by the University of Reading and has sixteen partners (including nine SMEs) from eight European countries. It started in November 2013 and will run for three years. The project is therefore in its early stages and therefore we will value the opportunity that this workshop affords to present our plans and interact with the wider Linked Geospatial Data community. The project is developing eight new services[1] covering a range of domains including agriculture, urban ecosystems, land use management, marine information, desertification, crisis management and hydrology. These services will combine Earth

  4. Efficacy of melody-based aphasia therapy may strongly depend on rhythm and conversational speech formulas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Stahl

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Left-hemisphere stroke patients suffering from language and speech disorders are often able to sing entire pieces of text fluently. This finding has inspired a number of melody-based rehabilitation programs – most notable among them a treatment known as Melodic Intonation Therapy – as well as two fundamental research questions. When the experimental design focuses on one point in time (cross section, one may determine whether or not singing has an immediate effect on syllable production in patients with language and speech disorders. When the design focuses on changes over several points in time (longitudinal section, one may gain insight as to whether or not singing has a long-term effect on language and speech recovery. The current work addresses both of these questions with two separate experiments that investigate the interplay of melody, rhythm and lyric type in 32 patients with non-fluent aphasia and apraxia of speech (Stahl et al., 2011; Stahl et al., 2013. Taken together, the experiments deliver three main results. First, singing and rhythmic pacing proved to be equally effective in facilitating immediate syllable production and long-term language and speech recovery. Controlling for various influences such as prosody, syllable duration and phonetic complexity, the data did not reveal any advantage of singing over rhythmic speech. This result was independent of lesion size and lesion location in the patients. Second, patients with extensive left-sided basal ganglia lesions produced more correct syllables when their speech was paced by rhythmic drumbeats. This observation is consistent with the idea that regular auditory cues may partially compensate for corticostriatal damage and thereby improve speech-motor planning (Grahn & Watson, 2013. Third, conversational speech formulas and well-known song lyrics yielded higher rates of correct syllable production than novel word sequences – whether patients were singing or speaking

  5. Exposing Coverage Data to the Semantic Web within the MELODIES project: Challenges and Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riechert, Maik; Blower, Jon; Griffiths, Guy

    2016-04-01

    Coverage data, typically big in data volume, assigns values to a given set of spatiotemporal positions, together with metadata on how to interpret those values. Existing storage formats like netCDF, HDF and GeoTIFF all have various restrictions that prevent them from being preferred formats for use over the web, especially the semantic web. Factors that are relevant here are the processing complexity, the semantic richness of the metadata, and the ability to request partial information, such as a subset or just the appropriate metadata. Making coverage data available within web browsers opens the door to new ways for working with such data, including new types of visualization and on-the-fly processing. As part of the European project MELODIES (http://melodiesproject.eu) we look into the challenges of exposing such coverage data in an interoperable and web-friendly way, and propose solutions using a host of emerging technologies like JSON-LD, the DCAT and GeoDCAT-AP ontologies, the CoverageJSON format, and new approaches to REST APIs for coverage data. We developed the CoverageJSON format within the MELODIES project as an additional way to expose coverage data to the web, next to having simple rendered images available using standards like OGC's WMS. CoverageJSON partially incorporates JSON-LD but does not encode individual data values as semantic resources, making use of the technology in a practical manner. The development also focused on it being a potential output format for OGC WCS. We will demonstrate how existing netCDF data can be exposed as CoverageJSON resources on the web together with a REST API that allows users to explore the data and run operations such as spatiotemporal subsetting. We will show various use cases from the MELODIES project, including reclassification of a Land Cover dataset client-side within the browser with the ability for the user to influence the reclassification result by making use of the above technologies.

  6. Podróż, cudze cierpienie i doświadczenie historyczne: Susan Silas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sendyka, Roma

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Autorka interpretuje pracę Susan Silas Helmbrechts walk (1998-2003, szczególny cykl czterdziestu pięciu zdjęć i dołączonych do nich materiałów wizualnych oraz tekstowych zbudowany podczas przejścia trasy dwustu dwudziestu pięciu mil, które w 1945 roku musiały przebyć kobiety pędzone w marszu śmierci z Helmbrecht koło Flossenbürga do czeskich Prachatic. Wykonywane zdjęcia, napotykani ludzie, w końcu – drzewa, sama materialność drogi stają się czynnikami wytwarzania własnej, indywidualnej pamięci wydarzenia sprzed lat. Silas wybiera szczególny obiekt "z marginesów Zagłady" – zapomniane zdarzenie, które przedstawia obserwując współczesne obiekty położone wzdłuż trasy tego zdarzenia. Praca Silas pozwala przyjrzeć się krytycznie koncepcji memory landscapes (gdzie w krajobrazie umiejscawia się pamięć? i zjawisku dark tourism (czy podążanie śladami więźniarek to pielgrzymka, turystyka czy terapia?. Silas problematyzuje nie tylko kwestię pamięci, bada również rodzaje nie-pamiętania. Jej kamera zostaje zwrócona ku lokalizacjom, które można nazwać "nie-miejscami pamięci".

  7. Treasure Your Exceptions: An Interview with 2017 George Beadle Award Recipient Susan A. Gerbi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbi, Susan A

    2017-12-01

    THE Genetics Society of America's (GSA) George W. Beadle Award honors individuals who have made outstanding contributions to the community of genetics researchers and who exemplify the qualities of its namesake. The 2017 recipient is Susan A. Gerbi, who has been a prominent leader and advocate for the scientific community. In the course of her research on DNA replication, Gerbi helped develop the method of Replication Initiation Point (RIP) mapping to map replication origins at the nucleotide level, improving resolution by two orders of magnitude. RIP mapping also provides the basis for the now popular use of λ-exonuclease to enrich nascent DNA to map replication origins genome-wide. Gerbi's second area of research on ribosomal RNA revealed a conserved core secondary structure, as well as conserved nucleotide elements (CNEs). Some CNEs are universally conserved, while other CNEs are conserved in all eukaryotes but not in archaea or bacteria, suggesting a eukaryotic function. Intriguingly, the majority of the eukaryotic-specific CNEs line the tunnel of the large ribosomal subunit through which the nascent polypeptide exits. Gerbi has promoted the fly Sciara coprophila as a model organism ever since she used its enormous polytene chromosomes to help develop the method of in situ hybridization during her Ph.D. research in Joe Gall's laboratory. The Gerbi laboratory maintains the Sciara International Stock Center and manages its future, actively spreading Sciara stocks to other laboratories. Gerbi has also served in many leadership roles, working on issues of science policy, women in science, scientific training, and career preparation. This is an abridged version of the interview. The full interview is available on the Genes to Genomes blog, at genestogenomes.org/gerbi. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  8. Word and melody in the opus of Momčilo and Svetomir Nastasijević

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peno Vesna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the house of artistically gifted family Nastasijević where renowned Belgrade artists used to gather together during the twenties and thirties of the previous century, music was nothing but an excuse for regular meetings. The art of sound represented a backbone of one system of poetics in the shaping of which Nastasijević brothers as well as their close contemporaries and faithful friends truly found the common ground. Rethinking the music phenomenon brought them close to their otherwise remote relatives by thought - to Greek philosophers, but also to French and especially Russian symbolists whose opinions they shared. A pursue for, on one hand, an authentically native but, on the other, cosmopolitan spirit and universal values, marked the creative output of Momčilo, a writer and a pivot of Nastasijević family, but also the overall creative engagement of his brothers. They all shared common aesthetic standards, attempting to apply these in their respective artistic media as well as in synergy, in their joint ventures. In music dramas entitled Međuluško blago and Đurađ Branković, for which Momčilo wrote the script and Svetomir composed the music, the brothers tried to transform into deeds the Nastasijević-like convictions regarding music. The aim was to re-find and turn a native - homeland melody into sound. This melody represented a “golden ratio point” in which all arts meet; it is a kind of a spiritual totality embodying one form of spiritual existence which cannot be reached otherwise but from the “homeland soil”. They believed they would reach the archetype of national identity and, at the same time, of the universal being by harking at and perpetual crying for the forgotten sound of words. Momčilo’s poetic concept demanded necessary interventions in respect to the dramatic genre. In his essay Dramsko stvaralaštvo i pozorište kod nas, he unequivocally opposed to what he argued to be a decadent and artistically

  9. Successful subxyphoid hybrid approach for placement of a Melody percutaneous pulmonary valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Kathleen E; Huddleston, Charles B; Foerster, Susan; Nicholas, Ramzi; Balzer, David

    2011-07-01

    A variety of complex congenital heart defects in the pediatric population involve placement of a right ventricle to pulmonary artery conduit as part of surgical repair. With the advent of percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation (PPVI), patients may avoid the risks of serial surgical reinterventions as the PPVI acts to prolong the life of a previously placed conduit. As the experience with PPVI is growing, new challenges arise from complicated anatomy and severe conduit stenosis. We present a case of a 16-year-old male who underwent successful pulmonary valve placement with a Melody valve via a subxyphoid hybrid approach after an unsuccessful attempt at percutaneous placement. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Initial Experience with Elective Perventricular Melody Valve Placement in Small Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Aamisha; Kenny, Damien; Caputo, Massimo; Amin, Zahid

    2017-03-01

    Perventricular Melody valve placement has been described as a bailout approach or alternative RVOT approach in patients >30 kg. We present three patients hybrid pulmonary valve replacement were reviewed. The subcostal approach was performed without sternotomy with the sheath introduced through the diaphragmatic surface of the right ventricle. Diagnoses included tetralogy of Fallot (n = 3) and truncus arteriosus (n = 2). Mean weight was 16.2 kg (range 4.7-28.1 kg). Four patients had RV-PA conduits (size: 14-21 mm), and the fifth patient had a transannular patch. All patients met criteria for surgical valve replacement. Technical success was 100%. In two patients with absent pulmonary valve, the stent migrated during advancement of the delivery sheath. These stents were anchored in the distal main pulmonary artery (n = 1) or branch pulmonary artery (n = 1) without sequela. Tricuspid valve chordal injury occurred in one patient, where transesophageal echocardiogram (TEE) was not utilized. No patient required conversion to cardiopulmonary bypass. One patient with absent pulmonary valve died on follow-up as a consequence of severe airway compromise. Our initial experience demonstrates that the perventricular valve can be placed safely in small-sized patients. Advancement of the melody ensemble may be difficult and may cause stent migration. We conclude that the technique is feasible in small-sized patients and that prevention of complications includes placement of the stent at the time of the valve and TEE assistance in reducing tricuspid valve injury.

  11. The Rosslyn Code: Can Physics Explain a 500-Year Old Melody Etched in the Walls of a Scottish Chapel?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Chris [State Magazine

    2011-10-19

    For centuries, historians have puzzled over a series of 213 symbols carved into the stone of Scotland’s Rosslyn Chapel. (Disclaimer: You may recognize this chapel from The Da Vinci Code, but this is real and unrelated!) Several years ago, a composer and science enthusiast noticed that the symbols bore a striking similarity to Chladni patterns, the elegant images that form on a two- dimensional surface when it vibrates at certain frequencies. This man’s theory: A 500-year-old melody was inscribed in the chapel using the language of physics. But not everyone is convinced. Slate senior editor Chris Wilson travelled to Scotland to investigate the claims and listen to this mysterious melody, whatever it is. Come find out what he discovered, including images of the patterns and audio of the music they inspired.

  12. Language and music: differential hemispheric dominance in detecting unexpected errors in the lyrics and melody of memorized songs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Takuya; Kaga, Kimitaka; Sakai, Kuniyoshi L

    2009-02-01

    Using magnetoencephalography (MEG), we report here the hemispheric dominance of the auditory cortex that is selectively modulated by unexpected errors in the lyrics and melody of songs (lyrics and melody deviants), thereby elucidating under which conditions the lateralization of auditory processing changes. In experiment 1 using familiar songs, we found that the dipole strength of responses to the lyrics deviants was left-dominant at 140 ms (M140), whereas that of responses to the melody deviants was right-dominant at 130 ms (M130). In experiment 2 using familiar songs with a constant syllable or pitch, the dipole strength of frequency mismatch negativity elicited by oddballs was left-dominant. There were significant main effects of experiment (1 and 2) for the peak latencies and for the coordinates of the dipoles, indicating that the M140 and M130 were not the frequency mismatch negativity. In experiment 3 using newly memorized songs, the right-dominant M130 was observed only when the presented note was unexpected one, independent of perceiving unnatural pitch transitions (i.e., perceptual saliency) and of selective attention to the melody of songs. The consistent right-dominance of the M130 between experiments 1 and 3 suggests that the M130 in experiment 1 is due to unexpected notes deviating from well-memorized songs. On the other hand, the left-dominant M140 was elicited by lyrics deviants, suggesting the influence of top-down linguistic information and the memory of the familiar songs. We thus conclude that the left- lateralized M140 and right-lateralized M130 reflect the expectation based on top-down information of language and music, respectively.

  13. How knowledge of the song influences the matching of "melodies" to rhythm sequences tapped in the right and left palms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Boyle, M W; Bormann, L; Harts, K

    1990-12-01

    Previous work by O'Boyle and Sanford (1988) has demonstrated that the right hemisphere (RH) is superior to the left hemisphere (LH) in the matching of tape-recorded melodies to rhythm sequences tapped in the palms of the hands. This asymmetrical advantage was attributed to a RH superiority in the perceptual processing of intonation as compared to the rhythm component of these musical stimuli. In the present study, subjects were taught that the monotone sound of two wooden drumsticks struck together in a specified rhythm actually represented non-melodic translations of songs with identifiable melodies. After such mental associations had been formed, these non-melodic stimuli (which produced no asymmetric performance in Exp. 2 of the O'Boyle and Sanford study), now produced a RH advantage that was comparable to that induced by the original melodies. This finding suggests that the physical presence of intonation and its subsequent perceptual analysis, are not necessarily critical to the RH advantage reported by O'Boyle and Sanford (1988). Rather, the asymmetry may be related to a superior ability of the RH to generate and/or manipulate echoic images in memory.

  14. Recognition memory for text and melody of songs after unilateral temporal lobe lesion: evidence for dual encoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, S; Zatorre, R J

    1991-07-01

    The role of left and right temporal lobes in memory for songs (words sung to a tune) was investigated. Patients who had undergone focal cerebral excision for the relief of intractable epilepsy along with normal control subjects were tested in 2 recognition memory tasks. The goal of Experiment 1 was to examine recognition of words and of tunes when they were presented together in an unfamiliar song. In Experiment 2, memory for spoken words and tunes sung without words was independently tested in 2 separate recognition tasks. The results clearly showed (a) a deficit after left temporal lobectomy in recognition of text whether sung to a tune or spoken without musical accompaniment, (b) impaired melody recognition when the tune was sung with new words following left or right temporal lobectomy and (c) impaired melody recognition in the absence of lyrics following right but not left temporal lobectomy. The different role of each temporal lobe in memorizing songs provides evidence for the use of dual memory codes. The verbal code is consistently related to left temporal lobe structures, whereas the melodie code my depend on either or both temporal lobe mechanisms, according to the type of encoding involved.

  15. Mental reversal of imagined melodies: a role for the posterior parietal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatorre, Robert J; Halpern, Andrea R; Bouffard, Marc

    2010-04-01

    Two fMRI experiments explored the neural substrates of a musical imagery task that required manipulation of the imagined sounds: temporal reversal of a melody. Musicians were presented with the first few notes of a familiar tune (Experiment 1) or its title (Experiment 2), followed by a string of notes that was either an exact or an inexact reversal. The task was to judge whether the second string was correct or not by mentally reversing all its notes, thus requiring both maintenance and manipulation of the represented string. Both experiments showed considerable activation of the superior parietal lobe (intraparietal sulcus) during the reversal process. Ventrolateral and dorsolateral frontal cortices were also activated, consistent with the memory load required during the task. We also found weaker evidence for some activation of right auditory cortex in both studies, congruent with results from previous simpler music imagery tasks. We interpret these results in the context of other mental transformation tasks, such as mental rotation in the visual domain, which are known to recruit the intraparietal sulcus region, and we propose that this region subserves general computations that require transformations of a sensory input. Mental imagery tasks may thus have both task or modality-specific components as well as components that supersede any specific codes and instead represent amodal mental manipulation.

  16. Is there a tape recorder in your head? How the brain stores and retrieves musical melodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef P Rauschecker

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Music consists of strings of sound that vary over time. Technical devices, such as tape recorders, store musical melodies by transcribing event times of temporal sequences into consecutive locations on the storage medium. Playback occurs by reading out the stored information in the same sequence. However, it is unclear how the brain stores and retrieves auditory sequences. Neurons in the anterior lateral belt of auditory cortex are sensitive to the combination of sound features in time, but the integration time of these neurons is not sufficient to store longer sequences that stretch over several seconds, minutes or more. Functional imaging studies in humans provide evidence that music is stored instead within the auditory dorsal stream, including premotor and prefrontal areas. In monkeys, these areas are the substrate for learning of motor sequences. It appears, therefore, that the auditory dorsal stream transforms musical into motor sequence information and vice versa, realizing what are known as forward and inverse models. The basal ganglia and the cerebellum are involved in setting up the sensorimotor associations, translating timing information into spatial codes and back again.

  17. Susan Magoffin’s Santa Fe Days in 1846: The Value of Testimony Les journées de Santa Fé en 1846 de Susan Magoffin : la valeur du témoignage

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    Susanne Berthier-Foglar

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Susan Magoffin, la jeune épouse d’un commerçant de la piste de Santa Fe, accompagna son mari en 1846 pour un voyage où la caravane suivait de près l’Armée de l’Ouest et pendant lequel elle tint un journal. Cet article traite des 37 jours que dura la pause de la caravane à Santa Fe et aborde plus spécifiquement la façon dont l’auteur appréhendait l’altérité dans un environnement inhabituel et parfois dangereux. Pour apprécier la valeur du témoignage, je combine une analyse du discours avec une évaluation statistique du contenu. La description, parfois naïve, de Santa Fe sous l’occupation américaine illustre les raisons de la guerre contre le Mexique. En tant qu’agent de la destinée manifeste, Susan Magoffin admirait le général Kearny en lui attribuant des qualités surhumaines et en participant à ses efforts de propagande. Alors qu’elle était enracinée dans sa classe et sa culture, elle voyait la population mexicaine et les Amérindiens avec un esprit ouvert bien que ses motifs pour apprendre l’espagnol, ainsi que le métier de commerçante, avaient une fonction plus prosaïque.

  18. Differential influences of emotion, task, and novelty on brain regions underlying the processing of speech melody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ethofer, Thomas; Kreifelts, Benjamin; Wiethoff, Sarah; Wolf, Jonathan; Grodd, Wolfgang; Vuilleumier, Patrik; Wildgruber, Dirk

    2009-07-01

    We investigated the functional characteristics of brain regions implicated in processing of speech melody by presenting words spoken in either neutral or angry prosody during a functional magnetic resonance imaging experiment using a factorial habituation design. Subjects judged either affective prosody or word class for these vocal stimuli, which could be heard for either the first, second, or third time. Voice-sensitive temporal cortices, as well as the amygdala, insula, and mediodorsal thalami, reacted stronger to angry than to neutral prosody. These stimulus-driven effects were not influenced by the task, suggesting that these brain structures are automatically engaged during processing of emotional information in the voice and operate relatively independent of cognitive demands. By contrast, the right middle temporal gyrus and the bilateral orbito-frontal cortices (OFC) responded stronger during emotion than word classification, but were also sensitive to anger expressed by the voices, suggesting that some perceptual aspects of prosody are also encoded within these regions subserving explicit processing of vocal emotion. The bilateral OFC showed a selective modulation by emotion and repetition, with particularly pronounced responses to angry prosody during the first presentation only, indicating a critical role of the OFC in detection of vocal information that is both novel and behaviorally relevant. These results converge with previous findings obtained for angry faces and suggest a general involvement of the OFC for recognition of anger irrespective of the sensory modality. Taken together, our study reveals that different aspects of voice stimuli and perceptual demands modulate distinct areas involved in the processing of emotional prosody.

  19. What musicians do to induce the sensation of groove in simple and complex melodies, and how listeners perceive it

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy eMadison

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Groove is the experience of wanting to move when hearing music, such as snapping fingers or tapping feet. This is a central aspect of much music, in particular of music intended for dancing. While previous research has found considerable consistency in ratings of groove across individuals, it remains unclear how groove is induced, that is, what are the physical properties of the acoustic signal that differ between more and less groove-inducing versions. Here, we examined this issue with a performance experiment, in which 4 musicians performed 6 simple and 6 complex melodies in two conditions with the intention of minimizing and maximizing groove. Analyses of rhythmical and temporal properties from the performances demonstrated some general effects. For example, more groove was associated with more notes on faster metrical levels and syncopation, and less groove was associated with deadpan timing and destruction of the regular pulse. We did not observe that deviations from the metrical grid (i.e. micro-timing were a predictor of groove. A listener experiment confirmed that the musicians’ manipulations had the intended effects on the experience of groove. A Brunswikian lens model was applied, which estimates the performer-perceiver communication across the two experiments. It showed that the communication achievement for simple melodies was 0.62, and that the matching of performers’ and listeners’ use of 9 rhythmical cues was 0.83. For complex melodies with an already high level of groove, the corresponding values were 0.39 and 0.34, showing that it was much more difficult to take out groove from musical structures designed to induce groove.

  20. On the Relationships Between Words and Melody in the Pulangihon-Umayamnon Bukidnon Uwaging

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    José S. Buenconsejo

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Singers of indigenous, long narratives in the Philippines employ a number of tunes in setting the verses. In this paper, I examine the tunes that Datu Sinuhoy Kaligunan utilized in his UWAGING performance, lasting near 11 hours, that I recorded in May 2005. Datu Sinuhoy is a Pulangihon-Umayamnon Bukidnon speaker. His tunes are named according to: (1 non-lexical formulaic expressions, (2 the places where the tunes are perceived to originate, and (3 even names of individual beings–persons and spirits–from those places.An investigation of the recording of the Pulangihon-Umayamnon uwaging performance in its entirety reveals that some tunes are used to project the moods and feelings attendant to the actions of the narrative but they are not emblematic of the characters in the narrative per se as in the Palawan TULTUL. I argue that tunes are important in uwaging performance for they facilitate the linear grouping of words into verse units that generally span eight (musical pulses, each of which is assigned one syllable each. Like most epics in the Philippines (e.g., ULLALIM, GASUMBI, HUDHUD, KATA-KATA, ULAGING, UWAEGING of Agusan Manobos, Pulangihon-Umayamnon Bukidnon uwaging has prosodic features that fit euphoniously with the tunes (e.g., the shapes of the tunes reinforce the sound parallelisms in the words. In addition, like the versions of the epic in Bukidnon, the Pulangihon-Umayamnon uwaging can be recited, MANTUKAW, minus the melody. This fact implies an important corollary; the internalization of uwaging prosody is acquired separately from the setting of words to tunes. In fact, singers internalize the prosody of the verses by reciting them from the memory of other singers’ performances, attempting to intone them (with the formulaic tunes only after they have mastered and memorized a fair amount of verses. In my fieldwork, Datu Sinuhoy dictated to my linguistic assistant a set of textual epithets forming poems called “unturan ne

  1. The MUSOS (MUsic SOftware System) Toolkit: A computer-based, open source application for testing memory for melodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainsford, M; Palmer, M A; Paine, G

    2017-04-21

    Despite numerous innovative studies, rates of replication in the field of music psychology are extremely low (Frieler et al., 2013). Two key methodological challenges affecting researchers wishing to administer and reproduce studies in music cognition are the difficulty of measuring musical responses, particularly when conducting free-recall studies, and access to a reliable set of novel stimuli unrestricted by copyright or licensing issues. In this article, we propose a solution for these challenges in computer-based administration. We present a computer-based application for testing memory for melodies. Created using the software Max/MSP (Cycling '74, 2014a), the MUSOS (Music Software System) Toolkit uses a simple modular framework configurable for testing common paradigms such as recall, old-new recognition, and stem completion. The program is accompanied by a stimulus set of 156 novel, copyright-free melodies, in audio and Max/MSP file formats. Two pilot tests were conducted to establish the properties of the accompanying stimulus set that are relevant to music cognition and general memory research. By using this software, a researcher without specialist musical training may administer and accurately measure responses from common paradigms used in the study of memory for music.

  2. ‘Speaking Kleinian’: Susan Isaacs as Ursula Wise and the Inter-War Popularisation of Psychoanalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapira, Michal

    2017-01-01

    How did the complex concepts of psychoanalysis become popular in early twentieth-century Britain? This article examines the contribution of educator and psychoanalyst Susan Isaacs (1885–1948) to this process, as well as her role as a female expert in the intellectual and medical history of this period. Isaacs was one of the most influential British psychologists of the inter-war era, yet historical research on her work is still limited. The article focuses on her writing as ‘Ursula Wise’, answering the questions of parents and nursery nurses in the popular journal Nursery World, from 1929 to 1936. Researched in depth for the first time, Isaacs’ important magazine columns reveal that her writing was instrumental in disseminating the work of psychoanalyst Melanie Klein in Britain. Moreover, Isaacs’ powerful rebuttals to behaviourist, disciplinarian parenting methods helped shift the focus of caregivers to the child’s perspective, encouraging them to acknowledge children as independent subjects and future democratic citizens. Like other early psychoanalysts, Isaacs was not an elitist; she was in fact committed to disseminating her ideas as broadly as possible. Isaacs taught British parents and child caregivers to ‘speak Kleinian’, translating Klein’s intellectual ideas into ordinary language and thus enabling their swift integration into popular discourse. PMID:28901872

  3. Learning piano melodies in visuo-motor or audio-motor training conditions and the neural correlates of their cross-modal transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engel, Annerose; Bangert, Marc; Horbank, David; Hijmans, Brenda S.; Wilkens, Katharina; Keller, Peter E.; Keysers, Christian

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the cross-modal transfer of movement patterns necessary to perform melodies on the piano, 22 non-musicians learned to play short sequences on a piano keyboard by 1) merely listening and replaying (vision of own fingers occluded) or 2) merely observing silent finger movements and

  4. Diasporic Reconciliations of Politics, Love and Trauma: Susan Abulhawa’s Quest for Identity in Mornings in Jenin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman M Abu-Shomar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Negotiating human conditions is an emblematic critical impetus of diaspora informed by multiple cultural possibilities practiced through the creation of multiple spaces that cross the realm of the ‘self’ to that of the ‘other’. It offers a locale to cross from the oppressed ‘self’ to an understanding of an oppressor ‘other’. Yet, diasporic negotiation is politically involved in the most responsible manner; it engages the contextual social realities in order to enable creative possibilities for overcoming the logic of the politics altogether. It invites a kind of political involvement that assures the ‘situatedness of the ethical’ in a framework of moral humanistic realisations. The realisation of diasporic negotiations is dialogically engaged in manners that will give birth to new possibilities for human togetherness. In this essay, I trace the signs of diasporic negotiations of politics, love and trauma in Susan Abulhawa’s Mornings in Jenin by focusing on the Diasporic identity of Amal (the central character. I consider the intersections between diaspora, dislocation of identity and the creation of negotiating spaces that qualify an 'epistemology of Diaspora' against essentialised and ethnocentric construction of realities. I argue that Abulhawa creates diasporic spaces and immense moral scenes to transcend a particular stance of politics via transcending love in opposition to suffering and tribulation. I contend that Abulhawa’s conceptualisation of Diasporic negotiations enables her to depict and gauge two extreme human sentiments: love and trauma, yet, without yielding or compromising the right of just resistance and dissent. Keywords: Diaspora, humanism, Trauma, identity, negotiating difference, and 'Otherness'

  5. Vasiljević’s collections of folk melodies: A Serbian musical treasure

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    Radinović Sanja

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Miodrag A. Vasiljević (1903-1963 was given a unique opportunity to span two great developmental stages in the history of Serbian ethnomusicology, occurring in the middle of the 20th century. The first of them was between the two World Wars, the stage in which Serbian musical folklore became Vasiljević’s life passion and in which he accomplished his early professional achievements. In the next stage, which started after World War II, he reached the zenith of his creation in slightly less than twenty years, setting new standards of the discipline, and providing fundamental directions for his successors, thereby immeasurably enlarging the corpus of collected material. Due all of these revolutionary innovations from the post-war period, Vasiljević is rightly considered to be not only the founder of modern Serbian ethnomusicology, but also the first person in Serbia worthy of being called an ethnomusicologist in the full sense of the word. Of the numerous results by which Vasiljević permanently indebted his people, the most pronounced does not belong to the category of pioneering endeavours, but is manifested in his melographic opus - an achievement which even today has not been surpassed in Serbia in terms of its span, scope and value. Such great productivity in recording resulted from the fact that Vasiljević had been devoted to melography from his childhood, and most intensely from 1932 to the end of his life. The exact number of examples which Vasiljević transcribed directly in the field before 1951 and those which he recorded on a tape-recorder after that time is still unknown, since many of them are still unavailable to the public, but it can be assumed that there are several thousand melodies in total. Among them are 3,198 which have already been published. That precious corpus of Vasiljević’s available material is contained in twelve collections (the largest number ever regarding any collector in Serbia so far, issued from 1950 to

  6. Vozvrashtshenije "Ekzorsista" / Susan Howard

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Howard, Susan

    2001-01-01

    William Friedkini 1973.a. valminud õudusfilm "Exorcist", selle järjed ja selle hiljuti restaureeritud ja taas ekraanile paisatud versioon ning nende mõju näitlejanna Linda Blair'i elukäigule, kes filmis mängis saatanast vaevatud teistmelist

  7. Dennis C. Roberts & Susan R. Komives (Eds. (2016. Enhancing Student Learning and Development in Cross-Border Higher Education. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munita Dunn-Coetzee

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Enhancing Student Learning and Development in Cross-Border Higher Education, edited by Dennis C. Roberts and Susan R. Komives, is a book that resulted from a short-term study-abroad experience between the Universities of Maryland and San Diego with the Qatar Foundation’s Education City in Doha in 2010. This partnership challenged the way in which higher education internalisation was viewed – in such a way that the visit was replicated in 2012 and this book was authored.

  8. Words in melody: an H(2)15O PET study of brain activation during singing and speaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffries, K J; Fritz, J B; Braun, A R

    2003-04-15

    We used H(2)15O PET to characterize the interaction of words and melody by comparing brain activity measured while subjects spoke or sang the words to a familiar song. Relative increases in activity during speaking vs singing were observed in the left hemisphere, in classical perisylvian language areas including the posterior superior temporal gyrus, supramarginal gyrus, and frontal operculum, as well as in Rolandic cortices and putamen. Relative increases in activity during singing were observed in the right hemisphere: these were maximal in the right anterior superior temporal gyrus and contiguous portions of the insula; relative increases associated with singing were also detected in the right anterior middle temporal gyrus and superior temporal sulcus, medial and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices, mesial temporal cortices and cerebellum, as well as in Rolandic cortices and nucleus accumbens. These results indicate that the production of words in song is associated with activation of regions within right hemisphere areas that are not mirror-image homologues of left hemisphere perisylvian language areas, and suggest that multiple neural networks may be involved in different aspects of singing. Right hemisphere mechanisms may support the fluency-evoking effects of singing in neurological disorders such as stuttering or aphasia.

  9. Failing left ventricle to ascending aorta conduit-Hybrid implantation of a melody valve and NuMed covered stent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gössl, Mario; Johnson, Jonathan N; Hagler, Donald J

    2014-04-01

    We present the case of a 36-year-old woman with increasing shortness of breath, a new 3/4 diastolic murmur, and a complex history of LV outflow tract obstruction. She has undergone multiple surgeries including the replacement of her old LV apex to ascending aorta conduit with a 20-mm Gore-Tex tube graft, addition of a 24-mm homograft sutured between the conduit and the LV apex, and insertion of a 21-mm Freestyle porcine valve conduit between the Gore-Tex tube graft and allograft at age 23. The current assessment showed a failing Freestyle conduit prosthesis leading to left heart decompensation. Due to substantial surgical risk, the patient underwent successful implantation of a Melody valve into the Gore-Tex tube and exclusion of the failing Freestyle bioprosthesis with a NuMed CP stent in a hybrid procedure. The case nicely illustrates the collaborative potential of cardiovascular surgeons and interventional cardiologists in the new arena of a hybrid operating room. Complex hybrid procedures like the current one, especially those including percutaneous placements of valves, offer therapeutic options for patients that are otherwise too high risk for conventional open heart surgery. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Express LD vascular stent in the treatment of iliac artery lesions: 24-month results from the MELODIE trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockx, Luc; Poncyljusz, Wojciech; Krzanowski, Marek; Schroë, Herman; Allocco, Dominic J; Dawkins, Keith D

    2010-10-01

    To report the 2-year results of the MELODIE trial, which evaluated the safety and effectiveness of the balloon-expandable Express LD Vascular stent for the treatment of atherosclerotic iliac artery disease. This prospective, multicenter, single-arm trial enrolled 151 patients (113 men; mean age 60.1±8.4 years) with 163 de novo or restenotic iliac lesions. The primary endpoint, 6-month angiographic mean percent loss of luminal diameter, was compared to an objective performance criterion (OPC) based on published results with the Palmaz stent. Follow-up included ankle-brachial index (ABI) measurement and symptom assessment (Fontaine classification) at discharge, 30 days, and 6, 12, and 24 months. Arteriography was performed at 6 months and computed tomographic angiography (CTA) at 1 and 2 years. The primary endpoint of 6-month mean percent luminal diameter loss was 16.2% (upper 95% confidence boundary of 19.1%) and non-inferior to the 20% OPC (p = 0.006). Primary patency was 92.1% at 6 months and 87.8% at 2 years. The rate of major adverse events (MAE) was 6.3% at 6 months and 10.2% at 2 years. Of the 3 event types included in the definition of MAE, only target lesion revascularization occurred; no distal embolization or device- or procedure-related deaths were recorded. The percent of patients with Fontaine stage IIb symptoms or worse improved from 84.1% before the procedure to 16.8% at 2 years (p<0.0001). The 2-year ABI remained significantly improved compared to baseline (0.85 versus 0.63, p<0.0001). The Express LD Vascular stent is safe, effective, and non-inferior to the Palmaz stent for treatment of iliac artery stenosis.

  11. Automatic Melody Segmentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodríguez López, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    The work presented in this dissertation investigates music segmentation. In the field of Musicology, segmentation refers to a score analysis technique, whereby notated pieces or passages of these pieces are divided into “units” referred to as sections, periods, phrases, and so on. Segmentation

  12. Left Main Coronary Artery Compression following Melody Pulmonary Valve Implantation: Use of Impella Support as Rescue Therapy and Perioperative Challenges with ECMO

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    Erica D. Wittwer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this case is to describe the complex perioperative management of a 30-year-old woman with congenital heart disease and multiple resternotomies presenting with pulmonary homograft dysfunction and evaluation for percutaneous pulmonary valve replacement. Transvenous, transcatheter Melody valve placement caused left main coronary artery occlusion and cardiogenic shock. An Impella ventricular assist device (VAD provided rescue therapy during operating room transport for valve removal and pulmonary homograft replacement. ECMO support was required following surgery. Several days later during an attempted ECMO wean, her hemodynamics deteriorated abruptly. Transesophageal and epicardial echocardiography identified pulmonary graft obstruction, requiring homograft revision due to large thrombosis. This case illustrates a role for Impella VAD as bridge to definitive procedure after left coronary occlusion and describes management of complex perioperative ECMO support challenges.

  13. Localized Donaldson-Thomas theory of surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gholampour, Amin; Sheshmani, Artan; Yau, Shing-Tung

    2017-01-01

    Let S be a projective simply connected complex surface and  be a line bundle on S. We study the moduli space of stable compactly supported 2-dimensional sheaves on the total spaces of . The moduli space admits a ℂ∗-action induced by scaling the fibers of . We identify certain components of the......  is the canonical bundle of S, the Vafa-Witten invariants defined recently by Tanaka-Thomas, can be extracted from these localized DT invariants. VW invariants are expected to have modular properties as predicted by S-duality....

  14. "If you thought this story sour, sweeten it with your own telling" - a feminist poetics of rewriting in Susan Price's Ghost dance

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    Sanna Lehtonen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The attempts to challenge conventional gendered discourses in children's fantasy have often resulted in feminist rewritings of earlier stories. Ghost dance (1994 by the English author Susan Price is a novel that reflects a specific feminist poetics of rewriting: metafictional passages highlight the constructedness of the narrative and at the end readers are invited to tell their own versions of the story. Moreover, the rewriting freely combines and recontextualises elements from different source texts and reformulates them to create a narrative that challenges conventional discourses of gender. While this poetics has an appeal from a feminist perspective, the play with cross-cultural intertexts and gender becomes more complex when the novel is examined in a postcolonialist framework in relation to ethnicity and the issue of cultural appropriation. Ghost dance is situated in a setting that has a real-world equivalent (Russia, involves characters that are identified with names of real-world ethnic groups (Lapps (Sámi, Russian, and mixes elements from Russian wonder tales, Nordic mythology and an Ojibwe legend. The novel does not aim at historical accuracy in its representations nor is it a direct retelling of any of the pre-texts but combines motifs, themes, names, characters and settings freely from each source. In this textual melting pot, the protagonist Shingebiss is, on one level, a revision of the witch Baba Yaga, but also described as a Lappish shaman with an Ojibwe name. To rewrite gendered discourses, certain elements from the pretexts are chosen and others left out – the question is, then, what effects does this recontextualisation have on the representation of ethnicity? Or, are the feminist rewriting strategies actually a form of cultural appropriation?

  15. Idufirma Silicon Valleyta / Susan Adams

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Adams, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Tarkvarafirma Apprenda toodab teenindusplatvormi tarkvara, mis võimaldab klientidel luua ja hoida käigus uusi mobiilseid ja pilvetehnoloogiapõhiseid rakendusi. Oma töötajatele pakub odavaid elamispindu ja madalaid makse

  16. Jeg havde ikke stemt, hvis jeg havde siddet alene: En receptionsanalyse af sms-deltagelsen til det europæiske Melodi Grand Prix [I wouldn’t have voted if I was sitting alone: A reception analysis of SMS voting during the Eurovision Song Contest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Bjørner

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Denne artikel vil med en receptionsanalytisk tilgang indkredse fænomenet sms-tv i forhold til det europæiske Melodi Grand Prix. Gennem artiklen beskrives, hvordan en gruppe af unge seere har oplevet samspillet mellem Grand Prixets opbygning, de særlige kollektive receptionsformer, der er hyppige omkring programmet, og den mulige deltagelse i den tilhørende interaktive sms-afstemning. Den interaktive mulighed, som Melodi Grand Prix stiller til rådighed, synes at rumme en række komplekse forhold, hvor kommunikationssituationen, erfaring og oplevelse med tv-showet spiller en væsentlig rolle.

  17. Parabolic bundles on algebraic surfaces I – The Donaldson ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G)y denote the stalk at y of the sheaf of germs of holomorphic maps of Y into G. And let MY (G)y denote the stalk at y of the sheaf of germs of meromorphic maps from Y to G. Since we have the exact sequence of sheaf of multiplicative groups.

  18. Susan G. Komen for the Cure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... de sus senos:Consejos útiles para mujeres El Cancer de Mama y el Medio Ambiente: Preguntas y Respuestas Guía de herramientas de educación sobre el cancer de seno para comunidades hispanas/Latinas About Us ...

  19. Entretien avec Susan Holtz | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Au seuil du prochain millénaire, le développement planétaire durable pose des défis complexes et d'envergure. Partout dans le monde, on cherche à relever ces défis en intégrant les politiques environnementales, sociales et économiques.

  20. "Like Melody or Witchcraft": Empowerment through Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Deborah A.

    2004-01-01

    This document, written by a Native American woman, examines the authors' personal feelings of writing about being a child of color in a white world. The author hopes to evoke a resonance within her readers through her writing. She discusses quotes from two of her favorite poets, Emily Dickinson and Linda Hogan.

  1. Living Melodies - Coevolution Of Sonic Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlstedt, Palle; Nordahl, Mats G.

    2001-01-01

    The authors have constructed an artificial world of coevolving communicating agents. The behavior of the agents is described in terms of a simple genetic programming framework, which allows the evolution of foraging behavior and movement in order to reproduce, as well as sonic communication. The ....... The sound of the entire world is used as musical raw material for the work. Musically interesting and useful structures are found to emerge....

  2. Some structural determinants of melody recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltz, M

    1991-05-01

    Sophisticated musicians were asked to recall, using musical notation, a set of unfamiliar folk tunes that varied in rhythmic structure and referents of tonality. The results showed that memory was facilitated by tonic triad members marking phrase endings, but only when their presence was highlighted by a corresponding pattern of temporal accents. Conversely, recall significantly declined when tonal information was either absent or obscured by rhythmic structure. Error analyses further revealed that the retention of overall pitch contour and information at phrase ending points varied as a function of these manipulations. The results are discussed in terms of a framework that links the acts of perceiving and remembering to a common attentional scheme.

  3. Contravene, write ... About the pain of others of Susan Sontag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucía Belén Couso

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Regarding the pain of others challenges our knowledge, challenges what is held as true. We appreciate this attitude condensed in the verb “to defy”. We analyze how Sontag develops her hypothesis and, from that point onward, which is the idea of criticism that emerges from the writing of Regarding the pain of others. Our analysis focuses on three of its topics: the reviewing of the ideas about the war that Virginia Woolf establishes on Three Guineas, the discussion of her own text On photography, and the criticism about Sebastião Salgado’s photography.

  4. From Estonian Exile to Executive Office / Susan Frith

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Frith, Susan

    2008-01-01

    Eesti Vabariigi Presidendi Toomas Hendrik Ilvese elukäigust, haridusteest, poliitilistest vaadetest. T. H. Ilves lõpetas Pennsylvania ülikooli psühholoogia alal magistrikraadiga 1978. a. Artiklis on kasutatud telefoniintervjuud presidendiga. T. H. Ilvese kohta avaldavad arvamust ülikoolikaaslane Brian Wandell ja Eesti Rahvuskomitee Ühendriikides endine president Juhan Simonson. Ülevaade artiklist ilmunud ka: Vaba Eesti Sõna, 24. jaan. 2008, lk. 7, 10: Vaga, Airi. Eesti president Toomas H. Ilves Pennsylvania ülikooli ajakirjas

  5. Reading Susan Isaacs: toward a radically revised theory of thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogden, Thomas H

    2011-08-01

    The author views Isaacs's (1952) paper, The nature and function of phantasy, as making an important contribution to the development of a radically revised psychoanalytic theory of thinking. Perhaps Isaacs's most important contribution is the notion that phantasy is the process that creates meaning, and that phantasy is the form in which all meanings - including feelings, defense 'mechanisms,' impulses, bodily experiences, and so on - exist in unconscious mental life. The author discusses both explicit formulations offered by Isaacs as well as his own extensions of her ideas. The latter include (1) the idea that phantasying generates not only unconscious psychic content, but also constitutes the entirety of unconscious thinking; (2) the notion that transference is a form of phantasying that serves as a way of thinking for the first time (in relation to the analyst) emotional events that occurred in the past, but were too disturbing to be experienced at the time they occurred and (3) a principal aim and function of phantasy is that of fulfilling the human need to get to know and understand the truth of one's experience. The author concludes by discussing the relationship between Isaacs's concept of phantasy and Bion's concepts of alpha function and the human need for the truth, as well as the differences between Fairbairn's and Isaacs's conceptions of the nature of unconscious internal object relationships. Copyright © 2011 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  6. A polarised SUSANS facility to study magnetic systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    magnet, at a small angle to the diagonal of the rectangle. Neutrons were thus de- flected by the 'magnetic air prism' [5] of 90◦ apex angle. The magnet was fabricated by attaching eight rare earth permanent magnet slabs (2 cm wide, 5 cm long and. 1.25 cm high, maximum energy product BHmax > 30 MGOe) each, just ...

  7. A polarised SUSANS facility to study magnetic systems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Spatial pair-distribution functions for the up- and down-spins as well as the nuclear and magnetic scattering length density distributions in the micrometer domain, have ... Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085, India; Berlin Neutron Scattering Center, Hahn-Meitner-Institut, Glienicker ...

  8. Entretien avec Susan Holtz | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour le ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    26 nov. 2010 ... À l'échelle planétaire, toutes les institutions continueront d'évoluer et de changer, c'est sûr. C'est ce qui se passe présentement étant donné la conjugaison d'une intégration plus poussée de l'économie planétaire à l'évolution rapide des technologies, particulièrement dans le monde des communications.

  9. In Conversation with Susan Holtz | CRDI - Centre de recherches ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    In response to Chapter 8 of Agenda 21, "Integrating environment and development in decision making," IDRC undertook to research and document the practical, policy integration problems encountered in its development work. The Cornerstone of Development: Integrating Environmental, Social, and Economic Policies, ...

  10. Rene Valner ja Mikk Suursild - lihtsa elu tegelased / Susan Lahesalu

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lahesalu, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Arhitekt Rene Valner ja Mikk Suursild - tandem nimega UNITe - ehitavad ökonoomseid ja ökoloogilisi looduslikest materjalidest maju. Nende koostöös on valminud ka Peipsi ääres Nina külas 3 põhumaja. Ott Kadariku, Margit Mutso ja Kuido Kartau kommentaarid

  11. A tropical motivic Fubini theorem with applications to Donaldson-Thomas theory

    OpenAIRE

    Nicaise, Johannes; Payne, Sam

    2017-01-01

    We present a new tool for the calculation of Denef and Loeser's motivic nearby fiber and motivic Milnor fiber: a motivic Fubini theorem for the tropicalization map, based on Hrushovski and Kazhdan's theory of motivic volumes of semi-algebraic sets. As applications, we prove a conjecture of Davison and Meinhardt on motivic nearby fibers of weighted homogeneous polynomials, and give a very short and conceptual new proof of the integral identity conjecture of Kontsevich and Soibelman, first prov...

  12. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT--BAGHOUSE FILTRATION PRODUCTS, DONALDSON COMPANY, INC., 6282 FILTRATION MEDIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program, established by the U.S. EPA, is designed to accelerate the developmentand commercialization of new or improved technologies through third-party verification and reporting of performance. The Air Pollution Control Technology...

  13. Environmental Technology Verification: Baghouse Filtration Products--Donaldson Co., Inc., Tetratec #6255-3 Filtration Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has created the Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program to facilitate the deployment of innovative or improved environmental technologies through performance verification and dissemination of information. ETV seeks to ach...

  14. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT: BAGHOUSE FILTRATION PRODUCTS--DONALDSON COMPANY, INC., TETRATEC #6255 FILTRATION MEDIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program, established by the U.S. EPA, is designed to accelerate the development and commercialization of new or improved technologies through third-party verification and reporting of performance. The Air Pollution Control Technolog...

  15. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT: BAGHOUSE FILTRATION PRODUCTS--DONALDSON COMPANY, INC. 6277 FILTRATION MEDIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has created the Environmental Technology Verification Program to facilitate the deployment of innovative or improved environmental technologies through high quality, peer reviewed data on technology performance to those involved in the des...

  16. Multicultural Music: Lyrics to Familiar Melodies and Authentic Songs. Elementary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Connie

    This teacher's guide, designed for use with elementary age students, contains units of study about eight countries, their inhabitants, customs, and nationally celebrated events with special emphasis on music and food traditions. Countries represented by the units in this guide include Australia, Canada, France, Japan, Kenya, Mexico, The…

  17. IDENTIFIKASI FITUR MELODI GENDING LANCARAN BERDASARKAN PENGENALAN POLA NOTASI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arry Maulana Syarif

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Komposisi   gending   mempunyai   karakteristik   tersendiri. Terdapat kemiripan dalam rangkaian notasi di antara gending- gending. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengidentifikasi pola notasi gending berdasarkan kemiripan antar-atributnya. Pasangan notasi ditentukan sebagai dasar analisis, dan algoritma apriori digunakan untuk menganalisis pasangan notasi dari sampel gending lancaran. Hasil yang dicapai dapat memetakan  dan  mengidentifikasi,  serta  memberikan  bobot nilai   ideal   untuk   merangkai   pasangan   notasi,   hingga merangkai gatra (1 gatra terdiri dari 4 notasi. Kata Kunci :pola notasi, apriori, gamelan, gending

  18. The Pied Piper: A Parasitic Beetle's Melodies Modulate Ant Behaviours.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Di Giulio

    Full Text Available Ants use various communication channels to regulate their social organisation. The main channel that drives almost all the ants' activities and behaviours is the chemical one, but it is long acknowledged that the acoustic channel also plays an important role. However, very little is known regarding exploitation of the acoustical channel by myrmecophile parasites to infiltrate the ant society. Among social parasites, the ant nest beetles (Paussus are obligate myrmecophiles able to move throughout the colony at will and prey on the ants, surprisingly never eliciting aggression from the colonies. It has been recently postulated that stridulatory organs in Paussus might be evolved as an acoustic mechanism to interact with ants. Here, we survey the role of acoustic signals employed in the Paussus beetle-Pheidole ant system. Ants parasitised by Paussus beetles produce caste-specific stridulations. We found that Paussus can "speak" three different "languages", each similar to sounds produced by different ant castes (workers, soldiers, queen. Playback experiments were used to test how host ants respond to the sounds emitted by Paussus. Our data suggest that, by mimicking the stridulations of the queen, Paussus is able to dupe the workers of its host and to be treated as royalty. This is the first report of acoustic mimicry in a beetle parasite of ants.

  19. Effects of Sleep on Performance of a Keyboard Melody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Amy L.; Duke, Robert A.

    2006-01-01

    Recent research has shown that both the speed and accuracy of novel motor skills improve during sleep in a process called consolidation. Such off-line learning in the absence of practice as yet has been experimentally observed only with learners performing relatively simple tasks. In the experiment we report here, we tested whether experienced…

  20. Our favourite melodies: musical consumption and teenage lifestyles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Julian; Asbridge, Mark; Wortley, Scot

    2008-03-01

    The present study explores the determinants and lifestyle correletes of musical preferences among a large sample of high school students in Toronto, Ontario. Our work is informed by theory and research on cultural stratification and adolescent subcultures. In terms of cultural stratification, we engage with Bourdieu's (1984) and Peterson's (1996) conceptualizations of elite taste, while subcultural theory encourages us to focus upon more dissenting tastes and to explore connections between musical tastes and peer group activity. Our findings suggest that racial and ethnic identity, school experiences and cultural capital are significant sources of variation in musical tastes that loosely correspond to existing typologies; they also confirm what has often been inferred - that musical tastes and peer group cultural practices are closely linked. Our findings are then discussed in the light of current debates about the nature and dimensions of listening audiences for music.

  1. Pharmacognosy, a Classical Theme Tuned to a Contemporary Melody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Phipps, Lisa B; McDaniel, Jennifer

    2017-10-01

    Objective. To describe the development of a pharmacognosy course that uses a combination of didactic teaching, team-based projects, and practicum laboratory practice. Methods. A course titled "Pharmacognosy" was developed by applying a three-tier teaching methodology: in the classroom, the basic concepts and principles were introduced in a didactic manner; outside the classroom, students worked in teams and each team created an independent literature-based research project that was submitted as a poster presentation; in the pharmacy practicum laboratory, students worked individually and conducted a quality control experiment comprised of a quantitative analysis of an herbal product. Results. During the seven-year course implementation, 1091 first-year PharmD students participated in the course. Their performance was consistently satisfactory. On average, 30% of students in each class received a grade of "A" and teams received a "B" and above on their projects. Conclusion. The pharmacognosy course, equipped with concurrent teaching methods, implemented with a group research project, and reinforced by practicum laboratory experience, has reached the original goal of introducing a classical topic in an updated and contemporary fashion to meet the requirement of integrated pharmacy education and practice.

  2. Musical melody and speech intonation: singing a different tune.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatorre, Robert J; Baum, Shari R

    2012-01-01

    Music and speech are often cited as characteristically human forms of communication. Both share the features of hierarchical structure, complex sound systems, and sensorimotor sequencing demands, and both are used to convey and influence emotions, among other functions [1]. Both music and speech also prominently use acoustical frequency modulations, perceived as variations in pitch, as part of their communicative repertoire. Given these similarities, and the fact that pitch perception and production involve the same peripheral transduction system (cochlea) and the same production mechanism (vocal tract), it might be natural to assume that pitch processing in speech and music would also depend on the same underlying cognitive and neural mechanisms. In this essay we argue that the processing of pitch information differs significantly for speech and music; specifically, we suggest that there are two pitch-related processing systems, one for more coarse-grained, approximate analysis and one for more fine-grained accurate representation, and that the latter is unique to music. More broadly, this dissociation offers clues about the interface between sensory and motor systems, and highlights the idea that multiple processing streams are a ubiquitous feature of neuro-cognitive architectures.

  3. What Kind of Knowledge Facilitates Memory of Melodies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oura, Yoko

    Melodic memory appears to be founded on building blocks that are memorized in terms of style-specific ordering rules, melodic prototypes, and memory strategies. Ordering rules concern musical form and construction, while melodic strategies involve sequences of several notes. This paper reports on research studies undertaken to test these concepts…

  4. Unsettling Melodies: A Cognitive Approach to Incongruent Film Music.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemsen, Steven; Kiss, Miklós

    2013-01-01

    Incongruent film music is a soundtrack, either diegetic or non- diegetic, which expresses qualities that stand in contrast to the emotions evoked by the events seen. The present article aims at covering two interconnected areas; the first is comprised of a critical recapitulation of available

  5. Modern Rap Music: Mining the Melodies for Mental Health Resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaleel K. Abdul-Adil

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Modern Rap music is a very popular, powerful, and controversial form of contemporary youth media. Despite clearly counter-productive aspects of certain lyrics, videos, and other cultural elements, Rap music also offers prosocial material that can enhance the appeal and impact of mental health interventions. This article describes the Young Warriors program as an example of a Rap-based program that promotes positive development in urban ethnic minority youth. Future directions and similar scholarly efforts are also highlighted.

  6. Konuşma ve Ses Eğitimi Arasında Konuşmanın Ezgisi Açısından Akrabalık İlişkisi Kindship of Speaking and Voice Education Through Speaking Melody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kıvanç AYCAN

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Voice education is interdisciplinary individual education, whichconsists of sub-matters like speaking and singing. It is also aneducation in which the individuals acquire the necessary behaviors touse their voices in compatible with the anatomical and physiologicalstructures, while they are speaking and singing. On the other hand,speech training is defined as "diction", "oratory", "rhetoric" which isdoctrines in Turkish language for this purpose. The person who wantsto talk with clear diction and to use his language in a appropriate wayand express himself properly, has to understand and apply voice andbreath control and has to acquire knowledge about phonetic, accent,intonation and enclisis. People who earns money through speaking asin advocators, public speaker, politicians and teachers, should learn tokeep their voices for a healthy voice. To make people to use innatespeaking ability in an accurate and ordered way, speaking educationpossession in school life is crucial. General purpose of speaking lessonsin the educational institution is to gain effective and fitting individualexpression ability through the student’s opinion, observation, ambitionand desires. Starting from these point students should understand themain structure and function of respiratory systems, diaphragm andabdominal muscles, larynx muscles and voice tube. Speakingeducation’s theoretical content is finding practical corresponds in voiceeducation through breath management exercises. The kinship betweenvoice and speaking education is the relationship between the theoreticalcontent of speaking education and practical content of vocal education,which relies on the melody of speaking. This article is a descriptivereview which contains kinship of voice and speaking education. Ses eğitimi; konuşma, şarkı söyleme ve şan gibi alt basamakları içeren disiplinler arası bir özel eğitim alanıdır. Bireylere konuşurken ve şarkı söylerken anatomik ve fizyolojik yap

  7. Environmental Technology Verification Report: Baghouse Filtration Products, Donaldson Company, Inc. Tetratex® 6277 Filtration Media (Tested March 2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has created the Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program to facilitate the deployment of innovative or improved environmental technologies through performance verification and dissemination of information. ETV seeks to ach...

  8. Environmental Technology Verification Report: Baghouse Filtration Products, Donaldson Company, Inc. Tetratex® 6262 Filtration Media (Tested March 2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has created the Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program to facilitate the deployment of innovative or improved environmental technologies through performance verification and dissemination of information. ETV seeks to ach...

  9. Environmental Technology Verification Report: Baghouse Filtration Products, Donaldson Company, Inc. Tetratex® 6282 Filtration Media (Tested March - April 2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has created the Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program to facilitate the deployment of innovative or improved environmental technologies through performance verification and dissemination of information. ETV seeks to ach...

  10. Donaldson Company, Inc., Dura-Life #0701607 Filtration Media(Tested October 2011) (ETV Baghouse Filtration Products) Verification Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghouses are air pollution control devices used to control particulate emissions from stationary sources and are among the technologies evaluated by the APCT Center. Baghouses and their accompanying filter media have long been one of the leading particulate control techniques fo...

  11. In Appreciation of Claude Warren and Susan Rose's "William Pengelly's Techniques of Archaeological Excavation"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. Browman

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available The short (40 pages pamphlet by Warren and Rose (1994 provides the answer to a complex question regarding credit for an important archaeological methodology, stratigraphic excavation. Let me set the stage for this appreciation. Continuing research on the beginnings of stratigraphic excavations in North America (Browman and Givens 1996, I sought the origins of the idea of actually excavating by strata, rather than post-facto interpretation, seen in North American as early as 1895 in the work of Henry Chapman Mercer, but not really introduced into the repertoire of American techniques until the work of Gamio, Kidder and Nelson between 1911 and 1914. The roots of the latter three seemed to lie with individuals such as Reisner, Boas, Uhle, who in turn seemed to rely on Hugo Obennaier, Gabriel de Mortillet, Marcellin Boule, and perhaps Pitt-Rivers, while Mercer's work could be traced to Boule and Albert Gaudry. Doggedly following back the roots, I found that Chapman (1989 could make a reasonable case that Pitt-Rivers had actually learned of the idea of strati­graphic excavation from Evans, Prestwich, and Lubbock, from the British scientists working with the Upper and Middle Paleolithic excavations during 1858-1868.

  12. Nõukogude "kaasaegne stiil" : sotsialistlik modernism = The Soviet "contemporary style" : a socialist modernism / Susan E. Reid

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Reid, Susan E., 1959-

    2009-01-01

    Modernismile lähenemisest nõukogude kunstis. Nõukogude kunstikriitikast ja -praktikast. Kaasaegne stiil sünteesis arhitektuuriga. Nõukogude Palee teostamata projektist Moskvas. 1962. aastal valminud Moskva Pioneeride Paleest kui stalinistliku praktika hülgamise näitest

  13. Comment on "Revisiting the 1872 owens valley, California, earthquake" by Susan E. Hough and Kate Hutton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakun, W.H.

    2009-01-01

    Bakun (2009) argues that the conclusions of Hough and Hutton (2008) are wrong because the study failed to take into account the Sierra Nevada attenuation model of Bakun (2006). In particular, Bakun (2009) argues that propagation effects can explain the relatively high intensities generated by the 1872 Owens Valley earthquake. Using an intensity attenuation model that attempts to account for attenuation through the Sierra Nevada, Bakun (2006) infers the magnitude estimate (Mw 7.4–7.5) that is currently accepted by National Earthquake Information Center (NEIC).

  14. David Brailer on a private-public health information technology infrastructure. Interview by Susan V. White.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brailer, David

    2004-01-01

    David Brailer, MD PhD, was appointed the first National Health Information Technology Coordinator by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Tommy Thompson on May 6, 2004. As National Coordinator he is to execute President Bush's Executive Order of April 27, 2004, calling for widespread deployment of health information technology (HIT) within 10 years. Dr. Brailer is an authority on clinical data sharing, local health information exchanges, and the use of peer-to-peer technologies in healthcare. He is a leader in the strategy and financing of quality and efficiency in healthcare, with a particular emphasis on HIT and health systems management. Previously, Dr. Brailer was a Senior Fellow at the Health Technology Center in San Francisco, advising a variety of regional and national data-sharing projects and several major corporations about the role of IT in improving the quality of healthcare. Dr. Brailer recently completed 10 years as Chairman and CEO of CareScience, Inc., a provider of care management services and Internet-based solutions that help reduce medical errors and improve physician and hospital-based performance. Dr. Brailer holds doctoral degrees in both medicine and economics. While in medical school, he was a Charles A. Dana Scholar at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and the first recipient of the National Library of Medicine Martin Epstein Award for his work in expert systems. Dr. Brailer was among the first medical students to serve on the Board of Trustees of the American Medical Association.

  15. 77 FR 73663 - Susan F. Knott; Denial of Hearing; Final Debarment Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-11

    ... seeking treatment with BOTOX/BOTOX Cosmetic (BOTOX) with a product, TRI-toxin, distributed by Toxic Research International, Inc. (TRI). BOTOX is a biological product derived from botulinum toxin type A that... approved for use, to be offered for sale as an approved drug product, BOTOX. This conduct clearly relates...

  16. Cracking the finger code: an interview with CCR’s Susan Mackem | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The creation of the digits in our hand—the thumb, index-middle-ring fingers and pinky—begins early in development, but little is known about the exact programming that occurs to produce the different digit types. Investigators in the Cancer and Developmental Biology Laboratory, (CDBL), provide the first genetic evidence of how the tuning of signals sets digit identity by studying the effects of dysregulation (abnormal regulation) in several mutations. Read more…

  17. A rose is a rose is a melody: Mapping Julio Cortázar's musical narratives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Pérez Mukdsi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In 2014, many of Julio Cortázar’s ground-breaking works were re-launched over the world to commemorate the centenary of the birth of the Argentine writer. A major figure of world literature, Cortázar’s fictions are known to break out of the prison of words and conventional practices. His “counternovel” Hopscotch (1963, a milestone in Latin American fiction writing, is nothing less than a linguistic revolution. Part of what makes this novel revolutionary is the way it explores the boundaries of language and reality. The other part are its profuse references to jazz music, making it a work of unparalleled sonority. In fact, the presence of music – jazz, classical music, and tango – is significant not only in this novel but also in at least in half of Cortázar’s tremendous production. Most scholarship about Cortázar agrees that the author uses music as an alternative form of expression, one that complements and contradicts traditional language. Nevertheless, scholarship has not yet fashioned a convincing and comprehensive theoretical approach to his musically-infused production. The present article starts by examining what scholars have thus far said regarding music and, more specifically, jazz in Cortázar’s work. Then the essay raises critical questions about the cultural and linguistic myopia resulting from typical approaches to music in the author’s work. Finally, it points out avenues which might lead scholarship to a comprehensive vision of Cortázar’s strategic use of music.

  18. Melodies and maladies: reflections on Shakespeare and his portrayal of disease and death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranab Chatterjee

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Shakespeare has long been acknowledged to be a pioneer in understanding the functions and dysfunctions of the human mind. However, very little discussion has centered on his knowledge of the physical science of medicine. In this article the authors reflect on Shakespeare’s portrayal of diseases and death in his work and conclude that he had significant knowledge of the contemporary medical sciences.

  19. Modulation of auditory cortex response to pitch variation following training with microtonal melodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatorre, Robert J; Delhommeau, Karine; Zarate, Jean Mary

    2012-01-01

    We tested changes in cortical functional response to auditory patterns in a configural learning paradigm. We trained 10 human listeners to discriminate micromelodies (consisting of smaller pitch intervals than normally used in Western music) and measured covariation in blood oxygenation signal to increasing pitch interval size in order to dissociate global changes in activity from those specifically associated with the stimulus feature that was trained. A psychophysical staircase procedure with feedback was used for training over a 2-week period. Behavioral tests of discrimination ability performed before and after training showed significant learning on the trained stimuli, and generalization to other frequencies and tasks; no learning occurred in an untrained control group. Before training the functional MRI data showed the expected systematic increase in activity in auditory cortices as a function of increasing micromelody pitch interval size. This function became shallower after training, with the maximal change observed in the right posterior auditory cortex. Global decreases in activity in auditory regions, along with global increases in frontal cortices also occurred after training. Individual variation in learning rate was related to the hemodynamic slope to pitch interval size, such that those who had a higher sensitivity to pitch interval variation prior to learning achieved the fastest learning. We conclude that configural auditory learning entails modulation in the response of auditory cortex to the trained stimulus feature. Reduction in blood oxygenation response to increasing pitch interval size suggests that fewer computational resources, and hence lower neural recruitment, is associated with learning, in accord with models of auditory cortex function, and with data from other modalities.

  20. Veranderlikes wat die leersukses van Vistastudente beïnvloed / Melody Schutte

    OpenAIRE

    Schutte, Melody

    1994-01-01

    The aim of the research was to determine which variables influence the academic achievement, self-efficacy and self-regulated learning of Vista students. To achieve this aim, a theoretical study was made of certain cognitive, non-cognitive, motivational and environmental variables and their influence on the successful learning of tertiary students. The cognitive variables studied related to intelligence, aptitude, previous achievement, metacognition, learning strategies and sel...

  1. Learning and Liking of Melody and Harmony: Further Studies in Artificial Grammar Learning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Loui, Psyche

    2012-01-01

    .... While previous studies have shown that these mental representations of music can be acquired rapidly and can influence preference, it is still unclear which aspects of music influence learning and preference formation...

  2. Learning and liking of melody and harmony: Further studies in artificial grammar learning

    OpenAIRE

    Loui, Psyche

    2012-01-01

    Much of what we know and love about music is based on implicitly acquired mental representations of musical pitches and the relationships between them. While previous studies have shown that these mental representations of music can be acquired rapidly and can influence preference, it is still unclear which aspects of music influence learning and preference formation. This article reports two experiments that use an artificial musical system to examine two questions: 1) which aspects of music...

  3. A vocal basis for the affective character of musical mode in melody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eBowling

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Why does major music sound happy and minor music sound sad? The idea that different musical modes are best suited to the expression of different emotions has been prescribed by composers, music theorists, and natural philosophers for millennia. However, the reason we associate musical modes with emotions remains a matter of debate. On one side there is considerable evidence that mode-emotion associations arise through exposure to the conventions of a particular musical culture, suggesting a basis in lifetime learning. On the other, cross-cultural comparisons suggest that the particular associations we make are supported by musical similarities to the prosodic characteristics of the voice in different affective states, indicating a basis in the biology of emotional expression. Here, I review developmental and cross-cultural studies on the affective character of musical modes, concluding that while learning clearly plays a role, the emotional associations we make are (1 not arbitrary, and (2 best understood by also taking into account the physical characteristics and biological purposes of vocalization.

  4. What is a melody? On the relationship between pitch and brightness of timbre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion eCousineau

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies showed that the perceptual processing of sound sequences is more efficient when the sounds vary in pitch than when they vary in loudness. We show here that sequences of sounds varying in brightness of timbre are processed with the same efficiency as pitch sequences. The sounds used consisted of two simultaneous pure tones one octave apart, and the listeners' task was to make same/different judgments on pairs of sequences varying in length (one, two, or four sounds. In one condition, brightness of timbre was varied within the sequences by changing the relative level of the two pure tones. In other conditions, pitch was varied by changing fundamental frequency, or loudness was varied by changing the overall level. In all conditions, only two possible sounds could be used in a given sequence, and these two sounds were equally discriminable. When sequence length increased from one to four, discrimination performance decreased substantially for loudness sequences, but to a smaller extent for brightness sequences and pitch sequences. In the latter two conditions, sequence length had a similar effect on performance. These results suggest that the processes dedicated to pitch and brightness analysis, when probed with a sequence-discrimination task, share unexpected similarities.

  5. Modulation of auditory cortex response to pitch variation following training with microtonal melodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Zatorre

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We tested changes in cortical functional response to auditory configural learning by training ten human listeners to discriminate micromelodies (consisting of smaller pitch intervals than normally used in Western music. We measured covariation in blood oxygenation signal to increasing pitch-interval size in order to dissociate global changes in activity from those specifically associated with the stimulus feature of interest. A psychophysical staircase procedure with feedback was used for training over a two-week period. Behavioral tests of discrimination ability performed before and after training showed significant learning on the trained stimuli, and generalization to other frequencies and tasks; no learning occurred in an untrained control group. Before training the functional MRI data showed the expected systematic increase in activity in auditory cortices as a function of increasing micromelody pitch-interval size. This function became shallower after training, with the maximal change observed in the right posterior auditory cortex. Global decreases in activity in auditory regions, along with global increases in frontal cortices also occurred after training. Individual variation in learning rate was related to the hemodynamic slope to pitch-interval size, such that those who had a higher sensitivity to pitch-interval variation prior to learning achieved the fastest learning. We conclude that configural auditory learning entails modulation in the response of auditory cortex specifically to the trained stimulus feature. Reduction in blood oxygenation response to increasing pitch-interval size suggests that fewer computational resources, and hence lower neural recruitment, is associated with learning, in accord with models of auditory cortex function, and with data from other modalities.

  6. Melody and pitch processing in five musical savants with congenital blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pring, Linda; Woolf, Katherine; Tadic, Valerie

    2008-01-01

    We examined absolute-pitch (AP) and short-term musical memory abilities of five musical savants with congenital blindness, seven musicians, and seven non-musicians with good vision and normal intelligence in two experiments. In the first, short-term memory for musical phrases was tested and the savants and musicians performed statistically indistinguishably, both significantly outperforming the non-musicians and remembering more material from the C major scale sequences than random trials. In the second experiment, participants learnt associations between four pitches and four objects using a non-verbal paradigm. This experiment approximates to testing AP ability. Low statistical power meant the savants were not statistically better than the musicians, although only the savants scored statistically higher than the non-musicians. The results are evidence for a musical module, separate from general intelligence; they also support the anecdotal reporting of AP in musical savants, which is thought to be necessary for the development of musical-savant skill.

  7. Two melodies in concert: mitral and pulmonary valve replacement late in repaired tetralogy of Fallot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Zhi; Hu, Jia; Zhu, Xianglan; Lin, Ke

    2015-04-17

    Disruption of pulmonary valve integrity after Tetralogy of Fallot repair often results in a cascade of hemodynamic and electrophysiological abnormalities. Here we report an uncommon case of severe pulmonary regurgitation with concomitant rheumatic mitral stenosis diagnosed 25 years after primary Tetralogy of Fallot repair. A 33-year-old man presented with symptomatic palpitation and exercise intolerance and was treated successfully with pulmonary and mitral valve replacement, after which his symptoms improved dramatically.

  8. Priming in Melody Perception: Tracking Down the Strength of Cognitive Expectations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmel, Frederic; Tillmann, Barbara; Delbe, Charles

    2010-01-01

    The musical priming paradigm has shown facilitated processing for tonally related over less-related targets. However, the congruence between tonal relatedness and the psychoacoustical properties of music challenges cognitive interpretations of the involved processes. Our goal was to show that cognitive expectations (based on listeners' tonal…

  9. Melody as Prosody: Toward a Usage-Based Theory of Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pooley, Thomas Mathew

    2014-01-01

    Rationalist modes of inquiry have dominated the cognitive science of music over the past several decades. This dissertation contests many rationalist assumptions, including its core tenets of nativism, modularity, and computationism, by drawing on a wide range of evidence from psychology, neuroscience, linguistics, and cognitive music theory, as…

  10. Thematic Melodies of Twentieth Century Theoretical Physics Quantization, Symmetry and Phase Factor

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva; Alvarez-Gaumé, Luís

    2006-01-01

    Professor C.N. Yang is a living legend in Physics. The depth and breadth of his contributions are simply staggering. He is at the origin of the discovery of parity violation, Yang-Mills theory (with which we write the basic interactions in the standard model), the Yang-Baxter equation in the theory of integrable systems, the applications of topology in physics, and a long etcetera. He is also an excellent speaker. It is rare to have people of his stature come and visit CERN. It will be a memorable colloquium.

  11. Melodies That Help: The Relation between Language Aptitude and Musical Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca-Mora, M. C.; Toscano-Fuentes, C.; Wermke, K.

    2011-01-01

    Music and rhythm have been defined as powerful aids to language learning, memory, and recall. But is this due to structural and motivational properties of instrumental music and songs, or is there a relation between learners' language aptitude and musical intelligence? It seems that everyone who feels motivated to do it is able to learn other…

  12. A Proposal of a Color Music Notation System on a Single Melody for Music Beginners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yi-Ting; Chuang, Ming-Chuen

    2013-01-01

    Music teachers often encounter obstructions in teaching beginners in music reading. Conventional notational symbols require beginners to spend significant amount of time in memorizing, which discourages learning at early stage. This article proposes a newly-developed color music notation system that may improve the recognition of the staff and the…

  13. Understanding Unlikeness, in John Chamberlain: Choices, Susan Davidson, ed. (New York: Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, 2012), pp. 45–55

    OpenAIRE

    Adrian Kohn

    2017-01-01

    ere is just some of what we are given to understand John Chamberlain’s art as being like: car wrecks and dancers, artichokes and mummies and giant phalluses, drapery, a football player, ornaments for an immense Christmas tree and monstrous jungle-gyms, a sucked egg, and Titans beside themselves with rage. Next, a long list of the art-historical movements that his pieces have brought to mind: the baroque and rococo, neoclassicism, Cubism, Dada and Surrealism, both Abstract Expressionism and Po...

  14. Uncovering Our History, Teaching Primary Sources (Tarihimizi Keşfetme, Birincil Kaynaklarla Öğretim - Susan H. Veccia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duygu Alphan Şentuna

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Okul yıllarından bahseden insanların büyük bir çoğunluğu için tarih dersi, not almak için isimlerin ve tarihlerin ezberlendiği, sınavdan sonra ise unutulduğu bir ders olarak hatıralarda yer alır. Günümüzde tarih öğretiminde önemli gelişmeler olmasına rağmen hala derslerde öğretmenlerin isim, tarih ve ders kitabı merkezli bir öğretim izledikleri görülmektedir. Öğrencilerin eleştirel ve tarihsel düşünme becerisi elde etmeleri için ilk önce bilgiye sahip olmaları gerektiği inancı, öğretmenlerin derslerde yenilikçi yöntemlere yeterli zaman ayırmalarını engellemektedir. Bu durum öğrencilerin tarih dersinden soğumalarına ve dersi zaman kaybı olarak görmelerine neden olmaktadır.

  15. 75 FR 22012 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; 12-Month Finding on a Petition to List Susan's...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-27

    ... that incidental dispersal via wind or adhesion to animals or humans could occur, but neither dispersal... species is imperiled (at a high risk of extinction) globally due to a very restricted range, very few... Spring may be impacted by poor water quality because of large amounts of filamentous algae in Trout Creek...

  16. Separated by Sex: A Critical Look at Single-Sex Education for Girls (edited by Susan Morse)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceraulo, Reviewed By Sandra C.

    1999-05-01

    As Cornelius Riordan states in his round-table paper, "The challenge of effective and equitable schooling in the next century is to overcome the resistance and recalcitrance of youth cultures in and out of school" (p 58). While this is admittedly not a new problem, it is more complex in its modern form and innovative ways to solve it are needed. In an old tradition, one such attempt has been single-sex schools, which have had particular success with the disadvantaged and white females in American society, with the notable involvement of Catholic religious communities. The report does not make clear whether their successes can be reproduced in some modification of the public school format. However, the AAUW report on single-sex schools sheds light on some of the characteristics that make true learning communities out of ordinary schools and on what it takes to reach disadvantaged girls. For these reasons, the AAUW report is good reading for educators at all levels.

  17. Recognition of music and melody in patients with cochlear implants, using a new programming approach for frequency assignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcón-González, Juan C; Borkoski-Barreiro, Silvia; Limiñana-Cañal, José María; Ramos-Macías, Angel

    2014-01-01

    Music is a universal, cross-cultural phenomenon. Perception and enjoyment of music are still not solved with current technological objectives of cochlear implants. The objective of this article was to advance the development and validation of a method of programming of cochlear implants that implements a frequency allocation strategy. We compared standard programming vs frequency programming in every subject. We studied a total of 40 patients with cochlear implants. Each patient was programmed with a optimal version of the standard program, using the Custom Sound Suite 3.2 cochlear platform. Speech tests in quiet were performed using syllable word lists from the protocol for the assessment of hearing in the Spanish language. Patients implanted bilaterally were tested in both ears at the same time. For assessing music listening habits we used the Munich Music Questionnaire and «MACarena»(minimum auditory capability) software. All patients achieved better results in recognition, instrument tests and tonal scales with frequency programming (P<.005). Likewise, there were better results with frequency programming in recognising harmonics and pitch test (P<.005). Frequency programming achieves better perception and recognition results in patients in comparison with standard programming. Bilateral stimulation patients have better perception of musical patterns and better performance in recognition of tonal scales, harmonics and musical instruments compared with patients with unilateral stimulation. Modification and frequency allocation during programming allows decreased levels of current intensity and increase the dynamic range, which allows mapping of each audio band less obtrusively and improves the quality of representation of the signal. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Patología Cérvico-Facial. All rights reserved.

  18. Music Supports the Processing of Song Lyrics and Changes their Contents: : Effects of Melody, Silences and Accompaniment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schotanus, Yke|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074311085

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of evidence indicates that singing might affect the perception of language both in a supportive and in a detrimental way. Accompaniment might be a factor of interest, because loud rests (on-beat silences) and out-of-key notes may confuse listeners, while accompaniment might elucidate

  19. The influence of music-elicited emotions and relative pitch on absolute pitch memory for familiar melodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubowski, Kelly; Müllensiefen, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Levitin's findings that nonmusicians could produce from memory the absolute pitches of self-selected pop songs have been widely cited in the music psychology literature. These findings suggest that latent absolute pitch (AP) memory may be a more widespread trait within the population than traditional AP labelling ability. However, it has been left unclear what factors may facilitate absolute pitch retention for familiar pieces of music. The aim of the present paper was to investigate factors that may contribute to latent AP memory using Levitin's sung production paradigm for AP memory and comparing results to the outcomes of a pitch labelling task, a relative pitch memory test, measures of music-induced emotions, and various measures of participants' musical backgrounds. Our results suggest that relative pitch memory and the quality and degree of music-elicited emotions impact on latent AP memory.

  20. Inter-individual differences in audio-motor learning of piano melodies and white matter fiber tract architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engel, Annerose; Hijmans, Brenda S.; Cerliani, Leonardo; Bangert, Marc; Nanetti, Luca; Keller, Peter E.; Keysers, Christian

    Humans vary substantially in their ability to learn new motor skills. Here, we examined inter-individual differences in learning to play the piano, with the goal of identifying relations to structural properties of white matter fiber tracts relevant to audio-motor learning. Non-musicians (n = 18)

  1. New Models for Initial Teacher Education in Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibble, Bob

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author responds to the recent article by Lynne Bianchi commenting on the Donaldson report, "Teaching Scotland's future" (Donaldson, 2011). He agrees that the Donaldson report has indeed been a catalyst to drive change across the entire landscape of initial teacher education (ITE) in Scotland. In fact, not only ITE:…

  2. Interview with a quality leader. Linda Aiken on the healthcare industry and workplace issues. Interview by Susan V. White and Colleen J. Hewes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiken, Linda

    2003-01-01

    Linda Aiken, PhD MSN, is director of the Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research and The Claire M. Fagin Leadership Professor of Nursing and Professor of Sociology at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. Dr. Aiken's other appointments at the University of Pennsylvania include senior fellow at the Leonard Davis Institute for Health Economics and research associate in the Population Studies Center. Before joining the University of Pennsylvania faculty in 1988, Dr. Aiken served as vice president of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine, a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and of the National Academy of Social Insurance, a former president of the American Academy of Nursing, a distinguished fellow of the Academy for Health Services Research and Health Policy (now AcademyHealth), and a member of the Council on the Economic Impact of Health System Change. Dr. Aiken served on the Medicare Physician Payment Review Commission for 6 years and was a member of the 1982 Social Security Advisory Council and of President Clinton's National Health Reform Task Force. Her recent work, for which she received the Sigma Theta Tau International Clinical Research Award in 1999, has focused on accounting for variation in hospital patient outcomes in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, and Germany. Dr. Aiken received her bachelor's and master's degrees in nursing from the University of Florida, Gainesville, and her doctorate in sociology and demography from the University of Texas at Austin.

  3. The Susan G. Komen for the Cure Tissue Bank at the IU Simon Cancer Center: a unique resource for defining the "molecular histology" of the breast

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sherman, Mark E; Figueroa, Jonine D; Henry, Jill E; Clare, Susan E; Rufenbarger, Connie; Storniolo, Anna Maria

    2012-01-01

    "Molecular histology" of the breast may be conceptualized as encompassing the normative ranges of histologic structure and marker expression in normal breast tissues in relation to a woman's age and life experiences...

  4. The Greek Life of St. Leo bishop of Catania (BHG 981b), Text and Notes by Alexandros G. Alexakis, Translation by Susan Wessel

    OpenAIRE

    Peters-Custot, Annick

    2014-01-01

    Le dossier hagiographique de Léon, évêque de Catane en Sicile, est un des plus originaux et des plus complexes de l’hagiographie médiévale en langue grecque. Logiquement, les débats savants qui entourent le dossier sont intenses et stimulés par chaque nouvelle publication. Toutefois, l’intérêt du dossier hagiographique de Léon dépasse largement le cercle restreint des spécialistes de l’hagiographie iconoclaste, crypto-iconoclaste et iconodoule, tant le contenu de cette Vie et les mystères de ...

  5. Interview with a quality leader: Kent Bottles, MD, president of ICSI, on transforming care for the future. Interview by Susan V. White.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottles, Kent

    2010-01-01

    Kent Bottles, MD, President of the Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement (ICSI). Dr. Bottles is a board-certified pathologist who specialized in surgical and cyto-pathology. He earned a medical degree from Case Western Reserve University in Ohio. He has extensive experience in integrated healthcare delivery systems, research, academia, commercial laboratories, genomics, proteomics, and management of biotech start-up companies. Dr. Bottles was vice president and chief medical officer of the Iowa Health System. Before that, he served as president and CEO of Grand Rapids Medical Education and Research Center for Health Professions, a multi-institutional consortium of healthcare organizations, and as president of Genomics Repository and chief knowledge officer, Genomics Collaborative Inc. Dr. Bottles has extensive academic experience, serving as Professor and Acting Head, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the University of Iowa. He was also the founding medical director of managed care plans for University of Iowa employees. Dr. Bottles has addressed topics ranging from quality and patient safety and disruptive technology to patient-physician relationships and the future of medicine. He has received numerous honors, including the Rodney T. West Literary Achievement Award for the most important article on medical management presented by the American College of Physician Executives. He has broad clinical experience with the University of Iowa and the San Francisco General Hospital, and has been a national leader in changing the practice of pathology and laboratory medicine to meet the challenges of managed care.

  6. The Effects of Verbal, Vocally Modeled, Kinesthetic, and Audio-Visual Treatment Conditions on Male and Female Middle-School Vocal Music Students' Abilities to Expressively Sing Melodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebie, Brian D.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine whether there were significant differences in male or female middle-school students' ability to appropriately convey the emotions of happiness, sadness, anger, and fear while singing musical passages within the context of four treatment situations. Four treatment methodologies were designed to identify…

  7. Severely regurgitant left ventricle to ascending aorta conduit in a failing fontan patient treated with a vascular endograft and melody transcatheter pulmonary valve via hybrid approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boe, Brian A; Rectenwald, John E; Bocks, Martin L

    2016-12-01

    A 28-year-old male with single ventricular heart disease status post Fontan palliation and subsequent placement of left ventricle to ascending aorta (LV-AAo) valved conduit developed ascites and edema. Diagnostic catheterization revealed elevated ventricular end diastolic pressures (EDP) secondary to severe LV-AAo conduit regurgitation. Given the unique anatomy, surgical access via the right axillary artery provided optimal route for transcatheter valve implantation within the conduit. The procedure resulted in significant hemodynamic improvement with no complications. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. The effect of MELatOnin on Depression, anxietY, cognitive function and sleep disturbances in patients with breast cancer. The MELODY trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Melissa Voigt; Madsen, Michael Tvilling; Hageman, Ida

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer represents about one-third of all cancer diagnoses and accounts for about 15% of cancer deaths in women. Many of these patients experience depression, anxiety, sleep disturbances and cognitive dysfunction. This may adversely affect quality of life and also contribute......-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial is to investigate whether treatment with oral melatonin has a prophylactic or ameliorating effect on depressive symptoms, anxiety, sleep disturbances and cognitive dysfunction in women with breast cancer. Furthermore, the authors will examine whether a specific clock...... measured by the Major Depression Inventory. The secondary outcomes are anxiety measured by a Visual Analogue Scale, total sleep time, sleep efficiency, sleep latency and periods awake measured by actigraphy and changes in cognitive function measured by a neuropsychological test battery. Tertiary outcomes...

  9. 4-manifolds and intersection forms with local coefficients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frøyshov, Kim Anders

    2012-01-01

    We extend Donaldson's diagonalization theorem to intersection forms with certain local coefficients, under some constraints. This provides new examples of non-smoothable topological 4-manifolds.......We extend Donaldson's diagonalization theorem to intersection forms with certain local coefficients, under some constraints. This provides new examples of non-smoothable topological 4-manifolds....

  10. Prosodic persistence in music performance and speech production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungers, Melissa K.; Palmer, Caroline; Speer, Shari R.

    2002-05-01

    Does the rate of melodies that listeners hear affect the rate of their performed melodies? Skilled adult pianists performed two short melodies as a measure of their preferred performance rate. Next they heard, on each trial, a computer-generated performance of a prime melody at a slow or fast rate (600 or 300 ms per quarter-note beat). Following each prime melody, the pianists performed a target melody from notation. The prime and target melodies were matched for meter and length. The rate of pianists' target melody performances was slower for performances that followed a slow prime than a fast prime, indicating that pianists' performances were influenced by the rate of the prime melody. Performance duration was predicted by a model that includes prime and preferred durations. Findings from an analogous speech production experiment show that a similar model predicts speakers' sentence rate from preferred and prime sentence rates. [Work supported by NIMH Grant 45764 and the Center for Cognitive Science.

  11. The Susan G. Komen for the Cure® Tissue Bank at the IU Simon Cancer Center: A Unique Resource for Defining the “Molecular Histology” of the Breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Mark E.; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Henry, Jill E.; Clare, Susan E.; Rufenbarger, Connie; Storniolo, Anna Maria

    2014-01-01

    “Molecular histology” of the breast may be conceptualized as encompassing the normative ranges of histological structure and marker expression in normal breast tissues in relation to a woman’s age and life experiences. Studies of molecular histology can aid our understanding of early events in breast carcinogenesis and provide data for comparison with diseased breast tissues. Until recently, lack of epidemiologically annotated, optimally prepared normal breast tissues obtained from healthy women presented a barrier to breast cancer research. The Komen Tissue Bank at Indiana University is a unique biorepository that was developed to overcome this limitation. The Bank enrolls healthy donors who provide questionnaire data, blood, and up to four breast biopsies, which are prepared as both formalin fixed paraffin embedded and frozen tissues. The resource is accessible to researchers worldwide through a proposal submission, review, and approval process. As of November 2010, the Bank had collected specimens and information from 1,174 donors. In this review, we discuss the importance of studying normal breast tissues, assess the strengths and limitations of studying normal tissues obtained from different sources, and summarize the features of the Komen Tissue Bank. As research projects are completed, results will be posted on the Bank’s website. PMID:22345117

  12. Shoot winter injury and nut cold tolerance: Possible limitations for American chestnut restoration in cold environments? In: Sniezko, Richard A.; Yanchuk, Alvin D.; Kliejunas, John T.; Palmieri, Katharine M.; Alexander, Janice M.; Frankel, Susan J., tech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas M. Saielli; Paul G. Schaberg; Gary J. Hawley; Joshua M. Halman; Kendra M. Gurney

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 100 years ago, American chestnut (Castanea dentata (Marsh.) Borkh.) was rapidly removed as an overstory tree by the fungal pathogen Cryphonectria parasitica (the causal agent of chestnut blight). Currently, the most effective method of restoration involves the hybridization of American chestnut with the...

  13. A Book Review of Arts-Based and Contemplative Practices in Research and Teaching: Honoring Presence Edited by Susan Walsh, Barbara Bickel, and Carl Leggo, Published by Routledge, 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J Guiney Yallop

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This book review of Arts-Based and Contemplative Practices in Research and Teaching: Honoring Presence is both a review of the work as well as a contemplation on the work. The reader is invited into the book through witnessing the impact reading the book had on this reviewer. Attention is given to each author’s contributions to the publication, noting how each chapter and each Lectio Divina (opportunities for contemplation between chapters calls us to pay attention.

  14. The Practice of Nursing Research: Appraisal, Synthesis, and Generation of Evidence - Seventh edition Grove Susan K The Practice of Nursing Research: Appraisal, Synthesis, and Generation of Evidence - Seventh edition 752pp Elsevier 9781455707362 1455707368 [Formula: see text].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-03

    This classic research text has been updated for nursing students and those in nursing practice. Though a substantial book, it is easy to dip in and out of, covering a wide range of topics from the research process and analysing data to sampling and seeking funding.

  15. Listen, Learn, Like! Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex Involved in the Mere Exposure Effect in Music

    OpenAIRE

    Green, Anders C.; Bærentsen, Klaus B.; Stødkilde-Jørgensen, Hans; Roepstorff, Andreas; Vuust, Peter

    2012-01-01

    We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the neural basis of the mere exposure effect in music listening, which links previous exposure to liking. Prior to scanning, participants underwent a learning phase, where exposure to melodies was systematically varied. During scanning, participants rated liking for each melody and, later, their recognition of them. Participants showed learning effects, better recognising melodies heard more often. Melodies heard most often were mos...

  16. Correlation between the ability to memorize a sentence and the ability to memorize a melody in children in the last year of kindergarten and the first year of primary school

    OpenAIRE

    Repe, Katja

    2012-01-01

    In school situations, the ability to memorize is very important for successful integration of children in the school process. When examining various literatures, I have come to conclusion that the majority of students deals with this kind of difficulties. Since in many children signs of learning disabilities appear already in preschool education, we can predict them with early diagnosis and moderate or even prevent them. In the diploma seminar paper, I have focused on establishing the shor...

  17. Health services and the public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Liam J

    2002-11-01

    The 16th Duncan Memorial Lecture. Given at Henry Cohen lecture theatre, Duncan Building, Daulby Street, Liverpool, UK on Wednesday 25 November 1998 by Professor Sir Liam J Donaldson, Chief Medical Officer for England.

  18. A Communications Link for an Implantable Electrode Array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-01

    knowledge used to generate better implantable devices. F- 7 Bibliography 1. Donaldson, P. E. K. "Experimental Visual Prothesis ,"IEE Proceedings of Control...and Science, 120: 281-T9- (February 1973). 2. Donaldson, P. E. K. "Engineering A Visual Prothesis ," Engineering In Medicine and Biology Magazine, 2...Functional Prothesis ," Science, 183: 440-444 (February 1974). 5. Kabrisky, M. A Proposed Model for Visual Processing in the Human Brain. Urbana

  19. Browse Author Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 151 - 200 of 798 ... Dixon, D · Djamba, yanyi K · Domson-Lindsay, AK · Domson-Lindsay, Albert · Donaldson, R · Donaldson, Ronnie · Dorfling, Tamzyn · Doubell, M · Douglas, Shirlane · Draai, E · Draai, Enaleen · du Plessis, Hester · du Plessis, Inus · du Toit Botha, P · Dumbe, Yunus · Duthie, Shawn Robert · Dzingirai, V ...

  20. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... coped with having iron-deficiency anemia. Prior to her diagnosis, Susan had symptoms such as tiredness, poor skin tone, dizziness, and depression. After her doctor diagnosed her with iron-deficiency anemia, Susan ...

  1. Program Development and Evaluation - Finance / Money Management

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Karen Biers: Ca$hing in on Business Opportunities: A Curriculum for Building an Effective Home-Based and Micro Business Educational Program. Susan E. Cosgrove: Statewide Personal Financial Literacy Campaign. Susan Shockey: Financial Education Helps IDA Participants Save Money.

  2. The Effect of Tactile Cues on Auditory Stream Segregation Ability of Musicians and Nonmusicians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slater, Kyle D.; Marozeau, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    , we test whether tactile cues can be used to segregate 2 interleaved melodies. Twelve musicians and 12 nonmusicians were asked to detect changes in a 4-note repeated melody interleaved with a random melody. In order to perform this task, the listener must be able to segregate the target melody from...... the random melody. Tactile cues were applied to the listener’s fingers on half of the blocks. Results showed that tactile cues can significantly improve the melodic segregation ability in both musician and nonmusician groups in challenging listening conditions. Overall, the musician group performance...

  3. 2011 Women in Defense (WID) National Fall Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-19

    PANEL: “RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN ACQUISITION: NEW LAWS, REGULATIONS AND DIRECTIVES” Moderator: Ms. Susan Ebner , Counsel, Buchanan Ingersoll...ACQUISITION: NEW LAWS, REGULATIONS AND DIRECTIVES” Moderator: u Ms. Susan Ebner , Counsel, Buchanan Ingersoll & Rooney PC Panelists: u Ms. Jennifer Schaus...Commendation Medal, Navy Achievement Medal with gold star and various unit citations, campaign medals and service medals. MS. SUSAN EBNER Counsel

  4. Influence of Pitch Height on the Perception of Submissiveness and Threat in Musical Passages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Huron

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Bolinger, Ohala, Morton and others have established that vocal pitch height is perceived to be associated with social signals of dominance and submissiveness: higher vocal pitch is associated with submissiveness, whereas lower vocal pitch is associated with social dominance. An experiment was carried out to test this relationship in the perception of non-vocal melodies. Results show a parallel situation in music: higher-pitched melodies sound more submissive (less threatening than lower-pitched melodies.

  5. Exposure effects on music preference and recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretz, I; Gaudreau, D; Bonnel, A M

    1998-09-01

    In three experiments, the effects of exposure to melodies on their subsequent liking and recognition were explored. In each experiment, the subjects first listened to a set of familiar and unfamiliar melodies in a study phase. In the subsequent test phase, the melodies were repeated, along with a set of distractors matched in familiarity. Half the subjects were required to rate their liking of each melody, and half had to identify the melodies they had heard earlier in the study phase. Repetition of the studied melodies was found to increase liking of the unfamiliar melodies in the affect task and to be best for detection of familiar melodies in the recognition task (Experiments 1, 2, and 3). These memory effects were found to fade at different time delays between study and test in the affect and recognition tasks, with the latter leading to the most persistent effects (Experiment 2). Both study-to-test changes in melody timbre and manipulation of study tasks had a marked impact on recognition and little influence on liking judgments (Experiment 3). Thus, all manipulated variables were found to dissociate the memory effects in the two tasks. The results are consistent with the view that memory effects in the affect and recognition tasks pertain to the implicit and explicit forms of memory, respectively. Part of the results are, however, at variance with the literature on implicit and explicit memory in the auditory domain. Attribution of these differences to the use of musical material is discussed.

  6. Music recognition in frontotemporal lobar degeneration and Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Julene K; Chang, Chiung-Chih; Brambati, Simona M; Migliaccio, Raffaella; Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa; Miller, Bruce L; Janata, Petr

    2011-06-01

    To compare music recognition in patients with frontotemporal dementia, semantic dementia, Alzheimer disease, and controls and to evaluate the relationship between music recognition and brain volume. Recognition of familiar music depends on several levels of processing. There are few studies about how patients with dementia recognize familiar music. Subjects were administered tasks that assess pitch and melody discrimination, detection of pitch errors in familiar melodies, and naming of familiar melodies. There were no group differences on pitch and melody discrimination tasks. However, patients with semantic dementia had considerable difficulty naming familiar melodies and also scored the lowest when asked to identify pitch errors in the same melodies. Naming familiar melodies, but not other music tasks, was strongly related to measures of semantic memory. Voxel-based morphometry analysis of brain magnetic resonance imaging showed that difficulty in naming songs was associated with the bilateral temporal lobes and inferior frontal gyrus, whereas difficulty in identifying pitch errors in familiar melodies correlated with primarily the right temporal lobe. The results support a view that the anterior temporal lobes play a role in familiar melody recognition, and that musical functions are affected differentially across forms of dementia.

  7. Music in minor activates limbic structures: a relationship with dissonance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Anders C; Baerentsen, Klaus B; Stødkilde-Jørgensen, Hans; Wallentin, Mikkel; Roepstorff, Andreas; Vuust, Peter

    2008-05-07

    Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we contrasted major and minor mode melodies controlled for liking to study the neural basis of musical mode perception. To examine the influence of the larger dissonance in minor melodies on neural activation differences, we further introduced a strongly dissonant stimulus, in the form of a chromatic scale. Minor mode melodies were evaluated as sadder than major melodies, and in comparison they caused increased activity in limbic structures, namely left parahippocampal gyrus, bilateral ventral anterior cingulate, and in left medial prefrontal cortex. Dissonance explained some, but not all, of the heightened activity in the limbic structures when listening to minor mode music.

  8. Online Recognition of Music Is Influenced by Relative and Absolute Pitch Information

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Creel, Sarah C; Tumlin, Melanie A

    2012-01-01

    .... Fixation and error data suggest that adults naturally recognize music, like language, incrementally, computing matches to representations before melody offset, despite the fact that music, unlike...

  9. Reply to “Comment on ‘Ground motions from the 2015 Mw 7.8 Gorkha, Nepal, earthquake constrained by a detailed assessment of macroseismic data’ by Stacey S. Martin, Susan E. Hough, and Charleen Hung” by Andrea Tertulliani, Laura Graziani, Corrado Castellano, Alessandra Maramai, and Antonio Rossi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Stacey S.; Hough, Susan E.

    2016-01-01

    We thank Andrea Tertulliani and his colleagues for their interest in our article on the 2015 Gorkha earthquake (Martin, Hough, et al., 2015), and for their comments pertaining to our study (Tertulliani et al., 2016). Indeed, as they note, a comprehensive assessment of macroseismic effects for an earthquake with far‐reaching effects as that of Gorkha is not only critically important but is also an extremely difficult undertaking. In the absence of a widely known web‐based system, employing a well‐calibrated algorithm with which to collect and systematically assess macroseismic information (e.g., Wald et al., 1999; Coppola et al., 2010; Bossu et al., 2015) in the Indian subcontinent, one is left with two approaches to characterize effects of an event such as the Gorkha earthquake: a comprehensive ground‐based survey such as the one undertaken in India following the 2001 Bhuj earthquake (Pande and Kayal, 2003), or an assessment such as Martin, Hough, et al. (2015) akin to other contemporary studies (e.g., Nuttli, 1973; Sieh, 1978; Meltzner and Wald, 1998; Martin and Szeliga, 2010; Ambraseys and Bilham, 2012; Mahajan et al., 2012; Gupta et al., 2013; Singh et al., 2013; Hough and Martin, 2015; Martin and Hough, 2015; Martin, Bradley, et al., 2015; Ribeiro et al., 2015), based primarily upon media reports and other available documentary accounts.

  10. Human Resource Management, 11th Edition International Student Version. By David A. DeCenzo, Stephen P. Robbins and Susan L. Verhulst, Wiley, 2013; 448 Pages. Price £54.99 / €66.00, ISBN 978-1-1183-7971-4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Kun Lin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The 11th Edition of Human Resource Management helps students understand and remember concepts through a straightforward and conversational writing style and a wealth of examples to clarify ideas and build interest. The authors provide a strong foundation of essential elements of Human Resource Management (HRM as well as a clear understanding of how Human Resource Management links with business strategy. Through practical applications, the authors illustrate the importance of employees on every level of the organization, helping students understand HRM elements such as recruitment, training, motivation, retention, safety, the legal environment, and how they support successful business strategies.

  11. Staffing an Academic Reference Desk with Librarians is not Cost-effective. A Review of: Ryan, Susan M. “Reference Transactions Analysis: The Cost-effectiveness of Staffing a Traditional Academic Reference Desk.” Journal of Academic Librarianship 34.5 (2008: 389-99.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cari Merkley

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To determine whether it is cost effective to staff an academic reference desk with librarians through an examination of the types of reference questions being asked and the qualifications required to answer them.Design – Content analysis of reference transaction logs and activity-based costing for reference services based on quantitative data derived from the logs.Setting – Stetson University, a private institution in the United States with an FTE of approximately 2500.Subjects – 6959 phone, email, and in-person reference transactions logged at the reference desk by four full-time and two part-time librarians.Methods – This study repurposes data originally collected to determine the frequency with which librarians turned to online versus print sources when responding to questions at the reference desk. Librarians working at the Stetson University library reference desk recorded all reference queries received in person, by phone, or by email for a total of eight months between 2002 and 2006. Data collection took place in two month intervals in fall 2002, spring 2003, spring 2006, and fall 2006. Each question and the sources used to address it were logged by the librarian. Directional questions that were not related to the library’s collections and technical questions dealing with printer or copier mechanical problems were counted, but the specifics of these questions were not recorded. It was felt that these queries would not yield data relevant to the original research question on sources used as they “did not directly relate to an information need” (391. A total of 6959 questions were logged by librarians during the four collection periods. Questions were recorded for only 4431 transactions; the remaining 2528 queries related to printer/copier problems or non-library specific directions and were described as “direction and machine: non- informational” (394. The 4431 recorded questions were then divided into four categories derived by the researcher: look-up (a search for a known item, directional (library-specific orientation to the space and collections, technology (assistance with using library technology and electronic resources, and reference. The category of reference was further subdivided into eight additional categories: catalogue search, citation help, database help, “guide to correct databases,” “personal knowledge or referral,” “quick internet search,” research, and Serials Solutions (392. “Guide to correct databases” referred to advice on the appropriate database to answer a question and serials solutions included questions that could be answered using the Serials Solutions product, such as the availability of a particular journal or article in the collection (392. Questions were assigned to the single most appropriate category by the researcher. Question categories were then mapped to “suggested staffing levels” (396. This determination was made by the researcher, and no details were given as to how the decision was made for each category. The three levels of staffing discussed were librarian, “trained student or staff,” and “well-trained staff/occasional librarian referral” (396. The cost of staffing the reference desk during the eight months captured in this study was calculated by multiplying the hours worked by each librarian by his/her individual average rate of pay across the four data collection periods. Indirect staff costs such as benefits were not included in this calculation. The average cost per reference transaction was determined by dividing the total salary costs by the total number of reference queries during the periods of study. Costs for those categories of questions best addressed by a librarian could then be determined. The actual number of librarians who participated in the study is unclear. The methodology refers to four full-time and two part-time librarians (391. However, later in the article there is reference to five full-time and three part-time librarians rather than the numbers initially stated (396. This may reflect staffing changes during the study period, with the first set of numbers referring to positions rather than individuals, but this cannot be verified with the evidence presented in the article.Main Results – It was determined that most questions asked at the reference desk during the study period could have been addressed by trained student and staff member rather than librarians. Only 11% (784 of questions logged were deemed sufficiently complex by the researcher to require the attention of a librarian. The remaining 6175 transactions (89% of all those logged could most likely be handled by a different staffing complement. According to Ryan, approximately 74% of the reference transactions, including directional, technology, “quick internet,” and known item searching questions could have been answered by “trained student and staff” (396. Questions on catalogue searching, databases, citations, Serial Solutions, and personal knowledge/referrals, representing approximately 15% of all questions, could have been handled by experienced and knowledgeable staff with limited librarian intervention. The complexity of the question was in part judged by the number of sources required to answer it, with most (75% answerable with just one source. The total cost of staffing the reference desk with librarians for the eight months studied was approximately US$49,328.00. A total of 6959 questions were logged during this period, resulting in an average cost of US$7.09 per reference transaction. This cost is approximate, as the exact time spent on each question was not recorded. The cost of answering “non-informational” directional and technical questions was the most significant (396. This category represented 36.3% of all questions received at the reference desk, with a total staffing cost of $17, 919.41 ($7.09 x 2528. “Information-orientated” directional and technology questions followed at 15.4% (US$7,620 and 12.4% (US$6,110.18 respectively (396. According to Ryan, questions in all three categories could be addressed by students and staff. The cost of addressing research questions, the only category requiring librarians, was US$5557.29. Research transactions were greatly outnumbered by directional and technology related questions. An average of 3.6 research questions were asked at the reference desk during the 12 hours it was open each day, compared to 20.8 directional/technical questions.Conclusion – The nature of questions logged at the Stetson University library reference desk suggests that it is inefficient to staff the desk with librarians, given the salary costs of such a staffing model and the fact that librarian’s skills may not be required to answer most of the questions posed. Since the number of questions that need a librarian is so low, Ryan suggests that alternative staffing and service models be considered, so the energies of librarians could be more effectively employed elsewhere in the organization in areas such as information literacy instruction and the development of enhanced web services. It is noted that any reorganization of reference services should be done in concert with user surveys, consultation with staff, and extensive training to prepare staff for new roles. Suggested areas for further research identified by the researcher include the quality of reference transactions in an increasingly online environment.

  12. Online Programs and Geographic Proximity are Key Determinants of Information Professionals’ Interest in Pursuing Post-Master’s Education at the Doctoral Level. A Review of: Powell, Ronald R. and Susan E. Boling. “Post-Master’s Educational Needs of Information Professionals.” Journal of Access Services 3.4 (2005: 29-43.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Ingrid Preddie

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To investigate post-master’s educational needs and interests of information professionals.Design – Survey research using print and electronic questionnaires.Setting – The geographic area surrounding Wayne State University in Michigan, United States of America.Subjects – Members of the library associations of Michigan, Ohio, Indiana, and Southwestern Ontario, Canada.Methods – Systematic random samples were derived from the membership lists of the library associations in Ohio, Indiana, and Southwestern Ontario. Paper questionnaires were mailed to those selected. Michigan Library Association’s official policy barred the release of its membership list to researchers. Consequently, announcements of the survey were placed in three successive issues of the Association’s electronic newsletter. Interested members were directed to a website to complete an electronic version of the questionnaire. This option was also extended to members of the other three library associations. The overall research question was investigated through specific questions that sought to ascertain the overall level of interest in professional library and information studies (LIS education, levels of interest in specific types of programs, factors that favoured or deterred enrolment in doctoral programs, as well as the fields of study that were preferred for combination with LIS in doctoral programs. With the exception of demographic type questions (e.g., place of residence and educational qualifications and two questions that required open ended responses, the questionnaire design encompassed questions with Likert scale type responses. Analysis of the responses included descriptive statistics, the use of Pearson chi square to determine statistically significant relationships, and, to a lesser extent, content analysis.Main Results – A total of 270 questionnaires(33% were returned from three populations: Ohio, Indiana, and Ontario. A self-selected sample of 101 members (6% of the Michigan Library Association responded. In general, almost 80% of the respondents admitted some importance to adding to their LIS qualification. However, only 41% felt that this was important or extremely important. From a choice of six educational offerings, namely, continuing education activities, non-degree master’s coursework, a second master’s degree, post-master’s certification, doctoral programs, and other, continuing education activities was the most valued, by 65.5% of the respondents. Participants were asked about their reasons, and the importance of these, for considering or deciding to enrol in an LIS doctoral program. The yearning to acquire knowledge was reported by 69.7% as the major reason, followed by 45.8% of the respondents who cited the wish to increase their income potential. In terms of major factors, prestige received the lowest rating, 21.1%. The time involved (73.8%, cost(66.3%, and distance from the program (63.2% were cited as the major deterrents to enrolling in doctoral programs. When asked about the likelihood of pursuing a doctoral LIS program in combination with business administration, computer science, or without any combination, “not likely” was the most popular choice. Those who were very likely or likely to pursue a joint program totalled approximately 30% of the respondents, while 37% indicated an interest in undertaking a doctorate in LIS only. The most frequent reasons proffered by those who selected “not likely” or “definitely not” for any of the three doctoral offerings included lack of interest, mitigating factors (e.g. time, cost, age, and program location, unfavourable cost/benefit analysis, preference for another area of knowledge,and the view that Ph.D.s were only useful for university faculty. Given the option to name subject areas that they desired to see combined with LIS in a doctoral program, 23 of 101 respondents proposed education, while 19 opted for public administration. A question inviting any other comments on the issue of post-master’s education yielded a predominant desire for “non traditional instruction,” particularly online courses as well as classes held in convenient locations. In terms of relationships between geographic location and factors that influenced interest in enrolling in a doctoral program, the desire “to become a more effective manager,” and “other” were statistically significant. The analysis also revealed a strong positive relationship between willingness to pursue an LIS-only doctoral program and the availability of such a program in geographic proximity. Similarly, there was a strong relationship between willingness to pursue an LIS program in close vicinity and the importance that was given to further LIS education.Conclusion – Online instruction and geographic proximity are key determinants of information professionals’ interest in pursuing post-master’s education at the doctoral level. Continuing education activities, non-degree coursework, and certificate programs are preferred over doctoral LIS programs, despite the finding that the major reason for enrolling in doctoral LIS programs is to fulfill the desire for knowledge acquisition. Schools offering Library and Information Science studies need to explore options for providing distance-education doctoral LIS programs as a means of reversing the current shortage of LIS faculty.

  13. CTOs at work

    CERN Document Server

    Donaldson, Scott; Donaldson, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Scott Donaldson, Stanley Siegel and Gary Donaldson interview many of the world's most influential chief technology officers in CTOs at Work, offering a brand-new companion volume to the highly acclaimed elite At Work books including Coders at Work, CIOS at Work and Venture Capitalists at Work. As the words "at work" suggest, the authors focus on how their interviewees tackle the day-to-day work of the CTO while revealing much more: how they got there, how they manage and allocate projects, and how they interact with business units and ensure that their companies take advantage of technologies,

  14. Intersection cohomology of moduli spaces of vector bundles over curves

    OpenAIRE

    Mozgovoy, Sergey; Reineke, Markus

    2015-01-01

    We compute the intersection cohomology of the moduli spaces $M(r,d)$ of semistable vector bundles of arbitrary rank $r$ and degree $d$ over a curve. To do this, we introduce new invariants, called Donaldson-Thomas invariants of a curve, which can be effectively computed by methods going back to Harder, Narasimhan, Desale and Ramanan. Our main result relates the Hodge-Euler polynomial of the intersection cohomology of $M(r,d)$ to the Donaldson-Thomas invariants. More generally, we introduce Do...

  15. Gauge Theory and Calibrated Geometry for Calabi-Yau 4-folds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yalong

    This thesis is devoted to the study of gauge theory and calibrated geometry for Calabi-Yau 4-folds. More specifically, our study is along the following five directions. 1. We develop Donaldson-Thomas type theory on Calabi-Yau 4-folds. Let X be a compact complex Calabi-Yau 4-fold. We define Donaldson-Thomas type deformation invariants (DT4 invariants) by studying moduli spaces of solutions to the Donaldson- Thomas equations on X. We also study sheaves counting problems on local Calabi-Yau 4-folds. We relate DT4 invariants of KY to the Donaldson-Thomas invariants of the associated Fano 3-fold Y. When the Calabi-Yau 4-fold is toric, we adapt the virtual localization formula to define the corresponding equivariant DT4 invariants. We also discuss the non-commutative version of DT4 invariants for quivers with relations. Finally, we compute DT4 invariants for certain Calabi-Yau 4-folds when moduli spaces are smooth and find a DT 4/GW correspondence for X. Examples of wall-crossing phenomenon in DT4 theory are also given. 2. Given a complex 4-fold X with an (Calabi-Yau 3-fold) anti-canonical divisor Y, we study relative Donaldson-Thomas invariants for this pair, which are elements in the Donaldson-Thomas cohomologies of Y. We also discuss gluing formulas which relate relative invariants and DT4 invariants for Calabi-Yau 4-folds. 3. We study orientability issues of moduli spaces from gauge theories on Calabi-Yau manifolds. Our results generalize and strengthen those for Donaldson-Thomas theory on Calabi-Yau manifolds of dimensions 3 and 4. We also prove a corresponding result in the relative situation which is relevant to the gluing formula in DT theory. 4. Motivated by Strominger-Yau-Zaslow's mirror symmetry proposal and Kontsevich's homological mirror symmetry conjecture, we study mirror phenomena (in A-model) of certain results from Donaldson-Thomas theory for Calabi-Yau 4-folds. More precisely, we study calibrated geometry in the sense of Harvey-Lawson and Lagrangian

  16. Moment Maps, Scalar Curvature and Quantization of Kähler Manifolds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arezzo, Claudio; Loi, Andrea

    Building on Donaldson's work on constant scalar curvature metrics, we study the space of regular Kähler metrics Eω, i.e. those for which deformation quantization has been defined by Cahen, Gutt and Rawnsley. After giving, in Sects. 2 and 3 a review of Donaldson's moment map approach, we study the ``essential'' uniqueness of balanced basis (i.e. of coherent states) in a more general setting (Theorem 2.5). We then study the space Eω in Sect.4 and we show in Sect.5 how all the tools needed can be defined also in the case of non-compact manifolds.

  17. Fathom Magazine, v. 8, no. 2, Summer 1996 22pp :Florida sharks

    OpenAIRE

    Humphreys, Jay; Sokol, Kelly Marie; Grantham, Susan; Hueter,Robert

    1996-01-01

    CONTENTS. Protecting the Predators, by Jay Humphrey. Economics Create Responsible Shark Management, by Jay Humphreys. The Healing Power of Sharks, by Kelly Marie Sokol. Shark! by Jay Humphreys. Florida's Sharks. Entering the Sharks' Environment, by Susan Grantham. Regulations Affect the Commercial Shark Fishing Industry, by Susan Grantham. Fishing for Information, by Susan Grantham. Tagging, not Bagging, by Robert Hueter, Mote Marine Laboratory. Shark Sites of In...

  18. A User’s Guide to BISAM (BIvariate SAMple): The Bivariate Data Modeling Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-08-01

    SU1Sam 842 EN*NE*OSSS :2. C 5 .... !0N SSU A S2S. SZ LUEN............S..A a&:. 55m CUNSSU A C2. 5 LUSENGUT.USYNSUSI SUSAN C21 THE 1S*VANNS*IT SUSAN4...SUSAN 142sS REAL YUNU.Y UA 2427 VUUUSUA 2429. 15. SUSAN 2S2 as TO 20SSA 2422. SD UUP SAN 2425 LP * .WIP I SSA 384 25 UIUU-P.TS sD TD

  19. The Effects of Limited, Restricted Music Practice on Overnight Memory Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Sarah E.; Duke, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    During evening practice sessions, 32 nonpianist musicians learned a short melody on piano, and then either learned a second short piano melody, learned a difficult unfamiliar piece on their principal instruments, practiced familiar material on their principal instruments, or engaged in no other music-related motor behavior prior to sleep; practice…

  20. Effects of Model Performances on Music Skill Acquisition and Overnight Memory Consolidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cash, Carla D.; Allen, Sarah E.; Simmons, Amy L.; Duke, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the extent to which the presentation of an auditory model prior to learning a novel melody affects performance during active practice and the overnight consolidation of procedural memory. During evening training sessions, 32 nonpianist musicians practiced a 13-note keyboard melody with their left…

  1. The Effect of Vocalization on Melodic Memory Conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pembrook, Randall G.

    1987-01-01

    Reports on a study which reinforces prior findings on melodic memory that show a majority of students do not sing accurately enough after only one hearing of a melody to benefit from vocalization memory techniques. Questions whether vocalization can be a memory reinforcer in melodies that are shorter and simpler than those used in this research.…

  2. Vocal Warm-Ups: From the Sublime to the Ridiculous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Robert

    2000-01-01

    Recommends using "activation exercises," or warm-ups, to awaken students' voices, minds, and breathing mechanisms when singing choral music. Describes three activation exercises: (1) plainchant melodies; (2) the five-note scale; and (3) tongue twisters sung to melodies or scale patterns. Explains why the first and third exercises work.…

  3. Finding Occurrences of Melodic Segments in Folk Songs Employing Symbolic Similarity Measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, B.; van Kranenburg, P.; Volk, A.

    2017-01-01

    Much research has been devoted to the classification of folk songs, revealing that variants are recognised based on salient melodic segments, such as phrases and motifs, while other musical material in a melody might vary considerably. In order to judge similarity of melodies on the level of melodic

  4. Finding occurrences of melodic segments in folk songs employing symbolic similarity measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Berit; van Kranenburg, P.; Volk, A.

    2017-01-01

    Much research has been devoted to the classification of folk songs, revealing that variants are recognised based on salient melodic segments, such as phrases and motifs, while other musical material in a melody might vary considerably. In order to judge similarity of melodies on the level of melodic

  5. Online Recognition of Music Is Influenced by Relative and Absolute Pitch Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creel, Sarah C.; Tumlin, Melanie A.

    2012-01-01

    Three experiments explored online recognition in a nonspeech domain, using a novel experimental paradigm. Adults learned to associate abstract shapes with particular melodies, and at test they identified a played melody's associated shape. To implicitly measure recognition, visual fixations to the associated shape versus a distractor shape were…

  6. Polyphonic Music Information Retrieval Based on Multi-Label Cascade Classification System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wenxin

    2009-01-01

    Recognition and separation of sounds played by various instruments is very useful in labeling audio files with semantic information. This is a non-trivial task requiring sound analysis, but the results can aid automatic indexing and browsing music data when searching for melodies played by user specified instruments. Melody match based on pitch…

  7. Experiments on the modular nature of word and sentence phonology in Chinese Broca's patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liang, Jie

    2006-01-01

    This book investigates the effects of brain lesions in the left hemisphere (Broca’s area) on the production and perception of vowels, word tones and the linguistic use of sentence melody. We aimed to test how and to what extent Beijing aphasic patients process Chinese word tones and sentence melody

  8. The Role of Familiarity in Episodic Memory and Metamemory for Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korenman, Lisa M.; Peynircioglu, Zehra F.

    2005-01-01

    Participants heard music snippets of varying melodic and instrumental familiarity paired with animal-name titles. They then recalled the target when given either the melody or the title as a cue, or they gave name feeling-of-knowing (FOK) ratings. In general, recall for titles was better than it was for melodies, and recall was enhanced with…

  9. Affective evolutionary music composition with MetaCompose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scirea, Marco; Togelius, Julian; Eklund, Peter

    2017-01-01

    express different mood-states, which we achieve through a unique combination of a graph traversal-based chord sequence generator, a search-based melody generator, a pattern-based accompaniment generator, and a theory for mood expression. Melody generation uses a novel evolutionary technique combining FI-2...

  10. ERP responses to cross-cultural melodic expectancy violations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demorest, Steven M; Osterhout, Lee

    2012-04-01

    In this preliminary study, we measured event-related potentials (ERPs) to melodic expectancy violations in a cross-cultural context. Subjects (n= 10) were college-age students born and raised in the United States. Subjects heard 30 short melodies based in the Western folk tradition and 30 from North Indian classical music. Each melody was presented in its original and deviation form, and subjects were asked to judge the congruence of the melody. Results indicated that subjects found the Indian melodies less congruous overall and were less sensitive to deviations in the Indian melody condition. ERP data were partly consistent with the behavioral data with significant P600 responses to deviations in both cultural conditions, but less robust in the Indian context. Results are interpreted in light of previous research on listeners' abilities to generate expectancies in unfamiliar cultures and the possibility of overlap in the scale systems influencing the findings. © 2012 New York Academy of Sciences.

  11. Jeg havde ikke stemt, hvis jeg havde siddet alene: En receptionsanalyse af sms-deltagelsen til det europæiske Melodi Grand Prix [I wouldn’t have voted if I was sitting alone: A reception analysis of SMS voting during the Eurovision Song Contest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Bjørner

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article the phenomenon of SMS TV in relation to the Eurovision Song Contest is described from a reception analysis perspective. The article describes how young viewers experience the structure of the Song Contest and the special social event of the TV programme, with its opportunities for interactive SMS voting. It is implied that the Eurovision Song Contest’s interactive opportunities entail a series of complex conditions, where the communication situation and the TV-show experience are important factors.

  12. 78 FR 54816 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans; Oklahoma; Revisions to Excess Emissions...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-06

    ...'' (Multimedia) and select ``Air'' before submitting comments. Email: Mr. Guy Donaldson at [email protected] ``anonymous access'' system, which means EPA will not know your identity or contact information unless you... control measures or techniques designed to minimize emissions during startup and shutdown activities in...

  13. 75 FR 21169 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; New Mexico; Revisions to New...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-23

    ... on ``6PD'' (Multimedia) and select ``Air'' before submitting comments. E-mail: Mr. Guy Donaldson at...'' system, which means EPA will not know your identity or contact information unless you provide it in the....150 Enforceability of Design 9/1/2007 4/23/2010, [Insert FR page number Concept and Scope and where...

  14. 75 FR 27514 - Approval and Promulgation of Implementation Plans and Designation of Areas for Air Quality...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-17

    ... Quality System (AQS) database but not yet certified, that demonstrate that the area has attained and is... ``6PD'' (Multimedia) and select ``Air'' before submitting comments. E-mail: Mr. Guy Donaldson at... otherwise protected. The www.regulations.gov Web site is an ``anonymous access'' system, which means EPA...

  15. Sublethal effects of manganese on the carbohydrate metabolism of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tate, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and pyruvate kinase concentrations). ... (Heath 1987). In cases where long periods of stress situations are present, the release of glucocorticoids (cortisol) increase as a response to the adrenal corticotrophic hormone ... from the adenohypophysis (Donaldson 1981; Heath 1987;.

  16. The influence of residential desegregation on property prices in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    S Blignaut

    Historia 43(1):29-40. HEYNS, M. (1939): Pietersburg. Historiese Studies 1(1):44-. 47. KOTZE, NJ (1998): Gentrifikasie as stedelik-geografiese verskynsel in Kaapstad. Ongepubliseerde PhD- verhandeling. Universiteit van Stellenbosch. KOTZE, NJ & DONALDSON, SE (1996): Desegregation in. Pietersburg after the repeal ...

  17. Effects of Serial and Concurrent Training on Receptive Identification Tasks: A Systematic Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunderlich, Kara L.; Vollmer, Timothy R.

    2017-01-01

    The current study compared the use of serial and concurrent methods to train multiple exemplars when teaching receptive language skills, providing a systematic replication of Wunderlich, Vollmer, Donaldson, and Phillips (2014). Five preschoolers diagnosed with developmental delays or autism spectrum disorders were taught to receptively identify…

  18. Town and Regional Planning - Vol 66 (2015)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Compiling a land audit in large rural areas: Results from the methodology applied in the non-urban areas of the Matzikama municipal area · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Garth Stephenson, Ronnie Donaldson, Danie du Plessis, Adriaan van Niekerk ...

  19. Diet of free ranging Angora goats in a False Upper Karoo veld type

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Angora goats are inherent browsers feeding on a wide variety of plants. Based on utilization frequency and f-eeding ... browsers (Aucamp, 1976; Campbell et al., 1962; Donaldson,. 1979; Grunow, 1980; Nge'the & Box, 1976: ..... Manage. 28, 298-808. MEISSNER, H.H., 1982. Classification of farm and game animals to.

  20. Nignninn Veinninnry .Fnnrnni 2'76} 2 63 “72

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    for reception of fertilized ovum/ova; when there is no fertilization, the uterine muscle produces PGF 2 alpha, which stimulates ..... and horses. J. Anim. Sci, 38. (Suppll): 10. W., MALVEN, M RV. and. BLACK, Dl... (1961): Estrous cycle regulation in the bovine. J. Anim. S011, 20: 621-625. , W., DONALDSON, WC. WAGNER, and ...

  1. Methods for shorebird surveys in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonathan Bart; Susan L. Earnst

    2005-01-01

    A substantial effort is being made to develop a longterm monitoring program for shorebirds in North American (Brown et al. 2000, Donaldson et al. 2001, Bart et al. this volume). The current program, PRISM (Program for Regional and International Shorebird Monitoring), has four segments: arctic and boreal breeding surveys, temperate breeding surveys, temperate non-...

  2. Essential Psychopharmacology Handbook of Psychiatry for Primary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PSYCHIATRIC DISORDERS WITH A. BIOCHEMICAL BASIS. By David Donaldson. Pp 214. £28. The Parthenon Publishing Group. 1998. This book deals with a subject which is often neglected or overlooked in clinical practice. It presents in a very easy to understand manner, and includes detailed information on psychiatric ...

  3. Educating Child Practitioners: A (Re)turn to the University Disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Joan; McCartney, Elspeth

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyses a specific disjunctive policy space in Scotland involving the current key children's social and educational policy agenda, "Getting it Right for Every Child" (GIRFEC), and a recent national report on teacher education, the "Donaldson Report". In four main parts, the paper first introduces and applies in…

  4. The utilisation and feeding value of milled woody plant species | CH ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The utilisation and feeding value of milled woody plant species. Donaldson CH, Niemann PJ, Swart JA. Abstract. Trials were conducted where ground material of Tarchonanthus camphorates, Grewia flava and Terminalia sericea, supplemented with molasses and in some treatments with maize meal and/or urea, were fed to ...

  5. Public participation in town-planning applications: Tlokwe Local ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    experienced as vague (Alexander, 2008: 58) and elusive (Theron, cited in Davids et al., 2009: 113) and not universally definable due to different meanings ascribed to it (Creighton, 2005: 8; Aregbeshola,. Mearns & Donaldson, 2011: 1279). Despite numerous definitions, public participation relates somehow to an open ...

  6. 78 FR 20912 - Southern Natural Gas Company, L.L.C.; Notice of Request Under Blanket Authorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-08

    ... Pipeline System, and to make similar modifications at its Auburn Compressor Station and Selma Compressor Station in order to increase firm transportation capacity on its South Main Pipeline System, all as more.... Donaldson, Sr. Regulatory Analyst II, P.O. Box 2563, Birmingham, Alabama 35202, at (205) 325-3739. Any...

  7. On topological approach to local theory of surfaces in Calabi-Yau threefolds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gukov, Sergei; Liu, Chiu-Chu Melissa; Sheshmani, Artan

    2017-01-01

    We study the web of dualities relating various enumerative invariants, notably Gromov-Witten invariants and invariants that arise in topological gauge theory. In particular, we study Donaldson-Thomas gauge theory and its reductions to D=4 and D=2 which are relevant to the local theory of surfaces...

  8. Teacher Education Reform in Scotland: National and Global Influences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menter, Ian; Hulme, Moira

    2011-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the background and recent developments leading to the current reshaping of teacher education in Scotland, starting with the developments emanating in the past decade from the McCrone Report and finishing with the recent Donaldson Report, "Teaching Scotland's Future." It documents the key features of…

  9. Retaining Public and Political Trust: Teacher Education in Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Donald; Weir, Douglas

    2014-01-01

    This paper traces the key periods, players and events which have contributed to the shaping of the current landscape of teacher education in Scotland. Starting with the Wheatley Report and the formation of the General Teaching Council (Scotland) in the 1960s through to the most recent Donaldson Review of Teacher Education, we examine ebb and flow…

  10. An audit of basic practical skills acquisition of final year medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    year medical students of a Nigerian medical school to basic practical skills. Materials and Methods: This is a descriptive .... medical curriculum. In the UK over a decade ago,. Calman and Donaldson[2] expressed concern about the lack of basic clinical skills in newly qualified medical graduates. A survey of interns on their.

  11. Making Sense of Health Information Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitzmiller, Rebecca Rutherford

    2012-01-01

    Background: Hospital adoption of health information technology (HIT) systems is promoted as essential to decreasing medical error and their associated 44,000 annual deaths and $17 billion in healthcare costs (Institute of Medicine, 2001; Kohn, Corrigan, & Donaldson, 1999). Leading national healthcare groups, such as the Institute of Medicine,…

  12. The Handbook for Student Leadership Development. 2nd Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komives, Susan R.; Dugan, John P.; Owen, Julie E.; Slack, Craig; Wagner, Wendy

    2011-01-01

    This is a must-have book for leadership educators and all student affairs professionals who want to develop impactful leadership programs and the leadership capacity of students. This book contains: (1) Advancing Leadership Education (Susan R. Komives); (2) Leadership Theories (John P. Dugan and Susan R. Komives); (3) Research on College Student…

  13. Coping with a Breast Cancer Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... regarding the accuracy, completeness, timeliness, quality or non-infringement of any of the materials, products or information provided by the organizations referenced herein. The Running Ribbon is a registered trademark of Susan G. Komen ® . ©2014 Susan G. Komen ® ...

  14. Breast Cancer in Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... regarding the accuracy, completeness, timeliness, quality or non-infringement of any of the materials, products or information provided by the organizations referenced herein. The Running Ribbon is a registered trademark of Susan G. Komen. © 2016 Susan G. Komen ® ...

  15. Breast Reconstruction and Prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... regarding the accuracy, completeness, timeliness, quality or non-infringement of any of the materials, products or information provided by the organizations referenced herein. The Running Ribbon is a registered trademark of Susan G. Komen. © 2016 Susan G. Komen ® ...

  16. SAMJFoRUM

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    By Susan Lightman and Hamish Tawler. Fundamentals ofClinical. Ophthalmology. Series Editor: Susan Lightman. Pp. ix + 163. Illustrated. £42. BM]. 1998. ISBN 0-7279-1201-X. The recognition of the different patterns of uveitis is dependent primarily upon basic clinical skills, relying on the acquisition of a careful ophthalmic ...

  17. The Development of the C3 Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Social Education, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Susan Griffin, executive director of NCSS, was chair of the Task Force of Professional Organizations that initiated and guided the development of "The College, Career, and Civic Life (C3) Framework for Social Studies State Standards", which will soon be released. In this interview with "Social Education", Susan explains how the…

  18. Schedule Risk Event Driven Methodology (SREDM): FY13 Army Studies Program Project Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    TRADOC Analysis Center ATRC-PR/ Susan Matus 255 Sedgwick Avenue Fort Leavenworth, KS 66027-2345 susan.g.matus.civ@mail.mil US...Army TRAC- White Sands Missile Range ATRC-W/Dr. Lambert Bldg 1400 Martin Luther King Drive White Sands Missile Range, NM 88002-5502

  19. Army Independent Risk Assessment Guidebook

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Rd. Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005-5071 US Army TRADOC Analysis Center ATRC-PR/ Susan Matus 255 Sedgwick Avenue Fort Leavenworth, KS...66027-2345 susan.g.matus.civ@mail.mil US Army TRAC- White Sands Missile Range ATRC-W/Dr. Lambert Bldg 1400 Martin Luther King Drive White

  20. Sadhana | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Sadhana. SEBA SUSAN. Articles written in Sadhana. Volume 41 Issue 12 December 2016 pp 1393-1406. Image coding based on maximum entropy partitioning for identifying improbable intensities related to facial expressions · SEBA SUSAN NANDINI AGGARWAL SHEFALI CHAND AYUSH GUPTA.

  1. Mitigating Information Overload: The Impact of "Context-Based Approach" to the Design of Tools for Intelligence Analysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    Reference Meetings Allen G. Schick, Lawrence A. Gordon, and Susan Haka , “Information overload: A temporal approach,” Accounting Organizations and...conversations Allen G. Schick, Lawrence A. Gordon, and Susan Haka , “Information overload: A temporal approach,” Accounting Organizations and

  2. An Analysis of the Purpose and Development of Management Reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-09-01

    first article reviewed was "Participative Budgeting and Managerial Performance" by Peter Chalos and Susan Haka . Their study examined two hypotheses...Susan Haka . "Participative Budgeting and Managerial Performance," Decision Sciences, Vol. 20: 334-347. 3. Department of Defense. Cost/Schedule

  3. Big Data for Education: Data Mining, Data Analytics, and Web Dashboards. Governance Studies at Brookings

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Darrell M.

    2012-01-01

    Twelve-year-old Susan took a course designed to improve her reading skills. She read short stories and the teacher would give her and her fellow students a written test every other week measuring vocabulary and reading comprehension. A few days later, Susan's instructor graded the paper and returned her exam. The test showed that she did well on…

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... shows how Susan, a full-time worker and student, has coped with having iron-deficiency anemia. Prior to her diagnosis, Susan had symptoms such as tiredness, poor skin tone, dizziness, and depression. After her doctor diagnosed her with iron-deficiency ...

  5. Vitamin D, Vitamin D Receptor Polymorphisms and Breast Cancer Aggressiveness in African American and European American Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Ruszczyk, Gregory Ciupak, Warren Davis, Helena Hwang, Susan McCann, Elisa Bandera , Christine Ambrosone Common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in...Sucheston, Jyoti Shankar, Michelle Roberts, Melanie Ruszczyk, Gregory Ciupak, Warren Davis, Helena Hwang, Susan McCann, Elisa Bandera , Christine Ambrosone

  6. Fed up: winning the war against childhood obesity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Okie, Susan

    2005-01-01

    .... Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Okie, Susan. Fed up! : winning the war against childhood obesity / Susan Okie. p. ; cm. Includes bibliographical references and index. ISBN 0-309-09310-4 (hardcover) 1. Obesity in children- United States. 2. Obesity in children- United States- Prevention. [DNLM: 1. Obesity- epidemiology- United ...

  7. The Collocation Policy: A Useful Personnel Assignment Policy for Those Who Don’t Understand Counterinsurgencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-20

    the Navy, SECNAVINST 1300.12C, December 28, 2005), 4.  12 Susan Dominus. “The War’s Deadliest Day for Women,” Glamour , May 1, 2006. http...January 4, 2009). Dominus, Susan. “The War’s Deadliest Day for Women,” Glamour , May 1, 2006. http://www.leatherneck.com/forums/ showthread.php?t

  8. Representing Evil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    Analyse af billedmateriale, der forholder sig til krig, især krigen mod terror, med afsæt i Alain Badiou, Jürgen Habermas og Susan Sontag.......Analyse af billedmateriale, der forholder sig til krig, især krigen mod terror, med afsæt i Alain Badiou, Jürgen Habermas og Susan Sontag....

  9. A 9-Year-Old Girl Discovers That Her Mother Was Murdered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonfeld, David J; Shekunov, Julia; Jellinek, Michael; Stein, Martin T

    Susan was a 9-year-old girl living with her mother; she had never met her father. Her mother returned one evening from her job as a cocktail waitress and Susan met her at the apartment door to let her know they had run out of cat food. Her mother said she would go and buy some the next morning because it was late and she was tired, but Susan insisted she go out that evening because the cat had not eaten all day. Her mother was fatally shot in the parking lot of the convenience store shortly thereafter; since there was no robbery involved, the police suspected it was someone that she knew. Susan's extended family had her move out of the apartment that evening and relocate to live with her aunt and uncle out-of-state. The transition happened quickly. Susan was unable to return to her apartment to pick up any additional belongings and never returned to say goodbye to her friends. The family decided she was too young to attend the funeral.Susan had trouble fitting in with her aunt and uncle's family; they had 2 children who were 8 and 6 years old, and Susan felt she was being treated like a baby. She resented having a bedtime (her mother allowed her to stay up as late as she wished), and she complained that the work at school was boring and her classmates were childish. When the family went to a festival in town, she left abruptly without telling them, which frightened Susan's aunt and uncle. They wanted to be supportive but felt that she needed more structure than her mother had provided her. Susan's aunt and uncle sought bereavement support for Susan from her pediatrician and parenting advice for themselves.

  10. Studying Musical and Linguistic Prediction in Comparable Ways: The Melodic Cloze Probability Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Allison R; Rosenberg, Jason C; Lehman, Frank M; Kuperberg, Gina R; Patel, Aniruddh D

    2015-01-01

    Prediction or expectancy is thought to play an important role in both music and language processing. However, prediction is currently studied independently in the two domains, limiting research on relations between predictive mechanisms in music and language. One limitation is a difference in how expectancy is quantified. In language, expectancy is typically measured using the cloze probability task, in which listeners are asked to complete a sentence fragment with the first word that comes to mind. In contrast, previous production-based studies of melodic expectancy have asked participants to sing continuations following only one to two notes. We have developed a melodic cloze probability task in which listeners are presented with the beginning of a novel tonal melody (5-9 notes) and are asked to sing the note they expect to come next. Half of the melodies had an underlying harmonic structure designed to constrain expectations for the next note, based on an implied authentic cadence (AC) within the melody. Each such 'authentic cadence' melody was matched to a 'non-cadential' (NC) melody matched in terms of length, rhythm and melodic contour, but differing in implied harmonic structure. Participants showed much greater consistency in the notes sung following AC vs. NC melodies on average. However, significant variation in degree of consistency was observed within both AC and NC melodies. Analysis of individual melodies suggests that pitch prediction in tonal melodies depends on the interplay of local factors just prior to the target note (e.g., local pitch interval patterns) and larger-scale structural relationships (e.g., melodic patterns and implied harmonic structure). We illustrate how the melodic cloze method can be used to test a computational model of melodic expectation. Future uses for the method include exploring the interplay of different factors shaping melodic expectation, and designing experiments that compare the cognitive mechanisms of prediction in

  11. Interference of the Transcription Process and Other Selected Variables on Perception and Memory during Melodic Dictation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pembrook, Randall G.

    1986-01-01

    Reports the result of a study of 167 college students' ability to notate 12 melodies under the conditions of simultaneous writing, concentration before notation, and singing before writing. Results revealed no differences in the three conditions. (JDH)

  12. Into the Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Library Media Activities Monthly, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Describes seven library media activities: "Mathematics: What's After the Decimal Point?"; "Music: Melody"; "Physical Education: Rope Climbing in Past and Present Jobs"; "Reading/Language Arts: Fantasy Themes"; "Re-Telling African Folktales"; "Social Studies: Famous People of the Westward…

  13. Uued plaadid / Koit Raudsepp

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Raudsepp, Koit

    1999-01-01

    Uute plaatide Mishka "Sembalembo", "Universal Soldier", Destiny"s Child "The Writing"s On The Wall", Ziggy Marley And The Melody MAkers "Spirit Of Music", Macy Gray "On How Life Is", Aztec Camera "The Best Of" tutvustus

  14. Music and Humane Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, Patty A.; Soltow, Willow

    1985-01-01

    Presents five songs written to well-known melodies that focus on animal facts and care. Provides descriptions of the songs and offers ideas for further modification for preschool and primary age children. Includes suggestions for creative movement gestures. (ML)

  15. Modeling Musical Complexity: Commentary on Eerola (2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Albrecht

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In his paper, "Expectancy violation and information-theoretic models of melodic complexity," Eerola compares a number of models that correlate musical features of monophonic melodies with participant ratings of perceived melodic complexity. He finds that fairly strong results can be achieved using several different approaches to modeling perceived melodic complexity. The data used in this study are gathered from several previously published studies that use widely different types of melodies, including isochronous folk melodies, isochronous 12-tone rows, and rhythmically complex African folk melodies. This commentary first briefly reviews the article's method and main findings, then suggests a rethinking of the theoretical framework of the study. Finally, some of the methodological issues of the study are discussed.

  16. Listen, Learn, Like! Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex Involved in the Mere Exposure Effect in Music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders C. Green

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the neural basis of the mere exposure effect in music listening, which links previous exposure to liking. Prior to scanning, participants underwent a learning phase, where exposure to melodies was systematically varied. During scanning, participants rated liking for each melody and, later, their recognition of them. Participants showed learning effects, better recognising melodies heard more often. Melodies heard most often were most liked, consistent with the mere exposure effect. We found neural activations as a function of previous exposure in bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal and inferior parietal cortex, probably reflecting retrieval and working memory-related processes. This was despite the fact that the task during scanning was to judge liking, not recognition, thus suggesting that appreciation of music relies strongly on memory processes. Subjective liking per se caused differential activation in the left hemisphere, of the anterior insula, the caudate nucleus, and the putamen.

  17. Listen, learn, like! Dorsolateral prefrontal cortex involved in the mere exposure effect in music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Anders C; Bærentsen, Klaus B; Stødkilde-Jørgensen, Hans; Roepstorff, Andreas; Vuust, Peter

    2012-01-01

    We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the neural basis of the mere exposure effect in music listening, which links previous exposure to liking. Prior to scanning, participants underwent a learning phase, where exposure to melodies was systematically varied. During scanning, participants rated liking for each melody and, later, their recognition of them. Participants showed learning effects, better recognising melodies heard more often. Melodies heard most often were most liked, consistent with the mere exposure effect. We found neural activations as a function of previous exposure in bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal and inferior parietal cortex, probably reflecting retrieval and working memory-related processes. This was despite the fact that the task during scanning was to judge liking, not recognition, thus suggesting that appreciation of music relies strongly on memory processes. Subjective liking per se caused differential activation in the left hemisphere, of the anterior insula, the caudate nucleus, and the putamen.

  18. Music training and rate of presentation as mediators of text and song recall

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kilgour, Andrea R; Jakobson, Lorna S; Cuddy, Lola L

    2000-01-01

    The present research addresses whether music training acts as a mediator of the recall of spoken and sung lyrics and whether presentation rate is the essential variable, rather than the inclusion of melody...

  19. Papers and Studies in Contrastive Linguistics, Volume Twenty Four.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisiak, Jacek, Ed.

    This collection of studies in contrastive linguistics includes the following: "Bilingual Intralinguistic Orthographic Interference" (Philip A. Luelsdorff); "Reassociation of Sentence Melodies" (Wolfgang U. Dressler, Lavinia Merlini Barbaresi); "English Word Stress and Empty Vowel Slots" (Grazyna Rowicka);…

  20. Plaadid / Brigitta Davidjants

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Davidjants, Brigitta, 1983-

    2007-01-01

    Uutest heliplaatidest Solveig Slettahjell & Slow Motion Quintet "Good Rain", Indigolapsed "Voorimehe viis", "A broke down melody", "Happy feet", JZ Belle "Teemant", Depeche Mode "The Best Of, Volume 1", "Demogustico"

  1. 75 FR 29757 - New York State Prohibition of Discharges of Vessel Sewage; Final Affirmative Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-27

    ... Blaser 27. William Wood, NY 28. Charlotte Witte, Conesus, NY 29. Marty La Nay 30. Melody Burdekin... bay constables, Harbor Masters, etc.) has the authority to enforce the NDZ. Therefore, EPA believes...

  2. Rand Corporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on PRGS.edu Overview: Pardee RAND Graduate School Student Spotlight Melody Harvey Assistant Policy Researcher; Ph.D. ... Drugs Report Biosimilar Drugs May Reduce U.S. Health Spending by $54 Billion Biologics are complex drugs used ...

  3. Plaadid / Kaarel Kressa

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kressa, Kaarel, 1983-

    2007-01-01

    Uutest heliplaatidest Kasabian "Empire", Katrin Mandel ja Lauri Saatpalu "Ei kunagi", The Hold Steady "Boys & Girls in America", "Corinne Bailey Rae", FAll Out Boy "Infinity On High", Laleh "Prinsessor", Melody Club "Scream"

  4. James Blunt matuselaulude edetabeli tipus

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    Bereavement Registeri andmetel Suurbritannias matustel tellitavate laulude edetabelis: James Blunt "Goodbye My Lover", Robbie Williams "Angels", Jennifer Warnes ja Bill Medley "I've Had the Time Of My Life", Elton John "Candle in the Wind", Righteous Brothers "Unchained Melody"

  5. Improvising on an Indian Flute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Martha Mead

    1984-01-01

    The Indian flute can be used by teachers to supplement classroom study of Indian culture. Indians used it as a personal instrument. Describes how an Indian flute can be made, and suggests improvising bird calls and melodies on it. (CS)

  6. Discrimination between Tone Quality and Intonation in Unaccompanied Flute/Oboe Duets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Clifford K.; Geringer, John M.

    1981-01-01

    Reports the results of a study that investigated patterns of judgmental discriminations and preferences with regard to tone quality versus intonation of accompanied flute and oboe duet performances of simple melodies among music and nonmusic graduate and undergraduate students. (AM)

  7. Music, memory, and Alzheimer's disease: is music recognition spared in dementia, and how can it be assessed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuddy, Lola L; Duffin, Jacalyn

    2005-01-01

    Despite intriguing and suggestive clinical observations, no formal research has assessed the possible sparing of musical recognition and memory in Alzheimer's dementia (AD). A case study is presented of an 84-year old woman with severe cognitive impairment implicating AD, but for whom music recognition and memory, according to her caregivers, appeared to be spared. The hypotheses addressed were, first, that memory for familiar music may be spared in dementia, and second, that musical recognition and memory may be reliably assessed with existing tests if behavioral observation is employed to overcome the problem of verbal or written communication. Our hypotheses were stimulated by the patient EN, for whom diagnosis of AD became probable in 2000. With severe problems in memory, language, and cognition, she now has a mini-mental status score of 8 (out of 30) and is unable to understand or recall standard instructions. In order to assess her music recognition abilities, three tests from the previous literature were adapted for behavioral observation. Two tests involved the discrimination of familiar melodies from unfamiliar melodies. The third involved the detection of distortions ("wrong" notes) in familiar melodies and discrimination of distorted melodies from melodies correctly reproduced. Test melodies were presented to EN on a CD player and her responses were observed by two test administrators. EN responded to familiar melodies by singing along, usually with the words, and often continuing to sing after the stimulus had stopped. She never responded to the unfamiliar melodies. She responded to distorted melodies with facial expressions - surprise, laughter, a frown, or an exclamation, "Oh, dear!"; she never responded in this way to the undistorted melodies. Allowing these responses as indicators of detection, the results for EN were in the normal or near normal range of scores for elderly controls. As well, lyrics to familiar melodies, spoken in a conversational

  8. Ovarian Sertoli-Leydig Cell Tumor with Elevated Inhibin B As a Cause of Secondary Amenorrhea in Adolescents with Germline DICER1 Mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-06

    DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE 59TH MEDICAL W ING (AETC) JOINT BASE SAN ANTON IO - LACKLAND TEXAS MEMORANDUM FOR SGOBS A TIN: MAJ SUSAN WHITEW A Y...CLINICAL RESEARCH 2. FROM: (Author’s Name. Rank. Grade, Office Symbol) 3. GMEJGHSE STUDENT: 4. PROTOCOL NUMBER: Susan Whitcway, Maj , 0-4, SGOBS DYES 181...c. Snitchler, A ndrea 0-5/C DR DCSS U S Naval H ospital, Naples d. Whitcway, Susan L 0-4/ Maj 9 59MDOS/959MDG/ SGOBS 59MDW e. 17. IS A 502 ISG/JAC

  9. Inflow Measurements Made with a Laser Velocimeter on a Helicopter Model in Forward Flight. Volume 7. Rectangular Planform Blades at an Advance Ratio of 0.40

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-04-01

    IIELICOIPTER MODEL IN FORWARD FLIGH-T Volume VII: RECTANGULAR PLANFORM BLAD)ES AT AN ADVANCI RAIO OF10.40(A( Danny R. -load, Susan L. Althoff , and Joe W...Organization Report No. Danny R. Hoad, Susan L. Althoff , Joe W. Elliott, and Richard H. Sailey 10. Work Unit No. 9. Performing Organization Name and Address...and 14 Sponsoring Agency Code US Army Aviation Systems Comnand St. Louis, INK) 63120-1798 15. Supplementary Notes Danny R. Hoad, Susan L. Althoff , and

  10. Affective evolutionary music composition with MetaCompose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scirea, Marco; Togelius, Julian; Eklund, Peter

    2017-01-01

    express different mood-states, which we achieve through a unique combination of a graph traversal-based chord sequence generator, a search-based melody generator, a pattern-based accompaniment generator, and a theory for mood expression. Melody generation uses a novel evolutionary technique combining FI-2...... affective state. This system, which can reliably generate affect-expressive music, can subsequently be integrated in any kind of interactive application (e.g., games) to create an adaptive and dynamic soundtrack....

  11. Sensory, Cognitive, and Sensorimotor Learning Effects in Recognition Memory for Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathias, Brian; Tillmann, Barbara; Palmer, Caroline

    2016-08-01

    Recent research suggests that perception and action are strongly interrelated and that motor experience may aid memory recognition. We investigated the role of motor experience in auditory memory recognition processes by musicians using behavioral, ERP, and neural source current density measures. Skilled pianists learned one set of novel melodies by producing them and another set by perception only. Pianists then completed an auditory memory recognition test during which the previously learned melodies were presented with or without an out-of-key pitch alteration while the EEG was recorded. Pianists indicated whether each melody was altered from or identical to one of the original melodies. Altered pitches elicited a larger N2 ERP component than original pitches, and pitches within previously produced melodies elicited a larger N2 than pitches in previously perceived melodies. Cortical motor planning regions were more strongly activated within the time frame of the N2 following altered pitches in previously produced melodies compared with previously perceived melodies, and larger N2 amplitudes were associated with greater detection accuracy following production learning than perception learning. Early sensory (N1) and later cognitive (P3a) components elicited by pitch alterations correlated with predictions of sensory echoic and schematic tonality models, respectively, but only for the perception learning condition, suggesting that production experience alters the extent to which performers rely on sensory and tonal recognition cues. These findings provide evidence for distinct time courses of sensory, schematic, and motoric influences within the same recognition task and suggest that learned auditory-motor associations influence responses to out-of-key pitches.

  12. Müzik Yazılımlarının Piyano Eğitimine Katkılarının İncelenmesi

    OpenAIRE

    Lehimler, Eren; ŞENGÜL, Cengiz

    2014-01-01

    When computer supported musical education is considered, it can be seen that music software programs give various opportunities such as setting the melody, reading the music, dictation, musical theory, ear education, instrument education, rhythm exercises, musical symbols, analysing melody by listening, creativeness, arpeggio and array performances. This education type has been set for the purpose of solving the problems of the piano lessons in institutions where music teachers are trained. I...

  13. A melodic contour repeatedly experienced by human near-term fetuses elicits a profound cardiac reaction one month after birth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn Granier-Deferre

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human hearing develops progressively during the last trimester of gestation. Near-term fetuses can discriminate acoustic features, such as frequencies and spectra, and process complex auditory streams. Fetal and neonatal studies show that they can remember frequently recurring sounds. However, existing data can only show retention intervals up to several days after birth. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show that auditory memories can last at least six weeks. Experimental fetuses were given precisely controlled exposure to a descending piano melody twice daily during the 35(th, 36(th, and 37(th weeks of gestation. Six weeks later we assessed the cardiac responses of 25 exposed infants and 25 naive control infants, while in quiet sleep, to the descending melody and to an ascending control piano melody. The melodies had precisely inverse contours, but similar spectra, identical duration, tempo and rhythm, thus, almost identical amplitude envelopes. All infants displayed a significant heart rate change. In exposed infants, the descending melody evoked a cardiac deceleration that was twice larger than the decelerations elicited by the ascending melody and by both melodies in control infants. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Thus, 3-weeks of prenatal exposure to a specific melodic contour affects infants 'auditory processing' or perception, i.e., impacts the autonomic nervous system at least six weeks later, when infants are 1-month old. Our results extend the retention interval over which a prenatally acquired memory of a specific sound stream can be observed from 3-4 days to six weeks. The long-term memory for the descending melody is interpreted in terms of enduring neurophysiological tuning and its significance for the developmental psychobiology of attention and perception, including early speech perception, is discussed.

  14. Expectations in Culturally Unfamiliar Music: Influences of Proximal and Distal Cues and Timbral Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine J Stevens

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Listeners’ musical perception is influenced by cues that can be stored in short-term memory (e.g. within the same musical piece or long-term memory (e.g. based on one’s own musical culture. The present study tested how these cues (referred to as respectively proximal and distal cues influence the perception of music from an unfamiliar culture. Western listeners who were naïve to Gamelan music judged completeness and coherence for newly constructed melodies in the Balinese gamelan tradition. In these melodies, we manipulated the final tone with three possibilities: the original gong tone, an in-scale tone replacement or an out-of-scale tone replacement. We also manipulated the musical timbre employed in Gamelan pieces. We hypothesized that novice listeners are sensitive to out-of-scale changes, but not in-scale changes, and that this might be influenced by the more unfamiliar timbre created by Gamelan sister instruments whose harmonics beat with the harmonics of the other instrument, creating a timbrally shimmering sound. The results showed: 1 out-of-scale endings were judged less complete than original gong and in-scale endings; 2 for melodies played with sister instruments, in-scale endings were judged as less complete than original endings. Furthermore, melodies using the original scale tones were judged more coherent than melodies containing few or multiple tone replacements; melodies played on single instruments were judged more coherent than the same melodies played on sister instruments. Additionally, there is some indication of within-session statistical learning, with expectations for the initially-novel materials developing during the course of the experiment. The data suggest the influence of both distal cues (e.g. previously unfamiliar timbres and proximal cues (within the same sequence and over the experimental session on the perception of melodies from other cultural systems based on unfamiliar tunings and scale systems.

  15. Time and Space in W.A. Mozart's Ave Verum Corpus (1791)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Nils Holger

    2015-01-01

    A discussion and interpretation of Mozart's famous motet contextualised through historical considerations of music, theology and aesthetics inspired by K.E. Løgstrup's notion of the fictive space of a melody.......A discussion and interpretation of Mozart's famous motet contextualised through historical considerations of music, theology and aesthetics inspired by K.E. Løgstrup's notion of the fictive space of a melody....

  16. Evaluation of Web access to historical sheet music collections and music–related iconography

    OpenAIRE

    Wheeler, Maurice; Venetis, Mary

    2005-01-01

    Previous research within Music Information Retrieval (MIR) has examined audio and textual facets in attempts to retrieve information about the music itself, including humming melodies, encoding of audio for transmission, extracting bibliographic data as well as melodies and harmonies. An area lacking within MIR relates to the retrieval of images and illustrations that often accompany printed music. Addressing that deficiency, this paper will briefly discuss historical American sheet music and...

  17. Audio-visual interactions uniquely contribute to resolution of visual conflict in people possessing absolute pitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sujin; Blake, Randolph; Lee, Minyoung; Kim, Chai-Youn

    2017-01-01

    Individuals possessing absolute pitch (AP) are able to identify a given musical tone or to reproduce it without reference to another tone. The present study sought to learn whether this exceptional auditory ability impacts visual perception under stimulus conditions that provoke visual competition in the form of binocular rivalry. Nineteen adult participants with 3-19 years of musical training were divided into two groups according to their performance on a task involving identification of the specific note associated with hearing a given musical pitch. During test trials lasting just over half a minute, participants dichoptically viewed a scrolling musical score presented to one eye and a drifting sinusoidal grating presented to the other eye; throughout the trial they pressed buttons to track the alternations in visual awareness produced by these dissimilar monocular stimuli. On "pitch-congruent" trials, participants heard an auditory melody that was congruent in pitch with the visual score, on "pitch-incongruent" trials they heard a transposed auditory melody that was congruent with the score in melody but not in pitch, and on "melody-incongruent" trials they heard an auditory melody completely different from the visual score. For both groups, the visual musical scores predominated over the gratings when the auditory melody was congruent compared to when it was incongruent. Moreover, the AP participants experienced greater predominance of the visual score when it was accompanied by the pitch-congruent melody compared to the same melody transposed in pitch; for non-AP musicians, pitch-congruent and pitch-incongruent trials yielded equivalent predominance. Analysis of individual durations of dominance revealed differential effects on dominance and suppression durations for AP and non-AP participants. These results reveal that AP is accompanied by a robust form of bisensory interaction between tonal frequencies and musical notation that boosts the salience of a

  18. Infective endocarditis following percutaneous pulmonary valve replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheung, Gary; Vejlstrup, Niels; Ihlemann, Nikolaj

    2013-01-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) following percutaneous pulmonary valve replacement (PPVR) with the Melody valve is rarely reported. Furthermore, there are challenges in this diagnosis; especially echocardiographic evidence of vegetation within the prosthesis may be difficult.......Infective endocarditis (IE) following percutaneous pulmonary valve replacement (PPVR) with the Melody valve is rarely reported. Furthermore, there are challenges in this diagnosis; especially echocardiographic evidence of vegetation within the prosthesis may be difficult....

  19. Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies Annual Report 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    con- trol of 25,000 Customs, Sales Tax , Income Tax & Central Excise Duty employees spread throughout the country. Whenever I visit the field of...and guidelines for support to alumni associations; and standardized methods for reporting, tracking and assessing the results and impact of alumni...Estrada, Carol Oshiro, Melody Pickens, Sheryl Uyehara, Melody Green, Tom Thorton, Tessie Magaoay, Brad Ong , Matt Sam- son, and Chris Conde. Lt. Col

  20. Audio-Visual Integration Modifies Emotional Judgment in Music

    OpenAIRE

    Shen-Yuan Su; Su-Ling Yeh

    2011-01-01

    The conventional view that perceived emotion in music is derived mainly from auditory signals has led to neglect of the contribution of visual image. In this study, we manipulated mode (major vs. minor) and examined the influence of a video image on emotional judgment in music. Melodies in either major or minor mode were controlled for tempo and rhythm and played to the participants. We found that Taiwanese participants, like Westerners, judged major melodies as expressing positive, and minor...

  1. Audio-visual interactions uniquely contribute to resolution of visual conflict in people possessing absolute pitch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujin Kim

    Full Text Available Individuals possessing absolute pitch (AP are able to identify a given musical tone or to reproduce it without reference to another tone. The present study sought to learn whether this exceptional auditory ability impacts visual perception under stimulus conditions that provoke visual competition in the form of binocular rivalry. Nineteen adult participants with 3-19 years of musical training were divided into two groups according to their performance on a task involving identification of the specific note associated with hearing a given musical pitch. During test trials lasting just over half a minute, participants dichoptically viewed a scrolling musical score presented to one eye and a drifting sinusoidal grating presented to the other eye; throughout the trial they pressed buttons to track the alternations in visual awareness produced by these dissimilar monocular stimuli. On "pitch-congruent" trials, participants heard an auditory melody that was congruent in pitch with the visual score, on "pitch-incongruent" trials they heard a transposed auditory melody that was congruent with the score in melody but not in pitch, and on "melody-incongruent" trials they heard an auditory melody completely different from the visual score. For both groups, the visual musical scores predominated over the gratings when the auditory melody was congruent compared to when it was incongruent. Moreover, the AP participants experienced greater predominance of the visual score when it was accompanied by the pitch-congruent melody compared to the same melody transposed in pitch; for non-AP musicians, pitch-congruent and pitch-incongruent trials yielded equivalent predominance. Analysis of individual durations of dominance revealed differential effects on dominance and suppression durations for AP and non-AP participants. These results reveal that AP is accompanied by a robust form of bisensory interaction between tonal frequencies and musical notation that boosts

  2. Expectations in culturally unfamiliar music: influences of proximal and distal cues and timbral characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Catherine J; Tardieu, Julien; Dunbar-Hall, Peter; Best, Catherine T; Tillmann, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Listeners' musical perception is influenced by cues that can be stored in short-term memory (e.g., within the same musical piece) or long-term memory (e.g., based on one's own musical culture). The present study tested how these cues (referred to as, respectively, proximal and distal cues) influence the perception of music from an unfamiliar culture. Western listeners who were naïve to Gamelan music judged completeness and coherence for newly constructed melodies in the Balinese gamelan tradition. In these melodies, we manipulated the final tone with three possibilities: the original gong tone, an in-scale tone replacement or an out-of-scale tone replacement. We also manipulated the musical timbre employed in Gamelan pieces. We hypothesized that novice listeners are sensitive to out-of-scale changes, but not in-scale changes, and that this might be influenced by the more unfamiliar timbre created by Gamelan "sister" instruments whose harmonics beat with the harmonics of the other instrument, creating a timbrally "shimmering" sound. The results showed: (1) out-of-scale endings were judged less complete than original gong and in-scale endings; (2) for melodies played with "sister" instruments, in-scale endings were judged as less complete than original endings. Furthermore, melodies using the original scale tones were judged more coherent than melodies containing few or multiple tone replacements; melodies played on single instruments were judged more coherent than the same melodies played on sister instruments. Additionally, there is some indication of within-session statistical learning, with expectations for the initially-novel materials developing during the course of the experiment. The data suggest the influence of both distal cues (e.g., previously unfamiliar timbres) and proximal cues (within the same sequence and over the experimental session) on the perception of melodies from other cultural systems based on unfamiliar tunings and scale systems.

  3. Effects of music on memory for text.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purnell-Webb, Patricia; Speelman, Craig P

    2008-06-01

    Previous research has suggested that the use of song can facilitate recall of text. This study examined the effect of repetition of a melody across verses, familiarity with the melody, rhythm, and other structural processing hypotheses to explain this phenomenon. Two experiments were conducted, each with 100 participants recruited from undergraduate Psychology programs (44 men, 156 women, M age = 28.5 yr., SD = 9.4). In Exp. 1, participants learned a four-verse ballad in one of five encoding conditions (familiar melody, unfamiliar melody, unknown rhythm, known rhythm, and spoken). Exp. 2 assessed the effect of familiarity in rhythm-only conditions and of pre-exposure with a previously unfamiliar melody. Measures taken were number of verbatim words recalled and number of lines produced with correct syllabic structure. Analysis indicated that rhythm, with or without musical accompaniment, can facilitate recall of text, suggesting that rhythm may provide a schematic frame to which text can be attached. Similarly, familiarity with the rhythm or melody facilitated recall. Findings are discussed in terms of integration and dual-processing theories.

  4. Exploring perception-action relations in music production: The asymmetric effect of tonal class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jebb, Andrew T; Pfordresher, Peter Q

    2016-05-01

    When playing musical passages, performers integrate the pitch content of auditory feedback with current action plans. However, this process depends on the degree to which the musical structure of the feedback melody is perceived as similar to the structure of what is planned. Four experiments reported here explored the relationship between the tonal class of planned melodies (tonal or atonal) and the sequence of events formed by auditory feedback. Participants produced short melodies from memory that were either tonal (Experiments 1 and 3) or atonal (Experiments 2 and 4). Auditory feedback matched the planned melody with respect to contour but could vary in tonal class. The results showed that when participants planned a tonal melody, atonal feedback was treated as unrelated to the planned sequence. However, when planning an atonal melody, tonal feedback was still treated as similar to the planned sequence. This asymmetric similarity mirrors findings found within the music perception literature and implies that schematic musical knowledge is highly active in determining perception-action relations during music performance. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Sensorimotor Learning Enhances Expectations During Auditory Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathias, Brian; Palmer, Caroline; Perrin, Fabien; Tillmann, Barbara

    2015-08-01

    Sounds that have been produced with one's own motor system tend to be remembered better than sounds that have only been perceived, suggesting a role of motor information in memory for auditory stimuli. To address potential contributions of the motor network to the recognition of previously produced sounds, we used event-related potential, electric current density, and behavioral measures to investigate memory for produced and perceived melodies. Musicians performed or listened to novel melodies, and then heard the melodies either in their original version or with single pitch alterations. Production learning enhanced subsequent recognition accuracy and increased amplitudes of N200, P300, and N400 responses to pitch alterations. Premotor and supplementary motor regions showed greater current density during the initial detection of alterations in previously produced melodies than in previously perceived melodies, associated with the N200. Primary motor cortex was more strongly engaged by alterations in previously produced melodies within the P300 and N400 timeframes. Motor memory traces may therefore interface with auditory pitch percepts in premotor regions as early as 200 ms following perceived pitch onsets. Outcomes suggest that auditory-motor interactions contribute to memory benefits conferred by production experience, and support a role of motor prediction mechanisms in the production effect. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Auditory profiles of classical, jazz, and rock musicians: Genre-specific sensitivity to musical sound features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari eTervaniemi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available When compared with individuals without explicit training in music, adult musicians have facilitated neural functions in several modalities. They also display structural changes in various brain areas, these changes corresponding to the intensity and duration of their musical training. Previous studies have focused on investigating musicians with training in Western classical music. However, musicians involved in different musical genres may display highly differentiated auditory profiles according to the demands set by their genre, i.e. varying importance of different musical sound features. This hypothesis was tested in a novel melody paradigm including deviants in tuning, timbre, rhythm, melody transpositions, and melody contour. Using this paradigm while the participants were watching a silent video and instructed to ignore the sounds, we compared classical, jazz, and rock musicians’ and non-musicians’ accuracy of neural encoding of the melody. In all groups of participants, all deviants elicited an MMN response, which is a cortical index of deviance discrimination. The strength of the MMN and the subsequent attentional P3a responses reflected the importance of various sound features in each music genre: these automatic brain responses were selectively enhanced to deviants in tuning (classical musicians, timing (classical and jazz musicians, transposition (jazz musicians, and melody contour (jazz and rock musicians. Taken together, these results indicate that musicians with different training history have highly specialized cortical reactivity to sounds which violate the neural template for melody content.

  7. Auditory Profiles of Classical, Jazz, and Rock Musicians: Genre-Specific Sensitivity to Musical Sound Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tervaniemi, Mari; Janhunen, Lauri; Kruck, Stefanie; Putkinen, Vesa; Huotilainen, Minna

    2015-01-01

    When compared with individuals without explicit training in music, adult musicians have facilitated neural functions in several modalities. They also display structural changes in various brain areas, these changes corresponding to the intensity and duration of their musical training. Previous studies have focused on investigating musicians with training in Western classical music. However, musicians involved in different musical genres may display highly differentiated auditory profiles according to the demands set by their genre, i.e., varying importance of different musical sound features. This hypothesis was tested in a novel melody paradigm including deviants in tuning, timbre, rhythm, melody transpositions, and melody contour. Using this paradigm while the participants were watching a silent video and instructed to ignore the sounds, we compared classical, jazz, and rock musicians' and non-musicians' accuracy of neural encoding of the melody. In all groups of participants, all deviants elicited an MMN response, which is a cortical index of deviance discrimination. The strength of the MMN and the subsequent attentional P3a responses reflected the importance of various sound features in each music genre: these automatic brain responses were selectively enhanced to deviants in tuning (classical musicians), timing (classical and jazz musicians), transposition (jazz musicians), and melody contour (jazz and rock musicians). Taken together, these results indicate that musicians with different training history have highly specialized cortical reactivity to sounds which violate the neural template for melody content.

  8. 10th China-Japan Geometry Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Miyaoka, Reiko; Tang, Zizhou; Zhang, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    Since the year 2000, we have witnessed several outstanding results in geometry that have solved long-standing problems such as the Poincaré conjecture, the Yau–Tian–Donaldson conjecture, and the Willmore conjecture. There are still many important and challenging unsolved problems including, among others, the Strominger–Yau–Zaslow conjecture on mirror symmetry, the relative Yau–Tian–Donaldson conjecture in Kähler geometry, the Hopf conjecture, and the Yau conjecture on the first eigenvalue of an embedded minimal hypersurface of the sphere. For the younger generation to approach such problems and obtain the required techniques, it is of the utmost importance to provide them with up-to-date information from leading specialists. The geometry conference for the friendship of China and Japan has achieved this purpose during the past 10 years. Their talks deal with problems at the highest level, often accompanied with solutions and ideas, which extend across various fields in Riemannian geometry, sympl...

  9. Three Dimensional Tropical Correspondence Formula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Brett

    2017-07-01

    A tropical curve in R3 contributes to Gromov-Witten invariants in all genus. Nevertheless, we present a simple formula for how a given tropical curve contributes to Gromov-Witten invariants when we encode these invariants in a generating function with exponents of {λ} recording Euler characteristic. Our main modification from the known tropical correspondence formula for rational curves is as follows: a trivalent vertex, which before contributed a factor of n to the count of zero-genus holomorphic curves, contributes a factor of {2sin(nλ/2)}. We explain how to calculate relative Gromov-Witten invariants using this tropical correspondence formula, and how to obtain the absolute Gromov-Witten and Donaldson-Thomas invariants of some 3-dimensional toric manifolds including {CP3}. The tropical correspondence formula counting Donaldson-Thomas invariants replaces n by {i^{-(1+n)}q^{n/2}+i^{1+n}q^{-n/2}}.

  10. Differential topology of complex surfaces elliptic surfaces with p g=1 smooth classification

    CERN Document Server

    Morgan, John W

    1993-01-01

    This book is about the smooth classification of a certain class of algebraicsurfaces, namely regular elliptic surfaces of geometric genus one, i.e. elliptic surfaces with b1 = 0 and b2+ = 3. The authors give a complete classification of these surfaces up to diffeomorphism. They achieve this result by partially computing one of Donalson's polynomial invariants. The computation is carried out using techniques from algebraic geometry. In these computations both thebasic facts about the Donaldson invariants and the relationship of the moduli space of ASD connections with the moduli space of stable bundles are assumed known. Some familiarity with the basic facts of the theory of moduliof sheaves and bundles on a surface is also assumed. This work gives a good and fairly comprehensive indication of how the methods of algebraic geometry can be used to compute Donaldson invariants.

  11. What is a Literary Intellectual? Creative Writing and the New Humanities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Dawson

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available I would like to discuss how the emergent area of Creative Writing in Australian universities might be situated in relation to what have become known as the New Humanities. The first question to ask is what are the New Humanities? The term was first used by Ian Donaldson at a symposium for the Australian Academy of the Humanities in 1989. Donaldson pointed out that in the previous few decades new modes of theoretical and methodological inquiry had contributed to a breakdown of the traditional divide between the humanities and the social sciences, between a refined liberal humanist world of the arts and a more rigorous analysis of society. The New Humanities, as he describes the work of research centres in America, are concerned with ‘reconfiguring knowledge ... bringing together new combinations of scholarly and theoretical enquiry’ and ‘redrawing old taxonomies within the academy’.

  12. Emergency Survey and Excavation in Southwestern New Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    Period 90 * The Apache 90 The Spanish, Mexican, and American Occupations 90 ii *li APPENDIX B - BOTANICAL RIMAIS 92 Mollie Struever and Marcia Donaldson...probably the scene of seasonal mesquite-gathering and hunting expeditions. The Cochise Cul- ture is also known from Tularosa and Cordova Caves near the upper... Cordova Caves (Martin and Rinaldo 1952). Additional chronology was provided by excavations in Bat Cave (Dick 1965). Tentatively dated at 300 B.C., the

  13. Horizontal/Vertical Stock Fund Cost Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-08-01

    Bob Stimac Mr. Sid Corbett Mr. Herb Mitchell Mr. Richard Farmer USALMSA E-4 Directorate of Materiel Management: COL C. L. Smith Maj...Kaplan Mr. Mel Trachtman Mr. Tom Soper Mr. Bob Heagy Comptroller: Mr. Gene Garnett Mr. William Drisch Directorate Systems: Mr. Bill Biesel Mr...Monetta Donaldson Mr. John C. Royer Mr. William Sykucki Comptroller: Mr. N. Marley Mr. Otto Chitwood Mr. Howard fearr New Cumberland

  14. Southeast Florida Sediment Assessment and Needs Determination (SAND) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    USACE • Richard Bouchard , St. Lucie County • Christopher Creed, P.E., Olsen and Associates, Inc. • Don Donaldson, Martin County • Roxane Dow, FDEP...Author(s): Richard Bouchard , P.E. – St. Lucie County Erosion District Michael Walther, P.E. – Coastal Tech Date: March 2, 2012 (revised...Richard Bouchard ). Figure 1 illustrates the fill area and borrow area at Capron Shoal. ERDC/CHL TR- A.1 - 10 Figure 1: Map Showing Ft. Pierce

  15. How Academics See The Benefits And Challenges Of Business Ethics Teaching: Some Views From A UK Business School

    OpenAIRE

    Tonthat, Ai-Quang

    2017-01-01

    The UN Principles of Responsible Management Education (PRME) initiative was launched at the same time as the global financial crisis was unfolding. This has highlighted the pressing need to teach business ethics in business schools around the world and has intensified the effort to have teaching business ethics institutionalised, a strategy which many scholars have called for over the years (De George 1987, Etzioni 1991, Donaldson 2014). Despite the development of business ethics over four de...

  16. Algebra, Arithmetic, and Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Tschinkel, Yuri

    2009-01-01

    The two volumes of "Algebra, Arithmetic, and Geometry: In Honor of Y.I. Manin" are composed of invited expository articles and extensions detailing Manin's contributions to the subjects, and are in celebration of his 70th birthday. The well-respected and distinguished contributors include: Behrend, Berkovich, Bost, Bressler, Calaque, Carlson, Chambert-Loir, Colombo, Connes, Consani, Dabrowski, Deninger, Dolgachev, Donaldson, Ekedahl, Elsenhans, Enriques, Etingof, Fock, Friedlander, Geemen, Getzler, Goncharov, Harris, Iskovskikh, Jahnel, Kaledin, Kapranov, Katz, Kaufmann, Kollar, Kont

  17. The Effects of Seductive Details on Recognition Tests and Transfer Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    Educational psychology . Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall. Dewey, J. (1913). Interest and effort in education. New York: The Free Press. Donaldson, W... Educational Psychology , 89, 92-103. Harp, S. F., & Mayer, R. E. (1998). How seductive details do their damage: A theory of cognitive interest in science...learning. Journal of Educational Psychology , 90, 414-434. Hidi, S. (1990). Interest and its contribution as a mental resource for learning. Review of

  18. Causes and correction of dissatisfaction after implantation of presbyopia-correcting intraocular lenses

    OpenAIRE

    Gibbons A; Ali TK; Waren DP; Donaldson KE

    2016-01-01

    Allister Gibbons, Tayyeba K Ali, Daniel P Waren, Kendall E Donaldson Department of Ophthalmology, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the causes and possible solutions for patient dissatisfaction after the implantation of presbyopia-correcting intraocular lenses (IOLs). Methods: This study was a retrospective review of clinical records. All patients who were seen between January ...

  19. Effect of Yaw Angle and Ambient Wind on Fabric Penetration of a Simulated Sleeve

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-20

    3/4 in. ID) was immersed in a bed of silica beads. The dryer/conditioner eliminated water vapor and most of the ethanol evidenced by a pre-drying...Reference 6 describes the bench top set up in greater detail. Component (sleeve) pressure was measured by a 10-in.-of- water and a 20-in.-of- water ...material tested: two commercial filter bags manufactured by Donaldson Company, Inc. ( Dura -Life and Tetratex (PTFE)), Kimberly-Clark Corp. Kleenguard

  20. Qualification Lab Testing on M1 Abrams Engine Oil Filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    TEST SYSTEM P/N: Flow Rate: GPM Element ID: Initial Volume: L Housing ID: Final Volume: L Element Type: Min. Element Bubble Point: in. H2O UPSTREAM...assemblies were assessed for qualification using the already qualified Purolator oil filter assembly as a baseline. 15. SUBJECT TERMS M-1, oil...HF28202 oil filter assemblies were assessed for qualification using the already qualified Purolator oil filter assembly as a baseline. The Donaldson

  1. A Bibliography on the Use of Information Theory in Psychology (1967- 1981)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-02-01

    309. 40. Bazhin, E. F., Meerson, Y. A.and Tonkonogh, I. M. On distin- guishing a visual signal from noise by patients with visual agnosia and visual...Donaldson, R. W. Communication via the auditory, tactile , and kinesthetic senses. IEEE Transactions on Information Theory, 1967, IT-13, 11-21. K 122...behavior in the tactile modality. Perceptual and Motor Skills, 1980, 50, 1179-1191. 480. Rosch, E., Simpson, C. and Miller, R. S. Structural bases of

  2. 77 FR 31216 - Changes in Flood Elevation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-25

    ... Honorable Steve February 13, 2012 060017 1235). of Butte County (11- October 14, 2011; Lambert, Chairman... Docket No.: B- Unincorporated areas October 6, 2011; The Honorable Susan February 10, 2012 320003 1235...

  3. Ämbliku jäljed kivimüüril / Sigrid Saarep

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Saarep, Sigrid, 1963-

    2009-01-01

    Suurbritannia paviljonis 53. Veneetsia kunstibiennaalil esinevad kunstnikud Steve McQueen, John Cale (Wales), Martin Boyce (Šotimaa) ja Susan MacWilliam (Põhja-Iirimaa). Videokunstnik Steve McQueeni filmist "Giardini" (2009)

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... red meats, nuts, dried fruits, and beans. Other lifestyle changes, such as getting enough sleep and exercising, ... By following her treatment plan and making smart lifestyle choices, Susan continues to feel better and see ...

  5. 75 FR 25830 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request, Supplemental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-10

    ... Request, Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Regulations, Part 275--Quality Control AGENCY: Food and... collection for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program's Regulations, Part 275--Quality Control... Susan Wilkinson, Program Analyst, Quality Control Branch, Program Accountability and Administration...

  6. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... periods. By following her treatment plan and making smart lifestyle choices, Susan continues to feel better and see the benefits of treatment. For more information about living with ...

  7. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Global challenges and local opportunities, Abstract. Susan Malcolm-Smith, Michelle Hoogenhout, Natalia Ing, Kevin GF Thomas, Petrus de Vries. Vol 22, No 2 (2010), Commentary Challenges in international collaboration in ...

  8. 75 FR 28853 - Quarterly Publication of Individuals, Who Have Chosen To Expatriate, as Required by Section 6039G

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-24

    ... CHEN MICHAEL JEN-KWEI CHENG KENNY CHEONG JUNE CHENG CHIN WILLIAM KUO FENG CHOA JAMES MICHAEL CHU-YIP... WALTER CORINE CHRISTINE WANG SHUI MING WATERS MICHAEL WATERS SUSAN WEBB CANDACE CYNTHIA WEBER KLAUS...

  9. Resistance ja Rootsi turvaühiskond / Peeter Linnap

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Linnap, Peeter, 1960-

    2001-01-01

    "Vastupanukunsti" näitus "The Path of Resistance : MoMa meets Moderna" Stockholmi Moodsa Kunsti Muuseumis, kuraatorid Susan Kismaric ja Joshua Siegel. Resistance'i kunsti raames käsitletakse ka nn. poliitilist kunsti

  10. With Home Testing, Consumers Take Charge of Their Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Used in Previous Reviews Mark Hughes and Joseph Keane, Enterprise Analysis Corporation, Stamford, CT. Interviews: 7/3/ ... Emery J. Stephans, MS, Gerard Conti, MS, Michelle Keane, MBA, and Susan Farber, MBA. Does the Economic ...

  11. Õnnelikud kodud kahel pool eesriiet / Triin Ojari

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ojari, Triin, 1974-

    2004-01-01

    Elukeskkonna konverents "Võistlevad õnned. Elukeskkond külma sõja perioodil" Eesti Kunstiakadeemias. Esinevad David Crowley, Jeremy Morris, Susan E. Reidi, Adrian Forty, Kirsi Saarikangas. Kodumaistel teemadel kõnelevad Liina Jänes ja etnoloog Anu Kannike

  12. Foundations of health psychology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Friedman, Howard S; Silver, Roxane Cohen

    2007-01-01

    ... and Effective Treatment 9 Adjustment to Chronic Disease: Progress and Promise in Research Annette L. Stanton and Tracey A. Revenson 203 10 Aging and Health 234 Karen S. Rook, Susan T. Charles, and...

  13. Journal of the Cameroon Academy of Sciences - Vol 11, No 1 (2013)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ) Yields in Meme Division, South West Region of Cameroon · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Martin Keghe Nkobe, Susan Imbolo Mulua, Amougou Joseph Armathée, ...

  14. Layout ppp

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nubidga

    ) Yields in. Meme Division, South West Region of Cameroon. Martin Keghe Nkobe1, Susan Imbolo Mulua2, Amougou Joseph Armathée3, Samuel Ndonwi. Ayonghe 2. 1 Institute of Agricultural Research for Development (IRAD), Barombi Kang ...

  15. 76 FR 41086 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Volatile Organic Compound...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-13

    ...) a new rule for the control of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from reinforced plastic..., Reporting and recordkeeping requirements, Volatile organic compounds. Dated: June 24, 2011. Susan Hedman... Organic Compound Reinforced Plastic Composites Production Operations Rule AGENCY: Environmental Protection...

  16. Resources and Information for Parents about Braille

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nemeth code. Often used in university programs. Exceptional Teaching Aids 3994 Oleander Way Castro Valley, CA 94546 Telephone: (800) 549-6999 E-Mail: ... Visual Impairments , edited by Susan LaVenture AFB Press American ...

  17. Nofretete muumia võib olla leitud / Evelyn Kaldoja

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kaldoja, Evelyn, 1980-

    2001-01-01

    Briti uurija Susan Jamesi väitel võib Nofretete olla 1898. a. prantsuse arheoloogi Victor Lloret' poolt Kuningate orust leitud naisemuumia, mis meenutab hämmastavalt palju skulptuuridena kujutatud vaarao Ehnatoni naist

  18. Practice question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Chris Beech, nurse consultant, Services for Older People, NHS Forth Valley and member of the nurses' and allied health professionals' special interest group, British Geriatrics Society; Susan Nixon, service manager, Services for Older People, Falkirk Council.

  19. Environmental, Health, and Safety Research Needs for Engineered Nanoscale Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    Canady Forest Service (FS/USDA) Christopher Risbrudt Theodore Wegner Intelligence Technology Innovation Center (ITIC) Susan Durham International...particle agglomeration and settling. Some types of nanomaterials could become attached to dust, pollen , or other airborne particulates. Particles larger

  20. EPA Regional Administrator Highlights the Benefits of Reducing Food Waste in South Bend

    Science.gov (United States)

    (SOUTH BEND, IND. - November 5, 2015) U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Regional Administrator Susan Hedman joined South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg today at Ivy Tech Community College's culinary school to highlight the benefits of diverting food waste fr

  1. Kui sulg ei jookse... / Jaanus Noormets

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Noormets, Jaanus

    2003-01-01

    Kuidas stsenarist Charlie Kaufman kirjutas stsenaariumi oma loomevaevadest Susan Orleani raamatu filmiks kirjutamisel : mängufilm "Kuidas kirjutada kassafilmi" ("Adaptation") : režissöör Spike Jonze : Ameerika Ühendriigid 2002

  2. 77 FR 64819 - New Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB Review: Office of Law Enforcement/Federal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-23

    ... SECURITY Transportation Security Administration New Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB Review... INFORMATION CONTACT: Susan L. Perkins, TSA PRA Officer, Office of Information Technology (OIT), TSA-11... other forms of information technology. Information Collection Requirement Title: LEO Reimbursement...

  3. The Westray chronicles: a case study in corporate crime

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McCormick, Christopher

    1999-01-01

    ..., and Corporate Crime John McMullan and Sherman Hinze 183 Chapter Ten: Unsettled Accounts after Westray Susan Dodd 218 Endnotes 250 References 273 List of IllustrationsLIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS Westray ...

  4. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Anemia What Is... CAUSES WHO IS AT RISK SIGNS & SYMPTOMS DIAGNOSIS TREATMENTS PREVENTION LIVING WITH CLINICAL TRIALS LINKS Related ... with having iron-deficiency anemia. Prior to her diagnosis, Susan had symptoms such as tiredness, poor skin ...

  5. Eesti president Toomas H. Ilves Pennsylvania ülikooli ajakirjas / Airi Vaga

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Vaga, Airi, 1940-

    2008-01-01

    University of Pennsylvania ajakirjas "The Pennsylvania Gazette" ilmunud artiklist "From Estonian Exile to Executive Office", autor Susan Frith - järjekordsest võimalusest tutvustada Eestit ja eestlasi USA ülikoolide kaudu

  6. GENE EXPRESSION PROFILES IN ARSENIC-TREATED MCF-7 BREAST CANCER CELLS EXPRESSING DIFFERENT LEVELS OF HSP70

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gene expression profiles in arsenic-treated MCF-7 breast cancer cells expressing different levels of HSP70Gail Nelson, Susan Hester, Ernest Winkfield, Jill Barnes, James AllenEnvironmental Carcinogenesis Division, NHEERL, ORD, US Environmental Protection Agency, Rese...

  7. Web-Based Instruction A Guide for Libraries

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Susan Sharpless

    2010-01-01

    Expanding on the popular, practical how-to guide for public, academic, school, and special libraries, technology expert Susan Sharpless Smith offers library instructors the confidence to take Web-based instruction into their own hands.

  8. 1. IV avati Tallinna Kunstihoone galeriis šoti videokunstinäitus "Nähtamatud väljad"

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2004-01-01

    Kuraatorid Sarah Felton ja Su Grierson, osalevad kunstnikud Victoria Clare Bernie, Samantha Clark, Maria Doyle, S. Felton, S. Grierson, Belinda Guidi, Anne Bjerge Hansen, Metacorpus, Jane McInally, Rosalind Nashashibi, Susannah Silver ja Susan Sloan

  9. Iron-Deficiency Anemia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... iron-deficiency anemia may require treatment in a hospital, blood transfusions , iron injections, or intravenous iron therapy. ... beans. Other lifestyle changes, such as getting enough sleep and exercising, also have helped Susan feel better. ...

  10. Biographies of Eminent Women in Psychology: Models for Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furumoto, Laurel; And Others

    1980-01-01

    In order to recognize women's contributions to the field of psychology, biographies of Margaret Floy Washburn, Mary Cover Jones, Karen Horney, Susan Grey, Edna Heidbreder, Ann Roe, and Mary Whitton Calkins are presented. (BEF)

  11. The Law and the Ladies in "Trifles."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehfuss, Ruth E.

    1992-01-01

    Shows how Susan Glaspell's one-act play "Trifles" (when linked to "Antigone") illustrates the difficult moral choices that human beings face. Discusses Glaspell's social and political context; cultural influences; and parallels in situation, setting, and character. (PRA)

  12. Raamatututvustus / Rein Põder

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Põder, Rein, 1943-

    1995-01-01

    Rousseau, Jean-Jacques. Üksildase uitaja mõtisklused; Hill, Susan. Proua de Winter; Kõrvemaast põhjarannani : Kuusalu kihelkonna kirjanduslik-kodulooline antoloogia / Koost. Helmut Elstrok; Tead.toim. Oskar Kuningas

  13. Injury-related behaviour among South African high-school students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Injury-related behaviour among South African high-school students at six sites. Alan J Flisher, Catherine L Ward, Holan Liang, Handsome Onya, Nomfundo Mlisa, Susan Terblanche, Arvin Bhana, Charles DH Parry, Carl J Lombard ...

  14. Must Surm võib varitseda viirusena / Tiit Kändler

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kändler, Tiit, 1948-

    2001-01-01

    Üldlevinud arusaama kohaselt on Must Surm muhkkatk, nüüd on Liverpooli ülikooli arstiteadlased Susan Scott ja Christopher Duncan avaldanud raamatu, milles väidavad, et katk polnud bakteri, vaid hoopis viiruse tekitatud

  15. The Tropenmuseum and the Colonial Heritage : Position paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Legêne, Susan

    1998-01-01

    Policy document outlining the Tropenmuseum's intention to work on the colonial past as an essential aspect of its contemporary policies. Author: Susan Legêne, at the time head of the Curatorial Department of the tropenmuseum.

  16. Investigation of manganese homeostasis in dogs with anaemia and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Investigation of manganese homeostasis in dogs with anaemia and chronic enteropathy. Marisa da Fonseca Ferreira, Arielle Elizabeth Ann Aylor, Richard John Mellanby, Susan Mary Campbell, Adam George Gow ...

  17. A Contributing Listener and Other Composition Wives: Reading and Writing the Feminine Metaphors in Composition Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Pegeen

    1996-01-01

    Draws on Susan Miller's distinction between "feminist composition studies" and "feminine composition studies" to raise concerns about the perception, place, and role of composition studies in English departments. Examines the feminine metaphors used in composition theory and research. (TB)

  18. Travelers' Health: Cruise Ship Travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kara Tardivel, Susan A. Lippold, Krista Kornylo Duong INTRODUCTION Cruise ship travel presents a unique combination of ... may include countries where vectorborne diseases such as malaria, dengue, yellow fever, Japanese encephalitis, and Zika are ...

  19. Brazilian physicists take centre stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Susan

    2014-06-01

    With the FIFA World Cup taking place in Brazil this month, Susan Curtis travels to South America's richest nation to find out how its physicists are exploiting recent big increases in science funding.

  20. Kui kapital veab alt, siis turvaliselt / Aleksander Tsapov

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tsapov, Aleksander

    2006-01-01

    Kuraatorinäitus "Kapital (see veab meid alt)" Tallinna Kunstihoones. Kuraator Simon Sheikh. Fia-Stina Sandlundi, Katya Sanderi, Oliver Ressleri, Ashley Hunti ja Susan Kelly&Stephen Mortoni töödest näitusel

  1. Ni rara, ni extraordinaria: política y corporalidad en Eva Perón

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Karina Elizabeth Vázquez

    2017-01-01

    This essay analyzes images and representations of Eva Perón combining theories of corporeality and affection with theories of the photo-image proposed by WJT Mitchell, Roland Barthes and Susan Sontag...

  2. Reported school experiences of young people living with sickle cell disorder in England.

    OpenAIRE

    Dyson, Simon; Abuateya, Hala; Atkin, Karl; Culley, Lorraine; Dyson, Sue; Rowley, David T.

    2010-01-01

    We are grateful to all the young people and their families for their time in replying to the survey. We would like to acknowledge the work of the Sickle Cell and Education group (SCED) in helping with the survey, including David Rees, Moira Dick, Susan Height, Sandra O’Driscoll, Shirley Samuel, Baba Inusa, Jo Howard, Helen Appleby, Neil Westerdale, Lola Oni, Elizabeth Okuyiga, Vesna Graham, Beatrice Barbola, Gavin Cho, Michele Afif, Lurieteen Miller, Susan Crawford, Maureen Williams, Janet L...

  3. Disclosure and sickle cell disorder: a mixed methods study of the young person with sickle cell at school.

    OpenAIRE

    Dyson, Simon; Atkin, Karl; Culley, Lorraine; Dyson, Sue; Evans, Hala; Rowley, David T.

    2010-01-01

    We are grateful to all the young people and their families for their time in replying to the questionnaires and the interviews. We would like to acknowledge the work of the Sickle Cell and Education group (SCED) in helping with the survey, including David Rees, Moira Dick, Susan Height, Sandra O’Driscoll, Shirley Samuel, Baba Inusa, Jo Howard, Helen Appleby, Neil Westerdale, Lola Oni, Elizabeth Okuyiga, Vesna Graham, Beatrice Barbola, Gavin Cho, Michele Afif, Lurieteen Miller, Susan Crawford...

  4. Preparing Women for Strategic Leadership Roles in the Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-03-01

    USAWC STRATEGY RESEARCH PROJECT PREPARING WOMEN FOR STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP ROLES IN THE ARMY by COL Susan R. Myers U.S. Army CDR Robert Kedney Project...to xx-xx-2003 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Preparing Women for Strategic Leadership Roles in the Army Unclassified 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...ii iii ABSTRACT AUTHOR: COL Susan R. Myers TITLE: Preparing Women for Strategic Leadership Roles in the Army FORMAT: Strategy Research Project DATE: 01

  5. Metal Residue Deposition from Military Pyrotechnic Devices and Field Sampling Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Jay L. Clausen, Julie Richardson, Nic Korte, Nancy Perron, Susan Taylor, Anthony Bednar, Patricia Tuminello...Julie Richardson1, Nic Korte3, Nancy Perron1, Susan Taylor1, Anthony Bednar2, Andrew Bray2, Patricia Tuminello2, William Jones2, Shawna Tazik2...in a warm water bath . Each sample was vacuum-filtered through a Whatman glass microfiber grade GF/A 1.6 µm filter. Several filters were required

  6. Social Media - DoD’s Greatest Information Sharing Tool or Weakest Security Link?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-15

    OR WEAKEST SECURITY LINK? BY LIEUTENTANT COLONEL SUSAN CAMORODA United States Army National Guard Se ni or S er vi ce C ol le ge F el lo w...SHARING TOOL OR WEAKEST SECURITY LINK? by Lieutenant Colonel Susan Camoroda United States Army National Guard Dr Rahul...CRP is submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements of the Senior Serivce College Fellowship. The U.S. Army War College is accredited by the

  7. STS-102 Crew Activity Report/Flight Day 7 Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Footage shows STS-102 Mission Specialist Andy Thomas, Expedition 1 crewmember Sergei Krikalev, and Expedition 2 crewmember Susan Helms transferring supplies from the Leonardo Module to the International Space Station (ISS). Then STS-102 Commander Jim Wetherbee joins the crew of Expedition 2 (James Voss, Susan Helms, and Yuriy Usachev) for an on-orbit interview, where they answer questions about the spacewalks performed by Voss and Helms and about living on the ISS.

  8. The Burden of Disability among Active Duty Air Force Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    regarding active duty pilots and navigators who experienced a cardiac event, which included myocardial infarctions, angina , and sudden death. The study...a Cohort of Active-Duty U.S. Air Force Members Authors: Anthony S. Robbins, MD, PhD, Susan Y. Chao, MS, Vincent P. Fonseca, MD, MPH, Michael R...Physical Fitness in a Cohort of Active-Duty U.S. Air Force Members Anthony S. Robbins, Susan Y. Chao, Vincent P. Fonseca, Michael R

  9. Possible Regulatory Improvements of the American Housing Finance System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunde, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Book review of: Susan M. Wachter and Joseph Tracy (eds.): Principles of Housing Finance Reform. PENN—University of Pennsylvania Press, Philadelphia, 282 pp, $65.00s, ISBN: 978-0-8122-4862-3......Book review of: Susan M. Wachter and Joseph Tracy (eds.): Principles of Housing Finance Reform. PENN—University of Pennsylvania Press, Philadelphia, 282 pp, $65.00s, ISBN: 978-0-8122-4862-3...

  10. Sun River (24CA74): A Stratified Pelican Lake and Oxbow Occupation Site near Great Falls, Montana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-08-31

    Oxbow Cascade County Phytoliths Pelican Lake Settlement Flotation 20. A.STIRACT . -u are. dde If n-"e- .. d nden~ff7 by block .- ber) The Sun River...Susan K. Short, Pollen Analyst * Rhoda Owen Lewis, Phytolith Analyst Meg Van Ness, Flotation Analyst Historical Research Associates Missoula, Montana...ANALYSES Susan K. Short, Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research, Boulder, Colorado D PHYTOLITH RESULTS Rhoda Lewis, Paleoenvironmental Consultants

  11. The effect of pitch, rhythm, and familiarity on working memory and anxiety as measured by digit recall performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to isolate and quantitatively evaluate the effects of pitch and rhythm of unfamiliar and familiar melodies on working memory and anxiety as measured by sequential digit recall performance. Participants (N = 60) listened to 6 treatment conditions each consisting of 9 randomized monosyllabic digits. The digits were paired with (a) a familiar melody and pitch only, (b) a familiar melody and rhythm only, (c) a familiar melody with both pitch and rhythm, (d) an unfamiliar melody with pitch only, (e) an unfamiliar melody with rhythm only, and (f) an unfamiliar melody with both pitch and rhythm. The 6 different treatments were counterbalanced using a Latin square design in an attempt to control for order effects. Participants rated their state anxiety on a Likert-type scale before, midway through, and after the digits test. No statistically significant order, learning, or practice effects were found. A 3-way repeated-measures ANOVA indicated a statistically significant difference in digit recall performance across musical element conditions and groups. Results indicated that music majors outperformed nonmusic majors on the digit recall task. Participants were able to recall digits from the rhythm condition most accurately while recalling digits from pitch only and both pitch and rhythm conditions the least accurately. Graphic analysis of treatment as a function of sequential position indicated digit recall was best during conditions of primacy and recency. No main effects were found for the familiarity condition. Additionally, no main effects or interactions were found for the anxiety variable. The results of this study are congruent with existing working memory and music literature suggesting that pairing information with rhythm can facilitate recall, music majors outperform non-music majors, and recall accuracy is best in positions of primacy and recency. Implications for practice in therapy and education are made as well as suggestions for

  12. Can Music Foster Learning – Effects of Different Text Modalities on Learning and Information Retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Janina A. M.; Seufert, Tina

    2018-01-01

    This study investigates the possibilities of fostering learning based on differences in recall and comprehension after learning with texts which were presented in one of three modalities: either in a spoken, written, or sung version. All three texts differ regarding their processing, especially when considering working memory. Overall, we assume the best recall performance after learning with the written text and the best comprehension performance after learning with the sung text, respectively, compared to both other text modalities. We also analyzed whether the melody of the sung material functions as a mnemonic aid for the learners in the sung text condition. If melody and text of the sung version are closely linked, presentation of the melody during the post-test phase could foster text retrieval. 108 students either learned from a sung text performed by a professional singer, a printed text, or the same text read out loud. Half of the participants worked on the post-test while listening to the melody used for the musical learning material and the other half did not listen to a melody. The written learning modality led to significantly better recall than with the spoken (d = 0.97) or sung text (d = 0.78). However, comprehension after learning with the sung modality was significantly superior compared to when learning with the written learning modality (d = 0.40). Reading leads to more focus on details, which is required to answer recall questions, while listening fosters a general understanding of the text, leading to higher levels of comprehension. Listening to the melody during the post-test phase negatively affected comprehension, irrespective of the modality during the learning phase. This can be explained by the seductive detail effect, as listening to the melody during the post-test phase may distract learners from their main task. In closing, theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

  13. A case of auditory agnosia with impairment of perception and expression of music: cognitive processing of tonality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Masayuki; Takeda, Katsuhiko; Kuzuhara, Shigeki

    2007-01-01

    There is fairly general agreement that the melody and the rhythm are the independent components of the perception of music. In the theory of music, the melody and harmony determine to which tonality the music belongs. It remains an unsettled question whether the tonality is also an independent component of the perception of music, or a by-product of the melody and harmony. We describe a patient with auditory agnosia and expressive amusia that developed after a bilateral infarction of the temporal lobes. We carried out a detailed examination of musical ability in the patient and in control subjects. Comparing with a control population, we identified the following impairments in music perception: (a) discrimination of familiar melodies; (b) discrimination of unfamiliar phrases, and (c) discrimination of isolated chords. His performance in pitch discrimination and tonality were within normal limits. Although intrasubject statistical analysis revealed significant difference only between tonality task and unfamiliar phrase performance, comparison with control subjects suggested a dissociation between a preserved tonality analysis and impairment of perception of melody and chords. By comparing the results of our patient with those in the literature, we may say that there is a double dissociation between the tonality and the other components. Thus, it seems reasonable to suppose that tonality is an independent component of music perception. Based on our present and previous studies, we proposed the revised version of the cognitive model of musical processing in the brain. Copyright 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Effects of prior exposure on music liking and recognition in patients with temporal lobe lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Séverine; Peretz, Isabelle

    2005-12-01

    Prior exposure to music typically increases liking. This manifestation of implicit memory can be dissociated from explicit memory recognition. To examine the contribution of the medial temporal lobe to musical preference and recognition, we tested patients with either left (LTL) or right (RTL) temporal lobe lesions as well as normal control (NC) participants using the procedure of Peretz et al. The results in the affect task showed that NC and LTL participants preferred the studied over nonstudied melodies, thereby demonstrating an implicit exposure effect on liking judgments, whereas RTL patients failed to exhibit this effect. Explicit recognition was impaired in both LTL and RTL patients as compared to NC participants. On the basis of these findings, we suggest that RTL structures play a critical role in the formation of melody representations that support both priming and memory recognition, whereas LTL structures are more involved in the explicit retrieval of melodies. Furthermore, we were able to test an amnesic patient (PC) with bilateral lesions of the temporal lobe. In this case, the exposure effect on liking was also absent. However, repeated exposure to melodies was found to enhance both liking and recognition judgments. This remarkable sparing of memory observed through melody repetition suggests that extensive exposure may assist both implicit and explicit memory in the presence of global amnesia.

  15. Music perception ability of korean adult cochlear implant listeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunoak; Lee, Hyo-Jeong; Kim, Hyung-Jong

    2012-04-01

    Although the cochlear implant (CI) is successful for understanding speech in patients with severe to profound hearing loss, listening to music is a challenging task to most CI listeners. The purpose of this study was to assess music perception ability and to provide clinically useful information regarding CI rehabilitation. Ten normal hearing and ten CI listeners with implant experience, ranging 2 to 6 years, participated in the subtests of pitch, rhythm, melody, and instrument. A synthesized piano tone was used as musical stimuli. Participants were asked to discriminate two different tones during the pitch subtest. The rhythm subtest was constructed with sets of five, six, and seven intervals. The melody & instrument subtests assessed recognition of eight familiar melodies and five musical instruments from a closed set, respectively. CI listeners performed significantly poorer than normal hearing listeners in pitch, melody, and instrument identification tasks. No significant differences were observed in rhythm recognition between groups. Correlations were not found between music perception ability and word recognition scores. The results are consistent with previous studies that have shown that pitch, melody, and instrument identifications are difficult to identify for CI users. Our results can provide fundamental information concerning the development of CI rehabilitation tools.

  16. The song system of the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Steven; Martinez, Michael J; Hodges, Donald A; Fox, Peter T; Parsons, Lawrence M

    2004-08-01

    Although sophisticated insights have been gained into the neurobiology of singing in songbirds, little comparable knowledge exists for humans, the most complex singers in nature. Human song complexity is evidenced by the capacity to generate both richly structured melodies and coordinated multi-part harmonizations. The present study aimed to elucidate this multi-faceted vocal system by using 15O-water positron emission tomography to scan "listen and respond" performances of amateur musicians either singing repetitions of novel melodies, singing harmonizations with novel melodies, or vocalizing monotonically. Overall, major blood flow increases were seen in the primary and secondary auditory cortices, primary motor cortex, frontal operculum, supplementary motor area, insula, posterior cerebellum, and basal ganglia. Melody repetition and harmonization produced highly similar patterns of activation. However, whereas all three tasks activated secondary auditory cortex (posterior Brodmann Area 22), only melody repetition and harmonization activated the planum polare (BA 38). This result implies that BA 38 is responsible for an even higher level of musical processing than BA 22. Finally, all three of these "listen and respond" tasks activated the frontal operculum (Broca's area), a region involved in cognitive/motor sequence production and imitation, thereby implicating it in musical imitation and vocal learning.

  17. The effect of visual cues on auditory stream segregation in musicians and non-musicians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Marozeau

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The ability to separate two interleaved melodies is an important factor in music appreciation. This ability is greatly reduced in people with hearing impairment, contributing to difficulties in music appreciation. The aim of this study was to assess whether visual cues, musical training or musical context could have an effect on this ability, and potentially improve music appreciation for the hearing impaired. METHODS: Musicians (N = 18 and non-musicians (N = 19 were asked to rate the difficulty of segregating a four-note repeating melody from interleaved random distracter notes. Visual cues were provided on half the blocks, and two musical contexts were tested, with the overlap between melody and distracter notes either gradually increasing or decreasing. CONCLUSIONS: Visual cues, musical training, and musical context all affected the difficulty of extracting the melody from a background of interleaved random distracter notes. Visual cues were effective in reducing the difficulty of segregating the melody from distracter notes, even in individuals with no musical training. These results are consistent with theories that indicate an important role for central (top-down processes in auditory streaming mechanisms, and suggest that visual cues may help the hearing-impaired enjoy music.

  18. Effects of different "relaxing" music styles on the autonomic nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Pérez-Lloret

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess the effects on heart rate variability (HRV of exposure to different styles of "relaxing" music. Autonomic responses to musical stimuli were correlated with subjective preferences regarding the relaxing properties of each music style. Linear and nonlinear HRV analysis was conducted in 25 healthy subjects exposed to silence or to classical, new age or romantic melodies in a random fashion. At the end of the study, subjects were asked to choose the melody that they would use to relax. The low-to-high-frequency ratio was significantly higher when subjects were exposed to "new age" music when compared with silence (3.4 ± 0.3 vs. 2.6 ± 0.3, respectively, P < 0.02, while no differences were found with "classical" or "romantic" melodies (2.1 ± 0.4 and 2.2 ± 0.3. These results were related to a reduction in the high frequency component with "new age" compared to silence (17.4 ± 1.9 vs. 23.1 ± 1.1, respectively P < 0.004. Significant differences across melodies were also found for nonlinear HRV indexes. Subjects′ preferences did not correlate with autonomic responses to melodies. The results suggest that "new age" music induced a shift in HRV from higher to lower frequencies, independently on the music preference of the listener.

  19. Neural basis of music imagery and the effect of musical expertise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herholz, Sibylle C; Lappe, Claudia; Knief, Arne; Pantev, Christo

    2008-12-01

    Although the influence of long-term musical training on the processing of heard music has been the subject of many studies, the neural basis of music imagery and the effect of musical expertise remain insufficiently understood. By means of magnetoencephalography (MEG) we compared musicians and nonmusicians in a musical imagery task with familiar melodies. Subjects listened to the beginnings of the melodies, continued them in their imagination and then heard a tone which was either a correct or an incorrect further continuation of the melody. Only in musicians was the imagery of these melodies strong enough to elicit an early preattentive brain response to unexpected incorrect continuations of the imagined melodies; this response, the imagery mismatch negativity (iMMN), peaked approximately 175 ms after tone onset and was right-lateralized. In contrast to previous studies the iMMN was not based on a heard but on a purely imagined memory trace. Our results suggest that in trained musicians imagery and perception rely on similar neuronal correlates, and that the musicians' intense musical training has modified this network to achieve a superior ability for imagery and preattentive processing of music.

  20. Music playing and memory trace: evidence from event-related potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiyama, Keiko; Katahira, Kentaro; Abla, Dilshat; Hori, Koji; Okanoya, Kazuo

    2010-08-01

    We examined the relationship between motor practice and auditory memory for sound sequences to evaluate the hypothesis that practice involving physical performance might enhance auditory memory. Participants learned two unfamiliar sound sequences using different training methods. Under the key-press condition, they learned a melody while pressing a key during auditory input. Under the no-key-press condition, they listened to another melody without any key pressing. The two melodies were presented alternately, and all participants were trained in both methods. Participants were instructed to pay attention under both conditions. After training, they listened to the two melodies again without pressing keys, and ERPs were recorded. During the ERP recordings, 10% of the tones in these melodies deviated from the originals. The grand-average ERPs showed that the amplitude of mismatch negativity (MMN) elicited by deviant stimuli was larger under the key-press condition than under the no-key-press condition. This effect appeared only in the high absolute pitch group, which included those with a pronounced ability to identify a note without external reference. This result suggests that the effect of training with key pressing was mediated by individual musical skills. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  1. Musical Expertise Increases Top–Down Modulation Over Hippocampal Activation during Familiarity Decisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Gagnepain

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The hippocampus has classically been associated with episodic memory, but is sometimes also recruited during semantic memory tasks, especially for the skilled exploration of familiar information. Cognitive control mechanisms guiding semantic memory search may benefit from the set of cognitive processes at stake during musical training. Here, we examined using functional magnetic resonance imaging, whether musical expertise would promote the top–down control of the left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG over the generation of hippocampally based goal-directed thoughts mediating the familiarity judgment of proverbs and musical items. Analyses of behavioral data confirmed that musical experts more efficiently access familiar melodies than non-musicians although such increased ability did not transfer to verbal semantic memory. At the brain level, musical expertise specifically enhanced the recruitment of the hippocampus during semantic access to melodies, but not proverbs. Additionally, hippocampal activation contributed to speed of access to familiar melodies, but only in musicians. Critically, causal modeling of neural dynamics between LIFG and the hippocampus further showed that top–down excitatory regulation over the hippocampus during familiarity decision specifically increases with musical expertise – an effect that generalized across melodies and proverbs. At the local level, our data show that musical expertise modulates the online recruitment of hippocampal response to serve semantic memory retrieval of familiar melodies. The reconfiguration of memory network dynamics following musical training could constitute a promising framework to understand its ability to preserve brain functions.

  2. Musical Expertise Increases Top–Down Modulation Over Hippocampal Activation during Familiarity Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnepain, Pierre; Fauvel, Baptiste; Desgranges, Béatrice; Gaubert, Malo; Viader, Fausto; Eustache, Francis; Groussard, Mathilde; Platel, Hervé

    2017-01-01

    The hippocampus has classically been associated with episodic memory, but is sometimes also recruited during semantic memory tasks, especially for the skilled exploration of familiar information. Cognitive control mechanisms guiding semantic memory search may benefit from the set of cognitive processes at stake during musical training. Here, we examined using functional magnetic resonance imaging, whether musical expertise would promote the top–down control of the left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG) over the generation of hippocampally based goal-directed thoughts mediating the familiarity judgment of proverbs and musical items. Analyses of behavioral data confirmed that musical experts more efficiently access familiar melodies than non-musicians although such increased ability did not transfer to verbal semantic memory. At the brain level, musical expertise specifically enhanced the recruitment of the hippocampus during semantic access to melodies, but not proverbs. Additionally, hippocampal activation contributed to speed of access to familiar melodies, but only in musicians. Critically, causal modeling of neural dynamics between LIFG and the hippocampus further showed that top–down excitatory regulation over the hippocampus during familiarity decision specifically increases with musical expertise – an effect that generalized across melodies and proverbs. At the local level, our data show that musical expertise modulates the online recruitment of hippocampal response to serve semantic memory retrieval of familiar melodies. The reconfiguration of memory network dynamics following musical training could constitute a promising framework to understand its ability to preserve brain functions. PMID:29033805

  3. Musical Manifestations of Textual Patterning in Estonian Regilaul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janika Oras

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses the marking of song text patterns by means of musical devices in the performances of Estonian regilaul. The article examines which variants of musical rhythm and melodic contour are preferred by four singers in their performance of verses that have different functions within the song structure. In both the text and the musical rhythm, a greater number of syllables, and the attendant changes in musical rhythm, mark the verses that have an initiating function and which communicate entirely new information. In performing such verses, rather than the extension verses of parallelism groups or verse repetitions, in the short melodies with narrow pitch range, the singers prefer more "intense" variants of melody contours in which the higher notes of the scale are predominantly used. In two-line melodies, the singer's patterning of the song text is largely determined by the musical logic, attempting to align the beginnings of the melodic strophes and verse groups.

  4. Living, Breathing Songs: Singing Along with Bob Dylan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith Negus

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Taking issue with approaches to Bob Dylan’s art that are preoccupied with his lyrics, this article suggests a route into thinking about his music by focusing on how Dylan’s vocal melodies work at the intersection of speech and singing. Drawing on Gino Stefani’s work on popular melodies, this article explores this issue through a discussion of how people sing along with Dylan’s songs at concerts. The discussion focuses on the song “It Ain’t Me Babe,” and examines more general points about the ways in which Dylan’s melodies connect with the everyday lives of his listeners.

  5. Modelling short- and long-term statistical learning of music as a process of predictive entropy reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels Christian; Loui, Psyche; Vuust, Peter

    Statistical learning underlies the generation of expectations with different degrees of uncertainty. In music, uncertainty applies to expectations for pitches in a melody. This uncertainty can be quantified by Shannon entropy from distributions of expectedness ratings for multiple continuations o...... melodic expectations with reduced entropy. These findings are consistent with the Free-Energy Principle, which has been proposed as a unified theory for brain function.......Statistical learning underlies the generation of expectations with different degrees of uncertainty. In music, uncertainty applies to expectations for pitches in a melody. This uncertainty can be quantified by Shannon entropy from distributions of expectedness ratings for multiple continuations...... and Charlie Parker solos. Experiments 3-5 tested participants before and after 25-30 mins exposure to 5, 15 or 400 melodies generated from a finite-state grammar using the Bohlen-Pierce scale. As predicted, we found between-participant differences in relative entropy corresponding to degree and relevance...

  6. Implicit memory for music in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, A R; O'Connor, M G

    2000-07-01

    Short, unfamiliar melodies were presented to young and older adults and to Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients in an implicit and an explicit memory task. The explicit task was yes-no recognition, and the implicit task was pleasantness ratings, in which memory was shown by higher ratings for old versus new melodies (the mere exposure effect). Young adults showed retention of the melodies in both tasks. Older adults showed little explicit memory but did show the mere exposure effect. The AD patients showed neither. The authors considered and rejected several artifactual reasons for this null effect in the context of the many studies that have shown implicit memory among AD patients. As the previous studies have almost always used the visual modality for presentation, they speculate that auditory presentation, especially of nonverbal material, may be compromised in AD because of neural degeneration in auditory areas in the temporal lobes.

  7. Musical Manifestations of Textual Patterning in Estonian Regilaul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janika Oras

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses the marking of song text patterns by means of musical devices in the performances of Estonian regilaul. The article examines which variants of musical rhythm and melodic contour are preferred by four singers in their performance of verses that have different functions within the song structure. In both the text and the musical rhythm, a greater number of syllables, and the attendant changes in musical rhythm, mark the verses that have an initiating function and which communicate entirely new information. In performing such verses, rather than the extension verses of parallelism groups or verse repetitions, in the short melodies with narrow pitch range, the singers prefer more "intense" variants of melody contours in which the higher notes of the scale are predominantly used. In two-line melodies, the singer's patterning of the song text is largely determined by the musical logic, attempting to align the beginnings of the melodic strophes and verse groups.

  8. Pitch perception beyond the traditional existence region of pitch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxenham, Andrew J.; Micheyl, Christophe; Keebler, Michael V.

    2011-01-01

    Humans’ ability to recognize musical melodies is generally limited to pure-tone frequencies below 4 or 5 kHz. This limit coincides with the highest notes on modern musical instruments and is widely believed to reflect the upper limit of precise stimulusdriven spike timing in the auditory nerve. We...... tested the upper limits of pitch and melody perception in humans using pure and harmonic complex tones, such as those produced by the human voice and musical instruments, in melody recognition and pitchmatching tasks. We found that robust pitch perception can be elicited by harmonic complex tones...... with fundamental frequencies below 2 kHz, even when all of the individual harmonics are above 6 kHz—well above the currently accepted existence region of pitch and above the currently accepted limits of neural phase locking. The results suggest that the perception of musical pitch at high frequencies...

  9. The effect of visual cues on difficulty ratings for segregation of musical streams in listeners with impaired hearing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamish Innes-Brown

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Enjoyment of music is an important part of life that may be degraded for people with hearing impairments, especially those using cochlear implants. The ability to follow separate lines of melody is an important factor in music appreciation. This ability relies on effective auditory streaming, which is much reduced in people with hearing impairment, contributing to difficulties in music appreciation. The aim of this study was to assess whether visual cues could reduce the subjective difficulty of segregating a melody from interleaved background notes in normally hearing listeners, those using hearing aids, and those using cochlear implants. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Normally hearing listeners (N = 20, hearing aid users (N = 10, and cochlear implant users (N = 11 were asked to rate the difficulty of segregating a repeating four-note melody from random interleaved distracter notes. The pitch of the background notes was gradually increased or decreased throughout blocks, providing a range of difficulty from easy (with a large pitch separation between melody and distracter to impossible (with the melody and distracter completely overlapping. Visual cues were provided on half the blocks, and difficulty ratings for blocks with and without visual cues were compared between groups. Visual cues reduced the subjective difficulty of extracting the melody from the distracter notes for normally hearing listeners and cochlear implant users, but not hearing aid users. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Simple visual cues may improve the ability of cochlear implant users to segregate lines of music, thus potentially increasing their enjoyment of music. More research is needed to determine what type of acoustic cues to encode visually in order to optimise the benefits they may provide.

  10. A rapid sound-action association effect in human insular cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabella Mutschler

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Learning to play a musical piece is a prime example of complex sensorimotor learning in humans. Recent studies using electroencephalography (EEG and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS indicate that passive listening to melodies previously rehearsed by subjects on a musical instrument evokes differential brain activation as compared with unrehearsed melodies. These changes were already evident after 20-30 minutes of training. The exact brain regions involved in these differential brain responses have not yet been delineated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: Using functional mri (fmri, we investigated subjects who passively listened to simple piano melodies from two conditions: in the 'actively learned melodies' condition subjects learned to play a piece on the piano during a short training session of a maximum of 30 minutes before the fMRI experiment, and in the 'passively learned melodies' condition subjects listened passively to and were thus familiarized with the piece. We found increased fMRI responses to actively compared with passively learned melodies in the left anterior insula, extending to the left fronto-opercular cortex. The area of significant activation overlapped the insular sensorimotor hand area as determined by our meta-analysis of previous functional imaging studies. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results provide evidence for differential brain responses to action-related sounds after short periods of learning in the human insular cortex. As the hand sensorimotor area of the insular cortex appears to be involved in these responses, re-activation of movement representations stored in the insular sensorimotor cortex may have contributed to the observed effect. The insular cortex may therefore play a role in the initial learning phase of action-perception associations.

  11. Impact of percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation procedural steps on leaflets histology and mechanical behaviour: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalal, Zakaria; Galmiche, Louise; Beloin, Christophe; Boudjemline, Younes

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous pulmonary valve implantation (PPVI) using the bovine jugular vein Melody(®) valve (Medtronic Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA) is safe and effective. However, post-procedural complications have been reported, the reasons for which are unclear. To assess the impact of PPVI procedural steps on valvular histology and leaflet mechanical behaviour. Three different valved stents (the Melody(®) valve and two homemade stents with bovine and porcine pericardium) were tested in vitro under four conditions: (1) control group; (2) crimping; (3) crimping plus inflation of low-pressure balloon; (4) condition III plus post-dilatation (high-pressure balloon). For each condition, valvular leaflets (and a venous wall sample for Melody(®) stents) were taken for histological analysis and mechanical uniaxial testing of the valve leaflets. Among the Melody(®) valves, the incidence of transverse fractures was significantly higher in traumatized samples compared with the control group (P<0.05), whereas the incidence and depth of transverse fractures were not statistically different between the four conditions for bovine and porcine pericardial leaflets. No significant modification of the mechanical behaviour of in vitro traumatized Melody(®) valvular leaflets was observed. Bovine and porcine pericardia became more elastic and less resilient after balloon expansion and post-dilatation (conditions III and IV), with a significant decrease in elastic modulus and stress at rupture. Valved stent implantation procedural steps induced histological lesions on Melody(®) valve leaflets. Conversely, bovine and porcine pericardial valved stents were not histologically altered by in vitro manipulations, although their mechanical properties were significantly modified. These data could explain some of the long-term complications observed with these substitutes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Neural mechanisms underlying melodic perception and memory for pitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatorre, R J; Evans, A C; Meyer, E

    1994-04-01

    The neural correlates of music perception were studied by measuring cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes with positron emission tomography (PET). Twelve volunteers were scanned using the bolus water method under four separate conditions: (1) listening to a sequence of noise bursts, (2) listening to unfamiliar tonal melodies, (3) comparing the pitch of the first two notes of the same set of melodies, and (4) comparing the pitch of the first and last notes of the melodies. The latter two conditions were designed to investigate short-term pitch retention under low or high memory load, respectively. Subtraction of the obtained PET images, superimposed on matched MRI scans, provides anatomical localization of CBF changes associated with specific cognitive functions. Listening to melodies, relative to acoustically matched noise sequences, resulted in CBF increases in the right superior temporal and right occipital cortices. Pitch judgments of the first two notes of each melody, relative to passive listening to the same stimuli, resulted in right frontal-lobe activation. Analysis of the high memory load condition relative to passive listening revealed the participation of a number of cortical and subcortical regions, notably in the right frontal and right temporal lobes, as well as in parietal and insular cortex. Both pitch judgment conditions also revealed CBF decreases within the left primary auditory cortex. We conclude that specialized neural systems in the right superior temporal cortex participate in perceptual analysis of melodies; pitch comparisons are effected via a neural network that includes right prefrontal cortex, but active retention of pitch involves the interaction of right temporal and frontal cortices.

  13. Broca's area processes the hierarchical organization of observed action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakita, Masumi

    2013-01-01

    Broca's area has been suggested as the area responsible for the domain-general hierarchical processing of language and music. Although meaningful action shares a common hierarchical structure with language and music, the role of Broca's area in this domain remains controversial. To address the involvement of Broca's area in the processing action hierarchy, the activation of Broca's area was measured using near-infrared spectroscopy. Measurements were taken while participants watched silent movies that featured hand movements playing familiar and unfamiliar melodies. The unfamiliar melodies were reversed versions of the familiar melodies. Additionally, to investigate the effect of a motor experience on the activation of Broca's area, the participants were divided into well-trained and less-trained groups. The results showed that Broca's area in the well-trained participants demonstrated a significantly larger activation in response to the hand motion when an unfamiliar melody was played than when a familiar melody was played. However, Broca's area in the less-trained participants did not show a contrast between conditions despite identical abilities of the two participant groups to identify the melodies by watching key pressing actions. These results are consistent with previous findings that Broca's area exhibits increased activation in response to grammatically violated sentences and musically deviated chord progressions as well as the finding that this region does not represent the processing of grammatical structure in less-proficient foreign language speakers. Thus, the current study suggests that Broca's area represents action hierarchy and that sufficiently long motor training is necessary for it to become sensitive to motor syntax. Therefore, the notion that hierarchical processing in Broca's area is a common function shared between language and music may help to explain the role of Broca's area in action perception.

  14. Melodic Priming of Motor Sequence Performance: The Role of the Dorsal Premotor Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Marianne A.; Brown, Rachel; Lega, Carlotta; Penhune, Virginia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether exposure to specific auditory sequences leads to the induction of new motor memories and to investigate the role of the dorsal premotor cortex (dPMC) in this crossmodal learning process. Fifty-two young healthy non-musicians were familiarized with the sound to key-press mapping on a computer keyboard and tested on their baseline motor performance. Each participant received subsequently either continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS) or sham stimulation over the dPMC and was then asked to remember a 12-note melody without moving. For half of the participants, the contour of the melody memorized was congruent to a subsequently performed, but never practiced, finger movement sequence (Congruent group). For the other half, the melody memorized was incongruent to the subsequent finger movement sequence (Incongruent group). Hearing a congruent melody led to significantly faster performance of a motor sequence immediately thereafter compared to hearing an incongruent melody. In addition, cTBS speeded up motor performance in both groups, possibly by relieving motor consolidation from interference by the declarative melody memorization task. Our findings substantiate recent evidence that exposure to a movement-related tone sequence can induce specific, crossmodal encoding of a movement sequence representation. They further suggest that cTBS over the dPMC may enhance early offline procedural motor skill consolidation in cognitive states where motor consolidation would normally be disturbed by concurrent declarative memory processes. These findings may contribute to a better understanding of auditory-motor system interactions and have implications for the development of new motor rehabilitation approaches using sound and non-invasive brain stimulation as neuromodulatory tools. PMID:27242414

  15. [The comparative analysis of changes of short pieces of EEG at perception of music on the basis of the event-related synchronization/desynchronization and wavelet-synchrony].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oknina, L B; Kuptsova, S V; Romanov, A S; Masherov, E L; Kuznetsova, O A; Sharova, E V

    2012-01-01

    The going of present pilot study is an analysis of features changes of EEG short pieces registered from 32 sites, at perception of musical melodies healthy examinees depending on logic (cognizance) and emotional (it was pleasant it was not pleasant) melody estimations. For this purpose changes of event-related synchronization/desynchronization, and also wavelet-synchrony of EEG-responses at 31 healthy examinees at the age from 18 till 60 years were compared. It is shown that at a logic estimation of music the melody cognizance is accompanied the event-related desynchronization in the left fronto-parietal-temporal area. At an emotional estimation of a melody the event-related synchronization in left fronto - temporal area for the pleasant melodies, desynchronization in temporal area for not pleasant and desynchronization in occipital area for the melodies which are not causing the emotional response is typical. At the analysis of wavelet-synchrony of EEG characterizing jet changes of interaction of cortical zones, it is revealed that the most distinct topographical distinctions concern type of processing of the heard music: logic (has learned-hasn't learned) or emotional (it was pleasant-it was not pleasant). If at an emotional estimation changes interhemispheric communications between associative cortical zones (central, frontal, temporal), are more expressed at logic - between inter - and intrahemispheric communications of projective zones of the acoustic analyzer (temporal area). It is supposed that the revealed event-related synchronization/desynhronization reflects, most likely, an activation component of an estimation of musical fragments whereas the wavelet-analysis provides guidance on character of processing of musical stimulus.

  16. Melodic Priming of Motor Sequence Performance: The Role of the Dorsal Premotor Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Anke Stephan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine whether exposure to specific auditory sequences leads to the induction of new motor memories and to investigate the role of the dorsal premotor cortex (dPMC in this crossmodal learning process. Fifty-two young healthy non-musicians were familiarized with the sound to key-press mapping on a computer keyboard and tested on their baseline motor performance. Each participant received subsequently either continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS or sham stimulation over the dPMC and was then asked to remember a 12-note melody without moving. For half of the participants, the contour of the melody memorized was congruent to a subsequently performed, but never practiced, finger movement sequence (Congruent group. For the other half, the melody memorized was incongruent to the subsequent finger movement sequence (Incongruent group. Hearing a congruent melody led to significantly faster performance of a motor sequence immediately thereafter compared to hearing an incongruent melody. In addition, cTBS speeded up motor performance in both groups, possibly by relieving motor consolidation from interference by the declarative melody memorization task. Our findings substantiate recent evidence that exposure to a movement-related tone sequence can induce specific, crossmodal encoding of a movement sequence representation. They further suggest that cTBS over the dPMC may enhance early offline procedural motor skill consolidation in cognitive states where motor consolidation would normally be disturbed by concurrent declarative memory processes. These findings may contribute to a better understanding of auditory-motor system interactions and have implications for the development of new motor rehabilitation approaches using sound and non-invasive brain stimulation as neuromodulatory tools.

  17. Status Report on Speech Research. A Report on the Status and Progress of Studies on the Nature of Speech, Instrumentation for Its Investigation, and Practical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-31

    songs compiled by Erdei (1974). Twenty pairs of excerpts with interchangeable melodies and texts were chosen, each excerpt consisting of the opening two...recognition in memory for melodies. Journal of the Acoustical Society orf America, 49, 524-531. Erdei , P. (1974). 150 American folksongs to sing, read... Erdei (1974) Number/Title Number/Title 1 9: Hunt the slipper 92: Cape Cod Girls 2 12: Let us chase the squirrel1 73: Christ was born1 3 15: Who’s

  18. Experiences in adapting post-byzantine chant into foreign languages: Research and praxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olkinuora Jaakko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the current state of the research and practical methodology of the adaptation of Byzantine melodies written in the “New Method” into foreign languages, with Romanian, English and Finnish serving as examples. The adaptation of independent, “fixed” melodies as well as metrical liturgical texts (prosomoia and canons are examined. The challenges emerging in adapting Byzantine chant into Finnish are also discussed. The author also suggests some future subjects for research, which include the synthesis of examining arrangements in both “Old” and “New Method”.

  19. The EyeHarp: A Gaze-Controlled Digital Musical Instrument

    OpenAIRE

    Vamvakousis, Zacharias; Ramirez, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    We present and evaluate the EyeHarp, a new gaze-controlled Digital Musical Instrument, which aims to enable people with severe motor disabilities to learn, perform, and compose music using only their gaze as control mechanism. It consists of (1) a step-sequencer layer, which serves for constructing chords/arpeggios, and (2) a melody layer, for playing melodies and changing the chords/arpeggios. We have conducted a pilot evaluation of the EyeHarp involving 39 participants with no disabilities ...

  20. MetaCompose: A Compositional Evolutionary Music Composer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scirea, Marco; Togelius, Julian; Eklund, Peter

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a compositional, extensible framework for music composition and a user study to systematically evaluate its core components. These components include a graph traversal-based chord sequence generator, a search-based melody generator and a pattern-based accompaniment generator....... An important contribution of this paper is the melody generator which uses a novel evolutionary technique combining FI-2POP and multi-objective optimization. A participant-based evaluation overwhelmingly confirms that all current components of the framework combine effectively to create harmonious, pleasant...

  1. Emergence of collective intelligence in musical performances

    CERN Document Server

    Lacasa, Lucas

    2016-01-01

    The average individual is typically a mediocre singer, with a rather restricted capacity to sing a melody in tune. Yet when many singers are assembled to perform collectively, the resulting melody of the crowd is suddenly perceived by an external listener as perfectly tuned -as if it was actually a choral performance- even if each individual singer is out of tune. This is an example of the so-called wisdom of crowds effect and can be routinely observed in music concerts or other social events, when a group of people spontaneously sings at unison. In this paper we provide a simple mechanistic explanation for the onset of this collective phenomenon.

  2. Long Intonations and Kalophonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troelsgård, Christian

    2008-01-01

    The paper shows that the melodic material in quasi-improvised intonation melodies (echemata) in the period from c. 1200 to 1400 develop from being drawn from the traditional genres - especially the pasltikon and asmatikon - to acquiring a more free and decidely 'kalophonic' character.......The paper shows that the melodic material in quasi-improvised intonation melodies (echemata) in the period from c. 1200 to 1400 develop from being drawn from the traditional genres - especially the pasltikon and asmatikon - to acquiring a more free and decidely 'kalophonic' character....

  3. The Seiberg-Witten equations and applications to the topology of smooth four-manifolds (MN-44)

    CERN Document Server

    Morgan, John W

    2014-01-01

    The recent introduction of the Seiberg-Witten invariants of smooth four-manifolds has revolutionized the study of those manifolds. The invariants are gauge-theoretic in nature and are close cousins of the much-studied SU(2)-invariants defined over fifteen years ago by Donaldson. On a practical level, the new invariants have proved to be more powerful and have led to a vast generalization of earlier results. This book is an introduction to the Seiberg-Witten invariants. The work begins with a review of the classical material on Spin c structures and their associated Dirac operators. Next com

  4. Counting spinning dyons in maximal supergravity: the Hodge-elliptic genus for tori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Nathan; Kachru, Shamit; Tripathy, Arnav

    2017-11-01

    We consider M-theory compactified on T^4 × T^2 and describe the count of spinning 1/8-BPS states. This builds on the work of Maldacena-Moore-Strominger in the physics literature. It simultaneously provides a refinement of the recent mathematical work of Bryan-Oberdieck-Pandharipande-Yin and Oberdieck-Shen, which studied (non-motivic) reduced Donaldson-Thomas invariants of abelian surfaces and threefolds. As in previous work on K3 × T^2 compactification, we track angular momenta under both the SU(2)_L and SU(2)_R factors in the 5d little group, providing predictions for the relevant motivic curve counts.

  5. Topological Field Theory of the Initial Singularity of Space-Time

    CERN Document Server

    Bogdanoff, I

    2000-01-01

    Here we suggest a possible resolution of the initial space-time singularity. In this novel approach, the initial singularity of space-time corresponds to a 0 size singular gravitational instanton, characterised by a Riemannian metric configuration (++++) in dimension D = 4. Associated with the 0 scale of space-time, the initial singularity is thus not considered in terms of divergences of physical fields but can be resolved in terms of topological field symmetries and associated invariants (in particular the first Donaldson invariant ). In this perspective, we here introduce a new topological invariant, associated with 0 scale, of the form Z = Tr (-1)s which we call "singularity invariant".

  6. Quantum hypermultiplet moduli spaces in N=2 string vacua: a review

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandrov, Sergei; Persson, Daniel; Pioline, Boris

    2013-01-01

    The hypermultiplet moduli space M_H in type II string theories compactified on a Calabi-Yau threefold X is largely constrained by supersymmetry (which demands quaternion-K\\"ahlerity), S-duality (which requires an isometric action of SL(2, Z)) and regularity. Mathematically, M_H ought to encode all generalized Donaldson-Thomas invariants on X consistently with wall-crossing, modularity and homological mirror symmetry. We review recent progress towards computing the exact metric on M_H, or rather the exact complex contact structure on its twistor space.

  7. Spark Gap Electrode Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-01

    Graduate Students : A. Donaldson B. M~aas C. Yeh* * Paid by the Republic of China (Taiwan) ~rYC -i"."." V, " .~ *.-,........ A...addressed here but is being considered for future work. -2- 29 0 Numerous studies 2 - 6 have shown that the choice of gas, electrode, and insulator material...obtained in C4Pmr-tunwqt, (-33) Air 9.5 0.20 1.2 0.4 this experiment are in generally good agreement with the inea- Caeer -tt,.esn Air 11.5 0.24 1., U.3

  8. Lecture notes on Chern-Simons-Witten theory

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Sen

    2001-01-01

    This invaluable monograph has arisen in part from E Witten's lectures on topological quantum field theory in the spring of 1989 at Princeton University. At that time Witten unified several important mathematical works in terms of quantum field theory, most notably the Donaldson polynomial, the Gromov-Floer homology and the Jones polynomials. In his lectures, among other things, Witten explained his intrinsic three-dimensional construction of Jones polynomials via Chern-Simons gauge theory. He provided both a rigorous proof of the geometric quantization of the Chern-Simons action and a very ill

  9. On the transverse Scalar Curvature of a Compact Sasaki Manifold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Weiyong

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We show that the standard picture regarding the notion of stability of constant scalar curvature metrics in Kähler geometry described by S.K. Donaldson [10, 11], which involves the geometry of infinitedimensional groups and spaces, can be applied to the constant scalar curvature metrics in Sasaki geometry with only few modification. We prove that the space of Sasaki metrics is an infinite dimensional symmetric space and that the transverse scalar curvature of a Sasaki metric is a moment map of the strict contactomophism group

  10. Relationship of Interfacial Compatibility to Durability of Adhesive - Bonded Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-03-01

    B. Z. Rosenblum, P. F. Braunlich, and L. Himmel , J. Apply. Phys. 48, 5262 (1977). D-4. R. G. Liptai and R. G. Tatro, "Proceedings of the Fourth...Publishers, John Wiley and Sons (New York, 1971). D-7. B. Z. Rosenblum, J. P. Carrico, P. Braunlich, and L. Himmel , J. Phys. E. Sci. Instr. 10 (1977). D-8...L. R. Danielson, M. J. Dresser, E. E. Donaldson, Jr., and L. Himmel , Surf. Sci. 71, 599 (1978). D-9. D. R. Arnott and J. A. Ramsey, Surf. Sci. 28, 1

  11. Common scale features of the recent Greek and Serbian church chant traditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peno Vesna

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an attempt to show the similarity between the Serbian and Greek Post-Byzantine chanting traditions, especially those which relate to the scale organization of modes. Three teachers and reformers from Constantinople, Chrisantos, Gregorios and Chourmousios, established a fairly firm theoretical system for the first time during the long history of church chant. One of the main results of their reform, beside changes relating to neums, was the assignment of strict sizes to the intervals in the natural tonal system. There are three kinds of natural scales: diatonic, chromatic and encharmonic. They all have their place in the Greek Anastasimatarion chant book, whose first edition was prepared by Petar Peloponesios, and later edited by Ionnes Protopsaltes. The first, first plagal and forth plagal modes are diatonic in each of their melos, with very few exceptions; the second and second plagal are soft and hard chromatic, while the third and varis are encharmonic. It is important to note that the Greek chanter is very conscious of the scale foundation of the melody, so he begins to chant the apechima foremost, the intonation formula that comprehends all indisposed details to enter the adequate mode, i. e. melos. One mode could use one sort of scale for all groups of melodies - melos. However, in some modes there are different melos, whose scale organisation is not equal at all. That means that it is not proper to equate mode with scale, but rather to look for the specific scale's shape through the melodies that belong to the melos. The absence of formal Serbian church music theory and, especially, the very conservative way in which church melodies are learnt by ear and by heart, has caused significant gaps, which preclude an adequate approach to the essentional principals of Serbian chant. Over the years many Serbian chanters and musicians have noted down church melodies, especially those from the Octoechos, in F or in G, with the key

  12. Markets and authorities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, Jochen; Cecco, Marcello de

    This text addresses the relationship between market authority and political authority - a favourite theme of Susan Strange, to whom the book is dedicated. From a survey of the bias against capital liberalization in economic thought to an analysis of the US role in global monetary affairs, it disc......This text addresses the relationship between market authority and political authority - a favourite theme of Susan Strange, to whom the book is dedicated. From a survey of the bias against capital liberalization in economic thought to an analysis of the US role in global monetary affairs...

  13. Rehabilitation R&D Progress Reports 1996, Volume 34, May 1997

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-05-01

    Cherney LR, Halper AS, Drimmer DP. Brain Lang 1995:51(l):51-3. 129 Head Trauma and Stroke [138] COMORBIDITIES AND COMPLICATIONS IN STROKE...persons with PD. [189] BIOCHEMICAL AND MYOELECTRIC EVENTS DURING FATIGUE Serge H. Roy, ScD; Edward Kupa, MS; Carlo J. De Luca, PhD; Susan C...R&D Progress Reports 1996 [190] EFFECTS OF MUSCLE FIBER SIZE ON EMG PARAMETERS Edward Kupa, MS; Serge H. Roy, ScD; Susan C. Kandarian, PhD; Carlo J

  14. Fantastiske forbindelser relationer i undervisning og læringssamvær

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antologiens artikler er lavet af en række anerkendte forskere og ide-folk fra Danmark, Norge, Holland, England og USA. Herunder Peter Lang, Daniel Stern, Maria Aarts, Thomas Armstrong, Maria Aarts, Jan Tønnesvang, Stein Bråten, Jesper Juul og Susan Hart......Antologiens artikler er lavet af en række anerkendte forskere og ide-folk fra Danmark, Norge, Holland, England og USA. Herunder Peter Lang, Daniel Stern, Maria Aarts, Thomas Armstrong, Maria Aarts, Jan Tønnesvang, Stein Bråten, Jesper Juul og Susan Hart...

  15. Idea Bank: I Can't Do That! Improvisation for Classically Trained Musicians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonviri, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    The Partnership for 21st Century Skills lists among its top priorities for students the development of "learning and innovation skills," of which the first are "creativity and innovation." The third National Standard from the National Association for Music Education is "Improvising melodies, variations, and accompaniments." These guiding…

  16. An approach to melodic segmentation and classification based on filtering with the Haar-wavelet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Velarde, Gissel; Weyde, Tillman; Meredith, David

    2013-01-01

    Haar wavelet transform. The melodies are first segmented using local maxima or zero-crossings of ws. The segments of ws are then classified using the k–nearest neighbour algorithm with Euclidian and city-block distances. The method proves more effective than using unfiltered pitch signals and Gestalt...

  17. Transcatheter Pulmonary Valve Replacement for Right Ventricular Outflow Tract Conduit Dysfunction After the Ross Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Matthew J; McElhinney, Doff B; Kreutzer, Jacqueline; Hellenbrand, William E; El-Said, Howaida; Ewert, Peter; Rhodes, John F; Søndergaard, Lars; Jones, Thomas K

    2015-09-01

    Right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) conduit dysfunction is a limitation of the Ross procedure. Transcatheter pulmonary valve replacement (TPVR) could alter the impact of conduit dysfunction and the risk-benefit balance for the Ross procedure. Retrospective review of databases from 3 prospective Melody TPV (Medtronic Inc, Minneapolis, MN) trials. Among 358 patients who were catheterized with the intent to implant a Melody TPV for RVOT conduit stenosis or regurgitation (PR) as part of 3 prospective multicenter studies, 67 (19%) had a prior Ross procedure. Of these, 56 (84%) received a Melody valve; in 5 of the 11 patients who did not, the implant was aborted due to concern for coronary artery compression, and 1 implanted patient required emergent surgery for left coronary compression. The RVOT gradient decreased from a median 38 mm Hg to 13.5 mm Hg (p Freedom from TPV explant was 89% ± 5% at 4 years. Among patients who did not undergo reintervention for obstruction, there was no change in RVOT gradient over time, and all but 1 patient had mild or less PR at last follow-up. The TPVR with the Melody valve provides acceptable early outcomes and durable valve function in the majority of Ross patients. Recurrent RVOT obstruction associated with stent fracture was the main reason for reintervention. Coronary compression is not uncommon in Ross patients and should be assessed prior to TPVR. Copyright © 2015 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Results of a pilot study on the involvement of bilateral inferior frontal gyri in emotional prosody perception: an rTMS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekert, Marjolijn; Vingerhoets, Guy; Aleman, Andre

    2010-01-01

    Background: The right hemisphere may play an important role in paralinguistic features such as the emotional melody in speech. The extent of this involvement however is unclear. Imaging studies have shown involvement of both left and right inferior frontal gyri in emotional prosody perception. The

  19. Pop / Tõnu Kaalep

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kaalep, Tõnu, 1966-

    2007-01-01

    Heliplaatidest: Chicago "XXX", Love Of Diagrams "Love Of Diagrams", James Holden "The Idiots Are Winning", Melody Club "Scream", Yo La Tengo "I Am Not Afraid Of You And I Will Beat Your Ass", Mogwai "Zidane: A 21st Century Portrait (OST)"

  20. Revisiting the dissociation between singing and speaking in expressive aphasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hébert, Sylvie; Racette, Amélie; Gagnon, Lise; Peretz, Isabelle

    2003-08-01

    We investigated the production of sung and spoken utterances in a non-fluent patient, C.C., who had a severe expressive aphasia following a right-hemisphere stroke, but whose language comprehension and memory were relatively preserved. In experiment 1, C.C. repeated familiar song excerpts under four different conditions: spoken lyrics, sung lyrics on original melody, lyrics sung on new but familiar melody and melody sung to a neutral syllable "la". In experiment 2, C.C. repeated novel song excerpts under three different conditions: spoken lyrics, sung lyrics and sung-to-la melody. The mean number of words produced under the spoken and sung conditions did not differ significantly in either experiment. The mean number of notes produced was not different either in the sung-to-la and sung conditions, but was higher than the words produced, hence showing a dissociation between C.C.'s musical and verbal productions. Therefore, our findings do not support the claim that singing helps word production in non-fluent aphasic patients. Rather, they are consistent with the idea that verbal production, be it sung or spoken, result from the operation of same mechanisms.

  1. Experiencia Pedagogica con Adolescentes Paraliticos Cerebrales: La Musica, Un Elemento Rehabilitador (A Pedagogical Experience with Teenage Cerebral Paralytics Using Music as a Rehabilitating Element).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colomer, Marta; And Others

    The monograph describes efforts carried out in the Department of Work Therapy of a center for cerebral paralysis in Barcelona, Spain. The rehabilitation program incorporated music and movement in an attempt to develop the musical ear, sensitivity, and a sensorial education. The program stresses rhythm, melody, harmony, voice, musical audition, and…

  2. The Unexpected Side-Effects of Dissonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodner, Ehud; Gilboa, Avi; Amir, Dorit

    2007-01-01

    The effects of dissonant and consonant music on cognitive performance were examined. Situational dissonance and consonance were also tested and determined as the state where one's opinion is contrasted or matched with the majority's opinion, respectively. Subjects performed several cognitive tasks while listening to a melody arranged dissonantly,…

  3. New World Symphony and Discord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author features the life and works of Antonin Dvorak, a Czech classical musician. In the throes of a New World epiphany, Dvorak has espoused a future for American music based on "negro melodies." For three years, beginning in the fall of 1892, Dvorak found himself embroiled in a sustained and often bitter debate over issues of…

  4. Learning Science Using Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolinski, Keith

    2011-01-01

    For thousands of years, people have used music to transfer information and narrate stories. The musical structure, consisting of words set to melodies in rhythmic patterns, made the content easier to remember. Researchers have investigated the long- and short-term effects of song on memory and found that music aided in the recall of information.…

  5. Auditory-motor learning influences auditory memory for music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Rachel M; Palmer, Caroline

    2012-05-01

    In two experiments, we investigated how auditory-motor learning influences performers' memory for music. Skilled pianists learned novel melodies in four conditions: auditory only (listening), motor only (performing without sound), strongly coupled auditory-motor (normal performance), and weakly coupled auditory-motor (performing along with auditory recordings). Pianists' recognition of the learned melodies was better following auditory-only or auditory-motor (weakly coupled and strongly coupled) learning than following motor-only learning, and better following strongly coupled auditory-motor learning than following auditory-only learning. Auditory and motor imagery abilities modulated the learning effects: Pianists with high auditory imagery scores had better recognition following motor-only learning, suggesting that auditory imagery compensated for missing auditory feedback at the learning stage. Experiment 2 replicated the findings of Experiment 1 with melodies that contained greater variation in acoustic features. Melodies that were slower and less variable in tempo and intensity were remembered better following weakly coupled auditory-motor learning. These findings suggest that motor learning can aid performers' auditory recognition of music beyond auditory learning alone, and that motor learning is influenced by individual abilities in mental imagery and by variation in acoustic features.

  6. Novice Collaboration in Solo and Accompaniment Improvisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anne-Marie; Andersen, Hans Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates how non-musicians engaged in a solo-accompaniment music improvisation relationship. Seven user teams interacted with two electronic music instruments integrated in two pen tablets. One instrument was a melody instrument and the other a chord instru-ment. The study was done...

  7. Teaching Aural Skills to High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domek, Richard C.

    1979-01-01

    Six drills are presented to enhance aural sensitivity in students who may have only minimal knowledge of music theory. The exercises require little preclass preparation and none takes longer than five minutes. Drills cover scales, pitch and rhythm memory, pitch patterns, and corrective listening with pitch patterns and melodies. (SJL)

  8. A Comparison of a Traditional Music Teaching Method with Music Ace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Barbara S.

    Elementary schools in Knox County, Tennessee employ music specialists who spend about one hour weekly instructing individual elementary classes in music. Students in those classes receive about 64 music lessons per school year. The music curriculum in Knox County includes the six major elements of music: melody, harmony, rhythm, style, expressive…

  9. Neural Correlates of Music Recognition in Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virji-Babul, N.; Moiseev, A.; Sun, W.; Feng, T.; Moiseeva, N.; Watt, K. J.; Huotilainen, M.

    2013-01-01

    The brain mechanisms that subserve music recognition remain unclear despite increasing interest in this process. Here we report the results of a magnetoencephalography experiment to determine the temporal dynamics and spatial distribution of brain regions activated during listening to a familiar and unfamiliar instrumental melody in control adults…

  10. Ókpè Disco: Its Emergence and Performance Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Western diatonic melodies and harmonies seldom feature in the music, while the harmonica and keyboard are included in few instrumental ensembles. Studio recordings of Ókpè Disco are available commercially and are regularly aired during Delta Broadcasting radio and television programmes. South African Journal of ...

  11. Development and Evaluation of Computer-Aided Music-Learning System for the Hearing Impaired

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H.-J.; Lay, Y.-L.; Liou, Y.-C.; Tsao, W.-Y.; Lin, C.-K.

    2007-01-01

    A computer-assisted music-learning system (CAMLS) has been developed to help the hearing impaired practice playing a musical melody. The music-learning performance is evaluated to test the usability of the system. This system can be a computer-supported learning tool for the hearing impaired to help them understand what pitch and tempo are, and…

  12. Measurement, Mathematics, and Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Katie; White, David

    The Greek mathematician, Pythagoras, was among the first to undertake a mathematical study of music. His work, resulted in a scale of notes which can produce beautiful melodies and which is easily reproduced in the elementary classroom. In an age when teachers look for an interdisciplinary connection between various aspects of the curriculum, in a…

  13. Auditory Channel Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Philip H.; Suiter, Patricia A.

    This teacher's guide contains a list of general auditory problem areas where students have the following problems: (a) inability to find or identify source of sound; (b) difficulty in discriminating sounds of words and letters; (c) difficulty with reproducing pitch, rhythm, and melody; (d) difficulty in selecting important from unimportant sounds;…

  14. Mathematics and Computation in Music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    and performed at MCM 2015 by Laurel Pardue, followed by Susanne Beer and Ian Pressland’s divergent interpretations of Piazzolla’s Le Grand Tango for cello and piano, each accompanied by Elaine Chew. An evening concert, Geometries and Ges- tures (Gege), featured Tom Johnson’s Rational Melodies performed on flute...

  15. Eurythmy in the Waldorf Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogletree, Earl J.

    Eurythmy is a disciplined art of movement of the arms and body that visibly expresses the vowels and consonants of speech and the tones and intervals of musical melody. In the classroom, eurythmic movements have a therapeutic function in which the child's development is supported and enhanced through its various stages. This article discusses the…

  16. [Cognitive rehabilitation of amusia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weill-Chounlamountry, A; Soyez-Gayout, L; Tessier, C; Pradat-Diehl, P

    2008-06-01

    The cognitive model of music processing has a modular architecture with two main pathways (a melody pathway and a time pathway) for processing the musical "message" and thus enabling music recognition. It also features a music-specific module for tonal encoding of pitch which stands apart from all other known cognitive systems (including language processing). To the best of our knowledge, rehabilitation therapy for amusia has not yet been reported. We developed a therapeutic method (inspired by work on word deafness) in order to determine whether specific rehabilitation based on melody discrimination could prompt the regression of amusia. We report the case of a patient having developed receptive, acquired amusia four years previously. His tone deafness disorder was assessed using the Montreal Battery of Evaluation of Amusia (MBEA), which revealed impairment of the melody pathway but no deficiency in the time pathway. A computer-assisted rehabilitation method was implemented; it used melody discrimination tasks and an errorless learning paradigm with progressively fading visual cues. After therapy, we noted an improvement in the overall MBEA score and its component subscores which could not be explained by spontaneous recovery (in view of the number of years since the neurological accident). The improvement was maintained at seven months post-therapy. Although post-therapy improvement in daily life was not systematically assessed, the patient started listening to his favourite music again. Specific amusia therapy has shown efficacy.

  17. Long-Term Memory for Music: Infants Remember Tempo and Timbre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trainor, Laurel J.; Wu, Luann; Tsang, Christine D.

    2004-01-01

    We show that infants' long-term memory representations for melodies are not just reduced to the structural features of relative pitches and durations, but contain surface or performance tempo- and timbre-specific information. Using a head turn preference procedure, we found that after a one week exposure to an old English folk song, infants…

  18. Novel Music Segmentation Interface and the Jazz Tune Collection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodríguez López, M.E.; Bountouridis, D.; Volk, A.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present MOSSA, an easy-to-use interface for mobile devices, developed to annotate the segment structure of music. Moreover, we present the jazz tune collection (JTC), a database of 125 Jazz melodies annotated using MOSSA, and developed specifically for benchmarking of computational

  19. African Music in an American Context. Mini-Module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    African-American Inst., New York, NY. School Services Div.

    Insights are offered into how speech, melody, and rhythm dramatize the differences in the construction and interpretation of music for Africa and America. Intended for use in instructing American students about African music, the learning module relates music to traditional African culture and maintains that the music is at the same time…

  20. Conversation on African Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Leslie R.

    1985-01-01

    A voice and music education teacher at the University of Lagos, Nigeria, talks about African music in this interview. Topics discussed include differences between African and Western music, African melody, rules for composing African music, the theory of counterpoint, and the popularity of classical composers in Nigeria. (RM)

  1. Automatic Tamil lyric generation based on ontological interpretation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2. Literature survey. One of the existing works on lyric generation for the Tamil language concentrates on generat- ing lyrics from a given melody (Sobha & Ananth Ramakrishnan 2010). This is a tune-based lyric generating system wherein the input to the system is a tune in the KNM representation, where 'K' refers to 'Kuril', ...

  2. Neural and Behavioral Correlates of Song Prosody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Reyna Leigh

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation studies the neural basis of song, a universal human behavior. The relationship of words and melodies in the perception of song at phonological, semantic, melodic, and rhythmic levels of processing was investigated using the fine temporal resolution of Electroencephalography (EEG). The observations reported here may shed light on…

  3. Student Musicians' Ear-Playing Ability as a Function of Vernacular Music Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woody, Robert H.; Lehmann, Andreas C.

    2010-01-01

    This study explored the differences in ear-playing ability between formal "classical" musicians and those with vernacular music experience (N = 24). Participants heard melodies and performed them back, either by singing or playing on their instruments. The authors tracked the number of times through the listen-then-perform cycle that each…

  4. Advertisement call and tadpole morphology of the clutch-guarding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We provide the first descriptions of the tadpole and advertisement call of Mantidactylus argenteus. Calls consist of 6–15 short and rather melodious notes, with a dominant frequency at 4100–4400 Hz and are emitted from arboreal positions during the day. The larva is an Orton type IV tadpole, with oval body shape and ...

  5. 1/f noise in music and speech. [Power spectrum studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voss, R.F.; Clarke, J.

    1975-11-27

    The power spectrum, S(f), of many fluctuating physical variables, V(t), is approximately ''1/f-like.'' Loudness fluctuations in music and speech and pitch (melody) fluctuations in music were found to exhibit 1/f power spectra. This observation has implications for stochastic music composition. 3 figures. (RWR)

  6. [The role of temporal fine structure in tone recognition and music perception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Q; Gu, X; Liu, B

    2017-11-07

    The sound signal can be decomposed into temporal envelope and temporal fine structure information. The temporal envelope information is crucial for speech perception in quiet environment, and the temporal fine structure information plays an important role in speech perception in noise, Mandarin tone recognition and music perception, especially the pitch and melody perception.

  7. Plantation of symbolic tree donated by CERN on the occasion of the International Forum on Music as a catalyst for environmental awareness

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN video productions

    2009-01-01

    Plantation of symbolic tree donated by CERN on the occasion of the International Forum on Music as a catalyst for environmental awareness in the presence of the honorable Mayor Rémy Pagani, President of the Melody Association and other dignitaries in Parc Beaulieu.

  8. Emotional ornamentation in performances of a Handel sonata

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, R.; Ashley, R.

    2007-01-01

    ORNAMENTATION IS ONE ASPECT OF MUSIC ASSOCIATED with emotional affect in Baroque music. In an empirical study, the relationship between ornamentation and emotion was investigated by asking a violinist and flutist to ornament three melodies in different ways to express four emotions: happiness,

  9. "Con minimos retoques en la letra" : Over García Lorca's 'Tres morillas'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorleijn, Gillis

    2014-01-01

    García Lorca's 'Tres morillos' is not by García Lorca. Melody and text have an anonymous sixtteenth-century provenance. However, in his compilation, Lorca added one stanza to the text to express his critical stance towards the Reconquista and christian dominance.

  10. Curricular Content for Pupils' Mental Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebadi, Seyed Hossein; Keshtiaray, Narges; Aghaei, Asghar; Yousefy, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Present-day curricular designs have to take the pupils' psychological needs in account, thus becoming melodies of mental health and happiness for the next generation. Emphasizing the findings from previous investigations using the research synthesis methodology, the present study has been conducted aiming at achieving some integrative knowledge…

  11. Transcatheter Pulmonary Valve Replacement for Right Ventricular Outflow Tract Conduit Dysfunction After the Ross Procedure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gillespie, Matthew J; McElhinney, Doff B; Kreutzer, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    . Of these, 56 (84%) received a Melody valve; in 5 of the 11 patients who did not, the implant was aborted due to concern for coronary artery compression, and 1 implanted patient required emergent surgery for left coronary compression. The RVOT gradient decreased from a median 38 mm Hg to 13.5 mm Hg (p

  12. Crosslinguistic Perception of Pitch in Language and Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Evan David

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation investigates the ways in which experience with lexical tone influences the perception of musical melody, and how musical training influences the perception of lexical tone. The central theoretical basis for the study is a model of perceptual learning, Reverse Hierarchy Theory (Ahissar et al., 2009), in which cognitive processes…

  13. SONGS AND IMPLICATIONS ON THE NIGERIAN SOCIETY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Singing has become part of Yorùbá culture and indeed, the human race as a ... for serious caution because it may have negative effects also as we shall .... economic and religious life of the human race in general cannot be underestimated. It is music that gives melody to a song. This implies that not all songs require music.

  14. L'Italiano tra le Note: The Value and Power of a Song.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, Mariagrazia

    A series of class exercises for Italian language instruction based on a song, "La Vita Mia" by Amedeo Minghi, is presented. The song was selected because of its rich literary content and appealing melody. Objectives, in-class activities, and homework assignments are outlined. In them, students listen to the song, discuss the relationship…

  15. “Musiek kan my teken”: klanke, voëlgeluide en musiek in die ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The music pieces which found their way into her poems reflect the poet's personality, and form part of the more accessible melody-driven category of music, for example works by Mozart and Schubert, her favourite composers. She regards the German art song as especially significant, as it constitutes a connection between ...

  16. Pitch Discrimination and Melodic Memory in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanutz, Sandy; Wapnick, Joel; Burack, Jacob A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pitch perception is enhanced among persons with autism. We extended this finding to memory for pitch and melody among school-aged children. Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate pitch memory in musically untrained children with autism spectrum disorders, aged 7-13 years, and to compare it to that of age- and…

  17. The Effect of Pattern Recognition and Tonal Predictability on Sight-Singing Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine, Philip; Berry, Anna; Rosner, Burton

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the role of concurrent musical parts in pitching ability in sight-singing, concentrating on the effects of melodic and harmonic coherence. Twenty-two experienced singers sang their part twice in each of four novel chorales. The chorales contained either original or altered melody and original (tonal) or altered (atonal)…

  18. Music Outlier Detection Using Multiple Sequence Alignment and Independent Ensembles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bountouridis, D.; Koops, Hendrik Vincent; Wiering, F.; Veltkamp, R.C.

    2016-01-01

    The automated retrieval of related music documents, such as cover songs or folk melodies belonging to the same tune, has been an important task in the field of Music Information Retrieval (MIR). Yet outlier detection, the process of identifying those documents that deviate significantly from the

  19. Factors Influencing Pop Music Preferences of Young Persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, J. David; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Examined and compared self-reported reasons for pop music preferences of 397 students in grades five, seven, nine, eleven, and college. Results revealed that characteristics such as melody, mood, rhythm, and lyrics were the most important reasons for selection. Differences in response by age and background characteristics were noted. (Author/SJL)

  20. The Guide to Teaching with Popular Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Music Educators National Conference, Reston, VA.

    Popular music is often characterized as a short work with a prominent melody and simple chordal accompaniment. Yet, teaching with pop music in the era of standards-based curriculum can present challenges. These standards offer teachers a blueprint for teaching music performance, composition, improvisation, and the relationship of music to other…