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Sample records for surviving freeze-thaw stress

  1. Climatic variation and seed persistence: freeze-thaw cycles lower survival via the joint action of abiotic stress and fungal pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Brian M; Orrock, John L

    2015-10-01

    Global climate change is altering thermal cycles in soils during late winter, a transition that may directly threaten seed survival via abiotic stress, facilitate infection by soil-borne pathogens, or both. Using field-collected soil and seeds of the perennial bunchgrass Elymus canadensis, we tested the hypothesis that soil freeze-thaw events limit survival within the soil through direct effects on seed persistence and amplification of soil pathogen attack using a factorial experiment that manipulated freeze-thaw cycles (constant freeze vs. freeze-thaw) and fungicide addition. Freeze-thaw treatment resulted in lower seedling emergence and delayed emergence time relative to constant-freeze controls. Fungicide-treated soils had greater emergence relative to untreated soils; the lowest seedling emergence was observed in no-fungicide, freeze-thaw-treated soils (fungi on seeds were mitigated through interactions at the seed-soil interface, as subsequent experiments showed that fungicide and freeze-thaw treatments alone do not influence dormancy. Our work demonstrates that changes in freeze-thaw events directly limit seedling emergence, delay seedling phenology, and provide opportunities for fungal pathogens to limit seed persistence. As recruitment from seeds is a key determinant of plant population dynamics, these results suggest that climatic variation may generate unique consequences for populations under changing climate regimes.

  2. Freeze/thaw stress in Ceanothus of southern California chaparral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewers, Frank W; Lawson, Michael C; Bowen, Timothy J; Davis, Stephen D

    2003-07-01

    Freeze/thaw stress was examined in chaparral shrubs of the genus Ceanothus to determine the interactive effects of freezing and drought and to consider which is the more vulnerable component, the living leaves (symplast) or the non-living water transport system (apoplast). We hypothesized that where Ceanothus species co-occurred, the more inland species C. crassifolius would be more tolerant of low temperatures than the coastal species C. spinosus, both in terms of leaf survival (LT(50), or the temperature at which there is 50% loss of function or viability) and in terms of resistance to freezing-induced embolism (measurements of percent loss hydraulic conductivity due to embolism following freeze/thaw). Cooling experiments on 2 m long winter-acclimated shoots resulted in LT(50) values of about -10 degrees C for C. spinosus versus -18 degrees C for C. crassifolius. Freeze-thaw cycles resulted in no change in embolism when the plants were well hydrated (-0.7 to -2.0 MPa). However, when plants were dehydrated to -5.0 MPa, C. spinosus became 96% embolized with freeze/thaw, versus only 61% embolism for C. crassifolius. Stems of C. crassifolius became 90% and 97% embolized at -6.6 and -8.0 MPa, respectively, meaning that even in this species, stems could be more vulnerable than leaves under conditions of extreme water stress combined with freeze/thaw events. The dominance of C. crassifolius at colder sites and the restriction of C. spinosus to warmer sites are consistent with both the relative tolerance of their symplasts to low temperatures and the relative tolerance of their apoplasts to freeze events in combination with drought stress.

  3. Phenome data - Freeze-thaw stress - DGBY | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us DGBY Phenome data - Freeze-thaw stress Data detail Data name Phenome data - Freeze-thaw stress... DOI 10.18908/lsdba.nbdc00953-006 Description of data contents Yeasts used in bread making are exposed to freeze-thaw stress...were components of vacuolar H + -ATPase. Next, the cross-sensitivity of the freeze-thaw-sensitive mutants to oxidative stress... and to cell wall stress was studied; both of these are environmental stress...es closely related to freeze-thaw stress. The results showed that defects in the functions of va

  4. Freeze-thaw Caenorhabditis elegans freeze-thaw stress response is regulated by the insulin/IGF-1 receptor daf-2.

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    Hu, Jian-Ping; Xu, Xiao-Ying; Huang, Li-Ying; Wang, Li-shun; Fang, Ning-Yuan

    2015-12-03

    Adaption to cold temperatures, especially those below freezing, is essential for animal survival in cold environments. Freezing is also used for many medical, scientific, and industrial purposes. Natural freezing survival in animals has been extensively studied. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Previous studies demonstrated that animals survive in extremely cold weather by avoiding freezing or controlling the rate of ice-crystal formation in their bodies, which indicates that freezing survival is a passive thermodynamic process. Here, we showed that genetic programming actively promotes freezing survival in Caenorhabditis elegans. We found that daf-2, an insulin/IGF-1 receptor homologue, and loss-of-function enhanced survival during freeze-thaw stress, which required the transcription factor daf-16/FOXO and age-independent target genes. In particular, the freeze-thaw resistance of daf-2(rf) is highly allele-specific and has no correlation with lifespan, dauer formation, or hypoxia stress resistance. Our results reveal a new function for daf-2 signaling, and, most importantly, demonstrate that genetic programming contributes to freezing survival.

  5. Structural properties of monoclonal antibody aggregates induced by freeze-thawing and thermal stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawe, Andrea; Kasper, Julia Christina; Friess, Wolfgang; Jiskoot, Wim

    2009-09-10

    Aggregation of monoclonal antibodies can be induced by freeze-thawing and elevated temperature, typical stress factors during development, production and storage. Our aim was to characterize structural properties of aggregates formed after freeze-thawing and thermal stressing of humanized monoclonal IgG(1) antibody (IgG). Formulations with 1.0mg/ml IgG in 100mM phosphate pH 7.2 were subjected to freeze-thawing and heating and characterized by spectroscopic techniques (UV-absorption, CD, ATR-FTIR and fluorescence), light obscuration, dynamic light scattering, SDS-PAGE, AF4 with UV and MALLS detection, and HP-SEC with UV and online fluorescent dye detection. Thermal stress led to an increased formation of dimers and soluble oligomers (HP-SEC, AF4). Aggregates smaller than 30nm were measured (DLS), next to slightly elevated particle levels in the mum range (light obscuration). Aggregates created by heating were in part covalently linked (SDS-PAGE) and made up of conformationally perturbed monomers (CD, ATR-FTIR, extrinsic dye fluorescence). Aggregation after freeze-thawing was manifested primarily in particle formation in the mum range. These aggregates were noncovalently linked (SDS-PAGE) and composed of native-like monomers, as obvious from CD, ATR-FTIR and extrinsic dye fluorescence spectroscopy. In conclusion, the complementary methods used in this study revealed that heating and freeze-thawing induced aggregates differ significantly in their physico-chemical characteristics.

  6. The cytoplasmic Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase of saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for resistance to freeze-thaw stress. Generation of free radicals during freezing and thawing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, J I; Grant, C M; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    1998-01-01

    The involvement of oxidative stress in freeze-thaw injury to yeast cells was analyzed using mutants defective in a range of antioxidant functions, including Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase (encoded by SOD1), Mn superoxide dismutase (SOD2), catalase A, catalase T, glutathione reductase, gamma...

  7. Freeze-Thaw Stress: Effects of Temperature on Hydraulic Conductivity and Ultrasonic Activity in Ten Woody Angiosperms1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charrier, Guillaume; Charra-Vaskou, Katline; Kasuga, Jun; Cochard, Hervé; Mayr, Stefan; Améglio, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    Freeze-thaw events can affect plant hydraulics by inducing embolism. This study analyzed the effect of temperature during the freezing process on hydraulic conductivity and ultrasonic emissions (UE). Stems of 10 angiosperms were dehydrated to a water potential at 12% percentage loss of hydraulic conductivity (PLC) and exposed to freeze-thaw cycles. The minimal temperature of the frost cycle correlated positively with induced PLC, whereby species with wider conduits (hydraulic diameter) showed higher freeze-thaw-induced PLC. Ultrasonic activity started with the onset of freezing and increased with decreasing subzero temperatures, whereas no UE were recorded during thawing. The temperature at which 50% of UE were reached varied between −9.1°C and −31.0°C across species. These findings indicate that temperatures during freezing are of relevance for bubble formation and air seeding. We suggest that species-specific cavitation thresholds are reached during freezing due to the temperature-dependent decrease of water potential in the ice, while bubble expansion and the resulting PLC occur during thawing. UE analysis can be used to monitor the cavitation process and estimate freeze-thaw-induced PLC. PMID:24344170

  8. Response of the cell membrane-cytoskeleton complex to osmotic and freeze/thaw stresses. Part 2: The link between the state of the membrane-cytoskeleton complex and the cellular damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragoonanan, Vishard; Less, Rebekah; Aksan, Alptekin

    2013-04-01

    In an earlier paper [35], we examined the mutual interaction between the actin cytoskeleton and the cell membrane and explored the role this interaction plays during freeze/thaw. In this follow-up paper, we investigate the physical and chemical stresses induced by freeze/thaw and explore the different mechanisms of damage caused by these stresses. Our results showed that changes in cell volume during freeze/thaw and the unfrozen water content in the solution alter the cytoskeleton stiffness, and the available membrane material. Combined with unfavorable ice-membrane interactions and increasing membrane stiffness, increased de-structuring of the membrane (such as bleb and microvilli formation) synergistically act on the membrane-cytoskeleton system generating irreversible damage. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. NMR Pore Structure and Dynamic Characteristics of Sandstone Caused by Ambient Freeze-Thaw Action

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    Bo Ke

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For a deeper understanding of the freeze-thaw weathering effects on the microstructure evolution and deterioration of dynamic mechanical properties of rock, the present paper conducted the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR tests and impact loading experiments on sandstone under different freeze-thaw cycles. The results of NMR test show that, with the increase of freeze-thaw cycles, the pores expand and pores size tends to be uniform. The experimental results show that the stress-strain curves all go through four stages, namely, densification, elasticity, yielding, and failure. The densification curve is shorter, and the slope of elasticity curve decreases as the freeze-thaw cycles increase. With increasing freeze-thaw cycles, the dynamic peak stress decreases and energy absorption of sandstone increases. The dynamic failure form is an axial splitting failure, and the fragments increase and the size diminishes with increasing freeze-thaw cycles. The higher the porosity is, the more severe the degradation of dynamic characteristics is. An increase model for the relationships between the porosity or energy absorption and freeze-thaw cycles number was built to reveal the increasing trend with the freeze-thaw cycles increase; meanwhile, a decay model was built to predict the dynamic compressive strength degradation of rock after repeated freeze-thaw cycles.

  10. Behavior of Plain Concrete of a High Water-Cement Ratio after Freeze-Thaw Cycles

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    Huai-Shuai Shang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study of plain concrete specimens of water-cement ratio 0.55, subjected to 0, 15, 25, 40, 50 and 75 cycles of freeze-thaw was completed. The dynamic modulus of elasticity (DME, weight loss, compressive strength, tensile strength, flexural strength, cleavage strength and stress-strain relationships of plain concrete specimens suffering from freeze-thaw cycles were measured. The experimental results showed that the strength decreased as the freeze-thaw cycles were repeated. A concise mathematic formula between DME, weight loss, mechanical properties and number of freeze-thaw cycles was also established. The influences of freeze-thaw cycles on the DME, weight loss and mechanical properties were analyzed. The experimental results serve as a reference for the maintenance, design and life prediction of dams, hydraulic structures, offshore structures, concrete roads and bridges in cold regions.

  11. Freeze-thaw stress of Alhydrogel ® alone is sufficient to reduce the immunogenicity of a recombinant hepatitis B vaccine containing native antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapp, Tanya; Munks, Michael W; Trivedi, Ruchit; Kompella, Uday B; Braun, LaToya Jones

    2014-06-24

    Preventing losses in vaccine potency due to accidental freezing has recently become a topic of interest for improving vaccines. All vaccines with aluminum-containing adjuvants are susceptible to such potency losses. Recent studies have described excipients that protect the antigen from freeze-induced inactivation, prevent adjuvant agglomeration and retain potency. Although these strategies have demonstrated success, they do not provide a mechanistic understanding of freeze-thaw (FT) induced potency losses. In the current study, we investigated how adjuvant frozen in the absence of antigen affects vaccine immunogenicity and whether preventing damage to the freeze-sensitive recombinant hepatitis B surface antigen (rHBsAg) was sufficient for maintaining vaccine potency. The final vaccine formulation or Alhydrogel(®) alone was subjected to three FT-cycles. The vaccines were characterized for antigen adsorption, rHBsAg tertiary structure, particle size and charge, adjuvant elemental content and in-vivo potency. Particle agglomeration of either vaccine particles or adjuvant was observed following FT-stress. In vivo studies demonstrated no statistical differences in IgG responses between vaccines with FT-stressed adjuvant and no adjuvant. Adsorption of rHBsAg was achieved; regardless of adjuvant treatment, suggesting that the similar responses were not due to soluble antigen in the frozen adjuvant-containing formulations. All vaccines with adjuvant, including the non-frozen controls, yielded similar, blue-shifted fluorescence emission spectra. Immune response differences could not be traced to differences in the tertiary structure of the antigen in the formulations. Zeta potential measurements and elemental content analyses suggest that FT-stress resulted in a significant chemical alteration of the adjuvant surface. This data provides evidence that protecting a freeze-labile antigen from subzero exposure is insufficient to maintain vaccine potency. Future studies should

  12. SLAPex Freeze/Thaw 2015: The First Dedicated Soil Freeze/Thaw Airborne Campaign

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    Kim, Edward; Wu, Albert; DeMarco, Eugenia; Powers, Jarrett; Berg, Aaron; Rowlandson, Tracy; Freeman, Jacqueline; Gottfried, Kurt; Toose, Peter; Roy, Alexandre; hide

    2016-01-01

    Soil freezing and thawing is an important process in the terrestrial water, energy, and carbon cycles, marking the change between two very different hydraulic, thermal, and biological regimes. NASA's Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) mission includes a binary freeze/thaw data product. While there have been ground-based remote sensing field measurements observing soil freeze/thaw at the point scale, and airborne campaigns that observed some frozen soil areas (e.g., BOREAS), the recently-completed SLAPex Freeze/Thaw (F/T) campaign is the first airborne campaign dedicated solely to observing frozen/thawed soil with both passive and active microwave sensors and dedicated ground truth, in order to enable detailed process-level exploration of the remote sensing signatures and in situ soil conditions. SLAPex F/T utilized the Scanning L-band Active/Passive (SLAP) instrument, an airborne simulator of SMAP developed at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, and was conducted near Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, in October/November, 2015. Future soil moisture missions are also expected to include soil freeze/thaw products, and the loss of the radar on SMAP means that airborne radar-radiometer observations like those that SLAP provides are unique assets for freeze/thaw algorithm development. This paper will present an overview of SLAPex F/T, including descriptions of the site, airborne and ground-based remote sensing, ground truth, as well as preliminary results.

  13. Cryoprotectant Production in Freeze-Tolerant Wood Frogs Is Augmented by Multiple Freeze-Thaw Cycles.

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    Larson, Don J; Barnes, Brian M

    2016-01-01

    Ice nucleation across the skin of wood frogs (Lithobates sylvaticus) rapidly induces endogenous production of glucose, a cryoprotectant necessary for freeze tolerance. In laboratory studies of freeze tolerance, wood frogs are cooled slowly, often at -0.05°C h(-1), to facilitate high cryoprotectant production and survival. Under natural conditions in Alaska, however, wood frogs accumulate maximal tissue glucose concentrations while cooling at much faster rates, -0.35° to -1.6°C h(-1), and in addition undergo multiple successive freeze-thaw cycles before remaining frozen for the winter. We examined whether simulating these ecologically relevant cooling rates and repeated freeze-thaw events in captive wood frogs results in the high glucose concentrations found in naturally frozen wood frogs. We found that over successive freezing and thawing events, glucose concentrations increased stepwise in all measured tissues. Short thawing periods did not result in a statistically significant decline of glucose concentrations. Wood frogs that experienced three freeze-thaw events had fresh weight glucose concentrations that approached values found in tissues of wood frogs frozen in natural conditions. Laboratory wood frogs survive frozen for 2 mo, while wood frogs frozen under natural conditions survive frozen for up to 7 mo at temperatures below -18°C. We hypothesize that repeated freeze-thaw cycles with rapid cooling and warming rates allow for greater survival in Alaskan wood frogs through enhanced cryoprotectant production.

  14. Salt crystallization and freeze-thaw damage of repair mortars and porous limestone; a laboratory perspective

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    Szemerey-Kiss, Balázs; Török, Ákos

    2017-04-01

    Durability of porous limestone and repair mortars were tested parallel. The specimens were subjected to salt weathering and freeze-thaw to understand the coeval behaviour and adherence of these materials. The tests were evaluated according to European Norms, salt crystallization (EN 12370) and freeze-thaw resistance (EN 12371). Three types of commercial available repair mortars and four types of laboratory mixed mortars were used for the tests. A Miocene porous limestone was also tested 40x40x40mm in size. 18 different mortars were placed next to limestone cubes in the 40x40x160mm stainless steel moulds (4 in one mould). Another 30 samples were prepared as control ones. Adhesion between the limestone and repair mortars reduced due to external stresses (freeze-thaw, salt). The results clearly show that durability of commercially available repair mortars is higher than that of the laboratory mixed mortars. Significant differences between the damage caused by freeze-thaw and salt crystallization cycles were recorded. Commercial available mortars have shown stronger adhesion during the tests. Most of the commercial samples kept the contact with the limestone interface until the end of the cyclic tests (30th cycle). At the same time, laboratory mixed mortars detached earlier (after the 8th cycle). Commercial mortars with 50m% limestone aggregate showed decreased durability, since detachment was observed after the 23rd cycle. The financial support of NKFI Fund (ref. no. K 116532) is appreciated.

  15. Freeze-Thaw Durability of Air-Entrained Concrete

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    Huai-Shuai Shang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most damaging actions affecting concrete is the abrupt temperature change (freeze-thaw cycles. The types of deterioration of concrete structures by cyclic freeze-thaw can be largely classified into surface scaling (characterized by the weight loss and internal crack growth (characterized by the loss of dynamic modulus of elasticity. The present study explored the durability of concrete made with air-entraining agent subjected to 0, 100, 200, 300, and 400 cycles of freeze-thaw. The experimental study of C20, C25, C30, C40, and C50 air-entrained concrete specimens was completed according to “the test method of long-term and durability on ordinary concrete” GB/T 50082-2009. The dynamic modulus of elasticity and weight loss of specimens were measured after different cycles of freeze-thaw. The influence of freeze-thaw cycles on the relative dynamic modulus of elasticity and weight loss was analyzed. The findings showed that the dynamic modulus of elasticity and weight decreased as the freeze-thaw cycles were repeated. They revealed that the C30, C40, and C50 air-entrained concrete was still durable after 300 cycles of freeze-thaw according to the experimental results.

  16. Response of Soil Biogeochemistry to Freeze-thaw Cycles: Impacts on Greenhouse Gas Emission and Nutrient Fluxes

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    Rezanezhad, F.; Parsons, C. T.; Smeaton, C. M.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2014-12-01

    Freeze-thaw is an abiotic stress applied to soils and is a natural process at medium to high latitudes. Freezing and thawing processes influence not only the physical properties of soil, but also the metabolic activity of soil microorganisms. Fungi and bacteria play a crucial role in soil organic matter degradation and the production of greenhouse gases (GHG) such as CO2, CH4 and N2O. Production and consumption of these atmospheric trace gases are the result of biological processes such as photosynthesis, aerobic respiration (CO2), methanogenesis, methanotrophy (CH4), nitrification and denitrification (N2O). To enhance our understanding of the effects of freeze-thaw cycles on soil biogeochemical transformations and fluxes, a highly instrumented soil column experiment was designed to realistically simulate freeze-thaw dynamics under controlled conditions. Pore waters collected periodically from different depths of the column and solid-phase analyses on core material obtained at the initial and end of the experiment highlighted striking geochemical cycling. CO2, CH4 and N2O production at different depths within the column were quantified from dissolved gas concentrations in pore water. Subsequent emissions from the soil surface were determined by direct measurement in the head space. Pulsed CO2 emission to the headspace was observed at the onset of thawing, however, the magnitude of the pulse decreased with each subsequent freeze-thaw cycle indicating depletion of a "freeze-thaw accessible" carbon pool. Pulsed CO2 emission was due to a combination of physical release of gases dissolved in porewater and entrapped below the frozen zone and changing microbial respiration in response to electron acceptor variability (O2, NO3-, SO42-). In this presentation, we focus on soil-specific physical, chemical, microbial factors (e.g. redox conditions, respiration, fermentation) and the mechanisms that drive GHG emission and nutrient cycling in soils under freeze-thaw cycles.

  17. Failure of cement hydrates: freeze-thaw and fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannidou, Katerina; Del Gado, Emanuela; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Pellenq, Roland

    Mechanical and viscoelastic behavior of concrete crucially depends on cement hydrates, the ``glue'' of cement. Even more than the atomistic structure, the mesoscale amorphous texture of cement hydrates over hundreds of nanometers plays a crucial role for material properties. We use simulations that combine information of the nano-scale building units of cement hydrates and on their effective interactions, obtained from atomistic simulations and experiments, into a statistical physics framework for aggregating nanoparticles.Our mesoscale model was able to reconcile different experimental results ranging from small-angle neutron scattering, SEM, adsorption/desorption of N2, and water to nanoindentation and gain the new fundamental insights into the microscopic origin of the properties measured. Our results suggest that heterogeneities developed during the early stages of hydration persist in the structure of C-S-H, impacting the rheological and mechanical performance of the hardened cement paste. In this talk I discuss recent investigation on failure mechanism at the mesoscale of hardened cement paste such as freeze-thaw and fracture. Using correlations between local volume fractions and local stress we provide a link between structural and mechanical heterogeneities during the failure mechanisms.

  18. Immobilization of biological membranes by sonication and freeze-thawing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goto, T.; Kikuchi, K. [Akita Univ. (Japan)

    1998-10-01

    A rapid and convenient means of immobilizing biological membranes is described. Sonication for formation of small vesicles, diffusion of the vesicles in support beads, and freeze-thawing is carried out in an immobilized multi-enzyme system. Large amounts of brush border membranes from bovine kidney were immobilized in Sepharose CL-6B, Sephacryl S-500, and Sephacryl S-1000 and increased in that order. For the latter two beads, the amounts were further increased with repetition of freeze-thawing up to a maximum of three times. Particle distribution analysis reveals that small vesicles are enlarged by the freeze-thawing repetition, suggesting an immobilization mode in which enlarged vesicles are physically entrapped in the beads. The bead-immobilized membrane vesicles were relatively stable, exhibiting constant enzyme activities for at least 6 h under packed column operation. 10 refs., 5 figs.

  19. The combined effect of freeze thaw events and heavy metal pollution leads to distinct lethal synergy in Enchytraeus albidus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boas, Sara Wincentz; Slotsbo, Stine; Holmstrup, Martin

    Many anthropogenic activities negatively affect the environment and stress the organisms living here in various ways. Due to global warming it is likely that freeze-thaw events will replace permanent freezing of soils in arctic regions. Metals are some of the most common contaminants in soil in E...

  20. Effect of repeated freeze-thaw cycles on geographically different populations of the freeze-tolerant worm Enchytraeus albidus (Oligochaeta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisker, Karina Vincents; Holmstrup, Martin; Malte, Hans; Overgaard, Johannes

    2014-11-01

    Freeze-tolerant organisms survive internal ice formation; however, the adaptations to repeated freeze-thaw cycles are often not well investigated. Here we report how three geographically different populations of Enchytraeus albidus (Germany, Iceland and Svalbard) respond to three temperature treatments - constant thawed (0°C), constant freezing (-5°C) and fluctuating temperature (0 to -5°C) - over a period of 42 days. Survival varied between treatments and populations such that enchytraeids from arctic locations had a higher survival following prolonged freeze periods compared with temperate populations. However, enchytraeids from temperate locations had the same survival rate as arctic populations when exposed to repeated freeze-thaw events. Across all populations, metabolic rate decreased markedly in frozen animals (-5°C) compared with thawed controls (0°C). This decrease is likely due to the lower temperature of frozen animals, but also to the transition to the frozen state per se. Animals exposed to repeated freeze-thaw events had an intermediate metabolic rate and freeze-thaw events were not associated with pronounced excess energetic costs. Overwintering under either condition was not associated with a decrease in lipid content; however, during exposure to constant freezing and repeated freeze-thaw events there was a noticeable decrease in carbohydrate stores over time. Thus, animals exposed to constant freezing showed a decrease in glycogen stores, while both glucose and glycogen content decreased over time when the organisms were exposed to repeated freezing. The results therefore suggest that carbohydrate resources are important as a fuel for E. albidus during freezing whereas lipid resources are of marginal importance. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  1. The Effect of Freeze-Thaw Conditions on Arctic Soil Bacterial Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia K. Walker

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Climate change is already altering the landscape at high latitudes. Permafrost is thawing, the growing season is starting earlier, and, as a result, certain regions in the Arctic may be subjected to an increased incidence of freeze-thaw events. The potential release of carbon and nutrients from soil microbial cells that have been lysed by freeze-thaw transitions could have significant impacts on the overall carbon balance of arctic ecosystems, and therefore on atmospheric CO2 concentrations. However, the impact of repeated freezing and thawing with the consequent growth and recrystallization of ice on microbial communities is still not well understood. Soil samples from three distinct sites, representing Canadian geographical low arctic, mid-arctic and high arctic soils were collected from Daring Lake, Alexandra Fjord and Cambridge Bay sampling sites, respectively. Laboratory-based experiments subjected the soils to multiple freeze-thaw cycles for 14 days based on field observations (0 °C to −10 °C for 12 h and −10 °C to 0 °C for 12 h and the impact on the communities was assessed by phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA methyl ester analysis and 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing. Both data sets indicated differences in composition and relative abundance between the three sites, as expected. However, there was also a strong variation within the two high latitude sites in the effects of the freeze-thaw treatment on individual PLFA and 16S-based phylotypes. These site-based heterogeneities suggest that the impact of climate change on soil microbial communities may not be predictable a priori; minor differential susceptibilities to freeze-thaw stress could lead to a “butterfly effect” as described by chaos theory, resulting in subsequent substantive differences in microbial assemblages. This perspectives article suggests that this is an unwelcome finding since it will make future predictions for the impact of on-going climate change on soil

  2. Freeze/thaw phenomena in concrete at low temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesson, Björn

    2007-01-01

    of formed ice at different temperatures and the corresponding measured length changes. The development of cracks in the material structure was indicated by an ultra-sonic technique by measuring on the samples before and after the freeze thaw tests. Further the air bubble structure was investigated using...... a microscopic technique in which air bubble size distributions and the so-called spacing factor, indicating the mean distance between air bubbles, were measured. By analyzing the experimental result it is concluded that damages occur in the temperature range of about -10 oC to 55 oC, when the air content......Freeze/thaw damage in concrete is by general practice concluded to be a problem that can be avoided by using air-entraining agents to develop an air bubble structure in the hardened concrete together with the use of a relatively low water to cement ratio in mix. This fact is true for inner damages...

  3. Sperm vacuoles are not modified by freezing--thawing procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatimel, Nicolas; Leandri, Roger; Parinaud, Jean

    2013-03-01

    Since the development of the motile sperm organellar morphology examination (MSOME) in 2001 for observing the cephalic vacuoles at high magnification, no study as yet assessed the effect of cryopreservation on these vacuoles, although sperm freezing-thawing procedures are known to affect sperm quality. Examination of the vacuoles before and after freezing-thawing would indicate whether the same normality criteria can be applied for frozen as for fresh spermatozoa when performing intracytoplasmic morphologically selected sperm injection. In 27 sperm samples from fertile men, analysis of conventional sperm parameters (motility, vitality, percentage of normal forms) and a morphological analysis at high magnification (×6000) using image analysis software was performed before freezing and after thawing. Whereas there were expected decreases in motility (Pvacuole area, total vacuole area, vacuole area in the anterior, median and basal parts of the head, percentage of spermatozoa with a vacuole area ≤6.5% and percentage of spermatozoa with a vacuole area >13%). Freezing-thawing procedures have no effect on human sperm vacuoles. Copyright © 2012 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Impact of Freeze/Thaw Process on Drug Substance Storage of Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayfield, William J; Kandula, Sunitha; Khan, Heera; Tugcu, Nihal

    2017-08-01

    The storage of drug substance at subzero temperatures mitigates potential risks associated with liquid storage, such as degradation and shipping stress, making it the best solution for long-term storage. However, slower (generally uncontrolled) rates of freezing and thawing of drug substance in conventional large storage containers (>2L) can lead to greater cryoconcentration (exclusion of solute molecules) resulting in zones of higher protein and excipient concentrations and changes to the desired formulation pH and excipient concentration. These conditions can negatively impact product quality, thus changing the target product profile. Freeze/thaw studies can provide valuable knowledge on the molecule even when performed from an early formulation image. This study attempts to provide guidance and strategy for planning of drug substance freeze and thaw studies in early development using a scale-down model, evaluating the impact of the (1) freeze/thaw rate, (2) mode of freezing, (3) drug substance container, (4) drug substance concentration, and (5) formulation on the drug substance product quality. Data presented in this study showed no impact on drug substance product quality after undergoing the typical one freeze/thaw cycle process for the variables evaluated. These findings suggest that a qualified scale-down model is not required for early phases of process development and that existing small-scale models can be used for drug substance storage development studies. Based on our experience, a workflow is suggested with minimal experimental design to reduce the material requirement by >70% at early stages of product development to reduce constraints. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The Impact of Freeze-Thaw Cycles on Epinephrine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, Heather; Ng, Pearlly; Wheeler, Albert; Smith, William R; McIntosh, Scott E

    2015-12-01

    Epinephrine is the first-line medical treatment for anaphylaxis, a life-threatening allergic syndrome. To treat anaphylaxis, backcountry recreationalists and guides commonly carry epinephrine autoinjectors. Epinephrine may be exposed to cold temperatures and freezing during expeditions. An epinephrine solution must contain 90% to 115% of the labeled epinephrine amount to meet United States Pharmacopeia standards. The purpose of this study was to determine whether freeze-thaw cycles alter epinephrine concentrations in autoinjectors labeled to contain 1.0 mg/mL epinephrine. A further objective was to determine whether samples continued to meet United States Pharmacopeia concentration standards after freeze-thaw cycles. Epinephrine from 6 autoinjectors was extracted and divided into experimental and control samples. The experimental samples underwent 7 consecutive 12-hour freeze cycles followed by 7 12-hour thaw cycles. The control samples remained at an average temperature of 23.1°C for the duration of the study. After the seventh thaw cycle, epinephrine concentrations were measured using a high-performance liquid chromatography assay with mass spectrometry detection. The mean epinephrine concentration of the freeze-thaw samples demonstrated a statistically significant increase compared with the control samples: 1.07 mg/mL (SD ± 8.78; 95% CI, 1.04 to 1.11) versus 0.96 mg/mL (SD ± 6.81; 95% CI, 0.94 to 0.99), respectively. The maximal mean epinephrine concentration in the experimental freeze-thaw group was 1.12 mg/mL, which still fell within the range of United States Pharmacopeia standards for injectables (0.90 to 1.15 mg/mL). Although every attempt should be made to prevent freezing of autoinjectors, this preliminary study demonstrates that epinephrine concentrations remain within 90% to 115% of 1.0 mg/mL after multiple freeze-thaw cycles. Copyright © 2015 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Supplementation freeze-thawed media with selenium protect adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells from freeze-thawed induced injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valadbeygi, Arash; Naji, Tahere; Pirnia, Afshin; Gholami, Mohammadreza

    2016-10-01

    Successful freezed-thaw of adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs) could be a major step in regenerative medicine as well as in the cloning of animal breeds. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of selenium on the optimizing of freezed-thaw media in the ADMSCs. ADMSCs were extracted from NMRI mice and purified with positive selection Monoclonal CD105 Antibody (PE) and negative selection Monoclonal CD31 and CD45 Antibody using MACS method as well as differentiation to adipose and bone tissue. ADMSCs were divided into four groups. ADMSCs were freezed-thaw under standard condition with or without the addition of 5 ng/ml selenium to both the cryopreservation and thawing solutions. Frozen cells were thawed after four months and viability and cytotoxicity of the cells were analyzed by the Trypan blue test and MTT assay respectively. RNA was extracted and cDNA was synthesized and the expression of apoptotic genes (P53, Fas, Bax, Caspase3, and Bcl2) was examined using Real time-PCR Rotor gene 2009. This study compares slow and rapid methods of cryopreservation. After thawing, viability of the cells treated with selenium was higher than the control group in rapid and slow cryopreserved ADMSCs. Also, the percentage of living cells in the slow cooling method was considerably more than with the rapid cooling method. After analysis of the results using Real time-PCR, the Bcl2 gene was shown to be expressed in both the rapid and slow cooling methods. In the rapid cooling group in addition to the BCL-2 gene, p53 was also expressed. It appears that selenium prevented the apoptotic genes from expression due to its anti-apoptotic effects. The slow cooling method is better and more optimized for ADMSCs protecting them from oxidative damage to a greater extent compared to the rapid cooling method. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Stem water transport and freeze-thaw xylem embolism in conifers and angiosperms in a Tasmanian treeline heath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feild, Taylor S; Brodribb, Tim

    2001-05-01

    The effect of freezing on stem xylem hydraulic conductivity and leaf chlorophyll a fluorescence was measured in 12 tree and shrub species from a treeline heath in Tasmania, Australia. Reduction in stem hydraulic conductivity after a single freeze-thaw cycle was minimal in conifers and the vessel-less angiosperm species Tasmannia lanceolata (Winteraceae), whereas mean loss of conductivity in vessel-forming angiosperms fell in the range 17-83%. A positive linear relationship was observed between percentage loss of hydraulic conductivity by freeze-thaw and the average conduit diameter across all 12 species. This supports the hypothesis that large-diameter vascular conduits have a greater likelihood of freeze-thaw cavitation because larger bubbles are produced, which are more likely to expand under tension. Leaf frost tolerances, as measured by a 50% loss of maximum PSII quantum yield, varied from -6 to -13°C, indicating that these species were more frost-sensitive than plants from northern hemisphere temperate forest and treeline communities. There was no evidence of a relationship between frost tolerance of leaves and the resilience of stem water transport to freezing, suggesting that low temperature survival and the resistance of stem water transport to freezing are independently evolving traits. The results of this study bear on the ecological importance of stem freezing in the southern hemisphere treeline zones.

  8. Influence of Xanthan-Curdlan Hydrogel Complex on Freeze-Thaw Stability and Rheological Properties of Whey Protein Isolate Gel over Multiple Freeze-Thaw Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiroodi, Setareh Ghorban; Rasco, Barbara A; Lo, Y Martin

    2015-07-01

    The effect of adding xanthan-curdlan hydrogel complex (XCHC) at 2 concentrations (0.25 and 0.5% w/w) on the freeze-thaw stability of heat-induced whey protein isolate (WPI) gel was investigated. Samples were stored at 4 °C for 24 h before subjected to 5 freeze-thaw cycles alternating between -16 °C (18 h) and 25 °C (6 h). Adding XCHC to the WPI solution resulted in the reduction of a significant amount of syneresis up to 5 repeated freeze-thaw cycles. Addition of XCHC decreased the amount of syneresis from 45% in the control sample (pure WPI gel) to 31.82% and 5.44% in the samples containing 0.25% and 0.5% gum, respectively, after the 5th freeze-thaw cycle. XCHC increased the storage modulus (G') of the gels and minimized the changes of the G' values over the 5 freeze-thaw cycles, indicating improvement of the stability of the system. Furthermore, the minimum protein concentration for gel formation decreased in the presence of the XCHC. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images showed that addition of XCHC resulted in the formation of a well-structured gel with numerous small pores in the network, which consequently improved the water retention ability during the temperature abuses up to 5 freeze-thaw cycles. These results have important implications for using XCHC in the formulation of the frozen WPI-based products with improved freeze-thaw stability and rheological properties. Application of XCHC in the formulation of frozen dairy-based food products has the potential to enhance freeze-thaw stability and minimize moisture migration caused by temperature abuses of the products during distribution and consumer application. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  9. FREEZE-THAW CYCLING AND COLD TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON GEOMEMBRANE SHEETS AND SEAMS. Project summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of freeze-thaw cycling on the tensile strength of 19 geomembranes and 31 different seam types were investigated. The study was performed in three parts using different test conditions. Part I involved incubating unconfined specimens in freeze-thaw cycles and then per...

  10. Experimental research on durability of recycled aggregate concrete under freeze- thaw cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yanqiu; Shang, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Youjia

    2017-07-01

    The freeze-thaw durability of recycled aggregate concrete has significance for the concrete buildings in the cold region. In this paper, the rapid freezing and thawing cycles experience on recycle aggregate concrete was conducted to study on the effects of recycle aggregate amount, water-binder ratio and fly ash on freeze-thaw durability of recycle aggregate concrete. The results indicates that recycle aggregate amount makes the significant influence on the freeze-thaw durability. With the increase of recycled aggregates amount, the freeze-thaw resistance for recycled aggregate concrete decreases. Recycled aggregate concrete with lower water cement ratio demonstrates better performance of freeze-thaw durability. It is advised that the amount of fly ash is less than 30% for admixture of recycled aggregates in the cold region.

  11. X-ray tomography of morphological changes after freeze/thaw in gas diffusion layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Je, Junho; Kim, Jongrok; Kaviany, Massoud; Son, Sang Young; Kim, MooHwan

    2011-09-01

    Liquid water produced in a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell experiences a freeze/thaw cycle when the cell is switched off and on while operating at ambient temperatures below freezing. This freeze/thaw cycle permanently deforms the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell capillary structures and reduces both the cell life and its ability to generate electric power. The X-ray tomography facility at the Pohang Accelerator Laboratory was used to observe the freeze/thaw effects on the gas diffusion layer (GDL), which is the thickest capillary layer in the cell. Morphological changes in the GDL under a water freeze/thaw cycle were observed. A scenario in which freeze/thaw cycles affect fuel cell performance is suggested based on images from X-ray tomography.

  12. Evaluation and Comparison of Freeze-Thaw Tests and Air Void Analysis of Pervious Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Mia Schou Møller; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard; Kevern, John T.

    2016-01-01

    Pearl-Chain Bridge technology is an innovative precast arch bridge solution which uses pervious concrete as fill material. To ensure longevity of the bridge superstructure it is necessary that the per-vious concrete fill is designed to be freeze-thaw durable; however, no standards exist on how...... to eval-uate the freeze-thaw resistance of fresh or hardened pervious concrete and correspondingly what constitutes acceptable freeze-thaw durability. A greater understanding of the correlation between the freeze-thaw performance and the air void structure of pervious concrete is needed. In the present...... study six pervious concrete mixes were exposed to freeze-thaw testing, and their air void structure was analyzed using an automated linear-traverse method. It was found that there is a miscorrelation between these two test methods in their assumption of whether or not the large interconnected voids...

  13. STUDY ON THE DAMAGE MECHANISM OF PORE STRUCTURE IN CONCRETE SUBJECTED TO FREEZE-THAW CYCLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Li

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available It is well know that freeze-thaw cycles play the most significant role in the durability evolution in concrete structures, freeze-thaw cycles have been accounted as one of the major factors on the damage and demolition of concrete. Microscopic parameters have been used for describing the characterizations of damage in concrete under freeze-thaw actions by researchers. However, their models could not provide specific damage factors or parameters. In this paper, a new damage model and equation based on variations of pore structure in concrete is established. This new pore damage model is used for analysing freeze-thaw damage of concrete and validated by experiments. The results show that the measurement of pore structure becomes larger, the diameters of most probably pore structure, critical pore structure, and the variations of porosity increase with the process of freeze-thaw cycles. The pore damage factor or parameter is suitable for describing the mechanism of freeze-thaw damage. Furthermore, the damage results calculated by this new freeze-thaw damage equation, based on variations of pore structure in concrete gives an excellent correlation with experimental results. This pore damage equation was proved to be effective for evaluating the degradation of concrete which is subjected to freezing and thawing cycles in low or sub-zero regions.

  14. MEaSUREs Global Record of Daily Landscape Freeze/Thaw Status

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MEaSUREs Global Record of Daily Landscape Freeze/Thaw Status, Version 01 data set is derived from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellite...

  15. Evaluation of Physicochemical Deterioration and Lipid Oxidation of Beef Muscle Affected by Freeze-thaw Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M. H.; Hossain, M. M.; Rahman, S. M. E.; Amin, M. R.; Oh, Deog-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    This study was performed to explore the deterioration of physicochemical quality of beef hind limb during frozen storage at −20℃, affected by repeated freeze-thaw cycles. The effects of three successive freeze-thaw cycles on beef hind limb were investigated comparing with unfrozen beef muscle for 80 d by keeping at −20±1℃. The freeze-thaw cycles were subjected to three thawing methods and carried out to select the best one on the basis of deterioration of physicochemical properties of beef. As the number of repeated freeze-thaw cycles increased, drip loss decreased and water holding capacity (WHC) increased (pphysicochemical quality of beef muscle, causing the degradation of its quality. PMID:26877637

  16. Products and stability of phosphate reactions with lead under freeze-thaw cycling in simple systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafsteinsdottir, Erla G., E-mail: erla.hafsteinsdottir@gmail.com [Department of Environment and Geography, Macquarie University, NSW 2109 (Australia); White, Duanne A., E-mail: duanne.white@mq.edu.au [Department of Environment and Geography, Macquarie University, NSW 2109 (Australia); Gore, Damian B., E-mail: damian.gore@mq.edu.au [Department of Environment and Geography, Macquarie University, NSW 2109 (Australia); Stark, Scott C., E-mail: scott.stark@aad.gov.au [Environmental Protection and Change, Australian Antarctic Division, Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities, Tasmania 7050 (Australia)

    2011-12-15

    Orthophosphate fixation of metal contaminated soils in environments that undergo freeze-thaw cycles is understudied. Freeze-thaw cycling potentially influences the reaction rate, mineral chemical stability and physical breakdown of particles during fixation. This study determines what products form when phosphate (triple superphosphate [Ca(H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}){sub 2}] or sodium phosphate [Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4}]) reacts with lead (PbSO{sub 4} or PbCl{sub 2}) in simple chemical systems in vitro, and assesses potential changes in formation during freeze-thaw cycles. Systems were subjected to multiple freeze-thaw cycles from +10 deg. C to -20 deg. C and then analysed by X-ray diffractometry. Pyromorphite formed in all systems and was stable over multiple freeze-thaw cycles. Low temperature lead orthophosphate reaction efficiency varied according to both phosphate and lead source; the most time-efficient pyromorphite formation was observed when PbSO{sub 4} and Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4} were present together. These findings have implications for the manner in which metal contaminated materials in freezing ground can be treated with phosphate. - Highlights: > Formation of lead phosphate products in cold environments is identified. > Potential change in formation during freeze-thaw cycling is assessed. > Lead phosphate reaction efficiency varies according to phosphate and lead source. > Pyromorphite formation is stable during 240 freeze-thaw cycles. - Pyromorphite, formed from Pb phosphate fixation, is stable during multiple freeze-thaw cycles but the efficiency of the fixation depends on the phosphate source and the type of Pb mineral.

  17. Remote sensing of freeze-thaw transitions in Arctic soils using the complex resistivity method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yuxin [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Hubbard, Susan S [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Ulrich, Craig [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Our ability to monitor freeze - thaw transitions is critical to developing a predictive understanding of biogeochemical transitions and carbon dynamics in high latitude environments. In this study, we conducted laboratory column experiments to explore the potential of the complex resistivity method for monitoring the freeze - thaw transitions of the arctic permafrost soils. Samples for the experiment were collected from the upper active layer of Gelisol soils at the Barrow Environmental Observatory, Barrow Alaska. Freeze - thaw transitions were induced through exposing the soil column to controlled temperature environments at 4 C and -20 C. Complex resistivity and temperature measurements were collected regularly during the freeze - thaw transitions using electrodes and temperature sensors installed along the column. During the experiments, over two orders of magnitude of resistivity variations were observed when the temperature was increased or decreased between -20 C and 0 C. Smaller resistivity variations were also observed during the isothermal thawing or freezing processes that occurred near 0 C. Single frequency electrical phase response and imaginary conductivity at 1 Hz were found to be exclusively related to the unfrozen water in the soil matrix, suggesting that these geophysical 24 attributes can be used as a proxy for the monitoring of the onset and progression of the freeze - thaw transitions. Spectral electrical responses and fitted Cole Cole parameters contained additional information about the freeze - thaw transition affected by the soil grain size distribution. Specifically, a shift of the observed spectral response to lower frequency was observed during isothermal thawing process, which we interpret to be due to sequential thawing, first from fine then to coarse particles within the soil matrix. Our study demonstrates the potential of the complex resistivity method for remote monitoring of freeze - thaw transitions in arctic soils. Although

  18. Mechanical and Failure Criteria of Air-Entrained Concrete under Triaxial Compression Load after Rapid Freeze-Thaw Cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-kun Cui

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The experiment study on the air-entrained concrete of 100 mm cubes under triaxial compression with different intermediate stress ratio α2=σ2D : σ3D was carried out using a hydraulic-servo testing system. The influence of rapid freeze-thaw cycles and intermediate stress ratio on the triaxial compressive strength σ3D was analyzed according to the experimental results, respectively. The experimental results of air-entrained concrete obtained from the study in this paper and the triaxial compression experimental results of plain concrete got through the same triaxial-testing-system were compared and analyzed. The conclusion was that the triaxial compressive strength is greater than the biaxial and uniaxial compressive strength after the same rapid freeze-thaw cycles, and the increased percentage of triaxial compressive strength over biaxial compressive strength or uniaxial compressive strength is dependent on the middle stress. The experimental data is useful for precise analysis of concrete member or concrete structure under the action complex stress state.

  19. Automated freeze-thaw cycles for decellularization of tendon tissue - a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Susanne Pauline; Glauche, Sina Marie; Plenge, Amelie; Erbe, Ina; Heller, Sandra; Burk, Janina

    2017-02-14

    Decellularization of tendon tissue plays a pivotal role in current tissue engineering approaches for in vitro research as well as for translation of graft-based tendon restoration into clinics. Automation of essential decellularization steps like freeze-thawing is crucial for the development of more standardized decellularization protocols and commercial graft production under good manufacturing practice (GMP) conditions in the future. In this study, a liquid nitrogen-based controlled rate freezer was utilized for automation of repeated freeze-thawing for decellularization of equine superficial digital flexor tendons. Additional tendon specimens underwent manually performed freeze-thaw cycles based on an established procedure. Tendon decellularization was completed by using non-ionic detergent treatment (Triton X-100). Effectiveness of decellularization was assessed by residual nuclei count and calculation of DNA content. Cytocompatibility was evaluated by culturing allogeneic adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells on the tendon scaffolds. There were no significant differences in decellularization effectiveness between samples decellularized by the automated freeze-thaw procedure and samples that underwent manual freeze-thaw cycles. Further, we inferred no significant differences in the effectiveness of decellularization between two different cooling and heating rates applied in the automated freeze-thaw process. Both the automated protocols and the manually performed protocol resulted in roughly 2% residual nuclei and 13% residual DNA content. Successful cell culture was achieved with samples decellularized by automated freeze-thawing as well as with tendon samples decellularized by manually performed freeze-thaw cycles. Automated freeze-thaw cycles performed by using a liquid nitrogen-based controlled rate freezer were as effective as previously described manual freeze-thaw procedures for decellularization of equine superficial digital flexor tendons

  20. Colloid-facilitated mobilization of metals by freeze-thaw cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Sanjay K; Saiers, James E; Ryan, Joseph N

    2014-01-21

    The potential of freeze-thaw cycles to release colloids and colloid-associated contaminants into water is unknown. We examined the effect of freeze-thaw cycles on the mobilization of cesium and strontium in association with colloids in intact cores of a fractured soil, where preferential flow paths are prevalent. Two intact cores were contaminated with cesium and strontium. To mobilize colloids and metal cations sequestered in the soil cores, each core was subjected to 10 intermittent wetting events separated by 66 h pauses. During the first five pauses, the cores were dried at room temperature, and during last five pauses, the cores were subjected to 42 h of freezing followed by 24 h of thawing. In comparison to drying, freeze-thaw cycles created additional preferential flow paths through which colloids, cesium, and strontium were mobilized. The wetting events following freeze-thaw intervals mobilized about twice as many colloids as wetting events following drying at room temperature. Successive wetting events following 66 h of drying mobilized similar amounts of colloids; in contrast, successive wetting events after 66 h of freeze-thaw intervals mobilized greater amounts of colloids than the previous one. Drying and freeze-thaw treatments, respectively, increased and decreased the dissolved cesium and strontium, but both treatments increased the colloidal cesium and strontium. Overall, the freeze-thaw cycles increased the mobilization of metal contaminants primarily in association with colloids through preferential flow paths. These findings suggest that the mobilization of colloid and colloid-associated contaminants could increase when temperature variations occur around the freezing point of water. Thus, climate extremes have the potential to mobilize contaminants that have been sequestered in the vadose zone for decades.

  1. Effects of a controlled freeze-thaw event on dissolved and colloidal soil organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Ah; Lee, Ha Kyung; Choi, Jung Hyun

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of the freezing and thawing that accompany the warming process on the composition of the soil organic matter in the dissolved and colloidal fractions. Temperate soil samples were incubated in a refrigerator at 2 °C for 4 weeks and compared with those frozen at -20 °C in the second week followed by thawing at 2 °C to study a freeze-thaw effect with minimal effect from the thawing temperature. The freeze-thaw group was compared with those incubated at 25 °C in the last week to investigate a warming effect after thawing. Thawing at 2 °C after freezing at -20 °C increased the dissolved organic carbon (DOC), but decreased colloidal Ca. The subsequent warming condition greatly increased both DOC and colloidal Ca. The colloidal organic carbon (COC) and dissolved Ca showed rather subtle changes in response to the freeze-thaw and warming treatments compared to the changes in DOC and colloidal Ca. The fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) and Fourier transformation-infrared spectrometry (FT-IR) results showed that the freeze-thaw and warming treatments gave the opposite effects on the compositions of dissolved humic-like substances, polysaccharides or silicates, and aliphatic alcohols. A principal component analysis (PCA) with the DOC, fluorescence EEM, and FT-IR spectra produced two principal components that successfully distinguished the effects of the freeze-thaw and warming treatments. Due to the contrasting effects of the freeze-thaw and warming treatments, the overall effects of freeze-thaw events in nature on the dissolved and colloidal soil organic matter could vary depending on the thawing temperature.

  2. Freeze-thaw decellularization of the trabecular meshwork in an ex vivo eye perfusion model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalong Dang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective The trabecular meshwork (TM is the primary substrate of outflow resistance in glaucomatous eyes. Repopulating diseased TM with fresh, functional TM cells might be a viable therapeutic approach. Decellularized TM scaffolds have previously been produced by ablating cells with suicide gene therapy or saponin, which risks incomplete cell removal or dissolution of the extracellular matrix, respectively. We hypothesized that improved trabecular meshwork cell ablation would result from freeze-thaw cycles compared to chemical treatment. Materials and Methods We obtained 24 porcine eyes from a local abattoir, dissected and mounted them in an anterior segment perfusion within two hours of sacrifice. Intraocular pressure (IOP was recorded continuously by a pressure transducer system. After 72 h of IOP stabilization, eight eyes were assigned to freeze-thaw (F ablation (−80 °C × 2, to 0.02% saponin (S treatment, or the control group (C, respectively. The TM was transduced with an eGFP expressing feline immunodeficiency viral (FIV vector and tracked via fluorescent microscopy to confirm ablation. Following treatment, the eyes were perfused with standard tissue culture media for 180 h. TM histology was assessed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. TM viability was evaluated by a calcein AM/propidium iodide (PI assay. The TM extracellular matrix was stained with Picro Sirius Red. We measured IOP and modeled it with a linear mixed effects model using a B-spline function of time with five degrees of freedom. Results F and S experienced a similar IOP reduction of 30% from baseline (P = 0.64. IOP reduction of about 30% occurred in F within 24 h and in S within 48 h. Live visualization of eGFP demonstrated that F conferred a complete ablation of all TM cells and only a partial ablation in S. Histological analysis and Picro Sirius staining confirmed that no TM cells survived in F while the extracellular matrix remained. The viability assay showed

  3. Freezing-thawing action in the deterioration of the stones of Chambord Castle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alomari, Asaad; Brunetaud, Xavier; Beck, Kevin; Al-Mukhtar, Muzahim

    2013-04-01

    Limestone is very common in architecture (monuments and cultural heritage buildings) and used in the sculptures. The soft and porous limestone soaks up water and show weathering patterns and forms: alveolar weathering, granular disintegration, efflorescences. Freezing-thawing actions can be considered as one of the processes that contribute in the deterioration of stones located in the "cold regions" characterized with air temperatures below freezing point temperature. The amount of water within the pore space of the stones is a crucial factor of the decay. The experimental work presented in this paper is a part of a research program that aims to study the mechanisms that lead to the degradation of stone building materials due to the variation of climatic conditions. The analysis of the meteorological data of the field around the castle of Chambord shows the magnitude of temperature variations and the frequency of freezing-thawing cycles. The critical degrees of saturation at which the stone start to deteriorate after treatment with freezing-thawing cycles were examined in the tests conducted. The study concerns two porous limestone used in the construction and conservation of Chambord castle; highly porous Tuffeau stone having a total porosity of about 48 %, and medium porous Richemont stone with a total porosity of 27 %. Richemont stone has been used as a substitute stone of the degraded Tuffeau stone on the castle. The main physical properties, total porosity, apparent dry density and skeleton density and sound velocity for mechanical properties were measured for the stone samples before and during freezing-thawing cycles. ASTM (D5312-04) procedure was applied in the freezing-thawing tests. Tuffeau and Richmond samples were prepared at nine different degrees of saturations; 0, 20, 40, 70, 80, 85, 90, 95 and 100%, and properties were measured after different freezing-thawing cycles conditions; 2, 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 30 and 50 cycles. The results of these tests show

  4. Influence of Freeze-Thaw Damage on the Steel Corrosion and Bond-Slip Behavior in the Reinforced Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangzhi Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper mainly studies the behavior of steel corrosion in various reinforced concrete under freeze-thaw environment. The influence of thickness of concrete cover is also discussed. Additionally, the bond-slip behavior of the reinforced concrete after suffering the freeze-thaw damage and steel corrosion has also be presented. The results show that the freeze-thaw damage aggravates the steel corrosion in concrete, and the results become more obvious in the concrete after suffering serious freeze-thaw damage. Compared with the ordinary concrete, both air entrained concrete and waterproofing concrete possess better resistance to steel corrosion under the same freeze-thaw environment. Moreover, increasing the thicknesses of concrete cover is also an effective method of improving the resistance to steel corrosion. The bond-slip behavior of reinforced concrete with corroded steel decreases with the increase of freeze-thaw damage, especially for the concrete that suffered high freeze-thaw cycles. Moreover, there exists a good correlation between the parameters of bond-slip and freeze-thaw cycles. The steel corrosion and bond-slip behavior of reinforced concrete should be considered serious under freeze-thaw cycles environment, which significantly impact the durability and safety of concrete structure.

  5. Characteristics of sugar surfactants in stabilizing proteins during freeze-thawing and freeze-drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Koreyoshi; Murai, Katsuyuki; Korehisa, Tamayo; Shimizu, Noriyuki; Yamahira, Ryo; Matsuura, Tsutashi; Tada, Hiroko; Imanaka, Hiroyuki; Ishida, Naoyuki; Nakanishi, Kazuhiro

    2014-06-01

    Sugar surfactants with different alkyl chain lengths and sugar head groups were compared for their protein-stabilizing effect during freeze-thawing and freeze-drying. Six enzymes, different in terms of tolerance against inactivation because of freeze-thawing and freeze-drying, were used as model proteins. The enzyme activities that remained after freeze-thawing and freeze-drying in the presence of a sugar surfactant were measured for different types and concentrations of sugar surfactants. Sugar surfactants stabilized all of the tested enzymes both during freeze-thawing and freeze-drying, and a one or two order higher amount of added sugar surfactant was required for achieving protein stabilization during freeze-drying than for the cryoprotection. The comprehensive comparison showed that the C10-C12 esters of sucrose or trehalose were the most effective through the freeze-drying process: the remaining enzyme activities after freeze-thawing and freeze-drying increased at the sugar ester concentrations of 1-10 and 10-100 μM, respectively, and increased to a greater extent than for the other surfactants at higher concentrations. Results also indicate that, when a decent amount of sugar was also added, the protein-stabilizing effect of a small amount of sugar ester through the freeze-drying process could be enhanced. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  6. Leachate Properties and Cadmium Migration Through Freeze-thaw Treated Soil Columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Meng; Zheng, Yue; Chen, Weiwei; Mao, Na; Guo, Ping

    2017-01-01

    Soil column leaching experiments were conducted to study the effects of multiple freeze-thaw cycles on the vertical migration of cadmium (Cd). Three Cd-spiked leaching solutions of different properties were derived from snowmelt, sludge, and straw, designated as B, W and J, respectively. The leaching solutions varied in dissolved organic matter (DOM) concentrations in the order of J > W > B. Changes in leachate properties and Cd concentration were observed. The results showed that pH values of all the leachate solutions through freeze-thaw treated soil columns were higher than those of leachates through unfrozen soils. However, electrical conductivity (EC) values decreased compared with leachates in unfrozen treated soil columns. Although the concentrations of DOM in leachate solutions had no evident differences between the freeze-thaw and unfrozen treated soil columns, the concentrations of DOM in the leachate solutions B, W and J were different. Freeze-thaw cycles resulted in increased concentrations of Cd in the leachate solutions in the order J > W > B, and promoted a deeper migration of Cd in the soil columns. Thus, it was shown that freeze-thaw cycles may increase the risk of groundwater pollution by Cd.

  7. MicroRNA regulation in heart and skeletal muscle over the freeze-thaw cycle in the freeze tolerant wood frog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Saumya; Luu, Bryan E; Storey, Kenneth B

    2016-02-01

    The North American wood frog, Rana sylvatica, is one of just a few anuran species that tolerates whole body freezing during the winter and has been intensely studied to identify the biochemical adaptations that support freeze tolerance. Among these adaptations is the altered expression of many genes, making freeze-responsive changes to gene regulatory mechanisms a topic of interest. The present study focuses on the potential involvement of microRNAs as one such regulatory mechanism and aims to better understand freeze/thaw stress-induced microRNA responses in the freeze-tolerant wood frog. Using quantitative PCR, relative levels of 53 microRNAs were measured in heart and skeletal muscle of control, 24 h frozen, and 8 h thawed frogs. MicroRNAs showed tissue specific expression patterns: 21 microRNAs decreased in the heart during thawing, whereas 16 microRNAs increased during freezing stress in skeletal muscle. These findings suggest that select genes may be activated and suppressed in heart and skeletal muscle, respectively, in response to freezing. Bioinformatics analysis using the DIANA miRPath program (v.2.0) predicted that the differentially expressed microRNAs may collectively regulate tissue-specific cellular pathways to promote survival of wood frogs undergoing freezing and thawing.

  8. Brown bear sperm double freezing: Effect of elapsed time and use of PureSperm(®) gradient between freeze-thaw cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Rodríguez, Manuel; Alvarez, Mercedes; López-Urueña, Elena; Martínez-Rodriguez, Carmen; Borragan, Santiago; Anel-López, Luis; de Paz, Paulino; Anel, Luis

    2013-12-01

    The use of sexed spermatozoa has great potential to captive population management in endangered wildlife. The problem is that the sex-sorting facility is a long distance from the semen collection place and to overcome this difficulty two freeze-thaw cycles may be necessary. In this study, effects of refreezing on brown bear electroejaculated spermatozoa were analyzed. We carried out two experiments: (1) to assess the effects of the two freezing-thawing cycles on sperm quality and to analyze three different elapsed times between freezing-thawing cycles (30, 90 and 180 min), and (2) to analyze the use of PureSperm between freezing-thawing cycles to select a more motile and viable sperm subpopulation which better survived first freezing. The motility, viability and undamaged acrosomes were significantly reduced after the second thawing respect to first thawing into each elapsed time group, but the elapsed times did not significantly affect the viability and acrosome status although motility was damaged. Our results with the PureSperm gradient showed higher values of viability in freezability of select sample (pellet) respect to the rest of the groups and it also showed a significant decrease in the number of acrosome damaged. In summary, the double freezing of bear semen selected by gradient centrifugation is qualitatively efficient, and thus could be useful to carry out a sex-sorting of frozen-thawed bear spermatozoa before to send the cryopreserved sample to a biobank. Given the low recovery of spermatozoa after applying a selection gradient, further studies will be needed to increase the recovery rate without damaging of the cell quality. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Compressive Strength, Chloride Permeability, and Freeze-Thaw Resistance of MWNT Concretes under Different Chemical Treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingang Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated compressive strength, chloride penetration, and freeze-thaw resistance of multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT concrete. More than 100 cylindrical specimens were used to assess test variables during sensitivity observations, including water-cement ratios (0.75, 0.5, and 0.4 and exposure to chemical agents (including gum arabic, propanol, ethanol, sodium polyacrylate, methylcellulose, sodium dodecyl sulfate, and silane. To determine the adequate sonication time for MWNT dispersal in water, the compressive strengths of MWNT concrete cylinders were measured after sonication times ranging from 2 to 24 minutes. The results demonstrated that the addition of MWNT can increase the compressive strength of concrete by up to 108%. However, without chemical treatment, MWNT concretes tend to have poor freeze-thaw resistance. Among the different chemical treatments, MWNT concrete treated with sodium polyacrylate has the best compressive strength, chloride resistance, and freeze-thaw durability.

  10. Compressive strength, chloride permeability, and freeze-thaw resistance of MWNT concretes under different chemical treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingang; Rhee, Inkyu; Wang, Yao; Xi, Yunping

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated compressive strength, chloride penetration, and freeze-thaw resistance of multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) concrete. More than 100 cylindrical specimens were used to assess test variables during sensitivity observations, including water-cement ratios (0.75, 0.5, and 0.4) and exposure to chemical agents (including gum arabic, propanol, ethanol, sodium polyacrylate, methylcellulose, sodium dodecyl sulfate, and silane). To determine the adequate sonication time for MWNT dispersal in water, the compressive strengths of MWNT concrete cylinders were measured after sonication times ranging from 2 to 24 minutes. The results demonstrated that the addition of MWNT can increase the compressive strength of concrete by up to 108%. However, without chemical treatment, MWNT concretes tend to have poor freeze-thaw resistance. Among the different chemical treatments, MWNT concrete treated with sodium polyacrylate has the best compressive strength, chloride resistance, and freeze-thaw durability.

  11. Comparison Study of Three Common Technologies for Freezing-Thawing Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinbao Yu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a comparison study on three different technologies (i.e., thermocouple, electrical resistivity probe and Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR that are commonly used for frost measurement. Specially, the paper developed an analyses procedure to estimate the freezing-thawing status based on the dielectric properties of freezing soil. Experiments were conducted where the data of temperature, electrical resistivity, and dielectric constant were simultaneously monitored during the freezing/thawing process. The comparison uncovered the advantages and limitations of these technologies for frost measurement. The experimental results indicated that TDR measured soil dielectric constant clearly indicates the different stages of the freezing/thawing process. Analyses method was developed to determine not only the onset of freezing or thawing, but also the extent of their development. This is a major advantage of TDR over other technologies.

  12. Effects of freezing/thawing on the mechanical properties of decellularized lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonaka, Paula N; Campillo, Noelia; Uriarte, Juan J; Garreta, Elena; Melo, Esther; de Oliveira, Luis V F; Navajas, Daniel; Farré, Ramon

    2014-02-01

    Lung bioengineering based on decellularized organ scaffolds is a potential alternative for transplantation. Freezing/thawing, a usual procedure in organ decellularization and storage could modify the mechanical properties of the lung scaffold and reduce the performance of the bioengineered lung when subjected to the physiological inflation-deflation breathing cycles. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of repeated freezing/thawing on the mechanical properties of decellularized lungs in the physiological pressure-volume regime associated with normal ventilation. Fifteen mice lungs (C57BL/6) were decellularized using a conventional protocol not involving organ freezing and based on sodium dodecyl sulfate detergent. Subsequently, the mechanical properties of the acellular lungs were measured before and after subjecting them to three consecutive cycles of freezing/thawing. The resistance (RL ) and elastance (EL ) of the decellularized lungs were computed by linear regression fitting of the recorded signals (tracheal pressure, flow, and volume) during mechanical ventilation. RL was not significantly modified by freezing-thawing: from 0.88 ± 0.37 to 0.90 ± 0.38 cmH2 O·s·mL(-1) (mean ± SE). EL slightly increased from 64.4 ± 11.1 to 73.0 ± 16.3 cmH2 O·mL(-1) after the three freeze-thaw cycles (p = 0.0013). In conclusion, the freezing/thawing process that is commonly used for both organ decellularization and storage induces only minor changes in the ventilation mechanical properties of the organ scaffold. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Measuring influenza RNA quantity after prolonged storage or multiple freeze/thaw cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados, Andrea; Petrich, Astrid; McGeer, Allison; Gubbay, Jonathan B

    2017-09-01

    In this study, we aim to determine what effects prolonged storage and repeated freeze/thaw cycles have on the stability of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 (influenza A/H1N1)RNA. Cloned influenza A/H1N1 RNA transcripts were serially diluted from 8.0-1.0 log10 copies/μl. RT-qPCR was used to measure RNA loss in transcripts stored at -80°C, -20°C, 4°C and 25°C for up to 84days or transcripts undergoing a total of 10 freeze/thaw cycles. Viral load was measured in clinical specimens stored at-80°C for three years (n=89 influenza A RNA extracts; n=35 primary specimens) and in 10 clinical specimens from the 2015/2016 influenza season that underwent 7 freeze/thaw cycles. RNA stored at -80°C, -20°C, 4°C and 25°C is stable for up to 56, 56, 21, and 7days respectively or up to 9 freeze/thaw cycles when stored at -80°C. There is no difference in viral load in clinical specimens that have been stored for up to three years at -80°C if they are re-extracted. Similarly, clinical specimens undergoing up to 7 freeze/thaw cycles are stable if they are re-extracted between cycles. Influenza specimens can be stored for up to three years at -80°C or undergo up to 7 freeze/thaw cycles without loss of RNA quantity if re-extracted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Characteristics of ultrasonic acoustic emissions from walnut branches during freeze-thaw-induced embolism formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasuga, Jun; Charrier, Guillaume; Uemura, Matsuo; Améglio, Thierry

    2015-04-01

    Ultrasonic acoustic emission (UAE) methods have been applied for the detection of freeze-thaw-induced embolism formation in water conduits of tree species. Until now, however, the exact source(s) of UAE has not been identified especially in angiosperm species, in which xylem tissues are composed of diverse types of cells. In this study, UAE was recorded from excised branches of walnut (Juglans regia cv. Franquette) during freeze-thaw cycles, and attempts were made to characterize UAEs generated by cavitation events leading to embolism formation according to their properties. During freeze-thaw cycles, a large number of UAEs were generated from the sample segments. However, the cumulative numbers of total UAE during freeze-thawing were not correlated with the percentage loss of hydraulic conductivity after thawing, suggesting that the sources of UAE were not only cavitation leading to embolism formation in vessels. Among the UAEs, cumulative numbers of UAEs with absolute energy >10.0 fJ strongly correlated with the increase in percentage loss of hydraulic conductivity. The high absolute energy of the UAEs might reflect the formation of large bubbles in the large lumen of vessels. Therefore, UAEs generated by cavitation events in vessels during freeze-thawing might be distinguished from other signals according to their magnitudes of absolute energy. On the other hand, the freezing of xylem parenchyma cells was followed by a certain number of UAEs. These results indicate the possibility that UAE methods can be applied to the detection of both freeze-thaw-induced embolism and supercooling breakdown in parenchyma cells in xylem. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Freezing/Thawing without Cryoprotectant Damages Native but not Decellularized Porcine Renal Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poornejad, Nafiseh; Frost, Timothy S; Scott, Daniel R; Elton, Brinden B; Reynolds, Paul R; Roeder, Beverly L; Cook, Alonzo D

    2015-01-01

    Whole organ decellularization of porcine renal tissue and recellularization with a patient's own cells would potentially overcome immunorejection, which is one of the most significant problems with allogeneic kidney transplantation. However, there are obstacles to achieving this goal, including preservation of the decellularized extracellular matrix (ECM), identifying the proper cell types, and repopulating the ECM before transplantation. Freezing biological tissue is the best option to avoid spoilage; however, it may damage the structure of the tissue or disrupt cellular membranes through ice crystal formation. Cryoprotectants have been used to repress ice formation during freezing, although cell toxicity can still occur. The effect of freezing/thawing on native (n = 10) and decellularized (n = 10) whole porcine kidneys was studied without using cryoprotectants. Results showed that the elastic modulus of native kidneys was reduced by a factor of 22 (P freezing/thawing or decellularization, while the elastic modulus for decellularized ECM was essentially unchanged by the freezing/thawing process (p = 0.0636). Arterial pressure, representative of structural integrity, was also reduced by a factor of 52 (P freezing/thawing for native kidneys, compared to a factor of 43 (P freezing/thawing decellularized structures. Both freezing/thawing and decellularization reduced stiffness, but the reductions were not additive. Investigation of the microstructure of frozen/thawed native and decellularized renal tissues showed increased porosity due to cell removal and ice crystal formation. Orcein and Sirius staining showed partial damage to elastic and collagen fibers after freezing/thawing. It was concluded that cellular damage and removal was more responsible for reducing stiffness than fibril destruction. Cell viability and growth were demonstrated on decellularized frozen/thawed and non-frozen samples using human renal cortical tubular epithelial (RCTE) cells over 12 d. No

  16. Enhanced Transport of Colloid And Metal Cations by Freeze-thaw Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, S. K.; Ryan, J. N.; Saiers, J. E.; Laboratory experiment

    2011-12-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of colloid mobilization is essential to predicting the importance of colloid-facilitated transport of contaminants in subsurface environments. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of freeze-thaw cycles on the mobilization of colloids and colloid-facilitated transport of cesium and strontium in intact soil cores. The soil cores were collected from a watershed in Tennessee, USA, where the soils are weathered from limey shale with fractured saprolite subsoils that have illite as the primary clay mineral. Each freeze-thaw cycle involved freezing the contaminated soil at -15 °C for 36 h followed by thawing at 25 °C for 24 h and infiltration of rainwater for 6 h. An 18-port grid was used to collect water sample from preferential flow paths. The amount of colloids mobilized by the freeze-thaw process was compared with the amount of colloids mobilized from a control soil-core at room temperature. The colloids mobilized during freeze-thaw were characterized using x-ray diffraction analysis. Results of current study indicated an enhanced mobilization of colloids from frozen soil compared to unfrozen soil. Colloids mobilized after five freeze-thaw cycles were two times higher than the amount of colloids mobilized from unfrozen soil. The duration of freezing had no significant impact on the amount of colloids mobilized. Results of XRD analysis indicated an increase in clay mineral and iron-containing minerals and a decrease in quartz fractions in the mobilized colloids compared to the soil from which colloids were mobilized. The soil consisted of 35.7% clay minerals, 43.3% quartz, and 1.5% iron-containing minerals including ferruginous smectite, goethite, and amphibole. In contrast, colloids mobilized from the soil by freeze-thaw cycles had 64.3% clay minerals, 21.7% quartz, and 5.5% of iron-containing minerals. The colloids mobilized in control soil had 73.7% clay minerals, 3.5% quartz, and 4.6% iron-containing minerals. The colloidal

  17. Aggregate Freezing-Thawing Performance Using the Iowa Pore Index : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    In cold climates, the use of non-durable aggregate leads to premature pavement deterioration due to damage caused by freezing-thawing cycles. Differentiating durable and non-durable aggregates is a crucial yet challenging task. The frost durability o...

  18. Analysis of Different Freezing/Thawing Parameterizations using the UTOPIA Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Cassardo

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Soil moisture changes are generally due to external factors (precipitation, evaporation, etc. and internal forces (gravitational force, capillarity, transpiration, etc.. When soil temperatures remain below 0 °C for a long time (hours or even entire consecutive days, part of the liquid water content of the soil can freeze, thus freezing/thawing effects must be taken into account in those conditions. The present work is devoted to the numerical modeling of the water phase change in the soil. The model used in this study for the land surface processes is UTOPIA (University of TOrino land Process Interaction in Atmosphere model, which is the updated version of LSPM (Land Surface Process Model. Scientific literature proposes some formulations to account for freezing/thawing processes. Three different parameterizations have been compared using a synthetic dataset in order to assess which one performs best from a physical point of view. Parameterizing freezing/thawing processes creates numerical instability and water overproduction in the UTOPIA model. These problems have been solved and described in the paper by means of synthetic data created to test the new parameterizations. The results show that UTOPIA is able to capture the freezing/thawing physical processes.

  19. Repeated freeze-thaw cycle effects on soil compaction in a clay loam in northeastern Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    In recent years, there has been an increased global concern regarding the impact of soil compaction on crop production and soil quality in modern mechanized agricultural farming systems. Freeze-thaw processes influence the physical properties of soil, primarily soil compaction and structure. A 3-yr...

  20. Efficient encapsulation of plasmid DNA in anionic liposomes by a freeze/thaw extrusion procedure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoen, P; Bijl, L; Wilschut, J

    1998-01-01

    In this study we investigated whether intact plasmid DNA can be efficiently encapsulated in anionic liposomes prepared by freeze/thaw and extrusion techniques. There is controversy about this method of DNA encapsulation, especially as to whether DNA remains intact and retains its biological activity

  1. Effect of Fast Freeze-Thaw Cycles on Mechanical Properties of Ordinary-Air-Entrained Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huai-shuai Shang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Freezing-thawing resistance is a very significant characteristic for concrete in severe environment (such as cold region with the lowest temperature below 0°C. In this study, ordinary-air-entrained (O-A-E concrete was produced in a laboratory environment; the compressive strength, cubic compressive strength of C50, C40, C30, C25, and C20 ordinary-air-entrained concrete, tensile strength, and cleavage strength of C30 ordinary-air-entrained concrete were measured after fast freeze-thaw cycles. The effects of fast freeze-thaw cycles on the mechanical properties (compressive strength and cleavage strength of ordinary-air-entrained concrete materials are investigated on the basis of the experimental results. And the concise mathematical formula between mechanical behavior and number of fast freeze-thaw cycles was established. The experiment results can be used as a reference in design, maintenance, and life prediction of ordinary-air-entrained concrete structure (such as dam, offshore platform, etc. in cold regions.

  2. Fracture Surface Fractal Characteristics of Alkali-Slag Concrete under Freeze-Thaw Cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wantong Cai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fractal theory is introduced in fracture surface research of alkali-slag concrete (ASC under freeze-thaw cycles; crack distribution of ASC fracture surface and freeze-thaw damage zone were calculated. Through fractal analysis of ASC sample fracture surfaces, relevance between section fractal dimension and fracture toughness and relationship between material composition and section fractal dimension are clarified. Results show that the specimen’s cracks before freeze-thaw extend along force direction gently, and there are more twists and turns after freezing and thawing; the fractal dimension D also grows from 1.10 to 1.33. SEM internal microcracks’ D of ASC internal microstructure after freezing and thawing is 1.37; 0 to 300 times ASC fractal dimension under freezing and thawing is between 2.10 and 2.23; with freeze-thaw times increasing, ASC fracture toughness decreases and fractal dimension increases, the fractal dimension and fracture toughness have a good linear relationship, and the fractal dimension can reflect the toughening effect of ASC. It is very feasible to evaluate ASC fracture behaviour under freezing and thawing with the fractal theory. Fractal dimension generally increases with activator solution-slag (A/S for short or slag content. The greater the amount of A/S or slag content, the lower the dimension.

  3. SLAPex-Initial Results from a Soil Freeze-Thaw Airborne Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, E. J.

    2016-12-01

    The SLAPex Freeze/Thaw airborne campaign took place in early November, 2015, near Carman, Manitoba, Canada (near Winnipeg). NASA Goddard's Scanning L-band Active Passive (SLAP) sensor—an airborne simulator of the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite mission—made 11 flights on the NASA Langley B200 aircraft to observe frozen and thawed soil conditions. Detailed ground truth was collected by a joint US-Canadian team. Future soil moisture satellite missions are expected to include soil freeze/thaw products, just as SMAP does. The loss of the radar on SMAP means that airborne radar-radiometer observations like those from SLAPex freeze/thaw are very unique assets for freeze/thaw algorithm development. SLAP freeze/thaw airborne observations are also directly applicable to the science interests of NASA's Arctic-Boreal Vulnerability Experiment (ABoVE) project. SLAP has both passive (radiometer) and active (radar) microwave L-band imaging capabilities. The radiometer observes at 1.4 GHz using duplicate front end hardware from the SMAP satellite radiometer. It also includes a duplicate of the digital backend development unit for SMAP, thus the novel Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) detection and mitigation features and algorithms for SMAP are duplicated with very high fidelity in SLAP. The digital backend provides 4-Stokes polarization capability. The real-aperture radar operates in the 1215-1300 MHz band with quad-pol capability. Radar and radiometer share one antenna. This paper will present flight data, imagery, and comparisons with ground truth with respect to frozen or thawed state, soil moisture, and brightness temperature (comparison with ground-based radiometers). The high sensitivity of the The passive and active signatures seen in the SLAP observations indicates that microwave signatures of frozen vs. thawed soil can yield information on the controlling processes and ramifications for the water, energy, and carbon cycles

  4. Diurnal Freeze-Thaw Cycles Modify Winter Soil Respiration in a Desert Shrub-Land Ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Liu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Winter soil respiration (Rs is becoming a significant component of annual carbon budgets with more warming in winter than summer. However, little is known about the controlling mechanisms of winter Rs in dryland. We made continuous measurements of Rs in four microsites (non-crust (BS, lichen (LC, moss (MC, and a mixture of moss and lichen (ML in a desert shrub-land ecosystem northern China, to investigate the causes of Rs dynamics in winter. The mean winter Rs ranged from 0.10 to 0.17 µmol CO2 m−2·s−1 across microsites, with the highest value in BS. Winter Q10 (known as the increase in respiration rate per 10 °C increase in temperature values (2.8–19 were much higher than those from the growing season (1.5. Rs and Q10 were greatly enhanced in freeze-thaw cycles compared to frozen days. Diurnal patterns of Rs between freeze-thaw and frozen days differed. Although the freeze-thaw period was relatively short, its cumulative Rs contributed significantly to winter Rs. The presence of biocrust might induce lower temperature, thus having fewer freeze-thaw cycles relative to bare soil, leading to the lower Rs for microsites with biocrusts. In conclusion, winter Rs in drylands was sensitive to soil temperature (Ts and Ts-induced freeze-thaw cycles. The temperature impact on Rs varied among soil cover types. Winter Rs in drylands may become more important as the climate is continuously getting warmer.

  5. Dietary flax seed oil and/or Vitamin E improve sperm parameters of cloned goats following freezing-thawing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargar, Rohollah; Forouzanfar, Mohsen; Ghalamkari, Gholamreza; Nasr Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein

    2017-02-01

    Semen cryopreservation is affected by individual differences and use of clones animal from the same source is the main tool to eliminate genetic variation. Among many nutrients that are necessary for fertility, essential fatty acids and antioxidants are vital for production of healthy sperm by improving sperm membrane integrity and protecting sperm from oxidative stress. The goal of the current study was to investigate whether a flax seed oil or/and Vitamin E dietary supplementation could improve semen quality of cloned bucks following semen cryopreservation. Accordingly, eight adult cloned Bakhtiari bucks were divided randomly into four groups. Bucks were offered a base diet of hay and concentrate. The concentrate was enriched with flax seed oil, 30 gr/kg body weight/day (OIL), Vitamin E (VIT), 3 gr/kg body weight/day, or combined flax seed oil and the vitamin E (OIL-VIT). The concentrate with no supplements was considered as control group (CONT). Both flax seed oil and Vitamin E supplements were added to the total diet. The bucks were fed with their corresponding diets for a total of 9 weeks while sperm collection was carried out within 10-14 weeks. Ejaculates were diluted with Andromed® and were frozen in liquid nitrogen. Sperm parameters and reactive oxygen species (ROS) contents were evaluated following freezing/thawing. According to the results of our study, dietary supplementation with flax seed oil, or/and Vitamin E can improve sperm motility, vitality and number of sperm with intact plasma membrane following freezing-thawing. But the degree of improvement in these parameters was significantly higher when Flax seed oil and vitamin E were co-supplemented. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. The Effect of Freeze - thaw Cycles on Slope Anchorage and Preventive Measures of Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Quanchao; Wang, Xuelei; Zhang, Mingxiu; Rao, Qiang; Fu, Zhixin; Su, Jianyao

    2017-10-01

    Freeze-thaw cycles have great harm to slope anchorage structure, and the theoretical system has not been formed because there are too many constraints and interrelations. This paper analyzes the failure principle and appearance of the slope under the freeze-thaw cycles and puts forward the prevention and control measures. On the whole, at this stage there is no way to raise the anchoring technology as a system to do the whole study. It is urgent to establish a complete concept and overall evaluation mechanism of rock and soil anchoring system, because it can give full play to the function of the favorable elements in the anchoring system and weaken the harm of the unfavorable elements so that the system can achieve the best working condition.

  7. Effect of alpha-lipoic acid on boar spermatozoa quality during freezing-thawing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) is known as a natural antioxidant. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the cryoprotective effect of ALA on the motility of boar sperm and the antioxidant effect of ALA on boar sperm during freezing-thawing. Different concentrations (2.0, 4.0, 6.0, 8.0, and 10.0, mg/m...

  8. Multi-Scale Process of Soil Freezing, Thawing, and Thaw-Settlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-18

    2010): 583. doi: 08/11/2011 2.00 Radoslaw L. Michalowski, Tabetha Martel. Stability Charts for 3D Failures of Steep Slopes Subjected to Seismic ...subjected to seismic excitation, Geo-Frontiers 2011, Dallas, TX.. 2011/03/13 00:00:00, . : , 08/09/2011 6.00 Radoslaw L. Michalowski, Srinivasa S...first freeze-thaw cycle. Artificial ground freezing applied in soft soil construction ( tunneling , excavations), and pipelines transporting chilled

  9. Freeze-Thaw Resistance of Normal and High Strength Concretes Produced with Fly Ash and Silica Fume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cenk Karakurt

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is based on determination of the freeze-thaw resistance of air-entrained and non-air-entrained normal strength concrete (NC and high strength concrete (HSC produced with fly ash and silica fume according to surface scaling. The procedure allows us to measure the amount of scaling per unit surface area due to a number of well defined freezing and thawing cycles in the presence of deicing salt. The weight loss, surface scaling, moisture uptake, and internal damage were measured after 0 and after every 4th freeze-thaw cycle. The test results showed that the freeze-thaw resistance is influenced directly by the compressive strength property of the concrete. Silica fume significantly reduced the resistance of normal strength concrete against freeze-thaw effect without plasticizing agent. The surface scaling of silica fume concrete without admixture was 22% higher than reference normal concrete.

  10. Oil recovery from refinery oily sludge via ultrasound and freeze/thaw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ju; Li, Jianbing; Thring, Ronald W; Hu, Xuan; Song, Xinyuan

    2012-02-15

    The effective disposal of oily sludge generated from the petroleum industry has received increasing concerns, and oil recovery from such waste was considered as one feasible option. In this study, three different approaches for oil recovery were investigated, including ultrasonic treatment alone, freeze/thaw alone and combined ultrasonic and freeze/thaw treatment. The results revealed that the combined process could achieve satisfactory performance by considering the oil recovery rate and the total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) concentrations in the recovered oil and wastewater. The individual impacts of five different factors on the combined process were further examined, including ultrasonic power, ultrasonic treatment duration, sludge/water ratio in the slurry, as well as bio-surfactant (rhamnolipids) and salt (NaCl) concentrations. An oil recovery rate of up to 80.0% was observed with an ultrasonic power of 66 W and an ultrasonic treatment duration of 10 min when the sludge/water ratio was 1:2 without the addition of bio-surfactant and salt. The examination of individual factors revealed that the addition of low concentration of rhamnolipids (oil recovery from the combined treatment process. The experimental results also indicated that ultrasound and freeze/thaw could promote the efficiency of each other, and the main mechanism of oil recovery enhancement using ultrasound was through enhanced desorption of petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs) from solid particles. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Oolitic limestone and marine sandstone gravel aggregate \\ud Early life concrete and aggregate freeze/thaw test for durability

    OpenAIRE

    Richardson, Alan; Hemapanpairo, Kawin; Sae-Tae, Thotsaphorn; Puthipad, Nipat; Northumbria University, UK; Thammasat University, Rangsit, Thailand

    2011-01-01

    Oolitic limestone is one type of limestone which formed during the Jurassic period and can be found in large deposits in many areas of England. It can be used as coarse aggregate for concrete construction, however due to its porosity, it requires additional cement to maintain compressive strength, when compared to marine gravel (sandstone) concrete. Since freeze/thaw durability is one of the most common problems in temperate countries, this paper investigates the freeze/thaw resistance of Ool...

  12. The Canadian Experiment for Freeze/Thaw in 2012 or 2013 CanEx-FT12 or FT13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belair, Stephane; Bernier, Monique; Colliander, Andreas; Jackson, Thomas; McDonald, Kyle; Walker, Anne

    2011-01-01

    General objectives of the experiment are: Pre-launch Calibration/Validation of SMAP Freeze/Thaw products and retrieval algorithms and rehearsal for Soil Moisture Active-Passive (SMAP) post launch validation. The basis of the radar freeze-thaw measurement is the large shift in dielectric constant and backscatter (dB) between predominantly frozen & thawed conditions. The Dielectric constant of liquid water varies with frequency, whereas that of pure ice is constant

  13. Influence of Rapid Freeze-Thaw Cycling on the Mechanical Properties of Sustainable Strain-Hardening Cement Composite (2SHCC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seok-Joon Jang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides experimental results to investigate the mechanical properties of sustainable strain-hardening cement composite (2SHCC for infrastructures after freeze-thaw actions. To improve the sustainability of SHCC materials in this study, high energy-consumptive components—silica sand, cement, and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA fibers—in the conventional SHCC materials are partially replaced with recycled materials such as recycled sand, fly ash, and polyethylene terephthalate (PET fibers, respectively. To investigate the mechanical properties of green SHCC that contains recycled materials, the cement, PVA fiber and silica sand were replaced with 10% fly ash, 25% PET fiber, and 10% recycled aggregate based on preliminary experimental results for the development of 2SHCC material, respectively. The dynamic modulus of elasticity and weight for 2SHCC material were measured at every 30 cycles of freeze-thaw. The effects of freeze-thaw cycles on the mechanical properties of sustainable SHCC are evaluated by conducting compressive tests, four-point flexural tests, direct tensile tests and prism splitting tests after 90, 180, and 300 cycles of rapid freeze-thaw. Freeze-thaw testing was conducted according to ASTM C 666 Procedure A. Test results show that after 300 cycles of freezing and thawing actions, the dynamic modulus of elasticity and mass loss of damaged 2SHCC were similar to those of virgin 2SHCC, while the freeze-thaw cycles influence mechanical properties of the 2SHCC material except for compressive behavior.

  14. Effects of aging and freezing/thawing sequence on quality attributes of bovine and

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Wook Kim

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective The effects of aging and freezing/thawing sequence on color, physicochemical, and enzymatic characteristics of two beef muscles (Mm. gluteus medius, GM and biceps femoris, BF were evaluated. Methods Beef muscles at 3 d postmortem were assigned to four different combinations of aging and freezing/thawing sequence as follows; aging at 2°C for 3 wk (A3, never-frozen control, freezing at −28°C for 2 wk then thawing (F2, frozen/thawed-only, aging at 2°C for 3 wk, freezing at −28°C for 2 wk then thawing (A3F2, and freezing at −28°C for 2 wk, thawing then further aging at 2°C for 3 wk (F2A3. Results No significant interactions between different aging/freezing/thawing treatments and muscle type on all measurements were found. Postmortem aging, regardless of aging/freezing/thawing sequence, had no impact on color stability of frozen/thawed beef muscles (p<0.05. F2A3 resulted in higher purge loss than F2 and A3F2 treatments (p<0.05. A3F2 and F2A3 treatments resulted in lower shear force of beef muscles compared to F2 (p<0.05. Although there was no significant difference in glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px activity, F2A3 had the highest β-N-acetyl glucominidase (BNAG activity in purge, but the lowest BNAG activity in muscle (p<0.05. GM muscle exhibited higher total color changes and purge loss, and lower GSH-Px activity than BF muscle. Conclusion The results from this present study indicate that different combinations of aging/freezing/thawing sequence would result in considerable impacts on meat quality attributes, particularly thaw/purge loss and tenderness. Developing a novel freezing strategy combined with postmortem aging will be beneficial for the food/meat industry to maximize its positive impacts on tenderness, while minimizing thaw/purge loss of frozen/thawed meat.

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of freeze-thaw damage in natural pumice concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang, Xiaoxiao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an analysis of the damage propagation features of the pore structure of natural pumice lightweight aggregate concrete (LWC under freeze-thaw cyclic action. After freeze-thaw cycling, we conducted nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR tests on the concrete and acquired the porosity, distribution of transverse relaxation time T2, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI results. The results showed the following. The T2 distribution of the LWC prior to freeze-thaw cycling presented four peaks representative of a preponderance of small pores. After 50, 100, 150, and 200 freeze-thaw cycles, the total area of the T2 spectrum and the porosity increased significantly. The MRI presented the changing spatial distribution of pores within the LWC during freeze-thaw cycling. Ultrasonic testing technology was applied simultaneously to analyze the NMR results, which verified that the new NMR technology demonstrated high accuracy and practicability for research regarding freeze-thaw concrete damage.En este trabajo se analiza la propagación de los daños que se producen en la estructura porosa de hormigón aligerado a base de piedra pómez natural sometido a la acción cíclica de hielo-deshielo. Después de realizarse los ensayos de hielo-deshielo, el hormigón se analizó mediante resonancia magnética nuclear (RMN, determinándose la porosidad y la distribución del tiempo de relajación transversal, T2, y registrándose las imágenes captadas por resonancia magnética. De acuerdo con los resultados obtenidos, antes de los ciclos de hielo-deshielo la distribución de T2 del hormigón aligerado presentaba cuatro picos, indicativos de un predominio de poros pequeños. Después de que se sometiera a 50, 100, 150, y 200 ciclos, se observó un aumento importante tanto de la porosidad como de la superficie total del espectro de T2. Las imágenes captadas por resonancia magnética evidenciaron la modificación de la distribución espacial de los poros del

  16. Electrical and seismic response of saline permafrost soil during freeze - Thaw transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuxin; Nakagawa, Seiji; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Dafflon, Baptiste; Hubbard, Susan

    2017-11-01

    We conducted laboratory studies on the geophysical signals from Arctic saline permafrost soils to help understand the physical and mechanical processes during freeze-thaw cycles. Our results revealed low electrical resistivity (freezing process, affected by concurrent changes of temperature, salinity, and ice formation. An anomalous induced polarization response was first observed during the transient period of supercooling and the onset of ice nucleation. Seismic measurements showed a characteristic maximal attenuation at the temperatures immediately below the freezing point, followed by a decrease with decreasing temperature. The calculated elastic moduli showed a non-hysteric response during the freeze - thaw cycle, which was different from the concurrently measured electrical resistivity response where a differential resistivity signal is observed depending on whether the soil is experiencing freezing or thawing. The differential electrical resistivity signal presents challenges for unfrozen water content estimation based on Archie's law. Using an improved formulation of Archie's law with a variable cementation exponent, the unfrozen water content estimation showed a large variation depending on the choice of the resistivity data during either a freezing or thawing cycle. Combining the electrical and seismic results, we suggest that, rather than a large hysteresis in the actual unfrozen water content, the shift of the resistivity response may reflect the changes of the distribution pattern of the unfrozen water (or ice) in the soil matrix during repeated freeze and thaw processes. Collectively, our results provide an improved petrophysical understanding of the physical and mechanical properties of saline permafrost during freeze - thaw transitions, and suggest that large uncertainty may exist when estimating the unfrozen water content using electrical resistivity data.

  17. L-Band Emission of Soil Freeze-Thaw State in a Tibetan Meadow Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Donghai; Wang, Xin; van der Velde, Rogier; Su, Zhongbo; Zeng, Yijian; Wen, Jun; Wang, Zuoliang; Schwank, Mike; Ferrazzoli, Paolo

    2017-04-01

    Soil freeze-thaw transition monitoring is essential for quantifying climate change and hydrologic dynamics over cold regions, for instance, the Tibetan Plateau. We investigate the L-band (1.4 GHz) microwave emission characteristics of soil freeze-thaw cycle via analysis of tower-based brightness temperature (TB) measurements using the ELBARA III radiometer in combination with simulations performed by a model of soil emission considering vertical variations of permittivity and soil temperature. Vegetation effects are modelled using the Tor Vergata discrete model. As part of Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) and Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) calibration and validation activities, the ELBARA III radiometer is installed on a 4.8 m high tower located in a seasonally frozen Tibetan meadow ecosystem to measure diurnal cycles of L-band TB. The daily measurements include elevation scanning sequences toward the ground and zenith (sky) measurements. The angular range considered for the elevation scans is performed every 30 min between 40°-70° (relative to nadir) in steps of 5°. The sky measurement is performed at 23:55 every day with an observation angle of 155°. Supporting micro-meteorological (e.g. solar radiation, air temperature and humidity) as well as soil moisture and temperature profile measurements are also conducted near the radiometer. Analyses of the measurements reveal that the impact on TB caused by diurnal changes of ground permittivity is generally stronger than the effect of changing ground temperature. Moreover, the simulations performed with the integrated Tor Vergata model and Noah land surface model indicate that the TB signatures of diurnal soil freeze-thaw cycle is most sensitive to the liquid water content of the soil surface layer, and the measurements taken at 5 cm depth are less representative for the L-band emission.

  18. Numerical Simulation of the Freeze-Thaw Behavior of Mortar Containing Deicing Salt Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeeli, Hadi S; Farnam, Yaghoob; Bentz, Dale P; Zavattieri, Pablo D; Weiss, Jason

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a one-dimensional finite difference model that is developed to describe the freeze-thaw behavior of an air-entrained mortar containing deicing salt solution. A phenomenological model is used to predict the temperature and the heat flow for mortar specimens during cooling and heating. Phase transformations associated with the freezing/melting of water/ice or transition of the eutectic solution from liquid to solid are included in this phenomenological model. The lever rule is used to calculate the quantity of solution that undergoes the phase transformation, thereby simulating the energy released/absorbed during phase transformation. Undercooling and pore size effects are considered in the numerical model. To investigate the effect of pore size distribution, this distribution is considered using the Gibbs-Thomson equation in a saturated mortar specimen. For an air-entrained mortar, the impact of considering pore size (and curvature) on freezing was relatively insignificant; however the impact of pore size is much more significant during melting. The fluid inside pores smaller than 5 nm (i.e., gel pores) has a relatively small contribution in the macroscopic freeze-thaw behavior of mortar specimens within the temperature range used in this study (i.e., +24 °C to -35 °C), and can therefore be neglected for the macroscopic freeze-thaw simulations. A heat sink term is utilized to simulate the heat dissipation during phase transformations. Data from experiments performed using a low-temperature longitudinal guarded comparative calorimeter (LGCC) on mortar specimens fully saturated with various concentration NaCl solutions or partially saturated with water is compared to the numerical results and a promising agreement is generally obtained.

  19. Effect of freeze-thaw cycles on the nutritional quality of some selected Nigerian soups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raji, Akeem Olayemi; Akinoso, Rahman; Raji, Monsurat Oyewale

    2016-03-01

    Freezing and thawing are heat transfer processes, involving chemical changes which may greatly affect product quality. Due to sparse literature on freeze-thawed cycles and its effects on soups quality, the effect of freeze-thaw cycles on the nutritional quality of selected Nigerian soups has to be investigated. Soups (Ila, Ewedu, Ogbono, and Kuka) were prepared using standard recipes. The soups were packaged in plastic and aluminum containers, frozen at -20°C, and thawed with microwave oven, hot water (100°C), and at ambient condition for four cycles of 5-day interval. After each cycle, chemical compositions of the samples were determined using AOAC methods. Data were analyzed using ANOVA at P = 0.05. Moisture, protein, fat, crude fiber, ash, and carbohydrate contents of the freeze-thawed soups were 63.6-88.6%, 3.6-8.8%, 1.0-6.1%, 0.8-1.2%, 1.8-4.6%, and 0.9-15.6%, respectively. Mineral contents were iron (5.0-6.8 mg/100 g), calcium (68.1-190.8 mg/100 g), sodium (144.4-231.7 mg/100 g), potassium (200.4-302.1 mg/100 g), and phosphorus (228.0-337.2 mg/100 g). Vitamins were vitamin A (29.5-59.9 mg/100 g), vitamin B (10.1-36.4 mg/100 g), and vitamin E (28.4-90.2 mg/100 g). Microwave-thawed plastic soups had limited nutritional losses when compared with other thawing methods, and should not be extended beyond the third cycle because of increasing reduction in fat and protein, indicating deterioration.

  20. Concrete Durability in Harsh Environmental Conditions Exposed to Freeze Thaw Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamze, Youssef

    Under line Pathology of Materials; one of the environmental causes of damage effects on concrete is freeze thaw cycles, which deteriorate the concrete exposed to water in cold weather. An example of old concrete is a dam project that was built in Canada, in the early 1909-1913. This project was reconstructed in 1932, 1934 and 1972, and required renovation due to the ice abrasion with the freeze/thaw cycles. Before completing any renovation, it is required to analyze the structural stability and the concrete failures of this dam. An investigation was conducted to determine the quality of the concrete in the Piers and in the Bridge Deck Slab. It was also required to determine the basic materials' properties that constitute this project. This will improve the analysis of its stability [10]. Core samples were examined and used as test samples, for the Alkali-Silica reactivity test samples, as well as the compressive strength test, the Chloride Ion test, and the freeze thaw testing which was performed on two sets of 12 concrete core samples that were taken from different locations in the project. These locations are the representations of the age of the concrete. Thus, the age difference between the samples' two sets is four decades. Testing was performed on prisms cut from cores. ASTM C-666 procedure (A) was applied using an automatic test system [6]. It was suggested that a plan for renovation of this project should be performed after the analysis is undertaken to assess the conditions estimating the remaining life of the concrete in this project [15].

  1. [Effects and mechanism of freeze-thawing cycles on key processes of nitrogen cycle in terrestrial ecosystem].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-qin; Qi, Yu-chun; Dong, Yun-she; Peng, Qin; Guo, Shu-fang; He, Yun-long; Yan, Zhong-qing

    2015-11-01

    As a widespread natural phenomenon in the soil of middle and high latitude as well as high altitude, freeze-thawing cycles have a great influence on the nitrogen cycle of terrestrial ecosystem in non-growing season. Freeze-thawing cycles can alter the physicochemical and biological properties of the soil, which thereby affect the migration and transformation of soil nitrogen. The impacts of freeze-thawing cycles on key processes of nitrogen cycle in terrestrial ecosystem found in available studies remain inconsistent, the mechanism is still not clear, and the research methods also need to be further explored and innovated. So it is necessary to sum up and analyze the existing achievements in order to better understand the processes of soil nitrogen cycle subjected to freeze-thawing cycles. This paper reviewed the research progress in China and abroad about the effects and mechanisms of freeze-thawing cycles on key processes of nitrogen cycle in terrestrial ecosystem, including mineralization, immobilization, nitrification and denitrification, N leakage and gaseous loss, and analyzed the deficiencies of extant research. The possible key research topics that should be urgently paid more attention to in the future were also discussed.

  2. Changes of Soil Aggregate Stability as a Result of the Effect of Freeze-thaw Cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta Žabenská

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present research was to assess the changes in soil erodibility during the non-vegetation period as one of the factors affecting the snowmelt erosion. The temperature fluctuation was simulated with the use of a climatic chamber ex situ. The soil surface was for simplicity reasons considered without any plant or snow cover. The paper deals with the rate of soil erodibility determination – the soil erodibility should increase due to the decrease of soil aggregate stability depending on the number of freeze-thaw cycles and initial soil moisture. Soil samples (taken from three sites were subjected to freeze-thaw cycles under laboratory conditions. Changes in soil agreggate stability were monitored as one of the main soil characteristics which determine the soil erodibility. Two methods were used to determine the soil macroaggregate stability (soil aggregate fraction 1–2 mm: standard single-sieve method of wet sieving (Kemper and Rosenau, 1986, and dry aggregate analysis using a set of flat sieves with a diameter of 1 mm and 0.5 mm. The results of each method are controversial. Intended hypothesis has not been clearly confirmed.

  3. Cryoprotection mechanisms of polyethylene glycols on lactate dehydrogenase during freeze-thawing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Yanli; Wood, George; Thoma, Laura

    2004-09-07

    The purpose of this study was to explore the cryoprotection mechanisms of high molecular weight polyethylene glycols (PEGs) (eg, PEG 4000 and PEG 8000) on lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Ultraviolet activity assays, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, gel filtration, sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), (14)C-PEG 4000 labeling and binding, and cryostage microscopic study were conducted. Different molecular weights and concentrations of PEGs in LDH formulations were treated by freeze-thawing. Higher molecular weights and concentrations of PEGs in LDH-PEG formulations obtained better activity and secondary structure recoveries of LDH after freeze-thawing. Insoluble aggregation of LDH was not observed in gel filtration studies. SDS-PAGE results suggested surface characteristic modifications of LDH by the larger molecular weight PEGs. The 14C-PEG 4000 labeling and binding study showed extensive nonspecific interactions between the PEG 4000 and LDH molecules in a concentration-dependent manner. The bound LDH-PEG 4000/free PEG 4000 ratio increased when LDH or PEG 4000 concentrations increased. Cryostage microscopic study showed that PEG 8000 delayed the ice crystallization and eutectic transition of LDH formulation. It appeared that multiple mechanisms were at work during PEGs' cryoprotection of LDH. It was unclear whether the delayed eutectic characteristics of PEGs contributed to LDH cryoprotection. The favorable interaction, rather than preferential exclusion, between LDH and PEGs (eg, 4000) cryoprotected LDH.

  4. Effects of freeze-thaw cycles on microarthropods and nutrient availability in a sub-arctic soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjursen, Heidi; Michelsen, Anders; Holmstrup, Martin

    2005-01-01

    content were examined. There was no conclusive evidence that recurring freeze-thaw events had a negative effect on the investigated soil faunal groups, and the treatment even seemed to stimulate the abundance of Acaridida. Respiration of soil subjected to 16 freeze-thaw cycles was low when kept at -2 °C......It is predicted that Arctic regions may experience an increase in mean temperature in the future. This will affect the frequency of severe climatic events such as summer droughts and freeze-thaw cycles. In order to understand the impact of recurring freezing and thawing on soil organisms...... and their environment, intact plant-soil samples from the sub-Arctic were subjected to a series of such events. Springtail and mite species composition and abundance were monitored at intervals throughout the experiment. Furthermore, nutrient content and mobilisation in the soil and soil microbial biomass and nutrient...

  5. Freeze-thaw immobilization of liposomes in chromatographic gel beads: evaluation by confocal microscopy and effects of freezing rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundqvist, A; Ocklind, G; Haneskog, L; Lundahl, P

    1998-01-01

    Biological membranes immobilized in chromatographic gel beads constitute a multifunctional affinity matrix. Membrane protein-solute interactions and drug partitioning into the lipid bilayers can conveniently be studied. By the use of confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM) the distribution of immobilized model membranes in the beads has been visualized for the first time. Freeze-thaw-immobilized liposomes in Superdex 200 gel beads were situated in a thick shell surrounding a liposome-free core. The amount of phospholipids immobilized by freeze-thawing was dependent on the temperature in the cooling bath and the type of test tube used. A bath temperature of -25 degrees C gave higher immobilization yield than freezing at -75 or -8 degrees C did. Freeze-thawing in the presence of liposomes did not affect the gel bead shape or the refractive index homogeneity of the agarose network of the beads, as shown by confocal microscopy.

  6. Enhancing the Properties of Conductive Polymer Hydrogels by Freeze-Thaw Cycles for High-Performance Flexible Supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wanwan; Lu, Han; Zhang, Ning; Ma, Mingming

    2017-06-14

    We report that a postsynthesis physical process (freeze-thaw cycles) can reform the microstructure of conductive polymer hydrogels from clustered nanoparticles to interconnected nanosheets, leading to enhanced mechanical and electrochemical properties. The polyaniline-poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogel after five freeze-thaw cycles (PPH-5) showed remarkable tensile strength (16.3 MPa), large elongation at break (407%), and high electrochemical capacitance (1053 F·g-1). The flexible supercapacitor based on PPH-5 provided a large capacitance (420 mF·cm-2 and 210 F·g-1) and high energy density (18.7 W·h·kg-1), whose robustness was demonstrated by its 100% capacitance retention after 1000 galvanostatic charge-discharge cycles or after 1000 mechanical folding cycles. The outstanding performance enables PPH-5 based supercapacitor as a promising power device for flexible electronics, which also demonstrates the merit of freeze-thaw cycles for enhancing the performance of functional hydrogels.

  7. Freezing and thawing or freezing, thawing, and aging effects on beef tenderness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayson, A L; King, D A; Shackelford, S D; Koohmaraie, M; Wheeler, T L

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of freezing and thawing or freezing and thawing with an additional aging period after frozen storage on the tenderness of longissimus lumborum (LL) and semitendinosus (ST) steaks relative to aged, fresh steaks. Left-side LL and ST (n = 35 each) were obtained from U.S. Select carcasses classified at the grading stand by the U.S. Meat Animal Research Center visible and near-infrared spectroscopy tenderness system to have predicted slice shear force greater than 16.5 kg at 14 d postmortem. At 2 d postmortem, 2.54 cm thick steaks were cut from each muscle and assigned to 1 of the following treatments: 2 d fresh (2FRESH), 2 d freeze + thaw (2FREEZE), 2 d freeze + thaw + 12 d age (2FREEZE+12AGE), 14 d fresh (14FRESH), 14 d freeze + thaw (14FREEZE), 14 d freeze + thaw + 14 d age (14FREEZE+14AGE), and 28 d fresh (28FRESH). Steaks assigned to a freezing treatment were frozen at -26°C for 30 d before thawing/cooking or thawing with an additional aging period at 2°C. Slice shear force for LL and ST was lower (P FREEZE (27.4 and 24.5 kg) and 14FREEZE (22.4 and 22.4 kg) compared to 2FRESH (33.0 and 29.2 kg) and 14FRESH (25.3 and 25.5 kg), respectively. Slice shear force for LL and ST was lower (P FREEZE+12AGE (17.8 and 20.8 kg) and 14FREEZE+14AGE (14.6 and 19.0 kg) compared to 14FRESH (25.3 and 25.5 kg) and 28FRESH (18.7 and 21.7 kg), respectively. Desmin degradation for LL was not different (P > 0.05) between 2FREEZE (21.0%) and 2FRESH (14.6%) or between 14FREEZE (40.4%) and 14FRESH (38.4%); however, desmin degradation was higher (P FREEZE+12AGE (46.7%) and 14FREEZE+14AGE (71.1%) when compared to 14FRESH (38.4%) and 28FRESH (60.5%), respectively. Cooking loss for LL was higher (P FREEZE+12AGE (15.2%) compared to 14FRESH (14.0%) but was not different (P > 0.05) between 14FREEZE+14AGE (15.0%) and 28FRESH (14.3%). Freezing and thawing or a combination of freezing, thawing, and aging resulted in increased tenderness for LL

  8. The influence of the curing conditions of concrete on durability after freeze-thaw accelerated testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Assadi, G.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This work relates the curing conditions of concrete with the damage caused by rapid freeze-thaw cycles (ASTM C 666. The “potential” durability of concrete after testing is also studied. In countries with a continental climate, the curing of concrete in summer is performed under high-temperature and low-humidity conditions, and during the winter the concrete undergoes freezing and thawing. This paper shows the experimental results of the behaviour of concrete specimens cured under climatic summer conditions and then subjected to freeze-thaw cycles. Curing of the specimens includes conditions of good and bad practice in relation to wetting and protection of the concrete. Mechanical properties, cement hydration, volume and pore sizes, oxygen permeability, chloride diffusion and water penetration under pressure tests of the concrete are assessed. These tests were performed before and after the application of the freeze-thaw cycles. Statistical analysis of the correlation among variables is also included.Este trabajo relaciona las condiciones de curado del hormigón con los daños causados por ciclos hielo-deshielo (ASTM C 666. Estudia la durabilidad “potencial” del hormigón dañado por este ensayo. En países con clima continental, el curado del hormigón en verano se realiza con alta temperatura y baja humedad, y durante el invierno sufre condiciones de hielo-deshielo. Se presentan los resultados experimentales de probetas de hormigón curadas bajo condiciones climáticas del verano y luego sometidas a ciclos hielo-deshielo. El curado de las probetas incluye condiciones de buenas y malas prácticas en relación con el curado del hormigón. Se miden las propiedades mecánicas, grado de hidratación, volumen de poros y distribución de tamaños, permeabilidad al oxígeno, penetración de agua bajo presión y coeficiente de difusión de cloruros antes y después de la aplicación de los ciclos de hielo-deshielo. Se incluye un estudio estad

  9. Durability of cracked fibre reinforced concrete exposed to freeze-thaw and deicing salt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan De Place

    1998-01-01

    -thaw and deicing salt. The concrete has a water-powder ratio of 0.38 including both fly ash and silica fume. Both steel fibres (ZP, 0.4 vol%) and polypropylene fibres (PP, 1 vol%) are used as well as main reinforcement. The freeze-thaw test emphasizes the need for a critical evaluation of the mix design and mixing...... methods when designing FRC-structures. The scaling is increased by a factor 5 to 10 when adding fibres to the concrete while the air content is below 4% by volume. The variation of the scaling increases when adding fibres. Capillary water uptake in uncracked specimens of FRC was 20-30% higher at 1°C than...... at 20°C for both ZP- and PP-fibres, while the temperature had no effect on the water uptake in plain concrete.(This abstract is a short version of the published abstract)...

  10. Freeze-thaw stability of rice starch modified by Improved Extrusion Cooking Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jiangping; Hu, Xiuting; Zhang, Fang; Fang, Chong; Liu, Chengmei; Luo, Shunjing

    2016-10-20

    This study aimed to explore freeze-thaw (FT) stability of rice starch modified by Improved Extrusion Cooking Technology (IECT). FT stability of IECT-modified rice starch was investigated and compared with native one. Syneresis and SEM analysis showed that IECT-modified rice starch had better FT stability than native starch. Furthermore, IECT-modified rice starch had less significant changes in the rheological parameters during the FT cycles than the native starch. XRD and iodine binding analysis demonstrated that IECT treatment inhibited the association of rice starch, especially amylose retrogradation. Additionally, the peak at around 20° was detected in XRD patterns of IECT-modified rice starch, which confirmed the formation of amylose-lipid complex during the IECT treatment. These results suggested that the IECT treatment could improve FT stability of rice starch, which was ascribed to inhibition of starch retrogradation by IECT. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Monitoring of Freeze-Thaw Cycles in Concrete Using Embedded Sensors and Ultrasonic Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Ranz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the study of damage produced during freeze-thaw (F-T cycles using two non-destructive measurement approaches—the first approach devoted to continuous monitoring using embedded sensors during the cycles, and the second one, performing ultrasonic imaging before and after the cycles. Both methodologies have been tested in two different types of concrete specimens, with and without air-entraining agents. Using the first measurement approach, the size and distribution of pores were estimated using a thermoporometrical model and continuous measurements of temperature and ultrasonic velocity along cycles. These estimates have been compared with the results obtained using mercury porosimetry testing. In the second approach, the damage due to F-T cycles has been evaluated by automated ultrasonic transmission and pulse-echo inspections made before and after the cycles. With these inspections the variations in the dimensions, velocity and attenuation caused by the accelerated F-T cycles were determined.

  12. Multiscale model of a freeze-thaw process for tree sap exudation

    CERN Document Server

    Graf, Isabell; Stockie, John M

    2015-01-01

    Sap transport in trees has long fascinated scientists, and a vast literature exists on experimental and modelling studies of trees during the growing season when large negative stem pressures are generated by transpiration from leaves. Much less attention has been paid to winter months when trees are largely dormant but nonetheless continue to exhibit interesting flow behaviour. A prime example is sap exudation, which refers to the peculiar ability of sugar maple (Acer saccharum) and related species to generate positive stem pressure while in a leafless state. Experiments demonstrate that ambient temperatures must oscillate about the freezing point before significantly heightened stem pressures are observed, but the precise causes of exudation remain unresolved. The prevailing hypothesis attributes exudation to a physical process combining freeze-thaw and osmosis, which has some support from experimental studies but remains a subject of active debate. We address this knowledge gap by developing the first math...

  13. Effect of low density lipoprotein on DNA integrity of freezing-thawing boar sperm by neutral comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhong-Liang; Li, Qing-Wang; Li, Wen-Ye; Hu, Jian-Hong; Zhao, Hong-Wei; Zhang, Shu-Shan

    2007-06-01

    A modified protocol of neutral comet assay was utilized to assess the effect of low density lipoprotein (LDL) on the DNA integrity of boar freezing-thawing semen. The results demonstrated that the method was high sensitive and easier manipulation and LDL significantly protected sperm DNA integrity (psperm DNA in cryopreservation 0 day and 30 days (p>0.05).

  14. Freezing tolerance of winter wheat as influenced by extended growth at low temperature and exposure to freeze-thaw cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    As the seasons progress, autumn-planted winter wheat plants (Triticum aestivum L.) first gain, then progressively lose freezing tolerance. Exposing the plants to freeze-thaw cycles of -3/3°C results in increased ability to tolerate subsequent freezing to potentially damaging temperatures. This stu...

  15. Responses of Antarctic soil microbial communities and associated functions to temperature and freeze-thaw cycle frequency.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yergeau, E.; Kowalchuk, G.A.

    2008-01-01

    Climatic changes will not only result in higher overall temperature, but also in greater variability in weather conditions. Antarctic soils are subjected to extremely variable conditions in the form of frequent freeze-thaw cycles (FTCs), but the importance of alteration in FTC frequency, compared

  16. Freeze-thaw regime effects on carbon and nitrogen dynamics in sub-arctic heath tundra mesocosms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grogan, P.; Michelsen, A.; Ambus, P.

    2004-01-01

    of which is realistic of in situ spatial and temporal variation in field conditions, on C and N dynamics in sub-arctic heath tundra mesocosms. In addition, N-15 isotopic label was used to follow the partitioning of a labile N pool between major ecosystem components, both during the freeze-thaw treatments...

  17. The effect of repeated freeze-thaw cycles on human muscle tissue visualized by postmortem computed tomography (PMCT)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klop, Anthony C.; Vester, Marloes E. M.; Colman, Kerri L.; Ruijter, Jan M.; van Rijn, Rick R.; Oostra, Roelof-Jan

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether effects of repetitive freeze-thaw cycles, with various thawing temperatures, on human muscle tissue can be quantified using postmortem computed tomography (PMCT) technology. An additional objective was to determine the preferred thawing temperature for

  18. The choice of a suitable oligosaccharide to prevent aggregation of PEGylated nanoparticles during freeze thawing and freeze drying

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hinrichs, Wouter; Manceñido, F A; Sanders, N N; Braeckmans, K; De Smedt, S C; Demeester, J; Frijlink, H W

    2006-01-01

    In a previous Study we have shown that the oligosaccharide inulin can prevent aggregation of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) coated plasmid DNA/cationic liposome complexes ('' PEGylated lipoplexes '') during freeze thawing and freeze drying [Hinrichs et al., 2005. J. Control. Release 103, 465]. By

  19. Investigation of the impact of nanotechnology on the freeze-thaw durability of concrete containing d-cracking aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Freezing and thawing damage is the most common cause of distress in Kansas pavements. Many : locally available aggregates in Kansas do not meet current standards for use in concrete pavements because : of poor freeze-thaw durability. The use of nanot...

  20. Polyvinyl alcohol/chitosan/montmorillonite nanocomposites preparation by freeze/thaw cycles and characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Părpăriţă Elena

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA and chitosan (CS based hydrogels are often chosen to obtain hydrogels as being considered non-toxic for human body. The present study aims the preparation and physical chemical characterisation of hydrogels based PVA and CS by using an environmental friendly method i.e. freeze/thaw. In this method the only parameters affecting the hydrogels’ properties is the PVA concentration in solution, time and number of cycles of freezing / thawing. Repeated freezing and thawing cycles resulted in production of a highly elastic polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel with higher degree of crystallization. Adding chitosan in polyvinyl alcohol hydrogel is giving to the newly formed material, biocompatibility and antibacterial properties due to the free amino groups of chitosan. Higher mechanical and thermal characteristics of PVA/CS based hydrogels were obtained by addition of a small amount of inorganic nanoparticles (montmorillonite clay, C30B into the matrix (i.e. 1%. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR, near-infrared chemical imaging spectroscopy (NI-CI, X-ray diffraction (XRD, thermogravimetric analysis (TG, swelling and rheological measurements were used to characterize the polyvinyl alcohol/chitosan/montmorillonite properties. The swelling degree increased with decreasing chitosan content in hydrogels and the variation is opposite in nanocomposites, decreasing after introducing the nanoclay. The swelling behaviour was influenced by the presence of the nanoparticles. The plasticizer effect of the nanoparticles was reflected by obtaining a more compact hydrogel network with higher mechanical and thermal properties. The proposed materials can be a promising alternative in biomedical applications

  1. A single freeze-thawing cycle for highly efficient solubilization of inclusion body proteins and its refolding into bioactive form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xingmei; Sun, Yifan; Xiong, Sidong

    2015-02-22

    Mild solubilization of inclusion bodies has attracted attention in recent days, with an objective to preserve the existing native-like secondary structure of proteins, reduce protein aggregation during refolding and recovering high amount of bioactive proteins from inclusion bodies. Here we presented an efficient method for mild solubilization of inclusion bodies by using a freeze-thawing process in the presence of low concentration of urea. We used two different proteins to demonstrate the advantage of this method over the traditional urea-denatured method: enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and the catalytic domain of human macrophage metalloelastase (MMP-12_CAT). Firstly, PBS buffer at pH 8 containing different molar concentration of urea (0-8 M) were used to solubilize EGFP and MMP-12-CAT inclusion bodies and the solubility achieved in 2 M urea in PBS buffer by freeze-thawing method was comparable to that of PBS buffer containing 8 M urea by traditional urea-denatured method. Secondly, different solvents were used to solubilize EGFP and MMP-12_CAT from inclusion bodies and the results indicated that a wide range of buffers containing 2 M urea could efficiently solubilize EGFP and MMP-12_CAT inclusion bodies by freeze-thawing method. Thirdly, the effect of pH and freezing temperature on the solubility of EGFP and MMP-12_CAT inclusion bodies were studied, revealing that solubilization of inclusion bodies by freeze-thawing method is pH dependent and the optimal freezing temperature indicated here is -20°C. Forth, the solubilized EGFP and MMP-12_CAT from inclusion bodies were refolded by rapid dilution and dialysis, respectively. The results showed that the refolded efficiency is much higher (more than twice) from freeze-thawing method than the traditional urea-denatured method. The freeze-thawing method containing 2 M urea also effectively solubilized a number of proteins as inclusion bodies in E.coli. Mild solubilization of inclusion body proteins

  2. Potential weathering by freeze-thaw action in alpine rocks in the European Alps during a nine year monitoring period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellerer-Pirklbauer, Andreas

    2017-11-01

    A quantification of rock weathering by freeze-thaw processes in alpine rocks requires at least rock temperature data in high temporal resolution, in high quality, and over a sufficient period of time. In this study up to nine years of rock temperature data (2006-2015) from eleven rock monitoring sites in two of the highest mountain ranges of Austria were analyzed. Data were recorded at a half-hourly or hourly logging interval and at rock depths of 3, 10, and 30-40 cm. These data have been used to quantify mean conditions, ranges, and relationships of the potential near-surface weathering by freeze-thaw action considering volumetric-expansion of ice and ice segregation. For the former, freeze-thaw cycles and effective freeze-thaw cycles for frost shattering have been considered. For the latter, the intensity and duration of freezing events as well as time within the 'frost cracking window' have been analyzed. Results show that the eleven sites are in rather extreme topoclimatic positions and hence represent some of the highest and coolest parts of Austria and therefore the Eastern Alps. Only four sites are presumably affected by permafrost. Most sites are influenced by a long-lasting seasonal snow cover. Freeze-thaw cycles and effective freeze-thaw cycles for frost shattering are mainly affecting the near-surface and are unimportant at few tens of centimeters below the rock surface. The lowest temperatures during freezing events and the shortest freezing events have been quantified at all eleven monitoring sites very close to the surface. The time within the frost cracking window decreases in most cases from the rock surface inwards apart from very cold years/sites with very low temperatures close to the surface. As shown by this study and predicted climate change scenarios, assumed warmer rock temperature conditions in the future at alpine rock walls in Austria will lead to less severe freezing events and to shorter time periods within the frost-cracking window

  3. Characterization of Propylene Glycol-Mitigated Freeze/Thaw Agglomeration of a Frozen Liquid nOMV Vaccine Formulation by Static Light Scattering and Micro-Flow Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensch, Christopher D; Davis, Harrison B; Blue, Jeffrey T

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the susceptibility of an aluminum adjuvant and an aluminum-adjuvanted native outer membrane vesicle (nOMV) vaccine formulation to freeze/thaw-induced agglomeration using static light scattering and micro-flow Imaging analysis; and to evaluate the use of propylene glycol as a vaccine formulation excipient by which freeze/thaw-induced agglomeration of a nOMV vaccine formulation could be mitigated. Our results indicate that including 7% v/v propylene glycol in an nOMV containing aluminum adjuvanted vaccine formulation, mitigates freeze/thaw-induced agglomeration. We evaluated the effect of freeze-thawing on an aluminum adjuvant and an aluminum adjuvanted native outer membrane vesicle (nOMV) vaccine formulation. Specifically, we characterized the freeze/thaw-induced agglomeration through the use of static light scattering, micro-flow imaging, and cryo-electron microscopy analysis. Further, we evaluated the use of 0-9% v/v propylene glycol as an excipient which could be included in the formulation for the purpose of mitigating the agglomeration induced by freeze/thaw. The results indicate that using 7% v/v propylene glycol as a formulation excipient is effective at mitigating agglomeration of the nOMV vaccine formulation, otherwise induced by freeze-thawing. © PDA, Inc. 2015.

  4. Results of molten salt panel and component experiments for solar central receivers: Cold fill, freeze/thaw, thermal cycling and shock, and instrumentation tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pacheco, J.E.; Ralph, M.E.; Chavez, J.M.; Dunkin, S.R.; Rush, E.E.; Ghanbari, C.M.; Matthews, M.W.

    1995-01-01

    Experiments have been conducted with a molten salt loop at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, NM to resolve issues associated with the operation of the 10MW{sub e} Solar Two Central Receiver Power Plant located near Barstow, CA. The salt loop contained two receiver panels, components such as flanges and a check valve, vortex shedding and ultrasonic flow meters, and an impedance pressure transducer. Tests were conducted on procedures for filling and thawing a panel, and assessing components and instrumentation in a molten salt environment. Four categories of experiments were conducted: (1) cold filling procedures, (2) freeze/thaw procedures, (3) component tests, and (4) instrumentation tests. Cold-panel and -piping fill experiments are described, in which the panels and piping were preheated to temperatures below the salt freezing point prior to initiating flow, to determine the feasibility of cold filling the receiver and piping. The transient thermal response was measured, and heat transfer coefficients and transient stresses were calculated from the data. Freeze/thaw experiments were conducted with the panels, in which the salt was intentionally allowed to freeze in the receiver tubes, then thawed with heliostat beams. Slow thermal cycling tests were conducted to measure both how well various designs of flanges (e.g., tapered flanges or clamp type flanges) hold a seal under thermal conditions typical of nightly shut down, and the practicality of using these flanges on high maintenance components. In addition, the flanges were thermally shocked to simulate cold starting the system. Instrumentation such as vortex shedding and ultrasonic flow meters were tested alongside each other, and compared with flow measurements from calibration tanks in the flow loop.

  5. Modified control strategies for critical source area of nitrogen (CSAN) in a typical freeze-thaw watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Peng; Ouyang, Wei; Gao, Xiang; Hao, Fanghua; Hao, Zengchao; Liu, Hongbin

    2017-08-01

    The management of critical source areas of diffuse nitrogen (CSANs) remains challenging in freeze-thaw areas due to the different N loss characteristics in different hydrological conditions and seasons. To address these challenges, a modified strategy was proposed in this study using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) to simulate diffuse N loads in the study catchments. Specifically, the spatial and temporal variations of CSANs caused by differences in precipitation and seasons were considered. In addition, the selection of best management practices (BMPs) was selected according to BMP performance and their seasonal characteristics in diffuse N control. The diffuse N load formed during freeze-thaw seasons accounts for approximately 50% of the annual diffuse N load. The diffuse N load discharged to rivers was higher in wet conditions than dry conditions by 127.4% and 181.5% during freeze-thaw seasons and growing seasons, respectively. The spatial distribution of CSANs was more sensitive to differences between freeze-thaw and growing seasons. Among BMPs, buffer strips (BS), no tillage (NT) and reducing N fertilizer applications (RNFA) all showed differences in their diffuse N removal efficiency under different hydrological conditions and seasons, while reforestation operations were not affected by these factors. The benefit of reforestation operations was lower in flatter areas. When areas with slopes greater than 2 degrees were reforested, the average N removal efficiency of the 1st CSAN could be as high as 82.4%. In the 2nd CSAN, the average N removal efficiency of BS was relatively constant across freeze-thaw seasons. Across growing seasons, the N removal efficiency of BS in wet years was 8%-10% higher than in dry conditions due to the lower percentage of lateral flow. The average N removal efficiency of NT was higher during freeze-thaw seasons and lower during growing seasons with average values of 9.3% and 6.1%, respectively. The N control efficiency of

  6. Controlled Freeze-thaw Experiments to Study Biogeochemical Process and its Effects on Greenhouse Gas Release in Arctic Soil Columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y.; Kneafsey, T. J.; Tas, N.; Bill, M.; Ulrich, C.; Hubbard, S. S.

    2014-12-01

    Greenhouse gas release associated with permafrost thawing is one of the largest uncertainties in future climate prediction. Improvement of such prediction relies on a better representation of the interactions between hydrological, geochemical and microbial processes in the Arctic ecosystem that occur over a wide range of space and time scales and under dynamic freeze-thaw conditions. As part of the Next Generation Ecosystem Experiments in the Arctic (NGEE-Arctic), we conducted controlled laboratory freeze-thaw experiments to study greenhouse gas release in vertical permafrost soil columns with vertically heterogeneous hydrological, geochemical and microbial properties. The studies were performed using soil cores collected from the NGEE Barrow, AK site. Two cores collected next to each other with very similar soil structures were used for the experiment. One of the cores was destructively sampled for baseline characterization, and the second core was used for the freeze-thaw experiments. The core extends from the ground surface into the permafrost with roughly 40 cm of active layer. The column was instrumented with various sensors and sampling devices, including thermocouples, geophysical (electrical) sensors, and sampling ports for solids and fluids. The headspace of the soil column was purged with CO2 free air and the gas samples were collected periodically for greenhouse gas analysis. Our initial tests simulated seasonal temperature variation from ~ -10°C to +10°C at the ground surface. Our results demonstrated that temperature and geophysical data provided real time information on the freeze thaw dynamics of the column and the surface greenhouse gas fluxes correlated with the freeze thaw stages and associated hydrological and biogeochemical processes in the vertical soil column. For example, surface fluxes data revealed an early burst of GHG concentrations during the initial thawing of the surface ice rich layer of the soil, indicating the presence of trapped

  7. Long-term geoelectrical monitoring of laboratory freeze-thaw experiments on bedrock samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuras, Oliver; Uhlemann, Sebastian; Murton, Julian; Krautblatter, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Much attention has recently focussed on the continuous and near-real-time geophysical monitoring of permafrost-affected bedrock with permanently installed sensor arrays. It is hoped that such efforts will enhance process understanding in such environments (permafrost degradation, weathering mechanisms) and augment our capability to predict future instabilities of rock walls and slopes. With regard to electrical methods for example, recent work has demonstrated that temperature-calibrated electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is capable of imaging recession and re-advance of rock permafrost in response to the ambient temperature regime. However, field experience also shows that several fundamental improvements to ERT methodology are still required to achieve the desired sensitivity, spatial-temporal resolution and long-term robustness that must underpin continuous geophysical measurements. We have applied 4D geoelectrical tomography to monitoring laboratory experiments simulating permafrost growth, persistence and thaw in bedrock over a period of 26 months. Six water-saturated samples of limestone and chalk of varying porosity represented lithologies commonly affected by permafrost-related instability. Time-lapse imaging of the samples was undertaken during multiple successive freeze-thaw cycles, emulating annual seasonal change over several decades. Further experimental control was provided by simultaneous measurements of vertical profiles of temperature and moisture content within the bedrock samples. These experiments have helped develop an alternative methodology for the volumetric imaging of permafrost bedrock and tracking active layer dynamics. Capacitive resistivity imaging (CRI), a technique based upon low-frequency, capacitively-coupled measurements emulates ERT methodology, but without the need for galvanic contact on frozen rock. The latter is perceived as a key potential weakness, which could lead to significant limitations as a result of the variable

  8. Development of the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) radiometer derived landscape freeze/thaw product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colliander, A.; Xu, X.; Dunbar, R. S.; Derksen, C.; Kim, Y.; Kimball, J. S.

    2016-12-01

    A baseline SMAP mission objective was to determine the land surface binary freeze/thaw (FT) state for northern (>45°N) regions with 80% spatial classification accuracy at 3 km resolution and 2-day average intervals. These requirements were initially achieved from the SMAP radar until the sensor failed in July 2015. The FT algorithm is now transitioning to using SMAP radiometer inputs. The main compromises of this change are a coarse (36 km) radiometer footprint, enhanced noise and potential FT signal degradation from seasonal vegetation biomass, soil moisture and surface inundation changes. The new daily passive FT product (L3_FT_P) is based on the same seasonal threshold algorithm as the radar derived product (L3_FT_A): instantaneous SMAP measurements are compared to reference signatures acquired during seasonal frozen and thawed states. Instead of radar inputs, the normalized polarization ratio (NPR) is calculated from SMAP radiometer measurements. The L3_FT_P algorithm is applied using NPR inputs, whereby NPR decreases and increases are associated with respective landscape freezing and thawing. A lower NPR under frozen conditions is due to smaller V-pol brightness temperature increases and larger H-pol increases. Using in situ measurements from core validation sites, the temporal behavior of backscatter and NPR measurements were evaluated during the spring 2015 radar and radiometer overlap period. The transition from frozen to thawed states produced a NPR response similar in timing and magnitude to the radar response, resulting in similar freeze to thaw seasonal transition dates. While the post-thaw radar backscatter consistently remained at elevated values relative to the frozen state, the NPR drifted downwards following the main thaw transition (due to de-polarization of the scene), which may introduce false freeze classification errors. Both radar and radiometer results tended to lead observed soil thawing due to strong sensitivity of the microwave

  9. Complementary testing techniques applied to obtain the freeze-thaw resistance of concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romero, H. L.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Most of the standards that evaluate the resistance of concrete against freeze-thaw cycles (FTC are based on the loss of weight due to scaling. Such procedures are useful but do not provide information about the microstructural deterioration of the concrete. The test procedure needs to be stopped after several FTCs for weighing the loss of material by scaling. This paper proposes the use of mercury-intrusion-porosimetry and thermogravimetric analysis for assessing the microstructural damage of concrete during FTCs. Continuous strain measurement can be performed without stopping the FTCs. The combination of the above techniques with the freeze-thaw resistance standards provides better and more precise information about concrete damage. The proposed procedure is applied to an ordinary concrete, a concrete with silica fume addition and one with an air-entraining agent. The test results showed that the three techniques used are suitable and useful to be employed as complementary to the standards.Las normas para evaluar la resistencia del hormigón a los ciclos hielo-deshielo (CHD se basan habitualmente en la pérdida de peso por descascarillamiento. Son útiles, pero no proporcionan información sobre el deterioro microestructural del hormigón. Además, exigen detener el ensayo para pesar el material desprendido. Se propone el uso complementario de la porosimetría por intrusión de mercurio y el análisis termogravimétrico para evaluar el daño microestructural del hormigón durante los CHDs. La medida continua de las deformaciones puede hacerse sin detener los CHDs. La combinación de las técnicas enumeradas con las normas de ensayo proporciona información más completa sobre el daño del hormigón. El procedimiento propuesto se aplica a un hormigón convencional, a un hormigón con adición de humo de sílice y a otro con aireante. Los resultados de los ensayos mostraron que las tres técnicas usadas son útiles y adecuadas como complemento a

  10. Fracture energy evolution of two concretes resistant to the action of freeze-thaw cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enfedaque, A.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The current standards that regulate use of structural concrete have highlighted the durability of concrete. However, how the fracture energy of concrete evolves under the action of freeze-thaw cycles is not well known. The fracture energy of two types of concrete, one with an air-entraining additive and the other with silica fume addition, is studied after four, 14 and 28 freeze-thaw cycles. The results obtained show that the concrete with an air-entraining additive was undamaged and that fracture energy grew slightly. In addition to this, they also showed that the concrete with silica fume addition suffered severe surface scaling and its fracture energy changed due to the greater fracture areas generated.La actual normativa que rige el empleo de hormigón estructural ha puesto enfásis en la durabilidad del hormigón. Sin embargo, no se conoce cómo evoluciona la energía de fractura del hormigón sometido a ciclos hielo- deshielo, lo cual es de vital importancia para asegurar la durabilidad y el correcto comportamiento mecánico de las estructuras de hormigón en entornos con heladas durante su vida útil. Se ha estudiado la evolución de la energía de fractura de un hormigón con aireante y de un hormigón con humo de sílice después de 4, 14 y 28 ciclos hielo-deshielo realizando ensayos de fractura. Los resultados muestran cómo el hormigón con aireante no sufre daño por los ciclos hielo-deshielo y cómo la energía de fractura del mismo aumenta ligeramente. El hormigón con humo de sílice se daña por los ciclos hielo-deshielo y reduce su energía de fractura al aumentar el area fracturada.

  11. Rapid yeast DNA extraction by boiling and freeze-thawing without using chemical reagents and DNA purification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gildo Almeida da Silva

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work was to study a rapid yeast DNA extraction by boiling and freeze-thawing processes without using chemical reagents or any purification procedures, to obtain a high grade PCR-product. A specific DNA fragment of the 18S region of Dekkera bruxellensis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae was chosen. The described boiling and freeze-thawing protocols generated the PCR-grade product preparations and could be used to process many samples. The amplification of the fragments could be observed after 30 and 35 cycles. These processes of extraction without using any kind of chemical reagents, especial water, and purification procedures proved to be efficient, reproducible, simple, fast, and inexpensive.

  12. Visualization of the freeze/thaw characteristics of a copper/water heat pipe - Effects of non-condensible gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochterbeck, J. M.; Peterson, G. P.

    1991-01-01

    The freeze/thaw characteristics of a copper/water heat pipe of rectangular cross section were investigated experimentally to determine the effect of variations in the amount of non-condensible gases (NCG) present. The transient internal temperature profiles in both the liquid and vapor channels are presented along with contours of the frozen fluid configuration obtained through visual observation. Several interesting phenomena were observed including total blockage of the vapor channel by a solid plug, evaporator dryout during restart, and freezing blowby. In addition, the restart characteristics are shown to be strongly dependent upon the shutdown procedure used prior to freezing, indicating that accurate prediction of the startup or restart characteristics requires a complete thermal history. Finally, the experimental results indicate that the freeze/thaw characteristics of room temperature heat pipes may be significantly different from those occurring in higher temperature, liquid metal heat pipes due to differences in the vapor pressures in the frozen condition.

  13. The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Radar: Measurements at High Latitudes and of Surface Freeze/Thaw State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Michael; Dunbar, Scott; Chen, Curtis

    2013-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) mission is scheduled for a late 2014 launch date. The mission will use both active radar and passive radiometer instruments at L-Band in order to achieve the science objectives of measuring soil moisture and land surface freeze-thaw state. To achieve requirements for a wide swath at sufficiently high resolution for both active and passive channels, an instrument architecture that uses a large rotating reflector is employed. In this paper, focus will be placed on the radar design. The radar will employ synthetic-aperture processing to achieve a "moderate" resolution dual-pol product over a 1000 km swath. Because the radar is operating continuously, very frequent temporal coverage will be achieved at high latitudes. This data will be used to produce a surface freeze/thaw state data product.

  14. Study on the Freeze-Thaw Performance of Concrete Using Granulated Blast-Furnace Slag as Fine Aggregate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the freeze-thaw performance of concrete using granulated blast-furnace slag (GBS as fine aggregate was studied. According to the test method for slow freezing and thawing, degradation of mechanical properties about GBS concrete with 2 kinds W/B ratio and 3 kinds GBS replacement ratio were tested, and micromorphology of GBS concrete were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Furthermore, relations between degradation of mechanical properties and micromorphology about GBS concrete are discussed. Test results show that: after freeze-thaw cycles, the relative compressive strength of GBS concrete is greater than ordinary river sand concrete, and the GBS concrete will produce more mutual interlacing fibrous and flowers from crystal, the growth of these crystals can improve the compressive strength of concrete. Therefore, the frost resistance of GBS concrete is little better than ordinary river sand concrete.

  15. Freeze/Thaw Detection in Permafrost Region with C-Band Scatterometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeimi, Vahid; Paulik, Christoph; Wagner, Wolfgang; Barsch, Annett

    2011-01-01

    Distribution of permafrost is largely controlled by climatic conditions. Current permafrost monitoring methods are based on in-situ measurements and modeling and they are mostly local measurements which offer only limited insight in the impacts of global climate variations on the regional to global scale. Permafrost is a subsurface phenomenon which cannot be directly measured with remotely sensed data. But the spatial distribution, thickness and temperature of permafrost is highly dependent on the condition of the active layer overlaying the permafrost. Satellite data can be utilized for operational monitoring of the permafrost active layer by means of a number of indicators and parameters, which are highly valuable for permafrost modeling and monitoring. In this study we present the usage of backscatter measurements from ASCAT scatterometer onboard Metop for detection of freeze/thaw conditions in high latitudes and validate the results with synoptic meteorological measurements. It is shown that there is a high correlation between frozen/unfrozen flag extracted from ASCAT data and the in-situ air temperature measurements.

  16. Estimation Model of Soil Freeze-Thaw Erosion in Silingco Watershed Wetland of Northern Tibet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Kong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The freeze-thaw (FT erosion is a type of soil erosion like water erosion and wind erosion. Limited by many factors, the grading evaluation of soil FT erosion quantities is not well studied. Based on the comprehensive analysis of the evaluation indices of soil FT erosion, we for the first time utilized the sensitivity of microwave remote sensing technology to soil moisture for identification of FT state. We established an estimation model suitable to evaluate the soil FT erosion quantity in Silingco watershed wetland of Northern Tibet using weighted summation method of six impact factors including the annual FT cycle days, average diurnal FT phase-changed water content, average annual precipitation, slope, aspect, and vegetation coverage. Finally, with the support of GIS, we classified soil FT erosion quantity in Silingco watershed wetland. The results showed that soil FT erosion are distributed in broad areas of Silingco watershed wetland. Different soil FT erosions with different intensities have evidently different spatial and geographical distributions.

  17. Estimation model of soil freeze-thaw erosion in Silingco watershed wetland of Northern Tibet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Bo; Yu, Huan

    2013-01-01

    The freeze-thaw (FT) erosion is a type of soil erosion like water erosion and wind erosion. Limited by many factors, the grading evaluation of soil FT erosion quantities is not well studied. Based on the comprehensive analysis of the evaluation indices of soil FT erosion, we for the first time utilized the sensitivity of microwave remote sensing technology to soil moisture for identification of FT state. We established an estimation model suitable to evaluate the soil FT erosion quantity in Silingco watershed wetland of Northern Tibet using weighted summation method of six impact factors including the annual FT cycle days, average diurnal FT phase-changed water content, average annual precipitation, slope, aspect, and vegetation coverage. Finally, with the support of GIS, we classified soil FT erosion quantity in Silingco watershed wetland. The results showed that soil FT erosion are distributed in broad areas of Silingco watershed wetland. Different soil FT erosions with different intensities have evidently different spatial and geographical distributions.

  18. Aroma improvement by repeated freeze-thaw treatment during Tuber melanosporum fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Deng-Rong; Liu, Rui-Sang; He, Long; Li, Hong-Mei; Tang, Ya-Ling; Liang, Xin-Hua; Chen, Tao; Tang, Ya-Jie

    2015-01-01

    The aroma attributes of sulfurous, mushroom and earthy are the most important characteristics of the aroma of Tuber melanosporum. However, these three aroma attributes are absent in the T. melanosporum fermentation system. To improve the quality of the aroma, repeated freeze-thaw treatment (RFTT) was adopted to affect the interplay of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Using RFTT, not only was the score on the hedonic scale of the aroma increased from the “liked slightly” to the “liked moderately” grade, but the aroma attributes of sulfurous, mushroom and earthy could also be smelled in the T. melanosporum fermentation system for the first time. A total of 29 VOCs were identified, and 9 compounds were identified as the key discriminative volatiles affected by RFTT. Amino acid analysis revealed that methionine, valine, serine, phenylalanine, isoleucine and threonine were the key substrates associated with the biosynthesis of the 9 key discriminative VOCs. This study noted that amino acid metabolism played an important role in the regulation of the aroma of the T. melanosporum fermentation system. PMID:26607288

  19. Synthesis of poly(vinyl alcohol)-magnetite ferrogel obtained by freezing-thawing technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reséndiz-Hernández, P. J.; Rodríguez-Fernández, O. S.; García-Cerda, L. A.

    Polymer gels are crosslinked polymer networks swollen by a fluid. If magnetic particles either as powder or dispersed in a magnetic fluid are introduced into the gel then the system becomes sensitive to external magnetic fields and the resulting material is called ferrogel. The polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-magnetite ferrogels system has properties that are attractive for artificial muscles and drug delivery systems for biomedical applications. This work investigates the synthesis and characterization of a ferrogel obtained by freezing-thawing cycles. PVA ( MW=89,000-98,000, degree of hydrolyzation: 99 mol%) and magnetite nanoparticles (˜12 nm) obtained by chemical coprecipitation were used as raw materials. The PVA-magnetite ferrogels were prepared by subjecting a PVA/DMSO/magnetite solution (2 g/30 ml/0.2 g) to freeze (-25 °C)/thaw (+25 °C) cycles. The resulting ferrogel was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and vibration sample magnetometry (VSM). The magnetic particles inside the PVA matrix formed agglomerates with average size ˜58 nm. All the ferrogels showed superparamagnetic behavior with maximum magnetization of 0.6 emu/g.

  20. Thermal Destabilization of Collagen Matrix Hierarchical Structure by Freeze/Thaw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcelikkale, Altug; Han, Bumsoo

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to characterize and understand the effects of freezing on collagen structures and functionality. Specifically, thermodynamic destabilization of collagen at molecular- and fibril-levels by combination of low temperatures and freezing were experimentally characterized using modulated differential scanning calorimetry. In order to delineate the effects of sub-zero temperature and water-ice phase change, we hypothesized that the extent of destabilization can be determined based on post-thaw heat induced thermal denaturation of collagen. It is found that thermal denaturation temperature of collagen in hydrogel decreases by 1.4–1.6°C after freeze/thaw while no such decrease is observed in the case of molecular solution. The destabilization is predominantly due to ice formation. Exposure to low temperatures in the absence of ice has only minimal effect. Calorimetry measurements combined with morphological examination of collagen matrices by scanning electron microscopy suggest that freezing results in destabilization of collagen fibrils due to expansion of intrafibrillar space by ice formation. This fibril-level damage can be alleviated by use of cryoprotectant DMSO at concentrations as low as 0.5 M. A theoretical model explaining the change in collagen post-thaw thermal stability by freezing-induced fibril expansion is also proposed. PMID:26765741

  1. Does Platelet-Rich Plasma Freeze-Thawing Influence Growth Factor Release and Their Effects on Chondrocytes and Synoviocytes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Roffi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available PRP cryopreservation remains a controversial point. Our purpose was to investigate the effect of freezing/thawing on PRP molecule release, and its effects on the metabolism of chondrocytes and synoviocytes. PRP was prepared from 10 volunteers, and a half volume underwent one freezing/thawing cycle. IL-1β, HGF, PDGF AB/BB, TGF-β1, and VEGF were assayed 1 hour and 7 days after activation. Culture media of chondrocytes and synoviocytes were supplemented with fresh or frozen PRP, and, at 7 days, proliferation, gene expression, and secreted proteins levels were evaluated. Results showed that in the freeze-thawed PRP the immediate and delayed molecule releases were similar or slightly lower than those in fresh PRP. TGF-β1 and PDGF AB/BB concentrations were significantly reduced after freezing both at 1 hour and at 7 days, whereas HGF concentration was significantly lower in frozen PRP at 7 days. In fresh PRP IL-1β and HGF concentrations underwent a significant further increase after 7 days. Similar gene expression was found in chondrocytes cultured with both PRPs, whereas in synoviocytes HGF gene expression was higher in frozen PRP. PRP cryopreservation is a safe procedure, which sufficiently preserves PRP quality and its ability to induce proliferation and the production of ECM components in chondrocytes and synoviocytes.

  2. A combination of solvent extraction and freeze thaw for oil recovery from petroleum refinery wastewater treatment pond sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guangji; Li, Jianbing; Hou, Haobo

    2015-01-01

    A combination of solvent extraction and freeze thaw was examined for recovering oil from the high-moisture petroleum refinery wastewater treatment pond sludge. Five solvents including cyclohexane (CHX), dichloromethane (DCM), methyl ethyl ketone (MEK), ethyl acetate (EA), and 2-propanol (2-Pro) were examined. It was found that these solvents except 2-Pro showed a promising oil recovery rate of about 40%, but the recycling of DCM solvent after oil extraction was quite low. Three solvents (CHX, MEK and EA) were then selected for examining the effect of freeze/thaw treatment on improving the quality of recovered oil. This treatment increased the total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content in recovered oil from about 40% to 60% for both MEK and EA extractions, but little effect was observed for CHX extraction. Although the solid residue after oil recovery had a significantly decreased TPH content, a high concentration of heavy metals was observed, indicating that this residue may require proper management. In general, the combination of solvent extraction with freeze/thaw is effective for high-moisture oily hazardous waste treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Behaviour of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in soils under freeze-thaw cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zschocke, Anne; Schönborn, Maike; Eschenbach, Annette

    2010-05-01

    The arctic region will be one of the most affected regions by climate change due to the predicted temperature rise. As a result of anthropogenic actions as mining, exploration and refining as well as atmospheric transport pollutions can be found in arctic soils. Therefore questions on the behaviour of organic contaminants in permafrost influenced soils are of high relevance. First investigations showed that permafrost can act as a semi-permeable layer for PAH (Curtosi et al., 2007). Therefore it can be assumed that global warming could result in a mobilization of PAH in these permafrost influenced soils. On the other hand a low but detectable mineralization of organic hydrocarbons by microorganisms under repeated freeze-thaw cycles was analysed (Börresen et al. 2007, Eschenbach et al. 2000). In this study the behaviour and distribution of PAH under freezing and periodically freezing and thawing were investigated in laboratory column experiments with spiked soil materials. Two soil materials which are typical for artic regions, a organic matter containing melt water sand and a well decomposed peat, were homogeneously spiked with a composite of a crude oil and the PAH anthracene and benzo(a)pyrene. After 14days preincubation time the soil material was filled in the laboratory columns (40cm high and 10 cm in diameter). Based on studies by Chuvilin et al. (2001) the impact of freezing of the upper third of the column from the surface downwards was examined. The impact of freezing was tested in two different approaches the first one with a single freezing step and the second one with a fourfold repeated cycle of freezing and thawing which takes about 6 or 7 days each. The experimental design and very first results will be shown and discussed. In some experiments with the peat a higher concentration of anthracene and benzo(a)pyrene could be detected below the freezing front in the unfrozen part of the column. Whereas the concentration of PAH had slightly decreased in

  4. Freeze/thaw-induced embolism: probability of critical bubble formation depends on speed of ice formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanna eSevanto

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Bubble formation in the conduits of woody plants sets a challenge for uninterrupted water transportation from the soil up to the canopy. Freezing and thawing of stems has been shown to increase the number of air-filled (embolized conduits, especially in trees with large conduit diameters. Despite numerous experimental studies, the mechanisms leading to bubble formation during freezing have not been addressed theoretically. We used classical nucleation theory and fluid mechanics to show which mechanisms are most likely to be responsible for bubble formation during freezing and what parameters determine the likelihood of the process. Our results confirm the common assumption that bubble formation during freezing is most likely due to gas segregation by ice. If xylem conduit walls are not permeable to the salts expelled by ice during the freezing process, osmotic pressures high enough for air seeding could be created. The build-up rate of segregated solutes in front of the ice-water interface depends equally on conduit diameter and freezing velocity. Therefore, bubble formation probability depends on these variables. The dependence of bubble formation probability on freezing velocity means that the experimental results obtained for cavitation threshold conduit diameters during freeze/thaw cycles depend on the experimental setup; namely sample size and cooling rate. The velocity dependence also suggests that to avoid bubble formation during freezing trees should have narrow conduits where freezing is likely to be fast (e.g. branches or outermost layer of the xylem. Avoidance of bubble formation during freezing could thus be one piece of the explanation why xylem conduit size of temperate and boreal zone trees varies quite systematically.

  5. [Cryobiology and pathologic lesions induced by freezing-thawing processes in prostatic tissue. Second part].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escudero Barrilero, Angel; Arias Fúnez, Fernando; Patrón Rodríguez, Rafael Rodríguez; García González, Ricardo; Cuesta Roca, Carmen

    2004-12-01

    Cryosurgery is an emerging technology consisting on controlled freezing of tissues. Good results, maintained in the long-term, have been referred in the treatment of prostate adenocarcinoma. A role as possible substitute of partial nephrectomy in the treatment of renal adenocarcinomas smaller than 4-5 cm is under research. There is no discussion that freezing destroys cellular machinery and triggers several events the final result of which is cell death by necrosis and apoptosis. The decrease of temperature makes extracellular liquid crystallize and creates a hyperosmotic environment, which induces water to go out of the cell producing intracellular dehydration. Intracellular ice is created with fast freezing speeds being attributed the most destructive effect on biological tissues with irreparable damage. In blood vessels, it directly induces endothelial cell death and mechanical lesions of the endothelium; the consequence is the formation of thrombi that obstruct the lumen of the vessel. In the post-thawing phase there is an increase in free radicals formation and neutrophil activity, which induces cellular membrane lipids peroxidation and new endothelium lesions. Tissue destruction is determined by: minimal temperature achieved, freezing speeds, freezing phase duration, number of freezing-thawing cycles provided, and distance to the freezing focus. As we move away from the freezing focus cells are affected in different ways, and there are several mechanisms proposed to explain the lethal action induced by temperatures higher than--40 degrees C. In our series pathologic findings were: necrosis, hemorrhagic areas either developed or not, fibrosis, hyalinization and increases in the relative number of hematic capillaries, microscopic calcifications, basal cells hyperplasia, and transitional or squamous metaplasia. Residual cancer is localized in the areas less affected by freezing. It should be emphasize the scarce morbimortality associated with the procedure. It

  6. Effect of freeze-thawing on aggregate stability in a calcareous Mediterranean soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Elena; Temporal, Beatriz; Oltra, Ángel; Mataix-Solera, Jorge; Arcenegui, Victoria; García-Orenes, Fuensanta

    2013-04-01

    Soil freezing has been reported as both beneficial and detrimental for soil structure depending on various factors (Dagesse, 2011), but the subsequent thawing process has not been adequately investigated as a factor in determining the net effect of freezing and thawing. In this study changes in soil aggregate stability (AS) were studied under different moisture and speed of thawing conditions in a laboratory experiment. Conditions favoring sublimation and commonly experienced during the winter include bare soil surfaces and synoptic meteorological conditions of clear skies, low humidity, and moderate winds. Aggregate stability measured may therefore reflect the effects of drying of the soil aggregates via the freezing process and the resulting water content distribution following thawing. The soil used is from an agricultural area located in Sierra de Enguera (Valencia, E Spain). Soil samples were collected in February 2012 from the first 2.5 cm depth of A horizon. We also studied the effect of a mulch cover in buffering soil temperature during 2 months under field conditions using thermocouples and data-loggers. Soil samples at two initial water contents (10% and 40%) were subjected to different treatments, including not frozen (control), freeze-thaw (freezing at -4 °C for 3 h and thawing at room temperature for 24 h) and freeze-drying (freezing at -4 for 3h and thawing at 60 °C for 3 h in a forced air oven). We measured the possible soil disruption of soil aggregates quantifying the soil mass in the fractions 2-0.25 mm and

  7. Freeze-thaw treatment effects on the dynamic mechanical properties of articular cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muldrew Ken

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As a relatively non-regenerative tissue, articular cartilage has been targeted for cryopreservation as a method of mitigating a lack of donor tissue availability for transplant surgeries. In addition, subzero storage of articular cartilage has long been used in biomedical studies using various storage temperatures. The current investigation studies the potential for freeze-thaw to affect the mechanical properties of articular cartilage through direct comparison of various subzero storage temperatures. Methods Both subzero storage temperature as well as freezing rate were compared using control samples (4°C and samples stored at either -20°C or -80°C as well as samples first snap frozen in liquid nitrogen (-196°C prior to storage at -80°C. All samples were thawed at 37.5°C to testing temperature (22°C. Complex stiffness and hysteresis characterized load resistance and damping properties using a non-destructive, low force magnitude, dynamic indentation protocol spanning a broad loading rate range to identify the dynamic viscoelastic properties of cartilage. Results Stiffness levels remained unchanged with exposure to the various subzero temperatures. Hysteresis increased in samples snap frozen at -196°C and stored at -80°C, though remained unchanged with exposure to the other storage temperatures. Conclusions Mechanical changes shown are likely due to ice lens creation, where frost heave effects may have caused collagen damage. That storage to -20°C and -80°C did not alter the mechanical properties of articular cartilage shows that when combined with a rapid thawing protocol to 37.5°C, the tissue may successfully be stored at subzero temperatures.

  8. Fracturing and Damage to Sandstone Under Coupling Effects of Chemical Corrosion and Freeze-Thaw Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tielin; Shi, Junping; Cao, Xiaoshan

    2016-11-01

    Rapid freeze-thaw (FT) cycles were adopted to explore the damage deterioration mechanism and mechanical properties of sandstone specimens under the coupling effects of different chemical solutions and FT cycles. The variation regularities of the FT cycles and physical and mechanical properties of sandstone specimens immersed in different chemical solutions were analyzed by using sandstone sampled from a Chinese riverbank slope. The damage variable based on porosity variation was used in the quantitative analysis of the damage to the sandstone under the coupling effects of chemical corrosion and FT cycles. Experimental results showed that the sandstone specimens weakened substantially under those effects. Their fracture toughness K IC, splitting tensile strength, and compressive strength showed a similar deteriorating trend with various numbers of FT cycles. However, a difference exists in the deterioration degree of their mechanical parameters, i.e., the deterioration degree of their fracture toughness K IC is the greatest followed by that of splitting tensile strength, and that of compressive strength is relatively small. Strong acid solutions may aggravate the deterioration of FT damage in sandstones, but at the early stage of the experiment, strong alkaline solutions inhibited sandstone damage deterioration. However, the inhibiting effect disappeared when the number of FT cycles exceeded 25. The different chemical solutions had a different effect on the FT damage degree of the sandstone specimens; for example, SO4 2- ions had a greater effect on FT damage than did HCO3 - ions. Water-chemical solutions and FT cycles promote each other in deteriorating rocks and simultaneously affect the damage deterioration degree of sandstones.

  9. Effect of freeze-thaw cycling on grain size of biochar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zuolin; Dugan, Brandon; Masiello, Caroline A; Wahab, Leila M; Gonnermann, Helge M; Nittrouer, Jeffrey A

    2018-01-01

    Biochar may improve soil hydrology by altering soil porosity, density, hydraulic conductivity, and water-holding capacity. These properties are associated with the grain size distributions of both soil and biochar, and therefore may change as biochar weathers. Here we report how freeze-thaw (F-T) cycling impacts the grain size of pine, mesquite, miscanthus, and sewage waste biochars under two drainage conditions: undrained (all biochars) and a gravity-drained experiment (mesquite biochar only). In the undrained experiment plant biochars showed a decrease in median grain size and a change in grain-size distribution consistent with the flaking off of thin layers from the biochar surface. Biochar grain size distribution changed from unimodal to bimodal, with lower peaks and wider distributions. For plant biochars the median grain size decreased by up to 45.8% and the grain aspect ratio increased by up to 22.4% after 20 F-T cycles. F-T cycling did not change the grain size or aspect ratio of sewage waste biochar. We also observed changes in the skeletal density of biochars (maximum increase of 1.3%), envelope density (maximum decrease of 12.2%), and intraporosity (porosity inside particles, maximum increase of 3.2%). In the drained experiment, mesquite biochar exhibited a decrease of median grain size (up to 4.2%) and no change of aspect ratio after 10 F-T cycles. We also document a positive relationship between grain size decrease and initial water content, suggesting that, biochar properties that increase water content, like high intraporosity and pore connectivity large intrapores, and hydrophilicity, combined with undrained conditions and frequent F-T cycles may increase biochar breakdown. The observed changes in biochar particle size and shape can be expected to alter hydrologic properties, and thus may impact both plant growth and the hydrologic cycle.

  10. Comparative stability of canine and feline hemostatic proteins in freeze-thaw-cycled fresh frozen plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaxley, Page E; Beal, Matthew W; Jutkowitz, L Ari; Hauptman, Joe G; Brooks, Marjory B; Hale, Anne S; Parr, Alice

    2010-10-01

    To evaluate the stability of canine and feline hemostatic proteins in freeze-thaw-cycled (FTC) fresh frozen plasma (FFP). Prospective study. Veterinary Teaching Hospital. Nine blood donor dogs and 10 blood donor cats. Whole blood was collected and separated into packed RBC and plasma units according to standard methods. Each unit of plasma was divided into 2 equal aliquots and frozen (-41 °C). One aliquot from each donor (FTC) was then thawed and then refrozen (-41 °C) until time of analysis. The second aliquot (nonfreeze-thaw-cycled; NFTC) remained frozen until time of analysis. The hemostatic proteins assessed included coagulation factors, anticoagulant factors (antithrombin and Protein C), and adhesive proteins (fibrinogen and von Willebrand Factor). The coagulant activities of factors II, VII, VIII, IX, X, XI, and XII were measured in modified one-stage activated partial thromboplastin time or prothrombin time assays. Antithrombin and Protein C activities were measured in chromogenic substrate assays. Clottable fibrinogen was measured via the Clauss method, and von Willebrand Factor concentration (vWF:Ag) was measured in an ELISA. A paired t-test was utilized to identify differences in factor activity or concentration between FTC FFP and NFTC FFP. No clinically or statistically significant differences (all P>0.05) were identified between FTC FFP and NFTC FFP. Refreezing FFP within 1 hour of initial thawing appeared to have no deleterious effects on the hemostatic protein activity or content of that unit. Transfusion of FTC FFP is expected to provide the recipient with comparable replacement of hemostatic proteins as FFP that has remained frozen. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2010.

  11. Freeze/Thaw-Induced Embolism: Probability of Critical Bubble Formation Depends on Speed of Ice Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevanto, Sanna; Holbrook, N. Michele; Ball, Marilyn C.

    2012-01-01

    Bubble formation in the conduits of woody plants sets a challenge for uninterrupted water transportation from the soil up to the canopy. Freezing and thawing of stems has been shown to increase the number of air-filled (embolized) conduits, especially in trees with large conduit diameters. Despite numerous experimental studies, the mechanisms leading to bubble formation during freezing have not been addressed theoretically. We used classical nucleation theory and fluid mechanics to show which mechanisms are most likely to be responsible for bubble formation during freezing and what parameters determine the likelihood of the process. Our results confirm the common assumption that bubble formation during freezing is most likely due to gas segregation by ice. If xylem conduit walls are not permeable to the salts expelled by ice during the freezing process, osmotic pressures high enough for air seeding could be created. The build-up rate of segregated solutes in front of the ice-water interface depends equally on conduit diameter and freezing velocity. Therefore, bubble formation probability depends on these variables. The dependence of bubble formation probability on freezing velocity means that the experimental results obtained for cavitation threshold conduit diameters during freeze/thaw cycles depend on the experimental setup; namely sample size and cooling rate. The velocity dependence also suggests that to avoid bubble formation during freezing trees should have narrow conduits where freezing is likely to be fast (e.g., branches or outermost layer of the xylem). Avoidance of bubble formation during freezing could thus be one piece of the explanation why xylem conduit size of temperate and boreal zone trees varies quite systematically. PMID:22685446

  12. Assimilation of Freeze - Thaw Observations into the NASA Catchment Land Surface Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhadi, Leila; Reichle, Rolf H.; DeLannoy, Gabrielle J. M.; Kimball, John S.

    2014-01-01

    The land surface freeze-thaw (F-T) state plays a key role in the hydrological and carbon cycles and thus affects water and energy exchanges and vegetation productivity at the land surface. In this study, we developed an F-T assimilation algorithm for the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System, version 5 (GEOS-5) modeling and assimilation framework. The algorithm includes a newly developed observation operator that diagnoses the landscape F-T state in the GEOS-5 Catchment land surface model. The F-T analysis is a rule-based approach that adjusts Catchment model state variables in response to binary F-T observations, while also considering forecast and observation errors. A regional observing system simulation experiment was conducted using synthetically generated F-T observations. The assimilation of perfect (error-free) F-T observations reduced the root-mean-square errors (RMSE) of surface temperature and soil temperature by 0.206 C and 0.061 C, respectively, when compared to model estimates (equivalent to a relative RMSE reduction of 6.7 percent and 3.1 percent, respectively). For a maximum classification error (CEmax) of 10 percent in the synthetic F-T observations, the F-T assimilation reduced the RMSE of surface temperature and soil temperature by 0.178 C and 0.036 C, respectively. For CEmax=20 percent, the F-T assimilation still reduces the RMSE of model surface temperature estimates by 0.149 C but yields no improvement over the model soil temperature estimates. The F-T assimilation scheme is being developed to exploit planned operational F-T products from the NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission.

  13. Effect of citrate ions on the softening of root crops prepared with freeze-thaw impregnation of macerating enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsu, Sayaka; Shimoda, Mitsuya; Shibata, Kenya; Kajihara, Ryo; Ishihara, Masako; Sakamoto, Koji

    2014-03-01

    Freeze-thaw impregnation is a technique used for the rapid impregnation of substances into foodstuffs. Freeze-thaw impregnation with macerating enzymes has been applied to soften foodstuffs, while retaining their original shapes and flavors. In this study, we found that co-impregnation with citrate ions and macerating enzymes significantly facilitated the softening of root crops. When burdock roots were processed by the impregnating solution at pH 4.0-5.0, co-impregnated burdock roots exhibited 1/6-1/3 firmness values compared with burdock roots impregnated with only enzymes. The impregnation with citrate ions alone at pH 4.0 to 5.0 did not soften burdock roots. The firmness of burdock roots was positively correlated with the amount of water-insoluble calcium in the samples. The results suggested that the degradation of pectins by pectinolytic activities could promote contact with citrate to bridging-calcium ions interacting with the pectin chains. Therefore, the softening by the synergistic effect of citrate ions and macerating enzymes was related to the amount of pectins contained in root crops. That is, the synergistic effect was significant with burdock roots and carrots (from which 50% of polysaccharides are pectins) unlike with lotus rhizomes and bamboo shoots (from which 30% and 10% of polysaccharides are pectins, respectively). Freeze-thaw impregnation with macerating enzymes and citrate ions can be applied for the production of care foods which can be eaten without chewing. The softened products induce the pleasure of eating for consumers because their original shapes and flavors are retained. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  14. Snowmelt and Surface Freeze/Thaw Timings over Alaska derived from Passive Microwave Observations using a Wavelet Classifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, N.; McDonald, K. C.; Dinardo, S. J.; Miller, C. E.

    2015-12-01

    Arctic permafrost soils contain a vast amount of organic carbon that will be released into the atmosphere as carbon dioxide or methane when thawed. Surface to air greenhouse gas fluxes are largely dependent on such surface controls as the frozen/thawed state of the snow and soil. Satellite remote sensing is an important means to create continuous mapping of surface properties. Advances in the ability to determine soil and snow freeze/thaw timings from microwave frequency observations improves upon our ability to predict the response of carbon gas emission to warming through synthesis with in-situ observation, such as the 2012-2015 Carbon in Arctic Reservoir Vulnerability Experiment (CARVE). Surface freeze/thaw or snowmelt timings are often derived using a constant or spatially/temporally variable threshold applied to time-series observations. Alternately, time-series singularity classifiers aim to detect discontinuous changes, or "edges", in time-series data similar to those that occur from the large contrast in dielectric constant during the freezing or thaw of soil or snow. We use multi-scale analysis of continuous wavelet transform spectral gradient brightness temperatures from various channel combinations of passive microwave radiometers, Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E, AMSR2) and Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I F17) gridded at a 10 km posting with resolution proportional to the observational footprint. Channel combinations presented here aim to illustrate and differentiate timings of "edges" from transitions in surface water related to various landscape components (e.g. snow-melt, soil-thaw). To support an understanding of the physical basis of observed "edges" we compare satellite measurements with simple radiative transfer microwave-emission modeling of the snow, soil and vegetation using in-situ observations from the SNOw TELemetry (SNOTEL) automated weather stations. Results of freeze/thaw and snow-melt timings and trends are

  15. A Passive Microwave L-Band Boreal Forest Freeze/Thaw and Vegetation Phenology Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, A.; Sonnentag, O.; Pappas, C.; Mavrovic, A.; Royer, A.; Berg, A. A.; Rowlandson, T. L.; Lemay, J.; Helgason, W.; Barr, A.; Black, T. A.; Derksen, C.; Toose, P.

    2016-12-01

    The boreal forest is the second largest land biome in the world and thus plays a major role in the global and regional climate systems. The extent, timing and duration of seasonal freeze/thaw (F/T) state influences vegetation developmental stages (phenology) and, consequently, constitute an important control on how boreal forest ecosystems exchange carbon, water and energy with the atmosphere. The effective retrieval of seasonal F/T state from L-Band radiometry was demonstrated using satellite mission. However, disentangling the seasonally differing contributions from forest overstory and understory vegetation, and the soil surface to the satellite signal remains challenging. Here we present initial results from a radiometer field campaign to improve our understanding of the L-Band derived boreal forest F/T signal and vegetation phenology. Two L-Band surface-based radiometers (SBR) are installed on a micrometeorological tower at the Southern Old Black Spruce site in central Saskatchewan over the 2016-2017 F/T season. One radiometer unit is installed on the flux tower so it views forest including all overstory and understory vegetation and the moss-covered ground surface. A second radiometer unit is installed within the boreal forest overstory, viewing the understory and the ground surface. The objectives of our study are (i) to disentangle the L-Band F/T signal contribution of boreal forest overstory from the understory and ground surface, (ii) to link the L-Band F/T signal to related boreal forest structural and functional characteristics, and (iii) to investigate the use of the L-Band signal to characterize boreal forest carbon, water and energy fluxes. The SBR observations above and within the forest canopy are used to retrieve the transmissivity (γ) and the scattering albedo (ω), two parameters that describe the emission of the forest canopy though the F/T season. These two forest parameters are compared with boreal forest structural and functional

  16. Evaluation of Spaceborne L-band Radiometer Measurements for Terrestrial Freeze/Thaw Retrievals in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, A.; Royer, A.; Derksen, C.; Brucker, L.; Langlois, A.; Mailon, A.; Kerr, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The landscape freeze/thaw (FT) state has an important impact on the surface energy balance, carbon fluxes, and hydrologic processes; the timing of spring melt is linked to active layer dynamics in permafrost areas. L-band (1.4 GHz) microwave emission could allow the monitoring of surface state dynamics due to its sensitivity to the pronounced permittivity difference between frozen and thawed soil. The aim of this paper is to evaluate the performance of both Aquarius and Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) L-band passive microwave measurements using a polarization ratio-based algorithm for landscape FT monitoring. Weekly L-band satellite observations are compared with a large set of reference data at 48 sites across Canada spanning three environments: tundra, boreal forest, and prairies. The reference data include in situ measurements of soil temperature (Tsoil) and air temperature (Tair), and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) land surface temperature (LST) and snow cover area (SCA) products. Results show generally good agreement between Lband FT detection and the surface state estimated from four reference datasets. The best apparent accuracies for all seasons are obtained using Tair as the reference. Aquarius radiometer 2 (incidence angle of 39.6) data gives the best accuracies (90.8), while for SMOS the best results (87.8 of accuracy) are obtained at higher incidence angles (55- 60). The FT algorithm identifies both freeze onset and end with a delay of about one week in tundra and two weeks in forest and prairies, when compared to Tair. The analysis shows a stronger FT signal at tundra sites due to the typically clean transitions between consistently frozen and thawed conditions (and vice versa) and the absence of surface vegetation. Results in the prairies were poorer because of the influence of vegetation growth in summer (which decreases the polarization ratio) and the high frequency of ephemeral thaw events during winter. Freeze onset

  17. Destabilization of the plasma membrane of isolated plant protoplasts during a freeze-thaw cycle: the influence of cold acclimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steponkus, P.L.; Dowgert, M.F.; Gordon-Kamm, W.J.

    1983-01-01

    The functional characteristics of the plasma membrane in response to a free-thaw cycle are studied in isolated protoplasts with the plasma membrane still intact. Three different forms of injury have been characterized: intracellular ice formation, hypertonic-induced loss of osmotic responsiveness, and expansion-induced lysis. In this report, the influence of cold acclimation on the incidence of these forms of injury is emphasized. Isolated protoplasts are an excellent arena in which destabilization of the plasma membrane can be directly observed during a freeze-thaw cycle by cryomicroscopy. 65 references, 8 figures.

  18. Micro-fractures produced in the Cadalso de los Vidrios granite (Madrid) subjected to Freeze-Thaw Durability Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire-Lista, D. M.; Varas-Muriel, M. J.; Fort, R.

    2012-04-01

    A specific leucogranite (fine to medium grain sized) from Cadalso de los Vidrios, Madrid, Spain, from where it takes the name of the stone variety, which is a traditional heritage building material used in Central Spain, was subjected to freezing-thaw durability tests or accelerated artificial ageing tests (according to Spanish standard EN 12371:2001) to assess its durability by means of ultrasonic velocity measurements (a non-destructive technique), and optical and fluorescence petrography using a polarized optical microscope (destructive technique), both techniques used before, during and after laboratory ageing tests, or in other words, what is determined is the improvement or deterioration in some properties. The measurement of the ultrasonic velocity in the leucogranite cubic test specimens along the freezing-thaw cycles shown that the velocity diminishes with the number of cycles, in relation to the decay that the stones were experiencing. This deterioration can be observed by the loss of crystalline minerals in the surface of the analyzed samples and by the micro-fractures appearance up to one centimeter deep, which have been detected by the petrographic techniques previously mentioned. The images taken by means of the fluorescence microscope clearly show the micro-fractures generated during the durability test. These images have been processed and analyzed by the UTHSCSA Image Tool program with the purpose of being able to quantify the degree of decay that this type of crystalline materials undergone, when subjected to a number of freezing-thaw test cycles. It is therefore an effective, reliable and complementary technique to that of the petrography analysis, both optical and fluorescence ones. In the first cycles of the ageing test, the micro-fractures propagate along crystals edges and during the last cycles of the test, intracrystalline micro-fractures are generated, which are developed in different ways depending on the mineralogy of the crystals. Thus

  19. The interplay between inner and outer frost damage and its implication for accelerated freeze-thaw testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasholt, Marianne Tange

    2014-01-01

    In the present project salt frost scaling was registered during an accelerated freeze-thaw test (CEN/TS 12390-9). After the test, inner damage was evaluated by observing the crack patterns on fluorescence impregnated plane sections. The results indicate that the developments of inner and outer...... damage are linked processes. The link is related to the moisture transport in the concrete, as both inner cracking and scaling change if a moisture barrier is implemented parallel to the test surface, 25 mm below the test surface....

  20. Xylem traits mediate a trade-off between resistance to freeze-thaw-induced embolism and photosynthetic capacity in overwintering evergreens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choat, Brendan; Medek, Danielle E; Stuart, Stephanie A; Pasquet-Kok, Jessica; Egerton, John J G; Salari, Hooman; Sack, Lawren; Ball, Marilyn C

    2011-09-01

    Hydraulic traits were studied in temperate, woody evergreens in a high-elevation heath community to test for trade-offs between the delivery of water to canopies at rates sufficient to sustain photosynthesis and protection against disruption to vascular transport caused by freeze-thaw-induced embolism. Freeze-thaw-induced loss in hydraulic conductivity was studied in relation to xylem anatomy, leaf- and sapwood-specific hydraulic conductivity and gas exchange characteristics of leaves. We found evidence that a trade-off between xylem transport capacity and safety from freeze-thaw-induced embolism affects photosynthetic activity in overwintering evergreens. The mean hydraulically weighted xylem vessel diameter and sapwood-specific conductivity correlated with susceptibility to freeze-thaw-induced embolism. There was also a strong correlation of hydraulic supply and demand across species; interspecific differences in stomatal conductance and CO(2) assimilation rates were correlated linearly with sapwood- and leaf-specific hydraulic conductivity. Xylem vessel anatomy mediated an apparent trade-off between resistance to freeze-thaw-induced embolism and hydraulic and photosynthetic capacity during the winter. These results point to a new role for xylem functional traits in determining the degree to which species can maintain photosynthetic carbon gain despite freezing events and cold winter temperatures. © 2011 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2011 New Phytologist Trust.

  1. Effect of Multiple Freezing/Thawing Cycles on the Structural and Functional Properties of Waxy Rice Starch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Han; Yan, Juan; Zhao, Jianwei; Tian, Yaoqi; Jin, Zhengyu; Xu, Xueming

    2015-01-01

    The structural and functional properties of non-gelatinized waxy rice starch were investigated after 1, 3, 7, and 10 freezing/thawing cycles. Freezing caused an increasing damaged starch from 1.36% in native waxy rice starch to 5.77% in 10 freezing/thawing-treated starch (FTS), as evidenced by the cracking surface on starch granules. More dry matter concentration was leached, which was characterized by high amylopectin concentration (4.34 mg/mL). The leaching was accompanied by a decrease in relative crystallinity from 35.19% in native starch to 31.34% in 10 FTS. Freezing treatment also led to significant deviations in the functional characteristics, for instance decreased gelatinization temperature range, enthalpy, and pasting viscosities. The resistant starch content of 10FTS significantly decreased from 58.9% to 19%, whereas the slowly digested starch content greatly increased from 23.8% in native starch to 50.3%. The increase in susceptibility to enzyme hydrolysis may be attributed to porous granular surface, amylopectin leaching, and the decrease in the relative crystallinity caused by freezing water. PMID:26018506

  2. Effect of multiple freezing/thawing cycles on the structural and functional properties of waxy rice starch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Tao

    Full Text Available The structural and functional properties of non-gelatinized waxy rice starch were investigated after 1, 3, 7, and 10 freezing/thawing cycles. Freezing caused an increasing damaged starch from 1.36% in native waxy rice starch to 5.77% in 10 freezing/thawing-treated starch (FTS, as evidenced by the cracking surface on starch granules. More dry matter concentration was leached, which was characterized by high amylopectin concentration (4.34 mg/mL. The leaching was accompanied by a decrease in relative crystallinity from 35.19% in native starch to 31.34% in 10 FTS. Freezing treatment also led to significant deviations in the functional characteristics, for instance decreased gelatinization temperature range, enthalpy, and pasting viscosities. The resistant starch content of 10FTS significantly decreased from 58.9% to 19%, whereas the slowly digested starch content greatly increased from 23.8% in native starch to 50.3%. The increase in susceptibility to enzyme hydrolysis may be attributed to porous granular surface, amylopectin leaching, and the decrease in the relative crystallinity caused by freezing water.

  3. Improving CLM4.5 simulations of land-atmosphere exchange during freeze-thaw processes on the Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Siqiong; Fang, Xuewei; Lyu, Shihua; Zhang, Yu; Chen, Boli

    2017-10-01

    Soil is heterogeneous and has different thermal and hydraulic properties, causing varied behavior in heat and moisture transport. Therefore, soil has an important effect on land-atmosphere interactions. In this study, an improved soil parameterization scheme that considers gravel and organic matter in the soil was introduced into CLM4.5 (Community Land Model). By using data from the Zoige and Madoi sites on the Tibetan Plateau, the ability of the model to simultaneously simulate the duration of freeze-thaw periods, soil temperature, soil moisture, and surface energy during freeze-thaw processes, was validated. The results indicated that: (1) the new parameterization performed better in simulating the duration of the frozen, thawing, unfrozen, and freezing periods; (2) with the new scheme, the soil thermal conductivity values were decreased; (3) the new parameterization improved soil temperature simulation and effectively decreased cold biases; (4) the new parameterization scheme effectively decreased the dry biases of soil liquid water content during the freezing, completely frozen, and thawing periods, but increased the wet biases during the completely thawed period; and (5) the net radiation, latent heat flux, and soil surface heat flux of the Zoige and Madoi sites were much improved by the new organic matter and thermal conductivity parameterization.

  4. Genetic Basis of Evolutionary Adaptation by Escherichia coli to Stressful Cycles of Freezing, Thawing and Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Sleight, Sean C.; Orlic, Christian; Schneider, Dominique; Lenski, Richard E.

    2008-01-01

    Microbial evolution experiments offer a powerful approach for coupling changes in complex phenotypes, including fitness and its components, with specific mutations. Here we investigate mutations substituted in 15 lines of Escherichia coli that evolved for 1000 generations under freeze–thaw–growth (FTG) conditions. To investigate the genetic basis of their improvements, we screened many of the lines for mutations involving insertion sequence (IS) elements and identified two genes where multipl...

  5. Ferrrate(VI) and freeze-thaw treatment for oxidation of hormones and inactivation of fecal coliforms in sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diak, James; Örmeci, Banu

    2017-04-01

    This study examined the individual and combined effects of potassium ferrate(VI) additions and freeze-thaw conditioning for the treatment and dewatering of wastewater sludge in cold climates, with particular focus on the inactivation of fecal coliforms and oxidation of estrogens, androgens, and progestogens. The first phase of the study evaluated the effects of potassium ferrate(VI) pre-treatment followed by freeze-thaw at -20 °C using a low (0.5 g/L) and high (5.0 g/L) dose of potassium ferrate(VI). The results showed that pre-treatment of anaerobically digested sludge with 5 g/L of potassium ferrate(VI) reduced the concentration of fecal coliforms in the sludge cake to below 100 MPN/g DS. The second phase evaluated the ability of ferrate(VI) to oxidise selected hormones in sludge. Anaerobically digested sludge samples were spiked with 10 different hormones: estrone (E1), 17α-estradiol, 17β-estradiol (E2), estriol (E3), 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), equilin, mestranol, testosterone, norethindrone and norgestrel in two groups of low (3-75 ng/mL) and high (12-300 ng/L) concentration ranges of hormones. The samples were treated with either 0.5 or 1.0 g/L of potassium ferrate(VI), and hormone concentrations were measured again after treatment. Potassium ferrate(VI) additions as low as 1.0 g/L reduced the concentration of estrogens in sludge. Potassium ferrate(VI) additions of 0.5 and 1.0 g/L were less effective at reducing the concentrations of androgens and progestogens. Increasing ferrate(VI) dose would likely result in more substantial decreases in the concentrations of fecal coliforms and hormones. The results of this study indicate that the combined use of freeze-thaw and ferrate(VI) has the potential to provide a complete sludge treatment solution in cold regions.

  6. Investigation of Seasonal Landscape Freeze/Thaw Cycles in Relation to Cloud Structure in the High Northern Latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Cosmo

    2011-01-01

    The seasonal freezing and thawing of Earth's cryosphere (the portion of Earth's surface permanently or seasonally frozen) has an immense impact on Earth's climate as well as on its water, carbon and energy cycles. During the spring, snowmelt and the transition between frozen and non-frozen states lowers Earth's surface albedo. This change in albedo causes more solar radiation to be absorbed by the land surface, raising surface soil and air temperatures as much as 5 C within a few days. The transition of ice into liquid water not only raises the surface humidity, but also greatly affects the energy exchange between the land surface and the atmosphere as the phase change creates a latent energy dominated system. There is strong evidence to suggest that the thawing of the cryosphere during spring and refreezing during autumn is correlated to local atmospheric conditions such as cloud structure and frequency. Understanding the influence of land surface freeze/thaw cycles on atmospheric structure can help improve our understanding of links between seasonal land surface state and weather and climate, providing insight into associated changes in Earth's water, carbon, and energy cycles that are driven by climate change.Information on both the freeze/thaw states of Earth's land surface and cloud characteristics is derived from data sets collected by NOAA's Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I), the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer on NASA's Earth Observing System(AMSR-E), NASA's CloudSat, and NASA's SeaWinds-on-QuickSCAT Earth remote sensing satellite instruments. These instruments take advantage of the microwave spectrum to collect an ensemble of atmospheric and land surface data. Our analysis uses data from radars (active instruments which transmit a microwave signal toward Earth and measure the resultant backscatter) and radiometers (passive devices which measure Earth's natural microwave emission) to accurately characterize salient details on Earth's surface

  7. Mix design for improved strength and freeze-thaw durability of pervious concrete fill in Pearl-Chain Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Mia Schou Møller; Kevern, John T.; Schaefer, Vernon R.

    2017-01-01

    , fibers, and by internal curing using lightweight aggregate to best possibly meet the requirements for a fill material in Pearl-Chain Bridges. The 28-day compressive strength, splitting tensile strength, shear strength, permeability, and freeze-thaw durability were determined and compared for eight...... density, and thus the easiest to place. The addition of a high-range water reducing admixture and lightweight sand (expanded shale) for internal curing improved the 28-day compressive strength and splitting tensile strength. The coarse aggregate gradation had a large influence on permeability; however......Pearl-Chain Bridges are an innovative precast arch bridge technology which can utilize pervious concrete as fill material. The present study investigates how the mix design of the pervious concrete fill can be influenced by use of an air-entraining admixture, a high-range water reducing admixture...

  8. Mix design for improved strength and freeze-thaw durability of pervious concrete fill in Pearl-Chain Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Mia Schou Møller; Kevern, John T.; Schaefer, Vernon R.

    2017-01-01

    Pearl-Chain Bridges are an innovative precast arch bridge technology which can utilize pervious concrete as fill material. The present study investigates how the mix design of the pervious concrete fill can be influenced by use of an air-entraining admixture, a high-range water reducing admixture......, fibers, and by internal curing using lightweight aggregate to best possibly meet the requirements for a fill material in Pearl-Chain Bridges. The 28-day compressive strength, splitting tensile strength, shear strength, permeability, and freeze-thaw durability were determined and compared for eight...... different mixture proportions using two different sizes of granite coarse aggregate and at two different water-to-cement ratios. The specimens had an average void content of 24-28 %. Specimens containing air entraining and high-range water reducing admixtures were most workable, as determined by fresh...

  9. The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP): Radar Measurements at High Latitudes and of Freeze/Thaw State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Michael; Dunbar, Scott; Chen, Curtis

    2013-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) mission is scheduled for a late 2014 launch date. The mission will use both active radar and passive radiometer instruments at L-Band. In order to achieve a wide swath at sufficiently high resolution for both active and passive channels, an instrument architecture that uses a large rotating reflector is employed. In this paper, a focus will be places on the radar design and associated data products at high latitudes. The radar will employ synthetic-aperture processing to achieve a "moderate" resolution dual-pol product over a 1000 km swath. Because the radar is operating continuously, very frequent temporal coverage will be achieved at high latitudes. This data will be used, among other things, to produce a surface freeze/thaw state data product.

  10. Prevention of denaturation of freshwater crayfish muscle subjected to different freeze-thaw cycles by gelatin hydrolysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasemi, Mehran

    2017-11-01

    The cryoprotective effect of gelatin hydrolysates from the skin of beluga sturgeon (Huso huso) on freshwater crayfish (Astacus leptodactylus) muscle subjected to different freeze-thaw cycles was investigated. Untreated muscle was particularly susceptible to quality loss as indicated by the formation of secondary lipid oxidation products and the loss in sulfhydryl groups and Ca2+-ATPase activity. Hydrolysate produced using flavourzyme which was mainly consisted of oligopeptides as the main fraction as well as small fraction of polypeptides could lower the denaturation of crayfish myosin heavy chain when compared to the control. In addition, lipid oxidation in treated muscle was impeded to some extent. Peptides with smaller or longer chain length than those in flavourzyme hydrolysate although exhibited antioxidant activity, but were less effective in maintaining the muscle quality during storage. Thus, the potential of flavourzyme hydrolysate as the alternative cryoprotectant might be employed during crustacean processing. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Stability Evaluation of Volcanic Slope Subjected to Rainfall and Freeze-Thaw Action Based on Field Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shima Kawamura

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Rainfall-induced failures of natural and artificial slopes such as cut slopes, which are subjected to freezing and thawing, have been frequently reported in Hokkaido, Japan. In particular, many failures occur intensively from spring to summer seasons. Despite numerous field studies, explanation of their mechanical behavior based on in situ data has not yet been completely achieved due to the difficulty in grasping failure conditions. This study aims at clarifying the aspects of in-situ volcanic slopes subjected to rainfall and freeze-thaw action. The changes in soil moisture, pore pressure, deformations, and temperatures in the slope were investigated using soil moisture meters, tensiometers, thermocouple sensors, clinometers, settlement gauges, an anemovane, a snow gauge, and a rainfall gauge. The data generated from these measures indicated deformation in the slope examined mainly proceeded during the drainage process according to changes in soil moisture. Based on this data, a prediction method for failures is discussed in detail.

  12. Nitrogen deposition may enhance soil carbon storage via change of soil respiration dynamic during a spring freeze-thaw cycle period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Guoyong; Xing, Yajuan; Xu, Lijian; Wang, Jianyu; Meng, Wei; Wang, Qinggui; Yu, Jinghua; Zhang, Zhi; Wang, Zhidong; Jiang, Siling; Liu, Boqi; Han, Shijie

    2016-06-30

    As crucial terrestrial ecosystems, temperate forests play an important role in global soil carbon dioxide flux, and this process can be sensitive to atmospheric nitrogen deposition. It is often reported that the nitrogen addition induces a change in soil carbon dioxide emission in growing season. However, the important effects of interactions between nitrogen deposition and the freeze-thaw-cycle have never been investigated. Here we show nitrogen deposition delays spikes of soil respiration and weaken soil respiration. We found the nitrogen addition, time and nitrogen addition×time exerted the negative impact on the soil respiration of spring freeze-thaw periods due to delay of spikes and inhibition of soil respiration (p nitrogen), 39% (medium-nitrogen) and 36% (high-nitrogen) compared with the control. And the decrease values of soil respiration under medium- and high-nitrogen treatments during spring freeze-thaw-cycle period in temperate forest would be approximately equivalent to 1% of global annual C emissions. Therefore, we show interactions between nitrogen deposition and freeze-thaw-cycle in temperate forest ecosystems are important to predict global carbon emissions and sequestrations. We anticipate our finding to be a starting point for more sophisticated prediction of soil respirations in temperate forests ecosystems.

  13. A Micro-Scale Investigation on the Behaviors of Asphalt Mixtures under Freeze-Thaw Cycles Using Entropy Theory and a Computerized Tomography Scanning Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huining Xu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermodynamic behavior of asphalt mixtures is critical to the engineers since it directly relates to the damage in asphalt mixtures. However, most of the current research of the freeze-thaw damage of asphalt mixtures is focused on the bulk body from the macroscale and lacks a fundamental understanding of the thermodynamic behaviors of asphalt mixtures from the microscale perspective. In this paper, to identify the important thermodynamic behaviors of asphalt mixtures under freeze-thaw loading cycle, the information entropy theory, an X-ray computerized tomography (CT scanner and digital image processing technology are employed. The voids, the average size of the voids, the connected porosity, and the void number are extracted according to the scanned images. Based on the experiments and the CT scanned images, the information entropy evolution of the asphalt mixtures under different freeze-thaw cycles is calculated and the relationship between the change of information entropy and the pore structure characteristics is established. Then, the influences of different freezing and thawing conditions on the thermodynamic behaviors of asphalt mixtures are compared. The combination of information entropy theory and CT scanning technique proposed in this paper provides an innovative approach to investigate the thermodynamics behaviors of asphalt mixtures and a new way to analyze the freeze-thaw damage in asphalt mixtures.

  14. Freeze-thaw method improves the detection of volatile compounds in insects using Headspace Solid-Phase Microextraction (HS-SPME)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) coupled with gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is commonly used in analyzing insect volatiles. In order to improve the detection of volatiles in insects, a freeze-thaw method was applied to insect samples before the HS-SPME-GC-MS analysis. ...

  15. Comparison of cook loss, shear force, and sensory descriptive profiles of broiler breast fillets cooked from a frozen state and cooked after freeze/thaw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Four replications were conducted to compare quality measurements, cook loss, shear force, and sensory quality profiles of cooked broiler breast meat (pectoralis major) prepared directly from a frozen state and prepared after freeze/thaw. In each replication, fresh broiler fillets (removed from carca...

  16. Effects of freezing-thawing on DNA integrity of boar spermatozoa assessed by the neutral comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, L; Strzezek, J

    2005-12-01

    A modified version of the neutral comet assay was employed to evaluate the effect of the freezing-thawing process on boar-sperm DNA integrity. The sperm-rich fractions were collected from four mature boars and frozen into aluminium tubes and straws after extension in lactose-hen egg yolk-glycerol extender (lactose-HEY-G) or an extender containing lactose, lyophilized lipoprotein fractions extracted from ostrich egg yolk and glycerol (lactose-LPFo-G). The semen samples were also frozen in a standard boar semen extender (Kortowo-3), without the addition of cryoprotective substances. Post-thaw sperm motility and plasma membrane integrity, assessed by SYBR-14/PI and Hoechst 33258 stains, declined (p sperm DNA damage, regardless of the extender type and packaging material. Spermatozoa frozen in lactose-HEY-G or lactose-LPFo-G extender showed lower (p sperm DNA, which varied among the boars. Inter-boar variations in post-thaw DNA damage were more pronounced in sperm samples frozen in lactose-HEY-G or lactose-LPFo-G extender. The results of this study show that the freezing-thawing process affects the DNA integrity of boar spermatozoa, irrespective of the extender type and packaging material. Furthermore, the use of whole hen egg yolk and ostrich lyophilized lipoprotein fractions in the freezing extender gave similar results regarding sperm DNA integrity. It can be concluded that the neutral comet assay can be used in conjunction with routine sperm parameters for assessment of post-thaw quality of boar semen.

  17. Temporal monitoring of the soil freeze-thaw cycles over snow-cover land by using off-ground GPR

    KAUST Repository

    Jadoon, Khan

    2013-07-01

    We performed off-ground ground-penetrating radar (GPR) measurements over a bare agricultural field to monitor the freeze-thaw cycles over snow-cover. The GPR system consisted of a vector network analyzer combined with an off-ground monostatic horn antenna, thereby setting up an ultra-wideband stepped-frequency continuous-wave radar. Measurements were performed during nine days and the surface of the bare soil was exposed to snow fall, evaporation and precipitation as the GPR antenna was mounted 110 cm above the ground. Soil surface dielectric permittivity was retrieved using an inversion of time-domain GPR data focused on the surface reflection. The GPR forward model used combines a full-waveform solution of Maxwell\\'s equations for three-dimensional wave propagation in planar layered media together with global reflection and transmission functions to account for the antenna and its interactions with the medium. Temperature and permittivity sensors were installed at six depths to monitor the soil dynamics in the top 8 cm depth. Significant effects of soil dynamics were observed in the time-lapse GPR, temperature and permittivity data and in particular freeze and thaw events were clearly visible. A good agreement of the trend was observed between the temperature, permittivity and GPR time-lapse data with respect to five freeze-thaw cycles. The GPR-derived permittivity was in good agreement with sensor observations. The proposed method appears to be promising for the real-time mapping and monitoring of the frozen layer at the field scale. © 2013 IEEE.

  18. Investigation on the Mechanical Properties of a Cement-Based Material Containing Carbon Nanotube under Drying and Freeze-Thaw Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei-Wen; Ji, Wei-Ming; Wang, Yao-Cheng; Liu, Yi; Shen, Ruo-Xu; Xing, Feng

    2015-12-14

    This paper aimed to explore the mechanical properties of a cement-based material with carbon nanotube (CNT) under drying and freeze-thaw environments. Mercury Intrusion Porosimetry and Scanning Electron Microscopy were used to analyze the pore structure and microstructure of CNT/cement composite, respectively. The experimental results showed that multi-walled CNT (MWCNT) could improve to different degrees the mechanical properties (compressive and flexural strengths) and physical performances (shrinkage and water loss) of cement-based materials under drying and freeze-thaw conditions. This paper also demonstrated that MWCNT could interconnect hydration products to enhance the performance of anti-microcracks for cement-based materials, as well as the density of materials due to CNT's filling action.

  19. Investigation on the Mechanical Properties of a Cement-Based Material Containing Carbon Nanotube under Drying and Freeze-Thaw Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Wen Li

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aimed to explore the mechanical properties of a cement-based material with carbon nanotube (CNT under drying and freeze-thaw environments. Mercury Intrusion Porosimetry and Scanning Electron Microscopy were used to analyze the pore structure and microstructure of CNT/cement composite, respectively. The experimental results showed that multi-walled CNT (MWCNT could improve to different degrees the mechanical properties (compressive and flexural strengths and physical performances (shrinkage and water loss of cement-based materials under drying and freeze-thaw conditions. This paper also demonstrated that MWCNT could interconnect hydration products to enhance the performance of anti-microcracks for cement-based materials, as well as the density of materials due to CNT’s filling action.

  20. Increasing viability, numbers, and motility of sperm in men with normal spermatogenesis exposed to saffron extract after freezing- thawing process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Khazaei

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sperm freezing method is used frequently in assisted reproductive techniques, on the other hand in different studies negative effect of freezing have been shown on different sperm parameters. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of saffron extract as an antioxidant, on the different sperm parameters in men with normal spermatogenesis after freezing-thawing process. Methods: In this case-control study, collecting of samples was done in 2015 year from the Infertility Treatment Center, ACECR Branch of Qazvin, Qazvin, Iran. These men had normal spermatogenesis and their spouse had infertility problem. Semen samples was divided in two groups, control without saffron extract, and case with 50 mg/ml saffron extract. Then, samples freezed with snap freezing method. After two weeks, they were thawed and different sperm parameters were assessed. Data were analyzed by two-tail T test. Findings: Our results showed, mean percent of viability (72±0.99, motility (87±0.43, and the number of sperm cells (62.5±3.8 in treaded group was elevated significantly (P0.05. Conclusion: Our results showed that possibly antioxidant agents of saffron extract could scavenge free radicals and thus, optimize different sperm parameters (viability, motility, and number after freezing and thawing.

  1. Comparative study of deterioration procedure in chemical-leavened steamed bread dough under frozen storage and freeze/thaw condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei; Yang, Runqiang; Gu, Zhenxin; Xu, Xueming; Jin, Zhengyu

    2017-08-15

    Successive freeze/thaw (FT) cycle was a widely used empirical approach to shorten the experimental period since it could accelerate frozen dough deterioration compared with frozen storage (FS). In order to compare the effect of FS and FT cycle on deterioration procedure of chemical-leavened steamed bread dough, kinetic studies of bread quality indices were performed and the relationships between bread quality and dough components were further established. Results showed that degradation of steamed bread loaf volume and firmness followed first-order kinetics during FS and zero-order kinetics during FT, respectively. Glutenin macropolymers (GMP) depolymerization and dough weight loss occurred steadily throughout FS and FT. Significant enhancement of damaged starch and crystallinity were observed at the later FS period and FT cycle. Multiple regression study led to the conclusion that dough weight loss contributed the most to the reduced bread loaf volume under FS whereas GMP depolymerization dominated under FT condition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A prediction model for uniaxial compressive strength of deteriorated pyroclastic rocks due to freeze-thaw cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    İnce, İsmail; Fener, Mustafa

    2016-08-01

    Either directly or indirectly, building stone is exposed to diverse atmospheric interactions depending on the seasonal conditions. Due to those interactions, objects of historic and cultural heritage, as well as modern buildings, partially or completely deteriorate. Among processes involved in rock deterioration, the freeze-thaw (F-T) cycle is one of the most important. Even though pyroclastic rocks have been used as building stone worldwide due to their easy workability, they are the building stone most affected by the F-T cycle. A historical region in Central Anatolia, Turkey, Cappadoia encompasses exceptional natural wonders characterized by fairy chimneys and unique historical and cultural heritage. Human-created caves, places of worship and houses have been dug into the pyroclastic rocks, which have in turn been used in architectural construction as building stone. Using 10 pyroclastic rock samples collected from Cappadocia, we determined the rock's index-mechanical properties to develop a statistical model for estimating percentage loss of uniaxial compressive strength a critical parameter of F-T cycle's important value. We used dry density (ρd), ultrasonic velocity (Vp), point load strengths (IS(50)), and slake-durability test indexes (Id4) values of unweathered rocks in our model, which is highly reliable (R2 = 0.84) for predetermination of percentage loss of uniaxial compressive strengths of pyroclastic rocks without requiring any F-T tests.

  3. Freeze-Thaw Performance and Moisture-Induced Damage Resistance of Base Course Stabilized with Slow Setting Bitumen Emulsion-Portland Cement Additives

    OpenAIRE

    Mojtaba Shojaei Baghini; Amiruddin Ismail

    2015-01-01

    Freeze-thaw (FT) cycles and moisture susceptibility are important factors influencing the geotechnical characteristics of soil-aggregates. Given the lack of published information on the behavior of cement-bitumen emulsion-treated base (CBETB) under environmental conditions, especially freezing and thawing, this study investigated the effects of these additives on the CBETB performance. The primary goal was to evaluate the resistance of CBETB to moisture damage by performing FT, Marshall condi...

  4. The Impact of Different Preservation Conditions and Freezing-Thawing Cycles on Quality of RNA, DNA, and Proteins in Cancer Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaogeng; Zheng, Hong; Chen, Jie; Zhong, Xiaorong; Wang, Yu; Wang, Zhu; Wang, Yanping

    2015-10-01

    High-quality cancer tissues are essential for future research, especially molecular research. For the sake of better quality of tissues, some storage methods are chosen according to lab conditions. But the impact of different storing conditions on the quality of RNA, DNA (especially the degree of DNA methylation), and protein of tissues that have undergone a thawing process, is not clear. We analyzed the influence of different storage conditions including in RNALater solution, normal saline, Opti-mum Cutting Temperature compound (OCT), and snap frozen with no protective reagent (as control) in paired tissue samples on the quality of RNA (RNA Integrity Number value and mRNA expression), DNA quality (DNA amplification and DNA methylation degree of gene RASSF1a), and protein quality. Further, we analyzed the RNA quality of tissues that underwent three freeze-thaw cycles. The RNALater-treated group retained good RNA quality as expected on three repeated freeze-thaw cycles (RIN>8), but the snap-frozen tissues showed relatively poor results after one freeze-thaw cycle (RINRNA from saline- and OCT-treated groups also yielded good results when we repeated freezing and thawing one time (RIN>7) and two times (RIN>6). The impact of different storing conditions on DNA amplification is small. However, DNA methylation and protein quality are different with different storing conditions. OCT seems to be more secure and stable compared with other two experimental groups, and show a similar trend with control group. In consideration of budget and efficiency, we suggest OCT as the best storing method that not only preserves RNA quality during the freezing-thawing process well, but also ensures more secure and stable DNA and protein.

  5. Properties and toughening mechanisms of PVA/PAM double-network hydrogels prepared by freeze-thawing and anneal-swelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Kangkang; Dong, Xia; Qin, Chengling; Ji, Xinan; He, Jinxin

    2017-08-01

    It is well known that preparation method of hydrogels has a significant effect on their properties. In this paper, freeze-thawing and anneal-swelling were applied to prepare poly(vinyl alcohol)/polyacrylamide (PVA/PAM) double-network hydrogels with covalently and physically cross-linked networks. The properties of these hydrogels were investigated and compared to control hydrogels. Results indicated that hydrogels fabricated by freeze-thawing show larger pores size and higher swelling capacity than those made by anneal-swelling and control hydrogels. Hydrogels prepared by anneal-swelling exhibit higher mechanical strength, energy dissipation, fracture energy, gel fraction and crystallinity than those made by freeze-thawing and control hydrogels. Physical cross-linking plays a key role in formation of physical-chemical double-network. The toughening mechanism of double-network hydrogel is related to their chain-fracture behavior and elasticity. The results also indicated that appropriate methods can endow hydrogels with specific microstructures and properties which would broaden current hydrogels research and applications in biomedical fields. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Studies on the protective efficacy of freeze thawed promastigote antigen of Leishmania donovani along with various adjuvants against visceral leishmaniasis infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Ankita; Kaur, Harpreet; Kaur, Sukhbir

    2015-09-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) caused by Leishmania donovani persists as a major public health issue in tropical and subtropical areas of the world. Current treatment of this disease relies on use of drugs. It is doubtful that chemotherapy can alone eradicate the disease, so there is a need for an effective vaccine. Killed antigen candidates remain a good prospect considering their ease of formulation, stability, low cost and safety. To enhance the efficacy of killed vaccines suitable adjuvant and delivery system are needed. Therefore, the current study was conducted to determine the protective efficacy of freeze-thawed L. donovani antigen in combination with different adjuvants against experimental infection of VL. For this, BALB/c mice were immunized thrice at an interval of two weeks. Challenge infection was given two weeks after last immunization. Mice were sacrificed after last immunization and on different post challenge/infection days. Immunized mice showed significant reduction in parasite burden, enhanced DTH responses with increased levels of Th1 cytokines and lower levels of Th2 cytokines, thus indicating the development of a protective Th1 response. Maximum protection was achieved with liposome encapsulated freeze thawed promastigote (FTP) antigen of L. donovani and it was followed by group immunized with FTP+MPL-A, FTP+saponin, FTP+alum and FTP antigen (alone). The present study highlights greater efficacy of freeze thawed promastigote antigen as a potential vaccine candidate along with effective adjuvant formulations against experimental VL infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Experimental Investigation of the Variation of Concrete Pores under the Action of Freeze-Thaw Cycles by Using X-Ray CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The variation of concrete pores under the action of freeze-thaw cycles was investigated experimentally by using the X-ray CT. Firstly, the statistical characteristics of pores of concrete specimens were obtained by using the X-ray image analysis. Secondly, the variation of porosity and pore volume of concrete pores were analyzed and discussed by comparing with above characteristics. Thirdly, the failure process of the concrete specimens acted by the freeze-thaw cycles was investigated by scanning the interior of concrete specimens. The results showed that the pore volumes of concrete pores whose volumes were located at the interval [0.5 mm3, 20 mm3] have no big variation in both the amounts and volume of concrete pores, while others were found to have huge change during the process of experiment. The extent of damage acted by the repeated freezing and thawing gradually ranged from surface to complete disintegration of the interior of concrete specimens after 30 cycles of freeze-thaw acting.

  8. Development of Fracture Energy of FRC Materials. Freeze-Thaw Resistance of FRC Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoklund Larsen, E.

    During the past four years research has been carried out at the Danish Building Research Institute on different aspects of the long term performance of fibre reinforced cementitious composites (FRC) exposed to climate stresses. Some of the most important results have been brought together in this...

  9. Development of Fracture Energy of FRC Materials. Freeze-Thaw Resistance of FRC Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoklund Larsen, E.

    in this SBI Bulletin in order to give more direct information about two of the most important aspects in connection with FRCs. The SBI Bulletin contains two oral presentations given at the Fourth RILEM International Symposium on Fibre Reinforced Cement and Concrete which was held at the University......During the past four years research has been carried out at the Danish Building Research Institute on different aspects of the long term performance of fibre reinforced cementitious composites (FRC) exposed to climate stresses. Some of the most important results have been brought together...

  10. Ultrasonic Measurements of Unconsolidated Saline Sediments During Freeze/Thaw Cycles: The Seismic Properties of Cryopeg Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, S.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.

    2013-12-01

    Saline permafrost and cryopegs (hypersaline unfrozen layers/zones within permafrost) are widespread in the Arctic coastal area as a result of marine transgression and regression in recent geological history. Owing to the freezing-point depression effect of soluble salts, they contain more unfrozen water than non-saline frozen sediments when subjected to the same permafrost temperatures (e.g., from 0 to -15 °C). Mapping subsurface cryopeg structure remains a challenging geophysical task due to the poor penetration of GPR in highly conductive fluids and related limitations for lower frequency EM techniques. Seismic profiling, particularly surface wave characterization, provides one possible approach to delineate the extent of cryopeg bodies. However, interpretation of such surveys is currently limited by the sparse database of measurements examining the seismic properties of unconsolidated materials saturated with saline fluids at sub-zero temperatures. We present the results of experiments examining seismic velocity in the ultrasonic range for both synthetic and natural permafrost sediments during freeze/thaw cycles; in these experiments, use of a range of brine salinities allows us to evaluate the properties of cryopeg sediments at in-situ conditions, a prerequisite for quantitative interpretation of seismic imaging results. Because of the abundant unfrozen water and less developed inter-granular ice structure, the seismic properties of saline permafrost typically falls between frozen and unfrozen soils. We conducted ultrasonic measurements of a freeze-thaw cycle on 20-30 Ottawa sand (grain size 590-840 μm) as well as natural mineral soils from the Barrow Environmental Observatory (BEO) saturated with brines of different salinities (0-2.5 M NaCl). For each salinity, seismic properties were measured using the ultrasonic (~1 MHz) pulse-transmission method in the temperature range from 20 to -30 °C. Similar to sediments saturated with low salinity fluids, seismic

  11. Is there a relationship between the chromatin status and DNA fragmentation of boar spermatozoa following freezing-thawing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, L; Strzezek, J

    2007-07-15

    In this study a radioisotope method, which is based on the quantitative measurements of tritiated-labeled actinomycin D ((3)H-AMD) incorporation into the sperm nuclei ((3)H-AMD incorporation assay), was used to assess the chromatin status of frozen-thawed boar spermatozoa. This study also tested the hypothesis that frozen-thawed spermatozoa with altered chromatin were susceptible to DNA fragmentation measured with the neutral comet assay (NCA). Boar semen was diluted in lactose-hen egg yolk-glycerol extender (L-HEY) or lactose ostrich egg yolk lipoprotein fractions-glycerol extender (L-LPFo), packaged into aluminum tubes or plastic straws and frozen in a controlled programmable freezer. In Experiment 1, the chromatin status and DNA fragmentation were measured in fresh and frozen-thawed spermatozoa from the same ejaculates. There was a significant increase in sperm chromatin destabilization and DNA fragmentation in frozen-thawed semen as compared with fresh semen. The proportions of spermatozoa labeled with (3)H-AMD were concurrent with elevated levels of sperm DNA fragmentation in K-3 extender, without cryoprotective substances, compared with L-HEY or L-LPFo extender. Regression analysis revealed that the results of the (3)H-AMD incorporation assay and NCA for frozen-thawed spermatozoa were correlated. Boars differed significantly in terms of post-thaw sperm DNA damage. In Experiment 2, the susceptibility of sperm chromatin to decondensation was assessed using a low concentration of heparin. Treatment of frozen-thawed spermatozoa with heparin revealed enhanced (3)H-AMD binding, suggesting nuclear chromatin decondensation. The deterioration in post-thaw sperm viability, such as motility, mitochondrial function and plasma membrane integrity, was concurrent with increased chromatin instability and DNA fragmentation. This is the first report to show that freezing-thawing procedure facilitated destabilization in the chromatin structure of boar spermatozoa, resulting in

  12. Evaluation of the freeze-thaw/evaporation process for the treatment of produced waters. Final report, August 1992--August 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boysen, J.E.; Walker, K.L.; Mefford, J.L.; Kirsch, J.R. [Resource Technology Corp., Laramie, WY (United States); Harju, J.A. [North Dakota Univ., Grand Forks, ND (United States). Energy and Environmental Research Center

    1996-06-01

    The use of freeze-crystallization is becoming increasingly acknowledged as a low-cost, energy-efficient method for purifying contaminated water. The natural freezing process can be coupled with natural evaporative processes to treat oil and gas produced waters year round in regions where subfreezing temperatures seasonally occur. The climates typical of Colorado`s San Juan Basin and eastern slope, as well as the oil and gas producing regions of Wyoming, are well suited for application of these processes in combination. Specifically, the objectives of this research are related to the development of a commercially-economic FTE (freeze-thaw/evaporation) process for the treatment and purification of water produced in conjunction with oil and natural gas. The research required for development of this process consists of three tasks: (1) a literature survey and process modeling and economic analysis; (2) laboratory-scale process evaluation; and (3) field demonstration of the process. Results of research conducted for the completion of these three tasks indicate that produced water treatment and disposal costs for commercial application of the process, would be in the range of $0.20 to $0.30/bbl in the Rocky Mountain region. FTE field demonstration results from northwestern New Mexico during the winter of 1995--96 indicate significant and simultaneous removal of salts, metals, and organics from produced water. Despite the unusually warm winter, process yields demonstrate disposal volume reductions on the order of 80% and confirm the potential for economic production of water suitable for various beneficial uses. The total dissolved solids concentrations of the FTE demonstration streams were 11,600 mg/L (feed), 56,900 mg/L (brine), and 940 mg/L (ice melt).

  13. Spatial Variability of L-Band Brightness Temperature during Freeze/Thaw Events over a Prairie Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Roy

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Passive microwave measurements from space are known to be sensitive to the freeze/thaw (F/T state of the land surface. These measurements are at a coarse spatial resolution (~15–50 km and the spatial variability of the microwave emissions within a pixel can have important effects on the interpretation of the signal. An L-band ground-based microwave radiometer campaign was conducted in the Canadian Prairies during winter 2014–2015 to examine the spatial variability of surface emissions during frozen and thawed periods. Seven different sites within the Kenaston soil monitoring network were sampled five times between October 2014 and April 2015 with a mobile ground-based L-band radiometer system at approximately monthly intervals. The radiometer measurements showed that in a seemingly homogenous prairie landscape, the spatial variability of brightness temperature (TB is non-negligible during both frozen and unfrozen soil conditions. Under frozen soil conditions, TB was negatively correlated with soil permittivity (εG. This correlation was related to soil moisture conditions before the main freezing event, showing that the soil ice volumetric content at least partly affects TB. However, because of the effect of snow on L-Band emission, the correlation between TB and εG decreased with snow accumulation. When compared to satellite measurements, the average TB of the seven plots were well correlated with the Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS TB with a root mean square difference of 8.1 K and consistent representation of the strong F/T signal (i.e., TB increases and decreases when soil freezing and thawing, respectively. This study allows better quantitative understanding of the spatial variability in L-Band emissions related to landscape F/T, and will help the calibration and validation of satellite-based F/T retrieval algorithms.

  14. Behavior of the plasma membrane of isolated protoplasts during a freeze-thaw cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowgert, M.F.; Steponkus, P.L.

    1984-08-01

    Cryomicroscopy of protoplasts isolated from nonacclimated (NA) rye leaves (Secale cereale L. cv Puma) revealed that the predominant form of injury following cooling to the minimum temperature for 50% survival (LT/sub 50/) (-5/sup 0/C) was expansion-induced lysis of the plasma membrane during warming and thawing of the suspending medium when the decreasing osmolality resulted in osmotic expansion of the protoplasts. When cooled to temperatures below the LT/sub 50/, the predominant form of injury was loss of osmotic responsiveness following cooling so that the protoplasts were osmotically inactive during warming. Only a low incidence (< 10%) of expansion-induced lysis was observed in protoplasts isolated from acclimated (ACC) leaves, and the predominant form of injury following cooling to the LT/sub 50/ (-25/sup 0/C) was loss of osmotic responsiveness. The tolerable surface area increment (TSAI/sub 50/) which resulted in lysis of 50% of a population (TSAI) of NA protoplasts osmotically expanded from isotonic solutions was 1122 +/- 172 square micrometers. Similar values were obtained when the protoplasts were osmotically expanded from hypertonic solutions. Osmotic contractions were readily reversible upon return to isotonic solutions. During freeze-induced dehydration, endocytotic vesicles formed in NA protoplasts whereas exocytotic extrusions formed on the surface of ACC protoplasts. During osmotic expansion following thawing of the suspending medium, the endocytotic vesicles remained in the cytoplasm of NA protoplasts and the protoplasts lysed before their original volume and surface area were regained. In contrast, the exocytotic extrusions were drawn back into the surface of ACC protoplasts as the protoplasts regained their original volume and surface area. 25 references, 10 figures, 1 table.

  15. Effect of stocking rate on soil-atmosphere CH4 flux during spring freeze-thaw cycles in a northern desert steppe, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Jie Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Methane (CH(4 uptake by steppe soils is affected by a range of specific factors and is a complex process. Increased stocking rate promotes steppe degradation, with unclear consequences for gas exchanges. To assess the effects of grazing management on CH(4 uptake in desert steppes, we investigated soil-atmosphere CH(4 exchange during the winter-spring transition period. METHODOLOGY/MAIN FINDING: The experiment was conducted at twelve grazing plots denoting four treatments defined along a grazing gradient with three replications: non-grazing (0 sheep/ha, NG, light grazing (0.75 sheep/ha, LG, moderate grazing (1.50 sheep/ha, MG and heavy grazing (2.25 sheep/ha, HG. Using an automatic cavity ring-down spectrophotometer, we measured CH(4 fluxes from March 1 to April 29 in 2010 and March 2 to April 27 in 2011. According to the status of soil freeze-thaw cycles (positive and negative soil temperatures occurred in alternation, the experiment was divided into periods I and II. Results indicate that mean CH(4 uptake in period I (7.51 µg CH(4-C m(-2 h(-1 was significantly lower than uptake in period II (83.07 µg CH(4-C m(-2 h(-1. Averaged over 2 years, CH(4 fluxes during the freeze-thaw period were -84.76 µg CH(4-C m(-2 h(-1 (NG, -88.76 µg CH(4-C m(-2 h(-1 (LG, -64.77 µg CH(4-C m(-2 h(-1 (MG and -28.80 µg CH(4-C m(-2 h(-1 (HG. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: CH(4 uptake activity is affected by freeze-thaw cycles and stocking rates. CH(4 uptake is correlated with the moisture content and temperature of soil. MG and HG decreases CH(4 uptake while LG exerts a considerable positive impact on CH(4 uptake during spring freeze-thaw cycles in the northern desert steppe in China.

  16. Repeated freezing induces oxidative stress and reduces survival in the freeze-tolerant goldenrod gall fly, Eurosta solidaginis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doelling, Adam R W; Griffis, Nicole; Williams, Jason B

    2014-08-01

    Freeze tolerant insects must not only survive extracellular ice formation but also the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during oxygen reperfusion upon thawing. Furthermore, diurnal fluctuations in temperature place temperate insects at risk of being exposed to multiple freeze-thaw cycles, yet few studies have examined metrics of survival and oxidative stress in freeze-tolerant insects subjected to successive freezing events. To address this, we assessed survival in larvae of the goldenrod gall fly Eurosta solidaginis, after being subjected to 0, 5, 10, 20, or 30 diurnally repeated cold exposures (RCE) to -18°C or a single freeze to -18°C for 20days. In addition, we measured indicators of oxidative stress, levels of cryoprotectants, and total aqueous antioxidant capacity in animals exposed to the above treatments at 8, 32, or 80h after their final thaw. Repeated freezing and thawing, rather than time spent frozen, reduced survival as only 30% of larvae subjected to 20 or 30 RCE successfully pupated, compared to those subjected to fewer RCE or a single 20d freeze, of which 82% pupated. RCE had little effect on the concentration of the cryoprotectant glycerol (4.26±0.66μgglycerol·ngprotein(-1) for all treatments and time points) or sorbitol (18.8±2.9μgsorbitol·mgprotein(-1) for all treatments and time points); however, sorbitol concentrations were more than twofold higher than controls (16.3±2.2μgsorbitol·mgprotein(-1)) initially after a thaw in larvae subjected to a single extended freeze, but levels returned to values similar to controls at 80h after thaw. Thawing likely produced ROS as total aqueous antioxidant capacities peaked at 1.8-fold higher than controls (14.7±1.6mmoltrolox·ngprotein(-1)) in animals exposed to 5, 10, or 20 RCE. By contrast, aqueous antioxidant capacities were similar to controls in larvae subjected to 30 RCE or the single 20d freeze regardless of time post final thaw, indicating these animals may have had an impaired

  17. Spaceborne microwave remote sensing of seasonal freeze-thaw processes in theterrestrial high l atitudes : relationships with land-atmosphere CO2 exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Kyle C.; Kimball, John S.; Zhao, Maosheng; Njoku, Eni; Zimmermann, Reiner; Running, Steven W.

    2004-01-01

    Landscape transitions between seasonally frozen and thawed conditions occur each year over roughly 50 million square kilometers of Earth's Northern Hemisphere. These relatively abrupt transitions represent the closest analog to a biospheric and hydrologic on/off switch existing in nature, affecting surface meteorological conditions, ecological trace gas dynamics, energy exchange and hydrologic activity profoundly. We utilize time series satellite-borne microwave remote sensing measurements from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) to examine spatial and temporal variability in seasonal freeze/thaw cycles for the pan-Arctic basin and Alaska. Regional measurements of spring thaw timing are derived using daily brightness temperature measurements from the 19 GHz, horizontally polarized channel, separately for overpasses with 6 AM and 6 PM equatorial crossing times. Spatial and temporal patterns in regional freeze/thaw dynamics show distinct differences between North America and Eurasia, and boreal forest and Arctic tundra biomes. Annual anomalies in the timing of thawing in spring also correspond closely to seasonal atmospheric CO2 concentration anomalies derived from NOAA CMDL arctic and subarctic monitoring stations. Classification differences between AM and PM overpass data average approximately 5 days for the region, though both appear to be effective surrogates for monitoring annual growing seasons at high latitudes.

  18. Spaceborne microwave remote sensing of seasonal freeze-thaw processes in the terrestrial high latitudes: relationships with land-atmosphere CO2 exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Kyle C.; Kimball, John S.; Zhao, Maosheng; Njoku, Eni; Zimmermann, Reiner; Running, Steven W.

    2004-12-01

    Landscape transitions between seasonally frozen and thawed conditions occur each year over roughly 50 million square kilometers of Earth's Northern Hemisphere. These realtively abrupt transitions represent the closest analog to a biospheric and hydrologic on/off switch existing in nature, affecting surface meteorological conditions, ecological trace gas dynamics, energy exchange and hydrologic activity profoundly. We utilize time series satellite-borne microwave remote sensing measurements from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) to examine spatial and temporal variability in seasonal freeze/thaw cycles for the pan-Arctic basin and Alaska. Regional measurements of spring thaw timing are derived using daily brightness temperature measurements from the 19 GHz, horizontally polarized channel, spearately for overpasses with 6 AM and 6 PM equatorial crossing times. Spatial and temporal patterns in regional freeze/thaw dynamics show distinct differences between North Americ and Eurasia, and boreal forest and Arctic tundra biomes. Annual anomalies in the timing of thawing in spring also correspond closely to seasonal atmospheric CO2 concentration anomalies derived from NOAA CMDL arctic and subarctic monitoring stations. Classification differences between AM and PM overpass data average approximately 5 days for the region, through both appear to be effective surrogates for monitoring annual growing seasons at high latitudes.

  19. Quantification of Intracellular Ice Formation and Recrystallization During Freeze-Thaw Cycles and Their Relationship with the Viability of Pig Iliac Endothelium Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoli; Zhao, Gang; Shu, Zhiquan; Niu, Dan; Zhang, Zhiguo; Zhou, Ping; Cao, Yunxia; Gao, Dayong

    2016-12-01

    Quantitative evaluation of the inherent correlation between cell cryoinjuries and intracellular ice formation (IIF) together with recrystallization (IIR) is of primary importance for both optimization of biopreservation and cryotherapy. The objective of this study is to thoroughly explore the roles of IIF on cell viability by using pig iliac endothelium cells (PIECs) as model cells during freezing and thawing. The experimental results indicated that both the probabilities of IIF (PIF) and IIR (PIR) increased along with the increase of cooling rates (p evaluation with Hoechst 33342/propidium iodide double staining showed that most of the cells were killed (viability <20%) by the abovementioned freeze-thaw cycles, which indicated that the cooling rates investigated were all too rapid since large amounts of IIF and IIR were introduced. Another interesting phenomenon is that the presence of a low concentration of DMSO (1 M) tends to improve cell viability while increasing the PIF and PIR during freezing/thawing, contrary to the common belief that larger PIF corresponds to greater cryoinjury. This may be attributed to the intrinsic protection effect of DMSO by reduction of solution injury or other potential injuries. These findings may be of potential application value for both cryopreservation and cryosurgery by providing helpful additions to the existing studies on investigation of cryoinjuries of PIECs.

  20. Temporal Monitoring of the Soil Freeze-Thaw Cycles over a Snow-Covered Surface by Using Air-Launched Ground-Penetrating Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Zaib Jadoon

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We tested an off-ground ground-penetrating radar (GPR system at a fixed location over a bare agricultural field to monitor the soil freeze-thaw cycles over a snow-covered surface. The GPR system consisted of a monostatic horn antenna combined with a vector network analyzer, providing an ultra-wideband stepped-frequency continuous-wave radar. An antenna calibration experiment was performed to filter antenna and back scattered effects from the raw GPR data. Near the GPR setup, sensors were installed in the soil to monitor the dynamics of soil temperature and dielectric permittivity at different depths. The soil permittivity was retrieved via inversion of time domain GPR data focused on the surface reflection. Significant effects of soil dynamics were observed in the time-lapse GPR, temperature and dielectric permittivity measurements. In particular, five freeze and thaw events were clearly detectable, indicating that the GPR signals respond to the contrast between the dielectric permittivity of frozen and thawed soil. The GPR-derived permittivity was in good agreement with sensor observations. Overall, the off-ground nature of the GPR system permits non-invasive time-lapse observation of the soil freeze-thaw dynamics without disturbing the structure of the snow cover. The proposed method shows promise for the real-time mapping and monitoring of the shallow frozen layer at the field scale.

  1. The effect of firing temperature on the irreversible expansion, water absorption and pore structure of a brick body during freeze-thaw cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikuláš ŠVEDA

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the monitoring of brick body in the process of volumetric freezing and thawing. The samples were fired at temperatures of 900, 1000 and 1060 °C. Attention is focused on monitoring of the irreversible expansion, water absorption and pore structure of a brick body. We found that in all cases the endpoints take place continuously, where the amount firing temperature plays a crucial role. The greatest influence of freeze/thaw cycles on the change of the pore structure was also observed at the lowest temperature. The change of the pore system during the freeze-thaw cycles occurs in such a way, that the pore volume of small pores further decreases and conversely, the pore volume of large pores increases. The knowledge gained can be used not only in the production of new but also in predicting the remaining durability of older clay roofing tiles. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.19.4.2741

  2. Temporal Monitoring of the Soil Freeze-Thaw Cycles over a Snow-Covered Surface by Using Air-Launched Ground-Penetrating Radar

    KAUST Repository

    Jadoon, Khan

    2015-09-18

    We tested an off-ground ground-penetrating radar (GPR) system at a fixed location over a bare agricultural field to monitor the soil freeze-thaw cycles over a snow-covered surface. The GPR system consisted of a monostatic horn antenna combined with a vector network analyzer, providing an ultra-wideband stepped-frequency continuous-wave radar. An antenna calibration experiment was performed to filter antenna and back scattered effects from the raw GPR data. Near the GPR setup, sensors were installed in the soil to monitor the dynamics of soil temperature and dielectric permittivity at different depths. The soil permittivity was retrieved via inversion of time domain GPR data focused on the surface reflection. Significant effects of soil dynamics were observed in the time-lapse GPR, temperature and dielectric permittivity measurements. In particular, five freeze and thaw events were clearly detectable, indicating that the GPR signals respond to the contrast between the dielectric permittivity of frozen and thawed soil. The GPR-derived permittivity was in good agreement with sensor observations. Overall, the off-ground nature of the GPR system permits non-invasive time-lapse observation of the soil freeze-thaw dynamics without disturbing the structure of the snow cover. The proposed method shows promise for the real-time mapping and monitoring of the shallow frozen layer at the field scale.

  3. Mapping of solution components, pH changes, protein stability and the elimination of protein precipitation during freeze-thawing of fibroblast growth factor 20.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Haripada; Karkaria, Cyrus; Davagnino, Juan

    2009-08-13

    This study discusses the effect of key factors like containers, buffers and the freeze (controlled vs. flash freezing) and thawing processes on the stability of a therapeutic protein fibroblast growth factor 20 (FGF-20). The freezing profiles monitored by 15 temperature probes located at different regions in a 2-L bottle during freezing can be grouped into three categories. A rapid drop in temperature was observed at the bottom followed by the top and middle center of the bottle. The freeze-thawing behavior in a 50 ml tube is considerably uniform, as expected. Among phosphate, HEPES (4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazine ethanesulfonic acid), citrate and histidine (each containing 0.5 M arginine-sulfate) buffer systems, a minimum pH change (0.4 pH unit vs. approximately 1.7 pH unit) was observed for the phosphate buffer system. Thawing in a 50 ml tube at room temperature standing resulted in a significant phase separation in citrate, histidine and HEPES buffers; however, phase separation was least in the phosphate buffer system. These phase separations were found to be temperature dependent. No effect of Polysorbate 80 on freeze-thawing of FGF-20 was observed. Significant concentration gradients in major buffer components and protein concentration were observed during freeze-thawing in a 2-L bottle. The segregation patterns of the various components were similar with the top and bottom layers containing lowest and highest concentrations, respectively. In the formulation buffer no pH gradient was formed, and the precipitation of FGF-20 during thawing at the top layer was related to an insufficient amount of arginine-sulfate and the precipitation at the bottom layer was due to a salting out effect. The precipitate generated during thawing goes into solution easily upon mixing whole solution of the bottle and the various gradient formations do not cause any irreversible change in structure, stability and isoform distribution of FGF-20. Comparison of slow freezing and flash

  4. Intensification of freeze-thaw cycles in the soil on post-fire alpine slopes of Mount Shirouma-dake, northern Japanese Alps central Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, A.; Suzuki, K.

    2016-12-01

    This is the continuous study to clarify the geo-environmental changes on the post-fire alpine slopes of Mount Shirouma-dake in the Northern Japanese Alps. The fire occurred at May 9, 2009 on the alpine slopes of Mount Shirouma-dake, and the fire spread to the Pinus pumila communities and grasslands. Although the grass had a little damage by the fire, the P. pumila received nearly impact of the fire. In the P. pumila communities where the leaf burnt, forest floor is exposed and become easy to be affected by atmospheric condition such as rain, wind, snow, and etc. First, we observed condition of the micro-landforms on post-fire slopes repeatedly for seventh years after the fire. As the results of the observation, it is clear that remarkable changes of these micro-landforms have not occurred but some litters on the forest-floor in the fired P. pumila communities are flushed out to surroundings. The litter layer on the forest-floor in the fired P. pumila communities were 3-4 cm thick in August of 2011, but it became 0.5 cm thick in September of 2014. The P. pumila communities established on the slopes consists of angular and sub-angular gravel with openwork texture, which are covered by thin soil layer. On July of 2016, the litter layer almost entirely flushed out and surface of soil layer is exposed to atmosphere. In addition, we observe the ground temperature and soil moisture, under the fired P. pumila communities and the no fired P. pumila communities since October 2009, to find influence of the fire. The ground temperature sensors were installed into at 1 cm, 10 cm, and 40 cm depth. The soil moisture sensors were installed into at 1 cm and 10 cm depth. The 1 cm depth of the soil on the post-fire slopes, several times of diurnal freeze-thaw cycles occurred on October and November since 2011, but it had not occurred in 2009 and 2010. In particular, more than 20 times of diurnal freeze-thaw cycles occurred on freezing period of 2014. The diurnal freeze-thaw cycles

  5. Diversity of Survival Patterns among Escherichia coli O157:H7 Genotypes Subjected to Food-Related Stress Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhadidy, Mohamed; Álvarez-Ordóñez, Avelino

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the resistance patterns to food-related stresses of Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 strains belonging to specific genotypes. A total of 33 E. coli O157:H7 strains were exposed to seven different stress conditions acting as potential selective pressures affecting the transmission of E. coli O157:H7 to humans through the food chain. These stress conditions included cold, oxidative, osmotic, acid, heat, freeze-thaw, and starvation stresses. The genotypes used for comparison included lineage-specific polymorphism, Shiga-toxin-encoding bacteriophage insertion sites, clade type, tir (A255T) polymorphism, Shiga toxin 2 subtype, and antiterminator Q gene allele. Bacterial resistance to different stressors was calculated by determining D-values (times required for inactivation of 90% of the bacterial population), which were then subjected to univariate and multivariate analyses. In addition, a relative stress resistance value, integrating resistance values to all tested stressors, was calculated for each bacterial strain and allowed for a ranking-type classification of E. coli O157:H7 strains according to their environmental robustness. Lineage I/II strains were found to be significantly more resistant to acid, cold, and starvation stress than lineage II strains. Similarly, tir (255T) and clade 8 encoding strains were significantly more resistant to acid, heat, cold, and starvation stress than tir (255A) and non-clade 8 strains. Principal component analysis, which allows grouping of strains with similar stress survival characteristics, separated strains of lineage I and I/II from strains of lineage II, which in general showed reduced survival abilities. Results obtained suggest that lineage I/II, tir (255T), and clade 8 strains, which have been previously reported to be more frequently associated with human disease cases, have greater multiple stress resistance than strains of other genotypes. The results from this

  6. In vitro evaluation of the inhibitory effect of canine serum, canine fresh frozen plasma, freeze-thaw-cycled plasma, and Solcoseryl™ on matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Derek W Y; Chau, Ying; Yeung, Wai Kit; Westermeyer, Hans D

    2015-05-01

    Compare the efficacy of canine serum, fresh frozen plasma (FFP), freeze-thaw-cycled plasma (FTCP), and Solcoseryl(™) at inhibiting matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) 2 and 9 in vitro. Matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 activity in the presence of serum, FFP, FTCP, or Solcoseryl(™) was assayed using a commercially available fluorogenic gelatinase activity kit. Matrix metalloproteinases 2 activity in the presence of serum, FFP, FTCP, and Solcoseryl(™) was 20.84%, 5.76%, 8.10%, and 83.03%, respectively of uninhibited MMP 2 activity. MMP 9 activity in the presence of serum, FFP, FTCP, and Solcoseryl(™) was 57.36%, 58.35%, 49.35%, and -8.69%, respectively of uninhibited MMP 9 activity. Serum, FFP, and FTCP exhibit similar levels of MMP 2 and 9 inhibitions. Solcoseryl(™) causes minimal MMP 2 inhibition, but profound MMP 9 inhibition. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  7. A freeze-thaw method for disintegration of Escherichia coli cells producing T7 lysozyme used in pBAD expression systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanarska, Marta; Hildebrandt, Piotr; Kur, Józef

    2007-01-01

    The pLysN plasmid containing the T7 lysozyme gene under control of the lac promoter was constructed to facilitate cell disintegration after expression of recombinant proteins in arabinose-induced expression systems. The usefulness of this plasmid was tested in Escherichia coli TOP10 and E. coli LMG194 cells carrying pBADMHADgeSSB plasmid containing Deinococcus geothermalis SSB protein gene under control of the araBAD promoter. The results showed that low-level expression of T7 lysozyme did not interfere with the target SSB protein production, and that the freezing-thawing treatment was sufficient for disruption of the E. coli cells producing low amounts of T7 lysozyme.

  8. Biogenic C5 VOCs: release from leaves after freeze-thaw wounding and occurrence in air at a high mountain observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall, Ray; Karl, Thomas; Jordan, Alfons; Lindinger, Werner

    During investigations of the formation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in leaves, we observed C5 VOCs during leaf drying, senescence, and following freeze-thaw damage. VOCs were quantified by proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). In freeze-damaged leaves, VOC products were verified with a gas chromatography PTR-MS system, showing that a variety of plants produced 1-penten-3-ol and 1-penten-3-one with smaller amounts of 2(Z)-penten-1-ol and pentenals; similar VOCs have been detected in soybean seed homogenates (Gardner et al., J. Agric. Food Chem. 44 (1996) 882). Most plants wounded in this way also released hexenals and hexanal, and clover also released methylbutanals. The formation of the C5 products was oxygen-dependent, consistent with the involvement of the enzyme lipoxygenase, and pentenone appeared to form independent of an alcohol dehydrogenase reaction; the latter is apparently disrupted by the freeze-thaw treatment. In parallel with these laboratory experiments, on-line PTR-MS measurements of ambient air were conducted at the Sonnblick Observatory in the Austrian Alps (3106 m a.s.l.). Following a hard freeze in central Austria, substantial amounts of C5 VOCs, ranging from 300 pptv to 6 ppbv and including 1-penten-3-ol, methylbutanals and probably pentenone, were detected at this site for several days peaking after midnight. Factor analysis supported their biogenic origin. We speculate that these VOCs were derived from freeze-damaged local vegetation by processes similar to those seen in laboratory freezing studies. If confirmed, these results suggest that leaf-freezing events in forests will give rise to the release of substantial levels of reactive C5 and C6 VOCs that can contribute to regional tropospheric chemistry.

  9. Oxygen consumption rate of permeabilized cells and isolated mitochondria from pork M. masseter and liver examined fresh and after freeze-thawing at different pH values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phung, Vinh T; Sælid, Elise; Egelandsdal, Bjørg; Volden, Jon; Slinde, Erik

    2011-08-01

    The oxygen consumption rate (OCR) of 2 types of permeabilized tissues and their corresponding isolated mitochondria from porcine M. masseter and liver, resulting in 4 systems, was studied at different pH values (5.0 to 7.1) using fresh samples and samples frozen directly in liquid nitrogen (N₂) or air-frozen at -20°C. A protocol with the additive sequence rotenone-succinate-ADP (adenosine diphosphate)-cytochrome c-FCCP (carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone) was used to study respiration changes. The OCR of liver respiring on succinate (OCR(S)) was higher than that of muscle tissue. pH had a larger effect on OCR(S) than freeze-thawing. Low pH was associated with reduced OCR(S). The OCR(S) of isolated muscle mitochondria appeared to be an underestimated relative to the OCR(S) of permeabilized muscle cells. Increasing pH, following prior subjection to pH 5.0, showed partial reversibility of the OCR(S). The freeze-thaw cycle increased the OCR(S) when muscle systems were frozen and examined above pH 6.0; this effect was less apparent for liver tissue. A response to cytochrome c addition, indicating a defective outer mitochondrial membrane, was observed for all 4 systems. The response was, however, lowest for permeabilized cells. The ADP/FCCP additive pair indicated partial coupling for isolated liver and muscle mitochondria. These additives gave weak responses for the permeabilized liver cells while the OCR seemed to be inhibited for permeabilized muscle fibers when ADP/FCCP was added. The mitochondrial state is believed to be important for myoglobin reduction, development of flavor, and possibly other meat qualities. By monitoring the oxygen consumption in mitochondria and meat we can better understand and control such processes following freezing and thawing. © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists®

  10. Dryland soil hydrological processes and their impacts on the nitrogen balance in a soil-maize system of a freeze-thawing agricultural area.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Ouyang

    Full Text Available Understanding the fates of soil hydrological processes and nitrogen (N is essential for optimizing the water and N in a dryland crop system with the goal of obtaining a maximum yield. Few investigations have addressed the dynamics of dryland N and its association with the soil hydrological process in a freeze-thawing agricultural area. With the daily monitoring of soil water content and acquisition rates at 15, 30, 60 and 90 cm depths, the soil hydrological process with the influence of rainfall was identified. The temporal-vertical soil water storage analysis indicated the local albic soil texture provided a stable soil water condition for maize growth with the rainfall as the only water source. Soil storage water averages at 0-20, 20-40 and 40-60 cm were observed to be 490.2, 593.8, and 358 m3 ha-1, respectively, during the growing season. The evapo-transpiration (ET, rainfall, and water loss analysis demonstrated that these factors increased in same temporal pattern and provided necessary water conditions for maize growth in a short period. The dry weight and N concentration of maize organs (root, leaf, stem, tassel, and grain demonstrated the N accumulation increased to a peak in the maturity period and that grain had the most N. The maximum N accumulative rate reached about 500 mg m-2d-1 in leaves and grain. Over the entire growing season, the soil nitrate N decreased by amounts ranging from 48.9 kg N ha-1 to 65.3 kg N ha-1 over the 90 cm profile and the loss of ammonia-N ranged from 9.79 to 12.69 kg N ha-1. With soil water loss and N balance calculation, the N usage efficiency (NUE over the 0-90 cm soil profile was 43%. The soil hydrological process due to special soil texture and the temporal features of rainfall determined the maize growth in the freeze-thawing agricultural area.

  11. Freeze-Thaw Performance and Moisture-Induced Damage Resistance of Base Course Stabilized with Slow Setting Bitumen Emulsion-Portland Cement Additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Shojaei Baghini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Freeze-thaw (FT cycles and moisture susceptibility are important factors influencing the geotechnical characteristics of soil-aggregates. Given the lack of published information on the behavior of cement-bitumen emulsion-treated base (CBETB under environmental conditions, especially freezing and thawing, this study investigated the effects of these additives on the CBETB performance. The primary goal was to evaluate the resistance of CBETB to moisture damage by performing FT, Marshall conditioning, and AASHTO T-283 tests and to evaluate the long-term stripping susceptibility of CBETB while also predicting the liquid antistripping additives to assess the mixture’s durability and workability. Specimens were stabilized with Portland cement (0%–6%, bitumen emulsion (0%–5%, and Portland cement-bitumen emulsion mixtures and cured for 7 days, and their short- and long-term performances were studied. Evaluation results of both the Marshall stability ratio and the tensile strength ratio show that the additions of additives increase the resistance of the mixtures to moisture damage. Results of durability tests performed for determining the resistance of compacted specimens to repeated FT cycles indicate that the specimen with the 4% cement-3% bitumen emulsion mixture significantly improves water absorption, volume changes, and weight losses. This indicates the effectiveness of this additive as a road base stabilizer with excellent engineering properties for cold regions.

  12. Decoupled responses of soil bacteria and their invertebrate consumer to warming, but not freeze-thaw cycles, in the Antarctic Dry Valleys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Matthew A; Andriuzzi, Walter S; Buelow, Heather N; Takacs-Vesbach, Cristina; Adams, Byron J; Wall, Diana H

    2017-10-01

    Altered temperature profiles resulting in increased warming and freeze-thaw cycle (FTC) frequency pose great ecological challenges to organisms in alpine and polar ecosystems. We performed a laboratory microcosm experiment to investigate how temperature variability affects soil bacterial cell numbers, and abundance and traits of soil microfauna (the microbivorous nematode Scottnema lindsayae) from McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. FTCs and constant freezing shifted nematode body size distribution towards large individuals, driven by higher mortality among smaller individuals. FTCs reduced both bacterial and nematode abundance, but bacterial cell numbers also declined under warming, demonstrating decoupled consumer-prey responses. We predict that higher occurrence of FTCs in cold ecosystems will select for large body size within soil microinvertebrates and overall reduce their abundance. In contrast, warm temperatures without FTCs could lead to divergent responses in soil bacteria and their microinvertebrate consumers, potentially affecting energy and nutrient transfer rates in soil food webs of cold ecosystems. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  13. Vertical variation of a black soil's properties in response to freeze-thaw cycles and its links to shift of microbial community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ziming; Deng, Mingwen; Yuan, Anqi; Wang, Jiahui; Li, Hao; Ma, Jincai

    2017-12-27

    Soil freeze-thaw cycles (FTCs) change soil physical, chemical, and biological properties, however information regarding their vertical variations in response to FTCs is limited. In this work, black soil (silty loam) packed soil columns were exposed to 8 FTCs, and soil properties were determined for each of vertical layer of soil columns. The results revealed that after FTCs treatment, moisture and electrical conductivity (EC) salinity tended to increase in upper soil layers. Increments of ammonium nitrogen (NH4+-N) and nitrate nitrogen (NO3--N) in top layers (0-10cm) were greater than those in other layers, and increments of water soluble organic carbon (WSOC) and decrease of microbial biomass carbon (MBC) in middle layers (10-20cm) were greater than those in both ends. Overall, microbial community structure was mainly influenced by soil physical properties (moisture and EC) and chemical properties (pH and WSOC). For bacterial (archaeal) and fungal communities, soil physical properties, chemical properties and their interaction explained 79.73% and 82.66% of total variation, respectively. Our results provided insights into the vertical variation of soil properties caused by FTCs, and such variation had a major impact on the change of structure and composition of soil bacterial and fungal communities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Stabilization of heavy metals in municipal sewage sludge by freeze-thaw treatment with a blend of diatomite, FeSO4, and Ca(OH)2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Fu, Rongbing; Xu, Zhen

    2017-08-01

    In this work, the effects of diatomite with 15% FeSO4•7H2O and 7.5% Ca(OH)2 on sludge stabilization were investigated using batch leaching tests. The influence of cell rupture caused by freezing and thawing on stabilization was also evaluated. The results indicated that the optimal diatomite percentage was 2%. Cell rupture by freezing and thawing reduced heavy metal leachability, followed by cell death and decrease of organic groups. The concentration of heavy metals in sludge leachate increased after cell rupture, indicating that the heavy metal leachability was reduced after freezing and thawings. Moreover, the stabilization effects were generally improved after freezing and thawing. As compared with the stabilization of the original sludge, the unstable fractions decreased and the residual fractions of the heavy metals increased in the stabilized sludge after cell rupture. This study developed a method to stabilize heavy metals in municipal sewage sludge. Diatomite combined with FeSO4·7H2O and Ca(OH)2 improved the treatment of sewage sludge contaminated by heavy metals. Cell lysis by freeze-thaw treatment reduced the risk of leaching heavy metals caused by cell death and decreased major organic groups in the sludge.

  15. Effect of freeze-thaw cycles and 4-nonylphenol on cellular energy allocation in the freeze-tolerant enchytraeid Enchytraeus albidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrício-Silva, Ana L; Amorim, Mónica J B

    2016-02-01

    Due to climate change and intense anthropogenic activity, organisms from cold regions are often exposed to combined effects of temperature fluctuations and contaminants. In this investigation, we assessed the lipid, protein, and carbohydrate energy budgets; the energy available (Ea); consumed (Ec); and cellular energy allocation (CEA) of the freeze-tolerant Enchytraeus albidus, when exposed to sublethal concentrations of 4-nonylphenol (a lipophilic contaminant) for 7 days, followed by exposure to different temperature regimes (continuous 2 °C, continuous -4 °C, and daily freeze-thaw cycles (FTC) (2 to -4 °C) for additional 10 days. Results showed that a pre-exposure to 4-nonylphenol (4-NP) induced important changes in the worms' energy budgets and CEA and increased mortality with most severe effects observed for the FTC events. For FTC, lipids were the most accumulated energy source, whereas during freezing (-4 °C), proteins were the most used. FTC caused the highest Ec, indicating the higher energy requirements for organisms when shifting between freezing and thawing events. This is also in line with the higher mortality observed in FTC compared to continuous -4 °C or 2 °C. Worms exposed to continuous freezing presented relatively stable and positive levels of Ea and low levels of Ec, possibly related with the decrease in metabolism.

  16. Effects of rates and time of zeolite application on controlling runoff generation and soil loss from a soil subjected to a freeze-thaw cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Behzadfar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Many factors such as freeze-thaw (FT cycle influence soil behavior. Application of soil amendments can play an important role on runoff time commencement (RT, volume (RV and soil loss (SL on soils subjected to FT cycles. However, limited studies have been documented on this subject. The present study was therefore carried out under rainfall simulation circumstances to investigate the effect of different rates of zeolite application to control the effects of FT on basic hydrological variables such as runoff production and soil loss. Towards this attempt, the effect of application of different rates of 250, 500 and 750 g m−2 of zeolite applied before, during and after the occurrence of FT cycle on RT, RV and SL was assessed in a completely randomized design. Treatments were set up in two categories viz. control (without zeolite application, and three rates and times of zeolite application in small 0.25 m2-experimental plots in three replications. The results showed that application of zeolite had significant effects on hydrological behavior of soil induced by FT cycles. Application rate of 750 g m−2 prior to FT cycle increased RT and reduced RV and SL at rates of 644%, 68% and 91%, respectively. The results also verified that zeolite could successfully mitigate the impacts of FT cycle on the main soil hydrological variables of soil profile induced by FT cycle. It is accordingly recommended to employ zeolite as an effective amendment to control soil erosion in steep and degraded rangelands where surface soil is exposed to rainfall and runoff.

  17. An extended global Earth system data record on daily landscape freeze-thaw status determined from satellite passive microwave remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngwook; Kimball, John S.; Glassy, Joseph; Du, Jinyang

    2017-02-01

    The landscape freeze-thaw (FT) signal determined from satellite microwave brightness temperature (Tb) observations has been widely used to define frozen temperature controls on land surface water mobility and ecological processes. Calibrated 37 GHz Tb retrievals from the Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR), Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I), and SSM/I Sounder (SSMIS) were used to produce a consistent and continuous global daily data record of landscape FT status at 25 km grid cell resolution. The resulting FT Earth system data record (FT-ESDR) is derived from a refined classification algorithm and extends over a larger domain and longer period (1979-2014) than prior FT-ESDR releases. The global domain encompasses all land areas affected by seasonal frozen temperatures, including urban, snow- and ice-dominant and barren land, which were not represented by prior FT-ESDR versions. The FT retrieval is obtained using a modified seasonal threshold algorithm (MSTA) that classifies daily Tb variations in relation to grid-cell-wise FT thresholds calibrated using surface air temperature data from model reanalysis. The resulting FT record shows respective mean annual spatial classification accuracies of 90.3 and 84.3 % for evening (PM) and morning (AM) overpass retrievals relative to global weather station measurements. Detailed data quality metrics are derived characterizing the effects of sub-grid-scale open water and terrain heterogeneity, as well as algorithm uncertainties on FT classification accuracy. The FT-ESDR results are also verified against other independent cryospheric data, including in situ lake and river ice phenology, and satellite observations of Greenland surface melt. The expanded FT-ESDR enables new investigations encompassing snow- and ice-dominant land areas, while the longer record and favorable accuracy allow for refined global change assessments that can better distinguish transient weather extremes, landscape phenological shifts

  18. Augmentation of freeze-thaw cycles in the alpine soil triggered by the fire on the alpine slopes, Mount Shirouma-dake, northern Japanese Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, A.; Suzuki, K.

    2015-12-01

    This is the continuous study to clarify the geo-environmental changes on the post-fire alpine slopes of Mount Shirouma-dake in the northern Japanese Alps. The fire occurred at May 9, 2009 on the alpine slopes of Mount Shirouma-dake, and the fire spread to the Pinus pumila communities and grasslands. Although the grass had a little damage by the fire, the P. pumila received nearly impact of the fire. In the P. pumila communities where the leaf burnt, forest floor is exposed and become easy to be affected by atmospheric condition such as rain, wind, snow, and etc. First, we illustrated a map of micro-landforms, based on geomorphological fieldworks. We observed these micro-landforms repeatedly for fifth years after the fire. As the results of the observation, it is clear that remarkable changes of these micro-landforms have not occurred but some litters on the forest-floor in the P. pumila communities are flushed out to surroundings. The litter layer on the forest-floor in the P. pumila communities were 3-4 cm thick in August of 2011, but it became 0.5 cm thick in September of 2014. The P. pumila communities established on the slopes consists of angular and sub-angular gravel with openwork texture, which are covered by thin soil layer. Therefore, it is necessary to pay attention to soil erosion following the outflow of the litter. In addition, we observe the ground temperature and soil moisture, under the fired P. pumila communities and the no fired P. pumila communities after the fire, to find influence of the fire. The ground temperature sensors were installed into at 1 cm, 10 cm, and 40 cm depth. The soil moisture sensors were installed into at 1 cm and 10 cm depth. The 1 cm depth of the soil on the post-fire slopes, diurnal freeze-thaw cycles occurred in October and November of 2011, 2012, 2013, and 2014 but it had not occurred in 2009 and 2010. In addition, the period of seasonal frost at 10 cm and 40 cm depth on the post-fire slopes are extended for two weeks

  19. Differences in the stress tolerances of Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains due to their source and harboring of virulence genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Akio; Hara-Kudo, Yukiko; Ogata, Kikuyo; Saito, Shioko; Sugita-Konishi, Yoshiko; Kumagai, Susumu

    2013-08-01

    To investigate the diversity of stress tolerance levels in Vibrio parahaemolyticus, 200 V. parahaemolyticus strains isolated from various coastal environments, seafood, and human clinical cases were exposed to acid, low-osmolality, freezing-thawing, and heat stresses. Tolerance against acid stress was higher in the virulent (tdh- and/or trh-positive) strains than in the avirulent (tdh- and trh-negative) strains. Tolerance against low-osmolality, freezing-thawing, and heat stresses was higher in the clinical strains of tdh- and/or trh-positive V. parahaemolyticus than in the coastal environment- and seafood-originated strains of tdh and/or trh-positive V. parahaemolyticus. Tolerance against acid stress was higher in the strains isolated from coastal seawater at ≤15°C than in the strains isolated at ≥20°C. Tolerance against heat stress was higher in the avirulent strains than the virulent strains, and in the strains isolated from coastal seawater at ≥20°C than the strains isolated from coastal seawater at ≤15°C. Therefore, this study demonstrated that the diversity of stress tolerance levels in V. parahaemolyticus strains depended on their source and whether they harbored virulence genes. In particular, there was significantly greater tolerance against acid in the virulence gene-harboring strains and strains isolated from low-temperature seawater. Because the stress tolerances of V. parahaemolyticus have direct influences for the survival in environment and food, it is important for the prevention of foodborne infection to control the stress-tolerant strains.

  20. Validating a refractometer to evaluate immunoglobulin G concentration in Jersey colostrum and the effect of multiple freeze-thaw cycles on evaluating colostrum quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrill, K M; Robertson, K E; Spring, M M; Robinson, A L; Tyler, H D

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to (1) validate a method using refractometry to rapidly and accurately determine immunoglobulin (IgG) concentration in Jersey colostrum, (2) determine whether there should be different refractive index (nD) and %Brix cut points for Jersey colostrum, and (3) evaluate the effect of multiple freeze-thaw (FT) cycles on radial immunodiffusion (RID) and a digital refractometer to determine IgG concentration in Jersey colostrum. Samples (n=58; 3L) of colostrum were collected from a dairy in northwestern Iowa. Samples were analyzed within 2h of collection for IgG concentration by RID, %Brix, and nD by refractometer and an estimate of IgG by colostrometer. Samples were frozen, placed on dry ice, and transported to the laboratory at Iowa State University (Ames). Samples arrived frozen and were placed in a -20°C manual-defrost freezer until further analysis. On d 7 (1FT), d 14 (2FT), and 1yr (3FT) all samples were thawed, analyzed for IgG by RID, %Brix, nD by refractometer, and IgG estimate by colostrometer, and frozen until reanalysis at the next time point. Fresh colostrum had a mean (±SD) IgG concentration of 72.91 (±33.53) mg/mL, 21.24% (±4.43) Brix, and nD 1.3669 (±0.0074). Multiple FT cycles did affect IgG as determined by RID and colostrometer reading. The IgG concentrations were greater in fresh and 1FT samples as compared with 2FT and 3FT samples (72.91, 75.38, 67.20, and 67.31mg of IgG/mL, respectively). The colostrometer reading was lower in 1FT samples compared with fresh and 2FT samples. Multiple FT cycles had no effect on nD or %Brix reading. In fresh samples, IgG concentration was moderately correlated with nD (r=0.79), %Brix (r=0.79), and colostrometer reading (r=0.79). Diagnostic test characteristics using the recommended cut point of 1.35966 nD resulted in similar sensitivities for 1FT and 2 FT samples (94.87 and 94.74%, respectively). Cut points of 18 and 19% Brix resulted in the greatest sensitivities (92.31 and 84

  1. Survival responses to oxidative stress and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Yuri; Endo, Tamao

    2010-07-01

    Oxidative stress is recognized as an important environmental factor in aging; however, because reactive oxygen species (ROS) and related free radicals are normally produced both intra- and extracellularly, air-living organisms cannot avoid the risk of oxidative stress. Consequently, these organisms have evolved various anti-oxidant systems to prevent ROS, scavenge free radicals, repair damaged components and adaptive responses. This review will focus on the repair and adaptive response to oxidative stress, and summarize the changes of these systems as a result aging and their relationship to premature aging.

  2. Stress, storage and survival of neem seed

    OpenAIRE

    Sacandé, M.

    2000-01-01

    Neem ( Azadirachta indica ) is an important multipurpose tropical tree species, frequently used in planting programmes in the arid tropics. However, its seeds are difficult to store for extended periods of time, as are those of many other tropical species which display intermediate or recalcitrant storage behaviour. This thesis describes the results of our investigations concerning factors involved in the rapid loss of germinability of neem seeds. Stress and surv...

  3. DrwH, a novel WHy domain-containing hydrophobic LEA5C protein from Deinococcus radiodurans, protects enzymatic activity under oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shijie; Wang, Jin; Liu, Xiaoli; Liu, Yingying; Guo, Cui; Zhang, Liwen; Han, Jiahui; Wu, Xiaoli; Xue, Dong; Gomaa, Ahmed E; Feng, Shuai; Zhang, Heng; Chen, Yun; Ping, Shuzhen; Chen, Ming; Zhang, Wei; Li, Liang; Zhou, Zhengfu; Zuo, Kaijing; Li, Xufeng; Yang, Yi; Lin, Min

    2017-08-24

    Water stress and hypersensitive response (WHy) domain is typically found as a component of atypical late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins closely associated with resistance to multiple stresses in numerous organisms. Several putative LEA proteins have been identified in Deinococcus bacteria; however their precise function remains unclear. This work reports the characterization of a Deinococcus-specific gene encoding a novel WHy domain-containing hydrophobic LEA5C protein (named DrwH) in D. radiodurans R1. The expression of the drwH gene was induced by oxidative and salinity stresses. Inactivation of this gene resulted in increased sensitivity to oxidative and salinity stresses as well as reduced activities of antioxidant enzymes. The WHy domain of the DrwH protein differs structurally from that of a previously studied bacterial LEA5C protein, dWHy1, identified as a gene product from an Antarctic desert soil metagenome library. Further analysis indicated that in E. coli, the function of DrwH is related to oxidative stress tolerance, whereas dWHy1 is associated with freezing-thawing stress tolerance. Under oxidative stress induced by H2O2, DrwH protected the enzymatic activities of malate dehydrogenase (MDH) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). These findings provide new insight into the evolutionary and survival strategies of Deinococcus bacteria under extreme environmental conditions.

  4. Influence of environmental stresses on the stability of W/O/W emulsions containing enzymatically modified starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mun, Saehun; Choi, Yongdoo; Park, Kwan-Hwa; Shim, Jae-Yong; Kim, Yong-Ro

    2013-02-15

    The present study was performed to investigate the stability of W/O/W emulsions containing 4-α-glucanotransferase (4αGTase)-treated starch against environmental stresses such as heating, shearing, and repeated freeze-thawing. W/O/W emulsions were subjected to thermal processing at different temperatures ranging from 30 to 90 °C for 30 min, constant shear for 0-7 min, and freeze-thaw cycling between -20 °C and 30 °C, respectively, and followed by encapsulation efficiency (EE) measurement. As for the case of thermal stress, it was clearly shown that addition of 4αGTase-treated starch in the internal aqueous phase of emulsions helped to maintain higher EE during thermal processing. However, at lower PGPR level (2%), the addition of 4αGTase-treated starch dramatically reduced EE at temperatures higher than 70 °C, which was probably related to the melting of 4αGTase-treated starch gel. The incorporation of 4αGTase-treated starch improved the stability of emulsions during shearing process, but could not prevent W/O/W emulsions from creaming and destabilizing during freeze-thaw cycling. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Adaptation and survival of plants in high stress habitats via fungal endophyte conferred stress tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Rusty J.; Woodward, Claire; Redman, Regina S.

    2010-01-01

    From the Arctic to the Antarctic, plants thrive in diverse habitats that impose different levels of adaptive pressures depending on the type and degree of biotic and abiotic stresses inherent to each habitat (Stevens, 1989). At any particular location, the abundance and distribution of individual plant species vary tremendously and is theorized to be based on the ability to tolerate a wide range of edaphic conditions and habitat-specific stresses (Pianka, 1966). The ability of individual plant species to thrive in diverse habitats is commonly referred to as phenotypic plasticity and is thought to involve adaptations based on changes in the plant genome (Givnish, 2002; Pan et al., 2006; Robe and Griffiths, 2000; Schurr et al., 2006). Habitats that impose high levels of abiotic stress are typically colonized with fewer plant species compared to habitats imposing low levels of stress. Moreover, high stress habitats have decreased levels of plant abundance compared to low stress habitats even though these habitats may occur in close proximity to one another (Perelman et al., 2007). This is particularly interesting because all plants are known to perceive, transmit signals, and respond to abiotic stresses such as drought, heat, and salinity (Bartels and Sunkar, 2005; Bohnert et al., 1995). Although there has been extensive research performed to determine the genetic, molecular, and physiological bases of how plants respond to and tolerate stress, the nature of plant adaptation to high stress habitats remains unresolved (Leone et al., 2003; Maggio et al., 2003; Tuberosa et al., 2003). However, recent evidence indicates that a ubiquitous aspect of plant biology (fungal symbiosis) is involved in the adaptation and survival of at least some plants in high stress habitats (Rodriguez et al., 2008).

  6. Enhancement of the proline and nitric oxide synthetic pathway improves fermentation ability under multiple baking-associated stress conditions in industrial baker's yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background During the bread-making process, industrial baker's yeast, mostly Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is exposed to baking-associated stresses, such as air-drying and freeze-thaw stress. These baking-associated stresses exert severe injury to yeast cells, mainly due to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to cell death and reduced fermentation ability. Thus, there is a great need for a baker's yeast strain with higher tolerance to baking-associated stresses. Recently, we revealed a novel antioxidative mechanism in a laboratory yeast strain that is involved in stress-induced nitric oxide (NO) synthesis from proline via proline oxidase Put1 and N-acetyltransferase Mpr1. We also found that expression of the proline-feedback inhibition-less sensitive mutant γ-glutamyl kinase (Pro1-I150T) and the thermostable mutant Mpr1-F65L resulted in an enhanced fermentation ability of baker's yeast in bread dough after freeze-thaw stress and air-drying stress, respectively. However, baker's yeast strains with high fermentation ability under multiple baking-associated stresses have not yet been developed. Results We constructed a self-cloned diploid baker's yeast strain with enhanced proline and NO synthesis by expressing Pro1-I150T and Mpr1-F65L in the presence of functional Put1. The engineered strain increased the intracellular NO level in response to air-drying stress, and the strain was tolerant not only to oxidative stress but also to both air-drying and freeze-thaw stresses probably due to the reduced intracellular ROS level. We also showed that the resultant strain retained higher leavening activity in bread dough after air-drying and freeze-thaw stress than that of the wild-type strain. On the other hand, enhanced stress tolerance and fermentation ability did not occur in the put1-deficient strain. This result suggests that NO is synthesized in baker's yeast from proline in response to oxidative stresses that induce ROS generation and that increased NO

  7. Saccharomyces cerevisiae glycerol/H+ symporter Stl1p is essential for cold/near-freeze and freeze stress adaptation. A simple recipe with high biotechnological potential is given

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferreira Célia

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Freezing is an increasingly important means of preservation and storage of microbial strains used for many types of industrial applications including food processing. However, the yeast mechanisms of tolerance and sensitivity to freeze or near-freeze stress are still poorly understood. More knowledge on this regard would improve their biotechnological potential. Glycerol, in particular intracellular glycerol, has been assigned as a cryoprotectant, also important for cold/near-freeze stress adaptation. The S. cerevisiae glycerol active transporter Stl1p plays an important role on the fast accumulation of glycerol. This gene is expressed under gluconeogenic conditions, under osmotic shock and stress, as well as under high temperatures. Results We found that cells grown on STL1 induction medium (YPGE and subjected to cold/near-freeze stress, displayed an extremely high expression of this gene, also visible at glycerol/H+ symporter activity level. Under the same conditions, the strains harbouring this transporter accumulated more than 400 mM glycerol, whereas the glycerol/H+ symporter mutant presented less than 1 mM. Consistently, the strains able to accumulate glycerol survive 25-50% more than the stl1Δ mutant. Conclusions In this work, we report the contribution of the glycerol/H+ symporter Stl1p for the accumulation and maintenance of glycerol intracellular levels, and consequently cell survival at cold/near-freeze and freeze temperatures. These findings have a high biotechnological impact, as they show that any S. cerevisiae strain already in use can become more resistant to cold/freeze-thaw stress just by simply adding glycerol to the broth. The combination of low temperatures with extracellular glycerol will induce the transporter Stl1p. This solution avoids the use of transgenic strains, in particular in food industry.

  8. Saccharomyces cerevisiae glycerol/H+ symporter Stl1p is essential for cold/near-freeze and freeze stress adaptation. A simple recipe with high biotechnological potential is given

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Freezing is an increasingly important means of preservation and storage of microbial strains used for many types of industrial applications including food processing. However, the yeast mechanisms of tolerance and sensitivity to freeze or near-freeze stress are still poorly understood. More knowledge on this regard would improve their biotechnological potential. Glycerol, in particular intracellular glycerol, has been assigned as a cryoprotectant, also important for cold/near-freeze stress adaptation. The S. cerevisiae glycerol active transporter Stl1p plays an important role on the fast accumulation of glycerol. This gene is expressed under gluconeogenic conditions, under osmotic shock and stress, as well as under high temperatures. Results We found that cells grown on STL1 induction medium (YPGE) and subjected to cold/near-freeze stress, displayed an extremely high expression of this gene, also visible at glycerol/H+ symporter activity level. Under the same conditions, the strains harbouring this transporter accumulated more than 400 mM glycerol, whereas the glycerol/H+ symporter mutant presented less than 1 mM. Consistently, the strains able to accumulate glycerol survive 25-50% more than the stl1Δ mutant. Conclusions In this work, we report the contribution of the glycerol/H+ symporter Stl1p for the accumulation and maintenance of glycerol intracellular levels, and consequently cell survival at cold/near-freeze and freeze temperatures. These findings have a high biotechnological impact, as they show that any S. cerevisiae strain already in use can become more resistant to cold/freeze-thaw stress just by simply adding glycerol to the broth. The combination of low temperatures with extracellular glycerol will induce the transporter Stl1p. This solution avoids the use of transgenic strains, in particular in food industry. PMID:21047428

  9. Effect of frozen storage, different thawing methods and cooking processes on the survival of Salmonella spp. and Escherichia coli O157:H7 in commercially shaped beef patties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manios, Stavros G; Skandamis, Panagiotis N

    2015-03-01

    The effect of common handling practices (i.e., freezing, thawing and cooking) of beef patties on the survival of Salmonella spp. and Escherichia coli O157:H7, was evaluated. Inoculated ground beef was stored at -22 °C for 5 and 75 days. After thawing at 4 °C/16 h, 20 °C/12 h, in microwave/22-24 min, or without prior thawing, beef patties (90 g) were shaped and cooked in oven-broiler or in pan-grill to internal temperatures of 60 °C or 71 °C. Cooking in oven-broiler was more effective compared to pan-grill, especially when cooked to 71 °C. Defrosting methods did not affect significantly (P ≥ 0.05) the survival of the pathogens during subsequent cooking. Frozen storage for 75 days enhanced the survival of E. coli O157:H7, as the pathogen survived 3.1 logCFU/g when cooked in oven-broiler at 71 °C. Results may supplement the existing guidelines for the appropriate practices, associated with freezing, thawing and cooking of patties in households or catering services. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Urea loading enhances freezing survival and postfreeze recovery in a terrestrially hibernating frog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costanzo, Jon P; Lee, Richard E

    2008-09-01

    We tested the hypothesis that urea, an osmolyte accumulated early in hibernation, functions as a cryoprotectant in the freeze-tolerant wood frog, Rana sylvatica. Relative to saline-treated, normouremic (10 micromol ml(-1)) frogs, individuals rendered hyperuremic (70 micromol ml(-1)) by administration of an aqueous urea solution exhibited significantly higher survival (100% versus 64%) following freezing at -4 degrees C, a potentially lethal temperature. Hyperuremic frogs also had lower plasma levels of intracellular proteins (lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, hemoglobin), which presumably escaped from damaged cells, and more quickly recovered neurobehavioral functions following thawing. Experimental freezing-thawing did not alter tissue urea concentrations, but did elevate glucose levels in the blood and organs of all frogs. When measured 24 h after thawing commenced, glucose concentrations were markedly higher in urea-loaded frogs as compared to saline-treated ones, possibly because elevated urea retarded glucose clearance. Like other low-molecular-mass cryoprotectants, urea colligatively reduces both the amount of ice forming within the body and the osmotic dehydration of cells. In addition, by virtue of certain non-colligative properties, it may bestow additional protection from freeze-thaw damage not afforded by glucose.

  11. Tuned to survive: Salt stress induced changes in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jułkowska, M.M.

    2015-01-01

    Plants are flexible organisms, with the potential to develop a plethora of morphological variants depending on the growth conditions to which they are exposed. This morphological flexibility enabled plants to colonize almost every corner of the globe and to survive in the harshest conditions. Our

  12. Vitamin E-analog Trolox prevents endoplasmic reticulum stress in frozen-thawed ovarian tissue of capuchin monkey (Sapajus apella).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, D C; Brito, A B; Scalercio, S R R A; Percário, S; Miranda, M S; Rocha, R M; Diniz, J A P; Oskam, I C; Van den Hurk, R; Paris, M C J; Domingues, S F S; Santos, R R

    2014-02-01

    Ovarian fragments were exposed to 0.5 M sucrose and 1 M ethylene glycol (freezing solution; FS) with or without selenium or Trolox. Histological and ultrastructural analyses showed that the percentages of normal follicles in control tissue and in tissue after exposure to FS + 50 μM Trolox were similar. Trolox prevented endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-related vacuolization, which is commonly observed in oocytes and stromal tissue after exposure to FS. From the evaluated stress markers, superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) was up-regulated in ovarian tissue exposed to FS + 10 ng/ml selenium. Ovarian fragments were subsequently frozen-thawed in the presence of FS with or without 50 μM Trolox, followed by in vitro culture (IVC). Antioxidant capacity in ovarian fragments decreased after freeze-thawing in Trolox-free FS compared with FS + 50 μM Trolox. Although freezing itself minimized the percentage of viable follicles in each solution, Trolox supplementation resulted in higher rates of viable follicles (67 %), even after IVC (61 %). Furthermore, stress markers SOD1 and ERp29 were up-regulated in ovarian tissue frozen-thawed in Trolox-free medium. Relative mRNA expression of growth factors markers was evaluated after freeze-thawing followed by IVC. BMP4, BMP5, CTGF, GDF9 and KL were down-regulated independently of the presence of Trolox in FS but down-regulation was less pronounced in the presence of Trolox. Thus, medium supplementation with 50 μM Trolox prevents ER stress and, consequently, protects ovarian tissue from ER-derived cytoplasmic vacuolization. ERp29 but not ERp60, appears to be a key marker linking stress caused by freezing-thawing and cell vacuolization.

  13. Effect of environmental stress factors on the uptake and survival of Campylobacter jejuni in Acanthamoeba castellanii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bui Xuan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Campylobacter jejuni is a major cause of bacterial food-borne illness in Europe and North America. The mechanisms allowing survival in the environment and transmission to new hosts are not well understood. Environmental free-living protozoa may facilitate both processes. Pre-exposure to heat, starvation, oxidative or osmotic stresses encountered in the environment may affect the subsequent interaction of C. jejuni with free-living protozoa. To test this hypothesis, we examined the impact of environmental stress on expression of virulence-associated genes (ciaB, dnaJ, and htrA of C. jejuni and on its uptake by and intracellular survival within Acanthamoeba castellanii. Results Heat, starvation and osmotic stress reduced the survival of C. jejuni significantly, whereas oxidative stress had no effect. Quantitative RT-PCR experiments showed that the transcription of virulence genes was slightly up-regulated under heat and oxidative stresses but down-regulated under starvation and osmotic stresses, the htrA gene showing the largest down-regulation in response to osmotic stress. Pre-exposure of bacteria to low nutrient or osmotic stress reduced bacterial uptake by amoeba, but no effect of heat or oxidative stress was observed. Finally, C. jejuni rapidly lost viability within amoeba cells and pre-exposure to oxidative stress had no significant effect on intracellular survival. However, the numbers of intracellular bacteria recovered 5 h post-gentamicin treatment were lower with starved, heat treated or osmotically stressed bacteria than with control bacteria. Also, while ~1.5 × 103 colony forming unit/ml internalized bacteria could typically be recovered 24 h post-gentamicin treatment with control bacteria, no starved, heat treated or osmotically stressed bacteria could be recovered at this time point. Overall, pre-exposure of C. jejuni to environmental stresses did not promote intracellular survival in A. castellanii

  14. Survival under stress: molecular mechanisms of metabolic rate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies in my laboratory are analysing the molecular mechanisms and regulatory events that underlie transitions to and from hypometabolic states In systems including ... Our newest research targets two areas: the role of protein kinases in regulating metabolic adjustments and the role of stress-induced gene expression in ...

  15. Surviving endoplasmic reticulum stress is coupled to altered chondrocyte differentiation and function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwok Yeung Tsang

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available In protein folding and secretion disorders, activation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress signaling (ERSS protects cells, alleviating stress that would otherwise trigger apoptosis. Whether the stress-surviving cells resume normal function is not known. We studied the in vivo impact of ER stress in terminally differentiating hypertrophic chondrocytes (HCs during endochondral bone formation. In transgenic mice expressing mutant collagen X as a consequence of a 13-base pair deletion in Col10a1 (13del, misfolded alpha1(X chains accumulate in HCs and elicit ERSS. Histological and gene expression analyses showed that these chondrocytes survived ER stress, but terminal differentiation is interrupted, and endochondral bone formation is delayed, producing a chondrodysplasia phenotype. This altered differentiation involves cell-cycle re-entry, the re-expression of genes characteristic of a prehypertrophic-like state, and is cell-autonomous. Concomitantly, expression of Col10a1 and 13del mRNAs are reduced, and ER stress is alleviated. ERSS, abnormal chondrocyte differentiation, and altered growth plate architecture also occur in mice expressing mutant collagen II and aggrecan. Alteration of the differentiation program in chondrocytes expressing unfolded or misfolded proteins may be part of an adaptive response that facilitates survival and recovery from the ensuing ER stress. However, the altered differentiation disrupts the highly coordinated events of endochondral ossification culminating in chondrodysplasia.

  16. Impact of nutritional stress on early embryonic survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukanta Mondal

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Low reproductive efficiency is the most critical problem faced by the livestock industry across the globe. Early embryonic loss is one the major cause of poor reproductive efficiency resulting in delayed pregnancy, fewer calves born, reduced milk production, slower genetic progress and substantial financial loss to the beef or dairy industry. The establishment of pregnancy results from the interaction between the embryo and the dam and is the culmination of a series of events initiated with development of the follicle and gametes. Among numerous internal and external factors nutrition has the potency to alter the micro-environment of the oocyte and the embryo, making it more hostile to optimal fertilization and pre-implantation embryonic growth. Understanding the impact of nutritional stress on oocyte function, embryo development and reciprocal signaling networks between the embryo and uterus will lead to alleviation of the problems of early embryonic mortality.

  17. Pre-disposition and epigenetics govern variation in bacterial survival upon stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Ni

    Full Text Available Bacteria suffer various stresses in their unpredictable environment. In response, clonal populations may exhibit cell-to-cell variation, hypothetically to maximize their survival. The origins, propagation, and consequences of this variability remain poorly understood. Variability persists through cell division events, yet detailed lineage information for individual stress-response phenotypes is scarce. This work combines time-lapse microscopy and microfluidics to uniformly manipulate the environmental changes experienced by clonal bacteria. We quantify the growth rates and RpoH-driven heat-shock responses of individual Escherichia coli within their lineage context, stressed by low streptomycin concentrations. We observe an increased variation in phenotypes, as different as survival from death, that can be traced to asymmetric division events occurring prior to stress induction. Epigenetic inheritance contributes to the propagation of the observed phenotypic variation, resulting in three-fold increase of the RpoH-driven expression autocorrelation time following stress induction. We propose that the increased permeability of streptomycin-stressed cells serves as a positive feedback loop underlying this epigenetic effect. Our results suggest that stochasticity, pre-disposition, and epigenetic effects are at the source of stress-induced variability. Unlike in a bet-hedging strategy, we observe that cells with a higher investment in maintenance, measured as the basal RpoH transcriptional activity prior to antibiotic treatment, are more likely to give rise to stressed, frail progeny.

  18. Strategies of survival and resource exploitation in the Antarctic fellfield ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, W; Lewis Smith, R I; Kennedy, A D

    2009-08-01

    Antarctic fellfields present organisms with a heterogeneous habitat characterised by a wide variety of environmental stresses. These include low temperatures, limited moisture availability, frequent and often rapid freeze-thaw and hydration-dehydration cycles, exposure to high photosynthetic photon flux density and ultraviolet (uv) irradiance, seasonal snow cover, high winds, cryoturbation and, depending on location south of the Antarctic Circle, considerable daylight in summer. Most of these factors vary both predictably and unpredictably in spatial and temporal planes. In response to this adverse environment, fellfield organisms have developed a variety of strategies to overcome physiological stress and to exploit the limited resources available during the short austral growing season. A high degree of synchronisation exists, so that investment in non-essential activity and adaptations is minimised. Here, we review the combined suites of co-adapted traits used by different fellfield taxa to achieve energy acquisition, growth and reproduction under adverse levels of two principal limiting factors: low temperatures and the scarcity of water. To this end, a detailed characterisation of the Antarctic fellfield microenvironment is followed by a synthesis of available data on the morphology, physiology, life history and behaviour of successful Antarctic flora and fauna. Tolerance of low temperatures by fellfield organisms is achieved by elevation of standard metabolism, production and accumulation of cryoprotectants, supercooling, melanic pigmentation, behavioural avoidance, compact growth forms and synchronised reproduction and extended life cycles. Low moisture conditions are overcome by dehydration resistance, anhydrobiosis, development of resting stages and by behavioural avoidance of desiccating conditions. Occupancy of the Antarctic fellfield habitat is considered to require the ability to respond rapidly to ephemeral resources and to tolerate severe

  19. Separation of Contaminants in The Freeze/Thaw Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szpaczyński Janusz A.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available These studies examined the concept of concentration and purification of several types of wastewater by freezing and thawing. The experiments demonstrated that freezing of contaminated liquid contributed to concentration of contaminants in solution as well as significant concentration and agglomeration of solid particles. A high degree of purification was achieved for many parameters. The results of comparative laboratory tests for single and multiple freezing are presented. It was found that there was a higher degree of concentration of pollutants in wastewater frozen as man-made snow than in bulk ice. Furthermore, the hypothesis that long storage time of liquid as snow and sufficient temperature gradient metamorphism allows for high efficiency of the concentration process was confirmed. It was reported that the first 30% of the melted liquid volume contained over 90% of all impurities. It gives great opportunities to use this method to concentrate pollutants. The results revealed that the application of this process in full scale is possible. Significant agglomeration of solid particles was also noted. Tests with clay slurry showed that repeated freezing and thawing processes significantly improve the characteristics of slurry for sedimentation and filtration.

  20. Mitochondrial elongation-mediated glucose metabolism reprogramming is essential for tumour cell survival during energy stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J; Huang, Q; Long, X; Guo, X; Sun, X; Jin, X; Li, Z; Ren, T; Yuan, P; Huang, X; Zhang, H; Xing, J

    2017-08-24

    To date, mechanisms of tumour cell survival under energy stress are not well understood. Cumulative evidence is beginning to reveal that specific mitochondrial morphologies are often associated with energetic states and survival of cells. However, the functional roles of mitochondria in the metabolic adaptation of tumour cells to energy stress remain to be elucidated. In this study, we first investigated the changes in mitochondrial morphology induced by nutrition deprivation in tumour cells, and the underlying molecular mechanism. We then systematically explored glucose metabolism reprogramming by energy stress-induced alteration of mitochondrial morphology and its effect on tumour cell survival. Our results showed that starvation treatment resulted in a dramatic mitochondrial elongation, which was mainly mediated by DRP1S637 phosphorylation through protein kinase A activation and subsequent suppression of mitochondrial translocation of DRP1. We further observed that tumour cells under an energy stress condition exhibited a clear shift from glycolysis towards oxidative phosphorylation, which was reversed by the recovery of mitochondrial fission induced by forced expression of mutant DRP1S637A. Mechanistically, energy stress-induced mitochondrial elongation facilitated cristae formation and assembly of respiratory complexes to enhance oxidative phosphorylation, which in turn exhibited a feedback inhibitory effect on glycolysis through NAD+-dependent SIRT1 activation. In addition, our data indicated that DRP1S637-mediated mitochondrial elongation under energy stress was essential for tumour cell survival both in vitro and in vivo and predicted poor prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma patients. Overall, our study demonstrates that remodelling of mitochondrial morphology plays a critical role in tumour cell adaptation to energy stress by reprogramming glucose metabolism.

  1. The impact of oxygen availability on stress survival and radical formation of Bacillus cereus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mols, J.M.; Pier, I.; Zwietering, M.H.; Abee, T.

    2009-01-01

    Both the growth and stress survival of two model Bacillus cereus strains, ATCC 14579 and ATCC 10987, were tested in three different conditions varying in oxygen availability, i.e., aerobic, microaerobic and anaerobic conditions. Both B. cereus strains displayed highest growth rates and yields under

  2. Survival

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data provide information on the survival of California red-legged frogs in a unique ecosystem to better conserve this threatened species while restoring...

  3. [Peculiarities of behavior of offspring of rats-ambidexters after surviving vital stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avaliani, T V; Apraksina, N K; Lazarenko, N S; Tsikunov, S G

    2013-01-01

    Psychogenic trauma inflicted to mothers (Wistar rats) during pregnancy is more tragic for establishment of psychoemotional functions in offspring than in the rat pups whose mothers survived prior to pregnancy the stress connected with threat of life. The "antenatal stress" causes in the one-month-old offspring the depression-like behavior, while the stress one month prior to conception--the increased anxiety. Disturbances of the integral behavior in the test "open field" can be caused both by the acute psychogenic trauma of mothers and by its delayed consequences. The sharp impoverishment of behavior and the more pronounced psychoemotional disturbances are realized in female individuals regardless of the terms of the action. In the male offspring the vital stress during their mothers' pregnancy produces the rougher behavioral disturbances than stress prior to conception.

  4. Endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway-mediated apoptosis in macrophages contributes to the survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Ji Lim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Apoptosis is thought to play a role in host defenses against intracellular pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, by preventing the release of intracellular components and the spread of mycobacterial infection. This study aims to investigate the role of endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress mediated apoptosis in mycobacteria infected macrophages. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we demonstrate that ER stress-induced apoptosis is associated with Mtb H37Rv-induced cell death of Raw264.7 murine macrophages. We have shown that Mtb H37Rv induced apoptosis are involved in activation of caspase-12, which resides on the cytoplasmic district of the ER. Mtb infection increase levels of other ER stress indicators in a time-dependent manner. Phosphorylation of eIF2α was decreased gradually after Mtb H37Rv infection signifying that Mtb H37Rv infection may affect eIF2α phosphorylation in an attempt to survive within macrophages. Interestingly, the survival of mycobacteria in macrophages was enhanced by silencing CHOP expression. In contrast, survival rate of mycobacteria was reduced by phosphorylation of the eIF2α. Futhermore, the levels of ROS, NO or CHOP expression were significantly increased by live Mtb H37Rv compared to heat-killed Mtb H37Rv indicating that live Mtb H37Rv could induce ER stress response. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings indicate that eIF2α/CHOP pathway may influence intracellular survival of Mtb H37Rv in macrophages and only live Mtb H37Rv can induce ER stress response. The data support the ER stress pathway plays an important role in the pathogenesis and persistence of mycobacteria.

  5. Survival of Salmonella serovars on beef carcasses and molecular mechanisms to survive low temperature stress and desiccation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Gitte Maegaard; Thomsen, Line Elnif; Aabo, Søren

    2006-01-01

    . Infantis and S. Newport. This experiment indicates that storage at low temperature of beef carcasses can be used as a reduction strategy for Salmonella spp. in beef. In addition molecular mechanisms to resist low temperature stress and desiccation have been investigated. Mutants in the otsA, rpoS and clp...... at 10°C and 15°C, the ¿clpP mutant was severely affected in ability to form colonies compared to the wildtype. Neither the ¿otsA nor the ¿rpoS were affected in growth or survival at low temperature. In a desiccation model, both the ¿rpoS and ¿clpP mutant were more sensitive than the C5 wildtype...

  6. Regulation of apoptotic pathways by Stylophora pistillata (Anthozoa, Pocilloporidae) to survive thermal stress and bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvitt, Hagit; Rosenfeld, Hanna; Zandbank, Keren; Tchernov, Dan

    2011-01-01

    Elevated seawater temperatures are associated with coral bleaching events and related mortality. Nevertheless, some coral species are able to survive bleaching and recover. The apoptotic responses associated to this ability were studied over 3 years in the coral Stylophora pistillata from the Gulf of Eilat subjected to long term thermal stress. These include caspase activity and the expression profiles of the S. pistillata caspase and Bcl-2 genes (StyCasp and StyBcl-2-like) cloned in this study. In corals exposed to thermal stress (32 or 34°C), caspase activity and the expression levels of the StyBcl-2-like gene increased over time (6-48 h) and declined to basal levels within 72 h of thermal stress. Distinct transcript levels were obtained for the StyCasp gene, with stimulated expression from 6 to 48 h of 34°C thermal stress, coinciding with the onset of bleaching. Increased cell death was detected in situ only between 6 to 48 h of stress and was limited to the gastroderm. The bleached corals survived up to one month at 32°C, and recovered back symbionts when placed at 24°C. These results point to a two-stage response in corals that withstand thermal stress: (i) the onset of apoptosis, accompanied by rapid activation of anti-oxidant/anti-apoptotic mediators that block the progression of apoptosis to other cells and (ii) acclimatization of the coral to the chronic thermal stress alongside the completion of symbiosis breakdown. Accordingly, the coral's ability to rapidly curb apoptosis appears to be the most important trait affecting the coral's thermotolerance and survival.

  7. Regulation of apoptotic pathways by Stylophora pistillata (Anthozoa, Pocilloporidae to survive thermal stress and bleaching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagit Kvitt

    Full Text Available Elevated seawater temperatures are associated with coral bleaching events and related mortality. Nevertheless, some coral species are able to survive bleaching and recover. The apoptotic responses associated to this ability were studied over 3 years in the coral Stylophora pistillata from the Gulf of Eilat subjected to long term thermal stress. These include caspase activity and the expression profiles of the S. pistillata caspase and Bcl-2 genes (StyCasp and StyBcl-2-like cloned in this study. In corals exposed to thermal stress (32 or 34°C, caspase activity and the expression levels of the StyBcl-2-like gene increased over time (6-48 h and declined to basal levels within 72 h of thermal stress. Distinct transcript levels were obtained for the StyCasp gene, with stimulated expression from 6 to 48 h of 34°C thermal stress, coinciding with the onset of bleaching. Increased cell death was detected in situ only between 6 to 48 h of stress and was limited to the gastroderm. The bleached corals survived up to one month at 32°C, and recovered back symbionts when placed at 24°C. These results point to a two-stage response in corals that withstand thermal stress: (i the onset of apoptosis, accompanied by rapid activation of anti-oxidant/anti-apoptotic mediators that block the progression of apoptosis to other cells and (ii acclimatization of the coral to the chronic thermal stress alongside the completion of symbiosis breakdown. Accordingly, the coral's ability to rapidly curb apoptosis appears to be the most important trait affecting the coral's thermotolerance and survival.

  8. Modeling of thermal stresses and probability of survival of tubular SOFC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajo, Arata [Laboratory for Industrial Energy Systems (LENI), Faculty of Engineering, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Stiller, Christoph; Bolland, Olav [Department of Energy and Process Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim N-7491 (Norway); Haerkegaard, Gunnar [Department of Engineering Design and Materials, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim N-7491 (Norway)

    2006-07-14

    The temperature profile generated by a thermo-electro-chemical model was used to calculate the thermal stress distribution in a tubular solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). The solid heat balances were calculated separately for each layer of the MEA (membrane electrode assembly) in order to detect the radial thermal gradients more precisely. It appeared that the electrolyte undergoes high tensile stresses at the ends of the cell in limited areas and that the anode is submitted to moderate tensile stresses. A simplified version of the widely used Weibull analysis was used to calculate the global probability of survival for the assessment of the risks related to both operating points and load changes. The cell at room temperature was considered and revealed as critical. As a general trend, the computed probabilities of survival were too low for the typical requirements for a commercial product. A sensitivity analysis showed a strong influence of the thermal expansion mismatch between the layers of the MEA on the probability of survival. The lack of knowledge on mechanical material properties as well as uncertainties about the phenomena occurring in the cell revealed itself as a limiting parameter for the simulation of thermal stresses. (author)

  9. Stress-Survival Gene Identification From an Acid Mine Drainage Algal Mat Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbina-Navarrete, J.; Fujishima, K.; Paulino-Lima, I. G.; Rothschild-Mancinelli, B.; Rothschild, L. J.

    2014-12-01

    Microbial communities from acid mine drainage environments are exposed to multiple stressors to include low pH, high dissolved metal loads, seasonal freezing, and desiccation. The microbial and algal communities that inhabit these niche environments have evolved strategies that allow for their ecological success. Metagenomic analyses are useful in identifying species diversity, however they do not elucidate the mechanisms that allow for the resilience of a community under these extreme conditions. Many known or predicted genes encode for protein products that are unknown, or similarly, many proteins cannot be traced to their gene of origin. This investigation seeks to identify genes that are active in an algal consortium during stress from living in an acid mine drainage environment. Our approach involves using the entire community transcriptome for a functional screen in an Escherichia coli host. This approach directly targets the genes involved in survival, without need for characterizing the members of the consortium.The consortium was harvested and stressed with conditions similar to the native environment it was collected from. Exposure to low pH (E. coli. The transformed E. coli were exposed to the same stressors as the original algal consortium to select for surviving cells. Successful cells incorporated the transcripts that encode survival mechanisms, thus allowing for selection and identification of the gene(s) involved. Initial selection screens for freeze and desiccation tolerance have yielded E. coli that are 1 order of magnitude more resistant to freezing (0.01% survival of control with no transcript, 0.2% survival of E. coli with transcript) and 3 orders of magnitude more resistant to desiccation (0.005% survival of control cells with no transcripts, 5% survival of cells with transcript).This work is transformative because genetic functions can be selected without having prior knowledge of the genes or of the organisms involved. Work continues to

  10. Effects of food stress on survival and reproductive performance of seabirds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatt, John F.; Kitaysky, Sasha

    2001-01-01

    Traditional field methods of assessing effects of fluctuations in food supply on the survival and reproductive performance of seabirds may give equivocal results. In this project we applied an additional tool: The measure of stress hormones in free-ranging seabirds. Food stress can be quantified by measuring base levels of stress hormones such as corticosterone in the blood of seabirds, or the rise in blood levels of corticosterone in response to a standardized stressor: capture, handling and restraint. We applied these techniques to seabirds breeding in Lower Cook Inlet and also used captive birds for controlled experiments. This study provided a unique opportunity for a concurrent field and captive study of the behavioral and physiological consequences of stress in seabirds. Moreover, this study provides the basis for management of seabird populations in the areas affected by the Exxon Valdez oil spill, which will have broader applications for seabird monitoring programs. This year represents production of a synthesis of the project.

  11. Expression of HSF2 decreases in mitosis to enable stress-inducible transcription and cell survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsing, Alexandra N.; Aspelin, Camilla; Björk, Johanna K.; Bergman, Heidi A.; Himanen, Samu V.; Kallio, Marko J.; Roos-Mattjus, Pia

    2014-01-01

    Unless mitigated, external and physiological stresses are detrimental for cells, especially in mitosis, resulting in chromosomal missegregation, aneuploidy, or apoptosis. Heat shock proteins (Hsps) maintain protein homeostasis and promote cell survival. Hsps are transcriptionally regulated by heat shock factors (HSFs). Of these, HSF1 is the master regulator and HSF2 modulates Hsp expression by interacting with HSF1. Due to global inhibition of transcription in mitosis, including HSF1-mediated expression of Hsps, mitotic cells are highly vulnerable to stress. Here, we show that cells can counteract transcriptional silencing and protect themselves against proteotoxicity in mitosis. We found that the condensed chromatin of HSF2-deficient cells is accessible for HSF1 and RNA polymerase II, allowing stress-inducible Hsp expression. Consequently, HSF2-deficient cells exposed to acute stress display diminished mitotic errors and have a survival advantage. We also show that HSF2 expression declines during mitosis in several but not all human cell lines, which corresponds to the Hsp70 induction and protection against stress-induced mitotic abnormalities and apoptosis. PMID:25202032

  12. Effect of storage temperatures and stresses on the survival of Salmonella spp. in halva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaili, T M; Al-Nabulsi, A A; Nazzal, D S; Shaker, R R

    2017-11-01

    The presence of Salmonella spp. in halva has been associated with foodborne illnesses and product recalls from the markets. This study investigated the effect of environmental stresses on the survival of Salmonella spp. in halva during storage for 12 months at 10 and 25°C (log (N 0 /N) g -1 ). Halva samples were inoculated with a cocktail of four strains of unstressed, desiccation stressed or heat stressed Salmonella (10 6 -10 7  CFU per gram). In general, survival of Salmonella spp. in halva decreased significantly (P ˂ 0·05) as storage time and temperature increased. At the end of halva shelf life at 10°C, the initial populations of unstressed, desiccation stressed or heat stressed Salmonella spp. decreased by 2·7, 2·6 or 2·8 log CFU per gram (reduction rate c. 0·2 log CFU per month), respectively. While at 25°C, the populations decreased 5·2, 6·7 or 6·3 log CFU per gram, respectively (reduction rate c. 0·4-0·5 log CFU per month). The populations of stressed Salmonella spp. in halva samples were not significantly different (P ≥ 0·05) from populations of unstressed cells during storage at 10 and 25°C, except during the last 3 months of storage at 25°C when populations of unstressed cells were higher (P tahini halva) with Salmonella from raw materials or during production was documented. Halva and tahini have been involved in salmonellosis outbreaks in different countries. The study demonstrated enhanced survivability of stressed and unstressed Salmonella spp. in halva over a 12-month storage period at 10 and 25°C with lower log reductions than expected. Exposing Salmonella spp. to desiccation or heat stress prior product contamination may play a role in microbial survival in halva during storage. These findings serve as a model to halva producers to implement control measures to prevent Salmonella spp. contamination in halva. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  13. Determination of survival, identity and stress resistance of probiotic bifidobacteria in bio-yoghurts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayamanne, V S; Adams, M R

    2006-03-01

    To determine the level of bifidobacteria in bio-yoghurts in the UK, identify the species, and compare the resistance of common Bifidobacterium spp. to acidity and oxidative stress. A storage trial of bio-yoghurts was carried out to determine the level and survival of bifidobacteria. The 16S rRNA gene targeted PCR was used to identify the species. Acid tolerance was determined by introducing the organisms to pH-adjusted skimmed milk and enumerating during storage at 4 degrees C. Oxidative stress resistance was determined using the H(2)O(2) disc diffusion assay technique. Nine of 10 bio-yoghurts contained bifidobacteria at levels >10(6) CFU g(-1) at the time of purchase. The viability of the organism decreased during storage and on expiry only five products retained viability >10(6) CFU g(-1) while two others were very close to the target population. Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis showed superior survival abilities and stress tolerance compared with Bifidobacterium longum, Bifidobacterium breve, Bifidobacterium bifidum, Bifidobacterium adolescentis and Bifidobacterium longum biotype infantis. Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis, the only Bifidobacterium spp. found in bio-yoghurts, had the greatest resistance to acidity and oxidative stress. The technological properties of B. animalis ssp. lactis make it suitable for inclusion in bio-yoghurts although its putative health benefits need further investigation.

  14. Cognitive function, stress hormones, heart rate and nutritional status during simulated captivity in military survival training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Harris R; Farina, Emily K; Caldwell, John; Williams, Kelly W; Thompson, Lauren A; Niro, Philip J; Grohmann, Kyle A; McClung, James P

    2016-10-15

    Stress influences numerous psychological and physiological processes, and its effects have practical implications in a variety of professions and real-world activities. However, few studies have concurrently assessed multiple behavioral, hormonal, nutritional and heart-rate responses of humans to acute, severe stress. This investigation simultaneously assessed cognitive, affective, hormonal, and heart-rate responses induced by an intensely stressful real-world environment designed to simulate wartime captivity. Sixty males were evaluated during and immediately following participation in U.S. Army Survival, Evasion, Resistance, and Escape (SERE) school, three weeks of intense but standardized training for Soldiers at risk of capture. Simulated captivity and intense mock interrogations degraded grammatical reasoning (pworking memory (pnutritional status and heart rate are simultaneously altered, and each of these subsequently recovers at different rates. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Clp chaperones and proteases are central in stress survival, virulence and antibiotic resistance of Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frees, Dorte; Gerth, Ulf; Ingmer, Hanne

    2014-01-01

    proteins. The ATP-dependent ClpP protease is highly conserved among eubacteria and in the chloroplasts and mitochondria of eukaryotic cells. In the serious human pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus inactivation of clpP rendered the bacterium avirulent emphasizing the central role of proteolysis in virulence....... The contribution of the Clp proteins to virulence is likely to occur at multiple levels. First of all, both Clp ATPases and the Clp protease are central players in stress responses required to cope with the adverse conditions met in the host. The ClpP protease has a dual role herein, as it both eliminates stress......-damaged proteins as well as ensures the timely degradation of major stress regulators such as Spx, LexA and CtsR. Additionally, as we will summarize in this review, Clp proteases and Clp chaperones impact on such central processes as virulence gene expression, cell wall metabolism, survival in stationary phase...

  16. Distributing tasks via multiple input pathways increases cellular survival in stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados, Alejandro A; Crane, Matthew M; Montano-Gutierrez, Luis F; Tanaka, Reiko J; Voliotis, Margaritis; Swain, Peter S

    2017-05-17

    Improving in one aspect of a task can undermine performance in another, but how such opposing demands play out in single cells and impact on fitness is mostly unknown. Here we study budding yeast in dynamic environments of hyperosmotic stress and show how the corresponding signalling network increases cellular survival both by assigning the requirements of high response speed and high response accuracy to two separate input pathways and by having these pathways interact to converge on Hog1, a p38 MAP kinase. Cells with only the less accurate, reflex-like pathway are fitter in sudden stress, whereas cells with only the slow, more accurate pathway are fitter in increasing but fluctuating stress. Our results demonstrate that cellular signalling is vulnerable to trade-offs in performance, but that these trade-offs can be mitigated by assigning the opposing tasks to different signalling subnetworks. Such division of labour could function broadly within cellular signal transduction.

  17. Oxidative Stress Promotes Peroxiredoxin Hyperoxidation and Attenuates Pro-survival Signaling in Aging Chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, John A; Wood, Scott T; Nelson, Kimberly J; Rowe, Meredith A; Carlson, Cathy S; Chubinskaya, Susan; Poole, Leslie B; Furdui, Cristina M; Loeser, Richard F

    2016-03-25

    Oxidative stress-mediated post-translational modifications of redox-sensitive proteins are postulated as a key mechanism underlying age-related cellular dysfunction and disease progression. Peroxiredoxins (PRX) are critical intracellular antioxidants that also regulate redox signaling events. Age-related osteoarthritis is a common form of arthritis that has been associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of aging and oxidative stress on chondrocyte intracellular signaling, with a specific focus on oxidation of cytosolic PRX2 and mitochondrial PRX3. Menadione was used as a model to induce cellular oxidative stress. Compared with chondrocytes isolated from young adult humans, chondrocytes from older adults exhibited higher levels of PRX1-3 hyperoxidation basally and under conditions of oxidative stress. Peroxiredoxin hyperoxidation was associated with inhibition of pro-survival Akt signaling and stimulation of pro-death p38 signaling. These changes were prevented in cultured human chondrocytes by adenoviral expression of catalase targeted to the mitochondria (MCAT) and in cartilage explants from MCAT transgenic mice. Peroxiredoxin hyperoxidation was observedin situin human cartilage sections from older adults and in osteoarthritic cartilage. MCAT transgenic mice exhibited less age-related osteoarthritis. These findings demonstrate that age-related oxidative stress can disrupt normal physiological signaling and contribute to osteoarthritis and suggest peroxiredoxin hyperoxidation as a potential mechanism. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Mitochondrial stress and activation of PI3K and Akt survival pathway in bladder ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang JH

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Jing-Hua Yang,1 Mike B Siroky,1 Subbarao V Yalla,2 Kazem M Azadzoi3,4 1Department of Urology, VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston University School of Medicine, 2Department of Urology, VA Boston Healthcare System, Harvard Medical School, 3Department of Urology, 4Department of Pathology, VA Boston Healthcare System, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA Purpose: Detrusor overactivity contributes to bothersome constellation of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS in men and women as they age. However, the underlying mechanisms of non-obstructive detrusor overactivity and LUTS remain largely unknown. Growing evidence suggests that ischemia may be an independent factor in the development of non-obstructive bladder dysfunction. Our goal was to determine the effects of ischemia on detrusor function and voiding behavior and define redox-mediated cellular stress and cell survival signaling in the ischemic bladder. Materials and methods: Male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into treatment (n=8 and control (n=8 groups. In the treatment group, iliac artery atherosclerosis and chronic bladder ischemia were induced. At 8 weeks after bladder ischemia, voiding patterns were examined in metabolic cages, cystometrograms were recorded in conscious animals, and then bladder blood flow was measured under general anesthesia. Bladder tissues were processed for assessment of transcription factors, markers of cellular and mitochondrial stress, mitochondrial respiration, and cell survival signaling pathway.Results: Atherosclerotic occlusive disease spread from the common iliac arteries to the internal iliac and vesical arteries and produced sustained bladder ischemia. Studies in metabolic cages showed increased micturition frequency and decreased voided volume in bladder ischemia. Conscious cystometrograms produced consistent data showing significant increase in micturition frequency and decreased voided volume and bladder capacity. Voiding

  19. The Antarctic nematode Plectus murrayi: an emerging model to study multiple stress survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Bishwo N; Tomasel, Cecilia M; Li, Grace; Wall, Diana H; Adams, Byron J

    2010-11-01

    The genus Plectus is one of the most widely distributed and common nematode taxa of freshwater and terrestrial habitats in the world, and is of particular interest because of its phylogenetic position relative to the origin of the Secernentean radiation. Plectus murrayi, a bacteria-feeding nematode, inhabits both semi-aquatic and terrestrial biotopes in the Antarctic McMurdo Dry Valleys (MCM), where its distribution is limited by organic carbon and soil moisture. Plectus nematodes from the MCM can survive extreme desiccation, freezing conditions, and other types of stress. Ongoing investigations of the physiological and molecular aspects of the stress biology of P. murrayi, along with the availability of genomic resources, will likely establish this nematode as an excellent invertebrate model system for studies of extreme environmental survival, and may provide a valuable source of genomic resources for comparative studies in other organisms. Moreover, because P. murrayi and Caenorhabditis elegans share a most recent common ancestor with the rest of the Secernentea, and given the ability of P. murrayi to be cultured at lower temperatures compared to C. elegans, P. murrayi could also be an emerging model system for the study of the evolution of environment-sensitive (stress response) alleles in nematodes.

  20. Survival, growth and stress response of juvenile tidewater goby, Eucyclogobius newberryi, to interspecific competition for food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Daniel A; Flynn, Erin E; Todgham, Anne E

    2016-01-01

    Reintroduction of endangered fishes to historic habitat has been used as a recovery tool; however, these fish may face competition from other fishes that established in their native habitat since extirpation. This study investigated the physiological response of tidewater goby, Eucyclogobius newberryi, an endangered California fish, when competing for food with threespine stickleback, Gasterosteus aculeatus, a native species, and rainwater killifish, Lucania parva, a non-native species. Survival, growth and physiological indicators of stress (i.e. cortisol, glucose and lactate concentrations) were assessed for juvenile fish held for 28 days in two food-limited conditions. When fed a 75% ration, survival of E. newberryi was significantly lower when held with G. aculeatus. In all fish assemblages, weight and relative condition decreased then stabilized over the 28 day experiment, while length remained unchanged. Whole-body cortisol in E. newberryi was not affected by fish assemblage; however, glucose and lactate concentrations were significantly higher with conspecifics than with other fish assemblages. When fed a 50% ration, survival of E. newberryi decreased during the second half of the experiment, while weight and relative condition decreased and length remained unchanged in all three fish assemblages. Cortisol concentrations were significantly higher for all fish assemblages compared with concentrations at the start of the experiment, whereas glucose and lactate concentrations were depressed relative to concentrations at the start of the experiment, with the magnitude of decrease dependent on the species assemblage. Our findings indicate that E. newberryi exhibited reduced growth and an elevated generalized stress response during low food availability. In response to reduced food availability, competition with G. aculeatus had the greatest physiological effect on E. newberryi, with minimal effects from the non-native L. parva. This study presents the first

  1. Oxidative stress survival in a clinical Saccharomyces cerevisiae isolate is influenced by a major quantitative trait nucleotide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diezmann, Stephanie; Dietrich, Fred S

    2011-07-01

    One of the major challenges in characterizing eukaryotic genetic diversity is the mapping of phenotypes that are the cumulative effect of multiple alleles. We have investigated tolerance of oxidative stress in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a trait showing phenotypic variation in the population. Initial crosses identified that this is a quantitative trait. Microorganisms experience oxidative stress in many environments, including during infection of higher eukaryotes. Natural variation in oxidative stress tolerance is an important aspect of response to oxidative stress exerted by the human immune system and an important trait in microbial pathogens. A clinical isolate of the usually benign yeast S. cerevisiae was found to survive oxidative stress significantly better than the laboratory strain. We investigated the genetic basis of increased peroxide survival by crossing those strains, phenotyping 1500 segregants, and genotyping of high-survival segregants by hybridization of bulk and single segregant DNA to microarrays. This effort has led to the identification of an allele of the transcription factor Rds2 as contributing to stress response. Rds2 has not previously been associated with the survival of oxidative stress. The identification of its role in the oxidative stress response here is an example of a specific trait that appears to be beneficial to Saccharomyces cerevisiae when growing as a pathogen. Understanding the role of this fungal-specific transcription factor in pathogenicity will be important in deciphering how fungi infect and colonize the human host and could eventually lead to a novel drug target.

  2. Surviving in a frozen desert: environmental stress physiology of terrestrial Antarctic arthropods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teets, Nicholas M; Denlinger, David L

    2014-01-01

    Abiotic stress is one of the primary constraints limiting the range and success of arthropods, and nowhere is this more apparent than Antarctica. Antarctic arthropods have evolved a suite of adaptations to cope with extremes in temperature and water availability. Here, we review the current state of knowledge regarding the environmental physiology of terrestrial arthropods in Antarctica. To survive low temperatures, mites and Collembola are freeze-intolerant and rely on deep supercooling, in some cases supercooling below -30°C. Also, some of these microarthropods are capable of cryoprotective dehydration to extend their supercooling capacity and reduce the risk of freezing. In contrast, the two best-studied Antarctic insects, the midges Belgica antarctica and Eretmoptera murphyi, are freeze-tolerant year-round and rely on both seasonal and rapid cold-hardening to cope with decreases in temperature. A common theme among Antarctic arthropods is extreme tolerance of dehydration; some accomplish this by cuticular mechanisms to minimize water loss across their cuticle, while a majority have highly permeable cuticles but tolerate upwards of 50-70% loss of body water. Molecular studies of Antarctic arthropod stress physiology are still in their infancy, but several recent studies are beginning to shed light on the underlying mechanisms that govern extreme stress tolerance. Some common themes that are emerging include the importance of cuticular and cytoskeletal rearrangements, heat shock proteins, metabolic restructuring and cell recycling pathways as key mediators of cold and water stress in the Antarctic.

  3. Effect of intrapartum fetal stress associated with obstetrical interventions on viability and survivability of canine neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthik V. Kuttan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was conducted with the objective of identifying and evaluating intrapartum fetal stress in connection with the type of delivery in bitches. Materials and Methods: A total of 26 bitches between 1 and 5 years, belonging to 10 different breeds were evaluated. Bitches were subjected to detailed clinico-gynecological examination based on history. Neonatal stress associated with spontaneous whelping (SW, assisted whelping (AW, and emergency cesarean section (EC was evaluated using umbilical vein lactate (UL estimation by collecting the blood from umbilical vein. Results: A high umbilical vein lactate value was associated with fetal distress. The mean umbilical lactate value was highest in EC (12.54±0.8 mmol/L followed by AW (8.86±0.9 mmol/L and the lowest value was found in SW (7.56±0.58 mmol/L. A significant increase (p<0.05 in umbilical lactate level was observed in EC group of canine neonates compared with AW and SW groups. Overall mean umbilical lactate values of neonates which died within 24 h (13.31±1.08 mmol/L and the neonates which survived beyond 24 h (8.87±0.55 mmol/L differed significantly at 5% level. Conclusion: Immediate identification of neonatal distress by use of umbilical vein lactate estimation is helpful for the clinician to undertake resuscitation or medical therapy to ensure better neonatal survivability.

  4. Habitat quality affects stress responses and survival in a bird wintering under extremely low ambient temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cīrule, Dina; Krama, Tatjana; Krams, Ronalds; Elferts, Didzis; Kaasik, Ants; Rantala, Markus J.; Mierauskas, Pranas; Luoto, Severi; Krams, Indrikis A.

    2017-12-01

    Animals normally respond to stressful environmental stimuli by releasing glucocorticoid hormones. We investigated whether baseline corticosterone (CORT), handling-induced corticosterone concentration(s), and body condition indices of members of willow tit ( Poecile montanus) groups differed while wintering in old growth forests and managed young forests in mild weather conditions and during cold spells. Willow tits spend the winter season in non-kin groups in which dominant individuals typically claim their priority to access resources, while subordinate individuals may experience greater levels of stress and higher mortality, especially during cold spells. We captured birds to measure baseline CORT and levels of handling-induced CORT secretion after 20 min of capture. Willow tits in the young forests had higher baseline CORT and a smaller increase in CORT in response to capture than individuals in the old forests. Baseline CORT was higher in females and juvenile birds compared to adult males, whereas handling-induced CORT secretion did not differ between birds of different ages. During cold spells, baseline CORT of willow tits increased and handling-induced CORT secretion decreased, especially in birds in young forests. Willow tits' survival was higher in the old forests, with dominant individuals surviving better than subordinates. Our results show that changes in CORT secretion reflect responses to habitat quality and climate harshness, indicating young managed coniferous forests as a suboptimal habitat for the willow tit.

  5. Fibronectin peptides that bind PDGF-BB enhance survival of cells and tissue under stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fubao; Zhu, Jia; Tonnesen, Marcia G.; Taira, Breena R.; McClain, Steve A.; Singer, Adam J.; Clark, Richard A.F.

    2013-01-01

    Stressors after injury from a multitude of factors can lead to cell death. We have identified four fibronectin (FN) peptides, two from the first FN type III repeat (FNIII1), one from the 13th FN type III repeat (FNIII13), and one from FN variable region (IIICS), that when tethered to a surface acted as platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) enhancers to promote cell survival. One of the FNIII1 peptides and its smallest (14mer) bioactive form (P12) were also active in solution. Specifically, P12 bound PDGF-BB (KD = 200nM), enhanced adult human dermal fibroblast (AHDF) survival under serum starvation, oxidative or endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stressors, and limited burn injury progression in a rat hot comb model. Furthermore, P12 inhibited ER stress-induced c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation. Although many growth factors have been found to bind FN directly or indirectly, this is the first report to identify peptide sequences of growth factor-binding sites in FN. The finding of these novel peptides further delineated how the extracellular matrix protein FN can support cell survival. Since the peptide P12 is active in either soluble form or tethered to a substrate, it will have multifactorial uses as a bioactive in tissue engineering. PMID:24126844

  6. A Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Predicted Serine Protease Is Associated with Acid Stress and Intraphagosomal Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugadas, Abirami; Lamont, Elise A; Bannantine, John P; Shoyama, Fernanda M; Brenner, Evan; Janagama, Harish K; Sreevatsan, Srinand

    2016-01-01

    The ability to maintain intra-cellular pH is crucial for bacteria and other microbes to survive in diverse environments, particularly those that undergo fluctuations in pH. Mechanisms of acid resistance remain poorly understood in mycobacteria. Although, studies investigating acid stress in M. tuberculosis are gaining traction, few center on Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), the etiological agent of chronic enteritis in ruminants. We identified a MAP acid stress response network involved in macrophage infection. The central node of this network was MAP0403, a predicted serine protease that shared an 86% amino acid identity with MarP in M. tuberculosis. Previous studies confirmed MarP as a serine protease integral to maintaining intra-bacterial pH and survival in acid in vitro and in vivo. We show that MAP0403 is upregulated in infected macrophages and MAC-T cells that coincided with phagosome acidification. Treatment of mammalian cells with bafilomcyin A1, a potent inhibitor of phagosomal vATPases, diminished MAP0403 transcription. MAP0403 expression was also noted in acidic medium. A surrogate host, M. smegmatis mc(2) 155, was designed to express MAP0403 and when exposed to either macrophages or in vitro acid stress had increased bacterial cell viability, which corresponds to maintenance of intra-bacterial pH in acidic (pH = 5) conditions, compared to the parent strain. These data suggest that MAP0403 may be the equivalent of MarP in MAP. Future studies confirming MAP0403 as a serine protease and exploring its structure and possible substrates are warranted.

  7. A Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis predicted serine protease is associated with acid stress and intraphagosomal survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abirami Kugadas

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe ability to maintain intra-cellular pH is crucial for bacteria and other microbes to survive in diverse environments, particularly those that undergo fluctuations in pH. Mechanisms of acid resistance remain poorly understood in mycobacteria. Although studies investigating acid stress in M. tuberculosis are gaining traction, few center on Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP, the etiological agent of chronic enteritis in ruminants. We identified a MAP acid stress response network involved in macrophage infection. The central node of this network was MAP0403, a predicted serine protease that shared an 86% amino acid identity with MarP in M. tuberculosis. Previous studies confirmed MarP as a serine protease integral to maintaining intra-bacterial pH and survival in acid in vitro and in vivo. We show that MAP0403 is upregulated in infected macrophage and MAC-T cells and coincided with phagosome acidification. Treatment of mammalian cells with bafilomcyin A1, a potent inhibitor of phagosomal vATPases, diminished MAP0403 transcription. MAP0403 expression was also noted in acidic medium. A surrogate host, M. smegmatis mc2 155, was designed to express MAP0403 and when exposed to either macrophages or in vitro acid stress had increase bacterial cell viability, which corresponds to maintenance of intra-bacterial pH in acidic (pH = 5 conditions. These data suggest that MAP0403 may be the equivalent of MarP in MAP. Future studies confirming MAP0403 as a serine protease and exploring its structure and possible substrates are warranted.

  8. Survival of Listeria monocytogenes with different antibiotic resistance patterns to food-associated stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komora, Norton; Bruschi, Carolina; Magalhães, Rui; Ferreira, Vânia; Teixeira, Paula

    2017-03-20

    The ongoing rise of antibiotic resistant microbial pathogens has become one of the major public health threats worldwide. Despite all the effort and actions taken so far, a proliferation of antibiotic resistant (AR) and multi-antibiotic resistant (MAR) strains is still observed, including in foodborne pathogens. This trend has been also noted recently for isolates of Listeria monocytogenes, a species that, although remaining largely sensitive to clinically relevant antimicrobials, has been reported to develop increased tolerance to antibiotics, particularly in isolates recovered from the food-chain. In this study we compared the ability of MAR (n=8), AR (n=18) and antibiotic susceptible (AS, n=11) L. monocytogenes strains from food and clinical origin to survive to different environmental stress conditions, including temperature (58°C), acidic stress (1% v/v lactic acid, pH3.5), and osmotic stress (37% w/v NaCl). The presence of antibiotic active efflux among MAR and AR strains, and its role on L. monocytogenes tolerance to different antimicrobial compounds was also investigated, namely; hydrogen peroxide; organic acids (acetic, citric and lactic); nisin; benzalkonium chloride (BC); and, sodium nitrite. While no significant differences were observed in the survival of the 37 strains exposed to high temperature (58°C), overall the mean logarithmic reduction of clinical strains was statistically lower after acid and salt exposure than that observed for strains of food origin; but both food and clinical strains resistant to two or three antibiotics were significantly less susceptible to acid (lactic acid 1% v/v) and osmotic stresses (37% w/v NaCl) when compared to AS strains. Using the EtBr-agar Cartwheel method, it was possible to detect efflux pumps in three of the 26 MAR and AR isolates, including one control strain; the active efflux in theses isolates was proven to be associated with fluoroquinolone resistance, and possible extrusion of BC and hydrogen peroxide

  9. Clp chaperones and proteases are central in stress survival, virulence and antibiotic resistance of Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frees, Dorte; Gerth, Ulf; Ingmer, Hanne

    2014-03-01

    Intracellular proteolysis carried out by energy-dependent proteases is one of the most conserved biological processes. In all cells proteolysis maintains and shapes the cellular proteome by ridding the cell of damaged proteins and by regulating abundance of functional proteins such as regulatory proteins. The ATP-dependent ClpP protease is highly conserved among eubacteria and in the chloroplasts and mitochondria of eukaryotic cells. In the serious human pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus inactivation of clpP rendered the bacterium avirulent emphasizing the central role of proteolysis in virulence. The contribution of the Clp proteins to virulence is likely to occur at multiple levels. First of all, both Clp ATPases and the Clp protease are central players in stress responses required to cope with the adverse conditions met in the host. The ClpP protease has a dual role herein, as it both eliminates stress-damaged proteins as well as ensures the timely degradation of major stress regulators such as Spx, LexA and CtsR. Additionally, as we will summarize in this review, Clp proteases and Clp chaperones impact on such central processes as virulence gene expression, cell wall metabolism, survival in stationary phase, and cell division. These observations together with recent findings that Clp proteins contribute to adaptation to antibiotics highlights the importance of this interesting proteolytic machinery both for understanding pathogenicity of the organism and for treating staphylococcal infections. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Survivability of Salmonella typhimurium L1388 and Salmonella enteritidis L1225 under stressful growth conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngwai YB

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available In an earlier study with Salmonella typhimurium L1388 (ST and Salmonella enteritidis L1225 (SE isolated from diseased chickens, we found that SE formed more biofilm than ST on abiotic surfaces in a time-dependent manner. Since the ability of salmonellae to survive extreme environment is related to their virulence, the present study examined the survival of Salmonella typhimurium L1388 and Salmonella nteritidis L1225 under the usual stresses that salmonellae encounter during their life cycle. This is with a view to understanding the strains’ stress tolerance that could be used to explain their virulence. Incubation at 37oC for various time periods was done for: i stationary phase (SP cells at pH 2.6; ii log-phase (LP cells at pH 4.0; log-phase or stationary phase cells in broth containing iii hydrogen peroxide, iv sodium chloride and v ethanol; vi stationary phase cells in Hank’s balanced salt solution (single strength containing 10% human serum; and vii prolong stationary phase cells. Stationary phase cells were also incubated at 52oC for 15 min. Surviving cells at the various incubation times were counted on trypticase soy agar (TSA after appropriate dilution in saline and overnight incubation at 37oC. Growth iron-poor medium was determined by growing a single bacterial colony in Medium A with shaking at 37oC or 40oC for 24 h. Statistics was done by one-way analysis-of-variance (ANOVA at P = 0.05. Differences in the survival of ST and SE were insignificant (p>0.05 in acid pH at both pH 4.0 (p = 0.3783 and pH 2.6 (p = 0.4711; at high salinity for log-phase (p = 0.1416 and stationary phase (p = 0.1816 cells; in ethanol (p = 0.5984, human serum (p = 0.8139, prolonged stationary phase (p = 0.3506; and under heat (p = 0.5766. SE was significantly (p<0.05; p = 0.0031 more tolerant to oxidative-killing by hydrogen peroxide. Culturable growth of the ST and SE in an iron-poor medium A revealed insignificant differences at 37oC (p = 0.8381 but

  11. Anaerobic survival of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by pyruvate fermentation requires an Usp-type stress protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schreiber, K; Boes, N; Escbach, M

    2006-01-01

    activity was detected in the deeper layers of a P. aeruginosa biofilm using a PPA3309-gfp (green fluorescent protein gene) fusion and confocal laser-scanning microscopy. This is the first description of an Anr-dependent, anaerobically induced, and functional Usp-like protein in bacteria....... the induced synthesis of three enzymes involved in arginine fermentation, ArcA, ArcB, and ArcC, and the outer membrane protein OprL. Moreover, formation of two proteins of unknown function, PA3309 and PA4352, increased by factors of 72- and 22-fold, respectively. Both belong to the group of universal stress...... proteins (Usp). Long-term survival of a PA3309 knockout mutant by pyruvate fermentation was found drastically reduced. The oxygen-sensing regulator Anr controls expression of the PPA3309-lacZ reporter gene fusion after a shift to anaerobic conditions and further pyruvate fermentation. PA3309 expression...

  12. Combined neonicotinoid pesticide and parasite stress alter honeybee queens’ physiology and survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dussaubat, Claudia; Maisonnasse, Alban; Crauser, Didier; Tchamitchian, Sylvie; Bonnet, Marc; Cousin, Marianne; Kretzschmar, André; Brunet, Jean-Luc; Le Conte, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Honeybee colony survival strongly relies on the queen to overcome worker losses exposed to combined stressors like pesticides and parasites. Queen’s capacity to withstand these stressors is however very little known. The effects of the common neonicotinoid pesticide imidacloprid in a chronic and sublethal exposure together with the wide distributed parasite Nosema ceranae have therefore been investigated on queen’s physiology and survivorship in laboratory and field conditions. Early physiological changes were observed on queens, particularly the increase of enzyme activities (catalase [CAT] and glutathione-S-transferase [GST] in the heads) related to protective responses to xenobiotics and oxidative stress against pesticide and parasite alone or combined. Stressors also alter the activity of two other enzymes (carboxylesterase alpha [CaE α] and carboxylesterase para [CaE p] in the midguts) involved in metabolic and detoxification functions. Furthermore, single and combined effects of pesticide and parasite decrease survivorship of queens introduced into mating hives for three months. Because colony demographic regulation relies on queen’s fertility, the compromise of its physiology and life can seriously menace colony survival under pressure of combined stressors. PMID:27578396

  13. Honey bee (Apis mellifera) drones survive oxidative stress due to increased tolerance instead of avoidance or repair of oxidative damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li-Byarlay, Hongmei; Huang, Ming Hua; Simone-Finstrom, Michael; Strand, Micheline K; Tarpy, David R; Rueppell, Olav

    2016-10-01

    Oxidative stress can lead to premature aging symptoms and cause acute mortality at higher doses in a range of organisms. Oxidative stress resistance and longevity are mechanistically and phenotypically linked; considerable variation in oxidative stress resistance exists among and within species and typically covaries with life expectancy. However, it is unclear whether stress-resistant, long-lived individuals avoid, repair, or tolerate molecular damage to survive longer than others. The honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) is an emerging model system that is well-suited to address this question. Furthermore, this species is the most economically important pollinator, whose health may be compromised by pesticide exposure, including oxidative stressors. Here, we develop a protocol for inducing oxidative stress in honey bee males (drones) via Paraquat injection. After injection, individuals from different colony sources were kept in common social conditions to monitor their survival compared to saline-injected controls. Oxidative stress was measured in susceptible and resistant individuals. Paraquat drastically reduced survival but individuals varied in their resistance to treatment within and among colony sources. Longer-lived individuals exhibited higher levels of lipid peroxidation than individuals dying early. In contrast, the level of protein carbonylation was not significantly different between the two groups. This first study of oxidative stress in male honey bees suggests that survival of an acute oxidative stressor is due to tolerance, not prevention or repair, of oxidative damage to lipids. It also demonstrates colony differences in oxidative stress resistance that might be useful for breeding stress-resistant honey bees. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Stress, sex, and plague: Patterns of developmental stress and survival in pre- and post-Black Death London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitte, Sharon N

    2017-10-26

    Previous research revealed declines in survivorship in London before the Black Death (c. 1346-1353), and improvements in survivorship following the epidemic. These trends indicate that there were declines in general levels of health before the Black Death and improvements thereof afterwards. This study expands on previous research by examining whether changes in survivorship were consistent between the sexes, and how patterns of developmental stress markers changed before and after the Black Death. This study uses samples from London cemeteries dated to one of three periods: Early Pre-Black Death (1000-1200 AD, n = 255), Late Pre-Black Death (1200-1250 AD, n = 247), or Post-Black Death (1350-1540 AD n = 329). Temporal trends in survivorship are assessed via Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, and trends in tibial length (as a proxy for stature) and linear enamel hypoplasia (LEH) are assessed using t-tests and Chi-square tests, respectively. Survivorship for both sexes decreased before the Black Death and increased afterwards. For males, LEH frequencies increased and stature decreased before the epidemic, and LEH declined and stature increased after the Black Death. For females, the only significant change with respect to developmental stress markers was a decrease in stature after the Black Death. These results might reflect variation between the sexes in sensitivity to stressors, the effects of nutrition on pubertal timing, disproportionate access to dietary resources for males in the aftermath of the Black Death, the disproportionate deaths of frail individuals during the epidemic, or some combination of these factors. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Survival of Listeria monocytogenes in simulated gastrointestinal system and transcriptional profiling of stress- and adhesion-related genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lingli; Olesen, Inger; Andersen, Thomas; Fang, Weihuan; Jespersen, Lene

    2010-03-01

    Food ingestion is the major route of exposure to the important human pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. An in vitro gastrointestinal model was used to (1) compare the survival rates of L. monocytogenes strains of serotypes 1/2a, 1/2c, and 4b; and (2) examine the transcription of stress- and adhesion-related genes after exposure to the conditions similar to those encountered in the mouth, stomach, and small intestine. None of the L. monocytogenes strains investigated could survive in the gastric juice at pH 2.5 or 3.0. Their survival increased at higher pH (3.5 and 4.0) in the gastric stress. Relative survival of L. monocytogenes serotypes 4b and 1/2a strains were higher than that of serotype 1/2c, suggesting that pathogenicity might be related to the viability in the gastrointestinal tract. The transcription levels of prfA and the general stress-related genes clpC, clpE, and clpP were upregulated after passing through the simulated gastrointestinal tract, whereas that of the adhesion-related gene ami was downregulated. Taken together, this study revealed that L. monocytogenes strains enhanced the expression of stress-related genes and decreased the transcription of adhesion-related gene in order to survive in the diverse microenvironments.

  16. ADF and Cofilin1 Control Actin Stress Fibers, Nuclear Integrity, and Cell Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanellos, Georgios; Zhou, Jing; Patel, Hitesh; Ridgway, Rachel A; Huels, David; Gurniak, Christine B; Sandilands, Emma; Carragher, Neil O; Sansom, Owen J; Witke, Walter; Brunton, Valerie G; Frame, Margaret C

    2015-12-01

    Genetic co-depletion of the actin-severing proteins ADF and CFL1 triggers catastrophic loss of adult homeostasis in multiple tissues. There is impaired cell-cell adhesion in skin keratinocytes with dysregulation of E-cadherin, hyperproliferation of differentiated cells, and ultimately apoptosis. Mechanistically, the primary consequence of depleting both ADF and CFL1 is uncontrolled accumulation of contractile actin stress fibers associated with enlarged focal adhesions at the plasma membrane, as well as reduced rates of membrane protrusions. This generates increased intracellular acto-myosin tension that promotes nuclear deformation and physical disruption of the nuclear lamina via the LINC complex that normally connects regulated actin filaments to the nuclear envelope. We therefore describe a pathway involving the actin-severing proteins ADF and CFL1 in regulating the dynamic turnover of contractile actin stress fibers, and this is vital to prevent the nucleus from being damaged by actin contractility, in turn preserving cell survival and tissue homeostasis. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of heat stress on survival of Frankliniella occidentalis (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) and Thrips tabaci (Thysanoptera: Thripidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J C; Zhang, B; Wang, J P; Li, H G; Wang, S F; Sun, L J; Zheng, C Y

    2014-08-01

    Temperature is known to play a crucial role in the population dynamics of insects. Insects have evolved different mechanisms to resist unfavorable extreme temperatures. In recent years, western flower thrips, Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), and onion thrips, Thrips tabaci (Lindeman) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), have caused significant damage to vegetable crops. Because of global warming and expanding areas of vegetable cultivation, a study of the effects of heat stress on these thrips species is warranted. We exposed the various developmental stages of western flower thrips and onion thrips to temperatures of 41, 43, or 45 degrees C for 2, 6, 12, 24, or 36 h to determine the effects of heat stress on survival. Our results showed that the heat resistance of nonadult western flower thrips was greater than that of the nonadult onion thrips, and that the natural heat resistant ability was the primary factor in heat resistance in western flower thrips. In contrast, the heat resistance of adult onion thrips was greater than that of the adult western flower thrips, which was primarily the result of the ability of searching suitable microenvironment that enabled the onion thrips to mitigate the effects of high temperatures more efficiently than the western flower thrips. Our analysis of the differences in heat resistance between western flower thrips and onion thrips provides important information for the development of thermal treatments for controlling western flower thrips and onion thrips.

  18. Stress Survival Islet 2, Predominantly Present in Listeria monocytogenes Strains of Sequence Type 121, Is Involved in the Alkaline and Oxidative Stress Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harter, Eva; Wagner, Eva Maria; Zaiser, Andreas; Halecker, Sabrina; Wagner, Martin

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is able to survive a variety of stress conditions leading to the colonization of different niches like the food processing environment. This study focuses on the hypervariable genetic hot spot lmo0443 to lmo0449 haboring three inserts: the stress survival islet 1 (SSI-1), the single-gene insert LMOf2365_0481, and two homologous genes of the nonpathogenic species Listeria innocua: lin0464, coding for a putative transcriptional regulator, and lin0465, encoding an intracellular PfpI protease. Our prevalence study revealed a different distribution of the inserts between human and food-associated isolates. The lin0464-lin0465 insert was predominantly found in food-associated strains of sequence type 121 (ST121). Functional characterization of this insert showed that the putative PfpI protease Lin0465 is involved in alkaline and oxidative stress responses but not in acidic, gastric, heat, cold, osmotic, and antibiotic stresses. In parallel, deletion of lin0464 decreased survival under alkaline and oxidative stresses. The expression of both genes increased significantly under oxidative stress conditions independently of the alternative sigma factor σB. Furthermore, we showed that the expression of the protease gene lin0465 is regulated by the transcription factor lin0464 under stress conditions, suggesting that lin0464 and lin0465 form a functional unit. In conclusion, we identified a novel stress survival islet 2 (SSI-2), predominantly present in L. monocytogenes ST121 strains, beneficial for survival under alkaline and oxidative stresses, potentially supporting adaptation and persistence of L. monocytogenes in food processing environments. IMPORTANCE Listeria monocytogenes strains of ST121 are known to persist for months and even years in food processing environments, thereby increasing the risk of food contamination and listeriosis. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this remarkable niche

  19. Stress Survival Islet 2, Predominantly Present in Listeria monocytogenes Strains of Sequence Type 121, Is Involved in the Alkaline and Oxidative Stress Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harter, Eva; Wagner, Eva Maria; Zaiser, Andreas; Halecker, Sabrina; Wagner, Martin; Rychli, Kathrin

    2017-08-15

    The foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is able to survive a variety of stress conditions leading to the colonization of different niches like the food processing environment. This study focuses on the hypervariable genetic hot spot lmo0443 to lmo0449 haboring three inserts: the stress survival islet 1 (SSI-1), the single-gene insert LMOf2365_0481, and two homologous genes of the nonpathogenic species Listeria innocua: lin0464, coding for a putative transcriptional regulator, and lin0465, encoding an intracellular PfpI protease. Our prevalence study revealed a different distribution of the inserts between human and food-associated isolates. The lin0464-lin0465 insert was predominantly found in food-associated strains of sequence type 121 (ST121). Functional characterization of this insert showed that the putative PfpI protease Lin0465 is involved in alkaline and oxidative stress responses but not in acidic, gastric, heat, cold, osmotic, and antibiotic stresses. In parallel, deletion of lin0464 decreased survival under alkaline and oxidative stresses. The expression of both genes increased significantly under oxidative stress conditions independently of the alternative sigma factor σB Furthermore, we showed that the expression of the protease gene lin0465 is regulated by the transcription factor lin0464 under stress conditions, suggesting that lin0464 and lin0465 form a functional unit. In conclusion, we identified a novel stress survival islet 2 (SSI-2), predominantly present in L. monocytogenes ST121 strains, beneficial for survival under alkaline and oxidative stresses, potentially supporting adaptation and persistence of L. monocytogenes in food processing environments.IMPORTANCEListeria monocytogenes strains of ST121 are known to persist for months and even years in food processing environments, thereby increasing the risk of food contamination and listeriosis. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this remarkable niche-specific adaptation is still

  20. Modeling the survival responses of a multi-component biofilm to environmental stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carles Brangarí, Albert; Manzoni, Stefano; Sanchez-Vila, Xavier; Fernàndez-Garcia, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Biofilms are consortia of microorganisms embedded in self-produced matrices of biopolymers. The survival of such communities depends on their capacity to improve the environmental conditions of their habitat by mitigating, or even benefitting from some adverse external factors. The mechanisms by which the microbial habitat is regulated remain mostly unknown. However, many studies have reported physiological responses to environmental stresses that include the release of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) and the induction of a dormancy state. A sound understanding of these capacities is required to enhance the knowledge of the microbial dynamics in soils and its potential role in the carbon cycle, with significant implications for the degradation of contaminants and the emission of greenhouse gases, among others. We present a numerical analysis of the dynamics of soil microbes and their responses to environmental stresses. The conceptual model considers a multi-component heterotrophic biofilm made up of active cells, dormant cells, EPS, and extracellular enzymes. Biofilm distribution and properties are defined at the pore-scale and used to determine nutrient availability and water saturation via feedbacks of biofilm on soil hydraulic properties. The pore space micro-habitat is modeled as a simplified pore-network of cylindrical tubes in which biofilms proliferate. Microbial compartments and most of the carbon fluxes are defined at the bulk level. Microbial processes include the synthesis, decay and detachment of biomass, the activation/deactivation of cells, and the release and reutilization of EPS. Results suggest that the release of EPS and the capacity to enter a dormant state offer clear evolutionary advantages in scenarios characterized by environmental stress. On the contrary, when the conditions are favorable, the diversion of carbon into the production of the aforementioned survival mechanisms does not confer any additional benefit and the population

  1. HBx regulates fatty acid oxidation to promote hepatocellular carcinoma survival during metabolic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming-Da; Wu, Han; Huang, Shuai; Zhang, Hui-Lu; Qin, Chen-Jie; Zhao, Ling-Hao; Fu, Gong-Bo; Zhou, Xu; Wang, Xian-Ming; Tang, Liang; Wen, Wen; Yang, Wen; Tang, Shan-Hua; Cao, Dan; Guo, Lin-Na; Zeng, Min; Wu, Meng-Chao; Yan, He-Xin; Wang, Hong-Yang

    2016-02-09

    Due to a high rate of nutrient consumption and inadequate vascularization, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells constantly undergo metabolic stress during tumor development. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) X protein (HBx) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of HBV-induced HCC. In this study, we investigated the functional roles of HBx in HCC adaptation to metabolic stress. Up-regulation of HBx increased the intracellular ATP and NADPH generation, and induced the resistance to glucose deprivation, whereas depletion of HBx via siRNA abolished these effects and conferred HCC cells sensitive to glucose restriction. Though HBx did not affect the glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation capacity of HCC cells under normal culture conditions, it facilitated fatty acid oxidation (FAO) in the absence of glucose, which maintained NADPH and ATP levels. Further investigation showed that HBx expression, under glucose deprivation, stimulated phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) via a calcium/CaMKK-dependent pathway, which was required for the activation of FAO. Conversely, inhibition of FAO by etomoxir (ETO) restored the sensitivity of HBx-expressing cells to glucose deficiency in vitro and retarded xenograft tumor formation in vivo. Finally, HBx-induced activation of the AMPK and FAO pathways were also observed in xenograft tumors and HBV-associated HCC specimens. Our data suggest that HBx plays a key role in the maintenance of redox and energy homeostasis by activating FAO, which is critical for HCC cell survival under conditions of metabolic stress and might be exploited for therapeutic benefit.

  2. Stress-induced nuclear RNA degradation pathways regulate yeast bromodomain factor 2 to promote cell survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Roy

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bromodomain proteins are key regulators of gene expression. How the levels of these factors are regulated in specific environmental conditions is unknown. Previous work has established that expression of yeast Bromodomain factor 2 (BDF2 is limited by spliceosome-mediated decay (SMD. Here we show that BDF2 is subject to an additional layer of post-transcriptional control through RNase III-mediated decay (RMD. We found that the yeast RNase III Rnt1p cleaves a stem-loop structure within the BDF2 mRNA to down-regulate its expression. However, these two nuclear RNA degradation pathways play distinct roles in the regulation of BDF2 expression, as we show that the RMD and SMD pathways of the BDF2 mRNA are differentially activated or repressed in specific environmental conditions. RMD is hyper-activated by salt stress and repressed by hydroxyurea-induced DNA damage while SMD is inactivated by salt stress and predominates during DNA damage. Mutations of cis-acting signals that control SMD and RMD rescue numerous growth defects of cells lacking Bdf1p, and show that SMD plays an important role in the DNA damage response. These results demonstrate that specific environmental conditions modulate nuclear RNA degradation pathways to control BDF2 expression and Bdf2p-mediated gene regulation. Moreover, these results show that precise dosage of Bromodomain factors is essential for cell survival in specific environmental conditions, emphasizing their importance for controlling chromatin structure and gene expression in response to environmental stress.

  3. Stress-Induced Nuclear RNA Degradation Pathways Regulate Yeast Bromodomain Factor 2 to Promote Cell Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Kevin; Chanfreau, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    Bromodomain proteins are key regulators of gene expression. How the levels of these factors are regulated in specific environmental conditions is unknown. Previous work has established that expression of yeast Bromodomain factor 2 (BDF2) is limited by spliceosome-mediated decay (SMD). Here we show that BDF2 is subject to an additional layer of post-transcriptional control through RNase III-mediated decay (RMD). We found that the yeast RNase III Rnt1p cleaves a stem-loop structure within the BDF2 mRNA to down-regulate its expression. However, these two nuclear RNA degradation pathways play distinct roles in the regulation of BDF2 expression, as we show that the RMD and SMD pathways of the BDF2 mRNA are differentially activated or repressed in specific environmental conditions. RMD is hyper-activated by salt stress and repressed by hydroxyurea-induced DNA damage while SMD is inactivated by salt stress and predominates during DNA damage. Mutations of cis-acting signals that control SMD and RMD rescue numerous growth defects of cells lacking Bdf1p, and show that SMD plays an important role in the DNA damage response. These results demonstrate that specific environmental conditions modulate nuclear RNA degradation pathways to control BDF2 expression and Bdf2p-mediated gene regulation. Moreover, these results show that precise dosage of Bromodomain factors is essential for cell survival in specific environmental conditions, emphasizing their importance for controlling chromatin structure and gene expression in response to environmental stress. PMID:25232960

  4. In utero heat stress decreases calf survival and performance through the first lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, A P A; Tao, S; Thompson, I M T; Dahl, G E

    2016-10-01

    Calves born to cows exposed to heat stress during late gestation (i.e., the dry period) have lower birth weight and weaning weight and compromised passive immune transfer compared with those born to dams that are cooled. However, it is unknown if heat stress in utero has carryover effects after weaning. The objective was to evaluate the effect of heat stress (HT) or cooling (CL) in late gestation dairy cows on the survival, growth, fertility, and milk production in the first lactation of their calves. Data of animals obtained from previous experiments conducted during 5 consecutive summers in Florida were pooled and analyzed. Cows were dried off 46d before expected calving and randomly assigned to 1 of 2 treatments, HT or CL. Cooled cows were housed with sprinklers, fans, and shade, whereas only shade was provided to HT cows. Within 4h of birth, 3.8 L of colostrum was fed to calves from both groups of cows. All calves were managed in the same manner and weaned at 49d of age. Birth weight and survival of 146 calves (HT=74; CL=72) were analyzed. Additionally, body weight, growth rate, fertility, and milk production in the first lactation from 72 heifers (HT=34; CL=38) were analyzed. As expected, HT calves were lighter (means ± SEM; 39.1±0.7 vs. 44.8±0.7kg) at birth than CL calves. Cooled heifers were heavier up to 1yr of age, but had similar total weight gain (means ± SEM; 305.8±6.3 vs. 299.1±6.3kg, respectively) compared with HT heifers. No effect of treatment was observed on age at first insemination (AI) and age at first parturition. Compared with CL heifers, HT heifers had a greater number of services per pregnancy confirmed at d 30 after AI, but no treatment effect was observed on number of services per pregnancy confirmed at d 50 after AI. A greater percentage of CL heifers reached first lactation compared with HT heifers (85.4 vs. 65.9%). Moreover, HT heifers produced less milk up to 35wk of the first lactation compared with CL heifers (means ± SEM; 26

  5. SÍNTESIS Y CARACTERIZACIÓN DE HIDROGELES DE ALCOHOL POLIVINÍLICO POR LA TÉCNICA DE CONGELAMIENTO/DESCONGELAMIENTO PARA APLICACIONES MÉDICAS SÍNTESES E CARACTERIZAÇÃO DE HIDROGEIS DE ÁLCOOL POLIVINÍLICO PELA TÉCNICA DE CONGELAMENTO/DESCONGELAMENTO PARA APLICAÇÕES MÉDICAS SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF POLYVINYL ALCOHOL HYDROGELS BY FREEZING/THAWING TECHNIQUE FOR MEDICAL APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Elena Echeverri

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Usando diferentes ciclos de congelamiento/descongelamiento se prepararon hidrogeles de alcohol polivinílico semicristalino 7,5 % y 12 % en concentración. La cinética y el grado de hinchamiento, los estados del agua y la resistencia a la tracción se evaluaron por gravimetría, calorimetría diferencial de barrido (DSC y pruebas de tracción, respectivamente. Los resultados indican que los hidrogeles de menor concentración y con menor número de ciclos presentan cinética y grado de hinchamiento mejores y menor resistencia a la tracción. Las DSC permitieron determinar la presencia de agua libre y de agua vinculada congelable. Las características de estos hidrogeles permiten clasificarlos para diferentes aplicaciones médicas.Usando diferentes ciclos de congelamento/descongelamento se prepararam hidrogéis de álcool polivinílico semicristalino 7,5 % e 12 % em concentração. A cinética e o grau de inchamento, os estados da água e a resistência à tração se avaliaram por gravimetria, calorimetria diferencial de varrido (DSC e provas de tração, respectivamente. Os resultados indicam que os hidrogeis de menor concentração e com menor número de ciclos apresentam cinética e grau de inchamento melhores e menor resistência à tração. As DSC permitiram determinar a presença de água livre e de agua ligada congelável. As características destes hidrogeis permitem classificá-los para diferentes aplicações médicas.Using different cycles of freeze-thawing, semicrystalline polyvinyl alcohol hydrogels were synthesized in concentrations of 7.5 % and 12 %. The kinetic and grade of swelling, states of water and the tensile strength were calculated by gravimetry, by differential scanning calorimetry, DSC, and the tensile tests respectively. The results show that hydrogels with less concentration and cycles have better grade and kinetic of swelling, while the tensile strength is lower. The DSC results allow us to determine the free and

  6. Anoxic or aerial survival of bivalves and other euryoxic invertebrates as a useful response to environmental stress - A comprehensive review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Zwaan, A.; Eertman, R.H.M.

    1996-01-01

    Laboratory and field studies have demonstrated the applicability of anoxic/aerial survival as an early warning indicator of contaminant induced stress. The effects of xenobiotics, including heavy metals, organometals and organics as well as contaminated field sediments have been investigated. The

  7. "Survival in air" of the blue mussel Mytilus edulis L. as a sensitive response to pollution-induced environmental stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eertman, R.H.M.; Wagenvoort, A.J.; Hummel, H.; Smaal, A.C.

    1993-01-01

    Mussels, Mytilus edulis, were exposed for periods of 6 weeks at various locations in Dutch coastal waters during 1989 and 1990. “Survival in air” showed to be a sensitive response parameter for indicating pollution induced environmental stress in transplanted mussels sampled from eight field sites.

  8. Device Survival after Primary Implantation of an Artificial Urinary Sphincter for Male Stress Urinary Incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yafi, Faysal A; DeLay, Kenneth J; Stewart, Carrie; Chiang, Jason; Sangkum, Premsant; Hellstrom, Wayne J G

    2017-03-01

    The AMS 800™ artificial urinary sphincter remains the gold standard for the surgical management of male stress urinary incontinence. We reviewed artificial urinary sphincter device survival after primary implantation. Retrospective data were collected from the AMS 800 patient information form database. Since 1972, 77,512 patient information forms for primary artificial urinary sphincter implantation have been completed in the United States. Following exclusion of procedures performed in children and females, and those labeled with an unknown surgical technique, 27,096 artificial urinary sphincter cases were included in the analysis. Collected variables included patient age, surgical approach, number of cuffs and surgeon volume. Measured outcomes included device explantation, device revision, component revision and time to each event. Artificial urinary sphincter insertion was performed by low volume implanters in 22,165 (82.6%) cases. The approach was perineal in 18,373 cases (67.8%) and a tandem cuff was used in 2,224 cases (8.2%). Overall 5,723 cases required revision or explantation (21.1%). Younger age and penoscrotal approach were associated with higher device explantation and revision rates, while the use of a tandem cuff was associated with higher explantation rates. On multivariate analysis younger age, penoscrotal approach and use of a tandem cuff but not surgeon volume were significant factors associated with device explantation and component revision. These data provide a general overview of artificial urinary sphincter device survival and may serve urologists when counseling patients. Younger age, penoscrotal approach and use of a tandem cuff may be associated with inferior outcomes. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Parkin elimination of mitochondria is important for maintenance of lens epithelial cell ROS levels and survival upon oxidative stress exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Lisa; Khoury, Josef; Kantorow, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Age-related cataract is associated with oxidative stress and death of lens epithelial cells (LECs) whose survival is dependent on functional mitochondrial populations. Oxidative stress-induced depolarization/damage of LEC mitochondria results in increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and cell death suggesting the need for a LEC mechanism to remove mitochondria depolarized/damaged upon oxidative stress exposure to prevent ROS release and LEC death. To date, a mechanism(s) for removal of depolarized/damaged LEC mitochondria has yet to be identified and the importance of eliminating oxidative stress-damaged mitochondria to prevent LEC ROS release and death has not been established. Here, we demonstrate that Parkin levels increase in LECs exposed to H2O2-oxidative stress. We establish that Parkin translocates to LEC mitochondria depolarized upon oxidative stress exposure and that Parkin recruits p62/SQSTM1 to depolarized LEC mitochondria. We demonstrate that translocation of Parkin results in the elimination of depolarized/damaged mitochondria and that Parkin clearance of LEC mitochondria is dependent on its ubiquitin ligase activity. Importantly, we demonstrate that Parkin elimination of damaged LEC mitochondria results in reduced ROS levels and increased survival upon oxidative stress exposure. These results establish that Parkin functions to eliminate LEC mitochondria depolarized/damaged upon oxidative stress exposure and that elimination of damaged mitochondria by Parkin is important for LEC homeostasis and survival. The data also suggest that mitochondrial quality control by Parkin could play a role in lens transparency. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Post-traumatic stress disorder in Polish stroke patients who survived Nazi concentration camps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachalska, Maria; Grochmal-Bach, Bozena; MacQueen, Bruce Duncan; Frańczuk, Bogusław

    2006-04-01

    Many persons who survived Nazi concentration camps are now in advanced age, so that rehabilitation centers in Poland are seeing increasing numbers of such patients, especially after strokes. In many cases, the process of rehabilitation is severely hampered by Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), while the neuropsychological consequences of the stroke itself often evoke traumatic memories and simultaneously disorganize or destroy the patient's previous coping mechanisms. The present study describes the program developed by the authors for concentration camp survivors in post-stroke rehabilitation, including the use of art therapy and specially prepared films to help the patients cope with PTSD. The experimental group (KL) consisted of 8 such patients (4 men, 4 women, average age 79.1+/-4.28) with mild post-stroke aphasia who went through the PTSD program, while the comparison group (C) included 8 post-stroke patients, matched for age and gender, who were not concentration camp survivors and showed no premorbid symptoms of PTSD. All subjects were tested at baseline and again 3 months later, using structured interview and observation, self-rating scales for three basic negative emotions (anger, anxiety and sadness) and the Frustration and Aggression Test for the Disabled. The results showed significant differences between the groups at baseline, while at follow-up the differences between groups had changed in both extent and distribution. Qualitative analysis of the results allows for some important observations about the etiology and course of PTSD in these persons.

  11. Insight into post-transcriptional gene regulation: stress-responsive microRNAs and their role in the environmental stress survival of tolerant animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggar, Kyle K; Storey, Kenneth B

    2015-05-01

    Living animals are constantly faced with various environmental stresses that challenge normal life, including: oxygen limitation, very low or high temperature, as well as restriction of water and food. It has been well established that in response to these stresses, tolerant organisms regularly respond with a distinct suite of cellular modifications that involve transcriptional, translational and post-translational modification. In recent years, a new mechanism of rapid and reversible transcriptome regulation, via the action of non-coding RNA molecules, has emerged into post-transcriptional regulation and has since been shown to be part of the survival response. However, these RNA-based mechanisms by which tolerant organisms respond to stressed conditions are not well understood. Recent studies have begun to show that non-coding RNAs control gene expression and translation of mRNA to protein, and can also have regulatory influence over major cellular processes. For example, select microRNAs have been shown to have regulatory influence over the cell cycle, apoptosis, signal transduction, muscle atrophy and fatty acid metabolism during periods of environmental stress. As we are on the verge of dissecting the roles of non-coding RNA in environmental stress adaptation, this Commentary summarizes the hallmark alterations in microRNA expression that facilitate stress survival. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. Compartmental stress responses correlate with cell survival in bystander effects induced by the DNA damage agent, bleomycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savu, Diana; Petcu, Ileana; Temelie, Mihaela; Mustaciosu, Cosmin; Moisoi, Nicoleta

    2015-01-01

    Physical or chemical stress applied to a cell system trigger a signal cascade that is transmitted to the neighboring cell population in a process known as bystander effect. Despite its wide occurrence in biological systems this phenomenon is mainly documented in cancer treatments. Thus understanding whether the bystander effect acts as an adaptive priming element for the neighboring cells or a sensitization factor is critical in designing treatment strategies. Here we characterize the bystander effects induced by bleomycin, a DNA-damaging agent, and compartmental stress responses associated with this phenomenon. Mouse fibroblasts were treated with increasing concentrations of bleomycin and assessed for DNA damage, cell death and induction of compartmental stress response (endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondrial and cytoplasmic stress). Preconditioned media were used to analyze bystander damage using the same end-points. Bleomycin induced bystander response was reflected primarily in increased DNA damage. This was dependent on the concentration of bleomycin and time of media conditioning. Interestingly, we found that ROS but not NO are involved in the transmission of the bystander effect. Consistent transcriptional down-regulation of the stress response factors tested (i.e. BiP, mtHsp60, Hsp70) occurred in the direct effect indicating that bleomycin might induce an arrest of transcription correlated with decreased survival. We observed the opposite trend in the bystander effect, with specific stress markers appearing increased and correlated with increased survival. These data shed new light on the potential role of stress pathways activation in bystander effects and their putative impact on the pro-survival pro-death balance. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Survival and weight change among adult individuals of Periplaneta americana (Linnaeus, 1758 (Blattaria, Blattidae subject to various stress conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jucelio Peter Duarte

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7925.2015v28n2p103 Periplaneta americana is a species of great importance to public health, since it can act as a vector of many pathogens and it reaches large populations in urban environments. This is probably due to its ability to resist starvation and desiccation. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of absence of water and food on survival and weight change among adult P. americana individuals and check whether the initial weight of individuals influences on their survival. Four groups having twenty P. americana couples were formed and subject to: I no water or food; II no food; III no water; and IV control group. Insects were isolated according to the groups, which were weighed at the beginning and end of the stress conditions. They remained under these conditions until all individuals in each test group were dead. Stress conditions caused reduction in survival time when compared to the control group. Adults with higher body mass survived longer when deprived only of food, while among those lacking water, weight had no influence on survival. Total weight loss was greater among individuals deprived of water than those deprived only of food.

  14. Branched-chain amino acid supplementation reduces oxidative stress and prolongs survival in rats with advanced liver cirrhosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motoh Iwasa

    Full Text Available Long-term supplementation with branched-chain amino acids (BCAA is associated with prolonged survival and decreased frequency of development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC in patients with liver cirrhosis. However, the pharmaceutical mechanism underlying this association is still unclear. We investigated whether continuous BCAA supplementation increases survival rate of rats exposed to a fibrogenic agent and influences the iron accumulation, oxidative stress, fibrosis, and gluconeogenesis in the liver. Further, the effects of BCAA on gluconeogenesis in cultured cells were also investigated. A significant improvement in cumulative survival was observed in BCAA-supplemented rats with advanced cirrhosis compared to untreated rats with cirrhosis (P<0.05. The prolonged survival due to BCAA supplementation was associated with reduction of iron contents, reactive oxygen species production and attenuated fibrosis in the liver. In addition, BCAA ameliorated glucose metabolism by forkhead box protein O1 pathway in the liver. BCAA prolongs survival in cirrhotic rats and this was likely the consequences of reduced iron accumulation, oxidative stress and fibrosis and improved glucose metabolism in the liver.

  15. Prenatal Stress Exposure Generates Higher Early Survival and Smaller Size without Impacting Developmental Rate in a Pacific Salmon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capelle, Pauline M; Semeniuk, Christina A D; Sopinka, Natalie M; Heath, John W; Love, Oliver P

    2016-12-01

    Prenatal exposure to elevated glucocorticoids can act as a signal of environmental stress, resulting in modifications to offspring phenotype. While "negative" phenotypic effects (i.e., smaller size, slower growth) are often reported, recent research coupling phenotype with other fitness-related traits has suggested positive impacts of prenatal stress. Using captive Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), we treated eggs with biologically relevant cortisol levels-low (300 ng mL(-1) ), high (1,000 ng mL(-1) ), or control (0 ng mL(-1) )-to examine the early-life impacts of maternally transferred stress hormones on offspring. Specifically, we measured early survival, rate of development, and multiple measures of morphology. Low and high cortisol dosing of eggs resulted in significantly higher survival compared to controls (37% and 24% higher, respectively). Fish reared from high dose eggs were structurally smaller compared to control fish, but despite this variation in structural size, exposure to elevated cortisol did not impact developmental rate. These results demonstrate that elevations in egg cortisol can positively influence offspring fitness through an increase in early survival while also altering phenotype at a critical life-history stage. Overall, these results suggest that exposure to prenatal stress may not always produce apparently negative impacts on offspring fitness and further proposes that complex phenotypic responses should be examined in relevant environmental conditions. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Survival and proliferation characteristics of the microalga Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L after hypergravitational stress pretreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhengquan; Li, Demao; Meng, Chunxiao; Xu, Dong; Zhang, Xiaowen; Ye, Naihao

    2013-09-01

    Seeking extraterrestrial life, transferring between planets, even migrating to other planets attracts more and more attention of public and scientists. However, to make it clear for the ability to survive the forces studies is prerequisite to enable the speculations by natural means. Gravity is a critical force involved in all the life on Earth and, possibly, others planets. Organisms have been grown in microgravity habitats and in centrifuges to characterize the biological response to a range of gravitational forces and radiation levels in space and on Earth. However, little is known about the profiles of eukaryotic life under conditions of hyperacceleration attributable to extreme gravities. In this study, a eukaryotic extremophile, the Antarctic green microalga Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L, showed amazing proliferation capacity during and after hypergravitational stress for 30 min to 48 h at 110,200, 423,400, and 670,800g. These extreme gravities also had profound effects on viability, reproduction rate, photosynthesis efficiency, and gene transcriptional expression of this microalga. Most notably, all three supergravities efficiently stimulated algal cell division, but the greater the centrifugal force and the longer the duration of treatment, the lower the viable rate and breeding potential of samples in the following incubation. These results illustrated Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L is a useful eukaryotic model system candidate for space research. Further studies could provide new insight into the physical limits of life and its evolution and enhance the possibility for interstellar space travel and the quest for extraterrestrial life according to panspermia theory. Also, it indicated that life come from the outer space is not always prokaryotes but may be eukaryotes.

  17. Branched-Chain Amino Acid Supplementation Reduces Oxidative Stress and Prolongs Survival in Rats with Advanced Liver Cirrhosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mifuji-Moroka, Rumi; Hara, Nagisa; Miyachi, Hirohide; Sugimoto, Ryosuke; Tanaka, Hideaki; Fujita, Naoki; Gabazza, Esteban C.; Takei, Yoshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    Long-term supplementation with branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) is associated with prolonged survival and decreased frequency of development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with liver cirrhosis. However, the pharmaceutical mechanism underlying this association is still unclear. We investigated whether continuous BCAA supplementation increases survival rate of rats exposed to a fibrogenic agent and influences the iron accumulation, oxidative stress, fibrosis, and gluconeogenesis in the liver. Further, the effects of BCAA on gluconeogenesis in cultured cells were also investigated. A significant improvement in cumulative survival was observed in BCAA-supplemented rats with advanced cirrhosis compared to untreated rats with cirrhosis (PBCAA supplementation was associated with reduction of iron contents, reactive oxygen species production and attenuated fibrosis in the liver. In addition, BCAA ameliorated glucose metabolism by forkhead box protein O1 pathway in the liver. BCAA prolongs survival in cirrhotic rats and this was likely the consequences of reduced iron accumulation, oxidative stress and fibrosis and improved glucose metabolism in the liver. PMID:23936183

  18. Survival of pathogenic enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) and control with calcium oxide in frozen meat products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ro, Eun Young; Ko, Young Mi; Yoon, Ki Sun

    2015-08-01

    This study investigated both the level of microbial contamination and the presence of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) in frozen meat products, followed by the evaluation of its survival over 180 days under frozen temperature. We also examined the effect of calcium oxide on the populations of EHEC, E. coli O157:H7 and EPEC under both 10 °C and -18 °C storage conditions. Afterward, the morphological changes occurring in EHEC cells in response to freezer storage temperature and calcium oxide (CaO) treatments were examined using transmission electron microscopy. Among the frozen meat products tested, the highest contamination levels of total aerobic counts, coliforms and E. coli were observed in pork cutlets. Examination showed that 20% of the frozen meat products contained virulence genes, including verotoxin (VT) 1 and 2. Over 180 days of frozen storage and after 3 freeze-thaw cycles, the population of EHEC did not change regardless of the type of products or initial inoculated concentration, indicating the strong survival ability of EHEC. Subsequent testing revealed that the growth of three pathogenic E. coli strains was completely inhibited in meat patties prepared with 1% CaO, stored at 10 °C. However, the addition of 2% CaO was necessary to control the survival of EHEC, E. coli O157:H7 and EPEC in meat patties stored at -18 °C. CaO reduced the population of E. coli O157:H7 more effectively than the other EHEC and EPEC strains at both 10 °C and -18 °C. Transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed that exposed EHEC cells were resistant to the freezer storage temperature, although some cells incurred injury and death after several freeze-thaw cycles. Most of the cells exposed to CaO were found to have died or lost their cellular integrity and membranes, indicating that CaO has the potential to be used as a powerful antimicrobial agent for manufacturing frozen meat products. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Hydric stress-dependent effects of Plasmodium falciparum infection on the survival of wild-caught Anopheles gambiae female mosquitoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aboagye-Antwi Fred

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whether Plasmodium falciparum, the agent of human malaria responsible for over a million deaths per year, causes fitness costs in its mosquito vectors is a burning question that has not yet been adequately resolved. Understanding the evolutionary forces responsible for the maintenance of susceptibility and refractory alleles in natural mosquito populations is critical for understanding malaria transmission dynamics. Methods In natural mosquito populations, Plasmodium fitness costs may only be expressed in combination with other environmental stress factors hence this hypothesis was tested experimentally. Wild-caught blood-fed Anopheles gambiae s.s. females of the M and S molecular form from an area endemic for malaria in Mali, West Africa, were brought to the laboratory and submitted to a 7-day period of mild hydric stress or kept with water ad-libitum. At the end of this experiment all females were submitted to intense desiccation until death. The survival of all females throughout both stress episodes, as well as their body size and infection status was recorded. The importance of stress, body size and molecular form on infection prevalence and female survival was investigated using Logistic Regression and Proportional-Hazard analysis. Results Females subjected to mild stress exhibited patterns of survival and prevalence of infection compatible with increased parasite-induced mortality compared to non-stressed females. Fitness costs seemed to be linked to ookinetes and early oocyst development but not the presence of sporozoites. In addition, when females were subjected to intense desiccation stress, those carrying oocysts exhibited drastically reduced survival but those carrying sporozoites were unaffected. No significant differences in prevalence of infection and infection-induced mortality were found between the M and S molecular forms of Anopheles gambiae. Conclusions Because these results suggest that infected

  20. Major E. coli heat-stress protein do not translocate: implications for cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatvin, M B; Clark, A W; Siegel, F L

    1987-10-01

    When Escherichia coli are exposed to heat stress, the majority of proteins in the process of synthesis at the time of heat stress are rapidly translocated to the outer membrane of the bacterium. The synthesis of most of these proteins appears to take place on membrane-bound polyribosomes. With the temperature shift, overall protein synthesis is inhibited while the synthesis of a small group of proteins is initiated. These proteins are not translocated, but remain in the cytosolic compartment, and they are identifiable as heat-stress proteins. Both the translocation phenomenon and the retention of heat-stress proteins in the cytosolic compartment in proximity to the nucleoid could counteract the effects of heat stress. The translocated proteins may operate by stabilizing the outer membrane prior to the induction of heat-stress proteins and the latter, which are confined to the cytoplasmic compartment, may serve to protect the integrity of the nucleoid structures.

  1. Contribution of protein isoaspartate methyl transferase (PIMT) in the survival of Salmonella Typhimurium under oxidative stress and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumawat, Manoj; Pesingi, Pavan Kumar; Agarwal, Rajesh Kumar; Goswami, Tapas Kumar; Mahawar, Manish

    2016-06-01

    The enteric pathogen Salmonella Typhimurium (ST) survives inside the oxidative environment of phagocytic cells. Phagocyte generated oxidants primarily target proteins and modify amino acids in them. These modifications render the targeted proteins functionally inactive. Conversion of Asp to iso-Asp is one of the several known oxidant mediated amino acids modifications. By repairing iso-Asp to Asp, protein-isoaspartyl methyltransferase (PIMT) maintains the activities of proteins and thus helps in cellular survival under oxidative stress. To elucidate the role of PIMT in ST survival under oxidative stress, we have constructed a pimt gene deletion strain (Δpimt strain) of ST. The Δpimt strain grows normally in various culture media in vitro. However, in comparison to wild type ST, the Δpimt strain is found significantly (psurvival of Δpimt mutant strain against oxidants in vitro and also inside the macrophages. In mice model, the LD50 for wild type ST and mutant Δpimt has been 1.73×10(4) and 1.38×10(5), respectively. Further, the mutant strain shows reduced dissemination to spleen and liver in mice. Following infection with a mixture of wild type ST and the Δpimt mutant (co-infection experiment), we recover significantly (p<0.001) less numbers of mutant bacteria from the spleen and liver of mice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. The time dimension in stress responses : relevance for survival and health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eriksen, HR; Olff, M; Murison, R; Ursin, H

    1999-01-01

    Within the Cognitive Activation Theory of Stress (CATS), the stress response occurs whenever there is a discrepancy between what the organism is expecting, and what really exists. It affects the biochemistry of the brain, mobilizes resources, affects performance, and endocrine, vegetative, and

  3. The time dimension in stress responses: relevance for survival and health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eriksen, H. R.; Olff, M.; Murison, R.; Ursin, H.

    1999-01-01

    Within the Cognitive Activation Theory of Stress (CATS), the stress response occurs whenever there is a discrepancy between what the organism is expecting, and what really exists. It affects the biochemistry of the brain, mobilizes resources, affects performance, and endocrine, vegetative, and

  4. Effects of cadmium and a one-time drought stress on survival, growth, and yield of native plant species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miles, L.J.; Parker, G.R.

    1980-04-01

    Andropogon scoparius, Monarda fistulosa, and Rudbeckia hirta were grown from seed for 6 weeks in an uncontaminated rural site soil and a heavy metal-contaminated urban site soil. The rural site soil was amended with cadmium chloride. Plants grown in both soils were subjected to a one-time drought stress. Survival, shoot weight, root weight, total weight, height, and weekly growth of Andropogon and Monarda were adversely affected by cadmium (Cd) addition and drought stress. Results were similar for Rudbeckia except that shoot, root, and total weight were not significantly affected by drought stress. Root weights of Monarda and Andropogon were more severely affected by Cd addition than were shoot weights. Root-shoot ratios were not significantly affected by drought stress for any species. Drought stress and Cd addition effects were found to be additive for Monarda and Andropogon. The effect of soil Cd addition on growth was found to be primarily due to an initial delay in growth rather than a reduction in the overall rate of growth. However, on the heavy metal contamination urban site soil the growth rate was found to be reduced. This was especially true for Andropogon which was found to be most tolerant of Cd addition to the rural site soil for the species tested. The reduction in growth rate of plants on the urban site soil was probably not due to Cd alone.

  5. The genome of the Antarctic polyextremophile Nesterenkonia sp. AN1 reveals adaptive strategies for survival under multiple stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliyu, Habibu; De Maayer, Pieter; Cowan, Don

    2016-04-01

    Nesterenkonia sp. AN1 is a polyextremophile isolated from Antarctic desert soil. Genomic analyses and genome comparisons with three mesophilic Nesterenkonia strains indicated that the unique genome fraction of Nesterenkonia sp. AN1 contains adaptive features implicated in the response to cold stress including modulation of membrane fluidity as well as response to cold-associated osmotic and oxidative stress. The core genome also encodes a number of putative cold stress response proteins. RNA-Seq-based transcriptome analyses of Nesterenkonia sp. AN1 grown at 5ºC and 21°C showed that there was significant induction of transcripts that code for antioxidants at 5ºC, demonstrated by the upregulation of sodA, bcp and bpoA2. There was also overexpression of universal stress protein genes related to uspA, along with genes encoding other characterized cold stress features. Genes encoding the two key enzymes of the glyoxylate cycle, isocitrate lyase (ICL) and malate synthase (AceB) were induced at 5ºC, suggesting possible adaptation strategies for energy metabolism in cold habitats. These genomic features may contribute to the survival of Nesterenkonia sp. AN1 in arid Antarctic soils. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Fatigue surviving, fracture resistance, shear stress and finite element analysis of glass fiber posts with different diameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandscher, Vinícius Felipe; Bergoli, César Dalmolin; de Oliveira, Ariele Freitas; Kaizer, Osvaldo Bazzan; Souto Borges, Alexandre Luiz; Limberguer, Inácio da Fontoura; Valandro, Luiz Felipe

    2015-03-01

    This study evaluated the shear stress presented in glass fiber posts with parallel fiber (0°) and different coronal diameters under fatigue, fracture resistance and FEA. 160 glass-fiber posts (N=160) with eight different coronal diameters were used (DT=double tapered, number of the post=coronal diameter and W=Wider - fiber post with coronal diameter wider than the conventional): DT1.4; DT1.8W; DT1.6; DT2W; DT1.8; DT2.2W; DT2; DT2.2. Eighty posts were submitted to mechanical cycling (3×10(6) cycles; inclination: 45°; load: 50N; frequency: 4Hz; temperature: 37°C) to assess the surviving under intermittent loading and other eighty posts were submitted to fracture resistance testing (resistance [N] and shear-stress [MPa] values were obtained). The eight posts types were 3D modeled (Rhinoceros 4.0) and the shear-stress (MPa) evaluated using FEA (Ansys 13.0). One-way ANOVA showed statistically differences to fracture resistance (DT2.2W and DT2.2 showed higher values) and shear stress values (DT1.4 showed lower values). Only the DT1.4 fiber posts failed after mechanical cycling. FEA showed similar values of shear stress between the groups and these values were similar to those obtained by shear stress testing. The failure analysis showed that 95% of specimens failed by shear. Posts with parallel fiber (0°) may suffer fractures when an oblique shear load is applied on the structure; except the thinner group, greater coronal diameters promoted the same shear stresses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Responses to environmental stresses in woody plants: key to survive and longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osakabe, Yuriko; Kawaoka, Akiyoshi; Nishikubo, Nobuyuki; Osakabe, Keishi

    2012-01-01

    Environmental stresses have adverse effects on plant growth and productivity, and are predicted to become more severe and widespread in decades to come. Especially, prolonged and repeated severe stresses affecting growth and development would bring down long-lasting effects in woody plants as a result of its long-term growth period. To counteract these effects, trees have evolved specific mechanisms for acclimation and tolerance to environmental stresses. Plant growth and development are regulated by the integration of many environmental and endogenous signals including plant hormones. Acclimation of land plants to environmental stresses is controlled by molecular cascades, also involving cross-talk with other stresses and plant hormone signaling mechanisms. This review focuses on recent studies on molecular mechanisms of abiotic stress responses in woody plants, functions of plant hormones in wood formation, and the interconnection of cell wall biosynthesis and the mechanisms shown above. Understanding of these mechanisms in depth should shed light on the factors for improvement of woody plants to overcome severe environmental stress conditions.

  8. Chronic stress in adulthood followed by intermittent stress impairs spatial memory and the survival of newborn hippocampal cells in aging animals: prevention by FGL, a peptide mimetic of neural cell adhesion molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borcel, Erika; Pérez-Alvarez, Laura; Herrero, Ana Isabel

    2008-01-01

    each week to a stress stimulus. When evaluated in the water maze at the early stages of aging (18 months old), chronic unpredictable stress accelerated spatial-cognitive decline, an effect that was accompanied by a reduction in the survival of newborn cells and in the number of adult granular cells......In this study, we examined whether chronic stress in adulthood can exert long-term effects on spatial-cognitive abilities and on the survival of newborn hippocampal cells in aging animals. Male Wistar rats were subjected to chronic unpredictable stress at midlife (12 months old) and then reexposed......, a peptide mimetic of neural cell adhesion molecule, during the 4 weeks of continuous stress not only prevented the deleterious effects of chronic stress on spatial memory, but also reduced the survival of the newly generated hippocampal cells in aging animals. FGL treatment did not, however, prevent...

  9. First feeding of Eugerres brasilianus (Carapeva larvae with Acartia tonsa (Copepod nauplii increases survival and resistance to acute stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanessa de Melo Costa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The rotifer Brachionus sp. is commonly used for larval feeding in marine fish hatcheries. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the inclusion of Acartia tonsa nauplii in the initial diet of carapeva larvae improves their survival, growth and resistance to stress when compared to the regimen containing only rotifers. Adult copepods were collected in the wild and cultured with the microalgae Chaetoceros muelleri, Isochrysis galbana and Nannochloropsis oculata to obtain nauplii. Carapeva larvae were grown for 15 days using four treatments and three replicates: 1 Brachionus plicatilis rotifers (10 to 15/mL; 2 A. tonsa nauplii (0.25 to 0.5/mL; 3 Brachionus plicatilis rotifers (5 to 7.5/mL + A. tonsa nauplii (0.12 to 0.25/mL, and 4 no supply of live feed. After 15 days, the carapeva larvae were subjected to stress by exposure to air for 10 seconds and then returned to the source tank to evaluate survival after 24 h. Survival and stress resistance were higher in carapeva larvae fed B. plicatilis + A. tonsa nauplii (P<0.05, 20.9 ± 11.2% and 88.9%, respectively. These results confirm the positive effect of the inclusion of copepod nauplii in the diet of fish larvae. However, more research is needed to validate these results.

  10. Effect of environmental stress factors on the uptake and survival of Campylobacter jejuni in Acanthamoeba castellanii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bui, Thanh Xuan; Qvortrup, Klaus; Wolff, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Background: Campylobacter jejuni is a major cause of bacterial food-borne illness in Europe and North America. The mechanisms allowing survival in the environment and transmission to new hosts are not well understood. Environmental free-living protozoa may facilitate both processes. Pre-exposure ......Background: Campylobacter jejuni is a major cause of bacterial food-borne illness in Europe and North America. The mechanisms allowing survival in the environment and transmission to new hosts are not well understood. Environmental free-living protozoa may facilitate both processes. Pre...

  11. Artichoke compound cynarin differentially affects the survival, growth and stress response of normal, immortalized and cancerous human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gezer, Ceren; Yücecan, Sevinç; Rattan, Suresh Inder Singh

    2015-01-01

    Cynarin (CYN) is the main derivative of caffeoylquinic acid, found in leaves and heads of artichoke. Potential health-beneficial effects of CYN include as being choloretic-cholesterol lowering, hepatoprotective, anti-atherosclerotic, and antioxidative. We have tested the effects of various doses...... of CYN on the proliferative potential, survival, morphology, and stress response (SR) markers haemoxygenase-1 (HO-1) and heat shock protein-70 (HSP70) in normal human skin fibroblasts (FSF-1), telomerase-immortalized mesenchymal stem cells (hTERT-MSC) and cervical cancer cells, HeLa. Effects of CYN...

  12. Weathering the storm: parental effort and experimental manipulation of stress hormones predict brood survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouyang, JQ; Lendvai, AZ; Dakin, R.; Domalik, AD; Fasanello, VJ; Vassallo, BG; Haussmann, MF; Moore, IT; Bonier, F.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Unpredictable and inclement weather is increasing in strength and frequency, challenging organisms to respond adaptively. One way in which animals respond to environmental challenges is through the secretion of glucocorticoid stress hormones. These hormones mobilize energy stores and

  13. Symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder among Surviving Parents of Child Homicide Victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinear, Eileen E.

    This paper recognizes murder as a major cause of mortality among adolescents and young adults and addresses the need for research examining the effects of murder on the victim's surviving family members. The information contained in this report was obtained from surveys completed by 237 members of the Parents of Murdered Children support group.…

  14. Stress Effects in Channel Catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) Fry on Pond Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Results from previous studies suggested that channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) fry that were housed in very high traffic areas from hatch until reaching 9 g in size were able to survive experimental challenge with Edwardsiella ictaluri better than siblings who were hatched and raised in very low...

  15. Transcript and protein analysis reveals better survival skills of monocyte-derived dendritic cells compared to monocytes during oxidative stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilse Van Brussel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dendritic cells (DCs, professional antigen-presenting cells with the unique ability to initiate primary T-cell responses, are present in atherosclerotic lesions where they are exposed to oxidative stress that generates cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS. A large body of evidence indicates that cell death is a major modulating factor of atherogenesis. We examined antioxidant defence systems of human monocyte-derived (moDCs and monocytes in response to oxidative stress. METHODS: Oxidative stress was induced by addition of tertiary-butylhydroperoxide (tert-BHP, 30 min. Cellular responses were evaluated using flow cytometry and confocal live cell imaging (both using 5-(and-6-chloromethyl-2,7-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate, CM-H(2DCFDA. Viability was assessed by the neutral red assay. Total RNA was extracted for a PCR profiler array. Five genes were selected for confirmation by Taqman gene expression assays, and by immunoblotting or immunohistochemistry for protein levels. RESULTS: Tert-BHP increased CM-H(2DCFDA fluorescence and caused cell death. Interestingly, all processes occurred more slowly in moDCs than in monocytes. The mRNA profiler array showed more than 2-fold differential expression of 32 oxidative stress-related genes in unstimulated moDCs, including peroxiredoxin-2 (PRDX2, an enzyme reducing hydrogen peroxide and lipid peroxides. PRDX2 upregulation was confirmed by Taqman assays, immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. Silencing PRDX2 in moDCs by means of siRNA significantly increased CM-DCF fluorescence and cell death upon tert-BHP-stimulation. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that moDCs exhibit higher intracellular antioxidant capacities, making them better equipped to resist oxidative stress than monocytes. Upregulation of PRDX2 is involved in the neutralization of ROS in moDCs. Taken together, this points to better survival skills of DCs in oxidative stress environments, such as atherosclerotic plaques.

  16. Virtual Institute of Microbial Stress and Survival: Deduction of Stress Response Pathways in Metal and Radionuclide Reducing Microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2004-04-17

    The projects application goals are to: (1) To understand bacterial stress-response to the unique stressors in metal/radionuclide contamination sites; (2) To turn this understanding into a quantitative, data-driven model for exploring policies for natural and biostimulatory bioremediation; (3) To implement proposed policies in the field and compare results to model predictions; and (4) Close the experimental/computation cycle by using discrepancies between models and predictions to drive new measurements and construction of new models. The projects science goals are to: (1) Compare physiological and molecular response of three target microorganisms to environmental perturbation; (2) Deduce the underlying regulatory pathways that control these responses through analysis of phenotype, functional genomic, and molecular interaction data; (3) Use differences in the cellular responses among the target organisms to understand niche specific adaptations of the stress and metal reduction pathways; (4) From this analysis derive an understanding of the mechanisms of pathway evolution in the environment; and (5) Ultimately, derive dynamical models for the control of these pathways to predict how natural stimulation can optimize growth and metal reduction efficiency at field sites.

  17. Food matrices and cell conditions influence survival of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG under heat stresses and during storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Akihito; Teräsjärvi, Johanna; Salminen, Seppo

    2014-03-17

    The present study evaluated impact of moisture content and cell conditions on survival of probiotic strain, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG, under lethal heat stresses and during long-term storage using freeze-dried cells and oils as matrices. Viable cell counts of freeze-dried L. rhamnosus GG cells suspended in oils had only 1-log-reduction after 5min at 80°C and approximately 3-log-reduction after 20min, while no or very few viable cells were recorded for freeze dried cells suspended in buffer and cultured cells in oils. Surprisingly, freeze-dried cells suspended in oils still contained 4.3 to 6.7logCFU/ml after 5min at 95°C. Long-term storage study indicated that freeze-dried cells suspended in oils kept viable conditions for 4months, and a loss of the viability was only 0.3 to 0.6logCFU/ml. Viable cell counts of cultured cells suspended in oils were not present after 3days to 3months. These results clearly indicate that moisture and cell conditions have a great impact on survival of probiotics under severe heat stress in processing and during long-term storage. Combination of freeze-dried cells and oils as carrier provides beneficial options to preserve viability of probiotics in food processes and storage. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. C. elegans AMPKs promote survival and arrest germline development during nutrient stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masamitsu Fukuyama

    2012-08-01

    Mechanisms controlling development, growth, and metabolism are coordinated in response to changes in environmental conditions, enhancing the likelihood of survival to reproductive maturity. Much remains to be learned about the molecular basis underlying environmental influences on these processes. C. elegans larvae enter a developmentally dormant state called L1 diapause when hatched into nutrient-poor conditions. The nematode pten homologue daf-18 is essential for maintenance of survival and germline stem cell quiescence during this period (Fukuyama et al., 2006; Sigmond et al., 2008, but the details of the signaling network(s in which it functions remain to be elucidated. Here, we report that animals lacking both aak-1 and aak-2, which encode the two catalytic α subunits of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, show reduced viability and failure to maintain mitotic quiescence in germline stem cells during L1 diapause. Furthermore, failure to arrest germline proliferation has a long term consequence; aak double mutants that have experienced L1 diapause develop into sterile adults when returned to food, whereas their continuously fed siblings are fertile. Both aak and daf-18 appear to maintain germline quiescence by inhibiting activity of the common downstream target, TORC1 (TOR Complex 1. In contrast, rescue of the lethality phenotype indicates that aak-2 acts not only in the intestine, as does daf-18, but also in neurons, likely promoting survival by preventing energy deprivation during L1 diapause. These results not only provide evidence that AMPK contributes to survival during L1 diapause in a manner distinct from that by which it controls dauer diapause, but they also suggest that AMPK suppresses TORC1 activity to maintain stem cell quiescence.

  19. Mosquito control pesticides and sea surface temperatures have differential effects on the survival and oxidative stress response of coral larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Cliff; Olsen, Kevin; Henry, Michael; Pierce, Richard

    2015-04-01

    The declining health of coral reefs is intensifying worldwide at an alarming rate due to the combined effects of land-based sources of pollution and climate change. Despite the persistent use of mosquito control pesticides in populated coastal areas, studies examining the survival and physiological impacts of early life-history stages of non-targeted marine organisms are limited. In order to better understand the combined effects of mosquito pesticides and rising sea surface temperatures, we exposed larvae from the coral Porites astreoides to selected concentrations of two major mosquito pesticide ingredients, naled and permethrin, and seawater elevated +3.5 °C. Following 18-20 h of exposure, larvae exposed to naled concentrations of 2.96 µg L(-1) or greater had significantly reduced survivorship compared to controls. These effects were not detected in the presence of permethrin or elevated temperature. Furthermore, larval settlement, post-settlement survival and zooxanthellae density were not impacted by any treatment. To evaluate the sub-lethal stress response of larvae, several oxidative stress endpoints were utilized. Biomarker responses to pesticide exposure were variable and contingent upon pesticide type as well as the specific biomarker being employed. In some cases, such as with protein carbonylation and catalase gene expression, the effects of naled exposure and temperature were interactive. In other cases pesticide exposure failed to induce any sub-lethal stress response. Overall, these results demonstrate that P. astreoides larvae have a moderate degree of resistance against short-term exposure to ecologically relevant concentrations of pesticides even in the presence of elevated temperature. In addition, this work highlights the importance of considering the complexity and differential responses encountered when examining the impacts of combined stressors that occur on varying spatial scales.

  20. ERLIN2 promotes breast cancer cell survival by modulating endoplasmic reticulum stress pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Guohui

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amplification of the 8p11-12 region has been found in approximately 15% of human breast cancer and is associated with poor prognosis. Previous genomic analysis has led us to identify the endoplasmic reticulum (ER lipid raft-associated 2 (ERLIN2 gene as one of the candidate oncogenes within the 8p11-12 amplicon in human breast cancer, particularly in the luminal subtype. ERLIN2, an ER membrane protein, has recently been identified as a novel mediator of ER-associated degradation. Yet, the biological roles of ERLIN2 and molecular mechanisms by which ERLIN2 coordinates ER pathways in breast carcinogenesis remain unclear. Methods We established the MCF10A-ERLIN2 cell line, which stably over expresses ERLIN2 in human nontransformed mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A using the pLenti6/V5-ERLIN2 construct. ERLIN2 over expressing cells and their respective parental cell lines were assayed for in vitro transforming phenotypes. Next, we knocked down the ERLIN2 as well as the ER stress sensor IRE1α activity in the breast cancer cell lines to characterize the biological roles and molecular basis of the ERLIN2 in carcinogenesis. Finally, immunohistochemical staining was performed to detect ERLIN2 expression in normal and cancerous human breast tissues Results We found that amplification of the ERLIN2 gene and over expression of the ERLIN2 protein occurs in both luminal and Her2 subtypes of breast cancer. Gain- and loss-of-function approaches demonstrated that ERLIN2 is a novel oncogenic factor associated with the ER stress response pathway. The IRE1α/XBP1 axis in the ER stress pathway modulated expression of ERLIN2 protein levels in breast cancer cells. We also showed that over expression of ERLIN2 facilitated the adaptation of breast epithelial cells to ER stress by supporting cell growth and protecting the cells from ER stress-induced cell death. Conclusions ERLIN2 may confer a selective growth advantage for breast cancer cells by

  1. Plant survival in a changing environment: the role of nitric oxide in plant responses to abiotic stress

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    Marcela eSimontacchi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide in plants may originate endogenously or come from surrounding atmosphere and soil. Interestingly, this gaseous free radical is far from having a constant level and varies greatly among tissues depending on a given plant´s ontogeny and environmental fluctuations.Proper plant growth, vegetative development, and reproduction require the integration of plant hormonal activity with the antioxidant network, as well as the maintenance of concentration of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species within a narrow range. Plants are frequently faced with abiotic stress conditions such as low nutrient availability, salinity, drought, high ultraviolet (UV radiation and extreme temperatures, which can influence developmental processes and lead to growth restriction making adaptive responses the plant´s priority. The ability of plants to respond and survive under environmental-stress conditions involves sensing and signalling events where nitric oxide becomes a critical component mediating hormonal actions, interacting with reactive oxygen species, and modulating gene expression and protein activity. This review focuses on the current knowledge of the role of nitric oxide in adaptive plant responses to some specific abiotic stress conditions, particularly low mineral nutrient supply, drought, salinity and high UV-B radiation.

  2. Short-Term Diet and Moderate Exercise in Young Overweight Men Modulate Cardiocyte and Hepatocarcinoma Survival by Oxidative Stress

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    Marcellino Monda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of diet lifestyle on extending lifespan and reducing liver cancer risk. Young overweight men (n=20, without metabolic syndrome, were placed in a 3-week residential program on a low-fat diet and moderate aerobic exercise. In each subject, pre- and postintervention fasting blood were collected for evaluating levels of serum lipids, and oxidative stress markers. Using subject sera and cardiomyocyte (H9C2 culture systems, we measured heat shock protein 27 and 90 expression, lipid accumulation, and oxidative stress marker levels. After 3-weeks of diet, significant reductions (P<0.05 in body mass index, serum lipids and lipid ratios, and oxidative markers were recorded. In vitro, we observed that the addition of postintervention sera increased H9C2 cell number and reduced HSP27 and 90 expression, mitochondrial superoxide anion, and lipid accumulation with a parallel increase in nitric oxide (NO production (all P<0.01. At the same time, postintervention sera decreased human liver hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HepG-2 proliferation, lipid accumulation, oxidative stress, and extracellular-signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2 activity. Lifestyle modification in young overweight men, without metabolic syndrome, could ameliorate cardiocyte survival and reduce hepatocellular carcinoma cell proliferation.

  3. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases are involved in growth, thermotolerance, oxidative stress survival, and fertility in Neurospora crassa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ravi; Tamuli, Ranjan

    2014-04-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinases (Ca(2+)/CaMKs) are Ser/Thr protein kinases that respond to change in cytosolic free Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]c) and play multiple cellular roles in organisms ranging from fungi to humans. In the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa, four Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent kinases, Ca(2+)/CaMK-1 to 4, are encoded by the genes NCU09123, NCU02283, NCU06177, and NCU09212, respectively. We found that camk-1 and camk-2 are essential for full fertility in N. crassa. The survival of ∆camk-2 mutant was increased in induced thermotolerance and oxidative stress conditions. In addition, the ∆camk-1 ∆camk-2, ∆camk-4 ∆camk-2, and ∆camk-3 ∆camk-2 double mutants display slow growth phenotype, reduced aerial hyphae, decreased thermotolerance, and increased sensitivity to oxidative stress, revealing the genetic interactions among these kinases. Therefore, Ca(2+)/CaMKs are involved in growth, thermotolerance, oxidative stress tolerance, and fertility in N. crassa.

  4. Chronic stress increases experimental pancreatic cancer growth, reduces survival and can be antagonised by beta-adrenergic receptor blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partecke, Lars Ivo; Speerforck, Sven; Käding, André; Seubert, Florian; Kühn, Sandra; Lorenz, Eric; Schwandke, Sebastian; Sendler, Matthias; Keßler, Wolfram; Trung, Dung Nguyen; Oswald, Stefan; Weiss, Frank Ulrich; Mayerle, Julia; Henkel, Christin; Menges, Pia; Beyer, Katharina; Lerch, Markus M; Heidecke, Claus-Dieter; von Bernstorff, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    Chronic stress could promote tumour growth and reduce survival of pancreatic cancer patients via beta-adrenergic receptors of tumour cells. We have tested the impact of chronic acoustic and restraint stress on tumour development in an orthotopic syngeneic murine model of pancreatic cancer. Tumour-bearing C57BL/6 mice exposed to chronic stress had 45% (p = 0.0138) higher circulating steroid and 111% (p = 0.0052) higher adrenal tyrosine hydroxylase levels. Their immune response was significantly suppressed: The in vitro LPS response of splenocytes was significantly reduced regarding Th1- and Th2-cytokines including IFN-gamma, IL-6, IL-10 and MCP-1 (0.0011  0.05). TGF-beta in vitro was increased by 23.4% using catecholamines (p Beta-catecholamines increased proliferation in tumour cells by 18% (p beta-blocker propranolol reduced these effects by 25% (p beta-blockers of patients with pancreatic cancer or other malignancies should be further evaluated as an adjuvant anti-neoplastic agent in clinical trials. Copyright © 2016 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Under Stress: Social Coping Mechanisms for Survival among the Working Professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Ms. Coral Barboza; Dr. Babu Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The nature of work of professionals and their family life may very often expose them to high level of stress which has the potential of affecting their productive and earning capacity. Coping strategies have been the subject of many studies and various suggestions have been made regarding the most appropriate way to categorise them in terms of function and efficacy (Amble, 2006; Buys et al., 2010). The goal of the current study was to examine how social coping mechanisms are helpful to employ...

  6. Effect of Hypergravity Stress on Gaseous Exchange and Survival of Young and Old Guinea Pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muradian, Kh. K.; Timchenko, A. N.

    Hypergravity tolerance decreases in aging Guinea pigs, the range being lower than in other studied species of laboratory mammals - mice, hamsters, and rats. Moreover, for the gaseous exchange rate and body temperature, the decline during the stress is not characteristic for Guinea pigs of both age groups, in contrast to other species. In general, hypergravity tolerance of Guinea pigs could be more appropriate experimental models.

  7. Loss of PINK1 impairs stress-induced autophagy and cell survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dajana Parganlija

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial kinase PINK1 and the ubiquitin ligase Parkin are participating in quality control after CCCP- or ROS-induced mitochondrial damage, and their dysfunction is associated with the development and progression of Parkinson's disease. Furthermore, PINK1 expression is also induced by starvation indicating an additional role for PINK1 in stress response. Therefore, the effects of PINK1 deficiency on the autophago-lysosomal pathway during stress were investigated. Under trophic deprivation SH-SY5Y cells with stable PINK1 knockdown showed downregulation of key autophagic genes, including Beclin, LC3 and LAMP-2. In good agreement, protein levels of LC3-II and LAMP-2 but not of LAMP-1 were reduced in different cell model systems with PINK1 knockdown or knockout after addition of different stressors. This downregulation of autophagic factors caused increased apoptosis, which could be rescued by overexpression of LC3 or PINK1. Taken together, the PINK1-mediated reduction of autophagic key factors during stress resulted in increased cell death, thus defining an additional pathway that could contribute to the progression of Parkinson's disease in patients with PINK1 mutations.

  8. Survival and virulence of copper- and chlorine-stressed Yersinia enterocolitica in Experimentally infected mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, A.; McFeters, G.A.

    1987-08-01

    The effect of gastric pH on the viability and virulence of Yersinia enterocolitica 0:8 after exposure to sublethal concentrations of copper and chlorine was determined in mice. Viability and injury were assessed with a nonselective TLY agar and two selective media, TLYD agar and CIN agar. Both copper and chlorine caused injury which was manifested by the inability of the cells to grow on selective media. CIN agar was more restrictive to the growth of injured cells than TLYD agar. Injury of the exposed cells was further enhanced in the gastric environment of mice. Besides injury, the low gastric pH caused extensive loss of viability in copper-exposed cells. Lethality in the chlorine-exposed cells was less extensive, and a portion of the inoculum reached the small intestine 5 min postinoculation. No adverse effect on the injured cells was apparent in the small intestine, and a substantial revival of the injury occurred in 3 to 4 h after intraluminal inoculation. The virulence of chlorine-stressed Y. enterocolitica in orally inoculated mice was similar to that of the control culture, but copper-stressed cells showed reduced virulence. Virulence was partly restored by oral administration of sodium bicarbonate before the inoculation of copper-exposed cells. Neutralization of gastric acidity had no effect on the virulence of the control of chlorine-stressed cells.

  9. High temperature and drought stress effects on survival of Pinus ponderosa seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, P F; Robberecht, R

    1996-08-01

    We studied the effects of high temperature and drought on the survival, growth and water relations of seedlings of Pinus ponderosa (Dougl.) Lawson, one of few coniferous tree species that can successfully colonize drought-prone sites with high soil surface temperatures. Temperature profiles were measured with 0.07-mm thermocouples in a sparse ponderosa pine forest in northern Idaho. The soil surface and the adjacent 5 mm of air reached maximum temperatures exceeding 75 degrees C, well above the lethal temperature threshold for most plants. Air temperatures 50 mm above the soil surface (seedling needle height) rarely exceeded 45 degrees C. Pinus ponderosa seedlings that survived maintained basal stem temperatures as much as 15 degrees C lower than the surrounding air. The apparent threshold temperature at the seedling stem surface resulting in death was approximately 63 degrees C for less than 1 min. No correlation between seedling mortality and needle temperature was found, although some needles reached temperatures as high as 60 degrees C for periods of cooling the stem below the lethal threshold temperature. Heat exchange calculations showed that rapid water flow through seedling stems can absorb sufficient energy to reduce stem temperature by 30 degrees C during peak sunlight hours.

  10. Do mycorrhizal network benefits to survival and growth of interior Douglas-fir seedlings increase with soil moisture stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Marcus A; Simard, Suzanne W

    2011-11-01

    Facilitation of tree establishment by ectomycorrhizal (EM) networks (MNs) may become increasingly important as drought stress increases with climate change in some forested regions of North America. The objective of this study was to determine (1) whether temperature, CO(2) concentration ([CO(2)]), soil moisture, and MNs interact to affect plant establishment success, such that MNs facilitate establishment when plants are the most water stressed, and (2) whether transfer of C and water between plants through MNs plays a role in this. We established interior Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesiivar.glauca) seedlings in root boxes with and without the potential to form MNs with nearby conspecific seedlings that had consistent access to water via their taproots. We varied temperature, [CO(2)], and soil moisture in growth chambers. Douglas-fir seedling survival increased when the potential existed to form an MN. Growth increased with MN potential under the driest soil conditions, but decreased with temperature at 800 ppm [CO(2)]. Transfer of (13)C to receiver seedlings was unaffected by potential to form an MN with donor seedlings, but deuterated water (D(2)O) transfer increased with MN potential under ambient [CO(2)]. Chlorophyll fluorescence was reduced when seedlings had the potential to form an MN under high [CO(2)] and cool temperatures. We conclude that Douglas-fir seedling establishment in laboratory conditions is facilitated by MN potential where Douglas-fir seedlings have consistent access to water. Moreover, this facilitation appears to increase as water stress potential increases and water transfer via networks may play a role in this. These results suggest that conservation of MN potential may be important to forest regeneration where drought stress increases with climate change.

  11. Survival of the Fittest: Overcoming Oxidative Stress at the Extremes of Acid, Heat and Metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukari Maezato

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The habitat of metal respiring acidothermophilic lithoautotrophs is perhaps the most oxidizing environment yet identified. Geothermal heat, sulfuric acid and transition metals contribute both individually and synergistically under aerobic conditions to create this niche. Sulfuric acid and metals originating from sulfidic ores catalyze oxidative reactions attacking microbial cell surfaces including lipids, proteins and glycosyl groups. Sulfuric acid also promotes hydrocarbon dehydration contributing to the formation of black “burnt” carbon. Oxidative reactions leading to abstraction of electrons is further impacted by heat through an increase in the proportion of reactant molecules with sufficient energy to react. Collectively these factors and particularly those related to metals must be overcome by thermoacidophilic lithoautotrophs in order for them to survive and proliferate. The necessary mechanisms to achieve this goal are largely unknown however mechanistics insights have been gained through genomic studies. This review focuses on the specific role of metals in this extreme environment with an emphasis on resistance mechanisms in Archaea.

  12. Peroxiredoxin 3 maintains the survival of endometrial cancer stem cells by regulating oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, In-Sung; Jeong, Yu Jeong; Seo, Young Jin; Byun, Jung Mi; Kim, Young Nanm; Jeong, Dae Hoon; Han, Jin; Kim, Ki Tae; Jang, Sung-Wuk

    2017-11-03

    Cancer stem cell (CSC)-targeted therapy could reduce tumor growth, recurrence, and metastasis in endometrial cancer (EC). The mitochondria of CSCs have been recently found to be an important target for cancer treatment, but the mitochondrial features of CSCs and their regulators, which maintain mitochondrial function, remain unclear. Here, we investigated the mitochondrial properties of CSCs, and identified specific targets for eliminating CSCs in EC. We found that endometrial CSCs displayed higher mitochondrial membrane potential, Ca 2+ , reactive oxygen species, ATP levels, and oxygen consumption rates than non-CSCs. Further, we also verified that mitochondrial peroxiredoxin 3 (Prx3) was upregulated, and that it contributed to the survival of CSCs in EC. The knockdown of the Prx3 gene resulted not only in decreased sphere formation, but also reduced the viability of endometrial CSCs, by causing mitochondrial dysfunction. Furthermore, we found that the forkhead box protein M1 (FoxM1), an important transcriptional factor, is overexpressed in patients with EC. FoxM1 expression correlates with elevated Prx3 expression levels, in agreement with the tumorigenic ability of Prx3 in endometrial CSCs. Taken together, our findings indicate that human endometrial CSCs have enhanced mitochondrial function compared to that of endometrial tumor cells. Endometrial CSCs show increased expression of the mitochondrial Prx3, which is required for the maintenance of mitochondrial function and survival, and is induced by FoxM1. Based on our findings, we believe that these proteins might represent valuable therapeutic targets and could provide new insights into the development of new therapeutic strategies for patients with endometrial cancer.

  13. Sirtuin 7 promotes cellular survival following genomic stress by attenuation of DNA damage, SAPK activation and p53 response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiran, Shashi; Oddi, Vineesha [Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Centre for DNA Fingerprinting and Diagnostics, Hyderabad, Telangana, 500001 (India); Ramakrishna, Gayatri, E-mail: gayatrirama1@gmail.com [Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Centre for DNA Fingerprinting and Diagnostics, Hyderabad, Telangana, 500001 (India); Laboratory of Cancer Cell Biology, Department of Research, Institute of Liver and Biliary Sciences, Delhi 110070 (India)

    2015-02-01

    Maintaining the genomic integrity is a constant challenge in proliferating cells. Amongst various proteins involved in this process, Sirtuins play a key role in DNA damage repair mechanisms in yeast as well as mammals. In the present work we report the role of one of the least explored Sirtuin viz., SIRT7, under conditions of genomic stress when treated with doxorubicin. Knockdown of SIRT7 sensitized osteosarcoma (U2OS) cells to DNA damage induced cell death by doxorubicin. SIRT7 overexpression in NIH3T3 delayed cell cycle progression by causing delay in G1 to S transition. SIRT7 overexpressing cells when treated with low dose of doxorubicin (0.25 µM) showed delayed onset of senescence, lesser accumulation of DNA damage marker γH2AX and lowered levels of growth arrest markers viz., p53 and p21 when compared to doxorubicin treated control GFP expressing cells. Resistance to DNA damage following SIRT7 overexpression was also evident by EdU incorporation studies where cellular growth arrest was significantly delayed. When treated with higher dose of doxorubicin (>1 µM), SIRT7 conferred resistance to apoptosis by attenuating stress activated kinases (SAPK viz., p38 and JNK) and p53 response thereby shifting the cellular fate towards senescence. Interestingly, relocalization of SIRT7 from nucleolus to nucleoplasm together with its co-localization with SAPK was an important feature associated with DNA damage. SIRT7 mediated resistance to doxorubicin induced apoptosis and senescence was lost when p53 level was restored by nutlin treatment. Overall, we propose SIRT7 attenuates DNA damage, SAPK activation and p53 response thereby promoting cellular survival under conditions of genomic stress. - Highlights: • Knockdown of SIRT7 sensitized cells to DNA damage induced apoptosis. • SIRT7 delayed onset of premature senescence by attenuating DNA damage response. • Overexpression of SIRT7 delayed cell cycle progression by delaying G1/S transition. • Upon DNA damage SIRT

  14. A detailed view of Listeria monocytogenes’ adaptation and survival under cold temperature stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hingston, P.; Hansen, Lisbeth Truelstrup; Wang, S.

    The human pathogen Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) continues to be a challenge for the food industry where it is known to contaminate ready-to-eat foods and grow during refrigerated storage. In order to gain increased control of Lm in the food-supply-chain, an improved understanding of low temperature...... stress adaptation methods is needed. In this study, RNA-seq (strand specific Illumina libraries;22-39 million 2x100bp reads) and cell membrane fatty acid profiling were used to analyze adaptation mechanisms used by a fast growing, serotype 1/2a, Lm food plant isolate at 4°C. Brain heart infusion (BHI...

  15. Distinct Functional Domains of UBC9 Dictate Cell Survival and Resistance to Genotoxic Stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Waardenburg,R.; Duda, D.; Lancaster, C.; Schulman, B.; Bjornsti, M.

    2006-01-01

    Covalent modification with SUMO alters protein function, intracellular localization, or protein-protein interactions. Target recognition is determined, in part, by the SUMO E2 enzyme, Ubc9, while Siz/Pias E3 ligases may facilitate select interactions by acting as substrate adaptors. A yeast conditional Ubc9P{sub 123}L mutant was viable at 36 C yet exhibited enhanced sensitivity to DNA damage. To define functional domains in Ubc9 that dictate cellular responses to genotoxic stress versus those necessary for cell viability, a 1.75- Angstroms structure of yeast Ubc9 that demonstrated considerable conservation of backbone architecture with human Ubc9 was solved. Nevertheless, differences in side chain geometry/charge guided the design of human/yeast chimeras, where swapping domains implicated in (i) binding residues within substrates that flank canonical SUMOylation sites, (ii) interactions with the RanBP2 E3 ligase, and (iii) binding of the heterodimeric E1 and SUMO had distinct effects on cell growth and resistance to DNA-damaging agents. Our findings establish a functional interaction between N-terminal and substrate-binding domains of Ubc9 and distinguish the activities of E3 ligases Siz1 and Siz2 in regulating cellular responses to genotoxic stress.

  16. Posttraumatic stress and posttraumatic growth among low-income mothers who survived Hurricane Katrina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Sarah R; Manove, Emily E; Rhodes, Jean E

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore the relationship between posttraumatic stress (PTS) and posttraumatic growth (PTG) after Hurricane Katrina, and the role of demographics, predisaster psychological distress, hurricane-related stressors, and psychological resources (optimism and purpose) in predicting each. Participants were 334 low-income mothers (82.0% non-Hispanic Black) living in the New Orleans area prior to Hurricane Katrina, who completed surveys in the year prior to the hurricane (T1 [Time 1]) and 1 and 3 years thereafter (T2 and T3). Higher T2 and T3 PTS full-scale and symptom cluster subscales (Intrusion, Avoidance, and Hyperarousal) were significantly associated with higher T3 PTG, and participants who surpassed the clinical cutoff for probable posttraumatic stress disorder at both T2 and T3 had significantly higher PTG than those who never surpassed the clinical cutoff. Older and non-Hispanic Black participants, as well as those who experienced a greater number of hurricane-related stressors and bereavement, reported significantly greater T3 PTS and PTG. Participants with lower T2 optimism reported significantly greater T3 intrusive symptoms, whereas those with higher T1 and T2 purpose reported significantly greater T3 PTG. Based on the results, we suggest practices and policies with which to identify disaster survivors at greater risk for PTS, as well as longitudinal investigations of reciprocal and mediational relationships between psychological resources, PTS, and PTG. (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  17. DIABETES ASSOCIATED OXIDATIVE STRESS AND INFLAMMATION ALTERS THE PROTECTIVE EFFECT OF OBESITY ON SURVIVAL IN CHD PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serpil M. Deger

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to the adverse outcomes of obesity in general population, increased body mass index (BMI is associated with improved survival in hemodialysis (CHD patients. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the association between obesity and mortality by diabetic status among 98 maintenance CHD patients. The median follow up was 33 (19, 56 months. Mean age was 49±13 years, 66% were male and 48 % had obesity. 45% of obese subjects were diabetic. Among the subgroups of study population, survival of diabetic obese patients was significantly lower compared to non-diabetic obese subjects (p=0.007 (Figure 1. The subgroup comparisons showed that diabetic obese patients tend to have higher truncal fat percentage (p<0.001 and lower lean body mass standardized by body surface area compared to nondiabetic counterparts although difference was not statistically significance. Diabetic obese patients had higher leptin (p=0.001 and high sensitivity C-reactive protein levels (0.005. Additionally, protein thiols (P-SH were significantly decreased in diabetic obese participants (p=0.03. Although, elevated body fatness appears to be protective for CHD population, presence of overt diabetes alters this advantage by increasing inflammation and oxidative stress.fx1

  18. Anatomical regulation of ice nucleation and cavitation helps trees to survive freezing and drought stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lintunen, A.; Hölttä, T.; Kulmala, M.

    2013-06-01

    Water in the xylem, the water transport system of plants, is vulnerable to freezing and cavitation, i.e. to phase change from liquid to ice or gaseous phase. The former is a threat in cold and the latter in dry environmental conditions. Here we show that a small xylem conduit diameter, which has previously been shown to be associated with lower cavitation pressure thus making a plant more drought resistant, is also associated with a decrease in the temperature required for ice nucleation in the xylem. Thus the susceptibility of freezing and cavitation are linked together in the xylem of plants. We explain this linkage by the regulation of the sizes of the nuclei catalysing freezing and drought cavitation. Our results offer better understanding of the similarities of adaption of plants to cold and drought stress, and offer new insights into the ability of plants to adapt to the changing environment.

  19. The effects of superoxide dismutase knockout on the oxidative stress parameters and survival of mouse erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzelak, Agnieszka; Kruszewski, Marcin; Macierzyńska, Ewa; Piotrowski, Łukasz; Pułaski, Łukasz; Rychlik, Błazej; Bartosz, Grzegorz

    2009-01-01

    The erythrocytes of 12-month old Sod1 (-/-) mice showed an increased level of reactive oxygen species (ROS), as estimated by the degree of dihydroethidine and dihydrorhodamine oxidation, and the increased level of Heinz bodies. No indices of severe oxidative stress were found in the red blood cells and blood plasma of Sod1 (-/-) mice as judged from the lack of significant changes in the levels of erythrocyte and plasma glutathione, plasma protein thiol and carbonyl groups and thiobarbituric-acid reactive substances in the blood plasma. However, a decreased erythrocyte lifespan, increased reticulocyte count and splenomegaly were noted, indicating the importance of superoxide dismutase for maintaining erythrocyte viability. The levels of erythrocyte ROS and Heinz bodies and the reticulocyte count were indistinguishable in Sod1 (+/+) and Sod1 (+/-) mice, suggesting that a superoxide dismutase activity decrease to half of its normal value may be sufficient to secure the protective effects of the enzyme.

  20. Inhibition of HSP90 Promotes Neural Stem Cell Survival from Oxidative Stress through Attenuating NF-κB/p65 Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell survival after transplantation determines the efficiency of stem cell treatment, which develops as a novel potential therapy for several central nervous system (CNS diseases in recent decades. The engrafted stem cells face the damage of oxidative stress, inflammation, and immune response at the lesion point in host. Among the damaging pathologies, oxidative stress directs stem cells to apoptosis and even death through several signalling pathways and DNA damage. However, the in-detail mechanism of stem cell survival from oxidative stress has not been revealed clearly. Here, in this study, we used hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 to induce the oxidative damage on neural stem cells (NSCs. The damage was in consequence demonstrated involving the activation of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90 and NF-κB/p65 signalling pathways. Further application of the pharmacological inhibitors, respectively, targeting at each signalling indicated an upper-stream role of HSP90 upon NF-κB/p65 on NSCs survival. Preinhibition of HSP90 with the specific inhibitor displayed a significant protection on NSCs against oxidative stress. In conclusion, inhibition of HSP90 would attenuate NF-κB/p65 activation by oxidative induction and promote NSCs survival from oxidative damage. The HSP90/NF-κB mechanism provides a new evidence on rescuing NSCs from oxidative stress and also promotes the stem cell application on CNS pathologies.

  1. Toxin ζ Triggers a Survival Response to Cope with Stress and Persistence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Moreno-del Álamo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria have evolved complex regulatory controls in response to various environmental stresses. Protein toxins of the ζ superfamily, found in prominent human pathogens, are broadly distributed in nature. We show that ζ is a uridine diphosphate-N-acetylglucosamine (UNAG-dependent ATPase whose activity is inhibited in vitro by stoichiometric concentrations of ε2 antitoxin. In vivo, transient ζ expression promotes a reversible multi-level response by altering the pool of signaling purine nucleotides, which leads to growth arrest (dormancy, although a small cell subpopulation persists rather than tolerating toxin action. High c-di-AMP levels (absence of phosphodiesterase GdpP decrease, and low c-di-AMP levels (absence of diadenylate cyclase DisA increase the rate of ζ persistence. The absence of CodY, a transition regulator from exponential to stationary phase, sensitizes cells to toxin action, and suppresses persisters formed in the ΔdisA context. These changes, which do not affect the levels of stochastic ampicillin (Amp persistence, sensitize cells to toxin and Amp action. Our findings provide an explanation for the connection between ζ-mediated growth arrest (with alterations in the GTP and c-di-AMP pools and persistence formation.

  2. Trypanosoma cruzi Polyamine Transporter: Its Role on Parasite Growth and Survival Under Stress Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reigada, Chantal; Sayé, Melisa; Vera, Edward Valera; Balcazar, Darío; Fraccaroli, Laura; Carrillo, Carolina; Miranda, Mariana R; Pereira, Claudio A

    2016-08-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas disease, a major health problem in Latin America. Polyamines are polycationic compounds that play a critical role as regulators of cell growth and differentiation. In contrast with other protozoa, T. cruzi is auxotrophic for polyamines because of its inability to synthesize putrescine due to the lack of both, arginine and ornithine decarboxylase; therefore, the intracellular availability of polyamines depends exclusively on transport processes. In this work, the polyamine transporter TcPAT12 was overexpressed in T. cruzi epimastigotes demonstrating that growth rates at different concentrations of polyamines strongly depend on the regulation of the polyamine transport. In addition, parasites overexpressing TcPAT12 showed a highly increased resistance to hydrogen peroxide and the trypanocidal drugs nifurtimox and benznidazole, which act by oxidative stress and interfering the synthesis of polyamine derivatives, respectively. Finally, the presence of putative polyamine transporters was analyzed in T. cruzi, Trypanosoma brucei, and Leishmania major genomes identifying 3-6 genes in these trypanosomatids.

  3. Survival of Listeria monocytogenes in simulated gastrointestinal system and transcriptional profiling of stress- and adhesion-related genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Lingli; Olesen, Inger; Andersen, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    survival of L. monocytogenes serotypes 4b and 1=2a strains were higher than that of serotype 1=2c, suggesting that pathogenicity might be related to the viability in the gastrointestinal tract.The transcription levels of prfA and the general stress-related genes clpC, clpE, and clpP were upregulated...

  4. Identification of sigma factor SigmaB-controlled genes and their impact on acid stress, high hydrostatic pressure, and freeze survival in Listeria monocytogenes EGD-e

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wemekamp-Kamphuis, H.H.; Wouters, J.A.; Leeuw, de P.P.L.A.; Hain, T.; Chakraborty, T.; Abee, T.

    2004-01-01

    The gene encoding the alternative sigma factor sigma(B) in Listeria monocytogenes is induced upon exposure of cells to several stresses. In this study, we investigated the impact of a sigB null mutation on the survival of L. monocytogenes EGD-e at low pH, during high-hydrostatic-pressure treatment,

  5. Aggregate freeze-thaw testing and d-cracking field performance : 30 years later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Premature deterioration of concrete pavement due to D-cracking has been a problem in Kansas since the 1930s. Kansas : geology includes mineable limestone coarse aggregates with variable durability in the eastern portion of the state. Due : to this va...

  6. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) inactivation in breast milk: reassessment of pasteurization and freeze-thawing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamprecht, Klaus; Maschmann, Jens; Müller, Denise; Dietz, Klaus; Besenthal, Ingo; Goelz, Rangmar; Middeldorp, Jaap M; Speer, Christian P; Jahn, Gerhard

    2004-10-01

    Breast-feeding mothers frequently transmit cytomegalovirus (CMV) to preterm infants of very low birth weight. Current recommendations for prevention of virus transmission are based on data published 20 y ago in the context of human milk banking. Two recent clinical trials examined storage of breast milk at -20 degrees Celsius to reduce virus transmission. However, in both studies, CMV transmission occurred. Using sensitive tools like quantitative PCR, CMV pp67 late mRNA assay, and a high-speed, centrifugation-based microculture assay for quantification of CMV infectivity, we reassessed the virological and biochemical characteristics of freeze-storing breast milk at -20 degrees Celsius, compared it with traditional Holder pasteurization (30 min at 62.5 degrees Celsius), and a new short-term pasteurization (5 s at 72 degrees Celsius) based on the generation of a milk film. Both heat treatment procedures were able to destroy viral infectivity and pp67 RNA completely. Preliminary results showed short-term heat inactivation below 72 degrees Celsius was less harmful in reducing the activity of marker enzymes than Holder pasteurization. Freezing breast milk preserved the biochemical and immunologic quality of the milk; however, late viral RNA and viral infectivity was also preserved. Compared with viral DNA, CMV-RNA more directly reflects infectious CMV in human milk samples. Further studies are necessary to evaluate short-term heat treatment below 72 degrees Celsius as an effective tool for prevention of CMV transmission.

  7. BOREAS RSS-17 1994 ERS-1 Level-3 Freeze/Thaw Backscatter Change Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The BOREAS RSS-17 team acquired and analyzed imaging radar data from the ESA's ERS-1 over a complete annual cycle at the BOREAS sites in Canada in 1994 to detect...

  8. Freezing-thawing and sub-sampling influence the marination performance of chicken breast meat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacuum-tumbling marination is often used to improve the yield and quality of whole or portioned boneless broiler breast fillets. The relationship between the marination performance of whole Pectoralis major muscles and breast fillet sub-samples is not well understood. The objective of this study wa...

  9. Effects of freezing-thawing on sensory descriptive profiles of cooked poultry breast meat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freezing is a common method used by consumers to extend meat shelf life and by researchers to allow for subsequent meat quality assessments and processing. However, the effects of freezing on the sensory quality of cooked poultry breast meat are not well documented. The objective of this study was t...

  10. Freezing, thawing and aging effects on beef tenderness from Bos indicus and Bos taurus cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aroeira, Carolina N; Torres Filho, Robledo A; Fontes, Paulo Rogério; Gomide, Lúcio Alberto M; Ramos, Alcinéia L S; Ladeira, Márcio M; Ramos, Eduardo M

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of freezing prior to aging on the meat tenderness of young Nellore and Aberdeen Angus bulls. Samples of the longissimus thoracis muscle were submitted to two treatments: conventional aging and freezing (-20°C for 40 days) followed by thawing and aging periods. The meats were evaluated after 0, 7, 14 and 21 aging days (1°C). Freezing increased (PFreezing increased proteolysis during aging in the meats of both breeds, but reduced shear force was found (Pfreezing prior to aging may contribute to meat tenderness in the first weeks of aging, but it is dependent on the animal breed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. BOREAS RSS-17 1994 ERS-1 Level-3 Freeze/Thaw Backscatter Change Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rignot, Eric; Nickeson, Jaime (Editor); Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Way, JoBea; McDonald, Kyle C.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Remote Sensing Science (RSS)-17 team acquired and analyzed imaging radar data from the European Space Agency's (ESA's) European Remote Sensing Satellite (ERS)-1 over a complete annual cycle at the BOREAS sites in Canada in 1994 to detect shifts in radar backscatter related to varying environmental conditions. Two independent transitions corresponding to soil thaw and possible canopy thaw were revealed by the data. The results demonstrated that radar provides an ability to observe thaw transitions at the beginning of the growing season, which in turn helps constrain the length of the growing season. The data set presented here includes change maps derived from radar backscatter images that were mosaicked together to cover the southern BOREAS sites. The image values used for calculating the changes are given relative to the reference mosaic image. The data are stored in binary image format files. The imaging radar data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  12. Perturbation Techniques in Condition-Controlled Freeze-Thaw Heat Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-01

    578. Stefan, J. (1891) Uber die Theorie des Eisbildung , insbesondere uber die Eisbildung im Polarmeere. Annals of Physics and Chemistry, Neue Folge, Bd...expansions, which is the main focus of this work. The report begins with a review of the perturbation theory and outlines the regular perturbation method, the... theory can understand the material. However, at the same time, the discussion covers the latest literature on the subject and therefore should serve

  13. EFFECT OF FREEZE-THAW ON THE HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY OF BARRIER MATERIALS: LABORATORY AND FIELD EVALUATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laboratory tests were conducted on barrier materials to determine if their hydraulic conductivity changes as a result of freezing and thawing. esults of the tests were compared to data collected from a field study. ests were conducted on two compacted clays, one sand-bentonite mi...

  14. Freeze-thaw cycles effects on soil compaction in a clay loam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inappropriate soil management practices and heavier farm machinery and equipment have led to an increase in soil compaction in the last two decades prompting increased global concern regarding the impact of soil compaction on crop production and soil quality in modern mechanized agriculture. A 3-yr ...

  15. Development of Fracture Energy of FRC Materials. Freeze-Thaw Resistance of FRC Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoklund Larsen, E.

    in this SBI Bulletin in order to give more direct information about two of the most important aspects in connection with FRCs. The SBI Bulletin contains two oral presentations given at the Fourth RILEM International Symposium on Fibre Reinforced Cement and Concrete which was held at the University...

  16. The Effect of Freezing Stress on Percentage of Electrolytes Leakage and Survival of Flixweed (Descurainia sophia L. Seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Izadi-Darbandi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Flixweed (Descurainia sophia L. is a medicinal plant from Brassicaceae family which also known as a weed for winter cereals and oil seed rape. Low temperatures are one of the most important abiotic stresses that threat Flixweed growth and productivity. Therefore it is important to recognize the freeze tolerance of Flixweed for successful planting and utilization in cold regions such as Mashhad in Khorasan Razavi Province (Iran’s north. east. Among many laboratory methods which have been developed to estimate and to evaluate plants response or their tolerance to freez¬ing temperatures, electrolyte leakage (EL test is widely used. This test is based on this principle that damage to the cell membranes results in enhanced leakage of solutes into the apoplastic water, hence recording the amount of leakage after stress treatments provides an estimation of tissue injury. Indeed continuing integration of plasma membrane is one important factor for survival of plants under freezing stress and any disturbance in membrane structure can lead to damage and death. So determination of LT50 point or critical temperature for electrolytes leakage and survival of plant is the most reliable, quantitative and simple methods for evaluating the cold tolerance of plants. The aim of this trial was to determine the LT50 according to the EL and SU% for Flixweed ecotypes. Materials and Methods In order to evaluate freeze tolerance in Flixweed, a factorial experiment based on completely randomized design with three replications was carried out in college of agriculture, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad. Experimental factors included five ecotypes of Flixweed (Eghlid, Sabzewar, Hamedan, Torbat-e-Jam and Neyshabour and 10 freezing temperature levels (0, -2,-4, -6, -8,-10,-12,-14,-16 and -18°C. Flixweed seeds were cultivated in pots in autumn of 2008 and were grown until 5-7 leaf stage under natural weather conditions for acclimation. Then to apply freezing

  17. Development of an Effective Transport Media for Juvenile Spring Chinook Salmon to Mitigate Stress and Improve Smolt Survival During Columbia River Fish Hauling Operations, 1985 Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wedemeyer, Gary A.

    1985-02-01

    Selected transport media consisting of mineral salt additions (Na/sup +/, Cl/sup -/, Ca/sup + +/, PO/sub 4//sup -3/, HCO/sub 3//sup -/, and Mg/sup + +/), mineral salts plus tranquilizing concentrations of tricaine methane sulfonate (MS-222), or MS-222 alone were tested for their ability to mitigate stress and increase smolt survival during single and mixed species hauling of Columbia River spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri). Successful stress mitigation was afforded by several formulations as indicated by protection against life-threatening osmoregulatory and other physiological dysfunctions, and against immediate and delayed hauling mortality. Effects on the seawater survival and growth of smolts hauled in transport media were used as the overall criterion of success. Of the fourteen chemical formulations tested, 10 ppM MS-222 emerged as top-rated in terms of ability to mitigate physiological stress during single and mixed species transport of juvenile spring chinook salmon at hauling densities of 0.5 or 1.0 lb/gallon. Immediate and delayed mortalities from hauling stress were also reduced, but benefits to early marine growth and survival were limited to about the first month in seawater. The two physical factors tested (reduced light intensity and water temperature) were generally less effective than mineral salt additions in mitigating hauling stress, but the degree of protection afforded by reduced light intensity was nevertheless judged to be physiologically beneficial. 36 refs., 1 fig., 19 tabs.

  18. Tetraselmis chuii biomass as a potential feed additive to improve survival and oxidative stress status of Pacific white-leg shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei postlarvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norazira Abdu Rahman

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Shrimp is an important traded fishery commodity. When subjected to stress, shrimp usually suffers from oxidative stress, which leads to cell injury, senescence, and death. To maintain shrimp good health, performance and production, antioxidant and immune systems are important. Natural antioxidants found in microalgae may be used to increase the cell protection against oxidative damage, being a promising alternative to the carcinogenic synthetic antioxidants. In this study, Tetraselmis chuii was evaluated for its effect on survival, growth and oxidative stress biomarkers on Litopenaeus vannamei postlarvae (PL. The antioxidant properties of the formulated feed with T. chuii inclusion were determined using four antioxidant chemical assays. Meanwhile, the oxidative stress biomarkers on PL were analyzed by hydrogen peroxide, membrane stability and lipid peroxidation assays. Results showed that PL reared on diets supplemented with 50% T. chuii had a significantly higher (P ≤ 0.05 survival (97.6 ± 1.4% and lower oxidative stress in terms of hydrogen peroxide content (10.08 ± 0.4 mM g−1 FW and electrolyte leakage (10.8 ± 0.3%. The result of this study also showed that shrimp PL reared on diets supplemented with microalgal, T. chuii have high resistance to reverse salinity stress test (76.7–100%. However, no significant differences (P ≥ 0.05 were found in the growth and lipid peroxidation. Due to the positive effect on oxidative stress status, survival and resistance to salinity stress, the feeding of L. vannamei PL with diet containing at least 50% of T. chuii is recommended as a natural source of antioxidant for PL.

  19. The ribokinases of Arabidopsis thaliana and Saccharomyces cerevisiae are required for ribose recycling from nucleotide catabolism, which in plants is not essential to survive prolonged dark stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Rebekka Y; Zhu, Anting; Eubel, Holger; Dahncke, Kathleen; Witte, Claus-Peter

    2017-09-18

    Nucleotide catabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana and Saccharomyces cerevisiae leads to the release of ribose, which requires phosphorylation to ribose-5-phosphate mediated by ribokinase (RBSK). We aimed to characterize RBSK in plants and yeast, to quantify the contribution of plant nucleotide catabolism to the ribose pool, and to investigate whether ribose carbon contributes to dark stress survival of plants. We performed a phylogenetic analysis and determined the kinetic constants of plant-expressed Arabidopsis and yeast RBSKs. Using mass spectrometry, several metabolites were quantified in AtRBSK mutants and double mutants with genes of nucleoside catabolism. Additionally, the dark stress performance of several nucleotide metabolism mutants and rbsk was compared. The plant PfkB family of sugar kinases forms nine major clades likely representing distinct biochemical functions, one of them RBSK. Nucleotide catabolism is the dominant ribose source in plant metabolism and is highly induced by dark stress. However, rbsk cannot be discerned from the wild type in dark stress. Interestingly, the accumulation of guanosine in a guanosine deaminase mutant strongly enhances dark stress symptoms. Although nucleotide catabolism contributes to carbon mobilization upon darkness and is the dominant source of ribose, the contribution appears to be of minor importance for dark stress survival. © 2017 The Authors New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  20. Synbiotic Amazonian palm berry (açai, Euterpe oleracea Mart.) ice cream improved Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG survival to simulated gastrointestinal stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Mayra Garcia Maia; Ooki, Gabriela Namur; Vieira, Antônio Diogo Silva; Bedani, Raquel; Saad, Susana Marta Isay

    2017-02-22

    The effect of açai pulp ice cream and of its supplementation with inulin (I), whey protein concentrate (WC), and/or whey protein isolate (WI) on the viability and resistance to simulated gastrointestinal stress of the probiotic Lactobacillus (Lb.) rhamnosus GG strain throughout storage at -18 °C for up to 112 days was evaluated and morphological changes during stress were monitored. Lb. rhamnosus GG viability was stable in all formulations for up to 112 days of storage, preserving populations around 9 log CFU g-1. Compared to the fresh culture, Lb. rhamnosus GG showed higher survival under simulated gastrointestinal conditions when incorporated into açai ice cream, indicating that the presence of the food matrix contributed to the microorganism survival. A reduction of at least 5 log cycles of Lb. rhamnosus GG was observed in all formulations after the gastrointestinal simulation in all storage periods assessed. The addition of I, WC, and/or WI did not show any significant effect on the probiotic survival under simulated gastrointestinal stress (p ice cream. Thus, the açai pulp ice cream was shown to be a suitable matrix for Lb. rhamnosus GG, improving its survival under in vitro simulated gastrointestinal conditions.

  1. Physical condition and stress levels during early development reflect feeding rates and predict pre- and post-fledging survival in a nearshore seabird

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Juliet S.; O'Reilly, Kathleen M.; Jodice, Patrick G.R.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of acute environmental stressors on reproduction in wildlife are often difficult to measure because of the labour and disturbance involved in collecting accurate reproductive data. Stress hormones represent a promising option for assessing the effects of environmental perturbations on altricial young; however, it is necessary first to establish how stress levels are affected by environmental conditions during development and whether elevated stress results in reduced survival and recruitment rates. In birds, the stress hormone corticosterone is deposited in feathers during the entire period of feather growth, making it an integrated measure of background stress levels during development. We tested the utility of feather corticosterone levels in 3- to 4-week-old nestling brown pelicans (Pelecanus occidentalis) for predicting survival rates at both the individual and colony levels. We also assessed the relationship of feather corticosterone to nestling body condition and rates of energy delivery to nestlings. Chicks with higher body condition and lower corticosterone levels were more likely to fledge and to be resighted after fledging, whereas those with lower body condition and higher corticosterone levels were less likely to fledge or be resighted after fledging. Feather corticosterone was also associated with intracolony differences in survival between ground and elevated nest sites. Colony-wide, mean feather corticosterone predicted nest productivity, chick survival and post-fledging dispersal more effectively than did body condition, although these relationships were strongest before fledglings dispersed away from the colony. Both reproductive success and nestling corticosterone were strongly related to nutritional conditions, particularly meal delivery rates. We conclude that feather corticosterone is a powerful predictor of reproductive success and could provide a useful metric for rapidly assessing the effects of changes in environmental

  2. TNF-α promotes survival and migration of MSCs under oxidative stress via NF-κB pathway to attenuate intimal hyperplasia in vein grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xiao; Xi, Jie; Bi, Yanwen; Zhao, Xin; Bing, Weidong; Meng, Xiangbin; Liu, Yimin; Zhu, Zhonglai; Song, Guangmin

    2017-09-01

    The oxidative stress caused by endothelial injury is involved in intimal hyperplasia (IH) in vein grafts. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can home to injured intima and promote endothelial repair. However, MSC apoptosis is increased accompanied by decreased functional activity under oxidative stress. Thus, we investigate whether tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) can promote the survival and activity of MSCs under oxidative stress to reduce IH more effectively, and establish what role the NF-κB pathway plays in this. In this study, we preconditioned MSCs with TNF-α ( TNF -α-PC MSCs) for 24 hrs and measured the activation of the IKK/NF-κB pathway. EdU and transwell assays were performed to assess proliferation and migration of TNF -α-PC MSCs. Apoptosis and migration of TNF -α- PC MSCs were evaluated in conditions of oxidative stress by analysis of the expression of Bcl-2 and CXCR4 proteins. TNF -α- PC MSCs were transplanted into a vein graft model, so that cell homing could be tracked, and endothelial apoptosis and IH of vein grafts were measured. The results demonstrated that TNF-α promotes proliferation and migration of MSCs. Furthermore, survival and migration of TNF -α- PC MSCs under oxidative stress were both enhanced. A greater number of MSCs migrated to the intima of vein grafts after preconditioning with TNF-α, and the formation of neointima was significantly reduced. These effects could be partially abolished by IKK XII (NF-κB inhibitor). All these results indicate that preconditioning with TNF-α can promote survival and migration of MSCs under oxidative stress via the NF-κB pathway and thus attenuate IH of vein grafts. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  3. Cascading effects from survival to physiological activities, and gene expression of heat shock protein 90 on the abalone Haliotis discus hannai responding to continuous thermal stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kiyun; Lee, Jung Sick; Kang, Ju-Chan; Kim, Jae Won; Kwak, Ihn-Sil

    2015-02-01

    Increasing temperatures can be a significant stressor for aquatic organisms. Abalones, a type of large marine gastropods, are the most commercially important species in aquaculture for Asia. To evaluate the potential ecological risk posed by temperature stress, we measured biological responses such as survival rate, adhesion ability (falling rate), and foot abnormalities in the abalone Haliotis discus hannai. Additionally, biochemical and molecular responses were evaluated in H. discus hannai exposed to various temperature gradients. The survival rate was reduced in abalones exposed to relative high temperatures (more than 26 °C). Increased temperature stress induced a higher falling rate and abnormal foot structure. Furthermore, increased antioxidant enzyme activities were observed in abalones exposed to relative high temperatures (26 and 28 °C). The activities of superoxide dismutase were induced in a time-dependent manner after high temperature stress. Generally, heat shock protein 90 also increased significantly in H. discus hannai exposed to temperature gradients (more than 24 °C) for 12 h. These results provide valuable information regarding stress responses to increased temperatures, in H. discus hannai: adverse biological and molecular outcomes could be utilized as risk assessments and stress monitoring of marine ecosystems under increased water temperatures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Honey bee (Apis mellifera) drones survive oxidative stress due to increased tolerance instead of avoidance or repair of oxidative damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxidative stress can lead to premature aging symptoms and cause acute mortality at higher doses in a range of organisms. Oxidative stress resistance and longevity are mechanistically and phenotypically linked: considerable variation in oxidative stress resistance exists among and within species and ...

  5. Effect of Microencapsulation Shear Stress on the Structural Integrity and Biological Activity of a Model Monoclonal Antibody, Trastuzumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritesh M. Pabari

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of process shear stressors on the stability of a model monoclonal antibody, trastuzumab. Trastuzumab, at concentrations of 0.4–4.0 mg/mL, was subjected to sonication, freeze-thaw, lyophilisation, spray drying and was encapsulated into micro- and nanoparticles. The stressed samples were analysed for structural integrity by gel electrophoresis, SDS-PAGE, and size exclusion chromatography (SEC, while the conformational integrity was analysed by circular dichroism (CD. Biological activity of the stressed trastuzumab was investigated by measuring the inhibition of cell proliferation of HER-2 expressing cell lines. Results show that trastuzumab was resistant to the process shear stresses applied and to microencapsulation processes. At the lowest concentration of 0.4 mg/mL, a low percent ( 0.05. The results of this study conclude that trastuzumab may be resistant to various processing stresses. These findings have important implications with respect to pharmaceutical processing of monoclonal antibodies.

  6. Flow cytometric assessment of the protectants for enhanced in vitro survival of probiotic lactic acid bacteria through simulated human gastro-intestinal stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Song; Cao, Yu; Ferguson, Lynnette R; Shu, Quan; Garg, Sanjay

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to apply flow cytometric (FCM) analysis to assess the use of sucrose and lecithin vesicles for the protection of probiotic lactic acid bacteria in response to the challenge of gastric acidity and bile salts. FCM analysis in combination with fluorescent probes carboxyfluorescein (cF) and propidium iodide was used to reveal the physiological heterogeneity in the stressed bacteria population. Three subpopulations (intact, stressed, and damaged) were differentiated by FCM in all six examined strains. Significant changes were observed in the presence of the selected protectants. The addition of 20 mM sucrose in the simulated gastric fluid substantially increased the number of intact cells over 20 folds and reduced the damaged subpopulation by half. The presence of 2 % (w/v) lecithin vesicles was shown to protect 50 % more intact cells from the challenge of bile salts. The improved survival as evaluated by FCM analysis was further assessed for the proliferation capacity by sorting a number of cells from each subpopulation on nutrient agar plate. The result confirmed conformity between the proliferation-based cultivability and the probe-indicated viability in the samples of the intact and the damaged subpopulations. However, it also revealed the complexities of the stressed (injured) subpopulation. In conclusion, FCM analysis confirmed that the selected protectants could improve the survival of the probiotic strains in the simulated GI environments. The FCM analysis also proved to be a useful analytical tool for the probiotics research.

  7. Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... natural disaster. This type of stress can cause post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Different people may feel stress in different ways. Some people experience digestive symptoms. Others may have headaches, sleeplessness, depressed mood, anger, ...

  8. Effect of oxygen stress on growth and survival of Clostridium perfringens, Campylobacter jejuni, and Listeria monocytogenes under different storage conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qadiri, Hamzah; Sablani, Shyam S; Ovissipour, Mahmoudreza; Al-Alami, Nivin; Govindan, Byju; Rasco, Barbara

    2015-04-01

    This study investigated the growth and survival of three foodborne pathogens (Clostridium perfringens, Campylobacter jejuni, and Listeria monocytogenes) in beef (7% fat) and nutrient broth under different oxygen levels. Samples were tested under anoxic (perfringens could grow in beef at 22 °C, with an increase of approximately 5 log under anoxic conditions and a 1-log increase under microoxic conditions. However, C. perfringens could not survive in beef held at 7 °C under microoxic and oxic storage conditions after 14 days. In an anoxic environment, C. perfringens survived in beef samples held at 7 °C, with a 1-log reduction. A cell decline was observed at 2 log under these conditions, with no surviving cells at the 1-log level. However, the results show that C. jejuni under microoxic conditions survived with declining cell numbers. Significant increases in L. monocytogenes (5 to 7 log) were observed in beef held at 22 °C for 5 days, with the lowest levels recovered under anoxic conditions. L. monocytogenes in refrigerated storage increased by a factor of 2 to 4 log. It showed the greatest growth under oxic conditions, with significant growth under anoxic conditions. These findings can be used to enhance food safety in vacuum-packed and modified atmosphere-packaged food products.

  9. Fluidised-bed spray-drying formulations of Candida sake CPA-1 by adding biodegradable coatings to enhance their survival under stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbó, Anna; Torres, Rosario; Usall, Josep; Solsona, Cristina; Teixidó, Neus

    2017-11-01

    The biocontrol agent Candida sake CPA-1 has demonstrated to be effective against several diseases on fruit. However, for application of CPA-1 under field conditions, it was necessary to mix it with a food coating to improve survival under stress conditions, as well as adherence and distribution on fruit surfaces. The objective of this study was to obtain a more competitive formulation under field conditions to be applied independently of any product. To achieve this purpose, the drying process of CPA-1 by a fluidised-bed spray-drying system together with biodegradable coatings was optimised. This approach is novel for the drying system used and the formulation obtained which was able to form a film or coating on fruit surfaces. Several substances were tested as carriers and binders, and drying temperature was optimised. The addition of protective compounds was also tested to improve survival of CPA-1 during the dehydration process. Product shelf life, biocontrol efficacy on grapes against Botrytis cinerea, and the improvement of C. sake behaviour under stress conditions were tested. The optimal temperature of drying was 55 °C and two formulations that were able to develop a coating on fruit surfaces were obtained. One of the formulations was created by using a combination of native and pregelatinised potato starch; the other formulation was obtained using maltodextrin and by adding skimmed milk and sucrose as protectant compounds. The formulated products reduced the incidence and severity of B. cinerea, and CPA-1 survival rate was increased under stress conditions of temperature and humidity.

  10. Aquaporins-2 and -4 regulate glycogen metabolism and survival during hyposmotic-anoxic stress in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMacchia, John C; Roth, Mark B

    2015-07-15

    Periods of oxygen deprivation can lead to ion and water imbalances in affected tissues that manifest as swelling (edema). Although oxygen deprivation-induced edema is a major contributor to injury in clinical ischemic diseases such as heart attack and stroke, the pathophysiology of this process is incompletely understood. In the present study we investigate the impact of aquaporin-mediated water transport on survival in a Caenorhabditis elegans model of edema formation during complete oxygen deprivation (anoxia). We find that nematodes lacking aquaporin water channels in tissues that interface with the surrounding environment display decreased edema formation and improved survival rates in anoxia. We also find that these animals have significantly reduced demand for glycogen as an energetic substrate during anoxia. Together, our data suggest that reductions in membrane water permeability may be sufficient to induce a hypometabolic state during oxygen deprivation that reduces injury and extends survival limits. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Determine the Influence of Time Held in “Knockdown” Anesthesia on Survival and Stress of Surgically Implanted Juvenile Salmonids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodley, Christa M.; Wagner, Katie A.; Knox, Kasey M.

    2012-01-31

    The Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) was developed for the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers Portland District (USACE) to address questions related to survival and performance measures of juvenile salmonids as they pass through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). Researchers using JSATS acoustic transmitters (ATs) were tasked with standardizing the surgical implantation procedure to ensure that the stressors of handling and surgery on salmonids were consistent and less likely to cause effects of tagging in survival studies. Researchers questioned whether the exposure time in 'knockdown' anesthesia (or induction) to prepare fish for surgery could influence the survival of study fish (CBSPSC 2011). Currently, fish are held in knockdown anesthesia after they reach Stage 4 anesthesia until the completion of the surgical implantation of a transmitter, varies from 5 to 15 minutes for studies conducted in the Columbia Basin. The Columbia Basin Surgical Protocol Steering Committee (CBSPSC ) expressed concern that its currently recommended 10-minute maximum time limit during which fish are held in anesthetic - tricaine methanesulfonate (MS-222, 80 mg L-1 water) - could increase behavioral and physiological costs, and/or decrease survival of outmigrating juvenile salmonids. In addition, the variability in the time fish are held at Stage 4 could affect the data intended for direct comparison of fish within or among survival studies. Under the current recommended protocol, if fish exceed the 10-minute time limit, they are to be released without surgical implantation, thereby increasing the number of fish handled and endangered species 'take' at the bypass systems for FCRPS survival studies.

  12. Effects of release procedures on the primary stress response and post-release survival and growth of hatchery-reared spotted seatrout Cynoscion nebulosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, T W; Rakocinski, C F; Evans, A N; Blaylock, R B

    2017-03-01

    To help explain the apparent poor post-release success of hatchery-reared (HR) spotted seatrout Cynoscion nebulosus, this study examined the effects of handling, transport and release procedures on the stress response of two age classes [48 and 80 day post-hatch (dph)] of HR C. nebulosus, as measured by cortisol concentrations and the post-release survival and growth of 48 and 80 dph HR C. nebulosus. As a proxy for stress, tissue cortisol was measured at various times during the handling, tagging (80 dph), transport, acclimation and release process. To consider the implications of the pre-release stressors, growth and survival were monitored in separate field experiments for each age class of acclimated post-transport C. nebulosus using control C. nebulosus that only experienced anaesthesia, transport, acclimation and a net release v. experimental C. nebulosus that underwent the entire routine procedure, including anaesthesia, tagging, transport, acclimation and gravity release through a pipe. For 48 dph C. nebulosus, mean cortisol varied significantly throughout handling and transport, increasing more than six-fold from controls before decreasing in mean concentration just prior to release. For 80 dph C. nebulosus, cortisol varied throughout handling, tagging and transport, first increasing more than three-fold compared with control C. nebulosus, before decreasing and rising slightly just prior to release. For 48 dph C. nebulosus within field enclosures, survival was high and similar for control and experimental groups; experimental C. nebulosus, however, were shorter, lighter and lower in condition than control C. nebulosus. For 80 dph C. nebulosus within field enclosures, fewer experimental C. nebulosus survived and those that did survive were of lower condition than C. nebulosus from the control group. Small untagged C. nebulosus may survive the release procedure better than larger C. nebulosus carrying a coded-wire tag. These findings document

  13. Survival of Enterococcus faecalis during alkaline stress: changes in morphology, ultrastructure, physiochemical properties of the cell wall and specific gene transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Shujun; He, Zhiyan; Liang, Jingping

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this investigation was to study the biochemical mechanisms employed by the endodontic pathogen Enterococcus faecalis to survive alkaline environment during biofilm formation. E. faecalis ATCC33186 was inoculated in media at pH 7, 9, 10 and 11 for biofilm formation. The morphology and ultrastructure of biofilm cells were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The physiochemical properties of the cell wall were investigated by measuring the hydrophobicity and Na(+)K(+)-ATPase and H(+)K(+)-ATPase activity. The expression of stress and virulence genes was quantified by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. E. faecalis grown in alkaline medium developed an irregular shape and asymmetrical septation. The activity of Na(+)K(+)-ATPase increased dramatically with rising pH, whereas the activity of H(+)K(+)-ATPase exhibited no increase, except at pH 10. A marked increase in cell surface hydrophobicity was also observed with increased pH and time. In addition, transcription of most of the genes tested increased 2- to 15-fold at pH 9 or 10 compared with pH 7 and increased more than 50-fold at pH 11, which is generally recognised as nearly lethal stress. E. faecalis survival and biofilm formation under alkaline stress was unrelated to H(+)K(+)-ATPase but was correlated with an increase in Na(+)K(+)-ATPase activity and cell-surface hydrophobicity in addition to the up-regulation of genes involved in stress response and biofilm formation. These characteristics may explain why E. faecalis resists alkaline root canal medications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Exposure to extremely low frequency (50 Hz electromagnetic field changes the survival rate and morphometric characteristics of neurosecretory neurons of the earthworm Eisenia foetida (Oligochaeta under illumination stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banovački Zorana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An in vivo model was set up to establish the behavioral stress response (rate of survival and morphometric characteristics of A1 protocerebral neurosecretory neurons (cell size of Eisenia foetida (Oligochaeta as a result of the synergetic effect of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF - 50 Hz, 50 μT, 17 V/m and 50 Hz, 150 μT, 17 V/m, respectively and constant illumination (420-450 lux. If combined, these two stressors significantly (p<0.05 increased the survival rate of E. foetida in the 150 μT-exposed animals, because of delayed caudal autotomy reflex, an indicator of stress response. In addition, morphometric analysis indicated that there were changes in the protocerebral neurosecretory cells after exposure to the ELF-EMF. The present data support the view that short-term ELF-EMF exposure in “windows” of intensity is likely to stimulate the immune and neuroendocrine response of E. foetida.

  15. Resilience potential of an Indian Ocean reef: an assessment through coral recruitment pattern and survivability of juvenile corals to recurrent stress events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikandan, Balakrishnan; Ravindran, Jeyaraman; Vidya, Pottekkatt Jayabalan; Shrinivasu, Selvaraju; Manimurali, Rajagopal; Paramasivam, Kaliyaperumal

    2017-05-01

    Coral reefs are degraded by the synergistic action of climate and anthropogenic stressors. Coral cover in the Palk Bay reef at the northern Indian Ocean largely declined in the past decade due to frequent bleaching events, tsunami and increased fishing activities. In this study, we carried out a comparative assessment to assess the differences in the recovery and resilience of three spatially distant reefs viz. Vedhalai, Mandapam and Pamban along Palk Bay affected by moderate, severe and low fishing pressure respectively. The assessment was based on the juvenile coral recruitment pattern and its survivability combined with availability of hard substratum, live coral cover and herbivore reef fish stock. The Vedhalai reef has the highest coral cover (14.6 ± 6.3%), and ≥90% of the live corals in Vedhalai and Mandapam were affected by turf algal overgrowth. The density of herbivore reef fish was low in Vedhalai and Mandapam reefs compared to the Pamban reef with relatively few grazing species. The juvenile coral diversity and density were high in the Pamban reef and low in Vedhalai and Mandapam reefs despite high hard substratum cover. In total, 22 species of juvenile corals of 10 genera were recorded in Palk Bay. Comparison of the species diversity of juvenile corals with adult ones suggested that the Pamban reef is connected with other distant reefs whereas Vedhalai and Mandapam reefs were self-seeded. There was no statistically significant difference in the survivability of juvenile corals between the study sites, and in total, ≥90% of the juvenile corals survived the high sedimentation stress triggered by the northeast monsoon and bleaching stress that occurred recurrently. Our results indicated that the human activities indirectly affected the juvenile coral recruitment by degrading the live coral cover and contributed to the spatial variation in the recovery and resilience of the Palk Bay reef. Low species diversity of the juvenile corals will increase the

  16. Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in children after paediatric intensive care treatment compared to children who survived a major fire disaster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronner, M.B.; Knoester, H.; Bos, AP; Last, B.F.; Grootenhuis, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The goals were to determine the presence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in children after paediatric intensive care treatment, to identify risk factors for PTSD, and to compare this data with data from a major fire disaster in the Netherlands. Methods: Children completed the

  17. 'Omics' for microbial food stability: Proteomics for the development of predictive models for bacterial spore stress survival and outgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhyankar, Wishwas; Stelder, Sacha; de Koning, Leo; de Koster, Chris; Brul, Stanley

    2017-01-02

    Bacterial spores are ubiquitous in nature. They are stress resistant entities that are a concern to microbiological food stability due to their environmental stress resistance. In addition germinating and outgrowing spores at undesired times and places pose a significant health burden. The challenge is amplified due to the heterogeneous germination and outgrowth behaviour of isogenic spore populations. We discuss the role of different 'omics' techniques, proteomics in particular, to study spore biology in detail. With examples, the use of label-based and label-free quantitative proteomics approaches in understanding the spore physiology is demonstrated. Also the need of genomics, single cell analyses and analysis of cellular physiology is discussed briefly. Certainly accurate comprehensive data obtained from omics methods and molecular physiology will underpin the development of robust molecular models of bacterial spore germination and outgrowth. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The Influence of the Toxin/Antitoxin mazEF on Growth and Survival of Listeria monocytogenes under Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Curtis, Thomas; Takeuchi, Ippei; Gram, Lone

    2017-01-01

    A major factor in the resilience of Listeria monocytogenes is the alternative sigma factor B (σB). Type II Toxin/Antitoxin (TA) systems are also known to have a role in the bacterial stress response upon activation via the ClpP or Lon proteases. Directly upstream of the σB operon in L. monocytoge......A major factor in the resilience of Listeria monocytogenes is the alternative sigma factor B (σB). Type II Toxin/Antitoxin (TA) systems are also known to have a role in the bacterial stress response upon activation via the ClpP or Lon proteases. Directly upstream of the σB operon in L....... monocytogenes is the TA system mazEF, which can cleave mRNA at UACMU sites. In this study, we showed that the mazEF TA locus does not affect the level of persister formation during treatment with antibiotics in lethal doses, but exerts different effects according to the sub-inhibitory stress added. Growth...

  19. Vegetation stress from soil moisture and chlorophyll fluorescence: synergy between SMAP and FLEX approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Jose; Moran, Susan

    2014-05-01

    soil moisture deficit is often the reason for the stress, the capability for an early detection of short-time stress conditions is one of the main advantages of vegetation fluorescence. The combined usage of active and passive techniques is also discussed. In the case of soil moisture, combination of active (radar) and passive (L-band radiometry) approaches are used, while in the case of fluorescence active (laser induced) and passive (solar induced) techniques are used as well. Experience from active techniques in laboratory and field conditions helps the operational usage of passive techniques which are readily applicable to satellite observations. Vegetation fluorescence dynamics, particularly over boreal forest, is characterized by an abrupt change in fluorescence levels in coincidence with the activation and deactivation of the photosynthetic machinery at start/end of growing season, which is also related to freeze/thaw state of soil conditions. The interest of looking at such transitions both on the side of photosynthetic activity (combined fluorescence and temperature measurements) and freeze/thaw conditions (L-band radiometry) can provide an unprecedented description of the soil and vegetation interactions and dynamical feedbacks in the energy and chemical exchanges with the atmosphere. A review of methods and results will be discussed in this paper, including suggestions for synergistic approaches to be exploited in future research priorities in vegetation stress detection.

  20. The role of BmoR, a MarR Family Regulator, in the survival of Bacteroides fragilis during oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Felipe Lopes; Silva, Deborah Nascimento Dos Santos; Pauer, Heidi; Ferreira, Livia Queiroz; Ferreira, Eliane de Oliveira; Domingues, Regina Maria Cavalcanti Pilotto; Lobo, Leandro Araujo

    2013-12-01

    The intestinal opportunistic pathogen Bacteroides fragilis is among the most aerotolerant species of strict anaerobic bacteria and survives exposure to atmospheric oxygen for up to 72h. Under these circumstances, a strong oxygen stress response (OSR) mechanism is activated and the expression of as much as 45% of B. fragilis genes is altered. One of the most important regulators of this response is the product of the oxyR gene, but other regulation systems are in place during the OSR. The MarR family of transcriptional regulators has been shown to control several physiological events in bacteria, including response to stress conditions. In B. fragilis, at least three homologs of MarR regulators are present, one of which, bmoR, is upregulated during oxidative stress independently of oxyR. In this study, we demonstrate that the inactivation of the bmoR gene in B. fragilis diminishes its ability to withstand oxidative stress caused either by exposure to atmospheric oxygen or hydrogen peroxide. Recovery of growth rate on pre-oxidized media under anaerobiosis is slower than that observed in parental strain. Addition of hydrogen peroxide has a similar effect on the growth rate. Complementation of the mutant strain partially recovered the oxygen resistance phenotype, but the overexpression of the gene in the parental strain was also deleterious to a lesser extent. Our results indicate that BmoR has a role in the OSR in B. fragilis, particularly in the initial stages of oxygen exposure. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. Pre-cultivation with Selected Prebiotics Enhances the Survival and the Stress Response of Lactobacillus rhamnosus Strains in Simulated Gastrointestinal Transit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Succi, Mariantonietta; Tremonte, Patrizio; Pannella, Gianfranco; Tipaldi, Luca; Cozzolino, Autilia; Romaniello, Rossana; Sorrentino, Elena; Coppola, Raffaele

    2017-01-01

    In our study, we dwelled upon combinations of lactobacilli/prebiotics, considering four different strains belonging to the Lactobacillus rhamnosus species, including Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG), and different prebiotics often found in commercial synbiotic products, such as inulin, lactulose and polyols mannitol and sorbitol. In the first step of the research, the survival, the growth kinetic parameters and the protein expression of Lb. rhamnosus strains cultivated in presence of the different prebiotics as a unique carbon source were evaluated. In the second step, the influence of pre-cultivation in medium added of metabolizable prebiotics on the strains survival to simulated gastrointestinal (GI) transit, assayed without prebiotics addition, was estimated. Our results showed that the presence in the medium of certain low fermented prebiotics, specific for each strain, represents a stress factor that significantly affects the growth of Lb. rhamnosus strains, inducing the up-regulation of several proteins. In detail, all added prebiotics used as unique carbon source caused a growth retard compared with glucose, as testified by increased values of the lag phase and decreased values of the μmax. Mannitol evidenced intermediate μmax values between those registered with glucose and those detected with the other assayed prebiotics. Moreover, the cultivation with prebiotics induced the over expression of 7 protein bands. Interestingly, we found a correlation between the up-regulation of two specific stress proteins, called P4 (ATP-binding subunit Clpx) and P7 (GrpE), and the death kinetic parameters (resistance and cells viability) registered during the simulated GI transit of strains pre-cultivated with specific, low fermented prebiotics. Specifically, the highest resistance and gastric-vitality scores were highlighted for the strain AT195 when pre-cultivated in presence of sorbitol. Conversely, the lowest values were found in the case of DSM20021 pre

  2. Behaviour of non-stressed and stressed Listeria monocytogenes and Campylobacter jejuni cells on fresh chicken burger meat packaged under modified atmosphere and inoculated with protective culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melero, Beatriz; Diez, Ana M; Rajkovic, Andreja; Jaime, Isabel; Rovira, Jordi

    2012-08-17

    Numerous investigations have provided evidence that chicken products are a source of Listeria monocytogenes and Campylobacter jejuni. Different strategies applied in final products are needed to prevent consumers' contamination. In this work, the combination of modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) and protective culture to control the growth of freeze stressed and non-stressed L. monocytogenes and C. jejuni on fresh chicken meat burger was studied. Meat burgers were inoculated with L. monocytogenes, C. jejuni and Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides PCK 18, as protective strain against L. monocytogenes. Prior to the addition of the protective culture, half of the L. monocytogenes and C. jejuni - inoculated meat was frozen at -18°C for 48 h to subject cells to stress. Following the addition of the protective culture, meat burgers were packaged in air or MAP (50% CO(2)/50% O(2)) and stored under refrigeration conditions. L. monocytogenes counts were not reduced by the freezing temperature applied; however, the addition of Lc. pseudomesenteroides PCK 18 reduced its counts for 0.90 log cfu/g when chicken meat burgers were packaged under MAP. Furthermore, freezing stress was an effective strategy to reduce C. jejuni counts but only in combination with a high-O(2) MAP, it was completely eliminated. Chicken meat burgers' shelf-life under aerobic packaging conditions was reduced by the effect of freeze-thawing, while the use of MAP extended the product's shelf-life till 21days. Therefore, the combination of freezing, protective culture and MAP could extend the shelf-life and enhance the food safety of this kind of chicken products. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Oxidative stress-mediated NFκB phosphorylation upregulates p62/SQSTM1 and promotes retinal pigmented epithelial cell survival through increased autophagy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunjuan Song

    Full Text Available p62 is a scaffolding adaptor implicated in the clearance of protein aggregates by autophagy. Reactive oxygen species (ROS can either stimulate or inhibit NFκB-mediated gene expression influencing cellular fate. We studied the effect of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2-mediated oxidative stress and NFκB signaling on p62 expression in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE and investigated its role in regulation of autophagy and RPE survival against oxidative damage. Cultured human RPE cell line ARPE-19 and primary human adult and fetal RPE cells were exposed to H2O2-induced oxidative stress. The human apolipoprotein E4 targeted-replacement (APOE4 mouse model of AMD was used to study expression of p62 and other autophagy proteins in the retina. p62, NFκB p65 (total, phosphorylated, nuclear and cytoplasmic and ATG10 expression was assessed by mRNA and protein analyses. Cellular ROS and mitochondrial superoxide were measured by CM-H2DCFDA and MitoSOX staining respectively. Mitochondrial viability was determined using MTT activity. qPCR-array system was used to investigate autophagic genes affected by p62. Nuclear and cytoplasmic levels of NFκB p65 were evaluated after cellular fractionation by Western blotting. We report that p62 is up-regulated in RPE cells under H2O2-induced oxidative stress and promotes autophagic activity. Depletion of endogenous p62 reduces autophagy by downregulation of ATG10 rendering RPE more susceptible to oxidative damage. NFκB p65 phosphorylation at Ser-536 was found to be critical for p62 upregulation in response to oxidative stress. Proteasome inhibition by H2O2 causes p62-NFκB signaling as antioxidant pre-treatment reversed p62 expression and p65 phosphorylation when RPE was challenged by H2O2 but not when by Lactacystin. p62 protein but not RNA levels are elevated in APOE4-HFC AMD mouse model, suggesting reduction of autophagic flux in disease conditions. Our findings suggest that p62 is necessary for RPE cytoprotection

  4. Candida albicans: The Ability to Invade Epithelial Cells and Survive under Oxidative Stress Is Unlinked to Hyphal Length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maza, Paloma K.; Bonfim-Melo, Alexis; Padovan, Ana C. B.; Mortara, Renato A.; Orikaza, Cristina M.; Ramos, Lilian M. Damas; Moura, Tauany R.; Soriani, Frederico M.; Almeida, Ricardo S.; Suzuki, Erika; Bahia, Diana

    2017-01-01

    In its hyphal form, Candida albicans invades epithelial and endothelial cells by two distinct mechanisms: active penetration and induced endocytosis. The latter is dependent on a reorganization of the host cytoskeleton (actin/cortactin recruitment), whilst active penetration does not rely on the host's cellular machinery. The first obstacle for the fungus to reach deep tissues is the epithelial barrier and this interaction is crucial for commensal growth, fungal pathogenicity and host defense. This study aimed to characterize in vitro epithelial HeLa cell invasion by four different isolates of C. albicans with distinct clinical backgrounds, including a C. albicans SC5314 reference strain. All isolates invaded HeLa cells, recruited actin and cortactin, and induced the phosphorylation of both Src-family kinases (SFK) and cortactin. Curiously, L3881 isolated from blood culture of a patient exhibited the highest resistance to oxidative stress, although this isolate showed reduced hyphal length and displayed the lowest cell damage and invasion rates. Collectively, these data suggest that the ability of C. albicans to invade HeLa cells, and to reach and adapt to the host's blood, including resistance to oxidative stress, may be independent of hyphal length. PMID:28769876

  5. The Influence of the Toxin/Antitoxin mazEF on Growth and Survival of Listeria monocytogenes under Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Thomas D; Takeuchi, Ippei; Gram, Lone; Knudsen, Gitte M

    2017-01-13

    A major factor in the resilience of Listeria monocytogenes is the alternative sigma factor B (σB). Type II Toxin/Antitoxin (TA) systems are also known to have a role in the bacterial stress response upon activation via the ClpP or Lon proteases. Directly upstream of the σB operon in L. monocytogenes is the TA system mazEF, which can cleave mRNA at UACMU sites. In this study, we showed that the mazEF TA locus does not affect the level of persister formation during treatment with antibiotics in lethal doses, but exerts different effects according to the sub-inhibitory stress added. Growth of a ΔmazEF mutant was enhanced relative to the wildtype in the presence of sub-inhibitory norfloxacin and at 42 °C, but was decreased when challenged with ampicillin and gentamicin. In contrast to studies in Staphylococcus aureus, we found that the mazEF locus did not affect transcription of genes within the σB operon, but MazEF effected the expression of the σB-dependent genes opuCA and lmo0880, with a 0.22 and 0.05 fold change, respectively, compared to the wildtype under sub-inhibitory norfloxacin conditions. How exactly this system operates remains an open question, however, our data indicates it is not analogous to the system of S. aureus, suggesting a novel mode of action for MazEF in L. monocytogenes.

  6. Candida albicans: The Ability to Invade Epithelial Cells and Survive under Oxidative Stress Is Unlinked to Hyphal Length

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paloma K. Maza

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In its hyphal form, Candida albicans invades epithelial and endothelial cells by two distinct mechanisms: active penetration and induced endocytosis. The latter is dependent on a reorganization of the host cytoskeleton (actin/cortactin recruitment, whilst active penetration does not rely on the host's cellular machinery. The first obstacle for the fungus to reach deep tissues is the epithelial barrier and this interaction is crucial for commensal growth, fungal pathogenicity and host defense. This study aimed to characterize in vitro epithelial HeLa cell invasion by four different isolates of C. albicans with distinct clinical backgrounds, including a C. albicans SC5314 reference strain. All isolates invaded HeLa cells, recruited actin and cortactin, and induced the phosphorylation of both Src-family kinases (SFK and cortactin. Curiously, L3881 isolated from blood culture of a patient exhibited the highest resistance to oxidative stress, although this isolate showed reduced hyphal length and displayed the lowest cell damage and invasion rates. Collectively, these data suggest that the ability of C. albicans to invade HeLa cells, and to reach and adapt to the host's blood, including resistance to oxidative stress, may be independent of hyphal length.

  7. Regulation of tyrosine kinase B activity by the Cyp46/cholesterol loss pathway in mature hippocampal neurons: relevance for neuronal survival under stress and in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodero, Alejandro O; Trovò, Laura; Iannilli, Francesca; Van Veldhoven, Paul; Dotti, Carlos G; Martin, Mauricio G

    2011-03-01

    It is well established that memory formation and retention involve the coordinated flow of information from the post-synaptic site of particular neuronal populations to the nucleus, where short and long-lasting modifications of gene expression occur. With age, mnemonic, motor and sensorial alterations occur, and it is believed that extra failures in the mechanisms used for memory formation and storage are the cause of neurodegenerative pathologies like Alzheimer's disease. A prime candidate responsible for damage and loss of function during aging is the accumulation of reactive oxygen species, derived from normal oxidative metabolism. However, dysfunction in the aged brain is not paralleled by an increase in neuronal death, indicative that the brain is better suited to fight against the death signals generated from reactive oxygen species than against loss-of-function stimuli. A main aim of this laboratory is to understand how neurons perform and survive in the constitutive stress background represented by aging. In this report, we summarize our recent findings in relation to survival. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry © 2011 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  8. A randomized controlled trial of cognitive-behavioral stress management in breast cancer: survival and recurrence at 11-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagl, Jamie M; Lechner, Suzanne C; Carver, Charles S; Bouchard, Laura C; Gudenkauf, Lisa M; Jutagir, Devika R; Diaz, Alain; Yu, Qilu; Blomberg, Bonnie B; Ironson, Gail; Glück, Stefan; Antoni, Michael H

    2015-11-01

    Non-metastatic breast cancer patients often experience psychological distress which may influence disease progression and survival. Cognitive-behavioral stress management (CBSM) improves psychological adaptation and lowers distress during breast cancer treatment and long-term follow-ups. We examined whether breast cancer patients randomized to CBSM had improved survival and recurrence 8-15 years post-enrollment. From 1998 to 2005, women (N = 240) 2-10 weeks post-surgery for non-metastatic Stage 0-IIIb breast cancer were randomized to a 10-week, group-based CBSM intervention (n = 120) or a 1-day psychoeducational seminar control (n = 120). In 2013, 8-15 years post-study enrollment (11-year median), recurrence and survival data were collected. Cox Proportional Hazards Models and Weibull Accelerated Failure Time tests were used to assess group differences in all-cause mortality, breast cancer-specific mortality, and disease-free interval, controlling for biomedical confounders. Relative to the control, the CBSM group was found to have a reduced risk of all-cause mortality (HR = 0.21; 95 % CI [0.05, 0.93]; p = .040). Restricting analyses to women with invasive disease revealed significant effects of CBSM on breast cancer-related mortality (p = .006) and disease-free interval (p = .011). CBSM intervention delivered post-surgery may provide long-term clinical benefit for non-metastatic breast cancer patients in addition to previously established psychological benefits. Results should be interpreted with caution; however, the findings contribute to the limited evidence regarding physical benefits of psychosocial intervention post-surgery for non-metastatic breast cancer. Additional research is necessary to confirm these results and investigate potential explanatory mechanisms, including physiological pathways, health behaviors, and treatment adherence changes.

  9. The caspase-3/p120 RasGAP stress-sensing module reduces liver cancer incidence but does not affect overall survival in gamma-irradiated and carcinogen-treated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanli, Güliz; Sempoux, Christine; Widmann, Christian

    2017-06-01

    Activation of oncogenes is the initial step in cellular transformation. Oncogenes favor aberrant proliferation, which, at least initially, induces cellular stress. This oncogenic stress can act as a safeguard mechanism against further transformation by inducing senescence or apoptosis. Yet, the few premalignant cells that tolerate and escape these senescent or apoptotic responses are those that will ultimately generate tumors. The caspase-3/p120 RasGAP module is a stress-sensing device that promotes survival under mild stress conditions. A point mutation in RasGAP that prevents its cleavage by caspase-3 inactivates the pro-survival capacity of the device. When the mice homozygous for this mutation (D455A knock-in mice) are patho-physiologically challenged, they experience much stronger cellular damage than their wild-type counterparts and the affected organs rapidly lose their functionality. We reasoned that the caspase-3/p120 RasGAP module could help premalignant cells to cope with oncogenic stress and hence favor the development of tumors. Using gamma-irradiation and N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) as tumor initiators, we assessed the survival advantage that the caspase-3/p120 RasGAP module could provide to premalignant cells. No difference in overall mortality between wild-type and D455A knock-in mice were observed. However, the number of ENU-induced liver tumors in the knock-in mice was higher than in control mice. These results indicate that the caspase-3/p120 RasGAP stress-sensing module impacts on carcinogen-induced liver cancer incidence but not sufficiently so as to affect overall survival. Hence, gamma irradiation and ENU-induced tumorigenesis processes do not critically rely on a survival mechanism that contributes to the maintenance of organ homeostasis in stressed healthy tissues. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Deoxycholate, an Endogenous Cytotoxin/Genotoxin, Induces the Autophagic Stress-Survival Pathway: Implications for Colon Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire M. Payne

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report that deoxycholate (DOC, a hydrophobic bile acid associated with a high-fat diet, activates the autophagic pathway in non-cancer colon epithelial cells (NCM-460, and that this activation contributes to cell survival. The DOC-induced increase in autophagy was documented by an increase in autophagic vacuoles (detected using transmission electron microscopy, increased levels of LC3-I and LC3-II (western blotting, an increase in acidic vesicles (fluorescence spectroscopy of monodansycadaverine and lysotracker red probes, and increased expression of the autophagic protein, beclin-1 (immunohistochemistry/western blotting. The DOC-induced increase in beclin-1 expression was ROS-dependent. Rapamycin (activator of autophagy pre-treatment of NCM-460 cells significantly (P<.05 decreased, and 3-MA (inhibitor of autophagy significantly (P<.05 increased the cell loss caused by DOC treatment, alone. Rapamycin pre-treatment of the apoptosis-resistant colon cancer cell line, HCT-116RC (developed in our laboratory, resulted in a significant decrease in DOC-induced cell death. Bafilomycin A1 and hydroxychloroquine (inhibitors of the autophagic process increased the DOC-induced percentage of apoptotic cells in HCT-116RC cells. It was concluded that the activation of autophagy by DOC has important implications for colon carcinogenesis and for the treatment of colon cancer in conjunction with commonly used chemotherapeutic agents.

  11. Evaluating Wharton’s Jelly-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell’s Survival, Migration, and Expression of Wound Repair Markers under Conditions of Ischemia-Like Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iris Himal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC therapy is currently limited by low retention and poor survival of transplanted cells as demonstrated by clinical studies. This is mainly due to the harsh microenvironment created by oxygen and nutrient deprivation and inflammation at the injured sites. The choice of MSC source could be critical in determining fate and cellular function of MSCs under stress. Our objective here was to investigate the influence of ischemia-like stress on Wharton’s jelly MSCs (WJ-MSCs from human umbilical cord to assess their therapeutic relevance in ischemic diseases. We simulated conditions of ischemia in vitro by culturing WJ-MSCs in 2% oxygen in serum deprived and low glucose medium. Under these conditions, WJ-MSCs retained viable population of greater than 80%. They expressed the characteristic MSC surface antigens at levels comparable to the control WJ-MSCs and were negative for the expression of costimulatory molecules. An upregulation of many ECM and adhesion molecules and growth and angiogenic factors contributing to wound healing and regeneration was noted in the ischemic WJ-MSC population by a PCR array. Their migration ability, however, got impaired. Our findings provide evidence that WJ-MSCs might be therapeutically beneficial and potent in healing wounds under ischemic conditions.

  12. Role of protein kinases CK1α and CK2 in multiple myeloma: regulation of pivotal survival and stress-managing pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina Manni

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Multiple myeloma (MM is a malignant tumor of transformed plasma cells. MM pathogenesis is a multistep process. This cancer can occur de novo (rarely or it can develop from monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (most of the cases. MM can be asymptomatic (smoldering myeloma or clinically active. Malignant plasma cells exploit intrinsic and extrinsic bone marrow microenvironment-derived growth signals. Upregulation of stress-coping pathways is also instrumental to maintain MM cell growth. The phylogenetically related Ser/Thr kinases CSNK1A1 (CK1α and CSNK2 (CK2 have recently gained a growing importance in hematologic malignancies arising both from precursors and from mature blood cells. In multiple myeloma, CK1α or CK2 sustain oncogenic cascades, such as the PI3K/AKT, JAK/STAT, and NF-κB, as well as propel stress-related signaling that help in coping with different noxae. Data also suggest that these kinases modulate the delivery of growth factors and cytokines from the bone marrow stroma. The “non-oncogene addiction” phenotype generated by the increased activity of CK1α and CK2 in multiple myeloma contributes to malignant plasma cell proliferation and survival and represents an Achilles’ heel for the activity of small ATP competitive CK1α or CK2 inhibitors.

  13. Brainstem neurons survive the identical ischemic stress that kills higher neurons: insight to the persistent vegetative state.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Devin Brisson

    Full Text Available Global ischemia caused by heart attack, pulmonary failure, near-drowning or traumatic brain injury often damages the higher brain but not the brainstem, leading to a 'persistent vegetative state' where the patient is awake but not aware. Approximately 30,000 U.S. patients are held captive in this condition but not a single research study has addressed how the lower brain is preferentially protected in these people. In the higher brain, ischemia elicits a profound anoxic depolarization (AD causing neuronal dysfunction and vasoconstriction within minutes. Might brainstem nuclei generate less damaging AD and so be more resilient? Here we compared resistance to acute injury induced from simulated ischemia by 'higher' hippocampal and striatal neurons versus brainstem neurons in live slices from rat and mouse. Light transmittance (LT imaging in response to 10 minutes of oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD revealed immediate and acutely damaging AD propagating through gray matter of neocortex, hippocampus, striatum, thalamus and cerebellar cortex. In adjacent brainstem nuclei, OGD-evoked AD caused little tissue injury. Whole-cell patch recordings from hippocampal and striatal neurons under OGD revealed sudden membrane potential loss that did not recover. In contrast brainstem neurons from locus ceruleus and mesencephalic nucleus as well as from sensory and motor nuclei only slowly depolarized and then repolarized post-OGD. Two-photon microscopy confirmed non-recoverable swelling and dendritic beading of hippocampal neurons during OGD, while mesencephalic neurons in midbrain appeared uninjured. All of the above responses were mimicked by bath exposure to 100 µM ouabain which inhibits the Na+/K+ pump or to 1-10 nM palytoxin which converts the pump into an open cationic channel. Therefore during ischemia the Na+/K+ pump of higher neurons fails quickly and extensively compared to naturally resilient hypothalamic and brainstem neurons. The selective survival

  14. Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD in children after paediatric intensive care treatment compared to children who survived a major fire disaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Last Bob F

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The goals were to determine the presence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD in children after paediatric intensive care treatment, to identify risk factors for PTSD, and to compare this data with data from a major fire disaster in the Netherlands. Methods Children completed the Dutch Children's Responses to Trauma Inventory at three and nine months after discharge from the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU. Comparison data were available from 355 children survivors who completed the same questionnaire 10 months after a major fire disaster. Results Thirty-six children aged eight to 17 years completed questionnaires at three month follow-up, nine month follow-up, or both. More than one third (34.5% of the children had subclinical PTSD, while 13.8% were likely to meet criteria for PTSD. Maternal PTSD was the strongest predictor for child PTSD. There were no significant differences in (subclinical PTSD symptoms either over time or compared to symptoms of survivors from the fire disaster. Conclusion This study shows that a considerable number of children have persistent PTSD after PICU treatment. Prevention of PTSD is important to minimize the profound adverse effects that PTSD can have on children's well-being and future development.

  15. Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in children after paediatric intensive care treatment compared to children who survived a major fire disaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronner, Madelon B; Knoester, Hendrika; Bos, Albert P; Last, Bob F; Grootenhuis, Martha A

    2008-01-01

    Background The goals were to determine the presence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in children after paediatric intensive care treatment, to identify risk factors for PTSD, and to compare this data with data from a major fire disaster in the Netherlands. Methods Children completed the Dutch Children's Responses to Trauma Inventory at three and nine months after discharge from the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Comparison data were available from 355 children survivors who completed the same questionnaire 10 months after a major fire disaster. Results Thirty-six children aged eight to 17 years completed questionnaires at three month follow-up, nine month follow-up, or both. More than one third (34.5%) of the children had subclinical PTSD, while 13.8% were likely to meet criteria for PTSD. Maternal PTSD was the strongest predictor for child PTSD. There were no significant differences in (subclinical) PTSD symptoms either over time or compared to symptoms of survivors from the fire disaster. Conclusion This study shows that a considerable number of children have persistent PTSD after PICU treatment. Prevention of PTSD is important to minimize the profound adverse effects that PTSD can have on children's well-being and future development. PMID:18489798

  16. Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Hanne Dauer

    2015-01-01

    Kapitlet handler om stress som følelse, og det trækker primært på de få kvalitative undersøgelser, der er lavet af stressforløb.......Kapitlet handler om stress som følelse, og det trækker primært på de få kvalitative undersøgelser, der er lavet af stressforløb....

  17. An In Vitro Model for the Study of Platelet-Vessel Wall Interactions Following a Freeze-Thaw Injury,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-03-16

    material (Fig. 9 arrows) located between the basal surface of the platelet and the apical surface of the damaged endothelial cell. The exact nature of...Ts’ao, C, Spaet, TH: Ultramicroscopic changes in the rabbit inferior vena cava following partial constriction . Amer 3 Pathol 51:789, 1967 32. Ts’ao, C

  18. Indices of immune function used by ecologists are mostly unaffected by repeated freeze-thaw cycles and methodological deviations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hegemann, Arne; Pardal, Sara; Matson, Kevin D.

    2017-01-01

    Background
    Over the past couple of decades, measuring immunological parameters has become widespread in studies of ecology and evolution. A combination of different immunological indices is useful for quantifying different parts of the immune system and comprehensively assessing immune function.

  19. Effects of drying-wetting and freezing-thawing cycle on leachability of metallic elements in mine soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, H.; Kim, J.; Hyun, S.

    2016-12-01

    Mine leachate derived from contaminated mine sites with metallic elements can pose serious risks on human society and environment. Only labile fraction of metallic elements in mine soils is subject to leaching and movement by rainfall. Lability of metallic element in soil is a function of bond strengths between metal and soil surfaces, which is influenced by environmental condition (e.g., rainfall intensity, duration, temperature, etc.) The purpose of this study was to elucidate the effects of various climate conditions on the leaching patterns and lability of metallic elements in mine soils. To do this, two mine soils were sampled from two abandoned mine sites located in Korea. Leaching test were conducted using batch decant-refill method. Various climatic conditions were employed in leaching test such as (1) oven drying (40oC) - wetting cycles, (2) air drying (20oC) - wetting cycle, and (3) freezing (-40oC) - thawing cycles. Duration of drying and freezing were varied from 4 days to 2 weeks. Concentration of metallic elements, pH, Eh and concentration of dissolved iron and sulfate in leachate from each leaching process was measured. To identify the changes of labile fraction in mine soils after each of drying or freezing period, sequential extraction procedure (five fraction) was used to compare labile fraction (i.e., F1 + F2) of metallic elements. The concentration of metallic elements in mine leachate was increased after drying and freezing procedure. The amounts of released metallic element from mine soils was changed depending on their drying or freezing period. In addition, labile fraction of metallic elements in soil was also changed after drying and freezing. The changes in labile fraction after drying and freezing might be due to the increased soil surface area by pore water volume expansion. Further study is therefore needed to evaluate the impact of altered physical properties of soils such as hydration of soil surface area and shrinking by drying and freezing cycles.

  20. BOREAS Follow-On DSP-04 1994 ERS-1 Level-4 Landscape Freeze/Thaw Maps, Ver. 1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The BOREAS DSP-4 team acquired and analyzed imaging radar data from the ESA's ERS-1 over a complete annual cycle at the BOREAS sites in Canada in 1994 to detect...

  1. EPINEPHRINE CONCENTRATION IN WILD BOAR (SUS SCROFA L. SERUM AFTER REPEATED ELISA TESTED FREEZE-THAWING CYCLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neška Vukšić

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Blood samples for determining of epinephrine concentration and biochemical parameters in the blood serum of wild boars were taken from 42 healthy wild boars, both sexes, during the hunting season. All animals in good condition, body weight 20 to 95 kg, were divided into two groups up to 50 kg (group A and up to 95 kg (Group B. Epinephrine concentration was determined by ELISA twice: one week after taking samples and a month after repeated freezing at -80°C. It was higher in relation to the reference value of domestic pigs and human (109.45 pg/ml in A and 119.54 pg/ml in B group. Repeated freezing and re-analysis after a month were resulted in lower concentrations of epinephrine (12% in young and 11.17% in adult animal, but without statistical significance (P>0.05. Biochemical analysis results’ show increased glucose and triglycerides concentrations compared to the reference values, while other indicators were observed within or slightly increased referring to the normal range. The correlation between glucose and epinephrine was not determined.

  2. Responses of Antarctic soil microbial communities and associated functions to temperature and freeze-thaw cycle frequency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yergeau, E.; Kowalchuk, G.A.

    2008-01-01

    Climatic changes will not only result in higher overall temperature, but also in greater variability in weather conditions. Antarctic soils are subjected to extremely variable conditions in the form of frequent freeze–thaw cycles (FTCs), but the importance of alteration in FTC frequency, compared

  3. Effect of long-term freezing and freeze-thaw cycles on indigenous and inoculated microorganisms in dewatered blackwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarsdóttir, Ragnhildur; Müller, Karoline; Jensen, Pernille Erland; Jenssen, Petter Deinboll; Villumsen, Arne

    2012-11-20

    Wastewater treatment in many Arctic regions is inadequate, even nonexisting. Natural freezing of wastewater in those areas may be beneficial for reduction of microorganisms. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of long-term freezing, and repeated freezing and thawing, on indigenous coliforms, fecal streptococci, and antibiotic-resistant (AR) bacteria, and inoculated Salmonella Enteriditis and E. coli bacteriophage ΦX174 in dewatered blackwater. At the end of the long-term freezing experiment (10 months), an MPN recovery study was done, including the microbial groups that had shown the largest reduction, using tryptone soy broth at incubation temperatures of 10 and 20 °C overnight for the coliforms and AR bacteria, and buffered peptone water at incubation temperature of 37 °C for 18-20 h for Salmonella. Fecal streptococci were more resistant to long-term freezing than the coliform group. Total number of AR bacteria decreased slowly but constantly over the 10-month freezing period. Salmonella rapidly decreased and were nondetectable within a week but exhibited some recovery after 10 months of freezing, whereas limited or no recovery of coliforms and AR-bacteria was detected. Bacteriophages showed limited reduction during the long-term freezing. Repeated freezing and thawing increased the reduction of all tested microbial groups markedly.

  4. Shallow subsurface temperature and moisture monitoring at rock walls during freeze thaw cycles in the Northern Calcareous Alps, Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rode, Matthias; Sass, Oliver

    2014-05-01

    The process of frost weathering as well as the contribution of further weathering processes (e.g. hydration, thermal fatigue) is poorly understood. For this purpose, different measuring systems were set up in two study areas (Dachstein massif - permafrost area (2700m asl, 47° 28' 32″ N, 13° 36' 23″ E) and Gesäuse mountains - non permafrost area (900m asl, 47° 35' 19″ N, 14° 39' 32″ E) located in Styria, Austria within the framework of the research project ROCKING ALPS (FWF-P2444). A key to understand frost weathering is to observe the rock temperature with several high resolution temperature sensors from the rock surface down to -20cm depth. The temperatures are measured hourly at north and south exposed rock walls since 2012 in the headwalls of the Dachstein glacier at the Koppenkarstein (built up of limestone) in about 2600m asl. Since 2013 the same measurement setup is installed in the lower Johnsbachtal (Gesäuse mountains, prevailing rock type is dolomite) in about 800m asl. To know the temperature is crucial to understand internal heat flow and transport and latent heat effects during freezing and thawing caused by night frost (lasting some hours), cold fronts (lasting some days) or winter frost of several weeks or months. At these study points we also have installed small-scale 2D-geoelectric survey lines, supplemented by moisture sensors. Moisture is determined by means of resistivity measurements which are difficult to calibrate, but provide good time series. Additional novel moisture sensors were developed which use the heat capacity of the surrounding rock as a proxy of water content. These sensors give point readings from a defined depth and are independent from soluble salt contents. First results from the Dachstein show that short term latent heat effects during the phase change have crucial influence on the moisture content. The moisture distribution and movements during temperature changes inside the rock are discussed upon the two main frost weathering theories - (A) volume expansion of moisture during the phase change and (B) the ice segregation.

  5. ANALYSIS OF STRESS STATE IN UPPER LAYER OF ROAD CONCRETE PAVEMENT WITH TEMPERATURE ACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. Pshembaev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available While being operated auto-road pavements are subjected to intensive mechanical impacts, ultraviolet ray irradiation, freeze-thaw temperatures, freezing and thawing, drying and moistening. Due to these actions various types of pavement distresses appear on the road pavement. The most significant and dangerous type of distresses is micro-cracks on the road surface. One of the main reasons for their formation is an action of weather and climatic factors that initiate large changes in temperature of coating surface and occurrence of large temperature gradients in the upper layer. In this context while designing and operating auto-roads it is rather essential to investigate a stress state in road surface which is caused by temperature action. Purpose of the described investigations is to determine permissible temperature gradients for cement-concrete pavements that exclude formation of micro-cracks on their surface and thickness of damaged surface layer. Calculations of road pavement have been carried out at various laws for temperature distribution in its depth. A finite difference method realized in PARUS software has been used for studying a stress state of cement-concrete auto-roads. Regularities for distribution of stresses in cement-concrete pavement of auto-roads have been obtained at various surface temperatures. Permissible temperature gradients in the upper pavement layer have been determined and thickness of the layer where micro-cracks are formed has been assessed in the paper. Strength criterion based on the process of micro-crack formation and development in the concrete has been used for calculations. Risk of micro-crack formation on the auto-road pavement depends on material strength, conditions of plate fixing and temperature gradients.

  6. Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Line Skov; Lova, Lotte; Hansen, Zandra Kulikovsky; Schønemann, Emilie; Larsen, Line Lyngby; Colberg Olsen, Maria Sophia; Juhl, Nadja; Magnussen, Bogi Roin

    2012-01-01

    Stress er en tilstand som er meget omdiskuteret i samfundet, og dette besværliggør i en vis grad konkretiseringen af mulige løsningsforslag i bestræbelsen på at forebygge den såkaldte folkesygdom. Hovedkonklusionen er, at selv om der bliver gjort meget for at forebygge, er der ikke meget der aktivt kan sættes i værk for at reducere antallet af stressramte, før en fælles forståelse af stressårsager og effektiv stresshåndtering er fremlagt. Problemformuleringen er besvaret gennem en undersø...

  7. Concentration-Dependent Effects of Rhodiola Rosea on Long-Term Survival and Stress Resistance of Yeast Saccharomyces Cerevisiae: The Involvement of YAP 1 and MSN2/4 Regulatory Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayliak, Maria M; Burdyliuk, Nadia I; Izers'ka, Lilia I; Lushchak, Volodymyr I

    2014-01-01

    Concentration-dependent effects of aqueous extract from R. rosea root on long-term survival and stress resistance of budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were studied. At low concentrations, R. rosea aqueous extract extended yeast chronological lifespan, enhanced oxidative stress resistance of stationary-phase cells and resistance to number stressors in exponentially growing cultures. At high concentrations, R. rosea extract sensitized yeast cells to stresses and shortened yeast lifespan. These biphasic concentration-responses describe a common hormetic phenomenon characterized by a low-dose stimulation and a high-dose inhibition. Yeast pretreatment with low doses of R. rosea extract enhanced yeast survival and prevented protein oxidation under H2O2-induced oxidative stress. Positive effect of R. rosea extract on yeast survival under heat shock exposure was not accompanied with changes in antioxidant enzyme activities and levels of oxidized proteins. The deficiency in transcriptional regulators, Msn2/Msn4 and Yap1, abolished the positive effect of low doses of R. rosea extract on yeast viability under stress challenges. Potential involvement of Msn2/Msn4 and Yap1 regulatory proteins in realization of R. rosea beneficial effects is discussed.

  8. Putrescine production via the ornithine decarboxylation pathway improves the acid stress survival of Lactobacillus brevis and is part of a horizontally transferred acid resistance locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Andrea; Ladero, Victor; Alvarez, Miguel A; Lucas, Patrick M

    2014-04-03

    Decarboxylation pathways are widespread among lactic acid bacteria; their physiological role is related to acid resistance through the regulation of the intracellular pH and to the production of metabolic energy via the generation of a proton motive force and its conversion into ATP. These pathways include, among others, biogenic amine (BA) production pathways. BA accumulation in foodstuffs is a health risk; thus, the study of the factors involved in their production is of major concern. The analysis of several lactic acid bacterial strains isolated from different environments, including fermented foods and beverages, revealed that the genes encoding these pathways are clustered on the chromosome, which suggests that these genes are part of a genetic hotspot related to acid stress resistance. Further attention was devoted to the ornithine decarboxylase pathway, which affords putrescine from ornithine. Studies were performed on three lactic acid bacteria belonging to different species. The ODC pathway was always shown to be involved in cytosolic pH alkalinisation and acid shock survival, which were observed to occur with a concomitant increase in putrescine production. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Studies on the pathogenesis and survival of different culture forms of Listeria monocytogenes to pulsed UV-light irradiation after exposure to mild-food processing stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Derek; McNeil, Brian; Laffey, John G; Rowan, Neil J

    2012-06-01

    The effects of mild conventional food-processing conditions on Listeria monocytogenes survival to pulsed UV (PUV) irradiation and virulence-associated characteristics were investigated. Specifically, this study describes the inability of 10 strains representative of 3 different culture forms or morphotypes of L. monocytogenes to adapt to normally lethal levels of PUV-irradiation after exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of salt (7.5% (w/v) NaCl for 1 h), acid (pH 5.5 for 1 h), heating (48 °C for 1 h) or PUV (UV dose 0.08 μJ/cm(2)). Findings showed that the order of increasing sensitivity of L. monocytogenes of non-adapted and stressed morphotypes to low pH (pH 3.5 for 5 h, adjusted with lactic), high salt (17.5% w/v NaCl for 5 h), heating (60 °C for 1 h) and PUV-irradiation (100 pulses at 7.2 J and 12.8 J, equivalent to UV doses of 2.7 and 8.4 μJ/cm(2) respectively) was typical wild-type smooth (S/WT), atypical filamentous rough (FR) and atypical multiple-cell-chain (MCR) variants. Exposure of L. monocytogenes cells to sub-lethal acid, salt or heating conditions resulted in similar or increased susceptibility to PUV treatments. Only prior exposure to mild heat stressing significantly enhanced invasion of Caco-2 cells, whereas subjection of L. monocytogenes cells to combined sub-lethal salt, acid and heating conditions produced the greatest reduction in invasiveness. Implications of these findings are discussed. This constitutes the first study to show that pre-exposure to mild conventional food-processing stresses enhances sensitivity of different culture morphotypes of L. monocytogenes to PUV, which is growing in popularity as an alternative or complementary approach for decontamination in the food environment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. PI3K/Akt and mTOR/p70S6K Pathways Mediate Neuroprotectin D1-Induced Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cell Survival during Oxidative Stress-Induced Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghiri, Zahra; Bazan, Nicolas G.

    2010-01-01

    The initiation and progression of several forms of retinal degenerations involve excessive, repetitive, and/or sustained oxidative stress that, in turn, mediate photoreceptor cell damage and death. Since phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and mTOR/p70S6-kinase pathways are part of survival signaling in cells confronted with oxidative stress, we asked whether or not docosahexaenoic acid-derived neuroprotectin D1 (NPD1) mediates survival upon single-dose and/or repetitive oxidative stress through this pathway. For this purpose, we used human retinal pigment epithelial (ARPE-19) cells challenged by exposure to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) plus tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). We found that in single-dose oxidative stress-induced apoptosis, phosphorylation of Akt, mTOR, and p70S6K was both time- and dose-dependent. Inhibition of PI3K or mTOR/p70S6K by wortmannin and rapamycin, respectively, increased apoptosis and inhibited phosphorylation of Akt and p70S6K induced by single-dose oxidative stress. While two exposures of a low-dose, non-damaging oxidation induced apoptosis and upregulation of Akt, mTOR, and p70S6K, longer treatment of the cells with three exposures of low dose to low-dose stress showed no changes in the levels of Akt, mTOR, or p70S6K, and resulted in enhanced apoptosis compared to higher doses. Removing the oxidative stress-inducing agents following the single-dose or short term repetitive oxidative stress at the peak of Akt, mTOR, and p70S6K phosphorylation (i.e, 30 minutes after induction) led to recovery, with no apoptosis after 16 hours of incubation. Cells that were induced with three low doses of stress did not show recovery when oxidative stress was removed 30 minutes after the last exposure. NPD1 protected the RPE cells against both single-dose and repetitive oxidative stress-induced apoptosis and promoted higher levels of phosphorylated Akt, mTOR, and p70S6K. Together, our results show that a) repetitive oxidative stress is dose

  11. Changes in thermo-tolerance and survival under simulated gastrointestinal conditions of Salmonella Enteritidis PT4 and Salmonella Typhimurium PT4 in chicken breast meat after exposure to sequential stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Adma Nadja Ferreira de; Souza, Geany Targino de; Schaffner, Donald; Oliveira, Tereza C Moreira de; Maciel, Janeeyre Ferreira; Souza, Evandro Leite de; Magnani, Marciane

    2017-06-19

    This study assessed changes in thermo-tolerance and capability to survive to simulated gastrointestinal conditions of Salmonella Enteritidis PT4 and Salmonella Typhimurium PT4 inoculated in chicken breast meat following exposure to stresses (cold, acid and osmotic) commonly imposed during food processing. The effects of the stress imposed by exposure to oregano (Origanum vulgare L.) essential oil (OVEO) on thermo-tolerance were also assessed. After exposure to cold stress (5°C for 5h) in chicken breast meat the test strains were sequentially exposed to the different stressing substances (lactic acid, NaCl or OVEO) at sub-lethal amounts, which were defined considering previously determined minimum inhibitory concentrations, and finally to thermal treatment (55°C for 30min). Resistant cells from distinct sequential treatments were exposed to simulated gastrointestinal conditions. The exposure to cold stress did not result in increased tolerance to acid stress (lactic acid: 5 and 2.5μL/g) for both strains. Cells of S. Typhimurium PT4 and S. Enteritidis PT4 previously exposed to acid stress showed higher (psurvived the sequential stress exposure (resistant) showed higher tolerance (psurvival rates (psurvival under gastrointestinal conditions of S. Enteritidis PT4 and S. Typhimurium PT4. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of mild cold stress on the survival of seawater-adapted mallard ducks (Anas platyrhynchos) maintained on food contaminated with petroleum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, W.N.; Gorsline, J.; Cronshaw, J.

    1979-01-01

    (1) Seawater-adapted Mallard ducks maintained in the laboratory will freely consume food that has been contaminated with either any one of a variety of crude oils or a petroleum derivative such as No. 2 fuel oil. (2) During a 100-day experimental period total masses of petroleum equivalent to 50% of the mean body weight were consumed by some birds and many showed no apparent symptoms of distress. (3) The consumption of petroleum-contaminated food was frequently accompanied by a persistent hyperphagia but no clear patterns of change in body weight were associated with this condition. (4) Among those birds that survived the 100-day experimental period only small changes in mean body weight were observed between successive weighings and in most instances these represented less than 10% of the previously recorded weight. (5) In all groups, including those maintained on uncontaminated food, most of the mortality occurred following exposure to continuous mild cold stress. The total number of deaths in the groups given petroleum-contaminated food, however, was always higher than that among birds given uncontaminated food. (6) The spate of mortality that occurred in groups given petroleum-contaminated food usually occurred earlier, lasted longer, and involved more birds than it did among groups fed uncontaminated food. (7) The pattern of each episode of mortality was sometimes quantitatively related to the concentration of petroleum in the food and a striking range of relative toxicities were observed among the crude oils from different geographic regions. (8) Throughout the experiment, the mean body weight of the birds that died was always significantly less than that of the survivors in the same group; in all instances most of the loss in weight occurred during the 2 weeks preceding death. (9) Autopsy revealed that adrenal hypertrophy and lymphoepithelial involution were characteristic in all of the birds that died, suggesting that a high level of adrenocortical

  13. Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, David W

    2008-01-01

    We all experience stress as a regular, and sometimes damaging and sometimes useful, part of our daily lives. In our normal ups and downs, we have our share of exhaustion, despondency, and outrage--matched with their corresponding positive moods. But burnout and workaholism are different. They are chronic, dysfunctional, self-reinforcing, life-shortening habits. Dentists, nurses, teachers, ministers, social workers, and entertainers are especially susceptible to burnout; not because they are hard-working professionals (they tend to be), but because they are caring perfectionists who share control for the success of what they do with others and perform under the scrutiny of their colleagues (they tend to). Workaholics are also trapped in self-sealing cycles, but the elements are ever-receding visions of control and using constant activity as a barrier against facing reality. This essay explores the symptoms, mechanisms, causes, and successful coping strategies for burnout and workaholism. It also takes a look at the general stress response on the physiological level and at some of the damage American society inflicts on itself.

  14. Survival rate and expression of Heat-shock protein 70 and Frost genes after temperature stress in Drosophila melanogaster lines that are selected for recovery time from temperature coma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udaka, Hiroko; Ueda, Chiaki; Goto, Shin G

    2010-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the physiological mechanisms underlying temperature tolerance using Drosophila melanogaster lines with rapid, intermediate, or slow recovery from heat or chill coma that were established by artificial selection or by free recombination without selection. Specifically, we focused on the relationships among their recovery from heat or chill coma, survival after severe heat or cold, and survival enhanced by rapid cold hardening (RCH) or heat hardening. The recovery time from heat coma was not related to the survival rate after severe heat. The line with rapid recovery from chill coma showed a higher survival rate after severe cold exposure, and therefore the same mechanisms are likely to underlie these phenotypes. The recovery time from chill coma and survival rate after severe cold were unrelated to RCH-enhanced survival. We also examined the expression of two genes, Heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70) and Frost, in these lines to understand the contribution of these stress-inducible genes to intraspecific variation in recovery from temperature coma. The line showing rapid recovery from heat coma did not exhibit higher expression of Hsp70 and Frost. In addition, Hsp70 and Frost transcription levels were not correlated with the recovery time from chill coma. Thus, Hsp70 and Frost transcriptional regulation was not involved in the intraspecific variation in recovery from temperature coma. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Phycocyanobilin promotes PC12 cell survival and modulates immune and inflammatory genes and oxidative stress markers in acute cerebral hypoperfusion in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marín-Prida, Javier [Centre for Research and Biological Evaluations (CEIEB), Institute of Pharmacy and Food, University of Havana, Ave. 23 e/ 214 y 222, La Lisa, PO Box: 430, Havana (Cuba); Pavón-Fuentes, Nancy [International Centre for Neurological Restoration (CIREN), Ave. 25 e/ 158 y 160, Playa, PO Box: 11300, Havana (Cuba); Llópiz-Arzuaga, Alexey; Fernández-Massó, Julio R. [Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (CIGB), Ave. 31 e/158 y 190, Playa, PO Box: 6162, Havana (Cuba); Delgado-Roche, Liván [Centre for Research and Biological Evaluations (CEIEB), Institute of Pharmacy and Food, University of Havana, Ave. 23 e/ 214 y 222, La Lisa, PO Box: 430, Havana (Cuba); Mendoza-Marí, Yssel; Santana, Seydi Pedroso; Cruz-Ramírez, Alieski; Valenzuela-Silva, Carmen; Nazábal-Gálvez, Marcelo; Cintado-Benítez, Alberto [Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (CIGB), Ave. 31 e/158 y 190, Playa, PO Box: 6162, Havana (Cuba); Pardo-Andreu, Gilberto L. [Centre for Research and Biological Evaluations (CEIEB), Institute of Pharmacy and Food, University of Havana, Ave. 23 e/ 214 y 222, La Lisa, PO Box: 430, Havana (Cuba); Polentarutti, Nadia [Istituto Clinico Humanitas (IRCCS), Rozzano (Italy); Riva, Federica [Department of Veterinary Science and Public Health (DIVET), University of Milano (Italy); Pentón-Arias, Eduardo [Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (CIGB), Ave. 31 e/158 y 190, Playa, PO Box: 6162, Havana (Cuba); Pentón-Rol, Giselle [Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (CIGB), Ave. 31 e/158 y 190, Playa, PO Box: 6162, Havana (Cuba)

    2013-10-01

    Since the inflammatory response and oxidative stress are involved in the stroke cascade, we evaluated here the effects of Phycocyanobilin (PCB, the C-Phycocyanin linked tetrapyrrole) on PC12 cell survival, the gene expression and the oxidative status of hypoperfused rat brain. After the permanent bilateral common carotid arteries occlusion (BCCAo), the animals were treated with saline or PCB, taking samples 24 h post-surgery. Global gene expression was analyzed with GeneChip Rat Gene ST 1.1 from Affymetrix; the expression of particular genes was assessed by the Fast SYBR Green RT-PCR Master Mix and Bioplex methods; and redox markers (MDA, PP, CAT, SOD) were evaluated spectrophotometrically. The PCB treatment prevented the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and glutamate induced PC12 cell injury assessed by the MTT assay, and modulated 190 genes (93 up- and 97 down-regulated) associated to several immunological and inflammatory processes in BCCAo rats. Furthermore, PCB positively modulated 19 genes mostly related to a detrimental pro-inflammatory environment and counteracted the oxidative imbalance in the treated BCCAo animals. Our results support the view of an effective influence of PCB on major inflammatory mediators in acute cerebral hypoperfusion. These results suggest that PCB has a potential to be a treatment for ischemic stroke for which further studies are needed. - Highlights: • Phycocyanobilin (PCB) prevents H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and glutamate induced PC12 cell viability loss. • Anterior cortex and striatum are highly vulnerable to cerebral hypoperfusion (CH). • PCB modulates 190 genes associated to inflammation in acute CH. • PCB regulates 19 genes mostly related to a detrimental pro-inflammatory environment. • PCB restores redox and immune balances showing promise as potential stroke therapy.

  16. Identification of opsA, a Gene Involved in Solute Stress Mitigation and Survival in Soil, in the Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon-Degrading Bacterium Novosphingobium sp. Strain LH128

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fida, Tekle Tafese; Breugelmans, Philip; Lavigne, Rob; van der Meer, Jan Roelof; De Mot, René; Vaysse, Pierre-Joseph

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify genes involved in solute and matric stress mitigation in the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-degrading Novosphingobium sp. strain LH128. The genes were identified using plasposon mutagenesis and by selection of mutants that showed impaired growth in a medium containing 450 mM NaCl as a solute stress or 10% (wt/vol) polyethylene glycol (PEG) 6000 as a matric stress. Eleven and 14 mutants showed growth impairment when exposed to solute and matric stresses, respectively. The disrupted sequences were mapped on a draft genome sequence of strain LH128, and the corresponding gene functions were predicted. None of them were shared between solute and matric stress-impacted mutants. One NaCl-affected mutant (i.e., NA7E1) with a disruption in a gene encoding a putative outer membrane protein (OpsA) was susceptible to lower NaCl concentrations than the other mutants. The growth of NA7E1 was impacted by other ions and nonionic solutes and by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), suggesting that opsA is involved in osmotic stress mitigation and/or outer membrane stability in strain LH128. NA7E1 was also the only mutant that showed reduced growth and less-efficient phenanthrene degradation in soil compared to the wild type. Moreover, the survival of NA7E1 in soil decreased significantly when the moisture content was decreased but was unaffected when soluble solutes from sandy soil were removed by washing. opsA appears to be important for the survival of strain LH128 in soil, especially in the case of reduced moisture content, probably by mitigating the effects of solute stress and retaining membrane stability. PMID:24657861

  17. Glutamate Increases In Vitro Survival and Proliferation and Attenuates Oxidative Stress-Induced Cell Death in Adult Spinal Cord-Derived Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells via Non-NMDA Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachem, Laureen D; Mothe, Andrea J; Tator, Charles H

    2016-08-15

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) leads to a cascade of secondary chemical insults, including oxidative stress and glutamate excitotoxicity, which damage host neurons and glia. Transplantation of exogenous neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) has shown promise in enhancing regeneration after SCI, although survival of transplanted cells remains poor. Understanding the response of NSPCs to the chemical mediators of secondary injury is essential in finding therapies to enhance survival. We examined the in vitro effects of glutamate and glutamate receptor agonists on adult rat spinal cord-derived NSPCs. NSPCs isolated from the periventricular region of the adult rat spinal cord were exposed to various concentrations of glutamate for 96 h. We found that glutamate treatment (500 μM) for 96 h significantly increased live cell numbers, reduced cell death, and increased proliferation, but did not significantly alter cell phenotype. Concurrent glutamate treatment (500 μM) in the setting of H2O2 exposure (500 μM) for 10 h increased NSPC survival compared to H2O2 exposure alone. The effects of glutamate on NSPCs were blocked by the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)/kainate receptor antagonist GYKI-52466, but not by the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor antagonist MK-801 or DL-AP5, or the mGluR3 antagonist LY-341495. Furthermore, treatment of NSPCs with AMPA, kainic acid, or the kainate receptor-specific agonist (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-tert-butylisoxazol-4-yl)propanoic acid mimicked the responses seen with glutamate both alone and in the setting of oxidative stress. These findings offer important insights into potential mechanisms to enhance NSPC survival and implicate a potential role for glutamate in promoting NSPC survival and proliferation after traumatic SCI.

  18. Effects of Pluronic F-68 on Tetrahymena cells: protection against chemical and physical stress and prolongation of survival under toxic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellung-Larsen, P; Assaad, F; Pankratova, Stanislava

    2000-01-01

    The effects of the non-ionic surfactant Pluronic F-68 (0.01% w/v) on Tetrahymena cells have been studied. A marked protection against chemical and physical stress was observed. The chemical stress effects were studied in cells suspended in buffer (starvation) or in buffers with added ingredients ...

  19. Expression of a serine protease gene prC is up-regulated by oxidative stress in the fungus Clonostachys rosea: implications for fungal survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Gang Zou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Soil fungi face a variety of environmental stresses such as UV light, high temperature, and heavy metals. Adaptation of gene expression through transcriptional regulation is a key mechanism in fungal response to environmental stress. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the transcription factors Msn2/4 induce stress-mediated gene expression by binding to the stress response element. Previous studies have demonstrated that the expression of extracellular proteases is up-regulated in response to heat shock in fungi. However, the physiological significance of regulation of these extracellular proteases by heat shock remains unclear. The nematophagous fungus Clonostachys rosea can secret an extracellular serine protease PrC during the infection of nematodes. Since the promoter of prC has three copies of the stress response element, we investigated the effect of environmental stress on the expression of prC. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our results demonstrated that the expression of prC was up-regulated by oxidants (H(2O(2 or menadione and heat shock, most likely through the stress response element. After oxidant treatment or heat shock, the germination of conidia in the wild type strain was significantly higher than that in the prC mutant strain in the presence of nematode cuticle. Interestingly, the addition of nematode cuticle significantly attenuated the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS induced by oxidants and heat shock in the wild type strain, but not in prC mutant strain. Moreover, low molecule weight (<3 kD degradation products of nematode cuticle suppressed the inhibitory effect of conidial germination induced by oxidants and heat shock. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate that PrC plays a protective role in oxidative stress in C. rosea. PrC degrades the nematode cuticle to produce degradation products, which in turn offer a protective effect against oxidative stress by scavenging ROS. Our study reveals a novel

  20. Survival assays using Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hae-Eun H; Jung, Yoonji; Lee, Seung-Jae V

    2017-02-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is an important model organism with many useful features, including rapid development and aging, easy cultivation, and genetic tractability. Survival assays using C. elegans are powerful methods for studying physiological processes. In this review, we describe diverse types of C. elegans survival assays and discuss the aims, uses, and advantages of specific assays. C. elegans survival assays have played key roles in identifying novel genetic factors that regulate many aspects of animal physiology, such as aging and lifespan, stress response, and immunity against pathogens. Because many genetic factors discovered using C. elegans are evolutionarily conserved, survival assays can provide insights into mechanisms underlying physiological processes in mammals, including humans.

  1. Exogenous Catalase and Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Improve Survival and Regeneration and Affect Oxidative Stress in Cryopreserved Dendrobium nobile Protocorm-like Bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, W; Jia, M X; Xu, J; Li, B L; Liu, Y

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced oxidative damage is responsible for viability loss in plant tissues following cryopreservation. Antioxidants may improve viability by preventing or repairing the injury. This work aimed at studying the effect of catalase (CAT) and pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), which are involved in ROS metabolism and are differentially expressed during pollen cryopreservation, for cryopreservation of Dendrobium nobile Lindl. 'Hamana Lake Dream' protocorm-like bodies (PLBs). Different concentrations of exogenous CAT or PDH were added at the loading, PVS2 treatment, unloading steps during vitrification-cryopreservation of PLBs. Their survival and regeneration were evaluated and correlated with physiological oxidative indexes. PLB survival increased significantly when CAT and PDH were added separately to the unloading solution at a suitable concentration. CAT at 400 U·ml(-1) increased PLB survival and regeneration by 33.5 and 14.6 percent respectively. It had no impact on the production of superoxide anion radical (·O2-) and on superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, but it reduced the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and malondialdehyde (MDA) contents and enhanced ascorbic acid (AsA) and endogenous CAT levels compared to PLBs cryopreserved using the standard vitrification protocol (CK1). PDH at 0.1 U·ml(-1) significantly improved PLB survival (by 2.5 percent), but it had no marked effect on regeneration compared to the CK1 group. It induced the same variations in ·O2-, AsA and endogenous CAT levels that were observed following CAT addition. However, PDH did not affect the H2O2 and MDA content but significantly increased SOD activity. These results indicate that the addition of 400 U·ml(-1) CAT and 0.1 U·ml(-1) PDH at the unloading step increased survival of cryopreserved PLBs and that this improvement was associated with scavenging of H2O2 and the repair of oxidative damage. Exogenous CAT also significantly improved PLB regeneration after

  2. Metabolite Profiling of adh1 Mutant Response to Cold Stress in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yuan; Liu, Lijun; Wei, Yunzhu; Li, Gaopeng; Yue, Xiule; An, Lizhe

    2016-01-01

    As a result of global warming, vegetation suffers from repeated freeze-thaw cycles caused by more frequent short-term low temperatures induced by hail, snow, or night frost. Therefore, short-term freezing stress of plants should be investigated particularly in light of the current climatic conditions. Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) plays a central role in the metabolism of alcohols and aldehydes and it is a key enzyme in anaerobic fermentation. ADH1 responds to plant growth and environmental stress; however, the function of ADH1 in the response to short-term freezing stress remains unknown. Using real-time quantitative fluorescence PCR, the expression level of ADH1 was analyzed at low temperature (4°C). The lethal temperature was calculated based on the electrolyte leakage tests for both ADH1 deletion mutants (adh1) and wild type (WT) plants. To further investigate the relationship between ADH1 and cold tolerance in plants, low-Mr polar metabolite analyses of Arabidopsis adh1 and WT were performed at cold temperatures using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. This investigation focused on freezing treatments (cold acclimation group: -6°C for 2 h with prior 4°C for 7 d, cold shock group: -6°C for 2 h without cold acclimation) and recovery (23°C for 24 h) with respect to seedling growth at optimum temperature. The experimental results revealed a significant increase in ADH1 expression during low temperature treatment (4°C) and at a higher lethal temperature in adh1 compared to that in the WT. Retention time indices and specific mass fragments were used to monitor 263 variables and annotate 78 identified metabolites. From these analyses, differences in the degree of metabolite accumulation between adh1 and WT were detected, including soluble sugars (e.g., sucrose) and amino acids (e.g., asparagine). In addition, the correlation-based network analysis highlighted some metabolites, e.g., melibiose, fumaric acid, succinic acid, glycolic acid, and xylose, which

  3. Metabolite Profiling of adh1 Mutant Response to Cold Stress in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yuan; Liu, Lijun; Wei, Yunzhu; Li, Gaopeng; Yue, Xiule; An, Lizhe

    2017-01-01

    As a result of global warming, vegetation suffers from repeated freeze-thaw cycles caused by more frequent short-term low temperatures induced by hail, snow, or night frost. Therefore, short-term freezing stress of plants should be investigated particularly in light of the current climatic conditions. Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) plays a central role in the metabolism of alcohols and aldehydes and it is a key enzyme in anaerobic fermentation. ADH1 responds to plant growth and environmental stress; however, the function of ADH1 in the response to short-term freezing stress remains unknown. Using real-time quantitative fluorescence PCR, the expression level of ADH1 was analyzed at low temperature (4°C). The lethal temperature was calculated based on the electrolyte leakage tests for both ADH1 deletion mutants (adh1) and wild type (WT) plants. To further investigate the relationship between ADH1 and cold tolerance in plants, low-Mr polar metabolite analyses of Arabidopsis adh1 and WT were performed at cold temperatures using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. This investigation focused on freezing treatments (cold acclimation group: −6°C for 2 h with prior 4°C for 7 d, cold shock group: −6°C for 2 h without cold acclimation) and recovery (23°C for 24 h) with respect to seedling growth at optimum temperature. The experimental results revealed a significant increase in ADH1 expression during low temperature treatment (4°C) and at a higher lethal temperature in adh1 compared to that in the WT. Retention time indices and specific mass fragments were used to monitor 263 variables and annotate 78 identified metabolites. From these analyses, differences in the degree of metabolite accumulation between adh1 and WT were detected, including soluble sugars (e.g., sucrose) and amino acids (e.g., asparagine). In addition, the correlation-based network analysis highlighted some metabolites, e.g., melibiose, fumaric acid, succinic acid, glycolic acid, and xylose, which

  4. Survival Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Rupert G

    2011-01-01

    A concise summary of the statistical methods used in the analysis of survival data with censoring. Emphasizes recently developed nonparametric techniques. Outlines methods in detail and illustrates them with actual data. Discusses the theory behind each method. Includes numerous worked problems and numerical exercises.

  5. Modelling survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashauer, Roman; Albert, Carlo; Augustine, Starrlight

    2016-01-01

    well GUTS, calibrated with short-term survival data of Gammarus pulex exposed to four pesticides, can forecast effects of longer-term pulsed exposures. Thirdly, we tested the ability of GUTS to estimate 14-day median effect concentrations of malathion for a range of species and use these estimates...

  6. Cellular stress-induced up-regulation of FMRP promotes cell survival by modulating PI3K-Akt phosphorylation cascades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wells David

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fragile X syndrome (FXS, the most commonly inherited mental retardation and single gene cause of autistic spectrum disorder, occurs when the Fmr1 gene is mutated. The product of Fmr1, fragile X linked mental retardation protein (FMRP is widely expressed in HeLa cells, however the roles of FMRP within HeLa cells were not elucidated, yet. Interacting with a diverse range of mRNAs related to cellular survival regulatory signals, understanding the functions of FMRP in cellular context would provide better insights into the role of this interesting protein in FXS. Using HeLa cells treated with etoposide as a model, we tried to determine whether FMRP could play a role in cell survival. Methods Apoptotic cell death was induced by etoposide treatment on Hela cells. After we transiently modulated FMRP expression (silencing or enhancing by using molecular biotechnological methods such as small hairpin RNA virus-induced knock down and overexpression using transfection with FMRP expression vectors, cellular viability was measured using propidium iodide staining, TUNEL staining, and FACS analysis along with the level of activation of PI3K-Akt pathway by Western blot. Expression level of FMRP and apoptotic regulator BcL-xL was analyzed by Western blot, RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry. Results An increased FMRP expression was measured in etoposide-treated HeLa cells, which was induced by PI3K-Akt activation. Without FMRP expression, cellular defence mechanism via PI3K-Akt-Bcl-xL was weakened and resulted in an augmented cell death by etoposide. In addition, FMRP over-expression lead to the activation of PI3K-Akt signalling pathway as well as increased FMRP and BcL-xL expression, which culminates with the increased cell survival in etoposide-treated HeLa cells. Conclusions Taken together, these results suggest that FMRP expression is an essential part of cellular survival mechanisms through the modulation of PI3K, Akt, and Bcl-xL signal

  7. Survival of Unstressed and Acid-, Cold-, and Starvation-Stress-Adapted Listeria monocytogenes in Ham Extract with Hops Beta Acids and Consumer Acceptability of HBA on Ready-to-Eat Ham

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of hops beta acids (HBA against unstressed and stress-adapted Listeria monocytogenes in ham extract and the consumers’ acceptability of HBA on ready-to-eat (RTE hams were investigated. Unstressed or acid-, cold-, or starvation-stress-adapted L. monocytogenes was inoculated (1.3–1.5 log CFU/mL into 10% ham extract, without (control or with HBA (4.44 or 10.0 µg/mL. Survival/growth of the pathogen during storage (7.2°C, 26 days was monitored periodically. Sensory evaluation (30 participants, 9-point hedonic scale was performed with hams dipped into 0.05, 0.11, and 0.23% HBA solution. Ham extracts without HBA supported rapid growth of unstressed and stress-adapted cells with growth rates of 0.39–0.71 log CFU/mL/day and lag phases of 0–3.26 days. HBA inhibited growth of unstressed L. monocytogenes by slowing (P0.05 affect sensory attributes of RTE ham. These results are useful for RTE meat processors to develop operational protocols using HBA to control L. monocytogenes.

  8. Survival of Unstressed and Acid-, Cold-, and Starvation-Stress-Adapted Listeria monocytogenes in Ham Extract with Hops Beta Acids and Consumer Acceptability of HBA on Ready-to-Eat Ham

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Shen, Cangliang

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of hops beta acids (HBA) against unstressed and stress-adapted Listeria monocytogenes in ham extract and the consumers' acceptability of HBA on ready-to-eat (RTE) hams were investigated. Unstressed or acid-, cold-, or starvation-stress-adapted L. monocytogenes was inoculated (1.3–1.5 log CFU/mL) into 10% ham extract, without (control) or with HBA (4.44 or 10.0 µg/mL). Survival/growth of the pathogen during storage (7.2°C, 26 days) was monitored periodically. Sensory evaluation (30 participants, 9-point hedonic scale) was performed with hams dipped into 0.05, 0.11, and 0.23% HBA solution. Ham extracts without HBA supported rapid growth of unstressed and stress-adapted cells with growth rates of 0.39–0.71 log CFU/mL/day and lag phases of 0–3.26 days. HBA inhibited growth of unstressed L. monocytogenes by slowing (P 0.05) affect sensory attributes of RTE ham. These results are useful for RTE meat processors to develop operational protocols using HBA to control L. monocytogenes. PMID:26539527

  9. TolC is important for bacterial survival and oxidative stress response in Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis in an acidic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jen-Jie; Wu, Ying-Chen; Kuo, Chih-Jung; Hsuan, Shih-Ling; Chen, Ter-Hsin

    2016-09-25

    The outer membrane protein TolC, which is one of the key components of several multidrug efflux pumps, is thought to be involved in various independent systems in Enterobacteriaceae. Since the acidic environment of the stomach is an important protection barrier against foodborne pathogen infections in hosts, we evaluated whether TolC played a role in the acid tolerance of Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis. Comparison of the acid tolerance of the tolC mutant and the parental wild-type strain showed that the absence of TolC limits the ability of Salmonella to sustain life under extreme acidic conditions. Additionally, the mutant exhibited morphological changes during growth in an acidic medium, leading to the conflicting results of cell viability measured by spectrophotometry and colony-forming unit counting. Reverse-transcriptional-PCR analysis indicated that acid-related molecules, apparatus, or enzymes and oxidation-induced factors were significantly affected by the acidic environment in the null-tolC mutant. The elongated cellular morphology was restored by adding antioxidants to the culture medium. Furthermore, we found that increased cellular antioxidative activity provides an overlapping protection against acid killing, demonstrating the complexity of the bacterial acid stress response. Our findings reinforce the multifunctional characteristics of TolC in acid tolerance or oxidative stress resistance and support the correlative protection mechanism between oxygen- and acid-mediated stress responses in Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The drosophila T-box transcription factor midline functions within Insulin/Akt and c-Jun-N terminal kinase stress-reactive signaling pathways to regulate interommatial bristle formation and cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Q Brent; Das, Sudeshna; Visic, Petra; Buford, Kendrick D; Zong, Yan; Buti, Wisam; Odom, Kelly R; Lee, Hannah; Leal, Sandra M

    2015-05-01

    We recently reported that the T-box transcription factor midline (mid) functions within the Notch-Delta signaling pathway to specify sensory organ precursor (SOP) cell fates in early-staged pupal eye imaginal discs and to suppress apoptosis (Das et al.). From genetic and allelic modifier screens, we now report that mid interacts with genes downstream of the insulin receptor(InR)/Akt, c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) and Notch signaling pathways to regulate interommatidial bristle (IOB) formation and cell survival. One of the most significant mid-interacting genes identified from the modifier screen is dFOXO, a transcription factor exhibiting a nucleocytoplasmic subcellular distribution pattern. In common with dFOXO, we show that Mid exhibits a nucleocytoplasmic distribution pattern within WT third-instar larval (3(o)L) tissue homogenates. Because dFOXO is a stress-responsive factor, we assayed the effects of either oxidative or metabolic stress responses on modifying the mid mutant phenotype which is characterized by a 50% loss of IOBs within the adult compound eye. While metabolic starvation stress does not affect the mid mutant phenotype, either 1 mM paraquat or 20% coconut oil, oxidative stress inducers, partially suppresses the mid mutant phenotype resulting in a significant recovery of IOBs. Another significant mid-interacting gene we identified is groucho (gro). Mid and Gro are predicted to act as corepressors of the enhancer-of-split gene complex downstream of Notch. Immunolabeling WT and dFOXO null 3(o)L eye-antennal imaginal discs with anti-Mid and anti-Engrailed (En) antibodies indicate that dFOXO is required to activate Mid and En expression within photoreceptor neurons of the eye disc. Taken together, these studies show that Mid and dFOXO serve as critical effectors of cell fate specification and survival within integrated Notch, InR/dAkt, and JNK signaling pathways during 3(o)L and pupal eye imaginal disc development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland

  11. Resin straw as an alternative system to securely store frozen microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thammavongs, Bouachanh; Poncet, Jean-Marc; Desmasures, Nathalie; Guéguen, Micheline; Panoff, Jean-Michel

    2004-05-01

    Freezing of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms is the main interest in the study of cold stress responses of living organisms. In parallel, applications which arise from this approach are of two types: (i) optimization of the frozen starters used in food processing; and (ii) improvement of the ex situ preservation of microorganisms in collections. Currently, cryopreservation of microorganisms in collections is carried out in cryotubes, and bibliographical references related to freezing microorganisms packaged in straws are scarce. In this context, a preliminary study was completed to evaluate the technological potential of ionomeric resin straws compared to polycarbonate cryo-tubes. Survival under freezing stress was tested on three microorganisms selected for their biotechnological interest: two lactic acid bacteria, Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and a deuteromycete fungus, Geotrichum candidum. The stress was carried out by repeated freezing-thawing cycles to artificially accelerate the lethal effect of freezing on the microorganisms. Two main results were obtained: (i) the survival rate values (per freezing-thawing cycle) seems to depend on the thermal type of the studied microorganism, and (ii) there was no, under our experimental conditions, significant difference between straws and tubes. However, conservation in the resin straws lead to a slight increase in the survival of L. cremoris and G. candidum compared to microtubes. In those conditions, straws seems an alternative system to securely store frozen microorganisms with three main characteristics: (i) a high resistance to thermal stress, (ii) a safe closing by hermetic weld, and (iii) a system for inviolable identification.

  12. Checkpoint kinase 2 is dispensable for regulation of the p53 response but is required for G2/M arrest and cell survival in cells with p53 defects under heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusawa, Yukihiro; Yamanouchi, Yuka; Iizumi, Takashi; Zhao, Qing-Li; Mitsuhashi, Yohei; Morita, Akinori; Enomoto, Atushi; Tabuchi, Yoshiaki; Kondo, Takashi

    2017-10-01

    Hyperthermia induced by heat stress (HS) is known to inhibit proliferation and induce cell death in cancer. We previously demonstrated that checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) contributes to G2/M arrest and cell survival under HS; however, the role of Chk2, a functional analog of Chk1, in regulation of the cell cycle and cell death under HS is still unknown. Here, we addressed the role of Chk2 using Molt-4 cells with p53-targeted shRNA (Molt-4/shp53) and parental control cells (Molt-4/V). Chk2 inhibition suppressed C-terminal acetylation of p53 and delayed the induction of p53-target genes in Molt-4/V cells under HS; however, Chk2 inhibition failed to inhibit apoptosis induced by HS, indicating that Chk2 was dispensable for p53-dependent apoptosis under HS. In contrast, Chk2 inhibition abrogated G2/M arrest and promoted cell death induced by HS in HeLa cells and Molt-4/shp53 cells. Thus, we demonstrated for the first time that Chk2 was required for cell cycle arrest and cell survival, particularly in cells with p53 defects under HS. These findings indicated that Chk2 may be a selective target for p53-mutated or -deficient cancer treated with hyperthermia.

  13. [Neural activity related to emotional and empathic deficits in subjects with post-traumatic stress disorder who survived the L'Aquila (Central Italy) 2009 earthquake].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazza, Monica; Pino, Maria Chiara; Tempesta, Daniela; Catalucci, Alessia; Masciocchi, Carlo; Ferrara, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a chronic anxiety disorder. The continued efforts to control the distressing memories by traumatized individuals, together with the reduction of responsiveness to the outside world, are called Emotional Numbing (EN). The EN is one of the central symptoms in PTSD and it plays an integral role not only in the development and maintenance of post-traumatic symptomatology, but also in the disability of emotional regulation. This disorder shows an abnormal response of cortical and limbic regions which are normally involved in understanding emotions since the very earliest stages of the development of processing ability. Patients with PTSD exhibit exaggerated brain responses to emotionally negative stimuli. Identifying the neural correlates of emotion regulation in these subjects is important for elucidating the neural circuitry involved in emotional and empathic dysfunction. We showed that PTSD patients, all survivors of the L'Aquila 2009 earthquake, have a higher sensitivity to negative emotion and lower empathy levels. These emotional and empathic deficits are accompanied by neural brain functional correlates. Indeed PTSD subjects exhibit functional abnormalities in brain regions that are involved in stress regulation and emotional responses. The reduced activation of the frontal areas and a stronger activation of the limbic areas when responding to emotional stimuli could lead the subjects to enact coping strategies aimed at protecting themselves from the re-experience of pain related to traumatic events. This would result in a dysfunctional hyperactivation of subcortical areas, which may cause emotional distress and, consequently, impaired social relationships often reported by PTSD patients.

  14. Innovations’ Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Tabas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Innovations currently represent a tool of maintaining the going concern of a business entity and its competitiveness. However, effects of innovations are not infinite and if an innovation should constantly preserve a life of business entity, it has to be a continual chain of innovations, i.e. continual process. Effective live of a single innovation is limited while the limitation is derived especially from industry. The paper provides the results of research on innovations effects in the financial performance of small and medium-sized enterprises in the Czech Republic. Objective of this paper is to determine the length and intensity of the effects of technical innovations in company’s financial performance. The economic effect of innovations has been measured at application of company’s gross production power while the Deviation Analysis has been applied for three years’ time series. Subsequently the Survival Analysis has been applied. The analyses are elaborated for three statistical samples of SMEs constructed in accordance to the industry. The results obtained show significant differences in innovations’ survival within these three samples of enterprises then. The results are quite specific for the industries, and are confronted and discussed with the results of authors’ former research on the issue.

  15. Dietary probiotic supplementation improved gut amylase to trypsin ratio in European seabass reared at different temperatures and survival after handling stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Filipe Ferreira Pereira

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics and chemical treatments are often used as disease control strategy. A prophylactic and alternative method to this chemical approach are the probiotics [1]. Probiotics are defined as "live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host" (FAO, 2001. The benefits of probiotic treatments are improvements in host nutritional retention [2], antagonistic properties to bacterial pathogen proliferation [3], modulation of immune responses [4], among others. Temperature plays a major role in dietary nutrient utilization and immune responses in fish, and have a modulatory effect on probiotic activity in intestine. The current study evaluated the use of a dietary probiotic supplementation in European seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax, one of the most important fish species in Southern Europe. Fish were fed on a multi-species probiotic (Bacillus sp., Pedicoccus sp., Enterococcus sp., Lactobacillus sp. , reared under 3 different temperatures (17, 20 and 23 ºC for 70 days. Fish were pair-fed, fixed to the voluntary feed intake of fish reared at 17 º C, in order to have similar probiotic intake among the temperature groups. Final body weight tripled initial weight (12.7 to 30.7g. At the end of the growth trial, all fish were subjected to a handling stress, in which stocking density increased by 6 fold (from 4 kg/m3 to 25 kg/m3, followed by a 15 min chase with a pole. Growth performance was not affected by the dietary treatment. Post-stress cumulative mortality were significantly higher in the 17ºC control group (figure 1A. Digestive enzymes activity were significantly affected by temperature and diet interaction. The activity ratio of amylase to trypsin (figure 1B increased with temperature and dietary probiotic supplementation, an indication that probiotic treatment at 23oC have a positive influence on the metabolic flexibility of carbohydrate-protein utilization. Non-specific immune response (ACH50

  16. Thermal stress and topography control on the exfoliation of spheroidal granite boulders in Pricopan Ridge, Macin Mountains, Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasile, Mirela; Vespremeanu-Stroe, Alfred

    2017-04-01

    Exfoliation is one of the most frequent processes of granite landforms shaping, its intensity being usually associated with the cumulated action of thermal stresses. Although exfoliation microforms are present on granite landforms in most of the warm-climates, the controlling factors of this process are not yet well defined. Within this study, we investigated the distribution pattern of the exfoliation microforms identified on the surface of 40 rounded granite boulders mapped on the western slope of Pricopan Ridge (Macin Mountains), in a semi-arid temperate environment (Northern Dobrogea, Romania). Continuous rock near-surface temperature measurement on a reference boulder over a four years period allowed us to evaluate the frequency and intensity of the rock thermal oscillations, taking into account (as control factors) (i) the fast temperature changes generated by convective summer rain events, (ii) the day-night temperature variations and (iii) the occurrence of freeze-thaw oscillations during winter. The relative rock strength at the rock surface was determined by Schmidt Hammer tests, which highlighted a reduced resistance of the boulder areas oriented towards South (mean rebound values of 27-33) compared to the North-exposed ones (mean rebound values of 43-50). Over a North-South profile of the boulders, the lowest resistance of the rock surface corresponds to their gently sloping southern faces (at slope values of 0-45 degrees (°)), which indicates a higher susceptibility of these sectors to be affected by weathering processes. These specific areas (gently-sloping faces of the rounded granite boulders) overlap the sector of high frequency and intensity of the investigated thermal-stress inducing processes, all three of them reaching the highest peak on the South-face of the boulders at slopes of 20°-30°. Correspondently, the exfoliation microforms mapped and morphometrically described in this study are developed most frequently in the area delimited by

  17. Role of a serine-type D-alanyl-D-alanine carboxypeptidase on the survival of Ochrobactrum sp. 11a under ionic and hyperosmotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Príncipe, Analía; Jofré, Edgardo; Alvarez, Florencia; Mori, Gladys

    2009-06-01

    The plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium, Ochrobactrum sp. 11a displays a high intrinsic salinity tolerance and has been used in this work to study the molecular basis of bacterial responses to high concentrations of NaCl. A collection of Ochrobactrum sp. 11a mutants was generated by Tn5-B21 mutagenesis and screened for sensitivity to salinity. One clone, designated PBP and unable to grow on glutamate mannitol salt agar medium supplemented with 300 mM NaCl was selected and further characterized. The PBP mutant carries a single transposon insertion in a gene showing a high degree of identity to the serine-type d-alanyl-d-alanine carboxypeptidase gene of Ochrobactrum anthropi. Interestingly, the expression of this gene was shown to be upregulated by salt in the PBP mutant. Moreover, evidence is presented for the requirement of the gene product for adaptation to high-salt conditions as well as to overcome the toxicity of LiCl, KCl, sucrose, polyethylene glycol (PEG), AlCl(3), CuSO(4), and ZnSO(4). In addition to the altered tolerance to both ionic and osmotic stresses, the PBP mutant exhibited changes in colony and cell morphology, exopolysaccharide production, and an increased sensitivity to detergents.

  18. Endocannabinoid CB1 receptor activation upon global ischemia adversely impact recovery of reward and stress signaling molecules, neuronal survival and behavioral impulsivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Megan Dunbar; de la Tremblaye, Patricia Barra; Azogu, Idu; Plamondon, Hélène

    2016-04-03

    Global cerebral ischemia in rodents, which mimics cardiac arrest in humans, is associated with a surge in endocannabinoids and increased transmission of dopamine and glutamate leading to excitotoxic cell death. The current study assessed the role of CB1 receptor activation at the moment of an ischemic insult on ensuing regulation of stress and reward signaling molecules, neuronal injury and anxiety-like behavior. Male Wistar rats were separated into 4 groups (n=10/group); sham and ischemic rats administered the CB1 endocannabinoid receptor antagonist AM251 (2mg/kg, i.p.) 30min prior to global cerebral ischemia, and vehicle-treated counterparts. The effects of CB1 receptor blockade on corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (vGluT2), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine receptor 1 (DRD1) signaling expression, together with CA1 neuronal damage and anxiety-like behaviors were assessed. Our findings show attenuated CA1 injury and behavioral deficits in AM251-treated ischemic rats. AM251-pretreatment also partially or completely reversed ischemia-induced alterations in TH-ir expression at the hippocampus, ventral tegmental area (VTA), nucleus accumbens (NAc) and basolateral amygdala (BLA), normalized DRD1-ir at the medial forebrain bundle, and diminished BLA and PVN-CRH expression. All groups showed comparable vGluT2 expression at the BLA and PVN-parvocellular subdivision. These findings support a determinant role of CB1 receptor activation at time of ischemia on functional recovery. They also support "state-dependent" effects of endocannabinoids, raising considerations in the development of effective molecules to regulate HPA axis function and mood disorders following cardiac arrest and stroke. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of Beta-Blocker Therapy, Maximal Heart Rate, and Exercise Capacity During Stress Testing on Long-Term Survival (from The Henry Ford Exercise Testing Project).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Rupert K; Al-Mallah, Mouaz H; Whelton, Seamus P; Michos, Erin D; Blumenthal, Roger S; Ehrman, Jonathan K; Brawner, Clinton A; Keteyian, Steven J; Blaha, Michael J

    2016-12-01

    Whether lower heart rate thresholds (defined as the percentage of age-predicted maximal heart rate achieved, or ppMHR) should be used to determine chronotropic incompetence in patients on beta-blocker therapy (BBT) remains unclear. In this retrospective cohort study, we analyzed 64,549 adults without congestive heart failure or atrial fibrillation (54 ± 13 years old, 46% women, 29% black) who underwent clinician-referred exercise stress testing at a single health care system in Detroit, Michigan from 1991 to 2009, with median follow-up of 10.6 years for all-cause mortality (interquartile range 7.7 to 14.7 years). Using Cox regression models, we assessed the effect of BBT, ppMHR, and estimated exercise capacity on mortality, with adjustment for demographic data, medical history, pertinent medications, and propensity to be on BBT. There were 9,259 deaths during follow-up. BBT was associated with an 8% lower adjusted achieved ppMHR (91% in no BBT vs 83% in BBT). ppMHR was inversely associated with all-cause mortality but with significant attenuation by BBT (per 10% ppMHR HR: no BBT: 0.80 [0.78 to 0.82] vs BBT: 0.89 [0.87 to 0.92]). Patients on BBT who achieved 65% ppMHR had a similar adjusted mortality rate as those not on BBT who achieved 85% ppMHR (p >0.05). Estimated exercise capacity further attenuated the prognostic value of ppMHR (per-10%-ppMHR HR: no BBT: 0.88 [0.86 to 0.90] vs BBT: 0.95 [0.93 to 0.98]). In conclusion, the prognostic value of ppMHR was significantly attenuated by BBT. For patients on BBT, a lower threshold of 65% ppMHR may be considered for determining worsened prognosis. Estimated exercise capacity further diminished the prognostic value of ppMHR particularly in patients on BBT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Frost damage of concrete subject to confinement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasholt, Marianne Tange

    2016-01-01

    When internal frost damage is observed in real concrete structures, the usual pattern is cracks with a preferred orientation parallel to the exposed surface. When exposing concrete with poor frost resistance to a standardised freeze/thaw test in the laboratory, the orientations of the resulting...... cracks are more or less random. The present study is an experimental study, which aims at investigating the influence of confinement during freeze/thaw action on the developed crack pattern. Confinement is established by mounting hose clamps on cylindrical test specimens, using similar test specimens...... without hose clamps as reference. The results show that confinement can change the outcome of a freeze/thaw test as regards extent of internal cracking, crack orientations, and amount of surface scaling. Thus it seems likely that the difference in confinement (and therefore also in stress state) can...

  1. The association between post-traumatic stress-related symptoms, resilience, current stress and past exposure to violence: a cross sectional study of the survival of Quechua women in the aftermath of the Peruvian armed conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Eliana B

    2013-10-23

    The long lasting resilience of individuals and communities affected by mass violence has not been given equal prominence as their suffering. This has often led to psychosocial interventions in post-conflict zones being unresponsive to local realities and ill-equipped to foster local strengths. Responding to the renewed interest in resilience in the field of violence and health, this study examines the resilience and post-traumatic responses of Indigenous Quechua women in the aftermath of the political violence in Peru (1980-2000). A cross-sectional study examined the relationship between resilience, post-traumatic responses, exposure to violence during the conflict and current life stress on 151 Quechua women participants. Purposive and convenience sampling strategies were used for recruitment in Ayacucho, the area most exposed to violence. The study instruments were translated to Quechua and Spanish and cross-culturally validated. Data was analyzed using hierarchical regression analysis. A locally informed trauma questionnaire of local idioms of distress was also included in the analysis. Sixty percent of women (n = 91) were recruited from Ayacucho city and the rest from three rural villages; the mean age was 45 years old. Despite high levels of exposure to violence, only 9.3% of the sample presented a level of symptoms that indicated possible PTSD. Resilience did not contribute to the overall variance of post-traumatic stress related symptoms, which was predicted by past exposure to violence, current life stress, age, and schooling (R2 = .421). Resilience contributed instead to the variance of avoidance symptoms (Stand β = -.198, t = -2.595, p = 0.010) while not for re-experiencing or arousal symptoms. These findings identified some of the pathways in which resilience and post-traumatic responses interrelate in the aftermath of violence; yet, they also point to the complexity of their relationship, which is not fully explained by linear

  2. The association between post-traumatic stress-related symptoms, resilience, current stress and past exposure to violence: a cross sectional study of the survival of Quechua women in the aftermath of the Peruvian armed conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The long lasting resilience of individuals and communities affected by mass violence has not been given equal prominence as their suffering. This has often led to psychosocial interventions in post-conflict zones being unresponsive to local realities and ill-equipped to foster local strengths. Responding to the renewed interest in resilience in the field of violence and health, this study examines the resilience and post-traumatic responses of Indigenous Quechua women in the aftermath of the political violence in Peru (1980–2000). Methods A cross-sectional study examined the relationship between resilience, post-traumatic responses, exposure to violence during the conflict and current life stress on 151 Quechua women participants. Purposive and convenience sampling strategies were used for recruitment in Ayacucho, the area most exposed to violence. The study instruments were translated to Quechua and Spanish and cross-culturally validated. Data was analyzed using hierarchical regression analysis. A locally informed trauma questionnaire of local idioms of distress was also included in the analysis. Findings Sixty percent of women (n = 91) were recruited from Ayacucho city and the rest from three rural villages; the mean age was 45 years old. Despite high levels of exposure to violence, only 9.3% of the sample presented a level of symptoms that indicated possible PTSD. Resilience did not contribute to the overall variance of post-traumatic stress related symptoms, which was predicted by past exposure to violence, current life stress, age, and schooling (R2 = .421). Resilience contributed instead to the variance of avoidance symptoms (Stand β = −.198, t = −2.595, p = 0.010) while not for re-experiencing or arousal symptoms. Conclusions These findings identified some of the pathways in which resilience and post-traumatic responses interrelate in the aftermath of violence; yet, they also point to the complexity of their

  3. Minding the body: psychotherapy and cancer survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, David

    2014-09-01

    This article reviews evidence regarding effects of psychotherapy on overall cancer survival time. Special emphasis is given to research on adverse effects of depression on cancer survival, breast cancer, and mediating psychophysiological pathways linking psychosocial support to longer survival. It reviews all published clinical trials addressing effects of psychotherapy on cancer survival, emphasizing depression, breast cancer, and psychophysiological evidence linking stress, depression, and support to cancer survival. Systematic literature review and synthesis. Eight of 15 published trials indicate that psychotherapy enhances cancer survival time. No studies show an adverse effect of psychotherapy on cancer survival. Potential psychophysiological mechanisms linking stress to shorter survival include dysregulation of diurnal cortisol, increased pro-inflammatory cytokines, reduced natural killer cell activity, shorter telomeres and lower telomerase activity, glucocorticoid-mediated suppression of p53 and BrCA1 gene expression, and sympathetic nervous system activation of vascular endothelial growth factor. Stress and support affect the course of cancer progression. What is known? Stress and support have been thought to be related to cancer risk and progression, but evidence has been mixed. Depression is a natural co-morbid condition with cancer. It has not been clear how stress and support could physiologically affect the rate of cancer progression. Immune function was not thought to have much relevance to cancer progression. Few other physiological mechanisms linking stress to cancer progression were known. What does this paper add? There is evidence from 15 RCTs indicating that effective psychosocial support improves quantity as well as quality of life with cancer. There is evidence that chronic depression predicts poorer prognosis with cancer. Dysregulated circadian cortisol patterns predict more rapid cancer progression. Inflammatory processes affect cancer

  4. Antioxidant effect of rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) extract in soybean lecithin-based semen extender following freeze-thawing process of ram sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motlagh, Mahdi Khodaei; Sharafi, Mohsen; Zhandi, Mahdi; Mohammadi-Sangcheshmeh, Abdollah; Shakeri, Malak; Soleimani, Masoud; Zeinoaldini, Saeed

    2014-10-01

    The aim of current study was to evaluate effect of rosemary aqueous extract on post-thawed ram sperm quality in a soybean lecithin-based (SL) extender. Ram semen samples were obtained, extended with SL extender and supplemented with 0% (SL-R0), 2% (SL-R2), 4% (SL-R4), 6% (SL-R6), and 8% (SL-R8) rosemary aqueous extract. Following equilibration, the straws were frozen, and then plunged into the liquid nitrogen. After thawing, sperm motility and velocity parameters, plasma membrane functionality, viability, acrosomal and capacitation status were evaluated. Membrane lipid peroxidation was also analyzed through the malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration. Our results showed that SL-R4 and SL-R6 groups resulted in higher (p membrane functionality, as compared with other groups. Highest (p 0.05) by different levels of rosemary aqueous extract. Lower (p < 0.05) MDA concentration has been observed in SL-R4 and SL-R6 groups. The results of this study demonstrate that supplementation of SL extender with rosemary aqueous extract influences post-thawed ram sperm quality in a dose dependent manner. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Analyzing the effect of seasonal water cover variability and freeze-thaw timing on methane emissions from boreal and arctic soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Downey, N.; Fu, R.

    2009-12-01

    Here we present a new technique to detect the extent of surface water cover in boreal and arctic regions using the QuikSCAT microwave backscatter signal from 2000 to 2008, and compare these data to satellite and flask based measurements of atmospheric methane concentrations. The QuikSCAT scatterometer provides a high resolution (2.5 km, daily) long term record of fractional water cover, and is particularly sensitive to the timing of spring thaw and flooding. Interannual and seasonal variability in surface water cover drive changes in methane emissions from lakes and wetlands across the arctic and boreal region. We identify several regions where lake extent has significantly increased or decreased over the period 2000 to 2008, and evaluate changes in the seasonal cycle of water cover over this period. We combine the QuikSCAT water cover product with satellite derived estimates of soil freeze and thaw, and compare these records to atmospheric methane data from the NOAA CMDL Flask network and the satellite based TES (Aura) CH4 measurements to identify ‘pulses’ of methane emitted during periods of active freezing and thawing. We also estimate the possible effects of long-term changes in the thaw season length (from 1988 to 2009) and fractional water cover area (2000 to 2008) on methane emissions from boreal and arctic soils.

  6. Effect of various levels of catalase antioxidant in semen extenders on lipid peroxidation and semen quality after the freeze-thawing bull semen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Asadpour

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate effect of different concentrations of catalase in two extenders on motility, viability and lipid peroxidation bull spermatozoa during semen freezing process. Thirty ejaculates collected from ten Holstein bulls were pooled and evaluated at 37 °C. Pool ejaculated was split into two main experimental groups, 1 and 2. In experiment 1, specimen was diluted to a final concentration of 30 × 106 spermatozoa with citrate-egg yolk and in experiment 2; specimen was diluted with tris-egg yolk extender to the same concentration. In both experiments diluted semen was divided into three aliquots, including a control and two test groups. Each aliquot was rediluted with an equal volume of extender either without (control or with one of the antioxidants contained one of the following antioxidants: catalase (CAT; 100 IU mL-1 catalase (CAT; 200 IU mL-1 and control group. No significant differences were observed in sperm viability and motility following addition of catalase enzyme at concentration of 100 IU mL-1 and 200 IU mL-1 to citrate-egg yolk extender. But the highest sperm viability was achieved by addition of 100 IU mL-1 and 200 IU mL-1 catalase to tris-egg yolk semen extender compared with the control group (P < 0.05. Malondialdehyde levels did not change with addition of catalase in both extenders compared with the control group. The obtained results provide a new approach to the cryopreservation of bull semen, and could positively contribute to intensive cattle production.

  7. Resilient Modulus of Freeze-Thaw Affected Granular Soils for Pavement Design and Evaluation. Part 2. Field Validation Tests at Winchendon, Massachusetts, Test Sections,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-10-01

    tIloIII ( _ 0, P ll I I I P Ilil I I I I " ()31 0 󈨒 Wo 3 Ap 󈨓 -0 25Fb𔄃 - 9 a 9 ()72 Fer 󈨓 :0 79 Map 󈨓 1 2M t𔃺 o1 AtS (.) 12 Mar 󈨞 (0) IO Ap...analysis of the six test sections are sum- Radius (m) •0 0 2 04 0 6 08 1 0 o E 400 Actual Basin - -- j/ / Calculoated Baosin 00 .. ~~~~~ ~~1200 1 1...35 - Oacc’..c- 20.. -’. - I 055 35 a 12 March 1980 (Day 72) JAy." I 9eo D., Plate P .el 3rh(?.L) 237 PLato Pr cc,.c a:+ 2.S 155 l8q T(’C3 .. .’" d Ll

  8. Prion extraction methods: comparison of bead beating, ultrasonic disruption and repeated freeze-thaw methodologies for the recovery of functional renilla-prion fusion protein from bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molecular DNA technology allows for production of mammalian proteins in bacteria at sufficient quantities for downstream use and analysis. Variation in design and engineering of DNA expression vectors imparts selective alterations resulting in the generation of fusion proteins with intrinsic report...

  9. Influencia de los ciclos hielo-deshielo en la resistencia del concreto (caso Tunja Influence of freeze-thaw cycles in the resistance concrete (Tunja case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Fernando Páez Moreno

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available El presente artículo contiene el análisis de afectación de un agente de deterioro del concreto, conocido como ciclo hielo-deshielo, que se presenta en Tunja en época de heladas. En él se explica cómo el fenómeno afecta al concreto tanto cualitativa como cuantitativamente en propiedades físicas y mecánicas como porosidad, absorción y resistencia, y en su apariencia física. En la etapa de experimentación se empleó un grupo de 24 probetas cilíndricas de concreto, y se manejaron como variables de experimentación la relación agua/cemento y el tipo de curado, con las que se planteó una matriz de distribución. Para obtener resultados inmediatos se hizo la simulación de este proceso de forma acelerada, llevando los especímenes de concreto a períodos de hielo en la noche y de deshielo en el día, durante un tiempo continuo, en los que se manejaron dos ambientes: uno artificial (refrigerador - temperatura baja y uno natural (ambiente.This article refers to the analysis of a concrete deterioration agent affectation, known as cycle ice - defrosting, which appears in Tunja at time of frosts. It is explained how the phenomenon qualitative and quantitatively affects the concrete in physical and mechanical properties like porosity, absorption, and resistance, as well as in its physical appearance. In the experimentation stage, a group of 24 cylindrical test tubes of concrete was used. Water/cement relation and type fop curing were used as experimentation variables, with them a distribution matrix was proposed. In order to obtain immediate results, a simulation of this process in an accelerated way was made: concrete parts were taken to frosting periods at night and to defrosting periods during the day, at a continuous time in which two environments were used, an artificial one (refrigerator - low temperature and a natural one (the environment.

  10. Sperm preparation after freezing improves motile sperm count, motility, and viability in frozen-thawed sperm compared with sperm preparation before freezing-thawing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomar Rios, A; Gascón, A; Martínez, J V; Balasch, S; Molina Botella, I

    2017-10-09

    The aim of this study is to evaluate which cryopreservation protocol, freezing before or after swim-up, optimizes cryopreservation outcomes in terms of motile sperm count, motility, morphology, and viability, and also to establish whether sperm viability could be assessed based on sperm motility. Fifty-three fresh and 53 swim-up prepared samples were considered for the first experiment. In parallel, total motility evaluation by CASA system (computer-assisted sperm analyzer) and hypoosmotic swelling test (HOS-test) was performed in each sample to compare the viability results of both methods. In the second experiment, 21 normozoospermic semen samples and 20 semen samples from male factor patients were included. After fresh ejaculate evaluation, the semen sample of each patient was divided into two aliquots, one of them was frozen before swim-up and the other was frozen after swim-up. Motility, sperm count, morphology, and viability were evaluated after thawing. A linear regression model allows prediction of HOS-test viability results based on total motility: HOS = 1.38 + 0.97 · TM (R (2) = 99.10, residual mean squares = 9.51). Freezing before sperm selection leads to higher total and progressive motility, total motile sperm count, and viability rates than when sperm selection is performed before freezing (P < 0.005 in all cases). In fact, sperm selection prior to freezing reaches critical values when subfertile patients are considered. To conclude, total motility evaluation can predict HOS-test viability results, resulting in a more objective and less time-consuming method to assess viability. In addition, sperm freezing prior to swim-up selection must be considered in order to achieve better outcomes after thawing, especially in patients presenting poor sperm baseline.

  11. Long-term Stability of Esomeprazole in 5% Dextrose Infusion Polyolefin Bags at 5 degrees C +/- 3 degrees C after Microwave Freeze-thaw Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecq, Jean-daniel; Rolin, Catherine; Godet, Marie; Gillet, Patricia; Jamart, Jacques; Galanti, Laurence M

    2015-01-01

    To improve quality assurance, security, time management, and cost saving of drug delivery, preparation in advance of intravenous solutions has been developed for several infusion solutions. The objective of this study was to investigate the stability of esomeprazole 0.4 mg/mL and 0.8 mg/mL in 5% dextrose polyolefin bags after freezing, long-term storage, and microwave thawing. The stability of five polyolefin bags containing approximately 0.4 mg/mL of esomeprazole and five other bags containing approximately 0.8 mg/mL in 5% dextrose prepared under aseptic conditions was studied after freezing for 1 month at -20 degrees C, thawing in a microwave oven with a validated cycle, and stored at 5 degrees C +/- 3 degrees C. Esomeprazole concentration was measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography using a reversed-phase column C8, a mobile phase consisting of 35% of acetonitrile and 65% of Na2HPO4 buffer at pH 7.59 with HPO4 (2 M) and NaOH (0.5 M), and detection with a diode array detector at 280 nm. Visual, microscopic, and spectrophotometric observation and pH measurements were also performed. No precipitation occurred in the preparations but little change of color was observed. No microaggregate was observed with optical microscopy or revealed by a change of absorbance at 350, 410, and 550 nm. Based on a shelf life of 90% residual potency, esomeprazole solutions (0.4 and 0.8 mg/mL) were stable for at least 20 or 29 days, respectively, after a freezing and microwave thawing period, where 95% one-side lower confidence limit of the concentration-time profile remained superior to 90% of the initial concentration. During this period, the pH values of drug solutions have been observed to decrease without affecting chromatographic parameters. Within these limits, esomeprazole (0.4 and 0.8 mg/mL) in 5% dextrose infusions may be prepared and frozen in advance by a centralized intravenous admixture service, thawed, and stored at least 20 days at 5 degrees C +/- 3 degrees C before use in clinical units.

  12. The loss of function of PhaC1 is a survival mechanism that counteracts the stress caused by the overproduction of poly-3-hydroxyalkanoates in Pseudomonas putidaΔfadBA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeso, José I; Maestro, Beatriz; Sanz, Jesús M; Olivera, Elías R; Luengo, José M

    2015-09-01

    The poly-3-hydroxylkanoate (PHA)-overproducing mutant Pseudomonas putida U ΔfadBA (PpΔfadBA) lacks the genes encoding the main β-oxidation pathway (FadBA). This strain accumulates enormous amounts of bioplastics when cultured in chemically defined media containing PHA precursors (different n-alkanoic or n-aryl-alkanoic acids) and an additional carbon source. In medium containing glucose or 4-hydroxy-phenylacetate, the mutant does not accumulate PHAs and grows just as the wild type (P. putida U). However, when the carbon source is octanoate, growth is severely impaired, suggesting that in PpΔfadBA, the metabolic imbalance resulting from a lower rate of β-oxidation, together with the accumulation of bioplastics, causes severe physiological stress. Here, we show that PpΔfadBA efficiently counteracts this latter effect via a survival mechanism involving the introduction of spontaneous mutations that block PHA accumulation. Surprisingly, genetic analyses of the whole pha cluster revealed that these mutations occurred only in the gene encoding one of the polymerases (phaC1) and that the loss of PhaC1 function was enough to prevent PHA synthesis. The influence of these mutations on the structure of PhaC1 and the existence of a protein-protein (PhaC1-PhaC2) interaction that explains the functionality of the polymerization system are discussed herein. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Outcomes Of Assisted Reproductive Technologies At The Nairobi In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Main outcome measures: Fertilisation, embryo cleavage, ET, embryo freeze/thaw survival, pre-clinical pregnancy and clinical pregnancy rates, live births and other obstetric outcomes. Results: A total of 362 IVF cycles were performed. Following controlled ovarian hyperstimulation, an average of 12 oocytes were retrieved ...

  14. Effect of cooling to different sub-zero temperatures on boar sperm cryosurvival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Garcia-Olivares

    2016-03-01

    Conclusions: Cooling of pig sperm to −7 °C (no freezing damaged sperm function and structure; in contrast, cooling to either −3 °C or −5 °C did not change pig sperm survival after freeze-thawing.

  15. Cold Shock Proteins and Low-Temperature Response of Streptococcus thermophilus CNRZ302

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, Jeroen A.; Rombouts, Frank M.; Vos, Willem M. de; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Abee, Tjakko

    1999-01-01

    Low-temperature adaptation and cryoprotection were studied in the thermophilic lactic acid bacterium Streptococcus thermophilus CNRZ302. S. thermophilus actively adapts to freezing during a pretreatment at 20°C, resulting in an approximately 1,000-fold increased survival after four freeze-thaw

  16. Stress, storage and survival of neem seed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sacandé, M.

    2000-01-01

    Neem ( Azadirachta indica ) is an important multipurpose tropical tree species, frequently used in planting programmes in the arid tropics. However, its seeds are difficult to store for extended periods of time, as are those of many other tropical species which display

  17. Distribution, abundance and properties of restriction enzymes On ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is high demand for modified starch globally for both food and industrial uses because of its ability to. withstand processing conditions such as extreme temperature, diverse pH, high shear stress and freeze-thaw. variations. The study described the distribution, abundance and properties of restriction enzymes on ...

  18. Divergence in strategies for coping with winter embolism among co-occurring temperate tree species: the role of positive xylem pressure, wood type and tree stature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cun-Yang Niu; Frederick C. Meinzer; Guang-You. Hao

    2017-01-01

    1. In temperate ecosystems, freeze-thaw events are an important environmental stress that can induce severe xylem embolism (i.e. clogging of conduits by air bubbles) in overwintering organs of trees. However, no comparative studies of different adaptive strategies among sympatric tree species for coping with winter embolism have examined the potential role of the...

  19. Ethyl acetate extract of germinated brown rice attenuates hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells: role of anti-apoptotic, pro-survival and antioxidant genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    catalase) and apoptotic (AKT, NF-Kβ, ERK1/2, JNK, p53 and p38 MAPK) genes that tended towards survival. Conclusions Taken together, the results of our study showed that the ethyl acetate extract of GBR, with high antioxidant potentials, could prevent H2O2-induced oxidative damage in SH-SY5Y cells. The potential of GBR and its neuroprotective mechanism in ameliorating oxidative stress-related cytotoxicity is therefore worth exploring further. PMID:23866310

  20. Stressed memories: How acute stress affects memory formation in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henckens, M.J.A.G.; Hermans, E.J.; Pu, Z.; Joels, M.; Fernandez, G.S.E.

    2009-01-01

    Stressful, aversive events are extremely well remembered. Such a declarative memory enhancement is evidently beneficial for survival, but the same mechanism may become maladaptive and culminate in mental diseases such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Stress hormones are known to enhance

  1. Surviving a Suicide Attempt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Al-Harrasi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Suicide is a global phenomenon in all regions of the world affecting people of all age groups. It has detrimental consequences on patients, their families, and the community as a whole. There have been numerous risk factors described for suicide including mental illness, stressful life situations, loss of social support, and general despair. The association of suicide with Islam has not been extensively studied. The common impression from clinical practice is that being a practicing Muslim reduces the risk of suicide. Another factor associated with suicide is starting a patient on antidepressants. However, this has been questioned recently. This report describes a middle-aged man with depression and multiple social stressors who survived a serious suicide attempt. The discussion will focus on the factors that lead him to want to end his life and the impact of the assumed protective factors such as religious belief and family support on this act of self-harm. Such patients can be on the edge when there is an imbalance between risk factors (such as depression, insomnia, and psychosocial stressors and protective factors (like religious affiliation and family support. All physicians are advised to assess the suicide risk thoroughly in patients with depression regardless of any presumed protective factor.

  2. Surviving a Suicide Attempt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Harrasi, Ahmed; Al Maqbali, Mandhar; Al-Sinawi, Hamed

    2016-09-01

    Suicide is a global phenomenon in all regions of the world affecting people of all age groups. It has detrimental consequences on patients, their families, and the community as a whole. There have been numerous risk factors described for suicide including mental illness, stressful life situations, loss of social support, and general despair. The association of suicide with Islam has not been extensively studied. The common impression from clinical practice is that being a practicing Muslim reduces the risk of suicide. Another factor associated with suicide is starting a patient on antidepressants. However, this has been questioned recently. This report describes a middle-aged man with depression and multiple social stressors who survived a serious suicide attempt. The discussion will focus on the factors that lead him to want to end his life and the impact of the assumed protective factors such as religious belief and family support on this act of self-harm. Such patients can be on the edge when there is an imbalance between risk factors (such as depression, insomnia, and psychosocial stressors) and protective factors (like religious affiliation and family support). All physicians are advised to assess the suicide risk thoroughly in patients with depression regardless of any presumed protective factor.

  3. Campylobacter virulence and survival factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Declan J

    2015-06-01

    Despite over 30 years of research, campylobacteriosis is the most prevalent foodborne bacterial infection in many countries including in the European Union and the United States of America. However, relatively little is known about the virulence factors in Campylobacter or how an apparently fragile organism can survive in the food chain, often with enhanced pathogenicity. This review collates information on the virulence and survival determinants including motility, chemotaxis, adhesion, invasion, multidrug resistance, bile resistance and stress response factors. It discusses their function in transition through the food processing environment and human infection. In doing so it provides a fundamental understanding of Campylobacter, critical for improved diagnosis, surveillance and control. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Surviving 1000 centuries can we do it?

    CERN Document Server

    Bonnet, Roger-Maurice

    2010-01-01

    This full color book provides a quantitative view of our civilization over the next 100,000 years. The authors present the dangers and stress the importance of taking decisions in the 21st century to ensure the long-term survival of people on Earth.

  5. Phychological Hardiness, Workplase Stress and Related Stress Reduction Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Lambert, Vickie A.; Lambert Jr., Clinton E.; Yamase, Hiroaki

    2002-01-01

    Contending with stressful situations in the workplace is a common occurrence for all health care providers. Stress has numerous devastating effects on the workplace environment, as well as upon individuals who become victims of stress. However, enhancing psychological hardiness may facilitate an individual's ability to deal with work place stress. Psychological hardiness, a personality style consisting of commitment, control and challenge, encourages human survival and the enrichment of life...

  6. Development of a freeze-stable formulation for vaccines containing aluminum salt adjuvants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, LaToya Jones; Tyagi, Anil; Perkins, Shalimar; Carpenter, John; Sylvester, David; Guy, Mark; Kristensen, Debra; Chen, Dexiang

    2009-01-01

    Vaccines containing aluminum salt adjuvants are prone to inactivation following exposure to freeze-thaw stress. Many are also prone to inactivation by heat. Thus, for maximum potency, these vaccines must be maintained at temperatures between 2 degrees C and 8 degrees C which requires the use of the cold chain. Nevertheless, the cold chain is not infallible. Vaccines are subject to freezing during both transport and storage, and frozen vaccines are discarded (under the best circumstances) or inadvertently administered despite potentially reduced potency. Here we describe an approach to minimize our reliance on the proper implementation of the cold chain to protect vaccines from freeze-thaw inactivation. By including PEG 300, propylene glycol, or glycerol in a hepatitis B vaccine, particle agglomeration, changes in the fluorescence emission spectrum--indicative of antigen tertiary structural changes--and losses of in vitro and in vivo indicators of potency were prevented following multiple exposures to -20 degrees C. The effect of propylene glycol was examined in more detail and revealed that even at concentrations too low to prevent freezing at -10 degrees C, -20 degrees C, and -80 degrees C, damage to the vaccine could be prevented. A pilot study using two commercially available diphtheria, tetanus toxoid, and acellular pertussis (DTaP) vaccines suggested that the same stabilizers might protect these vaccines from freeze-thaw agglomeration as well. It remains to be determined if preventing agglomeration of DTaP vaccines preserves their antigenic activity following freeze-thaw events.

  7. Multinationals and plant survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandick, Roger

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is twofold: first, to investigate how different ownership structures affect plant survival, and second, to analyze how the presence of foreign multinational enterprises (MNEs) affects domestic plants’ survival. Using a unique and detailed data set on the Swedish manufacturing...... sector, I am able to separate plants into those owned by foreign MNEs, domestic MNEs, exporting non-MNEs, and purely domestic firms. In line with previous findings, the result, when conditioned on other factors affecting survival, shows that foreign MNE plants have lower survival rates than non......-MNE plants. However, separating the non-MNEs into exporters and non-exporters, the result shows that foreign MNE plants have higher survival rates than non-exporting non-MNEs, while the survival rates of foreign MNE plants and exporting non-MNE plants do not seem to differ. Moreover, the simple non...

  8. Linking age, survival, and transit time distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Salvatore; Porporato, Amilcare

    2015-10-01

    Although the concepts of age, survival, and transit time have been widely used in many fields, including population dynamics, chemical engineering, and hydrology, a comprehensive mathematical framework is still missing. Here we discuss several relationships among these quantities by starting from the evolution equation for the joint distribution of age and survival, from which the equations for age and survival time readily follow. It also becomes apparent how the statistical dependence between age and survival is directly related to either the age dependence of the loss function or the survival-time dependence of the input function. The solution of the joint distribution equation also allows us to obtain the relationships between the age at exit (or death) and the survival time at input (or birth), as well as to stress the symmetries of the various distributions under time reversal. The transit time is then obtained as a sum of the age and survival time, and its properties are discussed along with the general relationships between their mean values. The special case of steady state case is analyzed in detail. Some examples, inspired by hydrologic applications, are presented to illustrate the theory with the specific results. This article was corrected on 11 Nov 2015. See the end of the full text for details.

  9. The integrated stress response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakos-Zebrucka, Karolina; Koryga, Izabela; Mnich, Katarzyna; Ljujic, Mila; Samali, Afshin; Gorman, Adrienne M

    2016-10-01

    In response to diverse stress stimuli, eukaryotic cells activate a common adaptive pathway, termed the integrated stress response (ISR), to restore cellular homeostasis. The core event in this pathway is the phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 alpha (eIF2α) by one of four members of the eIF2α kinase family, which leads to a decrease in global protein synthesis and the induction of selected genes, including the transcription factor ATF4, that together promote cellular recovery. The gene expression program activated by the ISR optimizes the cellular response to stress and is dependent on the cellular context, as well as on the nature and intensity of the stress stimuli. Although the ISR is primarily a pro-survival, homeostatic program, exposure to severe stress can drive signaling toward cell death. Here, we review current understanding of the ISR signaling and how it regulates cell fate under diverse types of stress. © 2016 The Authors.

  10. Stress and stress counselling.

    OpenAIRE

    Matheson, K. H.

    1990-01-01

    This is a report by the 1989 National Association of Clinical Tutors Wyeth Travelling Fellow to the United States of America. The stresses of postgraduate training and attempts to modify these are described, including stress counselling. The significance of stress and the relevance of the findings for postgraduate training in the United Kingdom are considered.

  11. Can community structure track sea‐level rise? Stress and competitive controls in tidal wetlands

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schile, Lisa M; Callaway, John C; Suding, Katharine N; Kelly, N. Maggi

    2017-01-01

    .... We tested the stress gradient hypothesis and examined the effect of increased inundation stress and biotic interactions on growth and survival of two congeneric wetland sedges, Schoenoplectus acutus...

  12. Childhood Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Childhood Stress KidsHealth / For Parents / Childhood Stress What's in this ... and feel stress to some degree. Sources of Stress Stress is a function of the demands placed ...

  13. Stress Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Stress management By Mayo Clinic Staff Stress basics Stress is a normal psychological and physical ... of life. Start practicing stress management techniques today. Stress relief The pace and challenges of modern life ...

  14. Network ties and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Acheampong, George; Narteh, Bedman; Rand, John

    2017-01-01

    Poultry farming has been touted as one of the major ways by which poverty can be reduced in low-income economies like Ghana. Yet, anecdotally there is a high failure rate among these poultry farms. This current study seeks to understand the relationship between network ties and survival chances...... of small commercial poultry farms (SCPFs). We utilize data from a 2-year network survey of SCPFs in rural Ghana. The survival of these poultry farms are modelled using a lagged probit model of farms that persisted from 2014 into 2015. We find that network ties are important to the survival chances...... but this probability reduces as the number of industry ties increases but moderation with dynamic capability of the firm reverses this trend. Our findings show that not all network ties aid survival and therefore small commercial poultry farmers need to be circumspect in the network ties they cultivate and develop....

  15. Aircraft Survivability: Rotorcraft Survivability. Summer 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    protect those who serve to protect us?” The answer is a mixed bag. I am fortunate to have joined a group of dedicated men and women who represent this...and Service subject matter experts on rotorcraft safety and survivability to complete the study and report the results to the Joint Chiefs of...Operations and Support CDD TEMP DT DT/OT LUT IOT &E BLRIP TEMP TEMP LRIP Acquisition & LFT Strategies B C LFT&E Review Requirements Approve TEMPs

  16. Manage Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Manage Stress Print This Topic En español Manage Stress Browse Sections The Basics Overview Signs and Health ... and Health Effects What are the signs of stress? When people are under stress, they may feel: ...

  17. Stress Incontinence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stress incontinence Overview Urinary incontinence is the unintentional loss of urine. Stress incontinence happens when physical movement or activity — such ... coughing, sneezing, running or heavy lifting — puts pressure (stress) on your bladder. Stress incontinence is not related ...

  18. Proof-Carrying Survivability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-15

    pp.289-302 ( Impact factor : 2.09). 2. Julic, J. and Zuo, Y. (2012). “An RFID Survivability Impact Model in the Military Domain”, Proc. of 18 th...Availability, Reliability and Security, 40(4), pp. 406-418 ( Impact factor : 2.016). 10. Zuo, Y. (2010). “A Holistic Approach for Specification of Security... Impact factor : 1.596). 20. Zuo, Y., Pimple, M. and Lande, S. (2009). “A Framework for RFID Survivability Requirement Analysis and Specification”, Proc

  19. Survivability via Control Objectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CAMPBELL,PHILIP L.

    2000-08-11

    Control objectives open an additional front in the survivability battle. A given set of control objectives is valuable if it represents good practices, it is complete (it covers all the necessary areas), and it is auditable. CobiT and BS 7799 are two examples of control objective sets.

  20. Artists’ Survival Rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Trine; Jensen, Søren

    2017-01-01

    The literature of cultural economics generally finds that an artistic education has no significant impact on artists’ income and careers in the arts. In our research, we have readdressed this question by looking at the artists’ survival in the arts occupations. The results show that an artistic...... education has a significant impact on artists’ careers in the arts and we find important industry differences....

  1. Education for Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldrich, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This article provides a brief overview of current approaches to education and concludes that none of these is sufficient to meet the challenges that now face the human race. It argues instead for a new concept of education for survival. (Contains 1 note.)

  2. Flexible survival regression modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortese, Giuliana; Scheike, Thomas H; Martinussen, Torben

    2009-01-01

    Regression analysis of survival data, and more generally event history data, is typically based on Cox's regression model. We here review some recent methodology, focusing on the limitations of Cox's regression model. The key limitation is that the model is not well suited to represent time-varyi...

  3. Seeds to survive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, S.P.C.

    2002-01-01

    Seeds are important for man, either as propagation material of crops or directly for the production of foods, fodder and drinks. The natural function of seeds is dispersal of its genes to successive generations. Survival mechanisms seed have evolved sometimes interfere with those preferred by

  4. Survival After Retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Clark; Youngblood, Stuart A.

    1986-01-01

    Examined survival rates after retirement in a large corporation. A regression analysis was performed to control for age, sex, job status, and type of work differences that may influence longevity. Short-term suvivors seemed to undergo a different adjustment process than long-term survivors. (Author/ABL)

  5. Treating boar sperm with cholesterol-loaded cyclodextrins or cyclodextrins prior to cryopreservation: effects on post-thaw in vitro sperm quality of sperm cryopreserved in different freezing extenders.

    OpenAIRE

    BLANCH TORRES, EVA

    2016-01-01

    [EN] Cryopreserved boar sperm is not used extensively for artificial insemination due to poor fertility rates of the sperm after freezing and thawing. The sperm membrane is damaged when cooled from body temperature to 5 ºC (cold shock), as well as during the freeze-thaw process. Increasing the cholesterol content of boar sperm membranes could increase their post-thaw survival, similarly to other species that are cold shock sensitive. Cholesterol can be easily added to sperm membranes using ch...

  6. Central effects of stress hormones in health and disease: understanding the protective and damaging effects of stress and stress mediators

    OpenAIRE

    McEwen, Bruce S.

    2008-01-01

    Stress begins in the brain and affects the brain, as well as the rest of the body. Acute stress responses promote adaptation and survival via responses of neural, cardiovascular, autonomic, immune and metabolic systems. Chronic stress can promote and exacerbate pathophysiology through the same systems that are dysregulated. The burden of chronic stress and accompanying changes in personal behaviors (smoking, eating too much, drinking, poor quality sleep; otherwise referred to as “lifestyle”) ...

  7. Neuronal responses to physiological stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kagias, Konstantinos; Nehammer, Camilla; Pocock, Roger David John

    2012-01-01

    damage during aging that results in decline and eventual death. Studies have shown that the nervous system plays a pivotal role in responding to stress. Neurons not only receive and process information from the environment but also actively respond to various stresses to promote survival. These responses...... include changes in the expression of molecules such as transcription factors and microRNAs that regulate stress resistance and adaptation. Moreover, both intrinsic and extrinsic stresses have a tremendous impact on neuronal development and maintenance with implications in many diseases. Here, we review...... the responses of neurons to various physiological stressors at the molecular and cellular level....

  8. Nuclear stress test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Persantine stress test; Thallium stress test; Stress test - nuclear; Adenosine stress test; Regadenoson stress test; CAD - nuclear stress; Coronary artery disease - nuclear stress; Angina - nuclear ...

  9. Low nitrogen stress stimulating the indole-3-acetic acid biosynthesis of Serratia sp. ZM is vital for the survival of the bacterium and its plant growth-promoting characteristic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Liming; Pei, Haiyan; Xu, Zhaohui

    2017-04-01

    Serratia sp. ZM is a plant growth-promoting (PGP) bacterial strain isolated from the rhizospheric soil of Populus euphratica in northwestern China. In this study, low nitrogen supply significantly stimulated the production of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) in Serratia sp.ZM. The inoculation of the bacterium to wheat seedlings improved plant growth compared with the uninoculated group, and the stimulating effect was more prominent under low nitrogen stress. Inactivation of the predicted key gene in the IAA biosynthesis pathway impaired IAA production and significantly hampered mutant growth in poor medium. Furthermore, the IAA-deficient mutant lost the PGP effect under either normal or low nitrogen conditions in plant experiments. This study revealed the significant impact of environmental nitrogen levels on IAA production in the PGP strain and the vital effect of IAA on resistance physiology of both the bacterium and host plant. The characteristics of Serratia sp. ZM also indicated its application potential as a biofertilizer for plants, especially those suffering from poor nitrogen soil.

  10. The CNC basic leucine zipper factor, Nrf1, is essential for cell survival in response to oxidative stress-inducing agents. Role for Nrf1 in gamma-gcs(l) and gss expression in mouse fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, M; Kan, Y W; Chan, J Y

    1999-12-24

    Nrf1 is a member of the CNC-basic leucine zipper (CNC-bZIP) family of transcription factors. CNC bZIP factors, together with small Maf proteins, bind as heterodimers to the NF-E2/AP-1 element. Similarity between the NF-E2/AP-1 element and the antioxidant response element identified in a number of promoters of genes involved in detoxification and antioxidant response raises the possibility that Nrf1 plays a role in mediating the antioxidant response element response. In this study, we exploited the availability of cells from Nrf1 knockout mice to study the role of Nrf1 transcription factor in the regulation of antioxidant gene expression and in cellular antioxidant response. Fibroblast cells derived from Nrf1 null embryos showed lower levels of glutathione and enhanced sensitivity to the toxic effects of oxidant compounds. Our results indicate that Nrf1 plays a role in the regulation of genes involved in glutathione synthesis and suggest a basis for a correspondingly low GSH concentration and reduced stress response.

  11. Surviving Sepsis Campaign

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rhodes, Andrew; Evans, Laura E; Alhazzani, Waleed

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide an update to "Surviving Sepsis Campaign Guidelines for Management of Sepsis and Septic Shock: 2012". DESIGN: A consensus committee of 55 international experts representing 25 international organizations was convened. Nominal groups were assembled at key international meetings......, and to formulate recommendations as strong or weak, or best practice statement when applicable. RESULTS: The Surviving Sepsis Guideline panel provided 93 statements on early management and resuscitation of patients with sepsis or septic shock. Overall, 32 were strong recommendations, 39 were weak recommendations...... of care have relatively weak support, evidence-based recommendations regarding the acute management of sepsis and septic shock are the foundation of improved outcomes for these critically ill patients with high mortality....

  12. Surviving Sepsis Campaign

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rhodes, Andrew; Evans, Laura E; Alhazzani, Waleed

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide an update to "Surviving Sepsis Campaign Guidelines for Management of Sepsis and Septic Shock: 2012." DESIGN: A consensus committee of 55 international experts representing 25 international organizations was convened. Nominal groups were assembled at key international meetings......, and to formulate recommendations as strong or weak, or best practice statement when applicable. RESULTS: The Surviving Sepsis Guideline panel provided 93 statements on early management and resuscitation of patients with sepsis or septic shock. Overall, 32 were strong recommendations, 39 were weak recommendations...... of care have relatively weak support, evidence-based recommendations regarding the acute management of sepsis and septic shock are the foundation of improved outcomes for these critically ill patients with high mortality....

  13. Cracking the survival code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Füllgrabe, Jens; Heldring, Nina; Hermanson, Ola; Joseph, Bertrand

    2014-01-01

    Modifications of histones, the chief protein components of the chromatin, have emerged as critical regulators of life and death. While the “apoptotic histone code” came to light a few years ago, accumulating evidence indicates that autophagy, a cell survival pathway, is also heavily regulated by histone-modifying proteins. In this review we describe the emerging “autophagic histone code” and the role of histone modifications in the cellular life vs. death decision. PMID:24429873

  14. Artillery Survivability Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    experiment mode also enables users to set their own design of experiment by manipulating an editable CSV file. The second one is a real-time mode that...renders a 3D virtual environment of a restricted battlefield where the survivability movements of an artillery company are visualized . This mode...provides detailed visualization of the simulation and enables future experimental uses of the simulation as a training tool. 14. SUBJECT TERMS

  15. The sub-lethal effects of repeated freezing in the woolly bear caterpillar Pyrrharctia isabella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Katie E; Sinclair, Brent J

    2011-04-01

    Repeated freeze-thaw cycles are common and are increasing in frequency with climate change in many temperate locations, yet understanding of their impact on freeze-tolerant insects is extremely limited. We investigated the effects of repeated freezing and thawing on the freeze-tolerant final instar caterpillars of the moth Pyrrharctia isabella (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae) by subjecting individuals to either a single sustained 35 h freeze or five 7 h freezes. Sub-lethal effects were quantified with changes in three broad groups of measures: (1) cold hardiness, (2) metabolic rate and energy reserves and (3) survival after challenge with fungal spores. Repeated freeze-thaw cycles increased mortality to almost 30% and increased tissue damage in Malpighian tubules and hemocytes. Repeated freezing increased caterpillar glycerol concentration by 0.82 mol l(-1). There were no changes in metabolic rate or energy reserves with repeated freezing. For the first time, we report increased survival after immune challenge in caterpillars after freezing and suggest that this may be linked to wounding during freezing. We suggest that little repair of freezing damage is possible in P. isabella caterpillars and repeated freeze-thaw cycles may present significant challenges to survival in this species.

  16. Survival analysis models and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Xian

    2012-01-01

    Survival analysis concerns sequential occurrences of events governed by probabilistic laws.  Recent decades have witnessed many applications of survival analysis in various disciplines. This book introduces both classic survival models and theories along with newly developed techniques. Readers will learn how to perform analysis of survival data by following numerous empirical illustrations in SAS. Survival Analysis: Models and Applications: Presents basic techniques before leading onto some of the most advanced topics in survival analysis.Assumes only a minimal knowledge of SAS whilst enablin

  17. Advanced wing design survivability testing and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, J.; Tobias, M.

    1992-01-01

    Composite wings on current operational aircraft are conservatively designed to account for stress/strain concentrations, and to assure specified damage tolerance. The technology that can lead to improved composite wing structures and associated structural efficiency is to increase design ultimate strain levels beyond their current limit of 3500 to 4000 micro-in/in to 6000 micro-in/in without sacrificing structural integrity, durability, damage tolerance, or survivability. Grumman, under the sponsorship of the Naval Air Development Center (NADC), has developed a high-strain composite wing design for a subsonic aircraft wing using novel and innovative design concepts and manufacturing methods, while maintaining a state-of-the-art fiber/resin system. The current advanced wing design effort addressed a tactical subsonic aircraft wing using previously developed, high-strain wing design concepts in conjunction with newer/emerging fiber and polymer matrix composite (PMC) materials to achieve the same goals, while reducing complexity. Two categories of advanced PMC materials were evaluated: toughened thermosets; and engineered thermoplastics. Advanced PMC materials offer the technological opportunity to take maximum advantage of improved material properties, physical characteristics, and tailorability to increase performance and survivability over current composite structure. Damage tolerance and survivability to various threats, in addition to structural integrity and durability, were key technical issues addressed during this study, and evaluated through test. This paper focuses on the live-fire testing, and the results performed to experimentally evaluate the survivability of the advanced wing design.

  18. Caregiver Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home A-Z Health Topics Caregiver stress Caregiver stress > A-Z Health Topics Caregiver fact sheet (PDF, ... receive Publications email updates Enter email Submit Caregiver stress Caregivers care for someone with an illness, injury, ...

  19. Isothermal Vitrification Methodology Development for Non-cryogenic Storage of Archival Human Sera

    OpenAIRE

    Less, Rebekah; Boylan, Kristin L M; Skubitz, Amy P.N.; Aksan, Alptekin

    2013-01-01

    Biorepositories worldwide collect human serum samples and store them for future research. Currently, hundreds of biorepositories across the world store human serum samples in refrigerators, freezers, or liquid nitrogen without following any specific cryopreservation protocol. This method of storage is both expensive and potentially detrimental to the biospecimens. To decrease both cost of storage and the freeze/thaw stresses, we explored the feasibility of storing archival human serum samples...

  20. Hydroxyurea-Induced Replication Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenza Lahkim Bennani-Belhaj

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Bloom's syndrome (BS displays one of the strongest known correlations between chromosomal instability and a high risk of cancer at an early age. BS cells combine a reduced average fork velocity with constitutive endogenous replication stress. However, the response of BS cells to replication stress induced by hydroxyurea (HU, which strongly slows the progression of replication forks, remains unclear due to publication of conflicting results. Using two different cellular models of BS, we showed that BLM deficiency is not associated with sensitivity to HU, in terms of clonogenic survival, DSB generation, and SCE induction. We suggest that surviving BLM-deficient cells are selected on the basis of their ability to deal with an endogenous replication stress induced by replication fork slowing, resulting in insensitivity to HU-induced replication stress.

  1. Applied survival analysis using R

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, Dirk F

    2016-01-01

    Applied Survival Analysis Using R covers the main principles of survival analysis, gives examples of how it is applied, and teaches how to put those principles to use to analyze data using R as a vehicle. Survival data, where the primary outcome is time to a specific event, arise in many areas of biomedical research, including clinical trials, epidemiological studies, and studies of animals. Many survival methods are extensions of techniques used in linear regression and categorical data, while other aspects of this field are unique to survival data. This text employs numerous actual examples to illustrate survival curve estimation, comparison of survivals of different groups, proper accounting for censoring and truncation, model variable selection, and residual analysis. Because explaining survival analysis requires more advanced mathematics than many other statistical topics, this book is organized with basic concepts and most frequently used procedures covered in earlier chapters, with more advanced topics...

  2. Liquid Water Restricts Habitability in Extreme Deserts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockell, Charles S; Brown, Sarah; Landenmark, Hanna; Samuels, Toby; Siddall, Rebecca; Wadsworth, Jennifer

    2017-04-01

    Liquid water is a requirement for biochemistry, yet under some circumstances it is deleterious to life. Here, we show that liquid water reduces the upper temperature survival limit for two extremophilic photosynthetic microorganisms (Gloeocapsa and Chroococcidiopsis spp.) by greater than 40°C under hydrated conditions compared to desiccated conditions. Under hydrated conditions, thermal stress causes protein inactivation as shown by the fluorescein diacetate assay. The presence of water was also found to enhance the deleterious effects of freeze-thaw in Chroococcidiopsis sp. In the presence of water, short-wavelength UV radiation more effectively kills Gloeocapsa sp. colonies, which we hypothesize is caused by factors including the greater penetration of UV radiation into hydrated colonies compared to desiccated colonies. The data predict that deserts where maximum thermal stress or irradiation occurs in conjunction with the presence of liquid water may be less habitable to some organisms than more extreme arid deserts where organisms can dehydrate prior to being exposed to these extremes, thus minimizing thermal and radiation damage. Life in extreme deserts is poised between the deleterious effects of the presence and the lack of liquid water. Key Words: Deserts-Extremophiles-Stress-High temperatures-UV radiation-Desiccation. Astrobiology 17, 309-318.

  3. Survival after blood transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads; Ahlgren, Martin; Rostgaard, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    of transfusion recipients in Denmark and Sweden followed for up to 20 years after their first blood transfusion. Main outcome measure was all-cause mortality. RESULTS: A total of 1,118,261 transfusion recipients were identified, of whom 62.0 percent were aged 65 years or older at the time of their first...... the SMR remained significantly 1.3-fold increased. CONCLUSION: The survival and relative mortality patterns among blood transfusion recipients were characterized with unprecedented detail and precision. Our results are relevant to assessments of the consequences of possible transfusion-transmitted disease...... as well as for cost-benefit estimation of new blood safety interventions....

  4. Nuclear War Survival Skills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kearny, C.H.

    2002-06-24

    The purpose of this book is to provide Americans with information and instructions that will significantly increase their chances of surviving a possible nuclear attack. It brings together field-tested instructions that, if followed by a large fraction of Americans during a crisis that preceded an attack, could save millions of lives. The author is convinced that the vulnerability of our country to nuclear threat or attack must be reduced and that the wide dissemination of the information contained in this book would help achieve that objective of our overall defense strategy.

  5. Design of survivable networks

    CERN Document Server

    Stoer, Mechthild

    1992-01-01

    The problem of designing a cost-efficient network that survives the failure of one or more nodes or edges of the network is critical to modern telecommunications engineering. The method developed in this book is designed to solve such problems to optimality. In particular, a cutting plane approach is described, based on polyhedral combinatorics, that is ableto solve real-world problems of this type in short computation time. These results are of interest for practitioners in the area of communication network design. The book is addressed especially to the combinatorial optimization community, but also to those who want to learn polyhedral methods. In addition, interesting new research problemsare formulated.

  6. OXIDATIVE STRESS, STRESS PROTEINSAND ANTIOXIDANTS IN EXERCISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Ranković

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Exercise appears to increase reactive oxygen species (ROS, which can result in damage to cells. Potential sources of ROS in skeletal muscle fibers during exercise include the mitochondrial respiratory chain, xantine oxidase production of superoxide, enzymatic arachidonic acid oxygenation, nitric oxide synthesis, catecholamine oxidation, and neutrophil-induced oxidative burts. Stress proteins (SPs represent one of the general molecular protective mechanisms that enable cell and whole organisms to survive stress. The exact relationship between exercise, ROS and SPs remains unclear. Antioxidant supplements have been touted by manufacturers as a means for athletes to perform better, recover more quickly and fully from endurance exercise, or allow them to train more strenuously. At present, data are insufficient to recommend antioxidant supplements for athletes or other persons who exercise regularly. However, no one questions the importance of ingesting a diet rich in antioxidants for all who exercise and train regularly.

  7. Concentration Dependent Actions of Glucocorticoids on Neuronal Viability and Survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ábrahám, István M.; Meerlo, Peter; Luiten, Paul G.M.

    2006-01-01

    A growing body of evidence based on experimental data demonstrates that glucocorticoids (GCs) can play a potent role in the survival and death of neurons. However, these observations reflect paradoxical features of GCs, since these adrenal stress hormones are heavily involved in both