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Sample records for survival hazard ratio

  1. Empirical likelihood for cumulative hazard ratio estimation with covariate adjustment.

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    Dong, Bin; Matthews, David E

    2012-06-01

    In medical studies, it is often of scientific interest to evaluate the treatment effect via the ratio of cumulative hazards, especially when those hazards may be nonproportional. To deal with nonproportionality in the Cox regression model, investigators usually assume that the treatment effect has some functional form. However, to do so may create a model misspecification problem because it is generally difficult to justify the specific parametric form chosen for the treatment effect. In this article, we employ empirical likelihood (EL) to develop a nonparametric estimator of the cumulative hazard ratio with covariate adjustment under two nonproportional hazard models, one that is stratified, as well as a less restrictive framework involving group-specific treatment adjustment. The asymptotic properties of the EL ratio statistic are derived in each situation and the finite-sample properties of EL-based estimators are assessed via simulation studies. Simultaneous confidence bands for all values of the adjusted cumulative hazard ratio in a fixed interval of interest are also developed. The proposed methods are illustrated using two different datasets concerning the survival experience of patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma or ovarian cancer. © 2011, The International Biometric Society.

  2. Impact of donor-to-recipient weight ratio on survival after bilateral lung transplantation.

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    Delom, F; Danner-Boucher, I; Dromer, C; Thumerel, M; Marthan, R; Nourry-Lecaplain, L; Magnan, A; Jougon, J; Fessart, D

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between donor-to-recipient weight ratio and post-transplantation survival. From February 1988 to November 2006, 255 adult bilateral lung transplantation patients from 2 different centers were retrospectively analyzed. The cohort was divided into 4 groups depending on the quartile ranges of the donor-to-recipient weight ratio. A time-to-event analysis was performed for risk of death after transplantation conditional on 5-year survival using Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards models. The mean weight ratio for the study cohort was 1.23 ± 0.39. For all lung transplant recipients during the study period, survival rate at 5 years was 58%. Median survival was 6.3 years in the cohort subgroup with weight ratio ratio >1.23. Weight ratio >1.23 recipients had a significant survival advantage out to 5 years compared with weight ratio ratio. Weight ratio strata affected overall survival, with quartile 1 (lower weight ratio recipients) experiencing the lowest 5-year survival (39.1%), followed by quartile 2 (57.8%), quartile 4 (68.2%), and quartile 3 (70.3%) recipients. The effect of weight ratio strata on survival was statistically significant for the quartile 1 recipients (lower quartile) as compared with the 3 other quartiles. Our findings show a statistically significant effect of donor-to-recipient weight ratios on bilateral lung transplantation survival. A higher donor-to-recipient weight ratio was associated with improved survival after bilateral lung transplantation and likely reflects a mismatch between a relatively overweight donor vs recipient. In contrast, a lower donor-to-recipient ratio was associated with increased mortality after bilateral lung transplantation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Network meta-analysis on the log-hazard scale, combining count and hazard ratio statistics accounting for multi-arm trials: A tutorial

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    Hawkins Neil

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Data on survival endpoints are usually summarised using either hazard ratio, cumulative number of events, or median survival statistics. Network meta-analysis, an extension of traditional pairwise meta-analysis, is typically based on a single statistic. In this case, studies which do not report the chosen statistic are excluded from the analysis which may introduce bias. Methods In this paper we present a tutorial illustrating how network meta-analyses of survival endpoints can combine count and hazard ratio statistics in a single analysis on the hazard ratio scale. We also describe methods for accounting for the correlations in relative treatment effects (such as hazard ratios that arise in trials with more than two arms. Combination of count and hazard ratio data in a single analysis is achieved by estimating the cumulative hazard for each trial arm reporting count data. Correlation in relative treatment effects in multi-arm trials is preserved by converting the relative treatment effect estimates (the hazard ratios to arm-specific outcomes (hazards. Results A worked example of an analysis of mortality data in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is used to illustrate the methods. The data set and WinBUGS code for fixed and random effects models are provided. Conclusions By incorporating all data presentations in a single analysis, we avoid the potential selection bias associated with conducting an analysis for a single statistic and the potential difficulties of interpretation, misleading results and loss of available treatment comparisons associated with conducting separate analyses for different summary statistics.

  4. Cumulative Hazard Ratio Estimation for Treatment Regimes in Sequentially Randomized Clinical Trials.

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    Tang, Xinyu; Wahed, Abdus S

    2015-05-01

    The proportional hazards model is widely used in survival analysis to allow adjustment for baseline covariates. The proportional hazard assumption may not be valid for treatment regimes that depend on intermediate responses to prior treatments received, and it is not clear how such a model can be adapted to clinical trials employing more than one randomization. Besides, since treatment is modified post-baseline, the hazards are unlikely to be proportional across treatment regimes. Although Lokhnygina and Helterbrand (Biometrics 63: 422-428, 2007) introduced the Cox regression method for two-stage randomization designs, their method can only be applied to test the equality of two treatment regimes that share the same maintenance therapy. Moreover, their method does not allow auxiliary variables to be included in the model nor does it account for treatment effects that are not constant over time. In this article, we propose a model that assumes proportionality across covariates within each treatment regime but not across treatment regimes. Comparisons among treatment regimes are performed by testing the log ratio of the estimated cumulative hazards. The ratio of the cumulative hazard across treatment regimes is estimated using a weighted Breslow-type statistic. A simulation study was conducted to evaluate the performance of the estimators and proposed tests.

  5. Hazard ratio estimation for biomarker-calibrated dietary exposures.

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    Shaw, Pamela A; Prentice, Ross L

    2012-06-01

    Uncertainty concerning the measurement error properties of self-reported diet has important implications for the reliability of nutritional epidemiology reports. Biomarkers based on the urinary recovery of expended nutrients can provide an objective measure of short-term nutrient consumption for certain nutrients and, when applied to a subset of a study cohort, can be used to calibrate corresponding self-report nutrient consumption assessments. A nonstandard measurement error model that makes provision for systematic error and subject-specific error, along with the usual independent random error, is needed for the self-report data. Three estimation procedures for hazard ratio (Cox model) parameters are extended for application to this more complex measurement error structure. These procedures are risk set regression calibration, conditional score, and nonparametric corrected score. An estimator for the cumulative baseline hazard function is also provided. The performance of each method is assessed in a simulation study. The methods are then applied to an example from the Women's Health Initiative Dietary Modification Trial. © 2011, The International Biometric Society.

  6. On confidence intervals for the hazard ratio in randomized clinical trials.

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    Lin, Dan-Yu; Dai, Luyan; Cheng, Gang; Sailer, Martin Oliver

    2016-12-01

    The log-rank test is widely used to compare two survival distributions in a randomized clinical trial, while partial likelihood (Cox, 1975) is the method of choice for making inference about the hazard ratio under the Cox (1972) proportional hazards model. The Wald 95% confidence interval of the hazard ratio may include the null value of 1 when the p-value of the log-rank test is less than 0.05. Peto et al. (1977) provided an estimator for the hazard ratio based on the log-rank statistic; the corresponding 95% confidence interval excludes the null value of 1 if and only if the p-value of the log-rank test is less than 0.05. However, Peto's estimator is not consistent, and the corresponding confidence interval does not have correct coverage probability. In this article, we construct the confidence interval by inverting the score test under the (possibly stratified) Cox model, and we modify the variance estimator such that the resulting score test for the null hypothesis of no treatment difference is identical to the log-rank test in the possible presence of ties. Like Peto's method, the proposed confidence interval excludes the null value if and only if the log-rank test is significant. Unlike Peto's method, however, this interval has correct coverage probability. An added benefit of the proposed confidence interval is that it tends to be more accurate and narrower than the Wald confidence interval. We demonstrate the advantages of the proposed method through extensive simulation studies and a colon cancer study. © 2016, The International Biometric Society.

  7. [Effect of different plant growth regulators on transplanting survival ratio of Haloxylon ammodendron seedling and parasitic ratio of Cistanche deserticola].

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    Li, Xia; Ma, Yong-qing; Song, Yu-xia; Shui, Jun-feng; Li, Xiu-wei

    2009-11-01

    To study the effect of different plant growth regulators on the transplanting survival ratio of Haloxylon ammodendron seedlings and parasitic ratio of Cistanche deserticola. Different combinations of PDJ and rooting powder were used for rooting soaking with Haloxylon ammodendron seedlings, then the survival ratio of Haloxylon ammodendron and parasitic conditions of Cistanche deserticola were statistical analyzed by SAS software. PDJ had promotable effect on the inoculating survival ratio of Haloxylon ammodendron and the parasitic ratio, parasitic number and size of Cistanche deserticola, but had no significant effect on the transplanting survival ratio. High concentration of PDJ (1 x 10(-5) mol/L) and rooting powder treatment improved the inoculation survival ratio, and low concentration of PDJ (1 x 10(6) mol/L) treatment improved the parasitic ratio of Cistanche deserticola, but PDJ with rooting powder treatment had inhibitive effect on the parasitism of Cistanche deserticola. Principal component analysis showed that the transplanting survival ratio, inoculating survival ratio, parasitic ratio and the parasited number of Cistanche deserticola could be taken to evaluate the effect of different plant growth regulators, and the comprehensive effect was the best with PDJ treatment. Rooting soaking with PDJ can be used to improve the survival ratio of Haloxylon ammodendron seedling and parasitic ratio of Cistanche deserticola.

  8. Can metastatic lymph node ratio (LNR) predict survival in oral cavity cancer patients?

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    Sayed, Suhail I; Sharma, Shilpi; Rane, Pawan; Vaishampayan, Sagar; Talole, Sanjay; Chaturvedi, Pankaj; Chaukar, Devendra; Deshmukh, Anuja; Agarwal, Jai Prakash; D'cruz, Anil K

    2013-09-01

    To evaluate the prognostic role of the lymph node ratio (LNR; ratio of total positive nodes to total dissected nodes) in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) as compared to pN staging with an aim to provide an optimal cut-off value. 1,408 OSCC previously untreated patients who underwent treatment (surgery + neck dissection + adjuvant treatment). LNR sensitivity with respect to survival was calculated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and Cox regression method. LNR and TNM staging variables were subjected to multivariate analysis. LNR (0.088) showed significant association with survival outcomes. For patients with LNR ≤0.088, the OS, DFS, local control, regional control and distant metastasis rates were 64%, 70%, and 89%; for LNR >0.088 it was 22%, 19%, and 52%, respectively (P analysis LNR of 0.088 was seen to be an independent prognostic factor for 5-year regional control (p, hazard ratio [95% confidence interval]; 0.044, 2.016 (1.019-3.990), DFS, 0.032, 1.858 (1.054-3.276), and OS, 0.040, 1.195 (1.033-1.144). On multivariate analysis LNR categorization showed a statistically significant [0.032, 1.858, (1.054-3.276)] advantage over pN staging [0.527, 1.208 (1.054-3.276)] in predicting survival. LNR is a better prognostic marker than the current N staging of TNM classification. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Novel head and neck cancer survival analysis approach: random survival forests versus Cox proportional hazards regression.

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    Datema, Frank R; Moya, Ana; Krause, Peter; Bäck, Thomas; Willmes, Lars; Langeveld, Ton; Baatenburg de Jong, Robert J; Blom, Henk M

    2012-01-01

    Electronic patient files generate an enormous amount of medical data. These data can be used for research, such as prognostic modeling. Automatization of statistical prognostication processes allows automatic updating of models when new data is gathered. The increase of power behind an automated prognostic model makes its predictive capability more reliable. Cox proportional hazard regression is most frequently used in prognostication. Automatization of a Cox model is possible, but we expect the updating process to be time-consuming. A possible solution lies in an alternative modeling technique called random survival forests (RSFs). RSF is easily automated and is known to handle the proportionality assumption coherently and automatically. Performance of RSF has not yet been tested on a large head and neck oncological dataset. This study investigates performance of head and neck overall survival of RSF models. Performances are compared to a Cox model as the "gold standard." RSF might be an interesting alternative modeling approach for automatization when performances are similar. RSF models were created in R (Cox also in SPSS). Four RSF splitting rules were used: log-rank, conservation of events, log-rank score, and log-rank approximation. Models were based on historical data of 1371 patients with primary head-and-neck cancer, diagnosed between 1981 and 1998. Models contain 8 covariates: tumor site, T classification, N classification, M classification, age, sex, prior malignancies, and comorbidity. Model performances were determined by Harrell's concordance error rate, in which 33% of the original data served as a validation sample. RSF and Cox models delivered similar error rates. The Cox model performed slightly better (error rate, 0.2826). The log-rank splitting approach gave the best RSF performance (error rate, 0.2873). In accord with Cox and RSF models, high T classification, high N classification, and severe comorbidity are very important covariates in the

  10. Preoperative lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio predicts survival in primary hepatitis B-virus positive hepatocellular carcinoma after curative resection

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    Li G

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Guang-Jun Li,1 Juan-Juan Ji,2 Fang Yang,2 Hong-Wei Xu,1 Yu Bai3 1First Department of General Surgery, 2Department of Gastroenterology, 3Department of Pathology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xin-Xiang Medical University, Henan, People’s Republic of China Background: Both inflammation and immunity are associated with the development of malignancy. The lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio (LMR has been confirmed as a prognostic factor for several malignant diseases. The purpose of our study was to analyze prognostic significance of preoperative LMR in hepatitis B virus (HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma after curative resection. Patients and methods: A total of 253 patients with primary HBV-positive hepatocellular carcinoma who underwent a curative operation were enrolled in this retrospective study. The relationship between preoperative LMR and survival outcomes was analyzed through Kaplan–Meier curves and multivariate Cox regression analyses. Results: Patients with a high LMR had a significantly higher mean overall survival than those with a low LMR (67 months vs 55 months, P=0.023, and high LMR remained significant for longer survival in the multivariate analysis (hazard ratio, 0.147; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.085–0.253; P=0.021. Furthermore, patients with a high LMR also had a higher median recurrence-free survival than those with a low LMR in univariate analyses (60 months vs 48 months, P=0.026 and multivariate analyses (hazard ratio, 0.317; 95% CI: 0.042–1.023; P=0.032. However, the survival benefit was limited to patients with advanced cancer. Conclusion: LMR was confirmed as an independent prognostic biomarker for primary HBV-positive hepatocellular carcinoma after curative resection. Keywords: lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio, survival, HBV, hepatocellular carcinoma

  11. Complete hazard ranking to analyze right-censored data: An ALS survival study.

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    Huang, Zhengnan; Zhang, Hongjiu; Boss, Jonathan; Goutman, Stephen A; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Dinov, Ivo D; Guan, Yuanfang

    2017-12-01

    Survival analysis represents an important outcome measure in clinical research and clinical trials; further, survival ranking may offer additional advantages in clinical trials. In this study, we developed GuanRank, a non-parametric ranking-based technique to transform patients' survival data into a linear space of hazard ranks. The transformation enables the utilization of machine learning base-learners including Gaussian process regression, Lasso, and random forest on survival data. The method was submitted to the DREAM Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) Stratification Challenge. Ranked first place, the model gave more accurate ranking predictions on the PRO-ACT ALS dataset in comparison to Cox proportional hazard model. By utilizing right-censored data in its training process, the method demonstrated its state-of-the-art predictive power in ALS survival ranking. Its feature selection identified multiple important factors, some of which conflicts with previous studies.

  12. Complete hazard ranking to analyze right-censored data: An ALS survival study.

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    Zhengnan Huang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Survival analysis represents an important outcome measure in clinical research and clinical trials; further, survival ranking may offer additional advantages in clinical trials. In this study, we developed GuanRank, a non-parametric ranking-based technique to transform patients' survival data into a linear space of hazard ranks. The transformation enables the utilization of machine learning base-learners including Gaussian process regression, Lasso, and random forest on survival data. The method was submitted to the DREAM Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS Stratification Challenge. Ranked first place, the model gave more accurate ranking predictions on the PRO-ACT ALS dataset in comparison to Cox proportional hazard model. By utilizing right-censored data in its training process, the method demonstrated its state-of-the-art predictive power in ALS survival ranking. Its feature selection identified multiple important factors, some of which conflicts with previous studies.

  13. Analysis of error-prone survival data under additive hazards models: measurement error effects and adjustments.

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    Yan, Ying; Yi, Grace Y

    2016-07-01

    Covariate measurement error occurs commonly in survival analysis. Under the proportional hazards model, measurement error effects have been well studied, and various inference methods have been developed to correct for error effects under such a model. In contrast, error-contaminated survival data under the additive hazards model have received relatively less attention. In this paper, we investigate this problem by exploring measurement error effects on parameter estimation and the change of the hazard function. New insights of measurement error effects are revealed, as opposed to well-documented results for the Cox proportional hazards model. We propose a class of bias correction estimators that embraces certain existing estimators as special cases. In addition, we exploit the regression calibration method to reduce measurement error effects. Theoretical results for the developed methods are established, and numerical assessments are conducted to illustrate the finite sample performance of our methods.

  14. smoothHR: An R Package for Pointwise Nonparametric Estimation of Hazard Ratio Curves of Continuous Predictors

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    Meira-Machado, Luís; Cadarso-Suárez, Carmen; Gude, Francisco; Araújo, Artur

    2013-01-01

    The Cox proportional hazards regression model has become the traditional choice for modeling survival data in medical studies. To introduce flexibility into the Cox model, several smoothing methods may be applied, and approaches based on splines are the most frequently considered in this context. To better understand the effects that each continuous covariate has on the outcome, results can be expressed in terms of splines-based hazard ratio (HR) curves, taking a specific covariate value as reference. Despite the potential advantages of using spline smoothing methods in survival analysis, there is currently no analytical method in the R software to choose the optimal degrees of freedom in multivariable Cox models (with two or more nonlinear covariate effects). This paper describes an R package, called smoothHR, that allows the computation of pointwise estimates of the HRs—and their corresponding confidence limits—of continuous predictors introduced nonlinearly. In addition the package provides functions for choosing automatically the degrees of freedom in multivariable Cox models. The package is available from the R homepage. We illustrate the use of the key functions of the smoothHR package using data from a study on breast cancer and data on acute coronary syndrome, from Galicia, Spain. PMID:24454541

  15. Flash Flood Hazard Susceptibility Mapping Using Frequency Ratio and Statistical Index Methods in Coalmine Subsidence Areas

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    Chen Cao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study focused on producing flash flood hazard susceptibility maps (FFHSM using frequency ratio (FR and statistical index (SI models in the Xiqu Gully (XQG of Beijing, China. First, a total of 85 flash flood hazard locations (n = 85 were surveyed in the field and plotted using geographic information system (GIS software. Based on the flash flood hazard locations, a flood hazard inventory map was built. Seventy percent (n = 60 of the flooding hazard locations were randomly selected for building the models. The remaining 30% (n = 25 of the flooded hazard locations were used for validation. Considering that the XQG used to be a coal mining area, coalmine caves and subsidence caused by coal mining exist in this catchment, as well as many ground fissures. Thus, this study took the subsidence risk level into consideration for FFHSM. The ten conditioning parameters were elevation, slope, curvature, land use, geology, soil texture, subsidence risk area, stream power index (SPI, topographic wetness index (TWI, and short-term heavy rain. This study also tested different classification schemes for the values for each conditional parameter and checked their impacts on the results. The accuracy of the FFHSM was validated using area under the curve (AUC analysis. Classification accuracies were 86.61%, 83.35%, and 78.52% using frequency ratio (FR-natural breaks, statistical index (SI-natural breaks and FR-manual classification schemes, respectively. Associated prediction accuracies were 83.69%, 81.22%, and 74.23%, respectively. It was found that FR modeling using a natural breaks classification method was more appropriate for generating FFHSM for the Xiqu Gully.

  16. Increased neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio after neoadjuvant therapy is associated with worse survival after resection of borderline resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

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    Glazer, Evan S; Rashid, Omar M; Pimiento, Jose M; Hodul, Pamela J; Malafa, Mokenge P

    2016-11-01

    The neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (neutrophil count divided by lymphocyte count) is a marker of inflammation associated with poor cancer outcomes. The role of neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio in borderline resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is unknown. We hypothesized that increased neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio in patients with borderline resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma after neoadjuvant therapy is inversely associated with survival. We used our borderline resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma database to identify patients who had completed neoadjuvant therapy and underwent resection. The neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio difference was calculated as the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio after neoadjuvant therapy minus the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio before neoadjuvant therapy. Patients were assigned to the increased neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio cohort if the difference was ≥2.5 units; all others were assigned to the stable neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio cohort. Statistical analyses were performed with t test and regression. Of 62 patients identified, 43 were assigned to the stable neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio cohort, and 19 to the increased neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio cohort. There were no differences in stage, age, or sex. The preneoadjuvant neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio was 3.1 ± 2.4, whereas the postneoadjuvant neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio was 4.4 ± 3.5 (P = .002). Overall survival was worse in the increased neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio cohort compared with the stable neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio cohort (P = .009) with a Cox hazard ratio of 2.9 (P = .02). N0 disease conferred a survival advantage over N1 disease (Cox hazard ratio = 0.3, P = .01). On multivariate Cox hazard regression analysis, both increased neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio and N1 stage were associated with worse survival (P ratio in patients with borderline resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. These findings support exploring

  17. Randomization-based adjustment of multiple treatment hazard ratios for covariates with missing data.

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    Lam, Diana; Koch, Gary G; Preisser, John S; Saville, Benjamin R; Hussey, Michael A

    2017-01-01

    Clinical trials are designed to compare treatment effects when applied to samples from the same population. Randomization is used so that the samples are not biased with respect to baseline covariates that may influence the efficacy of the treatment. We develop randomization-based covariance adjustment methodology to estimate the log hazard ratios and their confidence intervals of multiple treatments in a randomized clinical trial with time-to-event outcomes and missingness among the baseline covariates. The randomization-based covariance adjustment method is a computationally straight-forward method for handling missing baseline covariate values.

  18. Relative rates not relative risks: addressing a widespread misinterpretation of hazard ratios.

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    Sutradhar, Rinku; Austin, Peter C

    2017-11-07

    The use of the Cox proportional hazards model is ubiquitous in modern medical research. Despite the widespread implementation of this model, the terminology and interpretation that is used to describe the estimate hazard ratio (HR) has become loose and, unfortunately, often incorrect. Although some journals offer guidelines that advise against reporting HRs as relative risks, these guidelines are frequently overlooked. Perhaps due to a lack of understanding, authors continue to interpret the resultant HR as a relative risk-such an interpretation is inappropriate and can be misleading. The HR should be described as a relative rate, not as a relative risk. This article demonstrates that although the direction of the HR can be used to explain the direction of the relative risk, the magnitude of the HR alone cannot be used to explain the magnitude of the relative risk. This article clarifies the relationship between HRs and relative risks in a way that may be better suited for the applied clinical researcher. We also provide a convenient table illustrating the magnitude of relative risk under various values of the HR; the table demonstrates that for a given constant HR, the magnitude of the relative risk can vary substantially. As a take-home message, authors should refrain from using the magnitude of the HR to describe the magnitude of the relative risk. Authors should be strongly encouraged to ascribe accurate interpretations to the statistics derived from fitted Cox proportional hazards regression models. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Sex ratio estimation and survival analysis for Orthetrum coerulescens (Odonata, Libellulidae)

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    Kery, M.; Juillerat, L.

    2004-01-01

    There is controversy over whether uneven sex ratios observed in mature dragonfly populations are a mere artifact resulting from the higher observability of males. Previous studies have at best made indirect inference about sex ratios by analysis of survival or recapture rates. Here, we obtain direct estimates of sex ratio from capture?recapture data based on the Cormack?Jolly?Seber model. We studied Orthetrum coerulescens (Fabricius, 1798) at three sites in the Swiss Jura Mountains over an entire activity period. Recapture rates per 5-day interval were 3.5 times greater for males (0.67, SE 0.02) than for females (0.19, SE 0.02). At two sites, recapture rate increased over the season for males and was constant for females, and at one site it decreased with precipitation for both sexes. In addition, recapture rate was higher with higher temperature for males only. We found no evidence for higher male survival rates in any population. Survival per 5-day interval for both sexes was estimated to be 0.77 (95% CI 0.75?0.79) without significant site or time-specific variation. There were clear effects of temperature (positive) and precipitation (negative) on survival rate at two sites. Direct estimates of sex ratios were not significantly different from 1 for any time interval. Hence, the observed male-biased sex ratio in adult O. coerulescens was an artifact resulting from the better observability of males. The method presented in this paper is applicable to sex ratio estimation in any kind of animal.

  20. Emergence of interest groups on hazardous waste siting: how do they form and survive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, R.G.; Payne, B.A.

    1985-10-30

    This paper discusses the two components of the facilitative setting that are important for group formation. The first component, the ideological component, provides the basic ideas that are adopted by the emerging group. The ideological setting for group formation is produced by such things as antinuclear news coverage and concentration of news stories on hazardous waste problems, on ideas concerning the credibility of the federal government, and on the pervasivensee of ideas about general environmental problems. The organizational component of the facilitative setting provides such things as leadership ability, flexible time, resources, and experience. These are important for providing people, organization, and money to achieve group goals. By and large, the conditions conducive to group formation, growth, and survival are outside the control of decision-makers. Agencies and project sponsors are currently caught in a paradox. Actively involving the public in the decision-making process tends to contribute to the growth and survival of various interest groups. Not involving the public means damage to credibility and conflict with values concerning participatory democracy. Resolution in this area can only be achieved when a comprehensive, coordinated national approach to hazardous waste management emerges. 26 refs.

  1. Using H/V spectral ratios to constrain 1-D subsurface models for seismic hazard assessment

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    Shapira, A.; Zaslavsky, Y.

    2003-04-01

    In recent years, considerable research has been focused on establishing reliable methods to predict earthquake ground motions for seismic hazard assessment. The seismic motions are significantly affected by the soil layers at the site and by the impedance ratio between surficial and underlying deposits. These yield frequency selective amplification effects that are important parameters in the process of earthquake resistance design of buildings and in the process of preparing earthquake damage scenarios. Numerical methods for estimating site effects require modeling of the subsurface, primarily shear-wave velocities of the sedimentary layers and underlying rock and thickness of each layer. In many cases, it is difficult to construct such models by only using conventional geophysical methods and borehole information, especially with regard to the deeper sediments. We have encountered such difficulties at several sites for bridge design in Israel, located along or near the seismically active Dead Sea transform. There, and in many other places we found it very useful to constrain the subsurface models by considering site response functions evaluated by using the H/V spectral ratio techniques. A number of bridge construction sites where instrumented with three-component seismometers. We evaluated the empirical site response function from H/V spectral rations of weak motions from local and regional earthquakes and measurements of ambient noise. The average spectral ratio estimated for soil sites showed amplification factor up to 5 in the frequency range of 0.4 to 0.8 Hz. Regional geology data, S-wave refraction surveys in different areas for similar geological units and borehole information were used to construct 1D subsurface model for each site from which an analytical site response function is calculated. The uncertainty associated with the proposed subsurface model models yield a too high variability between the analytical site response functions. Hence, we found it

  2. Mediation Analysis with Survival Outcomes: Accelerated Failure Time Versus Proportional Hazards Models

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    Lois A Gelfand

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Survival time is an important type of outcome variable in treatment research. Currently, limited guidance is available regarding performing mediation analyses with survival outcomes, which generally do not have normally distributed errors, and contain unobserved (censored events. We present considerations for choosing an approach, using a comparison of semi-parametric proportional hazards (PH and fully parametric accelerated failure time (AFT approaches for illustration.Method: We compare PH and AFT models and procedures in their integration into mediation models and review their ability to produce coefficients that estimate causal effects. Using simulation studies modeling Weibull-distributed survival times, we compare statistical properties of mediation analyses incorporating PH and AFT approaches (employing SAS procedures PHREG and LIFEREG, respectively under varied data conditions, some including censoring. A simulated data set illustrates the findings.Results: AFT models integrate more easily than PH models into mediation models. Furthermore, mediation analyses incorporating LIFEREG produce coefficients that can estimate causal effects, and demonstrate superior statistical properties. Censoring introduces bias in the coefficient estimate representing the treatment effect on outcome – underestimation in LIFEREG, and overestimation in PHREG. With LIFEREG, this bias can be addressed using an alternative estimate obtained from combining other coefficients, whereas this is not possible with PHREG.Conclusions: When Weibull assumptions are not violated, there are compelling advantages to using LIFEREG over PHREG for mediation analyses involving survival-time outcomes. Irrespective of the procedures used, the interpretation of coefficients, effects of censoring on coefficient estimates, and statistical properties should be taken into account when reporting results.

  3. Estimation of direct effects for survival data by using the Aalen additive hazards model

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    Martinussen, T.; Vansteelandt, S.; Gerster, M.

    2011-01-01

    We extend the definition of the controlled direct effect of a point exposure on a survival outcome, other than through some given, time-fixed intermediate variable, to the additive hazard scale. We propose two-stage estimators for this effect when the exposure is dichotomous and randomly assigned...... Aalen's additive regression for the event time, given exposure, intermediate variable and confounders. The second stage involves applying Aalen's additive model, given the exposure alone, to a modified stochastic process (i.e. a modification of the observed counting process based on the first......-stage estimates). We give the large sample properties of the estimator proposed and investigate its small sample properties by Monte Carlo simulation. A real data example is provided for illustration....

  4. Survival prediction based on compound covariate under Cox proportional hazard models.

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    Takeshi Emura

    Full Text Available Survival prediction from a large number of covariates is a current focus of statistical and medical research. In this paper, we study a methodology known as the compound covariate prediction performed under univariate Cox proportional hazard models. We demonstrate via simulations and real data analysis that the compound covariate method generally competes well with ridge regression and Lasso methods, both already well-studied methods for predicting survival outcomes with a large number of covariates. Furthermore, we develop a refinement of the compound covariate method by incorporating likelihood information from multivariate Cox models. The new proposal is an adaptive method that borrows information contained in both the univariate and multivariate Cox regression estimators. We show that the new proposal has a theoretical justification from a statistical large sample theory and is naturally interpreted as a shrinkage-type estimator, a popular class of estimators in statistical literature. Two datasets, the primary biliary cirrhosis of the liver data and the non-small-cell lung cancer data, are used for illustration. The proposed method is implemented in R package "compound.Cox" available in CRAN at http://cran.r-project.org/.

  5. A flexible alternative to the Cox proportional hazards model for assessing the prognostic accuracy of hospice patient survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branko Miladinovic

    Full Text Available Prognostic models are often used to estimate the length of patient survival. The Cox proportional hazards model has traditionally been applied to assess the accuracy of prognostic models. However, it may be suboptimal due to the inflexibility to model the baseline survival function and when the proportional hazards assumption is violated. The aim of this study was to use internal validation to compare the predictive power of a flexible Royston-Parmar family of survival functions with the Cox proportional hazards model. We applied the Palliative Performance Scale on a dataset of 590 hospice patients at the time of hospice admission. The retrospective data were obtained from the Lifepath Hospice and Palliative Care center in Hillsborough County, Florida, USA. The criteria used to evaluate and compare the models' predictive performance were the explained variation statistic R(2, scaled Brier score, and the discrimination slope. The explained variation statistic demonstrated that overall the Royston-Parmar family of survival functions provided a better fit (R(2 =0.298; 95% CI: 0.236-0.358 than the Cox model (R(2 =0.156; 95% CI: 0.111-0.203. The scaled Brier scores and discrimination slopes were consistently higher under the Royston-Parmar model. Researchers involved in prognosticating patient survival are encouraged to consider the Royston-Parmar model as an alternative to Cox.

  6. The inspiratory capacity/total lung capacity ratio as a predictor of survival in an emphysematous phenotype of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Aimee; Balfe, David; Mirocha, James M; Falk, Jeremy A; Mosenifar, Zab

    2015-01-01

    Forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) grades severity of COPD and predicts survival. We hypothesize that the inspiratory capacity/total lung capacity (IC/TLC) ratio, a sensitive measure of static lung hyperinflation, may have a significant association with survival in an emphysematous phenotype of COPD. To access the association between IC/TLC and survival in an emphysematous phenotype of COPD. We performed a retrospective analysis of a large pulmonary function (PF) database with 39,050 entries, from April 1978 to October 2009. Emphysematous COPD was defined as reduced FEV1/forced vital capacity (FVC), increased TLC, and reduced diffusing capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide (DLCO; beyond 95% confidence intervals [CIs]). We evaluated the association between survival in emphysematous COPD patients and the IC/TLC ratio evaluated both as dichotomous (≤25% vs >25%) and continuous predictors. Five hundred and ninety-six patients had reported death dates. Univariate analysis revealed that IC/TLC ≤25% was a significant predictor of death (hazard ratio [HR]: 2.39, P<0.0001). Median survivals were respectively 4.3 (95% CI: 3.8-4.9) and 11.9 years (95% CI: 10.3-13.2). Multivariable analysis revealed age (HR: 1.19, 95% CI: 1.14-1.24), female sex (HR: 0.69, 95% CI: 0.60-0.83), and IC/TLC ≤25% (HR: 1.69, 95% CI: 1.34-2.13) were related to the risk of death. Univariate analysis showed that continuous IC/TLC was associated with death, with an HR of 1.66 (95% CI: 1.52-1.81) for a 10% decrease in IC/TLC. Adjusting for age and sex, IC/TLC ≤25% is related to increased risk of death, and IC/TLC as a continuum, is a significant predictor of mortality in emphysematous COPD patients.

  7. Peripheral venous blood neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio predicts survival in patients with advanced gastric cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen L

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Li Chen,1 Yanjiao Zuo,1 Lihua Zhu,2 Yuxin Zhang,3 Sen Li,1 Fei Ma,4 Yu Han,5 Hongjiang Song,1 Yingwei Xue11Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Harbin Medical University Cancer Hospital, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Heilongjiang, 2Department of Pathogen Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, North China University of Science and Technology, Tangshan, Hebei, 3Department of General Surgery, Mudanjiang First People’s Hospital, Mudanjiang, 4Department of Breast Surgery, 5Department of Gastrointestinal Oncology, Harbin Medical University Cancer Hospital, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Heilongjiang, People’s Republic of ChinaBackground: Accurate and useful predictors of gastric carcinoma treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy are lacking at present. We aim to explore the potential prognostic significance of the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR in advanced gastric cancer receiving S-1 plus oxaliplatin (SOX or oxaliplatin and capecitabine (XELOX regimen.Methods: We enrolled 91 patients with advanced gastric cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy from August 2008 to September 2015. The peripheral venous blood samples were collected before neoadjuvant chemotherapy. The NLR was divided into two groups: low NLR <2.17 group and high NLR ≥2.17 group. Univariate analysis on disease-free survival (DFS and overall survival (OS were generated using the Kaplan–Meier method and compared using the log-rank test. Prognostic factors were assessed by univariate analyses, and the independent prognostic factors were evaluated using multivariate analysis (Cox’s proportional-hazards regression model.Results: The univariate analysis showed that median DFS and median OS were worse for high NLR values than low NLR values before neoadjuvant chemotherapy (median DFS: 19.97 and 26.87 months, respectively, P=0.299; median OS: 25.83 and 29.73 months, respectively, P=0.405. Multivariate analysis showed that the NLR before neoadjuvant

  8. Extension of cox proportional hazard model for estimation of interrelated age-period-cohort effects on cancer survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mdzinarishvili, Tengiz; Gleason, Michael X; Kinarsky, Leo; Sherman, Simon

    2011-02-23

    In the frame of the Cox proportional hazard (PH) model, a novel two-step procedure for estimating age-period-cohort (APC) effects on the hazard function of death from cancer was developed. In the first step, the procedure estimates the influence of joint APC effects on the hazard function, using Cox PH regression procedures from a standard software package. In the second step, the coefficients for age at diagnosis, time period and birth cohort effects are estimated. To solve the identifiability problem that arises in estimating these coefficients, an assumption that neighboring birth cohorts almost equally affect the hazard function was utilized. Using an anchoring technique, simple procedures for obtaining estimates of interrelated age at diagnosis, time period and birth cohort effect coefficients were developed.As a proof-of-concept these procedures were used to analyze survival data, collected in the SEER database, on white men and women diagnosed with LC in 1975-1999 and the age at diagnosis, time period and birth cohort effect coefficients were estimated. The PH assumption was evaluated by a graphical approach using log-log plots. Analysis of trends of these coefficients suggests that the hazard of death from LC for a given time from cancer diagnosis: (i) decreases between 1975 and 1999; (ii) increases with increasing the age at diagnosis; and (iii) depends upon birth cohort effects.The proposed computing procedure can be used for estimating joint APC effects, as well as interrelated age at diagnosis, time period and birth cohort effects in survival analysis of different types of cancer.

  9. p53/Surviving Ratio as a Parameter for Chemotherapy Induction Response in Children with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinaldi Lenggana

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is a malignancy that is often found in children. Many studies into the failure of apoptosis function, or programmed cell death, is one of the most important regulatory mechanisms of cellular hemostasis which is closely linked to the development of cancer, are important. Also, regulation of the apoptotic (p53 and anti-apoptotic (surviving proteins influence treatment outcome. One role of p53 is to monitor cellular stress necessary to induce apoptosis. Surviving (BIRC5 is a group of proteins in the apoptosis inhibitor which works by inhibiting caspase-3. The role of surviving is considered very important in oncogenesis proliferation and cell growth regulation. Chemotherapy in childhood AML can inhibit cell growth and induce slowing as well as stopping the cell cycle. Thus, the aim of this study was to compare p53 and surviving before and after receiving induction chemotherapy in children with AML and also to determine the p53/surviving ratio. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were collected from AML children before treatment and three months after starting their induction therapy. p53 and surviving were measured by flowcytometry using monoclonal antibodies. Data were analyzed by t-test for comparison between groups and Spearman’s test to find out the correlation between variables with a significant value of p < 0.05. A total of 8 children were evaluated. The intensity of p53 expression was not significantly increased after induction phase chemotherapy (p = 0.224, but surviving expression and the ratio of p53/surviving were significantly increased in the treatment group compared with the levels prior to chemotherapy (p = 0.002, p = 0.034, and there was a strong negative correlation between p53 and surviving after chemotherapy (r = −0.63, p = 0.049.

  10. RATIO BETWEEN CARIOMETRIC PARAMETERS OF THE NUCLEUS AND THE SURVIVAL DURATION OF THE PATIENTS SUFFERING FROM THE INTRAORAL LOCALIZATION CARCINOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biljana Đorđević

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Carcinoma of intraoral localization is characterized by an intensive and short biological course with a low degree of five-year survival from 30 to 50%. In the second half of the twentieth century cariometry developed as a sub discipline of patho-histology. The aim of the paper is to determine the ratio between cariometric parameters for the nuclei of the intraoral localization carcinoma cells and the survival duration of the patients with this kind of tumor.The research included the examination of 75 patients; the multivariant regression analysis was applied to find the correlation between cariometric parameters for the nucleus and the survival duration.There was no statistically important correlation established between cariometric parameters for the nucleus and the survival duration in the patients with intraoral carcinoma; thus, it can be said that the parameters for the nucleus cannot give any relevant data for the biological course of the intraoral localization carcinoma.

  11. High-dimensional, massive sample-size Cox proportional hazards regression for survival analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Sushil; Madigan, David; Burd, Randall S; Suchard, Marc A

    2014-04-01

    Survival analysis endures as an old, yet active research field with applications that spread across many domains. Continuing improvements in data acquisition techniques pose constant challenges in applying existing survival analysis methods to these emerging data sets. In this paper, we present tools for fitting regularized Cox survival analysis models on high-dimensional, massive sample-size (HDMSS) data using a variant of the cyclic coordinate descent optimization technique tailored for the sparsity that HDMSS data often present. Experiments on two real data examples demonstrate that efficient analyses of HDMSS data using these tools result in improved predictive performance and calibration.

  12. Analyzing multivariate survival data using composite likelihood and flexible parametric modeling of the hazard functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jan; Parner, Erik

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we model multivariate time-to-event data by composite likelihood of pairwise frailty likelihoods and marginal hazards using natural cubic splines. Both right- and interval-censored data are considered. The suggested approach is applied on two types of family studies using the gamma...

  13. The number of positive nodes and the ratio of positive to excised nodes are significant predictors of survival in women with micrometastatic node-positive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Pauline T; Vinh-Hung, Vincent; Cserni, Gabor; Woodward, Wendy A; Tai, Patricia; Vlastos, Georges

    2008-08-01

    To evaluate the prognostic impact of the number of positive nodes and the lymph node ratio (LNR) of positive to excised nodes on survival in women diagnosed with nodal micrometastatic breast cancer before the era of widespread sentinel lymph node biopsy. Subjects were 62,551 women identified by the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results database, diagnosed with pT1-2pN0-1 breast cancer between 1988 and 1997. Kaplan-Meier breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) and overall survival (OS) were compared between three cohorts: node-negative (pN0, n=57,980) nodal micrometastasis all 2mm but or= 4) and the LNR (0.25). Median follow-up was 7.3 yr. Ten-year BCSS and OS in pNmic breast cancer were significantly lower compared to pN0 disease (BCSS 82.3% versus 91.9%, p<0.001 and OS 68.1% versus 75.7%, p<0.001). BCSS and OS with pNmic disease progressively declined with increasing number of positive nodes and increasing LNR. OS with pNmic was similar to pNmac disease when matched by the number of positive nodes and by the LNR. Both pN-based and LNR-based classifications were significantly prognostic of BCSS and OS on Cox regression multivariate analysis. Nodal micrometastasis is associated with poorer survival compared to pN0 disease. Mortality hazards with nodal micrometastasis increased with increasing number of positive nodes and increasing LNR. The number of positive nodes and the LNR should be considered in risk estimates for patients with nodal micrometastatic breast cancer.

  14. Sex-specific early survival drives adult sex ratio bias in snowy plovers and impacts mating system and population growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhart-Phillips, Luke J; Küpper, Clemens; Miller, Tom E X; Cruz-López, Medardo; Maher, Kathryn H; Dos Remedios, Natalie; Stoffel, Martin A; Hoffman, Joseph I; Krüger, Oliver; Székely, Tamás

    2017-07-03

    Adult sex ratio (ASR) is a central concept in population biology and a key factor in sexual selection, but why do most demographic models ignore sex biases? Vital rates often vary between the sexes and across life history, but their relative contributions to ASR variation remain poorly understood-an essential step to evaluate sex ratio theories in the wild and inform conservation. Here, we combine structured two-sex population models with individual-based mark-recapture data from an intensively monitored polygamous population of snowy plovers. We show that a strongly male-biased ASR (0.63) is primarily driven by sex-specific survival of juveniles rather than adults or dependent offspring. This finding provides empirical support for theories of unbiased sex allocation when sex differences in survival arise after the period of parental investment. Importantly, a conventional model ignoring sex biases significantly overestimated population viability. We suggest that sex-specific population models are essential to understand the population dynamics of sexual organisms: reproduction and population growth are most sensitive to perturbations in survival of the limiting sex. Overall, our study suggests that sex-biased early survival may contribute toward mating system evolution and population persistence, with implications for both sexual selection theory and biodiversity conservation.

  15. Sex-specific early survival drives adult sex ratio bias in snowy plovers and impacts mating system and population growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küpper, Clemens; Miller, Tom E. X.; Cruz-López, Medardo; Maher, Kathryn H.; dos Remedios, Natalie; Stoffel, Martin A.; Hoffman, Joseph I.; Krüger, Oliver; Székely, Tamás

    2017-01-01

    Adult sex ratio (ASR) is a central concept in population biology and a key factor in sexual selection, but why do most demographic models ignore sex biases? Vital rates often vary between the sexes and across life history, but their relative contributions to ASR variation remain poorly understood—an essential step to evaluate sex ratio theories in the wild and inform conservation. Here, we combine structured two-sex population models with individual-based mark–recapture data from an intensively monitored polygamous population of snowy plovers. We show that a strongly male-biased ASR (0.63) is primarily driven by sex-specific survival of juveniles rather than adults or dependent offspring. This finding provides empirical support for theories of unbiased sex allocation when sex differences in survival arise after the period of parental investment. Importantly, a conventional model ignoring sex biases significantly overestimated population viability. We suggest that sex-specific population models are essential to understand the population dynamics of sexual organisms: reproduction and population growth are most sensitive to perturbations in survival of the limiting sex. Overall, our study suggests that sex-biased early survival may contribute toward mating system evolution and population persistence, with implications for both sexual selection theory and biodiversity conservation. PMID:28634289

  16. COMPARISON OF COMPOST MATURITY, MICROBIAL SURVIVAL AND HEALTH HAZARDS IN TWO COMPOSTING SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. N.K. Rockson

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Data collected on germination index, temperature, moisture content, pH, total viable count, total coliform count and total fungi count were determined during composting in HV and FA systems at VREL Farms for a period of thirteen weeks and analysed to ascertain the effects of temperature, moisture and pH on compost maturity and microbial survival. There were no significant differences in germination index, pH and moisture content values for both systems as ANOVA results at α = 5% yielded p-values of 0.17, 0.98 and 0.13 respectively. Moisture content and pH values ranged between 40%-70% and 7.20 - 8.30 respectively. Temperature values recorded however were significantly different (p-value = 1.2 x 10-5, α = 5% in both systems and affected the microbial distribution during the process. The temperature recorded in HV and FA systems ranged between 45.19 ºC – 65.44 ºC and 29.00 ºC – 50.83ºC respectively. Germination Index values were >150% in different systems at the end of week 12. Listeria spp., known to be zoonotic, and Staphylococcus spp. survived in compost processed in FA system; and Penicillium spp. in both systems.

  17. Survival

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — These data provide information on the survival of California red-legged frogs in a unique ecosystem to better conserve this threatened species while restoring...

  18. The Carcinoma–Stromal Ratio of Colon Carcinoma Is an Independent Factor for Survival Compared to Lymph Node Status and Tumor Stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilma E. Mesker

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tumor staging insufficiently discriminates between colon cancer patients with poor and better prognosis. We have evaluated, for the primary tumor, if the carcinoma-percentage (CP, as a derivative from the carcinoma-stromal ratio, can be applied as a candidate marker to identify patients for adjuvant therapy. Methods: In a retrospective study of 63 patients with colon cancer (stage I–III, 1990–2001 the carcinoma-percentage of the primary tumor was estimated on routine H&E stained histological sections. Additionally these findings were validated in a second independent study of 59 patients (stage I–III, 1980–1992. (None of the patients had received preoperative chemo- or radiation therapy nor adjuvant chemotherapy. Results: Of 122 analyzed patients 33 (27.0% had a low CP and 89 (73.0% a high CP. The analysis of mean survival revealed: overall-survival (OS 2.13 years, disease-free- survival (DFS 1.51 years for CP-low and OS 7.36 years, DFS 6.89 years for CP-high. Five-year survival rates for CP-low versus CP-high were respectively for OS: 15.2% and 73.0% and for DFS: 12.1% and 67.4%. High levels of significance were found (OS p < 0.0001, DFS p < 0.0001 with hazard ratio’s of 3.73 and 4.18. In a multivariate Cox regression analysis, CP remained an independent variable when adjusted for either stage or for tumor status and lymph-node status (OSp < 0.001, OSp < 0.001. Conclusions: The carcinoma-percentage in primary colon cancer is a factor to discriminate between patients with a poor and a better outcome of disease. This parameter is already available upon routine histological investigation and can, in addition to the TNM classification, be a candidate marker to further stratify into more individual risk groups.

  19. Neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio is a simple and novel biomarker for prediction of survival after radioembolization for metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohme, Samer; Sukato, Daniel; Chalhoub, Didier; McDonald, Kerry Ann C A; Zajko, Albert; Amesur, Nikhil; Orons, Philip; Marsh, James W; Geller, David A; Tsung, Allan

    2015-05-01

    Previous studies have reported that an elevated preoperative Neutrophil-Lymphocyte Ratio (NLR) is associated with poor prognosis in patients with various solid tumors including colorectal cancer (CRC). Here, we examine whether NLR predicts survival in patients with unresectable CRC metastases undergoing hepatic radioembolization. A retrospective review of 104 consecutive patients with unresectable metastatic CRC who were treated with radioembolization after failing first and second-line chemotherapy. Between 2002 and 2012, the median NLR for all patients was 4.6. Using receiver operating curve analysis, there was no difference between using an NLR cut-off of 4.6 or 5. Forty-eight patients had a high NLR of ≥5 and 56 patients had an NLR of <5. Patients in both groups had similar previous extensive chemotherapy and liver-directed interventions. The median survival of patients with high NLR was 5.6 months (range 4.9-7.9 months) compared with 10.6 months (range 8.3-17.0 months) for patients with low NLR; a significant difference was found in overall survival (log-rank test; p = 0.001). Other factors associated with risk of death were extrahepatic spread of disease, presence of pulmonary nodules, previous liver-targeted intervention, and radiographic response. On multivariate analysis, high NLR, progressive radiographic response, and presence of extrahepatic disease remained independently associated with increased risk of death. NLR is a simply attainable, inexpensive, and useful biomarker to predict outcome in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer receiving radioembolization.

  20. Effect of estradiol-17β on the sex ratio, growth and survival of juvenile common snook (Centropomus undecimalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Vaz Avelar de Carvalho

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Sex control in fish is a promising technique for aquaculture, since it gives advantages associated with one sex. The aim of this study was to investigate the feminization of common snook (Centropomus undecimalis by oral administration of two doses of estradiol-17β (50 and 100 mg E2 kg-1 feed and control treatment for 45 days and to evaluate their effects on the sex ratio, growth and survival of common snook juveniles. After this period, fish were fed only with commercial feed without hormone supplementation. During the period of E2 administration, the control fish grew more than those in the other treatments. At the end of the experiment in the treatment with 50 mg E2 kg-1, 26.32% of the fish were male, 68.42% were female, and 5.26% were intersex. In the treatment with 100 mg E2 kg-1, 10% of the fish were male, and 90% were female. There was no difference in growth among the treatments after 11 months. This study showed that it is possible to obtain 90% common snook females using feeds with 100 mg E2 kg-1 for 45 days without impairing the fish growth or survival.

  1. Pancreatic cancer and predictors of survival: comparing the CA 19-9/bilirubin ratio with the McGill Brisbane Symptom Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitra, Sinziana; Jamal, Mohammad H; Aboukhalil, Jad; Doi, Suhail A; Chaudhury, Prosanto; Hassanain, Mazen; Metrakos, Peter P; Barkun, Jeffrey S

    2013-12-01

    Few tools predict survival from pancreatic cancer (PAC). The McGill Brisbane Symptom Score (MBSS) based on symptoms at presentation (weight loss, pain, jaundice and smoking) was recently validated. The present study compares the ability of four strategies to predict 9-month survival: MBSS, carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9) alone, CA19-9-to-bilirubin ratio and a combination of MBSS and the CA19-9-to-bilirubin ratio. A retrospective review of 133 patients diagnosed with PAC between 2005 and 2011 was performed. Survival was determined from the Quebec civil registry. Blood CA 19-9 and bilirubin values were collected (n = 52) at the time of diagnosis. Receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to determine a cutoff for optimal test characteristics of CA 19-9 and CA19-9-to-total bilirubin ratio in predicting survival at 9 months. Predictive characteristics were then calculated for the four strategies. Of the four strategies, the one with the greatest negative predictive value was the MBSS: negative predictive value (NPV) was 90.2% (76.9-97.3%) and the positive likelihood ratio (LR) was the greatest. The ability of CA 19-9 levels alone, at baseline, to predict survival was low. For the CA19-9-to-bilirubin ratio, the test characteristics improved but remained non-significant. The best performing strategy according to likelihood ratios was the combined MBSS and CA19-9 to the bilirubin ratio. CA19-9 levels and the CA19-9-to-bilirubin ratio are poor predictors of survival for PAC, whereas the MBSS is a far better predictor, confirming its clinical value. By adding the CA19-9-to-bilirubin ratio to the MBSS the predictive characteristics improved. © 2013 International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association.

  2. Extension of Cox Proportional Hazard Model for Estimation of Interrelated Age-Period-Cohort Effects on Cancer Survival

    OpenAIRE

    Mdzinarishvili, Tengiz; Gleason, Michael X.; Kinarsky, Leo; Sherman, Simon

    2011-01-01

    In the frame of the Cox proportional hazard (PH) model, a novel two-step procedure for estimating age-period-cohort (APC) effects on the hazard function of death from cancer was developed. In the first step, the procedure estimates the influence of joint APC effects on the hazard function, using Cox PH regression procedures from a standard software package. In the second step, the coefficients for age at diagnosis, time period and birth cohort effects are estimated. To solve the identifiabili...

  3. A novel risk stratification model, involving preoperative lymphocyte-monocyte ratio and standard pathological factors, for overall survival in patients with bladder cancer undergoing radical cystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Takashi; Kinoshita, Hidefumi; Yoshida, Kenji; Yanishi, Masaaki; Inui, Hidekazu; Komai, Yoshihiro; Sugi, Motohiko; Inoue, Takaaki; Murota, Takashi; Matsuda, Tadashi

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the ability of preoperative lymphocyte-monocyte ratio to predict prognosis and determine post-operative risk stratification in patients with bladder cancer undergoing radical cystectomy. A retrospective review of the 210 patients who had undergone radical cystectomy for bladder cancer from 2006 to 2013 identified 181 patients with sufficient data to evaluate the prognostic significance of the lymphocyte-monocyte ratio. Overall survival was assessed by the Kaplan-Meier method. The association of clinicopathological findings with overall survival was evaluated by a multivariate Cox proportional model, and a novel risk stratification model to predict prognosis was established. Median follow-up after radical cystectomy was 6.0 years. The 5-year overall survival rate was significantly lower for patients with low than high lymphocyte-monocyte ratio (27.6 vs 80.7%, P model using these factors showed significant differences among the three subgroups (low, intermediate and high risk) with a concordance index of 0.84. The 5-year overall survival rates in patients at low, intermediate and high risk were 85.4, 45.5 and 0%, respectively (P < 0.001). Preoperative lymphocyte-monocyte ratio, pathological tumor and lymph node stage and positive margins are significantly associated with overall survival in patients who have undergone radical cystectomy for bladder cancer. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Use of the p,p'-DDD: p,p'-DDE concentration ratio to trace contaminant migration from a hazardous waste site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkney, Alfred E; McGowan, Peter C

    2006-09-01

    For approximately 50 years, beginning in the 1920s, hazardous wastes were disposed in an 11-hectare area of the Marine Corps Base (MCB) Quantico, Virginia, USA known as the Old Landfill. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and DDT compounds were the primary contaminants of concern. These contaminants migrated into the sediments of a 78-hectare area of the Potomac River, the Quantico Embayment. Fish tissue contamination resulted in the MCB posting signs along the embayment shoreline warning fishermen to avoid consumption. In this paper, we interpret total PCB (t-PCBs) and total DDT (t-DDT, sum of six DDT, DDD, and DDE isomers) data from monitoring studies. We use the ratio of p,p'-DDD to p,p'-DDE concentrations as a tracer to distinguish site-related from regional contamination. The median DDD/DDE ratio in Quantico Embayment sediments (3.5) was significantly higher than the median ratio (0.71) in sediments from nearby Powells Creek, used as a reference area. In general, t-PCBs and t-DDT concentrations were significantly higher in killifish (Fundulus diaphanus) and carp (Cyprinus carpio) from the Quantico Embayment compared with Powells Creek. For both species, Quantico Embayment fish had mean or median DDD/DDE ratios greater than one. Median ratios were significantly higher in Quantico Embayment (4.6) than Powells Creek (0.28) whole body carp. In contrast, t-PCBs and t-DDT in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) fillets were similar in Quantico Embayment and Powells Creek collections, with median ratios of 0.34 and 0.26, respectively. Differences between species may be attributable to movement (carp and killifish being more localized) and feeding patterns (carp ingesting sediment while feeding). We recommend that environmental scientists use this ratio when investigating sites with DDT contamination.

  5. On robustness of marginal regression coefficient estimates and hazard functions in multivariate survival analysis of family data when the frailty distribution is mis-specified.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Li; Gorfine, Malka; Malone, Kathleen

    2007-11-10

    The shared frailty model is an extension of the Cox model to correlated failure times and, essentially, a random effects model for failure time outcomes. In this model, the latent frailty shared by individual members in a cluster acts multiplicatively as a factor on the hazard function and is typically modelled parametrically. One commonly used distribution is gamma, where both shape and scale parameters are set to be the same to allow for unique identification of baseline hazard function. It is popular because it is a conjugate prior, and the posterior distribution possesses the same form as gamma. In addition, the parameter can be interpreted as a time-independent cross-ratio function, a natural extension of odds ratio to failure time outcomes. In this paper, we study the effect of frailty distribution mis-specification on the marginal regression estimates and hazard functions under assumed gamma distribution with an application to family studies. The simulation results show that the biases are generally 10% and lower, even when the true frailty distribution deviates substantially from the assumed gamma distribution. This suggests that the gamma frailty model can be a practical choice in real data analyses if the regression parameters and marginal hazard function are of primary interest and individual cluster members are exchangeable with respect to their dependencies. Copyright 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. The influence of design characteristics on statistical inference in nonlinear estimation: A simulation study based on survival data and hazard modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J.S.; Bedaux, J.J.M.; Kooijman, S.A.L.M.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the influence of design characteristics on the statistical inference for an ecotoxicological hazard-based model using simulated survival data. The design characteristics of interest are the number and spacing of observations (counts) in time, the number and spacing of exposure...... concentrations (within c(min) and c(max)), and the initial number of individuals at time 0 in each concentration. A comparison of the coverage probabilities for confidence limits arising from the profile-likelihood approach and the Wald-based approach is carried out. The Wald-based approach is very sensitive...

  7. Prenatal prediction of neonatal survival in cases diagnosed with congenital diaphragmatic hernia using abdomen-to-thorax ratio determined by ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Yeon; Jun, Jong Kwan; Lee, JoonHo

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of abdomen-to-thorax ratio (ATR) measured by antenatal ultrasonography for predicting neonatal survival of fetuses with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). We identified 75 fetuses who were prenatally diagnosed with CDH and delivered in Seoul National University Hospital from 1998 to 2012, retrospectively. Of these, 40 cases who met the following criteria were included: (i) singleton pregnancy; (ii) a case that had available ultrasonographic images; and (iii) a neonate in whom follow-up until discharge from the hospital was available. ATR was measured as follows: each anteroposterior distance (APD) in the abdominal and thoracic cavity was measured in the same midsagittal plane with the fetal neutral position. A thoracic APD was measured from the back to the distal end of the sternum and an abdominal APD from the back to the most protruding abdominal surface. ATR is the ratio of the abdominal APD versus the thoracic APD. Survival rates were 57.5%. There were significant differences in ATR, lung-head ratio (LHR), observed/expected-LHR, quantitative lung index and intrathoracic liver between survivors and non-survivors. Regression analysis demonstrated that only ATR and intrathoracic position of the liver were independent predictors of survival. ATR by multivariate analysis had the most influence on survival rate (P = 0.002). The area under the receiver-operator curve for prediction of survival from ATR was 0.770 (P = 0.004). The diagnostic cut-off value for ATR was 0.96. Because ATR is effective to predict neonatal survival in CDH fetuses and is easy to measure, it can be used as another powerful parameter for managing CDH fetuses. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2014 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  8. The ratio of fibrinogen to red cells transfused affects survival in casualties receiving massive transfusions at an army combat support hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinger, Harry K; Spinella, Philip C; Perkins, Jeremy G; Grathwohl, Kurt W; Salinas, Jose; Martini, Wenjun Z; Hess, John R; Dubick, Michael A; Simon, Clayton D; Beekley, Alec C; Wolf, Steven E; Wade, Charles E; Holcomb, John B

    2008-02-01

    To treat the coagulopathy of trauma, some have suggested early and aggressive use of cryoprecipitate as a source of fibrinogen. Our objective was to determine whether increased ratios of fibrinogen to red blood cells (RBCs) decreased mortality in combat casualties requiring massive transfusion. We performed a retrospective chart review of 252 patients at a U.S. Army combat support hospital who received a massive transfusion (>or=10 units of RBCs in 24 hours). The typical amount of fibrinogen within each blood product was used to calculate the fibrinogen-to-RBC (F:R) ratio transfused for each patient. Two groups of patients who received either a low (or=0.2 g fibrinogen/RBC Unit) F:R ratio were identified. Mortality rates and the cause of death were compared between these groups, and logistic regression was used to determine if the F:R ratio was independently associated with survival. Two-hundred and fifty-two patients who received a massive transfusion with a mean (SD) ISS of 21 (+/-10) and an overall mortality of 75 of 252 (30%) were included. The mean (SD) F:R ratios transfused for the low and high groups were 0.1 grams/Unit (+/-0.06), and 0.48 grams/Unit (+/-0.2), respectively (p < 0.001). Mortality was 27 of 52 (52%) and 48 of 200 (24%) in the low and high F:R ratio groups respectively (p < 0.001). Additional variables associated with survival were admission temperature, systolic blood pressure, hemoglobin, International Normalized Ratio (INR), base deficit, platelet concentration and Combined Injury Severity Score (ISS). Upon logistic regression, the F:R ratio was independently associated with mortality (odds ratio 0.37, 95% confidence interval 0.171-0.812, p = 0.013). The incidence of death from hemorrhage was higher in the low F:R group, 23/27 (85%), compared to the high F:R group, 21/48 (44%) (p < 0.001). In patients with combat-related trauma requiring massive transfusion, the transfusion of an increased fibrinogen: RBC ratio was independently associated

  9. [Wild-tending techniques study on Glycyrrhiza uralensis--effect of irrigation and rhizome length on survival ratio, yield and quality].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Wei, Sheng-Li; Wang, Wen-Quan; Shi, Hua; Toda, Sogumeyi; Guo, Zheng-Zheng; Ren, Guang-Xi

    2014-08-01

    This research aimed at studying the effects of irrigation and rhizome length on the survival of ratio, yield and quality of Glycyrrhiza uralensis in wild tending condition. Employed the split-block design to carry out the field experiment, sampled with the quadrat method to measured the relative growth indexes and to estimate the yield, used the HPLC (high performance liquid chromatog- raphy ) method to measure the glycyrrhizin in the rhizome and adventitious root of the G. uralensis in this study. The quantity of the adventitious roots and the survival ratio were increased significantly as the length of the rhizome increased (P synthetic inertia of the medicinal components from the wild material of G. uralensis. But the maximum yield with this method was just more than 945 kg x hm(-2) in this study. So the further work of how to increase the yield in the practical application with the method found in this study need to be done in the next research.

  10. A high M1/M2 ratio of tumor-associated macrophages is associated with extended survival in ovarian cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are classified into two major phenotypes, M1 and M2. M1 TAMs suppress cancer progression, while M2 TAMs promote it. However, little is known regarding the role of TAMs in the development of ovarian cancer. Here, we investigated the relationship between TAM distribution patterns (density, microlocalization, and differentiation) and ovarian cancer histotypes, and we explored whether altered TAM distribution patterns influence long-term outcomes in ovarian cancer patients. Methods A total of 112 ovarian cancer patients were enrolled in this study, and the subjects were divided into two groups according to their survival (ovarian cancer tissues for each histotype. Kaplan-Meier survival and multivariate Cox regression analyses were used to evaluate the prognostic significance of TAM-related parameters in ovarian cancer. Results TAMs most frequently infiltrated into the cancer tissue of the serous histotype, followed by mucinous, undifferentiated, endometrioid, and clear cell histotypes (p = 0.049). The islet/stroma ratio of total TAMs varied among the cancer histotypes, with mucinous and undifferentiated cancers displaying the lowest and highest ratios, respectively (p = 0.005). The intratumoral TAM density significantly increased with increasing cancer stage and grade (p = 0.023 and 0.006, respectively). However, the overall M1/M2 TAM ratio decreased as the cancer stage increased (p = 0.012). In addition, the intra-islet M1/M2 ratio inversely correlated with the residual site size (p = 0.004). Among the TAM-related parameters, only the increased overall and intra-islet M1/M2 TAM ratios displayed prognostic significance in both the Kaplan-Meier survival and multivariate Cox regression analyses; however, the values of these two parameters did not differ significantly among the cancer histotypes. Conclusions The patients with increased overall or intra-islet M1/M2 TAM ratios presented with an improved 5

  11. Assessment of the Risk of Hospitalization for Heart Failure With Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 Inhibitors, Saxagliptin, Alogliptin, and Sitagliptin in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes, Using an Alternative Measure to the Hazard Ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Masayuki; Narukawa, Mamoru

    2017-07-01

    Saxagliptin statistically significantly increased the risk of hospitalization for heart failure compared with placebo in the clinical trial of SAVOR-TIMI 53. Neither the reason why only saxagliptin among several dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors increased the risk, nor the clinical implication of the result has been explained. To evaluate the risk of hospitalization for heart failure associated with DPP-4 inhibitors by using an alternative measure to the hazard ratio. We used the difference in restricted mean survival time (RMST) between DPP-4 inhibitors and placebo to evaluate the risk of cardiovascular events, including hospitalization for heart failure associated with DPP-4 inhibitors. Three randomized clinical trials with cardiovascular events as a primary end point-EXAMINE (alogliptin), SAVOR-TIMI 53 (saxagliptin), and TECOS (sitagliptin)-were reevaluated by estimating the RMSTs for the DPP-4 inhibitors and placebo based on the reconstructed individual patient data for each time-to-event outcome from publicly available information. The differences of RMSTs (DPP-4 inhibitors minus placebo) for hospitalization for heart failure were -4 days [-6, -2] in the SAVOR-TIMI 53 (720 days follow-up), -3 days [-9, 3] in the EXAMINE (900 days follow-up), and 1 day [-5, 7] in the TECOS (1440 days follow-up). There were no substantial differences in the risk of other cardiovascular outcomes between DPP-4 inhibitors and placebo. There are no substantial clinically relevant differences in the risk of cardiovascular events, including hospitalization for heart failure, between 3 of the DPP-4 inhibitors and placebo.

  12. Prognostic value of CT findings to predict survival outcomes in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms: a single institutional study of 161 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Wook; Kim, Hyoung Jung; Kim, Kyung Won; Byun, Jae Ho; Kim, So Yeon [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, Ki Byung [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Surgery, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ramaiya, Nikhil H.; Tirumani, Sree Harsha [Harvard Medical School, Department of Imaging, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Hong, Seung-Mo [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    To evaluate the prognostic value of CT to predict recurrence-free and overall survival in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (PanNENs). Between January 2004 and December 2012, 161 consecutive patients who underwent preoperative triphasic CT and surgical resection with curative intent for PanNENs were identified. The tumour consistency, margin, presence of calcification, pancreatic duct dilatation, bile duct dilatation, vascular invasion, and hepatic metastases were evaluated. The tumour size, arterial enhancement ratio, and portal enhancement ratio were measured. The Cox proportional hazard model was used to determine the association between CT features and recurrence-free survival and overall survival. By multivariate analysis, tumour size (>3 cm) (hazard ratio, 3.314; p = 0.006), portal enhancement ratio (≤1.1) (hazard ratio, 2.718; p = 0.006), and hepatic metastases (hazard ratio, 4.374; p = 0.003) were independent significant variables for worse recurrence-free survival. Portal enhancement ratio (≤1.1) (hazard ratio, 5.951; p = 0.001) and hepatic metastases (hazard ratio, 4.122; p = 0.021) were independent significant variables for worse overall survival. Portal enhancement ratio (≤1.1) and hepatic metastases assessed on CT were common independent prognostic factors for worse recurrence-free survival and overall survival in patients with PanNENs. (orig.)

  13. Ratios of colony mass to thermal conductance of tree and man-made nest enclosures of Apis mellifera: implications for survival, clustering, humidity regulation and Varroa destructor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Derek

    2016-05-01

    In the absence of human intervention, the honeybee ( Apis mellifera L.) usually constructs its nest in a tree within a tall, narrow, thick-walled cavity high above the ground (the enclosure); however, most research and apiculture is conducted in the thin-walled, squat wooden enclosures we know as hives. This experimental research, using various hives and thermal models of trees, has found that the heat transfer rate is approximately four to seven times greater in the hives in common use, compared to a typical tree enclosure in winter configuration. This gives a ratio of colony mass to lumped enclosure thermal conductance (MCR) of less than 0.8 kgW-1 K for wooden hives and greater than 5 kgW-1 K for tree enclosures. This result for tree enclosures implies higher levels of humidity in the nest, increased survival of smaller colonies and lower Varroa destructor breeding success. Many honeybee behaviours previously thought to be intrinsic may only be a coping mechanism for human intervention; for example, at an MCR of above 2 kgW-1 K, clustering in a tree enclosure may be an optional, rare, heat conservation behaviour for established colonies, rather than the compulsory, frequent, life-saving behaviour that is in the hives in common use. The implied improved survival in hives with thermal properties of tree nests may help to solve some of the problems honeybees are currently facing in apiculture.

  14. Ratios of colony mass to thermal conductance of tree and man-made nest enclosures of Apis mellifera: implications for survival, clustering, humidity regulation and Varroa destructor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Derek

    2016-05-01

    In the absence of human intervention, the honeybee (Apis mellifera L.) usually constructs its nest in a tree within a tall, narrow, thick-walled cavity high above the ground (the enclosure); however, most research and apiculture is conducted in the thin-walled, squat wooden enclosures we know as hives. This experimental research, using various hives and thermal models of trees, has found that the heat transfer rate is approximately four to seven times greater in the hives in common use, compared to a typical tree enclosure in winter configuration. This gives a ratio of colony mass to lumped enclosure thermal conductance (MCR) of less than 0.8 kgW(-1) K for wooden hives and greater than 5 kgW(-1) K for tree enclosures. This result for tree enclosures implies higher levels of humidity in the nest, increased survival of smaller colonies and lower Varroa destructor breeding success. Many honeybee behaviours previously thought to be intrinsic may only be a coping mechanism for human intervention; for example, at an MCR of above 2 kgW(-1) K, clustering in a tree enclosure may be an optional, rare, heat conservation behaviour for established colonies, rather than the compulsory, frequent, life-saving behaviour that is in the hives in common use. The implied improved survival in hives with thermal properties of tree nests may help to solve some of the problems honeybees are currently facing in apiculture.

  15. Application of random survival forests in understanding the determinants of under-five child mortality in Uganda in the presence of covariates that satisfy the proportional and non-proportional hazards assumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasejje, Justine B; Mwambi, Henry

    2017-09-07

    Uganda just like any other Sub-Saharan African country, has a high under-five child mortality rate. To inform policy on intervention strategies, sound statistical methods are required to critically identify factors strongly associated with under-five child mortality rates. The Cox proportional hazards model has been a common choice in analysing data to understand factors strongly associated with high child mortality rates taking age as the time-to-event variable. However, due to its restrictive proportional hazards (PH) assumption, some covariates of interest which do not satisfy the assumption are often excluded in the analysis to avoid mis-specifying the model. Otherwise using covariates that clearly violate the assumption would mean invalid results. Survival trees and random survival forests are increasingly becoming popular in analysing survival data particularly in the case of large survey data and could be attractive alternatives to models with the restrictive PH assumption. In this article, we adopt random survival forests which have never been used in understanding factors affecting under-five child mortality rates in Uganda using Demographic and Health Survey data. Thus the first part of the analysis is based on the use of the classical Cox PH model and the second part of the analysis is based on the use of random survival forests in the presence of covariates that do not necessarily satisfy the PH assumption. Random survival forests and the Cox proportional hazards model agree that the sex of the household head, sex of the child, number of births in the past 1 year are strongly associated to under-five child mortality in Uganda given all the three covariates satisfy the PH assumption. Random survival forests further demonstrated that covariates that were originally excluded from the earlier analysis due to violation of the PH assumption were important in explaining under-five child mortality rates. These covariates include the number of children under the

  16. Regression analysis of restricted mean survival time based on pseudo-observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Per Kragh; Hansen, Mette Gerster; Klein, John P.

    censoring; hazard function; health economics; regression model; survival analysis; mean survival time; restricted mean survival time; pseudo-observations......censoring; hazard function; health economics; regression model; survival analysis; mean survival time; restricted mean survival time; pseudo-observations...

  17. Regression Analysis of Restricted Mean Survival Time Based on Pseudo-Observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Per Kragh; Hansen, Mette Gerster; Klein, John P.

    2004-01-01

    censoring; hazard function; health economics; mean survival time; pseudo-observations; regression model; restricted mean survival time; survival analysis......censoring; hazard function; health economics; mean survival time; pseudo-observations; regression model; restricted mean survival time; survival analysis...

  18. Shared Frailty Model for Left-Truncated Multivariate Survival Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik; Brookmeyer, Ron; Aaby, Peter

    multivariate survival data, left truncation, multiplicative hazard model, shared gamma frailty, conditional model, piecewise exponential model, childhood survival......multivariate survival data, left truncation, multiplicative hazard model, shared gamma frailty, conditional model, piecewise exponential model, childhood survival...

  19. Individual social capital and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejlskov, Linda; Mortensen, Rikke N; Overgaard, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The concept of social capital has received increasing attention as a determinant of population survival, but its significance is uncertain. We examined the importance of social capital on survival in a population study while focusing on gender differences. METHODS: We used data from...... a Danish regional health survey with a five-year follow-up period, 2007-2012 (n = 9288, 53.5% men, 46.5% women). We investigated the association between social capital and all-cause mortality, performing separate analyses on a composite measure as well as four specific dimensions of social capital while...... controlling for covariates. Analyses were performed with Cox proportional hazard models by which hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. RESULTS: For women, higher levels of social capital were associated with lower all-cause mortality regardless of age, socioeconomic status, health...

  20. Prognostic impact of the lymph node metastatic ratio on 5-year survival of patients with rectal cancer not submitted to preoperative chemoradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Luiz Jacomo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Lymph node metastases are a major prognostic factor in colorectal cancer. Inadequate lymph node resection is related to shorter survival. The lymph nodes ratio (LNR has been used as a prognostic factor in patients with colon cancer. Few studies have evaluated the impact of LNR on the 5-year survival of patients with rectal cancer. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of LNR on the survival of patients with rectal cancer not submitted to preoperative chemoradiotherapy. METHODS: Ninety patients with rectal cancer excluding colon tumors, synchronous tumors, hereditary colorectal cancer and those undergoing preoperative chemoradiation. The patients were divided into three groups according t Metástases linfonodais representam um dos principais fatores prognósticos no câncer colorretal. A ressecção linfonodal inadequada relaciona-se à menor sobrevida. A proporção entre linfonodos metastáticos (PLM vem sendo utilizada como fator prognóstico em doentes com câncer de cólon. Poucos estudos avaliaram o impacto da PLM na sobrevida de doentes com câncer retal. OBJETIVO: Avaliar o impacto da PLM na sobrevida de doentes com câncer de reto não submetidos à quimioradioterapia pré-operatória. MÉTODOS: Foram incluídos 90 doentes com adenocarcinoma retal excluindo-se tumores de cólon, tumores sincrônicos, câncer colorretal hereditário e aqueles submetidos a tratamento radioquimioterápico pré-operatório. Os doentes foram divididos em três grupos segundo a PLM: PLM-0, sem linfonodos comprometidos; PLM-1, 1 a 20% dos linfonodos comprometidos; e PLM-2, mais de 21% dos linfonodos comprometidos. A identificação do ponto de corte da amostra selecionada foi obtida a partir da curva de características de operação do receptor (curva ROC. A sobrevida foi avaliada pelo teste de Kaplan-Meier, a diferença entre os grupos pelo teste de Cox-Mantel e a correlação entre as variáveis pelo teste de Pearson, adotando-se um nível de significância de 5

  1. Impact of insecticides used to control Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith in corn on survival, sex ratio, and reproduction of Trichogramma pretiosum Riley offspring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jander R Souza

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Corn (Zea mays L. is cultivated in large areas and considered one of the world's major cereal crops. There are several arthropod pests that can reduce its production such as the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith (Lep.: Noctuidae, which is considered to be the main pest for corn. Fall armyworm is primarily controlled by insecticides. The use of biological control agents to manage this pest is growing with an emphasis on the egg parasitoid Trichogramma pretiosum Riley (Hym.: Trichogrammatidae. Thus, the aim of this research was to evaluate the impact of the following insecticides (g ai L-1 beta-cypermethrin (0.03, chlorfenapyr (0.60, chlorpyrifos (0.96, spinosad (0.16, etofenprox (0.10, triflumuron (0.08, alfa-cypermethrin/teflubenzuron (0.0425/0.0425, and lambda-cyhalothrin/thiamethoxam (0.11/0.083 on survival, sex ratio, reproduction, and T. pretiosum offspring. Distilled water was used as a control. Commercial insecticide formulations were diluted in distilled water. Bioassays used Anagasta kuehniella eggs treated with insecticides which were afterwards exposed to parasitism. Bioassays were conducted under controlled conditions at 25 ± 2 °C, 70 ± 10% RH, and 12:12 h photoperiod. Alfa-cypermethrin/teflubenzuron, beta-cypermethrin, chlorpyrifos, chlorfenapyr, spinosad, etofenprox, and lambda-cyhalothrin/thiamethoxam reduced parasitism capacity of maternal generation females as well as the percentage of insect emergence from the F1 generation. Only triflumuron was selective for T. pretiosum and can be recommended along with this parasitoid in fall armyworm management programs in corn.

  2. Applied the additive hazard model to predict the survival time of patient with diffuse large B- cell lymphoma and determine the effective genes, using microarray data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arefa Jafarzadeh Kohneloo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recent studies have shown that effective genes on survival time of cancer patients play an important role as a risk factor or preventive factor. Present study was designed to determine effective genes on survival time for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients and predict the survival time using these selected genes. Materials & Methods: Present study is a cohort study was conducted on 40 patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. For these patients, 2042 gene expression was measured. In order to predict the survival time, the composition of the semi-parametric additive survival model with two gene selection methods elastic net and lasso were used. Two methods were evaluated by plotting area under the ROC curve over time and calculating the integral of this curve. Results: Based on our findings, the elastic net method identified 10 genes, and Lasso-Cox method identified 7 genes. GENE3325X increased the survival time (P=0.006, Whereas GENE3980X and GENE377X reduced the survival time (P=0.004. These three genes were selected as important genes in both methods. Conclusion: This study showed that the elastic net method outperformed the common Lasso method in terms of predictive power. Moreover, apply the additive model instead Cox regression and using microarray data is usable way for predict the survival time of patients.

  3. Obesity adversely affects survival in pancreatic cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, Robert R; Matsumoto, Martha E; Burch, Patrick A; Kim, George P; Halfdanarson, Thorvardur R; de Andrade, Mariza; Reid-Lombardo, Kaye; Bamlet, William R

    2010-11-01

    Higher body-mass index (BMI) has been implicated as a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer, but its effect on survival has not been thoroughly investigated. The authors assessed the association of BMI with survival in a sample of pancreatic cancer patients and used epidemiologic and clinical information to understand the contribution of diabetes and hyperglycemia. A survival analysis using Cox proportional hazards by usual adult BMI was performed on 1861 unselected patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma; analyses were adjusted for covariates that included clinical stage, age, and sex. Secondary analyses incorporated self-reported diabetes and fasting blood glucose in the survival model. BMI as a continuous variable was inversely associated with survival from pancreatic adenocarcinoma (hazard ratio [HR], 1.019 for each increased unit of BMI [kg/m2], Ppancreatic cancer. Although the mechanism of this association remains undetermined, diabetes and hyperglycemia do not appear to account for the observed association. Copyright © 2010 American Cancer Society.

  4. Hazardous Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you throw these substances away, they become hazardous waste. Some hazardous wastes come from products in our homes. Our garbage can include such hazardous wastes as old batteries, bug spray cans and paint ...

  5. Survival in Women with NSCLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katcoff, Hannah; Wenzlaff, Angela S.; Schwartz, Ann G.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Although lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in women, few studies have investigated the hormonal influence on survival after a lung cancer diagnosis and results have been inconsistent. We evaluated the role of reproductive and hormonal factors in predicting overall survival in women with non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods Population-based lung cancer cases diagnosed between November 1, 2001 and October 31, 2005 were identified through the Metropolitan Detroit Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Registry. Interview and follow-up data were collected for 485 women. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to determine hazard ratios (HRs) for death after an NSCLC diagnosis associated with reproductive and hormonal variables. Results Use of hormone therapy (HT) was associated with improved survival (HR, 0.69; 95% confidence interval, 0.54–0.89), adjusting for stage, surgery, radiation, education level, pack-years of smoking, age at diagnosis, race, and a multiplicative interaction between stage and radiation. No other reproductive or hormonal factor was associated with survival after an NSCLC diagnosis. Increased duration of HT use before the lung cancer diagnosis (132 months or longer) was associated with improved survival (HR, 0.54; 95% confidence interval, 0.37–0.78), and this finding remained significant in women taking either estrogen alone or progesterone plus estrogen, never smokers, and smokers. Conclusion These findings suggest that HT use, in particular use of estrogen plus progesterone, and long-term HT use are associated with improved survival of NSCLC. PMID:24496005

  6. On nonparametric hazard estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Brian P

    The Nelson-Aalen estimator provides the basis for the ubiquitous Kaplan-Meier estimator, and therefore is an essential tool for nonparametric survival analysis. This article reviews martingale theory and its role in demonstrating that the Nelson-Aalen estimator is uniformly consistent for estimating the cumulative hazard function for right-censored continuous time-to-failure data.

  7. On nonparametric hazard estimation

    OpenAIRE

    Hobbs, Brian P.

    2015-01-01

    The Nelson-Aalen estimator provides the basis for the ubiquitous Kaplan-Meier estimator, and therefore is an essential tool for nonparametric survival analysis. This article reviews martingale theory and its role in demonstrating that the Nelson-Aalen estimator is uniformly consistent for estimating the cumulative hazard function for right-censored continuous time-to-failure data.

  8. Mental vulnerability and survival after cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nakaya, Naoki; Bidstrup, Pernille E; Eplov, Lene F

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been hypothesized that personality traits affect survival after cancer, but studies have produced inconsistent results. This study examined the association between mental vulnerability and survival after cancer in Denmark in a prospective cohort study. METHODS: Between 1976...... and 2001, 12733 residents of Copenhagen completed a questionnaire eliciting information on a 12-item mental vulnerability scale, as well as various personal data. Follow-up in the Danish Cancer Registry until 2003 identified 884 incident cases of primary cancer, and follow-up for death from the date...... of cancer diagnosis until 2003 identified 382 deaths. Mental vulnerability scores were divided into 4 approximately equal-sized groups. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) of all-cause mortality. RESULTS: Multivariate HR for all-cause mortality for persons...

  9. An ensemble-based Cox proportional hazards regression framework for predicting survival in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC patients [version 1; referees: 1 approved, 2 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Meier

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available From March through August 2015, nearly 60 teams from around the world participated in the Prostate Cancer Dream Challenge (PCDC. Participating teams were faced with the task of developing prediction models for patient survival and treatment discontinuation using baseline clinical variables collected on metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC patients in the comparator arm of four phase III clinical trials. In total, over 2,000 mCRPC patients treated with first-line docetaxel comprised the training and testing data sets used in this challenge. In this paper we describe: (a the sub-challenges comprising the PCDC, (b the statistical metrics used to benchmark prediction performance, (c our analytical approach, and finally (d our team’s overall performance in this challenge. Specifically, we discuss our curated, ad-hoc, feature selection (CAFS strategy for identifying clinically important risk-predictors, the ensemble-based Cox proportional hazards regression framework used in our final submission, and the adaptation of our modeling framework based on the results from the intermittent leaderboard rounds. Strong predictors of patient survival were successfully identified utilizing our model building approach. Several of the identified predictors were new features created by our team via strategically merging collections of weak predictors. In each of the three intermittent leaderboard rounds, our prediction models scored among the top four models across all participating teams and our final submission ranked 9th place overall with an integrated area under the curve (iAUC of 0.7711 computed in an independent test set. While the prediction performance of teams placing between 2nd- 10th (iAUC: 0.7710-0.7789 was better than the current gold-standard prediction model for prostate cancer survival, the top-performing team, FIMM-UTU significantly outperformed all other contestants with an iAUC of 0.7915.  In summary, our ensemble-based Cox

  10. Dietary probiotic supplementation improved gut amylase to trypsin ratio in European seabass reared at different temperatures and survival after handling stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Filipe Ferreira Pereira

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics and chemical treatments are often used as disease control strategy. A prophylactic and alternative method to this chemical approach are the probiotics [1]. Probiotics are defined as "live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host" (FAO, 2001. The benefits of probiotic treatments are improvements in host nutritional retention [2], antagonistic properties to bacterial pathogen proliferation [3], modulation of immune responses [4], among others. Temperature plays a major role in dietary nutrient utilization and immune responses in fish, and have a modulatory effect on probiotic activity in intestine. The current study evaluated the use of a dietary probiotic supplementation in European seabass (Dicentrarchus labrax, one of the most important fish species in Southern Europe. Fish were fed on a multi-species probiotic (Bacillus sp., Pedicoccus sp., Enterococcus sp., Lactobacillus sp. , reared under 3 different temperatures (17, 20 and 23 ºC for 70 days. Fish were pair-fed, fixed to the voluntary feed intake of fish reared at 17 º C, in order to have similar probiotic intake among the temperature groups. Final body weight tripled initial weight (12.7 to 30.7g. At the end of the growth trial, all fish were subjected to a handling stress, in which stocking density increased by 6 fold (from 4 kg/m3 to 25 kg/m3, followed by a 15 min chase with a pole. Growth performance was not affected by the dietary treatment. Post-stress cumulative mortality were significantly higher in the 17ºC control group (figure 1A. Digestive enzymes activity were significantly affected by temperature and diet interaction. The activity ratio of amylase to trypsin (figure 1B increased with temperature and dietary probiotic supplementation, an indication that probiotic treatment at 23oC have a positive influence on the metabolic flexibility of carbohydrate-protein utilization. Non-specific immune response (ACH50

  11. Impact of scalp location on survival in head and neck melanoma: A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Charles; Pan, Yan; McLean, Catriona; Mar, Victoria; Wolfe, Rory; Kelly, John

    2017-03-01

    Scalp melanomas have more aggressive clinicopathological features than other melanomas and mortality rates more than twice that of melanoma located elsewhere. We sought to describe the survival of patients with scalp melanoma versus other cutaneous head and neck melanoma (CHNM), and explore a possible independent negative impact of scalp location on CHNM survival. A retrospective cohort study was performed of all invasive primary CHNM cases seen at a tertiary referral center over a 20-year period. Melanoma-specific survival (MSS) was compared between scalp melanoma and other invasive CHNM. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression was performed to determine associations with survival. On univariate analysis, patients with scalp melanoma had worse MSS than other CHNM (hazard ratio 2.22, 95% confidence interval 1.59-3.11). Scalp location was not associated with MSS in CHNM on multivariable analysis (hazard ratio 1.11, 95% confidence interval 0.77-1.61) for all tumors together, but remained independently associated with MSS for the 0.76- to 1.50-mm thickness stratum (hazard ratio 5.51, 95% confidence interval 1.55-19.59). Disease recurrence was not assessed because of unavailable data. The poorer survival of scalp melanoma is largely explained by greater Breslow thickness and a higher proportion of male patients. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Semi-parametric regression model for survival data: graphical visualization with R.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongheng

    2016-12-01

    Cox proportional hazards model is a semi-parametric model that leaves its baseline hazard function unspecified. The rationale to use Cox proportional hazards model is that (I) the underlying form of hazard function is stringent and unrealistic, and (II) researchers are only interested in estimation of how the hazard changes with covariate (relative hazard). Cox regression model can be easily fit with coxph() function in survival package. Stratified Cox model may be used for covariate that violates the proportional hazards assumption. The relative importance of covariates in population can be examined with the rankhazard package in R. Hazard ratio curves for continuous covariates can be visualized using smoothHR package. This curve helps to better understand the effects that each continuous covariate has on the outcome. Population attributable fraction is a classic quantity in epidemiology to evaluate the impact of risk factor on the occurrence of event in the population. In survival analysis, the adjusted/unadjusted attributable fraction can be plotted against survival time to obtain attributable fraction function.

  13. Treatment and survival of patients harboring histological variants of glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Alicia; Nuño, Miriam; Walia, Sartaaj; Mukherjee, Debraj; Black, Keith L; Patil, Chirag G

    2014-10-01

    It is unclear whether the survival difference observed between glioblastoma (GBM), giant cell glioblastoma (gcGBM), and gliosarcoma (GSM) patients is due to differences in tumor histology, patient demographics, and/or treatment regimens. The USA National Cancer Database was utilized to evaluate patients diagnosed with GBM, gcGBM, and GSM between 1998 and 2011. Kaplan-Meier survival estimates and Cox proportional hazards models were utilized to estimate overall survival. A cohort of 69,935 patients was analyzed; 67,509 (96.5%) of these patients had GBM, 592 (0.9%) gcGBM, and 1834 (2.6%) GSM. The median age for GBM and GSM patients was 61 versus 56 years for gcGBM (p<0.0001). Higher extent of resection (p<0.0001) and radiation (p=0.001) were observed in gcGBM patients compared to other histologies. Multivariate analysis showed that gcGBM patients had a 20% reduction in the hazards of mortality (hazard ratio [HR] 0.80, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.69-0.93) compared to GBM, while GSM patients trended towards higher hazards of mortality (HR 1.04, 95% CI 0.96-1.12) than the GBM cohort. Previous studies have suggested a disparity in the survival of patients with GBM tumors and their histological variants. Using a large cohort of patients treated at hospitals nationwide, this study found a 20% reduction in the hazards of mortality in gcGBM patients compared to GBM. Similarly, gcGBM patients had a 24% reduction in the hazards of mortality compared to the GSM cohort. GSM patients had a 3% increase in the hazards of mortality compared to GBM. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Survival of Sami cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leena Soininen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The incidence of cancer among the indigenous Sami people of Northern Finland is lower than among the Finnish general population. The survival of Sami cancer patients is not known, and therefore it is the object of this study. Study design. The cohort consisted of 2,091 Sami and 4,161 non-Sami who lived on 31 December 1978 in the two Sami municipalities of Inari and Utsjoki, which are located in Northern Finland and are 300–500 km away from the nearest central hospital. The survival experience of Sami and non-Sami cancer patients diagnosed in this cohort during 1979–2009 was compared with that of the Finnish patients outside the cohort. Methods. The Sami and non-Sami cancer patients were matched to other Finnish cancer patients for gender, age and year of diagnosis and for the site of cancer. An additional matching was done for the stage at diagnosis. Cancer-specific survival analyses were made using the Kaplan–Meier method and Cox regression modelling. Results. There were 204 Sami and 391 non-Sami cancer cases in the cohort, 20,181 matched controls without matching with stage, and 7,874 stage-matched controls. In the cancer-specific analysis without stage variable, the hazard ratio for Sami was 1.05 (95% confidence interval 0.85–1.30 and for non-Sami 1.02 (0.86–1.20, indicating no difference between the survival of those groups and other patients in Finland. Likewise, when the same was done by also matching the stage, there was no difference in cancer survival. Conclusion. Long distances to medical care or Sami ethnicity have no influence on the cancer patient survival in Northern Finland.

  15. Survival after dialysis discontinuation and hospice enrollment for ESRD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Nina R; Dougherty, Meredith; Harris, Pamela S; Casarett, David J

    2013-12-01

    Textbooks report that patients with ESRD survive for 7-10 days after discontinuation of dialysis. Studies describing actual survival are limited, however, and research has not defined patient characteristics that may be associated with longer or shorter survival times. The goals of this study were to determine the mean life expectancy of patients admitted to hospice after discontinuation of dialysis, and to identify independent predictors of survival time. Data for demographics, clinical characteristics, and survival were obtained from 10 hospices for patients with ESRD who discontinued dialysis before hospice admission. Data were collected for patients admitted between January 1, 2008 and May 15, 2012. All hospices were members of the Coalition of Hospices Organized to Investigate Comparative Effectiveness network, which obtains de-identified data from an electronic medical record. Of 1947 patients who discontinued dialysis, the mean survival after hospice enrollment was 7.4 days (range, 0-40 days). Patients who discontinued dialysis had significantly shorter survival compared with other patients (n=124,673) with nonrenal hospice diagnoses (mean survival 54.4 days; hazard ratio, 2.96; 95% confidence interval, 2.82 to 3.09; P<0.001). A Cox proportional hazards model identified seven independent predictors of earlier mortality after dialysis discontinuation, including male sex, referral from a hospital, lower functional status (Palliative Performance Scale score), and the presence of peripheral edema. Patients who discontinue dialysis have significantly shorter survival than other hospice patients. Individual survival time varies greatly, but several variables can be used to predict survival and tailor a patient's care plan based on estimated prognosis.

  16. Alcohol consumption and non-Hodgkin lymphoma survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xuesong; Zheng, Tongzhang; Foss, Francine M; Ma, Shuangge; Holford, Theodore R; Boyle, Peter; Leaderer, Brian; Zhao, Ping; Dai, Min; Zhang, Yawei

    2010-06-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that moderate alcohol drinkers have a lower death rate for all causes. Alcohol drinking has also been associated with reduced risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Here, we examined the role of alcohol consumption on NHL survival by type of alcohol consumed and NHL subtype. A cohort of 575 female NHL incident cases diagnosed during 1996-2000 in Connecticut was followed-up for a median of 7.75 years. Demographic, clinical, and lifestyle information was collected at diagnosis. Survival analyses were conducted with Kaplan-Meier methods, and hazard ratios (HR) were estimated from Cox Proportional Hazards models. Compared to never drinkers, wine drinkers experienced better overall survival (75% vs. 69% five-year survival rates, p-value for log-rank test = 0.030) and better disease free survival (70% vs. 67% five-year disease-free survival rates, p-value for log-rank test = 0.049). Analysis by NHL subtype shows that the favorable effect of wine consumption was mainly seen for patients diagnosed with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) (wine drinkers for more than 25 years vs. never drinkers: HR = 0.36, 95% CI 0.14-0.94 for overall survival; HR = 0.38, 95% CI 0.16-0.94 for disease-free survival), and the adverse effect of liquor consumption was also observed among DLBCL patients (liquor drinkers vs. never drinkers: HR=2.49, 95% CI 1.26-4.93 for disease-free survival). Our results suggest a moderate relationship between pre-diagnostic alcohol consumption and NHL survival, particularly for DLBCL. The results need to be replicated in larger studies. Pre-diagnostic behaviors might impact the prognosis and survival of NHL patients.

  17. Carbon Structure Hazard Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Tommy; Greene, Ben; Porter, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Carbon composite structures are widely used in virtually all advanced technology industries for a multitude of applications. The high strength-to-weight ratio and resistance to aggressive service environments make them highly desirable. Automotive, aerospace, and petroleum industries extensively use, and will continue to use, this enabling technology. As a result of this broad range of use, field and test personnel are increasingly exposed to hazards associated with these structures. No single published document exists to address the hazards and make recommendations for the hazard controls required for the different exposure possibilities from damaged structures including airborne fibers, fly, and dust. The potential for personnel exposure varies depending on the application or manipulation of the structure. The effect of exposure to carbon hazards is not limited to personnel, protection of electronics and mechanical equipment must be considered as well. The various exposure opportunities defined in this document include pre-manufacturing fly and dust, the cured structure, manufacturing/machining, post-event cleanup, and post-event test and/or evaluation. Hazard control is defined as it is applicable or applied for the specific exposure opportunity. The carbon exposure hazard includes fly, dust, fiber (cured/uncured), and matrix vapor/thermal decomposition products. By using the recommendations in this document, a high level of confidence can be assured for the protection of personnel and equipment.

  18. Treatment with finasteride and prostate cancer survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjellman, Anders; Friis, Søren; Granath, Fredrik; Gustafsson, Ove; Sørensen, Henrik Toft; Akre, Olof

    2013-08-01

    This study compared survival after diagnosis of prostate cancer (PC) in men previously treated with finasteride, in men previously treated with α-adrenoceptor antagonists, in men treated with both, and in men who had received neither type of medication. In total, 3791 men diagnosed with PC in northern Denmark were identified. The region's prescription database was used to identify all men prescribed finasteride and α-adrenoceptor antagonists and those who had received neither medication during the period 1989-2001. Among men with a diagnosis of PC, overall survival and disease-specific survival were assessed after diagnosis using Cox proportional hazards regression. The risk of being diagnosed with non-localized PC was estimated using conditional logistic regression. The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for PC death and overall death after treatment with finasteride was 0.93 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.76-1.14] and 0.92 (95% CI 0.77-1.10), respectively. Treatment with α-adrenoceptor antagonists was associated with a reduced risk of PC death and overall death (HR 0.78, 95% CI 0.67-0.90, and 0.82, 95% CI 0.73-0.93, respectively. The risk of being diagnosed with non-localized PC was increased for men taking finasteride (odds ratio 1.14, 95% CI 1.01-1.29) per 100 defined daily doses. Treatment with finasteride prior to a diagnosis of PC did not affect PC-specific survival, but increased the risk of being diagnosed with non-localized disease. Treatment with α-adrenoceptor antagonists was associated with better cause-specific survival and lower risk of non-localized disease.

  19. Similar survival of patients with multiple vs. single primary melanomas based on Utah SEER data (1973-2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Douglas; Farnham, James M; Hyngstrom, John; Klapperich, Marki E; Secrest, Aaron M; Empey, Sarah; Bowen, Glen M; Wada, David; Andtbacka, Robert H I; Grossmann, Kenneth; Bowles, Tawnya L; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A

    2018-02-27

    Survival data are mixed comparing patients with multiple primary melanomas (MPM) to those with single primary melanomas (SPM). To compare MPM vs. SPM patient survival, using a matching method that avoids potential biases associated with other analytic approaches. Records of 14,138 individuals obtained from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End-Results registry of all melanomas diagnosed or treated in Utah from 1973-2011 were reviewed. A single matched control patient was selected randomly from the SPM cohort for each MPM patient, with the restriction that they survived at least as long as the interval between the first and second diagnoses for the matched MPM patient. Survival curves (n=887 MPM, 887 SPM) without covariates showed a significant survival disadvantage for MPM patients (chi-squared = 39.29, p < 0.001). However, a multivariate Cox proportional hazards model showed no significant survival difference (hazard ratio = 1.07, p = 0.55). Restricting the multivariate analysis to invasive melanomas also showed no significant survival difference (hazard ratio = 0.99, p = 0.96). Breslow depth, ulceration status, and specific cause of death was not available for all patients. Patients with MPM had similar survival time as patients with SPM. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Golden Ratio

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Our attraction to another body increases if the body is sym- metrical and in proportion. If a face or a structure is in pro- portion, we are more likely to notice it and find it beautiful. The universal ratio of beauty is the 'Golden Ratio', found in many structures. This ratio comes from Fibonacci numbers. In this article, we explore this ...

  1. Golden Ratio

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Our attraction to another body increases if the body is symmetricaland in proportion. If a face or a structure is in proportion,we are more likely to notice it and find it beautiful.The universal ratio of beauty is the 'Golden Ratio', found inmany structures. This ratio comes from Fibonacci numbers.In this article, we explore this ...

  2. Use of common analgesic medications and ovarian cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dixon, Suzanne C; Nagle, Christina M; Wentzensen, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    -reported, pre-diagnosis use of common analgesics and overall/progression-free/disease-specific survival among 7694 women with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer (4273 deaths). RESULTS: Regular analgesic use (at least once per week) was not associated with overall survival (pooled hazard ratios, pHRs (95......% confidence intervals): aspirin 0.96 (0.88-1.04); non-aspirin NSAIDs 0.97 (0.89-1.05); acetaminophen 1.01 (0.93-1.10)), nor with progression-free/disease-specific survival. There was however a survival advantage for users of any NSAIDs in studies clearly defining non-use as less than once per week (pHR=0...

  3. Adjuvant chemotherapy is associated with improved survival after esophagectomy without induction therapy for node-positive adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speicher, Paul J; Englum, Brian R; Ganapathi, Asvin M; Mulvihill, Michael S; Hartwig, Matthew G; Onaitis, Mark W; D'Amico, Thomas A; Berry, Mark F

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated adjuvant chemotherapy (AC) use after esophagectomy without induction therapy for node-positive (pN+) adenocarcinoma using the National Cancer Database, including the impact of complications related to surgery (CRS) on outcomes. Predictors of AC use in 1694 patients in the National Cancer Data Base who underwent R0 esophagectomy from 2003-2011 without induction therapy for pN+ adenocarcinoma of the middle or lower esophagus and survived more than 30 days were identified with multivariable logistic regression. The impact of AC on survival was estimated using Kaplan-Meier and Cox-proportional hazards methods. AC was given to 874 of 1694 (51.6%) patients; 618 (70.7%) AC patients received radiation. Older age (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.58/decade, p improved survival in multivariate analysis (hazard ratio 0.67, p = 0.008). Receiving radiation in addition to AC did not improve survival (p = 0.35). Although CRS was associated with worse survival, patients who had CRS but received AC had superior survival compared to patients who did not have CRS or get AC (p = 0.016). AC after esophagectomy is associated with improved survival but was only used in half of patients with pN+ esophageal adenocarcinoma. We also found that the addition of radiation to AC was not associated with a survival benefit. CRS predict worse long-term survival and lower the chance of getting AC, but even patients with CRS had improved survival when given AC.

  4. Hazardous Chemicals

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-04-10

    Chemicals are a part of our daily lives, providing many products and modern conveniences. With more than three decades of experience, The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has been in the forefront of efforts to protect and assess people's exposure to environmental and hazardous chemicals. This report provides information about hazardous chemicals and useful tips on how to protect you and your family from harmful exposure.  Created: 4/10/2007 by CDC National Center for Environmental Health.   Date Released: 4/13/2007.

  5. Looking inward: The impact of operative time on graft survival after liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, David D; Li, Jun; Wang, Guihua; Croome, Kristopher P; Burns, Justin M; Perry, Dana K; Nguyen, Justin H; Hopp, Wallace J; Taner, C Burcin

    2017-10-01

    Operative time often has been cited as an important factor for postoperative outcomes. Despite this belief, most efforts to improve liver transplant outcomes have largely focused on only patient and donor factors, and little attention has been paid on operative time. The primary objective of this project was to determine the impact of operative time on graft survival after liver transplant. A retrospective review of 2,877 consecutive liver transplants performed at a single institution was studied. Data regarding recipient, donor, and operative characteristics, including detailed granular operative times were collected prospectively and retrospectively reviewed. Using an instrument variable approach, Cox multivariate modeling was performed to assess the impact of operative time without the confounding of known and unknown variables. Of the 2,396 patients who met the criteria for review, the most important factors determining liver transplant graft survival included recipient history of Hepatitis C (hazard ratio 1.45, P = .02), donor age (hazard ratio 1.23, P = .03), use of liver graft from donation after cardiac death donor (hazard ratio 1.50, P operative time (hazard ratio 1.26, P = .01). In detailed analysis of stages of the liver transplant operation, the time interval from incision to anhepatic phase was associated with graft survival (hazard ratio 1.33; P = .02). Using a novel instrument variable approach, we demonstrate that operative time (in particular, the time interval from incision to anhepatic time) has a significant impact on graft survival. It also seems that some of this efficiency is under the influence of the transplant surgeon. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Breast Cancer Heterogeneity: MR Imaging Texture Analysis and Survival Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Hun; Ko, Eun Sook; Lim, Yaeji; Lee, Kyung Soo; Han, Boo-Kyung; Ko, Eun Young; Hahn, Soo Yeon; Nam, Seok Jin

    2017-03-01

    Purpose To determine the relationship between tumor heterogeneity assessed by means of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging texture analysis and survival outcomes in patients with primary breast cancer. Materials and Methods Between January and August 2010, texture analysis of the entire primary breast tumor in 203 patients was performed with T2-weighted and contrast material-enhanced T1-weighted subtraction MR imaging for preoperative staging. Histogram-based uniformity and entropy were calculated. To dichotomize texture parameters for survival analysis, the 10-fold cross-validation method was used to determine cutoff points in the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. The Cox proportional hazards model and Kaplan-Meier analysis were used to determine the association of texture parameters and morphologic or volumetric information obtained at MR imaging or clinical-pathologic variables with recurrence-free survival (RFS). Results There were 26 events, including 22 recurrences (10 local-regional and 12 distant) and four deaths, with a mean follow-up time of 56.2 months. In multivariate analysis, a higher N stage (RFS hazard ratio, 11.15 [N3 stage]; P = .002, Bonferroni-adjusted α = .0167), triple-negative subtype (RFS hazard ratio, 16.91; P breast cancers that appeared more heterogeneous on T2-weighted images (higher entropy) and those that appeared less heterogeneous on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted subtraction images (lower entropy) exhibited poorer RFS. © RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  7. Perioperative beta-blocker use and survival in lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cata, Juan P; Villarreal, John; Keerty, Dinesh; Thakar, Dilip R; Liu, Diane D; Sood, Anil K; Gottumukkala, Vijaya

    2014-03-01

    To assess the effect of perioperative beta blockers on recurrence and overall survival after non-small cell lung cancer surgery. Retrospective study. Academic medical center. The medical records of patients with stage 1, 2, and 3a non-small cell lung cancer were divided into three different groups: those patients who never received beta blockers perioperatively, those receiving nonselective beta blockers within 60 days of surgery, and those taking selective beta blockers within 60 days of surgery. Recurrence-free survival and overall survival were the main clinical endpoints. Univariate log-rank tests and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the effects of selective beta blockers, nonselective beta blockers, or no beta blockers on recurrence-free survival and overall survival. The analysis included records of 435 patients. Univariate analyses showed that the use of both selective and nonselective beta blockers was associated with decreased recurrence-free survival (P = 0.014) and overall survival (P = 0.009). However, these findings were not sustained after adjusting for possible confounding variables in the multivariate analysis. The hazard ratios for recurrence-free survival (selective beta blockers vs no beta blocker use were: 1.304; 95% confidence intervals [CI] 0.973 - 1.747; P = 0.075; for nonselective beta blockers vs no beta blockers: 0.989; 95% CI 0.639 - 1.532; P = 0.962. The hazard ratios for overall survival were: selective beta blocker use vs no beta blockers: 1.335; 95% CI 0.966 - 1.846; P = 0.080; nonselective beta blocker use vs no beta blocker use: 1.108; 95% CI 0.678 - 1.812; P = 0.682. Administration of beta blockers during the perioperative period did not improve recurrence-free or overall survival in patients undergoing resection of non-small cell lung cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Heart Failure Overweight/Obesity Survival Paradox: The Missing Sex Link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vest, Amanda R; Wu, Yuping; Hachamovitch, Rory; Young, James B; Cho, Leslie

    2015-11-01

    This study sought to determine whether body mass index (BMI) has a differential impact on survival for females versus males with advanced systolic heart failure (HF). Females have a survival advantage in HF, the mechanisms of which are unclear. There is also a proposed "obesity survival paradox" in which excess adiposity promotes HF survival. We reviewed 3,811 patients with left ventricular ejection fraction ≤40% who had undergone cardiopulmonary exercise testing between 1995 and 2011. The endpoint was all-cause mortality. Multivariable analysis was performed using a Cox proportional hazards model. Because of the nonlinearity of BMI, a restricted cubic spline was used. An interaction term was added to investigate the impact of BMI on mortality by sex. The unadjusted data demonstrated an overall obesity survival paradox in HF. This survival paradox disappeared for males after adjustment for potential confounders, with overweight and obese males showing higher adjusted mortality hazard ratios compared with normal weight males. Conversely, females in the overweight BMI range (25.0 to 29.9 kg/m(2)) had the lowest adjusted mortality (hazard ratio: 0.84; 95% confidence interval: 0.77 to 0.93; p = 0.0005 compared with normal weight females) with a nadir in mortality hazard just below BMI 30 kg/m(2). The multivariable model supported a differential impact of BMI on mortality in males versus females (p for interaction obesity survival paradox disappeared after adjustment for confounders. Overweight and obese males had higher adjusted mortality than normal weight males, whereas a BMI in the overweight range was associated with a significant survival benefit in females. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Survival analysis of preweaning piglet survival in a dry-cured ham-producing crossbred line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchinato, A; Bonfatti, V; Gallo, L; Carnier, P

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate piglet preweaning survival and its relationship with a total merit index (TMI) used for selection of Large White terminal boars for dry-cured ham production. Data on 13,924 crossbred piglets (1,347 litters), originated by 189 Large White boars and 328 Large White-derived crossbred sows, were analyzed under a frailty proportional hazards model, assuming different baseline hazard functions and including sire and nursed litter as random effects. Estimated hazard ratios (HR) indicated that sex, cross-fostering, year-month of birth, parity of the nurse sow, size of the nursed litter, and class of TMI were significant effects for piglet preweaning survival. Female piglets had less risk of dying than males (HR = 0.81), as well as cross-fostered piglets (HR = 0.60). Survival increased when piglets were nursed by sows of third (HR = 0.85), fourth (HR = 0.76), and fifth (HR = 0.79) parity in comparison with first and second parity sows. Piglets of small (HR = 3.90) or very large litters (HR >1.60) had less chance of surviving in comparison with litters of intermediate size. Class of TMI exhibited an unfavorable relationship with survival (HR = 1.20 for the TMI top class). The modal estimates of sire variance under different baseline hazard functions were 0.06, whereas the variance for the nursed litter was close to 0.7. The estimate of the nursed litter effect variance was greater than that of the sire, which shows the importance of the common environment generated by the nurse sow. Relationships between sire rankings obtained from different survival models were high. The heritability estimate in equivalent scale was low and reached a value of 0.03. Nevertheless, the exploitable genetic variation for this trait justifies the inclusion of piglet preweaning survival in the current breeding program for selection of Large White terminal boars for dry-cured ham production.

  10. CNS involvement and treatment with interferon-α are independent prognostic factors in Erdheim-Chester disease: a multicenter survival analysis of 53 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, Laurent; Hervier, Baptiste; Néel, Antoine; Hamidou, Mohamed A; Kahn, Jean-Emmanuel; Wechsler, Bertrand; Pérez-Pastor, Gemma; Blomberg, Bjørn; Fuzibet, Jean-Gabriel; Dubourguet, François; Marinho, António; Magnette, Catherine; Noel, Violaine; Pavic, Michel; Casper, Jochen; Beucher, Anne-Bérangère; Costedoat-Chalumeau, Nathalie; Aaron, Laurent; Salvatierra, Juan; Graux, Carlos; Cacoub, Patrice; Delcey, Véronique; Dechant, Claudia; Bindi, Pascal; Herbaut, Christiane; Graziani, Giorgio; Amoura, Zahir; Haroche, Julien

    2011-03-10

    Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD) is a rare form of non-Langerhans histiocytosis, with noncodified therapeutic management and high mortality. No treatment has yet been shown to improve survival in these patients. We conducted a multicenter prospective observational cohort study to assess whether extraskeletal manifestations and interferon-α treatment would influence survival in a large cohort of ECD patients. To achieve this goal, we thoroughly analyzed the clinical presentation of 53 patients with biopsy-proven ECD, and we performed a survival analysis using Cox proportional hazard model. Fifty-three patients (39 men and 14 women) with biopsy-proven ECD were followed up between November 1981 and November 2010. Forty-six patients (87%) received interferon-α and/or PEGylated interferon-α. Multivariate survival analysis using Cox proportional hazard model revealed that central nervous system involvement was an independent predictor of death (hazard ratio = 2.51; 95% confidence interval, 1.28-5.52; P = .006) in our cohort. Conversely, treatment with interferon-α was identified as an independent predictor of survival (hazard ratio = 0.32; 95% confidence interval, 0.14-0.70; P = .006). Although definitive confirmation would require a randomized controlled trial, these results suggest that interferon-α improves survival in ECD patients. This may be seen as a significant advance, as it is the first time a treatment is shown to improve survival in this multisystemic disease with high mortality.

  11. Allergies, obesity, other risk factors and survival from pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Sara H; Chou, Joanne F; Ludwig, Emmy; O'Reilly, Eileen; Allen, Peter J; Jarnagin, William R; Bayuga, Sharon; Simon, Jennifer; Gonen, Mithat; Reisacher, William R; Kurtz, Robert C

    2010-11-15

    Survival from pancreatic adenocarcinoma remains extremely poor, approximately 5% at 5 years. Risk factors include smoking, high body mass index (BMI), family history of pancreatic cancer, and long-standing diabetes; in contrast, allergies are associated with reduced risk. Little is known about associations between these factors and survival. We analyzed overall survival in relation to risk factors for 475 incident cases who took part in a hospital based case-control study. Analyses were conducted separately for those who did (160) and did not (315) undergo tumor resection. Kaplan-Meier methods were used to describe survival according to smoking, BMI, family history, diabetes, and presence of allergies. Cox proportional hazards models were used to adjust for covariates. There was no association with survival based on smoking, family history, or history of diabetes in either group. Among patients with resection, those with allergies showed nonstatistically significant longer survival, a median of 33.1 months (95% CI: 19.0-52.5) vs. 21.8 months (95% CI: 18.0-33.1), p = 0.25. The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) was 0.72 (95% CI: 0.43-1.23), p = 0.23. Among patients without resection, those with self-reported allergies survived significantly longer than those without allergies: 13.3 months (95% CI: 10.6-16.9) compared to 10.4 months (95% CI: 8.8-11.0), p = 0.04, with an adjusted HR of 0.68 (95% CI: 0.49-0.95), p = 0.02. Obesity was nonsignificantly associated with poorer survival, particularly in the resected group (HR = 1.62, 95% CI: 0.76-3.44). The mechanisms underlying the association between history of allergies and improved survival are unknown. These novel results need to be confirmed in other studies.

  12. Trop-2 is a determinant of breast cancer survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Ambrogi

    Full Text Available Trop-2 is a calcium signal transducer that drives tumor growth. Anti-Trop-2 antibodies with selective reactivity versus Trop-2 maturation stages allowed to identify two different pools of Trop-2, one localized in the cell membrane and one in the cytoplasm. Of note, membrane-localized/functional Trop-2 was found to be differentially associated with determinants of tumor aggressiveness and distinct breast cancer subgroups. These findings candidated Trop-2 states to having an impact on cancer progression. We tested this model in breast cancer. A large, consecutive human breast cancer case series (702 cases; 8 years median follow-up was analyzed by immunohistochemistry with anti-Trop-2 antibodies with selective reactivity for cytoplasmic-retained versus functional, membrane-associated Trop-2. We show that membrane localization of Trop-2 is an unfavorable prognostic factor for overall survival (1+ versus 0 for all deaths: hazard ratio, 1.63; P = 0.04, whereas intracellular Trop-2 has a favorable impact on prognosis, with an adjusted hazard ratio for all deaths of 0.48 (high versus low; P = 0.003. A corresponding impact of intracellular Trop-2 was found on disease relapse (high versus low: hazard ratio, 0.51; P = 0.004. Altogether, we demonstrate that the Trop-2 activation states are critical determinants of tumor progression and are powerful indicators of breast cancer patients survival.

  13. Brachytherapy Improves Survival in Stage III Endometrial Cancer With Cervical Involvement

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    Bingham, Brian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Orton, Andrew; Boothe, Dustin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Stoddard, Greg [Division of Epidemiology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Huang, Y. Jessica; Gaffney, David K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Poppe, Matthew M., E-mail: Matthew.poppe@hci.utah.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the survival benefit of adding vaginal brachytherapy (BT) to pelvic external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in women with stage III endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: The National Cancer Data Base was used to identify patients with stage III endometrial cancer from 2004 to 2013. Only women who received adjuvant EBRT were analyzed. Women were grouped according to receipt of BT. Logistic regression modeling was used to identify predictors of receiving BT. Log–rank statistics were used to compare survival outcomes. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to evaluate the effect of BT on survival. A propensity score–matched analysis was also conducted among women with cervical involvement. Results: We evaluated 12,988 patients with stage III endometrial carcinoma, 39% of whom received EBRT plus BT. Women who received BT were more likely to have endocervical or cervical stromal involvement (odds ratios 2.03 and 1.77; P<.01, respectively). For patients receiving EBRT alone, the 5-year survival was 66% versus 69% with the addition of BT at 5 years (P<.01). Brachytherapy remained significantly predictive of decreased risk of death (hazard ratio 0.86; P<.01) on multivariate Cox regression. The addition of BT to EBRT did not affect survival among women without cervical involvement (P=.84). For women with endocervical or cervical stromal invasion, the addition of BT significantly improved survival (log–rank P<.01). Receipt of EBRT plus BT was associated with improved survival in women with positive and negative surgical margins, and receiving chemotherapy did not alter the benefit of BT. Propensity score–matched analysis results confirmed the benefit of BT among women with cervical involvement (hazard ratio 0.80; P=.01). Conclusions: In this population of women with stage III endometrial cancer the addition of BT to EBRT was associated with an improvement in survival for women with endocervical or cervical stromal invasion.

  14. Blood Lead, Bone Turnover, and Survival in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Fang; Peters, Tracy L; Beard, John D; Umbach, David M; Keller, Jean; Mariosa, Daniela; Allen, Kelli D; Ye, Weimin; Sandler, Dale P; Schmidt, Silke; Kamel, Freya

    2017-11-01

    Blood lead and bone turnover may be associated with the risk of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We aimed to assess whether these factors were also associated with time from ALS diagnosis to death through a survival analysis of 145 ALS patients enrolled during 2007 in the National Registry of Veterans with ALS. Associations of survival time with blood lead and plasma biomarkers of bone resorption (C-terminal telopeptides of type I collagen (CTX)) and bone formation (procollagen type I amino-terminal peptide (PINP)) were estimated using Cox models adjusted for age at diagnosis, diagnostic certainty, diagnostic delay, site of onset, and score on the Revised ALS Functional Rating Scale. Hazard ratios were calculated for each doubling of biomarker concentration. Blood lead, plasma CTX, and plasma PINP were mutually adjusted for one another. Increased lead (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.38; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.03, 1.84) and CTX (HR = 2.03; 95% CI: 1.42, 2.89) were both associated with shorter survival, whereas higher PINP was associated with longer survival (HR = 0.59; 95% CI: 0.42, 0.83), after ALS diagnosis. No interactions were observed between lead or bone turnover and other prognostic indicators. Lead toxicity and bone metabolism may be involved in ALS pathophysiology. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  15. Influence of residential segregation on survival after AIDS diagnosis among non-Hispanic blacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennie, Kristopher P; Lutfi, Khaleeq; Maddox, Lorene M; Lieb, Spencer; Trepka, Mary Jo

    2015-02-01

    Non-Hispanic blacks (NHBs) are disproportionately affected by the AIDS epidemic. With the advent of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), survival after AIDS diagnosis has increased dramatically, yet survival among NHBs is shorter compared with non-Hispanic whites. Racial residential segregation may be an important factor influencing observed racial disparities in survival. We linked data on 30,813 NHBs from the Florida Department of Health HIV/AIDS Reporting system (1993-2004) with death records and applied segregation indices and poverty levels to the data. Weighted Cox models were used to examine the association between segregation measured on five dimensions and survival, controlling for demographic factors, clinical factors, and area-level poverty. Analyses were stratified by pre-HAART (1993-1995), early HAART (1996-1998), and late-HAART (1999-2004) eras. In the late-HAART era, adjusting for area-level poverty, segregation remained a significant predictor of survival on two dimensions: Concentration (hazard ratio, 1.32; 95% confidence interval, 1.13-1.56) and centralization (hazard ratio, 1.44; 95% confidence interval, 1.12-1.84). Area-level poverty was an independent predictor of survival. These findings suggest that certain dimensions of segregation and poverty are associated with survival after AIDS diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Inherited variation at MC1R and ASIP and association with melanoma-specific survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Nicholas J; Reiner, Anne S; Begg, Colin B; Cust, Anne E; Busam, Klaus J; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Dwyer, Terence; From, Lynn; Gallagher, Richard P; Gruber, Stephen B; Rosso, Stefano; White, Kirsten A; Zanetti, Roberto; Orlow, Irene; Thomas, Nancy E; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Berwick, Marianne; Kanetsky, Peter A

    2015-06-01

    Melanocortin-1 receptor (MC1R) is a marker of melanoma risk in populations of European ancestry. However, MC1R effects on survival are much less studied. We investigated associations between variation at MC1R and survival in an international, population-based series of single primary melanoma patients enrolled into the Genes, Environment, and Melanoma study. MC1R genotype data was available for 2,200 participants with a first incident primary melanoma diagnosis. We estimated the association of MC1R genotypes with melanoma-specific survival (i.e., death caused by melanoma) and overall survival using COX proportional hazards modeling, adjusting for established prognostic factors for melanoma. We also conducted stratified analyses by Breslow thickness, tumor site, phenotypic index, and age. In addition, we evaluated haplotypes involving polymorphisms near the Agouti signaling protein gene (ASIP) locus for their impacts on survival. Melanoma-specific survival was inversely associated with carriage of MC1R variants in the absence of consensus alleles compared to carriage of at least one consensus allele (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.60; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.40, 0.90). MC1R results for overall survival were consistent with no association. We did not observe any statistical evidence of heterogeneity of effect estimates in stratified analyses. We observed increased hazard of melanoma-specific death among carriers of the risk haplotype TG near the ASIP locus (HR = 1.37; 95% CI: 0.91, 2.04) when compared to carriers of the most common GG haplotype. Similar results were noted for overall survival. Upon examining the ASIP TG/TG diplotype, we observed considerably increased hazard of melanoma-specific death (HR = 5.11; 95% CI: 1.88, 13.88) compared to carriers of the most common GG/GG diplotype. Our data suggest improved melanoma-specific survival among carriers of two inherited MC1R variants. © 2014 UICC.

  17. Survival analysis of cervical cancer using stratified Cox regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purnami, S. W.; Inayati, K. D.; Sari, N. W. Wulan; Chosuvivatwong, V.; Sriplung, H.

    2016-04-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the mostly widely cancer cause of the women death in the world including Indonesia. Most cervical cancer patients come to the hospital already in an advanced stadium. As a result, the treatment of cervical cancer becomes more difficult and even can increase the death's risk. One of parameter that can be used to assess successfully of treatment is the probability of survival. This study raises the issue of cervical cancer survival patients at Dr. Soetomo Hospital using stratified Cox regression based on six factors such as age, stadium, treatment initiation, companion disease, complication, and anemia. Stratified Cox model is used because there is one independent variable that does not satisfy the proportional hazards assumption that is stadium. The results of the stratified Cox model show that the complication variable is significant factor which influent survival probability of cervical cancer patient. The obtained hazard ratio is 7.35. It means that cervical cancer patient who has complication is at risk of dying 7.35 times greater than patient who did not has complication. While the adjusted survival curves showed that stadium IV had the lowest probability of survival.

  18. Family circumstances and survival from childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in West Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdmann, Friederike; Kaatsch, Peter; Schüz, Joachim

    2015-04-01

    Little is known about the relationship between family characteristics and survival from childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL), which we studied for the first time in German children. ALL cases were diagnosed between 1992 and 1994 and information on family characteristics was collected during a previously conducted nationwide case-control study. Children were followed for 10 years after diagnosis, as few disease-related events occur afterwards. Cox proportional hazards models estimating hazard ratios (HR) were calculated using overall as well as event-free survival methods. Second born children showed statistically significant better survival compared to first or later born children, with HRs ranging between 0.54 and 0.64 compared to firstborns. Somewhat poorer survival was observed for children having 3 or more siblings. A relationship was found for parental age at child's diagnosis, with poorer survival for children with younger parents (≤25 years of age at child's diagnosis), or with older fathers. The HR was statistically significant for fathers being ≥41years of age (HR of 2.1). No relationship between degree of urbanization of the place of residence at diagnosis and ALL survival was observed. Family circumstances may have an impact on survival from childhood ALL in Germany. Further research is warranted to elaborate the relationship of specific family characteristics and ALL survival and to investigate possible differential adherence to therapy and interactions with physicians. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Identification of novel genetic markers of breast cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Qi; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Kraft, Peter

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Survival after a diagnosis of breast cancer varies considerably between patients, and some of this variation may be because of germline genetic variation. We aimed to identify genetic markers associated with breast cancer-specific survival. METHODS: We conducted a large meta......-analysis of studies in populations of European ancestry, including 37954 patients with 2900 deaths from breast cancer. Each study had been genotyped for between 200000 and 900000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across the genome; genotypes for nine million common variants were imputed using a common reference.......2) associated with survival in ER-negative breast cancer cases (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.95, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.55 to 2.47, P = 1.91 x 10(-8)). Genotyping a subset of 2113 case patients, of which 300 were ER negative, provided supporting evidence for the quality of the imputation. The association...

  20. Survival time of dogs with splenic hemangiosarcoma treated by splenectomy with or without adjuvant chemotherapy: 208 cases (2001-2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendelburg, Kristin M; Price, Lori Lyn; Burgess, Kristine E; Lyons, Jeremiah A; Lew, Felicia H; Berg, John

    2015-08-15

    To determine survival time for dogs with splenic hemangiosarcoma treated with splenectomy alone, identify potential prognostic factors, and evaluate the efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy. Retrospective case series. 208 dogs. Medical records were reviewed, long-term follow-up information was obtained, and survival data were analyzed statistically. 154 dogs were treated with surgery alone, and 54 were treated with surgery and chemotherapy. Twenty-eight dogs received conventional chemotherapy, 13 received cyclophosphamide-based metronomic chemotherapy, and 13 received both conventional and metronomic chemotherapy. Median survival time of dogs treated with splenectomy alone was 1.6 months. Clinical stage was the only prognostic factor significantly associated with survival time. When the entire follow-up period was considered, there was no significant difference in survival time between dogs treated with surgery alone and dogs treated with surgery and chemotherapy. However, during the first 4 months of follow-up, after adjusting for the effects of clinical stage, survival time was significantly prolonged among dogs receiving any type of chemotherapy (hazard ratio, 0.6) and among dogs receiving both conventional and metronomic chemotherapy (hazard ratio, 0.4). Clinical stage was strongly associated with prognosis for dogs with splenic hemangiosarcoma. Chemotherapy was effective in prolonging survival time during the early portion of the follow-up period. Combinations of doxorubicin-based conventional protocols and cyclophosphamide-based metronomic protocols appeared to be more effective than either type of chemotherapy alone, but prolongations in survival time resulting from current protocols were modest.

  1. Comparison of methods for estimating the attributable risk in the context of survival analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malamine Gassama

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The attributable risk (AR measures the proportion of disease cases that can be attributed to an exposure in the population. Several definitions and estimation methods have been proposed for survival data. Methods Using simulations, we compared four methods for estimating AR defined in terms of survival functions: two nonparametric methods based on Kaplan-Meier’s estimator, one semiparametric based on Cox’s model, and one parametric based on the piecewise constant hazards model, as well as one simpler method based on estimated exposure prevalence at baseline and Cox’s model hazard ratio. We considered a fixed binary exposure with varying exposure probabilities and strengths of association, and generated event times from a proportional hazards model with constant or monotonic (decreasing or increasing Weibull baseline hazard, as well as from a nonproportional hazards model. We simulated 1,000 independent samples of size 1,000 or 10,000. The methods were compared in terms of mean bias, mean estimated standard error, empirical standard deviation and 95% confidence interval coverage probability at four equally spaced time points. Results Under proportional hazards, all five methods yielded unbiased results regardless of sample size. Nonparametric methods displayed greater variability than other approaches. All methods showed satisfactory coverage except for nonparametric methods at the end of follow-up for a sample size of 1,000 especially. With nonproportional hazards, nonparametric methods yielded similar results to those under proportional hazards, whereas semiparametric and parametric approaches that both relied on the proportional hazards assumption performed poorly. These methods were applied to estimate the AR of breast cancer due to menopausal hormone therapy in 38,359 women of the E3N cohort. Conclusion In practice, our study suggests to use the semiparametric or parametric approaches to estimate AR as a function of

  2. Comparison of methods for estimating the attributable risk in the context of survival analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassama, Malamine; Bénichou, Jacques; Dartois, Laureen; Thiébaut, Anne C M

    2017-01-23

    The attributable risk (AR) measures the proportion of disease cases that can be attributed to an exposure in the population. Several definitions and estimation methods have been proposed for survival data. Using simulations, we compared four methods for estimating AR defined in terms of survival functions: two nonparametric methods based on Kaplan-Meier's estimator, one semiparametric based on Cox's model, and one parametric based on the piecewise constant hazards model, as well as one simpler method based on estimated exposure prevalence at baseline and Cox's model hazard ratio. We considered a fixed binary exposure with varying exposure probabilities and strengths of association, and generated event times from a proportional hazards model with constant or monotonic (decreasing or increasing) Weibull baseline hazard, as well as from a nonproportional hazards model. We simulated 1,000 independent samples of size 1,000 or 10,000. The methods were compared in terms of mean bias, mean estimated standard error, empirical standard deviation and 95% confidence interval coverage probability at four equally spaced time points. Under proportional hazards, all five methods yielded unbiased results regardless of sample size. Nonparametric methods displayed greater variability than other approaches. All methods showed satisfactory coverage except for nonparametric methods at the end of follow-up for a sample size of 1,000 especially. With nonproportional hazards, nonparametric methods yielded similar results to those under proportional hazards, whereas semiparametric and parametric approaches that both relied on the proportional hazards assumption performed poorly. These methods were applied to estimate the AR of breast cancer due to menopausal hormone therapy in 38,359 women of the E3N cohort. In practice, our study suggests to use the semiparametric or parametric approaches to estimate AR as a function of time in cohort studies if the proportional hazards assumption appears

  3. Effects of common germ-line genetic variation in cell cycle genes on ovarian cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, H.; Hogdall, E.; Ramus, S.J.

    2008-01-01

    .05) in these genes. The genotypes of each polymorphism were tested for association with survival by Cox regression analysis. RESULTS: A nominally statistically significant association between genotype and ovarian cancer survival was observed for polymorphisms in CCND2 and CCNE1. The per-allele hazard ratios (95......PURPOSE: Somatic alterations have been shown to correlate with ovarian cancer prognosis and survival, but less is known about the effects on survival of common inherited genetic variation. Of particular interest are genes involved in cell cycle pathways, which regulate cell division and could......) and survival among women with invasive ovarian cancer participating in a multicenter case-control study from United Kingdom, Denmark, and United States. DNAs from up to 1,499 women were genotyped for 97 single-nucleotide polymorphisms that tagged the known common variants (minor allele frequency > or = 0...

  4. Effect of socioeconomic position on survival after childhood cancer in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simony, Sofie B; Lund, Lasse W; Erdmann, Friederike

    2016-01-01

    was slightly but not statistically significantly better the higher the education of the mother or the father, and with maternal income. Significantly better survival was observed when parents were living together compared to living alone and worse survival when the child had siblings compared to none. Young......Background One fifth of all deaths among children in Europe are accounted for by cancer. If this is to be reduced there is a need for studies on not only biology and treatment approaches but also on how social factors influence cure rates. We investigated how various socioeconomic characteristics...... individual level parental socioeconomic variables and vital status through 2012 by linkage to population-based registries. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for dying were estimated using multivariate Cox proportional hazard models. Results For all children with cancer combined, survival...

  5. Alpha emitter radium-223 and survival in metastatic prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, C; Nilsson, S; Heinrich, D; Helle, S I; O'Sullivan, J M; Fosså, S D; Chodacki, A; Wiechno, P; Logue, J; Seke, M; Widmark, A; Johannessen, D C; Hoskin, P; Bottomley, D; James, N D; Solberg, A; Syndikus, I; Kliment, J; Wedel, S; Boehmer, S; Dall'Oglio, M; Franzén, L; Coleman, R; Vogelzang, N J; O'Bryan-Tear, C G; Staudacher, K; Garcia-Vargas, J; Shan, M; Bruland, Ø S; Sartor, O

    2013-07-18

    Radium-223 dichloride (radium-223), an alpha emitter, selectively targets bone metastases with alpha particles. We assessed the efficacy and safety of radium-223 as compared with placebo, in addition to the best standard of care, in men with castration-resistant prostate cancer and bone metastases. In our phase 3, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, we randomly assigned 921 patients who had received, were not eligible to receive, or declined docetaxel, in a 2:1 ratio, to receive six injections of radium-223 (at a dose of 50 kBq per kilogram of body weight intravenously) or matching placebo; one injection was administered every 4 weeks. In addition, all patients received the best standard of care. The primary end point was overall survival. The main secondary efficacy end points included time to the first symptomatic skeletal event and various biochemical end points. A prespecified interim analysis, conducted when 314 deaths had occurred, assessed the effect of radium-223 versus placebo on survival. An updated analysis, when 528 deaths had occurred, was performed before crossover from placebo to radium-223. At the interim analysis, which involved 809 patients, radium-223, as compared with placebo, significantly improved overall survival (median, 14.0 months vs. 11.2 months; hazard ratio, 0.70; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.55 to 0.88; two-sided P=0.002). The updated analysis involving 921 patients confirmed the radium-223 survival benefit (median, 14.9 months vs. 11.3 months; hazard ratio, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.58 to 0.83; Pradium-233 as compared with placebo. Radium-223 was associated with low myelosuppression rates and fewer adverse events. In this study, which was terminated for efficacy at the prespecified interim analysis, radium-223 improved overall survival. (Funded by Algeta and Bayer HealthCare Pharmaceuticals; ALSYMPCA ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00699751.).

  6. Electrostatic hazards

    CERN Document Server

    Luttgens, Günter; Luttgens, Gnter; Luttgens, G Nter

    1997-01-01

    In the US, UK and Europe there is in excess of one notifiable dust or electrostatic explosion every day of the year. This clearly makes the hazards associated with the handling of materials subject to either cause or react to electrostatic discharge of vital importance to anyone associated with their handling or industrial bulk use. This book provides a comprehensive guide to the dangers of static electricity and how to avoid them. It will prove invaluable to safety managers and professionals, as well as all personnel involved in the activities concerned, in the chemical, agricultural, pharmaceutical and petrochemical process industries. The book makes extended use of case studies to illustrate the principles being expounded, thereby making it far more open, accessible and attractive to the practitioner in industry than the highly theoretical texts which are also available. The authors have many years' experience in the area behind them, including the professional teaching of the content provided here. Günte...

  7. Effect of smoking on survival of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolly, Philippe; Knöpfli, Marina; Dufour, Jean-François

    2017-11-01

    Lifestyle factors such as smoking, obesity and physical activity have gained interest in the field of hepatocellular carcinoma. These factors play a significant role in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma. Several studies revealed the impact of tobacco consumption on the development of hepatocellular carcinoma and its synergistic effects with viral etiologies (hepatitis B and C). The effects of smoking on survival in patients with a diagnosed hepatocellular carcinoma have not yet been investigated in a Western cohort where hepatitis C infection is a major risk factor. Using data from a prospective cohort of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma who were followed at the University Hospital of Bern, Switzerland, survival was compared by Kaplan-Meier analysis in smokers and nonsmokers, and multivariate Cox regression was applied to control for confounding variables. Of 238 eligible hepatocellular carcinoma patients, 64 were smokers at the time of inclusion and 174 were nonsmokers. Smokers had a significant worse overall survival than nonsmokers (hazard ratio 1.77, 95% confidence interval: 1.22-2.58, P=.003). Analysis of patients according to their underlying liver disease, revealed that smoking, and not nonsmoking, affected survival of hepatitis B virus and C virus-infected patients only. In this subgroup, smoking was an independent predictor for survival (hazard ratio 2.99, 95% confidence interval: 1.7-5.23, P<.001) and remained independently predictive when adjusted for confounding variables. This study shows that smoking is an independent predictor of survival in hepatitis B virus/hepatitis C virus-infected patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Cancer with diabetes: prevalence, metabolic control, and survival in an academic oncology practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlin, Nina J; Dueck, Amylou C; Cook, Curtiss B

    2012-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of diabetes mellitus, glycemic control, and impact of diabetes on overall survival in an academic oncology practice. Data on cancer patients (1999 to 2008) were retrieved from the institutional cancer registry and linked to electronic files to obtain diabetes status and hemoglobin A1c (A1C) values within the first 6 months of cancer diagnosis. Overall survival by cancer type with and without diabetes was compared using Cox regression. Excluding skin and hematologic malignancies, 15,951 cancer cases were identified. Overall diabetes prevalence was 6.8% (n = 1,090), declining over time (Pcancers (7.6% [68 of 899]). Patients with diabetes were older (mean age, 70 versus 66 years; Pcancer patients was 6.8% and did not differ across cancer types (P = 0.80). Only 58.6% (331 of 565) of diabetic cancer patients had all A1C cancer diagnosis. Pancreatic cancer patients with coexisting diabetes had better overall survival than pancreatic cancer patients without diabetes (hazard ratio, 0.60; 95% confidence interval 0.44 to 0.80; Pcancer patients had worse overall survival than prostate cancer patients without diabetes (hazard ratio, 1.36; 95% confidence interval 1.05 to 1.76; P = 0.02). In this academic oncology practice, diabetes was common, glycemic control often was suboptimal, and survival varied by cancer type. Additional study is needed to optimize glucose management and investigate mechanisms underlying age, sex, and survival differences.

  9. Socioeconomic disparity in survival after breast cancer in ireland: observational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M Walsh

    Full Text Available We evaluated the relationship between breast cancer survival and deprivation using data from the Irish National Cancer Registry. Cause-specific survival was compared between five area-based socioeconomic deprivation strata using Cox regression. Patient and tumour characteristics and treatment were compared using modified Poisson regression with robust variance estimation. Based on 21356 patients diagnosed 1999-2008, age-standardized five-year survival averaged 80% in the least deprived and 75% in the most deprived stratum. Age-adjusted mortality risk was 33% higher in the most deprived group (hazard ratio 1.33, 95% CI 1.21-1.45, P<0.001. The most deprived groups were more likely to present with advanced stage, high grade or hormone receptor-negative cancer, symptomatically, or with significant comorbidity, and to be smokers or unmarried, and less likely to have breast-conserving surgery. Cox modelling suggested that the available data on patient, tumour and treatment factors could account for only about half of the survival disparity (adjusted hazard ratio 1.18, 95% CI 0.97-1.43, P = 0.093. Survival disparity did not diminish over time, compared with the period 1994-1998. Persistent survival disparities among Irish breast cancer patients suggest unequal use of or access to services and highlight the need for further research to understand and remove the behavioural or other barriers involved.

  10. Changing Pattern in Malignant Mesothelioma Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Faig

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Survival for mesothelioma has been shown to be poor, with marginal improvement over time. Recent advances in the understanding of pathophysiology and treatment of mesothelioma may impact therapy to improve survival that may not be evident from available clinical trials that are often small and not randomized. Therapies may affect survival differently based on mesothelioma location (pleural vs peritoneal. Data are conflicting regarding the effect of asbestos exposure on mesothelioma location. OBJECTIVES: We examined survival in a large cohort of mesothelioma subjects analyzed by tumor location and presence and mode of asbestos exposure. METHODS: Data were analyzed from cases (n = 380 diagnosed with mesothelioma from 1992 to 2012. Cases were either drawn from treatment referrals, independent medical evaluation for medical legal purposes, or volunteers who were diagnosed with mesothelioma. Subjects completed an occupational medical questionnaire, personal interview with the examining physician, and physician review of the medical record. RESULTS: This study reports better survival for mesothelioma than historical reports. Survival for peritoneal mesothelioma was longer than that for pleural mesothelioma (hazard ratio = 0.36, 95% confidence interval = 0.24-0.54, P < .001 after adjusting for gender and age at diagnosis. Non-occupational cases were more likely to be 1 diagnosed with peritoneal mesothelioma, 2 female, 3 exposed, and 4 diagnosed at a younger age and to have a 5 shorter latency compared to occupational cases (P < .001. CONCLUSION: Peritoneal mesothelioma was more likely associated with non-occupational exposure, thus emphasizing the importance of exposure history in enhancing early diagnosis and treatment impact.

  11. Improved Survival with Ipilimumab in Patients with Metastatic Melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodi, F. Stephen; O’Day, Steven J.; McDermott, David F.; Weber, Robert W.; Sosman, Jeffrey A.; Haanen, John B.; Gonzalez, Rene; Robert, Caroline; Schadendorf, Dirk; Hassel, Jessica C.; Akerley, Wallace; van den Eertwegh, Alfons J.M.; Lutzky, Jose; Lorigan, Paul; Vaubel, Julia M.; Linette, Gerald P.; Hogg, David; Ottensmeier, Christian H.; Lebbé, Celeste; Peschel, Christian; Quirt, Ian; Clark, Joseph I.; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Weber, Jeffrey S.; Tian, Jason; Yellin, Michael J.; Nichol, Geoffrey M.; Hoos, Axel; Urba, Walter J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND An improvement in overall survival among patients with metastatic melanoma has been an elusive goal. In this phase 3 study, ipilimumab — which blocks cytotoxic T-lymphocyte–associated antigen 4 to potentiate an antitumor T-cell response — administered with or without a glycoprotein 100 (gp100) peptide vaccine was compared with gp100 alone in patients with previously treated metastatic melanoma. METHODS A total of 676 HLA-A⋆0201–positive patients with unresectable stage III or IV melanoma, whose disease had progressed while they were receiving therapy for metastatic disease, were randomly assigned, in a 3:1:1 ratio, to receive ipilimumab plus gp100 (403 patients), ipilimumab alone (137), or gp100 alone (136). Ipilimumab, at a dose of 3 mg per kilogram of body weight, was administered with or without gp100 every 3 weeks for up to four treatments (induction). Eligible patients could receive reinduction therapy. The primary end point was overall survival. RESULTS The median overall survival was 10.0 months among patients receiving ipilimumab plus gp100, as compared with 6.4 months among patients receiving gp100 alone (hazard ratio for death, 0.68; P<0.001). The median overall survival with ipilimumab alone was 10.1 months (hazard ratio for death in the comparison with gp100 alone, 0.66; P = 0.003). No difference in overall survival was detected between the ipilimumab groups (hazard ratio with ipilimumab plus gp100, 1.04; P = 0.76). Grade 3 or 4 immune-related adverse events occurred in 10 to 15% of patients treated with ipilimumab and in 3% treated with gp100 alone. There were 14 deaths related to the study drugs (2.1%), and 7 were associated with immune-related adverse events. CONCLUSIONS Ipilimumab, with or without a gp100 peptide vaccine, as compared with gp100 alone, improved overall survival in patients with previously treated metastatic melanoma. Adverse events can be severe, long-lasting, or both, but most are reversible with appropriate

  12. Comparison of Cox and Gray's survival models in severe sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasal, Jan; Andersen, Zorana Jovanovic; Clermont, Gilles

    2004-01-01

    Although survival is traditionally modeled using Cox proportional hazards modeling, this approach may be inappropriate in sepsis, in which the proportional hazards assumption does not hold. Newer, more flexible models, such as Gray's model, may be more appropriate.......Although survival is traditionally modeled using Cox proportional hazards modeling, this approach may be inappropriate in sepsis, in which the proportional hazards assumption does not hold. Newer, more flexible models, such as Gray's model, may be more appropriate....

  13. Infused Therapy and Survival in Older Patients Diagnosed with Metastatic Breast Cancer who Received Trastuzumab

    OpenAIRE

    Griffiths, Robert I.; Lalla, Deepa; Robert J. Herbert; Doan, Justin F; Brammer, Melissa G; Danese, Mark D.

    2011-01-01

    We used Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare data (2000-2006) to describe treatment and survival in women diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer (MBC) who received trastuzumab. There were 610 patients with a mean age of 74 years. Overall, 32% received trastuzumab alone and 47% received trastuzumab plus a taxane. In multivariate analysis, trastuzumab plus chemotherapy was associated with a lower adjusted cancer mortality rate (Hazard Ratio [HR] 0.54; 95% Confidence Interval [C...

  14. Viability of Iberian x Meishan F2 newborn pigs. II. Survival analysis up to weaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casellas, J; Noguera, J L; Varona, L; Sánchez, A; Arqué, M; Piedrafita, J

    2004-07-01

    Iberian x Meishan F2 piglet's preweaning survivability was analyzed using categorical data regression procedures within the proportional hazards assumption. A frailty sire model was assumed with the litter effect treated as an additional random source of variation. Moreover, the relative birth weight within litter and the litter effect were considered time-dependent covariates that changed their values in the second day of life due to cross fostering carried out to standardize litters. Six variables had a significant effect on survivability: birth weight (P piglets (Piglets that were small in relation to their siblings (relative birth weight within litter) also suffered an increased death risk, with a hazard ratio of 1.81 (P Piglets with a rectal temperature lower than 35.4 degrees C 60 min after birth showed the highest hazard ratio (7.18; P piglet survival involves several systematic influences related to birth weight, thermoregulatory ability, and injuries suffered during gestation and farrowing. The genetic variance was small compared with those generated by the common environment, for which the genetic improvement of piglet survival seems difficult.

  15. Assessment of survival of patients with metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma after radical cytoreductive nephrectomy versus no surgery: a SEER analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Jun Xiao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purposes To examine the factors related to the choice of cytoreductive nephrectomy (CN for patients with metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (mCCRCC, and compare the population-based survival rates of patients treated with or without surgery in the modern targeted therapy era. Materials and Methods From 2006 to 2009, patients with mCCRCC were identified from SEER database. The factors that affected patients to be submitted to CN were examined and propensity scores for each patient were calculated. Then patients were matched based upon propensity scores. Univariable and multivariable cox regression models were used to compare survival rates of patients treated with or without surgery. Finally, sensitivity analysis for the cox model on a hazard ratio scale was performed. Results Age, race, tumor size, T stage and N stage were associated with nephrectomy univariablely. After the match based upon propensity scores, the 1-, 2-, and 3-year cancer-specific survival rate estimates were 45.1%, 27.9%, and 21.7% for the no-surgery group vs 70.6%, 52.2%, and 41.7% for the surgery group, respectively (hazard ratio 0.42, 95%CI: 0.35-0.52, log-rank P<0.001. In multivariable Cox proportional hazard regression model, race, T stage, N stage and median household income were significantly associated with survival. Sensitivity analysis on a hazard ratio scale indicated that the hazard ratio might be above 1.00 only when the unknown factor had an opposite effect on survival which was 3-fold than CN. Conclusion The results of our study showed that CN significantly improves the survival of patients with metastatic CCRCC even in the targeted therapy era.

  16. Survival rates and predictors of survival among colorectal cancer patients in a Malaysian tertiary hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magaji, Bello Arkilla; Moy, Foong Ming; Roslani, April Camilla; Law, Chee Wei

    2017-05-18

    patients with data on their Duke's staging, independent predictors of poor colorectal cancer (5-year) survival were male sex (Hazard Ratio [HR]: 1.41; 95% CI: 1.12, 1.76), Chinese ethnicity (HR: 1.41; 95% CI: 1.07,1.85), elevated (≥ 5.1 ng/ml) pre-operative carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA) level (HR: 2.13; 95% CI: 1.60, 2.83), Duke's stage C (HR: 1.68; 95% CI: 1.28, 2.21), Duke's stage D (HR: 4.61; 95% CI: 3.39, 6.28) and emergency surgery (HR: 1.52; 95% CI: 1.07, 2.15). The survival rates of colorectal cancer among our patients were comparable with those of some Asian countries but lower than those found in more developed countries. Males and patients from the Chinese ethnic group had lower survival rates compared to their counterparts. More advanced staging and late presentation were important predictors of colorectal cancer survival. Health education programs targeting high risk groups and emphasizing the importance of screening and early diagnosis, as well as the recognition of symptoms and risk factors should be implemented. A nationwide colorectal cancer screening program should be designed and implemented to increase early detection and improve survival outcomes.

  17. Long-term hazard of recurrence in HER2+ breast cancer patients untreated with anti-HER2 therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strasser-Weippl, Kathrin; Horick, Nora; Smith, Ian E

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Worldwide, many patients with HER2+ (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive) early breast cancer (BC) do not receive adjuvant trastuzumab. Hazards of recurrence of these patients with respect to hormone receptor status of the primary tumor have not been described. METHODS......: Using data from 1,260 patients randomized to placebo in the adjuvant TEACH trial, we report 10-year annual hazards of recurrence in HER2+ patients not treated with anti-HER2 therapy. RESULTS: Disease-free survival (DFS) was 75% after 5 and 61% after 10 years, respectively. Patients with HER2+ hormone...... receptor-positive (HR+ (hormone receptor-positive); ER+ (estrogen receptor-positive) or PR+ (progesterone receptor-positive)) disease had a significantly better DFS than patients with HER2+ HR- (ER-/PR-) disease (hazard ratio 0.72, P=0.02). This difference was explainable by a significantly higher hazard...

  18. What happens after discharge? An analysis of long-term survival in cardiac surgical patients requiring prolonged intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfstrom, K Miriam; Hatefi, Dustin; Kilgo, Patrick D; Puskas, John D; Thourani, Vinod H; Guyton, Robert A; Halkos, Michael E

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac surgical patients with postoperative complications frequently require prolonged intensive care yet survive to hospital discharge. From January 1, 2002 to December 31, 2007, 11,541 consecutive patients underwent cardiac operations at a single academic institution. Of these, 11,084 (95.9%) survived to hospital discharge and comprised the study sample. Patients were retrospectively categorized into four groups according to intensive care unit (ICU) length of stay (LOS): 14 days. Survival at 12 months was determined using the Social Security Death Index. Kaplan-Meier (KM) survival curves and Cox proportional hazards regression modeling (hazard ratio, HR) were used to analyze group differences in survival. One-year survival among the four groups according to ICU LOS was: 14 days, 68.3% (265/388) (p 14 days (HR = 1.90) compared to patients with ICU LOS 14 days (HR = 1.63). Although cardiac surgery patients with major postoperative complications frequently survive to hospital discharge, survival after discharge is significantly reduced in patients requiring prolonged ICU care. Reduced survival in patients with a high risk of complications and anticipated long ICU stays should be considered when discussing surgical versus nonsurgical options. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Acquired xanthine dehydrogenase expression shortens survival in patients with resected adenocarcinoma of lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, Hayato; Minamiya, Yoshihiro; Saito, Hajime; Imai, Kazuhiro; Kawaharada, Yasushi; Motoyama, Satoru; Ogawa, Jun-ichi

    2012-10-01

    Xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH), also known as xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR), has long been recognized as the key enzyme in the catabolism of purines, oxidizing hypoxanthine into xanthine and then xanthine into uric acid. In addition, levels of XDH expression are reportedly related to the prognosis of patients with malignant tumors, though the relationship between the clinicopathological features of lung cancer and XDH is not fully understood. We therefore used semiquantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction to assess expression of XDH mRNA in tumor samples from 88 patients with adenocarcinoma of the lung. We then correlated XDH mRNA levels with known clinicopathological factors. We found that the 5-year overall survival rate among patients strongly expressing XDH was significantly poorer than among those expressing lower levels of XDH (P XDH. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard analyses revealed that being male (hazard ratio, 3.14; 95 % confidence interval (CI), 1.45-7.07; P = 0.004), nodal metastasis positivity (hazard ratio, 5.74; 95 % CI, 1.94-19.3; P = 0.001), and high XDH expression (hazard ratio, 2.33; 95 % CI, 1.11-5.02; P = 0.026) were all independent factors affecting 5-year disease-free survival. In conclusion, high tumoral XDH expression is an independent predictor of a poor prognosis in patients with adenocarcinoma of the lung.

  20. Association of dietary phosphorus intake and phosphorus to protein ratio with mortality in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noori, Nazanin; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Kovesdy, Csaba P; Bross, Rachelle; Benner, Debbie; Kopple, Joel D

    2010-04-01

    Epidemiologic studies show an association between higher predialysis serum phosphorus and increased death risk in maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) patients. The hypothesis that higher dietary phosphorus intake and higher phosphorus content per gram of dietary protein intake are each associated with increased mortality in MHD patients was examined. Food frequency questionnaires were used to conduct a cohort study to examine the survival predictability of dietary phosphorus and the ratio of phosphorus to protein intake. At the start of the cohort, Cox proportional hazard regression was used in 224 MHD patients, who were followed for up to 5 years (2001 to 2006). Both higher dietary phosphorus intake and a higher dietary phosphorus to protein ratio were associated with significantly increased death hazard ratios (HR) in the unadjusted models and after incremental adjustments for case-mix, diet, serum phosphorus, malnutrition-inflammation complex syndrome, and inflammatory markers. The HR of the highest (compared with lowest) dietary phosphorus intake tertile in the fully adjusted model was 2.37. Across categories of dietary phosphorus to protein ratios of or =16 mg/g, death HRs were 1.13, 1.00 (reference value), 1.80, and 1.99, respectively. Cubic spline models of the survival analyses showed similar incremental associations. Higher dietary phosphorus intake and higher dietary phosphorus to protein ratios are each associated with increased death risk in MHD patients, even after adjustments for serum phosphorus, phosphate binders and their types, and dietary protein, energy, and potassium intakes.

  1. INTRADIALYTIC ORAL NUTRITIONAL SUPPLEMENTS AND SURVIVAL IN MAINTENANCE HEMODIALYSIS PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Lacson

    2012-06-01

    Crude mortality in the ONS group (N= 7,264 was 29.4% vs. 36.6% for controls (N= 13,853, p<0.001. Compared to controls, the unadjusted mortality hazard ratio for ONS was 0.70 (0.67, 0.74 and after adjustment for baseline case‐mix and 5 quality indicators was 0.68 (0.64, 0.71. Although limited by the observational design, these results indicate favorable survival associated with ONS use in malnourished chronic HD patients with albumin ≤3.5 g/dL.

  2. Obesity and survival in population-based patients with pancreatic cancer in the San Francisco Bay Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zhihong; Holly, Elizabeth A; Bracci, Paige M

    2012-12-01

    Obesity has been consistently associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer incidence and mortality. However, studies of obesity and overall survival in patients with pancreatic cancer are notably lacking, especially in population-based studies. Active and passive follow-up were used to determine vital status and survival for 510 pancreatic cancer patients diagnosed from 1995 to 1999 in a large population-based case-control study in the San Francisco Bay Area. Survival rates were computed using Kaplan-Meier methods. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) were estimated in multivariable Cox proportional hazards models as measures of the association between pre-diagnostic obesity and pancreatic cancer survival. An elevated hazard ratio of 1.3 (95 % CI, 0.91-1.81) was observed for obese [body mass index (BMI) ≥ 30] compared with normal range BMI (patients. Associations between BMI and overall survival did not statistically significantly vary by known prognostic and risk factors (all p-interaction ≥0.18), yet elevated HRs consistently were observed for obese compared with normal BMI patients [localized disease at diagnosis (HR, 3.1), surgical resection (HR, 1.6), ever smokers (HR, 1.6), diabetics (HR, 3.3)]. Poor survival was observed among men, older patients, more recent and current smokers, whereas improved survival was observed for Asian/Pacific Islanders. Our results in general provide limited support for an association between pre-diagnostic obesity and decreased survival in patients with pancreatic cancer. Patterns of reduced survival associated with obesity in some patient subgroups could be due to chance and require assessment in larger pooled studies.

  3. Long-Term Survival Outcomes of Cancer-Directed Surgery for Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma: Propensity Score Matching Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, David B; Rice, David C; Niu, Jiangong; Atay, Scott; Vaporciyan, Ara A; Antonoff, Mara; Hofstetter, Wayne L; Walsh, Garrett L; Swisher, Stephen G; Roth, Jack A; Tsao, Anne; Gomez, Daniel; Giordano, Sharon H; Mehran, Reza; Sepesi, Boris

    2017-10-10

    Purpose Small observational studies have shown a survival advantage to undergoing cancer-directed surgery for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM); however, it is unclear if these results are generalizable. Our purpose was to evaluate survival after treatment of MPM with cancer-directed surgery and to explore the effect surgery interaction with chemotherapy or radiation therapy on survival by using the National Cancer Database. Patients and Methods Patients with microscopically proven MPM were identified within the National Cancer Database (2004 to 2014). Propensity score matching was performed 1:2 and among this cohort, a Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to identify predictors of survival. Median survival was calculated by using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results Of 20,561 patients with MPM, 6,645 were identified in the matched cohort, among whom 2,166 underwent no therapy, 2,015 underwent chemotherapy alone, 850 underwent cancer-directed surgery alone, 988 underwent surgery with chemotherapy, and 274 underwent trimodality therapy. The remaining 352 patients underwent another combination of surgery, radiation, or chemotherapy. Thirty-day and 90-day mortality rates were 6.3% and 15.5%. Cancer-directed surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy were independently associated with improved survival (hazard ratio, 0.77, 0.74, and 0.88, respectively). Stratified analysis revealed that surgery-based multimodality therapy demonstrated an improved survival compared with surgery alone, with no significant difference between surgery-based multimodality therapies; however, the largest estimated effect was when cancer-directed surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy were combined (hazard ratio, 0.52). For patients with the epithelial subtype who underwent trimodality therapy, median survival was extended from 14.5 months to 23.4 months. Conclusion MPM is an aggressive and rapidly fatal disease. Surgery-based multimodality therapy was associated with

  4. Centralized treatment of advanced stages of ovarian cancer improves survival: a nationwide Danish survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagö-Olsen, Carsten L; Høgdall, Claus; Kehlet, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Objective. This retrospective, nationwide, observational study was designed to compare treatment in tertiary referral centers vs. regional hospitals on overall survival for patients with stage IIIC and IV ovarian cancer. Material and methods. The study took place in all gynecological departments.......021). Treatment in a referral center was an independent prognostic factor for overall survival hazard ratio, 0.83 (confidence interval 0.70-0.98). Conclusion. Patients with stage IIIC and IV ovarian cancer benefit from treatment in a tertiary referral center....

  5. Never smokers with resected lung cancer: different demographics, similar survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiles, Brendon M; Rahouma, Mohamed; Hussein, Mohamed Kamel; Nasar, Abu; Nguyen, Andrew B; Harrison, Sebron; Lee, Benjamin; Port, Jeffrey L; Altorki, Nasser K

    2017-11-22

    We sought to examine changes over time in the proportion of never smokers among surgical lung cancer patients and to determine whether smoking history affected survival. We performed a retrospective review of a prospective database. Among never smokers and smokers, demographic and pathological data were compared. Disease-free survival (DFS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS) were analysed. Propensity matching was performed for further comparison of survival in a matched cohort. Among 3232 patients, we identified 718 never smokers (22%), 993 smokers with never smokers increased over time, comprising 26.6% of the cohort after 2007 compared with 16.1% prior thereto (P ≤ 0.001). Never smokers were younger, more likely to be women and Asian, more frequently had adenocarcinoma and lower lobe tumours and were more likely to have pStage I disease. In pStage-matched cohorts, there were no differences in DFS or CSS. Similarly, in propensity-matched groups (498 patients each), there was no difference in 5-year DFS (66% vs 67%, P = 0.661) or in CSS (84% vs 81%, P = 0.350). On univariate analysis of the matched cohort, never smoking status had no effect on DFS (hazard ratio 1.05, P = 0.661) or CSS (hazard ratio 1.16, P = 0.350). The proportion of never smokers undergoing resections for lung cancer is increasing. Never smokers have distinct demographic patterns and tend to be younger women with adenocarcinoma. Despite these differences, stage and propensity-matched never smokers have the same survival as smokers and remain at equal risk for recurrence and death.

  6. COMPUTERS HAZARDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Augustynek

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In June 2006, over 12.6 million Polish users of the Web registered. On the average, each of them spent 21 hours and 37 minutes monthly browsing the Web. That is why the problems of the psychological aspects of computer utilization have become an urgent research subject. The results of research into the development of Polish information society carried out in AGH University of Science and Technology, under the leadership of Leslaw H. Haber, in the period from 2000 until present time, indicate the emergence dynamic changes in the ways of computer utilization and their circumstances. One of the interesting regularities has been the inverse proportional relation between the level of computer skills and the frequency of the Web utilization.It has been found that in 2005, compared to 2000, the following changes occurred:- A significant drop in the number of students who never used computers and the Web;- Remarkable increase in computer knowledge and skills (particularly pronounced in the case of first years student- Decreasing gap in computer skills between students of the first and the third year; between male and female students;- Declining popularity of computer games.It has been demonstrated also that the hazard of computer screen addiction was the highest in he case of unemployed youth outside school system. As much as 12% of this group of young people were addicted to computer. A lot of leisure time that these youths enjoyed inducted them to excessive utilization of the Web. Polish housewives are another population group in risk of addiction to the Web. The duration of long Web charts carried out by younger and younger youths has been another matter of concern. Since the phenomenon of computer addiction is relatively new, no specific therapy methods has been developed. In general, the applied therapy in relation to computer addition syndrome is similar to the techniques applied in the cases of alcohol or gambling addiction. Individual and group

  7. Marital Status and Survival in Patients with Carcinoid Tumors

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    Erin K. Greenleaf

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Marital status is a known prognostic factor in overall and disease-specific survival in several types of cancer. The impact of marital status on survival in patients with carcinoid tumors remains unknown. We hypothesized that married patients have higher rates of survival than similar unmarried patients with carcinoid tumors. Methods Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database, we identified 23,126 people diagnosed with a carcinoid tumor between 2000 and 2011 and stratified them according to marital status. Univariate and multivariable analyses were performed to compare the characteristics and outcomes between patient cohorts. Overall and cancer-related survival were analyzed using the Kaplan–Meier method. Multivariable survival analyses were performed using Cox proportional hazards models (hazards ratio [HR], controlling for demographics and tumor-related and treatment-related variables. Propensity score analysis was performed to determine surgical intervention distributions among married and unmarried (ie, single, separated, divorced, widowed patients. Results Marital status was significantly related to both overall and cancer-related survival in patients with carcinoid tumors. Divorced and widowed patients had worse overall survival (HR, 1.33 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.08–1.33] and 1.34 [95% CI, 1.22–1.46], respectively and cancer-related survival (HR, 1.15 [95% CI, 1.00–1.31] and 1.15 [95% CI, 1.03–1.29], respectively than married patients over five years. Single and separated patients had worse overall survival (HR, 1.20 [95% CI, 1.08–1.33] and 1.62 [95% CI, 1.25–2.11], respectively than married patients over five years, but not worse cancer-related survival. Unmarried patients were more likely than matched married patients to undergo definitive surgical intervention (62.67% vs 53.11%, respectively, P < 0.0001. Conclusions Even after controlling for other prognostic factors, married patients

  8. Survival analysis of patients on maintenance hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Chandrashekar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the continuous improvement of dialysis technology and pharmacological treatment, mortality rates for dialysis patients are still high. A 2-year prospective study was conducted at a tertiary care hospital to determine the factors influencing survival among patients on maintenance hemodialysis. 96 patients with end-stage renal disease surviving more than 3 months on hemodialysis (8-12 h/week were studied. Follow-up was censored at the time of death or at the end of 2-year study period, whichever occurred first. Of the 96 patients studied (mean age 49.74 ± 14.55 years, 75% male and 44.7% diabetics, 19 died with an estimated mortality rate of 19.8%. On an age-adjusted multivariate analysis, female gender and hypokalemia independently predicted mortality. In Cox analyses, patient survival was associated with delivered dialysis dose (single pool Kt/V, hazard ratio [HR] =0.01, P = 0.016, frequency of hemodialysis (HR = 3.81, P = 0.05 and serum albumin (HR = 0.24, P = 0.005. There was no significant difference between diabetes and non-diabetes in relation to death (Relative Risk = 1.109; 95% CI = 0.49-2.48, P = 0.803. This study revealed that mortality among hemodialysis patients remained high, mostly due to sepsis and ischemic heart disease. Patient survival was better with higher dialysis dose, increased frequency of dialysis and adequate serum albumin level. Efforts at minimizing infectious complications, preventing cardiovascular events and improving nutrition should increase survival among hemodialysis patients.

  9. Time-Varying Effects of Prognostic Factors Associated With Disease-Free Survival in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Loki; Pu, Minya; Parker, Barbara A.; Thomson, Cynthia A.; Caan, Bette J.; Flatt, Shirley W.; Madlensky, Lisa; Hajek, Richard A.; Al-Delaimy, Wael K.; Saquib, Nazmus; Gold, Ellen B.

    2009-01-01

    Early detection and effective treatments have dramatically improved breast cancer survivorship, yet the risk of relapse persists even 15 years after the initial diagnosis. It is important to identify prognostic factors for late breast cancer events. The authors investigated time-varying effects of tumor characteristics on breast-cancer-free survival using data on 3,088 breast cancer survivors from 4 US states who participated in a randomized dietary intervention trial in 1995–2006, with maximum follow-up through 15 years (median, 9 years). A piecewise constant penalized spline approach incorporating time-varying coefficients was adopted, allowing for deviations from the proportional hazards assumption. This method is more flexible than standard approaches, provides direct estimates of hazard ratios across time intervals, and is computationally tractable. Having a stage II or III tumor was associated with a 3-fold higher hazard of breast cancer than having a stage I tumor during the first 2.5 years after diagnosis; this hazard ratio decreased to 2.1 after 7.7 years, but higher tumor stage remained a significant risk factor. Similar diminishing effects were found for poorly differentiated tumors. Interestingly, having a positive estrogen receptor status was protective up to 4 years after diagnosis but detrimental after 7.7 years (hazard ratio = 1.5). These results emphasize the importance of careful statistical modeling allowing for possibly time-dependent effects in long-term survivorship studies. PMID:19403844

  10. Improved Survival Among Children with Spina Bifida in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Mikyong; Kucik, James E.; Siffel, Csaba; Lu, Chengxing; Shaw, Gary M.; Canfield, Mark A.; Correa, Adolfo

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate trends in survival among children with spina bifida by race/ethnicity and possible prognostic factors in 10 regions of the United States. Study design A retrospective cohort study was conducted of 5165 infants with spina bifida born during 1979-2003, identified by 10 birth defects registries in the United States. Survival probabilities and adjusted hazard ratios were estimated for race/ethnicity and other characteristics using the Cox proportional hazard model. Results During the study period, the 1-year survival probability among infants with spina bifida showed improvements for whites (from 88% to 96%), blacks (from 79% to 88%), and Hispanics (from 88% to 93%). The impact of race/ethnicity on survival varied by birth weight, which was the strongest predictor of survival through age 8. There was little racial/ethnic variation in survival among children born of very low birth weight. Among children born of low birth weight, the increased risk of mortality to Hispanics was approximately 4-6 times that of whites. The black-white disparity was greatest among children born of normal birth weight. Congenital heart defects did not affect the risk of mortality among very low birth weight children but increased the risk of mortality 4-fold among children born of normal birth weight. Conclusions The survival of infants born with spina bifida has improved; however, improvements in survival varied by race/ethnicity, and blacks and Hispanics continued to have poorer survival than whites in the most recent birth cohort from 1998-2002. Further studies are warranted to elucidate possible reasons for the observed differences in survival. PMID:22727874

  11. Survival outcomes in elderly men undergoing radical prostatectomy in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranasinghe, Weranja; Wang, Luke L; Persad, Raj; Bolton, Damien; Lawrentschuk, Nathan; Sengupta, Shomik

    2017-09-18

    To investigate the outcomes of patients older than 75 years of age in Victoria undergoing radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer. Data on all men undergoing radical prostatectomy in Victoria between 1 January 2004 and 31 December 2014 were obtained from the Victorian Cancer Registry. Tumour characteristics including Gleason grade, stage of disease and cause of death were obtained. Statistical analysis was performed using chi-squared test, Cox proportional hazards method and Kaplan-Meier analysis. A total of 14 686 men underwent radical prostatectomy during the defined period, with a median follow-up of 58 months. Of these, 332 were men over the age of 75. All parameters are comparisons between patients >75 years of age and men 75 years had a higher proportion of Gleason grade ≥8 disease (16.6% versus 11.4%, P 75 years had lower rates of 5- and 10-year overall survival (67.3% versus 96.3% and 27.7% versus 89.1%) and lower rates of 5- and 10-year prostate cancer-specific survival (96.2% versus 99.3% and 94.3% versus 97.4%), respectively. Age was an independent risk factor for prostate cancer specific and overall mortality on multivariate analysis (hazard ratio 1.49, 95% confidence interval 1.32-1.68; P < 0.001 and hazard ratio 4.26, 95% confidence interval 2.15-8.42; P < 0.001), when adjusted for stage and grade. Older men undergoing radical prostatectomy in Victoria had higher-grade disease but similar stage. Age was an independent risk factor for worse prostate cancer-specific and overall survival. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  12. Young patients with colorectal cancer have poor survival in the first twenty months after operation and predictable survival in the medium and long-term: Analysis of survival and prognostic markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wickramarachchi RE

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives This study compares clinico-pathological features in young (50 years with colorectal cancer, survival in the young and the influence of pre-operative clinical and histological factors on survival. Materials and methods A twelve year prospective database of colorectal cancer was analysed. Fifty-three young patients were compared with forty seven consecutive older patients over fifty years old. An analysis of survival was undertaken in young patients using Kaplan Meier graphs, non parametric methods, Cox's Proportional Hazard Ratios and Weibull Hazard models. Results Young patients comprised 13.4 percent of 397 with colorectal cancer. Duration of symptoms and presentation in the young was similar to older patients (median, range; young patients; 6 months, 2 weeks to 2 years, older patients; 4 months, 4 weeks to 3 years, p > 0.05. In both groups, the majority presented without bowel obstruction (young - 81%, older - 94%. Cancer proximal to the splenic flexure was present more in young than in older patients. Synchronous cancers were found exclusively in the young. Mucinous tumours were seen in 16% of young and 4% of older patients (p Conclusion If patients, who are less than 40 years old with colorectal cancer, survive twenty months after operation, the prognosis improves and their survival becomes predictable.

  13. Survival in women with NSCLC: the role of reproductive history and hormone use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katcoff, Hannah; Wenzlaff, Angela S; Schwartz, Ann G

    2014-03-01

    Although lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in women, few studies have investigated the hormonal influence on survival after a lung cancer diagnosis and results have been inconsistent. We evaluated the role of reproductive and hormonal factors in predicting overall survival in women with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Population-based lung cancer cases diagnosed between November 1, 2001 and October 31, 2005 were identified through the Metropolitan Detroit Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Registry. Interview and follow-up data were collected for 485 women. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to determine hazard ratios (HRs) for death after an NSCLC diagnosis associated with reproductive and hormonal variables. Use of hormone therapy (HT) was associated with improved survival (HR, 0.69; 95% confidence interval, 0.54-0.89), adjusting for stage, surgery, radiation, education level, pack-years of smoking, age at diagnosis, race, and a multiplicative interaction between stage and radiation. No other reproductive or hormonal factor was associated with survival after an NSCLC diagnosis. Increased duration of HT use before the lung cancer diagnosis (132 months or longer) was associated with improved survival (HR, 0.54; 95% confidence interval, 0.37-0.78), and this finding remained significant in women taking either estrogen alone or progesterone plus estrogen, never smokers, and smokers. These findings suggest that HT use, in particular use of estrogen plus progesterone, and long-term HT use are associated with improved survival of NSCLC.

  14. Important prognostic factors for the long-term survival of lung cancer subjects in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ko Albert

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study used a large-scale cancer database in determination of prognostic factors for the survival of lung cancer subjects in Taiwan. Methods Total of 24,910 subjects diagnosed with lung cancer was analysed. Survival estimates by Kaplan-Meier methods. Cox proportional-hazards model estimated the death risk (hazard ratio (HR for various prognostic factors. Results The prognostic indicators associated with a higher risk of lung cancer deaths are male gender (males versus females; HR = 1.07, 95% confidence intervals (CI: 1.03–1.11, males diagnosed in later periods (shown in 1991–1994 versus 1987–1990; HR = 1.13, older age at diagnosis, large cell carcinoma (LCC/small cell carcinoma (SCC, and supportive care therapy over chemotherapy. The overall 5-year survival rate for lung cancer death was significantly poorer for males (21.3% than females (23.6%. Subjects with squamous cell carcinoma (SQCC and treatment by surgical resection alone had better prognosis. We find surgical resections to markedly increase 5-year survival rate from LCC, decreased risk of death from LCC, and no improved survival from SCC. Conclusion Gender and clinical characteristics (i.e. diagnostic period, diagnostic age, histological type and treatment modality play important roles in determining lung cancer survival.

  15. Association of the Timing of Pregnancy With Survival in Women With Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Javaid; Amir, Eitan; Rochon, Paula A; Giannakeas, Vasily; Sun, Ping; Narod, Steven A

    2017-05-01

    Increasing numbers of women experience pregnancy around the time of, or after, a diagnosis of breast cancer. Understanding the effect of pregnancy on survival in women with breast cancer will help in the counseling and treatment of these women. To compare the overall survival of women diagnosed with breast cancer during pregnancy or in the postpartum period with that of women who had breast cancer but did not become pregnant. This population-based, retrospective cohort study linked health administrative databases in Ontario, Canada, comprising 7553 women aged 20 to 45 years at the time of diagnosis with invasive breast cancer, from January 1, 2003, to December 31, 2014. Any pregnancy in the period from 5 years before, until 5 years after, the index date of the diagnosis of breast cancer. Women were classified into the following 4 exposure groups: no pregnancy (the referent), pregnancy before breast cancer, pregnancy-associated breast cancer, and pregnancy following breast cancer. Five-year actuarial survival rates for all exposure groups, age-adjusted and multivariable hazard ratios [HRs] of pregnancy for overall survival for all exposure groups, and time-dependent hazard ratios for women with pregnancy following breast cancer. Among the 7553 women in the study (mean age at diagnosis, 39.1 years; median, 40 years; range, 20-44 years) the 5-year actuarial survival rate was 87.5% (95% CI, 86.5%-88.4%) for women with no pregnancy, 85.3% (95% CI, 82.8%-87.8%) for women with pregnancy before breast cancer (age-adjusted hazard ratio, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.85-1.27; P = .73), and 82.1% (95% CI, 78.3%-85.9%) for women with pregnancy-associated breast cancer (age-adjusted hazard ratio, 1.18; 95% CI, 0.91-1.53; P = .20). The 5-year actuarial survival rate was 96.7% (95% CI, 94.1%-99.3%) for women who had pregnancy 6 months or more after diagnosis of breast cancer, vs 87.5% (95% CI, 86.5%-88.4%) for women with no pregnancy) (age-adjusted HR, 0.22; 95% CI, 0.10-0.49; P

  16. Blood Cell Palmitoleate-Palmitate Ratio Is an Independent Prognostic Factor for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriques, Alexandre; Blasco, Hélène; Fleury, Marie-Céline; Corcia, Philippe; Echaniz-Laguna, Andoni; Robelin, Laura; Rudolf, Gabrielle; Lequeu, Thiebault; Bergaentzle, Martine; Gachet, Christian; Pradat, Pierre-François; Marchioni, Eric; Andres, Christian R.; Tranchant, Christine; Gonzalez De Aguilar, Jose-Luis; Loeffler, Jean-Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidence supports a link between fatty acid metabolism and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Here we determined the fatty acid composition of blood lipids to identify markers of disease progression and survival. We enrolled 117 patients from two clinical centers and 48 of these were age and gender matched with healthy volunteers. We extracted total lipids from serum and blood cells, and separated fatty acid methyl esters by gas chromatography. We measured circulating biochemical parameters indicative of the metabolic status. Association between fatty acid composition and clinical readouts was studied, including ALS functional rating scale-revised (ALSFRS-R), survival, disease duration, site of onset and body mass index. Palmitoleate (16:1) and oleate (18:1) levels, and stearoyl-CoA desaturase indices (16:1/16:0 and 18:1/18:0) significantly increased in blood cells from ALS patients compared to healthy controls. Palmitoleate levels and 16:1/16:0 ratio in blood cells, but not body mass index or leptin concentrations, negatively correlated with ALSFRS-R decline over a six-month period (p<0.05). Multivariate Cox analysis, with age, body mass index, site of onset and ALSFRS-R as covariables, showed that blood cell 16:1/16:0 ratio was an independent prognostic factor for survival (hazard ratio=0.1 per unit of ratio, 95% confidence interval=0.01-0.57, p=0.009). In patients with high 16:1/16:0 ratio, survival at blood collection was extended by 10 months, as compared to patients with low ratio. The 16:1/16:0 index is an easy-to-handle parameter that predicts survival of ALS patients independently of body mass index. It therefore deserves further validation in larger cohorts for being used to assess disease outcome and effects of disease-modifying drugs. PMID:26147510

  17. Long-term Survival Outcomes by Smoking Status in Surgical and Nonsurgical Patients With Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meguid, Robert A.; Hooker, Craig M.; Harris, James; Xu, Li; Westra, William H.; Sherwood, J. Timothy; Sussman, Marc; Cattaneo, Stephen M.; Shin, James; Cox, Solange; Christensen, Joani; Prints, Yelena; Yuan, Nance; Zhang, Jennifer; Yang, Stephen C.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Survival outcomes of never smokers with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who undergo surgery are poorly characterized. This investigation compared surgical outcomes of never and current smokers with NSCLC. Methods: This investigation was a single-institution retrospective study of never and current smokers with NSCLC from 1975 to 2004. From an analytic cohort of 4,546 patients with NSCLC, we identified 724 never smokers and 3,822 current smokers. Overall, 1,142 patients underwent surgery with curative intent. For survival analysis by smoking status, hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazard modeling and then further adjusted by other covariates. Results: Never smokers were significantly more likely than current smokers to be women (P cancer diagnosis has little impact on the long-term survival of patients with NSCLC, especially after curative surgery. Despite different etiologies between lung cancer in never and current smokers the prognosis is equally dismal. PMID:20507946

  18. Association of Low-Dose Aspirin and Survival of Women With Endometrial Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Koji; Cahoon, Sigita S; Yoshihara, Kosuke; Shida, Masako; Kakuda, Mamoru; Adachi, Sosuke; Moeini, Aida; Machida, Hiroko; Garcia-Sayre, Jocelyn; Ueda, Yutaka; Enomoto, Takayuki; Mikami, Mikio; Roman, Lynda D; Sood, Anil K

    2016-07-01

    To examine the survival outcomes in women with endometrial cancer who were taking low-dose aspirin (81-100 mg/d). A multicenter retrospective study was conducted examining patients with stage I-IV endometrial cancer who underwent hysterectomy-based surgical staging between January 2000 and December 2013 (N=1,687). Patient demographics, medical comorbidities, medication types, tumor characteristics, and treatment patterns were correlated to survival outcomes. A Cox proportional hazard regression model was used to estimate adjusted hazard ratio for disease-free and disease-specific overall survival. One hundred fifty-eight patients (9.4%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 8.8-11.9) were taking low-dose aspirin. Median follow-up time for the study cohort was 31.5 months. One hundred twenty-seven patients (7.5%) died of endometrial cancer. Low-dose aspirin use was significantly correlated with concurrent obesity, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and hypercholesterolemia (all Pcancer stage (all P>.05). On multivariable analysis, low-dose aspirin use remained an independent prognostic factor associated with an improved 5-year disease-free survival rate (90.6% compared with 80.9%, adjusted hazard ratio 0.46, 95% CI 0.25-0.86, P=.014) and disease-specific overall survival rate (96.4% compared with 87.3%, adjusted hazard ratio 0.23, 95% CI 0.08-0.64, P=.005). The increased survival effect noted with low-dose aspirin use was greatest in patients whose age was younger than 60 years (5-year disease-free survival rates, 93.9% compared with 84.0%, P=.013), body mass index was 30 or greater (92.2% compared with 81.4%, P=.027), who had type I cancer (96.5% compared with 88.6%, P=.029), and who received postoperative whole pelvic radiotherapy (88.2% compared with 61.5%, P=.014). These four factors remained significant for disease-specific overall survival (all Pendometrial cancer, especially in those who are young, obese, with low-grade disease, and who receive postoperative

  19. Prosthesis-Patient Mismatch After Aortic Valve Replacement: Effect on Long-Term Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinkels, Ben M; de Mol, Bas A; Kelder, Johannes C; Vermeulen, Freddy E; ten Berg, Jurriën M

    2016-04-01

    Mean follow-up in previous studies on the effect of prosthesis-patient mismatch on long-term survival after aortic valve replacement (AVR) is confined to a maximum of one decade. This retrospective longitudinal cohort study was performed to determine the effect on long-term survival of prosthesis-patient mismatch after AVR with a mean follow-up of almost two decades. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was used to determine long-term survival after AVR in a cohort of 673 consecutive patients, divided into 163 patients (24.2%) with prosthesis-patient mismatch (indexed effective orifice area ≤ 0.85 cm(2)/m(2)) and 510 patients (75.8%) without prosthesis-patient mismatch (indexed effective orifice area >0.85 cm(2)/m(2)). Effective orifice area values of the prosthetic valves were retrieved from the literature or obtained from the charts of the prosthetic valve manufacturers. Cox multiple regression analysis was used to identify possible independent predictors, including prosthesis-patient mismatch, of decreased long-term survival. Median sizes of the implanted mechanical (n = 430) and biologic (n = 243) prostheses were 25 and 23 mm, respectively. Mean follow-up after AVR was 17.8 ± 1.8 years. Prosthesis-patient mismatch was not an independent predictor of decreased long-term survival (hazard ratio, 0.828; 95% confidence interval, 0.669 to 1.025; p = 0.083). Severe prosthesis-patient mismatch (indexed effective orifice area ≤ 0.65 cm(2)/m(2)), occurring in only 17 patients (2.5%), showed an insignificant trend toward decreased long-term survival (hazard ratio, 1.68; 95% confidence interval, 0.97 to 2.91; p = 0.066). Prosthesis-patient mismatch was not an independent predictor of decreased long-term survival after AVR. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Change in volume parameters induced by neoadjuvant chemotherapy provide accurate prediction of overall survival after resection in patients with oesophageal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamandl, Dietmar; Fueger, Barbara; Kinsperger, Patrick; Haug, Alexander; Ba-Ssalamah, Ahmed [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Comprehensive Cancer Center GET-Unit, Vienna (Austria); Gore, Richard M. [University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Hejna, Michael [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Medical Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Center GET-Unit, Vienna (Austria); Paireder, Matthias; Schoppmann, Sebastian F. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Surgery, Upper-GI-Service, Comprehensive Cancer Center GET-Unit, Vienna (Austria)

    2016-02-15

    To assess the prognostic value of volumetric parameters measured with CT and PET/CT in patients with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) and resection for oesophageal cancer (EC). Patients with locally advanced EC, who were treated with NACT and resection, were retrospectively analysed. Data from CT volumetry and {sup 18} F-FDG PET/CT (maximum standardized uptake [SUVmax], metabolic tumour volume [MTV], and total lesion glycolysis [TLG]) were recorded before and after NACT. The impact of volumetric parameter changes induced by NACT (MTV{sub RATIO}, TLG{sub RATIO}, etc.) on overall survival (OS) was assessed using a Cox proportional hazards model. Eighty-four patients were assessed using CT volumetry; of those, 50 also had PET/CT before and after NACT. Low post-treatment CT volume and thickness, MTV, TLG, and SUVmax were all associated with longer OS (p < 0.05), as were CTthickness{sub RATIO}, MTV{sub RATIO}, TLG{sub RATIO}, and SUVmax{sub RATIO} (p < 0.05). In the multivariate analysis, only MTV{sub RATIO} (Hazard ratio, HR 2.52 [95 % Confidence interval, CI 1.33-4.78], p = 0.005), TLG{sub RATIO} (HR 3.89 [95%CI 1.46-10.34], p = 0.006), and surgical margin status (p < 0.05), were independent predictors of OS. MTV{sub RATIO} and TLG{sub RATIO} are independent prognostic factors for survival in patients after NACT and resection for EC. (orig.)

  1. Racial disparity in amputation-free survival after infrainguinal bypass procedure: contribution of socioeconomic status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh-Park, Mooyeon; McGinn, Aileen; Lipsitz, Evan; Thomas, Mark; Zonszein, Joel

    2009-12-01

    To investigate amputation-free survival after infrainguinal bypass in African Americans and Hispanics compared with non-Hispanic whites and to determine the contribution of socioeconomic status to potential racial disparity. This is a retrospective cohort study of subjects who underwent infrainguinal bypass due to critical limb ischemia from 1997 through 2004. The primary end point was major amputation or death, whichever occurred first. Neighborhood socioeconomic status obtained from the 2000 United States Census was used as a proxy for an individual's socioeconomic status. There were 595 subjects (237 non-Hispanic whites, 205 African Americans, 153 Hispanics) in the study. Median amputation-free survival was 1.3, 3.3, and 3.2 yrs among Hispanics, African Americans, and non-Hispanic whites, respectively. Hazard ratio for amputation or death was 1.38 (95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.87) in Hispanics and 0.81 (95% confidence interval, 0.63-1.16) in African Americans compared with non-Hispanic whites after multivariable adjustment. For those residing in their homes, adjusting for socioeconomic status attenuated the hazard ratio in Hispanics to 1.08, explaining 78% of increased hazard. There was no significant difference between African Americans and non-Hispanic whites in amputation-free survival after infrainguinal bypass. Hispanics were 1.4 times more likely to have amputation or death than non-Hispanic whites, which was largely explained by low socioeconomic status.

  2. Hazard reduction in nanotechnology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijnders, L.

    2008-01-01

    The release of hazardous substances is a matter of concern for nanotechnology. This may include some nanoparticles, reactants, by-products, and solvents. The use of low-hazard solvents may reduce the hazards from nanoparticle production and nanomaterial processing. The hazards of inorganic

  3. Occupational Hazards of Farming

    OpenAIRE

    White, Gill; Cessna, Allan

    1989-01-01

    A number of occupational hazards exist for the farmer and farm worker. They include the hazards of farm machinery, biologic and chemical hazards, and social and environmental stresses. Recognizing of these hazards will help the family physician care for farmers and their families.

  4. Occupational Hazards of Farming

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Gill; Cessna, Allan

    1989-01-01

    A number of occupational hazards exist for the farmer and farm worker. They include the hazards of farm machinery, biologic and chemical hazards, and social and environmental stresses. Recognizing of these hazards will help the family physician care for farmers and their families. PMID:21248929

  5. High ΔNp73/TAp73 ratio is associated with poor prognosis in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucena-Araujo, Antonio R; Kim, Haesook T; Thomé, Carolina; Jacomo, Rafael H; Melo, Raul A; Bittencourt, Rosane; Pasquini, Ricardo; Pagnano, Katia; Glória, Ana Beatriz F; Chauffaille, Maria de Lourdes; Athayde, Melina; Chiattone, Carlos S; Mito, Ingrid; Bendlin, Rodrigo; Souza, Carmino; Bortolheiro, Cristina; Coelho-Silva, Juan L; Schrier, Stanley L; Tallman, Martin S; Grimwade, David; Ganser, Arnold; Berliner, Nancy; Ribeiro, Raul C; Lo-Coco, Francesco; Löwenberg, Bob; Sanz, Miguel A; Rego, Eduardo M

    2015-11-12

    The TP73 gene transcript is alternatively spliced and translated into the transcriptionally active (TAp73) or inactive (ΔNp73) isoforms, with opposite effects on the expression of p53 target genes and on apoptosis induction. The imbalance between ΔNp73 and TAp73 may contribute to tumorigenesis and resistance to chemotherapy in human cancers, including hematologic malignancies. In acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), both isoforms are expressed, but their relevance in determining response to therapy and contribution to leukemogenesis remains unknown. Here, we provide the first evidence that a higher ΔNp73/TAp73 RNA expression ratio is associated with lower survival, lower disease-free survival, and higher risk of relapse in patients with APL homogeneously treated with all-trans retinoic acid and anthracycline-based chemotherapy, according to the International Consortium on Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (IC-APL) study. Cox proportional hazards modeling showed that a high ΔNp73/TAp73 ratio was independently associated with shorter overall survival (hazard ratio, 4.47; 95% confidence interval, 1.64-12.2; P = .0035). Our data support the hypothesis that the ΔNp73/TAp73 ratio is an important determinant of clinical response in APL and may offer a therapeutic target for enhancing chemosensitivity in blast cells. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  6. Best lung function equations for the very elderly selected by survival analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Martin R; Thinggaard, Mikael; Christensen, Kaare

    2014-01-01

    proportional hazard regression found lower FEV1SR was a predictor of mortality having controlled for MMSE, grip strength and sex. The US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) III (1999) equations gave a better spread of median survival by FEV1SR quartile: 3.94, 3.65, 3.51 and 2.61 years...... with a hazard ratio for death of 1, 1.16, 1.32 and 1.60 respectively, compared with equations derived with the inclusion of elderly subjects.We conclude that extrapolating from NHANES III equations to predict lung function in nonagenarians gave better survival predictions from spirometry than when employing...... equations derived using very elderly subjects with possible selection bias. These findings can help inform how future lung function equations for the elderly are derived....

  7. Hazard function theory for nonstationary natural hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, L.; Vogel, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    Studies from the natural hazards literature indicate that many natural processes, including wind speeds, landslides, wildfires, precipitation, streamflow and earthquakes, show evidence of nonstationary behavior such as trends in magnitudes through time. Traditional probabilistic analysis of natural hazards based on partial duration series (PDS) generally assumes stationarity in the magnitudes and arrivals of events, i.e. that the probability of exceedance is constant through time. Given evidence of trends and the consequent expected growth in devastating impacts from natural hazards across the world, new methods are needed to characterize their probabilistic behavior. The field of hazard function analysis (HFA) is ideally suited to this problem because its primary goal is to describe changes in the exceedance probability of an event over time. HFA is widely used in medicine, manufacturing, actuarial statistics, reliability engineering, economics, and elsewhere. HFA provides a rich theory to relate the natural hazard event series (x) with its failure time series (t), enabling computation of corresponding average return periods and reliabilities associated with nonstationary event series. This work investigates the suitability of HFA to characterize nonstationary natural hazards whose PDS magnitudes are assumed to follow the widely applied Poisson-GP model. We derive a 2-parameter Generalized Pareto hazard model and demonstrate how metrics such as reliability and average return period are impacted by nonstationarity and discuss the implications for planning and design. Our theoretical analysis linking hazard event series x, with corresponding failure time series t, should have application to a wide class of natural hazards.

  8. Survival analysis of irish amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients diagnosed from 1995-2010.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Rooney

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The Irish ALS register is a valuable resource for examining survival factors in Irish ALS patients. Cox regression has become the default tool for survival analysis, but recently new classes of flexible parametric survival analysis tools known as Royston-Parmar models have become available. METHODS: We employed Cox proportional hazards and Royston-Parmar flexible parametric modeling to examine factors affecting survival in Irish ALS patients. We further examined the effect of choice of timescale on Cox models and the proportional hazards assumption, and extended both Cox and Royston-Parmar models with time varying components. RESULTS: On comparison of models we chose a Royston-Parmar proportional hazards model without time varying covariates as the best fit. Using this model we confirmed the association of known survival markers in ALS including age at diagnosis (Hazard Ratio (HR 1.34 per 10 year increase; 95% CI 1.26-1.42, diagnostic delay (HR 0.96 per 12 weeks delay; 95% CI 0.94-0.97, Definite ALS (HR 1.47 95% CI 1.17-1.84, bulbar onset disease (HR 1.58 95% CI 1.33-1.87, riluzole use (HR 0.72 95% CI 0.61-0.85 and attendance at an ALS clinic (HR 0.74 95% CI 0.64-0.86. DISCUSSION: Our analysis explored the strengths and weaknesses of Cox proportional hazard and Royston-Parmar flexible parametric methods. By including time varying components we were able to gain deeper understanding of the dataset. Variation in survival between time periods appears to be due to missing data in the first time period. The use of age as timescale to account for confounding by age resolved breaches of the proportional hazards assumption, but in doing so may have obscured deficiencies in the data. Our study demonstrates the need to test for, and fully explore, breaches of the Cox proportional hazards assumption. Royston-Parmar flexible parametric modeling proved a powerful method for achieving this.

  9. Does Off-Pump Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Negatively Impact Long-Term Survival and Freedom from Reintervention?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahzad G. Raja

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently published evidence has raised concerns about worse late mortality and increasing need for reintervention after off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting. We undertook this study to assess the impact of off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting on survival and freedom from reintervention at 10 years. From January 2002 to December 2002, 307 consecutive patients who had isolated multivessel off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting at our institution were compared to a control group of 397 patients that underwent multivessel on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting during the same period. In addition, univariate and risk-adjusted comparisons between the two groups were performed at 10 years. Kaplan-Meier survival was similar for the two cohorts. After adjusting for clinical covariates, off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting did not emerge as a significant independent predictor of long-term mortality (Hazard Ratio 0.91; 95% Confidence Interval 0.70–1.12, readmission to hospital for cardiac cause (Hazard Ratio 0.96; 95% Confidence Interval 0.78–1.10, or the need for reintervention (Hazard Ratio 0.93; 95% Confidence Interval 0.87–1.05. Off-pump coronary artery bypass grafting compared with on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting does not adversely impact survival or freedom from reintervention at a 10-year follow-up.

  10. Association of MTHFR gene polymorphisms with breast cancer survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mechanic Leah E

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR gene, C677T and A1298C, lead to decreased enzyme activity and affect chemosensitivity of tumor cells. We investigated whether these MTHFR SNPs were associated with breast cancer survival in African-American and Caucasian women. Methods African-American (n = 143 and Caucasian (n = 105 women, who had incident breast cancer with surgery, were recruited between 1993 and 2003 from the greater Baltimore area, Maryland, USA. Kaplan-Meier survival and multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were used to examine the relationship between MTHFR SNPs and disease-specific survival. Results We observed opposite effects of the MTHFR polymorphisms A1298C and C677T on breast cancer survival. Carriers of the variant allele at codon 1298 (A/C or C/C had reduced survival when compared to homozygous carriers of the common A allele [Hazard ratio (HR = 2.05; 95% confidence interval (CI, 1.05–4.00]. In contrast, breast cancer patients with the variant allele at codon 677 (C/T or T/T had improved survival, albeit not statistically significant, when compared to individuals with the common C/C genotype (HR = 0.65; 95% CI, 0.31–1.35. The effects were stronger in patients with estrogen receptor-negative tumors (HR = 2.70; 95% CI, 1.17–6.23 for A/C or C/C versus A/A at codon 1298; HR = 0.36; 95% CI, 0.12–1.04 for C/T or T/T versus C/C at codon 677. Interactions between the two MTHFR genotypes and race/ethnicity on breast cancer survival were also observed (A1298C, pinteraction = 0.088; C677T, pinteraction = 0.026. Conclusion We found that the MTHFR SNPs, C677T and A1298C, were associated with breast cancer survival. The variant alleles had opposite effects on disease outcome in the study population. Race/ethnicity modified the association between the two SNPs and breast cancer survival.

  11. The impact of pregnancy on breast cancer survival in women who carry a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, Adriana; Lubinski, Jan; Byrski, Tomasz; Ghadirian, Parviz; Moller, Pal; Lynch, Henry T; Ainsworth, Peter; Neuhausen, Susan L; Weitzel, Jeffrey; Singer, Christian F; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Saal, Howard; Lyonnet, Dominique Stoppa; Foulkes, William D; Kim-Sing, Charmaine; Manoukian, Siranoush; Zakalik, Dana; Armel, Susan; Senter, Leigha; Eng, Charis; Grunfeld, Eva; Chiarelli, Anna M; Poll, Aletta; Sun, Ping; Narod, Steven A

    2013-11-01

    Physicians are often approached by young women with a BRCA mutation and a recent history of breast cancer who wish to have a baby. They wish to know if pregnancy impacts upon their future risks of cancer recurrence and survival. To date, there is little information on the survival experience of women who carry a mutation in one of the BRCA genes and who become pregnant. From an international multi-center cohort study of 12,084 women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation, we identified 128 case subjects who were diagnosed with breast cancer while pregnant or who became pregnant after a diagnosis of breast cancer. These women were age-matched to 269 mutation carriers with breast cancer who did not become pregnant (controls). Subjects were followed from the date of breast cancer diagnosis until the date of last follow-up or death from breast cancer. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate 15-year survival rates. The hazard ratio for survival associated with pregnancy was calculated using a left-truncated Cox proportional hazard model, adjusting for other prognostic factors. Among women who were diagnosed with breast cancer when pregnant or who became pregnant thereafter, the 15-year survival rate was 91.5 %, compared to a survival of 88.6 % for women who did not become pregnant (adjusted hazard ratio = 0.76; 95 % CI 0.31-1.91; p = 0.56). Pregnancy concurrent with or after a diagnosis of breast cancer does not appear to adversely affect survival among BRCA1/2 mutation carriers.

  12. Sample size determination for the current strategy in oncology phase 3 trials that tests progression-free survival and overall survival in a two-stage design framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Shogo; Hirakawa, Akihiro; Hamada, Chikuma

    2017-09-08

    The selection of progression-free survival (PFS) or overall survival (OS) as the most suitable primary endpoint in oncology phase 3 trials is currently under intense debate. Because of substantial limitations in the single use of PFS (or OS) as the primary endpoint, trial designs that include PFS and OS as co-primary endpoints are attracting increasing interest. In this paper, we report on the formulation of determining the sample size for a trial that sequentially tests PFS and OS by treating them as co-primary endpoints. Using a three-component model of OS, the proposed method overcomes the drawbacks of an existing method that requires unreasonable assumption of the exponential distribution for OS, although the hazard function is non-constant because effective subsequent therapy have prolonged post-progression survival in recent oncology trials. Alternative estimation method of hazard ratio for OS under a three-component mode is also discussed by checking the appropriateness of assuming proportionality of hazards for OS. In order to examine the performance of our proposed method, we performed three numerical studies using both simulated and actual data of cancer phase 3 trials. We find that the proposed method preserves a pre-specified target value of power with a feasible increment of trial scale.

  13. The relationship between patient satisfaction with service quality and survival in pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta D

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Digant Gupta, Maurie Markman, Mark Rodeghier, Christopher G LisCancer Treatment Centers of America®, Schaumburg, IL, USAPurpose: Despite the recognized relevance of symptom burden in pancreatic cancer, there has been limited exploration of whether an individual patient's satisfaction with the overall quality of care received might influence outcome. We evaluated the relationship between patient satisfaction with health service quality and survival in patients with pancreatic cancer.Patients and methods: A random sample of 496 pancreatic cancer patients treated at Cancer Treatment Centers of America® (CTCA between July 2007 and December 2010. A questionnaire that covered several dimensions of patient satisfaction was administered. Items were measured on a seven-point Likert scale ranging from “completely dissatisfied” to “completely satisfied.” Patient survival was the primary end point. Cox regression was used to evaluate the association between patient satisfaction and survival.Results: The response rate for this study was 72%. Of the 496 patients, 345 (69.6% reported being “completely satisfied” with the care provided. Median overall survival was 7.9 months. On univariate analysis, patients reporting they were “completely satisfied” experienced superior survival compared with patients stating they were “not completely satisfied” (hazard ratio = 0.62; 95% confidence interval: 0.50–0.77; P < 0.001. On multivariate analysis controlling for stage at diagnosis, treatment history, and specific CTCA treatment center, “completely satisfied” patients demonstrated significantly lower mortality (hazard ratio = 0.63; 95% confidence interval: 0.51–0.79; P < 0.001.Conclusion: In this exploratory analysis, patient satisfaction with health service quality was an independent predictor of survival in pancreatic cancer. Further exploration of a possible meaningful relationship between patient satisfaction with the care they have

  14. Pre-diagnosis diet and survival after a diagnosis of ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Playdon, Mary C; Nagle, Christina M; Ibiebele, Torukiri I; Ferrucci, Leah M; Protani, Melinda M; Carter, Jonathan; Hyde, Simon E; Neesham, Deborah; Nicklin, James L; Mayne, Susan T; Webb, Penelope M

    2017-06-06

    The relationship between diet and survival after ovarian cancer diagnosis is unclear as a result of a limited number of studies and inconsistent findings. We examined the association between pre-diagnostic diet and overall survival in a population-based cohort (n=811) of Australian women diagnosed with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer between 2002 and 2005. Diet was measured by validated food frequency questionnaire. Deaths were ascertained up to 31 August 2014 via medical record review and Australian National Death Index linkage. We conducted Cox proportional hazards regression analysis, controlling for diagnosis age, tumour stage, grade and subtype, residual disease, smoking status, body mass index, physical activity, marital status, and energy intake. We observed improved survival with highest compared with lowest quartile of fibre intake (hazard ratio (HR)=0.69, 95% CI: 0.53-0.90, P-trend=0.002). There was a suggestion of better survival for women with highest compared with lowest intake category of green leafy vegetables (HR=0.79, 95% CI: 0.62-0.99), fish (HR=0.74, 95% CI: 0.57-0.95), poly- to mono-unsaturated fat ratio (HR=0.76, 95% CI: 0.59-0.98), and worse survival with higher glycaemic index (HR=1.28, 95% CI: 1.01-1.65, P-trend=0.03). The associations we observed between healthy components of diet pre-diagnosis and ovarian cancer survival raise the possibility that dietary choices after diagnosis may improve survival.

  15. Effect of prior cardiac operations on survival after coronary artery bypass grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likosky, Donald S; Surgenor, Stephen D; Kramer, Robert S; Russo, Louis; Leavitt, Bruce J; Sorensen, Meredith J; Helm, Robert E; Sardella, Gerald L; Dipierro, Francis V; Baribeau, Yvon R; Malenka, David J; Mackenzie, Todd A; Brown, Jeremiah R; Ross, Cathy S

    2011-10-01

    We examined a recent regional experience to determine the effect of a prior cardiac operation on short-term and midterm outcomes after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). We identified 20,703 patients who underwent nonemergent CABG at 8 centers in northern New England from 2000 to 2008, of whom 818 (3.8%) had undergone prior cardiac operations. Prior CABG using a minimal or full sternotomy was considered a prior sternotomy. Survival data out to 4 years were obtained from a link with the Social Security Administration Death Index. Hazard ratios were estimated using a Cox proportional hazards regression model, and adjusted survival curves were estimated using inverse probability weighting. In a separate analysis, 1,182 patients were matched 1:1 by a patient's propensity for having undergone prior CABG. Patients with prior sternotomies had a greater burden of comorbid diseases and increased acuity and had a greater likelihood of returning to the operating room for bleeding and low cardiac output failure. Prior sternotomy was associated with an increased risk of death out to 4 years for patients undergoing CABG, with an unmatched hazard ratio of 1.34 (95% confidence interval, 1.10 to 1.64) and a matched hazard ratio of 1.36 (95% confidence interval, 1.01 to 1.81). Analyses of our recent regional experience with nonemergent CABG showed that a prior cardiac operation was associated with a nearly twofold increased hazard of death at up to 4 years of follow-up. Copyright © 2011 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Prognostic factors and survival according to tumour subtype in women presenting with breast cancer brain metastases at initial diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, José Pablo; Leone, Julieta; Zwenger, Ariel Osvaldo; Iturbe, Julián; Leone, Bernardo Amadeo; Vallejo, Carlos Teodoro

    2017-03-01

    The presence of brain metastases at the time of initial breast cancer diagnosis (BMIBCD) is uncommon. Hence, the prognostic assessment and management of these patients is very challenging. The aim of this study was to analyse the influence of tumour subtype compared with other prognostic factors in the survival of patients with BMIBCD. We evaluated women with BMIBCD, reported to Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results program from 2010 to 2013. Patients with other primary malignancy were excluded. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine the effects of each variable on overall survival (OS). We included 740 patients. Median OS for the whole population was 10 months, and 20.7% of patients were alive at 36 months. Tumour subtype distribution was: 46.6% hormone receptor (HR)+/HER2-, 17% HR+/HER2+, 14.1% HR-/HER2+ and 22.3% triple-negative. Univariate analysis showed that the presence of liver metastases, lung metastases and triple-negative patients (median OS 6 months) had worse prognosis. The HR+/HER2+ subtype had the longest OS with a median of 22 months. In multivariate analysis, older age (hazard ratio 1.8), lobular histology (hazard ratio 2.08), triple-negative subtype (hazard ratio 2.25), liver metastases (hazard ratio 1.6) and unmarried patients (hazard ratio 1.39) had significantly shorter OS. Although the prognosis of patients with BMIBCD is generally poor, 20.7% were still alive 3 years after the diagnosis. There were substantial differences in OS according to tumour subtype. In addition to tumour subtype, other independent predictors of OS are age at diagnosis, marital status, histology and liver metastases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17.  Alkaline phosphatase normalization is a biomarker of improved survival in primary sclerosing cholangitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilscher, Moira; Enders, Felicity B; Carey, Elizabeth J; Lindor, Keith D; Tabibian, James H

    2016-01-01

     Introduction. Recent studies suggest that serum alkaline phosphatase may represent a prognostic biomarker in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis. However, this association remains poorly understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic significance and clinical correlates of alkaline phosphatase normalization in primary sclerosing cholangitis. This was a retrospective cohort study of patients with a new diagnosis of primary sclerosing cholangitis made at an academic medical center. The primary endpoint was time to hepatobiliaryneoplasia, liver transplantation, or liver-related death. Secondary endpoints included occurrence of and time to alkaline phosphatase normalization. Patients who did and did not achieve normalization were compared with respect to clinical characteristics and endpoint-free survival, and the association between normalization and the primary endpoint was assessed with univariate and multivariate Cox proportional-hazards analyses. Eighty six patients were included in the study, with a total of 755 patient-years of follow-up. Thirty-eight patients (44%) experienced alkaline phosphatase normalization within 12 months of diagnosis. Alkaline phosphatase normalization was associated with longer primary endpoint-free survival (p = 0.0032) and decreased risk of requiring liver transplantation (p = 0.033). Persistent normalization was associated with even fewer adverse endpoints as well as longer survival. In multivariate analyses, alkaline phosphatase normalization (adjusted hazard ratio 0.21, p = 0.012) and baseline bilirubin (adjusted hazard ratio 4.87, p = 0.029) were the only significant predictors of primary endpoint-free survival. Alkaline phosphatase normalization, particularly if persistent, represents a robust biomarker of improved long-term survival and decreased risk of requiring liver transplantation in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis.

  18. Thyroid function and survival following breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, J; Borgquist, S; Almquist, M; Manjer, J

    2016-11-01

    Thyroid function has been associated with breast cancer risk, and breast cancer cell growth and proliferation. It is not clear whether thyroid function affects prognosis following breast cancer but, if so, this could have an important clinical impact. The present study analysed prospectively collected measurements of free tri-iodothyronine (T3), free thyroxine (T4), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPO-Ab) in relation to breast cancer survival. The Malmö Diet and Cancer Study is a prospective cohort study of 17 035 women in Sweden. Study enrolment was conducted between 1991 and 1996. Patients with incident breast cancer were identified through record linkage with cancer registries until 31 December 2006. Information on vital status was collected from the Swedish Cause of Death Registry, with the endpoint breast cancer mortality (31 December 2013). Hazard ratios (HRs) with 95 per cent confidence intervals (c.i.) were obtained by Cox proportional hazards analysis. Some 766 patients with incident breast cancer were identified, of whom 551 were eligible for analysis. Compared with patients in the first free T4 tertile, breast cancer mortality was lower among those in the second tertile (HR 0·49, 95 per cent c.i. 0·28 to 0·84). There was an indication, although non-significant, of lower breast cancer mortality among patients in the second TSH tertile (HR 0·63, 0·37 to 1·09) and in those with positive TPO-Ab status (HR 0·61, 0·30 to 1·23). Free T3 showed no clear association with mortality. In the present study, there was a positive association between free T4 levels and improved breast cancer survival. © 2016 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Does Lung Donation by Heart Donors Have an Impact on Survival in Heart Transplant Recipients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Y; Friedmann, P; Bello, R; Goldstein, D; D'Alessandro, D

    2017-02-01

    Lung procurement is increasing during multiorgan recovery and substantially alters the explant process. This study evaluated whether lung donation by a heart donor affects survival in heart transplant recipients. Retrospective analysis of United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) adult heart transplantation data from 1998 to 2012 was performed. Lung donors (LDs) were defined as those having at least one lung procured and transplanted. Non-LDs had neither lung transplanted. Heart transplant recipients who had previous transplants, who had heterotopic transplants, who were waitlisted for other organs or who were temporarily delisted were excluded from the analysis. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazards regression were performed. Of 23 590 heart transplant recipients meeting criteria during the study period, 8638 (36.6%) transplants were from LDs. Donors in the LD group had less history of cigarette use (15.5% vs. 29.5%, p < 0.001). On univariate analysis, LDs were associated with improved patient survival (p < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, LDs were not significantly associated with patient survival (adjusted hazard ratio 0.98, 95% confidence interval 0.94-1.03). Analysis of the UNOS registry suggested that donor pulmonary status and lung procurement had no detrimental effect on survival in heart transplant recipients, supporting the present practice of using donor lungs whenever possible. © Copyright 2016 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  20. Job Hazard Analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1998-01-01

    .... Establishing proper job procedures is one of the benefits of conducting a job hazard analysis carefully studying and recording each step of a job, identifying existing or potential job hazards...

  1. Global Landslide Hazard Distribution

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Global Landslide Hazard Distribution is a 2.5 minute grid of global landslide and snow avalanche hazards based upon work of the Norwegian Geotechnical Institute...

  2. Coordinate descent methods for the penalized semiparametric additive hazards model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorst-Rasmussen, Anders; Scheike, Thomas

    . The semiparametric additive hazards model is a flexible alternative which is a natural survival analogue of the standard linear regression model. Building on this analogy, we develop a cyclic coordinate descent algorithm for fitting the lasso and elastic net penalized additive hazards model. The algorithm requires...

  3. On estimation methods and test for proportional hazards ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work compared three estimation methods to handle tied survival time data under the semiparametric Cox proportional hazards model framework (the Exact, Breslow and Efron partial likelihood) and also two parametric proportional hazards models (the Exponential and Weibull) which utilized full likelihood estimation ...

  4. Coordinate descent methods for the penalized semiprarametric additive hazard model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorst-Rasmussen, Anders; Scheike, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    . The semiparametric additive hazards model is a flexible alternative which is a natural survival analogue of the standard linear regression model. Building on this analogy, we develop a cyclic coordinate descent algorithm for fitting the lasso and elastic net penalized additive hazards model. The algorithm requires...

  5. Hazard function theory for nonstationary natural hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Laura K.; Vogel, Richard M.

    2016-04-01

    Impact from natural hazards is a shared global problem that causes tremendous loss of life and property, economic cost, and damage to the environment. Increasingly, many natural processes show evidence of nonstationary behavior including wind speeds, landslides, wildfires, precipitation, streamflow, sea levels, and earthquakes. Traditional probabilistic analysis of natural hazards based on peaks over threshold (POT) generally assumes stationarity in the magnitudes and arrivals of events, i.e., that the probability of exceedance of some critical event is constant through time. Given increasing evidence of trends in natural hazards, new methods are needed to characterize their probabilistic behavior. The well-developed field of hazard function analysis (HFA) is ideally suited to this problem because its primary goal is to describe changes in the exceedance probability of an event over time. HFA is widely used in medicine, manufacturing, actuarial statistics, reliability engineering, economics, and elsewhere. HFA provides a rich theory to relate the natural hazard event series (X) with its failure time series (T), enabling computation of corresponding average return periods, risk, and reliabilities associated with nonstationary event series. This work investigates the suitability of HFA to characterize nonstationary natural hazards whose POT magnitudes are assumed to follow the widely applied generalized Pareto model. We derive the hazard function for this case and demonstrate how metrics such as reliability and average return period are impacted by nonstationarity and discuss the implications for planning and design. Our theoretical analysis linking hazard random variable X with corresponding failure time series T should have application to a wide class of natural hazards with opportunities for future extensions.

  6. Survival analysis of orthodontic mini-implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shin-Jae; Ahn, Sug-Joon; Lee, Jae Won; Kim, Seong-Hun; Kim, Tae-Woo

    2010-02-01

    Survival analysis is useful in clinical research because it focuses on comparing the survival distributions and the identification of risk factors. Our aim in this study was to investigate the survival characteristics and risk factors of orthodontic mini-implants with survival analyses. One hundred forty-one orthodontic patients (treated from October 1, 2000, to November 29, 2007) were included in this survival study. A total of 260 orthodontic mini-implants that had sandblasted (large grit) and acid-etched screw parts were placed between the maxillary second premolar and the first molar. Failures of the implants were recorded as event data, whereas implants that were removed because treatment ended and those that were not removed during the study period were recorded as censored data. A nonparametric life table method was used to visualize the hazard function, and Kaplan-Meier survival curves were generated to identify the variables associated with implant failure. Prognostic variables associated with implant failure were identified with the Cox proportional hazard model. Of the 260 implants, 22 failed. The hazard function for implant failure showed that the risk is highest immediately after placement. The survival function showed that the median survival time of orthodontic mini-implants is sufficient for relatively long orthodontic treatments. The Cox proportional hazard model identified that increasing age is a decisive factor for implant survival. The decreasing pattern of the hazard function suggested gradual osseointegration of orthodontic mini-implants. When implants are placed in a young patient, special caution is needed to lessen the increased probability of failure, especially immediately after placement.

  7. Effect of Increased Radiotoxicity on Survival of Patients with Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Treated with Curatively Intended Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holgersson, Georg; Bergström, Stefan; Liv, Per; Nilsson, Jonas; Edlund, Per; Blomberg, Carl; Nyman, Jan; Friesland, Signe; Ekman, Simon; Asklund, Thomas; Henriksson, Roger; Bergqvist, Michael

    2015-10-01

    To elucidate the impact of different forms of radiation toxicities (esophagitis, radiation pneumonitis, mucositis and hoarseness), on the survival of patients treated with curatively intended radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Data were individually collected retrospectively for all patients diagnosed with NSCLC subjected to curatively intended radiotherapy (≥50 Gy) in Sweden during the time period 1990 to 2000. Esophagitis was the only radiation-induced toxicity with an impact on survival (hazard ratio=0.83, p=0.016). However, in a multivariate model, with clinical- and treatment-related factors taken into consideration, the impact of esophagitis on survival was no longer statistically significant (hazard ratio=0.88, p=0.17). The effect on survival seen in univariate analysis may be related to higher radiation dose and to the higher prevalence of chemotherapy in this group. The results do not suggest that the toxicities examined have any detrimental effect on overall survival. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  8. Survival outcomes for first-line antiretroviral therapy in India's ART program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandona, Rakhi; Rewari, Bharat B; Kumar, G Anil; Tanwar, Sukarma; Kumar, S G Prem; Vishnumolakala, Venkata S; Duber, Herbert C; Gakidou, Emmanuela; Dandona, Lalit

    2016-10-11

    Little is known about survival outcomes of HIV patients on first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) on a large-scale in India, or facility level factors that influence patient survival to guide further improvements in the ART program in India. We examined factors at the facility level in addition to patient factors that influence survival of adult HIV patients on ART in the publicly-funded ART program in a high- and a low-HIV prevalence state. Retrospective chart review in public sector ART facilities in the combined states of Andhra Pradesh and Telangana (APT) before these were split in 2014 and in Rajasthan (RAJ), the high- and a low-HIV prevalence states, respectively. Records of adults initiating ART between 2007-12 and 2008-13 in APT and RAJ, respectively, were reviewed and facility-level information collected at all ART centres and a sample of link ART centres. Survival probability was estimated using Kaplan-Meier method, and determinants of mortality explored with facility and patient-level factors using Cox proportional hazard model. Based on data from 6581 patients, the survival probability of ART at 60 months was 76.3 % (95 % CI 73.0-79.2) in APT and 78.3 % (74.4-81.7) in RAJ. The facilities with cumulative ART patient load above the state average had lower mortality in APT (Hazard ratio [HR] 0.74, 0.57-0.95) but higher in RAJ (HR 1.37, 1.01-1.87). Facilities with higher proportion of lost to follow-up patients in APT had higher mortality (HR 1.47, 1.06-2.05), as did those with higher ART to pre-ART patient ratio in RAJ (HR 1.62, 1.14-2.29). In both states, there was higher hazard for mortality in patients with CD4 count 100 cells/mm 3 or less at ART initiation, males, and in patients with TB co-infection. These data from the majority of facilities in a high- and a low-HIV burden state of India over 5 years reveal reasonable and similar survival outcomes in the two states. The facilities with higher ART load in the longer established ART program in

  9. Epidemiology of multiple sclerosis in US veterans. VIII. Long-term survival after onset of multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallin, M T; Page, W F; Kurtzke, J F

    2000-08-01

    Survival to 1996 was analysed for nearly 2500 veterans of World War II who were rated as 'service-connected' for multiple sclerosis as of 1956 by the then Veterans Administration. Survival from onset was defined for all white women and black men, and a random sample of white men. Median survival times from onset were 43 years (white females), 30 years (black males) and 34 years (white males). Crude 50-year survival rates were 31.5% (white females), 21.5% (black males) and 16.6% (white males), but only the white females and white males were significantly different. A proportional hazard analysis was used to identify risk factors for mortality from multiple sclerosis onset year. Significant risk factors included male sex (risk ratio: 1.57), older age at onset (risk ratio: 1.05 per year) and high socioeconomic status (risk ratio: 1.05 per socioeconomic status category). There were no statistically significant differences in survival following multiple sclerosis onset by race or latitude of place of entry into military service, both significant risk factors associated with the development of multiple sclerosis. Standardized mortality ratios utilizing national US data (for 1956-96) showed a marked excess for all three race-sex groups of multiple sclerosis cases, with little difference among them, but with a decreasing excess over time. Relative survival rates, used to compare the survival of multiple sclerosis cases with that of other military veterans, did not differ significantly by sex-race group, nor by latitude of place of entry into military service, but did differ significantly by socioeconomic class. The lack of difference in male and female relative survival rates suggests that the significant difference in survival between male and female multiple sclerosis cases is, at least in part, a result of sex per se and not the disease.

  10. Survival Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Rupert G

    2011-01-01

    A concise summary of the statistical methods used in the analysis of survival data with censoring. Emphasizes recently developed nonparametric techniques. Outlines methods in detail and illustrates them with actual data. Discusses the theory behind each method. Includes numerous worked problems and numerical exercises.

  11. Modelling survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashauer, Roman; Albert, Carlo; Augustine, Starrlight

    2016-01-01

    well GUTS, calibrated with short-term survival data of Gammarus pulex exposed to four pesticides, can forecast effects of longer-term pulsed exposures. Thirdly, we tested the ability of GUTS to estimate 14-day median effect concentrations of malathion for a range of species and use these estimates...

  12. The effect of health insurance on childhood cancer survival in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong Min; Wang, Xiaoyan; Ojha, Rohit P; Johnson, Kimberly J

    2017-12-15

    The effect of health insurance on childhood cancer survival has not been well studied. Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) data, this study was designed to assess the association between health insurance status and childhood cancer survival. Data on cancers diagnosed among children less than 15 years old from 2007 to 2009 were obtained from the SEER 18 registries. The effect of health insurance at diagnosis on 5-year childhood cancer mortality was estimated with marginal survival probabilities, restricted mean survival times, and Cox proportional hazards (PH) regression analyses, which were adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, and county-level poverty. Among 8219 childhood cancer cases, the mean survival time was 1.32 months shorter (95% confidence interval [CI], -4.31 to 1.66) after 5 years for uninsured children (n = 131) versus those with private insurance (n = 4297), whereas the mean survival time was 0.62 months shorter (95% CI, -1.46 to 0.22) for children with Medicaid at diagnosis (n = 2838). In Cox PH models, children who were uninsured had a 1.26-fold higher risk of cancer death (95% CI, 0.84-1.90) than those who were privately insured at diagnosis. The risk for those with Medicaid was similar to the risk for those with private insurance at diagnosis (hazard ratio, 1.06; 95% CI, 0.93-1.21). Overall, the results suggest that cancer survival is largely similar for children with Medicaid and those with private insurance at diagnosis. Slightly inferior survival was observed for those who were uninsured in comparison with those with private insurance at diagnosis. The latter result is based on a small number of uninsured children and should be interpreted cautiously. Further study is needed to confirm and clarify the reasons for these patterns. Cancer 2017;123:4878-85. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  13. Impact of body mass index on ovarian cancer survival varies by stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandera, Elisa V; Lee, Valerie S; Qin, Bo; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Lorna; Powell, C Bethan; Kushi, Lawrence H

    2017-07-11

    Research on the effect of body mass index (BMI) on ovarian cancer survival is inconsistent, but previous studies did not consider the possible impact of ascites, bowel obstruction, or cachexia, which commonly occur in late-stage disease. We evaluated the association of BMI, before and around the time of diagnosis, with overall and disease-specific survival in a cohort study of primary invasive epithelial ovarian cancers diagnosed from 2000 to 2013 in Kaiser Permanente Northern California (KPNC) (n=1184). Deaths were identified through December 2014, with a median follow-up of 37 months. Proportional hazards regression was used to estimate overall and ovarian cancer-specific mortality, accounting for prognostic variables including age at diagnosis, race, stage, grade, histology, comorbidities, treatment, post-treatment CA125 levels, ascites, and bowel obstruction. There was no evidence of an association between BMI and overall or ovarian cancer-specific survival. However, we found strong effect modification by stage (P interaction <0.01). Compared with normal prediagnosis BMI (18.5-24.9 kg m -2 ), for women who were obese before diagnosis (BMI⩾35 kg m -2 ) ovarian cancer-specific survival was lower among those diagnosed at stages I/II (hazard ratio (HR): 3.40; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.16-9.99), but increased among those diagnosed with stage IV disease (HR: 0.58; 95% CI: 0.35-0.96). Associations were attenuated after excluding those diagnosed with cachexia (n=82) and further adjustment for ascites and bowel obstruction, with no evidence of effect modification by these factors. Associations of obesity with ovarian cancer survival may differ by stage, with decreased survival among those with localised disease and increased survival among those with late-stage disease. Stage-specific effects of obesity on survival suggest a tailored approach to improve prognosis may be appropriate.

  14. Survival Following Veno-Venous Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation and Mortality in a Diverse Patient Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosca, Matthew S; Narotsky, David L; Liao, Ming; Mochari-Greenberger, Heidi; Beck, James; Mongero, Linda; Bacchetta, Matthew

    2015-12-01

    Racial and ethnic disparities in cardiovascular disease are well established; however, there is limited information about survival differences following veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VV-ECMO) in contemporary adult populations. The purpose of this study was to assess survival at discharge, 30 days, and at 1 year following institution of VV-ECMO in an ethnically diverse population, and to examine potential risk factors for mortality. This was a single-center study of 41 patients (49% female, 27% minorities, 7% > 65 years) who received VV-ECMO between the years 2004 and 2013 at an academic medical center. Kaplan-Meier estimates were calculated to assess survival up to 1 year, and cox proportional hazard models were used to evaluate the association between risk factors, mortality, and confounders. Overall, 76% (n = 31) of VV-ECMO patients survived to discharge and 30 days and 71% (n = 29) survived to 1 year. Whites (n = 30) had a higher survival at 1 year compared to minorities (n = 11) (83% vs. 36%, respectively, p = .01). Minorities had a significantly increased risk of mortality at 30 days (hazard ratio [HR] = 5.07, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.42-18.09) and at 1 year (HR = 5.19, 95% CI = 1.63-16.55). Race/ethnicity remained a significant independent predictor of survival at 30 days except when history of shock or lung transplantation was included in adjusted regression models. VV-ECMO was associated with an excellent overall survival up to 1 year. Racial/ethnic minorities had a 5-fold increased risk for 30-day mortality, which was largely explained by a lower likelihood of lung transplantation and increased risk of shock.

  15. Frailty Models in Survival Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Wienke, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    The concept of frailty offers a convenient way to introduce unobserved heterogeneity and associations into models for survival data. In its simplest form, frailty is an unobserved random proportionality factor that modifies the hazard function of an individual or a group of related individuals. "Frailty Models in Survival Analysis" presents a comprehensive overview of the fundamental approaches in the area of frailty models. The book extensively explores how univariate frailty models can represent unobserved heterogeneity. It also emphasizes correlated frailty models as extensions of

  16. Evaluation of three definitions of progression-free survival in preoperative cancer therapy (JCOG0801-A).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kenichi; Shibata, Taro; Takashima, Atsuo; Yamamoto, Seiichiro; Fukuda, Haruhiko

    2012-10-01

    Progression-free survival is an often-used endpoint in clinical trials comparing preoperative therapy and surgery-first therapy. Because the surgery date is always later in the preoperative arm than in the surgery-first arm, it is difficult to define progression-free survival optimally. We evaluated three progression-free survival definitions that used different methods to handle incomplete resection. The three definitions specify the event date of incomplete resection (IR) as follows: 'IR = event' method, date of surgery; 'IR not event' method, date of radiological or clinical progression after incomplete resection; landmark method, landmark time. According to these definitions, the theoretical strengths and weaknesses of the three definitions are investigated. Three patterns of progression-free survival and overall survival were estimated using the data of the Japan Clinical Oncology Group studies. Theoretically, 'IR = event' inflates alpha error while 'IR not event' method and landmark method reduce the statistical power under the alternative hypothesis. In JCOG9907, hazard ratios for the three definitions were: 'IR = event', 0.80 (95% confidence interval, 0.59-1.07; P = 0.13); 'IR not event', 0.81 (95% confidence interval, 0.60-1.09; P = 0.16); landmark, 0.80 (95% confidence interval, 0.59-1.07; P = 0.15). No P value of any methods corresponded with the positive result for overall survival (P = 0.03). In the preoperative arms of the four studies, maximum differences in median and percentage of 1 year progression-free survival among the three definitions were 0-6.4 months and 1.2-5.2%. Progression-free survival sometimes fails as a surrogate of overall survival, and differences among results obtained with various progression-free survival definitions can be large. Overall survival should be used as primary endpoint in studies evaluating preoperative therapy.

  17. Statin use and kidney cancer survival outcomes: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayan, Madhur; Punjani, Nahid; Juurlink, David N; Finelli, Antonio; Austin, Peter C; Kulkarni, Girish S; Uleryk, Elizabeth; Hamilton, Robert J

    2017-01-01

    Statin use has been associated with improved survival outcomes in various malignancies. Randomized controlled trials are currently underway evaluating their utility as adjunctive cancer therapies. However, studies evaluating the association between statin use and outcomes in kidney cancer yield conflicting results. We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE to identify studies evaluating the association between statin use and kidney cancer survival outcomes. We evaluated risk of bias with the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. We pooled hazard ratios for recurrence-free survival, progression-free survival, cancer-specific survival, and overall survival using random-effects models. We evaluated publication bias through Begg's and Egger's tests, and the trim and fill procedure. We identified 12 studies meeting inclusion criteria and summarized data from 18,105 patients. No study was considered to be at high risk of bias. Statin use was not significantly associated with recurrence-free survival (pooled HR 0.97, 95% CI 0.89-1.06) or progression-free survival (pooled HR 0.92, 95% CI 0.51-1.65); however, statin use was associated with marked improvements in cancer-specific survival (pooled HR 0.67, 95% CI 0.47-0.94) and overall survival (pooled HR 0.74, 95% CI 0.63-0.88). There was no strong evidence of publication bias for any outcome. Our results demonstrate that statin use among patients with kidney cancer is associated with significantly improved cancer-specific and overall survival. Further studies are needed to confirm the therapeutic role of statins in kidney cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Graphing survival curve estimates for time-dependent covariates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Lonni R; Peterson, Edward L; Breslau, Naomi

    2002-01-01

    Graphical representation of statistical results is often used to assist readers in the interpretation of the findings. This is especially true for survival analysis where there is an interest in explaining the patterns of survival over time for specific covariates. For fixed categorical covariates, such as a group membership indicator, Kaplan-Meier estimates (1958) can be used to display the curves. For time-dependent covariates this method may not be adequate. Simon and Makuch (1984) proposed a technique that evaluates the covariate status of the individuals remaining at risk at each event time. The method takes into account the change in an individual's covariate status over time. The survival computations are the same as the Kaplan-Meier method, in that the conditional survival estimates are the function of the ratio of the number of events to the number at risk at each event time. The difference between the two methods is that the individuals at risk within each level defined by the covariate is not fixed at time 0 in the Simon and Makuch method as it is with the Kaplan-Meier method. Examples of how the two methods can differ for time dependent covariates in Cox proportional hazards regression analysis are presented.

  19. Hazard Analysis Database Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GRAMS, W.H.

    2000-12-28

    The Hazard Analysis Database was developed in conjunction with the hazard analysis activities conducted in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U S . Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports, for HNF-SD-WM-SAR-067, Tank Farms Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR). The FSAR is part of the approved Authorization Basis (AB) for the River Protection Project (RPP). This document describes, identifies, and defines the contents and structure of the Tank Farms FSAR Hazard Analysis Database and documents the configuration control changes made to the database. The Hazard Analysis Database contains the collection of information generated during the initial hazard evaluations and the subsequent hazard and accident analysis activities. The Hazard Analysis Database supports the preparation of Chapters 3 ,4 , and 5 of the Tank Farms FSAR and the Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) process and consists of two major, interrelated data sets: (1) Hazard Analysis Database: Data from the results of the hazard evaluations, and (2) Hazard Topography Database: Data from the system familiarization and hazard identification.

  20. Hazardous Waste: Learn the Basics of Hazardous Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Agency Search Search Hazardous Waste Contact Us Share Learn the Basics of Hazardous Waste Hazardous waste that ... Regulations part 261 . Select a question below to learn more about each step in the hazardous waste ...

  1. The McGill Brisbane Symptom Score in relation to survival in pancreatic adenocarcinoma: a validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Suhail A R; Furuya-Kanamori, Luis; Engel, Jessica M; Jamal, Mohammad H; Stankowski, Rachel V; Barkun, Jeffrey; Onitilo, Adedayo A

    2016-07-01

    The McGill Brisbane Symptom Score (MBSS) is a clinical score for pancreatic cancer patients upon initial presentation that takes into account four variables (weight loss, abdominal pain, jaundice, and history of smoking) to stratify them into two MBSS intensity categories. Several studies have suggested that these categories are strongly associated with eventual survival in patients with resectable (rPCa) and unresectable (uPCa) pancreatic cancer. This study aimed to validate the MBSS in a cohort of patients with pancreatic cancer from a single institution. Survival time by resection status and MBSS intensity category were analyzed among 633 patients from our institution between 2001 and 2010. Hazard ratios for death using Cox proportional hazards models, with age as the timescale, adjustment for sex and year of diagnosis, and stratified by adjuvant chemotherapy status were estimated. Median survival time was the longest in patients with low-intensity MBSS and rPCa (817 days), whereas the shortest survival time was found among patients with uPCa regardless of MBSS status (144-147 days). After consideration of age and chemotherapy status, high-intensity MBSS was associated with poorer survival for both rPCa (HR 1.64; 95 % CI 1.07-2.52) and uPCa (HR 1.35; 95 % CI 1.06-1.72). Preoperative MBSS intensity is a useful prognostic indicator of survival in resectable as well as unresectable pancreatic cancer.

  2. Prognostic value of DCE-MRI in breast cancer patients undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy: a comparison with traditional survival indicators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickles, Martin D.; Lowry, Martin; Turnbull, Lindsay W. [Hull York Medical School at University of Hull, Hull Royal Infirmary, Centre for Magnetic Resonance Investigations, Hull (United Kingdom); Manton, David J. [Hull and East Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust, Radiation Physics Department, Hull (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-01

    To determine associations between dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging (DCE-MRI) parameters and survival intervals in patients with locally advanced breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC), surgery, and adjuvant therapies. Further, to compare the prognostic value of DCE-MRI parameters against traditional survival indicators. DCE-MRI and MR tumour volume measures were obtained prior to treatment and post 2nd NAC cycle. To demonstrate which parameters were associated with survival, Cox's proportional hazards models (CPHM) were employed. To avoid over-parameterisation, only those MR parameters with at least a borderline significant result were entered into the final CPHM. When considering disease-free survival positive axillary nodal status (hazard ratio [HR] 6.79), younger age (HR 3.37), negative oestrogen receptor status (HR 3.24), pre-treatment Maximum Enhancement Index (MaxEI) (HR 6.51), and percentage change in MaxEI (HR 1.02) represented the retained CPHM covariates. Similarly, positive axillary nodal status (HR 11.47), negative progesterone receptor status (HR 4.37) and percentage change in AUC{sub 90} (HR 1.01) represented the retained predictive variables for overall survival. Multivariate survival analysis has demonstrated that DCE-MRI parameters obtained prior to NAC and/or post 2nd cycle can provide independent prognostic information that can complement traditional prognostic indicators available prior to treatment. (orig.)

  3. Statistical analysis of survival data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, J; Breslow, N

    1984-01-01

    A general review of the statistical techniques that the authors feel are most important in the analysis of survival data is presented. The emphasis is on the study of the duration of time between any two events as applied to people and on the nonparametric and semiparametric models most often used in these settings. The unifying concept is the hazard function, variously known as the risk, the force of mortality, or the force of transition.

  4. Long-term survival outcomes by smoking status in surgical and nonsurgical patients with non-small cell lung cancer: comparing never smokers and current smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meguid, Robert A; Hooker, Craig M; Harris, James; Xu, Li; Westra, William H; Sherwood, J Timothy; Sussman, Marc; Cattaneo, Stephen M; Shin, James; Cox, Solange; Christensen, Joani; Prints, Yelena; Yuan, Nance; Zhang, Jennifer; Yang, Stephen C; Brock, Malcolm V

    2010-09-01

    Survival outcomes of never smokers with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who undergo surgery are poorly characterized. This investigation compared surgical outcomes of never and current smokers with NSCLC. This investigation was a single-institution retrospective study of never and current smokers with NSCLC from 1975 to 2004. From an analytic cohort of 4,546 patients with NSCLC, we identified 724 never smokers and 3,822 current smokers. Overall, 1,142 patients underwent surgery with curative intent. For survival analysis by smoking status, hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazard modeling and then further adjusted by other covariates. Never smokers were significantly more likely than current smokers to be women (P cancer diagnosis has little impact on the long-term survival of patients with NSCLC, especially after curative surgery. Despite different etiologies between lung cancer in never and current smokers the prognosis is equally dismal.

  5. Influence of socioeconomic factors on survival after breast cancer-A nationwide cohort study of women diagnosed with breast cancer in Denmark 1983-1999

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg; Ross, Lone; During, M.

    2007-01-01

    The reasons for social inequality in breast cancer survival are far from established. Our study aims to study the importance of a range of socioeconomic factors and comorbid disorders on survival after breast cancer surgery in Denmark where the health care system is tax-funded and uniform. All 25......,897 Danish women who underwent protocol-based treatment for breast cancer in 1983-1999 were identified in a clinical database and information on socioeconomic variables and both somatic and psychiatric comorbid disorders was obtained from population-based registries. We used Cox proportional hazards models...... to estimate the association between socioeconomic position and overall survival and further to analyse breast cancer specific deaths in a competing risk set-up regarding all other causes of death as competing risks. The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for death was reduced in women with higher education (HR, 0...

  6. Overall Survival Following Thoracoscopic vs Open Lobectomy for Early-stage Non-small Cell Lung Cancer: A Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaji, Masatsugu; Lee, Hyun-Sung; Kawaguchi, Atsushi; Burt, Bryan M

    2017-01-01

    A majority of observational studies on overall survival following thoracoscopic vs open lobectomy for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer did not demonstrate a significant difference, whereas several meta-analyses on this topic showed a significant difference. The PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science databases were queried for studies published in the English language. We searched for meta-analyses and original studies comparing overall survival between thoracoscopic and open lobectomy for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer. Our meta-analysis, using random effect models and with a hazard ratio as a measure of effect, was performed on original studies. Publication bias was evaluated with funnel plots of precision and the Egger test. Seven meta-analyses on this topic were found and all of them have shown that thoracoscopic lobectomy is associated with significantly more favorable overall survival than open lobectomy, using odds ratio, risk ratio, or risk difference as measures of effect. Our meta-analysis of 11 observational studies demonstrated no significant difference in overall survival between thoracoscopic (n = 2386) and open lobectomy (n = 3494) for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (pooled hazard ratio: 0.91, 95% confidence interval: 0.76-1.09, P = 0.30). Neither funnel plots of precision nor the Egger test suggested a publication bias. Our meta-analysis, using a hazard ratio as a measure of effect for a time-to-event outcome, did not demonstrate a significant difference in overall survival between thoracoscopic and open lobectomy with the current dataset available in the literature, as opposed to previous meta-analyses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. LONG TERM SURVIVAL FOLLOWING TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY: A POPULATION BASED PARAMETRIC SURVIVAL ANALYSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Gordon Ward; Ransom, Jeanine; Mandrekar, Jay; Brown, Allen W

    2017-01-01

    Background Long term mortality may be increased following traumatic brain injury (TBI); however the degree to which survival could be reduced is unknown. We aimed to model life expectancy following post-acute TBI to provide predictions of longevity and quantify differences in survivorship with the general population. Methods A population based retrospective cohort study using data from the Rochester Epidemiology Project (REP) was performed. A random sample of patients from Olmsted County, Minnesota with a confirmed TBI between 1987 and 2000 was identified and vital status determined in 2013. Parametric survival modelling was then used to develop a model to predict life expectancy following TBI conditional on age at injury. Survivorship following TBI was also compared with the general population and age and gender matched non-head injured REP controls. Results 769 patients were included in complete case analyses. Median follow up time was 16.1 years (IQR 9.0–20.4) with 120 deaths occurring in the cohort during the study period. Survival after acute TBI was well represented by a Gompertz distribution. Victims of TBI surviving for at least 6 months post-injury demonstrated a much higher ongoing mortality rate compared to the US general population and non-TBI controls (hazard ratio 1·47, 95% CI 1·15–1·87). US general population cohort life table data was used to update the Gompertz model’s shape and scale parameters to account for cohort effects and allow prediction of life expectancy in contemporary TBI. Conclusions Survivors of TBI have decreased life expectancy compared to the general population. This may be secondary to the head injury itself or result from patient characteristics associated with both the propensity for TBI and increased early mortality. Post-TBI life expectancy estimates may be useful to guide prognosis, in public health planning, for actuarial applications and in the extrapolation of outcomes for TBI economic models. PMID:27165161

  8. Occupational hazard exposure and at risk drinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, K M; Furner, S E; Qian, Y

    1999-01-01

    This study examined associations between workers' reported exposure to occupational hazards and at risk drinking. A sample of 15,907 working adults was drawn from the 1985 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) (weighted sample represented 85,395,000 workers). This was the only year the NHIS included questions on both occupational hazard exposure and at risk drinking. Occupational hazard exposures included chemical/biological substances, physical hazards, injury risk, and mental stress. At risk drinking was defined as binge drinking and drinking and driving. Prevalence adjusted odds ratios were estimated. Sixty percent of workers reported exposure to one or more occupational hazards with considerable variation among and within occupations. In all, 31% reported binge drinking and 15% drove after drinking too much. In a multivariate analysis that controlled for background characteristics, workers who reported occupational hazard exposures were 1.2 to 1.4 times more likely to engage in binge drinking than workers without exposures. Similar results were found for drinking/driving. All multivariate results were statistically significant. Findings suggest workers who report occupational hazard exposures are at greater risk of both binge drinking and drinking/driving. Occupational and environmental health nurses can lead workplace initiatives to reduce occupational hazard exposure and, simultaneously, invest in health promotion efforts to curb at risk drinking among workers.

  9. Induction regimen and survival in simultaneous heart-kidney transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariyamuthu, Venkatesh K; Amin, Alpesh A; Drazner, Mark H; Araj, Faris; Mammen, Pradeep P A; Ayvaci, Mehmet; Mete, Mutlu; Ozay, Fatih; Ghanta, Mythili; Mohan, Sumit; Mohan, Prince; Tanriover, Bekir

    2017-11-15

    Induction therapy in simultaneous heart-kidney transplantation (SHKT) is not well studied in the setting of contemporary maintenance immunosuppression consisting of tacrolimus (TAC), mycophenolic acid (MPA), and prednisone (PRED). We analyzed the Organ Procurement and Transplant Network registry from January 1, 2000, to March 3, 2015, for recipients of SHKT (N = 623) maintained on TAC/MPA/PRED at hospital discharge. The study cohort was further stratified into 3 groups by induction choice: induction (n = 232), rabbit anti-thymoglobulin (r-ATG; n = 204), and interleukin-2 receptor-α (n = 187) antagonists. Survival rates were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier estimator. Multivariable inverse probability weighted Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to assess hazard ratios associated with post-transplant mortality as the primary outcome. The study cohort was censored on March 4, 2016, to allow at least 1-year of follow-up. During the study period, the number of SHKTs increased nearly 5-fold. The Kaplan-Meier survival curve showed superior outcomes with r-ATG compared with no induction or interleukin-2 receptor-α induction. Compared with the no-induction group, an inverse probability weighted Cox proportional hazard model showed no independent association of induction therapy with the primary outcome. In sub-group analysis, r-ATG appeared to lower mortality in sensitized patients with panel reactive antibody of 10% or higher (hazard ratio, 0.19; 95% confidence interval, 0.05-0.71). r-ATG may provide a survival benefit in SHKT, especially in sensitized patients maintained on TAC/MPA/PRED at hospital discharge. Copyright © 2017 International Society for the Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Survival benefit with capecitabine/docetaxel versus docetaxel alone: analysis of therapy in a randomized phase III trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, David; Vukelja, Svetislava; Moiseyenko, Vladimir; Cervantes, Guadalupe; Mauriac, Louis; Van Hazel, Guy; Liu, Wing-Yiu; Ayoub, Jean-Pierre; O'Shaughnessy, Joyce A

    2004-10-01

    In a large phase III trial of 511 patients with anthracycline-pretreated advanced/metastatic breast cancer, capecitabine/docetaxel combination therapy was shown to have significantly superior efficacy compared with single-agent docetaxel, including superior progression-free and overall survival and objective response rate. An updated survival analysis with >/= 27 months follow-up shows that patients receiving combination therapy maintained significantly superior survival (hazard ratio [HR], 0.777 [95% CI, 0.645-0.942]; P < 0.01; median survival, 14.5 months vs. 11.5 months) compared with those receiving single-agent docetaxel. Following the failure of docetaxel monotherapy, 35% of patients did not receive additional cytotoxic chemotherapy. Among patients randomized to single-agent docetaxel, only those given poststudy single-agent capecitabine had significantly prolonged survival compared with those given any other poststudy chemotherapy (HR, 0.500; P = 0.0046; median survival, 21.0 months vs. 12.3 months, respectively). By contrast, poststudy vinorelbine-containing chemotherapy did not affect survival following progression on single-agent docetaxel compared with other poststudy chemotherapy regimens (HR, 1.014; P = 0.94; median survival, 13.5 months vs. 12.6 months, respectively). Among patients randomized to combination therapy, discontinuing docetaxel of capecitabine has a similar effect on survival (HR, 0.720; P = 0.20; median survival, 15.8 months vs. 18.3 months, respectively). Median survival was 18.3 months in patients who discontinued docetaxel and continued to receive capecitabine versus 15.8 months in patients who discontinued capecitabine and continued to receive docetaxel, with a trend toward improved survival in patients continuing to receive capecitabine. Although this is a retrospective analysis, these data suggest that the sequential administration of docetaxel followed by capecitabine is associated with prolonged survival in patients who are

  11. Hazard Analysis Database Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GAULT, G.W.

    1999-10-13

    The Hazard Analysis Database was developed in conjunction with the hazard analysis activities conducted in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports, for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR). The FSAR is part of the approved TWRS Authorization Basis (AB). This document describes, identifies, and defines the contents and structure of the TWRS FSAR Hazard Analysis Database and documents the configuration control changes made to the database. The TWRS Hazard Analysis Database contains the collection of information generated during the initial hazard evaluations and the subsequent hazard and accident analysis activities. The database supports the preparation of Chapters 3,4, and 5 of the TWRS FSAR and the USQ process and consists of two major, interrelated data sets: (1) Hazard Evaluation Database--Data from the results of the hazard evaluations; and (2) Hazard Topography Database--Data from the system familiarization and hazard identification.

  12. Lymphocyte/Monocyte Ratio is a Novel Predictor for Early Stage Extranodal Natural Killer/T-cell Lymphoma, Nasal Type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiao-Xuan; Li, Shao-Hua; Ji, Bao-Yan; Wang, Han-Yu; Li, Yi-Yang; Feng, Ling-Ling; Chen, Kai; Xia, Yun-Fei; Zhang, Yu-Jing

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Great heterogeneity exists in clinical behavior and survival outcome in patients with stage IE/IIE extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type (ENKTL). In this study, we proposed lymphocyte/monocyte ratio (LMR) as a new prognostic factor for these early stage ENKTL. Methods: We retrospectively examined the LMR as a prognostic variable in a cohort of 379 patients with newly diagnosed stage IE/IIE ENKTL. The relationship between the LMR and clinicopathologic variables were analyzed in Kaplan-Meier log-rank survival analysis, and the Cox proportional hazards model was used to determine the survival significance of the LMR for both progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Results: Patients were categorized into two different groups based on the LMR using cut-off value of 2.0. The 5-year PFS rates in the low and high LMR group were 43.9% and 62.7%, respectively, and the 5-year OS rates in the two groups were 59.1% and 77.7%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, low LMR at diagnosis was associated with worse PFS (hazard ratio 1.611, 95% confidence interval: 1.027-2.525, P =0.038) independent of age (P=0.033) and treatment stratagem (Phazard ratio 2.003, 95% confidence interval: 1.124-3.569, P =0.018) independent of age (P=0.007), LDH level (P=0.042), local tumor invasiveness (P=0.008), and treatment stratagem (P<0.001). Conclusion: The LMR is an independent prognostic factor for both DFS and OS in patients with stage IE/IIE ENKTL, and provides additional prognostic value beyond standard clinicopathological parameters.

  13. Neutrophil-to-Lymphocyte Ratio Predicts Prognosis in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Patients Who Received Cabazitaxel Chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Uemura

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and Objectives. An elevated neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR has been suggested to be associated with a poor prognosis in several cancers. We evaluated the utility of an elevated NLR as a biomarker to predict the prognosis of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC patients treated with cabazitaxel (CBZ. Methods. We analyzed 47 patients who received CBZ chemotherapy for mCRPC in our institutions. The NLR was calculated using the neutrophil and lymphocyte counts before CBZ chemotherapy. We determined the NLR cut-off value based on the sensitivity and specificity levels derived from area under the receiver operator characteristic curves for death. A multivariate analysis was performed to investigate the association between the NLR and the prognosis. Results. The median overall survival (OS after CBZ was 10.0 months (range: 6.3–13.2. The median OS was shorter in patients with a high NLR (≥3.83 than in those with a low NLR (<3.83 (5.8 versus 13.2 months, p=0.018. In the multivariate analysis, the NLR, patient age, and lymph node (LN metastasis were independent predictors of the OS (hazard ratio 3.01, p=0.030; hazard ratio 3.10, p=0.029; hazard ratio 12.38, p=0.001, resp.. Conclusions. NLR might be a useful prognostic biomarker in mCRPC patients treated with CBZ.

  14. Recovery of Serum Cholesterol Predicts Survival After Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vest, Amanda R.; Kennel, Peter J.; Maldonado, Dawn; Young, James B.; Mountis, Maria M.; Naka, Yoshifumi; Colombo, Paolo C.; Mancini, Donna M.; Starling, Randall C.; Schulze, P. Christian

    2017-01-01

    Background Advanced systolic heart failure is associated with myocardial and systemic metabolic abnormalities, including low levels of total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein. Low cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein have been associated with greater mortality in heart failure. Implantation of a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) reverses some of the metabolic derangements of advanced heart failure. Methods and Results A cohort was retrospectively assembled from 2 high-volume implantation centers, totaling 295 continuous-flow LVAD recipients with ≥2 cholesterol values available. The cohort was predominantly bridge-to-transplantation (67%), with median age of 59 years and 49% ischemic heart failure cause. Total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, high-density lipoprotein, and triglyceride levels all significantly increased after LVAD implantation (median values from implantation to 3 months post implantation 125–150 mg/dL, 67–85 mg/dL, 32–42 mg/dL, and 97–126 mg/dL, respectively). On Cox proportional hazards modeling, patients achieving recovery of total cholesterol levels, defined as a median or greater change from pre implantation to 3 months post-LVAD implantation, had significantly better unadjusted survival (hazard ratio, 0.445; 95% confidence interval, 0.212–0.932) and adjusted survival (hazard ratio, 0.241; 95% confidence interval, 0.092–0.628) than those without cholesterol recovery after LVAD implantation. The continuous variable of total cholesterol at 3 months post implantation and the cholesterol increase from pre implantation to 3 months were also both significantly associated with survival during LVAD support. Conclusions Initiation of continuous-flow LVAD support was associated with significant recovery of all 4 lipid variables. Patients with a greater increase in total cholesterol by 3 months post implantation had superior survival during LVAD support. PMID:27623768

  15. Migration and Environmental Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Lori M.

    2011-01-01

    Losses due to natural hazards (e.g., earthquakes, hurricanes) and technological hazards (e.g., nuclear waste facilities, chemical spills) are both on the rise. One response to hazard-related losses is migration, with this paper offering a review of research examining the association between migration and environmental hazards. Using examples from both developed and developing regional contexts, the overview demonstrates that the association between migration and environmental hazards varies by setting, hazard types, and household characteristics. In many cases, however, results demonstrate that environmental factors play a role in shaping migration decisions, particularly among those most vulnerable. Research also suggests that risk perception acts as a mediating factor. Classic migration theory is reviewed to offer a foundation for examination of these associations. PMID:21886366

  16. Opioids, survival, and advanced cancer in the hospice setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azoulay, Daniel; Jacobs, Jeremy M; Cialic, Ron; Mor, Eliana Ein; Stessman, Jochanan

    2011-02-01

    Although pain is common among advanced cancer patients, it can be controlled in a large proportion of patients. Several barriers hinder this, including the concern that opioids hasten death. We examined whether opioids influence survival among advanced cancer patients. Retrospective observational study from September 2006 to October 2007. In-patient hospice unit. Participants were 114 consecutive hospice patients (mean age 71.7 ± 13.9 years). Analysis of survival (days) following admission, according to opioid usage. Standardized Oral Morphine Equivalents (OME mg/d) were calculated. On admission 74.6% received opioids, rising to 92.1% at death. Mean opioid dosage was OME of 146 ± 245 mg/d, and mean survival was 12.3 ± 12.15 days. Mean survival, according to opioid dosage of 0, 1 to 119, and greater than or equal to 120 OME mg/d respectively at admission, was 16.7 ± 13.4, 11.2 ± 12.1, 10.0 ± 10.2 (P = .009), and according to dose at death was 17.0 ± 15.1, 12.3 ± 12.1, 11.1 ± 11.3 (P = ns). Increasing overall opioid dosage was associated with improved survival compared with no change or decreasing overall dosage (mean survival 14.0 ± 12.7 days versus 9.3 ± 9.8 versus 9.1 ± 11.4, days respectively, P = .01). Adjusting for clinical variables in Cox proportional hazards models, no significant association was found between mortality and of the following aspects of opioid usage: (1) dose on admission (Hazard Ratio [HR] 1.009, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.999-1.019); (2) dose at death (HR 1.004, 95% CI 0.996-1.013); (3) mean dose (HR 1.006, 95% CI 0.997-1.016); (4) overall dose increase (HR 0.733, 95% CI 0.417-1.288) and decrease (HR 0.967, 95% CI 0.472-1.984); (5) day-by-day dosage changes (HR 1.005, 95% CI 0.996-1.013). Opioid usage, even at high dosages, had no effect on survival among advanced cancer patients in a hospice setting. Copyright © 2011 American Medical Directors Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Social disparities in survival after diagnosis with colorectal cancer: Contribution of race and insurance status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulte, Dianne; Jansen, Lina; Brenner, Hermann

    2017-06-01

    Both minority race and lack of health insurance are risk factors for lower survival in colorectal cancer (CRC) but the interaction between the two factors has not been explored in detail. One to 5-year survival by race/ethnic group and insurance type for patients with CRC diagnosed in 2007-13 and registered in the Surveillance Epidemiology, and End RESULTS: database were explored. Shared frailty models were computed to further explore the association between CRC specific survival and insurance status after adjustment for demographic and treatment variables. Age-adjusted 5-year survival estimates were 70.4% for non-Hispanic whites (nHW), 62.7% for non-Hispanic blacks (nHB), 70.2% for Hispanics, 64.7% for Native Americans, and 73.1% for Asian/Pacific Islanders (API). Survival was greater for patients with insurance other than Medicaid for all races, but the differential in survival varied with race, with the greatest difference being seen for nHW at +25.0% and +20.2%, respectively, for Medicaid and uninsured versus other insurance. Similar results were observed for stage- and age-specific analyses, with survival being consistently higher for nHW and API compared to other groups. After confounder adjustment, hazard ratios of 1.53 and 1.50 for CRC-specific survival were observed for Medicaid and uninsured. Racial/ethnic differences remained significant only for nHB compared to nHW. Race/ethnic group and insurance type are partially independent factors affecting survival expectations for patients diagnosed with CRC. NHB had lower than expected survival for all insurance types. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Renal cell carcinoma in end-stage renal disease: Multi-institutional comparative analysis of survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Cheryn; Hong, Sung Hoo; Chung, Jin Soo; Byun, Seok Soo; Kwak, Cheol; Jeong, Chang Wook; Seo, Seong Il; Jeon, Hwang Gyun; Seo, Ill Young

    2016-06-01

    To describe the clinical features of renal cell carcinoma arising in end-stage renal disease and to compare survival outcomes after definitive treatment with non-end-stage renal disease renal cell carcinoma. Data of 181 consecutive patients with end-stage renal disease renal cell carcinoma who had received surgical treatment between 1995 and 2011 at seven institutions were reviewed. Data of 362 non-end-stage renal disease renal cell carcinoma patients matched for clinicopathological parameters who received surgery at Asan Medical Center during the same study period were also reviewed. The two study groups were compared with respect to recurrence-free, cancer-specific, and overall survival by Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards method. Mean follow up was 40 ± 34.2 months after surgery. Median tumor size was 2.5 cm (interquartile range 1.5-4.5), and pathological tumor stage was T1 in 78%, T2 in 7.1% and T3 and higher in 14.9%. Tumor histological type was clear cell in 63%, papillary in 17%, chromophobe in 5%, clear cell papillary in 2.8% and acquired cystic disease-related in 6.1%. Compared with the controls, the stage-specific 5-year recurrence-free survival was similar (87.6 vs 88.5%), but cancer-specific and overall survival was significantly lower. On multivariate analysis, end-stage renal disease renal cell carcinoma was not a predictor for recurrence-free survival, but a significant predictor for cancer-specific (hazard ratio 4.07, 95% confidence interval 2.08-7.94) and overall survival (hazard ratio 3.13, 95% confidence interval 1.66-5.96). End-stage renal disease renal cell carcinoma seems to have comparable stage-specific recurrence-free, but poorer cancer-specific and overall survival compared with non-end-stage renal disease renal cell carcinoma. As patients with end-stage renal disease are a high-risk population for renal cell carcinoma, routine radiographic screening to improve survival outcomes should be further investigated. © 2016

  19. Surviving downsizing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, A.C. [Colorado Public Service Co., Platteville, CO (United States); Schulz, J.W. [Applied Behavioral Sciences, Englewood, CO (United States); Holmes, M.H. [Colorado Public Service Co., Platteville, CO (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Utilities along with other companies are under increasing pressure to operate in a leaner, more efficient way. Companies with excess personnel costs consider downsizing as one solution. Developments in communication and technology along with more team-oriented management approaches further fuel the move to downsize as these developments permit smaller, flatter organizations. Downsizing is often, however, a difficult and even hazardous path. Reducing the size of a workforce does not automatically translate into lower costs or improved operations. The hidden costs of downsizing, i.e., the psychological impacts on the entire organization, may, in fact, overwhelm the anticipated gains. Yet, utilities facing deregulation and increasing competition ma be forced to follow this difficult course.

  20. Survival Trends in Elderly Patients with Glioblastoma in the United States: a Population-based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Binay Kumar; Bista, Amir; Sharma, Sandhya

    2016-09-01

    Concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide along with radiotherapy following surgery (the Stupp regimen) is the preferred therapy for young patients with glioblastoma as well as for elderly (>70 years) ones with favorable risk factors. This study investigated the survival trend since the introduction of the use of the Stupp regimen in elderly patients in a population-based setting. Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results 18 database was used to identify patients aged ≥70 years with glioblastoma as the first primary cancer diagnosed from 1999 to 2010. Chi-square test, Kaplan-Meier analysis with log-rank test and Cox proportional hazard method were used for analysis. A total of 5,575 patients were included in the survival analysis. Survival in Stupp era (year of diagnosis ≥2005) was significantly better compared to the pre-Stupp era with p<0.001 by log-rank test, with 1-, 2- and 3-year overall survival of 18.8% vs. 12.9%, 6.5% vs. 2.1% and 3.1% vs. 0.9% respectively, and hazard ratio for death in 3 years in the Stupp era was 0.87 (95% confidence interval=0.82-0.92; p<0.001) when compared with the pre-Stupp era. Factors such as younger age (<85 years), female sex, married status, Caucasian race and total resection favored better survival compared to their counterparts. This study shows that the survival of elderly patients with glioblastoma has improved since the introduction of the Stupp regimen. However, there are significant differences in survival rates among various cohorts. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  1. Immigration factors and prostate cancer survival among Hispanic men in California: does neighborhood matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schupp, Clayton W; Press, David J; Gomez, Scarlett Lin

    2014-05-01

    Hispanics are more likely than other racial/ethnic groups in the United States to be diagnosed with later stage of prostate cancer, yet they have lower prostate cancer mortality rates. The authors evaluated the impact of nativity and neighborhood-level Hispanic ethnic enclave on prostate cancer survival among Hispanics. A total of 35,427 Hispanic men diagnosed with invasive prostate cancer from 1995 through 2008 in the California Cancer Registry were studied; vital status data were available through 2010. Block group-level neighborhood measures were developed from US Census data. Stage-stratified Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the effect of nativity and ethnic enclave on prostate cancer survival. In models adjusted for neighborhood socioeconomic status and other individual factors, foreign-born Hispanics were found to have a significantly lower risk of prostate cancer survival (hazards ratio [HR], 0.81; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.75-0.87). Living in an ethnic enclave appeared to modify this effect, with the survival advantage slightly more pronounced in the high ethnic enclave neighborhoods (HR, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.71-0.86) compared with low ethnic enclave neighborhoods (HR, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.76-0.98). Despite lower socioeconomic status, Hispanic immigrants have better survival after prostate cancer than US-born Hispanics and this pattern was more striking among those living in ethnic enclaves. Identifying the modifiable individual and neighborhood-level factors that facilitate this survival advantage in Hispanic immigrants may help to inform specific interventions to improve survival among all patients. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  2. The Impact of Chemoembolization Endpoints on Survival in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Brian; Wang, Dingxin; Lewandowski, Robert J.; Riaz, Ahsun; Ryu, Robert K.; Sato, Kent T.; Larson, Andrew C.; Salem, Riad; Omary, Reed A.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the relationship between angiographic embolic endpoints of transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) and survival in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). MATERIALS AND METHODS This study retrospectively assessed 105 patients with surgically unresectable HCC who underwent TACE. Patients were classified according to a previously established subjective angiographic chemoembolization endpoint (SACE) scale. Only one patient was classified as SACE level 1 and thus excluded from all subsequent analysis. Survival was evaluated with Kaplan-Meier analysis. Multivariate analysis with Cox’s proportional hazard regression model was used to determine independent prognostic risk factors of survival. RESULTS Overall median survival was 21.1 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 15.9–26.4). Patients embolized to SACE levels 2 and 3 were aggregated and had a significantly higher median survival (25.6 months; 95% CI, 16.2–35.0) than patients embolized to SACE level 4 (17.1 months; 95% CI, 13.3–20.9) (p = 0.035). Multivariate analysis indicated that SACE level 4 (Hazard ratio [HR], 2.49; 95% CI, 1.41–4.42; p = 0.002), European Cooperative Oncology Group performance status > 0 (HR, 1.97; 95% CI, 1.15–3.37; p = 0.013), American Joint Committee on Cancer stage 3 or 4 (HR, 2.42; 95% CI, 1.27–4.60; p = 0.007), and Child-Pugh class B (HR, 1.94; 95% CI, 1.09–3.46; p = 0.025) were all independent negative prognostic indicators of survival. CONCLUSION Embolization to an intermediate, sub-stasis endpoint (SACE levels 2 and 3) during TACE improves survival compared to embolization to a higher, stasis endpoint (SACE level 4). Interventional oncologists should consider targeting these intermediate, sub-stasis angiographic endpoints during TACE. PMID:21427346

  3. Health Care Wide Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Scope | Glossary | References | Site Map | Credits Hospital eTool Administration Central Supply Clinical Services Dietary Emergency Engineering Healthcare Wide Hazards Heliport Housekeeping ICU Laboratory Laundry ...

  4. Survival and prognostic factors for survival, cancer specific survival and disease free interval in 239 patients with Hurthle cell carcinoma: a single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oluic, Branisav; Paunovic, Ivan; Loncar, Zlatibor; Djukic, Vladimir; Diklic, Aleksandar; Jovanovic, Milan; Garabinovic, Zeljko; Slijepcevic, Nikola; Rovcanin, Branislav; Micic, Dusan; Filipovic, Aleksandar; Zivaljevic, Vladan

    2017-05-25

    Hurthle cell carcinoma makes up 3 to 5% of all thyroid cancers and is considered to be a true rarity. The aim of our study was to analyze clinical characteristics and survival rates of patients with Hurthle cell carcinoma. Clinical data regarding basic demographic characteristics, tumor grade, type of surgical treatment and vital status were collected. Methods of descriptive statistics and Kaplan-Meier survival curves were used for statistical analysis. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to identify independent predictors. During the period from 1995 to 2014, 239 patients with Hurthle cell carcinoma were treated at our Institution. The average age of the patients was 54.3, with female to male ratio of 3.6:1 and average tumor size was 41.8 mm. The overall recurrence rate was 12.1%, with average time for relapse of 90.74 months and average time without any signs of the disease of 222.4 months. Overall 5-year, 10-year and 20-year survival rates were 89.4%, 77.2%, 61.9% respectively. The 5-year, 10-year and 20-year cancer specific survival rates were 94.6%, 92.5%, 87.4%, respectively. When disease free interval was observed, 5-year, 10-year and 20-year rates were 91.1%, 86.2%, 68.5%, respectively. The affection of both thyroid lobes and the need for reoperation due to local relapse were unfavorable independent prognostic factors, while total thyroidectomy as primary procedure was favorable predictive factor for cancer specific survival. Hurthle cell carcinoma is a rare tumor with an encouraging prognosis and after adequate surgical treatment recurrences are rare.

  5. Local-regional radiotherapy and surgery is associated with a significant survival advantage in metastatic breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Bevan Hong; Vlastos, Georges; Rapiti, Elisabetta; Vinh-Hung, Vincent; Nguyen, Nam Phong

    2010-01-01

    There is growing evidence of a survival benefit for metastatic breast cancer patients receiving surgery of the primary tumor. We investigated whether or not adjuvant radiotherapy can improve survival. Women diagnosed between 1988 and 2003 with metastatic, histologically confirmed unilateral primary breast cancer were selected from the SEER Program. Overall survival and specific survival were computed by the Kaplan-Meier method. Treatment hazard ratios of breast-conserving surgery or mastectomy versus no surgery, and radiotherapy versus none, were computed by Cox regression adjusting for period of diagnosis, age, marital status, race, histology, grade, and hormone receptors. Of 8761 women, radiotherapy was given to 1473 of 3905 who did not undergo surgery, to 882 of 2070 who underwent breast-conserving surgery, and to 1103 of 2786 mastectomy patients. Median overall survival was: for no surgery, 14 months; for breast-conserving surgery, 23 months; and for mastectomy, 28 months (P < 0.0001). The median overall survival of radiotherapy versus none was respectively 16 vs. 13 months without surgery (P = 0.0003), 28 vs. 20 months for breast-conserving surgery patients (P < 0.0001), and 28 vs. 28 months among mastectomy patients (P = 0.895). Multivariate analysis showed relative mortality reductions of 28% by breast-conserving surgery, 42% by mastectomy, and 10% by radiotherapy. Specific survival showed comparable results. Surgery and radiotherapy were associated with a significant survival advantage. We argue that local therapy should be considered even in metastatic disease.

  6. Multimodality treatment of brain metastases: an institutional survival analysis of 275 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demakas John J

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT, surgical resection, stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS, and combinations of the three modalities are used in the management of patients with metastatic brain tumors. We present the previously unreported survival outcomes of 275 patients treated for newly diagnosed brain metastases at Cancer Care Northwest and Gamma Knife of Spokane between 1998 and 2008. Methods The effects treatment regimen, age, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group-Performance Status (ECOG-PS, primary tumor histology, number of brain metastases, and total volume of brain metastases have on patient overall survival were analyzed. Statistical analysis was performed using Kaplan-Meier survival curves, Andersen 95% confidence intervals, approximate confidence intervals for log hazard-ratios, and multivariate Cox proportional hazard models. Results The median clinical follow up time was 7.2 months. On multivariate analysis, survival statistically favored patients treated with SRS alone when compared to patients treated with WBRT alone (p Conclusions In our analysis, patients benefited from a combined modality treatment approach and physicians must consider patient age, performance status, and primary tumor histology when recommending specific treatments regimens.

  7. Clinical significance of the metastatic lymph-node ratio in early gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunisaki, Chikara; Makino, Hirochika; Akiyama, Hirotoshi; Otsuka, Yuichi; Ono, Hidetaka A; Kosaka, Takashi; Takagawa, Ryo; Nagahori, Yutaka; Takahashi, Masazumi; Kito, Fumihiko; Shimada, Hiroshi

    2008-03-01

    The metastatic lymph-node ratio has important prognostic value in gastric cancer; this study focused on its significance in early gastric cancer. In total, 1,472 patients with early gastric cancer underwent curative gastrectomy between 1992 and 2001. Of these, 166 (11.3%) had histologically proven lymph-node metastasis. Prognostic factors were identified by univariate and multivariate analyses. Metastasis was evaluated using the Japanese Classification of Gastric Carcinoma (JGC) and the Union Internationale Contre le Cancer/Tumor, Node, Metastasis (UICC/TNM) Classification. The metastatic lymph-node ratio was calculated using the hazard ratio. The cut-off values for the metastatic lymph-node ratio were set at 0, or=0.15 to or=0.30. The numbers of dissected and metastatic lymph nodes were correlated, but the number of dissected lymph nodes and the metastatic lymph-node ratio was not related. The JGC and UICC/TNM classification demonstrated stage migration and heterogeneous stratification for disease-specific survival. The metastatic lymph-node ratio showed less stage migration and homogenous stratification. The metastatic lymph-node ratio may be a superior method of classification, which provides also accurate prognostic stratification for early gastric cancer patients.

  8. Survival advantage of hemodialysis relative to peritoneal dialysis in patients with end-stage renal disease and congestive heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sens, Florence; Schott-Pethelaz, Anne-Marie; Labeeuw, Michel; Colin, Cyrille; Villar, Emmanuel

    2011-11-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) has been proposed as a therapeutic option for patients with end-stage renal disease and associated congestive heart failure (CHF). Here, we compare mortality risks in these patients by dialysis modality by including all patients who started planned chronic dialysis with associated congestive heart failure and were prospectively enrolled in the French REIN Registry. Survival was compared between 933 PD and 3468 hemodialysis (HD) patients using a Kaplan-Meier model, Cox regression, and propensity score analysis. The patients were followed from their first dialysis session and stratified by modality at day 90 or last modality if death occurred prior. There was a significant difference in the median survival time of 20.4 months in the PD group and 36.7 months in the HD group (hazard ratio, 1.55). After correction for confounders, the adjusted hazard ratio for death in PD compared to the HD patients remained significant at 1.48. Subgroup analyses showed that the results were not changed with regard to the New York Heart Association stage, age strata, or estimated glomerular filtration rate strata at first renal replacement therapy. The use of propensity score did not change results (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.55). Thus, mortality risk was higher with PD than with HD among incident patients with end-stage renal disease and congestive heart failure. These results may help guide clinical decisions and also highlight the need for randomized clinical trials.

  9. Global Activities and Plant Survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandick, Roger

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides an extensive review of the empirical evidence found for Sweden concerning plant survival. The result reveals that foreign MNE plants and exporting non-MNE plants have the lowest exit rates, followed by purely domestic-oriented plants, and that domestic MNE plants have...... the highest exit rates. Moreover, the exit rates of globally engaged plants seem to be unaffected by increased foreign presence, whereas there appears to be a negative impact on the survival rates of non-exporting non-MNE plants. Finally, the result reveals that the survival ratio of plants of acquired...... exporters, but not other types of plants, improves post acquisition....

  10. Educational history is an independent predictor of cognitive deficits and long-term survival in postacute patients with mild to moderate ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojala-Oksala, Johanna; Jokinen, Hanna; Kopsi, Valtteri; Lehtonen, Kalevi; Luukkonen, Liisa; Paukkunen, Antti; Seeck, Lotte; Melkas, Susanna; Pohjasvaara, Tarja; Karhunen, Pekka; Hietanen, Marja; Erkinjuntti, Timo; Oksala, Niku

    2012-11-01

    Poststroke cognitive decline and white matter lesions (WML) are related to poor poststroke survival. Whether cognitive reserve as reflected by educational history associates with cognitive decline, recurrent strokes, and poststroke mortality independent of WML is not known. A total of 486 consecutive acute mild/moderate ischemic stroke patients subjected to comprehensive neuropsychological assessment (n=409) and magnetic resonance imaging (n=395) 3 months poststroke were included in the study and followed-up for up to 12 years. Odds ratios (OR) for logistic and hazard ratios for Cox regression analyses are reported (OR and hazard ratio≤1 indicates a beneficial effect). Long educational history (per tertile) was associated with lower frequency of executive dysfunction in models adjusted for age, sex, marital status, and stroke severity (OR, 0.75; Peducational history was independently associated with less memory impairment (OR, 0.67; Peducational history was not associated with recurrent strokes, but it associated independently with favorable poststroke survival (hazard ratio, 0.86; Peducational history associates with less poststroke cognitive deficits, dementia, and favorable long-term survival independent of age, gender, marital status, stroke severity, and WML in patients with mild/moderate ischemic stroke. This supports the hypothesis that educational history as a proxy indicator of cognitive reserve protects against deficits induced by acute stroke.

  11. Innovations’ Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Tabas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Innovations currently represent a tool of maintaining the going concern of a business entity and its competitiveness. However, effects of innovations are not infinite and if an innovation should constantly preserve a life of business entity, it has to be a continual chain of innovations, i.e. continual process. Effective live of a single innovation is limited while the limitation is derived especially from industry. The paper provides the results of research on innovations effects in the financial performance of small and medium-sized enterprises in the Czech Republic. Objective of this paper is to determine the length and intensity of the effects of technical innovations in company’s financial performance. The economic effect of innovations has been measured at application of company’s gross production power while the Deviation Analysis has been applied for three years’ time series. Subsequently the Survival Analysis has been applied. The analyses are elaborated for three statistical samples of SMEs constructed in accordance to the industry. The results obtained show significant differences in innovations’ survival within these three samples of enterprises then. The results are quite specific for the industries, and are confronted and discussed with the results of authors’ former research on the issue.

  12. Breast Cancer Detected at Screening US: Survival Rates and Clinical-Pathologic and Imaging Factors Associated with Recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo-Yeon; Han, Boo-Kyung; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Choi, Woo Jung; Choi, Yunhee; Kim, Hak Hee; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2017-08-01

    Purpose To determine the survival rates and clinical-pathologic and imaging factors associated with recurrence in women with breast cancer detected at screening ultrasonography (US). Materials and Methods This study was approved by the institutional review board, and the requirement to obtain informed consent was waived. A retrospective review of the databases of four institutions identified 501 women (median age, 47 years; range, 27-74 years) with breast cancer (425 invasive cancers and 76 ductal carcinoma in situ) detected at screening US between January 2004 and March 2011. Five-year overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS) rates were estimated, and the clinical-pathologic and imaging data were collected. Multivariate analysis was performed by using Cox proportional hazard regression to determine factors associated with recurrence. Results At a median follow-up of 7.0 years (range, 5.0-12.1 years), 15 (3.0%) recurrences were detected: five in ipsilateral breast and 10 in contralateral breast. The 5-year OS and RFS rates were 100% and 98.0% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 96.8%, 99.2%), respectively. In patients with invasive cancers, age younger than 40 years (hazard ratio: 3.632 [95% CI: 1.099, 11.998]; P = .032), the triple-negative subtype (hazard ratio: 7.498 [95% CI: 2.266, 24.816]; P = .001), and Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) category 4A lesions (hazard ratio: 5.113 [95% CI: 1.532, 17.195]; P = .008) were associated with recurrence. Conclusion Women with breast cancers detected at screening US have excellent outcomes, with a 5-year RFS rate of 98.0%. However, in patients with invasive breast cancer, age younger than 40 years, the triple-negative subtype, and BI-RADS category 4A lesions were associated with recurrence. © RSNA, 2017 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  13. Use of Antithrombotic Therapy and Long-Term Clinical Outcome Among Patients Surviving Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Tobias Pilgaard; Grijota, Miriam; Hansen, Morten Lock

    2016-01-01

    (43%) died, 497 (17%) had a thromboembolic event, and 536 (18%) had major bleeding. Postdischarge use of oral anticoagulation therapy among patients with indication for oral anticoagulation therapy was associated with a significant lower risk of death (adjusted hazard ratio, 0.59; 95% confidence...... inhibitors was not related to statistically significantly improved clinical outcome. CONCLUSIONS: Approximately 1 of 2 patients surviving intracerebral hemorrhage had a high risk of thromboembolism. Postdischarge use of oral anticoagulation therapy was associated with a lower risk of all-cause mortality...

  14. Predictors of early operative mortality and long-term survival in octogenarians undergoing open and endovascular repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Y; Chan, Y C; Cheng, S W

    2017-12-09

    The study aims to report outcomes of open repair (OR) and endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) in octogenarians. Consecutive patients aged between 80 and 89 who underwent OR or EVAR were identified from a prospectively collected departmental database. Short-term outcomes included 30 days mortalities and perioperative complications; long-term outcomes included overall survival and re-intervention using the Kaplan-Meier method. Logistic regression was used to identify predictors for operative mortality and Cox regression analysis was used to identify predictors for long-term survival. From January 1999 to December 2013, 53 underwent open repairs (23 emergency and 30 elective) and 115 underwent endovascular repairs (11 emergency and 104 elective). For elective procedures, 30 days operative mortalities were 6.7% and 0% in OR and EVAR respectively (Chi square test, p = 0.049). For emergency procedures, 30 days mortalities were 39.1% and 27.2% respectively (Chi square test, p = 0.705). Overall 5 years survival rates were 40.4% and 36.7% after OR and EVAR respectively. Rupture of aneurysm (Odd ratio 18.8, 95% CI 3.4-104.5, p = 0.001) was the only predictor for 30 days mortality. Rupture of aneurysm (Hazard ratio 2.0, 95% CI 1.3-3.3, p = 0.003), history of lung disease (Hazard ratio 1.7, 95% CI 1.0-2.9, p = 0.039) and history of renal disease (Hazard ratio 2.1, 95% CI 1.4-3.1, p survival. Decision of AAA repair in octogenarians should not be based on age alone. Both elective OR and EVAR had acceptable perioperative risk, but emergency repair, lung disease and renal impairment predicted poor long-term survival. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  15. Discerning the survival advantage among patients with prostate cancer who undergo radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy: The limitations of cancer registry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Stephen B; Huo, Jinhai; Chamie, Karim; Smaldone, Marc C; Kosarek, Christopher D; Fang, Justin E; Ynalvez, Leslie A; Kim, Simon P; Hoffman, Karen E; Giordano, Sharon H; Chapin, Brian F

    2017-05-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the overall survival of patients who undergo radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy versus noncancer controls to discern whether there is a survival advantage according to prostate cancer treatment and the impact of selection bias on these results. A matched cohort study was performed using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare-linked database. In total, 34,473 patients ages 66 to 75 years were identified who were without significant comorbidity, were diagnosed with localized prostate cancer, and received treatment treated with surgery or radiotherapy between 2004 and 2011. These patients were matched to a noncancer control cohort. The rates of all-cause mortality that occurred within the study period were compared. Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to identify determinants associated with overall survival. Of 34,473 patients who were included in the analysis, 21,740 (63%) received radiation therapy, and 12,733 (37%) underwent surgery. There was improved survival in patients who underwent surgery (hazard ratio, 0.35; 95% confidence interval, 0.32-0.38) and in those who received radiotherapy (hazard ratio, 0.72; 95% confidence interval, 0.68-0.75) compared with noncancer controls. Overall survival improved significantly in both treatment groups, with the greatest benefit observed among patients who underwent surgery (log rank P < .001). Population-based data indicated that patients with prostate cancer who received treatment with either surgery or radiotherapy had improved overall survival compared with a cohort of matched noncancer controls. Surgery produce longer survival compared with radiation therapy. These results suggest an inherent selection-bias because of unmeasured confounding variables. Cancer 2017;123:1617-1624. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  16. Hope, optimism and survival in a randomised trial of chemotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Penelope E; Stockler, M R; Zannino, D; Tebbutt, N C; Price, T J; Simes, R J; Wong, N; Pavlakis, N; Ransom, D; Moylan, E; Underhill, C; Wyld, D; Burns, I; Ward, R; Wilcken, N; Jefford, M

    2016-01-01

    Psychological responses to cancer are widely believed to affect survival. We investigated associations between hope, optimism, anxiety, depression, health utility and survival in patients starting first-line chemotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer. Four hundred twenty-nine subjects with metastatic colorectal cancer in a randomised controlled trial of chemotherapy completed baseline questionnaires assessing the following: hopefulness, optimism, anxiety and depression and health utility. Hazard ratios (HRs) and P values were calculated with Cox models for overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) in univariable and multivariable analyses. Median follow-up was 31 months. Univariable analyses showed that OS was associated negatively with depression (HR 2.04, P optimism, anxiety or hopefulness. PFS was not associated with hope, optimism, anxiety or depression in any analyses. Depression and health utility, but not optimism, hope or anxiety, were associated with survival after controlling for known prognostic factors in patients with advanced colorectal cancer. Further research is required to understand the nature of the relationship between depression and survival. If a causal mechanism is identified, this may lead to interventional possibilities.

  17. Multiagent induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation is associated with improved survival in locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torgeson, Anna; Lloyd, Shane; Boothe, Dustin; Tao, Randa; Whisenant, Jonathan; Garrido-Laguna, Ignacio; Cannon, George M

    2017-10-01

    The role of chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) is uncertain after multiple randomized clinical trials have yielded mixed results. The authors used the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) to determine whether CRT yields a survival benefit compared with chemotherapy alone (CT). Patients with nonmetastatic LAPC diagnosed during 2004 through 2014 were identified in the NCDB. Patients who received CT were compared with those who received CRT using chi-square analysis. Univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses were used to compare demographic, clinical, and treatment characteristics that were predictive of survival. Propensity score matching and shared frailty analysis were done. Subgroup analyses were undertaken to examine patients who underwent pancreatectomy and cohorts of patients who received different CT or CRT regimens. In total, 8689 patients with LAPC were identified. CRT was associated with improved survival (median survival [MS], 13.5 months) compared with CT (MS, 10.6 months) on multivariate analysis (hazard ratio [HR], 0.80; P chemotherapy before CRT (HR, 0.67; P chemotherapy (HR, 0.72; P chemotherapy had superior MS and pancreatectomy rates (MS, 17.5 months; HR, 0.70; P improved survival (MS, 22 vs 10.6 months; HR, 0.39; P chemotherapy before CRT improved survival compared with CT alone in patients with LAPC. Continued analysis of CRT in properly selected patients after maximized systemic therapy is needed. Cancer 2017;123:3816-24. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  18. Impact of modern chemotherapy on the survival of women presenting with de novo metastatic breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pal Sumanta K

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Data that directly associate utilization of novel systemic therapies with survival trends in metastatic breast cancer (MBC are limited. In the setting of de novo MBC, large registry analyses cite positive temporal trends in survival, but the extent to which advances in systemic therapy have contributed to these gains is not clear. Methods The City of Hope Cancer Registry was used to identify a consecutive series of patients with de novo MBC who received their first line of therapy between 1985 and 2004. Comprehensive clinicopathologic and treatment-related data were collected for each patient. Univariate analyses were conducted via Cox regression to identify factors associated with improved survival. Multivariate analysis was also conducted via Cox regression and the stepwise procedure was used to identify independent predictors of survival. Results A total of 324 patients with de novo MBC were identified. After application of exclusion criteria, including the sole presence of supraclavicular node metastasis, 274 patients were retained in the analysis. The treatment-related characteristics associated with improved survival included: use of endocrine therapy (hazard ratio [HR] 0.60, 95%CI 0.47-0.77; P Conclusions The overall survival of women with de novo metastatic breast cancer has improved over the past 20 years. However, the contribution of conventional cytotoxic agents to this improvement is minimal.

  19. REVEAL risk scores applied to riociguat-treated patients in PATENT-2: Impact of changes in risk score on survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benza, Raymond L; Farber, Harrison W; Frost, Adaani; Ghofrani, Hossein-Ardeschir; Gómez-Sánchez, Miguel A; Langleben, David; Rosenkranz, Stephan; Busse, Dennis; Meier, Christian; Nikkho, Sylvia; Hoeper, Marius M

    2017-11-11

    The Registry to Evaluate Early and Long-term PAH Disease Management (REVEAL) risk score (RRS) calculator was developed using data derived from the REVEAL registry, and predicts survival in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) based on multiple patient characteristics. Herein we applied the RRS to a pivotal PAH trial database, the 12-week PATENT-1 and open-label PATENT-2 extension studies of riociguat. We examined the effect of riociguat vs placebo on RRS in PATENT-1, and investigated the prognostic implications of change in RRS during PATENT-1 on long-term outcomes in PATENT-2. RRS was calculated post hoc for baseline and Week 12 of PATENT-1, and Week 12 of PATENT-2. Patients were grouped into risk strata by RRS. Kaplan-Meier estimates were made for survival and clinical worsening-free survival in PATENT-2 to evaluate the relationship between RRS in PATENT-1 and long-term outcomes in PATENT-2. A total of 396 patients completed PATENT-1 and participated in PATENT-2. In PATENT-1, riociguat significantly improved RRS (p = 0.031) and risk stratum (p = 0.018) between baseline and Week 12 compared with placebo. RRS at baseline, and at PATENT-1 Week 12, and change in RRS during PATENT-1 were significantly associated with survival (hazard ratios for a 1-point reduction in RRS: 0.675, 0.705 and 0.804, respectively) and clinical worsening-free survival (hazard ratios of 0.736, 0.716 and 0.753, respectively) over 2 years in PATENT-2. RRS at baseline and Week 12, and change in RRS, were significant predictors of both survival and clinical worsening-free survival. These data support the long-term predictive value of the RRS in a controlled study population. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Customized hazard maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    Finding out about the historic occurrence of six different types of natural hazards in any region in the United States recently became a little easier.A Project Impact initiative of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and ESRI—a leading provider of Geographic Information System (GIS) software and a Project Impact partner—offers the public customized online hazard maps.

  1. A Natural Hazards Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Fred

    This paper discusses the development of and provides examples of exercises from a student workbook for a college-level course about natural hazards. The course is offered once a year to undergraduates at Western Illinois University. Students are introduced to 10 hazards (eight meteorological plus earthquakes and volcanoes) through slides, movies,…

  2. Creation of a model to predict survival in patients with refractory coeliac disease using a multinational registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Tapia, A; Malamut, G; Verbeek, W H M; van Wanrooij, R L J; Leffler, D A; Niveloni, S I; Arguelles-Grande, C; Lahr, B D; Zinsmeister, A R; Murray, J A; Kelly, C P; Bai, J C; Green, P H; Daum, S; Mulder, C J J; Cellier, C

    2016-10-01

    Refractory coeliac disease is a severe complication of coeliac disease with heterogeneous outcome. To create a prognostic model to estimate survival of patients with refractory coeliac disease. We evaluated predictors of 5-year mortality using Cox proportional hazards regression on subjects from a multinational registry. Bootstrap resampling was used to internally validate the individual factors and overall model performance. The mean of the estimated regression coefficients from 400 bootstrap models was used to derive a risk score for 5-year mortality. The multinational cohort was composed of 232 patients diagnosed with refractory coeliac disease across seven centres (range of 11-63 cases per centre). The median age was 53 years and 150 (64%) were women. A total of 51 subjects died during a 5-year follow-up (cumulative 5-year all-cause mortality = 30%). From a multiple variable Cox proportional hazards model, the following variables were significantly associated with 5-year mortality: age at refractory coeliac disease diagnosis (per 20 year increase, hazard ratio = 2.21; 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.38-3.55), abnormal intraepithelial lymphocytes (hazard ratio = 2.85; 95% CI: 1.22-6.62), and albumin (per 0.5 unit increase, hazard ratio = 0.72; 95% CI: 0.61-0.85). A simple weighted three-factor risk score was created to estimate 5-year survival. Using data from a multinational registry and previously reported risk factors, we create a prognostic model to predict 5-year mortality among patients with refractory coeliac disease. This new model may help clinicians to guide treatment and follow-up. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Association Among Blood Transfusion, Sepsis, and Decreased Long-term Survival After Colon Cancer Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquina, Christopher T; Blumberg, Neil; Becerra, Adan Z; Boscoe, Francis P; Schymura, Maria J; Noyes, Katia; Monson, John R T; Fleming, Fergal J

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the potential additive effects of blood transfusion and sepsis on colon cancer disease-specific survival, cardiovascular disease-specific survival, and overall survival after colon cancer surgery. Perioperative blood transfusions are associated with infectious complications and increased risk of cancer recurrence through systemic inflammatory effects. Furthermore, recent studies have suggested an association among sepsis, subsequent systemic inflammation, and adverse cardiovascular outcomes. However, no study has investigated the association among transfusion, sepsis, and disease-specific survival in postoperative patients. The New York State Cancer Registry and Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System were queried for stage I to III colon cancer resections from 2004 to 2011. Propensity-adjusted survival analyses assessed the association of perioperative allogeneic blood transfusion, sepsis, and 5-year colon cancer disease-specific survival, cardiovascular disease-specific survival, and overall survival. Among 24,230 patients, 29% received a transfusion and 4% developed sepsis. After risk adjustment, transfusion and sepsis were associated with worse colon cancer disease-specific survival [(+)transfusion: hazard ratio (HR) 1.19, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.09-1.30; (+)sepsis: HR 1.84, 95% CI 1.44-2.35; (+)transfusion/(+)sepsis: HR 2.27, 95% CI 1.87-2.76], cardiovascular disease-specific survival [(+)transfusion: HR 1.18, 95% CI 1.04-1.33; (+)sepsis: HR 1.63, 95% CI 1.14-2.31; (+)transfusion/(+)sepsis: HR 2.04, 95% CI 1.58-2.63], and overall survival [(+)transfusion: HR 1.21, 95% CI 1.14-1.29; (+)sepsis: HR 1.76, 95% CI 1.48-2.09; (+)transfusion/(+)sepsis: HR 2.36, 95% CI 2.07-2.68] relative to (-)transfusion/(-)sepsis. Additional analyses suggested an additive effect with those who both received a blood transfusion and developed sepsis having even worse survival. Perioperative blood transfusions are associated with shorter survival

  4. Multi-institutional Nomogram Predicting Survival Free From Salvage Whole Brain Radiation After Radiosurgery in Patients With Brain Metastases

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    Gorovets, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Brown University Warren Alpert Medical School, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Perlmutter Cancer Center, NYU School of Medicine, New York, New York (United States); Ayala-Peacock, Diandra [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Tybor, David J. [Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Rava, Paul [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Brown University Warren Alpert Medical School, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, UMass Memorial Medical Center, University of Massachusetts School of Medicine, Worcester, Massachusetts (United States); Ebner, Daniel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Brown University Warren Alpert Medical School, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Cielo, Deus; Norén, Georg [Department of Neurosurgery, Rhode Island Hospital, Brown University Warren Alpert Medical School, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Wazer, David E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Brown University Warren Alpert Medical School, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Chan, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Hepel, Jaroslaw T., E-mail: jhepel@lifespan.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Brown University Warren Alpert Medical School, Providence, Rhode Island (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Purpose: Optimal patient selection for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) as the initial treatment for brain metastases is complicated and controversial. This study aimed to develop a nomogram that predicts survival without salvage whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) after upfront SRS. Methods and Materials: Multi-institutional data were analyzed from 895 patients with 2095 lesions treated with SRS without prior or planned WBRT. Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to identify independent pre-SRS predictors of WBRT-free survival, which were integrated to build a nomogram that was subjected to bootstrap validation. Results: Median WBRT-free survival was 8 months (range, 0.1-139 months). Significant independent predictors for inferior WBRT-free survival were age (hazard ratio [HR] 1.1 for each 10-year increase), HER2(−) breast cancer (HR 1.6 relative to other histologic features), colorectal cancer (HR 1.4 relative to other histologic features), increasing number of brain metastases (HR 1.09, 1.32, 1.37, and 1.87 for 2, 3, 4, and 5+ lesions, respectively), presence of neurologic symptoms (HR 1.26), progressive systemic disease (HR 1.35), and increasing extracranial disease burden (HR 1.31 for oligometastatic and HR 1.56 for widespread). Additionally, HER2(+) breast cancer (HR 0.81) and melanoma (HR 1.11) trended toward significance. The independently weighted hazard ratios were used to create a nomogram to display estimated probabilities of 6-month and 12-month WBRT-free survival with a corrected Harrell's C concordance statistic of 0.62. Conclusions: Our nomogram can be used at initial evaluation to help select patients best suited for upfront SRS for brain metastases while reducing expense and morbidity in patients who derive minimal or no benefit.

  5. Inferences about ungulate population dynamics derived from age ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, N.C.; Kauffman, M.J.; Mills, L.S.

    2008-01-01

    Age ratios (e.g., calf:cow for elk and fawn:doe for deer) are used regularly to monitor ungulate populations. However, it remains unclear what inferences are appropriate from this index because multiple vital rate changes can influence the observed ratio. We used modeling based on elk (Cervus elaphus) life-history to evaluate both how age ratios are influenced by stage-specific fecundity and survival and how well age ratios track population dynamics. Although all vital rates have the potential to influence calf:adult female ratios (i.e., calf:xow ratios), calf survival explained the vast majority of variation in calf:adult female ratios due to its temporal variation compared to other vital rates. Calf:adult female ratios were positively correlated with population growth rate (??) and often successfully indicated population trajectories. However, calf:adult female ratios performed poorly at detecting imposed declines in calf survival, suggesting that only the most severe declines would be rapidly detected. Our analyses clarify that managers can use accurate, unbiased age ratios to monitor arguably the most important components contributing to sustainable ungulate populations, survival rate of young and ??. However, age ratios are not useful for detecting gradual declines in survival of young or making inferences about fecundity or adult survival in ungulate populations. Therefore, age ratios coupled with independent estimates of population growth or population size are necessary to monitor ungulate population demography and dynamics closely through time.

  6. Associations between statin use and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) risk and survival: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xibiao; Mneina, Ayat; Johnston, James B; Mahmud, Salaheddin M

    2017-06-01

    Evidence on the effect of statin use on non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is not clear. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to examine the associations between statin use and NHL risk and survival. We searched multiple literature sources up to October 2014 and identified 10 studies on the risk of diagnosis with NHL and 9 studies on survival. Random effects model was used to calculate pooled odds ratio (PORs) for risk and pooled hazard ratio (PHR) for survival. Heterogeneity among studies was examined using the Tau-squared and the I-squared (I 2 ) tests. Statin use was associated with reduced risk for total NHL (POR = 0.82, 95% CI 0.69-0.99). Among statin users, there was a lower incidence risk for marginal zone lymphoma (POR = 0.54, 95% CI 0.31-0.94), but this was not observed for other types of NHL. However, statin use did not affect overall survival (PHR = 1.02, 95% CI 0.99-1.06) or event-free survival (PHR = 0.99, 95% CI 0.87-1.12) in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. There is suggestive epidemiological evidence that statins decrease the risk of NHL, but they do not influence survival in NHL patients. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Quality of Acute Care and Long-Term Quality of Life and Survival: The Australian Stroke Clinical Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadilhac, Dominique A; Andrew, Nadine E; Lannin, Natasha A; Middleton, Sandy; Levi, Christopher R; Dewey, Helen M; Grabsch, Brenda; Faux, Steve; Hill, Kelvin; Grimley, Rohan; Wong, Andrew; Sabet, Arman; Butler, Ernest; Bladin, Christopher F; Bates, Timothy R; Groot, Patrick; Castley, Helen; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Anderson, Craig S

    2017-04-01

    Uncertainty exists over whether quality improvement strategies translate into better health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and survival after acute stroke. We aimed to determine the association of best practice recommended interventions and outcomes after stroke. Data are from the Australian Stroke Clinical Registry during 2010 to 2014. Multivariable regression was used to determine associations between 3 interventions: received acute stroke unit (ASU) care and in various combinations with prescribed antihypertensive medication at discharge, provision of a discharge care plan, and outcomes of survival and HRQoL (EuroQoL 5-dimensional questionnaire visual analogue scale) at 180 days, by stroke type. An assessment was also made of outcomes related to the number of processes patients received. There were 17 585 stroke admissions (median age 77 years, 47% female; 81% managed in ASUs; 80% ischemic stroke) from 42 hospitals (77% metropolitan) assessed. Cumulative benefits on outcomes related to the number of care processes received by patients. ASU care was associated with a reduced likelihood of death (hazard ratio, 0.49; 95% confidence interval, 0.43-0.56) and better HRQoL (coefficient, 21.34; 95% confidence interval, 15.50-27.18) within 180 days. For those discharged from hospital, receiving ASU+antihypertensive medication provided greater 180-day survival (hazard ratio, 0.45; 95% confidence interval, 0.38-0.52) compared with ASU care alone (hazard ratio, 0.64; 95% confidence interval, 0.54-0.76). HRQoL gains were greatest for patients with intracerebral hemorrhage who received care bundles involving discharge processes (range of increase, 11%-19%). Patients with stroke who receive best practice recommended hospital care have improved long-term survival and HRQoL. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Does early resection of presumed low-grade glioma improve survival? A clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijnenga, Maarten M J; Mattni, Tariq; French, Pim J; Rutten, Geert-Jan; Leenstra, Sieger; Kloet, Fred; Taphoorn, Martin J B; van den Bent, Martin J; Dirven, Clemens M F; van Veelen, Marie-Lise; Vincent, Arnaud J P E

    2017-05-01

    Early resection is standard of care for presumed low-grade gliomas. This is based on studies including only tumors that were post-surgically confirmed as low-grade glioma. Unfortunately this does not represent the clinicians' situation wherein he/she has to deal with a lesion on MRI that is suspect for low-grade glioma (i.e. without prior knowledge on the histological diagnosis). We therefore aimed to determine the optimal initial strategy for patients with a lesion suspect for low-grade glioma, but not histologically proven yet. We retrospectively identified 150 patients with a resectable presumed low-grade-glioma and who were otherwise in good clinical condition. In this cohort we compared overall survival between three types of initital treatment strategy: a wait-and-scan approach (n = 38), early resection (n = 83), or biopsy for histopathological verification (n = 29). In multivariate analysis, no difference was observed in overall survival for early resection compared to wait-and-scan: hazard ratio of 0.92 (95% CI 0.43-2.01; p = 0.85). However, biopsy strategy showed a shorter overall survival compared to wait-and-scan: hazard ratio of 2.69 (95% CI 1.19-6.06; p = 0.02). In this cohort we failed to confirm superiority of early resection over a wait-and-scan approach in terms of overall survival, though longer follow-up is required for final conclusion. Biopsy was associated with shorter overall survival.

  9. High RBM3 expression is associated with an improved survival and oxaliplatin response in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Siesing

    Full Text Available High expression of the RNA-binding motif protein 3 (RBM3 has been shown to correlate, with prolonged survival in several malignant diseases and with the benefit of platinum-based chemotherapy in ovarian cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate RBM3 in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC as a prognostic factor for overall survival and in relation to benefit of first-line chemotherapy.Immunohistochemical staining was conducted and evaluated in tumours from 455 mCRC patients. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox regression proportional hazards models were used to access the impact of RBM3 expression on overall survival (OS and progression-free survival (PFS.High RBM3 expression, both nuclear and cytoplasmic, was an independent prognostic factor for prolonged OS (hazard ratio [HR] 0.67, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.50-0.90 and HR 0.66, 95% CI 0.48-0.91, respectively. PFS was significantly longer in patients with high RBM3 expression who had received first-line oxaliplatin based treatment, compared to those who had received irinotecan based treatment, both regarding nuclear and cytoplasmic expression (p-value 0.020 and 0.022 respectively.High RBM3 expression is an independent predictor of prolonged survival in mCRC patients, in particular in patients treated with first-line oxaliplatin based chemotherapy.

  10. Natural hazards science strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Robert R.; Jones, Lucile M.; Eidenshink, Jeffery C.; Godt, Jonathan W.; Kirby, Stephen H.; Love, Jeffrey J.; Neal, Christina A.; Plant, Nathaniel G.; Plunkett, Michael L.; Weaver, Craig S.; Wein, Anne; Perry, Suzanne C.

    2012-01-01

    The mission of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in natural hazards is to develop and apply hazard science to help protect the safety, security, and economic well-being of the Nation. The costs and consequences of natural hazards can be enormous, and each year more people and infrastructure are at risk. USGS scientific research—founded on detailed observations and improved understanding of the responsible physical processes—can help to understand and reduce natural hazard risks and to make and effectively communicate reliable statements about hazard characteristics, such as frequency, magnitude, extent, onset, consequences, and where possible, the time of future events.To accomplish its broad hazard mission, the USGS maintains an expert workforce of scientists and technicians in the earth sciences, hydrology, biology, geography, social and behavioral sciences, and other fields, and engages cooperatively with numerous agencies, research institutions, and organizations in the public and private sectors, across the Nation and around the world. The scientific expertise required to accomplish the USGS mission in natural hazards includes a wide range of disciplines that this report refers to, in aggregate, as hazard science.In October 2010, the Natural Hazards Science Strategy Planning Team (H–SSPT) was charged with developing a long-term (10-year) Science Strategy for the USGS mission in natural hazards. This report fulfills that charge, with a document hereinafter referred to as the Strategy, to provide scientific observations, analyses, and research that are critical for the Nation to become more resilient to natural hazards. Science provides the information that decisionmakers need to determine whether risk management activities are worthwhile. Moreover, as the agency with the perspective of geologic time, the USGS is uniquely positioned to extend the collective experience of society to prepare for events outside current memory. The USGS has critical statutory

  11. Summarising censored survival data using the mean residual life function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Iglesias, Alberto; Newell, John; Scarrott, Carl; Hinde, John

    2015-05-20

    The mean residual life function provides a clear and simple summary of the effect of a treatment or a risk factor in units of time, avoiding hazard ratios or probability scales, which require careful interpretation. Estimation of the mean residual life is complicated by the upper tail of the survival distribution not being observed as, for example, patients may still be alive at the end of the follow-up period. Various approaches have been developed to estimate the mean residual life in the presence of such right censoring. In this work, a novel semi-parametric method that combines existing non-parametric methods and an extreme value tail model is presented, where the limited sample information in the tail (prior to study termination) is used to estimate the upper tail behaviour. This approach will be demonstrated with simulated and real-life examples. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Survival of patients with ovarian cancer in central and northern Denmark, 1998-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grann, Anne Fia; Nørgaard, Mette; Blaakær, Jan; Søgaard-Andersen, Erik; Jacobsen, Jacob Bonde

    2011-01-01

    To examine time trends of survival and mortality of ovarian cancer in the central and northern Denmark regions during the period 1998-2009. We conducted a cohort study including women recorded with a first-time diagnosis of ovarian cancer in the Danish National Registry of Patients (DNRP) between 1998 and 2009. Patients were followed for survival through the Danish Civil Registration System. We determined survival stratified by age, and used Cox proportional hazard regression analyses to obtain mortality rate ratios (MRRs) to assess changes over time. We found no improvement in overall ovarian cancer survival between 1998 and 2009. One-year survival was 71% in 1998-2000 and 68% in 2007-2009. Three-year survival declined from 48% in 1998-2000 to 46% in 2007-2009 (predicted), and 5-year survival declined from 40% in 1998-2000 to 37% in 2007-2009 (predicted). Compared with the period 1998-2000, the age-adjusted 1-year MRR was 1.05 (95% confidence interval CI: 0.86-1.28) for the period 2007-2009, and the predicted age-adjusted 3- and 5-year MRRs were 0.96 (95% CI: 0.83-1.12) and 0.99 (95% CI: 0.86-1.14), respectively. Results are not adjusted for tumor stage as this information was not available. We also observed a decline in the annual number of incident ovarian cancer patients during the study period, most pronounced in the youngest age group. The survival of ovarian cancer patients did not improve during the study period. This lack of improvement contrasts with the national cancer strategies implemented during this last decade, focusing on improving the survival of ovarian cancer patients.

  13. Thrombophilia and arteriovenous fistula survival in ESRD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmela, Birgitta; Hartman, Jari; Peltonen, Seija; Albäck, Anders; Lassila, Riitta

    2013-06-01

    The role of thrombophilia in failing arteriovenous fistula (AVF) among patients with ESRD undergoing hemodialysis is not established. This study aimed to assess whether AVF primary patency is associated with thrombophilia and coagulation abnormalities. This observational study screened 219 patients between 2002 and 2004 for thrombophilia before AVF surgery. Thrombophilia included factor V Leiden and prothrombin G20210A mutations, protein C and antithrombin activities, and protein S. Coagulation abnormalities included high factor VIII:C, homocysteine, fibrinogen, and d-dimer levels; presence of antiphospholipid antibodies; and short thrombin time. We reviewed patient charts for comorbid conditions, AVF maturation and interventions, kidney transplantation, and patient survival (mean follow-up duration, 3.6 [range, 2.3-5.8] years). Primary patency from the AVF placement and functional primary patency from the first AVF cannulation were analyzed with Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards models. Thrombophilia was present in 9% of the patients, and coagulation abnormalities occurred in 77%. One-year primary patency was 68%; 46% of the AVF failures occurred before the initiation of hemodialysis. Female sex (hazard ratio [HR], 2.6; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.7-4.1) and thrombophilia (HR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.2-4.2) were independent risk factors for loss of primary patency. Thrombophilia mutations or low antithrombin level (HR, 3.8), female sex (HR, 2.5), and diabetes (HR, 1.9) were associated with shortened functional primary patency of AVF. Against the background of frequent coagulation abnormalities, thrombophilia and female sex predispose patients with ESRD to access failure, mostly due to thrombosis or stenosis.

  14. Second Primary Malignant Neoplasms and Survival in Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, Theresa H M; Bleyer, Archie; Rosenberg, Aaron S; Li, Qian; Goldfarb, Melanie

    2017-11-01

    Although the increased incidence of second primary malignant neoplasms (SPMs) is a well-known late effect after cancer, few studies have compared survival after an SPM to survival of the same cancer occurring as first primary malignant neoplasm (PM) by age. To assess the survival impact of SPMs in adolescents and young adults (AYAs) (15-39 years) compared with that of pediatric (cancer in 13 Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results regions in the United States diagnosed from 1992 to 2008 and followed through 2013. Data analysis was performed between June 2016 and January 2017. Five-year relative survival was calculated overall and for each cancer occurring as a PM or SPM by age at diagnosis. The impact of SPM status on cancer-specific death was examined using multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression. A total of 15 954 pediatric, 125 750 AYAs, and 878 370 older adult patients diagnosed as having 14 cancers occurring as a PM or SPM were included. Overall, 5-year survival after an SPM was 33.1% lower for children, 20.2% lower for AYAs, and 8.3% lower for older adults compared with a PM at the same age. For the most common SPMs in AYAs, the absolute difference in 5-year survival was 42% lower for secondary non-Hodgkin lymphoma, 19% for secondary breast carcinoma, 15% for secondary thyroid carcinoma, and 13% for secondary soft-tissue sarcoma. Survival by SPM status was significantly worse in younger vs older patients for thyroid, Hodgkin lymphoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, acute myeloid leukemia, soft-tissue sarcoma, and central nervous system cancer. Adolescents and young adults with secondary Hodgkin lymphoma (hazard ratio [95% CI], 3.5 [1.7-7.1]); soft-tissue sarcoma (2.8 [2.1-3.9]); breast carcinoma (2.1 [1.8-2.4]); acute myeloid leukemia (1.9 [1.5-2.4]); and central nervous system cancer (1.8 [1.2-2.8]) experienced worse survival compared with AYAs with the same PMs. The adverse impact of SPMs on survival is substantial for AYAs and may partially

  15. Response to [90Yttrium-DOTA]-TOC treatment is associated with long-term survival benefit in metastasized medullary thyroid cancer: a phase II clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iten, Fabienne; Müller, Beat; Schindler, Christian; Rochlitz, Christoph; Oertli, Daniel; Mäcke, Helmut R; Müller-Brand, Jan; Walter, Martin A

    2007-11-15

    We aimed to explore the efficacy of (90)Yttrium-1,4,7,10-tetra-azacyclododecane N,N',N'',N-'''-tetraacetic acid ((90)Y-DOTA)-Tyr(3)-octreotide (TOC) therapy in advanced medullary thyroid cancer. In a phase II trial, we investigated the response, survival, and long-term safety profile of systemic [(90)Y-DOTA]-TOC treatment in metastasized medullary thyroid cancer. Adverse events were assessed according to the criteria of the National Cancer Institute. Survival analyses were done using multiple regression models. Thirty-one patients were enrolled. A median cumulative activity of 12.6 GBq (range, 1.7-29.6 GBq) of [(90)Y-DOTA]-TOC was administered. Response was found in nine patients (29.0%). Four patients (12.9%) developed hematologic toxicities and seven patients (22.6%) developed renal toxicities. Response to treatment was associated with longer survival from time of diagnosis (hazard ratio, 0.20; 95% confidence interval, 0.05-0.81; P = 0.02) and from time of first [(90)Y-DOTA]-TOC therapy (hazard ratio, 0.16; 95% confidence interval, 0.04-0.63; P = 0.009). The visual grade of scintigraphic tumor uptake was not associated with treatment response or survival. Response to [(90)Y-DOTA]-TOC therapy in metastasized medullary thyroid cancer is associated with a long-term survival benefit. Treatment should be considered independently from the result of the pretherapeutic scintigraphy.

  16. Health-related quality of life is a prognostic factor for survival in older patients after colorectal cancer diagnosis: A population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Evelyne; Jooste, Valérie; Woronoff, Anne-Sophie; Quipourt, Valérie; Bouvier, Anne-Marie; Mercier, Mariette

    2016-01-01

    Studies carried out in the context of clinical trials have shown a relationship between survival and health-related quality of life in colorectal cancer patients. We assessed the prognostic value of health-related quality of life at diagnosis and of its longitudinal evolution on survival in older colorectal cancer patients. All patients aged ≥65 years, diagnosed with new colorectal cancer between 2003 and 2005 and registered in the Digestive Cancer Registry of Burgundy were eligible. Patients were asked to complete the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 30 at inclusion, three, six and twelve months after. Multivariate regression models were used to evaluate the prognostic value of health-related quality of life scores at diagnosis and their deterioration on relative survival. In multivariate analysis, a role functioning dimension lower than median was predictive of lower survival (hazard ratio=3.1, p=0.015). After three and six months of follow-up, patients with greater appetite loss were more likely to die, with hazard ratios of 4.7 (p=0.013) and 3.7 (p=0.002), respectively. Health-related quality of life assessments at diagnosis are independently associated with older colorectal cancer patients' survival. Its preservation should be a major management goal for older cancer patients. Copyright © 2015 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Treatment Patterns and Differences in Survival of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients Between Academic and Non-Academic Hospitals in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linden, Naomi; Bongers, Mathilda L; Coupé, Veerle M H; Smit, Egbert F; Groen, Harry J M; Welling, Alle; Schramel, Franz M N H; Uyl-de Groot, Carin A

    2017-09-01

    The aims of this study are to analyze differences in survival between academic and non-academic hospitals and to provide insight into treatment patterns for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Results show the state of NSCLC survival and care in the Netherlands. The Netherlands Cancer Registry provided data on NSCLC survival for all Dutch hospitals. We used the Kaplan-Meier estimate to calculate median survival time by hospital type and a Cox proportional hazards model to estimate the relative risk of mortality (expressed as hazard ratios) for patients diagnosed in academic versus non-academic hospitals, with adjustment for age, gender, and tumor histology, and stratifying for disease stage. Data on treatment patterns in Dutch hospitals was obtained from 4 hospitals (2 academic, 2 non-academic). A random sample of patients diagnosed with NSCLC from January 2009 until January 2011 was identified through hospital databases. Data was obtained on patient characteristics, tumor characteristics, and treatments. The Cox proportional hazards model shows a significantly decreased hazard ratio of mortality for patients diagnosed in academic hospitals, as opposed to patients diagnosed in non-academic hospitals. This is specifically true for primary radiotherapy patients and patients who receive systemic treatment for non-metastasized NSCLC. Patients diagnosed in academic hospitals have better median overall survival than patients diagnosed in non-academic hospitals, especially for patients treated with radiotherapy, systemic treatment, or combinations. This difference may be caused by residual confounding since the estimates were not adjusted for performance status. A wide variety of surgical, radiotherapeutic, and systemic treatments is prescribed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Association of Compliance With Process-Related Quality Metrics and Improved Survival in Oral Cavity Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graboyes, Evan M; Gross, Jennifer; Kallogjeri, Dorina; Piccirillo, Jay F; Al-Gilani, Maha; Stadler, Michael E; Nussenbaum, Brian

    2016-05-01

    % vs ≤50% compliance: adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 4.2; 95% CI, 2.1-8.5; 100% vs 51%-99% compliance: aHR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.0-3.1), improved disease-specific survival (100% vs ≤50% compliance: aHR, 3.9; 95% CI, 1.7-9.0; 100% vs 51%-99%: aHR, 1.3; 95% CI, 0.6-2.9), and improved disease-free survival (100% vs ≤50% compliance: aHR, 3.0; 95% CI, 1.5-5.8; 100% vs 51%-99% compliance: aHR, 1.6; 95% CI, 0.9-2.7). Compliance with a core set of process-related quality metrics was associated with improved survival for patients with surgically managed oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma. Multi-institutional validation of these metrics is warranted.

  19. Impact of beta blockers on epithelial ovarian cancer survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Elena S; Karlan, Beth Y; Li, Andrew J

    2012-11-01

    Stress may promote ovarian cancer progression through mechanisms including autonomic nervous system mediators such as norepinephrine and epinephrine. Beta blockers, used to treat hypertension, block production of these adrenergic hormones, and have been associated with prolonged survival in several malignancies. We sought to determine the association between beta blocker use and epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) disease progression and survival. We performed an institutional retrospective review of patients with EOC treated between 1996 and 2006. Patients underwent cytoreductive surgery followed by platinum-based chemotherapy. Women were considered beta blocker users if these medications were documented on at least two records more than 6 months apart. Statistical tests included Fisher's exact, Kaplan-Meier, and Cox regression analyses. 248 met inclusion criteria. 68 patients used antihypertensives, and 23 used beta blockers. Median progression-free survival for beta blocker users was 27 months, compared with 17 months for non-users (p=0.05). Similarly, overall disease-specific survival was longer for beta blocker users (56 months) compared with non-users (48 months, p=0.02, hazard ratio=0.56). Multivariate analysis identified beta blocker use as an independent positive prognostic factor, after controlling for age, stage, grade, and cytoreduction status (p=0.03). Overall survival remained longer for beta blocker users (56 months) when compared with hypertensive patients on other medications (34 months) and patients without hypertension (51 months) (p=0.007). In this cohort of patients with EOC, beta blocker use was associated with a 54% reduced chance of death compared with that of non-users. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Survival times of patients with a first hip fracture with and without subsequent major long-bone fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angthong, Chayanin; Angthong, Wirana; Harnroongroj, Thos; Naito, Masatoshi; Harnroongroj, Thossart

    2013-01-01

    Survival rates are poorer after a second hip fracture than after a first hip fracture. Previous survival studies have included in-hospital mortality. Excluding in-hospital deaths from the analysis allows survival times to be evaluated in community-based patients. There is still a lack of data regarding the effects of subsequent fractures on survival times after hospital discharge following an initial hip fracture. This study compared the survival times of community-dwelling patients with hip fracture who had or did not have a subsequent major long-bone fracture. Hazard ratios and risk factors for subsequent fractures and mortality rates with and without subsequent fractures were calculated. Of 844 patients with hip fracture from 2000 through 2008, 71 had a subsequent major long-bone fracture and 773 did not. Patients who died of other causes, such as perioperative complications, during hospitalization were excluded. Such exclusion allowed us to determine the effect of subsequent fracture on the survival of community-dwelling individuals after hospital discharge or after the time of the fracture if they did not need hospitalization. Demographic data, causes of death, and mortality rates were recorded. Differences in mortality rates between the patient groups and hazard ratios were calculated. Mortality rates during the first year and from 1 to 5 years after the most recent fracture were 5.6% and 1.4%, respectively, in patients with subsequent fractures, and 4.7% and 1.4%, respectively, in patients without subsequent fractures. These rates did not differ significantly between the groups. Cox regression analysis and calculation of hazard ratios did not show significant differences between patients with subsequent fractures and those without. On univariate and multivariate analyses, age fracture. This study found that survival times did not differ significantly between patients with and without subsequent major long-bone fractures after hip fracture. Therefore, all

  1. Family history and survival after colorectal cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Adam J; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A; Chan, Jennifer A; Giovannucci, Edward L; Fuchs, Charles S

    2008-03-15

    A history of colorectal cancer in a first-degree relative is a recognized risk factor for developing this malignancy. The influence of a family history of colorectal cancer on survival after a diagnosis of colorectal cancer was examined in a large cohort of women. We analyzed data from 1001 women diagnosed with colorectal cancer while participating in a prospective cohort study. Data on family history were obtained before cancer diagnosis. We computed Cox proportional hazards for cancer-specific and overall mortality according to a family history of colorectal cancer, adjusting for other predictors for survival. Before diagnosis, 16% of colorectal patients reported a history of colorectal cancer in a first-degree relative. Patients with a history of colorectal cancer in 1 or more first-degree relatives experienced an adjusted hazard ratio (HR) for overall mortality of 1.32 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-1.72) and colorectal cancer-specific mortality of 1.38 (95% CI, 1.02-1.86) when compared with those without a family history. Moreover, patients with 2 or more affected relatives had an HR for overall mortality of 2.07 (95% CI, 1.14-3.76) and cancer-specific mortality of 2.19 (95% CI, 1.10-4.38). The significant deleterious effect of family history was limited to patients with advanced disease at presentation and cancers originating in the colon. Among women with colorectal cancer, a history of colorectal cancer in a first-degree relative was associated with a significant decrease in survival. Additional study is needed to validate these findings and determine whether specific germline polymorphisms correlate with clinical outcomes. Copyright (c) 2008 American Cancer Society.

  2. Factors predicting resource utilization and survival after major amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Antonia J; Hevelone, Nathanael D; Hawkins, Alexander T; Watkins, Michael T; Belkin, Michael; Nguyen, Louis L

    2013-03-01

    Major amputation is associated with increased short-term healthcare resource utilization (RU), early mortality, and socioeconomic status (SES) disparities. Our objective is to study patient-specific and SES-related predictors of long-term RU and survival after amputation. This retrospective analysis identified 364 adult patients who underwent index major amputation for critical limb ischemia from January 1995 through December 2000 at two tertiary centers with outcomes through December 2010. Age, gender, SES (race, income, insurance, and marital status), comorbidities (congestive heart failure [CHF], diabetes, diabetes with complications, and renal failure [RF]), subsequent procedures, cumulative length of stay (cLOS), and mortality were analyzed. Bivariate and multivariate Poisson regression for subsequent procedures and cLOS and Cox proportional hazard modeling for all-cause mortality were undertaken. During a mean follow-up of 3.25 years, amputation patients had mean cLOS of 71.2 days per person-year (median, 17.6), 19.5 readmissions per person-year (median, 2.1), 0.57 amputation-related procedures (median, 0), and 0.31 cardiovascular procedures (median, 0). Below-knee amputation as the index procedure was performed in 70% of patients, and 25% had additional amputation procedures. Of readmissions at ≤ 30 days, 52% were amputation-related. Overall mortality during follow-up was 86.9%; 37 patients (10.2%) died within 30 days. Among patients surviving >30 days, multivariate Poisson regression demonstrated that younger age (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 0.98), public insurance (IRR, 1.63), CHF (IRR, 1.60), and RF (IRR, 2.12) were associated with increased cLOS. Diabetes with complications (IRR, 1.90) and RF (IRR, 2.47) affected subsequent amputation procedures. CHF (IRR, 1.83) and RF (IRR, 3.67) were associated with a greater number of cardiovascular procedures. Cox proportional hazard modeling indicated older age (hazard ratio [HR], 1.04), CHF (HR, 2.26), and RF (HR

  3. High serum YKL-40 level after surgery for colorectal carcinoma is related to short survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cintin, Christina; Johansen, Julia S; Christensen, Ib Jarle

    2002-01-01

    carcinoma are associated with a significantly poorer prognosis compared to patients with normal serum YKL-40. In the current study the authors evaluated the value of serum YKL-40 in monitoring patients with colorectal carcinoma. METHODS: YKL-40 was determined by an in-house radioimmunoassay method in serum...... died. RESULTS: Serum YKL-40 was significantly decreased in the first postoperative blood sample in 62% of patients with high preoperative levels. In addition, patients with high serum YKL-40 (adjusted for age) six months after curative operation had significantly shorter survival times (P = 0...... that patients exhibiting elevated serum YKL-40 had an increased hazard for death within the following six months compared to those patients with normal serum YKL-40 level (hazard ratio [HR] = 9.6, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 6.0-15.5, P

  4. Inverse odds ratio-weighted estimation for causal mediation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric J

    2013-11-20

    An important scientific goal of studies in the health and social sciences is increasingly to determine to what extent the total effect of a point exposure is mediated by an intermediate variable on the causal pathway between the exposure and the outcome. A causal framework has recently been proposed for mediation analysis, which gives rise to new definitions, formal identification results and novel estimators of direct and indirect effects. In the present paper, the author describes a new inverse odds ratio-weighted approach to estimate so-called natural direct and indirect effects. The approach, which uses as a weight the inverse of an estimate of the odds ratio function relating the exposure and the mediator, is universal in that it can be used to decompose total effects in a number of regression models commonly used in practice. Specifically, the approach may be used for effect decomposition in generalized linear models with a nonlinear link function, and in a number of other commonly used models such as the Cox proportional hazards regression for a survival outcome. The approach is simple and can be implemented in standard software provided a weight can be specified for each observation. An additional advantage of the method is that it easily incorporates multiple mediators of a categorical, discrete or continuous nature. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Moral Hazard and Stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tumennasan, Norovsambuu

    2014-01-01

    Economists perceive moral hazard as an undesirable problem because it undermines efficiency. Carefully designed contracts can mitigate the moral hazard problem, but this assumes that a team is already formed. This paper demonstrates that these contracts are sometimes the reason why teams do...... not form. Formally, we study the team formation problem in which the agents’ efforts are not verifiable and the size of teams does not exceed quota r . We show that if the team members cannot make transfers, then moral hazard affects stability positively in a large class of games. For example, a stable...

  6. Parathyroid carcinoma survival: improvements in the era of intact parathyroid hormone monitoring?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve R. Martinez

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH assay is a critical test in the diagnosis and management of PTH-mediated hypercalcemia, including parathyroid carcinoma (PCa. We hypothesized that the survival of patients diagnosed with PCa has improved since adoption of the iPTH assay into clinical practice. We identified all confirmed cases of PCa within the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results database from 1973 to 2006. Patients were categorized into two eras based upon introduction of the iPTH assay: 1973 to 1997 (era I and 1997 to 2006 (era II, when the iPTH assay was in standard use. We estimated overall survival (OS and disease-specific survival (DSS using the Kaplan-Meier method, with differences among survival curves assessed via log rank. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards models compared the survival rates between treatment eras while controlling for patient age, sex, race/ethnicity, tumor size, nodal status, extent of disease, and type of surgery. Multivariate models included patients undergoing potentially curative surgery and excluded those with dis- tant metastases. Risks of overall and disease-specific mortality were reported as hazard ratios with 95% confidence intervals. Study criteria were met by 370 patients. Median survival was 15.6 years. Five-year rates of OS and DSS were 78% and 88% for era I and 82% and 96% for era II. On multivariate analysis, age, black race, and unknown extent of disease predicted an increased risk of death from any cause. Treatment era did not predict OS. No factor predicted PCa-specific mortality. In multivariate analysis, neither OS nor DSS have improved in the current era that utilizes iPTH for the detection and management of PCa.

  7. Survival analysis of female dogs with mammary tumors after mastectomy: epidemiological, clinical and morphological aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luíza de M. Dias

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Mammary gland tumors are the most common type of tumors in bitches but research on survival time after diagnosis is scarce. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between survival time after mastectomy and a number of clinical and morphological variables. Data was collected retrospectively on bitches with mammary tumors seen at the Small Animal Surgery Clinic Service at the University of Brasília. All subjects had undergone mastectomy. Survival analysis was conducted using Cox's proportional hazard method. Of the 139 subjects analyzed, 68 died and 71 survived until the end of the study (64 months. Mean age was 11.76 years (SD=2.71, 53.84% were small dogs. 76.92% of the tumors were malignant, and 65.73% had both thoracic and inguinal glands affected. Survival time in months was associated with age (hazard rate ratios [HRR] =1.23, p-value =1.4x10-4, animal size (HRR between giant and small animals =2.61, p-value =0.02, nodule size (HRR =1.09, p-value =0.03, histological type (HRR between solid carcinoma and carcinoma in a mixed tumor =2.40, p-value =0.02, time between diagnosis and surgery (TDS, with HRR =1.21, p-value =2.7x10-15, and the interaction TDS*follow-up time (HRR =0.98, p-value =1.6x10-11. The present study is one of the few on the subject matter. Several important covariates were evaluated and age, animal size, nodule size, histological type, TDS and TDS*follow up time were identified as significantly associated to survival time.

  8. Military service, deployments, and exposures in relation to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D Beard

    Full Text Available Military veterans may have higher rates of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS mortality than non-veterans. Few studies, with sparse exposure information and mixed results, have studied relationships between military-related factors and ALS survival. We evaluated associations between military-related factors and ALS survival among U.S. military veteran cases.We followed 616 medical record-confirmed cases from enrollment (2005-2010 in the Genes and Environmental Exposures in Veterans with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis study until death or July 25, 2013, whichever came first. We ascertained vital status information from several sources within the Department of Veterans Affairs. We obtained information regarding military service, deployments, and 39 related exposures via standardized telephone interviews. We used Cox proportional hazards regression models to estimate hazard ratios (HRs and 95% confidence intervals. We adjusted for potential confounding and missing covariate data biases via inverse probability weights. We also used inverse probability weights to adjust for potential selection bias among a case group that included a disproportionate number of long-term survivors at enrollment.We observed 446 deaths during 24,267 person-months of follow-up (median follow-up: 28 months. Survival was shorter for cases who served before 1950, were deployed to World War II, or mixed and applied burning agents, with HRs between 1.58 and 2.57. Longer survival was associated with exposure to: paint, solvents, or petrochemical substances; local food not provided by the Armed Forces; or burning agents or Agent Orange in the field with HRs between 0.56 and 0.73.Although most military-related factors were not associated with survival, associations we observed with shorter survival are potentially important because of the large number of military veterans.

  9. COX-2/EGFR expression and survival among women with adenocarcinoma of the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dyke, Alison L; Cote, Michele L; Prysak, Geoffrey M; Claeys, Gina B; Wenzlaff, Angie S; Murphy, Valerie C; Lonardo, Fulvio; Schwartz, Ann G

    2008-09-01

    Previous studies suggest that cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression may predict survival among patients with non-small cell lung cancer. COX-2 may interact with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), suggesting that combined COX-2/EGFR expression may provide predictive value. The extent to which their independent or combined expression is associated with prognosis in women with adenocarcinoma of the lung is unknown. In the present study, we examined relationships between COX-2 expression (n = 238), EGFR expression (n = 158) and dual COX-2/EGFR expression (n = 157) and survival among women with adenocarcinoma of the lung. Overall survival was estimated by constructing Cox proportional hazards models adjusting for other significant variables and stratifying by stage at diagnosis and race. Clinical or demographic parameters were not associated with either COX-2 or EGFR expression. Patients with COX-2-positive tumors tended to have poorer prognosis than did patients with COX-2-negative tumors [hazard ratio (HR) 1.67, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01-2.78]. African-Americans with COX-2-positive tumors had a statistically non-significant higher risk of death than African-Americans with COX-2-negative tumors (HR 5.58, 95% CI 0.64-48.37). No association between COX-2 expression and survival was observed among Caucasians (HR 1.29, 95% CI 0.72-2.30). EGFR expression was associated with a 44% reduction in the risk of death (HR 0.56, 95% CI 0.32-0.98). COX-2-/EGFR+ tumor expression, but not COX-2+/EGFR+ tumor expression, was associated with survival when compared with other combined expression results. In conclusion, COX-2 and EGFR expression, but not combined COX-2+/EGFR+ expression, independently predict survival of women with adenocarcinoma of the lung.

  10. Survival analysis of patients with interval cancer undergoing gastric cancer screening by endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamashima, Chisato; Shabana, Michiko; Okamoto, Mikizo; Osaki, Yoneatsu; Kishimoto, Takuji

    2015-01-01

    Interval cancer is a key factor that influences the effectiveness of a cancer screening program. To evaluate the impact of interval cancer on the effectiveness of endoscopic screening, the survival rates of patients with interval cancer were analyzed. We performed gastric cancer-specific and all-causes survival analyses of patients with screen-detected cancer and patients with interval cancer in the endoscopic screening group and radiographic screening group using the Kaplan-Meier method. Since the screening interval was 1 year, interval cancer was defined as gastric cancer detected within 1 year after a negative result. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to investigate the risk factors associated with gastric cancer-specific and all-causes death. A total of 1,493 gastric cancer patients (endoscopic screening group: n = 347; radiographic screening group: n = 166; outpatient group: n = 980) were identified from the Tottori Cancer Registry from 2001 to 2008. The gastric cancer-specific survival rates were higher in the endoscopic screening group than in the radiographic screening group and the outpatients group. In the endoscopic screening group, the gastric cancer-specific survival rate of the patients with screen-detected cancer and the patients with interval cancer were nearly equal (P = 0.869). In the radiographic screening group, the gastric cancer-specific survival rate of the patients with screen-detected cancer was higher than that of the patients with interval cancer (P = 0.009). For gastric cancer-specific death, the hazard ratio of interval cancer in the endoscopic screening group was 0.216 for gastric cancer death (95%CI: 0.054-0.868) compared with the outpatient group. The survival rate and the risk of gastric cancer death among the patients with screen-detected cancer and patients with interval cancer were not significantly different in the annual endoscopic screening. These results suggest the potential of endoscopic screening in reducing

  11. Nonparametric conditional hazard rate estimation: A local linear approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spierdijk, L.

    A new nonparametric estimator for the conditional hazard rate is proposed, which is defined as the ratio of local linear estimators for the conditional density and survivor function. The resulting hazard rate estimator is shown to be pointwise consistent and asymptotically normally distributed under

  12. Nonparametric conditional hazard rate estimation : A local linear approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spierdijk, L.

    2008-01-01

    A new nonparametric estimator for the conditional hazard rate is proposed, which is defined as the ratio of local linear estimators for the conditional density and survivor function. The resulting hazard rate estimator is shown to be pointwise consistent and asymptotically normally distributed under

  13. Dynamic changes in MELD score not only predict survival on the waiting list but also overall survival after liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Györi, Georg P; Silberhumer, Gerd R; Zehetmayer, Sonja; Kern, Barbara; Hetz, Hubert; Soliman, Thomas; Steininger, Rudolf; Mühlbacher, Ferdinand; Berlakovich, Gabriela A

    2012-09-01

    The predictive value of MELD score for post-transplant survival has been under constant debate since its implementation in 2001. Aim of this study was to assess the impact of alterations in MELD score throughout waiting time (WT) on post-transplant survival. A single-centre retrospective analysis of 1125 consecutive patients listed for liver transplantation between 1997 and 2009 was performed. The impact of MELD score and dynamic changes in MELD score (DeltaMELD), as well as age, sex, year of listing and WT were evaluated on waiting list mortality and post-transplant survival. In this cohort, 539 (60%) patients were transplanted, 223 (25%) died on list and 142 (15%) were removed from the waiting list during WT. One-, three- and five-year survival after liver transplantation were 83%, 78% and 76% respectively. DeltaMELD as a continuous variable proved to be the only significant risk factor for overall survival after liver transplantation (hazard ratio (HR): 1.06, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02-1.1, P = 0.013). The highest risk of post-transplant death could be defined for patients with a DeltaMELD > 10 (HR: 4.87, 95% CI 2.09-11.35, P listing showed a significant impact on waiting list mortality. DeltaMELD may provide an easy evaluation tool to identify patients on the liver transplant waiting list with a high mortality risk after transplantation in the current setting. Temporarily withholding and re-evaluating these patients might improve overall outcome after liver transplantation. © 2012 The Authors. Transplant International © 2012 European Society for Organ Transplantation.

  14. Perioperative Mortality and Long-Term Survival in 80 Dogs and 32 Cats Undergoing Excision of Thymic Epithelial Tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garneau, Mark S; Price, Lori Lyn; Withrow, Stephen J; Boston, Sarah E; Ewing, Patty J; McClaran, Janet Kovak; Liptak, Julius M; Berg, John

    2015-07-01

    To examine perioperative mortality, long-term survival, causes of death, and prognostic factors for dogs and cats undergoing surgical excision of thymic epithelial tumors (TETs). Multi-institutional case series. Eighty dogs and 32 cats. Follow-up information was obtained for dogs and cats that underwent surgical excision of a TET between 2001 and 2012. Perioperative mortality was 20% in dogs and 22% in cats. No independent risk factors for perioperative mortality were identified. The estimated median survival time for all dogs was 1.69 years (95% CI 0.56-4.32) and the 1- and 4-year survival rates were 55% (95% CI 44-67) and 44% (95% CI 32-56). The estimated median survival time for all cats was 3.71 years (95% CI 0.56-unestimatable) and the 1- and 4-year survival rates were 70% (95% CI 53-87) and 47% (95% CI 0-100). Of animals that survived to discharge, 42% of dogs and 20% of cats eventually died of TET-related causes. The presence of paraneoplastic syndromes (hazard ratio [HR] 5.78, 95% CI 1.64-20.45, P = .007) or incomplete histologic margins (HR 6.09, 95% CI 1.50-24.72, P = .01) were independently associated with decreased survival in dogs. No significant predictors of survival were identified in cats. Conclusions regarding the effect of chemotherapy or radiation therapy could not be made. While there is substantial risk of perioperative death in dogs and cats undergoing surgery for TETs, many animals that survive to discharge have prolonged survival. Survival is significantly decreased in dogs with paraneoplastic syndromes or incomplete histologic margins. © Copyright 2014 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  15. Modeling survival data extending the cox model

    CERN Document Server

    Therneau, Terry M

    2000-01-01

    Extending the Cox Model is aimed at researchers, practitioners, and graduate students who have some exposure to traditional methods of survival analysis The emphasis is on semiparametric methods based on the proportional hazards model The inclusion of examples with SAS and S-PLUS code will make the book accessible to most working statisticians

  16. Empirical likelihood method in survival analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Mai

    2015-01-01

    Add the Empirical Likelihood to Your Nonparametric ToolboxEmpirical Likelihood Method in Survival Analysis explains how to use the empirical likelihood method for right censored survival data. The author uses R for calculating empirical likelihood and includes many worked out examples with the associated R code. The datasets and code are available for download on his website and CRAN.The book focuses on all the standard survival analysis topics treated with empirical likelihood, including hazard functions, cumulative distribution functions, analysis of the Cox model, and computation of empiric

  17. Embolotherapy for Neuroendocrine Tumor Liver Metastases: Prognostic Factors for Hepatic Progression-Free Survival and Overall Survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, James X. [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States); Rose, Steven [University of San Diego Medical Center, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States); White, Sarah B. [Medical College of Wisconsin, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States); El-Haddad, Ghassan [Moffitt Cancer Center, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States); Fidelman, Nicholas [University of San Francisco Medical Center, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States); Yarmohammadi, Hooman [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States); Hwang, Winifred; Sze, Daniel Y.; Kothary, Nishita [Stanford University Medical Center, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States); Stashek, Kristen [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Pathology (United States); Wileyto, E. Paul [University of Pennsylvania, Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology (United States); Salem, Riad [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States); Metz, David C. [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine (United States); Soulen, Michael C., E-mail: michael.soulen@uphs.upenn.edu [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2017-01-15

    PurposeThe purpose of the study was to evaluate prognostic factors for survival outcomes following embolotherapy for neuroendocrine tumor (NET) liver metastases.Materials and MethodsThis was a multicenter retrospective study of 155 patients (60 years mean age, 57 % male) with NET liver metastases from pancreas (n = 71), gut (n = 68), lung (n = 8), or other/unknown (n = 8) primary sites treated with conventional transarterial chemoembolization (TACE, n = 50), transarterial radioembolization (TARE, n = 64), or transarterial embolization (TAE, n = 41) between 2004 and 2015. Patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factors were evaluated for prognostic effect on hepatic progression-free survival (HPFS) and overall survival (OS) using unadjusted and propensity score-weighted univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models.ResultsMedian HPFS and OS were 18.5 and 125.1 months for G1 (n = 75), 12.2 and 33.9 months for G2 (n = 60), and 4.9 and 9.3 months for G3 tumors (n = 20), respectively (p < 0.05). Tumor burden >50 % hepatic volume demonstrated 5.5- and 26.8-month shorter median HPFS and OS, respectively, versus burden ≤50 % (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences in HPFS or OS between gut or pancreas primaries. In multivariate HPFS analysis, there were no significant differences among embolotherapy modalities. In multivariate OS analysis, TARE had a higher hazard ratio than TACE (unadjusted Cox model: HR 2.1, p = 0.02; propensity score adjusted model: HR 1.8, p = 0.11), while TAE did not differ significantly from TACE.ConclusionHigher tumor grade and tumor burden prognosticated shorter HPFS and OS. TARE had a higher hazard ratio for OS than TACE. There were no significant differences in HPFS among embolotherapy modalities.

  18. Low C4 gene copy numbers are associated with superior graft survival in patients transplanted with a deceased donor kidney

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Jakob T; Schejbel, Lone; Madsen, Hans O

    2013-01-01

    rejection, but a relationship between graft survival and serum C4 concentration as well as C4 genetic variation has not been established. We evaluated this using a prospective study design of 676 kidney transplant patients and 211 healthy individuals as controls. Increasing C4 gene copy numbers...... significantly correlated with the C4 serum concentration in both patients and controls. Patients with less than four total copies of C4 genes transplanted with a deceased donor kidney experienced a superior 5-year graft survival (hazard ratio 0.46, 95% confidence interval: 0.25-0.84). No significant association...... was observed in patients transplanted with a living donor. Thus, low C4 copy numbers are associated with increased kidney graft survival in patients receiving a kidney from a deceased donor. Hence, the degree of ischemia may influence the clinical impact of complement....

  19. Contrast-Enhancing Meningeal Lesions Are Associated with Longer Survival in Breast Cancer-Related Leptomeningeal Metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regierer, Anne Constanze; Stroux, Andrea; Kühnhardt, Dagmar; Dieing, Annette; Lehenbauer-Dehm, Silvia; Flath, Bernd; Possinger, Kurt; Eucker, Jan

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Leptomeningeal metastasis (LM) is a devastating complication of advanced cancer. Despite aggressive therapy survival is very poor. METHODS: Data of all breast cancer patients with LM were retrospectively analyzed (n = 27). RESULTS: Median survival was 9 weeks. Patients with contrast-enhancing meningeal lesions (n = 11) detected by MRI had a median survival of 33 weeks versus 8 weeks for patients without contrast-enhancing lesions (n = 9; p = 0.0407). Patients who received systemic chemotherapy (n = 18) had a median survival of 15 weeks versus 7 weeks (n = 9; p = 0.0106). Patients undergoing radiotherapy (n = 8) had a median survival of 17 weeks as compared to 5 weeks for patients without radiotherapy (n = 18; p = 0.0188). In a multiple Cox regression analysis, lack of systemic therapy (hazard ratio, HR 89.5; p = 0.002) and negative hormone receptor status (HR 4.2; p = 0.027) emerged as significant main risk factors, together with contrast-enhancing lesion as effect modifier for systemic therapy (p = 0.03). CONCLUSION: Contrast-enhancing meningeal lesions, systemic therapy, and radiotherapy were significantly associated with longer survival. Patients with contrast-enhancing lesions who were treated systemically had the longest survival. Evidence is increasing that systemic therapy plays an important role and should be applied in breast cancer patients with LM.

  20. The impact of positive circumferential margin on survival following oesophagectomy using the new 7th TNM classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theologou, Thomas; Diab, Mohammad; Kyaw, Phyo A; Gosney, John R; McShane, James; Howes, Nathan; Page, Richard D; Shackcloth, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Previous studies looking at the influence of positive circumferential margin (CRM) on survival after oesophagectomy are conflicting. This may be due to the fact that older versions of the TNM classification were used, which do not predict survival as accurately as the new 7th edition. We examine whether CRM involvement has an impact on survival when the 7th TNM classification is used. Over a 10-year period, 199 patients who had undergone potentially curative resection for oesophageal cancer with postoperative histopathological T3 were identified. A total of 151 (75.9%) were found to have CRM involvement (CRM was free of tumour. Cancers were staged according to the International Union against Cancer TNM 7th edition. First, univariate and then multivariate Cox regression analysis were performed to assess the factors influencing survival. Potentially significant predictors (P CRM involvement was found to have no effect on survival following oesophagectomy [hazard ratio 1.28 (95% CI: 0.82-2.01) (P = 0.28)]. This was seen for all N-stages. Stage of disease, age at operation, % predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 second and shortness of breath [(according to New York Heart Association classification)] were all significant predictors of survival. With this study, it became clear that CRM involvement does not affect long-term survival of patients after oesophagectomy. Patients with CRM involvement should not necessarily be considered to have had an incomplete resection.

  1. What Are Volcano Hazards?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sheet 002-97 Revised March 2008 What Are Volcano Hazards? Volcanoes give rise to numerous geologic and ... as far as 15 miles from the volcano. Volcano Landslides A landslide or debris avalanche is a ...

  2. Naturally occurring hazardous materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    The study of naturally occurring hazardous materials (NOHMs) was conceived as a proactive response to assure that the Oregon : Department of Transportation (ODOT) maintenance and construction activities take the presence of NOHMs into account. The la...

  3. Introduction: Hazard mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Rex L.; Miyagi, Toyohiko; Lee, Saro; Trofymchuk, Oleksandr M

    2014-01-01

    Twenty papers were accepted into the session on landslide hazard mapping for oral presentation. The papers presented susceptibility and hazard analysis based on approaches ranging from field-based assessments to statistically based models to assessments that combined hydromechanical and probabilistic components. Many of the studies have taken advantage of increasing availability of remotely sensed data and nearly all relied on Geographic Information Systems to organize and analyze spatial data. The studies used a range of methods for assessing performance and validating hazard and susceptibility models. A few of the studies presented in this session also included some element of landslide risk assessment. This collection of papers clearly demonstrates that a wide range of approaches can lead to useful assessments of landslide susceptibility and hazard.

  4. Hazardous Waste Research Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES) is playing a major role in development of technologies for cleanup of toxic and hazardous waste in military...

  5. Flood Hazard Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) data incorporates all Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map(DFIRM) databases published by FEMA, and any Letters Of Map Revision...

  6. Natural Hazards Image Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Photographs and other visual media provide valuable pre- and post-event data for natural hazards. Research, mitigation, and forecasting rely on visual data for...

  7. Flood Hazard Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) data incorporates all Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map(DFIRM) databases published by FEMA, and any Letters Of Map Revision...

  8. Managing geotechnical hazards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billey, D. [Pembina Pipeline Corp., Calgary, AB (Canada); Rizkalla, M. [Visitless Integrity Assessment Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)] (comps.)

    2009-07-01

    This workshop provided a forum for discussing practical challenges related to the management of geotechnical hazards and pipeline integrity. System-wide geotechnical hazard management processes and site-specific engineering assessment, monitoring and mitigation methods were reviewed. Topics discussed at the workshop included geographic information system (GIS) tools; standards and regulations related to geotechnical hazard; strain-based design techniques for pipelines; and aerial, satellite, and geotechnical instrumentation. Other mitigation methods for geotechnical hazards included the avoidance of unstable ground; pipeline ditch modifications; bedding and padding; and excavation for pipeline strain relief. It was concluded that guidance is needed from regulators and standards developing organizations in order to develop appropriate risk assessment procedures. The workshop was divided into 2 sessions: (1) assessment and management processes; and (2) monitoring and mitigation methods. tabs., figs.

  9. Survival Rates of Teeth with Primary Endodontic Treatment after Core/Post and Crown Placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Kandace; Bhagavatula, Pradeep; Stover, Sheila; Eichmiller, Frederick; Hashimoto, Lance; MacDonald, Scott; Barkley, Gordon

    2017-12-08

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of delayed placement of the core/post and crown on the outcomes of nonsurgical root canal therapy (NSRCT). According to the Delta Dental of Wisconsin claims database, 160,040 NSRCTs were completed with a core/post and a crown placed before the end of the continuous coverage period or occurrence of an untoward event. Untoward events were defined as a retreatment, apicoectomy, or extraction as defined by the Code on Dental Procedures and Nomenclature. Statistical analysis was performed by using a multivariable Cox proportional hazards model. The survival rate from the time of crown placement to an untoward event was 99.1% at 1 year, 96.0% at 3 years, 92.3% at 5 years, and 83.8% at 10 years. Failure rates were greater when a core/post was placed more than 60 days after the NSRCT (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.08) and when the crown was placed more than 60 days after the core/post placement (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.14). Overall, the survival rates of NSRCT were greater when performed by an endodontist versus other providers. On the basis of the information available from insurance claims data, this study shows that the long-term survival rates of initial endodontic therapy are adversely affected by the delayed placement of the final restoration and full coverage crown. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Hazard identification methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna ORYMOWSKA

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the main hazards that occur in the context of inland navigation and their impact on the vessel. First, characteristics are extracted from the following methods with regard to identifying threats: involving steering gear damage to an inland vessel moving on a straight waterway. Next, a hazard identification model is presented, which is appropriate to a situation involving steering gear damage to an inland vessel moving on a straight fairway.

  11. Modeling survival: application of the Andersen-Gill model to Yellowstone grizzly bears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christopher J.; Boyce, Mark S.; Schwartz, Charles C.; Haroldson, Mark A.

    2004-01-01

     Wildlife ecologists often use the Kaplan-Meier procedure or Cox proportional hazards model to estimate survival rates, distributions, and magnitude of risk factors. The Andersen-Gill formulation (A-G) of the Cox proportional hazards model has seen limited application to mark-resight data but has a number of advantages, including the ability to accommodate left-censored data, time-varying covariates, multiple events, and discontinuous intervals of risks. We introduce the A-G model including structure of data, interpretation of results, and assessment of assumptions. We then apply the model to 22 years of radiotelemetry data for grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) of the Greater Yellowstone Grizzly Bear Recovery Zone in Montana, Idaho, and Wyoming, USA. We used Akaike's Information Criterion (AICc) and multi-model inference to assess a number of potentially useful predictive models relative to explanatory covariates for demography, human disturbance, and habitat. Using the most parsimonious models, we generated risk ratios, hypothetical survival curves, and a map of the spatial distribution of high-risk areas across the recovery zone. Our results were in agreement with past studies of mortality factors for Yellowstone grizzly bears. Holding other covariates constant, mortality was highest for bears that were subjected to repeated management actions and inhabited areas with high road densities outside Yellowstone National Park. Hazard models developed with covariates descriptive of foraging habitats were not the most parsimonious, but they suggested that high-elevation areas offered lower risks of mortality when compared to agricultural areas.

  12. Exposure to magnetic fields and survival after diagnosis of childhood leukemia: a German cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Anne Louise; Weihkopf, Thomas; Kaatsch, Peter

    2007-01-01

    conducted between 1992 and 2001. A total of 595 ALL cases with 24-h magnetic field measurements are included in the analysis with a median follow-up of 9.5 years. We calculate the hazard ratios (HR) using the Cox proportional hazards model for overall survival, adjusted for age at diagnosis, calendar year......Inspired by a recent U.S. study showing poorer survival among children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) exposed to magnetic fields above 0.3 microT, we examine this relationship in a German cohort of childhood leukemia cases derived from previous population-based case-control studies...... for prognostic risk group, the hazard for exposures above 0.2 microT increases to HR, 3.0 (95% CI, 0.9-9.8). In conclusion, this study is generally consistent with the previous finding; however, we report the excess risk at field levels lower than those in the U.S. study. In all, the evidence is still based...

  13. Survival benefits of remote ischemic conditioning in sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Bellal; Khalil, Mazhar; Hashmi, Ammar; Hecker, Louise; Kulvatunyou, Narong; Tang, Andrew; Friese, Randall S; Rhee, Peter

    2017-06-01

    Sepsis remains the leading cause of death in the surgical intensive care unit. Prior studies have demonstrated a survival benefit of remote ischemic conditioning (RIC) in many disease states. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of RIC on survival in sepsis in an animal model and to assess alterations in inflammatory biochemical profiles. We hypothesized that RIC alters inflammatory biochemical profiles resulting in decreased mortality in a septic mouse model. Eight to 12 week C57BL/6 mice received intra-peritoneal injection of 12.5-mg/kg lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Septic animals in the experimental group underwent RIC at 0, 2, and 6 h after LPS by surgical exploration and alternate clamping of the femoral artery. Six 4-min cycles of ischemia-reperfusion were performed. Primary outcome was survival at 5-d after LPS injection. Secondary outcome was to assess the following serum cytokine levels: interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin (IL)-10, IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factoralpha (TNFα) at the baseline before LPS injection, 0 hour after LPS injection, and at 2, 4, 24 hours after induction of sepsis (RIC was performed at 2 h after LPS injection). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and log-rank test were used. ANOVA test was used to compare cytokine measurements. We performed experiments on 44 mice: 14 sham and 30 RIC mice (10 at each time point). Overall survival was higher in the experimental group compared to the sham group (57% versus 21%; P = 0.02), with the highest survival rate observed in the 2-hour post-RIC group (70%). On Kaplan-Meier analysis, 2-h post-RIC group had increased survival at 5 days after LPS (P = 0.04) with hazard ratio of 0.3 (95% confidence interval = 0.09-0.98). In the RIC group, serum concentrations of IFN-γ, IL-10, IL-1β, and TNFα peaked at 2 h after LPS and then decreased significantly over 24 hours (P sepsis and has the potential for implementation in the clinical practice. Early implementation of RIC may play an

  14. Physical activity level significantly affects the survival of patients with end-stage lung disease on a waiting list for lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Teruya; Oshima, Ayako; Chen-Yoshikawa, Toyofumi F; Harashima, Shin-Ichi; Aoyama, Akihiro; Inagaki, Nobuya; Date, Hiroshi

    2017-12-01

    Our objective was to investigate the factors predicting the survival of patients on the waiting list for lung transplantation (LT) during the waiting period, with a special emphasis on the physical activity level. The study included 70 patients with end-stage pulmonary disease who were on the waiting list for LT at Kyoto University Hospital. We examined the association between the baseline characteristics, including the body mass index and body composition, serum albumin, serum C-reactive protein (CRP), steroid administration, physical activity level (calculated by the food frequency questionnaire) and survival during the waiting period using Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox proportional hazard regression models. A physical activity level of ≤1.2 was correlated with significantly decreased survival (1-year survival: 68 vs. 90.9%, p = 0.0089), with a hazard ratio (HR) of 2.24 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.22-4.19, p = 0.0001). Hypo-albumin (HR 2.024, 95% CI 1.339-6.009, p = 0.004), a high level of CRP (HR 2.551, CI 1.229-4.892, p = 0.02), and the administration of steroids (HR 2.258, CI 1.907-5.032, p = 0.024) were also significant predictors of survival. Low levels of physical activity during the waiting period for LT led to decreased survival times among LT candidates.

  15. Prognostic Factors for Survival and Resection in Patients with Initial Nonresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Treated with Chemoradiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Jon K; Mortensen, Michael B; Jensen, Helle A

    2012-01-01

    for survival demonstrated resection (hazard ratio [HR] 0.12; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.1-0.3) and pre-CRT gemcitabine-based therapy (HR 0.57; 95% CI, 0.4-0.9) as being associated with a favorable outcome, increasing gross tumor volume (HR 1.14; 95% CI, 1.0-1.3) was associated with shorter survival....... A logistic regression model showed Stage III disease (odds ratio [OR] 0.16; 95% CI, 0.0-1.1) and abnormal hemoglobin (OR 0.26; 95% CI, 0.0-1.2) as being associated with lower odds of resection. CONCLUSION: This study confirms the favorable prognosis for patients receiving gemcitabine therapy before CRT...

  16. Hydroxyurea-Increased Fetal Hemoglobin Is Associated with Less Organ Damage and Longer Survival in Adults with Sickle Cell Anemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney D Fitzhugh

    Full Text Available Adults with sickle cell anemia (HbSS are inconsistently treated with hydroxyurea.We retrospectively evaluated the effects of elevating fetal hemoglobin with hydroxyurea on organ damage and survival in patients enrolled in our screening study between 2001 and 2010.An electronic medical record facilitated development of a database for comparison of study parameters based on hydroxyurea exposure and dose. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00011648.Three hundred eighty-three adults with homozygous sickle cell disease were analyzed with 59 deaths during study follow-up. Cox regression analysis revealed deceased subjects had more hepatic dysfunction (elevated alkaline phosphatase, Hazard Ratio = 1.005, 95% CI 1.003-1.006, p<0.0.0001, kidney dysfunction (elevated creatinine, Hazard Ratio = 1.13, 95% CI 1.00-1.27, p = 0.043, and cardiopulmonary dysfunction (elevated tricuspid jet velocity on echocardiogram, Hazard Ratio = 2.22, 1.23-4.02, p = 0.0082. Sixty-six percent of subjects were treated with hydroxyurea, although only 66% of those received a dose within the recommended therapeutic range. Hydroxyurea use was associated with improved survival (Hazard Ratio = 0.58, 95% CI 0.34-0.97, p = 0.040. This effect was most pronounced in those taking the recommended dose of 15-35 mg/kg/day (Hazard Ratio 0.36, 95% CI 0.17-0.73, p = 0.0050. Hydroxyurea use was not associated with changes in organ function over time. Further, subjects with higher fetal hemoglobin responses to hydroxyurea were more likely to survive (p = 0.0004. While alkaline phosphatase was lowest in patients with the best fetal hemoglobin response (95.4 versus 123.6, p = 0.0065 and 96.1 versus 113.6U/L, p = 0.041 at first and last visits, respectively, other markers of organ damage were not consistently improved over time in patients with the highest fetal hemoglobin levels.Our data suggest that adults should be treated with the maximum tolerated hydroxyurea dose

  17. Cigarette smoking is associated with adverse survival among women with ovarian cancer: Results from a pooled analysis of 19 studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praestegaard, Camilla; Jensen, Allan; Jensen, Signe M; Nielsen, Thor S S; Webb, Penelope M; Nagle, Christina M; DeFazio, Anna; Høgdall, Estrid; Rossing, Mary Anne; Doherty, Jennifer A; Wicklund, Kristine G; Goodman, Marc T; Modugno, Francesmary; Moysich, Kirsten; Ness, Roberta B; Edwards, Robert; Matsuo, Keitaro; Hosono, Satoyo; Goode, Ellen L; Winham, Stacey J; Fridley, Brooke L; Cramer, Daniel W; Terry, Kathryn L; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Berchuck, Andrew; Bandera, Elisa V; Paddock, Lisa E; Massuger, Leon F; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Pharoah, Paul; Song, Honglin; Whittemore, Alice; McGuire, Valerie; Sieh, Weiva; Rothstein, Joseph; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Menon, Usha; Gayther, Simon A; Ramus, Susan J; Gentry-Maharaj, Alexandra; Wu, Anna H; Pearce, Celeste L; Pike, Malcolm; Lee, Alice W; Sutphen, Rebecca; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Risch, Harvey A; Kjaer, Susanne K

    2017-06-01

    Cigarette smoking is associated with an increased risk of developing mucinous ovarian tumors but whether it is associated with ovarian cancer survival overall or for the different histotypes is unestablished. Furthermore, it is unknown whether the association between cigarette smoking and survival differs according to strata of ovarian cancer stage at diagnosis. In a large pooled analysis, we evaluated the association between various measures of cigarette smoking and survival among women with epithelial ovarian cancer. We obtained data from 19 case-control studies in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC), including 9,114 women diagnosed with ovarian cancer. Cox regression models were used to estimate adjusted study-specific hazard ratios (HRs), which were combined into pooled hazard ratios (pHR) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) under random effects models. Overall, 5,149 (57%) women died during a median follow-up period of 7.0 years. Among women diagnosed with ovarian cancer, both current (pHR = 1.17, 95% CI: 1.08-1.28) and former smokers (pHR = 1.10, 95% CI: 1.02-1.18) had worse survival compared with never smoking women. In histotype-stratified analyses, associations were observed for mucinous (current smoking: pHR = 1.91, 95% CI: 1.01-3.65) and serous histotypes (current smoking: pHR = 1.11, 95% CI: 1.00-1.23; former smoking: pHR = 1.12, 95% CI: 1.04-1.20). Further, our results suggested that current smoking has a greater impact on survival among women with localized than disseminated disease. The identification of cigarette smoking as a modifiable factor associated with survival has potential clinical importance as a focus area to improve ovarian cancer prognosis. © 2017 UICC.

  18. Preoperative multivariable prognostic models for prediction of survival and major complications following surgical resection of renal cell carcinoma with suprahepatic caval tumor thrombus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Ahmed Q; Leibovich, Bradley C; Abel, Edwin Jason; Luo, Jun-Hang; Krabbe, Laura-Maria; Thompson, Robert Houston; Heckman, Jennifer E; Merrill, Megan M; Gayed, Bishoy A; Sagalowsky, Arthur I; Boorjian, Stephen A; Wood, Christopher G; Margulis, Vitaly

    2015-09-01

    Surgical resection for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with suprahepatic inferior vena cava tumor thrombus is associated with significant morbidity, yet there are currently no tools for preoperative prognostic evaluation. Our goal was to develop a preoperative multivariable model for prediction of survival and risk of major complications in patients with suprahepatic thrombi. We identified patients who underwent surgery for RCC with suprahepatic tumor thrombus extension from 2000 to 2013 at 4 tertiary centers. A Cox proportional hazard model was used for analysis of overall survival (OS) and logistic regression was used for major complications within 90 days of surgery (Clavien ≥ 3A). Nomograms were internally calibrated by bootstrap resampling method. A total of 49 patients with level III thrombus and 83 patients with level IV thrombus were identified. During median follow-up of 24.5 months, 80 patients (60.6%) died and 46 patients (34.8%) experienced major complication. Independent prognostic factors for OS included distant metastases at presentation (hazard ratio = 2.52, P = 0.002) and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status (hazard ratio = 1.84, Pmodels for the prediction of survival and major complications in patients with RCC who have a suprahepatic inferior vena cava thrombus. If externally validated, these tools may aid in patient selection for surgical intervention. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Analysis of the association between bisphosphonate treatment survival in Danish hip fracture patients-a nationwide register-based open cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bondo, L; Eiken, P; Abrahamsen, B

    2012-01-01

    significantly lower 3-month mortality (adjusted odds ratio, OR, 0.68; 0.59-0.77). Patients who began BP after the fracture (2.6 %) had significantly decreased mortality, both for patients who filled only one prescription (adjusted hazard ratio, HR 0.84; 0.73-0.95) and for patients who filled multiple...... of a reduction in mortality in patients who filled only one prescription for a BP suggests that patient factors may account for a considerable part of the survival advantage observed with BPs....

  20. Prognostic nutritional index as a prognostic biomarker for survival in digestive system carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yang; Xu, Peng; Kang, Huafeng; Lin, Shuai; Wang, Meng; Yang, Pengtao; Dai, Cong; Liu, Xinghan; Liu, Kang; Zheng, Yi; Dai, Zhijun

    2016-12-27

    The prognostic nutritional index (PNI) has been reported to correlate with the prognosis in patients with various malignancies. We performed a meta-analysis to determine the predictive potential of PNI in digestive system cancers. Twenty-three studies with a total of 7,384 patients suffering from digestive system carcinomas were involved in this meta-analysis. A lower PNI was significantly associated with the shorter overall survival (OS) [Hazard Ratio (HR) 1.83, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.62-2.07], the poorer disease-free survival (DFS) (HR 1.85, 95% CI 1.19-2.89), and the higher rate of post-operative complications (HR 2.31, 95% CI 1.63-3.28). In conclusion, PNI was allowed to function as an efficient indicator for the prognosis of patients with digestive system carcinomas.

  1. Leukotriene A4 Hydrolase Genotype and HIV Infection Influence Intracerebral Inflammation and Survival From Tuberculous Meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuong, Nguyen T T; Heemskerk, Dorothee; Tram, Trinh T B; Thao, Le T P; Ramakrishnan, Lalita; Ha, Vu T N; Bang, Nguyen D; Chau, Tran T H; Lan, Nguyen H; Caws, Maxine; Dunstan, Sarah J; Chau, Nguyen V V; Wolbers, Marcel; Mai, Nguyen T H; Thwaites, Guy E

    2017-04-01

    Tuberculous meningitis (TBM) is the most devastating form of tuberculosis, yet very little is known about the pathophysiology. We hypothesized that the genotype of leukotriene A4 hydrolase (encoded by LTA4H), which determines inflammatory eicosanoid expression, influences intracerebral inflammation, and predicts survival from TBM. We characterized the pretreatment clinical and intracerebral inflammatory phenotype and 9-month survival of 764 adults with TBM. All were genotyped for single-nucleotide polymorphism rs17525495, and inflammatory phenotype was defined by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leukocyte and cytokine concentrations. LTA4H genotype predicted survival of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-uninfected patients, with TT-genotype patients significantly more likely to survive TBM than CC-genotype patients, according to Cox regression analysis (univariate P = .040 and multivariable P = .037). HIV-uninfected, TT-genotype patients had high CSF proinflammatory cytokine concentrations, with intermediate and lower concentrations in those with CT and CC genotypes. Increased CSF cytokine concentrations correlated with more-severe disease, but patients with low CSF leukocytes and cytokine concentrations were more likely to die from TBM. HIV infection independently predicted death due to TBM (hazard ratio, 3.94; 95% confidence interval, 2.79-5.56) and was associated with globally increased CSF cytokine concentrations, independent of LTA4H genotype. LTA4H genotype and HIV infection influence pretreatment inflammatory phenotype and survival from TBM. LTA4H genotype may predict adjunctive corticosteroid responsiveness in HIV-uninfected individuals.

  2. Racial Disparities in Clinical Presentation and Survival Times Among Young-Onset Colorectal Adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Hafiz Muhammad Sharjeel; Kabir, Christopher; Tetangco, Eula; Shah, Natahsa; Raddawi, Hareth

    2017-09-01

    Recently published data indicate increasing incidence of colorectal adenocarcinoma (CRC) in young-onset (racial disparities in presentation and survival times among non-Hispanic Blacks (NHB) and Hispanics compared with non-Hispanic Whites (NHW). A retrospective single-center cohort study was conducted from 2004 through 2014 using 96 patient medical charts with a diagnosis of young-onset CRC. Age, gender, primary site, and histological stage at the time of diagnosis were assessed for survival probabilities by racial group over a minimum follow-up period of 5 years. Among subjects with CRC diagnosis before 50 years of age, the majority of subjects were between 40 and 50 years, with CRC presentation occurring among this age group for 51 (79.7%) of NHW, 18 (81.8%) of NHB, and 5 (50.0%) of Hispanics. The majority of all patients presented with advanced stages of CRC (31.3% with stage III and 27.1% with stage IV). NHB exhibited statistically significantly worse survival compared to NHW (adjusted hazard ratio for death = 2.09; 95% confidence interval 1.14-3.84; P = 0.02). A possible trend of worse survival was identified for Hispanics compared to NHW, but this group was low in numbers and results were not statistically significant. Disparities between racial groups among young-onset CRC cases were identified in overall survival and reflect growing concern in rising incidence and differentiated care management.

  3. Adjuvant radiation therapy is associated with improved survival for adenoid cystic carcinoma of the breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Jodi M; Martinez, Steve R; Bold, Richard J; Chen, Steven L

    2010-09-15

    The role of adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) for adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) of the breast remains unclear. We queried the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database for patients with breast ACC resected between 1988 and 2005, and divided patients based on the receipt of RT. Univariate and multivariate survival comparisons were made for overall and disease-specific survival. Three hundred seventy six patients met criteria for inclusion. Demographics and staging were similar between groups. Univariate analysis revealed an absolute overall and cause-specific survival benefit of 21% and 7% at 10 years (P = 0.005 and P = 0.12 respectively). In the multivariate analysis, RT was a significant predictor of overall and cause-specific survival with hazard ratios of 0.44 (95% Confidence interval (CI) = 0.22-0.88) and 0.1 (95% CI: 0.01-0.88), respectively. RT after local surgical therapy for ACC of the breast improved both cause-specific and overall survival. Use of RT in this rare tumor should be considered in patients otherwise eligible for RT. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Socioeconomic disparities in breast cancer survival: relation to stage at diagnosis, treatment and race

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Xue

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have documented lower breast cancer survival among women with lower socioeconomic status (SES in the United States. In this study, I examined the extent to which socioeconomic disparity in breast cancer survival was explained by stage at diagnosis, treatment, race and rural/urban residence using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER data. Methods Women diagnosed with breast cancer during 1998-2002 in the 13 SEER cancer registry areas were followed-up to the end of 2005. The association between an area-based measure of SES and cause-specific five-year survival was estimated using Cox regression models. Six models were used to assess the extent to which SES differences in survival were explained by clinical and demographical factors. The base model estimated the hazard ratio (HR by SES only and then additional adjustments were made sequentially for: 1 age and year of diagnosis; 2 stage at diagnosis; 3 first course treatment; 4 race; and 5 rural/urban residence. Results An inverse association was found between SES and risk of dying from breast cancer (p Conclusion Stage at diagnosis, first course treatment and race explained most of the socioeconomic disparity in breast cancer survival. Targeted interventions to increase breast cancer screening and treatment coverage in patients with lower SES could reduce much of socioeconomic disparity.

  5. Survival outcome associated with the screening interval for gastric cancer in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyuk; Min, Byung-Hoon; Lee, Jun Haeng; Son, Hee Jung; Kim, Jae J; Rhee, Jong Chul; Kim, Seonwoo; Rhee, Poong-Lyul

    2011-01-01

    Early gastric cancer (EGC) can be treated by endoscopic resection, which results in an excellent prognosis. Optimal screening intervals considering risk factors for gastric cancer have not been established. The aim of this study was to determine the maximum gastric cancer screening interval in terms of long-term survival. Curative resection was performed in 561 patients with gastric cancer who had completed a questionnaire on their previous history of screening tests and risk factors. The association between EGC detection rate and previous screening history was evaluated, and 5-year disease-free survival rates were compared between various screening intervals. Multivariate analysis showed that intestinal metaplasia [hazard ratio (HR) 9.690, 95% confidence interval (CI) 5.896-15.927] and previous screening history (HR 0.077, 95% CI 0.048-0.125) were independent factors associated with advanced gastric cancer. In patients without intestinal metaplasia, there was no significant difference in the extent of gastric cancer progression and the 5-year disease-free survival rate between groups with screening intervals of less than 3 years. In patients with intestinal metaplasia, the cutoff screening interval for detection of EGC and disease-free survival was 2 years. The optimum screening interval for disease-free survival for gastric cancer in a normal population is 3 years, but a screening interval of 2 years should be used for patients with intestinal metaplasia in Korea. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Serum alpha 2-HS glycoprotein predicts survival in patients with glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrik, Vladimir; Saadoun, Samira; Loosemore, Alison; Hobbs, Josie; Opstad, Kirstie S; Sheldon, Joanna; Tarelli, Edward; Howe, Franklyn A; Bell, B Anthony; Papadopoulos, Marios C

    2008-04-01

    Glioblastoma, the most common primary brain tumor, has variable prognosis. We aimed to identify serum biomarkers that predict survival of patients with glioblastoma. In phase 1 (biomarker discovery), SELDI-TOF mass spectra were studied in 200 serum samples from 58 control subjects and 36 patients with grade II astrocytoma, 15 with anaplastic astrocytoma, and 91 with glioblastoma. To identify potential biomarkers, we searched for peptide peaks that changed progressively in size with increasing malignancy. One peak, identified as the B-chain of alpha 2-Heremans-Schmid glycoprotein (AHSG), was less prominent with increasing tumor grade. We therefore investigated AHSG as a survival predictor in glioblastoma. We measured serum AHSG by turbidimetry and determined indices of malignancy, including tumor proliferation (Ki67 immunolabel) and necrosis (tumor lipids on magnetic resonance spectroscopy). In phase 2 (biomarker validation), the prognostic power of AHSG was validated in an independent group of 72 glioblastoma patients. Median survival was longer (51 vs 29 weeks) in glioblastoma patients with normal vs low serum AHSG concentrations (hazard ratio 2.7, 95% CI 1.5-5.0, P AHSG inversely correlated with Ki-67 immunolabeling and tumor lipids. A prognostic index combining serum AHSG with patient age and Karnofsky score separated glioblastoma patients with short (2 years) median survival. The prognostic value of serum AHSG was validated in a different cohort of glioblastoma patients. We conclude that serum AHSG concentration, measured before starting treatment, predicts survival in patients with glioblastoma.

  7. Overall Survival with Combined Nivolumab and Ipilimumab in Advanced Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolchok, Jedd D; Chiarion-Sileni, Vanna; Gonzalez, Rene; Rutkowski, Piotr; Grob, Jean-Jacques; Cowey, C Lance; Lao, Christopher D; Wagstaff, John; Schadendorf, Dirk; Ferrucci, Pier F; Smylie, Michael; Dummer, Reinhard; Hill, Andrew; Hogg, David; Haanen, John; Carlino, Matteo S; Bechter, Oliver; Maio, Michele; Marquez-Rodas, Ivan; Guidoboni, Massimo; McArthur, Grant; Lebbé, Celeste; Ascierto, Paolo A; Long, Georgina V; Cebon, Jonathan; Sosman, Jeffrey; Postow, Michael A; Callahan, Margaret K; Walker, Dana; Rollin, Linda; Bhore, Rafia; Hodi, F Stephen; Larkin, James

    2017-10-05

    Nivolumab combined with ipilimumab resulted in longer progression-free survival and a higher objective response rate than ipilimumab alone in a phase 3 trial involving patients with advanced melanoma. We now report 3-year overall survival outcomes in this trial. We randomly assigned, in a 1:1:1 ratio, patients with previously untreated advanced melanoma to receive nivolumab at a dose of 1 mg per kilogram of body weight plus ipilimumab at a dose of 3 mg per kilogram every 3 weeks for four doses, followed by nivolumab at a dose of 3 mg per kilogram every 2 weeks; nivolumab at a dose of 3 mg per kilogram every 2 weeks plus placebo; or ipilimumab at a dose of 3 mg per kilogram every 3 weeks for four doses plus placebo, until progression, the occurrence of unacceptable toxic effects, or withdrawal of consent. Randomization was stratified according to programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) status, BRAF mutation status, and metastasis stage. The two primary end points were progression-free survival and overall survival in the nivolumab-plus-ipilimumab group and in the nivolumab group versus the ipilimumab group. At a minimum follow-up of 36 months, the median overall survival had not been reached in the nivolumab-plus-ipilimumab group and was 37.6 months in the nivolumab group, as compared with 19.9 months in the ipilimumab group (hazard ratio for death with nivolumab plus ipilimumab vs. ipilimumab, 0.55 [Pnivolumab vs. ipilimumab, 0.65 [Pnivolumab-plus-ipilimumab group and 52% in the nivolumab group, as compared with 34% in the ipilimumab group. The safety profile was unchanged from the initial report. Treatment-related adverse events of grade 3 or 4 occurred in 59% of the patients in the nivolumab-plus-ipilimumab group, in 21% of those in the nivolumab group, and in 28% of those in the ipilimumab group. Among patients with advanced melanoma, significantly longer overall survival occurred with combination therapy with nivolumab plus ipilimumab or with nivolumab alone than

  8. DDX3X Biomarker Correlates with Poor Survival in Human Gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dueng-Yuan Hueng

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Primary high-grade gliomas possess invasive growth and lead to unfavorable survival outcome. The investigation of biomarkers for prediction of survival outcome in patients with gliomas is important for clinical assessment. The DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp box helicase 3, X-linked (DDX3X controls tumor migration, proliferation, and progression. However, the role of DDX3X in defining the pathological grading and survival outcome in patients with human gliomas is not yet clarified. We analyzed the DDX3X gene expression, WHO pathological grading, and overall survival from de-linked data. Further validation was done using quantitative RT-PCR of cDNA from normal brain and glioma, and immunohistochemical (IHC staining of tissue microarray. Statistical analysis of GEO datasets showed that DDX3X mRNA expression demonstrated statistically higher in WHO grade IV (n = 81 than in non-tumor controls (n = 23, p = 1.13 × 10−10. Moreover, DDX3X level was also higher in WHO grade III (n = 19 than in non-tumor controls (p = 2.43 × 10−5. Kaplan–Meier survival analysis showed poor survival in patients with high DDX3X mRNA levels (n = 24 than in those with low DDX3X expression (n = 53 (median survival, 115 vs. 58 weeks, p = 0.0009, by log-rank test, hazard ratio: 0.3507, 95% CI: 0.1893–0.6496. Furthermore, DDX3X mRNA expression and protein production significantly increased in glioma cells compared with normal brain tissue examined by quantitative RT-PCR, and Western blot. IHC staining showed highly staining of high-grade glioma in comparison with normal brain tissue. Taken together, DDX3X expression level positively correlates with WHO pathologic grading and poor survival outcome, indicating that DDX3X is a valuable biomarker in human gliomas.

  9. Prognostic factors for locoregional recurrence and survival in stage IIIC breast carcinoma: impact of adjuvant radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuru, B

    2011-04-01

    The aims of the present study were to define the prognostic factors for locoregional recurrence (LRR) and survival in stage IIIC breast carcinoma as well as to examine the impact of adjuvant radiotherapy on the outcome of the disease. The records of 586 consecutive patients with stage IIIC breast carcinoma who underwent modified radical mastectomy were evaluated, and the prognostic factors for LRR and survival were analysed. Survival curves were generated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and multivariate analysis was performed using the Cox proportional hazard model. Five-year LRR and survival of stage IIIC breast carcinoma were 15 percent and 41.3 percent, respectively. Five-year LRR was significantly lower and five-year survival was significantly higher for all patients as well as for T1-2 patients with one to three apical node involvements who were treated with adjuvant radiotherapy. In multivariate analysis, apical node involvement, age below 35 years, T4 tumour, grade 3, extracapsular extension and lymphovascular invasion decreased survival, whereas adjuvant tamoxifen and adjuvant radiotherapy (risk ratio [RR] 0.51, 95 percent confidence interval [CI] 0.39-0.67) increased survival. Adjuvant radiotherapy was the sole independent factor that was found to be significantly associated with decreased LRR (RR 0.25, 95 percent CI 0.16-0.38). Radiotherapy decreased LRR and increased survival significantly in all stage IIIC patients and in the subgroup of T1-2 patients with one to three apical node involvements. Thus, it should be considered in the treatment of stage IIIC breast carcinoma.

  10. Chemical process hazards analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    The Office of Worker Health and Safety (EH-5) under the Assistant Secretary for the Environment, Safety and Health of the US Department (DOE) has published two handbooks for use by DOE contractors managing facilities and processes covered by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Rule for Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (29 CFR 1910.119), herein referred to as the PSM Rule. The PSM Rule contains an integrated set of chemical process safety management elements designed to prevent chemical releases that can lead to catastrophic fires, explosions, or toxic exposures. The purpose of the two handbooks, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` and ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate implementation of the provisions of the PSM Rule within the DOE. The purpose of this handbook ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate, within the DOE, the performance of chemical process hazards analyses (PrHAs) as required under the PSM Rule. It provides basic information for the performance of PrHAs, and should not be considered a complete resource on PrHA methods. Likewise, to determine if a facility is covered by the PSM rule, the reader should refer to the handbook, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` (DOE- HDBK-1101-96). Promulgation of the PSM Rule has heightened the awareness of chemical safety management issues within the DOE. This handbook is intended for use by DOE facilities and processes covered by the PSM rule to facilitate contractor implementation of the PrHA element of the PSM Rule. However, contractors whose facilities and processes not covered by the PSM Rule may also use this handbook as a basis for conducting process hazards analyses as part of their good management practices. This handbook explains the minimum requirements for PrHAs outlined in the PSM Rule. Nowhere have requirements been added beyond what is specifically required by the rule.

  11. Body mass index, weight change, and survival in non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients in Connecticut women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xuesong; Stevens, June; Bradshaw, Patrick T

    2013-01-01

    Evidence is emerging that obesiy and weight gain may affect the prognosis of several types of cancer. We investigated the impact of body mass index (BMI) as well as pre-and postdiagnosis weight changes on non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) prognosis. A cohort of 573 female incident NHL cases diagnosed during 1996-2000 in Connecticut was followed for a median of 7.8 yr. Self-reported height and weight at 3 time points before and after diagnosis were collected. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using proportional hazard models adjusting for factors believed to be associated with overall survival of NHL. Underweight (BMI weight (18.5 ≤ BMI weight loss (HR = 1.42; 95% CI = 1.02-1.97) and posttreatment weight loss (HR = 1.98; 95% CI = 1.14-3.45) and weight gain (HR = 1.85; 95% CI = 1.04-3.32) were associated with poorer survival. NHL patients who were underweight, lost weight prediagnosis, or change weight after treatment were found to have a poorer survival.

  12. Effect of Dialysis Modality on Survival of Hepatitis C-Infected ESRF Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Bhadran; McDonald, Stephen P.; Hawley, Carmel M.; Brown, Fiona G.; Badve, Sunil V.; Wiggins, Kathryn J.; Bannister, Kym M.; Boudville, Neil; Clayton, Philip

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with increased mortality and morbidity in end-stage renal failure (ESRF) patients. Despite a lower incidence and risk of transmission of HCV infection with peritoneal dialysis (PD), the optimal dialysis modality for HCV-infected ESRF patients is not known. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of dialysis modality on the survival of HCV-infected ESRF patients. Design, setting, participants, & measurements The study included all adult incident ESRF patients in Australia and New Zealand who commenced dialysis between January 1, 1994, and December 31, 2008, and were HCV antibody-positive at the time of dialysis commencement. Time to all-cause mortality was compared between hemodialysis (HD) and PD according to modality assignment at day 90, using Cox proportional hazards model analysis. Results A total of 424 HCV-infected ESRF patients commenced dialysis during the study period and survived for at least 90 days (PD n = 134; HD n = 290). Mortality rates were comparable between PD and HD in the first year (10.7 versus 13.8 deaths per 100 patient-years, respectively; adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 0.65, 95% CI 0.34 to 1.26) and thereafter (20 versus 15.9 deaths per 100 patient-years, respectively; HR 1.27, 95% CI 0.86 to 1.88). Conclusions The survival of HCV-infected ESRF patients is comparable between PD and HD. PMID:21903989

  13. Total Laryngectomy Versus Larynx Preservation for T4a Larynx Cancer: Patterns of Care and Survival Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grover, Surbhi; Swisher-McClure, Samuel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Mitra, Nandita; Li, Jiaqi [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Cohen, Roger B. [Department of Hematology Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Ahn, Peter H.; Lukens, John N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Chalian, Ara A.; Weinstein, Gregory S.; O' Malley, Bert W. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Lin, Alexander, E-mail: alexander.lin@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: To examine practice patterns and compare survival outcomes between total laryngectomy (TL) and larynx preservation chemoradiation (LP-CRT) in the setting of T4a larynx cancer, using a large national cancer registry. Methods and Materials: Using the National Cancer Database, we identified 969 patients from 2003 to 2006 with T4a squamous cell larynx cancer receiving definitive treatment with either initial TL plus adjuvant therapy or LP-CRT. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression were used to assess predictors of undergoing surgery. Survival outcomes were compared using Kaplan-Meier and propensity score–adjusted and inverse probability of treatment–weighted Cox proportional hazards methods. Sensitivity analyses were performed to account for unmeasured confounders. Results: A total of 616 patients (64%) received LP-CRT, and 353 (36%) received TL. On multivariable logistic regression, patients with advanced nodal disease were less likely to receive TL (N2 vs N0, 26.6% vs 43.4%, odds ratio [OR] 0.52, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.37-0.73; N3 vs N0, 19.1% vs 43.4%, OR 0.23, 95% CI 0.07-0.77), whereas patients treated in high case-volume facilities were more likely to receive TL (46.1% vs 31.5%, OR 1.78, 95% CI 1.27-2.48). Median survival for TL versus LP was 61 versus 39 months (P<.001). After controlling for potential confounders, LP-CRT had inferior overall survival compared with TL (hazard ratio 1.31, 95% CI 1.10-1.57), and with the inverse probability of treatment–weighted model (hazard ratio 1.25, 95% CI 1.05-1.49). This survival difference was shown to be robust on additional sensitivity analyses. Conclusions: Most patients with T4a larynx cancer receive LP-CRT, despite guidelines suggesting TL as the preferred initial approach. Patients receiving LP-CRT had more advanced nodal disease and worse overall survival. Previous studies of (non-T4a) locally advanced larynx cancer showing no difference in survival between LP-CRT and TL may not

  14. Does ifosfamide therapy improve survival of patients with dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Satoshi; Sun, Tao; Lin, Patrick P; Deavers, Michael; Harun, Nusrat; Lewis, Valerae O

    2014-03-01

    Dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma remains a significant therapeutic challenge. Studies performed to date have not identified efficacious chemotherapy regimens for this disease. We sought to (1) evaluate the disease-specific survival at 2 and 5 years of patients with dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma; (2) assess the prognostic variables (both patient- and treatment-related), including the use of chemotherapy with ifosfamide, that relate to survivorship; and (3) assess specific toxicities associated with ifosfamide use. Data from 41 patients with dedifferentiated chondrosarcoma diagnosed and treated at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center from 1986 to 2010 were analyzed for demographics, treatments, oncologic outcomes, and prognostic variables. There were 14 women and 27 men. The mean age at diagnosis was 58 years (range, 26-86 years). Seven patients presented with metastasis. Surgical resection alone was performed in 11 patients; resection and chemotherapy in 26 patients; resection and radiotherapy in two patients; and resection, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy in two patients. Ifosfamide-based regimens were used for 16 patients. In general, ifosfamide was used when the tumor was located in the trunk or if cisplatin was discontinued as a result of toxicity. Minimum followup was 8 months (median, 68 months; range, 8-281 months). Survival was estimated using Kaplan-Meier plots and analyzed by using the Cox proportional hazards model. Disease-specific survival rates at 2 and 5 years were 33% and 15%, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that treatment without ifosfamide-based chemotherapy was the only independent negative prognostic factor for disease-specific survival (hazard ratio, 0.4; 95% confidence interval, 0.17-0.92; p = 0.03). Ifosfamide was discontinued in a patient as a result of renal dysfunction and was decreased in dose in another patient who developed encephalopathy. In this small retrospective study, it appeared that ifosfamide

  15. Cabozantinib versus everolimus, nivolumab, axitinib, sorafenib and best supportive care: A network meta-analysis of progression-free survival and overall survival in second line treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Billy Amzal

    Full Text Available Relative effect of therapies indicated for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma (aRCC after failure of first line treatment is currently not known. The objective of the present study is to evaluate progression-free survival (PFS and overall survival (OS of cabozantinib compared to everolimus, nivolumab, axitinib, sorafenib, and best supportive care (BSC in aRCC patients who progressed after previous VEGFR tyrosine-kinase inhibitor (TKI treatment.Systematic literature search identified 5 studies for inclusion in this analysis. The assessment of the proportional hazard (PH assumption between the survival curves for different treatment arms in the identified studies showed that survival curves in two of the studies did not fulfil the PH assumption, making comparisons of constant hazard ratios (HRs inappropriate. Consequently, a parametric survival network meta-analysis model was implemented with five families of functions being jointly fitted in a Bayesian framework to PFS, then OS, data on all treatments. The comparison relied on data digitized from the Kaplan-Meier curves of published studies, except for cabozantinib and its comparator everolimus where patient level data were available. This analysis applied a Bayesian fixed-effects network meta-analysis model to compare PFS and OS of cabozantinib versus its comparators. The log-normal fixed-effects model displayed the best fit of data for both PFS and OS, and showed that patients on cabozantinib had a higher probability of longer PFS and OS than patients exposed to comparators. The survival advantage of cabozantinib increased over time for OS. For PFS the survival advantage reached its maximum at the end of the first year's treatment and then decreased over time to zero.With all five families of distributions, cabozantinib was superior to all its comparators with a higher probability of longer PFS and OS during the analyzed 3 years, except with the Gompertz model, where nivolumab was

  16. Survival of cancer patients treated with mistletoe extract (Iscador: a systematic literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Büssing Arndt

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Europe, extracts from Viscum album (VA-E, the European white-berry mistletoe, are widely used to treat patients with cancer. Methods We searched several databases such as Cochrane, EMBASE, NCCAM, NLM, DIMDI, CAMbase, and Medline. Inclusion criteria were controlled clinical studies on parameters associated with survival in cancer patients treated with Iscador. Outcome data were extracted as they were given in the publication, and expressed as hazard ratios (HR, their logarithm, and the respective standard errors using standard formulas. Results We found 49 publications on the clinical effects of Iscador usage on survival of cancer patients which met our criteria. Among them, 41 studies and strata provided enough data to extract hazard ratios (HR and their standard errors (Iscador versus no extra treatment. The majority of studies reported positive effects in favour of the Iscador application. Heterogeneity of study results was moderate (I2 = 38.3%, p Conclusions Pooled analysis of clinical studies suggests that adjuvant treatment of cancer patients with the mistletoe extract Iscador is associated with a better survival. Despite obvious limitations, and strong hints for a publication bias which limits the evidence found in this meta-analysis, one can not ignore the fact that studies with positive effects of VA-E on survival of cancer patients are accumulating. Future studies evaluating the effects of Iscador should focus on a transparent design and description of endpoints in order to provide greater insight into a treatment often being depreciated as ineffective, but highly valued by cancer patients.

  17. Embryonic Origin of Primary Colon Cancer Predicts Pathologic Response and Survival in Patients Undergoing Resection for Colon Cancer Liver Metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Suguru; Brudvik, Kristoffer Watten; Kopetz, Scott E; Maru, Dipen; Clarke, Callisia N; Passot, Guillaume; Conrad, Claudius; Chun, Yun Shin; Aloia, Thomas A; Vauthey, Jean-Nicolas

    2016-12-19

    The aim of this study was to determine the prognostic value of embryonic origin in patients undergoing resection after chemotherapy for colon cancer liver metastases (CCLM). We identified 725 patients with primary colon cancer and known RAS mutation status who underwent hepatic resection after preoperative chemotherapy for CCLM (1990 to 2015). Survival after resection of CCLM from midgut origin (n = 238) and hindgut origin (n = 487) was analyzed. Predictors of pathologic response and survival were determined. Prognostic value of embryonic origin was validated with a separate cohort of 252 patients with primary colon cancer who underwent resection of CCLM without preoperative chemotherapy. Recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) after hepatic resection were worse in patients with midgut origin tumors (RFS rate at 3 years: 15% vs 27%, P origin [odds ratio (OR) 1.55, P = 0.010], absence of bevacizumab (OR 1.42, P = 0.034), and mutant RAS (OR 1.41, P = 0.043). Independent factors associated with worse OS were midgut embryonic origin [hazard ratio (HR) 2.04, P origin had a worse 3-year OS rate (55% vs 78%, P = 0.003). Compared with CCLM from hindgut origin, CCLM from midgut origin are associated with worse pathologic response to chemotherapy and worse survival after resection. This effect appears to be independent of RAS mutation status.

  18. Natural Hazards, Second Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhban, Badaoui

    Natural disaster loss is on the rise, and the vulnerability of the human and physical environment to the violent forces of nature is increasing. In many parts of the world, disasters caused by natural hazards such as earthquakes, floods, landslides, drought, wildfires, intense windstorms, tsunami, and volcanic eruptions have caused the loss of human lives, injury, homelessness, and the destruction of economic and social infrastructure. Over the last few years, there has been an increase in the occurrence, severity, and intensity of disasters, culminating with the devastating tsunami of 26 December 2004 in South East Asia.Natural hazards are often unexpected or uncontrollable natural events of varying magnitude. Understanding their mechanisms and assessing their distribution in time and space are necessary for refining risk mitigation measures. This second edition of Natural Hazards, (following a first edition published in 1991 by Cambridge University Press), written by Edward Bryant, associate dean of science at Wollongong University, Australia, grapples with this crucial issue, aspects of hazard prediction, and other issues. The book presents a comprehensive analysis of different categories of hazards of climatic and geological origin.

  19. Identification of Aircraft Hazards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Ashley

    2006-12-08

    Aircraft hazards were determined to be potentially applicable to a repository at Yucca Mountain in ''Monitored Geological Repository External Events Hazards Screening Analysis'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174235], Section 6.4.1). That determination was conservatively based upon limited knowledge of flight data in the area of concern and upon crash data for aircraft of the type flying near Yucca Mountain. The purpose of this report is to identify specific aircraft hazards that may be applicable to a monitored geologic repository (MGR) at Yucca Mountain, using NUREG-0800, ''Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants'' (NRC 1987 [DIRS 103124], Section 3.5.1.6), as guidance for the inclusion or exclusion of identified aircraft hazards. The intended use of this report is to provide inputs for further screening and analysis of identified aircraft hazards based upon the criteria that apply to Category 1 and Category 2 event sequence analyses as defined in 10 CFR 63.2 [DIRS 176544] (Section 4). The scope of this report includes the evaluation of military, private, and commercial use of airspace in the 100-mile regional setting of the repository at Yucca Mountain with the potential for reducing the regional setting to a more manageable size after consideration of applicable screening criteria (Section 7).

  20. IDENTIFICATION OF AIRCRAFT HAZARDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.L. Ashley

    2005-03-23

    Aircraft hazards were determined to be potentially applicable to a repository at Yucca Mountain in the ''Monitored Geological Repository External Events Hazards Screening Analysis'' (BSC 2004, Section 6.4.1). That determination was conservatively based on limited knowledge of flight data in the area of concern and on crash data for aircraft of the type flying near Yucca Mountain. The purpose of this report is to identify specific aircraft hazards that may be applicable to a Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) at Yucca Mountain using NUREG-0800, ''Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants'' (NRC 1987, Section 3.5.1.6), as guidance for the inclusion or exclusion of identified aircraft hazards. NUREG-0800 is being used here as a reference because some of the same considerations apply. The intended use of this report is to provide inputs for further screening and analysis of the identified aircraft hazards based on the criteria that apply to Category 1 and 2 event sequence analyses as defined in 10 CFR 63.2 (see Section 4). The scope of this technical report includes the evaluation of military, private, and commercial use of airspace in the 100-mile regional setting of the MGR at Yucca Mountain with the potential for reducing the regional setting to a more manageable size after consideration of applicable screening criteria (see Section 7).

  1. Additive survival least square support vector machines: A simulation study and its application to cervical cancer prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khotimah, Chusnul; Purnami, Santi Wulan; Prastyo, Dedy Dwi; Chosuvivatwong, Virasakdi; Sriplung, Hutcha

    2017-11-01

    Support Vector Machines (SVMs) has been widely applied for prediction in many fields. Recently, SVM is also developed for survival analysis. In this study, Additive Survival Least Square SVM (A-SURLSSVM) approach is used to analyze cervical cancer dataset and its performance is compared with the Cox model as a benchmark. The comparison is evaluated based on the prognostic index produced: concordance index (c-index), log rank, and hazard ratio. The higher prognostic index represents the better performance of the corresponding methods. This work also applied feature selection to choose important features using backward elimination technique based on the c-index criterion. The cervical cancer dataset consists of 172 patients. The empirical results show that nine out of the twelve features: age at marriage, age of first getting menstruation, age, parity, type of treatment, history of family planning, stadium, long-time of menstruation, and anemia status are selected as relevant features that affect the survival time of cervical cancer patients. In addition, the performance of the proposed method is evaluated through a simulation study with the different number of features and censoring percentages. Two out of three performance measures (c-index and hazard ratio) obtained from A-SURLSSVM consistently yield better results than the ones obtained from Cox model when it is applied on both simulated and cervical cancer data. Moreover, the simulation study showed that A-SURLSSVM performs better when the percentage of censoring data is small.

  2. Impact of the branched-chain amino acid to tyrosine ratio and branched-chain amino acid granule therapy in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma: A propensity score analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Toshifumi; Kumada, Takashi; Toyoda, Hidenori; Kiriyama, Seiki; Tanikawa, Makoto; Hisanaga, Yasuhiro; Kanamori, Akira; Kitabatake, Shusuke; Yama, Tsuyoki

    2015-09-01

    It has been reported that the branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) to tyrosine ratio (BTR) is a useful indicator of liver function and BCAA therapy is associated with a decreased incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, there has not been sufficient research on the relationship between BTR and the effects of BCAA therapy after initial treatment of HCC. We investigated the impact of BTR and BCAA therapy on survival in patients with HCC. A total of 315 patients with HCC who were treated (n = 66) or not treated (n = 249) with BCAA were enrolled; of these, 66 were selected from each group using propensity score matching. Survival from liver-related mortality was analyzed. In patients who did not receive BCAA therapy (n = 249), multivariate analysis for factors associated with survival indicated that low BTR (≤ 4.4) was independently associated with poor prognosis in patients with HCC (hazard ratio, 1.880; 95% confidence interval, 1.125-3.143; P = 0.016). In addition, among patients selected by propensity score matching (n = 132), multivariate analysis indicated that BCAA therapy was independently associated with good prognosis in patients with HCC (hazard ratio, 0.524; 95% confidence interval, 0.282-0.973; P = 0.041). BTR was not significantly associated with survival. Intervention involving BCAA therapy improved survival in patients with HCC versus untreated controls, regardless of BTR. In addition, low BTR was associated with poor prognosis in patients who did not receive BCAA therapy. © 2015 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  3. Meta-analysis of survival prediction with Palliative Performance Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, Michael; Lau, Francis; Lesperance, Mary; Karlson, Nicholas; Shaw, Jack; Kuziemsky, Craig; Bernard, Steve; Hanson, Laura; Olajide, Lola; Head, Barbara; Ritchie, Christine; Harrold, Joan; Casarett, David

    2007-01-01

    This paper aims to reconcile the use of Palliative Performance Scale (PPSv2) for survival prediction in palliative care through an international collaborative study by five research groups. The study involves an individual patient data meta-analysis on 1,808 patients from four original datasets to reanalyze their survival patterns by age, gender, cancer status, and initial PPS score. Our findings reveal a strong association between PPS and survival across the four datasets. The Kaplan-Meier survival curves show each PPS level as distinct, with a strong ordering effect in which higher PPS levels are associated with increased length of survival. Using a stratified Cox proportional hazard model to adjust for study differences, we found females lived significantly longer than males, with a further decrease in hazard for females not diagnosed with cancer. Further work is needed to refine the reporting of survival times/probabilities and to improve prediction accuracy with the inclusion of other variables in the models.

  4. ABO blood group and breast cancer incidence and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Margaret A; Xu, Mousheng; Chen, Wendy Y; Kraft, Peter; Hankinson, Susan E; Wolpin, Brian M

    2012-05-01

    ABO blood type has been associated with risk and survival for several malignancies; however, data for an association with breast cancer are inconsistent. Our study population consisted of Nurses' Health Study participants with self-reported serologic blood type and/or ABO genotype. Using Cox proportional hazards regression, we examined the association between serologic blood type and incident breast cancer among 67,697 women, including 3,107 cases. In addition, we examined the association with ABO genotype in a nested case-control study of 1,138 invasive breast cancer cases and 1,090 matched controls. Finally, we evaluated the association between serologic blood type and survival among 2,036 participants with breast cancer. No clear association was seen between serologic blood type or ABO genotype and risk of total breast cancer, invasive breast cancer or breast cancer subtypes. Compared to women with blood type O, the age-adjusted incidence rate ratios for serologic blood type and total breast cancer were 1.06 (95% CI, 0.98-1.15) for type A, 1.06 (95% CI, 0.93-1.22) for AB and 1.08 (95% CI, 0.96-1.20) for B. In genetic analyses, odds ratios for invasive breast cancer were 1.05 (95% CI, 0.87-1.27) for A/O, 1.21 (95% CI, 0.86-1.69) for A/A, 0.84 (95% CI, 0.56-1.26) for A/B, 0.84 (95% CI, 0.63-1.13) for B/O and 1.17 (95% CI, 0.35-3.86) for B/B, compared to O/O. No significant association was noted between blood type and overall or breast cancer-specific mortality. Our results suggest no association between ABO blood group and breast cancer risk or survival. Copyright © 2011 UICC.

  5. Financial Key Ratios

    OpenAIRE

    Tănase Alin-Eliodor

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on computing techniques starting from trial balance data regarding financial key ratios. There are presented activity, liquidity, solvency and profitability financial key ratios. It is presented a computing methodology in three steps based on a trial balance.

  6. Moral Hazard in Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunnquell, Donald; Michaelson, Christopher M

    2016-07-01

    "Moral hazard" is a term familiar in economics and business ethics that illuminates why rational parties sometimes choose decisions with bad moral outcomes without necessarily intending to behave selfishly or immorally. The term is not generally used in medical ethics. Decision makers such as parents and physicians generally do not use the concept or the word in evaluating ethical dilemmas. They may not even be aware of the precise nature of the moral hazard problem they are experiencing, beyond a general concern for the patient's seemingly excessive burden. This article brings the language and logic of moral hazard to pediatrics. The concept reminds us that decision makers in this context are often not the primary party affected by their decisions. It appraises the full scope of risk at issue when decision makers decide on behalf of others and leads us to separate, respect, and prioritize the interests of affected parties.

  7. The role of poverty rate and racial distribution in the geographic clustering of breast cancer survival among older women: a geographic and multilevel analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schootman, Mario; Jeffe, Donna B; Lian, Min; Gillanders, William E; Aft, Rebecca

    2009-03-01

    The authors examined disparities in survival among women aged 66 years or older in association with census-tract-level poverty rate, racial distribution, and individual-level factors, including patient-, treatment-, and tumor-related factors, utilization of medical care, and mammography use. They used linked data from the 1992-1999 Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) programs, 1991-1999 Medicare claims, and the 1990 US Census. A geographic information system and advanced statistics identified areas of increased or reduced breast cancer survival and possible reasons for geographic variation in survival in 2 of the 5 SEER areas studied. In the Detroit, Michigan, area, one geographic cluster of shorter-than-expected breast cancer survival was identified (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.60). An additional area where survival was longer than expected approached statistical significance (HR = 0.4; P = 0.056). In the Atlanta, Georgia, area, one cluster of shorter- (HR = 1.81) and one cluster of longer-than-expected (HR = 0.72) breast cancer survival were identified. Stage at diagnosis and census-tract poverty (and patient's race in Atlanta) explained the geographic variation in breast cancer survival. No geographic clusters were identified in the 3 other SEER programs. Interventions to reduce late-stage breast cancer, focusing on areas of high poverty and targeting African Americans, may reduce disparities in breast cancer survival in the Detroit and Atlanta areas.

  8. Prevalence, incidence, survival, and disease characteristics of systemic sclerosis in a large US population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Maureen D; Lacey, James V; Beebe-Dimmer, Jennifer; Gillespie, Brenda W; Cooper, Brenda; Laing, Timothy J; Schottenfeld, David

    2003-08-01

    To estimate the prevalence, incidence, survival, and disease characteristics of systemic sclerosis (SSc) in the Detroit tricounty area. A census of SSc cases for the period 1989-1991 was conducted in the Detroit area, using multiple sources for case identification. Diagnoses were verified by medical record review. Capture-recapture analysis was used to estimate the total SSc population. Cases of localized scleroderma (morphea and linear disease) were excluded. Based on 706 verified cases of SSc, prevalence was initially estimated to be 242.0 cases per million adults (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 213-274), with an annual incidence of 19.3 new cases per million adults per year (95% CI 12.4-30.2). Capture-recapture analysis, based on the degree of overlap of verified cases among multiple sources, resulted in a revised prevalence estimate of 276 cases per million adults (95% CI 245-310). Sex- and race-specific prevalence estimates were significantly higher for women than for men, and for blacks than for whites. The average age at diagnosis was significantly younger for blacks than for whites. Compared with white patients, black patients were almost twice as likely to have diffuse disease (prevalence proportion ratio 1.86, 95% CI 1.48-2.35). Median survival was approximately 11 years. Factors negatively affecting survival included male sex (hazard ratio 1.81, 95% CI 1.29-2.55) and older age at diagnosis (hazard ratio 1.04, 95% CI 1.03-1.05). This study establishes baseline estimates of SSc occurrence and characteristics in a large US cohort consisting primarily of black adults and white adults. These data should facilitate research regarding the role of geographic, ethnic, racial, and environmental factors for this disease in comparison populations.

  9. Trends and territorial inequalities of incidence and survival of childhood leukaemia and their relations to socioeconomic status in Hungary, 1971-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakab, Zsuzsanna; Juhasz, Attila; Nagy, Csilla; Schuler, Dezso; Garami, Miklos

    2017-09-01

    The Hungarian Childhood Cancer Registry, a population-based national registry of the Hungarian Paediatric Haemato-Oncology Network founded in 1971, monitors the incidence and mortality of childhood cancer. Our aims were to carry out a longitudinal study to investigate the trends and spatial inequalities of incidence and survival of leukaemia, and the association between survival and deprivation in Hungary. All cases of childhood leukaemia and myelodysplasia were analysed (3157 cases, 1971-2015, age: 0-14 years). Time trends and the annual percentage change in direct standardized incidence and mortality were assessed. Survival and association with deprivation were assessed using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression. Incidence rates of leukaemia (23.5-56.0/million) increased with an average annual percent change (AAPC) of 1%, determined by an increase in the incidence of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (14.6-39.2/million, AAPC: 1.25%). Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a significant improvement in overall survival over the study period. Starting from 25% of cases surviving 5 years in the 70s; the overall 5-year survival reached 80% by 2010. Survival differences were observed with sex, leukaemia type and age at diagnosis. A reverse association was found in the survival probability of leukaemia by degree of deprivation. The Cox proportional hazards model verified a significant reverse association with deprivation [hazard ratio=1.08 (1.04-1.12)]. This is the first nationwide study to confirm the prognostic role of deprivation on the basis of a large cohort of patients with childhood leukaemia during a 45-year period. To maintain further improvement in treatment results, it is important to detect inequalities. Our results showed that deprivation may also be important in the survival of leukaemia.

  10. Identification of novel genetic markers of breast cancer survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qi; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Kraft, Peter; Canisius, Sander; Chen, Constance; Khan, Sofia; Tyrer, Jonathan; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Lush, Michael; Kar, Siddhartha; Beesley, Jonathan; Dunning, Alison M; Shah, Mitul; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Eriksson, Mikael; Lambrechts, Diether; Weltens, Caroline; Leunen, Karin; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Blomqvist, Carl; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Fagerholm, Rainer; Muranen, Taru A; Couch, Fergus J; Olson, Janet E; Vachon, Celine; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Broeks, Annegien; Hogervorst, Frans B; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Hopper, John L; Tsimiklis, Helen; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm W R; Giles, Graham G; Milne, Roger L; McLean, Catriona; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Hooning, Maartje J; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Martens, John W M; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; Marme, Federik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Yang, Rongxi; Burwinkel, Barbara; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J; Lissowska, Jolanta; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Holleczek, Bernd; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Li, Jingmei; Brand, Judith S; Humphreys, Keith; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Mariani, Paolo; Fasching, Peter A; Beckmann, Matthias W; Hein, Alexander; Ekici, Arif B; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Balleine, Rosemary; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Benitez, Javier; Zamora, M Pilar; Arias Perez, Jose Ignacio; Menéndez, Primitiva; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Hamann, Ute; Kabisch, Maria; Ulmer, Hans Ulrich; Rüdiger, Thomas; Margolin, Sara; Kristensen, Vessela; Nord, Silje; Evans, D Gareth; Abraham, Jean E; Earl, Helena M; Hiller, Louise; Dunn, Janet A; Bowden, Sarah; Berg, Christine; Campa, Daniele; Diver, W Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M; Gaudet, Mia M; Hankinson, Susan E; Hoover, Robert N; Hüsing, Anika; Kaaks, Rudolf; Machiela, Mitchell J; Willett, Walter; Barrdahl, Myrto; Canzian, Federico; Chin, Suet-Feung; Caldas, Carlos; Hunter, David J; Lindstrom, Sara; García-Closas, Montserrat; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F; Eccles, Diana M; Rahman, Nazneen; Nevanlinna, Heli; Pharoah, Paul D P

    2015-05-01

    Survival after a diagnosis of breast cancer varies considerably between patients, and some of this variation may be because of germline genetic variation. We aimed to identify genetic markers associated with breast cancer-specific survival. We conducted a large meta-analysis of studies in populations of European ancestry, including 37954 patients with 2900 deaths from breast cancer. Each study had been genotyped for between 200000 and 900000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across the genome; genotypes for nine million common variants were imputed using a common reference panel from the 1000 Genomes Project. We also carried out subtype-specific analyses based on 6881 estrogen receptor (ER)-negative patients (920 events) and 23059 ER-positive patients (1333 events). All statistical tests were two-sided. We identified one new locus (rs2059614 at 11q24.2) associated with survival in ER-negative breast cancer cases (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.95, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.55 to 2.47, P = 1.91 x 10(-8)). Genotyping a subset of 2113 case patients, of which 300 were ER negative, provided supporting evidence for the quality of the imputation. The association in this set of case patients was stronger for the observed genotypes than for the imputed genotypes. A second locus (rs148760487 at 2q24.2) was associated at genome-wide statistical significance in initial analyses; the association was similar in ER-positive and ER-negative case patients. Here the results of genotyping suggested that the finding was less robust. This is currently the largest study investigating genetic variation associated with breast cancer survival. Our results have potential clinical implications, as they confirm that germline genotype can provide prognostic information in addition to standard tumor prognostic factors. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  11. Intensive Hemodialysis Associates with Improved Survival Compared with Conventional Hemodialysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Robert M.; Cuerden, Meaghan S.; Garg, Amit X.; Port, Friedrich; Austin, Peter C.; Moist, Louise M.; Pierratos, Andreas; Chan, Christopher T.; Zimmerman, Deborah; Lockridge, Robert S.; Couchoud, Cécile; Chazot, Charles; Ofsthun, Norma; Levin, Adeera; Copland, Michael; Courtney, Mark; Steele, Andrew; McFarlane, Philip A.; Geary, Denis F.; Pauly, Robert P.; Komenda, Paul; Suri, Rita S.

    2012-01-01

    Patients undergoing conventional maintenance hemodialysis typically receive three sessions per week, each lasting 2.5–5.5 hours. Recently, the use of more intensive hemodialysis (>5.5 hours, three to seven times per week) has increased, but the effects of these regimens on survival are uncertain. We conducted a retrospective cohort study to examine whether intensive hemodialysis associates with better survival than conventional hemodialysis. We identified 420 patients in the International Quotidian Dialysis Registry who received intensive home hemodialysis in France, the United States, and Canada between January 2000 and August 2010. We matched 338 of these patients to 1388 patients in the Dialysis Outcomes and Practice Patterns Study who received in-center conventional hemodialysis during the same time period by country, ESRD duration, and propensity score. The intensive hemodialysis group received a mean (SD) 4.8 (1.1) sessions per week with a mean treatment time of 7.4 (0.87) hours per session; the conventional group received three sessions per week with a mean treatment time of 3.9 (0.32) hours per session. During 3008 patient-years of follow-up, 45 (13%) of 338 patients receiving intensive hemodialysis died compared with 293 (21%) of 1388 patients receiving conventional hemodialysis (6.1 versus 10.5 deaths per 100 person-years; hazard ratio, 0.55 [95% confidence interval, 0.34–0.87]). The strength and direction of the observed association between intensive hemodialysis and improved survival were consistent across all prespecified subgroups and sensitivity analyses. In conclusion, there is a strong association between intensive home hemodialysis and improved survival, but whether this relationship is causal remains unknown. PMID:22362910

  12. Factors affecting healing and survival after finger amputations in patients with digital artery occlusive disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Gregory J; McClary, Ashley; Liem, Timothy K; Mitchell, Erica L; Azarbal, Amir F; Moneta, Gregory L

    2013-05-01

    Finger amputations are typically performed as distal as possible to preserve maximum finger length. Failure of primary amputation leads to additional procedures, which could potentially be avoided if a more proximal amputation was initially performed. The effect of single versus multiple procedures on morbidity and mortality is not known. We evaluated factors that predicted primary healing and the effects of secondary procedures on survival. Patients undergoing finger amputations from 1995 to 2011 were evaluated for survival with uni- and multivariate analysis of demographic data and preoperative vascular laboratory studies to assess factors influencing primary healing. Seventy-six patients underwent 175 finger amputations (range 1 to 6 fingers per patient). Forty-one percent had diabetes, 33% had nonatherosclerotic digital artery disease, and 29% were on dialysis. Sex distribution was equal. Primary healing occurred in 78.9%, with the remainder requiring revisions. By logistic regression analysis, nonatherosclerotic digital artery disease was associated with failure of primary healing (odds ratio = 7.5; 95% confidence interval, 1.03 to 54; P = .047). Digital photoplethysmography did not predict primary healing. The overall healing of primary and secondary finger amputations was 96.0%. The mean survival after the initial finger amputation was 34.3 months and did not differ between patients undergoing single (35.6 months) versus multiple procedures (33.6 months). Dialysis dependence was associated with decreased survival (hazard ratio = 2.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.13 to 7.25; P = .026). Failure of primary healing is associated with the presence of nonatherosclerotic digital artery disease and is not predicted by digital photoplethysmographic studies. Dialysis dependence is associated with decreased survival in patients with finger amputations, but failure of primary healing does not adversely affect survival. A strategy of aggressive preservation of finger

  13. Environmental pollution has sex-dependent effects on local survival

    OpenAIRE

    Eeva, Tapio; Hakkarainen, Harri; Laaksonen, Toni; Lehikoinen, Esa

    2006-01-01

    Environmental pollutants cause a potential hazard for survival in free-living animal populations. We modelled local survival (including emigration) by using individual mark–recapture histories of males and females in a population of a small insectivorous passerine bird, the pied flycatcher (Ficedula hypoleuca) living around a point source of heavy metals (copper smelter). Local survival of F. hypoleuca females did not differ between polluted and unpolluted environments. Males, however, showed...

  14. Effect of Induction Therapy on Graft Survival in Primary Pediatric Heart Transplantation: A Propensity Score Analysis of the UNOS Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butts, Ryan; Davis, Melanie; Savage, Andrew; Burnette, Ali; Kavarana, Minoo; Bradley, Scott; Atz, Andrew; Nietert, Paul J

    2017-06-01

    The use of induction therapy in pediatric heart transplantation has increased. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of induction therapy on graft survival. The United Network for Organ Sharing database was queried for isolated pediatric heart transplants from January 1, 1994, to December 31, 2013. Propensity scores for induction treatment were calculated by estimating probability of induction using a logistic regression model. Transplants were then matched between induction treatment groups based on the propensity score, reducing potential biases. Using only propensity score matched transplants, the effect of induction therapy on graft survival was investigated using Cox-proportional hazards. Subgroup analyses were performed based on age, race, recipient cardiac diagnosis, HLA, and recipient panel-reactive antibody (PRA). Of 4565 pediatric primary heart transplants from 1994 to 2013, 3741 had complete data for the propensity score calculation. There were 2792 transplants successfully matched (induction, n = 1396; no induction, n = 1396). There were no significant differences in transplant and pretransplant covariates between induction and no induction groups. In the Cox-proportional hazards model, the use of induction of was not associated with graft loss (hazard ratio [HR], 0.88; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.75-1.01; P = 0.07). In subgroup analyses, induction therapy may be associated with improved survival in patients with PRA greater than 50% (HR, 0.57; 95% CI, 0.34-0.97) and congenital heart disease (HR, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.64-0.96). Induction therapy is not associated with improved graft survival in primary pediatric heart transplantation. However, in pediatric heart transplant recipients with PRA greater than 50% or congenital heart disease, induction therapy is associated with improved survival.

  15. Transportation of hazardous goods

    CERN Multimedia

    TS Department

    2008-01-01

    A general reminder: any transportation of hazardous goods by road is subject to the European ADR rules. The goods concerned are essentially the following: Explosive substances and objects; Gases (including aerosols and non-flammable gases such as helium and nitrogen); Flammable substances and liquids (inks, paints, resins, petroleum products, alcohols, acetone, thinners); Toxic substances (acids, thinners); Radioactive substances; Corrosive substances (paints, acids, caustic products, disinfectants, electrical batteries). Any requests for the transport of hazardous goods must be executed in compliance with the instructions given at this URL: http://ts-dep.web.cern.ch/ts-dep/groups/he/HH/adr.pdf Heavy Handling Section TS-HE-HH 73793 - 160364

  16. Hazard Communication Standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sichak, S.

    1991-01-01

    The current rate of technological advances has brought with it an overwhelming increase in the usage of chemicals in the workplace and in the home. Coupled to this increase has been a heightened awareness in the potential for acute and chronic injuries attributable to chemical insults. The Hazard Communication Standard has been introduced with the desired goal of reducing workplace exposures to hazardous substances and thereby achieving a corresponding reduction in adverse health effects. It was created and proclaimed by the US Department of Labor and regulated by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. 1 tab.

  17. Expression profiles of loneliness-associated genes for survival prediction in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Liang-Fu; Yeh, Jia-Rong; Su, Mu-Chun

    2014-01-01

    Influence of loneliness on human survival has been established epidemiologically, but genomic research remains undeveloped. We identified 34 loneliness-associated genes which were statistically significant for high- lonely and low-lonely individuals. With the univariate Cox proportional hazards regression model, we obtained corresponding regression coefficients for loneliness-associated genes fo individual cancer patients. Furthermore, risk scores could be generated with the combination of gene expression level multiplied by corresponding regression coefficients of loneliness-associated genes. We verified that high-risk score cancer patients had shorter mean survival time than their low-risk score counterparts. Then we validated the loneliness-associated gene signature in three independent brain cancer cohorts with Kaplan-Meier survival curves (n=77, 85 and 191), significantly separable by log-rank test with hazard ratios (HR) >1 and p-values loneliness-associated gene signature in bone cancer (HR=5.10, p-value=4.69e-3), lung cancer (HR=2.86, p-value=4.71e-5), ovarian cancer (HR=1.97, p-value=3.11e-5), and leukemia (HR=2.06, p-value=1.79e-4) cohorts. The last lymphoma cohort proved to have an HR=3.50, p-value=1.15e-7. Loneliness- associated genes had good survival prediction for cancer patients, especially bone cancer patients. Our study provided the first indication that expression of loneliness-associated genes are related to survival time of cancer patients.

  18. Incident Atrial Fibrillation and Disability-Free Survival in the Cardiovascular Health Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Erin R; Siscovick, David S; Sitlani, Colleen M; Dublin, Sascha; Mitchell, Pamela H; Odden, Michelle C; Hirsch, Calvin H; Thielke, Stephen; Heckbert, Susan R

    2016-04-01

    To assess the associations between incident atrial fibrillation (AF) and disability-free survival and risk of disability. Prospective cohort study. Cardiovascular Health Study. Individuals aged 65 and older and enrolled in fee-for-service Medicare followed between 1991 and 2009 (MN = 4,046). Individuals with prevalent AF, activity of daily living (ADL) disability, or a history of stroke or heart failure at baseline were excluded. Incident AF was identified according to annual study electrocardiogram, hospital discharge diagnosis, or Medicare claims. Disability-free survival was defined as survival free of ADL disability (any difficulty or inability in bathing, dressing, eating, using the toilet, walking around the home, or getting out of a bed or chair). ADLs were assessed at annual study visits or in a telephone interview. Association between incident AF and disability-free survival or risk of disability was estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. Over an average of 7.0 years of follow-up, 660 individuals (16.3%) developed incident AF, and 3,112 (77%) became disabled or died. Incident AF was associated with shorter disability-free survival (hazard ratio (HR) for death or ADL disability = 1.71, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.55-1.90) and a higher risk of ADL disability (HR = 1.36, 95% CI = 1.18-1.58) than in individuals with no history of AF. This association persisted after adjustment for interim stroke and heart failure. These results suggest that AF is a risk factor for shorter functional longevity in older adults, independent of other risk factors and comorbid conditions. © 2016, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2016, The American Geriatrics Society.

  19. Tumor subtype-specific associations of hormone-related reproductive factors on breast cancer survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Song

    Full Text Available It is inconclusive whether reproductive factors, which are known as risk factors of breast cancer, also influence survival. We investigated overall and subtype-specific associations between reproductive factors and breast cancer survival.Among 3,430 incident breast cancer patients who enrolled in the Seoul Breast Cancer Study, 269 patients (7.8% died and 528 patients (15.4% recurred. The overall and subtype-specific associations of reproductive factors including age at menarche and menopause, duration of estrogen exposure, menstrual cycle, parity, age at first full-term pregnancy, number of children, age at last birth, time since the last birth, and duration of breastfeeding, on overall and disease-free survival (OS and DFS were estimated by hazard ratios (HRs and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs using a multivariate Cox proportional hazard model.An older age at menarche (HR for OS=1.10, 95% CI=1.03-1.19, a greater number of children (≥ 4 vs. 2, HR for DFS=1.58, 95% CI=1.11-2.26, and a shorter time since last birth (<5 vs. ≥ 20 years, HR for DFS=1.67, 95% CI=1.07-2.62 were associated with worse survival while longer duration of estrogen exposure with better survival (HR for DFS=0.97, 95% CI=0.96-0.99. In the stratified analyses by subtypes, those associations were more pronounced among women with hormone receptor and human epidermal growth factor 2 positive (HR+ HER2+ tumors.It is suggested that reproductive factors, specifically age at menarche, number of children, time since last birth, and duration of estrogen exposure, could influence breast tumor progression, especially in the HR+ HER2+ subtype.

  20. Choline kinase alpha and hexokinase-2 protein expression in hepatocellular carcinoma: association with survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandi A Kwee

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Hexokinase-2 (HK2 and more recently choline kinase alpha (CKA expression has been correlated with clinical outcomes in several major cancers. This study examines the protein expression of HK2 and CKA in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC in association with patient survival and other clinicopathologic parameters. METHODS: Immunohistochemical analysis for HK2 and CKA expression was performed on a tissue microarray of 157 HCC tumor samples. Results were analyzed in relation to clinicopathologic data from Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End-Results Program registries. Mortality rates were assessed by Kaplan-Meier estimates and compared using log-rank tests. Predictors of overall survival were assessed using proportional hazards regression. RESULTS: Immunohistochemical expression of HK2 and CKA was detected in 71 (45% and 55 (35% tumor samples, respectively. Differences in tumor HK2 expression were associated with tumor grade (p = 0.008 and cancer stage (p = 0.001, while CKA expression differed significantly only across cancer stage (p = 0.048. Increased mortality was associated with tumor HK2 expression (p = 0.003 as well as CKA expression (p = 0.03 with hazard ratios of 1.86 (95% confidence interval (CI 1.23-2.83 and 1.59 (95% CI 1.04-2.41, respectively. Similar effects on overall survival were noted in a subset analysis of early stage (I and II HCC. Tumor HK2 expression, but not CKA expression, remained a significant predictor of survival in multivariable analyses. CONCLUSION: HK2 and CKA expression may have biologic and prognostic significance in HCC, with tumor HK2 expression being a potential independent predictor of survival.

  1. Lean body mass predicts long-term survival in Chinese patients on peritoneal dialysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenq-Wen Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Reduced lean body mass (LBM is one of the main indicators in malnutrition inflammation syndrome among patients on dialysis. However, the influence of LBM on peritoneal dialysis (PD patients' outcomes and the factors related to increasing LBM are seldom reported. METHODS: We enrolled 103 incident PD patients between 2002 and 2003, and followed them until December 2011. Clinical characteristics, PD-associated parameters, residual renal function, and serum chemistry profiles of each patient were collected at 1 month and 1 year after initiating PD. LBM was estimated using creatinine index corrected with body weight. Multiple linear regression analysis, Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, and Cox regression proportional hazard analysis were used to define independent variables and compare survival between groups. RESULTS: Using the median LBM value (70% for men and 64% for women, patients were divided into group 1 (n = 52; low LBM and group 2 (n = 51; high LBM. Group 1 patients had higher rates of peritonitis (1.6 vs. 1.1/100 patient months; p<0.05 and hospitalization (14.6 vs. 9.7/100 patient months; p<0.05. Group 1 patients also had shorter overall survival and technique survival (p<0.01. Each percentage point increase in LBM reduced the hazard ratio for mortality by 8% after adjustment for diabetes, age, sex, and body mass index (BMI. Changes in residual renal function and protein catabolic rate were independently associated with changes in LBM in the first year of PD. CONCLUSIONS: LBM serves as a good parameter in addition to BMI to predict the survival of patients on PD. Preserving residual renal function and increasing protein intake can increase LBM.

  2. One-carbon metabolism-related nutrients and prostate cancer survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasperzyk, Julie L; Fall, Katja; Mucci, Lorelei A; Håkansson, Niclas; Wolk, Alicja; Johansson, Jan-Erik; Andersson, Swen-Olof; Andrén, Ove

    2009-09-01

    Folate and other one-carbon metabolism nutrients may influence prostate cancer pathogenesis. Prior studies of these nutrients in relation to prostate cancer incidence have been inconclusive, and none have explored prostate cancer survival. The objective was to assess whether dietary intakes of folate, riboflavin, vitamin B-6, vitamin B-12, and methionine measured around the time of prostate cancer diagnosis are associated with prostate cancer survival. This population-based prospective study comprised 525 men from Orebro, Sweden, who received a diagnosis of incident prostate cancer between 1989 and 1994 and completed a self-administered food-frequency questionnaire. Record linkages to the Swedish Death Registry enabled all cases to be followed for up to 20 y after diagnosis, and the cause of death was assigned via medical record review. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to calculate multivariable hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% CIs. During a median of 6.4 y of follow-up, 218 men (42%) died of prostate cancer and 257 (49%) of other causes. A comparison of the highest with the lowest quartile showed that vitamin B-6 intake was inversely associated with prostate cancer-specific death (HR: 0.71; 95% CI: 0.46, 1.10; P for trend = 0.08), especially in men with a diagnosis of localized-stage disease (HR; 0.05; 95% CI: 0.01, 0.26; P for trend = 0.0003). However, vitamin B-6 intake was not associated with improved prostate cancer survival among advanced-stage cases (HR: 1.04; 95% CI: 0.64, 1.72; P for trend = 0.87). Folate, riboflavin, vitamin B-12, and methionine intakes were not associated with prostate cancer survival. A high vitamin B-6 intake may improve prostate cancer survival among men with a diagnosis of localized-stage disease.

  3. Immediate postmastectomy breast reconstruction showed limited advantage in patient survival after stratifying by family income.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yi-Zhou; Liu, Yi-Rong; Yu, Ke-Da; Zuo, Wen-Jia; Shao, Zhi-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Postmastectomy breast reconstruction is widely used in breast cancer patients for its aesthetic effect. Although several studies have casted suspicion upon the oncological safety of immediate breast reconstruction after mastectomy, the potential impact of different reconstruction methods on patient survival remains unclear. We identified 35,126 female patients diagnosed with breast cancer from January 1, 1998 to December 31, 2002 in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. Breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS) and overall survival (OS) were compared among patients who underwent mastectomy with or without immediate breast reconstruction (autologous reconstruction or implant reconstruction) using Cox proportional hazard regression models. In multivariate analysis unadjusted for family income, patients undergoing immediate postmastectomy reconstruction exhibited improved BCSS [POOLED reconstruction (any types of reconstruction): hazard ratio (HR)  =  0.87, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.80-0.95, P = 0.001] and OS (pooled reconstruction: HR = 0.70, 95% CI 0.65-0.75, Padvantage in BCSS and OS compared with those undergoing mastectomy alone. When comparing between the two reconstruction methods, no significant differences were observed in either BCSS (implant versus autologous reconstruction: HR = 1.11, 95%CI 0.90-1.35, P = 0.330) or OS (implant versus autologous reconstruction: HR = 1.07, 95% 0.90-1.28, P = 0.424). Compared to mastectomy alone, immediate postmastectomy reconstruction had limited advantage in survival after adjusting for confounding factor of family income. Our findings, if validated in other large databases, may help to illustrate the actual effect of immediate postmastectomy reconstruction on patient survival.

  4. Causal Mediation Analysis for the Cox Proportional Hazards Model with a Smooth Baseline Hazard Estimator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Albert, Jeffrey M

    2017-08-01

    An important problem within the social, behavioral, and health sciences is how to partition an exposure effect (e.g. treatment or risk factor) among specific pathway effects and to quantify the importance of each pathway. Mediation analysis based on the potential outcomes framework is an important tool to address this problem and we consider the estimation of mediation effects for the proportional hazards model in this paper. We give precise definitions of the total effect, natural indirect effect, and natural direct effect in terms of the survival probability, hazard function, and restricted mean survival time within the standard two-stage mediation framework. To estimate the mediation effects on different scales, we propose a mediation formula approach in which simple parametric models (fractional polynomials or restricted cubic splines) are utilized to approximate the baseline log cumulative hazard function. Simulation study results demonstrate low bias of the mediation effect estimators and close-to-nominal coverage probability of the confidence intervals for a wide range of complex hazard shapes. We apply this method to the Jackson Heart Study data and conduct sensitivity analysis to assess the impact on the mediation effects inference when the no unmeasured mediator-outcome confounding assumption is violated.

  5. Survival Analysis of Patients with End Stage Renal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrutia, J. D.; Gayo, W. S.; Bautista, L. A.; Baccay, E. B.

    2015-06-01

    This paper provides a survival analysis of End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) under Kaplan-Meier Estimates and Weibull Distribution. The data were obtained from the records of V. L. MakabaliMemorial Hospital with respect to time t (patient's age), covariates such as developed secondary disease (Pulmonary Congestion and Cardiovascular Disease), gender, and the event of interest: the death of ESRD patients. Survival and hazard rates were estimated using NCSS for Weibull Distribution and SPSS for Kaplan-Meier Estimates. These lead to the same conclusion that hazard rate increases and survival rate decreases of ESRD patient diagnosed with Pulmonary Congestion, Cardiovascular Disease and both diseases with respect to time. It also shows that female patients have a greater risk of death compared to males. The probability risk was given the equation R = 1 — e-H(t) where e-H(t) is the survival function, H(t) the cumulative hazard function which was created using Cox-Regression.

  6. Adjuvant Sunitinib for High-risk Renal Cell Carcinoma After Nephrectomy: Subgroup Analyses and Updated Overall Survival Results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Motzer, Robert J; Ravaud, Alain; Patard, Jean-Jacques

    2018-01-01

    the relationship between baseline factors and DFS, pattern of recurrence, and updated overall survival (OS). DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Data for 615 patients randomized to sunitinib (n=309) or placebo (n=306) in the S-TRAC trial. OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS AND STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Subgroup DFS analyses...... by baseline risk factors were conducted using a Cox proportional hazards model. Baseline risk factors included: modified University of California Los Angeles integrated staging system criteria, age, gender, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (ECOG PS), weight, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio...

  7. A prognostic model of therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome for predicting survival and transformation to acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintás-Cardama, Alfonso; Daver, Naval; Kim, Hawk; Dinardo, Courtney; Jabbour, Elias; Kadia, Tapan; Borthakur, Gautam; Pierce, Sherry; Shan, Jianqin; Cardenas-Turanzas, Marylou; Cortes, Jorge; Ravandi, Farhad; Wierda, William; Estrov, Zeev; Faderl, Stefan; Wei, Yue; Kantarjian, Hagop; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo

    2014-10-01

    We evaluated the characteristics of a cohort of patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) related to therapy (t-MDS) to create a prognostic model. We identified 281 patients with MDS who had received previous chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy for previous malignancy. Potential prognostic factors were determined using univariate and multivariate analyses. Multivariate Cox regression analysis identified 7 factors that independently predicted short survival in t-MDS: age ≥ 65 years (hazard ratio [HR], 1.63), Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 2-4 (HR, 1.86), poor cytogenetics (-7 and/or complex; HR, 2.47), World Health Organization MDS subtype (RARs or RAEB-1/2; HR, 1.92), hemoglobin (HR, 2.24), platelets (HR, 2.01), and transfusion dependency (HR, 1.59). These risk factors were used to create a prognostic model that segregated patients into 3 groups with distinct median overall survival: good (0-2 risk factors; 34 months), intermediate (3-4 risk factors; 12 months), and poor (5-7 risk factors; 5 months) (P < .001) and 1-year leukemia-free survival (96%, 84%, and 72%, respectively, P = .003). This model also identified distinct survival groups according to t-MDS therapy. In summary, we devised a prognostic model specifically for patients with t-MDS that predicted overall survival and leukemia-free survival. This model might facilitate the development of risk-adapted therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Bisphosphonates in the adjuvant setting of breast cancer therapy--effect on survival: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irit Ben-Aharon

    Full Text Available The role of bisphosphonates (BP in early breast cancer (BC has been considered controversial. We performed a meta-analysis of all randomized controlled trials (RCTs that appraised the effects of BP on survival in early BC.RCTs were identified by searching the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE databases and conference proceedings. Hazard ratios (HRs of overall survival (OS, disease-free survival (DFS and relative risks of adverse events were estimated and pooled.Thirteen trials met the inclusion criteria, evaluating a total of 15,762 patients. Meta-analysis of ten trials which reported OS revealed no statistically significant benefit in OS for BP (HR 0.89, 95% CI = 0.79 to 1.01. Meta-analysis of nine trials which reported the DFS revealed no benefit in DFS (HR 0.95 (0.81-1.12. Meta-analysis upon menopausal status showed a statistically significant better DFS in the BP-treated patients (HR 0.81(0.69-0.95. In meta-regression, chemotherapy was negatively associated with HR of survival.Our meta-analysis indicates a positive effect for adjuvant BP on survival only in postmenopausal patients. Meta-regression demonstrated a negative association between chemotherapy use BP effect on survival. Further large scale RCTs are warranted to unravel the specific subgroups that would benefit from the addition of BP in the adjuvant setting.

  9. Effect of intended intraoperative cholangiography and early detection of bile duct injury on survival after cholecystectomy: population based cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strömberg, Cecilia; Persson, Gunnar; Nilsson, Magnus

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether the routine use of intraoperative cholangiography can improve survival from complications related to bile duct injuries. Design Population based cohort study. Setting Prospectively collected data from the Swedish national registry of gallstone surgery and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, GallRiks. Multivariate analysis done by Cox regression. Population All cholecystectomies recorded in GallRiks between 1 May 2005 and 31 December 2010. Main outcome measures Evidence of bile duct injury, rate of intended use of intraoperative cholangiography, and rate of survival after cholecytectomy. Results During the study, 51 041 cholecystectomies were registered in GallRiks and 747 (1.5%) iatrogenic bile duct injuries identified. Patients with bile duct injuries had an impaired survival compared with those without injury (mortality at one year 3.9% v 1.1%). Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that early detection of a bile duct injury, during the primary operation, improved survival. The intention to use intraoperative cholangiography reduced the risk of death after cholecystectomy by 62% (hazard ratio 0.38 (95% confidence interval 0.31 to 0.46)). Conclusions The high incidence of bile duct injury recorded is probably from GallRiks’ ability to detect the entire range of injury severities, from minor ductal lesions to complete transections of major ducts. Patients with bile duct injury during cholecystectomy had impaired survival, and early detection of the injury improved survival. The intention to perform an intraoperative cholangiography reduced the risk of death after cholecystectomy. PMID:23060654

  10. Survival of women with breast cancer in central and northern Denmark, 1998-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lietzen, Lone Winther; Sørensen, Gitte Vrelits; Ording, Anne Gulbech; Garne, Jens Peter; Christiansen, Peer; Nørgaard, Mette; Jacobsen, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women worldwide. The Nordic countries have relatively high survival, but Denmark has a lower survival than neighboring countries. A breast cancer screening program was introduced in 2007 and 2008 in the northern and central regions of Denmark respectively. We aimed to examine possible changes in survival of Danish breast cancer patients in central and northern Denmark in the period 1998-2009. From the northern and central Denmark regions, we included all women (n = 13,756) with an incident diagnosis of breast cancer, as recorded in the Danish National Registry of Patients during the period January 1, 1998 through December 31, 2009. We calculated age-stratified survival and used Cox proportional hazard regression to estimate mortality rate ratios (MRRs) for all breast cancer patients. Median age was 62 years (21-102 years). The overall 1-year survival improved steadily over the period from 90.9% in 1998-2000 to 94.4% in 2007-2009, corresponding to a 1-year age adjusted MRR of 0.68 in 2007-2009 compared with the reference period 1998-2000. We estimated the 5-year survival to improve from 70.0% in 1998-2000 to 74.7% in 2007-2009, corresponding to a 5-year age adjusted MRR of 0.82 in 2007-2009 compared with the reference period 1998-2000. For middle-aged women (50-74 years) 1-year survival increased from 92.8% in 1998-2000 to 96.6% in 2008-2009, and 5-year survival was expected to increase from 73.9% in 1998-2000 to 80.2% in 2007-2009. Among younger women (15-49 years) and elderly women (>75 years), 1-year survival and 5-year predicted survival did not change over the two time periods. Survival of breast cancer patients has improved in Denmark over the period 1998-2009, and this change was most distinct in women aged 50-74 years. Survival improved even before the implementation of a formal breast cancer screening program.

  11. Overconfidence and Moral Hazard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de la Rosa, Leonidas Enrique

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, I study the effects of overconfidence on incentive contracts in a moral-hazard framework. Agent overconfidence can have conflicting effects on the equilibrium contract. On the one hand, an optimistic or overconfident agent disproportionately values success-contingent payments...

  12. Managing Academe's Hazardous Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Fay

    1991-01-01

    Those responsible for planning and management of colleges and universities must plan comprehensively for hazardous waste disposal. Federal and state regulations are increasing, landfill area is becoming scarce, and incineration costs are rising fast. High-level institutional commitment to a sound campus environment policy is essential. (MSE)

  13. Wind shear hazard determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Michael S.

    1992-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: F-factor relationship with aircraft performance; F-factor formulations; the F-bar index; F-factor hazard limit; F-bar with Doppler sensors; and F-bar profile composite.

  14. Pre-operative perfusion skewness and kurtosis are potential predictors of progression-free survival after partial resection of newly diagnosed glioblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paik, Wo Yul [Dept. of Radiology, Dankook University Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ho Sung; Choi, Choong Gon; Kim, Sang Joon [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    To determine whether pre-operative perfusion skewness and kurtosis derived from normalized cerebral blood volume (nCBV) histograms are associated with progression-free survival (PFS) of patients after partial resection of newly diagnosed glioblastoma. A total of 135 glioblastoma patients who had undergone partial resection of tumor (resection of < 50% of pre-operative tumor volume or surgical biopsy) confirmed with immediate postsurgical MRI and examined with both conventional MRI and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion MRI before the surgery were retrospectively reviewed in this study. They had been followed up post-surgical chemoradiotherapy for tumor progression. Using histogram analyses of nCBV derived from pre-operative DSC perfusion MRI, patients were sub-classified into the following four groups: positive skewness and leptokurtosis (group 1); positive skewness and platykurtosis (group 2); negative skewness and leptokurtosis (group 3); negative skewness and platykurtosis (group 4). Kaplan-Meier analysis and multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analysis were performed to determine whether clinical and imaging covariates were associated with PFS or overall survival (OS) of these patients. According to the Kaplan-Meier method, median PFS of group 1, 2, 3, and 4 was 62, 51, 39, and 41 weeks, respectively, with median OS of 82, 77, 77, and 72 weeks, respectively. In multivariable analyses with Cox proportional hazards regression, pre-operative skewness/kurtosis pattern (hazard ratio: 2.98 to 4.64; p < 0.001), Karnofsky performance scale score (hazard ratio: 1.04; p = 0.003), and post-operative tumor volume (hazard ratio: 1.04; p = 0.02) were independently associated with PFS but not with OS. Higher skewness and kurtosis of nCBV histogram before surgery were associated with longer PFS in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma after partial tumor resection.

  15. N0/N1, PNL, or LNR? The effect of lymph node number on accurate survival prediction in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valsangkar, Nakul P; Bush, Devon M; Michaelson, James S; Ferrone, Cristina R; Wargo, Jennifer A; Lillemoe, Keith D; Fernández-del Castillo, Carlos; Warshaw, Andrew L; Thayer, Sarah P

    2013-02-01

    We evaluated the prognostic accuracy of LN variables (N0/N1), numbers of positive lymph nodes (PLN), and lymph node ratio (LNR) in the context of the total number of examined lymph nodes (ELN). Patients from SEER and a single institution (MGH) were reviewed and survival analyses performed in subgroups based on numbers of ELN to calculate excess risk of death (hazard ratio, HR). In SEER and MGH, higher numbers of ELN improved the overall survival for N0 patients. The prognostic significance (N0/N1) and PLN were too variable as the importance of a single PLN depended on the total number of LN dissected. LNR consistently correlated with survival once a certain number of lymph nodes were dissected (≥13 in SEER and ≥17 in the MGH dataset). Better survival for N0 patients with increasing ELN likely represents improved staging. PLN have some predictive value but the ELN strongly influence their impact on survival, suggesting the need for a ratio-based classification. LNR strongly correlates with outcome provided that a certain number of lymph nodes is evaluated, suggesting that the prognostic accuracy of any LN variable depends on the total number of ELN.

  16. The effect of gender and age on kidney cancer survival: younger age is an independent prognostic factor in women with renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampersaud, Edward N; Klatte, Tobias; Bass, Geoffrey; Patard, Jean-Jacques; Bensaleh, Karim; Böhm, Malte; Allhoff, Ernst P; Cindolo, Luca; De La Taille, Alexandre; Mejean, Arnaud; Soulie, Michel; Bellec, Laurent; Christophe Bernhard, Jean; Pfister, Christian; Colombel, Marc; Belldegrun, Arie S; Pantuck, Allan J; George, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Gender-specific differences in incidence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and its outcome have previously been reported. We used age as a surrogate to test whether this might be hormone-related in a large international RCC cohort. This study included patients treated by nephrectomy at 10 international academic centers. Clinicopathologic features were assessed using chi-square and the Student t-tests. Kaplan-Meier survival estimates and Cox proportional hazards models addressed the effect of gender and age on disease-specific survival. Of the 5,654 patients, 3,777 (67%) were men and 1,877 (33%) were women. Generally, women presented at lower T stages (PWomen more frequently had clear-cell (87% vs. 82%) and less frequently had papillary RCC (7% vs. 12%) than men (PWomen had a 19% reduced risk of death from RCC than men (hazard ratio 0.81, 95% confidence interval 0.73-0.90, Pwomen was present to the greatest degree in the age groupwomen aged 42 to 58 years (Pindependent predictor of disease-specific survival in women (hazard ratio 1.011, 95% confidence interval 1.004-1.019, P = 0.004), but not in men. As a group, women present with less advanced tumors, leading to a 19% reduced risk of RCC-specific death compared with men. This survival difference is present only in patients aged<59 years. Because this gender-based survival difference is not related to pathologic features, the role of hormonal effects on the development and progression of RCC needs to be investigated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Social networks and survival after breast cancer diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, Jeannette M; Newcomb, Polly A; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Hampton, John M; Ceballos, Rachel M; Titus-Ernstoff, Linda; Egan, Kathleen M; Holmes, Michelle D

    2010-12-01

    Evidence has been inconsistent regarding the impact of social networks on survival after breast cancer diagnosis. We prospectively examined the relation between components of social integration and survival in a large cohort of breast cancer survivors. Women (N=4,589) diagnosed with invasive breast cancer were recruited from a population-based, multi-center, case-control study. A median of 5.6 years (Interquartile Range 2.7-8.7) after breast cancer diagnosis, women completed a questionnaire on recent post-diagnosis social networks and other lifestyle factors. Social networks were measured using components of the Berkman-Syme Social Networks Index to create a measure of social connectedness. Based on a search of the National Death Index, 552 deaths (146 related to breast cancer) were identified. Adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards regression. Higher scores on a composite measure of social connectedness as determined by the frequency of contacts with family and friends, attendance of religious services, and participation in community activities was associated with a 15-28% reduced risk of death from any cause (p-trend=0.02). Inverse trends were observed between all-cause mortality and frequency of attendance at religious services (p-trend=0.0001) and hours per week engaged in community activities (p-trend=0.0005). No material associations were identified between social networks and breast cancer-specific mortality. Engagement in activities outside the home was associated with lower overall mortality after breast cancer diagnosis.

  18. Tank farms hazards assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broz, R.E.

    1994-09-30

    Hanford contractors are writing new facility specific emergency procedures in response to new and revised US Department of Energy (DOE) Orders on emergency preparedness. Emergency procedures are required for each Hanford facility that has the potential to exceed the criteria for the lowest level emergency, an Alert. The set includes: (1) a facility specific procedure on Recognition and Classification of Emergencies, (2) area procedures on Initial Emergency Response and, (3) an area procedure on Protective Action Guidance. The first steps in developing these procedures are to identify the hazards at each facility, identify the conditions that could release the hazardous material, and calculate the consequences of the releases. These steps are called a Hazards Assessment. The final product is a document that is similar in some respects to a Safety Analysis Report (SAR). The document could br produced in a month for a simple facility but could take much longer for a complex facility. Hanford has both types of facilities. A strategy has been adopted to permit completion of the first version of the new emergency procedures before all the facility hazards Assessments are complete. The procedures will initially be based on input from a task group for each facility. This strategy will but improved emergency procedures in place sooner and therefore enhance Hanford emergency preparedness. The purpose of this document is to summarize the applicable information contained within the Waste Tank Facility ``Interim Safety Basis Document, WHC-SD-WM-ISB-001`` as a resource, since the SARs covering Waste Tank Operations are not current in all cases. This hazards assessment serves to collect, organize, document and present the information utilized during the determination process.

  19. Association between pretreatment Glasgow prognostic score and gastric cancer survival and clinicopathological features: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang CX

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Chun-Xiao Zhang,* Shu-Yi Wang,* Shuang-Qian Chen, Shuai-Long Yang, Lu Wan, Bin Xiong Department of Oncology, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Hubei Key Laboratory of Tumor Biological Behaviors and Hubei Cancer Clinical Study Center, Wuhan, Hubei, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Glasgow prognostic score (GPS is widely known as a systemic inflammatory-based marker. The relationship between pretreatment GPS and gastric cancer (GC survival and clinicopathological features remains controversial. The aim of the study was to conduct a meta-analysis of published studies to evaluate the association between pretreatment GPS and survival and clinicopathological features in GC patients. Methods: We searched PubMed, Embase, MEDLINE, and BioMed databases for relevant studies. Combined analyses were used to assess the association between pretreatment GPS and overall survival, disease-free survival, and clinicopathological parameters by Stata Version 12.0. Results: A total of 14 studies were included in this meta-analysis, including 5,579 GC patients. The results indicated that pretreatment high GPS (HGPS predicted poor overall survival (hazard ratio =1.51, 95% CI: 1.37–1.66, P<0.01 and disease-free survival (hazard ratio =1.45, 95% CI: 1.26–1.68, P<0.01 in GC patients. Pretreatment HGPS was also significantly associated with advanced tumor–node–metastasis stage (odds ratio [OR] =3.09, 95% CI: 2.11–4.53, P<0.01, lymph node metastasis (OR =4.60, 95% CI: 3.23–6.56, P<0.01, lymphatic invasion (OR =3.04, 95% CI: 2.00–4.62, P<0.01, and venous invasion (OR =3.56, 95% CI: 1.81–6.99, P<0.01. Conclusion: Our meta-analysis indicated that pretreatment HGPS could be a predicative factor of poor survival outcome and clinicopathological features for GC patients. Keywords: Glasgow prognostic score, gastric cancer, survival, clinicopathological feature

  20. Improved survival outcomes with the incidental use of beta-blockers among patients with non-small-cell lung cancer treated with definitive radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H M; Liao, Z X; Komaki, R; Welsh, J W; O'Reilly, M S; Chang, J Y; Zhuang, Y; Levy, L B; Lu, C; Gomez, D R

    2013-05-01

    Preclinical studies have shown that norepinephrine can directly stimulate tumor cell migration and that this effect is mediated by the beta-adrenergic receptor. We retrospectively reviewed 722 patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who received definitive radiotherapy (RT). A Cox proportional hazard model was utilized to determine the association between beta-blocker intake and locoregional progression-free survival (LRPFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS). In univariate analysis, patients taking beta-blockers (n = 155) had improved DMFS (P beta-blockers (n = 567). In multivariate analysis, beta-blocker intake was associated with a significantly better DMFS [hazard ratio (HR), 0.67; P = 0.01], DFS (HR, 0.74; P = 0.02), and OS (HR, 0.78; P = 0.02) with adjustment for age, Karnofsky performance score, stage, histology type, concurrent chemotherapy, radiation dose, gross tumor volume, hypertension, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and the use of aspirin. There was no association of beta-blocker use with LRPFS (HR = 0.91, P = 0.63). Beta-blocker use is associated with improved DMFS, DFS, and OS in this large cohort of NSCLC patients. Future prospective trials can validate these retrospective findings and determine whether the length and timing of beta-blocker use influence survival outcomes.

  1. Racial differences in survival from gynecologic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, M A; Behbakht, K; Benjamin, I; Berlin, M; King, S A; Rubin, S C

    1996-12-01

    To determine whether survival from gynecologic cancer is different between African-American and white patients at an inner-city hospital with both a large clinic and a private service. We studied 538 patients (89 African American, 449 white) diagnosed with cervical, uterine, or ovarian cancer at a single institution from January 1, 1989 through December 31, 1993. Information was obtained on age, stage, site of disease, histology, and type of health insurance (public or commercial). Insurance coverage was used as a proxy for socioeconomic status. Overall survival was estimated by the method of Kaplan and Meier and compared by the log-rank test. Cox proportional hazard modeling was used to evaluate the effects of multiple factors on survival. African-American patients were significantly older and were more likely to have cervical cancer and public insurance than white patients. Overall survival was worse for African-American patients than for white patients (P whites, and African-American patients older than 65 years had a worse survival than whites of similar age. On multivariate analysis, only stage and insurance coverage were significant predictors of survival. African-American patients with gynecologic cancer at our institution have worse overall survival than white patients. The survival difference seems to be due predominantly to differences in socioeconomic status and stage at diagnosis.

  2. Associations of ATM Polymorphisms With Survival in Advanced Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Patients Receiving Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Zhongli [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Department of Etiology and Carcinogenesis (Beijing Key Laboratory for Carcinogenesis and Cancer Prevention), Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Zhang, Wencheng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Zhou, Yuling; Yu, Dianke; Chen, Xiabin; Chang, Jiang; Qiao, Yan; Zhang, Meng; Huang, Ying; Wu, Chen [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Department of Etiology and Carcinogenesis (Beijing Key Laboratory for Carcinogenesis and Cancer Prevention), Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Xiao, Zefen, E-mail: xiaozefen@sina.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Tan, Wen, E-mail: tanwen@cicams.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Department of Etiology and Carcinogenesis (Beijing Key Laboratory for Carcinogenesis and Cancer Prevention), Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); and others

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene are associated with survival in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) receiving radiation therapy or chemoradiation therapy or surgery only. Methods and Materials: Four tagSNPs of ATM were genotyped in 412 individuals with clinical stage III or IV ESCC receiving radiation therapy or chemoradiation therapy, and in 388 individuals with stage I, II, or III ESCC treated with surgery only. Overall survival time of ESCC among different genotypes was estimated by Kaplan-Meier plot, and the significance was examined by log-rank test. The hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for death from ESCC among different genotypes were computed by a Cox proportional regression model. Results: We found 2 SNPs, rs664143 and rs664677, associated with survival time of ESCC patients receiving radiation therapy. Individuals with the rs664143A allele had poorer median survival time compared with the rs664143G allele (14.0 vs 20.0 months), with the HR for death being 1.45 (95% CI 1.12-1.89). Individuals with the rs664677C allele also had worse median survival time than those with the rs664677T allele (14.0 vs 23.5 months), with the HR of 1.57 (95% CI 1.18-2.08). Stratified analysis showed that these associations were present in both stage III and IV cancer and different radiation therapy techniques. Significant associations were also found between the SNPs and locosregional progression or progression-free survival. No association between these SNPs and survival time was detected in ESCC patients treated with surgery only. Conclusion: These results suggest that the ATM polymorphisms might serve as independent biomarkers for predicting prognosis in ESCC patients receiving radiation therapy.

  3. Survival Patterns in Elderly Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Patients Treated With Definitive Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommers, Linda W; Steenbakkers, Roel J H M; Bijl, Henk P; Vemer-van den Hoek, Johanna G M; Roodenburg, Jan L N; Oosting, Sjoukje F; Halmos, Gyorgy B; de Rooij, Sophia E; Langendijk, Johannes A

    2017-07-15

    We sought to assess the effect of age on overall survival (OS), cancer-specific survival (CSS), and non-cancer-related death (NCRD) in elderly (aged ≥70 years) head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients treated with definitive radiation therapy. The results were compared with those of younger patients, and the most important prognostic factors for survival endpoints were determined. Treatments may be better justified based on identification of the main differences in survival between young and elderly patients. Data were analyzed from all consecutive HNSCC patients treated with definitive radiation therapy (66-70 Gy) in our department between April 2007 and December 2014. A total of 674 patients, including 168 elderly patients (24.9%), were included in the study. Multivariate association models were constructed to assess the effect of age on survival endpoints. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify potential prognostic factors for survival in elderly patients. A total of 674 consecutive patients, including 168 elderly patients, were analyzed. The 5-year OS and NCRD rates were significantly worse for elderly patients than for young patients: 45.5% versus 58.2% (P=.007) and 39.0% versus 20.7% (Pelderly patient group. Of the elderly patients, 80 (47%) died during follow-up; 45% of these deaths were ascribed to the index tumor. For elderly patients, radiation therapy combined with systemic forms of treatment was significantly associated with adverse NCRD rate (hazard ratio, 8.02; 95% confidence interval, 2.36-27.2; P=.001) after we performed a multivariate association analysis. Elderly HNSCC patients have worse survival outcomes than young HNSCC patients. Age is an independent prognostic factor for OS, mainly due to an increase in non-cancer-related mortality and comorbid diseases. The differences in CSS between young and elderly patients are negligible. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index Predicts Survival in Elderly Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Patients with Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Yacong; Wang, Kunlun; Liu, Yang; You, Jie; Cui, Han; Zhu, Yiwei; Lu, Quanjun; Yuan, Ling

    2016-01-01

    The impact of nutritional status on survival among elderly esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) patients undergoing radiotherapy is unclear. In this study, we aimed at validating the performance of the geriatric nutritional risk index (GNRI) in predicting overall survival time in elderly ESCC patients with radiotherapy. A retrospective cohort study was conducted on 239 ESCC patients aged 60 and over admitted consecutively from January 2008 to November 2014 in the Department of Radiotherapy, Henan Tumor Hospital (Affiliated Tumor Hospital of Zhengzhou University), Zhengzhou, Henan, China. All patients were subjected to nutritional screening using GNRI, and were followed for the occurrence of lymphatic node metastasis, radiation complication and mortality. The Kaplan-Meier method with Log-rank test was used to estimate survival curves. Univariable Cox regression analysis was used to identify variables associated with overall survival time. Among the 239 patients, 184 patients (76.9%) took no nutritional risk, 32 patients (13.4%) took moderate risk of malnutrition, and 23 patients (9.7%) took a high risk of malnutrition. Univariable Cox regression showed that both high nutritional risk group and moderate nutritional risk group were significantly less likely to survive than no nutritional risk patients (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.688, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.019-2.798 for moderate risk group, and HR = 2.699, 95% CI = 1.512-4.819 for high risk group, respectively). The GNRI is an independent prognostic factor for overall survival time in elderly ESCC patients with radiotherapy. A GNRI ≤98 can be suggested as an indicator of surviving less.

  5. Perioperative blood transfusion: does it influence survival and cancer progression in metastatic spine tumor surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaw, Aye Sandar; Kantharajanna, Shashidhar B; Maharajan, Karthikeyan; Tan, Barry; Vellayappan, Balamurugan; Kumar, Naresh

    2017-02-01

    Despite advances in surgical techniques for spinal metastases, there is often substantial blood loss, resulting in patients requiring blood transfusion during the perioperative period. Allogeneic blood transfusion (ABT) has been the main replenishment method for lost blood. However, the impact of ABT on cancer-related outcomes has been controversial in various studies. We aimed to evaluate the influence of perioperative ABT on disease progression and survival in patients undergoing metastatic spinal tumor surgery (MSTS). We conducted a retrospective study that included 247 patients who underwent MSTS at a single tertiary institution between 2005 and 2014. The impact of using perioperative ABT (either exposure to or quantities of transfusion) on disease progression and survival was assessed using Cox regression analyses while adjusting for potential confounding variables. Of 247 patients, 133 (54%) received ABT. The overall median number of blood units transfused was 2 (range, 0-10 units). Neither blood transfusion exposure nor quantities of transfusion were associated with overall survival (hazard ratio [HR], 1.15 [p = 0.35] and 1.10 [p = 0.11], respectively) and progression-free survival (HR, 0.87 [p = 0.18] and 0.98 [p = 0.11], respectively). The factors that influenced overall survival were primary tumor type and preoperative Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, whereas primary tumor type was the only factor that had an impact on progression-free survival. This is the first study providing evidence that disease progression and survival in patients who undergo MSTS are less likely to be influenced by perioperative ABT. The worst oncologic outcomes are more likely to be caused by the clinical circumstances necessitating blood transfusion, but not transfusion itself. However, because ABT can have a propensity toward developing postoperative infections, including surgical site infection, the use of patient blood management

  6. [Functional limitation and survival of community dwelling elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciel, Alvaro Campos Cavalcanti; Guerra, Ricardo Oliveira

    2008-01-01

    The present study aims to analyze the functional limitation as risk factor of death of elderly dwelling in a community and its relationship with socio-demographic, physical health and neuropsychiatric related factors. A prospective study was carried out in the city of Santa Cruz, Rio Grande do Norte, Brasil. A total of 310 randomly selected elderly formed the baseline (63.5% women, 73.7+/-9.03 years). The Katz Index was used to evaluate the functional capacity for basic activities of daily living. The follow-up period was of 53 months. The statistical methods used were bivariate analysis (Pearson's chi-square), survival analysis by the Kaplan-Meyer method, followed by Cox regression in multivariate analysis, with the respective hazards ratios (HR). A total of 60 elderly (20.5%) died during the study follow-up; the main cause of death was cardiovascular disease. The mean survival time was of about 24.8 months, and the main risk factors identified at Cox regression were cognitive deficit (HR= 4.30) and stroke (HR= 3.49) besides the dependence for the basic activities of daily living (HR = 3.17). The functional limitation was an independent risk factor for death.

  7. Further Developments in Beta-Gamma to Alpha Ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David L

    2017-04-01

    An emphasis on alpha-emitting nuclides at nuclear power plants has produced methods for assessing the relative hazard of alpha versus other species. From the relative hazards, or ratios, decisions on the level of effort for worker protection and monitoring are made. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has issued technical guidance on relative alpha hazard and action level beta-gamma to alpha ratios. This paper shows the development of the ratio concept from first principles and brings hard-to-detect species into consideration. Outcomes from the exercise of computational forms of the ratios are compared to the EPRI results and the differences are noted. Some discussion of the implications and advantages of the developed forms then follows.

  8. The effects of building design on hazard of first service in Norwegian dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, A D; Kielland, C; Nelson, S T; Østerås, O

    2015-12-01

    Reproductive inefficiency is one of the major production and economic constraints on modern dairy farms. The environment affects onset of ovarian activity in a cow postcalving and influences estrus behavior, which in turn affects a stockperson's ability to inseminate her at the correct time. This study used survival analysis to investigate effects of building design and animal factors on the postpartum hazard of first service (HFS) in freestall-housed Norwegian Red cows. The study was performed on 232 Norwegian dairy farms between 2004 and 2007. Data were obtained through on farm measurements and by accessing the Norwegian Dairy Herd Recording System. The final data set contained data on 38,436 calvings and 27,127 services. Univariate Cox proportional hazard analyses showed that herd size and milk yield were positively associated with HFS. Total free accessible area and free accessible area available per cow year were positively associated with the HFS, as was the number of freestalls available per cow. Cows housed on slatted floors had a lower HFS than those housed on solid floors. Conversely, cows housed on rubber floors had a higher HFS than cows on concrete floors. Dead-ending alleyways reduced the hazard of AI after calving. A multivariable Cox proportional hazards model, accounting for herd management by including a frailty term for herd, showed relationships between hazard of postpartum service and explanatory variables. Animals in herds with more than 50 cows had a higher HFS [hazard ratio (HR)=3.0] compared with those in smaller herds. The HFS was also higher (HR=4.3) if more than 8.8 m(2) of space was available per cow year compared with herds in which animals had less space. The HFS after calving increased with parity (parity 2 HR=0.5, parity ≥3 HR=1.7), and was reduced if a lactation began with dystocia (HR=0.82) or was a breed other than Norwegian Red (HR=0.2). The frailty term, herd, was large and highly significant indicating a significant

  9. Survival As a Quality Metric of Cancer Care: Use of the National Cancer Data Base to Assess Hospital Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulman, Lawrence N; Palis, Bryan E; McCabe, Ryan; Mallin, Kathy; Loomis, Ashley; Winchester, David; McKellar, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    Survival is considered an important indicator of the quality of cancer care, but the validity of different methodologies to measure comparative survival rates is less well understood. We explored whether the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB) could serve as a source of unadjusted and risk-adjusted cancer survival data and whether these data could be used as quality indicators for individual hospitals or in the aggregate by hospital type. The NCDB, an aggregate of > 1,500 hospital cancer registries, was queried to analyze unadjusted and risk-adjusted hazards of death for patients with stage III breast cancer (n = 116,787) and stage IIIB or IV non-small-cell lung cancer (n = 252,392). Data were analyzed at the individual hospital level and by hospital type. At the hospital level, after risk adjustment, few hospitals had comparative risk-adjusted survival rates that were statistically better or worse. By hospital type, National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer centers had risk-adjusted survival ratios that were statistically significantly better than those of academic cancer centers and community hospitals. Using the NCDB as the data source, survival rates for patients with stage III breast cancer and stage IIIB or IV non-small-cell lung cancer were statistically better at National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer centers when compared with other hospital types. Compared with academic hospitals, risk-adjusted survival was lower in community hospitals. At the individual hospital level, after risk adjustment, few hospitals were shown to have statistically better or worse survival, suggesting that, using NCDB data, survival may not be a good metric to determine relative quality of cancer care at this level.

  10. Counterfactual Volcano Hazard Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Gordon

    2013-04-01

    The historical database of past disasters is a cornerstone of catastrophe risk assessment. Whereas disasters are fortunately comparatively rare, near-misses are quite common for both natural and man-made hazards. The word disaster originally means 'an unfavourable aspect of a star'. Except for astrologists, disasters are no longer perceived fatalistically as pre-determined. Nevertheless, to this day, historical disasters are treated statistically as fixed events, although in reality there is a large luck element involved in converting a near-miss crisis situation into a disaster statistic. It is possible to conceive a stochastic simulation of the past to explore the implications of this chance factor. Counterfactual history is the exercise of hypothesizing alternative paths of history from what actually happened. Exploring history from a counterfactual perspective is instructive for a variety of reasons. First, it is easy to be fooled by randomness and see regularity in event patterns which are illusory. The past is just one realization of a variety of possible evolutions of history, which may be analyzed through a stochastic simulation of an array of counterfactual scenarios. In any hazard context, there is a random component equivalent to dice being rolled to decide whether a near-miss becomes an actual disaster. The fact that there may be no observed disaster over a period of time may belie the occurrence of numerous near-misses. This may be illustrated using the simple dice paradigm. Suppose a dice is rolled every month for a year, and an event is recorded if a six is thrown. There is still an 11% chance of no events occurring during the year. A variety of perils may be used to illustrate the use of near-miss information within a counterfactual disaster analysis. In the domain of natural hazards, near-misses are a notable feature of the threat landscape. Storm surges are an obvious example. Sea defences may protect against most meteorological scenarios. However

  11. The Effect of Individual and Neighbourhood Socioeconomic Status on Diabetes Mellitus Survival in Working Age Patients in Taiwan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Hsien Yang

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is a global pandemic metabolic disorder. In recent years, the amount of medical resources required for the treatment of diabetes has increased as diabetes rates have gradually risen. The combined effects of individual and neighbourhood socio-economic status (SES on DM survival rates are still not clear, especially in patients of working age. In this paper, we aim to analyze the combined effects of neighbourhood and individual SES on DM survival rates in patients of working age in Taiwan.The study of 23,781 people who were diagnosed with DM by using population-based study between 2002 and 2006. Each sample was followed up for 4 years or as a sensor case. We defined Individual SES and neighbourhood SES by each patient's job category and household income which characterized as advantaged or disadvantaged. Then we compared the survival rates by SES group used Cox proportional hazards model for adjust risk factors.The 4-year overall survival rates of diabetic patients were worst for those with low individual SES who living in advantaged neighbourhoods. After adjustment for patient characteristics, DM patients with high individual SES living in disadvantaged neighbourhoods had the same risk of mortality as those patients with high individual SES living in advantaged neighbourhoods (hazard ratio: 1.11; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.81-1.51. The study found that DM patients with low individual SES who live in disadvantaged areas had a greater risk of mortality than those with high SES (odds ratio: 2.57; 95% CI: 2.04-3.24. There were significant differences in survival rates between patients with high individual SES and patients with low individual SES. In contrast, the results did not statistically significant differences in survival rates between advantaged and disadvantaged neighbourhood SES groups.DM patients with low individual SES had the worst survival rate, regardless of whether they were living in a high or low SES

  12. Complementary Chinese Herbal Medicine Therapy Improves Survival of Patients With Pancreatic Cancer in Taiwan: A Nationwide Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yi-Ting; Liao, Hou-Hsun; Chiang, Jen-Huai; Wu, Mei-Yao; Chen, Bor-Chyuan; Chang, Ching-Mao; Yeh, Ming-Hsien; Chang, Tung-Ti; Sun, Mao-Feng; Yeh, Chia-Chou; Yen, Hung-Rong

    2017-08-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a difficult-to-treat cancer with a late presentation and poor prognosis. Some patients seek traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) consultation. We aimed to investigate the benefits of complementary Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) among patients with pancreatic cancer in Taiwan. We included all patients with pancreatic cancer who were registered in the Taiwanese Registry for Catastrophic Illness Patients Database between 1997 and 2010. We used 1:1 frequency matching by age, sex, the initial diagnostic year of pancreatic cancer, and index year to enroll 386 CHM users and 386 non-CHM users. A Cox regression model was used to compare the hazard ratios (HRs) of the risk of mortality. The Kaplan-Meier curve was used to compare the difference in survival time. According to the Cox hazard ratio model mutually adjusted for CHM use, age, sex, urbanization level, comorbidity, and treatments, we found that CHM users had a lower hazard ratio of mortality risk (adjusted HR = 0.67, 95% CI = 0.56-0.79). Those who received CHM therapy for more than 90 days had significantly lower hazard ratios of mortality risk than non-CHM users (90- to 180-day group: adjusted HR = 0.56, 95% CI = 0.42-0.75; >180-day group: HR = 0.33, 95% CI = 0.24-0.45). The survival probability was higher for patients in the CHM group. Bai-hua-she-she-cao (Herba Oldenlandiae; Hedyotis diffusa Spreng) and Xiang-sha-liu-jun-zi-tang (Costus and Chinese Amomum Combination) were the most commonly used single herb and Chinese herbal formula, respectively. Complementary Chinese herbal therapy might be associated with reduced mortality among patients with pancreatic cancer. Further prospective clinical trial is warranted.

  13. Hazard perception in traffic. [previously knows as: Hazard perception.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2008-01-01

    Hazard perception is an essential part of the driving task. There are clear indications that insufficient skills in perceiving hazards play an important role in the occurrence of crashes, especially those involving novice drivers. Proper hazard perception not only consists of scanning and perceiving

  14. Smoking and survival of colorectal cancer patients: population-based study from Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Viola; Jansen, Lina; Hoffmeister, Michael; Ulrich, Alexis; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Brenner, Hermann

    2015-09-15

    Current evidence on the association between smoking and colorectal cancer (CRC) prognosis after diagnosis is heterogeneous and few have investigated dose-response effects or outcomes other than overall survival. Therefore, the association of smoking status and intensity with several prognostic outcomes was evaluated in a large population-based cohort of CRC patients; 3,130 patients with incident CRC, diagnosed between 2003 and 2010, were interviewed on sociodemographic factors, smoking behavior, medication and comorbidities. Tumor characteristics were collected from medical records. Vital status, recurrence and cause of death were documented for a median follow-up time of 4.9 years. Using Cox proportional hazards regression, associations between smoking characteristics and overall, CRC-specific, non-CRC related, recurrence-free and disease-free survival were evaluated. Among stage I-III patients, being a smoker at diagnosis and smoking ≥15 cigarettes/day were associated with lower recurrence-free (adjusted hazard ratios (aHR): 1.29; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.93-1.79 and aHR: 1.31; 95%-CI: 0.92-1.87) and disease-free survival (aHR: 1.26; 95%-CI: 0.95-1.67 and aHR: 1.29; 95%-CI: 0.94-1.77). Smoking was associated with decreased survival in stage I-III smokers with pack years ≥20 (Overall survival: aHR: 1.40; 95%-CI: 1.01-1.95), in colon cancer cases (Overall survival: aHR: 1.51; 95%-CI: 1.05-2.17) and men (Recurrence-free survival: aHR: 1.51; 95%-CI: 1.09-2.10; disease-free survival: aHR: 1.49; 95%-CI: 1.12-1.97), whereas no associations were seen among women, stage IV or rectal cancer patients. The observed patterns support the existence of adverse effects of smoking on CRC prognosis among nonmetastatic CRC patients. The potential to enhance prognosis of CRC patients by promotion of smoking cessation, embedded in tertiary prevention programs warrants careful evaluation in future investigations. © 2015 UICC.

  15. Family history of colorectal cancer is not associated with colorectal cancer survival regardless of microsatellite instability status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Amanda I; Ahnen, Dennis J; Campbell, Peter T; Win, Aung Ko; Jenkins, Mark A; Lindor, Noralane M; Gryfe, Robert; Potter, John D; Newcomb, Polly A

    2014-08-01

    Individuals with a family history of colorectal cancer in first-degree relatives have an elevated risk of developing colorectal cancer themselves, particularly colorectal cancer exhibiting high microsatellite instability (MSI-high). Given that MSI-high colorectal cancer is associated with a favorable prognosis, it is plausible that having a family history of colorectal cancer could, in turn, be favorably associated with colorectal cancer survival. This study comprised N = 4,284 incident colorectal cancer cases enrolled in the Colon Cancer Family Registry via population-based cancer registries. Using Cox proportional hazards regression, we evaluated the association between family history and both overall and disease-specific survival, accounting for MSI status and tumor site via stratified analyses and statistical adjustment. There was no evidence of association between family history and overall [hazard ratio (HR), 0.92; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.79-1.08] or disease-specific survival (HR, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.85-1.24) for all cases combined, after adjustment for MSI status or tumor site. Only for rectal cancer cases was colorectal cancer family history modestly associated with more favorable overall survival (HR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.56-0.99). Although individuals with a family history of colorectal cancer were more likely to have MSI-high tumors than those with nonfamilial disease, this did not translate to a survival benefit. Overall, there is no evidence that family history of colorectal cancer is associated with colorectal cancer survival; however, specific mechanisms underlying family history may have prognostic impact and merit further study. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. Impact of Heart Transplantation on Survival in Patients on Venoarterial Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation at Listing in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasseron, Carine; Lebreton, Guillaume; Cantrelle, Christelle; Legeai, Camille; Leprince, Pascal; Flecher, Erwan; Sirinelli, Agnes; Bastien, Olivier; Dorent, Richard

    2016-09-01

    Venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA-ECMO) is increasingly used as a short-term circulatory support in patients with refractory cardiogenic shock providing a bridge to long-term mechanical circulatory support or transplantation. In France, a higher priority status is granted to transplant candidates on VA-ECMO than to those on long-term mechanical circulatory support. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of transplantation as primary therapy on survival in patients on VA-ECMO at listing. This was a retrospective analysis of data from the French national registry CRISTAL including all patients (n = 866) newly registered on the waiting list for heart transplantation between January 2010 and December 2011. We compared outcomes of 80 patients on VA-ECMO at listing to outcomes of the comparison group. In the VA-ECMO group, a Cox proportional hazard model with transplantation as a time dependent variable was used to evaluate the effect of transplantation on survival. Patients on VA-ECMO were more often on ventilator and dialysis and had a higher bilirubin level than other candidates. One-year overall survival rate was lower in candidates from the study group (52.2%) compared with comparison group (75.5%), (P < 0.01). One-year posttransplant survival was 70% in the VA-ECMO group and 81% in comparison group (P = 0.06). In the VA-ECMO group, transplantation was associated with a lower risk of mortality (hazard ratio, 0.44; 95% confidence interval, 0.2-0.9). Transplantation provides a survival benefit in listed patients on VA-ECMO even if posttransplant survival remains inferior than for patients without VA-ECMO. Transplantation may be considered to be an acceptable primary therapy in selected patients on VA-ECMO.

  17. Survival after radiation for stage I and II non-small cell lung cancer with positive margins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulack, Brian C; Cox, Morgan L; Yang, Chi-Fu Jeffrey; Speicher, Paul J; Kara, H Volkan; D'Amico, Thomas A; Berry, Mark F; Hartwig, Matthew G

    2018-03-01

    There is limited data guiding treatment for positive margins following lobectomy for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Using data from the National Cancer Data Base, we sought to determine whether radiation therapy following lobectomy for stage I or II NSCLC was associated with improved overall survival in patients with positive margins. Patients who underwent lobectomy without induction therapy for stage I or II NSCLC (1998-2006) with positive resection margins were selected. Patients were stratified by administration of radiation therapy following surgery, and overall survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. The association between radiation therapy and survival was adjusted for nonrandom treatment selection using Cox proportional hazards regression modeling. Positive margins were recorded in 1934 of 49,563 (3.9%) patients who underwent lobectomy for stage I or II NSCLC. Positive margin status was associated with significantly worse 5-year survival (34.5% versus 57.2%, P < 0.001). After selection of patients with positive margins and known radiation status and exclusion of patients who had upstaged disease or received radiation therapy for palliative indications, radiation therapy was used in 579 of 1579 patients (38.2%) but was not associated with a significant difference in the likelihood of death during subsequent follow-up (hazard ratio: 1.10, 95% confidence interval: 0.90, 1.35). Positive margins following lobectomy for stage I or II NSCLC are associated with reduced 5-year survival. Postsurgical radiation is not strongly associated with an improvement in overall survival among these patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Sex disparity in childhood and young adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) survival: Evidence from US population data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Md Jobayer; Xie, Li

    2015-12-01

    Sex variation has been persistently investigated in studies concerning acute myeloid leukemia (AML) survival outcomes but has not been fully explored among pediatric and young adult AML patients. We detected sex difference in the survival of AML patients diagnosed at ages 0-24 years and explored distinct effects of sex across subgroups of age at diagnosis, race-ethnicity and AML subtypes utilizing the United States Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) population based dataset of 4865 patients diagnosed with AML between 1973 and 2012. Kaplan-Meier survival function, propensity scores and stratified Cox proportional hazards regression were used for data analyses. After controlling for other prognostic factors, females showed a significant survival advantage over their male counterparts, adjusted hazard ratio (aHR, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.09, 1.00-1.18). Compared to females, male patients had substantially increased risk of mortality in the following subgroups of: ages 20-24 years at diagnosis (aHR1.30), Caucasian (1.14), acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) (1.35), acute erythroid leukemia (AEL) (1.39), AML with inv(16)(p13.1q22) (2.57), AML with minimum differentiation (1.47); and had substantially decreased aHR in AML t(9;11)(p22;q23) (0.57) and AML with maturation (0.82). Overall, females demonstrated increased survival over males and this disparity was considerably large in patients ages 20-24 years at diagnosis, Caucasians, and in AML subtypes of AML inv(16), APL and AEL. In contrast, males with AML t(9;11)(p22;q23), AML with maturation and age at diagnosis of 10-14 years showed survival benefit. Further investigations are needed to detect the biological processes influencing the mechanisms of these interactions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluating survival model performance: a graphical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, M; Galai, N; Simchen, E

    2005-06-30

    In the last decade, many statistics have been suggested to evaluate the performance of survival models. These statistics evaluate the overall performance of a model ignoring possible variability in performance over time. Using an extension of measures used in binary regression, we propose a graphical method to depict the performance of a survival model over time. The method provides estimates of performance at specific time points and can be used as an informal test for detecting time varying effects of covariates in the Cox model framework. The method is illustrated on real and simulated data using Cox proportional hazard model and rank statistics. Copyright 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Association of family history with cancer recurrence and survival among patients with stage III colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jennifer A; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Hollis, Donna; Saltz, Leonard B; Mayer, Robert J; Thomas, James; Schaefer, Paul; Whittom, Renaud; Hantel, Alexander; Goldberg, Richard M; Warren, Robert S; Bertagnolli, Monica; Fuchs, Charles S

    2008-06-04

    A family history of colorectal cancer in a first-degree relative increases the risk of developing colorectal cancer. However, the influence of family history on cancer recurrence and survival among patients with established disease remains uncertain. To examine the association of family history of colorectal cancer with cancer recurrence and survival of patients with colon cancer. Prospective observational study of 1087 patients with stage III colon cancer enrolled in a randomized adjuvant chemotherapy trial (CALGB 89803) between April 1999 and May 2001. Patients provided data on family history at baseline and were followed up until March 2007 for disease recurrence and death (median follow-up, 5.6 years). In a subset of patients, we assessed microsatellite instability (MSI) and expression of the mismatch repair (MMR) proteins MLH1 and MSH2 in tumor specimens. Disease-free survival, recurrence-free survival, and overall survival according to the presence or absence of a family history of colorectal cancer. Among 1087 eligible patients, 195 (17.9%) reported a family history of colorectal cancer in a first-degree relative. Cancer recurrence or death occurred in 57 of 195 patients (29%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 23%-36%) with a family history of colorectal cancer and 343 of 892 patients (38%; 95% CI, 35%-42%) without a family history. Compared with patients without a family history, the adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) among those with 1 or more affected first-degree relatives were 0.72 (95% CI, 0.54-0.96) for disease-free survival, 0.74 (95% CI, 0.55-0.99) for recurrence-free survival, and 0.75 (95% CI, 0.54-1.05) for overall survival. This reduction in risk of cancer recurrence or death associated with a family history became stronger with an increasing number of affected first-degree relatives. Compared with participants without a family history of colorectal cancer, those with 1 affected relative had a multivariate HR of 0.77 (95% CI, 0.57-1.04) for disease

  1. Population-based study of contralateral prophylactic mastectomy and survival outcomes of breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedrosian, Isabelle; Hu, Chung-Yuan; Chang, George J

    2010-03-17

    Despite increased demand for contralateral prophylactic mastectomy (CPM), the survival benefit of this procedure remains uncertain. We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database to identify 107 106 women with breast cancer who had undergone mastectomy for treatment between 1998 and 2003 and a subset of 8902 women who also underwent CPM during the same period. Associations between predictor variables and the likelihood of undergoing CPM were evaluated by use of chi(2) analyses. Risk-stratified (estrogen receptor [ER] status, stage, and age) adjusted survival analyses were performed by using Cox regression. Statistical tests were two-sided. In a univariate analysis, CPM was associated with improved disease-specific survival (hazard ratio [HR] of death = 0.63, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.57 to 0.69; P mastectomy also had a lower overall risk for contralateral breast cancer than women with ER-negative tumors (0.46% vs 0.90%, difference = 0.44%; P < .001). CPM is associated with a small improvement in 5-year breast cancer-specific survival mainly in young women with early-stage ER-negative breast cancer. This effect is related to a higher baseline risk of contralateral breast cancer.

  2. Comprehensive baseline hazard assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, S.B.; Amundson, T.M.

    1994-10-01

    Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) has developed and implemented a cost effective/value-added program/process that assists in fulfilling key elements of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration`s (OSHA) voluntary Protection Program (VPP) requirements. WHC is the prime contractor for the US Department of Energy (US DOE) at the Hanford site, located in Richland, Washington. The site consists of over 560 square miles, contains over 1100 facilities and has an employment of approximately 18,000. WHC is currently in the application review phase for the US DOE equivalent of OSHA-VPP ``merit`` program status. The program involves setting up a team consisting of industrial safety and health (industrial hygienists) professionals, members of the maintenance and operations work force, and facility management. This team performs a workplace hazard characterization/analysis and then applies a risk assessment approach to prioritize observed and potential hazards in need of abatement. The process involves using checklists that serve as a guide for evaluation/inspection criteria. Forms are used to document meetings, field observations, instrument calibration and performance testing. Survey maps are generated to document quality records of measurement results. A risk assessment code matrix with a keyword index was developed to facilitate consistency. The end product is useful in communicating hazards to facility management, health and safety professionals, audit/appraisal groups, and most importantly, facility workers.

  3. Radiation hazard control report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morishima, Hiroshige; Koga, Taeko; Inagaki, Masayo; Aoki, Yutaka; Takiguchi, Chizuko; Hutai, Yasuhiro; Sakamoto, Norihiko; Okazaki, Koji (Kinki Univ., Higashi-Osaka, Osaka (Japan). Atomic Energy Research Inst.)

    1993-12-01

    The results of the radiation hazard control in the Atomic Energy Research Institute, Kinki University, from April, 1992 to March, 1993 are reported. The persons engaged in radiation-related works in fiscal year 1992 were 55 teachers, 22 students and 47 workers, accordingly, 124 persons became the object of radiation hazard control. As to the state of operation of the nuclear reactor in fiscal year 1992, the highest thermal output was 1 W, cumulative thermal output was 297.06 W[center dot]h, and the total time of operation was 578.18 h. The operation of the neutron generator was not carried out. The periodic inspection by Science and Technology Agency was performed on April 2-4, and the investigation of the state of security regulation observation was performed on July 21, 1992, and the reactor passed both without trouble. The health checkup and the control of dose equivalent of personal radiation exposure were carried out, but abnormality was not found. In the radiation hazard control in laboratories and in fields, the particularly high level of radiation was not found. (K.I.).

  4. FEMA DFIRM Flood Hazard Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — FEMA flood hazard delineations are used by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to designate the Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA) and for insurance rating...

  5. Seismic hazard maps for Haiti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, Arthur; Harmsen, Stephen; Mueller, Charles; Calais, Eric; Haase, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    We have produced probabilistic seismic hazard maps of Haiti for peak ground acceleration and response spectral accelerations that include the hazard from the major crustal faults, subduction zones, and background earthquakes. The hazard from the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden, Septentrional, and Matheux-Neiba fault zones was estimated using fault slip rates determined from GPS measurements. The hazard from the subduction zones along the northern and southeastern coasts of Hispaniola was calculated from slip rates derived from GPS data and the overall plate motion. Hazard maps were made for a firm-rock site condition and for a grid of shallow shear-wave velocities estimated from topographic slope. The maps show substantial hazard throughout Haiti, with the highest hazard in Haiti along the Enriquillo-Plantain Garden and Septentrional fault zones. The Matheux-Neiba Fault exhibits high hazard in the maps for 2% probability of exceedance in 50 years, although its slip rate is poorly constrained.

  6. Household Hazardous Waste and Demolition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Household wastes that are toxic, corrosive, ignitable, or reactive are known as Household Hazardous Waste (HHW). Household Hazardous Waste may be found during residential demolitions, and thus require special handling for disposal.

  7. Mechanical dyssynchrony evaluated by tissue Doppler cross-correlation analysis is associated with long-term survival in patients after cardiac resynchronization therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risum, Niels; Williams, Eric S; Khouri, Michel G

    2013-01-01

    -max was independently associated with improved survival when adjusted for QRS > 150 ms and aetiology {hazard ratio (HR) 0.35 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.16-0.77], P = 0.01}. Maximal activation delay performed significantly better than Yu index, OWD, and the presence of left bundle branch block (P ..., for difference between parameters). In subgroup analysis, patients without dyssynchrony and QRS between 120 and 150 ms showed a particularly poor survival [HR 4.3 (95% CI 1.46-12.59), P QRS between 120 and 150 ms]. Conclusion Mechanical dyssynchrony assessed...... by AD-max was associated with long-term survival after CRT and was significantly better associated compared with other TDI-derived indices. Patients without dyssynchrony and QRS between 120 and 150 ms had a particularly poor prognosis. These results indicate a valuable role for XCA in selection of CRT...

  8. Interval between Intra-Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy and Surgery for Locally Advanced Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Impacts on Effectiveness of Chemotherapy and on Overall Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Fung Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The interval between intra-arterial infusion chemotherapy (IAIC and surgery was investigated in terms of its effects on survival in patients with locally advanced oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC. Methods. This retrospective study analyzed 126 patients who had completed treatment modalities for stage IV OSCC. All patients were followed up for 3 years. Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression methods were used to determine how survival was affected by general factors, primary tumor volume, TNM stage, and duration of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Results. In 126 patients treated for locally advanced OSCC by preoperative induction IAIC using methotrexate, multivariate analysis of relevant prognostic factors showed that an IAIC duration longer than 90 days was significantly associated with poor prognosis (hazard ratio, 1.77; P=0.0259. Conclusions. Duration of IAIC is a critical factor in the effectiveness of multimodal treatment for locally advanced OSCC. Limiting the induction course to 90 days improves overall survival.

  9. Restaging and Survival Analysis of 4036 Ovarian Cancer Patients According to the 2013 FIGO Classification for Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, and Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosendahl, Mikkel; Høgdall, Claus Kim; Mosgaard, Berit Jul

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: With the 2013 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) staging for ovarian, fallopian tube, and primary peritoneal cancer, the number of substages changed from 10 to 14. Any classification of a malignancy should easily assign patients to prognostic groups, refer...... patients to individualized treatments, and allow benchmarking and comparison of patients and results between centers. The stage should reflect survival in particular. The objective of the study was to validate these requirements of the revised FIGO staging on a high number of ovarian cancer patients....... MATERIALS AND METHODS: Demographic, surgical, histological, and survival data from 4036 ovarian cancer patients were used in the analysis. Five-year survival rates (5YSR) and hazard ratios for the old and revised FIGO staging were calculated using Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox regression. RESULTS: A total...

  10. [Comparison liver resection with transarterial chemoembolization for Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer stage B hepatocellular carcinoma patients on long-term survival after SPSS propensity score matching].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Yang; Zhong, Jianhong; Guo, Zhe; Liang, Yongrong; Li, Lequn; Xiang, Bangde

    2014-03-18

    To compare the long-term survival of patients with Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) stage B hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) undergoing either liver resection or transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) after propensity score matching (PSM). One hundred sixty-seven and 70 BCLC-B HCC patients undergoing liver resection and TACE were retrospectively collected. PSM function of SPSS software was conducted to reduce confounding bias between the groups. And then survival analysis was performed for the matched data. Fifty-three pairs of patients were successfully matched. And then survival analysis showed that the median survival periods and their 95% confidence intervals were 35.0 (26.3-43.7)months in the liver resection group versus 20.0(15.0-25.0) months in the TACE group. The 1, 3, 5 and 7-year survival rates were 91.0%, 49.0%, 30.0% and 17.0% in the liver resection group versus 73.0%, 25.0%, 8.0% and 5.0% respectively in the TACE group (P = 0.001). Cox regression analysis revealed that TACE, total bilirubin ≥ 34.2 µmol/L, alpha fetoprotein ≥ 400 ng/ml and tumor number ≥ 3 were independent risk factors of survival (hazard ratio >1, P < 0.05). The balance of covariates may be achieved through PSM. And for patients with BCLC-B HCC, liver resection provides better long-term overall survival than TACE.

  11. Long-term disability and survival in traumatic brain injury: results from the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research Model Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Jordan C; Strauss, David J; Shavelle, Robert M; Paculdo, David R; Hammond, Flora M; Harrison-Felix, Cynthia L

    2013-11-01

    To document long-term survival in 1-year survivors of traumatic brain injury (TBI); to compare the use of the Disability Rating Scale (DRS) and FIM as factors in the estimation of survival probabilities; and to investigate the effect of time since injury and secular trends in mortality. Cohort study of 1-year survivors of TBI followed up to 20 years postinjury. Statistical methods include standardized mortality ratio, Kaplan-Meier survival curve, proportional hazards regression, and person-year logistic regression. Postdischarge from rehabilitation units. Population-based sample of persons (N=7228) who were admitted to a TBI Model Systems facility and survived at least 1 year postinjury. These persons contributed 32,505 person-years, with 537 deaths, over the 1989 to 2011 study period. Not applicable. Survival. Survival was poorer than that of the general population (standardized mortality ratio=2.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.9-2.3). Age, sex, and functional disability were significant risk factors for mortality (Pmodels had comparable predictive performance (C index: .80 vs .80; Akaike information criterion: 11,005 vs 11,015). Time since injury and current calendar year were not significant predictors of long-term survival (both P>.05). Long-term survival prognosis in TBI depends on age, sex, and disability. FIM and DRS are useful prognostic measures with comparable statistical performance. Age- and disability-specific mortality rates in TBI have not declined over the last 20 years. A survival prognosis calculator is available online (http://www.LifeExpectancy.org/tbims.shtml). Copyright © 2013 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio in complete blood count as a mortality predictor in breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimica, Ximena; Acevedo, Francisco; Oddo, David; Ibáñez, Carolina; Medina, Lidia; Kalergis, Alexis; Camus, Mauricio; Sánchez, César

    2016-06-01

    The white blood cell count is one of the most sensitive markers associated with inflammation. The neutrophil/lymphocyte count ratio may be an independent factor for breast cancer mortality. To assess the predictive value of the neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio for mortality in breast cancer. Review of the database of a cancer center of a University hospital. Patients with infiltrating breast cancer treated between 1997 and 2012 were selected. The pathology type and lymph node involvement were obtained from the pathology report. The expression of estrogen, progesterone and Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2) was determined by immunohistochemistry or in situ fluorescent hybridization (FISH). The absolute peripheral neutrophil and lymphocyte counts were obtained from a complete blood count obtained at least three months before treatment. Patients were followed for a median of 61 months (range 1-171). From 323 eligible patients, after excluding those in stage IV and those without an available complete blood count, 131 patients were analyzed (81 with negative receptors and 117 HER2 enriched). The neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio was similar in both types of tumors (2.1 and 1.91 respectively). Twenty two patients died during follow-up. Surviving patients with HER2 enriched tumors had a lower neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio than those who died (1.79 and 3.21 respectively, p < 0.01). In a multivariate analysis, including age, tumor stage and lymph node involvement as confounding factors, the neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio was still significantly associated with a risk of death with a hazard ratio of 2.56. A high neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio in the complete blood count can be a predictor of death in breast cancer.

  13. Hazard Function Estimation with Cause-of-Death Data Missing at Random

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Qihua; Dinse, Gregg E.; Liu, Chunling

    2012-01-01

    Hazard function estimation is an important part of survival analysis. Interest often centers on estimating the hazard function associated with a particular cause of death. We propose three nonparametric kernel estimators for the hazard function, all of which are appropriate when death times are subject to random censorship and censoring indicators can be missing at random. Specifically, we present a regression surrogate estimator, an imputation estimator, and an inverse probability weighted e...

  14. Prognostic role of the lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio in colorectal cancer: An up-to-date meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qingbin; Hu, Tao; Zheng, Erliang; Deng, Xiangbing; Wang, Ziqiang

    2017-06-01

    Although previous meta-analyses have proved that lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio (LMR) is a prognostic factor in solid cancers, its prognostic role in colorectal cancer (CRC) remains controversial. We, therefore, conducted this up-to-date meta-analysis to evaluate the prognostic role of the LMR in CRC. A systematic search was performed in PubMed and Embase for relevant studies in November 2016. Article assessing the prognostic role of LMR in CRC was enrolled in this meta-analysis. Data and characteristics of each study were extracted. A meta-analysis was performed to generate pooled hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival. Begg funnel plot was used to evaluate publication bias. Eleven studies published between 2014 and 2016 with a total of 9045 patients were enrolled in this meta-analysis. Our findings indicated that a low LMR predicted a worse OS (HR 1.57, 95% CI 1.30-1.90, P up-to-date meta-analysis shows that a low LMR is associated with poor survival in patients with CRC, although the publication bias is existed. Large-sample multicenter prospective cohort is needed to assess the role of the LMR in CRC patients.

  15. Pretreatment Lymphocyte Monocyte Ratio Predicts Long-Term Outcomes in Patients with Digestive System Tumor: A Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingwen Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The prognostic value of pretreatment lymphocyte monocyte ratio (LMR in digestive system cancer patients remains controversial. The aim of this study was to quantify the prognostic impact of this biomarker and assess its consistency in digestive system tumors. Methods. We searched “PubMed,” “Embase,” and “CBM” for published eligible studies before June 2016 and conducted a meta-analysis to estimate the pooled hazard ratios (HRs for disease recurrence and mortality focusing on LMR. Subgroup analyses, meta-regression, and sensitivity analyses were also performed. Results. A total of 22 cohort studies enrolling 12829 patients with digestive system cancer were included. The summary results showed that lower LMR was significantly associated with worse overall survival (OS, cancer-specific survival (CSS, and tumor disease or recurrence-free survival (DFS/RFS in analyses using the studies reporting HRs either by the univariate analyses (HR = 1.32, HR = 1.35, and HR = 1.26 for OS, CSS, and DFS/RFS, resp. or by multivariate analyses (HR = 1.21, HR = 1.18, and HR = 1.26 for OS, CSS, and DFS/RFS, resp.. Conclusion. Our results support the fact that decreased LMR indicates worse prognosis in multiple digestive system tumors.

  16. Early-Stage Classic Hodgkin Lymphoma: The Utilization of Radiation Therapy and Its Impact on Overall Survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parikh, Rahul R., E-mail: rparikh@chpnet.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai Beth Israel Medical Center and Mount Sinai St. Luke' s-Roosevelt Hospitals, Mount Sinai Health System, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York (United States); Grossbard, Michael L. [Division of Hematology-Oncology, Laura and Isaac Perlmutter Cancer Center, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Harrison, Louis B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Yahalom, Joachim [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Purpose: To examine the association between radiation therapy (RT) utilization and overall survival (OS) for patients with early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Methods and Materials: Using the National Cancer Database, we evaluated clinical features and survival outcomes among patients diagnosed with stage I/II HL from 1998 to 2011. The association between RT use, covariables, and outcome was assessed in a Cox proportional hazards regression model. Propensity score matching was performed to balance observed confounding factors. Survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Among the 41,943 patients in the National Cancer Database with stage I/II HL, 29,752 patients were analyzed for this study. Radiation therapy use was associated with younger age (≤40 years), favorable insured status, higher socioeconomic status (income, education), and treatment at comprehensive community cancer centers (all P<.05). Five-year OS for patients receiving RT was 94.5%, versus 88.9% for those not receiving RT (P<.01). Radiation therapy use was a significant predictor of OS in the “As-Treated” cohort (hazard ratio 0.53, 95% confidence interval 0.49-0.58, P<.01) and intention-to-treat analysis (P<.01). After propensity score matching based on clinicopathologic characteristics, RT use remained associated with improved OS (hazard ratio 0.46, 95% confidence interval 0.38-0.56, P<.01). Over the study period, RT utilization for this cohort decreased from 55% to 44%, most commonly because it was not part of the planned initial treatment strategy. Conclusions: Consolidation RT was associated with improved OS for patients with early-stage classic HL. We also have identified patient-specific variations in the use of RT that may be targeted to improve patient access to care.

  17. The effect of solar-geomagnetic activity during and after admission on survival in patients with acute coronary syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vencloviene, Jone; Babarskiene, Ruta; Milvidaite, Irena; Kubilius, Raimondas; Stasionyte, Jolanta

    2014-08-01

    A number of studies have established the effects of solar-geomagnetic activity on the human cardio-vascular system. It is plausible that the heliophysical conditions existing during and after hospital admission may affect survival in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). We analyzed data from 1,413 ACS patients who were admitted to the Hospital of Kaunas University of Medicine, Lithuania, and who survived for more than 4 days. We evaluated the associations between active-stormy geomagnetic activity (GMA), solar proton events (SPE), and solar flares (SF) that occurred 0-3 days before and after admission, and 2-year survival, based on Cox's proportional-hazards model, controlling for clinical data. After adjustment for clinical variables, active-stormy GMA on the 2nd day after admission was associated with an increased (by 1.58 times) hazard ratio (HR) of cardiovascular death (HR = 1.58, 95 % CI 1.07-2.32). For women, geomagnetic storm (GS) 2 days after SPE occurred 1 day after admission increased the HR by 3.91 times (HR = 3.91, 95 % CI 1.31-11.7); active-stormy GMA during the 2nd-3rd day after admission increased the HR by over 2.5 times (HR = 2.66, 95 % CI 1.40-5.03). In patients aged over 70 years, GS occurring 1 day before or 2 days after admission, increased the HR by 2.5 times, compared to quiet days; GS in conjunction with SF on the previous day, nearly tripled the HR (HR = 3.08, 95 % CI 1.32-7.20). These findings suggest that the heliophysical conditions before or after the admission affect the hazard ratio of lethal outcome; adjusting for clinical variables, these effects were stronger for women and older patients.

  18. Industrial hazard and safety handbook

    CERN Document Server

    King, Ralph W

    1979-01-01

    Industrial Hazard and Safety Handbook (Revised Impression) describes and exposes the main hazards found in industry, with emphasis on how these hazards arise, are ignored, are identified, are eliminated, or are controlled. These hazard conditions can be due to human stresses (for example, insomnia), unsatisfactory working environments, as well as secret industrial processes. The book reviews the cost of accidents, human factors, inspections, insurance, legal aspects, planning for major emergencies, organization, and safety measures. The text discusses regulations, codes of practice, site layou

  19. Prognostic Significance of Lymph Node Ratio in Metastatic Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseros, Evan A; Gebski, Val; Morgan, Gary J; Veness, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    The prognostic variables in patients with metastatic cutaneous nodal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) are well documented; however, the relationship between lymph node ratio (LNR) and outcome is not well researched. LNR represents the ratio of positive lymph nodes to total excised lymph nodes. We analyzed the correlation between LNR and outcome in patients who have undergone surgery for metastatic cutaneous nodal SCC of the head and neck. Analysis was performed on retrospectively collected data, identifying patients who underwent surgery at Westmead Hospital, Sydney. Pathology reports were reviewed to ascertain LNR. A log-rank test identified a specific LNR value to compare time to disease progression (TTDP) and overall survival (OS). Multivariate proportional hazard regression models were used to review outcome. In total, 193 males and 45 females with a median of age 68 years were identified, with a mean recorded LNR of 0.15. On multivariate analysis, an LNR cutpoint of 0.21 was a significant predictor of decreased TTDP [hazard ratio (HR) 2.34, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 4.40-0.49; p = 0.009] and OS (HR 2.75, 95 % CI 1.57-4.82; p 0.21. LNR is potentially an independent predictor of outcome in patients with metastatic cutaneous nodal SCC. The clinical relevance of this finding requires further validation.

  20. Empirical Bayes estimation for additive hazards regression models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Debajyoti; McHenry, M Brent; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Ghosh, Malay

    2009-09-01

    We develop a novel empirical Bayesian framework for the semiparametric additive hazards regression model. The integrated likelihood, obtained by integration over the unknown prior of the nonparametric baseline cumulative hazard, can be maximized using standard statistical software. Unlike the corresponding full Bayes method, our empirical Bayes estimators of regression parameters, survival curves and their corresponding standard errors have easily computed closed-form expressions and require no elicitation of hyperparameters of the prior. The method guarantees a monotone estimator of the survival function and accommodates time-varying regression coefficients and covariates. To facilitate frequentist-type inference based on large-sample approximation, we present the asymptotic properties of the semiparametric empirical Bayes estimates. We illustrate the implementation and advantages of our methodology with a reanalysis of a survival dataset and a simulation study.

  1. A protected area influences genotype-specific survival and the structure of a Canis hybrid zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, John F; Patterson, Brent R; Mahoney, Peter J

    2014-02-01

    It is widely recognized that protected areas can strongly influence ecological systems and that hybridization is an important conservation issue. However, previous studies have not explicitly considered the influence of protected areas on hybridization dynamics. Eastern wolves are a species of special concern and their distribution is largely restricted to a protected population in Algonquin Provincial Park (APP), Ontario, Canada, where they are the numerically dominant canid. We studied intrinsic and extrinsic factors influencing survival and cause-specific mortality of hybrid and parental canids in the three-species hybrid zone between eastern wolves, eastern coyotes, and gray wolves in and adjacent to APP. Mortality risk for eastern wolves in areas adjacent to APP was significantly higher than for other sympatric Canis types outside of APP, and for eastern wolves and other canids within APP. Outside of APP, the annual mortality rate of all canids by harvest (24%) was higher than for other causes of death (4-7%). Furthermore, eastern wolves (hazard ratio = 3.5) and nonresidents (transients and dispersing animals, hazard ratio = 2.7) were more likely to die from harvest relative to other Canis types and residents, respectively. Thus, eastern wolves dispersing from APP were especially vulnerable to harvest mortality. For residents, eastern wolf survival was more negatively influenced by increased road density than for other Canis types, further highlighting the sensitivity of eastern wolves to human disturbance. A cycle of dispersal from APP followed by high rates of mortality and hybridization appears to maintain eastern wolves at low density adjacent to APP, limiting the potential for expansion beyond the protected area. However, high survival and numerical dominance of eastern wolves within APP suggest that protected areas can allow rare hybridizing species to persist even if their demographic performance is compromised and barriers to hybridization are largely

  2. Survival in pediatric lung transplantation: The effect of center volume and expertise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad S; Zhang, Wei; Taylor, Rachel A; Dean McKenzie, E; Mallory, George B; Schecter, Marc G; Morales, David L S; Heinle, Jeffrey S; Adachi, Iki

    2015-08-01

    Institutional operative volume has been shown to impact outcomes of various procedures including lung transplantation (LTx). We sought to determine whether this holds true with pediatric LTx by comparing outcomes of adult centers (with larger overall volume) to those of pediatric centers (with smaller volume but more pediatric-specific experience). A retrospective analysis of the Organ Procurement and Transplant Network data was performed. Centers were categorized as either adult (LTx volume predominantly in adult patients), high-volume pediatric (HVP, ≥4 LTxs/year), or low-volume pediatric (LVP, HVP 3 [5%], LVP 8 [13%]). Although adult centers had larger overall LTx volume, their pediatric experiences were severely limited (median 1/year). In younger children, HVP centers were significantly better than LVP centers for patient survival (half-life: 7.3 vs 2.9 years, p = 0.002). Similarly, in older children and adolescents, HVP centers were significantly better than adult centers for patient survival (half-life: 4.6 vs 2.5 years, p = 0.001). Of note, even LVP centers tended to have longer patient survival than adult centers (p = 0.064). Multivariable analysis identified adult centers as an independent risk factor for graft failure (hazard ratio: 1.5, p < 0.001) as with LVP (hazard ratio: 1.3, p = 0.0078). Despite larger overall clinical volume, outcomes among pediatric LTx recipients in adult centers are not superior to those of pediatric centers. Not only center volume but pediatric-specific experience has an impact on outcomes in pediatric LTx. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. BCL2 genotypes and prostate cancer survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renner, Wilfried [Medical University of Graz, Clinical Institute of Medical and Chemical Laboratory Diagnostics, Graz (Austria); Langsenlehner, Uwe [GKK Outpatient Department, Division of Internal Medicine, Graz (Austria); Krenn-Pilko, Sabine; Langsenlehner, Tanja [Medical University of Graz, Department of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, Graz (Austria); Eder, Petra [University Hospital Wuerzburg, Department of Internal Medicine I, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    The antiapoptotic B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2) gene is a key player in cancer development and progression. A functional single-nucleotide polymorphism (c.-938C>A, rs2279115) in the inhibitory P2 BCL2 gene promoter has been associated with clinical outcomes in various types of cancer. Aim of the present study was to analyze the role of BCL2-938C>A genotypes in prostate cancer mortality. The association between BCL2-938C>A (rs2279115) genotypes and prostate cancer outcome was studied within the prospective PROCAGENE study comprising 702 prostate cancer patients. During a median follow-up time of 92 months, 120 (17.1%) patients died. A univariate Cox regression model showed a significant association of the CC genotype with reduced cancer-specific survival (CSS; hazard ratio, HR, 2.13, 95% confidence interval, CI, 1.10-4.12; p = 0.024) and overall survival (OS; HR 2.34, 95% CI 1.58-3.47; p < 0.001). In a multivariate Cox regression model including age at diagnosis, risk group, and androgen deprivation therapy, the CC genotype remained a significant predictor of poor CSS (HR 2.05, 95% CI 1.05-3.99; p = 0.034) and OS (HR 2.25, 95% CI 1.51-3.36; p < 0.001). This study provides evidence that the homozygous BCL2-938 CC genotype is associated with OS and C in prostate cancer patients. (orig.) [German] Das antiapoptotische Gen B cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2) spielt eine Schluesselrolle in der Entstehung und Progression von Krebserkrankungen. Ein funktioneller Einzelnukleotid-Polymorphismus (c.-938C>A, rs2279115) im inhibitorischen P2-BCL2-Promotor wurde mit dem klinischen Outcome verschiedener Krebserkrankungen verknuepft. Ziel der vorliegenden Studie war die Untersuchung der Rolle von BCL2-938C>A-Genotypen fuer die Mortalitaet bei Patienten mit Prostatakarzinom. Der Zusammenhang zwischen BCL2-938C>A-Genotypen (rs2279115) und dem Outcome bei Prostatakrebs wurde in der prospektiven PROCAGENE-Studie, die 702 Patienten mit Prostatakarzinom umfasste, untersucht. Waehrend der medianen

  4. Toxic Hazards in Aviation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-04-01

    Specificity in Drosophila Melanogaster . Mutation Res. 16, 1972, 363. 10. Zimmerman, F.K. and R. Schwaren. A Genetic Effect of Symmetric Dimethyl...showed signs of anorexia and general fatigue. Changing diets and forced feedings resulted in the survival of the remaining two dogs. A six-month chronic

  5. Volcanic hazards to airports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guffanti, M.; Mayberry, G.C.; Casadevall, T.J.; Wunderman, R.

    2009-01-01

    Volcanic activity has caused significant hazards to numerous airports worldwide, with local to far-ranging effects on travelers and commerce. Analysis of a new compilation of incidents of airports impacted by volcanic activity from 1944 through 2006 reveals that, at a minimum, 101 airports in 28 countries were affected on 171 occasions by eruptions at 46 volcanoes. Since 1980, five airports per year on average have been affected by volcanic activity, which indicates that volcanic hazards to airports are not rare on a worldwide basis. The main hazard to airports is ashfall, with accumulations of only a few millimeters sufficient to force temporary closures of some airports. A substantial portion of incidents has been caused by ash in airspace in the vicinity of airports, without accumulation of ash on the ground. On a few occasions, airports have been impacted by hazards other than ash (pyroclastic flow, lava flow, gas emission, and phreatic explosion). Several airports have been affected repeatedly by volcanic hazards. Four airports have been affected the most often and likely will continue to be among the most vulnerable owing to continued nearby volcanic activity: Fontanarossa International Airport in Catania, Italy; Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport in Alaska, USA; Mariscal Sucre International Airport in Quito, Ecuador; and Tokua Airport in Kokopo, Papua New Guinea. The USA has the most airports affected by volcanic activity (17) on the most occasions (33) and hosts the second highest number of volcanoes that have caused the disruptions (5, after Indonesia with 7). One-fifth of the affected airports are within 30 km of the source volcanoes, approximately half are located within 150 km of the source volcanoes, and about three-quarters are within 300 km; nearly one-fifth are located more than 500 km away from the source volcanoes. The volcanoes that have caused the most impacts are Soufriere Hills on the island of Montserrat in the British West Indies

  6. Identifying and modeling safety hazards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DANIELS,JESSE; BAHILL,TERRY; WERNER,PAUL W.

    2000-03-29

    The hazard model described in this paper is designed to accept data over the Internet from distributed databases. A hazard object template is used to ensure that all necessary descriptors are collected for each object. Three methods for combining the data are compared and contrasted. Three methods are used for handling the three types of interactions between the hazard objects.

  7. There's Life in Hazard Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mary Torsello; Toni McLellan

    The goals of hazard tree management programs are to maximize public safety and maintain a healthy sustainable tree resource. Although hazard tree management frequently targets removal of trees or parts of trees that attract wildlife, it can take into account a diversity of tree values. With just a little extra planning, hazard tree management can be highly beneficial...

  8. 77 FR 17573 - Hazard Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-26

    ..., 1915 and 1926 Hazard Communication; Final Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 77 , No. 58 / Monday... Administration 29 CFR Parts 1910, 1915, and 1926 RIN 1218-AC20 Hazard Communication AGENCY: Occupational Safety... modifying its Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) to conform to the United Nations' Globally Harmonized...

  9. On savings ratio.

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaochuan, Z.

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the factors that affect saving and consumption behaviours, in a context where some believe that the high savings ratio of the East Asia and oil-producing countries is one major cause for the global imbalances and the crisis. The paper elaborates on the factors behind the high savings ratios in East Asia and oil producing countries and low savings ratios in the United States. It argues that the high savings in East Asia can mainly be explained by cultural and structural fac...

  10. Polygenic hazard score to guide screening for aggressive prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seibert, Tyler M; Fan, Chun Chieh; Wang, Yunpeng

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To develop and validate a genetic tool to predict age of onset of aggressive prostate cancer (PCa) and to guide decisions of who to screen and at what age. DESIGN: Analysis of genotype, PCa status, and age to select single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with diagnosis...... ng/L, nodal metastasis, distant metastasis). The resulting polygenic hazard score is an assessment of individual genetic risk. The final model was applied to an independent dataset containing genotype and PSA screening data. The hazard score was calculated for these men to test prediction of survival......; the validation dataset comprised 6411 men. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Prediction with hazard score of age of onset of aggressive cancer in validation set. RESULTS: In the independent validation set, the hazard score calculated from 54 single nucleotide polymorphisms was a highly significant predictor of age...

  11. Epidemiology and survival of hepatocellular carcinoma in north-east Peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norsa'adah, Bachok; Nurhazalini-Zayani, Che Ghazali Che

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is relatively high in Southeast Asia. Globally, HCC has a high fatality rate and short survival. The objectives of this retrospective cohort study were to review the epidemiology and survival of HCC patients at a tertiary centre in north-east of Peninsular Malaysia. Subjects were adult HCC patients diagnosed by histopathology or radio-imaging. Secondary liver carcinoma was excluded. Kaplan Meier and multiple Cox proportional hazard survival analyses were used. Only 210 HCC cases from years 1987-2008, were included in the final analysis. The number of cases was increasing annually. The mean age was 55.0 (SD 13.9) years with male:female ratio of 3.7:1. Approximately 57.6% had positive hepatitis B virus, 2.4% hepatitis C virus, 20% liver cirrhosis and 8.1% chronic liver disease. Only 2.9% had family history and 9.0% had frequently consumed alcohol. Most patients presented with abdominal pain or discomfort and had hepatomegaly, 47.9% had an elevated α-fetoprotein level of 800 IU/ml or more, 51.9% had multiple tumors and 44.8% involved multiple liver lobes. Approximately 63.3% were in stage 3 and 23.4% in stage 4, and 82.9% did not receive any treatment. The overall median survival time was 1.9 months (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.5, 2.3). The 1-month, 6-month, 1-year and 2-year survival rates were 71.8%, 23.3%, 13.0% and 7.3% respectively. Significant prognostic factors were Malay ethnicity [Adjusted hazard ratio (AHR) 1.6; 95%CI: 1.0, 2.5; p=0.030], no chemotherapy [AHR 1.7; 95%CI: 1.1, 2.5; p=0.017] and Child-Pugh class C [AHR 2.6; 95%CI: 1.4, 4.9; p=0.002]. HCC in our study affected a wide age range, mostly male, in advanced stage of disease, with no treatment and very low survival rates. Primary prevention should be advocated in view of late presentation and difficulty of treatment. Vaccination of hepatitis virus and avoidance of liver toxins are to be encouraged.

  12. Interpreting overall survival results when progression-free survival benefits exist in today's oncology landscape: a metastatic renal cell carcinoma case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Y

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Yiyun Tang,1 Paul Bycott,1 Örjan Åkerborg,2 Linus Jönsson,2 Sylvie Negrier,3 Connie Chen4 1Pfizer Global Research and Development, La Jolla, CA, USA; 2OptumInsight, Stockholm, Sweden; 3Medical Oncology Department, University of Lyon, Lyon, France; 4Pfizer Global Outcomes Research, New York, NY, USA Background: The debate surrounding the acceptance of progression-free survival (PFS as an intermediate endpoint to overall survival (OS has grown in recent years, due to the challenges in demonstrating an OS benefit within clinical trials today. PFS is generally a good predictor of OS for cases where survival post-progression (SPP is short, and less so when SPP is long. SPP depends on multiple factors, including residual effect from experimental treatment and effect from crossover or other subsequent therapies, posing unique challenges into the translation of PFS benefit into OS. Methods: The objective of this analysis was to conduct simulations investigating how increasing SPP impacts PFS translation to OS, utilizing data from the AXIS (axitinib versus sorafenib in advanced metastatic renal cell carcinoma trial. The underlying assumption was a treatment benefit in PFS (the PFS distribution parameters were chosen to be equal to median PFS in the AXIS trial but no treatment effect on SPP, implying that PFS improvement is directly reflected in OS improvement. Results: The probability of a statistically significant difference between arms for OS decreased from 54.7% to 6.1% when median SPP was increased from one to 20 months. The probability of the hazard ratio of OS being ≥0.9 was similarly increased from 24.3% to 72.6%, even though the hazard ratio for PFS was 0.69. Conclusion: The present study shows that when simulated SPP is added to trial PFS data, the existing PFS benefit is diluted. Knowing that the AXIS treatment arms are well balanced with respect to post-trial treatments, we conclude that the PFS to OS benefit translation is primarily

  13. Evaluation of beta-blockers and survival among hypertensive patients with renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, William P; Lohse, Christine M; Zaid, Harras B; Cheville, John C; Boorjian, Stephen A; Leibovich, Bradley C; Thompson, R Houston

    2017-01-01

    Beta-blocker use is associated with improved survival for multiple nonurologic malignancies. Our objective was to evaluate the association between beta-blocker use and survival among surgically managed hypertensive patients with clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). Hypertensive patients with ccRCC treated with either radical or partial nephrectomy between 2000 and 2010 were identified from our Nephrectomy Registry. Beta-blocker use within 90 days before surgery was identified. The associations between beta-blocker use and risk of disease progression, death from renal cell carcinoma (RCC), and all-cause mortality were assessed using Cox proportional hazards regression models. In total, 913 hypertensive patients were identified who underwent either partial or radical nephrectomy for ccRCC. Of these, 104 (11%) had documented beta-blocker use within 90 days before surgery. At last follow-up (median 8.2y among survivors), 258 patients showed progression (median 1.6y following surgery), and 369 patients had died (median 4.1y following surgery), including 138 who died of RCC. After adjusting for PROG (progression-free survival) and SSIGN (cancer-specific survival) scores, beta-blocker use was not significantly associated with the risk of disease progression (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.94; 95% CI: 0.61-1.47; P = 0.80) or the risk of death from RCC (HR = 0.74; 95% CI: 0.38-1.41; P = 0.35). Similarly, on multivariable analysis adjusting for clinicopathologic features, there was not a significant association between beta-blocker use and the risk of all-cause mortality (HR = 0.83; 95% CI: 0.59-1.16; P = 0.27). Beta-blocker use for hypertension within 90 days before surgery was not associated with the risk of progression, death from RCC, or death from any cause. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Adjuvant chemotherapy is associated with improved survival in patients with stage II colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadaban, Leigh; Rauscher, Garth; Aklilu, Mebea; Villenes, Dana; Freels, Sally; Maker, Ajay V

    2016-11-15

    The role of adjuvant chemotherapy in patients with stage II colon cancer remains to be elucidated and its use varies between patients and institutions. Currently, clinical guidelines suggest discussing adjuvant chemotherapy for patients with high-risk stage II disease in the absence of conclusive randomized controlled trial data. To further investigate this relationship, the objective of the current study was to determine whether an association exists between overall survival (OS) and adjuvant chemotherapy in patients stratified by age and pathological risk features. Data from the National Cancer Data Base were analyzed for demographics, tumor characteristics, management, and survival of patients with stage II colon cancer who were diagnosed from 1998 to 2006 with survival information through 2011. Pearson Chi-square tests and binary logistic regression were used to analyze disease and demographic data. Survival analysis was performed with the log-rank test and Cox proportional hazards regression modeling. Propensity score weighting was used to match cohorts. Among 153,110 patients with stage II colon cancer, predictors of receiving chemotherapy included age Improved and clinically relevant OS was associated with the receipt of adjuvant chemotherapy in all patient subgroups regardless of high-risk tumor pathologic features (poor or undifferentiated histology, chemotherapy regimen, even after adjustment for covariates and propensity score weighting (hazard ratio, 0.76; Pchemotherapy regimens. In what to the authors' knowledge is the largest group of patients with stage II colon cancer evaluated to date, improved OS was found to be associated with adjuvant chemotherapy regardless of treatment regimen, patient age, or high-risk pathologic risk features. Cancer 2016;122:3277-3287. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  15. Dietary glycemic and insulin scores and colorectal cancer survival by tumor molecular biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keum, NaNa; Yuan, Chen; Nishihara, Reiko; Zoltick, Emilie; Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Martinez Fernandez, Alejandro; Zhang, Xuehong; Hanyuda, Akiko; Liu, Li; Kosumi, Keisuke; Nowak, Jonathan A; Jhun, Iny; Soong, T Rinda; Morikawa, Teppei; Tabung, Fred K; Qian, Zhi Rong; Fuchs, Charles S; Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A; Chan, Andrew T; Ng, Kimmie; Ogino, Shuji; Giovannucci, Edward L; Wu, Kana

    2017-06-15

    Accumulating evidence suggests that post-diagnostic insulin levels may influence colorectal cancer (CRC) survival. Yet, no previous study has examined CRC survival in relation to a post-diagnostic diet rich in foods that increase post-prandial insulin levels. We hypothesized that glycemic and insulin scores (index or load; derived from food frequency questionnaire data) may be associated with survival from specific CRC subtypes sensitive to the insulin signaling pathway. We prospectively followed 1,160 CRC patients from the Nurses' Health Study (1980-2012) and Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (1986-2012), resulting in 266 CRC deaths in 10,235 person-years. CRC subtypes were defined by seven tumor biomarkers (KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA mutations, and IRS1, IRS2, FASN and CTNNB1 expression) implicated in the insulin signaling pathway. For overall CRC and each subtype, hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) for an increase of one standard deviation in each of glycemic and insulin scores were estimated using time-dependent Cox proportional hazards model. We found that insulin scores, but not glycemic scores, were positively associated with CRC mortality (HR = 1.19, 95% CI = 1.02-1.38 for index; HR = 1.23, 95% CI = 1.04-1.47 for load). The significant positive associations appeared more pronounced among PIK3CA wild-type cases and FASN-negative cases, with HR ranging from 1.36 to 1.60 across insulin scores. However, we did not observe statistically significant interactions of insulin scores with PIK3CA, FASN, or any other tumor marker (p interaction > 0.12). While additional studies are needed for definitive evidence, a high-insulinogenic diet after CRC diagnosis may contribute to worse CRC survival. © 2017 UICC.

  16. Effect of VDRA on survival in incident hemodialysis patients: results of the FARO-2 observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messa, Piergiorgio; Cozzolino, Mario; Brancaccio, Diego; Cannella, Giuseppe; Malberti, Fabio; Costanzo, Anna Maria; di Luzio Paparatti, Umberto; Festa, Vincenzo; Gualberti, Giuliana; Mazzaferro, Sandro

    2015-02-06

    Mortality rate among patients with stage five chronic kidney disease (CKD) maintained on hemodialysis (HD) is high. Although evidence suggests that use of Vitamin D Receptor Activators (VDRA) in CKD patients increases survival, few studies have examined the effect of VDRA in incident HD patients. The FARO-2 study evaluated the clinical outcome of VDRA therapy on mortality in incident HD patients. FARO-2 was a longitudinal epidemiological study performed on 568 incident HD patients followed prospectively from 26 dialysis centers over a 3-year period. Data were collected every 6 months using a questionnaire, obtaining clinical, biochemical and therapeutic parameters. Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox proportional hazard regression models were used to determine cumulative probability of time-to-death and adjusted hazard ratios. 568 patients (68% male) with an average age of 65.5 years were followed up. Mean dialysis duration at study entry was 3 months. VDRA use increased from 46% at 6 months to 54.7% at 36 months of follow-up (p = 0.08). No difference was observed in the presence of comorbid diseases at baseline in patients with and without VDRA therapy. Cumulative probability of survival at 24 months was 74.5% (95% CI: 70.2-78.3). Patients receiving VDRA therapy showed a significant increase in survival at 24 months (80.7%; 95% CI: 75.7-84.8) compared to those without (63.3%; 95% CI: 54.8-70.7, p FARO-2 indicate that in incident HD patients VDRA therapy was associated with increased survival.

  17. Adjuvant Radiation Therapy Treatment Time Impacts Overall Survival in Gastric Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMillan, Matthew T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Department of Surgery, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Ojerholm, Eric [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Roses, Robert E., E-mail: Robert.Roses@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Surgery, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Plastaras, John P.; Metz, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Mamtani, Ronac [Department of Hematology/Oncology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Karakousis, Giorgos C.; Fraker, Douglas L.; Drebin, Jeffrey A. [Department of Surgery, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Stripp, Diana; Ben-Josef, Edgar [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Datta, Jashodeep [Department of Surgery, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: Prolonged radiation therapy treatment time (RTT) is associated with worse survival in several tumor types. This study investigated whether delays during adjuvant radiation therapy impact overall survival (OS) in gastric cancer. Methods and Materials: The National Cancer Data Base was queried for patients with resected gastric cancer who received adjuvant radiation therapy with National Comprehensive Cancer Network–recommended doses (45 or 50.4 Gy) between 1998 and 2006. RTT was classified as standard (45 Gy: 33-36 days, 50.4 Gy: 38-41 days) or prolonged (45 Gy: >36 days, 50.4 Gy: >41 days). Cox proportional hazards models evaluated the association between the following factors and OS: RTT, interval from surgery to radiation therapy initiation, interval from surgery to radiation therapy completion, radiation therapy dose, demographic/pathologic and operative factors, and other elements of adjuvant multimodality therapy. Results: Of 1591 patients, RTT was delayed in 732 (46%). Factors associated with prolonged RTT were non-private health insurance (OR 1.3, P=.005) and treatment at non-academic facilities (OR 1.2, P=.045). Median OS and 5-year actuarial survival were significantly worse in patients with prolonged RTT compared with standard RTT (36 vs 51 months, P=.001; 39 vs 47%, P=.005); OS worsened with each cumulative week of delay (P<.0004). On multivariable analysis, prolonged RTT was associated with inferior OS (hazard ratio 1.2, P=.002); the intervals from surgery to radiation therapy initiation or completion were not. Prolonged RTT was particularly detrimental in patients with node positivity, inadequate nodal staging (<15 nodes examined), and those undergoing a cycle of chemotherapy before chemoradiation therapy. Conclusions: Delays during adjuvant radiation therapy appear to negatively impact survival in gastric cancer. Efforts to minimize cumulative interruptions to <7 days should be considered.

  18. Survival Outcome after Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Surgery for Early Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao-Jun; Dai, Wan-Rong; Xu, Yong

    2017-08-22

    Treatment modalities in medically compromised patients with early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are controversial. Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) or stereotactic ablative radiotherapy has been increasingly recognized as a favorable alternative to surgical resection for early-stage NSCLC. Many retrospective analyses compared the efficacy of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) with surgery for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, the efficacy between SBRT and surgery regimens for patients with early-stage NSCLC remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate the efficacy between SBRT and surgery. Publications on comparison SBRT with Surgery in treatment of early stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) from 2011 to 2017 were collected. Retrospective trials analyzed the summary hazard ratios (HRs) of overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), local control survival (LC), regional control survival (RC), loco-regional control survival (LRC), and distant control survival (DC) between SBRT and Surgery. The major outcomes measures were hazard ratios (HRs). Meta-analysis Revman 5.3 software was used to analyze the combined Pooled HRs using fixed- or random-effects models according to the heterogeneity. A systematic literature search was conducted including14 studies. In this meta-analysis, patients with SBRT achieved inferior OS, DFS, LC, RC, LRC and DC, compared with surgery. In this study we found more favorable outcomes with stage I NSCLC treated with SBRT. The surgery had no obvious advantages in this meta-analysis. Although surgery has become the recommended treatment at present, SBRT has potential to be an alternative treatment as a novel non-invasive radiation therapy modality in patients with stage I-II NSCLC.

  19. Recovery of polyclonal immunoglobulins one year after autologous stem cell transplantation as a long-term predictor marker of progression and survival in multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Calle, Verónica; Cerdá, Seila; Labrador, Jorge; Sobejano, Eduardo; González-Mena, Beatriz; Aguilera, Carmen; Ocio, Enrique María; Vidriales, María Belén; Puig, Noemí; Gutiérrez, Norma Carmen; García-Sanz, Ramón; Alonso, José María; López, Rosa; Aguilar, Carlos; de Coca, Alfonso García; Hernández, Roberto; Hernández, José Mariano; Escalante, Fernando; Mateos, María-Victoria

    2017-05-01

    Immunoparesis or suppression of polyclonal immunoglobulins is a very common condition in newly diagnosed myeloma patients. However, the recovery of polyclonal immunoglobulins in the setting of immune reconstitution after autologous stem cell transplantation and its effect on outcome has not yet been explored. We conducted this study in a cohort of 295 patients who had undergone autologous transplantation. In order to explore the potential role of immunoglubulin recovery as a dynamic predictor of progression or survival after transplantation, conditional probabilities of progression-free survival and overall survival were estimated according to immunoglobulin recovery at different time points using a landmark approach. One year after transplant, when B-cell reconstitution is expected to be completed, among 169 patients alive and progression free, 88 patients (52%) showed immunoglobulin recovery and 81 (48%) did not. Interestingly, the group with immunoglobulin recovery had a significantly longer median progression-free survival than the group with persistent immunoparesis (median 60.4 vs. 27.9 months, respectively; Hazard Ratio: 0.45, 95%Confidence Interval: 0.31-0.66; P<0.001), and improved overall survival (11.3 vs. 7.3 years; Hazard Ratio: 0.45, 95%Confidence Interval: 0.27-0.74; P=0.002). Furthermore, the percentage of normal plasma cells detected by flow cytometry in the bone marrow assessed at day 100 after transplantation was associated with the immunoglobulin recovery at that time and may predict immunoglobulin recovery in the subsequent months: nine months and one year. In conclusion, the recovery of polyclonal immunoglobulins one year after autologous transplantation in myeloma patients is an independent long-term predictor marker for progression and survival. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  20. Time trends in incidence rates and survival of newly diagnosed stage IV breast cancer by tumor histology: a population-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Meglio, Antonio; Freedman, Rachel A; Lin, Nancy U; Barry, William T; Metzger-Filho, Otto; Keating, Nancy L; King, Tari A; Sertoli, Mario Roberto; Boccardo, Francesco; Winer, Eric P; Vaz-Luis, Ines

    2016-06-01

    Few contemporary data are available that compare incidence and survival of metastatic breast cancer between ductal and lobular carcinomas. Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-9 registries, we identified 10,639 patients with de novo metastatic breast cancer diagnosed from 1990 to 2011. Annual age-adjusted incidence rates and annual percent changes (APCs) were analyzed. Multivariable Cox regression models were used to investigate the impact of year of diagnosis and histology on overall survival. 9250 (86.9 %) patients had ductal and 1389 (13.1 %) had lobular carcinomas. Metastatic breast cancer incidence increased slightly over time for ductal (APC = +1.7, 95 % confidence interval (CI) = +1.0 to +2.4) and lobular carcinomas (APC = +3.0, 95 % CI = +1.8 to +4.3). Median overall survival was 22 months among the whole cohort. More recent year of diagnosis was associated with better overall survival only for patients with ductal carcinomas (interaction p value = 0.006), with an adjusted hazard ratio of death for every five-year increment in the date of diagnosis of 0.93 (95 % CI =  0.91-0.95) among ductal carcinomas, compared with 1.05 (95 % CI = 0.95-1.10) among lobular carcinomas. Overall survival was longer for lobular versus ductal carcinomas (28 versus 21 months, respectively; adjusted hazard ratio of death = 0.93, 95 % CI = 0.87-0.99), but the magnitude of this effect was attenuated among the cohort restricted to hormone receptor-positive tumors. In this population-based analysis, incidence rates of metastatic breast cancer at presentation increased slightly over time for both histologies, and particularly for lobular tumors. A modest improvement in metastatic breast cancer median overall survival was observed, but was apparently limited to ductal carcinomas.

  1. Survival and Associated Risk Factors of Selective Caries Removal Treatments in Primary Teeth: A Retrospective Study in a High Caries Risk Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melgar, Ximena C; Opdam, Niek J M; Britto Correa, Marcos; Franzon, Renata; Demarco, Flávio Fernando; Araujo, Fernando B; Casagrande, Luciano

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to analyze the survival probability of selective caries removal (SCR) treatments in the primary teeth of children with high caries experience and factors potentially associated with treatment failure. The sample included SCR treatments conducted in anterior and posterior teeth without sedation or general anesthesia among children attending a university dental service. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was used to estimate the longevity of restorations and multivariate Cox regression with shared frailty was used to assess risk factors. A total of 284 SCR treatments in 88 children (aged 5.2 ± 1.91 years) with high caries experience (mean dmft/DMFT = 11.1 ± 5.04) were analyzed. The 3-year survival reached 48.8%, with an annual failure rate of 21.2%. Restorative failures (n = 60) were found more frequently compared to pulp complications (n = 12). SCR performed in anterior primary teeth were more prone to failure (hazard ratio = 3.6, 95% CI: 1.94; 6.71). Patients with a higher amount of visible plaque experienced more failures in SCR treatments (hazard ratio 3.0, 95% CI:1.27; 7.07). In this retrospective study, SCR showed restricted survival when compared to other prospective clinical trials. Patient-related factors, especially the young age and high caries experience of the children, may represent a challenge for restoration survival. Regardless of the caries removal technique or restorative material, cariogenic biofilm has a negative effect on the survival of restorations, probably by acting directly on material deterioration and, particularly, on the development of new caries lesions of rapid progression. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Association of a Locus in the CAMTA1 Gene With Survival in Patients With Sporadic Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogh, Isabella; Lin, Kuang; Tiloca, Cinzia; Rooney, James; Gellera, Cinzia; Diekstra, Frank P.; Ratti, Antonia; Shatunov, Aleksey; van Es, Michael A.; Proitsi, Petroula; Jones, Ashley; Sproviero, William; Chiò, Adriano; McLaughlin, Russell Lewis; Sorarù, Gianni; Corrado, Lucia; Stahl, Daniel; Bo, Roberto Del; Cereda, Cristina; Castellotti, Barbara; Glass, Jonathan D.; Newhouse, Steven; Dobson, Richard; Smith, Bradley N.; Topp, Simon; van Rheenen, Wouter; Meininger, Vincent; Melki, Judith; Morrison, Karen E.; Shaw, Pamela J.; Leigh, P. Nigel; Andersen, Peter M.; Comi, Giacomo P.; Ticozzi, Nicola; Mazzini, Letizia; D’Alfonso, Sandra; Traynor, Bryan J.; Van Damme, Philip; Robberecht, Wim; Brown, Robert H.; Landers, John E.; Hardiman, Orla; Lewis, Cathryn M.; van den Berg, Leonard H.; Shaw, Christopher E.; Veldink, Jan H.; Silani, Vincenzo; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Powell, John

    2017-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating adult-onset neurodegenerative disorder with a poor prognosis and a median survival of 3 years. However, a significant proportion of patients survive more than 10 years from symptom onset. OBJECTIVE To identify gene variants influencing survival in ALS. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS This genome-wide association study (GWAS) analyzed survival in data sets from several European countries and the United States that were collected by the Italian Consortium for the Genetics of ALS and the International Consortium on Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Genetics. The study population included 4256 patients with ALS (3125 [73.4%] deceased) with genotype data extended to 7 174 392 variants by imputation analysis. Samples of DNA were collected from January 1, 1993, to December 31, 2009, and analyzed from March 1, 2014, to February 28, 2015. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Cox proportional hazards regression under an additive model with adjustment for age at onset, sex, and the first 4 principal components of ancestry, followed by meta-analysis, were used to analyze data. Survival distributions for the most associated genetic variants were assessed by Kaplan-Meier analysis. RESULTS Among the 4256 patients included in the analysis (2589 male [60.8%] and 1667 female [39.2%]; mean [SD] age at onset, 59 [12] years), the following 2 novel loci were significantly associated with ALS survival: at 10q23 (rs139550538; P = 1.87 × 10−9) and in the CAMTA1 gene at 1p36 (rs2412208, P = 3.53 × 10−8). At locus 10q23, the adjusted hazard ratio for patients with the rs139550538 AA or AT genotype was 1.61 (95% CI, 1.38–1.89; P = 1.87 × 10−9), corresponding to an 8-month reduction in survival compared with TT carriers. For rs2412208 CAMTA1, the adjusted hazard ratio for patients with the GG or GT genotype was 1.17 (95% CI, 1.11–1.24; P = 3.53 × 10−8), corresponding to a 4-month reduction in survival compared with TT carriers

  3. Survival Forests with R-Squared Splitting Rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Chen, Xiaolin; Li, Gang

    2017-12-21

    In modeling censored data, survival forest models are a competitive nonparametric alternative to traditional parametric or semiparametric models when the function forms are possibly misspecified or the underlying assumptions are violated. In this work, we propose a survival forest approach with trees constructed using a novel pseudo R2 splitting rules. By studying the well-known benchmark data sets, we find that the proposed model generally outperforms popular survival models such as random survival forest with different splitting rules, Cox proportional hazard model, and generalized boosted model in terms of C-index metric.

  4. Difference and ratio plots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Anders Jørgen; Holmskov, U; Bro, Peter

    1995-01-01

    hitherto unnoted differences between controls and patients with either rheumatoid arthritis or systemic lupus erythematosus. For this we use simple, but unconventional, graphic representations of the data, based on difference plots and ratio plots. Differences between patients with Burkitt's lymphoma...... and systemic lupus erythematosus from another previously published study (Macanovic, M. and Lachmann, P.J. (1979) Clin. Exp. Immunol. 38, 274) are also represented using ratio plots. Our observations indicate that analysis by regression analysis may often be misleading....

  5. Social integration and survival after diagnosis of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Elizabeth A; Kawachi, Ichiro; Poole, Elizabeth M; Tworoger, Shelley S; Giovannucci, Edward L; Fuchs, Charles S; Bao, Ying

    2018-02-15

    Although larger social networks have been associated with lower all-cause mortality, few studies have examined whether social integration predicts survival outcomes among patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). The authors examined the association between social ties and survival after CRC diagnosis in a prospective cohort study. Participants included 896 women in the Nurses' Health Study who were diagnosed with stage I, II, or III CRC between 1992 and 2012. Stage was assigned using the American Joint Committee on Cancer criteria. Social integration was assessed every 4 years since 1992 using the Berkman-Syme Social Network Index, which included marital status, social network size, contact frequency, religious participation, and other social group participation. During follow-up, there were 380 total deaths, 167 of which were due to CRC. In multivariable analyses, women who were socially integrated before diagnosis had a subsequent reduced risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 0.65; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.46-0.92) and CRC mortality (HR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.38-1.06) compared with women who were socially isolated. In particular, women with more intimate ties (family and friends) had lower all-cause mortality (HR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.42-0.88) and CRC mortality (HR, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.34-1.03) compared with those with few intimate ties. Participation in religious or community activities was not found to be related to outcomes. The analysis of postdiagnosis social integration yielded similar results. Socially integrated women were found to have better survival after a diagnosis of CRC, possibly due to beneficial caregiving from their family and friends. Interventions aimed at strengthening social network structures to ensure access to care may be valuable programmatic tools in the management of patients with CRC. Cancer 2018;124:833-40. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  6. Value of Positive Lymph Node Ratio for Predicting Postoperative Distant Metastasis and Prognosis in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jia; Hu, Wenhao; Pang, Linrong; Chen, Jun; Yang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between positive lymph node ratio (PLNR) and postoperative distant metastasis and prognosis in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). 167 ESCC patients with regional lymph node metastasis, who underwent radical esophagectomy and lymphadenectomy at the Ningbo Yinzhou People's Hospital between October 2005 and December 2010, were enrolled in this study. The prognostic value of PLNR was calculated by univariate Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and multivariate Cox proportional hazard model analysis. After a median follow-up time of 34 months, 88 (52.7%) of the 167 patients had distant metastasis and 76 (45.5%) had died. Patients with a PLNR of less than 0.15 had a 5-year distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) rate of 33.3% while those with a PLNR greater than 0.15 had a 5-year DMFS rate of 25.5% (log-rank test, p = 0.002). Multivariate analysis indicated that a PLNR > 0.15 was an independent poor prognostic factor for DMFS (hazard ratio (HR) 1.92, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.21-3.05) and overall survival (OS) (HR 2.08, 95% CI 1.26-3.43). This analysis was adjusted for patient age, sex, smoking behavior, and pT stage. The PLNR is an independent prognostic factor for predicting postoperative distant metastasis and prognosis in ESCC, and patients with a PLNR ≤ 0.15 have better OS. © 2015 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  7. Survival and human papillomavirus in oropharynx cancer in TAX 324: a subset analysis from an international phase III trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posner, M R; Lorch, J H; Goloubeva, O; Tan, M; Schumaker, L M; Sarlis, N J; Haddad, R I; Cullen, K J

    2011-05-01

    The association between human papillomavirus (HPV) and overall survival (OS) in oropharynx cancer (OPC) was retrospectively examined in TAX 324, a phase III trial of sequential therapy for locally advanced head and neck cancer. Accrual for TAX 324 was completed in 2003 and data updated through 2008. Pretherapy tumor biopsies were studied by PCR for human papillomavirus type 16 and linked to OS, progression-free survival (PFS) and demographics. Of 264 patients with OPC, 111 (42%) had evaluable biopsies; 56 (50%) were HPV+ and 55 (50%) were HPV-. HPV+ patients were significantly younger (54 versus 58 years, P = 0.02), had T1/T2 primary cancers (49% versus 20%, P = 0.001), and had a performance status of zero (77% versus 49%, P = 0.003). OS and PFS were better for HPV+ patients (OS, hazard ratio = 0.20, P aggressive treatment.

  8. Recreational physical activity and survival in African-American women with ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Sarah E; Camacho, Fabian; Peres, Lauren C; Alberg, Anthony J; Bandera, Elisa V; Bondy, Melissa; Cote, Michele L; Funkhouser, Ellen; Moorman, Patricia G; Peters, Edward S; Qin, Bo; Schwartz, Ann G; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill; Terry, Paul; Schildkraut, Joellen M

    2018-01-01

    While recreational physical activity (RPA) has been associated with reduced mortality in breast, colorectal, and prostate cancers, evidence for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is limited. Most EOC studies have been in predominantly white populations, although inactivity is more prevalent and survival is poorer among African-American (AA) women. We examined RPA before and after EOC diagnosis and associations with survival among AA women. We analyzed data from 264 EOC survivors enrolled in a population-based, case-control study who completed surveys that included questions about pre- and post-diagnosis RPA. Data were collected on RPA frequency, intensity, and duration before diagnosis and approximately 1 year after the baseline interview. We calculated metabolic equivalent of task (MET)-hours/week for pre- and post-diagnosis RPA, and evaluated associations with risk of mortality using Cox proportional hazards models. RPA before diagnosis was not associated with mortality. Hazard ratios (HRs) for post-diagnosis RPA were  0-9 MET-hours/week and 0.53 (95% CI 0.21, 1.35) for > 9 MET-hours/week. Our results suggest that RPA may be inversely associated with mortality among AA women with ovarian cancer, although it is possible that the present study was underpowered to detect an association. There is a clear need for more studies of RPA after diagnosis in EOC survivors with attention to potential differences by race.

  9. Survival of Patients with Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Enrolled in Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrieta, Oscar; Carmona, Amir; Ramírez-Tirado, Laura Alejandra; Flores-Estrada, Diana; Macedo-Pérez, Eleazar Omar; Martínez-Hernández, Jorge Negueb; Corona-Cruz, José Francisco; Cardona, Andrés F; de la Garza, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Up-to-date oncological therapy has been accomplished through the results of clinical trials (CTs). We analyzed the overall survival (OS) of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and its relation to CT enrollment. The study included 1,042 patients with advanced NSCLC treated at the Instituto Nacional de Cancerología. All patients received treatment according to the national and international guidelines. Data were collected from medical records. Patients were subgrouped on the basis of their CT enrollment as follows: participants in any CT (ACT), exclusively intervention CTs (ICT) or exclusively pharmaceutical-sponsored CTs (PCT). The CT enrollment effect was assessed through a multivariate Cox proportional hazards model. Thirty percent of the patients were in ACT, 28.3% in ICT and 13.7% in PCT. Female gender (p = 0.001), adenocarcinoma histology (p = 0.018), positive EGFR mutation (p = 0.006), and better ECOG performance status (<2) (p ≤ 0.0001) were more frequent in patients enrolled in CT; further, tobacco smoking (p ≤ 0.0001) and KRAS mutation (p = 0.001) were more frequent in patients who were not enrolled in a CT. Enrollment in ACT was associated with a better OS (hazard ratio: 0.47-0.74). NSCLC patients enrolled in a CT have an improved survival in an independent manner to other prognostic factors. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. The Survival of Class V Composite Restorations and Analysis of Marginal Discoloration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J-H; Cho, J; Lee, Y; Cho, B-H

    The aims of this retrospective clinical study were to analyze the longevity of class V composite restorations and compare the results obtained from clinical and laboratory evaluation of marginal discoloration. A total of 186 restorations were evaluated with modified US Public Health Service criteria. Longevity and associated variables were analyzed with the Kaplan-Meier method and a Cox proportional hazard model. Restorations with marginal discoloration were additionally evaluated using digital photographs and epoxy resin replicas under a stereomicroscope. The mean survival time was 15.0 years, with five- and 10-year survival rates of 95.5% and 83.1%, respectively. Z250 had a higher risk of failure (hazard ratio=7.01, 95% confidence interval=2.07-23.72) than Z100. In addition, the presence of occlusal wear facets and bleeding on probing were associated with an increased risk of failure of the restorations. However, the use of an adhesive system (Scotchbond Multi-Purpose or Clearfil SE Bond) did not affect the longevity of the restorations. The results of laboratory evaluation were significantly different from clinical evaluation (p<0.001, McNemar test). Among 55 restorations rated as Bravo in the clinical evaluation, 24 restorations (43.6%) were determined to have penetrating discoloration on laboratory evaluation. When evaluating aged composite restorations, surface refurbishment and the use of a microscope are recommended, which will be helpful in determining the need for timely repair or replacement.

  11. Smoking and body mass index and survival in pancreatic cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelucchi, Claudio; Galeone, Carlotta; Polesel, Jerry; Manzari, Marco; Zucchetto, Antonella; Talamini, Renato; Franceschi, Silvia; Negri, Eva; La Vecchia, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to provide further information on the role of personal characteristics and lifestyle factors, including obesity, diabetes, and tobacco smoking, on survival from pancreatic cancer. We obtained follow-up data of pancreatic cancer patients enrolled in 2 Italian case-control studies. Information on characteristics and habits up to the time of diagnosis was collected by trained interviewers. Vital status was ascertained through population registers and record linkage with health system databases. Hazard ratios (HRs) of all-cause mortality and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. Follow-up information was retrieved for 648 cancer patients. Compared with subjects with body mass index of less than 25 kg/m, the HRs were 1.14 (95% CI, 0.94-1.39) for overweight (ie, 25-29.9 kg/m) and 1.32 (95% CI, 0.98-1.79) for obese (ie, ≥30 kg/m) patients (trend P = 0.046). The HRs were 1.37 (95% CI, 1.14-1.65) for ever, 1.30 (95% CI, 1.03-1.65) for ex-smokers, and 1.42 (95% CI, 1.16-1.73) for current versus never smokers. Increasing amount and duration of smoking were associated with reduced survival after pancreatic cancer. No association emerged with diabetes, alcohol consumption, and diet. Smoking and overweight before diagnosis may play a role in the prognosis of pancreatic cancer, besides its etiology.

  12. Increased tumour ADC value during chemotherapy predicts improved survival in unresectable pancreatic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishiofuku, Hideyuki; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Kichikawa, Kimihiko [Nara Medical University, Department of Radiology and IVR Center, Kashihara-city, Nara (Japan); Marugami, Nagaaki [Nara Medical University, Department of Endoscopy and Ultrasound, Kashihara-city, Nara (Japan); Sho, Masayuki; Akahori, Takahiro; Nakajima, Yoshiyuki [Nara Medical University, Department of Surgery, Kashihara-city, Nara (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    To investigate whether changes to the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of primary tumour in the early period after starting chemotherapy can predict progression-free survival (PFS) or overall survival (OS) in patients with unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Subjects comprised 43 patients with histologically confirmed unresectable pancreatic cancer treated with first-line chemotherapy. Minimum ADC values in primary tumour were measured using the selected area ADC (sADC), which excluded cystic and necrotic areas and vessels, and the whole tumour ADC (wADC), which included whole tumour components. Relative changes in ADC were calculated from baseline to 4 weeks after initiation of chemotherapy. Relationships between ADC and both PFS and OS were modelled by Cox proportional hazards regression. Median PFS and OS were 6.1 and 11.0 months, respectively. In multivariate analysis, sADC change was the strongest predictor of PFS (hazard ratio (HR), 4.5; 95 % confidence interval (CI), 1.7-11.9; p = 0.002). Multivariate Cox regression analysis for OS revealed sADC change and CRP as independent predictive markers, with sADC change as the strongest predictive biomarker (HR, 6.7; 95 % CI, 2.7-16.6; p = 0.001). Relative changes in sADC could provide a useful imaging biomarker to predict PFS and OS with chemotherapy for unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. (orig.)

  13. Survival among Never-Smokers with Lung Cancer in the Cancer Care Outcomes Research and Surveillance Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clément-Duchêne, Christelle; Stock, Shannon; Xu, Xiangyan; Chang, Ellen T; Gomez, Scarlett Lin; West, Dee W; Wakelee, Heather A; Gould, Michael K

    2016-01-01

    Differences in patient characteristics and outcomes have been observed among current, former, and never-smokers with lung cancer, but most prior studies included few never-smokers and were not prospective. We used data from a large, prospective study of lung cancer care and outcomes in the United States to compare characteristics of never-smokers and smokers with lung cancer and to examine survival among the never-smokers. Smoking status at diagnosis was determined by self-report and survival was determined from medical records and cancer registries, with follow-up through June 2010 or later. Cox regression was used to examine the association between smoking and survival, and to identify predictors of survival among never-smokers. Among 3,410 patients with lung cancer diagnosed between September 1, 2003 and October 14, 2005 who completed a baseline patient survey, there were 274 never-smokers (8%), 1,612 former smokers (47%), 1,496 current smokers or smokers who quit recently (44%), and 28 with missing information about smoking status (Never-smokers appeared more likely than former and current/recent smokers to be female and of Asian or Hispanic race/ethnicity, and to have adenocarcinoma histology, fewer comorbidities, private insurance, and higher income and education. Compared with never-smokers, the adjusted hazard of death from any cause was 29% higher among former smokers (hazard ratio, 1.29; 95% confidence interval, 1.08-1.55), and 39% higher among current/recent smokers (hazard ratio, 1.39; 95% confidence interval, 1.16-1.67). Factors predicting worse overall survival among never-smokers included Hispanic ethnicity, severe comorbidity, undifferentiated histology, and regional or distant stage. Never-smoking Hispanics appeared more likely to have regional or advanced disease at diagnosis and less likely to undergo surgical resection, although these differences were not statistically significant. Never-smokers with lung cancer are more likely than ever

  14. Radiation Hazard Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    NASA technology has made commercially available a new, inexpensive, conveniently-carried device for protection, of people exposed to potentially dangerous levels of microwave radiation. Microwaves are radio emissions of extremely high frequency. They can be hazardous but the degree of hazard is not yet well understood. Generally, it is believed that low intensity radiation of short duration is not harmful but that exposure to high levels can induce deep internal burns, affecting the circulatory and nervous systems, and particularly the eyes. The Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has established an allowable safe threshold of exposure. However, people working near high intensity sources of microwave energy-for example, radar antennas and television transmitters-may be unknowingly exposed to radiation levels beyond the safe limit. This poses not only a personal safety problem but also a problem for employers in terms of productivity loss, workman's compensation claims and possible liability litigation. Earlier-developed monitoring devices which warn personnel of dangerous radiation levels have their shortcomings. They can be cumbersome and awkward to use while working. They also require continual visual monitoring to determine if a person is in a dangerous area of radiation, and they are relatively expensive, another deterrent to their widespread adoption. In response to the need for a cheaper and more effective warning system, Jet Propulsion Laboratory developed, under NASA auspices, a new, battery-powered Microwave Radiation Hazard Detector. To bring the product to the commercial market, California Institute Research Foundation, the patent holder, granted an exclusive license to Cicoil Corporation, Chatsworth, California, an electronic components manufacturer.

  15. Survival of Patients on Hemodialysis and Predictors of Mortality: a Single-Centre Analysis of Time-Dependent Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossareh, Shahrzad; Farrokhi, Farhat; Zebarjadi, Marjan

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the outcome and predictors of survival in hemodialysis patients of Hasheminejad Kidney Center where a comprehensive dialysis care program has been placed since 2004. Data of 560 hemodialysis patients were used to evaluate 9-year survival rates and predictors of mortality. Cox regression models included comorbidities as well as averaged and 6-month-averaged time-dependent values of laboratory findings as independent factors. Survival rates were 91.9%, 66.0%, 46.3%, and 28.5%,  at 1, 3, 5, and 9 years, respectively, in all patients and 90.8%, 61.6%, 42.1%, and 28.0% in 395 incident patients starting hemodialysis after 2004. Adjusted survival models demonstrated age, male sex, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and high-risk vascular access as baseline predictors of mortality, as well as averaged low hemoglobin level (hazard ratio [HR], 1.98; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.36 to 2.90) and a single-pool KT/V patients have relatively comparable survival rates with high-profile dialysis centers. Aiming to better achieve the recommended targets, especially hemoglobin and nutritional and bone metabolism factors, should be considered for optimal dialysis outcomes.

  16. Statins and risk of diabetes: an analysis of electronic medical records to evaluate possible bias due to differential survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danaei, Goodarz; García Rodríguez, Luis A; Fernandez Cantero, Oscar; Hernán, Miguel A

    2013-05-01

    Two meta-analyses of randomized trials of statins found increased risk of type 2 diabetes. One possible explanation is bias due to differential survival when patients who are at higher risk of diabetes survive longer under statin treatment. We used electronic medical records from 500 general practices in the U.K. and included data from 285,864 men and women aged 50-84 years from January 2000 to December 2010. We emulated the design and analysis of a hypothetical randomized trial of statins, estimated the observational analog of the intention-to-treat effect, and adjusted for differential survival bias using inverse-probability weighting. During 1.2 million person-years of follow-up, there were 13,455 cases of type 2 diabetes and 8,932 deaths. Statin initiation was associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes. The hazard ratio (95% CI) of diabetes was 1.45 (1.39-1.50) before adjusting for potential confounders and 1.14 (1.10-1.19) after adjustment. Adjusting for differential survival did not change the estimates. Initiating atorvastatin and simvastatin was associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes. In this sample of the general population, statin therapy was associated with 14% increased risk of type 2 diabetes. Differential survival did not explain this increased risk.

  17. No association between germline variation in catechol-O-methyltransferase and colorectal cancer survival in postmenopausal women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passarelli, Michael N.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Makar, Karen W.; Burnett-Hartman, Andrea N.; Phipps, Amanda I.; David, Sean P.; Hsu, Li; Harrison, Tabitha A.; Hutter, Carolyn M.; Duggan, David J.; White, Emily; Chan, Andrew T.; Peters, Ulrike

    2013-01-01

    Objective Sex-steroid hormones play a role in colorectal cancer (CRC) development, but little is known about their influence on tumor progression and metastasis. Because catechol-O-methyltransferase activity (COMT; 22q11.21) is an important component of estrogen-mediated carcinogenesis, we hypothesized that germline variation in COMT may be associated with CRC survival. Methods We identified 10 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that tagged variation across both isoforms of COMT in 2,458 women with CRC from the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS), Postmenopausal Hormones Supplementary Study to the Colon Cancer Family Registry (PMH-CCFR), VITamins And Lifestyle (VITAL) Study, and Women’s Health Initiative (WHI). All four studies participate in the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium (GECCO). Results Over a median follow-up of 7 years across all studies, there were 799 deaths, including 566 from CRC. Accounting for multiple comparisons, no associations between the SNPs and CRC-specific or overall survival reached statistical significance, including the well-characterized Val108/158Met polymorphism (rs4680; hazard ratio per minor allele [HR], 1.04; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.92–1.17 for CRC-specific survival and 1.01; 0.90–1.14 for overall survival). Conclusions In this large study of women with CRC, we found no evidence that common inherited variation in COMT is associated with survival-time after diagnosis. PMID:23880798

  18. Pretreatment Evaluation of Microcirculation by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Predicts Survival in Primary Rectal Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeVries, Alexander Friedrich [Department of Radio-Oncology, Academic Teaching Hospital Feldkirch, Feldkirch (Austria); Piringer, Gudrun, E-mail: gudrun.piringer@hotmail.com [Department of Oncology, Wels-Grieskirchen Medical Hospital, Wels (Austria); Kremser, Christian; Judmaier, Werner [Department of Radiology, Innsbruck Medical University, Innsbruck (Austria); Saely, Christoph Hubert [Department of Medicine and Cardiology, Academic Teaching Hospital Feldkirch, Feldkirch (Austria); Lukas, Peter [Department of Radio-Oncology, Innsbruck Medical University, Innsbruck (Austria); Öfner, Dietmar [Department of Surgery, Paracelsus Medical University, Salzburg (Austria)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic value of the perfusion index (PI), a microcirculatory parameter estimated from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), which integrates information on both flow and permeability, to predict overall survival and disease-free survival in patients with primary rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 83 patients with stage cT3 rectal cancer requiring neoadjuvant chemoradiation were investigated with DCE-MRI before start of therapy. Contrast-enhanced dynamic T{sub 1} mapping was obtained, and a simple data analysis strategy based on the calculation of the maximum slope of the tissue concentration–time curve divided by the maximum of the arterial input function was used as a measure of tumor microcirculation (PI), which integrates information on both flow and permeability. Results: In 39 patients (47.0%), T downstaging (ypT0-2) was observed. During a mean (±SD) follow-up period of 71 ± 29 months, 58 patients (69.9%) survived, and disease-free survival was achieved in 45 patients (54.2%). The mean PI (PImean) averaged over the group of nonresponders was significantly higher than for responders. Additionally, higher PImean in age- and gender-adjusted analyses was strongly predictive of therapy nonresponse. Most importantly, PImean strongly and significantly predicted disease-free survival (unadjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.85 [ 95% confidence interval, 1.35-2.54; P<.001)]; HR adjusted for age and sex, 1.81 [1.30-2.51]; P<.001) as well as overall survival (unadjusted HR 1.42 [1.02-1.99], P=.040; HR adjusted for age and sex, 1.43 [1.03-1.98]; P=.034). Conclusions: This analysis identifies PImean as a novel biomarker that is predictive for therapy response, disease-free survival, and overall survival in patients with primary locally advanced rectal cancer.

  19. Metastasis-Free Survival Is a Strong Surrogate of Overall Survival in Localized Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wanling; Regan, Meredith M; Buyse, Marc; Halabi, Susan; Kantoff, Philip W; Sartor, Oliver; Soule, Howard; Clarke, Noel W; Collette, Laurence; Dignam, James J; Fizazi, Karim; Paruleker, Wendy R; Sandler, Howard M; Sydes, Matthew R; Tombal, Bertrand; Williams, Scott G; Sweeney, Christopher J

    2017-09-20

    Purpose Adjuvant therapy for intermediate-risk and high-risk localized prostate cancer decreases the number of deaths from this disease. Surrogates for overall survival (OS) could expedite the evaluation of new adjuvant therapies. Methods By June 2013, 102 completed or ongoing randomized trials were identified and individual patient data were collected from 28 trials with 28,905 patients. Disease-free survival (DFS) and metastasis-free survival (MFS) were determined for 21,140 patients from 24 trials and 12,712 patients from 19 trials, respectively. We evaluated the surrogacy of DFS and MFS for OS by using a two-stage meta-analytic validation model by determining the correlation of an intermediate clinical end point with OS and the correlation of treatment effects on both the intermediate clinical end point and OS. Results Trials enrolled patients from 1987 to 2011. After a median follow-up of 10 years, 45% of 21,140 men and 45% of 12,712 men experienced a DFS and MFS event, respectively. For DFS and MFS, 61% and 90% of the patients, respectively, were from radiation trials, and 63% and 66%, respectively, had high-risk disease. At the patient level, Kendall's τ correlation with OS was 0.85 and 0.91 for DFS and MFS, respectively. At the trial level, R(2) was 0.86 (95% CI, 0.78 to 0.90) and 0.83 (95% CI, 0.71 to 0.88) from weighted linear regression of 8-year OS rates versus 5-year DFS and MFS rates, respectively. Treatment effects-measured by log hazard ratios-for the surrogates and OS were well correlated ( R(2), 0.73 [95% CI, 0.53 to 0.82] for DFS and 0.92 [95% CI, 0.81 to 0.95] for MFS). Conclusion MFS is a strong surrogate for OS for localized prostate cancer that is associated with a significant risk of death from prostate cancer.

  20. Pre- and post-diagnostic β-blocker use and lung cancer survival: A population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weberpals, Janick; Jansen, Lina; Haefeli, Walter E; Hoffmeister, Michael; Wolkewitz, Martin; Herk-Sukel, Myrthe P P van; Vissers, Pauline A J; Brenner, Hermann

    2017-06-06

    Beta-blockers have been associated with decreased cancer mortality. However, evidence for lung cancer is sparse and reported beneficial effects might be based on biased analyses. In this so far largest study we investigated the association between β-blocker use and lung cancer survival. Therefore, patients with a lung cancer diagnosis between April 1998 and December 2011 were selected from a database linkage of the Netherlands Cancer Registry and the PHARMO Database Network. After matching eligible patients on the propensity score, adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using Cox proportional hazards regression to investigate the association between pre-diagnostic and time-dependent β-blocker use and overall survival. Duration and dose-response analyses and stratified analyses by β-blocker type, histological subgroups and stage were conducted. Of 3,340 eligible lung cancer patients, 1437 (43%) took β-blockers four months prior to diagnosis. Pre-diagnostic β-blocker use was not associated with overall survival (HR 1.00 (0.92-1.08)) in the adjusted model. Time-dependent post-diagnostic analysis showed similar results with a HR of 1.03 (0.94-1.11). Trend analyses showed no association for cumulative dose (HR 0.99 (0.97-1.02)) and cumulative duration (HR 1.00 (0.96-1.05)). In conclusion, β-blocker use is not associated with reduced mortality among lung cancer patients.

  1. The Impact of Local and Regional Disease Extent on Overall Survival in Patients With Advanced Stage IIIB/IV Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higginson, Daniel S., E-mail: daniel.higginson@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Chen, Ronald C.; Tracton, Gregg; Morris, David E.; Halle, Jan; Rosenman, Julian G.; Stefanescu, Mihaela; Pham, Erica [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Socinski, Mark A. [Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology and Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Marks, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Patients with advanced stage IIIB or stage IV non-small cell lung carcinoma are typically treated with initial platinum-based chemotherapy. A variety of factors (eg, performance status, gender, age, histology, weight loss, and smoking history) are generally accepted as predictors of overall survival. Because uncontrolled pulmonary disease constitutes a major cause of death in these patients, we hypothesized that clinical and radiographic factors related to intrathoracic disease at diagnosis may be prognostically significant in addition to conventional factors. The results have implications regarding the selection of patients for whom palliative thoracic radiation therapy may be of most benefit. Methods and Materials: We conducted a pooled analysis of 189 patients enrolled at a single institution into 9 prospective phase II and III clinical trials involving first-line, platinum-based chemotherapy. Baseline clinical and radiographic characteristics before trial enrollment were analyzed as possible predictors for subsequent overall survival. To assess the relationship between anatomic location and volume of disease within the thorax and its effect on survival, the pre-enrollment computed tomography images were also analyzed by contouring central and peripheral intrapulmonary disease. Results: On univariate survival analysis, multiple pulmonary-related factors were significantly associated with worse overall survival, including pulmonary symptoms at presentation (P=.0046), total volume of intrathoracic disease (P=.0006), and evidence of obstruction of major bronchi or vessels on prechemotherapy computed tomography (P<.0001). When partitioned into central and peripheral volumes, central (P<.0001) but not peripheral (P=.74) disease was associated with worse survival. On multivariate analysis with known factors, pulmonary symptoms (hazard ratio, 1.46; P=.042), central disease volume (hazard ratio, 1.47; P=.042), and bronchial/vascular compression (hazard ratio, 1

  2. Extremes in body mass index affect overall survival in women with cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Leslie H; Jackson, Amanda L; Soo, Adrianne E; Orrey, Danielle C; Gehrig, Paola A; Kim, Kenneth H

    2016-06-01

    To examine the effect of BMI on pathologic findings, cancer recurrence and survival in cervical cancer patients. A retrospective cohort study of cervical cancer patients treated from July 2000 to March 2013 was performed. BMI was calculated, and patients were classified by BMI. The primary outcome was overall survival (OS). Secondary outcomes included stage, histopathology, disease-specific survival (DSS) and recurrence free survival (RFS). Kaplan-Meier survival curves were generated and compared using Cox proportional hazard ratios. Of 632 eligible patients, 24 (4%) were underweight, 191 (30%) were normal weight, 417 (66%) were overweight/obese. There was no difference in age (p=0.91), stage at presentation (p=0.91), grade (p=0.46), or histology (p=0.76) between weight categories. There were fewer White patients in the underweight (54%) and overweight/obese (58%) groups compared to the normal weight (71%) group (p=0.04). After controlling for prognostic factors, underweight and overweight/obese patients had worse median RFS than normal weight patients (7.6 v 25.0months, p=0.01 and 20.3 v 25.0months, p=0.03). Underweight patients also had worse OS (10.4 v 28.4months, p=0.031) and DSS (13.8 v 28.4months, p=0.04) compared to normal weight patients. Overweight/obese patients had worse OS than normal weight patients (22.2 v 28.4months, p=0.03) and a trend toward worse DSS (21.9 v 28.4months, p=0.09). Both extremes of weight (underweight and overweight/obesity) were associated with worse survival in patients with cervical cancer. Optimizing weight in cervical cancer patients may improve outcomes in these patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Obesity and survival among women with ovarian cancer: results from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagle, C M; Dixon, S C; Jensen, A; Kjaer, S K; Modugno, F; deFazio, A; Fereday, S; Hung, J; Johnatty, S E; Fasching, P A; Beckmann, M W; Lambrechts, D; Vergote, I; Van Nieuwenhuysen, E; Lambrechts, S; Risch, H A; Rossing, M A; Doherty, J A; Wicklund, K G; Chang-Claude, J; Goodman, M T; Ness, R B; Moysich, K; Heitz, F; du Bois, A; Harter, P; Schwaab, I; Matsuo, K; Hosono, S; Goode, E L; Vierkant, R A; Larson, M C; Fridley, B L; Høgdall, C; Schildkraut, J M; Weber, R P; Cramer, D W; Terry, K L; Bandera, E V; Paddock, L; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, L; Wentzensen, N; Yang, H P; Brinton, L A; Lissowska, J; Høgdall, E; Lundvall, L; Whittemore, A; McGuire, V; Sieh, W; Rothstein, J; Sutphen, R; Anton-Culver, H; Ziogas, A; Pearce, C L; Wu, A H; Webb, P M

    2015-09-01

    Observational studies have reported a modest association between obesity and risk of ovarian cancer; however, whether it is also associated with survival and whether this association varies for the different histologic subtypes are not clear. We undertook an international collaborative analysis to assess the association between body mass index (BMI), assessed shortly before diagnosis, progression-free survival (PFS), ovarian cancer-specific survival and overall survival (OS) among women with invasive ovarian cancer. We used original data from 21 studies, which included 12 390 women with ovarian carcinoma. We combined study-specific adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) using random-effects models to estimate pooled HRs (pHR). We further explored associations by histologic subtype. Overall, 6715 (54%) deaths occurred during follow-up. A significant OS disadvantage was observed for women who were obese (BMI: 30-34.9, pHR: 1.10 (95% confidence intervals (CIs): 0.99-1.23); BMI: ⩾35, pHR: 1.12 (95% CI: 1.01-1.25)). Results were similar for PFS and ovarian cancer-specific survival. In analyses stratified by histologic subtype, associations were strongest for women with low-grade serous (pHR: 1.12 per 5 kg m(-2)) and endometrioid subtypes (pHR: 1.08 per 5 kg m(-2)), and more modest for the high-grade serous (pHR: 1.04 per 5 kg m(-2)) subtype, but only the association with high-grade serous cancers was significant. Higher BMI is associated with adverse survival among the majority of women with ovarian cancer.

  4. Survival, Risk Factors, and Effect of Treatment in 101 Patients With Calciphylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, James T; El-Azhary, Rokea A; Patzelt, Michelle T; Weaver, Amy L; Albright, Robert C; Bridges, Alina D; Claus, Paul L; Davis, Mark D P; Dillon, John J; El-Zoghby, Ziad M; Hickson, LaTonya J; Kumar, Rajiv; McBane, Robert D; McCarthy-Fruin, Kathleen A M; McEvoy, Marian T; Pittelkow, Mark R; Wetter, David A; Williams, Amy W

    2016-10-01

    To report on the survival and the associations of treatments upon survival of patients with calciphylaxis seen at a single center. Using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision diagnosis code of 275.49 and the keyword "calciphylaxis" in the dismissal narrative, we retrospectively identified 101 patients with calciphylaxis seen at our institution between January 1, 1999, through September 20, 2014, using a predefined, consensus-developed classification scheme. The average age of patients was 60 years: 81 (80.2%) were women; 68 (68.0%) were obese; 19 (18.8%) had stage 0 to 2 chronic kidney disease (CKD), 19 (18.9%) had stage 3 or 4 CKD; 63 (62.4%) had stage 5 or 5D (dialysis) CKD. Seventy-five patients died during follow-up. Six-month survival was 57%. Lack of surgical debridement was associated with insignificantly lower 6-month survival (hazard ratio [HR]=1.99; 95% CI, 0.96-4.15; P=.07) and significantly poorer survival for the entire duration of follow-up (HR=1.98; 95% CI, 1.15-3.41; P=.01), which was most pronounced in stage 5 or 5D CKD (HR=1.91; 95% CI, 1.03-3.56; P=.04). Among patients with stage 5/5D CKD, subtotal parathyroidectomy (performed only in patients with hyperparathyroidism) was associated with better 6-month (HR=0.12; 95% CI, 0.02-0.90; P=.04) and overall survival (HR= 0.37; 95% CI, 0.15-0.87; P=.02). Calciphylaxis is associated with a high mortality rate. Significantly effective treatments included surgical debridement and subtotal parathyroidectomy in patients with stage 5/5D CKD with hyperparathyroidism. Treatments with tissue-plasminogen activator, sodium thiosulfate, and hyperbaric oxygen therapy were not associated with higher mortality. Copyright © 2016 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Single nucleotide polymorphisms within interferon signaling pathway genes are associated with colorectal cancer susceptibility and survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun Lu

    Full Text Available Interferon (IFN signaling has been suggested to play an important role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Our study aimed to examine potentially functional genetic variants in interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3, IRF5, IRF7, type I and type II IFN and their receptor genes with respect to colorectal cancer (CRC risk and clinical outcome. Altogether 74 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were covered by the 34 SNPs genotyped in a hospital-based case-control study of 1327 CRC cases and 758 healthy controls from the Czech Republic. We also analyzed these SNPs in relation to overall survival and event-free survival in a subgroup of 483 patients. Seven SNPs in IFNA1, IFNA13, IFNA21, IFNK, IFNAR1 and IFNGR1 were associated with CRC risk. After multiple testing correction, the associations with the SNPs rs2856968 (IFNAR1 and rs2234711 (IFNGR1 remained formally significant (P = 0.0015 and P<0.0001, respectively. Multivariable survival analyses showed that the SNP rs6475526 (IFNA7/IFNA14 was associated with overall survival of the patients (P = 0.041 and event-free survival among patients without distant metastasis at the time of diagnosis, P = 0.034. The hazard ratios (HRs for rs6475526 remained statistically significant even after adjustment for age, gender, grade and stage (P = 0.029 and P = 0.036, respectively, suggesting that rs6475526 is an independent prognostic marker for CRC. Our data suggest that genetic variation in the IFN signaling pathway genes may play a role in the etiology and survival of CRC and further studies are warranted.

  6. Impact of dialysis modality on technique survival in end-stage renal disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Hak; Park, Sun-Hee; Lim, Jeong-Hoon; Park, Young-Jae; Kim, Sang Un; Lee, Kyung-Hee; Kim, Kyung-Hoon; Park, Seung Chan; Jung, Hee-Yeon; Kwon, Owen; Choi, Ji-Young; Cho, Jang-Hee; Kim, Chan-Duck; Kim, Yong-Lim

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzed the risk factors for technique survival in dialysis patients and compared technique survival rates between hemodialysis (HD) and peritoneal dialysis (PD) in a prospective cohort of Korean patients. A total of 1,042 patients undergoing dialysis from September 2008 to June 2011 were analyzed. The dialysis modality was defined as that used 90 days after commencing dialysis. Technique survival was compared between the two dialysis modalities, and the predictive risk factors were evaluated. The dialysis modality was an independent risk factor predictive of technique survival. PD had a higher risk for technique failure than HD (hazard ratio [HR], 10.8; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.9 to 62.0; p = 0.008) during a median follow-up of 11.0 months. In the PD group, a high body mass index (BMI) was an independent risk factor for technique failure (HR, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.0 to 1.8; p = 0.036). Peritonitis was the most common cause of PD technique failure. The difference in technique survival between PD and HD was more prominent in diabetic patients with a good nutritional status and in non-diabetic patients with a poor nutritional status. In a prospective cohort of Korean patients with end-stage renal disease, PD was associated with a higher risk of technique failure than HD. Diabetic patients with a good nutritional status and non-diabetic patients with a poor nutritional status, as well as patients with a higher BMI, had an inferior technique survival rate with PD compared to HD.

  7. Single nucleotide polymorphisms within interferon signaling pathway genes are associated with colorectal cancer susceptibility and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shun; Pardini, Barbara; Cheng, Bowang; Naccarati, Alessio; Huhn, Stefanie; Vymetalkova, Veronika; Vodickova, Ludmila; Buchler, Thomas; Hemminki, Kari; Vodicka, Pavel; Försti, Asta

    2014-01-01

    Interferon (IFN) signaling has been suggested to play an important role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Our study aimed to examine potentially functional genetic variants in interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), IRF5, IRF7, type I and type II IFN and their receptor genes with respect to colorectal cancer (CRC) risk and clinical outcome. Altogether 74 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were covered by the 34 SNPs genotyped in a hospital-based case-control study of 1327 CRC cases and 758 healthy controls from the Czech Republic. We also analyzed these SNPs in relation to overall survival and event-free survival in a subgroup of 483 patients. Seven SNPs in IFNA1, IFNA13, IFNA21, IFNK, IFNAR1 and IFNGR1 were associated with CRC risk. After multiple testing correction, the associations with the SNPs rs2856968 (IFNAR1) and rs2234711 (IFNGR1) remained formally significant (P = 0.0015 and P<0.0001, respectively). Multivariable survival analyses showed that the SNP rs6475526 (IFNA7/IFNA14) was associated with overall survival of the patients (P = 0.041 and event-free survival among patients without distant metastasis at the time of diagnosis, P = 0.034). The hazard ratios (HRs) for rs6475526 remained statistically significant even after adjustment for age, gender, grade and stage (P = 0.029 and P = 0.036, respectively), suggesting that rs6475526 is an independent prognostic marker for CRC. Our data suggest that genetic variation in the IFN signaling pathway genes may play a role in the etiology and survival of CRC and further studies are warranted.

  8. Climbing Stairs, Handrail Use, and Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stessman, J; Rottenberg, Y; Jacobs, J M

    2017-01-01

    Negotiating stairs is identified as a challenging task by older people, and using a handrail to climb stairs is a compensatory gait strategy to overcome mobility difficulties. We examine the association between handrail use to climb stairs at increasing ages, and long term survival. Data were collected by the Jerusalem Longitudinal Study, which is a prospective study of a representative sample from the 1920-1921 birth-cohort living in West Jerusalem. Comprehensive assessment at home in 1990, 1998, and 2005, at ages 70 (n=446), 78 (n=897), and 85 (n=1041) included direct questioning concerning handrail use for climbing stairs. Mortality data were collected from age 70-90. The frequency of handrail use to climb stairs at ages 70, 78, 85 years was 23.1% (n=103/446), 41.0% (n=368/897), and 86.7% (n=903/1041) respectively. Handrail use was associated throughout follow-up with a consistent pattern of negative demographic, functional and medical parameters. Between ages 70-78, 70-90, 78-85, 78-90, and 85-90, survival was significantly lower among subjects using a handrail, with unadjusted mortality Hazard Ratios of HR 1.57 (95%CI, 1.01-2.42), HR 1.65 (95%CI, 1.27-2.14), HR 1.78 (95%CI, 1.41-2.25), HR 1.71 (95%CI, 1.41-2.06), and HR 1.53 (95%CI, 1.01-2.33) respectively. HR's remained significant at all ages after adjusting for sociodemographic factors (gender, education, marital, and financial status), and common medical conditions (ischemic heart disease, hypertension, diabetes, chronic pain), as well as between ages 78-85 and 78-90 after adjusting for functional covariables (self-rated health, physical activity, depression, BMI and ADL difficulties). Using a handrail to climb stairs is increasingly common with rising age, was associated with a negative profile of health parameters and is associated with subsequent mortality.

  9. The Paradoxical Relationship Between Donor Distance and Survival After Heart Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Todd C; Magruder, J Trent; Grimm, Joshua C; Kemp, Clinton D; Suarez-Pierre, Alejandro; Zehr, Kenton J; Mandal, Kaushik; Whitman, Glenn J; Conte, John V; Higgins, Robert S; Cameron, Duke E; Sciortino, Christopher M

    2017-05-01

    Concerns over prolonged allograft ischemia have limited the widespread adoption of long-distance organ procurement in heart transplantation (HT). We sought to assess whether donor distance from the center of transplantation independently affects mortality. We queried the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) database for adults undergoing isolated HT from 2005 to 2012. Risk-adjusted Cox proportional hazards models were constructed for the primary outcomes of 30-day and 1-year mortality, and the independent impact of donor distance from transplantation center at the time of procurement was assessed. We included 14,588 heart transplant recipients. The mean distance from location of the donor heart to transplantation center was 184.4 ± 214.6 miles; 1,214 HTs (8.3%) occurred at the same location as the donor heart. Ischemic times were inversely related to the distance from the site of donor procurement to recipient transplantation. After risk adjustment, longer donor distances (in miles) were associated with a significantly lower risk of mortality at both 30 days (hazard ratio [HR] 0.9993, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.9988 to 0.9998, p distances between donor location and center of heart transplantation are associated with a reduced hazard for survival at 30 days and 1 year, despite greater ischemic times. Future studies are necessary to elucidate the protective factors surrounding long-distance heart donation. Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Post-treatment changes of tumour perfusion parameters can help to predict survival in patients with high-grade astrocytoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanz-Requena, Roberto; Marti-Bonmati, Luis [Hospital Quironsalud Valencia, Radiology Department, Valencia (Spain); Hospital Universitari i Politecnic La Fe, Grupo de Investigacion Biomedica en Imagen, Valencia (Spain); Revert-Ventura, Antonio J.; Salame-Gamarra, Fares [Hospital de Manises, Radiology Department, Manises (Spain); Garcia-Marti, Gracian [Hospital Quironsalud Valencia, Radiology Department, Valencia (Spain); Hospital Universitari i Politecnic La Fe, Grupo de Investigacion Biomedica en Imagen, Valencia (Spain); CIBER-SAM, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid (Spain); Perez-Girbes, Alexandre [Hospital Universitari i Politecnic La Fe, Grupo de Investigacion Biomedica en Imagen, Valencia (Spain); Molla-Olmos, Enrique [Hospital La Ribera, Radiology Department, Alzira (Spain)

    2017-08-15

    Vascular characteristics of tumour and peritumoral volumes of high-grade gliomas change with treatment. This work evaluates the variations of T2*-weighted perfusion parameters as overall survival (OS) predictors. Forty-five patients with histologically confirmed high-grade astrocytoma (8 grade III and 37 grade IV) were included. All patients underwent pre- and post-treatment T2*-weighted contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Tumour, peritumoral and control volumes were segmented. Relative variations of cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), mean transit time (MTT), K{sup trans-T2*}, k{sub ep-T2*}, v{sub e-T2*} and v{sub p-T2*} were calculated. Differences regarding tumour grade and surgical resection extension were evaluated with ANOVA tests. For each parameter, two groups were defined by non-supervised clusterisation. Survival analysis were performed on these groups. For the tumour region, the 90th percentile increase or stagnation of CBV was associated with shorter survival, while a decrease related to longer survival (393 ± 189 vs 594 ± 294 days; log-rank p = 0.019; Cox hazard-ratio, 2.31; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12-4.74). K{sup trans-T2*} showed similar results (414 ± 177 vs 553 ± 312 days; log-rank p = 0.037; hazard-ratio, 2.19; 95% CI, 1.03-4.65). The peritumoral area values showed no relationship with OS. Post-treatment variations of the highest CBV and K{sup trans-T2*} values in the tumour volume are predictive factors of OS in patients with high-grade gliomas. (orig.)

  11. Does hormonal therapy for fertility preservation affect the survival of young women with early-stage endometrial cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwald, Zoë R; Huang, Lina N; Wissing, Michel D; Franco, Eduardo L; Gotlieb, Walter H

    2017-05-01

    The incidence of endometrial cancer among young women is increasing. Some patients with low-grade endometrial cancer receive hormone therapy (HT) before surgery to preserve fertility. It is unclear whether this adversely affects survival. Patients with localized, low-grade endometrial cancer who were aged Cancer-specific and overall survival were measured using Kaplan-Meier methods. Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were estimated using Cox models adjusted for age, period of diagnosis, marital status, race, tumor grade, morphology, and previous radiotherapy. A total of 6339 women were included in the current study cohort, 161 of whom initially received HT and 6178 of whom received primary surgery. After 15 years of follow-up, all-cause mortality did not differ between the groups (HT group: 14.1% [95% CI, 6.7%-28.4%] and propensity score-matched primary surgery group: 9.3% [95% CI, 4.1%-20.5%]). Cancer-specific mortality appeared higher in patients treated with HT compared with those treated with primary surgery (9.2% [95% CI, 3.4%-24.0%] vs 2.1% [95% CI, 1.5%-2.8%]). However, this difference was driven by 3 late deaths in the HT group. Sensitivity analyses using a broader definition of cancer-specific mortality provided no statistical evidence of a survival difference between the treatment groups. The hazard ratio for the overall risk of death was 1.45 (95% CI, 0.44-4.74). Based on this population-based cohort, young patients with low-grade endometrial cancer appear to have excellent survival, regardless of the primary therapy chosen (HT vs primary surgery). The current selection of patients for HT to preserve fertility, which is managed carefully by experienced clinicians, does not appear to significantly worsen clinical outcomes. Cancer 2017;123:1545-1554. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  12. Adjuvant radiotherapy improves overall survival in patients with resected gastric adenocarcinoma: A National Cancer Data Base analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpf, Priscilla K; Amini, Arya; Jones, Bernard L; Koshy, Matthew; Sher, David J; Lieu, Christopher H; Schefter, Tracey E; Goodman, Karyn A; Rusthoven, Chad G

    2017-09-01

    For patients with resectable gastric adenocarcinoma, perioperative chemotherapy and adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) are considered standard options. In the current study, the authors used the National Cancer Data Base to compare overall survival (OS) between these regimens. Patients who underwent gastrectomy for nonmetastatic gastric adenocarcinoma from 2004 through 2012 were divided into those treated with perioperative chemotherapy without RT versus those treated with adjuvant CRT. Survival was estimated and compared using univariate and multivariate models adjusted for patient and tumor characteristics, surgical margin status, and the number of lymph nodes examined. Subset analyses were performed for factors chosen a priori, and potential interactions between treatment and covariates were assessed. A total of 3656 eligible patients were identified, 52% of whom underwent perioperative chemotherapy and 48% of whom received postoperative CRT. The median follow-up was 47 months, and the median age of the patients was 62 years. Analysis of the entire cohort demonstrated improved OS with adjuvant RT on both univariate (median of 51 months vs 42 months; P = .013) and multivariate (hazard ratio, 0.874; 95% confidence interval, 0.790-0.967 [P = .009]) analyses. Propensity score-matched analysis also demonstrated improved OS with adjuvant RT (median of 49 months vs 39 months; P = .033). On subset analysis, a significant interaction was observed between the survival impact of adjuvant RT and surgical margins, with a greater benefit of RT noted among patients with surgical margin-positive disease (hazard ratio with RT: 0.650 vs 0.952; P for interaction Cancer Data Base analysis, the use of adjuvant RT in addition to chemotherapy was associated with a significant OS advantage for patients with resected gastric cancer. The survival advantage observed with adjuvant CRT was most pronounced among patients with positive surgical margins. Cancer 2017;123:3402-9. © 2017 American

  13. Depression and Survival in a 17-Year Longitudinal Study of People With HIV: Moderating Effects of Race and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ironson, Gail; Fitch, Calvin; Stuetzle, Rick

    2017-09-01

    The prevalence of clinically significant depressive symptoms is three times higher in people living with HIV than in the general population. Although studies have shown that depression predicts worse course with HIV, few have investigated its relationship with mortality, and none have had a 17-year follow-up period and been conducted entirely during the time since the advent of protease inhibitors. We followed a diverse sample of HIV-positive people (N = 177) in the mid-range of illness for a study on stress and coping. Participants were assessed every 6 months (for 12 years) via blood draw, questionnaires, and interview. Depression was measured using the Beck Depression Inventory. The study began in March 1997 and mortality was assessed in April 2014. In the primary analysis depression, analyzed as a continuous variable, significantly predicted all-cause mortality (hazard ratio = 1.038, 95% confidence interval = 1.008-1.068). With Beck Depression Inventory scores dichotomized, the hazard ratio was 2.044 (95% confidence interval = 1.176-3.550). Furthermore, this result was moderated by race and educational attainment such that depression only predicted worse survival for non-African Americans and those with a college education or higher. Depression is associated with worse long-term survival in people with HIV during 17 years of follow-up. Interventions targeting depression may improve well-being and potentially survival in individuals with HIV. However, since depression did not predict survival in African Americans or those with low education, more research is needed to identify risk factors for long term outcomes in these groups.

  14. Decreased survival of glioma patients with astrocytoma grade IV (glioblastoma multiforme) associated with long-term use of mobile and cordless phones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlberg, Michael; Hardell, Lennart

    2014-10-16

    On 31 May 2011 the WHO International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) categorised radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMFs) from mobile phones, and from other devices that emit similar non-ionising electromagnetic fields, as a Group 2B, i.e., a "possible", human carcinogen. A causal association would be strengthened if it could be shown that the use of wireless phones has an impact on the survival of glioma patients. We analysed survival of 1678 glioma patients in our 1997-2003 and 2007-2009 case-control studies. Use of wireless phones in the >20 years latency group (time since first use) yielded an increased hazard ratio (HR) = 1.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.2-2.3 for glioma. For astrocytoma grade IV (glioblastoma multiforme; n = 926) mobile phone use yielded HR