WorldWideScience

Sample records for surveys student journals

  1. How do medical student journals fare? A global survey of journals run by medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamri, Yassar

    2016-01-01

    Medical students have made significant contributions to the medical and scientific fields in the past. Today, medical students still contribute to biomedical research; however, they often face disappointment from journals when trying to publish their findings. This led to the development of medical student journals, which take a more "student-friendly" approach. This article reviews the current medical student journals published in English and sheds light on current trends and challenges.

  2. Findings From the INANE Survey on Student Papers Submitted to Nursing Journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Maureen Shawn; Newland, Jamesetta A; Owens, Jacqueline K

    Nursing students are often encouraged or required to submit scholarly work for consideration for publication but most manuscripts or course assignment papers do not meet journal standards and consume valuable resources from editors and peer reviewers. The International Academy of Nursing Editors (INANE) is a group of nurse editors and publishers dedicated to promoting best practices in publishing in the nursing literature. In August 2014, editors at INANE's annual meeting voiced frustrations over multiple queries, poorly written student papers, and lack of proper behavior in following through. This article describes the findings of a survey distributed to INANE members to seek feedback about submissions by students. Fifty-three (53) members responded to an online anonymous survey developed by the INANE Student Papers Work Group. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics for Likert-type questions and content analysis of open-ended questions. Quantitative data revealed that most editors reported problems with student papers across all levels of graduate programs. Six themes emerged from the qualitative data: submissions fail to follow author guidelines; characteristics of student submissions; lack of professional behavior from students; lack of professional behavior from faculty; editor responses to student submissions; and faculty as mentors. These themes formed the basis for recommendations and strategies to improve student scholarly writing. Overall, editors endorsed supporting new scholars in the publication process but faculty engagement was integral to student success. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Chinese Journalism Students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dombernowsky, Laura Møller

    2014-01-01

    society. This chapter is concerned with Chinese journalism students' self-perceptions and evaluations of journalistic performances in order to understand the professional values to which they adhere. The study is based on semi-structured in-depth interviews conducted in two periods in Spring 2011 and Fall...... 2012 with 41 students studying journalism at People's University, Tsinghua University, China Youth University for Political Sciences, Central University for Nationalities, Beijing Foreign Languages University and Chinese Academy of Social Sciences in Beijing and at Fudan University in Shanghai....

  4. Networking Journalism Studies: Towards a World Journalism Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Hanitzsch

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Most scholars argue that cross-national research is indispensable for establishing the generalizability of theories and the validity of interpretations derived from single-nation studies. Another important aspect of comparative studies is that they force us to test our interpretations against cross-cultural diferences and inconsistencies. In journalism studies, the advantages of cross-national research are obvious. While the empirical inquiry into news-making has generated a vast quantity of data, some of the more fundamental questions in journalism research remain largely unresolved: What shapes the news and the structures of journalism most? Is it politics, economy, or culture? How do the conventional Western values of objective journalism ft in with non-Western cultures? In this article, I would like to propose the creation of a “World Journalism Survey”, modeled after the World Values Survey, for a better map of the cultural diferences in journalism practices around the world.

  5. Recognizing Students' Multiple Intelligences in Cross-Age Buddy Journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasgow, Jacqueline N.

    1999-01-01

    Describes a project in which students in a college survey class on young adult literature were paired with students in a high school English class in a "buddy journal" project. Shows examples of this writing and of the assignments which used Howard Gardner's concept of multiple intelligences to offer students multiple paths for responding to…

  6. Electronic Journal Writing for Student Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Deborah; Brooks, David W.

    1994-01-01

    Describes "Student Journal," an electronic writing tool for journals that uses the Macintosh HyperCard and accommodates three different kinds of journal entries--student teacher, cooperating teacher, and supervising teacher. Includes samples of representative entries and a discussion of their value. (SM)

  7. Facilitating Student Learning through Math Journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koirala, Hari P.

    In the last two decades, mathematics teachers have shown a great deal of interest in how students learn mathematics through journal writing. I have also used journals in mathematics classes for the last five years. Based on the analysis of more than 1800 journal entries written by approximately 200 students in the last five years, I conclude that…

  8. Social Media Use in Journalism Education: Faculty and Student Expectations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, Ammina; Hickerson, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Social media use has become essential for journalists. Although previous research has explored how journalists use social media, less is known about how journalism and mass communication programs incorporate social media in their coursework. Based on our survey of 323 students and 125 faculty in American universities, this study offers a…

  9. Journalism Students' Experience of Mobile Phone Technology: Implications for Journalism Education

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bethell, Paul

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates journalism students' usage of mobile phone technology when they begin their university studies and considers the implications of these baseline data for journalism education...

  10. High School Journalism Students' Attitudes toward Journalism as a Career: A Thirty Year Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Julie E.; And Others

    This study was conducted to determine what factors attract high school students to journalism, how much students' attitudes toward journalism have changed since the late 1950s, and to suggest methods to encourage high school students to pursue journalism as a career. Subjects, 743 students attending the 1989 Florida Scholastic Press Association…

  11. Reflective Journaling as a Flipped Classroom Technique to Increase Reading and Participation With Social Work Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sage, Melanie; Sele, Patti

    Students in undergraduate social work practice courses come to the class with varying levels of educational, life, and practice experience. Students require an introduction to the material through textbook reading before they are able to engage in critical discussions, yet reading adherence varies widely among students. This research explores the use of reflective journals as a Flipped Classroom technique to increase reflective thinking and reading adherence. This study surveys 27 students in two practice courses about the use of weekly reflective journaling as a flipped classroom assignment. Findings support that reflective reading journals increase student preparation and engagement, but require more work for students and instructors. Implications are discussed.

  12. Reflective Journaling as a Flipped Classroom Technique to Increase Reading and Participation With Social Work Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sage, Melanie; Sele, Patti

    2016-01-01

    Students in undergraduate social work practice courses come to the class with varying levels of educational, life, and practice experience. Students require an introduction to the material through textbook reading before they are able to engage in critical discussions, yet reading adherence varies widely among students. This research explores the use of reflective journals as a Flipped Classroom technique to increase reflective thinking and reading adherence. This study surveys 27 students in two practice courses about the use of weekly reflective journaling as a flipped classroom assignment. Findings support that reflective reading journals increase student preparation and engagement, but require more work for students and instructors. Implications are discussed. PMID:27672301

  13. EEASA members opinion survey | Irwin | Southern African Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Southern African Journal of Environmental Education. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 9 (1988) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. EEASA members opinion survey. Pat Irwin. Abstract.

  14. Dar Es Salaam Medical Students' Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The journal publishes original research, case report/case series, letter to the editor, reviews of health related issues in medicine, pharmacy, dentistry, nursing, public and allied health sciences. Furthermore the DMSJ endeavours to disseminate research findings mainly of medical students.

  15. Motives of Chinese Students to Choose Journalism Careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei

    2000-01-01

    Examines the motivations of Chinese journalism students to choose journalism as their major and discusses possible reasons for their choices. Finds that Chinese journalism students chose journalism for some professional motivations: for a chance to develop their potentials and for love of writing instead of being attracted by quick fame or high…

  16. Networking Journalism Studies: Towards a World Journalism Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Hanitzsch

    2011-01-01

    Most scholars argue that cross-national research is indispensable for establishing the generalizability of theories and the validity of interpretations derived from single-nation studies. Another important aspect of comparative studies is that they force us to test our interpretations against cross-cultural diferences and inconsistencies. In journalism studies, the advantages of cross-national research are obvious. While the empirical inquiry into news-making has generated a vast quantity of ...

  17. Using Science Journals to Encourage All Students to Write

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fingon, Joan C.; Fingon, Shallon D.

    2008-01-01

    It seems that everyone is using science journals or notebooks lately. As middle school science teachers, the authors use science journals as a tool to enhance students' knowledge and understanding of content and reinforce students' writing skills. Here they share how they use science journals to motivate students to write about science in middle…

  18. Forgive Me Now, Fire Me Later: Mass Communication Students' Ethics Gap Concerning School and Journalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Mike; Groshek, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    Survey data on mass communication students' perceptions of plagiarism and fabrication indicate an ethics gap in which students are more concerned about ethical breaches in journalism than in academics. Further analyses found that the ethics gap increases among students near graduation who had higher levels of concern and suggested harsher…

  19. Journal Articles Applying National Aquatic Resource Survey Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Aquatic Resource Surveys (NARS) data are being used and applied above and beyond the regional and national assessments. This page includes a list of recent journal articles that reference NARS data.

  20. A journal cancellation survey and resulting impact on interlibrary loan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob L. Nash, MSLIS, AHIP

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: Soliciting user feedback through an electronic survey can assist collections librarians to make electronic journal cancellation decisions during slim budgetary years. This methodology can be adapted and improved upon at other health sciences libraries.

  1. Surveys on Reporting Guideline Usage in Dental Journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, F; Walsh, T; Glenny, A-M; Worthington, H

    2016-10-01

    The objectives of this study were 1) to find out if and how authors and peer reviewers for dental journals are encouraged to use reporting guidelines (RGs); 2) to identify factors related to RG endorsement; and 3) to assess the knowledge, opinions, and future plans of dental journal editors in chief (EICs) on RGs. A total of 109 peer-reviewed and original research-oriented dental journals that were indexed in the MEDLINE and/or SCIE database in 2015 were included. The "instructions to authors" and "instructions to reviewers" of these journals were identified and retrieved from journals' official websites. Any mention of RGs or other related policies were sought and extracted. In addition, an anonymous survey of the EICs of the included journals was conducted with a validated questionnaire. All 109 journals provided "instructions to authors," among which 55 (50.5%) mentioned RGs. Only the CONSORT (45.0%), PRISMA (13.8%), and STROBE (12.8%) guidelines were mentioned by >10% of the included journals. Statistical analyses suggest that RGs were more frequently mentioned by SCIE-indexed journals (P journals (P = 0.002), and journals that endorsed the ICMJE recommendations (P journals (8.3%), 3 of which mentioned RGs. For the EIC survey, the response rate was 32.1% (35 of 109). Twenty-six editors (74.3%) stated that they knew what RGs were before receiving our questionnaire. Twenty-four editors (68.6%) believed that RGs should be adopted by all refereed dental journals where appropriate. RGs are important tools for enhancing research reporting and reducing avoidable research waste, but currently they are not widely endorsed by dental journals. Joint efforts by all stakeholders to further promote RG usage in dentistry are needed. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2016.

  2. Press Start: the value of an online student-led, peer-reviewed game studies journal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Barr

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article, an online student journal is described, and the ways in which student participants value the journal are discussed. Press Start is a peer-reviewed international journal of game studies, which aims to publish the best student work related to the academic study of video games. Content analysis of qualitative survey data (n = 29 provides insights into what students value about the journal, revealing six broad themes: community and support, inclusiveness and accessibility, the published research, feedback from peer review, experience of conducting peer review and the opportunity to publish. The article concludes by suggesting that engagement with online student journals should not be limited in terms of geography or the level of study, unless there are robust pedagogical reasons for doing so.

  3. Onsite Survey of Five Journalism Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allcorn, Mary

    Data gathered during visits to libraries associated with five major university programs in journalism and mass communication in the United States are summarized in this report. The report contains information about the collections, services, and facilities of the following university libraries: (1) University of Illinois Communications Library,…

  4. A journal cancellation survey and resulting impact on interlibrary loan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Jacob L; McElfresh, Karen R

    2016-10-01

    The research describes an extensible method of evaluating and cancelling electronic journals during a budget shortfall and evaluates implications for interlibrary loan (ILL) and user satisfaction. We calculated cost per use for cancellable electronic journal subscriptions (n=533) from the 2013 calendar year and the first half of 2014, cancelling titles with cost per use greater than $20 and less than 100 yearly uses. For remaining titles, we issued an online survey asking respondents to rank the importance of journals to their work. Finally, we gathered ILL requests and COUNTER JR2 turnaway reports for calendar year 2015. Three hundred fifty-four respondents completed the survey. Because of the level of heterogeneity of titles in the survey as well as respondents' backgrounds, most titles were reported to be never used. We developed criteria based on average response across journals to determine which to cancel. Based on this methodology, we cancelled eight journals. Examination of ILL data revealed that none of the cancelled titles were requested with any frequency. Free-text responses indicated, however, that many value free ILL as a suitable substitute for immediate full-text access to biomedical journal literature. Soliciting user feedback through an electronic survey can assist collections librarians to make electronic journal cancellation decisions during slim budgetary years. This methodology can be adapted and improved upon at other health sciences libraries.

  5. The Impact of a Student-Run Journal Club on Pharmacy Students' Self-Assessment of Critical Appraisal Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi, Macayla; Springer, Sydney; Estus, Erica; Ward, Kristina

    2015-06-01

    After attending an educational session on hosting journal clubs at the 2013 Annual Meeting & Exhibition, American Society of Consultant Pharmacists, Seattle, Washington, two third-year professional pharmacy students created a student-run journal club through the University of Rhode Island's ASCP student chapter. Three journal club sessions were held during the spring semester and were open to all pharmacy students. Students completed an anonymous pre- and post-survey to assess confidence in evaluating medical literature. Of the 18 participants, 5 were lost to follow-up. Significant improvements were found among all participants in their confidence in critically evaluating clinical research, interpreting statistical methods, and completing a journal club during Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience rotations. This activity can be replicated in academic settings as well as workplace environments where pharmacy students are involved.

  6. Recognizing Exemplary Student Writing: A Model for a Student Journal of Politics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, Sharon; Weber, Lori M.

    To allow student writing to reach a broader audience, in 1999 political science educators and students at California State University Chico (CSUC) began a student journal in which exemplary student writing on political themes could be published. The resulting journal, "Studium: The California State University, Chico Student Journal of…

  7. National journals of physical rehabilitation medicine in Europe: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrini, S; Fusco, C; Ilieva, E; Moslavac, S; Zampolini, M; Giustini, A

    2010-06-01

    The European Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine Journal Network (EPRMJN), a joint initiative between the European Society Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (ESPRM) and the European Journal of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (EJPRM), has the aim to increase scientific knowledge among PRM specialists and foster collaboration among physical and rehabilitation medicine (PRM) journals. This article reports the results of a survey of national PRM journals in Europe we conducted to obtain an overview of the current state of PRM research in the European setting. Every year 682 PRM papers are published in a total of 66 issues per 3 294 page in the 16 national journals that responded to our survey, out of the 21 published in 15 countries; 12 countries have no PRM journals and two did not respond. Some 94% of the journals responding to the survey have a research aim and 88% an educational aim; all journals use a peer-review process (75% blinded); on average, 58.8 submissions are received per year, of which 6.7% are invited papers; the rejection rate is 21.4%. The majority of papers report original research, and main topics are musculoskeletal and neurological rehabilitation. Since the national journals published in Europe have a good peer review process and publish mainly original articles, it is possible that good research can be found. A major problem is the English language barrier to wider readerships, as many researchers publish only in their native language. The EPRMJN aims to discover this research and make it accessible to international audiences through systematic collection of articles appearing in the national journals of the EPRMJN and publication of content summaries on the ESPRM website.

  8. Selection of Universities by Students in Journalism and Mass Communication Courses: Do Criteria Differ between Caucasian and Minority Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Masudul; Perkins, Lyle; Izard, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    This study measures the significance of factors used by minority students in their selection of universities/colleges. This web survey was conducted mainly on 778 students enrolled in journalism/mass communication courses representing five historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) and twelve other universities. Differences were found…

  9. Reflective Thinking and Journal Writing: Examining Student Teachers' Perceptions of Preferred Reflective Modality, Journal Writing Outcomes, and Journal Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiman, Bradley C.; Covington, Holly K.

    2007-01-01

    Journal writing is generally required of student teachers; however, there is a void in career and technical education research regarding this activity. The purpose of this study was to examine student teachers' journal writing experiences to obtain insight into the process of developing reflective practitioners. The study drew on the work of Dewey…

  10. Journalism Students' Motivations and Expectations of Their Work in Comparative Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanusch, Folker; Mellado, Claudia; Boshoff, Priscilla; Humanes, María Luisa; de León, Salvador; Pereira, Fabio; Márquez Ramírez, Mireya; Roses, Sergio; Subervi, Federico; Wyss, Vinzenz; Yez, Lyuba

    2015-01-01

    Based on a survey of 4,393 journalism students in Australia, Brazil, Chile, Mexico, South Africa, Spain, Switzerland, and the United States, this study provides much-needed comparative evidence about students' motivations for becoming journalists, their future job plans, and expectations. Findings show not only an almost universal decline in…

  11. Mass Communication and Journalism Faculty and Their Electronic Communication with College Students: A Nationwide Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Brigitta R.; Yates, Bradford L.; Adams, Jennifer Wood

    2008-01-01

    Nearly 700 U.S. journalism and mass communication faculty reported their perceptions of student e-mail use via a Web-based survey. This nationwide study focused on content of e-mail received by faculty and made comparisons based on faculty gender. Nearly half of the respondents reported that they occasionally receive e-mails from students before a…

  12. Quality of survey reporting in nephrology journals: a methodologic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Alvin Ho-Ting; Thomas, Sonia M; Farag, Alexandra; Duffett, Mark; Garg, Amit X; Naylor, Kyla L

    2014-12-05

    Survey research is an important research method used to determine individuals' attitudes, knowledge, and behaviors; however, as with other research methods, inadequate reporting threatens the validity of results. This study aimed to describe the quality of reporting of surveys published between 2001 and 2011 in the field of nephrology. The top nephrology journals were systematically reviewed (2001-2011: American Journal of Kidney Diseases, Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation, and Kidney International; 2006-2011: Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology) for studies whose primary objective was to collect and report survey results. Included were nephrology journals with a heavy focus on clinical research and high impact factors. All titles and abstracts were screened in duplicate. Surveys were excluded if they were part of a multimethod study, evaluated only psychometric characteristics, or used semi-structured interviews. Information was collected on survey and respondent characteristics, questionnaire development (e.g., pilot testing), psychometric characteristics (e.g., validity and reliability), survey methods used to optimize response rate (e.g., system of multiple contacts), and response rate. After a screening of 19,970 citations, 216 full-text articles were reviewed and 102 surveys were included. Approximately 85% of studies reported a response rate. Almost half of studies (46%) discussed how they developed their questionnaire and only a quarter of studies (28%) mentioned the validity or reliability of the questionnaire. The only characteristic that improved over the years was the proportion of articles reporting missing data (2001-2004: 46.4%; 2005-2008: 61.9%; and 2009-2011: 84.8%; respectively) (Pnephrology journals remains suboptimal. In particular, reporting of the validity and reliability of the questionnaire must be improved. Guidelines to improve survey reporting and increase transparency are clearly needed. Copyright © 2014 by the

  13. The "Roles" of the Game: The Influence of News Consumption Patterns on the Role Conceptions of Journalism Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandoc, Edson C., Jr.

    2014-01-01

    This study is based on a survey of 364 undergraduate journalism students and looks at how news consumption patterns influence the journalistic role conceptions that students hold. This study finds that students rated the interpreter role as most important. Students who prioritized the interpreter role also tend to get their news from online…

  14. Content Analysis of Students' Journals in a Percussion Methods Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlton, Dave S.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents an empirical investigation of music education students' journals within a percussion methods course at a Midwestern university in the United States. The findings of this investigation raise issues about music education students' sense of self-awareness, specificity within the journals, and the predominance of discussions…

  15. Survey Identifies Characteristics of a Knowledgeable Journalism Teacher/Adviser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broussard, E. Joseph; Blackmon, C. Robert

    1978-01-01

    Reports on a survey in which journalism advisers were asked to rule as they believed a judge would on ten hypothetical situations generalized from actual court decisions regarding freedom of the press. Describes the educational backgrounds and characteristics of the advisers who scored highest on the questions. (GW)

  16. Abia State University Medical Students' Association Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991; 324 Papers accepted but not yet published may be cited with the journal designated and “in press” added. i. For standard journal articles: Author(s) name (s) and initial(s). Title of article. Name of journal. Year of publication; volume (in Arabic numeral): page. E.g. Mbanaso A. U, Adisa A. C, Roles of maggots in surgery.

  17. [Scientific journals of medical students in Latin-America].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Samith, Ignacio; Oróstegui-Pinilla, Diana; Angulo-Bazán, Yolanda; Mayta-Tristán, Percy; Rodríguez-Morales, Alfonso J

    2010-11-01

    This article deals with the history and evolution of student's scientific journals in Latin-America, their beginnings, how many still exist and which is their future projection. Relevant events show the growth of student's scientific journals in Latin-America and how are they working together to improve their quality. This article is addressed not only for Latin American readers but also to worldwide readers. Latin American medical students are consistently working together to publish scientific research, whose quality is constantly improving.

  18. Scientific misconduct encountered by APAME journals: an online survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looi, Lai-Meng; Wong, Li Xuan; Koh, Cing Chai

    2015-12-01

    In June 2015, invitations were sent by email to 151 APAME journals to participate in an online survey with an objective of gaining insight into the common publication misconduct encountered by APAME editors. The survey, conducted through SurveyMonkey over a 20-day-period, comprised 10 questions with expansions to allow anecdotes limited to 400 characters, estimated to take less than 10 minutes to complete. Only one invitation was issued per journal, targeting (in order of priority) editors, editorial board members and editorial staff, and limited by email availability. 54 (36%) journals responded. 98% of respondents held Editor or Editorial Board positions. All respondent journals have editorial policies on publication ethics and 96% provide instructions related to ethics. 45% use anti-plagiarism software to screen manuscripts, the most popular being iThenticate, CrossCheck and Turnitin. Up to 50% of journals had encountered studies without IRB approval. Author misconduct encountered were (in rank order): plagiarism (75%), duplicate publication (58%), unjustified authorship (39%), authorship disputes (33%), data falsification (29%), data/image manipulation (27%), conflict of interest (25%), copyright violation (17%) and breach of confidentiality (10%). Reviewer misconduct encountered were: conflict of interest (19%), plagiarism (17%), obstructive behavior (17%), abusive language (13%) and breach of confidentiality (13%). Notwithstanding the limitations of the survey and the response rate, a few insights have been gained: (1) the need for strengthening the ethical culture of researchers/authors and reviewers, (2) anti-plagiarism software can improve plagiarism detection by about 15%, and (3) the need for technical support to detect plagiarism, duplicate publication and image manipulation.

  19. Journalism Students Across the Globe, Norway 2013. Methodology, questionnaire and selected tables

    OpenAIRE

    Hovden, Jan Fredrik; Esperås, Eirik Nymark

    2014-01-01

    "The JSG project aims to conduct simultaneous surveys of journalism students around the world, with the aim of providing as large a variety of countries as possible, and representing all inhabited continents … The professional values and attitudes of journalism can be learned and internalized by journalists by way of living different experiences in a variety of settings and by interacting with multiple sources, including those stemming from professional educational settings (Pr...

  20. Multiple Surveys of Students and Survey Fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Stephen R.; Whitcomb, Michael E.; Weitzer, William H.

    2004-01-01

    This chapter reviews the literature on survey fatigue and summarizes a research project that indicates that administering multiple surveys in one academic year can significantly suppress response rates in later surveys. (Contains 4 tables.)

  1. Journal of Student Affairs in Africa: Journal Sponsorship

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JSAA is published for:Society for the Professionalization of Student Affairs in Africa (SPSAA) JSAA website is developed and hosted by:University of the Western Cape LibraryBellville, Cape Town, South Africahttp://www.lib.uwc.ac.za CallSend SMSAdd to SkypeYou'll need Skype CreditFree via Skype. African Minds ...

  2. Asia-Pacific Journal for Student Affairs (AJSA)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Lisa Bardill Moscaritolo serves as Associate Vice President and Dean for Students at Pace University,. New York, USA. ... copy of the inaugural Journal of the Philippine Association of Administrators of Student Affairs. (PAASA). ... Bonnet, offers a reflection on the ASEAN integration and how the skills students need to.

  3. War News Radio: Conflict Education through Student Journalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, Emily

    2009-01-01

    In this essay Emily Hager presents an example of conflict education through student journalism. War News Radio is a student-organized and student-produced program developed at Swarthmore College in which participants produce for a global audience nonpartisan weekly radio shows and podcasts focused on the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Hager shares…

  4. Between Ideals and Practice: Journalism Students Facing Ethical Dilemmas in Online Newsroom Teaching--Lessons From Denmark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberholst, Mads Kaemsgaard; Hartley, Jannie Møller; Olsen, Maria Bendix

    2016-01-01

    This article looks at journalism students' experiences in a course that simulates an online newsroom. On the basis of a quantitative survey and more qualitative reflections from the students, we explore the dilemmas that students experience "working" as online journalists and how these are related to broader issues of journalistic…

  5. Mass Communication and Journalism Faculty's Perceptions of the Effectiveness of Email Communication with College Students: A Nationwide Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Bradford L.; Adams, Jennifer Wood; Brunner, Brigitta R.

    2009-01-01

    Nearly 700 US journalism and mass communication faculty (all teaching personnel) reported their perceptions of student email use via a web-based survey. This nationwide study focused on the content of email sent by faculty to students, email's effectiveness, and email's effect on student learning. Comparisons were made based on faculty gender,…

  6. Journal of Student Affairs in Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Since 2017, JSAA is DHET-accredited in South Africa by the national Department of Higher Education and Training as a subsidy earning scholarly journal on the SA-list of accredited journals. JSAA is indexed and co-hosted by AJOL, DOAJ, and indexed by ERIC, BASE, WorldCat Libraries and Google Scholar. Scopus ...

  7. What Editors and Journalism Educators Expect from Journalism Education; An ANPA News Research Center Survey. News Research Bulletin No. 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulteng, John L.

    The purpose of this survey was to assemble data about the expectations of editors and journalism educators as to journalism education, with the objective of providing a basis for an informed dialogue about ways to advance and support education for journalism. Some of the findings were: editors much less than educators perceived newly-hired…

  8. Journal of the Obafemi Awolowo University Medical Student's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IFEMED Journal is the official publication of Obafemi Awolowo University Medical Students' Association, Ile-Ife , Nigeria . The Journal Club periodically publishes articles on medical and medically related topics for the consumption of emerging health care professionals from all over the country, ranging from medical, ...

  9. Students' Appropriation, Rejection and Perceptions of Creativity in Reflective Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Timothy S.; Dyment, Janet E.; Smith, Heidi A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the intersection of reflection, journal writing and creativity. Undergraduate students who participated in a residential field camp were required to keep a creative reflective journal to demonstrate their theoretical and practical understandings of their experience. This study reports on the content analysis of 42 student…

  10. Minorities and Journalism: Career Orientations among High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgoon, Judee K.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Examines factors influencing the educational and career choices of minority students, as well as their perception of journalism, job characteristic preferences, and differences in academic preparation and performance. Asserts that increased recruitment efforts are needed to attract the number of minorities needed in the journalism field. (MM)

  11. Scientific publications in international anaesthesiology journals: a 10-year survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z; Qiu, L-X; Wu, F-X; Yang, L-Q; Sun, S; Yu, W F

    2011-03-01

    Significant growth has been seen in the field of anaesthesiology in recent decades. The current geographic distribution of the publications on anaesthesia research may be different from ten years ago. We performed this literature survey to examine the national origin of articles published in international anaesthesiology journals and to evaluate their contribution to anaesthesia research. Articles published in 18 major anaesthesiology journals from 2000 to 2009 were identified from the PubMed database and the Science Citation Index. A total of 30,191 articles were published in the selected 18 journals from 2000 to 2009. The country responsible for the largest number of articles was the United States of America (29.4%), followed by the United Kingdom, Germany, Japan, Canada, Australia and France. Denmark, Switzerland and Finland had the largest number of articles per capita. Anesthesia & Analgesia published the most number of articles from 2000 to 2009, followed by Anesthesiology, Pain and the British Journal of Anaesthesia. The numbers of clinical studies and randomised controlled trials decreased markedly from 2000 to 2009.

  12. [The use of medical journals by medical students. Which medical journals are read?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algra, Annemijn M; Dekker, Friedo W

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the role of scientific medical journals in Dutch medical curricula. Descriptive questionnaire study. In 2013, medical students (from year 3 onwards) at the Leiden University Medical Centre (LUMC), were invited to respond to an online questionnaire. They were presented with 28 multiple-choice questions and 11 statements about the use of scientific medical journals in the medical curriculum. We calculated the frequencies of the answers per question and analysed differences between medical students using two-by-two tables. The questionnaire was completed by 680 (53.0%) of 1277 invited medical students enrolled at the LUMC. Most of the respondents were those doing clinical rotations (56.6%) and 60.1% had research experience. More than half of the students read at least one scientific journal a few times per month; this percentage was 38.8% among third-year students, 49.3% among fourth-year students, 60.0% among those on clinical rotation, and was higher among students with research experience (63.3%) than among those without research experience (44.1%). Nearly 90% of students agreed with the statement that the development of academic and scientific education should take place in the bachelor's phase of medical school. Medical students start to read scientific medical journals at an early phase in the medical curriculum and this increases further when students start to undertake research projects or go on clinical rotation. Medical curricula should be constructed in such a way that medical students learn to select and interpret research findings adequately for themselves before they turn to articles from scientific medical journals.

  13. Using reflective learning journals to improve students learning and awareness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Peter

    2008-01-01

    . A new course called Professional Procedures in a Globalized World is established for Danish 1st semester Master students in Electronics and IT, with a double purpose of both developing the team work and intercultural skills further and restart the students reflection and talking about how they actually...... work together, in order to prepare them to take in foreign students on the 2nd semester. To secure the latter part and the learning goal the students have to write an individual learning journal. The setup of the course and the learning journals is described, and the learning outcome discussed using...... examples from the learning journals, proving that the students reach the learning goals of the course being able to discuss a more professional approach to their team work and they plan how to help foreigners entering their team....

  14. Student-Initiated Use of Facebook for Learning Online Journalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yang

    2017-01-01

    This article presents a case study of student-initiated use of Facebook Groups in doing a team project for an online journalism course. Drawing upon the concept of affinity space and a theoretical taxonomy of asynchronous online discussion, the present study triangulates classroom observation, semi-structured student interviews, and microanalysis…

  15. Shifting Views of High School Students about Journalism Careers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Julie E.; Tipton, Leonard

    1993-01-01

    Finds that, in some ways, students' perceptions of journalistic careers have changed little: they rank them near the bottom for financial reward and in the middle for usefulness. Notes that journalism is judged more interesting than medicine. Finds also, when matched against working journalists, students do not share the professionals' views of…

  16. [Reader survey of the Journal of the Norwegian Medical Association 2007].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasland, Olaf Gjerløw

    2008-06-26

    Upon request, The Research Institute of the Norwegian Medical Association conducted a reader survey for the Journal of the Norwegian Medical Association (JNMA) during the autumn of 2007. Three probability samples of 1,500 active doctors, 250 medical students and 250 retired doctors were given a questionnaire that could be completed and returned by ordinary mail or electronically. 48% of the students, 54% of the doctors, and 76% of the retired doctors responded. 54% of the readers spend 30 min or more on each issue. 20% of the retired doctors, 9% of the active doctors, and 7% of the students spend two hours or more. The declared aims of being a membership journal and a source for professional update were fulfilled significantly better than the other three declared aims; to stimulate research, support professional attitudes and promote health policy debate. The readers wanted more review articles, news from other journals and situations to learn from; and fewer advertisements, articles on "medicine and art" and a shorter language column. The website was particularly used to search for previously published articles, but also to read articles on screen. 32% of the students, 19% of the doctors, and 59% of the retired doctors did not use the JNMA's website. With regard to layout, the paper quality and the quality of the illustrations were praised. All in all the readers found many interesting articles in the JNMA and did not think it was too compact.

  17. Representation of developing countries in orthopaedic journals: a survey of four influential orthopaedic journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluede, Edward E; Phillips, Jonathan; Bleyer, Jamie; Jergesen, Harry E; Coughlin, Richard

    2012-08-01

    The developing world contains more than ¾ of the world's population, and has the largest burden of musculoskeletal disease. Published studies provide crucial information that can influence healthcare policies. Presumably much information regarding burden in the developing world would arise from authors from developing countries. However, the extent of participation of authors from the developing world in widely read orthopaedic journals is unclear. We surveyed four influential English-language orthopaedic journals to document the contributions of authors from developing countries. We surveyed Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma, and the American and British volumes of The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, from May 2007 through May 2010. The country of origin of all authors was identified. We used the designations provided by the International Monetary Fund to define countries as either developed or developing. Two hundred sixty-five of 3964 publications (7%) included authors from developing countries. Ninety percent of these had authors from developing countries with industrialized and emerging-market economies. Publications from Sub-Saharan Africa accounted for only 0.4% of the 3964 articles reviewed and 5.6% of the 265 articles with developing world authorship. Countries with the least robust economies were least represented. Less than 1/3 of articles with authors from the developing world had coauthors from developed or other developing countries. Additional studies are needed to determine the reasons for the low representation noted and to establish strategies to increase the number of orthopaedic publications from parts of the world where the burden of musculoskeletal disease is the greatest.

  18. Journalism as a Profession: Perceptions of Students of Journalism and Students of Communication Science at the University of Zagreb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Jokoš

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines what journalism students at the Faculty of Political Science and communication science students at the Center for Croatian Studies at the University of Zagreb expect and suppose of their future profession. The aim of the research is to determine whether there are differences in the perception of journalism with respect to participants’ level and type of study. Almost all journalism and communication science students in this study believe that journalists should be educated, trained and qualified to work in journalism. Most of the research respondents believe that the Croatian journalist should be a critic of irregularities and that she should be the source that provides information to the citizens about their rights. They also believe that today’s typical Croatian journalist is prone to manipulation, tendentious writing, and tends to emphasize bad news and sensationalism. Guidelines for future research and recommendations for solving theses problems are also offered.

  19. Using clinical caring journaling: nursing student and instructor experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chien-Lin; Turton, Michael; Cheng, Su-Fen; Lee-Hsieh, Jane

    2011-06-01

    Journaling has been incorporated into many nursing courses as an active reflective teaching strategy that can facilitate the learning process, personal growth, and professional development of students. There is limited research support of journaling as an appropriate tool to promote reflection for the purpose of learning caring in nursing education. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences and perceptions of student nurses and instructors who use clinical caring journaling (CCJ) in their clinical practicum. Researchers used a descriptive qualitative research design. The study population was 880 senior student nurses and 90 clinical instructors from a nursing program at a university in Taiwan who used CCJ. After completion of 1 year of clinical practicum, 16 students and 7 instructors participated voluntarily in focus group interviews. Researchers used content analysis to sort interview data into themes. Six themes were categorized that encapsulated student and instructor experiences and perceptions regarding using CCJ in their clinical practicum. These themes were guiding caring behavior toward patients, enabling students' reflective caring abilities, building up students' self-confidence, increasing interaction between students and instructors, enhancing students' self-development, and overcoming writing difficulty. Research findings may serve as a reference for nursing educators to use CCJ strategy in student nurses' clinical practicum.

  20. Dar Es Salaam Medical Students' Journal: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    International Committee of Medical Journal Editors. Med Educ. 1999;33 (1): 66 – 78). They should be numbered in the order of which they appear in the text and at the end of the article the full list of references should follow the Vancouver style.

  1. Journal of Student Affairs in Africa: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Journal uses the APA author-date referencing system. (for details see our referencing guide here). - JSAA is divided into different sections, i.e. Research Article (peer reviewed); Reflective Practice (peer reviewed); Dialogue section; Book Reviews section; and Calls and Notices. Please note that different requirements ...

  2. Clinical judgment in reflective journals of prelicensure nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussard, Michelle E

    2015-01-01

    Clinical judgment is an essential skill needed by RNs. Employers expect new graduate nurses to enter the work-force with established clinical judgment skills. Therefore, nurse educators must ensure that prelicensure nursing students develop clinical judgment before graduation. This qualitative, interpretive description study reviewed the reflective journals of 30 prelicensure nursing students who participated in four progressive high-fidelity simulation (HFS) scenarios during a medical-surgical nursing course. Eight themes were identified in the reflective journals: (a) expectations about the patient, (b) recognition of a focused assessment, (c) interpretation of medications, laboratory data, and diagnostics, (d) communication with the patient, (e) collaboration and interprofessionalism, (f) prioritizing interventions, (g) skillfulness with interventions, and (h) incorporation of skills and information into real patient situations. This study indicated that reflective journaling following progressive HFS scenarios may be an effective teaching-learning strategy to assist prelicensure nursing students in the development of clinical judgment. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. Principals' Attitudes toward Student Journalism and Freedom of the Press.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Laurence R.

    The 145 high school principals and 317 student newspaper advisers who answered questionnaires in this 1974 survey provided information about the following topics: adult responsibility for student publications, advisers' qualifications, financial support arrangements, space and facilities available, general support of students' First Amendment…

  4. Reflective journals: unmasking student perceptions of anatomical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, L; Sookrajh, R; Satyapal, K S

    2017-01-01

    In medical education, reflection has been considered to be a core skill in professional competence. The anatomy laboratory is an ideal setting for faculty/ student interaction and provides invaluable opportunities for active learning and reflection on anatomical knowledge. This study was designed to record student attitudes regarding human cadaveric dissection, explore their experiences of anatomy through an analysis of their journal-reflective writings and determine whether this type of creative writing had a beneficial effect on those students who chose to complete them. A total of 75 journals from Medical and Allied Health Science students were collected and analysed. Results were categorised according to the following themes: (i) Dissecting room stressors (27.6%); (ii) Educational value of dissection (26.3%); (iii) Appreciation, Gratitude, Respect and Curiosity for the cadaver (18.9%); (iv) Positive and negative sentiments expressed in the dissecting room (25.8%); (v) Benefit of alternate teaching modalities (4.6%); (vi) Spirituality/Religious Beliefs (3.7%); (vii) Shared humanity and emotional bonds (3.69%); (viii) Acknowledgement of human anatomical variations (3.2%); (ix) Beauty and complexity of the human body (1.8%) and (x) Psychological detachment (0.9%). Students appreciated the opportunity to share their emotions and reflect on the humanistic dimension of anatomy as a subject. Student reflections illustrated clearly their thoughts and some of the difficult issues with which they wrestled. The anatomy laboratory is seen as the budding clinician's first encounter with a patient, albeit a cadaver. This was the first time that reflective journals were given to students in the discipline. Reflective journals allow students to express themselves in an open-ended and creative fashion. It also assists students to integrate anatomy and clinical medicine and assists in applying their basic anatomical knowledge in an authentic, yet safe environment.

  5. Asia-Pacific Journal for Student Affairs (AJSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Bardill Moscaritolo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The International Association of Student Affairs and Services (IASAS serves as a global network of student affairs and services workers that encourages sharing, cooperation, research, exchanges, and attendance at each other’s conferences. The Vice President and General Secretary of IASAS attended the 2016 Asia Pacific Student Services Association (APSSA Conference in Chiang Mai, Thailand. Long-time colleague and past regional coordinator in Asia for IASAS, Evelyn Ariola-Songco, presented both members with a copy of the inaugural Journal of the Philippine Association of Administrators of Student Affairs (PAASA. This is the first journal in the South East Asian region and is an important first step in advancing the field.

  6. Abia State University Medical Students' Association Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Determinants of HIV/AIDS Risky Behaviours among Senior Secondary School Students in Aba North Local Government Area, Abia State · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. CA Onwubiko, SC Ivy, O Kalu ...

  7. Art Journals: High-School Students Get Personal

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Jackie

    2012-01-01

    For some time, the author has wanted her advanced 11th- and 12th-grade art students to not just create in the classroom, but also at home. When this was not achieved with standard sketchbook assignments, she decided to "spice up" their homework/sketchbook experience by having them create their own artists' journals. She got her idea from a book by…

  8. Is journaling empowering? Students' perceptions of their reflective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    university of technology nursing department to respond to limitations imposed by traditionally-formed educational frames of reference of post-basic nurse practitioner students that historically rated proficiency in the tasks of nursing above that of knowing nursing. Reflective journals were introduced as an educational strategy ...

  9. Responding to Intimacies and Crises in Students' Journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Marti

    1990-01-01

    Notes that even specific journal writing assignments tend to elicit intimate feelings and expressions from students. Notes that English teachers often question their ability to respond in positive ways to such intimacies. Argues that English teachers should learn about legal implications, response options, and their own individual values to…

  10. Nature Journaling: Enhancing Students' Connections to the Environment through Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormell, Janita; Ivey, Toni

    2012-01-01

    Today's youth are increasingly spending more time indoors and less time outside. As a result, many children have a "nature deficit" (Louv 2005) and little awareness of their role in nature. In this article, the first author describes how she shared her passion for nature with her sixth-grade students through nature journaling and how her…

  11. Book Review | Hamilton | Journal of Student Affairs in Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Osfield, K.J., Perozzi, B., Bardill Moscaritolo, L. & Shea, R. (2016). Supporting Students Globally in Higher Education. Washington, D.C.: NASPA. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL.

  12. Refining the Journal Club Presentations of Postgraduate Students in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: A gap between best practice and actual clinical care exists and this can be overcome by evidence‑based practice (EBP), which is essential to improve the clinical decision making. A strategy to reduce deficits in care provision is to train the postgraduate students in the practice of EBP in the journal clubs as ...

  13. The Class of 2011 Student Survey Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Association of Colleges and Employers (NJ3), 2011

    2011-01-01

    Based on responses from 20,000 college seniors nationwide, "The Class of 2011 Student Survey Report" gives you hard numbers "plus" the analysis you need to develop your college recruiting strategy and build your brand among college students. Align your recruiting strategies tactics with students' wants, needs, attitudes, and behaviors--you'll get…

  14. Journalism Education in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Dick; Russell, Catharine

    Twenty-four of the 35 Canadian schools with formal journalism programs responded to a survey conducted to collect data about enrollment, curricula, faculty background in journalism, and the ability of journalism graduates to find jobs in the profession. Highlights of the results are as follows: there are an estimated 3,300 journalism students in…

  15. A Nutrition Journal and Diabetes Shopping Experience to Improve Pharmacy Students' Empathy and Cultural Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Yolanda

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To implement and assess the effectiveness of an exercise designed to develop pharmacy students' empathy toward patients regarding diabetes and obesity and encourage cultural and “economic” competence. Design Students in the Nutrition Journal and Diabetes Shopping Experience attended a nutrition and weight management lecture, monitored their own nutritional intake by maintaining an online nutrition and exercise journal, and grocery shopped based on an assigned patient scenario. Scenarios varied in terms of income, ethnicity, insurance coverage, family size, grocery store, and medication lists. Students completed written reflections and group discussions and completed pre- and post-assignment survey instruments. Assessment The activities improved student confidence levels regarding nutrition and weight-related patient counseling, and knowledge about general nutrition and weight management. The majority of students agreed that the activities improved their ability to empathize with overweight patients regarding the challenges of nutrition and lifestyle changes and enhanced their awareness of the impact that cultural and financial situations have on nutrition and lifestyle. Conclusion The Nutrition Journal and Diabetes Shopping Experience positively impacted the way pharmacy students view the challenges surrounding nutrition and healthy eating in patients with culturally and socioeconomically diverse backgrounds. PMID:19513175

  16. A Nutrition Journal and Diabetes Shopping Experience to improve pharmacy students' empathy and cultural competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Jennifer M; Hardy, Yolanda

    2009-04-07

    To implement and assess the effectiveness of an exercise designed to develop pharmacy students' empathy toward patients regarding diabetes and obesity and encourage cultural and "economic" competence. Students in the Nutrition Journal and Diabetes Shopping Experience attended a nutrition and weight management lecture, monitored their own nutritional intake by maintaining an online nutrition and exercise journal, and grocery shopped based on an assigned patient scenario. Scenarios varied in terms of income, ethnicity, insurance coverage, family size, grocery store, and medication lists. Students completed written reflections and group discussions and completed pre- and post-assignment survey instruments. The activities improved student confidence levels regarding nutrition and weight-related patient counseling, and knowledge about general nutrition and weight management. The majority of students agreed that the activities improved their ability to empathize with overweight patients regarding the challenges of nutrition and lifestyle changes and enhanced their awareness of the impact that cultural and financial situations have on nutrition and lifestyle. The Nutrition Journal and Diabetes Shopping Experience positively impacted the way pharmacy students view the challenges surrounding nutrition and healthy eating in patients with culturally and socioeconomically diverse backgrounds.

  17. A survey of statistics in three UK general practice journal

    OpenAIRE

    Rigby, A S; Armstrong, G K; Campbell, M J; Summerton, N

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background Many medical specialities have reviewed the statistical content of their journals. To our knowledge this has not been done in general practice. Given the main role of a general practitioner as a diagnostician we thought it would be of interest to see whether the statistical methods reported reflect the diagnostic process. Methods Hand search of three UK journals of general practice namely the British Medical Journal (general practice section), British Journal of General Pr...

  18. Reading Journal as a Way to Improve Students' Comprehension Toward a Textbook Reading Material

    OpenAIRE

    Winiharti, Menik; Herawati, Agnes; Rahayu, Esti

    2014-01-01

    Reading journal is one way to record students' independent learning based on text they read. This study was conducted to find out the students' level of reading comprehension through some notes written in the reading journal, the extent to which the activity of writing reading journals improved students' reading comprehension, whether the students got benefit from reading journal. There were 104 respondents coming from four different departments in Bina Nusantara University were asked to read...

  19. Using Scavenger Hunts to Familiarize Students with Scientific Journal Articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lijek, Rebeccah S; Fankhauser, Sarah C

    2016-03-01

    Primary scientific literature can be difficult to navigate for anyone unfamiliar with its foreign, formal structure. We sought to create a fun, easy learning tool to help familiarize students of all ages with the structure of a scientific article. Our main learning objective was for the student to realize that science writing is formulaic-that specific information is found in predictable locations within an article-and that, with an understanding of the formula, anyone can comfortably navigate any journal article and accurately predict what to expect to find in each section. To this end, we designed a Journal Article Scavenger Hunt that requires the user to find and identify a series of commonplace features of a primary research article. The scavenger hunt activity is quick and easy to implement, and is adaptable to various ages and settings, including the classroom, lab, and at outreach events. The questions in the scavenger hunt can be scaled in difficulty and specificity to suit the instructor's needs. Over many years of using this activity, we have received positive feedback from students of all ages, from elementary school students to lay adult-learners as well as science teachers themselves. By making the unknown seem predictable and approachable, the scavenger hunt helps a variety of audiences feel more comfortable with science and more confident in their ability to engage directly with the scientific literature. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education.

  20. The Survey of Iranian English Medical Journals in some Databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    maliheh farrokhni

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This research analyzed 20 Iranian English medical scientific journals indexed in some elected creitable databases from 2001-2004/ 1380-1383. The results showed that from these 20 journals, only 5 ones having 687 articles were indexed in databases. Daru Journal was the first journal. The most of articles were indexed in EMBASE and none of journals were entered in PUBMED and WEB OF SCIENCE. Most percentage of articles was in the field of Pharmacology then Communicable Diseases and Pediatrics. And the articles with 3 authors were the most articles.

  1. Using students' journals about death experiences as a pedagological tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doll, Kevin; Kereakoglow, Sandra; Radhika Sarma, Arti; Hare, Jan

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to evaluate a pedagological tool for student's study of death and bereavement. Previous research suggests that students may be more willing to discuss issues associated with death through written correspondence rather than through oral communication. However, despite these efforts there are still students who experience great difficulty in expressing themselves fully in class by no fault of the teacher but merely due to the student's own disposition. Based on the data, it appears as if journal writing may offer a way around this difficulty. Data were collected from two sites: a private college in New England and a Midwestern state university. Common themes that students stated effected their experiences with death included reactions of significant others to the death in question, the funeral services provided, and the familial events postfuneral. The limitations and benefits of using journaling as a pedagological tool for a bereavement course are discussed. Using projects such as this one may help students to accurately display their learning to the professor while still bringing in their own perceptions of death.

  2. Update on the endorsement of CONSORT by high impact factor journals: a survey of journal "Instructions to Authors" in 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamseer, Larissa; Hopewell, Sally; Altman, Douglas G; Moher, David; Schulz, Kenneth F

    2016-06-24

    The CONsolidated Standards Of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) Statement provides a minimum standard set of items to be reported in published clinical trials; it has received widespread recognition within the biomedical publishing community. This research aims to provide an update on the endorsement of CONSORT by high impact medical journals. We performed a cross-sectional examination of the online "Instructions to Authors" of 168 high impact factor (2012) biomedical journals between July and December 2014. We assessed whether the text of the "Instructions to Authors" mentioned the CONSORT Statement and any CONSORT extensions, and we quantified the extent and nature of the journals' endorsements of these. These data were described by frequencies. We also determined whether journals mentioned trial registration and the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE; other than in regards to trial registration) and whether either of these was associated with CONSORT endorsement (relative risk and 95 % confidence interval). We compared our findings to the two previous iterations of this survey (in 2003 and 2007). We also identified the publishers of the included journals. Sixty-three percent (106/168) of the included journals mentioned CONSORT in their "Instructions to Authors." Forty-four endorsers (42 %) explicitly stated that authors "must" use CONSORT to prepare their trial manuscript, 38 % required an accompanying completed CONSORT checklist as a condition of submission, and 39 % explicitly requested the inclusion of a flow diagram with the submission. CONSORT extensions were endorsed by very few journals. One hundred and thirty journals (77 %) mentioned ICMJE, and 106 (63 %) mentioned trial registration. The endorsement of CONSORT by high impact journals has increased over time; however, specific instructions on how CONSORT should be used by authors are inconsistent across journals and publishers. Publishers and journals should encourage authors to

  3. Perceptions of student nurses on the writing of reflective journals as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Reflective journals are used by the students to voice their views on the daily activities during clinical placement. Reflective journals are aimed at helping the student to observe and record as many facts about daily practice as the student finds relevant. Reflective journal writing can therefore be used as a tool to ...

  4. Endorsement of the CONSORT Statement by high impact factor medical journals: a survey of journal editors and journal 'Instructions to Authors'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopewell, Sally; Altman, Douglas G; Moher, David; Schulz, Kenneth F

    2008-01-01

    Background The CONSORT Statement provides recommendations for reporting randomized controlled trials. We assessed the extent to which leading medical journals that publish reports of randomized trials incorporate the CONSORT recommendations into their journal and editorial processes. Methods This article reports on two observational studies. Study 1: We examined the online version of 'Instructions to Authors' for 165 high impact factor medical journals and extracted all text mentioning the CONSORT Statement or CONSORT extension papers. Any mention of the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) or clinical trial registration were also sought and extracted. Study 2: We surveyed the editor-in-chief, or editorial office, for each of the 165 journals about their journal's endorsement of CONSORT recommendations and its incorporation into their editorial and peer-review processes. Results Study 1: Thirty-eight percent (62/165) of journals mentioned the CONSORT Statement in their online 'Instructions to Authors'; of these 37% (23/62) stated this was a requirement, 63% (39/62) were less clear in their recommendations. Very few journals mentioned the CONSORT extension papers. Journals that referred to CONSORT were more likely to refer to ICMJE guidelines (RR 2.16; 95% CI 1.51 to 3.08) and clinical trial registration (RR 3.67; 95% CI 2.36 to 5.71) than those journals which did not. Study 2: Thirty-nine percent (64/165) of journals responded to the on-line survey, the majority were journal editors. Eighty-eight percent (50/57) of journals recommended authors comply with the CONSORT Statement; 62% (35/56) said they would require this. Forty-one percent (22/53) reported incorporating CONSORT into their peer-review process and 47% (25/53) into their editorial process. Eighty-one percent (47/58) reported including CONSORT in their 'Instructions to Authors' although there was some inconsistency when cross checking information on the journal's website. Sixty

  5. Endorsement of the CONSORT Statement by high impact factor medical journals: a survey of journal editors and journal 'Instructions to Authors'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moher David

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The CONSORT Statement provides recommendations for reporting randomized controlled trials. We assessed the extent to which leading medical journals that publish reports of randomized trials incorporate the CONSORT recommendations into their journal and editorial processes. Methods This article reports on two observational studies. Study 1: We examined the online version of 'Instructions to Authors' for 165 high impact factor medical journals and extracted all text mentioning the CONSORT Statement or CONSORT extension papers. Any mention of the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE or clinical trial registration were also sought and extracted. Study 2: We surveyed the editor-in-chief, or editorial office, for each of the 165 journals about their journal's endorsement of CONSORT recommendations and its incorporation into their editorial and peer-review processes. Results Study 1: Thirty-eight percent (62/165 of journals mentioned the CONSORT Statement in their online 'Instructions to Authors'; of these 37% (23/62 stated this was a requirement, 63% (39/62 were less clear in their recommendations. Very few journals mentioned the CONSORT extension papers. Journals that referred to CONSORT were more likely to refer to ICMJE guidelines (RR 2.16; 95% CI 1.51 to 3.08 and clinical trial registration (RR 3.67; 95% CI 2.36 to 5.71 than those journals which did not. Study 2: Thirty-nine percent (64/165 of journals responded to the on-line survey, the majority were journal editors. Eighty-eight percent (50/57 of journals recommended authors comply with the CONSORT Statement; 62% (35/56 said they would require this. Forty-one percent (22/53 reported incorporating CONSORT into their peer-review process and 47% (25/53 into their editorial process. Eighty-one percent (47/58 reported including CONSORT in their 'Instructions to Authors' although there was some inconsistency when cross checking information on the journal

  6. Endorsement of the CONSORT statement by Chinese journals of Traditional Chinese Medicine: a survey of journal editors and review of journals' instructions for authors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Bin; Ke, Fa-Yong; Zheng, Er-Liang; Yang, Zun-Xian; Tang, Qing-Nan; Qi, Guo-Qing

    2016-06-01

    We aimed to assess the endorsement of the Consolidation Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) statement by Chinese journals of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and its incorporation into their editorial processes. PubMed, Embase and major Chinese databases were searched to identify journals of TCM from China for inclusion. The latest 'instruction for authors' (IFA) of each included journal was obtained and any text mentioning CONSORT or CONSORT extension papers was extracted. Subsequently, the editor of each of the included journals was surveyed about their journal's endorsement of the CONSORT recommendations and their incorporation into editorial and peer review processes. Sixty-three journals of TCM from China were examined. Of these, only three (5%) and one (2%) of the 63 journals mentioned the CONSORT statement and extension papers, respectively, in their IFA. Fifty-four of 63 (86%) of surveyed journals responded, with the majority of respondents being editors. Only 20% (11/54) of the respondents reported that they had any knowledge of the CONSORT statement. Only 6% (3/54) of the editors reported that they required authors to comply with the CONSORT statement or that they incorporated it into their peer review and editorial processes. TCM journals in China endorsing the CONSORT statement constituted a small percentage of the total. The majority of editors surveyed were not familiar with the content of the CONSORT statement and extension papers. We strongly recommend that the China Periodicals Association issue a policy to promote the endorsement of the CONSORT statement and conduct relevant training for journal editors in China. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  7. Pharmacy students' participation in a research experience culminating in journal publication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nykamp, Diane; Murphy, John E; Marshall, Leisa L; Bell, Allison

    2010-04-12

    To examine factors that influenced doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) students to collaborate with faculty members, preceptors, or others on scholarly activities that resulted in publication of an article in a pharmacy journal, and whether this experience influenced their consideration of a career in academic pharmacy. A 17-question survey instrument was e-mailed to student authors of papers published between 2004 and 2008 in 6 pharmacy journals. Responses were analyzed to determine factors influencing student participation in research and whether the experience led them to consider a career in academic pharmacy. Factors about their participation in the scholarly activity that respondents found valuable included personal fulfillment and making a contribution to the literature. Respondents indicated they were more interested in a career in academic pharmacy after their participation in the scholarly experience (p Participation in scholarly activities and student authorship of a peer-reviewed journal manuscript during pharmacy school may lead to increased interest in a career in academic pharmacy.

  8. An analysis of science conceptual knowledge in journals of students with disabilities and normally achieving students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigg, Gail S.

    Science education reforms of the last two decades have focused on raising the bar for ALL students which includes students with mild to moderate disabilities. Formative assessment can be used to assess the progress of these students to inquire, understand scientific concepts, reason scientifically, make decisions, and communicate effectively in science. The purpose of this study is to examine the use of science journals as a formative assessment in a guided inquiry unit of study for students with learning disabilities. Two normally achieving students (NA) and five students with learning disabilities (SLD) participated in a study of mammals that utilized journals to record the development of student knowledge through the course of study. Students were interviewed after the lessons were complete using the same prompts required in the journals. Themes were developed from the student writings and their verbal discourse using Grounded Theory. Journals and verbal discourse were rated following the themes of Knowledge Telling (KT) and Knowledge Transformation (KTR). Concept maps were developed for the Pre and Post test lessons (written and verbal discourses) by the raters in an attempt to further explain the knowledge that the students conveyed. The results of this study suggest that SLD are able to demonstrate knowledge about mammals better through verbal discourse than written discourse. While the NA students wrote more and used more technical discourse than did their SLD peers, the conceptual understanding of the topic by the SLD was no less inclusive than their NA peers when accessed verbally. The journals demonstrated limited conceptual growth for the SLD. Further, while lexical density is important to the development of knowledge in science, this study suggests the "conceptual density" may be another important indicator to examine.

  9. A survey of statistics in three UK general practice journal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell Michael J

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many medical specialities have reviewed the statistical content of their journals. To our knowledge this has not been done in general practice. Given the main role of a general practitioner as a diagnostician we thought it would be of interest to see whether the statistical methods reported reflect the diagnostic process. Methods Hand search of three UK journals of general practice namely the British Medical Journal (general practice section, British Journal of General Practice and Family Practice over a one-year period (1 January to 31 December 2000. Results A wide variety of statistical techniques were used. The most common methods included t-tests and Chi-squared tests. There were few articles reporting likelihood ratios and other useful diagnostic methods. There was evidence that the journals with the more thorough statistical review process reported a more complex and wider variety of statistical techniques. Conclusions The BMJ had a wider range and greater diversity of statistical methods than the other two journals. However, in all three journals there was a dearth of papers reflecting the diagnostic process. Across all three journals there were relatively few papers describing randomised controlled trials thus recognising the difficulty of implementing this design in general practice.

  10. Do Neuroscience Journals Accept Replications? A Survey of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy W. K. Yeung

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recent reports in neuroscience, especially those concerning brain-injury and neuroimaging, have revealed low reproducibility of results within the field and urged for more replication studies. However, it is unclear if the neuroscience journals welcome or discourage the submission of reports on replication studies. Therefore, the current study assessed the explicit position of neuroscience journals on replications.Methods: A list of active neuroscience journals publishing in English was compiled from Scopus database. These journal websites were accessed to read their aims and scope and instructions to authors, and to assess if they: (1 explicitly stated that they accept replications; (2 did not state their position on replications; (3 implicitly discouraged replications by emphasizing on the novelty of the manuscripts; or (4 explicitly stated that they reject replications. For journals that explicitly stated they accept or reject replications, their subcategory within neuroscience and their 5-year impact factor were recorded. The distribution of neuroscience replication studies published was also recorded by searching and extracting data from Scopus.Results: Of the 465 journals reviewed, 28 (6.0% explicitly stated that they accept replications, 394 (84.7% did not state their position on replications, 40 (8.6% implicitly discouraged replications by emphasizing on the novelty of the manuscripts, and 3 (0.6% explicitly stated that they reject replications. For the 28 journals that explicitly welcomed replications, three (10.7% stated their position in the aims and scope, whereas 25 (89.3% stated in within the detailed instructions to authors. The five-year impact factor (2015 of these journals ranged from 1.655 to 10.799, and nine of them (32.1% did not receive a 5-year or annual impact factor in 2015. There was no significant difference in the proportions of journals explicitly welcomed replications (journals with vs. without impact

  11. The Non-Professional Degree in Mass Communication: A Study of Curriculum and Student Enrollment. AASDJ Studies on Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, No. 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Peter

    A survey of 57 of the 61 schools accredited by the American Association of Schools and Departments of Journalism found seven schools offering a program of studies not designed to prepare students for vocations or careers in journalism. At these institutions an average of 10% of the junior/senior undergraduate majors--about 250 students…

  12. mba.com Prospective Students Survey. 2015 Survey Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Gregg

    2015-01-01

    This 2015 "mba.com Prospective Students Survey Report" explores the motivations, career goals, preferred program types, financial choices, decision time lines, and intended study destinations of individuals interested in pursuing a graduate management education. Findings analyzed in the report represent responses from nearly 12,000…

  13. How American and Chinese Journalism Students Prioritize Values: A Comparative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jin; Arant, David

    2016-01-01

    This study found that Chinese journalism students and American journalism students are more different than similar in their value systems. Overall, American students give greater weight to social-interaction values and self-improvement values, and Chinese students give greater importance to morality-oriented values and competency-oriented values.…

  14. Exploring the "Learning Careers" of Irish Undergraduate Sociology Students through the Establishment of an Undergraduate Sociology Student Journal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Patricia; Power, Martin J.; Barnes, Cliona; Haynes, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, a faculty-reviewed student undergraduate journal titled "Socheolas: The Limerick Student Journal of Sociology" was officially launched. The journal, now in its fourth volume, is produced, edited, and managed by a small team from within the Department of Sociology at the University of Limerick in Ireland. The objective of this…

  15. An Investigation of Students' Academic Development, Views, and Feelings through Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erduran Avci, Dilek; Karaca, Dilek

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate upper primary school students' academic development in science courses and to evaluate their views and feelings about self-learning processes through journals. Students in 6th and 7th grade wrote journals twice a week for nine weeks. We evaluated the journals weekly according to the Science Journal…

  16. The Effect of Journal Writing on Mathematics Achievement among High-Ability Students in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Tracy; Garces-Bacsal, Rhoda Myra

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effect of journal writing on mathematics achievement in high-ability students in Singapore. It assessed both the cognitive benefits of journal writing (as evidenced through gains in math test scores) and the socio-affective benefits of journal writing (as demonstrated in their personal reflections) as the students learned…

  17. Comparison of teacher-directed and student-directed journals on achievement in college chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Catherine Ann

    The purpose of this research was to use written student journals as a means to improve academic achievement in a one semester introductory college chemistry course designed for nonscience majors. Two kinds of journals were investigated to compare their effectiveness in improving academic achievement and their ability to strengthen conceptual and algorithmic problem solving mastery. Student opinions toward journal writing in college chemistry were also compared. Each journal format was examined for possible differences between the genders. The journal types that were compared were a teacher-directed format and a student-directed format. In the teacher-directed group of 62 students responded to specific topics and readings assigned by the instructor. The 74 students in the student-directed group individually chose the topics that they wrote about. Students wrote two to four entries per week for the duration of the semester (15 weeks). Results showed no significant differences at the alpha=0.05 level between the journal types for improvement of academic achievement as measured by the ACS standardized General-Organic-Biological Chemistry Test. No significant differences in student ability to solve algorithmic and conceptual chemistry problems were detected. Additionally, there were no significant differences between the genders with respect to the journal type analyses. There was a significant difference in the students' opinions toward the journal format that they were assigned to use. The student-directed group gave significantly higher ratings to their format compared to the teacher-directed students. There were no significant differences in the opinion of males and females with regard to journal format. Based on the outcomes of this investigation, for instructors choosing to use written student journals in their college science classes, the use of student-directed journals is recommended. Although there is no benefit in terms of academic achievement or conceptual

  18. Factor analysis of sources of information on organ donation and transplantation in journalism students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Alarcón, L; Ríos, A; Ramis, G; López-Navas, A; Febrero, B; Ramírez, P; Parrilla, P

    2013-01-01

    Journalists and the information they disseminate are essential to promote health and organ donation and transplantation (ODT). The attitude of journalism students toward ODT could influence public opinion and help promote this treatment option. The aim of this study was to determine the media through which journalism students receive information on ODT and to analyze the association between the sources of information and psychosocial variables. We surveyed journalism students (n = 129) recruited in compulsory classes. A validated psychosocial questionnaire (self-administered, anonymous) about ODT was used. Student t test and χ(2) test were applied. Questionnaire completion rate was 98% (n = 126). The medium with the greatest incidence on students was television (TV), followed by press and magazines/books. In the factor analysis to determine the impact of the information by its source, the first factor was talks with friends and family; the second was shared by hoardings/publicity posters, health professionals, and college/school; and the third was TV and radio. In the factor analysis between information sources and psychosocial variables, the associations were between information about organ donation transmitted by friends and family and having spoken about ODT with them; by TV, radio, and hoardings and not having spoken in the family; and by TV/radio and the father's and mother's opinion about ODT. The medium with the greatest incidence on students is TV, and the medium with the greatest impact on broadcasting information was conversations with friends, family, and health professionals. This could be useful for society, because they should be provided with clear and concise information. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Coming to Journalism: A Comparative Case Study of Postgraduate Students in Dublin and Amman

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Boyle, Neil; Knowlton, Steven

    2015-01-01

    This article presents findings from a pilot study of postgraduate journalism students in Dublin and Amman. The study compared professional outlooks and social characteristics of students in both contexts and examined institutional settings. The study finds that journalism students in Dublin and Amman have very similar views on the profession,…

  20. Enhancing Quality of Student Teachers' Practices through Reflective Journal Writing during School Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezati, Betty Akullu; Ocheng, Mary K.; Ssentamu, Proscovia N.; Sikoyo, Leah N.

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the role of journal writing in enhancing student teachers' learning during school practice. It analyses data from 22 student teachers' journals and 23 questionnaires. The study focuses on the areas that student teachers reflected on most, the nature of their reflection and the extent to which previous experiences informed their…

  1. The Legal Content of School Psychology Journals: A Systematic Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaheer, Imad; Zirkel, Perry A.

    2014-01-01

    The many challenges that school psychologists face inevitably include legal issues. In light of the agreement between the two primary professional organizations for school psychologists that understanding of law is a critical competency, this study analyzed the extent of law-based articles in leading school psychology journal articles published…

  2. An Examination of How Academic Advancement of U.S. Journalism Students Relates to Their Degree Motivations, Values, and Technology Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Serena; Hoag, Anne; Grant, August E.; Bowe, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    The newsroom is a powerful influence in a journalist's identity formation. Research has yet to verify the socializing impact of academia. This research utilized the quantitative survey method applying it to undergraduate journalism students (n = 798) to assess how academic status relates to students' degree motivations, life values, and technology…

  3. Endorsement of CONSORT by Chinese medical journals: a survey of "instruction to authors".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Lu; Hu, Jing; Zhang, Li; Shang, Hong-cai

    2014-07-01

    To determine the extent to which Chinese medical (CM) journals incorporate Consolidated Standards for Reporting of Trials (CONSORT) into their "instruction to authors". We reviewed the latest "instruction to authors" of the CM journals in China which indexed by MEDLINE in 2010 or Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE) in 2012 and extracted all information of CONSORT, International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE), other reporting guidelines or clinical trial registration. By reading the instructions to authors and reviewing recent studies published in those journals, those that do not publish clinical trials were excluded. We also contacted each of journals by telephone on contributor's status to ask them whether mentioned CONSORT in their instructions and incorporated it into their editorial and peer-review process. Full-text papers of randomized controlled trials (RCTs, from January 2011 to March 2012) published in the journals which mentioned "CONSORT" in their instructions for authors were downloaded. Seven CM journals were included. Three of these journals mentioned CONSORT in its instructions. By telephone survey, all journals gave responses and all respondents knew CONSORT statement. Three of 7 journals required authors to comply with the CONSORT statement and provide the CONSORT checklist and a flow chart of the trial. The rest 4 journals recommended authors of RCTs to refer to the CONSORT statement. From January 2011 to March 2012, a total of 50 RCTs were obtained from the 3 journals endorsing the CONSORT statement; 17 (17/50, 34%) contained a flow diagram in their manuscript, and none of those RCTs had mentioned the trial registration information. The endorsement of CONSORT by CM journals' "instruction to authors" was not satisfactory. The spread of CONSORT endorsement should be wider in instructing the performance of CM clinical trials in the future. Chinese journals should introduce CONSORT to their authors and require authors to comply with

  4. Be My Guest: A Survey of Mass Communication Students' Perception of Guest Speakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merle, Patrick F.; Craig, Clay

    2017-01-01

    The use of guest speakers as a pedagogical technique across disciplines at the college level is hardly novel. However, empirical assessment of journalism and mass communication students' perceptions of this practice has not previously been conducted. To fill this gap, this article presents results from an online survey specifically administered to…

  5. Educational Master Plan Student Survey: Perceptions of the San Diego Community College District. Student Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, William B.

    In 1989, a survey was conducted in the San Diego Community College District to determine students' perspectives of the services offered at their college or continuing education site. The range of services evaluated included instruction, administration, student services, cafeteria, and facilities. A total of 246 classes taught at 13 campuses and…

  6. Representation of less-developed countries in Pharmacology journals: an online survey of corresponding authors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohra Dileep K

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Scientists from less-developed countries (LDC perceive that it is difficult to publish in international journals from their countries. This online survey was conducted with the primary aim of determining the opinion of corresponding authors of published papers in international Pharmacology journals regarding the difficulties in publications and their possible solutions. Methods The titles of all Pharmacology journals were retrieved from Pubmed. 131 journals were included in study. The latest issue of all journals was reviewed thoroughly. An online survey was conducted from the corresponding authors of the published papers who belonged to LDC. Results 584 out 1919 papers (30.4% originated from the LDC. 332 responses (response rate; 64.5% were received from the authors. Approximately 50% the papers from LDC were published in journals with impact factor of less than 2. A weak negative correlation (r = -0.236 was observed between journal impact factor and the percentage of publications emanating from LDC. A significant majority of the corresponding authors (n = 254; 76.5% perceived that it is difficult to publish in good quality journals from their countries. According to their opinion, biased attitude of editors and reviewers (64.8% is the most important reason followed by the poor writing skills of the scientists from LDC (52.8%. The authors thought that well-written manuscript (76.1%, improvement in the quality of research (69.9% and multidisciplinary research (42.9% are important determinants that may improve the chances of publications. Conclusions The LDC are underrepresented in publications in Pharmacology journals. The corresponding authors of the published articles think that biased attitude of the editors as well as the reviewers of international journals and the poor writing skills of scientists are the major factors underlying the non-acceptance of their results. They also think that the improvement in the writing

  7. Book Review | Dunn-Coetzee | Journal of Student Affairs in Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Student Affairs in Africa. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 5, No 1 (2017) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should load here if your ...

  8. Medical student musculoskeletal education: an institutional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelley, Nathan W; Tanaka, Miho J; Skelley, Logan M; LaPorte, Dawn M

    2012-10-03

    Since the 1910 Flexner Report, medical education continues to undergo curriculum and graduation guideline reform to meet the needs of physicians and patients. Our aims were to (1) assess the quality of musculoskeletal education at our institution's School of Medicine by reporting the results of the Freedman and Bernstein examination among our medical students across all four years of training, and (2) stratify results according to medical school year, educational module, and intended career. We surveyed the 460 2009-2010 School of Medicine students via e-mail. The survey contained a validated orthopaedic examination of musculoskeletal competency (passing grade, 70%), demographic questions (e.g., year in training, clinical area of interest, and time dedicated to musculoskeletal topics in medical school education), and a 10-point tool for determining confidence in assessing musculoskeletal disorders. There were 354 responses (77.0%); six were excluded for incompleteness, leaving 348 for analysis. Linear regression analysis was used to determine the association between test scores and days spent studying musculoskeletal material. The unpaired Student t test was used to compare performance among areas of interest and training years, with p < 0.05 being considered significant. The mean score was 51.1%; only sixty-seven (19.3%) of the students passed. Fourth-year students scored significantly higher (59.0%) compared with first-year students (37.3%), but >65% of students in both groups failed. Only 34.2% of the graduating students had completed a musculoskeletal elective. Students who participated in elective musculoskeletal education had a higher pass rate (67.5%) than those who did not (43.9%, p < 0.001). A minimum of fifteen days dedicated to elective study of musculoskeletal medicine significantly increased the chance of passing this examination. First-year through fourth-year students ranked their level of confidence in dealing with musculoskeletal issues as 3.18, 3

  9. Professional Perceptions and Reasons for Access to Journalism Studies. The Case of Journalism Students at Complutense University of Madrid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam RODRÍGUEZ PALLARES

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the academic year 2013-2014, the MediaCom UCM research group conducted a study among students in the first and fourth year of the Degree in Journalism at UCM with the pretention to know the reasons that they decided to pursue these studies, their perceptions of journalism and media influence. From a quantitative analysis model relatively vocational criteria among students are perceived; generally they believe that journalists are not very independent and that political and economic factors influence in the activity of the media sector, whose influence on policy choices and consumption is subject to debate. This article is part of an academic project, whose results are intended to work with universities to improve their teaching and training model of students according to their perception of journalism as a profession.

  10. Survey of instructions to authors in Indian and British Dental Journals with respect to ethical guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, V P; Dhillon, J K; Kalra, G; Sharma, A; Mathur, R

    2013-01-01

    Publication can become a symbol of presenting how meticulously a person has followed ethical principles in research. It is the duty of the investigators or authors to carefully read the instructions to authors and generate data with honesty and genuineness. In fulfillment of the basic requisite to publish, clearly defined instructions to authors should be provided by the journal. To assess the pattern of instructions regarding the ethical requirements given to authors in Indian Dental Journals and tried to compare the same with British Dental Journals. A cross-sectional survey of 'instructions for authors,' for analysis of guidelines on ethical processes, was done. Instructions to authors of Indian and British Dental Journals indexed in PubMed were reviewed for guidelines with regard to seven key ethical issues. Descriptive statistics were used and results were expressed in percentages as well as numbers. Of the 10 Indian Dental Journals, 7 (70%) cited ethical guidelines such as International Committee of Medical Journal Editors, Committee on Publication Ethics, Indian Council of Medical Research guidelines whereas out of 27 British Dental Journals, 16 (59.25%) cited these. Protection of human subjects such as approval from an institutional/independent ethics committee, obtaining informed consent and maintenance of confidentiality of patient records was covered with 8 (80%) Indian and 19 (70.3%) British Dental Journals. Four (40%) Indian and 13 (48.1%) instructed about animals welfare. Nine (90%) of the Indian and 25 (92.5%) British Dental Journals required declaration of conflicts of interest by authors. Publication issues and authorship/contributorship criteria were specified by all 10 Indian and 25 (92.5%) and 24 (88.8%) British journals respectively. 6 (60%) of Indian and 11 (40.75%) of British Journals explained about data management, in case of clinical trials. A significant proportion of Indexed Indian and British Dental Journals did not provide adequate

  11. A Survey of Face Recognition Technique | Omidiora | Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A review of face recognition techniques has been carried out. Face recognition has been an attractive field in the society of both biological and computer vision of research. It exhibits the characteristics of being natural and low-intrusive. In this paper, an updated survey of techniques for face recognition is made. Methods of ...

  12. Assessing the Quality of Reflection in Student Journals: A Review of the Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyment, Janet E.; O'Connell, Timothy S.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we review 11 research articles that examine the level of reflection found in student journals in higher education across a range of disciplines. Our review reveals little to no consistency in the research community around the mechanisms and process of assessing levels of reflection in student journals. Our analysis also reveals that…

  13. The Reading Response E-Journal: An Alternative Way to Engage Low-Achieving EFL Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hsiao-Chien

    2013-01-01

    The reading response journal has been valued as an effective tool for involving students in authentic reading and writing activities. As the internet has become an essential medium in today's English classroom, it is advisable to integrate both the web and the journal when approaching our EFL students. In order to motivate and engage my…

  14. Journalism Educators, Their Students, and Local Media Practitioners: A Case Study Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuban, Adam J.

    2014-01-01

    Journalism educators must make critical decisions about their undergraduate curricula, determining how to best prepare their students for professional careers. Present scholarship indicates that a disconnect exists in what journalism students think they ought to know and/or be able to do upon graduation, what educators think they must teach their…

  15. The effects of blogs versus dialogue journals on open-response writing scores and attitudes of grade eight science students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Diane K.

    Today's students have grown up surrounded by technology. They use cell phones, word processors, and the Internet with ease, talking with peers in their community and around the world through e-mails, chatrooms, instant messaging, online discussions, and weblogs ("blogs"). In the midst of this technological explosion, adolescents face a growing need for strong literacy skills in all subject areas for achievement in school and on mandated state and national high stakes tests. The purpose of this study was to examine the use of blogs as a tool for improving open-response writing in the secondary science classroom in comparison to the use of handwritten dialogue journals. The study used a mixed-method approach, gathering both quantitative and qualitative data from 94 students in four eighth-grade science classes. Two classes participated in online class blogs where they posted ideas about science and responded to the ideas of other classmates. Two classes participated in handwritten dialogue journals, writing ideas about science and exchanging journals to respond to the ideas of classmates. The study explored these research questions: Does the use of blogs, as compared to the use of handwritten dialogue journals, improve the open-response writing scores of eighth grade science students? How do students describe their experience using blogs to study science as compared to students using handwritten dialogue journals? and How do motivation, self-efficacy, and community manifest themselves in students who use blogs as compared to students who use handwritten dialogue journals? The quantitative aspect of the study used data from pre- and post-tests and from a Likert-scale post-survey. The pre- and post-writing on open-response science questions were scored using the Massachusetts Comprehensive Assessment System (MCAS) open-response scoring rubric. The study found no statistically significant difference in the writing scores between the blog group and the dialogue journal

  16. New journal selection for quantitative survey of infectious disease research: application for Asian trend analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background Quantitative survey of research articles, as an application of bibliometrics, is an effective tool for grasping overall trends in various medical research fields. This type of survey has been also applied to infectious disease research; however, previous studies were insufficient as they underestimated articles published in non-English or regional journals. Methods Using a combination of Scopus™ and PubMed, the databases of scientific literature, and English and non-English keywords directly linked to infectious disease control, we identified international and regional infectious disease journals. In order to ascertain whether the newly selected journals were appropriate to survey a wide range of research articles, we compared the number of original articles and reviews registered in the selected journals to those in the 'Infectious Disease Category' of the Science Citation Index Expanded™ (SCI Infectious Disease Category) during 1998-2006. Subsequently, we applied the newly selected journals to survey the number of original articles and reviews originating from 11 Asian countries during the same period. Results One hundred journals, written in English or 7 non-English languages, were newly selected as infectious disease journals. The journals published 14,156 original articles and reviews of Asian origin and 118,158 throughout the world, more than those registered in the SCI Infectious Disease Category (4,621 of Asian origin and 66,518 of the world in the category). In Asian trend analysis of the 100 journals, Japan had the highest percentage of original articles and reviews in the area, and no noticeable increase in articles was revealed during the study period. China, India and Taiwan had relatively large numbers and a high increase rate of original articles among Asian countries. When adjusting the publication of original articles according to the country population and the gross domestic product (GDP), Singapore and Taiwan were the most

  17. Journals: a tool to improve students' writing skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernández Herrero, Annabelle

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: This paper reports on the results of a research study carried out with a group of second-year students of English at the School of Modern Languages at the University of Costa Rica. The purpose of the study was to determine if explicit instruction of troublesome linguistic aspects (syntax, morphology, lexicon, and punctuation taken from the students’ journal entries improved the students writing skills. A qualitative methodology was used.Resumen: El propósito de este artículo es reportar los resultados de un estudio que se llevó a cabo con un grupo de estudiantes de inglés de segundo año de la carrera de inglés en la Escuela de Lenguas Modernas de la Universidad de Costa Rica. Se investigó qué aspectos de la enseñanza explícita de temas lingüísticos tomados de los diarios de los estudiantes permiten una mejora en las habilidades de escritura de los mismos. Se utilizó una metodología cualitativa.

  18. Conflict-of-interest disclosure at medical journals in Japan: a nationwide survey of the practices of journal secretariats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Takako; Green, Joseph; Barron, J Patrick

    2015-08-26

    Medical journals in Japan generally have appropriate policies regarding disclosure of conflicts of interest (COI). However, COI management depends on the staff members of each journal's editorial secretariat. This study's objectives were to find out (A) whether COI disclosure and the journal's role in it are clearly understood by the journal's secretariat staff, (B) how much experience the editorial secretariat has in actually handling issues related to disclosure and (C) what kind of help or support they need. In January 2014, questionnaires were sent to the editorial secretariats of journal-publishing societies belonging to the Japanese Association of Medical Sciences (JAMS). The response rate was 100%, and the respondents represented 121 journals published by the 118 JAMS member societies (at the time of the survey). Information was collected on the history of COI policies and on how those policies were implemented. At the end of the questionnaire, there was an open-ended call for comments. Compulsory COI disclosure began between 2010 and 2013 for 60.3% of the journals (73/121). Handling of COI issues was not uniform: 17.4% (21/121) of respondents do not pursue cases of dubious disclosure, and 47.9% (58/121) do not require COI disclosures from editorial board members. Very few of the editorial secretariats had clearly-stated consequences for violations of COI-disclosure policy (33/121, 27.3%), and only 28.9% offered COI education (35/121). Respondents' comments indicated that uniform, easily-searchable guidance regarding COI policies and implementation would be welcome. Although commitment is widespread, policy implementation is inconsistent and COI experience is lacking. Clear, easy-to-use guidelines are desired by many societies. The JAMS is to be commended for supporting this country-wide investigation; other countries and regions are encouraged to perform similar investigations to respond to needs regarding COI management. Published by the BMJ Publishing

  19. Science journal editors' views on publication ethics: results of an international survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wager, E; Fiack, S; Graf, C; Robinson, A; Rowlands, I

    2009-06-01

    Breaches of publication ethics such as plagiarism, data fabrication and redundant publication are recognised as forms of research misconduct that can undermine the scientific literature. We surveyed journal editors to determine their views about a range of publication ethics issues. Questionnaire sent to 524 editors-in-chief of Wiley-Blackwell science journals asking about the severity and frequency of 16 ethical issues at their journals, their confidence in handling such issues, and their awareness and use of guidelines. Responses were obtained from 231 editors (44%), of whom 48% edited healthcare journals. The general level of concern about the 16 issues was low, with mean severity scores of 20% of the editors stated that 12 of the 16 items never occurred at their journal. However, 13%-47% did not know the frequency of the problems. Awareness and use of guidelines was generally low. Most editors were unaware of all except other journals' instructions. Most editors of science journals seem not very concerned about publication ethics and believe that misconduct occurs only rarely in their journals. Many editors are unfamiliar with available guidelines but would welcome more guidance or training.

  20. Designing Journalism Capstone Units That Demonstrate Student Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Trevor

    2016-01-01

    There are considerable differences in the structure, content, and delivery of tertiary journalism degrees in Australia as identified in a 2014 Office for Learning and Teaching (OLT) Innovation and Development Project report on graduate qualities and journalism curriculum renewal. To address this situation, the author argues for journalism capstone…

  1. Doing it for Real: Designing Experiential Journalism Curricula that Prepare Students for the New and Uncertain World of Journalism Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanti St Clair

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The world of journalism in the digital age is changing faster than university curricula can keep up. News is now produced in forms and on platforms that were nonexistent 10 years ago. Journalists may increasingly generate their own work opportunities in entrepreneurial news outlets and start-ups, rather than as employees in legacy newsprint and broadcast media. Substantial workforce contraction has also occurred since 2012 as revenue in print and other traditional media has found new homes in social media and search engines, and over 1000 journalists (or 15 percent of the journalism workforce were made redundant. Journalism graduates therefore need to be flexible, innovative and enterprising to survive professionally in this evolving setting. Additionally, financial and funding pressures on universities are leading them to reduce course costs and deliver more courses online. Elongated unpaid internships provide real world experience but access to these will likely reduce as workforces continue to contract. This article considers student feedback from three authentic experiential journalism projects in light of these changing times in journalism. It explores how the performative and very practical nature of traditional and digital journalism skills may be developed through a learning-centred curriculum anchored in authentic and experiential activities and settings. The article briefly considers some of the challenges facing journalism educators in delivering such a curriculum in e-learning settings, and sets out a simple framework for supporting the development of digital media workforce readiness.

  2. Business School Deans on Student Academic Dishonesty: A Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Bob S.; Weible, Rick J.; Olmosk, Kurt E.

    2010-01-01

    While students and, to a lesser extent, faculty have been surveyed about the student academic dishonesty issue, deans have been virtually ignored. This paper reports the results of an online survey of business school deans on the issue. Deans' perceptions of the level of student academic dishonesty in their schools were much lower than the levels…

  3. Yavapai College Student Satisfaction Survey Conducted December 2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavapai Coll., Prescott, AZ.

    Yavapai College, Arizona, conducted a telephone survey of current college students in December 2002. The survey provides data for future marketing efforts, as well as providing information to be used as part of an ongoing assessment of student opinions and needs. An independent telemarketing firm called students from a random list of 1,400 credit…

  4. Reflective Journals as a Research Tool: The Case of Student Teachers' Development of Teamwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashan, Bilha; Holsblat, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    The study explores the development of teamwork among a group of Israeli student teachers enrolled in a practicum, in order to help teacher educators to understand better the processes student teachers experience in becoming a collaborative team. The student teachers' reflective journals provide qualitative evidence of the stages in the development…

  5. Marginalization of Published Scholarship on Students with Disabilities in Higher Education Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, Edlyn Vallejo

    2014-01-01

    While numbers of students with disabilities continue to rise in postsecondary education, little is known about the extent to which the scholarship on this student population has kept pace. A critical content analysis was conducted to review articles on students with disabilities published in top-tier journals of higher education between 1990 and…

  6. Doctoral Students as Journal Editors: Non-Formal Learning through Academic Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopwood, Nick

    2010-01-01

    Much attention has been paid to formal pedagogic elements of the doctorate--supervision and other structured institutional provisions--but we know less about the role played by non-formal practices in doctoral students' learning. This paper explores the experiences of eight doctoral students involved in editing student-run journals. Editorship and…

  7. The Effect of Reflective Science Journal Writing on Students' Self-Regulated Learning Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rawahi, Nawar M.; Al-Balushi, Sulaiman M.

    2015-01-01

    The current study investigates the effectiveness of grade-ten students' reflective science journal writing on their self-regulated learning strategies. We used a pre-post control group quasi-experimental design. The sample consisted of 62 tenth-grade students (15 years old) in Oman, comprising 32 students in the experimental group and 30 students…

  8. A Seventeen-Year Study of Graduate Student Authorship in Advertising Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ye; Rodgers, Shelly; Wang, Zongyuan; Thorson, Esther

    2016-01-01

    An examination of five leading advertising journals over seventeen years revealed that the number of graduate student "authors" increased over time. However, there was no increase in the total number of "articles" with graduate student authors. More than 70 percent of graduate students who authored or co-authored the published…

  9. Annual Enrollment Report: Growth in Number of Students Studying Journalism and Mass Communication Slows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Lee B.; Vlad, Tudor; Huh, Jisu; Daniels, George L.

    2002-01-01

    Provides the key findings of the 2001 Annual Survey of Journalism and Mass Communication Enrollments. Shows that undergraduate enrollments continued to grow while graduate enrollments declined. Discusses degrees granted and race, ethnicity, and gender factors. (PM)

  10. Actively Engaging Middle Level Students with Photo Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar-Brown, Rajni

    2011-01-01

    The author describes the implementation of a photo journal project and explains how it positively impacted diverse young adolescents, specifically three reluctant learners. In addition to increasing motivation and engagement in learning, the photo journal project built community in the classroom. This article shares practical ideas for…

  11. Journal Writing: Support for Students with Learning Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahsl, Allison J.; McAndrews, Stephanie L.

    2012-01-01

    Writing can be a powerful tool for thinking and learning. Journaling is one form of writing that is a commonly used learning tool in many classrooms. Children use journals to record personal experiences, explore reactions and interpretations to reading and videos, or record, analyze, or enhance information about literature or other subject areas.…

  12. Honorary and ghost authorship in high impact biomedical journals: a cross sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wislar, Joseph S; Flanagin, Annette; Fontanarosa, Phil B; Deangelis, Catherine D

    2011-10-25

    To assess the prevalence of honorary and ghost authors in six leading general medical journals in 2008 and compare this with the prevalence reported by authors of articles published in 1996. Cross sectional survey using a web based questionnaire. International survey of journal authors. Sample of corresponding authors of 896 research articles, review articles, and editorial/opinion articles published in six general medical journals with high impact factors in 2008: Annals of Internal Medicine, JAMA, Lancet, Nature Medicine, New England Journal of Medicine, and PLoS Medicine. Self reported compliance with International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) criteria for authorship for all authors on the selected articles. A total of 630/896 (70.3%) corresponding authors responded to the survey. The prevalence of articles with honorary authorship or ghost authorship, or both, was 21.0% (95% CI 18.0% to 24.3%), a decrease from 29.2% reported in 1996 (P = 0.004). Based on 545 responses on honorary authorship, 96 articles (17.6% (95% CI 14.6% to 21.0%)) had honorary authors (range by journal 12.2% to 29.3%), a non-significant change from 1996 (19.3%; P = 0.439). Based on 622 responses on ghost authorship, 49 articles (7.9% (6.0% to 10.3%)) had ghost authors (range by journal 2.1% to 11.0%), a significant decline from 1996 (11.5%; P = 0.023). The prevalence of honorary authorship was 25.0% in original research reports, 15.0% in reviews, and 11.2% in editorials, whereas the prevalence of ghost authorship was 11.9% in research articles, 6.0% in reviews, and 5.3% in editorials. Evidence of honorary and ghost authorship in 21% of articles published in major medical journals in 2008 suggests that increased efforts by scientific journals, individual authors, and academic institutions are essential to promote responsibility, accountability, and transparency in authorship, and to maintain integrity in scientific publication.

  13. Survey of instructions to authors in Indian and British Dental Journals with respect to ethical guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V P Mathur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Publication can become a symbol of presenting how meticulously a person has followed ethical principles in research. It is the duty of the investigators or authors to carefully read the instructions to authors and generate data with honesty and genuineness. In fulfillment of the basic requisite to publish, clearly defined instructions to authors should be provided by the journal. Aims: To assess the pattern of instructions regarding the ethical requirements given to authors in Indian Dental Journals and tried to compare the same with British Dental Journals. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional survey of ′instructions for authors,′ for analysis of guidelines on ethical processes, was done. Materials and Methods: Instructions to authors of Indian and British Dental Journals indexed in PubMed were reviewed for guidelines with regard to seven key ethical issues. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive statistics were used and results were expressed in percentages as well as numbers. Results: Of the 10 Indian Dental Journals, 7 (70% cited ethical guidelines such as International Committee of Medical Journal Editors, Committee on Publication Ethics, Indian Council of Medical Research guidelines whereas out of 27 British Dental Journals, 16 (59.25% cited these. Protection of human subjects such as approval from an institutional/independent ethics committee, obtaining informed consent and maintenance of confidentiality of patient records was covered with 8 (80% Indian and 19 (70.3% British Dental Journals. Four (40% Indian and 13 (48.1% instructed about animals welfare. Nine (90% of the Indian and 25 (92.5% British Dental Journals required declaration of conflicts of interest by authors. Publication issues and authorship/contributorship criteria were specified by all 10 Indian and 25 (92.5% and 24 (88.8% British journals respectively. 6 (60% of Indian and 11 (40.75% of British Journals explained about data management, in case of

  14. Unveiling the Effects of Citizen Journalism Practice on College Students' Social Capital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nah, Seungahn; Namkoong, Kang; Van Stee, Stephanie K.; Record, Rachael A.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effects of citizen journalism practices on social capital concerning nonprofit and voluntary organizations (i.e., satisfaction, trust, and engagement). Through a quasi-experimental design, the analyses revealed that students in the treatment group, in which participants engaged in citizen journalism practice, had greater…

  15. The Quality of Reflection in Student Journals: A Review of Limiting and Enabling Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyment, Janet E.; O'Connell, Timothy S.

    2010-01-01

    Although reflective journals are widely used across many disciplines in higher education, the research that examines their use presents an unclear picture of the quality of reflection found in them. Some research reveals that student journals contain primarily deeply reflective entries. Yet other research presents a less optimistic perspective,…

  16. Sharing similarities and discussing differences : How Utrecht’s international journalism students cross cultural borders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Els Diekerhof

    2011-01-01

    The Utrecht School of Journalism has a long tradition in international higher education. The School’s European Culture & European Journalism (ED&EJ) programme is an example of a pedagogical practice in higher education where advanced students learn how to perform in an international context.

  17. What Journals Do Psychology Graduate Students Need? A Citation Analysis of Thesis References.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvia, Margaret; Lesher, Marcella

    1995-01-01

    Increasing subscription prices and the number of journals available make it difficult for libraries to supply all needed material for scholarly research. Bibliographic citations in graduate students' theses and dissertations, cost-per-use statistics, and shelving statistics were used for psychology journal selection in the St. Mary's University…

  18. The integration and evaluation of a social-media facilitated journal club to enhance the student learning experience of evidence-based practice: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Caleb; DiGiacomo, Michelle; Gholizadeh, Leila; Ferguson, Leila E; Hickman, Louise D

    2017-01-01

    Nurses are required to interpret and apply knowledge so communities will receive care based on best available evidence, as opposed to care that is simply based on tradition or authority. Fostering nursing students' critical appraisal skills will assist in their capacity to engage with, interpret and use best evidence. Journal clubs are frequently used approach to engage learners with research and develop critical appraisal skills. Given new flipped and blended approaches to teaching and learning there is need to rejuvenate how research is utilised and integrated within journal clubs to maximise engagement and translation of evidence. This paper provides a case study of a single site Australian university experience of transitioning a traditional physical journal club, to a social media-facilitated club within a postgraduate health subject to stimulate and facilitate engagement with the chosen manuscripts. This case study is based on our own experiences, supported by literature and includes qualitative comments obtained via student feedback surveys during November 2015. Case study. Social media-facilitated journal clubs offer an efficient way to continue developing critical appraisal skills in nursing students. The integration of a social media-facilitated journal clubs increased student attention, engagement with presented activities and overall student satisfaction within this evidence-based practice subject. Future rigorously-designed, large-scale studies are required to evaluate the impact of online journal clubs on the uptake of evidence-based practice, including those resulting in improved patient outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Examining University Students' Scholarly Publication in English Journals: A Case for Postgraduate Students' Written Literacy Practices

    OpenAIRE

    Marjan Vosoughi; Sue-San Ghahremani Ghajar; Atefeh Navarchi

    2017-01-01

    This  research  aimed  to  screen  'essay  writing'  difficulties  that  non-native  university students  at  postgraduate  levels  usually  experience  regarding  scholarly  publication  in mainstream, English journals. Two sets of variables including written literacy competencies in Persian and English languages were mapped over language uses (General vs. Academic). Initial screenings  from  one  hundred  Iranian  students  at  PhD  and  MA  levels  with  publication experiences  in  both  ...

  20. Medical Student Journals: Teaching The Peer-Review Process and Promoting Academic Mentorship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaskas, Nadine M; Ballard, David H; Weisman, Jeffery A; Vanchiere, John A

    2016-01-01

    Early exposure to research and longitudinal academic mentorship encourages medical student interest in academic careers and postgraduate research productivity. There are various ways for students to gain exposure to research in medical school; however, there are very few opportunities for medical students to participate in the peer-review process as a reviewer or editor for an academic journal. One potential method to supply such educational experiences is the creation of scientific journals specifically for medical students. Medical student research journals provide a platform for students to develop a scholarly voice as authors, reviewers, and editors. As the corresponding author of their own work, student authors learn to communicate professionally to address reviewer concerns. As peer-reviewers in training, students learn to analyze manuscripts for quality and document their concerns in a cohesive manner under the supervision of a faculty advisor. The authors elected to model the reviewer and editor education process in the spirit of traditional medical education, with student reviewers and editors "presenting" their assessments to the "attending" faculty advisor to obtain feedback on performance. Student journals have the potential to bolster critical thinking and communication skills, provide longitudinal faculty mentorship opportunities, and promote interest in physician-scientist and academic medical careers.

  1. Improving Students' Writing Skills Through Writing Journal Articles

    OpenAIRE

    Iftanti, Erna

    2016-01-01

    In Indonesian context, writing is considered as painful activity indicating that oral culture is much better than writing one. The students’ works are sufficiently kept in the libraries, although to publish those is much more worthy. Therefore, it is necessary to improve the students’ writing skills through a meaningful way namely writing journal article. This review article is therefore intended to discuss ways of improving students’ writing skills through writing journal article. The result...

  2. Are peer reviewers encouraged to use reporting guidelines? A survey of 116 health research journals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Hirst

    Full Text Available Pre-publication peer review of manuscripts should enhance the value of research publications to readers who may wish to utilize findings in clinical care or health policy-making. Much published research across all medical specialties is not useful, may be misleading, wasteful and even harmful. Reporting guidelines are tools that in addition to helping authors prepare better manuscripts may help peer reviewers in assessing them. We examined journals' instructions to peer reviewers to see if and how reviewers are encouraged to use them.We surveyed websites of 116 journals from the McMaster list. Main outcomes were 1 identification of online instructions to peer reviewers and 2 presence or absence of key domains within instructions: on journal logistics, reviewer etiquette and addressing manuscript content (11 domains.Only 41/116 journals (35% provided online instructions. All 41 guided reviewers about the logistics of their review processes, 38 (93% outlined standards of behaviour expected and 39 (95% contained instruction about evaluating the manuscript content. There was great variation in explicit instruction for reviewers about how to evaluate manuscript content. Almost half of the online instructions 19/41 (46% mentioned reporting guidelines usually as general statements suggesting they may be useful or asking whether authors had followed them rather than clear instructions about how to use them. All 19 named CONSORT for reporting randomized trials but there was little mention of CONSORT extensions. PRISMA, QUOROM (forerunner of PRISMA, STARD, STROBE and MOOSE were mentioned by several journals. No other reporting guideline was mentioned by more than two journals.Although almost half of instructions mentioned reporting guidelines, their value in improving research publications is not being fully realised. Journals have a responsibility to support peer reviewers. We make several recommendations including wider reference to the EQUATOR Network

  3. Engineering surveying theory and examination problems for students

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    Schofield, W

    2013-01-01

    Engineering Surveying: Theory and Examination Problems for Students, Volume 1, Third Edition discusses topics concerning engineering surveying techniques and instrumentations. The book is comprised of eight chapters that cover several concerns in engineering survey. Chapter 1 discusses the basic concepts of surveying. Chapter 2 deals with simple and precise leveling, while Chapter 3 covers earthworks. The book also talks about the theodolite and its applications, and then discusses optical distance measurement. Curves, underground and hydrographic surveying, and aspects of dimensional control

  4. Community-College Students Need Better Financial Advising, Survey Finds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Eric

    2008-01-01

    All the tutoring in the world cannot save students who run short of the money they need to pay for college. This year's Community College Survey of Student Engagement affirms as much. In the survey, known as Cessie, nearly half (45 percent) of respondents cited a lack of finances as a hardship that would likely cause them to withdraw from classes…

  5. Using Students' Journals about Death Experiences as a Pedagological Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doll, Kevin; Kereakoglow, Sandra; Sarma, Arti Radhika; Hare, Jan

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to evaluate a pedagological tool for student's study of death and bereavement. Previous research suggests that students may be more willing to discuss issues associated with death through written correspondence rather than through oral communication. However, despite these efforts there are still students who…

  6. Not What They Want, but What They Need: Teaching Politics to Journalism Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Tor; Jones, Alistair

    2017-01-01

    There is an issue around getting students engaged in subject matter about which they may have little interest. Often, such subject matter is essential to their studies. The module Essential Public Affairs is such a concern for students of journalism. It is essential for their professional qualification. This article explores a pilot project which…

  7. An Exploratory Study of NNES Graduate Students' Reading Comprehension of English Journal Articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kate Tzu-Ching

    2017-01-01

    The academic success of non-native English speaker (NNES) graduate students greatly relies on their ability to read and comprehend English journal articles (EJA). The purpose of this study was to identify NNES graduate students' comprehension difficulties and reading strategies when reading EJA. In addition, the study explored how the relationship…

  8. Measuring Student Self-Perceptions of Writing Skills in Programs of Journalism and Mass Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingwall, Andrew; Kuehn, Scott

    2013-01-01

    This study explored student self-perceptions of writing skills in journalism and mass communication programs at thirteen public state universities in the mid-Atlantic region. Factor analysis revealed seven sets of perceptions among 860 students. A Media Writing Self-Perception Scale was constructed and found to be reliable. The authors propose…

  9. Is journaling empowering? Students' perceptions of their reflective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    for critical reflective practice (Van Aswegen, 1998) to promote independent thinking for improved professional practice and support and sustain 'deep' learning. This four-year qualitative ... as a means of promoting self-insight and self-development and as a viable strategy for life-long learning. Keywords: reflective journals ...

  10. Journal of the Obafemi Awolowo University Medical Student's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IFEMED) - Vol 14, No 1 (2008). Journal Home > Archives > Vol 14, No 1 (2008) ... Pancreatic Cancer in Nigeria: a Study of Incidence in O.A.U.T.H.C, Ile-Ife · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  11. Refining the Journal Club Presentations of Postgraduate Students in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Refining journal club presentations for better EBP. 186. Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research | May-Jun 2016 | Vol 6 | Issue 3 | clinical use of these guidelines does not occur that between. 10 and 40% of patients do not receive care based on current scientific evidence and that ≥20% of care provided is not.

  12. Journal of Student Affairs in Africa: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Since 2017, JSAA is DHET-accredited in South Africa by the national Department of Higher Education and Training as a subsidy earning scholarly journal on the ... It considers for publication submissions of original scholarly research-based articles, reflective discussions by practitioners, book reviews and professional ...

  13. Journal of the Obafemi Awolowo University Medical Student's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Manuscripts should be sent electronically to the Editor-in-Chief, IFEMED Journal club at ifemedjc@yahoo.com, ifemedjc@gmail.com or by post to the editorial office ... 1. title page with full title of paper 10 words maximum , author's full name, postal and electronic addresses, degrees , department and institutional affiliations

  14. Students' Interpretations of the Meanings of Questionnaire Items in the National Student Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Roger; Kane, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    In many countries the outputs from university student satisfaction surveys are used for a variety of educational management purposes. Within the United Kingdom, the main instrument employed by state authorities to measure student satisfaction is the National Student Survey (NSS). The issue investigated by the current research related to whether…

  15. Asia-Pacific Journal for Student Affairs (AJSA)

    OpenAIRE

    Lisa Bardill Moscaritolo; Kathleen Callahan

    2017-01-01

    The International Association of Student Affairs and Services (IASAS) serves as a global network of student affairs and services workers that encourages sharing, cooperation, research, exchanges, and attendance at each other’s conferences. The Vice President and General Secretary of IASAS attended the 2016 Asia Pacific Student Services Association (APSSA) Conference in Chiang Mai, Thailand. Long-time colleague and past regional coordinator in Asia for IASAS, Evelyn Ariola-Songco, presented bo...

  16. Physiotherapy students find guided journals useful to develop reflective thinking and practice during their first clinical placement: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinou, Maria; Kuys, Suzanne S

    2013-03-01

    This study evaluated physiotherapy students' perception of a reflective journal in developing reflective thinking and practice and identified the main concepts recorded by students in the journal. A mixed methods study with qualitative content analysis of student journals and quantitative analysis of questionnaire responses. 131 (74 female, 57 male) physiotherapy students undergoing their first clinical placement. On completion of their placement, students submitted a reflective journal electronically and completed a questionnaire of closed and open ended questions. Questionnaires were analysed using frequencies for the responses of the closed questions and thematic analysis of the open ended questions. Journals were de-indentified and underwent a content analysis using Leximancer software to obtain a concept map and frequencies of the main concepts identified in the journals, with specific examples. The majority (88%, 79/90) of respondents found the journal useful in assisting them to learn from their experiences, and to develop reflective thinking and practice. 54% (49/90) indicated they would continue to use the journals. The most frequently identified concepts were residents, time and exercises; representing more than 5000 of the total concepts identified in the journals. Analysis of the reflective journals indicated that students demonstrated improvements in the three stages of reflective practice: awareness of thoughts and feelings, critical analysis of situation, and development of new perspectives. Guided journal writing may be a useful tool in facilitating reflective thinking and practice during clinical placements of physiotherapy students. Copyright © 2012 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. 2015 Survey of Journalism and Mass Communication Enrollments: Challenges and Opportunities for a Changing and Diversifying Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotlieb, Melissa R.; McLaughlin, Bryan; Cummins, R. Glenn

    2017-01-01

    As with previous years, enrollments in journalism and mass communication programs in the United States have continued to decline. In 2015, such decline among undergraduate student enrollments was particularly prevalent in journalism sequences; in contrast, undergraduate enrollments in strategic communication sequences have seen some growth since…

  18. SURVEYING WORKSHEETS TO PROMOTE STUDENT INVOLVEMENT IN SPEAKING CLASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisyah Ririn Perwikasih Utari

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Having students get involved actively in the classroom is a kind of teacher‘s expectation. The main purpose of teaching speaking, commonly known, is having them speak. Surveying worksheet is one of the ways to lead the students communicate interactively within the Survival English Class in English Education Department of Universitas Muria Kudus. The objectives of the study are: 1 considering the surveying worksheets based on the contextualized materials; 2 the effectiveness of the surveying worksheets in the classroom. Leading from the objectives, the appropriate research design is qualitative in which the data are analyzed descriptively. The research data are the surveying worksheets to promote student involvement in speaking class. The data sources are the students of Survival English class in English Education Department of Universitas Muria Kudus. The surveying worksheets created are based on the materials of knowing your friends, foods, shopping, and personal lifestyle. The components of the questions lead the students to ask and answer actively by documenting the answer on the worksheet. Through the observation, the students move to the every corner of the class, talk and laugh joyfully, there is almost no one silent when they do the survey and fulfill the worksheet. The research leads to the conclusion that surveying worksheets can be one of teachers‘ choices to have the students get involved in all activities planned.

  19. Journal

    OpenAIRE

    Kessler, Comte Harry; Drost, Julia; Kirchner, Thomas; Kostka, Alexandre; Le Normand-Romain, Antoinette; Raulff, Ulrich; Recht, Roland

    2017-01-01

    Le comte Harry Kessler (1868–1937) est une figure essentielle de la vie des arts en Europe à la fin du XIXe et au début du XXe siècle. Sa triple éducation allemande, anglaise et française le voue dès l’origine à une mobilité qui devient bientôt le maître-mot de son existence de collectionneur et de mécène, de critique, de directeur de musée. Resté longtemps inédit, le Journal qu’il a tenu pendant près de soixante ans en est le dépôt et le témoin assidu. Les quelque dix mille pages manuscrites...

  20. Journal

    OpenAIRE

    Reinhold Lenz, Jakob Michael

    2017-01-01

    Je dois, mon cher Goethe, pour la bonne compréhension de ce que tu vas lire, te faire part avant tout de quelques informations. J’ai écrit ce journal sous les yeux de mon pire ennemi, dont j’étais tributaire, dans une langue qu’il ne comprenait pas et d’où j’ai traduit littéralement ce qui suit. Il regardait de temps en temps par-dessus mon épaule. Scipion, avec qui j’avais fait un voyage en Allemagne, avait à X une promise dont il dut à plusieurs reprises s’éloigner pour des périodes de quat...

  1. Asia-Pacific Journal for Student Affairs (AJSA)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The International Association of Student Affairs and Services (IASAS) serves as a global network of student affairs and services workers that encourages sharing, cooperation, research, exchanges, and attendance at each other's conferences. The Vice President and. General Secretary of IASAS attended the 2016 Asia ...

  2. Analyis of Diffrences Among Students | Jokthan | Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper examines personal learning styles among undergraduate students who were introduced to Educational Psychology. Eighty (80) students were involved; forty four (44) males and thirty six (36) females. The investigator adopted Lewis and Greene (1982) Personal Learning Styles instrument which had ten (10) ...

  3. Student perceptions on writing support | Rambiritch | Journal for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This particular study looks at one such 'compulsory' tutorial programme, with a view to determining student perceptions to the tutorial programme, as well as to the role of the tutor in helping them improve their (academic) writing. The article highlights the type of writing support provided to students during the tutorials and by ...

  4. Interpretations: A Student Journal of Historical Writings, 1988.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interpretations, 1988

    1988-01-01

    This booklet features a selection of student prepared essays, poetry, research papers, and reviews about various historical subjects and social studies-related areas. These collected works include: (1) "To the Mayan Ruins at Chichen-Itza, Mexico" (W. McClure); (2) "Corruption in Collegiate Athletics and How It Damages the Student Athlete's…

  5. The effect of three types of feedback on the journal writing of EFL Japanese students

    OpenAIRE

    デュペンサラー, ピーター; Peter, DUPPENTHALER; Tezukayama Gakuin University

    2004-01-01

    The one-year experimental study reported in this article investigated which of three types of feedback had the most beneficial effect on EFL students' English-language journal writing. The three types of feedback were: meaning-focused feedback, positive comments, and error-focused feedback. The major finding was that meaning-focused feedback was more effective than either positive comments or error-focused feedback in facilitating overall improvement in journal entries.

  6. A Survey of Physical Sciences, Engineering and Mathematics Faculty Regarding Author Fees in Open Access Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusker, Jeremy; Rauh, Anne E.

    2014-01-01

    Discussions of the potential of open access publishing frequently must contend with the skepticism of research authors regarding the need to pay author fees (also known as publication fees). With that in mind, the authors undertook a survey of faculty, postdocs, and graduate students in physical science, mathematics, and engineering fields at two…

  7. A survey of variable selection methods in two Chinese epidemiology journals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn Henry S

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although much has been written on developing better procedures for variable selection, there is little research on how it is practiced in actual studies. This review surveys the variable selection methods reported in two high-ranking Chinese epidemiology journals. Methods Articles published in 2004, 2006, and 2008 in the Chinese Journal of Epidemiology and the Chinese Journal of Preventive Medicine were reviewed. Five categories of methods were identified whereby variables were selected using: A - bivariate analyses; B - multivariable analysis; e.g. stepwise or individual significance testing of model coefficients; C - first bivariate analyses, followed by multivariable analysis; D - bivariate analyses or multivariable analysis; and E - other criteria like prior knowledge or personal judgment. Results Among the 287 articles that reported using variable selection methods, 6%, 26%, 30%, 21%, and 17% were in categories A through E, respectively. One hundred sixty-three studies selected variables using bivariate analyses, 80% (130/163 via multiple significance testing at the 5% alpha-level. Of the 219 multivariable analyses, 97 (44% used stepwise procedures, 89 (41% tested individual regression coefficients, but 33 (15% did not mention how variables were selected. Sixty percent (58/97 of the stepwise routines also did not specify the algorithm and/or significance levels. Conclusions The variable selection methods reported in the two journals were limited in variety, and details were often missing. Many studies still relied on problematic techniques like stepwise procedures and/or multiple testing of bivariate associations at the 0.05 alpha-level. These deficiencies should be rectified to safeguard the scientific validity of articles published in Chinese epidemiology journals.

  8. Research on participatory journalism in Brazil: a survey of the state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Holanda

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide interest in the study of participatory journalism has been growing in recent years and it is generally accepted that journalistic practices are undergoing considerable transformations as a result of this expanding conversational dimension (Gillmor, 2004; Bowman and Willis 2003; Brums, 2005; Deuze et al. 2006; Rutigliano, Hyun and Jeong, 2007 brought forwards by mechanisms that facilitate production and circulation of information through different participatory communication systems, such as forums, blogs, and sites of the open source type. In this study we produce a preliminary survey of thematic concentration and methodologies of research on blogs and other interactive models of journalistic publication in recent Brazilian contributions in this area.

  9. RESEARCH ON PARTICIPATORY JOURNALISM IN BRAZIL: A survey of the state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Alyne Barbosa Silva

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide interest in the study of participatory journalism has been growing in recent years and it is generally accepted that journalistic practices are undergoing considerable transformations as a result of this expanding conversational dimension (Gillmor, 2004; Bowman and Willis 2003; Brums, 2005; Deuze et al. 2006; Rutigliano, Hyun and Jeong, 2007 brought forwards by mechanisms that facilitate production and circulation of information through different participatory communication systems, such as forums, blogs, and sites of the open source type. In this study we produce a preliminary survey of thematic concentration and methodologies of research on blogs and other interactive models of journalistic publication in recent Brazilian contributions in this area.

  10. The Development of the Communication Competences. Contribution of the Journal to Academic Education of Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandrache Carmen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Our paper presents the importance of the journal for developing the communication competences and social and professional integration of students. These aspects are important but often they are neglected in academic activities, because the professional skills are priority in Curricula of faculties. In this paper we analyze the theoretical importance of the journal and its forms to present from communicate and reflexive perspectives. The paper offers a few examples of good practice which hopes the teacher to develop the communication competences of students.

  11. Evaluating off-campus student housing preferences: A pilot survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johari, Noraini; Mohd, Thuraiya; Abdullah, Lizawati; Ahmad@Mohamed, Nurulanis; Sani, Suwaibatul Islamiah Abdullah

    2017-10-01

    In recent decades, the term student housing has been highlighted as a body of knowledge in housing studies. In providing better quality of life, student housing evolved into a critical agenda in developing higher education learning. This research paper aims to discuss on a pilot study examining student housing preferences among university and college students should they reside off-campus. The research aims at identifying the attributes of off-campus student housing preferences to give a significant input for the development of an off-campus student housing preferences conceptual framework. This research is a cross-sectional study in which survey participants are currently-enrolled students throughout the period of survey. During this pilot study, questionnaires were distributed among university students in Shah Alam, Selangor in Malaysia. A total of 86 survey questionnaires were collected, consisting of questions reflecting students' background, Likert scale questions to specify their preferences, and open-ended questions. This preliminary pilot result shows that the 46 variables student housing preferences have a good reliability and validity. The outcomes from this research provide insight into students' preferences on how off-campus housing should be developed. Since Selangor is divided into various districts with a plethora of different local contexts including different university campuses, there is a need for further study to avoid generalization.

  12. The Impact of Lottery Incentives on Student Survey Response Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Stephen R.; Whitcomb, Michael E.

    2003-01-01

    A controlled experiment tested the effects of lottery incentives using a prospective college applicant Web survey, with emails sent to more than 9,000 high school students. Found minimal effect of postpaid incentives for increasing levels of incentive. (EV)

  13. Recent findings from the Ontario Student Drug Use Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Adlaf, E M; Ivis, F J

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Every 2 years, the Addiction Research Foundation of Ontario, a division of the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, sponsors the Ontario Student Drug Use Survey. The results of the surveys conducted in 1995 and 1997 are presented here and compared with results from the early 1990s. METHODS: Questionnaires were completed by 3870 and 3990 Ontario public school students enrolled in grades 7, 9, 11 and 13 in 1995 and 1997 respectively. The outcome measures were prevalence of use of...

  14. Landscapes of promise: An examination of students' journals written during a cross-cultural wilderness experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Judith Ann

    1997-12-01

    This paper is an examination of nature journals written by ten American and ten Russian high school students during a cross-cultural exchange that provided experiences in selected national wilderness areas designated by the respective countries. The students participated in a backpacking excursion in the Lee Metcalf Wilderness Area of Montana in the summer of 1994, and a camping experience in the wilderness areas in the provincial region of Penza, Russia in the summer of 1995. The examination of the journals focuses on the following areas: aesthetic "peak" experiences; spiritual inspiration derived from experiences in nature; attitudes toward the preservation of wildlife; and environmental ethics. The students' attitudes toward the environment is compared using student-identified cultural values of both the Russian and the American students. Also discussed is the viability of the students' reflections as natural history journal-writing, with references to selected natural history authors, including Henry David Thoreau, Aldo Leopold and Anne Dillard. Because the experience focused on wilderness preservation students were invited to speculate about how to develop and reinforce essential attitudes that are respectful of ecology. Conclusions they reached included the necessity to economic security at some level and the notion that direct experience in the environment is essential to developing an attitude that will engender an ethics of caring within their--as well as other--cultural groups.

  15. The American College Student Cell Phone Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuel, Richard C.

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on a study of cell phone use among college students. This group is considered particularly important because college students tend to be among the first to try new technology, are the group most likely to innovate new ways of using existing technology, and are most vocal about what they need and/or want to see changed…

  16. Reflective Journaling for Critical Thinking Development in Advanced Practice Registered Nurse Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raterink, Ginger

    2016-02-01

    Critical thinking, clinical decision making, and critical reflection have been identified as skills required of nurses in every clinical situation. The Educating Nurses: A Call for Radical Transformation report suggested that critical reflection is a key to improving the educational process. Reflective journaling is a tool that helps develop such skills. This article presents the tool of reflective journaling and the use of this process by educators working with students. It describes the use of reflective journaling in graduate nursing education, as well as a scoring process to evaluate the reflection and provide feedback. Students and faculty found the journaling to be helpful for reflection of a clinical situation focused on critical thinking skill development. The rubric scoring tool provided faculty with a method for feedback. Reflective journaling is a tool that faculty and students can use to develop critical thinking skills for the role of the advanced practice RN. A rubric scoring system offers a consistent format for feedback. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. A survey of drug abuse problems among students of selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of the study was to survey drug abuse problems among students of selected secondary schools in Ile-Ife in Osun State. Specifically, the study was to find out the reasons for drug abuse among students. The major instrument used to collect needed information was the questionnaire which was distributed to ...

  18. The Online Student Connectedness Survey: Evidence of Initial Construct Validity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Tekeisha; Nimon, Kim

    2017-01-01

    The Online Student Connectedness Survey (OSCS) was introduced to the academic community in 2012 as an instrument designed to measure feelings of connectedness between students participating in online degree and certification programs. The purpose of this study was to examine data from the instrument for initial evidence of validity and reliability…

  19. A Survey of Secondary School Students' Reading Strategy Use ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study tried to explore the reading strategy use of Grade 9 Students of four senior high schools in Jimma Zone as well as their English teachers' perceived use of reading strategies and awareness. A total of 152 students and 29 Grade 9 English teachers responded to a survey questionnaire with a five point Likert scale.

  20. Ego Network Analysis of Upper Division Physics Student Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewe, Eric

    2017-01-01

    We present the analysis of student networks derived from a survey of upper division physics students. Ego networks focus on the connections that center on one person (the ego). The ego networks in this talk come from a survey that is part of an overall project focused on understanding student retention and persistence. The theory underlying this work is that social and academic integration are essential components to supporting students continued enrollment and ultimately graduation. This work uses network analysis as a way to investigate the role of social and academic interactions in retention and persistence decisions. We focus on student interactions with peers, on mentoring interactions with physics department faculty, and on engagement in physics groups and how they influence persistence. Our results, which are preliminary, will help frame the ongoing research project and identify ways in which departments can support students. This work supported by NSF grant #PHY 1344247.

  1. What are the personal and professional characteristics that distinguish the researchers who publish in high- and low-impact journals? A multi-national web-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Carlos Eduardo; Araujo, Raphael L C; Paiva, Bianca Sakamoto Ribeiro; de Pádua Souza, Cristiano; Cárcano, Flavio Mavignier; Costa, Marina Moreira; Serrano, Sérgio Vicente; Lima, João Paulo Nogueira

    2017-01-01

    This study identifies the personal and professional profiles of researchers with a greater potential to publish high-impact academic articles. The study involved conducting an international survey of journal authors using a web-based questionnaire. The survey examined personal characteristics, funding, and the perceived barriers of research quality, work-life balance, and satisfaction and motivation in relation to career. The processes of manuscript writing and journal publication were measured using an online questionnaire that was developed for this study. The responses were compared between the two groups of researchers using logistic regression models. A total of 269 questionnaires were analysed. The researchers shared some common perceptions; both groups reported that they were seeking recognition (or to be leaders in their areas) rather than financial remuneration. Furthermore, both groups identified time and funding constraints as the main obstacles to their scientific activities. The amount of time that was spent on research activities, having >5 graduate students under supervision, never using text editing services prior to the publication of articles, and living in a developed and English-speaking country were the independent variables that were associated with their article getting a greater chance of publishing in a high-impact journal. In contrast, using one's own resources to perform studies decreased the chance of publishing in high-impact journals. The researchers who publish in high-impact journals have distinct profiles compared with the researchers who publish in low-impact journals. English language abilities and the actual amount of time that is dedicated to research and scientific writing, as well as aspects that relate to the availability of financial resources are the factors that are associated with a successful researcher's profile.

  2. Most Business Editors Find Journalism Graduates Still Unprepared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardue, Mary Jane

    2014-01-01

    In 2002, a study was published in "Newspaper Research Journal" that explored the preparedness of graduating journalism students to cover business news. In 2012, a follow-up survey of business editors at the nation's daily newspapers was done to see whether progress had been made in the training of journalism students for the…

  3. Questionnaire Survey of Physical Therapy Students' View of General Education

    OpenAIRE

    日高, 正巳; 嶋田, 智明; 武政, 誠一; 篠原, 英記; 米田, 稔彦; 講武, 芳英; 松尾, 智; 松原, 貴子; 三木, 明徳; 平田, 総一郎; 石川, 斉

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze students' view of the relationship between general education and physical therapy education in the university. Fifty-six physical therapy students administered the questionnaire in this survey and completed it on their own. Nineteen subjects selected in general education were categorized into seven grades, indicating Grade 0 (no relation to physical therapy education) to Grade 6 (closest relation). It was characteristic that the students looked on the ...

  4. Teacher characteristics and student achievement: evidence from teacher surveys

    OpenAIRE

    Jepsen, Christopher

    2005-01-01

    Teachers and peers are believed to have a strong influence on student achievement, but the specific characteristics that affect student achievement are hard to identify. This paper utilizes teacher survey data to investigate teacher characteristics that are not usually available in administrative data, as well as more readily available attributes such as experience and education. Classroom fixed effects explain a large portion of within-student variation in test score growth, suggesting a pot...

  5. Meaningful Gamification for Journalism Students to Enhance Their Critical Thinking Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ling-Yi; Yeh, Yu-Chu

    2017-01-01

    Training in critical thinking is essential for the professional development of journalism students. To achieve this goal, this study developed a gamified platform and a blended learning curriculum. During an 18-week experimental instruction period, a series of instructional activities, which included online discussions as well as classroom…

  6. Journalism and Mass Communication Textbook Representations of Verbal Media Skills: Implications for Students with Speech Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Elia M.; Haller, Beth

    2017-01-01

    This study examines representation of disabilities by conducting a qualitative content analysis of how 41 journalism/mass communication textbooks frame the ideal standards of verbal communication for media professionals. Textbooks are integral to students' understanding of professional norms and may influence career decisions. Results show that…

  7. The Impact of the Programme for International Student Assessment on Academic Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Maria; Vieira, Maria-Jose; Vidal, Javier

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the impact of PISA (Programme for International Student Assessment) on international scientific journals. A bibliometric analysis was conducted of publications included in three main scientific publication databases: Eric, EBSCOhost and the ISI Web of Knowledge, from 2002 to 2010. The paper focused on four main…

  8. Dow Jones Fund Opens Journalism Programs to White Students after Lawsuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scmidt, Peter

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses a Lawsuit filed against Dow Jones Newspaper Fund and the legal settlement between the defendant and the plaintiff. The fund, a nonprofit organization affiliated with Dow Jones & Company had been operating more than 20 programs for minority high-school students to pursue careers in newspaper journalism. The organization…

  9. Book Review | Dunn-Coetzee | Journal of Student Affairs in Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Roberts, Dennis C. & Komives, Susan R. (Eds.) (2016). Enhancing Student Learning and Development in Cross- Border Higher Education. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online.

  10. Investigating College Students' Views on Mathematics Learning through Reflective Journal Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guce, Ivee K.

    2017-01-01

    The study on reflective journal writing (RJW) and its benefits as assessed by the teachers has long been an inclination in mathematics education. However, little research has been done to explore the feelings of students towards RJW and how such has an effect on their mathematics learning. This study aimed to describe the feelings of the students…

  11. Blogging a Journal: Changing Students' Writing Skills and Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ming Huei; Li, Ji-Jhen; Hung, Po Yi; Huang, Hui-Wen

    2014-01-01

    This article investigates the effects of blogging as an approach to journal writing in the EFL writing classroom by means of a 16-week comparative experiment involving two groups of EFL college students. The experimental group (EG) was required to blog daily while the control group (CG) was asked to do so using traditional pen-and-paper methods.…

  12. The Effects of Gratitude Journaling on Turkish First Year College Students' College Adjustment, Life Satisfaction and Positive Affect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isik, Serife; Ergüner-Tekinalp, Bengü

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the effects of gratitude journaling on first-year college students' adjustment, life satisfaction, and positive affect. Students who scored high (i.e., scores between 35 and 56) on the Perceived Stress Scale (Cohen et al. in "Journal of Health and Social Behavior," 24, 385-396, 1983) and low (i.e., scores between 48…

  13. Student-Teacher Dialogue Journals as a Tool for Developing Interactional Ability. Tesi di Laurea in Lingua Inglese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morini, Emanuela

    A study investigated the features of discourse in the written student-teacher interaction in dialogue journals. It was assumed that such an activity would encourage the negotiation of meaning and roles, and that the data would provide evidence of that negotiation. Data were drawn from 32 journals written by 16-to-18-year-old students in an Italian…

  14. At the Margins of Internationalization: An Analysis of Journal Articles on College Student Development, Learning, and Experiences, 1998-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renn, Kristen A.; Brazelton, G. Blue; Holmes, Joshua M.

    2014-01-01

    Although international attention to understanding college student development, learning, and experiences has increased, leading higher education journals do not seem to have kept pace. We examined 8 higher education and student affairs journals (5 from the US, 3 from Europe) from 1998 to 2011. We found overall that 5% of articles addressed…

  15. The Gap between Online Journalism Education and Practice: A Hong Kong Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Ying Roselyn; Lo, S. C. Eric

    2014-01-01

    This twin survey of online journalism professionals and students examines their perceptions of journalism skills, duties, and concepts. Using samples of online journalists and journalism students in Hong Kong, Asia's media hub, it attempts to offer updated insights into the changes taking place in journalism classrooms and newsrooms and uncovers…

  16. Library anxiety among university students: A survey

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McPherson, Marisa Alicia

    2015-01-01

    Library anxiety has been identified as a contributory factor to poor academic performance among students, and libraries are being challenged to give serious consideration to this phenomenon in order...

  17. Smoking behavior among student nurses: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haughey, B P; O'Shea, R M; Dittmar, S S; Bahn, P; Mathewson, M; Smith, S; Brasure, J

    1986-01-01

    The study describes the smoking habits of student nurses and determines the correlates of smoking initiation, continuation, and cessation. The sample included 1,163 students attending 10 nursing schools in Buffalo, NY. Data were gathered by means of a self-administered questionnaire. Approximately 30 percent of the students were current smokers, 25 percent were exsmokers, and 45 percent had never smoked. More than half of the smokers (57 percent) expressed the desire to quit, and 81 percent had tried to do so in the past. Major reasons for trying to quit were to protect future health, save money, self-discipline, and pressure from significant others. Most (90 percent) of the students who had tried to quit had attempted to do so on their own and all at once. Knowledge of the health consequences of smoking was not significantly related to smoking behavior. These data suggest the need for health educators to promote personal health practices among their students that are congruent with the goals of the nursing profession of health promotion and disease prevention. PMID:3097747

  18. Vaccine Education of Medical Students: A Nationwide Cross-sectional Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kernéis, Solen; Jacquet, Caroline; Bannay, Aurélie; May, Thierry; Launay, Odile; Verger, Pierre; Pulcini, Céline

    2017-09-01

    Physicians play a primary role in vaccination of the population. Strong initial training of medical students is therefore essential to enable them to fulfill this role. This cross-sectional nationwide online survey conducted between September 2015 and January 2016 obtained 2,118 completed surveys from 6,690 eligible respondents (response rate, 32%) at 27 of 32 medical schools in France regarding their education about vaccination. The data were analyzed in April-June 2016. The survey covered their knowledge, attitudes, practices, and perceptions, and assessed their level of perceived preparedness for their future practice as interns. Around a third of the students (n=708, 34%) felt insufficiently prepared for questions about vaccination, especially for communicating with patients on side effects (n=1,381, 66%) and strategies to respond to vaccine hesitancy (n=1,217, 58%). The mean knowledge score was 26/45 (SD=7.9). Lecture courses, which are the main education method used in French medical schools (1,891/5,660 responses, 33%), were considered effective by only 11% of students (693/6,155 responses), whereas practical training was significantly associated with better perceived preparedness (peducation about vaccination during medical school in France is not optimal. Methods based on practical learning methods (case-based learning, clinical placements, and other hands-on methods) appear to produce the best results and must be favored for improving students' preparedness. Copyright © 2017 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Stress, Eustress and the National Student Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to explore the relationship between sources of stress and a range of coping behaviours on student satisfaction and motivation. Most research exploring sources of stress construes stress as distress, with little attempt to consider positive, good stress or "eustress" experiences. A cohort of first-year psychology students…

  20. The Survey of Jimma University Students Problems

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Psychological Problems of Study Subjects at Jimma University, June 2002. Problems. No. of Students (%). Attention Problem. 69 (49.0). Anxiety. 58 (41.0). Memory Problem. 56 (40.0). Mood Oscillations. 27 (36.5). Learned Helplessness. 34 (24.0). Depression. 32 (23.0). Paranoid Thought. 26 (18.6). Drug /substance abuse.

  1. Student Science Research Associates (SSRA) 1996 Research Journal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knezovich, J. [ed.

    1996-12-01

    The following student projects are reported: SSRA water research projects, various effects on polliwogs` growth and development, effects of Willow Park Golf Course on nitrate and phosphate levels in San Leandro Creek, water quality evaluation using color infrared photography, biochemical analysis of aquatic insects, effects of miracid/calcium chloride/liquid plant food on stringless bush beans, effects of vegetable oil on bean growth, effect of river water on lima beans, effect of storm water runoff on pH and phosphate levels of Dry Creek, acid rain in Modesto, use of random amplified polymorphic DNA to study Egeria Densa, and effect of marination on formation of heterocyclic aromatic amines in cooked chicken meat.

  2. Cosmic Times: Engaging Students in Astronomy through History and Journalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochner, James C.; Mattson, B. J.

    2010-03-01

    Cosmic Times tells the story of how our understanding of the nature of the universe has changed over the past 100 years. Designed to fulfill the need for quality science literature in the classroom, Cosmic Times takes the form of six posters, each mimicking the front page of a newspaper at a key point in this history, with articles describing the discoveries. These milestones include the confirmation of Einstein's theory of gravity, Hubble's evidence for an expanding universe, the detection of the microwave background, and finally the discovery of dark energy. Telling this story also involves tracing astronomer's efforts to determine the size of the universe, understand the nature of supernovae, and comprehend the expansion of the universe. Through the scope of this history, students experience the process of science and how new technology and data change our ideas. The posters are accompanied by 28 lessons for grades 7-12, designed by scientists and teachers and field-tested by third-party teachers in rural communities. The lessons teach the science concepts behind the discoveries, the process of science, and skills for science literacy. To facilitate these lessons and meet student's individual science literacy needs, the articles are also available in two newsletter versions: one with the same articles as on the posters, the second at a slightly lower reading level. In addition, lessons include cross-curricular activities which explore the times and social circumstances of the discoveries. All these materials, including an on-line Teacher Guide, are available on the Cosmic Times website, http://cosmictimes.gsfc.nasa.gov/. In this presentation, we shall describe how Cosmic Times uses journalistic storytelling to create a rich experience based on science literacy to teach fundamental science concepts. We will show how framing the story as historic news articles illustrates the process of science and opens up opportunities for multidisciplinary lessons.

  3. [Storytelling in Health Journalism: Online Survey of Health Journalists on Definition and Use].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimes, S

    2016-12-01

    Background: Although health information is of great interest and plays an important role in almost all media, there are very few studies on the actual work of health journalists. Methods: A quantitative online survey with qualitative elements on the definition and use of storytelling in health journalism was carried out among members of various professional journalists' associations (n=86). Results: The results suggest that health journalists understand storytelling especially as a term used when an article has a dramatic construction, and the story is about real people. As reasons for using storytelling, health journalists primarily name the understandable and clear presentation of medical issues. They see better chances for identification and establishing a relationship to the readers' lives. Of particular importance seems to be that narrative elements do not distort the facts and protect the privacy rights of persons mentioned in case reports. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. The Effect of Dialogue Journal Writing on EFL Students' Writing Skill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Gholami Mehrdad

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite the role writing plays in learning a foreign language, many students do not show much interest in taking an active part in writing classes (Myint, 1997. Thus different activities have been proposed to motivate students to write one of which is dialogue journal writing, and the present work tries to investigate the possible effect(s of such activity on writing ability of a group of English students at Islamic Azad University- Hamedan branch. To do this, 50 students obtaining 1 and 2 on the TWE scale on the structure section of a TOEFL test were selected and randomly assigned to experimental and control groups. After some introductory sessions, the students were asked to write paragraphs on a weekly schedule and hand them in to be corrected. In the experimental group the students were, furthermore, asked to keep journals and hand them in. After 4 months, the students in both groups took part in a writing exam in which they had to write two paragraphs on the topics given. The comparison of the means at p

  5. Lessons from experience: ESL student teachers' reflection during practicum through reflective journals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Intan Safinas Mohd Ariff Albakri

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Reflection is a prospective alternative in exploring student teachers’ thinking during practicum. The data gained from student teachers’ reflection are significant in informing teacher education programs on how to equip pre-service teachers to become quality teachers. It is also crucial in addressing issues and conflicts highlighted by student teachers when they interact with the real context. This study is conducted with six semester seven student teachers undergoing their Bachelor in Education with honors Teaching English as a Second Language (TESL program. The student teachers were asked to write reflective journal entries throughout the 14 weeks of their teaching practicum experience. The aim of the study is to identify the focus of the student teachers’ reflection and the challenges faced by them during practicum. Data were gathered using the reflective journal entries and semi-structured interviews with all the participants. The data were analyzed according to emerging themes. The findings indicated that the student teachers focus on three main themes in their reflections, which are managing learning, pedagogy and teacher attributes. While the challenges highlighted were difficulty in socializing with members of the institution, lack of professional support and lack of ability to manage a classroom.

  6. Cosmic Times: Engaging Students in Science through History and Journalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochner, J. C.; Mattson, B. J.

    2009-12-01

    Cosmic Times tells the story of how our understanding of the nature of the universe has changed over the past 100 years. Designed to fulfill the need for quality science literature in the classroom, Cosmic Times takes the form of six posters, each mimicking the front page of a newspaper at a key point in this history, with articles describing the discoveries. These milestones include the confirmation of Einstein’s theory of gravity, Hubble’s evidence for an expanding universe, the detection of the microwave background, and finally the discovery of dark energy. Telling this story also involves tracing astronomer’s efforts to determine the size of the universe, understand the nature of supernovae, and comprehend the expansion of the universe. Through the scope of this history, students experience the process of science and how new technology and data change our ideas. The posters are accompanied by 28 lessons, designed for grades 7-12 by scientists and teachers and field-tested by third-party teachers in rural communities. The lessons teach the science concepts behind the discoveries, the process of science, and skills for science literacy. To facilitate these lessons and meet student’s individual science literacy needs, the articles are also available in two newsletter versions: one with the same articles as on the posters, the second at a slightly lower reading level. In addition, lessons include cross-curricular activities which explore the times and social circumstances of the discoveries. In a capstone lesson, students write and design the 2019 edition of Cosmic Times, not only predicting what we will know in the future, but also applying expository writing skills. In addition, an on-line Teacher Guide provides background material for all the articles. All these materials are available on the Cosmic Times website, http://cosmictimes.gsfc.nasa.gov/. In this presentation, we shall describe how Cosmic Times uses a journalistic storytelling approach to

  7. Integrating K-W-L Prompts into Science Journal Writing: Can Simple Question Scaffolding Increase Student Content Knowledge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Brandon Joel

    Writing-to-learn strategies have been administered in the past to enrich student learning. The purpose of this study was to see if K-W-L prompts in science journal writing could benefit student content knowledge within biology. Two high school biology classes were provided with learning journals. The journals given to the students during the treatment unit were provided with K-W-L question prompts to guide student learning while during the comparison unit students were given an open ended writing assignment. Pre and posttests were administered to determine student-learning gains. Student motivations and opinions of the treatment were collected through student interviews. The combined results were used to determine to what extent could K-W-L prompts in science journal writing influence comprehension of content knowledge. This study found there to be no difference in student learning gains when utilizing the K-W-L literacy strategy versus another free-writing activity. When scored, student K-W-Ls total scores did correlate to student success on unit tests. This opens up the potential for K-W-Ls to serve as an adequate tool for formative assessment. Here the K-W-L could be expanded to enrich student question asking, potentially aid students learning English, and potentially be used by students without teacher scaffolding.

  8. Marriage and Family Therapy Graduate Student Stress: A Survey of AAMFT Student Members

    OpenAIRE

    Klick, Patricia David

    2005-01-01

    Marriage and Family Therapy Graduate Student Stress: A Survey of AAMFT Student Members Patricia David Klick Eric E. McCollum, Ph.D. (Committee Chair) Human Development Abstract The purpose of this study was to examine stress that MFT graduate students experience in their personal lives. The researcher developed a 31-item quantitative and qualitative questionnaire to identify factors that relate to stress experienced by MFT graduate students and coping resources and strategi...

  9. Non-Response in Student Surveys: The Role of Demographics, Engagement and Personality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Stephen R.; Whitcomb, Michael E.

    2005-01-01

    What causes a student to participate in a survey? This paper looks at participation across multiple surveys to understand survey non-response; by using multiple surveys we minimize the impact of survey salience. Students at a selective liberal arts college were administered four different surveys throughout the 2002-2003 academic year, and we use…

  10. Students' perceptions of their learning experiences: A repeat regional survey of healthcare students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamshire, Claire; Barrett, Neil; Langan, Mark; Harris, Edwin; Wibberley, Christopher

    2017-02-01

    Student experience is an international concern and recent research has focused on initiatives to improve students' learning experiences and ultimately reduce attrition levels. To determine similarities and differences between students' perceptions of their learning experiences between 2011 and 2015 in relation to campus-based learning, placement-based learning and personal circumstances. A repeat online survey in 2011 and 2015; using a questionnaire developed from thematic analysis of narrative interviews with a subsample of the target population. Nine universities in the North West of England. A total of 1080 students completed the survey in 2011 and 1983 students in 2015 from a target population of all students studying on commissioned pre-registration healthcare education programmes. An online survey was made available to all undergraduate students studying on Health Education funded programmes within the region and survey respondents were invited to give demographic information and rate their agreement to statements on four-point Likert-type responses. Responses to a repeat survey of healthcare studying in the North West of England in 2015 were strikingly similar overall to those of an original 2011 survey. Although the students were positive overall about their experiences, a number were dissatisfied with some aspects of their experiences - particularly in relation to initial support on campus and whilst studying on placement. Four years on from the original survey, despite a considerable investment in improving students' experiences across the region, there appears to be little change in students' perceptions of their learning experiences CONCLUSION: In the short-term monitoring of student experience needs to be continued; and links to attrition (potential or actual) noted and acted upon. However, given that attrition from these courses has been a long-term problem and the complexity of its resolution a recurrent finding in the literature; new ways of framing

  11. Nonmedical drug use among adolescent students: highlights from the 1999 Ontario Student Drug Use Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Adlaf, E M; Paglia, A.; Ivis, F J; Ialomiteanu, A

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: During the 1990s, rates of nonmedical drug use among adolescents escalated. We assessed data from 5 cycles of the Ontario Student Drug Use Survey for overall trends in the proportion of students reporting illegal drug use between 1991 and 1999. METHODS: The survey is a repeated, cross-sectional, 2-stage cluster-design survey of students enrolled in grades 7, 9, 11 and 13. Outcome measures were prevalence of use of 17 drugs, including alcohol and tobacco, over the 12 months precedi...

  12. Students' Perceptions of and Experiences With Educational Technology: A Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royal, Kenneth; Hedgpeth, Mari-Wells; McWhorter, Dan

    2016-05-18

    It is generally assumed that incoming students in medical education programs will be better equipped for the "digital age" given their younger age and an educational upbringing in which technology was seemingly omnipresent. In particular, many assume that today's medical students are more likely to hold positive attitudes and increased comfortability with technology and possess greater information technology (IT) skills. The purpose of this study was to compare responses of incoming veterinary medical students to a series of IT-related questions contained in a common questionnaire over the course of a 10-year period (2005-2015) to discern whether students' attitudes have improved and uses and comfortability with technology have increased as anticipated. A survey measuring attitudes and preferences, computing experience, and technology ownership was administered each year for the past 10 years to incoming veterinary medical students at a large veterinary school in the United States. Students' responses to survey items were compared at 3 data points (2005, 2010, and 2015). Today's incoming veterinary medical students tend to indicate the same desire to improve skills using spreadsheets and web page design as incoming students from 10 years ago. It seems that despite technological advances and increased exposure to such applications and skills, there remains a challenge for students to "keep up" with the ever evolving technology. Moreover, although students continue to report they are very comfortable with using a computer (and related devices), many use their computers as typewriters or word processors, as opposed to a means for performing more advanced computing functions. In general, today's medical students are not expert computer users as many assume. Despite an upbringing in a digitized world, many students still lack many basic computing skills.

  13. The survey regarding sports and exercise of Keio University students

    OpenAIRE

    野口, 和行; 近藤, 明彦; 加藤, 大仁; 山内, 賢

    2009-01-01

    We conducted a survey of "College Students' Attitude toward Sports and Exercise" using students of all facilities and grades in Keio University. The purpose of this report is 1) to compare the amount of sports and exercise across facilities and grades, 2) to analyze frequencies, amount of time, and attitudes regarding different types of sports and exercise activities, 3) to examine attitudes toward and reasoning of no exercise, and 4) to examine their preference of activities in their free ti...

  14. Segmenting Student Markets with a Student Satisfaction and Priorities Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borden, Victor M. H.

    1995-01-01

    A market segmentation analysis of 872 university students compared 2 hierarchical clustering procedures for deriving market segments: 1 using matching-type measures and an agglomerative clustering algorithm, and 1 using the chi-square based automatic interaction detection. Results and implications for planning, evaluating, and improving academic…

  15. Improving journal club: increasing student discussion and understanding of primary literature in molecular biology through the use of dialectical notes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonough, Virginia

    2012-01-01

    Reading the primary literature in a journal club format is an excellent practice where undergraduate students can develop their abilities in experimental data analysis and critical thinking, learn about new ideas and methods, and gain a foothold in scientific discourse. However, students are not familiar with the format, writing style, and depth of knowledge assumed when first reading journal articles. This can inhibit class discussion. To alleviate this problem, the author has instituted the use of dialectical notes in journal club, so that students fully engage the article. This novel use of a strategy borrowed from humanities has improved class participation. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Indexation of psychiatric journals from low- and middle-income countries: a survey and a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    KIELING, CHRISTIAN; HERRMAN, HELEN; PATEL, VIKRAM; MARI, JAIR DE JESUS

    2009-01-01

    There is a marked underepresentation of low- and middle-income countries (LAMIC) in the psychiatric literature, which may reflect an overall low representation of LAMIC publications in databases of indexed journals. This paper investigates the worldwide distribution of indexed psychiatric journals. A survey in both Medline and ISI Web of Science was performed in order to identify journals in the field of psychiatry according to their country of origin. Two hundred and twenty-two indexed psychiatric journals were found. Of these, 213 originated from high-income countries and only nine (4.1%) from middle-income countries. None were found in low-income countries. We also present the experience of a LAMIC psychiatric journal, the Revista Brasileira de Psiquiatria, in its recent indexation process. This case study may serve as an example for other LAMIC journals to pursue indexation in major databases as a strategy to widen the international foundation of psychiatric research. There is an important need for the inclusion of LAMIC psychiatric publications in the major indexation databases. This process will require multiple agents to partner with journals from LAMIC to improve their quality and strengthen their chances of being indexed. PMID:19293959

  17. A Directory of Women and Minority Men in Academic Journalism and Mass Communication...A Two-Year Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzolf, Marion, Comp.; Ward, Walter, Comp.

    This directory of women and minority men in academic journalism and mass communication lists the names, degrees, teaching experience, and specialties of over 400 teachers. The directory is a result of national surveys conducted in 1972 and 1974 with the support of the Ad Hoc Committee on the Status of Women of the Association for Education in…

  18. Taking Journal Clubs off Autopilot: A Case Study of Teaching Literature Evaluation Skills to Preclinical MD/PhD Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currier, Rebecca L; Schneider, Marguerite Reid; Heubi, James E

    2013-12-01

    Researchers designed learner-directed journal clubs to develop literature evaluation skills in preclinical students. Sessions balanced student-led discussion with structured objectives and faculty support. During the pilot with preclinical MD/PhD students, self-rated mastery improved over all 17 measured objectives. Six exercises have since been incorporated into the full medical school curriculum.

  19. ‘Research clinics’: online journal clubs between south and north for student mentoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salla Atkins

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Capacity development in health research is high on the agenda of many low- and middle-income countries. Objective: The ARCADE projects, funded by the EU, have been working in Africa and Asia since 2011 in order to build postgraduate students’ health research capacity. In this short communication, we describe one initiative in these projects, that of research clinics – online journal clubs connecting southern and northern students and experts. Design: We describe the implementation of these research clinics together with student and participant experiences. Results: From 2012 to 2015, a total of seven journal clubs were presented by students and junior researchers on topics related to global health. Sessions were connected through web conferencing, connecting experts and students from different countries. Conclusions: The research clinics succeeded in engaging young researchers across the globe and connecting them with global experts. The contacts and suggestions made were appreciated by students. This format has potential to contribute toward research capacity building in low- and middle-income countries.

  20. Student Evaluations of Teaching as 'Fact-Totems': The Case of the UK National Student Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Duna Sabri

    2013-01-01

    Taking the UK National Student Survey (NSS) as a case study of student evaluations of teaching (SET) which are now used widely in higher education, I argue that the production and consumption of such survey data have a symbolic value that exceeds, and is often independent of, any technical understanding of their statistical meaning. The NSS, in particular, has acquired significance that far outweighs its validity or intended use. This is evident in national policy where it has become the prim...

  1. Vision Survey of the Nnamdi Azikiwe University Medical Students

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vision Survey of the Nnamdi Azikiwe. University Medical Students. S. N. N. Nwosu, E. O. Nwobodo1, J. K. Ndulue2. Departments of Ophthalmology and 1Physiology, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Nnewi Campus, Nnewi, 2Department of Surgery,. Anambra State University Teaching Hospital, Amaku Awka, Nigeria. ABSTRACT.

  2. A Survey of Gender Biases of Freshman Students toward Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaer, Barbara; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A survey of 724 freshman engineering orientation students investigated the significance of 5 literature-cited barriers to women's success in engineering--sexual discrimination, financial concerns, academic comfort, career awareness, and locus of control. Significant main effects were found for gender but not ethnic group. The instrument is…

  3. App Use in Psychiatric Education: A Medical Student Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Cecilia; Kolli, Venkata

    2017-02-01

    The objective of the study is to understand and appraise app use by medical students during their clerkships. Following Creighton University IRB approval, a voluntary and anonymous paper-based, 15-question survey was distributed to third-year medical students. Data were analyzed using Microsoft Excel. Of 112 medical students available, 76.7% (86) participated in the survey. All participants owned a smartphone or tablet with 84.9% using Apple iOS, followed by 12.8% using Android platform. Students reported using the fewest number of apps during surgery, psychiatry, and obstetrics and gynecology clerkships. The largest number of apps were used during the internal medicine rotation (70.3%). The three most popular apps were Epocrates, UpToDate, and UWorld. The most common uses for these apps were as references during the clerkship, followed by improving knowledge, and test taking. Perceived major benefits included accessibility (96% of student respondents) and interactivity (39.5%). Common apps used during the psychiatry clerkship included UpToDate (71%), Epocrates (51%), and Medscape (43%). Despite less frequent app use during their psychiatry clerkship, 90% felt there was a utility for educational apps in psychiatric education. Consistent with the previous literature on medical students preferring educational apps, students suggest developers focus on question bank-type apps, followed by clinical support-focused and self-directed case-based learning apps for psychiatry clerkship learning. Educators should factor these modes of educational delivery into future educational app development. This survey shows a high degree of smartphone and tablet use among medical students, and they attest to mobile phone app utility in psychiatric education.

  4. Understanding Why Students Participate in Multiple Surveys: Who are the Hard-Core Responders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Stephen R.; Whitcomb, Michael E.

    2004-01-01

    What causes a student to participate in a survey? This paper looks at survey response across multiple surveys to understand who the hard-core survey responders and non-responders are. Students at a selective liberal arts college were administered four different surveys throughout the 2002-2003 academic year, and we use the number of surveys…

  5. A survey of basic technical skills of medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Charles W; Edwards, Janine C; Burdenski, Thomas K

    2004-09-01

    In 1998, the Medical Schools Objectives Project (MSOP) Report listed the minimum routine technical procedures that graduating medical students should be proficient to perform. The authors conducted a survey to determine to what extent basic technical skills are being taught formally and how student competence in these skills is being evaluated in U.S. medical schools. A questionnaire of five items, designed to supplement existing information in CurrMIT, the national curriculum database for medical schools, was transmitted electronically via the AAMC listserv to associate deans for academic affairs. Sixty-two of the 126 medical schools (52%) responded to the survey. Most agreed that graduating medical students should be proficient to perform basic technical skills. Fifty-five percent of the respondents required students to keep logs of procedures performed. A majority responded that their students were proficient to perform venipuncture, IV placement, suturing lacerations, Foley catheter placement, and arterial puncture. The responding schools stated that few students are proficient in thoracentesis and intubation of children and neonates. It is likely that half of the medical schools are not attaining the MSOP objective of rigorously teaching and evaluating technical procedures. Currently, more measures and more sophisticated measures of physicians' performance are being implemented in medical practice. The authors' findings call attention to this educational need and act as a stimulus to improve this aspect of medical education.

  6. Reversal of Gender Disparity in Journalism Education- Study of Ghana Institute of Journalism

    OpenAIRE

    Boateng, Kodwo Jonas

    2017-01-01

    Journalism has practically become a feminine profession across the world. To understand the root of the flow of women into the Journalism profession it is pertinent to begin at the university education level. Gallagher’s 1992 worldwide survey of female students in 83 journalism institutions reveals a significant increase in number of female students. Djerf-Pierre (2007) and others argue along Bourdieu’s conception of education as a form of social capital which empowers, enable and enha...

  7. Blended learning in ethics education: a survey of nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Li-Ling

    2011-05-01

    Nurses are experiencing new ethical issues as a result of global developments and changes in health care. With health care becoming increasingly sophisticated, and countries facing challenges of graying population, ethical issues involved in health care are bound to expand in quantity and in depth. Blended learning rather as a combination of multiple delivery media designed to promote meaningful learning. Specifically, this study was focused on two questions: (1) the students' satisfaction and attitudes as members of a scenario-based learning process in a blended learning environment; (2) the relationship between students' satisfaction ratings of nursing ethics course and their attitudes in the blended learning environment. In total, 99 senior undergraduate nursing students currently studying at a public nursing college in Taiwan were invited to participate in this study. A cross-sectional survey design was adopted in this study. The participants were asked to fill out two Likert-scale questionnaire surveys: CAAS (Case Analysis Attitude Scale), and BLSS (Blended Learning Satisfaction Scale). The results showed what students felt about their blended learning experiences - mostly items ranged from 3.27-3.76 (the highest score is 5). Another self-assessment of scenario analysis instrument revealed the mean scores ranged from 2.87-4.19. Nearly 57.8% of the participants rated the course 'extremely helpful' or 'very helpful.' This study showed statistically significant correlations (r=0.43) between students' satisfaction with blended learning and case analysis attitudes. In addition, results testified to a potential of the blended learning model proposed in this study to bridge the gap between students and instructors and the one between students and their peers, which are typical of blended learning, and to create meaningful learning by employing blended pedagogical consideration in the course design. The use of scenario instruction enables students to develop critical

  8. THE USE OF ELECTRONIC JOURNALS IN SCORE RATING ACCOUNTING SYSTEM OF EDUCATIONAL ACHIEVEMENTS OF STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    И Н Куринин

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article describes a method of using electronic journals as a tool for efficient organization of teacher’s practical work in conditions of computerization of educational process and the widespread implementation of credit-modular system of educational process organization and grade-rating system for basic educational programs proficiency examination. A version of the electronic journal designed by the authors and realized in the program MS Excel is also presented in the article. An example of a completed “Academic Progress” page of the university educational web portal is discussed. It contains a marked electronic student grade book section and the stated conditions and criteria for grades allocation, according to a 100-point scale.

  9. A Survey of the Prevalence and Impact of Reporting Guideline Endorsement in Pathology Journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Justin E; March, Jordon K; Cohen, Michael B; Schmidt, Robert L

    2017-10-01

    To determine the prevalence of reporting guideline endorsement in pathology journals and to estimate the impact of guideline endorsement. We compared the quality of reporting in two sets of studies: (1) studies published in journals that explicitly mentioned a guideline vs studies published in journals that did not and (2) studies that cited a guideline vs studies that did not. The quality of reporting in prognostic biomarker studies was assessed using the REporting recommendations for tumor MARKer prognostic studies (REMARK) guideline. We found that six (10%) of the 59 leading pathology journals explicitly mention reporting guidelines in the instructions to authors. Only one journal required authors to submit a checklist. There was significant variation in the rate at which various REMARK items were reported (P pathology journals, but guideline endorsement may improve the quality of reporting.

  10. Quality of Life Among Dental Students: A Survey Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, Amanda; Pierre, Gaelle C; McAndrew, Maureen

    2017-10-01

    Quality of life is a complex construct that affects the overall life satisfaction, emotional well-being, and functioning of individuals. The aim of our study was to assess the quality of life of dental students at one U.S. dental school, using the World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL)-BREF, a multi-dimensional, cross-cultural, validated, and reliable survey instrument. Of the 1,437 students invited to participate, 401 students responded, but 17 were excluded because of missing data. The final sample consisted of 384 students for an overall response rate of 27%: response rates by year were first year 32.6%, second year 16.9%, third year 26.6%, and fourth year 24.0%. The results showed that the responding students rated their overall quality of life as good. The Physical Health domain had the highest mean score, while the Psychological domain had the lowest. Females reported higher quality of life than males in the Social Relationships domain. Single students were found to have a lower perceived quality of life than married students. Older students were found to have lower perceived quality of life in the Physical Health and Environment domains. Physical Health domain scores were significantly higher for fourth-year than first-year respondents, while Psychological domain scores were significantly lower for third-year than first-year respondents. Further research is needed to explore the effect of dental school on the quality of life of dental students. Targeted programs to impact students' quality of life at various points in the curriculum may be beneficial.

  11. Burnout risk in medical students in Spain using the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Student Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galán, Fernando; Sanmartín, Arturo; Polo, Juan; Giner, Lucas

    2011-04-01

    It is questionable whether the Maslach Burnout is suitable for studying burnout prevalence in preclinical medical students because many questions are patient-centered and the students have little or no contact with patients. Among factors associated with burnout in medical students, the gender shows conflicting results. The first aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of the risk of burnout in medical students in preclinical and clinical years of training, using the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Student Survey, specifically designed and validated to assess the burnout in university students, and secondly, to investigate the association between gender and burnout subscales. A cross-sectional study was carried out in a sample of 270 Spanish medical students-176 (65%) in the third year and 94 (35%) in the sixth year of training-using the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Student Survey questionnaire. Internal consistencies (Cronbach's alpha) for the three subscales on the whole sample were as follows: for exhaustion 0.78, cynicism 0.78, and efficacy 0.71. Moreover, the prevalence of burnout risk was significantly higher in sixth-year students 35 (37.5%) compared with students in third year of training 26 (14.8%) (χ(2) test, p burnout subscales. The Maslach Burnout Inventory-Student Survey overcame difficulties encountered when students have little or no contact with patients. Our findings show that the risk of burnout prevalence doubled from the third year to sixth year of training and that gender was not significantly associated with any of the subscales of burnout.

  12. Journalism Career and Scholarship Guide, 1992. 31st Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow Jones Newspaper Fund, Princeton, NJ.

    The information in this guide answers high school and college students' frequently asked questions about careers in journalism. The first section of the guide discusses journalism career opportunities and is based on results from the 27th annual survey of the nation's college journalism graduates, reporting where they found their first jobs and…

  13. Do journals publishing in the field of urology endorse reporting guidelines? A survey of author instructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunath, Frank; Grobe, Henrik R; Rücker, Gerta; Engehausen, Dirk; Antes, Gerd; Wullich, Bernd; Meerpohl, Jörg J

    2012-01-01

    Reporting guidelines aim to ensure adequate and complete reporting of clinical studies and are an indispensable tool to translate scientific results into clinical practice. The extent to which reporting guidelines are incorporated into the author instructions of journals publishing in the field of urology remained unclear. We assessed the author instructions of uro-nephrological journals indexed in 'Journal Citation Reports 2009'. Two authors independently assessed the author guidelines. We evaluated additional information including whether a journal was published by or in association with a medical association. Discrepancies were resolved by re-checking the respective author instructions and by discussion with a third author. The recommendations of the International Committee of Journal Editors were endorsed by 32 journals (58.2%) but were mentioned in 12 (37.5%) only to give general advice about manuscript preparation. Fourteen journals (25.5%) mentioned at least one reporting guideline, with CONSORT the most frequently cited. Journals with high impact factors were more likely to endorse CONSORT (p < 0.009). Other reporting guidelines were mentioned by <6% of the journals. All key stakeholders involved in the publication process should more frequently promote the awareness and use of reporting guidelines. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Refining the Journal Club Presentations of Postgraduate Students in Seven Clinical Departments for Better Evidence-based Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herur, A; Kolagi, S; Ramadurg, U; Hiremath, C S; Hadimani, C P; Goudar, S S

    2016-01-01

    A gap between best practice and actual clinical care exists and this can be overcome by evidence-based practice (EBP), which is essential to improve the clinical decision making. A strategy to reduce deficits in care provision is to train the postgraduate students in the practice of EBP in the journal clubs as evidence from medical colleges in India reveals that current format of journal club presentations is unsatisfactory. The aim of the present study was to refine the journal club presentations of postgraduate students of clinical departments and to study the effectiveness of EBP training in them for better EBP. This study was conducted in S. Nijalingappa Medical College, Bagalkot, Karnataka, India, and it was a pre- and post-trial. This study was a pre- and post-trial done during the journal club presentations of postgraduate students from clinical departments. Postgraduate students' understanding of concepts about EBP was assessed using Fresno test questionnaire in traditional journal club presentation. A hands-on session incorporating steps of EBP was imparted to them. Soon after the session, each student was assessed. In the next journal club presentation, 1 week later, the students were assessed again with the same questionnaire by the same faculty. Scores of the postgraduate students, before and after intervention (immediate and 1 week later), were compared. Data were analyzed by paired t-test using SPSS. An increase in mean posttest scores was seen immediately and also 1 week later as compared to the pretest scores. The scores also increased significantly, when each step of EBP was considered. Incorporating teaching of EBP in journal club presentations improved the competencies of postgraduate students in clinical decision making.

  15. Reflective journal writing: how it promotes reflective thinking in clinical nursing education: a students' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, J; Chabeli, M M

    2002-08-01

    According to the outcomes-based education and training system of education (OBET) in the country and the South African Nursing Council, education should focus on "creating" reflective learners and practitioners. This article seeks to determine the effectiveness of reflective journal writing in promoting the reflective thinking of learners in clinical nursing education and to validate the guidelines described in a bigger study on how to facilitate reflective thinking using reflective journal writing. A qualitative, contextual, explorative, descriptive research design was used to determine the learners' perceptions on whether reflective journal writing did promote their higher-level thinking skills during the six-month placement in a psychiatric clinical practice using the reflective diaries. From a population of seventeen fourth-year students, six volunteered to participate in a focus group interview. The data was analysed by means of the descriptive method of open coding of Tesch (in Creswell, 1994:154-156). Positive and negative results from the perceptions of the participants and a literature review served as a basis for deducing and describing guidelines for the effective use of reflective journal writing in promoting reflective thinking in clinical nursing education. The positive perception was the development of problem-solving skills attained through reflection by using analytical critical thinking, synthesis and the evaluation of situations. Self-evaluation leading to intellectual growth and self-awareness indicated a positive perception. Negative perceptions were that reflective journal writing is time consuming, content based with a lack of clear expectations from the teacher, and distrust of students about the information written. Guba's model of ensuring trustworthiness in qualitative research as described in Krefting (1991:215-222) was employed. It is concluded that reflective journal writing in clinical nursing education does promote reflective

  16. Student Engagement and Student Learning: Examining the Convergent and Discriminant Validity of the Revised National Survey of Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilvinskis, John; Masseria, Anthony A.; Pike, Gary R.

    2017-01-01

    The present study examined the relationships between student engagement, represented by two versions of the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) and self-reported gains in learning. The study drew on institutional-level data from participating institutions in 2011 and 2013. The objective of the research was to compare evidence of…

  17. The Health Challenges of Urban Latino College Students as Revealed through Student Journaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Amy L.

    2008-01-01

    Because of the unique health risks faced by the Hispanic population and the notoriously poor health habits of college students, this study examines the health challenges faced by Latino college students enrolled at an urban commuter institution. A thematic analysis reveals the top themes for males and females as healthy eating, weight management,…

  18. How to Educate Innovation Journalists? Experiences of Innovation Journalism Education in Finland 2004-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassila-Merisalo, Maria; Uskali, Turo

    2011-01-01

    Finland has been among the very first nations to apply for practice theories of innovation journalism--journalism covering innovations. This essay is based on deep interviews since 2004 of all former Finnish innovation journalism fellows (N = 9), and two surveys of undergraduate journalism students (N = 16) who took part in the world's first…

  19. Workplace violence experienced by nursing students: A UK survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, Stephen; Üzar Özçetin, Yeter Sinem; Russell-Westhead, Michele

    2016-06-01

    To appreciate the nature and scope of workplace violence amongst a sample of the UK nursing student population during clinical placement and to recommend strategies universities can implement to successfully manage the impact. Workplace violence is defined as a violent act(s) directed toward workers and can include physical, psychological or verbal behaviour. It is prevalent in nursing and causes victims work-based stress that can affect not only the individual but also the quality of care. Similar negative experiences amongst students can have a direct impact on the development of future professional skills. This study employed a cross-sectional survey design. Questions were uploaded in the format of a commercial internet survey provider (SurveyMonkey.com) and distributed across a sample of nursing schools in the UK. The survey was voluntary and employed a validated tool to assess workplace violence and was based on a similar study in Australia. The number of respondents was 657. This paper reports on the quantitative results. Nearly half of the students (42.18%) indicated they had experienced bullying/harassment in the past year while on clinical placement. One-third (30.4%) had witnessed bullying/harassment of other students and 19.6% of incidents involved a qualified nurse. The unwanted behaviours made some students consider leaving nursing (19.8%). Some respondents said the standard of patient care (12.3%) and their work with others (25.9%) were negatively affected. Workplace violence can influence nursing students' attitude toward the profession and their level of satisfaction with the work. Whilst it was reassuring to note that the majority of the participants knew where/how to report, only one fifth had actively reported an episode of bullying/harassment. Current students are the nurses and leaders of the future and have a key role in shaping the culture of generations to come. Universities and clinical providers need to work together to reduce the

  20. The Effect of Journal Writing Technique and Students' Achievement Motivation Toward Writing Achievement of the Fourth Semester Students of English Education Department of Undiksha

    OpenAIRE

    Mettaningrum, Gustiana; Dantes, N; SUARNAJAYA

    2013-01-01

    This study aims at investigating any significance difference between the writing achievement of students who were taught by using journal writing technique and those by conventional writing technique and investigating any interactional effect between the implementation of those techniques and the students' achievement motivation upon students' writing achievement. This research was a post-test only control group design which was conducted in the fourth semester students of English Education D...

  1. Construction and Validation of the Student-Athlete Environmental and Academic Orientation Survey (SEAOS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullenbach, Lauren E.; Green, Gary T.

    2016-01-01

    Many surveys exist that measure environmental orientations, yet few measure learning outcomes, such as self-efficacy, and even fewer specifically target student-athletes. Hence, this study created a survey, named the Student-Athlete Environmental and Academic Orientation Survey (SEAOS), which measured student-athletes' environmental attitudes,…

  2. Perceptions of the News Media's Societal Roles: How the Views of U.K. Journalism Students Changed during Their Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Mark; Sanders, Karen

    2012-01-01

    A longitudinal study of U.K. journalism undergraduates records how their attitudes on societal roles of the news media changed during university education. Students became more likely to endorse an adversarial approach toward public officials and businesses as extremely important. Yet students did not support these roles as strongly as an older…

  3. Improving Journal Club: Increasing Student Discussion and Understanding of Primary Literature in Molecular Biology through the Use of Dialectical Notes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonough, Virginia

    2012-01-01

    Reading the primary literature in a journal club format is an excellent practice where undergraduate students can develop their abilities in experimental data analysis and critical thinking, learn about new ideas and methods, and gain a foothold in scientific discourse. However, students are not familiar with the format, writing style, and depth…

  4. Two-Year Community: The Use of Journaling to Assess Student Learning and Acceptance of Evolutionary Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharmann, Lawrence C.; Butler, Wilbert, Jr.

    2015-01-01

    Journal writing was introduced as a means to assess student learning and acceptance of evolutionary science in a nonmajors' biology course taught at a community college. Fourteen weeks of instruction were performed, each initiated by student-centered, in-class activities and culminated by a discussion, to elucidate tentative conclusions based on…

  5. Exploring science and mathematics teaching experiences in Thailand using reflective journals of an internship program between Vietnamese and Thai students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruekpramool, Chaninan; Kanyaprasith, Kamonwan; Phonphok, Nason; Diem, Huynh Thi Thuy

    2018-01-01

    An internship program between Vietnamese student teachers from Cantho University and Thai graduate students from Srinakharinwirot University has occurred in June 2016. There were six Vietnamese student teachers and four Thai graduate students participated in this program with the help of science teachers from two schools in Sa Kaeo and Chachoengsao Provinces of Thailand. To explore Vietnamese and Thai students' life experiences and their perceptions in science and Mathematics teaching, reflective journals were used to record their progress as team teaching in primary and lower secondary classrooms in the form of the online format via social media in English language. The data were collected from 54 reflective journals from their eight days experiences at the schools. The data were analyzed qualitatively using Van Manen's level of reflectivity which composed of three levels; 1) Technical Rationality (TR), 2) Practical Action (PA) and 3) Critical Reflection (CR). The results explicitly revealed that the three levels of reflectivity have appeared in the reflective journals. Besides, Vietnamese and Thai students have learned more from each other and can exchange their educational experiences and culture. Certainly, this was the first time for them to teach science and mathematics in English to Thai students. Moreover, they have shared their impressions toward schools, teachers and also students in the schools in their reflective journal as well.

  6. 78 FR 15800 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Exchange Student Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-12

    ... Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Exchange Student Survey ACTION: Notice of request for public... INFORMATION: Title of Information Collection: ECA Exchange Student Surveys. OMB Control Number: none. Type of...: SV2012-0007 (Foreign Exchange students) and SV2012-0010 (U.S. Exchange students). Respondents: Exchange...

  7. 77 FR 75251 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: ECA Exchange Student Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-19

    ... Notice of Proposed Information Collection: ECA Exchange Student Surveys ACTION: Notice of request for...: ] Title of Information Collection: ECA Exchange Student Surveys. OMB Control Number: None. Type of Request...: SV2012-0007 (Foreign Exchange students) and SV2012-0010 (U.S. Exchange students). Respondents: Exchange...

  8. Nonmedical drug use among adolescent students: highlights from the 1999 Ontario Student Drug Use Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adlaf, E M; Paglia, A; Ivis, F J; Ialomiteanu, A

    2000-06-13

    During the 1990s, rates of nonmedical drug use among adolescents escalated. We assessed data from 5 cycles of the Ontario Student Drug Use Survey for overall trends in the proportion of students reporting illegal drug use between 1991 and 1999. The survey is a repeated, cross-sectional, 2-stage cluster-design survey of students enrolled in grades 7, 9, 11 and 13. Outcome measures were prevalence of use of 17 drugs, including alcohol and tobacco, over the 12 months preceding the survey. The rates of drug use increased between 1993 and 1999. The 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the differences in proportions between 1997 and 1999 indicated significant increases in the overall use of 6 drugs: alcohol (95% CIdiff 6.1, 1.9-10.3), cannabis (95% CIdiff 46.3, 0.2-8.4), glue (95% CIdiff 2.3, 1.3-3.3), other solvents (95% CIdiff 5.0, 3.1-6.3), barbiturates (95% CIdiff 1.9, 0.4-3.4) and hallucinogens such as mescaline and psilocybin (95% CIdiff 3.5, 0.8-6.9). Fewer grade 7 students in 1999 than in earlier cohorts reported using alcohol or cigarettes by age 9. The public health implications of the findings are mixed. On the positive side, there is no evidence of increases in early onset of drug use. On the negative side, the overall proportion of students reporting illegal drug use has continued to rise.

  9. Examining University Students' Scholarly Publication in English Journals: A Case for Postgraduate Students' Written Literacy Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjan Vosoughi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This  research  aimed  to  screen  'essay  writing'  difficulties  that  non-native  university students  at  postgraduate  levels  usually  experience  regarding  scholarly  publication  in mainstream, English journals. Two sets of variables including written literacy competencies in Persian and English languages were mapped over language uses (General vs. Academic. Initial screenings  from  one  hundred  Iranian  students  at  PhD  and  MA  levels  with  publication experiences  in  both  Persian  and  English  languages  gave  rise  to  some  fifty-five  participants randomly  selected  from  different  university  disciplines  (Humanities,  Engineering,  Medicine and Basic Sciences and diverse university settings (Public and Private across the country and classified  via  stratified  sampling.  A  validated  questionnaire  from  a  large-scale  project  called ENEIDA (Moreno, 2011 was used for collecting the required data. Two measures were used to assess  written  literacy  competencies  across  language  uses:  1  participants'  assumed,  self-reported written literacy competencies in using English and Persian languages for General and Academic  purposes  were  denoted  as  'perceived'  measures  and  2  further  supported  by  actual measures:  mostly  received  comments  from  reviewers  in  the  mainstream,  English  journals  by the  target  group  above.  Findings  were  discussed  in  the  light  of  recent  lines  of  enquiries  in Academic Literacy (AL trends بررسی تجربیات دانشجویان در نگارش وچاپ مقاله درمجلات انگلیسی زبان؛ مطالعه موردی بر روی فعالیت های سواد نوشتاری دانشجویان تحصیلات تکمیلی چکیده: هدف از نگارش مقاله حاضر انعکاس مشکلات رایج درخصوص نگارش و

  10. Study Meta Analysis of Strategies and Utilization of Electronic Journals ( e - journals For Graduate Student University of Malang in Efforts Produce Internationally Reputed Scientific Publications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokhibul Anshor

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Scientific publications in journals of international repute acts as a medium for self-actualization academics in the development of science internationally . Higher education institutions that have the quality of education , science and technology are good tend to have a high number of international publications . To produce scientific publications of high quality , must be supported by research and a source of reference quality . In an effort to improve the scientific publication of national repute academic environment . Malang State University. providing electronic information resources in the form of an electronic journal that comes from a variety of electronic information resources , in the hope utilized by students in an effort to increase scientific publication of international repute . The effort is also supported by a set of rules that requires that academic graduate students have a scientific publication of international repute as a graduation requirement

  11. Study Meta Analysis of Strategies and Utilization of Electronic Journals ( e - journals For Graduate Student University of Malang in Efforts Produce Internationally Reputed Scientific Publications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokibul Ansor

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Scientific publications in journals of international repute acts as a medium for self-actualization academics in the development of science internationally . Higher education institutions that have the quality of education , science and technology are good tend to have a high number of international publications . To produce scientific publications of high quality , must be supported by research and a source of reference quality . In an effort to improve the scientific publication of national repute academic environment . Malang State University. providing electronic information resources in the form of an electronic journal that comes from a variety of electronic information resources , in the hope utilized by students in an effort to increase scientific publication of international repute . The effort is also supported by a set of rules that requires that academic graduate students have a scientific publication of international repute as a graduation requirement

  12. Scientific publication in orthopedics journals from Chinese authors: a survey of 10-year survey of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Zhao, Chenglong; Chu, Jianjun; Yang, Cheng; Kong, Jinhai; Sun, Zhengwang; Xiao, Hui; Liu, Tielong; Xiao, Jianru

    2015-08-01

    In the scientific community, a scientist's productivity is usually measured by his scientific output. The productivity of a group, an institution or, on a larger scale, a country can be assessed in similar manner. This study aims to show the contribution of Chinese authors to orthopedics research, from three major regions, namely Mainland China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong. Articles published in 63 orthopedics journals originating from Mainland China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong from 2003 to 2012 were retrieved from the PubMed database and Journal Citation Report. Quantitative and qualitative analyses were conducted for the total number of articles, clinical trials, randomized controlled trails, case reports, impact factors (IF), citations, and articles published in high-impact journals. There were totally 3473 articles from Mainland China (1859), Taiwan (1111), and Hong Kong (503) from 2003 to 2012, showing gradual increase from 2003 to 2012. From 2006 onward, the number of published articles from Mainland China exceeded that from Hong Kong and exceeded that from Taiwan in 2008. The accumulated IF of articles from Mainland China (3746.21) was higher than that from Taiwan (2466.74) and that from Hong Kong (1089.35). However, Taiwan witnessed the highest mean IF (2.22), followed by Hong Kong (2.17), and Mainland China (2.02). Hong Kong displayed the highest mean citations of each article (9.35), followed by Taiwan (9.12), and Mainland China (5.71). By contract, Spine was the most popular journal to choose in these three regions. The total number of orthopedics articles in China increased markedly from 2003 to 2012. Of the three regions, Mainland China published the most articles, clinical trials, randomized controlled trails, and case reports. In general, Spine was the most popular journal to choose in the three regions.

  13. Sex and gender in medical education: a national student survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Marjorie R; Herrmann, Alyssa; Tashjian, Amanda; Ramineni, Tina; Ramakrishnan, Rithika; Raef, Donna; Rokas, Tracy; Shatzer, John

    2016-01-01

    Gender- and sex-specific medicine is defined as the practice of medicine based on the understanding that biology (dictated by sex chromosomes) and social roles (gender) are important in and have implications for prevention, screening, diagnosis, and treatment in men and women. In light of the many ways that sex and gender influence disease presentation and patient management, there have been various initiatives to improve the integration of these topics into medical education curriculum. Although certain schools may include the topics, their impact on the student body's knowledge has not been as fully studied. By studying the opinions of US allopathic and osteopathic-enrolled students on the extent to which their schools address these topics and their understanding of these topics, this study examined the role of gender specific medicine in the US medical school curriculum. An email solicitation with link to an anonymous survey was sent to approximately 35,876 student members of five US medical student organizations. The survey instrument consisted of yes/no, multiple choice, and attitude awareness questions. Data was analyzed as a complete data set to evaluate national trends and via subset analysis using chi-square, paired t test, and one-way anova. A total of 1097 students responded. The majority of respondents strongly agreed that sex and gender medicine (SGBM) improves patient management (96.0 %) and should be included as a part of the medical school curriculum (94.4 %). Only 2.4 % of participants agreed that SGBM is the same as Women's Health. When asked specifically about inclusion of an identified sex and gender-based medicine curriculum at their institution, students answered not sure at 40.8, 25.1, 19.1, and 20.3 % from first year to fourth year, respectively. Males reported a higher rate of exposure to SGBM content areas (in medical history taking, domestic violence) than women. Medical students recognize the differentiation between SGBM principles

  14. Recent findings from the Ontario Student Drug Use Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adlaf, E M; Ivis, F J

    1998-09-08

    Every 2 years, the Addiction Research Foundation of Ontario, a division of the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, sponsors the Ontario Student Drug Use Survey. The results of the surveys conducted in 1995 and 1997 are presented here and compared with results from the early 1990s. Questionnaires were completed by 3870 and 3990 Ontario public school students enrolled in grades 7, 9, 11 and 13 in 1995 and 1997 respectively. The outcome measures were prevalence of use of 20 types of drugs and other substances, including alcohol, tobacco and prescription drugs, over the previous 12 months. For several drugs the prevalence of use in the previous 12 months had increased from 1993 to 1995, but from 1995 to 1997 there was a significant increase for only one type (hallucinogens such as mescaline and psilocybin). The inhalation of glue declined, and the use of the other 18 types of drugs remained stable. Recent data suggest that increases in adolescent student drug use reported earlier this decade have not continued. However, the stability in rates of drug use is not a justification for complacency in this important area of public health.

  15. When Students Grade Their Teachers: A Validity Analysis of the Tripod Student Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhfeld, Megan

    2017-01-01

    This article develops a validity argument for the use of the Tripod student survey of instructional practices to assess teacher effectiveness in summative teacher evaluations and professional development decisions. This paper expands upon previous research in three ways: (a) it draws from current validity thinking to examine the evidence for…

  16. Constructing the Japanese version of the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Student Survey: Confirmatory factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubakita, Takashi; Shimazaki, Kazuyo

    2016-01-01

    To examine the factorial validity of the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Student Survey, using a sample of 2061 Japanese university students majoring in the medical and natural sciences (67.9% male, 31.8% female; Mage  = 19.6 years, standard deviation = 1.5). The back-translated scale used unreversed items to assess inefficacy. The inventory's descriptive properties and Cronbach's alphas were calculated using SPSS software. The present authors compared fit indices of the null, one factor, and default three factor models via confirmatory factor analysis with maximum-likelihood estimation using AMOS software, version 21.0. Intercorrelations between exhaustion, cynicism, and inefficacy were relatively higher than in prior studies. Cronbach's alphas were 0.76, 0.85, and 0.78, respectively. Although fit indices of the hypothesized three factor model did not meet the respective criteria, the model demonstrated better fit than did the null and one factor models. The present authors added four paths between error variables within items, but the modified model did not show satisfactory fit. Subsequent analysis revealed that a bi-factor model fit the data better than did the hypothesized or modified three factor models. The Japanese version of the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Student Survey needs minor changes to improve the fit of its three factor model, but the scale as a whole can be used to adequately assess overall academic burnout in Japanese university students. Although the scale was back-translated, two items measuring exhaustion whose expressions overlapped should be modified, and all items measuring inefficacy should be reversed in order to statistically clarify the factorial difference between the scale's three factors. © 2015 The Authors. Japan Journal of Nursing Science © 2015 Japan Academy of Nursing Science.

  17. A survey of evidence in the Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine oncology manuscripts from 1999 to 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahora, A; Khanna, C

    2010-01-01

    To survey and monitor trends in evidence for oncology manuscripts published in the Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine (JVIM) between 1999 and 2007 based on an evidence-based medicine (EBM) standard. All veterinary oncology-related articles published in JVIM and 7 other high-impact journals from 1999 to 2007 were collected by database searches. Relevant manuscripts then were characterized including investigator affiliation, subject matter investigated, retrospective or prospective study design, manuscript type, and classifications of manuscripts using an EBM standard. A total of 172 relevant veterinary oncology manuscripts were identified in JVIM between 1999 and 2007. The proportion of oncology manuscripts published each year rose with the total number of manuscripts published in JVIM (mean, 13%; range, 8-15%). The author affiliations and subject matter were similar during this evaluation period. Case series represented the most common manuscript type (40%). With the exception of a progressive increase in prospective manuscripts and a reduction in case reports, no significant changes in the classification of manuscripts using EBM standards were seen. During this same period, veterinary oncology manuscripts published in 7 high-impact journals were associated with higher standards of evidence including prospective studies and randomized trials. The standards of evidence for veterinary oncology manuscripts published in JVIM have remained static between 1999 and 2007. This survey provides an informative benchmark for the state of evidence in previous JVIM oncology manuscripts and may be useful in identifying specific opportunities that may raise the standards of evidence in future publications in JVIM.

  18. Development, Evaluation and Use of a Student Experience Survey in Undergraduate Science Laboratories: The Advancing Science by Enhancing Learning in the Laboratory Student Laboratory Learning Experience Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrie, Simon C.; Bucat, Robert B.; Buntine, Mark A.; Burke da Silva, Karen; Crisp, Geoffrey T.; George, Adrian V.; Jamie, Ian M.; Kable, Scott H.; Lim, Kieran F.; Pyke, Simon M.; Read, Justin R.; Sharma, Manjula D.; Yeung, Alexandra

    2015-01-01

    Student experience surveys have become increasingly popular to probe various aspects of processes and outcomes in higher education, such as measuring student perceptions of the learning environment and identifying aspects that could be improved. This paper reports on a particular survey for evaluating individual experiments that has been developed…

  19. SURVEY ON ACCOUNTING STUDENT SATISFACTION. EVIDENCE FROM A ROMANIAN UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile GORGAN

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available During recent years, on the background of increased competition, changing demographics in the population and declining enrollments, a paradigm shift occurred in the higher education system where universities begin to realize the importance of student satisfaction and market-type mechanism have been introduced even in countries previously characterized by a high degree of government control. Our study aims to assess the satisfaction of students who graduated from the Faculty of Accounting and Management Information Systems of the Bucharest University of Economic with Bachelor's degrees in 2012 and 2013. A survey research was conducted aiming to assess the overall satisfaction through questions pertaining to global fulfilment of expectations related to undergraduate accounting program, the perceived value of the program and the willingness to recommend the accounting program to a close friend. The key determinants of the overall satisfaction level were analyzed and discussed.

  20. [Epidemiological evaluation of soft drinks consumption--students surveys].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chłapowska, Joanna; Pawlaczyk-Kamieńska, Tamara

    2012-01-01

    Non carious lesions, including erosion changes, are becoming increasingly apparent. There are multiple factors involved in the etiology of dental erosion i.a. acids in commercially available drinks. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of soft drink consumption that promote dental erosion among young adults. The 266 subjects were asked to fill in a questionnaire. The questionnaire inquired questions about consumption of drinks favouring tooth erosion. The students declared frequent drinking of isotonic drinks, energetic drinks, fizzy drinks and coca-cola type drinks. On the basis of a survey of Poznań University of Medical Sciences students it can be determined, that they have relatively high risk of dental erosion. To minimize the risk of dental erosion occurrence in young population there is a need to disseminate knowledge about the etiology.

  1. Survey of editors and reviewers of high-impact psychology journals: statistical and research design problems in submitted manuscripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Alex; Reeder, Rachelle; Hyun, Jenny

    2011-01-01

    The authors surveyed 21 editors and reviewers from major psychology journals to identify and describe the statistical and design errors they encounter most often and to get their advice regarding prevention of these problems. Content analysis of the text responses revealed themes in 3 major areas: (a) problems with research design and reporting (e.g., lack of an a priori power analysis, lack of congruence between research questions and study design/analysis, failure to adequately describe statistical procedures); (b) inappropriate data analysis (e.g., improper use of analysis of variance, too many statistical tests without adjustments, inadequate strategy for addressing missing data); and (c) misinterpretation of results. If researchers attended to these common methodological and analytic issues, the scientific quality of manuscripts submitted to high-impact psychology journals might be significantly improved.

  2. A survey of the current status of web-based databases indexing Iranian journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merat, Shahin; Khatibzadeh, Shahab; Mesgarpour, Bita; Malekzadeh, Reza

    2009-05-01

    The scientific output of Iran is increasing rapidly during the recent years. Unfortunately, most papers are published in journals which are not indexed by popular indexing systems and many of them are in Persian without English translation. This makes the results of Iranian scientific research unavailable to other researchers, including Iranians. The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of current web-based databases indexing scientific articles published in Iran. We identified web-based databases which indexed scientific journals published in Iran using popular search engines. The sites were then subjected to a series of tests to evaluate their coverage, search capabilities, stability, accuracy of information, consistency, accessibility, ease of use, and other features. Results were compared with each other to identify strengths and shortcomings of each site. Five web sites were indentified. None had a complete coverage on scientific Iranian journals. The search capabilities were less than optimal in most sites. English translations of research titles, author names, keywords, and abstracts of Persian-language articles did not follow standards. Some sites did not cover abstracts. Numerous typing errors make searches ineffective and citation indexing unreliable. None of the currently available indexing sites are capable of presenting Iranian research to the international scientific community. The government should intervene by enforcing policies designed to facilitate indexing through a systematic approach. The policies should address Iranian journals, authors, and indexing sites. Iranian journals should be required to provide their indexing data, including references, electronically; authors should provide correct indexing information to journals; and indexing sites should improve their software to meet standards set by the government.

  3. A survey of energy drink consumption patterns among college students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carpenter-Aeby Tracy

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Energy drink consumption has continued to gain in popularity since the 1997 debut of Red Bull, the current leader in the energy drink market. Although energy drinks are targeted to young adult consumers, there has been little research regarding energy drink consumption patterns among college students in the United States. The purpose of this study was to determine energy drink consumption patterns among college students, prevalence and frequency of energy drink use for six situations, namely for insufficient sleep, to increase energy (in general, while studying, driving long periods of time, drinking with alcohol while partying, and to treat a hangover, and prevalence of adverse side effects and energy drink use dose effects among college energy drink users. Methods Based on the responses from a 32 member college student focus group and a field test, a 19 item survey was used to assess energy drink consumption patterns of 496 randomly surveyed college students attending a state university in the Central Atlantic region of the United States. Results Fifty one percent of participants (n = 253 reported consuming greater than one energy drink each month in an average month for the current semester (defined as energy drink user. The majority of users consumed energy drinks for insufficient sleep (67%, to increase energy (65%, and to drink with alcohol while partying (54%. The majority of users consumed one energy drink to treat most situations although using three or more was a common practice to drink with alcohol while partying (49%. Weekly jolt and crash episodes were experienced by 29% of users, 22% reported ever having headaches, and 19% heart palpitations from consuming energy drinks. There was a significant dose effect only for jolt and crash episodes. Conclusion Using energy drinks is a popular practice among college students for a variety of situations. Although for the majority of situations assessed, users consumed one

  4. A survey of energy drink consumption patterns among college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinauskas, Brenda M; Aeby, Victor G; Overton, Reginald F; Carpenter-Aeby, Tracy; Barber-Heidal, Kimberly

    2007-10-31

    Energy drink consumption has continued to gain in popularity since the 1997 debut of Red Bull, the current leader in the energy drink market. Although energy drinks are targeted to young adult consumers, there has been little research regarding energy drink consumption patterns among college students in the United States. The purpose of this study was to determine energy drink consumption patterns among college students, prevalence and frequency of energy drink use for six situations, namely for insufficient sleep, to increase energy (in general), while studying, driving long periods of time, drinking with alcohol while partying, and to treat a hangover, and prevalence of adverse side effects and energy drink use dose effects among college energy drink users. Based on the responses from a 32 member college student focus group and a field test, a 19 item survey was used to assess energy drink consumption patterns of 496 randomly surveyed college students attending a state university in the Central Atlantic region of the United States. Fifty one percent of participants (n = 253) reported consuming greater than one energy drink each month in an average month for the current semester (defined as energy drink user). The majority of users consumed energy drinks for insufficient sleep (67%), to increase energy (65%), and to drink with alcohol while partying (54%). The majority of users consumed one energy drink to treat most situations although using three or more was a common practice to drink with alcohol while partying (49%). Weekly jolt and crash episodes were experienced by 29% of users, 22% reported ever having headaches, and 19% heart palpitations from consuming energy drinks. There was a significant dose effect only for jolt and crash episodes. Using energy drinks is a popular practice among college students for a variety of situations. Although for the majority of situations assessed, users consumed one energy drink with a reported frequency of 1 - 4 days per

  5. Views on the peer review system of biomedical journals: an online survey of academics from high-ranking universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Peer review is the major method used by biomedical journals for making the decision of publishing an article. This cross-sectional survey assesses views concerning the review system of biomedical journals among academics globally. Methods A total of 28,009 biomedical academics from high-ranking universities listed by the 2009 Times Higher Education Quacquarelli Symonds (THE-QS) World University Rankings were contacted by email between March 2010 and August 2010. 1,340 completed an online survey which focused on their academic background, negative experiences and views on biomedical journal peer review and the results were compared among basic scientists, clinicians and clinician scientists. Results Fewer than half of the respondents agreed that the peer review systems of biomedical journals were fair (48.4%), scientific (47.5%), or transparent (25.1%). Nevertheless, 58.2% of the respondents agreed that authors should remain anonymous and 64.4% agreed that reviewers should not be disclosed. Most, (67.7%) agreed to the establishment of an appeal system. The proportion of native English-speaking respondents who agreed that the “peer review system is fair” was significantly higher than for non-native respondents (p = 0.02). Similarly, the proportion of clinicians stating that the “peer review system is fair” was significantly higher than that for basic scientists and clinician-scientists (p = 0.004). For females, (β = −0.1, p = 0.03), the frequency of encountering personal attacks in reviewers’ comments (β = −0.1, p = 0.002) and the frequency of imposition of unnecessary references by reviewers (β = −0.06, p = 0.04) were independently and inversely associated with agreement that “the peer review system is fair”. Conclusion Academics are divided on the issue of whether the biomedical journal peer review system is fair, scientific and transparent. A majority of academics agreed with the double-blind peer

  6. Views on the peer review system of biomedical journals: an online survey of academics from high-ranking universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Roger Chun-Man; Mak, Kwok-Kei; Tao, Ren; Lu, Yanxia; Day, Jeffrey R; Pan, Fang

    2013-06-07

    Peer review is the major method used by biomedical journals for making the decision of publishing an article. This cross-sectional survey assesses views concerning the review system of biomedical journals among academics globally. A total of 28,009 biomedical academics from high-ranking universities listed by the 2009 Times Higher Education Quacquarelli Symonds (THE-QS) World University Rankings were contacted by email between March 2010 and August 2010. 1,340 completed an online survey which focused on their academic background, negative experiences and views on biomedical journal peer review and the results were compared among basic scientists, clinicians and clinician scientists. Fewer than half of the respondents agreed that the peer review systems of biomedical journals were fair (48.4%), scientific (47.5%), or transparent (25.1%). Nevertheless, 58.2% of the respondents agreed that authors should remain anonymous and 64.4% agreed that reviewers should not be disclosed. Most, (67.7%) agreed to the establishment of an appeal system. The proportion of native English-speaking respondents who agreed that the "peer review system is fair" was significantly higher than for non-native respondents (p = 0.02). Similarly, the proportion of clinicians stating that the "peer review system is fair" was significantly higher than that for basic scientists and clinician-scientists (p = 0.004). For females, (β = -0.1, p = 0.03), the frequency of encountering personal attacks in reviewers' comments (β = -0.1, p = 0.002) and the frequency of imposition of unnecessary references by reviewers (β = -0.06, p = 0.04) were independently and inversely associated with agreement that "the peer review system is fair". Academics are divided on the issue of whether the biomedical journal peer review system is fair, scientific and transparent. A majority of academics agreed with the double-blind peer review and to the establishment of an appeal system. Female academics, experience of

  7. Use of surgical telescopes by senior dental students: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagge, Mark S

    2003-12-01

    This survey examined the use of surgical telescopes (STs) in a large senior dental student class. The percentage of students who purchased STs, factors that influenced those purchases, frequency/patterns of use, and purchase satisfaction were investigated. The survey return rate was 85.3% (128 of 150). Among the respondents, 86% had purchased STs and 14% had not. The most frequent motive for ST purchase was advice received from others (43%); ergonomic reasons were cited by 21% of users. Fixed-lens designs were selected more frequently (70%) than flip-down systems (30%). Nearly all ST purchases were made during the first year of dental school (95%), and low-power magnification (x 2-2.5) was chosen by 88% of purchasers. STs were used more often for operative dentistry, fixed prosthodontics, endodontics, and pediatric dentistry than for practice in other disciplines. ST users expressed a high level of satisfaction with their purchases (84%). The most common reason given for not purchasing STs was being able to see well enough without them (9 of 18; 50%).

  8. Self-Reported Mental Disorders and Distress by Sexual Orientation: Results of the Minnesota College Student Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przedworski, Julia M; VanKim, Nicole A; Eisenberg, Marla E; McAlpine, Donna D; Lust, Katherine A; Laska, Melissa N

    2015-07-01

    Sexual minority college students (i.e., those not identifying as heterosexual, or those reporting same-sex sexual activity) may be at increased risk of poor mental health, given factors such as minority stress, stigma, and discrimination. Such disparities could have important implications for students' academic achievement, future health, and social functioning. This study compares reports of mental disorder diagnoses, stressful life events, and frequent mental distress across five gender-stratified sexual orientation categories. Data were from the 2007-2011 College Student Health Survey, which surveyed a random sample of college students (N=34,324) at 40 Minnesota institutions. Data analysis was conducted in 2013-2014. The prevalence of mental disorder diagnoses, frequent mental distress, and stressful life events were calculated for heterosexual, discordant heterosexual, gay or lesbian, bisexual, and unsure students. Logistic regression models were fit to estimate the association between sexual orientation and mental health outcomes. Lesbian, gay, and bisexual students were more likely to report any mental health disorder diagnosis than were heterosexual students (pstudents were significantly more likely to report frequent mental distress compared to heterosexual students (OR range, 1.6-2.7). All sexual minority groups, with the exception of unsure men, had significantly greater odds of experiencing two or more stressful life events (OR range, 1.3-2.8). Sexual minority college students experience worse mental health than their heterosexual peers. These students may benefit from interventions that target the structural and social causes of these disparities, and individual-level interventions that consider their unique life experiences. Copyright © 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Instructional Vignettes in Publication and Journalism Ethics in Radiology Research: Assessment via a Survey of Radiology Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Ginocchio, Luke A

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the potential usefulness of written instructional vignettes relating to publication and journalism ethics in radiology via a survey of radiology trainees. A literature review was conducted to guide the development of vignettes, each describing a scenario relating to an ethical issue in research and publication, with subsequent commentary on the underlying ethical issue and potential approaches to its handling. Radiology trainees at a single institution were surveyed regarding the vignettes' perceived usefulness. A total of 21 vignettes were prepared, addressing institutional review board and human subjects protection, authorship issues, usage of previous work, manuscript review, and other miscellaneous topics. Of the solicited trainees, 24.7% (16/65) completed the survey. On average among the vignettes, 94.0% of the participants found the vignette helpful; 19.9 received prior formal instruction on the issue during medical training; 40.0% received prior informal guidance from a research mentor; and 42.0% indicated that the issue had arisen in their own or a peer's prior research experience. The most common previously experienced specific issue was authorship order (93.8%). Free-text responses were largely favorable regarding the value of the vignettes, although also indicated numerous challenges in properly handling the ethical issues: impact of hierarchy, pressure to publish, internal politics, reluctance to conduct sensitive conversations with colleagues, and variability in journal and professional society policies. Radiology trainees overall found the vignettes helpful, addressing commonly encountered topics for which formal and informal guidance were otherwise lacking. The vignettes are publicly available through the Association of University Radiologists (AUR) website and may foster greater insights by investigators into ethical aspects of the publication and journalism process, thus contributing to higher quality

  10. Consulting the Delphi: A New Idea for Collecting Student Feedback through the Two Survey Method (TSM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finelli, Cynthia J.; Wright, Mary C.; Pinder-Grover, Tershia

    2010-01-01

    The Two Survey Method (TSM) is a new time-efficient tool for gathering formative student feedback. Based on the Delphi technique, the TSM uses iterative surveys to develop student consensus about key strengths and suggestions for instruction. Evaluation data indicate that both faculty and students are satisfied with the method's efficiency and the…

  11. Journalism and Student Publications in American Junior Colleges; A Directory of Programs and Personnel with Selective Interpretation and Recommendations. Revised Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deaver, Frank

    The directory presents data defining the scope of journalism instruction in the nation's two-year colleges. Entries for each institution are given alphabetically within states and include: journalism courses offered; journalism instructors and their background, experience, and responsibilities; student publications produced and pertinent…

  12. 2013 Annual Survey of Journalism Mass Communication Enrollments: Enrollments Decline for Third Consecutive Year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Lee Bernard; Vlad, Tudor; Simpson, Holly Anne

    2014-01-01

    Enrollments in journalism and mass communication programs in the United States in the fall of 2013 were down from a year earlier for the third year in a row. Enrollments dropped at the bachelor's, master's, and doctoral levels, and the number of freshmen and sophomores were down dramatically from a year earlier. Enrollments in the…

  13. A History of Journalism in the Black Community: A Preliminary Survey. Exchange Bibliography No. 862.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Lenwood G.

    Works pertinent to the study of journalism in the black community are listed in this bibliography. The works are divided into six sections: selected general reference works dealing with black studies, selected black periodicals, books, articles, doctoral dissertations, and masters' theses. Two additional sections list selected United States…

  14. Perceived role of the journal clubs in teaching critical appraisal skills: A survey of surgical trainees in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrasheed Ibrahim

    2014-01-01

    , residents indicated a need for a formal evaluation of the journal clubs. It is our hope that the results of this survey will encourage postgraduate coordinators to evaluate the quality of their journal clubs in the development of skills in critical appraisal of the literature.

  15. What lessons to be learnt from reflective learning journals written by students to improve learning and intercultural awareness?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Peter

    2009-01-01

    semester Master students in 2007, with a double purpose of both developing team work and intercultural skills further and restart the students reflection and talking about how they actually work together, to prepare them to take in foreign students on the 2nd semester. To secure the latter part...... and the learning goal the students have to write an individual learning journal. The setup of the course and the learning journals was presented at last years SEFI conference. This paper will investigate the learning portfolios further, now having two years experiences in app. 100 portfolios. The focus...... will be on intercultural awareness and the lessons to be learnt about how to prepare for and start up an intercultural teamwork in problem solving....

  16. OF MICROBES AND MEN: A SPECIAL REPORT IN THE JOURNAL FOR MINORITY MEDICAL STUDENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BILL BOWERS

    2008-11-12

    In support of the mission for the Office of Science and the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER), Spectrum Publishers proposes an editorial project to inform and educate minority undergraduate students in the sciences, minority medical students and minority medical residents of the opportunities and challenges available to them as they complete their training. This editorial project will take the form of a 32-page insert in the Journal for Minority Medical Students. The subject matter will be determined by BER based on mission requirements. The material will be compiled, assembled, edited, revised, designed, printed and distributed as a total package with a vast majority of the work performed by our staff. Our objective is to provide the special report without added (and burdensome) work to the BER staff. The 32-page report will be distributed to our readership of 10,000 future scientists and physicians. In addition, we will prepare the insert so that it can also be used by BER as a stand-alone piece and outreach tool. After publication, we will solicit feedback from our readers through our unique Campus Rep Program of students strategically located on campuses across the nation who will provide valuable editorial feedback. This innovative program will give BER a quick read on the effectiveness of its message. The total cost for this mission-related project is only $30,000.00. Based on our earlier experience with DOE, we are confident that this level of funding will be sufficient to develop an effective educational campaign.

  17. Washington Center's Online Student Survey Validation Study: Surfacing Students' Individual and Collective Understanding of Their Learning Community Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malnarich, Gillies; Pettitt, Maureen A.; Mino, Jack J.

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on findings from a mixed-methods validation study of the "Online Survey of Students' Experiences of Learning in Learning Communities". In the quantitative part of the study, we found strong correlations among survey items related to faculty behaviors, student behaviors, and critical thinking. Factor analysis yielded…

  18. Journalism Forum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journalism Educator, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Five journalism educators report on surveys examining (1) the hiring of teachers and the course content needed for the public relations curriculum; (2) the study of journalism history; (3) the structure, purpose, and content of photojournalism courses; and (4) problems created by the increased use of electronic laboratory equipment in journalism…

  19. Endorsement of the CONSORT statement by high-impact medical journals in China: a survey of instructions for authors and published papers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-qian Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The CONSORT Statement is a reporting guideline for authors when reporting randomized controlled trials (RCTs. It offers a standard way for authors to prepare RCT reports. It has been endorsed by many high-impact medical journals and by international editorial groups. This study was conducted to assess the endorsement of the CONSORT Statement by high-impact medical journals in China by reviewing their instructions for authors. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total of 200 medical journals were selected according to the Chinese Science and Technology Journal Citation Reports, 195 of which publish clinical research papers. Their instructions for authors were reviewed and all texts mentioning the CONSORT Statement or CONSORT extension papers were extracted. Any mention of the Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts Submitted to Biomedical Journals (URM developed by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE or 'clinical trial registration' was also extracted. For journals endorsing the CONSORT Statement, their most recently published RCT reports were retrieved and evaluated to assess whether the journals have followed what the CONSORT Statement required. Out of the 195 medical journals publishing clinical research papers, only six (6/195, 3.08% mentioned 'CONSORT' in their instructions for authors; out of the 200 medical journals surveyed, only 14 (14/200, 7.00% mentioned 'ICMJE' or 'URM' in their instructions for authors, and another five journals stated in their instructions for authors that clinical trials should have trial registration numbers and that priority would be given to clinical trials which had been registered. Among the 62 RCT reports published in the six journals endorsing the CONSORT Statement, 20 (20/62, 32.26% contained flow diagrams and only three (3/62, 4.84% provided trial registration information. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Medical journals in China endorsing either the CONSORT Statement or the

  20. The Currency of Gender: Student and Institutional Responses to the First Gender Unit in an Australian Journalism Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Louise

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on the development and implementation of the first unit in an Australian university undergraduate journalism program to specifically examine the gendered nature of both news content and production processes. The paper outlines why such a unit is important to addressing entrenched industry bias, the core content, and student and…

  1. [The journal club as a teaching strategy to develop evidence-based practice for undergraduate students in nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouinard, Maud-christine; Lavoie, Mélissa; Poitras, Marie-éve; Sasseville, Maxime; De Jordy, Louise Catherine; Girard, Ariane

    2015-03-01

    Contemporary nursing practice requires constant updating of knowledge, especially in regards to research results found in academic or scientific papers. As part of the university curriculum in nursing, students must develop their skills in relation to the understanding and evaluation of research evidence. The objective of this study was to explore the appreciation and effects of a new teaching approach, the use of a journal club within a nursing research course, with undergraduate students in nursing sciences. As part of a qualitative exploratory descriptive design, a questionnaire with open-ended questions about their appreciation and perception of the effects of the journal club was administered to the participating students (n = 41) at the end of the course. Participation in the journal club appears to have provided an introduction to the scientific area of nursing, to have improved several skills related to the evaluation of scientific articles and has increased motivation to adopt evidence-based practice. The use of a journal club within an undergraduate research course in nursing was a relevant teaching method that aroused great interest in the undergraduate students in nursing.

  2. Journal Use by Graduate Students as Indicated by Master's Theses Bibliographies at an Urban Commuter College, 1991-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sexton, Ellen

    2006-01-01

    Citation analyses were carried out on master's theses in three disciplines: forensic psychology, forensic science, and criminal justice, completed and deposited in the John Jay College Library from 1991 to 2004. The aim was to determine the effect of availability of electronic journals on students' choice of references. The number of journal…

  3. Electronic Clinic Journaling: The Use of Weblogs to Support Evidence-Based Practice in Doctor of Audiology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neldon, Gayle B.

    2009-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is a strategy for the provision of high quality health care. The use of journals to document clinical experiences and reflection has been used in speech-language pathology as well as nursing and psychology. This study uses qualitative analysis to study what AuD students learn about evidence-based practice from writing…

  4. Word Prediction Programs with Phonetic Spelling Support: Performance Comparisons and Impact on Journal Writing for Students with Writing Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evmenova, Anna S.; Graff, Heidi J.; Jerome, Marci Kinas; Behrmann, Michael M.

    2010-01-01

    This investigation examined the effects of currently available word prediction software programs that support phonetic/inventive spelling on the quality of journal writing by six students with severe writing and/or spelling difficulties in grades three through six during a month-long summer writing program. A changing conditions single-subject…

  5. Preparation for the Profession: An Examination of the Triangulation among University of Utah Journalism Educators, Their Students, and the Salt Lake Valley Media Practitioners Who Hire Them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuban, Adam Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Journalism educators must make critical decisions about their undergraduate curricula, determining how to best prepare their students for professional careers. Present scholarship indicates that a disconnect exists in what journalism students think they ought to know and/or be able to do upon graduation, what educators think they must teach their…

  6. Reporting quality of randomized controlled trial abstracts: survey of leading general dental journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Fang; Deng, Lijia; Kau, Chung How; Jiang, Han; He, Hong; Walsh, Tanya

    2015-09-01

    The authors conducted a study to assess the reporting quality of randomized controlled trial (RCT) abstracts published in leading general dental journals, investigate any improvement after the release of the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) for Abstracts guidelines, and identify factors associated with better reporting quality. The authors searched PubMed for RCTs published in 10 leading general dental journals during the periods from 2005 to 2007 (pre-CONSORT period) and 2010 to 2012 (post-CONSORT period). The authors evaluated and scored the reporting quality of included abstracts by using the original 16-item CONSORT for Abstracts checklist. The authors used risk ratios and the t test to compare the adequate reporting rate of each item and the overall quality in the 2 periods. The authors used univariate and multivariate regressions to identify predictors of better reporting quality. The authors included and evaluated 276 RCT abstracts. Investigators reported significantly more checklist items during the post-CONSORT period (mean [standard deviation {SD}], 4.53 [1.69]) than during the pre-CONSORT period (mean [SD], 3.87 [1.10]; mean difference, -0.66 [95% confidence interval, -0.99 to -0.33]; P 80%). In contrast, the authors saw sufficient reporting of randomization, recruitment, outcome in the results section, and funding in none of the pre-CONSORT abstracts and less than 2% of the post-CONSORT abstracts. On the basis of the multivariate analysis, a higher impact factor (P journals has improved significantly, but there is still room for improvement. Joint efforts by authors, reviewers, journal editors, and other stakeholders to improve the reporting of dental RCT abstracts are needed. Copyright © 2015 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Survey of instructions to authors in Indian and British Dental Journals with respect to ethical guidelines

    OpenAIRE

    V P Mathur; J K Dhillon; Kalra, G; Sharma, A; Mathur, R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Publication can become a symbol of presenting how meticulously a person has followed ethical principles in research. It is the duty of the investigators or authors to carefully read the instructions to authors and generate data with honesty and genuineness. In fulfillment of the basic requisite to publish, clearly defined instructions to authors should be provided by the journal. Aims: To assess the pattern of instructions regarding the ethical requirements given to authors in Ind...

  8. Scientific publications in anesthesiology journals from East Asia: a 10-year survey of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi; Qiu, Li-Xin; Wu, Fei-Xiang; Yang, Li-Qun; Sun, Yu-Ming; Yu, Wei-Feng

    2011-04-01

    The scientific publications in anesthesiology research from East Asian authors have not been reported yet. The present study was designed to analyze the contribution of articles from East Asia to anesthesiology research. Articles published in 17 journals in anesthesiology originating from Japan, China, and South Korea from 2000 to 2009 were retrieved from the PubMed database and Web of Science. From 2000 to 2009, there were 3,076 articles published from East Asia. During this period, there were a notable decrease in publications from Japan and modest increases in publications from both China and South Korea. The average 5-year impact factor of the published articles was similar among the three regions, and China had the highest average number of citations to each article. Anesthesia & Analgesia published more articles than any other journal from all three regions. Our analysis showed that Japan was the most productive region in East Asia, but there was a notable decrease in publications from Japan in 2000-2009. The impact factor of the articles suggests similar levels of scholarship. Anesthesia & Analgesia was the most popular journal in East Asia.

  9. A national survey of UK health libraries investigating the cost of interlibrary loan services and assessing the accessibility to key orthopaedic journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahim, Arpan; Stokes, Oliver; Vedi, Vikas

    2012-06-01

     NHS Library Services are utilised by NHS staff and junior trainees to locate scientific papers that provide them with the evidence base required for modern medical practice. The cost of accessing articles can be considerable particularly for junior trainees.  This survey looks at variations in cost of journal article loans and investigates access to particular orthopaedic journals across the country.  A national survey of UK Health Libraries was performed. Access to and costs of journals and interlibrary loan services were assessed. Availability of five wide-reaching orthopaedic journals was investigated.  Seven hundred and ten libraries were identified. One hundred and ten libraries completed the questionnaire (16.7%). Of these, 96.2% reported free access to scientific journals for users. 99.1% of libraries used interlibrary loan services with 38.2% passing costs on to the user at an average of £2.99 per article. 72.7% of libraries supported orthopaedic services. Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (British) had greatest onsite availability.  The study demonstrates fluctuations in cost of access to interlibrary loan services and variation in access to important orthopaedic journals. It provides a reflection of current policy of charging for the acquisition of medical evidence by libraries in the UK. © 2012 The authors. Health Information and Libraries Journal © 2012 Health Libraries Group.

  10. Reflective Journals of Students Taking a Positive Youth-Development Course in a University Context in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T. L. Shek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To promote the holistic development of university students, a course entitled “Tomorrow's Leaders” was developed and offered at The Hong Kong Polytechnic University. Based on a case study approach, reflective journals of five outstanding students of the course are presented and analyzed (i.e., thick description, with several themes emerging from the reflection. First, the students liked the course, and they identified many positive attributes. Second, the students appreciated the instructors. Third, the students viewed that the course contributed to different aspects of their development. Fourth, some areas of improvements were proposed. In conjunction with other evaluation mechanisms, the present findings strongly suggest that the course is able to promote psychosocial competencies in university students taking this course.

  11. Nursing students' clinical competencies: a survey on clinical education objectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrigoni, C; Grugnetti, A M; Caruso, R; Gallotti, M L; Borrelli, P; Puci, M

    2017-01-01

    Developing clearly defined competencies and identifying strategies for their measurement remain unfortunately a critical aspect of nursing training. In the current international context, which continues to be characterised by deep economic crisis, universities have a fundamental role to play in redefining the educational goals to respond to the expectations of certain geographical areas of interest, as underscored in the Bologna Process (Joint Declaration of the European Ministers of Education Convened in Bologna 19 June 1999). The aim of this observational study was to examine the clinical learning context of nursing students using a tool developed by a team of teachers for the analysis of clinical learning. Redefinition of the clinical learning objectives with reference to the competencies set out in the questionnaire validated by Venturini et al. (2012) and the subsequent use of the tool created by the team of teachers for students in the first, second and third-year courses of the 2013/14 academic year, covering all the internships called for in those years. All nursing students enrolled in the first, second and third year of the nursing undergraduate degree program at the University of Pavia (no. 471) participated in this survey. A total of 1,758 clinical internships were carried out: 461 for the first year, 471 for the second year and 826 for the third year. Setting objectives, beginning with the educational offerings in the several clinical contexts, represents a strong point for this process. The results highlight a level of heterogeneity and complexity intrinsic to the University of Pavia educational system, characterized by clinical settings with different clinical levels (Research hospital and other traditional hospitals) that offering different levels of training. The use of the self-evaluation form for clinical learning made it possible to perform real-time observations of the training activities of the entire student body. An educational model

  12. Research design and statistical methods in Indian medical journals: a retrospective survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Shabbeer; Yellur, Rajashree; Subramani, Pooventhan; Adiga, Poornima; Gokhale, Manoj; Iyer, Manasa S; Mayya, Shreemathi S

    2015-01-01

    Good quality medical research generally requires not only an expertise in the chosen medical field of interest but also a sound knowledge of statistical methodology. The number of medical research articles which have been published in Indian medical journals has increased quite substantially in the past decade. The aim of this study was to collate all evidence on study design quality and statistical analyses used in selected leading Indian medical journals. Ten (10) leading Indian medical journals were selected based on impact factors and all original research articles published in 2003 (N = 588) and 2013 (N = 774) were categorized and reviewed. A validated checklist on study design, statistical analyses, results presentation, and interpretation was used for review and evaluation of the articles. Main outcomes considered in the present study were - study design types and their frequencies, error/defects proportion in study design, statistical analyses, and implementation of CONSORT checklist in RCT (randomized clinical trials). From 2003 to 2013: The proportion of erroneous statistical analyses did not decrease (χ2=0.592, Φ=0.027, p=0.4418), 25% (80/320) in 2003 compared to 22.6% (111/490) in 2013. Compared with 2003, significant improvement was seen in 2013; the proportion of papers using statistical tests increased significantly (χ2=26.96, Φ=0.16, pdesign decreased significantly (χ2=16.783, Φ=0.12 pdesigns has remained very low (7.3%, 43/588) with majority showing some errors (41 papers, 95.3%). Majority of the published studies were retrospective in nature both in 2003 [79.1% (465/588)] and in 2013 [78.2% (605/774)]. Major decreases in error proportions were observed in both results presentation (χ2=24.477, Φ=0.17, pdesigns have decreased significantly. Randomized clinical trials are quite rarely published and have high proportion of methodological problems.

  13. Using Journals to Show Students What Social Psychology Is All about

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrod, Wendy J.

    2009-01-01

    Professional journals serve the vital scientific function of disseminating knowledge to colleagues. In so doing, journals become the "face" and "voice" of the professional disciplines they represent. Journal content shows the major topics of interest, the scope, and the boundaries of the profession. It shows the techniques and methods of research…

  14. Effects of computers on creativity of art students | Dogbe | Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Science and Technology (Ghana). Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 24, No 2 (2004) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should load ...

  15. The use of reflective journaling as a learning strategy during the clinical rotations of students from the faculty of health sciences: An action-research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-López, Montserrat; Rodriguez-García, Marta; Villanueva, Purificación-González; Márquez-Cava, Montserrat; García-Mateos, Mónica; Ruiz-Ruiz, Beatriz; Herrera-Sánchez, Esteban

    2015-10-01

    Reflective practice contributes significantly to the assimilation of knowledge in undergraduate health students. Reflective journals constitute a learning strategy that promotes student reflection during clinical practice. The overall aim of the study was to explore teachers' perceptions and experiences regarding the use of reflective clinical journals as a learning tool for students in order to improve the implementation of clinical journal writing in all the Health Science degrees offered by our University. A qualitative research study was performed using the Action-Research method. Students studying various degrees at our Health Faculty were considered for this study (Nursing Physiotherapy, and Physiotherapy and Physical Activity and Sport Science). Data were collected using triangulation of document analysis (102 student journals and 12 teacher journals, together with the teachers' responses to the student's journals) and transcripts from 2 discussion groups (1 student discussion group and 1 teacher discussion group). Data analysis was performed based on the constant comparative method using ATLAS.ti version 6.2 software. Four qualitative themes emerged from the data: the journal as a teaching strategy; building a relationship of trust between the tutor and the student; the role of the teacher and the world of emotions. Several recommendations for supporting clinical journal writing were identified: an informative meeting should be arranged with students; written guidelines should be provided; a personal interview with the student is recommended at the start of the activity; feedback should be offered over short time periods; teachers should provide constructive feedback; and students should adopt a free writing approach, or be guided by very open questions. Finally, it is important that students be familiarized with the assessment criteria. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Super-Diversity and Foreign-Born Students in Academic Libraries: A Survey Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarillo, Frans

    2018-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a survey study of foreign-born students' use of academic and public libraries. The researcher administered the survey at a public liberal arts college in the fall of 2014. The analysis shows that foreign-born students use both public and academic libraries with great frequency for academic tasks. Variables such as…

  17. A survey of abstracts of high-impact clinical journals indicated most statistical methods presented are summary statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taback, Nathan; Krzyzanowska, Monika K

    2008-03-01

    To assess what statistical methods are commonly used in high-impact clinical research and how they are presented in abstracts of articles published in high-impact medical journals. A cross-sectional survey of abstracts of original articles published in July 2003 in four high-impact medical journals was conducted. The primary outcome was the distribution of statistical methods used in study results presented in the abstract of articles. Seventy articles met inclusion criteria. One hundred twenty-five unique statistical method presentations were analyzed. Sixty-eight percent of statistical methods used summary statistics, and 27.2% used regression analysis. When summary statistics were used, clinical evidence was presented with a P-value or confidence interval (CI) in 51.8% of statistical methods compared to 72.5% when summary statistics were not used (P=0.0282). Clinical evidence was presented verbally in 7.1% of statistical methods when summary statistics were used and in 20.0% when summary statistics were not used (P=0.0323). Summary statistics are the most frequently used statistical method to generate high-impact clinical evidence presented in the abstract of a medical article. Evidence described by summary statistics is significantly associated with less frequent reporting of a P-value or CI, and less frequent verbal presentations.

  18. Suicide Prevention Exposure, Awareness, and Knowledge Survey (SPEAKS) - Student

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The SPEAKS- student dataset contains individual level information from a sample of college students on GLS funded campuses. These data include student demographics,...

  19. The Move toward Pluralism in Journalism and Mass Communication Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning-Miller, Carmen L.; Dunlap, Karen Brown

    2002-01-01

    Surveys diversity research in journalism and mass communication education. Examines student admissions and retention, faculty and administration hiring and retention, and curriculum. Explores historical context of diversity efforts in journalism and mass communication education. Finds few departments are developing multicultural courses or…

  20. The Psychometric Characteristics of Maslach Burnout Inventory Student Survey: A Study Students of Isfahan University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeinab Rostami

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: In order to fill the gap of tool for measurement of student burnout in Iran, this study was performed on the 238 female students of Isfahan university that were selected by simple random sampling. Materials and Methods: The inventory is including 15 items and three subscales. Data were presented by analytical and descriptive statistic and draw table. In order to determine reliability of MBI-SS were used internal consistency method and test-retest. Results: Coefficient Cronbach's alpha for the exhaustion, cynicism and academic efficacy respectively was 88, 90, 84 (p<0.05 and showed good internal consistency. Also test-retest reliability about 4 weeks later, obtaining a reliability coefficient of 89, 84 and 67 (p<0.01 respectively for exhaustion, cynicism and academic efficacy. Principle component factor analysis with exploration method with warimax rotation was used to determine construct validity. In order to check the concurrent validity and divergent validity of this inventory were used respectively from the University Student Depression Inventory and the researcher made of scale interest to academic filed and coefficients for the exhaustion, cynicism and academic efficacy respectively were obtained -21, -53, -32 (p<0.01. Also concurrent validity for exhaustion, cynicism and academic efficacy respectively were obtained 74, 68 and 50 (p<0.01. Conclusion: This finding was that the Maslach burnout inventory-student survey is a valid and reliable instrument to measure academic burnout girls.

  1. Analysis of Survey Data on First-Year Students at Our University (2)

    OpenAIRE

    木下, 栄二

    2014-01-01

    Through an annual survey of all freshmen at this university, we gather excellent data on our students. One purpose of this project is to analyze and utilize this data, which is useful for investigating changes among our students. Here, we have analyzed survey data gathered from 2004 to 2010. In this paper, we report on analysis results regarding changes in student economic situation and reading activity. We hope that this information will be helpful to our faculties and sections, and of use i...

  2. Improved knowledge gain and retention for third-year medical students during surgical journal club using basic science review: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Austin D; Mann, Barry D

    2017-02-01

    As they enter the clinical years, medical students face large adjustments in the acquisition of medical knowledge. We hypothesized that basic science review related to the topic of journal club papers would increase the educational benefit for third-year medical students. Students were randomized either to participation in a review session about basic science related to the journal club paper, or to no review. After one day, and after three months, students were given a 10-question quiz encompassing the basic science and the clinical implications of the paper. Twenty-six of 50 students were randomized to basic science review. These students scored better on both sections of the quiz one day after journal club, but only on basic science questions after three months. Students who participated in basic science review had better knowledge gain and retention. Educational activities building upon foundational knowledge improves learning on clinical rotations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Peer Assessment for Construction Management and Quantity Surveying Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia McLaughlin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Students undertaking the Bachelor of ConstructionManagement degree course at RMIT University, Melbourne,qualify for registration with the Australian Institute ofQuantity Surveyors (AIQS and the Australian Institute ofBuilding (AIB upon graduation. Over the past decade thedegree course has been constantly upgraded and altered inline with recommendations from professional bodies such asthese and other industry partners. In 1994 the Departmentof Building and Construction Economics re-assesseda range of subjects including the first year technologysubjects. Out of the review a problem-based integratedlearning unit was developed and tested. This unit has nowbeen in place for ten years.Quantity surveying and construction management likemost other professions in the construction industryrequire teamwork and advanced consultation skills. Theseskills may be learnt through experience but there isconsiderable evidence that these skills can be taught in theundergraduate years. Therefore in line with team-basedapproaches used in industry and professional constructionsettings, this year a new assessment model - peerassessment - will be applied to the problem-based learningunit. This paper describes the procedures and processesused to introduce the change and examines the theoreticalbase upon which the model was developed.

  4. An exploratory survey of eating behaviour patterns in adolescent students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arata, A; Battini, V; Chiorri, C; Masini, B

    2010-12-01

    Empirical research has always treated adolescents' eating habits from a variable-centered perspective, but this approach may miss the configurations of eating behaviours that uniquely describe discrete groups of individuals. The aim of this study was to investigate prototypical patterns of eating habits in a large sample of Italian adolescents and their behavioural and psychological correlates. Data were gathered from 1388 students (F=60%, mean age 14.90±1.34 yrs), who were asked to fill in an original questionnaire surveying dietary habits, body weight attitudes, body image, sport activities and sources of information about food. Perfectionism, self-esteem, self-efficacy and care for food were also assessed as well-known psychological risk factors for Eating Disorders. Five prototypical eating behaviour patterns were identified through cluster analysis. Cluster membership was associated (peating habits patterns revealed a large range of wrong eating attitudes and behaviours among Italian adolescents. Such data suggest the need to develop and implement adequate prevention programs.

  5. [Reading behavior and preferences regarding subscriptions to scientific journals : Results of a survey of members of the German Society for General and Visceral Surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronellenfitsch, U; Klinger, C; Buhr, H J; Post, S

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of surgical literature is to publish the latest study results and to provide continuing medical education to readers. For optimal allocation of resources, institutional subscribers, professional societies and scientific publishers require structured data on reading and subscription preferences of potential readers of surgical literature. To obtain representative data on the preferences of German general and visceral surgeons regarding reading of and subscription to scientific journals. All members of the German Society for General and Visceral Surgery (DGAV) were invited to participate in a web-based survey. Questions were asked on the affiliation and position of the member, individual journal subscriptions, institutional access to scientific journals, preferences regarding electronic or print articles and special subscriptions for society members. Answers were descriptively analyzed. A total of 630 out of 4091 (15 %) members participated in the survey and 73 % of the respondents had at least 1 individual subscription to a scientific journal. The most frequently subscribed journal was Der Chirurg (47 % of respondents). The institutional access to journals was deemed insufficient by 48 % of respondents, predominantly in primary care hospitals and outpatient clinics. Almost half of the respondents gave sufficient importance to reading printed versions of articles for which they would pay extra fees. A group subscription for society members was perceived as advantageous as long as no relevant extra costs were incurred. This structured survey among members of the DGAV provides data on preferences regarding reading of and subscription to scientific journals. Individual subscriptions to journals are still common, possibly due to suboptimal institutional access particularly at smaller non-academic institutions. In an age of online publications it seems surprising that many respondents place a high value on printed versions. The results are relevant for

  6. Probing University Students' Pre-Knowledge in Quantum Physics with QPCS Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asikainen, Mervi A.

    2017-01-01

    The study investigated the use of Quantum Physics Conceptual Survey (QPCS) in probing student understanding of quantum physics. Altogether 103 Finnish university students responded to QPCS. The mean scores of the student responses were calculated and the test was evaluated using common five indices: Item difficulty index, Item discrimination…

  7. Student Experiences at Off-Campus Parties: Results from a Multicampus Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakeman, Rick C.; Silver, Blake R.; Molasso, William

    2014-01-01

    The need to understand the settings in which students drink represents an ongoing challenge for universities. Undergraduate students (N = 2,146) completed an online multicampus survey to capture the perceptions of off-campus party guests regarding common party behaviors and events. Results indicate that students frequently attend off-campus…

  8. A Survey of the English Reading Habits of EFL Students in Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iftanti, Erna

    2012-01-01

    This article investigated the English reading habits of Indonesian students of EFL. The data were collected through a questionnaire survey and interview validation. The questionnaires were distributed to 546 EFL college students in East Java. Based on the statistical analysis of the data, it is concluded that although the students have read…

  9. Adapting the Survey of Attitudes towards Statistics (SATS-36) for Estonian Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hommik, Carita; Luik, Piret

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to adapt the Survey of Attitudes Towards Statistics (SATS-36) for Estonian secondary school students in order to develop a valid instrument to measure students' attitudes within the Estonian educational context. The SATS-36 was administered to Estonian-speaking secondary school students before their compulsory…

  10. Do Undergraduate Journalism Students Tend to Write Report-Books on Human Rights?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Antônio Zibordi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this article is to present updated results of incipient research on report-book production (Lima, 2009 by journalism undergraduate students. We relate three data sets to support the premise that these authors tend to focus on humanitarian topics, regardless of the Brazilian region and the course type, public or private. A private educational institution in the city of São Paulo is being systematically researched and in this article we publish results between 2015 and 2017 regarding the journalistic products made by the undergraduate students, mainly report-books. This information is intersected with the winning works of two national awards, the Brazilian Association of Investigative Journalism (Abraji and the Experimental Research in Communication Exhibition (Expocom, whose journalistic products and selected topics in annual competitions adopt the same perspective of those produced in the researched institution of São Paulo, indicating that, for the time being, at least the hypothesis of this research is justified. O objetivo deste artigo é apresentar resultados atualizados de incipiente pesquisa sobre produção de livros-reportagem (Lima, 2009 por graduandos de Jornalismo. Relacionamos três conjuntos de dados para sustentar a premissa de que esses autores tendem a pautar temas humanitários, independente da região do Brasil e do tipo de curso, público ou particular. Uma instituição de ensino privada da capital paulista está sendo sistematicamente pesquisada e neste artigo publicamos resultados entre 2015 e 2017 referentes aos produtos jornalísticos realizados pelos concluintes, sobretudo livros-reportagem. Essas informações são cruzadas com os trabalhos vencedores de duas premiações nacionais, a da Associação Brasileira de Jornalismo Investigativo (Abraji e a da Exposição de Pesquisa Experimental em Comunicação (Expocom, cujos produtos jornalísticos e temas selecionados em certames anuais adotam a mesma

  11. Annual Enrollment Report Number of Students Studying Journalism and Mass Communication at All-time High.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Lee B.; Vlad, Tudor; Huh, Jisu; Prine, Joelle

    2001-01-01

    Finds that journalism and mass communication programs appear to be entering another period of rapid enrollment growth, swept up by overall increases in enrollments at United States universities. Finds that only about four in ten of the journalism and mass communication programs report enrollments by race, suggesting many administrators are not…

  12. Five Years Later: Predicting Student Use of Journals in a New Water Resources Graduate Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Andrea A.; Mellinger, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    Using citation analysis, the authors examined the journals cited in theses and dissertations over the first five years of the Water Resources Graduate Program at Oregon State University. These journal titles were compared to the titles predicted as being important in the 2003 Oregon State University Libraries new program (Category I) review. A…

  13. Reflective Practice for Psychology Students: The Use of Reflective Journal Feedback in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Andreina; Dell'Aversana, Giuseppina

    2017-01-01

    Reflective journals have emerged as an effective means of monitoring and developing reflective practice in higher education, as part of a wider metacognitive strategy to transform traditional learning approaches. In addition, assessment procedures of reflective journals appear to be an important factor in enhancing commitment to learning and…

  14. Mental Health Issues Facing a Diverse Sample of College Students: Results from the College Student Mental Health Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soet, Johanna; Sevig, Todd

    2006-01-01

    Over the past 5 years there has been increased attention given to mental health issues on college and university campuses across the country. However, few research efforts have been conducted to systematically investigate the mental health of college students. The College Student Mental Health Survey was undertaken as a first step towards gaining…

  15. Surveying Turkish high school and university student attitudes and approaches to physics problem solving

    CERN Document Server

    Balta, Nuri; Singh, Chandralekha

    2016-01-01

    Student attitudes and approaches to problem solving can impact how well they learn physics. Prior research in the US using a validated Attitude and Approaches to Problem Solving (AAPS) survey suggests that there are major differences between students in introductory physics and astronomy courses and physics experts in terms of their attitudes and approaches to physics problem solving. Here we discuss the validation, administration and analysis of data for the Turkish version of the AAPS survey for high school and university students in Turkey. After the validation and administration of the Turkish version of the survey, the analysis of the data was conducted by grouping the data by grade level, school type, and gender. While there are no statistically significant differences between the averages of various groups on the survey, overall, the university students in Turkey were more expert-like than vocational high school students. On an item by item basis, there are statistically differences between the average...

  16. The Effect of Journal Writing on Students' Cognitive Critical Thinking Skills: "A Quasi-Experimental Research on an English as a Foreign Language (EFL) Undergraduate Classroom in Egypt"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaarawy, Hanaa Youssef

    2014-01-01

    Based on writing weekly academic journals and on Bloom's (1984) taxonomy of cognitive critical thinking skills, this article reports on a quasi-experiment where journal writing was an additional task to an academic writing course. The experiment was carried out with first year university students (semester two) in one of the Egyptian private…

  17. Hey! Guess What I Did in School Today: Using Family Message Journals to Improve Student Writing and Strengthen the School-Home Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valerie, Lynda M.; Foss-Swanson, Sheila

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the rationale for and implementation of the family message journal as a writing tool. The family message journal provides multiple opportunities for students to develop as writers while strengthening the school-home connection. This article provides examples of rhetorical moves that indicate young writers are aware of their…

  18. Endorsement of the CONSORT Statement by High-Impact Medical Journals in China: A Survey of Instructions for Authors and Published Papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qing-hui; Moher, David; Chen, Hong-yun; Wang, Fu-zhe; Ling, Chang-quan

    2012-01-01

    Background The CONSORT Statement is a reporting guideline for authors when reporting randomized controlled trials (RCTs). It offers a standard way for authors to prepare RCT reports. It has been endorsed by many high-impact medical journals and by international editorial groups. This study was conducted to assess the endorsement of the CONSORT Statement by high-impact medical journals in China by reviewing their instructions for authors. Methodology/Principal Findings A total of 200 medical journals were selected according to the Chinese Science and Technology Journal Citation Reports, 195 of which publish clinical research papers. Their instructions for authors were reviewed and all texts mentioning the CONSORT Statement or CONSORT extension papers were extracted. Any mention of the Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts Submitted to Biomedical Journals (URM) developed by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) or ‘clinical trial registration’ was also extracted. For journals endorsing the CONSORT Statement, their most recently published RCT reports were retrieved and evaluated to assess whether the journals have followed what the CONSORT Statement required. Out of the 195 medical journals publishing clinical research papers, only six (6/195, 3.08%) mentioned ‘CONSORT’ in their instructions for authors; out of the 200 medical journals surveyed, only 14 (14/200, 7.00%) mentioned ‘ICMJE’ or ‘URM’ in their instructions for authors, and another five journals stated in their instructions for authors that clinical trials should have trial registration numbers and that priority would be given to clinical trials which had been registered. Among the 62 RCT reports published in the six journals endorsing the CONSORT Statement, 20 (20/62, 32.26%) contained flow diagrams and only three (3/62, 4.84%) provided trial registration information. Conclusions/Significance Medical journals in China endorsing either the CONSORT Statement or the

  19. Texas School Survey of Substance Use among Students on the Border, 1998: Grades 4-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Jane Carlisle; Wallisch, Lynn S.

    This report presents the results of a survey on drug and alcohol use among students in elementary and secondary schools. Schools in 15 counties along the Texas-Mexico border were oversampled so that substance use among students could be looked at in detail. A total of 63,292 students (grades 7-12) and 43,915 students (grades 4-6) were sampled.…

  20. Scientific publications in respiratory journals from Chinese authors in various parts of North Asia: a 10-year survey of literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Bo; Du, Ting-Ting; Xie, Ting; Ji, Jun-Tao; Zheng, Zhao-Hong; Liao, Zhuan; Hu, Liang-Hao; Li, Zhao-Shen

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Respiratory disease remains one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in China. However, little is known about the research status of respirology in three major regions of China—Mainland (ML), Hong Kong (HK) and Taiwan (TW). A 10-year survey of literature was conducted to compare the three regions’ outputs in the research of respirology. Design A bibliometric study. Setting China. Participants and outcome measures A literature search in PubMed database, updated as of September 2012, led to the identification of the related articles from 2000 to 2009. The number of total articles, randomised controlled trials, case reports, meta-analysis, impact factors (IF), citations and articles published in top general medicine journals was collected for quantity and quality comparisons. Results 2208 articles were collected, 814 from ML, 909 from TW and 485 from HK. The total number of articles from the three regions has increased significantly from 2000 to 2009. The number of articles published per year from ML has exceeded that from HK in 2005 and TW in 2008. The accumulated IF of articles from TW (3192.417) was much higher than that from ML (2409.956) and HK (1898.312). HK got the highest average IF of respirology articles and the majority of articles were published in top general medicine journals. Conclusions The total number of published articles from the three major regions of China has increased notably from 2000 to 2009. The annual number of publications by ML researchers exceeded those from TW and HK. However, the quality of articles from TW and HK is better than that from ML. PMID:24583761

  1. Scientific publications in respiratory journals from Chinese authors in various parts of North Asia: a 10-year survey of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Bo; Du, Ting-Ting; Xie, Ting; Ji, Jun-Tao; Zheng, Zhao-Hong; Liao, Zhuan; Hu, Liang-Hao; Li, Zhao-Shen

    2014-02-28

    Respiratory disease remains one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in China. However, little is known about the research status of respirology in three major regions of China-Mainland (ML), Hong Kong (HK) and Taiwan (TW). A 10-year survey of literature was conducted to compare the three regions' outputs in the research of respirology. A bibliometric study. China. A literature search in PubMed database, updated as of September 2012, led to the identification of the related articles from 2000 to 2009. The number of total articles, randomised controlled trials, case reports, meta-analysis, impact factors (IF), citations and articles published in top general medicine journals was collected for quantity and quality comparisons. 2208 articles were collected, 814 from ML, 909 from TW and 485 from HK. The total number of articles from the three regions has increased significantly from 2000 to 2009. The number of articles published per year from ML has exceeded that from HK in 2005 and TW in 2008. The accumulated IF of articles from TW (3192.417) was much higher than that from ML (2409.956) and HK (1898.312). HK got the highest average IF of respirology articles and the majority of articles were published in top general medicine journals. The total number of published articles from the three major regions of China has increased notably from 2000 to 2009. The annual number of publications by ML researchers exceeded those from TW and HK. However, the quality of articles from TW and HK is better than that from ML.

  2. African Journal of Biotechnology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Featured Country: Tanzania, Featured Journal: Dar Es Salaam Medical Students' Journal. PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH. AJOL · Journals · Advanced Search · FAQ's · Register. Username. Password. Remember me. or Register · Find Journals on AJOL. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for ...

  3. Student Engagement: Developing a Conceptual Framework and Survey Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Gerald F.; Heller, Nathan A.; Burch, Jana J.; Freed, Rusty; Steed, Steve A.

    2015-01-01

    Student engagement is considered to be among the better predictors of learning, yet there is growing concern that there is no consensus on the conceptual foundation. The authors propose a conceptualization of student engagement grounded in A. W. Astin's (1984) Student Involvement Theory and W. A. Kahn's (1990) employee engagement research where…

  4. On the survey of students of internship in sports buisiness

    OpenAIRE

    森, 喬夫; 浦田, 憲二; 太田, あや子; 文谷, 知明; 河合, 一武; 杉山, 仁志; 桂, 和仁; 星川, 秀利; 浜田, 琴美; Takao, Mori; Kenji, URATA; Ayako, Urata; Tomoaki, BUNYA; Kazutake, Kawai; Hitosi, Sugiyama

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the this paper is to clarify our students needs to course of internship in sports buiseness. Students responded to questionnaire, which has 20 items. We examined the results. 1 Many studenst want to get information of their enterprises which accept them before their pracuticum. 2 Many students are satisfied with their internship and they recommnded this course for their juniors.

  5. An Exploratory Survey of Student Perspectives Regarding Search Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshare, Khaled; Miller, Don; Wenger, James

    2005-01-01

    This study explored college students' perceptions regarding their use of search engines. The main objective was to determine how frequently students used various search engines, whether advanced search features were used, and how many search engines were used. Various factors that might influence student responses were examined. Results showed…

  6. FRAMING OF JOURNALISM DISCOURSE TO IMPROVE DISCOURSE COMPETENCE OF SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dadang S. Anshori

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to describe the analysis model of framing on journalism discourse in Indonesian textbooks in Senior High School to be used in language learning. This research used qualitative method with framing theory from Pan and Kosicki as an tool of analysis. The research data is journalism discourse in textbook amounted to 30 pieces of discourse taken from 10 text books of class X, XI, and XII in Senior High School. The results show the following: (1 The discourse of journalism has received acceptance in the world of education, especially in textbooks. The use of journalism discourse in 10 textbooks is very high and very diverse in terms of number, topic, source, and usage. (2 The journalism discourse in the textbook meets the criteria of reporting value, even if not all reporting value is fulfilled. (3 The frame construction of the journalism discourse in Indonesian textbooks is packaged in different angles according to news topics and facts. (4 The analysis model of journalism discourse framing is developed by focusing on the structural analysis of category, syntax, script, thematic, diction/phrase, and rhetoric.

  7. Multimedia content production inside the classroom. A teaching proposal for journalism and audiovisual communication students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Herrero Curiel

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this article is to present and describe two multimedia experiences carried out during two practice groups in the Journalism and Audiovisual Communications program. Thirty students participated in Experience A during 14 teaching sessions, and the experience required each student to record a 3-minute interview of someone newsworthy within academia and, then, create a short documentary piece of up to 5 minutes. Experience B focused on content curation using Storify, and the ultimate goal of the practice exercise was to produce a story from different multimedia contents found within the platform. A SWOT analysis after integrating both experiences revealed that, although students were willing and motivated to use new technologies and produce audiovisual content, they also showed low motivation to work in groups, scant prior knowledge of the medium, and a lack of adaptation to complex situations. As such, the researchers conclude this type of experience can be valuable as the convergence of content and skills in audiovisual and journalistic settings responds to the courses’ demands and facilitates their adaptation to the EHEA requirements. Producción de contenido multimedia en el aula. Una propuesta docente para alumnos de periodismo y comunicación audiovisual Resumen El principal objetivo de este estudio de caso es presentar y describir dos experiencias multimedia llevadas a cabo en dos grupos prácticos de los grados de periodismo y comunicación audiovisual. En la Experiencia A participaron 30 estudiantes durante 14 sesiones docentes, y consistió en la grabación de una entrevista de 3 minutos a un personaje noticioso en el ámbito académico y, después, debían construir en grupo una pequeña pieza documental de, como máximo, 5 minutos de duración. La Experiencia B se centró en curación de contenidos utilizando Storify, en la que los alumnos construyeron una noticia a partir de diferentes contenidos multimedia

  8. Simulation With Debriefing and Guided Reflective Journaling to Stimulate Critical Thinking in Prelicensure Baccalaureate Degree Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padden-Denmead, Mary L; Scaffidi, Rose M; Kerley, Regina M; Farside, Amy Lee

    2016-11-01

    Simulation and guided reflective journaling have been identified as effective teaching and learning methods to develop critical thinking (CT) and clinical reasoning skills in nursing students. A descriptive correlational design was used to determine the relationship between CT and level of reflection using the Holistic Critical Thinking Skills Rubric (HCTSR) and the level of reflection on action assessment (LORAA), respectively, to evaluate 23 baccalaureate student-guided reflective journal entries after a simulation exercise with guided debriefing and after two subsequent clinical experiences. A statistically significant positive relationship (p < .01) was found between mean HCTSR and LORAA scores on all three journal entries, but no relationship to CT during simulation or on standardized test scores. The results also indicated support for use of the guided reflection after significant learning experiences. The LORAA and the HCTSR are effective measures of level of reflection and CT to evaluate learning from simulation and clinical experiences. [J Nurs Educ. 2016;55(11):645-650.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Defining Medical Student Patient Care Responsibilities Before Intern Year: Results of a National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Christopher J; Bolton, Andrew; Guerrasio, Jeannette; Trosterman, Adam

    2017-12-01

    Program directors have noted that first-year residents struggle with many of the patient care responsibilities they assume as they enter the US graduate medical education system. A national description of medical students' patient care experience in advance of graduation has not been published. We sought to describe the experience of US medical students during their clinical training by surveying the student representatives of each school. We developed a mixed-methods survey that was delivered to representatives of 82 schools via an e-mail link to an online survey. Our response rate was 54% (44/82). Of those responding, 28% reported that students do not write any patient care orders at their institution and 34% reported not receiving pages related to patient care. Only 26% of institutions provide an increased patient load to students during their final year of training. Students identified many areas to improve the role of fourth-year medical students, including writing patient care orders, answering pages, increasing autonomy, defining their role better, and providing them with a longer subinternship experience. Our survey suggests that students are graduating from the undergraduate medical education system and moving to the graduate medical education system in the United States without a guarantee of having answered a page related to patient care or having placed a patient care order. Further studies of students' experiences should be conducted to explore whether exposure to these skills improves first-year resident performance.

  10. A survey of alcohol and other drug use behaviors and risk factors in health profession students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegler, K A; Baldwin, J N; Scott, D M

    1994-05-01

    This survey assessed the alcohol and other drug (AOD) use habits and risk factors of health profession students at a midwestern university health science center. The authors administered a 75-item survey to 1,707 students in selected classrooms: 984 students responded for a return rate of 57.6%. In 1990, they found, alcohol use among the health profession students in the past year was comparable to that of undergraduate college students nationally (86%), although significantly fewer health profession students drank heavily (27% had five or more drinks in the past 2 weeks, compared with 41% of college students). The percentage of health profession students who reported using tobacco or illicit drugs was lower than the percentage of undergraduate students who used these substances. At the time of the study, 16% of the respondents may have had a potential current alcohol problem and 3.5% a potential drug problem. Pharmacy students most often reported negative consequences from their AOD use. Peer pressure influenced the drinking decisions of 55% of the respondents; students in dentistry and pharmacy experienced the least support from peers for their decisions to abstain from drinking. Family histories of alcohol problems were reported by 38% of the respondents, and family histories of drug use by 14.8%. Male health profession students, when compared with the female professional students, drank more and experienced more consequences of their drinking or drug use and were also more influenced by peers.

  11. Alcohol mixed with energy drinks: methodology and design of the Utrecht Student Survey

    OpenAIRE

    de Haan, Lydia; de Haan, Hein A; Olivier, Berend; Verster, Joris C

    2012-01-01

    Lydia de Haan,1 Hein A de Haan,2,3 Berend Olivier,1 Joris C Verster11Utrecht University, Utrecht Institute for Pharmaceutical Sciences, Division of Pharmacology, Utrecht, The Netherlands; 2Tactus Addiction Treatment, Deventer, The Netherlands; 3Nijmegen Institute for Scientist-Practitioners in Addiction, Nijmegen, The NetherlandsAbstract: This paper describes the methodology of the Utrecht Student Survey. This online survey was conducted in June 2011 by 6002 students living in Utrecht, The Ne...

  12. Prioritizing Student Skill Development in the Small College Literature Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalata, Kristianne

    2016-01-01

    This essay describes the successes and challenges of skills-based literature survey courses in the small liberal arts college setting of Westminster College (New Wilmington, PA). It considers the overall purpose of the survey in the skills-based English curriculum and then focuses on the integration of literary theory and creative writing as means…

  13. A survey of graduate students' knowledge, views, and behavior with respect to reproductive health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, X

    1997-01-01

    This study examines knowledge, attitude, and reproductive health behavior among unmarried and married graduate students from 18 universities and colleges in eight Chinese cities (Beijing, Shanghai, Tianjin, Dalian, Changchun, Suzhou, Wuhan, and Nanjing). Data were obtained from a 1994 survey conducted among 2730 graduate students, who account for about 2.56% of the graduate students nationwide. Most married graduate students were aged 25-30 years, but only 60.6% of unmarried graduate students were similarly aged. 50% of students had parents who were intellectuals or professionals. The next highest proportion were students who had parents who were farmers. Single students tended to live in dormitories. 16.4% of married students lived at home with their parents or independently. 45.3% of married students had at least one child. Graduate students are not allowed to marry while in school. Romantic involvement of any kind is discouraged. Most graduate students valued chastity as a Chinese cultural virtue, but 25% did not respond to this question. Chastity was not as favored among unmarried students. Male students were more likely to favor premarital sex under all circumstances. Both genders similarly accepted premarital sex based on love and commitment. Over 50% (more women than men) were aware of safe abortion within the first 2 months of pregnancy; only 25% of unmarried students were aware of the safe abortion period. 16.5% of married students and 50% of unmarried students did not know the impregnation-prone period. Few students learned about reproductive health from their parents. Married students were more likely to read about reproductive health. 72.9% of married student used contraception, usually obtained from pharmacies. 38.6% of married students had an abortion. 10.9% of unmarried students had premarital sex. Most favored college courses in reproductive health.

  14. Coping with stress: a survey of Murdoch University veterinary students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Sandy M; Arnold, Pauline K; Mills, Jennifer N

    2005-01-01

    Students in veterinary schools can experience stress in balancing the different demands on them-academic, interpersonal, intrapersonal, and professional or work related-as well as managing potential conflict between animal and human interests. Practicing veterinarians report many similar stressors and reactions. Stressful stimuli produce stress reactions that can be inimical to physical and psychological well-being, and students' performance in veterinary programs can be adversely affected if they do not have coping resources. While there has been some research into stress among university students in general, and among medical students in particular, there is little on the experience of veterinary students. This article describes a study by the School of Psychology, commissioned by the Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, at Murdoch University in Western Australia. It was designed to investigate the levels and causes of stress among, and the frequency and type of coping strategies used by, fourth- and fifth-year students. Results indicate that the students in this cohort faced frequent stressors and felt at least moderately stressed but did not routinely and systematically use a range of coping strategies. Academic stressors and perceived responsibilities attached to moving into practical or professional areas figured strongly and were associated with higher levels of stress in the students, in particular physical sequelae. Though the numbers were small, it is of concern that some students were using measures that were potentially harmful. Some recommendations are made here about measures that veterinary programs may be able to incorporate to address stress in their students. Information is included on current strategies within the curriculum to manage potential stressful situations as part of students' professional development.

  15. Factors influencing dental students' specialty choice: a survey of ten graduating classes at one institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jane H; Kinnunen, Taru H; Zarchy, Marisa; Da Silva, John D; Chang, Brian Myung W; Wright, Robert F

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to survey ten graduating classes at Harvard School of Dental Medicine regarding students' specialty choice and factors influencing that choice. Students were surveyed once in 2008 (for the Classes of 2007-11) and again in 2013 (for the Classes of 2012-16). A prior article reported results regarding students' interest in and experiences with prosthodontics; this article presents results regarding their interest in all dental specialties and factors influencing those interests. Of a total 176 students in the Classes of 2012-16, 143 responded to the survey, for a response rate of 81%, compared to a 95% response rate (167 of total 176 students) for the Classes of 2007-11. The results showed that orthodontics was the most popular specialty choice, followed by oral and maxillofacial surgery. From the 2008 to the 2013 survey groups, there was an increase in the percentages of students planning to pursue oral and maxillofacial surgery, pediatric dentistry, and postdoctoral general dentistry. The educational debt these students expected to accrue by graduation also increased. The largest percentage of students chose "enjoyment of providing the specialty service" as the factor most influencing their specialty choice. "Prior dental school experience" and "faculty influence" were greater influences for students pursuing specialties than those pursuing postdoctoral general dentistry. Increased interest in particular disciplines may be driven by high debt burdens students face upon graduation. Factors related to mentoring especially influenced students pursuing specialties, demonstrating the importance of student experiences outside direct patient care for exposure to the work of specialists beyond the scope of predoctoral training. This finding suggests that dental schools should increase mentoring efforts to help students make career decisions based not on financial burden but rather on personal interest in the specialty, which is likely to have a

  16. Counseling Programs' Informed Consent Practices: A Survey of Student Preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pease-Carter, Cheyenne; Minton, Casey A. Barrio

    2012-01-01

    This study examined 115 master's-level counseling students' preferences for content, timing, and method of programmatic informed consent. Students rated the majority of items as moderately or extremely important to receive, and they indicated a desire for the informed consent to be facilitated through a combination of both oral and written methods…

  17. Sexual behavior of medical students: A single institutional survey ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: We investigated the sexual practices of medical students as they are positioned to serve as peer educators in the fight against HIV/AIDS. Methods: This was a cross sectional study, where self- administered questionnaires were distributed to consenting 4th to 6th year medical students in Jos, Nigeria with a view of ...

  18. Stress, Positive Psychology and the National Student Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Chris

    2012-01-01

    The aim was to explore the predictive ability of sources of stress and a range of dispositional and coping behaviours on student satisfaction and motivation. Most research exploring sources of stress and coping in students construes stress as psychological distress, with little attempt to consider positive experiences of stress. A questionnaire…

  19. Nursing students motivation toward their studies – a survey study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilsson Kerstin EL

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study focuses on Swedish nursing students' motivation toward their studies during their three year academic studies. Earlier studies show the importance of motivation for study commitment and result. The aim was to analyze nursing students' estimation of their degree of motivation during different semester during their education and to identify reasons for the degree of motivation. Methods A questionnaire asking for scoring motivation and what influenced the degree of motivation was distributed to students enrolled in a nursing programme. 315 students who studied at different semesters participated. Analyzes were made by statistical calculation and content analysis. Results The mean motivation score over all semesters was 6.3 (ranked between 0–10 and differed significantly during the semesters with a tendency to lower score during the 5th semester. Students (73/315 with motivation score 6 reported positive opinions to becoming a nurse (125/234, organization of the programme and attitude to the studies. The mean score value for the motivation ranking differed significantly between male (5.8 and female (6.8 students. Conclusion Conclusions to be drawn are that nursing students mainly grade their motivation positive distributed different throughout their entire education. The main motivation factor was becoming a nurse. This study result highlights the need of understanding the students' situation and their need of tutorial support.

  20. Vision survey of the Nnamdi Azikiwe University medical students ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To determine the ocular problems of 1st‑year preclinical medical students at the Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Nnewi Campus, Nnewi, Nigeria. Materials and Methods: All registered 1st‑year preclinical medical students were examined in October 2008. Ocular investigation included filling out self‑administered ...

  1. College Student Engagement Surveys: Implications for Information Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratch-Lindauer, Bonnie

    2008-01-01

    Librarians have led the way for information literacy skills and abilities to be more integrated throughout the curriculum, and students are expected to demonstrate competency in finding, evaluating, and using information at many colleges and universities as part of the institution's curricular requirements and student learning outcomes. As part of…

  2. Nursing students motivation toward their studies - a survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Kerstin El; Warrén Stomberg, Margareta I

    2008-04-25

    This study focuses on Swedish nursing students' motivation toward their studies during their three year academic studies. Earlier studies show the importance of motivation for study commitment and result. The aim was to analyze nursing students' estimation of their degree of motivation during different semester during their education and to identify reasons for the degree of motivation. A questionnaire asking for scoring motivation and what influenced the degree of motivation was distributed to students enrolled in a nursing programme. 315 students who studied at different semesters participated. Analyzes were made by statistical calculation and content analysis. The mean motivation score over all semesters was 6.3 (ranked between 0-10) and differed significantly during the semesters with a tendency to lower score during the 5th semester. Students (73/315) with motivation score motivation score >6 reported positive opinions to becoming a nurse (125/234), organization of the programme and attitude to the studies. The mean score value for the motivation ranking differed significantly between male (5.8) and female (6.8) students. Conclusions to be drawn are that nursing students mainly grade their motivation positive distributed different throughout their entire education. The main motivation factor was becoming a nurse. This study result highlights the need of understanding the students' situation and their need of tutorial support.

  3. A Survey of Psychostimulant Use among University Students in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Substance use was prevalent among students. While previous studies suggested high prevalence of substance abuse, no study has been reported among university students in Sokoto north western Nigeria. Aim: This study aimed to determine the prevalence of psychoactive substance use among university ...

  4. An International Survey of Veterinary Students to Assess Their Use of Online Learning Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gledhill, Laura; Dale, Vicki H M; Powney, Sonya; Gaitskell-Phillips, Gemma H L; Short, Nick R M

    Today's veterinary students have access to a wide range of online resources that support self-directed learning. To develop a benchmark of current global student practice in e-learning, this study measured self-reported access to, and use of, these resources by students internationally. An online survey was designed and promoted via veterinary student mailing lists and international organizations, resulting in 1,070 responses. Analysis of survey data indicated that students now use online resources in a wide range of ways to support their learning. Students reported that access to online veterinary learning resources was now integral to their studies. Almost all students reported using open educational resources (OERs). Ownership of smartphones was widespread, and the majority of respondents agreed that the use of mobile devices, or m-learning, was essential. Social media were highlighted as important for collaborating with peers and sharing knowledge. Constraints to e-learning principally related to poor or absent Internet access and limited institutional provision of computer facilities. There was significant geographical variation, with students from less developed countries disadvantaged by limited access to technology and networks. In conclusion, the survey provides an international benchmark on the range and diversity in terms of access to, and use of, online learning resources by veterinary students globally. It also highlights the inequalities of access among students in different parts of the world.

  5. "Activities of Older Adults" Survey: Tapping into Student Views of the Elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurtele, Sandy K.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes an exercise used in a life span developmental psychology course to tap into undergraduates' perceptions of activities of the elderly. Students were asked to generate items to be included in a hypothetical Activities of Older Adults survey (to be administered to people 65 years and older). Responses from 1,340 students over a…

  6. Surveys Assessing Students' Attitudes toward Statistics: A Systematic Review of Validity and Reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Meaghan M.; Beran, Tanya; Hecker, Kent G.

    2012-01-01

    Students with positive attitudes toward statistics are likely to show strong academic performance in statistics courses. Multiple surveys measuring students' attitudes toward statistics exist; however, a comparison of the validity and reliability of interpretations based on their scores is needed. A systematic review of relevant electronic…

  7. University Students and AIDS: Some Findings from Three Surveys--1989, 1990 and 1992.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Ineke; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Presents three surveys conducted at the University of Puerto Rico concerning college students' AIDS knowledge and their sexual and preventive behaviors. Findings show students had knowledge of how HIV is transmitted, but they also harbored misconceptions about ways the disease can spread. These misconceptions coupled with the machismo attitude…

  8. Shedding Light on District Issues. 1991-92 Surveys of Students, Staff, and Graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spano, Sedra G.

    In 1991-92, over 50,000 surveys were administered to high school students, elementary school and secondary school teachers and administrators, elementary school students' parents, and graduates from the Austin (Texas) Independent School District (AISD). Parent responses are not published in this report, which discusses the following parameters:…

  9. School Selection by Students. First Results from the GMAC's New Matriculants Survey. GMAC Occasional Papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolzenberg, Ross M.; Giarrusso, Roseann

    A description of the Graduate Management Admission Council's New Matriculants Survey focusing on school selection by Masters of Business Administration students is presented. Four sections are as follows: (1) reasons for applying and enrolling (including student differences in reasons for applying); (2) who applies to more than one school (e.g.,…

  10. Surveying Turkish High School and University Students' Attitudes and Approaches to Physics Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balta, Nuri; Mason, Andrew J.; Singh, Chandralekha

    2016-01-01

    Students' attitudes and approaches to physics problem solving can impact how well they learn physics and how successful they are in solving physics problems. Prior research in the U.S. using a validated Attitude and Approaches to Problem Solving (AAPS) survey suggests that there are major differences between students in introductory physics and…

  11. A Comprehensive Survey on Student Perceptions of Cyberbullying at a Major Metropolitan University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, James P.; Molluzzo, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Cyberbullying is a concern for any college or university. Digital harassment incidents are featured daily in the news. The authors of this study examine the perceptions of students on cyberbullying at a major metropolitan university. From the findings of a student survey, the authors learn of high levels of perceptions on incidents as an issue but…

  12. A Questionnaire Survey On Use Of The Internet By Students Of The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was carried out to examine use of Internet by students of the University of Ibadan, Nigeria\\'s premier higher educational institution. Adopting a sample survey research design, systematic sampling was used to select 560 students who are resident in the main campus hostels, and data was collected from the ...

  13. A Survey of the Reading Habit of Exchange Students of Government ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The focus of this paper is on "a survey of the reading habit of exchange students of Government Secondary School and Queen Elizabeth School, Ilorin Kwara State". The students were drawn from seventeen states in Northern Nigeria. Causes of the low reading habit were identified, highlighted and the effects on their ...

  14. Natural Language Thesaurus: A Survey of Student Research Skills and Research Tool Preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfern, Victoria

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a University of Canberra Library survey of student research knowledge, skills, tools and resources. Students are experiencing difficulties interrogating databases, the internet and library catalogues because of the lack of consistency in terminology and various methods of interrogation. This research was an…

  15. A New Measurement and Ranking System for the UK National Student Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canning, John

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous criticisms of the UK National Student Survey (NSS) institutional managers still strongly support its use in informing student choice, quality and assurance and quality enhancement activities. This article outlines a granular and nuanced benchmarking system for the NSS which provides both a "raw" score (weighted student…

  16. Social Networking in School Psychology Training Programs: A Survey of Faculty and Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Andy V.; Goforth, Anisa N.; Segool, Natasha; Burt, Isaac

    2014-01-01

    The increasing use of social networking sites has become an emerging focus in school psychology training, policy, and research. The purpose of the current study is to present data from a survey on social networking among faculty and graduate students in school psychology training programs. A total of 110 faculty and 112 graduate students in school…

  17. The Arizona Home Language Survey: The Identification of Students for ELL Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, Claude; Rutherford-Quach, Sara

    2010-01-01

    Assuring that English language learners (ELLs) receive the services to which they have a right requires accurately identifying those students. Virtually all states identify ELLs in a two-step process. First, parents fill out a home language survey. Second, students in whose homes a language other than English is spoken and who therefore might…

  18. International Students in Rehabilitation Counseling Education Programs: Results from a National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanan; Degeneffe, Charles Edmund

    2011-01-01

    A national sample of 21 international students in Rehabilitation Counseling Education (RCE) programs was surveyed on their connection to their programs, the stressors they experienced during graduate studies, and their recommendations for RCE programs to better support international students. Participants engaged in limited social activities due…

  19. Lessons from experience: ESL student teachers' reflection during practicum through reflective journals

    OpenAIRE

    Intan Safinas Mohd Ariff Albakri; Mohd Hassan Abdullah; Ahmad Jazimin Jusoh

    2017-01-01

    Reflection is a prospective alternative in exploring student teachers’ thinking during practicum. The data gained from student teachers’ reflection are significant in informing teacher education programs on how to equip pre-service teachers to become quality teachers. It is also crucial in addressing issues and conflicts highlighted by student teachers when they interact with the real context. This study is conducted with six semester seven student teachers undergoing their Bachelor in Educat...

  20. A Survey of Student and Professor Awareness of English Teaching and Learning at Toyohashi University of Technology

    OpenAIRE

    伊藤, 光彦; 尾碕, 一志; 加藤, 三保子; 田村, 真奈美; 西村, 政人; Levin, David; イトウ, ミツヒコ; オザキ, カズシ; カトウ, ミホコ; タムラ, マナミ; ニシムラ, マサヒト /; Mitsuhiko, Ito; Kazushi, Ozaki; Mihoko, Kato; Manami, Tamura

    2007-01-01

    This is a report based on a general survey given to undergraduate students and professors at Toyohashi University of Technology (TUT) about English education at TUT. Regarding students, the main purposes of the survey, conducted in the fall of 2005, were to find how students had studied English before enrolling in TUT, what the students thought of English teaching and learning at TUT, and how important they thought English was for their majors. As for the survey to professors, the main purpos...

  1. The Academic Journal Review Process as a Framework for Student Developmental Peer Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Robert S.

    2006-01-01

    Developmental peer feedback has been suggested as a method for providing students with individual feedback critical to the learning process. However, many faculty members are reluctant to employ peer feedback citing fear of student responses, student feedback capabilities, unfamiliarity with the process, and time constraints in and outside of…

  2. Reflective Journaling as a Flipped Classroom Technique to Increase Reading and Participation with Social Work Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sage, Melanie; Sele, Patti

    2015-01-01

    Students in undergraduate social work practice courses come to class with varying levels of educational, life, and practice experience. Students require an introduction to the material through textbook reading before they are able to engage in critical discussions, yet reading adherence varies widely among students. This research explores the use…

  3. Using Academic Journals to Help Students Learn Subject Matter Content, Develop and Practice Critical Reasoning Skills, and Reflect on Personal Values in Food Science and Human Nutrition Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaoka, Wayne T.; Crosetti, Lea M.

    2008-01-01

    It has been reported that students learn best when they use a wide variety of techniques to understand the information of the discipline, be it visual, auditory, discussion with others, metacognition, hands-on activities, or writing about the subject. We report in this article the use of academic journals not only as an aid for students to learn…

  4. A SURVEY OF THE ENGLISH READING HABITS OF EFL STUDENTS IN INDONESIA

    OpenAIRE

    Erna Iftanti

    2012-01-01

    This article investigated the English reading habits of Indonesian students of EFL. The data were collected through a questionnaire survey and interview validation. The questionnaires were distributed to 546 EFL college students in East Java. Based on the statistical analysis of the data, it is concluded that although the students have read English since elementary school, they do not indicate to have good English reading habits. Only few of them are identified to have good English reading ha...

  5. Probing University Students' Pre-Knowledge in Quantum Physics with QPCS Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Asikainen Mervi A

    2017-01-01

    The study investigated the use of Quantum Physics Conceptual Survey (QPCS) in probing student understanding of quantum physics. Altogether 103 Finnish university students responded to QPCS. The mean scores of the student responses were calculated and the test was evaluated using common five indices: Item difficulty index, Item discrimination index, Item point biserial index, Kuder-Richardson Formula 21, and Ferguson’s delta. The results show that QPCS is not well suitable for probing Finnish ...

  6. Recruitment and Baseline Characteristics of American Indian Tribal College Students Participating in a Tribal College Tobacco and Behavioral Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Won S; Nazir, Niaman; Pacheco, Christina M; Filippi, Melissa K; Pacheco, Joseph; White Bull, Julia; Nance, Christi; Faseru, Babalola; Greiner, K Allen; Daley, Christine Makosky

    2016-06-01

    American Indians (AIs) have the highest cigarette smoking rates of any racial/ethnic group in the United States. Although the overall smoking prevalence in the United States for nonminority populations has decreased over the past several decades, the same pattern is not observed among AIs. The purpose of this observational study was to collect cigarette smoking and related information from American Indian tribal college students to inform tailored interventions. We conducted a repeated cross-sectional survey of American Indian tribal college students, Tribal College Tobacco and Behavior Survey (TCTABS), with a focus on recruiting all incoming freshman at three participating tribal colleges in the Midwest and Northern Plains regions. A total of 1256 students participated in the baseline surveys between April 2011 and October 2014. The overall smoking prevalence of this sample was 34.7%, with differences by region (Northern Plains-44.0% and Midwest-28%). The majority, 87.5% of current smokers reported smoking 10 or less cigarettes per day, 41% reported smoking menthol cigarettes, 52% smoked Marlboro brand, and the mean age of their first cigarette was 14 years. The majority, 62% had made at least one quit attempt in the past year. The overwhelming majority of respondents, regardless of their smoking status, thought that the current smoking prevalence on campus was greater than 41% and approximately one-third believed that it was as high as 61%. Very few studies of smoking have been conducted in this population and results from our study confirm the need for effective interventions. AIs have the highest cigarette smoking rates compared to other racial/ethnic groups in the United States. Furthermore, limited studies have examined the epidemiology of cigarette smoking among tribal college students. This study addresses health disparities related to smoking among college students by examining the demographic, cultural, and environmental characteristics of smoking and

  7. Disclosure of funding sources and conflicts of interest in phase III surgical trials: survey of ten general surgery journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridoux, Valérie; Moutel, Grégoire; Schwarz, Lilian; Michot, Francis; Herve, Christian; Tuech, Jean-Jacques

    2014-10-01

    Discussions regarding disclosure of funding sources and conflicts of interest (COI) in published peer-reviewed journal articles are becoming increasingly more common and intense. The aim of the present study was to examine whether randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in leading surgery journals report funding sources and COI. All articles reporting randomized controlled phase III trials published January 2005 through December 2010 were chosen for review from ten international journals. We evaluated the number of disclosed funding sources and COI, and the factors associated with such disclosures. From a review of 657 RCT from the ten journals, we discovered that presence or absence of a funding source and COI was disclosed by 47 % (309) and 25.1 % (165), respectively. Most articles in "International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE)-affiliated journals" did not disclose COI. Disclosure of funding was associated with a journal impact factor >3 (51.7 vs 41.6 %; p journal being ICMJE-affiliated (49.3 vs 40 %; p journal not being affiliated with ICMJE (36.9 vs 21.3 %; p < 0.001). Of the published studies we investigated, over half did not disclose funding sources (i.e., whether or not there was a funding source), and almost three quarters did not disclose whether COI existed. Our findings suggest the need to adopt best current practices regarding disclosure of competing interests to fulfill responsibilities to readers and, ultimately, to patients.

  8. A Survey of Teacher-Student Relations in Secondary Schools.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    unique firstlady

    Abstract. This paper examined teacher-student relationship in ... trustworthy than individual decisions because the basis of judgment is broad ended. Also as we share in making .... Teacher Characteristics and Teacher Job Performance.

  9. Human Genetic Engineering: A Survey of Student Value Stances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Sara McCormack; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Assesses the values of high school and college students relative to human genetic engineering and recommends that biology educators explore instructional strategies merging human genetic information with value clarification techniques. (LS)

  10. A survey of energy-drink consumption among medical students

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hidiroglu, Seyhan; Tanriover, Ozlem; Unaldi, Sule; Sulun, Serdar; Karavus, Melda

    2013-01-01

    To determine the frequency and pattern of energy drink consumption among medical school students, their knowledge of its effects and side effects and to see its relation with alcohol and cigarette usage...

  11. A survey of energy drink consumption patterns among college students

    OpenAIRE

    Carpenter-Aeby Tracy; Overton Reginald F; Aeby Victor G; Malinauskas Brenda M; Barber-Heidal Kimberly

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Energy drink consumption has continued to gain in popularity since the 1997 debut of Red Bull, the current leader in the energy drink market. Although energy drinks are targeted to young adult consumers, there has been little research regarding energy drink consumption patterns among college students in the United States. The purpose of this study was to determine energy drink consumption patterns among college students, prevalence and frequency of energy drink use for six...

  12. Polydrug use among college students in Brazil: a nationwide survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcio Garcia de Oliveira

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To estimate the frequency of polydrug use (alcohol and illicit drugs among college students and its associations with gender and age group. Methods: A nationwide sample of 12,544 college students was asked to complete a questionnaire on their use of drugs according to three time parameters (lifetime, past 12 months, and last 30 days. The co-use of drugs was investigated as concurrent polydrug use (CPU and simultaneous polydrug use (SPU, a subcategory of CPU that involves the use of drugs at the same time or in close temporal proximity. Results: Almost 26% of college students reported having engaged in CPU in the past 12 months. Among these students, 37% had engaged in SPU. In the past 30 days, 17% college students had engaged in CPU. Among these, 35% had engaged in SPU. Marijuana was the illicit drug mostly frequently used with alcohol (either as CPU or SPU, especially among males. Among females, the most commonly reported combination was alcohol and prescribed medications. Conclusions: A high proportion of Brazilian college students may be engaging in polydrug use. College administrators should keep themselves informed to be able to identify such use and to develop educational interventions to prevent such behavior.

  13. A survey of energy-drink consumption among medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidiroglu, Seyhan; Tanriover, Ozlem; Unaldi, Sule; Sulun, Serdar; Karavus, Melda

    2013-07-01

    To determine the frequency and pattern of energy drink consumption among medical school students, their knowledge of its effects and side effects and to see its relation with alcohol and cigarette usage. The descriptive analytical study was conducted at Marmara University Medical School, Istanbul, Turkey from October 2011 and January 2012. A semi-structured questionnaire was filled by students who were asked about their socio-demographic status and their energy drink consumption. SPSS 12 was used for statistical analysis. The mean age of the 390 students in the study was 20.98+/-1.96 years (range:16-27). Of them, 204 (52.3%) were females and 186 (47.7%) were males. Overall 52(13.3%) were smoking regularly at least one cigarette per day; 122(31.3%) were consuming alcohol; 127 (32.6%) had consumed energy drinks at least once and 73(18.8%)more than once. In terms of perception, 110(28.2%) students said energy drinks were similar to sports drinks, while only 121(41.1%) named the brands correctly; 96 (24.6%) students did not answer this particular question. Although consumption of energy drinks was common among medical students, the knowledge of ingredients and knowledge of health risks of energy drinks among them was unsatisfactory.

  14. Examining Student Attitudes in Introductory Physics via the Math Attitude and Expectations Survey (MAX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemingway, Deborah; Eichenlaub, Mark; Losert, Wolfgang; Redish, Edward F.

    2017-01-01

    Student often face difficulties with using math in science, and this exploratory project seeks to address the underlying mechanisms that lead to these difficulties. This mixed-methods project includes the creation of two novel assessment surveys, the Mathematical Epistemic Games Survey (MEGS) and the Math Attitude and Expectations Survey (MAX). The MAX, a 30-question Likert-scale survey, focuses on the attitudes towards using mathematics of the students in a reformed introductory physics course for the life sciences (IPLS) which is part of the National Experiment in Undergraduate Education (NEXUS/Physics) developed at the University of Maryland (UMD). Preliminary results from the MAX are discussed with specific attention given to students' attitudes towards math and physics, opinions about interdisciplinarity, and the usefulness of physics in academic settings as well as in professional biological research and modern medicine settings.

  15. [Questionnaire survey of musician's dystonia among students of a music college].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konaka, Kuni; Mochizuki, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Musician's dystonia is known as a task specific dystonia. Though it is thought to occur during a long course of repetitive performance, the actual circumstances that precipitate this condition are not clear. According to factual reports this disease is not commonly known, probably because many of these patients may not have been visiting a hospital. We prepared a questionnaire and did a survey among the students of a music college. This is the first questionnaire survey aimed at finding out the prevalence of musician's dystonia among the students of music. Among the 480 participants of this survey, 29% of the students had knowledge of this disorder and 1.25% of the students had dystonia while performing music.

  16. Journal of Student Affairs in Africa - Vol 5, No 2 (2017)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Academic Support at the University of KwaZulu-Natal: A Systematic Review of Peer-Reviewed Journal Articles, 2010–2015 · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Vino Paideya, Annah Bengesai, 55-74 ...

  17. Improving the Quality of Experience Journals: Training Educational Psychology Students in Basic Qualitative Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds-Keefer, Laura

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluates the impact of teaching basic qualitative methodology to preservice teachers enrolled in an educational psychology course in the quality of observation journals. Preservice teachers enrolled in an educational psychology course requiring 45 hr of field experience were given qualitative methodological training as a part of the…

  18. Examining Education and Newsroom Work Experience as Predictors of Communication Students' Perceptions of Journalism Ethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detenber, Benjamin H.; Cenite, Mark; Malik, Shelly; Neo, Rachel L.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines education and work experience in newsrooms as predictors of ethical perceptions among communication undergraduates at a large Singaporean university (N = 826). Results indicate that education is associated with ethical ideologies, perceived importance of journalism ethics codes, justifiability of using contentious news…

  19. A survey of senior medical students' attitudes and awareness toward teaching and participation in a formal clinical teaching elective: a Canadian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew Hughes, J D; Azzi, Elise; Rose, Gregory Walter; Ramnanan, Christopher J; Khamisa, Karima

    2017-01-01

    To prepare for careers in medicine, medical trainees must develop clinical teaching skills. It is unclear if Canadian medical students need or want to develop such skills. We sought to assess Canadian students' perceptions of clinical teaching, and their desire to pursue clinical teaching skills development via a clinical teaching elective (CTE) in their final year of medical school. We designed a descriptive cross-sectional study of Canadian senior medical students, using an online survey to gauge teaching experience, career goals, perceived areas of confidence, and interest in a CTE. Students at 13 of 17 Canadian medical schools were invited to participate in the survey (4154 students). We collected 321 responses (7.8%). Most (75%) respondents expressed confidence in giving presentations, but fewer were confident providing bedside teaching (47%), teaching sensitive issues (42%), and presenting at journal clubs (42%). A total of 240 respondents (75%) expressed interest in participating in a CTE. The majority (61%) favored a two week elective, and preferred topics included bedside teaching (85%), teaching physical examination skills (71%), moderation of small group learning (63%), and mentorship in medicine (60%). Our study demonstrates that a large number of Canadian medical students are interested in teaching in a clinical setting, but lack confidence in skills specific to clinical teaching. Our respondents signaled interest in participating in an elective in clinical teaching, particularly if it is offered in a two-week format.

  20. Do emergency medicine journals promote trial registration and adherence to reporting guidelines? A survey of "Instructions for Authors".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Matthew T; Henning, Nolan M; Wayant, C Cole; Vassar, Matt

    2016-11-24

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the current state of two publication practices, reporting guidelines requirements and clinical trial registration requirements, by analyzing the "Instructions for Authors" of emergency medicine journals. We performed a web-based data abstraction from the "Instructions for Authors" of the 27 Emergency Medicine journals catalogued in the Expanded Science Citation Index of the 2014 Journal Citation Reports and Google Scholar Metrics h5-index to identify whether each journal required, recommended, or made no mention of the following reporting guidelines: EQUATOR Network, ICMJE, ARRIVE, CARE, CONSORT, STARD, TRIPOD, CHEERS, MOOSE, STROBE, COREQ, SRQR, SQUIRE, PRISMA-P, SPIRIT, PRISMA, and QUOROM. We also extracted whether journals required or recommended trial registration. Authors were blinded to one another's ratings until completion of the data validation. Cross-tabulations and descriptive statistics were calculated using IBM SPSS 22. Of the 27 emergency medicine journals, 11 (11/27, 40.7%) did not mention a single guideline within their "Instructions for Authors," while the remaining 16 (16/27, 59.3%) mentioned one or more guidelines. The QUOROM statement and SRQR were not mentioned by any journals whereas the ICMJE guidelines (18/27, 66.7%) and CONSORT statement (15/27, 55.6%) were mentioned most often. Of the 27 emergency medicine journals, 15 (15/27, 55.6%) did not mention trial or review registration, while the remaining 12 (12/27, 44.4%) at least mentioned one of the two. Trial registration through ClinicalTrials.gov was mentioned by seven (7/27, 25.9%) journals while the WHO registry was mentioned by four (4/27, 14.8%). Twelve (12/27, 44.4%) journals mentioned trial registration through any registry platform. The aim of this study was to evaluate the current state of two publication practices, reporting guidelines requirements and clinical trial registration requirements, by analyzing the "Instructions for Authors" of

  1. The Effects of Survey Timing on Student Evaluation of Teaching Measures Obtained Using Online Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estelami, Hooman

    2015-01-01

    Teaching evaluations are an important measurement tool used by business schools in gauging the level of student satisfaction with the educational services delivered by faculty. The growing use of online teaching evaluations has enabled educational administrators to expand the time period during which student evaluation of teaching (SET) surveys…

  2. Can Student Populations in Developing Countries Be Reached by Online Surveys? The Case of the National Service Scheme Survey (N3S) in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Arnim; Meuleman, Bart; Oshodi, Abdul-Gafar Tobi; Schroyens, Maarten

    2017-01-01

    This article tackles the question whether it is a viable strategy to conduct online surveys among university students in developing countries. By documenting the methodology of the National Service Scheme Survey conducted in Ghana, we set out to answer three questions: (1) How can a sample of university students be obtained? (2) How can students…

  3. Culturally diverse health care students' experiences with teaching strategies in Finland: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitkajarvi, Marianne; Eriksson, Elina; Pitkala, Kaisu

    2013-06-01

    All over the world, current health care students come from a variety of cultural, linguistic and educational backgrounds. Their expectations and learning needs vary, yet little is known about how our current education system meets their needs. The purpose of this study was to explore culturally diverse health care students' experiences of teaching strategies in polytechnic faculties of health care in Finland. Specifically, we aimed to compare how international students and Finnish students experience the same curriculum. A cross sectional survey. Ten polytechnic faculties of health care in Finland offering English-Language-Taught Degree Programmess (ELTDPs). 283 students studying nursing, public health nursing, or physiotherapy in English. Of these, 166 were international students and 112 were Finnish students. The data were collected using a questionnaire designed specifically for this study. The survey included items grouped into seven dimensions: 1. concreteness of theoretical instruction, 2. encouragement of student activity, 3. use of skills labs, 4. variation among teaching strategies, 5. assessment, 6. interaction in the English-Language-Taught Degree Programmes, and 7. approach to diversity in the English-Language-Taught Degree Programmes. The most positive experiences for all students were with the approach to cultural diversity and the concreteness of theoretical instruction, whereas the most negative experiences were with assessment. International students' experiences were more positive than Finnish students' in the following dimensions: encouragement of student activity (p=0.005), variation among teaching strategies (p<0.001), and assessment (p<0.001). Compared to the Finnish students, more than double the number of international students were dissatisfied with their lives (p<0.001). The implications for education include the strengthening teachers' leadership role in small group activities, providing individual and detailed feedback, and ensuring

  4. Under-representation of developing countries in the research literature: ethical issues arising from a survey of five leading medical journals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siribaddana Sisira

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is widely acknowledged that there is a global divide on health care and health research known as the 10/90 divide. Methods A retrospective survey of articles published in the BMJ, Lancet, NEJM, Annals of Internal Medicine & JAMA in a calendar year to examine the contribution of the developing world to medical literature. We categorized countries into four regions: UK, USA, Other Euro-American countries (OEAC and (RoW. OEAC were European countries other than the UK but including Australia, New Zealand and Canada. RoW comprised all other countries. Results The average contribution of the RoW to the research literature in the five journals was 6.5%. In the two British journals 7.6% of the articles were from the RoW; in the three American journals 4.8% of articles were from RoW. The highest proportion of papers from the RoW was in the Lancet (12%. An analysis of the authorship of 151 articles from RoW showed that 104 (68.9% involved authorship with developed countries in Europe or North America. There were 15 original papers in these journals with data from RoW but without any authors from RoW. Conclusions There is a marked under-representation of countries in high-impact general medical journals. The ethical implications of this inequity and ways of reducing it are discussed.

  5. Surveying Turkish high school and university students' attitudes and approaches to physics problem solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balta, Nuri; Mason, Andrew J.; Singh, Chandralekha

    2016-06-01

    Students' attitudes and approaches to physics problem solving can impact how well they learn physics and how successful they are in solving physics problems. Prior research in the U.S. using a validated Attitude and Approaches to Problem Solving (AAPS) survey suggests that there are major differences between students in introductory physics and astronomy courses and physics experts in terms of their attitudes and approaches to physics problem solving. Here we discuss the validation, administration, and analysis of data for the Turkish version of the AAPS survey for high school and university students in Turkey. After the validation and administration of the Turkish version of the survey, the analysis of the data was conducted by grouping the data by grade level, school type, and gender. While there are no statistically significant differences between the averages of various groups on the survey, overall, the university students in Turkey were more expertlike than vocational high school students. On an item by item basis, there are statistically differences between the averages of the groups on many items. For example, on average, the university students demonstrated less expertlike attitudes about the role of equations and formulas in problem solving, in solving difficult problems, and in knowing when the solution is not correct, whereas they displayed more expertlike attitudes and approaches on items related to metacognition in physics problem solving. A principal component analysis on the data yields item clusters into which the student responses on various survey items can be grouped. A comparison of the responses of the Turkish and American university students enrolled in algebra-based introductory physics courses shows that on more than half of the items, the responses of these two groups were statistically significantly different, with the U.S. students on average responding to the items in a more expertlike manner.

  6. Perceptions of mumps and MMR vaccination among university students in England: an online survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton-Maggs, Diane; Conrad, David; Keenan, Alex; Lamden, Ken; Ghebrehewet, Sam; Vivancos, Roberto

    2012-07-20

    Mumps is easily preventable through vaccination. Investigation of a number of recent mumps outbreaks in universities in the North West of England, however, found that affected students were either not vaccinated or only partially vaccinated. An online survey of students (n=2456) attending five universities in the region was undertaken during 2010 to establish MMR vaccination status, knowledge of mumps and willingness to take up vaccination if offered. Regression analysis was undertaken to identify characteristics of unimmunized students to ascertain likely target groups for future vaccination campaigns. Students least likely to be fully vaccinated with MMR included males; those not registered with a GP; first year students; mature students; and those with poor knowledge of mumps. A high proportion of students were willing to accept MMR vaccination if offered at university. Those least likely to take up vaccination included students not registered with a GP; mature students; and those who did not consider mumps to be a serious disease. The survey also highlighted that misconceptions remain about both the MMR vaccine safety and perceptions of risk/benefit of the vaccine. Encouraging registration with a GP and awareness raising should be a key part of campaigns to improve vaccination uptake among university students. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Abortion education in the medical curriculum: a survey of student attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espey, Eve; Ogburn, Tony; Leeman, Larry; Nguyen, Tina; Gill, Geoff

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate student attitudes toward the inclusion of abortion education in the preclinical and clinical medical school curriculum. All students completing the OB-GYN rotation from May 2004 through January 2005 (n=118) were asked to complete a 21-item survey. Survey questions focused on students' attitudes about the appropriateness of abortion education, reasons for participation or nonparticipation in the abortion care experiences in the clinical curricula and the value of abortion education. One hundred students completed the survey for a response rate of 85%. Nearly all respondents indicated that abortion education was appropriate in the preclinical and clinical curricula (96%). Fifty-three percent of students participated in a clinical abortion care experience. The majority of these students rated it as valuable (84%) and would recommend it to a friend (73%). Most students who planned a career in Family Medicine and OB-GYN preferred the integration of abortion training into the residency curriculum (74%). Abortion education is acceptable and valued by medical students and should be integrated into the curricula of all medical schools.

  8. Knowledge of medical students on National Health Care System: A French multicentric survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feral-Pierssens, A-L; Jannot, A-S

    2017-09-01

    Education on national health care policy and costs is part of our medical curriculum explaining how our health care system works. Our aim was to measure French medical students' knowledge about national health care funding, costs and access and explore association with their educational and personal background. We developed a web-based survey exploring knowledge on national health care funding, access and costs through 19 items and measured success score as the number of correct answers. We also collected students' characteristics and public health training. The survey was sent to undergraduate medical students and residents from five medical universities between July and November 2015. A total of 1195 students from 5 medical universities responded to the survey. Most students underestimated the total amount of annual medical expenses, hospitalization costs and the proportion of the general population not benefiting from a complementary insurance. The knowledge score was not associated with medical education level. Three students' characteristics were significantly associated with a better knowledge score: male gender, older age, and underprivileged status. Medical students have important gaps in knowledge regarding national health care funding, coverage and costs. This knowledge was not associated with medical education level but with some of the students' personal characteristics. All these results are of great concern and should lead us to discussion and reflection about medical and public health training. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Students' epistemologies about experimental physics: Validating the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey for Experimental Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Wilcox, Bethany R

    2015-01-01

    Student learning in instructional physics labs represents a growing area of research that includes investigations of students' beliefs and expectations about the nature of experimental physics. To directly probe students' epistemologies about experimental physics and support broader lab transformation efforts at the University of Colorado Boulder (CU) and elsewhere, we developed the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey for Experimental Physics (E-CLASS). Previous work with this assessment has included establishing the accuracy and clarity of the instrument through student interviews and preliminary testing. Several years of data collection at multiple institutions has resulted in a growing national data set of student responses. Here, we report on results of the analysis of these data to investigate the statistical validity and reliability of the E-CLASS as a measure of students' epistemologies for a broad student population. We find that the E-CLASS demonstrates an acceptable level of both validi...

  10. Attitudes toward neurosciences in medical students in Wuhan, China: a survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukas, Rimas V; Cooper, Brian; Morgan, Ivy; Brorson, James R; Dong, Hongmei; Sherer, Renslow

    2014-01-01

    Neurophobia is a well-described phenomenon among medical students in many countries. Little is reported concerning the perceptions of neurosciences among medical students in China. We surveyed senior medical students in Wuhan, China, on their perceptions of neuroscience. Students' self-assessments of knowledge in various specialties ranked neurology low, but not the lowest. Students' confidence in diagnosing neurological patients and managing neurological patients demonstrated significant correlation. A positive correlation was noted between confidence in these clinical parameters and the likelihood of specializing in neurology. Students reported bedside teaching and small group sessions as having the greatest value in learning neurology. The low, but not the lowest ranking of self-perceived knowledge in neurology by medical students in Wuhan, China, differs from findings reported in other countries. In this exploratory study the investigators hypothesize that the well-described phenomenon of neurophobia may exhibit a less pronounced influence in Wuhan, China. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A survey of final year medical students at University College, Galway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, M; Leonard, B E

    1993-01-01

    The results of this survey of final year medical students at a provincial Irish university showed that over three-quarters came from families in which at least one parent was in a professional or semi-professional occupation. The majority of the students had repeated their Leaving Certificate examination. Most students expressed dissatisfaction with the career guidance counselling they received during their second level education. All the students came from secondary schools. While the majority expressed satisfaction with their choice of University course, approximately one-third had considered withdrawing from the course, particularly during the pre-clinical years. The main reasons given were financial difficulties, personal problems and difficulties with the course. Despite the provision of student counsellors and academic staff members to assist such students, the majority did not consult any staff member for help. Most students expected they would have to obtain employment outside of Ireland.

  12. Engaging Students in Survey Design and Data Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sole, Marla A.

    2015-01-01

    Every day, people use data to make decisions that affect their personal and professional lives, trusting that the data are correct. Many times, however, the data are inaccurate, as a result of a flaw in the design or methodology of the survey used to collect the data. Researchers agree that only questions that are clearly worded, unambiguous, free…

  13. Reported Voice Difficulties in Student Teachers: A Questionnaire Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairfield, Carol; Richards, Brian

    2007-01-01

    As professional voice users, teachers are particularly at risk of abusing their voices and developing voice disorders during their career. In spite of this, attention paid to voice care in the initial training and further professional development of teachers is unevenly spread and insufficient. This article describes a questionnaire survey of 171…

  14. Perceived Immune Status and Sleep : A Survey among Dutch Students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donners, Anouk A M T; Tromp, Marilou D P; Garssen, Johan; Roth, Thomas; Verster, Joris C

    2015-01-01

    Reduced immune functioning may have a negative impact on sleep and health, and vice versa. A survey among Dutch young adults (18-35 years old) was administered to collect information on perception of reduced immunity and its relationship to sleep disorders, sleep duration, and quality. Sleep

  15. Conducting Sanitary Surveys of Water Supply Systems. Student Workbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976

    This workbook is utilized in connection with a 40-hour course on sanitary surveys of water supply systems for biologists, chemists, and engineers with experience as a water supply evaluator. Practical training is provided in each of the 21 self-contained modules. Each module outlines the purpose, objectives and content for that section. The course…

  16. Assessment of burnout in veterinary medical students using the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Educational Survey: a survey during two semesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chigerwe, Munashe; Boudreaux, Karen A; Ilkiw, Jan E

    2014-11-28

    Burnout among veterinary students can result from known stressors in the absence of a support system. The objectives of this study were to evaluate use of the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Educator Survey (MBI-ES) to assess burnout in veterinary students and evaluate the factors that predict the MBI-ES scores. The MBI-ES was administered to first (Class of 2016) and second year (Class of 2015) veterinary medical students during the 2012-2013 academic year in the fall and spring semesters. Factor analysis and test reliability for the survey were determined. Mean scores for the subscales determining burnout namely emotional exhaustion (EE), depersonalization (DP) and lack of personal accomplishment (PA) were calculated for both classes in the 2 semesters. Multiple regression analysis was performed to evaluate other factors that predict the MBI-ES scores. A non-probability sampling method was implemented consisting of a voluntary sample of 170 and 123 students in the fall and spring semesters, respectively. Scores for EE, DP and PA were not different between the 2 classes within the same semester. Mean ± SD scores for EE, DP and PA for the fall semester were 22.9 ± 9.6, 5.0 ± 4.8 and 32.3 ± 6.7, respectively. Mean ± SD scores for EE, DP and PA the spring semester were 27.8 ± 10.7, 6.5 ± 6.1and 31.7 ± 6.8, respectively. The EE score was higher in spring compared to fall while DP and PA scores were not different between the 2 semesters. Living arrangements specifically as to whether or not a student lived with another veterinary medical students was the only variable significantly associated with the MBI-ES scores. Students in this study had moderate levels of burnout based on the MBI-ES scores. The MBI-ES was an acceptable instrument for assessing burnout in veterinary medical students. The EE scores were higher in the spring semester as compared to the fall semester. Thus students in the first and second years of veterinary school under the current curriculum

  17. IDENTIFICATION OF THE LEARNING OUTCOME FROM REFLECTIVE JOURNAL WRITING WITH PHYSIOTHERAPY STUDENTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Jørgen

    involves debate on the use and sense of evidence thinking in education. This project was looking for evidence based outcome from reflective journal writing. The outcome was understood as acquirement of: 1) physiotherapy competences aiming for aspects of humanistic practice accentuated in the Danish......’s taxonomy of reflective thinking (Mezirow; 1998), and on an analysis of constituting competences for humanistic practice. After the course both groups attended the post-test. Answers from the tests were presented to 4 blinded judges, all experienced academic lecturers, provided with rating formulas...... competence: No difference between groups in post test (p > 0.2). No difference between pre- and post test within the intervention group (p > 0.5). CONCLUSIONS: Results show very little impact from reflective journal writing on students’ reflective competence. In categories of competence the groups were equal...

  18. The survey of American college students computer technology preferences & purchasing plans

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    This report presents data from a survey of more than 400 American college students.  The report presents data on student computer ownership of both PCs and laptops, purchasing plans for PCs and laptops, as well as purchasing plans for cell phones and digital cameras.  The report also provides details on how student finance their computer purchases, how much money comes from parents or guardians, and how much from the student themselves, or from their parties.  In addition to data on PCs the report provides detailed info on use of popular word processing packages such as Word, WordPerfect and Open Office.

  19. Effects of computers on creativity of art students | Dogbe | Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was made to investigate the effects of the use of computers by the Art students of the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology (KNUST) in Kumasi on their creativity in art productions. A total of 200 art students of the fourth year were involved in the study. The instrument consisted of a 20-item Likert ...

  20. Journal of Student Affairs in Africa - Vol 3, No 1 (2015)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Internationalisation and the role for student affairs professionals: Lessons learned from the International Student Engagement Meeting Initiative · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Allen M. McFarlane, 83-91 ...

  1. Teaching Journalism Students about Confidential Whistleblower Sources: An Analysis of Introductory News Writing Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huxford, John; Moore, Maria A.

    2011-01-01

    Whistleblowers are a key journalistic source for many current news stories. However, reporters pursuing these major stories must navigate the dilemma between transparent full disclosure and protecting their confidential source. Professional journalists begin their journey as students, and students begin their journey in the classroom with a…

  2. A Phenomenological Study of Student Experiences in a Multiplatform Journalism Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auger, Giselle A.; Tanes-Ehle, Zeynep; Gee, Charlie

    2017-01-01

    Studies suggest that the goal of convergence curriculum should be one in which students are prepared both conceptually and practically. The purpose of this study was to examine the experience of students working with new and traditional technologies to develop and produce news stories. The results indicate that participation in the course…

  3. Student and instructor perceptions of the use of inquiry practices in a Biology Survey Laboratory course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayer, Lisbeth Ann

    The level of inquiry in science education has been the subject of a great deal of research by organizations such as The National Resource Council, The National Science Teachers Association, and The National Science Resources Center. Although inquiry has been promulgated as best practice, most colleges have not included inquiry science instruction in their coursework. The purpose of this study was to determine the perceptions of the level of inquiry, which students and instructors in a Biology Survey Laboratory I course consider the most supportive of student learning at a small, rural, Midwestern university. A survey instrument developed using the Inquiry Level Rubric designed by Buck et al., (2008) and the Likert Scale (1932) was used to collect data from 192 Biology Survey Laboratory I course students and their two instructors. The instrument consisted of 36 five-point Likert scale items followed by four demographic questions. A total of 190 (99.0%) students' surveys contained usable information for statistical analyses. Semi-structured instructor interviews were completed after the survey. Descriptive statistics including means and standard deviations were analyzed to determine the perceptions of students and their instructors regarding the best level of inquiry to learn biology. Inferential statistical analysis with independent t tests were utilized to determine if there were statistically significant differences between education majors and non-education majors, underrepresented groups and students typically represented in the science fields, and students with high versus low inquiry experience K--12. Qualitative phenomenological data were collected and analyzed from instructor interviews. Descriptive analyses revealed that students perceived that they would learn best with Open or Authentic inquiry levels, while instructors' perceptions leaned towards Open or Guided inquiry levels in the Biology Survey Laboratory I course (Buck et al., 2008). Inferential data

  4. Perceptions of Professional Counselors: Survey of College Student Views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wantz, Richard A.; Firmin, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Numerous sources of information influence how individuals perceive professional counselors. The stressors associated with entering college, developmental differences, and factors associated with service fees may further impact how college students view mental health professionals and may ultimately influence when, for what issues, and with whom…

  5. Pharmacy Students' Attitude and Future Career Choices: A survey of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pharmacy as a health profession has major responsibilities and contributions in maintaining health of the society. Thus, pharmacists have to maintain professional behaviour and attitude that is worthy of the respect the public has for the profession. Studies on pharmacy students' attitude and career choice are important to ...

  6. A national benchmarking survey of student counselling centres/units ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Most counselling centres/units offer psychotherapeutic services to students, and the main focus areas reported were crisis intervention (reported as a key focus area by all the centres/units), psychotherapy, substance abuse counselling, career counselling, study skills and generic skills workshops. The present study further ...

  7. Student Entrepreneurship in Hungary: Selected Results Based on GUESSS Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea S. Gubik

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study investigates students’ entrepreneurial activities and aims to answer questions regarding to what extent do students utilize the knowledge gained during their studies and the personal connections acquired at universities, as well as what role a family business background plays in the development of students’ business start-ups. Research Design & Methods: This paper is based on the database of the GUESSS project investigates 658 student entrepreneurs (so-called ‘active entrepreneurs’ who have already established businesses of their own. Findings: The rate of self-employment among Hungarian students who study in tertiary education and consider themselves to be entrepreneurs is high. Motivations and entrepreneurial efforts differ from those who owns a larger company, they do not necessarily intend to make an entrepreneurial path a career option in the long run. A family business background and family support play a determining role in entrepreneurship and business start-ups, while entrepreneurial training and courses offered at higher institutions are not reflected in students’ entrepreneurial activities. Implications & Recommendations: Universities should offer not only conventional business courses (for example, business planning, but also new forms of education so that students meet various entrepreneurial tasks and problems, make decisions in different situations, explore and acquaint themselves with entrepreneurship. Contribution & Value Added: The study provides literature overview of youth entrepreneurship, describes the main characteristics of students’ enterprises and contributes to understanding the factors of youth entrepreneurship.

  8. A Survey on Literacy Instruction for Students with Multiple Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durando, Julie

    2008-01-01

    The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 and the Individuals with Disabilities Improvement Education Act of 2004 stress the importance of giving every child access to the general education curriculum. The Reading First program, under the No Child Left Behind Act, aimed to establish evidence-based literacy instruction for all students in kindergarten…

  9. Students' View of Evidence-Based Medicine: A Survey in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reto Kaderli

    2012-02-01

    Conclusions: Medical students in Switzerland were aware of their moderate knowledge in EBM and Medical Statistics and aimed for an improvement. More courses in EBM and journal clubs must be introduced and access to information resources must be ensured with an early introduction in search engines (i.e. MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, etc.. A general strengthening of the knowledge on EBM and Medical Statistics among medical students may be a good way of educating the critical number of academic physicians and establishing a foundation for their future academic environment. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2012; 1(1.000: 34-40

  10. African Journals Online: Health

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 167 ... c) Update articles surveying the present state of knowledge in selected fields of Dentistry and oral health. d) Critical or analytical reviews in the ... African Journal of Paediatric Nephrology is the official Journal of the African Paediatric Nephrology Association (AFPNA). The journal is dedicated to increasing ...

  11. A survey of health professions students for knowledge, attitudes, and confidence about tuberculosis, 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catanzaro Antonino

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2003 the NIH perceived a need to strengthen teaching about tuberculosis (TB to health professions students. The National Tuberculosis Curriculum Consortium (NTCC was funded to meet this need. The purpose of this study was to survey students enrolled in NTCC schools prior to NTCC-developed educational materials being made available to faculty. Methods A self-administered survey for students in NTCC schools to establish a baseline level of knowledge, attitudes, and confidence about tuberculosis. Results 1480/2965 (50% students in 28 programs in 20 NTCC schools completed the survey. If public health students are eliminated from totals (only 61 respondents of 765 public health students, the overall response proportion for the seven clinically-related disciplines was 64.5%. The majority (74% were in schools of medicine (MD/DO, undergraduate nursing (BSN, and pharmacy (PharmD; others were in programs for physician assistants (PA, advanced practice nursing (NP/APN, respiratory therapy (RT, clinical laboratory sciences (MT/CLS, and public health (MPH. Almost 90% had attended at least one lecture about TB. Although 91.4% knew TB was transmitted via aerosols, about one-third did not know the method for administering tuberculin, or that Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG vaccine was not a contraindication to TB skin testing. Fewer than two-thirds knew that about 10% of people in the U.S.A. who have latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI and a normal immune system will develop TB disease, or that BCG is not part of the routine vaccination program in the U.S.A. because it complicates surveillance for new TB infection. Conclusion There is room for improvement in knowledge, attitudes, and confidence about TB by health professions students surveyed. The NTCC-developed educational products may be used by faculty to improve student performance to be assessed with future surveys.

  12. Bibliometric Studies in CIMEL: A Latin-American Medical Student Journal and the Future of Bibliometric Publications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Bonilla-Escobar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bibliometric or scientometric studies are methodological fields focused on the structural analysis of the information contained in scientific publication and generate indicators that help identify challenges and achievements in research. We aimed to characterize the publications that used this method authored by medical students in Latin America. Methods: We reviewed articles that performed a bibliometric analysis and were published in a Latin American medical student journal, between 2001 and 2012. We analyzed the characteristics of the articles, authors and references. Linear simple regression and Pearson correlation coefficient (PCC were developed to identify trends and correlations with 95% confidence. Results: There were 12 volumes of the journal available online, with a total of 236 articles. Of these, 13 (5.5% were bibliometric studies: five original articles, four letters to the editor, two editorials, one short communication, and one review. There was a positive significant relationship between time (years and number of publications (ß1=0.16, p=0.03, PCC=63%, and citations of each article (not significant, ß1=1.3, p=0.09, PCC=49%. Conclusion: There was an increase in the number of bibliometric publications after 2008, possibly influenced by a popularization of these types of studies in Latin America. Findings should motivate new and collaborative studies in this field. Moreover, it will be necessary to clarify publication areas of interest of medical students around the world.

  13. Do Veterinary Students See a Need for More In-Course Discussion? A Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasch, Cindy; Haimerl, Peggy; Heuwieser, Wolfgang; Arlt, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Rather than merely transferring information, veterinary education should stimulate and motivate students and encourage them to think. Currently in veterinary education, most curricula use the method of frontal teaching (e.g., in lectures). A student-centered critical approach to information is rarely used. Our research sought to determine if students consider in-course discussion useful and if sufficient possibilities for discussion are provided and supported by their lecturers. In December 2013, we conducted a survey of fourth-year students. Specifically, we wanted to know if students consider in-course discussion about course content useful for successful learning and if students wish to have more opportunities for discussion during class time. Finally, we wanted to identify barriers that limit the students' motivation and ability to engage in discussion of course content. In total, 105 students completed the survey. The majority of students agreed or strongly agreed that clinical topics should be discussed during class time. Frequently stated reasons were improved learning (85.7%) and the opportunity to look at topics from different perspectives (92.4%). In conclusion, we found a considerable dearth of and request for discussion within veterinary education. In light of these findings, we emphasize the need for new teaching strategies that promote independent thinking and critical questioning. We suggest the implementation of more discussion opportunities in well considered and moderated settings in veterinary teaching.

  14. Attitudes towards mental illness of nursing students in a Baccalaureate programme in Jamaica: a questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, J; Stennett, R

    2015-10-01

    There is longstanding evidence of nurses demonstrating negative attitudes towards people with mental illness. Student nurses' fear or discomfort with mentally ill patients results in poorer outcomes for patients and students' dissatisfaction with their experience of mental health nursing. There is evidence of negative attitudes towards mental illness in the Jamaican society; however, no studies have explored whether these attitudes are held by nursing students. The aim of the study was to examine the attitudes of nursing students towards mental illness. A questionnaire survey was conducted with a convenience sample of 143 third-year nursing students who were enrolled in a baccalaureate programme. Data were collected using the Attitudes Towards Acute Mental Health Scale (ATAMHS). A response rate of 71% was achieved for the survey. The findings indicated that the student nurses held an overall negative attitude towards mental illness, with a general perception that mentally ill people are dangerous. The student nurses were divided in their opinions in a number of areas, suggesting a possible conflict of opinions. Negative attitudes towards mental illness impact client outcomes and the career choices made by nurses. This study provides baseline data within the Jamaican context that adds to the evidence on nursing students' attitude to mental illness. Further research is needed to explore whether nursing education and clinical experience enables student nurses in Jamaica to develop a more positive attitude towards mental illness and mental health nursing and whether cultural factors contribute to negative attitudes. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Medical students' perceptions of an emergency medicine clerkship: an analysis of self-assessment surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avegno, Jennifer L; Murphy-Lavoie, Heather; Lofaso, Daryl P; Moreno-Walton, Lisa

    2012-05-31

    No studies have been performed that evaluate the perceptions of medical students completing an emergency medicine (EM) clerkship. Given the variability of exposure to EM in medical schools nationwide, assessment of the student rotation may inform the structure and content of new and existing clerkships, particularly in relation to student's acquisition of the core competencies. To investigate whether undergraduate medical students rotating through an EM clerkship improved their understanding and abilities in core content areas and common procedural skills; to evaluate whether improvement was affected by rotation length. All students participating in an EM clerkship over a 12-month period were asked to complete an anonymous voluntary pre- and post-rotation survey. Confidence with patient assessment, diagnosis, and management plans; trauma and medical resuscitations; formal and informal presentations; basic procedure skills and understanding of the modern practice of EM were self assessed using a Likert scale. Group mean scores on each question on the pre- and post-clerkship surveys were calculated and compared. The mean scores on each survey item, both pre- and post-clerkship, were compared between 2- and 4-week clerkship rotation groups. Two hundred thirty-nine students participated in the rotation during the 12 months of the study. One hundred sixty-one (161), or 67.4%, completed the pre-rotation survey, and 96 (40.2%) completed the post-rotation survey. Overall, students showed significant mean gains in confidence with initial patient assessment, diagnosis, and management plans (p skills (p skills (p = 0.01), where the 4-week students demonstrated a statistically significant advantage. The 2-week clerkship participants were significantly less confident in all procedures except EKG interpretation, splinting, and venipuncture (p = 0.28, 0.22, 0.05). Regardless of rotation length, students generally felt they had sufficient exposure to patients and

  16. Medical students' experiences of moral distress: development of a web-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggleton, Catherine; Petrusa, Emil; Loomis, Kim; Tarpley, John; Tarpley, Margaret; O'Gorman, Mary Lou; Miller, Bonnie

    2010-01-01

    To develop an instrument for measuring moral distress in medical students, measuring the prevalence of moral distress in a cohort of students, and identifying the situations most likely to cause it. Moral distress, defined as the negative feelings that arise when one knows the morally correct thing to do but cannot act because of constraints or hierarchies, has been documented in nurses but has not been measured in medical students. The authors constructed a survey consisting of 55 items describing potentially distressing situations. Responders rated the frequency of these situations and the intensity of distress that they caused. The survey was administered to 106 fourth-year medical students during a three-week period in 2007; the response rate was 60%. Each of the situations was experienced by at least some of the 64 respondents, and each created some degree of moral distress. On average, students witnessed almost one-half of the situations at least once, and more than one-third of the situations caused mild-to-moderate distress. The survey measured individual distress (Cronbach alpha = 0.95), which varied among the students. Whereas women witnessed potentially distressing situations significantly more frequently than did men (P = .04), men tended to become more distressed by each event witnessed (P = .057). Medical students frequently experience moral distress. Our survey can be used to measure aspects of the learning environment as well as individual responses to the environment. The variation found among student responses warrants further investigation to determine whether students at either extreme of moral distress are at risk of burnout or erosion of professionalism.

  17. Public attitudes toward practice by medical students: a nationwide survey in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Kyoko; Sakuma, Mio; Seki, Susumu; Morimoto, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    It is essential for medical students to interact directly with patients. However, patients may be reluctant to be seen by medical students in settings in which they may also be seen by senior staff. To understand patients' attitudes toward practice by medical students and consider the factors involved in obtaining patients' cooperation, we conducted a nationwide cross-sectional survey. We randomly selected 2,400 adult participants from all over Japan. Trained research assistants inquired about participants' experiences and attitudes toward practice by medical students using a questionnaire. We compared differences in attitudes between participants who were accepting of practice by medical students and those who were not, as well as differences between participants who had experienced practice by a medical student versus those who had not. A total of 1,109 (46%) participants were included in the study. Eleven percent (117/1109) of the participants had experienced practice by a medical student. One fourth of participants were accepting of practice by medical students, and experienced participants were significantly more likely to be accepting of practice by medical students than inexperienced participants (45% vs. 24%, pmedical students among accepting participants with previous experiences included "polite," "kind," and "hard-working." Fifty-nine percent (637/1088) of participants indicated that they would request a senior staff member's supervision when being seen by a medical student. The present nationwide survey suggests that education emphasizing bedside manner may be effective in promoting patients' cooperation of medical students. In addition, providing information to patients about medical students and efforts to increase supervision during clinical clerkship should be emphasized to foster the public's cooperation.

  18. 1984 Survey: No Change in Mass Comm Enrollments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Paul V.

    1985-01-01

    Describes methodology and results of a survey of college and university students indicating that, overall, college and university enrollments in journalism and mass communications have reached a plateau. (HTH)

  19. African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journals OnLine (AJOL) is the world's largest and pre-eminent collection ... Gender and climate change-induced conflict in pastoral communities: Case study of Turkana in northwestern Kenya African Journal on Conflict Resolution; Project Work by Students for First Degree: ... Southern African Journal of Critical Care.

  20. Development and Validation of the Online Student Connectedness Survey (OSCS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris U Bolliger

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available With the growth of online courses and programs in higher education, considerable concerns emerge about student feelings of isolation and disconnectedness in the online learning environment. A research study was conducted to develop and validate an instrument that can be used to measure perceptions of connectedness of students enrolled in online programs or certification programs in higher education. The instrument consists of 25 items and has four scales: (a community, (b comfort, (c facilitation, and (d interaction and collaboration. One hundred and forty-six online learners who were enrolled in courses at a Turkish university completed the online questionnaire. Results of a factor and reliability analysis confirmed that the instrument is a valid and reliable measure of students’ perceived connectedness in an online certificate program.

  1. Internet addiction in Greek medical students: an online survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsimtsiou, Zoi; Haidich, Anna-Bettina; Spachos, Dimitris; Kokkali, Stamatia; Bamidis, Panagiotis; Dardavesis, Theodoros; Arvanitidou, Malamatenia

    2015-06-01

    The authors investigated the prevalence of Internet addiction (IA) in undergraduate medical students to identify possible associations with sociodemographics and Internet habits. All students at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki School of Medicine, Greece, were invited to complete the online Internet Addiction Test (IAT) along with sociodemographics and preferences on Internet activities. The authors received 585 responses after three reminders (23.5 % response rate). Mild IA was found in 24.5 %, moderate in 5.4 %, and severe in 0.2 %. In multivariable analysis, the odds to develop IA were increased with visits in Internet cafes (Odds Ratio [OR] 3.49, 95 % Confidence Interval [CI]: 1.45, 8.46), the use of Facebook (OR 2.43, 95 % CI: 1.35, 4.38), Twitter (OR 2.45, 95 % CI: 1.37, 4.39), and online games (OR 1.95, 95 % CI: 1.29, 2.94). Using e-mails seemed to be protective against IA (OR 0.59, 95 % CI: 0.37, 0.94). This is the first IA prevalence study in a European medical school. Early-detection systems and other ways to help students with pathological behaviors should be developed.

  2. The Psychometric Characteristics of Maslach Burnout Inventory Student Survey: A Study Students of Isfahan University

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zeinab Rostami; Mohammad Reza Abedi; Willmar B Schaufeli; S. Ahmad Ahmadi; Amir Hossein Sadeghi

    2014-01-01

    Background: In order to fill the gap of tool for measurement of student burnout in Iran, this study was performed on the 238 female students of Isfahan university that were selected by simple random sampling...

  3. Student- and faculty-reported importance of science prerequisites for osteopathic medical school: a survey-based study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Binstock, Judith; Junsanto-Bahri, Tipsuda

    2014-01-01

    .... Preclinical osteopathic medical students and their basic science and OMM faculty from 3 colleges of osteopathic medicine were surveyed about the importance of specific science concepts, laboratories...

  4. Segmenting Business Students Using Cluster Analysis Applied to Student Satisfaction Survey Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Allen

    2009-01-01

    This paper demonstrates a new application of cluster analysis to segment business school students according to their degree of satisfaction with various aspects of the academic program. The resulting clusters provide additional insight into drivers of student satisfaction that are not evident from analysis of the responses of the student body as a…

  5. Surveying Medical Students to Gauge Library Use and Plan for a New Medical Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronoff, Nell

    2016-01-01

    In spring 2015, a 45-question survey was e-mailed to 585 medical students at the University at Buffalo (UB) in order to gauge their use of library spaces, resources, equipment, and services at UB's Health Sciences Library and plan for a library space located within a new medical school building. Students' self-reported use of the library during the academic year is presented along with the features they would like to see in their ideal library space. The responses generated in the survey are a barometer of current use and will be used in the planning process.

  6. Oxygen and pulse oximetry in childhood pneumonia: surveys of clinicians and student clinicians in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsburg, Amy Sarah; Gerth-Guyette, Emily; Mollis, Brenda; Gardner, Michelle; Chham, Samnang

    2014-05-01

    To better understand the availability of oxygen and pulse oximetry, barriers to use, clinician perceptions and practices regarding their role in the management of childhood pneumonia, and the formal education and training regarding these technologies received by student clinicians in Cambodia. In the clinician survey, we surveyed 81 clinicians practising at all national paediatric, provincial and district referral hospitals throughout Cambodia. Respondents were primarily physicians whose scope of practice included paediatrics, and most reported the presence of oxygen (93% (95% confidence interval (CI) [87, 98])) but less availability of pulse oximetry (51% (95% CI [39, 61])). Common barriers to use included a lack of policies and guidelines, as well as a lack of training. In the student clinician survey, 332 graduating medical and nursing students were surveyed, and most reported learning about oxygen (96% (95% CI [94, 98])) and pulse oximetry (72% (95% CI [67, 77])) during their training. Data from both surveys indicate that despite their utility, oxygen and pulse oximetry may be underused in Cambodia. The reported barriers and perceptions of the tools indicate a clear role for improved training for clinicians and students on the use of oxygen and pulse oximetry, the value of oxygen and pulse oximetry for managing childhood pneumonia, and the need for improved policies and guidelines governing their use. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Simulation in Medical Student Education: Survey of the Clerkship Directors in Emergency Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Fitch; Michael Smith; Raymond Ten Eyck; Corey Heitz

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The objective of this study is to identify (1) the current role of simulation in medical student emergency medicine (EM) education; (2) the challenges to initiating and sustaining simulationbased programs; and (3) educational advances to meet these challenges. Methods: We solicited members of the Clerkship Directors in Emergency Medicine (CDEM) e-mail list to complete a Web-based survey addressing the use of simulation in both EM clerkships and preclinical EM curricula. Survey ...

  8. Simulation in Medical Student Education: Survey of Clerkship Directors in Emergency Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Heitz, Corey; Eyck, Raymond Ten; Smith, Michael; Fitch, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The objective of this study is to identify (1) the current role of simulation in medical student emergency medicine (EM) education; (2) the challenges to initiating and sustaining simulation-based programs; and (3) educational advances to meet these challenges. Methods We solicited members of the Clerkship Directors in Emergency Medicine (CDEM) e-mail list to complete a Web-based survey addressing the use of simulation in both EM clerkships and preclinical EM curricula. Survey el...

  9. Validation of the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey for Estimating Burnout in Dental Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel-Company, José María; Subirats-Roig, Cristian; Flores-Martí, Pau; Bellot-Arcís, Carlos; Almerich-Silla, José Manuel

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the validity and reliability of the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS) as a tool for assessing the prevalence and level of burnout in dental students in Spanish universities. The survey was adapted from English to Spanish. A sample of 533 dental students from 15 Spanish universities and a control group of 188 medical students self-administered the survey online, using the Google Drive service. The test-retest reliability or reproducibility showed an Intraclass Correlation Coefficient of 0.95. The internal consistency of the survey was 0.922. Testing the construct validity showed two components with an eigenvalue greater than 1.5, which explained 51.2% of the total variance. Factor I (36.6% of the variance) comprised the items that estimated emotional exhaustion and depersonalization. Factor II (14.6% of the variance) contained the items that estimated personal accomplishment. The cut-off point for the existence of burnout achieved a sensitivity of 92.2%, a specificity of 92.1%, and an area under the curve of 0.96. Comparison of the total dental students sample and the control group of medical students showed significantly higher burnout levels for the dental students (50.3% vs. 40.4%). In this study, the MBI-HSS was found to be viable, valid, and reliable for measuring burnout in dental students. Since the study also found that the dental students suffered from high levels of this syndrome, these results suggest the need for preventive burnout control programs.

  10. The Relevance of Teaching Traditional Measurement Techniques to Undergraduate Quantity Surveying Students.

    OpenAIRE

    McDonnell, Fiacra P.

    2010-01-01

    Measurement of quantities is a core skill which must be inherent in all graduates from Quantity Surveying courses. Many students find this subject difficult to grasp, and the learning experience can be problematic especially in the first semester of first year. This is not unique to measurement as in many cases first year students are in the process of adapting to a new stage in their life, along with attempting to master many new subjects (Cottrell, 2008). This is reinforced by Johnston (201...

  11. CAFES 2009 New Student Survey Report. Survey Research Center Report 2010/3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speerstra, Mandy; Trechter, David

    2010-01-01

    During Academic Day, September 1, 2009, incoming freshmen and transfer students in the College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences (CAFES) were asked to complete a one-page questionnaire designed to find out: (1) how they learned about UW-River Falls as an option for their tertiary education; (2) what factors most influenced their…

  12. 2015 American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology (AACN) student affairs committee survey of neuropsychology trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Douglas M; Guidotti Breting, Leslie M; Butts, Alissa M; Hahn-Ketter, Amanda E; Osborn, Katie; Towns, Stephanie J; Barisa, Mark; Santos, Octavio A; Smith, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    Surveys of practicing neuropsychologists have been conducted for years; however, there have been no comprehensive surveys of neuropsychology trainees, which may result in important issues being overlooked by the profession. This survey assessed trainees' experiences in areas such as student debt, professional development, and training satisfaction. Survey items were written by a task force of the AACN Student Affairs Committee (SAC), and neuropsychology trainees were recruited via neuropsychology-focused listservs. In total, 344 trainees completed the survey (75% female) and included participants from every region of the US and Canada. Based on the survey questions, nearly half of all trainees (47%) indicated financial factors were the greatest limitation in their training. Student debt had a bimodal distribution; 32.7% had minimal debt, but 45% had debt >$100,000. In contrast, expected starting salaries were modest, but consistent with findings ($80-100,000). While almost all trainees intended to pursue board certification (97% through ABPP), many were 'not at all' or only 'somewhat' familiar with the process. Results indicated additional critical concerns beyond those related to debt and lack of familiarity with board certification procedures. The results will inform SAC conference programming and the profession on the current 'state of the trainees' in neuropsychology.

  13. Alcohol mixed with energy drinks: methodology and design of the Utrecht Student Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haan, Lydia; de Haan, Hein A; Olivier, Berend; Verster, Joris C

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology of the Utrecht Student Survey. This online survey was conducted in June 2011 by 6002 students living in Utrecht, The Netherlands. The aim of the survey was to determine the potential impact of mixing alcoholic beverages with energy drinks on overall alcohol consumption and alcohol-related consequences. In contrast to most previous surveys conducted on this topic, the current survey used a more appropriate within-subject design, comparing the alcohol consumption of individuals who consume alcohol mixed with energy drinks on occasions. Specifically, a comparison was conducted to examine the occasions during which these individuals consume this mixture versus occasions during which they consume alcohol alone. In addition to energy drinks, the consumption of other non-alcoholic mixers was also assessed when combined with alcoholic beverages. Furthermore, the reasons for consuming energy drinks alone or in combination with alcohol were investigated, and were compared to reasons for mixing alcohol with other non-alcoholic beverages. Finally, personality characteristics and the level of risk-taking behavior among the individuals were also assessed to explore their relationship with alcohol consumption. The Utrecht Student Survey will be replicated in the USA, Australia, and the UK. Results will be pooled, but also examined for possible cross-cultural differences. PMID:23118547

  14. Alcohol mixed with energy drinks: methodology and design of the Utrecht Student Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haan, Lydia; de Haan, Hein A; Olivier, Berend; Verster, Joris C

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology of the Utrecht Student Survey. This online survey was conducted in June 2011 by 6002 students living in Utrecht, The Netherlands. The aim of the survey was to determine the potential impact of mixing alcoholic beverages with energy drinks on overall alcohol consumption and alcohol-related consequences. In contrast to most previous surveys conducted on this topic, the current survey used a more appropriate within-subject design, comparing the alcohol consumption of individuals who consume alcohol mixed with energy drinks on occasions. Specifically, a comparison was conducted to examine the occasions during which these individuals consume this mixture versus occasions during which they consume alcohol alone. In addition to energy drinks, the consumption of other non-alcoholic mixers was also assessed when combined with alcoholic beverages. Furthermore, the reasons for consuming energy drinks alone or in combination with alcohol were investigated, and were compared to reasons for mixing alcohol with other non-alcoholic beverages. Finally, personality characteristics and the level of risk-taking behavior among the individuals were also assessed to explore their relationship with alcohol consumption. The Utrecht Student Survey will be replicated in the USA, Australia, and the UK. Results will be pooled, but also examined for possible cross-cultural differences.

  15. Factors affecting UK medical students' decision to train in urology: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Nithish; Ahmed, Kamran; Challacombe, Ben

    2016-10-01

    Our aim was to understand the specific factors which influence medical students' choice to train in urology, in order to attract the best and the brightest into the specialty during a challenging time for surgical training in the United Kingdom A cross-sectional web-based survey was generated to evaluate: 1) perceptions of urology; 2) attitudes about urology as a career; 3) exposure to urology at medical school; and 4) proficiency in common urological procedures. The survey was sent to all 33 medical schools in the UK and advertised to all medical students. The survey received 488 responses were received from 14 medical schools; 59.8% of respondents did not consider a career in urology. Factors affecting a career choice in urology included: 1) year of study; 2) male gender; 3) favorable perceptions of urology; 4) favorable attitudes about urology as a career; 5) more hours of urology teaching in preclinical years; 6) attendance at urology theatre sessions; 7) confidence in performing urological procedures; and 8) more attempts at male catheterization. The commonest reason for not considering urology was inadequate exposure to urology. Students in Year 3 were more likely to consider urology than final-year students, due to multifactorial reasons. Year of study is a novel factor affecting students' consideration of urology as a career. This paper clearly shows that early and sustained exposure to urology positively correlated with considering a career in urology. Urologists must be more active in promoting the specialty to medical students.

  16. The mentored journal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilinski, Hope

    2002-01-01

    The "writing to learn" paradigm assists students in developing reflection, critical thinking, and the higher order cognitive skills of analysis and synthesis. One common teaching strategy used in this process is clinical journals. Integrating the concepts and underlying theory of journaling, mentoring, and the Circles of Meaning model in the development of the mentored journal, the author discusses a model in which each component acts synergistically to enhance the process of critical thinking within nursing students.

  17. First year nursing students use of social media within education: Results of a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Ann M; Devis, Kate; LeMoine, Gayle; Crouch, Sarah; South, Nicole; Hossain, Rosa

    2018-02-01

    Social media rapidly disseminates information but is a controversial learning platform in nurse education. This study aimed to explore how students viewed the use of Twitter, and other social media, in their first year of a nursing degree. The aim of this study was to evaluate first year student nurses' use of social media, before and after commencing a pre-registration programme, where Twitter was used in a module. A cross-sectional approach using a descriptive survey was completed. An online survey, that included Likert scale and open questions, was open for one month in 2016. All students on Nursing Undergraduate Degrees, in Adult, Child and Mental Health, who were in the first year of their programme were eligible to participate. 121 students took part with a response rate of 32%. Most students were positive about using social media as they found it an engaging way to promote discussion and share information. Students use of Twitter changed in the first year with 19.8% using it once or more per week on commencement of the programme which increased to 45.5%; other social media platforms remained static. Most students (57.8%) understood the purpose of using Twitter although 14% reported that it was not used within their module; thus, not all students gained experience of using the social media. 81% of students said that using Twitter had been beneficial to increase awareness of nursing issues within their course. However, there were areas that students found difficult such as time, and not knowing what to say. The study suggests that teaching about social media, and incorporating it into learning activities, may be beneficial for students. However, more research into the subject using an experimental design to assess changes over time would be useful. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Student beliefs and learning environments: Developing a survey of factors related to conceptual change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanrahan, Mary

    1994-12-01

    This paper presents a model for the type of classroom environment believed to facilitate scientific conceptual change. A survey based on this model contains items about students' motivational beliefs, their study approach and their perceptions of their teacher's actions and learning goal orientation. Results obtained from factor analyses, correlations and analyses of variance, based on responses from 113 students, suggest that an empowering interpersonal teacher-student relationship is related to a deep approach to learning, a positive attitude to science, and positive self-efficacy beliefs, and may be increased by a constructivist approach to teaching.

  19. Journal of Student Affairs in Africa - Vol 2, No 1 (2014)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Listen, live and learn: A review of the application process, aiming to enhance diversity within the Listen, Live and Learn senior student housing initiative at Stellenbosch University · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Mathew Smorenburg, Munita Dunn ...

  20. The influence of gender on the entrepreneurial intentions of journalism students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco-Javier Caro-González

    2017-02-01

    Originality/value: This is the first study of its kind conducted in the context of communications and with university students, specifically, those pursuing a degree in communications, who are faced with an economic crisis and a changing environment, in which entrepreneurship is critical to their professional development.

  1. Scientific publications in nursing journals from Mainland China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong: a 10-year survey of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: China has witnessed remarkable progress in scientific performance in recent years. However, the quantity and quality of nursing publications from three major regions (Mainland China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong have not been reported. This study aimed to investigate the characteristics of scientific research productivity from Mainland China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong in the field of nursing. Methods: Articles published in the 110 nursing journals originating from Mainland China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong between 2005 and 2014 were retrieved from the Web of Science. The total number of articles published, the impact factor, and the citation count were analyzed. Results: There were 2,439 publications between 2005 and 2014 from China, including 438 from Mainland China, 1,506 from Taiwan, and 495 from Hong Kong. There was a significant increase in publications for these three regions (p < 0.05, especially for Mainland China, with a 59.50-fold increase experienced. From 2011, the number of publications from Mainland China exceeded that from Hong Kong. Taiwan had the highest total journal impact factor (2,142.81, followed by Hong Kong (720.39 and Mainland China (583.94. The mean journal impact factor from Hong Kong (1.46 was higher than that from Taiwan (1.42 and Mainland China (1.33. Taiwan had the highest total citation count (8,392, followed by Hong Kong (3,785 and Mainland China (1,493. The mean citation count from Hong Kong (7.65 was higher than that from Taiwan (5.57 and Mainland China (3.41. The Journal of Clinical Nursing was the most popular journal in the three regions. Discussion: Chinese contributions to the field of nursing have significantly increased in the past ten years, particularly from Mainland China. Taiwan is the most productive region in China. Hong Kong had the highest-quality research output, according to mean journal impact factor and mean citation count.

  2. Scientific publications in nursing journals from Mainland China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong: a 10-year survey of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Di; Wang, Xiaming; Yuan, Xueru; Yang, Li; Xue, Yu; Xie, Qian

    2016-01-01

    China has witnessed remarkable progress in scientific performance in recent years. However, the quantity and quality of nursing publications from three major regions (Mainland China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong) have not been reported. This study aimed to investigate the characteristics of scientific research productivity from Mainland China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong in the field of nursing. Articles published in the 110 nursing journals originating from Mainland China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong between 2005 and 2014 were retrieved from the Web of Science. The total number of articles published, the impact factor, and the citation count were analyzed. There were 2,439 publications between 2005 and 2014 from China, including 438 from Mainland China, 1,506 from Taiwan, and 495 from Hong Kong. There was a significant increase in publications for these three regions (p < 0.05), especially for Mainland China, with a 59.50-fold increase experienced. From 2011, the number of publications from Mainland China exceeded that from Hong Kong. Taiwan had the highest total journal impact factor (2,142.81), followed by Hong Kong (720.39) and Mainland China (583.94). The mean journal impact factor from Hong Kong (1.46) was higher than that from Taiwan (1.42) and Mainland China (1.33). Taiwan had the highest total citation count (8,392), followed by Hong Kong (3,785) and Mainland China (1,493). The mean citation count from Hong Kong (7.65) was higher than that from Taiwan (5.57) and Mainland China (3.41). The Journal of Clinical Nursing was the most popular journal in the three regions. Chinese contributions to the field of nursing have significantly increased in the past ten years, particularly from Mainland China. Taiwan is the most productive region in China. Hong Kong had the highest-quality research output, according to mean journal impact factor and mean citation count.

  3. Scientific publications in critical care medicine journals from Chinese authors: a 10-year survey of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi; Liao, Zhuan; Wu, Fei-Xiang; Yang, Li-Qun; Sun, Yu-Ming; Yu, Wei-Feng

    2010-10-01

    People of Chinese ethnicity are the largest population in the world. Critical care medicine in China is developing rapidly and has achieved great advances in recent 20 years. The research contribution in critical care medicine among Chinese individuals in the three major regions of China--Mainland (ML), Hong Kong (HK), and Taiwan (TW)--is unknown. Articles published in 18 journals on critical care medicine originating from ML, TW, and HK from 1999 to 2008 were retrieved from the PubMed database and Science Citation Index Expanded. Quantity and quality analyses were conducted for the total numbers of articles, clinical trials, randomized controlled trials, impact factors (IF), citations, and articles published in high-impact journals. There were 932 articles from ML (268), TW (506), and HK (158) from 1999 to 2008. The annual total numbers of articles of the three regions increased gradually from 1999 to 2008 (from 57 to 157). From 2002 onward, the number of articles published from ML exceeded that from HK, but TW still has the dominance in both annual and total number of articles published compared with ML and HK. The accumulated IF of articles from TW (1676.67) was higher than that from ML (708.25) and HK (449.51). TW had the highest average IF of 3.31 followed by HK of 2.85 and ML of 2.64. HK had the highest average citations of each article of 10.73, followed by TW of 6.74 and ML of 5.34. The Journal of Trauma was the most popular journal in the three regions. The total numbers of articles in China increased markedly from 1999 to 2008. TW published the most number of articles, clinical trials, and randomised controlled trials among the three regions. The Journal of Trauma was the most popular journal in the three regions.

  4. Student Success Survey: Supporting Academic Success for At-Risk Nursing Students Through Early Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLain, Rhonda M; Fifolt, Matthew; Dawson, Martha A; Su, Wei; Milligan, Gary; Davis, Sandra; Hites, Lisle

    Diversity in the nursing workforce has a positive impact on the quality of care provided to minority patients. Although the number of students from diverse backgrounds entering nursing programs has increased, the attrition rate of these students remains high. This study assessed the construct validity of a self-assessment tool that can be used by faculty advisors to determine individual academic needs of students.

  5. Whether or wither some specialties: a survey of Canadian medical student career interest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenneis Fraser R

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Given the looming shortage of physicians in Canada, we wished to determine how closely the career preference of students entering Canadian medical schools was aligned with the current physician mix in Canada. Methods Career choice information was collected from a survey of 2,896 Canadian medical students upon their entry to medical school. The distribution of career choices of survey respondents was compared to the current physician speciality mix in Canada. Results We show that there is a clear mismatch between student career choice at medical school entry and the current specialty mix of physicians in Canada. This mismatch is greatest in Urban Family Medicine with far fewer students interested in this career at medical school entry compared to the current proportion of practicing physicians. There are also fewer students interested in Psychiatry than the current proportion of practicing physicians. Conclusion This mismatch between the student interest and the current proportion of practicing physicians in the various specialities in Canada is particularly disturbing in the face of the current sub-optimal distribution of physicians. If nothing is done to correct this mismatch of student interest in certain specialities, shortages and misdistributions of physicians will be further amplified. Studies such as this can give a window into the future health human resources challenges for a nation.

  6. French validation of the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Student Survey (MBI-SS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faye-Dumanget, Christine; Carré, Julie; Le Borgne, Margaux; Boudoukha, Pr Abdel Halim

    2017-06-27

    Several international studies have been conducted on student burnout. To contribute to the clinical examination as well as research on the mental health of students, the MBI-SS (Maslach Burnout Inventory-Student Survey) has been validated and used in different countries but not in French. The aim of this study is to examine the validity of the 3-dimensional model of the French version of the MBI-SS, which is characterized by emotional "Emotional Exhaustion" (EE); "Cynicism" (CY); and low scores in "Academic Efficacy" (AE). A total of 667 university students were questioned to study the 3-dimensional structure of the French translation of the MBI-SS. The results validate the 3-dimensional structure of the MBI-SS and indicate satisfactory psychometric values. It is concluded that the MBI-SS can be used to assess burnout in French students. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Exploring Student-to-Workforce Transitions with the National Geoscience Exit Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, L. M.; Keane, C. M.; Houlton, H. R.

    2011-12-01

    In 2011, the American Geological Institute (AGI) launched the first pilot of a National Geoscience Exit Survey in collaboration with 32 geoscience university departments. The survey collects data about demographics, high school and community college coursework, university degrees, financial aid, field and research experiences, internships, and when and why the student chose to pursue a geosciences degree. Additionally, the survey collects information about students' future academic and career plans, and gives participants the option to take part in a longitudinal survey to track long-term career trajectories of geosciences graduates. The survey also provides geoscience departments with the ability to add customized questions to collect data about important departmental-level topics. The National Geoscience Exit Survey will be available to all U.S. geoscience programs at two- and four-year colleges and universities by the end of the 2011-2012 academic year. We use the results of the National Geoscience Exit Survey to examine student preparation and transition into geosciences and non-geoscience careers. Preliminary results from the pilot survey indicated future academic and career trajectories for geoscience Bachelor's degree recipients included graduate school (53%) and pursuit of a geoscience career (45%), with some undergraduates keeping their options open for either trajectory. Twelve percent of Bachelor's degree recipients already accepted job offers with geoscience employers. For geoscience Master's degree recipients, 17% planned to continue in graduate school, 35% were seeking a geoscience job, and 42% had already accepted job offers with geoscience employers. Furthermore, the majority of those geoscience graduates who already accepted geoscience job offers had also interned previously with the employer.

  8. A survey on education in cariology for undergraduate dental students in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulte, A.G.; Buchalla, W.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.; Amaechi, B.T.; Sampaio, F.; Vougiouklakis, G.; Pitts, N.B.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the survey was to collect relevant information about education in cariology for dental undergraduate students in Europe. The ORCA/ADEE cariology curriculum group prepared a questionnaire that was mailed in 2009 to 179 European dental schools. One hundred and twenty-three dental schools

  9. Survey Regarding the Competence and Interest towards Research of Romanian University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demjén, Beátrix-Aletta; Ciascai, Liliana

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to find out the respondents' opinion regarding their abilities and interest towards research. The survey was carried out on a sample of 51 respondents that are involved in research activities in the universities of origin. The participants are students from Faculties of Real and Applied Sciences. The results highlight…

  10. The Mechanical Waves Conceptual Survey: An Analysis of University Students' Performance, and Recommendations for Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barniol, Pablo; Zavala, Genaro

    2017-01-01

    The Mechanical Waves Conceptual Survey (MWCS), presented in 2009, is the most important test to date that has been designed to evaluate university students' understanding of four main topics: propagation, superposition, reflection, and standing waves. In a literature review, we detected a significant need for a study that uses this test as an…

  11. Exploring E-Learning Acceptance among University Students in Thailand: A National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Timothy; Ruangrit, Nammon; Khlaisang, Jintavee; Thammetar, Thapanee; Sunphakitjumnong, Kobkul

    2014-01-01

    This study surveys the e-learning acceptance of university students in Thailand. One thousand nine hundred and eighty-one (1,981) participants completed the E-Learning Acceptance Measure (Teo, 2010) which measures three constructs that predict e-learning acceptance (tutor quality, perceived usefulness, and facilitating conditions). Data analysis…

  12. Teaching Quality Assessment in University Studies: Possibilities for Application of Student Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Audrone; Pileicikiene, Nora

    2010-01-01

    This article aims to reveal possibilities for teaching quality assessment when data from student survey are used. To achieve this aim, the conception of teaching in a higher education institution was reviewed and criteria of teaching quality were distinguished in the theoretical part. In the empirical part of the research, validity of teaching…

  13. A Nationwide Survey of Financing Health-Related Services for Special Education Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodman, Jack; Weill, Kenny; Driscoll, Margaret; Fenton, Terry; Alpert, Hillel; Salem-Schatz, Susanne; Palfrey, Judith S.

    1999-01-01

    Surveys of directors of special education, Medicaid, and public health departments in all 50 states examined the financing arrangements covering health-related services for students with special health care needs in the schools. Results indicated that schools tapped traditional health resources to supplement educational dollars in paying for…

  14. Engaging Students in Survey Research Projects across Research Methods and Statistics Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovekamp, William E.; Soboroff, Shane D.; Gillespie, Michael D.

    2017-01-01

    One innovative way to help students make sense of survey research has been to create a multifaceted, collaborative assignment that promotes critical thinking, comparative analysis, self-reflection, and statistical literacy. We use a short questionnaire adapted from the Higher Education Research Institute's Cooperative Institutional Research…

  15. The Non-Participation Survey: Understanding Why High School Students Choose Not to Eat School Lunch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asperin, Amelia Estepa; Nettles, Mary Frances; Carr, Deborah H.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this project was to develop and validate a survey that will enable school nutrition (SN) directors and managers to identify and address issues affecting the non-participation of high school students in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP). Methods: The research was conducted in two phases. Qualitative data…

  16. Students and recorded lectures: survey on current use and demands for higher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorissen, Pierre; Van Bruggen, Jan; Jochems, Wim

    2012-01-01

    Gorissen, P., Van Bruggen, J., & Jochems, W. M. G. (2012). Students and recorded lectures: survey on current use and demands for higher education. Research In Learning Technology, 20(3). doi:10.3402/rlt.v20i0.17299

  17. International medical students--a survey of perceived challenges and established support services at medical faculties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huhn, D; Junne, F; Zipfel, S; Duelli, R; Resch, F; Herzog, W; Nikendei, C

    2015-01-01

    Medical students with a non-German background face several challenges during their studies. Besides support given by foreign student offices further specific projects for international students have been developed and are offered by medical faculties. However, so far, neither a systematic survey of the faculties' perceived problems nor of the offered support exists. All study deaneries of medical faculties in Germany were contacted between April and October 2013 and asked for their participation in a telephone interview. Interview partners were asked about 1.) The percentage of non-German students at the medical faculty; 2.) The perceived difficulties and problems of foreign students; 3.) The offers for non-German students; and 4.) The specification of further possibilities of support. Given information was noted, frequencies counted and results interpreted via frequency analysis. Only 39% of the medical faculties could give detailed information about the percentage of non-German students. They reported an average share of 3.9% of students with an EU migration background and 4.9% with a non-EU background. Most frequently cited offers are student conducted tutorials, language courses and tandem-programs. The most frequently reported problem by far is the perceived lack of language skills of foreign students at the beginning of their studies. Suggested solutions are mainly the development of tutorials and the improvement of German medical terminology. Offers of support provided by medical faculties for foreign students vary greatly in type and extent. Support offered is seen to be insufficient in coping with the needs of the international students in many cases. Hence, a better coverage of international students as well as further research efforts to the specific needs and the effectiveness of applied interventions seem to be essential.

  18. International medical students – a survey of perceived challenges and established support services at medical faculties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huhn, D.; Junne, F.; Zipfel, S.; Duelli, R.; Resch, F.; Herzog, W.; Nikendei, C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Medical students with a non-German background face several challenges during their studies. Besides support given by foreign student offices further specific projects for international students have been developed and are offered by medical faculties. However, so far, neither a systematic survey of the faculties’ perceived problems nor of the offered support exists. Method: All study deaneries of medical faculties in Germany were contacted between April and October 2013 and asked for their participation in a telephone interview. Interview partners were asked about 1.) The percentage of non-German students at the medical faculty; 2.) The perceived difficulties and problems of foreign students; 3.) The offers for non-German students; and 4.) The specification of further possibilities of support. Given information was noted, frequencies counted and results interpreted via frequency analysis. Results: Only 39% of the medical faculties could give detailed information about the percentage of non-German students. They reported an average share of 3.9% of students with an EU migration background and 4.9% with a non-EU background. Most frequently cited offers are student conducted tutorials, language courses and tandem-programs. The most frequently reported problem by far is the perceived lack of language skills of foreign students at the beginning of their studies. Suggested solutions are mainly the development of tutorials and the improvement of German medical terminology. Discussion: Offers of support provided by medical faculties for foreign students vary greatly in type and extent. Support offered is seen to be insufficient in coping with the needs of the international students in many cases. Hence, a better coverage of international students as well as further research efforts to the specific needs and the effectiveness of applied interventions seem to be essential. PMID:25699112

  19. [A survey on knowledge, attitude and practice related to evidence-based dentistry among dental students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Zhong-Fu; Zhu, Ce; Tao, Dan-Ying; Feng, Xi-Ping; Lu, Hai-Xia

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the knowledge, attitude and practice related to evidence-based dentistry among dental students, and to provide a reference for targeted evidence-based dentistry teaching and practice evidence-based dentistry in dental students. Dental students who attended the internship in Shanghai Ninth People's Hospital and Pudong People's Hospital were invited to attend this survey. Information on knowledge, attitude and practices related evidence-based dentistry was collected through questionnaires. SPSS 21.0 software package was used for data analysis. A total of 62 dental students attended this survey. Evidence-based dentistry related knowledge and attitude scores were 5.5±1.9 and 5.1±1.0, respectively. Over three quarters of students took courses on evidence-based medicine, while around half of students (56.5%) self-reported that they knew little about evidence-based medicine. 70.5% students practiced evidence-based dentistry less than once in the process of clinical decision making per week. The majority of students (80.3%) used MEDLINE or other databases to search for practice-related literature less than once per week. 63.9% students used practice guideline. The top three barriers to practice evidence-based dentistry were lack of information resources, insufficient time and lack of search skills. Evidence-based dentistry related knowledge and practice among dental students is deficient, whereas they hold positive attitude on practice. The top three barriers to practice evidence-based dentistry are lack of information resources, insufficient time and lack of search skills.

  20. A survey of interventional radiology awareness among final-year medical students in a European country.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Leong, Sum

    2009-07-01

    Interventional radiology (IR) is a rapidly expanding specialty that is facing the challenges of turf wars and personnel shortages. Appropriate exposure of medical students to this field can be vital to recruitment of potential future trainees or referring physicians. The aim of this study was to determine the knowledge and views of final-year medical students in a single EU country regarding various aspects of IR. An electronic survey was sent via e-mail to all final-year medical students in a European country. The students were given a month to respond to the questionnaire. A total of 234 students of 675 (34.5%) replied to the survey. Of the respondents, 35% had previously completed an attachment to the radiology department. The majority of students (63%) thought their knowledge in radiology in general was poor. The percentage of students who correctly identified procedures performed by interventional radiologists was 69% for Hickman line insertion, 79% for fibroid embolization, and 67.5% for lower limb angioplasty. Sixty percent, 30%, and 47% thought that interventional radiologists perform cardiac angioplasties, perform arterial bypasses, and create AV fistulas, respectively. Forty-nine percent felt that interventional radiologists are surgically trained. Eighty-three percent of students were first made aware of angioplasty by a cardiologist. Thirty-one percent thought that interventional radiologists do ward rounds, 24% thought that interventional radiologists have admitting rights, and 26% felt that interventional radiologists run an outpatient practice. A significant number of students (76%) thought that the job prospects in IR are good or excellent but only 40.5% were willing to consider a career in IR. In conclusion, this study indicates that IR remains a nascent but attractive specialty to the majority of medical students. Further development of the existing informal undergraduate curriculum to address shortcomings will ensure that IR continues to attract

  1. Medical Students' Empathy for Vulnerable Groups: Results From a Survey and Reflective Writing Assignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellbery, Caroline; Saunders, Pamela A; Kureshi, Sarah; Visconti, Adam

    2017-12-01

    As medical education curricula increasingly acknowledge the contributions of the social determinants of health to individual health, new methods of engaging students in the care of vulnerable groups are needed. Empathy is one way to connect students with patients, but little is known about how to nurture students' empathy on behalf of populations. This study examined the relationship between individual and social empathy as groundwork for cultivating students' empathy for vulnerable groups. In 2014-2015, first-year medical students completed the Social Empathy Index at the start and end of a two-semester population health course, and they completed a reflective writing assignment exploring the challenges of caring for vulnerable patients. Pre- and posttest mean survey scores were compared, and reflective writing assignments were analyzed for themes concerning social empathy. Data from 130 students were analyzed. Scores for the contextual understanding of systemic barriers domain increased significantly. There was a trend toward increased cumulative social empathy scores that did not reach statistical significance. Students' essays revealed three themes relating to individual empathy as the foundation for social empathy; civic and moral obligations; and the role of institutional practices in caring for vulnerable groups. This study extends understanding of empathy beyond care for the individual to include care for vulnerable groups. Thus, social empathy may function as a valuable concept in developing curricula to support students' commitment to care for the underserved. Educators first need to address the many barriers students cited that impede both individual and social empathy.

  2. Why medical students choose psychiatry - a 20 country cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Kitty; Lydall, Gregory J; Malik, Amit; Ndetei, David M; Bhugra, Dinesh

    2014-01-15

    Recruitment to psychiatry is insufficient to meet projected mental health service needs world-wide. We report on the career plans of final year medical students from 20 countries, investigating factors identified from the literature which influence psychiatric career choice. Cross sectional electronic or paper survey. Subjects were final year medical students at 46 medical schools in participating countries. We assessed students' career intentions, motivations, medical school teaching and exposure to psychiatry. We assessed students' attitudes and personality factors. The main outcome measure was likelihood of specializing in psychiatry. Multilevel logistic regression was used to examine the joint effect of factors upon the main outcome. 2198 of 9135 (24%) of students responded (range 4 to 91%) across the countries. Internationally 4.5% of students definitely considered psychiatry as a career (range 1 to 12%). 19% of students (range 0 to 33%) were "quite likely", and 25% were "definitely not" considering psychiatry. Female gender, experience of mental/physical illness, media portrayal of doctors, and positive attitudes to psychiatry, but not personality factors, were associated with choosing psychiatry. Quality of psychiatric placement (correlation coefficient = 0.22, p students choosing psychiatry: importance of own vocation, odds ratio (OR) 3.01, 95% CI 1.61 to 5.91, p student selection and psychiatry teaching which affect career choice. Addressing these factors may improve recruitment to psychiatry internationally.

  3. Facilitators' influence on student PBL small group session online information resource use: a survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Elizabeth

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In problem-based learning curricular research has focused on the characteristics of good facilitators and how they influence student performance and satisfaction. Far less frequently addressed has been the question of how PBL facilitators influence the small group session activity of students. We investigated the impact that facilitators' encouragement of use or non-use of the Internet would have on the students' use of online information resources. Methods Survey of student and facilitator perceptions of facilitator behavior and student use of online information resources. Results Students who used online information resources rated their facilitators' behavior as more encouraging, while students in groups who didn't use online information resources during problem-based learning small group sessions rated their facilitators' behavior as less encouraging. This result was statistically significant. Conclusions Our study supports the role of the facilitator as an influence on medical students in small groups, particularly with respect to facilitator verbal behavior encouraging or discouraging student use of information technology in the problem-based learning small group session.

  4. Sexual behaviour of adolescents in Nigeria: cross sectional survey of secondary school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slap, Gail B; Lot, Lucy; Huang, Bin; Daniyam, Comfort A; Zink, Therese M; Succop, Paul A

    2003-01-04

    To determine whether family structure (polygamous or monogamous) is associated with sexual activity among school students in Nigeria. Cross sectional school survey with a two stage, clustered sampling design. 4218 students aged 12-21 years attending 39 schools in Plateau state, Nigeria. Responses from 2705 students were included in the analysis. Report of ever having had sexual intercourse. Variables of interest included sexual history, age, sex, religion, family polygamy, educational level of parents, having a dead parent, and sense of connectedness to parents and school. Overall 909 students (34%) reported ever having had sexual intercourse, and 1119 (41%) reported a polygamous family structure. Sexual activity was more common among students from polygamous families (42% of students) than monogamous families (28%) (chi2=64.23; Pforced sex. Secondary school students in Nigeria from a polygamous family structure are more likely to have engaged in sexual activity than students from a monogamous family structure. This effect is partly explained by a higher likelihood of marriage during adolescence and forced sex. Students' sense of connectedness to their parents and school, regardless of family structure, decreases the likelihood of sexual activity, and fostering this sense may help reduce risky sexual behaviour among Nigerian youth.

  5. Medical student illness and impairment: a vignette-based survey study involving 955 students at 9 medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Laura Weiss; Warner, Teddy D; Rogers, Melinda; Horwitz, Russell; Redgrave, Graham

    2005-01-01

    Physician impairment is defined by the presence of a physical, mental, or substance-related disorder that interferes with the ability to practice medicine competently and safely. The seeds of impairment may be sown early in adulthood, and medical students experience health issues that may receive insufficient attention in the context of a rigorous training period. Few empirical studies have examined the attitudes of medical students toward recognizing and acting upon signs of potentially impairing illnesses in peers. Medical students at 9 medical schools were invited to participate in a written survey exploring personal health care issues during training. As part of this larger project, students were asked to imagine their response in 3 situations to a medical student who is discovered to have serious symptoms and potential impairment secondary to mental illness, substance abuse, or diabetes. Responses were gathered from 955 students (52% overall response rate). For all of the vignettes, "tell no one but encourage him/her to seek professional help" was the most prevalent reaction (45%, 53%, and 49%, respectively) as opposed to seek advice (37%, 35%, and 42%) and notify the Dean's office (18%, 12%, and 9%). Willingness to report varied by school, and women were somewhat less likely to formally report medical student illness. This study suggests that medical students attach great importance to preserving the confidentiality of fellow medical students who may experience even very severe symptoms. This pattern may have important implications for the early recognition and treatment of potentially impairing disorders. Greater attention to these issues may help assure the health of early career physicians as well as the many patients whose safety and well-being are entrusted to their care.

  6. Sex Survey about university students of UPF (from 20 to 27 years old

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Maté

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present survey was to assess the level of sexual knowledge, attitudes and practice of university students, adult young people from 20 to 27 years old and to identify if there was any significant difference in terms of age and sexual activity with other surveys. The survey was undertaken in which data were collected from 838 students who attended the third and four course of their graduate in Humanities. Differences between answers by sex were tested using Pearson’s χ2 test. The study established that behaviour, knowledge, attitudes and practice of the universitary students vary by sex in some regards. The fi rst sexual relationships is around they have 15,4 years old and no statistically significant difference was found between sex. The average of the starter interesting about sex is around 13,5 years old and a statistically signifi cant difference was found between sex, the average of boys is 12,7 years old and girls 13,7. People who were sexually active are satisfi ed and show is so important to their wellbeing. Majority use contraceptive methods in the last relationship and the same percentage use the condom in order to avoid sexually transmitted diseases. The study confirmed that there are 21% the students don’t use any method to avoid sexually transmitted diseases. Our conclusion is both, the knowledge and attitudes of students necessarily required appropriate sex education in the secondary school.

  7. Higher Education: How Freshmen and First-Year Journalism and Mass Communication Students at HBCUs and PWUs Used the Internet in Their Decision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Jerry, II

    2013-01-01

    This study set out to explore how the Internet was used by Journalism and Mass Communications Program students at Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Predominately White Universities in their college choice and if these institutions were able to provide the information the respondents were looking for in their search. The study found…

  8. Turking Statistics: Student-Generated Surveys Increase Student Engagement and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitley, Cameron T.; Dietz, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    Thirty years ago, Hubert M. Blalock Jr. published an article in "Teaching Sociology" about the importance of teaching statistics. We honor Blalock's legacy by assessing how using Amazon Mechanical Turk (MTurk) in statistics classes can enhance student learning and increase statistical literacy among social science gradaute students. In…

  9. Comparative Analysis of Student Surveys on International Student Experience in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebennikov, Leonid; Skaines, Ivan

    2007-01-01

    This article seeks to contribute to the current discourse on internationalisation of higher education in Australia and to understanding and managing the increasing diversity of the student body. Its specific concern is a comparison of international versus domestic student experience regarding a range of a university's academic and general services…

  10. Study on Life Education for College Students--A Survey on Students in Guangzhou

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xingyan

    2008-01-01

    Due to the social environment of China's reform and opening up, as well as China's education system with knowledge impartation as its focus, some college students lack the humanistic care and education of value and significance of life. Universities should plan effective activities to make students realize the importance of life. They should…

  11. 2012 Annual Survey of Journalism and Mass Communication Enrollments: Enrollments Decline for Second Year in a Row

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Lee B.; Vlad, Tudor; Simpson, Holly Anne

    2013-01-01

    Enrollments in journalism and mass communication programs in the United States have declined over the last two years, reversing a pattern of growth that has sustained the field for twenty years. It is a decline at a time of continued growth in enrollments at universities generally. It is a decline at a time when enrollments have been growing in…

  12. Citation-Based Journal Rankings for AI Research A Business Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Chun Hung; Clyde W. Holsapple; Lee, Anita

    1996-01-01

    A significant and growing area of business-computing research is concerned with AI. Knowledge about which journals are the most influential forums for disseminating AI research is important for business school faculty, students, administrators, and librarians. To date, there has been only one study attempting to rank AI journals from a business-computing perspective. It used a subjective methodology, surveying opinions of business faculty about a prespecified list of 30 journals. Here, we rep...

  13. [Survey regarding mental health conditions of high school students and attitudes of students and their teachers toward students' mental health issues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Isao; Fujii, Chiyo; Fukuzawa, Ayako

    2013-01-01

    We administered a self-reporting questionnaire survey regarding the mental health conditions of high school students and attitudes of students and their teachers toward students' mental health issues. In addition, we discussed the requirements for high school students' mental health support system. The subjects were 3,312 students and 208 teachers in four Shizuoka prefectural public high schools in 2009. University Personality Inventory (UPI) is usually conducted to assess university students' mental state and is a questionnaire that high school students can answer easily. Therefore, we adopted UPI for this survey. UPI was composed of 56 unhealthy and 4 healthy condition items. High school students completed the UPI and determined the sum of unhealthy condition items; a higher score indicated a poorer mental health status. The average UPI score of all students (n = 3,312) was 12.7 points, and that of females (n = 1,217)was 15.2 points, which was significantly higher than the 11.3 points of males (n = 2,095). Those with scores > or = 30 points (7.5%), which was more than half of the maximum score, were designated as the High Score (HS) group and considered to have poor mental health. Those with scores of > or = 40 (1.4%) seemed to have very poor mental health, and there was concern that they may be suffering from psychosis. Our observations indicated that HS students were likely to avoid seeking help regarding mental health issues, which was especially true for male HS students. The majority of students chose their friends and parents as advisers, but HS students were significantly more likely to choose advisers who were engaged in jobs related to medical work. Students in both the HS and non-HS groups who did not wish to consult anyone else about their mental conditions wanted to be approached by those around them. High school teachers hesitated to intervene with mentally disturbed students and attempted to resolve problems within the school. Thus, it appears

  14. A Study of General Education Astronomy Students' Understandings of Cosmology. Part I. Development and Validation of Four Conceptual Cosmology Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Colin S.; Prather, Edward E.; Duncan, Douglas K.

    2011-01-01

    This is the first in a series of five articles describing a national study of general education astronomy students' conceptual and reasoning difficulties with cosmology. In this paper, we describe the process by which we designed four new surveys to assess general education astronomy students' conceptual cosmology knowledge. These surveys focused…

  15. Students' Motivations for Choosing (Or Not) to Study Portuguese: A Survey of Beginning-Level University Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bateman, Blair E.; de Almeida Oliveira, Desirée

    2014-01-01

    Although previous literature has discussed ways of promoting the study of Portuguese, to our knowledge no study has ever directly surveyed students to ascertain why they chose to learn the language. This study reports on a survey of the motivations of first- and second-year Portuguese students to study the language, and contrasts their motivations…

  16. A Survey of Former Business Students (General Business, Management, Marketing, Real Estate). Summary Findings of Respondents District-Wide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glyer-Culver, Betty

    In fall 2002 staff of the Los Rios Community College District (LRCCD) Office of Institutional Research collaborated with occupational deans, academic deans, and faculty to develop and administer a survey of former business students. The survey was designed to determine how well courses had met the needs of former business students in the areas of…

  17. Predicting Student Performance in Web-Based Distance Education Courses Based on Survey Instruments Measuring Personality Traits and Technical Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Two common web-based surveys, "Is Online Learning Right for Me?' and "What Technical Skills Do I Need?", were combined into a single survey instrument and given to 228 on-campus and 83 distance education students. The students were enrolled in four different classes (business, computer information services, criminal justice, and…

  18. The ethical and legal implications of nanotechnologies: a preliminary survey to picture the perceptions of law students and medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daloiso, V; Ricci, G; Minacori, R; Sacchini, D; Spagnolo, A G

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this preliminary survey was to picture the current knowledge and opinions of law students and medical students about nanotechnologies. Data were collected in June 2012 by interviews with 60 students of the University of Camerino (Macerata, Italy) defined as "jurist population" and 159 medical students of the Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore (Rome, Italy) defined as "medical population". The Authors found that both law and medical students have some knowledge on what nanotechnologies are; with regards to the ethical issues and risks perception, both categories indicated that nanotechnologies generate bioethical issues. Nevertheless, a high percentage of respondents believed that neither existing technologies nor nanotechnologies pose risks for human health. Opinions on regulation of nanotechnologies are instead different. These preliminary findings underlined the ambiguity surrounding nanotechnologies both concerning the bioethical dimension and risks perception and their regulation. These early data therefore showed a need of additional reflection on these technologies that should be investigated more in detail; moving from students, future scientists and regulators, these data could contribute to clarify the debate on them.

  19. How should complementary and alternative medicine be taught to medical students in Switzerland? A survey of medical experts and students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolao, Marie; Täuber, Martin G; Heusser, Peter

    2010-01-01

    In Switzerland and in the whole western world, the growing popularity of CAM is calling for its implementation in the undergraduate medical curriculum. To determine whether medical experts and medical students are favorable to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) education at Swiss medical schools and to investigate their opinion about its form, content and goals. Experts in the fields of conventional medicine (COM, n = 106), CAM experts (n = 29) and senior medical students (n = 640) were surveyed by an online questionnaire. 48.7% of the COM experts, 100% of the CAM experts, and 72.6% of the students are favorable to CAM education at Swiss medical schools. The most requested disciplines are acupuncture, phytotherapy, and homeopathy; the most recommended characteristics of CAM education are elective courses, during the clinical years, in the format of seminars and lectures. For the CAM experts, the priority is to improve the students' knowledge of CAM, whereas for the COM experts and the students, the priority is to analyze efficiency, security, interactions, and secondary effects of CAM. CAM courses should be informative, giving the students sufficient knowledge to provide a critical analysis of efficiency and security of different CAM modalities.

  20. How Important Are High Response Rates for College Surveys?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosnacht, Kevin; Sarraf, Shimon; Howe, Elijah; Peck, Leah K.

    2017-01-01

    Surveys play an important role in understanding the higher education landscape. About 60 percent of the published research in major higher education journals utilized survey data (Pike, 2007). Institutions also commonly use surveys to assess student outcomes and evaluate programs, instructors, and even cafeteria food. However, declining survey…

  1. Alcohol mixed with energy drinks: methodology and design of the Utrecht Student Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Haan L

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Lydia de Haan,1 Hein A de Haan,2,3 Berend Olivier,1 Joris C Verster11Utrecht University, Utrecht Institute for Pharmaceutical Sciences, Division of Pharmacology, Utrecht, The Netherlands; 2Tactus Addiction Treatment, Deventer, The Netherlands; 3Nijmegen Institute for Scientist-Practitioners in Addiction, Nijmegen, The NetherlandsAbstract: This paper describes the methodology of the Utrecht Student Survey. This online survey was conducted in June 2011 by 6002 students living in Utrecht, The Netherlands. The aim of the survey was to determine the potential impact of mixing alcoholic beverages with energy drinks on overall alcohol consumption and alcohol-related consequences. In contrast to most previous surveys conducted on this topic, the current survey used a more appropriate within-subject design, comparing the alcohol consumption of individuals who consume alcohol mixed with energy drinks on occasions. Specifically, a comparison was conducted to examine the occasions during which these individuals consume this mixture versus occasions during which they consume alcohol alone. In addition to energy drinks, the consumption of other non-alcoholic mixers was also assessed when combined with alcoholic beverages. Furthermore, the reasons for consuming energy drinks alone or in combination with alcohol were investigated, and were compared to reasons for mixing alcohol with other non-alcoholic beverages. Finally, personality characteristics and the level of risk-taking behavior among the individuals were also assessed to explore their relationship with alcohol consumption. The Utrecht Student Survey will be replicated in the USA, Australia, and the UK. Results will be pooled, but also examined for possible cross-cultural differences.Keywords: energy drink, alcohol, alcohol related consequences, survey, methodology

  2. Information-Seeking Behaviors of Medical Students: A Cross-Sectional Web-Based Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Carroll, Aoife Marie; Westby, Erin Patricia; Dooley, Joseph; Gordon, Kevin E

    2015-06-29

    Medical students face an information-rich environment in which retrieval and appraisal strategies are increasingly important. To describe medical students' current pattern of health information resource use and characterize their experience of instruction on information search and appraisal. We conducted a cross-sectional web-based survey of students registered in the four-year MD Program at Dalhousie University (Halifax, Nova Scotia, and Saint John, New Brunswick, sites), Canada. We collected self-reported data on information-seeking behavior, instruction, and evaluation of resources in the context of their medical education. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Surveys were returned by 213 of 462 eligible students (46.1%). Most respondents (165/204, 80.9%) recalled receiving formal instruction regarding information searches, but this seldom included nontraditional tools such as Google (23/107, 11.1%), Wikipedia, or social media. In their daily practice, however, they reported heavy use of these tools, as well as EBM summaries. Accessibility, understandability, and overall usefulness were common features of highly used resources. Students identified challenges managing information and/or resource overload and source accessibility. Medical students receive instruction primarily on searching and assessing primary medical literature. In their daily practice, however, they rely heavily on nontraditional tools as well as EBM summaries. Attention to appropriate use and appraisal of nontraditional sources might enhance the current EBM curriculum.

  3. [The Humboldtian model in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery - a student survey on teaching and venia legendi].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alawi, Seyed Arash; Busch, Lukas Fabian; Limbourg, Anne; Jokuszies, Andreas; Ipaktchi, Ramin; Vogt, Peter M

    2017-10-26

    Background The workload of university hospitals and hospitals with university association includes clinical patient care as well as teaching and research in particular. The current development with focus on financial issues leads to a reduction of teaching and research capacities. Economic focus in university medicine changes priorities of academic surgery. Methods An online survey questioned medical students with regard to subjective assessment of quality of the academic body of university hospitals and current teaching quality. Students evaluated the current quality of teaching of postdoctoral lecturers in relation to their career stage and made suggestions for quality of teaching improvement. Results A total of 166 students participated in the survey. Of 123 students, about 78 % stated that the reputation of postdoctoral lecturers increases with the habilitation but about 85 % stated that professional expectations also rise. About 43 % of the students aim to achieve a postdoctoral lecture qualification. Discussion Among students academic career is still attractive, but restructuring and modernization of established working models is an essential prerequisite. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Experiential learning in high energy physics: a survey of students at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camporesi, Tiziano; Catalano, Gelsomina; Florio, Massimo; Giffoni, Francesco

    2017-03-01

    More than 36 000 students and post-docs will be involved until 2025 in research at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) mainly through international collaborations. To what extent they value the skills acquired? Do students expect that their learning experience will have an impact on their professional future? By drawing from earlier literature on experiential learning, we have designed a survey of current and former students at LHC. To quantitatively measure the students’ perceptions, we compare the salary expectations of current students with the assessment of those now employed in different jobs. Survey data are analysed by ordered logistic regression models, which allow multivariate statistical analyses with limited dependent variables. Results suggest that experiential learning at LHC positively correlates with both current and former students’ salary expectations. Those already employed clearly confirm the expectations of current students. At least two not mutually exclusive explanations underlie the results. First, the training at LHC is perceived to provide students valuable skills, which in turn affect the salary expectations; secondly, the LHC research experience per se may act as signal in the labour market. Respondents put a price tag on their learning experience, a ‘LHC salary premium’ ranging from 5% to 12% compared with what they would have expected for their career without such an experience at CERN.

  5. Injury risk behaviours among young Asian New Zealanders: a national survey of secondary school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasanathan, Kumanan; Ameratunga, Shanthi; Tin Tin, Sandar; Robinson, Elizabeth; Chen, Janet; Young, Wilson; Watson, Peter D

    2008-02-01

    To investigate injury risk behaviours among young Asian New Zealanders. Secondary analysis of data from Youth2000, a nationwide cross-sectional youth health survey conducted in 2001 in a random sample of New Zealand (NZ) secondary schools using a multimedia, computer-assisted, self-administered interview. Of the 9,567 survey participants (aged 12 to 18 years), this study was restricted to students who identified with an 'Asian' ethnic category (n=922). Many young Asian New Zealanders report engaging in injury risk behaviours, including: not using helmets when cycling; dangerous drink and drug driving; and being intentionally physically harmed by others. NZ-born Asian students are more likely than overseas-born Asian students to report most of these risky behaviours. Chinese and Indian students are less likely to engage in most of these behaviours than their NZ European peers. While young Asian New Zealanders are a relatively healthy population, many engage in well-recognised injury risk behaviours. The lower levels of these risky behaviours in Indian and Chinese students compared with NZ European students, and the positive dose-response effect seen in relation to duration of residence in NZ, are likely to be due to the effect of acculturation. Injury prevention strategies for young people in NZ need to specifically consider the diversity, context and specific risk profiles of young Asian New Zealanders. Health promotion efforts for this group should target the use of safety equipment and risky driving behaviours and consider traditional cultural practices that may be protective.

  6. Student nurses' motivation to choose gerontological nursing as a career in China: a survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Min; Cheng, Cheng; Tian, Yan; Fan, Xiuzhen

    2015-07-01

    The world's population is aging, and the need for nurses is increasing. Working with older adults, however, has always been an unpopular career choice among student nurses. It is important to understand student nurses' motivation for choosing gerontological nursing as a career. The purpose of this study was to examine the motivation for choosing gerontological nursing as a career and to identify the associated factors among student nurses. Cross-sectional survey. Participants were last-semester student nurses from 7 universities offering nursing undergraduate programs in Shandong, China. Of the 1290 student nurses, 916 completed the survey (a response rate of 71.0%). The outcome variable was the motivation to choose gerontological nursing as a career. This was measured using a motivation questionnaire that included expectancy and value subscales. Other instruments included the Chinese version of the Facts on Aging Quiz I, the Geriatrics Attitudes Scale, the Anxiety about Aging Scale, a clinical practice environment questionnaire and a self-administered general information questionnaire. Student nurses' expectancy and value aspects of motivation for choosing gerontological nursing as a career were both at a moderate level; the highest value they held was of personal interest. Clinical practice environment, anxiety about aging and the attitudes about geriatrics were the main factors influencing student nurses' motivation to choose gerontological nursing as a career in China. It is imperative for nurse educators to improve the gerontological nursing clinical practice environment for student nurses. Moreover, cultivating student nurses' positive attitudes about geriatrics and relieving anxiety about aging could be beneficial. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Student experiences of participating in five collaborative blended learning courses in Africa and Asia: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Salla; Yan, Weirong; Meragia, Elnta; Mahomed, Hassan; Rosales-Klintz, Senia; Skinner, Donald; Zwarenstein, Merrick

    2016-01-01

    As blended learning (BL; a combination of face-to-face and e-learning methods) becomes more commonplace, it is important to assess whether students find it useful for their studies. ARCADE HSSR and ARCADE RSDH (African Regional Capacity Development for Health Systems and Services Research; Asian Regional Capacity Development for Research on Social Determinants of Health) were unique capacity-building projects, focusing on developing BL in Africa and Asia on issues related to global health. We aimed to evaluate the student experience of participating in any of five ARCADE BL courses implemented collaboratively at institutions from Africa, Asia, and Europe. A post-course student survey with 118 students was conducted. The data were collected using email or through an e-learning platform. Data were analysed with SAS, using bivariate and multiple logistic regression. We focused on the associations between various demographic and experience variables and student-reported overall perceptions of the courses. In total, 82 students responded to the survey. In bivariate logistic regression, the course a student took [ p =0.0067, odds ratio (OR)=0.192; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.058-0.633], male gender of student ( p =0.0474, OR=0.255; 95% CI: 0.066-0.985), not experiencing technical problems ( p learning component to their studies. In contrast, perceiving the assessment as adequate was associated with a worse perception of overall usefulness. In a multiple regression, the course, experiencing no technical problems, and perceiving the discussion as adequate remained significantly associated with a more positively rated perception of the usefulness of the online component of the blended courses. The results suggest that lack of technical problems and functioning discussion forums are of importance during BL courses focusing on global health-related topics. Through paying attention to these aspects, global health education could be provided using BL approaches to student

  8. Survey on the perception of urology as a specialty by medical students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soojin; Farrokhyar, Forough; Braga, Luis H.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Upon inquiring with medical students and urologists across Canada, it is evident that urology is perceived as a male-dominant specialty, among other stereotypes. These misperceptions may hamper the recruitment of the best and brightest trainees. With that in mind, we surveyed medical students at our institution to obtain an objective assessment of their perception of urology and to determine the cause for misperceptions. Methods: A 25-factor, validated, anonymous, cross-sectional, self-reported, electronic survey was sent to all medical students at McMaster University to assess their perception of urology. The survey was piloted among students and educational leaders to optimize face and content validity, and minimize measurement bias. Six variables (years in training, role model, a family member or friend in urology, gender, and exposure) were selected a priori and entered into a logistic regression model to determine factors associated with a positive impression of the specialty. Results: The overall response rate was 70%. Of the respondents, 66% had no exposure to urology and 61% found the amount of exposure to be inadequate. Urology staff and resident involvement in education was considered to be poor by over 30% of medical students. Over 70% perceived urology to be a specialty with a great gender imbalance. On multivariate analysis, exposure to urology was the most important factor (purology exposure and poor staff and resident involvement in undergraduate education were seen as potential causes for misperceptions of the specialty. Increasing exposure to urology, encouraging female students, constant effort to approach senior students, and providing mentorship are found to be important factors in establishing a positive perception of urology PMID:27800058

  9. Mental disorders among college students in the World Health Organization World Mental Health Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerbach, R P; Alonso, J; Axinn, W G; Cuijpers, P; Ebert, D D; Green, J G; Hwang, I; Kessler, R C; Liu, H; Mortier, P; Nock, M K; Pinder-Amaker, S; Sampson, N A; Aguilar-Gaxiola, S; Al-Hamzawi, A; Andrade, L H; Benjet, C; Caldas-de-Almeida, J M; Demyttenaere, K; Florescu, S; de Girolamo, G; Gureje, O; Haro, J M; Karam, E G; Kiejna, A; Kovess-Masfety, V; Lee, S; McGrath, J J; O'Neill, S; Pennell, B-E; Scott, K; Ten Have, M; Torres, Y; Zaslavsky, A M; Zarkov, Z; Bruffaerts, R

    2016-10-01

    Although mental disorders are significant predictors of educational attainment throughout the entire educational career, most research on mental disorders among students has focused on the primary and secondary school years. The World Health Organization World Mental Health Surveys were used to examine the associations of mental disorders with college entry and attrition by comparing college students (n = 1572) and non-students in the same age range (18-22 years; n = 4178), including non-students who recently left college without graduating (n = 702) based on surveys in 21 countries (four low/lower-middle income, five upper-middle-income, one lower-middle or upper-middle at the times of two different surveys, and 11 high income). Lifetime and 12-month prevalence and age-of-onset of DSM-IV anxiety, mood, behavioral and substance disorders were assessed with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI). One-fifth (20.3%) of college students had 12-month DSM-IV/CIDI disorders; 83.1% of these cases had pre-matriculation onsets. Disorders with pre-matriculation onsets were more important than those with post-matriculation onsets in predicting subsequent college attrition, with substance disorders and, among women, major depression the most important such disorders. Only 16.4% of students with 12-month disorders received any 12-month healthcare treatment for their mental disorders. Mental disorders are common among college students, have onsets that mostly occur prior to college entry, in the case of pre-matriculation disorders are associated with college attrition, and are typically untreated. Detection and effective treatment of these disorders early in the college career might reduce attrition and improve educational and psychosocial functioning.

  10. Medical Student Experiences on Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry Rotations: A Nationwide Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Fremonta; Abbasi, Omair; Kasick, David; Lee, Kewchang; Pelic, Christine; Zinser, Jennifer; Harris, Thomas; Funk, Margo

    Consultation-liaison (C-L) psychiatry clerkship rotations may improve medical students' understanding of psychiatric principles relevant to the settings in which they will ultimately practice. This study aimed to characterize students' experiences on C-L rotations. This cross-sectional survey study, sponsored by the Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine Subcommittee on Medical Student Education, was conducted at 5 US medical schools between 2012 and 2016. After the C-L rotation, students completed a voluntary 17-item survey. A total of 235 surveys were collected (mean response rate = 92%). The most frequently endorsed benefit of C-L was learning to manage psychiatric disorders in the context of medical illness (89%). The most frequently endorsed drawback was inconsistent/excessively variable workload (40%). Overall, 82% of respondents recommended C-L to other students; 80% reported that the ideal clerkship would include exposure to both C-L and inpatient psychiatry. Overall, 38% reported that their C-L experience increased their interest in psychiatry as a career. Effect of C-L on interest in psychiatry did not differ by study site, age, sex, clerkship length, or time spent on C-L. Respondents who noted more positive role-modeling on C-L compared to other clerkship rotations were more likely to report increased interest in a psychiatry career (odds ratio = 2.70). Most medical students perceive C-L rotations favorably. Positive role modeling may increase their consideration of psychiatry specialization. The findings that C-L rotation length did not correlate with attitudes and that most students preferred exposure to both inpatient and C-L psychiatry suggest that C-L exposure can beneficially be integrated into core clerkships containing other elements. Copyright © 2018 The Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Survey on the perception of urology as a specialty by medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soojin; Farrokhyar, Forough; Braga, Luis H

    2016-01-01

    Upon inquiring with medical students and urologists across Canada, it is evident that urology is perceived as a male-dominant specialty, among other stereotypes. These misperceptions may hamper the recruitment of the best and brightest trainees. With that in mind, we surveyed medical students at our institution to obtain an objective assessment of their perception of urology and to determine the cause for misperceptions. A 25-factor, validated, anonymous, cross-sectional, self-reported, electronic survey was sent to all medical students at McMaster University to assess their perception of urology. The survey was piloted among students and educational leaders to optimize face and content validity, and minimize measurement bias. Six variables (years in training, role model, a family member or friend in urology, gender, and exposure) were selected a priori and entered into a logistic regression model to determine factors associated with a positive impression of the specialty. The overall response rate was 70%. Of the respondents, 66% had no exposure to urology and 61% found the amount of exposure to be inadequate. Urology staff and resident involvement in education was considered to be poor by over 30% of medical students. Over 70% perceived urology to be a specialty with a great gender imbalance. On multivariate analysis, exposure to urology was the most important factor (pstudents' positive perception of the specialty, in addition to male gender, earlier years in training, and positive role models. Concerns regarding inadequate urology exposure and poor staff and resident involvement in undergraduate education were seen as potential causes for misperceptions of the specialty. Increasing exposure to urology, encouraging female students, constant effort to approach senior students, and providing mentorship are found to be important factors in establishing a positive perception of urology.

  12. Teaching child and adolescent psychiatry to undergraduate medical students - A survey in German-speaking countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Florian

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To conduct a survey about teaching child and adolescent psychiatry to undergraduate medical students in German-speaking countries. Methods A questionnaire was sent to the 33 academic departments of child and adolescent psychiatry in Germany, Austria, and the German-speaking part of Switzerland. Results All departments responded. For teaching knowledge, the methods most commonly reported were lectures and case presentations. The most important skills to be taught were thought to be how to assess psychopathology in children and how to assess families. For elective courses, the departments reported using a wide range of teaching methods, many with active involvement of the students. An average of 34 hours per semester is currently allocated by the departments for teaching child and adolescent psychiatry to medical students. Required courses are often taught in cooperation with adult psychiatry and pediatrics. Achievement of educational objectives is usually assessed with written exams or multiple-choice tests. Only a minority of the departments test the achievement of skills. Conclusions Two ways of improving education in child and adolescent psychiatry are the introduction of elective courses for students interested in the field and participation of child and adolescent psychiatrists in required courses and in longitudinal courses so as to reach all students. Cooperation within and across medical schools can enable departments of child and adolescent psychiatry, despite limited resources, to become more visible and this specialty to become more attractive to medical students. Compared to the findings in earlier surveys, this survey indicates a trend towards increased involvement of academic departments of child and adolescent psychiatry in training medical students.

  13. Factors affecting residency rank-listing: A Maxdiff survey of graduating Canadian medical students

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    Forgie Melissa

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Canada, graduating medical students consider many factors, including geographic, social, and academic, when ranking residency programs through the Canadian Residency Matching Service (CaRMS. The relative significance of these factors is poorly studied in Canada. It is also unknown how students differentiate between their top program choices. This survey study addresses the influence of various factors on applicant decision making. Methods Graduating medical students from all six Ontario medical schools were invited to participate in an online survey available for three weeks prior to the CaRMS match day in 2010. Max-Diff discrete choice scaling, multiple choice, and drop-list style questions were employed. The Max-Diff data was analyzed using a scaled simple count method. Data for how students distinguish between top programs was analyzed as percentages. Comparisons were made between male and female applicants as well as between family medicine and specialist applicants; statistical significance was determined by the Mann-Whitney test. Results In total, 339 of 819 (41.4% eligible students responded. The variety of clinical experiences and resident morale were weighed heavily in choosing a residency program; whereas financial incentives and parental leave attitudes had low influence. Major reasons that applicants selected their first choice program over their second choice included the distance to relatives and desirability of the city. Both genders had similar priorities when selecting programs. Family medicine applicants rated the variety of clinical experiences more importantly; whereas specialty applicants emphasized academic factors more. Conclusions Graduating medical students consider program characteristics such as the variety of clinical experiences and resident morale heavily in terms of overall priority. However, differentiation between their top two choice programs is often dependent on social/geographic factors

  14. Evaluation of the medical student research programme in Norwegian medical schools. A survey of students and supervisors

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    Tømmerås Karin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Medical Student Research Programme is a national education and grant scheme for medical students who wish to carry out research in parallel with their studies. The purpose of the programme is to increase recruitment of people with a standard medical degree to medical research. The Research Programme was established in 2002 and underwent a thorough evaluation during the spring of 2007. The evaluation should investigate if the programme had fulfilled its objectives of increased recruitment to medical research, in addition to the students' and supervisors' satisfaction of the programme, and unwanted differences between the universities. Methods Data was collected from students, supervisors and administrative staff via web-based questionnaires. Information about admission, implementation, results achieved and satisfaction was analysed and compared between the four Norwegian medical schools. In addition, the position of the scheme in relation to the national Quality Reform of Higher Education was analysed. Results At the end of 2006, the Medical Student Research Programme had recruited 265 medical students to research. These consisted of 214 active students, 35 who had completed their studies and only 17 who had dropped out. Both students and supervisors were generally very satisfied with the scheme, including the curriculum, the results achieved and the administrative service. The majority of students wanted to continue their research towards a PhD and, of those who had completed the Medical Student Research Programme, practically all had published one or several scientific papers. The survey showed only small differences between the four medical schools, despite their choice of somewhat different solutions in terms of administration and organisation. The Medical Student Research Programme satisfies the majority of the demands of the Quality Reform, however as an integrated research programme aimed at a PhD it presupposes

  15. Evaluation of the medical student research programme in Norwegian medical schools. A survey of students and supervisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunskaar, Steinar; Breivik, Jarle; Siebke, Maje; Tømmerås, Karin; Figenschau, Kristian; Hansen, John-Bjarne

    2009-07-14

    The Medical Student Research Programme is a national education and grant scheme for medical students who wish to carry out research in parallel with their studies. The purpose of the programme is to increase recruitment of people with a standard medical degree to medical research. The Research Programme was established in 2002 and underwent a thorough evaluation during the spring of 2007. The evaluation should investigate if the programme had fulfilled its objectives of increased recruitment to medical research, in addition to the students' and supervisors' satisfaction of the programme, and unwanted differences between the universities. Data was collected from students, supervisors and administrative staff via web-based questionnaires. Information about admission, implementation, results achieved and satisfaction was analysed and compared between the four Norwegian medical schools. In addition, the position of the scheme in relation to the national Quality Reform of Higher Education was analysed. At the end of 2006, the Medical Student Research Programme had recruited 265 medical students to research. These consisted of 214 active students, 35 who had completed their studies and only 17 who had dropped out. Both students and supervisors were generally very satisfied with the scheme, including the curriculum, the results achieved and the administrative service. The majority of students wanted to continue their research towards a PhD and, of those who had completed the Medical Student Research Programme, practically all had published one or several scientific papers. The survey showed only small differences between the four medical schools, despite their choice of somewhat different solutions in terms of administration and organisation. The Medical Student Research Programme satisfies the majority of the demands of the Quality Reform, however as an integrated research programme aimed at a PhD it presupposes access to PhD courses before the completion of medical

  16. Medical students as patients: implications of their dual role as explored in a vignette-based survey study of 1027 medical students at nine medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Laura Weiss; Warner, Teddy D; Smithpeter, Megan; Rogers, Melinda; Horwitz, Russell

    2011-01-01

    Medical students experience a range of mental and physical illnesses during training and may encounter significant barriers in seeking health care. Little is known about the issues surrounding the dual role as both learner and patient when a medical student seeks care at his or her training institution. A confidential survey examining medical students' health care needs, practices, and concerns was administered at 9 US medical schools. One part of the survey focused on responses to 4 medical student-patient vignettes. The vignettes systematically varied preexisting student vs preexisting patient status before assuming a medical student-patient role, and the vignettes also varied illness situations that were more vs less stigmatizing. Responses were analyzed using χ(2) and multivariate analysis of variance tests. A total of 1027 students participated. We found that students were more likely to accept the dual role as medical student-patient in vignettes depicting a preexisting patient role than a preexisting student role. Students sought to avoid the dual role as student-patient in the context of stigmatizing health concerns. Women students were more likely than men to reject the dual role in all cases. Medical students appear to be sensitive to the conflicts that may be associated with the dual role as both medical student and patient when seeking care at their training institution. Our data suggest the importance of substantive efforts to promote the health, interests, and well-being of medical student-patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A national survey of international electives for medical students in Japan: 2009-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishigori, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Osamu; Sugimoto, Naomi; Kitamura, Kiyoshi; McMahon, Graham T

    2012-01-01

    International electives can provide experiences for medical students to learn about health systems and foster critical self-reflection. So far, little is known about the status of Japanese students' engagement in international electives. We sought to provide information about the internationalization of Japanese medical education by clarifying the current situations of international electives. We undertook a cross-sectional national 17-item questionnaire survey of program officers in all medical schools in Japan in February 2010. Sixty-five (81.3%) of 80 Japanese medical schools responded to the questionnaire. 462 Japanese medical students (3% of all students in their clinical years) travelled to North America (45.5%), Asia (25.0%), or Western Europe (24.4%) to study abroad. The number of students who participated in international electives was significantly increased when academic credit was available (median 6 vs. 1, p students, p students were evaluated by means of written assignment on return. About 3% of Japanese medical students participate in international clinical exchanges. Academic credit and institutional affiliations appear to promote greater utilization of international exchange opportunities.

  18. German medical students´ exposure and attitudes toward pharmaceutical promotion: A cross-sectional survey

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    Jahnke, Kristine

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available [english] Objective: Early contact of medical students with pharmaceutical promotion has been shown in many international studies. We assessed the frequency and places of contact of German medical students to pharmaceutical promotion and examined their attitudes toward pharmaceutical promotional activities.Methods: This cross-sectional survey was based on a self-developed questionnaire. It was distributed to all clinical students at the University of Goettingen Medical School in 2010. A 4-point rating scale was used to assess the attitudes toward different statements regarding pharmaceutical promotion.Results: The overall response rate was 55% (702/1287. The proportion of students with direct contact to pharmaceutical sales representatives increased from 21% in the first clinical year up to 77% in the final year. 60% were contacted during their elective clerkship. 80% had accepted promotional gifts. 86% stated their prescribing behavior to be unsusceptible to the influence of accepting promotional gifts. However, 35% of the unsusceptible students assumed doctors to be susceptible. Almost all (90% reported that dealing with pharmaceutical promotion was never addressed during lectures and 65% did not feel well prepared for interactions with the pharmaceutical industry. 19% agreed to prohibit contacts between medical students and the pharmaceutical industry.Conclusions: German medical students get in contact with pharmaceutical promotion early and frequently. There is limited awareness for associated conflicts of interests. Medical schools need to regulate contacts and incorporate the topic in their curriculum to prepare students for interactions with the pharmaceutical industry.

  19. The Value of the Subinternship: A Survey of Fourth Year Medical Students

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    Eric H. Green, MD MSc

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although the subinternship is often regarded as an important part of many fourth year curricula it is rarely studied. Purpose: We aimed to understand the how well the subinternship prepared medical students to perform core clinical skills. Methods: Senior medical students at Boston University School of Medicine rated their perception of the effectiveness of the subinternship and “medical school overall” in preparing them to perform core clinical skills using a written survey. Results: Overall, 69% (101 of students responded. Students believe that the subinternship prepares them to perform most key skills involved in day-to-day medical care. However, students feel less prepared by either their subinternship or overall medical school experience to carry out some complex patient communication skills including delivering “bad news” and discussing end-of-life wishes. Conclusions: The subinternship appears to be effective in preparing students for many of the challenges they will face as an intern and beyond. However, students identified several complex communication skills that could be addressed in part by the subinternship for which they felt unprepared. Student learning would likely be enhanced by creating a longitudinal program to teach these higher-level communication skills during medical school and by integrating practice and feedback of these skills into the subinternship

  20. Journal of ELT Research|115L2 Writing Strategies Used by EFL Graduate Students

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    Syaadiah Arifin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the writing strategies and the predominantly strategies used by four Indonesian graduate students when writing in L2 (English. They were divided into 2 groups, skilled and less skilled writers, to examine what strategies they applied when writing. The main instrument of this study is Think Aloud Protocols (TAPs. The analysis of data collected discovered some findings: (1 both skilled and less skilled writers used varied strategies. However, the frequency of using each strategy was different. Skilled writers used each strategy in high frequency. On the other hand, less skilled writers only used each strategy in low frequency, while skilled writers understand the recursive nature of writing. (2 Skilled writers used reading and rereading strategies in high frequency for several purposes: revising and editing the text, developing ideas, and getting new ideas, while less skilled writers rarely used those strategies. They wrote whatever ideas came into their mind, and reread the text once in a while. These findings suggest that effective writing strategies should be introduced explicitly when student writers have already mastered the foundation of writing. Unfortunately, they are seldom guided on the use of writing strategies in the process of their writing. In fact, effective writing strategies and the frequency of using each strategy could help them become good writers and influence the quality of their writing. Based on these findings some suggestions are discussed.