WorldWideScience

Sample records for surveys group discussions

  1. An electronic survey of physicians using online clinical discussion groups: a brief report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelo, S J; Citkowitz, E

    2001-03-01

    Online discussion groups are a relatively new form of informal communication among physicians. Physicians' Online, an Internet-based medical information and communication network with a current membership base that includes more than 200,000, United States physicians, contains extensive bulletin-board discussion areas with more than 47,000 topics posted to date. There are no published data available regarding the characteristics and behaviors of the individuals who participate in these discussions. To better characterize the users of these groups, in March 1998, we posted an eight-question, multiple-choice electronic survey on Physicians' Online's home page inviting users of the clinical discussion groups to participate. We analyzed responses from 586 participants. The most common characteristics were: urban and Northeastern United States location, age less than 55 years, clinical practice of internal medicine or one of its subspecialties, private solo or single/multispecialty group practice, and reported weekly consultation with three or less colleagues. Most physicians were interested in specific clinical cases. Forty-one percent of the respondents chose to read discussion groups only but rarely or never initiated or responded. Younger age, urban setting, private practice, and infrequent consultation with colleagues were the most common characteristics found among users of Physicians' Online's online clinical discussion groups. That specific clinical cases were the most common interest speaks to the notion that discussion groups may represent an attractive resource for helping to manage clinical cases. Future research should explore in greater depth the demographics of users, specific motivations for physician use, ways to improve active participation, and the impact on clinical practice.

  2. Informal group discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hans Nienstaedt; Dean W. Einspahr; J. Douglas Brodie

    1973-01-01

    Editor's note: The morning's presentations were discussed during the afternoon by three groups, each group discussing one of the morning's three topics. Summaries of the discussions, prepared by the discussion leaders, follow.

  3. Deliberative Discussion Focus Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothwell, Erin; Anderson, Rebecca; Botkin, Jeffrey R

    2016-05-01

    This article discusses a new approach for the conduct of focus groups in health research. Identifying ways to educate and inform participants about the topic of interest prior to the focus group discussion can promote more quality data from informed opinions. Data on this deliberative discussion approach are provided from research within three federally funded studies. As healthcare continues to improve from scientific and technological advancements, educating the research participants prior to data collection about these complexities is essential to gather quality data. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. The Economic Returns to Membership of a Dairy Discussion Group: Evidence from the Irish National Farm Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Hennessy, Thia C.; Lapple, Doris; Newman, Carol F.

    2011-01-01

    In December 2009 the Irish Department of Agriculture launched the Dairy Efficiency Programme. The Programme, which is operated through a series of discussion groups, is designed to promote technology transfer to dairy farmers. Drawing on National Farm Survey data from 2009, the purpose of this paper is to quantify the economic return to membership of dairy discussion groups. An endogenous switching regression model is specified for over 300 dairy farms to assess the impact of discussion group...

  5. Focus group discussions

    CERN Document Server

    Hennink, Monique M

    2014-01-01

    The Understanding Research series focuses on the process of writing up social research. The series is broken down into three categories: Understanding Statistics, Understanding Measurement, and Understanding Qualitative Research. The books provide researchers with guides to understanding, writing, and evaluating social research. Each volume demonstrates how research should be represented, including how to write up the methodology as well as the research findings. Each volume also reviews how to appropriately evaluate published research. Focus Group Discussions addresses the challenges associated with conducting and writing focus group research. It provides detailed guidance on the practical and theoretical considerations in conducting focus group discussions including: designing the discussion guide, recruiting participants, training a field team, moderating techniques and ethical considerations. Monique Hennink describes how a methodology section is read and evaluated by others, such as journal reviewers or ...

  6. Summaries of group discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, L. D.

    1972-01-01

    Group discussions following the presentations of reports on the remote sensing of Chesapeake Bay resources are presented. The parameters to be investigated by the remote sensors and the specifications of the sensors are described. Specific sensors for obtaining data on various aspects of the ecology are identified. Recommendations for establishing a data bank and additional efforts to obtain increased understanding of the ecology are submitted.

  7. Survey and online discussion groups to develop a patient-rated outcome measure on acceptability of treatment response in vitiligo

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Vitiligo is a chronic depigmenting skin disorder which affects around 0.5-1% of the world’s population. The outcome measures used most commonly in trials to judge treatment success focus on repigmentation. Patient-reported outcome measures of treatment success are rarely used, although recommendations have been made for their inclusion in vitiligo trials. This study aimed to evaluate the face validity of a new patient-reported outcome measure of treatment response, for use in future trials and clinical practice. Method An online survey to gather initial views on what constitutes treatment success for people with vitiligo or their parents/carers, followed by online discussion groups with patients to reach consensus on what constitutes treatment success for individuals with vitiligo, and how this can be assessed in the context of trials. Participants were recruited from an existing database of vitiligo patients and through posts on the social network sites Facebook and Twitter. Results A total of 202 survey responses were received, of which 37 were excluded and 165 analysed. Three main themes emerged as important in assessing treatment response: a) the match between vitiligo and normal skin (how well it blends in); b) how noticeable the vitiligo is and c) a reduction in the size of the white patches. The majority of respondents said they would consider 80% or more repigmentation to be a worthwhile treatment response after 9 months of treatment. Three online discussion groups involving 12 participants led to consensus that treatment success is best measured by asking patients how noticeable their vitiligo is after treatment. This was judged to be best answered using a 5-point Likert scale, on which a score of 4 or 5 represents treatment success. Conclusions This study represents the first step in developing a patient reported measure of treatment success in vitiligo trials. Further work is now needed to assess its construct validity and responsiveness to

  8. Survey and online discussion groups to develop a patient-rated outcome measure on acceptability of treatment response in vitiligo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tour, Selina K; Thomas, Kim S; Walker, Dawn-Marie; Leighton, Paul; Yong, Adrian Sw; Batchelor, Jonathan M

    2014-06-14

    Vitiligo is a chronic depigmenting skin disorder which affects around 0.5-1% of the world's population. The outcome measures used most commonly in trials to judge treatment success focus on repigmentation. Patient-reported outcome measures of treatment success are rarely used, although recommendations have been made for their inclusion in vitiligo trials. This study aimed to evaluate the face validity of a new patient-reported outcome measure of treatment response, for use in future trials and clinical practice. An online survey to gather initial views on what constitutes treatment success for people with vitiligo or their parents/carers, followed by online discussion groups with patients to reach consensus on what constitutes treatment success for individuals with vitiligo, and how this can be assessed in the context of trials. Participants were recruited from an existing database of vitiligo patients and through posts on the social network sites Facebook and Twitter. A total of 202 survey responses were received, of which 37 were excluded and 165 analysed. Three main themes emerged as important in assessing treatment response: a) the match between vitiligo and normal skin (how well it blends in); b) how noticeable the vitiligo is and c) a reduction in the size of the white patches. The majority of respondents said they would consider 80% or more repigmentation to be a worthwhile treatment response after 9 months of treatment. Three online discussion groups involving 12 participants led to consensus that treatment success is best measured by asking patients how noticeable their vitiligo is after treatment. This was judged to be best answered using a 5-point Likert scale, on which a score of 4 or 5 represents treatment success. This study represents the first step in developing a patient reported measure of treatment success in vitiligo trials. Further work is now needed to assess its construct validity and responsiveness to change.

  9. Group discussion improves lie detection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nadav Klein; Nicholas Epley

    2015-01-01

    ... identify when a person is lying. These experiments demonstrate that the group advantage in lie detection comes through the process of group discussion, and is not a product of aggregating individual opinions...

  10. Small group discussion: Students perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annamalai, Nachal; Manivel, Rajajeyakumar; Palanisamy, Rajendran

    2015-08-01

    Various alternative methods are being used in many medical colleges to reinforce didactic lectures in physiology. Small group teaching can take on a variety of different tasks such as problem-solving, role play, discussions, brainstorming, and debate. Research has demonstrated that group discussion promotes greater synthesis and retention of materials. The aims of this study were to adopt a problem-solving approach by relating basic sciences with the clinical scenario through self-learning. To develop soft skills, to understand principles of group dynamics, and adopt a new teaching learning methodology. Experimental study design was conducted in Phase I 1(st) year medical students of 2014-2015 batch (n = 120). On the day of the session, the students were grouped into small groups (15 each). The session started with the facilitator starting off the discussion. Feedback forms from five students in each group was taken (n = 40). A five point Likert scale was used ranging from strongly agree to strongly disagree. Data were analyzed using IBM SPSS Statistics for Windows, Version 21.0. Armonk, NY: IBM Corp. Our results show that 70% of the students opined that small group discussion were interactive, friendly, innovative, built interaction between teacher and student. Small group discussion increased their thought process and helped them in better communication. The small group discussion was interactive, friendly, and bridged the gap between the teacher and student. The student's communication skills are also improved. In conclusion, small group discussion is more effective than the traditional teaching methods.

  11. Small group discussion: Students perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annamalai, Nachal; Manivel, Rajajeyakumar; Palanisamy, Rajendran

    2015-01-01

    Context: Various alternative methods are being used in many medical colleges to reinforce didactic lectures in physiology. Small group teaching can take on a variety of different tasks such as problem-solving, role play, discussions, brainstorming, and debate. Research has demonstrated that group discussion promotes greater synthesis and retention of materials. Aims: The aims of this study were to adopt a problem-solving approach by relating basic sciences with the clinical scenario through self-learning. To develop soft skills, to understand principles of group dynamics, and adopt a new teaching learning methodology. Subjects and Methods: Experimental study design was conducted in Phase I 1st year medical students of 2014–2015 batch (n = 120). On the day of the session, the students were grouped into small groups (15 each). The session started with the facilitator starting off the discussion. Feedback forms from five students in each group was taken (n = 40). A five point Likert scale was used ranging from strongly agree to strongly disagree. Data were analyzed using IBM SPSS Statistics for Windows, Version 21.0. Armonk, NY: IBM Corp. Results: Our results show that 70% of the students opined that small group discussion were interactive, friendly, innovative, built interaction between teacher and student. Small group discussion increased their thought process and helped them in better communication. Conclusions: The small group discussion was interactive, friendly, and bridged the gap between the teacher and student. The student's communication skills are also improved. In conclusion, small group discussion is more effective than the traditional teaching methods. PMID:26380202

  12. Small group discussion: Students perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Annamalai, Nachal; Manivel, Rajajeyakumar; Palanisamy, Rajendran

    2015-01-01

    Context: Various alternative methods are being used in many medical colleges to reinforce didactic lectures in physiology. Small group teaching can take on a variety of different tasks such as problem-solving, role play, discussions, brainstorming, and debate. Research has demonstrated that group discussion promotes greater synthesis and retention of materials. Aims: The aims of this study were to adopt a problem-solving approach by relating basic sciences with the clinical scenario through s...

  13. Group discussion improves lie detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Nadav; Epley, Nicholas

    2015-06-16

    Groups of individuals can sometimes make more accurate judgments than the average individual could make alone. We tested whether this group advantage extends to lie detection, an exceptionally challenging judgment with accuracy rates rarely exceeding chance. In four experiments, we find that groups are consistently more accurate than individuals in distinguishing truths from lies, an effect that comes primarily from an increased ability to correctly identify when a person is lying. These experiments demonstrate that the group advantage in lie detection comes through the process of group discussion, and is not a product of aggregating individual opinions (a "wisdom-of-crowds" effect) or of altering response biases (such as reducing the "truth bias"). Interventions to improve lie detection typically focus on improving individual judgment, a costly and generally ineffective endeavor. Our findings suggest a cheap and simple synergistic approach of enabling group discussion before rendering a judgment.

  14. National GAP Conference 2007-Discussion Groups Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratz, Joan M.; Lamb, Berton Lee

    2010-01-01

    We led two discussion groups during the 2007 National GAP Conference. These discussion groups provided information to help develop a survey of National Gap Analysis Program (GAP) data users. One group discussed technical issues, and the second group discussed the use of GAP data for decisionmaking. Themes emerging from the technical issues group included concerns about data quality, need for information on how to use data, and passive data distribution. The decisionmaking discussion included a wide range of topics including the need to understand presentation of information, the need to connect with and understand users of data, the revision of GAP's mission, and the adaptability of products and data. The decisionmaking group also raised concerns regarding technical issues. One conclusion is that a deep commitment to ongoing information transfer and support is a key component of success for the GAP program.

  15. Nationwide survey of nutritional management in an Asian upper-middle income developing country government hospitals: Combination of quantitative survey and focus group discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chittawatanarat, K; Tosanguan, K; Chaikledkaew, U; Tejavanija, S; Teerawattananon, Y

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the differences in pattern, process, and management of nutrition care in government hospitals in Thailand (an Asian upper-middle income developing country). This is a combination of a quantitative nationwide questionnaire survey and focus group discussions. A total of 2300 questionnaires were sent to government hospitals across Thailand. The responders were divided by routine-nutrition screening/assessment unit vs. non-routine-nutrition screening/assessment unit (RSA vs. NRSA). The comparison between the groups was reported as percentage and cross-sectional odds ratio (CS-OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI). The significant difference was defined as p Nutrition Triage (BNT), 21.2% Subjective Global Assessment (SGA) and 20.2% Nutrition Alert Form (NAF). The RSA was significantly higher in proportion for the role of the nurses (RSA vs. NRSA; CS-OR [95% CI]: 68.3% vs. 11.9%; 15.8 [11.1 to 22.7]; p nutrition management guidelines (60.6% vs. 2.8%; 53.6 [29.6 to 102.8]; p nutrition (91.4% vs.69.7%; 4.6 [2.9 to 7.4]; p Nutrition screening/assessment tools were found to be varied in Thailand. RSA affected the nutrition management working process and the types of nutrition support. The main barriers of RSA implementation were inconsistency of policy and reimbursement, acceptable workload, and national guidance as regards - screening/assessment tools. Copyright © 2016 European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Interteaching: Discussion Group Size and Course Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truelove, Jacob C.; Saville, Bryan K.; Van Patten, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Researchers have yet to examine whether discussion group size affects student performance in an interteaching-based course. In the current study, we addressed this question by manipulating discussion group size (smaller groups of 2 students vs. larger groups of 4 students) across 2 sections of an undergraduate psychology course. We found no…

  17. Dr. Irvin Yalom Discusses Group Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forester-Miller, Holly

    1989-01-01

    In this interview, Dr. Irvin Yalom, director of the Adult Psychiatry Clinic at Stanford University School of Medicine, discusses his beginnings as a group psychotherapist, current issues in group work, and the future of group work. (Author/TE)

  18. Enhancing Understanding and Interest through Group Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Patrick

    2006-01-01

    Group discussion allows students to learn how to "talk to someone." Through group discussion, students can acquire or refine a broad range of attributes, from basic oratory skills to a more sophisticated development of communicative competence to embracing and valuing dialogic interchange and reflexivity. In this article, the author explains how…

  19. Assessing clinical competency: reports from discussion groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnwald, Grant; Stone, Elizabeth; Bristol, David; Fuentealba, Carmen; Hardie, Lizette; Hellyer, Peter; Jaeger, Laurie; Kerwin, Sharon; Kochevar, Deborah; Lissemore, Kerry; Olsen, Christopher; Rogers, Kenita; Sabin, Beth; Swanson, Cliff; Warner, Angeline

    2008-01-01

    This report describes proposed new models for assessment of eight of the nine clinical competencies the American Veterinary Medical Association Council on Education requires for accreditation. The models were developed by discussion groups at the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges' Clinical Competency Symposium. Clinical competencies and proposed models (in parentheses) are described. Competency 1: comprehensive patient diagnosis (neurologic examination on a dog, clinical reasoning skills); Competency 2: comprehensive treatment planning (concept mapping, computerized case studies); Competency 3: anesthesia, pain management (student portfolio); Competency 4: surgery skills (objective structured clinical examination, cased-based examination, "super dog" model); Competency 5: medicine skills (clinical reasoning and case management, skills checklist); Competency 6: emergency and intensive care case management (computerized case study or scenario); Competency 7: health promotion, disease prevention/biosecurity (360 degrees evaluation, case-based computer simulation); Competency 8: client communications and ethical conduct (Web-based evaluation forms, client survey, communicating with stakeholders, telephone conversation, written scenario-based cases). The report also describes faculty recognition for participating in clinical competency assessments.

  20. Developing algebraic thinking through group discussion | Fletcher ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper explores the potential of group discussion in generating algebraic thinking among learners. Algebraic thinking, particularly the recognition and articulation of generality, is vital and ought to be within reach of all learners if they are to participate fully in society. Furthermore, generalisation, being fundamental to ...

  1. Reading Discussion Groups for Teachers: Connecting Theory to Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton-Smith, Ben; Stillwell, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    This article explores how teachers can engage with ideas (research findings, theory, and professional knowledge) through participation in a reading discussion group. Focusing on one group formed by English language teachers at a Japanese university, the study employs survey data, attendance statistics, and observational notes regarding the group's…

  2. Student decision making in large group discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kustusch, Mary Bridget; Ptak, Corey; Sayre, Eleanor C.; Franklin, Scott V.

    2015-04-01

    It is increasingly common in physics classes for students to work together to solve problems and perform laboratory experiments. When students work together, they need to negotiate the roles and decision making within the group. We examine how a large group of students negotiates authority as part of their two week summer College Readiness Program at Rochester Institute of Technology. The program is designed to develop metacognitive skills in first generation and Deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHH) STEM undergraduates through cooperative group work, laboratory experimentation, and explicit reflection exercises. On the first full day of the program, the students collaboratively developed a sign for the word ``metacognition'' for which there is not a sign in American Sign Language. This presentation will focus on three aspects of the ensuing discussion: (1) how the instructor communicated expectations about decision making; (2) how the instructor promoted student-driven decision making rather than instructor-driven policy; and (3) one student's shifts in decision making behavior. We conclude by discussing implications of this research for activity-based physics instruction.

  3. Group reports. The recommendations proposed by the seven discussion groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1989-01-01

    GROUP 1 — Discussion leader S.H. Sohmer — Organization and the ideal format of a large Flora (over 10,000 species) The Working Group first recognized that there are really two major categories of Flora projects serving quite different needs in the Malesian region: the local/national projects that

  4. Forming a Turbomachinery Seals Working Group - An Overview and Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Margaret P.

    2007-01-01

    A proposal to form a Turbomachinery Seals Working Group is discussed. Survey responses regarding the purpose, membership, and meeting frequency are presented as well as the areas of expertise and experience of the respondents. The types of seals used, designed, or sold, current work, and technical challenges of turbomachinery seals, their materials, analysis, geometry, manufacturing, maintenance, testing, and incorporation into engine systems are also presented.

  5. The Development of Social Climate in Virtual Learning Discussion Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avigail Oren

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available As the educational use of computer mediated communication (CMC increases there is growing interest among researchers as to social processes evolving within the varied models of group work using Internet – e.g., special interest groups, topical discussion groups, discussion forums attached to virtual courses, and learning communities. In this paper we present a synthetic summary of five studies that explored social climate issues in synchronous and asynchronous online activities in academic courses, focusing on the following questions: Does a social atmosphere develop in online learning discussion groups? What are the different modes of social interaction are manifest in online learning discussion groups? What is the role of the virtual teacher with regards to the social climate in online learning discussion groups? Discussed are the implications of these five studies' on the design of virtual-learning-discussion-groups, and the results for the characterization of teacher moderation functions.

  6. The Effects of Unstructured Group Discussion on Ethical Judgment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Clinton H.; Alder, G. Stoney

    2014-01-01

    The authors examine the effects of shared information and group discussion on ethical judgment when no structure is imposed on the discussion to encourage ethical considerations. Discussants were asked to identify arguments for and against a variety of business behaviors with ethical implications. A group moderator solicited and recorded arguments…

  7. Organizing Parent Discussion Groups in Preschools (A How To Guide).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousey, Carol G.

    This series of discussion sessions and suggestions for further reading, was designed to serve as a guide for discussion groups made up of parents of preschool children. The first chapter discusses the organization of groups, leaders' qualifications, the general format of sessions, recordkeeping, and suggestions for the first and final sessions.…

  8. Increasing Social Presence in Online Learning through Small Group Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akcaoglu, Mete; Lee, Eunbae

    2016-01-01

    Social presence is difficult to achieve, but an imperative component of online learning. In this study, we investigated the effect of group size on students' perceptions of social presence in two graduate-level online courses, comparing small group versus whole class discussions. Our results indicated that when in small group discussions, students…

  9. Learning Physics in Small-Group Discussions--Three Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benckert, Sylvia; Pettersson, Sune

    2008-01-01

    This article reports on an investigation of students learning of physics during group discussions around context-rich problems in introductory physics courses at university level. We present the results from video recordings of student groups solving three different problems. We found that group discussions around physics problems can lead to…

  10. Literature Discussion Groups: The Role of Teacher Talk in Discussing Social Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guay, Mary

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how teacher talk influenced the way issues of race, culture, and disability were addressed in literature discussion groups. Discussions of one teacher with two groups of students, of varying reading levels, were studied. The research questions were: 1) How does the teacher's perspective on the students…

  11. The group discussion effect: integrative processes and suggestions for implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meleady, Rose; Hopthrow, Tim; Crisp, Richard J

    2013-02-01

    One of the most consistent findings in experimental social dilemmas research is the positive effect group discussion has on cooperative behavior. At a time when cooperation and consensus is critical to tackle global problems, ranging from debt to deforestation, understanding the dynamics of group discussion is a pressing need. Unfortunately, research investigating the underlying processes and implementation of the effect has been inconclusive. The authors present a critical review of existing explanations and integrate these perspectives into a single process model of group discussion, providing a more complete theoretical picture of how interrelated factors combine to facilitate discussion-induced cooperation. On the basis of this theoretical analysis, they consider complimentary approaches to the indirect and feasible implementation of group discussion. They argue that such strategies may overcome the barriers to direct discussion observed across a range of groups and organizations.

  12. Summary of small group discussions: Monitoring objectives and thresholds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricia Manley

    2013-01-01

    Workshop participants were asked to address sets of questions in small group discussions, which were subsequently brought to the entire group for discussion. The second set of questions was directed at identifying a set of degradation activities that could be a primary focus for developing or refining methods and techniques for monitoring:

  13. Summary of small group discussions: Detection of forest degradation drivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patricia Manley

    2013-01-01

    Workshop participants were asked to address sets of questions in small group discussions, which were subsequently brought to the entire group for discussion. The first set of questions was directed at identifying a set of degradation activities that could be a primary focus for developing or refining methods and techniques for monitoring:

  14. Searching for Intertextual Connections in Small Group Text Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Feng-ming

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the sources for and intentions of intertextuality made by 10 groups of Taiwanese university students in the process of discussing two American stories. Two types of data, small group text discussions and oral interviews, were gathered. The results indicated that participants used diverse sources of intertextual links, and with…

  15. Frustration and Fulfillment: The Talk of Literature Discussion Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollman-Bonilla, Julie E.

    Two different groups of sixth graders were studied as one discussed Roald Dahl's "James and the Giant Peach" and the other discussed Mark Twain's "Tom Sawyer." In interviews, students from the two groups offered very different assessments of their experiences, despite the fact that the teacher was the same. The Dahl students,…

  16. The Development of Social Climate in Virtual Learning Discussion Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Avigail Oren; David Mioduser; Rafi Nachmias

    2002-01-01

    As the educational use of computer mediated communication (CMC) increases there is growing interest among researchers as to social processes evolving within the varied models of group work using Internet – e.g., special interest groups, topical discussion groups, discussion forums attached to virtual courses, and learning communities. In this paper we present a synthetic summary of five studies that explored social climate issues in synchronous and asynchronous online activities in academic c...

  17. Dynamical networks of influence in small group discussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussaïd, Mehdi; Noriega Campero, Alejandro; Almaatouq, Abdullah

    2018-01-01

    In many domains of life, business and management, numerous problems are addressed by small groups of individuals engaged in face-to-face discussions. While research in social psychology has a long history of studying the determinants of small group performances, the internal dynamics that govern a group discussion are not yet well understood. Here, we rely on computational methods based on network analyses and opinion dynamics to describe how individuals influence each other during a group discussion. We consider the situation in which a small group of three individuals engages in a discussion to solve an estimation task. We propose a model describing how group members gradually influence each other and revise their judgments over the course of the discussion. The main component of the model is an influence network-a weighted, directed graph that determines the extent to which individuals influence each other during the discussion. In simulations, we first study the optimal structure of the influence network that yields the best group performances. Then, we implement a social learning process by which individuals adapt to the past performance of their peers, thereby affecting the structure of the influence network in the long run. We explore the mechanisms underlying the emergence of efficient or maladaptive networks and show that the influence network can converge towards the optimal one, but only when individuals exhibit a social discounting bias by downgrading the relative performances of their peers. Finally, we find a late-speaker effect, whereby individuals who speak later in the discussion are perceived more positively in the long run and are thus more influential. The numerous predictions of the model can serve as a basis for future experiments, and this work opens research on small group discussion to computational social sciences.

  18. When Children Discuss: A Study of Learning in Small Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Mary Anastole

    1976-01-01

    Describes a study designed to increase and improve participation in class discussions among urban low-income fifth and sixth graders. Comparisons are made between small group discussions of moral issues led by teachers, by trained students, and by untrained students. (CW)

  19. Facilitating Meaningful Discussion Groups in the Primary Grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Lindsey; Ogden, Meridith; Kelly, Laura Beth

    2015-01-01

    This Teaching Tips describes a yearlong process of facilitating meaningful discussion groups about literature with first-grade students in an urban Title I school. At the beginning of the year, the teacher provided explicit instruction in speaking and listening skills to support students with the social skills needed for thoughtful discussion. She…

  20. Summary of small group discussions: Regional themes and next steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rick Turner

    2013-01-01

    At the conclusion of the workshop, a breakout group session discussed common themes that had emerged regarding forest degradation monitoring in the Southeast Asia region. The participants were also asked to list any important issues that may not have been sufficiently addressed during the workshop and that may require further discussion, and recommendations for next...

  1. Learning What Works: Promoting Small-Group Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJarnette, Anna F.; Dao, Jennifer N.; González, Gloriana

    2014-01-01

    Many teachers have designed lessons for students who will be working in groups to discuss and solve a problem. After investing time in constructing an interesting problem, creating strategically designed groups, and introducing the problem carefully, teachers may be left wondering how to help students collaborate to make sense of mathematical…

  2. Impact of discussion on preferences elicited in a group setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milne Ruairidh

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The completeness of preferences is assumed as one of the axioms of expected utility theory but has been subject to little empirical study. Methods Fifteen non-health professionals was recruited and familiarised with the standard gamble technique. The group then met five times over six months and preferences were elicited independently on 41 scenarios. After individual valuation, the group discussed the scenarios, following which preferences could be changed. Changes made were described and summary measures (mean and median before and after discussion compared using paired t test and Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test. Semi-structured telephone interviews were carried out to explore attitudes to discussing preferences. These were transcribed, read by two investigators and emergent themes described. Results Sixteen changes (3.6% were made to preferences by seven (47% of the fifteen members. The difference between individual preference values before and after discussion ranged from -0.025 to 0.45. The average effect on the group mean was 0.0053. No differences before and after discussion were statistically significant. The group valued discussion highly and suggested it brought four main benefits: reassurance; improved procedural performance; increased group cohesion; satisfying curiosity. Conclusion The hypothesis that preferences are incomplete cannot be rejected for a proportion of respondents. However, brief discussion did not result in substantial number of changes to preferences and these did not have significant impact on summary values for the group, suggesting that incompleteness, if present, may not have an important effect on cost-utility analyses.

  3. THE APPLICABILITY OF SMALL GROUP DISCUSSION IN ENGLISH READING CLASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurniawan Yudhi Nugroho

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Success of learning is not only a matter of using an appropriate teaching resources, instead, the interference of teaching method is found to be essential to determine the students’ learning achievement. Teacher as a captain of class has the right to choose type of method used in the classroom for sake of students’ improvement. This study was designed as an attempt to help Master Students from a well established private university improve their reading comprehension skill through small group discussion. This study was participated by 30 students, later divided into two classes and served differently as an experimental group for the class A and a control group for the class B. Referring to the final data analysis of the study, it is found that there is an improving learning achievement in the experimental group, indicated by higher performance of posttest (20.333 than the pretest. Apart from this, further analysis was also conducted to find out whether or not small group discussion was able to show better performance than another teaching method applied in another different class. Based on the result of statistical calculation, it shows that small group discussion got better result 12.334 than that of another group. As a result, some suggestions were made by referring to result of the study.

  4. Fostering professionalism among doctors: the role of workplace discussion groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Deborah; Griffin, Ann; Launer, John

    2014-10-01

    The professionalism of doctors has come in for increasing scrutiny and discussion, within the profession and in society. Professionalism has also become of central interest in undergraduate and postgraduate medical education. There is a great deal of debate about the nature of medical professionalism, how to promote it and what approaches to learning are most effective. This study aims to identify the role of workplace-based discussion groups in encouraging and supporting the development of professionalism among doctors. Workplace-based discussion groups including doctors from all non-consultant grades and specialties were established in five hospitals over a 6 month period in 2010-2011. A mixed-methods approach was used to identify the perceived impact of these groups on participants, which included interviewing the group facilitators and education leaders at participating hospitals. Understanding of professionalism at an individual level was improved along with an increased awareness of the collective nature of professionalism in everyday clinical practice. Key to the success of the groups was the creation of a legitimate space to explore professionalism and professional challenges and the use of experienced facilitators who could build trust in the groups. A purely individualistic approach to professionalism does not resonate with contemporary, team-based healthcare. Work-based groups can provide a focus for an approach to professionalism that is mindful of self, the team, the culture and the organisation. This evaluation provides guidance to a range of stakeholders on how to develop educational interventions that foster professionalism, personal and collective, and offers some pointers towards the range of factors that may impact on the outcomes of such activities. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. Induced abortion in Nigeria: findings from focus group discussion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abortion is carried out daily in Nigeria despite the restrictive abortion law. This study was carried out to obtain information on societal attitude to the issues of family planning, unwanted pregnancy, abortion, adoption of children and laws relating to them. Focus group discussions were held in south-western Nigeria among 11 ...

  6. Extending Students' Mathematical Thinking during Whole-Group Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengiz, Nesrin; Kline, Kate; Grant, Theresa J.

    2011-01-01

    Studies show that extending students' mathematical thinking during whole-group discussions is a challenging undertaking. To better understand what extending student thinking looks like and how teachers' mathematical knowledge for teaching (MKT) supports teachers in their efforts to extend student thinking, the teaching of six experienced…

  7. Lexical Bundles: Facilitating University "Talk" in Group Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Chan Swee; Kashiha, Hadi; Tan, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Group discussion forms an integral language experience for most language learners, providing them with an opportunity to express themselves in a naturalistic setting. Multi-word expressions are commonly used and one of them is lexical bundles. Lexical bundles are types of extended collocations that occur more commonly than we expect; they are…

  8. Academic Discourse Socialization through Small-Group Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Mei-ching

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the nature of small-group discussion and explores how it fosters oral academic discourse socialization in a TESOL postgraduate course. The participants included four native-English speaking and six non-native English Speaking postgraduate students at a state university in the U.S. The findings revealed that small-group…

  9. How Introverts versus Extroverts Approach Small-Group Argumentative Discussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussbaum, E. Michael

    2002-01-01

    Explored in two studies disparities between how students with different degrees of extroversion and introversion engaged in small-group discussions requiring construction and critique of arguments. Found that extroverted students exhibited a greater tendency to use conflictual discourse, whereas introverted students worked with one another…

  10. Improving Students’ Speaking Ability through Small-Group Discussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imam Fauzi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to investigate how small-group discussion can be implemented to improve vocational high school students’ speaking ability and to identify the role of small group discussion in improving students’ speaking skill. This research was conducted by using action research, with 35 students of the second grade participating in this research. The findings of research can be explained in three cycles. Cycle 1 revealed that there were 37.2% of the students who did well; 42.8% were good although they had weaknesses in some aspects of using statements of introduction and choosing good sentences; 20% were weak and did not understand to choose appropriate sentences for introduction. Cycle II showed that 45.7% of the participants were good either in choosing appropriate sentences and pronunciation; 54.3% were considered good although they still lacked speaking communicatively with appropriate words. Cycle III was implemented after having additional classes, small guidelines of active speaking, and intensive practices. It found that 71.4% of the participants could communicate with English basic words and better structure, and 28.6% of them were still slightly below. Findings of this study showed that small group discussion could effectively improve students’ speaking skill, engage them in the group work discussion actively, encourage them to be independent learners who can expose themselves in learning activities, make them feel more relaxed at learning, give them more opportunities to improve their speaking skills

  11. Impact of individual study on tutorial group discussion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hurk, M.M. van den; Dolmans, D.H.J.M.; Wolfhagen, H.A.P.; Muijtjens, A.M.M.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    1999-01-01

    Background: This research focuses on the relation between individual study and group discussion. In a problem-based curriculum, it is expected that the way students prepare themselves during individual study (i.e., search and prepare the literature) will influence the quality of the reporting phase.

  12. Work discussion groups in clinical supervision in mental health nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Danny

    This study aims to explore the value and meaning of a psychodynamic work discussion for mental health nurses, and its potential as an approach in staff clinical supervision. Data were generated by using a focus group with a purposive sample of six mental health nurses, and analysed by the 'collapsing of data' from labels to form categories and formulate themes. The findings suggest that staff emotion generated from clinical work is dealt with in many personal ways though rarely in clinical supervision. Although the idea of a work discussion group is not readily known among the focus group, staff appear to be open to its potential to provide a helpful emotional perspective. Education in the form of an introduction and exposure to some basic psychodynamic ideas could provide the first step towards unlocking its potential. Sharing personal experiences of an emotional nature within a safe, secure environment seems significant in this education process.

  13. Discussion as media and tool in PBL project-groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spliid, Claus Monrad

    2013-01-01

    on the discussions which groups undertake in their pursuit of problem-solutions fulfilling assessed real-world needs as well as meeting the requirements of the educational program, it is concluded that discussions serve as a media for achieving learning and as a tool for developing skills essential for professional......The Aalborg PBL Model encourages project-management as a way for students to achieve efficiency and effectiveness in their study-projects. This paper looks into how the development of conversation skills relates to project-management as well as other factors. Through analysis of interviews focusing...

  14. [Virtual discussion groups: a proposal for nursing teaching].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Pai, Daiane; Lautert, Liana

    2007-09-01

    This paper describes a teaching experience aimed at providing interactivity to the technique of field diary by using a virtual learning environment. The educational proposal derives from the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS)'s Teaching Training Program of the Stricto Sensu Post-Graduation Program in Nursing, in which the author, a Master's degree candidate, oriented by her advisor, proposed forming virtual discussion groups in order to write the field diary for an undergraduate discipline in Nursing, with the aim of providing an opportunity for a joint discussion of academic experiences in the realm of practice. The instructors of the discipline in which the proposal was developed also participated in the activities. The virtual technology gave new dynamism to the technique of field diary, making possible an exchange of experiences among the students, the instructor and the author, as well as moments of reflection and discussion regarding the themes faced in the Nursing practice.

  15. Learning through Discussions: Comparing the Benefits of Small-Group and Large-Class Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Philip H.; Hamann, Kerstin; Wilson, Bruce M.

    2011-01-01

    The literature on teaching and learning heralds the benefits of discussion for student learner outcomes, especially its ability to improve students' critical thinking skills. Yet, few studies compare the effects of different types of face-to-face discussions on learners. Using student surveys, we analyze the benefits of small-group and large-class…

  16. Discussions of Fatherhood in Male Batterer Treatment Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anu Veteläinen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine how men who have perpetrated violence toward their partners and participated in batterer group talked about being a father and how they perceived their own fatherhood. The discussion in the group was analyzed qualitatively by using the methods of content analysis. In traditional fatherhood, they talked about avoidant, passiveness, distant, indifference, and authoritative controlling ways of acting. These men also created an image of themselves as active and caring fathers, thus including empathy and nurture in the concept of fatherhood. This new fatherhood was considered an achieved goal and an objective for the men as being a father. Talking about fatherhood in these groups is important as fatherhood and relations to children are both an important motivator toward nonviolence.

  17. Online Group Discussion pada Mata Kuliah Teknologi Pembelajaran Fisika

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuberti Yuberti

    2015-10-01

    penawaran akses internet yang menggiurkan demi menarik minat penggunanya. Beberapa fenomena tersebut menunjukkan semakin banyak kalangan yang memanfaatkan internet dan menjadikanya sebagai gaya hidup untuk berintaksi, bersosialisasi, belajar dan mendapatkan informasi. Meluasnya pemanfaatan internet bisa menjadi potensi besar dalam pengembangan pembelajaran dengan sistem online memungkinkan pebelajar untuk mengakses infromasi secara fleksibel tanpa terbatas waktu dan tempat. Diskusi tidak lagi terjadi secara tatap muka, namun dapat terus berlangsung meskipun dalam lingkungan maya. Sebagaimana pelaksanaan metode pembelajaran maya lainnya. Pelaksanaannya diskusi online itu sendiri pada dasarnya mengadopsi dari metode pembelajaran diskusi tatap muka. Kata kunci: online group discussion, teknologi pembelajaran

  18. Perceptions of Group-Led Online Discussions: The Benefits of Cooperative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz-Uhler, Beth; Lanter, Jason R.

    2012-01-01

    To assess the effectiveness of a cooperative learning activity, students were randomly assigned to small groups and asked to lead an online discussion. Responses to a survey administered at the completion of the course suggest that the activity was effective in meeting its goals of promoting student interaction and increasing perceived student…

  19. Increasing Student Participation in Online Group Discussions via Facebook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Scott T.

    2013-01-01

    A comparison study between two different methods of conducting online discussions in an introductory astronomy course was performed to determine if the use of Facebook as an online discussion tool has an impact on student participation as well as student response time. This study shows that students using Facebook for their online discussions…

  20. Pretest online discussion groups to augment teaching and learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Jonathan; Hasbargen, Barbara; Miziniak, Halina

    2010-01-01

    Tests and final examination scores of three semesters of control students in a nursing foundation course were compared with tests and final examination scores of three semesters of participating students. Participating students were offered access to an asynchronous pretest online discussion activity with a faculty e-moderator. While the simplified Bloom's revised taxonomy assisted in creating appropriate preparatory test and final examination questions for pretest online discussion, Salmon's five-stage online method provided direction to the e-moderator on how to encourage students to achieve Bloom's higher-order thinking skills during the pretest online discussions. Statistical analysis showed the pretest online discussion activity had a generally positive impact on tests and final examination scores, when controlling for a number of possible confounding variables, including instructor, cumulative grade point average, age, and credit hours.

  1. The care and feeding of small-group leaders of sex discussion groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Held, J P; Rosenberg, P P

    1978-01-01

    This paper will focus on the selection, training, and monitoring of the small-group leaders in an extensive program of sex education. While not explicitly therapeutic, the leadership role in the six small-group sessions held during a 2-day period, covering highly emotional material, demands the skills and sensitivities of the traditional group therapist. In addition, group leaders must be aware of the limits of this experience and the subtle effect of a leader's role modeling during group discussion. The paper will discuss the SAR model, its academic history, and our experience with over 200 leaders drawn from both professional and paraprofessional ranks. We have data on participant evaluation of leaders and have developed a series of concepts regarding group process which is fed into our training program. Qualitative assessment of characteristics of the effective sex group leader is now possible as are basic group and member issues that most leaders must handle. The paper will discuss leadership screening, early orientation, small-group training sessions, practice leadership, supervision, evaluation, and problem solution in this highly sensitive area of sexuality, which while educational in purpose, is therapeutic in process.

  2. discussions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex S. Poznyak

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a version of Robust Stochastic Maximum Principle (RSMP applied to the Minimax Mayer Problem formulated for stochastic differential equations with the control-dependent diffusion term. The parametric families of first and second order adjoint stochastic processes are introduced to construct the corresponding Hamiltonian formalism. The Hamiltonian function used for the construction of the robust optimal control is shown to be equal to the Lebesque integral over a parametric set of the standard stochastic Hamiltonians corresponding to a fixed value of the uncertain parameter. The paper deals with a cost function given at finite horizon and containing the mathematical expectation of a terminal term. A terminal condition, covered by a vector function, is also considered. The optimal control strategies, adapted for available information, for the wide class of uncertain systems given by an stochastic differential equation with unknown parameters from a given compact set, are constructed. This problem belongs to the class of minimax stochastic optimization problems. The proof is based on the recent results obtained for Minimax Mayer Problem with a finite uncertainty set [14,43-45] as well as on the variation results of [53] derived for Stochastic Maximum Principle for nonlinear stochastic systems under complete information. The corresponding discussion of the obtain results concludes this study.

  3. A Blueprint for Implementing Small-Group Collaborative Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu-Jones, Lisa; Proctor, C. Patrick

    2016-01-01

    The adoption of the Common Core in many states across the country means we need to explore instructional approaches that promote student language use in order to meet many of the complex linguistic standards that comprise the Common Core. In this Teaching Tip, we provide a blueprint for a 4-week collaborative discussion mini-unit that a second…

  4. Social capital as norms and resources: Focus groups discussing alcohol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demant, Jakob Johan; Järvinen, Margaretha

    2011-01-01

    and an effect of their drinking experience. We apply Coleman's micro-oriented perspective on local network mechanisms – with a specific focus on collective norms negotiated in the focus groups – in combination with Bourdieu's definition of social capital as resources. The data used in this article come from...... focus group interviews with 18–19-year-old Danes. Read More: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/16066351003725776...

  5. The Sport Consumption in Portugal : survey presentation and discussion

    OpenAIRE

    Viseu, José

    2001-01-01

    CISEP (2001) The main objective of the present paper is to present a survey designed to describe and to explain the extension and the structure of the demand of sport merchandise and sport services in Portugal. The Portuguese population is questioned for the first time directly on their sport expenditures. The presented survey contributes with representative and quantitative scientific data to understand the economy of sport. The results of this survey will help decision-making in Scien...

  6. The Effect of Interactive Group Discussion among Physicians to Promote Rational use of Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Garjani

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Rational use of drugs remains a problem in Iran. Polypharmacy, overuse of antibiotic, misuse and overuse of injections, short consulting time and poor patient compliance are common patterns of irrational use of drugs in Eastern Azarbydjan - Iran. Concerning the promotion of rational use of drugs, this study aimed the effect of educational intervention as interactive group discussion on prescribing behavior of Tabriz Northwest physicians.Methods: Fifty one general physicians from private and public sectors in Northwest of Tabriz were selected randomly and their prescriptions were analyzed. A questionnaire with 8 close questions was completed for each prescription to investigate all aspects of prescribing patterns. By a professional software the information of the prescriptions was analyzed and drug prescribing indicators such as percentage of patients receiving antibiotics, glucocorticoids and other drug groups were determined.The method of intervention included focus group and interactive group discussions. Focus group was built in group of health professionals to collect training material using pre-intervention results for interactive group discussion. The physicians were divided into two groups of control andintervention groups. Following pre-intervention study the physicians of intervention group were discussed and trained in one-day interactive group discussion course using pre-intervention data and educational materials obtained from the focus group discussion.Results: The results of pre-intervention study showed that the average number of drugs in each prescription was 3.82. The percentage of patients receiving antibiotics, corticosteroids and injections were 40.81, 25.94 and 58.04 %, respectively. The results of this survey show great differences from WHO and international standards. Following the intervention the indicators were similar in both intervened and non-intervened groups and also were same as the pre

  7. The Effect of Instructional Methods (Lecture-Discussion versus Group Discussion) and Teaching Talent on Teacher Trainees Student Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutrofin; Degeng, Nyoman Sudana; Ardhana, Wayan; Setyosari, Punaji

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine difference in the effect of instructional methods (lecture-discussion versus group discussion) and teaching talent on teacher trainees student learning outcomes. It was conducted by a quasi-experimental design using the factorialized (2 x 2) version of the nonequivalent control group design. The subjects were…

  8. Discussion of the health benefits of breastfeeding within small groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monica, K Clarkson; du Plessis, Ruth A

    2011-01-01

    Breastfeeding is as a key target in Sefton as rates fall well below the national average. This paper reports on an evaluation that set out to examine the usefulness of an interactive group session designed to explore the health benefits of breastfeeding. The session used a tool called the Breastfeeding Treasure Box, developed in the US but not previously evaluated. It consists of a box containing 14 items, each chosen to indicate a benefit of breastfeeding, together with a lesson plan. The evaluation was conducted in parentcraft sessions. Five staff with experience of delivering the session completed qualitative questionnaires and 48 clients completed questionnaires about their experiences. Overall, the tool was found to stimulate learning and change thinking about breastfeeding. Staff thought the tool could be used in a range of different situations and, although there was mixed opinion on who should deliver it, knowledge, experience and enthusiasm were seen as essential. Clients said the session was fun, they would recommend it to others and they learned health benefits. There is potential for further development of the tool to reflect the specific health benefits identified by the Baby Friendly Initiative, though messages about breastfeeding benefits would still need reinforcement at all opportunities using other resources.

  9. Facebook Discussion Groups Provide a Robust Worldwide Platform for Free Pathology Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Raul S; Amer, Sadiq M; Yahia, Nejib Ben; Costa, Felipe D'Almeida; Noatay, Manu; Qiao, Jian-Hua; Rosado, Flavia G; Rosen, Yale; Sedassari, Bruno Tavares; Yantiss, Rhonda K; Gardner, Jerad M

    2017-05-01

    - Facebook (Menlo Park, California) is one of many online sites that provide potential educational tools for pathologists. We have each founded Facebook groups dedicated to anatomic pathology, in which members can share cases, ask questions, and contribute to discussions. - To report our experiences in founding and maintaining these Facebook groups and to characterize the contributed content. - We circulated a survey among the group founders, then compiled and analyzed the responses. - The groups varied in membership and in the quality of member contribution. Most posts were of pathology cases, although other topics (such as research articles) were also shared. All groups remained active and received posts from users all over the world, although all groups had many noncontributing members and received unwanted messages (which were screened and removed). Most founders were glad they had founded the groups because they provided an opportunity to both teach and learn. - Each analyzed Facebook group had a different character, and some downsides exist, but the groups all provided a no-cost way for pathologists and others across the world to interact online with many colleagues.

  10. Effects of Tagcloud-Anchored Group Discussions on Pre-Service Teachers' Collaborative Knowledge Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shu-Yuan; Xie, Ying

    2017-01-01

    Group discussions are critical for students constructing new understanding and knowledge in both classroom and distance education. Tagclouds can provide an intuitive overview about the group's collective knowledge and could potentially be used as an anchor for group discussions. The effect of using tagclouds as anchors for group discussions was…

  11. An online monogenic diabetes discussion group: supporting families and fueling new research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, Marie E; Carmody, David; Philipson, Louis H; Greeley, Siri Atma W

    2015-11-01

    Many online support groups are available for patients with rare disorders, but scant evidence is available on how effectively such groups provide useful information or valuable psychosocial support to their participants. It is also unclear to what extent physicians and researchers may learn more about these disorders by participating in such groups. To formally assess the utility of the Kovler Monogenic Diabetes Registry online discussion group for patients and families affected by KATP channel-related monogenic neonatal diabetes in providing psychosocial and informational support and in identifying concerns unique to patients with this rare form of diabetes. We qualitatively analyzed all 1,410 messages from the online group that consisted of 64 participants affected by KATP channel monogenic diabetes and 11 researchers. We utilized the Social Behavior Support Code to assign each message to a support category and deductive thematic analysis to identify discussion topics addressed by each message. 44% of messages provided/requested informational support, whereas 31.4% of the messages contained psychosocial/emotional support. The most popular topics of postings to the forums were diabetes treatment (503 messages) and neurodevelopmental concerns (472 messages). Participation in the discussion led researchers to modify survey instruments and design new studies focusing on specific topics of concern, such as sleep. We demonstrate that an online support group for a monogenic form of diabetes is an effective informational tool that also provides psychosocial support. Participation by researchers and care providers can inform future research directions and highlight issues of patient concern. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. An interactive online approach to small-group student presentations and discussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thor, Der; Xiao, Nan; Zheng, Meixun; Ma, Ruidan; Yu, Xiao Xi

    2017-12-01

    Student presentations had been widely implemented across content areas, including health sciences education. However, due to various limitations, small-group student presentations in the classroom may not reach their full potential for student learning. To address challenges with presentations in the classroom, we redesigned the assignment by having students present and discuss online using VoiceThread, a cloud-based presentation and discussion tool. First-year students pursuing a Doctor of Dental Surgery degree were assigned into small groups to present physiology content and to discuss that content online. This assignment was similar to traditional student classroom presentations, with the exception that the entire assignment was conducted online. The primary purpose of this exploratory study was to investigate the impact of the online format on the discussion quality. Another purpose of the study was to examine students' perceptions of using VoiceThread for presenting and learning, as well as the online interactions between the presenter and audience. Students posted a higher number of questions and comments than required by the assignment. The questions from students were also higher level questions, and the answers to these questions were more thorough compared with what we had previously observed in classroom presentations. The survey results showed that students preferred using VoiceThread for presenting, learning from other presentations, and discussing presentation content over performing this process in the classroom. Preliminary findings suggested that having dental students make presentations and hold discussions online might help address the challenges of student presentations in the classroom. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Group Discussions and Test-Enhanced Learning: Individual Learning Outcomes and Personality Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenlund, Tova; Jönsson, Fredrik U.; Jonsson, Bert

    2017-01-01

    This paper focuses on the factors that are likely to play a role in individual learning outcomes from group discussions, and it includes a comparison featuring test-enhanced learning. A between-groups design (N = 98) was used to examine the learning effects of feedback if provided to discussion groups, and to examine whether group discussions…

  14. ROSAT: X ray survey of compact groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gorkom, Jacqueline

    1993-01-01

    This is the final technical report on grant NAG5-1954, which was awarded under the NASA ROSAT Guest Investigator Program to Columbia University. This grant was awarded for a number of projects on two rather different topics: (1) an x-ray survey of compact groups of galaxies; and (2) the fate of gas

  15. Choosing none of the above: Persistence of negativity after group discussion and group decision refusal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijstad, B.A.

    2008-01-01

    Within psychology and other disciplines, group decision making is a much-studied topic. However, the conditions in which groups do not decide but rather refuse to choose among available options have not been studied systematically. This research begins to fill this void, studying the effects of the

  16. Choosing none of the above : Persistence of negativity after group discussion and group decision refusal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijstad, Bernard A.

    2008-01-01

    Within psychology and other disciplines, group decision making is a much-studied topic. However, the conditions in which groups do not decide but rather refuse to choose among available options have not been studied systematically. This research begins to fill this void, studying the effects of the

  17. Group Discussion as an Effective Method of Instruction. IDD&E Working Paper No. 20.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeasi, Kwasi; Reigeluth, Charles M.

    Advantages and disadvantages of group discussion as a method of instruction are reviewed in this paper and criteria are suggested for determining when group discussion is or is not an appropriate instructional method. The guidelines provided take into consideration the characteristics of the students, the teacher, the group as a whole, and the…

  18. Adult auditory training is it part of aural rehabilitation? Focused group discussion

    OpenAIRE

    G Archana; Y Krishna; B Rajashekhar; P G Bhargavi

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To conduct focused group discussion on audiologist and hearing aid users to find out the necessity of auditory training in adults and geriatrics. Materials and Methods: A qualitative focused group discussion was conducted on 30 audiologist and 10 hearing aid users to gather the information on auditory rehabilitation in adults and geriatrics. Eight different questions were proposed for the discussion on aural rehabilitation in these population. Discussion was recorded and analyzed for the...

  19. A Study of a Method for Teaching Group Discussion in English

    OpenAIRE

    加藤, 和美; Kazumi, KATO; 東海大学; Tokai University

    2015-01-01

    This paper will introduce a teaching method that helps students use unrehearsed English to make a conversation and accomplish group tasks. A discussion-based task was conducted by native English speaking students at a college in the U.K, and the task was recorded with a video camera. Using the video, materials for group discussion were made for Japanese students. Discussion lessons using group tasks were conducted in 7 different university classes in Japan with several revisions. The unique p...

  20. Challenges in the doctor-patient relationship: 12 tips for more effective peer group discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Hamish

    2015-09-01

    In New Zealand, almost all general practitioners are members of peer groups, which provide opportunities for both clinical discussion and collegial support. This article proposes that peer groups can also be a useful medium for exploring specific challenges within the doctor-patient relationship. However, the peer group culture needs to be receptive to this particular goal. Structured discussion can help peer group members explore interpersonal issues more thoroughly.

  1. Relevant prior knowledge moderates the effect of elaboration during small group discussion on academic achievement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.M. van Blankenstein (Floris); D.H.J.M. Dolmans (Diana); C.P.M. van der Vleuten (Cees); H.G. Schmidt (Henk)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThis study set out to test whether relevant prior knowledge would moderate a positive effect on academic achievement of elaboration during small-group discussion. In a 2 × 2 experimental design, 66 undergraduate students observed a video showing a small-group problem-based discussion

  2. Relevant Prior Knowledge Moderates the Effect of Elaboration during Small Group Discussion on Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Blankenstein, Floris M.; Dolmans, Diana H. J. M.; Van der Vleuten, Cees P. M.; Schmidt, Henk G.

    2013-01-01

    This study set out to test whether relevant prior knowledge would moderate a positive effect on academic achievement of elaboration during small-group discussion. In a 2 × 2 experimental design, 66 undergraduate students observed a video showing a small-group problem-based discussion about thunder and lightning. In the video, a teacher asked…

  3. Promoting Thinking, Problem-Solving and Reasoning during Small Group Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Robyn M.

    2011-01-01

    The study reports on the types of questioning strategies teachers use to promote thinking, problem-solving and reasoning during small group discussions. The study also reports on the types of discourses students use to problem-solve and reason during their small group discussions. An audiotape of one class lesson from the three teachers included…

  4. Qualitative Research and Consumer Policy: Focus Group Discussions as a Form of Consumer Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiskanen, Eva; Jarvela, Katja; Pulliainen, Annukka; Saastamoinen, Mika; Timonen, Paivi

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes our ongoing attempts to involve consumers in innovation and technology policy by means of a national Consumer Panel, using focus group discussions as the primary method of consumer participation. We evaluate our experiences of the usefulness of focus group discussions in this context by considering two examples of studies…

  5. The Effect of Small Group Discussion on Cutoff Scores during Standard Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deunk, Marjolein I.; van Kuijk, Mechteld F.; Bosker, Roel J.

    2014-01-01

    Standard setting methods, like the Bookmark procedure, are used to assist education experts in formulating performance standards. Small group discussion is meant to help these experts in setting more reliable and valid cutoff scores. This study is an analysis of 15 small group discussions during two standards setting trajectories and their effect…

  6. Use of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator in Psychology Courses and Discussion Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carskadon, Thomas G.

    1978-01-01

    A study investigated student participation in class discussion in a college psychology course. Findings indicated that the quality of participation is related to personality. Teachers are cautioned to avoid one-sided discussions by dividing students into discussion groups which include intuitive, extroverted, judging, thinking, and perceptive…

  7. Talking Science: The research evidence on the use of small group discussions in science teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Judith; Hogarth, Sylvia; Lubben, Fred; Campbell, Bob; Robinson, Alison

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports the findings of two systematic reviews of the use and effects of small group discussions in high school science teaching. Ninety-four studies were included in an overview (systematic map) of work in the area, and 24 studies formed the basis of the in-depth reviews. The reviews indicate that there is considerable diversity in the topics used to promote small group discussions. They also demonstrate that students often struggle to formulate and express coherent arguments, and demonstrate a low level of engagement with tasks. The reviews suggest that groups function more purposefully, and understanding improves most, when specifically constituted such that differing views are represented, when some form of training is provided for students on effective group work, and when help in structuring discussions is provided in the form of "cues". Single-sex groups function more purposefully than mixed-sex groups, though improvements in understanding are independent of gender composition of groups. Finally, the reviews demonstrate very clearly that, for small group discussions to be effective, teachers and students need to be given explicit teaching in the skills associated with the development of arguments and the characteristics associated with effective group discussions. In addition to the substantive findings, the paper also reports on key features of the methods employed to gather and analyse data. Of particular note are the two contrasting approaches to data analysis, one adopting a grounded theory approach and the other drawing on established methods of discourse analysis.

  8. Effectiveness of group discussions and commitment in improving cleaning behaviour of shared sanitation users in Kampala, Uganda slums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumwebaze, Innocent K; Mosler, Hans-Joachim

    2015-12-01

    Access to and use of hygienic shared sanitation facilities is fundamental in reducing the high risk of diseases such as diarrhoea and respiratory infections. We evaluated the effectiveness of group discussions and commitment in improving the cleaning behaviour of shared sanitation users in three urban slums in Kampala, Uganda. The study follows the risk, attitudes, norms, abilities and self-regulation (RANAS) model of behaviour change and some factors of the social dilemma theory. A pre-versus post-intervention survey was conducted in three slums of Kampala, Uganda, between December 2012 and September 2013. From the pre-intervention findings, users of dirty sanitation facilities were randomly assigned to discussions, discussions + commitment and control interventions. The interventions were implemented for 3 months with the aim of improving cleaning behaviour. This paper provides an analysis of 119 respondents who belonged to the intervention discussion-only (n = 38), discussions + commitment (n = 41) and the control (no intervention, n = 40) groups. Compared to the control, discussions and discussions + commitment significantly improved shared toilet users' cleaning behaviour. The rate of improvement was observed through behavioural determinants such as cleaning obligation, cleaning ease, cleaning approval and affective beliefs. Our study findings show that group discussions and commitment interventions derived from RANAS model of behaviour change are effective in improving the shared sanitation users' cleaning behaviour. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Using clinical experience in discussion within problem-based learning groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Paul; Duplock, Amanda; Willis, Sarah

    2006-11-01

    A key principle in problem-based learning (PBL) is the student linking learning from different sources to enrich understanding. We have explored how medical students based in a clinical environment use clinical experience within PBL groups. We recorded the discussion of 12 third-year groups, which were meeting for the second time on a PBL case, where students report back on the learning objectives. Discussions covering five separate PBL paper cases were recorded. Analysis of the transcripts was based on constant comparative method using a coding framework. The range of discussion segments of clinical experience was 2-15, with 9 of 12 groups having at least five separate segments. Our initial coding framework covered 10 categories, of which the most common were: a specific patient encounter (19%); an experience in the community (15%); and a personal health experience (15%). Students often used emotive phrases with 37 examples in the clinical experience segments compared with 9 from the longer non-clinical discussion. Most clinical descriptions triggered further discussion with almost half leading to some related medical topic. The discussion segments were subsequently coded into; 'confirming' (40); 'extending' (40); and 'disconfirming' (16) the understanding of the group for that topic. Discussion of clinical experience encouraged students to connect to the affective aspects of learning. It helped students to bridge between the tutorial and real clinical contexts. A clinical experience was often a powerful pivotal point, which confirmed, extended or refuted what was being discussed.

  10. Advances and bottlenecks in modelling the greenhouse climate: summary of a group discussion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seginer, I.; Bakker, J.C.

    1998-01-01

    This report is a summary of a group discussion at the symposium 'Models in protected cultivation' held in Wageningen, August 1997. The discussion focused on the reasons for the relatively limited acceptance and application of greenhouse climate models, especially in commercial practice. The

  11. Indian Youth Speak about Tobacco: Results of Focus Group Discussions with School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Arima; Arora, Monika; Stigler, Melissa H.; Komro, Kelli A.; Lytle, Leslie A.; Reddy, K. Srinath; Perry, Cheryl L.

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses the findings of Focus Group Discussions (FGDs) that were conducted as a formative assessment for Project MYTRI (Mobilizing Youth for Tobacco Related Initiatives in India), a randomized, multicomponent, school-based trial to prevent and control tobacco use among youth in India. Forty-eight FGDs were conducted with students (N…

  12. Social Skills and Leadership Abilities among Children in Small-Group Literature Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Certo, Janine L.

    2011-01-01

    Many childhood educators are attempting to shift from the dominant "recitation" format of discussions found in today's classrooms. This study draws on reader response, and sociocognitive and sociocultural theories to investigate children's perceptions of social skills and leadership moves after participating in small-group discussions of…

  13. Attitudes and Language Use in Group Discussions on Socio-Scientific Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Mats Gunnar; Folkesson, Anne-Mari

    2016-01-01

    The school systems of many countries have been pervaded by student-centred pedagogy making students' small group discussion a common feature of the classroom practice.However, there is a lack of studies focussing different modes of discussion for the purpose of finding out whether some modes are more beneficial than others. Hence, the aim of this…

  14. Literacy and Technology: Integrating Technology with Small Group, Peer-Led Discussions of Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Genya

    2012-01-01

    This review examines research of computer-mediated small group discussion of literature. The goal of this review is to explore several instructional formats for integrating print-based and new literacies skills. First, the theoretical foundations for the shift from teacher-led to student led discussion are outlined. Research exploring ways in…

  15. Using Multimodal Presentation Software and Peer Group Discussion in Learning English as a Second Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mei-jung

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports an application of multimedia in a blended learning environment in which students engaged in multimodal presentations and peer group discussion. Students' presentation files were commented upon by their peers on the discussion board and scored by the researcher, based on questions developed by Levy and Kimber (2009) to apply…

  16. Inter-professional learning: discussion groups in a minor surgery skills course for nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestel, Debra; Kneebone, Roger; Martin, Shirley

    2004-12-01

    Inter-professional teaching and learning takes many forms. This paper describes an inter-professional educational intervention using structured discussion groups of nurses and medical students within an innovative course on minor surgery for nurses. During an initial course, nurses were required to demonstrate competence in technical and communication skills by undergoing scenario-based assessments. Unhelpful levels of anxiety before and after these assessments interfered with learning and performance. Semi-structured discussion groups facilitated by medical students were introduced during a second course, running parallel with assessments and replacing the self-directed activities scheduled in the pilot course. Written evaluations and group interviews explored participants' experiences of taking part in these discussion groups. Results indicate that the groups were successful in reducing unhelpful anxiety and that they conferred additional benefits for both nurses and medical students. Future courses incorporating these inter-professional learning opportunities will evaluate immediate and longer-term benefits in greater depth.

  17. Balint-style case discussion groups in psychiatric training: an evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Simon; Gask, Linda; Swift, Geraldine; Evans, Mark

    2009-01-01

    The authors aim to identify any benefits or limitations of psychiatric residents attending a Balint-style case discussion group, to explore those experiences, to study the process of the learning experience, and to identify potential educational implications. Seventeen psychiatric residents and counselors completing two parallel case discussion groups at a U.K. psychotherapy service were given in-depth interviews about their experiences of this training. Interview transcripts were analyzed using qualitative methodology. The groups were anxiety provoking; most participants were able to progressively accommodate to and benefit from the psychological learning process, but some struggled to adapt. Basic psychological competency and the awareness of the self in relation to the patient can be fostered through attendance at a case discussion group. With some limitations, Balint groups continue to be a useful way of introducing young psychiatrists to psychological processes.

  18. [The Mechanism of Free-Floating Discussion in a Psychiatric/Mental Health Nursing Supervisory Group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Hsien-Hsien

    2015-06-01

    Although the free-floating discussion format is widely used in group therapy, the application of this format in the context of supervisory groups has yet to be clarified. The purpose of this study was to explore the mechanisms involved in facilitating and learning the free-floating discussion format in a supervisory group. A phenomenological approach was used to investigate the group content and personal feedback of a psychiatric-nurse supervisory group. The group held on 12 sessions. Each session was conducted once weekly and lasting 150 minutes. The findings identified the functions of free-floating discussions in the context of supervisory groups as: embodied interaction and initiation by handling. Embodied interaction included: reflection on the experience of the other, sense of body, and present action. Initiation by handling included: facilitating the self-narrative, following the lead of the group, and reflecting in accordance with the group. The role of the facilitator is to parallel process rather than to lead in order to produce practical wisdom. Free-floating discussion and self-evidence from initiation by handling has the potential to promote spontaneity, creativity, and self-confidence in clinical practice and to promote deep learning.

  19. Using a Facebook Group as a Forum to Distribute, Answer and Discuss Content: Influence on Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Bannon, Blanche W.; Britt, Virginia G.; Beard, Jeffrey L.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of using a Facebook group to increase preservice teachers' knowledge when one was used as a forum to share, answer, and discuss content-related questions in a technology course required for all students seeking teacher licensure. Further, it examined the students' prior use of Facebook groups, how the…

  20. The Effects of L1 and L2 Group Discussions on L2 Reading Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Blake; Evans, Moyra Sweetnam

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the effects of post-reading group discussions in both first (L1) and second (L2) languages on L2 reading comprehension. The participants were fifteen Japanese university students of intermediate-level English. Three cohorts read four English texts and produced individual written recalls. Group 1 (the control…

  1. Reducing Preschoolers' Disruptive Behavior in Public with a Brief Parent Discussion Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joachim, Sabine; Sanders, Matthew R.; Turner, Karen M. T.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the efficacy of a brief 2-h discussion group for parents of preschool children that show disruptive behavior on shopping trips. Forty-six parents with children aged 2-6 years were randomly assigned to either the intervention condition or a waitlist control group. Significant intervention effects were found for measures of…

  2. Focus group discussion with private sector doctors in the eThekwini ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Two focus group discussions were conducted amongst private sector doctors in the eThekwini Metro, after obtaining their consent. The focus group sessions were scripted, ... which impacted negatively on adherence. Five doctors mentioned that depressed patients abused alcohol, resulting in nonadherence.

  3. Student discussion groups on doctor-patient relationships: a critical assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, C J; Pullen, G P

    1981-11-01

    Regular discussion groups for all students were introduced at a new clinical medical school to enable students to discuss freely their responses to patients. The main aim was to prevent the alleged dehumanizing effect of medical education. The groups were monitoring by attendance records, questionnaires and tape-recordings. In fact, the majority of students stopped attending so that only two of the five groups survived longer than 6 months. Despite improvements in organization and styles of conducting the groups, a similar fall in attendance occurred in the next year's intake. paradoxically, in most meeting there was a lively and apparently beneficial discussion on the students' reactions to their contacts with patients, so it was difficult to explain the overall drop in attendance. It was concluded that, while organizational details and inappropriate styles of conducting the groups were partly responsible, the main problem was the apparent conflict in attitudes between the students medical teachers and their group conductors (who were mainly psychiatrists), i.e. between the concepts of modern technological medicine and those of psycho-social medicine. This induced a conflict of motivation in the students, who naturally need to identify with their teachers, which most of them resolved by avoiding the groups. It is suggested that more effective integration between general medical teachers and the organizers of such groups is needed, and that group conductors should include general practitioners and clinical supervisors as well as psychiatrists.

  4. How University Students Managed Conflictual Talk in Small-Group Text Discussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-ming Chi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article was to investigate how 10 groups of Taiwanese university students managed conflictual talk via two text discussions, and how they perceived such talk as a social act of reading. Data sources included each group’s text discussions and an oral interview with each participant. Three holistic, detailed, and selective approaches were used to glean the meaning of the data; as a result, five aspects of conflictual talk, namely, collaboration, reflexivity, humor, alteration, and collision were generated for discussion. The findings revealed that conflictual talk provided multiple opportunities for participants to carry out meaning co-construction with their peers; participants not only clarified, elaborated, and challenged one another’s ideas, but also had to listen attentively to one another and direct the discussion themselves. However, if any group members showed no interest in negotiating meaning with their peers, conflictual talk may lead to confrontations. The pedagogical implications of this work are also addressed.

  5. Health information, credibility, homophily, and influence via the Internet: Web sites versus discussion groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zuoming; Walther, Joseph B; Pingree, Suzanne; Hawkins, Robert P

    2008-07-01

    Despite concerns about online health information and efforts to improve its credibility, how users evaluate and utilize such information presented in Web sites and online discussion groups may involve different evaluative mechanisms. This study examined credibility and homophily as two underlying mechanisms for social influence with regard to online health information. An original experiment detected that homophily grounded credibility perceptions and drove the persuasive process in both Web sites and online discussion groups. The more homophilous an online health information stimulus was perceived as being, the more likely people were to adopt the advice offered in that particular piece of information.

  6. Do Veterinary Students See a Need for More In-Course Discussion? A Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasch, Cindy; Haimerl, Peggy; Heuwieser, Wolfgang; Arlt, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Rather than merely transferring information, veterinary education should stimulate and motivate students and encourage them to think. Currently in veterinary education, most curricula use the method of frontal teaching (e.g., in lectures). A student-centered critical approach to information is rarely used. Our research sought to determine if students consider in-course discussion useful and if sufficient possibilities for discussion are provided and supported by their lecturers. In December 2013, we conducted a survey of fourth-year students. Specifically, we wanted to know if students consider in-course discussion about course content useful for successful learning and if students wish to have more opportunities for discussion during class time. Finally, we wanted to identify barriers that limit the students' motivation and ability to engage in discussion of course content. In total, 105 students completed the survey. The majority of students agreed or strongly agreed that clinical topics should be discussed during class time. Frequently stated reasons were improved learning (85.7%) and the opportunity to look at topics from different perspectives (92.4%). In conclusion, we found a considerable dearth of and request for discussion within veterinary education. In light of these findings, we emphasize the need for new teaching strategies that promote independent thinking and critical questioning. We suggest the implementation of more discussion opportunities in well considered and moderated settings in veterinary teaching.

  7. Empirical research on dictionary use in foreign-language learning: survey and discussion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulstijn, J.H.; Atkins, B.T.S.; Atkins, B.T.S.

    1998-01-01

    This paper begins with a brief survey, in the form of a classified bibliography of research into dictionary use. A discussion follows of the type of research required in order to increase one's insight into the cognitive processes involved in using a dictionary; the principal factors which affect

  8. Social support and online postpartum depression discussion groups: a content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Marilyn; Donelle, Lorie; Hume-Loveland, Laurie

    2012-06-01

    Social support has a positive influence on women's childbearing experience and is shown to be a preventive factor in postpartum depression. This study examined the perceived value and types of social supports that characterize the discussions of women who participate in postpartum depression online discussion groups. A directed content analysis was used to examine 512 messages posted on a postpartum depression online support group over six months. The majority of the women's postings illustrated emotional support followed by informational and instrumental support. Online support groups provide women experiencing postpartum depression a safe place to connect with others and receive information, encouragement and hope. Education strategies are needed to address the many questions regarding PPD medical treatment. Recommending vetted links to PPD online support groups will create opportunities for women to share their experiences and obtain support. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of communication strategy training on EFL students’ performance in small-group discussions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Benson

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, a number of studies have been conducted with regard to communication strategy training and performance on communicative tasks (Lam, 2009; Nakatani, 2010; Naughton, 2006. This study aims to add to the literature by examining how two strategies, clarifying/confirming and extending a conversation, and two methods of teaching the strategies, affected the interactional sequences and overall group discussion performance of EFL students at a university in Japan. Pre and posttreatment small-group discussions were recorded for assessment, and a stimulated recall interview was administered to determine the participants’ perceptions of their learning and language use. Posttest results reveal that the experimental groups that were taught predetermined phrases aimed at clarifying/confirming and extending a conversation employed such phrases more frequently than the control group. However, this employment of phrases did not lead to higher gains in group discussion skills as the control group enjoyed the largest gains from pre to posttest. The researchers consider the findings in light of previous research, and conclude with recommendations for future research on the topic with special regard to research design.

  10. Students’ Evaluation of Google Hangouts Through A Cross-Cultural Group Discussion Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiko KOBAYASHI

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The study investigated perceived ease of use and usefulness of Google Hangouts as an instructional/learning tool. Forty-two teacher education students at U.S and Japanese universities participated in an online cross-cultural activity using Google Hangouts and discussed cultural differences between the two countries and their teaching philosophies. After the activity, students responded to a survey to evaluate the ease of use and usefulness of Google Hangouts. Qualitative data were also collected through the survey to examine their overall learning experience. The results indicated that Google Hangouts is a useful instructional tool, but not easy to use. Although technical problems occurred during the conference, the activity provided valuable experiences for both U.S. and Japanese students. The study provides suggestions for how Google Hangouts can be integrated into online classrooms based on the findings.

  11. Interlinkages between energy, environmental changes and livelihoods in Laotian households. Findings from 14 focus group discussions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khanthaphat, B.; Lakkala, H.; Luukkanen, J.

    2012-07-01

    This publication presents and discusses the findings of 14 focus group discussions (FGD) conducted in different parts of Laos in early 2011 as a part of the project 'Interlinkages Between Energy and Livelihoods - Data, Training and Scenarios for Sustainable Energy Planning in Laos (INES)', which is a project funded by the Finnish Ministry for Foreign Affairs and Nordic Development Fund in the framework of Energy and Environment Partnership (EEP) Mekong in South East Asia. The INES project was implemented by Finland Futures Research Centre (FFRC) in cooperation with the Ministry of Energy and Mines of Laos. The overall objective of the project is to improve the capacity of decision makers in Laos to promote sustainable long-term energy planning. In addition, the aim has been to provide qualitative and quantitative data on rural and urban resources and livelihood strategies and increase the knowledge of energy resources and use, and sustainable use of natural resources in Laos. In the quantitative survey 2100 households in Laos were interviewed. This e-publication summarizes the results of the qualitative data from the 14 FGDs and covers the following topics: household energy use and management, livelihoods and changes in livelihoods, environmental changes and food security as well as perspectives on economic development over the next 3-5 years. Throughout the report a comparison between Southern and Northern provinces has been made. Geographically speaking Northern and Southern Laos differ from each other in terms that Northern Laos is to a large extent mountainous and less densely populated with large areas covered by forest, in comparison to Southern Laos which is mainly low land, covered by agricultural land to a larger extent and has a denser population. Thus, the settings for livelihoods and living conditions differ between Northern and Southern Laos which is also reflected in the FGD results. Where applicable, also a comparison between on- grid and

  12. Study-Discussion in the Liberal Arts. Studies in Adult Group Learning in the Liberal Arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Abbott

    Three Liberal Arts Centers in Los Angeles, Pasadena, and Whittier, California, sponsored by The Fund for Adult Education, were evaluated on the effectiveness of discussion groups in World Affairs Are Your Affairs; An Introduction to Humanities; Ways of Mankind; and World Politics. Data were collected from personal interviews with a random…

  13. A High-Leverage Language Teaching Practice: Leading an Open-Ended Group Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Erin

    2015-01-01

    In response to calls for more practice-based teacher education, this study investigated the way in which two high-performing novice world language teachers, one in Spanish and one in Latin, implemented a high-leverage teaching practice, leading an open-ended group discussion. Observational data revealed a number of constituent micro-practices. The…

  14. Students discussing their mathematical ideas: Group-tests and mind-maps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijls, M.; de Kramer, D.; Maj, B.; Pytlak, M.; Swoboda, E.

    2008-01-01

    In an explorative research project, teachers experimented with new ideas to make their students discuss (i.e. show, explain, justify and reconstruct their work) their mathematical ideas with each other. Two kind of special tasks were developed: group tests and mind maps. Also, the role of the

  15. Quantifying the Effect of Discussion Group Membership on Technology Adoption and Farm Profit on Dairy Farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, Thia; Heanue, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Participatory extension, specifically farm discussion groups, has become a very popular form of agricultural extension in Ireland. The purpose of this article is to assess its effectiveness in promoting the adoption of new technologies and improving farm profit. Design/Methodology/Approach: Following a review of the background and theory…

  16. Online Reflective Group Discussion--Connecting First Year Undergraduate Students with Their Third Year Peers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Annetta K. L.

    2011-01-01

    University professional programs seek to develop students as reflective practitioners. The ability to critically reflect is often assumed to occur along the way. The explicit development of critical reflective skills among students is challenging. This study describes the utilization of online group discussion for critical reflection and provides…

  17. Creating Spaces for Critical Transformative Dialogues: Legitimising Discussion Groups as Professional Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards-Groves, Christine J.

    2013-01-01

    Focussed dialogue (as lived and living practices) can have a powerful role in renewing professional practice, advancing its sustainability and development as administrative and political systems colonise the practices of teachers and teacher educators. However, participating in discussion groups for many teachers, including those in academia, is…

  18. Influence of a Teacher's Scaffolding Moves during Child-Led Small-Group Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadallah, May; Anderson, Richard C.; Nguyen-Jahiel, Kim; Miller, Brian W.; Kim, Il-Hee; Kuo, Li-Jen; Dong, Ting; Wu, Xiaoying

    2011-01-01

    The influence of one teacher's scaffolding moves on children's performance in free-flowing child-led small-group discussions was investigated. Three moves were examined: prompting for and praising the use of evidence, asking for clarification, and challenging. Lag sequential analysis was applied to a corpus of over 5,300 speaking turns during 30…

  19. Evaluating Impact of Small-Group Discussion on Learning Utilizing a Classroom Response System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flosason, Thorhallur O.; McGee, Heather M.; Diener-Ludwig, Lori

    2015-01-01

    Classroom response systems (also referred to as clickers) can enhance learning outcomes and are generally viewed favorably by students and instructors alike. The current study used an alternating treatments design to examine whether discussing questions in small groups before responding to clicker questions during lecture improved accurate…

  20. The Influence of Group Discussion on Students' Responses and Confidence during Peer Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Bill J.; Koretsky, Milo D.

    2011-01-01

    Peer instruction is an active-learning pedagogy in which students answer short, conceptually based questions that are interspersed during instruction. A key element is the group discussion that occurs among students between their initial and final answers. This study analyzes student responses during a modified form of peer instruction in two…

  1. Talking Science: The Research Evidence on the Use of Small Group Discussions in Science Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Judith; Hogarth, Sylvia; Lubben, Fred; Campbell, Bob; Robinson, Alison

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports the findings of two systematic reviews of the use and effects of small group discussions in high school science teaching. Ninety-four studies were included in an overview (systematic map) of work in the area, and 24 studies formed the basis of the in-depth reviews. The reviews indicate that there is considerable diversity in the…

  2. A Framework for Conducting Critical Dialectical Pluralist Focus Group Discussions Using Mixed Research Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.; Frels, Rebecca K.

    2015-01-01

    Although focus group discussions (FGDs) represent a popular data collection tool for researchers, they contain an extremely serious flaw: FGD researchers have ultimate power over all decisions made at every stage of the research process--from the conceptualization of the research, to the planning of the research study, to the implementation of the…

  3. Talk in the Science Classroom: Using Verbal Behaviour Analysis as a Tool for Group Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Lynne; Booth, Josephine

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a pilot study following on from a curriculum development activity with teachers and children in primary school classrooms, using a framework for group discussion developed by Huthwaite International. The Centre for Science Education at Sheffield Hallam University and Huthwaite International worked with teachers from three…

  4. Examination of Students' Small Groups Discussion in Argumentation Process: Scientific and Socio-Scientific Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memis, Esra Kabatas; Cevik, Ebru Ezberci

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine processes experienced by students of different achievement levels in small group discussions in argumentation applications conducted in scientific and socio-scientific issues. Case study which is a qualitative research design was used for the study. In this line, a success test including mechanical subjects…

  5. Flemish adolescents' perceptions of cigarette plain packaging : a qualitative study with focus group discussions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Hal, Guido; Van Roosbroeck, Sofie; Vriesacker, Bart; Arts, Matheus; Hoeck, Sarah; Fraeyman, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To find out whether there is a potential impact of the appearance of a plain cigarette package on the smoking perceptions and behavioural intentions of Flemish adolescents. Design: We performed a cross-sectional study using the qualitative method of focus group discussions. Setting:

  6. Shaping Understanding of HIV through Negotiation and Conflict Resolution during Peer Group Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vimla L.; Branch, Timothy; Gutnik, Lily; Arocha, Jose F.

    2006-01-01

    High-risk behavior in youths related to HIV transmission continues to occur despite large-scale efforts to disseminate information about safe sexual practices through education. Our study examined the relationships among knowledge, decision-making strategies, and risk assessment about HIV by youths during peer group focused discussions. Two focus…

  7. Communicating for Diversity: Using Teacher Discussion Groups to Transform Multicultural Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Mare, Danielle M.

    2014-01-01

    The author argues that in order to create space for authentic multicultural engagement in the face of Eurocentric norms, teachers should form discussion groups that follow five basic guidelines: engage, don't enrage; be comfortable with negative emotion; watch for and change unproductive language; talk about everything; and engage in classroom…

  8. Integrated and Applied Curricula Discussion Group and Data Base Project. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisconsin Univ. - Stout, Menomonie. Center for Vocational, Technical and Adult Education.

    A project was conducted to compile integrated and applied curriculum resources, develop databases on the World Wide Web, and encourage networking for high school and technical college educators through an Internet discussion group. Activities conducted during the project include the creation of a web page to guide users to resource banks…

  9. [The educational reach of discussion in small groups. The role of the professor's differential experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Mangas, José Alberto; Viniegra-Velázquez, Leonardo

    2008-01-01

    The teachers' formation program at IMSS includes the methodological diplomate in teaching level I (DMDI) and level II (DMDII). This program is based in educational strategies that promote the participation (guide towards knowledge elaboration). The importance of discussion in small groups (subgroups) to increase learning has been showed as part of such strategies. To evaluate the influence in learning of the professors' experience in coordinating the subgroup discussion. Three groups of students were included (professors in teaching formation) that had consecutively studied the DMDI: DMDIa, DMDIb, and DMDIc. There was also included a group of DMDII whose students had participated in DMDI as coordinators of the subgroup discussion of DMDIb and DMDIc (DMDIa did not count with coordinators). Two instruments previously validated were used to evaluate the development of a position about education and scientific work (indicator of both: % of consequence). Evaluations were made at the beginning and end of each DMDI. Position in education: at the beginning DMDIa = 36; DMDIb = 30, DMDIc = 31, without differences among them (p 0.65). After the interventions the increases were: DMDIa from 36 to 75 (p groups among themselves, differences were found between DMDIa and DMDIb, DMDIa and DMDIc, and no differences were found between DMDIb and DMDIc. Position about scientific work: at the beginning DMDIa = 20; DMDIb = 14; DMDIc = 15 (p. 0.35). After the interventions the increases were: DMDIa from 20 to 35 (p groups among themselves, difference was found between DMDIb and DMDIc (p discussion has a notorious influence in learning. The DMDIa group that did not have this support showed lower advances with both instruments. The DMDIb group that had coordinating professors with little experience had equivalent advances to DMDIc in position about education, and lower advances in the position about scientific work. The DMDIc group whose coordinating professors had a previous experience with

  10. Breast cancer risk reduction options: awareness, discussion, and use among women from four ethnic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Celia Patricia; Haas, Jennifer S; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J; Gregorich, Steven E; Somkin, Carol; Des Jarlais, Genevieve; Kerlikowske, Karla

    2006-01-01

    With recent advances in breast cancer risk reduction practices, it is increasingly important to assess both the breadth of and disparities in use across different racial/ethnic groups. We conducted telephone interviews with 1,700 women ages 40 to 74, from four racial/ethnic groups, without prior history of breast cancer, who received mammograms at one of five mammography facilities in San Francisco. Main outcomes measured included recognition of tamoxifen, raloxifene, genetic testing, and prophylactic surgery. Global indicators (recognition of any therapy, discussion of breast cancer risk) were developed from original outcome measures and analyzed using logistic regression. Multivariate analyses indicate that race/ethnicity and interview language affected recognition of therapies and discussion of risk. White women were more likely than all other women to recognize any therapy and more likely than Asian-Americans to discuss risk. Women at high risk, who had a prior abnormal mammogram, who perceived themselves to be at high risk, or who were exposed to breast health information were more likely to discuss risk. Women are aware of preventive therapies, although discussion and use is limited. Interventions to increase use of therapies should focus on those at high risk. (Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2006;15(1):162-6).

  11. Enhancing a cancer prevention and control curriculum through interactive group discussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, L P; Gadalla, S M; Hamilton, J G; Heckman-Stoddard, B M; Kent, E E; Lai, G Y; Lin, S W; Luhn, P; Faupel-Badger, J M

    2012-06-01

    The Principles and Practice of Cancer Prevention and Control course (Principles course) is offered annually by the National Cancer Institute Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program. This 4-week postgraduate course covers the spectrum of cancer prevention and control research (e.g., epidemiology, laboratory, clinical, social, and behavioral sciences) and is open to attendees from medical, academic, government, and related institutions across the world. In this report, we describe a new addition to the Principles course syllabus, which was exclusively a lecture-based format for over 20 years. In 2011, cancer prevention fellows and staff designed and implemented small group discussion sessions as part of the curriculum. The goals of these sessions were to foster an interactive environment, discuss concepts presented during the Principles course, exchange ideas, and enhance networking among the course participants and provide a teaching and leadership opportunity to current cancer prevention fellows. Overall, both the participants and facilitators who returned the evaluation forms (n=61/87 and 8/10, respectively) reported a high satisfaction with the experience for providing both an opportunity to explore course concepts in a greater detail and to network with colleagues. Participants (93%) and facilitators (100%) stated that they would like to see this component remain a part of the Principles course curriculum, and both groups provided recommendations for the 2012 program. The design, implementation, and evaluation of this initial discussion group component of the Principles course are described herein. The findings in this report will not only inform future discussion group sessions in the Principles course but may also be useful to others planning to incorporate group learning into large primarily lecture-based courses.

  12. Enhancing a Cancer Prevention and Control Curriculum through Interactive Group Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsythe, L.P.; Gadalla, S.M.; Hamilton, J.G.; Heckman-Stoddard, B.M.; Kent, E.E.; Lai, G.Y.; Lin, S.W.; Luhn, P.; Faupel-Badger, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    The Principles and Practice of Cancer Prevention and Control course (Principles course) is offered annually by the National Cancer Institute Cancer Prevention Fellowship Program. This four-week post-graduate course covers the spectrum of cancer prevention and control research (e.g. epidemiology, laboratory, clinical, social, and behavioral sciences) and is open to attendees from medical, academic, government, and related institutions across the world. In this report, we describe a new addition to the Principles course syllabus, which was exclusively a lecture-based format for over 20 years. In 2011, Cancer Prevention Fellows and staff designed and implemented small group discussion sessions as part of the curriculum. The goals of these sessions were to foster an interactive environment, discuss concepts presented during the Principles course, exchange ideas, and enhance networking amongst the course participants, and provide a teaching and leadership opportunity to current Cancer Prevention Fellows. Overall, both the participants and facilitators who returned the evaluation forms (n=61/87, and 8/10, respectively), reported high satisfaction with the experience for providing both an opportunity to explore course concepts in greater detail and to network with colleagues. Participants (93%) and facilitators (100%) stated they would like to see this component remain a part of the Principles course curriculum, and both groups provided recommendations for the 2012 program. The design, implementation, and evaluation of this initial discussion group component of the Principles course are described herein. The findings in this report will not only inform future discussion group sessions in the Principles course but may also be useful to others planning to incorporate group learning into large primarily lecture-based courses. PMID:22661264

  13. Reasons for attending support groups and organizational preferences: the European scleroderma support group members survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumuchian, Stephanie T; Delisle, Vanessa C; Kwakkenbos, Linda; Pépin, Mia; Carrier, Marie-Eve; Malcarne, Vanessa L; Peláez, Sandra; El-Baalbaki, Ghassan; Thombs, Brett D

    2017-12-19

    The objectives were to identify reasons why patients attend scleroderma support groups and to ascertain preferences for how meetings are best organized. The survey included 30-items on reasons for attending and nine items on organizational preferences. Patients were recruited through European patient organizations. Exploratory factor analysis was used to group reasons for attendance thematically. About 213 scleroderma patients (192 women) completed the survey. A three-factor model best described reasons for attending [χ2(348) = 586.1, p support, (2) learning about treatment and symptom management strategies, and (3) discussing other aspects of scleroderma. Among organizational preferences, respondents emphasized that meetings should include educational aspects and the opportunity to share information and support. People with scleroderma attend support groups to give and obtain social support and for education about managing their disease and other aspects of living with scleroderma. Support groups should be structured to facilitate both educational and informational aspects and to provide opportunities for sharing and support between members. Implications for rehabilitation Local peer-led support groups are an important support and informational resource for patients living with scleroderma. People with scleroderma attend support groups in order to: (1) obtain interpersonal and social support, (2) learn about disease treatment and symptom management strategies, and (3) discuss other aspects of living with scleroderma outside of symptom management. Most support group members prefer groups with a trained facilitator, that include family members or loved ones in the groups, that include between 11and 20 members, that last between 1 and 2 h, and that meet once every 1-3 months. Rehabilitation professionals can support the formation and management of local support groups or can refer patients to national scleroderma patient organizations for information on

  14. Malaysian cultural differences in knowledge, attitudes and practices related to erectile dysfunction: focus group discussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, W Y; Wong, Y L; Zulkifli, S N; Tan, H M

    2002-12-01

    This qualitative study aimed to examine cultural differences in knowledge, attitudes and practices related to erectile dysfunction (ED) utilizing focus group discussion. Six focus groups consisting of 66 men, 45-70-y-old were conducted-two Malay groups (n=18), two Chinese groups (n=25) and two Indian groups (n=23). Participants were purposely recruited from the general public on a voluntary basis with informed consent. Transcripts were analyzed using qualitative data analysis software ATLASti. The Malay and Chinese traditional remedies for preventing or treating ED are commonly recognized among all races. Many have a negative perception of someone with ED. Malay and Chinese men tended to blame their wife for their problem and thought that the problem might lead to extra-marital affairs, unlike the Indian men who attributed their condition to fate. Malays would prefer traditional medicine for the problem. The Chinese felt they would be more comfortable with a male doctor whilst this is not so with the Malays or Indians. Almost all prefer the doctor to initiate discussion on sexual issues related to their medical condition. There is a need for doctors to consider cultural perspectives in a multicultural society as a lack of understanding of this often contributes to an inadequate consultation.

  15. Preventive Strategies and Processes to Counteract Bullying in Health Care Settings: Focus Group Discussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandmark K, Margaretha; Rahm, GullBritt; Wilde Larsson, Bodil; Nordström, Gun; Rystedt, Ingrid

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore preventive strategies and processes to counteract bullying in workplaces. Data were collected by individual interviews and focus group discussions at one hospital and two nursing home wards for elderly, a total of 29 participants. In the analysis of the interviews we were inspired by constructivist grounded theory. Persistent work with a humanistic value system by supervisor and coworkers, raising awareness about the bullying problem, strong group collaboration, and conflict management, along with an open atmosphere at the workplace, appears to be imperative for accomplishing a policy of zero tolerance for bullying.

  16. Making Space to Sensemake: Epistemic Distancing in Small Group Physics Discussions

    CERN Document Server

    Conlin, Luke D

    2015-01-01

    Students in inquiry science classrooms face an essential tension between sharing new ideas and critically evaluating those ideas. Both sides of this tension pose affective risks that can discourage further discussion, such as the embarrassment of having an idea rejected. This paper presents a close discourse analysis of three groups of undergraduate physics students in their first discussions of the semester, detailing how they navigate these tensions to create a safe space to make sense of physics together. A central finding is that students and instructors alike rely on a common discursive resource, epistemic distancing, to protect affect while beginning to engage with ideas in productive ways. The groups differ in how soon, how often, and how deeply they engage in figuring out mechanisms together, and these differences can be explained, in part, by differences in how they epistemically distance themselves from their claims. Implications for research include the importance of considering the coupled dynamic...

  17. Adding to the mix: Students use of Facebook groups and blackboard discussion forums in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Kent

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on a case study of the use of Facebook in learning and teaching in higher education. Facebook was used as a venue for online discussion to support the existing Learning Management System (in this case Blackboard in the unit Internet Collaboration and Organisation as part of the Internet Communications degree taught fully online through Open Universities Australia (OUA. Students’ posts to both Facebook and the Blackboard discussion forum were analysed for content, length, and when throughout the study period they were posted. This is significant as much of the previous work in this area has relied on students self-reporting, rather than direct observation of student behaviour. These results were then compared to earlier instances of the same unit that ran within the previous twelve months, one fully online with OUA only using the Blackboard discussion group, and a second taught at Curtin University with both blended learning for students at the University’s Bentley campus as well as fully online for external students, that utilised both Blackboard and Facebook. The results show that Facebook greatly increases the level of student activity in online discussions, both absolutely and in the level of sustained activity across the unit’s study period. Facebook groups also had a different pattern of content from Blackboard. In Blackboard discussion is more focused on the set unit learning content, in Facebook students were using the groups to discuss administration and assignments and also bring in additional material from outside the units set learning materials. Facebook posts, while more sustained over the semester, were shorter in length. This study found that the addition of a Facebook discussion forum does not noticeably impact on the use of Blackboard’s discussion forum, but rather adds a new dimension to the mix of online interaction. The paper concludes that there is value in using both of these forums for student

  18. Patients' views on improving sickle cell disease management in primary care: focus group discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljuburi, Ghida; Phekoo, Karen J; Okoye, Nv Ogo; Anie, Kofie; Green, Stuart A; Nkohkwo, Asaah; Ojeer, Patrick; Ndive, Comfort; Banarsee, Ricky; Oni, Lola; Majeed, Azeem

    2012-12-01

    To assess sickle cell disease (SCD) patient and carer perspectives on the primary care services related to SCD that they receive from their general practitioner (GP). A focus group discussion was used to elicit the views of patients about the quality of care they receive from their primary health-care providers and what they thought was the role of primary care in SCD management. The focus group discussion was video recorded. The recording was then examined by the project team and recurring themes were identified. A comparison was made with notes made by two scribes also present at the discussion. Sickle Cell Society in Brent, UK. Ten participants with SCD or caring for someone with SCD from Northwest London, UK. Patients' perceptions about the primary care services they received, and a list of key themes and suggestions. Patients and carers often bypassed GPs for acute problems but felt that GPs had an important role to play around repeat prescriptions and general health care. These service users believed SCD is often ignored and deemed unimportant by GPs. Participants wanted the health service to support primary health-care providers to improve their knowledge and understanding of SCD. Key themes and suggestions from this focus group have been used to help develop an educational intervention for general practice services that will be used to improve SCD management in primary care.

  19. Observing real-world groups in the virtual field: The analysis of online discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, David C

    2016-09-01

    This article sets out to establish the naturalistic study of online social communication as a substantive topic in social psychology and to discuss the challenges of developing methods for a formal analysis of the structural and interactional features of message threads on discussion forums. I begin by outlining the essential features of online communication and specifically discussion forum data, and the important ways in which they depart from spoken conversation. I describe the handful of attempts to devise systematic analytic techniques for adapting methods such as conversation and discourse analysis to the study of online discussion. I then present a case study of a thread from the popular UK parenting forum Mumsnet which presents a number of challenges for existing methods, and examine some of the interactive phenomena typical of forums. Finally, I consider ways in which membership categorization analysis and social identity theory can complement one another in the exploration of both group processes and the rhetorical deployment of identities as dynamic phenomena in online discussion. © 2016 The British Psychological Society.

  20. A common ground in clinical discussion groups: Intersubjective resonance and implicit operational theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Ricardo

    2017-10-01

    Clinical discussion groups based on the Three-Level Model for Observing Patient Transformations (3-LM) enable us to reflect on the clinical common ground shared by psychoanalysts who have different theoretical frameworks. The very existence of this common ground is controversial. While analysts such as Wallerstein support it, others, like Green, think it is just a myth. In their 2005 controversy Wallerstein and Green proposed an observation procedure that might clarify this matter. This procedure bears great similarity to the one used by clinical discussion groups that apply the 3-LM. The study of numerous theoretically heterogeneous groups that use this model shows that communication is possible in crucial areas. We may thus conclude that a partial and dynamic common ground exists. At a phenomenological level, certain fragments of material produce a shared resonance that enriches clinical understanding for the whole group. Communication is also possible with regard to the conceptualization of patient changes, although some controversial issues persist at this level. Finally, at the level of theoretical explanations, divergences concerning abstract theories do not prevent a fertile interaction among 'in vivo' personal implicit theories. The latter give rise to the actual operational frameworks underlying participants' approach to clinical problems. Copyright © 2017 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  1. Testing an empirically derived mental health training model featuring small groups, distributed practice and patient discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrihy, Rachael C; Byrne, Mitchell K; Gonsalvez, Craig J

    2009-02-01

    Internationally, family doctors seeking to enhance their skills in evidence-based mental health treatment are attending brief training workshops, despite clear evidence in the literature that short-term, massed formats are not likely to improve skills in this complex area. Reviews of the educational literature suggest that an optimal model of training would incorporate distributed practice techniques; repeated practice over a lengthy time period, small-group interactive learning, mentoring relationships, skills-based training and an ongoing discussion of actual patients. This study investigates the potential role of group-based training incorporating multiple aspects of good pedagogy for training doctors in basic competencies in brief cognitive behaviour therapy (BCBT). Six groups of family doctors (n = 32) completed eight 2-hour sessions of BCBT group training over a 6-month period. A baseline control design was utilised with pre- and post-training measures of doctors' BCBT skills, knowledge and engagement in BCBT treatment. Family doctors' knowledge, skills in and actual use of BCBT with patients improved significantly over the course of training compared with the control period. This research demonstrates preliminary support for the efficacy of an empirically derived group training model for family doctors. Brief CBT group-based training could prove to be an effective and viable model for future doctor training.

  2. Qualitative findings from focus group discussions on hand hygiene compliance among health care workers in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Sharon; McLaws, Mary-Louise

    2015-10-01

    It is accepted by hospital clinical governance that every clinician's "duty of care" includes hand hygiene, yet globally, health care workers (HCWs) continue to struggle with compliance. Focus group discussions were conducted to explore HCWs' barriers to hand hygiene in Vietnam. Twelve focus group discussions were conducted with HCWs from 6 public hospitals across Hanoi, Vietnam. Discussions included participants' experiences with and perceptions concerning hand hygiene. Tape recordings were transcribed verbatim and then translated into English. Thematic analysis was conducted by 2 investigators. Expressed frustration with high workload, limited access to hand hygiene solutions, and complicated guidelines that are difficult to interpret in overcrowded settings were considered by participants to be bona fide reasons for noncompliance. No participant acknowledged hand hygiene as a duty of care practice for her or his patients. Justification for noncompliance was the observation that visitors did not perform hand hygiene. HCWs did acknowledge a personal duty of care when hand hygiene was perceived to benefit her or his own health, and then neither workload or environmental challenges influenced compliance. Limited resources in Vietnam are amplified by overcrowded conditions and dual bed occupancy. Yet without a systematic systemic duty of care to patient safety, changes to guidelines and resources might not immediately improve compliance. Thus, introducing routine hand hygiene must start with education programs focusing on duty of care. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Barriers to Managing Fertility: Findings From the Understanding Fertility Management in Contemporary Australia Facebook Discussion Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Background As part of research investigating the complexities of managing fertility in Australia, public opinions about how Australians manage their fertility were sought from women and men. Objective To identify public opinion about sexual and reproductive health in Australia. Methods To ensure access to a diverse group of people throughout Australia, an online group was advertised and convened on Facebook from October through December 2013. In a closed-group moderated discussion, participants responded to questions about how people in Australia attempt to manage three aspects of fertility: avoiding pregnancy, achieving pregnancy, and difficulties conceiving. Nonidentifiable demographic information was sought; no personal accounts of fertility management were requested. The discussion transcript was analyzed thematically. Results There were 61 female and 2 male Facebook users aged 18 to 50 years living in Australia participating in the study. Four main themes about fertility management were identified: access, geographical location, knowledge, and cost. Participants reported that young people and people from rural areas face barriers accessing contraception and fertility services. Limited knowledge about sex and reproduction and the cost of fertility services and contraception were also said to impede effective fertility management. Conclusions Reasons for inequalities in effective fertility management that are amenable to change were identified. Facebook is an effective method for gaining insights into public opinion about sexual and reproductive health. PMID:26878865

  4. Barriers to Managing Fertility: Findings From the Understanding Fertility Management in Contemporary Australia Facebook Discussion Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holton, Sara; Rowe, Heather; Kirkman, Maggie; Jordan, Lynne; McNamee, Kathleen; Bayly, Christine; McBain, John; Sinnott, Vikki; Fisher, Jane

    2016-02-15

    As part of research investigating the complexities of managing fertility in Australia, public opinions about how Australians manage their fertility were sought from women and men. To identify public opinion about sexual and reproductive health in Australia. To ensure access to a diverse group of people throughout Australia, an online group was advertised and convened on Facebook from October through December 2013. In a closed-group moderated discussion, participants responded to questions about how people in Australia attempt to manage three aspects of fertility: avoiding pregnancy, achieving pregnancy, and difficulties conceiving. Nonidentifiable demographic information was sought; no personal accounts of fertility management were requested. The discussion transcript was analyzed thematically. There were 61 female and 2 male Facebook users aged 18 to 50 years living in Australia participating in the study. Four main themes about fertility management were identified: access, geographical location, knowledge, and cost. Participants reported that young people and people from rural areas face barriers accessing contraception and fertility services. Limited knowledge about sex and reproduction and the cost of fertility services and contraception were also said to impede effective fertility management. Reasons for inequalities in effective fertility management that are amenable to change were identified. Facebook is an effective method for gaining insights into public opinion about sexual and reproductive health.

  5. THE USE OF FACEBOOK GROUP DISCUSSION TO IMPROVE READING STRATEGIES, AN ACTION RESEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endang Yuliani

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The rapid development of technology influence people‘s life in many aspects including the process of teaching and learning in university, school etc. Some social medias are popular in society, one of them is Facebook. This social networking can be used for any purposes Such as interacting, marketing, publishing, learning etc. The study aims to prove whether Facebook‘s group discussion can be effectively used to improve reading strategies which are normally developed through classroom interaction. It is an action research design involving one group consisting of 37 students randomly sampled out from a population of 198 students. A plan-act-observe-reflect design of the study will be carried out in two cycles. Each cycle involves pretest, treatment and post test. Cycle 1 is undertaken to see if there is a significant difference between the pretest and post test upon treatment. The indicator of success of the treatment is that the post test outscores the pretest. If it does, then Cycle 2 will be conducted to convince the results. If the two cycles show an increase in the mean scores, it can be claimed that the method is effective. In other words, Facebook‘s group discussion can be effectively used to improve reading strategies.

  6. The contribution of health discussion groups with students to campus health promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Sabine; Stock, Christiane; Krämer, Alexander

    2007-03-01

    Based on the idea of implementing health promotion in the university setting, this project is aimed at identifying determinants of health and well-being in the working and living environment of students and at developing targeted health interventions. The approach of health discussion groups is a well-established tool in workplace health promotion to enable participation and empowerment. This concept was innovatively applied and evaluated with the student body. There were seven sessions held at the University of Bielefeld with students from five different areas, a representative of the university management and a representative from the compulsory accident assurance. Process evaluation was done through standardized questionnaires and guided interviews with the participants while its impact was assessed in a follow-up period of 3 years by the amount of effects. Data included 11 distinct topics from the areas of study conditions, learning and their living environment with a total of 46 ideas for health-promoting actions. The process evaluation showed highly positive results, both in quantitative as well as qualitative approaches. Critical points were the resistances of students to participate in health discussion groups and the low confidence of students in the implementation of the proposed measures. The follow-up after 3 years showed that 11% of proposed actions could not be implemented, while 43% have resulted in recommendations for policy guidelines, 20% were fully implemented and 26% is still in progress. In conclusion, the health discussion group proved to be a useful instrument for student participation in university-based health promotion. Special emphasis should be given towards decreasing barriers for participation. The implementation of the proposed actions is highly depending on well-established structures of health promotion, such as a steering committee, and the commitment of the university management.

  7. Using discussion groups as a strategy for postgraduate implant dentistry students to reflect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koole, S; Fine, P; De Bruyn, H

    2016-02-01

    More than undergraduates, postgraduate students have the day-to-day clinical experience to reflect upon. Nevertheless, reflection in postgraduate dental education is less well studied. Hence, the purpose was to investigate the attitude towards reflection and the content of reflections in postgraduate implant dentistry education in the UK and Belgium. To investigate the attitude towards reflection, a questionnaire was administered to the 10 postgraduates at UCL Eastman Dental Institute (EDI) and 6 postgraduates at Ghent University (UGent). Additionally, students were invited to attend two reflective sessions (60-90 minutes). The sessions' audio recordings were transcribed and analysed using a thematic approach. In total, 16 postgraduate implant dentistry students participated. Although the majority reported prior experience with reflection, there was variation in the provided definitions of reflection. EDI students agreed with reflection being beneficial for professional development/clinical reasoning and were positive about discussing clinical experiences in groups, but were divided about individual/group reflections. Their UGent counterparts were more indecisive (=neutral), but were positive about discussing clinical experiences. Thematic analysis identified recurring themes as individual learning process, learning and clinical experiences, attitude towards implant dentistry and course programme. EDI postgraduates' reflections focussed on specific clinical situations, while UGent postgraduates' reflections described general considerations. Although students/professionals often report to reflect, it is not clear whether/how they actually reflect, due to the all-purpose word reflection has become. A strategy, using group discussions along with supervision/guidance in how to reflect, demonstrated to expand clinical reasoning into reflections about postgraduate students' clinical actions and professional growth. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley

  8. [Modification of the risk profile of obese essential hypertensive patients by the group "hypertension discussion" program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basler, H D; Baumann, H; Beckers, H H; Bergdolt, H; Deschner, W; Ebschner, K J; Hasper, M; Kies, H K; Nüssel, E; Wenzel, G

    1988-01-01

    The programme "Discussions on Hypertension" is a programme for group treatment of obese essential hypertensives in medical practices on the basis of behavioural therapy. A co-operation model was developed between the Department for General Medicine of the "Medizinische Hochschule Hannover", the Institute for Medical Psychology of the "Philipps-Universität Marburg" and the company Galenus Mannheim and was offered to doctors in general practice. The effects of the programme on the modifying of the risk profile for coronary heart disease was investigated in a controlled study in 137 patients by nine general practitioners. 81 patients were enrolled in the experimental group and 56 patients were assigned to a control group that was not using the programme. The experimental and control groups were comparable with respect to sociodemographic, psychological and medical parameters. Three months after completing the programme, the results of the study was shown in specific effect both on the psychological criteria of success (well-being, health knowledge, healthy behaviour, salt use and compliance) and in a reduction of the diastolic blood pressure in spite of a reduction of the antihypertensive drug treatment. The blood lipid levels (cholesterol and triglycerides) and the blood glucose level were also favourably affected. Patients in the experimental group had reduced their weight by an average of 5.6 kg. The patients in the control group only by 0.8 kg. Overall, there was a marked reduction in the proportion of patients with several risk factors in the experimental group, so that the programme can be attributed a preventive effect.

  9. Human dimensions in bedside teaching: focus group discussions of teachers and learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramani, Subha; Orlander, Jay D

    2013-01-01

    Clinical teaching has moved from the bedside to conference rooms; many reasons are described for this shift. Yet, essential clinical skills, professionalism, and humanistic patient interactions are best taught at the bedside. Clinical teaching has moved from the bedside to conference rooms; many reasons are described for this decline. This study explored perceptions of teachers and learners on the value of bedside teaching and the humanistic dimensions of bedside interactions that make it imperative to shift clinical teaching back to the bedside. Focus group methodology was used to explore teacher and learner opinions. Four teacher groups consisted of (a) Chief Residents, (b) Residency Program Directors, (c) skilled bedside teachers, and (d) a convenience group of other Department of Medicine faculty at Boston University School of Medicine. Six learner groups consisted 2 each of 3rd-year students, PGY1 medicine residents, and PGY2 medicine residents. Each discussion lasted 60 to 90 minutes. Sessions were audiotaped, transcribed, and analyzed using qualitative methods. Teachers and learners shared several opinions on bedside teaching, particularly around humanistic aspects of bedside interactions. The key themes that emerged included (a) patient involvement in discussions, (b) teachers as role models of humanism, (c) preserving learner autonomy, (d) direct observation and feedback of learners at the bedside, (e) interactions with challenging patients, and (e) admitting limitations. Within these themes, participants noted some behaviors best avoided at the bedside. Teachers and learners regard the bedside as a valuable venue in which to learn core values of medicine. They proposed many strategies to preserve these humanistic values and improve bedside teaching. These strategies are essential for true patient-centered care.

  10. Loose groups of galaxies in the Perseus-Pisces survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trasarti-Battistoni, R.

    1998-06-01

    We present a large catalog of loose groups of galaxies in the Southern Galactic Hemisphere, selected from the Perseus-Pisces redshift Survey (PPS). Particular care is taken in order to obtain group samples as homogeneous as possible to previously published catalogs. All our catalogs contain about 200 groups, significantly more than in most previous studies where group samples were obtained from galaxy data sets of comparable quality to (but smaller extent than) PPS. Groups are identified with the adaptive Friends-Of-Friends (FOF) algorithm of \\cite[Huchra & Geller (1982),]{HG82} with suitable normalizations D_0=0.231 \\ h(-1) Mpc and V_0=350 \\ km \\ s(-1) at cz_0=1000 \\ km \\ s(-1) . The luminosity function (LF) normalization phi_ *=0.02 \\ h(3) \\ Mpc(-3) appropriate for PPS yields a number density threshold delta n/n ~ 180 for the adopted D_0, instead of delta n/n ~ 80 used in previous studies of other samples. However, the customary choice of D_0 obtained (through the LF) from a fixed mass overdensity delta rho / rho =80, well motivated in theory, suffers from important observational uncertainties and sample-to-sample variations of the LF normalization, and from major uncertainties in the relation between galaxy density n and mass density rho . We discuss how to self-consistently match FOF parameters among different galaxy samples. We then separately vary several FOF and sample parameters, and discuss their effect on group properties. Loose groups in PPS nicely trace the large scale structure (LSS) in the parent galaxy sample. The group properties vary little with different redshift corrections, redshift cut-off, and galaxy LF, but are rather sensitive to the adopted links D_0 and V_0. More precisely, the typical group size (velocity dispersion) is linearly related to the adopted distance (velocity) link, while it is rather insensitive to the adopted velocity (distance) link. Physical properties of groups in PPS and in directly comparable samples show good

  11. Shaping understanding of HIV through negotiation and conflict resolution during peer group discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vimla L; Branch, Timothy; Gutnik, Lily; Arocha, Jose F

    2006-05-01

    High-risk behavior in youths related to HIV transmission continues to occur despite large-scale efforts to disseminate information about safe sexual practices through education. Our study examined the relationships among knowledge, decision-making strategies, and risk assessment about HIV by youths during peer group focused discussions. Two focus groups with first-year college students were conducted, with a series of questions about risk for HIV transmission as prompts. All group interactions were recorded, transcribed and analyzed using methods of discourse analysis to characterize a detailed description of the interactions. The results indicated that youths negotiated their perspectives with the use of justification and elaboration to support alternative opinions and positions. They used concrete experiential examples to further explain and illustrate their positions, Opposing views or arguments met with requests for clarification and further negotiation. This cycle of clarification-negotiation shaped their understanding of HIV-related concepts. The use of strategies, such as justification of alternative positions and the use of examples as support for arguments to clarify and negotiate various perspectives, could be used as a tool for designing educational programs to improve understanding of health related issues, such as HIV transmission and prevention.

  12. Facilitating Dental Student Reflections: Using Mentor Groups to Discuss Clinical Experiences and Personal Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koole, Sebastiaan; Christiaens, Veronique; Cosyn, Jan; De Bruyn, Hugo

    2016-10-01

    Despite the consensus on the importance of reflection for dental professionals, a lack of understanding remains about how students and clinicians should develop their ability to reflect. The aim of this study was to investigate dental students' and mentors' perceptions of mentor groups as an instructional method to facilitate students' reflection in terms of the strategy's learning potential, role of the mentor, group dynamics, and feasibility. At Ghent University in Belgium, third- and fourth-year dental students were encouraged to reflect on their clinical experiences and personal development in three reflective mentor sessions. No preparation or reports afterwards were required; students needed only to participate in the sessions. Sessions were guided by trained mentors to establish a safe environment, frame clinical discussions, and stimulate reflection. Students' and mentors' perceptions of the experience were assessed with a 17-statement questionnaire with response options on a five-point Likert scale (1=totally disagree to 5=totally agree). A total of 50 students and eight mentors completed the questionnaire (response rates 81% and 89%, respectively). Both students and mentors had neutral to positive perceptions concerning the learning potential, role of the mentor, group dynamics, and feasibility. The mean ideal total time for sessions in a year was 99 minutes (third-year students), 111 minutes (fourth-year students), and 147 minutes (mentors). Reported reflective topics related to patient management, frustrations, and practice of dentistry. Overall mean appreciation for the experience ranged from 14.50 to 15.14 on the 20-point scale. These findings about students' and mentors' positive perceptions of the experience suggest that mentor groups may be a potentially valuable strategy to promote dental students' reflection.

  13. Focused group discussion with health care staff improves breastfeeding rates in hospitalized infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnes Yunie Purwita Sari

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Improving breastfeeding in sick infants is essential. During the neonatal care, health care staff play an important role in promoting breastfeeding. Therefore, it is important to study in depth how healthcare staff can improve breastfeeding practice in sick neonates. Objective To compare breastfeeding rates in sick infants before and after a focused group discussion (FGD of health care staff on how to improve breastfeeding. Methods This study was an operational study using FGD and in-depth interviews as an intervention. A fish bone diagram was used to assess problems that may prevent mothers from breastfeeding their sick infants. Breastfeeding achievement was compared before and after the FGD. Results Of 257 sick infants, 177 subjects were in the before FGD group and 80 subjects were in the after FGD group. Significantly more after FGD subjects were breastfed during hospitalization than before FGD subjects [97.5% vs. 82.9%, respectively; (x2 =9.43; P=0.002]. Breastfeeding initiation within 0-4 hours of birth was also significantly higher in the after FGD group [10 (12.5% vs. 6 (3.5%, respectively; (x2 = 52.5; P<0.001]. The solutions for breastfeeding problems were: 1 support of hospital management, 2 support of healthcare workers for breastfeeding mothers, 3 support of husbands and families for breastfeeding mothers, 4 financial support, 5 other factors such as level of care and consistent FGD events, and 6 a prospective cohort study. Conclusion The FGD with health care staff significantly increases breastfeeding achievement during infant hospitalization, and accelerated breastfeeding initiation. A fish bone diagram is used to effectively assess the problems with breastfeeding programs for sick babies.

  14. Teaching pathology without lectures through computer-based exercises, small-group discussions and reading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trelstad, R L; Raskova, J

    1992-01-01

    The Department of Pathology at Robert Wood Johnson Medical School teaches a 205-hour, one semester course to 150 second-year students in the fall semester of the second year. The course begins with General Pathology (4 weeks) and continues with Systemic Pathology (12 weeks). In 1986, lectures were eliminated as a means of conveying the course content. Students were expected to read the textbook and to participate in obligatory small group discussions. Extensive computer based self-learning materials were provided in both MS/DOS and Macintosh formats. In 1991, these computer resources included the full text of Robbins Pathologic Basis of Disease, extensive question banks and a guide through the Slice of Life Videodisc. Over the past 6 years this modified curriculum has been enthusiastically received by the students and faculty. Student performance on internal and external examinations has been excellent. Approximately 4% of the graduating students select pathology for their post-graduate training.

  15. What Are Parents Willing to Discuss with Their Pediatrician About Firearm Safety? A Parental Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbutt, Jane M; Bobenhouse, Neil; Dodd, Sherry; Sterkel, Randall; Strunk, Robert C

    2016-12-01

    To determine if parents are receptive to discussing firearm safety with their pediatrician. Parents completed a self-administered paper survey during a pediatric office visit. Responses of those who confirmed and denied household firearms were compared using Fisher exact test. Between March 23 and May 21, 2015, 1246 of 1363 eligible parents (91.4%) completed the survey (22.6% African American, 79.5% at least some college education); 36% of respondents reported household firearms (owners). An additional 14.3% reported that their child was often in homes that contained firearms. Of the 447 owners, 25.1% reported ≥1 firearm was stored loaded, and 17.9% carried a firearm when leaving the house. Seventy-five percent of parents thought the pediatrician should advise about safe storage of firearms (owners 71.1%, others 77.5%), 16.9% disagreed (owners 21.9%, others 13.4%), and 8.2% were uncertain. Sixty-six percent thought pediatricians should ask about the presence of household firearms (owners 58.4%, others 70.9%), 23.2% disagreed (owners 31.5%, others 17.8%), and 10.5% were uncertain. Differences in parental opinions between owners and other parents were statistically significant. Twenty-two percent of owners would ignore advice to not have household firearms for safety reasons, and 13.9% would be offended by such advice. Only 12.8% of all parents reported a discussion about firearms with the pediatrician. Avoiding direct questioning about firearm ownership and extending the discussion about why and how to ensure safe storage of firearms to all parents may be an effective strategy to decrease firearm-related injuries and fatalities in children. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Male leaders participate in Mrs. Ndere's family planning program. Case scenarios for training and group discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    A case scenario for training of family planning (FP) managers in developing countries and for group discussion follows. A clinic director had learned that two FP programs in another part of the country worked with community members to promote their goals. In one, a manager of a food processing company organized weekly discussions about FP and reproductive health during lunch. The number of factory workers using contraception increased from 12-25%. The director returned to her clinic with plans to recruit influential male community leaders. If she could use male volunteers, she would not need to worry about resources to recruit, hire, and train new people for IEC activities. In her region, awareness of and access to FP were among the lowest countrywide. Less than 50% of men knew about condoms in her region, while more women knew about FP methods. She thought that if males knew more about the benefits of FP, they would support their wives' interest in FP. Increased FP knowledge would likely result in better reproductive health practices and prevention of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), which are prevalent in her region. She invited 8 male leaders to a meeting with 2 IEC outreach workers. The first meeting revolved around the benefits their participation would bestow on the program and community. The men were quite interested. During the second meeting, they examined the objectives of the FP program and produced their own goals. To help the program increase use of family planning methods 5%, the men aimed to increase knowledge of FP and STDs among males and to increase the number of condoms distributed through the program 2-fold in the first year. They wanted to involve other community males. The Ministry would provide condoms if a condom distribution system could be set up and some men suggested that males be trained to distribute condoms. Case discussion questions follow the scenario: e.g., How can community participation benefit the community and the FP

  17. Survey as a group interactive teaching technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana GOREA

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Smooth running of the educational process and the results depend a great deal on the methods used. The methodology of teaching offers a great variety of teaching techniques that the teacher can make use of in the teaching/learning process. Such techniques as brainstorming, the cube, KLW, case study, Venn diagram, and many other are familiar to the teachers and they use them effectively in the classroom. The present article proposes a technique called ‘survey’, which has been successfully used by the author as a student-centered speaking activity in foreign language classes. It has certain advantages especially if used in large groups. It can be adapted for any other discipline in the case when the teacher wishes to offer the students space for cooperative activity and creativity.

  18. Discussing Opioid Risks With Patients to Reduce Misuse and Abuse: Evidence From 2 Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hero, Joachim O; McMurtry, Caitlin; Benson, John; Blendon, Robert

    2016-11-01

    We used 2 population-representative surveys to evaluate the recommendation from recent clinical guidelines for prescribing opioid analgesics that physicians discuss the risk of long-term use disorders with patients. In nationally representative data we observed a 60% lower rate, after adjustment for covariates, in a self-reported saving of pills among respondents who say they talked with their physicians about the risks of prescription painkiller addiction (67% lower rate without adjustment). These findings suggest patient education efforts, as currently practiced in the United States, may have positive behavioral consequences that could lower the risks of prescription painkiller abuse. Future research should test these associations under controlled settings. © 2016 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  19. Communication of geohazard risks by focus group discussions in the Mount Cameroon area, Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Marmol, M.-A.; Suh Atanga, M. Bi; Njome, S.; Mafany Teke, G.; Jacobs, P.; Suh, C. E.

    2012-04-01

    The inappropriate translation of scientific information of geohazard (volcanic, landslide and crater lake outgassing) risks to any local population leaves people with incongruent views of the real dangers. Initial workshops organized under the supervision of the VLIR-OI (Flemish Interuniversity Council - Own Initiatives) members have led to the deployment of billboards as requested and drawn up by the locals. The VLIR-OI project has also organized focus group discussions (FGD) with the local stakeholders to find out in various cities, the state of preparedness, the response to emergency situations, the recovery from the emergency and the mitigation. Researchers have preferred open discussion with the local population and its representatives in order to elicit information that otherwise might not be found on a structured questionnaire. FGD provide a meaningful interactive opportunity to collect information and reflection on a wide range of input. The method provides an insight into problems that require a solution through a process of discovering the meaning attributed to certain events or issues. In this research four cardinal points as preparedness, response, recovery and mitigation (Fothergill, 1996) guided the FGD. The population (i.e. local town councils) were constituted by a mix of chiefs, engineers, technicians and civil servants and government officials. In all the three city councils concerned, the engineers in charge complained about the lack of strategic planning, and about the missing of an elaborated strategy for disasters. They are aware of the existence of an organigram in the "Département de l'Action Civile" in Yaounde but never received any "strategic" document. Therefore inappropriate actions might be taken by the municipalities themselves. Fortunately all people interrogated at the FDG always mentioned solidarity in any event. Fothergill, 1996, Gender, Risk, and Disasters, Intern. Jour. of Mass Emergencies and Disasters, vol.14, n°1, 33-56

  20. Which Cognitive Processes Support Learning during Small-Group Discussion? The Role of Providing Explanations and Listening to Others

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Blankenstein, Floris M.; Dolmans, Diana H. J. M.; van der Vleuten, Cees P. M.; Schmidt, Henk G.

    2011-01-01

    Seventy students participated in an experiment to measure the effects of either providing explanations or listening during small group discussions on recall of related subject-matter studied after the discussion. They watched a video of a small group discussing a problem. In the first experimental condition, the video was stopped at various points…

  1. Recruitment of racial/ethnic minority older adults through community sites for focus group discussions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary E. Northridge

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite a body of evidence on racial/ethnic minority enrollment and retention in research, literature specifically focused on recruiting racially/ethnically diverse older adults for social science studies is limited. There is a need for more rigorous research on methodological issues and the efficacy of recruitment methods. Cultural obstacles to recruitment of racial/ethnic minority older adults include language barriers, lack of cultural sensitivity of target communities on the part of researchers, and culturally inappropriate assessment tools. Methods Guided by the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR, this study critically appraised the recruitment of racial/ethnic minority older adults for focus groups. The initial approach involved using the physical and social infrastructure of the ElderSmile network, a community-based initiative to promote oral and general health and conduct health screenings in places where older adults gather, to recruit racial/ethnic minority adults for a social science component of an interdisciplinary initiative. The process involved planning a recruitment strategy, engaging the individuals involved in its implementation (opinion leaders in senior centers, program staff as implementation leaders, senior community-based colleagues as champions, and motivated center directors as change agents, executing the recruitment plan, and reflecting on the process of implementation. Results While the recruitment phase of the study was delayed by 6 months to allow for ongoing recruitment and filling of focus group slots, the flexibility of the recruitment plan, the expertise of the research team members, the perseverance of the recruitment staff, and the cultivation of change agents ultimately resulted in meeting the study targets for enrollment in terms of both numbers of focus group discussions (n = 24 and numbers of participants (n = 194. Conclusions This study adds to the

  2. Recruitment of racial/ethnic minority older adults through community sites for focus group discussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northridge, Mary E; Shedlin, Michele; Schrimshaw, Eric W; Estrada, Ivette; De La Cruz, Leydis; Peralta, Rogelina; Birdsall, Stacia; Metcalf, Sara S; Chakraborty, Bibhas; Kunzel, Carol

    2017-06-09

    Despite a body of evidence on racial/ethnic minority enrollment and retention in research, literature specifically focused on recruiting racially/ethnically diverse older adults for social science studies is limited. There is a need for more rigorous research on methodological issues and the efficacy of recruitment methods. Cultural obstacles to recruitment of racial/ethnic minority older adults include language barriers, lack of cultural sensitivity of target communities on the part of researchers, and culturally inappropriate assessment tools. Guided by the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR), this study critically appraised the recruitment of racial/ethnic minority older adults for focus groups. The initial approach involved using the physical and social infrastructure of the ElderSmile network, a community-based initiative to promote oral and general health and conduct health screenings in places where older adults gather, to recruit racial/ethnic minority adults for a social science component of an interdisciplinary initiative. The process involved planning a recruitment strategy, engaging the individuals involved in its implementation (opinion leaders in senior centers, program staff as implementation leaders, senior community-based colleagues as champions, and motivated center directors as change agents), executing the recruitment plan, and reflecting on the process of implementation. While the recruitment phase of the study was delayed by 6 months to allow for ongoing recruitment and filling of focus group slots, the flexibility of the recruitment plan, the expertise of the research team members, the perseverance of the recruitment staff, and the cultivation of change agents ultimately resulted in meeting the study targets for enrollment in terms of both numbers of focus group discussions (n = 24) and numbers of participants (n = 194). This study adds to the literature in two important ways. First, we leveraged the social and

  3. Size and socio-economic resources of core discussion networks in the Netherlands : Differences by national-origin group and immigrant generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tubergen, Frank

    2014-01-01

    This study examines differences in the size and socio-economic resources of core discussion networks across national-origin groups and immigrant generation. The analysis is based on the Netherlands Longitudinal Lifecourse Study (2008-10), a nationally representative, large-scale survey of the Dutch

  4. Loose Groups of Galaxies in the Perseus-Pisces Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Trasarti-Battistoni, Roberto

    1997-01-01

    We present a large catalog of loose groups of galaxies in the Southern Galactic Hemisphere, selected from the Perseus-Pisces redshift Survey (PPS). Particular care is taken in order to obtain group samples as homogeneous as possible to previously published catalogs. All our catalogs contain about 200 groups, significantly more than in most previous studies where group samples were obtained from galaxy data sets of comparable quality to (but smaller extent than) PPS. Groups are identified with...

  5. A targeted survey for HI clouds in galaxy groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaan, MA

    2001-01-01

    Five galaxy groups with properties similar to those of the Local Group have been surveyed for H I clouds with the Arecibo Telescope. In total 300 pointings have been observed on grids of approximately 2.5 x 1.5 Mpc(2) centred on the groups. The 4.5 sigma detection limit on the minimal detectable H I

  6. Physician groups' use of data from patient experience surveys.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friedberg, M.W.; SteelFisher, G.K.; Karp, M.; Schneider, E.C.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In Massachusetts, physician groups' performance on validated surveys of patient experience has been publicly reported since 2006. Groups also receive detailed reports of their own performance, but little is known about how physician groups have responded to these reports. OBJECTIVE: To

  7. Determinants of eating behaviour in university students: a qualitative study using focus group discussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deliens, Tom; Clarys, Peter; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Deforche, Benedicte

    2014-01-18

    College or university is a critical period regarding unhealthy changes in eating behaviours in students. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore which factors influence Belgian (European) university students' eating behaviour, using a qualitative research design. Furthermore, we aimed to collect ideas and recommendations in order to facilitate the development of effective and tailored intervention programs aiming to improve healthy eating behaviours in university students. Using a semi-structured question guide, five focus group discussions have been conducted consisting of 14 male and 21 female university students from a variety of study disciplines, with a mean age of 20.6 ± 1.7 yrs. Using Nvivo9, an inductive thematic approach was used for data analysis. After the transition from secondary school to university, when independency increases, students are continuously challenged to make healthful food choices. Students reported to be influenced by individual factors (e.g. taste preferences, self-discipline, time and convenience), their social networks (e.g. (lack of) parental control, friends and peers), physical environment (e.g. availability and accessibility, appeal and prices of food products), and macro environment (e.g. media and advertising). Furthermore, the relationships between determinants and university students' eating behaviour seemed to be moderated by university characteristics, such as residency, student societies, university lifestyle and exams. Recommendations for university administrators and researchers include providing information and advice to enhance healthy food choices and preparation (e.g. via social media), enhancing self-discipline and self-control, developing time management skills, enhancing social support, and modifying the subjective as well as the objective campus food environment by e.g. making healthy foods price-beneficial and by providing vending machines with more healthy products. This is the first European

  8. Determinants of eating behaviour in university students: a qualitative study using focus group discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background College or university is a critical period regarding unhealthy changes in eating behaviours in students. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore which factors influence Belgian (European) university students’ eating behaviour, using a qualitative research design. Furthermore, we aimed to collect ideas and recommendations in order to facilitate the development of effective and tailored intervention programs aiming to improve healthy eating behaviours in university students. Methods Using a semi-structured question guide, five focus group discussions have been conducted consisting of 14 male and 21 female university students from a variety of study disciplines, with a mean age of 20.6 ± 1.7 yrs. Using Nvivo9, an inductive thematic approach was used for data analysis. Results After the transition from secondary school to university, when independency increases, students are continuously challenged to make healthful food choices. Students reported to be influenced by individual factors (e.g. taste preferences, self-discipline, time and convenience), their social networks (e.g. (lack of) parental control, friends and peers), physical environment (e.g. availability and accessibility, appeal and prices of food products), and macro environment (e.g. media and advertising). Furthermore, the relationships between determinants and university students’ eating behaviour seemed to be moderated by university characteristics, such as residency, student societies, university lifestyle and exams. Recommendations for university administrators and researchers include providing information and advice to enhance healthy food choices and preparation (e.g. via social media), enhancing self-discipline and self-control, developing time management skills, enhancing social support, and modifying the subjective as well as the objective campus food environment by e.g. making healthy foods price-beneficial and by providing vending machines with more healthy products

  9. Patient advisory groups in practice improvement: sample case presentation with a discussion of best practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angstman, Kurt B; Bender, Robert O; Bruce, Steven M

    2009-01-01

    Using patient advisory groups can affect practice changes and create a patient-centric focus for a primary care practice. A successful patient advisory group has been developed for our primary care clinics. Utilizing this group, we have implemented practice improvement changes that have had a significant impact in patient care. This will be demonstrated in a case presentation involving the implementation of depression care managers at our practice sites. We will review key "best practices," as defined by the group, regarding size, composition, and meeting frequency that can be used for the development of a clinical patient advisory group.

  10. The Astronomy Thesaurus and UDC -- Present and Future (Group Discussion for Users and Potential Users)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Marlene

    A brief discussion of the potential and problems of the Astronomy Thesaurus and UDC classification system took place. Once again, no resolution to the questions of updating and revising these items was found.

  11. In-Class Reflective Group Discussion as a Strategy for the Development of Students as Evolving Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Annetta Kit Lam

    2011-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to determine perceptions of three cohorts of third year undergraduate students (n = 65) on in-class reflective group discussion as a critical reflective approach for evolving professionals. Reflective group discussions were embedded into a final year course within the University of Queensland Bachelor of Oral…

  12. Investigating the purpose of an online discussion group for health professionals: a case example from forensic occupational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieleman, Crystal; Duncan, Edward A S

    2013-07-03

    Thousands of health-related online discussion groups are active world-wide however, very little is known about the purpose and usefulness of such groups. In 2003 an online discussion group called 'forensic occupational therapy' was established in the United Kingdom. This group was examined to gain an understanding of the purpose and use of online discussion groups for health professionals who may be practically and geographically isolated from others in similar areas of practice. Following a case study design, descriptive characteristics on members' locations and number of posts were collected from the forensic occupational therapy online discussion group. Eight years of posts (2003-2011) were examined using a theoretical thematic analysis process to identify and describe the purposes for which members were using the group. Members from 20 countries contributed to the discussion group; the vast majority of posts being from members in the United Kingdom. Activity within the group was consistently high for the first five years however, activity within the group declined in the final three years. Six purposes for which members use the online discussion group were identified: seeking and giving advice, networking, requesting and sharing material resources, service development, defining the role of occupational therapists, and student learning. Findings suggest that health professionals in specialized and often isolated areas of practice are keen to connect with colleagues and learn from each other's experiences. The main purposes for which the online discussion group was used could be summarized as communication, information sharing and networking; though activity within the group declined significantly during the last three years of the data collection period. This raises questions about the sustainability of online discussion groups within the rapidly developing social media environment.

  13. Investigating the purpose of an online discussion group for health professionals: a case example from forensic occupational therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Thousands of health-related online discussion groups are active world-wide however, very little is known about the purpose and usefulness of such groups. In 2003 an online discussion group called ‘forensic occupational therapy’ was established in the United Kingdom. This group was examined to gain an understanding of the purpose and use of online discussion groups for health professionals who may be practically and geographically isolated from others in similar areas of practice. Methods Following a case study design, descriptive characteristics on members’ locations and number of posts were collected from the forensic occupational therapy online discussion group. Eight years of posts (2003–2011) were examined using a theoretical thematic analysis process to identify and describe the purposes for which members were using the group. Results Members from 20 countries contributed to the discussion group; the vast majority of posts being from members in the United Kingdom. Activity within the group was consistently high for the first five years however, activity within the group declined in the final three years. Six purposes for which members use the online discussion group were identified: seeking and giving advice, networking, requesting and sharing material resources, service development, defining the role of occupational therapists, and student learning. Conclusions Findings suggest that health professionals in specialized and often isolated areas of practice are keen to connect with colleagues and learn from each other’s experiences. The main purposes for which the online discussion group was used could be summarized as communication, information sharing and networking; though activity within the group declined significantly during the last three years of the data collection period. This raises questions about the sustainability of online discussion groups within the rapidly developing social media environment. PMID:23822895

  14. Developing the level of adoption survey to inform collaborative discussion regarding educational innovation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doug Orr

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Learning organizations rely on collaborative information and understanding to support and sustain professional growth and development. A collaborative self-assessment instrument can provide clear articulation and characterization of the level of adoption of innovation such as the use of instructional technologies. Adapted from the “Level of Use” (LoU and “Stages of Concern” indices, the Level of Adoption (LoA survey was developed to assess changes in understanding of and competence with emerging and innovative educational technologies. The LoA survey, while reflecting the criteria and framework of the original LoU from which it was derived, utilizes a specifically structured on-line, self-reporting scale of “level of adoption” to promote collaborative self-reflection and discussion. Growth in knowledge of, and confidence with, specific emergent technologies is clearly indicated by the results of this pilot study, thus supporting the use of collaborative reflection and assessment to foster personal and systemic professional development. Résumé : Les organisations apprenantes s’appuient sur des informations et une compréhension issues de la collaboration afin de soutenir et d’entretenir la croissance et le perfectionnement professionnels. Un instrument d’auto-évaluation collaboratif permet d’articuler et de caractériser de manière explicite le niveau d’adoption des innovations, comme l’utilisation de technologies éducatives, par exemple. Adapté à partir des indices de « niveau d’utilisation » (ou « LoU » pour Level of Use et de « niveaux de préoccupation », l’instrument d’enquête sur le niveau d’adoption (ou « LoA » pour Level of Adoption a été conçu afin d’évaluer les changements qui surviennent dans la compréhension des technologies éducatives émergentes et innovatrices ainsi que dans les compétences relatives à ces technologies. L’instrument d’enquête LoA, bien qu’il refl

  15. A standardized approach to qualitative content analysis of focus group discussions from different countries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moretti, F.; Vliet, L. van; Bensing, J.; Deledda, G.; Mazzi, M.; Rimondini, M.; Zimmermann, C.; Fletcher, I.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the methodological procedures of a multi-centre focus group research for obtaining content categories also suitable for categorical statistical analyses. METHODS: Inductive content analyses were performed on a subsample of 27 focus groups conducted in three different

  16. Sex, Pregnancy and Contraception: A Report of Focus Group Discussions with Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugland, Barbara W.; Wilder, Kathleen J.; Chandra, Anita

    Findings in this report summarize the first phase of a larger, multi-year study that is combining qualitative and quantitative methods to outline a conceptual framework to guide future demographic/fertility research, pregnancy prevention programs and policies. Twelve focus groups--involving a multiculturally representative group of male and female…

  17. Using Leadered Groups in Organizational Behavior and Management Survey Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, Rae

    2011-01-01

    In organizational behavior and management survey courses, students are likely to maximize certain career-appropriate knowledge when their classroom groups are leadered rather than leaderless. Using leadered groups facilitates the learning of the professional and managerial skills associated with formal leadership while reducing some problematic…

  18. Factors Associated with Discussion of Disasters by Final Year High School Students: An International Cross-sectional Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codreanu, Tudor A; Celenza, Antonio; Alabdulkarim, Ali A Rahman

    2015-08-01

    Introduction The effect on behavioral change of educational programs developed to reduce the community's disaster informational vulnerability is not known. This study describes the relationship of disaster education, age, sex, and country-specific characteristics with students discussing disasters with friends and family, a measure of proactive behavioral change in disaster preparedness. Three thousand eight hundred twenty-nine final year high school students were enrolled in an international, multi-center prospective, cross-sectional study using a pre-validated written questionnaire. In order to obtain information from different educational systems, from countries with different risk of exposure to disasters, and from countries with varied economic development status, students from Bahrain, Croatia, Cyprus, Egypt, Greece, Italy, Portugal, Romania, and Timor-Leste were surveyed. Logistic regression analyses examined the relationship between the likelihood of discussing disasters with friends and family (dependent variable) and a series of independent variables (age, gender, participation in school lessons about disasters, existence of a national disaster educational program, ability to list pertinent example of disasters, country's economic group, and disaster risk index) captured by the questionnaire or available as published data. There was no statistically significant relationship between age, awareness of one's surroundings, planning for the future, and foreseeing consequences of events with discussions about potential hazards and risks with friends and/or family. The national educational budget did not have a statistically significant influence. Participants who lived in a low disaster risk and high income Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) country were more likely to discuss disasters. While either school lessons or a national disaster education program had a unique, significant contribution to the model, neither had a better

  19. The Influence of Collaborative Group Work on Students' Development of Critical Thinking: The Teacher's Role in Facilitating Group Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Dennis Chun-Lok; To, Helen; Leung, Kit

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether the incorporation of group work in a teaching intervention can effectively foster students' critical thinking skills. Building upon Kuhn's critical thinking model, the research involved comparison of pretest and post-test results for 140 secondary four (10th grade) students in Hong Kong on two…

  20. Using Facebook Groups to Encourage Science Discussions in a Large-Enrollment Biology Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Aditi; McGinnis, Gene; Bryant, Dana; Cole, Megan; Kovacs, Jennifer; Stovall, Kyndra; Lee, Mark

    2017-01-01

    This case study reports the instructional development, impact, and lessons learned regarding the use of Facebook as an educational tool within a large enrollment Biology class at Spelman College (Atlanta, GA). We describe the use of this social networking site to (a) engage students in active scientific discussions, (b) build community within the…

  1. Students' Evaluation of Google Hangouts through a Cross-Cultural Group Discussion Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Michiko

    2015-01-01

    The study investigated perceived ease of use and usefulness of Google Hangouts as an instructional/learning tool. Forty-two teacher education students at U.S and Japanese universities participated in an online cross-cultural activity using Google Hangouts and discussed cultural differences between the two countries and their teaching philosophies.…

  2. Attitudes Towards (Psychotherapy) Groups: Results of a Survey in a Representative Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Bernhard; Spangenberg, Lena; Brähler, Elmar; Bormann, Bianca

    2015-07-01

    Based upon observations indicating decreasing attractiveness of groups within and outside the clinical field, the present study aimed to determine attitudes toward, and expectations of, groups in a representative sample of 2512 German citizens. The survey also included questions specifically related to group psychotherapy and its acceptance. In addition, psychological characteristics of respondents (measures of narcissism, psychological impairment, and emotion regulation) and socio-demographic variables were assessed to examine their potential association with group-related attitudes. In total, the survey revealed a relatively positive picture of attitudes and expectations toward groups in general and psychotherapy groups in particular. Those with more open attitudes towards groups were comparatively less distressed, anxious, and depressed; they favored emotional reappraisal instead of suppression as the dominant strategy to regulate their emotions. Contrary to prediction, narcissism did not influence attitudes towards groups. The results are related to current discussions of the attractiveness of groups and to implications for the practice of group psychotherapy.

  3. Comparison of effect between group discussion and educational booklet on Iranian nursing students' attitude and practice toward patient privacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adib-Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Faraji, Mona

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the effects between group discussion and educational booklet on nursing students' attitude and practice toward patient privacy in Iran. A two-group, pre-test and post-test design study was conducted in 2015. The study was conducted on 60 nursing students in Kashan, Iran who were randomly allocated into two groups to be trained on patient privacy either through group discussion or by an educational booklet. The students' attitude and practice was assessed before and after the education using a questionnaire and a checklist. Data analysis was performed through paired t-test, Wilcoxon signed ranks test, and independent samples t-tests. Before the intervention, no significant difference was found between the group designated to group discussion and that designated to the educational booklet in the mean overall score of attitude (P=0.303) and practice (P=0.493) toward patient privacy. After the intervention, the mean attitude score significantly increased in the two groups (P=0.001). Moreover, the students' practice score increased in the discussion group while it did not significantly change in the booklet group (P=0.001). Both methods were effective on the students' attitude; however, the educational booklet did not affect their practice toward patient privacy. Group discussion can effectively improve the students' attitude and practice toward patient privacy.

  4. Making Foundational Assumptions Transparent: Framing the Discussion about Group Communication and Influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Renee A.; Seibold, David R.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the authors seek to augment Dean Hewes's (1986, 1996) intriguing bracketing and admirable larger effort to "return to basic theorizing in the study of group communication" by making transparent the foundational, and debatable, assumptions that underlie those models. Although these assumptions are addressed indirectly by Hewes, the…

  5. Cultural Ways of Constructing Knowledge: The Role of Identities in Online Group Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztok, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Learning scientists and the CSCL community have argued that knowledge construction is a process of collective thinking; a process that is simultaneously personal and social that requires group cognition. However, while CSCL researchers have investigated situated knowledge in the process of collective thinking, little work has been done to fully…

  6. [Data validation methods and discussion on Chinese materia medica resource survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Ma, Wei-Feng; Zhang, Xiao-Bo; Zhu, Shou-Dong; Guo, Lan-Ping; Wang, Xing-Xing

    2013-07-01

    From the beginning of the fourth national survey of the Chinese materia medica resources, there were 22 provinces have conducted pilots. The survey teams have reported immense data, it put forward the very high request to the database system construction. In order to ensure the quality, it is necessary to check and validate the data in database system. Data validation is important methods to ensure the validity, integrity and accuracy of census data. This paper comprehensively introduce the data validation system of the fourth national survey of the Chinese materia medica resources database system, and further improve the design idea and programs of data validation. The purpose of this study is to promote the survey work smoothly.

  7. Online discussion groups for bulimia nervosa: an inductive approach to Internet-based communication between patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesemann, Dorette; Grunwald, Martin

    2008-09-01

    Online discussion forums are often used by people with eating disorders. This study analyses 2,072 threads containing a total of 14,903 postings from an unmoderated German "prorecovery" forum for persons suffering from bulimia nervosa (www.ab-server.de) during the period from October 2004 to May 2006. The threads were inductively analyzed for underlying structural types, and the various types found were then analyzed for differences in temporal and quantitative parameters. Communication in the online discussion forum occurred in three types of thread: (1) problem-oriented threads (78.8% of threads), (2) communication-oriented threads (15.3% of threads), and (3) metacommunication threads (2.6% of threads). Metacommunication threads contained significantly more postings than problem-oriented and communication-oriented threads, and they were viewed significantly more often. Moreover, there are temporal differences between the structural types. Topics relating to active management of the disorder receive great attention in prorecovery forums. (c) 2008 by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Minimal clinically important difference in plain films in RA: Group discussions, conclusions, and recommendations

    OpenAIRE

    van der Heijde, Desiree; Lassere, M.; Edmonds, J.; Kirwan, J; Strand, V.; Boers, M

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of progression of structural damage on an individual patient level in randomized controlled trials provides extra information in addition to the analysis on a group level. A cutoff level is required to define which patients show progression and which patients do not. The objective of the mimimal clinically important difference (MCID) module for plain films was to elaborate the various concepts to determine a MCID for plain films, and if possible, to define a MCID for specific scoring...

  9. Amount of Conflicting Information In a Group Discussion and Tolerance for Ambiguity As Predictors of Task Attractiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgoon, Michael

    1971-01-01

    The author found through experimentation that a person's tolerance for ambiguity alone is not sufficient to predict his attraction to a group discussion task since the amount of existing conflicting information will mediate evaluation of the task. (Author)

  10. Technicians or patient advocates?--still a valid question (results of focus group discussions with pharmacists)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almarsdóttir, A B; Morgall, J M

    1999-01-01

    New legislation went into effect in Iceland in March 1996 making it the first Nordic country to liberate their drug distribution system. The term liberalization implies the abolishment of the professional monopoly in that ownership was not tied to the pharmacy profession anymore. Focus group...... and the self-image of the pharmacist has changed in the short time since the legislative change. The pharmacists generally said that their patient contact is deteriorating due to the discount wars, the rural pharmacists being more optimistic, and believing in a future competition based on quality. Secondly...

  11. A qualitative analysis of student Balint groups in medical education: contexts and triggers of case presentations and discussion themes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torppa, Martina A; Makkonen, Eeva; Mårtenson, Camilla; Pitkälä, Kaisu H

    2008-07-01

    No previous rigorous qualitative studies exist on student Balint groups. The aim of this study was to explore the contexts and triggers of cases presented in student Balint groups and to clarify the themes in the group discussions. Fifteen student Balint sessions in two groups were organised. Nine female students participated. A grounded theory-based approach with thematic content analysis of the field notes was used. We identified five triggers for case narrations (witnessing injustice, value conflict, difficult human relationships, incurable patient, role confusion) that originated from three distinct contexts (patient encounters, confusing experiences in medical education, tension between privacy and profession). Four main discussion themes could be identified (feelings related to patients, building professional identity, negative role models, cooperation with other medical professionals). The concept of case in student Balint groups was wider than in traditional Balint groups. Feelings related to patients and to one's own role as a doctor were openly discussed in groups. The discussions often touched on professional growth and future professional identity as doctors. The Balint groups may support medical students' professional growth process. This topic warrants further study in more heterogeneous student groups.

  12. Patient informed governance of distributed research networks: results and discussion from six patient focus groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamo, Laura A; Browe, Dennis K; Logan, Holly C; Kim, Katherine K

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how to govern emerging distributed research networks is essential to their success. Distributed research networks aggregate patient medical data from many institutions leaving data within the local provider security system. While much is known about patients' views on secondary medical research, little is known about their views on governance of research networks. We conducted six focus groups with patients from three medical centers across the U.S. to understand their perspectives on privacy, consent, and ethical concerns of sharing their data as part of research networks. Participants positively endorsed sharing their health data with these networks believing that doing so could advance healthcare knowledge. However, patients expressed several concerns regarding security and broader ethical issues such as commercialism, public benefit, and social responsibility. We suggest that network governance guidelines move beyond strict technical requirements and address wider socio-ethical concerns by fully including patients in governance processes.

  13. Technicians or patient advocates?--still a valid question (results of focus group discussions with pharmacists)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almarsdóttir, Anna Birna; Morgall, Janine Marie

    1999-01-01

    New legislation went into effect in Iceland in March 1996 making it the first Nordic country to liberate their drug distribution system. The term liberalization implies the abolishment of the professional monopoly in that ownership was not tied to the pharmacy profession anymore. Focus group...... and the self-image of the pharmacist has changed in the short time since the legislative change. The pharmacists generally said that their patient contact is deteriorating due to the discount wars, the rural pharmacists being more optimistic, and believing in a future competition based on quality. Secondly...... technical skills. This account of the changes in the drug distribution system in Iceland highlights some of the implications for pharmacists internationally....

  14. Effectiveness of interactive discussion group in suicide risk assessment among general nurses in Taiwan: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chia-Yi; Lin, Yi-Yin; Yeh, Mei Chang; Huang, Lian-Hua; Chen, Shaw-Ji; Liao, Shih-Cheng; Lee, Ming-Been

    2014-11-01

    The evidence of suicide prevention training for nurses is scarce. Strategies to enhance general nurses' ability in suicide risk assessment are critical to develop effective training programs in general medical settings. This study was aimed to examine the effectiveness of an interactive discussion group in a suicide prevention training program for general nurses. In this randomized study with two groups of pre-post study design, the sample was recruited from the Medical, Surgical, and Emergency/Intensive Care Sectors of a 2000-bed general hospital via stratified randomization. Among the 111 nurses, 57 participants randomly assigned to the control group received a two-hour baseline suicide gatekeeper lecture, and 54 participants assigning to the experimental group received an additional five-hour group discussion about suicide risk assessment skills. Using a case vignette, the nurses discussed and assessed suicide risk factors specified in a 10-item Chinese SAD PERSONS Scale during a group discussion intervention. The findings revealed that the nurses achieved significant and consistent improvements of risk identification and assessment after the intervention without influencing their mental health status for assessing suicide risks. The result suggested an effective approach of interactive group discussion for facilitating critical thinking and learning suicide risk assessment skills among general nurses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Phases and Changes: Using I Ching as a Source of Generative Metaphors in Teaching Small Group Discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, G. Richard; Chang, Hui-Ching

    1992-01-01

    This essay describes the use of I Ching hexagrams as a focus to improve the ability of college student groups to evolve creative solutions and improve decision-making skills. The philosophy of I Ching is briefly explained, and examples are given of hexagram interpretations which are applicable to group discussion and problem solving. (DB)

  16. Media Memories in Focus Group Discussions - Methodological Reflections Instancing the Global Media Generations Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theo Hug

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Medienereignisse wie auch die Einführung und Verbreitung neuer Medientechnologien und Formate bringen mannigfaltige Wege des „Eintretens von Medien ins Leben“ mit sich. Im Projekt Globale Mediengenerationen (GMG wurden Medienerinnerungen aus der Kindheit im Kontext von Gruppendiskussionen am Beispiel dreier Generationen aus verschiedenen Ländern aller Kontinente untersucht. Dabei wurden medienbezogene Wissensbestände von drei Alterskohorten globaler Generationen analysiert. Der Artikel diskutiert methodologische Aspekte des Projekts und komplexe und selektive Prozesse des Erinnerns vergangener Ereignisse. Er untersucht Gemeinsamkeiten und Unterschiede des GMG-Ansatzes mit dem dokumentarischen Ansatz von Ralf Bohnsack, die beide in der Wissenssoziologie von Karl Mannheim verwurzelt sind. Darüber hinaus wird Medialität als basale methodologische Kategorie in Erwägung gezogen, nicht nur im Hinblick auf die Klärung begrifflicher Grundlagen, sondern auch als inhärente Dimension von Forschungsprozessen. Media events in general and the introduction and divulgence of new media technologies and formats in particular implicate various (new ways of “media entering life.” In the Global Media Generations (GMG research project, articulation of individuals’ memories of childhood experiences with the media was afforded by context of focus groups of three generations in different countries of six continents. In this project media related knowledge segments of different age cohorts have been analyzed and interpreted. The article deals with methodological questions of the project and complex processes of ‘remembering’ past events. It explores commonalities and differences of the GMG approach with Ralf Bohnsack’s documentary approach, both rooted in the sociology of knowledge of Karl Mannheim. Furthermore, mediality is taken into consideration as a basic methodological category, which means that it is perceived not only as subject matter to

  17. Effects of an additional small group discussion to cognitive achievement and retention in basic principles of bioethics teaching methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dedi Afandi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim The place of ethics in undergraduate medical curricula is essential but the methods of teaching medical ethics did not show substantial changes. “Basic principles of bioethics” is the best knowledge to develop student’s reasoning analysis in medical ethics In this study, we investigate the effects of an additional small group discussion in basic principles of bioethics conventional lecture methods to cognitive achievement and retention. This study was a randomized controlled trial with parallel design. Cognitive scores of the basic principles of bioethics as a parameter was measured using basic principles of bioethics (Kaidah Dasar Bioetika, KDB test. Both groups were attending conventional lectures, then the intervention group got an additional small group discussion.Result Conventional lectures with or without small group discussion significantly increased cognitive achievement of basic principles of bioethics (P= 0.001 and P= 0.000, respectively, and there were significant differences in cognitive achievement and retention between the 2 groups (P= 0.000 and P= 0.000, respectively.Conclusion Additional small group discussion method improved cognitive achievement and retention of basic principles of bioethics. (Med J Indones 2009; 18: 48-52Keywords: lecture, specification checklist, multiple choice questions

  18. Survey of Sterile Admixture Practices in Canadian Hospital Pharmacies: Part 2. More Results and Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Travis; Nishi, Cesilia; Checkowski, Ryan; Hall, Kevin W

    2009-01-01

    Background: The 1996 Guidelines for Preparation of Sterile Products in Pharmacies of the Canadian Society of Hospital Pharmacists (CSHP) represent the current standard of practice for sterile compounding in Canada. However, these guidelines are practice recommendations, not enforceable standards. Previous surveys of sterile compounding practices have shown that actual practice deviates markedly from voluntary practice recommendations. In 2004, the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) published its “General Chapter Pharmaceutical Compounding—Sterile Preparations”, which set a more rigorous and enforceable standard for sterile compounding in the United States. Objectives: To assess sterile compounding practices in Canadian hospital pharmacies and to compare them with current CSHP recommendations and USP chapter standards. Methods: An online survey, based on previous studies of sterile compounding practices, the CSHP guidelines, and the chapter standards, was created and distributed to 193 Canadian hospital pharmacies. Results: A total of 133 pharmacies completed at least part of the survey, for a response rate of 68.9%. All respondents reported the preparation of sterile products. Various degrees of deviation from the practice recommendations were noted for virtually all areas of the CSHP guidelines and the USP standards. Low levels of compliance were most notable in the areas of facilities and equipment, process validation, and product testing. Availability in the central pharmacy of a clean room facility meeting or exceeding the criteria of International Organization for Standardization (ISO) class 8 is a requirement of the chapter standards, but more than 40% of responding pharmacies reported that they did not have such a facility. Higher levels of compliance were noted for policies and procedures, garbing requirements, aseptic technique, and handling of hazardous products. The survey methods for this study and results relating to policies, personnel, raw

  19. [Methodological discussion about prevalence of the dental fluorosis on dental health surveys].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Cláudia Helena Soares de Morais; Sampaio, Fábio Correia; Roncalli, Angelo Giuseppe; Moysés, Samuel Jorge

    2013-12-01

    To analyze the limitations of studying dental fluorosis in cross-sectional studies. Data from the Oral Health of the Brazilian Population (SBBrasil 2003) and the Brazilian Oral Health Survey (SBBrasil 2010) were used. Epidemiological trends for fluorosis in 12-year-old Brazilians, aspects of the reliability of the data as well as the accuracy of the estimates are assessed for these two studies. The distribution of prevalence of fluorosis was carried out according to the domains of the study (state capitals and regions) and the year in which the study took place. The confidence intervals (95%CI) were also shown for simple prevalence (without taking into account level of severity). The prevalence of dental fluorosis showed considerable variation, between 0% and 61% in 2003 and 0% and 59% in 2010. Inconsistencies were observed in the data in individual terms (for year and for domain) and in the behavior of the trend. Considering the expected prevalence and the data available in the two studies, the minimum sample size should be 1,500 individuals in order to obtain 3.4% and 6.6% confidence intervals, considering the minimum coefficient of variation to be 15%. Given the subjectivity in its classification, examinations for dental fluorosis may show more variation than those for other oral health conditions. The power to establish differences between the domains of the study with the sample of the SBBrasil 2010 is quite limited. Based on the 2003 and 2010 studies, it was not possible to analyze patterns of dental fluorosis in Brazil; these data are merely exploratory indicators of the prevalence of dental fluorosis. It was impossible to make comparisons due to different analysis models being used in the two surveys. Investigating dental fluorosis in population-based surveys is not even an economically viable technique, using localized epidemiological studies with a sampling plan would be more suitable [corrected].

  20. Discussing sexuality with patients with Parkinson's disease : A survey among Dutch neurologists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hees, P.J.; van der Plas, A.A.; van Ek, G.F.; Putter, H.; den Oudsten, B.L.; den Ouden, M.E.; Elzevier, H.W.

    2017-01-01

    Sexual functioning is often impaired in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) and may affect quality of life of patients and their spouse. However, little is known about the practice patterns of neurologists with regard to discussing sexuality in this field. The aim of this cross-sectional study

  1. Physician groups' use of data from patient experience surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedberg, Mark W; SteelFisher, Gillian K; Karp, Melinda; Schneider, Eric C

    2011-05-01

    In Massachusetts, physician groups' performance on validated surveys of patient experience has been publicly reported since 2006. Groups also receive detailed reports of their own performance, but little is known about how physician groups have responded to these reports. To examine whether and how physician groups are using patient experience data to improve patient care. During 2008, we conducted semi-structured interviews with the leaders of 72 participating physician groups (out of 117 groups receiving patient experience reports). Based on leaders' responses, we identified three levels of engagement with patient experience reporting: no efforts to improve (level 1), efforts to improve only the performance of low-scoring physicians or practice sites (level 2), and efforts to improve group-wide performance (level 3). Groups' level of engagement and specific efforts to improve patient care. Forty-four group leaders (61%) reported group-wide improvement efforts (level 3), 16 (22%) reported efforts to improve only the performance of low-scoring physicians or practice sites (level 2), and 12 (17%) reported no performance improvement efforts (level 1). Level 3 groups were more likely than others to have an integrated medical group organizational model (84% vs. 31% at level 2 and 33% at level 1; P communication with patients, and customer service. The most commonly reported improvement initiatives were changing office workflow, providing additional training for nonclinical staff, and adopting or enhancing an electronic health record. Despite statewide public reporting, physician groups' use of patient experience data varied widely. Integrated organizational models were associated with greater engagement, and efforts to enhance clinicians' interpersonal skills were uncommon, with groups predominantly focusing on office workflow and support staff.

  2. [Training of health professors. Role of discussion in small groups for the development of critical reading aptitude].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insfrán-Sánchez, Myriam; Viniegra-Velázquez, Leonardo

    2004-01-01

    Compare the achievements of an educational strategy promoting participation of three phases (homework, discussion in small groups, plenary session) and other of two phases (homework and plenary session) for the development of critical reading of educational research reports in professors of medicine and other health care areas. An instrument was validated with summaries of 5 published articles and 114 sentences that explored the 3 indicators of critical reading: to interpret, judge and propose; balanced by indicators and options with true/false/don't know answers. The consistency of the instrument was 0.90 (Kuder-Richardson). Two groups of medical and no medical personnel were formed at random. The experimental group (GE) was exposed to the strategy promoting the participation of three phases and the control group (GC) to the strategy promoting the participation of two phases. The contents and duration were equal in both groups. Before the educative interventions there were no significant differences between the groups. After the interventions both groups advanced significantly in the global score, the GE from 32 to 82 (p discussion phase in small groups.

  3. A Randomized Controlled Trial to Decrease Job Burnout in First-Year Internal Medicine Residents Using a Facilitated Discussion Group Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripp, Jonathan A; Fallar, Robert; Korenstein, Deborah

    2016-05-01

    Background Burnout is common in internal medicine (IM) trainees and is associated with depression and suboptimal patient care. Facilitated group discussion reduces burnout among practicing clinicians. Objective We hypothesized that this type of intervention would reduce incident burnout among first-year IM residents. Methods Between June 2013 and May 2014, participants from a convenience sample of 51 incoming IM residents were randomly assigned (in groups of 3) to the intervention or a control. Twice-monthly theme-based discussion sessions (18 total) led by expert facilitators were held for intervention groups. Surveys were administered at study onset and completion. Demographic and personal characteristics were collected. Burnout and burnout domains were the primary outcomes. Following convention, we defined burnout as a high emotional exhaustion or depersonalization score on the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Results All 51 eligible residents participated; 39 (76%) completed both surveys. Initial burnout prevalence (10 of 21 [48%] versus 7 of 17 [41%], P = .69), incidence of burnout at year end (9 of 11 [82%] versus 5 of 10 [50%], P = .18), and secondary outcomes were similar in intervention and control arms. More residents in the intervention group had high year-end depersonalization scores (18 of 21 [86%] versus 9 of 17 [53%], P = .04). Many intervention residents revealed that sessions did not truly free them from clinical or educational responsibilities. Conclusions A facilitated group discussion intervention did not decrease burnout in resident physicians. Future discussion-based interventions for reducing resident burnout should be voluntary and effectively free participants from clinical duties.

  4. Social networks and cooperation in electronic communities : a theoretical-empirical analysis of academic communication and Internet discussion groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matzat, Uwe

    2001-01-01

    The study examines the use of academic e-mailing lists and newsgroups on the Internet by university researchers in the Netherlands and England. Their use is related to three clusters of problems that are analyzed. Firstly, while there are considerable time costs for using Internet Discussion Groups,

  5. Qualitative Inquiry into Church-Based Assets for HIV/AIDS Prevention and Control: A Forum Focus Group Discussion Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aja, Godwin N.; Modeste, Naomi N.; Montgomery, Susanne B.

    2012-01-01

    Assets church members believed they needed to engage in effective HIV/AIDS prevention and control activities. We used the three-step forum focus group discussion (FFGD) methodology to elicit responses from 32 church leaders and lay members, representing five denominations in Aba, Nigeria. Concrete resources, health expertise, finances,…

  6. Video Modeling of Cooperative Discussion Group Behaviors with Students with Learning Disabilities in a Secondary Content-area Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Chris; Wood, Charles L.

    2011-01-01

    Peer-mediated instructional strategies such as cooperative learning are commonly used in general education classrooms in secondary schools; however, students with disabilities often lack the group interaction and discussion skills necessary to fully benefit from evidence-based interventions. The present study used a multiple baseline across…

  7. Discussion and group work design in O2O teaching of applied optics: questions, strategies and extending

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaotong; Cen, Zhaofeng; Liu, Xiangdong; Zheng, Zhenrong

    2017-08-01

    Applied optics course in Zhejiang University is a National Excellent Resource Sharing Course in China, and the online to offline teaching strategies have been implemented and shared with dozens of universities and colleges in China. Discussion is an important activity in teaching. In this paper our main consideration is designing the discussion questions and group works so as to develop the students' critical thinking, cooperative and sharing spirits, and communication abilities in the cosmopolitan era. Typical questions that connect different chapters and help the students to understand the relationship between each sub-system in both field of view and aperture are given for discussion. We inspire the students to complete group works such as ray trace programming by cooperation and then make presentations. All of these create a circumstance for sharing thoughts and developing intelligence and knowledge. A poll shows that the students pay more attention to optical design than before and have made progress in conversation and cooperation.

  8. Educational Outcomes of Small-Group Discussion Versus Traditional Lecture Format in Dental Students' Learning and Skills Acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Ana; Scott, Raymond; Peters, Ove A; McClain, Elizabeth; Gluskin, Alan H

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this prospective quantitative study was to compare the effect of different instructional formats on dental students' skills and knowledge acquisition for access cavity preparation. All first-year dental students were invited to participate in this study conducted during the four consecutive two-week endodontic rotation courses at the University of the Pacific Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry in spring semester 2015. Four alphabetically distributed intact groups of students were randomly allocated to two groups (n=70 each) that participated in either small-group discussion or a traditional lecture on access preparation. The first outcome measure was skill acquisition, measured by the quality of access cavities prepared in extracted teeth at the conclusion of the session. Two blinded raters scored direct observations on a continuous scale. Knowledge, the second outcome measure, was scored with a multiple-choice and open-ended question test at the end of each two-week session. Data were obtained for 134 of the 140 students, for a 96% response rate. The results showed that students in the small-group discussion groups scored significantly higher than those in the lecture groups when skill performance was tested (p=8.9 × 10(-7)). However, no significant differences were found in the acquisition of knowledge between the two groups on the written test. Active student participation was significantly related to improved manual skill acquisition, but the format of the session does not seem to have had a direct influence on acquired knowledge.

  9. Using standardized patient with immediate feedback and group discussion to teach interpersonal and communication skills to advanced practice nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Esther Ching-Lan; Chen, Shiah-Lian; Chao, Shu-Yuan; Chen, Yueh-Chih

    2013-06-01

    Interpersonal and communication skills (IPCS) are essential for advanced practice nursing (APN) in our increasingly complex healthcare system. The Standardized Patient (SP) is a promising innovative pedagogy in medical and healthcare education; however, its effectiveness for teaching IPCS to graduate nursing students remains unclear. We examined the effectiveness of using SP with SP feedback and group discussion to teach IPCS in graduate nursing education. Randomized-controlled study. First-year APN students in Taiwan. Participants were randomly assigned to the experimental (SP assessments with SP feedback and group discussion) or control (SP assessments only) group. There were two outcome indicators: IPCS and student learning satisfaction (SLS). The IPCS were assessed before and after the study in interviews with the SPs. SLS was measured when the study ended. All participants expressed high SLS (94.44%) and showed significant (p ≤ 0.025) improvements on IPCS total scores, interviewing, and counseling. However, there were no significant differences between groups. Qualitative feedback from encounters with SPs is described. Using SPs to teach IPCS to APN students produced a high SLS. The students learned and significantly improved their IPCS by interviewing SPs, but future studies are needed to confirm the effectiveness of SP feedback and group discussions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Who is the competent physics student? A study of students' positions and social interaction in small-group discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due, Karin

    2014-06-01

    This article describes a study which explored the social interaction and the reproduction and challenge of gendered discourses in small group discussions in physics. Data for the study consisted of video recordings of eight upper secondary school groups solving physics problems and 15 audiotaped individual interviews with participating students. The analysis was based on gender theory viewing gender both as a process and a discourse. Specifically discursive psychology analysis was used to examine how students position themselves and their peers within discourses of physics and gender. The results of the study reveal how images of physics and of "skilled physics student" were constructed in the context of the interviews. These discourses were reconstructed in the students' discussions and their social interactions within groups. Traditional gendered positions were reconstructed, for example with boys positioned as more competent in physics than girls. These positions were however also resisted and challenged.

  11. Can a Back Pain E-mail Discussion Group improve health status and lower health care costs?: A randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorig, Kate R; Laurent, Diana D; Deyo, Richard A; Marnell, Margaret E; Minor, Marian A; Ritter, Philip L

    2002-04-08

    Given the high health care utilization, limited evidence for the effectiveness of back pain interventions, and the proliferation of e-mail health discussion groups, this study seeks to determine if the Internet can be used to improve health status and health care utilization for people with chronic back pain. Randomized controlled trial. Participants included 580 people from 49 states with chronic back pain having at least 1 outpatient visit in the past year, no "red-flag" symptoms, and access to e-mail. Major exclusion criteria included continuous back pain for more than 90 days causing major activity intolerance and/or receiving disability payments. Closed, moderated, e-mail discussion group. Participants also received a book and videotape about back pain. Controls received a subscription to a non-health-related magazine of their choice. Pain, disability, role function, health distress, and health care utilization. At 1-year treatment, subjects compared with controls demonstrated improvements in pain (P =.045), disability (P =.02), role function (P =.007), and health distress (P =.001). Physician visits for the past 6 months declined by 1.5 visits for the treatment group and by 0.65 visits for the control group (P =.07). Mean hospital days declined nearly 0.20 days for the treated group vs and increased 0.04 days for the control group (P =.24). An e-mail discussion group can positively affect health status and possibly health care utilization. It may have a place in the treatment of chronic recurrent back pain.

  12. Gay-Straight Alliances as Settings to Discuss Health Topics: Individual and Group Factors Associated with Substance Use, Mental Health, and Sexual Health Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poteat, V. P.; Heck, N. C.; Yoshikawa, H.; Calzo, J. P.

    2017-01-01

    Sexual minority (e.g. lesbian, gay, bisexual, questioning; LGBQ) and gender minority (e.g. transgender) youth experience myriad health risks. Gay-Straight Alliances (GSAs) are school-based settings where they may have opportunities to discuss substance use, mental health, and sexual health issues in ways that are safe and tailored to their…

  13. ClimateQUAL® and Thinklets: Using ClimateQUAL® with Group Support Systems to Facilitate Discussion and Set Priorities for Organizational Change at Criss Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Hillyer

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective – This article discusses a series of actions taken by the Criss Library at the University of Nebraska at Omaha to implement organizational change, using the ClimateQUAL® survey and facilitated discussions with ThinkTank™ group decision software. The library had experienced significant changes over a five-year period, with a renovation of the facility and three reorganizations resulting in a 50% staff turnover. Recognizing the strain that years of construction and personnel changes had placed on the organization, there was a desire to uncover the mood of the employees and reveal the issues behind low morale, uneasiness, and fear.Methods – In November 2009, the library conducted a ClimateQUAL® survey to develop a baseline to assess the effectiveness of any changes. After the results were distributed to library faculty and staff, a series of two-hour facilitated discussions was held to gather opinions and ideas for solutions using thinkLets, a pattern language for reasoning toward a goal. The group support system ThinkTank™ software was loaded onto computers, and employees were able to add their ideas anonymously during the sessions. Finally, 12 employees (29% completed a four-question survey on their perceptions of the facilitated discussions.Results – The facilitated discussions returned 76 sub-themes in 12 categories: staffing and scheduling issues, staff unity/teamwork, communication, goodwill/morale, accountability, decision-making, policy issues, skills and training, leadership, ergonomics/physical work environment, respect, and bullying. An advisory team culled the 76 sub-themes into 40 improvement strategies. Five were implemented immediately, and the remaining 35 were scheduled to be presented to the faculty and staff via an online survey. Participants’ perceptions of the facilitated discussions were mixed. Eighty-three percent of respondents reported that they did not feel safe speaking out about issues, most

  14. Fit Minded College Edition Pilot Study: Can a Magazine-Based Discussion Group Improve Physical Activity in Female College Freshmen?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellitteri, Katelyn; Huberty, Jennifer; Ehlers, Diane; Bruening, Meg

    Initial efficacy of a magazine-based discussion group for improving physical activity (PA), self-worth, and eating behaviors in female college freshmen. Randomized control trial. A large university in southwestern United States. Thirty-seven female college freshmen were randomized to the intervention (n = 17) and control groups (n = 20) in September 2013. Participants completed an 8-week magazine-based discussion group program, Fit Minded College Edition, adapted from Fit Minded, a previously tested theory-based intervention. Education on PA, self-worth, and nutrition was provided using excerpts from women's health magazines. Participants also had access to a Web site with supplementary health and wellness material. The control group did not attend meetings or have access to the Web site but received the magazines. Interventions focusing on concepts of self-worth with less focus on weight and appearance may promote long term PA participation and healthy eating behaviors in college women. Self-reported PA, global self-worth, knowledge self-worth, self-efficacy, social support, eating behaviors (ie, fruit/veggie/junk food/sugar-sweetened beverage consumption), satisfaction, and Web site usage. Mean age of participants was 18.11 (SD = 0.32) years. Time × Intervention effects were observed for PA minutes per week (Partial η = 0.34), knowledge self-worth (Partial η = 0.02), and daily sugar-sweetened beverage consumption (Partial η = 0.17) (P group reporting greater increases in PA and knowledge self-worth and greater decreases in sugar-sweetened beverage consumption. A magazine-based discussion group may provide a promising platform to improve health behaviors in female college freshmen.

  15. [Group Discussions in Health Services Research - Part 1: Introduction and Deliberations on Selection of Method and Planning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohontsch, Nadine Janis; Müller, Veronika; Brandner, Susanne; Karlheim, Christoph; Jünger, Saskia; Klindtworth, Katharina; Stamer, Maren; Höfling-Engels, Nicole; Kleineke, Vera; Brandt, Benigna; Xyländer, Margret; Patzelt, Christiane; Meyer, Thorsten

    2017-05-12

    Health services researchers focus on the players, structures and impact of health care in "real life". They investigate how social aspects, financing, organizational structures, technologies and personal attitudes affect the process and outcomes of health care. Qualitative research methods are used here, which address how people act according to their unique living conditions (outside the context of experimental studies). Different methods of debriefing groups are essential for qualitative health services research. In 2 subsequent articles, we aim to outline the diverse facets and possible range of implementation of the above-mentioned methods, in order to highlight the potential of debriefing groups in health services research (focus groups or group discussions) using these methods. In the current article, we would like to encourage researchers to reflect on relevant topics such as the selection of an appropriate method, the planning and undertaking of investigations including sampling methods, and questions regarding ethics and privacy. A follow-up article (in preparation) will deal with theoretical considerations of the term "group", as well as with the process of moderating discussions, methods of analyzing data and (qualitative) online research. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Comparison the Effect of Student-Based Group Discussion and Lecture Methods Teaching on Midwifery Student\\'s Learning Level

    OpenAIRE

    Aghapour SA.; Vakili MA; Karbasi M; Badeli R

    2015-01-01

    Aims: True learning needs the utilization of proper teaching methods leading to students’ interests in the learning activities to gain useful learning experiences. Therefore, it is needed to reform the traditional teaching methods and to use new student-focused methods by the educational systems.  The aim of this study was to compare the effects of the student-focused group discussion method and lecture method on the learning level in the Midwifery students. Materials & Methods...

  17. Interpretation for Discussions about End-of-Life Issues: Results from a National Survey of Health Care Interpreters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Alicia; Kerr, Kathleen; O'Riordan, David; Pantilat, Steven Z.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Communication about end-of-life issues is difficult across language barriers. Little is known about the experience of health care interpreters in these discussions. Objectives Objectives of this study were to: 1) assess the experiences of healthcare interpreters when interpreting discussions about end-of-life issues; 2) identify interpreter characteristics and experiences that may be associated with improved satisfaction and comfort with interpreting these discussions; and 3) describe interpreter training needs. Methods The study utilized an electronically administered survey distributed nationally to health care interpreters in the United States. One hundred and forty-two health care interpreters participated. Measurements included general experiences, attitudes, and perceived training needs when interpreting discussions about end-of-life issues. Results Most respondents had received a certificate in interpretation (71%, 101/142), completed more than 40 hours of training (89%, 127/142), and had more than 5 years of interpreting experience (65%, 93/142). Overall, 85% (121/142) of respondents had interpreted discussions about end-of-life issues and most interpreted multiple discussions per week. Of those interpreters who had experience with these discussions, the majority (85%, 103/121) reported feeling comfortable, but only half (48%, 58/121) reported that these discussions usually went well. Interpreters who felt clear about their role were more likely than interpreters who did not feel clear about their role to think that discussions went well (51% [57/112] versus 11% [1/9], p=0.02) and to feel comfortable interpreting (88% [98/112] versus 56% [5/9], p=0.01). Eighty percent (97/121) of respondents with experience in end-of-life discussions were personally interested in more specific training for these discussions. Attitudes and perceived training needs did not differ by interpreter demographics or qualifications. Conclusions The majority of

  18. The role of individualism and the Five-Factor Model in the prediction of performance in a leaderless group discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, David A; Atwater, Leanne E; Davidson, Ronald A

    2004-02-01

    Personality has seen a resurgence in the work performance literature. The Five-Factor Model (FFM) represents a set of personality factors that has received the most attention in recent years. Despite its popularity, the FFM may not be sufficiently comprehensive to account for relevant variation across performance dimensions or tasks. Accordingly, the present study also considers how individualism may predict additional variance in performance beyond the FFM. The study involved 152 undergraduate students who experienced a leaderless group discussion (LGD) exercise. Results showed that while the FFM accounted for variance in students' LGD performance, individualism (independence) accounted for additional, unique variance. Furthermore, analyses of the group compositions revealed curvilinear relationships between the relative amount of extraversion, conscientiousness, and individualism in relation to group-level performance.

  19. Selective traditions in group discussions: teachers' views about good science and the possible obstacles when encountering a new topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundqvist, Eva; Sund, Per

    2016-11-01

    There is an ongoing discussion about what content that should be taught in science education and there are different views among teachers about what represent good science content. However, teachers are not isolated individuals making their own interpretations, but are part of institutionalised systems building on patterns in the selection of teaching goals and content. Earlier research shows that teachers teach in alignment with different selective traditions, which can be understood as well-developed teaching habits. Individual teachers seem to develop their personal habits on the basis of the contextual situations created by earlier generations of teachers. In order to find out which content teachers find representative for science education, we asked nine teachers to take part in group interviews to talk about what they value as "good" science content. The participants were grouped according to their selective traditions expressed in earlier studies. The method was used to dynamically explore, challenge and highlight teachers' views. The starting point for the group discussions is national tests in science. In Sweden, national tests in biology, physics and chemistry were introduced in secondary school science (year 9) in 2009. One overarching aim of these tests is to support the implementation of the science curricula and to include for example knowledge about socio-scientific issues (SSI). The content of the tests can consequently be seen as important for teachers to consider. The findings show that `resistance' to including SSI is not just an issue for individual teachers. As individuals teachers can create many kinds of obstacles, but still be interested in integrating SSI in their science teaching. However, in group discussions the teachers tend to collectively adopt the scientific rational discourse. This discourse is what joins them and creates their common identity as science teachers. In turn, they seek to free scientific knowledge from social knowledge

  20. Intergenerational participatory discussion groups foster knowledge exchange to improve child nutrition and food security in northern Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satzinger, Franziska; Bezner Kerr, Rachel; Shumba, Lizzie

    2009-01-01

    This article assesses the effectiveness of a participatory, intergenerational, dialogue approach in addressing gender and generational conflicts related to both child nutrition and agriculture. Analysis of 46 interviews and 3 focus groups with smallholder farmers in rural agrarian communities with high rates of child malnutrition in northern Malawi suggested that participatory discussion can lead to positive change, including increasing child feeding frequency and dietary diversity. An intergenerational, transformative, and holistic approach to nutrition education which integrates agricultural and gender issues can effectively address sensitive conflicts within households and communities that affect child nutrition, and come up with local solutions.

  1. Randomized controlled trial of group cognitive behavioral therapy compared to a discussion group for co-morbid anxiety and depression in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuthrich, V M; Rapee, R M; Kangas, M; Perini, S

    2016-03-01

    Co-morbid anxiety and depression in older adults is associated with worse physical and mental health outcomes and poorer response to psychological and pharmacological treatments in older adults. However, there is a paucity of research focused on testing the efficacy of the co-morbid treatment of anxiety and depression in older adults using psychological interventions. Accordingly, the primary objective of the current study was to test the effects of a group cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) program in treating co-morbid anxiety and depression in a sample of older age adults. A total of 133 community-dwelling participants aged ⩾60 years (mean age = 67.35, s.d. = 5.44, male = 59) with both an anxiety disorder and unipolar mood disorder, as assessed on the Anxiety Disorder Interview Schedule (ADIS), were randomly allocated to an 11-week CBT group or discussion group. Participants with Mini-Mental State Examination scores Depression Scale. Both conditions resulted in significant improvements over time on all diagnostic, symptom and wellbeing measures. Significant group × time interaction effects emerged at post-treatment only for diagnostic severity of the primary disorder, mean severity of all anxiety disorders, mood disorders, and all disorders, and recovery rates on primary disorder. Group CBT produced faster and sustained improvements in anxiety and depression on diagnostic severity and recovery rates compared to an active control in older adults.

  2. Exploring views on long term rehabilitation for people with stroke in a developing country: findings from focus group discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The importance of long term rehabilitation for people with stroke is increasingly evident, yet it is not known whether such services can be materialised in countries with limited community resources. In this study, we explored the perception of rehabilitation professionals and people with stroke towards long term stroke rehabilitation services and potential approaches to enable provision of these services. Views from providers and users are important in ensuring whatever strategies developed for long term stroke rehabilitations are feasible and acceptable. Methods Focus group discussions were conducted involving 15 rehabilitation professionals and eight long term stroke survivors. All recorded conversations were transcribed verbatim and analysed using the principles of qualitative research. Results Both groups agreed that people with stroke may benefit from more rehabilitation compared to the amount of rehabilitation services presently provided. Views regarding the unavailability of long term rehabilitation services due to multi-factorial barriers were recognised. The groups also highlighted the urgent need for the establishment of community-based stroke rehabilitation centres. Family-assisted home therapy was viewed as a potential approach to continued rehabilitation for long term stroke survivors, given careful planning to overcome several family-related issues. Conclusions Barriers to the provision of long term stroke rehabilitation services are multi-factorial. Establishment of community-based stroke rehabilitation centres and training family members to conduct home-based therapy are two potential strategies to enable the continuation of rehabilitation for long term stroke survivors. PMID:24606911

  3. The Colombian conference of bishops and its participation in peace negotiations with insurgent groups: origins and discussions (1982-1990

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Cristancho

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the most representative academic works about the participation of the Colombian Bishops’ Conference in negotiations with insurgent groups during the eighties, focusing on their perspective about their vision of peace. In that sense, this paper analyses how the Colombian clergy adapted to the national reality their perspective of peace, identifying the main debates and the wide variety of answers, focusing on two main issues: the relevance of establishing a relationship between the need to address social issues with the overcoming of violence and the participation of bishops and priests in the talks with the insurgency. As a result of these discussions, the Colombian Catholic Church gained greater unity in action on peace and conflict.

  4. Women's Ideas about the Health Effects of Household Air Pollution, Developed through Focus Group Discussions and Artwork in Southern Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devakumar, Delan; Qureshi, Zeshan; Mannell, Jenevieve; Baruwal, Manju; Sharma, Neha; Rehfuess, Eva; Saville, Naomi M; Manandhar, Dharma S; Osrin, David

    2018-02-01

    Household air pollution is a major cause of ill health, but few solutions have been effective to date. While many quantitative studies have been conducted, few have explored the lived experiences and perceptions of women who do the cooking, and as a result are those most exposed to household air pollution. In this study, we worked with groups of home cooks, and sought to use art as a means of engaging them in discussions of how household air pollution from cooking affects their lives. In the Terai district of southern Nepal, we held four focus groups that included 26 local women from urban and peri-urban areas, as well as six local artists. The women then met approximately weekly over four months, and produced images related to air pollution. Transcripts from the focus groups were reviewed independently by two authors, who initially categorised data deductively to pre-defined nodes, and subsequently inductively reviewed emergent themes. Women identified a number of health effects from air pollution. The main physical effects related to the eye and the respiratory system, and women and young children were seen as most vulnerable. The psychosocial effects of air pollution included reduced food intake by women and lethargy. Suggested solutions included modifications to the cooking process, changing the location of stoves, and increasing ventilation. The main barriers were financial. The lived experiences of women in southern Nepal around the problem of air pollution offers a more nuanced and context-specific understanding of the perceptions and challenges of addressing air pollution, which can be used to inform future interventions.

  5. Determinants of physical activity and sedentary behaviour in university students: a qualitative study using focus group discussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deliens, Tom; Deforche, Benedicte; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Clarys, Peter

    2015-02-28

    College or university is a critical period regarding unhealthy changes in energy related behaviours in students. The first objective of this explorative study was to identify determinants of physical activity and sedentary behaviour in Belgian university students. Secondly, we aimed to collect ideas and recommendations to increase physical activity and decrease sedentary behaviours in university students. Using a semi-structured question guide, seven focus group discussions were conducted consisting of 17 male and 29 female university students from a variety of study disciplines, with a mean age of 20.7 ± 1.6 yrs. Using Nvivo9, an inductive thematic approach was used for data analysis. Students reported that both physical and sedentary activities were influenced by individual factors (e.g. perceived enjoyment, self-discipline, time and convenience), their social networks (e.g. (lack of) parental control, modelling, social support), physical environment (e.g. availability and accessibility, travel time/distance, prices), and macro environment (e.g. media and advertising). Furthermore, the relationships between determinants and university students' physical activity and sedentary behaviour seemed to be moderated by university characteristics, such as residency, university lifestyle, exams and academic pressure. Recommendations for future physical activity interventions include improving information strategies regarding on-campus sports activities, cheaper and/or more flexible sports subscriptions and formulas, including 'sports time' into the curricula, and providing university bicycles around campus. Students also believed that increasing students' physical activity might decrease their sedentary behaviour at the same time. The recommendations and ideas discussed in this study may facilitate the development of effective and tailored (multilevel) intervention programs aiming to increase physical activity and decrease sedentary behaviours in university students.

  6. Measuring Sexual Violence on Campus: Climate Surveys and Vulnerable Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Heer, Brooke; Jones, Lynn

    2017-01-01

    Since the 2014 "Not Alone" report on campus sexual assault, the use of climate surveys to measure sexual violence on campuses across the United States has increased considerably. The current study utilizes a quasi meta-analysis approach to examine the utility of general campus climate surveys, which include a measure of sexual violence,…

  7. End-of-Life Care and Discussions in Japanese Geriatric Health Service Facilities: A Nationwide Survey of Managing Directors' Viewpoints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanoh, Asako; Kizawa, Yoshiyuki; Tsuneto, Satoru; Yokoya, Shoji

    2018-01-01

    Geriatric health service facilities (GHSFs) play important roles as intermediate care facilities for elderly individuals temporarily when they need rehabilitation before returning home. However, the number of residents spending their end-of-life (EOL) period in such facilities is increasing. To improve the quality of EOL care, end-of-life discussions (EOLDs) are recommended by some guidelines and studies. This study aimed to clarify the current practice of EOL care and EOLDs in GHSFs in Japan. We conducted a nationwide cross-sectional survey by mailing questionnaires about EOL care and EOLDs to 3437 GHSF managing directors. The questionnaire was developed through a literature review and discussion among the researchers and experts. Descriptive statistics summarized the data. We also analyzed the factors related to GHSFs conducting EOLDs using Fisher exact tests. The response rate was 20.7% (713 of 3437). Among the respondents, 75.2% (536 of 713) of GHSFs provided EOL care and 73.1% (521 of 713) conducted EOLDs. The most common reasons for difficulties in providing EOL care included the lack of EOL education for nurses and care workers, and their fear about caring for dying residents. End-of-life discussions were mostly initiated after the deterioration of a resident's condition and were conducted with families by physicians. Statistically significant factors of GHSFs conducting EOLDs included providing EOL education for nurses and care workers, availability of private room for critically ill residents, emergency on-call doctors, and EOL care. Adequate practical staff education programs for EOL care including EOLDs may be crucial for quality of end-of-life care in aged care facilities.

  8. To feel like an outsider: focus group discussions regarding the influence on sexuality caused by breast cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaeson, K; Sandell, K; Berterö, C M

    2011-11-01

    The aftermath of breast cancer treatment, especially the sexual side effects, appears to be a neglected issue in developed society. The purpose of this study was to explore how middle-aged women treated for a breast cancer experienced their sexual identity connected to the community norms and values in the society as a whole. Three focus group interviews were conducted, with a total of 12 women. The discussions were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The main theme to feel like an outsider symbolises the women's situation after breast cancer treatment. They experienced their body in a wholly new unfamiliar way, which affected their sexuality in a deep and profound way. This feeling affected their female roles and overshadowed earlier experiences in life. All their female roles were suddenly vague and this was expressed in various ways across each of the four subthemes: to feel different, the unruly body, eroticism is not what it used to be and re-evaluating. From a nursing perspective, there appears to be a definite challenge to identify the women's own unique sexual needs in the rehabilitation transition and to use the skills from all team professionals to improve sexual health in this context. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Training Genetic Counsellors to Deliver an Innovative Therapeutic Intervention: their Views and Experience of Facilitating Multi-Family Discussion Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisler, Ivan; Flinter, Frances; Grey, Jo; Hutchison, Suzanne; Jackson, Carole; Longworth, Louise; MacLeod, Rhona; McAllister, Marion; Metcalfe, Alison; Patch, Christine; Cope, Buddug; Robert, Glenn; Rowland, Emma; Ulph, Fiona

    2017-04-01

    Innovations in clinical genetics have increased diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of inherited genetic conditions (IGCs). This has led to an increased number of families seeking genetic testing and / or genetic counselling and increased the clinical load for genetic counsellors (GCs). Keeping pace with biomedical discoveries, interventions are required to support families to understand, communicate and cope with their Inherited Genetic Condition. The Socio-Psychological Research in Genomics (SPRinG) collaborative have developed a new intervention, based on multi-family discussion groups (MFDGs), to support families affected by IGCs and train GCs in its delivery. A potential challenge to implementing the intervention was whether GCs were willing and able to undergo the training to deliver the MFDG. In analysing three multi-perspective interviews with GCs, this paper evaluates the training received. Findings suggests that MFDGs are a potential valuable resource in supporting families to communicate genetic risk information and can enhance family function and emotional well-being. Furthermore, we demonstrate that it is feasible to train GCs in the delivery of the intervention and that it has the potential to be integrated into clinical practice. Its longer term implementation into routine clinical practice however relies on changes in both organisation of clinical genetics services and genetic counsellors' professional development.

  10. Perceptions of contraception, non-protection and induced abortion among a sample of urban Swedish teenage girls: focus group discussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsén, Caroline; Aneblom, Gunilla; Gemzell-Danielsson, Kristina

    2006-12-01

    To explore the attitudes of teenage girls towards contraception and induced abortion in order to better understand underlying reasons for non-protection. Four focus group discussions with urban teenage girls aged 15-18 years (n = 16). Attitudes towards abortion were generally positive despite some degree of misinformation and lack of knowledge about the subject. Knowledge about methods of birth control was accurate. The use of alcohol was often cited as a factor contributing to risk-taking behaviour. Sexual abuse was mentioned as a common phenomenon, and all participants knew someone who had been sexually abused. Participants agreed that sexual partners were reluctant to use condoms and that it was difficult to negotiate with them about this use. The increased rate of abortion was felt to be mainly due to initiation of sexual activity at a younger age. A need for easily available and inexpensive contraception was expressed along with improvement in the quality of sexual education in school. Qualitative sexual education with single-sex sessions and gender related messages as a recurrent activity in the school curricula may help to empower young women and promote avoidance of risk-taking during sexual activity thus helping to reduce the incidence of unwanted pregnancies. In addition, access to cheap condoms could provide a stimulus to increased use of condoms.

  11. Assessing Student Perceptions of the Benefits of Discussions in Small-Group, Large-Class, and Online Learning Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Kerstin; Pollock, Philip H.; Wilson, Bruce M.

    2012-01-01

    A large literature establishes the benefits of discussions for stimulating student engagement and critical thinking skills. However, we know considerably less about the differential effects of various discussion environments on student learning. In this study, we assess student perceptions concerning the benefits of discussions in an upper-level…

  12. General practitioner views about discussing sexual issues with patients with coronary heart disease: a national survey in Ireland

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Byrne, Molly

    2010-05-25

    Abstract Background Sexual problems are common among people with coronary heart disease and can adversely affect patients\\' quality of life. GPs are ideally placed to deal with these problems. Research suggests that GPs are reluctant to address sexual problems but little is known about what currently takes place in practice. The aim of this study was to examine GPs\\' self-reported behaviour and attitudes to discussing sexual problems with people with coronary heart disease. Method Design: A cross-sectional survey which administered 230 postal questionnaires to a nationally representative, stratified random sample of GPs in the Republic of Ireland. GPs were asked about current practice, knowledge, awareness and confidence in dealing with sexual problems, barriers to addressing sexual problems, and about improving services in this area. Results Responses were available for 61 GPs (27% response rate). Seventy percent of GPs reported that they rarely or never discussed sexual problems with coronary patients. While all GPs believed addressing sexual problems was important, many GPs reported lacking awareness, knowledge and confidence in addressing sexual problems. The main barriers were lack of time, feeling the patient wasn\\'t ready and lack of training in the area. GPs wanted more training and guidelines for practice. Conclusions There is currently no standardised protocol for GPs for dealing with sexual problems among coronary patients. Awareness of these issues appears to be low among GPs. Services could be improved by developing practice guidelines for brief, effective actions or assessments, providing training in the area and improving information resources and support services for referral.

  13. General practitioner views about discussing sexual issues with patients with coronary heart disease: a national survey in Ireland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGee Hannah M

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sexual problems are common among people with coronary heart disease and can adversely affect patients' quality of life. GPs are ideally placed to deal with these problems. Research suggests that GPs are reluctant to address sexual problems but little is known about what currently takes place in practice. The aim of this study was to examine GPs' self-reported behaviour and attitudes to discussing sexual problems with people with coronary heart disease. Method Design: A cross-sectional survey which administered 230 postal questionnaires to a nationally representative, stratified random sample of GPs in the Republic of Ireland. GPs were asked about current practice, knowledge, awareness and confidence in dealing with sexual problems, barriers to addressing sexual problems, and about improving services in this area. Results Responses were available for 61 GPs (27% response rate. Seventy percent of GPs reported that they rarely or never discussed sexual problems with coronary patients. While all GPs believed addressing sexual problems was important, many GPs reported lacking awareness, knowledge and confidence in addressing sexual problems. The main barriers were lack of time, feeling the patient wasn't ready and lack of training in the area. GPs wanted more training and guidelines for practice. Conclusions There is currently no standardised protocol for GPs for dealing with sexual problems among coronary patients. Awareness of these issues appears to be low among GPs. Services could be improved by developing practice guidelines for brief, effective actions or assessments, providing training in the area and improving information resources and support services for referral.

  14. Results of focus group discussion, conducted with students and tutors of the medical faculty Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin

    OpenAIRE

    Worthmann, Dörte

    2010-01-01

    Since the end of the 80s, there has been an ongoing discussion in the Anglo-Saxon world about the definition of personal und professional development (PPD) within the undergraduate medical education. Eventually, some medical schools in North America and Europe implemented recommendations resulting from this discussion into their medical curricula. In the German speaking countries, this discussion only played a minor role. This survey utilizises methods of qualitative social research (four foc...

  15. Teacher-student co-construction processes in biology: Strategies for developing mental models in large group discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez Oviedo, Maria Cecilia

    The aim of this study was to describe co-construction processes in large group discussions. Co-construction, as used here, is a process by which the teacher and the students work together to construct and evaluate mental models of a target concept. Data were collected for an in-depth case study of a single teacher instructing middle school students with an innovative curriculum on human respiration. Data came from transcripts of video taped lessons, drawings, and pre- and post-test scores. Quantitative and qualitative analyses were conducted. In the quantitative analysis, differences in gains between one and two standard deviations in size were found between the pre- and post-test scores indicating that the students increased their understanding about human respiration. In the qualitative analysis, a generative exploratory method followed by a convergent coded method was conducted to examine teacher-student interaction patterns. The aim of this part was to determine how learning occurred by attempting to connect dialogue patterns with underlying cognitive processes. The main outcome of the study is a hypothesized model containing four layers of nested teaching strategies. Listed from large to small time scales these are: the Macro Cycle, the Co-construction Modes, the Micro Cycle, and the Teaching Tactics. The most intensive analysis focused on identifying and articulating the Co-construction Modes---Accretion Mode, Disconfirmation Mode, Modification Mode, Evolution Mode, and Competition Mode---and their relations to the other levels of the model. These modes can either describe the construction and evaluation of individual model elements or of entire models giving a total of ten modes. The frequency of these co-construction modes was then determined by coding, twenty-six hours of transcripts. The most frequent modes were the Accretion Mode and the Disconfirmation Mode. The teacher's and the students' contributions to the co-construction process were also examined

  16. How-To Data Collection Series: The Evolution of the Focused Discussion Group--From Non-Participant to One of the Crew

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon, Jose Luis

    2011-01-01

    This article is part of The Weekly Qualitative Report's occasional series on "How-To Collect Qualitative Data." The qualitative data collection method described is that of focused discussion groups (FDG's). This method involves the moderator, or scripter as is the preferred term in focused discussion groups, to move beyond that of a…

  17. Proposed Principles for Promoting Pre-Service Teacher Transfer of Group-Based Learning to the Classroom: A Discussion Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Terry; Cullity, Marguerite; Sharp, Sue; Spiers, Sue; Wren, Julia

    2010-01-01

    The effective "transfer" of knowledge and skills from university to the workplace is of global interest, yet this area of inquiry lacks research. Teacher educators, for example, require information on how to advance pre-service teachers' transfer of group-based learning to the primary school classroom (Scott & Baker, 2003). Group-based learning…

  18. Effect of using an audience response system on learning environment, motivation and long-term retention, during case-discussions in a large group of undergraduate veterinary clinical pharmacology students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucet, Michèle; Vrins, André; Harvey, Denis

    2009-12-01

    Teaching methods that provide an opportunity for individual engagement and focussed feedback are required to create an active learning environment for case-based teaching in large groups. A prospective observational controlled study was conducted to evaluate whether the use of an audience response system (ARS) would promote an active learning environment during case-based discussions in large groups, have an impact on student motivation and improve long-term retention. Group A (N = 83) participated in large group case discussions where student participation was voluntary, while for group B (N = 86) an ARS was used. Data collection methods included student and teacher surveys, student focus group interviews, independent observations and 1-year post-course testing. Results indicated that the use of an ARS provided an active learning environment during case-based discussions in large groups by favouring engagement, observation and critical reflection and by increasing student and teacher motivation. Although final exam results were significantly improved in group B, long-term retention was not significantly different between groups. It was concluded that ARS use significantly improved the learning experience associated with case-based discussions in a large group of undergraduate students.

  19. Analyzing Talk in a Long-Term Literature Discussion Group: Ways of Operating within LGBT-Inclusive and Queer Discourses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Mollie V.; Clark, Caroline T.

    2011-01-01

    Scholars have argued for reading and discussing children's and young adult literature containing lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and/or questioning (LGBTQ) characters and related themes with youths. Yet, we know very little about how to do this among LGBTQ people and their allies. This study examined 18 transcripts of talk from a literature…

  20. A study of space station needs, attributes and architectural options. Final briefing: Cost working group discussion session

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    The economic factors involved in the design and utilization of the space station are investigated. Topics include the economic benefits associated with research and production, the orbit transfer vehicle, and satellite servicing. Program costs and design options are examined. The possibilities of financing from the private sector are discussed.

  1. Victimization among female and male sexual minority status groups: evidence from the British Crime Survey 2007-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Bere; Davies, Michelle; Scurlock-Evans, Laura

    2014-01-01

    International surveys of victims show crime rates in England and Wales, including hate crimes, are among the highest in Europe. Nevertheless, sexual minority status is a less considered risk factor in general victimization research. This study used sexual minority status and sex to predict victimization across British Crime Surveys from 2007-2010. Logistic regression analyses showed sexual minority status groups were more likely than heterosexuals to be victimized from any and some specific crimes. However, bisexuals rather than lesbians or gay men were more consistently victimized, notably by sexual attacks and within the household. Implications for understanding victimization among these groups are discussed.

  2. The Effect of Education-Based Intervention Using Small Group Discussion in Empowering Adolescent Girls to Prevent Iron Deficiency Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemehsadat Seyed Nematollah Roshan

    2014-10-01

    Results: At baseline, independent T-test showed no significant difference between the two groups in the perceived susceptibility, perceived severity, and self efficacy, all of which could be regarded as empowerment process components (P>0.05. However, significant differences were observed after intervention. Also, the paired T-test showed a significant difference before and after the intervention in the test group in means of the perceived susceptibility, perceived severity, self efficacy and, in the grand scheme, adolescent girls' empowerment (P

  3. Qualitative analysis of parents, teachers and students’ beliefs about education of reproductive health to students using focus group discussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Azizi

    2003-09-01

    However, a few fathers and a group of mothers believed that education of family planning is not suitable for students. A need for education of AIDS and marital problems for students were the major concerns in all groups. The female students emphasized a need for programming counseling in pre-marital period. In conclusion, essentials in puberty health, family planning, AIDS and marital problems should be provided in mid- and high schools in order to narrow the knowledge gap of the students.

  4. Men and Their Families: Contributions of Caribbean Men to Family Life. A Discussion Guide for Use by Groups in Church, School, Community and Other Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Janet, Comp.; And Others

    The Carribean Child Development Centre conducted a 2-year research project to provide a socio-historical perspective on roles of Caribbean men within the family, and to survey and describe attitudes and behaviors of a cross-section of men in Jamaica. An 8-week series of discussions, designed for a maximum of 15 men and 15 women, was organized to…

  5. Medical research: civil liability and compensation for personal injury--a discussion paper. Ciba Foundation Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    The Ciba Foundation Study Group has considered the most appropriate means of compensating participants (or their relatives) for injuries received as a consequence of medical research. The group recognises that injury may occur despite the exercise of the highest degree of skill and care by the investigator and that compensation through an action for negligence is therefore not available. At present injured participants have to rely on ex gratia payments. The group considers this unsatisfactory and recommends the establishment of a centrally operated fund with authority to provide compensation on a no-fault basis. These recommendations do not diminish the rights of the participant to bring an action in the event of negligence on the part of the investigator or an action under the law relating to product liability against the manufacturers of defective equipment or drugs. PMID:7388452

  6. From Social Exclusion to Supported Inclusion: Adults with Intellectual Disability Discuss Their Lived Experiences of a Structured Social Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Nathan J; Jaques, Hayden; Johnson, Amanda; Brotherton, Michelle L

    2017-09-01

    People with intellectual disability often have few friends and experience social exclusion. Recognising this gap, supported social groups with the aim of inclusion and interdependence were created by a supported employment provider. Interviews were undertaken with 10 adults with intellectual disability exploring their lived experiences of a supported social group. Data were analysed using descriptive phenomenology. Two themes emerged (i) supported engagement fosters wellbeing, and (ii) developing social belonging and connectedness. Participants not only acknowledged the support that they needed to participate, but also that the social group had changed their lives in many ways. Adults with intellectual disability want to socialise, have friends and be part of their community. For this to be achieved, they recognise the need to seek some form of support. With appropriate and targeted support, adults with intellectual disability can move from social exclusion towards supported inclusion and experience richer lives. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Uruguayan secondary school students speak up about tobacco: results from focus group discussions in and around Montevideo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Erin; Harrell, Melissa; Springer, Andrew; Medina, José; Martinez, Lucía; Perry, Cheryl; Estol, Diego

    2017-07-01

    This qualitative research study investigated intrapersonal, interpersonal, and environmental factors that shape young adolescent tobacco use behaviors in Uruguay. Focus groups were conducted in the summer of 2012 and fall of 2013 in four secondary schools in Montevideo, Uruguay, including two private schools and two public schools. A total of four focus groups were led in each school, composed of 4-6 students each, 16 focus groups in total. Data analysis utilized NVivo software and included deductive and inductive content analysis. Overwhelmingly, students reported that the onset of smoking occurred in the second year of secondary school. The primary intrapersonal factors that were found to be universal among respondents identified that smoking was a performance in groups, to garner attention from their peers. Students interviewed most often stated that the greatest interpersonal factors for smoking were to look older, as a rite of passage, and for group membership. Environmental factors cited most often indicate that they smoked during unsupervised time, either at night or around the short Uruguayan school day. Focus group interviews revealed that adolescents had easy access to cigarettes for purchase through small family owned grocery stores, even though laws exist preventing the sale of cigarettes to minors. Few differences were cited between strata related to cigarette use in adolescents. The differences that do exist are most apparent across gender, though there were a few observed differences when stratified by public and private school. Findings from this study indicate that key factors across ecological levels (intrapersonal, interpersonal, and environmental) should be taken into consideration when designing tobacco prevention programs for youth in Uruguay. A multiple-component approach which addresses risk factors at all of these levels, implemented in schools, may be particularly well-suited to this setting.

  8. An introduction to the Thysanoptera a survey of the group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevor Lewis

    1991-01-01

    I acknowledge with gratitude the invitation of Bruce L. Parker, Margaret Skinner and the organizers of this meeting to open the proceedings. It is a great pleasure to be asked to enthuse about a group of insects for which I have long had a particular affection - the Thysanoptera. My problem is that relatively few of the world's entomologists - less than 0.2% -...

  9. From Social Exclusion to Supported Inclusion: Adults with Intellectual Disability Discuss Their Lived Experiences of a Structured Social Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Nathan J.; Jaques, Hayden; Johnson, Amanda; Brotherton, Michelle L.

    2017-01-01

    Background: People with intellectual disability often have few friends and experience social exclusion. Recognising this gap, supported social groups with the aim of inclusion and interdependence were created by a supported employment provider. Methods: Interviews were undertaken with 10 adults with intellectual disability exploring their lived…

  10. The Nature and Role of Common Ground in the Learning of Mathematics in Small-Group Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Per; Ryve, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the nature and role of common ground in group learning of mathematics by means of the analytical constructs of "focal projects" and "contextualization." The analysis investigates two students (12-13 years old) playing a dice game, where their task is to distribute a set of markers based on the total of…

  11. An exploratory survey of undergraduate nursing students' experiences of group work within a problem-based curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brysiewicz, P; Cassimjee, R; McInerney, P

    2002-11-01

    Problem-based Learning is a learner-centered approach to education which encourages student participation and group work in the learning process. This method of self-directed learning is facilitated by the use of small-group discussions. This being the case, it is important for groups to function effectively in order for this learning to occur. These small groups are guided by a facilitator and utilize real-life problems from the clinical settings. An exploratory survey using open-ended questionnaires was conducted amongst senior nursing students at the University of Natal, and this focussed on their experiences of group work. The students described their best and worst experiences as a member of a group, as well as what they found most irritating and most appreciated about the group work. The students also highlighted what they expected from the group and in turn what they were willing to do for the group.

  12. Married Iranian Women's Knowledge, Attitude and Sense of Self-efficacy about Oral Contraceptives: Focus Group Discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyman, Nooshin; Oakley, Deborah

    2011-10-01

    Oral contraceptive pills effectiveness is lower in actual use than in clinical trials. The views of a group of married Iranian women were sought as a step toward improving the enhanced use of contraceptive pills. Two focus groups of current pill users (n=13) and two focus groups of women not currently taking the pills (n=14) were held. Leaders trained facilitators; themes were identified from line-by-line analysis of transcripts. The majority of the participants were primary school graduates with a mean age of 34 years. Knowledge about mechanisms of action was low; some women wanted more information. Both users and non-users recognized positive and negative characteristics of contraceptive pills. For non-users, physical and emotional side-effects were the most important; and anecdotal information from their social network was more important. They tended to trust more traditional methods. For users, their own experience and more reality-based understanding of side-effects mitigated concerns about side-effects. They also felt that health clinic staff had a negative attitude toward the pills. A stronger expression of self-efficacy seemed to be associated with more positive attitudes toward oral contraceptive pills. Although Iran has had a government-funded family planning program since 1990, and pills are the single most popular modern contraceptive method, women who take OCPs can provide important information that could increase effective health education about their use.

  13. Lie groups, differential equations, and geometry advances and surveys

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book collects a series of contributions addressing the various contexts in which the theory of Lie groups is applied. A preliminary chapter serves the reader both as a basic reference source and as an ongoing thread that runs through the subsequent chapters. From representation theory and Gerstenhaber algebras to control theory, from differential equations to Finsler geometry and Lepage manifolds, the book introduces young researchers in Mathematics to a wealth of different topics, encouraging a multidisciplinary approach to research. As such, it is suitable for students in doctoral courses, and will also benefit researchers who want to expand their field of interest.

  14. Retention of allied health professionals in rural New South Wales: a thematic analysis of focus group discussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Sheila; Lincoln, Michelle; Smith, Tony

    2012-06-22

    Uneven distribution of the medical workforce is globally recognised, with widespread rural health workforce shortages. There has been substantial research on factors affecting recruitment and retention of rural doctors, but little has been done to establish the motives and conditions that encourage allied health professionals to practice rurally. This study aims to identify aspects of recruitment and retention of rural allied health professionals using qualitative methodology. Six focus groups were conducted across rural NSW and analysed thematically using a grounded theory approach. The thirty allied health professionals participating in the focus groups were purposively sampled to represent a range of geographic locations, allied health professions, gender, age, and public or private work sectors. Five major themes emerged: personal factors; workload and type of work; continuing professional development (CPD); the impact of management; and career progression. 'Pull factors' favouring rural practice included: attraction to rural lifestyle; married or having family in the area; low cost of living; rural origin; personal engagement in the community; advanced work roles; a broad variety of challenging clinical work; and making a difference. 'Push factors' discouraging rural practice included: lack of employment opportunities for spouses; perceived inadequate quality of secondary schools; age related issues (retirement, desire for younger peer social interaction, and intention to travel); limited opportunity for career advancement; unmanageable workloads; and inadequate access to CPD. Having competent clinical managers mitigated the general frustration with health service management related to inappropriate service models and insufficient or inequitably distributed resources. Failure to fill vacant positions was of particular concern and frustration with the lack of CPD access was strongly represented by informants. While personal factors affecting recruitment and

  15. Retention of allied health professionals in rural New South Wales: a thematic analysis of focus group discussions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keane Sheila

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Uneven distribution of the medical workforce is globally recognised, with widespread rural health workforce shortages. There has been substantial research on factors affecting recruitment and retention of rural doctors, but little has been done to establish the motives and conditions that encourage allied health professionals to practice rurally. This study aims to identify aspects of recruitment and retention of rural allied health professionals using qualitative methodology. Methods Six focus groups were conducted across rural NSW and analysed thematically using a grounded theory approach. The thirty allied health professionals participating in the focus groups were purposively sampled to represent a range of geographic locations, allied health professions, gender, age, and public or private work sectors. Results Five major themes emerged: personal factors; workload and type of work; continuing professional development (CPD; the impact of management; and career progression. ‘Pull factors’ favouring rural practice included: attraction to rural lifestyle; married or having family in the area; low cost of living; rural origin; personal engagement in the community; advanced work roles; a broad variety of challenging clinical work; and making a difference. ‘Push factors’ discouraging rural practice included: lack of employment opportunities for spouses; perceived inadequate quality of secondary schools; age related issues (retirement, desire for younger peer social interaction, and intention to travel; limited opportunity for career advancement; unmanageable workloads; and inadequate access to CPD. Having competent clinical managers mitigated the general frustration with health service management related to inappropriate service models and insufficient or inequitably distributed resources. Failure to fill vacant positions was of particular concern and frustration with the lack of CPD access was strongly represented by

  16. SURVEY ON SOLIDARITY GROUPS OF BUYERS: CRITICAL ISSUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Pennisi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This work is intended to provide, through the analysis of the dynamics of purchase of solidarity groups of buyers, a contribution to the study of current trends that are affecting the alternative to the dominant agro-food industry. Through the use of a questionnaire the paper investigated the perception as consumers this particular class of buyers have of themselves and how their concepts of “conscious choice” and “responsibility” drive their shopping list and consequently influence the growth and development of the Short Supply Chain, as the work remarked the progressive and notable increment of commerce and families circling around this young but widespreading phenomenon. Particularly striking, in fact, emerge from the role that consumers are becoming part of this phenomenon and the most of them have matured during time the idea that biological and hand-made products are for themselves also Safe, while the Long Supply Chain should incarnate the role of an alienating and wholly food system. The analysis of the questionnaires revealed some problems concerning the methods of transport and storage.

  17. Who Is the Competent Physics Student? A Study of Students' Positions and Social Interaction in Small-Group Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due, Karin

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a study which explored the social interaction and the reproduction and challenge of gendered discourses in small group discussions in physics. Data for the study consisted of video recordings of eight upper secondary school groups solving physics problems and 15 audiotaped individual interviews with participating students.…

  18. The Effect of Group Discussion-based Education on Self-management of Adults with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Compared with Usual Care: A Randomized Control Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibzadeh, Hosein; Sofiani, Akbar; Alilu, Leyla; Gillespie, Mark

    2017-11-01

    We sought to determine the effect of group discussion-based education on the self-management capability of patients with type 2 diabetes in Iran. This randomized control trial was conducted on 90 patients with type 2 diabetes. Participants were allocated randomly into one of two groups; intervention and control. The intervention group received the group discussion-based education while the control group received routine care only. The Lin's self-management questionnaire was completed at baseline and three months post-intervention. Statistical analysis, including the use of independent t-test, identified that in comparison to the control group, significant increases were observed in the scores of self-organization (t =11.24, p self-adjustment (t = 7.53, p self-monitoring (t = 6.42, p self-management (t = 10.82, p self-manage diabetes.

  19. Identification of mistakes and their correction by a small group discussion as a revision exercise at the end of a teaching module in biochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobby, Zachariah; Nandeesha, H; Sridhar, M G; Soundravally, R; Setiya, Sajita; Babu, M Sathish; Niranjan, G

    2014-01-01

    Graduate medical students often get less opportunity for clarifying their doubts and to reinforce their concepts after lecture classes. The Medical Council of India (MCI) encourages group discussions among students. We evaluated the effect of identifying mistakes in a given set of wrong statements and their correction by a small group discussion by graduate medical students as a revision exercise. At the end of a module, a pre-test consisting of multiple-choice questions (MCQs) was conducted. Later, a set of incorrect statements related to the topic was given to the students and they were asked to identify the mistakes and correct them in a small group discussion. The effects on low, medium and high achievers were evaluated by a post-test and delayed post-tests with the same set of MCQs. The mean post-test marks were significantly higher among all the three groups compared to the pre-test marks. The gain from the small group discussion was equal among low, medium and high achievers. The gain from the exercise was retained among low, medium and high achievers after 15 days. Identification of mistakes in statements and their correction by a small group discussion is an effective, but unconventional revision exercise in biochemistry. Copyright 2014, NMJI.

  20. Review: Ralf Bohnsack, Aglaja Przyborski & Burkhard Schäffer (Eds. (2010. Das Gruppendiskussionsverfahren in der Forschungspraxis [The Group Discussion Technique in Research Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Schmidt-Pfister

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This edited volume comprises a range of studies that have employed a group discussion technique in combination with a specific strategy for reconstructive social research—the so-called documentary method. The latter is an empirical research strategy based on the meta-theoretical premises of the praxeological sociology of knowledge, as developed by Ralf BOHNSACK. It seeks to access practice in a more appropriate manner, namely by differentiating between various dimensions of knowledge and sociality. It holds that habitual collective orientations, in particular, are best accessed through group discussions. Thus this book does not address the group discussion technique in general, as might be expected from the title. Instead, it presents various contributions from researchers interpreting transcripts of group discussions according to the documentary method. The chapters are grouped into three main sections, representing different frameworks of practice and habitual orientation: childhood, adolescence, and organizational or societal context. A fourth section includes chapters on further, potentially useful ways of employing this particular technique and approach, as well as a chapter on teaching it in a meaningful way. Each chapter is structured in the same way: introduction to the research field and focus; methodological discussion; exemplary interpretation of group discussions; and concluding remarks. Whilst the transcripts referred to by the authors are very helpfully presented in the chapters, there is a lack of methodological reflection on the group discussion technique itself, which, as mentioned above, is only evaluated in regard to the documentary method. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs110225

  1. Associations of Topics of Discussion on Twitter With Survey Measures of Attitudes, Knowledge, and Behaviors Related to Zika: Probabilistic Study in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhadloo, Mohsen; Winneg, Kenneth; Chan, Man-Pui Sally; Hall Jamieson, Kathleen; Albarracin, Dolores

    2018-02-09

    Recent outbreaks of Zika virus around the world led to increased discussions about this issue on social media platforms such as Twitter. These discussions may provide useful information about attitudes, knowledge, and behaviors of the population regarding issues that are important for public policy. We sought to identify the associations of the topics of discussions on Twitter and survey measures of Zika-related attitudes, knowledge, and behaviors, not solely based upon the volume of such discussions but by analyzing the content of conversations using probabilistic techniques. Using probabilistic topic modeling with US county and week as the unit of analysis, we analyzed the content of Twitter online communications to identify topics related to the reported attitudes, knowledge, and behaviors captured in a national representative survey (N=33,193) of the US adult population over 33 weeks. Our analyses revealed topics related to "congress funding for Zika," "microcephaly," "Zika-related travel discussions," "insect repellent," "blood transfusion technology," and "Zika in Miami" were associated with our survey measures of attitudes, knowledge, and behaviors observed over the period of the study. Our results demonstrated that it is possible to uncover topics of discussions from Twitter communications that are associated with the Zika-related attitudes, knowledge, and behaviors of populations over time. Social media data can be used as a complementary source of information alongside traditional data sources to gauge the patterns of attitudes, knowledge, and behaviors in a population.

  2. The Effect of Group Discussion-based Education on Self-management of Adults with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Compared with Usual Care: A Randomized Control Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosein Habibzadeh

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: We sought to determine the effect of group discussion-based education on the self-management capability of patients with type 2 diabetes in Iran. Methods: This randomized control trial was conducted on 90 patients with type 2 diabetes. Participants were allocated randomly into one of two groups; intervention and control. The intervention group received the group discussion-based education while the control group received routine care only. The Lin’s self-management questionnaire was completed at baseline and three months post-intervention. Results: Statistical analysis, including the use of independent t-test, identified that in comparison to the control group, significant increases were observed in the scores of self-organization (t =11.24, p < 0.001, self-adjustment (t = 7.53, p < 0.001, interaction with health experts (t = 7.31, p < 0.001, blood sugar self-monitoring (t = 6.42, p < 0.001, adherence to the proposed diet (t = 5.22, p < 0.001, and total self-management (t = 10.82, p < 0.001 in the intervention group. Conclusions: Sharing experiences through group discussions and receiving instructive feedback can improve the ability to self-manage diabetes.

  3. Beyond a Dichotomous View of the Concepts of ‘Sex’ and ‘Gender’ Focus Group Discussions among Gender Researchers at a Medical Faculty

    OpenAIRE

    Lena Alex; Anncristine Fjellman Wiklund; Berit Lundman; Monica Christianson; Anne Hammarström

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The concepts of 'sex' and 'gender' are both of vital importance in medicine and health sciences. However, the meaning of these concepts has seldom been discussed in the medical literature. The aim of this study was to explore what the concepts of 'sex' and 'gender' meant for gender researchers based in a medical faculty. Methods: Sixteen researchers took part in focus group discussions. The analysis was performed in several steps. The participating researchers read the text and ...

  4. New survey looks at high DUI, death rates among some Hispanic groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-09-30

    The article reports on a study that surveyed Mexican American and Caucasian men who were arrested for driving under the influence (DUI) in California. The survey included 300 Mexican American and 300 Caucasian men; in each group, half had been arrest...

  5. The impact of complex survey design on prevalence estimates of intakes of food groups in the Australian National Children's Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burden, Sandy; Probst, Yasmine; Steel, David; Tapsell, Linda

    2012-08-01

    To assess the impact of the complex survey design used in the 2007 Australian National Children's Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey (ANCNPAS07) on prevalence estimates for intakes of groups of foods in the population of children. The impacts on prevalence estimates were determined by calculating design effects for values for food group consumption. The implications of ignoring elements of the sample design including stratification, clustering and weighting are discussed. The ANCNPAS07 used a complex sample design involving stratification, a high degree of clustering and estimation weights. Australian children aged 2-16 years. Design effects ranging from design used in the ANCNPAS07 could result in underestimating the width of confidence intervals, higher mean square errors and biased estimators. The magnitude of these effects depends on both the parameter under consideration and the chosen estimator.

  6. The Effect of Group Discussion on the Quality of Life and HbA1c Levels of Adolescents With Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshar, Mohamad; Memarian, Robabe; Mohammadi, Esa

    2014-08-01

    Diabetes is a metabolic syndrome and the most common endocrine disorder in childhood and adolescence. Diabetes occurs at any age but the highest outbreak is during ten to 15 years of age and 75% of the cases are diagnosed at the age 18. This study aimed to investigate the effect of a group discussion on the quality of life (QOL) and glycosylated hemoglobin A (HbA1c) levels of adolescents with diabetes. This quasi-experimental study was performed on 56 adolescents with diabetes who were referred to Golabchi Diabetes Center in Kashan, Iran. After obtaining written informed consent from the patients, blood sample was drawn for measuring sugar and HbA1c levels. The participants completed the questionnaire regarding the QOL. Patients were randomly allocated to four groups. All the groups attended similar group discussion sessions, which were conducted according to the guidance of diabetic specialists. The groups' members followed the discussed instructions for four months. Then, another questionnaire was completed and blood sugar and HbA1c levels were measured again. The results were compared by paired-samples t-test and Wilcoxon signed-rank test. After the group discussion sessions, in 56% of the patients the HbA1c levels (8.45 ± 1.35 and 6.98 ± 0.89 before and after intervention, respectively) and QOL were improved significantly. The mean age of these patients was 14.75 ± 1.80 years and the mean of daily insulin injection was 35.70 ± 13.42 units. Sharing experiences trough group discussions and receiving instructive feedbacks can improve the QOL and metabolic status of adolescents with diabetes.

  7. Use of Modified SOAP Notes and Peer-Led Small-Group Discussion in a Medical Physiology Course: Addressing the Hidden Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibble, Jonathan; Hansen, Penelope A.; Nelson, Loren

    2006-01-01

    Peer leading of small-group discussion of cases; use of modified subjective, objective, assessment of physiology (SOAP) notes; and opportunities for self-assessment were introduced into a Medical Physiology course to increase students' awareness and practice of professional behaviors. These changes arose from faculty members' understanding of the…

  8. Examining the Effects of Text Genre and Structure on Fourth-and Fifth-Grade Students' High-Level Comprehension as Evidenced in Small-Group Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengyi; Murphy, P. Karen; Firetto, Carla M.

    2014-01-01

    Although there is a rich literature on the role of text genre and structure on students' literal comprehension, more research is needed regarding the role of these text features on students' high-level comprehension as evidenced in their small-group discussions. As such, the present study examined the effects of text genre (i.e., narrative and…

  9. Perceptions of women, nurses, midwives and doctors about the use of video during birth to improve quality of care : focus group discussions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lonkhuijzen, L.; Groenewout, M.; Schreuder, A.; Zeeman, G.; Scherpbier, A.; Aukes, L.; van den Berg, P.

    Please cite this paper as: van Lonkhuijzen L, Groenewout M, Schreuder A, Zeeman G, Scherpbier A, Aukes L, van den Berg P. Perceptions of women, nurses, midwives and doctors about the use of video during birth to improve quality of care: focus group discussions. BJOG 2011;

  10. A Focus Group Study of African American Students' Experiences with Classroom Discussions about Race at a Predominantly White University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walls, Jill K.; Hall, Scott S.

    2018-01-01

    Past research has drawn attention to the unique challenges for students of color attending predominantly white colleges and universities, yet few have focused on the classroom as a micro-context in which race-related discussions often occur. Using a focus group methodology, 22 African American undergraduate students from a variety of academic…

  11. Designing Transferable Skills Inventory for Assessing Students Using Group Discussion: A Case Study of First Year Electrical and Electronics Engineering Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejaswani, K.; Madhuri, G. V.

    2015-01-01

    Employability skills among engineering graduates have been a concern due to their inability to perform on a professional platform to the employer's expected level. As they are higher cognitive skills, they are to be nurtured during the graduation period. Keeping this in view, group discussions are identified as one of the methods to elicit…

  12. The Effect of Educational Software, Video Modelling and Group Discussion on Social-Skill Acquisition Among Students with Mild Intellectual Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetzroni, Orit E; Banin, Irit

    2017-07-01

    People with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) often demonstrate difficulties in social skills. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a comprehensive intervention program on the acquisition of social skills among students with mild IDD. Single subject multiple baseline design across situations was used for teaching five school-age children with mild IDD social skills embedded in school-based situations. Results demonstrate that the intervention program that included video modelling and games embedded with group discussions and simulations increased the level and use of adequate social behaviours within the school's natural environment. Results demonstrate the unique attribution of a comprehensive interactive program for acquisition and transfer of participants' social skills such as language pragmatics and social rules within the school environment. Group discussions and simulations were beneficial and enabled both group and personalized instruction through the unique application of the program designed for the study. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Development of a Farsi translation of the AGREE instrument, and the effects of group discussion on improving the reliability of the scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashidian, Arash; Yousefi-Nooraie, Reza

    2012-06-01

    We aimed to develop a formal Farsi (Persian) translation of the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE) clinical guideline appraisal instrument. We considered the effect of group discussion in improving the reliability of scores. We followed a multi-step process of translation including independent translations of the instrument and extensive assessment of face validity and fluency. We used the instruments to appraise 11 guidelines from three specialities. After the first appraisal, the raters discussed about each guideline in groups, and had the opportunity to revise their scores individually. In total 96 appraisals were conducted. The intra-class correlations (1,1) were calculated for domain scores obtained by two versions at each time point. We observed no statistically significant differences between the mean values obtained from the English and the translated versions of AGREE, and the scores at two time points. The average domain scores, as well as the reliability rose significantly after discussion. The Farsi version of the AGREE instrument yields in the scores comparable to the original version, despite a lower reliability. Revision of scores after group discussion leads to higher reliability, probably by helping the raters recognize what they might have overlooked during the short time of assessment. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. International multi-site survey on the use of online support groups in bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer, Rita; Conell, Jörn; Glenn, Tasha

    2017-01-01

    . The survey was completed between March 2014 and January 2016 and included questions on the use of online support groups. All patients were diagnosed by a psychiatrist. Analysis included descriptive statistics and general estimating equations to account for correlated data. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: The survey.......8% of the total sample). Given the benefits reported in prior research, clarification of the role of online support groups in bipolar disorder is needed. With only a minority of patients using online support groups, there are analytical challenges for future studies....

  15. Bilingual asynchronous online discussion groups: design and delivery of an eLearning distance study module for nurse academics in a developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Peter A; Mai, Van Anh Thi; Gray, Genevieve

    2012-04-01

    The advent of eLearning has seen online discussion forums widely used in both undergraduate and postgraduate nursing education. This paper reports an Australian university experience of design, delivery and redevelopment of a distance education module developed for Vietnamese nurse academics. The teaching experience of Vietnamese nurse academics is mixed and frequently limited. It was decided that the distance module should attempt to utilise the experience of senior Vietnamese nurse academics - asynchronous online discussion groups were used to facilitate this. Online discussion occurred in both Vietnamese and English and was moderated by an Australian academic working alongside a Vietnamese translator. This paper will discuss the design of an online learning environment for foreign correspondents, the resources and translation required to maximise the success of asynchronous online discussion groups, as well as the rationale of delivering complex content in a foreign language. While specifically addressing the first iteration of the first distance module designed, this paper will also address subsequent changes made for the second iteration of the module and comment on their success. While a translator is clearly a key component of success, the elements of simplicity and clarity combined with supportive online moderation must not be overlooked. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Focus group methodology in the development of a survey to measure physician use of cancer staging systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashbury, F D; Gospodarowicz, M; Kaegi, E; O'Sullivan, B

    1995-07-01

    Accurate classification and staging of cancers enables physicians to select appropriate treatments, to evaluate outcomes of health management more reliably, to compare and interpret statistics reported from various institutions on a local, regional, national and international basis more consistently and to assist exchanges of information between different centers of treatment. This paper examines group interview methodology to develop the first-ever survey of Canadian cancer care specialists pertaining to staging systems. It is shown how the responses provided by participants contributed to the formulation of testable hypotheses and shaped the development of survey questions. As well, experiences are shared regarding the technical issues that arose using the focus group technique with physicians. In conclusion, there is a brief discussion of how the use of staging classification systems might be understood from the perspective of diffusion theory and social marketing (i.e., how information about cancer staging has been communicated and disseminated.

  17. Discussion groups with parents of children with cerebral palsy in Europe designed to assist development of a relevant measure of environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, V; Michelsen, S I; Parkinson, K; Colver, A; Beckung, E; Pez, O; Caravale, B

    2006-03-01

    An instrument to measure environmental factors relevant to physically impaired children is being developed in a European context. Preliminary work in England had identified some potentially important themes. Further inquiry was needed to identify issues important in other European countries. To inform the content of a questionnaire relevant to the environment of children with cerebral palsy (CP) living in Europe. A qualitative study using discussion groups. Parents of 28 children with CP from five countries; Denmark, France, Italy, Ireland and Sweden. One discussion group was held in each country with an average of seven parents per group. The four themes identified in the preliminary work done in England were strongly confirmed across Europe - namely: Mobility, Transport, Support by and to parents, and Attitudes of individuals and institutions towards children. Two new themes identified in the discussion groups were Bureaucracy and Access to information about rights and entitlements. The environmental factors that cause concern to parents of children with CP are similar across Europe. A prototype environmental questionnaire has been developed based on these findings. The environmental questionnaire is in use in a study in nine European centres.

  18. EVOLUTION OF GROUP GALAXIES FROM THE FIRST RED-SEQUENCE CLUSTER SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, I. H. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Yee, H. K. C. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Hsieh, B. C. [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Gladders, M., E-mail: tli@astro.swin.edu.au, E-mail: hyee@astro.utoronto.ca, E-mail: bchsieh@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw, E-mail: gladders@oddjob.uchicago.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640 S. Ellis Ave, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2012-04-20

    We study the evolution of the red-galaxy fraction (f{sub red}) in 905 galaxy groups with 0.15 {<=} z < 0.52. The galaxy groups are identified by the 'probability friends-of-friends' algorithm from the first Red-Sequence Cluster Survey (RCS1) photometric-redshift sample. There is a high degree of uniformity in the properties of the red sequence of the group galaxies, indicating that the luminous red-sequence galaxies in the groups are already in place by z {approx} 0.5 and that they have a formation epoch of z {approx}> 2. In general, groups at lower redshifts exhibit larger f{sub red} than those at higher redshifts, showing a group Butcher-Oemler effect. We investigate the evolution of f{sub red} by examining its dependence on four parameters, one of which can be classified as intrinsic and three of which can be classified as environmental: galaxy stellar mass (M{sub *}), total group stellar mass (M{sub *,grp}, a proxy for group halo mass), normalized group-centric radius (r{sub grp}), and local galaxy density ({Sigma}{sub 5}). We find that M{sub *} is the dominant parameter such that there is a strong correlation between f{sub red} and galaxy stellar mass. Furthermore, the dependence of f{sub red} on the environmental parameters is also a strong function of M{sub *}. Massive galaxies (M{sub *} {approx}> 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun }) show little dependence of f{sub red} on r{sub grp}, M{sub *,grp}, and {Sigma}{sub 5} over the redshift range. The dependence of f{sub red} on these parameters is primarily seen for galaxies with lower masses, especially for M{sub *} {approx}< 10{sup 10.6} M{sub Sun }. We observe an apparent 'group down-sizing' effect, in that galaxies in lower-mass halos, after controlling for galaxy stellar mass, have lower f{sub red}. We find a dependence of f{sub red} on both r{sub grp} and {Sigma}{sub 5} after the other parameters are controlled. At a fixed r{sub grp}, there is a significant dependence of f{sub red} on {Sigma}{sub 5

  19. Discussion groups with parents of children with cerebral palsy in Europe designed to assist development of a relevant measure of environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McManus, V; Michelsen, S I; Parkinson, K

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An instrument to measure environmental factors relevant to physically impaired children is being developed in a European context. Preliminary work in England had identified some potentially important themes. Further inquiry was needed to identify issues important in other European....... One discussion group was held in each country with an average of seven parents per group. RESULTS: The four themes identified in the preliminary work done in England were strongly confirmed across Europe - namely: Mobility, Transport, Support by and to parents, and Attitudes of individuals...

  20. The business of healing: focus group discussions of readjustment to the post-9/11 work environment among employees of affected agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Carol S; Pfefferbaum, Betty; Hong, Barry A; Gordon, Mollie R; Kim, You-Seung; Lind, Lisa; Pollio, David E

    2010-07-01

    Understanding postdisaster workplace adjustment may help guide interventions for postdisaster emotional functioning and recovery. One to two years after the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, 12 focus groups were conducted with 85 employees of companies directly affected by the 9/11 attacks on New York City, to discuss mental health issues surrounding return to the workplace after the disaster. Risk communication, tension between workplace productivity and employees' emotional needs, and postdisaster work space were topics discussed in the focus groups. Employees identified many effective responses by their companies after 9/11 relating to these areas of concern as well as gaps in response. Recommended risk communication procedures were applied but not systematically. Little direction was available for balancing workplace productivity and employees' emotional needs or for strategic management of postdisaster workspace, suggesting areas for future disaster workplace research.

  1. Implementation status of self-assessment/peer-group discussion program: a bottom-up approach of monitoring/supervision in improving quality of health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafle, K K; Bhuju, G B; Karkee, S B; Prasad, R R; Shrestha, N; Shrestha, A D; Das, P L; Chataut, B D; Shrestha, A; Suvedi, B K

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring/supervision is an essential component for improving the quality of health services including rational use of medicines. A new bottom-up approach of monitoring/supervision consisting of self-assessment/ peer-group discussion was found to be effective in improving prescribing practices. The new strategy significantly improved the prescribing practices based on standard treatment guidelines. The government has implemented it as a Program in primary health care services of Nepal. This article aims to share the implementation status of the self-assessment/peer-group discussion Program for improving the prescribing practices of common health problems and availability of drugs in the district health system. Concurrent mixed research design was applied for data collection. The data were collected at different levels of health care system using in-depth interviews, participatory observations and documentary analysis. The Management Division, Department of Health Services implemented the Program in 2009-10 and the PHC Revitalization Division, DoHs is the implementation division since 2010-11. The Program comprised revision of participant's and trainer's manuals, training of trainers and prescribers, finalisation of health conditions and indicators, distribution of carbon copy prescription pads, and conduction of peer-group discussions.The Program was implemented in number of districts. The government made the policy decision to implement the Program for monitoring prescribing practices and the availability of free drugs in districts. However, it has covered only few districts and needs escalation to cover all 75 districts of the country.

  2. A Large Sample of Proto-Clusters and Proto-Groups from the VIMOS Ultra-Deep Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaux, Brian C.

    2017-07-01

    Using observations from the VIMOS Ultra-Deep Survey (VUDS), a massive spectroscopic campaign targeting 10,000 typical star-forming galaxies at 2 groups forming in the early universe. Though ostensibly a field survey, a number of factors relating to the survey itself and intrinsic to proto-structures have allowed VUDS to sample a large range of local and global densities at these redshifts. In this talk, I will discuss the development of the methods for finding, confirming, and characterizing proto-clusters and proto-groups in the context of VUDS including new techniques and tools developed specifically for these purposes. Several case studies of spectroscopically confirmed massive proto-clusters will be presented, focused both on the diversity of their global properties and that of their member populations. I will also discuss preliminary work on the full ensemble of VUDS proto-structures as well as measurements of the star formation rate-density and color-density relations at these redshifts.

  3. The role of support groups in facilitating families in coping with a genetic condition and in discussion of genetic risk information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumridge, Gillian; Metcalfe, Alison; Coad, Jane; Gill, Paramjit

    2012-09-01

      Giving children and young people information about genetic conditions and associated risk has been shown to be important to their identity, coping and decision making. Parents, however, find talking to their children difficult, and support from health professionals is often not available to them.   To explore the role of support groups in family coping, and in assisting parents' communication about risk with children in families affected by an inherited genetic condition.   Semi-structured interviews analysed using grounded theory and informed by models focusing on aspects of family communication.   Affected and unaffected children and their parents, from families affected by one of six genetic conditions, that represent different patterns of inheritance, and variations in age of onset, life expectancy and impact on families.   Parents often sought support they did not receive elsewhere from support groups. They identified benefits, but also potential disadvantages to this involvement. These related to the specific condition and also whether groups were run solely by parents or had professional input. Support groups rarely helped directly with family communication, but attendance often stimulated family discussion, and they provided information that improved parents' confidence in discussing the condition.   Support groups should be seen only as additional to the support offered by health and social care professionals. An increased understanding of the role of support groups in assisting families with genetic conditions has been highlighted, but further work is needed to explore more fully how this may be made more sustainable and far-reaching. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Identifying patterns of item missing survey data using latent groups: an observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElwee, Paul; Nathan, Andrea; Burton, Nicola W; Turrell, Gavin

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To examine whether respondents to a survey of health and physical activity and potential determinants could be grouped according to the questions they missed, known as ‘item missing’. Design Observational study of longitudinal data. Setting Residents of Brisbane, Australia. Participants 6901 people aged 40–65 years in 2007. Materials and methods We used a latent class model with a mixture of multinomial distributions and chose the number of classes using the Bayesian information criterion. We used logistic regression to examine if participants’ characteristics were associated with their modal latent class. We used logistic regression to examine whether the amount of item missing in a survey predicted wave missing in the following survey. Results Four per cent of participants missed almost one-fifth of the questions, and this group missed more questions in the middle of the survey. Eighty-three per cent of participants completed almost every question, but had a relatively high missing probability for a question on sleep time, a question which had an inconsistent presentation compared with the rest of the survey. Participants who completed almost every question were generally younger and more educated. Participants who completed more questions were less likely to miss the next longitudinal wave. Conclusions Examining patterns in item missing data has improved our understanding of how missing data were generated and has informed future survey design to help reduce missing data. PMID:29084795

  5. International multi-site survey on the use of online support groups in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Rita; Conell, Jörn; Glenn, Tasha; Alda, Martin; Ardau, Raffaella; Baune, Bernhard T; Berk, Michael; Bersudsky, Yuly; Bilderbeck, Amy; Bocchetta, Alberto; Bossini, Letizia; Castro, Angela M Paredes; Cheung, Eric Y W; Chillotti, Caterina; Choppin, Sabine; Zompo, Maria Del; Dias, Rodrigo; Dodd, Seetal; Duffy, Anne; Etain, Bruno; Fagiolini, Andrea; Hernandez, Miryam Fernández; Garnham, Julie; Geddes, John; Gildebro, Jonas; Gonzalez-Pinto, Ana; Goodwin, Guy M; Grof, Paul; Harima, Hirohiko; Hassel, Stefanie; Henry, Chantal; Hidalgo-Mazzei, Diego; Kapur, Vaisnvy; Kunigiri, Girish; Lafer, Beny; Larsen, Erik R; Lewitzka, Ute; Licht, Rasmus W; Hvenegaard Lund, Anne; Misiak, Blazej; Piotrowski, Patryk; Monteith, Scott; Munoz, Rodrigo; Nakanotani, Takako; Nielsen, René E; O'donovan, Claire; Okamura, Yasushi; Osher, Yamima; Reif, Andreas; Ritter, Philipp; Rybakowski, Janusz K; Sagduyu, Kemal; Sawchuk, Brett; Schwartz, Elon; Scippa, Ângela M; Slaney, Claire; Sulaiman, Ahmad H; Suominen, Kirsi; Suwalska, Aleksandra; Tam, Peter; Tatebayashi, Yoshitaka; Tondo, Leonardo; Vieta, Eduard; Vinberg, Maj; Viswanath, Biju; Volkert, Julia; Zetin, Mark; Whybrow, Peter C; Bauer, Michael

    2017-08-01

    Peer support is an established component of recovery from bipolar disorder, and online support groups may offer opportunities to expand the use of peer support at the patient's convenience. Prior research in bipolar disorder has reported value from online support groups. To understand the use of online support groups by patients with bipolar disorder as part of a larger project about information seeking. The results are based on a one-time, paper-based anonymous survey about information seeking by patients with bipolar disorder, which was translated into 12 languages. The survey was completed between March 2014 and January 2016 and included questions on the use of online support groups. All patients were diagnosed by a psychiatrist. Analysis included descriptive statistics and general estimating equations to account for correlated data. The survey was completed by 1222 patients in 17 countries. The patients used the Internet at a percentage similar to the general public. Of the Internet users who looked online for information about bipolar disorder, only 21.0% read or participated in support groups, chats, or forums for bipolar disorder (12.8% of the total sample). Given the benefits reported in prior research, clarification of the role of online support groups in bipolar disorder is needed. With only a minority of patients using online support groups, there are analytical challenges for future studies.

  6. Beyond a dichotomous view of the concepts of 'sex' and 'gender' focus group discussions among gender researchers at a medical faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex, Lena; Fjellman Wiklund, Anncristine; Lundman, Berit; Christianson, Monica; Hammarström, Anne

    2012-01-01

    The concepts of 'sex' and 'gender' are both of vital importance in medicine and health sciences. However, the meaning of these concepts has seldom been discussed in the medical literature. The aim of this study was to explore what the concepts of 'sex' and 'gender' meant for gender researchers based in a medical faculty. Sixteen researchers took part in focus group discussions. The analysis was performed in several steps. The participating researchers read the text and discussed ideas for analysis in national and international workshops. The data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The authors performed independent preliminary analyses, which were further developed and intensively discussed between the authors. The analysis of meanings of the concepts of 'sex' and 'gender' for gender researchers based in a medical faculty resulted in three categories; "Sex as more than biology", with the subcategories 'sex' is not simply biological, 'sex' as classification, and 'sex' as fluid and changeable; "Gender as a multiplicity of power-related constructions", with the subcategories: 'gender' as constructions, 'gender' power dimensions, and 'gender' as doing femininities and masculinities; "Sex and gender as interwoven", with the subcategories: 'sex' and 'gender' as inseparable and embodying 'sex' and 'gender'. Gender researchers within medicine pointed out the importance of looking beyond a dichotomous view of the concepts of 'sex' and 'gender'. The perception of the concepts was that 'sex' and 'gender' were intertwined. Further research is needed to explore how 'sex' and 'gender' interact.

  7. Effects of supportive-expressive discussion groups on loneliness, hope and quality of life in breast cancer survivors: a randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabrizi, Fatemeh Moghaddam; Radfar, Moloud; Taei, Zeynab

    2016-09-01

    Evaluation of the effect of supportive expressive discussion groups on loneliness, hope and quality of life in breast cancer survivors. A randomized control trial including breast cancer patients who had completed chemotherapy and randomly allocated into two groups: intervention (n = 41) and control (n = 40). The intervention consisted of twelve weekly 90-min sessions for groups of six to eight breast cancer survivors. Data were obtained pre-to -post the intervention and at 8-week follow-up. The data were analyzed using a repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA). The findings revealed a significant reduction in loneliness scores (F = 69.85, p group, while scores of control participants did not show this pattern during the study. The strongest effects were found for global quality of life (effect size) = 0.59), for future perspectives (effect size = 0.51), emotional functioning (effect size = 0.35) and social functioning (effect size = 0.31). The intervention was effective on loneliness, hope and quality of life in the intervention group. The intervention needs further evaluation in a larger study and with other cancer types. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Why aren't women choosing STEM academic jobs? Observations from a small-group discussion at the 2016 American Society for Microbiology annual meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamowicz, Elizabeth M

    2017-03-01

    This commentary summarizes a small-group discussion that recently occurred at the American Society for Microbiology annual general meeting, ASM Microbe, in Boston, Massachusetts, on 16-20 June 2016, on the topic 'why are so few women choosing to become academics?' Specifically, the discussion focused on asking what the actual and perceived barriers to academic STEM careers women face, and possible solutions to address them which would make women more likely to seek out academic careers. The conclusions reached suggest that, despite improvement in recent years, women and minorities still face complex barriers to STEM academic careers, and further research is needed to determine the best solutions to this problem. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Strengthening Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintz, Allison B.

    2013-01-01

    "Strategy sharing" is a certain type of discussion that centers on students' ideas and occurs when children present different approaches to problems and provide information about how they solved the problem (Wood, Williams, and McNeal 2004). A teacher may orchestrate a strategy-sharing discussion to achieve one or more of the…

  10. Patient-based outcome analysis is important to determine the success of total knee arthroplasty: result of a focus group discussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zacharia B

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Balaji Zacharia, Manu Paul, Mohammed Thanveeruddin Sherule Department of Orthopedics, Government Medical College, Kozhikode, Kerala, India Background: Total knee replacement (TKR results in an excellent outcome in terms of pain relief. The reporting of outcomes was traditionally focused on implant survivorship and objective outcomes such as range of motion, knee stability, and radiographic alignment. However, patients and doctors had differing perceptions of all domains of outcome, especially subjective quality of life domains such as emotions and social functioning. In this study, we tried to find out the expectations of Indian patients regarding TKR and assess the level of satisfaction among our patients from their view point using focus group discussion (FGD, and whether these expectations have an impact on outcomes and patient satisfaction. Materials and methods: This study was conducted in the Department of Orthopedics, Government Medical College, Kozhikode, Kerala, India, in November 2014. Patients between the ages 60 and 65 years who met inclusion criteria were selected. A total of 50 patients were selected for FGDs. Among them, 42 patients participated in FGD. The remaining eight did not appear for the discussion. A total of four FGD sessions were conducted. Results and discussion: It was found that there is a discrepancy between the satisfaction levels of patient and surgeon. There is a difference in satisfaction level achieved depending on socioeconomic, geographic, and cultural characteristics. Conclusion: Newer methods of TKR outcome assessment combining radiological outcome, surgeon-based assessment, and patient satisfaction based on their socioeconomic status and cultural characteristics should be developed for different populations. Keywords: focus group discussion, total knee arthroplasty, patient-specific objectives

  11. Conference Report: Drug Metabolism Discussion Group Short Meeting: microsampling--the next big thing. Alderley Park, Macclesfield, UK, 14 March 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson-Addie, Kirsty; Woods, Karen; Muir, Allan; Smith, Christopher; Higton, David

    2012-12-01

    On behalf of the Drug Metabolism Discussion Group, Regulatory Bioanalysis AstraZeneca (UK) recently organized and hosted an extremely successful Drug Metabolism Discussion Group Short Meeting on 'microsampling--the next big thing'. This attracted over 140 delegates and a strong line up of presenters of respected scientists within the field. This meeting focused on the impact of taking a reduced sample (5-20 µl) from an animal, or later in the clinic, particularly neonates. The agenda covered the spectrum of microsampling, from capillary plasma microsampling, as championed by Ove Jonsson and Kristian Königsson, through to dried blood spots. The day was split up in to three sections, the morning concentrating on the sampling aspects from animals. A highlight of the first section was the 'poster blitz' where four poster presenters gave a quick overview of their work. This introduced the poster session and created a good atmosphere for general debate between the delegates. The mid-session saw the bioanalytical challenges discussed from the discovery to the preclinical stage. To encourage interaction between the presenters and the audience, a panel discussion was used that led to interesting insights into study design from toxicological and bioanalytical viewpoints. The final session was left to clinical aspects of microsampling and a particularly interesting presentation from Hitesh Pandya from the Pediatric Respiratory Medicine Department (University of Leicester, Leicester, UK). An eloquent and hard-hitting presentation put into perspective the importance of advancements in this field that enables sample to be taken in a noninvasive manner. The meeting was well received with excellent feedback from all concerned.

  12. The DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey: The Voronoi-Delaunay Method Catalog of Galaxy Groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerke, Brian F.; /UC, Berkeley; Newman, Jeffrey A.; /LBNL, NSD; Davis, Marc; /UC, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley, Astron.Dept.; Marinoni, Christian; /Brera Observ.; Yan, Renbin; Coil, Alison L.; Conroy, Charlie; Cooper, Michael C.; /UC, Berkeley, Astron.Dept.; Faber, S.M.; /Lick Observ.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P.; /Princeton U. Observ.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; /Lick Observ.; Kaiser, Nick; /Hawaii U.; Koo, David C.; Phillips, Andrew C.; /Lick Observ.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; /Maryland U.

    2012-02-14

    We use the first 25% of the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey spectroscopic data to identify groups and clusters of galaxies in redshift space. The data set contains 8370 galaxies with confirmed redshifts in the range 0.7 {<=} z {<=} 1.4, over one square degree on the sky. Groups are identified using an algorithm (the Voronoi-Delaunay Method) that has been shown to accurately reproduce the statistics of groups in simulated DEEP2-like samples. We optimize this algorithm for the DEEP2 survey by applying it to realistic mock galaxy catalogs and assessing the results using a stringent set of criteria for measuring group-finding success, which we develop and describe in detail here. We find in particular that the group-finder can successfully identify {approx}78% of real groups and that {approx}79% of the galaxies that are true members of groups can be identified as such. Conversely, we estimate that {approx}55% of the groups we find can be definitively identified with real groups and that {approx}46% of the galaxies we place into groups are interloper field galaxies. Most importantly, we find that it is possible to measure the distribution of groups in redshift and velocity dispersion, n({sigma}, z), to an accuracy limited by cosmic variance, for dispersions greater than 350 km s{sup -1}. We anticipate that such measurements will allow strong constraints to be placed on the equation of state of the dark energy in the future. Finally, we present the first DEEP2 group catalog, which assigns 32% of the galaxies to 899 distinct groups with two or more members, 153 of which have velocity dispersions above 350 km s{sup -1}. We provide locations, redshifts and properties for this high-dispersion subsample. This catalog represents the largest sample to date of spectroscopically detected groups at z {approx} 1.

  13. Group Finding in the Stellar Halo Using Photometric Surveys: Current Sensitivity and Future Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sanjib; Johnston, Kathryn V.; Majewski, Steven R.; Bullock, James; Muñoz, Ricardo R.

    2011-02-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) provided the first deep and global photometric catalogs of stars in our halo and not only clearly mapped its structure but also demonstrated the ubiquity of substructure within it. Future surveys promise to push such catalogs to ever increasing depths and larger numbers of stars. This paper examines what can be learned from current and future photometric databases using group-finding techniques. We compare groups recovered from a sample of M-giants from 2MASS with those found in synthetic surveys of simulated ΛCDM stellar halos that were built entirely from satellite accretion events and demonstrate broad consistency between the properties of the two sets. We also find that these recovered groups are likely to represent the majority of high-luminosity (L > 5 × 106 L sun) satellites accreted within the last 10 Gyr and on orbits with apocenters within 100 kpc. However, the sensitivity of the M-giant survey to accretion events that were either ancient from low-luminosity objects or those on radial orbits is limited because of the low number of stars, bias toward high-metallicity stars, and the shallow depth (distance explored only out to 100 kpc from the Sun). We examine the extent to which these limitations are addressed by current and future surveys, in particular catalogs of main-sequence turnoff (MSTO) stars from SDSS and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), and of RR Lyrae stars from LSST or PanSTARRS. The MSTO and RR Lyrae surveys are more sensitive to low-luminosity events (L ~ 105 L sun or less) than the 2MASS M-giant sample. Additionally, RR Lyrae surveys, with superior depth, are also good at detecting events on highly eccentric orbits whose debris tends to lie beyond 100 kpc. When combined we expect these photometric surveys to provide a comprehensive picture of the last 10 Gyr of Galactic accretion. Events older than this are too phase mixed to be discovered. Pushing

  14. Focusing on SSI's risk and radiation protection criteria. A report based on discussions in focus groups in Oesthammar and Oskarshamn municipalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drottz-Sjoeberg, Britt-Marie [BMD Research (Sweden)

    2003-11-01

    The project was a result of the authority's continued work on the 1998 regulations on protection of human health and the environment in final disposal of spent nuclear fuel and nuclear waste. The idea behind the project, to involve persons from the municipalities participating in SKB's site selection investigation in focus group discussions, was that the questions and points of views that emerged in the discussions could serve as a basis for the authority's work of producing general guidelines associated with the regulations. The finished report would then be handed over to an expert group at the authority which answered or commented on the issues raised, and made a report on this to the participating municipalities Oskarshamn and Oesthammar. The result of discussions in two focus groups in Oskarshamn municipality and two in Oesthammar municipality in October 2002 is presented here, together with a presentation of the project's purpose and organisation. The results are presented in three main sections. The first concentrates on radiation and radioactivity since the task in the discussion groups was to attempt to clarify the issues and problems observed in this area in order to contribute to the authority's work of developing the general guidelines. The second section, on understanding of concepts, measurement, risk and safety, illustrates that the frequently asked and 'simple' knowledge related questions are only the tip of the iceberg where many of the participants have also thought about the more complex contexts and the fundamental problems in the risk and safety analysis, its validity and use. The third section of the report focuses primarily on content and information aspects. It provides a number of ideas about how information on current problems and important issues can be improved, how knowledge can be deepened in the site selection municipalities and how working methods in the process can be developed. The report mainly

  15. Evaluation of factors influencing on non-exclusive breast feeding during the first six months of life in Bushehr Port using focus group discussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherafat Akaberian

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Non-exclusive breast feeding in the early years of life is one of the most important factors in growth and development of infants. Therefore, exclusive breast feeding is recommended during the first six months of life. For determining the effective factors of non-exclusive breast feeding during the first six months of life, we used focus group discussion by participation of 60 mothers who had an infant under 6 months age and enjoyed non-exclusive breast feeding. Mothers divided into eight groups considering their occupation and number of child. All groups reported scanty of mother’s milk, mother’s occupation, mother’s illness, mother’s comfort, wrong beliefs, infant’s illness, doctors and health care providers recommendations, infant’s dependency to feeding bottle and pacifiers as the most frequent factors in using nonexclusive breast feeding. All mothers believed that health care centers, relatives and older members of family, books and pamphlets, mass media, physicians were their effective sources of awareness and promotion of exclusive breast feeding. Considering the presented ideas in all groups, it is realized that mothers during their pregnancy have sparse information about exclusive breast feeding and because of lack of enough essential training, some socio – cultural beliefs affects non-exclusive breast feeding. Mass media and especial training programs should be implemented to promote exclusive breast feeding in Bushehr Port.

  16. Use of eyeglasses among children in elementary school: perceptions, behaviors, and interventions discussed by parents, school nurses, and teachers during focus groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodjebacheva, Gergana Damianova; Maliski, Sally; Coleman, Anne L

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the perceptions, behaviors, and recommendations that parents, school nurses, and teachers have regarding children's use of eyeglasses. Focus groups with parents, school nurses, and teachers were conducted. The study took place in one Southern California school district. There were 39 participants, including 24 parents, seven school nurses, and eight teachers. An experienced moderator guided the focus group discussions. Transcripts were analyzed using grounded theory techniques. Participants perceive visual impairment as a serious problem in the development of children. The lack of eyeglasses may lead to problems such as tiredness, headaches, inability to focus on school work, and decreased reading speed. Participants experienced disappointment, unhappiness, worry, and concern when they realized they needed eyeglasses at a young age. Negative societal perceptions toward eyeglasses, lack of eye doctors in minority communities, parental perceptions that children do not need eyeglasses, and peer bullying of children wearing eyeglasses are key obstacles to children's use of eyeglasses. Participants suggest school and national campaigns featuring respected public figures who wear eyeglasses to promote positive attitudes toward eyeglasses. Parents and teachers who closely follow the academic development of children have observed that visual impairment has negative consequences for the scholastic achievement of children. They recommend interventions to promote the attractiveness of eyeglasses in society. The participants discuss the need for a national preventative message for eye care similar to the message for dental care. The public health message should emphasize the importance of embracing and respecting differences among individuals.

  17. PEACE JOURNALISM PRACTICE AND DEVELOPMENT IN THE NORTHEAST OF NIGERIA: FOCUS GROUP DISCUSSION WITH SOME MEMBERS OF NTA CORRESPONDENTS’ DAMATURU, YOBE STATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aondover Eric Msughter

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Peace journalism is fundamental like in any type of reporting. Thus, it facilitates reporters to disseminate information that would help attune to the development of a nation. Base on the available literature, the study discovered that the media have been variously blamed for their role in the exacerbation of different conflicts in complex and heterogeneous countries like Nigeria. The study uses social responsibility theory as a guiding principle. Likewise, Focus Group Discussions (FGD is applied as a methodological approach in data gathering among some selected members of NTA correspondents’ Damaturu, Yobe State. A total number of 10 practicing journalists were randomly selected in NTA, Damaturu. They discussed peace journalism practice and development in the Northeast of Nigeria. Arising from the discussions, the study concludes that all media organisations should imbibe the appropriate way of reporting peace journalism and development in the country, especially in the Northeast of Nigeria where cases of ethnic, religious, political and other types of conflicts have taken the lead.

  18. Monitoring survey of pulsating giant stars in the Local Group galaxies: survey description, science goals, target selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saremi, E.; Javadi, A.; van Loon, J. Th; Khosroshahi, H.; Abedi, A.; Bamber, J.; Hashemi, S. A.; Nikzat, F.; Molaei Nezhad, A.

    2017-06-01

    The population of nearby dwarf galaxies in the Local Group constitutes a complete galactic environment, perfect suited for studying the connection between stellar populations and galaxy evolution. In this study, we are conducting an optical monitoring survey of the majority of dwarf galaxies in the Local Group, with the Isaac Newton Telescope (INT), to identify long period variable stars (LPVs). These stars are at the end points of their evolution and therefore their luminosity can be directly translated into their birth masses; this enables us to reconstruct the star formation history. By the end of the monitoring survey, we will have performed observations over ten epochs, spaced approximately three months apart, and identified long-period, dust-producing AGB stars; five epochs of data have been obtained already. LPVs are also the main source of dust; in combination with Spitzer Space Telescope images at mid-IR wavelengths we will quantify the mass loss, and provide a detailed map of the mass feedback into the interstellar medium. We will also use the amplitudes in different optical passbands to determine the radius variations of the stars, and relate this to their mass loss.

  19. An exploration of computer-simulated evolution and small group discussion on pre-service science teachers' perceptions of evolutionary concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Ronald Douglas

    The primary goal of this study was to explore how the use of a computer simulation of basic evolutionary processes, in combination with small-group discussions, affected Intermediate/Senior pre-service science teachers' perspectives of basic evolutionary concepts. Qualitative and quantitative methods were used in a case study approach with 19 pre-service Intermediate/Senior science teachers at an Ontario university. Several sub-goals were explored. The first sub-goal was to assess Intermediate/Senior pre-service science teachers' current conceptions of evolution. The results indicated that approximately two-thirds of the participants had a poor understanding of basic evolutionary concepts, with only 2 of the 19 participants demonstrating a strong comprehension. These results were found to be very similar to comparable samples of subjects from other research. The second sub-goal was to explore the relationships among Intermediate/Senior pre-service science teachers' understanding of contemporary evolutionary concepts, their perspectives of the nature of science, and their intentions to teach evolutionary concepts in the classroom. Participants' knowledge of evolutionary concepts was found to be associated strongly with their intentions to teach evolution by natural selection (r = .42). However, knowledge of evolutionary concepts was not found to be associated with any particular science epistemology perspective. The third sub-goal was to analyze and to interpret the small-group discussions as members interacted with the simulation. The simulation was found to be highly engaging and a very effective method of encouraging participants to speculate, question, discuss and learn about important evolutionary concepts. Analyses of the discussions revealed that the simulation evoked a wide array of correct conceptions as well as misconceptions. The fourth sub-goal was to assess the extent to which creating a lesson plan on the topic of natural selection could affect

  20. Supportive care for children with acute leukemia - Report of a survey on supportive care by the Dutch Childhood Leukemia Study Group. Part I

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, A; Van Leeuwen, EF; Gerritsen, EJA; Roord, JJ; De vries-Hospers, HG

    1998-01-01

    The Dutch Childhood Leukemia Study Group celebrated its 20th anniversary by conducting a nationwide survey on supportive care for children with leukemia. Pediatricians were asked about daily practice and current perceptions with regard to supportive care. The results are discussed and compared to

  1. Challenges for achieving safe and effective radical cure of Plasmodium vivax: a round table discussion of the APMEN Vivax Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thriemer, Kamala; Ley, Benedikt; Bobogare, Albino; Dysoley, Lek; Alam, Mohammad Shafiul; Pasaribu, Ayodhia P; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Jambert, Elodie; Domingo, Gonzalo J; Commons, Robert; Auburn, Sarah; Marfurt, Jutta; Devine, Angela; Aktaruzzaman, Mohammad M; Sohel, Nayeem; Namgay, Rinzin; Drukpa, Tobgyel; Sharma, Surender Nath; Sarawati, Elvieda; Samad, Iriani; Theodora, Minerva; Nambanya, Simone; Ounekham, Sonesay; Mudin, Rose Nanti Binti; Da Thakur, Garib; Makita, Leo Sora; Deray, Raffy; Lee, Sang-Eun; Boaz, Leonard; Danansuriya, Manjula N; Mudiyanselage, Santha D; Chinanonwait, Nipon; Kitchakarn, Suravadee; Nausien, Johnny; Naket, Esau; Duc, Thang Ngo; Do Manh, Ha; Hong, Young S; Cheng, Qin; Richards, Jack S; Kusriastuti, Rita; Satyagraha, Ari; Noviyanti, Rintis; Ding, Xavier C; Khan, Wasif Ali; Swe Phru, Ching; Guoding, Zhu; Qi, Gao; Kaneko, Akira; Miotto, Olivo; Nguitragool, Wang; Roobsoong, Wanlapa; Battle, Katherine; Howes, Rosalind E; Roca-Feltrer, Arantxa; Duparc, Stephan; Bhowmick, Ipsita Pal; Kenangalem, Enny; Bibit, Jo-Anne; Barry, Alyssa; Sintasath, David; Abeyasinghe, Rabindra; Sibley, Carol H; McCarthy, James; von Seidlein, Lorenz; Baird, J Kevin; Price, Ric N

    2017-04-05

    The delivery of safe and effective radical cure for Plasmodium vivax is one of the greatest challenges for achieving malaria elimination from the Asia-Pacific by 2030. During the annual meeting of the Asia Pacific Malaria Elimination Network Vivax Working Group in October 2016, a round table discussion was held to discuss the programmatic issues hindering the widespread use of primaquine (PQ) radical cure. Participants included 73 representatives from 16 partner countries and 33 institutional partners and other research institutes. In this meeting report, the key discussion points are presented and grouped into five themes: (i) current barriers for glucose-6-phosphate deficiency (G6PD) testing prior to PQ radical cure, (ii) necessary properties of G6PD tests for wide scale deployment, (iii) the promotion of G6PD testing, (iv) improving adherence to PQ regimens and (v) the challenges for future tafenoquine (TQ) roll out. Robust point of care (PoC) G6PD tests are needed, which are suitable and cost-effective for clinical settings with limited infrastructure. An affordable and competitive test price is needed, accompanied by sustainable funding for the product with appropriate training of healthcare staff, and robust quality control and assurance processes. In the absence of quantitative PoC G6PD tests, G6PD status can be gauged with qualitative diagnostics, however none of the available tests is currently sensitive enough to guide TQ treatment. TQ introduction will require overcoming additional challenges including the management of severely and intermediately G6PD deficient individuals. Robust strategies are needed to ensure that effective treatment practices can be deployed widely, and these should ensure that the caveats are outweighed by  the benefits of radical cure for both the patients and the community. Widespread access to quality controlled G6PD testing will be critical.

  2. Beyond a Dichotomous View of the Concepts of ‘Sex’ and ‘Gender’ Focus Group Discussions among Gender Researchers at a Medical Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex, Lena; Fjellman Wiklund, Anncristine; Lundman, Berit; Christianson, Monica; Hammarström, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The concepts of ‘sex’ and ‘gender’ are both of vital importance in medicine and health sciences. However, the meaning of these concepts has seldom been discussed in the medical literature. The aim of this study was to explore what the concepts of ‘sex’ and ‘gender’ meant for gender researchers based in a medical faculty. Methods Sixteen researchers took part in focus group discussions. The analysis was performed in several steps. The participating researchers read the text and discussed ideas for analysis in national and international workshops. The data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. The authors performed independent preliminary analyses, which were further developed and intensively discussed between the authors. Results The analysis of meanings of the concepts of ‘sex’ and ‘gender’ for gender researchers based in a medical faculty resulted in three categories; “Sex as more than biology”, with the subcategories ‘sex’ is not simply biological, ‘sex’ as classification, and ‘sex’ as fluid and changeable; ”Gender as a multiplicity of power-related constructions”, with the subcategories: ‘gender’ as constructions, ‘gender’ power dimensions, and ‘gender’ as doing femininities and masculinities; “Sex and gender as interwoven”, with the subcategories: ‘sex’ and ‘gender’ as inseparable and embodying ‘sex’ and ‘gender’. Conclusions Gender researchers within medicine pointed out the importance of looking beyond a dichotomous view of the concepts of ‘sex’ and ‘gender’. The perception of the concepts was that ‘sex’ and ‘gender’ were intertwined. Further research is needed to explore how ‘sex’ and ‘gender’ interact. PMID:23185593

  3. Informed consent in rhinoplasty: prospective randomized study of risk recall in patients who are given written disclosure of risks versus traditional oral discussion groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Paul; Makdessian, Ara Samuel; Ellis, David A F; Taylor, S Mark

    2009-06-01

    To determine the effectiveness of providing written information in enhancing patient understanding and retention. A multicentre prospective randomized study was conducted in university-affiliated ambulatory surgical centres. One hundred consecutive patients seen for rhinoplasty consultation were included. Patients were randomly assigned to (1) those receiving traditional oral dialogue of the surgical risks or (2) those receiving an oral discussion and a written pamphlet outlining the risks of the procedure. Fourteen to 18 days after the consultation, each patient was contacted for an assessment of risk recall. Overall risk recall was higher in the group that received written information (2.3 vs 1.3 of 5 risks; p group that received a pamphlet, patients with university and postgraduate levels of education had a better rate of recall (p groups reported higher risk recall (p < .01). Patient risk recall of rhinoplasty is improved with the addition of written information during the informed consent process. As the process of informed consent plays a very decisive role in facial plastic surgery, enhanced postoperative satisfaction may result from the use of supplemental educational materials.

  4. Manifestations of Differential Cultural Capital in a University Classroom: Views from Classroom Observations and Focus Group Discussions in a South African University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmore Mutekwe

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Based predominantly on Pierre Bourdieu’s social and cultural reproduction theory, particularly his notions of cultural capital and symbolic violence, this paper explores how first year post graduate Diploma in Higher Education (PGDHE university students from diverse socio-linguistic backgrounds differ in the levels at which they understand and express themselves in classroom activities. The paper’s thesis is that the diverse nature of South African classrooms presents a number of challenges not only for students but also for educators in terms of the use of English as a medium of instruction or the language for learning and teaching (LOLT. Owing to the fact that the South African Language in Education Policy (LiEP of 1997 empowers both learners and educators in schools to use any of the eleven South African official languages as a LOLT wherever that is reasonably possible, students whose English backgrounds were deficient in enculturating them in the use of English as a learning tool often encounter challenges in expressing their ideas in the classroom, whether in writing or in oral presentations. The discussion is anchored in the data elicited through two data collection methods, lesson observations in a Diploma in Higher Education, Research class composed of students from diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds and through focus group discussion sessions with 40 multi-ethnic Diploma in Higher Education students from the same classroom. The data management and analysis for this study was done thematically, with views emerging from the observations and focus group discussions being clustered into superordinate themes for convenience of the discussion of the findings. The findings of this study were that students from affluent socio-economic backgrounds who enter university with a rich and relevant English linguistic capital, values and attitudes enjoy an enormous advantage compared to their counterparts whose social class and linguistic

  5. The Baryonic Collapse Efficiency of Galaxy Groups in the RESOLVE and ECO Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Kathleen D.; Kannappan, Sheila J.; Lagos, Claudia del P.; Baker, Ashley D.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Stark, David V.; Moffett, Amanda J.; Nasipak, Zachary; Norris, Mark A.

    2017-11-01

    We examine the z = 0 group-integrated stellar and cold baryonic (stars + cold atomic gas) mass functions (group SMF and CBMF) and the baryonic collapse efficiency (group cold baryonic to dark matter halo mass ratio) using the RESOLVE and ECO survey galaxy group catalogs and a galform semi-analytic model (SAM) mock catalog. The group SMF and CBMF fall off more steeply at high masses and rise with a shallower low-mass slope than the theoretical halo mass function (HMF). The transition occurs at the group-integrated cold baryonic mass {M}{bary}{cold} ∼ 1011 {M}ȯ . The SAM, however, has significantly fewer groups at the transition mass ∼1011 {M}ȯ and a steeper low-mass slope than the data, suggesting that feedback is too weak in low-mass halos and conversely too strong near the transition mass. Using literature prescriptions to include hot halo gas and potential unobservable galaxy gas produces a group BMF with a slope similar to the HMF even below the transition mass. Its normalization is lower by a factor of ∼2, in agreement with estimates of warm-hot gas making up the remaining difference. We compute baryonic collapse efficiency with the halo mass calculated two ways, via halo abundance matching (HAM) and via dynamics (extended all the way to three-galaxy groups using stacking). Using HAM, we find that baryonic collapse efficiencies reach a flat maximum for groups across the halo mass range of {M}{halo}∼ {10}11.4-12 {M}ȯ , which we label “nascent groups.” Using dynamics, however, we find greater scatter in baryonic collapse efficiencies, likely indicating variation in group hot-to-cold baryon ratios. Similarly, we see higher scatter in baryonic collapse efficiencies in the SAM when using its true groups and their group halo masses as opposed to friends-of-friends groups and HAM masses.

  6. Study protocol: evaluation of a parenting and stress management programme: a randomised controlled trial of Triple P Discussion Groups and Stress Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Melanie L; Henderson, Marion; Sanders, Matthew R; Keown, Louise J; White, Jim

    2013-09-25

    Children displaying psychosocial problems are at an increased risk of negative developmental outcomes. Parenting practices are closely linked with child development and behaviour, and parenting programmes have been recommended in the treatment of child psychosocial problems. However, parental mental health also needs to be addressed when delivering parenting programmes as it is linked with parenting practices, child outcomes, and treatment outcomes of parenting programmes. This paper describes the protocol of a study examining the effects of a combined intervention of a parenting programme and a cognitive behavioural intervention for mental health problems. The effects of a combined intervention of Triple P Discussion Groups and Stress Control will be examined using a randomised controlled trial design. Parents with a child aged 3-8 years will be recruited to take part in the study. After obtaining informed consent and pre-intervention measures, participants will be randomly assigned to either an intervention or a waitlist condition. The two primary outcomes for this study are change in dysfunctional/ineffective parenting practices and change in symptoms of depression, anxiety, and stress. Secondary outcomes are child behaviour problems, parenting experiences, parental self-efficacy, family relationships, and positive parental mental health. Demographic information, participant satisfaction with the intervention, and treatment fidelity data will also be collected. Data will be collected at pre-intervention, mid-intervention, post-intervention, and 3-month follow-up. The aim of this paper is to describe the study protocol of a randomised controlled trial evaluating the effects of a combined intervention of Triple P Discussion Groups and Stress Control in comparison to a waitlist condition. This study is important because it will provide evidence about the effects of this combined intervention for parents with 3-8 year old children. The results of the study could be

  7. Aiming to be a breastfeeding mother in a neonatal intensive care unit and at home: a thematic analysis of peer-support group discussion in social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niela-Vilén, Hannakaisa; Axelin, Anna; Melender, Hanna-Leena; Salanterä, Sanna

    2015-10-01

    Preterm infants are usually breastfed less than full-term infants, and successful breastfeeding requires a supportive environment and special efforts from their mothers. A breastfeeding peer-support group, utilising social media, was developed for these mothers in order to support them in this challenge. Mothers were able to discuss breastfeeding and share experiences. The purpose of this study was to describe the perceptions of breastfeeding mothers of preterm infants based on the postings in peer-support group discussions in social media. The actively participating mothers (n = 22) had given birth social media postings (n = 305) were analysed using thematic analysis. A description of the process of breastfeeding a preterm infant from the point of view of a mother was created. The process consisted of three main themes: the breastfeeding paradox in hospital, the 'reality check' of breastfeeding at home and the breastfeeding experience as part of being a mother. The mothers encountered paradoxical elements in the support received in hospital; discharge was promoted at the expense of breastfeeding and pumping breast milk was emphasised over breastfeeding. After the infant's discharge, the over-optimistic expectations of mothers often met with reality - mothers did not have the knowledge or skills to manage breastfeeding at home. Successful breastfeeding was an empowering experience for the mothers, whereas unsuccessful breastfeeding induced feelings of disappointment. Therefore, the mothers of preterm infants need evidence-based breastfeeding counselling and systematic support in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and at home. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Do we have a moral responsibility to compensate for vulnerable groups? A discussion on the right to health for LGBT people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekmekci, Perihan Elif

    2017-09-01

    Vulnerability is a broad concept widely addressed in recent scholarly literature. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people are among the vulnerable populations with significant disadvantages related to health and the social determinants of health. Medical ethics discourse tackles vulnerability from philosophical and political perspectives. LGBT people experience several disadvantages from both perspectives. This article aims to justify the right to health for LGBT people and their particular claims regarding healthcare because they belong to a vulnerable group. Rawls' theory of justice and Norman Daniels' normal functioning approach will be discussed in this context. Despite the fact that the right to health can be justified by Daniels' normal functioning approach, there is still a theoretical gap in justifying the right to health for particular vulnerable populations such as LGBT peopleand discussing society's duty to compensate for these disadvantages. In search of solid theoretical grounds for the justification of the right to health for LGBT people, the present author takes the opportunity to utilize Daniels' flexible definition of normal functioning to show that normal functioning not only varies by age but also by different states of human existence, including sexual orientation and gender identity, and to propose replacing the life span approach with normal states of human existence.

  9. [Investigation of the educational effectiveness of including small group discussion as part of a drug abuse prevention program for junior high school students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Junichi; Takayanagi, Risa; Yokoyama, Haruko; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Sinohara, Satomi; Yamada, Yasuhiko

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of small group discussion (SGD) in association with a drug abuse prevention program for junior high school students. The students first received a lecture about drug abuse prevention, then participated in SGD. The discussion focused on how to take action when tempted to abuse drugs. We gave a questionnaire 3 times; before and after the lecture (before SGD), and after SGD. Seventy-seven students replied to these questionnaires. After the lecture, knowledge about drug abuse was improved and all students answered that they had never abused drugs. However, in answer to a different question, a few students noted that they might use drugs in some situations. We consider it necessary to give more consideration to this problem. After the lecture, 35.5% of the students felt that they had definitely acquired skills for drug abuse prevention, whereas after the SGD this was increased to 73.7%. In addition, more than 75% of the students answered that the SGD program was useful since the opinions of other students could be heard. These results suggest that more students acquired skills to prevent drug abuse by participation in SGD. Our findings showed that SGD was useful and that the students were able to more effectively understand important concepts related to drug abuse prevention.

  10. Patient-based outcome analysis is important to determine the success of total knee arthroplasty: result of a focus group discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharia, Balaji; Paul, Manu; Thanveeruddin Sherule, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Total knee replacement (TKR) results in an excellent outcome in terms of pain relief. The reporting of outcomes was traditionally focused on implant survivorship and objective outcomes such as range of motion, knee stability, and radiographic alignment. However, patients and doctors had differing perceptions of all domains of outcome, especially subjective quality of life domains such as emotions and social functioning. In this study, we tried to find out the expectations of Indian patients regarding TKR and assess the level of satisfaction among our patients from their view point using focus group discussion (FGD), and whether these expectations have an impact on outcomes and patient satisfaction. This study was conducted in the Department of Orthopedics, Government Medical College, Kozhikode, Kerala, India, in November 2014. Patients between the ages 60 and 65 years who met inclusion criteria were selected. A total of 50 patients were selected for FGDs. Among them, 42 patients participated in FGD. The remaining eight did not appear for the discussion. A total of four FGD sessions were conducted. It was found that there is a discrepancy between the satisfaction levels of patient and surgeon. There is a difference in satisfaction level achieved depending on socioeconomic, geographic, and cultural characteristics. Newer methods of TKR outcome assessment combining radiological outcome, surgeon-based assessment, and patient satisfaction based on their socioeconomic status and cultural characteristics should be developed for different populations.

  11. Salary survey of the Medical Library Group of Southern California and Arizona.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, J.L; Connolly, B.F.; Davis, M.; Graham, E; Wheeler, S

    1984-01-01

    The 1982 salary survey of the Medical Library Group of Southern California and Arizona (MLGSCA) indicates that 211 health sciences librarians in Southern California and Arizona earned a mean annual salary of $20,910 for 1982. Data analysis shows a positive correlation between salary and educational level. Other factors found to affect salary were job history, number of positions held, MLA certification, and professional responsibility. Age, gender, and MLA certification did not have a consist...

  12. Readiness of hospital-based internists to embrace and discuss high-value care with patients and family members: a single-centre cross-sectional survey study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt Vegas, Daniel; Levinson, Wendy; Norman, Geoff; Monteiro, Sandra; You, John J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Choosing Wisely Canada is a campaign that fosters conversations between physicians and patients about high-value health care. However, little is known about physicians' readiness to have these conversations. Our objective was to determine how ready practising internists were to embrace and openly address high-value care during conversations with patients or their families. Methods: Practising internists in hospitals affiliated with McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, were invited to complete an electronic survey with 3 clinical scenarios: each had 3 low-value interventions that had been requested by the patient or family member. For each request, participants chose 1 of 3 statements reflecting how they would respond: a low-value statement agreeing to provide the intervention, an implicit high-value statement declining to provide the intervention without mentioning value or an explicit high-value statement declining to provide the intervention with mention of value. Results: Forty-four of 62 eligible physicians (71.0% response rate) participated in the survey. High-value statements were selected in 91% of cases. The implicit high-value statement was chosen more often than the explicit high-value statement (65.7% v. 25.5% of all responses, respectively; χ2 range 4.46-56.23, p care but frequently chose not to explicitly address value in their statements. Physicians seemed ready to embrace high-value health care practice, although they were not ready to openly discuss it with patients and their families. PMID:26770961

  13. Applications of Group Theoretical Methods to Non-Newtonian Fluid Flow Models: Survey of Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taha Aziz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present review is intended to encompass the applications of symmetry based approaches for solving non-Newtonian fluid flow problems in various physical situations. Works which deal with the fundamental science of non-Newtonian fluids that are analyzed using the Lie group method and conditional symmetries are reviewed. We provide the mathematical modelling, the symmetries deduced, and the solutions obtained for all the models considered. This survey includes, as far as possible, all the articles published until 2015. Only papers published by a process of peer review in archival journals are reviewed and are grouped together according to the specific non-Newtonian models under investigation.

  14. A Nordic survey of management practices and owners' attitudes towards keeping horses in groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, E.; Bøe, K. E.; Christensen, J. W.

    2015-01-01

    Keeping horses in groups is widely recommended but limited information is vailable about how this is implemented in practice. The aim of this survey was to describe how horses are kept in the Nordic countries in relation to sex, age, breed, and equestrian discipline and to assess owners’ attitudes...... toward keeping horses in groups. Horse owners in Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden were approached using a web-based questionnaire, which was translated into 4 languages and distributed online via equestrian forums, organizations, and social media. The number of respondents was 3,229, taking care...

  15. Near-ultraviolet signatures of environment-driven galaxy quenching in Sloan Digital Sky Survey groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossett, Jacob P.; Pimbblet, Kevin A.; Jones, D. Heath; Brown, Michael J. I.; Stott, John P.

    2017-01-01

    We have investigated the effect of group environment on residual star formation in galaxies, using Galaxy Evolution Explorer near-ultraviolet (NUV) galaxy photometry with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey group catalogue of Yang et al. We compared the (NUV - r) colours of grouped and non-grouped galaxies, and find a significant increase in the fraction of red sequence galaxies with blue (NUV - r) colours outside of groups. When comparing galaxies in mass-matched samples of satellite (non-central), and non-grouped galaxies, we found a >4σ difference in the distribution of (NUV - r) colours, and an (NUV - r) blue fraction >3σ higher outside groups. A comparison of satellite and non-grouped samples has found the NUV fraction is a factor of ˜2 lower for satellite galaxies between 1010.5 and 10^{10.7} M_{⊙}, showing that higher mass galaxies are more likely to have residual star formation when not influenced by a group potential. There was a higher (NUV - r) blue fraction of galaxies with lower Sérsic indices (n < 3) outside of groups, not seen in the satellite sample. We have used stellar population models of Bruzual & Charlot with multiple burst, or exponentially declining star formation histories to find that many of the (NUV - r) blue non-grouped galaxies can be explained by a slow (˜2 Gyr) decay of star formation, compared to the satellite galaxies. We suggest that taken together, the difference in (NUV - r) colours between samples can be explained by a population of secularly evolving, non-grouped galaxies, where star formation declines slowly. This slow channel is less prevalent in group environments where more rapid quenching can occur.

  16. Participatory rural appraisal approaches: an overview and an exemplary application of focus group discussion in climate change adaptation and mitigation strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.N. Uddin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Different tools and techniques of participatory approaches are the basic way of conducting qualitative research especially in the field of applied social science. Focus Group Discussion (FGD is one of the main Participatory Rural Appraisal (PRA technique often used in combination with others to achieve desired goals. Considering this concept, this paper attempts to review the PRA approach and then application of FGD, in combination with matrix scoring and ranking to identify problems and causes of climate change along with possible mitigation and adaptation strategies. A group of 20 students at post graduate level under the faculty of Agriculture and Horticulture at Humboldt University of Berlin, Germany those from different corner of the world was considered as target people of the study. The results concluded that “unpredictable weather events” was ranked as the present outstanding visible climate change problem caused by “human activities”. However, it was noted that if alternative renewable energy sources are exploited, this could contribute to solving the present climate change problem. This finding might have the good reference for the policy makers in the same line not only for developing countries but also for developed countries.

  17. A Nordic survey of management practices and owners' attitudes towards keeping horses in groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, E; Bøe, K E; Christensen, J W; Hyyppä, S; Jansson, H; Jørgensen, G H M; Ladewig, J; Mejdell, C M; Norling, Y; Rundgren, M; Särkijärvi, S; Søndergaard, E; Keeling, L J

    2015-09-01

    Keeping horses in groups is widely recommended but limited information is available about how this is implemented in practice. The aim of this survey was to describe how horses are kept in the Nordic countries in relation to sex, age, breed, and equestrian discipline and to assess owners' attitudes toward keeping horses in groups. Horse owners in Denmark, Finland, Norway, and Sweden were approached using a web-based questionnaire, which was translated into 4 languages and distributed online via equestrian forums, organizations, and social media. The number of respondents was 3,229, taking care of 17,248 horses. Only 8% of horses were never kept in groups, 47% were permanently grouped for 24 h/d, and 45% were stabled singly but grouped during turnout. Yearlings were most often permanently kept in groups (75%), mares and geldings more commonly during parts of the day (50 and 51%, respectively), and stallions were often kept alone (38%). Icelandic horses were more likely to be permanently kept in groups (36%) than warmbloods (16%) and ponies (15%). Twice as many competition horses (51%) were never grouped compared with horses used for breeding (20%) or leisure purposes (15%). The majority of respondents (86%) strongly agreed that group housing benefits horse welfare and that it is important for horses to have the company of conspecifics (92%). Nevertheless, not all horses were kept in groups, showing that attitudes toward group housing may not necessarily reflect current management. The risk of injury was a concern of many respondents (45%), as was introducing unfamiliar horses into already established groups (40%) and challenges in relation to feeding in groups (44%). Safety of people (23%) and difficulties handling group-kept horses (19%) were regarded as less problematic. Results suggest that the majority of horses have the possibility to freely interact with other horses, either as fulltime members of a group during 24 h/d or during turnout. Future research should

  18. Review of the Effects of Housing Place on Individual and Social Development and Academic Success of University Students by Focus Group Discussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdal ARLI

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Students who are entitled to get into a university in our country usually live with their families. However, when a student gets into a university which is far away or when it is difficult to go and return, one of the problems which their family has to solve is housing. Housing place alternatives might be government owned hostel, private hostel or houses for rent. The young student who has lived with their family until that age may find themselves in a different environment. This life might make the young people gain socialization, sense of responsibility and sharing, being able to manage their lives in the community - and it might also make them gain qualifications like being able to make discrimination between good and bad. The basic objective of this research is to identify the effects of housing place on individual and social development. The research has been applied to the students of Kocaeli University, Karamürsel Vocational High School . For the research, five focus group discussions have been carried out, each of which is formed of 8 participants and one assistant. In the study which was carried out based on question and answer, 3 general to special questions were directed . Group members have been formed of students who stay in house and hostel also students who stay with their own family. Maximum diversity sampling has been executed. According to the results, it appears that most essential contributions of staying in a hostel are mainly information sharing, growing mature, learning about recognizing human beings, being able to make discrimination between good and bad, learning about trusting, learning about making more moderate spending, and being able to make decisions freely. Besides, participants stated that any type of environment was available for studying both in governmental hostel and in housing environment, and studying in groups increases their successes.

  19. Galaxy groups in the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: the catalogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchán, Manuel; Zandivarez, Ariel

    2002-09-01

    We construct a galaxy groups catalogue from the public 100-K data release of the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey. The group identification is carried out using a slightly modified version of the group-finding algorithm developed by Huchra & Geller. Several tests using mock catalogues allow us to find the optimal conditions to increase the reliability of the final group sample. A minimum number of four members, an outer number density enhancement of 80 and a linking radial cut-off of 200 km s-1 are the best obtained values from the analysis. Using these parameters, approximately 90 per cent of groups identified in real space have a redshift space counterpart. On the other hand, the level of contamination in redshift space reaches 30 per cent, including ~6 per cent of artificial groups and ~24 per cent of groups associated with binaries or triplets in real space. The final sample comprises 2209 galaxy groups covering the sky region described by Colless et al.spanning over the redshift range of 0.003 <=z<= 0.25 with a mean redshift of 0.1.

  20. Epidemiological survey of human brucellosis in Inner Mongolia, China, 2010-2014: A high risk groups-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Cao; Shuyi, Guo; Tao, Yan; Hao, Zhu; Zhang, Xingguang

    2017-03-17

    Brucellosis, a zoonosis which can seriously harm public health. Inner Mongolia is known as an endemic region of human brucellosis in China. The aim of this study is to present the epidemic of human brucellosis in Inner Mongolia from 2010 to 2014, and to provide the evidence of preventing from brucellosis in endemic areas. The study included 838,956 participants by cluster random sampling from 2010 to 2014. The contents of this study included questionnaire survey and serological testing. The seropositive rate was calculated based on the serological testing results, tested to determine whether the participants were infected by brucellosis. The new brucellosis cases were diagnosed using the questionnaire data and serological testing results then and the incidence rate was obtained. We also plotted spatial distribution maps based on the seropositive and incidence rate of human brucellosis. The total seropositive and incidence rate of human brucellosis among the high risk groups in Inner Mongolia from 2010 to 2014 was 35.91‰ and 18.25‰, respectively. The epidemic of the mid-eastern Inner Mongolia was decreased, however, the epidemic has worsened in western Inner Mongolia. Despite the epidemic of human brucellosis among the high risk groups of Inner Mongolia decreased significantly from 2010 to 2014, increased prevention and control measures are urgently needed. Copyright © 2017 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. [How do Prevention Projects Reach their Target Groups? Results of a Survey with Prevention Projects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, T; Böttcher, S; Jahn, I

    2015-12-01

     The aim of this study was to assess methods used to access target groups in prevention projects funded within the prevention research framework by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research.  A survey with prevention projects was conducted. Access strategies, communication channels, incentives, programme reach, and successful practical recruitment strategies were explored.  38 out of 60 projects took part in the survey. Most projects accessed their target group within structured settings (e. g., child day-care centers, schools, workplaces). Multiple communication channels and incentives were used, with written information and monetary incentives being used most frequently. Only few projects were able to report their programme reach adequately; programme reach was highest for programmes accessing the target groups in structured settings. The respondents viewed active recruitment via personal communication with the target group and key persons in the settings as the most successful strategy.  The paper provides an overview on recruitment strategies used in current preven-tion projects. More systematic research on programme reach is necessary. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Panel discussion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    No Author Given

    1975-01-01

    Panel discussion: summation and future projections. Introductory remarks by panelists followed by questions and comments from the floor. Panelists: Dr. Joseph Barnea (former director of Resources and Transport for the United Nations; energy consultant to the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR)); the Honorable Clyde F. Bel, Jr. (member of the Louisiana House of Representatives representing District 90 and New Orleans); Dr. David Lombard (acting chief of the Advanced Systems Branch of the Division of Geothermal Energy Research and Technology, Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA)); Fred C. Repper (vice-president of Central Power and Light Company in Corpus Christi, Texas); Dr. Hans Suter (environmental consultant in Corpus Christi, Texas; environmental columnist for the Corpus Christi Caller Times). Session chairman: Herbert Woodson.

  3. Insights of health district managers on the implementation of primary health care outreach teams in Johannesburg, South Africa: a descriptive study with focus group discussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosa, Shabir; Derese, Anselme; Peersman, Wim

    2017-01-21

    Primary health care (PHC) outreach teams are part of a policy of PHC re-engineering in South Africa. It attempts to move the deployment of community health workers (CHWs) from vertical programmes into an integrated generalised team-based approach to care for defined populations in municipal wards. There has little evaluation of PHC outreach teams. Managers' insights are anecdotal. This is descriptive qualitative study with focus group discussions with health district managers of Johannesburg, the largest city in South Africa. This was conducted in a sequence of three meetings with questions around implementation, human resources, and integrated PHC teamwork. There was a thematic content analysis of validated transcripts using the framework method. There were two major themes: leadership-management challenges and human resource challenges. Whilst there was some positive sentiment, leadership-management challenges loomed large: poor leadership and planning with an under-resourced centralised approach, poor communications both within the service and with community, concerns with its impact on current services and resistance to change, and poor integration, both with other streams of PHC re-engineering and current district programmes. Discussion by managers on human resources was mostly on the plight of CHWs and calls for formalisation of CHWs functioning and training and nurse challenges with inappropriate planning and deployment of the team structure, with brief mention of the extended team. Whilst there is positive sentiment towards intent of the PHC outreach team, programme managers in Johannesburg were critical of management of the programme in their health district. Whilst the objective of PHC reform is people-centred health care, its implementation struggles with a centralising tendency amongst managers in the health service in South Africa. Managers in Johannesburg advocated for decentralisation. The implementation of PHC outreach teams is also limited by

  4. Sex-Typical and Sex-Atypical Interests of Kuder Occupational Interest Survey Criterion Groups: Implications for Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Esther E.

    1981-01-01

    The degree of overlap between scores on male-normed and female-normed scales for Kuder Occupational Interest Survey criterion groups was studied. Results provide clues to sex-typical and sex-atypical interests of these groups. (Author)

  5. Understanding the impact of subsidizing artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) in the retail sector--results from focus group discussions in rural Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedenge, Sarah V; Kangwana, Beth P; Waweru, Evelyn W; Nyandigisi, Andrew J; Pandit, Jayesh; Brooker, Simon J; Snow, Robert W; Goodman, Catherine A

    2013-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the potential of private sector subsidies to increase availability and affordability of artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) for malaria treatment. A cluster randomized trial of such subsidies was conducted in 3 districts in Kenya, comprising provision of subsidized packs of paediatric ACT to retail outlets, training of retail staff, and community awareness activities. The results demonstrated a substantial increase in ACT availability and coverage, though patient counselling and adherence were suboptimal. We conducted a qualitative study in order to understand why these successes and limitations occurred. Eighteen focus group discussions were conducted, 9 with retailers and 9 with caregivers, to document experiences with the intervention. Respondents were positive about intervention components, praising the focused retailer training, affordable pricing, strong promotional activities, dispensing job aids, and consumer friendly packaging, which are likely to have contributed to the positive access and coverage outcomes observed. However, many retailers still did not stock ACT, due to insufficient supplies, lack of capital and staff turnover. Advice to caregivers was poor due to insufficient time, and poor recall of instructions. Adherence by caregivers to dosing guidelines was sub-optimal, because of a wish to save tablets for other episodes, doses being required at night, stopping treatment when the child felt better, and the number and bitter taste of the tablets. Caregivers used a number of strategies to obtain paediatric ACT for older age groups. This study has highlighted that important components of a successful ACT subsidy intervention are regular retailer training, affordable pricing, a reliable supply chain and community mobilization emphasizing patient adherence and when to seek further care.

  6. Understanding the impact of subsidizing artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs in the retail sector--results from focus group discussions in rural Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah V Kedenge

    Full Text Available There is considerable interest in the potential of private sector subsidies to increase availability and affordability of artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs for malaria treatment. A cluster randomized trial of such subsidies was conducted in 3 districts in Kenya, comprising provision of subsidized packs of paediatric ACT to retail outlets, training of retail staff, and community awareness activities. The results demonstrated a substantial increase in ACT availability and coverage, though patient counselling and adherence were suboptimal. We conducted a qualitative study in order to understand why these successes and limitations occurred.Eighteen focus group discussions were conducted, 9 with retailers and 9 with caregivers, to document experiences with the intervention. Respondents were positive about intervention components, praising the focused retailer training, affordable pricing, strong promotional activities, dispensing job aids, and consumer friendly packaging, which are likely to have contributed to the positive access and coverage outcomes observed. However, many retailers still did not stock ACT, due to insufficient supplies, lack of capital and staff turnover. Advice to caregivers was poor due to insufficient time, and poor recall of instructions. Adherence by caregivers to dosing guidelines was sub-optimal, because of a wish to save tablets for other episodes, doses being required at night, stopping treatment when the child felt better, and the number and bitter taste of the tablets. Caregivers used a number of strategies to obtain paediatric ACT for older age groups.This study has highlighted that important components of a successful ACT subsidy intervention are regular retailer training, affordable pricing, a reliable supply chain and community mobilization emphasizing patient adherence and when to seek further care.

  7. Apheresis activity in Spain: a survey of the Spanish Apheresis Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Miguel; Cid, Joan; Areal, Carlos; Romon, Iñigo; Muncunill, Josep

    2013-12-01

    The Spanish Apheresis Group is a scientific association of physicians and nurses representing most of the medical centers in the country that are involved in apheresis. The group developed a survey in order to get information about the types and number of apheresis procedures performed in Spain. We received responses from 66 centers and we were able to collect data from at least one center of each autonomous region. There were 7 centers (11%) that did not perform any kind of apheresis procedures, 26 (39%) centers performed therapeutic apheresis procedures only, 18 (27%) centers performed apheresis donations only, and 15 (23%) centers performed both types of apheresis procedures. Regarding therapeutic apheresis in adult patients, plasma exchange (34%) and stem cell collections (30%) were the two therapeutic procedures most frequently reported, followed by erythrocytapheresis (13%) and extracorporeal photochemotherapy (11%). Regarding apheresis donation, our survey showed that the most frequent was multicomponent donation (45%) followed by plasmapheresis (28%) and single plateletapheresis (21%). When analyzing the current instrumentation for performing apheresis procedures, centers used the Spectra, Optia, and Trima devices (TerumoBCT) as the most frequent ones, followed by the MCS+(Haemonetics), Amicus (Fenwal), and Fresenius devices. In conclusion, we report here the first nationwide survey performed in Spain in order to get information about apheresis activities in our country. The survey is representative of Spain because we were able to collect data from at least one center from each of the different 17 autonomous regions, and we found a wide variety of therapeutic and donation procedures, as well as instrumentation used. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Steps towards a CSP yield calculation guideline: A first draft for discussion in the SolarPACES working group guiSmo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Tobias; Bachelier, Camille; Eck, Markus; Dersch, Jürgen; Fluri, Thomas; Giuliano, Stefano; Goebel, Olaf; Haller, Ursula; Lude, Simon; Meyer, Richard; Rau, Christoph; Schenk, Heiko; Schmidt, Norbert; Seitz, Markus; Westphal, Boris; Yildiz, Enver

    2016-05-01

    This paper provides an overview on an important step towards a SolarPACES guideline for CSP yield calculation. With the increasing number of CSP installations, standardization becomes more and more important for further reduction of costs and increase in quality. Yield calculation is a key issue throughout all phases of project development and throughout most of the involved players. Due to the need for more complex process models for CSP compared to other renewables like PV or wind, the yield calculation procedure is more demanding. Uncertainties in the process are covered by additional but partially unnecessary risk surcharges since systematic approaches for avoiding expensive redundancies in risk buffers are not available. It is the main motivation of the mentioned CSP yield calculation guideline to overcome this situation by providing a detailed methodology for yield calculation. A first comprehensive draft version has been compiled and will be subject of discussion in the SolarPACES working group guiSmo. The following sections illustrate the motivation for the guideline, the contents at a glance, as well as expected benefits for selected players.

  9. The Origin of Stellar Species: constraining stellar evolution scenarios with Local Group galaxy surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarbadhicary, Sumit; Badenes, Carles; Chomiuk, Laura; Maldonado, Jessica; Caprioli, Damiano; Heger, Mairead; Huizenga, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    Our understanding of the progenitors of many stellar species, such as supernovae, massive and low-mass He-burning stars, is limited because of many poorly constrained aspects of stellar evolution theory. For my dissertation, I have focused on using Local Group galaxy surveys to constrain stellar evolution scenarios by measuring delay-time distributions (DTD). The DTD is the hypothetical occurrence rate of a stellar object per elapsed time after a brief burst of star formation. It is the measured distribution of timescales on which stars evolve, and therefore serves as a powerful observational constraint on theoretical progenitor models. The DTD can be measured from a survey of stellar objects and a set of star-formation histories of the host galaxy, and is particularly effective in the Local Group, where high-quality star-formation histories are available from resolved stellar populations. I am currently calculating a SN DTD with supernova remnants (SNRs) in order to provide the strongest constraints on the progenitors of thermonuclear and core-collapse supernovae. However, most SNRs do not have reliable age measurements and their evolution depends on the ambient environment. For this reason, I wrote a radio light curve model of an SNR population to extract the visibility times and rates of supernovae - crucial ingredients for the DTD - from an SNR survey. The model uses observational constraints on the local environments from multi-wavelength surveys, accounts for missing SNRs and employs the latest models of shock-driven particle acceleration. The final calculation of the SN DTD in the Local Group is awaiting completion of a systematic SNR catalog from deep radio-continuum images, now in preparation by a group led by Dr. Laura Chomiuk. I have also calculated DTDs for the LMC population of RR Lyrae and Cepheid variables, which serve as important distance calibrators and stellar population tracers. We find that Cepheids can have delay-times between 10 Myrs - 1 Gyr

  10. Salary survey of the Medical Library Group of Southern California and Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J L; Connolly, B F; Davis, M; Graham, E; Wheeler, S

    1984-01-01

    The 1982 salary survey of the Medical Library Group of Southern California and Arizona (MLGSCA) indicates that 211 health sciences librarians in Southern California and Arizona earned a mean annual salary of $20,910 for 1982. Data analysis shows a positive correlation between salary and educational level. Other factors found to affect salary were job history, number of positions held, MLA certification, and professional responsibility. Age, gender, and MLA certification did not have a consistent positive correlation with salary. Results indicate that the salaries of hospital librarians are, on the average, roughly comparable to those of academic librarians in Southern California and Arizona. PMID:6743878

  11. Facilitators' influence on student PBL small group session online information resource use: a survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Elizabeth

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In problem-based learning curricular research has focused on the characteristics of good facilitators and how they influence student performance and satisfaction. Far less frequently addressed has been the question of how PBL facilitators influence the small group session activity of students. We investigated the impact that facilitators' encouragement of use or non-use of the Internet would have on the students' use of online information resources. Methods Survey of student and facilitator perceptions of facilitator behavior and student use of online information resources. Results Students who used online information resources rated their facilitators' behavior as more encouraging, while students in groups who didn't use online information resources during problem-based learning small group sessions rated their facilitators' behavior as less encouraging. This result was statistically significant. Conclusions Our study supports the role of the facilitator as an influence on medical students in small groups, particularly with respect to facilitator verbal behavior encouraging or discouraging student use of information technology in the problem-based learning small group session.

  12. The construct equivalence of the job diagnostic survey for diverse South African cultural groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vorster

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The Job Diagnostic Survey (JDS and the Job Characteristics Model (JCM have been widely used in South African organisations. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the JDS is useful if it is applied to a particular population or to groups from highly dissimilar backgrounds. Cultural diversity research has revealed differences between the values, attitudes and leadership styles of people from different cultural groups. In this study, Hackman and Oldham’s JDS was applied to Black and White employees (n=66 to determine construct equivalence for these two cultural groups. Confirmatory factor analysis confirmed that there were no significant differences between the Black and White groups tested, suggesting that the JDS could be applied to different population groups. Opsomming Die Pos-diagnostiese vraelys (JDS en die Pos-kenmerke Model (JCM word wydverspreid deur Suid-Afrikaanse organisasies gebruik. Die doel van hierdie studie was om te bepaal of die JDS van toepassing is op verskillende kultuurgroepe. Navorsing rakende kultuurdiversiteit het aangetoon dat daar verskille bestaan rakende die waardes, houdings en leierskapstyle van verskillende kultuurgroepe. In hierdie studie is die (JDS van Hackman en Oldham toegepas op Swart- en Blanke werknemers (n=677 ten einde die konstruk-ekwivalensie daarvan bepaal. ’n Bevestigende faktorontleding het aangetoon dat daar geen betekenisvolle verskille bestaan tussen die Swart- en Blankegroepe wat getoets is nie. Die aanname word dus gemaak dat die JDS toegepas kan word op verskillende populasiegroepe.

  13. [Discrimination of Blacks on account of their skin colour? Results of focus group discussions with victims in the German health-care system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, H; Becker, N; Fuchs, A; Wollny, A; Abholz, H-H

    2008-01-01

    In spite of a number of researches on immigrants in the German Health System, there has hardly been any research on immigrant's experiences with General Practitioners or research on Black patients. As an example the experiences of Black People (1) with an immigration background from the Democratic Republic of Congo (RDC) with German White GPs was investigated. Two focus groups with a total of 33 participants from the DRC were held and the discussions documented and transcribed. The authors performed a content analysis and developed inductively the categorical system on the basis of the transcription. The participants underlined their self-competences in health and diseases. Language was mentioned as a problem in communication, but had no priority except for the lack of documents in French. However, they underlined the hectic and unfriendliness of German medical staff as well as lack of respect towards them. They also criticised the insufficient medical competence of German medical doctors concerning diseases, which are common in Africa and the increasing social injustice, bureaucracy and economic efficiency. Experiences with discrimination and racism were clearly expressed and illustrated in its intermingled structure with other forms of discrimination. The concept concerning health and diseases of the African immigrants was a Western medical concept, other concepts like, e.g., "African" formed medical concepts did not occur. The many-sided experienced discriminations of Black immigrants in White Surgeries and in the German Health System presumably also correspond to experiences in other areas of German society. A number of critical remarks of the participants corresponded with what we expect from White patients, especially when speaking about communicative abilities of doctors. Better communicative abilities and a better knowledge of the so-called "tropical diseases" are required. But to the same degree it is mandatory to develop the ability of reflecting on

  14. SU-F-T-244: Radiotherapy Risk Estimation Based On Expert Group Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, J; Yoon, M [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, W; Chung, M; Kim, D [Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Gangdong-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the reliability of RPN (Risk Priority Number) decided by expert group and to provide preliminary data for adapting FMEA in Korea. Methods: 1163 Incidents reported in ROSIS for 11 years were used as a real data to be compared with, and were categorized into 146 items. The questionnaire was composed of the 146 items and respondents had to valuate ‘occurrence (O)’, ‘severity (S)’, ‘detectability (D)’ of each item on a scale from 1 to 10 according to the proposed AAPM TG-100 rating scales. 19 medical physicists from 19 different organizations in Korea had participated in the survey. Because the number of ROSIS items was not evenly spread enough to be classified into 10 grades, 1–5 scale was chosen instead of 1–10 and survey result was also fit to 5 grades to compare. Results: The average O,S,D were 1.77, 3.50, 2.13, respectively and the item which had the highest RPN(32) was ‘patient movement during treatment’ in the survey. When comparing items ranked in the top 10 of each survey(O) and ROSIS database, two items were duplicated and ‘Simulation’ and ’Treatment’ were the most frequently ranked RT process in top 10 of survey and ROSIS each. The Chronbach α of each RT process were ranged from 0.74 to 0.99 and p-value was <0.001. When comparing O*D, the average difference was 1.4. Conclusion: This work indicates the deviation between actual risk and expectation. Considering that the respondents were Korean and ROSIS is mainly composed of incidents happened in European countries and some of the top 10 items of ROSIS cannot be applied in radiotherapy procedure in Korea, the deviation could have been came from procedural difference. Moreover, if expert group was consisted of experts from various parts, expectation might have been more accurate. Therefore, further research on radiotherapy risk estimation is needed.

  15. Strategies for Stimulating Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    practices describe ways to facilitate communication during discussion. Use constructive questioning strategies . Facilitators serve to ensure the...lecture and group discussion teaching strategies in developing critical thinking skills. Communication Education, 45, 212-227. Gilmore, T. N., & Schall, E...U.S. Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences Research Report 2008 Strategies for Stimulating Discussion

  16. Medical Students' Empathy for Vulnerable Groups: Results From a Survey and Reflective Writing Assignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellbery, Caroline; Saunders, Pamela A; Kureshi, Sarah; Visconti, Adam

    2017-12-01

    As medical education curricula increasingly acknowledge the contributions of the social determinants of health to individual health, new methods of engaging students in the care of vulnerable groups are needed. Empathy is one way to connect students with patients, but little is known about how to nurture students' empathy on behalf of populations. This study examined the relationship between individual and social empathy as groundwork for cultivating students' empathy for vulnerable groups. In 2014-2015, first-year medical students completed the Social Empathy Index at the start and end of a two-semester population health course, and they completed a reflective writing assignment exploring the challenges of caring for vulnerable patients. Pre- and posttest mean survey scores were compared, and reflective writing assignments were analyzed for themes concerning social empathy. Data from 130 students were analyzed. Scores for the contextual understanding of systemic barriers domain increased significantly. There was a trend toward increased cumulative social empathy scores that did not reach statistical significance. Students' essays revealed three themes relating to individual empathy as the foundation for social empathy; civic and moral obligations; and the role of institutional practices in caring for vulnerable groups. This study extends understanding of empathy beyond care for the individual to include care for vulnerable groups. Thus, social empathy may function as a valuable concept in developing curricula to support students' commitment to care for the underserved. Educators first need to address the many barriers students cited that impede both individual and social empathy.

  17. Satisfaction with obstetric care. Patient survey in a family practice shared-call group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, J. L.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine patients' satisfaction with their obstetric care in a family medicine shared-call group. DESIGN: A survey was given to a convenience sample of patients who came to see their doctors over a 6-week period. SETTING: Brameast Family Practice in Brampton, Ont, where eight doctors participate in a shared obstetrics call group with 16 other physicians, each taking call 1 day in 23 days. PARTICIPANTS: Mothers in the practice who had delivered in the previous 8 months. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Demographic data, interventions during delivery, and satisfaction ratings. RESULTS: Of the 70% of women who responded, 96% were delivered by a doctor other than their own. Eighty-eight percent of these women were satisfied with their medical care at delivery and 96% were satisfied with their prenatal care. Nearly 79% said they would choose this shared-call group again. CONCLUSIONS: This pilot study demonstrated a high level of patient satisfaction with obstetric care, despite the fact that most patients were delivered by a doctor other than their own. Family practice groups sharing obstetric call offer a feasible alternative for physicians who wish to avoid the interference with lifestyle and office appointments that practising obstetrics usually entails. PMID:10099804

  18. A new method for finding and characterizing galaxy groups via low-frequency radio surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croston, J. H.; Ineson, J.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Mingo, B.

    2017-09-01

    We describe a new method for identifying and characterizing the thermodynamic state of large samples of evolved galaxy groups at high redshifts using high-resolution, low-frequency radio surveys, such as those that will be carried out with LOFAR and the Square Kilometre Array. We identify a sub-population of morphologically regular powerful [Fanaroff-Riley type II (FR II)] radio galaxies and demonstrate that, for this sub-population, the internal pressure of the radio lobes is a reliable tracer of the external intragroup/intracluster medium (ICM) pressure, and that the assumption of a universal pressure profile for relaxed groups enables the total mass and X-ray luminosity to be estimated. Using a sample of well-studied FR II radio galaxies, we demonstrate that our method enables the estimation of group/cluster X-ray luminosities over three orders of magnitude in luminosity to within a factor of ˜2 from low-frequency radio properties alone. Our method could provide a powerful new tool for building samples of thousands of evolved galaxy groups at z > 1 and characterizing their ICM.

  19. Beyond 50. challenges at work for older nurses and allied health workers in rural Australia: a thematic analysis of focus group discussions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Depczynski Julie C

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The health workforce in Australia is ageing, particularly in rural areas, where this change will have the most immediate implications for health care delivery and workforce needs. In rural areas, the sustainability of health services will be dependent upon nurses and allied health workers being willing to work beyond middle age, yet the particular challenges for older health workers in rural Australia are not well known. The purpose of this research was to identify aspects of work that have become more difficult for rural health workers as they have become older; and the age-related changes and exacerbating factors that contribute to these difficulties. Findings will support efforts to make workplaces more 'user-friendly' for older health workers. Methods Nurses and allied health workers aged 50 years and over were invited to attend one of six local workshops held in the Hunter New England region of NSW, Australia. This qualitative action research project used a focus group methodology and thematic content analysis to identify and interpret issues arising from workshop discussions. Results Eighty older health workers from a range of disciplines attended the workshops. Tasks and aspects of work that have become more difficult for older health workers in hospital settings, include reading labels and administering medications; hearing patients and colleagues; manual handling; particular movements and postures; shift work; delivery of babies; patient exercises and suturing. In community settings, difficulties relate to vehicle use and home visiting. Significant issues across settings include ongoing education, work with computers and general fatigue. Wider personal challenges include coping with change, balancing work-life commitments, dealing with attachments and meeting goals and expectations. Work and age-related factors that exacerbate difficulties include vision and hearing deficits, increasing tiredness, more complex

  20. Beyond 50. Challenges at work for older nurses and allied health workers in rural Australia: a thematic analysis of focus group discussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragar, Lyn J; Depczynski, Julie C

    2011-02-21

    The health workforce in Australia is ageing, particularly in rural areas, where this change will have the most immediate implications for health care delivery and workforce needs. In rural areas, the sustainability of health services will be dependent upon nurses and allied health workers being willing to work beyond middle age, yet the particular challenges for older health workers in rural Australia are not well known. The purpose of this research was to identify aspects of work that have become more difficult for rural health workers as they have become older; and the age-related changes and exacerbating factors that contribute to these difficulties. Findings will support efforts to make workplaces more 'user-friendly' for older health workers. Nurses and allied health workers aged 50 years and over were invited to attend one of six local workshops held in the Hunter New England region of NSW, Australia. This qualitative action research project used a focus group methodology and thematic content analysis to identify and interpret issues arising from workshop discussions. Eighty older health workers from a range of disciplines attended the workshops. Tasks and aspects of work that have become more difficult for older health workers in hospital settings, include reading labels and administering medications; hearing patients and colleagues; manual handling; particular movements and postures; shift work; delivery of babies; patient exercises and suturing. In community settings, difficulties relate to vehicle use and home visiting. Significant issues across settings include ongoing education, work with computers and general fatigue. Wider personal challenges include coping with change, balancing work-life commitments, dealing with attachments and meeting goals and expectations. Work and age-related factors that exacerbate difficulties include vision and hearing deficits, increasing tiredness, more complex professional roles and a sense of not being valued in the

  1. A survey of the southernmost representatives of the tricolor species group, genus Phalotris (Serpentes, Colubridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldo C. Leynaud

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Colubrid snakes of the South American genus Phalotris are difficult to detect because of their secretive habits, and thus they are poorly represented in collections. The species Phalotris cuyanus and P. tricolor, the southernmost representatives of the tricolor species group, were studied to determine the limits of intraspecific variation of P. cuyanus and to consolidate the taxonomic relationship between both species, the phenetically and geographically closest members in the group. The distribution of selected external characters (cephalic, ventral and subcaudal scales, coloration pattern, width of white and black collars, and hemipenis morphology were analyzed. Comparative data on the other members of the group, P. mertensi and P. matogrossensis, are briefly discussed. Males of P. cuyanus have a higher number of ventral scales than males of P. tricolor (mean of 220.3 vs. 204.6. Cephalic melanism varies among individuals and does not have discriminant orgeographic value for this species group. The white nuchal collar may partially cover the parietal scales in the four species. The black collar is moderately narrow in P. cuyanus, but it can be up to 12 scales wide in P. tricolor. Vertebral dotting is neither constant nor exclusive of any species. The four species of the group are wellcharacterized by combinations of character states for each one. We suggest considering to P. cuyanus as an evolutionary species typical of the Monte biogeographic province.

  2. Health literacy among different age groups in Germany: results of a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berens, Eva-Maria; Vogt, Dominique; Messer, Melanie; Hurrelmann, Klaus; Schaeffer, Doris

    2016-11-09

    Health literacy is of increasing importance in public health research. It is a necessary pre-condition for the involvement in decisions about health and health care and related to health outcomes. Knowledge about limited health literacy in different age groups is crucial to better target public health interventions for subgroups of the population. However, little is known about health literacy in Germany. The study therefore assesses the prevalence of limited health literacy and associated factors among different age groups. The Health Literacy Survey Germany is a cross-sectional study with 2,000 participants aged 15 years or older in private households. Perceived health literacy was assessed via computer-assisted personal interviews using the HLS-EU-Q-47 questionnaire. Descriptive analyses, chi-square tests and odds ratios were performed stratified for different age groups. The population affected by limited perceived health literacy increases by age. Of the respondents aged 15-29 years, 47.3 % had limited perceived health literacy and 47.2 % of those aged 30-45 years, whereas 55.2 % of the respondents aged 46-64 years and 66.4 % aged 65 years and older showed limited perceived health literacy. In all age groups, limited perceived health literacy was associated with limited functional health literacy, low social status, and a high frequency of doctor visits. The results suggest a need to further investigate perceived health literacy in all phases of the life-course. Particular attention should be devoted to persons with lower social status, limited functional health literacy and/or a high number of doctor visits in all age groups.

  3. Perceived social justice, long-term unemployment and health. A survey among marginalised groups in Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freidl, Wolfgang; Fazekas, Christian; Raml, Reinhard; Pretis, Manfred; Feistritzer, Gert

    2007-07-01

    Although socially disadvantaged groups are known to have a high risk of poor health the involved mechanisms and psychosocial dynamics are not fully understood. Long-term unemployment and the perception of social justice may both additionally endanger health. We therefore set out to explore the specific impact of these two context variables on self-reported health, health behaviour, and resources in marginalised groups. A structured interview survey was conducted in three federal provinces in Austria, which targeted a quota sample of 486 subjects in long-term unemployment. Both, duration of long-term unemployment and low perceived social justice, are strongly associated with self-reported poor health and low personal (internal) and social (external) health resources. The best differentiation of dependent variables concerning the univariate analyses was found with respect to social health resources, as all variables on this level significantly correlated with perceived social justice but not with duration of long-term unemployment. While this study does not allow to establish causal relationships, the associations we found suggest that also perceived social justice needs to be taken into account in interventions that are intended to foster equity in health among socially disadvantaged groups.

  4. A survey of common prevalent psychiatric disorders among a group of Iranian repatriated prisoners of war

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nourbala A

    1995-04-01

    Full Text Available The present survey covers a number of 91 Iranian repatriated war prisoners who, six months after their freedom, approached three psychiatric clinics in Tehran during 1989 and spring 1990. Of these, 34 persons (37.4% who showed higher symptoms of disorders were hospitalized and 57 (62.6% who showed milder signs of disorders were carefully diagnosed mentally and psychologically as outpatients. The prevalent disorders revealed by this study were adjustment disorders (48.3%, mood disorders (22%, schizophrenia (11%, anxiety disorder (9.9% and organic mental disorders (7.7%. The survey showed statistically the existence of a meaningful relation between the disorder severity with such factors as negative opinion of the prisoner's family on his going to the war front, and observance of martyrdom of co-fighters by the patient. However, no significant relation was observed between the severity of disorders and such factors as being involuntarily dispatched to the front, duration of captivity, type of being captive (singular or in group, having a previous record of solitary imprisonment, observing the treason of co-fighters during his captivity.

  5. [Survey on musculoskeletal disorders in a group of 2755 construction workers in the province of Bergamo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battevi, N; Vitelli, N

    2012-01-01

    In the past ten years European and Italian statistics reported a significant increase in work-related musculoskeletal disorders, which also covered the construction industry. To verify this issue, the EPM Research Unit, in collaboration with the Small Craft Industries Territorial Joint Committee in Bergamo (CPTA), undertook a research project on muscular-skeletal disorders. The health survey was carried out by an ad hoc trained staff. Between November 2009 and September 2010, data on 2755 subjects were obtained. The entire sample and the group of masons were investigated and both exhibited high prevalence of upper limb disorders and high prevalence of degenerative diseases (herniated disc). Active research needs to be included in the protocol of health surveillance, of upper limb and spinal MSDs. The data also highlight the need for biomechanical overload exposure data aimed at reconstructing risk profiles and at identifying the technological and organizational solutions to eliminate this particular risk.

  6. The Global Oscillation Network Group site survey. 1: Data collection and analysis methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Frank; Fischer, George; Grier, Jennifer; Leibacher, John W.; Jones, Harrison B.; Jones, Patricia P.; Kupke, Renate; Stebbins, Robin T.

    1994-01-01

    The Global Oscillation Network Group (GONG) Project is planning to place a set of instruments around the world to observe solar oscillations as continuously as possible for at least three years. The Project has now chosen the sites that will comprise the network. This paper describes the methods of data collection and analysis that were used to make this decision. Solar irradiance data were collected with a one-minute cadence at fifteen sites around the world and analyzed to produce statistics of cloud cover, atmospheric extinction, and transparency power spectra at the individual sites. Nearly 200 reasonable six-site networks were assembled from the individual stations, and a set of statistical measures of the performance of the networks was analyzed using a principal component analysis. An accompanying paper presents the results of the survey.

  7. An international survey of classification and treatment choices for group D retinoblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scelfo, Christina; Francis, Jasmine H; Khetan, Vikas; Jenkins, Thomas; Marr, Brian; Abramson, David H; Shields, Carol L; Pe'er, Jacob; Munier, Francis; Berry, Jesse; Harbour, J William; Yarovoy, Andrey; Lucena, Evandro; Murray, Timothy G; Bhagia, Pooja; Paysse, Evelyn; Tuncer, Samuray; Chantada, Guillermo L; Moll, Annette C; Ushakova, Tatiana; Plager, David A; Ziyovuddin, Islamov; Leal, Carlos A; Materin, Miguel A; Ji, Xun-Da; Cursino, Jose W; Polania, Rodrigo; Kiratli, Hayyam; All-Ericsson, Charlotta; Kebudi, Rejin; Honavar, Santosh G; Vishnevskia-Dai, Vicktoria; Epelman, Sidnel; Daniels, Anthony B; Ling, Jeanie D; Traore, Fousseyni; Ramirez-Ortiz, Marco A

    2017-01-01

    To determine which IIRC scheme was used by retinoblastoma centers worldwide and the percentage of D eyes treated primarily with enucleation versus globe salvaging therapies as well as to correlate trends in treatment choice to IIRC version used and geographic region. An anonymized electronic survey was offered to 115 physicians at 39 retinoblastoma centers worldwide asking about IIRC classification schemes and treatment patterns used between 2008 and 2012. Participants were asked to record which version of the IIRC was used for classification, how many group D eyes were diagnosed, and how many eyes were treated with enucleation versus globe salvaging therapies. Averages of eyes per treatment modality were calculated and stratified by both IIRC version and geographic region. Statistical significance was determined by Chi-square, ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis tests using Prism. The survey was completed by 29% of physicians invited to participate. Totally 1807 D eyes were diagnosed. Regarding IIRC system, 27% of centers used the Children's Hospital of Los Angeles (CHLA) version, 33% used the Children's Oncology Group (COG) version, 23% used the Philadelphia version, and 17% were unsure. The rate for primary enucleation varied between 0 and 100% and the mean was 29%. By IIRC version, primary enucleation rates were: Philadelphia, 8%; COG, 34%; and CHLA, 37%. By geographic region, primary enucleation rates were: Latin America, 57%; Asia, 40%; Europe, 36%; Africa, 10%, US, 8%; and Middle East, 8%. However, systemic chemoreduction was used more often than enucleation in all regions except Latin America with a mean of 57% per center ( P <0.0001). Worldwide there is no consensus on which IIRC version is used, systemic chemoreduction was the most frequently used initial treatment during the study period followed by enucleation and primary treatment modality, especially enucleation, varied greatly with regards to IIRC version used and geographic region.

  8. An international survey of classification and treatment choices for group D retinoblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmine H Francis

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To determine which IIRC scheme was used by retinoblastoma centers worldwide and the percentage of D eyes treated primarily with enucleation versus globe salvaging therapies as well as to correlate trends in treatment choice to IIRC version used and geographic region. METHODS: An anonymized electronic survey was offered to 115 physicians at 39 retinoblastoma centers worldwide asking about IIRC classification schemes and treatment patterns used between 2008 and 2012. Participants were asked to record which version of the IIRC was used for classification, how many group D eyes were diagnosed, and how many eyes were treated with enucleation versus globe salvaging therapies. Averages of eyes per treatment modality were calculated and stratified by both IIRC version and geographic region. Statistical significance was determined by Chi-square, ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis tests using Prism. RESULTS: The survey was completed by 29% of physicians invited to participate. Totally 1807 D eyes were diagnosed. Regarding IIRC system, 27% of centers used the Children’s Hospital of Los Angeles (CHLA version, 33% used the Children’s Oncology Group (COG version, 23% used the Philadelphia version, and 17% were unsure. The rate for primary enucleation varied between 0 and 100% and the mean was 29%. By IIRC version, primary enucleation rates were: Philadelphia, 8%; COG, 34%; and CHLA, 37%. By geographic region, primary enucleation rates were: Latin America, 57%; Asia, 40%; Europe, 36%; Africa, 10%, US, 8%; and Middle East, 8%. However, systemic chemoreduction was used more often than enucleation in all regions except Latin America with a mean of 57% per center (P<0.0001. CONCLUSION: Worldwide there is no consensus on which IIRC version is used, systemic chemoreduction was the most frequently used initial treatment during the study period followed by enucleation and primary treatment modality, especially enucleation, varied greatly with regards to IIRC version

  9. The prevalence in the general population of advance directives on euthanasia and discussion of end-of-life wishes: a nationwide survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vleminck, Aline; Pardon, Koen; Houttekier, Dirk; Van den Block, Lieve; Vander Stichele, Robert; Deliens, Luc

    2015-12-07

    To determine the extent to which members of the general population have talked to their physician about their wishes regarding medical treatment at the end of life, to describe the prevalence of advance directives on euthanasia, and to identify associated factors. This study used data from the cross-sectional Health Interview Study (HIS) 2008 that collected data from a representative sample (N = 9651) of the Belgian population. Of all respondents, 4.4 % had spoken to their physician about their wishes regarding medical treatment at the end of life, while 1.8 % had an advance directive on euthanasia. Factors positively associated with discussions regarding wishes for medical treatment at the end of life were being female, being older in age, having poorer health status and having more GP contacts. People older than 55 years and living in Flanders or Brussels were more likely than the youngest age categories to have an advance directive on euthanasia. Younger people, men, people living in the Walloon region of Belgium, people without a longstanding illness, chronic condition or disability and people with few GP contacts could represent a target group for education regarding advance care planning. Public information campaigns and education of physicians may help to enable the public and physicians to engage more in advance care planning.

  10. Using Group Discussion with Taiwan's EFL College Students: A Comparison of Comprehension Instruction for Book Club, Literature Circles, and Instructional Conversations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Fu-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    The research presented here involved a one-semester study; during this period of time, reading comprehension instruction representing three major discussion-centered approaches (Book Club, BC; Literature Circles, LC; Instructional Conversations, IC) was designed and implemented. The effectiveness of the three experimental approaches and one…

  11. Changing the Response of Vocational Students to Supervision: The Use of Motion Pictures and Group Discussion. Final Report. Research Series No. 44.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stogdill, Ralph M.; Bailey, Walter R.

    This study was designed to determine whether viewing and discussing five movies, each depicting a different pattern of supervisory behavior, would enable maladjusted students to react more favorably to supervision. Patterns of behavior were: (1) consideration of employees, (2) structuring expectations, (3) tolerance of freedom of action, (4)…

  12. Where can I call you? The “mobile (phone) revolution” and its impact on survey research and coverage error: A discussion of the Italian case

    OpenAIRE

    Callegaro, Mario; Poggio, Teresio

    2004-01-01

    The increase in mobile phone ownership is changing the sampling frame for landline telephone surveys, with a consequent impact on coverage error. This paper describes the main features of the Italian phone market - characterized by high mobile phone penetration rates - and the rising impact of mobile-phone-only (MPO) households. A survey that uses a landline sampling frame excludes MPO and no-phone households, creating a noncoverage rate of 17% in 2002. Types of phone arrangements and noncove...

  13. Preparing for bike-sharing: insight from focus groups and surveys, Chattanooga, Tennessee, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Kassi M; Cunningham, Christopher J L

    2013-01-01

    To obtain in-depth community input using qualitative and quantitative methods to guide development and marketing of a bike-share program in Chattanooga, Tennessee. Focus groups and surveys assessed bicycling attitudes, beliefs, barriers, and behaviors of residents, workers, and university students. The authors completed nine focus groups (N = 56): five sessions with downtown workers, three with downtown residents, and one with university students. Health, recreation and transportation benefits of bicycling were commonly identified. Concerns regarding bicycling in traffic are apparent because of lack of facilities and a need for public education on safe motorist and bicyclist behavior. Practical limitations can inhibit bicycling during the day, including shower access and personal hygiene concerns. Public desire for environmental, educational, and enforcement tactics to support safe bicycling was noted. Marketing tactics for bike-share usage should emphasize health, recreational, and transportation benefits. Worksites can reduce barriers related to bicycling and encourage bike-share use. Future studies should assess bike-share impact on perceptions and behavior, as well as the resulting policy and environmental changes.

  14. Evaluating a web-based health risk assessment with tailored feedback: what does an expert focus group yield compared to a web-based end-user survey?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vosbergen, Sandra; Mahieu, Guy R; Laan, Eva K; Kraaijenhagen, Roderik A; Jaspers, Monique Wm; Peek, Niels

    2014-01-02

    Increasingly, Web-based health applications are developed for the prevention and management of chronic diseases. However, their reach and utilization is often disappointing. Qualitative evaluations post-implementation can be used to inform the optimization process and ultimately enhance their adoption. In current practice, such evaluations are mainly performed with end-user surveys. However, a review approach by experts in a focus group may be easier to administer and might provide similar results. The aim of this study was to assess whether industrial design engineers in a focus group would address the same issues as end users in a Web-based survey when evaluating a commercial Web-based health risk assessment (HRA) with tailored feedback. Seven Dutch companies used the HRA as part of their corporate health management strategy. Employees using the HRA (N=2289) and 10 independent industrial designers were invited to participate in the study. The HRA consisted of four components: (1) an electronic health questionnaire, (2) biometric measurements, (3) laboratory evaluation, and (4) individually tailored feedback generated by decision support software. After participating in the HRA as end users, both end users and designers evaluated the program. End users completed an evaluation questionnaire that included a free-text field. Designers participated in a focus group discussion. Constructs from user satisfaction and technology acceptance theories were used to categorize and compare the remarks from both evaluations. We assessed and qualitatively analyzed 294 remarks of 189 end users and 337 remarks of 6 industrial designers, pertaining to 295 issues in total. Of those, 137 issues were addressed in the end-user survey and 148 issues in the designer focus group. Only 7.3% (10/137) of the issues addressed in the survey were also addressed in the focus group. End users made more remarks about the usefulness of the HRA and prior expectations that were not met. Designers made

  15. The Use of Discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Edmund deS.; And Others

    Research on the use of discussion in adult education has been largely concerned with comparing it with the use of other instructional techniques and with measuring opinion change. Many studies, such as Kurt Lewin's study of food habits, have compared the effectiveness of group discussion as contrasted with lecture in changing opinions and…

  16. Assessing poisoning risks related to storage of household hazardous materials: using a focus group to improve a survey questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Martin M; Smolinske, Susan; Keswick, David

    2005-08-10

    In fall of 2004, the authors began an investigation to characterize the correlations between the storage of Household Hazardous Materials and the associated health risks, particularly to children. The study area selected was Genesee County, Michigan, near Flint, with data to be collected by a phone survey of residents and through the acquisition of county hospital records containing procedure codes indicating treatment for poison emergencies, and review of poison control center data. A focus group was used to identify key topics and relationships within these data for improving the phone survey questionnaire and its analysis. The focus group was successful in identifying the key issues with respect to all the data collection objectives, resulting in a significantly shorter and more topically focused survey questionnaire. Execution time of the phone survey decreased from 30 to 12 minutes, and useful relationships between the data were revealed, e.g., the linkage between reading food labels and reading labels on containers containing potentially harmful substances. Focus groups and their preparatory planning can help reveal data interrelationships before larger surveys are undertaken. Even where time and budget constraints prevent the ability to conduct a series of focus groups, one successful focus group session can improve survey performance and reduce costs.

  17. Assessing poisoning risks related to storage of household hazardous materials: using a focus group to improve a survey questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keswick David

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In fall of 2004, the authors began an investigation to characterize the correlations between the storage of Household Hazardous Materials and the associated health risks, particularly to children. The study area selected was Genesee County, Michigan, near Flint, with data to be collected by a phone survey of residents and through the acquisition of county hospital records containing procedure codes indicating treatment for poison emergencies, and review of poison control center data. Methods A focus group was used to identify key topics and relationships within these data for improving the phone survey questionnaire and its analysis. Results The focus group was successful in identifying the key issues with respect to all the data collection objectives, resulting in a significantly shorter and more topically focused survey questionnaire. Execution time of the phone survey decreased from 30 to 12 minutes, and useful relationships between the data were revealed, e.g., the linkage between reading food labels and reading labels on containers containing potentially harmful substances. Conclusion Focus groups and their preparatory planning can help reveal data interrelationships before larger surveys are undertaken. Even where time and budget constraints prevent the ability to conduct a series of focus groups, one successful focus group session can improve survey performance and reduce costs.

  18. Adequacy of pathology resident training for employment: a survey report from the Future of Pathology Task Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kass, Mary E; Crawford, James M; Bennett, Betsy; Cox, Teresa M; Grimes, Margaret M; LiVolsi, Virginia; Fletcher, Christopher D M; Wilkinson, David S

    2007-04-01

    The recent change in accreditation requirements for anatomic pathology and clinical pathology residency training from 5 to 4 years and the rapid advances in technologies for pathology services have sparked a renewed debate over the adequacy of pathology residency training. In particular, perceived deficiencies in training have been declared from a variety of sources, both in the form of recent editorial opinions and from surveys of community hospital pathologist employers in 1998, 2003, and 2005 by Dr Richard Horowitz. To obtain more comprehensive data on the perceptions of strengths and weaknesses in pathology residency training. The College of American Pathologists conducted a survey of potential pathology employers (senior College of American Pathologists members, members designated as head of group, and members of the Association of Directors of Anatomic and Surgical Pathology). Also surveyed were recent graduates of pathology residency programs, who were identified as being junior members of the College of American Pathologists, were recent recipients of certification from the American Board of Pathology, or were contacted through their directors of pathology residency programs. There were 559 employer respondents, of whom 384 were responsible for hiring and/or supervising new pathologists. There were 247 recent graduates of pathology residency training programs who responded. From the employers' standpoint, the majority expressed overall satisfaction with recent graduates, but almost one third of employers indicated that new hires had a major deficiency in a critical area. Specific areas of deficiency were clinical laboratory management and judgment in ordering special stains and studies. In addition, one half of employers agreed that more guidance and support for newly trained pathologists is needed now than was required 10 years ago. Academic employers generally were more satisfied than private sector employers. Newly trained pathologists did not appear to

  19. Characterizing Communication Networks in a Web-Based Classroom: Cognitive Styles and Linguistic Behavior of Self-Organizing Groups in Online Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercellone-Smith, Pamela; Jablokow, Kathryn; Friedel, Curtis

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we explore the cognitive style profiles and linguistic patterns of self-organizing groups within a web-based graduate education course to determine how cognitive preferences and individual behaviors influence the patterns of information exchange and the formation of communication hierarchies in an online classroom. Network analysis…

  20. Analysis and Discussion of a Questionnaire Survey on Memories and Impressions of Music Classes : Focusing on Responses by Students in Other Special Courses (Non-Music Majors)

    OpenAIRE

    伊藤, 誠

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyzes the results of a questionnaire survey conducted in the 2010-2011 Music Instruction Methods A class from a variety of angles. The survey was implemented in class during both the first semester (on Monday, April 19) and the second semester (on Monday, October 18). Aside from these two days, 23 second-year music majors from the Department of Education who were enrolled in the Music Instruction Methods D class and 49 third-year students (nearly all piano majors) who were enrol...

  1. Undergraduate Understanding of Climate Change: The Influences of College Major and Environmental Group Membership on Survey Knowledge Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huxster, Joanna K.; Uribe-Zarain, Ximena; Kempton, Willett

    2015-01-01

    A survey covering the scientific and social aspects of climate change was administered to examine U.S. undergraduate student mental models, and compare knowledge between groups based on major and environmental group membership. A Knowledge Score (scale 0-35, mean score = 17.84) was generated for respondents at two, central East Coast, U.S.…

  2. Correlates of sedentary time in different age groups: results from a large cross sectional Dutch survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernaards, Claire M; Hildebrandt, Vincent H; Hendriksen, Ingrid J M

    2016-10-26

    Evidence shows that prolonged sitting is associated with an increased risk of mortality, independent of physical activity (PA). The aim of the study was to identify correlates of sedentary time (ST) in different age groups and day types (i.e. school-/work day versus non-school-/non-work day). The study sample consisted of 1895 Dutch children (4-11 years), 1131 adolescents (12-17 years), 8003 adults (18-64 years) and 1569 elderly (65 years and older) who enrolled in the Dutch continuous national survey 'Injuries and Physical Activity in the Netherlands' between 2006 and 2011. Respondents estimated the number of sitting hours during a regular school-/workday and a regular non-school/non-work day. Multiple linear regression analyses on cross-sectional data were used to identify correlates of ST. Significant positive associations with ST were observed for: higher age (4-to-17-year-olds and elderly), male gender (adults), overweight (children), higher education (adults ≥ 30 years), urban environment (adults), chronic disease (adults ≥ 30 years), sedentary work (adults), not meeting the moderate to vigorous PA (MVPA) guideline (children and adults ≥ 30 years) and not meeting the vigorous PA (VPA) guideline (4-to-17-year-olds). Correlates of ST that significantly differed between day types were working hours and meeting the VPA guideline. More working hours were associated with more ST on school-/work days. In children and adolescents, meeting the VPA guideline was associated with less ST on non-school/non-working days only. This study provides new insights in the correlates of ST in different age groups and thus possibilities for interventions in these groups. Correlates of ST appear to differ between age groups and to a lesser degree between day types. This implies that interventions to reduce ST should be age specific. Longitudinal studies are needed to draw conclusions on causality of the relationship between identified correlates and ST.

  3. Correlates of sedentary time in different age groups: results from a large cross sectional Dutch survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire M. Bernaards

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence shows that prolonged sitting is associated with an increased risk of mortality, independent of physical activity (PA. The aim of the study was to identify correlates of sedentary time (ST in different age groups and day types (i.e. school-/work day versus non-school-/non-work day. Methods The study sample consisted of 1895 Dutch children (4–11 years, 1131 adolescents (12–17 years, 8003 adults (18–64 years and 1569 elderly (65 years and older who enrolled in the Dutch continuous national survey ‘Injuries and Physical Activity in the Netherlands’ between 2006 and 2011. Respondents estimated the number of sitting hours during a regular school-/workday and a regular non-school/non-work day. Multiple linear regression analyses on cross-sectional data were used to identify correlates of ST. Results Significant positive associations with ST were observed for: higher age (4-to-17-year-olds and elderly, male gender (adults, overweight (children, higher education (adults ≥ 30 years, urban environment (adults, chronic disease (adults ≥ 30 years, sedentary work (adults, not meeting the moderate to vigorous PA (MVPA guideline (children and adults ≥ 30 years and not meeting the vigorous PA (VPA guideline (4-to-17-year-olds. Correlates of ST that significantly differed between day types were working hours and meeting the VPA guideline. More working hours were associated with more ST on school-/work days. In children and adolescents, meeting the VPA guideline was associated with less ST on non-school/non-working days only. Conclusions This study provides new insights in the correlates of ST in different age groups and thus possibilities for interventions in these groups. Correlates of ST appear to differ between age groups and to a lesser degree between day types. This implies that interventions to reduce ST should be age specific. Longitudinal studies are needed to draw conclusions on causality of

  4. Employment and Welfare Reform in the National Survey of America's Families. Discussion Papers. Assessing the New Federalism: An Urban Institute Program To Assess Changing Social Policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loprest, Pamela; Wissoker, Douglas

    Data from the National Survey of America's Families (NSAF) in 13 states for 1997 and 1999 was used to study how welfare reform policies, mandated by the 1996 passage of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act, affected employment of single mothers with children. The states were Alabama, California, Colorado, Florida,…

  5. The Hispanic Americans Baseline Alcohol Survey (HABLAS): Rates and predictors of DUI across Hispanic national groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano, Raul; Ramisetty-Mikler, Suhasini; Rodriguez, Lori A

    2008-03-01

    This paper examines rates of self-reported driving under the influence (DUI) of alcohol and 12-month and lifetime DUI arrest rates among Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans, Cuban Americans and South/Central Americans in the U.S. population. Using a multistage cluster sample design, a total of 5224 individuals 18 years of age and older were selected from the household population in five metropolitan areas of the U.S.: Miami, New York, Philadelphia, Houston and Los Angeles. The survey weighted response rate was 76%. Among men, 21% of Mexican Americans, 19.9% of South/Central Americans, 11.6% of Puerto Ricans and 6.9% of Cuban Americans reported DUI. Rates were lower among women, ranging from 9.7% for Mexican Americans to 1.3% for Cuban Americans. Mexican American men had the highest 12-month arrest rate (1.6%) and the highest lifetime arrest rate (11.2%). Drinkers who reported DUI were heavier drinkers than those not reporting DUI according to a variety of indicators. However, most DUI incidents involved non-alcohol-dependent drivers. Mexican Americans and South Central/Americans, men, younger drivers, those with less than high school education, those with higher income and higher alcohol consumption were more likely to report DUI and DUI arrests. These findings show that Hispanic national groups in the U.S. are diverse regarding drinking and DUI-related experiences.

  6. Temporomandibular Disorders and Related Factors in a Group of Iranian Adolescents: A Cross-sectional Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Ebrahimi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs are the most common condition affecting the temporomandibular joint and associated structures. The aim of this study was the epidemiologic evaluation of TMDs and related factors in a group of Iranian adolescents. Materials and methods. This descriptive cross-sectional survey included a sample of 800 high school students (400 girls and 400 boys aged 14 to18 years, in Mashhad, Iran, selected using cluster sampling. Examiners completed questionnaires and performed the clinical examinations. Data were analyzed with the Chi-square and Fisher exact tests. Results. The prevalence of TMDs in the studied sample was 34.7%. The most common signs of TMDs were clicking, muscle tenderness and TMJ tenderness. The most prevalent predisposing factors of TMDs were clenching, premature contact in protrusive movement and bruxism. A clear predominance was seen in girls (40.5% compared with boys (29% (P = 0.001. Conclusion. Signs and symptoms of TMDs were prevalent in Iranian adolescents with a clear female predominance

  7. Present Status and Habitat Survey of the Delmarva Fox Squirrel (Sciurus niger cinereus) with a Discussion of Reasons For Its Decline.

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The recovery plan for Demarva Fox Squirrel on Chesapeake Marshlands Complex discusses the current status of the species, habitat requirements and limiting factors,...

  8. Patient Engagement Practices in Clinical Research among Patient Groups, Industry, and Academia in the United States: A Survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia K Smith

    Full Text Available Patient-centered clinical trial design and execution is becoming increasingly important. No best practice guidelines exist despite a key stakeholder declaration to create more effective engagement models. This study aims to gain a better understanding of attitudes and practices for engaging patient groups so that actionable recommendations may be developed.Individuals from industry, academic institutions, and patient groups were identified through Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative and Drug Information Association rosters and mailing lists. Objectives, practices, and perceived barriers related to engaging patient groups in the planning, conduct, and interpretation of clinical trials were reported in an online survey. Descriptive and inferential statistical analysis of survey data followed a literature review to inform survey questions.Survey respondents (n = 179 valued the importance of involving patient groups in research; however, patient group respondents valued their contributions to research protocol development, funding acquisition, and interpretation of study results more highly than those contributions were valued by industry and academic respondents (all p < .001. Patient group respondents placed higher value in open communications, clear expectations, and detailed contract execution than did non-patient group respondents (all p < .05. Industry and academic respondents more often cited internal bureaucratic processes and reluctance to share information as engagement barriers than did patient group respondents (all p < .01. Patient groups reported that a lack of transparency and understanding of the benefits of collaboration on the part of industry and academia were greater barriers than did non-patient group respondents (all p< .01.Despite reported similarities among approaches to engagement by the three stakeholder groups, key differences exist in perceived barriers and benefits to partnering with patient groups among the

  9. Perceptions and Attitudes towards Medical Research in the United Arab Emirates: Results from the Abu Dhabi Cohort Study (ADCS) Focus Group Discussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Obaid, Yusra; Al Hamiz, Aisha; Abdulle, Abdishakur; Hayes, Richard B; Sherman, Scott; Ali, Raghib

    2016-01-01

    In developing medical research, particularly in regions where medical research is largely unfamiliar, it is important to understand public perceptions and attitudes towards medical research. In preparation for starting the first cohort study in the United Arab Emirates, the Abu Dhabi Cohort Study (ADCS), we sought to understand how we could improve the quality of the research process for participants and increase public trust and awareness of research. We conducted six focus groups (FG), consisting of Emirati men and women aged above 18 years to resemble the target population for the ADCS. Sampling was purposive and convenient. Data collection was an iterative process until saturation was reached with no new themes identified. Text from each FG was analyzed separately by identifying emerging issues and organizing related concepts into categories or themes. A coding tree was developed, consisting of the main concepts, themes, subthemes and corresponding quotes. Both themes and main ideas were identified using inductive analysis. Forty-two participants enrolled at 3 academic centers (New York University Abu Dhabi, UAE University, Zayed University) and the Abu Dhabi blood bank. Focus group participants described lack of awareness of research as a challenge to participation in clinical research studies. Altruism, personal relevance of the research, and the use of role models were commonly identified motivators. Participants were generally satisfied with the informed consent process for the ADCS, but would be disappointed if not provided test results or study outcomes. Fear of a breach in confidentiality was a frequently expressed concern. Participants join research studies for varied, complex reasons, notably altruism and personal relevance. Based on these insights, we propose specific actions to enhance participant recruitment, retention and satisfaction in the ADCS. We identified opportunities to improve the research experience through improved study materials and

  10. Perceptions and Attitudes towards Medical Research in the United Arab Emirates: Results from the Abu Dhabi Cohort Study (ADCS Focus Group Discussions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusra El Obaid

    Full Text Available In developing medical research, particularly in regions where medical research is largely unfamiliar, it is important to understand public perceptions and attitudes towards medical research. In preparation for starting the first cohort study in the United Arab Emirates, the Abu Dhabi Cohort Study (ADCS, we sought to understand how we could improve the quality of the research process for participants and increase public trust and awareness of research.We conducted six focus groups (FG, consisting of Emirati men and women aged above 18 years to resemble the target population for the ADCS. Sampling was purposive and convenient. Data collection was an iterative process until saturation was reached with no new themes identified. Text from each FG was analyzed separately by identifying emerging issues and organizing related concepts into categories or themes. A coding tree was developed, consisting of the main concepts, themes, subthemes and corresponding quotes. Both themes and main ideas were identified using inductive analysis.Forty-two participants enrolled at 3 academic centers (New York University Abu Dhabi, UAE University, Zayed University and the Abu Dhabi blood bank. Focus group participants described lack of awareness of research as a challenge to participation in clinical research studies. Altruism, personal relevance of the research, and the use of role models were commonly identified motivators. Participants were generally satisfied with the informed consent process for the ADCS, but would be disappointed if not provided test results or study outcomes. Fear of a breach in confidentiality was a frequently expressed concern.Participants join research studies for varied, complex reasons, notably altruism and personal relevance. Based on these insights, we propose specific actions to enhance participant recruitment, retention and satisfaction in the ADCS. We identified opportunities to improve the research experience through improved study

  11. Patient Engagement Practices in Clinical Research among Patient Groups, Industry, and Academia in the United States: A Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sophia K; Selig, Wendy; Harker, Matthew; Roberts, Jamie N; Hesterlee, Sharon; Leventhal, David; Klein, Richard; Patrick-Lake, Bray; Abernethy, Amy P

    2015-01-01

    Patient-centered clinical trial design and execution is becoming increasingly important. No best practice guidelines exist despite a key stakeholder declaration to create more effective engagement models. This study aims to gain a better understanding of attitudes and practices for engaging patient groups so that actionable recommendations may be developed. Individuals from industry, academic institutions, and patient groups were identified through Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative and Drug Information Association rosters and mailing lists. Objectives, practices, and perceived barriers related to engaging patient groups in the planning, conduct, and interpretation of clinical trials were reported in an online survey. Descriptive and inferential statistical analysis of survey data followed a literature review to inform survey questions. Survey respondents (n = 179) valued the importance of involving patient groups in research; however, patient group respondents valued their contributions to research protocol development, funding acquisition, and interpretation of study results more highly than those contributions were valued by industry and academic respondents (all p group respondents placed higher value in open communications, clear expectations, and detailed contract execution than did non-patient group respondents (all p group respondents (all p groups reported that a lack of transparency and understanding of the benefits of collaboration on the part of industry and academia were greater barriers than did non-patient group respondents (all pgroups, key differences exist in perceived barriers and benefits to partnering with patient groups among the sectors studied. This recognition could inform the development of best practices for patient-centered clinical trial design and execution. Additional research is needed to define and optimize key success factors.

  12. Preparing for human papillomavirus vaccine introduction in Kenya: implications from focus-group and interview discussions with caregivers and opinion leaders in Western Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Allison L; Oruko, Kelvin O; Habel, Melissa A; Ford, Jessie; Kinsey, Jennine; Odhiambo, Frank; Phillips-Howard, Penelope A; Wang, Susan A; Collins, Tabu; Laserson, Kayla F; Dunne, Eileen F

    2014-08-16

    Cervical cancer claims the lives of 275,000 women each year; most of these deaths occur in low-or middle-income countries. In Kenya, cervical cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality among women of reproductive age. Kenya's Ministry of Public Health and Sanitation has developed a comprehensive strategy to prevent cervical cancer, which includes plans for vaccinating preteen girls against human papillomavirus (HPV) by 2015. To identify HPV vaccine communication and mobilization needs, this research sought to understand HPV vaccine-related perceptions and concerns of male and female caregivers and community leaders in four rural communities of western Kenya. We conducted five focus groups with caregivers (n = 56) and 12 key-informant interviews with opinion leaders to explore cervical cancer-related knowledge, attitudes and beliefs, as well as acceptability of HPV vaccination for 9-12 year-old girls. Four researchers independently reviewed the data and developed codes based on questions in interview guides and topics that emerged organically, before comparing and reconciling results through a group consensus process. Cervical cancer was not commonly recognized, though it was understood generally in terms of its symptoms. By association with cancer and genital/reproductive organs, cervical cancer was feared and stigmatized. Overall acceptability of a vaccine that prevents cervical cancer was high, so long as it was endorsed by trusted agencies and communities were sensitized first. Some concerns emerged related to vaccine safety (e.g., impact on fertility), program intent, and health equity. For successful vaccine introduction in Kenya, there is a need for communication and mobilization efforts to raise cervical cancer awareness; prompt demand for vaccination; address health equity concerns and stigma; and minimize potential resistance. Visible endorsement by government leaders and community influencers can provide reassurance of the vaccine's safety

  13. Mobile Technology Use Across Age Groups in Patients Eligible for Cardiac Rehabilitation: Survey Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Robyn; Roach, Kellie; Sadler, Leonie; Glinatsis, Helen; Belshaw, Julie; Kirkness, Ann; Zhang, Ling; Gallagher, Patrick; Paull, Glenn; Gao, Yan; Partridge, Stephanie Ruth; Parker, Helen; Neubeck, Lis

    2017-10-24

    Emerging evidence indicates mobile technology-based strategies may improve access to secondary prevention and reduce risk factors in cardiac patients. However, little is known about cardiac patients' use of mobile technology, particularly for health reasons and whether the usage varies across patient demographics. This study aimed to describe cardiac patients' use of mobile technology and to determine variations between age groups after adjusting for education, employment, and confidence with using mobile technology. Cardiac patients eligible for attending cardiac rehabilitation were recruited from 9 hospital and community sites across metropolitan and rural settings in New South Wales, Australia. Participants completed a survey on the use of mobile technology devices, features used, confidence with using mobile technology, willingness and interest in learning, and health-related use. The sample (N=282) had a mean age of 66.5 (standard deviation [SD] 10.6) years, 71.9% (203/282) were male, and 79.0% (223/282) lived in a metropolitan area. The most common diagnoses were percutaneous coronary intervention (33.3%, 94/282) and myocardial infarction (22.7%, 64/282). The majority (91.1%, 257/282) used at least one type of technology device, 70.9% (200/282) used mobile technology (mobile phone/tablet), and 31.9% (90/282) used all types. Technology was used by 54.6% (154/282) for health purposes, most often to access information on health conditions (41.4%, 117/282) and medications (34.8%, 98/282). Age had an important independent association with the use of mobile technology after adjusting for education, employment, and confidence. The youngest group (technology than the oldest (>69 years) age group (odds ratio [OR] 4.45, 95% CI 1.46-13.55), 5 times more likely to use mobile apps (OR 5.00, 95% CI 2.01-12.44), and 3 times more likely to use technology for health-related reasons (OR 3.31, 95% CI 1.34-8.18). Compared with the older group, the middle age group (56-69 years

  14. Mobile Technology Use Across Age Groups in Patients Eligible for Cardiac Rehabilitation: Survey Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Kellie; Sadler, Leonie; Glinatsis, Helen; Belshaw, Julie; Kirkness, Ann; Zhang, Ling; Gallagher, Patrick; Paull, Glenn; Gao, Yan; Partridge, Stephanie Ruth; Parker, Helen; Neubeck, Lis

    2017-01-01

    Background Emerging evidence indicates mobile technology–based strategies may improve access to secondary prevention and reduce risk factors in cardiac patients. However, little is known about cardiac patients’ use of mobile technology, particularly for health reasons and whether the usage varies across patient demographics. Objective This study aimed to describe cardiac patients’ use of mobile technology and to determine variations between age groups after adjusting for education, employment, and confidence with using mobile technology. Methods Cardiac patients eligible for attending cardiac rehabilitation were recruited from 9 hospital and community sites across metropolitan and rural settings in New South Wales, Australia. Participants completed a survey on the use of mobile technology devices, features used, confidence with using mobile technology, willingness and interest in learning, and health-related use. Results The sample (N=282) had a mean age of 66.5 (standard deviation [SD] 10.6) years, 71.9% (203/282) were male, and 79.0% (223/282) lived in a metropolitan area. The most common diagnoses were percutaneous coronary intervention (33.3%, 94/282) and myocardial infarction (22.7%, 64/282). The majority (91.1%, 257/282) used at least one type of technology device, 70.9% (200/282) used mobile technology (mobile phone/tablet), and 31.9% (90/282) used all types. Technology was used by 54.6% (154/282) for health purposes, most often to access information on health conditions (41.4%, 117/282) and medications (34.8%, 98/282). Age had an important independent association with the use of mobile technology after adjusting for education, employment, and confidence. The youngest group (mobile technology than the oldest (>69 years) age group (odds ratio [OR] 4.45, 95% CI 1.46-13.55), 5 times more likely to use mobile apps (OR 5.00, 95% CI 2.01-12.44), and 3 times more likely to use technology for health-related reasons (OR 3.31, 95% CI 1.34-8.18). Compared with

  15. Social support contributes to resilience among physiotherapy students: a cross sectional survey and focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bíró, Éva; Veres-Balajti, Ilona; Kósa, Karolina

    2016-06-01

    The present study, taking a resource-oriented approach to mental health, aimed at investigating mental resilience and its determinants among undergraduate physiotherapy students using quantitative and qualitative tools. A questionnaire-based cross-sectional survey supplemented by 2 focus groups. One university in Hungary. 130 physiotherapy students at years 1, 2, and 3. Sense of coherence, a measure of dynamic self-esteem, as well as social support from family and peers were used to assess mental well-being. A screening instrument for psychological morbidity and perceived stress were used as deficiency-oriented approaches. Student opinions were gathered on positive and negative determinants of mental health. Resilience was lower [mean difference 4.8 (95% CI -3.4; 13.1)], and the occurrence of psychological morbidity (32.5% vs. 0%) was higher among female compared to male students. However, the proportion of students fully supported by their peers was higher among females (63% vs. 37.5%). Female students, unlike their male counterparts, experienced higher stress compared to their peers in the general population. Social support declined as students progressed in their studies though this proved to be the most important protective factor for their mental well-being. Results were fed back to the course organizers recommending the implementation of an evidence-based method to improve social support as delineated by the Guide to Community Preventive Services of the US the outcomes of which are to be seen in the future. Copyright © 2015 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. An exploratory survey of undergraduate nursing students’ experiences of group work within a Problem-Based Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Brysiewicz

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Problem-based Learning is a learner-centered approach to education which encourages student participation and group work in the learning process. This method of selfdirected learning is facilitated by the use of small-group discussions. This being the case, it is important for groups to function effectively in order for this learning to occur. These small groups are guided by a facilitator and utilize real-life problems from the clinical settings.

  17. Public Awareness Survey Recommendations of the NHTSA-GHSA Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    The Governors Highway Safety Association (GHSA) and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) developed a basic set of survey questions including information on seat belt use, impaired driving, and speeding. These core questions can ...

  18. The Fritz Roethlisberger Memorial Award Goes to "Using Leadered Groups in Organizational Behavior and Management Survey Courses"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amoroso, Lisa M.; Loyd, Denise Lewin; Hoobler, Jenny M.

    2012-01-01

    The Fritz J. Roethlisberger Memorial Award for the best article in the 2011 "Journal of Management Education" goes to Rae Andre for her article, Using Leadered Groups in Organizational Behavior and Management Survey Courses ("Journal of Management Education," Volume 35, Number 5, pp. 596-619). In keeping with Roethlisberger's legacy, this year's…

  19. Suicide by age, ethnic group, coroners' verdicts and country of birth - A three-year survey in inner London

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neeleman, J; Mak, [No Value; Wessely, S

    1997-01-01

    Background information on suicide in ethnic and immigrant groups in England and Wales is limited. Method A three-year (1991-1993) survey was conducted of all unnatural deaths of residents of an urban area. True likely and 'official' age-adjusted suicide rates were compared by ethnicity and, for

  20. The Factorial Validity of The Maslach Burnout Inventory--General Survey in Representative Samples of Eight Different Occupational Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langballe, Ellen Melbye; Falkum, Erik; Innstrand, Siw Tone; Aasland, Olaf Gjerlow

    2006-01-01

    The Maslach Burnout Inventory--General Survey (MBI-GS) is designed to measure the three subdimensions (exhaustion, cynicism, and professional efficacy) of burnout in a wide range of occupations. This article examines the factorial validity of the MBI-GS across eight different occupational groups in Norway: lawyers, physicians, nurses, teachers,…

  1. Online Focus Groups: Electronic Discussions for Research

    OpenAIRE

    Rezabek, Roger J.

    2000-01-01

    Als Teil einer Promotionsarbeit wurden im Rahmen einer Online-Fokusgruppe Fragen und Themenbereiche entwickelt, die in (Tiefen-) Interviews mit Fernkursstudenten Anwendung fanden. Die Untersuchung betraf Motive, Erschwernisse usw., die für eine Entscheidung, an Fernstudiengänge teilzunehmen, bedeutungsvoll waren. Im Rahmen der Fokusgruppe wurden ca. zweieinhalb Monate asynchrone Gespräche geführt. Von dieser Untersuchung ausgehend enthält der Beitrag auch ein FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions) ...

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Groups of Galaxies from CfA2 Redshift Survey (Mahtessian++, 2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahtessian, A. P.; Movsessian, V. G.

    2009-11-01

    The catalog contains statistically homogeneous and physically well graunded groups of galaxies based on the CfA2 redshift survey (Cat. J/ApJS/121/287) in the area of space 1000km/s=20°. For identification of groups we used a modification of a friends of friends (FoF) method. Principles of friendship and definition of values of presented there free parameters described in Mahtessian (1988Afz....28..255M, 1997Ap.....40..285M). There are 1971 groups with 2 or more members, for a total of 6787 members (46.3%); 765 of the groups have 3 or more members with 4375 galaxies (28.1%). The others 8790 (56.4%) galaxies make a sample of "single" galaxies. The catalog includes group numbers, numbers of members, equatorial coordinates, Virgo-centric radial velocities, line-of-sight-velocity dispersions, integrated group luminosities, and relative quantity of false members. (2 data files).

  3. The Making of discussion groups in a combined process of internal evaluation of safety culture; La realizacion de grupos de discuion en un proceso combinado de evaluacion interna de cultura de seguridad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    German, S.; Buedo, J. L.; La Salabarnada, E.; Navajas, J.; Silla, I.

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show the design and evaluation of safety culture conducted in the Cofrentes nuclear plant. The process has combined the use of different methodologies and techniques and has allowed the participation of different internal and external stake holders. For internal assessment discussion groups were conducted. These groups, which were designed and analyzed by the CIEMAT, were led by employees from different levels of Cofrentes.

  4. GD表(Group Discussion Diagram)を使用する協同学習過程分析 : 異なる課題に対するグループ活動の比較

    OpenAIRE

    藤井, 佑介

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is elucidation of the aspect. In addition, it offers suggestions for performing a longitudinal study of a group discussion diagram by comparing group activity on two different assignments. HATSUGENHYOU was originally developed by Toru Nakamura in 1986 according to scientific principles. Further, the concept of Takayasu Shigematsu has thus far been applied by Yuichi Tashiro and Satoru Tanoue. However, this is the first study to examine the cooperative learning process...

  5. Small groups, contexts, and civic engagement: A multilevel analysis of United States Congregational Life Survey data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Andrew L; Stroope, Samuel

    2015-07-01

    Prior research suggests that church-goers are more civically engaged than their non-church-going counterparts. Little is known, however, about how the popular phenomenon of small groups factors into this equation. In the present study, we examine relationships between small group participation at individual and congregation levels and civic engagement. Using multilevel modeling and national data on congregations and individuals from the U.S. Congregational Life Study (n=82,044), we find that: (1) individual-level small group involvement is associated with four measures of civic engagement; (2) congregation-level small group participation is associated with both lower and higher civic engagement in the case of two outcomes; and (3) in the case of three civic outcomes, congregation-level small group participation moderates individual-level small group involvement such that small group members' civic activity more closely resembles the lower civic engagement of small group nonparticipants. In the case of one civic outcome, at high levels of overall small group participation, small group members' civic engagement drops below that of small group nonparticipants. Explanations for these findings, including a "crowding out" effect, are examined including their complex implications for debates regarding small groups, religious involvement, and civic engagement. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Nancay blind 21cm line survey of the Canes Venatici group region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraan-Korteweg, R. C.; Driel, W. van; Briggs, F.; Binggeli, B.; Mostefaoui, T. I.

    1998-01-01

    Submitted to: Astron. Astrophys. Abstract: A radio spectroscopic driftscan survey in the 21cm line with the Nancay Radio Telescope of 0.08 steradians of sky in the direction of the constellation Canes Venatici covering a heliocentric velocity range of -350 < V_hel < 2350 km/s produced 53 spectral

  7. Nancay "blind" 21 cm line survey of the Canes Venatici group region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraan-Korteweg, RC; van Driel, W; Briggs, F; Binggeli, B; Mostefaoui, TI

    A radio spectroscopic driftscan survey in the 21 cm line with the Nancay decimetric radio telescope of 0.08 steradians of sky in the direction of the constellation Canes Venatici covering a heliocentric velocity range of -350

  8. COST Action TU1208 - Working Group 2 - GPR surveying of pavements, bridges, tunnels and buildings; underground utility and void sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajewski, Lara; Benedetto, Andrea; Derobert, Xavier; Fontul, Simona; Govedarica, Miro; Gregoire, Colette; Loizos, Andreas; Perez-Gracia, Vega; Plati, Christina; Ristic, Aleksandar; Tosti, Fabio; Van Geem, Carl

    2017-04-01

    This work aims at presenting the main results achieved by Working Group (WG) 2 "GPR surveying of pavements, bridges, tunnels and buildings; underground utility and void sensing" of the COST (European COoperation in Science and Technology) Action TU1208 "Civil Engineering Applications of Ground Penetrating Radar" (www.GPRadar.eu, www.cost.eu). The principal goal of the Action, started in April 2013 and ending in October 2017, is to exchange and increase scientific-technical knowledge and experience of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) techniques in civil engineering, whilst promoting throughout Europe the effective use of this safe non-destructive technique. The Action involves more than 300 Members from 28 COST Countries, a Cooperating State, 6 Near Neighbour Countries and 6 International Partner Countries. The most interesting achievements of WG2 include: 1. The state of the art on the use of GPR in civil engineering was composed and open issues were identified. The few existing international/national guidelines/protocols for GPR inspection in civil engineering were reviewed and discussed. Academic end-users, private companies and stakeholders presented their point of view and needs. 2. Guidelines for investigating flexible pavement by using GPR were prepared, with particular regard to layer-thickness assessment, moisture-content sensing, pavement-damage detection and classification, and other main GPR-based investigations in pavement engineering. 3. Guidelines for GPR sensing and mapping of underground utilities and voids were prepared, with a main focus on urban areas. 4. Guidelines for GPR assessment of concrete structures, with particular regard to inspections in bridges and tunnels, were prepared. 5. A report was composed, including a series of practical suggestions and very useful information to guide GPR users during building inspection. 6. WG2 Members carried out a plethora of case studies where GPR was used to survey roads, highways, airport runways, car

  9. Humpback whale Megaptera novaeangliae (Cetartiodactyla: Balaenopteridae group sizes in line transect ship surveys: An evaluation of observer errors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme A. Bortolotto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Accurate estimates of group sizes through line transect sampling methods are important to correctly ascertain the abundance of animals that occur in groups. Since the average observed group size is a component of the distance sampling formula, bias in these data leads to biased abundance estimates. This study aimed to evaluate the potential errors in group size estimation during line transect ship surveys to estimate abundances of the humpback whale, Megaptera novaeangliae (Borowski 1781. In a research cruise along the Brazilian coast, an experiment to collect group size information was conducted from two different sighting platforms on the same vessel. Group sizes were recorded by primary observers at first sighting (PO1 and, in some cases, after some time (PO2. A tracker (T was located on a higher platform to estimate the sizes of groups detected by the primary observers, but tracked one group at a time until it passed abeam. Thus, the dedicated effort to obtain multiple group counts (i.e. higher platform, more time and no responsibility for detecting new groups was expected to provide more accurate numbers. PO2 estimates were compared with PO1 estimates, and T estimates were compared with both PO1 and PO2. Additionally, ratios between T and both PO2 (R1 and PO1 (R2, and between PO2 and PO1 (R3 were calculated. To investigate a possible improvement in abundance estimates, a correction factor (CF was computed from the ratio of T and PO2 means. Primary observer self-correction (= 1.60, CV% = 70.3 was statistically similar to the correction for the tracker (= 1.62, CV% = 84.1. CF resulted in 1 and would not improve abundance estimates. This study supports that observers conducting line transect surveys on large whales have the potential to provide group size information that is as adequate as the correction procedure adopted.

  10. Survey and discussion of models applicable to the transport and fate thrust area of the Department of Energy Chemical and Biological Nonproliferation Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    The availability and easy production of toxic chemical and biological agents by domestic and international terrorists pose a serious threat to US national security, especially to civilian populations in and around urban areas. To address this threat, the Department of Energy (DOE) has established the Chemical and Biological Nonproliferation Program (CBNP) with the goal of focusing the DOE`s technical resources and expertise on capabilities to deny, deter, mitigate and respond to clandestine releases of chemical and biological agents. With the intent to build on DOE core competencies, the DOE has established six technology thrust areas within the CBNP Program: Biological Information Resources; Point Sensor Systems; Stand-off Detection; Transport and Fate; Decontamination; and Systems Analysis and Integration. The purpose of the Transport and Fate Thrust is to accurately predict the dispersion, concentration and ultimate fate of chemical and biological agents released into the urban and suburban environments and has two major goals: (1) to develop an integrated and validated state-of-the-art atmospheric transport and fate modeling capability for chemical and biological agent releases within the complex urban environment from the regional scale down to building and subway interiors, and (2) to apply this modeling capability in a broad range of simulation case studies of chemical and biological agent release scenarios in suburban, urban and confined (buildings and subways) environments and provide analysis for the incident response user community. Sections of this report discuss subway transport and fate models; buildings interior transport and fate modeling; models for flow and transport around buildings; and local-regional meteorology and dispersion models.

  11. Let's Discuss: Teaching Students about Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brank, Eve; Wylie, Lindsey

    2013-01-01

    Research consistently demonstrates the benefits of employing classroom discussions; however, there has been less attention given to teaching students about discussions. The current research compared 2 advanced social psychology courses: 1 without (control) and 1 with (experimental) a week devoted to learning about and discussing discussions.…

  12. Surveying the moral landscape: moral motives and group-based moralities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janoff-Bulman, Ronnie; Carnes, Nate C

    2013-08-01

    We present a new six-cell Model of Moral Motives that applies a fundamental motivational distinction in psychology to the moral domain. In addition to moral motives focused on the self or another, we propose two group-based moralities, both communal in orientation, but reflecting distinct moral motives (Social Order/Communal Solidarity vs. Social Justice/Communal Responsibility) as well as differences in construals of group entitativity. The two group-based moralities have implications for intragroup homogeneity as well as intergroup conflict. Our model challenges the conclusions of Haidt and colleagues that only conservatives (not liberals) are group oriented and embrace a binding morality. We explore the implications of this new model for politics in particular and for the self-regulation versus social regulation of morality more generally.

  13. Online Discussion and Learning Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    William T. Alpert; Oskar R. Harmon; Joseph Histen

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we describe how we used online discussion forums to complement lecture presentations. We collected data on student usage and surveyed student opinion in several online/blended sections. Our hypothesis is that increased student participation in online discussion forums will increase learner engagement and learning outcomes. Using panel data we estimate a fixed effects model and find active participation in the discussion board has a positive effect on exam score at a statisticall...

  14. Assessing the reliability of friends-of-friends groups on the future Javalambre Physics of the Accelerating Universe Astrophysical Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandivarez, A.; Díaz-Giménez, E.; Mendes de Oliveira, C.; Ascaso, B.; Benítez, N.; Dupke, R.; Sodré, L.; Irwin, J.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: We have performed a detailed analysis of the ability of the friends-of-friends algorithm to identify real galaxy systems in deep surveys such as the future Javalambre Physics of the Accelerating Universe Astrophysical Survey. Our approach was twofold: assessing the reliability of the algorithm in real and in redshift space. In the latter, our intention was also to determine the degree of accuracy that could be achieved when using spectroscopic or photometric-redshift determinations as a distance indicator. Methods: We built a light-cone mock catalogue using synthetic galaxies constructed from the Millennium Run Simulation I plus a semi-analytical model of galaxy formation. We explored different ways to define the proper linking length parameters of the algorithm to identify the best-suited galaxy groups in each case. Results: We found that when one identifies systems in redshift space using spectroscopic information, the linking lengths should take into account the variation of the luminosity function with redshift as well as the linear redshift dependence of the radial fiducial velocity in the line-of-sight direction. When we tested the purity and completeness of the group samples, we found that the best resulting group sample reaches values of ~40% and ~70% of systems with high levels of purity and completeness, when spectroscopic information was used. To identify systems using photometric redshifts, we adopted a probabilistic approach to link galaxies in the line-of-sight direction. Our result suggests that it is possible to identify a sample of groups with fewer than ~40% false identifications at the same time as we recover around 60% of the true groups. Conclusions: This modified version of the algorithm can be applied to deep surveys provided that the linking lengths are selected appropriately for the science to be made with the data.

  15. Return to sports after surgery to correct adolescent idiopathic scoliosis: a survey of the Spinal Deformity Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Ronald A; Kang, Daniel G; Lenke, Lawrence G; Sucato, Daniel J; Bevevino, Adam J

    2015-05-01

    There are no guidelines for when surgeons should allow patients to return to sports and athletic activities after spinal fusion for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). Current recommendations are based on anecdotal reports and a survey performed more than a decade ago in the era of first/second-generation posterior implants. To identify current recommendations for return to sports and athletic activities after surgery for AIS. Questionnaire-based survey. Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis after corrective surgery. Type and time to return to sports. A survey was administered to members of the Spinal Deformity Study Group. The survey consisted of surgeon demographic information, six clinical case scenarios, three different construct types (hooks, pedicle screws, hybrid), and questions regarding the influence of lowest instrumented vertebra (LIV) and postoperative physical therapy. Twenty-three surgeons completed the survey, and respondents were all experienced expert deformity surgeons. Pedicle screw instrumentation allows earlier return to noncontact and contact sports, with most patients allowed to return to running by 3 months, both noncontact and contact sports by 6 months, and collision sports by 12 months postoperatively. For all construct types, approximately 20% never allow return to collision sports, whereas all surgeons allow eventual return to contact and noncontact sports regardless of construct type. In addition to construct type, we found progressively distal LIV resulted in more surgeons never allowing return to collision sports, with 12% for selective thoracic fusion to T12/L1 versus 33% for posterior spinal fusion to L4. Most respondents also did not recommend formal postoperative physical therapy (78%). Of all surgeons surveyed, there was only one reported instrumentation failure/pullout without neurologic deficit after a patient went snowboarding 2 weeks postoperatively. Modern posterior instrumentation allows surgeons to recommend earlier return

  16. [A survey on anemia among children under 7 years of age from 15 minority ethnic groups in Yunnan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Li-qin; Zou, Tuan-biao; Liu, Jin-tao; Quan, Xing; Chen, Qian; Yang, Fa-bin; Hu, Li-sha; Zhao, Zhong-ming; Wang, Xing-tian

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the level and distribution characteristics of anemia of the minority ethnic group children in Yunnan. The cases with anemia were surveyed from 13 336 samples of 15 minority ethnic groups and Han children in Yunnan by Taking the method of random cluster sampling. The prevalence of anemia among the children under 7 years of age of 15 ethnic groups of minority in Yunnan was 13.6%. There are differences among the different ethnic groups (χ(2) = 716.33, P age in the different ethnic groups (6 months to 1 years old: χ(2) = 70.52, P age or older. The prevalence of anemia was 13.6% among the children of 15 ethnic minority under 7 years of age in Yunnan. There were differences among different ethnic groups of minority in different prefectures. There were differences among different ethnic groups of different age groups, but it was highest in 6 months to 1 year old children, it declined among older children, and rose in children 6 years of age or older. The prevalence of anemia was related to the ethnic and geographic factors.

  17. Characteristics of personal health information management groups: findings from an online survey using Amazon’s mTurk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sujin; Huber, Jeffrey T.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The study characterized three groups with different levels of familiarity with personal health information management (PHIM) in terms of their demographics, health knowledge, technological competency, and information sources and barriers. In addition, the authors examined differences among PHIM groups in subjective self-ratings and objective test scores for health literacy. Methods: A total of 202 survey participants were recruited using Amazon’s Mechanical Turk (mTurk) service, a crowdsourcing Internet service. Using K-means clustering, three groups with differing levels of familiarity with PHIM were formed: Advanced, Intermediate, and Basic. Results: The Advanced group was the youngest, and the Basic group contained the highest proportion of males, whereas the Intermediate group was the oldest and contained the fewest males. The Advanced group was significantly more likely to engage in provider- or hospital-initiated PHIM activities such as emailing with providers, viewing test results online, and receiving summaries of hospital visits via email or websites than the other groups. The Basic group had significantly lower information management skills and Internet use than the other groups. Advanced and Basic groups reported significant differences in several information barriers. While the Advanced group self-reported the highest general literacy, they scored lowest on an objective health literacy test. Conclusions: For effective personal health records management, it is critical to understand individual differences in PHIM using a comprehensive measure designed to assess personal health records–specific activities. Because they are trained to perform an array of information management activities, medical librarians or patient educators are well positioned to promote the effective use of personal health records by health consumers. PMID:28983200

  18. Characteristics of personal health information management groups: findings from an online survey using Amazon's mTurk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sujin; Huber, Jeffrey T

    2017-10-01

    The study characterized three groups with different levels of familiarity with personal health information management (PHIM) in terms of their demographics, health knowledge, technological competency, and information sources and barriers. In addition, the authors examined differences among PHIM groups in subjective self-ratings and objective test scores for health literacy. A total of 202 survey participants were recruited using Amazon's Mechanical Turk (mTurk) service, a crowdsourcing Internet service. Using K-means clustering, three groups with differing levels of familiarity with PHIM were formed: Advanced, Intermediate, and Basic. The Advanced group was the youngest, and the Basic group contained the highest proportion of males, whereas the Intermediate group was the oldest and contained the fewest males. The Advanced group was significantly more likely to engage in provider- or hospital-initiated PHIM activities such as emailing with providers, viewing test results online, and receiving summaries of hospital visits via email or websites than the other groups. The Basic group had significantly lower information management skills and Internet use than the other groups. Advanced and Basic groups reported significant differences in several information barriers. While the Advanced group self-reported the highest general literacy, they scored lowest on an objective health literacy test. For effective personal health records management, it is critical to understand individual differences in PHIM using a comprehensive measure designed to assess personal health records-specific activities. Because they are trained to perform an array of information management activities, medical librarians or patient educators are well positioned to promote the effective use of personal health records by health consumers.

  19. The measurement invariance of job diagnostic survey (JDS) across three university student groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Gomez, M.; Marin-Garcia, J.A.; Girado Omeara, M.

    2016-07-01

    The main purpose of this study is to apply a multigroup confirmatory analysis to examine the measurement invariance (MI) of the adapted version of the Job Diagnosis Survey (JDS) as a measurement tool that analyses the relationship between the features of teaching methodologies with university students’ motivation and satisfaction across data collected on different degrees and academic years. Design/methodology/approach: Confirmatory factor analysis was carried out using a multigroup structural equation model, using the program EQS 6.1 to test the invariance of the adapted version of JDS in a sample constituted by 535 student of a Spanish public university. The assessment of invariance included the levels of configural, metric, scalar, covariance and latent variables invariance. Several goodness-of-fit measures were assessed... (Author)

  20. Sampling guidelines for oral fluid-based surveys of group-housed animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotolo, Marisa L; Sun, Yaxuan; Wang, Chong; Giménez-Lirola, Luis; Baum, David H; Gauger, Phillip C; Harmon, Karen M; Hoogland, Marlin; Main, Rodger; Zimmerman, Jeffrey J

    2017-09-01

    Formulas and software for calculating sample size for surveys based on individual animal samples are readily available. However, sample size formulas are not available for oral fluids and other aggregate samples that are increasingly used in production settings. Therefore, the objective of this study was to develop sampling guidelines for oral fluid-based porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) surveys in commercial swine farms. Oral fluid samples were collected in 9 weekly samplings from all pens in 3 barns on one production site beginning shortly after placement of weaned pigs. Samples (n=972) were tested by real-time reverse-transcription PCR (RT-rtPCR) and the binary results analyzed using a piecewise exponential survival model for interval-censored, time-to-event data with misclassification. Thereafter, simulation studies were used to study the barn-level probability of PRRSV detection as a function of sample size, sample allocation (simple random sampling vs fixed spatial sampling), assay diagnostic sensitivity and specificity, and pen-level prevalence. These studies provided estimates of the probability of detection by sample size and within-barn prevalence. Detection using fixed spatial sampling was as good as, or better than, simple random sampling. Sampling multiple barns on a site increased the probability of detection with the number of barns sampled. These results are relevant to PRRSV control or elimination projects at the herd, regional, or national levels, but the results are also broadly applicable to contagious pathogens of swine for which oral fluid tests of equivalent performance are available. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The measurement invariance of job diagnostic survey (JDS across three university student groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Martinez-Gomez

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The main purpose of this study is to apply a multigroup confirmatory analysis to examine the measurement invariance (MI of the adapted version of the Job Diagnosis Survey (JDS as a measurement tool that analyses the relationship between the features of teaching methodologies with university students’ motivation and satisfaction across data collected on different degrees and academic years. Design/methodology/approach: Confirmatory factor analysis was carried out using a multigroup structural equation model, using the program EQS 6.1 to test the invariance of the adapted version of JDS in a sample constituted by 535 student of a Spanish public university. The assessment of invariance included the levels of configural, metric, scalar, covariance and latent variables invariance. Several goodness-of-fit measures were assessed. Findings: The results show that measurements are equivalent at the configural, metric, covariance and latent factors invariance. Although the hypotheses of scalar invariance is rejected, results suggest that JDS is partial strict invariant and has satisfactory psychometric properties on all samples. Research limitations/implications: The sample is framed in university students aged between 18 and 30 and for a questionnaire on teaching methodology and students' satisfaction in the context of a Spanish university and the generalization to other questionnaire, or population, should be proved with specific data. Furthermore, the sample size is rather small. Originality/value: In the current process of change that is taking place in universities according to the plan developed by the European Space of Higher Education, focused on increasing the student skills, validate instruments as the satisfaction scale of JDS, are necessary to evaluate students’ satisfaction with new active methodologies. These findings are useful for researchers since they add the first sample in which the MI of a student’s satisfaction survey

  2. A Mental Health Survey of Different Ethnic and Occupational Groups in Xinjiang, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Ailing; Liu, Bo; Jiang, Yu; Zhao, Junling; Zhang, Guanghui; Liu, Jiwen

    2017-01-05

    Poor mental health has become a serious social and public health-care burden. This cross-sectional study used multistage stratified cluster random sampling to gather mental health information from 11,891 adults (18-60 years) employed in various occupations categorized according to the Chinese Standard Occupational Classification. Mental health was measured by the General Health Questionnaire, and participants exceeding the cut-off score were defined as having poor mental health. The overall prevalence of poor mental health was 23.8%. The prevalence of poor mental health was significantly higher in the Han ethnic group than Kazak ethnic group and in health-care workers, teachers, and civil servants compared to manual workers. Females (odds ratios (OR) = 1.139, 95% confidence intervals (CI): 1.012-3.198) and knowledge workers (1.697, 1.097-2.962) were risk factors for poor mental health, while Kazak ethnicity (0.465, 0.466-0.937), other minority status (non-Han) (0.806, 0.205-0.987), and working ≥15 years in the same occupation (0.832, 0.532-0.932) were protective (p mental health in Xinjiang, China, is higher in the Kazak ethnic group than the Han ethnic group. The prevalence of poor mental health is higher among knowledge workers than in manual workers due to high incidences of poor mental health in civil servants, health-care workers, and teachers.

  3. Correlates of sedentary time in different age groups: results from a large cross sectional Dutch survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernaards, C.; Hildebrandt, V.H.; Hendriksen, I.J.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Evidence shows that prolonged sitting is associated with an increased risk of mortality, independent of physical activity (PA). The aim of the study was to identify correlates of sedentary time (ST) in different age groups and day types (i.e. school-/work day versus non-school-/non-work

  4. The Use of Interest Surveys with Groups: A Useful Team-Building Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, David P.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a group counseling and team-building session, using the results of a career interest inventory to stimulate debate. Offers suggestions for conducting the session and developing an agenda, logistical procedures, and tips on practical administrative techniques. Most of the article addresses the development of a histogram. (RJM)

  5. Do medical students generate sound arguments during small group discussions in problem-based learning?: an analysis of preclinical medical students' argumentation according to a framework of hypothetico-deductive reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Hyunjung; Choi, Ikseon; Yoon, Bo Young

    2017-06-01

    Hypothetico-deductive reasoning (HDR) is an essential learning activity and a learning outcome in problem-based learning (PBL). It is important for medical students to engage in the HDR process through argumentation during their small group discussions in PBL. This study aimed to analyze the quality of preclinical medical students' argumentation according to each phase of HDR in PBL. Participants were 15 first-year preclinical students divided into two small groups. A set of three 2-hour discussion sessions from each of the two groups during a 1-week-long PBL unit on the cardiovascular system was audio-recorded. The arguments constructed by the students were analyzed using a coding scheme, which included four types of argumentation (Type 0: incomplete, Type 1: claim only, Type 2: claim with data, and Type 3: claim with data and warrant). The mean frequency of each type of argumentation according to each HDR phase across the two small groups was calculated. During small group discussions, Type 1 arguments were generated most often (frequency=120.5, 43%), whereas the least common were Type 3 arguments (frequency=24.5, 8.7%) among the four types of arguments. The results of this study revealed that the students predominantly made claims without proper justifications; they often omitted data for supporting their claims or did not provide warrants to connect the claims and data. The findings suggest instructional interventions to enhance the quality of medical students' arguments in PBL, including promoting students' comprehension of the structure of argumentation for HDR processes and questioning.

  6. Extra-nodal lymphoma. A survey of Japan lymphoma radiation therapy group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oguchi, Masahiko [Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan). Hospital; Ikeda, Hiroshi [National Cancer Center, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan). East Hospital; Nakamura, Shigeo [Aichi Cancer Center, Nagoya (Japan). Hospital] [and others

    2002-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine, retrospectively, national-wide clinical data of patients with localized extranodal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) who were treated by radiation therapy with or without chemotherapy. The survey was carried out at 25 radiation oncology institutions in Japan in 1998. In 1999, according to the Revised European American Lymphoma (REAL) classification, central pathological review conducted at Aichi cancer center was carried out for the data from 7 radiation oncology institutions. The 5-year progression free survival rates (PFS) were calculated to identify prognostic factors. Survey: Data from 1, 141 patients with stage I and II NHL were recruited from 1988 through 1992. Of them, 787 patients, who were treated using definitive radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy for intermediate and high-grade lymphomas in Working Formulation, constituted the core of this study. Primary tumors arose mainly from extra-nodal organs (71%) in the head and neck (Waldeyer's ring: 41%, thyroid gland: 7%, nasal cavities: 5%, oral cavities: 4%, sinus: 3%, orbital structures: 3%, skin: 2% and etc.). The median age of 60 years for patients with extra-nodal NHL was higher than that of 56 years for patients with nodal NHL (p<0.01). Female were dominant in incidence of extra-nodal NHL arising from the thyroid gland, skin and gastrointestinal tract. The percentage of stage I to the extra-nodal NHL from orbit, sino-nasal presentation was higher than that of other NHLs. The percentage of stage II to the extra-nodal NHL from Waldeyer's ring and thyroid gland was higher than that of other NHLs. Central pathological review was carried out for pathological data from 79 patients (Waldeyer's ring: 45, thyroid gland: 19, sinonasal cavities: 15). Of these, diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) composed 63% of all patients, mucosa associated lyumphoid tissue lymphoma (MALT-L): 16%, Natural Killer/T cell lymphoma (NK/T-L): 11%, and mantle cell

  7. Mobile Technology Use Across Age Groups in Patients Eligible for Cardiac Rehabilitation: Survey Study

    OpenAIRE

    Gallagher, Robyn; Roach, Kellie; Sadler, Leonie; Glinatsis, Helen; Belshaw, Julie; Kirkness, Ann; Zhang, Ling; Gallagher, Patrick; Paull, Glenn; Gao, Yan; Partridge, Stephanie R; Helen M. Parker; Neubeck, Lis

    2017-01-01

    Background Emerging evidence indicates mobile technology–based strategies may improve access to secondary prevention and reduce risk factors in cardiac patients. However, little is known about cardiac patients’ use of mobile technology, particularly for health reasons and whether the usage varies across patient demographics. Objective This study aimed to describe cardiac patients’ use of mobile technology and to determine variations between age groups after adjusting for education, employment...

  8. A Mental Health Survey of Different Ethnic and Occupational Groups in Xinjiang, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ailing Fu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Poor mental health has become a serious social and public health-care burden. This cross-sectional study used multistage stratified cluster random sampling to gather mental health information from 11,891 adults (18–60 years employed in various occupations categorized according to the Chinese Standard Occupational Classification. Mental health was measured by the General Health Questionnaire, and participants exceeding the cut-off score were defined as having poor mental health. The overall prevalence of poor mental health was 23.8%. The prevalence of poor mental health was significantly higher in the Han ethnic group than Kazak ethnic group and in health-care workers, teachers, and civil servants compared to manual workers. Females (odds ratios (OR = 1.139, 95% confidence intervals (CI: 1.012–3.198 and knowledge workers (1.697, 1.097–2.962 were risk factors for poor mental health, while Kazak ethnicity (0.465, 0.466–0.937, other minority status (non-Han (0.806, 0.205–0.987, and working ≥15 years in the same occupation (0.832, 0.532–0.932 were protective (p < 0.05. We concluded that the general level of mental health in Xinjiang, China, is higher in the Kazak ethnic group than the Han ethnic group. The prevalence of poor mental health is higher among knowledge workers than in manual workers due to high incidences of poor mental health in civil servants, health-care workers, and teachers.

  9. The Hispanic Americans baseline alcohol survey (HABLAS): DUI rates, birthplace, and acculturation across Hispanic national groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano, Raul; Ramisetty-Mikler, Suhasini; Rodriguez, Lori A

    2008-03-01

    This article examines the association between birthplace, acculturation, and self-reported driving under the influence of alcohol (DUI), 12-month and lifetime DUI arrest rates among Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans, Cuban Americans, and South/Central Americans in the U.S. population. Using a multistage cluster sample design, 5,224 adults (18 years of age or older) were interviewed from households in five metropolitan areas of the United States: Miami, New York, Philadelphia, Houston, and Los Angeles. Birthplace was not associated with DUI, 12-month DUI arrest rates, or lifetime DUI arrest rates. Mexican Americans in the medium- and high-acculturation groups were more likely to engage in DUI. A higher proportion of U.S.-born than foreign-born respondents as well as those in the high-acculturation group, irrespective of national origin, reported having been stopped by police when driving. U.S.-born Cuban Americans, Mexican Americans, and South/Central Americans thought they could consume a higher mean number of drinks before their driving is impaired compared with those who are foreign born. There are considerable differences in DUI-related behavior across Hispanic national groups. U.S.-born Hispanics and those born abroad, but not those at different levels of acculturation, have equal risk of involvement with DUI.

  10. The Hispanic Americans Baseline Alcohol Survey (HABLAS): DUI Rates, Birthplace, and Acculturation Across Hispanic National Groups*

    Science.gov (United States)

    CAETANO, RAUL; RAMISETTY-MIKLER, SUHASINI; RODRIGUEZ, LORI A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective This article examines the association between birthplace, acculturation, and self-reported driving under the influence of alcohol (DUI), 12-month and lifetime DUI arrest rates among Mexican Americans, Puerto Ricans, Cuban Americans, and South/Central Americans in the U.S. population. Method Using a multistage cluster sample design, 5,224 adults (18 years of age or older) were interviewed from households in five metropolitan areas of the United States: Miami, New York, Philadelphia, Houston, and Los Angeles. Results Birthplace was not associated with DUI, 12-month DUI arrest rates, or lifetime DUI arrest rates. Mexican Americans in the medium- and high-acculturation groups were more likely to engage in DUI. A higher proportion of U.S.-born than foreign-born respondents as well as those in the high-acculturation group, irrespective of national origin, reported having been stopped by police when driving. U.S.-born Cuban Americans, Mexican Americans, and South/Central Americans thought they could consume a higher mean number of drinks before their driving is impaired compared with those who are foreign born. Conclusions There are considerable differences in DUI-related behavior across Hispanic national groups. U.S.-born Hispanics and those born abroad, but not those at different levels of acculturation, have equal risk of involvement with DUI. PMID:18299767

  11. Interaction in online interprofessional education case discussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterston, Rosemary

    2011-07-01

    This study investigated online interaction within a curriculum unit at the University of Toronto, Canada that included an interprofessional case study discussion in a mixed-mode (face-to-face and online) format. Nine of the 81 teams that completed the four-day curriculum were selected for detailed review based on the attitudes students expressed on a survey about the value of collaborating online for enhancing their appreciation of other health care professions. Five of the teams selected were 'positive' and four were 'negative'. The responses to other survey items by members of these teams were then compared, as well as their message posting patterns and the content of their online discussions. Differences between the two sets were situated within a theoretical framework drawn from the contact theory, social interdependence theory, and the Community of Inquiry model. Institutional support in the form of facilitator involvement, individual predispositions to online and group learning, the group composition, the learning materials, task and assignment, and technical factors all affected the levels of participation online. Discourse and organizational techniques were identified that related to interactivity within the online discussions. These findings can help curriculum planners design interprofessional case studies that encourage the interactivity required for successful online discussions.

  12. Breast interest group faculty of radiation oncology: Australian and New Zealand patterns of practice survey on breast radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Kimberley; Mackenzie, Penny; Allen, Angela; Dreosti, Marcus; Morgia, Marita; Zissiadis, Yvonne; Lamoury, Gilian; Windsor, Apsara

    2017-08-01

    This patterns of practice study was conducted on behalf of the RANZCR Breast Interest Group in order to document current radiotherapy practices for breast cancer in Australia and New Zealand. The survey identifies variations and highlights potential contentious aspects of radiotherapy management of breast cancer. A fifty-eight question survey was disseminated via the Survey Monkey digital platform to 388 Radiation Oncologists in Australia and New Zealand. In total, 156 responses were received and collated. Areas of notable consensus among respondents included hypofractionation (77.3% of respondents would 'always' or 'sometimes' consider hypofractionation in the management of ductal carcinoma in-situ and 99.3% in early invasive breast cancer); margin status in early breast cancer (73.8% believe a clear inked margin is sufficient and does not require further surgery) and use of bolus in post-mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) (91.1% of participants use bolus in PMRT). Areas with a wider degree of variability amongst respondents included regional nodal irradiation and components of radiotherapy planning and delivery (examples include the technique used for delivery of boost and frequency of bolus application for PMRT). The results of these patterns of practice survey informs radiation oncologists in Australia and New Zealand of the current clinical practices being implemented by their peers. The survey identifies areas of consensus and contention, the latter of which may lead to a development of research trials and/or educational activities to address these areas of uncertainty. © 2016 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  13. Advantages of asynchronous online focus groups and face-to-face focus groups as perceived by child, adolescent and adult participants: a survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwaanswijk, Marieke; van Dulmen, Sandra

    2014-10-24

    Online focus groups (OFGs) are increasingly used as a method of data collection. Although their advantages for research have repeatedly been described, participants' opinions about OFGs have seldom been studied. We investigated OFG participants' preference for participation in an OFG or a face-to-face focus group (FTF), as well as their perceptions of the advantages of both methods. We also investigated whether any differences exist between the perceptions of child, adolescent, and adult participants. Participants' opinions were studied by means of a questionnaire completed by 284 persons (aged 8-72 years) after their participation in one of 50 OFGs. The OFGs were conducted between December 2005 and December 2013 as part of 19 separate studies. Chi square tests with p advantages of OFGs and FTFs between children, adolescents and adults. The most important advantage of OFGs as perceived by OFG participants was the possibility to participate at a moment most convenient to them. Adolescents and adults (90.5% and 95.9%) more often reported this as an advantage than children did (30.8%, p advantages of OFGs as a research method. Whereas respondents generally value the convenience of participating at their own time and place, the anonymity of OFGs and the increased ease to discuss personal issues were mentioned less often as advantages by the participants. An aspect that may need more attention when conducting an OFG, is the absence of a fluid discussion, which is, according to our respondents, easier to achieve in an FTF. This underlines the importance of the moderator in enabling a constructive discussion.

  14. A Discussion with Jacques Derrida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrida, Jacques

    1990-01-01

    Presents an edited transcript of a discussion held in April 1989 between Jacques Derrida and a group of students and professors concerning Derrida's "Afterword: Toward an Ethic of Discussion." Discusses Derrida's views on "deconstruction" as a term and a movement, the idea of arguments and persuasion, and specific power…

  15. Characterization of type 2 diabetes mellitus burden by age and ethnic groups based on a nationwide survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Janice M S; Bailey, Robert A; Rupnow, Marcia F T; Annunziata, Kathy

    2014-04-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is the most common form of diabetes. Risk factors for its development include older age, obesity, family history of diabetes, history of gestational diabetes, impaired glucose metabolism, physical inactivity, and race/ethnicity. The purpose of this study was to characterize T2DM burden, from a patient perspective, with respect to age and race/ethnicity. Adults aged ≥18 years with T2DM from a large, Internet-based, nationwide survey were retrospectively analyzed. Demographic and clinical characteristics (glycemic control, body mass index [BMI], comorbidities, and diabetes-related complications), hypoglycemic episodes, and medication adherence were used to assess diabetes burden. Degree of burden was compared across age (18-64, 65-74, and ≥75 years) and racial/ethnic (white, African American, Hispanic, Asian, and American Indian) groups. An apparent association was found between glycemic control and medication adherence. Hispanics had the lowest percentage of participants with a hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level levels (55.4%) but also had the poorest medication adherence among racial/ethnic groups. Conversely, American Indians and whites had the best glycemic control, HbA1c knowledge, and medication adherence. The 18- to 64-year age group had the poorest glycemic control (28.8%), the most with unknown HbA1c levels (46.3%), and the poorest medication adherence of the age groups. Mean BMIs were high (>30 mg/kg(2)) for all racial/ethnic groups other than the Asian group (28.9 mg/kg(2)). Approximately 71% of Asians were obese or overweight compared with ≥90% in the other racial/ethnic groups. Mean BMIs decreased with increasing age group (34.5, 32.6, and 29.8 kg/m(2) for the age groups of 18-64, 65-74, and ≥75 years, respectively). Regarding diabetes-related comorbidities, the Asian group had the lowest percentages of those with hypertension (39.1%) and hypercholesterolemia (46.6%). The Asian group had the lowest mean Charlson

  16. [Psychosocial patient education groups focusing on work-related issues - results of a survey of German medical rehabilitation centers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driesel, P; Vogel, H; Gerlich, C; Löffler, S; Lukasczik, M; Wolf, H-D; Schuler, M; Neuderth, S

    2014-04-01

    Psychosocial patient education programs focusing on work-related issues are a core element in the German statutory pension insurance's profile of requirements (POR) regarding inpatient vocationally oriented medical rehabilitation (VOMR). This study aims at analyzing the prevalence of patient education programs focusing on work-related issues in German rehabilitation centers with regard to their content and quality.Data were collected in a national survey on the current state of patient education within medical rehabilitation programs in Germany in 1473 inpatient and outpatient medical rehabilitation centers. Data were analyzed both quantitatively and qualitatively, with free text responses being assigned to categories, drawing upon criteria developed by the German Center of Patient Education and the pension insurance's POR. 283 of the 908 institutions participating in the survey provided information on 454 psychosocial patient education programs focusing on work-related issues. "Unemployment and job training", "work hardening", "stress"/"relaxation" were named most frequently. The criteria derived from the POR regarding group content and from the Center of Patient Education regarding group size and education methods were largely fulfilled. There is a need for existing group programs in VOMR to be further manualized, evaluated and published. More patient education programs focusing on work-related issues should be developed specifically for relevant indications. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. A survey on keeler’s theorem and application of symmetric group for swapping game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratama, Yohanssen; Prakasa, Yohenry

    2017-01-01

    An episode of Futurama features two-body mind-switching machine which will not work more than once on the same pair of bodies. The problem is “Can the switching be undone so as to restore all minds to their original bodies?” Ken Keeler found an algorithm that undoes any mind-scrambling permutation, and Lihua Huang found the refinement of it. We look on the process how the puzzle can be modeled in terms group theory and using symmetric group to solve it and find the most efficient way of it. After that we will try to build the algorithm to implement it into the computer program and see the effect of the transposition notion into the algorithm complexity. The number of steps that given by the algorithm will be different and one of algorithms will have the advantage in terms of efficiency. We compare Ken Keeler and Lihua Huang algorithms to see is there any difference if we run it in the computer program, although the complexity could be remain the same.

  18. Factors influencing women's attitudes towards antenatal vaccines, group B Streptococcus and clinical trial participation in pregnancy: an online survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuaid, Fiona; Jones, Christine; Stevens, Zoe; Plumb, Jane; Hughes, Rhona; Bedford, Helen; Voysey, Merryn; Heath, Paul T; Snape, Matthew D

    2016-04-20

    To explore factors influencing the likelihood of antenatal vaccine acceptance of both routine UK antenatal vaccines (influenza and pertussis) and a hypothetical group B Streptococcus (GBS) vaccine in order to improve understanding of how to optimise antenatal immunisation acceptance, both in routine use and clinical trials. An online survey distributed to women of childbearing age in the UK. 1013 women aged 18-44 years in England, Scotland and Wales. Data from an online survey conducted to gauge the attitudes of 1013 women of childbearing age in England, Scotland and Wales to antenatal vaccination against GBS were further analysed to determine the influence of socioeconomic status, parity and age on attitudes to GBS immunisation, using attitudes to influenza and pertussis vaccines as reference immunisations. Factors influencing likelihood of participation in a hypothetical GBS vaccine trial were also assessed. Women with children were more likely to know about each of the 3 conditions surveyed (GBS: 45% vs 26%, pertussis: 79% vs 63%, influenza: 66% vs 54%), to accept vaccination (GBS: 77% vs 65%, pertussis: 79% vs 70%, influenza: 78% vs 68%) and to consider taking part in vaccine trials (37% vs 27% for a hypothetical GBS vaccine tested in 500 pregnant women). For GBS, giving information about the condition significantly increased the number of respondents who reported that they would be likely to receive the vaccine. Health professionals were the most important reported source of information. Increasing awareness about GBS, along with other key strategies, would be required to optimise the uptake of a routine vaccine, with a specific focus on informing women without previous children. More research specifically focusing on acceptability in pregnant women is required and, given the value attached to input from healthcare professionals, this group should be included in future studies. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not

  19. Staffs' and managers' perceptions of how and when discrete event simulation modelling can be used as a decision support in quality improvement: a focus group discussion study at two hospital settings in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hvitfeldt-Forsberg, Helena; Mazzocato, Pamela; Glaser, Daniel; Keller, Christina; Unbeck, Maria

    2017-06-06

    To explore healthcare staffs' and managers' perceptions of how and when discrete event simulation modelling can be used as a decision support in improvement efforts. Two focus group discussions were performed. Two settings were included: a rheumatology department and an orthopaedic section both situated in Sweden. Healthcare staff and managers (n=13) from the two settings. Two workshops were performed, one at each setting. Workshops were initiated by a short introduction to simulation modelling. Results from the respective simulation model were then presented and discussed in the following focus group discussion. Categories from the content analysis are presented according to the following research questions: how and when simulation modelling can assist healthcare improvement? Regarding how, the participants mentioned that simulation modelling could act as a tool for support and a way to visualise problems, potential solutions and their effects. Regarding when, simulation modelling could be used both locally and by management, as well as a pedagogical tool to develop and test innovative ideas and to involve everyone in the improvement work. Its potential as an information and communication tool and as an instrument for pedagogic work within healthcare improvement render a broader application and value of simulation modelling than previously reported. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  20. Extension of the Peters-Belson method to estimate health disparities among multiple groups using logistic regression with survey data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y; Graubard, B I; Huang, P; Gastwirth, J L

    2015-02-20

    Determining the extent of a disparity, if any, between groups of people, for example, race or gender, is of interest in many fields, including public health for medical treatment and prevention of disease. An observed difference in the mean outcome between an advantaged group (AG) and disadvantaged group (DG) can be due to differences in the distribution of relevant covariates. The Peters-Belson (PB) method fits a regression model with covariates to the AG to predict, for each DG member, their outcome measure as if they had been from the AG. The difference between the mean predicted and the mean observed outcomes of DG members is the (unexplained) disparity of interest. We focus on applying the PB method to estimate the disparity based on binary/multinomial/proportional odds logistic regression models using data collected from complex surveys with more than one DG. Estimators of the unexplained disparity, an analytic variance-covariance estimator that is based on the Taylor linearization variance-covariance estimation method, as well as a Wald test for testing a joint null hypothesis of zero for unexplained disparities between two or more minority groups and a majority group, are provided. Simulation studies with data selected from simple random sampling and cluster sampling, as well as the analyses of disparity in body mass index in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2004, are conducted.  Empirical results indicate that the Taylor linearization variance-covariance estimation is accurate and that the proposed Wald test maintains the nominal level. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Extension of the Peters–Belson method to estimate health disparities among multiple groups using logistic regression with survey data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Graubard, B. I.; Huang, P.; Gastwirth, J. L.

    2015-01-01

    Determining the extent of a disparity, if any, between groups of people, for example, race or gender, is of interest in many fields, including public health for medical treatment and prevention of disease. An observed difference in the mean outcome between an advantaged group (AG) and disadvantaged group (DG) can be due to differences in the distribution of relevant covariates. The Peters–Belson (PB) method fits a regression model with covariates to the AG to predict, for each DG member, their outcome measure as if they had been from the AG. The difference between the mean predicted and the mean observed outcomes of DG members is the (unexplained) disparity of interest. We focus on applying the PB method to estimate the disparity based on binary/multinomial/proportional odds logistic regression models using data collected from complex surveys with more than one DG. Estimators of the unexplained disparity, an analytic variance–covariance estimator that is based on the Taylor linearization variance–covariance estimation method, as well as a Wald test for testing a joint null hypothesis of zero for unexplained disparities between two or more minority groups and a majority group, are provided. Simulation studies with data selected from simple random sampling and cluster sampling, as well as the analyses of disparity in body mass index in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999–2004, are conducted. Empirical results indicate that the Taylor linearization variance–covariance estimation is accurate and that the proposed Wald test maintains the nominal level. PMID:25382235

  2. Hair Color and Hearing Loss: A Survey in a Group of Military Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman Movahhed

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It has been shown that low levels of pigmentation increase susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss in humans. For this reason, white populations develop more pronounced noise- induced hearing loss in comparison to black populations. Similarly, blue-eyed individuals exhibit greater temporary threshold shift than brown-eyed subjects; still, no strong correlation has been verified between the lightness of hair color and susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss. This study was performed with the purpose of investigating a possible association between hair color and the degree of hearing loss due to firing noise. Study Design: Prospective observational study. Setting: A tertiary referral center with an accredited otorhinolaryngology-head & neck surgery department.   Materials and Methods: A total of 57 military recruits were divided into two groups; light-colored (blond and light brown and dark-colored hair (dark brown and black. The two groups were matched based on history of firing noise exposure (number of rounds; type of weapon and the level of hearing loss at 2, 3, 4, 6 and 8 kHz sound frequencies was compared between them.   Results: The results showed that the mean level of hearing loss of light-colored hair individuals (20.5±17dB was significantly greater than that of dark-haired subjects (13.5±11dB, (P=0.023.   Conclusion: The results indicate that hair color (blond versus black can be used as an index for predicting susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss in military environments. Therefore, based on the individual's hair color, upgraded hearing conservation programs are highly recommended.

  3. The Hispanic Americans Baseline Alcohol Survey (HABLAS): is the "prevention paradox" applicable to alcohol problems across Hispanic national groups?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano, Raul; Mills, Britain A

    2011-07-01

    The "prevention paradox," a notion that most alcohol-related problems are generated by nonheavy drinkers, has significant relevance to public health policy and prevention efforts. The extent of the paradox has driven debate over the type of balance that should be struck between alcohol policies targeting a select group of high-risk drinkers versus more global approaches that target the population at-large. This paper examines the notion that most alcohol problems among 4 Hispanic national groups in the United States are attributable to moderate drinkers. A general population survey employing a multistage cluster sample design, with face-to-face interviews in respondents' homes was conducted in 5 metropolitan areas of the United States. Study participants included a total of 2,773 current drinkers 18 years and older. Alcohol consumed in the past year (bottom 90% vs. top 10%), binge drinking (binge vs. no binge), and a 4-way grouping defined by volume and binge criteria were used. Alcohol-related harms included 14 social and dependence problems. Drinkers at the bottom 90% of the distribution are responsible for 56 to 73% of all social problems, and for 55 to 73% of all dependence-related problems reported, depending on Hispanic national group. Binge drinkers are responsible for the majority of the social problems (53 to 75%) and dependence-related problems (59 to 73%), also depending on Hispanic national group. Binge drinkers at the bottom 90% of the distribution are responsible for a larger proportion of all social and dependence-related problems reported than those at the top 10% of the volume distribution. Cuban Americans are an exception. The prevention paradox holds when using volume-based risk groupings and disappears when using a binge-drinking risk grouping. Binge drinkers who drink moderately on an average account for more harms than those who drink heavily across all groups, with exception of Cuban Americans. Copyright © 2011 by the Research Society on

  4. Demand for specialised training for the obese trauma patient: National ATLS expert group survey results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucher, Philip H; Tanno, Lulu; Hewage, Kalon; Bagnall, N Mark

    2017-05-01

    The growing incidence of obesity in Western populations continues to place new stressors on health systems. Obese trauma patients present particular challenges across the entirety of the patient care pathway, and are at risk of higher lengths of stay, morbidity, and mortality. This study sought to assess a national group of trauma experts' opinions and knowledge regarding the management of obese trauma. A questionnaire was circulated to a trauma training providers and national steering committee members at a UK national Advance Trauma Life Support meeting. Demographic, knowledge, and opinion data was collected and collated for analysis. 109 questionnaires were returned (73% response rate). Broad agreement was reached that obese trauma patients were more challenging to manage (96.2% agreement) and suffered worse outcomes (89.9%). Only 22.2% felt their hospitals possessed appropriate resources to facilitate management. Up to a third of respondents had personally witnesses errors in care due to patient obesity. 90% believed specialist training for obese trauma could improve care. There is broad consensus amongst UK trauma providers that obese trauma patients are at risk of poorer outcomes and errors in care. Knowledge and preparedness of centres to manage these patients is variable. There was broad consensus that specialist training for the management of obese trauma patients may improve outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Epidemiological Survey of Group A Rotaviruses Infection among Children under 5 Years with Acute Diarrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Kargar

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rotaviruses are one of the most important causes of acute gastroenteritis and death in children worldwide. WHO suggested hospital based surveillance all over the world in order to evaluate the prevalence of rotavirus diarrhea. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of rotavirus gastroenteritis in hospitalized children in Shiraz. Materials and Methods: In this study 138 stool samples from children aged 3 loose watery stools per 24 hours, hospitalized at Shaheed Dastgheib and Nemazee hospitals in Shiraz, were collected during 2006-2007. All the stool specimens were evaluated for Group A of rotaviruses with enzyme immunoassays (EIA. Then demographic and clinical data were analyzed by SPSS software.Results: Out of total collected samples rotavirus infection was detected in 48(34.78%. The highest infection rate was among children less than two years old (70.83%. Diarrhea (97.92%, vomiting (77.08% and fever (52.08% were the most frequent reported clinical symptoms in children with rotavirus infection. The highest of isolation of virus was observed in autumn (45.83% and the lowest in spring (8.33% (p=0.012. Also, there was no significant difference between the frequency of the rotavirus diarrhea and the pattern of nutrition (p= 0.236.Conclusion: Regarding to high frequency of rotavirus infection, concurrently surveillance of rotavirus gastroenteritis in other hospitals of Iran is recommended.

  6. Spathebothriidea: survey of species, scolex and egg morphology, and interrelationships of a non-segmented, relictual tapeworm group (Platyhelminthes: Cestoda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchta, Roman; Pearson, Rebecca; Scholz, Tomás; Ditrich, Oleg; Olson, Peter D

    2014-08-01

    Tapeworms of the order Spathebothriidea Wardle et McLeod, 1952 (Cestoda) are reviewed. Molecular data made it possible to assess, for the first time, the phylogenetic relationships of all genera and to confirm the validity of Bothrimonus Duvernoy, 1842, Diplocotyle Krabbe, 1874 and Didymobothrium Nybelin, 1922. A survey of all species considered to be valid is provided together with new data on egg and scolex morphology and surface ultrastructure (i.e. microtriches). The peculiar morphology of the members of this group, which is today represented by five effectively monotypic genera whose host associations and geographical distribution show little commonality, indicate that it is a relictual group that was once diverse and widespread. The order potentially represents the earliest branch of true tapeworms (i.e. Eucestoda) among extant forms.

  7. Leisure-time Physical Activity Among Different Social Groups of Estonia: Results of the National Physical Activity Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lusmägi Peeter

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available According to the Eurobarometer (European Commission, 2010, 39% of the Estonian adult population is not physically active at all. This percentage is relatively high compared to other countries that are culturally close to Estonia; the corresponding figure of close neighbors Finland and Sweden is below 10%. The article aims to present the results of a survey of physical activity (n=1,009 conducted in Estonia in 2013 and analyzes physical activity levels across various social groups. The results of the article show that employment, age, education, and ethnicity are important factors for engaging in leisure-time physical activity in Estonia. Non-ethnic Estonians, the less educated, the elderly, the unemployed, and those on maternity leave are less engaged in regular leisure exercise than people in other social groups. The results of the article were used to develop Estonia’s Sports 2030 strategy.

  8. SURVEY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    SURVEY er en udbredt metode og benyttes inden for bl.a. samfundsvidenskab, humaniora, psykologi og sundhedsforskning. Også uden for forskningsverdenen er der mange organisationer som f.eks. konsulentfirmaer og offentlige institutioner samt marketingsafdelinger i private virksomheder, der arbejder...

  9. Frontalunterricht oder interaktive Gruppenarbeit? Ein Vergleich des Lernerfolgs und der studentischen Evaluation für das Fach Biochemie [Didactic lecture or interactive group discussion? A comparison of the learning success and the student evaluation in biochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadmon, Martina

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available [english] Aims: Interactive, student-centered teaching methods have replaced traditional teacher-centered didactic formats in many modern medical curricula in the past few years. However, in the natural sciences such as biochemistry, interactive teaching methods are not well proven. The present study was conducted to compare the effect of the teaching format on the performance of undergraduate students in biochemistry and their evaluation of the respective format. Methods: A total of 421 second-year students were randomized into two groups: The control group was taught in a traditional lecture-like format, whereas the study group dealt with the same topic in an interactive group discussion. At the end of each lesson, students performed a multiple-choice test and completed a questionnaire. The same MCQ test was repeated 4–6 weeks after the last lesson. Results: Students who were taught in a lecture-like format performed significantly better in the first MCQ test immediately after the lesson than students taught in the interactive format. However, in the second MCQ test, there was no difference between the two groups. In the questionnaire, students rated the lecture-based course significantly better than the interactive group discussion. Conclusion: One reason why students prefer a didactic lecture to an interactive group discussion might be due to the subject biochemistry, which is strongly knowledge-based. Students perceived that the transfer of knowledge by a professional lecturer was more effective than the knowledge obtained in a student-centered discussion group. Other reasons might be the method of assessment and the overall design of the curriculum. [german] Zielsetzung: Interaktive, Lerner-orientierte Unterrichtsmethoden werden vielfach mit moderner und guter Lehre in Verbindung gebracht und ersetzen zunehmend konventionellen, Lehrer-zentrierten Frontalunterricht. In naturwissenschaftlichen Fächern, wie Biochemie, sind interaktive

  10. A pediatric food allergy support group can improve parent and physician communication: results of a parent survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ashika; Prematta, Tracy; Fausnight, Tracy

    2012-01-01

    Rationale. We sought to evaluate the impact of having an allergist at a food allergy support group (FASG) on the relationship between parents and their child's allergist. Methods. Ninety-eight online surveys were sent to parents who attend a FASG affiliated with our institution. Responses were analyzed looking for reasons for attending the support group and comfort with having an allergist present at the meetings. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of having an allergist at the food allergy support group on the relationship between parents and their child's allergist. Results. The FASG decreased anxiety about food allergies for 77.7% of those who responded. Most (71.4%) felt the FASG improved their child's quality of life. Greater than 90% felt comfortable having an allergist at the support group meeting, and 64.3% felt that talking to an allergist at the FASG made it easier to speak with their child's allergist. Conclusions. FASG meetings appear to be a good way for families of children with food allergies to learn more about food allergies, improve quality of life, and increase comfort in communicating with a child's allergist.

  11. A survey on the impact of the training period on empowering management team: A case study Saipa Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Darvish

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Having reliable and skilled employees are essential component of any organization. Employees are considered as intangible assets for most organizations and they are the primary source of making value added decisions. On the other hand, a learning organization is capable of making continuous improvement and survives in today’s competitive environment. The proposed study of this paper considers whether training programs could empower employees who were working as managers for Saipa Group Company, a well-known automaker in Iran. The study concentrates on those employees who participated in master program in one of educational organizations in city of Tehran, Iran. 178 managers attended this program representing approximately 70% of total managers. The results of our survey have indicated that while training programs have created meaningful sense and help them have a better sense of efficacy it has not created any feeling of competence or building feeling of self-organization. The survey also concluded that training programs could increase the level of meaningful sense and the feeling of competence. In addition, the results indicate that training programs could increase employees’ self-organization as well as efficacy characteristics.

  12. Hospital antibiotic management in the Czech Republic--results of the ABS maturity survey of the ABS International group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindrák, Vlastimil; Urbásková, Pavla; Bergerová, Tamara; Buchta, Vladimír; Hanslianová, Markéta; Horníková, Magdaléna; Chmelík, Václav; Nyc, Otakar; Vanis, Václav

    2008-01-01

    Hospital antibiotic stewardship (ABS) programs are essential for ensuring long-lasting quality of antibiotic usage and for controlling antimicrobial resistance in the hospital setting. A questionnaire for self-assessment of a hospital's ABS maturity was sent to 80 Czech hospitals in May 2007. The survey was focused on diagnostic issues, control of antibiotic consumption, antibiotic-related organization and tools, antibiotic-related personnel development and antibiotic-related relationships to relevant environments. Of 80 addressed hospitals, 45 sent back processed questionnaires (response rate 56.3%). These 80 hospitals cover about 85% of the Czech population. All Czech university hospitals were included in the replying group. The listed diagnostic tools were declared available by all hospitals; 44 of 45 hospitals have surveillance systems for antibiotic resistance rates. Control of antibiotic consumption was available only partially in 42 of 45 hospitals. Some antibiotic tools need to be improved and must be used more frequently. Official recognition, job descriptions and better funding of antibiotic personnel are needed, as well as support for further development of ABS structures and functions. The basic structure of ABS is well developed in the Czech hospitals. A network of antibiotic centers focusing their services on optimization of antibiotic usage has been in place in the Czech Republic since the 1970s. Nevertheless, the survey revealed a clear need and many opportunities for further improvement. Control of antibiotic consumption is not implemented in all Czech hospitals and some of the essential antibiotic tools should be used more widely.

  13. Availability of stereotactic radiotherapy with irregular ports (STRIP). Survey from database of pReference stereotactic system users group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohizumi, Yukio; Tamai, Hisashi; Imamiya, Satoshi; Akiba, Takeshi; Mori, Tomoyuki [Tokai Univ., Isehara, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Medicine; Seo, Makoto

    1999-04-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy with irregular ports (STRIP) contributes to reduce normal tissue damage around irregular target by using conformal collimator. The availability of STRIP was surveyed on the database of pReference stereotactic system users group. During the last three years, STRIP was used in 44% of patients with stereotactic irradiation. The high availability was seen in patients with astrocytoma (55%), H and N cancer (50%), pituitary adenoma (50%), and AVM (44%). In sites, temporal lobe (46%), base of skull (43%), and brain stem (38%). In target volume, 4 cc-13.5 cc (47%), 13.5 cc-35 cc (66%), and >35 cc (83%). In target regularity, {+-}4 mm-{+-}8 mm (43%) and >{+-}8 mm (75%). The diameter of target and irregularity correlated strongly. Targets with 3 cm in diameter and >{+-}4 mm of irregularity were recommended to treat with irregular pots. Hand-made irregular-shaped collimators were easily made and not expensive in cost. (author)

  14. Provision of group psychoeducation for relatives of persons in inpatient depression treatment--a cross-sectional survey of acute care hospitals in Germany

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Frank, Fabian; Rummel-Kluge, Christine; Berger, Mathias; Bitzer, Eva M; Hölzel, Lars P

    2014-01-01

    ...". Since there is limited knowledge on the provision of psychoeducational groups for relatives of persons in inpatient depression treatment, we conducted a survey among acute care hospitals in Germany...

  15. U.S. Geological Survey Karst Interest Group Proceedings, Carlsbad, New Mexico, April 29-May 2, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuniansky, Eve L.; Spangler, Lawrence E.; Kuniansky, Eve L.; Spangler, Lawrence E.

    2014-01-01

    strong interest in the study of karst terrains.Many of the major springs and aquifers in the United States have developed in carbonate rocks, such as the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Alabama, Georgia, and South Carolina; the Ozark Plateaus aquifer system in parts of Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma; and the Edwards-Trinity aquifer system in west-central Texas. These aquifers, and the springs that discharge from them, serve as major water-supply sources and as unique ecological habitats. Competition for the water resources of karst aquifers is common, and urban development and the lack of attenuation of contaminants in karst areas can impact the ecosystem and water quality of these aquifers.The concept for developing a platform for interaction among scientists within the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) working on karst-related studies evolved from the November 1999 National Ground-Water Meeting of the USGS. As a result, the Karst Interest Group (KIG) was formed in 2000. The KIG is a loose-knit, grass-roots organization of USGS and non-USGS scientists and researchers devoted to fostering better communication among scientists working on, or interested in, karst science. The primary mission of the KIG is to encourage and support interdisciplinary collaboration and technology transfer among scientists working in karst areas. Additionally, the KIG encourages collaborative studies between the different mission areas of the USGS as well as other federal and state agencies, and with researchers from academia and institutes. The KIG also encourages younger scientists by participation of students in the poster and oral sessions.To accomplish its mission, the KIG has organized a series of workshops that are held near nationally important karst areas. To date (2014) six KIG workshops, including the workshop documented in this report, have been held. The workshops typically include oral and poster sessions on selected karst-related topics and research, as well

  16. Grupos de discussão virtual: uma proposta para o ensino em enfermagem Grupos de discusión virtual: una propuesta para la enseñanza en enfermería Virtual discussion groups: a proposal for nursing teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiane Dal Pai

    2007-09-01

    émicos, el profesor y la estudiante, bien como momentos de reflexión y discusión sobre los temas confrontados en la práctica de enfermería.This paper describes a teaching experience aimed at providing interactivity to the technique of field diary by using a virtual learning environment. The educational proposal derives from the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS's Teaching Training Program of the Stricto Sensu Post-Graduation Program in Nursing, in which the author, a Master's degree candidate, oriented by her advisor, proposed forming virtual discussion groups in order to write the field diary for an undergraduate discipline in Nursing, with the aim of providing an opportunity for a joint discussion of academic experiences in the realm of practice. The instructors of the discipline in which the proposal was developed also participated in the activities. The virtual technology gave new dynamism to the technique of field diary, making possible an exchange of experiences among the students, the instructor and the author, as well as moments of reflection and discussion regarding the themes faced in the Nursing practice.

  17. Communicating with the public following radiological terrorism: results from a series of focus groups and national surveys in Britain and Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Julia M; Rubin, G James; Selke, Piet; Amlôt, Richard; Mowbray, Fiona; Rogers, M Brooke

    2013-04-01

    Incidents involving the exposure of large numbers of people to radiological material can have serious consequences for those affected, their community and wider society. In many instances, the psychological effects of these incidents have the greatest impact. People fear radiation and even incidents which result in little or no actual exposure have the potential to cause widespread anxiety and behavior change. The aim of this study was to assess public intentions, beliefs and information needs in the UK and Germany in response to a hidden radiological exposure device. By assessing how the public is likely to react to such events, strategies for more effective crisis and risk communication can be developed and designed to address any knowledge gaps, misperceptions and behavioral responses that are contrary to public health advice. This study had three stages. The first stage consisted of focus groups which identified perceptions of and reactions to a covert radiological device. The incident was introduced to participants using a series of mock newspaper and broadcast injects to convey the evolving scenario. The outcomes of these focus groups were used to inform national telephone surveys, which quantified intended behaviors and assessed what perceptions were correlated with these behaviors. Focus group and survey results were used to develop video and leaflet communication interventions, which were then evaluated in a second round of focus groups. In the first two stages, misperceptions about the likelihood and routes of exposure were associated with higher levels of worry and greater likelihood of engaging in behaviors that might be detrimental to ongoing public health efforts. The final focus groups demonstrated that both types of misunderstanding are amenable to change following targeted communication. Should terrorists succeed in placing a hidden radiological device in a public location, then health agencies may find that it is easier to communicate effectively

  18. Willingness to Be a Brain Donor: A Survey of Research Volunteers From 4 Racial/Ethnic Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boise, Linda; Hinton, Ladson; Rosen, Howard J; Ruhl, Mary C; Dodge, Hiroko; Mattek, Nora; Albert, Marilyn; Denny, Andrea; Grill, Joshua D; Hughes, Travonia; Lingler, Jennifer H; Morhardt, Darby; Parfitt, Francine; Peterson-Hazan, Susan; Pop, Viorela; Rose, Tara; Shah, Raj C

    2017-01-01

    Racial and ethnic groups are under-represented among research subjects who assent to brain donation in Alzheimer disease research studies. There has been little research on this important topic. Although there are some studies that have investigated the barriers to brain donation among African American study volunteers, there is no known research on the factors that influence whether or not Asians or Latinos are willing to donate their brains for research. African American, Caucasian, Asian, and Latino research volunteers were surveyed at 15 Alzheimer Disease Centers to identify predictors of willingness to assent to brain donation. Positive predictors included older age, Latino ethnicity, understanding of how the brain is used by researchers, and understanding of what participants need to do to ensure that their brain will be donated. Negative predictors included African/African American race, belief that the body should remain whole at burial, and concern that researchers might not be respectful of the body during autopsy. The predictive factors identified in this study may be useful for researchers seeking to increase participation of diverse ethnic groups in brain donation.

  19. Patterns of knowledge and condom use among population groups: results from the 2005 Ethiopian behavioral surveillance surveys on HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsui Amy O

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Behavioral surveys help interpret the magnitude of HIV/AIDS. We analyzed indicators of knowledge on HIV/AIDS and condom use among sub populations selected for behavioral surveillance in Ethiopia. Methods We used 2005 HIV/AIDS behavioral data from ten target groups. These were female sex workers, defense forces, police force, pastoralists, truck drivers, intercity bus drivers, road construction workers, teachers, factory workers and people in ANC catchment areas. Results Data from 14,524 individuals were analyzed. The majority were males (63.6%. Overall, knowledge of the three preventive methods, misconceptions and comprehensive knowledge was 57%, 75% and 18.5%, respectively. Female sex workers and the defense force showed some behavioral change in using a condom during the most recent sexual encounter and consistently used a condom with non-regular sexual partners and paying partners. Women, pastoralists and the illiterate were less likely to use condom. Conclusion Misconceptions about the transmission of HIV were high and comprehensive knowledge about HIV & AIDS was low, particularly among pastoralists. Consistent condom use and condom use during the last sexual encounter were high among both female sex workers and defense force employees, both with paying and non-regular sexual partners. This might be a positive sign, though a considerable proportion in each target group did not report using a condom during sex with non-regular partners.

  20. Prevalence of bronchial asthma and respiratory symptoms in a group of students from grodno. An example of standardized epidemiological survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Ahiyevets

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Due to an insufficient knowledge of the real asthma prevalence rate among children and adults in Belarus, we conducted a population-based respiratory health survey. Aim of the study: The study aimed at estimating the prevalence rate of asthma and major respiratory symptoms among students of the Grodno Region (Western Belarus. Material and methods: The cross-sectional study was conducted in 2014 and included 833 students aged 20-40 (young adults. Physician-diagnosed respiratory diseases and symptoms were ascertained using electronic version of the ISAAC questionnaire (web LimeSurvey. Results: The prevalence of asthma was 2.88% (physician-diagnosed. The obstructive (asthmatic bronchitis (without established diagnosis of asthma was found in 5.04% of the respondents. A chronic respiratory symptom occurring in the past 12 months and suggestive of asthma included attacks of dyspnea at rest, cough (5.88% or in previous periods (8.88%, and wheezing in the chest (one of the most characteristic symptoms of asthma - 8.04%, which may indicate a higher prevalence of asthma among patients. Wheezing and wheeze without diagnosed asthma, colds or infections were reported in a small number of cases (about 1.0%. 32 respondents (3.84% can be attributed to the group of risk for asthma due to the presence of specific respiratory symptoms. Conclusions: The findings show a low prevalence of physician-diagnosed asthma among students of Western Belarus. Relatively low prevalence of allergic disorders among respondents of Belarus suggest underdiagnosis of allergic diseases, in particular of asthma. Presumably, cases of asthma might be diagnosed as spastic bronchitis, “obstructive bronchitis”, “asthmatic bronchitis”, a traditional label for clinical manifestation of asthma in medical practice in the region.

  1. European survey of diagnosis and management of the polycystic ovary syndrome: results of the ESE PCOS Special Interest Group's Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Gerard; Dewailly, Didier; Diamanti-Kandarakis, Evanthia; Escobar-Morreale, Hector F; Franks, Steven; Gambineri, Alessandra; Kelestimur, Fahrettin; Macut, Djuro; Micic, Dragan; Pasquali, Renato; Pfeifer, Marija; Pignatelli, Duarte; Pugeat, Michel; Yildiz, Bulent

    2014-10-01

    There is evidence for differences between endocrinologists and other specialists in their approach to diagnosis and management of the polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). A mailed survey consisting of a simple questionnaire aiming to understand current practice for diagnosis and management of the PCOS by specialists across Europe. The questionnaire consisted of 23 questions grouped to achieve information on i) the general characteristics of the respondents, ii) patients with PCOS seen by endocrinologists, iii) the main diagnostic criteria, iv) biochemical parameters used in the differential diagnosis of hyperandrogenism, v) long-term concerns, and, finally vi) treatment choices. A total of 357 questionnaires representing 13.3% of the members of European Society of Endocrinology (ESE) were available for final analysis; 93% of the respondents were endocrinologists In relation to the diagnostic criteria, respondents were most likely to select menstrual irregularity as the most frequent criteria used for the diagnosis of PCOS although very high rates were achieved for the use of hirsutism and biochemical hyperandrogenism. It therefore appears that the NIH criteria were followed by the majority of respondents. The most frequent biochemical parameters in the differential diagnosis of hyperandrogenism were total testosterone or free androgen index. Obesity and type 2 diabetes were regarded as the principal long-term concerns for PCOS. The most common treatments for patients with PCOS were metformin (33%), lifestyle modification (25%), and oral contraceptives (22%). More direct treatments of infertility include clomiphene citrate alone or in combination with metformin, prescribed by 9 and 23%, respectively, whereas only 6% used other methods for induction of ovulation. The survey produced by ESE is a good start for evaluating the perspective in the diagnosis and treatment of PCOS by endocrinologists in Europe. © 2014 European Society of Endocrinology.

  2. How can young women be encouraged to attend cervical cancer screening? Suggestions from face-to-face and internet focus group discussions with 30-year-old women in Stockholm, Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomberg, Karin; Tishelman, Carol; Ternestedt, Britt-Marie; Törnberg, Sven; Levál, Amy; Widmark, Catarina

    2011-01-01

    cervical cancer screening (CCS) using Pap-smears has been carried out for decades and is still an essential tool for secondary cancer prevention. Focus has traditionally been on what hinders women's attendance, instead of researching this issue from a positive standpoint, i.e. what factors encourage women to take a Pap-smear? In this article, we therefore explore issues that 30-year-old women have addressed as encouraging CCS attendance, with particular focus on aspects susceptible to intervention. through the population-based cervical cancer screening (PCCSP) registry in Stockholm, Sweden, a stratified random sampling technique was used to recruit women from the same birth cohort with varied CCS histories and results. Nine face-to-face focus groups discussions (FGDs) and 30 internet-based FGDs were conducted with a total of 138 women aged 30. Qualitative analysis was inspired by interpretative description, to generate clinically relevant and useful data. in general, these women expressed positive views about the PCCSP as an existing service, regardless of screening history. They described a wide range of factors encompassing the entire screening trajectory from invitation through follow-up which could motivate young women to CCS participation, including social marketing. Many of the suggestions related to individualization of the PCCSP, as well as a need to understand the relationship between human papilloma virus (HPV) and cervical cancer. [corrected these results are discussed in terms of the inherent tension between population-based public health initiatives and individually-oriented health care provision. Many suggestions given are already incorporated into the existing Stockholm-Gotland screening program, although this information may not reach women who need it. New research should test whether systematic information on HPV may provide a missing link in motivating young women to attend CCS, and which of their suggestions can serve to increase CCS

  3. Wide-Field Survey around Local Group Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy Leo II: Spatial Distribution of Stellar Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komiyama, Yutaka; Doi, Mamoru; Furusawa, Hisanori; Hamabe, Masaru; Imi, Katsumi; Kimura, Masahiko; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Nakata, Fumiaki; Okada, Norio; Okamura, Sadanori; Ouchi, Masami; Sekiguchi, Maki; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Yagi, Masafumi; Yasuda, Naoki

    2007-08-01

    We carried out a wide-field V, I imaging survey of the Local Group dwarf spheroidal galaxy Leo II using the Subaru Prime Focus Camera on the 8.2 m Subaru Telescope. The survey covered an area of 26.67×26.67 arcmin2, far beyond the tidal radius of Leo II (8.63'), down to the limiting magnitude of V~=26, which is roughly 1 mag deeper than the turnoff point of the main-sequence stars of Leo II. Radial number density profiles of bright and faint red giant branch (RGB) stars were found to change their slopes at around the tidal radius, and extend beyond the tidal radius with shallower slopes. A smoothed surface brightness map of Leo II suggests the existence of a small substructure (4×2.5 arcmin2, 270×170 pc 2 in physical size) of globular cluster luminosity beyond the tidal radius. We investigated the properties of the stellar population by means of a color-magnitude diagram. The horizontal branch (HB) morphology index shows a radial gradient in which red HB stars are more concentrated than blue HB stars, which is common to many Local Group dwarf spheroidal galaxies. The color distribution of RGB stars around the mean RGB sequence shows a larger dispersion at the center than in the outskirts, indicating a mixture of stellar populations at the center and a more homogeneous population in the outskirts. Based on the age estimation using subgiant branch stars, we found that although the major star formation took place ~8 Gyr ago, a considerable stellar population younger than 8 Gyr is found at the center; such a younger population is insignificant in the outskirts. The following star formation history is suggested for Leo II. Star-forming activity occurred more than ~8 Gyr ago throughout the galaxy at a modest star formation rate. The star-forming region gradually shrank from the outside toward the center, and star-forming activity finally dropped to ~0 by ~4 Gyr ago, except for the center, where a small population younger than 4 Gyr is present. Based on data collected

  4. U.S. Geological Survey Karst Interest Group Proceedings, Bowling Green, Kentucky, May 27-29, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuniansky, Eve L.

    2008-01-01

    States are developed in carbonate rocks and karst areas. These aquifers and the springs that discharge from them, serve as major water-supply sources and as unique biological habitats. Commonly, there is competition for the water resources of karst aquifers, and urban development in karst areas can impact the ecosystem and water quality of these aquifers. The concept for developing a Karst Interest Group evolved from the November 1999 National Ground-Water Meeting of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Water Resources Division. As a result, the Karst Interest Group was formed in 2000. The Karst Interest Group is a loose-knit grass-roots organization of USGS employees devoted to fostering better communication among scientists working on, or interested in, karst hydrology studies. The mission of the Karst Interest Group is to encourage and support interdisciplinary collaboration and technology transfer among USGS scientists working in karst areas. Additionally, the Karst Interest Group encourages cooperative studies between the different disciplines of the USGS and other Department of Interior agencies and university researchers or research institutes. The first Karst Interest Group workshop was held in St. Petersburg, Florida, February 13-16, 2001, in the vicinity of karst features of the Floridan aquifer system. The proceedings of that first meeting, Water-Resources Investigations Report 01-4011 are available online at: http://water.usgs.gov/ogw/karst/ The second Karst Interest Group workshop was held August 20-22, 2002, in Shepherdstown, West Virginia, in close proximity to the carbonate aquifers of the northern Shenandoah Valley. The proceedings of the second workshop were published in Water-Resources Investigations Report 02-4174, which is available online at the previously mentioned website. The third workshop of the Karst Interest Group was held September, 12-15, 2005, in Rapid City, South Dakota, which is in close proximity to karst features

  5. Encouraging Classroom Discussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Joseph McKee

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Classroom discussion has the potential to enhance the learning environment and encourages students to become active participants in the educational process. Student participation in classroom discussion has been shown to significantly improve the student learning experience. Research suggests that classroom discussion is an effective method for encouraging student classroom participation and for motivating student learning beyond the classroom. Participation in classroom discussion encourages students to become active collaborators in the learning process, while at the same time providing instructors with a practical method of assessing student learning. Classroom discussion is an effective tool for developing higher-level cognitive skills like critical thinking. Despite the potential discussion holds for student learning, many in academia lament the lack of participation in the classroom. The lack of student participation in classroom discussion is not a recent problem; it is one that has frustrated instructors for decades. Instructors report that some of the more current methods for encouraging classroom discussion can be exasperating and at times non-productive. This two-year study of 510 college and university students provides insight into the reasons why some students do not participate in classroom discussion. This study, which also elicited input from sixteen college and university professors and two high school teachers, offers some suggestions for creating and encouraging an environment conducive to student participation in the classroom.

  6. Hispanic Americans Baseline Alcohol Survey (HABLAS): effects of container size adjustments on estimates of alcohol consumption across Hispanic national groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano, Raul; Mills, Britain A; Harris, T Robert

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine discrepancies in alcohol consumption estimates between a self-reported standard quantity-frequency measure and an adjusted version based on respondents' typically used container size. Using a multistage cluster sample design, 5,224 Hispanic individuals 18 years of age and older were selected from the household population in five metropolitan areas of the United States: Miami, New York, Philadelphia, Houston, and Los Angeles. The survey-weighted response rate was 76%. Personal interviews lasting an average of 1 hour were conducted in respondents' homes in either English or Spanish. The overall effect of container adjustment was to increase estimates of ethanol consumption by 68% for women (range across Hispanic groups: 17%-99%) and 30% for men (range: 14%-42%). With the exception of female Cuban American, Mexican American, and South/Central American beer drinkers and male Cuban American wine drinkers, all percentage differences between unadjusted and container-adjusted estimates were positive. Second, container adjustments produced the largest change for volume of distilled spirits, followed by wine and beer. Container size adjustments generally produced larger percentage increases in consumption estimates for the higher volume drinkers, especially the upper tertile of female drinkers. Self-reported alcohol consumption based on standard drinks underreports consumption when compared with reports based on the amount of alcohol poured into commonly used containers.

  7. Learning through Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Robert A.; Calvo, Rafael; Levy, David; Tan, Kelvin

    2004-01-01

    Students studying a third-year e-commerce subject experienced face-to-face and online discussions as an important part of their learning experience. The quality of the students' experiences of learning through those discussions is investigated in this study. This study uses qualitative approaches to investigate the variation in the students'…

  8. A Survey of Local Group Galaxies Currently Forming Stars. I. UBVRI Photometry of Stars in M31 and M33

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Philip; Olsen, K. A. G.; Hodge, Paul W.; Strong, Shay B.; Jacoby, George H.; Schlingman, Wayne; Smith, R. C.

    2006-05-01

    We present UBVRI photometry obtained from Mosaic images of M31 and M33 using the Kitt Peak National Observatory 4 m telescope. We describe our data reduction and automated photometry techniques in some detail, as we will shortly perform a similar analysis of other Local Group galaxies. The present study covered 2.2 deg2 along the major axis of M31 and 0.8 deg2 on M33, chosen so as to include all of the regions currently active in forming massive stars. We calibrated our data using photometry from the Lowell 1.1 m telescope, and this external method resulted in millimagnitude differences in the photometry of overlapping fields, providing some assurance that our photometry is reliable. The final catalog contains 371,781 and 146,622 stars in M31 and M33, respectively, where every star has a counterpart in (at least) the B, V, and R passbands. Our survey goes deep enough to achieve 1%-2% photometry at 21 mag (corresponding to stars more massive than 20 Msolar) and achieves projects, we demonstrate the success of our photometry in being able to distinguish M31/M33 members from foreground Galactic stars. Finally, we present the results of a single night of spectroscopy on the WIYN 3.5 m telescope, examining the brightest likely members of M31. The spectra identify 34 newly confirmed members, including B-A supergiants, the earliest O star known in M31, and two new luminous blue variable candidates whose spectra are similar to that of P Cygni. Based in part on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA), Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. These observations are associated with program GO-9794.

  9. Italian survey in postoperative radiation therapy for prostate carcinoma by the AIRO National Working Group on Prostate Radiotherapy: definitive results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinverni, Giuseppe; Greco, Carlo; Bianchi, Pieromaria; Busutti, Luciano; Cagna, Emanuela; Cozzarini, Cesare; Del Duca, Massimo; Franzone, Paola; Frezza, Giovanni; Gabriele, Pietro; Genovesi, Domenico; Girelli, Giuseppe Franco; Italia, Corrado; Mandoliti, Giovanni; Mauro, Floranna; Nava, Simonetta; Pratissoli, Silvia; Saracino, Maria Bianca; Squillace, Luigi; Signor, Marco; Tagliagambe, Angiolo; Vavassori, Vittorio; Villa, Sergio; Zini, Giampaolo; Valdagni, Riccardo

    2005-01-01

    The National Working Group on Prostate Radiotherapy of AIRO (Associazione Italiana Radioterapia Oncologica, Italian Association of Radiotherapeutic Oncology) was established in March 2001. A retrospective multi-center survey was performed to analyze the patterns of care for prostate cancer patients treated with postoperative radiotherapy following radical prostatectomy in Italy with regard to the year 2000. A structured questionnaire was mailed to 47 Italian radiotherapy centers to assess patient accrual in the postoperative setting in the interval comprised between period January-December 2000. Numbers of patients treated for different stages, specific prognostic factors indicating the need for adjuvant radiotherapy, fractionation schedules and prescription doses were acquired as well as other clinically important factors such as radiotherapy timing and the use of hormone therapy. More technical features of the treatment, such as patient positioning, mode of simulation, typical field setup and dose prescription criteria were also included in the questionnaire. The questionnaire was returned by 24 radiotherapy Institutions (51%) with a total number of 470 patients treated postoperatively in the year 2000. An average of about 20 patients were enrolled by each radiotherapy center. The age range was 45-81 years. Radiotherapy was delivered within 6 months of radical prostatectomy in 297 patients (65.4%) (mean, 3.4 months). In 157 (34.6%), the treatment was delivered as a salvage approach for biochemical or micro-macroscopic recurrence. Most of patients had locally advanced stage disease (pT3-pT4) (76%). Unfavorable prognostic factors, such as positive margins, capsular invasion, Gleason pattern score > 7 were present in about 50% of patients. The study confirmed that important risk factors for recurrences are present in a significant percentage of patients treated by radical prostatectomy. The number of patients that would benefit from adjuvant radiotherapy is

  10. Discussion about magnesium phosphating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pokorny

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes results from recently published research focused on production of non-conventional magnesium phosphate Mg3(PO42・4H2O – bobierrite, or MgHPO4・3H2O – newberyite coating for both magnesium alloys and/or mild steel. This new kind of coating is categorized in the context of current state of phosphating technology and its potential advantages and crystal structure is discussed. At the same time, the suitable comparison techniques for magnesium phosphate coating and conventional zinc phosphate coating are discussed.

  11. LGBT Roundtable Discussion: Meet-up and Mentoring Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    The LGBT+ Physicists group welcomes those who identify as gender sexual minorities, as LGBTQQIAAP+, or as allies to participate in a round-table discussion on mentoring physicists. The session will provide an opportunity to learn and discuss successful mentoring strategies at different career stages for physicists in all environments, including academia, industry, etc. Attendees are encouraged to attend a social event to follow the panel to continue to network. Allies are especially welcome at this event to learn how to support and mentor LGBT+ physicists.

  12. WORKSHOP: Discussion, debate, deliberation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeliazkova, Margarita I.

    2014-01-01

    Discussing, deliberating and debating are a core part of any democratic process. To organise these processes well, a great deal of knowledge and skill is required. It is not simple to find a good balance between a number of elements: appropriate language and terminology; paying attention to solid

  13. John Cage Discusses Fluxus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Ellsworth

    1992-01-01

    Presents an informal discussion with composer John Cage which includes his response to George Maciunas' work, his recollections of Marcel Duchamp, the complex relationship between inelegant material and revealing works of art, neo-Dada and neo-Fluxus, Wittgenstein and the artist's ultimate responsibility to initiate a change in the viewer or…

  14. [Discussion paper participation research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farin, Erik

    2012-12-01

    This contribution introduces the "Diskussionspapier Teilhabeforschung" (discussion paper participation research) of the German Association for Rehabilitation (DVfR) and German Society for Rehabilitation Science (DGRW). The aim of this paper is to more clearly define current scientific research activity on the subject of participation and the significance of interdisciplinary participation research. The authors emphasise the desirability of a stronger scientific basis for instruments designed to improve the participation of disabled individuals. The paper is meant to be understood as an initial basis for the discussion about participation research development, and the authors are open to suggestions and elaboration.Participation research is understood in this discussion paper as an interdisciplinary research field with 7 goals and characteristics: 1. focussing on participation and self-determination; 2. contextual approach (taking environmental and personal factors into consideration that affect participation); 3. the participation of disabled persons in participation research; 4. interdisciplinary cooperation; 5. involving organisations and institutions whose approaches to participation research overlap; 6. referring to social and healthcare policies; 7. national and international orientations.The authors discuss the rationale behind increasing the support for participation research and theoretical models thereof. Fundamental concepts with high relevance to participation research include the biopsychosocial model of the International Classification of Functionality, Disability and Health (ICF), the inclusion concept, empowerment concept, and capabilities concept. The authors conclude their paper with recommendations for strengthening the research funding for participation research, and specify concrete steps toward greater participation research. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Discussion of the design of satellite-laser measurement stations in the eastern Mediterranean under the geological aspect. Contribution to the earthquake prediction research by the Wegener Group and to NASA's Crustal Dynamics Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paluska, A.; Pavoni, N.

    1983-01-01

    Research conducted for determining the location of stations for measuring crustal dynamics and predicting earthquakes is discussed. Procedural aspects, the extraregional kinematic tendencies, and regional tectonic deformation mechanisms are described.

  16. Advantages of asynchronous online focus groups and face-to-face focus groups as perceived by child, adolescent and adult participants: a survey study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaanswijk, M.; Dulmen, S. van

    2014-01-01

    Background: Online focus groups (OFGs) are increasingly used as a method of data collection. Although their advantages for research have repeatedly been described, participants’ opinions about OFGs have seldom been studied. We investigated OFG participants’ preference for participation in an OFG or

  17. Private peer group settings as an environmental determinant of alcohol use in Dutch adolescents: results from a representative survey in the region of Twente

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korte, J.; Pieterse, Marcel E.; Postel, Marloes Gerda; van Hoof, Joris Jasper

    2012-01-01

    This study supports the hypothesis that the drinking setting can be an environmental risk factor for hazardous alcohol use. In a survey of Dutch adolescents (n=1516), alcohol consumption and participation in private peer group settings (PPSs), environments where adolescents meet and drink alcohol

  18. The Moving Group Targets of the SEEDS High-contrast Imaging Survey of Exoplanets and Disks: Results and Observations from the First Three Years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandt, T.D.; et al., [Unknown; Thalmann, C.

    2014-01-01

    We present results from the first three years of observations of moving group (MG) targets in the Strategic Exploration of Exoplanets and Disks with Subaru (SEEDS) high-contrast imaging survey of exoplanets and disks using the Subaru telescope. We achieve typical contrasts of ~105 at 1'' and ~106

  19. Analysis of innovation diffusion theory under "micro" environment - Survey analysis of application and promotion of WeChat among the youth group

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chen Wei; Bingqi Wang; Ran Ma

    2016-01-01

    ... of innovation diffusion theory, and development stage of WeChat in the youth group, based on the survey data and by the use of the statistics of informatics, qualitative and quantitative analysis method, so as to provide a certain theoretical basis for the future research of WeChat.

  20. Underreporting Discrimination among Arab American and Muslim American Community College Students: Using Focus Groups to Unravel the Ambiguities within the Survey Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shammas, Diane

    2017-01-01

    Using a mixed methods approach, the researcher gathered a set of narrative responses from focus groups that supported the claim of underreporting campus discrimination on a survey. Multiple studies have shown that underrepresented minority students are likely to bond with same-ethnic peers in a racially tense campus climate. This mixed method is a…

  1. [An evaluation of the current status and the reported problems of the cancer support group "Hidamari" in our hospital-results of a questionnaire survey completed by group participants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Ikuko; Tadokoro, Hiroshi; Wakabayashi, Akiko; Nagaeki, Minako; Goto, Masahiro

    2013-09-01

    Peer support is a very important support intervention for cancer patients and their families. Our hospital has offered cancer support in the form of a support group "Hidamari" to cancer patients and their families since February 2012. This study analyzed and examined the current group status and the results of a questionnaire survey completed by group participants in order, to evaluate the functioning of the group and identify problems. The current group status was determined as per the records of practice. A questionnaire survey that consisted of both multiple choice and open-ended questions was administered to the participants after the sessions. ETHICAL CONSIDERATIONS: The subjects were informed about the study purpose and confidentiality provisions in both oral and written forms, and return of the anonymous survey was considered to be consent. A group session was performed every 2 months(to date, a total of 4 sessions), and a total of 48 patients(68%)and 23 family members(32%)participated in the sessions. Each session included 9-25 subjects(mean: 17. 7 subjects/session). The response rate of the survey was 95. 8%. Responses to the question, "Are you satisfied with the sessions ?" were very satisfied, satisfied, dissatisfied, or very dissatisfied in 63%, 37%, 0%, and 0% of the participants, respectively. Responses to the question, "Do you wish to participate in further sessions ?" were yes, no, undecided, or gave no response in 94%, 0%, 2%, and 4% of the subjects, respectively. Reasons for satisfaction with the sessions were "It gives me courage and strength," "Useful information can be obtained," and "Good advice from nurses." All participants were satisfied with the sessions and most of the participants wished to participate in future sessions, indicating that the sessions had some positive effects. In future, we must consider initiatives covering the whole region, such as the implementation of a workshop that meets the needs of the participants and increases

  2. Evaluating effectiveness of small group information literacy instruction for Undergraduate Medical Education students using a pre- and post-survey study design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClurg, Caitlin; Powelson, Susan; Lang, Eddy; Aghajafari, Fariba; Edworthy, Steven

    2015-06-01

    The Undergraduate Medical Education (UME) programme at the University of Calgary is a three-year programme with a strong emphasis on small group learning. The purpose of our study was to determine whether librarian led small group information literacy instruction, closely integrated with course content and faculty participation, but without a hands on component, was an effective means to convey EBM literacy skills. Five 15-minute EBM information literacy sessions were delivered by three librarians to 12 practicing physician led small groups of 15 students. Students were asked to complete an online survey before and after the sessions. Data analysis was performed through simple descriptive statistics. A total of 144 of 160 students responded to the pre-survey, and 112 students answered the post-survey. Instruction in a small group environment without a mandatory hands on component had a positive impact on student's evidence-based information literacy skills. Students were more likely to consult a librarian and had increased confidence in their abilities to search and find relevant information. Our study demonstrates that student engagement and faculty involvement are effective tools for delivering information literacy skills when working with students in a small group setting outside of a computer classroom. © 2015 Health Libraries Group.

  3. Discussion with CERN Directorate

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Please note that the Discussion with CERN Directorate will be transmitted also in the following rooms: Council Chamber - 503-1-001 IT Amphitheatre - 31-3-004 Prevessin 774-R-013 Simultaneous interpreting into French and English will be available in the Main Auditorium. Une interprétation simultanée en français et en anglais sera disponible dans l'amphithéâtre principal.

  4. Discussion about magnesium phosphating

    OpenAIRE

    Pokorny, P.; Tej, P.; Szelag, P.

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes results from recently published research focused on production of non-conventional magnesium phosphate Mg3(PO4)2・4H2O – bobierrite, or MgHPO4・3H2O – newberyite) coating for both magnesium alloys and/or mild steel. This new kind of coating is categorized in the context of current state of phosphating technology and its potential advantages and crystal structure is discussed. At the same time, the suitable comparison techniques for magnesium phosphate coating and convention...

  5. Personalization of Mail Surveys for General Public and Populations with a Group Identity: Results from Nine Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillman, Don A.; Lesser, Virginia; Mason, Robert; Carlson, John; Willits, Fern; Robertson, Rob; Burke, Bryan

    2007-01-01

    The effect of personalization on mail survey response rates was examined in nine studies that included 17 comparisons under several research conditions. A study of this variable across multiple experiments in five agricultural experiment stations was undertaken because of conflicting results from previous research and from concern that the…

  6. Validation of the Social and Emotional Health Survey for Five Sociocultural Groups: Multigroup Invariance and Latent Mean Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Sukkyung; Furlong, Michael; Felix, Erika; O'Malley, Meagan

    2015-01-01

    Social-emotional health influences youth developmental trajectories and there is growing interest among educators to measure the social-emotional health of the students they serve. This study replicated the psychometric characteristics of the Social Emotional Health Survey (SEHS) with a diverse sample of high school students (Grades 9-12; N =…

  7. Dating Norms and Dating Violence among Ninth Graders in Northeast Georgia: Reports from Student Surveys and Focus Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Patricia M.; Orpinas, Pamela

    2012-01-01

    This mixed-methods study describes the norms supporting male-to-female and female-to-male dating violence in a diverse sample of ninth graders. The quantitative study, based on student surveys (n = 624), compared norms supporting dating violence by sex, race/ethnicity, and dating status, and it examined the relation between dating violence norms…

  8. Panel Discussion Vi: Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, E.; Dolgov, A.; Crothers, S.; Mitra, A.; Rubakov, V.; Zakharov, A.

    2014-03-01

    Questions to discuss: * To what extent are Dark Matter and Dark Energy necessary to explain the observed properties of the Universe? * Why are the Dark matter profiles so universal at the galactic scales? * Are there viable candidates of modified gravitational dynamics to exclude the dark components of Universe? * Do we have any perspectives to distinguish the Dark Energy from the cosmological constant? * Are there any certain indications for sterile neutrinos in the cosmos? * How does the Planck data change the view of inflation in the early Universe? What could be the origin of the inflaton plateau? So far, what else is interesting about the Planck data? * What are the nearest crucial points in cosmological observations? * Can we be more decisive discriminating between the anthropic principle, the superstringy landscape, fine tuning or dynamics as reasons for the cosmological coincidences?

  9. Experiences of a Community-Based Lymphedema Management Program for Lymphatic Filariasis in Odisha State, India: An Analysis of Focus Group Discussions with Patients, Families, Community Members and Program Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Tali; Worrell, Caitlin M.; Little, Kristen; Prakash, Aishya; Patra, Inakhi; Rout, Jonathan; Fox, LeAnne M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Globally 68 million people are infected with lymphatic filariasis (LF), 17 million of whom have lymphedema. This study explores the effects of a lymphedema management program in Odisha State, India on morbidity and psychosocial effects associated with lymphedema. Methodology/Principal Findings Focus groups were held with patients (eight groups, separated by gender), their family members (eight groups), community members (four groups) and program volunteers (four groups) who had participated in a lymphedema management program for the past three years. Significant social, physical, and economic difficulties were described by patients and family members, including marriageability, social stigma, and lost workdays. However, the positive impact of the lymphedema management program was also emphasized, and many family and community members indicated that community members were accepting of patients and had some improved understanding of the etiology of the disease. Program volunteers and community members stressed the role that the program had played in educating people, though interestingly, local explanations and treatments appear to coexist with knowledge of biomedical treatments and the mosquito vector. Conclusions/Significance Local and biomedical understandings of disease can co-exist and do not preclude individuals from participating in biomedical interventions, specifically lymphedema management for those with lymphatic filariasis. There is a continued need for gender-specific psychosocial support groups to address issues particular to men and women as well as a continued need for improved economic opportunities for LF-affected patients. There is an urgent need to scale up LF-related morbidity management programs to reduce the suffering of people affected by LF. PMID:26849126

  10. Sexual risk attitudes and intentions of youth aged 12-14 years: survey comparisons of parent-teen prevention and control groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederman, Regina P; Chan, Wenyaw; Roberts-Gray, Cynthia

    2004-01-01

    In this study, the authors compared differences in sexual risk attitudes and intentions for three groups of youth (experimental program, n = 90; attention control, n = 80; and nonparticipant control, n = 634) aged 12-14 years. Two student groups participated with their parents in programs focused on strengthening family interaction and prevention of sexual risks, HIV, and adolescent pregnancy. Surveys assessed students' attitudes and intentions regarding early sexual and other health-risk behaviors, family interactions, and perceived parental disapproval of risk behaviors. The authors used general linear modeling to compare results. The experimental prevention program differentiated the total scores of the 3 groups (p group scored higher than the nonparticipant group on total scores (p < .01) and on students' intention to avoid sex (p < .01). The results suggest this novel educational program involving both parents and students offers a promising approach to HIV and teen pregnancy prevention.

  11. Assessing poisoning risks related to storage of household hazardous materials: using a focus group to improve a survey questionnaire

    OpenAIRE

    Keswick David; Smolinske Susan; Kaufman Martin M

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background In fall of 2004, the authors began an investigation to characterize the correlations between the storage of Household Hazardous Materials and the associated health risks, particularly to children. The study area selected was Genesee County, Michigan, near Flint, with data to be collected by a phone survey of residents and through the acquisition of county hospital records containing procedure codes indicating treatment for poison emergencies, and review of poison control c...

  12. Using benchmarking techniques and the 2011 maternity practices infant nutrition and care (mPINC) survey to improve performance among peer groups across the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Roger A; Dee, Deborah; Umer, Amna; Perrine, Cria G; Shealy, Katherine R; Grummer-Strawn, Laurence M

    2014-02-01

    A substantial proportion of US maternity care facilities engage in practices that are not evidence-based and that interfere with breastfeeding. The CDC Survey of Maternity Practices in Infant Nutrition and Care (mPINC) showed significant variation in maternity practices among US states. The purpose of this article is to use benchmarking techniques to identify states within relevant peer groups that were top performers on mPINC survey indicators related to breastfeeding support. We used 11 indicators of breastfeeding-related maternity care from the 2011 mPINC survey and benchmarking techniques to organize and compare hospital-based maternity practices across the 50 states and Washington, DC. We created peer categories for benchmarking first by region (grouping states by West, Midwest, South, and Northeast) and then by size (grouping states by the number of maternity facilities and dividing each region into approximately equal halves based on the number of facilities). Thirty-four states had scores high enough to serve as benchmarks, and 32 states had scores low enough to reflect the lowest score gap from the benchmark on at least 1 indicator. No state served as the benchmark on more than 5 indicators and no state was furthest from the benchmark on more than 7 indicators. The small peer group benchmarks in the South, West, and Midwest were better than the large peer group benchmarks on 91%, 82%, and 36% of the indicators, respectively. In the West large, the Midwest large, the Midwest small, and the South large peer groups, 4-6 benchmarks showed that less than 50% of hospitals have ideal practice in all states. The evaluation presents benchmarks for peer group state comparisons that provide potential and feasible targets for improvement.

  13. Using Benchmarking Techniques and the 2011 Maternity Practices Infant Nutrition and Care (mPINC) Survey to Improve Performance among Peer Groups across the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Roger A.; Dee, Deborah; Umer, Amna; Perrine, Cria G.; Shealy, Katherine R.; Grummer-Strawn, Laurence M.

    2015-01-01

    Background A substantial proportion of US maternity care facilities engage in practices that are not evidence-based and that interfere with breastfeeding. The CDC Survey of Maternity Practices in Infant Nutrition and Care (mPINC) showed significant variation in maternity practices among US states. Objective The purpose of this article is to use benchmarking techniques to identify states within relevant peer groups that were top performers on mPINC survey indicators related to breastfeeding support. Methods We used 11 indicators of breastfeeding-related maternity care from the 2011 mPINC survey and benchmarking techniques to organize and compare hospital-based maternity practices across the 50 states and Washington, DC. We created peer categories for benchmarking first by region (grouping states by West, Midwest, South, and Northeast) and then by size (grouping states by the number of maternity facilities and dividing each region into approximately equal halves based on the number of facilities). Results Thirty-four states had scores high enough to serve as benchmarks, and 32 states had scores low enough to reflect the lowest score gap from the benchmark on at least 1 indicator. No state served as the benchmark on more than 5 indicators and no state was furthest from the benchmark on more than 7 indicators. The small peer group benchmarks in the South, West, and Midwest were better than the large peer group benchmarks on 91%, 82%, and 36% of the indicators, respectively. In the West large, the Midwest large, the Midwest small, and the South large peer groups, 4–6 benchmarks showed that less than 50% of hospitals have ideal practice in all states. Conclusion The evaluation presents benchmarks for peer group state comparisons that provide potential and feasible targets for improvement. PMID:24394963

  14. TU-D-201-02: Medical Physics Practices for Plan and Chart Review: Results of AAPM Task Group 275 Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fong de los Santos, L [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Dong, L [Scripps Proton Therapy Center, San Diego, CA (United States); Greener, A [VA Medical Center, East Orange, NJ (United States); Johnson, J [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Johnson, P [University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Kim, G [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Mechalakos, J; Yorke, E [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Napolitano, B [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Parker, S [Novant Health, Winston Salem, NC (United States); Schofield, D [Saint Vincent Hospital, Acton, MA (United States); Wells, M [Piedmont Hospital, Atlanta, GA (United States); Ford, E [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Scripps Proton Therapy Center, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: AAPM Task Group (TG) 275 is charged with developing riskbased guidelines for plan and chart review clinical processes. As part of this work an AAPM-wide survey was conducted to gauge current practices. Methods: The survey consisted of 103 multiple-choice questions covering the following review processes for external beam including protons: 1) Initial Plan Check, 2) On-Treatment and 3) End-of-Treatment Chart Check. The survey was designed and validated by TG members with the goal of providing an efficient and easy response process. The survey, developed and deployed with the support of AAPM headquarters, was released to all AAPM members who have self-reported as working in the radiation oncology field and it was kept open for 7 weeks. Results: There are an estimated 4700 eligible participants. At the time of writing, 962 completed surveys have been collected with an average completion time of 24 minutes. Participants are mainly from community hospitals (40%), academicaffiliated hospitals (31%) and free-standing clinics (18%). Among many other metrics covered on the survey, results so far indicate that manual review is an important component on the plan and chart review process (>90%) and that written procedures and checklists are widely used (>60%). However, the details of what is reviewed or checked are fairly heterogeneous among the sampled medical physics community. Conclusion: The data gathered from the survey gauging current practices will be used by TG 275 to develop benchmarks and recommendations for the type and extent of checks to perform effective physics plan and chart review processes.

  15. Beta-haemolytic group A, C and G streptococcal infections in Western Norway: a 15-year retrospective survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppegaard, O; Mylvaganam, H; Kittang, B R

    2015-02-01

    Pyogenic streptococci cause significant morbidity and mortality, and the incidence of invasive group C and G streptococcal disease appears to be increasing. In this retrospective study we describe the epidemiological characteristics of invasive group A, C and G, along with non-invasive group C and G streptococcal infections in Western Norway from 1999 to 2013. A total of 512 invasive streptococcal infections were identified, of these 297 (58%) were group A (GAS), 24 (5%) group C (GCS) and 188 (37%) group G streptococci (GGS). In the non-invasive group, 4935 GCS and GGS-infections were identified. GCS and GGS were treated as one group (GCGS) for statistical purposes. All microbial categories displayed increasing incidence with age, seasonal variation and a male predominance. The incidence of invasive GCGS infections increased significantly from 1.4/100,000 inhabitants in 1999 to 6.3/100,000 in 2013 (p streptococcal disease in our community calls for sustained attentiveness to the clinical and molecular aspects of GAS, GCS and GGS infections. Copyright © 2014 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. U.S. Geological Survey Karst Interest Group Proceedings, San Antonio, Texas, May 16–18, 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuniansky, Eve L.; Spangler, Lawrence E.

    2017-05-15

    karst hydrogeologic systems. As a result, numerous federal, state, and local agencies have a strong interest in the study of karst terrains.Many of the major springs and aquifers in the United States have developed in carbonate rocks, such as the Floridan aquifer system in Florida and parts of Alabama, Georgia, and South Carolina; the Ozark Plateaus aquifer system in parts of Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma; and the Edwards-Trinity aquifer system in west-central Texas. These aquifers, and the springs that discharge from them, serve as major water-supply sources and form unique ecological habitats. Competition for the water resources of karst aquifers is common, and urban development and the lack of attenuation of contaminants in karst areas due to dissolution features that form direct pathways into karst aquifers can impact the ecosystem and water quality associated with these aquifers.The concept for developing a platform for interaction among scientists within the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) working on karst-related studies evolved from the November 1999 National Groundwater Meeting of the USGS. As a result, the Karst Interest Group (KIG) was formed in 2000. The KIG is a loose-knit, grass-roots organization of USGS and non-USGS scientists and researchers devoted to fostering better communication among scientists working on, or interested in, karst science. The primary mission of the KIG is to encourage and support interdisciplinary collaboration and technology transfer among scientists working in karst areas. Additionally, the KIG encourages collaborative studies between the different mission areas of the USGS as well as with other federal and state agencies, and with researchers from academia and institutes.To accomplish its mission, the KIG has organized a series of workshops that have been held near nationally important karst areas. To date (2017) seven KIG workshops, including the workshop documented in this report, have been held. The workshops

  17. A Survey of Local Group Galaxies Currently Forming Stars. I. UBVRI Photometry of Stars in M31 and M33

    OpenAIRE

    Massey, Philip; Olsen, K. A. G.; Hodge, Paul W.; Strong, Shay B.; Jacoby, George H.; Schlingman, Wayne; Smith, R. C.

    2006-01-01

    We present UBVRI photometry obtained from Mosaic images of M31 and M33 using the KPNO 4-m telescope. The survey covers 2.2 sq degrees of M31, and 0.8 sq degrees of M33, chosen so as to include all of the regions currently active in forming massive stars. The catalog contains 371,781 and 146,622 stars in M31 and M33, respectively, where every star has a counterpart (at least) in B, V, and R. We compare our photometry to previous studies. We provide cross references to the stars confirmed as me...

  18. First on-line survey of an international multidisciplinary working group (MightyMedic) on current practice in diagnosis, therapy and follow-up of dyslipidemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanutti, C; D'Alessandri, G; Petta, A; Harada-Shiba, M; Julius, U; Soran, H; Moriarty, P M; Romeo, S; Drogari, E; Jaeger, B R

    2015-05-01

    The MightyMedic (Multidisciplinary International Group for Hemapheresis TherapY and MEtabolic DIsturbances Contrast) Working Group has been founded in 2013. The leading idea was to establish an international network of interdisciplinary nature aimed at working to cross national borders research projects, clinical trials, educational initiatives (meetings, workshops, summer schools) in the field of metabolic diseases, namely hyperlipidemias, and diabetes, preventive cardiology, and atherosclerosis. Therapeutic apheresis, its indications and techniques, is a parallel field of investigation. The first on-line survey of the Group has been completed in the first half of 2014. The survey included # 24 Centers in Italy, Germany, Greece, UK, Sweden, Japan and USA. Relevant data have been collected on current practice in diagnosis, therapy and follow-up of dyslipidemias. 240 subjects with hyperlipidemia and treated with lipoprotein apheresis have been reported in the survey, but a large percentage of patients (35%) who could benefit from this therapeutic option are still treated by conventional drug approach. Genetic molecular diagnosis is performed in only 33% of patients while Lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)) is included in cardiovascular disease risk assessment in 71% of participating Centers. New detailed investigations and prospective multicenter studies are needed to evaluate changes induced by the impact of updated indications and strategies, as well as new treatment options, targeting standardization of therapeutic and diagnostic approaches. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Impact of Pathologist Involvement in Sarcoma and Rare Tumor Patient Support Groups on Facebook: A Survey of 542 Patients and Family Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, Jasmine; David, Marjorie Parker; Lee, Nathan E; Shalin, Sara C; Gardner, Jerad M

    2018-01-29

    - Patients with rare tumors have difficulty finding reliable information about their disease. Facebook patient support groups allow patients to educate one another. - To investigate how these patients perceive the value of pathologists, both in Facebook groups and real-world patient care. - Survey links were posted in 12 Facebook patient groups: 6 with an active pathologist member (angiosarcoma, epithelioid hemangioendothelioma, epithelioid sarcoma, dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans [×2], and desmoid fibromatosis), and 6 without "active" pathologist involvement (aggressive angiomyxoma, chondrosarcoma, Ewing sarcoma, leiomyosarcoma, liposarcoma, and osteosarcoma). - A total of 542 people responded (403 were patients): 264 from groups with a pathologist, and 278 from groups without active pathologist involvement. Of groups with an active pathologist, respondents agreed the pathologist's posts helped them better understand their disease (107 of 119; 90%) and relieved some of their disease-related anxiety (92 of 119; 77%). And for these groups 98% (117 of 119) of respondents agreed that having a pathologist in their group was a good thing; 83% (192 of 232) wanted more pathologists involved. More respondents from groups with an active pathologist (219 of 236; 93%) than without one (215 of 252; 85%) agreed: "pathologists are an important part of the patient care team for patients with cancer and other rare tumors" ( P = .008). - This study is the first to evaluate the impact of pathologist interaction with Facebook patient support groups and to assess perceptions about the specialty of pathology from a large group of patients with rare tumors. Pathologist involvement in Facebook patient groups appears to positively influence patient perception of the importance of pathologists. We hope these data will encourage more pathologists to participate in Facebook patient support groups.

  20. Critical infantile hepatic hemangioma: results of a nationwide survey by the Japanese Infantile Hepatic Hemangioma Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Tatsuo; Kumagai, Masaaki; Nosaka, Shunsuke; Nakazawa, Atsuko; Takimoto, Tetsuya; Hoshino, Ken

    2011-12-01

    The current survey aimed to describe the clinical features of critical infantile hepatic hemangioma (IHH) and the implications of recent treatments. A nationwide survey of critical IHH patients treated between 2005 and 2010 was performed in all 117 registered pediatric surgical hospitals in Japan. As a result, 19 patients were identified and reviewed using a statistical analysis. Abdominal distention (47.4%), high-output cardiac failure (47.4%), coagulopathy (42.1%), and respiratory distress (31.6%) were the major symptoms. Three patients died (1 of coagulopathy, 1 of cardiac failure, and 1 of both). An accompanying portovenous shunt was also highlighted. Infantile hepatic hemangioma was totally insensitive to steroid treatment in 3 (23.1%) of the 13 patients, and 9 (47.4%) of the 19 patients required other treatments. Surgical resection and β-blocker improved the hematologic data, whereas hepatic arterial ligation and embolization seemed to produce a limited effect. Among the dead patients, several hematologic parameters were significantly worse: the thrombocyte count (pretherapeutic: 73,000 vs 300,000/mm(3), dead vs survivor, respectively [P < .03]; posttherapeutic: 66,000 vs 388,700/mm(3) [P < .003]) and the prothrombin time (posttherapeutic, 35.0 vs 12.1 seconds [P < .0001], dead vs survivor, respectively). For critical IHH cases with steroid-insensitive hematologic disorders, alternative treatments including β-blocker therapy, surgery, and liver transplantation should be considered. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. National survey on edentulism and its geographic distribution, among Mexicans 18 years of age and older (with emphasis in WHO age groups).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Solís, C E; Pérez-Núñez, R; Maupomé, G; Avila-Burgos, L; Pontigo-Loyola, A P; Patiño-Marín, N; Villalobos-Rodelo, J J

    2008-04-01

    To determine the prevalence of edentulism in adults aged 18 years and older in Mexico and to describe its distribution in 20 of the 32 States in Mexico, highlighting the experience in the WHO age groups. A secondary analysis of the National Performance Evaluation Survey 2002-2003 (representative at the state level and part of the Word Health Survey) was undertaken. The sample design was probabilistic, stratified and through conglomerates. Data on dental conditions were available only for 20 of the 32 states of Mexico, leading to a total of 24 159 households (N = 54 638 654). The percentage of edentulism was determined as the proportion of subjects that self-reported complete loss of teeth. Data were analyzed using the SVY module for complex surveys in STATA 8.2. The mean age was 41.3 +/- 17.0 years (range 18-99). An estimated 6.3% (N = 3 437 816) of the population > or =18 years was edentulous. Lowest prevalences were observed in the states of Tlaxcala, Puebla and the Estado de Mexico with 3.4%, 3.8% and 4.5%, respectively. Highest prevalences were observed in San Luis Potosí, Colima, and Michoacán with 10.3%, 10.2% and 10.1%, respectively. Following the WHO age groups, the prevalence ranged from 2.4% in the 35-44 group through 25.5% in the 65-74 group. No obvious association between socio-economic and socio-demographic indicators at the state level and prevalence of edentulism was found. The prevalence of complete tooth loss observed in the present study varied greatly across states, although no straightforward association was found with socio-economic and socio-demographic indicators at the state level. This study could serve as a baseline to enable future evaluations of the oral status of Mexican adults and elders, following WHO age groups.

  2. Reply to Effect of concentration of organic matter on optical maturity parameters. Interlaboratory results of the organic matter concentration working group of the ICCP. Discussion by Vinay K. Sahay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonca, Filho J.G.; Araujo, C.V.; Borrego, A.G.; Cook, A.; Flores, D.; Hackley, P.; Hower, J.C.; Kern, M.L.; Kommeren, K.; Kus, J.; Mastalerz, Maria; Mendonca, J.O.; Menezes, T.R.; Newman, J.; Ranasinghe, P.; Souza, I.V.A.F.; Suarez-Ruiz, I.; Ujiie, Y.

    2011-01-01

    This reply is motivated by Sahay's comments on the paper published by Mendon??a Filho et al. (2010) dealing with the effect of concentration of an organic matter on optical maturity parameters. Four points were raised by Sahay: suggestion to use of chemical parameters to assess the effect of isolation, indication that suppression of vitrinite reflectance in liptinite-rich rocks was insufficiently addressed, discussion on the way to deal with the existence of multiple vitrinite populations in a dispersed organic matter, and contradictory explanation of results involving the influence of isolation procedure on fluorescence properties but no effect on vitrinite reflectance. The four points were separately addressed being the two first ones out of the scope of the paper. The existence of multiple vitrinite populations is a well-recognized problem whose importance in the results could be addressed because the participants provided individual records of vitrinite reflectance. These results indicated that election of different populations was not a major problem in the results. The influence of isolation procedure on the fluorescence spectra of alginite while the vitrinite reflectance remains unaltered is not considered contradictory because both parameters are measured on different components which may have a different response to the acid treatment. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  3. Will Gay Sex-Seeking Mobile Phone Applications Facilitate Group Sex? A Cross-Sectional Online Survey among Men Who Have Sex with Men in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiming Tang

    Full Text Available China is amidst a sexual revolution, with changing sexual practices and behaviors. Sex-seeking mobile phone applications (gay apps that allow multiple people to meet up quickly may facilitate group sex. This study was therefore undertaken to evaluate group sex among Chinese MSM and to better understand factors associated with group sex.An online survey was conducted from September-October 2014, collecting data on socio-demographics, sexual behaviors, use of gay apps and occurrence of group sex among Chinese MSM. Univariate and multivariable logistic regressions were used to compare group sex and non-group sex participants.Of the 1,424 MSM, the majority were under 30 years old (77.5%, unmarried (83.9%, and were gay apps users (57.9%. Overall, 141 (9.9% participants engaged in group sex in the last 12 months. Multivariate analyses showed that men living with HIV, engaged in condomless anal intercourse with men, and used gay apps were more likely to engage in group sex, with adjusted ORs of 3.74 (95% CI 1.92-7.28, 2.88 (95% CI 2.00-4.16 and 1.46 (95% CI: 1.00-2.13, respectively. Among gay app users, the likelihood of group sex increases with the number of sex partners and the number of sex acts with partners met through a gay app.Chinese MSM who engage in group sex are also more likely to engage in other risky sexual behaviors, and gay app use may facilitate group sex. Further research is needed among MSM who engage in group sex in order to target interventions and surveillance.

  4. Will Gay Sex-Seeking Mobile Phone Applications Facilitate Group Sex? A Cross-Sectional Online Survey among Men Who Have Sex with Men in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Weiming; Tang, Songyuan; Qin, Yilu; Zhang, Ye; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Chuncheng; Tso, Lai Sze; Wei, Chongyi; Yang, Ligang; Huang, Shujie; Yang, Bin; Tucker, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    China is amidst a sexual revolution, with changing sexual practices and behaviors. Sex-seeking mobile phone applications (gay apps) that allow multiple people to meet up quickly may facilitate group sex. This study was therefore undertaken to evaluate group sex among Chinese MSM and to better understand factors associated with group sex. An online survey was conducted from September-October 2014, collecting data on socio-demographics, sexual behaviors, use of gay apps and occurrence of group sex among Chinese MSM. Univariate and multivariable logistic regressions were used to compare group sex and non-group sex participants. Of the 1,424 MSM, the majority were under 30 years old (77.5%), unmarried (83.9%), and were gay apps users (57.9%). Overall, 141 (9.9%) participants engaged in group sex in the last 12 months. Multivariate analyses showed that men living with HIV, engaged in condomless anal intercourse with men, and used gay apps were more likely to engage in group sex, with adjusted ORs of 3.74 (95% CI 1.92-7.28), 2.88 (95% CI 2.00-4.16) and 1.46 (95% CI: 1.00-2.13), respectively. Among gay app users, the likelihood of group sex increases with the number of sex partners and the number of sex acts with partners met through a gay app. Chinese MSM who engage in group sex are also more likely to engage in other risky sexual behaviors, and gay app use may facilitate group sex. Further research is needed among MSM who engage in group sex in order to target interventions and surveillance.

  5. The Patient-Reported Information Multidimensional Exploration (PRIME) Framework for Investigating Emotions and Other Factors of Prostate Cancer Patients with Low Intermediate Risk Based on Online Cancer Support Group Discussions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandaragoda, Tharindu; Ranasinghe, Weranja; Adikari, Achini; de Silva, Daswin; Lawrentschuk, Nathan; Alahakoon, Damminda; Persad, Raj; Bolton, Damien

    2018-02-21

    This study aimed to use the Patient Reported Information Multidimensional Exploration (PRIME) framework, a novel ensemble of machine-learning and deep-learning algorithms, to extract, analyze, and correlate self-reported information from Online Cancer Support Groups (OCSG) by patients (and partners of patients) with low intermediate-risk prostate cancer (PCa) undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP), external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), and active surveillance (AS), and to investigate its efficacy in quality-of-life (QoL) and emotion measures. From patient-reported information on 10 OCSG, the PRIME framework automatically filtered and extracted conversations on low intermediate-risk PCa with active user participation. Side effects as well as emotional and QoL outcomes for 6084 patients were analyzed. Side-effect profiles differed between the methods analyzed, with men after RP having more urinary and sexual side effects and men after EBRT having more bowel symptoms. Key findings from the analysis of emotional expressions showed that PCa patients younger than 40 years expressed significantly high positive and negative emotions compared with other age groups, that partners of patients expressed more negative emotions than the patients, and that selected cohorts ( 70 years, partners of patients) have frequently used the same terms to express their emotions, which is indicative of QoL issues specific to those cohorts. Despite recent advances in patient-centerd care, patient emotions are largely overlooked, especially in younger men with a diagnosis of PCa and their partners. The authors present a novel approach, the PRIME framework, to extract, analyze, and correlate key patient factors. This framework improves understanding of QoL and identifies low intermediate-risk PCa patients who require additional support.

  6. The CFHTLS-Strong Lensing Legacy Survey (SL2S): Investigating the Group-scale Lenses with the SARCS Sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, A.; Cabanac, R.; More, S.; Alard, C.; Limousin, M.; Kneib, J.-P.; Gavazzi, R.; Motta, V.

    2012-04-01

    We present the Strong Lensing Legacy Survey-ARCS (SARCS) sample compiled from the final T0006 data release of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) covering a total non-overlapping area of 159 deg2. We adopt a semi-automatic method to find gravitational arcs in the survey that makes use of an arc-finding algorithm. The candidate list is pruned by visual inspection and ranking to form the final SARCS sample. This list also includes some serendipitously discovered lens candidates which the automated algorithm did not detect. The SARCS sample consists of 127 lens candidates which span arc radii ~2''-18'' within the unmasked area of ~150 deg2. Within the sample, 54 systems are promising lenses among which, we find 12 giant arcs (length-to-width ratio >=8). We also find two radial arc candidates in SL2SJ141447+544704. From our sample, we detect a systematic alignment of the giant arcs with the major axis of the baryonic component of the putative lens in concordance with previous studies. This alignment is also observed for all arcs in the sample and does not vary significantly with increasing arc radius. The mean values of the photometric redshift distributions of lenses corresponding to the giant arcs and all arcs sample are at z ~ 0.6. Owing to the large area and depth of the CFHTLS, we find the largest sample of lenses probing mass scales that are intermediate to cluster and galaxy lenses for the first time. We compare the observed image separation distribution (ISD) of our arcs with theoretical models. A two-component density profile for the lenses which accounts for both the central galaxy and the dark matter component is required by the data to explain the observed ISD. Unfortunately, current levels of uncertainties and degeneracies accommodate models both with and without adiabatic contraction. We also show the effects of changing parameters of the model that predict the ISD and that a larger lens sample might constrain relations such as the

  7. Current surgical principle for uterine cervical cancer of stages Ia2, Ib1, and IIa1 in Japan: a survey of the Japanese Gynecologic Oncology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, Mikio; Aoki, Yoichi; Sakamoto, Masaru; Shimada, Muneaki; Takeshima, Nobuhiro; Fujiwara, Hisaya; Matsumoto, Takashi; Kita, Tunekazu; Takizawa, Ken

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the current operative principle of uterine cervical cancer of stages Ia2, Ib1, and IIa1 (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics) in Japan by surveying member institutions of the Japanese Gynecologic Oncology Group (JGOG). We conducted a survey to assess the current operative principle, including indications and treatment, at all 199 active member institutions of the JGOG. A total of 166 institutions (83.4%) responded to the survey. For Ia2 squamous cell carcinoma without the need to preserve fertility, modified radical hysterectomy was performed, and lymph node dissection was done in about 85%. At 60% of JGOG institutions, it was considered that less invasive procedures might be suitable. At the majority of JGOG institutions, radical surgery and lymph node dissection were considered necessary for stages Ib1 and IIa1 squamous cell carcinoma, with 70% considering that less invasive procedures might not be suitable. This survey provides information regarding the current status of surgical principle for uterine cervical cancer (stages Ia2, Ib1, and IIa1) in Japan.

  8. Characterizing mobility from the prosthetic limb user's perspective: Use of focus groups to guide development of the Prosthetic Limb Users Survey of Mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, Brian J; Morgan, Sara J; Abrahamson, Daniel C; Amtmann, Dagmar

    2016-10-01

    Input from target respondents in the development of patient-reported outcome measures is necessary to ensure that the instrument is meaningful. To solicit perspectives of prosthetic limb users about their mobility experiences and to inform development of the Prosthetic Limb Users Survey of Mobility. Qualitative study. Four focus groups of lower limb prosthesis users were held in different regions of the United States. Focus group transcripts were coded, and themes were identified. Feedback from participants was used to develop a framework for measuring mobility with a lower limb prosthesis. Focus group participants (N = 37) described mobility as a confluence of factors that included characteristics of the individual, activity, and environment. Identified themes were defined as individual characteristics, forms of movement, and environmental situations. Prosthetic mobility was conceptualized as movement activities performed in an environmental or situational context. Respondent feedback used to guide development of Prosthetic Limb Users Survey of Mobility established a foundation for a new person-centered measure of mobility with a prosthetic limb. Perspectives of target respondents are needed to guide development of instruments intended to measure health outcomes. Focus groups of prosthetic limb users were conducted to solicit experiences related to mobility with a lower limb prosthesis. Results were used to inform development of a clinically meaningful, person-centered instrument. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2015.

  9. Survey of care for the underserved: a control group study of practicing physicians who were graduates of The Ohio State University College of Medicine premedical postbaccalaureate training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougle, Leon; Way, David P; Rucker, Yosman L

    2010-01-01

    Multiple publications describe short- term and intermediate outcomes of premedical postbaccalaureate programs (PBPs). However, the authors could find no control group studies reporting the service provided by graduates of PBPs to patients who are medically indigent (e.g., on Medicaid or uninsured) and/or poor. The authors explored the relationship between successful completion of a midwestern PBP and providing care for the underserved. In 2008, the authors surveyed 1996-2002 graduates of The Ohio State University College of Medicine who had been in practice for at least one year about their current practice population. The authors compared two groups: (1) physicians who completed the PBP and (2) a stratified random control group of physicians who graduated from the same medical school, in the same graduating classes, but did not participate in the PBP. The survey return rate was 70.9% (73/103). Findings suggest that PBP graduates were more likely to be practicing medicine in a federally designated underserved area (29.4% versus 5.1%, P < .009) or providing service where 40% or more of the patients were medically indigent or poor (67.6% versus 33.3%, P < .003). PBP graduates were also more likely to be volunteering their services to patients who were indigent (47.1% versus 10.3%, P < .001). This is likely the first control group study demonstrating the increased likelihood of graduates of a PBP providing health care to patients who are medically indigent and/or poor.

  10. The Hispanic Americans Baseline Alcohol Survey (HABLAS): Acculturation, Birthplace and Alcohol-Related Social Problems across Hispanic National Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano, Raul; Vaeth, Patrice A. C.; Rodriguez, Lori A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the association between acculturation, birthplace, and alcohol-related social problems across Hispanic national groups. A total of 5,224 Hispanic adults (18+ years) were interviewed using a multistage cluster sample design in Miami, New York, Philadelphia, Houston, and Los Angeles. Multivariate analysis…

  11. 75 FR 17428 - Notice of Proposed New Information Collection for Focus Groups for Non-use Valuation Survey...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-06

    ..., costs and distributional effects of dam removal. An interagency economics team consisting of... represented, including sex, age, education, income, race, and rural/ urban residence. Each focus group will... Management and Budget control number. Dated: March 31, 2010. Benjamin Simon, Acting Economics Staff Director...

  12. Survey of antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of the bacteria of the Bacteroides fragilis group isolated from the intestinal tract of children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Nakano

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available The bacteria of the Bacteroides fragilis group are considered important clinical pathogens and they are the most common anaerobes isolated from human endogenous infections. In this study, the susceptibility patterns to antibiotics and metals of 114 species of the B. fragilis group isolated from children with and without diarrhea were determined. Susceptibility was assayed by using an agar dilution method with Wilkins-Chalgren agar. All B. fragilis strains were resistant to lead and nickel, but susceptible to metronidazole and imipenem. beta-lactamase production was detected by using biological and nitrocefin methods, respectively, in 50% and 90.6% of the isolates of children with diarrhea and in 60% and 90% of the isolates of children without diarrhea. Our results show an increase of antibiotics and metals resistance in this microbial group, and a periodic evaluation of the antimicrobial susceptibility is needed. In Brazil, the contamination for antibiotics or metal ions is often observed, and it is suggested an increase the antimicrobial resistance surveillance of this microbial group, mainly those isolated from children's diarrhea.

  13. Students' Satisfaction with the Group Work Method and Its Performance Evaluation: A Survey in an Italian University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zedda, Massimo; Bernardelli, Silvia; Maran, Daniela Acquadro

    2017-01-01

    Group Work Learning Method is a cooperative learning technique that has positive effects in learning: students' active participation can increase both cognitive and social skills. Our work involved three cohorts of students of different years attending the same course at the University of Torino, Department of Psychology. The contents of the…

  14. Calcium intake in the United States from dietary and supplemental sources across adult age groups: new estimates from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003-2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangano, Kelsey M; Walsh, Stephen J; Insogna, Karl L; Kenny, Anne M; Kerstetter, Jane E

    2011-05-01

    Adequate lifelong calcium intake is essential in optimizing bone health. Recent National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data were used to quantify variation in calcium intake across adult age groups and to relate age-associated changes in calcium intake with energy intake. Additional goals were to assess differences in dietary calcium intake between supplemental calcium users and nonusers and to evaluate associations between age and calcium density in the diet. This cross-sectional analysis determined calcium and energy intake for National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey respondents during 2003-2006. Diet was assessed with 24-hour recall and supplement use via questionnaire. Trends in median intakes for dietary calcium, total calcium, and energy across age categories were assessed using survey analysis methods. Nutrient density was represented using calcium to energy intake ratios. The analyses included data from 9,475 adults. When compared to the 19- to 30-year age group, median dietary calcium intake was lower in the ≥81-year age group by 23% in men (Pcalcium supplement use increased (Pcalcium intake was greater than in nonusers (P=0.02). Calcium density in the diet significantly increased relative to age in men and women (Pcalcium to energy ratios were insufficient to meet target ratios inferred by adequate intake standards after age 50 years. Although supplemental calcium use and calcium density were highest in older age groups, they were not sufficient in meeting recommended levels. New approaches to increasing the frequency and level of calcium supplement use to enhance calcium density in diets may be necessary to reduce osteoporosis risk among older Americans. Copyright © 2011 American Dietetic Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Trends in the knowledge, attitudes and practices of travel risk groups towards prevention of malaria: results from the Dutch Schiphol Airport Survey 2002 to 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous studies investigating the travellers’ knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) profile indicated an important educational need among those travelling to risk destinations. Initiatives to improve such education should target all groups of travellers, including business travellers, those visiting friends and relatives (VFRs), and elderly travellers. Methods In the years 2002 to 2009, a questionnaire-based survey was conducted at the Dutch Schiphol Airport with the aim to study trends in KAP of travel risk groups towards prevention of malaria. The risk groups last-minute travellers, solo-travellers, business travellers, VFRs and elderly travellers were specifically studied. Results A total of 3,045 respondents were included in the survey. Travellers to destinations with a high risk for malaria had significantly more accurate risk perceptions (knowledge) than travellers to low-risk destinations. The relative risk for malaria in travellers to high-risk destinations was probably mitigated by higher protection rates against malaria as compared with travellers to low risk destinations. There were no significant differences in intended risk-taking behaviour. Trend analyses showed a significant change over time in attitude towards more risk-avoiding behaviour and towards higher protection rates against malaria in travellers to high-risk destinations. The KAP profile of last-minute travellers substantially increased their relative risk for malaria, which contrasts to the slight increase in relative risk of solo travellers, business travellers and VFRs for malaria. Conclusions The results of this sequential cohort survey in Dutch travellers suggest an annual 1.8% increase in protection rates against malaria coinciding with an annual 2.5% decrease in intended risk-seeking behaviour. This improvement may reflect the continuous efforts of travel health advice providers to create awareness and to propagate safe and healthy travel. The KAP profile of last

  16. Use of a Novel Accounting and Grouping Method for Major Trunk Injury-Analysis of Data from a Statewide Trauma Financial Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joubert, Kyla D; Mabry, Charles D; Kalkwarf, Kyle J; Betzold, Richard D; Spencer, Horace J; Spinks, Kara M; Porter, Austin; Karim, Saleema; Robertson, Ronald D; Sutherland, Michael J; Maxson, Robert T

    2016-09-01

    Major trunk trauma is common and costly, but comparisons of costs between trauma centers (TCs) are rare. Understanding cost is essential to improve quality, manage trauma service lines, and to facilitate institutional commitment for trauma. We have used results of a statewide trauma financial survey of Levels I to IV TC to develop a useful grouping method for costs and clinical characteristics of major trunk trauma. The trauma financial survey collected billing and clinical data on 75 per cent of the state trauma registry patients for fiscal year 2012. Cost was calculated by separately accounting for embedded costs of trauma response and verification, and then adjusting reasonable costs from the Medicare cost report for each TC. The cost-to-charge ratios were then recalculated and used to determine uniform cost estimates for each patient. From the 13,215 patients submitted for the survey, we selected 1,094 patients with major trunk trauma: lengths of stay ≥ 48 hours and a maximum injury of AIS ≥3 for either thorax or abdominal trauma. These patients were then divided into three Injury Severity Score (ISS) groups of 9 to 15, 16 to 24, or 25+ to stratify patients into similar injury groups for analysis of cost and cost drivers. For abdominal injury, average total cost for patients with ISS 9 to 15 was $17,429. Total cost and cost per day increased with severity of injury, with $51,585 being the total cost for those with ISS 25. Similar trends existed for thoracic injury. Use of the Medicare cost report and cost-to-charge ratios to compute uniform costs with an innovative grouping method applied to data collected across a statewide trauma system provides unique information regarding cost and outcomes, which affects quality improvement, trauma service line management, and decisions on TC participation.

  17. Dementia research--what do different public groups want? A survey by the Scottish Dementia Clinical Research Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Emma; Starr, John M; Connelly, Peter John

    2013-01-01

    Scotland's National Dementia Strategy calls for people with dementia and their carers to give voice to what they see as the priorities for dementia research. We sent questionnaires on dementia research priorities, locus and type of research, desired outcome measures and willingness to volunteer, to two groups of dementia research stakeholders: (1) people with dementia and their carers who may or may not be participating in research and (2) those who are directly participating in research. We also made the questionnaire available on a national dementia research website. Five hundred and fourteen responses were received. The top four topics rated by importance were identical across all three groups of respondents: early detection (38.1%), drug trials (14.2%), studies on people living at home (9.7%) and study of carers (6.0%). The data can help shape the dementia research agenda, but more information needs to be made available to the public about other potential research areas.

  18. The prevalence, correlates and impact of dementia in Cuba. A 10/66 group population-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llibre Rodríguez, J; Valhuerdi, A; Sanchez, I I; Reyna, C; Guerra, M A; Copeland, J R M; McKeigue, P; Ferri, C P; Prince, M J

    2008-01-01

    We aimed to estimate the prevalence, correlates and impact of dementia in Havana and Matanzas, Cuba. A 1-phase catchment area survey of all over 65-year-old residents of 7 catchment areas in Havana and 1 in Matanzas was conducted. Dementia diagnosis was established according to DSM-IV and our own, pre-validated 10/66 criteria. The impact of dementia was assessed through associations with needs for care, cutting back on work to care and caregiver psychological morbidity. We interviewed 2,944 older people, a response proportion of 96.4%. The prevalence of DSM-IV dementia was 6.4% and that of 10/66 dementia 10.8%. Both dementia outcomes were associated with older age, less education, a family history of dementia, shorter leg length and smaller skull circumference. Dementia, rather than physical health problems or depression, was the main contributor to needs for care (population-attributable prevalence fraction = 64.6%) and caregiver cutting back on work (population-attributable prevalence fraction = 57.3%). The prevalence of dementia in Cuba is similar to Europe. Among health conditions, dementia is the major contributor to dependency and caregiver economic and psychological strain. More attention needs to be given to it and other chronic diseases associated more with disability than premature mortality. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Survey of stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy in the UK by the QA group on behalf of the UK SABR Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, A; Scott, A J D; Webster, G J

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To ascertain the progress being made towards the implementation of stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) treatment in the UK, to obtain details of current practice in centres with an active treatment programme and to assess the projected future provision. Methods: In August 2012, an online questionnaire was sent to all 65 UK radiotherapy institutions. The included questions covered the current number of patients being treated and the intended number of patients for each clinical site; immobilization and motion management methods; CT scanning protocols; target and organ-at-risk delineation; treatment planning; image-guidance and treatment protocols; and quality assurance methods. Results: 48/65 (74%) institutions responded by the end of November 2012, with 15 indicating an active SABR programme. A further four centres indicated that a SABR protocol had been established but was not yet in clinical use. 14 of the 29 remaining responses stated an intention to develop a SABR programme in the next 2 years. Conclusion: The survey responses confirm that SABR provision in the UK is increasing and that this should be expected to continue in the next 2 years. A projection of the future uptake would suggest that by the end of 2014, UK SABR provision will be broadly in line with international practice. PMID:24620840

  20. Surgical principles for managing stage IB2, IIA2, and IIB uterine cervical cancer (Bulky Tumors) in Japan: a survey of the Japanese Gynecologic Oncology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, Mikio; Aoki, Yoichi; Sakamoto, Masaru; Shimada, Muneaki; Takeshima, Nobuhiro; Fujiwara, Hisaya; Matsumoto, Takashi; Kita, Tunekazu; Takizawa, Ken

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the current operative management of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IB2, IIA2, and IIB uterine cervical cancer (bulky tumors) in Japan by surveying the member institutions of the Japanese Gynecologic Oncology Group. We conducted a survey to assess current operative management, including indications and treatment, at all 199 active member institutions of the Japanese Gynecologic Oncology Group. A total of 166 institutions (83.4%) responded to the survey. For patients with stage IIB squamous cell carcinoma, 35.5% (59/166) of the institutions performed surgery. For stage IIB nonsquamous cell carcinoma, surgery was performed at 88 (53.7%) of 164 institutions. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy was provided by 75 (45.5%) of 165 institutions (actively in 44 and reluctantly in 31). At 101 (61.2%) of 165 institutions, para-aortic node dissection was performed as part of radical surgery in patients with any indications. At 96 (57.9%) of 166 institutions, high-risk patients underwent chemoradiotherapy after surgery. On the other hand, adjuvant chemotherapy was given to high-risk and intermediate-risk patients at 19.9% and 33.1% institutions, respectively. More than half of the 166 institutions considered the number of metastatic nodes (91/166, 54.8%) and tumor histology (116/166, 69.9%) when selecting adjuvant therapy. This survey provided information regarding the current surgical management of uterine cervical cancer (stages IB2, IIA2, and IIA) in Japan.