WorldWideScience

Sample records for survey spectral index-environment

  1. LAMOST spectral survey — An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Gang; Zhao Yongheng; Chu Yaoquan; Deng Licai; Jing Yipeng

    2012-01-01

    LAMOST (Large sky Area Multi-Object fiber Spectroscopic Telescope) is a Chinese national scientific research facility operated by National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC). After two years of commissioning beginning in 2009, the telescope, instruments, software systems and operations are nearly ready to begin the main science survey. Through a spectral survey of millions of objects in much of the northern sky, LAMOST will enable research in a number of contemporary cutting edge topics in astrophysics, such as discovery of the first generation stars in the Galaxy, pinning down the formation and evolution history of galaxies — especially the Milky Way and its central massive black hole, and looking for signatures of the distribution of dark matter and possible sub-structures in the Milky Way halo. To maximize the scientific potential of the facility, wide national participation and international collaboration have been emphasized. The survey has two major components: the LAMOST ExtraGAlactic Survey (LEGAS) and the LAMOST Experiment for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (LEGUE). Until LAMOST reaches its full capability, the LEGUE portion of the survey will use the available observing time, starting in 2012. An overview of the LAMOST project and the survey that will be carried out in the next five to six years is presented in this paper. The science plan for the whole LEGUE survey, instrumental specifications, site conditions, and the descriptions of the current on-going pilot survey, including its footprints and target selection algorithm, will be presented as separate papers in this volume.

  2. The SPHEREx All-Sky Spectral Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, James; SPHEREx Science Team

    2018-01-01

    SPHEREx, a mission in NASA's Medium Explorer (MIDEX) program that was selected for Phase A in August 2017, is an all-sky survey satellite designed to address all three science goals in NASA's astrophysics division, with a single instrument, a wide-field spectral imager. SPHEREx will probe the physics of inflation by measuring non-Gaussianity by studying large-scale structure, surveying a large cosmological volume at low redshifts, complementing high-z surveys optimized to constrain dark energy. The origin of water and biogenic molecules will be investigated in all phases of planetary system formation - from molecular clouds to young stellar systems with protoplanetary disks - by measuring ice absorption spectra. We will chart the origin and history of galaxy formation through a deep survey mapping large-scale spatial power in two deep fields located near the ecliptic poles. Following in the tradition of all-sky missions such as IRAS, COBE and WISE, SPHEREx will be the first all-sky near-infrared spectral survey. SPHEREx will create spectra (0.75 – 4.2 um at R = 41; and 4.2 – 5 um at R = 135) with high sensitivity making background-limited observations using a passively-cooled telescope with a wide field-of-view for large mapping speed. During its two-year mission, SPHEREx will produce four complete all-sky maps that will serve as a rich archive for the astronomy community. With over a billion detected galaxies, hundreds of millions of high-quality stellar and galactic spectra, and over a million ice absorption spectra, the archive will enable diverse scientific investigations including studies of young stellar systems, brown dwarfs, high-redshift quasars, galaxy clusters, the interstellar medium, asteroids and comets. All aspects of the instrument and spacecraft have high heritage. SPHEREx requires no new technologies and carries large technical and resource margins on every aspect of the design. SPHEREx is a partnership between Caltech and JPL, following the

  3. SPHEREx: An All-Sky Spectral Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, James; SPHEREx Science Team

    2016-01-01

    SPHEREx, a mission in NASA's Small Explorer (SMEX) program that was selected for Phase A in July 2015, is an all-sky survey satellite designed to address all three science goals in NASA's astrophysics division, in a single survey, with a single instrument. We will probe the physics of inflation by measuring non-Gaussianity by studying large-scale structure, surveying a large cosmological volume at low redshifts, complementing high-z surveys optimized to constrain dark energy. The origin of water and biogenic molecules will be investigated in all phases of planetary system formation - from molecular clouds to young stellar systems with protoplanetary disks - by measuring ice absorption spectra. We will chart the origin and history of galaxy formation through a deep survey mapping large-scale spatial power. Finally, SPHEREx will be the first all-sky near-infrared spectral survey, creating a legacy archive of spectra (0.75 - 4.8 um at R = 41.5 and 150) with high sensitivity using a cooled telescope with large mapping speed.SPHEREx will observe from a sun-synchronous low-earth orbit, covering the entire sky in a manner similar to IRAS, COBE and WISE. During its two-year mission, SPHEREx will produce four complete all-sky maps for constraining the physics of inflation. These same maps contain numerous high signal-to-noise absorption spectra to study water and biogenic ices. The orbit naturally covers two deep regions at the celestial poles, which we use for studying galaxy evolution. All aspects of the SPHEREx instrument and spacecraft have high heritage. SPHEREx requires no new technologies and carries large technical and resource margins on every aspect of the design. The projected instrument sensitivity, based on conservative performance estimates, meets the driving point source sensitivity requirement with 300 % margin.SPHEREx is a partnership between Caltech and JPL, following the successful management structure of the NuSTAR and GALEX SMEX missions. The spacecraft

  4. Hungaria Asteroid Region Telescopic Spectral Survey (HARTSS) II: Spectral Homogeneity Among Hungaria Family Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Michael P.; Emery, Joshua; Pinilla-Alonso, Noemi; Lindsay, Sean S.; MacLennan, Eric M.; Cartwright, Richard; Reddy, Vishnu; Sanchez, Juan A.; Thomas, Cristina A.; Lorenzi, Vania

    2017-10-01

    Spectral observations of asteroid family members provide valuable information regarding parent body interiors, the source regions of near-Earth asteroids, and the link between meteorites and their parent bodies. Hungaria family asteroids constitute the closest samples to the Earth from a collisional family (~1.94 AU), permitting observations of smaller fragments than accessible for Main Belt families. We have carried out a ground-based observational campaign - Hungaria Asteroid Region Telescopic Spectral Survey (HARTSS) - to record reflectance spectra of these preserved samples from the inner-most primordial asteroid belt. During HARTSS phase one (Lucas et al. [2017]. Icarus 291, 268-287) we found that ~80% of the background population is comprised of stony S-complex asteroids that exhibit considerable spectral and mineralogical diversity. In HARTSS phase two, we turn our attention to family members and hypothesize that the Hungaria collisional family is homogeneous. We test this hypothesis through taxonomic classification, albedo estimates, and spectral properties.During phase two of HARTSS we acquired near-infrared (NIR) spectra of 50 new Hungarias (19 family; 31 background) with SpeX/IRTF and NICS/TNG. We analyzed X-type family spectra for NIR color indices (0.85-J J-K), and a subtle ~0.9 µm absorption feature that may be attributed to Fe-poor orthopyroxene. Surviving fragments of an asteroid collisional family typically exhibit similar taxonomies, albedos, and spectral properties. Spectral analysis of X-type Hungaria family members and independently calculated WISE albedo determinations for 428 Hungaria asteroids is consistent with this scenario. Furthermore, ~1/4 of the background population exhibit similar spectral properties and albedos to family X-types.Spectral observations of 92 Hungaria region asteroids acquired during both phases of HARTSS uncover a compositionally heterogeneous background and spectral homogeneity down to ~2 km for collisional family

  5. Compton-thick AGN in the 3XMM spectral survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgantopoulos, I.; Corral, A.; Watson, M.; Rosen, S.

    2014-07-01

    In the framework of an ESA Prodex project, we have derived X-ray spectral fits for a large number (120,000) of 3XMM sources. We focus our study on the 120 square degrees that overlap with the SDSS survey. For about 1,100 AGN there are spectroscopic redsifts available. We automatically select candidate Compton-thick sources using simple spectral models. Various selection criteria are applied including a) a high equivalent width FeK line b) a flat spectrum with a photon index of 1.4 or lower at the 90% confidence level or at higher redshift an absorption turnover consistent with a column density of logNh=24. We find 30 candidate Compton-thick sources. More detailed spectral models are applied trying to secure the Compton-thick nature of these sources. We compare our findings with X-ray background synthesis models as well as with Compton-thick surveys in the COSMOS and XMM/CDFS areas.

  6. Spectral induced polarization survey applied to gold mine exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Samgyu; Son, Jeong-Sul; Shin, Seung-Wook; Cho, Seong-Jun; Kim, Changryol

    2017-04-01

    The induced polarization (IP) method has been used for the exploration of metallic ore deposits with sulfide minerals such as sphalerite, pyrite, galena, and so on. This method makes use of the capacitive action of the subsurface to locate zones where conductive minerals are disseminated within the host rock. But the IP method has problems with EM coupling and high-power currents that make it difficult to obtain high-quality data in field sites. To address these problems, we have developed an inversion algorithm and field survey techniques using the spectral induced polarization (SIP) method. In this study, we examined the applicability of SIP survey to determine the boundaries of subsurface mineralization and hydrothermal alteration associated with epithermal Au-Ag deposits. A SIP survey was carried out over a wide tuff area, including an area where the silicified zone had been identified from the results of geological and borehole investigations. The survey lines were installed across the silicified zone, and dipole-dipole configurations were used, with electrode spacing of 20m. The transmitter and receiver cables were isolated, and current and potential electrodes were used in stainless steel and non-polarized electrodes, respectively. The data on each survey line were obtained from three frequencies, 0.125 Hz, 1 Hz, and 8Hz. From the survey results, we could image the 2D electrical resistivity and phase difference distributions for each survey line. The boundaries of the silicified zone by hydrothermal alteration were defined by a high resistivity of 500 ohm-m, and the Au-Ag bearing quartz veins by mineralization of the epithermal deposits were defined by a high phase difference of 60 mrad.

  7. X-ray stars observed in LAMOST spectral survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hong-peng; Zhang, Li-yun; Han, Xianming L.; Shi, Jianrong

    2018-05-01

    X-ray stars have been studied since the beginning of X-ray astronomy. Investigating and studying the chromospheric activity from X-ray stellar optical spectra is highly significant in providing insights into stellar magnetic activity. The big data of LAMOST survey provides an opportunity for researching stellar optical spectroscopic properties of X-ray stars. We inferred the physical properties of X-ray stellar sources from the analysis of LAMOST spectra. First, we cross-matched the X-ray stellar catalogue (12254 X-ray stars) from ARXA with LAMOST data release 3 (DR3), and obtained 984 good spectra from 713 X-ray sources. We then visually inspected and assigned spectral type to each spectrum and calculated the equivalent width (EW) of Hα line using the Hammer spectral typing facility. Based on the EW of Hα line, we found 203 spectra of 145 X-ray sources with Hα emission above the continuum. For these spectra we also measured the EWs of Hβ, Hγ, Hδ and Ca ii IRT lines of these spectra. After removing novae, planetary nebulae and OB-type stars, we found there are 127 X-ray late-type stars with Hα line emission. By using our spectra and results from the literature, we found 53 X-ray stars showing Hα variability; these objects are Classical T Tauri stars (CTTs), cataclysmic variables (CVs) or chromospheric activity stars. We also found 18 X-ray stars showing obvious emissions in the Ca ii IRT lines. Of the 18 X-ray stars, 16 are CTTs and 2 are CVs. Finally, we discussed the relationships between the EW of Hα line and X-ray flux.

  8. Transport survey calculations using the spectral collocation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Painter, S.L.; Lyon, J.F.

    1989-01-01

    A novel transport survey code has been developed and is being used to study the sensitivity of stellarator reactor performance to various transport assumptions. Instead of following one of the usual approaches, the steady-state transport equation are solved in integral form using the spectral collocation method. This approach effectively combine the computational efficiency of global models with the general nature of 1-D solutions. A compact torsatron reactor test case was used to study the convergence properties and flexibility of the new method. The heat transport model combined Shaing's model for ripple-induced neoclassical transport, the Chang-Hinton model for axisymmetric neoclassical transport, and neoalcator scaling for anomalous electron heat flux. Alpha particle heating, radiation losses, classical electron-ion heat flow, and external heating were included. For the test problem, the method exhibited some remarkable convergence properties. As the number of basis functions was increased, the maximum, pointwise error in the integrated power balance decayed exponentially until the numerical noise level as reached. Better than 10% accuracy in the globally-averaged quantities was achieved with only 5 basis functions; better than 1% accuracy was achieved with 10 basis functions. The numerical method was also found to be very general. Extreme temperature gradients at the plasma edge which sometimes arise from the neoclassical models and are difficult to resolve with finite-difference methods were easily resolved. 8 refs., 6 figs

  9. THE GBT 67–93.6 GHz SPECTRAL LINE SURVEY OF ORION-KL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frayer, D. T.; Maddalena, Ronald J.; Meijer, M.; Hough, L.; White, S.; Norrod, R.; Watts, G.; Stennes, M.; Simon, R.; Woody, D.; Whitehead, M.; Ford, P.; Mello, M.; Bloss, M.; Srikanth, S.; Pospieszalski, M.; Bryerton, E.

    2015-01-01

    We present a 67–93.6 GHz spectral line survey of Orion-KL with the new 4 mm Receiver on the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). The survey reaches unprecedented depths and covers the low-frequency end of the 3 mm atmospheric window which has been relatively unexplored previously. The entire spectral-line survey is published electronically for general use by the astronomical community. The calibration and performance of the 4 mm Receiver on the GBT is also summarized

  10. The Herschel/HIFI unbiased spectral survey of the solar-mass protostar IRAS16293

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottinelli, S.; Caux, E.; Cecarelli, C.; Kahane, C.

    2012-03-01

    Unbiased spectral surveys are powerful tools to study the chemistry and the physics of star forming regions, because they can provide a complete census of the molecular content and the observed lines probe the physical structure of the source. While unbiased surveys at the millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths observable from ground-based telescopes have previously been performed towards several high-mass protostars, very little data exist on low-mass protostars, with only one such ground-based survey carried out towards this kind of object. However, since low-mass protostars are believed to resemble our own Sun's progenitor, the information provided by spectral surveys is crucial in order to uncover the birth mechanisms of low-mass stars and hence of our Sun. To help fill up this gap in our understanding, we carried out an almost complete spectral survey towards the solar-type protostar IRAS16293-2422 with the HIFI instrument onboard Herschel. The observations covered a range of about 700 GHz, in which a few hundreds lines were detected with more than 3σ confidence interval certainty and identified. All the detected lines which were free from obvious blending effects were fitted with Gaussians to estimate their basic kinematic properties. Contrarily to what is observed in the millimeter range, no lines from complex organic molecules have been observed. In this work, we characterize the different components of IRAS16293-2422 (a known binary at least) by analyzing the numerous emission and absorption lines identified.

  11. Atmospheric stellar parameters for large surveys using FASMA, a new spectral synthesis package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsantaki, M.; Andreasen, D. T.; Teixeira, G. D. C.; Sousa, S. G.; Santos, N. C.; Delgado-Mena, E.; Bruzual, G.

    2018-02-01

    In the era of vast spectroscopic surveys focusing on Galactic stellar populations, astronomers want to exploit the large quantity and good quality of data to derive their atmospheric parameters without losing precision from automatic procedures. In this work, we developed a new spectral package, FASMA, to estimate the stellar atmospheric parameters (namely effective temperature, surface gravity and metallicity) in a fast and robust way. This method is suitable for spectra of FGK-type stars in medium and high resolution. The spectroscopic analysis is based on the spectral synthesis technique using the radiative transfer code, MOOG. The line list is comprised of mainly iron lines in the optical spectrum. The atomic data are calibrated after the Sun and Arcturus. We use two comparison samples to test our method, (i) a sample of 451 FGK-type dwarfs from the high-resolution HARPS spectrograph; and (ii) the Gaia-ESO benchmark stars using both high and medium resolution spectra. We explore biases in our method from the analysis of synthetic spectra covering the parameter space of our interest. We show that our spectral package is able to provide reliable results for a wide range of stellar parameters, different rotational velocities, different instrumental resolutions and for different spectral regions of the VLT-GIRAFFE spectrographs, used amongst others for the Gaia-ESO survey. FASMA estimates stellar parameters in less than 15 m for high-resolution and 3 m for medium-resolution spectra. The complete package is publicly available to the community.

  12. Accurate Atmospheric Parameters at Moderate Resolution Using Spectral Indices: Preliminary Application to the MARVELS Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghezzi, Luan; Dutra-Ferreira, Letícia; Lorenzo-Oliveira, Diego; Porto de Mello, Gustavo F.; Santiago, Basílio X.; De Lee, Nathan; Lee, Brian L.; da Costa, Luiz N.; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Ogando, Ricardo L. C.; Wisniewski, John P.; González Hernández, Jonay I.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Fleming, Scott W.; Schneider, Donald P.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Cargile, Phillip; Ge, Jian; Pepper, Joshua; Wang, Ji; Paegert, Martin

    2014-12-01

    Studies of Galactic chemical, and dynamical evolution in the solar neighborhood depend on the availability of precise atmospheric parameters (effective temperature T eff, metallicity [Fe/H], and surface gravity log g) for solar-type stars. Many large-scale spectroscopic surveys operate at low to moderate spectral resolution for efficiency in observing large samples, which makes the stellar characterization difficult due to the high degree of blending of spectral features. Therefore, most surveys employ spectral synthesis, which is a powerful technique, but relies heavily on the completeness and accuracy of atomic line databases and can yield possibly correlated atmospheric parameters. In this work, we use an alternative method based on spectral indices to determine the atmospheric parameters of a sample of nearby FGK dwarfs and subgiants observed by the MARVELS survey at moderate resolving power (R ~ 12,000). To avoid a time-consuming manual analysis, we have developed three codes to automatically normalize the observed spectra, measure the equivalent widths of the indices, and, through a comparison of those with values calculated with predetermined calibrations, estimate the atmospheric parameters of the stars. The calibrations were derived using a sample of 309 stars with precise stellar parameters obtained from the analysis of high-resolution FEROS spectra, permitting the low-resolution equivalent widths to be directly related to the stellar parameters. A validation test of the method was conducted with a sample of 30 MARVELS targets that also have reliable atmospheric parameters derived from the high-resolution spectra and spectroscopic analysis based on the excitation and ionization equilibria method. Our approach was able to recover the parameters within 80 K for T eff, 0.05 dex for [Fe/H], and 0.15 dex for log g, values that are lower than or equal to the typical external uncertainties found between different high-resolution analyses. An additional test was

  13. Deep, Broadband Spectral Line Surveys of Molecule-rich Interstellar Clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widicus Weaver, Susanna L.; Laas, Jacob C.; Zou, Luyao; Kroll, Jay A.; Rad, Mary L.; Hays, Brian M.; Sanders, James L.; Cross, Trevor N.; Wehres, Nadine; McGuire, Brett A. [Department of Chemistry, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322 (United States); Lis, Dariusz C.; Sumner, Matthew C., E-mail: susanna.widicus.weaver@emory.edu [California Institute of Technology, Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics 301-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Spectral line surveys are an indispensable tool for exploring the physical and chemical evolution of astrophysical environments due to the vast amount of data that can be obtained in a relatively short amount of time. We present deep, broadband spectral line surveys of 30 interstellar clouds using two broadband λ  = 1.3 mm receivers at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. This information can be used to probe the influence of physical environment on molecular complexity. We observed a wide variety of sources to examine the relative abundances of organic molecules as they relate to the physical properties of the source (i.e., temperature, density, dynamics, etc.). The spectra are highly sensitive, with noise levels ≤25 mK at a velocity resolution of ∼0.35 km s{sup −1}. In the initial analysis presented here, column densities and rotational temperatures have been determined for the molecular species that contribute significantly to the spectral line density in this wavelength regime. We present these results and discuss their implications for complex molecule formation in the interstellar medium.

  14. Accurate atmospheric parameters at moderate resolution using spectral indices: Preliminary application to the marvels survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghezzi, Luan; Da Costa, Luiz N.; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Ogando, Ricardo L. C.; Dutra-Ferreira, Letícia; Lorenzo-Oliveira, Diego; Porto de Mello, Gustavo F.; Santiago, Basílio X.; De Lee, Nathan; Lee, Brian L.; Ge, Jian; Wisniewski, John P.; González Hernández, Jonay I.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Cargile, Phillip; Pepper, Joshua; Fleming, Scott W.; Schneider, Donald P.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Wang, Ji

    2014-01-01

    Studies of Galactic chemical, and dynamical evolution in the solar neighborhood depend on the availability of precise atmospheric parameters (effective temperature T eff , metallicity [Fe/H], and surface gravity log g) for solar-type stars. Many large-scale spectroscopic surveys operate at low to moderate spectral resolution for efficiency in observing large samples, which makes the stellar characterization difficult due to the high degree of blending of spectral features. Therefore, most surveys employ spectral synthesis, which is a powerful technique, but relies heavily on the completeness and accuracy of atomic line databases and can yield possibly correlated atmospheric parameters. In this work, we use an alternative method based on spectral indices to determine the atmospheric parameters of a sample of nearby FGK dwarfs and subgiants observed by the MARVELS survey at moderate resolving power (R ∼ 12,000). To avoid a time-consuming manual analysis, we have developed three codes to automatically normalize the observed spectra, measure the equivalent widths of the indices, and, through a comparison of those with values calculated with predetermined calibrations, estimate the atmospheric parameters of the stars. The calibrations were derived using a sample of 309 stars with precise stellar parameters obtained from the analysis of high-resolution FEROS spectra, permitting the low-resolution equivalent widths to be directly related to the stellar parameters. A validation test of the method was conducted with a sample of 30 MARVELS targets that also have reliable atmospheric parameters derived from the high-resolution spectra and spectroscopic analysis based on the excitation and ionization equilibria method. Our approach was able to recover the parameters within 80 K for T eff , 0.05 dex for [Fe/H], and 0.15 dex for log g, values that are lower than or equal to the typical external uncertainties found between different high-resolution analyses. An additional test

  15. Analysis of the Herschel/Hexos Spectral Survey Toward Orion South: A Massive Protostellar Envelope with Strong External Irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tahani, K.; Plume, R.; Bergin, E. A.; Tolls, V.; Phillips, T. G.; Caux, E.; Cabrit, S.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Johnstone, D.; Lis, D. C.; Pagani, L.; Menten, K. M.; Müller, H. S. P.; Ossenkopf-Okada, V.; Pearson, J. C.; van der Tak, F. F. S.

    2016-01-01

    We present results from a comprehensive submillimeter spectral survey toward the source Orion South, based on data obtained with the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared instrument on board the Herschel Space Observatory, covering the frequency range of 480 to 1900 GHz. We detect 685 spectral

  16. Chemical composition of interstellar molecular clouds: a millimeter and submillimeter spectral line survey of OMC-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blake, G.A.

    1986-01-01

    Results are presented from a millimeter and submillimeter spectral line survey of the core of the Orion molecular cloud (OMC-1). The millimeter-wave survey, conducted at the Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO), covers a 55 GHz interval in 1.3 mm (23 GHz) atmospheric window and contains emission from 29 molecules. Together with the frequency selective submillimeter observations of H 2 D + (372.4 GHz), Cl(492.2 GHz), NH 3 (572.5 GHz), and HCl (625.9 GHz) performed from the NASA Kuiper Airborne Observatory, over 800 emission lines have been detected from 33 chemically distinct species during the course of this work. The uniformly calibrated results from the unique and extensive OVRO spectral line survey place significant constraints on models of interstellar chemistry, and have allowed the chemical composition of the various regions in OMC-1 to be definitively characterized. A global analysis of the observed abundances showed that the markedly different chemical composition of the kinematically distinct Orion subsources may be simply interpreted in the framework of an evolving, initially quiescent, gas phase chemistry influenced by the process of massive star formation

  17. MALT-45: a 7 mm survey of the southern Galaxy - I. Techniques and spectral line data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Christopher H.; Walsh, Andrew J.; Lowe, Vicki; Voronkov, Maxim A.; Ellingsen, Simon P.; Breen, Shari L.; Purcell, Cormac R.; Barnes, Peter J.; Burton, Michael G.; Cunningham, Maria R.; Hill, Tracey; Jackson, James M.; Longmore, Steven N.; Peretto, Nicolas; Urquhart, James S.

    2015-04-01

    We present the first results from the MALT-45 (Millimetre Astronomer's Legacy Team-45 GHz) Galactic Plane survey. We have observed 5 square degrees (l = 330°-335°, b = ±0.5°) for spectral lines in the 7 mm band (42-44 and 48-49 GHz), including CS (1-0), class I CH3OH masers in the 7(0,7)-6(1,6) A+ transition and SiO (1-0) v = 0, 1, 2, 3. MALT-45 is the first unbiased, large-scale, sensitive spectral line survey in this frequency range. In this paper, we present data from the survey as well as a few intriguing results; rigorous analyses of these science cases are reserved for future publications. Across the survey region, we detected 77 class I CH3OH masers, of which 58 are new detections, along with many sites of thermal and maser SiO emission and thermal CS. We found that 35 class I CH3OH masers were associated with the published locations of class II CH3OH, H2O and OH masers but 42 have no known masers within 60 arcsec. We compared the MALT-45 CS with NH3 (1,1) to reveal regions of CS depletion and high opacity, as well as evolved star-forming regions with a high ratio of CS to NH3. All SiO masers are new detections, and appear to be associated with evolved stars from the Spitzer Galactic Legacy Infrared Mid-Plane Survey Extraordinaire (GLIMPSE). Generally, within SiO regions of multiple vibrational modes, the intensity decreases as v = 1, 2, 3, but there are a few exceptions where v = 2 is stronger than v = 1.

  18. The Galah Survey: Classification and Diagnostics with t-SNE Reduction of Spectral Information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traven, G.; Zwitter, T.; Žerjal, M. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, University of Ljubljana, Jadranska 19, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Matijevič, G. [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Kos, J.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; De Silva, G.; Sharma, S. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, A28, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Asplund, M.; Freeman, K.; Lin, J.; Da Costa, G.; Duong, L. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Casey, A. R. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Martell, S. L. [School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Schlesinger, K. J. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Mount Stromlo Observatory, Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Simpson, J. D. [Australian Astronomical Observatory, North Ryde, NSW 2113 (Australia); Zucker, D. B. [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 915, North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia); Anguiano, B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Macquarie University, North Ryde, NSW 2109 (Australia); Horner, J., E-mail: gregor.traven@fmf.uni-lj.si [Computational Engineering and Science Research Centre, University of Southern Queensland, Towoomba QLD 4350 (Australia); and others

    2017-02-01

    Galah is an ongoing high-resolution spectroscopic survey with the goal of disentangling the formation history of the Milky Way using the fossil remnants of disrupted star formation sites that are now dispersed around the Galaxy. It is targeting a randomly selected magnitude-limited ( V ≤ 14) sample of stars, with the goal of observing one million objects. To date, 300,000 spectra have been obtained. Not all of them are correctly processed by parameter estimation pipelines, and we need to know about them. We present a semi-automated classification scheme that identifies different types of peculiar spectral morphologies in an effort to discover and flag potentially problematic spectra and thus help to preserve the integrity of the survey results. To this end, we employ the recently developed dimensionality reduction technique t-SNE ( t -distributed stochastic neighbor embedding), which enables us to represent the complex spectral morphology in a two-dimensional projection map while still preserving the properties of the local neighborhoods of spectra. We find that the majority (178,483) of the 209,533 Galah spectra considered in this study represents normal single stars, whereas 31,050 peculiar and problematic spectra with very diverse spectral features pertaining to 28,579 stars are distributed into 10 classification categories: hot stars, cool metal-poor giants, molecular absorption bands, binary stars, H α /H β emission, H α /H β emission superimposed on absorption, H α /H β P-Cygni, H α /H β inverted P-Cygni, lithium absorption, and problematic. Classified spectra with supplementary information are presented in the catalog, indicating candidates for follow-up observations and population studies of the short-lived phases of stellar evolution.

  19. Model Atmospheres and Spectral Irradiance Library of the Exoplanet Host Stars Observed in the MUSCLES Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsky, Jeffrey

    2017-08-01

    We propose to compute state-of-the-art model atmospheres (photospheres, chromospheres, transition regions and coronae) of the 4 K and 7 M exoplanet host stars observed by HST in the MUSCLES Treasury Survey, the nearest host star Proxima Centauri, and TRAPPIST-1. Our semi-empirical models will fit theunique high-resolution panchromatic (X-ray to infrared) spectra of these stars in the MAST High-Level Science Products archive consisting of COS and STIS UV spectra and near-simultaneous Chandra, XMM-Newton, and ground-based observations. We will compute models with the fully tested SSRPM computer software incorporating 52 atoms and ions in full non-LTE (435,986 spectral lines) and the 20 most-abundant diatomic molecules (about 2 million lines). This code has successfully fit the panchromatic spectrum of the M1.5 V exoplanet host star GJ 832 (Fontenla et al. 2016), the first M star with such a detailed model, and solar spectra. Our models will (1) predict the unobservable extreme-UV spectra, (2) determine radiative energy losses and balancing heating rates throughout these atmospheres, (3) compute a stellar irradiance library needed to describe the radiation environment of potentially habitable exoplanets to be studied by TESS and JWST, and (4) in the long post-HST era when UV observations will not be possible, the stellar irradiance library will be a powerful tool for predicting the panchromatic spectra of host stars that have only limited spectral coverage, in particular no UV spectra. The stellar models and spectral irradiance library will be placed quickly in MAST.

  20. A sample of galaxy pairs identified from the LAMOST spectral survey and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Shi-Yin; Argudo-Fernández, Maria; Chen, Li; Feng, Shuai; Hou, Jin-Liang; Shao, Zheng-Yi; Chen, Xiao-Yan; Luo, A-Li; Wu, Hong; Yang, Hai-Feng; Yang, Ming; Hou, Yong-Hui; Wang, Yue-Fei; Jiang, Peng; Wang, Ting-Gui; Jing, Yi-Peng; Kong, Xu; Wang, Wen-Ting; Luo, Zhi-Jian; Wu, Xue-Bing

    2016-01-01

    A small fraction (< 10%) of the SDSS main galaxy (MG) sample has not been targeted with spectroscopy due to the effect of fiber collisions. These galaxies have been compiled into the input catalog of the LAMOST ExtraGAlactic Surveys and named the complementary galaxy sample. In this paper, we introduce this project and status of the spectroscopies associated with the complementary galaxies in the first two years of the LAMOST spectral survey (till Sep. of 2014). Moreover, we present a sample of 1102 galaxy pairs identified from the LAMOST complementary galaxies and SDSS MGs, which are defined as two members that have a projected distance smaller than 100 h −1 70 kpc and a recessional velocity difference smaller than 500 km s −1 . Compared with galaxy pairs that are only selected from SDSS, the LAMOST-SDSS pairs have the advantages of not being biased toward large separations and therefore act as a useful supplement in statistical studies of galaxy interaction and galaxy merging. (paper)

  1. THE ALMA SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY IN THE HUBBLE ULTRA DEEP FIELD: IMPLICATIONS FOR SPECTRAL LINE INTENSITY MAPPING AT MILLIMETER WAVELENGTHS AND CMB SPECTRAL DISTORTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carilli, C. L.; Walter, F. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 0, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Chluba, J. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Decarli, R. [Max-Planck Institute for Astronomy, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Aravena, M. [Nucleo de Astronomia, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Diego Portales, Av. Ejercito 441, Santiago (Chile); Wagg, J. [Square Kilometre Array Organisation, Lower Withington, Cheshire (United Kingdom); Popping, G. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748, Garching (Germany); Cortes, P. [Joint ALMA Observatory—ESO, Av. Alonso de Cordova, 3104, Santiago (Chile); Hodge, J. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, Niels Bohrweg 2, NL2333 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Weiss, A. [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Bertoldi, F. [Argelander Institute for Astronomy, University of Bonn, Auf dem Hügel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Riechers, D., E-mail: ccarilli@aoc.nrao.edu [Cornell University, 220 Space Sciences Building, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

    2016-12-10

    We present direct estimates of the mean sky brightness temperature in observing bands around 99 and 242 GHz due to line emission from distant galaxies. These values are calculated from the summed line emission observed in a blind, deep survey for spectral line emission from high redshift galaxies using ALMA (the ALMA spectral deep field observations “ASPECS” survey). In the 99 GHz band, the mean brightness will be dominated by rotational transitions of CO from intermediate and high redshift galaxies. In the 242 GHz band, the emission could be a combination of higher order CO lines, and possibly [C ii] 158 μ m line emission from very high redshift galaxies ( z  ∼ 6–7). The mean line surface brightness is a quantity that is relevant to measurements of spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background, and as a potential tool for studying large-scale structures in the early universe using intensity mapping. While the cosmic volume and the number of detections are admittedly small, this pilot survey provides a direct measure of the mean line surface brightness, independent of conversion factors, excitation, or other galaxy formation model assumptions. The mean surface brightness in the 99 GHZ band is: T{sub B}  = 0.94 ± 0.09 μ K. In the 242 GHz band, the mean brightness is: T{sub B}  = 0.55 ± 0.033 μ K. These should be interpreted as lower limits on the average sky signal, since we only include lines detected individually in the blind survey, while in a low resolution intensity mapping experiment, there will also be the summed contribution from lower luminosity galaxies that cannot be detected individually in the current blind survey.

  2. SURVEY DESIGN FOR SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTION FITTING: A FISHER MATRIX APPROACH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acquaviva, Viviana; Gawiser, Eric; Bickerton, Steven J.; Grogin, Norman A.; Guo Yicheng; Lee, Seong-Kook

    2012-01-01

    The spectral energy distribution (SED) of a galaxy contains information on the galaxy's physical properties, and multi-wavelength observations are needed in order to measure these properties via SED fitting. In planning these surveys, optimization of the resources is essential. The Fisher Matrix (FM) formalism can be used to quickly determine the best possible experimental setup to achieve the desired constraints on the SED-fitting parameters. However, because it relies on the assumption of a Gaussian likelihood function, it is in general less accurate than other slower techniques that reconstruct the probability distribution function (PDF) from the direct comparison between models and data. We compare the uncertainties on SED-fitting parameters predicted by the FM to the ones obtained using the more thorough PDF-fitting techniques. We use both simulated spectra and real data, and consider a large variety of target galaxies differing in redshift, mass, age, star formation history, dust content, and wavelength coverage. We find that the uncertainties reported by the two methods agree within a factor of two in the vast majority (∼90%) of cases. If the age determination is uncertain, the top-hat prior in age used in PDF fitting to prevent each galaxy from being older than the universe needs to be incorporated in the FM, at least approximately, before the two methods can be properly compared. We conclude that the FM is a useful tool for astronomical survey design.

  3. SPECTRAL CLASSIFICATION AND PROPERTIES OF THE O Vz STARS IN THE GALACTIC O-STAR SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY (GOSSS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arias, Julia I.; Barbá, Rodolfo H.; Sabín-Sanjulián, Carolina [Departamento de Física y Astronomía, Universidad de La Serena, Av. Cisternas 1200 Norte, La Serena (Chile); Walborn, Nolan R. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, MD 21218, Baltimore (United States); Díaz, Sergio Simón [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38200, Departamento de Astrofísica, Universidad de La Laguna, E-38205, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Apellániz, Jesús Maíz [Centro de Astrobiología, CSIC-INTA, campus ESAC, Camino Bajo del Castillo s/n, E-28 692 Madrid (Spain); Gamen, Roberto C. [Instituto de Astrofísica de La Plata (CONICET, UNLP), Facultad de Ciencias Astronómicas y Geofísicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque s/n, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Morrell, Nidia I. [Las Campanas Observatory, Carnegie Observatories, Casilla 601, La Serena (Chile); Sota, Alfredo [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía-CSIC, Glorieta de la Astronomía s/n, E-18 008 Granada (Spain); Marco, Amparo; Negueruela, Ignacio, E-mail: jarias@userena.cl [Departamento de Física, Ingeniería de Sistemas y Teoría de la Señal, Escuela Politécnica Superior, Universidad de Alicante, Carretera San Vicente del Raspeig s/n, E03690, San Vicente del Raspeig (Spain); and others

    2016-08-01

    On the basis of the Galactic O Star Spectroscopic Survey (GOSSS), we present a detailed systematic investigation of the O Vz stars. The currently used spectral classification criteria are rediscussed, and the Vz phenomenon is recalibrated through the addition of a quantitative criterion based on the equivalent widths of the He i λ 4471, He ii λ 4542, and He ii λ 4686 spectral lines. The GOSSS O Vz and O V populations resulting from the newly adopted spectral classification criteria are comparatively analyzed. The locations of the O Vz stars are probed, showing a concentration of the most extreme cases toward the youngest star-forming regions. The occurrence of the Vz spectral peculiarity in a solar-metallicity environment, as predicted by the fastwind code, is also investigated, confirming the importance of taking into account several processes for the correct interpretation of the phenomenon.

  4. SPECTRAL LINE SURVEY TOWARD MOLECULAR CLOUDS IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Yuri; Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Yamamoto, Satoshi [Department of Physics, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0033 (Japan); Shimonishi, Takashi [Frontier Research Institute for Interdisciplinary Sciences, Tohoku University, Aramakiazaaoba 6-3, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi, 980-8578 (Japan); Sakai, Nami [RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Aikawa, Yuri [Center for Computational Sciences, The University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1, Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Kawamura, Akiko [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo, 181-8588 (Japan)

    2016-02-20

    Spectral line survey observations of seven molecular clouds in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) have been conducted in the 3 mm band with the Mopra 22 m telescope to reveal chemical compositions in low metallicity conditions. Spectral lines of fundamental species such as CS, SO, CCH, HCN, HCO{sup +}, and HNC are detected in addition to those of CO and {sup 13}CO, while CH{sub 3}OH is not detected in any source and N{sub 2}H{sup +} is marginally detected in two sources. The molecular-cloud scale (10 pc scale) chemical composition is found to be similar among the seven sources regardless of different star formation activities, and hence, it represents the chemical composition characteristic of the LMC without influences by star formation activities. In comparison with chemical compositions of Galactic sources, the characteristic features are (1) deficient N-bearing molecules, (2) abundant CCH, and (3) deficient CH{sub 3}OH. Feature (1) is due to a lower elemental abundance of nitrogen in the LMC, whereas features (2) and (3) seem to originate from extended photodissociation regions and warmer temperature in cloud peripheries due to a lower abundance of dust grains in the low metallicity condition. In spite of general resemblance of chemical abundances among the seven sources, the CS/HCO{sup +} and SO/HCO{sup +} ratios are found to be slightly higher in a quiescent molecular cloud. An origin of this trend is discussed in relation to possible depletion of sulfur along the molecular cloud formation.

  5. THE HERSCHEL ORION PROTOSTAR SURVEY: SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS AND FITS USING A GRID OF PROTOSTELLAR MODELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furlan, E. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, 770 S. Wilson Ave., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Fischer, W. J. [Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Ali, B. [Space Science Institute, 4750 Walnut Street, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Stutz, A. M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Stanke, T. [ESO, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Tobin, J. J. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Megeath, S. T.; Booker, J. [Ritter Astrophysical Research Center, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, 2801 W. Bancroft Street, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Osorio, M. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía, CSIC, Camino Bajo de Huétor 50, E-18008 Granada (Spain); Hartmann, L.; Calvet, N. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Poteet, C. A. [New York Center for Astrobiology, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 Eighth Street, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Manoj, P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Colaba, Mumbai 400005 (India); Watson, D. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States); Allen, L., E-mail: furlan@ipac.caltech.edu [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)

    2016-05-01

    We present key results from the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey: spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and model fits of 330 young stellar objects, predominantly protostars, in the Orion molecular clouds. This is the largest sample of protostars studied in a single, nearby star formation complex. With near-infrared photometry from 2MASS, mid- and far-infrared data from Spitzer and Herschel , and submillimeter photometry from APEX, our SEDs cover 1.2–870 μ m and sample the peak of the protostellar envelope emission at ∼100 μ m. Using mid-IR spectral indices and bolometric temperatures, we classify our sample into 92 Class 0 protostars, 125 Class I protostars, 102 flat-spectrum sources, and 11 Class II pre-main-sequence stars. We implement a simple protostellar model (including a disk in an infalling envelope with outflow cavities) to generate a grid of 30,400 model SEDs and use it to determine the best-fit model parameters for each protostar. We argue that far-IR data are essential for accurate constraints on protostellar envelope properties. We find that most protostars, and in particular the flat-spectrum sources, are well fit. The median envelope density and median inclination angle decrease from Class 0 to Class I to flat-spectrum protostars, despite the broad range in best-fit parameters in each of the three categories. We also discuss degeneracies in our model parameters. Our results confirm that the different protostellar classes generally correspond to an evolutionary sequence with a decreasing envelope infall rate, but the inclination angle also plays a role in the appearance, and thus interpretation, of the SEDs.

  6. Hungaria asteroid region telescopic spectral survey (HARTSS) I: Stony asteroids abundant in the Hungaria background population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Michael P.; Emery, Joshua P.; Pinilla-Alonso, Noemi; Lindsay, Sean S.; Lorenzi, Vania

    2017-07-01

    The Hungaria asteroids remain as survivors of late giant planet migration that destabilized a now extinct inner portion of the primordial asteroid belt and left in its wake the current resonance structure of the Main Belt. In this scenario, the Hungaria region represents a ;purgatory; for the closest, preserved samples of the asteroidal material from which the terrestrial planets accreted. Deciphering the surface composition of these unique samples may provide constraints on the nature of the primordial building blocks of the terrestrial planets. We have undertaken an observational campaign entitled the Hungaria Asteroid Region Telescopic Spectral Survey (HARTSS) to record near-infrared (NIR) reflectance spectra in order to characterize their taxonomy, surface mineralogy, and potential meteorite analogs. The overall objective of HARTSS is to evaluate the compositional diversity of asteroids located throughout the Hungaria region. This region harbors a collisional family of Xe-type asteroids, which are situated among a background (i.e., non-family) of predominantly S-complex asteroids. In order to assess the compositional diversity of the Hungaria region, we have targeted background objects during Phase I of HARTSS. Collisional family members likely reflect the composition of one original homogeneous parent body, so we have largely avoided them in this phase. We have employed NIR instruments at two ground-based telescope facilities: the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF), and the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG). Our data set includes the NIR spectra of 42 Hungaria asteroids (36 background; 6 family). We find that stony S-complex asteroids dominate the Hungaria background population (29/36 objects; ∼80%). C-complex asteroids are uncommon (2/42; ∼5%) within the Hungaria region. Background S-complex objects exhibit considerable spectral diversity as band parameter measurements of diagnostic absorption features near 1- and 2-μm indicate that several

  7. ASPECT: A spectra clustering tool for exploration of large spectral surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    in der Au, A.; Meusinger, H.; Schalldach, P. F.; Newholm, M.

    2012-11-01

    Context. Analysing the empirical output from large surveys is an important challenge in contemporary science. Difficulties arise, in particular, when the database is huge and the properties of the object types to be selected are poorly constrained a priori. Aims: We present the novel, semi-automated clustering tool ASPECT for analysing voluminous archives of spectra. Methods: The heart of the program is a neural network in the form of a Kohonen self-organizing map. The resulting map is designed as an icon map suitable for the inspection by eye. The visual analysis is supported by the option to blend in individual object properties such as redshift, apparent magnitude, or signal-to-noise ratio. In addition, the package provides several tools for the selection of special spectral types, e.g. local difference maps which reflect the deviations of all spectra from one given input spectrum (real or artificial). Results: ASPECT is able to produce a two-dimensional topological map of a huge number of spectra. The software package enables the user to browse and navigate through a huge data pool and helps them to gain an insight into underlying relationships between the spectra and other physical properties and to get the big picture of the entire data set. We demonstrate the capability of ASPECT by clustering the entire data pool of ~6 × 105 spectra from the Data Release 4 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). To illustrate the results regarding quality and completeness we track objects from existing catalogues of quasars and carbon stars, respectively, and connect the SDSS spectra with morphological information from the GalaxyZoo project. Code is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/547/A115

  8. Spectral classification indicators of emission-line galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Fei; Liu, Yu-Yan; Li, Pei-Yu; Yu, Ming; Lei, Yu-Ming; Wang, Jian

    2015-07-01

    To find efficient spectral classification diagrams to classify emission-line galaxies, especially in large surveys and huge data bases, an artificial neural network (ANN) supervised learning algorithms is applied to a sample of emission-line galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data release 9 provided by the Max Planck Institute and the Johns Hopkins University (MPA/JHU) (http://www.sdss3.org/dr9/spectro/spectroaccess.php). A two-step approach is adopted. (i) The ANN network must be trained with a subset of objects that are known to be active galactic nuclei (AGNs) hosts, composites or star-forming galaxies, treating the strong emission-line flux measurements as input feature vectors in n-dimensional space, where n is the number of strong emission-line flux ratios. (ii) After the network is trained on a sample of galaxies, the remaining galaxies are classified in the automatic test analysis as AGN hosts, composites or star-forming galaxies. We show that the classification diagrams based on the [N II]/Hα versus other emission-line ratio, such as [O III]/Hβ, [Ne III]/[O II], ([O III]λ4959 + [O III]λ5007)/[O III]λ4363, [O II]/Hβ, [Ar III]/[O III], [S II]/Hα, and [O I]/Hα, plus colour, allows us to separate unambiguously AGN hosts, composites or star-forming galaxies. Among them, the diagram of [N II]/Hα versus [O III]/Hβ achieved an accuracy of 98 per cent for classification of AGN hosts, composites or star-forming galaxies. The other diagrams above except the diagram of [N II]/Hα versus [O III]/Hβ give an accuracy of ˜90 per cent. The code in the paper is available on the web (http://fshi5388.blog.163.com).

  9. Using a spatial and tabular database to generate statistics from terrain and spectral data for soil surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath , E.A.; Fosnight, E.A.; Klingebiel, A.A.; Moore, D.G.; Stone, J.E.; Reybold, W.U.; Petersen, G.W.

    1987-01-01

    A methodology has been developed to create a spatial database by referencing digital elevation, Landsat multispectral scanner data, and digitized soil premap delineations of a number of adjacent 7.5-min quadrangle areas to a 30-m Universal Transverse Mercator projection. Slope and aspect transformations are calculated from elevation data and grouped according to field office specifications. An unsupervised classification is performed on a brightness and greenness transformation of the spectral data. The resulting spectral, slope, and aspect maps of each of the 7.5-min quadrangle areas are then plotted and submitted to the field office to be incorporated into the soil premapping stages of a soil survey. A tabular database is created from spatial data by generating descriptive statistics for each data layer within each soil premap delineation. The tabular data base is then entered into a data base management system to be accessed by the field office personnel during the soil survey and to be used for subsequent resource management decisions.Large amounts of data are collected and archived during resource inventories for public land management. Often these data are stored as stacks of maps or folders in a file system in someone's office, with the maps in a variety of formats, scales, and with various standards of accuracy depending on their purpose. This system of information storage and retrieval is cumbersome at best when several categories of information are needed simultaneously for analysis or as input to resource management models. Computers now provide the resource scientist with the opportunity to design increasingly complex models that require even more categories of resource-related information, thus compounding the problem.Recently there has been much emphasis on the use of geographic information systems (GIS) as an alternative method for map data archives and as a resource management tool. Considerable effort has been devoted to the generation of tabular

  10. Galaxy Evolution Insights from Spectral Modeling of Large Data Sets from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoversten, Erik A. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2007-10-01

    This thesis centers on the use of spectral modeling techniques on data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to gain new insights into current questions in galaxy evolution. The SDSS provides a large, uniform, high quality data set which can be exploited in a number of ways. One avenue pursued here is to use the large sample size to measure precisely the mean properties of galaxies of increasingly narrow parameter ranges. The other route taken is to look for rare objects which open up for exploration new areas in galaxy parameter space. The crux of this thesis is revisiting the classical Kennicutt method for inferring the stellar initial mass function (IMF) from the integrated light properties of galaxies. A large data set (~ 105 galaxies) from the SDSS DR4 is combined with more in-depth modeling and quantitative statistical analysis to search for systematic IMF variations as a function of galaxy luminosity. Galaxy Hα equivalent widths are compared to a broadband color index to constrain the IMF. It is found that for the sample as a whole the best fitting IMF power law slope above 0.5 M is Γ = 1.5 ± 0.1 with the error dominated by systematics. Galaxies brighter than around Mr,0.1 = -20 (including galaxies like the Milky Way which has Mr,0.1 ~ -21) are well fit by a universal Γ ~ 1.4 IMF, similar to the classical Salpeter slope, and smooth, exponential star formation histories (SFH). Fainter galaxies prefer steeper IMFs and the quality of the fits reveal that for these galaxies a universal IMF with smooth SFHs is actually a poor assumption. Related projects are also pursued. A targeted photometric search is conducted for strongly lensed Lyman break galaxies (LBG) similar to MS1512-cB58. The evolution of the photometric selection technique is described as are the results of spectroscopic follow-up of the best targets. The serendipitous discovery of two interesting blue compact dwarf galaxies is reported. These

  11. Identification of Interesting Objects in Large Spectral Surveys Using Highly Parallelized Machine Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škoda, Petr; Palička, Andrej; Koza, Jakub; Shakurova, Ksenia

    2017-06-01

    The current archives of LAMOST multi-object spectrograph contain millions of fully reduced spectra, from which the automatic pipelines have produced catalogues of many parameters of individual objects, including their approximate spectral classification. This is, however, mostly based on the global shape of the whole spectrum and on integral properties of spectra in given bandpasses, namely presence and equivalent width of prominent spectral lines, while for identification of some interesting object types (e.g. Be stars or quasars) the detailed shape of only a few lines is crucial. Here the machine learning is bringing a new methodology capable of improving the reliability of classification of such objects even in boundary cases. We present results of Spark-based semi-supervised machine learning of LAMOST spectra attempting to automatically identify the single and double-peak emission of Hα line typical for Be and B[e] stars. The labelled sample was obtained from archive of 2m Perek telescope at Ondřejov observatory. A simple physical model of spectrograph resolution was used in domain adaptation to LAMOST training domain. The resulting list of candidates contains dozens of Be stars (some are likely yet unknown), but also a bunch of interesting objects resembling spectra of quasars and even blazars, as well as many instrumental artefacts. The verification of a nature of interesting candidates benefited considerably from cross-matching and visualisation in the Virtual Observatory environment.

  12. Can the periodic spectral modulations observed in 236 Sloan Sky Survey stars be due to dark matter effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburini, Fabrizio; Licata, Ignazio

    2017-09-01

    The search for dark matter (DM) is one of the most active and challenging areas of current research. Possible DM candidates are ultralight fields such as axions and weak interacting massive particles (WIMPs). Axions piled up in the center of stars are supposed to generate matter/DM configurations with oscillating geometries at a very rapid frequency, which is a multiple of the axion mass m B (Brito et al (2015); Brito et al (2016)). Borra and Trottier (2016) recently found peculiar ultrafast periodic spectral modulations in 236 main sequence stars in the sample of 2.5 million spectra of galactic halo stars of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (˜1% of main sequence stars in the F-K spectral range) that were interpreted as optical signals from extraterrestrial civilizations, suggesting them as possible candidates for the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) program. We argue, instead, that this could be the first indirect evidence of bosonic axion-like DM fields inside main sequence stars, with a stable radiative nucleus, where a stable DM core can be hosted. These oscillations were not observed in earlier stellar spectral classes probably because of the impossibility of starting a stable oscillatory regime due to the presence of chaotic motions in their convective nuclei. The axion mass values, (50< {m}B< 2.4× {10}3) μ {eV}, obtained from the frequency range observed by Borra and Trottier, (0.6070< f< 0.6077) THz, agree with the recent theoretical results from high-temperature lattice quantum chromodynamics (Borsanyi et al (2016); Borsanyi et al (2016b)).

  13. The Einstein@Home Gamma-ray Pulsar Survey. II. Source Selection, Spectral Analysis, and Multiwavelength Follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J.; Clark, C. J.; Pletsch, H. J.; Guillemot, L.; Johnson, T. J.; Torne, P.; Champion, D. J.; Deneva, J.; Ray, P. S.; Salvetti, D.; Kramer, M.; Aulbert, C.; Beer, C.; Bhattacharyya, B.; Bock, O.; Camilo, F.; Cognard, I.; Cuéllar, A.; Eggenstein, H. B.; Fehrmann, H.; Ferrara, E. C.; Kerr, M.; Machenschalk, B.; Ransom, S. M.; Sanpa-Arsa, S.; Wood, K.

    2018-02-01

    We report on the analysis of 13 gamma-ray pulsars discovered in the Einstein@Home blind search survey using Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) Pass 8 data. The 13 new gamma-ray pulsars were discovered by searching 118 unassociated LAT sources from the third LAT source catalog (3FGL), selected using the Gaussian Mixture Model machine-learning algorithm on the basis of their gamma-ray emission properties being suggestive of pulsar magnetospheric emission. The new gamma-ray pulsars have pulse profiles and spectral properties similar to those of previously detected young gamma-ray pulsars. Follow-up radio observations have revealed faint radio pulsations from two of the newly discovered pulsars and enabled us to derive upper limits on the radio emission from the others, demonstrating that they are likely radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsars. We also present results from modeling the gamma-ray pulse profiles and radio profiles, if available, using different geometric emission models of pulsars. The high discovery rate of this survey, despite the increasing difficulty of blind pulsar searches in gamma rays, suggests that new systematic surveys such as presented in this article should be continued when new LAT source catalogs become available.

  14. Chandra ACIS Survey of M33 (ChASeM33): Spectral and Timing Analysis of the 15 Brightest Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plucinsky, Paul P.; Tuellmann, R.; Gaetz, T. J.; Challis, P.; Kirshner, R. P.; Williams, B. F.; Kuntz, K. D.; ChASeM33 Team

    2011-01-01

    The Chandra ACIS Survey of M33 (ChASeM33) is the deepest X-ray survey to date of M33. ChASeM33 covers about 70% of the D25 isophote (R 4.0 kpc) with a total exposure of 1.4 Ms. The source catalog includes 662 sources, reaching a limiting sensitivity of 2.0e34 erg/s in the 0.35--8.0 keV energy band. There are fifteen sources in the catalog with more than 2,000 net counts, allowing detailed spectral and timing analyses to be conducted. We report here the results of fitting these spectra with multi-component disk blackbody, power-law, and/or thermal plasma models. We also report on the short-term (within an observation) and long-term (from one observation to another) variability of these sources. These X-ray spectral and timing results in conjunction with optical spectroscopy for some of the sources, allow us to classify the objects. Six of the sources are X-ray Binaries (3 certain/3 most likely), 3 are Supernova Remnants (all three certain), and 6 are Active Galactic Nuclei (3 certain/3 most likely). The faintest of these sources has a flux (0.35-8.0 keV) of 3.5e-14 ergs/(s cm2) and an inferred luminosity of 3.0e36 ergs/s (0.35-8.0 keV) at the distance of M33. We comment on the contribution of these ``background'' sources to studies of the X-ray source populations in galaxies. This work was supported by NASA grant NAS G06-7073A and NASA contract NAS8-03060.

  15. Chromospheric activity of periodic variable stars (including eclipsing binaries) observed in DR2 LAMOST stellar spectral survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liyun; Lu, Hongpeng; Han, Xianming L.; Jiang, Linyan; Li, Zhongmu; Zhang, Yong; Hou, Yonghui; Wang, Yuefei; Cao, Zihuang

    2018-05-01

    The LAMOST spectral survey provides a rich databases for studying stellar spectroscopic properties and chromospheric activity. We cross-matched a total of 105,287 periodic variable stars from several photometric surveys and databases (CSS, LINEAR, Kepler, a recently updated eclipsing star catalogue, ASAS, NSVS, some part of SuperWASP survey, variable stars from the Tsinghua University-NAOC Transient Survey, and other objects from some new references) with four million stellar spectra published in the LAMOST data release 2 (DR2). We found 15,955 spectra for 11,469 stars (including 5398 eclipsing binaries). We calculated their equivalent widths (EWs) of their Hα, Hβ, Hγ, Hδ and Caii H lines. Using the Hα line EW, we found 447 spectra with emission above continuum for a total of 316 stars (178 eclipsing binaries). We identified 86 active stars (including 44 eclipsing binaries) with repeated LAMOST spectra. A total of 68 stars (including 34 eclipsing binaries) show chromospheric activity variability. We also found LAMOST spectra of 12 cataclysmic variables, five of which show chromospheric activity variability. We also made photometric follow-up studies of three short period targets (DY CVn, HAT-192-0001481, and LAMOST J164933.24+141255.0) using the Xinglong 60-cm telescope and the SARA 90-cm and 1-m telescopes, and obtained new BVRI CCD light curves. We analyzed these light curves and obtained orbital and starspot parameters. We detected the first flare event with a huge brightness increase of more than about 1.5 magnitudes in R filter in LAMOST J164933.24+141255.0.

  16. The BAT AGN Spectroscopic Survey (BASS) DR1-Spectral Measurements, Derived Quantities, and AGN Demographics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koss, Michael; BASS Team

    2018-01-01

    We present the first catalog and data release of the Swift-BAT AGN Spectroscopic Survey (BASS). We analyze optical spectra of the majority of AGN (77%, 641/836) detected based on their 14-195 keV emission in the 70-month Swift BAT all-sky catalog. This includes redshift determination, absorption and emission line measurements, and black hole mass and accretion rate estimates for the majority of obscured and un-obscured AGN (74%, 473/641) with 340 measured for the first time. With ~90% of sources at z10^21.9 cm^-2. Seyfert 1.9 show a range of column densities. Compared to narrow line AGN in the SDSS, the X-ray selected AGN have a larger fraction of dusty host galaxies suggesting these types of AGN are missed in optical surveys. Using the most sensitive [OIII]/Hbeta and [NII]/Halpha emission line diagnostic, about half of the sources are classified as Seyferts, ~15% reside in dusty galaxies that lack an Hbeta detection, but for which the line upper limits imply either a Seyfert or LINER, ~15% are in galaxies with weak or no emission lines despite high quality spectra, and a few percent each are LINERS, composite galaxies, HII regions, or in known beamed AGN.

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Colour and spectral index from the SLUGGS survey (Usher+, 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher, C.; Forbes, D. A.; Brodie, J. P.; Romanowsky, A. J.; Strader, J.; Conroy, C.; Foster, C.; Pastorello, N.; Pota, V.; Arnold, J. A.

    2017-10-01

    The SLUGGS survey is an ongoing study of 25 massive, nearby, early-type galaxies and their GC systems using Keck DEIMOS spectroscopy and wide-field imaging from Suprime-Cam (Miyazaki et al. 2002, PASJ, 54, 833) on the Subaru telescope. The spectra were all observed with DEIMOS in multislit mode between 2006 and 2013 with the primary aim of measuring GC radial velocities. Exposure times averaged two hours per slit mask. All observations used a central wavelength of 7800 Å, the 1200 line/mm grating and 1 arcsec slits. This setup yields a resolution of Δλ~1.5 Å and covers the Na I doublet to CaT wavelength region. In roughly half of the slits, Hα is also covered. (3 data files).

  18. An unbiased spectral line survey toward R CrA IRS7B in the 345 GHz window with ASTE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Sakai, Nami; Lindberg, Johan

    2012-01-01

    We have conducted a spectral line survey in the 332-364 GHz region with the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment 10 m telescope toward R CrA IRS7B, a low-mass protostar in the Class 0 or Class 0/I transitional stage. We have also performed some supplementary observations in the 450 GHz band...... corino. These results suggest a weak hot corino activity in R CrA IRS7B. On the other hand, the carbon-chain related molecules, CCH and c-C3H2, are found to be abundant. However, this source cannot be classified as a WCCC source, since long carbon-chain molecules are not detected. If WCCC and hot corino...... chemistry represent the two extremes in chemical compositions of low-mass Class 0 sources, R CrA IRS7B would be a source with a mixture of these two chemical characteristics. The UV radiation from the nearby Herbig Ae star R CrA may also affect the chemical composition. The present line survey demonstrates...

  19. ANALYSIS OF THE HERSCHEL /HEXOS SPECTRAL SURVEY TOWARD ORION SOUTH: A MASSIVE PROTOSTELLAR ENVELOPE WITH STRONG EXTERNAL IRRADIATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahani, K.; Plume, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2N 1N4 (Canada); Bergin, E. A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Tolls, V. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Phillips, T. G.; Lis, D. C. [California Institute of Technology, Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics 301-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Caux, E. [Université de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, F-31028 Toulouse (France); Cabrit, S.; Pagani, L. [LERMA, Observatoire de Paris, PSL Research University, CNRS, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ. Paris 06, F-75014, Paris (France); Goicoechea, J. R. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (ICMM-CSIC). Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, E-28049 Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain); Goldsmith, P. F.; Pearson, J. C. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Johnstone, D. [National Research Council Canada, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Menten, K. M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Müller, H. S. P.; Ossenkopf-Okada, V. [I. Physikalisches Institut, Universität zu Köln, Zülpicher Strasse 77, D-50937 Köln (Germany); Tak, F. F. S. van der, E-mail: ktahani@ucalgary.ca [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, P.O. Box 800, 9700 AV, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2016-11-20

    We present results from a comprehensive submillimeter spectral survey toward the source Orion South, based on data obtained with the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared instrument on board the Herschel Space Observatory , covering the frequency range of 480 to 1900 GHz. We detect 685 spectral lines with signal-to-noise ratios (S/Ns) > 3 σ , originating from 52 different molecular and atomic species. We model each of the detected species assuming conditions of Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium. This analysis provides an estimate of the physical conditions of Orion South (column density, temperature, source size, and V {sub LSR}). We find evidence for three different cloud components: a cool ( T {sub ex} ∼ 20–40 K), spatially extended (>60″), and quiescent (Δ V {sub FWHM} ∼ 4 km s{sup -1}) component; a warmer ( T {sub ex} ∼ 80–100 K), less spatially extended (∼30″), and dynamic (Δ V {sub FWHM} ∼ 8 km s{sup -1}) component, which is likely affected by embedded outflows; and a kinematically distinct region ( T {sub ex} > 100 K; V {sub LSR} ∼ 8 km s{sup -1}), dominated by emission from species that trace ultraviolet irradiation, likely at the surface of the cloud. We find little evidence for the existence of a chemically distinct “hot-core” component, likely due to the small filling factor of the hot core or hot cores within the Herschel beam. We find that the chemical composition of the gas in the cooler, quiescent component of Orion South more closely resembles that of the quiescent ridge in Orion-KL. The gas in the warmer, dynamic component, however, more closely resembles that of the Compact Ridge and Plateau regions of Orion-KL, suggesting that higher temperatures and shocks also have an influence on the overall chemistry of Orion South.

  20. HST HOT-JUPITER TRANSMISSION SPECTRAL SURVEY: CLEAR SKIES FOR COOL SATURN WASP-39b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Patrick D.; Knutson, Heather A. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Sing, David K.; Kataria, Tiffany; Nikolov, Nikolay [Astrophysics Group, School of Physics, University of Exeter, Stocker Road, Exeter, EX4 4QL (United Kingdom); Henry, Gregory W.; Williamson, Michael W. [Center of Excellence in Information Systems, Tennessee State University, Nashville, TN 37209 (United States); Fortney, Jonathan J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Burrows, Adam S. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Peyton Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Showman, Adam P.; Ballester, Gilda E. [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Désert, Jean-Michel [CASA, Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, 389-UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Aigrain, Suzanne [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Deming, Drake [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Etangs, Alain Lecavelier des; Vidal-Madjar, Alfred [CNRS, Institut dAstrophysique de Paris, UMR 7095, 98bis boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France)

    2016-08-10

    We present the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) optical transmission spectroscopy of the cool Saturn-mass exoplanet WASP-39b from 0.29-1.025 μ m, along with complementary transit observations from Spitzer IRAC at 3.6 and 4.5 μ m. The low density and large atmospheric pressure scale height of WASP-39b make it particularly amenable to atmospheric characterization using this technique. We detect a Rayleigh scattering slope as well as sodium and potassium absorption features; this is the first exoplanet in which both alkali features are clearly detected with the extended wings predicted by cloud-free atmosphere models. The full transmission spectrum is well matched by a clear H{sub 2}-dominated atmosphere, or one containing a weak contribution from haze, in good agreement with the preliminary reduction of these data presented in Sing et al. WASP-39b is predicted to have a pressure-temperature profile comparable to that of HD 189733b and WASP-6b, making it one of the coolest transiting gas giants observed in our HST STIS survey. Despite this similarity, WASP-39b appears to be largely cloud-free, while the transmission spectra of HD 189733b and WASP-6b both indicate the presence of high altitude clouds or hazes. These observations further emphasize the surprising diversity of cloudy and cloud-free gas giant planets in short-period orbits and the corresponding challenges associated with developing predictive cloud models for these atmospheres.

  1. Molecular-cloud-scale Chemical Composition. II. Mapping Spectral Line Survey toward W3(OH) in the 3 mm Band

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Yuri [Institute of Astronomy, The University of Tokyo, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Watanabe, Yoshimasa; Yamamoto, Satoshi [Department of Physics, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Harada, Nanase [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, No.1, Sec. 4, Roosevelt Road, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan, R.O.C. (China); Shimonishi, Takashi [Frontier Research Institute for Interdisciplinary Sciences, Tohoku University, Aramakiazaaoba 6-3, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Sakai, Nami [RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Aikawa, Yuri [Department of Astronomy, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Kawamura, Akiko [Chile Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2017-10-10

    To study a molecular-cloud-scale chemical composition, we conducted a mapping spectral line survey toward the Galactic molecular cloud W3(OH), which is one of the most active star-forming regions in the Perseus arm. We conducted our survey through the use of the Nobeyama Radio Observatory 45 m telescope, and observed the area of 16′ × 16′, which corresponds to 9.0 pc × 9.0 pc. The observed frequency ranges are 87–91, 96–103, and 108–112 GHz. We prepared the spectrum averaged over the observed area, in which eight molecular species (CCH, HCN, HCO{sup +}, HNC, CS, SO, C{sup 18}O, and {sup 13}CO) are identified. On the other hand, the spectrum of the W3(OH) hot core observed at a 0.17 pc resolution shows the lines of various molecules such as OCS, H{sub 2}CS CH{sub 3}CCH, and CH{sub 3}CN in addition to the above species. In the spatially averaged spectrum, emission of the species concentrated just around the star-forming core, such as CH{sub 3}OH and HC{sub 3}N, is fainter than in the hot core spectrum, whereas emission of the species widely extended over the cloud such as CCH is relatively brighter. We classified the observed area into five subregions according to the integrated intensity of {sup 13}CO, and evaluated the contribution to the averaged spectrum from each subregion. The CCH, HCN, HCO{sup +}, and CS lines can be seen even in the spectrum of the subregion with the lowest {sup 13}CO integrated intensity range (<10 K km s{sup −1}). Thus, the contributions of the spatially extended emission is confirmed to be dominant in the spatially averaged spectrum.

  2. New UV-source catalogs, UV spectral database, UV variables and science tools from the GALEX surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Luciana; de la Vega, Alexander; Shiao, Bernard; Bohlin, Ralph

    2018-03-01

    We present a new, expanded and improved catalog of Ultraviolet (UV) sources from the GALEX All-Sky Imaging survey: GUVcat_AIS (Bianchi et al. in Astrophys. J. Suppl. Ser. 230:24, 2017). The catalog includes 83 million unique sources (duplicate measurements and rim artifacts are removed) measured in far-UV and near-UV. With respect to previous versions (Bianchi et al. in Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 411:2770 2011a, Adv. Space Res. 53:900-991, 2014), GUVcat_AIS covers a slightly larger area, 24,790 square degrees, and includes critical corrections and improvements, as well as new tags, in particular to identify sources in the footprint of extended objects, where pipeline source detection may fail and custom-photometry may be necessary. The UV unique-source catalog facilitates studies of density of sources, and matching of the UV samples with databases at other wavelengths. We also present first results from two ongoing projects, addressing respectively UV variability searches on time scales from seconds to years by mining the GALEX photon archive, and the construction of a database of ˜120,000 GALEX UV spectra (range ˜1300-3000 Å), including quality and calibration assessment and classification of the grism, hence serendipitous, spectral sources.

  3. Spectral-line Survey at Millimeter and Submillimeter Wavelengths toward an Outflow-shocked Region, OMC 2-FIR 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimajiri, Yoshito; Sakai, Takeshi; Kitamura, Yoshimi; Tsukagoshi, Takashi; Saito, Masao; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Momose, Munetake; Takakuwa, Shigehisa; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Sakai, Nami; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Kawabe, Ryohei

    2015-12-01

    We performed the first spectral line survey at 82-106 GHz and 335-355 GHz toward the outflow-shocked region OMC 2-FIR 4, the outflow driving source FIR 3, and the northern outflow lobe FIR 3N. We detected 120 lines of 20 molecular species. The line profiles can be classified into two types: one type is a single Gaussian component with a narrow (3 km s-1) widths. The narrow components for most of the lines are detected at all positions, suggesting that they trace the ambient dense gas. For CO, CS, HCN, and HCO+, the wide components are detected at all positions, suggesting an outflow origin. The wide components of C34S, SO, SiO, H13CN, HC15N, {{{H}}}213CO, H2CS, HC3N, and CH3OH are only detected at FIR 4, suggesting an origin as outflow-shocked gas. The rotation diagram analysis revealed that the narrow components of C2H and H13CO+ show low temperatures of 12.5 ± 1.4 K, while the wide components show high temperatures of 20-70 K. This supports our interpretation that the wide components trace the outflow and/or outflow-shocked gas. We compared the observed molecular abundances relative to H13CO+ with those of the outflow-shocked region L 1157 B1 and the hot corino IRAS 16293-2422. Although we cannot exclude the possibility that the chemical enrichment in FIR 4 is caused by hot-core chemistry, the chemical compositions in FIR 4 are more similar to those in L 1157 B1 than those in IRAS 16293-2422.

  4. An Impurity Emission Survey in the near UV and Visible Spectral Ranges of Electron Cyclotron Heated (ECH) Plasma in the TJ-II Stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, K. J.; Zurro, B.; Baciero, A.

    2001-01-01

    We report on a near-ultraviolet and visible spectroscopic survey (220-600 nm) of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heated plasmas created in the TJ-II stellarator, with central electron temperatures up to 2 keV and central electron densities up to 1.7 x 10 ''19 m''-3. Approximately 1200 lines from thirteen elements have been identified. The purpose of the work is to identify the principal impurities and spectral lines present in TJ-II plasmas, as well as their possible origin to search for transitions from highly ionised ions. This work will act as a base for identifying suitable transitions for following the evolution of impurities under different operating regimens and multiplet systems for line polarisation studies. It is intended to use the database creates as a spectral line reference for comparing spectra under different operating and plasma heating regimes. (Author)

  5. An Impurity Emission Survey in the near UV and Visible Spectral Ranges of Electron Cyclotron Heated (ECH) Plasma in the TJ-II Stellarator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, K. J.; Zurro, B.; Baciero, A.

    2001-07-01

    We report on a near-ultraviolet and visible spectroscopic survey (220-600 nm) of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heated plasmas created in the TJ-II stellarator, with central electron temperatures up to 2 keV and central electron densities up to 1.7 x 10 ''19 m''-3. Approximately 1200 lines from thirteen elements have been identified. The purpose of the work is to identify the principal impurities and spectral lines present in TJ-II plasmas, as well as their possible origin to search for transitions from highly ionised ions. This work will act as a base for identifying suitable transitions for following the evolution of impurities under different operating regimens and multiplet systems for line polarisation studies. It is intended to use the database creates as a spectral line reference for comparing spectra under different operating and plasma heating regimes. (Author)

  6. X-Ray Spectral Analyses of AGNs from the 7Ms Chandra Deep Field-South Survey: The Distribution, Variability, and Evolutions of AGN Obscuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Teng; Tozzi, Paolo; Wang, Jun-Xian; Brandt, William N.; Vignali, Cristian; Xue, Yongquan; Schneider, Donald P.; Comastri, Andrea; Yang, Guang; Bauer, Franz E.; Paolillo, Maurizio; Luo, Bin; Gilli, Roberto; Wang, Q. Daniel; Giavalisco, Mauro; Ji, Zhiyuan; Alexander, David M.; Mainieri, Vincenzo; Shemmer, Ohad; Koekemoer, Anton; Risaliti, Guido

    2017-09-01

    We present a detailed spectral analysis of the brightest active galactic nuclei (AGNs) identified in the 7Ms Chandra Deep Field-South (CDF-S) survey over a time span of 16 years. Using a model of an intrinsically absorbed power-law plus reflection, with possible soft excess and narrow Fe Kα line, we perform a systematic X-ray spectral analysis, both on the total 7Ms exposure and in four different periods with lengths of 2-21 months. With this approach, we not only present the power-law slopes, column densities {N}{{H}}, observed fluxes, and absorption-corrected 2-10 keV luminosities L X for our sample of AGNs, but also identify significant spectral variabilities among them on timescales of years. We find that the {N}{{H}} variabilities can be ascribed to two different types of mechanisms, either flux-driven or flux-independent. We also find that the correlation between the narrow Fe line EW and {N}{{H}} can be well explained by the continuum suppression with increasing {N}{{H}}. Accounting for the sample incompleteness and bias, we measure the intrinsic distribution of {N}{{H}} for the CDF-S AGN population and present reselected subsamples that are complete with respect to {N}{{H}}. The {N}{{H}}-complete subsamples enable us to decouple the dependences of {N}{{H}} on L X and on redshift. Combining our data with those from C-COSMOS, we confirm the anticorrelation between the average {N}{{H}} and L X of AGN, and find a significant increase of the AGN-obscured fraction with redshift at any luminosity. The obscured fraction can be described as {f}{obscured}≈ 0.42 {(1+z)}0.60.

  7. The Bolocam 1.1 mm Lockman Hole Galaxy Survey: SHARC II 350 μm Photometry and Implications for Spectral Models, Dust Temperatures, and Redshift Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, G. T.; Glenn, J.; Egami, E.; Rieke, G. H.; Ivison, R. J.; Yun, M. S.; Aguirre, J. E.; Maloney, P. R.; Haig, D.

    2006-05-01

    We present 350 μm photometry of all 17 galaxy candidates in the Lockman Hole detected in a 1.1 mm Bolocam survey. Several of the galaxies were previously detected at 850 μm, at 1.2 mm, in the infrared by Spitzer, and in the radio. Nine of the Bolocam galaxy candidates were detected at 350 μm, and two new candidates were serendipitously detected at 350 μm (bringing the total in the literature detected in this way to three). Five of the galaxies have published spectroscopic redshifts, enabling investigation of the implied temperature ranges and a comparison of photometric redshift techniques. For z~2.5 thermally emitting galaxies, λ=350 μm lies near the spectral energy distribution peak. Thus, luminosities can be measured without extrapolating to the peak from detection wavelengths of λ>=850 μm. Characteristically, the galaxy luminosities lie in the range 1.0-1.2×1013 Lsolar, with dust temperatures in the range 40-70 K, depending on the choice of spectral index and wavelength of unit optical depth. The implied dust masses are (3-5)×108 Msolar. We find that the far-infrared to radio relation for star-forming ULIRGs systematically overpredicts the radio luminosities and overestimates redshifts on the order of Δz~1, whereas redshifts based on either submillimeter data alone or the 1.6 μm stellar bump and PAH features are more accurate.

  8. Second byurakan spectral sky survey. IV. Results for region centered on /chi/ = 12 /sup h/ 22 /sup m/, δ = +55 /sup o/ 00

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makaryan, B.E.; Erastova, L.K.; Stepanyan, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    The fourth list of objects of the second Byurkan spectral sky survey in the 4 0 x 4 0 region centered on alpha= 12 /sup h/ 22 /sup m/, delta = +55 0 00' is presented. The observations were made with the 40''-52'' Schmidt telescope of the Byurkan Observatory with a set of three objective prisms. The list contains data on 106 objects and galxies and 12 blue stars. The distribution of the objects with respect to types is as follows: 16 candidates for QSO, 29 for BSO, 32 galaxies with appreciable ultraviolet continuum, among which weak Seyfert features are suspected for three, and 29 emission galaxies without appreciable ultraviolet continuum. The surface density of QSO and Seyferts down to 19 /sup m/ is more than one per square degree

  9. Spectral Energy Distribution Fitting of Hetdex Pilot Survey Ly-alpha Emitters in Cosmos and Goods-N

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Alex; Ciardullo, Robin; Cronwall, Caryl; Acquaviva, Viviana; Bridge, Joanna; Zeimann, Gregory R.; Blanc, Guillermo; Bond, Nicholas; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Song, Mimi; hide

    2014-01-01

    We use broadband photometry extending from the rest-frame UV to the near-IR to fit the individual spectral energy distributions of 63 bright (L(Ly-alpha) greater than 10(exp 43) erg s(exp -1) Ly-alpha emitting galaxies (LAEs) in the redshift range 1.9 less than z less than 3.6. We find that these LAEs are quite heterogeneous, with stellar masses that span over three orders of magnitude, from 7.5 greater than logM/solar mass less than 10.5. Moreover, although most LAEs have small amounts of extinction, some high-mass objects have stellar reddenings as large as E(B - V ) is approximately 0.4. Interestingly, in dusty objects the optical depths for Ly-alpha and the UV continuum are always similar, indicating that Lya photons are not undergoing many scatters before escaping their galaxy. In contrast, the ratio of optical depths in low-reddening systems can vary widely, illustrating the diverse nature of the systems. Finally, we show that in the star-formation-rate-log-mass diagram, our LAEs fall above the "main-sequence" defined by z is approximately 3 continuum selected star-forming galaxies. In this respect, they are similar to submillimeter-selected galaxies, although most LAEs have much lower mass.

  10. The HYSPIRI Decadal Survey Mission: Update on the Mission Concept and Science Objectives for Global Imaging Spectroscopy and Multi-Spectral Thermal Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Robert O.; Hook, Simon J.; Middleton, Elizabeth; Turner, Woody; Ungar, Stephen; Knox, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The NASA HyspIRI mission is planned to provide global solar reflected energy spectroscopic measurement of the terrestrial and shallow water regions of the Earth every 19 days will all measurements downlinked. In addition, HyspIRI will provide multi-spectral thermal measurements with a single band in the 4 micron region and seven bands in the 8 to 12 micron region with 5 day day/night coverage. A direct broadcast capability for measurement subsets is also planned. This HyspIRI mission is one of those designated in the 2007 National Research Council (NRC) Decadal Survey: Earth Science and Applications from Space. In the Decadal Survey, HyspIRI was recognized as relevant to a range of Earth science and science applications, including climate: "A hyperspectral sensor (e.g., FLORA) combined with a multispectral thermal sensor (e.g., SAVII) in low Earth orbit (LEO) is part of an integrated mission concept [described in Parts I and II] that is relevant to several panels, especially the climate variability panel." The HyspIRI science study group was formed in 2008 to evaluate and refine the mission concept. This group has developed a series of HyspIRI science objectives: (1) Climate: Ecosystem biochemistry, condition & feedback; spectral albedo; carbon/dust on snow/ice; biomass burning; evapotranspiration (2) Ecosystems: Global plant functional types, physiological condition, and biochemistry including agricultural lands (3) Fires: Fuel status, fire frequency, severity, emissions, and patterns of recovery globally (4) Coral reef and coastal habitats: Global composition and status (5) Volcanoes: Eruptions, emissions, regional and global impact (6) Geology and resources: Global distributions of surface mineral resources and improved understanding of geology and related hazards These objectives are achieved with the following measurement capabilities. The HyspIRI imaging spectrometer provides: full spectral coverage from 380 to 2500 at 10 nm sampling; 60 m spatial sampling

  11. A New Radio Spectral Line Survey of Planetary Nebulae: Exploring Radiatively-driven Heating and Chemistry of Molecular Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bublitz, Jesse; Kastner, Joel H.; Santander-García, Miguel; Montez, Rodolfo; Alcolea, Javier; Balick, Bruce; Bujarrabal, Valentín

    2018-01-01

    We report the results of a survey of mm-wave molecular line emission from nine nearby (molecular line frequencies were chosen to investigate the molecular chemistry of these nebulae. New detections of one or more of five molecules -- the molecular mass tracer 13CO and the chemically important trace species HCO+, CN, HCN, and HNC -- were made in at least one PN. We present analysis of emission line flux ratios that are potential diagnostics of the influence that ultraviolet and X-ray radiation have on the chemistry of residual molecular gas in PNe.

  12. Measurements of Lyman-Alpha Escape From HST Far-UV Spectral SNAP Survey of 33 Starforming Galaxies: Initial Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redwine, Keith

    2018-01-01

    This thesis will describe and analyze far-UV spectra from nearby starforming galaxies to investigate how line features like the hydrogen Lyman-alpha (Lyα) line at 1216 Å are related to the local properties of the host galaxy. It has been suggested that Lyα can be used as a proxy for the escape of Lyman continuum (LyC) radiation, the escape of of which from bright regions of galaxies is of particular interest. Most notably, the reionization epoch of neutral atomic hydrogen in the universe over a redshift range from z∼6 to z∼12, was highly dependent on the flux of ionizing LyC photons in the interstellar and intergalactic media. Expanding our understanding of the dynamics of the Lyα escape fraction (fLyα) from the local environment of its emission could be key to determining a total LyC escape fraction (fLyC) across all morphologies of galaxies. The wide range of Lyα emitters and absorbors (occasionally both) of this Cycle 22 SNAP survey observed by the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) onboard Hubble Space Telescope (HST) provides a unique look at far-UV spectra in candidate LyC emitters. Lyα profiles are easily observable in short exposures, and line features discernable in the low-resolution G140L mode can inform and guide future observations by COS or other FUV spectroscopy.

  13. The Mega-MUSCLES Treasury Survey: Measurements of the Ultraviolet Spectral Characteristics of Low-mass Exoplanetary Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froning, Cynthia

    2017-08-01

    JWST will be able to observe the atmospheres of rocky planets transiting nearby M dwarfs. A few such planets are already known (around GJ1132, Proxima Cen, and Trappist-1) and TESS is predicted to find many more, including 14 habitable zone planets. To interpret observations of these exoplanets' atmospheres, we must understand the high-energy SED of their host stars: X-ray/EUV irradiation can erode a planet's gaseous envelope and FUV/NUV-driven photochemistry shapes an atmosphere's molecular abundances, including potential biomarkers like O2, O3, and CH4. Our MUSCLES Treasury Survey (Cycles 19+22) used Hubble/COS+STIS UV observations with contemporaneous X-ray and ground-based data to construct complete SEDs for 11 low-mass exoplanet hosts. MUSCLES is the most widely used database for early-M and K dwarf (>0.3 M_sun) irradiance spectra and has supported a wide range of atmospheric stability and biomarker modeling work. However, TESS will find most of its habitable planets transiting stars less massive than this, and these will be the planets to characterize with JWST. Here, we propose to expand the MUSCLES project to: (a) new M dwarf exoplanet hosts with varying properties; (b) reference M dwarfs below 0.3 solar masses that may be used as proxies for M dwarf planet hosts discovered after HST's lifetime; and (c) more rapidly rotating stars of GJ1132's mass to probe XUV evolution over gigayear timescales. We propose to gather the first panchromatic SEDs of rocky planet hosts GJ1132 and Trappist-1. This proposal extends proven methods to a key new sample of stars, upon which critically depends the long-term goal of studying habitable planet atmospheres with JWST and beyond.

  14. Gemini/GMOS Transmission Spectral Survey: Complete Optical Transmission Spectrum of the Hot Jupiter WASP-4b

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huitson, C. M.; Désert, J.-M.; Bean, J. L.; Fortney, J. J.; Stevenson, K. B.; Bergmann, M.

    2017-01-01

    We present the complete optical transmission spectrum of the hot Jupiter WASP-4b from 440 to 940 nm at R  ∼ 400–1500 obtained with the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrometers (GMOS); this is the first result from a comparative exoplanetology survey program of close-in gas giants conducted with GMOS. WASP-4b has an equilibrium temperature of 1700 K and is favorable to study in transmission due to its large scale height (370 km). We derive the transmission spectrum of WASP-4b using four transits observed with the MOS technique. We demonstrate repeatable results across multiple epochs with GMOS, and derive a combined transmission spectrum at a precision about twice above photon noise, which is roughly equal to one atmospheric scale height. The transmission spectrum is well fitted with a uniform opacity as a function of wavelength. The uniform opacity and absence of a Rayleigh slope from molecular hydrogen suggest that the atmosphere is dominated by clouds with condensate grain sizes of ∼1  μ m. This result is consistent with previous observations of hot Jupiters since clouds have been seen in planets with similar equilibrium temperatures to WASP-4b. We describe a custom pipeline that we have written to reduce GMOS time-series data of exoplanet transits, and present a thorough analysis of the dominant noise sources in GMOS, which primarily consist of wavelength- and time-dependent displacements of the spectra on the detector, mainly due to a lack of atmospheric dispersion correction.

  15. Gemini/GMOS Transmission Spectral Survey: Complete Optical Transmission Spectrum of the Hot Jupiter WASP-4b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huitson, C. M. [CASA, University of Colorado, 389 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309-0389 (United States); Désert, J.-M. [API, University of Amsterdam, P.O. Box 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bean, J. L. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Fortney, J. J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Stevenson, K. B. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Bergmann, M., E-mail: catherine.huitson@colorado.edu [NOAO and Gemini Observatory, present address Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2017-09-01

    We present the complete optical transmission spectrum of the hot Jupiter WASP-4b from 440 to 940 nm at R  ∼ 400–1500 obtained with the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrometers (GMOS); this is the first result from a comparative exoplanetology survey program of close-in gas giants conducted with GMOS. WASP-4b has an equilibrium temperature of 1700 K and is favorable to study in transmission due to its large scale height (370 km). We derive the transmission spectrum of WASP-4b using four transits observed with the MOS technique. We demonstrate repeatable results across multiple epochs with GMOS, and derive a combined transmission spectrum at a precision about twice above photon noise, which is roughly equal to one atmospheric scale height. The transmission spectrum is well fitted with a uniform opacity as a function of wavelength. The uniform opacity and absence of a Rayleigh slope from molecular hydrogen suggest that the atmosphere is dominated by clouds with condensate grain sizes of ∼1  μ m. This result is consistent with previous observations of hot Jupiters since clouds have been seen in planets with similar equilibrium temperatures to WASP-4b. We describe a custom pipeline that we have written to reduce GMOS time-series data of exoplanet transits, and present a thorough analysis of the dominant noise sources in GMOS, which primarily consist of wavelength- and time-dependent displacements of the spectra on the detector, mainly due to a lack of atmospheric dispersion correction.

  16. An ALMA survey of submillimetre galaxies in the COSMOS field: Physical properties derived from energy balance spectral energy distribution modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miettinen, O.; Delvecchio, I.; Smolčić, V.; Aravena, M.; Brisbin, D.; Karim, A.; Magnelli, B.; Novak, M.; Schinnerer, E.; Albrecht, M.; Aussel, H.; Bertoldi, F.; Capak, P. L.; Casey, C. M.; Hayward, C. C.; Ilbert, O.; Intema, H. T.; Jiang, C.; Le Fèvre, O.; McCracken, H. J.; Muñoz Arancibia, A. M.; Navarrete, F.; Padilla, N. D.; Riechers, D. A.; Salvato, M.; Scott, K. S.; Sheth, K.; Tasca, L. A. M.

    2017-09-01

    Context. Submillimetre galaxies (SMGs) represent an important source population in the origin and cosmic evolution of the most massive galaxies. Hence, it is imperative to place firm constraints on the fundamental physical properties of large samples of SMGs. Aims: We determine the physical properties of a sample of SMGs in the COSMOS field that were pre-selected at the observed-frame wavelength of λobs = 1.1 mm, and followed up at λobs = 1.3 mm with the Atacama Large Millimetre/submillimetre Array (ALMA). Methods: We used the MAGPHYS model package to fit the panchromatic (ultraviolet to radio) spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 124 of the target SMGs, which lie at a median redshift of z = 2.30 (19.4% are spectroscopically confirmed). The SED analysis was complemented by estimating the gas masses of the SMGs by using the λobs = 1.3 mm dust emission as a tracer of the molecular gas component. Results: The sample median and 16th-84th percentile ranges of the stellar masses, obscured star formation rates, dust temperatures, and dust and gas masses were derived to be log(M⋆/M⊙) = 11.09+0.41-0.53, SFR = 402+661-233 M⊙ yr-1, Tdust = 39.7+9.7-7.4 K, log(Mdust/M⊙) = 9.01+0.20-0.31, and log(Mgas/M⊙ = 11.34+0.20-0.23, respectively. The Mdust/M⋆ ratio was found to decrease as a function of redshift, while the Mgas/Mdust ratio shows the opposite, positive correlation with redshift. The derived median gas-to-dust ratio of 120+73-30 agrees well with the canonical expectation. The gas fraction (Mgas/ (Mgas + M⋆)) was found to range from 0.10 to 0.98 with a median of 0.62+0.27-0.23. We found that 57.3% of our SMGs populate the main sequence (MS) of star-forming galaxies, while 41.9% of the sources lie above the MS by a factor of greater than three (one source lies below the MS). These super-MS objects, or starbursts, are preferentially found at z ≳ 3, which likely reflects the sensitivity limit of our source selection. We estimated that the median gas

  17. Second Byurakan spectral sky survey. II. Results for region centered on alpha 09h50m, delta +55 deg 00 arcmin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markarian, B.E.; Stepanian, D.A.

    1984-01-01

    The second list of objects in the Second Biurakan Spectral Sky Survey of the region centered on alpha 09h50m, delta +55 deg 00 arcmin is given. The list contains data on 110 objects and galaxies of a peculiar physical nature and 24 blue stars. The observations were made with the 40-52 arcsec Schmidt telescope of the Biurakan Astrophysical Observatory with a set of three objective prisms using Kodak IIIaJ and IIIaF emulsions sensitized in nitrogen. The area is found to contain 20 quasar candidates and four Seyfert galaxies, 27 blue stellar objects, 24 galaxies with an appreciable ultraviolet continuum, and 39 emission galaxies without appreciable ultraviolet radiation. The surface brightness of the quasars and Seyferts on the considered area down to the limiting magnitude 19.5 M is more than 1.5 per square degree with allowance for the already known quasars. The surface density of emission galaxies is about four per square degree. 7 references

  18. Spectral Pollution

    OpenAIRE

    Davies, E B; Plum, M

    2003-01-01

    We discuss the problems arising when computing eigenvalues of self-adjoint operators which lie in a gap between two parts of the essential spectrum. Spectral pollution, i.e. the apparent existence of eigenvalues in numerical computations, when no such eigenvalues actually exist, is commonplace in problems arising in applied mathematics. We describe a geometrically inspired method which avoids this difficulty, and show that it yields the same results as an algorithm of Zimmermann and Mertins.

  19. SURVEY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    SURVEY er en udbredt metode og benyttes inden for bl.a. samfundsvidenskab, humaniora, psykologi og sundhedsforskning. Også uden for forskningsverdenen er der mange organisationer som f.eks. konsulentfirmaer og offentlige institutioner samt marketingsafdelinger i private virksomheder, der arbejder...... med surveys. Denne bog gennemgår alle surveyarbejdets faser og giver en praktisk indføring i: • design af undersøgelsen og udvælgelse af stikprøver, • formulering af spørgeskemaer samt indsamling og kodning af data, • metoder til at analysere resultaterne...

  20. Spectral Decomposition Algorithm (SDA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Spectral Decomposition Algorithm (SDA) is an unsupervised feature extraction technique similar to PCA that was developed to better distinguish spectral features in...

  1. Spectral Imaging by Upconversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Pedersen, Christian; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter

    2011-01-01

    We present a method to obtain spectrally resolved images using upconversion. By this method an image is spectrally shifted from one spectral region to another wavelength. Since the process is spectrally sensitive it allows for a tailored spectral response. We believe this will allow standard sili...... silicon based cameras designed for visible/near infrared radiation to be used for spectral images in the mid infrared. This can lead to much lower costs for such imaging devices, and a better performance.......We present a method to obtain spectrally resolved images using upconversion. By this method an image is spectrally shifted from one spectral region to another wavelength. Since the process is spectrally sensitive it allows for a tailored spectral response. We believe this will allow standard...

  2. Gaia-ESO Survey: Empirical classification of VLT/Giraffe stellar spectra in the wavelength range 6440-6810 Å in the γ Velorum cluster, and calibration of spectral indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiani, F.; Prisinzano, L.; Micela, G.; Randich, S.; Gilmore, G.; Drew, J. E.; Jeffries, R. D.; Frémat, Y.; Alfaro, E. J.; Bensby, T.; Bragaglia, A.; Flaccomio, E.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Pancino, E.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Sacco, G. G.; Smiljanic, R.; Jackson, R. J.; de Laverny, P.; Morbidelli, L.; Worley, C. C.; Hourihane, A.; Costado, M. T.; Jofré, P.; Lind, K.; Maiorca, E.

    2014-06-01

    We present a study of spectral diagnostics available from optical spectra with R = 17 000 obtained with the VLT/Giraffe HR15n setup, using observations from the Gaia-ESO Survey, on the γ Vel young cluster, with the purpose of classifying these stars and finding their fundamental parameters. We define several spectroscopic indices, sampling the amplitude of TiO bands, the Hα line core and wings, and temperature- and gravity-sensitive sets of lines, each useful as a Teff or log g indicator over a limited range of stellar spectral types. Hα line indices are also useful as chromospheric activity or accretion indicators. Furthermore, we use all indices to define additional global Teff- and log g-sensitive indices τ and γ, valid for the entire range of types in the observed sample. We find a clear difference between gravity indices of main-sequence and pre-main-sequence stars, as well as a much larger difference between these and giant stars. The potentially great usefulness of the (γ,τ) diagram as a distance-independent age measurement tool for young clusters is discussed. We discuss the effect on the defined indices of classical T Tauri star veiling, which is however detected in only a few stars in the present sample. Then, we present tests and calibrations of these indices, on the basis of both photometry and literature reference spectra, from the UVES Paranal Observatory Projectand the ELODIE 3.1 Library. The known properties of these stars, spanning a wide range of stellar parameters, enable us to obtain a good understanding of the performances of our new spectral indices. For non-peculiar stars with known temperature, gravity, and metallicity, we are able to calibrate quantitatively our indices, and derive stellar parameters for a wide range of stellar types. To this aim, a new composite index is defined, providing a good metallicity indicator. The ability of our indices to select peculiar, or otherwise rare classes of stars is also established. For pre

  3. Spectral analysis of the Chandra comet survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodewits, D.; Christian, D. J.; Torney, M.; Dryer, M.; Lisse, C. M.; Dennerl, K.; Zurbuchen, T. H.; Wolk, S. J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Hoekstra, R.

    Aims. We present results of the analysis of cometary X-ray spectra with an extended version of our charge exchange emission model (Bodewits et al. 2006). We have applied this model to the sample of 8 comets thus far observed with the Chandra X-ray observatory and acis spectrometer in the 300 - 1000

  4. Adaptive Spectral Doppler Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gran, Fredrik; Jakobsson, Andreas; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2009-01-01

    . The methods can also provide better quality of the estimated power spectral density (PSD) of the blood signal. Adaptive spectral estimation techniques are known to pro- vide good spectral resolution and contrast even when the ob- servation window is very short. The 2 adaptive techniques are tested......In this paper, 2 adaptive spectral estimation techniques are analyzed for spectral Doppler ultrasound. The purpose is to minimize the observation window needed to estimate the spectrogram to provide a better temporal resolution and gain more flexibility when designing the data acquisition sequence...... and compared with the averaged periodogram (Welch’s method). The blood power spectral capon (BPC) method is based on a standard minimum variance technique adapted to account for both averaging over slow-time and depth. The blood amplitude and phase estimation technique (BAPES) is based on finding a set...

  5. Stellar Spectral Classification with Locality Preserving Projections ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    type and 3 subclasses of F-type spectra from. Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Lastly, the performance of LPP+SVM is compared with that of PCA+SVM in stellar spectral classification, and we found that LPP does better than PCA. Key words.

  6. Spectral analysis of ground magnetic data in Magadi area, Southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A ground magnetic survey was conducted to investigate geothermal potential of the area and a magnetic anomaly contour map prepared. Spectral analysis involving determining power spectrum was applied to magnetic data along selected profiles cutting through discerned anomalies. Spectral analysis results suggest that ...

  7. Spectral radius of graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Stevanovic, Dragan

    2015-01-01

    Spectral Radius of Graphs provides a thorough overview of important results on the spectral radius of adjacency matrix of graphs that have appeared in the literature in the preceding ten years, most of them with proofs, and including some previously unpublished results of the author. The primer begins with a brief classical review, in order to provide the reader with a foundation for the subsequent chapters. Topics covered include spectral decomposition, the Perron-Frobenius theorem, the Rayleigh quotient, the Weyl inequalities, and the Interlacing theorem. From this introduction, the

  8. Unmixing of spectrally similar minerals

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Debba, Pravesh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available techniques is complicated when considering very similar spectral signatures. Iron-bearing oxide/hydroxide/sulfate minerals have similar spectral signatures. The study focuses on how could estimates of abundances of spectrally similar iron-bearing oxide...

  9. Vowel Inherent Spectral Change

    CERN Document Server

    Assmann, Peter

    2013-01-01

    It has been traditional in phonetic research to characterize monophthongs using a set of static formant frequencies, i.e., formant frequencies taken from a single time-point in the vowel or averaged over the time-course of the vowel. However, over the last twenty years a growing body of research has demonstrated that, at least for a number of dialects of North American English, vowels which are traditionally described as monophthongs often have substantial spectral change. Vowel Inherent Spectral Change has been observed in speakers’ productions, and has also been found to have a substantial effect on listeners’ perception. In terms of acoustics, the traditional categorical distinction between monophthongs and diphthongs can be replaced by a gradient description of dynamic spectral patterns. This book includes chapters addressing various aspects of vowel inherent spectral change (VISC), including theoretical and experimental studies of the perceptually relevant aspects of VISC, the relationship between ar...

  10. High Resolution Spectral Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-10-25

    liable methods for high resolution spectral analysis of multivariable processes, as well as to distance measures for quantitative assessment of...called "modern nonlinear spectral analysis methods " [27]. An alternative way to reconstruct /„(#), based on Tn, is the periodogram/correlogram f{6...eie). A homotopy method was proposed in [8, 9] leading to a differential equation for A(T) in a homotopy variable r. If the statistics are consistent

  11. Spectrally selective glazings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-08-01

    Spectrally selective glazing is window glass that permits some portions of the solar spectrum to enter a building while blocking others. This high-performance glazing admits as much daylight as possible while preventing transmission of as much solar heat as possible. By controlling solar heat gains in summer, preventing loss of interior heat in winter, and allowing occupants to reduce electric lighting use by making maximum use of daylight, spectrally selective glazing significantly reduces building energy consumption and peak demand. Because new spectrally selective glazings can have a virtually clear appearance, they admit more daylight and permit much brighter, more open views to the outside while still providing the solar control of the dark, reflective energy-efficient glass of the past. This Federal Technology Alert provides detailed information and procedures for Federal energy managers to consider spectrally selective glazings. The principle of spectrally selective glazings is explained. Benefits related to energy efficiency and other architectural criteria are delineated. Guidelines are provided for appropriate application of spectrally selective glazing, and step-by-step instructions are given for estimating energy savings. Case studies are also presented to illustrate actual costs and energy savings. Current manufacturers, technology users, and references for further reading are included for users who have questions not fully addressed here.

  12. Spectral Classification of Asteroids by Random Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C.; Ma, Y. H.; Zhao, H. B.; Lu, X. P.

    2016-09-01

    With the increasing asteroid spectral and photometric data, a variety of classification methods for asteroids have been proposed. This paper classifies asteroids based on the observations of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Moving Object Catalogue (MOC) by using the random forest algorithm. With the training data derived from the taxonomies of Tholen, Bus, Lazzaro, DeMeo, and Principal Component Analysis, we classify 48642 asteroids according to g, r, i, and z SDSS magnitudes. In this way, asteroids are divided into 8 spectral classes (C, X, S, B, D, K, L, and V).

  13. Automated spectral classification and the GAIA project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasala, Jerry; Kurtz, Michael J.

    1995-01-01

    Two dimensional spectral types for each of the stars observed in the global astrometric interferometer for astrophysics (GAIA) mission would provide additional information for the galactic structure and stellar evolution studies, as well as helping in the identification of unusual objects and populations. The classification of the large quantity generated spectra requires that automated techniques are implemented. Approaches for the automatic classification are reviewed, and a metric-distance method is discussed. In tests, the metric-distance method produced spectral types with mean errors comparable to those of human classifiers working at similar resolution. Data and equipment requirements for an automated classification survey, are discussed. A program of auxiliary observations is proposed to yield spectral types and radial velocities for the GAIA-observed stars.

  14. Spectral analysis and filter theory in applied geophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Buttkus, Burkhard

    2000-01-01

    This book is intended to be an introduction to the fundamentals and methods of spectral analysis and filter theory and their appli­ cations in geophysics. The principles and theoretical basis of the various methods are described, their efficiency and effectiveness eval­ uated, and instructions provided for their practical application. Be­ sides the conventional methods, newer methods arediscussed, such as the spectral analysis ofrandom processes by fitting models to the ob­ served data, maximum-entropy spectral analysis and maximum-like­ lihood spectral analysis, the Wiener and Kalman filtering methods, homomorphic deconvolution, and adaptive methods for nonstation­ ary processes. Multidimensional spectral analysis and filtering, as well as multichannel filters, are given extensive treatment. The book provides a survey of the state-of-the-art of spectral analysis and fil­ ter theory. The importance and possibilities ofspectral analysis and filter theory in geophysics for data acquisition, processing an...

  15. CRISS power spectral density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaeth, W.

    1979-04-01

    The correlation of signal components at different frequencies like higher harmonics cannot be detected by a normal power spectral density measurement, since this technique correlates only components at the same frequency. This paper describes a special method for measuring the correlation of two signal components at different frequencies: the CRISS power spectral density. From this new function in frequency analysis, the correlation of two components can be determined quantitatively either they stem from one signal or from two diverse signals. The principle of the method, suitable for the higher harmonics of a signal as well as for any other frequency combinations is shown for the digital frequency analysis technique. Two examples of CRISS power spectral densities demonstrates the operation of the new method. (orig.) [de

  16. Parametric Explosion Spectral Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, S R; Walter, W R

    2012-01-19

    Small underground nuclear explosions need to be confidently detected, identified, and characterized in regions of the world where they have never before occurred. We develop a parametric model of the nuclear explosion seismic source spectrum derived from regional phases that is compatible with earthquake-based geometrical spreading and attenuation. Earthquake spectra are fit with a generalized version of the Brune spectrum, which is a three-parameter model that describes the long-period level, corner-frequency, and spectral slope at high-frequencies. Explosion spectra can be fit with similar spectral models whose parameters are then correlated with near-source geology and containment conditions. We observe a correlation of high gas-porosity (low-strength) with increased spectral slope. The relationship between the parametric equations and the geologic and containment conditions will assist in our physical understanding of the nuclear explosion source.

  17. Spectral analysis by correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fauque, J.M.; Berthier, D.; Max, J.; Bonnet, G.

    1969-01-01

    The spectral density of a signal, which represents its power distribution along the frequency axis, is a function which is of great importance, finding many uses in all fields concerned with the processing of the signal (process identification, vibrational analysis, etc...). Amongst all the possible methods for calculating this function, the correlation method (correlation function calculation + Fourier transformation) is the most promising, mainly because of its simplicity and of the results it yields. The study carried out here will lead to the construction of an apparatus which, coupled with a correlator, will constitute a set of equipment for spectral analysis in real time covering the frequency range 0 to 5 MHz. (author) [fr

  18. Spectral Ensemble Kalman Filters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mandel, Jan; Kasanický, Ivan; Vejmelka, Martin; Fuglík, Viktor; Turčičová, Marie; Eben, Kryštof; Resler, Jaroslav; Juruš, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 11, - (2014), EMS2014-446 [EMS Annual Meeting /14./ & European Conference on Applied Climatology (ECAC) /10./. 06.10.2014-10.10.2014, Prague] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-34856S Grant - others:NSF DMS -1216481 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : data assimilation * spectral filter Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology

  19. A Simple Spectral Observer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizeth Torres

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The principal aim of a spectral observer is twofold: the reconstruction of a signal of time via state estimation and the decomposition of such a signal into the frequencies that make it up. A spectral observer can be catalogued as an online algorithm for time-frequency analysis because is a method that can compute on the fly the Fourier transform (FT of a signal, without having the entire signal available from the start. In this regard, this paper presents a novel spectral observer with an adjustable constant gain for reconstructing a given signal by means of the recursive identification of the coefficients of a Fourier series. The reconstruction or estimation of a signal in the context of this work means to find the coefficients of a linear combination of sines a cosines that fits a signal such that it can be reproduced. The design procedure of the spectral observer is presented along with the following applications: (1 the reconstruction of a simple periodical signal, (2 the approximation of both a square and a triangular signal, (3 the edge detection in signals by using the Fourier coefficients, (4 the fitting of the historical Bitcoin market data from 1 December 2014 to 8 January 2018 and (5 the estimation of a input force acting upon a Duffing oscillator. To round out this paper, we present a detailed discussion about the results of the applications as well as a comparative analysis of the proposed spectral observer vis-à-vis the Short Time Fourier Transform (STFT, which is a well-known method for time-frequency analysis.

  20. Spectral analysis of bedform dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winter, Christian; Ernstsen, Verner Brandbyge; Noormets, Riko

    Successive multibeam echo sounder surveys in tidal channels off Esbjerg (Denmark) on the North Sea coast reveal the dynamics of subaquatic compound dunes. Mainly driven by tidal currents, dune structures show complex migration patterns in all temporal and spatial scales. Common methods for the an....... The proposed method overcomes the above mentioned problems of common descriptive analysis as it is an objective and straightforward mathematical process. The spectral decomposition of superimposed dunes allows a detailed description and analysis of dune patterns and migration.......Successive multibeam echo sounder surveys in tidal channels off Esbjerg (Denmark) on the North Sea coast reveal the dynamics of subaquatic compound dunes. Mainly driven by tidal currents, dune structures show complex migration patterns in all temporal and spatial scales. Common methods...... allows the application of a procedure, which has been a standard for the analysis of water waves for long times: The bathymetric signal of a cross-section of subaquatic compound dunes is approximated by the sum of a set of harmonic functions, derived by Fourier transformation. If the wavelength...

  1. Wavelength conversion based spectral imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Jeppe Seidelin

    There has been a strong, application driven development of Si-based cameras and spectrometers for imaging and spectral analysis of light in the visible and near infrared spectral range. This has resulted in very efficient devices, with high quantum efficiency, good signal to noise ratio and high...... resolution for this spectral region. Today, an increasing number of applications exists outside the spectral region covered by Si-based devices, e.g. within cleantech, medical or food imaging. We present a technology based on wavelength conversion which will extend the spectral coverage of state of the art...... visible or near infrared cameras and spectrometers to include other spectral regions of interest....

  2. USGS Digital Spectral Library splib06a

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Roger N.; Swayze, Gregg A.; Wise, Richard A.; Livo, K. Eric; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Sutley, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction We have assembled a digital reflectance spectral library that covers the wavelength range from the ultraviolet to far infrared along with sample documentation. The library includes samples of minerals, rocks, soils, physically constructed as well as mathematically computed mixtures, plants, vegetation communities, microorganisms, and man-made materials. The samples and spectra collected were assembled for the purpose of using spectral features for the remote detection of these and similar materials. Analysis of spectroscopic data from laboratory, aircraft, and spacecraft instrumentation requires a knowledge base. The spectral library discussed here forms a knowledge base for the spectroscopy of minerals and related materials of importance to a variety of research programs being conducted at the U.S. Geological Survey. Much of this library grew out of the need for spectra to support imaging spectroscopy studies of the Earth and planets. Imaging spectrometers, such as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Airborne Visible/Infra Red Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) or the NASA Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) which is currently orbiting Saturn, have narrow bandwidths in many contiguous spectral channels that permit accurate definition of absorption features in spectra from a variety of materials. Identification of materials from such data requires a comprehensive spectral library of minerals, vegetation, man-made materials, and other subjects in the scene. Our research involves the use of the spectral library to identify the components in a spectrum of an unknown. Therefore, the quality of the library must be very good. However, the quality required in a spectral library to successfully perform an investigation depends on the scientific questions to be answered and the type of algorithms to be used. For example, to map a mineral using imaging spectroscopy and the mapping algorithm of Clark and others (1990a, 2003b

  3. Hybrid spectral CT reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Darin P.

    2017-01-01

    Current photon counting x-ray detector (PCD) technology faces limitations associated with spectral fidelity and photon starvation. One strategy for addressing these limitations is to supplement PCD data with high-resolution, low-noise data acquired with an energy-integrating detector (EID). In this work, we propose an iterative, hybrid reconstruction technique which combines the spectral properties of PCD data with the resolution and signal-to-noise characteristics of EID data. Our hybrid reconstruction technique is based on an algebraic model of data fidelity which substitutes the EID data into the data fidelity term associated with the PCD reconstruction, resulting in a joint reconstruction problem. Within the split Bregman framework, these data fidelity constraints are minimized subject to additional constraints on spectral rank and on joint intensity-gradient sparsity measured between the reconstructions of the EID and PCD data. Following a derivation of the proposed technique, we apply it to the reconstruction of a digital phantom which contains realistic concentrations of iodine, barium, and calcium encountered in small-animal micro-CT. The results of this experiment suggest reliable separation and detection of iodine at concentrations ≥ 5 mg/ml and barium at concentrations ≥ 10 mg/ml in 2-mm features for EID and PCD data reconstructed with inherent spatial resolutions of 176 μm and 254 μm, respectively (point spread function, FWHM). Furthermore, hybrid reconstruction is demonstrated to enhance spatial resolution within material decomposition results and to improve low-contrast detectability by as much as 2.6 times relative to reconstruction with PCD data only. The parameters of the simulation experiment are based on an in vivo micro-CT experiment conducted in a mouse model of soft-tissue sarcoma. Material decomposition results produced from this in vivo data demonstrate the feasibility of distinguishing two K-edge contrast agents with a spectral

  4. Context Dependent Spectral Unmixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    remote sensing [1–13]. It is also used in food safety [14–17], pharmaceutical process monitoring and quality control [18–22], as well as in biomedical...23,24], industrial [25], biometric [26] and forensic applications [27]. Hyperspectral sensors capture both the spatial and spectral information of a...imagery,” IEEE Signal Processing Magazine, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 58–69, 2002. [12] A. Plaza, J. A. Benediktsson, J. W. Boardman, J. Brazile , L. Bruzzone, G

  5. Hybrid spectral CT reconstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darin P Clark

    Full Text Available Current photon counting x-ray detector (PCD technology faces limitations associated with spectral fidelity and photon starvation. One strategy for addressing these limitations is to supplement PCD data with high-resolution, low-noise data acquired with an energy-integrating detector (EID. In this work, we propose an iterative, hybrid reconstruction technique which combines the spectral properties of PCD data with the resolution and signal-to-noise characteristics of EID data. Our hybrid reconstruction technique is based on an algebraic model of data fidelity which substitutes the EID data into the data fidelity term associated with the PCD reconstruction, resulting in a joint reconstruction problem. Within the split Bregman framework, these data fidelity constraints are minimized subject to additional constraints on spectral rank and on joint intensity-gradient sparsity measured between the reconstructions of the EID and PCD data. Following a derivation of the proposed technique, we apply it to the reconstruction of a digital phantom which contains realistic concentrations of iodine, barium, and calcium encountered in small-animal micro-CT. The results of this experiment suggest reliable separation and detection of iodine at concentrations ≥ 5 mg/ml and barium at concentrations ≥ 10 mg/ml in 2-mm features for EID and PCD data reconstructed with inherent spatial resolutions of 176 μm and 254 μm, respectively (point spread function, FWHM. Furthermore, hybrid reconstruction is demonstrated to enhance spatial resolution within material decomposition results and to improve low-contrast detectability by as much as 2.6 times relative to reconstruction with PCD data only. The parameters of the simulation experiment are based on an in vivo micro-CT experiment conducted in a mouse model of soft-tissue sarcoma. Material decomposition results produced from this in vivo data demonstrate the feasibility of distinguishing two K-edge contrast agents with

  6. Spectral distributions and symmetries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quesne, C.

    1980-01-01

    As it is now well known, the spectral distribution method has both statistical and group theoretical aspects which make for great simplifications in many-Fermion system calculations with respect to more conventional ones. Although both aspects intertwine and are equally essential to understand what is going on, we are only going to discuss some of the group theoretical aspects, namely those connected with the propagation of information, in view of their fundamental importance for the actual calculations of spectral distributions. To be more precise, let us recall that the spectral distribution method may be applied in principle to many-Fermion spaces which have a direct-product structure, i.e., are obtained by distributing a certain number n of Fermions over N single-particle states (O less than or equal to n less than or equal to N), as it is the case for instance for the nuclear shell model spaces. For such systems, the operation of a central limit theorem is known to provide us with a simplifying principle which, when used in conjunction with exact or broken symmetries, enables us to make definite predictions in those cases which are not amendable to exact shell model diagonalizations. The distribution (in energy) of the states corresponding to a fixed symmetry is then defined by a small number of low-order energy moments. Since the Hamiltonian is defined in few-particle subspaces embedded in the n-particlespace, the low-order moments, we are interested in, can be expressed in terms of simpler quantities defined in those few-particle subspaces: the information is said to propagate from the simple subspaces to the more complicated ones. The possibility of actually calculating spectral distributions depends upon the finding of simple ways to propagate the information

  7. Spectral and Diffraction Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Lionheart, William

    2016-01-01

    We discuss several cases of what we call "Rich Tomography" problems in which more data is measured than a scalar for each ray. We give examples of infra red spectral tomography and Bragg edge neutron tomography in which the data is insufficient. For diffraction tomography of strain for polycrystaline materials we give an explicit reconstruction procedure. We go on to describe a way to find six independent rotation axes using Pascal's theorem of projective geometry

  8. Mechanical spectral shift reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, J.F.; Sherwood, D.G.

    1982-01-01

    A mechanical spectral shift reactor comprises a reactive core having fuel assemblies accommodating both water displacer elements and neutron absorbing control rods for selectively changing the volume of water-moderator in the core. The fuel assemblies with displacer and control rods are arranged in alternating fashion so that one displacer element drive mechanism may move displacer elements in more than one fuel assembly without interfering with the movement of control rods of a corresponding control rod drive mechanisms. (author)

  9. International Conference on Spectral Theory and Mathematical Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Raikov, Georgi; Aldecoa, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    The present volume contains the Proceedings of the International Conference on Spectral Theory and Mathematical Physics held in Santiago de Chile in November 2014. Main topics are: Ergodic Quantum Hamiltonians, Magnetic Schrödinger Operators, Quantum Field Theory, Quantum Integrable Systems, Scattering Theory, Semiclassical and Microlocal Analysis, Spectral Shift Function and Quantum Resonances. The book presents survey articles as well as original research papers on these topics. It will be of interest to researchers and graduate students in Mathematics and Mathematical Physics.

  10. QCD spectral sum rules

    CERN Document Server

    Narison, Stéphan

    The aim of the book is to give an introduction to the method of QCD Spectral Sum Rules and to review its developments. After some general introductory remarks, Chiral Symmetry, the Historical Developments of the Sum Rules and the necessary materials for perturbative QCD including the MS regularization and renormalization schemes are discussed. The book also gives a critical review and some improvements of the wide uses of the QSSR in Hadron Physics and QSSR beyond the Standard Hadron Phenomenology. The author has participated actively in this field since 1978 just before the expanding success

  11. Spectral signatures of chirality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Goor; Mortensen, Asger

    2009-01-01

    We present a new way of measuring chirality, via the spectral shift of photonic band gaps in one-dimensional structures. We derive an explicit mapping of the problem of oblique incidence of circularly polarized light on a chiral one-dimensional photonic crystal with negligible index contrast...... to the formally equivalent problem of linearly polarized light incident on-axis on a non-chiral structure with index contrast. We derive analytical expressions for the first-order shifts of the band gaps for negligible index contrast. These are modified to give good approximations to the band gap shifts also...

  12. On spectral pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llobet, X.; Appert, K.; Bondeson, A.; Vaclavik, J.

    1990-01-01

    Finite difference and finite element approximations of eigenvalue problems, under certain circumstances exhibit spectral pollution, i.e. the appearance of eigenvalues that do not converge to the correct value when the mesh density is increased. In the present paper this phenomenon is investigated in a homogeneous case by means of discrete dispersion relations: the polluting modes belong to a branch of the dispersion relation that is strongly distorted by the discretization method employed, or to a new, spurious branch. The analysis is applied to finite difference methods and to finite element methods, and some indications about how to avoiding polluting schemes are given. (author) 5 figs., 10 refs

  13. Spectral signature selection for mapping unvegetated soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, G. A.; Petersen, G. W.

    1975-01-01

    Airborne multispectral scanner data covering the wavelength interval from 0.40-2.60 microns were collected at an altitude of 1000 m above the terrain in southeastern Pennsylvania. Uniform training areas were selected within three sites from this flightline. Soil samples were collected from each site and a procedure developed to allow assignment of scan line and element number from the multispectral scanner data to each sampling location. These soil samples were analyzed on a spectrophotometer and laboratory spectral signatures were derived. After correcting for solar radiation and atmospheric attenuation, the laboratory signatures were compared to the spectral signatures derived from these same soils using multispectral scanner data. Both signatures were used in supervised and unsupervised classification routines. Computer-generated maps using the laboratory and multispectral scanner derived signatures resulted in maps that were similar to maps resulting from field surveys. Approximately 90% agreement was obtained between classification maps produced using multispectral scanner derived signatures and laboratory derived signatures.

  14. Intensity Conserving Spectral Fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimchuk, J. A.; Patsourakos, S.; Tripathi, D.

    2015-01-01

    The detailed shapes of spectral line profiles provide valuable information about the emitting plasma, especially when the plasma contains an unresolved mixture of velocities, temperatures, and densities. As a result of finite spectral resolution, the intensity measured by a spectrometer is the average intensity across a wavelength bin of non-zero size. It is assigned to the wavelength position at the center of the bin. However, the actual intensity at that discrete position will be different if the profile is curved, as it invariably is. Standard fitting routines (spline, Gaussian, etc.) do not account for this difference, and this can result in significant errors when making sensitive measurements. Detection of asymmetries in solar coronal emission lines is one example. Removal of line blends is another. We have developed an iterative procedure that corrects for this effect. It can be used with any fitting function, but we employ a cubic spline in a new analysis routine called Intensity Conserving Spline Interpolation (ICSI). As the name implies, it conserves the observed intensity within each wavelength bin, which ordinary fits do not. Given the rapid convergence, speed of computation, and ease of use, we suggest that ICSI be made a standard component of the processing pipeline for spectroscopic data.

  15. Spectral correction factors for conventional neutron dose meters used in high-energy neutron environments improved and extended results based on a complete survey of all neutron spectra in IAEA-TRS-403

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oparaji, U.; Tsai, Y. H.; Liu, Y. C.; Lee, K. W.; Patelli, E.; Sheu, R. J.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents improved and extended results of our previous study on corrections for conventional neutron dose meters used in environments with high-energy neutrons (E n > 10 MeV). Conventional moderated-type neutron dose meters tend to underestimate the dose contribution of high-energy neutrons because of the opposite trends of dose conversion coefficients and detection efficiencies as the neutron energy increases. A practical correction scheme was proposed based on analysis of hundreds of neutron spectra in the IAEA-TRS-403 report. By comparing 252 Cf-calibrated dose responses with reference values derived from fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients, this study provides recommendations for neutron field characterization and the corresponding dose correction factors. Further sensitivity studies confirm the appropriateness of the proposed scheme and indicate that (1) the spectral correction factors are nearly independent of the selection of three commonly used calibration sources: 252 Cf, 241 Am-Be and 239 Pu-Be; (2) the derived correction factors for Bonner spheres of various sizes (6''-9'') are similar in trend and (3) practical high-energy neutron indexes based on measurements can be established to facilitate the application of these correction factors in workplaces. (authors)

  16. Spectral clustering for water body spectral types analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Leping; Li, Shijin; Wang, Lingli; Chen, Deqing

    2017-11-01

    In order to study the spectral types of water body in the whole country, the key issue of reservoir research is to obtain and to analyze the information of water body in the reservoir quantitatively and accurately. A new type of weight matrix is constructed by utilizing the spectral features and spatial features of the spectra from GF-1 remote sensing images comprehensively. Then an improved spectral clustering algorithm is proposed based on this weight matrix to cluster representative reservoirs in China. According to the internal clustering validity index which called Davies-Bouldin(DB) index, the best clustering number 7 is obtained. Compared with two clustering algorithms, the spectral clustering algorithm based only on spectral features and the K-means algorithm based on spectral features and spatial features, simulation results demonstrate that the proposed spectral clustering algorithm based on spectral features and spatial features has a higher clustering accuracy, which can better reflect the spatial clustering characteristics of representative reservoirs in various provinces in China - similar spectral properties and adjacent geographical locations.

  17. Spectral Automorphisms in Quantum Logics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Alexandru; Caragheorgheopol, Dan

    2010-12-01

    In quantum mechanics, the Hilbert space formalism might be physically justified in terms of some axioms based on the orthomodular lattice (OML) mathematical structure (Piron in Foundations of Quantum Physics, Benjamin, Reading, 1976). We intend to investigate the extent to which some fundamental physical facts can be described in the more general framework of OMLs, without the support of Hilbert space-specific tools. We consider the study of lattice automorphisms properties as a “substitute” for Hilbert space techniques in investigating the spectral properties of observables. This is why we introduce the notion of spectral automorphism of an OML. Properties of spectral automorphisms and of their spectra are studied. We prove that the presence of nontrivial spectral automorphisms allow us to distinguish between classical and nonclassical theories. We also prove, for finite dimensional OMLs, that for every spectral automorphism there is a basis of invariant atoms. This is an analogue of the spectral theorem for unitary operators having purely point spectrum.

  18. Rectangular spectral collocation

    KAUST Repository

    Driscoll, Tobin A.

    2015-02-06

    Boundary conditions in spectral collocation methods are typically imposed by removing some rows of the discretized differential operator and replacing them with others that enforce the required conditions at the boundary. A new approach based upon resampling differentiated polynomials into a lower-degree subspace makes differentiation matrices, and operators built from them, rectangular without any row deletions. Then, boundary and interface conditions can be adjoined to yield a square system. The resulting method is both flexible and robust, and avoids ambiguities that arise when applying the classical row deletion method outside of two-point scalar boundary-value problems. The new method is the basis for ordinary differential equation solutions in Chebfun software, and is demonstrated for a variety of boundary-value, eigenvalue and time-dependent problems.

  19. [Review of digital ground object spectral library].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiao-Hu; Zhou, Ding-Wu

    2009-06-01

    A higher spectral resolution is the main direction of developing remote sensing technology, and it is quite important to set up the digital ground object reflectance spectral database library, one of fundamental research fields in remote sensing application. Remote sensing application has been increasingly relying on ground object spectral characteristics, and quantitative analysis has been developed to a new stage. The present article summarized and systematically introduced the research status quo and development trend of digital ground object reflectance spectral libraries at home and in the world in recent years. Introducing the spectral libraries has been established, including desertification spectral database library, plants spectral database library, geological spectral database library, soil spectral database library, minerals spectral database library, cloud spectral database library, snow spectral database library, the atmosphere spectral database library, rocks spectral database library, water spectral database library, meteorites spectral database library, moon rock spectral database library, and man-made materials spectral database library, mixture spectral database library, volatile compounds spectral database library, and liquids spectral database library. In the process of establishing spectral database libraries, there have been some problems, such as the lack of uniform national spectral database standard and uniform standards for the ground object features as well as the comparability between different databases. In addition, data sharing mechanism can not be carried out, etc. This article also put forward some suggestions on those problems.

  20. Spectral Theory of Chemical Bonding

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Langhoff, P. W; Boatz, J. A; Hinde, R. J; Sheehy, J. A

    2004-01-01

    New theoretical methods are reported for obtaining the binding energies of molecules and other chemical aggregates employing the spectral eigenstates and related properties of their atomic constituents...

  1. Spectral Classification of Asteroids by Random Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao; Ma, Yue-hua; Zhao, Hai-bin; Lu, Xiao-ping

    2017-10-01

    With the increasing spectral and photometric data of asteroids, a variety of classification methods for asteroids have been proposed. This paper classifies asteroids based on the observations in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Moving Object Catalogue (MOC) by using the random forest algorithm. In combination with the present taxonomies of Tholen, Bus, Lazzaro, and DeMeo, and the principal component analysis, we have classified 48642 asteroids according to their SDSS magnitudes at the g, r, i, and z wavebands. In this way, these asteroids are divided into 8 (C, X, S, B, D, K, L, and V) classes.

  2. An experiment of spectral induced polarization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Sambuelli

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available A Spectral Induced Polarization (SIP survey was carried out in a mining test site in Sardinia (Italy. Measurements were developed along a profile by using an axial dipole-dipole array with 10 AB positions and 6 MN positions for cach AB. The amplitude and phase spectra of the apparent resistivity were acquired in the 0.25-4096 Hz frequeney range. The results obtained through the processing and inversion step seem to confirm that, with respect to the classical TD/FD Induced Polarization, SIP allows better discrimination of some important characteristics of mineral deposits such as mineral content and grain size.

  3. Understanding Soliton Spectral Tunneling as a Spectral Coupling Effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Hairun; Wang, Shaofei; Zeng, Xianglong

    2013-01-01

    Soliton eigenstate is found corresponding to a dispersive phase profile under which the soliton phase changes induced by the dispersion and nonlinearity are instantaneously counterbalanced. Much like a waveguide coupler relying on a spatial refractive index profile that supports mode coupling...... between channels, here we suggest that the soliton spectral tunneling effect can be understood supported by a spectral phase coupler. The dispersive wave number in the spectral domain must have a coupler-like symmetric profile for soliton spectral tunneling to occur. We show that such a spectral coupler...... exactly implies phase as well as group-velocity matching between the input soliton and tunneled soliton, namely a soliton phase matching condition. Examples in realistic photonic crystal fibers are also presented....

  4. The broadband spectral energy distributions of SDSS blazars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huai-Zhen; Chen, Luo-En; Jiang, Yun-Guo; Yi, Ting-Feng

    2015-07-01

    We compiled the radio, optical and X-ray data of blazars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey database, and presented the distribution of luminosities and broadband spectral indices. The distribution of luminosities shows that the averaged luminosity of flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) is larger than that of BL Lacertae (BL Lac) objects. On the other hand, the broadband spectral energy distribution reveals that FSRQs and low energy peaked BL Lac objects have similar spectral properties, but high energy peaked BL Lac objects have a distinct spectral property. This may be due to the fact that different subclasses of blazars have different intrinsic environments and are at different cooling levels. Even so, a unified scheme is also revealed from the color-color diagram, which hints that there are similar physical processes operating in all objects under a range of intrinsic physical conditions or beaming parameters. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China.

  5. SPECTRAL ANALYSIS OF EXCHANGE RATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALEŠA LOTRIČ DOLINAR

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Using spectral analysis is very common in technical areas but rather unusual in economics and finance, where ARIMA and GARCH modeling are much more in use. To show that spectral analysis can be useful in determining hidden periodic components for high-frequency finance data as well, we use the example of foreign exchange rates

  6. Intersection numbers of spectral curves

    CERN Document Server

    Eynard, B

    2011-01-01

    We compute the symplectic invariants of an arbitrary spectral curve with only 1 branchpoint in terms of integrals of characteristic classes in the moduli space of curves. Our formula associates to any spectral curve, a characteristic class, which is determined by the laplace transform of the spectral curve. This is a hint to the key role of Laplace transform in mirror symmetry. When the spectral curve is y=\\sqrt{x}, the formula gives Kontsevich--Witten intersection numbers, when the spectral curve is chosen to be the Lambert function \\exp{x}=y\\exp{-y}, the formula gives the ELSV formula for Hurwitz numbers, and when one chooses the mirror of C^3 with framing f, i.e. \\exp{-x}=\\exp{-yf}(1-\\exp{-y}), the formula gives the topological vertex formula, i.e. the generating function of Gromov-Witten invariants of C^3. In some sense this formula generalizes ELSV formula, and Mumford formula.

  7. Spectral imagery collection experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Joao M.; Rosario, Dalton; Farley, Vincent; Sohr, Brian

    2010-04-01

    The Spectral and Polarimetric Imagery Collection Experiment (SPICE) is a collaborative effort between the US Army ARDEC and ARL for the collection of mid-wave and long-wave infrared imagery using hyperspectral, polarimetric, and broadband sensors. The objective of the program is to collect a comprehensive database of the different modalities over the course of 1 to 2 years to capture sensor performance over a wide variety of adverse weather conditions, diurnal, and seasonal changes inherent to Picatinny's northern New Jersey location. Using the Precision Armament Laboratory (PAL) tower at Picatinny Arsenal, the sensors will autonomously collect the desired data around the clock at different ranges where surrogate 2S3 Self-Propelled Howitzer targets are positioned at different viewing perspectives at 549 and 1280m from the sensor location. The collected database will allow for: 1) Understand of signature variability under the different weather conditions; 2) Development of robust algorithms; 3) Development of new sensors; 4) Evaluation of hyperspectral and polarimetric technologies; and 5) Evaluation of fusing the different sensor modalities. In this paper, we will present the SPICE data collection objectives, the ongoing effort, the sensors that are currently deployed, and how this work will assist researches on the development and evaluation of sensors, algorithms, and fusion applications.

  8. Spectral Depth Analysis of some Segments of the Bida Basin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    2017-12-16

    Dec 16, 2017 ... ABSTRACT: Spectral depth analysis was carried out on ten (10) of the 2009 total magnetic field intensity data sheets covering some segments of the Bida basin, to determine the depth to magnetic basement within the basin. The data was obtained from the Nigerian Geological Survey Agency and used to ...

  9. ULTRAVIOLET RAMAN SPECTRAL SIGNATURE ACQUISITION: UV RAMAN SPECTRAL FINGERPRINTS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SEDLACEK,III, A.J.FINFROCK,C.

    2002-09-01

    As a member of the science-support part of the ITT-lead LISA development program, BNL is tasked with the acquisition of UV Raman spectral fingerprints and associated scattering cross-sections for those chemicals-of-interest to the program's sponsor. In support of this role, the present report contains the first installment of UV Raman spectral fingerprint data on the initial subset of chemicals. Because of the unique nature associated with the acquisition of spectral fingerprints for use in spectral pattern matching algorithms (i.e., CLS, PLS, ANN) great care has been undertaken to maximize the signal-to-noise and to minimize unnecessary spectral subtractions, in an effort to provide the highest quality spectral fingerprints. This report is divided into 4 sections. The first is an Experimental section that outlines how the Raman spectra are performed. This is then followed by a section on Sample Handling. Following this, the spectral fingerprints are presented in the Results section where the data reduction process is outlined. Finally, a Photographs section is included.

  10. Comparing the predictive power of field survey and multithermal spectral imager (MTI) remote-sensed environmental data for the identification of Anopheles (Diptera: Culicidae) aquatic larval habitats in Kisumu and Malindi, Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Benjamin George

    This research evaluates the extent to which utilization of data at 5-meter data from satellite surveys of mosquito larval habitats adjusted for field-based ecological data enhances predictions of mosquito counts. Mosquito larval habitats were sampled and Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI) satellite data in the visible spectrum at 5-meter spatial resolution were acquired for Kisumu, and Malindi, Kenya, during February and March 2001. All entomological parameters were collected from January to May, 2001, June to August 2002, and June to August, 2003. For Kisumu there was a total of 329 anopheline and 1,022 culcine larvae. Of the 329 Anopheles, all were An. gambiae s.l. of which 88.8% (189 of 213 specimens) were PCR identified as An. arabiensis and 6.6% (14 specimens) as An. gambiae s.s. For Malindi there was a total of 459 anopheline and 4,651 culcine larvae. Of the 459 total Anopheles, 22.1% were identified as An. funestus and 77.9% were identified as An. gambiae s.l., of which 88.3% (95 of 108 specimens) were PCR identified as An. gambiae s.s., 4.3% (5 specimens) as An. arabensis and 1% (2 specimens) as An. merus Poisson and logistic regression models were generated for each urban area and the pooled data for Kisumu and Malindi. To validate the initial models, a set of 54 randomly selected aquatic larval habitats were sampled from June 2003 to August 2003. The R 2 of the final model for Kisumu was 0.35 (p < 0.001). The R 2 of the final model for Malindi was 0.52 (p < 0.001). Additionally, SpaceStat 1.80 spatial analytic tools were used to create Local Indicators for Spatial Autocorrelation (LISA) from field and satellite collected ecological datasets from Kisumu, Malindi and the combination of the two dataset for both urban towns. Both Kisumu and Malindi displayed a weak positive spatial autocorrelation; in Kisumu the Moran's I is 0.075, and for Malindi the Moran's I is 0.295. The spatial model for the combined dataset of Kisumu and Malindi was not appropriate for

  11. Spectral Unmixing With Multiple Dictionaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jeremy E.; Gillis, Nicolas

    2018-02-01

    Spectral unmixing aims at recovering the spectral signatures of materials, called endmembers, mixed in a hyperspectral or multispectral image, along with their abundances. A typical assumption is that the image contains one pure pixel per endmember, in which case spectral unmixing reduces to identifying these pixels. Many fully automated methods have been proposed in recent years, but little work has been done to allow users to select areas where pure pixels are present manually or using a segmentation algorithm. Additionally, in a non-blind approach, several spectral libraries may be available rather than a single one, with a fixed number (or an upper or lower bound) of endmembers to chose from each. In this paper, we propose a multiple-dictionary constrained low-rank matrix approximation model that address these two problems. We propose an algorithm to compute this model, dubbed M2PALS, and its performance is discussed on both synthetic and real hyperspectral images.

  12. Special topics in spectral distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    French, J.B.

    1980-01-01

    We discuss two problems which relate to the foundations of the subject, and a third about asymptotic properties of spectral distributions. We give also a brief list of topics which should be further explored

  13. Substitution dynamical systems spectral analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Queffélec, Martine

    2010-01-01

    This volume mainly deals with the dynamics of finitely valued sequences, and more specifically, of sequences generated by substitutions and automata. Those sequences demonstrate fairly simple combinatorical and arithmetical properties and naturally appear in various domains. As the title suggests, the aim of the initial version of this book was the spectral study of the associated dynamical systems: the first chapters consisted in a detailed introduction to the mathematical notions involved, and the description of the spectral invariants followed in the closing chapters. This approach, combined with new material added to the new edition, results in a nearly self-contained book on the subject. New tools - which have also proven helpful in other contexts - had to be developed for this study. Moreover, its findings can be concretely applied, the method providing an algorithm to exhibit the spectral measures and the spectral multiplicity, as is demonstrated in several examples. Beyond this advanced analysis, many...

  14. Spectral dimensionality reduction for HMMs

    OpenAIRE

    Foster, Dean P.; Rodu, Jordan; Ungar, Lyle H.

    2012-01-01

    Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) can be accurately approximated using co-occurrence frequencies of pairs and triples of observations by using a fast spectral method in contrast to the usual slow methods like EM or Gibbs sampling. We provide a new spectral method which significantly reduces the number of model parameters that need to be estimated, and generates a sample complexity that does not depend on the size of the observation vocabulary. We present an elementary proof giving bounds on the rel...

  15. Compressive spectroscopy by spectral modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oiknine, Yaniv; August, Isaac; Stern, Adrian

    2017-05-01

    We review two compressive spectroscopy techniques based on modulation in the spectral domain that we have recently proposed. Both techniques achieve a compression ratio of approximately 10:1, however each with a different sensing mechanism. The first technique uses a liquid crystal cell as a tunable filter to modulate the spectral signal, and the second technique uses a Fabry-Perot etalon as a resonator. We overview the specific properties of each of the techniques.

  16. Spectral unmixing: estimating partial abundances

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Debba, Pravesh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available the ingredients for this chocolate cake? Debba (CSIR) Spectral Unmixing LQM 2009 3 / 22 Background and Research Question Ingredients Quantity unsweetened chocolate unsweetened cocoa powder boiling water flour baking powder baking soda salt unsalted... butter white sugar eggs pure vanilla extract milk Table: Chocolate cake ingredients Debba (CSIR) Spectral Unmixing LQM 2009 4 / 22 Background and Research Question Ingredients Quantity unsweetened chocolate 120 grams unsweetened cocoa powder 28...

  17. SCORPIO - II. Spectral indices of weak Galactic radio sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallaro, F.; Trigilio, C.; Umana, G.; Franzen, T. M. O.; Norris, R. P.; Leto, P.; Ingallinera, A.; Buemi, C. S.; Marvil, J.; Agliozzo, C.; Bufano, F.; Cerrigone, L.; Riggi, S.

    2018-01-01

    In the next few years the classification of radio sources observed by the large surveys will be a challenging problem and spectral index is a powerful tool for addressing it. Here we present an algorithm to estimate the spectral index of sources from multiwavelength radio images. We have applied our algorithm to SCORPIO, a Galactic plane survey centred around 2.1 GHz carried out with Australian Telescope Compact Array and found we can measure reliable spectral indices only for sources stronger than 40 times the rms noise. Above a threshold of 1 mJy, the source density in SCORPIO is 20 per cent greater than in a typical extragalactic field, like Australia Telescope Large Area Survey because of the presence of Galactic sources. Among this excess population, 16 sources per square degree have a spectral index of about zero suggesting optically thin thermal emission such as H II regions and planetary nebulae, while 12 per square degree present a rising spectrum, suggesting optically thick thermal emission such as stars and UCH II regions.

  18. Change Detection Analysis With Spectral Thermal Imagery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Behrens, Richard

    1998-01-01

    ... (LWIR) region. This study used analysis techniques of differencing, histograms, and principal components analysis to detect spectral changes and investigate the utility of spectral change detection...

  19. Development of spectral analysis math models and software program and spectral analyzer, digital converter interface equipment design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, W. L.; Robinson, L. H.

    1972-01-01

    Spectral analyses of angle-modulated communication systems is studied by: (1) performing a literature survey of candidate power spectrum computational techniques, determining the computational requirements, and formulating a mathematical model satisfying these requirements; (2) implementing the model on UNIVAC 1230 digital computer as the Spectral Analysis Program (SAP); and (3) developing the hardware specifications for a data acquisition system which will acquire an input modulating signal for SAP. The SAP computational technique uses extended fast Fourier transform and represents a generalized approach for simple and complex modulating signals.

  20. Spectral theory of linear operators and spectral systems in Banach algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, Vladimir

    2003-01-01

    This book is dedicated to the spectral theory of linear operators on Banach spaces and of elements in Banach algebras. It presents a survey of results concerning various types of spectra, both of single and n-tuples of elements. Typical examples are the one-sided spectra, the approximate point, essential, local and Taylor spectrum, and their variants. The theory is presented in a unified, axiomatic and elementary way. Many results appear here for the first time in a monograph. The material is self-contained. Only a basic knowledge of functional analysis, topology, and complex analysis is assumed. The monograph should appeal both to students who would like to learn about spectral theory and to experts in the field. It can also serve as a reference book. The present second edition contains a number of new results, in particular, concerning orbits and their relations to the invariant subspace problem. This book is dedicated to the spectral theory of linear operators on Banach spaces and of elements in Banach alg...

  1. Spectral filtering for plant production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, R.E.; McMahon, M.J.; Rajapakse, N.C.; Becoteau, D.R.

    1994-12-31

    Research to date suggests that spectral filtering can be an effective alternative to chemical growth regulators for altering plant development. If properly implemented, it can be nonchemical and environmentally friendly. The aqueous CuSO{sub 4}, and CuCl{sub 2} solutions in channelled plastic panels have been shown to be effective filters, but they can be highly toxic if the solutions contact plants. Some studies suggest that spectral filtration limited to short EOD intervals can also alter plant development. Future research should be directed toward confirmation of the influence of spectral filters and exposure times on a broader range of plant species and cultivars. Efforts should also be made to identify non-noxious alternatives to aqueous copper solutions and/or to incorporate these chemicals permanently into plastic films and panels that can be used in greenhouse construction. It would also be informative to study the impacts of spectral filters on insect and microbal populations in plant growth facilities. The economic impacts of spectral filtering techniques should be assessed for each delivery methodology.

  2. Solar Spectral Irradiance and Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilewskie, P.; Woods, T.; Cahalan, R.

    2012-01-01

    Spectrally resolved solar irradiance is recognized as being increasingly important to improving our understanding of the manner in which the Sun influences climate. There is strong empirical evidence linking total solar irradiance to surface temperature trends - even though the Sun has likely made only a small contribution to the last half-century's global temperature anomaly - but the amplitudes cannot be explained by direct solar heating alone. The wavelength and height dependence of solar radiation deposition, for example, ozone absorption in the stratosphere, absorption in the ocean mixed layer, and water vapor absorption in the lower troposphere, contribute to the "top-down" and "bottom-up" mechanisms that have been proposed as possible amplifiers of the solar signal. New observations and models of solar spectral irradiance are needed to study these processes and to quantify their impacts on climate. Some of the most recent observations of solar spectral variability from the mid-ultraviolet to the near-infrared have revealed some unexpected behavior that was not anticipated prior to their measurement, based on an understanding from model reconstructions. The atmospheric response to the observed spectral variability, as quantified in climate model simulations, have revealed similarly surprising and in some cases, conflicting results. This talk will provide an overview on the state of our understanding of the spectrally resolved solar irradiance, its variability over many time scales, potential climate impacts, and finally, a discussion on what is required for improving our understanding of Sun-climate connections, including a look forward to future observations.

  3. Spectral element simulation of ultrafiltration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M.; Barker, Vincent A.; Hassager, Ole

    1998-01-01

    A spectral element method for simulating stationary 2-D ultrafiltration is presented. The mathematical model is comprised of the Navier-Stokes equations for the velocity field of the fluid and a transport equation for the concentration of the solute. In addition to the presence of the velocity...... vector in the transport equation, the system is coupled by the dependency of the fluid viscosity on the solute concentration and by a concentration-dependent boundary condition for the Navier-Stokes equations at the membrane surface. The spectral element discretization yields a nonlinear algebraic system....... The performance of the spectral element code when applied to several ultrafiltration problems is reported. (C) 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  4. Spectrally Compatible Iterative Water Filling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verlinden, Jan; Bogaert, Etienne Vanden; Bostoen, Tom; Zanier, Francesca; Luise, Marco; Cendrillon, Raphael; Moonen, Marc

    2006-12-01

    Until now static spectrum management has ensured that DSL lines in the same cable are spectrally compatible under worst-case crosstalk conditions. Recently dynamic spectrum management (DSM) has been proposed aiming at an increased capacity utilization by adaptation of the transmit spectra of DSL lines to the actual crosstalk interference. In this paper, a new DSM method for downstream ADSL is derived from the well-known iterative water-filling (IWF) algorithm. The amount of boosting of this new DSM method is limited, such that it is spectrally compatible with ADSL. Hence it is referred to as spectrally compatible iterative water filling (SC-IWF). This paper focuses on the performance gains of SC-IWF. This method is an autonomous DSM method (DSM level 1) and it will be investigated together with two other DSM level-1 algorithms, under various noise conditions, namely, iterative water-filling algorithm, and flat power back-off (flat PBO).

  5. Spectrally Compatible Iterative Water Filling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cendrillon Raphael

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Until now static spectrum management has ensured that DSL lines in the same cable are spectrally compatible under worst-case crosstalk conditions. Recently dynamic spectrum management (DSM has been proposed aiming at an increased capacity utilization by adaptation of the transmit spectra of DSL lines to the actual crosstalk interference. In this paper, a new DSM method for downstream ADSL is derived from the well-known iterative water-filling (IWF algorithm. The amount of boosting of this new DSM method is limited, such that it is spectrally compatible with ADSL. Hence it is referred to as spectrally compatible iterative water filling (SC-IWF. This paper focuses on the performance gains of SC-IWF. This method is an autonomous DSM method (DSM level 1 and it will be investigated together with two other DSM level-1 algorithms, under various noise conditions, namely, iterative water-filling algorithm, and flat power back-off (flat PBO.

  6. Ultracool Dwarf Stars: Surveys, Properties, and Spectral Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Iain A.; Jones, Hugh R. A.

    2001-03-01

    Conference was held in Manchester, England, United Kingdom, in 2000 August. The Proceedings will be edited by H. R. A. Jones and I. A. Steele and published in the Lecture Notes in Physics Series by Springer-Verlag.

  7. The James Clerk Maxwell Telescope spectral legacy survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plume, R.; Fuller, G. A.; Helmich, F.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; Roberts, H.; Bowey, J.; Buckle, J.; Butner, H.; Caux, E.; Ceccarelli, C.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Friberg, P.; Gibb, A. G.; Hatchell, J.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Matthews, H.; Millar, T. J.; Mitchell, G.; Moore, T. J. T.; Ossenkopf, V.; Rawlings, J. M. C.; Richer, J.; Roellig, M.; Schilke, P.; Spaans, M.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Thompson, M. A.; Viti, S.; Weferling, B.; White, Glenn J.; Wouterloot, J.; Yates, J.; Zhu, M.

    Stars form in the densest, coldest, most quiescent regions of molecular clouds. Molecules provide the only probes that can reveal the dynamics, physics, chemistry, and evolution of these regions, but our understanding of the molecular inventory of sources and how this is related to their physical

  8. Spectral scheme for spacetime physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seriu, Masafumi

    2002-01-01

    Based on the spectral representation of spatial geometry, we construct an analysis scheme for spacetime physics and cosmology, which enables us to compare two or more universes with each other. In this scheme the spectral distance plays a central role, which is the measure of closeness between two geometries defined in terms of the spectra. We apply this scheme for analyzing the averaging problem in cosmology; we explicitly investigate the time evolution of the spectra, distance between two nearby spatial geometries, simulating the relation between the real Universe and its model. We then formulate the criteria for a model to be a suitable one

  9. Spectral ellipsometry of nanodiamond composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yastrebov, S.G.; Ivanov-Omskij, V.I.; Gordeev, S.K.; Garriga, M.; Alonso, I.A.

    2006-01-01

    Methods of spectral ellipsometry were applied for analysis of optical properties of nanodiamond based composite in spectral region 1.4-5 eV. The nanocomposite was synthesized by molding of ultradispersed nanodiamond powder in the course of heterogeneous chemical reaction of decomposition of methane, forming pyrocarbon interconnecting nanodiamond grains. The energy of σ + π plasmon of pyrocarbon component of nanodiamond composite was restored which proves to be ∼ 24 eV; using this value, an estimation was done of pyrocarbon matrix density, which occurs to be 2 g/cm 3 [ru

  10. JUNO E/J/SS WAVES CALIBRATED SURVEY FULL RESOLUTION V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Juno Waves calibrated full resolution survey data set includes all low rate science electric spectral densities from 50Hz to 41MHz and magnetic spectral...

  11. SPECTRAL DEPENDENT ELECTRICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT: The illuminated current-voltage characteristics of thin film a-Si:H. p-i-n solar cells were measured for the visible and near infrared spectral regions. The fill factor, the conversion efficiency, the open circuit Voltage and the short circuit current were compared to the parameters of crystalline silicon pit-junction.

  12. Speech recognition from spectral dynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Information is carried in changes of a signal. The paper starts with revis- iting Dudley's concept of the carrier nature of speech. It points to its close connection to modulation spectra of speech and argues against short-term spectral envelopes as dominant carriers of the linguistic information in speech. The history of ...

  13. Optical Spectral Variability of Blazars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... It is well established that blazars show flux variations in the complete electromagnetic (EM) spectrum on all possible time scales ranging from a few tens of minutes to several years. Here, we report the review of optical flux and spectral variability properties of different classes of blazars on IDV and STV ...

  14. Speech recognition from spectral dynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Some of the history of gradual infusion of the modulation spectrum concept into Automatic recognition of speech (ASR) comes next, pointing to the relationship of modulation spectrum processing to wellaccepted ASR techniques such as dynamic speech features or RelAtive SpecTrAl (RASTA) filtering. Next ...

  15. Spectral problems for operator matrices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bátkai, A.; Binding, P.; Dijksma, A.; Hryniv, R.; Langer, H.

    2005-01-01

    We study spectral properties of 2 × 2 block operator matrices whose entries are unbounded operators between Banach spaces and with domains consisting of vectors satisfying certain relations between their components. We investigate closability in the product space, essential spectra and generation of

  16. Spectral Methods for Numerical Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grandclément Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Equations arising in general relativity are usually too complicated to be solved analytically and one must rely on numerical methods to solve sets of coupled partial differential equations. Among the possible choices, this paper focuses on a class called spectral methods in which, typically, the various functions are expanded in sets of orthogonal polynomials or functions. First, a theoretical introduction of spectral expansion is given with a particular emphasis on the fast convergence of the spectral approximation. We then present different approaches to solving partial differential equations, first limiting ourselves to the one-dimensional case, with one or more domains. Generalization to more dimensions is then discussed. In particular, the case of time evolutions is carefully studied and the stability of such evolutions investigated. We then present results obtained by various groups in the field of general relativity by means of spectral methods. Work, which does not involve explicit time-evolutions, is discussed, going from rapidly-rotating strange stars to the computation of black-hole–binary initial data. Finally, the evolution of various systems of astrophysical interest are presented, from supernovae core collapse to black-hole–binary mergers.

  17. Functional Analysis-Spectral Theoryl

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 4. Functional Analysis - Spectral Theory1. Cherian Varughese. Book Review Volume 6 Issue 4 April 2001 pp 91-92 ... Author Affiliations. Cherian Varughese1. Indian Statistical Institute, 8th Mile, Mysore Road, Bangalore 560 059, India.

  18. Spectral Diagonal Ensemble Kalman Filters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kasanický, Ivan; Mandel, Jan; Vejmelka, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 4 (2015), s. 485-497 ISSN 1023-5809 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-34856S Grant - others:NSF(US) DMS -1216481 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : data assimilation * ensemble Kalman filter * spectral representation Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 1.321, year: 2015

  19. Speech recognition from spectral dynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Some of the history of gradual infusion of the modulation spectrum concept into Automatic recognition of speech (ASR) comes next, pointing to the relationship of modulation spectrum processing to wellaccepted ASR techniques such as dynamic speech features or RelAtive SpecTrAl (RASTA) filtering. Next, the frequency ...

  20. Speech recognition from spectral dynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    automatic recognition of speech (ASR). Instead, likely for historical reasons, envelopes of power spectrum were adopted as main carrier of linguistic information in ASR. However, the relationships between phonetic values of sounds and their short-term spectral envelopes are not straightforward. Consequently, this asks for ...

  1. Spectral representation of Gaussian semimartingales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basse-O'Connor, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present paper is to characterize the spectral representation of Gaussian semimartingales. That is, we provide necessary and sufficient conditions on the kernel K for X t =∫ K t (s) dN s to be a semimartingale. Here, N denotes an independently scattered Gaussian random measure...

  2. Assessing FRET using Spectral Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leavesley, Silas J.; Britain, Andrea L.; Cichon, Lauren K.; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O.; Rich, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) techniques have proven invaluable for probing the complex nature of protein–protein interactions, protein folding, and intracellular signaling events. These techniques have traditionally been implemented with the use of one or more fluorescence band-pass filters, either as fluorescence microscopy filter cubes, or as dichroic mirrors and band-pass filters in flow cytometry. In addition, new approaches for measuring FRET, such as fluorescence lifetime and acceptor photobleaching, have been developed. Hyperspectral techniques for imaging and flow cytometry have also shown to be promising for performing FRET measurements. In this study, we have compared traditional (filter-based) FRET approaches to three spectral-based approaches: the ratio of acceptor-to-donor peak emission, linear spectral unmixing, and linear spectral unmixing with a correction for direct acceptor excitation. All methods are estimates of FRET efficiency, except for one-filter set and three-filter set FRET indices, which are included for consistency with prior literature. In the first part of this study, spectrofluorimetric data were collected from a CFP–Epac–YFP FRET probe that has been used for intracellular cAMP measurements. All comparisons were performed using the same spectrofluorimetric datasets as input data, to provide a relevant comparison. Linear spectral unmixing resulted in measurements with the lowest coefficient of variation (0.10) as well as accurate fits using the Hill equation. FRET efficiency methods produced coefficients of variation of less than 0.20, while FRET indices produced coefficients of variation greater than 8.00. These results demonstrate that spectral FRET measurements provide improved response over standard, filter-based measurements. Using spectral approaches, single-cell measurements were conducted through hyperspectral confocal microscopy, linear unmixing, and cell segmentation with quantitative image analysis

  3. Spectral Tensor-Train Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bigoni, Daniele; Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter; Marzouk, Youssef M.

    2016-01-01

    discretizations of the target function. We assess the performance of the method on a range of numerical examples: a modified set of Genz functions with dimension up to 100, and functions with mixed Fourier modes or with local features. We observe significant improvements in performance over an anisotropic......The accurate approximation of high-dimensional functions is an essential task in uncertainty quantification and many other fields. We propose a new function approximation scheme based on a spectral extension of the tensor-train (TT) decomposition. We first define a functional version of the TT.......e., the “cores”) comprising the functional TT decomposition. This result motivates an approximation scheme employing polynomial approximations of the cores. For functions with appropriate regularity, the resulting spectral tensor-train decomposition combines the favorable dimension-scaling of the TT...

  4. Spectral computations for bounded operators

    CERN Document Server

    Ahues, Mario; Limaye, Balmohan

    2001-01-01

    Exact eigenvalues, eigenvectors, and principal vectors of operators with infinite dimensional ranges can rarely be found. Therefore, one must approximate such operators by finite rank operators, then solve the original eigenvalue problem approximately. Serving as both an outstanding text for graduate students and as a source of current results for research scientists, Spectral Computations for Bounded Operators addresses the issue of solving eigenvalue problems for operators on infinite dimensional spaces. From a review of classical spectral theory through concrete approximation techniques to finite dimensional situations that can be implemented on a computer, this volume illustrates the marriage of pure and applied mathematics. It contains a variety of recent developments, including a new type of approximation that encompasses a variety of approximation methods but is simple to verify in practice. It also suggests a new stopping criterion for the QR Method and outlines advances in both the iterative refineme...

  5. Towards a measurement of the spectral runnings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muñoz, Julian B.; Kovetz, Ely D.; Raccanelli, Alvise; Kamionkowski, Marc; Silk, Joseph, E-mail: julianmunoz@jhu.edu, E-mail: ekovetz1@jhu.edu, E-mail: alvise@icc.ub.edu, E-mail: mkamion1@jhu.edu, E-mail: joseph.silk@physics.ox.ac.uk [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Single-field slow-roll inflation predicts a nearly scale-free power spectrum of perturbations, as observed at the scales accessible to current cosmological experiments. This spectrum is slightly red, showing a tilt (1− n {sub s} )∼ 0.04. A direct consequence of this tilt are nonvanishing runnings α {sub s} = d n {sub s} / dlog k , and β {sub s} = dα {sub s} / dlog k , which in the minimal inflationary scenario should reach absolute values of 10{sup −3} and 10{sup −5}, respectively. In this work we calculate how well future surveys can measure these two runnings. We consider a Stage-4 (S4) CMB experiment and show that it will be able to detect significant deviations from the inflationary prediction for α {sub s} , although not for β {sub s} . Adding to the S4 CMB experiment the information from a WFIRST-like or a DESI-like survey improves the sensitivity to the runnings by ∼ 20%, and 30%, respectively. A spectroscopic survey with a billion objects, such as the SKA, will add enough information to the S4 measurements to allow a detection of α {sub s} =10{sup −3}, required to probe the single-field slow-roll inflationary paradigm. We show that only a very-futuristic interferometer targeting the dark ages will be capable of measuring the minimal inflationary prediction for β {sub s} . The results of other probes, such as a stochastic background of gravitational waves observable by LIGO, the Ly-α forest, and spectral distortions, are shown for comparison. Finally, we study the claims that large values of β {sub s} , if extrapolated to the smallest scales, can produce primordial black holes of tens of solar masses, which we show to be easily testable by the S4 CMB experiment.

  6. Biomarkers and Biological Spectral Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-23

    karyotyping (SKY) in hematological neoplasia [4259-13] B. S. Preiss, R. K. Pedersen, G. B. Kerndrup, Odense Univ. Hospital (Denmark) 60 Structure of...astronomy and airborne monitoring to forensic and biomedical sciences or industrial qualit\\ and process monitoring. There is growing need for a sensitive...SPIE Vol. 4259 55 Spectral Karyotyping (SKY) in Hematologic Neoplasia. Birgitte S. Preiss*a, Rikke K. Pedersena, Gitte B. Kerndrupa aInstitute of

  7. Chebyshev and Fourier spectral methods

    CERN Document Server

    Boyd, John P

    2001-01-01

    Completely revised text focuses on use of spectral methods to solve boundary value, eigenvalue, and time-dependent problems, but also covers Hermite, Laguerre, rational Chebyshev, sinc, and spherical harmonic functions, as well as cardinal functions, linear eigenvalue problems, matrix-solving methods, coordinate transformations, methods for unbounded intervals, spherical and cylindrical geometry, and much more. 7 Appendices. Glossary. Bibliography. Index. Over 160 text figures.

  8. Abundance estimation of spectrally similar minerals

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Debba, Pravesh

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates a spectral unmixing method for estimating the partial abundance of spectrally similar minerals in complex mixtures. The method requires formulation of a linear function of individual spectra of individual minerals. The first...

  9. Calibration with near-continuous spectral measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Aalborg; Rasmussen, Michael; Madsen, Henrik

    2001-01-01

    In chemometrics traditional calibration in case of spectral measurements express a quantity of interest (e.g. a concentration) as a linear combination of the spectral measurements at a number of wavelengths. Often the spectral measurements are performed at a large number of wavelengths and in thi...... by an example in which the octane number of gasoline is related to near infrared spectral measurements. The performance is found to be much better that for the traditional calibration methods....

  10. USGS Spectral Library Version 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; Clark, Roger N.; Swayze, Gregg A.; Livo, K. Eric; Hoefen, Todd M.; Pearson, Neil C.; Wise, Richard A.; Benzel, William M.; Lowers, Heather A.; Driscoll, Rhonda L.; Klein, Anna J.

    2017-04-10

    We have assembled a library of spectra measured with laboratory, field, and airborne spectrometers. The instruments used cover wavelengths from the ultraviolet to the far infrared (0.2 to 200 microns [μm]). Laboratory samples of specific minerals, plants, chemical compounds, and manmade materials were measured. In many cases, samples were purified, so that unique spectral features of a material can be related to its chemical structure. These spectro-chemical links are important for interpreting remotely sensed data collected in the field or from an aircraft or spacecraft. This library also contains physically constructed as well as mathematically computed mixtures. Four different spectrometer types were used to measure spectra in the library: (1) Beckman™ 5270 covering the spectral range 0.2 to 3 µm, (2) standard, high resolution (hi-res), and high-resolution Next Generation (hi-resNG) models of Analytical Spectral Devices (ASD) field portable spectrometers covering the range from 0.35 to 2.5 µm, (3) Nicolet™ Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) interferometer spectrometers covering the range from about 1.12 to 216 µm, and (4) the NASA Airborne Visible/Infra-Red Imaging Spectrometer AVIRIS, covering the range 0.37 to 2.5 µm. Measurements of rocks, soils, and natural mixtures of minerals were made in laboratory and field settings. Spectra of plant components and vegetation plots, comprising many plant types and species with varying backgrounds, are also in this library. Measurements by airborne spectrometers are included for forested vegetation plots, in which the trees are too tall for measurement by a field spectrometer. This report describes the instruments used, the organization of materials into chapters, metadata descriptions of spectra and samples, and possible artifacts in the spectral measurements. To facilitate greater application of the spectra, the library has also been convolved to selected spectrometer and imaging spectrometers sampling and

  11. Calibrating spectral images using penalized likelihood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, van der G.W.A.M.; Glasbey, C.

    2003-01-01

    A new method is presented for automatic correction of distortions and for spectral calibration (which band corresponds to which wavelength) of spectral images recorded by means of a spectrograph. The method consists of recording a bar-like pattern with an illumination source with spectral bands

  12. Spectral properties of generalized eigenparameter dependent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jost function, spectrum, the spectral singularities, and the properties of the principal vectors corresponding to the spectral singularities of L, if. ∞Σn=1 n(∣1 - an∣ + ∣bnl) < ∞. Mathematics Subject Classication (2010): 34L05, 34L40, 39A70, 47A10, 47A75. Key words: Discrete equations, eigenparameter, spectral analysis, ...

  13. Spectral Lag Evolution among -Ray Burst Pulses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... We analyse the spectral lag evolution of -ray burst (GRB) pulses with observations by CGRO/BATSE. No universal spectral lag evolution feature and pulse luminosity-lag relation within a GRB is observed.Our results suggest that the spectral lag would be due to radiation physics and dynamics of a given ...

  14. Spectral Synthesis via Mean Field approach to Independent Component Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Ning; Su, Shan-Shan; Kong, Xu

    2016-01-01

    We apply a new statistical analysis technique, the Mean Field approach to Independent Component Analysis (MF-ICA) in a Bayseian framework, to galaxy spectral analysis. This algorithm can compress a stellar spectral library into a few Independent Components (ICs), and the galaxy spectrum can be reconstructed by these ICs. Compared to other algorithms which decompose a galaxy spectrum into a combination of several simple stellar populations, the MF-ICA approach offers a large improvement in efficiency. To check the reliability of this spectral analysis method, three different methods are used: (1) parameter recovery for simulated galaxies, (2) comparison with parameters estimated by other methods, and (3) consistency test of parameters derived with galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We find that our MF-ICA method can not only fit the observed galaxy spectra efficiently, but can also accurately recover the physical parameters of galaxies. We also apply our spectral analysis method to the DEEP2 spectroscopic data, and find it can provide excellent fitting results for low signal-to-noise spectra. (paper)

  15. The Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) Spectral Library: Cool Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayner, John T.; Cushing, Michael C.; Vacca, William D.

    2009-12-01

    We present a 0.8-5 μm spectral library of 210 cool stars observed at a resolving power of R ≡ λ/Δλ ~ 2000 with the medium-resolution infrared spectrograph, SpeX, at the 3.0 m NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The stars have well-established MK spectral classifications and are mostly restricted to near-solar metallicities. The sample not only contains the F, G, K, and M spectral types with luminosity classes between I and V, but also includes some AGB, carbon, and S stars. In contrast to some other spectral libraries, the continuum shape of the spectra is measured and preserved in the data reduction process. The spectra are absolutely flux calibrated using the Two Micron All Sky Survey photometry. Potential uses of the library include studying the physics of cool stars, classifying and studying embedded young clusters and optically obscured regions of the Galaxy, evolutionary population synthesis to study unresolved stellar populations in optically obscured regions of galaxies and synthetic photometry. The library is available in digital form from the IRTF Web site.

  16. Spectral Envelope Transformation in Singing Voice for Advanced Pitch Shifting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L. Santacruz

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work is to perform a step towards more natural pitch shifting techniques in singing voice for its application in music production and entertainment systems. In this paper, we present an advanced method to achieve natural modifications when applying a pitch shifting process to singing voice by modifying the spectral envelope of the audio excerpt. To this end, an all-pole model has been selected to model the spectral envelope, which is estimated using a constrained non-linear optimization. The analysis of the global variations of the spectral envelope was carried out by identifying changes of the parameters of the model along with the changes of the pitch. With the obtained spectral envelope transformation functions, we applied our pitch shifting scheme to some sustained vowels in order to compare results with the same transformation made by using the Flex Pitch plugin of Logic Pro X and pitch synchronous overlap and add technique (PSOLA. This comparison has been carried out by means of both an objective and a subjective evaluation. The latter was done with a survey open to volunteers on our website.

  17. Spectral characteristics of asphalt road aging and deterioration: implications for remote-sensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herold, Martin; Roberts, Dar

    2005-07-10

    We integrate ground spectrometry, imaging spectrometry, and in situ pavement condition surveys for assessment of asphalt road infrastructure. There is strong spectral evidence for asphalt aging and deterioration. Several spectral measures derived from field and image spectra correlate well with pavement quality indicators (e.g., a pavement condition index). However, the potential for mapping is limited by fine spatial resolution requirements (as fine as 0.5 m) and by the spectral confusion between pavement material aging and asphalt mix erosion on the one hand and structural road damages (e.g., cracking) on the other.

  18. Spectral characteristics of asphalt road aging and deterioration: implications for remote-sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herold, Martin; Roberts, Dar

    2005-07-01

    We integrate ground spectrometry, imaging spectrometry, and in situ pavement condition surveys for assessment of asphalt road infrastructure. There is strong spectral evidence for asphalt aging and deterioration. Several spectral measures derived from field and image spectra correlate well with pavement quality indicators (e.g., a pavement condition index). However, the potential for mapping is limited by fine spatial resolution requirements (as fine as 0.5 m) and by the spectral confusion between pavement material aging and asphalt mix erosion on the one hand and structural road damages (e.g., cracking) on the other.

  19. Spectral multitude and spectral dynamics reflect changing conjugation length in single molecules of oligophenylenevinylenes

    KAUST Repository

    Kobayashi, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule study of phenylenevinylene oligomers revealed distinct spectral forms due to different conjugation lengths which are determined by torsional defects. Large spectral jumps between different spectral forms were ascribed to torsional flips of a single phenylene ring. These spectral changes reflect the dynamic nature of electron delocalization in oligophenylenevinylenes and enable estimation of the phenylene torsional barriers. © 2012 The Owner Societies.

  20. [Spectral analysis in nanometer material science].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Sun, Shi-gang

    2002-06-01

    Spectral analysis is an important means in studies of nanometer scale systems, and is essential for deep understanding the structure and properties of nanometer materials. This paper reviews the recent progresses made in studies of nanometer materials using spectral analysis methods such as UV-Visible spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, Mössbauer spectroscopy, positron annihilation and photoacoustic spectroscopy. The principle, characteristics and applications of most frequently employed spectral methods are introduced briefly and illustrated with typical examples. Future perspectives of spectral analysis in nanometer field are discussed. New directions of establishing spectral analysis methods at nanometer scale resolution and developing new spectroscopy technology in nanometer material studies are also emphasized.

  1. Semiclassical Theory of Spectral Rigidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, M. V.

    1985-08-01

    The spectral rigidity Δ(L) of a set of quantal energy levels is the mean square deviation of the spectral staircase from the straight line that best fits it over a range of L mean level spacings. In the semiclassical limit (hslash-> 0), formulae are obtained giving Δ(L) as a sum over classical periodic orbits. When L ~= Lmax, where Lmax ~ hslash-(N-1) for a system of N freedoms, Δ(L) is shown to display the following universal behaviour as a result of properties of very long classical orbits: if the system is classically integrable (all periodic orbits filling tori), Δ(L) = 1/15L (as in an uncorrelated (Poisson) eigenvalue sequence); if the system is classically chaotic (all periodic orbits isolated and unstable) and has no symmetry, Δ(L) = ln L/2π^2 + D if 1 ~= L ~= Lmax (as in the gaussian unitary ensemble of random-matrix theory); if the system is chaotic and has time-reversal symmetry, Δ(L) = ln L/π^2 + E if 1 ~= L ~= Lmax (as in the gaussian orthogonal ensemble). When L >> Lmax, Δ(L) saturates non-universally at a value, determined by short classical orbits, of order hslash-(N-1) for integrable systems and ln (hslash-1) for chaotic systems. These results are obtained by using the periodic-orbit expansion for the spectral density, together with classical sum rules for the intensities of long orbits and a semiclassical sum rule restricting the manner in which their contributions interfere. For two examples Δ(L) is studied in detail: the rectangular billiard (integrable), and the Riemann zeta function (assuming its zeros to be the eigenvalues of an unknown quantum system whose unknown classical limit is chaotic).

  2. Planck 2013 results. IX. HFI spectral response

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Armitage-Caplan, C; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Atrio-Barandela, F; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bobin, J; Bock, J J; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Bridges, M; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Challinor, A; Chamballu, A; Chary, R -R; Chen, X; Chiang, L -Y; Chiang, H C; Christensen, P R; Church, S; Clements, D L; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Comis, B; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Delouis, J -M; Désert, F -X; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Falgarone, E; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Franceschi, E; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Giard, M; Giraud-Héraud, Y; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Jaffe, T R; Jaffe, A H; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Knox, L; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Laureijs, R J; Lawrence, C R; Leahy, J P; Leonardi, R; Leroy, C; Lesgourgues, J; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maffei, B; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Marshall, D J; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Matthai, F; Mazzotta, P; McGehee, P; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; North, C; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Osborne, S; Oxborrow, C A; Paci, F; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paoletti, D; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Popa, L; Poutanen, T; Pratt, G W; Prézeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Riller, T; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Roudier, G; Rusholme, B; Santos, D; Savini, G; Shellard, E P S; Spencer, L D; Starck, J -L; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sudiwala, R; Sureau, F; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Tavagnacco, D; Terenzi, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2014-01-01

    The Planck High Frequency Instrument (HFI) spectral response was determined through a series of ground based tests conducted with the HFI focal plane in a cryogenic environment prior to launch. The main goal of the spectral transmission tests was to measure the relative spectral response (including out-of-band signal rejection) of all HFI detectors. This was determined by measuring the output of a continuously scanned Fourier transform spectrometer coupled with all HFI detectors. As there is no on-board spectrometer within HFI, the ground-based spectral response experiments provide the definitive data set for the relative spectral calibration of the HFI. The spectral response of the HFI is used in Planck data analysis and component separation, this includes extraction of CO emission observed within Planck bands, dust emission, Sunyaev-Zeldovich sources, and intensity to polarization leakage. The HFI spectral response data have also been used to provide unit conversion and colour correction analysis tools. Ver...

  3. Spectral fluctuations and zeta functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balazs, N.L.; Schmit, C.; Voros, A.

    1987-01-01

    The study theoretically and numerically the role of the fluctuations of eigenvalue spectra {μ/sub n} in a particular analytical continuation process applied to the (generalized) zeta function Z(s) = Σ/sub n/μ/sub n//sup -s/ for s large and positive. A particularly interesting example is the spectrum of the Laplacian on a triangular domain which tessellates a compact surface of constant negative curvature (of genus two). The authors indeed find that the fluctuations restrict the abscissa of convergence, and also affect the rate of convergence. This then initiates a new approach to the exploration of spectral fluctuations through the convergence of analytical continuation processes

  4. Running of the Scalar Spectral Index from Inflationary Models

    CERN Document Server

    Chung, D J H; Trodden, M; Chung, Daniel J.H.; Shiu, Gary; Trodden, Mark

    2003-01-01

    The scalar spectral index n is an important parameter describing the nature of primordial density perturbations. Recent data, including that from the WMAP satellite, shows some evidence that the index runs (changes as a function of the scale k at which it is measured) from n>1 (blue) on long scales to n<1 (red) on short scales. We investigate the extent to which inflationary models can accomodate such significant running of n. We present several methods for constructing large classes of potentials which yield a running spectral index. We show that within the slow-roll approximation, the fact that n-1 changes sign from blue to red forces the slope of the potential to reach a minimum at a similar field location. We also briefly survey the running of the index in a wider class of inflationary models, including a subset of those with non-minimial kinetic terms.

  5. Auditory evoked fields elicited by spectral, temporal, and spectral-temporal changes in human cerebral cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidehiko eOkamoto

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Natural sounds contain complex spectral components, which are temporally modulated as time-varying signals. Recent studies have suggested that the auditory system encodes spectral and temporal sound information differently. However, it remains unresolved how the human brain processes sounds containing both spectral and temporal changes. In the present study, we investigated human auditory evoked responses elicited by spectral, temporal, and spectral-temporal sound changes by means of magnetoencephalography (MEG. The auditory evoked responses elicited by the spectral-temporal change were very similar to those elicited by the spectral change, but those elicited by the temporal change were delayed by 30 – 50 ms and differed from the others in morphology. The results suggest that human brain responses corresponding to spectral sound changes precede those corresponding to temporal sound changes, even when the spectral and temporal changes occur simultaneously.

  6. "Calibration" system for spectral measurements and its experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruchkouskaya, Sviatlana I.; Katkovsky, Leonid V.; Belyaev, Boris I.; Malyshev, Vladislav B.

    2017-04-01

    "Calibration" system has been developed at A. N. Sevchenko Research Institute of Applied Physical Problems of the Belarusian State University. It was designed for measuring the characteristics of spectral reflectance of all types of natural surfaces (test sites) in ground conditions or on board of aircraft carriers and has the following components: - Photospectroradiometr (PhSR) of high resolution with a range of 400-900 nm, equipped with a digital time-lapse video system; - Two-channel modular spectroradiometer (TMS) with a range of 400-900 nm, designed for simultaneous measurements of reflected light brightness of the underlying surface and the incident radiation from the upper hemisphere; - Two portable spectroradiometers (PSR-700 and PSR-1300) with a spectral range 800-1500 nm; 1200-2500 nm; - Scanning solar spectropolarimeter (SSP-600) with a range of 350-950 nm for measurements of direct sunlight and scattered by the atmosphere at different angles; "Calibration" system provides spectral resolution of 5.2 nm in a range of 400-900 nm, 10 nm in a range of 800-1500 nm and 15 nm in a range of 1200-2500 nm. Measurements of the optical characteristics of solar radiation (for determining parameters of the atmosphere) and that of underlying surface are synchronous. There is also a set of special nozzles for measurements of spectral brightness coefficients, polarization characteristics and spectral albedo. Spectra and images are geotagged to the navigation data (time, GPS). For the measurements of spectral reflection dependencies within "Monitoring-SG" framework expeditions to the Kuril Islands, Kursk aerospace test site and Kamchatka Peninsula were conducted in 2015 and 2016. The spectra of different underlying surfaces have been obtained: soils, plants and water objects, sedimentary and volcanic rocks. These surveys are a valuable material for further researches and selection of test facilities for flight calibration of space imaging systems. Information obtained

  7. Light distribution system comprising spectral conversion means

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    System (200, 300) for the distribution of white light, having a supply side (201, 301, 401) and a delivery side (202, 302, 402), the system being configured for guiding light with a multitude of visible wavelengths in a propagation direction P from the supply side to the distribution side...... fibre being operationally connected to the spectral conversion fibre having a length extending from an input end (221, 321)to an output end (222, 322), the spectral conversion fibre comprising a photoluminescent agent (511, 611, 711) for converting light of a first wavelength to light of a second......, longer wavelength,a spectral conversion characteristics of the spectral conversion fibre being essentially determined by the spectral absorption and emission properties of the photoluminescent agent, the amount of photo- luminescent agent,and the distribution of the photoluminescent agent in the spectral...

  8. Spectral functions in mathematics and physics

    CERN Document Server

    Kirsten, Klaus

    2002-01-01

    The literature on the spectral analysis of second order elliptic differential operators contains a great deal of information on the spectral functions for explicitly known spectra. The same is not true, however, for situations where the spectra are not explicitly known. Over the last several years, the author and his colleagues have developed new, innovative methods for the exact analysis of a variety of spectral functions occurring in spectral geometry and under external conditions in statistical mechanics and quantum field theory. Spectral Functions in Mathematics and Physics presents a detailed overview of these advances. The author develops and applies methods for analyzing determinants arising when the external conditions originate from the Casimir effect, dielectric media, scalar backgrounds, and magnetic backgrounds. The zeta function underlies all of these techniques, and the book begins by deriving its basic properties and relations to the spectral functions. The author then uses those relations to d...

  9. Quantitative spectral comparison by weighted spectral difference for protein higher order structure confirmation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh, Nikita N; Winn, Bradley C; Arthur, Kelly K; Gabrielson, John P

    2014-11-01

    Previously, different approaches of spectral comparison were evaluated, and the spectral difference (SD) method was shown to be valuable for its linearity with spectral changes and its independence on data spacing (Anal. Biochem. 434 (2013) 153-165). In this note, we present an enhancement of the SD calculation, referred to as the "weighted spectral difference" (WSD), by implementing a weighting function based on relative signal magnitude. While maintaining the advantages of the SD method, WSD improves the method sensitivity to spectral changes and tolerance for baseline inclusion. Furthermore, a generalized formula is presented to unify further development of approaches to quantify spectral difference. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Spectral properties of nuclear matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozek, P

    2006-01-01

    We review self-consistent spectral methods for nuclear matter calculations. The in-medium T-matrix approach is conserving and thermodynamically consistent. It gives both the global and the single-particle properties the system. The T-matrix approximation allows to address the pairing phenomenon in cold nuclear matter. A generalization of nuclear matter calculations to the super.uid phase is discussed and numerical results are presented for this case. The linear response of a correlated system going beyond the Hartree-Fock+ Random-Phase-Approximation (RPA) scheme is studied. The polarization is obtained by solving a consistent Bethe-Salpeter (BS) equation for the coupling of dressed nucleons to an external field. We find that multipair contributions are important for the spin(isospin) response when the interaction is spin(isospin) dependent

  11. Signature spectrale des grains interstellaires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léger, A.

    Notre connaissance de la nature des grains interstellaires reposait sur un nombre très restreint de signatures spectrales dans la courbe d'extinction du milieu interstellaire. Une information considérable est contenue dans les 40 bandes interstellaires diffuses dans le visible, mais reste inexploitée. L'interprétation récente des cinq bandes IR en émission, en terme de molécules d'hydrocarbures aromatiques polycycliques, est développée. Elle permet l'utilisation d'une information spectroscopique comparable, à elle seule, à ce sur quoi était basée jusqu'alors notre connaissance de la matière interstellaire condensée. Différentes implications de cette mise en évidence sont proposées.

  12. Elementary principles of spectral distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    French, J.B.

    1980-01-01

    It is a common observation that as we add particles, one by one, to a simple system, things get steadily more and more complicated. For example if the system is describable in shell-model terms, i.e., with a model space in which m particles are distributed over N single-particle states, then as long as m << N, the dimensionality increases rapidly with particle number. On the other hand, for the usual (1 + 2)-body Hamiltonian, the (m greater than or equal to 2)-particle spectrum and wave functions are determined by operators defined in the one-particle space (for the single-particle energies) and the two-particle space (for the interactions). We may say then that the input information becomes more and more fragmented as the particle number increases, the fixed amount of information being distributed over more and more matrix elements. On the other hand there arise also new simplicities whose origin is connected with the operation of statistical laws. There is a macroscopic simplicity corresponding to the fact that the smoothed spectrum takes on a characteristic shape defined by a few parameters (low-order moments) of the spectrum. There is a microscopic simplicity corresponding to a remarkable spectral rigidity which extends over the entire spectrum and guarantees us that the fluctuations from uniformity in the spectrum are small and in many cases carry little information. The purpose of spectral-distribution theory, as applied to these problems, is to deal with the complexities by taking advantage of the simplicities

  13. Buckling feedback of the spectral calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing Xingqing; Shan Wenzhi; Luo Jingyu

    1992-01-01

    This paper studies the problems about buckling feedback of spectral calculations in physical calculations of the reactor and presents a useful method by which the buckling feedback of spectral calculations is implemented. The effect of the buckling feedback in spectra and the broad group cross section, convergence of buckling feedback iteration and the effect of the spectral zones dividing are discussed in the calculations. This method has been used for the physical design of HTR-10 MW Test Module

  14. Spectral mapping theorems a bluffer's guide

    CERN Document Server

    Harte, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Written by an author who was at the forefront of developments in multi-variable spectral theory during the seventies and the eighties, this guide sets out to describe in detail the spectral mapping theorem in one, several and many variables. The basic algebraic systems – semigroups, rings and linear algebras – are summarised, and then topological-algebraic systems, including Banach algebras, to set up the basic language of algebra and analysis. Spectral Mapping Theorems is written in an easy-to-read and engaging manner and will be useful for both the beginner and expert. It will be of great importance to researchers and postgraduates studying spectral theory.

  15. Spectrally-engineered solar thermal photovoltaic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenert, Andrej; Bierman, David; Chan, Walker; Celanovic, Ivan; Soljacic, Marin; Wang, Evelyn N.; Nam, Young Suk; McEnaney, Kenneth; Kraemer, Daniel; Chen, Gang

    2018-03-27

    A solar thermal photovoltaic device, and method of forming same, includes a solar absorber and a spectrally selective emitter formed on either side of a thermally conductive substrate. The solar absorber is configured to absorb incident solar radiation. The solar absorber and the spectrally selective emitter are configured with an optimized emitter-to-absorber area ratio. The solar thermal photovoltaic device also includes a photovoltaic cell in thermal communication with the spectrally selective emitter. The spectrally selective emitter is configured to permit high emittance for energies above a bandgap of the photovoltaic cell and configured to permit low emittance for energies below the bandgap.

  16. Global and local aspects of spectral actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iochum, B.; Levy, C.; Vassilevich, D. V.

    2012-09-01

    The principal object in noncommutative geometry is the spectral triple consisting of an algebra {A}, a Hilbert space {H} and a Dirac operator {D}. Field theories are incorporated in this approach by the spectral action principle, which sets the field theory action to Tr\\,f( {D}^2/\\Lambda ^2), where f is a real function such that the trace exists and Λ is a cutoff scale. In the low-energy (weak-field) limit, the spectral action reproduces reasonably well the known physics including the standard model. However, not much is known about the spectral action beyond the low-energy approximation. In this paper, after an extensive introduction to spectral triples and spectral actions, we study various expansions of the spectral actions (exemplified by the heat kernel). We derive the convergence criteria. For a commutative spectral triple, we compute the heat kernel on the torus up to the second order in gauge connection and consider limiting cases. This article is part of a special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical in honour of Stuart Dowker’s 75th birthday devoted to ‘Applications of zeta functions and other spectral functions in mathematics and physics’.

  17. LWIR Stellar Calibration: Infrared Spectral Curves for 30 Standard Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-04-10

    Alpha Orionis ( Betelgeuse ), M2-l supergiant wkith circumstellar dust. 106 B-8 Beta Pegasi CO bands. 109 B-9 Spectrum of Alpha Scorpii (Antares). M2-1...random error = 2.2% No CO bands 104 Alpha Orionis ( Betelgeuse ) Spectral Type: M2 I Variable with Circumstellar Dust Below 8 p o. 0 ( ) - 5.207 x 10-10...r" .-jnitudes obtained in the IRAS survey Fgwcit B-7. Spei truil of Alp/ia0 Oionoi ( Betelgeuse ). M2-1 supergiant with c-rcuntstellar dutst. 106 Beta

  18. MCDONALD OBSERVATORY FAINT COMET SPECTRO-PHOTOMETRIC SURVEY

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The McDonald Observatory Faint Comet Survey data set presents spectral data from 152 observations of 17 comets taken using the Intensified Dissector Scanner...

  19. Spectral filtering for plant production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Roy E.; Mcmahon, Margaret J.; Rajapakse, Nihal C.; Decoteau, Dennis R.

    1994-01-01

    Both plants and animals have one general commonality in their perception of light. They both are sensitive primarily to the 400 to 700 nm wavelength portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. This is referred to as the visible spectrum for animals and as the photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) spectrum for plants. Within this portion of the spectrum, animals perceive colors. Relatively recently it has been learned that within this same spectral range plants also demonstrate varying responses at different wavelengths, somewhat analogous to the definition of various colors at specific wavelengths. Although invisible to the human eye, portions of the electromagnetic spectrum on either side of the visible range are relatively inactive photosynthetically but have been found to influence important biological functions. These portions include the ultraviolet (UV approximately equal to 280-400 nm) and the far-red (FR approximately equal to 700-800 nm). The basic photoreceptor of plants for photosynthesis is chlorophyll. It serves to capture radiant energy which combined with carbon dioxide and water produces oxygen and assimulated carbon, used for the synthesis of cell wall polysaccarides, proteins, membrane lipids and other cellular constituents. The energy and carbon building blocks of photosynthesis sustain growth of plants. On the other hand, however, there are other photoreceptors, or pigments, that function as signal transducers to provide information that controls many physiological and morphological responses of how a plant grows. Known photomorphogenic receptors include phytochrome (the red/far-red sensor in the narrow bands of 655-665 nm and 725-735 nm ranges, respectively) and 'cryptochrome' (the hypothetical UV-B sensor in the 280-320 nm range). Since the USDA team of W. L. Butler, S. B. Hendricks, H. A. Borthwick, H. A. Siegleman and K. Norris in Beltsville, MD detected by spectroscopy, extracted and identified phytochrome as a protein in the 1950's, many

  20. A Black Hole Spectral Signature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titarchuk, Lev; Laurent, Philippe

    2000-03-01

    An accreting black hole is, by definition, characterized by the drain. Namely, the matter falls into a black hole much the same way as water disappears down a drain matter goes in and nothing comes out. As this can only happen in a black hole, it provides a way to see ``a black hole'', an unique observational signature. The accretion proceeds almost in a free-fall manner close to the black hole horizon, where the strong gravitational field dominates the pressure forces. In this paper we present analytical calculations and Monte-Carlo simulations of the specific features of X-ray spectra formed as a result of upscattering of the soft (disk) photons in the converging inflow (CI) into the black hole. The full relativistic treatment has been implemented to reproduce these spectra. We show that spectra in the soft state of black hole systems (BHS) can be described as the sum of a thermal (disk) component and the convolution of some fraction of this component with the CI upscattering spread (Greens) function. The latter boosted photon component is seen as an extended power-law at energies much higher than the characteristic energy of the soft photons. We demonstrate the stability of the power spectral index over a wide range of the plasma temperature 0 - 10 keV and mass accretion rates (higher than 2 in Eddington units). We also demonstrate that the sharp high energy cutoff occurs at energies of 200-400 keV which are related to the average energy of electrons mec2 impinging upon the event horizon. The spectrum is practically identical to the standard thermal Comptonization spectrum when the CI plasma temperature is getting of order of 50 keV (the typical ones for the hard state of BHS). In this case one can see the effect of the bulk motion only at high energies where there is an excess in the CI spectrum with respect to the pure thermal one. Furthermore we demonstrate that the change of spectral shapes from the soft X-ray state to the hard X-ray state is clearly to be

  1. Spectral affinity in protein networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voevodski, Konstantin; Teng, Shang-Hua; Xia, Yu

    2009-11-29

    Protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks enable us to better understand the functional organization of the proteome. We can learn a lot about a particular protein by querying its neighborhood in a PPI network to find proteins with similar function. A spectral approach that considers random walks between nodes of interest is particularly useful in evaluating closeness in PPI networks. Spectral measures of closeness are more robust to noise in the data and are more precise than simpler methods based on edge density and shortest path length. We develop a novel affinity measure for pairs of proteins in PPI networks, which uses personalized PageRank, a random walk based method used in context-sensitive search on the Web. Our measure of closeness, which we call PageRank Affinity, is proportional to the number of times the smaller-degree protein is visited in a random walk that restarts at the larger-degree protein. PageRank considers paths of all lengths in a network, therefore PageRank Affinity is a precise measure that is robust to noise in the data. PageRank Affinity is also provably related to cluster co-membership, making it a meaningful measure. In our experiments on protein networks we find that our measure is better at predicting co-complex membership and finding functionally related proteins than other commonly used measures of closeness. Moreover, our experiments indicate that PageRank Affinity is very resilient to noise in the network. In addition, based on our method we build a tool that quickly finds nodes closest to a queried protein in any protein network, and easily scales to much larger biological networks. We define a meaningful way to assess the closeness of two proteins in a PPI network, and show that our closeness measure is more biologically significant than other commonly used methods. We also develop a tool, accessible at http://xialab.bu.edu/resources/pnns, that allows the user to quickly find nodes closest to a queried vertex in any protein

  2. Spectral affinity in protein networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teng Shang-Hua

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein interaction (PPI networks enable us to better understand the functional organization of the proteome. We can learn a lot about a particular protein by querying its neighborhood in a PPI network to find proteins with similar function. A spectral approach that considers random walks between nodes of interest is particularly useful in evaluating closeness in PPI networks. Spectral measures of closeness are more robust to noise in the data and are more precise than simpler methods based on edge density and shortest path length. Results We develop a novel affinity measure for pairs of proteins in PPI networks, which uses personalized PageRank, a random walk based method used in context-sensitive search on the Web. Our measure of closeness, which we call PageRank Affinity, is proportional to the number of times the smaller-degree protein is visited in a random walk that restarts at the larger-degree protein. PageRank considers paths of all lengths in a network, therefore PageRank Affinity is a precise measure that is robust to noise in the data. PageRank Affinity is also provably related to cluster co-membership, making it a meaningful measure. In our experiments on protein networks we find that our measure is better at predicting co-complex membership and finding functionally related proteins than other commonly used measures of closeness. Moreover, our experiments indicate that PageRank Affinity is very resilient to noise in the network. In addition, based on our method we build a tool that quickly finds nodes closest to a queried protein in any protein network, and easily scales to much larger biological networks. Conclusion We define a meaningful way to assess the closeness of two proteins in a PPI network, and show that our closeness measure is more biologically significant than other commonly used methods. We also develop a tool, accessible at http://xialab.bu.edu/resources/pnns, that allows the user to

  3. SNR radio spectral index distribution and its correlation with polarization. a case study: the Lupus Loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borka Jovanović, V.; Jovanović, P.; Borka, D.

    2017-04-01

    We use radio-continuum all-sky surveys at 1420 and 408 MHz with the aim to investigate properties of the Galactic radio source Lupus Loop. The survey data at 1435 MHz, with the linear polarization of the southern sky, are also used. We calculate properties of this supernova remnant: the brightness temperature, surface brightness and radio spectral index. To determine its borders and to calculate its properties, we use the method we have developed. The non-thermal nature of its radiation is confirmed. The distribution of spectral index over its area is also given. A significant correlation between the radio spectral index distribution and the corresponding polarized intensity distribution inside the loop borders is found, indicating that the polarization maps could provide us information about the distribution of the interstellar medium, and thus could represent one additional way to search for new Galactic loops.

  4. Total spectral distributions from Hawking radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broda, Bogusław

    2017-11-01

    Taking into account the time dependence of the Hawking temperature and finite evaporation time of the black hole, the total spectral distributions of the radiant energy and of the number of particles have been explicitly calculated and compared to their temporary (initial) blackbody counterparts (spectral exitances).

  5. A Spectral Emissivity Library of Spoil Substrates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pivovarník, Marek; Pikl, Miroslav; Frouz, J.; Zemek, František; Kopačková, V.; Notesco, G.; Ben Dor, E.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 2 (2016) E-ISSN 2306-5729 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415 Institutional support: RVO:86652079 Keywords : post- mining sites * spectral emissivity * spectral library * spoil substrates Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour OBOR OECD: Environmental sciences (social aspects to be 5.7)

  6. Relaxation schemes for Chebyshev spectral multigrid methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yimin; Fulton, Scott R.

    1993-01-01

    Two relaxation schemes for Chebyshev spectral multigrid methods are presented for elliptic equations with Dirichlet boundary conditions. The first scheme is a pointwise-preconditioned Richardson relaxation scheme and the second is a line relaxation scheme. The line relaxation scheme provides an efficient and relatively simple approach for solving two-dimensional spectral equations. Numerical examples and comparisons with other methods are given.

  7. Active spectral imaging nondestructive evaluation (SINDE) camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simova, E.; Rochefort, P.A., E-mail: eli.simova@cnl.ca [Canadian Nuclear Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    A proof-of-concept video camera for active spectral imaging nondestructive evaluation has been demonstrated. An active multispectral imaging technique has been implemented in the visible and near infrared by using light emitting diodes with wavelengths spanning from 400 to 970 nm. This shows how the camera can be used in nondestructive evaluation to inspect surfaces and spectrally identify materials and corrosion. (author)

  8. Total spectral distributions from Hawking radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broda, Boguslaw [University of Lodz, Department of Theoretical Physics, Faculty of Physics and Applied Informatics, Lodz (Poland)

    2017-11-15

    Taking into account the time dependence of the Hawking temperature and finite evaporation time of the black hole, the total spectral distributions of the radiant energy and of the number of particles have been explicitly calculated and compared to their temporary (initial) blackbody counterparts (spectral exitances). (orig.)

  9. Stellar Spectral Classification with Locality Preserving Projections ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    With the help of computer tools and algorithms, automatic stellar spectral classification has become an area of current interest. The process of stellar spectral classification mainly includes two steps: dimension reduction and classification. As a popular dimensionality reduction technique, Principal Component Analysis (PCA) ...

  10. Basic Functional Analysis Puzzles of Spectral Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Booss-Bavnbek, Bernhelm

    2011-01-01

    We explain an array of basic functional analysis puzzles on the way to general spectral flow formulae and indicate a direction of future topological research for dealing with these puzzles.......We explain an array of basic functional analysis puzzles on the way to general spectral flow formulae and indicate a direction of future topological research for dealing with these puzzles....

  11. Measurement of spectral linewidths of semiconductor lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du Xiaocheng; He Zhengchuan; Tang Sulan

    1987-03-01

    Based on the van der Pol equation, formulas describing the measurement of spectral linewidths of semiconductor lasers with the delayed self-heterodyne method were deduced and the influence of the spectral parameters on the measurement are given. Experimental results of single frequency semiconductor lasers are reported.

  12. Online Multi-Spectral Meat Inspection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jannik Boll; Larsen, Anders Boesen Lindbo

    2013-01-01

    We perform an explorative study on multi-spectral image data from a prototype device developed for fast online quality inspection of meat products. Because the camera setup is built for speed, we sacrifice exact pixel correspondences between the different bands of the multi-spectral images. Our...

  13. Sums of two-dimensional spectral triples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Erik; Ivan, Cristina

    2007-01-01

    We study countable sums of two dimensional modules for the continuous complex functions on a compact metric space and show that it is possible to construct a spectral triple which gives the original metric back. This spectral triple will be finitely summable for any positive parameter. We also co...

  14. Spectral features : How to reduce them

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brug, H. van; Bloemendal, D. ten; Goeij, B. de; Vink, R.; Maresi, L.

    2009-01-01

    Spectral features are introduced by the diffuser that is used during on-board sun calibration. New findings are presented on how to reduce the size of these spectral features. Reduction can be obtained via optical design of the calibration unit, but also in creating a better diffuser. A novel

  15. Spectral Learning for Supervised Topic Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yong; Wang, Yining; Zhu, Jun

    2018-03-01

    Supervised topic models simultaneously model the latent topic structure of large collections of documents and a response variable associated with each document. Existing inference methods are based on variational approximation or Monte Carlo sampling, which often suffers from the local minimum defect. Spectral methods have been applied to learn unsupervised topic models, such as latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA), with provable guarantees. This paper investigates the possibility of applying spectral methods to recover the parameters of supervised LDA (sLDA). We first present a two-stage spectral method, which recovers the parameters of LDA followed by a power update method to recover the regression model parameters. Then, we further present a single-phase spectral algorithm to jointly recover the topic distribution matrix as well as the regression weights. Our spectral algorithms are provably correct and computationally efficient. We prove a sample complexity bound for each algorithm and subsequently derive a sufficient condition for the identifiability of sLDA. Thorough experiments on synthetic and real-world datasets verify the theory and demonstrate the practical effectiveness of the spectral algorithms. In fact, our results on a large-scale review rating dataset demonstrate that our single-phase spectral algorithm alone gets comparable or even better performance than state-of-the-art methods, while previous work on spectral methods has rarely reported such promising performance.

  16. Spectral analysis of bedform dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winter, Christian; Ernstsen, Verner Brandbyge; Noormets, Riko

    Successive multibeam echo sounder surveys in tidal channels off Esbjerg (Denmark) on the North Sea coast reveal the dynamics of subaquatic compound dunes. Mainly driven by tidal currents, dune structures show complex migration patterns in all temporal and spatial scales. Common methods for the an......Successive multibeam echo sounder surveys in tidal channels off Esbjerg (Denmark) on the North Sea coast reveal the dynamics of subaquatic compound dunes. Mainly driven by tidal currents, dune structures show complex migration patterns in all temporal and spatial scales. Common methods...... for the analysis of bedform migration are based on the description of average characteristics as dune length, height and celerity. Their application to superimposed structures is dissatisfying as the recognition of dunes is subjective and work intensive. The high resolution and accuracy of the bathymetric surveys...... of the single harmonic constituents is assumed to be uniform and stationary, bedform dynamics can be completely assessed by changes in amplitude and phase. Dune migration at several transects were analysed and quantified by taking into account the phase differences of individual harmonic constituents...

  17. Meson spectral functions at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetzorke, I.; Karsch, F.; Laermann, E.; Petreczky, P.; Stickan, S.

    2002-01-01

    The Maximum Entropy Method provides a Bayesian approach to reconstruct the spectral functions from discrete points in Euclidean time. The applicability of the approach at finite temperature is probed with the thermal meson correlation function. Furthermore the influence of fuzzing/smearing techniques on the spectral shape is investigated. We present first results for meson spectral functions at several temperatures below and above T c . The correlation functions were obtained from quenched calculations with Clover fermions on large isotropic lattices of the size (24 - 64) 3 x 16. We compare the resulting pole masses with the ones obtained from standard 2-exponential fits of spatial and temporal correlation functions at finite temperature and in the vacuum. The deviation of the meson spectral functions from free spectral functions is examined above the critical temperature

  18. Meson spectral functions at finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wetzorke, I.; Karsch, F.; Laermann, E.; Petreczky, P.; Stickan, S.

    2001-10-01

    The Maximum Entropy Method provides a Bayesian approach to reconstruct the spectral functions from discrete points in Euclidean time. The applicability of the approach at finite temperature is probed with the thermal meson correlation function. Furthermore the influence of fuzzing/smearing techniques on the spectral shape is investigated. We present first results for meson spectral functions at several temperatures below and above T c . The correlation functions were obtained from quenched calculations with Clover fermions on large isotropic lattices of the size (24 - 64) 3 x 16. We compare the resulting pole masses with the ones obtained from standard 2-exponential fits of spatial and temporal correlation functions at finite temperature and in the vacuum. The deviation of the meson spectral functions from free spectral functions is examined above the critical temperature. (orig.)

  19. Meson spectral functions at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetzorke, I.; Karsch, F.; Laermann, E.; Petreczky, P.; Stickan, S

    2002-03-01

    The Maximum Entropy Method provides a Bayesian approach to reconstruct the spectral functions from discrete points in Euclidean time. The applicability of the approach at finite temperature is probed with the thermal meson correlation function. Furthermore the influence of fuzzing/smearing techniques on the spectral shape is investigated. We present first results for meson spectral functions at several temperatures below and above T{sub c}. The correlation functions were obtained from quenched calculations with Clover fermions on large isotropic lattices of the size (24 - 64){sup 3} x 16. We compare the resulting pole masses with the ones obtained from standard 2-exponential fits of spatial and temporal correlation functions at finite temperature and in the vacuum. The deviation of the meson spectral functions from free spectral functions is examined above the critical temperature.

  20. Meson spectral functions at finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetzorke, I.; Karsch, F.; Laermann, E.; Petreczky, P.; Stickan, S. [Bielefeld Univ. (Germany). Fakultaet fuer Physik

    2001-10-01

    The Maximum Entropy Method provides a Bayesian approach to reconstruct the spectral functions from discrete points in Euclidean time. The applicability of the approach at finite temperature is probed with the thermal meson correlation function. Furthermore the influence of fuzzing/smearing techniques on the spectral shape is investigated. We present first results for meson spectral functions at several temperatures below and above T{sub c}. The correlation functions were obtained from quenched calculations with Clover fermions on large isotropic lattices of the size (24 - 64){sup 3} x 16. We compare the resulting pole masses with the ones obtained from standard 2-exponential fits of spatial and temporal correlation functions at finite temperature and in the vacuum. The deviation of the meson spectral functions from free spectral functions is examined above the critical temperature. (orig.)

  1. Extracting attosecond delays from spectrally overlapping interferograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Inga; Wörner, Hans Jakob

    2018-02-01

    Attosecond interferometry is becoming an increasingly popular technique for measuring the dynamics of photoionization in real time. Whereas early measurements focused on atomic systems with very simple photoelectron spectra, the technique is now being applied to more complex systems including isolated molecules and solids. The increase in complexity translates into an augmented spectral congestion, unavoidably resulting in spectral overlap in attosecond interferograms. Here, we discuss currently used methods for phase retrieval and introduce two new approaches for determining attosecond photoemission delays from spectrally overlapping photoelectron spectra. We show that the previously used technique, consisting in the spectral integration of the areas of interest, does in general not provide reliable results. Our methods resolve this problem, thereby opening the technique of attosecond interferometry to complex systems and fully exploiting its specific advantages in terms of spectral resolution compared to attosecond streaking.

  2. Spectral Interferometry with Electron Microscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talebi, Nahid

    2016-09-21

    Interference patterns are not only a defining characteristic of waves, but also have several applications; characterization of coherent processes and holography. Spatial holography with electron waves, has paved the way towards space-resolved characterization of magnetic domains and electrostatic potentials with angstrom spatial resolution. Another impetus in electron microscopy has been introduced by ultrafast electron microscopy which uses pulses of sub-picosecond durations for probing a laser induced excitation of the sample. However, attosecond temporal resolution has not yet been reported, merely due to the statistical distribution of arrival times of electrons at the sample, with respect to the laser time reference. This is however, the very time resolution which will be needed for performing time-frequency analysis. These difficulties are addressed here by proposing a new methodology to improve the synchronization between electron and optical excitations through introducing an efficient electron-driven photon source. We use focused transition radiation of the electron as a pump for the sample. Due to the nature of transition radiation, the process is coherent. This technique allows us to perform spectral interferometry with electron microscopes, with applications in retrieving the phase of electron-induced polarizations and reconstructing dynamics of the induced vector potential.

  3. Method of photon spectral analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrke, Robert J.; Putnam, Marie H.; Killian, E. Wayne; Helmer, Richard G.; Kynaston, Ronnie L.; Goodwin, Scott G.; Johnson, Larry O.

    1993-01-01

    A spectroscopic method to rapidly measure the presence of plutonium in soils, filters, smears, and glass waste forms by measuring the uranium L-shell x-ray emissions associated with the decay of plutonium. In addition, the technique can simultaneously acquire spectra of samples and automatically analyze them for the amount of americium and .gamma.-ray emitting activation and fission products present. The samples are counted with a large area, thin-window, n-type germanium spectrometer which is equally efficient for the detection of low-energy x-rays (10-2000 keV), as well as high-energy .gamma. rays (>1 MeV). A 8192- or 16,384 channel analyzer is used to acquire the entire photon spectrum at one time. A dual-energy, time-tagged pulser, that is injected into the test input of the preamplifier to monitor the energy scale, and detector resolution. The L x-ray portion of each spectrum is analyzed by a linear-least-squares spectral fitting technique. The .gamma.-ray portion of each spectrum is analyzed by a standard Ge .gamma.-ray analysis program. This method can be applied to any analysis involving x- and .gamma.-ray analysis in one spectrum and is especially useful when interferences in the x-ray region can be identified from the .gamma.-ray analysis and accommodated during the x-ray analysis.

  4. Spectral partitioning in equitable graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barucca, Paolo

    2017-06-01

    Graph partitioning problems emerge in a wide variety of complex systems, ranging from biology to finance, but can be rigorously analyzed and solved only for a few graph ensembles. Here, an ensemble of equitable graphs, i.e., random graphs with a block-regular structure, is studied, for which analytical results can be obtained. In particular, the spectral density of this ensemble is computed exactly for a modular and bipartite structure. Kesten-McKay's law for random regular graphs is found analytically to apply also for modular and bipartite structures when blocks are homogeneous. An exact solution to graph partitioning for two equal-sized communities is proposed and verified numerically, and a conjecture on the absence of an efficient recovery detectability transition in equitable graphs is suggested. A final discussion summarizes results and outlines their relevance for the solution of graph partitioning problems in other graph ensembles, in particular for the study of detectability thresholds and resolution limits in stochastic block models.

  5. Spectral statistics of 'cellular' billiards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutkin, Boris

    2011-01-01

    For a bounded domain Ω 0 subset of R 2 whose boundary contains a number of flat pieces Γ i , i = 1, ..., l we consider a family of non-symmetric billiards Ω constructed by patching several copies of Ω 0 along Γ i s. It is demonstrated that the length spectrum of the periodic orbits in Ω is degenerate with the multiplicities determined by a matrix group G. We study the energy spectrum of the corresponding quantum billiard problem in Ω and show that it can be split into a number of uncorrelated subspectra corresponding to a set of irreducible representations α of G. Assuming that the classical dynamics in Ω 0 are chaotic, we derive a semiclassical trace formula for each spectral component and show that their energy level statistics are the same as in standard random matrix ensembles. Depending on whether α is real, pseudo-real or complex, the spectrum has either Gaussian orthogonal, Gaussian symplectic or Gaussian unitary types of statistics, respectively

  6. SOFIA: a flexible source finder for 3D spectral line data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serra, Paolo; Westmeier, Tobias; Giese, Nadine; Jurek, Russell; Flöer, Lars; Popping, Attila; Winkel, Benjamin; van der Hulst, Thijs; Meyer, Martin; Koribalski, Bärbel S.; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Courtois, Hélène

    We introduce SOFIA, a flexible software application for the detection and parametrization of sources in 3D spectral line data sets. SOFIA combines for the first time in a single piece of software a set of new source-finding and parametrization algorithms developed on the way to future H I surveys

  7. Using the spatial and spectral precision of satellite imagery to predict wildlife occurrence patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edward J. Laurent; Haijin Shi; Demetrios Gatziolis; Joseph P. LeBouton; Michael B. Walters; Jianguo. Liu

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the potential of using unclassified spectral data for predicting the distribution of three bird species over a -400,000 ha region of Michigan's Upper Peninsula using Landsat ETM+ imagery and 433 locations sampled for birds through point count surveys. These species, Black-throated Green Warbler, Nashville Warbler, and Ovenbird. were known to be...

  8. Spectral Variability of FSRQs Minfeng Gu1,∗ & Y. L. Ai2,3

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (DR7; Abazajian et al. 2009) and the SN survey during 2005–2007. We use the point- spread function magnitudes. The spectral index α are calculated from ... Abdo, A. A., Ackermann, M., Ajello, M. et al. 2010, Astrophys. J., 715, 429. Abazajian, K. N. et al. 2009, Astrophys. J. Suppl., 182, 543. Ai, Y. L., Yuan, W., Zhou, H. Y. et ...

  9. Spectral characterization of Quillaja saponaria (Mol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Acuña

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a spectral reflectance characterization of the specie Quillaja saponaria (Mol., endemic tree of Chile and valued by society due to its provision of several ecosystem services that gives to society and also for its high concentration of saponins in cortex widely used in the pharmacological industry. For spectral characterization a foliar spectral signatures protocol was designed which included standardized instrumental and environmental parameters. The spectral response of different individuals was measured to evaluate the spectral behaviour and degree of variability within species in the visible and near infrared ranges (VNIR; 400-990 nm with two hyperspectral sensors (ASD HH and camera PDF-65-V10E. The resulting spectral signatures obtained with ASD HH showed a variation less than 5% of reflectance in VNIR and lesser than that in the transition zone from red to near infrared (red-edge; 680-730 nm. Additionally, two distinctive spectral features were detected for the specie, the first is related to a fast increase of reflectance in bands 450-480 nm and the second, to a marked decrease in the 920-970 nm range associated with water absorption features. At branch level, these distinctive features are maintained but with a smaller magnitude of reflectance, which could indicate that they are useful characteristic spectral patterns that can eventually be used for monitoring the physical health state of the specie using remote sensing. On the other hand, we used a PDF-65 camera for study the plant vigour from different health states (healthy, ill, died with spectral vegetation index. The Plant Senescence Reflectance Index detected stress on leaves, and Triangular Vegetation Index allows for a gradually characterization of every state. This work provides the first spectral reference for one of the most important sclerophyll species of Chile.

  10. "Suntelligence" Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to the American Academy of Dermatology's "Suntelligence" sun-smart survey. Please answer the following questions to measure ... be able to view a ranking of major cities suntelligence based on residents' responses to this survey. ...

  11. The MALT-45 Pilot Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Christopher; Bains, Indra; Voronkov, Maxim; Lo, Nadia; Jones, Paul; Muller, Erik; Cunningham, Maria; Burton, Michael; Brooks, Kate; Green, James; Fuller, Gary; Barnes, Peter; Ellingsen, Simon; Urquhart, James; Morgan, Larry; Rowell, Gavin; Walsh, Andrew; Loenen, Edo; Baan, Willem; Hill, Tracey; Purcell, Cormac; Breen, Shari; Peretto, Nicolas; Jackson, James; Lowe, Vicki; Longmore, Steven

    2011-10-01

    As part of the MALT (Millimetre Astronomers Legacy Team) collaboration, we are proposing to undertake test observations with the ATCA that will lead to a southern Galactic plane survey at 7mm. We intend to take fast-mosaicking snaphot observations of a quarter square degree of the Galactic plane, focusing on the 7mm spectral lines of CS(1-0), C34S (1-0), Class I methanol masers and SiO masers. We will utilise the new CABB in zoom mode to simultaneously observe these lines and test the system for a future large-scale survey.

  12. SPECTRAL SMILE CORRECTION IN CRISM HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceamanos, X.; Doute, S.

    2009-12-01

    The Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) is affected by a common artifact in "push-broom" sensors, the so-called "spectral smile". As a consequence, both central wavelength and spectral width of the spectral response vary along the across-track dimension, thus giving rise to a shifting and smoothing of spectra (see Fig. 1 (left)). In fact, both effects are greater for spectra on the edges, while they are minimum for data acquired by central detectors, the so-called "sweet spot". The prior artifacts become particularly critical for Martian observations which contain steep spectra such as CO2 ice-rich polar images. Fig. 1 (right) shows the horizontal brightness gradient which appears in every band corresponding to a steep portion of spectra. The correction of CRISM spectral smile is addressed using a two-step method which aims at modifying data sensibly in order to mimic the optimal CRISM response. First, all spectra, which are previously interpolated by cubic splines, are resampled to the "sweet spot" wavelengths in order to overcome the spectra shift. Secondly, the non-uniform spectral width is overcome by mimicking an increase of spectral resolution thanks to a spectral sharpening. In order to minimize noise, only bands particularly suffering from smile are selected. First, bands corresponding to the outliers of the Minimum Noise Transformation (MNF) eigenvector, which corresponds to the MNF band related to smile (MNF-smile), are selected. Then, a spectral neighborhood Θi, which takes into account the local spectral convexity or concavity, is defined for every selected band in order to maximize spectral shape preservation. The proposed sharpening technique takes into account both the instrument parameters and the observed spectra. First, every reflectance value belonging to a Θi is reevaluated by a sharpening which depends on a ratio of the spectral width of the current detector and the "sweet spot" one. Then, the optimal degree of

  13. Spectrally selective solar energy materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikkens, M.

    1981-01-01

    The performance and properties of spectrally selective materials are considered and, in particular, the selective absorption of solar radiation by free electrons is discussed, both in a homogeneous material in which these electrons are strongly scattered, and in a composite material consisting of small metal particles in a dielectric host. Such materials can be used as selective absorbers if they are deposited as a thin film onto a metal substrate, the latter providing the required low emittance. This type of selective surfaces is produced by reactive sputtering of Ni in an Ar/CH 4 gas mixture. This method can yield Ni films with a considerable carbon concentration. The carbon concentration can be varied over a wide range by adjusting the partial methane pressure. The associated experimental techniques are discussed. As the carbon concentration increases, the structure of the films changes from a Ni phase in which carbon is dissolved, via an intermediate Ni 3 C phase into an amorphous carbon phase with a high electrical resistivity in which small nickel particles are embedded. Both mechanisms of selective absorption by free electrons are observed and are found to be well described by rather simple models. The best selectivity is obtained at high carbon concentrations where the films consist of nickel particles in carbon. Depending on the film thickness and the substrate material, the solar absorptance varies between 0.78 and 0.90, while the thermal emittance varies between 0.025 and 0.04. Since the films are found to be stable at 400 0 C in vacuum, it appears that these films are good candidates for application in photothermal solar energy conversion at temperature levels around 200 0 C and higher. (Auth.)

  14. Nonlinear spectral imaging of biological tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palero, J. A.

    2007-07-01

    The work presented in this thesis demonstrates live high resolution 3D imaging of tissue in its native state and environment. The nonlinear interaction between focussed femtosecond light pulses and the biological tissue results in the emission of natural autofluorescence and second-harmonic signal. Because biological intrinsic emission is generally very weak and extends from the ultraviolet to the visible spectral range, a broad-spectral range and high sensitivity 3D spectral imaging system is developed. Imaging the spectral characteristics of the biological intrinsic emission reveals the structure and biochemistry of the cells and extra-cellular components. By using different methods in visualizing the spectral images, discrimination between different tissue structures is achieved without the use of any stain or fluorescent label. For instance, RGB real color spectral images of the intrinsic emission of mouse skin tissues show blue cells, green hair follicles, and purple collagen fibers. The color signature of each tissue component is directly related to its characteristic emission spectrum. The results of this study show that skin tissue nonlinear intrinsic emission is mainly due to the autofluorescence of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate), flavins, keratin, melanin, phospholipids, elastin and collagen and nonlinear Raman scattering and second-harmonic generation in Type I collagen. In vivo time-lapse spectral imaging is implemented to study metabolic changes in epidermal cells in tissues. Optical scattering in tissues, a key factor in determining the maximum achievable imaging depth, is also investigated in this work.

  15. Spectral modeling of magnetohydrodynamic turbulent flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baerenzung, J; Politano, H; Ponty, Y; Pouquet, A

    2008-08-01

    We present a dynamical spectral model for large-eddy simulation of the incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations based on the eddy damped quasinormal Markovian approximation. This model extends classical spectral large-eddy simulations for the Navier-Stokes equations to incorporate general (non-Kolmogorovian) spectra as well as eddy noise. We derive the model for MHD flows and show that the introduction of an eddy damping time for the dynamics of spectral tensors, in the absence of equipartition between the velocity and magnetic fields, leads to better agreement with direct numerical simulations, an important point for dynamo computations.

  16. Reservoir hydrocarbon delineation using spectral decomposition: The application of S-Transform and empirical mode decomposition (EMD) method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haris, A.; Morena, V.; Riyanto, A.; Zulivandama, S. R.

    2017-07-01

    Non-stationer signal from the seismic survey is difficult to be directly interpreted in time domain analysis. Spectral decomposition is one of the spectral analysis methods that can analyze the non-stationer signal in frequency domain. The Fast Fourier Transform method was commonly used for spectral decomposition analysis, however, this method had a limitation in the scaled window analysis and produced pure quality for low-frequency shadow. The S-Transform and Empirical the Mode Decomposition (EMD) is another method of spectral decomposition that can be used to enhanced low-frequency shadows. In this research, comparison of the S-Transform and the EMD methods that can show the difference imaging result of low-frequency shadows zone is applied to Eldo Field, Jambi Province. The spectral decomposition result based on the EMD method produced better imaging of low-frequency shadows zone in tuning thickness compared to S-Transform methods.

  17. Multi-Configuration Matched Spectral Filter Core Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — OPTRA proposes an open-architecture spectral gas sensor based on compressive sensing concepts employed for both spatial and spectral domains. Our matched spectral...

  18. Multi-Configuration Matched Spectral Filter Core, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — OPTRA proposes an open-architecture spectral gas sensor based on compressive sensing concepts employed for both spatial and spectral domains. Our matched spectral...

  19. Spectral Shifting in Nondestructive Assay Instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trellue, Holly Renee [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Nettleton, Anthony Steven [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tutt, James Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Menlove, Howard Olsen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); LaFleur, Adrienne Marie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tobin, Stephen Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-17

    This project involves spectrum tailoring research that endeavors to better distinguish energies of gamma rays using different spectral material thicknesses and determine neutron energies by coating detectors with various materials.

  20. [Hygiene and the spectral energtic light pattern].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaptsov, V A; Deynego, V N; SoshMn, N P; Ulasyuk, V N

    There are considered methodological bases of multicriteria synthesis of a spectral energetic pattern for the evaluation of the excessive share of blue and red light in the spectrum of artificial energy sources. The basis of this methodology is relied upon on the hygienic approach to the spectrum analysis of solar and led light. Relying upon on "photobiological paradox of vision" according to M. A. Ostrovsky, conditions of "melanopsin cross" and mechanisms of adverse impact of light on vision, all the spectral-energy characteristics of solar light were divided into subspaces. The border between them became a spectral energy pattern for the evaluation of artificial sources on the security of their impact on eye and human health according to criteria of the excessive dose of blue or red light. On two examples there was shown the effectiveness and clarity of this estimation with the using of the spectral energetic pattern of light.

  1. Spectral properties of supersymmetric shape invariant potentials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SIPs). Although the folded spectrum is completely random, unfolded spectrum shows that energy levels are highly correlated and absolutely rigid. All the SIPs exhibit harmonic oscillator-type spectral statistics in the unfolded spectrum.

  2. Salinity and spectral reflectance of soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szilagyi, A.; Baumgardner, M. F.

    1991-01-01

    The basic spectral response related to the salt content of soils in the visible and reflective IR wavelengths is analyzed in order to explore remote sensing applications for monitoring processes of the earth system. The bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF) was determined at 10 nm of increments over the 520-2320-nm spectral range. The effect of salts on reflectance was analyzed on the basis of 162 spectral measurements. MSS and TM bands were simulated within the measured spectral region. A strong relationship was found in variations of reflectance and soil characteristics pertaining to salinization and desalinization. Although the individual MSS bands had high R-squared values and 75-79 percent of soil/treatment combinations were separable, there was a large number of soil/treatment combinations not distinguished by any of the four highly correlated MSS bands under consideration.

  3. SSBUV middle ultraviolet solar spectral irradiance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebula, Richard P.; Hilsenrath, Ernest

    1994-01-01

    The Shuttle Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SSBUV) instrument performs multiple solar spectral irradiance measurements in the wavelength region 200 to 400 nm at 1.1 nm resolution during yearly Space Shuttle flights. Solar spectral irradiance observations from the first three SSBUV Shuttle flights, October 1989, October 1990, and August 1991, are compared with one another and with solar measurements made by the NOAA-11 SBUV/2 instrument. The repeated SSBUV solar spectral observations, which agree to within plus or minus 1-2 percent from 200 to 400 nm, are valuable not only as a means of validating and calibrating the satellite-based solar irradiance measurements, but also as a distinct set of stand-alone solar measurements for monitoring long-term changes in the solar spectral irradiance, which are important for ozone photochemistry.

  4. Broadband Advanced Spectral System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NovaSol proposes to develop an advanced hyperspectral imaging system for earth science missions named BRASS (Broadband Advanced Spectral System). BRASS combines...

  5. Algorithms for Spectral Decomposition with Applications

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The analysis of spectral signals for features that represent physical phenomenon is ubiquitous in the science and engineering communities. There are two main...

  6. Ultra-High Density Spectral Storage Materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hasan, Zameer U

    2002-01-01

    .... Being atomic scale storage, spectral storage has the potential of providing orders of magnitude denser memories than present day memories that depend on the hulk properties of the storage medium...

  7. Chromosome analysis using spectral karyotyping (SKY).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imataka, George; Arisaka, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    Spectral karyotyping is a novel technique for chromosome analysis that has been developed based on the approach of the fluorescence in situ hybridization technique. Spectral karyotyping makes it feasible to diagnose a variety of diseases, because of its technology in painting each of the 24 human chromosomes with different colors. In recent years, it has become possible to adopt the usage of spectral karyotyping for research in general clinical practice, and its usability has attracted particular attention in the diagnosis of different diseases. In this review, we will explain the principle of the spectral karyotyping, as well as its specificity and limitation in detecting the genetic defects within clinical application by presenting two case reports.

  8. Computer-assisted spectral design and synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadakkumpadan, Fijoy; Wang, Qiqi; Sun, Yinlong

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a computer-assisted approach for spectral design and synthesis. This approach starts with some initial spectrum, modifies it interactively, evaluates the change, and decides the optimal spectrum. Given a requested change as function of wavelength, we model the change function using a Gaussian function. When there is the metameric constraint, from the Gaussian function of request change, we propose a method to generate the change function such that the result spectrum has the same color as the initial spectrum. We have tested the proposed method with different initial spectra and change functions, and implemented an interactive graphics environment for spectral design and synthesis. The proposed approach and graphics implementation for spectral design and synthesis can be helpful for a number of applications such as lighting of building interiors, textile coloration, and pigment development of automobile paints, and spectral computer graphics.

  9. Spectral properties of almost-periodic Hamiltonians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, R.

    1983-12-01

    We give a description of some spectral properties of almost-periodic hamiltonians. We put the stress on some particular points of the proofs of the existence of absolutely continuous or pure point spectrum [fr

  10. HIRES NIMS IDA SPECTRAL IMAGE CUBES

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data volume contains 17 channel spectral image cubes of asteroid 243 Ida ranging from 0.7 to 5.2 micrometers in wavelength in cgs units of radiance. These data...

  11. GALILEO NIMS SPECTRAL IMAGE CUBES: JUPITER OPERATIONS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The natural form of imaging spectrometer data is the spectral image cube. It is normally in band sequential format, but has a dual nature. It is a series of 'images'...

  12. GALILEO NIMS SPECTRAL IMAGE TUBES: JUPITER OPERATIONS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The natural form of imaging spectrometer data is the spectral image cube. It is normally in band sequential format, but has a dual nature. It is a series of 'images'...

  13. Learning theory of distributed spectral algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zheng-Chu; Lin, Shao-Bo; Zhou, Ding-Xuan

    2017-07-01

    Spectral algorithms have been widely used and studied in learning theory and inverse problems. This paper is concerned with distributed spectral algorithms, for handling big data, based on a divide-and-conquer approach. We present a learning theory for these distributed kernel-based learning algorithms in a regression framework including nice error bounds and optimal minimax learning rates achieved by means of a novel integral operator approach and a second order decomposition of inverse operators. Our quantitative estimates are given in terms of regularity of the regression function, effective dimension of the reproducing kernel Hilbert space, and qualification of the filter function of the spectral algorithm. They do not need any eigenfunction or noise conditions and are better than the existing results even for the classical family of spectral algorithms.

  14. Matched Spectral Filter Imager, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — OPTRA proposes the development of an imaging spectrometer for greenhouse gas and volcanic gas imaging based on matched spectral filtering and compressive imaging....

  15. Precise Multi-Spectral Dermatological Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gomez, David Delgado; Carstensen, Jens Michael; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    2004-01-01

    In this work, an integrated imaging system to obtain accurate and reproducible multi-spectral dermatological images is proposed. The system is made up of an integrating sphere, light emitting diodes and a generic monochromatic camera. The system can collect up to 10 different spectral bands....... These spectral bands vary from ultraviolet to near infrared. The welldefined and diffuse illumination of the optically closed scene aims to avoid shadows and specular reflections. Furthermore, the system has been developed to guarantee the reproducibility of the collected images. This allows for comparative...... studies of time series of images. Two experiments are conducted to show the ability of the system to acquire highly precise and standardized multi-spectral images. The first experiment aims to show the capacity of the system to collect reproducible images. The second experiment demonstrates that the multi...

  16. Learning theory of distributed spectral algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Zheng-Chu; Lin, Shao-Bo; Zhou, Ding-Xuan

    2017-01-01

    Spectral algorithms have been widely used and studied in learning theory and inverse problems. This paper is concerned with distributed spectral algorithms, for handling big data, based on a divide-and-conquer approach. We present a learning theory for these distributed kernel-based learning algorithms in a regression framework including nice error bounds and optimal minimax learning rates achieved by means of a novel integral operator approach and a second order decomposition of inverse operators. Our quantitative estimates are given in terms of regularity of the regression function, effective dimension of the reproducing kernel Hilbert space, and qualification of the filter function of the spectral algorithm. They do not need any eigenfunction or noise conditions and are better than the existing results even for the classical family of spectral algorithms. (paper)

  17. Recovering Type Ia Supernova Spectral Indicators from Low-Resolution Spectroscopy and Photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Samantha; Nearby Supernova Factory Collaboration, Perlmutter et al. WFIRST Supernova Science Investigation Team

    2018-01-01

    Type Ia supernovae are one of the best tools for measuring cosmological distances, and recent results have used advanced matching techniques to dramatically improve the standardization of supernova brightnesses when spectroscopic data is available. Photometric studies, however, are currently limited in their use for cosmology by as yet unmodeled dispersion in standardized magnitudes. Some fraction of this dispersion is due to diversity among supernovae that is revealed by spectra but not captured by traditional light curve fitters. Several studies in the literature propose using direct measurements of a variety of spectral features to parametrize this diversity and make additional corrections to the magnitudes inferred from light curve fits. A forthcoming paper by Saunders et al., presents a new empirical model of Type Ia supernova spectral time series, based on over 2000 spectrophotometric observations of 241 supernovae from the Nearby Supernova Factory, that captures a wider range of supernova behavior. I will present a study that uses this new empirical model to reconstruct the spectral time series of supernovae observed with a range of signal-to-noise ratios and spectral resolutions in order to explore how well spectral indicators can be recovered from photometry and low-resolution spectroscopy. Using results from the literature, I will also examine how the ability to recover these spectral indicators impacts cosmology, particularly in the context of future surveys (e.g. WFIRST and LSST).

  18. Evidence for large temperature fluctuations in quasar accretion disks from spectral variability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruan, John J.; Anderson, Scott F.; Agol, Eric; Dexter, Jason

    2014-01-01

    The well-known bluer-when-brighter trend observed in quasar variability is a signature of the complex processes in the accretion disk and can be a probe of the quasar variability mechanism. Using a sample of 604 variable quasars with repeat spectra in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey-I/II (SDSS), we construct difference spectra to investigate the physical causes of this bluer-when-brighter trend. The continuum of our composite difference spectrum is well fit by a power law, with a spectral index in excellent agreement with previous results. We measure the spectral variability relative to the underlying spectra of the quasars, which is independent of any extinction, and compare to model predictions. We show that our SDSS spectral variability results cannot be produced by global accretion rate fluctuations in a thin disk alone. However, we find that a simple model of an inhomogeneous disk with localized temperature fluctuations will produce power-law spectral variability over optical wavelengths. We show that the inhomogeneous disk will provide good fits to our observed spectral variability if the disk has large temperature fluctuations in many independently varying zones, in excellent agreement with independent constraints from quasar microlensing disk sizes, their strong UV spectral continuum, and single-band variability amplitudes. Our results provide an independent constraint on quasar variability models and add to the mounting evidence that quasar accretion disks have large localized temperature fluctuations.

  19. Survey research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderman, Amy K; Salem, Barbara

    2010-10-01

    Survey research is a unique methodology that can provide insight into individuals' perspectives and experiences and can be collected on a large population-based sample. Specifically, in plastic surgery, survey research can provide patients and providers with accurate and reproducible information to assist with medical decision-making. When using survey methods in research, researchers should develop a conceptual model that explains the relationships of the independent and dependent variables. The items of the survey are of primary importance. Collected data are only useful if they accurately measure the concepts of interest. In addition, administration of the survey must follow basic principles to ensure an adequate response rate and representation of the intended target sample. In this article, the authors review some general concepts important for successful survey research and discuss the many advantages this methodology has for obtaining limitless amounts of valuable information.

  20. Spectral properties of 441 radio pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, F.; van Straten, W.; Keane, E. F.; Bailes, M.; Barr, E. D.; Johnston, S.; Kerr, M.

    2018-02-01

    We present a study of the spectral properties of 441 pulsars observed with the Parkes radio telescope near the centre frequencies of 728, 1382 and 3100 MHz. The observations at 728 and 3100 MHz were conducted simultaneously using the dual-band 10-50 cm receiver. These high-sensitivity, multifrequency observations provide a systematic and uniform sample of pulsar flux densities. We combine our measurements with spectral data from the literature in order to derive the spectral properties of these pulsars. Using techniques from robust regression and information theory, we classify the observed spectra in an objective, robust and unbiased way into five morphological classes: simple or broken power law, power law with either low- or high-frequency cut-off and log-parabolic spectrum. While about 79 per cent of the pulsars that could be classified have simple power-law spectra, we find significant deviations in 73 pulsars, 35 of which have curved spectra, 25 with a spectral break and 10 with a low-frequency turn-over. We identify 11 gigahertz-peaked spectrum (GPS) pulsars, with 3 newly identified in this work and 8 confirmations of known GPS pulsars; 3 others show tentative evidence of GPS, but require further low-frequency measurements to support this classification. The weighted mean spectral index of all pulsars with simple power-law spectra is -1.60 ± 0.03. The observed spectral indices are well described by a shifted log-normal distribution. The strongest correlations of spectral index are with spin-down luminosity, magnetic field at the light-cylinder and spin-down rate. We also investigate the physical origin of the observed spectral features and determine emission altitudes for three pulsars.

  1. Spectral Feature Selection for Data Mining

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Zheng Alan

    2011-01-01

    Spectral Feature Selection for Data Mining introduces a novel feature selection technique that establishes a general platform for studying existing feature selection algorithms and developing new algorithms for emerging problems in real-world applications. This technique represents a unified framework for supervised, unsupervised, and semisupervised feature selection. The book explores the latest research achievements, sheds light on new research directions, and stimulates readers to make the next creative breakthroughs. It presents the intrinsic ideas behind spectral feature selection, its th

  2. Measuring Collimator Infrared (IR) Spectral Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    TECHNICAL REPORT RDMR-WD-16-15 MEASURING COLLIMATOR INFRARED ( IR ) SPECTRAL TRANSMISSION Christopher L. Dobbins Weapons...AND DATES COVERED Final 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Measuring Collimator Infrared ( IR ) Spectral Transmission 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Christopher L...release; distribution is unlimited. 12b. DISTRIBUTION CODE A 13. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 Words) Several Infrared ( IR ) imaging systems have been measured

  3. Biomimetic joint spatial-spectral pattern recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, H. John

    2003-08-01

    Most animals use color and shape to recognize things in their worlds. Shapes are properties of objects inferable from their 2D images. Colors are spectral discriminants computed by their brains using data sensed in 2-4 broad, spectrally overlapping bands. So color is not an object property. Both shape and color combine to make discrimination work well. I will describe Artificial Color and then ways to recognize an Artificially colored image.

  4. A high throughput spectral image microscopy system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesley, M.; Puri, R.

    2018-01-01

    A high throughput spectral image microscopy system is configured for rapid detection of rare cells in large populations. To overcome flow cytometry rates and use of fluorophore tags, a system architecture integrates sample mechanical handling, signal processors, and optics in a non-confocal version of light absorption and scattering spectroscopic microscopy. Spectral images with native contrast do not require the use of exogeneous stain to render cells with submicron resolution. Structure may be characterized without restriction to cell clusters of differentiation.

  5. Spectral evolution of galaxies: current views

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruzual, A.G.

    1985-01-01

    A summary of current views on the interpretation of the various evolutionary tests aimed at detecting spectral evolution in galaxies is presented. It is concluded that the evolution taking place in known galaxy samples is a slow process (perhaps consistent with no evolution at all), and that the early phases of rapid spectral evolution in early-type galaxies have not yet been detected. (author)

  6. Spectral indices of Galactic radio loops between 1420, 820 and 408 MHz

    OpenAIRE

    Borka, V.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper the average brightness temperatures and surface brightnesses at 1420, 820 and 408 MHz of the six main Galactic radio-continuum loops are derived, as are their radio spectral indices. The temperatures and surface brightnesses of the radio loops are computed using data taken from radio continuum surveys at 1420, 820 and 408 MHz. We have demonstrated the reality of Loops V and VI and present diagrams of their spectra for the first time. We derived the radio spectral indices of Gala...

  7. Spectral theory and differential equations V. A. Marchenko's 90th anniversary collection

    CERN Document Server

    Khruslov, E; Shepelsky, D

    2014-01-01

    This volume is dedicated to V. A. Marchenko on the occasion of his 90th birthday. It contains refereed original papers and survey articles written by his colleagues and former students of international stature and focuses on the areas to which he made important contributions: spectral theory of differential and difference operators and related topics of mathematical physics, including inverse problems of spectral theory, homogenization theory, and the theory of integrable systems. The papers in the volume provide a comprehensive account of many of the most significant recent developments in th

  8. A spatial-spectral approach for deriving high signal quality eigenvectors for remote sensing image transformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rogge, Derek; Bachmann, Martin; Rivard, Benoit

    2014-01-01

    -line surveys, or temporal data sets as computational burden becomes significant. In this paper we present a spatial-spectral approach to deriving high signal quality eigenvectors for image transformations which possess an inherently ability to reduce the effects of noise. The approach applies a spatial...... and spectral subsampling to the data, which is accomplished by deriving a limited set of eigenvectors for spatially contiguous subsets. These subset eigenvectors are compiled together to form a new noise reduced data set, which is subsequently used to derive a set of global orthogonal eigenvectors. Data from...

  9. Resolving spectral information from time domain induced polarization data through 2-D inversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiandaca, Gianluca; Ramm, James; Binley, A.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Field-based time domain (TD) induced polarization (IP) surveys are usually modelled by taking into account only the integral chargeability, thus disregarding spectral content. Furthermore, the effect of the transmitted waveform is commonly neglected, biasing inversion results. Given...... these limitations of conventional approaches, a new 2-D inversion algorithm has been developed using the full voltage decay of the IP response, together with an accurate description of the transmitter waveform and receiver transfer function. This allows reconstruction of the spectral information contained in the TD...

  10. The Effect of Field Spectral Reflectance Measurement Distance to the Spectral Reflectance of Rhizophora stylosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, M.; Ningam, M. U. L.; Alqorina, F.

    2017-12-01

    Mapping mangrove species from remote sensing data through its spectral reflectance pattern collected in the field is challenging. There are high variations in light condition, leaf orientation, canopy structure, background objects and measurement distance when measuring mangrove spectral reflectance in the field. Spectral measurement distance to the object is one of the most important aspects controlling the result of spectral reflectance pattern. This research is aimed to assess the effect of spectral reflectance pattern of Rhizophora stylosa collected at various distances. Specific objectives of this research are to collect samples of mangrove spectral reflectance pattern in the field, to assess the effect of the observation scale to the result of the spectral reflectance pattern, and to characterize the mangrove spectral reflectance pattern resulted from different observation scales. Spectral reflectance data collection in the field was conducted using JAZ EL-350 field spectrometer at 2cm, 50cm, 1m, 2m, and 5m distance and was conducted in Karimunjawa Island, Jepara, Central Java, Indonesia. A visual comparison of the spectral reflectance curve was conducted to understand the effect of measurement distance. The results of this study indicate that the difference in the measurement distance of Rhizophora stylosa species was highly influential to the resulting spectral reflectance curve. The spectral reflectance curve recorded at close range to the leaf (i.e. 2 cm) has the lowest curve variation, as well as the furthest distance (i.e. 5 m). This study is a basic study that supports the development of the use of remote sensing imagery for mangrove species mapping.

  11. The SOAR Gravitational Arc Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makler, M.; Furlanetto, C.; Santiago, B. X.; Caminha, G. B.; Cypriano, E.; Cibirka, N.; Pereira, M. E. S.; Bom, C. R. D.; Lima, M. P.; Brandt, C. H.; Neto, A. F.; Estrada, J.; Lin, H.; Hao, J.; McKay, T. M.; da Costa, L. N.; Maia, M. A. G.

    2014-10-01

    We present the first results of the SOAR Gravitational Arc Survey (SOGRAS). The survey imaged 47 clusters in two redshift intervals centered at z=0.27 and z=0.55, targeting the richest clusters in each interval. Images were obtained in the g', r' and i' bands with a median seeing of 0.83, 0.76 and 0.71 arcsec, respectively, in these filters. Most of the survey clusters are located within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe-82 region and all of them are in the SDSS footprint. We present the first results of the survey, including the 6 best strong lensing systems, photometric and morphometric catalogs of the galaxy sample, and cross matches of the clusters and galaxies with complementary samples (spectroscopic redshifts, photometry in several bands, X-ray and Sunyaev Zel'dovich clusters, etc.), exploiting the synergy with other surveys in Stripe-82. We apply several methods to characterize the gravitational arc candidates, including the Mediatrix method (Bom et al. 2012) and ArcFitting (Furlanetto et al. 2012), and for the subtraction of galaxy cluster light. Finally, we apply strong lensing inversion techniques to the best systems, providing constraints on their mass distribution. The analyses of a spectral follow-up with Gemini and the derived dynamical masses are presented in a poster submitted to this same meeting (Cibirka et al.). Deeper follow-up images with Gemini strengthen the case for the strong lensing nature of the candidates found in this survey.

  12. Solar spectral irradiance changes during cycle 24

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchenko, S. V.; DeLand, M. T. [Also at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD, USA. (United States)

    2014-07-10

    We use solar spectra obtained by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on board the Aura satellite to detect and follow long-term (years) and short-term (weeks) changes in the solar spectral irradiance (SSI) in the 265-500 nm spectral range. During solar Cycle 24, in the relatively line-free regions the SSI changed by ∼0.6% ± 0.2% around 265 nm. These changes gradually diminish to 0.15% ± 0.20% at 500 nm. All strong spectral lines and blends, with the notable exception of the upper Balmer lines, vary in unison with the solar 'continuum'. Besides the lines with strong chromospheric components, the most involved species include Fe I blends and all prominent CH, NH, and CN spectral bands. Following the general trend seen in the solar 'continuum', the variability of spectral lines also decreases toward longer wavelengths. The long-term solar cycle SSI changes are closely, to within the quoted 0.1%-0.2% uncertainties, matched by the appropriately adjusted short-term SSI variations derived from the 27 day rotational modulation cycles. This further strengthens and broadens the prevailing notion about the general scalability of the UV SSI variability to the emissivity changes in the Mg II 280 nm doublet on timescales from weeks to years. We also detect subtle deviations from this general rule: the prominent spectral lines and blends at λ ≳ 350 nm show slightly more pronounced 27 day SSI changes when compared to the long-term (years) trends. We merge the solar data from Cycle 21 with the current Cycle 24 OMI and GOME-2 observations and provide normalized SSI variations for the 170-795 nm spectral region.

  13. Test of multi-object exoplanet search spectral interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Wang, Liang; Jiang, Haijiao; Zhu, Yongtian; Hou, Yonghui; Dai, Songxin; Tang, Jin; Tang, Zhen; Zeng, Yizhong; Chen, Yi; Wang, Lei; Hu, Zhongwen

    2014-07-01

    Exoplanet detection, a highlight in the current astronomy, will be part of puzzle in astronomical and astrophysical future, which contains dark energy, dark matter, early universe, black hole, galactic evolution and so on. At present, most of the detected Exoplanets are confirmed through methods of radial velocity and transit. Guo shoujing Telescope well known as LAMOST is an advanced multi-object spectral survey telescope equipped with 4000 fibers and 16 low resolution fiber spectrographs. To explore its potential in different astronomical activities, a new radial velocity method named Externally Dispersed Interferometry (EDI) is applied to serve Exoplanet detection through combining a fixed-delay interferometer with the existing spectrograph in medium spectral resolution mode (R=5,000-10,000). This new technology has an impressive feature to enhance radial velocity measuring accuracy of the existing spectrograph through installing a fixed-delay interferometer in front of spectrograph. This way produces an interference spectrum with higher sensitivity to Doppler Effect by interference phase and fixed delay. This relative system named Multi-object Exoplanet Search Spectral Interferometer (MESSI) is composed of a few parts, including a pair of multi-fiber coupling sockets, a remote control iodine subsystem, a multi-object fixed delay interferometer and the existing spectrograph. It covers from 500 to 550 nm and simultaneously observes up to 21 stars. Even if it's an experimental instrument at present, it's still well demonstrated in paper that how MESSI does explore an effective way to build its own system under the existing condition of LAMOST and get its expected performance for multi-object Exoplanet detection, especially instrument stability and its special data reduction. As a result of test at lab, inside temperature of its instrumental chamber is stable in a range of +/-0.5degree Celsius within 12 hours, and the direct instrumental stability without further

  14. Understanding Spatial and Spectral Morphologies of Ultracompact H II Regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Thomas; /ZAH, Heidelberg; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; /Amer. Museum Natural Hist. /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. Astron.; Banerjee, Robi; /ZAH, Heidelberg; Klessen, Ralf S.; /ZAH, Heidelberg /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Dullemond, Cornelis P.; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. Astron.

    2010-08-25

    The spatial morphology, spectral characteristics, and time variability of ultracompact H II regions provide strong constraints on the process of massive star formation. We have performed simulations of the gravitational collapse of rotating molecular cloud cores, including treatments of the propagation of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. We here present synthetic radio continuum observations of H II regions from our collapse simulations, to investigate how well they agree with observation, and what we can learn about how massive star formation proceeds. We find that intermittent shielding by dense filaments in the gravitationally unstable accretion flow around the massive star leads to highly variable H II regions that do not grow monotonically, but rather flicker, growing and shrinking repeatedly. This behavior appears able to resolve the well-known lifetime problem. We find that multiple ionizing sources generally form, resulting in groups of ultracompact H II regions, consistent with observations. We confirm that our model reproduces the qualitative H II region morphologies found in surveys, with generally consistent relative frequencies. We also find that simulated spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from our model are consistent with the range of observed H II region SEDs, including both regions showing a normal transition from optically thick to optically thin emission, and those with intermediate spectral slopes. In our models, anomalous slopes are solely produced by inhomogeneities in the H II region, with no contribution from dust emission at millimeter or submillimeter wavelengths. We conclude that many observed characteristics of ultracompact H II regions appear consistent with massive star formation in fast, gravitationally unstable, accretion flows.

  15. a Variable Resolution Global Spectral Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardiker, Vivek Manohar

    A conformal transformation suggested by F. Schimdt is followed to implement a global spectral model with variable horizontal resolution. A conformal mapping is defined between the real physical sphere (Earth) to a transformed (Computational) sphere. The model equations are discretized on the computational sphere and the conventional spectral technique is applied to solve the model equations. There are two types of transformations used in the present study, namely, the Stretching transformation and the Rotation of the horizontal grid points. Application of the stretching transformation results in finer resolution along the meridional direction. The stretching is controlled by a parameter C. The rotation transformation can be used to relocate the North Pole of the model to any point on the geographic sphere. The idea is now to rotate the pole to the area of interest and refine the resolution around the new pole by applying the stretching transformation. The stretching transformation can be applied alone without the rotation. A T-42 Spectral Shallow-Water model is transformed by applying the stretching transformation alone as well as the two transformations together. A T-42 conventional Spectral Shallow-Water model is run as the control experiment and a conventional T-85 Spectral Shallow-Water model run is treated as the benchmark (Truth) solution. RMS error analysis for the geopotential field as well as the wind field is performed to evaluate the forecast made by the transformed model. It is observed that the RMS error of the transformed model is lower than that of the control run in a latitude band, for the case of stretching transformation alone, while for the total transformation (rotation followed by stretching), similar results are obtained for a rectangular domain. A multi-level global spectral model is designed from the current FSU global spectral model in order to implement the conformal transformation. The transformed T-85 model is used to study Hurricane

  16. Schrodinger Eigenmaps for spectral target detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorado-Munoz, Leidy P.; Messinger, David W.

    2015-05-01

    Spectral imagery such as multispectral and hyperspectral data could be seen as a set of panchromatic images stacked as a 3d cube, with two spatial dimensions and one spectral. For hyperspectral imagery, the spectral dimension is highly sampled, which implies redundant information and a high spectral dimensionality. Therefore, it is necessary to use transformations on the data not only to reduce processing costs, but also to reveal some features or characteristics of the data that were hidden in the original space. Schrodinger Eigenmaps (SE) is a novel mathematical method for non-linear representation of a data set that attempts to preserve the local structure while the spectral dimension is reduced. SE could be seen as an extension of Laplacian Eigenmaps (LE), where the diffusion process could be steered in certain directions determined by a potential term. SE was initially introduced as a semi supervised classification technique and most recently, it has been applied to target detection showing promising performance. In target detection, only the barrier potential has been used, so different forms to define barrier potentials and its influence on the data embedding are studied here. In this way, an experiment to assess the target detection vs. how strong the influence of potentials is and how many eigenmaps are used in the detection, is proposed. The target detection is performed using a hyperspectral data set, where several targets with different complexity are presented in the same scene.

  17. Efficient uncertainty minimization for fuzzy spectral clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Brian S; Shalloway, David

    2009-11-01

    Spectral clustering uses the global information embedded in eigenvectors of an inter-item similarity matrix to correctly identify clusters of irregular shape, an ability lacking in commonly used approaches such as k -means and agglomerative clustering. However, traditional spectral clustering partitions items into hard clusters, and the ability to instead generate fuzzy item assignments would be advantageous for the growing class of domains in which cluster overlap and uncertainty are important. Korenblum and Shalloway [Phys. Rev. E 67, 056704 (2003)] extended spectral clustering to fuzzy clustering by introducing the principle of uncertainty minimization. However, this posed a challenging nonconvex global optimization problem that they solved by a brute-force technique unlikely to scale to data sets having more than O(10;{2}) items. Here we develop a method for solving the minimization problem, which can handle data sets at least two orders of magnitude larger. In doing so, we elucidate the underlying structure of uncertainty minimization using multiple geometric representations. This enables us to show how fuzzy spectral clustering using uncertainty minimization is related to and generalizes clustering motivated by perturbative analysis of almost-block-diagonal matrices. Uncertainty minimization can be applied to a wide variety of existing hard spectral clustering approaches, thus transforming them to fuzzy methods.

  18. Spectral line polarimetry with a channeled polarimeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Harten, Gerard; Snik, Frans; Rietjens, Jeroen H H; Martijn Smit, J; Keller, Christoph U

    2014-07-01

    Channeled spectropolarimetry or spectral polarization modulation is an accurate technique for measuring the continuum polarization in one shot with no moving parts. We show how a dual-beam implementation also enables spectral line polarimetry at the intrinsic resolution, as in a classic beam-splitting polarimeter. Recording redundant polarization information in the two spectrally modulated beams of a polarizing beam-splitter even provides the possibility to perform a postfacto differential transmission correction that improves the accuracy of the spectral line polarimetry. We perform an error analysis to compare the accuracy of spectral line polarimetry to continuum polarimetry, degraded by a residual dark signal and differential transmission, as well as to quantify the impact of the transmission correction. We demonstrate the new techniques with a blue sky polarization measurement around the oxygen A absorption band using the groundSPEX instrument, yielding a polarization in the deepest part of the band of 0.160±0.010, significantly different from the polarization in the continuum of 0.2284±0.0004. The presented methods are applicable to any dual-beam channeled polarimeter, including implementations for snapshot imaging polarimetry.

  19. Revived STIS. II. Properties of Stars in the Next Generation Spectral Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heap, Sara R.; Lindler, D.

    2010-01-01

    Spectroscopic surveys of galaxies at high redshift will bring the rest-frame ultraviolet into view of large, ground-based telescopes. The UV-blue spectral region is rich in diagnostics, but these diagnostics have not yet been calibrated in terms of the properties of the responsible stellar population(s). Such calibrations are now possible with Hubble's Next Generation Spectral Library (NGSL). The NGSL contains UV-optical spectra (0.2 - 1.0 microns) of 374 stars having a wide range in temperature, luminosity, and metallicity. We will describe our work to derive basic stellar parameters from NGSL spectra using modern model spectra and to use these stellar parameters to develop UV-blue spectral diagnostics.

  20. Spectral Energy Distribution Analysis of Luminous Infrared Galaxies from GOALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    U, Vivian; Sanders, D.; Evans, A.; Mazzarella, J.; Armus, L.; Iwasawa, K.; Vavilkin, T.; Surace, J.; Howell, J.; GOALS Team

    2009-05-01

    The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the local luminous and ultraluminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs and ULIRGs) were thought to be well understood and exemplified by that of Arp 220, the "poster child" of these objects; but in fact, Arp 220 has been shown to be special in more than one way. Here we present comprehensive SEDs (from radio through x-ray) for the 88 most luminous (U)LIRGs in the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS), which combines multiwavelength imaging and spectroscopic data from space telescopes (Spitzer, HST, GALEX, and Chandra) in an effort to fully understand galaxy evolution processes and the enhanced infrared emission in the local universe. Spanning the luminosity range 11.4 < log(L_ir/L_sun) < 12.5, our objects are a complete subset of the flux-limited IRAS Revised Bright Galaxy Sample. To complement spacecraft data, we also took optical imaging data from Mauna Kea as well as searched through literature in order to compile accurate and consistent photometry and fully characterize the spectral shapes of the SEDs. We then analyzed the ratios of the radio, infrared, optical, and x-ray emission as a function of infrared luminosity and discussed the trends observed.

  1. The Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Spectral Library Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    Advanced Spectral Library (ASTRAL) is a Hubble Large Treasury Project, whose aim is to collect high-quality ultraviolet (1150-3100 Å) spectra of bright stars, utilizing the echelle modes of powerful Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph; with resolution and signal-to-noise rivaling the best that can be achieved at ground-based observatories in the visible. During HST Cycle 18 (2010-2011), ASTRAL was allocated 146 orbits to record eight representative late-type ("cool") stars, including well-known cosmic denizens like Procyon and Betelgeuse. In Cycle 21 (2013-2014), ASTRAL was awarded an additional 230 orbits to extend the project to the hot side of the H-R diagram: 21 targets covering the O-A spectral types, including household favorites Vega and Sirius. The second part of the program was completed in January 2015. I describe the scientific motivations for observing hot and cool stars in the UV; the unique instrumental characteristics of STIS that enabled a broad survey like ASTRAL; progress in the program to date; and prospects for the future.

  2. Spectral classification and composites of galaxies in LAMOST DR4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Li; Luo, A.-Li; Shen, Shi-Yin; Hou, Wen; Kong, Xiao; Song, Yi-Han; Zhang, Jian-Nan; Wu, Hong; Cao, Zi-Huang; Hou, Yong-Hui; Wang, Yue-Fei; Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Yong-Heng

    2018-02-01

    We study the classification and composite spectra of galaxies in the fourth data release (DR4) of the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fibre Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST). We select 40 182 spectra of galaxies from LAMOST DR4, which have photometric information but no spectroscopic observations in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). These newly observed spectra are recalibrated and classified into six classes - passive, Hα-weak, star-forming, composite, LINER and Seyfert - using the line intensity (Hβ, [O III]λ5007, Hα and [N II]λ6585). We also study the correlation between spectral class and morphological type through three parameters: concentration index, (u - r) colour and D4000n index. We calculate composite spectra of high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) for six spectral classes and, using these composites, we pick out some features that can differentiate the classes effectively, including Hβ, Fe5015, HγA, HK and the Mg2 band. In addition, we compare our composite spectra with the SDSS ones and analyse their differences. A galaxy catalogue of 40 182 newly observed spectra (36 601 targets) and the composite spectra of the six classes are available online.

  3. Spectral Properties of AGN with Very Weak [O III] Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovacevic, J.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The spectral properties of a sample of 58 Active GalacticNuclei (AGN spectra, in which emission [O~III] $lambdalambda$4959, 5007 AA lines are weak or totally absent, are analyzed. In order to investigate thephysical reason for the [O~III] emission suppression, the spectral propertiesof the weak [O~III] spectra sample are compared with the same properties of asample of 269 spectra with the strong [O~III] lines. The spectra are obtainedfrom Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS Database. It is found that the objectswith the weak or absent [O~III] $lambdalambda$4959, 5007 AA linesgenerally have the high continuum luminosities (log($lambda$L$_{5100}$ $>$45, that they are very rare at smaller redshifts ($z <$ 0.3 and that theyusually have strong starburst influence. From the sample with weak or absent[O~III] lines, two boundary subgroups may be distinguished: the subgroup witha strong H$beta$ narrow component and subgroup with a very weak or negligibleH$beta$ narrow component. The physical causes for the [O~III] linessuppressing are probably different in these two subgroups: the [O~III] linesare absent in objects with strong narrow H$beta$ probably because of strongstarburst (SB activity, which produces high density of the gas, while in theobjects with the negligible narrow H$beta$, the reason for [O~III] and narrowH$beta$ suppression may be a low covering factor.

  4. Spectral properties of AGN with very weak [O III] lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovačević J.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The spectral properties of a sample of 58 Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN spectra, in which emission [O III] λλ4959, 5007 Å lines are weak or totally absent, are analyzed. In order to investigate the physical reason for the [O III] emission suppression, the spectral properties of the weak [O III] spectra sample are compared with the same properties of a sample of 269 spectra with the strong [O III] lines. The spectra are obtained from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS Database. It is found that the objects with the weak or absent [O III] λλ4959, 5007 Å lines generally have the high continuum luminosities (log(λL5100 > 45, that they are very rare at smaller redshifts (z < 0.3 and that they usually have strong starburst influence. From the sample with weak or absent [O III] lines, two boundary subgroups may be distinguished: the subgroup with a strong Hβ narrow component and subgroup with a very weak or negligible Hβ narrow component. The physical causes for the [O III] lines suppressing are probably different in these two subgroups: the [O III] lines are absent in objects with strong narrow Hβ probably because of strong starburst (SB activity, which produces high density of the gas, while in the objects with the negligible narrow Hβ, the reason for [O III] and narrow Hβ suppression may be a low covering factor.

  5. The Sturm-Liouville inverse spectral problem with boundary conditions depending on the spectral parameter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelis van der Mee

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the complete version including proofs of the results announced in [van der Mee C., Pivovarchik V.: A Sturm-Liouville spectral problem with boundary conditions depending on the spectral parameter. Funct. Anal. Appl. 36 (2002, 315–317 [Funkts. Anal. Prilozh. 36 (2002, 74–77 (Russian

  6. Metallicity and the spectral energy distribution and spectral types of dwarf O-stars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mokiem, M.R.; Martín-Hernández, N.L.; Lenorzer, A.; de Koter, A.; Tielens, A.G.G.M.

    2004-01-01

    We present a systematic study of the effect of metallicity on the stellar spectral energy distribution (SED) of O main sequence (dwarf) stars, focussing on the hydrogen and helium ionizing continua, and on the optical and near-IR lines used for spectral classification. The spectra are based on

  7. Spectrally Enhanced Lighting Program Implementation for Energy Savings: Field Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, Kelly L.; Sullivan, Gregory P.; Armstrong, Peter R.; Richman, Eric E.; Matzke, Brett D.

    2006-08-22

    This report provides results from an evaluation PNNL conducted of a spectrally enhanced lighting demonstration project. PNNL performed field measurements and occupant surveys at three office buildings in California before and after lighting retrofits were made in August and December 2005. PNNL measured the following Overhead lighting electricity demand and consumption, Light levels in the workspace, Task lighting use, and Occupant ratings of satisfaction with the lighting. Existing lighting, which varied in each building, was replaced with lamps with correlated color temperature (CCT) of 5000 Kelvin, color rendering index (CRI) of 85, of varying wattages, and lower ballast factor electronic ballasts. The demonstrations were designed to decrease lighting power loads in the three buildings by 22-50 percent, depending on the existing installed lamps and ballasts. The project designers hypothesized that this reduction in electrical loads could be achieved by the change to higher CCT lamps without decreasing occupant satisfaction with the lighting.

  8. Spectral image reconstruction using an edge preserving spatio-spectral Wiener estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Philipp; Rosen, Mitchell R; Berns, Roy S

    2009-08-01

    Reconstruction of spectral images from camera responses is investigated using an edge preserving spatio-spectral Wiener estimation. A Wiener denoising filter and a spectral reconstruction Wiener filter are combined into a single spatio-spectral filter using local propagation of the noise covariance matrix. To preserve edges the local mean and covariance matrix of camera responses is estimated by bilateral weighting of neighboring pixels. We derive the edge-preserving spatio-spectral Wiener estimation by means of Bayesian inference and show that it fades into the standard Wiener reflectance estimation shifted by a constant reflectance in case of vanishing noise. Simulation experiments conducted on a six-channel camera system and on multispectral test images show the performance of the filter, especially for edge regions. A test implementation of the method is provided as a MATLAB script at the first author's website.

  9. Spectral resolution measurement technique for Czerny-Turner spectrometers based on spectral interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras Martínez, Ramiro; Garduño Mejía, Jesús; Rosete Aguilar, Martha; Román Moreno, Carlos J.

    2016-08-01

    We propose the design of a new technique for measuring the spectral resolution of a Czerny-Turner Spectrometer based on spectral interferometry of ultrashort laser pulses. It is well known that ultrashort pulse measurement like SPIDER and TADPOLE techniques requires a precise and well characterized spectrum, especially in fringe resolution. We developed a new technique, to our knowledge, in which by measuring the nominal fringe spacing of a spectral interferogram one can characterize the spectral resolution in a Czerny-Turner spectrometer using Ryleigh's criteria. This technique was tested in a commercial Czerny-Turner spectrometer. The results demonstrate a consistent spectral resolution between what was reported by the manufacturer. The actual calibration technique was applied in a homemade broadband astigmatism-free Czerny-Turner spectrometer. Theory and experimental results are presented.

  10. Listening talkers produce great spectral tilt contrasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas Ulrich; Heegård, Jan; Henrichsen, Peter Juel

    It is well known that the envelope of the long-term average speech spectrum flattens with vocal effort. A recent study [1] showed that content words had a flatter spectral envelope than content words at the same overall level for a specific Danish speech material. The present paper investigates...... of colored geometrical shapes taken from DanPASS [2]. The spectral tilt was gauged by calculating the band-level difference in dB between two frequency bands with pass-bands 150 to 803 Hz and 803 to 1358 Hz respectively in 5 ms intervals. This was done separately for intervals containing content words...... and function words and grouped by talker. The spectral tilt difference was then calculated as the average band-level difference for function words minus the average band-level difference for content words. This calculation was grouped per talker. For the monologues these differences ranged between 5 and 8 d...

  11. Spectrally resolved longitudinal spatial coherence inteferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodard, Ethan R.; Kudenov, Michael W.

    2017-05-01

    We present an alternative imaging technique using spectrally resolved longitudinal spatial coherence interferometry to encode a scene's angular information onto the source's power spectrum. Fourier transformation of the spectrally resolved channeled spectrum output yields a measurement of the incident scene's angular spectrum. Theory for the spectrally resolved interferometric technique is detailed, demonstrating analogies to conventional Fourier transform spectroscopy. An experimental proof of concept system and results are presented using an angularly-dependent Fabry-Perot interferometer-based optical design for successful reconstruction of one-dimensional sinusoidal angular spectra. Discussion for a potential future application of the technique, in which polarization information is encoded onto the source's power spectrum is also given.

  12. Multiple spectral splits of supernova neutrinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Basudeb; Dighe, Amol; Raffelt, Georg G; Smirnov, Alexei Yu

    2009-07-31

    Collective oscillations of supernova neutrinos swap the spectra f(nu(e))(E) and f(nu[over ](e))(E) with those of another flavor in certain energy intervals bounded by sharp spectral splits. This phenomenon is far more general than previously appreciated: typically one finds one or more swaps and accompanying splits in the nu and nu[over ] channels for both inverted and normal neutrino mass hierarchies. Depending on an instability condition, swaps develop around spectral crossings (energies where f(nu(e))=f(nu(x)), f(nu[over ](e))=f(nu[over ](x)) as well as E-->infinity where all fluxes vanish), and the widths of swaps are determined by the spectra and fluxes. Washout by multiangle decoherence varies across the spectrum and splits can survive as sharp spectral features.

  13. Survey Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Cleaned and QCd data for the Fishing Effort Survey. Questions on fishing and other out are asked on weather and outdoor activity, including fishing trips. Used for...

  14. Spectral Trends of Titan's Tropical Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Caitlin Ann; Penteado, Paulo F.; Turner, Jake; Montiel, Nicholas; Schoenfeld, Ashley; Lopes, Rosaly M. C.; Soderblom, Laurence A.; Neish, Catherine; Radebaugh, Jani

    2016-10-01

    Titan's surface can be observed most clearly at 8 spectral regions that lie in between the strong methane bands in Titan's spectrum. Within these "windows", between 0.9 to 5 microns, the surface is nonetheless obscured by methane and haze, the latter of which is optically thick at lower wavelengths. Thus studies of Titan's surface must eliminate the effects of atmospheric extinction and extract the subtle spectral features that underlie the dominant spectral trends.To determine the subtle spectral features of Titan's tropical surface (30S--30N) we conducted a Principal Components Analysis (PCA) of the I/F at the 1.1, 1.3, 1.6 and 2.0 um wavelength windows, recorded by Cassini/VIMS. The PCA analysis identifies the spectral trend that defines the highest variance in the data (the principal component), as well as successively weaker orthogonal trends, without a priori assumptions about the surface composition, e.g. as needed in radiative transfer analyses.Our analysis derives the spectral features at the four wavelengths that describe Titan's tropical surface. We detect a large almost contiguous region that extends roughly 160 degrees in longitude and which exhibits absorption features at 1.6 and 2.0, as well as 2.8 um (characteristic of water ice). This vast and perhaps tectonic feature is, in part, associated with terrain that is hypothesized to be some of the oldest surfaces on Titan. In addition, the PCA analysis indicates at least 2 separate organic spectra signatures, potentially due to the separation of liquid and refractory sediments or to their chemically alteration over time. Here we discuss the PCA analysis and compare our derived compositional maps of Titan's surface with Radar maps of the topography and morphology, to entertain questions regarding the geology of Titan's surface the age of its atmosphere.

  15. Beam profile assessment in spectral CT scanners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjomrouz, Marzieh; Shamshad, Muhammad; Panta, Raj K; Broeke, Lieza Vanden; Schleich, Nanette; Atharifard, Ali; Aamir, Raja; Bheesette, Srinidhi; Walsh, Michael F; Goulter, Brian P; Bell, Stephen T; Bateman, Christopher J; Butler, Anthony P H; Butler, Philip H

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we present a method that uses a combination of experimental and modeled data to assess properties of x-ray beam measured using a small-animal spectral scanner. The spatial properties of the beam profile are characterized by beam profile shape, the angular offset along the rotational axis, and the photon count difference between experimental and modeled data at the central beam axis. Temporal stability of the beam profile is assessed by measuring intra- and interscan count variations. The beam profile assessment method was evaluated on several spectral CT scanners equipped with Medipix3RX-based detectors. On a well-calibrated spectral CT scanner, we measured an integral count error of 0.5%, intrascan count variation of 0.1%, and an interscan count variation of less than 1%. The angular offset of the beam center ranged from 0.8° to 1.6° for the studied spectral CT scanners. We also demonstrate the capability of this method to identify poor performance of the system through analyzing the deviation of the experimental beam profile from the model. This technique can, therefore, aid in monitoring the system performance to obtain a robust spectral CT; providing the reliable quantitative images. Furthermore, the accurate offset parameters of a spectral scanner provided by this method allow us to incorporate a more realistic form of the photon distribution in the polychromatic-based image reconstruction models. Both improvements of the reliability of the system and accuracy of the volume reconstruction result in a better discrimination and quantification of the imaged materials. © 2018 MARS Bioimaging Ltd. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  16. Universal fermionic spectral functions from string theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauntlett, Jerome P; Sonner, Julian; Waldram, Daniel

    2011-12-09

    We carry out the first holographic calculation of a fermionic response function for a strongly coupled d=3 system with an explicit D=10 or D=11 supergravity dual. By considering the supersymmetry current, we obtain a universal result applicable to all d=3 N=2 SCFTs with such duals. Surprisingly, the spectral function does not exhibit a Fermi surface, despite the fact that the system is at finite charge density. We show that it has a phonino pole and at low frequencies there is a depletion of spectral weight with a power-law scaling which is governed by a locally quantum critical point.

  17. Glue Film Thickness Measurements by Spectral Reflectance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. R. Marshall

    2010-09-20

    Spectral reflectance was used to determine the thickness of thin glue layers in a study of the effect of the glue on radiance and reflectance measurements of shocked-tin substrates attached to lithium fluoride windows. Measurements based on profilometry of the components were found to be inaccurate due to flatness variations and deformation of the tin substrate under pressure during the gluing process. The accuracy of the spectral reflectance measurements were estimated to be ±0.5 μm, which was sufficient to demonstrate a convincing correlation between glue thickness and shock-generated light.

  18. Glue Film Thickness Measurements by Spectral Reflectance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, B.R.

    2010-01-01

    Spectral reflectance was used to determine the thickness of thin glue layers in a study of the effect of the glue on radiance and reflectance measurements of shocked-tin substrates attached to lithium fluoride windows. Measurements based on profilometry of the components were found to be inaccurate due to flatness variations and deformation of the tin substrate under pressure during the gluing process. The accuracy of the spectral reflectance measurements were estimated to be ±0.5 (micro)m, which was sufficient to demonstrate a convincing correlation between glue thickness and shock-generated light.

  19. Quantum BCH Codes Based on Spectral Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Ying; Zeng Guihua

    2006-01-01

    When the time variable in quantum signal processing is discrete, the Fourier transform exists on the vector space of n-tuples over the Galois field F 2 , which plays an important role in the investigation of quantum signals. By using Fourier transforms, the idea of quantum coding theory can be described in a setting that is much different from that seen that far. Quantum BCH codes can be defined as codes whose quantum states have certain specified consecutive spectral components equal to zero and the error-correcting ability is also described by the number of the consecutive zeros. Moreover, the decoding of quantum codes can be described spectrally with more efficiency.

  20. Spectral methods in numerical plasma simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coutsias, E.A.; Hansen, F.R.; Huld, T.; Knorr, G.; Lynov, J.P.

    1989-01-01

    An introduction is given to the use of spectral methods in numerical plasma simulation. As examples of the use of spectral methods, solutions to the two-dimensional Euler equations in both a simple, doubly periodic region, and on an annulus will be shown. In the first case, the solution is expanded in a two-dimensional Fourier series, while a Chebyshev-Fourier expansion is employed in the second case. A new, efficient algorithm for the solution of Poisson's equation on an annulus is introduced. Problems connected to aliasing and to short wavelength noise generated by gradient steepening are discussed. (orig.)

  1. Spectral Methods in Numerical Plasma Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coutsias, E.A.; Hansen, F.R.; Huld, T.

    1989-01-01

    in a two-dimensional Fourier series, while a Chebyshev-Fourier expansion is employed in the second case. A new, efficient algorithm for the solution of Poisson's equation on an annulus is introduced. Problems connected to aliasing and to short wavelength noise generated by gradient steepening are discussed.......An introduction is given to the use of spectral methods in numerical plasma simulation. As examples of the use of spectral methods, solutions to the two-dimensional Euler equations in both a simple, doubly periodic region, and on an annulus will be shown. In the first case, the solution is expanded...

  2. Bedform characterization through 2D spectral analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lefebvre, Alice; Ernstsen, Verner Brandbyge; Winter, Christian

    2011-01-01

    characteristics using twodimensional (2D) spectral analysis is presented and tested on seabed elevation data from the Knudedyb tidal inlet in the Danish Wadden Sea, where large compound bedforms are found. The bathymetric data were divided into 20x20 m areas on which a 2D spectral analysis was applied. The most...... energetic peak of the 2D spectrum was found and its energy, frequency and direction were calculated. A power-law was fitted to the average of slices taken through the 2D spectrum; its slope and y-intercept were calculated. Using these results the test area was morphologically classified into 4 distinct...

  3. Krein Spectral Triples and the Fermionic Action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dungen, Koen van den

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the space of spinors on a Lorentzian manifold, we define Krein spectral triples, which generalise spectral triples from Hilbert spaces to Krein spaces. This Krein space approach allows for an improved formulation of the fermionic action for almost-commutative manifolds. We show by explicit calculation that this action functional recovers the correct Lagrangians for the cases of electrodynamics, the electro-weak theory, and the Standard Model. The description of these examples does not require a real structure, unless one includes Majorana masses, in which case the internal spaces also exhibit a Krein space structure.

  4. Spectral Analysis of Large Particle Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlbæk, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    is on obtaining a framework which unifies and generalizes frameworks that have appeared previously in the literature. The end result is a calculus for creation/annihilation symbols, where Wick’s theorem provides a formula for the product of finitely many symbols. The framework is then applied to the Fröhlich...... polaron model. The framework is also applied to the spin boson model. The application to the spin boson model is based on the spectral renormalization group. It is shown that the spectral renormalization group scheme can be natu- rally posed as an iterated Grushin problem. While it is already known...

  5. Bordism, stable homotopy and adams spectral sequences

    CERN Document Server

    Kochman, Stanley O

    1996-01-01

    This book is a compilation of lecture notes that were prepared for the graduate course "Adams Spectral Sequences and Stable Homotopy Theory" given at The Fields Institute during the fall of 1995. The aim of this volume is to prepare students with a knowledge of elementary algebraic topology to study recent developments in stable homotopy theory, such as the nilpotence and periodicity theorems. Suitable as a text for an intermediate course in algebraic topology, this book provides a direct exposition of the basic concepts of bordism, characteristic classes, Adams spectral sequences, Brown-Peter

  6. Novel spectral features of nanoelectromechanical systems

    KAUST Repository

    Tahir, M.

    2014-02-17

    Electron transport through a quantum dot or single molecule coupled to a quantum oscillator is studied by the Keldysh nonequilibrium Green\\'s function formalism to obtain insight into the quantum dynamics of the electronic and oscillator degrees of freedom. We tune the electronic level of the quantum dot by a gate voltage, where the leads are kept at zero temperature. Due to the nonequilibrium distribution of the electrons in the quantum dot, the spectral function becomes a function of the gate voltage. Novel spectral features are identified for the ground and excited states of nanomechanical oscillators that can be used to enhance the measurement sensitivity.

  7. Planck 2013 results. IX. HFI spectral response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Planck Collaboration,; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.

    2013-01-01

    -of-band signal rejection) of all HFI detectors to a known source of electromagnetic radiation individually. This was determined by measuring the output of all detection channels for radiation propagated through a continuously scanned polarizing Fourier transform spectrometer. As there is no on-board spectrometer......, this paper focuses on the analysis of the pre-flight spectral response measurements and the derivation of data products, e.g. band-average spectra, unit conversion coefficients, and colour correction coefficients, all with related uncertainties. Verifications of the HFI spectral response data are provided...

  8. Reducing the spectral index in supernatural inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, C.-M.; Cheung, Kingman

    2009-01-01

    Supernatural inflation is an attractive model based on just a flat direction with soft supersymmetry breaking mass terms in the framework of supersymmetry. The beauty of the model is that it needs no fine-tuning. However, the prediction of the spectral index is n s > or approx. 1, in contrast to experimental data. In this paper, we discuss supernatural inflation with the spectral index reduced to n s =0.96 without any fine-tuning, considering the general feature that a flat direction is lifted by a nonrenormalizable term with an A-term.

  9. Reducing the spectral index in supernatural inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Min; Cheung, Kingman

    2009-04-01

    Supernatural inflation is an attractive model based on just a flat direction with soft supersymmetry breaking mass terms in the framework of supersymmetry. The beauty of the model is that it needs no fine-tuning. However, the prediction of the spectral index is ns≳1, in contrast to experimental data. In this paper, we discuss supernatural inflation with the spectral index reduced to ns=0.96 without any fine-tuning, considering the general feature that a flat direction is lifted by a nonrenormalizable term with an A-term.

  10. Spectrally-Temporally Adapted Spectrally Modulated Spectrally Encoded (SMSE) Waveform Design for Coexistent CR-Based SDR Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Only and Spectrally-Temporally adapted SMSE signals at var - ious levels channel estimate MSE. Results based on a maximum BER constraint of PB = 10 −2...57. Tian, Z. and G. B. Giannakis. “A Wavelet Approach to Wideband Spectrum Sensing for Cognitive Radios”. Proceedings of the 1st International

  11. Multi-spectral optical scanners for commercial earth observation missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröter, Karin; Engel, Wolfgang; Berndt, Klaus

    2017-11-01

    In recent years, a number of commercial Earth observation missions have been initiated with the aim to gather data in the visible and near-infrared wavelength range. Some of these missions aim at medium resolution (5 to 10 m) multi-spectral imaging with the special background of daily revisiting. Typical applications aim at monitoring of farming area for growth control and harvest prediction, irrigation control, or disaster monitoring such as hail damage in farming, or flood survey. In order to arrive at profitable business plans for such missions, it is mandatory to establish the space segment, i.e. the spacecraft with their opto -electronic payloads, at minimum cost while guaranteeing maximum reliability for mission success. As multiple spacecraft are required for daily revisiting, the solutions are typically based on micro-satellites. This paper presents designs for multi-spectral opto-electric scanners for this type of missions. These designs are drive n by minimum mass and power budgets of microsatellites, and the need for minimum cost. As a consequence, it is mandatory to arrive at thermally robust, compact telescope designs. The paper gives a comparison between refractive, catadioptric, and TMA optics. For mirror designs, aluminium and Zerodur mirror technologies are briefly discussed. State-of-the art focal plane designs are presented. The paper also addresses the choice of detector technologies such as CCDs and CMOS Active Pixel Sensors. The electronics of the multi-spectral scanners represent the main design driver regarding power consumption, reliability, and (most often) cost. It can be subdivided into the detector drive electronics, analog and digital data processing chains, the data mass memory unit, formatting and down - linking units, payload control electronics, and local power supply. The paper gives overviews and trade-offs between data compression strategies and electronics solutions, mass memory unit designs, and data formatting approaches

  12. XMMFITCAT-Z: The enhanced XMM-Newton spectral-fit database by the inclusion of photometric redshifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral, A.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Mountrichas, G.; Ruiz, A.; Carrera, F.; Fotopoulou, S.; Watson, M.; Rosen, S.; Webb, N.

    2017-10-01

    I will present XMMFITCAT-Z, an unique tool for the astronomical community to construct large and representative samples of X-ray sources by selecting them according to their spectral properties. XMMFITCAT-Z is an enhanced version of XMMFITCAT, the XMM-Newton spectral-fit database, which contains automated spectral-fitting results for the X-ray sources within the XMM-Newton serendipitous source catalogue for which spectral data were pipe-line extracted, ˜ 120,000 source detetections corresponding to ˜ 80,000 unique sources. XMMFITCAT-Z is aimed to the derivation of photometric redshifts and redshift-dependent spectral fits by using up to 10 photometric points, from the optical to the mid-infrared, and machine learnig techniques. We have already made use of the photometric data from the SDSS, UKIDSS, 2MASS and WISE surveys to evaluate the reliability of our photometric redshifts, and we are currently implementing the recently released data from the Pan-STARRS survey to further increase the number of X-ray sources with optical counterparts. The final database will contain photometric redshifts for more than 40,000 extragalactic X-ray sources, and redshift-dependent spectral fits for those with extracted spectra.

  13. Location of Bare Soil Surface and Soil Line on the RED-NIR Spectral Plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koroleva, P. V.; Rukhovich, D. I.; Rukhovich, A. D.; Rukhovich, D. D.; Kulyanitsa, A. L.; Trubnikov, A. V.; Kalinina, N. V.; Simakova, M. S.

    2017-12-01

    Soil as a separate natural body occupies certain area with its own set of spectral characteristics within the RED-NIR spectral space. This is an ellipse-shaped area, and its semi-major axis is the soil line for a satellite image. The spectral area for a bare soil surface is neighboring to the areas of black carbon, straw, vegetating plants, and missing RED-NIR values. A reliable separation of the bare soil surface within the spectral space is possible with the technology of spectral neighborhood of soil line. The accuracy of this method is 90%. The determination of the bare soil surface using vegetation indices, both relative (NDVI), and perpendicular (PVI), is incorrect; the accuracy of these methods does not exceed 65%, and for most of the survey seasons it may be lower than 50%. The flat part of the "tasseled cap" described as the soil line, is not a synonym for the area of the bare soil surface. The bare soil surface on the RED-NIR plots occupies significantly smaller areas than the area of soil line according to Kauth and Thomas.

  14. Design of a Novel Spectral Albedometer for Validating the MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Spectral Albedo Product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongmin Zhou

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Land surface shortwave broadband albedo is a key parameter in general circulation models and surface energy budget models. Multispectral satellite data are typically used to generate broadband albedo products in a three-step process: atmospheric correction, for converting the top-of-atmosphere observations to surface directional reflectance; angular modeling, for converting the surface directional reflectance to spectral albedo of each individual band; and finally, narrowband-to-broadband conversion, for transforming the spectral albedos to broadband albedos. Spectroradiometers can be used for validating surface directional reflectance products and pyranometers or broadband albedometers, for validating broadband albedo products, but spectral albedo products are rarely validated using ground measurements. In this study, we designed a new type of albedometer that can measure spectral albedos. It consists of multiple interference filters and a silicon detector, for measuring irradiance from 400–1100 nm. The linearity of the sensors is 99%, and the designed albedometer exhibits consistency up to 0.993, with a widely-used commercial instrument. A field experiment for measuring spectral albedo of grassland using this new albedometer was conducted in Yudaokou, China and the measurements are used for validating the MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS spectral albedos. The results show that the biases of the MODIS spectral albedos of the first four bands are −0.0094, 0.0065, 0.0159, and −0.0001, respectively. This new instrument provides an effective technique for validating spectral albedos of any satellite sensor in this spectral range, which is critical for improving satellite broadband albedo products.

  15. Spectral evolution of gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, D.; Matteson, J.; Ford, L.; Schaefer, B.; Teegarden, B.; Cline, T.; Paciesas, W.; Pendleton, G.; Fishman, G.; Meegan, C.

    1992-01-01

    BATSE's Spectral Detectors provide a series of high resolution spectra over the duration of a gamma-ray burst; fits to these spectra show the evolution of the continuum as the burst progresses. The burst continuum can usually be fit by the spectral form AE sup alpha exp(-E/kT) from around 25 keV to more than 3 MeV, with varying trends in the value and evolution of the spectral parameters. As a result of limited statistics for E greater than 1 - 2 MeV in the individual spectra, a high energy power law is not required. Only long duration strong bursts can be studied by fitting a series of spectra, and therefore our conclusions concern only this class of burst. The bursts we analyzed tend to be characterized by a hard-to-soft trend both for individual intensity spikes and for the burst as a whole: the hardness leads the count rate in spectra which resolve the temporal variations, while the hardness of successive spikes decreases. We also summarize the performance of the Spectral Detectors and the development of analysis tools to date.

  16. On Spectral Triples in Quantum Gravity I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aastrup, Johannes; M. Grimstrup, Jesper; Nest, Ryszard

    2009-01-01

    This paper establishes a link between Noncommutative Geometry and canonical quantum gravity. A semi-finite spectral triple over a space of connections is presented. The triple involves an algebra of holonomy loops and a Dirac type operator which resembles a global functional derivation operator. ...

  17. Holonomy loops, spectral triples and quantum gravity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannes, Aastrup; Grimstrup, Jesper Møller; Nest, Ryszard

    2009-01-01

    We review the motivation, construction and physical interpretation of a semi-finite spectral triple obtained through a rearrangement of central elements of loop quantum gravity. The triple is based on a countable set of oriented graphs and the algebra consists of generalized holonomy loops...

  18. Spectral triples and the geometry of fractals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Erik; Ivan, Cristina; Schroe, Elmar

    2012-01-01

    It is shown that one can construct a spectral triple for the Sierpinski gasket such that it represents any given K-homology class, On the other hand if the geodesic distance and the dimension has to be part of the data from the triple, there are certain restriction....

  19. Spectral analysis for differential operators with singularities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vjacheslav Anatoljevich Yurko

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonselfadjoint boundary value problems for second-order differential equations on a finite interval with nonintegrable singularities inside the interval are considered under additional sewing conditions for solutions at the singular point. We study properties of the spectrum, prove the completeness of eigen- and associated functions, and investigate the inverse problem of recovering the boundary value problem from its spectral characteristics.

  20. Synthesis, spectral characterization and in vitro antibacterial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Shafqat Nadeem

    2015-12-17

    Dec 17, 2015 ... Petra/Osiris/Molinspiration analysis. Abstract The paper emphasizes on the synthesis of Palladium(II) iodide complexes containing based ligands. The new compounds .... The spectral conditions were as follows: 32 K data points,. 1.822 s acquisition time, 2.00 s pulse delay and 6.00 ls pulse width. The 13C ...

  1. Prediction formula for the spectral wave period

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofland, B.; Chen, X.; Altomare, Corrado; Oosterlo, P.

    2017-01-01

    During the last decades, the spectral wave period Tm-1,0 has become accepted as a characteristic wave period when describing the hydraulic attack on coastal structures, especially over shallow foreshores. In this study, we derive an empirical prediction formula for

  2. Low-Cost Spectral Sensor Development Description.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armijo, Kenneth Miguel; Yellowhair, Julius

    2014-11-01

    Solar spectral data for all parts of the US is limited due in part to the high cost of commercial spectrometers. Solar spectral information is necessary for accurate photovoltaic (PV) performance forecasting, especially for large utility-scale PV installations. A low-cost solar spectral sensor would address the obstacles and needs. In this report, a novel low-cost, discrete- band sensor device, comprised of five narrow-band sensors, is described. The hardware is comprised of commercial-off-the-shelf components to keep the cost low. Data processing algorithms were developed and are being refined for robustness. PV module short-circuit current ( I sc ) prediction methods were developed based on interaction-terms regression methodology and spectrum reconstruction methodology for computing I sc . The results suggest the computed spectrum using the reconstruction method agreed well with the measured spectrum from the wide-band spectrometer (RMS error of 38.2 W/m 2 -nm). Further analysis of computed I sc found a close correspondence of 0.05 A RMS error. The goal is for ubiquitous adoption of the low-cost spectral sensor in solar PV and other applications such as weather forecasting.

  3. Spectral Radius and Hamiltonicity of Graphs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fiedler, Miroslav; Nikiforov, V.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 432, č. 9 (2010), s. 2170-2173 ISSN 0024-3795 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : Hamiltonian cycle * Hamiltonian path * spectral radius Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.005, year: 2010

  4. Sparsity and spectral properties of dual frames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krahmer, Felix; Kutyniok, Gitta; Lemvig, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    We study sparsity and spectral properties of dual frames of a given finite frame. We show that any finite frame has a dual with no more than $n^2$ non-vanishing entries, where $n$ denotes the ambient dimension, and that for most frames no sparser dual is possible. Moreover, we derive an expressio...

  5. SYNTHESIS, SPECTRAL AND THERMAL PROPERTIES OF SOME ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The infrared spectral studies reveal that the ligand HNAAPTS is coordinated in neutral tridentate (N,N,S) fashion. The coordination number of Th(IV) in these coordination compounds varies from 6, 8, 10 or 11; while for U(VI) the coordination number are 8, 9 or 10. Thermal stabilities of these complexes were investigated ...

  6. Spectral Gaps in Graphene Antidot Lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barbaroux, Jean-Marie; Cornean, Decebal Horia; Stockmeyer, Edgardo

    2017-01-01

    We consider the gap creation problem in an antidot graphene lattice, i.e. a sheet of graphene with periodically distributed obstacles. We prove several spectral results concerning the size of the gap and its dependence on different natural parameters related to the antidot lattice....

  7. Some spectral equivalences between Schroedinger operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunning, C; Hibberd, K E; Links, J

    2008-01-01

    Spectral equivalences of the quasi-exactly solvable sectors of two classes of Schroedinger operators are established, using Gaudin-type Bethe ansatz equations. In some instances the results can be extended leading to full isospectrality. In this manner we obtain equivalences between PT-symmetric problems and Hermitian problems. We also find equivalences between some classes of Hermitian operators

  8. The 3XMM spectral fit database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgantopoulos, I.; Corral, A.; Watson, M.; Carrera, F.; Webb, N.; Rosen, S.

    2016-06-01

    I will present the XMMFITCAT database which is a spectral fit inventory of the sources in the 3XMM catalogue. Spectra are available by the XMM/SSC for all 3XMM sources which have more than 50 background subtracted counts per module. This work is funded in the framework of the ESA Prodex project. The 3XMM catalog currently covers 877 sq. degrees and contains about 400,000 unique sources. Spectra are available for over 120,000 sources. Spectral fist have been performed with various spectral models. The results are available in the web page http://xraygroup.astro.noa.gr/ and also at the University of Leicester LEDAS database webpage ledas-www.star.le.ac.uk/. The database description as well as some science results in the joint area with SDSS are presented in two recent papers: Corral et al. 2015, A&A, 576, 61 and Corral et al. 2014, A&A, 569, 71. At least for extragalactic sources, the spectral fits will acquire added value when photometric redshifts become available. In the framework of a new Prodex project we have been funded to derive photometric redshifts for the 3XMM sources using machine learning techniques. I will present the techniques as well as the optical near-IR databases that will be used.

  9. Spectral methods applied to Ising models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeFacio, B.; Hammer, C.L.; Shrauner, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    Several applications of Ising models are reviewed. A 2-d Ising model is studied, and the problem of describing an interface boundary in a 2-d Ising model is addressed. Spectral methods are used to formulate a soluble model for the surface tension of a many-Fermion system

  10. Fingerprint Verification Using Spectral Minutiae Representations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, H.; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.; Bazen, A.M.; Kevenaar, Tom A.M.; Akkermans, Ton A.H.M.; Gökberk, B.

    2009-01-01

    Most fingerprint recognition systems are based on the use of a minutiae set, which is an unordered collection of minutiae locations and orientations suffering from various deformations such as translation, rotation, and scaling. The spectral minutiae representation introduced in this paper is a

  11. Power Spectral Density Conversions and Nonlinear Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Rassaian

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available To predict the vibration environment of a payload carried by a ground or air transporter, mathematical models are required from which a transfer function to a prescribed input can be calculated. For sensitive payloads these models typically include linear shock isolation system stiffness and damping elements relying on the assumption that the isolation system has a predetermined characteristic frequency and damping ratio independent of excitation magnitude. In order to achieve a practical spectral analysis method, the nonlinear system has to be linearized when the input transportation and handling vibration environment is in the form of an acceleration power spectral density. Test data from commercial isolators show that when nonlinear stiffness and damping effects exist the level of vibration input causes a variation in isolator resonant frequency. This phenomenon, described by the stationary response of the Duffing oscillator to narrow-band Gaussian random excitation, requires an alternative approach for calculation of power spectral density acceleration response at a shock isolated payload under random vibration. This article details the development of a plausible alternative approach for analyzing the spectral response of a nonlinear system subject to random Gaussian excitations.

  12. ICRAF-ISRIC Soil VNIR Spectral Library

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batjes, N.H.

    2014-01-01

    The ICRAF-ISRIC Soil VNIR Spectral Library contains visible near infrared spectra of 4,438 soils selected from the Soil Information System (ISIS) of the International Soil Reference and Information Centre (ISRIC). The samples consist of all physically archived samples at ISRIC in 2004 for which soil

  13. Electrophysiological measurements of spectral sensitivities: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.D. DeVoe

    1997-02-01

    Full Text Available Spectral sensitivities of visual systems are specified as the reciprocals of the intensities of light (quantum fluxes needed at each wavelength to elicit the same criterion amplitude of responses. This review primarily considers the methods that have been developed for electrophysiological determinations of criterion amplitudes of slow-wave responses from single retinal cells. Traditional flash methods can require tedious dark adaptations and may yield erroneous spectral sensitivity curves which are not seen in such modifications as ramp methods. Linear response methods involve interferometry, while constant response methods involve manual or automatic adjustments of continuous illumination to keep response amplitudes constant during spectral scans. In DC or AC computerized constant response methods, feedback to determine intensities at each wavelength is derived from the response amplitudes themselves. Although all but traditional flash methods have greater or lesser abilities to provide on-line determinations of spectral sensitivities, computerized constant response methods are the most satisfactory due to flexibility, speed and maintenance of a constant adaptation level

  14. Women's preferences of dynamic spectral imaging colposcopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louwers, J.A.; Zaal, Afra; Kocken, M.; Papagiannakis, E.; Meijer, C.J.; Verheijen, RHM

    2015-01-01

    Background: The focus of testing the dynamic spectral imaging (DSI) colposcope has been on the technical characteristics and clinical performance. However, aspects from a patient’s perspective are just as important. Methods: This study was designed as a substudy of the DSI validation study, a

  15. Synthesis, spectral, thermal, optical dispersion and dielectric ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 39; Issue 1. Synthesis, spectral, thermal, optical dispersion and dielectric properties of nanocrystalline dimer complex (PEPyr–diCd) thin films as novel organic semiconductor. Ahmed Farouk Al-Hossainy. Volume 39 Issue 1 February 2016 pp 209-222 ...

  16. Testing a missing spectral link in turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kellay, H.; Tran, Tuan; Goldburg, W.; Goldenfeld, N.; Gioia, G.; Chakraborty, P.

    2012-01-01

    Although the cardinal attribute of turbulence is the velocity fluctuations, these fluctuations have been ignored in theories of the frictional drag of turbulent flows. Our goal is to test a new theory that links the frictional drag to the spectral exponent , a property of the velocity fluctuations

  17. Fast Fourier Transform Spectral Analysis Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, J. A., Jr.; Graves, M. L.; Hovey, N. M.

    1969-01-01

    Fast Fourier Transform Spectral Analysis Program is used in frequency spectrum analysis of postflight, space vehicle telemetered trajectory data. This computer program with a digital algorithm can calculate power spectrum rms amplitudes and cross spectrum of sampled parameters at even time increments.

  18. TP89 - SIRZ Decomposition Spectral Estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seetho, Isacc M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Azevedo, Steve [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Smith, Jerel [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brown, William D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Martz, Jr., Harry E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-12-08

    The primary objective of this test plan is to provide X-ray CT measurements of known materials for the purposes of generating and testing MicroCT and EDS spectral estimates. These estimates are to be used in subsequent Ze/RhoE decomposition analyses of acquired data.

  19. Aspiring to Spectral Ignorance in Earth Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, S. A.

    2016-12-01

    Enabling robust, defensible and integrated decision making in the Era of Big Earth Data requires the fusion of data from multiple and diverse sensor platforms and networks. While the application of standardised global grid systems provides a common spatial analytics framework that facilitates the computationally efficient and statistically valid integration and analysis of these various data sources across multiple scales, there remains the challenge of sensor equivalency; particularly when combining data from different earth observation satellite sensors (e.g. combining Landsat and Sentinel-2 observations). To realise the vision of a sensor ignorant analytics platform for earth observation we require automation of spectral matching across the available sensors. Ultimately, the aim is to remove the requirement for the user to possess any sensor knowledge in order to undertake analysis. This paper introduces the concept of spectral equivalence and proposes a methodology through which equivalent bands may be sourced from a set of potential target sensors through application of equivalence metrics and thresholds. A number of parameters can be used to determine whether a pair of spectra are equivalent for the purposes of analysis. A baseline set of thresholds for these parameters and how to apply them systematically to enable relation of spectral bands amongst numerous different sensors is proposed. The base unit for comparison in this work is the relative spectral response. From this input, determination of a what may constitute equivalence can be related by a user, based on their own conceptualisation of equivalence.

  20. Spectral Compressive Sensing with Polar Interpolation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fyhn, Karsten; Dadkhahi, Hamid; F. Duarte, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Existing approaches to compressive sensing of frequency-sparse signals focuses on signal recovery rather than spectral estimation. Furthermore, the recovery performance is limited by the coherence of the required sparsity dictionaries and by the discretization of the frequency parameter space...

  1. Spectral solution of the inverse Mie problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanov, Andrey V.; Konokhova, Anastasiya I.; Yastrebova, Ekaterina S.; Gilev, Konstantin V.; Strokotov, Dmitry I.; Chernyshev, Andrei V.; Maltsev, Valeri P.; Yurkin, Maxim A.

    2017-10-01

    We developed a fast method to determine size and refractive index of homogeneous spheres from the power Fourier spectrum of their light-scattering patterns (LSPs), measured with the scanning flow cytometer. Specifically, we used two spectral parameters: the location of the non-zero peak and zero-frequency amplitude, and numerically inverted the map from the space of particle characteristics (size and refractive index) to the space of spectral parameters. The latter parameters can be reliably resolved only for particle size parameter greater than 11, and the inversion is unique only in the limited range of refractive index with upper limit between 1.1 and 1.25 (relative to the medium) depending on the size parameter and particular definition of uniqueness. The developed method was tested on two experimental samples, milk fat globules and spherized red blood cells, and resulted in accuracy not worse than the reference method based on the least-square fit of the LSP with the Mie theory. Moreover, for particles with significant deviation from the spherical shape the spectral method was much closer to the Mie-fit result than the estimated uncertainty of the latter. The spectral method also showed adequate results for synthetic LSPs of spheroids with aspect ratios up to 1.4. Overall, we present a general framework, which can be used to construct an inverse algorithm for any other experimental signals.

  2. Synthesis and Spectral Characterization of Some New ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NJD

    O=P and N-H....O=C hydrogen bonds in1aand4b, respectively. In all the synthesized molecules, similar spectral patterns were obtained in the 13C NMR spectra for carbon atoms of cyclic amines with 2JPNC = 0 and 3JPNC ranging from 4 to 6 Hz. KEYWORDS. Carbacylamidophosphates, hydrogen bonds, IR spectroscopy, ...

  3. Improvement of electrophoresis performance by spectral analysis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper describes a new design of standard agarose gel electrophoresis procedure for nucleic acids analysis. The electrophoresis was improved by using the real-time spectral analysis of the samples to increase its performance. A laser beam illuminated the analysed sample at wavelength with the highest absorption of ...

  4. Spectral Representations of Fingerprint Minutiae Subsets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, H.; Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.

    2009-01-01

    The investigation of the privacy protection of biometric templates gains more and more attention. The spectral minutiae representation is a novel method to represent a minutiae set as a fixed-length feature vector, which is invariant to translation, and in which rotation and scaling become

  5. Retrieval of spheroid particle size distribution from spectral extinction data in the independent mode using PCA approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Hong; Lin, Jian-Zhong

    2013-01-01

    An improved anomalous diffraction approximation (ADA) method is presented for calculating the extinction efficiency of spheroids firstly. In this approach, the extinction efficiency of spheroid particles can be calculated with good accuracy and high efficiency in a wider size range by combining the Latimer method and the ADA theory, and this method can present a more general expression for calculating the extinction efficiency of spheroid particles with various complex refractive indices and aspect ratios. Meanwhile, the visible spectral extinction with varied spheroid particle size distributions and complex refractive indices is surveyed. Furthermore, a selection principle about the spectral extinction data is developed based on PCA (principle component analysis) of first derivative spectral extinction. By calculating the contribution rate of first derivative spectral extinction, the spectral extinction with more significant features can be selected as the input data, and those with less features is removed from the inversion data. In addition, we propose an improved Tikhonov iteration method to retrieve the spheroid particle size distributions in the independent mode. Simulation experiments indicate that the spheroid particle size distributions obtained with the proposed method coincide fairly well with the given distributions, and this inversion method provides a simple, reliable and efficient method to retrieve the spheroid particle size distributions from the spectral extinction data. -- Highlights: ► Improved ADA is presented for calculating the extinction efficiency of spheroids. ► Selection principle about spectral extinction data is developed based on PCA. ► Improved Tikhonov iteration method is proposed to retrieve the spheroid PSD.

  6. Panchromatic spectral energy distributions of Herschel sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berta, S.; Lutz, D.; Santini, P.; Wuyts, S.; Rosario, D.; Brisbin, D.; Cooray, A.; Franceschini, A.; Gruppioni, C.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Hwang, H. S.; Le Floc'h, E.; Magnelli, B.; Nordon, R.; Oliver, S.; Page, M. J.; Popesso, P.; Pozzetti, L.; Pozzi, F.; Riguccini, L.; Rodighiero, G.; Roseboom, I.; Scott, D.; Symeonidis, M.; Valtchanov, I.; Viero, M.; Wang, L.

    2013-03-01

    Combining far-infrared Herschel photometry from the PACS Evolutionary Probe (PEP) and Herschel Multi-tiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES) guaranteed time programs with ancillary datasets in the GOODS-N, GOODS-S, and COSMOS fields, it is possible to sample the 8-500 μm spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of galaxies with at least 7-10 bands. Extending to the UV, optical, and near-infrared, the number of bands increases up to 43. We reproduce the distribution of galaxies in a carefully selected restframe ten colors space, based on this rich data-set, using a superposition of multivariate Gaussian modes. We use this model to classify galaxies and build median SEDs of each class, which are then fitted with a modified version of the magphys code that combines stellar light, emission from dust heated by stars and a possible warm dust contribution heated by an active galactic nucleus (AGN). The color distribution of galaxies in each of the considered fields can be well described with the combination of 6-9 classes, spanning a large range of far- to near-infrared luminosity ratios, as well as different strength of the AGN contribution to bolometric luminosities. The defined Gaussian grouping is used to identify rare or odd sources. The zoology of outliers includes Herschel-detected ellipticals, very blue z ~ 1 Ly-break galaxies, quiescent spirals, and torus-dominated AGN with star formation. Out of these groups and outliers, a new template library is assembled, consisting of 32 SEDs describing the intrinsic scatter in the restframe UV-to-submm colors of infrared galaxies. This library is tested against L(IR) estimates with and without Herschel data included, and compared to eightother popular methods often adopted in the literature. When implementing Herschel photometry, these approaches produce L(IR) values consistent with each other within a median absolute deviation of 10-20%, the scatter being dominated more by fine tuning of the codes, rather than by the choice of

  7. SpecViz: Interactive Spectral Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earl, Nicholas Michael; STScI

    2016-06-01

    The astronomical community is about to enter a new generation of scientific enterprise. With next-generation instrumentation and advanced capabilities, the need has arisen to equip astronomers with the necessary tools to deal with large, multi-faceted data. The Space Telescope Science Institute has initiated a data analysis forum for the creation, development, and maintenance of software tools for the interpretation of these new data sets. SpecViz is a spectral 1-D interactive visualization and analysis application built with Python in an open source development environment. A user-friendly GUI allows for a fast, interactive approach to spectral analysis. SpecViz supports handling of unique and instrument-specific data, incorporation of advanced spectral unit handling and conversions in a flexible, high-performance interactive plotting environment. Active spectral feature analysis is possible through interactive measurement and statistical tools. It can be used to build wide-band SEDs, with the capability of combining or overplotting data products from various instruments. SpecViz sports advanced toolsets for filtering and detrending spectral lines; identifying, isolating, and manipulating spectral features; as well as utilizing spectral templates for renormalizing data in an interactive way. SpecViz also includes a flexible model fitting toolset that allows for multi-component models, as well as custom models, to be used with various fitting and decomposition routines. SpecViz also features robust extension via custom data loaders and connection to the central communication system underneath the interface for more advanced control. Incorporation with Jupyter notebooks via connection with the active iPython kernel allows for SpecViz to be used in addition to a user’s normal workflow without demanding the user drastically alter their method of data analysis. In addition, SpecViz allows the interactive analysis of multi-object spectroscopy in the same straight

  8. The spectral irradiance traceability chain at PTB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sperfeld, P.; Pape, S.; Nevas, S.

    2013-01-01

    Spectral irradiance is a fundamental radiometric unit. Its application to measurement results requires qualified traceability to basic units of the international system of units (Système international d’unités, SI). The Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) is amongst other national metrological institutes (NMIs) responsible for the realization, maintenance and dissemination of various radiometric and photometric units based on and traceable to national standards. The unit of spectral irradiance is realized and represented by a blackbody-radiator as the national primary standard of the PTB. Based on Planck’s radiation law, the irradiance is calculated and realized for any wavelength taking into account the exact knowledge of the radiation temperature and the geometrical parameters. Using a double-monochromator-based spectroradiometer system, secondary standard lamps can be calibrated by direct comparison to the blackbody-radiator (substitution method). These secondary standard lamps are then used at the PTB to calibrate standard lamps of customers. The customers themselves use these so-called transfer standards to calibrate their working standard lamps. These working standards are then used to calibrate own spectroradiometers or sources. This rather complex calibration chain is a common procedural method that for the customers generally leads to satisfying measurement results on site. Nevertheless, the standard lamps in use have to fulfill highest requirements concerning stability and reproducibility. Only this allows achieving comparably low transfer measurement uncertainties, which occur at each calibration step. Thus, the PTB is constantly investigating the improvement and further development of transfer standards and measurement methods for various spectral regions. The realization and dissemination of the spectral irradiance using the blackbody-radiator at the PTB is accomplished with worldwide approved minimized measurement uncertainties confirmed

  9. The Open Spectral Database: an open platform for sharing and searching spectral data

    OpenAIRE

    Chalk, Stuart J.

    2016-01-01

    Background A number of websites make available spectral data for download (typically as JCAMP-DX text files) and one (ChemSpider) that also allows users to contribute spectral files. As a result, searching and retrieving such spectral data can be time consuming, and difficult to reuse if the data is compressed in the JCAMP-DX file. What is needed is a single resource that allows submission of JCAMP-DX files, export of the raw data in multiple formats, searching based on multiple chemical iden...

  10. Engineering surveying

    CERN Document Server

    Schofield, W

    2007-01-01

    Engineering surveying involves determining the position of natural and man-made features on or beneath the Earth's surface and utilizing these features in the planning, design and construction of works. It is a critical part of any engineering project. Without an accurate understanding of the size, shape and nature of the site the project risks expensive and time-consuming errors or even catastrophic failure.Engineering Surveying 6th edition covers all the basic principles and practice of this complex subject and the authors bring expertise and clarity. Previous editions of this classic text have given readers a clear understanding of fundamentals such as vertical control, distance, angles and position right through to the most modern technologies, and this fully updated edition continues that tradition.This sixth edition includes:* An introduction to geodesy to facilitate greater understanding of satellite systems* A fully updated chapter on GPS, GLONASS and GALILEO for satellite positioning in surveying* Al...

  11. The UV Survey Mission Concept, CETUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heap, Sara; and the CETUS Team

    2018-01-01

    In March 2017, NASA selected CETUS for study of a Probe-class mission concept. W. Danchi is the CETUS PI, and S. Heap is the Science PI. CETUS is primarily a UV survey telescope to complement survey telescopes of the 2020’s including E-ROSITA, Subaru Hyper Suprime Cam and Prime-Focus Spectrograph, WFIRST, and the Square Kilometer Array. CETUS comprises a 1.5-m wide-field telescope and three science instruments: a wide-field (1045” on a side) far-UV and near-UV camera; a similarly wide-field near-UV multi-object spectrograph utilizing a next-generation micro-shutter array; and a single-object spectrograph with options of spectral region (far-UV or near-UV) and spectral resolving power (2,000 or 40,000). The survey instruments will operate simultaneously thereby producing wide-field images in the near-UV and far-UV and a spectrogram containing near-UV spectra of up to 100 sources free of spectral overlap and astronomical background. ln concert with other survey telescopes, CETUS will focus on understanding galaxy evolution at cosmic noon (z~1-2).

  12. Digital staining for histopathology multispectral images by the combined application of spectral enhancement and spectral transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bautista, Pinky A; Yagi, Yukako

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we introduced a digital staining method for histopathology images captured with an n-band multispectral camera. The method consisted of two major processes: enhancement of the original spectral transmittance and the transformation of the enhanced transmittance to its target spectral configuration. Enhancement is accomplished by shifting the original transmittance with the scaled difference between the original transmittance and the transmittance estimated with m dominant principal component (PC) vectors;the m-PC vectors were determined from the transmittance samples of the background image. Transformation of the enhanced transmittance to the target spectral configuration was done using an nxn transformation matrix, which was derived by applying a least square method to the enhanced and target spectral training data samples of the different tissue components. Experimental results on the digital conversion of a hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained multispectral image to its Masson's trichrome stained (MT) equivalent shows the viability of the method.

  13. KK -theory and spectral flow in von Neumann algebras

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaad, Jens; Nest, Ryszard; Rennie, Adam

    2012-01-01

    We present a definition of spectral flow for any norm closed ideal J in any von Neumann algebra N. Given a path of selfadjoint operators in N which are invertible in N/J, the spectral flow produces a class in Ko (J). Given a semifinite spectral triple (A, H, D) relative to (N, t) with A separable......, we construct a class [D] ¿ KK1 (A, K(N)). For a unitary u ¿ A, the von Neumann spectral flow between D and u*Du is equal to the Kasparov product [u] A[D], and is simply related to the numerical spectral flow, and a refined C* -spectral flow....

  14. Optimization design of spectral discriminator for high-spectral-resolution lidar based on error analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Huige; Zhang, Zhanfei; Hua, Hangbo; Zhang, Jiaqi; Hua, Dengxin; Wang, Yufeng; He, Tingyao

    2017-03-06

    Accurate aerosol optical properties could be obtained via the high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) technique, which employs a narrow spectral filter to suppress the Rayleigh or Mie scattering in lidar return signals. The ability of the filter to suppress Rayleigh or Mie scattering is critical for HSRL. Meanwhile, it is impossible to increase the rejection of the filter without limitation. How to optimize the spectral discriminator and select the appropriate suppression rate of the signal is important to us. The HSRL technology was thoroughly studied based on error propagation. Error analyses and sensitivity studies were carried out on the transmittance characteristics of the spectral discriminator. Moreover, ratwo different spectroscopic methods for HSRL were described and compared: one is to suppress the Mie scattering; the other is to suppress the Rayleigh scattering. The corresponding HSRLs were simulated and analyzed. The results show that excessive suppression of Rayleigh scattering or Mie scattering in a high-spectral channel is not necessary if the transmittance of the spectral filter for molecular and aerosol scattering signals can be well characterized. When the ratio of transmittance of the spectral filter for aerosol scattering and molecular scattering is less than 0.1 or greater than 10, the detection error does not change much with its value. This conclusion implies that we have more choices for the high-spectral discriminator in HSRL. Moreover, the detection errors of HSRL regarding the two spectroscopic methods vary greatly with the atmospheric backscattering ratio. To reduce the detection error, it is necessary to choose a reasonable spectroscopic method. The detection method of suppressing the Rayleigh signal and extracting the Mie signal can achieve less error in a clear atmosphere, while the method of suppressing the Mie signal and extracting the Rayleigh signal can achieve less error in a polluted atmosphere.

  15. STUDY OF CHARACTERISTICS OF SPECTRAL INTERFERENCE SIGNALS IN THE NEAR INFRARED SPECTRAL RANGE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. P. Gurov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Peculiarities of signals formation in spectral interferometry and optical coherence tomography are considered. Basic relations are given defining minimal depth coordinate value of an investigated object, where single period of spectral interference signal is acquired and a value of the wave length increment set according to the depth range, where spectral interference signals are registered. The estimate of resolving power of the spectral interfereometry and optical coherence tomography systems with tunable wave length is given taking into account a spectral range of wave length tuning. It is shown that the ratio of the wave length mean value and the range of the wave length tuning defines the resolving power in depth of an investigated object, while the maximum depth range, within which investigation of an object’s micro structure by the spectral optical coherence tomography is possible does not depend on the range of the wave length tuning being determined by the wave length (wave number tuning step. Numerical estimates of the parameters mentioned above are presented when using light sources in near infrared range, as well as relations and estimates of interference fringe visibility dependent on registered relative intensity of a measuring wave.

  16. (LMRG): Microscope Resolution, Objective Quality, Spectral Accuracy and Spectral Un-mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayles, Carol J.; Cole, Richard W.; Eason, Brady; Girard, Anne-Marie; Jinadasa, Tushare; Martin, Karen; McNamara, George; Opansky, Cynthia; Schulz, Katherine; Thibault, Marc; Brown, Claire M.

    2012-01-01

    The second study by the LMRG focuses on measuring confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) resolution, objective lens quality, spectral imaging accuracy and spectral un-mixing. Affordable test samples for each aspect of the study were designed, prepared and sent to 116 labs from 23 countries across the globe. Detailed protocols were designed for the three tests and customized for most of the major confocal instruments being used by the study participants. One protocol developed for measuring resolution and objective quality was recently published in Nature Protocols (Cole, R. W., T. Jinadasa, et al. (2011). Nature Protocols 6(12): 1929–1941). The first study involved 3D imaging of sub-resolution fluorescent microspheres to determine the microscope point spread function. Results of the resolution studies as well as point spread function quality (i.e. objective lens quality) from 140 different objective lenses will be presented. The second study of spectral accuracy looked at the reflection of the laser excitation lines into the spectral detection in order to determine the accuracy of these systems to report back the accurate laser emission wavelengths. Results will be presented from 42 different spectral confocal systems. Finally, samples with double orange beads (orange core and orange coating) were imaged spectrally and the imaging software was used to un-mix fluorescence signals from the two orange dyes. Results from 26 different confocal systems will be summarized. Time will be left to discuss possibilities for the next LMRG study.

  17. Cool stars: spectral library of high-resolution echelle spectra and database of stellar parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, D.

    2013-05-01

    During the last years our group have undertake several high resolution spectroscopic surveys of nearby FGKM stars with different spectrographs (FOCES, SARG, SOFIN, FIES, HERMES). A large number of stars have been already observed and we have already determined spectral types, rotational velocities as well as radial velocities, Lithium abundance and several chromospheric activity indicators. We are working now in a homogeneous determination of the fundamental stellar parameters (T_{eff}, log{g}, ξ and [Fe/H]) and chemical abundances of many elements of all these stars. Some fully reduced spectra in FITS format have been available via ftp and in the {http://www.ucm.es/info/Astrof/invest/actividad/spectra.html}{Worl Wide Web} (Montes et al. 1997, A&AS, 123, 473; Montes et al. 1998, A&AS, 128, 485; and Montes et al. 1999, ApJS, 123, 283) and some particular spectral regions of the echelle spectra are available at VizieR by López-Santiago et al. 2010, A&A, 514, A97. We are now working in made accessible all the spectra of our different surveys in a Virtual Observatory ({http://svo.cab.inta-csic.es/}{VO}) compliant library and database accessible using a common web interface following the standards of the International Virtual Observatory Alliance ({http://www.ivoa.net/}{IVOA}). The spectral library includes F, G, K and M field stars, from dwarfs to giants. The spectral coverage is from 3800 to 10000 Å, with spectral resolution ranging from 40000 to 80000. The database will provide in addition the stellar parameters determined for these spectra using {http://cdsads.u-strasbg.fr/abs/2012arXiv1205.4879T}{StePar} (Tabernero et al. 2012, A&A, 547, A13).

  18. Remote sensing, airborne radiometric survey and aeromagnetic survey data processing and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Xiuzhen; Liu Dechang; Ye Fawang; Xuan Yanxiu

    2009-01-01

    Taking remote sensing data, airborne radiometric data and aero magnetic survey data as an example, the authors elaborate about basic thinking of remote sensing data processing methods, spectral feature analysis and adopted processing methods, also explore the remote sensing data combining with the processing of airborne radiometric survey and aero magnetic survey data, and analyze geological significance of processed image. It is not only useful for geological environment research and uranium prospecting in the study area, but also reference to applications in another area. (authors)

  19. Functional analysis, spectral theory, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Einsiedler, Manfred

    2017-01-01

    This textbook provides a careful treatment of functional analysis and some of its applications in analysis, number theory, and ergodic theory. In addition to discussing core material in functional analysis, the authors cover more recent and advanced topics, including Weyl’s law for eigenfunctions of the Laplace operator, amenability and property (T), the measurable functional calculus, spectral theory for unbounded operators, and an account of Tao’s approach to the prime number theorem using Banach algebras. The book further contains numerous examples and exercises, making it suitable for both lecture courses and self-study. Functional Analysis, Spectral Theory, and Applications is aimed at postgraduate and advanced undergraduate students with some background in analysis and algebra, but will also appeal to everyone with an interest in seeing how functional analysis can be applied to other parts of mathematics.

  20. Intelligent multi-spectral IR image segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Thomas; Luong, Andrew; Heim, Stephen; Patel, Maharshi; Chen, Kang; Chao, Tien-Hsin; Chow, Edward; Torres, Gilbert

    2017-05-01

    This article presents a neural network based multi-spectral image segmentation method. A neural network is trained on the selected features of both the objects and background in the longwave (LW) Infrared (IR) images. Multiple iterations of training are performed until the accuracy of the segmentation reaches satisfactory level. The segmentation boundary of the LW image is used to segment the midwave (MW) and shortwave (SW) IR images. A second neural network detects the local discontinuities and refines the accuracy of the local boundaries. This article compares the neural network based segmentation method to the Wavelet-threshold and Grab-Cut methods. Test results have shown increased accuracy and robustness of this segmentation scheme for multi-spectral IR images.

  1. Spectral functions from anisotropic lattice QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarts, G.; Allton, C.; Amato, A.; Evans, W.; Giudice, P.; Harris, T.; Kelly, A.; Kim, S. Y.; Lombardo, M. P.; Praki, K.; Ryan, S. M.; Skullerud, J.-I.

    2016-12-01

    The FASTSUM collaboration has been carrying out lattice simulations of QCD for temperatures ranging from one third to twice the crossover temperature, investigating the transition region, as well as the properties of the Quark Gluon Plasma. In this contribution we concentrate on quarkonium correlators and spectral functions. We work in a fixed scale scheme and use anisotropic lattices which help achieving the desirable fine resolution in the temporal direction, thus facilitating the (ill posed) integral transform from imaginary time to frequency space. We contrast and compare results for the correlators obtained with different methods, and different temporal spacings. We observe robust features of the results, confirming the sequential dissociation scenario, but also quantitative differences indicating that the methods' systematic errors are not yet under full control. We briefly outline future steps towards accurate results for the spectral functions and their associated statistical and systematic errors.

  2. Spectral emissivity of surface blackbody calibrators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Sønnik

    2007-01-01

    in emissivity using similar materials can be reduced to 0.5-1% by optimizing the coating process and the surface geometry. Results are discussed and an equation for calculation of the equivalent blackbody surface temperature from FTIR spectra is presented, including reflected ambient radiation. It is in most......The normal spectral emissivity of commercial infrared calibrators is compared with measurements of anodized aluminum samples and grooved aluminum surfaces coated with Pyromark. Measurements performed by FTIR spectroscopy in the wavelength interval from 2 to 20 mu m and at temperatures between 5...... and 550 degrees C are presented with absolute uncertainties from 0.25% to 1% in spectral regions with sufficient signal and no significant atmospheric gas absorption. A large variation in emissivity with wavelength is observed for some surfaces, i.e., from 1% to 3% to more than 10%. The variation...

  3. Decimative Spectral Estimation with Unconstrained Model Order

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stavroula-Evita Fotinea

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new state-space method for spectral estimation that performs decimation by any factor, it makes use of the full set of data and brings further apart the poles under consideration, while imposing almost no constraints to the size of the Hankel matrix (model order, as decimation increases. It is compared against two previously proposed techniques for spectral estimation (along with derived decimative versions, that lie among the most promising methods in the field of spectroscopy, where accuracy of parameter estimation is of utmost importance. Moreover, it is compared against a state-of-the-art purely decimative method proposed in literature. Experiments performed on simulated NMR signals prove the new method to be more robust, especially for low signal-to-noise ratio.

  4. Quantum Probability and Spectral Analysis of Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Hora, Akihito

    2007-01-01

    This is the first book to comprehensively cover the quantum probabilistic approach to spectral analysis of graphs. This approach has been developed by the authors and has become an interesting research area in applied mathematics and physics. The book can be used as a concise introduction to quantum probability from an algebraic aspect. Here readers will learn several powerful methods and techniques of wide applicability, which have been recently developed under the name of quantum probability. The exercises at the end of each chapter help to deepen understanding. Among the topics discussed along the way are: quantum probability and orthogonal polynomials; asymptotic spectral theory (quantum central limit theorems) for adjacency matrices; the method of quantum decomposition; notions of independence and structure of graphs; and asymptotic representation theory of the symmetric groups.

  5. Stochastic Spectral and Conjugate Descent Methods

    KAUST Repository

    Kovalev, Dmitry

    2018-02-11

    The state-of-the-art methods for solving optimization problems in big dimensions are variants of randomized coordinate descent (RCD). In this paper we introduce a fundamentally new type of acceleration strategy for RCD based on the augmentation of the set of coordinate directions by a few spectral or conjugate directions. As we increase the number of extra directions to be sampled from, the rate of the method improves, and interpolates between the linear rate of RCD and a linear rate independent of the condition number. We develop and analyze also inexact variants of these methods where the spectral and conjugate directions are allowed to be approximate only. We motivate the above development by proving several negative results which highlight the limitations of RCD with importance sampling.

  6. Luminosity and spectral evolution of QSOs

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Y Y; Yi, I S

    1999-01-01

    We apply the observed spectral states of the Galactic black hole candidates (GBHCs) to the quasi-stellar object (QSO) luminosity evolution based on the correlation between luminosity and the spectrum, which is strongly supported by the similarities of emission mechanisms in GBHCs and QSOs. We derive the QSO luminosity evolution trends in the UV/optical and the X-ray energy bands and demonstrate that their trends are significantly affected by the spectral evolution. Each energy band shows distinct evolution properties. We test one of the widely discussed cosmological evolution scenarios of QSOs, in which QSOs evolve as a single long-lived population, and show that the resulting luminosity functions seen in different energy bands exhibit distinguishable and potentially observable evolution signatures in the X-ray energy bands.

  7. On Spectral Triples in Quantum Gravity I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aastrup, Johannes; M. Grimstrup, Jesper; Nest, Ryszard

    2009-01-01

    This paper establishes a link between Noncommutative Geometry and canonical quantum gravity. A semi-finite spectral triple over a space of connections is presented. The triple involves an algebra of holonomy loops and a Dirac type operator which resembles a global functional derivation operator....... The interaction between the Dirac operator and the algebra reproduces the Poisson structure of General Relativity. Moreover, the associated Hilbert space corresponds, up to a discrete symmetry group, to the Hilbert space of diffeomorphism invariant states known from Loop Quantum Gravity. Correspondingly......, the square of the Dirac operator has, in terms of canonical quantum gravity, the form of a global area-squared operator. Furthermore, the spectral action resembles a partition function of Quantum Gravity. The construction is background independent and is based on an inductive system of triangulations...

  8. Multifrequency electrical impedance tomography using spectral constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Emma; Sato Dos Santos, Gustavo; Holder, David; Arridge, Simon

    2014-02-01

    Multifrequency electrical impedance tomography (MFEIT) exploits the dependence of tissue impedance on frequency to recover an image of conductivity. MFEIT could provide emergency diagnosis of pathologies such as acute stroke, brain injury and breast cancer. We present a method for performing MFEIT using spectral constraints. Boundary voltage data is employed directly to reconstruct the volume fraction distribution of component tissues using a nonlinear method. Given that the reconstructed parameter is frequency independent, this approach allows for the simultaneous use of all multifrequency data, thus reducing the degrees of freedom of the reconstruction problem. Furthermore, this method allows for the use of frequency difference data in a nonlinear reconstruction algorithm. Results from empirical phantom measurements suggest that our fraction reconstruction method points to a new direction for the development of multifrequency EIT algorithms in the case that the spectral constraints are known, and may provide a unifying framework for static EIT imaging.

  9. Nonparametric Collective Spectral Density Estimation and Clustering

    KAUST Repository

    Maadooliat, Mehdi

    2017-04-12

    In this paper, we develop a method for the simultaneous estimation of spectral density functions (SDFs) for a collection of stationary time series that share some common features. Due to the similarities among the SDFs, the log-SDF can be represented using a common set of basis functions. The basis shared by the collection of the log-SDFs is estimated as a low-dimensional manifold of a large space spanned by a pre-specified rich basis. A collective estimation approach pools information and borrows strength across the SDFs to achieve better estimation efficiency. Also, each estimated spectral density has a concise representation using the coefficients of the basis expansion, and these coefficients can be used for visualization, clustering, and classification purposes. The Whittle pseudo-maximum likelihood approach is used to fit the model and an alternating blockwise Newton-type algorithm is developed for the computation. A web-based shiny App found at

  10. Spectral theory and nonlinear functional analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez-Gomez, Julian

    2001-01-01

    This Research Note addresses several pivotal problems in spectral theory and nonlinear functional analysis in connection with the analysis of the structure of the set of zeroes of a general class of nonlinear operators. It features the construction of an optimal algebraic/analytic invariant for calculating the Leray-Schauder degree, new methods for solving nonlinear equations in Banach spaces, and general properties of components of solutions sets presented with minimal use of topological tools. The author also gives several applications of the abstract theory to reaction diffusion equations and systems.The results presented cover a thirty-year period and include recent, unpublished findings of the author and his coworkers. Appealing to a broad audience, Spectral Theory and Nonlinear Functional Analysis contains many important contributions to linear algebra, linear and nonlinear functional analysis, and topology and opens the door for further advances.

  11. Spectral Networks and Fenchel-Nielsen Coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollands, Lotte; Neitzke, Andrew

    2016-06-01

    It is known that spectral networks naturally induce certain coordinate systems on moduli spaces of flat SL( K)-connections on surfaces, previously studied by Fock and Goncharov. We give a self-contained account of this story in the case K = 2 and explain how it can be extended to incorporate the complexified Fenchel-Nielsen coordinates. As we review, the key ingredient in the story is a procedure for passing between moduli of flat SL(2)-connections on C (equipped with a little extra structure) and moduli of equivariant GL(1)-connections over a covering {Σ to C}; taking holonomies of the equivariant GL(1)-connections then gives the desired coordinate systems on moduli of SL(2)-connections. There are two special types of spectral network, related to ideal triangulations and pants decompositions of C; these two types of network lead to Fock-Goncharov and complexified Fenchel-Nielsen coordinate systems, respectively.

  12. Flatfield correction errors due to spectral mismatching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Nathan

    2014-12-01

    Flat field calibration of broadband imaging systems is widely used, and it has been said that users should try to make the spectrum of the flatfield calibration light source as close as possible to that of the measurement object. However, a quantitative analysis of the error induced by a mismatch of calibration and object spectra has been lacking. In order to develop this quantitative analysis, we provide a theoretical radiometric model for flatfield calibration and show how this spectral mismatching error arises. Simulations covering a variety of measurement scenarios indicate that spectral mismatching can create quantitative errors of up to a factor of 5 in situations that are regularly encountered by researchers performing quantitative work.

  13. Artifacts Of Spectral Analysis Of Instrument Readings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, James H.

    1995-01-01

    Report presents experimental and theoretical study of some of artifacts introduced by processing outputs of two nominally identical low-frequency-reading instruments; high-sensitivity servo-accelerometers mounted together and operating, in conjunction with signal-conditioning circuits, as seismometers. Processing involved analog-to-digital conversion with anti-aliasing filtering, followed by digital processing including frequency weighting and computation of different measures of power spectral density (PSD).

  14. SURFACE ALBEDO AND SPECTRAL VARIABILITY OF CERES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jian-Yang; Reddy, Vishnu; Corre, Lucille Le; Sykes, Mark V.; Prettyman, Thomas H. [Planetary Science Institute, 1700 E. Ft. Lowell Road, Suite 106, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Nathues, Andreas; Hoffmann, Martin; Schaefer, Michael [Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Göttingen (Germany); Izawa, Matthew R. M.; Cloutis, Edward A. [University of Winnipeg, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Carsenty, Uri; Jaumann, Ralf; Krohn, Katrin; Mottola, Stefano; Schröder, Stefan E. [German Aerospace Center (DLR), Institute of Planetary Research, Berlin (Germany); Castillo-Rogez, Julie C. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Schenk, Paul [Lunar and Planetary Institute, Houston, TX 77058 (United States); Williams, David A. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Smith, David E. [Solar System Exploration Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Zuber, Maria T. [Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); and others

    2016-02-01

    Previous observations suggested that Ceres has active, but possibly sporadic, water outgassing as well as possibly varying spectral characteristics over a timescale of months. We used all available data of Ceres collected in the past three decades from the ground and the Hubble Space Telescope, as well as the newly acquired images by the Dawn  Framing Camera, to search for spectral and albedo variability on Ceres, on both a global scale and in local regions, particularly the bright spots inside the Occator crater, over timescales of a few months to decades. Our analysis has placed an upper limit on the possible temporal albedo variation on Ceres. Sporadic water vapor venting, or any possibly ongoing activity on Ceres, is not significant enough to change the albedo or the area of the bright features in the Occator crater by >15%, or the global albedo by >3% over the various timescales that we searched. Recently reported spectral slope variations can be explained by changing Sun–Ceres–Earth geometry. The active area on Ceres is less than 1 km{sup 2}, too small to cause global albedo and spectral variations detectable in our data. Impact ejecta due to impacting projectiles of tens of meters in size like those known to cause observable changes to the surface albedo on Asteroid Scheila cannot cause detectable albedo change on Ceres due to its relatively large size and strong gravity. The water vapor activity on Ceres is independent of Ceres’ heliocentric distance, ruling out the possibility of the comet-like sublimation process as a possible mechanism driving the activity.

  15. Evolutionary Computing Methods for Spectral Retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrile, Richard; Fink, Wolfgang; Huntsberger, Terrance; Lee, Seugwon; Tisdale, Edwin; VonAllmen, Paul; Tinetti, Geivanna

    2009-01-01

    A methodology for processing spectral images to retrieve information on underlying physical, chemical, and/or biological phenomena is based on evolutionary and related computational methods implemented in software. In a typical case, the solution (the information that one seeks to retrieve) consists of parameters of a mathematical model that represents one or more of the phenomena of interest. The methodology was developed for the initial purpose of retrieving the desired information from spectral image data acquired by remote-sensing instruments aimed at planets (including the Earth). Examples of information desired in such applications include trace gas concentrations, temperature profiles, surface types, day/night fractions, cloud/aerosol fractions, seasons, and viewing angles. The methodology is also potentially useful for retrieving information on chemical and/or biological hazards in terrestrial settings. In this methodology, one utilizes an iterative process that minimizes a fitness function indicative of the degree of dissimilarity between observed and synthetic spectral and angular data. The evolutionary computing methods that lie at the heart of this process yield a population of solutions (sets of the desired parameters) within an accuracy represented by a fitness-function value specified by the user. The evolutionary computing methods (ECM) used in this methodology are Genetic Algorithms and Simulated Annealing, both of which are well-established optimization techniques and have also been described in previous NASA Tech Briefs articles. These are embedded in a conceptual framework, represented in the architecture of the implementing software, that enables automatic retrieval of spectral and angular data and analysis of the retrieved solutions for uniqueness.

  16. Spectral Element Multigrid. Part 2. Theoretical Justification

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-12-01

    R.VERFORTH - A note on multigrid methods for nonconforming finite element methods, Stochastische Mathematische Modellenumber 453, Mars 1988. Preprint...submitted to SIAM J. Numer. Anal. [MM] J. F. MAITRE & F. MUSY - Multigrid methods : Convergence theory in a variational framework, SINUM 21, 4,(1984) pp...Equations-M, SIAM (1984). [ZWHl] T.A. ZANG, Y. S. WONG & M.Y. HUSSAINI - Spectral multigrid methods for elliptic equations, J.CP. 49,(1982) pp485-50l

  17. Theory of atomic spectral emission intensity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yngstroem, S.

    1989-02-01

    The theoretical derivation of a new spectral line intensity formula for atomic radiative emission is presented. The theory is based on first principles of quantum physics and statistical physics. It is argued that the formulation of the theory provides a very good example of the manner in which quantum logic transforms into common sense logic. The theory is strongly supported by experimental evidence. (author) (16 refs.)

  18. Advanced Spectral Library (ASTRAL): Cool stars edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, T. R.

    2013-02-01

    ASTRAL is a project to create high-resolution, high-S/N UV (1150-3200 Å) atlases of bright stars utilizing {HST}/STIS. During Cycle 18 (2010-2011), eight cool star targets were observed, including key objects like Procyon and Betelgeuse, churning through 146 orbits in the process. The new spectral atlases are publically available through the project website. Data were obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope.

  19. A spectral route to determining chirality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Goor; Mortensen, Asger

    2009-01-01

    We show how one-dimensional structured media can be used to measure chirality, via the spectral shift of the photonic band gap edges. Analytically, we show that a chiral contrast can, in some cases, be mapped unto an index contrast, thereby greatly simplifying the analysis of such structures. Using...... this mapping, we derive a first-order shift of the band gap edges with chirality. Potentially, this effect could be used for measuring enantiomeric excess....

  20. Spectral converters and luminescent solar concentrators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scudo, Petra F.; Abbondanza, Luigi; Fusco, Roberto; Caccianotti, Luciano [Eni S.p.A, Research Center for Non-Conventional Energies - Istituto ENI Donegani, Via G.Fauser 4, 28100 Novara (Italy)

    2010-07-15

    In this paper we present a comprehensive theoretical description of molecular spectral converters in the specific context of luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs). The theoretical model is an extension to a three-level system interacting with a solar radiation bath of the standard quantum theory of atomic radiative processes. We derive the equilibrium equations of the conversion process and provide specific examples of application of this principle to the development of solar concentration devices. (author)

  1. Temporal and spectral interaction in loudness perception

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Benjamin; Ellermeier, Wolfgang

    An experiment was conducted to investigate how changes in spectral content influence loudness judgments. Six listeners were asked to discriminate sounds, which were of one second duration and changing in level every 0.1 s. In one condition the first half of the sound was low-pass filtered and the....... This outcome is inconsistent with overall temporal integration, and argues for a cognitive mechanism allocating attention to changes in an event sequence....

  2. Spectrally efficient polymer optical fiber transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randel, Sebastian; Bunge, Christian-Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The step-index polymer optical fiber (SI-POF) is an attractive transmission medium for high speed communication links in automotive infotainment networks, in industrial automation, and in home networks. Growing demands for quality of service, e.g., for IPTV distribution in homes and for Ethernet based industrial control networks will necessitate Gigabit speeds in the near future. We present an overview on recent advances in the design of spectrally efficient and robust Gigabit-over-SI-POF transmission systems.

  3. New Spectral Features from Bound Dark Matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Catena, Riccardo; Kouvaris, Chris

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that dark matter particles gravitationally bound to the Earth can induce a characteristic nuclear recoil signal at low energies in direct detection experiments. The new spectral feature we predict can provide the ultimate smoking gun for dark matter discovery for experiments...... with positive signal but unclear background. The new feature is universal, in that the ratio of bound over halo dark matter event rates at detectors is independent of the dark matter-nucleon cross section....

  4. Non-Redundant Spectral Dimensionality Reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Blau, Yochai; Michaeli, Tomer

    2016-01-01

    Spectral dimensionality reduction algorithms are widely used in numerous domains, including for recognition, segmentation, tracking and visualization. However, despite their popularity, these algorithms suffer from a major limitation known as the "repeated Eigen-directions" phenomenon. That is, many of the embedding coordinates they produce typically capture the same direction along the data manifold. This leads to redundant and inefficient representations that do not reveal the true intrinsi...

  5. Multiple Kernel Spectral Regression for Dimensionality Reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Bing; Xia, Shixiong; Zhou, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Traditional manifold learning algorithms, such as locally linear embedding, Isomap, and Laplacian eigenmap, only provide the embedding results of the training samples. To solve the out-of-sample extension problem, spectral regression (SR) solves the problem of learning an embedding function by establishing a regression framework, which can avoid eigen-decomposition of dense matrices. Motivated by the effectiveness of SR, we incorporate multiple kernel learning (MKL) into SR for dimensionality...

  6. Spectral analysis of blood flow in rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnautovic, M.; Jerkic, M.; Gal, V.

    1997-01-01

    Blood flow was continuously monitored in carotid, femoral and renal arteries in rats with acute renal failure and in the animals of control group. The spectral analysis of data were done using fast Fourier transform. Two characteristic peaks were obtained. The dominant component has frequency corresponding to heart rate, (4-7)Hz, while the frequency of the other peak is about 1 Hz. A physiological interpretation of the data is presented. (author)

  7. Power Spectral Density and Hilbert Transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    2002. Pierce J. An introduction to information theory : symbols, signals , and noise. New York (NY): Dover Publications; 1980. Soumekh M. Fourier array...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT This technical report focuses on the Hilbert transform and some of its applications for digital signal processing. Herein we...review power spectral density and complex exponentials, and illustrate how the Hilbert transform converts a real signal (real in the sense of a real time

  8. Canopy spectral invariants for remote sensing and model applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, D.; Knyazikhin, Y.; Dickinson, R.E.; Rautiainen, M.; Stenberg, P.; Disney, M.; Lewis, P.; Cescatti, A.; Tian, Y.; Verhoef, W.; Martonchik, J.V.; Myneni, R.B.

    2007-01-01

    The concept of canopy spectral invariants expresses the observation that simple algebraic combinations of leaf and canopy spectral transmittance and reflectance become wavelength independent and determine a small set of canopy structure specific variables. This set includes the canopy interceptance,

  9. Spectral entropy and haemodynamic response to surgery during ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    Spectral entropy and haemodynamic response to surgery during sevoflurane anaesthesia. Introduction. Apart from somatic responses, surgery also evokes autonomic responses, including haemodynamic responses. Spectral entropy has been validated as a means to monitor the hypnotic state during sevoflurane ...

  10. COFFEE - Coherent Optical System Field Trial for Spectral Efficiency Enhancement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Imran, Muhammad; Fresi, Francesco; Rommel, Simon

    2016-01-01

    The scope, aims, and contributions of the COFFEE project for spectral efficiency enhancement and market exposure are presented.......The scope, aims, and contributions of the COFFEE project for spectral efficiency enhancement and market exposure are presented....

  11. Spectral factorization using the delta operator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostgaard, Morten; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad; Ravn, Ole

    1994-01-01

    In recent years many papers have been published abouth the gamma-operator, mostly caused by the better numerical properties and the rapprochement between continuous and discrete time. A major problem within the LQG-design of a delta-based input-output relation has been how to spectral-factorize i......In recent years many papers have been published abouth the gamma-operator, mostly caused by the better numerical properties and the rapprochement between continuous and discrete time. A major problem within the LQG-design of a delta-based input-output relation has been how to spectral......-factorize in an efficient way. The discrete-time method of Kuccera will not be applied since numerical word-length characteristics will be poor for fast sampling rates. In this paper a new approach is considered. A new gamma-operator (Tustin operator) is introduced, in order to make an iterative and numerical stable...... solution to the spectral factorization problem. The key idea is to use the gamma-operator resembled by its behavior to the differential operator....

  12. A spectral algorithm for the seriation problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atkins, J.E. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Mathematics; Boman, E.G. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Computer Science; Hendrickson, B. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-11-01

    Given a set of objects and a correlation function f reflecting the desire for two items to be near each other, find all sequences {pi} of the items so that correlation preferences are preserved; that is if {pi}(i) < {pi}(j) < {pi}(k) then f(i,j) {ge} f(i,k) and f(j,k) {ge} f(i,k). This seriation problem has numerous applications, for instance, solving it yields a solution to the consecutive ones problem. We present a spectral algorithm for this problem that has a number of interesting features. Whereas most previous applications of spectral techniques provided bounds or heuristics, our result is an algorithm for a nontrivial combinatorial problem. Our analysis introduces powerful tools from matrix theory to the theoretical computer science community. Also, spectral methods are being applied as heuristics for a variety of sequencing problems and our result helps explain and justify these applications. Although the worst case running time for our approach is not competitive with that of existing methods for well posed problem instances, unlike combinatorial approaches our algorithm remains a credible heuristic for the important cases where there are errors in the data.

  13. The Advanced Spectral Library (ASTRAL) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Thomas R.; The ASTRAL I & Science Teams, II

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced Spectral Library (ASTRAL) is an HST Treasury Program whose aim is to secure definitive ultraviolet (115-310 nm) spectra of representative bright stars utilizing the venerable -- yet still state-of-the-art -- Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS). The initial Cycle 18 installment of the program (146 orbits in 2010-2011) focused on late-type (``cool’’) stars, acquiring high-S/N, high spectral resolution measurements of eight pivotal targets, including iconic objects like Betelgeuse and Procyon. The latest episode, in current Cycle 21 (230 orbits in 2013-2014), is designed to record very high-S/N (>100) STIS echellegrams, at the highest resolution feasible ( 30,000-100,000), of 21 representative bright early-type (``hot’’) stars, including equally iconic objects like Vega, Sirius, Regulus, and Zeta Puppis. The targets span a broad range of spectral types between early-O and early-A, encompassing main sequence and evolved stars, fast and slow rotators, as well as chemically peculiar and magnetic objects. These high-quality STIS UV spectra will be publicly available immediately after observation from the HST archive; and, in post-processed and merged form, at the project website: http://casa.colorado.edu ayres/ASTRAL/. The UV "atlases" produced by the ASTRAL Program will enable investigations of a broad range of astrophysical problems -- stellar, interstellar, and beyond -- for many years to come. Supported by Guest Observer grants from STScI.

  14. The spectral imaging facility: Setup characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Angelis, Simone, E-mail: simone.deangelis@iaps.inaf.it; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Manzari, Paola Olga [Institute for Space Astrophysics and Planetology, INAF-IAPS, Via Fosso del Cavaliere, 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Ammannito, Eleonora [Institute for Space Astrophysics and Planetology, INAF-IAPS, Via Fosso del Cavaliere, 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Department of Earth, Planetary and Space Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095-1567 (United States); Di Iorio, Tatiana [ENEA, UTMEA-TER, Rome (Italy); Liberati, Fabrizio [Opto Service SrL, Campagnano di Roma (RM) (Italy); Tarchi, Fabio; Dami, Michele; Olivieri, Monica; Pompei, Carlo [Selex ES, Campi Bisenzio (Italy); Mugnuolo, Raffaele [Italian Space Agency, ASI, Spatial Geodesy Center, Matera (Italy)

    2015-09-15

    The SPectral IMager (SPIM) facility is a laboratory visible infrared spectrometer developed to support space borne observations of rocky bodies of the solar system. Currently, this laboratory setup is used to support the DAWN mission, which is in its journey towards the asteroid 1-Ceres, and to support the 2018 Exo-Mars mission in the spectral investigation of the Martian subsurface. The main part of this setup is an imaging spectrometer that is a spare of the DAWN visible infrared spectrometer. The spectrometer has been assembled and calibrated at Selex ES and then installed in the facility developed at the INAF-IAPS laboratory in Rome. The goal of SPIM is to collect data to build spectral libraries for the interpretation of the space borne and in situ hyperspectral measurements of planetary materials. Given its very high spatial resolution combined with the imaging capability, this instrument can also help in the detailed study of minerals and rocks. In this paper, the instrument setup is first described, and then a series of test measurements, aimed to the characterization of the main subsystems, are reported. In particular, laboratory tests have been performed concerning (i) the radiation sources, (ii) the reference targets, and (iii) linearity of detector response; the instrumental imaging artifacts have also been investigated.

  15. Remote Sensing of Landscapes with Spectral Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, John B.; Gillespie, Alan R.

    2006-05-01

    Remote Sensing of Landscapes with Spectral Images describes how to process and interpret spectral images using physical models to bridge the gap between the engineering and theoretical sides of remote-sensing and the world that we encounter when we venture outdoors. The emphasis is on the practical use of images rather than on theory and mathematical derivations. Examples are drawn from a variety of landscapes and interpretations are tested against the reality seen on the ground. The reader is led through analysis of real images (using figures and explanations); the examples are chosen to illustrate important aspects of the analytic framework. This textbook will form a valuable reference for graduate students and professionals in a variety of disciplines including ecology, forestry, geology, geography, urban planning, archeology and civil engineering. It is supplemented by a web-site hosting digital color versions of figures in the book as well as ancillary images (www.cambridge.org/9780521662214). Presents a coherent view of practical remote sensing, leading from imaging and field work to the generation of useful thematic maps Explains how to apply physical models to help interpret spectral images Supplemented by a website hosting digital colour versions of figures in the book, as well as additional colour figures

  16. Asteroids: spectral reflectance and color characteristics. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCord, T.B.; Chapman, C.R.

    1975-01-01

    We present new spectrophotometry for 31 asteroids, and improved data for nine previously observed, raising our total sample to 98. Several important new spectral types have been found. Asteroid 349 Dembowska is the first large main-belt asteroid found to resemble ordinary chondritic meteorites in spectral properties (it is similar to LL6 chondrites in pyroxene/olivine content). The first two measured Trojan asteroids show unusual spectra not compatible with carbonaceous chondrites or other known meteorites. The spectrum of Mars-crosser 887 Alinda is compatible with unequilibrated chondrites. Most fainter asteroids (especially those in the outer half of the belt) have flat spectra indicating probable carbonaceous composition. Compositional heterogeneity of Hirayama families is common among the 16 families studied to date. But individual asteroids seem to have remarkably uniform surface compositions, indicated by the usual lack of spectral changes with rotation. Spectra of a preliminary sample of proposed meteorite source-bodies are consistent with derivation of meteorites by proposed mechanics, but further observations are needed

  17. RAiSE II: resolved spectral evolution in radio AGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Ross J.; Rogers, Jonathan G.; Shabala, Stanislav S.; Krause, Martin G. H.

    2018-01-01

    The active galactic nuclei (AGN) lobe radio luminosities modelled in hydrodynamical simulations and most analytical models do not address the redistribution of the electron energies due to adiabatic expansion, synchrotron radiation and inverse-Compton scattering of cosmic microwave background photons. We present a synchrotron emissivity model for resolved sources that includes a full treatment of the loss mechanisms spatially across the lobe, and apply it to a dynamical radio source model with known pressure and volume expansion rates. The bulk flow and dispersion of discrete electron packets is represented by tracer fields in hydrodynamical simulations; we show that the mixing of different aged electrons strongly affects the spectrum at each point of the radio map in high-powered Fanaroff & Riley type II (FR-II) sources. The inclusion of this mixing leads to a factor of a few discrepancy between the spectral age measured using impulsive injection models (e.g. JP model) and the dynamical age. The observable properties of radio sources are predicted to be strongly frequency dependent: FR-II lobes are expected to appear more elongated at higher frequencies, while jetted FR-I sources appear less extended. The emerging FR0 class of radio sources, comprising gigahertz peaked and compact steep spectrum sources, can potentially be explained by a population of low-powered FR-Is. The extended emission from such sources is shown to be undetectable for objects within a few orders of magnitude of the survey detection limit and to not contribute to the curvature of the radio spectral energy distribution.

  18. Surveying Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Stig

    2009-01-01

    . In surveying education there are a range of other challenges to be faced. These relate to the focus on learning to learn; the need for flexible curriculum to deal with constant change; the move towards introducing virtual academy; the demand for creating a quality culture; and the perspective of lifelong......In relation to surveying education there is one big question to be asked: Is the role of the surveyors changing? In a global perspective the answer will be "Yes". There is a big swing that could be entitled "From Measurement to Management". This does not imply that measurement is no longer...... learning perspective. This paper looks into the challenges in some details. It is stated that facing these challenges requires an innovative and adaptable approach to both curriculum design and course delivery within the framework of an overall quality culture. The success will eventually depend...

  19. Surveying Humaness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Randi; Gad, Christopher

    and personhood imagined to be already there, and communication as the free-flow of information? Is it therefore considered non-problematic that people commit themselves to remembering their past and present experience of illness and share it in detail within an - to them - unknown context? Can it even...... be imagined as a positive end, as ‘making explicit’ (in a popular psychological perspective) is considered to be therapeutic and good in itself? We will discuss those questions from a Foucaultian and ANT perspective, where one does not accept that pre-existing subjects are exposed to survey procedures....... Subjectivity is rather regulated and constituted in this practice. The relevant question becomes in what particular ways subjectivity and humanness are performed here? We want to look into this question exploring the agency of surveys, their effects and the politics involved in such a scientific practice....

  20. Readership survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    The article reviews the last readership survey, which helped to check readers' reactions and the level and style of the journal. The majority of readers (32 per cent), not surprisingly, work in high energy physics. In fact, if the estimate of the world high energy physics population as some 5000 people is correct, CERN Courier reaches every one of them. The next large category of readers is the teaching profession (21 percent), with industrialists (12 per cent) in third place

  1. Estimating the Spectral Width of a Narrowband Optical Signal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lading, Lars; Skov Jensen, A.

    1980-01-01

    Methods for estimating the spectral width of a narrowband optical signal are investigated. Spectral analysis and Fourier spectroscopy are compared. Optimum and close-to-optimum estimators are developed under the constraint of having only one photodetector.......Methods for estimating the spectral width of a narrowband optical signal are investigated. Spectral analysis and Fourier spectroscopy are compared. Optimum and close-to-optimum estimators are developed under the constraint of having only one photodetector....

  2. Spectral beam combining of diode lasers with high efficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, André; Vijayakumar, Deepak; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin

    2012-01-01

    Based on spectral beam combining we obtain 16 W of output power, combining two 1063 nm DBR-tapered diode lasers. The spectral separation within the combined beam can be used for subsequent sum-frequency generation.......Based on spectral beam combining we obtain 16 W of output power, combining two 1063 nm DBR-tapered diode lasers. The spectral separation within the combined beam can be used for subsequent sum-frequency generation....

  3. SPECTRAL SETS AND TILES IN CARTESIAN PRODUCTS OVER ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    41

    Spectral set conjecture: A Borel set Ω ⊂ Rd of positive and finite. Lebesgue measure is a spectral set if and only if it ... Ω ⊂ G of positive and finite Haar measure is a spectral set if and only if it is a translational tile. ... Key words and phrases. p-adic number field, Cartesian product, tile, spectral set. This work was supported by ...

  4. Stability estimates for hp spectral element methods for general ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Proceedings – Mathematical Sciences; Volume 113; Issue 4. Stability Estimates for ℎ- Spectral ... We establish basic stability estimates for a non-conforming ℎ- spectral element method which allows for simultaneous mesh refinement and variable polynomial degree. The spectral element functions are ...

  5. Spectral control of diode lasers using external waveguide circuits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldenbeuving, Ruud

    2013-01-01

    We investigated spectral control of diode lasers using external waveguide circuits. The purpose of this work is to investigate such external control for providing a new class of diode lasers with technologically interesting properties, such as a narrow spectral bandwidth and spectrally tunable

  6. Introduction to finite and spectral element methods using Matlab

    CERN Document Server

    Pozrikidis, Constantine

    2014-01-01

    The Finite Element Method in One Dimension. Further Applications in One Dimension. High-Order and Spectral Elements in One Dimension. The Finite Element Method in Two Dimensions. Quadratic and Spectral Elements in Two Dimensions. Applications in Mechanics. Viscous Flow. Finite and Spectral Element Methods in Three Dimensions. Appendices. References. Index.

  7. Relation of Core Dominance Parameter and Extended Spectral ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... The correlations between differences of two core dominance parameters and core/extended spectral index are investigated. The extended spectral index is associated with the differences very well, while there is a weak relationship between core spectral index and the differences. The average core ...

  8. Application of combined temporal and spectral processing methods ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    error (MMSE) short term spectral amplitude (STSA) estimators) first estimate the spectral characteristics .... band spectral subtraction (Kamath & Loizou 2002) or STSA–MMSE estimator (Ephraim &. Malah 1984) ...... Greenberg S, Kingsbury B E D 1997 The modulation spectrogram: in pursuit of an invariant repre- sentation of ...

  9. Relation of Core Dominance Parameter and Extended Spectral ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Relation of Core Dominance Parameter and Extended Spectral Index for Radio Sources. J. H. Yang1,2,∗, J. J. ... nance parameters and core/extended spectral index are investigated. The extended spectral index is ... (10JJ3020), and the research fund of Hunan University of Arts and Science (JJZD. 201101). References.

  10. Spectral Action for Torsion with and without Boundaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iochum, B.; Levy, Cyril Olivier; Vassilevich, D.

    2012-01-01

    We derive a commutative spectral triple and study the spectral action for a rather general geometric setting which includes the (skew-symmetric) torsion and the chiral bag conditions on the boundary. The spectral action splits into bulk and boundary parts. In the bulk, we clarify certain issues...

  11. Spectral Information System for Australian Spectroscopy Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm, L. A.; Ong, C.; Hueni, A.; Suarez, L.; Restrepo-Coupe, N.

    2013-12-01

    Inherently field spectroscopy involves the study of the interrelationships between the spectral characteristics of objects and their biophysical attributes in the field environment (Bauer et al., 1986; Milton, 1987). Spectroscopy measurements taken of vegetated surfaces provide spectral characteristics indicative of the status, composition and structure of the components measured. However, additional elements are present that add undesired effects to the overall signal such as the soil background or the viewing and illumination geometry (Suarez etal 2013). Further, the leaf spectrum is affected by several factors including leaf age, phenology, a highly variable range of stressors, any of which may be the actual focus of study, and additionally influenced by a range of environmental conditions. There is a critical need to use acquired spectra to infer vegetation function, understand phenological cycles, characterise biodiversity or as part of the process to assess biogeochemical processes. However the collection of leaf spectra during field campaigns is undertaken on a project basis, where a large number of spectra tend to be collected, yet the value and ability to share and confidently re-use such collections is often restricted. Often this is because the data are stored in disparate silos with little, if any, consistency in formatting and content, and most importantly, lack metadata to aid their discovery and re-use. These datasets have significant potential for vegetation scientists but also benefit the wider earth observation remote sensing and other earth science communities. In Australia this problem has been addressed by the adoption and enhancement of the existing SPECCHIO system (Hueni et al. 2009) as a suitable standard for spectral data exchange. As a spectral database, the system provides storage of spectra and associated metadata, retrieval of spectral data using metadata space queries, information on provenance, all of which facilitate repeatability of

  12. Comparison of data and spectral driven methods for kaolinite-bearing area mapping in Masahim volcano, using Hyperion images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahram Bahrambeygi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Hyperion hyperspectral data contains a very rich source of information from the Earth surface that collects 242 narrow contiguous spectral bands. Achieving this source of rich information is subject to the performance of suitable image processing methods on raw satellite data. Satellite image processing methods can be classified into two categories of statistical-based and spectral-based. In the statistical-based methods, processing principle is based on the distribution pattern of pixels’ DN values around mean, mode and median in DN value histogram of each band. However, in the spectral-based methods, the analysis is performed based on the spectral properties of the materials under question. In this study, we investigated both image processing methods and validated the results with field and laboratory data. Field and laboratory studies included the investigation of field samples, laboratory spectroradiometry, XRD analysis and thin section studies of the rock samples. SAM and PCA image processing methods performed on Hyperion images of the argillic zone in Masahim volcanic crater as spectral and statistical-based methods, respectively. The MTMF method also was surveyed as a composite method in addition to the use of reference spectrum using statistical principles. Confusion matrix prepared for the results of the three methods illustrated producer accuracy of 74.58% for SAM, 25.42% for PCA and 61% for MTMF results. Therefore, use of spectral-based methods on hyperspectral image processing is considered as a suitable way for ground surface remote sensing studies using hyperspectral Hyperion images.

  13. Enzyme activity measurement via spectral evolution profiling and PARAFAC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baum, Andreas; Meyer, Anne S.; Garcia, Javier Lopez

    2013-01-01

    The recent advances in multi-way analysis provide new solutions to traditional enzyme activity assessment. In the present study enzyme activity has been determined by monitoring spectral changes of substrates and products in real time. The method relies on measurement of distinct spectral...... fingerprints of the reaction mixture at specific time points during the course of the whole enzyme catalyzed reaction and employs multi-way analysis to detect the spectral changes. The methodology is demonstrated by spectral evolution profiling of Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectral fingerprints using...

  14. EEZ survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Peter M.

    The United States Geological Survey (USGS) has contracted with the Institute of Oceanographic Sciences (IOS) to charter the research vessel Farnella. The project is to map the ocean floor at depths greater than 500 m along the recently established United States Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ). The short range objectives include obtaining seafloor contours along the deep sea thermal spring zones in the Pacific Ocean basin. Should any of the zones prove economic for their sulfide mineral deposits, the charts should be of value to industry for years to come.

  15. Atmospheric parameters, spectral indexes and their relation to CPV spectral performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Núñez, Rubén, E-mail: ruben.nunez@ies-def.upm.es; Antón, Ignacio, E-mail: ruben.nunez@ies-def.upm.es; Askins, Steve, E-mail: ruben.nunez@ies-def.upm.es; Sala, Gabriel, E-mail: ruben.nunez@ies-def.upm.es [Instituto de Energía Solar - Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Instituto de Energía Solar, ETSI Telecomunicación, Ciudad Universitaria 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-09-26

    Air Mass and atmosphere components (basically aerosol (AOD) and precipitable water (PW)) define the absorption of the sunlight that arrive to Earth. Radiative models such as SMARTS or MODTRAN use these parameters to generate an equivalent spectrum. However, complex and expensive instruments (as AERONET network devices) are needed to obtain AOD and PW. On the other hand, the use of isotype cells is a convenient way to characterize spectrally a place for CPV considering that they provide the photocurrent of the different internal subcells individually. Crossing data from AERONET station and a Tri-band Spectroheliometer, a model that correlates Spectral Mismatch Ratios and atmospheric parameters is proposed. Considering the amount of stations of AERONET network, this model may be used to estimate the spectral influence on energy performance of CPV systems close to all the stations worldwide.

  16. A deep X-ray spectroscopic survey of the ESO imaging survey fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard-Nielsen, Hans Ulrik; Jørgensen, H.E.; Hansen, Lene

    1998-01-01

    V, we propose to perform a spectroscopic survey with SODART and push these telescopes to the limit at the high energies. By selecting the four ESO Imaging Survey fields EIS teach 6 deg(2)) we will take full advantage of the large, systematic effort ESO is putting into the optical survey of these fields......The deepest ROSAT surveys have shown, that, in the energy range 0.5-2.0 keV, QSO's can account for similar to 30 per cent of the Diffuse X-ray Background (DXRB), and Narrow Emission Line Galaxies (NELG) and clusters of galaxies for about 10 per cent each. But, by assuming characteristic spectral....... This spectroscopic X-ray survey will provide a large, statistically complete, sample of sources detected at high energies, more than an order of magnitude fainter than obtained by previous missions. The study of these sources will significantly improve our understanding not only of the origin of DXRB, but also...

  17. Spectrally based mapping of riverbed composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legleiter, Carl; Stegman, Tobin K.; Overstreet, Brandon T.

    2016-01-01

    Remote sensing methods provide an efficient means of characterizing fluvial systems. This study evaluated the potential to map riverbed composition based on in situ and/or remote measurements of reflectance. Field spectra and substrate photos from the Snake River, Wyoming, USA, were used to identify different sediment facies and degrees of algal development and to quantify their optical characteristics. We hypothesized that accounting for the effects of depth and water column attenuation to isolate the reflectance of the streambed would enhance distinctions among bottom types and facilitate substrate classification. A bottom reflectance retrieval algorithm adapted from coastal research yielded realistic spectra for the 450 to 700 nm range; but bottom reflectance-based substrate classifications, generated using a random forest technique, were no more accurate than classifications derived from above-water field spectra. Additional hypothesis testing indicated that a combination of reflectance magnitude (brightness) and indices of spectral shape provided the most accurate riverbed classifications. Convolving field spectra to the response functions of a multispectral satellite and a hyperspectral imaging system did not reduce classification accuracies, implying that high spectral resolution was not essential. Supervised classifications of algal density produced from hyperspectral data and an inferred bottom reflectance image were not highly accurate, but unsupervised classification of the bottom reflectance image revealed distinct spectrally based clusters, suggesting that such an image could provide additional river information. We attribute the failure of bottom reflectance retrieval to yield more reliable substrate maps to a latent correlation between depth and bottom type. Accounting for the effects of depth might have eliminated a key distinction among substrates and thus reduced discriminatory power. Although further, more systematic study across a broader

  18. Quality evaluation of tandem mass spectral libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberacher, Herbert; Weinmann, Wolfgang; Dresen, Sebastian

    2011-06-01

    Tandem mass spectral libraries are gaining more and more importance for the identification of unknowns in different fields of research, including metabolomics, forensics, toxicology, and environmental analysis. Particularly, the recent invention of reliable, robust, and transferable libraries has increased the general acceptance of these tools. Herein, we report on results obtained from thorough evaluation of the match reliabilities of two tandem mass spectral libraries: the MSforID library established by the Oberacher group in Innsbruck and the Weinmann library established by the Weinmann group in Freiburg. Three different experiments were performed: (1) Spectra of the libraries were searched against their corresponding library after excluding either this single compound-specific spectrum or all compound-specific spectra prior to searching; (2) the libraries were searched against each other using either library as reference set or sample set; (3) spectra acquired on different mass spectrometric instruments were matched to both libraries. Almost 13,000 tandem mass spectra were included in this study. The MSforID search algorithm was used for spectral matching. Statistical evaluation of the library search results revealed that principally both libraries enable the sensitive and specific identification of compounds. Due to higher mass accuracy of the QqTOF compared with the QTrap instrument, matches to the MSforID library were more reliable when comparing spectra with both libraries. Furthermore, only the MSforID library was shown to be efficiently transferable to different kinds of tandem mass spectrometers, including "tandem-in-time" instruments; this is due to the coverage of a large range of different collision energy settings-including the very low range-which is an outstanding characteristics of the MSforID library.

  19. Spectral properties of electromagnetic turbulence in plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Shaikh

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available We report on the nonlinear turbulent processes associated with electromagnetic waves in plasmas. We focus on low-frequency (in comparison with the electron gyrofrequency nonlinearly interacting electron whistlers and nonlinearly interacting Hall-magnetohydrodynamic (H-MHD fluctuations in a magnetized plasma. Nonlinear whistler mode turbulence study in a magnetized plasma involves incompressible electrons and immobile ions. Two-dimensional turbulent interactions and subsequent energy cascades are critically influenced by the electron whisters that behave distinctly for scales smaller and larger than the electron skin depth. It is found that in whistler mode turbulence there results a dual cascade primarily due to the forward spectral migration of energy that coexists with a backward spectral transfer of mean squared magnetic potential. Finally, inclusion of the ion dynamics, resulting from a two fluid description of the H-MHD plasma, leads to several interesting results that are typically observed in the solar wind plasma. Particularly in the solar wind, the high-time-resolution databases identify a spectral break at the end of the MHD inertial range spectrum that corresponds to a high-frequency regime. In the latter, turbulent cascades cannot be explained by the usual MHD model and a finite frequency effect (in comparison with the ion gyrofrequency arising from the ion inertia is essentially included to discern the dynamics of the smaller length scales (in comparison with the ion skin depth. This leads to a nonlinear H-MHD model, which is presented in this paper. With the help of our 3-D H-MHD code, we find that the characteristic turbulent interactions in the high-frequency regime evolve typically on kinetic-Alfvén time-scales. The turbulent fluctuation associated with kinetic-Alfvén interactions are compressive and anisotropic and possess equipartition of the kinetic and magnetic energies.

  20. Infrared spectral reflectances of asteroid surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, H. P.; Veeder, G. J.

    1979-01-01

    This review compares the types of compositional information produced by three complementary techniques used in infrared observations of asteroid surfaces: broadband JHKL photometry, narrow band photometry, and multiplex spectroscopy. The high information content of these infrared observations permits definitive interpretations of asteroid surface compositions in terms of the major meteoritic minerals (olivine, pyroxene, plagioclase feldspar, hydrous silicates, and metallic Ni-Fe). These studies emphasize the individuality of asteroid surface compositions, the inadequacy of simple comparisons with spectra of meteorites, and the need to coordinate spectral measurements of all types to optimize diagnostic capabilities.

  1. Storage and retrieval of mass spectral information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohn, M. E.; Humberston, M. J.; Eglinton, G.

    1977-01-01

    Computer handling of mass spectra serves two main purposes: the interpretation of the occasional, problematic mass spectrum, and the identification of the large number of spectra generated in the gas-chromatographic-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) analysis of complex natural and synthetic mixtures. Methods available fall into the three categories of library search, artificial intelligence, and learning machine. Optional procedures for coding, abbreviating and filtering a library of spectra minimize time and storage requirements. Newer techniques make increasing use of probability and information theory in accessing files of mass spectral information.

  2. Deformation effect on spectral statistics of nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabri, H.; Jalili Majarshin, A.

    2018-02-01

    In this study, we tried to get significant relations between the spectral statistics of atomic nuclei and their different degrees of deformations. To this aim, the empirical energy levels of 109 even-even nuclei in the 22 ≤ A ≤ 196 mass region are classified as their experimental and calculated quadrupole, octupole, hexadecapole and hexacontatetrapole deformations values and analyzed by random matrix theory. Our results show an obvious relation between the regularity of nuclei and strong quadrupole, hexadecapole and hexacontatetrapole deformations and but for nuclei that their octupole deformations are nonzero, we have observed a GOE-like statistics.

  3. Mixed-Precision Spectral Deferred Correction: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grout, Ray W. S.

    2015-09-02

    Convergence of spectral deferred correction (SDC), where low-order time integration methods are used to construct higher-order methods through iterative refinement, can be accelerated in terms of computational effort by using mixed-precision methods. Using ideas from multi-level SDC (in turn based on FAS multigrid ideas), some of the SDC correction sweeps can use function values computed in reduced precision without adversely impacting the accuracy of the final solution. This is particularly beneficial for the performance of combustion solvers such as S3D [6] which require double precision accuracy but are performance limited by the cost of data motion.

  4. YGFP: a spectral variant of GFP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming G.; Atlung, Tove

    2011-01-01

    We describe YGFP, a slow bleaching green fluorescent protein (GFP) with unique spectral properties. YGFP is derived from an Escherichia coli codon-optimized synthetic gfp, mutant 2 derivative. In addition to the GFP-mut 2 changes, it also carries S202F and T203I substitutions. YGFP can be used...... as a substitute for yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) in experiments in which two or more fluorescent proteins are fused to different cellular protein components, expanding the ability to study multiple labeled proteins in a cell at once....

  5. Alpha spectral analysis via artificial neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kangas, L.J.; Hashem, S.; Keller, P.E.; Kouzes, R.T.; Troyer, G.L.

    1994-10-01

    An artificial neural network system that assigns quality factors to alpha particle energy spectra is discussed. The alpha energy spectra are used to detect plutonium contamination in the work environment. The quality factors represent the levels of spectral degradation caused by miscalibration and foreign matter affecting the instruments. A set of spectra was labeled with a quality factor by an expert and used in training the artificial neural network expert system. The investigation shows that the expert knowledge of alpha spectra quality factors can be transferred to an ANN system

  6. Spectral difference methods for solving differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazziotti, David A.

    1999-01-01

    A family of recently developed techniques is explored for achieving both matrix sparsity and rapid convergence when numerically solving differential and eigenvalue equations without domain decomposition. These methods, which we call spectral differences, include Boyd's sum acceleration techniques and the Lagrange distributed approximating functional (LDAF) approach. A formula is developed for estimating the unknown Gaussian parameter within LDAF. We implement these methods to calculate the Morse vibrational energies for diatomic iodine. For equivalent bandwidths the sum acceleration with finite difference weights generates energies which are between two and three orders of magnitude more accurate than those from LDAF.

  7. New spectral types in NGC 3603

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrell, N.; Melena, N.; Massey, P.; Zangari, A.

    NGC 3603 is a giant H II region known to harbor a large population of massive stars. Its central cluster is the closest galactic counterpart to the R136 cluster in 30 Dor, in the Large Magellanic Cloud (Walborn 1973). It is very compact (76 arcsecs in diameter) which makes it an extremely difficult target for individual stars spectroscopy. Some stars lying mostly in the periphery of NGC 3603 have been classified from the ground by Moffat (1983), but for the highly crowded core only one study was available at present (Drissen et al. 1995), which was performed with the Faint Object Spectrograph on board of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Among the massive members of NGC 3603 there are some of the objects showing H-rich WN + abs spectra, also found in the R136 cluster in 30 Doradus (Massey & Hunter 1998). During 2 nights in April 2006, we have made use of the excellent seeing and large aperture of the Magellan telescopes to obtain individual spectroscopy for stars in the crowded core of NGC 3603. We used the IMACS spectrograph in F4 mode at the Baade (Magellan I) telescope, with a 600 l/mm grating and a 0.7 arcsec long slit. From these observations we were able to derive new spectral types for 26 stars: 16 of which are classified here for the first time, while for the remaining 10 we have revised previous spectral classifications, finding very good general agreement, but exact coincidence for only 2 of them. This rises to 38 the number of stars in this massive star forming region, for which spectral classification is available. Not surprisingly, most of the newly classified spectra belong to the earliest O-subtypes. This work is part of a more comprehensive study (Melena et al. 2007) in which archival HST/ACS-HRC images (P.I. Maiz-Apellaniz) have been used to derive new photometry for stars in the cluster, including those for which there is spectroscopy. Having new spectral types and improved photometry, allowed us to determine new values for the reddening (E (B

  8. Improving dimensionality reduction with spectral gradient descent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memisevic, Roland; Hinton, Geoffrey

    2005-01-01

    We introduce spectral gradient descent, a way of improving iterative dimensionality reduction techniques. The method uses information contained in the leading eigenvalues of a data affinity matrix to modify the steps taken during a gradient-based optimization procedure. We show that the approach is able to speed up the optimization and to help dimensionality reduction methods find better local minima of their objective functions. We also provide an interpretation of our approach in terms of the power method for finding the leading eigenvalues of a symmetric matrix and verify the usefulness of the approach in some simple experiments.

  9. Semiclassical universality of parametric spectral correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuipers, Jack; Sieber, Martin

    2007-01-01

    We consider quantum systems with a chaotic classical limit that depends on an external parameter, and study correlations between the spectra at different parameter values. In particular, we consider the parametric spectral form factor K(τ, x) which depends on a scaled parameter difference x. For parameter variations that do not change the symmetry of the system we show by using semiclassical periodic orbit expansions that the small τ expansion of the form factor agrees with random matrix theory for systems with and without time reversal symmetry

  10. Spectral density regression for bivariate extremes

    KAUST Repository

    Castro Camilo, Daniela

    2016-05-11

    We introduce a density regression model for the spectral density of a bivariate extreme value distribution, that allows us to assess how extremal dependence can change over a covariate. Inference is performed through a double kernel estimator, which can be seen as an extension of the Nadaraya–Watson estimator where the usual scalar responses are replaced by mean constrained densities on the unit interval. Numerical experiments with the methods illustrate their resilience in a variety of contexts of practical interest. An extreme temperature dataset is used to illustrate our methods. © 2016 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg

  11. Programmable spectral design and the binary supergrating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levner, Daniel

    Spectral operations such as wavelength selection, power level manipulation, and chromatic dispersion control are key to many processes in optical telecommunication, spectroscopy, and sensing. In their simplest forms, these functions can be performed using a number of successful devices such as the Fraunhofer ("diffraction") grating, Bragg grating, thin-film filter (TFF), and dispersion-compensating fiber (DCF). More complicated manipulations, however, often require either problematic cascades of many simple elements, the use of custom technologies that offer little adjustment, or the implementation of fully programmable devices, which allow for the desired spectral function to be synthesized ab initio. Here, I present the Binary Supergrating (BSG), a novel technology that permits the programmable and near-arbitrary control of optical amplitude and phase using a simple, robust and practical form. This guided-wave form consists of an aperiodic sequence of binary elements; the sequence, determined through the process of BSG synthesis, encodes an optical program that defines device functionality. The ability to derive optical programs that address broad spectral demands is central to the BSG's extensive capabilities. In consequence, I present a powerful approach to synthesis that exploits existing knowledge in the design of "analog" gratings. This approach is based on a two-step process, which first derives an analog diffractive structure using the best available methods and then transforms it into binary form. Accordingly, I discuss the notion of diffractive structure transformation and introduce the principle of key information. I identify such key information and illustrate its application in grating quantizers based on an atypical form of Delta-Sigma modulation. As a digital approach to spectral engineering, the BSG presents many of the same advantages offered by the digital approach to electronic signal processing (DSP) over its analog predecessors. As such, it

  12. Spectral Analysis Methods of Social Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. G. Klyucharev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Online social networks (such as Facebook, Twitter, VKontakte, etc. being an important channel for disseminating information are often used to arrange an impact on the social consciousness for various purposes - from advertising products or services to the full-scale information war thereby making them to be a very relevant object of research. The paper reviewed the analysis methods of social networks (primarily, online, based on the spectral theory of graphs. Such methods use the spectrum of the social graph, i.e. a set of eigenvalues of its adjacency matrix, and also the eigenvectors of the adjacency matrix.Described measures of centrality (in particular, centrality based on the eigenvector and PageRank, which reflect a degree of impact one or another user of the social network has. A very popular PageRank measure uses, as a measure of centrality, the graph vertices, the final probabilities of the Markov chain, whose matrix of transition probabilities is calculated on the basis of the adjacency matrix of the social graph. The vector of final probabilities is an eigenvector of the matrix of transition probabilities.Presented a method of dividing the graph vertices into two groups. It is based on maximizing the network modularity by computing the eigenvector of the modularity matrix.Considered a method for detecting bots based on the non-randomness measure of a graph to be computed using the spectral coordinates of vertices - sets of eigenvector components of the adjacency matrix of a social graph.In general, there are a number of algorithms to analyse social networks based on the spectral theory of graphs. These algorithms show very good results, but their disadvantage is the relatively high (albeit polynomial computational complexity for large graphs.At the same time it is obvious that the practical application capacity of the spectral graph theory methods is still underestimated, and it may be used as a basis to develop new methods.The work

  13. Spectral evolution of dwarf nova outbursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannizzo, J.K.; Kenyon, S.J.

    1987-01-01

    The disk instability model for dwarf nova eruptions is investigated by computing the spectral development of the accretion disk through a complete limit cycle. Observed stellar spectra are used to model the radiation emitted by optically thick annuli within the disc. The general findings agree with those of Smak (1984) and Pringle et al. (1986). It is suggested that the dwarf nova oscillations might be a source of information concerning the evolution of the inner disk and that detailed observations of this phenomenon can be used to test various outburst mechanisms. 74 references

  14. The Improvement of Automated Spectral Identification Tool ASERA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hailong; zhang, Yanxia

    2015-08-01

    The regular survey of Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) has acquired over four millions spectra of celestial objects by the summer of 2014, covering about a third of the whole sky area. More spectra will be obtained as the survey projects (eg. LAMOST, SDSS) keeps going on. To effectively make use of the massive spectral data, various advanced data analysis methods and technologies are in great requirement. ASERA, A Spectrum Eye Recognition Assistant, provides a simple convenient solution for the user to access spectra from LAMOST and SDSS, identify their types (QSO, galaxy, and various types of stars) and estimate their redshifts in an interactive graphic interface. The toolkit is at first especially designed for quasar identification. By shifting the quasar template overlaping the target spectrum interactively, one can easily find out the best broad emission line position and the redshift value. Now, besides the quasar template, various templates for different types of galaxies (early type, later type, starburst, bulge, elliptical and luminous red galaxies) and stars (O, B, A, F, G, K, M, WD, CV, Double Stars and Emission-Line-Objects) are added. We also have developed many new useful functionalities for inspecting and analyzing spectra, such as zooming, line fitting, smoothing and automatic result saving. The target information from input catalogues and data processing result from the pipeline as well as fitting parameters for various types of templates, can be presented at the same time. Several volume processing components are developed to support the cooperation with MySQL database, internet resources and SSAP services. ASERA will be a strong helper for astronomers to recognize spectra.

  15. Spectral Hounsfield units: a new radiological concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurrell, Michael Anthony; Butler, Anthony Philip Howard; Cook, Nicholas James; Butler, Philip Howard; Ronaldson, J.P.; Zainon, Rafidah

    2012-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) uses radiographical density to depict different materials; although different elements have different absorption fingerprints across the range of diagnostic X-ray energies, this spectral absorption information is lost in conventional CT. The recent development of dual energy CT (DECT) allows extraction of this information to a useful but limited extent. However, the advent of new photon counting chips that have energy resolution capabilities has put multi-energy or spectral CT (SCT) on the clinical horizon. This paper uses a prototype SCT system to demonstrate how CT density measurements vary with kilovoltage. While radiologists learn about linear attenuation curves during radiology training, they do not usually need a detailed understanding of this phenomenon in their clinical practice. However SCT requires a paradigm shift in how radiologists think about CT density. Because radiologists are already familiar with the Hounsfield Unit (HU), it is proposed that a modified HU be used that includes the mean energy used to obtain the image, as a conceptual bridge between conventional CT and SCT. A suggested format would be: HU keV . (orig.)

  16. Recursive and Fast Recursive Capon Spectral Estimators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Jingdong

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The Capon algorithm, which was originally proposed for wavenumber estimation in array signal processing, has become a powerful tool for spectral analysis. Over several decades, a significant amount of research attention has been devoted to the estimation of the Capon spectrum. Most of the developed algorithms thus far, however, rely on the direct computation of the inverse of the input correlation (or covariance matrix, which can be computationally very expensive particularly when the dimension of the matrix is large. This paper deals with fast and efficient algorithms in computing the Capon spectrum. Inspired from the recursive idea established in adaptive signal processing theory, we first derive a recursive Capon algorithm. This new algorithm does not require an explicit matrix inversion, and hence it is more efficient to implement than the direct-inverse approach. We then develop a fast version of the recursive algorithm based on techniques used in fast recursive least-squares adaptive algorithms. This new fast algorithm can further reduce the complexity of the recursive Capon algorithm by an order of magnitude. Although our focus is on the Capon spectral estimation, the ideas shown in this paper can also be generalized and applied to other applications. To illustrate this, we will show how to apply the recursive idea to the estimation of the magnitude squared coherence function, which plays an important role for problems like time-delay estimation, signal-to-noise ratio estimation, and doubletalk detection in echo cancellation.

  17. Multitaper spectral analysis of atmospheric radar signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. K. Anandan

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Multitaper spectral analysis using sinusoidal taper has been carried out on the backscattered signals received from the troposphere and lower stratosphere by the Gadanki Mesosphere-Stratosphere-Troposphere (MST radar under various conditions of the signal-to-noise ratio. Comparison of study is made with sinusoidal taper of the order of three and single tapers of Hanning and rectangular tapers, to understand the relative merits of processing under the scheme. Power spectra plots show that echoes are better identified in the case of multitaper estimation, especially in the region of a weak signal-to-noise ratio. Further analysis is carried out to obtain three lower order moments from three estimation techniques. The results show that multitaper analysis gives a better signal-to-noise ratio or higher detectability. The spectral analysis through multitaper and single tapers is subjected to study of consistency in measurements. Results show that the multitaper estimate is better consistent in Doppler measurements compared to single taper estimates. Doppler width measurements with different approaches were studied and the results show that the estimation was better in the multitaper technique in terms of temporal resolution and estimation accuracy.

  18. Kernel spectral clustering with memory effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langone, Rocco; Alzate, Carlos; Suykens, Johan A. K.

    2013-05-01

    Evolving graphs describe many natural phenomena changing over time, such as social relationships, trade markets, metabolic networks etc. In this framework, performing community detection and analyzing the cluster evolution represents a critical task. Here we propose a new model for this purpose, where the smoothness of the clustering results over time can be considered as a valid prior knowledge. It is based on a constrained optimization formulation typical of Least Squares Support Vector Machines (LS-SVM), where the objective function is designed to explicitly incorporate temporal smoothness. The latter allows the model to cluster the current data well and to be consistent with the recent history. We also propose new model selection criteria in order to carefully choose the hyper-parameters of our model, which is a crucial issue to achieve good performances. We successfully test the model on four toy problems and on a real world network. We also compare our model with Evolutionary Spectral Clustering, which is a state-of-the-art algorithm for community detection of evolving networks, illustrating that the kernel spectral clustering with memory effect can achieve better or equal performances.

  19. Plasmonic spectral tunability of conductive ternary nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassavetis, S.; Patsalas, P., E-mail: ppats@physics.auth.gr [Department of Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, GR-54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Bellas, D. V.; Lidorikis, E. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ioannina, GR-45110 Ioannina (Greece); Abadias, G. [Institut Pprime, Département Physique et Mécanique des Matériaux, Université de Poitiers-CNRS-ENSMA, 86962 Chasseneuil-Futuroscope (France)

    2016-06-27

    Conductive binary transition metal nitrides, such as TiN and ZrN, have emerged as a category of promising alternative plasmonic materials. In this work, we show that ternary transition metal nitrides such as Ti{sub x}Ta{sub 1−x}N, Ti{sub x}Zr{sub 1−x}N, Ti{sub x}Al{sub 1−x}N, and Zr{sub x}Ta{sub 1−x}N share the important plasmonic features with their binary counterparts, while having the additional asset of the exceptional spectral tunability in the entire visible (400–700 nm) and UVA (315–400 nm) spectral ranges depending on their net valence electrons. In particular, we demonstrate that such ternary nitrides can exhibit maximum field enhancement factors comparable with gold in the aforementioned broadband range. We also critically evaluate the structural features that affect the quality factor of the plasmon resonance and we provide rules of thumb for the selection and growth of materials for nitride plasmonics.

  20. ALEPH Tau Spectral Functions and QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Davier, M; Zhang, Z; Davier, Michel; Hoecker, Andreas; Zhang, Zhiqing

    2007-01-01

    Hadronic $\\tau$ decays provide a clean laboratory for the precise study of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). Observables based on the spectral functions of hadronic $\\tau$ decays can be related to QCD quark-level calculations to determine fundamental quantities like the strong coupling constant, quark and gluon condensates. Using the ALEPH spectral functions and branching ratios, complemented by some other available measurements, and a revisited analysis of the theoretical framework, the value $\\asm = 0.345 \\pm 0.004_{\\rm exp} \\pm 0.009_{\\rm th}$ is obtained. Taken together with the determination of \\asZ from the global electroweak fit, this result leads to the most accurate test of asymptotic freedom: the value of the logarithmic slope of $\\alpha_s^{-1}(s)$ is found to agree with QCD at a precision of 4%. The value of \\asZ obtained from $\\tau$ decays is $\\asZ = 0.1215 \\pm 0.0004_{\\rm exp} \\pm 0.0010_{\\rm th} \\pm 0.0005_{\\rm evol} = 0.1215 \\pm 0.0012$.

  1. Spectral analysis and the Riemann hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachaud, Gilles

    2003-11-01

    The explicit formulas of Riemann and Guinand-Weil relate the set of prime numbers with the set of nontrivial zeros of the zeta function of Riemann. We recall Alain Connes' spectral interpretation of the critical zeros of the Riemann zeta function as eigenvalues of the absorption spectrum of an unbounded operator in a suitable Hilbert space. We then give a spectral interpretation of the zeros of the Dedekind zeta function of an algebraic number field K of degree n in an automorphic setting. If K is a complex quadratic field, the torical forms are the functions defined on the modular surface X, such that the sum of this function over the "Gauss set" of K is zero, and Eisenstein series provide such torical forms. In the case of a general number field, one can associate to K a maximal torus T of the general linear group G. The torical forms are the functions defined on the modular variety X associated to G, such that the integral over the subvariety induced by T is zero. Alternately, the torical forms are the functions which are orthogonal to orbital series on X. We show here that the Riemann hypothesis is equivalent to certain conditions bearing on spaces of torical forms, constructed from Eisenstein series, the torical wave packets. Furthermore, we define a Hilbert space and a self-adjoint operator on this space, whose spectrum equals the set of critical zeros of the Dedekind zeta function of K.

  2. Function of snake mobbing in spectral tarsiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gursky, Sharon

    2006-04-01

    Numerous species are known for their tendency to approach and confront their predators as a group. This behavior is known as mobbing. Snakes seem to be one of the more consistent recipients of this type of predator-directed behavior. This paper explores individual differences (sex and age) in the mobbing behavior of the spectral tarsier toward live and model snakes. This study was conducted at Tangkoko Nature Reserve (Sulawesi, Indonesia) during 2003-2004. During this research, 11 natural mobbing events and 31 artificially induced mobbing events were observed. The mean number of individuals at a mobbing was 5.7. The duration of mobbing events was strongly correlated with the number of assembled mobbers. Adults were more likely than other age classes to participate in mobbings. Males were more likely than females to participate in mobbings. Mobbing groups often contained more than one adult male, despite the fact that no spectral tarsier group contains more than one adult male. No difference in body size between extragroup males and resident males was observed, refuting the "attract the mightier" hypothesis. The number of mobbers did not affect whether the tarsier or the snake retreated first, countering the "move-on" hypothesis. The "perception advertisement" hypothesis was tentatively supported, in that live snakes were rarely seen in the area following mobbing calls, in comparison to when tarsiers either ignored the snake or alarm call. Copyright 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Mercury's Pyroclastic Deposits and their spectral variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besse, Sebastien; Doressoundiram, Alain

    2016-10-01

    Observations of the MESSENGER spacecraft in orbit around Mercury have shown that volcanism is a very important process that has shaped the surface of the planet, in particular in its early history.In this study, we use the full range of the MASCS spectrometer (300-1400nm) to characterize the spectral properties of the pyroclastic deposits. Analysis of deposits within the Caloris Basin, and on other location of Mercury's surface (e.g., Hesiod, Rachmaninoff, etc.) show two main results: 1) Spectral variability is significant in the UV and VIS range between the deposits themselves, and also with respect to the rest of the planet and other features like hollows, 2) Deposits exhibit a radial variability similar to those found with the lunar pyroclastic deposits of floor fractured craters.These results are put in context with the latest analysis of other instruments of the MESSENGER spacecraft, in particular the visible observations from the imager MDIS, and the elemental composition given by the X-Ray spectrometer. Although all together, the results do not allow pointing to compositional variability of the deposits for certain, information on the formation mechanisms, the weathering and the age formation can be extrapolated from the radial variability and the elemental composition.

  4. EXOPLANETARY DETECTION BY MULTIFRACTAL SPECTRAL ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Sahil; Wettlaufer, John S. [Program in Applied Mathematics, Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States); Sordo, Fabio Del [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Owing to technological advances, the number of exoplanets discovered has risen dramatically in the last few years. However, when trying to observe Earth analogs, it is often difficult to test the veracity of detection. We have developed a new approach to the analysis of exoplanetary spectral observations based on temporal multifractality, which identifies timescales that characterize planetary orbital motion around the host star and those that arise from stellar features such as spots. Without fitting stellar models to spectral data, we show how the planetary signal can be robustly detected from noisy data using noise amplitude as a source of information. For observation of transiting planets, combining this method with simple geometry allows us to relate the timescales obtained to primary and secondary eclipse of the exoplanets. Making use of data obtained with ground-based and space-based observations we have tested our approach on HD 189733b. Moreover, we have investigated the use of this technique in measuring planetary orbital motion via Doppler shift detection. Finally, we have analyzed synthetic spectra obtained using the SOAP 2.0 tool, which simulates a stellar spectrum and the influence of the presence of a planet or a spot on that spectrum over one orbital period. We have demonstrated that, so long as the signal-to-noise-ratio ≥ 75, our approach reconstructs the planetary orbital period, as well as the rotation period of a spot on the stellar surface.

  5. Exploratory Item Classification Via Spectral Graph Clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunxiao; Li, Xiaoou; Liu, Jingchen; Xu, Gongjun; Ying, Zhiliang

    2017-01-01

    Large-scale assessments are supported by a large item pool. An important task in test development is to assign items into scales that measure different characteristics of individuals, and a popular approach is cluster analysis of items. Classical methods in cluster analysis, such as the hierarchical clustering, K-means method, and latent-class analysis, often induce a high computational overhead and have difficulty handling missing data, especially in the presence of high-dimensional responses. In this article, the authors propose a spectral clustering algorithm for exploratory item cluster analysis. The method is computationally efficient, effective for data with missing or incomplete responses, easy to implement, and often outperforms traditional clustering algorithms in the context of high dimensionality. The spectral clustering algorithm is based on graph theory, a branch of mathematics that studies the properties of graphs. The algorithm first constructs a graph of items, characterizing the similarity structure among items. It then extracts item clusters based on the graphical structure, grouping similar items together. The proposed method is evaluated through simulations and an application to the revised Eysenck Personality Questionnaire.

  6. Spectral intensities in trivalent lanthanide systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acevedo, Roberto [Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Mayor, Avenida Manuel Montt 367, Postal code 7500994, Providencia, Santiago (Chile)], E-mail: roberto.acevedo@umayor.cl; Soto-Bubert, Andres; Bosch, Paul [Instituto de Ciencias Basicas, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Diego Portales, Avenida Ejercito 441, Casilla 298-V, Santiago (Chile); Strek, Wieslaw [Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, Okoelna 2, 50-422 Wroclaw (Poland)

    2008-08-11

    The main goal of this research work is to rationalize the rich vibronic structure of lanthanide type crystals, such as Cs{sub 2}NaDyCl{sub 6} and Cs{sub 2}NaHoCl{sub 6}, in the space group Fm3m(O{sub h}{sup 5}). These systems are known to be highly relativistic and as a consequence, major corrections to previous model calculations should be taken into account so as to explain from a semi-quantitative viewpoint, the observed spectral intensities. We have decided to tackle this study taking special care, of both the physics and the chemistry involved with special emphasis on the theoretical model to be employed as well as, in the strategy to be followed to rationalize the available experimental data. This paper aims to advance our understanding of the intensity mechanisms, associated with observed radiative transitions, say for complex highly relativistic systems, in the solid state physics. The spectral intensities associated with superpositions (juxtapositions) of peaks and/or bands in the absortion and emission spectra are considered in detail and a preliminary working methodology is put forward with reference to the Cs{sub 2}NaDyCl{sub 6} and Cs{sub 2}NaHoCl{sub 6} crystals.

  7. CMB spectral distortion constraints on thermal inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Kihyun; Stewart, Ewan D. [Department of Physics, KAIST, Daejeon 34141 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Sungwook E. [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 34055 (Korea, Republic of); Zoe, Heeseung, E-mail: cho_physics@kaist.ac.kr, E-mail: heezoe@dgist.ac.kr, E-mail: jcap@profstewart.org, E-mail: heezoe@dgist.ac.kr [School of Undergraduate Studies, College of Transdisciplinary Studies, Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST), Daegu 42988 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-01

    Thermal inflation is a second epoch of exponential expansion at typical energy scales V {sup 1/4} ∼ 10{sup 6} {sup ∼} {sup 8} GeV. If the usual primordial inflation is followed by thermal inflation, the primordial power spectrum is only modestly redshifted on large scales, but strongly suppressed on scales smaller than the horizon size at the beginning of thermal inflation, k > k {sub b} = a {sub b} H {sub b}. We calculate the spectral distortion of the cosmic microwave background generated by the dissipation of acoustic waves in this context. For k {sub b} || 10{sup 3} Mpc{sup −1}, thermal inflation results in a large suppression of the μ-distortion amplitude, predicting that it falls well below the standard value of μ ≅ 2× 10{sup −8}. Thus, future spectral distortion experiments, similar to PIXIE, can place new limits on the thermal inflation scenario, constraining k {sub b} ∼> 10{sup 3} Mpc{sup −1} if μ ≅ 2× 10{sup −8} were found.

  8. Spectrally resolved single-molecule electrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggeri, F.; Krishnan, M.

    2018-03-01

    Escape-time electrometry is a recently developed experimental technique that offers the ability to measure the effective electrical charge of a single biomolecule in solution with sub-elementary charge precision. The approach relies on measuring the average escape-time of a single charged macromolecule or molecular species transiently confined in an electrostatic fluidic trap. Comparing the experiments with the predictions of a mean-field model of molecular electrostatics, we have found that the measured effective charge even reports on molecular conformation, e.g., folded or disordered state, and non-uniform charge distribution in disordered proteins or polyelectrolytes. Here we demonstrate the ability to use the spectral dimension to distinguish minute differences in electrical charge between individual molecules or molecular species in a single simultaneous measurement, under identical experimental conditions. Using one spectral channel for referenced measurement, this kind of photophysical distinguishability essentially eliminates the need for accurate knowledge of key experimental parameters, otherwise obtained through intensive characterization of the experimental setup. As examples, we demonstrate the ability to detect small differences (˜5%) in the length of double-stranded DNA fragments as well as single amino acid exchange in an intrinsically disordered protein, prothymosin α.

  9. Reader survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Many, thanks to the hundreds of people who took the time to reply to the CERN Courier readership survey questionnaire published in our May issue. Bringing out a monthly journal is a lonely business. Issue after issue goes out, and the only response is when there's an occasional factual error. Send out a readership survey and a faint echo comes back. Most striking was the sheer enthusiasm of the replies. Despite the current erosion of support in the US (see page 2), subatomic physics has significant world-wide box-office appeal. Most important was to find out who our readers are. 61% of the replies came from Europe, 21% from the USA, 14% from elsewhere, (including the former Soviet Union), and 4% from inside CERN. Not surprisingly, the main audience (37%) is in the high energy physics sector. Then comes teaching (31%), followed closely by accelerators operations and design (12%) and industry (11%). Apart from detailed breakdowns of readership and feedback on the journal's content and style, the replies revealed several major features. Firstly, the CERN Courier is widely read and appreciated. There are a lot of people outside the immediate research field who want to keep broadly up to date with the latest developments in high energy physics and related fields, without getting too involved in details. It was gratifying to receive replies from far-flung places (Nepal, Indonesia,....), and learn how much distant readers appreciate getting such regular information. 'It helps us feel part of the world scene,' was a typical such reply, from Australia. Despite jet airplanes, fax and electronic mail, our planet is still big

  10. Spectral Clustering of Hermean craters hollows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchetti, Alice; Pajola, Maurizio; Cremonese, Gabriele; Carli, Cristian; Marzo, Giuseppe; Roush, Ted

    2017-04-01

    The Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS, Hawkins et al., 2007) onboard NASA MESSENGER (MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging) spacecraft, provided high-resolution images of "hollows", i.e. shallow, irregular, rimless, flat-floored depressions with bright interiors and halos, often found on crater walls, rims, floors and central peaks (Blewett et al., 2011, 2013). The formation mechanism of these features was suggested to be related to the depletion of subsurface volatiles (Blewett et al., 2011, Vaughan et al., 2012). To understand the hollows' mineralogical composition, which can provide new insights on Mercury's surface characterization, we applied a spectral clustering method to different craters where hollows are present. We chose, as first test case, the 20 km wide Dominici crater due to previous multiple spectral detection (Vilas et al., 2016). We used the MDIS WAC dataset covering Dominici crater with a scale of 935 m/pixel through eight filters, ranging from 0.433 to 0.996 μm. First, the images have been photometrically corrected using the Hapke parameters (Hapke et al., 2002) derived in Domingue et al. (2015). We then applied a statistical clustering over the entire dataset based on a K-means partitioning algorithm (Marzo et al., 2006). This approach was developed and evaluated by Marzo et al. (2006, 2008, 2009) and makes use of the Calinski and Harabasz criterion (Calinski, T., Harabasz, J., 1974) to identify the intrinsically natural number of clusters, making the process unsupervised. The natural number of ten clusters was identified and spectrally separates the Dominici surrounding terrains from its interior, as well as the two hollows from their edges. The units located on the brightest part of the south wall/rim of Dominici crater clearly present a wide absorption band between 0.558 and 0.828 μm. Hollows surrounding terrains typically present a red slope in the VNIR with a possible weak absorption band centered at 0.748

  11. Progress on multi-object exoplanet search spectral interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Zhu, Yongtian; Wang, Lei; Yue, Zhongyu; Chen, Yi; Tang, Jin; Hu, Zhongwen

    2012-09-01

    It's a very important point that fully open up power of Gou Shoujing telescope (LAMOST) in exoplanet detection field by developing a multi-exoplanet survey system. But it's an indisputable truth in the present astronomy that a traditional type of multi-object high resolution spectrograph is almost impossible to be developed. External Dispersed Interferometry is an effective way to improve the radial velocity measuring accuracy of medium resolution spectrograph. With the using of this technique, Multi-object Exoplanet Search Spectral Interferometer (MESSI) is an exploratory system with medium measuring accuracy based on LAMOST low resolution spectrograph works in medium-resolution mode (R=5,000 - 10,000). And it's believed that will bring some feasible way in the future development of multi-object medium/high resolution spectrograph. After prototype experiment in 2010, a complete configuration is under the development, including a multi-object fixed-delay Michelson interferometer, an iodine cell with multi-fiber optical coupling system and a multi-terminal switching system in an efficient fiber physical coupling way. By some effective improvement, the interferometer has smaller cross section and more stable interference component. Moreover, based on physical and optical fiber coupling technique, it's possible for the iodine cell and the switching system to simultaneously and identically coupling 25 pairs of fibers. In paper, all of the progress is given in detail.

  12. REMOTE SPECTRAL IMAGING USING A LOW COST UAV SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Tsouvaltsidis

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this scientific survey is to support the research being conducted at York University in the field of spectroscopy and nanosatellites using Argus 1000 micro- spectrometer and low cost unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV system. On the CanX-2 mission, the Argus spectrometer observes reflected infrared solar radiation emitted by Earth surface targets as small as 1.5 km within the 0.9-1.7 μm range. However, limitations in the volume of data due to onboard power constraints and a lack of an onboard camera system make it very difficult to verify these objectives using ground truth. In the last five years that Argus has been in operation, we have made over 200 observations over a series of land and ocean targets. We have recently examined algorithms to improve the geolocation accuracy of the spectrometer payload and began to conduct an analysis of soil health content using Argus spectral data. A field campaign is used to obtain data to assess geolocation accuracy using coastline crossing detection and to obtain airborne bare soil spectra in ground truth form. The payload system used for the field campaign consists of an Argus spectrometer, optical camera, GPS, and attitude sensors, integrated into a low-cost, unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV, which will be presented along with the experimental procedure and field campaign results.

  13. Remote Spectral Imaging Using a Low Cost Uav System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsouvaltsidis, C.; Salem, N. Zaid Al; Benari, G.; Vrekalic, D.; Quine, B.

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this scientific survey is to support the research being conducted at York University in the field of spectroscopy and nanosatellites using Argus 1000 micro- spectrometer and low cost unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) system. On the CanX-2 mission, the Argus spectrometer observes reflected infrared solar radiation emitted by Earth surface targets as small as 1.5 km within the 0.9-1.7 μm range. However, limitations in the volume of data due to onboard power constraints and a lack of an onboard camera system make it very difficult to verify these objectives using ground truth. In the last five years that Argus has been in operation, we have made over 200 observations over a series of land and ocean targets. We have recently examined algorithms to improve the geolocation accuracy of the spectrometer payload and began to conduct an analysis of soil health content using Argus spectral data. A field campaign is used to obtain data to assess geolocation accuracy using coastline crossing detection and to obtain airborne bare soil spectra in ground truth form. The payload system used for the field campaign consists of an Argus spectrometer, optical camera, GPS, and attitude sensors, integrated into a low-cost, unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), which will be presented along with the experimental procedure and field campaign results.

  14. Central stars of planetary nebulae: New spectral classifications and catalogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidmann, W. A.; Gamen, R.

    2011-02-01

    Context. There are more than 3000 confirmed and probable known Galactic planetary nebulae (PNe), but central star spectroscopic information is available for only 13% of them. Aims: We undertook a spectroscopic survey of central stars of PNe at low resolution and compiled a large list of central stars for which information was dispersed in the literature. Methods: We observed 45 PNs using the 2.15 m telescope at Casleo, Argentina. Results: We present a catalogue of 492 confirmed and probable CSPN and provide a preliminary spectral classification for 45 central star of PNe. This revises previous values of the proportion of CSPN with atmospheres poor in hydrogen in at least 30% of cases and provide statistical information that allows us to infer the origin of H-poor stars. Based on data collected at the Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito (CASLEO), which is operated under agreement between the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas de la República Argentina y Universidades Nacionales de La Plata, Córdoba y San Juan, Argentina.

  15. High speed parallel spectral-domain OCT using spectrally encoded line-field illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kye-Sung; Hur, Hwan; Bae, Ji Yong; Kim, I. Jong; Kim, Dong Uk; Nam, Ki-Hwan; Kim, Geon-Hee; Chang, Ki Soo

    2018-01-01

    We report parallel spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) at 500 000 A-scan/s. This is the highest-speed spectral-domain (SD) OCT system using a single line camera. Spectrally encoded line-field scanning is proposed to increase the imaging speed in SD-OCT effectively, and the tradeoff between speed, depth range, and sensitivity is demonstrated. We show that three imaging modes of 125k, 250k, and 500k A-scan/s can be simply switched according to the sample to be imaged considering the depth range and sensitivity. To demonstrate the biological imaging performance of the high-speed imaging modes of the spectrally encoded line-field OCT system, human skin and a whole leaf were imaged at the speed of 250k and 500k A-scan/s, respectively. In addition, there is no sensitivity dependence in the B-scan direction, which is implicit in line-field parallel OCT using line focusing of a Gaussian beam with a cylindrical lens.

  16. Spectral analysis of a class of Schrodinger operators exhibiting a parameter-dependent spectral transition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Barseghyan, Diana; Exner, Pavel; Khrabustovskyi, A.; Tater, Miloš

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 16 (2016), s. 165302 ISSN 1751-8113 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-06818S Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Schrodinger operator * eigenvalue estimates * spectral transition Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 1.857, year: 2016

  17. Upconversion based spectral imaging in 6 to 8 μm spectral regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junaid, Saher; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Pedersen, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Spectral imaging in the 6 to 8μm range has great potential for medical diagnostics. Here a novel technique based on frequency upconversion of the infrared images to the near visible for subsequent acquisition using a Si-CCD camera is investigated. The upconversion unit consists of an AgGaS2 crystal...

  18. Towards quantized number theory: spectral operators and an asymmetric criterion for the Riemann hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapidus, Michel L

    2015-08-06

    This research expository article not only contains a survey of earlier work but also contains a main new result, which we first describe. Given c≥0, the spectral operator [Formula: see text] can be thought of intuitively as the operator which sends the geometry onto the spectrum of a fractal string of dimension not exceeding c. Rigorously, it turns out to coincide with a suitable quantization of the Riemann zeta function ζ=ζ(s): a=ζ(∂), where ∂=∂(c) is the infinitesimal shift of the real line acting on the weighted Hilbert space [Formula: see text]. In this paper, we establish a new asymmetric criterion for the Riemann hypothesis (RH), expressed in terms of the invertibility of the spectral operator for all values of the dimension parameter [Formula: see text] (i.e. for all c in the left half of the critical interval (0,1)). This corresponds (conditionally) to a mathematical (and perhaps also, physical) 'phase transition' occurring in the midfractal case when [Formula: see text]. Both the universality and the non-universality of ζ=ζ(s) in the right (resp., left) critical strip [Formula: see text] (resp., [Formula: see text]) play a key role in this context. These new results are presented here. We also briefly discuss earlier joint work on the complex dimensions of fractal strings, and we survey earlier related work of the author with Maier and with Herichi, respectively, in which were established symmetric criteria for the RH, expressed, respectively, in terms of a family of natural inverse spectral problems for fractal strings of Minkowski dimension D∈(0,1), with [Formula: see text], and of the quasi-invertibility of the family of spectral operators [Formula: see text] (with [Formula: see text]). © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  19. Spectral signature verification using statistical analysis and text mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCoster, Mallory E.; Firpi, Alexe H.; Jacobs, Samantha K.; Cone, Shelli R.; Tzeng, Nigel H.; Rodriguez, Benjamin M.

    2016-05-01

    In the spectral science community, numerous spectral signatures are stored in databases representative of many sample materials collected from a variety of spectrometers and spectroscopists. Due to the variety and variability of the spectra that comprise many spectral databases, it is necessary to establish a metric for validating the quality of spectral signatures. This has been an area of great discussion and debate in the spectral science community. This paper discusses a method that independently validates two different aspects of a spectral signature to arrive at a final qualitative assessment; the textual meta-data and numerical spectral data. Results associated with the spectral data stored in the Signature Database1 (SigDB) are proposed. The numerical data comprising a sample material's spectrum is validated based on statistical properties derived from an ideal population set. The quality of the test spectrum is ranked based on a spectral angle mapper (SAM) comparison to the mean spectrum derived from the population set. Additionally, the contextual data of a test spectrum is qualitatively analyzed using lexical analysis text mining. This technique analyzes to understand the syntax of the meta-data to provide local learning patterns and trends within the spectral data, indicative of the test spectrum's quality. Text mining applications have successfully been implemented for security2 (text encryption/decryption), biomedical3 , and marketing4 applications. The text mining lexical analysis algorithm is trained on the meta-data patterns of a subset of high and low quality spectra, in order to have a model to apply to the entire SigDB data set. The statistical and textual methods combine to assess the quality of a test spectrum existing in a database without the need of an expert user. This method has been compared to other validation methods accepted by the spectral science community, and has provided promising results when a baseline spectral signature is

  20. The Open Spectral Database: an open platform for sharing and searching spectral data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalk, Stuart J

    2016-01-01

    A number of websites make available spectral data for download (typically as JCAMP-DX text files) and one (ChemSpider) that also allows users to contribute spectral files. As a result, searching and retrieving such spectral data can be time consuming, and difficult to reuse if the data is compressed in the JCAMP-DX file. What is needed is a single resource that allows submission of JCAMP-DX files, export of the raw data in multiple formats, searching based on multiple chemical identifiers, and is open in terms of license and access. To address these issues a new online resource called the Open Spectral Database (OSDB) http://osdb.info/ has been developed and is now available. Built using open source tools, using open code (hosted on GitHub), providing open data, and open to community input about design and functionality, the OSDB is available for anyone to submit spectral data, making it searchable and available to the scientific community. This paper details the concept and coding, internal architecture, export formats, Representational State Transfer (REST) Application Programming Interface and options for submission of data. The OSDB website went live in November 2015. Concurrently, the GitHub repository was made available at https://github.com/stuchalk/OSDB/, and is open for collaborators to join the project, submit issues, and contribute code. The combination of a scripting environment (PHPStorm), a PHP Framework (CakePHP), a relational database (MySQL) and a code repository (GitHub) provides all the capabilities to easily develop REST based websites for ingestion, curation and exposure of open chemical data to the community at all levels. It is hoped this software stack (or equivalent ones in other scripting languages) will be leveraged to make more chemical data available for both humans and computers.

  1. Pseudo-spectral methodology for a quantitative assessment of the cover of in-stream vegetation in small streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershkovitz, Yaron; Anker, Yaakov; Ben-Dor, Eyal; Schwartz, Guy; Gasith, Avital

    2010-05-01

    In-stream vegetation is a key ecosystem component in many fluvial ecosystems, having cascading effects on stream conditions and biotic structure. Traditionally, ground-level surveys (e.g. grid and transect analyses) are commonly used for estimating cover of aquatic macrophytes. Nonetheless, this methodological approach is highly time consuming and usually yields information which is practically limited to habitat and sub-reach scales. In contrast, remote-sensing techniques (e.g. satellite imagery and airborne photography), enable collection of large datasets over section, stream and basin scales, in relatively short time and reasonable cost. However, the commonly used spatial high resolution (1m) is often inadequate for examining aquatic vegetation on habitat or sub-reach scales. We examined the utility of a pseudo-spectral methodology, using RGB digital photography for estimating the cover of in-stream vegetation in a small Mediterranean-climate stream. We compared this methodology with that obtained by traditional ground-level grid methodology and with an airborne hyper-spectral remote sensing survey (AISA-ES). The study was conducted along a 2 km section of an intermittent stream (Taninim stream, Israel). When studied, the stream was dominated by patches of watercress (Nasturtium officinale) and mats of filamentous algae (Cladophora glomerata). The extent of vegetation cover at the habitat and section scales (100 and 104 m, respectively) were estimated by the pseudo-spectral methodology, using an airborne Roli camera with a Phase-One P 45 (39 MP) CCD image acquisition unit. The swaths were taken in elevation of about 460 m having a spatial resolution of about 4 cm (NADIR). For measuring vegetation cover at the section scale (104 m) we also used a 'push-broom' AISA-ES hyper-spectral swath having a sensor configuration of 182 bands (350-2500 nm) at elevation of ca. 1,200 m (i.e. spatial resolution of ca. 1 m). Simultaneously, with every swath we used an Analytical

  2. Development of Jet Noise Power Spectral Laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khavaran, Abbas; Bridges, James

    2011-01-01

    High-quality jet noise spectral data measured at the Aero-Acoustic Propulsion Laboratory (AAPL) at NASA Glenn is used to develop jet noise scaling laws. A FORTRAN algorithm was written that provides detailed spectral prediction of component jet noise at user-specified conditions. The model generates quick estimates of the jet mixing noise and the broadband shock-associated noise (BBSN) in single-stream, axis-symmetric jets within a wide range of nozzle operating conditions. Shock noise is emitted when supersonic jets exit a nozzle at imperfectly expanded conditions. A successful scaling of the BBSN allows for this noise component to be predicted in both convergent and convergent-divergent nozzles. Configurations considered in this study consisted of convergent and convergent- divergent nozzles. Velocity exponents for the jet mixing noise were evaluated as a function of observer angle and jet temperature. Similar intensity laws were developed for the broadband shock-associated noise in supersonic jets. A computer program called sJet was developed that provides a quick estimate of component noise in single-stream jets at a wide range of operating conditions. A number of features have been incorporated into the data bank and subsequent scaling in order to improve jet noise predictions. Measurements have been converted to a lossless format. Set points have been carefully selected to minimize the instability-related noise at small aft angles. Regression parameters have been scrutinized for error bounds at each angle. Screech-related amplification noise has been kept to a minimum to ensure that the velocity exponents for the jet mixing noise remain free of amplifications. A shock-noise-intensity scaling has been developed independent of the nozzle design point. The computer program provides detailed narrow-band spectral predictions for component noise (mixing noise and shock associated noise), as well as the total noise. Although the methodology is confined to single

  3. Extreme ultraviolet spectral irradiance measurements since 1946

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidtke, G.

    2015-03-01

    In the physics of the upper atmosphere the solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation plays a dominant role controlling most of the thermospheric/ionospheric (T/I) processes. Since this part of the solar spectrum is absorbed in the thermosphere, platforms to measure the EUV fluxes became only available with the development of rockets reaching altitude levels exceeding 80 km. With the availability of V2 rockets used in space research, recording of EUV spectra started in 1946 using photographic films. The development of pointing devices to accurately orient the spectrographs toward the sun initiated intense activities in solar-terrestrial research. The application of photoelectric recording technology enabled the scientists placing EUV spectrometers aboard satellites observing qualitatively strong variability of the solar EUV irradiance on short-, medium-, and long-term scales. However, as more measurements were performed more radiometric EUV data diverged due to the inherent degradation of the EUV instruments with time. Also, continuous recording of the EUV energy input to the T/I system was not achieved. It is only at the end of the last century that there was progress made in solving the serious problem of degradation enabling to monitore solar EUV fluxes with sufficient radiometric accuracy. The data sets available allow composing the data available to the first set of EUV data covering a period of 11 years for the first time. Based on the sophisticated instrumentation verified in space, future EUV measurements of the solar spectral irradiance (SSI) are promising accuracy levels of about 5% and less. With added low-cost equipment, real-time measurements will allow providing data needed in ionospheric modeling, e.g., for correcting propagation delays of navigation signals from space to earth. Adding EUV airglow and auroral emission monitoring by airglow cameras, the impact of space weather on the terrestrial T/I system can be studied with a spectral terrestrial

  4. Infrastructure Survey 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Group of Eight (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, the Group of Eight (Go8) conducted a survey on the state of its buildings and infrastructure. The survey is the third Go8 Infrastructure survey, with previous surveys being conducted in 2007 and 2009. The current survey updated some of the information collected in the previous surveys. It also collated data related to aspects of the…

  5. Oil droplets of bird eyes: microlenses acting as spectral filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavenga, Doekele G; Wilts, Bodo D

    2014-01-01

    An important component of the cone photoreceptors of bird eyes is the oil droplets located in front of the visual-pigment-containing outer segments. The droplets vary in colour and are transparent, clear, pale or rather intensely yellow or red owing to various concentrations of carotenoid pigments. Quantitative modelling of the filter characteristics using known carotenoid pigment spectra indicates that the pigments' absorption spectra are modified by the high concentrations that are present in the yellow and red droplets. The high carotenoid concentrations not only cause strong spectral filtering but also a distinctly increased refractive index at longer wavelengths. The oil droplets therefore act as powerful spherical microlenses, effectively channelling the spectrally filtered light into the photoreceptor's outer segment, possibly thereby compensating for the light loss caused by the spectral filtering. The spectral filtering causes narrow-band photoreceptor spectral sensitivities, which are well suited for spectral discrimination, especially in birds that have feathers coloured by carotenoid pigments.

  6. Spectral zone selection methodology for pebble bed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mphahlele, Ramatsemela; Ougouag, Abderrafi M.; Ivanov, Kostadin N.; Gougar, Hans D.

    2011-01-01

    A methodology is developed for determining boundaries of spectral zones for pebble bed reactors. A spectral zone is defined as a region made up of a number of nodes whose characteristics are collectively similar and that are assigned the same few-group diffusion constants. The spectral zones are selected in such a manner that the difference (error) between the reference transport solution and the diffusion code solution takes a minimum value. This is achieved by choosing spectral zones through optimally minimizing this error. The objective function for the optimization algorithm is the total reaction rate error, which is defined as the sum of the leakage, absorption and fission reaction rates errors in each zone. The selection of these spectral zones is such that the core calculation results based on diffusion theory are within an acceptable tolerance as compared to a proper transport reference solution. Through this work, a consistent approach for identifying spectral zones that yield more accurate diffusion results is introduced.

  7. A spectral identity mapper for chemical image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, John F; Zhang, Jing; O'Connor, Anne

    2004-11-01

    Generating chemically relevant image contrast from spectral image data requires multivariate processing algorithms that can categorize spectra according to shape. Conventional chemometric techniques like inverse least squares, classical least squares, multiple linear regression, principle component regression, and multivariate curve resolution are effective for predicting the chemical composition of samples having known constituents, but they are less effective when a priori information about the sample is unavailable. We have developed a multivariate technique called spectral identity mapping (SIM) that reduces the dependence of spectral image analysis on training datasets. The qualitative SIM method provides enhanced spectral shape specificity and improved chemical image contrast. We present SIM results of spectral image data acquired from polymer-coated paper substrates used in the manufacture of pressure sensitive adhesive tapes. In addition, we compare the SIM results to results from spectral angle mapping (SAM) and cosine correlation analysis (CCA), two closely related techniques.

  8. Structural Vibration Monitoring Using Cumulative Spectral Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Goto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a resonance decay estimation for structural health monitoring in the presence of nonstationary vibrations. In structural health monitoring, the structure's frequency response and resonant decay characteristics are very important for understanding how the structure changes. Cumulative spectral analysis (CSA estimates the frequency decay by using the impulse response. However, measuring the impulse response of buildings is impractical due to the need to shake the building itself. In a previous study, we reported on system damping monitoring using cumulative harmonic analysis (CHA, which is based on CSA. The current study describes scale model experiments on estimating the hidden resonance decay under non-stationary noise conditions by using CSA for structural condition monitoring.

  9. Spectral Properties and Variability of BIS objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudenzi, S.; Nesci, R.; Rossi, C.; Sclavi, S.; Gigoyan, K. S.; Mickaelian, A. M.

    2017-10-01

    Through the analysis and interpretation of newly obtained and of literature data we have clarified the nature of poorly investigated IRAS point sources classified as late type stars, belonging to the Byurakan IRAS Stars catalog. From medium resolution spectroscopy of 95 stars we have strongly revised 47 spectral types and newly classified 31 sources. Nine stars are of G or K types, four are N carbon stars in the Asymptotic Giant Branch, the others being M-type stars. From literature and new photometric observations we have studied their variability behaviour. For the regular variables we determined distances, absolute magnitudes and mass loss rates. For the other stars we estimated the distances, ranging between 1.3 and 10 kpc with a median of 2.8 kpc from the galactic plane, indicating that BIS stars mostly belong to the halo population.

  10. Spectral characteristics of spring arctic mesosphere dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Hall

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available The spring of 1997 has represented a stable period of operation for the joint University of Tromsø / University of Saskatchewan MF radar, being between refurbishment and upgrades. We examine the horizontal winds from the February to June inclusive and also include estimates of energy dissipation rates derived from signal fading times and presented as upper limits on the turbulent energy dissipation rate, ε. Here we address the periodicity in the dynamics of the upper mesosphere for time scales from hours to one month. Thus, we are able to examine the changes in the spectral signature of the mesospheric dynamics during the transition from winter to summer states.Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics; turbulence; waves and tides.

  11. Spectral Methods for Time Dependent Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-09-01

    3.1.37a) eN(t) = EN(t, O)eN(O) + 1=O EN(t, r)FN(T)d-r and (3.1.3 7b) IjeN (t)jf < Const.e Mt [IieNccii1L,2 . + j jFN(X, -r)11L(x)d7l In our case eN(O...conver- gence (3.1.39) IjeN (t) = uN(t) - vN(t)j < Const.eAft - ?)I. Adding to this the error between uN(t) and u(t) (- which is due to the spectrally

  12. CONTRAST ENHANCED SPECTRAL MAMMOGRAPHY (CESM (REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. I. Rozhkova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of early diagnosis of a breast cancer is extremely actual. Growth of incidence at women from 19 to 39 years increased for 34% over the last 10 years. It defines need of acceleration of development and deployment of the latest technologies of identification of the earliest symptoms of diseases. The x-ray mammography is the conducting method among of all radiological methods of diagnostics. Nevertheless a number of restrictions of method reduces its efficiency. The technologies increasing informational content of x-ray mammography – the leading method of screening – due to use of artificial contrasting and advantages of digital technologies are constantly developed. In this review it is described works, in which the authors having clinical experience of application of CESM – contrastenhanced spectral mammography on representative group of women. Positive sides and restrictions of new technology in comparison with mammography, ultrasonography and MRT are shown in this article.

  13. Lagrangian Curves on Spectral Curves of Monopoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guilfoyle, Brendan; Khalid, Madeeha; Ramon Mari, Jose J.

    2010-01-01

    We study Lagrangian points on smooth holomorphic curves in TP 1 equipped with a natural neutral Kaehler structure, and prove that they must form real curves. By virtue of the identification of TP 1 with the space LE 3 of oriented affine lines in Euclidean 3-space, these Lagrangian curves give rise to ruled surfaces in E 3 , which we prove have zero Gauss curvature. Each ruled surface is shown to be the tangent lines to a curve in E 3 , called the edge of regression of the ruled surface. We give an alternative characterization of these curves as the points in E 3 where the number of oriented lines in the complex curve Σ that pass through the point is less than the degree of Σ. We then apply these results to the spectral curves of certain monopoles and construct the ruled surfaces and edges of regression generated by the Lagrangian curves.

  14. Least Squares Moving-Window Spectral Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Jong

    2017-08-01

    Least squares regression is proposed as a moving-windows method for analysis of a series of spectra acquired as a function of external perturbation. The least squares moving-window (LSMW) method can be considered an extended form of the Savitzky-Golay differentiation for nonuniform perturbation spacing. LSMW is characterized in terms of moving-window size, perturbation spacing type, and intensity noise. Simulation results from LSMW are compared with results from other numerical differentiation methods, such as single-interval differentiation, autocorrelation moving-window, and perturbation correlation moving-window methods. It is demonstrated that this simple LSMW method can be useful for quantitative analysis of nonuniformly spaced spectral data with high frequency noise.

  15. Spectral properties in supersymmetric matrix models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boulton, Lyonell, E-mail: L.Boulton@hw.ac.uk [Department of Mathematics and Maxwell Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Garcia del Moral, Maria Pilar, E-mail: garciamormaria@uniovi.es [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Oviedo, Avda Calvo Sotelo 18, 33007 Oviedo (Spain); Restuccia, Alvaro, E-mail: arestu@usb.ve [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Simon Bolivar, Apartado 89000, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Oviedo, Avda Calvo Sotelo 18, 33007 Oviedo (Spain)

    2012-03-21

    We formulate a general sufficiency criterion for discreteness of the spectrum of both supersymmmetric and non-supersymmetric theories with a fermionic contribution. This criterion allows an analysis of Hamiltonians in complete form rather than just their semiclassical limits. In such a framework we examine spectral properties of various (1+0) matrix models. We consider the BMN model of M-theory compactified on a maximally supersymmetric pp-wave background, different regularizations of the supermembrane with central charges and a non-supersymmetric model comprising a bound state of N D2 with m D0. While the first two examples have a purely discrete spectrum, the latter has a continuous spectrum with a lower end given in terms of the monopole charge.

  16. Spectral unfolding of fast neutron energy distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosby, Michelle; Jackman, Kevin; Engle, Jonathan

    2015-10-01

    The characterization of the energy distribution of a neutron flux is difficult in experiments with constrained geometry where techniques such as time of flight cannot be used to resolve the distribution. The measurement of neutron fluxes in reactors, which often present similar challenges, has been accomplished using radioactivation foils as an indirect probe. Spectral unfolding codes use statistical methods to adjust MCNP predictions of neutron energy distributions using quantified radioactive residuals produced in these foils. We have applied a modification of this established neutron flux characterization technique to experimentally characterize the neutron flux in the critical assemblies at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and the spallation neutron flux at the Isotope Production Facility (IPF) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Results of the unfolding procedure are presented and compared with a priori MCNP predictions, and the implications for measurements using the neutron fluxes at these facilities are discussed.

  17. Field dynamics inference via spectral density estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Philipp; Steininger, Theo; Enßlin, Torsten A.

    2017-11-01

    Stochastic differential equations are of utmost importance in various scientific and industrial areas. They are the natural description of dynamical processes whose precise equations of motion are either not known or too expensive to solve, e.g., when modeling Brownian motion. In some cases, the equations governing the dynamics of a physical system on macroscopic scales occur to be unknown since they typically cannot be deduced from general principles. In this work, we describe how the underlying laws of a stochastic process can be approximated by the spectral density of the corresponding process. Furthermore, we show how the density can be inferred from possibly very noisy and incomplete measurements of the dynamical field. Generally, inverse problems like these can be tackled with the help of Information Field Theory. For now, we restrict to linear and autonomous processes. To demonstrate its applicability, we employ our reconstruction algorithm on a time-series and spatiotemporal processes.

  18. Optical unmasking of spectrally overlapping RF signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, William; Yegnanarayanan, Siva; Kolodziej, Kenneth E; Juodawlkis, Paul W

    2017-10-30

    When two signals having overlapping frequency content are received at the same time, they interfere to obstruct detection of the information carried by each individual signal. We introduce here a new nonlinear optoelectronic filtering technique that enables the ability to individually detect two concurrent and spectrally overlapping signals, even when the amplitude ratio between the signals is as high as 100,000. We demonstrate our system for application in steganography where we unveil the information carried by a hidden desired RF signal, while a dominant interferer signal is intentionally transmitted nearby and at the same frequency. Our signal recovery technique, which operates assuming no a priori knowledge of either signal, presents an additional pathway that can be used to control how information can be processed and communicated.

  19. Handbook of spectral lines in diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Dischler, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    This handbook is a breakthrough in the understanding of the large number of spectral lines in diamond. Data on more than 2000 lines and bands are presented in 200 tables, including many unpublished results. With a novel organization scheme, the search for a specific line is greatly simplified as a benefit for researchers and students. In order to meet the interest in the understanding of the spectra, structure assignments for 80 % of the lines are given, of which 15 % only were published before. The majority of the structures for the 300 centers is explained in most cases for the first time. A key instrument in the interpretation is the analysis by donor-acceptor pair transitions. In a special chapter 95 such centers are listed and discussed, of which only two have been published before, the first one by the present author in 1994.

  20. Multiple Kernel Spectral Regression for Dimensionality Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional manifold learning algorithms, such as locally linear embedding, Isomap, and Laplacian eigenmap, only provide the embedding results of the training samples. To solve the out-of-sample extension problem, spectral regression (SR solves the problem of learning an embedding function by establishing a regression framework, which can avoid eigen-decomposition of dense matrices. Motivated by the effectiveness of SR, we incorporate multiple kernel learning (MKL into SR for dimensionality reduction. The proposed approach (termed MKL-SR seeks an embedding function in the Reproducing Kernel Hilbert Space (RKHS induced by the multiple base kernels. An MKL-SR algorithm is proposed to improve the performance of kernel-based SR (KSR further. Furthermore, the proposed MKL-SR algorithm can be performed in the supervised, unsupervised, and semi-supervised situation. Experimental results on supervised classification and semi-supervised classification demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of our algorithm.

  1. Spectral mapping of soil organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristof, S. J.; Baumgardner, M. F.; Johannsen, C. J.

    1974-01-01

    Multispectral remote sensing data were examined for use in the mapping of soil organic matter content. Computer-implemented pattern recognition techniques were used to analyze data collected in May 1969 and May 1970 by an airborne multispectral scanner over a 40-km flightline. Two fields within the flightline were selected for intensive study. Approximately 400 surface soil samples from these fields were obtained for organic matter analysis. The analytical data were used as training sets for computer-implemented analysis of the spectral data. It was found that within the geographical limitations included in this study, multispectral data and automatic data processing techniques could be used very effectively to delineate and map surface soils areas containing different levels of soil organic matter.

  2. Multiband fluorescence spectral properties of QMOM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomin, V. I.; Jaworski, R.

    2011-02-01

    The spectral characteristics of the 1-methyl-2-(4-methoxyphenyl)-3-hydroxy-4(1 H)-quinolone (QMOM) dye with dual fluorescence in acetonitrile were studied under selective excitation in a wide temperature range. This dye is a structural analog of 3-hydroxyflavone and exhibits excited-state proton transfer, which forms a fluorescent tautomeric form, while the solution is characterized by dual fluorescence. The thermal behavior of the relative band intensities revealed the kinetic character of the proton transfer. The third form showed itself as a maximum between the bands of the normal and tautomeric forms upon excitation in several regions of the absorption spectrum and became dominant in solution at 60-80°C. The characteristics of the third form were studied. Additional experiments showed that this was possibly the anionic form of the dye.

  3. Broadband Spectral Investigations of Magnetar Bursts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kırmızıbayrak, Demet; Şaşmaz Muş, Sinem; Kaneko, Yuki; Göğüş, Ersin, E-mail: demetk@sabanciuniv.edu [Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Sabancı University, Orhanlı Tuzla, Istanbul 34956 (Turkey)

    2017-09-01

    We present our broadband (2–250 keV) time-averaged spectral analysis of 388 bursts from SGR J1550−5418, SGR 1900+14, and SGR 1806−20 detected with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer ( RXTE ) here and as a database in a companion web-catalog. We find that two blackbody functions (BB+BB), the sum of two modified blackbody functions (LB+LB), the sum of a blackbody function and a power-law function (BB+PO), and a power law with a high-energy exponential cutoff (COMPT) all provide acceptable fits at similar levels. We performed numerical simulations to constrain the best fitting model for each burst spectrum and found that 67.6% of burst spectra with well-constrained parameters are better described by the Comptonized model. We also found that 64.7% of these burst spectra are better described with the LB+LB model, which is employed in the spectral analysis of a soft gamma repeater (SGR) for the first time here, than with the BB+BB and BB+PO models. We found a significant positive lower bound trend on photon index, suggesting a decreasing upper bound on hardness, with respect to total flux and fluence. We compare this result with bursts observed from SGR and AXP (anomalous X-ray pulsar) sources and suggest that the relationship is a distinctive characteristic between the two. We confirm a significant anticorrelation between burst emission area and blackbody temperature, and find that it varies between the hot and cool blackbody temperatures differently than previously discussed. We expand on the interpretation of our results in the framework of a strongly magnetized neutron star.

  4. HYMOSS signal processing for pushbroom spectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, David E.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the Pushbroom Spectral Imaging Program was to develop on-focal plane electronics which compensate for detector array non-uniformities. The approach taken was to implement a simple two point calibration algorithm on focal plane which allows for offset and linear gain correction. The key on focal plane features which made this technique feasible was the use of a high quality transimpedance amplifier (TIA) and an analog-to-digital converter for each detector channel. Gain compensation is accomplished by varying the feedback capacitance of the integrate and dump TIA. Offset correction is performed by storing offsets in a special on focal plane offset register and digitally subtracting the offsets from the readout data during the multiplexing operation. A custom integrated circuit was designed, fabricated, and tested on this program which proved that nonuniformity compensated, analog-to-digital converting circuits may be used to read out infrared detectors. Irvine Sensors Corporation (ISC) successfully demonstrated the following innovative on-focal-plane functions that allow for correction of detector non-uniformities. Most of the circuit functions demonstrated on this program are finding their way onto future IC's because of their impact on reduced downstream processing, increased focal plane performance, simplified focal plane control, reduced number of dewar connections, as well as the noise immunity of a digital interface dewar. The potential commercial applications for this integrated circuit are primarily in imaging systems. These imaging systems may be used for: security monitoring systems, manufacturing process monitoring, robotics, and for spectral imaging when used in analytical instrumentation.

  5. Broadband Spectral Investigations of Magnetar Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kırmızıbayrak, Demet; Şaşmaz Muş, Sinem; Kaneko, Yuki; Göğüş, Ersin

    2017-09-01

    We present our broadband (2-250 keV) time-averaged spectral analysis of 388 bursts from SGR J1550-5418, SGR 1900+14, and SGR 1806-20 detected with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) here and as a database in a companion web-catalog. We find that two blackbody functions (BB+BB), the sum of two modified blackbody functions (LB+LB), the sum of a blackbody function and a power-law function (BB+PO), and a power law with a high-energy exponential cutoff (COMPT) all provide acceptable fits at similar levels. We performed numerical simulations to constrain the best fitting model for each burst spectrum and found that 67.6% of burst spectra with well-constrained parameters are better described by the Comptonized model. We also found that 64.7% of these burst spectra are better described with the LB+LB model, which is employed in the spectral analysis of a soft gamma repeater (SGR) for the first time here, than with the BB+BB and BB+PO models. We found a significant positive lower bound trend on photon index, suggesting a decreasing upper bound on hardness, with respect to total flux and fluence. We compare this result with bursts observed from SGR and AXP (anomalous X-ray pulsar) sources and suggest that the relationship is a distinctive characteristic between the two. We confirm a significant anticorrelation between burst emission area and blackbody temperature, and find that it varies between the hot and cool blackbody temperatures differently than previously discussed. We expand on the interpretation of our results in the framework of a strongly magnetized neutron star.

  6. RADIATION SPECTRAL SYNTHESIS OF RELATIVISTIC FILAMENTATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frederiksen, Jacob Trier; Haugboelle, Troels; Medvedev, Mikhail V.; Nordlund, Ake

    2010-01-01

    Radiation from many astrophysical sources, e.g., gamma-ray bursts and active galactic nuclei, is believed to arise from relativistically shocked collisionless plasmas. Such sources often exhibit highly transient spectra evolving rapidly compared with source lifetimes. Radiation emitted from these sources is typically associated with nonlinear plasma physics, complex field topologies, and non-thermal particle distributions. In such circumstances, a standard synchrotron paradigm may fail to produce accurate conclusions regarding the underlying physics. Simulating spectral emission and spectral evolution numerically in various relativistic shock scenarios is then the only viable method to determine the detailed physical origin of the emitted spectra. In this Letter, we present synthetic radiation spectra representing the early stage development of the filamentation (streaming) instability of an initially unmagnetized plasma, which is relevant for both collisionless shock formation and reconnection dynamics in relativistic astrophysical outflows as well as for laboratory astrophysics experiments. Results were obtained using a highly efficient in situ diagnostics method, based on detailed particle-in-cell modeling of collisionless plasmas. The synthetic spectra obtained here are compared with those predicted by a semi-analytical model for jitter radiation from the filamentation instability, the latter including self-consistent generated field topologies and particle distributions obtained from the simulations reported upon here. Spectra exhibit dependence on the presence-or the absence-of an inert plasma constituent, when comparing baryonic plasmas (i.e., containing protons) with pair plasmas. The results also illustrate that considerable care should be taken when using lower-dimensional models to obtain information about the astrophysical phenomena generating observed spectra.

  7. Fourier spectral simulations for wake fields in conducting cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Min, M.; Chin, Y.-H.; Fischer, P.F.; Chae, Y.-Chul; Kim, K.-J.

    2007-01-01

    We investigate Fourier spectral time-domain simulations applied to wake field calculations in two-dimensional cylindrical structures. The scheme involves second-order explicit leap-frogging in time and Fourier spectral approximation in space, which is obtained from simply replacing the spatial differentiation operator of the YEE scheme by the Fourier differentiation operator on nonstaggered grids. This is a first step toward investigating high-order computational techniques with the Fourier spectral method, which is relatively simple to implement.

  8. Contribution of photoreceptor subtypes to spectral wavelength preference in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Yamaguchi, Satoko; Desplan, Claude; Heisenberg, Martin

    2010-01-01

    The visual systems of most species contain photoreceptors with distinct spectral sensitivities that allow animals to distinguish lights by their spectral composition. In Drosophila, photoreceptors R1–R6 have the same spectral sensitivity throughout the eye and are responsible for motion detection. In contrast, photoreceptors R7 and R8 exhibit heterogeneity and are important for color vision. We investigated how photoreceptor types contribute to the attractiveness of light by blocking the func...

  9. Nonlinear spectral correlation for fatigue crack detection under noisy environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peipei; Sohn, Hoon; Jeon, Ikgeun

    2017-07-01

    When ultrasonic waves at two distinct frequencies are applied to a structure with a fatigue crack, crack-induced nonlinearity creates nonlinear ultrasonic modulations at the sum and difference of the two input frequencies. The amplitude of the nonlinear modulation components is typically one or two orders of magnitude smaller than that of the primary linear components. Therefore, the modulation components can be easily buried under noise levels and it becomes difficult to extract the nonlinear modulation components under noisy environments using a conventional spectral density function. In this study, nonlinear spectral correlation, which calculates the spectral correlation between nonlinear modulation components, is proposed to isolate the nonlinear modulation components from noisy environments and used for fatigue crack detection. The proposed nonlinear spectral correlation offers the following benefits: (1) Stationary noises have little effect on nonlinear spectral correlation; (2) By using a wideband high-frequency input and a single low-frequency input, the contrast of nonlinear spectral correlation between damage and intact conditions can be enhanced; and (3) The test efficiency can be also improved via reducing the data collection time. Validation tests are performed on aluminum plates and scaled steel shafts with real fatigue cracks. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed nonlinear spectral correlation owns a higher sensitivity to fatigue crack than the classical nonlinear coefficient estimated from the spectral density function, and the usage of nonlinear spectral correlation allows the detection of fatigue crack even using noncontact air-coupled transducers with a low signal-to-noise ratio.

  10. Chebyshev super spectral viscosity method for water hammer analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyu Chen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a new fast and efficient algorithm, Chebyshev super spectral viscosity (SSV method, is introduced to solve the water hammer equations. Compared with standard spectral method, the method's advantage essentially consists in adding a super spectral viscosity to the equations for the high wave numbers of the numerical solution. It can stabilize the numerical oscillation (Gibbs phenomenon and improve the computational efficiency while discontinuities appear in the solution. Results obtained from the Chebyshev super spectral viscosity method exhibit greater consistency with conventional water hammer calculations. It shows that this new numerical method offers an alternative way to investigate the behavior of the water hammer in propellant pipelines.

  11. Infrared and Raman spectroscopy: principles and spectral interpretation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Larkin, Peter

    2011-01-01

    "Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy: Principles and Spectral Interpretation explains the background, core principles and tests the readers understanding of the important techniques of Infrared and Raman Spectroscopy...

  12. Spectrally-Selective Photonic Structures for PV Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedikt Bläsi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We review several examples of how spectrally-selective photonic structures may be used to improve solar cell systems. Firstly, we introduce different spectrally-selective structures that are based on interference effects. Examples shown include Rugate filter, edge filter and 3D photonic crystals such as artificial opals. In the second part, we discuss several examples of photovoltaic (PV concepts that utilize spectral selectivity such as fluorescence collectors, upconversion systems, spectrum splitting concepts and the intermediate reflector concept. The potential of spectrally selective filters in the context of solar cells is discussed.

  13. Code aperture optimization for spectrally agile compressive imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arguello, Henry; Arce, Gonzalo R

    2011-11-01

    Coded aperture snapshot spectral imaging (CASSI) provides a mechanism for capturing a 3D spectral cube with a single shot 2D measurement. In many applications selective spectral imaging is sought since relevant information often lies within a subset of spectral bands. Capturing and reconstructing all the spectral bands in the observed image cube, to then throw away a large portion of this data, is inefficient. To this end, this paper extends the concept of CASSI to a system admitting multiple shot measurements, which leads not only to higher quality of reconstruction but also to spectrally selective imaging when the sequence of code aperture patterns is optimized. The aperture code optimization problem is shown to be analogous to the optimization of a constrained multichannel filter bank. The optimal code apertures allow the decomposition of the CASSI measurement into several subsets, each having information from only a few selected spectral bands. The rich theory of compressive sensing is used to effectively reconstruct the spectral bands of interest from the measurements. A number of simulations are developed to illustrate the spectral imaging characteristics attained by optimal aperture codes.

  14. Multi-Configuration Matched Spectral Filter Core Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — OPTRA proposes the development of a modular, reconfigurable matched spectral filter (RMSF) spectrometer for the monitoring of greenhouse and volcanic gases. The...

  15. Next Generation UAV Based Spectral Systems for Environmental Monitoring

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — At present, UAVs used in environmental monitoring mostly collect low spectral resolution imagery, capable of retrieving canopy greenness or properties related water...

  16. Multi-Configuration Matched Spectral Filter Core, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — OPTRA proposes the development of a modular, reconfigurable matched spectral filter (RMSF) spectrometer for the monitoring of greenhouse and volcanic gases. The...

  17. The XMM-Newton spectral-fit database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corral, A.; Georgantopoulos, I.; Rosen, S.; Watson, M. G.; Page, K.; Stewart, G. C.

    2014-07-01

    The XMM-Newton spectral-fit database is an ongoing ESA funded project aimed to construct a catalogue of spectral-fitting results for all the sources within the XMM-Newton serendipitous source catalogue for which spectral data products have been pipeline-extracted (>~ 120,000 X-ray source detections). The fundamental goal of this project is to provide the astronomical community with a tool to construct large and representative samples of X-ray sources by allowing source selection according to spectral properties.

  18. Near-infrared calibration transfer based on spectral regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jiangtao; Peng, Silong; Jiang, An; Tan, Jie

    2011-04-01

    A calibration transfer method for near-infrared (NIR) spectra based on spectral regression is proposed. Spectral regression method can reveal low dimensional manifold structure in high dimensional spectroscopic data and is suitable to transfer the NIR spectra of different instruments. A comparative study of the proposed method and piecewise direct standardization (PDS) for standardization on two benchmark NIR data sets is presented. Experimental results show that spectral regression method outperforms PDS and is quite competitive with PDS with background correction. When the standardization subset has sufficient samples, spectral regression method exhibits excellent performance.

  19. Near-infrared calibration transfer based on spectral regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jiangtao; Peng, Silong; Jiang, An; Tan, Jie

    2011-04-01

    A calibration transfer method for near-infrared (NIR) spectra based on spectral regression is proposed. Spectral regression method can reveal low dimensional manifold structure in high dimensional spectroscopic data and is suitable to transfer the NIR spectra of different instruments. A comparative study of the proposed method and piecewise direct standardization (PDS) for standardization on two benchmark NIR data sets is presented. Experimental results show that spectral regression method outperforms PDS and is quite competitive with PDS with background correction. When the standardization subset has sufficient samples, spectral regression method exhibits excellent performance. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Digital spectral analysis parametric, non-parametric and advanced methods

    CERN Document Server

    Castanié, Francis

    2013-01-01

    Digital Spectral Analysis provides a single source that offers complete coverage of the spectral analysis domain. This self-contained work includes details on advanced topics that are usually presented in scattered sources throughout the literature.The theoretical principles necessary for the understanding of spectral analysis are discussed in the first four chapters: fundamentals, digital signal processing, estimation in spectral analysis, and time-series models.An entire chapter is devoted to the non-parametric methods most widely used in industry.High resolution methods a

  1. Spectral Slope as an Indicator of Pasture Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Lugassi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we develop a spectral method for assessment of pasture quality based only on the spectral information obtained with a small number of wavelengths. First, differences in spectral behavior were identified across the near infrared–shortwave infrared spectral range that were indicative of changes in chemical properties. Then, slopes across different spectral ranges were calculated and correlated with the changes in crude protein (CP, neutral detergent fiber (NDF and metabolic energy concentration (MEC. Finally, partial least squares (PLS regression analysis was applied to identify the optimal spectral ranges for accurate assessment of CP, NDF and MEC. Six spectral domains and a set of slope criteria for real-time evaluation of pasture quality were suggested. The evaluation of three level categories (low, medium, high for these three parameters showed a success rate of: 73%–96% for CP, 72%–87% for NDF and 60%–85% for MEC. Moreover, only one spectral range, 1748–1764 nm, was needed to provide a good estimation of CP, NDF and MEC. Importantly, five of the six selected spectral regions were not affected by water absorbance. With some modifications, this rationale can be applied to further analyses of pasture quality from airborne sensors.

  2. Spectral-Product Methods for Electronic Structure Calculations (Preprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Langhoff, P. W; Mills, J. E; Boatz, J. A

    2006-01-01

    .... The spectral-product approach to molecular electronic structure avoids the repeated evaluations of the one- and two-electron integrals required in construction of polyatomic Hamiltonian matrices...

  3. Spectral-Product Methods for Electronic Structure Calculations (Postprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Langhoff, P. W; Hinde, R. J; Mills, J. D; Boatz, J. A

    2007-01-01

    .... The spectral-product approach to molecular electronic structure avoids the repeated evaluations of the one- and two-electron integrals required in construction of polyatomic Hamiltonian matrices...

  4. Parallel phase-shifting digital holography using spectral estimation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Peng; Awatsuji, Yasuhiro; Nishio, Kenzo; Ura, Shogo; Matoba, Osamu

    2014-09-20

    We propose a parallel phase-shifting digital holography using a spectral estimation technique, which enables the instantaneous acquisition of spectral information and three-dimensional (3D) information of a moving object. In this technique, an interference fringe image that contains six holograms with two phase shifts for three laser lines, such as red, green, and blue, is recorded by a space-division multiplexing method with single-shot exposure. The 3D monochrome images of these three laser lines are numerically reconstructed by a computer and used to estimate the spectral reflectance distribution of object using a spectral estimation technique. Preliminary experiments demonstrate the validity of the proposed technique.

  5. A radio spectral index map and catalogue at 147-1400 MHz covering 80 per cent of the sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Gasperin, F.; Intema, H. T.; Frail, D. A.

    2018-03-01

    The radio spectral index is a powerful probe for classifying cosmic radio sources and understanding the origin of the radio emission. Combining data at 147 MHz and 1.4 GHz from the TIFR GMRT Sky Survey (TGSS) and the NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS), we produced a large-area radio spectral index map of ˜80 per cent of the sky (Dec. > - 40 deg), as well as a radio spectral index catalogue containing 1396 515 sources, of which 503 647 are not upper or lower limits. Almost every TGSS source has a detected counterpart, while this is true only for 36 per cent of NVSS sources. We released both the map and the catalogue to the astronomical community. The catalogue is analysed to discover systematic behaviours in the cosmic radio population. We find a differential spectral behaviour between faint and bright sources as well as between compact and extended sources. These trends are explained in terms of radio galaxy evolution. We also confirm earlier reports of an excess of steep-spectrum sources along the galactic plane. This corresponds to 86 compact and steep-spectrum source in excess compared to expectations. The properties of this excess are consistent with normal non-recycled pulsars, which may have been missed by pulsation searches due to larger than average scattering along the line of sight.

  6. Inferring the Growth of Massive Galaxies Using Bayesian Spectral Synthesis Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stillman, Coley Michael; Poremba, Megan R.; Moustakas, John

    2018-01-01

    The most massive galaxies in the universe are typically found at the centers of massive galaxy clusters. Studying these galaxies can provide valuable insight into the hierarchical growth of massive dark matter halos. One of the key challenges of measuring the stellar mass growth of massive galaxies is converting the measured light profiles into stellar mass. We use Prospector, a state-of-the-art Bayesian spectral synthesis modeling code, to infer the total stellar masses of a pilot sample of massive central galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We compare our stellar mass estimates to previous measurements, and present some of the quantitative diagnostics provided by Prospector.

  7. Spectral-ratio radon background correction method in airborne γ-ray spectrometry based on compton scattering deduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Yi; Xiong Shengqing; Zhou Jianxin; Fan Zhengguo; Ge Liangquan

    2014-01-01

    γ-ray released by the radon daughter has severe impact on airborne γ-ray spectrometry. The spectral-ratio method is one of the best mathematical methods for radon background deduction in airborne γ-ray spectrometry. In this paper, an advanced spectral-ratio method was proposed which deducts Compton scattering ray by the fast Fourier transform rather than tripping ratios, the relationship between survey height and correction coefficient of the advanced spectral-ratio radon background correction method was studied, the advanced spectral-ratio radon background correction mathematic model was established, and the ground saturation model calibrating technology for correction coefficient was proposed. As for the advanced spectral-ratio radon background correction method, its applicability and correction efficiency are improved, and the application cost is saved. Furthermore, it can prevent the physical meaning lost and avoid the possible errors caused by matrix computation and mathematical fitting based on spectrum shape which is applied in traditional correction coefficient. (authors)

  8. An Unbiased Survey of 500 Nearby Stars for Debris Disks: A JCMT Legacy Program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matthews, B.C.; Greaves, J.S.; Holland, W.S.; Wyatt, M.C.; Barlow, M.J.; Bastien, P.; Beichman, C.A.; Biggs, A.; Butner, H.M.; Dent, W.R.F.; Francesco, J. Di; Dominik, C.; Fissel, L.; Friberg, P.; Gibb, A.G.; Halpern, M.; Ivison, R.J.; Jayawardhana, R.; Jenness, T.; Johnstone, D.; Kavelaars, J.J.; Marshall, J.L.; Phillips, N.; Schieven, G.; Snellen, I.A.G.; Walker, H.J.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Weferling, B.; White, G.J.; Yates, J.; Zhu, M.; Craigon, A.

    2007-01-01

    We present the scientific motivation and observing plan for an upcoming detection survey for debris disks using the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. The SCUBA-2 Unbiased Nearby Stars (SUNS) survey will observe 500 nearby main-sequence and subgiant stars (100 of each of the A, F, G, K, and M spectral

  9. Spectral response model for a multibin photon-counting spectral computed tomography detector and its applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuejin; Persson, Mats; Bornefalk, Hans; Karlsson, Staffan; Xu, Cheng; Danielsson, Mats; Huber, Ben

    2015-07-01

    Variations among detector channels in computed tomography can lead to ring artifacts in the reconstructed images and biased estimates in projection-based material decomposition. Typically, the ring artifacts are corrected by compensation methods based on flat fielding, where transmission measurements are required for a number of material-thickness combinations. Phantoms used in these methods can be rather complex and require an extensive number of transmission measurements. Moreover, material decomposition needs knowledge of the individual response of each detector channel to account for the detector inhomogeneities. For this purpose, we have developed a spectral response model that binwise predicts the response of a multibin photon-counting detector individually for each detector channel. The spectral response model is performed in two steps. The first step employs a forward model to predict the expected numbers of photon counts, taking into account parameters such as the incident x-ray spectrum, absorption efficiency, and energy response of the detector. The second step utilizes a limited number of transmission measurements with a set of flat slabs of two absorber materials to fine-tune the model predictions, resulting in a good correspondence with the physical measurements. To verify the response model, we apply the model in two cases. First, the model is used in combination with a compensation method which requires an extensive number of transmission measurements to determine the necessary parameters. Our spectral response model successfully replaces these measurements by simulations, saving a significant amount of measurement time. Second, the spectral response model is used as the basis of the maximum likelihood approach for projection-based material decomposition. The reconstructed basis images show a good separation between the calcium-like material and the contrast agents, iodine and gadolinium. The contrast agent concentrations are reconstructed with more

  10. Spectral identity mapping for enhanced chemical image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, John F., II

    2005-03-01

    Advances in spectral imaging instrumentation during the last two decades has lead to higher image fidelity, tighter spatial resolution, narrower spectral resolution, and improved signal to noise ratios. An important sub-classification of spectral imaging is chemical imaging, in which the sought-after information from the sample is its chemical composition. Consequently, chemical imaging can be thought of as a two-step process, spectral image acquisition and the subsequent processing of the spectral image data to generate chemically relevant image contrast. While chemical imaging systems that provide turnkey data acquisition are increasingly widespread, better strategies to analyze the vast datasets they produce are needed. The Generation of chemically relevant image contrast from spectral image data requires multivariate processing algorithms that can categorize spectra according to shape. Conventional chemometric techniques like inverse least squares, classical least squares, multiple linear regression, principle component regression, and multivariate curve resolution are effective for predicting the chemical composition of samples having known constituents, but are less effective when a priori information about the sample is unavailable. To address these problems, we have developed a fully automated non-parametric technique called spectral identity mapping (SIMS) that reduces the dependence of spectral image analysis on training datasets. The qualitative SIMS method provides enhanced spectral shape specificity and improved chemical image contrast. We present SIMS results of infrared spectral image data acquired from polymer coated paper substrates used in the manufacture of pressure sensitive adhesive tapes. In addition, we compare the SIMS results to results from spectral angle mapping (SAM) and cosine correlation analysis (CCA), two closely related techniques.

  11. FIREFLY (Fitting IteRativEly For Likelihood analYsis): a full spectral fitting code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, David M.; Maraston, Claudia; Goddard, Daniel; Thomas, Daniel; Parikh, Taniya

    2017-12-01

    We present a new spectral fitting code, FIREFLY, for deriving the stellar population properties of stellar systems. FIREFLY is a chi-squared minimization fitting code that fits combinations of single-burst stellar population models to spectroscopic data, following an iterative best-fitting process controlled by the Bayesian information criterion. No priors are applied, rather all solutions within a statistical cut are retained with their weight. Moreover, no additive or multiplicative polynomials are employed to adjust the spectral shape. This fitting freedom is envisaged in order to map out the effect of intrinsic spectral energy distribution degeneracies, such as age, metallicity, dust reddening on galaxy properties, and to quantify the effect of varying input model components on such properties. Dust attenuation is included using a new procedure, which was tested on Integral Field Spectroscopic data in a previous paper. The fitting method is extensively tested with a comprehensive suite of mock galaxies, real galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and Milky Way globular clusters. We also assess the robustness of the derived properties as a function of signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) and adopted wavelength range. We show that FIREFLY is able to recover age, metallicity, stellar mass, and even the star formation history remarkably well down to an S/N ∼ 5, for moderately dusty systems. Code and results are publicly available.1

  12. Line by Line Spectral Parameters in the 4ν_3 Spectral Region of Methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benner, D. Chris; Devi, V. Malathy; O'Brien, J. J.; Shaji, S.; Spickler, P. T.; Houck, C. P.; Coakley, J. A.; Dolph, J.; Rankin, K.

    2012-06-01

    The near infrared bands of methane were first observed in the outer planets and Titan where atmospheric ray paths are long. The spectrum is complex, and long absorption paths in the laboratory are difficult to cool to outer solar system temperatures. At room temperature, many significant spectral lines appear per Doppler width. The band models generally used in the 890 nm spectral region of methane do not provide transmissions that are multiplicative, so scattering and inhomogeneous atmospheres cannot be properly treated using this approach. The intracavity laser spectrometer at the University of Missouri-St. Louis was used to obtain low temperature (99-161K), low pressure (0.12-7.13 Torr), long path (3.14-5.65 km) and high resolution ( 0.01 cm-1 HWHM) spectra of methane covering the entire 890nm feature (10925-11500 cm-1), the deepest band in the CCD spectral region. At these temperatures the Doppler width is 0.01 cm-1 and the spectral lines originating from levels higher than J"=11 and excited vibrational states are not visible. The result is a dense, but manageable spectrum from which over 11,200 line positions, intensities and lower state energies are derived on a line by line basis by the College of William and Mary multispectrum nonlinear least squares fitting program Simulations of the methane spectrum for outer planet atmospheres using our positions, intensities and lower state energies reveal a surprising amount of spectral structure at high resolution. This structure carries a great deal of atmospheric information Support for the work at William and Mary was provided by NASA through grant NNX08AF06G. Support for the work at UM-St. Louis provided by NASA through grant NAG5-12013, from NSF through grant CHE-0213356 and by the University of Missouri Research Board. Partial support at Bridgewater College was provided by its Martin Science Research Institute and from an AAS Small Research Grant. D. Chris Benner, C. P. Rinsland, V. M. Devi, M. A. H. Smith, and

  13. Metaoptics for Spectral and Spatial Beam Manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghu Srimathi, Indumathi

    Laser beam combining and beam shaping are two important areas with applications in optical communications, high power lasers, and atmospheric propagation studies. In this dissertation, metaoptical elements have been developed for spectral and spatial beam shaping, and multiplexing. Beams carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM), referred to as optical vortices, have unique propagation properties. Optical vortex beams carrying different topological charges are orthogonal to each other and have low inter-modal crosstalk which allows for them to be (de)multiplexed. Efficient spatial (de)multiplexing of these beams have been carried out by using diffractive optical geometrical coordinate transformation elements. The spatial beam combining technique shown here is advantageous because the efficiency of the system is not dependent on the number of OAM states being combined. The system is capable of generating coaxially propagating beams in the far-field and the beams generated can either be incoherently or coherently multiplexed with applications in power scaling and dynamic intensity profile manipulations. Spectral beam combining can also be achieved with the coordinate transformation elements. The different wavelengths emitted by fiber sources can be spatially overlapped in the far-field plane and the generated beams are Bessel-Gauss in nature with enhanced depth of focus properties. Unique system responses and beam shapes in the far-field can be realized by controlling amplitude, phase, and polarization at the micro-scale. This has been achieved by spatially varying the structural parameters at the subwavelength scale and is analogous to local modification of material properties. With advancements in fabrication technology, it is possible to control not just the lithographic process, but also the deposition process. In this work, a unique combination of spatial structure variations in conjunction with the conformal coating properties of an atomic layer deposition tool

  14. Angular Spectral Analysis and Lowpass Filtering of Aeromagnetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Total-field aeromagnetic data over the western half of the Bornu basin and its surrounding areas were analyzed using angular spectral analysis, upward continuation and lowpass filtering techniques. Results revealed several angular spectral peaks at various angular orientations. The angular orientations correlated with the ...

  15. Gromov-Witten theory and spectral curve topological recursion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dunin-Barkovskiy, P.

    2015-01-01

    Gromov-Witten theory and spectral curve topological recursion are important parts of modern algebraic geometry and mathematical physics. In my thesis I study relations between these theories and some important new aspects and applications of them. In particular, a construction for a local spectral

  16. Stability estimates for hp spectral element methods for general ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We establish basic stability estimates for a non-conforming ℎ- spectral element method which allows for simultaneous mesh refinement and variable polynomial degree. The spectral element functions are non-conforming if the boundary conditions are Dirichlet. For problems with mixed boundary conditions they are ...

  17. SOCl 2 catalyzed cyclization of chalcones: Synthesis and spectral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some aryl-aryl 1H pyrazoles have been synthesised by cyclization of aryl chalcones and hydrazine hydrate in the presence of SOCl2. The yields of the pyrazoles are more than 85%. These pyrazoles are characterized by their physical constants and spectral data. The infrared, NMR spectral group frequencies of these ...

  18. Simulating performance of solar cells with spectral downshifting layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Sark, W.G.J.H.M.

    2008-01-01

    In order to estimate the performance of solar cells with downshifters under realistic irradiation conditions we used spectral distributions as they may be found outdoors. The spectral distributions were generated on a minutely basis by means of the spectrum simulation model SEDES2, using minutely

  19. FSD: Frequency Space Differential measurement of CMB spectral distortions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Suvodip; Silk, Joseph; Wandelt, Benjamin D.

    2018-04-01

    Although the Cosmic Microwave Background agrees with a perfect blackbody spectrum within the current experimental limits, it is expected to exhibit certain spectral distortions with known spectral properties. We propose a new method, Frequency Space Differential (FSD) to measure the spectral distortions in the CMB spectrum by using the inter-frequency differences of the brightness temperature. The difference between the observed CMB temperature at different frequencies must agree with the frequency derivative of the blackbody spectrum, in the absence of any distortion. However, in the presence of spectral distortions, the measured inter-frequency differences would also exhibit deviations from blackbody which can be modeled for known sources of spectral distortions like y & μ. Our technique uses FSD information for the CMB blackbody, y, μ or any other sources of spectral distortions to model the observed signal. Successful application of this method in future CMB missions can provide an alternative method to extract spectral distortion signals and can potentially make it feasible to measure spectral distortions without an internal blackbody calibrator.

  20. Ultra compact spectral slicer devices based on microring resonators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, F.S.; Kelderman, H.; Driessen, A.

    In Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM), access network spectral slicer devices in connection with a broadband light source are attracting low-cost alternatives for the laser diodes that are required for transmission in the desired wavelength channels. The proposed ultra-compact spectral slicer