WorldWideScience

Sample records for survey questions asked

  1. Asking Questions in Academia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Annette Skovsted

    2014-01-01

    Motivation for the activity In academia the most important skill is to ask academically relevant and sound questions. This is not easy and students need to practice asking questions orally and in writing before they write research papers.......Motivation for the activity In academia the most important skill is to ask academically relevant and sound questions. This is not easy and students need to practice asking questions orally and in writing before they write research papers....

  2. Survey questions about sleep duration: does asking separately about weekdays and weekends matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauderdale, Diane S

    2014-03-04

    There is no standard way to ask about sleep duration in surveys, and little is known about the comparability of different questions. This article reports on a randomized survey experiment designed to test 1 type of variation: 1 question about usual sleep hours versus 2 questions separately asking about weekday and weekend sleep. Mean sleep duration was significantly shorter (7.03 hr vs. 7.28 hr) for the single question than a weighted average from 2 questions, and race and ethnicity contrasts differed by question format. Correlations between sleep duration and reported sleep need were significantly higher for the 2-question format. These results demonstrate that question wording can affect reported sleep duration in complicated ways, making it difficult to compare studies that use different questions.

  3. Asking the Right Questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, Ruth Mehrtens

    1990-01-01

    Like good researchers, writers about research need to be able to tell whether scientific findings are valid. Six questions, to be asked of the researcher, can help the writer explain to others. A healthy skepticism is also important; there may be signals that more questions should be asked. (MSE)

  4. Questions English Teachers Ask.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuman, R. Baird

    This volume is based on the responses of 374 English teachers at the secondary and college levels to a letter asking them to describe the questions that most perplex them professionally. Answers are provided by 88 leaders in English education, including James R. Squire, Walter H. MacGinitie, R. Baird Shuman, Sheila Schwartz, and Ken Macrorie. The…

  5. Asking the Right Questions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Line

    are part of everyday life, children are often the most vulnerable. The project was carried out to shed light on mainly two types of diseases - malaria and diarrheal diseases - that strike children. In practice the academic backgrounds of the researchers played a role in the methodological approach...... to the field. By emphasizing the logos in methodology this paper wishes to underscore that where anthropology sets itself apart from public health is, among other, in the way anthropologists think about method and how this affects fieldwork practices as well as analyses. By tracing two concepts, hygiene......, is the ability to move beyond even the best hidden assumptions and question our own questions, thereby enabling us to ask the right questions....

  6. IC: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... IC Epidemiology (RICE) Study Boston Area Community Health (BACH) Survey ICA Pilot Research Program Funding Opportunities Clinical ... IC Epidemiology (RICE) Study Boston Area Community Health (BACH) Survey ICA Pilot Research Program Funding Opportunities Clinical ...

  7. Frequently Asked Questions: Hemophilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resource Annual Global Survey Treatment Guidelines Laboratory Manual Hemophilia in Pictures Young Voices Compendium of Assessment Tools Educational Games Video Library Find a Treatment Centre Haemophilia Journal ...

  8. LGBT Caregiving: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FCA - A A + A You are here Home LGBT Caregiving: Frequently Asked Questions Order this publication Printer- ... service or organization is open to working with LGBT families? Kudos to you for managing to “go ...

  9. Questions to Ask Your Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to MBCN Contact Us Questions to ask your doctor Medical appointments can be stressful. To better deal ... for you. If diagnosed by your primary care physician Where do you send your metastatic patients for ...

  10. Frequently Asked Questions about Pharmacogenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care Specific Genetic Disorders Frequently Asked Questions About Pharmacogenomics Enlarge What is pharmacogenomics? What might pharmacogenomics mean ... page, you will need Adobe Reader. What is pharmacogenomics? Pharmacogenomics uses information about a person's genetic makeup, ...

  11. Commonly Asked Questions in Thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Assael, Marc J

    2011-01-01

    Have you ever had a question that keeps persisting and for which you cannot find a clear answer? Is the question seemingly so "simple" that the problem is glossed over in most resources, or skipped entirely? CRC Press/Taylor and Francis is pleased to introduce Commonly Asked Questions in Thermodynamics, the first in a new series of books that address the questions that frequently arise in today's major scientific and technical disciplines. Designed for a wide audience, from students and researchers to practicing professionals in related areas, the books are organized in a user friend

  12. 'Asking the Right Question'. A Comparison of Two Approaches to Gathering Data on 'Herbals' Use in Survey Based Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James S McLay

    Full Text Available Over the last decade academic interest in the prevalence and nature of herbal medicines use by pregnant women has increased significantly. Such data are usually collected by means of an administered questionnaire survey, however a key methodological limitation using this approach is the need to clearly define the scope of 'herbals' to be investigated. The majority of published studies in this area neither define 'herbals' nor provide a detailed checklist naming specific 'herbals' and CAM modalities, which limits inter-study comparison, generalisability and the potential for meta-analyses. The aim of this study was to compare the self-reported use of herbs, herbal medicines and herbal products using two different approaches implemented in succession.Cross-sectional questionnaire surveys of women attending for their mid-trimester scan or attending the postnatal unit following live birth at the Royal Aberdeen Maternity Hospital, North-East Scotland. The questionnaire utilised two approaches to collect data on 'herbals' use, a single closed yes/no answer to the question "have you used herbs, herbal medicines and herbal products in the last three months"; and a request to tick which of a list of 40 'herbals' they had used in the same time period.A total of 889 responses were obtained of which 4.3% (38 answered 'yes' to herbal use via the closed question. However, using the checklist 39% (350 of respondents reported the use of one or more specific 'herbals' (p<0.0001. The 312 respondents who reported 'no' to 'herbals' use via the closed question but "yes" via the checklist consumed a total of 20 different 'herbals' (median 1, interquartile range 1-2, range 1-6.This study demonstrates that the use of a single closed question asking about the use of 'herbals', as frequently reported in published studies, may not yield valid data resulting in a gross underestimation of actual use.

  13. Frequently Asked Questions about Bunion Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A | Print | Share Frequently Asked Questions About Bunion Surgery Here are some frequently asked questions (FAQs) and ... best for you. 5. How can I avoid surgery? Sometimes observation of the bunion is all that ...

  14. The Art of Asking Questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, Rosetta A.

    1979-01-01

    A rationale is given for the use of questioning techniques and strategies in classroom instruction. B. Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives is presented as one framework for questions. Five pitfalls, including avoiding vague questions and personal pronouns, are discussed. (CL)

  15. Questions Students Ask: Beta Decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koss, Jordan; Hartt, Kenneth

    1988-01-01

    Answers a student's question about the emission of a positron from a nucleus. Discusses the problem from the aspects of the uncertainty principle, beta decay, the Fermi Theory, and modern physics. (YP)

  16. IMS Learning Design Frequently Asked Questions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tattersall, Colin; Manderveld, Jocelyn; Hummel, Hans; Sloep, Peter; Koper, Rob; De Vries, Fred

    2004-01-01

    This list of frequently asked questions was composed on the basis of questions asked of the Educational Technology Expertise Centrum. The questions addessed are: Where can I find the IMS Learning Design Specification? What is meant by the phrase “Learning Design”? What is the IMS LD Specification ab

  17. Question-Asking and Question-Exploring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, Lorraine; Carr, Margaret; Lee, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    The Centre of Innovation Research at Greerton Early Childhood Centre was characterised as a dispositional milieu where working theories were explored through a narrative research methodology. As the research progressed, the teachers at Greerton strengthened the way we were listening to, and watching out for young children's questions to enable…

  18. Frequently Asked Questions: The Higgs!

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2012-01-01

    Why have we tried so hard to find the Higgs particle? How does the Higgs mechanism work? What is the difference in physics between strong evidence and a discovery? Why do physicists speak in terms of "sigmas"? Find out here!   Why have we tried so hard to find the Higgs particle? Because it could be the answer to the question: how does Nature decide whether or not to assign mass to particles? All the fundamental particles making up matter – the electron, the quarks, etc. – have masses. Moreover, quantum physics requires that forces are also carried by particles. The W and Z particles that carry the weak force responsible for radioactivity must also have masses, whereas the photon, the carrier of the electromagnetic force, has no mass at all. This is the root of the “Higgs problem”: how to give masses to the fundamental particles and break the symmetry between the massive W and Z and the massless photon? Just assigning masses by hand...

  19. Frequently Asked Questions on Potassium Iodide (KI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bioterrorism and Drug Preparedness Frequently Asked Questions on Potassium Iodide (KI) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... Drug Administration (FDA) issued a final Guidance on Potassium Iodide as a Thyroid Blocking Agent in Radiation Emergencies) ( ...

  20. Frequently Asked Questions about Digital Mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Consumer Information (MQSA) Frequently Asked Questions About Digital Mammography Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... mammography exams, such as DBT? What is digital mammography? Full field digital mammography (FFDM, also known simply ...

  1. Frequently Asked Questions about Genetic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care Specific Genetic Disorders Frequently Asked Questions About Genetic Testing What is genetic testing? What can I learn ... find more information about genetic testing? What is genetic testing? Genetic testing uses laboratory methods to look at ...

  2. Frequently Asked Questions about Genetic Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on this page Frequently Asked Questions About Genetic Counseling What are genetic professionals and what do they ... genetics nurses. Top of page What is genetic counseling and evaluation? Genetic professionals work as members of ...

  3. Treatment of Anthrax Disease Frequently Asked Questions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judd, Kathleen S.; Young, Joan E.; Lesperance, Ann M.; Malone, John D.

    2010-05-14

    This document provides a summary of Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) on the treatment of anthrax disease caused by a wide-area release of Bacillus anthracis spores as an act bioterrorism. These FAQs are intended to provide the public health and medical community, as well as others, with guidance and communications to support the response and long-term recovery from an anthrax event.

  4. Heart Failure Questions to Ask Your Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Heart Failure Questions to Ask Your Doctor Updated:Oct 4, ... content was last reviewed on 04/06/2015. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  5. Who asks questions at astronomy meetings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Sarah J.; Davenport, James R. A.

    2017-06-01

    Over the last decade, significant attention has been drawn to the gender ratio of speakers at conferences, with ongoing efforts for meetings to better reflect the gender representation in the field. We find that women are significantly under-represented, however, among the astronomers asking questions after talks.

  6. [Adolescents ask physicians on the Internet: a one-year survey of adolescents' questions on health issues in an Internet forum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardoff, Daniel; Friedman, Rina; Pilo, Nurit; Friedman, Fernando; Greilsammer, Daniel; Rigler, Shmuel

    2012-06-01

    During the past decade, the internet has become a major information resource in various domains of life and a communication venue among young people and adolescents who seek health information via the internet. Until now, the contents of Israeli adolescents' questions regarding health issues on internet sites have not been published. (1) A survey of the characteristics of adolescents who seek health information and their questions presented to the Ynet forum "The body during adolescence". In this forum physicians experienced in adolescent medicine respond to these questions and to comments of other forum participants. (2) Presentation of problematic issues in professionals' responses to health questions in the internet. Survey of a representative sample of contacts to the Ynet forum "The body during adolescence" during 2009 gathering information on gender and age of contacting person, parents' contacts, contacts' contents and physicians responses. A total of 412 contacts were surveyed, 210 (51%) females, aged 14-17 years--60%, 10-13 years--17% and 18-21 years 15%. Parents' questions appeared in 39 (9%) of contacts. Of all contacts, 44% related to sexuality issues and 17% related to self image and body composition. The physicians provided complete responses to 60% of the contacts, while in 40% the physician's responses included referral to clinical medical consultation. An internet health forum enables adolescents and parents to ask questions and raise doubts and anxieties regarding various health issues without the fear of being exposed and enables them to express their concerns face-to-face with a healthcare provider Sensitive issues regarding sexuality and self-image, which are not raised frequently during clinical encounters, are expressed and receive professional responses in the forum. Notwithstanding the significance of a rapid professional contribution, physicians responding to contacts in internet forums need to recognize the barrier related to professional

  7. Frequently asked questions about global modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letellier, Christophe; Aguirre, Luis A.; Freitas, U. S.

    2009-06-01

    When a global model is attempted from experimental data, some preprocessing might be required. Therefore it is only natural to wonder what kind of effects the preprocessing might have on the modeling procedure. This concern is manifested in the form of recurrent frequently asked questions, such as "how does the preprocessing affect the underlying dynamics?" This paper aims at providing answers to important questions related to (i) data interpolation, (ii) data smoothing, (iii) data-estimated derivatives, (iv) model structure selection, and (v) model validation. The answers provided will hopefully remove some of those doubts and one shall be more confident not only on global modeling but also on various data analyses which may be also dependent on data preprocessing.

  8. Frequently asked questions in hypoxia research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenger RH

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Roland H Wenger,1,2 Vartan Kurtcuoglu,1,2 Carsten C Scholz,1,2 Hugo H Marti,3 David Hoogewijs1,2,4 1Institute of Physiology and Zurich Center for Human Physiology (ZIHP, University of Zurich, 2National Center of Competence in Research “Kidney.CH”, Zurich, Switzerland; 3Institute of Physiology and Pathophysiology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, 4Institute of Physiology, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen, Germany Abstract: “What is the O2 concentration in a normoxic cell culture incubator?” This and other frequently asked questions in hypoxia research will be answered in this review. Our intention is to give a simple introduction to the physics of gases that would be helpful for newcomers to the field of hypoxia research. We will provide background knowledge about questions often asked, but without straightforward answers. What is O2 concentration, and what is O2 partial pressure? What is normoxia, and what is hypoxia? How much O2 is experienced by a cell residing in a culture dish in vitro vs in a tissue in vivo? By the way, the O2 concentration in a normoxic incubator is 18.6%, rather than 20.9% or 20%, as commonly stated in research publications. And this is strictly only valid for incubators at sea level. Keywords: gas laws, hypoxia-inducible factor, Krogh tissue cylinder, oxygen diffusion, partial pressure, tissue oxygen levels

  9. Hepatitis C: Questions to Ask Your Doctor about Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Questions to Ask Your Doctor about Treatment Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... treatment? Other questions you want to ask: _______________________________________ _______________________________________ _______________________________________ Search Hepatitis Search this website Submit Share this page Related ...

  10. Children's Question Asking and Curiosity: A Training Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirout, Jamie; Klahr, David

    2011-01-01

    A primary instructional objective of most early science programs is to foster children's scientific curiosity and question-asking skills (Jirout & Klahr, 2011). However, little is known about the relationship between curiosity, question-asking behavior, and general inquiry skills. While curiosity and question asking are invariably mentioned in…

  11. The Question Each Citizen Must Ask

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Educating students to be good, informed citizens remains a core purpose of K-12 schools. The purposes of civic education, however, are contested, notes Levine, director of the Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement. Levine argues that a citizen is someone who seriously asks, "What should we do?"--someone who…

  12. Hepatitis C: Questions to Ask Your Doctor about Your Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Ask Your Doctor about Your Diagnosis Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... me? Other questions you want to ask: ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________ Search Hepatitis Search this website Submit Share this page Related ...

  13. Managing cancer pain: frequently asked questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Induru, Raghava R; Lagman, Ruth L

    2011-07-01

    For a variety of reasons, cancer pain is often undertreated, adversely affecting the quality of life for patients and caregivers. To manage cancer pain effectively, physicians need to understand its pathogenesis, how to assess it, how to treat it, and, in particular, how to optimize opioid treatment. We discuss common questions faced by physicians in everyday practice.

  14. Smart Questions To Ask Your Insurance Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Abby J.

    1997-01-01

    Provides advice on insurance coverage for child care centers. Suggests that before purchasing insurance you inquire about the agent's qualifications, company's financial stability, and corporate ratings; and obtain written answers to questions about specific coverage issues such as volunteers, legal defense costs, special events, and…

  15. Setting generalization of question-asking by children with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koegel, L K; Camarata, S M; Valdez-Menchaca, M; Koegel, R L

    1998-01-01

    We examined whether motivational procedures incorporated into teaching question-asking to children with autism, who lack verbal initiations, would result in generalization without additional teaching, prompting, or reinforcement in other settings. Specifically, we assessed whether such children could learn to use questions and whether the spontaneous use of question-asking would generalize across stimuli, settings, and people. All children learned to use questions in relation to items they had previously been unable to label and demonstrated generalization of spontaneous question-asking to new items and to their home environments with their mothers, with concomitant gains in expressive vocabulary. Results were discussed in terms of teaching response strategies, such as question-asking, to promote spontaneous child-initiated social interactions and expressive language development.

  16. Quora.com: Another Place for Users to Ask Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovadia, Steven

    2011-01-01

    Quora (www.quora.com) is a contemporary, web-based take on reference. Users post questions within Quora and other users answer the questions. Users can vote for and against answers (or not vote at all). It is users asking questions of friends and strangers and then sorting through the results. If the model sounds familiar, it's because it is.…

  17. Frequently Asked Questions about Measles in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pan American Health Organization Frequently Asked Questions about Measles in the U.S. Language: English (US) Español ( ... I’ve been exposed to someone who has measles. What should I do? A: Immediately call your ...

  18. Frequently Asked Questions about Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Submit Button Frequently Asked Questions about Ventilator-associated Pneumonia Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir What is a Ventilator-associated Pneumonia (VAP)? Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is a lung ...

  19. Choosing a Breast Reconstruction Surgeon and Questions to Ask

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Reconstruction Surgery Questions to Ask Your Surgeon About Breast Reconstruction If you’ve had surgery to treat your ... reconstruction. Finding the right plastic surgeon for your breast reconstruction If you decide to have breast reconstruction, you’ ...

  20. Substance Abuse Treatment for Children and Adolescents: Questions to Ask

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Families Guide Substance Abuse Treatment For Children And Adolescents: Questions To Ask No. 41; Reviewed July 2013 Many children and adolescents use alcohol and other drugs. Some develop serious ...

  1. Frequently Asked Questions for Parents of Children with PH

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Frequently Asked Questions for Parents of Children with PH What causes pulmonary hypertension in children? I’ve ... of what I read is about adults with PH. What are the primary differences between PH in ...

  2. Question asking by family caregivers in hospice interdisciplinary team meetings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine; Oliver, Debra Parker; Demiris, George; Washington, Karla T; Regehr, Kelly; Wilder, Heidi M

    2010-04-01

    This article reports findings from a pilot study that enabled family caregivers to use videophone technology to participate in hospice interdisciplinary team meetings. The goal of the study was to ascertain which issues were important to caregivers and the hospice team. A qualitative content analysis of video-recorded team meetings between team members and caregivers was conducted. In a sample of 12 caregivers in 36 discussions, caregivers asked a total of 137 questions, with the majority being Yes/No questions (45.1%), primarily used to seek clarification (19.6%). Hospice staff asked 396 questions, with the majority consisting of Yes/No questions (66.5%), mainly used to ask about the overall condition of the patient (22.2%). Data from this study suggest that when given the opportunity to participate in hospice team meetings, caregivers will ask questions of hospice staff. In addition, in light of prior research, this study's findings suggest that caregivers may have questions that go unaddressed, specifically regarding pain and medication.

  3. Competence-Based Education and Training– about Frequently Asked Questions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, M.

    2012-01-01

    This article follows the author's previous piece on practical guidelines for the development of comprehensive competence-based education and training (Mulder, 2012). It is about the questions that have been and are still frequently asked in presentations, workshops and classes about the introduction

  4. The Answers to Questions That Teachers Most Frequently Ask.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Julie Wofford

    This book presents a teacher's responses to various real questions asked by student teachers and beginning teachers. The nine chapters are: (1) "It Don't Mean a Thing if It Ain't Got That Swing: Teacher Attitude"; (2) "Who, What, When, Where, and Why, Oh Why, Me?: Organization"; (3) "A Little Song, A Little Dance, A Little Quiz Tomorrow: Delivery…

  5. Asking Better Questions: Approaching the Process of Thesis Supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manderson, Desmond

    1996-01-01

    The questions typically asked by a law student in different stages of the process of thesis supervision are re-formulated to encourage more student reflection on the experience. The stages include approaching the supervision concept, selecting an appropriate supervisor, considering rights and responsibilities of both parties in developing a…

  6. AskHERMES: An online question answering system for complex clinical questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, YongGang; Liu, Feifan; Simpson, Pippa; Antieau, Lamont; Bennett, Andrew; Cimino, James J; Ely, John; Yu, Hong

    2011-04-01

    Clinical questions are often long and complex and take many forms. We have built a clinical question answering system named AskHERMES to perform robust semantic analysis on complex clinical questions and output question-focused extractive summaries as answers. This paper describes the system architecture and a preliminary evaluation of AskHERMES, which implements innovative approaches in question analysis, summarization, and answer presentation. Five types of resources were indexed in this system: MEDLINE abstracts, PubMed Central full-text articles, eMedicine documents, clinical guidelines and Wikipedia articles. We compared the AskHERMES system with Google (Google and Google Scholar) and UpToDate and asked physicians to score the three systems by ease of use, quality of answer, time spent, and overall performance. AskHERMES allows physicians to enter a question in a natural way with minimal query formulation and allows physicians to efficiently navigate among all the answer sentences to quickly meet their information needs. In contrast, physicians need to formulate queries to search for information in Google and UpToDate. The development of the AskHERMES system is still at an early stage, and the knowledge resource is limited compared with Google or UpToDate. Nevertheless, the evaluation results show that AskHERMES' performance is comparable to the other systems. In particular, when answering complex clinical questions, it demonstrates the potential to outperform both Google and UpToDate systems. AskHERMES, available at http://www.AskHERMES.org, has the potential to help physicians practice evidence-based medicine and improve the quality of patient care. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. I Wish I'd Asked That: The Culture of Asking Questions in Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baleisis, Audra

    2009-01-01

    I will present the results from a qualitative study of the values and norms for thinking about science in academic astronomy, as seen through astronomers’ beliefs about departmental speech events. In-depth interviews were carried out with 12 graduate students and 9 faculty members from a prominent astronomy department at a large, public university. Interviewees were asked about a variety of speaking events in their department. The speaking events chosen were those at which: (1) graduate students could be presenters and/or ask questions, and (2) presenters spoke about science research to an audience of academic peers. This included Coffee Hour, Journal Club, research seminars, Colloquium, and dissertation defense talks. These events are part of the socialization of students into "acting like an astronomer.” Socialization is a process by which novices learn the rules (can and can't do), norms (should and shouldn't do), and values of a culture. The values of astronomy culture are encoded within the rules for participation in these events and the assumptions that audience members make about speakers. When these values contradict each other speakers face the dilemma of choosing between conflicting behaviors. One of the central dilemmas that arose in this study was that of whether or not to ask a question during a talk. Both graduate students and faculty members wanted students to speak up more often. However, students had conflicting worries - of voicing a question and it being a "stupid question” vs. having remained silent if it turned out to have been a "good question.” I will argue that this anxiety is a product of academic culture and not an indicator of individual failure, and discuss a number of factors that influence this situation, such as the perceived goals of each event, and astronomers’ beliefs about intelligence and learning.

  8. Human-Assisted Graph Search: It's Okay to Ask Questions

    CERN Document Server

    Parameswaran, Aditya; Garcia-Molina, Hector; Polyzotis, Neoklis; Widom, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    We consider the problem of human-assisted graph search: given a directed acyclic graph with some (unknown) target node(s), we consider the problem of finding the target node(s) by asking an omniscient human questions of the form "Is there a target node that is reachable from the current node?". This general problem has applications in many domains that can utilize human intelligence, including curation of hierarchies, debugging workflows, image segmentation and categorization, interactive search and filter synthesis. To our knowledge, this work provides the first formal algorithmic study of the optimization of human computation for this problem. We study various dimensions of the problem space, providing algorithms and complexity results. Our framework and algorithms can be used in the design of an optimizer for crowd-sourcing platforms such as Mechanical Turk.

  9. Three questions you need to ask about your brand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Kevin Lane; Sternthal, Brian; Tybout, Alice

    2002-09-01

    Traditionally, the people responsible for positioning brands have concentrated on the differences that set each brand apart from the competition. But emphasizing differences isn't enough to sustain a brand against competitors. Managers should also consider the frame of reference within which the brand works and the features the brand shares with other products. Asking three questions about your brand can help: HAVE WE ESTABLISHED A FRAME?: A frame of reference--for Coke, it might be as narrow as other colas or as broad as all thirst-quenching drinks--signals to consumers the goal they can expect to achieve by using a brand. Brand managers need to pay close attention to this issue, in some cases expanding their focus in order to preempt the competition. ARE WE LEVERAGING OUR POINTS OF PARITY?: Certain points of parity must be met if consumers are to perceive your product as a legitimate player within its frame of reference. For instance, consumers might not consider a bank truly a bank unless it offers checking and savings plans. ARE THE POINTS OF DIFFERENCE COMPELLING?: A distinguishing characteristic that consumers find both relevant and believable can become a strong, favorable, unique brand association, capable of distinguishing the brand from others in the same frame of reference. Frames of reference, points of parity, and points of difference are moving targets. Maytag isn't the only dependable brand of appliance, Tide isn't the only detergent with whitening power, and BMWs aren't the only cars on the road with superior handling. The key questions you need to ask about your brand may not change, but their context certainly will. The saviest brand positioners are also the most vigilant.

  10. Asking a Great Question: A Librarian Teaches Questioning Skills to First-Year Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Nancy E

    2015-01-01

    In a single one-hour session, first-year medical students were taught a framework for differentiating between lower-order questions that lead to knowledge of facts and higher-order questions that lead to integration of concepts and deeper learning, thereby preparing them for problem-based learning (PBL). Students generated lists of questions in response to an assertion prompt and categorized them according to Bloom's Taxonomy. These data were analyzed in addition to data from the course exam, which asked them to formulate a higher-level question in response to a prompt. Categorizing questions according to Bloom's Taxonomy was a more difficult task for students than was formulating higher-order questions. Students reported that the skills that they learned were used in subsequent PBL sessions to formulate higher-order learning objectives that integrated new and previously-learned concepts.

  11. Physics of Toys: The Joy of Asking Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Beverley

    2014-03-01

    Children are natural scientists. They ask questions, they observe, they try things to see what happens. Often school-based science does little to nurture the young scientist and, in fact, may do just the opposite with thick textbooks, fact heavy lessons, and too many equations. The exploration of common toys produces deep learning by emphasizing concepts and connections before formal definitions and mathematics. It also connects the classroom to the familiar world outside of school and gets students writing and talking about physics ideas. At the university level, investigating what toys do and how they do it can be a challenging application of undergraduate physics from the introductory course up through senior mechanics. Toys provide an ideal system for the kind of open-ended inquiry that introduces students to what scientists really do. They can pose their own questions, explore the behavior of the system sufficiently to create a hypothesis, use their theoretical knowledge to make a simplified model of the system and predict an outcome, design an experiment, discover that the real world is messy, think about what they haven't taken into account with their simple model and try to improve it. I have spent close to 30 years thinking about how to use toys to enhance physics education from 4th grade through college. In the process I have collected hundreds of toys the majority of which relate to mechanics, but also to sound, light, electricity and magnetism. I will discuss the pedagogical reasons for using toys in physics education and the many different ways to use them from demonstrations to laboratory experiments to discussion starters as well as how it is possible to use the same toy with many different age levels by approaching the analysis differently. I will share a number of my favorite toys, but focus particularly on those related to energy concepts.

  12. The Role Of Gender In Asking Questions At Cool Stars 18 And 19

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Sarah J.; Douglas, Stephanie; Gosnell, Natalie M.; Muirhead, Philip S.; Booth, Rachel S.; Davenport, James R. A.; Mace, Gregory N.

    2016-12-01

    We examine the gender balance of the 18th and 19th meetings of the Cambridge Workshop on Cool Stellar Systems and the Sun (CS18 and CS19). The percent of female attendees at both meetings (31% at CS18 and 37% at CS19) was higher than the percent of women in the American Astronomical Society (25%) and the International Astronomical Union (18%). The representation of women in Cool Stars as SOC members, invited speakers, and contributed speakers was similar to or exceeded the percent of women attending the meetings. We requested that conference attendees assist in a project to collect data on the gender of astronomers asking questions after talks. Using this data, we found that men were over-represented (and women were under-represented) in the question sessions after each talk. Men asked 79% of the questions at CS18 and 75% of the questions at CS19, but were 69% and 63% of the attendees respectively. Contrary to findings from previous conferences, we did not find that the gender balance of questions was strongly affected by the session chair gender, the speaker gender, or the length of the question period. We also found that female and male speakers were asked a comparable number of questions after each talk. The contrast of these results from previous incarnations of the gender questions survey indicate that more data would be useful in understanding the factors that contribute to the gender balance of question askers. We include a preliminary set of recommendations based on this and other work on related topics, but also advocate for additional research on the demographics of conference participants. Additional data on the intersection of gender with race, seniority, sexual orientation, ability and other marginalized identities is necessary to fully address the role of gender in asking questions at conferences.

  13. Frequently asked questions about family medicine in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Raman

    2016-01-01

    Family medicine (FM) is an independent and distinct medical specialty in the developed countries such as USA, UK, Australia, and Canada since 1960s. FM teaching is imparted at undergraduate and postgraduate levels in countries such as Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka. Family practice is the practicing vocation of the majority doctors in India. The practitioners of FM include general practitioners, family physicians, FM specialists, and medical officers in the public sector. Medical students are largely unaware about FM career as this concept is not introduced at MBBS level. Faculty and senior doctors from other disciplines are also not able to answer the queries related to FM as they themselves also have gone through the same education system for last three decades, largely unexposed to the concept of academic family medicine. This article is a compilation of frequently asked questions, and their appropriate responses, presented here to dispel myths and misinformation about FM specialty. The answers are deliberated upon by Dr. Raman Kumar the founder president of the Academy of Family Physicians of India and the chief editor of the Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care. This article was originally published as an interview in Docplexus, a popular online network and website for medical doctors in November 2015.

  14. Anatomy of the Human Ear/Questions to Ask Your Hearing Professional

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issue Past Issues Special Section: Focus on Communication Anatomy of the Human Ear/ Questions to Ask your ... Focus on Communication" Articles Living with Hearing Loss / Anatomy of the Human Ear/Questions to Ask your ...

  15. Toward Question-Asking Machines: The Logic of Questions and the Inquiry Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuth,Kevin H.

    2005-01-01

    For over a century, the study of logic has focused on the algebra of logical statements. This work, first performed by George Boole, has led to the development of modern computers, and was shown by Richard T. Cox to be the foundation of Bayesian inference. Meanwhile the logic of questions has been much neglected. For our computing machines to be truly intelligent, they need to be able to ask relevant questions. In this paper I will show how the Boolean lattice of logical statements gives rise to the free distributive lattice of questions thus defining their algebra. Furthermore, there exists a quantity analogous to probability, called relevance, which quantifies the degree to which one question answers another. I will show that relevance is not only a natural generalization of information theory, but also forms its foundation.

  16. Colorectal (Colon) Cancer: Questions to Ask Your Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... risk, ask your doctor if you should begin screening earlier than age 50. If You’re Having Symptoms Tell your doctor if you have any of these symptoms— Blood in or on your stool (bowel movement). Stomach pain, aches, or cramps that do not go ...

  17. asking questions for higher order thinking in visual literacy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    thinking skills in the English visual literacy (VL) learning classroom. Guided by an .... challenges in changing teacher negative attitudes and culture towards continuous pro- fessional ..... However, questions on the effect of linguistic aspects on.

  18. Mergers and acquisitions. Frequently asked questions and answers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, S M; Smeltzer, C H; Thomas, C

    2000-03-01

    This article is structured in a question/answer format based on interviews with Dr. Carolyn Hope Smeltzer and Salima Manji Lin of PricewaterhouseCoopers, Chicago, and Chuck Thomas of Hinshaw & Culbertson, Rockford. The questions come from CEO's, healthcare executives, and nurse executives at hospitals that are contemplating mergers or that have both succeeded and failed to merge their institutions. The experts share their knowledge.

  19. The Question Asking Skills of Preschool Teacher Candidates: Turkey and America Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bay, D. Neslihan

    2016-01-01

    Question asking is an important skill that teachers should use during class activities. Teachers need to get used to this ability while they are teacher candidates. The aim of this research is to identify the cognitive taxonomy and the structure of the questions asked by the candidate of preschool teachers and to compare the questioning skills of…

  20. Creating robust vocabulary frequently asked questions and extended examples

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, Isabel L

    2008-01-01

    Bringing Words to Life has enlivened the classrooms of hundreds of thousands of teachers. Responding to readers' success stories, practical questions, and requests for extended examples, this ideal volume builds on the groundbreaking work of Bringing Words to Life. The authors present additional tools, tips, and detailed explanations of such questions as which words to teach, when and how to teach them, and how to adapt instruction for English language learners. They provide specific instructional sequences, including assessments, for grades K-2, 3-5, 6-8, and 9-12, as well as interactive less

  1. 11 critical questions to ask when buying a physician practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessee, William F

    2012-07-01

    Answering probing questions in advance of a practice purchase can help hospital and health system leaders make informed decisions. The questions are intended to stimulate careful consideration before entering into a practice acquisition; no single piece of information or answer should be considered definitive in the final decision-making process. Success depends on having a clear game plan and spending time ensuring that all players-board, management, physician leaders, and the physicians who will be employees--understand and support the plan.

  2. Ask Marilyn in the Mathematics Classroom: Probability Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasko, Francis J.

    2012-01-01

    Since 1986, Marilyn Vos Savant, who is listed in the "Guinness Book of World Records Hall of Fame" for the highest IQ, has had a weekly column that is published in "Parade Magazine." In this column, she answers readers' questions on a wide variety of subjects including mathematics and particularly probability. Many of the mathematically oriented…

  3. Questions Students Ask: The Red-Eye Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physics Teacher, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Addresses the question of why a dog's eyes appear red and glow when a flash photograph is taken. Conditions for the red-eye effect, light paths involved, structure of the eye, and typical cameras and lenses are discussed. Also notes differences between the eyes of nocturnal animals and humans. (JN)

  4. Telehealth Regulatory and Legal Considerations: Frequently Asked Questions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Cason

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available As telehealth gains momentum as a service delivery model in the United States within the rehabilitation professions, regulatory and legal questions arise. This article examines the following questions:1. Is there a need to secure licenses in two states (i.e., where the practitioner resides, and where the client is located, before engaging in telehealth?2. Do state laws differ concerning if and how telehealth can occur?3. Do any states expressly disallow telehealth?4. Can services delivered through telehealth be billed the same way as services provided in-person?5. If practitioners fulfill the requirements to maintain licensure (e.g., continuing education obligations in their state of residence, do they also need to fulfill the requirements to maintain licensure for the state in which the client resides?6. Will professional malpractice insurance cover services delivered through telehealth?7. Does a sole practitioner need to abide by HIPAA regulations?Responses to these questions are offered to raise awareness of the regulatory and legal implications associated with the use of a telehealth service delivery model

  5. "This is a question we have to ask everyone": asking young people about self-harm and suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, M; Kiyimba, N; Karim, K

    2016-10-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: An essential part of the mental health assessment is to evaluate the risk of harm to self. Fundamentally this involves asking directly about self-harming behaviour and suicidal thoughts or urges, but practitioners often find it difficult to open up these conversations. This evaluation of risk is particularly important as self-harm and suicidal thoughts are frequently found in young people who attend mental health services. WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: Young people are not always routinely asked directly about self-harm or suicidal thoughts when they are assessed. There are two ways that mental health practitioners introduce this topic: first, by building up to it by initially asking about general feelings, and second by stating that it is a requirement to ask everyone. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: These questions should not be avoided by mental health practitioners just because they are difficult. We offer suggestions as to how to ask questions about self-harm and suicide based on real-world practice.

  6. Marketing foods to children: are we asking the right questions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Charlene

    2012-06-01

    The childhood obesity epidemic has prompted a range of regulatory initiatives that seek to reduce the impact of food marketing on children. Policy recommendations by government and public health organizations have suggested regulating the promotion of high-sugar, -fat, and/or -salt foods to children, while the food industry has created voluntary nutrition guidelines to channel child-targeted marketing toward only "better-for-you" products. This article argues that the overarching focus on the nutrient profile of foods (nutritionism) is wrong-headed: The slippage in terms from "better-for-you" foods to "healthy dietary choices" is problematic and also makes it difficult for children to identify the healthy choice. Nutritionism further works to sidestep important questions pertaining to the ethics of food marketing, not to mention the way that marketing foods as fun and entertainment works to encourage overeating in children.

  7. Nutritional assessment in vegetarians and vegans: questions clinicians should ask.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikoff, Gregory A

    2012-12-01

    Not all who adhere to vegetarian, vegan or other special diets have nutritionally sound eating habits. The clinical consequences of an insufficiently mindful vegetarian or vegan diet include many common symptoms such as anxiety, brain fog, depression, fatigue, insomnia, neuropathies and other neurologic dysfunction. Patients with such symptoms who report having a vegetarian or vegan diet, or a diet that severely restricts meat consumption, require a slightly expanded differential diagnosis. The challenge is to identify which patients require closer attention. This article lists questions to use to quickly assess for potential dietary drivers of clinical symptoms. In many cases, simple nutritional interventions, through diet and/or supplementation, can resolve or minimize problematic symptoms.

  8. New Horizons at Pluto: Asking the right questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Leslie; Stern, S. Alan; Olkin, Catherine B.; Spencer, John R.; Cheng, Andrew F.; Weaver, Harold A.; Ennico, Kimberly; Moore, Jeffrey M.; Grundy, William M.; Bagenal, Fran; Gladstone, Randy; Lunine, Jonathan I.; New Horizons Science Team

    2016-10-01

    In the 1980's and 1990's, breakthroughs about Pluto and the outer solar system laid the groundwork for the Outer Planets Science Working Group (1992), the Pluto Kuiper Express mission Science Definition Team (1996), and the Announcement of Opportunity for the Pluto Kuiper-Belt mission in 2001. These included specific science goals that molded the mission design, instrument selection, and observing sequence. These goals held up amazingly well over the decades. This historical review of New Horizons will explain how ground-based and theoretical work prepared us for a successful investigation of Pluto, and speculate on some of the new questions raised by the New Horizons flyby of the Pluto system.This work was supported by NASA's New Horizons project.

  9. Asking Bigger Questions: An Invitation to Further Conversation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Bloch-Schulman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this essay, the editors and contributors to this special section on SoTL in the Arts and Humanities argue that given the current climate and context, debates within SoTL about appropriate methodology both lead scholars from their disciplines to reject SoTL and also, more importantly, distract us from more significant questions and challenges. If, instead, SoTL would embrace not only its diversity but also its political potential, then we, as a scholarly community, would be in a position to do more than merely improve students’ learning in our own classrooms. We could help to transform higher education. To achieve that, we need a broader conversation and a wider range of studies. We also need to be mindful of and engaged with the political, economic, and ideological forces that are shaping our institutions, our work, and our students’ expectations.

  10. Workplace safety: Let’s ask the right questions

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    Since 2003, the International Labour Organization and the World Health Organization have been organising an annual event on 28 April called “World Day for Safety and Health at Work.” This year, CERN is taking part for the first time with campaigns organised by the Safety Unit of the BE Department and by the HSE Unit.   The HSE Unit and the Safety Unit of the BE Department invite you to find out about everyday health and safety questions by visiting the stands they will be setting up at the entrances to the different restaurants at lunchtime on Thursday, 28 April. "This will be a chance to think about safety not just in the workplace but also at home and in the context of leisure activities,” explains Charles-Edouard Sala, who came up with the idea for CERN's participation in the event. “Safety is, first and foremost, a matter of personal awareness of and sensitivity to risks. That is why we in the Safety Unit had the idea for a campaign with the mo...

  11. How Are Questions That Students Ask in High Level Mathematics Classes Linked to General Giftedness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leikin, Roza; Koichu, Boris; Berman, Avi; Dinur, Sariga

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a part of a larger study, in which we asked "How are learning and teaching of mathematics at high level linked to students' general giftedness?" We consider asking questions, especially student-generated questions, as indicators of quality of instructional interactions. In the part of the study presented in this…

  12. EPAct Alternative Fuel Transporation Program - State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets: Frequently Asked Questions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-03-01

    Factsheet answering frequently asked questions about the U.S. Department of Energy's Alternative Fuel Transportation Program (the Program) that implements provisions of Titles III–V of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct). Answers to questions that are frequently asked about the Program by managers of state government and alternative fuel provider fleets are provided in the factsheet.

  13. Developing Students' Ability to Ask More and Better Questions Resulting from Inquiry-Type Chemistry Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstein, Avi; Navon, Oshrit; Kipnis, Mira; Mamlok-Naaman, Rachel

    2005-01-01

    This study focuses on the ability of high-school chemistry students, who learn chemistry through the inquiry approach, to ask meaningful and scientifically sound questions. We investigated (a) the ability of students to ask questions related to their observations and findings in an inquiry-type experiment (a practical test) and (b) the ability of…

  14. The Fostering of Question-Asking Capability. A Meaningful Aspect of Problem Solving in Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoller, Uri

    1987-01-01

    Deals with strategies for the fostering of the question-asking capabilities of chemistry students through the use of active, real-world problem-solving and decision-making processes. Suggests that appropriate teaching strategies do facilitate the students' question-asking abilities, and strengthen their confidence in applying them to…

  15. Separating the Research Question from the Laboratory Techniques: Advancing High-School Biology Teachers' Ability to Ask Research Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasson, Eilat; Yarden, Anat

    2012-01-01

    Inquiry is essentially a process in which research questions are asked and an attempt is made to find the answers. However, the formulation of operational research questions of the sort used in authentic scientific inquiry is not a trivial task. Here, we set out to explore the possible influence of separating the research question from the…

  16. Information-seeking behaviors of medical students: a classification of questions asked of librarians and physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildemuth, B M; de Bliek, R; Friedman, C P; Miya, T S

    1994-07-01

    To solve a problem, a person often asks questions of someone with more expertise. This paper reports on a study of the types of questions asked and how the experts are chosen. In the study, sixty-three first-year medical students responded to clinical scenarios, each describing a patient affected by a toxin and asking questions concerning the identity of the toxin and its characteristics. After answering those questions, the students were asked to imagine that they had access to a medical reference librarian and an internist specializing in toxicology. The students then generated two questions for each expert about each clinical scenario. Each question was categorized according to the type of information requested, and the frequency of each type of question was calculated. The study found that students most often asked for the identification of the toxin(s), references about the scenario, or the effects of the toxin; an explanation of the patient's symptoms; or a description of the appropriate treatment. Students were more likely to address questions on the identity of the toxin and references to the hypothetical librarian; they were more likely to ask the internist for explanations of the symptoms and descriptions of the treatment. The implications of these results for the design of information and educational systems are discussed.

  17. Las Preguntas Que Hacen los Padres sobre la Escuela (Questions Parents Ask about School).

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Opinion Research Center, Chicago, IL.

    This guide presents questions that parents frequently ask about their children's school along with answers to those questions. The questions and answers were prepared based on the results of studies conducted by the Partnership for Family Involvement in Education, the U.S. Department of Education, the GTE Foundation, and by the National Center for…

  18. Lung Cancer, Questions to Ask Your Health Professional | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Lung Cancer Questions to Ask Your Health Professional Past Issues / ... 2013 Table of Contents Tests What type of lung cancer do I have? Has the cancer spread from ...

  19. Questions Often Asked about Special Education Services = Preguntas sobre los servicios de educacion especial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupper, Lisa, Ed.

    This guide, available in both English and Spanish, answers questions often asked by parents about special education services. Questions and answers address the following topics: where to begin if a parent believes a child needs special education services, services available to very young children, the evaluation process, the Individualized…

  20. Asking well-built questions for evidence-based practice in augmentative and alternative communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlosser, Ralf W; Koul, Rajinder; Costello, John

    2007-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) is increasingly being advocated as the preferred approach to practice in augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). The EBP process involves multiple steps. The asking of a well-built question is the first step in the quest for answers. At the same time it is also often the first stumbling block for practitioners. To facilitate the asking of well-built questions it may be helpful to follow a template. The most frequently used template is PICO, which stands for patient, intervention, comparison, and outcome [Richardson, W., Wilson, M., Nishikawa, J., & Hayward, R. (1995). The well-built clinical question: A key to evidence-based decisions. ACP Journal Club, 123, A12-A13]. In this article, we examine the suitability of the PICO template for AAC in terms of the representativeness of the components, and the appropriateness of its subcomponents, and their terminology. Based on this analysis, we propose the PESICO template, which stands for person, environments, stakeholders, intervention, comparison, and outcome. This template is then illustrated with examples representing a range of decision-making areas in AAC. Finally, directions for future research are provided. The reader will be able to: (1) appreciate the importance of asking well-built questions, (2) name the shortcomings of the PICO template, and (3) describe the components of the proposed PESICO template for asking well-built questions.

  1. Asking Survey Respondents about Reasons for Their Behavior: A Split Ballot Experiment in Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, Charles Q.; McHenry, Gretchen

    2014-01-01

    When policymakers design programs and policies, they often want to understand why individuals engage in particular behaviors. Collecting survey data about respondents’ reasons for their behavior presents important challenges, and there is little methodological research on this topic. We conducted an experiment to investigate the best practices for asking questions about respondents’ reasons for their behavior. We embedded a split ballot experiment in a face-to-face survey of 608 entrepreneurs...

  2. Teaching individuals with autism spectrum disorder to ask questions: A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raulston, T.; Carnett, A.; Lang, Russell; Tostanoski, A.; Lee, A.; Machalicek, W.A.; Sigafoos, J.; O'Reilly, M.F.; Didden, H.C.M.; Lancioni, G.E.

    2013-01-01

    This review involved a systematic search and analysis of studies aimed at teaching individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) to ask questions (i.e., teaching mands for information). A systematic search of databases, reference lists, and journals identified 21 studies that met predetermined inc

  3. Tips for a physician in getting the right job, part XII: general questions for the applicant to ask.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harolds, Jay A

    2014-07-01

    The type and caliber of the questions asked by a job hunter is one of the ways an interviewer will evaluate the candidate. Questions that show poor preparation should not be asked, such as failure to read what the employer sent to the job seeker or not doing elementary research on the practice, the organization, or the community. Asking about insignificant details also is not helpful. Not having any good questions to ask is a negative in an interview. This article discusses many possible important questions for the applicant to ask during an interview.

  4. Analysis of Questions Teachers ask About Teaching Modern Mathematics in the Elementary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Robert W.

    1976-01-01

    Teachers were surveyed concerning their major questions about modern mathematics curricula. Their questions were classified as concerned with reasons certain topics are included (12 per cent), how to teach particular topics (21 per cent) or miscellaneous. Nine recommendations are made. (SD)

  5. 100 commonly asked questions in math class answers that promote mathematical understanding, grades 6-12

    CERN Document Server

    Posamentier, Alfred S (Steven); Germain-Williams, Terri L (Lynn); Paris, Elaine S; Lehmann, Ingmar H (Horst)

    2013-01-01

    100 ways to get students hooked on math! That one question got you stumped? Or maybe you have the answer, but it's not all that compelling. Al Posamentier and his coauthors to the rescue with this handy reference containing fun answers to students'100 most frequently asked math questions. Even if you already have the answers, Al's explanations are certain to keep kids hooked. The big benefits? You'll discover high-interest ways to Teach to the Common Core's math content standards Promote inquiry and process in mathematical thinking Build procedural skills and conceptual understanding Encourage

  6. Brief Report: Question-Asking and Collateral Language Acquisition in Children with Autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koegel, Lynn Kern; Koegel, Robert L; Green-Hopkins, Israel; Barnes, Cynthia Carter

    2010-04-01

    The literature suggests children with autism use communication primarily for requests and protests, and almost never for information-seeking. This study investigated whether teaching "Where" questions using intrinsic reinforcement procedures would produce the generalized use of the question, and whether concomitant improvements in related language structures, provided as answers to the children's questions, would occur. In the context of a multiple baseline across participants design, data showed that the children could rapidly acquire and generalize the query, and that there were collateral improvements in the children's use of language structures corresponding to the answers to the questions the children asked. The results are discussed in the context of teaching child initiations to improve linguistic competence in children with autism.

  7. Ask the right question: a critical step for practicing evidence-based laboratory medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Christopher P; Christenson, Robert H

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of laboratory medicine is to facilitate better decision making in clinical practice and healthcare delivery. Decision making implies an unresolved issue, problem or unmet need. The most important criterion for any investigation to be of value in clinical practice is that it addresses an unmet need. The different ways in which laboratory investigations are utilized in patient care can be represented in the form of questions. It is important that these questions are articulated to highlight the variables that will impact on the effectiveness of the investigation in the scenario being considered. These variables include the characteristics of the patient (or population) and clinical setting, the nature of the decision and action taken on receipt of the test result and the expected outcome. Asking a question is the first step of the evidence-based laboratory medicine (EBLM) cycle, the other steps being acquiring the evidence, critically appraising the evidence, applying the evidence and auditing use of the evidence. Getting the question right determines the quality of the whole process, thus, defines the quality in practice of laboratory medicine. Whilst the main focus of the EBLM cycle is to provide a strong evidence base for use in clinical practice, it is clear that the five steps are equally applicable in commissioning, delivery and audit (performance management) of services. Asking the right question is crucial to improving the quality of evidence, and practice, in laboratory medicine, and should be used in routine laboratory medicine practice and management throughout healthcare.

  8. Answers to frequently asked questions about cleanup activities at Three Mile Island, Unit 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-03-01

    This question-and-answer report provides answers in nontechnical language to frequently asked questions about the status of cleanup activities at Three Mile Island, Unit 2. The answers update information first prepared in 1981, shortly after the cleanup got under way. Since then, a variety of important developments in the cleanup has occurred. The information in the report should be read in conjunction with NUREG 1060, a discussion of increased occupational exposure estimates for the cleanup. The questions and answers in this report cover purpose and community involvement, decontamination of water and reactor, fuel removal, radwaste transport, environmental impact, social and economic effects, worker exposures and safety, radiation monitoring, potential for accidents, and schedule and funding.

  9. Dynamic Question Ordering in Online Surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Early Kirstin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Online surveys have the potential to support adaptive questions, where later questions depend on earlier responses. Past work has taken a rule-based approach, uniformly across all respondents. We envision a richer interpretation of adaptive questions, which we call Dynamic Question Ordering (DQO, where question order is personalized. Such an approach could increase engagement, and therefore response rate, as well as imputation quality. We present a DQO framework to improve survey completion and imputation. In the general survey-taking setting, we want to maximize survey completion, and so we focus on ordering questions to engage the respondent and collect hopefully all information, or at least the information that most characterizes the respondent, for accurate imputations. In another scenario, our goal is to provide a personalized prediction. Since it is possible to give reasonable predictions with only a subset of questions, we are not concerned with motivating users to answer all questions. Instead, we want to order questions to get information that reduces prediction uncertainty, while not being too burdensome. We illustrate this framework with two case studies, for the prediction and survey-taking settings. We also discuss DQO for national surveys and consider connections between our statistics-based question-ordering approach and cognitive survey methodology.

  10. A survey on question answering systems with classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Mishra

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Question answering systems (QASs generate answers of questions asked in natural languages. Early QASs were developed for restricted domains and have limited capabilities. Current QASs focus on types of questions generally asked by users, characteristics of data sources consulted, and forms of correct answers generated. Research in the area of QASs began in 1960s and since then, a large number of QASs have been developed. To identify the future scope of research in this area, the need of a comprehensive survey on QASs arises naturally. This paper surveys QASs and classifies them based on different criteria. We identify the current status of the research in the each category of QASs, and suggest future scope of the research.

  11. Answers to frequently asked questions about cleanup activities at Three Mile Island, Unit 2. Public information report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-09-01

    The document presents answers to frequently asked questions about plans for cleanup and decontamination activities at Three Mile Island, Unit 2. Answers to the questions asked are based on information in the NRC 'Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement related to decontamination and disposal of radioactive wastes resulting from March 28, 1979, accident, Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 2,' NUREG-0683.

  12. Management of hyperthyroidism due to Graves' disease: frequently asked questions and answers (if any).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartalena, L; Chiovato, L; Vitti, P

    2016-10-01

    Graves' disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism in iodine-replete areas. Although progress has been made in our understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease, no treatment targeting pathogenic mechanisms of the disease is presently available. Therapies for Graves' hyperthyroidism are largely imperfect because they are bound to either a high rate of relapsing hyperthyroidism (antithyroid drugs) or lifelong hypothyroidism (radioiodine treatment or thyroidectomy). Aim of the present article is to offer a practical guidance to the reader by providing evidence-based answers to frequently asked questions in clinical practice.

  13. Can consumers learn to ask three questions to improve shared decision making? A feasibility study of the ASK (AskShareKnow) Patient-Clinician Communication Model(®) intervention in a primary health-care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Heather L; Barratt, Alexandra; Jones, Anna; Bateson, Deborah; Carey, Karen; Trevena, Lyndal J; McGeechan, Kevin; Del Mar, Chris B; Butow, Phyllis N; Epstein, Ronald M; Entwistle, Vikki; Weisberg, Edith

    2016-10-01

    To test the feasibility and assess the uptake and acceptability of implementing a consumer questions programme, AskShareKnow, to encourage consumers to use the questions '1. What are my options; 2. What are the possible benefits and harms of those options; 3. How likely are each of those benefits and harms to happen to me?' These three questions have previously shown important effects in improving the quality of information provided during consultations and in facilitating patient involvement. This single-arm intervention study invited participants attending a reproductive and sexual health-care clinic to view a 4-min video-clip in the waiting room. Participants completed three questionnaires: (T1) prior to viewing the intervention; (T2) immediately after their consultation; and (T3) two weeks later. A total of 121 (78%) participants viewed the video-clip before their consultation. Eighty-four (69%) participants asked one or more questions, and 35 (29%) participants asked all three questions. For those making a decision, 55 (87%) participants asked one or more questions, while 27 (43%) participants asked all three questions. Eighty-seven (72%) participants recommended the questions. After two weeks, 47 (49%) of the participants recalled the questions. Enabling patients to view a short video-clip before an appointment to improve information and involvement in health-care consultations is feasible and led to a high uptake of question asking in consultations. This AskShareKnow programme is a simple and feasible method of training patients to use a brief consumer-targeted intervention that has previously shown important effects in improving the quality of information provided during consultations and in facilitating patient involvement and use of evidence-based questions. ©2015 The Authors. Health Expectations published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. The effect of different levels of constructive teaching practices on teacher question asking behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, Ibrahim

    The purposes of the study were: (1) to examine the effectiveness of the Iowa Chautauqua Professional Development Program (ICPDP) in moving elementary science teachers toward the use of more constructive teaching practices and (2) to investigate the effectiveness of different levels of teaching practices, especially in terms of a sample of teachers achieving "expert" state at the end of program compared with some attaining only with "competent" level. The variables considered were their perceptions of their own classroom practices, stated philosophy of teaching and learning, and their actual classroom practices and question asking behaviors observed via videotape recording. Structured questionnaires, focus group interviews, teacher reflections, and examination of lesson modules were used to collect data from thirty-three K-5 in-service teachers who were involved in a one-year ICPDP. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of data revealed that: (1) Teacher perceptions regarding their teaching and learning, and their actual teaching practices in classroom in terms of constructivist approaches were significantly changed after participation in the ICPDP. (2) Teacher perceptions of their classroom practices and stated philosophies of teaching and learning have a great affect on their actual practices that can be observed. (3) Teacher stated philosophies of teaching and learning significantly influence the quantity and quality of their use of questions in their classrooms. (4) The "expert" teachers accept students' alternative answers and deliberately ask high cognitive level questions that enable students to think critically and to guide them based on what the students are thinking. Alternatively, the "competent" teachers do not follow student responses and used questions which do not help students to understand their current level of understanding nor encourage students to reflect on their own thinking. (5) The role of "expert" teacher is more geared toward challenging

  15. How basic-level objects facilitate question-asking in a categorization task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggeri, Azzurra; Feufel, Markus A.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to categorize information is essential to everyday tasks such as identifying the cause of an event given a set of likely explanations or pinpointing the correct from a set of possible diagnoses by sequentially probing questions. In three studies, we investigated how the level of inclusiveness at which objects are presented (basic-level vs. subordinate-level) influences children's (7- and 10-year-olds) and adults' performance in a sequential binary categorization task. Study 1 found a robust facilitating effect of basic-level objects on the ability to ask effective questions in a computerized version of the Twenty Questions game. Study 2 suggested that this facilitating effect might be due to the kinds of object-differentiating features participants generate when provided with basic-level as compared to subordinate-level objects. Study 3 ruled out the alternative hypothesis that basic-level objects facilitate the selection of the most efficient among a given set of features. PMID:26217262

  16. How basic-level objects facilitate question-asking in a categorization task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azzurra eRuggeri

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The ability to categorize information is essential to everyday tasks such as identifying the cause of an event given a set of likely explanations or pinpointing the correct from a set of possible diagnoses by sequentially probing questions. In three studies, we investigated how the level of inclusiveness at which objects are presented (basic-level versus subordinate-level influences children’s (7 and 10-year olds and adults’ performances in a sequential binary categorization task. Study 1 found a robust facilitating effect of basic-level objects on the ability to ask effective questions in a computerized version of the Twenty Questions game. Study 2 suggested that this facilitating effect might be due to the kinds of object-differentiating features participants generate when provided with basic-level as compared to subordinate-level objects. Study 3 ruled out the alternative hypothesis that basic-level objects facilitate the selection of the most efficient among a given set of features.

  17. Pinon and Juniper Field Guide: Asking the Right Questions to Select Appropriate Management Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tausch, R.J.; Miller, R.F.; Roundy, B.A.; Chambers, J.C.

    2009-01-01

    Pinon-juniper woodlands are an important vegetation type in the Great Basin. Old-growth and open shrub savanna woodlands have been present over much of the last several hundred years. Strong evidence indicates these woodlands have experienced significant tree infilling and major expansion in their distribution since the late 1800s by encroaching into surrounding landscapes once dominated by shrubs and herbaceous vegetation. Both infilling and expansion affects soil resources, plant community structure and composition, water and nutrient cycles, forage production, wildlife habitat, biodiversity, and fire patterns across the landscape. Another impact is the shift from historic fire regimes to larger and more intense wildfires that are increasingly determining the future of this landscape. This publication helps biologists and land managers consider how to look at expansion of woodlands and determine what questions to ask to develop a management strategy, including prescribed fire or other practices.

  18. The Impact of Asking Intention or Self-Prediction Questions on Subsequent Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Chantelle; Conner, Mark; Miles, Eleanor; Sandberg, Tracy; Taylor, Natalie; Godin, Gaston; Sheeran, Paschal

    2015-01-01

    The current meta-analysis estimated the magnitude of the impact of asking intention and self-prediction questions on rates of subsequent behavior, and examined mediators and moderators of this question–behavior effect (QBE). Random-effects meta-analysis on 116 published tests of the effect indicated that intention/prediction questions have a small positive effect on behavior (d+ = 0.24). Little support was observed for attitude accessibility, cognitive dissonance, behavioral simulation, or processing fluency explanations of the QBE. Multivariate analyses indicated significant effects of social desirability of behavior/behavior domain (larger effects for more desirable and less risky behaviors), difficulty of behavior (larger effects for easy-to-perform behaviors), and sample type (larger effects among student samples). Although this review controls for co-occurrence of moderators in multivariate analyses, future primary research should systematically vary moderators in fully factorial designs. Further primary research is also needed to unravel the mechanisms underlying different variants of the QBE. PMID:26162771

  19. Effectively detect dependence on benzodiazepines among community-dwelling seniors by asking only two questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voyer, P; Roussel, M E; Berbiche, D; Préville, M

    2010-05-01

    Consumption of benzodiazepines (BZDs) is common among seniors. When used over a long period of time, BZDs can induce dependence. The present study aimed to equip nurses with valid screening questions for detecting BZD dependence among seniors, applicable to clinical practice and based on the DSM-IV-TR version. A random sample of 707 BZD users aged 65 years and over was screened for BZD dependence using the DSM-IV-TR criteria for substance dependence. To predict a diagnosis of BZDs dependence, sensitivity and specificity were computed for each pair of items. Results showed that an affirmative answer to 'Have you try to stop taking this medication?' and 'Over the past 12 months, have you noticed any decrease in the effect of this medication?' led to a sensitivity of 97.1% and a specificity of 94.9% to detect BZD dependence. Asking these two simple questions can be easily integrated into clinical practice and have considerable potential for identifying cases of BZD dependence.

  20. What can we learn about postnatal care in Ghana if we ask the right questions? A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zelee Hill

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: There are increasing efforts to monitor progress in maternal and neonatal care, with household surveys the main mode of data collection. Postnatal care (PNC is considered a priority indicator yet few countries report on it, and the need to improve the construct validity associated with PNC questions is recognized. Objectives: To determine women's knowledge of what happens to the baby after delivery, women's comprehension of terms and question phrasing related to PNC, and issues with recall periods. Design: Forty qualitative interviews and four focus group discussions were conducted with mothers, and 10 interviews with health workers in rural Ghana. Data were collected on knowledge and recall of postnatal health checks and language used to describe these health checks. Results: Mothers required specific probing using appropriate language to report postnatal checks. They only had adequate knowledge of postnatal checks, which were easily observed or required asking them a question. Respondents reported that health workers rarely communicated with mothers about what they were doing, and most women did not know the purpose of the equipment used during health checks, such as why a thermometer was being used. Knowledge of neonatal checks in the first hours after a facility delivery was low if the mother and child were separated, or if the mother was tired or weak. Many women reported that they could remember events clearly, but long recall periods affected reporting for some, especially those who had multiple checks or for those with no problems. Conclusions: Direct questions about PNC or health checks are likely to underestimate coverage. Validity of inferences can be enhanced by using appropriate verbal probes during surveys on commonly performed checks that are clear and visible to the mother.

  1. Did HIV contribute to the breakdown of society in Rwanda? A question worth asking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Rwanda may represent the first example of an entire society breaking down because of the prevalence of AIDS. It was known that infection rates in Rwanda were among the highest in the world, yet few Rwandans, even those tested, were given a diagnosis. Analysts believe that this situation led to feelings of fear and despair which fueled the recent violence. It has been estimated that as many as 70% of sex workers, 30-40% of pregnant women, and 4-65% of soldiers were infected. The disease decimated the officer corps, leaving an unstable leadership and a lack of discipline. In addition, although 98% of the people in Rwanda were aware of the epidemic, only 5% changed their behavior as a result of this knowledge. Because the government failed to acknowledge AIDS as a problem, public discussion was prohibited. It is instructive that when the atrocities began, HIV/AIDS workers were among the first to be murdered. Although it will be impossible to pinpoint the amount of influence that this epidemic had on the breakdown of civilization in Rwanda, it is important to ask this question. Attention is also being paid to the appropriate strategies for dealing with AIDS in postwar conditions. Is it reasonable to hand out condoms, for example, to a population struggling with cholera? Also, how can AIDS awareness be maintained in a country which must deal with repairing the far-reaching damages of war?

  2. High-sensitivity cardiac troponin assays: answers to frequently asked questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenevier-Gobeaux, Camille; Bonnefoy-Cudraz, Éric; Charpentier, Sandrine; Dehoux, Monique; Lefevre, Guillaume; Meune, Christophe; Ray, Patrick

    2015-02-01

    Cardiac troponin (cTn) assays have quickly gained in analytical sensitivity to become what are termed 'high-sensitivity cardiac troponin' (hs-cTn) assays, bringing a flurry of dense yet incomplete literature data. The net result is that cTn assays are not yet standardized and there are still no consensus-built data on how to use and interpret cTn assay results. To address these issues, the authors take cues and clues from multiple disciplines to bring responses to frequently asked questions. In brief, the effective use of hs-cTn hinges on knowing: specific assay characteristics, particularly precision at the 99th percentile of a reference population; factors of variation at the 99th percentile value; and the high-individuality of hs-cTn assays, for which the notion of individual kinetics is more informative than straight reference to 'normal' values. The significance of patterns of change between two assay measurements has not yet been documented for every hs-cTn assay. Clinicians need to work hand-in-hand with medical biologists to better understand how to use hs-cTn assays in routine practice.

  3. The effects of survey mode and asking about future intentions on self-reports of colorectal cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, Timothy J; Jenkins, Sarah M; Anderson, Kari J; Davern, Michael E; Rockwood, Todd H

    2008-04-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates are often ascertained via self-reports but can be subject to overreporting bias. Asking about intention to get screened before asking about past screening may minimize overreporting of cancer screening. In a statewide survey conducted from July through October of 2005, we embedded an experiment that tested the effect of question ordering (asking about future intention to get screened before or after asking about past screening; "future first" and "future second," respectively), crossed with survey mode (mail versus telephone), on CRC screening rates. Weighted analysis focused on 752 respondents who were ages 50 years or older. We found (a) that asking about future intentions to get screened before asking about past screening (future first) statistically significantly lowers reports of past CRC screening [70.9% future second versus 58.0% future first; odds ratio (OR), 1.83; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.08-3.13]; (b) that there was no main effect of survey mode; and (c) that the effect of the ordering of the future intentions item varies by survey mode. In the mailed survey, the odds of reporting past CRC screening were almost thrice greater in the future second condition compared with the future first condition (72.4% versus 49.0%, respectively; OR, 2.74; 95% CI, 1.22-6.17). In the telephone condition, the odds of reporting were only 28% higher in the future second (69.5%) condition than in the future first condition (63.9%; OR, 1.28; 95% CI, 0.64-2.57). The results suggest that asking about future intentions to get screened before the actual behavior elicits lower, and arguably more truthful reports of CRC screening but mainly in mailed surveys.

  4. Improving question asking in high-functioning adolescents with autism spectrum disorders - Effectiveness of small-group training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palmen, A.M.J.W.; Didden, H.C.M.; Arts, M.C.M.

    2008-01-01

    Small-group training consisting of feedback and self-management was effective in improving question-asking skills during tutorial conversations in nine high-functioning adolescents with autism spectrum disorder. Training was implemented in a therapy room and lasted 6 weeks. Sessions were conducted o

  5. Science Learning: A Path Analysis of Its Links with Reading Comprehension, Question-Asking in Class and Science Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, Francisco; García, Ángela; Berbén, A. B. G.; Justicia, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to build and test a conceptual model of the complex interrelationships between students' learning in science (learning approaches and self-regulation), their reading comprehension, question-asking in class and science achievement. These variables were measured by means of a test and a series of questionnaires…

  6. Science Learning: A Path Analysis of Its Links with Reading Comprehension, Question-Asking in Class and Science Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, Francisco; García, Ángela; Berbén, A. B. G.; Justicia, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to build and test a conceptual model of the complex interrelationships between students' learning in science (learning approaches and self-regulation), their reading comprehension, question-asking in class and science achievement. These variables were measured by means of a test and a series of questionnaires…

  7. Answers to the Most Frequently Asked Questions about Reinspections under the AHERA Asbestos-In-Schools Rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Toxic Substances.

    This document was prepared in response to inquiries that have been received by the Environmental Protection Agency concerning the reinspection requirements and related provisions of the Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act (AHERA) regulations. The answers developed represent the Agency's responses to the 15 most frequently asked questions to…

  8. Towards a Virtual Teaching Assistant to Answer Questions Asked by Students in Introductory Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiner, Cecily

    2009-01-01

    Students in introductory programming classes often articulate their questions and information needs incompletely. Consequently, the automatic classification of student questions to provide automated tutorial responses is a challenging problem. This dissertation analyzes 411 questions from an introductory Java programming course by reducing the…

  9. Towards a Virtual Teaching Assistant to Answer Questions Asked by Students in Introductory Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiner, Cecily

    2009-01-01

    Students in introductory programming classes often articulate their questions and information needs incompletely. Consequently, the automatic classification of student questions to provide automated tutorial responses is a challenging problem. This dissertation analyzes 411 questions from an introductory Java programming course by reducing the…

  10. Ask and You Will Receive: How Question Type Influences Quantity and Quality of Online Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Megan E.; Thom, Lindsay R.; Hayes, Jennifer; Hay, Cindy

    2008-01-01

    This study examined how question types influenced the quantity and quality of undergraduate students' online submissions. Discussion questions were structured based on one of six question types: direct link, course link, brainstorm, limited focal, open focal and application. Transcripts of eight online discussions involving 114 participants were…

  11. Analysis of the Questions Asked through Digital and Face-to-Face Reference Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Keita; Arai, Shunsuke; Suga, Reina; Ikeuchi, Atsushi; Yoshikane, Fuyuki

    2013-01-01

    In Japan, only a few public libraries provide e-mail reference services. To help public libraries start e-mail reference services, the authors investigated reference questions received by libraries via e-mail and traditional face-to-face services. The authors found that research questions are more frequently observed among e-mail questions and…

  12. On the questions that we can ask visual archives: for public history, communication and teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Bruce Silva

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Experiências anteriores com arquivos e coleções fotográficas datadas de meados do século XX, me levaram a pensar nas imagens que os sujeitos, as instituições e as épocas compartilham em suas falas cotidianas. Elas podem ser acessadas não somente em acervos, também na internet, em exposições, no cinema, na sala de aula e em outros espaços de convivência, vistos de uma plataforma como a História pública. Através das perguntas que lhes fazemos é possível distinguir como elas ficam presentes em nosso cotidiano. É possível reconstituir percursos e perscrutar, no presente, ecos daqueles valores que aparecem visualmente. Com isso, o objetivo deste ensaio é expor fragmentos que fazem parte da cultura visual no Recife. Como plataforma reflexiva, os argumentos identificam e relatam alguns desses fragmentos.   PALAVRAS-CHAVE: Arquivos e coleções fotográficas, História pública, comunicação, ensino.   ABSTRACT Previous experiences with photographic archives and collections dating from the mid-twentieth century have led me to think about the images that the subjects, the institutions and the epochs shared in their day-to-day discourse. They can be accessed not only in collections, but also on the internet, in exhibitions, in the cinema, in the classroom and in other spaces of coexistence, seen from a platform such as public History. Through the questions that we ask them, it is possible to distinguish how they become present in our daily lives. It is possible to reconstitute paths and examine, in the present, echoes of those values that appear visually. configure the visibility presented. On thinking about images, we carry out montages. The aim of this essay is therefore to expose fragments that are part of the visual culture in Recife. As a reflective platform, the arguments identify and relate some of these fragments.   KEYWORDS: Photographic archives and collections, public History, communication, teaching.     RESUMEN

  13. A Cognitive Developmental Approach to Question Asking: A Learning Cycle-Distancing Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigel, Irving E.; Kelley, Todd D.

    The role of questioning techniques in the classroom is discussed, with particular emphasis on the cyclical nature of teacher-student dialogues. Excerpts from transcripts of actual dialogues are also analyzed. According to the model, based on Piaget's theory of cognitive development, the questioning strategies are designed to enhance the student's…

  14. Why Did I Ask That Question? Bilingual/ESL Pre-Service Teachers’ Insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zulmaris Diaz

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Questioning techniques have historically been considered the measurement by which teachers challenge and gauge student learning. Much has been said about questioning strategies used by teachers; yet little is known about the strategies used by pre-service teachers, especially those that are working with English language learners. This study presents findings from a qualitative study that explored what types of questions pre-service teachers use and their reflections on the use of such strategies. Eight bilingual/ESL pre-service teachers in South Texas were videotaped during a math and a language arts lesson, attended focus groups, and participated in an exit interview. The findings revealed the type of questions used by the participants, how they made sense of their teaching, and how accountability measures influenced their teaching. This research recommends education programs to prepare future teachers to comply with what is required by the current reform without compromising their students’ learning and thinking skills.

  15. 75 FR 47856 - Draft Emergency Action Level Frequently Asked Questions; Request for Comment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-09

    .... Address questions about NRC dockets to Carol Gallagher 301-492-3668; e-mail Carol.Gallagher@nrc.gov . Mail comments to: Michael T. Lesar, Chief, Rulemaking and Directives Branch (RDB), Division of...

  16. The Majority of Library Clients Still Use Person-to-Person Interaction When Asking Reference Questions. A review of: De Groote, Sandra L. “Questions Asked at the Virtual and Physical Health Sciences Reference Desk: How Do They Compare and What Do They Tell Us?” Medical Reference Services Quarterly 24.2 (Summer 2005: 11-23.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Pamela Lewis

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective - To identify similarities and difference in the questions asked at the virtual and physical refernece desks of a helath scienmces library, in order to better undertand user needs and highlight areas for service improvement. Also to retrospectively analyze reference statistics collected over the previous six years. Design - Use study; retrospective study of reference statistics for the period July 1997 to June 2003; literature review. Setting - Large academic helath sciences library in the United States. Subjects - All questions asked at the reference and information desks, plus questions submitted to the University-wide virtual reference service and answered by a health sciences librarian, over a period of one month. The questions were asked by faculty, staff, students and members of the public. Methods - A literature review was carried out to examine the types of information/reference questions typically asked in health sciences libraries both before and after the mass introduction of remote end-user searching of online resources and the establishment of virtual reference services. Next, the reference statistics collected at the University of Illinois at Chicage (UIC Library of the Health Sciences between July 1997 and June 2003 were examined. For most of this period a digital reference service was offered using a listserv address to which patrons would submit email queries. Beginning in March 2003, a formal virtual reference service (chat and email was provided using commercial software. Finally, data was gathered on questions answered by a health sciences librarians, and clients who asked the question, at either the physical or cirtual reference desk, during the month of November 2003 at the UIC Library of the Health Sciences. Library staff completed an online survey form for each question, and if a client asked more than one question, each question was coded individually. Data included: status of client using the service (faculty

  17. What Security Questions Do Developers Ask? A Large-Scale Study of Stack Overflow Posts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-Li Yang; David Lo; Xin Xia; Zhi-Yuan Wan; Jian-Ling Sun

    2016-01-01

    Security has always been a popular and critical topic. With the rapid development of information technology, it is always attracting people’s attention. However, since security has a long history, it covers a wide range of topics which change a lot, from classic cryptography to recently popular mobile security. There is a need to investigate security-related topics and trends, which can be a guide for security researchers, security educators and security practitioners. To address the above-mentioned need, in this paper, we conduct a large-scale study on security-related questions on Stack Overflow. Stack Overflow is a popular on-line question and answer site for software developers to communicate, collaborate, and share information with one another. There are many different topics among the numerous questions posted on Stack Overflow and security-related questions occupy a large proportion and have an important and significant position. We first use two heuristics to extract from the dataset the questions that are related to security based on the tags of the posts. And then we use an advanced topic model, Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) tuned using Genetic Algorithm (GA), to cluster different security-related questions based on their texts. After obtaining the different topics of security-related questions, we use their metadata to make various analyses. We summarize all the topics into five main categories, and investigate the popularity and difficulty of different topics as well. Based on the results of our study, we conclude several implications for researchers, educators and practitioners.

  18. Values in translation: how asking the right questions can move translational science toward greater health impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Maureen; Edwards, Kelly; Starks, Helene; Fullerton, Stephanie M; James, Rosalina; Goering, Sara; Holland, Suzanne; Disis, Mary L; Burke, Wylie

    2012-12-01

    The speed and effectiveness of current approaches to research translation are widely viewed as disappointing given small gains in real population health outcomes despite huge investments in basic and translational science. We identify critical value questions-ethical, social, economic, and cultural-that arise at moments throughout the research pathway. By making these questions visible, and promoting discussion of them with diverse stakeholders, we can facilitate handoffs along the translational pathway and increase uptake of effective interventions. Who is involved with those discussions will determine which research projects, populations, and methods get prioritized. We argue that some upfront investment in community and interdisciplinary engagement, shaped by familiar questions in ethics, social justice, and cultural knowledge, can save time and resources in the long run because interventions and strategies will be aimed in the right direction, that is, toward health improvements for all.

  19. Science Learning: A path analysis of its links with reading comprehension, question-asking in class and science achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, Francisco; García, Ángela; Berbén, A. B. G.; Justicia, Fernando

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this research was to build and test a conceptual model of the complex interrelationships between students' learning in science (learning approaches and self-regulation), their reading comprehension, question-asking in class and science achievement. These variables were measured by means of a test and a series of questionnaires administered to 604 ninth-grade students, and the data collected were analysed using a correlational, cross-sectional design. Results of a path analysis indicated that (a) students' self-regulated and intentional knowledge-constructing activity (self-regulated strategy use, deep approach and knowledge-building) were what chiefly accounted for their question-asking in class; (b) question-asking (high and low levels) was related directly to reading comprehension and indirectly, through its contribution to the this, to academic achievement; (c) reading comprehension was directly and negatively associated with surface approach and indirectly and positively related to deep approach and knowledge-building; and (d) some of these variables, particularly reading comprehension, accounted for academic achievement in science. This model explained nearly 30% of the variance in academic achievement and provided a substantial and distinctive insight into the web of interrelationships among these variables. Implications for future research and science teaching and learning are discussed (e.g. the importance of supporting students' efforts to learn science in a meaningful, active and self-regulated way and of improving their reading comprehension).

  20. Managing the Documentation Maze Answers to Questions You Didn't Even Know to Ask

    CERN Document Server

    Gough, Janet

    2010-01-01

    This book deals with a topic of critical importance for compliance with record-keeping regulations in pharmaceutical and medical device industries. It presents more than 750 questions and answers about documentation management, whether electronic or paper-based. It defines, through a Q&A approach, what document management actually is, and why it should be a core discipline in the industry. Questions and responses also address electronic system selection and validation, system security, user accountability, and audit trails, as well as standard operating procedures for supporting document syste

  1. Improving Question-Asking Initiations in Young Children with Autism Using Pivotal Response Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koegel, Robert L.; Bradshaw, Jessica L.; Ashbaugh, Kristen; Koegel, Lynn Kern

    2014-01-01

    Social initiations make up a core deficit for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). In particular, initiated questions during social interactions are often minimal or absent in this population. In the context of a multiple baseline design, the efficacy of using the motivational procedures of Pivotal Response Treatment to increase social…

  2. Questions Students Ask: Why Does a Football Keep its Axis Pointing Along its Trajectory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physics Teacher, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Why does a football thrown with a spin keep its axis pointing along its trajectory? (It's most obvious in a long, soft pass. Even with a wobbly pass the ball's axis wobbles around the line of its trajectory). The answer to this question is provided. (JN)

  3. Questions Parents Ask about Schools = Preguntas que hacen los padres sobre las escuelas. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Education, Washington, DC. Office of Intergovernmental and Interagency Affairs.

    Noting that parents play an important role in the school success of their elementary- and middle-school-aged children, this booklet offers research-based tips to provide both practical guidance and information about a range of education-related topics. Presented in a question-answer format in both English and Spanish versions, the booklet provides…

  4. What Questions Are We Asking in the Contemporary Children's Literature Classroom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Aziz, Fazhuda

    2012-01-01

    This case study of four B.Ed TESL Overseas Link Degree trainee teachers was undertaken with the intention of discovering what goes on in the classroom in terms of the trainee teachers' classroom interactions in relation to their questioning techniques and responses. This is looked at how much of thinking is being encouraged and how much of the…

  5. Asking the Right Questions: A Critique of Facebook, Social Media, and Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodnar, Jonathan; Doshi, Ameet

    2011-01-01

    Reflecting on the library literature on Facebook, our experience using Facebook and other social networking sites professionally, and our discussions with librarians about these tools, we question the use of social networking sites in academic libraries and note opportunities for discussion and research. Ultimately, we encourage librarians and…

  6. Children's Books in a High School Library? A Risky Question Worth Asking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Keith

    2001-01-01

    An online survey seeking librarians' opinions about including children's books in the high school library returned many positive responses. Lists ways children's books could be used in high school. Discusses the new wave of children's literature; children's books made into movies; commonality of high school libraries having collections of…

  7. Lithuanian and Russian child-directed speech: Why do we ask young children so many questions?

    OpenAIRE

    Victoria V. Kazakovskaya; Ingrida Balčiūnienė

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of the study was to identify and compare the variety and distribution of interrogatives in Lithuanian and Russian child-directed speech (CDS) from the perspective of the functional and structural characteristics of questions addressed to young children. The analysis was based on the longitudinal data of two monolingual typically developing children, a Lithuanian girl (2;0–2;8) and a Russian boy (2;0–2;8). The transcribed corpus of conversations between the children and thei...

  8. Evidence-informed primary health care workforce policy: are we asking the right questions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naccarella, Lucio; Buchan, Jim; Brooks, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Australia is facing a primary health care workforce shortage. To inform primary health care (PHC) workforce policy reforms, reflection is required on ways to strengthen the evidence base and its uptake into policy making. In 2008 the Australian Primary Health Care Research Institute funded the Australian Health Workforce Institute to host Professor James Buchan, Queen Margaret University, UK, an expert in health services policy research and health workforce planning. Professor Buchan's visit enabled over forty Australian PHC workforce mid-career and senior researchers and policy stakeholders to be involved in roundtable policy dialogue on issues influencing PHC workforce policy making. Six key thematic questions emerged. (1) What makes PHC workforce planning different? (2) Why does the PHC workforce need to be viewed in a global context? (3) What is the capacity of PHC workforce research? (4) What policy levers exist for PHC workforce planning? (5) What principles can guide PHC workforce planning? (6) What incentives exist to optimise the use of evidence in policy making? The emerging themes need to be discussed within the context of current PHC workforce policy reforms, which are focussed on increasing workforce supply (via education/training programs), changing the skill mix and extending the roles of health workers to meet patient needs. With the Australian government seeking to reform and strengthen the PHC workforce, key questions remain about ways to strengthen the PHC workforce evidence base and its uptake into PHC workforce policy making.

  9. Lithuanian and Russian child-directed speech: Why do we ask young children so many questions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria V. Kazakovskaya

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the study was to identify and compare the variety and distribution of interrogatives in Lithuanian and Russian child-directed speech (CDS from the perspective of the functional and structural characteristics of questions addressed to young children. The analysis was based on the longitudinal data of two monolingual typically developing children, a Lithuanian girl (2;0–2;8 and a Russian boy (2;0–2;8. The transcribed corpus of conversations between the children and their parents was annotated for multipurpose automatic linguistic analysis, using tools of the program CHILDES (Child Language Data Exchange System. During the investigation, the functional and structural features of parental interrogatives were analysed.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5128/ERYa8.05

  10. How Asking a Very Basic Research Question Led Us to a Model for at Least Three Diseases | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Howard Young Editor’s note: This article is adapted from Dr. Young’s January 12, 2015, post to the I am Intramural Blog of the Intramural Research Program. When I started this project, it was not my objective to develop a model for any specific disease, nor did I even suspect that the ultimate result would be some insight into autoimmune disease. The basic research question I was asking was why there are sequences in the 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR) of the interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) mRNA that are more highly conserved than in the coding region of the gene.

  11. Asking better questions! A review of the pedagogical strategies used in one senior level award in Scotland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorburn Malcolm

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous related research on teaching effectiveness in one senior level award - Higher Still Physical Education (HSPE in Scotland - revealed a number of extended challenges in adopting the practical experiential teaching and learning approaches advised. However, these studies were restricted by lack of observation of teaching and learning in action and of detailed analysis of the types and timings of questions asked. The present study addressed these limitations. Data were collected through observations of teaching, questionnaire responses on the uses of discussions by pupils and teachers and semi-structured teacher interviews. Findings revealed that there were encouraging signs of a broad range of purposeful question techniques being used in practical sessions. However, there was still a lack of full teacher trust in these approaches, despite high pupil endorsement for their usage. We conclude that perceived subject content and external assessment demands continue to constrain pedagogical strategies in HSPE.

  12. Arthritis: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir What is Arthritis? The word arthritis actually means joint inflammation, but ... provided for you. Who is at risk for arthritis? Certain factors are associated with a greater risk ...

  13. Asking the Right Questions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Line

    Based on fieldwork in Mali this paper discusses the role of anthropology (and the anthropologist) in a large public health research project on children's health. In the uncertainty and disquiet that comes with the battle to combat and avoid diseases in a setting where poverty and abysmal diseases...... are part of everyday life, children are often the most vulnerable. The project was carried out to shed light on mainly two types of diseases - malaria and diarrheal diseases - that strike children. In practice the academic backgrounds of the researchers played a role in the methodological approach...

  14. Triglycerides : Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... upon baseline triglyceride level, level of intensity, caloric expenditure and duration of activity. 3. Is body fat ... Stop Hypertension, http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/public/heart/hbp/dash/new_dash.pdf) dietary eating ...

  15. Blood Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hemovigilance Membership AABB HUB Membership Directory Corporate Supporters Advertise Copyright © AABB. Privacy Statement | Terms of Use | About AABB | Contact Us Facebook Twitter Youtube LinkedIn

  16. IC: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Complicated IC Cases Promising IC Diagnostic Tests Wrong Diagnosis IC Treatment Guideline IC Treatments IC Diet & Self Management Physical Therapy Antidepressants Antihistamines Pentosan Polysulfate Sodium Bladder Instillations Immunosuppresants ...

  17. Keratoconus Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or if there are other factors like abnormal corneal topography. Ultimately, you have to decide if the risk is justified. Sometimes a second opinion is helpful. My advice is when it comes to your ... the thinning cornea to bulge? A certain amount of internal pressure ...

  18. Plague: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... plague? Plague is an infectious disease that affects rodents, certain other animals, and humans. It is caused ... of plague? Fleas become infected by feeding on rodents, such as chipmunks, prairie dogs, ground squirrels, mice, ...

  19. Determining Who to Question, What to Ask, and How Much Information to Ask for: The Development of Inquiry in Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Candice M.; Legare, Christine H.; Grant, Meridith G.; Landrum, Asheley R.

    2011-01-01

    To obtain reliable information, it is important to identify and effectively question knowledgeable informants. Two experiments examined how age and the ease of distinguishing between reliable and unreliable sources influence children's ability to effectively question those sources to solve problems. A sample of 3- to 5-year-olds was introduced to…

  20. If MOOCS are the answer, did we ask the right questions? Implications for the design of large-scale online-courses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalz, Marco; Specht, Marcus

    2013-01-01

    Kalz, M., & Specht, M. (2013). If MOOCS are the answer, did we ask the right questions? Implications for the design of large-scale online courses. Working paper 2013/25. Maastricht School of Management, Maastricht.

  1. Questions You May Want to Ask Your Child's Speech-Language Pathologist = Preguntas que usted le podria hacer al patologo del habla y el lenguaje de su hijo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This accordion style pamphlet, dual sided with English and Spanish text, suggests questions for parents to ask their Speech-Language Pathologist and speech and language therapy services for their children. Sample questions include: How will I participate in my child's therapy sessions? How do you decide how much time my child will spend on speech…

  2. Increasing Opportunities for Question-Asking in School-Aged Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Effectiveness of Staff Training in Pivotal Response Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschuur, Rianne; Huskens, Bibi; Verhoeven, Ludo; Didden, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Deficits in question-asking are common in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Furthermore, their opportunities to self-initiate questions are often hindered by directive behavior of their conversation partners. This study assessed the effectiveness of staff training in pivotal response treatment (PRT) on staff member-created…

  3. Asking the right questions: Scoping studies in the commissioning of research on the organisation and delivery of health services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peckham Stephen

    2008-07-01

    commissioners. Scoping studies are an essential element in the portfolio of approaches to research, particularly as a mechanism for helping research commissioners and policy makers to ask the right questions. Their utility will be further enhanced by greater recognition of the individual components, definitions for which are provided.

  4. The effect of question wording in questionnaire surveys on placebo use in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babel, Przemyslaw

    2012-12-01

    To identify factors that contribute to the high variability of the rates of use of placebo interventions reported in questionnaire surveys, the author investigated the effect of the explicit use of the word "placebo" in questionnaire surveys on placebo use in clinical practice on the results obtained. 190 primary care physicians in Poland were divided randomly into two groups. The groups received a questionnaire in which either the word placebo or the term "nonspecific methods of treatment" was used. The respondents who were asked explicitly about the use of placebo interventions declared that they never used placebo interventions significantly more often than participants asked about the use of nonspecific treatment methods. Moreover, the former reported significantly rarer use of placebo interventions than the latter. The study demonstrates that differences in the wording of questions in questionnaire surveys on placebo use can create statistically significant differences in results.

  5. Agree or Disagree? Cognitive Processes in Answering Contrastive Survey Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamoen, Naomi; Holleman, Bregje; Mak, Pim; Sanders, Ted; Van Den Bergh, Huub

    2011-01-01

    Survey designers have long assumed that respondents who disagree with a negative question ("This policy is bad.": "Yes" or "No"; 2-point scale) will agree with an equivalent positive question ("This policy is good.": "Yes" or "No"; 2-point scale). However, experimental evidence has proven otherwise: Respondents are more likely to disagree with…

  6. Disfluencies and gaze aversion in unreliable responses to survey questions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schober, Michael F.; Conrad, Frederick G.; Dijkstra, Wil; Ongena, Yfke P.

    2012-01-01

    When survey respondents answer survey questions, they can also produce "paradata" (Couper 2000, 2008): behavioral evidence about their response process. The study reported here demonstrates that two kinds of respondent paradata - fluency of speech and gaze direction during answers - identify answers

  7. Five Hundred Questions Kids Ask about Sex and Some of the Answers: Sex Education for Parents, Teachers and Young People Themselves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younger, Frances

    This book is based on the premise that sexual expression is a way for people to show affection and love for one another. The book is divided into six chapters that cover topics related to sexuality and growing up. The sections in each chapter contain questions that preteens and teenagers typically ask and provide clear, unambiguous, and…

  8. Surveying problem solution with theory and objective type questions

    CERN Document Server

    Chandra, AM

    2005-01-01

    The book provides a lucid and step-by-step treatment of the various principles and methods for solving problems in land surveying. Each chapter starts with basic concepts and definitions, then solution of typical field problems and ends with objective type questions. The book explains errors in survey measurements and their propagation. Survey measurements are detailed next. These include horizontal and vertical distance, slope, elevation, angle, and direction. Measurement using stadia tacheometry and EDM are then highlighted, followed by various types of levelling problems. Traversing is then explained, followed by a detailed discussion on adjustment of survey observations and then triangulation and trilateration.

  9. Question-asking organization / A relação pergunta-resposta como preditor do reconto de histórias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Alice de Mattos Pimenta Parente

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to verify two hypotheses of the text questionability theory (Virbel: 1 the recall is similar to the author's question-asking organization; and 2 the similarity between the recall and the questionability force will be in function of the text consistency. A first experiment compared the recall of 53 subjects with the questionability force of the elementary sentences. Significant correlations and regressions between the two variables were found. A second experiment analyzed the recall of 141 subjects in 2 versions of the story of the first experiment differentiated by the degree of consistency Correlations were found only in the version with higher degree of consistency. The results of the 2 experiments were in accordance with the questionability theory in that, in order to understand and to reconstruct a story, the 'comprehender' follows a hierarchical network, which organizes the unities of meaning based on their questionability force.

  10. A framework for integrating and synthesizing data to ask and answer science questions in the Critical Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristol, S.

    2014-12-01

    In 2007, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) published a science strategy that resulted in an organizational pivot toward more focused attention on societal challenges and our ability to predict changes and study mitigation and resilience. The strategy described a number of global dynamics including climate and resource-related critical zone (CZ) impacts and emphasized the need for data integration as a significant underpinning for all of the science questions raised in the report. Organizational changes that came about as a result of the science strategy sparked a new entity called Core Science Systems, which has set as its mission the creation of a Modular Science Framework designed to seamlessly organize and integrate all data, information, and knowledge from the CZ. A part of this grand challenge is directly within the purview of the USGS mission and our science programs, while the data integration framework itself is part of a much larger global scientific cyberinfrastructure. This talk describes current research and development in pursuit of the USGS Modular Science Framework and how the work is being conducted in the context of the broader earth system sciences. Communities of practice under the banner of the Earth Science Information Partners are fostering working relationships vital to cohesion and interoperability between contributing institutions. The National Science Foundation's EarthCube and Cyberinfrastructure for the 21st Century initiatives are providing some of the necessary building blocks through foundational informatics and data science research. The U.S. Group on Earth Observations is providing leadership and coordination across agencies who operate earth observation systems. The White House Big Data Initiative is providing long term research and development vision to set the stage for sustainable, long term infrastructure across government data agencies. The end result will be a major building block of CZ science.

  11. Survey design research: a tool for answering nursing research questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siedlecki, Sandra L; Butler, Robert S; Burchill, Christian N

    2015-01-01

    The clinical nurse specialist is in a unique position to identify and study clinical problems in need of answers, but lack of time and resources may discourage nurses from conducting research. However, some research methods can be used by the clinical nurse specialist that are not time-intensive or cost prohibitive. The purpose of this article is to explain the utility of survey methodology for answering a number of nursing research questions. The article covers survey content, reliability and validity issues, sample size considerations, and methods of survey delivery.

  12. 2016 Workplace and Gender Relations Survey of Active Duty Members: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    techniques to draw conclusions from random, representative samples of the active duty populations. To construct estimates for the 2016 Workplace and...industry standards used by government statistical agencies including the Census Bureau, Bureau of Labor Statistics, National Agricultural Statistical

  13. Drug use during pregnancy; asking questions and finding answers for women with a rheumatic disease : Drug use during pregnancy; asking questions and finding answers for women with a rheumatic disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vroom, Fokaline; Van De Laar, Mart A. F. J.; Van Roon, Eric N.; De Walle, Hermien E. K.; De Jong-van Den Berg, Lolkje T. W.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Evidence about drug use in pregnancy is scarce and often inconsistent. This study explored what questions women with rheumatic diseases have concerning drug use during pregnancy and their satisfaction with the answers they obtained. Design and methods: Through the website of the Dutch

  14. To Charter or Not to Charter: What Questions Should We Ask, and What Will the Answers Tell Us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brighouse, Harry; Schouten, Gina

    2014-01-01

    In this essay, Harry Brighouse and Gina Schouten outline four standards for judging whether to support the chartering of a new school within a given jurisdiction. The authors pose the following questions to a hypothetical school board member: Will the school increase equality of opportunity? Will it benefit the least-advantaged students in the…

  15. To Charter or Not to Charter: What Questions Should We Ask, and What Will the Answers Tell Us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brighouse, Harry; Schouten, Gina

    2014-01-01

    In this essay, Harry Brighouse and Gina Schouten outline four standards for judging whether to support the chartering of a new school within a given jurisdiction. The authors pose the following questions to a hypothetical school board member: Will the school increase equality of opportunity? Will it benefit the least-advantaged students in the…

  16. Supporting families of children with autism spectrum disorders: questions parents ask and what nurses need to know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, Jennifer Harrison; D'Alessandro, Tina

    2009-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder is a lifelong condition that currently has an unclear etiology and no known cure. Families of children on the autism spectrum typically have many questions and much to learn as they manage the disorder and create meaningful lives for their children and themselves. Helping families understand both features of autism and the diagnostic process is key to supporting family acceptance of the diagnosis. Nurses can also assist families in navigating the common process of grief and adjustment following diagnosis. As the diagnosis becomes real, many questions about medications and other treatments can be addressed by knowledgeable nurses. Additionally, nurses can support families in the critical areas of managing family life, addressing sibling needs, and planning for the future. Parent-to-parent advice from the mother of a child with autism supplements this article.

  17. Teaching children who use augmentative and alternative communication to ask inverted yes/no questions using aided modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent-Walsh, Jennifer; Binger, Cathy; Buchanan, Carolyn

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the effects of a direct intervention program involving aided modeling and the presentation of contrastive targets on the aided production of inverted yes/no questions and possible generalization to other sentence types by children using augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). A single-case, multiple-probe, experimental design across participants was used to evaluate the effects of the instructional program with 3 children who had motor speech disorders and used AAC (ages 4;10 [years;months], 6;2, and 4;9). The treatment involved aided modeling of treatment and contrastive targets through concentrated modeling and interactive play activities. Direct treatment outcomes were examined by measuring the accuracy of producing inverted yes/no questions and to be declaratives through probes. All 3 participants showed a direct treatment effect, producing a greater number of inverted yes/no questions and to be declaratives within the probes following treatment compared with before treatment. All 3 participants evidenced some generalization to novel sentences. Results provide initial evidence that instruction involving aided modeling with contrastive targets holds promise in targeting specific linguistic rules with children using AAC. Patterns of generalization may depend on participants' specific language deficits and acquisition patterns during intervention.

  18. Which long-term care residents should be asked to complete a customer satisfaction survey?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van De Water, Margaret S; Kutner, Michael; Parmelee, Patricia A; Johnson, Theodore

    2003-01-01

    impairment, mild-to-moderate impairment, and moderate-to-severe impairment, respectively. The rate of decline in reliability, however, was small for each unit of increase in MDS-COGS. Although the staff's opinions about residents' ability to complete a CSS were significantly associated with an objective MDS-COGS assessment, staff nonetheless failed on several occasions to let cognitively intact residents complete their own surveys. Although higher MDS-COGS scores were significantly related to lower reliability, there were no natural cut-points in the data to suggest a participate/do not participate line and the trend line between MDS-COGS level, and percent of questions answered reliably was not very strong. These results suggest that LTC residents with mild to moderate dementia might be capable of reliably answering certain types of customer satisfaction surveys.

  19. Conflating Capacity & Authority: Why We're Asking the Wrong Question in the Adolescent Decision-Making Debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Erica K

    2017-01-01

    Whether adolescents should be allowed to make their own medical decisions has been a topic of discussion in bioethics for at least two decades now. Are adolescents sufficiently capacitated to make their own medical decisions? Is the mature-minor doctrine, an uncommon legal exception to the rule of parental decision-making authority, something we should expand or eliminate? Bioethicists have dealt with the curious liminality of adolescents-their being neither children nor adults-in a variety of ways. However, recently there has been a trend to rely heavily, and often exclusively, on emerging neuroscientific and psychological data to answer these questions. Using data from magnetic resonance imaging and functional MRI studies on the adolescent brain, authors have argued both that the adolescent brain isn't sufficiently mature to broadly confer capacity on this population and that the adolescent brain is sufficiently mature to assume adolescent capacity. Scholars then accept these data as sufficient for concluding that adolescents should or should not have decision-making authority. Two critical mistakes are being made here. The first is the expectation that neuroscience or psychology is or will be able to answer all our questions about capacity. The second, and more concerning, mistake is the conflation of decision-making capacity with decision-making authority.

  20. Climate change and sustainability. Seven questions CEOs and boards should ask about 'triple bottom line' reporting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-01-15

    The questions, dealt with in this report are: (1) Who issues sustainability reports? More than 3,000 companies worldwide, including more than two-thirds of the Fortune Global 500; (2) Why report on sustainability if you do not have to? Increasingly, external stakeholders such as institutional investors expect it. Reporting can also bring operational improvements, strengthen compliance, and enhance your corporate reputation; (3) What information should a sustainability report contain? Reports should contain key performance indicators relevant to the reporter's industry. Four principles for deciding what to include are materiality, stakeholder inclusiveness, sustainability context, and completeness; (4) What governance, systems and processes are needed to report on sustainability? Governance requires a high-level mandate and clear reporting lines. Also needed: robust systems and processes that help companies collect, store and analyze sustainability information; (5) Do sustainability reports have to be audited? Not yet. But they are being more closely monitored than ever before. As this trend continues, users of sustainability information will come to expect that the information has been validated by a reliable third party; (6) What are the challenges and risks of reporting? Sustainability reporting presents many challenges, including data consistency, striking a balance between positive and negative information, continually improving performance and keeping reports readable and concise; and finally (7) How can companies get the most value out of sustainability reporting? Sustainability reports should be mandatory reading for all employees, and can be a valuable tool for communicating with external audiences as well. Setting targets in the form of KPIs also forces the organization to meet publicly stated goals, which makes reporting an accountability tool.

  1. Asking about Sex in General Health Surveys: Comparing the Methods and Findings of the 2010 Health Survey for England with Those of the Third National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Prah

    Full Text Available Including questions about sexual health in the annual Health Survey for England (HSE provides opportunities for regular measurement of key public health indicators, augmenting Britain's decennial National Survey of Sexual Attitudes and Lifestyles (Natsal. However, contextual and methodological differences may limit comparability of the findings. We examine the extent of these differences between HSE 2010 and Natsal-3 and investigate their impact on parameter estimates.Complex survey analyses of data from men and women in the 2010 HSE (n = 2,782 men and 3,588 women and Natsal-3 undertaken 2010-2012 (n = 4,882 men and 6,869 women aged 16-69y and resident in England, both using probability sampling, compared their characteristics, the amount of non-response to, and estimates from, sexual health questions. Both surveys used self-completion for the sexual behaviour questions but this was via computer-assisted self-interview (CASI in Natsal-3 and a pen-and-paper questionnaire in HSE 2010.The surveys achieved similar response rates, both around 60%, and demographic profiles largely consistent with the census, although HSE participants tended to be less educated, and reported worse general health, than Natsal-3 participants. Item non-response to the sexual health questions was typically higher in HSE 2010 (range: 9-18% relative to Natsal-3 (all <5%. Prevalence estimates for sexual risk behaviours and STI-related indicators were generally slightly lower in HSE 2010 than Natsal-3.While a relatively high response to sexual health questions in HSE 2010 demonstrates the feasibility of asking such questions in a general health survey, differences with Natsal-3 do exist. These are likely due to the HSE's context as a general health survey and methodological limitations such as its current use of pen-and-paper questionnaires. Methodological developments to the HSE should be considered so that its data can be interpreted in combination with those from dedicated

  2. The effect of question order on self-rated general health status in a multilingual survey context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sunghee; Grant, David

    2009-06-15

    Current practices recommend placing a self-rated health question before specific health items in survey questionnaires to minimize potential order effects. Because this recommendation is based on data collected in English, its applicability to other languages is unknown. This study examines whether there is an order effect associated with self-rated health for interviews conducted in English and Spanish languages. An experiment was conducted by using the 2007 California Health Interview Survey, where questions on self-rated health were inserted in 1 of 2 locations: preceding and following question items on specific chronic conditions. Respondents were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 versions of the locations by the split-half method. Although no order effect was present in the English interviews, the authors found a significant and large effect with Spanish interviews: Self-rated health appeared much worse when asked before chronic conditions than when asked after them. This order effect was larger among females than males. Order effects for self-rated health differ by interview language; inferences about the health status of Spanish-speaking populations (and potentially Latinos) depend on question order. If maintaining comparability is important, the authors' finding contradicts current recommendations, as inserting the self-rated health question before specific questions led to larger differences in health status between English and Spanish speakers.

  3. Organ Transplantation: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that can help patients afford the cost of transplantation? Organ matching and allocation What factors are considered in ... long will I have to wait? What is organ transplantation? If you have a medical condition that may ...

  4. Frequently Asked Questions about Immunizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Medicine (IOM) found that thimerosal (an organic mercury compound that's been used as a preservative in vaccines since the 1930s) does not cause autism. Still, some parents have opted ... exposure to mercury and other heavy metals, thimerosal began being removed ...

  5. Wilson Disease: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Support Contacts Individuals who can offer Support and Information View Contacts Contact Us Today! Home About WDA Back WDA Membership History of ... plans and how to resolve disputes is critical. Today, 40 states plus the ... "external review" systems, yet studies show these systems are not well ...

  6. Carcinoid Tumor: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... low doses of niacin to prevent subclinical pellagra. Niacinamide Should I take niacin or niacinamide if 50 mg of niacin in my multi- ... dose to prevent flushing or else do use niacinamide. The mechanism of niacin flush is quite different ...

  7. Winter Weather Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Part 3 of 3) Hot Weather Tips Heat Stress in Older Adults FAQs Extreme Heat PSAs Related Links MMWR Bibliography CDC's Program Floods Flood Readiness Personal Hygiene After a Disaster Cleanup of Flood Water After a Flood Worker Safety Educational Materials Floods ...

  8. Still asking the wrong questions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Steffen Moltrup Ernø

    -up of the entrepreneur (Gartner, 1988). Building on this critique I will use the presentation to show, through the use of a historical case, how much we need new conceptualizations in order to highlight the collective development of ideas, which would also open for a discussion about the values guiding entrepreneurship...

  9. Diving Medicine: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sinus Congestion Surfers Ear (Exotoses) Surfers Ear (Exotoses) Tinnitus (Ringing) TMJ (Temporal-Mandibular Joint Syndrome) Tympanic Membrane ... Implants Face Lift Liposuction Rhinoplasty Psychological Diving and Depression Medications Respiratory Breathing Discomfort Immersion Pulmonary Edema Mechanism ...

  10. Questions to Ask Your Doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Minority Rural Women Información en español Prevención y bienestar Condiciones y enfermedades Atención médica Medicamentos La seguridad ... Newsroom Press Releases Data Visualizations AHRQ Stats AHRQ Social Media Blog AHRQ Views Events AHRQ Research Summit ...

  11. Five Impossible Questions Women Ask

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许文龙

    2004-01-01

    1.“What are you thinking?”Right answer: “I'm sorry if I've been quiet, dear. I was just reflecting on what a warm, wonderful,beautiful woman you are and what a lucky guy I am to have met you.”

  12. Japanese Encephalitis: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the vaccine, what should I do? What is Japanese encephalitis? Japanese encephalitis (JE) is a potentially severe disease. ... cause inflammation of the brain (encephalitis). Where does Japanese encephalitis occur? JE occurs in Asia and parts of ...

  13. Scabies: Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tip of a needle or by obtaining skin scraping to examine under a microscope for mites, eggs, ... of scabies should be confirmed by a skin scraping that includes observing the mite, eggs, or mite ...

  14. Diving Medicine: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Paroxysmal Supraventricular Tachycardia(PSVT) Patent Foramen Ovale (PFO) Raynaud's Syndrome or Phenomenon Vasovagal and Carotid Sinus Syncopes DAN ... Implants and Diving Loss of Sight After HBO Treatment Macular Degeneration DAN discusses diving with this leading ...

  15. Frequently Asked Questions about Sugar

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sodas and other products made with non-nutritive (artificial) sweeteners contain zero calories from added sugars, does that ... is “sugar free” or made with non-nutritive (artificial) sweeteners doesn’t necessarily mean that it’s healthy. Last ...

  16. Frequently Asked Questions about Immunizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... get sick. This is called immunity . Will my child's immune system be weaker by relying on a vaccine? ... is one of the most common causes of diarrhea in young children. In 1999, a rotavirus vaccine was taken off ...

  17. Simple neck pain questions used in surveys, evaluated in relation to health outcomes: a cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grimby-Ekman Anna

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The high prevalence of pain reported in many epidemiological studies, and the degree to which this prevalence reflects severe pain is under discussion in the literature. The aim of the present study was to evaluate use of the simple neck pain questions commonly included in large epidemiological survey studies with respect to aspects of health. We investigated if and how an increase in number of days with pain is associated with reduction in health outcomes. Methods A cohort of university students (baseline age 19–25 years were recruited in 2002 and followed annually for 4 years. The baseline response rate was 69% which resulted in 1200 respondents (627 women, 573 men. Participants were asked about present and past pain and perceptions of their general health, sleep disturbance, stress and energy levels, and general performance. The data were analyzed using a mixed model for repeated measurements and a random intercept logistic model. Results When reporting present pain, participants also reported lower prevalence of very good health, higher stress and sleep disturbance scores and lower energy score. Among those with current neck pain, additional questions characterizing the pain such as duration (categorized, additional pain sites and decreased general performance were associated with lower probability of very good health and higher amounts of sleep disturbance. Knowing about the presence or not of pain explains more of the variation in health between individuals, than within individuals. Conclusion This study of young university students has demonstrated that simple neck pain survey questions capture features of pain that affect aspects of health such as perceived general health, sleep disturbance, mood in terms of stress and energy. Simple pain questions are more useful for group descriptions than for describing or following pain in an individual.

  18. A relação pergunta-resposta como preditor do reconto de histórias Question-asking organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Alice de Mattos Pimenta Parente

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Esse estudo teve como objetivo verificar duas hipóteses da teoria de questionabilidade textual de Virbel: 1 o reconto é semelhante à organização de pergunta-resposta do autor; e, 2 a semelhança entre o reconto e força de questionabilidade da frase varia em função do grau de consistência do texto. Um primeiro comparou o reconto de 53 participantes com a força de questionabilidade das frases elementares do texto. Os resultados mostraram correlações significativas entre as duas variáveis de estudo. Um segundo experimento analisou o reconto de 141 participantes de 2 versões da história, que variaram quanto ao grau de consistência. Foram encontradas correlações significativas apenas na versão com maior grau de consistência. Os resultados dos 2 experimentos vão ao encontro da teoria de questionabilidade que propõe que para compreender e reconstruir uma história o ouvinte/leitor segue uma rede hierárquica que organiza as unidades significativas tendo por base a força de questionabilidade.This study aimed to verify two hypotheses of the text questionability theory (Virbel: 1 the recall is similar to the author's question-asking organization; and 2 the similarity between the recall and the questionability force will be in function of the text consistency. A first experiment compared the recall of 53 subjects with the questionability force of the elementary sentences. Significant correlations and regressions between the two variables were found. A second experiment analyzed the recall of 141 subjects in 2 versions of the story of the first experiment differentiated by the degree of consistency Correlations were found only in the version with higher degree of consistency. The results of the 2 experiments were in accordance with the questionability theory in that, in order to understand and to reconstruct a story, the 'comprehender' follows a hierarchical network, which organizes the unities of meaning based on their

  19. "I just think that doctors need to ask more questions": Sexual minority and majority adolescents' experiences talking about sexuality with healthcare providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuzzell, Lindsay; Fedesco, Heather N; Alexander, Stewart C; Fortenberry, J Dennis; Shields, Cleveland G

    2016-09-01

    To examine adolescent and young adults' experiences of sexuality communication with physicians, and gain advice for improving interactions. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with questions focusing on: puberty, romantic attractions, sexual orientation, dating, sexual behavior, clinical environment, and role of parents. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed using thematic analysis with both open and axial coding. Five themes emerged from interviews: 1) need for increased quantity of sexual communication, 2) issues of confidentiality/privacy, 3) comfort (physician discomfort, physical space), 4) inclusivity (language use, gender-fluid patients, office environment), 5) need for increased quality of sexual communication. Sexual minority and majority adolescents and young adults indicate sexuality discussions with physicians are infrequent and need improvement. They indicate language use and clinical physical environment are important places where physicians can show inclusiveness and increase comfort. Physicians should make an effort to include sexual communication at every visit. They should consider using indirect questions to assess sexual topics, provide other outlets for sexual health information, and ask parents to leave the exam room to improve confidentiality. Clinic staff should participate in Safe Zone trainings, and practices can promote inclusion with signs that indicate safe and accepting environments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Asking for Permission: A Survey of Copyright Workflows for Institutional Repositories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlon, Ann; Ramirez, Marisa

    2011-01-01

    An online survey of institutional repository (IR) managers identified copyright clearance trends in staffing and workflows. The majority of respondents followed a mediated deposit model, and reported that library personnel, instead of authors, engaged in copyright clearance activities for IRs. The most common "information gaps" pertained to the…

  1. Survey research: it's just a few questions, right?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Alan R; Voepel-Lewis, Terri

    2015-07-01

    While most anesthesiologists and other physician- or nurse-scientists are familiar with traditional descriptive, observational, and interventional study design, survey research has typically remained the preserve of the social scientists. To that end, this article provides a basic overview of the elements of good survey design and offers some rules of thumb to help guide investigators through the survey process.

  2. Pacific Northwest residential energy survey. Volume 3. Question-by-question results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-07-01

    Tabulations are presented of responses to approximately 105 questions. Results are tabulated by 9 geographic regions: the four states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington; four climate zones in the region; and a weighted Pacific Northwest total. A description of the tabulated data is given in the Introduction. Tabulated data deal with questions on dwelling characteristics; heating and air-conditioning systems; water heating; appliances; demographic and swelling characteristics; and insulation.

  3. What to Ask: Delirium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Join our e-newsletter! Resources What to Ask: Delirium Tools and Tips Under recognition of delirium is a major problem. It is important to ... questions you can ask your healthcare professional about delirium. What is delirium? What are its symptoms? How ...

  4. Surveying Parental Mediation: Connections, Challenges and Questions for Media Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Kelly

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines three strategies of parental mediation--coviewing, restrictive mediation, and active mediation--in order to make connections, challenge, and raise questions for media literacy. Coviewing, whether it is intentional practice, or whether it functions to promote media literacy, is explored. Restrictive mediation, how it connects to…

  5. 76 FR 54283 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collections: Language Learning Survey Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-31

    ... Notice of Proposed Information Collections: Language Learning Survey Questions ACTION: Notice of request... Information Collection: Language Learning Programs: Pre Program Survey Questions OMB Control Number: None Type... participants in ECA exchange programs that focus on critical language learning instruction. Estimated Number of...

  6. Framing Higher Education: Questions and Responses in the British Social Attitudes Survey, 1983-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountford-Zimdars, Anna; Jones, Steven; Sullivan, Alice; Heath, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on questions and attitudes towards higher education in the British Social Attitudes (BSA) survey series. First, we analyse the changing BSA questions (1983-2010) in the context of key policy reports. Our results show that changes in the framing of higher education questions correspond with changes in the macro-discourse of…

  7. The Impact of Question Format, Context, and Content on Survey Answers in Early and Late Adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diersch Nadine

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Self-reports in surveys are often influenced by the presented question format and question context. Much less is known about how these effects influence the answers of younger survey respondents. The present study investigated how variations in response format, answer scale frequency, and question order influence self-reports of two age groups: younger (11–13 years old and older (16–18 years old adolescents. In addition, the impact of the respondents’ level of familiarity with the question content was taken into account. Results indicated that younger adolescents are more strongly influenced by the presented question format and context than older adolescents. This, however, was dependent on the particular question content, implying that response effects are more pronounced when questions deal with issues that lie outside of the respondents’ field of experience. Implications of these findings in survey research with younger respondents are discussed.

  8. Graduate entry nurses' initial perspectives on nursing: Content analysis of open-ended survey questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Lisa; Brooks, Ingrid; Vanderheide, Rebecca

    2017-02-01

    Graduate entry nursing courses offer individuals with prior degrees the opportunity to gain nursing qualifications and facilitate career change. While it is known that accelerated graduate entry courses are increasingly popular, the perceptions of nursing held by such individuals and the influence this has on those seeking to enter the profession are less clearly understood. To explore graduate entry nursing students' perceptions of nursing on entering their pre-registration course. A descriptive design utilising cross-section survey with two open-ended questions: What do you believe the role of the nurse is? What things have influenced that view? were asked. Demographic data were analysed using descriptive frequencies, while the two open-ended questions were analysed using summative content analysis. One university-based postgraduate graduate entry nursing course in Australia PARTICIPANTS: Eight cohorts (n=286) commencing students with prior degrees other than nursing. The course attracts students from diverse backgrounds. Exposure to nursing and nurses, either as a consumer of health care or other health care role, plays a primary role in influencing career change. However, similar to those found with school leavers, there remains much misinformation about nurses' roles for students in these courses. Most identify the role of caring in nursing. For some, media representations are the only information sources. Graduate entry courses offer opportunities to attract new nurses and contribute to addressing workforce shortages. However, there is still a lack of knowledge of nursing roles among students on entry. More work is required by the profession to ensure nursing is accurately and positively represented to the community. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Framing violence: the effect of survey context and question framing on reported rates of partner violence

    OpenAIRE

    Regan, Katherine V.

    2008-01-01

    In this dissertation, I investigated two explanations for the variability in levels of partner violence found by large community surveys. In Study 1, I examined the effect of how questions about partner violence are introduced (question framing: conflict, violence-in-relationships, or attacks) on reports of partner violence. Although there was not a reliable effect of question framing, the pattern of findings was consistent across 3 of 4 analyses. Counter to predictions, an attacks question f...

  10. Incomplete categorical data design non-randomized response techniques for sensitive questions in surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, Guo-Liang

    2013-01-01

    Respondents to survey questions involving sensitive information, such as sexual behavior, illegal drug usage, tax evasion, and income, may refuse to answer the questions or provide untruthful answers to protect their privacy. This creates a challenge in drawing valid inferences from potentially inaccurate data. Addressing this difficulty, non-randomized response approaches enable sample survey practitioners and applied statisticians to protect the privacy of respondents and properly analyze the gathered data.Incomplete Categorical Data Design: Non-Randomized Response Techniqu

  11. On the interpretation of World Values Survey trust question - global expectations vs. local beliefs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banerjee, Ritwik

    How should we interpret the World Values Survey (WVS) trust question? We conduct an experiment in India - a low trust country, to correlate the WVS trust question with trust decisions in an incentivized Trust Game. Evidence supports findings from one strand of the fractured literature - the WVS t...

  12. Reincarnation Revisited: Question format and the distribution of belief in reincarnation in survey research

    OpenAIRE

    Siegers, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Comparing frequency of belief in reincarnation from different international survey projects (RAMP, EVS, ISSP) reveals differences of about 15 to 20 percent depending on the specific question format. If single binary questions are used, then belief in reincarnation is more often reported than if a forced-choice question is used which offers respondents alternatives to belief in reincarnation (e.g. resurrection). One possible explanation for this result is that respondents confuse reincarnation...

  13. The Influence of Interviewer Presence and Survey Mode on Question Sensitivity : Results From a Fake Good/Fake Bad Experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegkamp, Annemiek; Ongena, Yfke; Haan, Marieke

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines whether interviewer presence and survey mode affect the sensitivity of questions in survey interviews. A comparison is made between web surveys and paper & pencil surveys. A fake good/fake bad experiment was designed to find out which questions of the European Social Survey are s

  14. Selection, Generalization, and Theories of Cause in Qualitative Physics Education Research: Answers to the Hard-Hitting Questions Asked by Skeptical Quantitative Researchers

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, Amy D; Scherr, Rachel E

    2013-01-01

    Qualitative research incorporates distinct methods for selecting data for analysis, generalizing results, and making causal claims. Unanswered questions about these methods may constrain researchers more familiar with quantitative methods from participating in or critically engaging with qualitative research. We use results from interviews with physics education researchers, a synthesis of the literature on research methodologies, and published examples of qualitative and quantitative research to answer hard-hitting questions that quantitative researchers may pose.

  15. Public health questions on physical disabilities and musculoskeletal conditions : studies using health surveys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Picavet, H.S.J.

    2001-01-01

    For population-based information on physical disability and musculoskeletal conditions health surveys are the most important source of information. In this thesis studies are presented on the methods of the health survey and on public health questions concerning physical disabilities and

  16. Five questiouns dentists should ask about their money. Question 4: how do the communities (family, practice, profession, culture, neighborhood, etc.) in which I live affect my financial decisions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Troy E

    2006-11-01

    Communities, and the personal value you place on them, affect all your spending, both business and personal. Once you begin questioning and analyzing how they affect your financial decisions, you will begin making more complete choices - the better-informed, the greater chance of success. Society has attached many financial expectations to dentists - both good and bad. By participating in this part of the Five Questions process, you will be able to separate the business of dentistry from the practice of dentistry and your persona beliefs from the beliefs of your communities'.

  17. A Parent's Guide to Sex, Drugs and Flunking out: Answers to the Questions Your College Student Doesn't Want You To Ask.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Joel

    This guide is intended to help parents as their children make decisions about college and the first year of college. It discusses college selection, financial decisions, academic choices, social choices, and questions of personal safety. The chapters are: (1) "The Right School for Your Child--And You"; (2) "Paying for College and Getting What You…

  18. Ask a Periodontist (Frequently Asked Questions about Gum Disease)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in adolescents. However, children should still learn the importance of keeping their teeth and gums healthy to ... periodontist. Many periodontists are willing to set up financing options, such as a payment plan. They also ...

  19. Questioning Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Michelle

    1999-01-01

    Questions are so much a part of the classroom routine and they should stimulate learning and thinking. Introduces the Questioning and Understanding to Improve Learning and Thinking (QUILT) method which incorporates Bloom's Taxonomy and wait time. (ASK)

  20. "I am pregnant and my husband has diabetes. Is there a risk for my child?" A qualitative study of questions asked by email about the role of genetic susceptibility to diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornel Martina C

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes Mellitus is a global health problem. Scientific knowledge on the genetics of diabetes is expanding and is more and more utilised in clinical practice and primary prevention strategies. Health consumers have become increasingly interested in genetic information. In the Netherlands, the National Genetic Research and Information Center provides online information about the genetics of diabetes and thereby offers website visitors the opportunity to ask a question per email. The current study aims at exploring people's need of (additional information about the role of inheritance in diabetes. Results may help to tailor existing clinical and public (online genetic information to the needs of an increasing population at risk for diabetes. Methods A data base with emailed questions about diabetes and inheritance (n = 172 is used in a secondary content analysis. Questions are posted in 2005-2009 via a website providing information about more than 600 inheritable disorders, including all diabetes subtypes. Queries submitted were classified by contents as well as persons' demographic profiles. Results Questions were received by diabetes patients (49%, relatives (30%, and partners (21%. Questioners were relatively young (54.8% ≤ 30 years and predominantly female (83%. Most queries related to type 1 diabetes and concerned topics related to (future pregnancy and family planning. Questioners mainly asked for risk estimation, but also clarifying information (about genetics of diabetes in general and advice (mostly related to family planning was requested. Preventive advice to reduce own diabetes risk was hardly sought. Conclusions Genetic information on diabetes provided by professionals or public health initiatives should address patients, as well as relatives and partners. In particular women are receptive to genetic information; they worry about the diabetes related health of (future offspring. It seems important that

  1. Brief Report: Attitudes about Responding to Survey Questions Concerning Childhood Sexual Abuse by Hispanic Female College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Frederick A.; Salinas, Nancy I.; Perez, Natalie

    2009-01-01

    In no studies have research participants been asked how they feel about answering questions concerning childhood sexual abuse. We have performed searches from two different search engines again and have found nothing published which specifically addresses this question in the way we have. A questionnaire about childhood sexual abuse was…

  2. 美国波多里奇国家质量奖问与答%Frequently Asked Questions about the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曲阳; 王为人

    2004-01-01

    The Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award is the United States'premier award for business excellence and quality achievement.The Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award is given to U.S.organizations that have exemplary achievements in seven areas:leadership,stategic planning,customer and market focus,information and analysis,human resource focus,process management,and results.The Baldrige Award is given by the President of the United States to businesses-manufacturing and service,small and largeand to education and health care organizations that apply and are judged to be outstanding in those seven areas.All applicants for the Baldrige Award undergo a rigorous examination process that involves a minimum of 300 hours of review by an independent board of examinrs primarily from the private sector.Final-stage applicants receive about 1,000 hours of review and are visited by teams of examiners to clarify questions and verify information.Each applicant receives a report citing strengths and opportunities for improvement.

  3. [EBM Service: evidence-based answers provided by general practitioners to questions asked by general practitioners--a project from South Tyrol/Italy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccoliori, Giuliano; Kostner, Simon; Abholz, Heinz-Harald

    2010-01-01

    General practices also require more and more evidence-based decision-making. But knowledge is increasing rapidly and guidelines produced to help doctors to find answers to their problems seem to exclude a number of problems that are important in general practices. Here we report on the introduction and activities of an EbM Service provided by general practitioners to answer questions of their colleagues. The aim is to give EBM answers, but also, in doing so, to teach the application of EBM and--in the long run--to enable the users themselves to find EBM answers. The provision of EBM answers is fairly pragmatic: after using the service the inquiring physician should be better informed, i.e., have more evidence-based information, but sometimes this need not be the "ultimate truth" that experts might deliver. EBM answers are published both on the homepage of the College of General Practitioners and in their journal. It took quite a while to implement this service, and the number of those using it has increased slowly but constantly.

  4. Can i just check...? Effects of edit check questions on measurement error and survey estimates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lugtig, Peter; Jäckle, Annette

    2014-01-01

    Household income is difficult to measure, since it requires the collection of information about all potential income sources for each member of a household.Weassess the effects of two types of edit check questions on measurement error and survey estimates: within-wave edit checks use responses to

  5. An Assessment of FY2016 Locally Developed Questions from the DEOMI Organizational Climate Survey: Recommendations and Potential Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-11

    1 An Assessment of FY2016 Locally Developed Questions from the DEOMI Organizational Climate Survey: Recommendations and Potential Implications...Equal Opportunity Management Institute (DEOMI) Organizational Climate Survey (DEOCS). The top 15 questions were ranked across a total of 180,797...Department of Equal Opportunity Management Institute Organizational Climate Survey (DEOCS) for fiscal year 2016 by commanders across the Department

  6. Unanswered clinical questions: a survey of specialists and primary care providers*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Bridget; Shenoy, Anant M.; Blanchard, Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    Objective With the myriad of cases presented to clinicians every day at our integrated academic health system, clinical questions are bound to arise. Clinicians need to recognize these knowledge gaps and act on them. However, for many reasons, clinicians might not seek answers to these questions. Our goal was to investigate the rationale and process behind these unanswered clinical questions. Subsequently, we explored the use of biomedical information resources among specialists and primary care providers and identified ways to promote more informed clinical decision making. Methods We conducted a survey to assess how practitioners identify and respond to information gaps, their background knowledge of search tools and strategies, and their usage of and comfort level with technology. Results Most of the 292 respondents encountered clinical questions at least a few times per week. While the vast majority often or always pursued answers, time was the biggest barrier for not following through on questions. Most respondents did not have any formal training in searching databases, were unaware of many digital resources, and indicated a need for resources and services that could be provided at the point of care. Conclusions While the reasons for unanswered clinical questions varied, thoughtful review of the responses suggested that a combination of educational strategies, embedded librarian services, and technology applications could help providers pursue answers to their clinical questions, enhance patient safety, and contribute to patient-based, self-directed learning. PMID:28096740

  7. Survey Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Cleaned and QCd data for the Fishing Effort Survey. Questions on fishing and other out are asked on weather and outdoor activity, including fishing trips. Used for...

  8. Who Justifies Questionable Reporting Practices? Answers from a Representative Survey of Journalists in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Baugut

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Based on a secondary analysis of representative survey data of journalists in Germany (n= 1536, this paper draws attention to two variables that are important when it comes to explain whether journalists accept questionable reporting practices, such as paying people to obtain information or using confidential government documents without permission. First, perceived role achievement is important, as journalists who do not feel able to achieve an active role tend to accept questionable reporting practices more often. Second, however, this relationship is only true for journalists having a moderate tendency to the political left. Findings are explained by means of the theory of cognitive dissonance.

  9. Cutting a Long Story Short? The Clinical Relevance of Asking Parents, Nurses, and Young Children Themselves to Identify Children’s Mental Health Problems by One or Two Questions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Mari Borg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims. Assessing young children’s mental health is a crucial and challenging task. The aim of the study was to evaluate the clinical relevance of asking parents, nurses, and young children themselves to identify children’s mental health problems by only one or two questions. Methods. In regular health check-ups of 4- to 9-year-old children (n=2682, parents and public health nurses assessed by one question whether the child had any emotional or behavioral difficulties. The child completed a self-evaluation enquiry on his/her emotional well-being. A stratified proportion of the participating parents were invited to a diagnostic interview. Results. Sensitivities were fairly good for the parents’ (68%, nurses’ (65%, and their combined (79% one-question screens. Difficulties identified by parents and nurses were major risks (OR 10–14 for any child psychiatric disorders (P<0.001. The child’s self-evaluation was related to 2-fold to 3-fold risks (P<0.05 for any psychiatric diagnosis, for any emotional diagnosis, and for negative situational factors. Conclusion. The one-question screen for parents and public health nurses together quite adequately identified the young children with mental health problems. The child’s self-evaluation provided relevant and complementary information on his/her mental health and especially emotional problems.

  10. Simple neck pain questions used in surveys, evaluated in relation to health outcomes: a cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The high prevalence of pain reported in many epidemiological studies, and the degree to which this prevalence reflects severe pain is under discussion in the literature. The aim of the present study was to evaluate use of the simple neck pain questions commonly included in large epidemiological survey studies with respect to aspects of health. We investigated if and how an increase in number of days with pain is associated with reduction in health outcomes. Methods A cohor...

  11. Frequently Asked Questions about Personal Health Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and money. And it saved my life! A woman's Facebook PHR saved her life In The Blogs Get To Know Your Healthcare Team Caregiving at an Early Age Your Rights Regarding Your Personal Health Information Start a PHR ...

  12. Frequently Asked Questions about Surgical Site Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Infection FAQs about SSIs Catheter-associated Urinary Tract Infection FAQs about CAUTI Ventilator-associated Pneumonia FAQs about VAP Diseases and Organisms Acinetobacter Burkholderia cepacia Clostridium difficile Patients Clinicians FAQs about ...

  13. Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) about Malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease maintains a vicious cycle of disease and poverty. Top of Page How People Get Malaria (Transmission) ... a list of all the places in the world where malaria transmission occurs and the malaria drugs ...

  14. Questions to ask your child's doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... families who are coping with this type of cancer? My child's life after treatment: Will my child grow normally? ... able to have children as an adult? Will cancer treatment put my child at risk for health problems later in life? ...

  15. Lymphatic Filariasis: Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the skin and lymph system. This causes hardening and thickening of the skin, which is called ... Carefully wash the swollen area with soap and water every day. Elevate and exercise the swollen arm ...

  16. Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) about Plague

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Specific Hazards Bioterrorism A-Z Anthrax (Bacillus anthracis) Arenaviruses Treatment & Infection Control Specimen Submission & Lab Testing Education & ... hemorrhagic fevers (filoviruses [e.g., Ebola, Marburg] and arenaviruses [e.g., Lassa, Machupo]) Yersinia pestis (plague) Fact ...

  17. Head Lice: Malathion Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... contact during play and other activities at home, school, and elsewhere (slumber parties, sports activities, camp, playground). Do not share clothing such as hats, scarves, coats, sports uniforms, hair ribbons, or barrettes. Do not share combs, ...

  18. Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) about Extreme Heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Part 3 of 3) Hot Weather Tips Heat Stress in Older Adults FAQs Extreme Heat PSAs Related Links MMWR Bibliography CDC's Program Floods Flood Readiness Personal Hygiene After a Disaster Cleanup of Flood Water After a Flood Worker Safety Educational Materials Floods ...

  19. Head Lice: Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... casings. This is difficult to distinguish with the naked eye. Nymph form. (CDC Photo) Nymph: A nymph ... with your local and state health departments to see if they have such recommendations. More on: Head ...

  20. Ten Questions to Ask Your GI Endoscopist...

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dissection (ESD) Endoscopic Ultrasound (EUS) Procedures F - Z GI Bleeding Manometry Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) Polypectomy Pseudocyst Drainage ... ASGE Masterclasses Clinical Courses DDW / Digestive Disease Week ® GI Outlook (GO) Practice Management Conference Practice Management Courses ...

  1. Lyme Disease Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in ticks is Borrelia burgdorferi (Lyme disease) and Anaplasma phagocytophilum (anaplasmosis). The frequency of tickborne coinfections in ... patients with early Lyme disease may also have anaplasma infection, and 2 to 40% of patients with ...

  2. Immunotherapy: questions to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:chap 77. Pardoll D. Cancer immunology. In: Niederhuber JE, Armitage JO, Doroshow JH, Kastan MB, Tepper JE, eds. Abeloff's Clinical Oncology . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap 6. ... Florida Cancer Specialists & Research Institute, Wellington, FL. Review provided by ...

  3. Targeted therapy: questions to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nih.gov/pubmed/23589545 . Kummar S, Murgo AJ, Tomaszewski JE, Doroshow JH. Therapeutic targeting of cancer cells: era of molecularly targeted agents. In: Niederhuber JE, Armitage JO, Doroshow JH, Kastan MB, Tepper JE, ...

  4. Body Lice Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... living conditions where hygiene is poor (the homeless, refugees, victims of war or natural disasters). In the ... intense itching can lead to scratching which can cause sores on the body; these sores sometimes can ...

  5. Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP): Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cells. One very large family with PSP in multiple members has a variant in a gene other ... difficulty planning or executing unrehearsed movements, dementia) sensory loss “alien hand/limb” phenomenon (difficulty controlling the movements of a limb, ...

  6. Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP): Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in this section for the benefit of others. PSP What does the name "supranuclear palsy" mean? In ... CurePSP. What are the common early symptoms of PSP? The most common first symptom, occurring on average ...

  7. Right turn resuscitation: frequently asked questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, N R M; Russell, R

    2011-09-01

    In this article the process of operating room resuscitation - commonly known as Right Turn Resuscitation (RTR) when conducted in the medical treatment facility at Camp Bastion - is described. The place of RTR within the concepts of damage control resuscitation and surgery is discussed along with activation criteria and protocols. The medical leadership, team roles, advantages and disadvantages are reviewed. Finally, studies describing the impact of RTR and operating room resuscitation are briefly described.

  8. Frequently Asked Questions about Clinical Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... conducted with human subjects, or material of human origin, in which the researcher directly interacts with human ... The placebo effect is the phenomenon of patients feeling better simply because they think they are receiving ...

  9. Women Veterans Health Care: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care Apply Online Application Process Veteran Eligibility Active Duty Families of Veterans Women Veterans Determine Costs Copays ... VHA Forms & Publications Quality & Safety Quality of Care Ethics VA/DOD Clinical Practice Guidelines Access and Quality ...

  10. Women and Diabetes: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... html New Year, Fresh Recipes Enjoy these free recipes and meal plans to start 2017 on a healthy note. sticky en -- Chef Ronaldo's Sabores de Cuba - 2016-08-book-sabores-de-cuba.html More from diabetes.org ...

  11. Frequently Asked Questions about Music Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... top How is music therapy utilized in hospitals? Music is used in general hospitals to: alleviate pain in conjunction with anesthesia or pain medication: elevate patients' mood and counteract depression; promote movement for physical rehabilitation; calm or sedate, ...

  12. Nutrition for Women Athletes. Commonly Asked Questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, N. Peggy

    1987-01-01

    Information on the nutritional needs of female athletes is presented. Among the topics discussed are proper eating habits, carbohydrate loading, amenorrhea, osteoporosis, anemia, vitamins, and minerals. (MT)

  13. Women Veterans Health Care: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Violence Intimate Partner Violence Domestic Abuse Sexual Trauma Culture Change Culture Change I'm One Proud Veteran Women Veterans ... online at www.va.gov/directory ). During normal business hours, you can contact the Veterans Health Administration ( ...

  14. 7 Questions to Ask Open Source Vendors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raths, David

    2012-01-01

    With their budgets under increasing pressure, many campus IT directors are considering open source projects for the first time. On the face of it, the savings can be significant. Commercial emergency-planning software can cost upward of six figures, for example, whereas the open source Kuali Ready might run as little as $15,000 per year when…

  15. Frequently Asked Questions about Radiation Emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the size and extent of the disaster, the radiation levels, and whether or not roads and structures are ... developing cancer later in life, depending on the level of radiation exposure. For people who receive low doses of ...

  16. Asking Questions and Performing Mathematics Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darragh, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    When students begin secondary school they must learn what it means to be a learner of mathematics in this new context. Certain actions are more valued than others and these can be considered "scripts" for successful learning. Students may call upon these scripts when enacting their mathematics learner identity. Sixty-four interviews with…

  17. Suicide in America: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... these risk factors but do not attempt suicide. Suicide is not a normal response to stress. It is, however, a sign of extreme distress, not a harmless bid for attention. What about gender? Men are more likely to die by suicide than women, but women are more likely to ...

  18. Alcohol and Public Health: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... problem? What health problems are associated with excessive alcohol use? I’m young. Is drinking bad for my health? Is it ... health? Yes. 8,9 Studies have shown that alcohol use by adolescents and young adults increases the risk of both fatal and ...

  19. Frequently Asked Questions on Ebola Virus Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease Updated January 2016 1. What is Ebola virus disease? Ebola virus disease (formerly known as Ebola haemorrhagic fever) ... are the typical signs and symptoms of Ebola virus infection? Ebola symptoms vary but sudden onset of fever, intense ...

  20. Frequently Asked Questions and Answers on Smallpox

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... protect anyone else judged to have a high risk of exposure to smallpox. The vaccine cannot be used in ... only to those persons who have a high risk of coming into contact with the virus which ... health workers and hospital personnel around the world have been trained to ...

  1. Head Lice: Treatment Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... kill head lice? Which medicine is best? Is mayonnaise effective for treating head lice? CDC does not ... to determine if suffocation of head lice with mayonnaise, olive oil, margarine, butter, or similar substances is ...

  2. Frequently Asked Questions about Nutrition Labeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... labeled “ trans fat-free” may be high in saturated fats, which also raise your bad cholesterol levels and ... free” – does that mean the food contains no saturated fats or trans fats? Not necessarily. The U.S. Food ...

  3. Frequently Asked Questions (Palliative Care: Conversations Matter)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chaplains, and counselors. Support may involve art and music therapists, home health aides, nutritionists, and respite care providers. How does palliative care help children and their families? A child’s serious illness affects the entire family. Pediatric palliative care can support ...

  4. Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP): Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... throat, and these movements also weaken in PSP. Speech becomes slurred in most patients after 3 or 4 years, on average, although it ... to a degree, but usually not the mental, speech, visual or swallowing difficulties. It usually loses its benefit after two or three years, but a few patients ...

  5. Frequently Asked Questions about Spina Bifida

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... adults with Spina Bifida who want to become active? A: You will want to first make sure ... long- term) treatment usually involves behavioral strategies (biofeedback, relaxation therapy, etc) and medications – the best studied of ...

  6. Frequently Asked Questions about Rare Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page What are some examples of rare diseases? Examples of rare diseases caused by mutations in single genes include cystic fibrosis, which affects ... responsible for some rare, inherited types of cancer. Examples of these are ... which certain mutations increase the risk for hereditary breast and ovarian ...

  7. Frequently Asked Questions about Genetic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... they are caused by a combination of inherited mutations in multiple genes, often acting together with environmental factors. Examples of such diseases include many commonly-occurring diseases, ...

  8. Frequently Asked Questions about Music Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Music Therapy Association Home Contact News Help/FAQ Members Only Login About Music Therapy & AMTA What is Music Therapy? Definition and Quotes ... m Having Trouble Logging In/Staying Logged In Music Therapy What is Music Therapy? What do music therapists ...

  9. Thymectomy: Common Questions Patients Ask about Thymectomies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... A few MG Centers add a formal neck dissection to the sternal technique to also ensure the ... of patient services, public information, medical research, professional education, advocacy and patient care. This publication is intended ...

  10. Prader-Willi Syndrome: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... causes low muscle tone, short stature, incomplete sexual development, cognitive disabilities, problem behaviors, and a chronic feeling of hunger that can lead to excessive eating and life-threatening obesity. What does the future ...

  11. On How to Inspire Children to Ask Questions in Scientific Activities in Kindergarten%在科学领域活动中如何激发幼儿提问

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊灿灿

    2014-01-01

    在幼儿园科学领域活动中激发幼儿提问,是实现幼儿主体、教师主导,促进幼儿主动性、探索性和创造性发展的重要一步。本文从转变教育观念、提升提问策略、捕捉幼儿提问和深入进行科学探索等方面提出在科学活动中激发幼儿提问的教育措施。%Inspiring children to ask questions in scientific activi-ties is an important step to promote the development of children's initiative, exploratory spirit and creativity in kindergarten. In this paper, the following measures are put forward:changing the con-cept of education, improving questioning strategies, capturing children's questions and further scientific exploration.

  12. Two valuation questions in one survey: Is it a recipe for sequencing and instrument context effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraud, K.L.; Loomis, J.B.; Johnson, R.L.

    1999-01-01

    Economic theory suggests that willingness to pay for two goods independently offered should remain unchanged when the survey instrument changes slightly. Four survey treatments consisting of comprehensive good and a subset of that good were used. The surveys alternated in the question ordering and in the embedded good which accompanied the comprehensive good. We tested for sequencing and instrument context effects using both a combined and split sample designs. In the combined sample case we found some evidence to sequencing effects in the data containing the first subset good. Likelihood ratio tests indicated that sequencing did not effect scale or location of parameters. In the test for instrument context effects, evidence was found indicating context does effect willingness to pay estimates.

  13. A Survey on the Levels of Questioning of ELT: A Case Study in an Indonesian Tertiary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashadi, Rido Imam; Lubis, Nazriani

    2017-01-01

    This present study focused on examining the levels of questions in Indonesia tertiary education. A survey research was conducted in one of the private universities in North Sumatra. The English summative assessment in an undergraduate education was used as target of survey. There were a collection of questions that had been administered by four…

  14. 76 FR 39966 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collections: ECA/P/V Youth and Leadership Survey Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-07

    ... Notice of Proposed Information Collections: ECA/P/V Youth and Leadership Survey Questions ACTION: Notice... Information Collection: ECA/P/V Youth and Leadership Programs: Pre Program Survey Questions. OMB Control.... Respondents: Participants in ECA exchange programs that focus on youth and leadership. Specifically...

  15. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Information Optical Illusions Printables Ask a Scientist Video Series Why can’t you see colors well in ... and more with our Ask a Scientist video series. Dr. Sheldon Miller answers questions about color blindness, ...

  16. Can I Just Check...? Effects of Edit Check Questions on Measurement Error and Survey Estimates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lugtig Peter

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Household income is difficult to measure, since it requires the collection of information about all potential income sources for each member of a household.Weassess the effects of two types of edit check questions on measurement error and survey estimates: within-wave edit checks use responses to questions earlier in the same interview to query apparent inconsistencies in responses; dependent interviewing uses responses from prior interviews to query apparent inconsistencies over time.Weuse data from three waves of the British Household Panel Survey (BHPS to assess the effects of edit checks on estimates, and data from an experimental study carried out in the context of the BHPS, where survey responses were linked to individual administrative records, to assess the effects on measurement error. The findings suggest that interviewing methods without edit checks underestimate non-labour household income in the lower tail of the income distribution. The effects on estimates derived from total household income, such as poverty rates or transition rates into and out of poverty, are small.

  17. The '10 Excess' Phenomenon in Responses to Survey Questions on Happiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brulé, Gaël; Veenhoven, Ruut

    2017-01-01

    Happiness in nations is typically measured in surveys using a single question. A common question is: 'all things considered, how satisfied or dissatisfied are you with your life as-a-whole these days on a scale from 0 to 10?'. The responses typically follow a uni-modal distribution with highest frequencies between 5 and 8. Yet in some nations, the percentage of 10 responses stands out and is higher than the percentage of 9 responses. This is particularly present in Latin America and in the Middle East. In this paper we explore the prevalence of the '10-excess' pattern and check some possible explanations. We conclude that the 10-excess phenomenon is partly due to cultural influence.

  18. Using Reinterview and Reconciliation Methods to Design and Evaluate Survey Questions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy E. Morton

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Conducting reinterviews is an effective method to estimate and reduce response errors in interview surveys. As part of the School Health Policies and Programs Study 2000 (SHPPS, RTI used reinterview methods to assist in designing and evaluating survey questions. Reinterviews were conducted in the field test with selected respondents to identify discrepancies between the original interviews and reinterviews. Reconciliation interviews were then conducted to determine the reasons for the discrepancies in terms of comprehension, recall, encoding, response options, or other problems. In this paper, we describe the design of the reinterview and reconciliation study and discuss the implications of using these methods for questionnaire design and evaluation, specifically in comparison to cognitive interviewing.

  19. [EbM from the bottom up: are questions asking for evidence in daily clinical practice answerable?---a report from a pilot test to assist general practitioners with using evidence-based medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Wolfgang; Weingart, Olaf

    2009-01-01

    Many physicians agree on the advantages of using Evidence-based Medicine (EbM) in daily practice, but they do not make use of this method very often. One reason for this lack of EbM implementation is that it is difficult to access clinically relevant and appropriate information in daily practice. The division "Principles and Practices of EbM" in the German Network for Evidence-based Medicine (DNEbM) initiated a pilot project to improve their information management. During two weeks in February 2007 physicians in a local setting in the southeast part of Germany were offered an EbM expert service. They were asked to formulate open-ended questions arising from daily practice. Seventeen experts answered these questions within a three day period. In addition, all participants regularly received an edited version of these topics, and finally a questionnaire was sent out to evaluate physician satisfaction. Five family doctors and two hospital departments formulated 28 questions in two weeks. There was a wide range of answers, from evidence summaries (including full texts of the trials or relevant guidelines) up to expert opinion together with a discussion of different action strategies in the case of uncertain evidence. The participating physicians' satisfaction with this offer of low-barrier access to the best available evidence and the answers provided by the experts was high. Apart from the suggested solutions to the respective problems the project initiated a critical self-analysis of their individual clinical practice among the participating physicians. All of them saw the need for continuing this project. Further investigations are needed in order to optimise both the process of EbM implementation on a long-term basis and the health care quality by providing EbM expert services.

  20. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Relations afh@nei.nih.gov NEI Office of Communications (301)496-5248 Health Information Frequently asked questions ... is maintained by the NEI Office of Science Communications, Public Liaison, and Education. Technical questions about this ...

  1. Lyme disease - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about Lyme disease; Lyme borreliosis - questions; Bannwarth syndrome - questions ... I am treated with antibiotics? How can my doctor diagnose me with Lyme disease? Can I be ...

  2. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Relations afh@nei.nih.gov NEI Office of Communications (301)496-5248 Health Information Frequently asked questions ... and comments to the NEI Office of Science Communications, Public Liaison, and Education. Technical questions about this ...

  3. Explaining topic prevalence in answers to open-ended survey questions about climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tvinnereim, Endre; Fløttum, Kjersti

    2015-08-01

    Citizens’ opinions are crucial for action on climate change, but are, owing to the complexity of the issue, diverse and potentially unformed. We contribute to the understanding of public views on climate change and to knowledge needed by decision-makers by using a new approach to analyse answers to the open survey question `what comes to mind when you hear the words `climate change’?’. We apply automated text analysis, specifically structural topic modelling, which induces distinct topics based on the relative frequencies of the words used in 2,115 responses. From these data, originating from the new, nationally representative Norwegian Citizen Panel, four distinct topics emerge: Weather/Ice, Future/Impact, Money/Consumption and Attribution. We find that Norwegians emphasize societal aspects of climate change more than do respondents in previous US and UK studies. Furthermore, variables that explain variation in closed questions, such as gender and education, yield different and surprising results when employed to explain variation in what respondents emphasize. Finally, the sharp distinction between scepticism and acceptance of conventional climate science, often seen in previous studies, blurs in many textual responses as scepticism frequently turns into ambivalence.

  4. Questions About Cervical and Breast Cancer Screening Knowledge, Practice, and Outcomes: A Review of Demographic and Health Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viens, Laura; Perin, Doug; Senkomago, Virginia; Neri, Antonio; Saraiya, Mona

    2017-05-01

    United Nation's Sustainable Development Goals and the World Health Organization's Global Monitoring Framework support a strong global commitment to reducing the high burden of cervical and breast cancers among low- and middle-income countries. Strategies include vaccination, screening, and early diagnosis. Population-based surveys, such as those conducted by the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) Program, can collect the information needed to guide cancer control efforts in a standardized comparable manner. We identified and evaluated the breadth of breast and cervical cancer screening information that was collected by the DHS from 1984 through 2015. Then, we determined if these surveys currently provide the specific and measurable data about both the quantity and quality of cancer screening needed to guide national efforts to reduce the overall effects of cervical and breast cancers. We searched the DHS website to identify surveys conducted between the start of the DHS Program in 1984 and November 2015 that included questions about breast and cervical cancer screening. The relevant questions were extracted from the questionnaire, translated into English, and grouped by themes. Of the 90 countries where DHS surveys have been implemented, cervical cancer screening questions were included in 22 countries (24.4%) and breast cancer screening questions in 18 countries (20.0%). The common themes identified were disease knowledge, screening knowledge, screening practice, and screening outcomes. Most countries with survey questionnaires available for review addressed at least one aspect of screening practice (88.9% of cervical and 87.5% of breast), although few countries queried knowledge and outcomes. Questions that assess varied aspects of breast and cervical cancer screening have been incorporated into relatively few DHS surveys. The themes identified could guide the design of a standard set of questions for use in future population-based surveys and enable evaluation

  5. Deng Tingluo's Question and Ask of Military Mirror and The Study on Sun Tzu's Military Science in Early Qing Dynasty%邓廷罗之《兵镜或问》与清初孙子兵学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毕海林

    2012-01-01

    There are some characteristic in Deng Tingluo' s Question and Ask of Military Mirror, such as histo- ry and discussion,elaborating military affairs and governing the country and interpretation of micro field,in which many analysis won the essence of Sun Tzu's military science and relatively comprehensively summed up military changes trends and military thought development in thousands of years since The Art of War came into being. The works have characteristics on three aspects of the basic concept of war, troops idea and winning ways around the study on Sun Tzu ,show the adjustment and fusion of both military strategic thoughts and Confucianism thoughts, and continue academic tradition of the blending of Ming military strategy and Confucianism,which is the representa- tive works of studying The Art of War in early Qing Dynasty.%邓廷罗所作《兵镜或问》史论兼及,论兵亦论治国,阐释中有发微,不少分析深得孙子兵学之精要,较为全面地总结和探讨了自《孙子兵法》成书后千余年战争趋势的变化和军事思想的发展。围绕孙子兵学的概念范畴,在基本战争观念、治军理念和制胜之道三个方面展现了兵儒之间的相互调适与融合的特色,在学术上延续了明代兵儒相融的孙子兵学研究传统,是清初孙子兵学研究的代表之作。

  6. Fluid management in burn patients: results from a European survey-more questions than answers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldt, Joachim; Papsdorf, Michael

    2008-05-01

    Many strategies were proposed for fluid management in burn patients with different composition containing saline solution, colloids, or plasma. The actual clinical use of volume replacement regimen in burn patients in Europe was analysed by an international survey. A total of 187 questionnaires consisting of 20 multiple-choice questions were sent to 187 burn units listed by the European Burn Association. The response rate was 43%. The answers came from a total of 20 European countries. Volume replacement is mostly exclusively with crystalloids (always: 58%; often: 28%). The majority still use fixed formulae: 12% always use the traditional Baxter formula, in 50% modifications of this formula are used. The most often used colloid is albumin (always: 17%, often: 38%), followed by HES (always: 4%, often: 34%). Gelatins, dextrans, and hypertonic saline are used only very rarely. Fresh frozen plasma (FFP) is given in 12% of the units as the colloid of choice. Albumin was named most often to be able to improve patients' outcome (64%), followed by HES (53%), and the exclusive use of crystalloids (45%). Central venous pressure (CVP) is most often used to monitor volume therapy (35%), followed by the PiCCO-system (23%), and mixed-venous saturation (ScVO2; 10%). It is concluded that the kind of volume therapy differs widely among European burn units. This survey supported that no generally accepted volume replacement strategy in burn patients exists. New results, e.g. importance of goal-directed therapy or data concerning use of albumin in the critically ill, have not yet influenced strategies of volume replacement in the burn patient.

  7. Clever Questions and Ask with Skills--5~6-years Old Children Question Method of Picture Books Reading%巧妙发问,问而有法--5~6岁幼儿绘本阅读教学提问方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟美玲

    2014-01-01

    近几年,全国掀起绘本阅读热潮。绘本读物成为幼儿园阅读教学活动的首选材料。那么教师在5~6岁幼儿绘本阅读活动的组织中,要运用什么样的提问方法,引导幼儿阅读、理解呢?笔者认为作为教师应巧妙发问引导幼儿阅读画面信息、理解故事情节;引导幼儿推测、判断,深层阅读理解。%In recent years, the country set off a wave of picture books to read. Illustrated books become the kindergarten tea-ching reading material of choice. So teachers in the organization 5-6 years old children's picture books in the reading activi-ties, what kind of questions to use methods to guide children to read, understand? I believe that as a teacher should be clever to read information on the screen to guide children to ask questions and understand the story;guide children to speculate that judgment, deep reading comprehension.

  8. How Important Is the Local, Really? A Cross-Institutional Quantitative Assessment of Frequently Asked Questions in Writing Center Exit Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromley, Pam; Northway, Kara; Schonberg, Eliana

    2013-01-01

    Much writing center assessment literature focuses on the deep importance of local, institutional context. Still, a tension exists in the field more generally, and in assessment research specifically, between a reliance on local practice and a reliance on shared lore (Driscoll and Perdue; Thompson et al.). This tension can be fruitfully examined…

  9. Act 7 Ask for Commitment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Duane Sparks from KMG

    2008-01-01

    <正>"I’ll bite.How does Action Selling define an objection?""Action Selling defines an objection as a customer’s response to an unasked question,"Joe said."Every objection you’ll ever hear will relate to one of the customer’s five buying decisions.And all of the objections you hear could have been uncovered during Act 3 instead of in Act 7.""Come again?"Matt asked."This is important,so listen up,"Joe said."If you had followed the"Ask the Best Questions Map"carefully in Act 3 to determine the needs,issues,competition,budget,buying influences,and time frame,then objections you hear at the end of

  10. Unanswered clinical questions: a survey of specialists and primary care providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Brassil, MSLS, MAT, AHIP

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: While the reasons for unanswered clinical questions varied, thoughtful review of the responses suggested that a combination of educational strategies, embedded librarian services, and technology applications could help providers pursue answers to their clinical questions, enhance patient safety, and contribute to patient-based, self-directed learning.

  11. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 5248 Health Information Frequently asked questions Clinical Studies Publications Catalog Photos and Images Spanish Language Information Grants and Funding Extramural Research Division of Extramural Science Programs Division of Extramural Activities Extramural Contacts NEI ...

  12. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Links to More Information Optical Illusions Printables Ask a Scientist Video Series Why can’t you see ... eyelids? Why does saltwater sting your eyes? Select a video below to get answers to questions like ...

  13. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Links to More Information Optical Illusions Printables Ask a Scientist Video Series Why can’t you see ... eyelids? Why does saltwater sting your eyes? Select a video below to get answers to questions like ...

  14. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Illusions Printables Ask a Scientist Video Series Why can’t you see colors well in the dark? ... Miller answers questions about color blindness, whether it can be treated, and how people become color blind. ...

  15. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... programs with respect to blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual function, preservation of sight, and the special health problems and ... Health Information Frequently asked questions ...

  16. Making sense of sexual orientation measures: findings from a cognitive processing study with adolescents on health survey questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, S Bryn; Conron, Kerith; Patel, Aarti; Freedner, Naomi

    2007-01-01

    To carry out a study using cognitive processing interview methods to explore ways in which adolescents understand sexual orientation questions currently used on epidemiologic surveys. In-depth, individual interviews were conducted to probe cognitive processes involved in answering four self-report survey questions assessing sexual identity, sexual attraction, and sex of sexual partners.A semi-structured interview guide was used to explore variation in question interpretation, information retrieval patterns and problems, item clarity, valence of reactions to items (positive, negative, neutral), respondent burden, and perceived threat associated with the measures. Thirty adolescents aged 15 to 21 of diverse sexual orientations and race/ethnicities participated in the study, including female, male, and transgender youth. A question on sexual attraction was the most consistently understood and thus was easy for nearly all youth to answer. In contrast, a measure of sexual identity with options heterosexual, bisexual, gay/lesbian, and unsure was the most difficult to answer. Most preferred a sexual identity item that also provided the intermediate options mostly heterosexual and mostly homosexual, which many said reflected their experience of feeling between categories. Participants had varying and inconsistent interpretations of sexual behavior terms, such as sex and sexual intercourse, used in assessing the sex of sexual partners. Differences in understanding could affect interpretation of survey data in important ways. Development of valid measures of sexual orientation will be essential to better monitor health disparities.

  17. ASK Magazine; No. 21

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufer, Alexander (Editor); Little, Terry (Editor); Davis, Marty (Editor); Simmons, Jessica (Editor); Margolies, Donald (Editor); Goshorn, Larry (Editor)

    2005-01-01

    THIS ISSUE FEATURES A VISUAL DEPICTION OF THE ACADEMY of Program and Project Leadership (APPL). I imagine a variety of initial reactions to the drawing. One might be, "What is a cartoon doing in a magazine about project management?" Or perhaps, "Wow, nice colors-and fun." Another may be to closely search the image for signs, symbols and meaning. Still another, to read a new level of innovation and creativity into the picture. Undoubtedly, some readers will raise questions about the cost. Of course, any reaction is a sign of engagement. The stronger, the more energized the emotional and cognitive processing, the better. It is a sign of attention and interaction. For I've heard it said, "You only need to worry if they don t care one way or the other." So what is the point of the picture? To stimulate interest, raise questions, promote discussion, and maybe raise a smile.. .That, at least, was my initial reaction when I was introduced to the work of Nancy Hegedus, who helps to create these drawings for Root Learning Inc. At the NASA PM Conference, I was first shown the work Nancy had been doing with the help of Goddard s Knowledge Management Architect, Dr. Ed Rogers. I was immediately drawn into the power of visualization as a tool for more effective learning, communicating, and conveying complex knowledge concepts. We need new tools in today s world, where information and data overwhelms by sheer volume. There are articles, pamphlets, communications, and white papers-all aiming to convince and influence. Reactions to these tend to be either avoidance or mind-numbing, heavy-eyed consent; the message never registers or enters the soul. That s one of the reasons that APPL s Knowledge Sharing Initiative (KSI) has turned to storytelling as a memorable way of transfer- ring knowledge, inspiring imitation of best practices, and spurring reflection. ASK Magazine s recent fourth birthday marks an important milestone in APPL s continuing quest to provide ongoing support to

  18. Ask Teacher Joe!

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joseph DeVeto

    2005-01-01

    Hello Readers! Many people have sent me questions from all over China. Most of the questions, however, are far too general. For example, more than half of the questions I have received have been like this:

  19. My Questions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    I have many questions.I think hard and cannot find the answers.I wonder what the world is in reality.Is there any answer to the mystery of the world?I ask what it is like to be outside the earth.Are there any people on other planets1?How many planets are there in the universe?I wonder a lot about this and that.

  20. Web life: Ask Nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Ask Nature is a site devoted to biomimicry, an interdisciplinary field in which practitioners study how animals and plants solve problems, and then use those solutions to develop better human technologies.

  1. Thousand Questions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soon, Winnie; Pritchard, Helen

    2016-01-01

    In this work the network asks “If I wrote you a love letter would you write back?” Like the love letters which appeared mysteriously on the noticeboards of Manchester University’s Computer Department in the 1950s, thousands of texts circulate as computational processes perform the questions...... (perhaps as an expanded Turing test) on its listeners. These questions are extracted in real-time from Twitter with the keyword search of the ‘?’ symbol to create a spatio-temporal experience. The computerized voice the audience hears is a collective one, an entanglement of humans and non...

  2. Asking for a Commitment: Violations during the 2007 Match and the Effect on Applicant Rank Lists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hern, Gene H.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Applicants to residency face a number of difficult questions during the interview process, one of which is when a program asks for a commitment to rank the program highly. The regulations governing the National Resident Matching Program (NRMP match explicitly forbid any residency programs asking for a commitment. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of applicants from U.S. medical schools to five specialties during the 2006-2007 interview season using the Electronic Residency Application Service of the Association of American Medical Colleges. Applicants were asked to recall being asked to provide any sort of commitment (verbal or otherwise to rank a program highly. Surveys were sent after rank lists were submitted, but before match day. We analyzed data using descriptive statistics and logistic regression. Results: There were 7,028 unique responses out of 11,983 surveys sent for a response rate of 58.6%. Of those who identified their specialty (emergency medicine, internal medicine, obstetrics and gynecology [OBGYN], general surgery and orthopedics, there were 6,303 unique responders. Overall 19.6% (1380/7028 of all respondents were asked to commit to a program. Orthopedics had the highest overall prevalence at 28.9% (372/474, followed by OBGYN (23.7%; 180/759, general surgery (21.7%; 190/876, internal medicine (18.3%; 601/3278, and finally, emergency medicine (15.4%; 141/916. Of those responding, 38.4% stated such questions made them less likely to rank the program. Conclusion: Applicants to residencies are being asked questions expressly forbidden by the NRMP. Among the five specialties surveyed, orthopedics and OBGYN had the highest incidence of this violation. Asking for a commitment makes applicants less likely to rank a program highly. [West J Emerg Med. 2015;16(2:331-335.

  3. Surveys on attitudes towards legalisation of euthanasia: importance of question phrasing

    OpenAIRE

    Hagelin, J.; Nilstun, T.; Hau, J; Carlsson, H

    2004-01-01

    Methods: Results were compared from two different surveys in populations with similar characteristics. The alternatives "positive", "negative", and "don't know" (first questionnaire) were replaced with an explanatory text, "no legal sanction", four types of legal sanctions, and no possibility to answer "don't know" (second questionnaire). Four undergraduate student groups (engineering, law, medicine, and nursing) answered.

  4. Surveys on attitudes towards legalisation of euthanasia: importance of question phrasing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagelin, J; Nilstun, T; Hau, J; Carlsson, H

    2004-01-01

    Methods: Results were compared from two different surveys in populations with similar characteristics. The alternatives "positive", "negative", and "don't know" (first questionnaire) were replaced with an explanatory text, "no legal sanction", four types of legal sanctions, and no possibility to answer "don't know" (second questionnaire). Four undergraduate student groups (engineering, law, medicine, and nursing) answered. Results: In the first questionnaire (n = 684) 43% accepted euthanasia (range 28–50%), 14% (8–33%) did not, and 43% (39–59%) answered "don't know". Two per cent of the respondents declined to answer. In comparison with previous surveys on attitudes to euthanasia the proportion of "don't know" was large. The results of the second questionnaire (n = 639), showed that 38% favoured "no legal prosecution" (26–50%). However, 62% (50–74%) opted for different kinds of legal sanctions, and two of four groups expressed significantly different views in the two surveys. A proportion of 10% declined to answer the second questionnaire. Conclusion: An introduction of an explanatory text and a wider range of response alternatives produced differences between the results of the two surveys conducted. PMID:15574435

  5. New Survey Questions and Estimators for Network Clustering with Respondent-Driven Sampling Data

    CERN Document Server

    Verdery, Ashton M; Siripong, Nalyn; Abdesselam, Kahina; Bauldry, Shawn

    2016-01-01

    Respondent-driven sampling (RDS) is a popular method for sampling hard-to-survey populations that leverages social network connections through peer recruitment. While RDS is most frequently applied to estimate the prevalence of infections and risk behaviors of interest to public health, like HIV/AIDS or condom use, it is rarely used to draw inferences about the structural properties of social networks among such populations because it does not typically collect the necessary data. Drawing on recent advances in computer science, we introduce a set of data collection instruments and RDS estimators for network clustering, an important topological property that has been linked to a network's potential for diffusion of information, disease, and health behaviors. We use simulations to explore how these estimators, originally developed for random walk samples of computer networks, perform when applied to RDS samples with characteristics encountered in realistic field settings that depart from random walks. In partic...

  6. Anthropological and demographic dimensions of the Kurdish question: Findings from census and survey data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinan Zeyneloğlu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Within this study, demographic and anthropological differences between the Kurdish group and the rest of the Turkish population are presented while existing approaches on the Kurdish question based on economic and political factors are critically evaluated. Using results of the 1945 Census an inventory of all language groups in Turkey is given together with their respective ‘literacy rates’ and ‘prevalence of knowledge of Turkish’, which reveal temporal differences in terms of entrance into the demographic transition and give hints as to why some ethnic groups have adopted the Turkish identity while some other groups have remained outside the ‘Turkish core’. Recent data from the TDHS, on the other hand, is used to analyze ‘fertility’ and ‘prevalence of consanguineous marriages’ among the Kurdish population. While Kurds who use Turkish as either main or second language converge to the rest of the population in terms of both fertility decline and the matrilateral swing among consanguineous marriages, among Kurds who do not speak Turkish at all the mentioned rates increase in the opposite direction. The Turkish and Kurdish family structures are evaluated within the framework of Emmanuel Todd’s family types with special consideration on the effects of consanguineous marriages and the patrilateral inclination among these on the status of women.

  7. Homogenizing Responses to Different Survey Questions on the Same Topic: Proposal of a Scale Homogenization Method Using a Reference Distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jonge, Tineke; Veenhoven, Ruut; Arends, Lidia

    2014-01-01

    Survey data are often used for comparison purposes, such as comparisons across nations or comparisons over time. To be effective, this would require equivalent questions and equivalent responses options to the questions. Yet there is a lot of variation in the response scales used, which, for example, differ in the number of response options used and the labeling of these options. This is the case in happiness research, and as a result most of the research data in this field is incomparable. Several methods have been proposed to transform ratings on verbal response scales to a common numerical scale, typically ranging from 0 to 10. In this paper we give an overview of the progress made in those Scale Homogenization methods over time. We describe two early methods: Linear Stretch and the Semantic Judgement of Fixed Word Value Method. Next we discuss the Semantic Judgement of Word Value in Context Method in more detail. Based on these discussions we propose a new Reference Distribution Method. We apply the Semantic Judgement of Word Value in Context and the Reference Distribution Methods to data on happiness in The Netherlands for the years 1989-2009. We show that the Reference Distribution Method produces comparable time series on different questions and that it allows discontinuities in data to be corrected.

  8. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News from NEI Grantees Spokesperson bios Statistics and Data Resources for the media Pressroom Contacts Joe Balintfy - Media Lead joe.balintfy@nih.gov Anna Harper - Media Relations afh@nei.nih.gov NEI Office of Communications (301)496-5248 Health Information Frequently asked questions ...

  9. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... visual function, preservation of sight, and the special health problems and requirements of the blind.” News & Events Events Calendar NEI Press Releases News from NEI Grantees Spokesperson bios Statistics and ... Frequently asked questions Clinical Studies Publications Catalog ...

  10. Female Genital Mutilation in Sierra Leone: Forms, Reliability of Reported Status, and Accuracy of Related Demographic and Health Survey Questions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owolabi Bjälkander

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine forms of female genital mutilation (FGM, assess consistency between self-reported and observed FGM status, and assess the accuracy of Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS FGM questions in Sierra Leone. Methods. This cross-sectional study, conducted between October 2010 and April 2012, enrolled 558 females aged 12–47 from eleven antenatal clinics in northeast Sierra Leone. Data on demography, FGM status, and self-reported anatomical descriptions were collected. Genital inspection confirmed the occurrence and extent of cutting. Results. All participants reported FGM status; 4 refused genital inspection. Using the WHO classification of FGM, 31.7% had type Ib; 64.1% type IIb; and 4.2% type IIc. There was a high level of agreement between reported and observed FGM prevalence (81.2% and 81.4%, resp.. There was no correlation between DHS FGM responses and anatomic extent of cutting, as 2.7% reported pricking; 87.1% flesh removal; and 1.1% that genitalia was sewn closed. Conclusion. Types I and II are the main forms of FGM, with labia majora alterations in almost 5% of cases. Self-reports on FGM status could serve as a proxy measurement for FGM prevalence but not for FGM type. The DHS FGM questions are inaccurate for determining cutting extent.

  11. Questions and information systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lauer, Thomas W; Graesser, Arthur C

    2013-01-01

    The design and functioning of an information system improve to the extent that the system can handle the questions people ask. Surprisingly, however, researchers in the cognitive, computer, and information sciences have not thoroughly examined the multitude of relationships between information systems and questions -- both question asking and answering. The purpose of this book is to explicitly examine these relationships. Chapter contributors believe that questions play a central role in the analysis, design, and use of different kinds of natural or artificial information systems such as huma

  12. Translating Answers to Open-Ended Survey Questions in Cross-Cultural Research: A Case Study on the Interplay between Translation, Coding, and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behr, Dorothée

    2015-01-01

    Open-ended probing questions in cross-cultural surveys help uncover equivalence problems in cross-cultural survey research. For languages that a project team does not understand, probe answers need to be translated into a common project language. This article presents a case study on translating open-ended, that is, narrative answers. It describes…

  13. ASK Magazine. No. 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Todd (Editor); Laufer, Alexander (Editor); Collins, Michelle (Editor)

    2002-01-01

    What makes a successful team? In this issue our contributors look closely at the subject and come up with several answers. Working on team chemistry is the "Activation Energy" Dr. Owen Gadeken's story is about. Scott Cameron thinks it's getting to know people one to one. Tony Maturo says it's getting the most out of your support staff. Dr. Michael Hecht finds the best people he can and build the team around their talents. Teamwork is a theme we explore often in Academy Sharing Knowledge (ASK), but never so directly as in this issue. You'll not only find formulas for building successful teams, you'll see examples of ones in action, strategies for how project managers can motivate their teams, and expert advice on how to choose who to work with and who not to work with. It seems like all the stories make one common point: everyone on a team counts. Few project managers can pull off a project alone, and when the whole team is performing to everyone's potential, the chances of pulling off a successful project goes up exponentially. If that doesn't seem like enough by itself, listen to this... Discerning fans of ASK will note the last two issues our Special Feature was "There are no Mistakes, Only Lessons." We have not abandoned this feature, but for now we want to broaden our repertoire. In this issue we add a new Special Feature, "My Metaphor," starting with Paul Espinosa's article "My Big Wall" about his rock climbing adventures on El Capitan in Yosemite National Park. If you think getting to Mars is work, read what it's like to scale a 3,000-foot rock face. This issue we're also welcoming two new members to our Review Board, Hugh Woodward and Jody Kusek. Hugh and Jody are our first reviewers from outside NASA, and we are delighted to have them on our team. Read their bios on the ASK Review Board page and see why we feel privileged to have them on our team.

  14. Ask Teacher Joe!

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joseph DeVeto

    2005-01-01

    I have a question for you. I have read these two sentences ""Two icecreams, please."" and ""Is there any ice cream in the refrigerator?"" Could you tell me whether ""ice cream"" is a countable noun or uncountable noun? I'm looking forward to your answer. Thank you.

  15. Ask Teacher Joe!

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joseph DeVeto

    2005-01-01

    Question: Hi Teacher Joe. I read your ideas about using dictations in the August issue of College English. It seems like a good way to improve my listening skills while also learning new vocabulary and sentences. Sometimes, however, I don't know if I should listen word by word, sentence by sentence, or paragraph by paragraph. Can you give me any suggestions? Thanks!

  16. Ask Teacher Joe!

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joseph DeVeto

    2005-01-01

    @@ Question: Hello Teacher Joe. I have just read College English and am really interested in your helpful answers. Now I need your help - I really want to know how to improve reading comprehension. Is doing practice more helpful than remembering vocabulary? I am looking forward to hearing from you. Thank you!

  17. Ask the Experts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Two science questions are answered: (1) How can someone have one brown eye and one blue eye?, and (2) Why are magnets attracted to some metals, but not all metals? It is very rare that a human will have two irises of different colors. This condition, heterochromia, can be a normal variant or the result of an ocular disease. Heterochromia can…

  18. Ask Teacher Joe!

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joseph DeVeto

    2005-01-01

    Question: Dear Teacher Joe, I hope you can help me find a word that is not in my dictionary. My father's elder brother married a woman from Australia. Now she is coming to China, but I don't know what to call her in English. In Chinese, we say bomu which means ""auntie"". I want to know how to correctly talk to her.

  19. Is the Lack of Specific Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer/Questioning (LGBTQ) Health Care Education in Medical School a Cause for Concern? Evidence From a Survey of Knowledge and Practice Among UK Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parameshwaran, Vishnu; Cockbain, Beatrice C; Hillyard, Miriam; Price, Jonathan R

    2017-01-01

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer/questioning (LGBTQ) people frequently report negative health care encounters. Medical professionals may inadequately manage LGBTQ persons' health if they have not received training in this area. An anonymous survey measuring efficacy in health situations among LGBTQ persons was answered by 166 medical students across all years of a UK university. Results show that 84.9% of participants reported a lack of LGBTQ health care education, with deficits in confidence clarifying unfamiliar sexual and gender terms, deciding the ward in which to nurse transgender patients, finding support resources, and discussing domestic abuse with LGBTQ patients. Most participants reported that they would not clarify gender pronouns or ask about gender or sexual identity in mental health or reproductive health settings. Participants reported infrequently observing doctors making similar inquiries. Participants held positive attitudes toward LGBTQ patients, with attitude scores positively correlating with LGBTQ terminology knowledge scores (rs = 0.5052, p LGBTQ patients.

  20. Competitors' Perceptions of Questions in Individual Events Rounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Daniel; Pettus, Ann Burnett

    A study investigated student competitors' opinions of the practice of judges asking questions of competitors at the conclusion of speeches in the individual events competiton at forensic tournaments. Surveys were completed by 52 final round student competitors at a large midwestern university individual events invitational tournament. Results…

  1. Asking the Right Questions: Action Learning and PMT 401

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    program aimed at improving leadership , critical thinking, problem solving and decision­making skills . Participants in this rigorous, in­residence...problem • Skill Development • Urgent and complex problems requiring unique systems thinking • Groups charged with implementing the solution as...is used the world over by business and organizations of all sorts, in the public and private sectors, and makes significant contributions to the

  2. 49 CFR Appendix C to Part 604 - Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... transit agency proposes to provide an express shuttle service to football games, it should look at the... provider 14 days to respond to the notice. Under pressure to begin the service sooner, the transit agency... public transportation) and if the registered charter provider signs an appropriate use and...

  3. Multimedia Learning: Are We Still Asking the Wrong Questions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Gunter Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The article discusses problems that arise from comparing different kinds of presentation modes such as texts, pictures or animations with regard to learning outcome. These comparisons are confounded with or depend on other variables like quality of the instructional design, learning content, familiarity with the presentation mode as well as…

  4. Newborn Screening (NBS): Answers to Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... here . What if I don't have the money to purchase Additional Newborn Screening? If you have ... may not know about it. Be prepared to supply your doctor with information. For information to give ...

  5. Prosthetic Frequently Asked Questions for the New Amputee

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources State Resource Map Pain Management Information Publications Materiales en español / Spanish Materials Support Groups & Peer Support ... Resources State Resource Map Pain Management Information Publications Materiales en español / Spanish Materials Support Groups & Peer Support ...

  6. Frequently Asked Questions about Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Outcomes for Patients with Spasticity: Improving Assessment and Maximizing Intervention Options General Information Mobile App Why You ... New Look, New Features Medicare Resources Diversifying Practice Revenue Advocacy Federal Health Care Reform Better Care Reconciliation ...

  7. Questions Students Ask: What Causes Total Internal Reflection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giancoli, Douglas

    1983-01-01

    Provides a detailed, non-mathematical analysis of total internal reflection based on the interaction of light and matter and the principle of superposition. Discusses factors affecting the critical angle and the percent of the incident beam that is refracted and reflected. (JM)

  8. Asking the Right Questions: A Framework for Assessing Counterterrorism Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    services distributed among the population?  How is employment distributed among the population?  What is the level of access to health care...Human_Development_Index)  World Happiness Report (see: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_Happiness_Report) What is the level of employment/unemployment

  9. MedlinePlus Connect: Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CMS programs requiring the use of certified EHR technology. The National Library of Medicine does not make or interpret CMS quality program ... Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) or contact ... National Library of Medicine, part of the National Institutes of Health, maintains ...

  10. Questions never asked. Positive family outcomes of extremely premature childbirth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lou, Hanne; Pedersen, Birthe D; Hedegaard, Morten

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore positive aspects of family life after extremely premature childbirth, thereby supplementing current literature on long-term family outcome. DESIGN: Semi-structured, qualitative research interviews were analysed according to the editing strategy described by Miller and Crabtree...... lend to future research on family outcome, as well as the balance they may offer in the information provided to parents of premature children....

  11. Asking Better Questions: How Presentation Formats Influence Information Search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Charley M; Meder, Björn; Filimon, Flavia; Nelson, Jonathan D

    2017-03-20

    While the influence of presentation formats have been widely studied in Bayesian reasoning tasks, we present the first systematic investigation of how presentation formats influence information search decisions. Four experiments were conducted across different probabilistic environments, where subjects (N = 2,858) chose between 2 possible search queries, each with binary probabilistic outcomes, with the goal of maximizing classification accuracy. We studied 14 different numerical and visual formats for presenting information about the search environment, constructed across 6 design features that have been prominently related to improvements in Bayesian reasoning accuracy (natural frequencies, posteriors, complement, spatial extent, countability, and part-to-whole information). The posterior variants of the icon array and bar graph formats led to the highest proportion of correct responses, and were substantially better than the standard probability format. Results suggest that presenting information in terms of posterior probabilities and visualizing natural frequencies using spatial extent (a perceptual feature) were especially helpful in guiding search decisions, although environments with a mixture of probabilistic and certain outcomes were challenging across all formats. Subjects who made more accurate probability judgments did not perform better on the search task, suggesting that simple decision heuristics may be used to make search decisions without explicitly applying Bayesian inference to compute probabilities. We propose a new take-the-difference (TTD) heuristic that identifies the accuracy-maximizing query without explicit computation of posterior probabilities. (PsycINFO Database Record

  12. Shoot first, ask questions later: Interpretative narratives of Neanderthal hunting

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Mark; Pettitt, Paul; Schreve, Danielle

    2016-05-01

    This paper examines the hunting strategies employed by Neanderthals at a series of kill or near-kill sites from the Middle Palaeolithic of Europe (Mauran, La Borde, Taubach, Zwoleń and Salzgitter Lebenstedt). Using palaeolandscape reconstructions and animal ethology as our context, we adopt a multifaceted approach that views hunting as a chaîne opératoire involving the decisions and actions of both the hunter and the hunted, which together help reconstruct a forensic picture of past events as they unfolded. Our conclusions indicate that Neanderthals did not necessarily pre-select individuals from a herd, who they then isolated, pursued and killed, but rather ambushed whole groups, which they slaughtered indiscriminately. There is strong evidence, however, that Neanderthals were highly selective in the carcasses they then chose to process. Our conclusions suggest that Neanderthals were excellent tacticians, casual executioners and discerning diners.

  13. Nutrition and dementia: are we asking the right questions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Thomas B; Rogers, Eugene; Remington, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) has no cure or nullifying pharmacological interventions. Nutritional supplementation represents a systemic approach that in some studies has provided benefit and has augmented pharmacological approaches. However, additional studies report no benefit of supplementation. We review herein how studies of nutrition on dementia, including those combining nutrition and dementia, are inherently compromised. We also review studies with mice, which demonstrate that nutritional supplementation can alleviate multiple genetic risk factors for AD. An individual diagnosed with AD has by definition undergone considerable cognitive decline; anticipating restoration/maintenance of cognitive performance following nutritional supplementation alone may be misdirected. Nutrition declines in aging, and even more so in AD. While optimization of nutrition should ideally be initiated well before any cognitive decline, we present evidence that the systemic benefit alone of nutritional supplementation at the very minimum warrants initiation along with pharmacological intervention.

  14. Hepatitis C: Questions to Ask Your Doctor about Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care Apply Online Application Process Veteran Eligibility Active Duty Families of Veterans Women Veterans Determine Costs Copays ... VHA Forms & Publications Quality & Safety Quality of Care Ethics VA/DOD Clinical Practice Guidelines Access and Quality ...

  15. Hepatitis C: Questions to Ask Your Doctor about Your Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care Apply Online Application Process Veteran Eligibility Active Duty Families of Veterans Women Veterans Determine Costs Copays ... VHA Forms & Publications Quality & Safety Quality of Care Ethics VA/DOD Clinical Practice Guidelines Access and Quality ...

  16. Frequently Asked Questions about Monitored Natural Attenuation in Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Technology 2001, 35(19): 3884-3891. (167) Lee, W.; Batchelor, B., Abiotic Reductive Dechlorination of Chlorinated Ethylenes by Iron-Bearing Soil...MNA was inspired by the fact that it has been over a decade since publication of Natu10l Attenuation of Fuels and Chlorinated Sol~~ents15 which was...effect, MNA is typically a component of every chlorinated -solvent site remedy. (ITRC Integrated DNAPL Strategy Guidance, 20 II, citing ITRC’s

  17. Answers to Frequently Asked Questions about Interactive Writing. Classroom Connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Justina; Wiley, Barbara Joan

    1999-01-01

    Interactive writing is a term coined by a research group of faculty members from the Ohio State University and teachers from the Columbus Public Schools. The group examined Moira McKenzie's (1985) work in shared writing and adopted the approach as having power in helping children understand the writing process. They varied the approach with a…

  18. Waging War with Civilians: Asking the Unanswered Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    traditional DOD employees and contracted civilians?22 After  meeting  the  provisions  of  the  US legal   system , we may not solve many difficul­ ties...soldier? Will the current US  legal system  allow the presence of civilians in com­ bat  but  prevent  their  suing  the  US  govern­ ment at every

  19. Signs of Bullying: Important Questions for Parents to Ask

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... size, age, political advantage, economic advantage or social advantage. Bullying is common, happening every seven seconds to a child in the U.S. It reaches victims in school and online via social media apps and programs like Instagram, SnapChat, WhatsApp, Burn ...

  20. Ask Good Questions by Starting with Key Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyek-Franssen, Deborah; Briggs, Charlotte

    2008-01-01

    Assessing campus needs for educational technologies and support is no small undertaking, so ensuring that one collects information that truly will help decision making requires careful planning. Data collection can be time-consuming and expensive. A well-organized educational technology needs assessment should add value to campus IT resources, not…

  1. Commonly Asked Questions about Children and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... EKG), echocardiography (ultrasound of the heart), 24-hour Holter monitoring, stress testing, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... to a cardiologist. Another test is called a Holter monitor. It records an EKG continuously for 24 ...

  2. Frequently Asked Questions about ALS and the ALS Registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Muscular Dystrophy Association (www.mda.org) The Les Turner ALS Foundation (www.lesturnerals.org) Back to Top ... als. Back to Top Why was incidence (new cases of ALS) not provided in the report? Date of diagnosis is needed to calculate incidence. ...

  3. Frequently Asked Questions about Genetic and Genomic Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... acute lymphoblastic leukemia [cancer.gov] is stem cell transplantation therapy. There has been much debate nationally about the use of embryonic stem cells, especially about the creation of human embryos for use in experiments. In 1995, Congress enacted ...

  4. Simulation in the Service of Design - Asking the Right Questions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donn, Michael; Selkowitz, Stephen; Bordass, Bill

    2009-03-01

    This paper proposes an approach to the creation of design tools that address the real information needs of designers in the early stages of design of nonresidential buildings. Traditional simplified design tools are typically too limited to be of much use, even in conceptual design. The proposal is to provide access to the power of detailed simulation tools, at a stage in design when little is known about the final building, but at a stage also when the freedom to explore options is greatest. The proposed approach to tool design has been derived from consultation with design analysis teams as part of the COMFEN tool development. The paper explores how tools like COMFEN have been shaped by this consultation and how requests from these teams for real-world relevance might shape such tools in the future, drawing into the simulation process the lessons from Post Occupancy Evaluation (POE) of buildings.

  5. Twelve Frequently Asked Questions about Growth Curve Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Patrick J.; Obeidat, Khawla; Losardo, Diane

    2010-01-01

    Longitudinal data analysis has long played a significant role in empirical research within the developmental sciences. The past decade has given rise to a host of new and exciting analytic methods for studying between-person differences in within-person change. These methods are broadly organized under the term "growth curve models." The…

  6. 40 CFR Appendix I to Part 310 - Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS REIMBURSEMENT TO LOCAL GOVERNMENTS FOR EMERGENCY... emergency measures. Providing bottled water on a temporary emergency basis is reimbursable. (§ 310.10(a)) (6) What if EPA gets too many applications in one year? In the beginning of the program, there was...

  7. Frequently Asked Questions about Drug Testing in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Anabolic) Synthetic Cannabinoids (K2/Spice) Synthetic Cathinones (Bath Salts) Tobacco/Nicotine Other Drugs Related Topics Addiction Science Adolescent Brain Comorbidity College-Age & Young Adults ...

  8. Question Order Affects the Measurement of Bullying Victimization among Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Francis L.; Cornell, Dewey G.

    2016-01-01

    Bullying among youth is recognized as a serious student problem, especially in middle school. The most common approach to measuring bullying is through student self-report surveys that ask questions about different types of bullying victimization. Although prior studies have shown that question-order effects may influence participant responses, no…

  9. Question Order Affects the Measurement of Bullying Victimization among Middle School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Francis L.; Cornell, Dewey G.

    2016-01-01

    Bullying among youth is recognized as a serious student problem, especially in middle school. The most common approach to measuring bullying is through student self-report surveys that ask questions about different types of bullying victimization. Although prior studies have shown that question-order effects may influence participant responses, no…

  10. Ask Teacher Joe!

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joseph DeVeto

    2005-01-01

    Question: Dear Teacher Joe, I am a second year student of Hohai University. Although English is not my specialty, I like it very much. In the coming days, I will take a national English test. I have taken this test before but I was not satisfied with my score. The biggest problem with the test is that I am not able to keep up with BBC English. I hope you can give advice on how to improve my listening skills. Also, please recommend some good listening materials to me. I'm looking forward to your answer.

  11. Ask Teacher Joe!

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Joseph DeVeto

    2005-01-01

    Question: Hello, Teacher Joe. I am a university student preparing for the CET4, but now I am so puzzled. You have said that reading is the best way to learn new words, much more effective than just reading a dictionary. I agre ewith you, as reading a dictionary often makes me forget the words. But, in what way can reading help me to pass the CET4? The test contains many new words that I have never seen. How should I prepare for it?

  12. Question-asking in brazilian portuguese reading comprehension textbooks Question-asking in brazilian portuguese reading comprehension textbooks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Oliveira

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available “The proper business of school is to teach students to think!” has been the most widespread cliché in education over the last two decades (Squire, 1983; Paris, Lipson & Wixson, 1983; Spires et alli, 1993; Littlewood, 1996; Collins, 1998; Yang, 1998; Shneiderman, 1998. That is the bad news. In fact, despite all the rhetoric surrounding the major role assigned to education, the reality is that it is still struggling in the midst of a fundamental shift. The good news is that the cliché has a good chance to become more and more tangible among educators, materials designers and policy makers, who are starting to realise that in today’s Knowledge Era to think [critically] represents an asset which drastically shifts the traditional paradigms of power. Without a doubt, a learning environment which gives priority to the training of skills aiming at making students become critical thinkers can create and strengthen vantages of independence and autonomy for the students/future citizens belonging to that environment. “The proper business of school is to teach students to think!” has been the most widespread cliché in education over the last two decades (Squire, 1983; Paris, Lipson & Wixson, 1983; Spires et alli, 1993; Littlewood, 1996; Collins, 1998; Yang, 1998; Shneiderman, 1998. That is the bad news. In fact, despite all the rhetoric surrounding the major role assigned to education, the reality is that it is still struggling in the midst of a fundamental shift. The good news is that the cliché has a good chance to become more and more tangible among educators, materials designers and policy makers, who are starting to realise that in today’s Knowledge Era to think [critically] represents an asset which drastically shifts the traditional paradigms of power. Without a doubt, a learning environment which gives priority to the training of skills aiming at making students become critical thinkers can create and strengthen vantages of independence and autonomy for the students/future citizens belonging to that environment.

  13. Pittsburgh American Community Survey Data 2015 - Household Types

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — The data on relationship to householder were derived from answers to Question 2 in the 2015 American Community Survey (ACS), which was asked of all people in...

  14. PENERAPAN METODE SURVEY, QUESTION, READ, RECITE, REVIEW (SQ3R UNTUK MENINGKATKAN PEMAHAMAN MAHASISWA PADA KONSEP MANAJEMEN SUMBERDAYA MANUSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harnanik Harnanik

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Students need to understand the concepts of Human Resources Management (HRM because it is very useful in the job world. Unfotunately, the fact showed that students were less enhusiastic in teaching and learning process of the subject. The promblem of this research was: 1 did the SQ3R method improve students’ understanding to the concept of HRM? Thus; the objective of the research was: 1 to improve the quality of HRM learning, to improve students’ enthusiasm in learning the subject, to upgrade the lecturer’s skill in developing the learning model media also to improve students’ achievement. It was a class action researchconsisted of three cycles. The result of research showed that the students’ achievement were better on each cycle. The complete learning before applying the SQ3R methode was only 0%. It increased up to 8% after applying the SQ3R methode. Furthermore, the students’ enthusiasm, livelinnes and cooperation (the ranges are among 1-4 were at good category (3.2. Similarly, the result averages of the lecturer’s skill in teaching HRM were 3.2 from the 1st cycle, 2nd cycle, and 3rd cycle by applying the SQ3R method. Based on the results above, it is suggested: 1 for the lecturers of HRM to implement the SQ3R method in teaching the subject since the method can improve students’ ability and understanding. The method gives opportunity for students to do survey, compile questions, read literature, review the concept, and discuss to other students. 2 for other researchers to continue this research on other subjects or other students.

  15. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Colorectal Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staging What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Colorectal Cancer? It’s important to have frank, open discussions with ... these questions: When you’re told you have colorectal cancer Where is the cancer located? Has the cancer ...

  16. Using oxygen at home - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000251.htm Using oxygen at home - what to ask your doctor To ... lungs or heart, you will need to use oxygen in your home. Below are questions you may ...

  17. The usefulness of the Basic Question Procedure for determining non-response bias in substantive variables - A test of four telephone questionnaires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goor, Henk; van Goor, Annemiek

    2007-01-01

    The Basic Question Procedure (BQP) is a method for determining non-response bias. The BQP involves asking one basic question - that is, the question relating to the central substantive variable of the study - of those persons who refuse to participate in the survey. We studied the usefulness of this

  18. Pooling Time Series Based on Slightly Different Questions About the Same Topic Forty Years of Survey Research on Happiness and Life Satisfaction in The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJonge, Tineke; Veenhoven, Ruut; Kalmijn, Wim; Arends, Lidia

    Survey research on subjective wellbeing in The Netherlands started in the early 1970s. The time series happiness and life satisfaction that have emerged since then are unfortunately based on slightly different survey items of which one part uses verbal response scales and another part uses numerical response scales. The diversity of the survey items and a number of other measurement issues, such as the effects of changes in survey mode, hamper comparison over time and make it difficult to establish whether life became any better over the last forty years. These problems can be tackled using the recently developed Reference Distribution Method with which responses to equivalent but not identical survey questions can be pooled to obtain long, consistent time series. We applied the Reference Distribution method to pool time series of happiness and life satisfaction. We conclude that in the past 40 years the Dutch have become slightly happier and satisfied with their lives.

  19. The Forum State of the Field Survey 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreutzer, Kim

    2012-01-01

    In the summer of 2011, the Forum on Education Abroad conducted its fourth State of the Field Survey. This survey is an annual or biannual assessment of the very latest trends and issues in the field of education abroad. As in the past, questions on new topics have been combined with questions that have been asked on previous State of the Field…

  20. The Hermeneutics of Educational Questioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Charles

    2005-01-01

    This article looks at the practice of educational questioning using the philosophical hermeneutics of Hans-Georg Gadamer. It first looks at questions and statements from a hermeneutic perspective, demonstrating some of the differences and similarities between the two. It then details Gadamer's notion of the "true question", asking whether it is…

  1. The Hermeneutics of Educational Questioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Charles

    2005-01-01

    This article looks at the practice of educational questioning using the philosophical hermeneutics of Hans-Georg Gadamer. It first looks at questions and statements from a hermeneutic perspective, demonstrating some of the differences and similarities between the two. It then details Gadamer's notion of the "true question", asking whether it is…

  2. Climate Leadership Awards Frequent Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provides answers to frequently asked questions regarding the Climate Leadership Awards, sponsored by EPA's Center for Corporate Climate Leadership with co-sponsorship from the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions and The Climate Registry.

  3. Policy Implications for Local Application of the 2009 Youth Risk Behavior Survey, Duval County, Florida

    OpenAIRE

    Livingood, William C.; Bryant, Thomas; Bowles, Kathy; Bell, Dale; LaVine, Marcy; Kane, Rick; Butterfield, Ryan; Luminita, Razaila; Filipowicz, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) data have rarely been analyzed at the subcounty level. The purpose of this study was to explore the feasibility of such analysis and its potential to inform local policy and resource allocation. Methods We administered the 2009 YRBS to 5,860 students from 46 public middle and high schools in Duval County, Florida. In addition to asking core questions, we asked a set of questions customized for local needs, including questions about zip codes. The...

  4. Art of Question in English Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩雪

    2009-01-01

    A language is the tool of human communication. English teaching is really not a way to input or output information-it is not an one-way transmission of information. Students must personally think, speak and write what they are taught. That is the practical features of English teaching. Questioning is one of important methods which embody this feature completely. Teachers apply asking questions to enlighten and stimulate students in order to perfect this vital importance. Students who are in middle schools are asked questions but do not give answers. Except for learners' own quality and degree of difficulty of questions, it is connected with teachers' quality of asking questions.

  5. Dementia - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about dementia; Alzheimer disease - what to ask your doctor; Cognitive impairment - what to ask your doctor ... who is losing or has lost their memory? What type of words should I use? What is ...

  6. Epilepsy - what to ask your doctor - adult

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about epilepsy - adult; Seizures - what to ask your doctor - adult; Seizure - what to ask your doctor ... call to find more information about driving and epilepsy? What should I discuss with my boss at ...

  7. Using Short Dietary Questions to Develop Indicators of Dietary Behaviour for Use in Surveys Exploring Attitudinal and/or Behavioural Aspects of Dietary Choices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Daly

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available For countries where nutrition surveys are infrequent, there is a need to have some measure of healthful eating to plan and evaluate interventions. This study shows how it is possible to develop healthful eating indicators based on dietary guidelines from a cross sectional population survey. Adults 18 to 64 years answered questions about the type and amount of foods eaten the previous day, including fruit, vegetables, cereals, dairy, fish or meat and fluids. Scores were based on serves and types of food according to an established method. Factor analysis indicated two factors, confirmed by structural equation modeling: a recommended food healthful eating indicator (RF_HEI and a discretionary food healthful eating indicator (DF_HEI. Both yield mean scores similar to an established dietary index validated against nutrient intake. Significant associations for the RF_HEI were education, income, ability to save, and attitude toward diet; and for the DF_HEI, gender, not living alone, living in a socially disadvantaged area, and attitude toward diet. The results confirm that short dietary questions can be used to develop healthful eating indicators against dietary recommendations. This will enable the exploration of dietary behaviours for “at risk” groups, such as those with excess weight, leading to more relevant interventions for populations.

  8. Eight Questions about Corruption

    OpenAIRE

    Jakob Svensson

    2005-01-01

    This paper will discuss eight frequently asked questions about public corruption: (1) What is corruption? (2) Which countries are the most corrupt? (3) What are the common characteristics of countries with high corruption? (4) What is the magnitude of corruption? (5) Do higher wages for bureaucrats reduce corruption? (6) Can competition reduce corruption? (7) Why have there been so few (recent) successful attempts to fight corruption? (8) Does corruption adversely affect growth?

  9. Surveying Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Stig

    2009-01-01

    In relation to surveying education there is one big question to be asked: Is the role of the surveyors changing? In a global perspective the answer will be "Yes". There is a big swing that could be entitled "From Measurement to Management". This does not imply that measurement is no longer a rele...... on an efficient interaction between education, research, and professional practice.......In relation to surveying education there is one big question to be asked: Is the role of the surveyors changing? In a global perspective the answer will be "Yes". There is a big swing that could be entitled "From Measurement to Management". This does not imply that measurement is no longer....... In surveying education there are a range of other challenges to be faced. These relate to the focus on learning to learn; the need for flexible curriculum to deal with constant change; the move towards introducing virtual academy; the demand for creating a quality culture; and the perspective of lifelong...

  10. Questions That Engage Students in Mathematical Thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilaria, Daniel R.

    Teacher questions are an important part of a student-inquiry classroom. This research examines two different student-centered settings to determine the teacher questions that engaged students in mathematical thinking. It reports on questions asked in both a research setting and a high school classroom. Discursive and retracing questions are…

  11. Tag Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, David

    2015-01-01

    "Changing English" is a new feature in "ELT Journal" which aims to illustrate the diversity of English in the world today and to ask whether, and how, ELT practitioners might accommodate such variation. Focusing on a particular language issue in each article, the series will explore how English varies between places and spaces,…

  12. What's the Harm in Asking about Suicidal Ideation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathias, Charles W.; Furr, Michael; Sheftall, Arielle H.; Hill-Kapturczak, Nathalie; Crum, Paige; Dougherty, Donald M.

    2012-01-01

    Both researchers and oversight committees share concerns about patient safety in the study-related assessment of suicidality. However, concern about assessing suicidal thoughts can be a barrier to the development of empirical evidence that informs research on how to safely conduct these assessments. A question has been raised if asking about…

  13. Act 7 Ask for Commitment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Duane Sparks

    2008-01-01

    <正>"If you ask for commitment and don’t get it,what you’ll get instead will be either a stall or an objection,"he said."Handling those has always been the toughest part of my job,"Matt admitted."This is the point where every other sales system I know sort of kicks me outside the boundaries of the process and says,‘Here are some gimmicks to fall back on.’How does Action Selling want me to deal with stalls and objections?""To begin with,stop thinking of them as different names for the same thing,"Joe replied."Action Selling says that stalls and objections are two entirely different animals,and they call for A stall means the customer is not quite sold yet but has no

  14. Trick questions: cosmopolitan hospitality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleanor Byrne

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Byrne’s paper consists of two parallel texts. The first explores the limits of cosmopolitanism in practice, taking as its subject the Life in the UK Citizenship Test, inaugurated under the Labour Government in 2005. It argues that the test exemplifies the predicament of all attempts at cosmopolitan hospitality as unconditional welcoming, through a discussion of the relation between questioning and welcoming the stranger. Establishing the relationship between cosmopolitanism and hospitality as envisaged in Derrida’s reading of Kant it asks what kind of cosmopolitan hospitality is either possible or desirable by exploring what Derrida calls the ‘perversions’ inherent in the structures of hospitality. It focuses on the concept of the ‘trick questions’ that the state asks the foreigner observed by Derrida in his reading of The Apology of Socrates; questions that seem to invite answers but foreclose the possibilities of a free response. The second text asks how this logic that Derrida identifies can be pushed or coaxed into new ways of addressing the perceived threats of ‘unconditional’ hospitality through a reading of ‘unconditional hospitality’ as queer in the work of Tove Jansson.

  15. Curiosity Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelsen, Jane; DeLorenzo, Chip

    2010-01-01

    Have you ever found yourself lecturing a child, with the best of intentions, in an attempt to help him or her learn a lesson or process a situation in a manner that you feel will be productive? Curiosity questions, which the authors also call What and How questions, help children process an experience, event, or natural consequence so that they…

  16. A Comparison of the Cheater Detection and the Unrelated Question Models: A Randomized Response Survey on Physical and Cognitive Doping in Recreational Triathletes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes Schröter

    Full Text Available This study assessed the prevalence of physical and cognitive doping in recreational triathletes with two different randomized response models, that is, the Cheater Detection Model (CDM and the Unrelated Question Model (UQM. Since both models have been employed in assessing doping, the major objective of this study was to investigate whether the estimates of these two models converge.An anonymous questionnaire was distributed to 2,967 athletes at two triathlon events (Frankfurt and Wiesbaden, Germany. Doping behavior was assessed either with the CDM (Frankfurt sample, one Wiesbaden subsample or the UQM (one Wiesbaden subsample. A generalized likelihood-ratio test was employed to check whether the prevalence estimates differed significantly between models. In addition, we compared the prevalence rates of the present survey with those of a previous study on a comparable sample.After exclusion of incomplete questionnaires and outliers, the data of 2,017 athletes entered the final data analysis. Twelve-month prevalence for physical doping ranged from 4% (Wiesbaden, CDM and UQM to 12% (Frankfurt CDM, and for cognitive doping from 1% (Wiesbaden, CDM to 9% (Frankfurt CDM. The generalized likelihood-ratio test indicated no differences in prevalence rates between the two methods. Furthermore, there were no significant differences in prevalences between the present (undertaken in 2014 and the previous survey (undertaken in 2011, although the estimates tended to be smaller in the present survey.The results suggest that the two models can provide converging prevalence estimates. The high rate of cheaters estimated by the CDM, however, suggests that the present results must be seen as a lower bound and that the true prevalence of doping might be considerably higher.

  17. Design and evaluation of a teaching strategy for teaching to ask

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Antonio Chamizo Guerrero

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, after a literature review it was characterized the questions in open and closed. Later a teaching strategy that allows high school students learn to ask open-ended questions was designed. The strategy included lectures, experiments and visits. Finally we carried out an intervention with various groups. The results show that it is possible to teach to ask open-ended questions, those that characterize scientific thinking skills.

  18. Inspiring Sustainable Behaviour 19 Ways to Ask for Change

    CERN Document Server

    Payne, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    What is the answer to inspiring sustainable behaviour? It starts with a question - or nineteen. With this simple and inspiring guide you'll learn how to ask for persistent, pervasive, and near-costless change by uncovering our hidden quirks, judgmental biases, and apparent irrationalities.  The only change you'll need to make is how you ask.Businesses, larger or small, will soon have to cut costs and cut carbon, irrespective of the products they sell, or the services they perform. National government has structural policy and legislative needs, and local government has implementation and docum

  19. Concussion - what to ask your doctor - child

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about concussion - child; Mild brain injury - what to ask your doctor - child ... school people I should tell about my child's concussion? Can my child stay for a full day? ...

  20. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... NEI for Kids > Ask a Scientist Video Series All About Vision About the Eye Ask a Scientist ... have eyelids? Click to Watch Why don’t all animal eyes look the same? Click to Watch ...

  1. Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis: Ask the Experts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tetanus, Pertussis Ask the Experts: Diseases & Vaccines Diphtheria, Tetanus, Pertussis Ask the Experts Home Combination Vaccines Diphtheria ... have died. How many doses of pediatric diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis (DTaP) vaccine does an infant need ...

  2. Enlarged prostate - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about enlarged prostate; Benign prostatic hypertrophy - what to ask your doctor; BPH - what to ... nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23234640 . Roehrborn CG. Benign prostatic hyperplasia: Etiology, pathophysiology, epidemiology, and natural history. In: Wein ...

  3. Ask a Librarian: Florida's Virtual Reference Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, Diana

    2004-01-01

    Florida's Ask a Librarian service (http://www.askalibrarian.org) brings virtual reference to users at their moment of need via the Internet. Ask a Librarian is a growing service with 76 participating libraries including public, school, four-year, and community college libraries. The following article describes how Ask a Librarian was developed…

  4. Sexual Abuse in Irritable Bowel Syndrome: To Ask or Not to Ask – That Is the Question

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Ilnyckyj

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is a common and costly disorder in Canada. The paucity of medical treatment underscores the importance of examining every element of the management approach. Data exist supporting an increased prevalence of abuse among individuals with IBS. Importantly, the pathophysiology underlying the link between abuse and IBS is increasingly understood. Treatment recommendations by opinion leaders support an abuse inquiry. However, many clinicians view abuse inquiry as an ethical dilemma.

  5. Questions and Answers About Nuclear Power Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC.

    This pamphlet is designed to answer many of the questions that have arisen about nuclear power plants and the environment. It is organized into a question and answer format, with the questions taken from those most often asked by the public. Topics include regulation of nuclear power sources, potential dangers to people's health, whether nuclear…

  6. Critical Questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthy, Jo; Hoffman, James V.

    1998-01-01

    Offers responses from four readers of this journal, all reading and/or classroom teachers, to a question posed by another teacher: whether children who have had limited literacy experiences should start reading in whole-language readers and/or trade books or whether they should start in controlled-vocabulary preprimers. (SR)

  7. Thousand Questions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    (perhaps as an expanded Turing test) on its listeners. These questions are extracted in real-time from Twitter with the keyword search of the ‘?’ symbol to create a spatio-temporal experience. The computerized voice the audience hears is a collective one, an entanglement of humans and non...

  8. Questions about elastic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Engelbrecht, Jüri

    2015-01-01

    This book addresses the modelling of mechanical waves by asking the right questions about them and trying to find suitable answers. The questions follow the analytical sequence from elementary understandings to complicated cases, following a step-by-step path towards increased knowledge. The focus is on waves in elastic solids, although some examples also concern non-conservative cases for the sake of completeness. Special attention is paid to the understanding of the influence of microstructure, nonlinearity and internal variables in continua. With the help of many mathematical models for describing waves, physical phenomena concerning wave dispersion, nonlinear effects, emergence of solitary waves, scales and hierarchies of waves as well as the governing physical parameters are analysed. Also, the energy balance in waves and non-conservative models with energy influx are discussed. Finally, all answers are interwoven into the canvas of complexity.

  9. Questions, Curiosity and the Inquiry Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Leo

    2014-01-01

    This article discusses the conceptual relationship between questions, curiosity and learning as inquiry elaborated in the work of Chip Bruce and others as the Inquiry Cycle. The Inquiry Cycle describes learning in terms of a continuous dynamic of ask, investigate, create, discuss and reflect. Of these elements "ask" has a privileged…

  10. 101 questions on corals: Towards awareness

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Wafar, M.V.M.; Wafar, S.

    to nature and man-made changes, in every stakeholder, from local population through tourists to managers. This book serves such a purpose by answering most of the questions we ask everyday about corals and reefs....

  11. IT and Activity Displacement: Behavioral Evidence from the U.S. General Social Survey (GSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, John P.; Martin, Steven

    2009-01-01

    In order to track social change during a period of the rapid advances brought about by new information technologies (IT), a targeted module of IT-relevant and Internet questions was added to the 2000, 2002 and 2004 samples of the General Social Survey (GSS). The general issue inherent in and guiding the questions asked (as well as the analyses…

  12. What Are Youth Asking about Drugs? A Report of NIDA Drug Facts Chat Day

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Cory M.; Hoefinger, Heidi; Linn-Walton, Rebecca; Aikins, Ross; Falkin, Gregory P.

    2015-01-01

    The current study analyzes a sample of questions about drugs asked online by youth who participated in the National Institute on Drug Abuse's (NIDA) "Drug Facts Chat Day." The types of drugs youth asked about were coded into 17 substance categories, and the topics they raised were coded into seven thematic categories. The top five…

  13. What Are Youth Asking about Drugs? A Report of NIDA Drug Facts Chat Day

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Cory M.; Hoefinger, Heidi; Linn-Walton, Rebecca; Aikins, Ross; Falkin, Gregory P.

    2015-01-01

    The current study analyzes a sample of questions about drugs asked online by youth who participated in the National Institute on Drug Abuse's (NIDA) "Drug Facts Chat Day." The types of drugs youth asked about were coded into 17 substance categories, and the topics they raised were coded into seven thematic categories. The top five…

  14. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... gov NEI Office of Communications (301)496-5248 Health Information Frequently asked ... Division of Extramural Science Programs Division of Extramural Activities Extramural Contacts NEI ...

  15. Socrates' questions: a focus for nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunkers, Sandra S

    2004-07-01

    This column focuses on the philosophical dialogue originated by Socrates. Six questions that Socrates would ask the ancient Greeks are explored in discussing a book written by Phillips entitled Six Questions of Socrates. These questions were: What is virtue? What is moderation? What is justice? What is good? What is courage? What is piety? A human becoming perspective is used as a lens to view the discussion on these questions and the question is posed, "What would it be like to frame discussions on health and quality of life around Socrates' questions?" Parse's teaching-learning processes are presented as a means of creating an environment where dialogue on these questions can occur.

  16. On Cultivating the Ability of Question-Raising in English Class for High School Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘龙霞

    2015-01-01

    Questioning is the starting point and the power of human cognition and development.At present,most of students in our country have no awareness of questioning.In traditional teaching , teachers are accustomed to asking students questions,rather than to guide students to ask questions.How to develop students' awareness of questioning and enable students to ask questions is becoming a hot topic today.Therefore,I wil discuss this topic with you.

  17. What do Americans know about inequality? It depends on how you ask them

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimmo Eriksson

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A recent survey of inequality (Norton and Ariely, Perspectives on Psychological Science, 6, 9-12 asked respondents to indicate what percent of the nation's total wealth is---and should be---controlled by richer and poorer quintiles of the U.S. population. We show that such measures lead to powerful anchoring effects that account for the otherwise remarkable findings that respondents reported perceiving, and desiring, extremely low inequality in wealth. We show that the same anchoring effects occur in other domains, namely web page popularity and school teacher salaries. We introduce logically equivalent questions about average levels of inequality that lead to more accurate responses. Finally, when we made respondents aware of the logical connection between the two measures, the majority said that typical responses to the average measures, indicating higher levels of inequality, better reflected their actual perceptions and preferences than did typical responses to percent measures.

  18. How you ask is what you get: Framing effects in willingness-to-pay for a QALY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlert, Marlies; Breyer, Friedrich; Schwettmann, Lars

    2016-02-01

    In decisions on financing new and innovative health care technologies a central question is how to determine the value citizens place on the gains in health and life expectancy that result from respective medical treatments. We report results of surveys of four representative samples of the German population. In 2010 and 2012, in total about 5000 respondents were asked for their willingness-to-pay (WTP) for either an extension of their life or an improvement in their health corresponding to a gain of one quality-adjusted life year (QALY). Specific changes of the study design allow for ceteris paribus comparisons of different survey versions. While the initial version exactly copied a questionnaire used in the EuroVaQ (European Value of a QALY) project, which was conducted in nine European countries and Palestine, but not in Germany, in other versions the wording and the survey technique were modified. The findings show that the technique of posing the questions plays an important role when respondents are asked to imagine being in hypothetical situations. This clearly refers to the wording of the questions and the survey setting (personal or online interview). But even simple design elements such as putting a yes/no filter in front greatly affect the answers in terms of both the frequency of zero WTP and the distribution of positive amounts. From the different results, we conclude that it is inevitable to conduct studies comprising a broad variety of versions when trying to elicit WTP for a specific type of QALY in order to achieve an array of values combined by insights into the principles of their sensitivity.

  19. An alternative to satisfaction surveys: let the patients talk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemi, Farrokh; Jasper, Harry

    2014-01-01

    We propose to replace the standardized 27-item hospital version of the Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS) survey with 1-item questionnaire that asks "What worked well and what needs improvement?" Sentiment analysis can take the responses to this single question and reconstruct a report on frequency of dissatisfied customers and reasons for dissatisfaction similar to reports received from longer surveys. This article shows, by way of an example, how benchmarked and quantitative reports can be generated from patients' comments. The CAHPS survey asks more leading questions, is less granular in its feedback, has lower response rate, has costly repeated reminders, and may not be as timely as sentiment analysis of a single, open-ended question. This article also shows the implementation of the proposed approach in one critical access hospital and its affiliated clinic and calls for additional research to compare sentiment analysis and CAHPS satisfaction surveys.

  20. Why physicians and nurses ask (or don’t about partner violence: a qualitative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beynon Charlene E

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intimate partner violence (IPV against women is a serious public health issue and is associated with significant adverse health outcomes. The current study was undertaken to: 1 explore physicians’ and nurses’ experiences, both professional and personal, when asking about IPV; 2 determine the variations by discipline; and 3 identify implications for practice, workplace policy and curriculum development. Methods Physicians and nurses working in Ontario, Canada were randomly selected from recognized discipline-specific professional directories to complete a 43-item mailed survey about IPV, which included two open-ended questions about barriers and facilitators to asking about IPV. Text from the open-ended questions was transcribed and analyzed using inductive content analysis. In addition, frequencies were calculated for commonly described categories and the Fisher’s Exact Test was performed to determine statistical significance when examining nurse/physician differences. Results Of the 931 respondents who completed the survey, 769 (527 nurses, 238 physicians, four whose discipline was not stated provided written responses to the open-ended questions. Overall, the top barriers to asking about IPV were lack of time, behaviours attributed to women living with abuse, lack of training, language/cultural practices and partner presence. The most frequently reported facilitators were training, community resources and professional tools/protocols/policies. The need for additional training was a concern described by both groups, yet more so by nurses. There were statistically significant differences between nurses and physicians regarding both barriers and facilitators, most likely related to differences in role expectations and work environments. Conclusions This research provides new insights into the complexities of IPV inquiry and the inter-relationships among barriers and facilitators faced by physicians and nurses. The

  1. The impact of definition and question order on the prevalence of bullying victimization using student self-reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Francis L; Cornell, Dewey G

    2015-12-01

    Accurate measurement is essential to determining the prevalence of bullying and evaluating the effectiveness of intervention efforts. The most common measurement approach is through anonymous self-report surveys, but previous studies have suggested that students do not adhere to standard definitions of bullying and may be influenced by the order of questions about types of victimization. In the current study, we have presented findings from 2 randomized experiments designed to determine (a) the impact of using or not using a definition of bullying and (b) asking about general versus specific types of bullying victimization and how the order of these questions affects victimization-prevalence rates. The study was conducted using a sample of 17,301 students attending 119 high schools. Findings indicate that the use of a definition had no impact on prevalence rates, but asking specific bullying-victimization questions (e.g., "I have been verbally bullied at school") prior to general bullying-victimization questions (e.g., "I have been bullied at school"), resulted in a 29-76% increase in victimization-prevalence rates. Results suggest that surveys that ask general-to-specific bullying-victimization questions, such as those found in national and international surveys, may be underreporting bullying victimization.

  2. Distance Education Practices: Summary Results of the AACRAO February 2015 60 Second Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (AACRAO), 2015

    2015-01-01

    The February 2015 American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (AACRAO) "60 Second Survey" asked respondents to identify whether or not their institution offers distance education, and if so, to answer additional questions about distance education course practices. The survey received 838 unique institutional…

  3. 77 FR 31566 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; 2012 Survey of Business Owners and Self...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-29

    ... intellectual ] property rights and business success led to the addition of a question on whether the business.... Census Bureau Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; 2012 Survey of Business Owners and Self... Survey of Business Owners and Self-Employed Persons (SBO). In the SBO, businesses are asked...

  4. From text to talk : Answers and their uptake in standardised survey interviews

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hof, S. van 't

    2006-01-01

    The standardised survey interview is a highly structured form of interaction. Interviewers ask questions from a script, and respondents select one of the pre-formulated answers. However, interviewers and respondents do more than just their pre-allocated tasks. This study approaches survey interviews

  5. Children's questions: a mechanism for cognitive development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouinard, Michael M

    2007-01-01

    Preschoolers' questions may play an important role in cognitive development. When children encounter a problem with their current knowledge state (a gap in their knowledge, some ambiguity they do not know how to resolve, some inconsistency they have detected), asking a question allows them to get targeted information exactly when they need it. This information is available to them when they are particularly receptive to it, and because it comes as the result of their own disequilibrium, it may have depth of processing benefits. In that questions allow children to get information they need to move their knowledge structures closer to adult-like states, the ability to ask questions to gather needed information constitutes an efficient mechanism for cognitive development (referred to in this paper as the Information Requesting Mechanism [IRM]; this term is used because it includes question-asking and other information recruiting behaviors such as gestures, expressions, and vocalizations). However, the role of children's questions in their cognitive development has been largely overlooked. If questions are a force in cognitive development, the following must be true: (1) children must actually ask questions that gather information; (2) children must receive informative answers to their questions if they are able to be of use to cognitive development; (3) children must be motivated to get the information they request, rather than asking questions for other purposes such as attention; (4) the questions children ask must be relevant and of potential use to their cognitive development; (5) we must see evidence that children's questions help them in some way-that is, that they can ask questions for a purpose, and use the information they receive purposefully to successfully achieve some change of knowledge state. This monograph reports data on these points. Study 1 analyzed questions taken from four children's transcripts in the CHILDES database (age 1;2-5;1). This

  6. Diarrhea - what to ask your doctor - child

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about diarrhea - child; Loose stools - what to ask your doctor - child ... FOODS What foods can make my child's diarrhea worse? How should I prepare the foods for my child? If my child is still breastfeeding or bottle feeding, do I ...

  7. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ask a Scientist Video Series Glossary The Visual System Your Eyes’ Natural Defenses Eye Health and Safety First Aid Tips Healthy Vision Tips Protective Eyewear Sports and Your Eyes Fun Stuff Cool Eye Tricks Links to More Information Optical Illusions Printables Ask a Scientist Video Series ...

  8. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ask a Scientist Video Series Glossary The Visual System Your Eyes’ Natural Defenses Eye Health and Safety First Aid Tips Healthy Vision Tips Protective Eyewear Sports and Your Eyes Fun Stuff Cool Eye Tricks Links to More Information Optical Illusions Printables Ask a Scientist Video Series ...

  9. Helping Children Correctly Say "I Don't Know" to Unanswerable Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterman, Amanda H.; Blades, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Adults ask children questions in a variety of contexts, for example, in the classroom, in the forensic context, or in experimental research. In such situations children will inevitably be asked some questions to which they do not know the answer, because they do not have the required information ("unanswerable" questions). When asked unanswerable…

  10. Policies and procedures related to testing for weak D phenotypes and administration of Rh immune globulin: results and recommendations related to supplemental questions in the Comprehensive Transfusion Medicine survey of the College of American Pathologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandler, S Gerald; Roseff, Susan D; Domen, Ronald E; Shaz, Beth; Gottschall, Jerome L

    2014-05-01

    Advances in RHD genotyping offer an opportunity to update policies and practices for testing weak D phenotypes and administration of Rh immune globulin to postpartum women. To repeat questions from a 1999 College of American Pathologists proficiency test survey, to evaluate current practices for testing for weak D and administration of Rh immune globulin, and to determine whether there is an opportunity to begin integrating RHD genotyping in laboratory practice. The College of American Pathologists Transfusion Medicine Resource Committee sent questions from the 1999 survey to laboratories that participated in the 2012 proficiency test survey. The results of the 2012 survey were compared with those from 1999. Results from published RHD genotyping studies were analyzed to determine if RHD genotyping could improve current policies and practices for serological Rh typing. More than 3100 survey participants responded to the 2012 questions. The most significant finding was a decrease in the number of transfusion services performing a serological weak D test on patients as a strategy to manage those with a weak D as Rh negative (from 58.2% to 19.8%, P Rh positive. Selective integration of RHD genotyping policies and practices could improve the accuracy of Rh typing results, reduce unnecessary administration of Rh immune globulin in women with a weak D, and decrease transfusion of Rh-negative red blood cells in most recipients with a serological weak D phenotype.

  11. Questioning Many Mysteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sara F.

    2015-04-01

    The first section of this memoir queries my formative years. Indirectly I address the question, did my childhood and early years make a difference in my choice of career? Why and how did I begin my journey to becoming a scientist? Did I choose the field of solar astronomy or did circumstances dictate it for me? In the second section, I travel through my work environments and experiences, talking about interactions and aspects of being a scientist that do not appear in our research papers. What parts of my research were happenstances and what parts did I plan? What does it feel like to be on scientific quests? Using examples in my journey, I also turn to questions that have intrigued me throughout my sojourn as a solar astronomer. How do scientific discoveries come about? What factors lead to little discoveries? And what factors lead to major exciting discoveries? Are there timely questions we do not think to ask? How can small, seemingly scattered pieces of knowledge suddenly coalesce into a deeper understanding - what is called the "Aha!" experience - the times when our mental light switches on, and with child-like wonder we behold a "big picture"?

  12. New Hybrid Algorithm for Question Answering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaspreet Kaur

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available With technical advancement, Question Answering has emerged as the main area for the researchers. User is provided with specific answers instead of large number of documents or passages in question answering. Question answering proposes the solution to acquire efficient and exact answers to user question asked in natural language rather than language query. The major goal of this paper is to develop a hybrid algorithm for question answering. For this task different question answering systems for different languages were studied. After deep study, we are able to develop an algorithm that comprises the best features from excellent systems. An algorithm developed by us performs well.

  13. Question Inventory on Tobacco (QIT)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 1965, 1966, 1970, 1974-2017. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Office on Smoking and Health (OSH). Tobacco-Related Survey Questions. The QIT is a...

  14. Question Inventory on Tobacco (QIT)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 1965, 1966, 1970, 1974-2015, 2017. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Office on Smoking and Health (OSH). Survey Questions (Tobacco Use). The QIT is...

  15. The questions for Machiavelli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakićević Dragan D.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The main intention of the work that deals with the Nicolo Machiavelli thought is to point out the obvious paradox between the high political goal and the legitimating of all possible means for its realization. Are evil deeds inevitable in the sphere of politics and under what circumstances the immorality contained in political acts could be transformed into common good? The text asks additional questions such as about the accomplishments of ambitious political projects, the relationship among the ideologist and the representative of political power, the transformations of the means into the ends, the use of violence and indoctrination in political acts, revolutionary and evolutionary political methods, etc. The author claims that political technologies recommended by Machiavelli basically haven't diminished, but have taken on more modern and more adequate forms.

  16. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stuff Cool Eye Tricks Links to More Information Optical Illusions Printables Ask a Scientist Video Series Why can’ ... a scientist? Click to Watch What is an optical illusion? Click to Watch What is color blindness? Click ...

  17. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... search for current job openings visit HHS USAJobs Home > NEI for Kids > Ask a Scientist Video Series ... can see clearly from 25 feet away. NEI Home Contact Us A-Z Site Map NEI on ...

  18. Epilepsy - what to ask your doctor - child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000222.htm Epilepsy - what to ask your doctor - child To use ... this page, please enable JavaScript. Your child has epilepsy. Children with epilepsy have seizures. A seizure is ...

  19. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Printables Ask a Scientist Video Series Why can’t you see colors well in the dark? Do ... fish have eyelids? Click to Watch Why don’t all animal eyes look the same? Click to ...

  20. Cholesterol - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your doctor; What to ask your doctor about cholesterol ... What is my cholesterol level? What should my cholesterol level be? What are HDL ("good") cholesterol and LDL ("bad") cholesterol? Does my cholesterol ...

  1. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Printables Ask a Scientist Video Series Why can’t you see colors well in the dark? Do ... fish have eyelids? Click to Watch Why don’t all animal eyes look the same? Click to ...

  2. Constipation - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000214.htm Constipation - what to ask your doctor To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Constipation is when you are passing stools less often ...

  3. Comparison of Face-to-Face and Web Surveys on the Topic of Homosexual Rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingnan; Wang, Yichen

    2016-06-01

    Although academic research on homosexuality relies heavily on survey data, there has been limited study of the survey method of asking relevant questions. This study examines the effect of survey mode on responses to questions about homosexual rights. We find significant mode effects among heterosexual respondents, who are more likely to support equal access to employment, military service, adoption, and marriage for homosexual people in face-to-face surveys than in Web surveys. They are also more likely to choose to not respond when face-to-face than online. Homosexual respondents do not show mode effects for either substantive responses or item nonresponse rate.

  4. A survey of quality and quantity indexes of multiple choice question (MCQ exams of medical residents at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences: 2008-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R pourmirza kalhori

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Multiple choice questions (MCQs are widely used to assess medical residents. The study aims to analyse MCQ exams of medical residents administered at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences during 2008-2012. Method: Data of this retrospective study were extracted from 63 MCQ exams including 9600 tests. Quantity related variables included discrimination index, difficulty level, reliability of test index (KR20. Quality related variables included proportion of questions without structural defect and proportion of taxonomy 1, 2 and 3 questions. Data were collected using MCQs from question bank and analyzed by SPSS V.16 software. Results: Over the specified five years, the average difficulty level was %0.62, the average discrimination index was 0.27 and the average of reliability coefficient (KR20 in total exams was 0.88. The average of questions in Taxonomy 1 over the specified years was 33.5% and questions with taxonomy 2 and 3 were66.5%. The average of questions without structural defect was 62.6% which fell in the unacceptable range. A significant difference was observed in reliability coefficient (KR20- (P=0.017, difficulty level (P=0.001, taxonomy 1 (P=0.001 and Taxonomy 2 and 3 (P=0.006. Conclusion: According to findings of this study, taxonomy 2 and 3 were decreased and taxonomy 1 was increased over the specified five years. We recommend the specialist board members and the Deputy for Education of the Ministry of Health to consider the results of this study and react to them by improving MCQ quality of future exams.

  5. The Part-Time Student and the University of Ottawa: A 1988 Survey Report on Their Relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Keith Allan

    This study investigated the relationship between the part-time student and the University of Ottawa (Ontario, Canada) using a survey designed around the marketing principles of price, place, product, personnel, and promotion. The survey asked questions concerned with problems associated with fees (price), the campus and its facilities (place),…

  6. A Technique Socratic Questioning-Guided Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Hakan Türkçapar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available “Socratic Method” is a way of teaching philosophical thinking and knowledge by asking questions which was used by antique period greek philosopher Socrates. Socrates was teaching knowledge to his followers by asking questions and the conversation between them was named “Socratic Dialogues”. In this meaning, no novel knowledge is taught to the individual but only what is formerly known is reminded and rediscovered. The form of socratic questioning which is used during the process of cognitive behavioral therapy is known as Guided Discovery. In this method it is aimed to make the client notice the piece of knowledge which he could notice but is not aware with a series of questions. Socratic method or guided discovery consists of several steps which are: Identifying the problem by listening to the client and making reflections, finding alternatives by examining and evaluating, reidentification by using the newly found information and questioning the old distorted belief and reaching to a conclusion and applying it. Question types used during these procedures are, questions for gaining information, questions revealing the meanings, questions revealing the beliefs, questions about behaviours during the similar past experiences, analyse questions and analytic synthesis questions. In order to make the patient feel understood it is important to be empathetic and summarising the problem during the interview. In this text, steps of Socratic Questioning-Guided Discovery will be reviewed with sample dialogues after each step

  7. Barriers to optimal care between physicians and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning adolescent patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitts, Robert Li

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this article was to identify barriers to optimal care between physicians and LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning) adolescents. To this end, 464 anonymous, self-administered surveys were distributed in 2003 to residents and attending physicians in pediatrics, internal medicine, obstetrics-gynecology, psychiatry, emergency medicine, and family practice at Upstate Medical University. The survey included questions pertaining to practice, knowledge, and attitude pertaining to lesbian, gay, transgender, or questioning (LGBTQ) adolescents. One hundred eight four surveys were returned. The majority of physicians would not regularly discuss sexual orientation, sexual attraction, or gender identity while taking a sexual history from a sexually active adolescent. As well, the majority of physicians would not ask patients about sexual orientation if an adolescent presented with depression, suicidal thoughts, or had attempted suicide. If an adolescent stated that he or she was not sexually active, 41% of physicians reported that they would not ask additional sexual health-related questions. Only 57% agreed to an association between being a LGBTQ adolescent and suicide. The majority of physicians did not believe that they had all the skills they needed to address issues of sexual orientation with adolescents, and that sexual orientation should be addressed more often with these patients and in the course of training. This study concludes that barriers in providing optimal care for LGBTQ adolescents can be found with regard to practice, knowledge, and attitude regardless of medical field and other demographics collected. Opportunities exist to enhance care for LGBTQ adolescents.

  8. IT Department User Survey Engineering Tools Usage Report

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Pete

    2017-01-01

    Engineering tools are supports by the IT-CDA-AD section and these include Electronic, Mechanical, Mathematical and Field Solver tools. The survey carried out by IT-CDA during 2016 asked CERN users questions concerning their working environments, habits and preferences and also included several question pertaining to the use of engineering tools. This analysis will help IT-CDA to better understand who is using these tools, the user requirements and their problems and so help us to improve the service.

  9. A Statistical Analysis of Student Questions in a Cell Biology Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeling, Elena L.; Polacek, Kelly M.; Ingram, Ella L.

    2009-01-01

    Asking questions is an essential component of the practice of science, but question-asking skills are often underemphasized in science education. In this study, we examined questions written by students as they prepared for laboratory exercises in a senior-level cell biology class. Our goals were to discover 1) what types of questions students…

  10. A Statistical Analysis of Student Questions in a Cell Biology Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeling, Elena L.; Polacek, Kelly M.; Ingram, Ella L.

    2009-01-01

    Asking questions is an essential component of the practice of science, but question-asking skills are often underemphasized in science education. In this study, we examined questions written by students as they prepared for laboratory exercises in a senior-level cell biology class. Our goals were to discover 1) what types of questions students…

  11. Questionnaire Designing for a Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Roopa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Questionnaires are frequently used in quantitative marketing research and social research. A questionnaire is a series of questions asked to individuals to obtain statistically useful information about a given topic. When properly constructed and responsibly administered, questionnaires become a vital instrument by which statements can be made about specific groups or people or entire populations. They are a valuable method of collecting a wide range of information from a large number of individuals, often referred to as respondents. Adequate questionnaire construction is critical to the success of a survey. Appropriate questions, correct ordering of questions, correct scaling, or good questionnaire format can make the survey worthwhile, as it may accurately reflect the views and opinions of the participants. A useful method for checking a questionnaire and making sure it is accurately capturing the intended information is to pretest among a smaller subset of target respondents.

  12. Learning How to Ask: Women and Negotiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Lauren H; Bajaj, Anureet K

    2017-03-01

    Women are less likely to reach top-level leadership positions, and more likely to leave academic positions, than men, and are likely to earn less money than men. Women are also less likely to initiate a negotiation-a process that is crucial for professional advancement. This reluctance to ask hinders their advancement and can have long-lasting consequences-both financial and professional. The reasons that women do not ask are multifactorial. In this article, we will explore reasons why women are less likely to negotiate, the barriers they face when they do, and strategies that women can apply to improve their negotiation skills.

  13. A question of authority

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, Earl W.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

    2003-10-15

    A Question of Authority. This article deals with a certain scenario and several reviewers are to give their opinion. This one is in regards to - Suspending an IACUC approved animal use activity is about the last thing a research institution wants to do. Consider the predicament that the Great Eastern University IACUC faced when Dr. Janet Jenkins, the Attending Veterinarian, suspended all animal use activity on an approved protocol of Dr. Roy Maslo. Jenkins had the IACUCs authority to temporarily suspend a protocol, subject to review by a quorum of the full committee. She alleged that Maslo used mice from his breeding colony, not purchased rats, to begin a new study. Jenkins saw Maslos technicians bringing mouse cages to a procedure room and setting up for a minor survival surgery. She asked them to wait until she clarified things as she felt confident that the protocol called for rats. She called Maslo and asked him if the study had been approved for mice, to which he responded affirmatively. Still not feeling quite assured, she went to her office, reviewed the protocol, and found only rat studies described. She also called the IACUC office to see if there were any approved amendments which she may not have received, and was told that there were none. By the time she returned, one procedure was completed. Understandably upset, she informed the technicians and Maslo that any further activity on the protocol was suspended until the issue was resolved. Jenkins informed the IACUC chairman who in turned called an emergency meeting of the committee.

  14. Interpreting Survey Questions About Sexual Aggression in Cross-Cultural Research : A Qualitative Study with Young Adults from Nine European Countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krahé, Barbara; de Haas, Stans; Vanwesenbeeck, Wilhelmina; Bianchi, Gabriel; Chliaoutakis, Joannes; Fuertes, Antonio; de Matos, Margarida Gaspar; Hadjigeorgiou, Eleni; Hellemans, Sabine; Kouta, Christiana; Meijnckens, Dwayne; Murauskiene, Liubove; Papadakaki, Maria; Ramiro, Lucia; Reis, Marta; Symons, Katrien; Tomaszewska, Paulina; Vicario-Molina, Isabel; Zygadlo, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Examining equivalence in the interpretation of survey items on sexual assault by participants from different cultures is an important step toward building a valid international knowledge base about the prevalence of sexual aggression among young adults. Referring to the theoretical framework of cont

  15. Asthma - what to ask the doctor - adult

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about asthma - adult ... For what side effects should I call the doctor? How will I know when my inhalers are ... worse and that I need to call the doctor? What should I do when I feel short ...

  16. Asthma - what to ask your doctor - child

    Science.gov (United States)

    What to ask your doctor about asthma - child ... For what side effects should I call the doctor? How will I know when the inhalers are ... worse and that I need to call the doctor? What should I do when my child feels ...

  17. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... other programs with respect to blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual function, preservation of sight, and the special health ... Eye Ask a Scientist Video Series Glossary The Visual System Your Eyes’ Natural Defenses Eye Health and ...

  18. New patient asking for a benzodiazepine prescription

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Simon de Lusignan; Andy Kent

    2008-01-01

    @@ Your final patient on a Friday is a 26 year old man who is new to the list. He asks you for a repeat prescription for two months of diazepam, 5 mg up to four a day. He says he has been taking these for a whil for his "newves" and he has run out. You do not hold this patient's records.

  19. Conceptualization and measurement of homosexuality in sex surveys: a critical review

    OpenAIRE

    Michaels Stuart; Lhomond Brigitte

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews major national population sex surveys that have asked questions about homosexuality focusing on conceptual and methodological issues, including the definitions of sex, the measured aspects of homosexuality, sampling and interviewing technique, and questionnaire design. Reported rates of major measures of same-sex attraction, behavior, partners, and sexual identity from surveys are also presented and compared. The study of homosexuality in surveys has been shaped by the re...

  20. "Question Moments": A Rolling Programme of Question Opportunities in Classroom Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrosa-de-Jesus, Helena; Leite, Sara; Watts, Mike

    2016-01-01

    This naturalistic study integrates specific "question moments" into lesson plans to increase pupils' classroom interactions. A range of tools explored students' ideas by providing students with opportunities to ask and write questions. Their oral and written outcomes provide data on individual and group misunderstandings. Changes to the…

  1. The Importance of Questioning & Questions for Consideration in Programming for Intercultural Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Anne-Marie

    2008-01-01

    The significance of questioning in intercultural language learning was highlighted during Phase 1 of the project as project team members worked with teachers preparing units of work and long-term programs. This paper explores the types of questions asked by team members to elicit teachers' thinking regarding students' learning and teachers' roles…

  2. Question, answer, compare: a cross-category comparison of answers on question and answer websites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocepek, Melissa G.; Westbrook, Lynn

    2015-10-01

    Online information seekers make heavy use of websites that accept their natural language questions. This study compared the three types of such websites: social question and answer (Q&A), digital reference services, and ask-an-expert services. Questions reflecting daily life, research, and crisis situations were posed to high use websites of all three types. The resulting answers' characteristics were analyzed in terms of speed, transparency, formality, and intimacy. The results indicate that social Q&A websites excel in speed, ask-an-expert websites in intimacy, and digital reference services in transparency and formality.

  3. How Does Survey Context Impact Self-reported Fraud Victimization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beals, Michaela E; Carr, Dawn C; Mottola, Gary R; Deevy, Martha J; Carstensen, Laura L

    2017-04-01

    This study examines the effect of survey context on self-reported rates of personal fraud victimization, and explores if the effect is influenced by age and gender. Participants (3,000U.S. adults) were randomly assigned to 1 of the 3 versions of a fraud victimization questionnaire: questions about fraud were identical across conditions, however, the context varies. One questionnaire asked about crime, one about consumer buying experiences, and a third focused only on fraud. Participants who were asked about fraud victimization in the context of crime reported significantly less victimization (p fraud-alone condition, yet the number of reports from those asked within the context of a consumer survey did not differ from the fraud-alone condition. The effect of the crime context interacted with age (p fraud victimization. These findings inform the production of new surveys and guide the development of effective social and health policies.

  4. 150 Student Questions on Solar Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, R. E.; Gross, N. A.; Knipp, D. J.

    2010-12-01

    The Center for Integrated Space Weather Modeling (CISM) holds a two-week Space Weather Summer School for introductory graduate students and space weather professionals to gain a system level understanding of the space environment and the effects of space weather. A typical day in the summer school consists of three morning lectures followed by an afternoon lab session. After the morning lectures, the participants are each asked to submit a question about the mornings topics on a question card. The lecturers then take the time to answer these questions prior to afternoon sessions. In the last 5 years over 1000 such question cards have been collected and cataloged. Despite detailed lectures by experts similar questions appear every year. We have analyzed over 150 questions related to the introductory lectures on solar physics and solar activity. Questions content was categorized using the AGU Index, and question sophistication was categorized using Bloom’s Taxonomy of Educational Objectives. Specific analysis results along with lists of questions will be presented. We hope that these results can be used to improve the lecture and classroom content and allow students to move beyond low level education objectives and ask more sophisticated questions.

  5. Frequently Asked Questions on Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS‐CoV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... widespread in dromedary camels in the Middle East, Africa and parts of South Asia. It is possible ... board planes and ships, and banners, pamphlets, and radio announcements at international points of entry, can also ...

  6. U.S. Military Action Against the Islamic State: Answers to Frequently Asked Legal Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-09

    which proclaimed the privilege suspended for a broader category of persons); Little v. Barreme, 6 U.S. (2 Cr.) 170 (1804) (finding seizure of vessel...by Chadha and describing arguments to the contrary as “plausible but not compelling”); FRANCIS D. WORMUTH AND EDWIN B. FIRMAGE, TO CHAIN THE DOG

  7. An Interim Report on Pennsylvania's Framework for Leadership: Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bing-ru, Teh; Chiang, Hanley; Lipscomb, Stephen; Gill, Brian

    2014-01-01

    A new study analyzed data from the 2012/13 pilot of the Framework for Leadership (FFL), Pennsylvania's tool for evaluating the leadership practices of principals and assistant principals. Based on the FFL scores of 336 principals and 69 assistant principals evaluated by their supervisors in the 2012/13 school year, this interim report found that…

  8. Quantifying pelagic-benthic coupling in the North Sea: Are we asking the right question?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richardson, K.; Cedhagen, T.

    2002-01-01

    fished region such as the North Sea where deployment of sediment traps or bottom mounted cameras or samplers is difficult. Thus, there are relatively few sites in the North Sea for which good data are available for describing pelagic-benthic (or near shore-offsbore) coupling and considerable effort...... of energy and nutrients. We argue that foraminiferans may deserve more study in this respect. Their large numbers in combination with structural and physiological adaptations suggest that these organisms may be of greater importance than other meiofaunal organisms of comparative size and abundance....

  9. Frequently Asked Questions on BSE (Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy or Mad Cow Disease)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Health and Safety Organic Plants Recreation Research and Science Rural Trade Our Agency Our Agency About USDA Agencies Initiatives Careers Employee Services Reforming USDA Staff Offices Media Media Agency News Releases Agency Reports Blog Digital Press Releases Testimony ...

  10. Patient-Reported Outcome and Quality of Life Instruments Database (PROQOLID: Frequently asked questions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perrier Laure-Lou

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The exponential development of Patient-Reported Outcomes (PRO measures in clinical research has led to the creation of the Patient-Reported Outcome and Quality of Life Instruments Database (PROQOLID to facilitate the selection process of PRO measures in clinical research. The project was initiated by Mapi Research Trust in Lyon, France. Initially called QOLID (Quality of Life Instruments Database, the project's purpose was to provide all those involved in health care evaluation with a comprehensive and unique source of information on PRO and HRQOL measures available through the Internet. PROQOLID currently describes more than 470 PRO instruments in a structured format. It is available in two levels, non-subscribers and subscribers, at http://www.proqolid.org. The first level is free of charge and contains 14 categories of basic useful information on the instruments (e.g. author, objective, original language, list of existing translations, etc.. The second level provides significantly more information about the instruments. It includes review copies of over 350 original instruments, 120 user manuals and 350 translations. Most are available in PDF format. This level is only accessible to annual subscribers. PROQOLID is updated in close collaboration with the instruments' authors on a regular basis. Fifty or more new instruments are added to the database annually. Today, all of the major pharmaceutical companies, prestigious institutions (such as the FDA, the NIH's National Cancer Institute, the U.S. Veterans Administration, dozens of universities, public institutions and researchers subscribe to PROQOLID on a yearly basis. More than 800 users per day routinely visit the database.

  11. Questions Student Ask: Why Is It Harder to Paddle a Canoe in Shallow Water?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physics Teacher, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Explains the effect that depth of water has on the speed of Olympic-style racing canoes and kayaks. Indicates that canoes are harder to paddle in shallow water because the skin friction drag increases appreciable when the water depth decreases. (DH)

  12. Is My Dog or Cat a Healthy Weight? Important Questions to Ask the Vet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Emiten Radiación Fraude en la Salud Medicamentos Nutrición Productos Veterinarios Productos de Tabaco Salud Infantil Salud de la Mujer Suplementos Dietéticos Vacunas, Sangre y Productos Biológicos Page Last Updated: 03/02/2017 Note: ...

  13. In Situ Chemical Oxidation for Remediation of Contaminated Groundwater. Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    peroxide − Most contaminants are amenable including chlorocarbons, fuel hydrocarbons, pesticides , PAHs  Permanganate − Chloroethenes and PAHs...alternative endpoints such as: 1) transition from active treatment (e.g., ISCO) to a more passive technology like MNA or in situ bioremediation , 2

  14. Measuring Library Vendor Cyber Security: Seven Easy Questions Every Librarian Can Ask

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Caro

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on an independent cyber security risk management audit for a public library system completed by the authors in early 2015 and based on a research paper by the same group at Clark University in 2014. We stress that while cyber security must include raising public knowledge in regard to cyber security issues and resources, and libraries are indeed the perfect place to disseminate this knowledge, librarians are also in a unique position as the gatekeepers of information services provided to the public and should conduct internal audits to ensure our content partners and IT vendors take cyber security as seriously as the library and its staff. One way to do this is through periodic reviews of existing vendor relationships. To this end, the authors created a simple grading rubric you can adopt or modify to help take this first step towards securing your library data. It is intended to be used by both technical and non-technical staff as a simple measurement of what vendor agreements currently exist and how they rank, while at the same time providing a roadmap for which security features or policy statements the library can or should require moving forward.

  15. Asking Sensitive Questions: A Statistical Power Analysis of Randomized Response Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Rolf; Schroter, Hannes; Striegel, Heiko; Simon, Perikles

    2012-01-01

    This article derives the power curves for a Wald test that can be applied to randomized response models when small prevalence rates must be assessed (e.g., detecting doping behavior among elite athletes). These curves enable the assessment of the statistical power that is associated with each model (e.g., Warner's model, crosswise model, unrelated…

  16. Rejecting the Null: Research and Social Justice Means Asking Different Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Stephanie; Schwartz, Jonathan P.

    2012-01-01

    The focus of this article is on the specific ethical issues related to social justice research and the practical implications of engaging in social justice research, including the potential impact of research results on practice, policy, and advocacy at the local and national level. Specific recommendations are offered, including identifying…

  17. Who's asking the important questions? Sexual topics discussed among young pregnant couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albritton, Tashuna; Fletcher, Kyla Day; Divney, Anna; Gordon, Derrick; Magriples, Urania; Kershaw, Trace S

    2014-12-01

    The aim was to examine gender differences in sexual risk communication among young couples and factors influencing communication. Sample consisted of 296 young pregnant couples. We assessed individual, interpersonal, and community factors on sexual risk communication. The Actor-Partner Independence Model was used to assess actor and partner effects on sexual risk communication. For actor effects, being female, older, not being Hispanic, and higher condom use self-efficacy was associated with sexual risk communication. The significant partner effect was avoidant romantic attachment. Gender interactions were significant for high risk behaviors and family functioning. High risk behaviors and family functioning were associated with sexual risk communication for females but not for males. The study emphasizes the need to promote sexual risk communication among young high risk couples, particularly for males. Family support could serve as a catalyst for sexual risk communication and other sexual protective behaviors among young couples.

  18. A Focused Review of the Reengineering Literature: Expert Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    at Pacific Bell. Planning Review (May/June):28-33. Mark Nissen 24 Ives, B., Jarvenpaa, S.L., and R.O. Mason. 1993. Global business drivers...aligning information technology to global business strategy. IBM Systems Journal 32, no. 1:143-161. JAVA. 1996. Java FAQ archives. Internet World

  19. A New Higher Education Curriculum in Organic Chemistry: What Questions Should Be Asked?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafarge, David L.; Morge, Ludovic M.; Méheut, Martine M.

    2014-01-01

    Organic chemistry is often considered to be a difficult subject to teach and to learn, particularly as students prefer to resort to memorization alone rather than reasoning using models from chemical reactivity. Existing studies have led us to suggest principles for redefining the curriculum, ranging from its overall structure to the tasks given…

  20. What impedes knowledge sharing in culturally diverse organizations: Asking ethnographic questions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauring, Jakob; Madsen, Mona Toft

    Ideas of linking cultural diversity and knowledge resources have recently gained momentum. However, only little research has empirically addressed the issues of knowledge sharing in diverse organizations. This explorative article is based on an ethnographic fieldwork in a Danish organization......, and sets out to illustrate implications of knowledge sharing in diverse organizations. It is argued that the theories on management of cultural diversity should include theories on knowledge and knowledge sharing. The main theoretical argument is that a locally grounded understanding of social aspects...... of knowledge sharing should be the departure point for dealing with cultural diversity in a business context....

  1. Frequently Asked Questions on BSE (Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy or Mad Cow Disease)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Food and Agriculture Research OPEDA Scholarship Program MARKETING AND TRADE Exporting Goods Importing Goods Newsroom Agency ... This is directly attributable to the impact and effectiveness of feed bans as a primary control measure ...

  2. Changing Teaching and Learning Relationships through Collaborative Action Research: Learning to Ask Different Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Paula; Gillam, Katy; Andrews, Jane; Day, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    The article reports work over one year by three teachers from the Milton Keynes Primary Schools Learning Network. Their collaborative classroom-focused action research investigated the limits and possibilities of pupils' and teachers' learning through self-evaluation. In phase one the teacher researchers used questionnaires, interviews and…

  3. The Knowledge Engineer as Student: Metacognitive Bases for Asking Good Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    Center Washington, DC 20350 San Diego, CA 92152-6800 Dr. Pat Carpenter Carnegio-mellon University Dr. Michael Atwood Dr. Jeff Bonar Department of...330 Packard Road Dr. Paula Kirk Ann Arbor, MI 48109 Oakridge Associated Universities Margaret Jeromie University Programs Division Prof. Lutz F. Hornka

  4. Rethinking Breast Self-Examinations: Are We Asking the Right Questions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Conley

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available There are a myriad of studies on the efficacy of BSE, with mixed results. Research also highlights growing health disparities and continuing limited access to technology in underserved communities. Results from a pilot study with rural teens suggest that successful skill mastery and sustained practice can be learned. Perhaps most importantly, BSE offers a technology-free method for self-assessment that can be taught at the community level and provides an opportunity for women to gain a measure of self-control over their bodies and themselves.

  5. Questions for Parents to Ask about School Adaptations. PHP-c91

    Science.gov (United States)

    PACER Center, 2004

    2004-01-01

    A child with a disability who has an Individualized Education Program (IEP) or Section 504 Accommodation Plan may need extra help and support to participate in school. It takes thoughtful planning to choose adaptations, based on a child's disability, to help the child learn or have access to learning. Appropriate accommodations vary with…

  6. A New Higher Education Curriculum in Organic Chemistry: What Questions Should Be Asked?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafarge, David L.; Morge, Ludovic M.; Méheut, Martine M.

    2014-01-01

    Organic chemistry is often considered to be a difficult subject to teach and to learn, particularly as students prefer to resort to memorization alone rather than reasoning using models from chemical reactivity. Existing studies have led us to suggest principles for redefining the curriculum, ranging from its overall structure to the tasks given…

  7. What Employers Need to Know: Frequently Asked Questions about High School Students in Workplaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobs For the Future, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Employers may not know the best way to reach out or how to structure opportunities for young people to explore careers within their organization. In addition, employers may be uncertain about liability, privacy policies, and safety regulations for employees under the age of 18. State and federal laws and policies pertaining to youth employment can…

  8. PANDAS: Frequently Asked Questions about Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal ....

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... has had strep throat before, and he has tics and/or OCD. Does that mean he has ... PANDAS when: Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and/or tic disorders suddenly appear following a strep infection (such ...

  9. Questions Students Ask: How Can a Downhill Skier Move Faster than a Sky Diver?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armenti, Angelo, Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the relationship of gravity, coefficient of friction, surface area, and Newton's second law to explain the physics involved in downhill skiers being able to move faster than sky divers in free fall. (JM)

  10. Rethinking Safe Schools Approaches for LGBTQ Students: Changing the Questions We Ask

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Elizabethe; Smith, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    In this article the authors address the limitations of framing "the problem" of in-school LGBTQ harassment within dominant anti-bullying discourses. They offer a critical sociological framework as an alternative way of understanding the issues of LGBTQ harassment and propose a research agenda in which school culture and gender policing are the…

  11. "Asking Pompeii Questions": A Co-Operative Approach to Writing in the Disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somerville, Elizabeth M.; Creme, Phyllis

    2005-01-01

    This article is an account of a cooperative project to develop student writing within an interdisciplinary human sciences degree, in line with the 'Writing in the Disciplines' approach adopted in the USA that aims to develop student writing within mainstream teaching. The course tutor worked with a writing tutor to introduce a 'writing strand'…

  12. Ten Essential Questions Educators Should Ask when Using Video Annotation Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Peter J.; Trip, Tonya

    2011-01-01

    The increasing ease and ubiquity of video has resulted in a proliferation of video annotation tools used and designed for improving education. While similar, each tool has its relative strengths and weaknesses. Choosing the "right" tool can have an impact on the experience of teachers and the effectiveness of video as a means for improving…

  13. Team meetings in specialist palliative care: Asking questions as a strategy within interprofessional interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Arber, A

    2008-01-01

    In this article, I explore what happens when specialist palliative care staff meet together to discuss patients under their care. Many studies (e.g., Atkinson) have discussed how health care practitioners in various settings use rhetorical strategies when presenting cases in situations such as ward rounds and team meetings. Strategies for arguing and persuading are central to medical practice in the interprofessional context. The context of specialist palliative care is an interesting place...

  14. Challenge-Based Acquisition: Stimulating Innovative Solutions Faster and Cheaper by Asking the Right Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    flight. Space Exploration Technologies Corporation, also known as SpaceX , made history on May 25, 2012, as the world’s first privately held company to...send a cargo payload, carried on the Dragon spacecraft, to the International Space Station ( SpaceX Corporation, n.d.). Military Combat Systems...www.airandspace.si.edu/wrightbrothers/age/1910/military.cfm SpaceX Corporation. (n.d.). Company overview. Retrieved from http://www.spacex.com/company.php

  15. H1N1 Flu & U.S. Schools: Answers to Frequently Asked Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Department of Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    A severe form of influenza known as H1N1, commonly being called swine flu, has health officials around the world concerned. In the United States, the outbreak of H1N1 has prompted school closures and cancellation of school-related events. As the flu spreads, the Department of Education encourages school leaders, parents and students to know how to…

  16. Asking new questions with old data: The Centralized Open-Access Rehabilitation database for Stroke (SCOAR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith Lohse

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: This paper introduces a tool for streamlining data integration in rehabilitation science, the Centralized Open-Access Rehabilitation database for Stroke (SCOAR, which allows researchers to quickly visualize relationships among variables, efficiently share data, generate hypotheses, and enhance clinical trial design. Methods: Bibliographic databases were searched according to inclusion criteria leaving 2,892 titles that were further screened to 514 manuscripts to be screened by full text, leaving 215 randomized controlled trials in the database (489 independent groups representing 12,847 patients. Demographic, methodological, and statistical data were extracted by independent coders and entered into SCOAR. Results: Trial data came from 114 locations in 27 different countries and represented patients with a wide range of ages, 62 yr 41; 85, (shown as median range and at various stages of recovery following their stroke, 141 d 1; 3372. There was considerable variation in the dose of therapy that patients received, 20 h 0; 221, over interventions of different durations, 28 d 10; 365. There was also a lack of common data elements (CDEs across trials, but this lack of CDEs was most pronounced for baseline assessments of patient impairment and severity of stroke. Conclusions: Data integration across hundreds of RCTs allows clinicians and researchers to quickly visualize data from the history of the field and lays the foundation for making SCOAR a living database to which researchers can upload new data as trial results are published. SCOAR is a useful tool for clinicians and researchers that will facilitate data visualization, data sharing, the finding of relevant past studies, and the design of clinical trials by enabling more accurate and comprehensive power analyses. Furthermore, these data speak to the need for CDEs specific to stroke rehabilitation in randomized controlled trials.PROSPERO# CRD4201409010

  17. "Asking Pompeii Questions": A Co-Operative Approach to Writing in the Disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somerville, Elizabeth M.; Creme, Phyllis

    2005-01-01

    This article is an account of a cooperative project to develop student writing within an interdisciplinary human sciences degree, in line with the 'Writing in the Disciplines' approach adopted in the USA that aims to develop student writing within mainstream teaching. The course tutor worked with a writing tutor to introduce a 'writing strand'…

  18. 75 FR 59322 - Notice of Availability of Answers to Frequently Asked Questions Regarding Buy America & FRA's...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-27

    ... number FRA-2010-0147. All electronic submissions must be made to the U.S. Government electronic site at... comments on the U.S. Government electronic docket site; (2) Fax: (202) 493-2251; (3) Mail: U.S. Department... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF...

  19. Ten Essential Questions Educators Should Ask when Using Video Annotation Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Peter J.; Trip, Tonya

    2011-01-01

    The increasing ease and ubiquity of video has resulted in a proliferation of video annotation tools used and designed for improving education. While similar, each tool has its relative strengths and weaknesses. Choosing the "right" tool can have an impact on the experience of teachers and the effectiveness of video as a means for improving…

  20. Influence of individual learning styles in online interaction: a case for dynamic frequently asked questions (DFAQ)

    OpenAIRE

    Ng'ambi, Dick

    2006-01-01

    Although current literature on learning styles shows that matching a teacher’s instructional style with the learning styles of students affects performance in a classroom environment, little is known about the influence of learning styles in online interaction. The paper argues that students’ individual learning styles influences how students interact online and that rather than adapt to user’s learning styles, online environments tend to force behavior change on users’ learning styles. The p...

  1. Understanding, Treating, and Preventing STDs / Questions to Ask your Health Care Professional

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gonorrhea, herpes simplex, HIV/AIDS, HPV, syphilis and trichomoniasis. STDs affect men and women. In many cases ... with antibiotics. Some bacterial STDs include chlamydia, gonorrhea, trichomoniasis, and syphilis. STDs caused by viruses can be ...

  2. Western Juniper Field Guide: Asking the Right Questions to Select Appropriate Management Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    The rapid expansion of western juniper into neighboring plant communities during the past 130 years has been linked to increased soil erosion; reduced forage production; altered wildlife habitat; changes in plant community composition, structure, and biodiversity. Impacts of post-settlement woodland...

  3. Are We Asking the Wrong Questions in Arts-Based Research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donoghue, Donal

    2009-01-01

    Arts-based researchers distinguish themselves from other qualitative researchers on the grounds that they use artistic processes and practices in their inquiries and in the communication of their research outcomes. Like artists, they operate out of a particular community of practice, with its own distinctive history of emergence, set of…

  4. Home management of cats and dogs with diabetes mellitus. Common questions asked by veterinarians and clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnick, A N; Greco, D S

    1995-05-01

    Home management of the insulin-dependent diabetic pet can be confusing and frustrating for many pet owners. This article addresses many of the common concerns of pet owners, as well as issues of interest for the veterinarian regarding insulin therapy and client communication.

  5. The Intelligence Problem of Policymakers in Counterinsurgency: Asking And Answering the Right Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    explosive device ISR intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance J2 joint staff intelligence section NATO North Atlantic Treaty Organization OSINT open...commonly referring to the technical means of collection to the exclusion of HUMINT, open source intelligence ( OSINT ), and other information coming...is using to gain popular support or to delegitimize the supported government. The 10th Mountain Division determined OSINT was an important component

  6. Are Asian cultures really less ageist than Western ones? It depends on the questions asked.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vauclair, Christin-Melanie; Hanke, Katja; Huang, Li-Li; Abrams, Dominic

    2017-04-01

    Ageism is an increasing concern in ageing populations such as Asia and Europe. A prevalent assumption in psychology is that Eastern cultures may be less prone to ageism because of norms and values that honour and respect elders. Yet, evidence for this culture hypothesis is inconclusive. The current study examines this issue by comparing attitudes towards older people in an Eastern and Western samples of 184 young people from the UK and 249 from Taiwan. Attitudes to old age were measured both as meta-perceptions (the perceived normative context) and personal attitudes in regard to the cognitive, affective and behavioural components of ageism. Consistent with the culture hypothesis, meta-perceptions about competence and admiration were more positive in Taiwan than in the UK, yet other meta-perceptions were more negative pointing to the existence of old age subtypes. Personal attitudes about older people in regard to the affective and behavioural, but not the cognitive component, were more negative in Taiwan than in the UK. Thus, cultural differences in ageism are more nuanced than suggested by previous research. The importance of distinguishing between the normative context and personal attitudes as well as the different components of ageism is highlighted by the present findings.

  7. Questions for Parents to Ask about School Adaptations. PHP-c91

    Science.gov (United States)

    PACER Center, 2004

    2004-01-01

    A child with a disability who has an Individualized Education Program (IEP) or Section 504 Accommodation Plan may need extra help and support to participate in school. It takes thoughtful planning to choose adaptations, based on a child's disability, to help the child learn or have access to learning. Appropriate accommodations vary with…

  8. What questions do patients undergoing lower extremity joint replacement surgery have?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhalla Amandeep

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The value of the Internet to deliver preoperative education would increase if there was variability in questions patients want answered. This study's goal was to have patients consulting an orthopedic surgeon about undergoing either a total hip arthroplasty (THA or a total knee arthroplasty (TKA rate the importance of different questions concerning their care. Methods We assembled questions patients might have about joint replacement surgery by analyzing the literature and querying a pilot group of patients and surgeons. Twenty-nine patients considering undergoing THA and 19 patients considering TKR completed a written survey asking them to rate 30 different questions, with a 5 point Likert scale from 1 (least important – 5 (most important. Results For patients considering THA or TKR, the 4 highest rated questions were: Will the surgery affect my abilities to care for myself?, Am I going to need physical therapy?, How mobile will I be after my surgery?, When will I be able to walk normally again? The mean percentage disagreement was 42% for questions answered by TKR patients and 47% for the THA group. Some patients gave a high rating to questions lowly rated by the rest of the group. Conclusions Although there was enough agreement to define a core set of questions that should be addressed with most patients considering THA or TKA, some of the remaining questions were also highly important to some patients. The Web may offer a flexible medium for accommodating this large variety of information needs.

  9. Weight-loss surgery - before - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastric bypass - before - what to ask your doctor; Roux-en-Y gastric bypass - before - what to ask your doctor; Gastric banding - before - what to ask your doctor; Vertical sleeve surgery - before - ...

  10. Mastectomy and breast reconstruction - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastectomy - what to ask your doctor; Breast reconstruction - what to ask your doctor; TRAM flap - what to ... your doctor; What to ask your doctor about mastectomy and breast reconstruction; Breast cancer - mastectomy - what to ...

  11. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Lead joe.balintfy@nih.gov Anna Harper - Media Relations afh@nei.nih.gov NEI Office of Communications (301)496-5248 ... Please send general questions and comments to the NEI Office of Science Communications, Public Liaison, and Education. Technical questions about this website ...

  12. ASK Talks with W. Scott Cameron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, W. Scott

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents an interview with Scott Cameron who is the Capital Systems Manager for the Food and Beverage Global Business Unit of Procter and Gamble. He has been managing capital projects and mentoring other project managers for the past 20 years at Procter and Gamble within its Beauty Care, Health Care, Food and Beverage, and Fabric and Home Care Businesses. Scott also has been an Academy Sharing Knowledge (ASK) feature writer since Volume One.

  13. Management Satisfaction Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — The Chief Human Capital Officers' Managers' Satisfaction Survey asks managers to rate their perception of workforce planning, interaction with and levels of support...

  14. Questioning Skills for Conceptual Change in Science Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Din Yan

    2004-01-01

    Science teachers ask questions to assess students' cognitive abilities and to promote student motivation in learning. Cognitive questions are usually divided into low-order and high-order types. According to the conceptual change model of learning, teachers can also use questions to facilitate the construction of knowledge by students. These…

  15. Critical Questions about Early Intervention and Early Childhood Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winer, Abby; Hebbeler, Kathy; Nelson, Robin; Gundler, Darla; Cate, Debbie; Hudson, Laura; Taylor, Cornelia; Peters, Mary Louise

    2015-01-01

    What is a high-quality statewide data system? One characteristic is that it provides the information needed to address important questions about early intervention and early childhood special education. But what are those questions? What questions should data users, such as program directors, advocates, and policymakers, be asking? The Center for…

  16. SALES STRATEGIES CENTERED ON ELABORATING QUESTIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Nelu DORLE

    2016-01-01

    Making a good sales approach depends largely on the strategy established by a salesperson, depending on the type of customer, the circumstances, and his/her psycho-linguistic availability. The sales strategies based on the science of reasoning, on the oratory and persuasive ability include skills related to communication, on which one of the most important is the development and asking of questions. The science related to the salesperson’s ability to handles questions in a sales interview giv...

  17. Learning from Chatting: How Our Virtual Reference Questions Are Giving Us Answers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorna Rourke

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective ‐ This research compares two types of online reference services and attempts to determine whether the same sorts of questions are being asked; which questions are being asked most often; and whether patron and staff behaviour is consistent or different in the two types of online reference sessions. Patron satisfaction with the two types of online reference services is also examined.Methods ‐ The researchers reviewed over 1400 online reference transcripts, including 744 from Docutek virtual reference (VR transactions and 683 from MSN chat reference (IM transactions. The questions were classified according to categories of reference questions based on recurring questions discovered during the review. Each transaction was also categorized as ʺinformalʺ or ʺformalʺ based on patron language and behaviour, and general observations were made about the interactions between patrons and librarians. In addition, results from 223 user surveys were examined to determine patron satisfaction with online reference services and to determine which type of service patrons preferred.Results ‐ The analysis suggests that patrons are using VR and IM services differently. In general, VR questions tend to be more research intensive and formal, while IM questions are less focused on academic research and informal. Library staff and patrons appear to alter their behaviour depending upon which online environment they are in. User surveys demonstrated that patrons are generally satisfied with either type of online reference assistance.Conclusion ‐ Both types of online reference service are meeting the needs of patrons. They are being used for different purposes and in different ways, so it may be worthwhile for libraries to consider offering both VR and IM reference. The relationship building that appears to take place more naturally in IM interactions demonstrates the benefits of librarians being more approachable with patrons in order to provide a

  18. Ileostomy - what to ask your doctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... had an operation to create an ileostomy or colostomy. Your ileostomy or colostomy changes the way your body gets rid of ... help you take care of your ileostomy or colostomy. Questions Will I be able to wear the ...

  19. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... video series. Dr. Sheldon Miller answers questions about color blindness, whether it can be treated, and how people ... an optical illusion? Click to Watch What is color blindness? Click to Watch How do I become a ...

  20. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Lead joe.balintfy@nih.gov Anna Harper - Media Relations afh@nei.nih.gov NEI Office of Communications ( ... comments to the NEI Office of Science Communications, Public Liaison, and Education. Technical questions about this website ...

  1. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... eyelids? Click to Watch Why don’t all animal eyes look the same? Click to Watch Why ... is maintained by the NEI Office of Science Communications, Public Liaison, and Education. Technical questions about this ...

  2. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Sheldon Miller answers questions about color blindness, whether it can be treated, and how people become color ... I’m sleeping? Click to Watch What does it mean to be nearsighted or farsighted? Click to ...

  3. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Grants and Funding Extramural Research Division of Extramural Science Programs Division of Extramural Activities Extramural Contacts NEI ... website is maintained by the NEI Office of Science Communications, Public Liaison, and Education. Technical questions about ...

  4. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Scientist Video Series Why can’t you see colors well in the dark? Do fish have eyelids? ... video series. Dr. Sheldon Miller answers questions about color blindness, whether it can be treated, and how ...

  5. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Sheldon Miller answers questions about color blindness, whether it can be treated, and how people become color ... I’m sleeping? Click to Watch What does it mean to be nearsighted or farsighted? Click to ...

  6. Fifty Years of the Spectrum Problem: Survey and New Results

    CERN Document Server

    Durand, Arnaud; Makowsky, Johann; More, Malika

    2009-01-01

    In 1952, Heinrich Scholz published a question in the Journal of Symbolic Logic asking for a characterization of spectra, i.e., sets of natural numbers that are the cardinalities of finite models of first order sentences. G\\"unter Asser asked whether the complement of a spectrum is always a spectrum. These innocent questions turned out to be seminal for the development of finite model theory and descriptive complexity. In this paper we survey developments over the last 50-odd years pertaining to the spectrum problem. Our presentation follows conceptual developments rather than the chronological order. Originally a number theoretic problem, it has been approached in terms of recursion theory, resource bounded complexity theory, classification by complexity of the defining sentences, and finally in terms of structural graph theory. Although Scholz' question was answered in various ways, Asser's question remains open. One appendix paraphrases the contents of several early and not easily accesible papers by G. Ass...

  7. Reflective Questioning in the Program Evaluation Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florez, MaryAnn Cunningham

    This paper explains how to use reflective questioning in adult English-as-a-Second-Language classes, describing how one teacher spends about 30 minutes at the end of every 3-month session asking learners to reflect on the work they and their teachers have been doing. Tips for reflecting with adult ESL students include the following: give the…

  8. SURVEY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    SURVEY er en udbredt metode og benyttes inden for bl.a. samfundsvidenskab, humaniora, psykologi og sundhedsforskning. Også uden for forskningsverdenen er der mange organisationer som f.eks. konsulentfirmaer og offentlige institutioner samt marketingsafdelinger i private virksomheder, der arbejder...... med surveys. Denne bog gennemgår alle surveyarbejdets faser og giver en praktisk indføring i: • design af undersøgelsen og udvælgelse af stikprøver, • formulering af spørgeskemaer samt indsamling og kodning af data, • metoder til at analysere resultaterne...

  9. How to Ask for a Favor: A Case Study on the Success of Altruistic Requests

    CERN Document Server

    Althoff, Tim; Jurafsky, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Requests are at the core of many social media systems such as question & answer sites and online philanthropy communities. While the success of such requests is critical to the success of the community, the factors that lead community members to satisfy a request are largely unknown. Success of a request depends on factors like who is asking, how they are asking, when are they asking, and most critically what is being requested, ranging from small favors to substantial monetary donations. We present a case study of altruistic requests in an online community where all requests ask for the very same contribution and do not offer anything tangible in return, allowing us to disentangle what is requested from textual and social factors. Drawing from social psychology literature, we extract high-level social features from text that operationalize social relations between recipient and donor and demonstrate that these extracted relations are predictive of success. More specifically, we find that clearly communic...

  10. Mining Branching Rules from Past Survey Data with an Illustration Using a Geriatric Assessment Survey for Older Adults with Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R. Jeske

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We construct a fast data mining algorithm that can be used to identify high-frequency response patterns in historical surveys. Identification of these patterns leads to the derivation of question branching rules that shorten the time required to complete a survey. The data mining algorithm allows the user to control the error rate that is incurred through the use of implied answers that go along with each branching rule. The context considered is binary response questions, which can be obtained from multi-level response questions through dichotomization. The algorithm is illustrated by the analysis of four sections of a geriatric assessment survey used by oncologists. Reductions in the number of questions that need to be asked in these four sections range from 33% to 54%.

  11. "Suntelligence" Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to the American Academy of Dermatology's "Suntelligence" sun-smart survey. Please answer the following questions to measure ... be able to view a ranking of major cities suntelligence based on residents' responses to this survey. ...

  12. The Development of Children's Information Gathering: To Look or to Ask?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitneva, Stanka A.; Lam, Nietzsche H. L.; Dunfield, Kristen A.

    2013-01-01

    The testimony of others and direct experience play a major role in the development of children's knowledge. Children actively use questions to seek others' testimony and explore the environment. It is unclear though whether children distinguish when it is better to ask from when it is better to try to find an answer by oneself. In 2 experiments,…

  13. NREL Partnership Survey - FY 2016 Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-09-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducts an annual partnership satisfaction survey in which we ask our clients to rate NREL in a number of areas. As a national laboratory, the principal areas we focus on include value, timeliness, quality, price, and capabilities. This fact sheet shows the results of a survey with 300 customers responding to 11 questions using ratings that vary from 'strongly agree' to 'strongly disagree.' In FY 16, 100% of the scores improved or were equal to FY 15 numbers.

  14. Ask Dr. Sue: "Children and Fevers."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, Susan S.

    1989-01-01

    Considers aspects of children's fevers. Answers questions concerning: (1) the temperature at which a fever is infectious; (2) the point at which a feverish child in care should be sent home; (3) the length of time a parent should wait before returning the child to day care; and (4) the way to take a child's temperature. (RJC)

  15. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... questions Clinical Studies Publications Catalog Photos and Images Spanish Language Information Dilated Exam Grants and Funding Extramural ... Contact Us A-Z Site Map Information in Spanish (Información en español) Website, Social Media Policies and ...

  16. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... questions Clinical Studies Publications Catalog Photos and Images Spanish Language Information Grants and Funding Extramural Research Division ... Site Map NEI on Social Media Information in Spanish (Información en español) Website, Social Media Policies and ...

  17. Ask a Scientist: What is Color Blindness?

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Watch Is perfect vision real? Click to Watch Are these common eye-related myths true or false? ... Media Information in Spanish (Información en español) Website, ... Office of Science Communications, Public Liaison, and Education. Technical questions about ...

  18. Zur Sicherheit: frag doch! Forschungsbericht Nr 30 (In Order to be Safe, Just Ask. Research Bulletin No. 30).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flammer, August; And Others

    Eighty-eight college students were invited to cook a chocolate mousse and were allowed first to ask any question that seemed helpful to completing the task. The questions were answered immediately according to a predetermined schema: in one condition the subjects were told that the task would be rather easy, in the other condition they were told…

  19. A practical guide to surveys and questionnaires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, Eric L; Voelker, Courtney C J; Nussenbaum, Brian; Rich, Jason T; Paniello, Randal C; Neely, J Gail

    2011-06-01

    Surveys with questionnaires play a vital role in decision and policy making in society. Within medicine, including otolaryngology, surveys with questionnaires may be the only method for gathering data on rare or unusual events. In addition, questionnaires can be developed and validated to be used as outcome measures in clinical trials and other clinical research architecture. Consequently, it is fundamentally important that such tools be properly developed and validated. Just asking questions that have not gone through rigorous design and development may be misleading and unfair at best; at worst, they can result in under- or overtreatment and unnecessary expense. Furthermore, it is important that consumers of the data produced by these instruments understand the principles of questionnaire design to interpret results in an optimal and meaningful way. This article presents a practical guide for understanding the methodologies of survey and questionnaire design, including the concepts of validity and reliability, how surveys are administered and implemented, and, finally, biases and pitfalls of surveys.

  20. The U. S. transportation sector in the year 2030: results of a two-part Delphi survey.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, G.; Stephens, T.S. (Energy Systems); (Univ. of California at Davis); (ES)

    2011-10-11

    A two-part Delphi Survey was given to transportation experts attending the Asilomar Conference on Transportation and Energy in August, 2011. The survey asked respondents about trends in the US transportation sector in 2030. Topics included: alternative vehicles, high speed rail construction, rail freight transportation, average vehicle miles traveled, truck versus passenger car shares, vehicle fuel economy, and biofuels in different modes. The survey consisted of two rounds -- both asked the same set of seven questions. In the first round, respondents were given a short introductory paragraph about the topic and asked to use their own judgment in their responses. In the second round, the respondents were asked the same questions, but were also given results from the first round as guidance. The survey was sponsored by Argonne National Lab (ANL), the National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL), and implemented by University of California at Davis, Institute of Transportation Studies. The survey was part of the larger Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project run by the Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. Of the 206 invitation letters sent, 94 answered all questions in the first round (105 answered at least one question), and 23 of those answered all questions in the second round. 10 of the 23 second round responses were at a discussion section at Asilomar, while the remaining were online. Means and standard deviations of responses from Round One and Two are given in Table 1 below. One main purpose of Delphi surveys is to reduce the variance in opinions through successive rounds of questioning. As shown in Table 1, the standard deviations of 25 of the 30 individual sub-questions decreased between Round One and Round Two, but the decrease was slight in most cases.