WorldWideScience

Sample records for survey feedback procedures

  1. Effective Feedback Procedures in Games for Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranowski, Moderator Tom; Bower, Participants Kelly; Krebs, Paul; Lamoth, Claudine J; Lyons, Elizabeth J

    2013-12-01

    Feedback on game performance can be provided in many ways (e.g., cumulative points on game achievements, points on selected aspects of game play, biofeedback, brief statements offered during gameplay on choices made, verbal feedback at end of gameplay on overall performance, etc.). Feedback could be used motivationally to maintain player interest and involvement, informationally to guide the player in more effective choices, to build player confidence, and for a variety of other purposes. Although diverse feedback types and purposes are possible, some are more likely to be useful and effective. We have contacted several accomplished game designers and game researchers to obtain their insights into issues in feedback in Games for Health Journal.

  2. Development of the GPSE : a tool to improve feedback on procedural skills in residency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nothnagle, Melissa; Reis, Shmuel; Goldman, Roberta; Diemers, Agnes

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Learning procedural skills requires supervised practice with feedback. Observation of performance provides an opportunity for feedback, but the quality of feedback is often poor. We developed an instrument to improve feedback during procedural skills training in residency.

  3. Content Analysis of Survey Feedback Meetings: An Evaluation Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-05-01

    AD-AO10 210 CONTENT ANALYSIS OF SURVEY FEEDBACK MEETINGS: AN EVALUATION TOOL Patricia A. Pecorella Michigan University Prepared for: Office of Naval...RECIPIENIT’S CATALOG NUMSEA 4, TITLE (#wtd$4bIII*) 5.&TYJ F REPORT 6PEFlIOg COVERlEO Content Analysis of Survey Feedback Meetings: Technical Report An...Ratings Coder Re1liability Evaluation Supervisory Leadership Consultant Roles Problem-Identification Survey Feedback Content Analysis Problem-Solving

  4. Reciprocal Feedback: Closing the Loop on Postactivity Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Those who conduct feedback surveys, which follow almost every CME presentation and medical-school lecture, would do well to offer participants' reciprocal feedback. That is, the course director should provide each survey respondent, on request, a brief summary of the comments received from this survey and the extent to which the recommendations will lead to objective improvements in the future. Surveyors who provide respondents with reciprocal feedback can expect heightened credibility, more reliable feedback in the future, and an added incentive to effect significant change for the better. Feedback has not circled all the way back until we have provided a succinct summary of results to those who have offered us their comments and suggestions. Let us close the loop; let reciprocal feedback become the last word in CME surveys.

  5. PEP surveying procedures and equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linker, F.

    1982-06-01

    The PEP Survey and Alignment System, which employs both laser-based and optical survey methods, is described. The laser is operated in conjunction with the Tektronix 4051 computer and surveying instruments such as ARM and SAM, system which is designed to automate data input, reduction, and production of alignment instructions. The laser system is used when surveying ring quadrupoles, main bend magnets, sextupoles, and is optional when surveying RF cavities and insertion quadrupoles. Optical methods usually require that data be manually entered into the computer for alignment, but in some cases, an element can be aligned using nominal values of fiducial locations without use of the computer. Optical surveying is used in the alignment of NIT and SIT, low field bend magnets, wigglers, RF cavities, and insertion quadrupoles.

  6. Corrected Feedback: A Procedure to Enhance Recall of Informed Consent to Research among Substance Abusing Offenders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Festinger, David S; Dugosh, Karen L; Croft, Jason R; Arabia, Patricia L; Marlowe, Douglas B

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the efficacy of corrected feedback for improving consent recall throughout the course of an ongoing longitudinal study. Participants (N = 135) were randomly assigned to either a corrected feedback or a no-feedback control condition. Participants completed a consent quiz 2-weeks after consenting to the host study and at months 1, 2, and 3. The corrected feedback group received corrections to erroneous responses and the no-feedback control group did not. The feedback group displayed significantly greater recall overall and in specific content areas (i.e., procedures, protections, risks/benefits). Results support the use of corrected feedback for improving consent recall.

  7. Feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Barbara K

    2004-12-01

    The emergency department provides a rich environment for diverse patient encounters, rapid clinical decision making, and opportunities to hone procedural skills. Well-prepared faculty can utilize this environment to teach residents and medical students and gain institutional recognition for their incomparable role and teamwork. Giving effective feedback is an essential skill for all teaching faculty. Feedback is ongoing appraisal of performance based on direct observation aimed at changing or sustaining a behavior. Tips from the literature and the author's experience are reviewed to provide formats for feedback, review of objectives, and elements of professionalism and how to deal with poorly performing students. Although the following examples pertain to medical student education, these techniques are applicable to the education of all adult learners, including residents and colleagues. Specific examples of redirection and reflection are offered, and pitfalls are reviewed. Suggestions for streamlining verbal and written feedback and obtaining feedback from others in a fast-paced environment are given. Ideas for further individual and group faculty development are presented.

  8. Affective feedback in a tutoring system for procedural tasks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heylen, D.K.J.; Vissers, M.; Akker, op den H.J.A.; Nijholt, A.; André, E.; Dybkjaer, L.; Minker, W.; Heisterkamp, P.

    2004-01-01

    We discuss the affective aspects of tutoring dialogues in an ITS -called INES- that helps students to practice nursing tasks using a haptic device and a virtual environment. Special attention is paid to affective control in the tutoring process by means of selecting the appropriate feedback, taking

  9. Non-Numeric Intrajudge Consistency Feedback in an Angoff Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, George M.

    2015-01-01

    The credibility of standard-setting cut scores depends in part on two sources of consistency evidence: intrajudge and interjudge consistency. Although intrajudge consistency feedback has often been provided to Angoff judges in practice, more evidence is needed to determine whether it achieves its intended effect. In this randomized experiment with…

  10. Using Video Modeling with Voiceover Instruction Plus Feedback to Train Staff to Implement Direct Teaching Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannakakos, Antonia R; Vladescu, Jason C; Kisamore, April N; Reeve, Sharon A

    2016-06-01

    Direct teaching procedures are often an important part of early intensive behavioral intervention for consumers with autism spectrum disorder. In the present study, a video model with voiceover (VMVO) instruction plus feedback was evaluated to train three staff trainees to implement a most-to-least direct (MTL) teaching procedure. Probes for generalization were conducted with untrained direct teaching procedures (i.e., least-to-most, prompt delay) and with an actual consumer. The results indicated that VMVO plus feedback was effective in training the staff trainees to implement the MTL procedure. Although additional feedback was required for the staff trainees to show mastery of the untrained direct teaching procedures (i.e., least-to-most and prompt delay) and with an actual consumer, moderate to high levels of generalization were observed.

  11. Time Optimal Synchronization Procedure and Associated Feedback Loops

    CERN Document Server

    Angoletta, Maria Elena; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    A procedure to increase the speed of currently used synchronization loops in a synchrotron by an order of magnitude is presented. Beams dynamics constraint imposes an upper limit on excursions in stable phase angle, and the procedure presented exploits this limit to arrive in the synchronized state from an arbitrary initial state in the fastest possible way. Detailed corrector design for beam phase loop, differential frequency loop and final synchronization loop is also presented. Finally, an overview of the synchronization methods currently deployed in some other CERN’s machines is provided, together with a brief comparison with the newly proposed time-optimal algorithm.

  12. La medida del feedback laboral en las organizaciones : adaptación del cuestionario Job Feedback Survey

    OpenAIRE

    García Álvarez, Ana Isabel; Ovejero Bernal, Anastasio

    1998-01-01

    Las organizaciones utilizan el feedback laboral para la socialización, entrenamiento, mejora del desempeño y dirección de sus miembros. En el presente trabajo se examinan las investigaciones que han culminado con el desarrollo del cuestionario Job Feedback Survey (Herold y Parsons, 1985) para medir el feedback laboral y así poder estudiar su impacto sobre la conducta del trabajador. El objetivo de la investigación es la traducción y adaptación de este cuestionario a nuestro país para utilizar...

  13. A Computational Model of the Temporal Dynamics of Plasticity in Procedural Learning: Sensitivity to Feedback Timing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian V. Valentin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The evidence is now good that different memory systems mediate the learning of different types of category structures. In particular, declarative memory dominates rule-based (RB category learning and procedural memory dominates information-integration (II category learning. For example, several studies have reported that feedback timing is critical for II category learning, but not for RB category learning – results that have broad support within the memory systems literature. Specifically, II category learning has been shown to be best with feedback delays of 500ms compared to delays of 0 and 1000ms, and highly impaired with delays of 2.5 seconds or longer. In contrast, RB learning is unaffected by any feedback delay up to 10 seconds. We propose a neurobiologically detailed theory of procedural learning that is sensitive to different feedback delays. The theory assumes that procedural learning is mediated by plasticity at cortical-striatal synapses that are modified by dopamine-mediated reinforcement learning. The model captures the time-course of the biochemical events in the striatum that cause synaptic plasticity, and thereby accounts for the empirical effects of various feedback delays on II category learning.

  14. Teachers' Use of a Self-Assessment Procedure: The Role of Criteria, Standards, Feedback and Reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Diggelen, Migchiel; den Brok, Perry; Beijaard, Douwe

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on the way teachers assess their own coaching competencies regarding the development of vocational education students' reflection skills. The participating teachers used a self-assessment procedure in which they had to judge themselves with the help of criteria and standards, received feedback from a colleague based on the…

  15. Procedural Attack! Procedural Generation for Populated Virtual Cities: A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Gaisbauer

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available On the one hand, creating rich virtual worlds "by hand" like in the game Grand Theft Auto V is hugely expensive and limited to large studios. On the other hand, procedural content generation (PCG allows tiny teams to create huge worlds like Hello Games did with only four people (in the beginning for the recently released game No Man's Sky. Following in the footsteps of Hello Games, this paper tries to equip the reader with an overview about the state-of-the-art of how to build such a virtual world, i.e., a populated virtual city with buildings, streets, parks, vegetation, humans, and vehicles, using just PCG assets. Each PCG asset that is envisioned to bring the city to life is grouped and discussed in detail and the latest research trends in PCG are presented together with open questions. Using the above-mentioned PCG assets, instead of months, a city can be built in a mere couple of minutes by a user without much experience in designing 3D assets. The city can then be used for many applications like games, virtual reality (VR, or film.

  16. 75 FR 26345 - Agency Information Collection (Ethics Consultation Feedback Tool (ECFT)) New Enrollee Survey...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-11

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Ethics Consultation Feedback Tool (ECFT)) New Enrollee Survey.... 2900-New (VA Form 10-0502).'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Ethics Consultation Feedback Tool (ECFT... experience during the Ethics Consultation Service. VA will be used the data to improve the process of...

  17. North Mississippi Refuges Complex Raptor Survey Routes and Procedure

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Report contains maps and location information for raptor survey points and procedures to conduct on Dahomey, Coldwater River, and Tallahatchie NWR.

  18. Just Another Student Survey?--Point-of-Contact Survey Feedback Enhances the Student Experience and Lets Researchers Gather Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Warren; Boyd, William; Boyd, Wendy; Hellmundt, Suzi

    2017-01-01

    When student surveys are conducted within university environments, one outcome of feedback to the researcher is that it provides insight into the potential ways that curriculum can be modified and how content can be better delivered. However, the benefit to the current students undertaking the survey is not always evident. By modifying Biggs'…

  19. The benefit of repetitive skills training and frequency of expert feedback in the early acquisition of procedural skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosse, Hans Martin; Mohr, Jonathan; Buss, Beate; Krautter, Markus; Weyrich, Peter; Herzog, Wolfgang; Jünger, Jana; Nikendei, Christoph

    2015-02-19

    Redundant training and feedback are crucial for successful acquisition of skills in simulation trainings. It is still unclear how or how much feedback should best be delivered to maximize its effect, and how learners' activity and feedback are optimally blended. To determine the influence of high- versus low-frequency expert feedback on the learning curve of students' clinical procedural skill acquisition in a prospective randomized study. N = 47 medical students were trained to insert a nasogastric tube in a mannequin, including structured feedback in the initial instruction phase at the beginning of the training (T1), and either additional repetitive feedback after each of their five subsequent repetitions (high-frequency feedback group, HFF group; N = 23) or additional feedback on just one occasion, after the fifth repetition only (low-frequency feedback group, LFF group; N = 24). We assessed a) task-specific clinical skill performance and b) global procedural performance (five items of the Integrated Procedural Performance Instrument (IPPI); on the basis of expert-rated videotapes at the beginning of the training (T1) and during the final, sixth trial (T2). The two study groups did not differ regarding their baseline data. The calculated ANOVA for task-specific clinical skill performance with the between-subject factor 'Group' (HFF vs. LFF) and within-subject factors 'Time' (T1 vs. T2) turned out not to be significant (p training (T2; p training (T2; p training.

  20. A survey on delayed feedback control of chaos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuping TIAN; Jiandong ZHU; Guanrong CHEN

    2005-01-01

    This paper introduces the basic idea and provides the mathematical formulation of the delayed feedback control (DFC) methodology, which has been widely used in chaos control. Stability analysis including the well-known odd number limitation of the DFC is reviewed. Some new developments in characterizing the limitation of the DFC are presented. Various modified DFC methods, which are developed in order to overcome the odd number limitation, are also described. Finally, some open problems in this research field are discussed.

  1. Survey Says: Using Teacher Feedback to Bolster Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, Ross; Lundy, Kasia

    2014-01-01

    Many of the leading private sector organizations have for years embraced a survey approach to improving products, services, and internal policies and processes. Like these successful private sector businesses, school systems can utilize a similar survey-based approach to improving teacher evaluation. Here, the authors provide and outline some…

  2. A survey on orthodontic retention procedures in The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renkema, A.M.; Sips, E.T.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to survey retention procedures used in orthodontic practices in The Netherlands. A questionnaire was sent to all 279 orthodontists working in The Netherlands. The questionnaire consisted of six parts, mainly containing multiple-choice questions. Information as to back

  3. Real-time force feedback during flexion-distraction procedure for low back pain: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudavalli, Maruti Ram; Cox, James M

    2014-06-01

    A form of chiropractic procedure known as Cox flexion-distraction is used by chiropractors to treat low back pain. Patient lies face down on a specially designed table having a stationery thoracic support and a moveable caudal support for the legs. The Doctor of Chiropractic (DC) holds a manual contact applying forces over the posterior lumbar spine and press down on the moving leg support to create traction effects in the lumbar spine. This paper reports on the development of real-time feedback on the applied forces during the application of the flexion-distraction procedure. In this pilot study we measured the forces applied by experienced DCs as well as novice DCs in using this procedure. After a brief training with real-time feedback novice DCs have improved on the magnitude of the applied forces. This real-time feedback technology is promising to do systematic studies in training DCs during the application of this procedure.

  4. Procedures manual for the ORNL Radiological Survey Activities (RASA) Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myrick, T.E.; Berven, B.A.; Cottrell, W.D.; Goldsmith, W.A.; Haywood, F.F.

    1987-04-01

    The portion of the radiological survey program performed by ORNL is the subject of this Procedures Manual. The RASA group of the Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) at ORNL is responsible for the planning, conducting, and reporting of the results of radiological surveys at specified sites and associated vicinity properties. The results of these surveys are used by DOE in determining the need for and extent of remedial actions. Upon completion of the necessary remedial actions, the ORNL-RASA group or other OOS contractor may be called upon to verify the effectiveness of the remedial action. Information from these postremedial action surveys is included as part of the data base used by DOE in certifying a site for unrestricted use.

  5. Uncovering star formation feedback and magnetism in galaxies with radio continuum surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaei, F. S.

    2017-03-01

    Recent studies show the importance of the star formation feedback in changing the energetic and structure of galaxies. Dissecting the physics of the feedback is hence crucial to understand the evolution of galaxies. Full polarization radio continuum surveys can be ideally performed to trace not only star formation but also the energetic components of the interstellar medium (ISM), the magnetic fields and cosmic ray electrons. Using the SKA precursors, we investigate the effect of the massive star formation on the ISM energy balance in nearby galaxies. Our multi-scale and multi-frequency surveys show that cosmic rays are injected in star forming regions and lose energy propagating away from their birth place. Due to the star formation feedback, cosmic ray electron population becomes younger and more energetic. Star formation also amplifies the turbulent magnetic field inserting a high pressure which is important in energy balance in the ISM and structure formation in the host galaxy.

  6. Uncovering star formation feedback and magnetism in galaxies with radio continuum surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Tabatabaei, Fatemeh S

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies show the importance of the star formation feedback in changing the energetic and structure of galaxies. Dissecting the physics of the feedback is hence crucial to understand the evolution of galaxies. Full polarization radio continuum surveys can be ideally performed to trace not only star formation but also the energetic components of the interstellar medium (ISM), the magnetic fields and cosmic ray electrons. Using the SKA precursors, we investigate the effect of the massive star formation on the ISM energy balance in nearby galaxies. Our multi-scale and multi-frequency surveys show that cosmic rays are injected in star forming regions and lose energy propagating away from their birth place. Due to the star formation feedback, cosmic ray electron population becomes younger and more energetic. Star formation also amplifies the turbulent magnetic field inserting a high pressure which is important in energy balance in the ISM and structure formation in the host galaxy.

  7. The National Criminal Justice Treatment Practices survey: multilevel survey methods and procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taxman, Faye S; Young, Douglas W; Wiersema, Brian; Rhodes, Anne; Mitchell, Suzanne

    2007-04-01

    The National Criminal Justice Treatment Practices (NCJTP) survey provides a comprehensive inquiry into the nature of programs and services provided to adult and juvenile offenders involved in the justice system in the United States. The multilevel survey design covers topics such as the mission and goals of correctional and treatment programs; organizational climate and culture for providing services; organizational capacity and needs; opinions of administrators and staff regarding rehabilitation, punishment, and services provided to offenders; treatment policies and procedures; and working relationships between correctional and other agencies. The methodology generates national estimates of the availability of programs and services for offenders. This article details the methodology and sampling frame for the NCJTP survey, response rates, and survey procedures. Prevalence estimates of juvenile and adult offenders under correctional control are provided with externally validated comparisons to illustrate the veracity of the methodology. Limitations of the survey methods are also discussed.

  8. A survey of dermatology resident education in cosmetic procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Joslyn S; Adgerson, Cheri N; Anderson, Bryan E

    2013-02-01

    The demands for cosmetic procedures are increasing. Dermatologists perform many of these procedures, therefore adequate education and training during residency is important. Surveys demonstrate dermatology residents desire more training even while faculty members believe this has already become a more prominent feature of resident education. We sought to assess the time and methods dedicated to education and training of cosmetic procedures in dermatology residency. A 26-question survey was developed and electronically distributed in May 2010 to dermatology program directors via the Association of Professors of Dermatology list-serve with their approval. Program directors were asked to forward the e-mail to their instructors of cosmetic/procedural dermatology, and chief residents. Responses were anonymous. A total of 86 responses were collected. In all, 67% (n = 54) of respondents had formal lectures focusing on cosmetic dermatology. Lecture topics reported by more than 50% of respondents included botulinum toxin injection, lasers, soft tissue augmentation, chemical peels, and sclerotherapy. Topics such as dermabrasion, liposuction, and scar revision were less commonly taught. The most commonly encountered and performed procedures were botulinum toxin injection and lasers (100%, n = 86); 98.8% (n = 85) encounter soft tissue augmentation and 95.4% (n = 82) encounter both chemical peels and sclerotherapy. Resident experience performing procedures as the first assistant or as the first surgeon varied widely. The limitations of this study are that the data were subjectively reported so results may differ from the true amount of time spent in any activity. The data may be biased by the population that responded as they may have strong opinions supporting or opposing training in cosmetic procedures. The data also may have been skewed by the small percentage of participants who were instructors of cosmetic dermatology (21%), chief residents (20%), and others respondents (8

  9. Procedure for preventing response strain on random interval schedules with a linear feedback loop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Phil

    2016-03-01

    An experiment examined the impact of a procedure designed to prevent response or extinction strain occurring on random interval schedules with a linear feedback loop (i.e., an RI+ schedule). Rats lever-pressed for food reinforcement on either a RI+ or a random interval (RI) schedule that was matched to the RI+ schedule in terms of reinforcement rate. Two groups of rats responded on an RI+ and two on an RI schedule matched for rate of reinforcement. One group on each schedule also received response-independent food if there had been no response for 60 s, and response-independent food continued to be delivered on an RT-60 schedule until a response was made. Rats on the RI and RI+ obtained similar rates of reinforcement and had similar reinforced inter-response times to one another. On the schedules without response-independent food, rats had similar rates of response to one another. However, while the delivery of response-independent food reduced rates of response on an RI schedule, they enhanced response rates on an RI+ schedule. These results suggest that rats can display sensitivity to the molar aspects of the free-operant contingency, when procedures are implemented to reduce the impact of factors such as extinction-strain.

  10. Optimising surgical training: use of feedback to reduce errors during a simulated surgical procedure.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Boyle, Emily

    2011-08-01

    To assess the effect of proximate or immediate feedback during an intensive training session. The authors hypothesised that provision of feedback during a training session would improve performance and learning curves.

  11. Do 360-degree Feedback Survey Results Relate to Patient Satisfaction Measures?

    OpenAIRE

    Hageman, Michiel G. J. S.; Ring, David C.; Gregory, Paul J.; Rubash, Harry E.; Harmon, Larry

    2014-01-01

    Background There is evidence that feedback from 360-degree surveys—combined with coaching—can improve physician team performance and quality of patient care. The Physicians Universal Leadership-Teamwork Skills Education (PULSE) 360 is one such survey tool that is used to assess work colleagues’ and coworkers’ perceptions of a physician’s leadership, teamwork, and clinical practice style. The Clinician & Group-Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and System (CG-CAHPS), developed by the ...

  12. User Feedback Procedures; Part III of Scientific Report No. ISR-18, Information Storage and Retrieval...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY. Dept. of Computer Science.

    Part Three of this five part report on Salton's Magical Automatic Retriever of Texts (SMART) project contains four papers. The first: "Variations on the Query Splitting Technique with Relevance Feedback" by T. P. Baker discusses some experiments in relevance feedback performed with variations on the technique of query splitting. The…

  13. Audio Feedback -- Better Feedback?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelkel, Susanne; Mello, Luciane V.

    2014-01-01

    National Student Survey (NSS) results show that many students are dissatisfied with the amount and quality of feedback they get for their work. This study reports on two case studies in which we tried to address these issues by introducing audio feedback to one undergraduate (UG) and one postgraduate (PG) class, respectively. In case study one…

  14. Do 360-degree feedback survey results relate to patient satisfaction measures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hageman, Michiel G J S; Ring, David C; Gregory, Paul J; Rubash, Harry E; Harmon, Larry

    2015-05-01

    There is evidence that feedback from 360-degree surveys-combined with coaching-can improve physician team performance and quality of patient care. The Physicians Universal Leadership-Teamwork Skills Education (PULSE) 360 is one such survey tool that is used to assess work colleagues' and coworkers' perceptions of a physician's leadership, teamwork, and clinical practice style. The Clinician & Group-Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and System (CG-CAHPS), developed by the US Department of Health and Human Services to serve as the benchmark for quality health care, is a survey tool for patients to provide feedback that is based on their recent experiences with staff and clinicians and soon will be tied to Medicare-based compensation of participating physicians. Prior research has indicated that patients and coworkers often agree in their assessment of physicians' behavioral patterns. The goal of the current study was to determine whether 360-degree, also called multisource, feedback provided by coworkers could predict patient satisfaction/experience ratings. A significant relationship between these two forms of feedback could enable physicians to take a more proactive approach to reinforce their strengths and identify any improvement opportunities in their patient interactions by reviewing feedback from team members. An automated 360-degree software process may be a faster, simpler, and less resource-intensive approach than telephoning and interviewing patients for survey responses, and it potentially could facilitate a more rapid credentialing or quality improvement process leading to greater fiscal and professional development gains for physicians. Our primary research question was to determine if PULSE 360 coworkers' ratings correlate with CG-CAHPS patients' ratings of overall satisfaction, recommendation of the physician, surgeon respect, and clarity of the surgeon's explanation. Our secondary research questions were to determine whether CG-CAHPS scores

  15. Leadership development in a professional medical society using 360-degree survey feedback to assess emotional intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Paul J; Robbins, Benjamin; Schwaitzberg, Steven D; Harmon, Larry

    2016-12-30

    The current research evaluated the potential utility of a 360-degree survey feedback program for measuring leadership quality in potential committee leaders of a professional medical association (PMA). Emotional intelligence as measured by the extent to which self-other agreement existed in the 360-degree survey ratings was explored as a key predictor of leadership quality in the potential leaders. A non-experimental correlational survey design was implemented to assess the variation in leadership quality scores across the sample of potential leaders. A total of 63 of 86 (76%) of those invited to participate did so. All potential leaders received feedback from PMA Leadership, PMA Colleagues, and PMA Staff and were asked to complete self-ratings regarding their behavior. Analyses of variance revealed a consistent pattern of results as Under-Estimators and Accurate Estimators-Favorable were rated significantly higher than Over-Estimators in several leadership behaviors. Emotional intelligence as conceptualized in this study was positively related to overall performance ratings of potential leaders. The ever-increasing roles and potential responsibilities for PMAs suggest that these organizations should consider multisource performance reviews as these potential future PMA executives rise through their organizations to assume leadership positions with profound potential impact on healthcare. The current findings support the notion that potential leaders who demonstrated a humble pattern or an accurate pattern of self-rating scored significantly higher in their leadership, teamwork, and interpersonal/communication skills than those with an aggrandizing self-rating.

  16. Australian and New Zealand Perfusion Survey: Management and Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuble, Sigrid C.; Willcox, Timothy W.; Baker, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract: In this report, we will discuss management and procedural aspects of perfusion practice. This report allows us to compare and contrast recent trends and changes in perfusion with historic practices. A survey comprised of 233 single-answer and 12 open-ended questions was sent by e-mail to senior perfusionists or individuals in charge of perfusion in 40 hospital groups. The survey encompasses a review of the perfusion practices for the calendar year of 2003, and respondents were required to answer the survey based on the predominant practice in their institutions. Standard management of routine adult cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) in 2003 consisted of perfusion strategies that achieved a target temperature of 32.0°C (range, 28.0–35.0°C), a flow index of 2.4 L/min/m2 (range, 1.6–3.0 L/min/m2) during normothermia and 1.8 L/min/m2 (range, 1.2–3.0 L/min/m2) during hypothermia, and a pressure during CPB between 50 (range, 30–65 mmHg) and 70 mmHg (range, 60–95 mmHg). Myocardial protection with blood cardioplegia was used in 77% of the 20,688 CPB cases, whereas in 53% cases, cardiotomy blood was never processed. Pre-operatively, 76% of perfusion groups assessed their patients (21% directly with the patient), and 85% responded that perfusionists performed or participated in a formal pre-bypass checklist. The majority of the perfusion groups used a handwritten perfusion record (62%), 12% used an electronic perfusion record, and 26% used both, whereas more than one half of the groups were involved in quality assurance (79%), incident reporting (74%), audits (62%), research (53%), participating in interdisciplinary meetings (53%), and morbidity and mortality meetings (65%). Only 26% conducted formal perfusion team meetings. This report outlines the status of clinical management and procedural performance for perfusion practices in Australia and New Zealand in 2003. Awareness of these trends will allow perfusionists to assess both individual practices and

  17. A Pharmaceutical Bioethics Consultation Service: Six-Year Descriptive Characteristics and Results of a Feedback Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Campen, Luann E; Allen, Albert J; Watson, Susan B; Therasse, Donald G

    2015-04-03

    Background: Bioethics consultations are conducted in varied settings, including hospitals, universities, and other research institutions, but there is sparse information about bioethics consultations conducted in corporate settings such as pharmaceutical companies. The purpose of this article is to describe a bioethics consultation service at a pharmaceutical company, to report characteristics of consultations completed by the service over a 6-year period, and to share results of a consultation feedback survey. Methods: Data on the descriptive characteristics of bioethics consultations were collected from 2008 to 2013 and analyzed in Excel 2007. Categorical data were analyzed via the pivot table function, and time-based variables were analyzed via formulas. The feedback survey was administered to consultation requesters from 2009 to 2012 and also analyzed in Excel 2007. Results: Over the 6-year period, 189 bioethics consultations were conducted. The number of consultations increased from five per year in 2008 to approximately one per week in 2013. During this time, the format of the consultation service was changed from a committee-only approach to a tiered approach (tailored to the needs of the case). The five most frequent topics were informed consent, early termination of a clinical trial, benefits and risks, human biological samples, and patient rights. The feedback survey results suggest the consultation service is well regarded overall and viewed as approachable, helpful, and responsive. Conclusions: Pharmaceutical bioethics consultation is a unique category of bioethics consultation that primarily focuses on pharmaceutical research and development but also touches on aspects of clinical ethics, business ethics, and organizational ethics. Results indicate there is a demand for a tiered bioethics consultation service within this pharmaceutical company and that advice was valued. This company's experience indicates that a bioethics consultation service raises

  18. Constructing a survey over time: Audio-visual feedback and theatre sketches in rural Mali

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Véronique Hertrich

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge dissemination is an emerging issue in population studies, both in terms of ethics and data quality. The challenge is especially important in long term follow-up surveys and it requires methodological imagination when the population is illiterate. The paper presents the dissemination project developed in a demographic surveillance system implemented in rural Mali over the last 20 years. After basic experience of document transfer, the feedback strategy was developed through audiovisual shows and theatre sketches. The advantages and drawbacks of these media are discussed, in terms of scientific communication and the construction of dialogue with the target population.

  19. Factors influencing trainers' feedback-giving behavior: a cross-sectional survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelgrim, E.A.M.; Kramer, A.W.M.; Mokkink, H.G.A.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The literature provides some insight into the role of feedback givers, but little information about within-trainer factors influencing 'feedback-giving behaviours'. We looked for relationships between characteristics of feedback givers (self-efficacy, task perception, neuroticism,

  20. A Survey on Procedural Modelling for Virtual Worlds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smelik, R.M.; Tutenel, T.; Bidarra, R.; Benes, B.

    2014-01-01

    Procedural modelling deals with (semi-)automatic content generation by means of a program or procedure. Among other advantages, its data compression and the potential to generate a large variety of detailed content with reduced human intervention, have made procedural modelling attractive for creati

  1. The MAGNUM survey: positive feedback in the nuclear region of NGC 5643 suggested by MUSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresci, G.; Marconi, A.; Zibetti, S.; Risaliti, G.; Carniani, S.; Mannucci, F.; Gallazzi, A.; Maiolino, R.; Balmaverde, B.; Brusa, M.; Capetti, A.; Cicone, C.; Feruglio, C.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Nagao, T.; Oliva, E.; Salvato, M.; Sani, E.; Tozzi, P.; Urrutia, T.; Venturi, G.

    2015-10-01

    We study the ionization and kinematics of the ionized gas in the nuclear region of the barred Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 5643 using MUSE integral field observations in the framework of the Measuring Active Galactic Nuclei Under MUSE Microscope (MAGNUM) survey. The data were used to identify regions with different ionization conditions and to map the gas density and the dust extinction. We find evidence for a double-sided ionization cone, possibly collimated by a dusty structure surrounding the nucleus. At the center of the ionization cone, outflowing ionized gas is revealed as a blueshifted, asymmetric wing of the [OIII] emission line, up to projected velocity v10 ~ -450 km s-1. The outflow is also seen as a diffuse, low-luminosity radio and X-ray jet, with similar extension. The outflowing material points in the direction of two clumps characterized by prominent line emission with spectra typical of HII regions, located at the edge of the dust lane of the bar. We propose that the star formation in the clumps is due to positive feedback induced by gas compression by the nuclear outflow, providing the first candidate for outflow-induced star formation in a Seyfert-like, radio-quiet AGN. This suggests that positive feedback may be a relevant mechanism in shaping the black hole-host galaxy coevolution. This work is based on observations made at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile (ESO program 60.A-9339).

  2. Systematic errors in the measurement of neutrino masses due to baryonic feedback processes: Prospects for stage IV lensing surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Natarajan, Aravind; Battaglia, Nicholas; Trac, Hy

    2014-01-01

    We examine the importance of baryonic feedback effects on the matter power spectrum on small scales, and the implications for the precise measurement of neutrino masses through gravitational weak lensing. Planned large galaxy surveys such as the Large Synoptic Sky Telescope (LSST) and Euclid are expected to measure the sum of neutrino masses to extremely high precision, sufficient to detect non-zero neutrino masses even in the minimal mass normal hierarchy. We show that weak lensing of galaxies while being a very good probe of neutrino masses, is extremely sensitive to baryonic feedback processes. We use publicly available results from the Overwhelmingly Large Simulations (OWLS) project to investigate the effects of active galactic nuclei feedback, the nature of the stellar initial mass function, and gas cooling rates, on the measured weak lensing shear power spectrum. Using the Fisher matrix formalism and priors from CMB+BAO data, we show that when one does not account for feedback, the measured neutrino mas...

  3. Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge Nightjar Survey Network Survey Field Procedures and Completed Data Sheets

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Raw data and survey instructions from the Nightjar Survey Network's nighjar survey on Okefenokee NWR. Nightjar Surveys are standardized population counts conducted...

  4. SAS procedures for designing and analyzing sample surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford, Joshua D.; Reinecke, Kenneth J.; Kaminski, Richard M.

    2003-01-01

    Complex surveys often are necessary to estimate occurrence (or distribution), density, and abundance of plants and animals for purposes of re-search and conservation. Most scientists are familiar with simple random sampling, where sample units are selected from a population of interest (sampling frame) with equal probability. However, the goal of ecological surveys often is to make inferences about populations over large or complex spatial areas where organisms are not homogeneously distributed or sampling frames are in-convenient or impossible to construct. Candidate sampling strategies for such complex surveys include stratified,multistage, and adaptive sampling (Thompson 1992, Buckland 1994).

  5. Factors influencing trainers' feedback-giving behavior: a cross-sectional survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelgrim, E.A.M.; Kramer, A.W.M.; Mokkink, H.G.A.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The literature provides some insight into the role of feedback givers, but little information about within-trainer factors influencing 'feedback-giving behaviours'. We looked for relationships between characteristics of feedback givers (self-efficacy, task perception, neuroticism, extrav

  6. Nursing home administrators' perspectives on a study feedback report: a cross sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boström, Anne-Marie; Cranley, Lisa A; Hutchinson, Alison M; Cummings, Greta G; Norton, Peter G; Estabrooks, Carole A

    2012-09-13

    This project is part of the Translating Research in Elder Care (TREC) program of research, a multi-level and longitudinal research program being conducted in 36 nursing homes in three Canadian Prairie Provinces. The overall goal of TREC is to improve the quality of care for older persons living in nursing homes and the quality of work life for care providers. The purpose of this paper is to report on development and evaluation of facility annual reports (FARs) from facility administrators' perspectives on the usefulness, meaningfulness, and understandability of selected data from the TREC survey. A cross sectional survey design was used in this study. The feedback reports were developed in collaboration with participating facility administrators. FARs presented results in four contextual areas: workplace culture, feedback processes, job satisfaction, and staff burnout. Six weeks after FARs were mailed to each administrator, we conducted structured telephone interviews with administrators to elicit their evaluation of the FARs. Administrators were also asked if they had taken any actions as a result of the FAR. Descriptive and inferential statistics, as well as content analysis for open-ended questions, were used to summarize findings. Thirty-one facility administrators (representing thirty-two facilities) participated in the interviews. Six administrators had taken action and 18 were planning on taking action as a result of FARs. The majority found the four contextual areas addressed in FAR to be useful, meaningful, and understandable. They liked the comparisons made between data from years one and two and between their facility and other TREC study sites in their province. Twenty-two indicated that they would like to receive information on additional areas such as aggressive behaviours of residents and information sharing. Twenty-four administrators indicated that FARs contained enough information, while eight found FARs 'too short'. Administrators who reported

  7. Nursing home administrators’ perspectives on a study feedback report: a cross sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boström Anne-Marie

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This project is part of the Translating Research in Elder Care (TREC program of research, a multi-level and longitudinal research program being conducted in 36 nursing homes in three Canadian Prairie Provinces. The overall goal of TREC is to improve the quality of care for older persons living in nursing homes and the quality of work life for care providers. The purpose of this paper is to report on development and evaluation of facility annual reports (FARs from facility administrators’ perspectives on the usefulness, meaningfulness, and understandability of selected data from the TREC survey. Methods A cross sectional survey design was used in this study. The feedback reports were developed in collaboration with participating facility administrators. FARs presented results in four contextual areas: workplace culture, feedback processes, job satisfaction, and staff burnout. Six weeks after FARs were mailed to each administrator, we conducted structured telephone interviews with administrators to elicit their evaluation of the FARs. Administrators were also asked if they had taken any actions as a result of the FAR. Descriptive and inferential statistics, as well as content analysis for open-ended questions, were used to summarize findings. Results Thirty-one facility administrators (representing thirty-two facilities participated in the interviews. Six administrators had taken action and 18 were planning on taking action as a result of FARs. The majority found the four contextual areas addressed in FAR to be useful, meaningful, and understandable. They liked the comparisons made between data from years one and two and between their facility and other TREC study sites in their province. Twenty-two indicated that they would like to receive information on additional areas such as aggressive behaviours of residents and information sharing. Twenty-four administrators indicated that FARs contained enough information, while eight

  8. Procedures, Resources and Selected Results of the Deep Ecliptic Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buie, M. W.; Millis, R. L.; Wasserman, L. H.; Elliot, J. L.; Kern, S. D.; Clancy, K. B.; Chiang, E. I.; Jordan, A. B.; Meech, K. J.; Wagner, R. M.; Trilling, D. E.

    2003-06-01

    The Deep Ecliptic Survey is a project whose goal is to survey a large area of the near-ecliptic region to a faint limiting magnitude (R ~ 24) in search of objects in the outer solar system. We are collecting a large homogeneous data sample from the Kitt Peak Mayall 4-m and Cerro Tololo Blanco 4-m telescopes with the Mosaic prime-focus CCD cameras. Our goal is to collect a sample of 500 objects with good orbits to further our understanding of the dynamical structure of the outer solar system. This survey has been in progress since 1998 and is responsible for 272 designated discoveries as of March 2003. We summarize our techniques, highlight recent results, and describe publically available resources.

  9. A Survey of Procedural Methods for Terrain Modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smelik, R.M.; Kraker, J.K. de; Groenewegen, S.A.; Tutenel, T.; Bidarra, R.

    2009-01-01

    Procedural methods are a promising but underused alternative to manual content creation. Commonly heard drawbacks are the randomness of and the lack of control over the output and the absence of integrated solutions, although more recent publications increasingly address these issues. This paper sur

  10. Evaluating the performance of survey-based operational management procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pomarede, M.; Hillary, R.; Ibaibarriaga, L.; Bogaards, J.A.; Apostolaki, P.

    2010-01-01

    The design and evaluation of survey-based management strategies is addressed in this article, using three case-study fisheries: North Sea herring, Bay of Biscay anchovy and North Sea cod, with a brief history and the main management issues with each fishery outlined. A range of operational managemen

  11. Nursing procedures during continuous renal replacement therapies: a national survey

    OpenAIRE

    Ricci, Zaccaria; Benelli, Sonia; Barbarigo, Fabio; Cocozza, Giulia; Pettinelli, Noemi; Di Luca, Emanuela; Mettifogo, Mariangela; Toniolo, Andrea; Ronco, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The current role of nurses in the management of critically ill patients needing continuous renal replacement therapies is clearly fundamental. The care of these complex patients is typically shared by critical care and dialysis nurses: their precise duties may vary from country to country. Methods To clarify this issue we conducted a national-level survey at a recent Italian course on nursing practices during continuous renal replacement therapies. Results A total of 119 question...

  12. National survey on patient's fears before a general surgery procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez Lobato, Rosa Carmen; Soria-Aledo, Víctor; Jover Navalón, José María; Calvo Vecino, José María

    2015-12-01

    To assess the magnitude of the different causes of anxiety in patients and families, facing surgery. Cross-sectional multicenter national survey recruiting 1,260 participants between patients and companions, analyzing the impact of 14 areas selected based on scientific publications aimed at the general public, concerning patients and/or companions, focused on concern about surgery. Patient sex, age, type of surgery (minor/major) and expected inpatient or ambulatory surgery were analyzed. For the companions sex and age, and relationship to patient were analyzed. In both cases it was assessed based on a unidimensional scale of 0 to 10, with 0 being be minimal cause for concern and 10, maximum. The most prominent have been the fear of the unknown, possible complications, the impact on quality of life, the accuracy of diagnosis and possible malignancy of the disease, as well as anesthesia and pain control. There are significant differences in the involvement of patients and companions; and are also differences by sex and age of the patient; type of surgery (minor/major) and expected hospital admission or not. The patient faces surgery with a number of fears that can be reduced with increased information. Copyright © 2014 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Increasing Dopamine Levels in the Brain Improves Feedback-Based Procedural Learning in Healthy Participants: An Artificial-Grammar-Learning Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Meinou H.; Ulte, Catrin; Zwitserlood, Pienie; Szymanski, Barbara; Knecht, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Recently, an increasing number of studies have suggested a role for the basal ganglia and related dopamine inputs in procedural learning, specifically when learning occurs through trial-by-trial feedback (Shohamy, Myers, Kalanithi, & Gluck. (2008). "Basal ganglia and dopamine contributions to probabilistic category learning." "Neuroscience and…

  14. Increasing Dopamine Levels in the Brain Improves Feedback-Based Procedural Learning in Healthy Participants: An Artificial-Grammar-Learning Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Meinou H.; Ulte, Catrin; Zwitserlood, Pienie; Szymanski, Barbara; Knecht, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Recently, an increasing number of studies have suggested a role for the basal ganglia and related dopamine inputs in procedural learning, specifically when learning occurs through trial-by-trial feedback (Shohamy, Myers, Kalanithi, & Gluck. (2008). "Basal ganglia and dopamine contributions to probabilistic category learning." "Neuroscience and…

  15. The results of a survey highlighting issues with feedback on medical training in the United Kingdom and how a Smartphone App could provide a solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Thomas G; Hood, Gill; Farrell, Tom

    2015-11-06

    Feedback drives learning in medical education. Healthcare Supervision Logbook (HSL) is a Smartphone App developed at Sheffield Teaching Hospitals for providing feedback on medical training, from both a trainee's and a supervisor's perspective. In order to establish a mandate for the role of HSL in clinical practice, a large survey was carried out. Two surveys (one for doctors undertaking specialty training and a second for consultants supervising their training) were designed. The survey for doctors-in-training was distributed to all specialty trainees in the South and West localities of the Health Education Yorkshire and the Humber UK region. The survey for supervisors was distributed to all consultants involved in educational and clinical supervision of specialty trainees at Sheffield Teaching Hospitals. The results confirm that specialty trainees provide feedback on their training infrequently-66 % do so only annually. 96 % of the specialty trainees owned a Smartphone and 45 % said that they would be willing to use a Smartphone App to provide daily feedback on the clinical and educational supervision they receive. Consultant supervisors do not receive regular feedback on the educational and clinical supervision they provide to trainees-56 % said they never received such feedback and 33 % said it was only on an annual basis. 86 % of consultants surveyed owned a Smartphone and 41 % said they would be willing to use a Smartphone App to provide feedback on the performance of trainees they were supervising. Feedback on medical training is recorded by specialty trainees infrequently and consultants providing educational and clinical supervision often do not receive any feedback on their performance in this area. HSL is a simple, quick and efficient way to collect and collate feedback on medical training to improve this situation. Good support and education needs to be provided when implementing this new technology.

  16. The Fruit & Vegetable Screener in the 2000 California Health Interview Survey: Scoring Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoring procedures were developed to convert the individual respondent's screener responses to estimates of individual dietary intake for servings of fruits and vegetables using USDA's 1994-96 Continuing Survey of Food Intakes of Individuals (CSFII 94-96) dietary recall data.

  17. Multifactor Screener in the 2000 National Health Interview Survey Cancer Control Supplement: Scoring Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoring procedures were developed to convert a respondent's screener responses to estimates of individual dietary intake for percentage energy from fat, grams of fiber, and servings of fruits and vegetables, using USDA's 1994-96 Continuing Survey of Food Intakes of Individuals (CSFII 94-96) dietary recall data.

  18. Gathering Feedback from Early-Career Faculty: Speaking with and Surveying Agricultural Faculty Members about Research Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah C. Williams

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In spring 2013, the Life Sciences Data Services Librarian at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign gave a data management presentation to early-career, agricultural faculty members participating in a selective program designed to help them succeed in the tenure process. After the presentation, the participants were invited to complete an online survey that included questions on how well informed and prepared they feel about funding agencies’ data requirements, what data challenges they face, and how the library can help with new or improved services in this area. The presentation discussion and survey responses suggested value in offering data training specifically for agricultural graduate students and research assistants and compiling examples of data management plans from successful grant proposals. Despite the small number of participants, the feedback provides an interesting glimpse into data management from the perspective of early-career faculty.

  19. Increasing dopamine levels in the brain improves feedback-based procedural learning in healthy participants: An artificial-grammar-learning experiment

    OpenAIRE

    De Vries, M.; Ulte, C.; Zwitserlood, P.; Szymanski, B.; Knecht, S.

    2010-01-01

    Recently, an increasing number of studies have suggested a role for the basal ganglia and related dopamine inputs in procedural learning, specifically when learning occurs through trial-by-trial feedback (Shohamy, Myers, Kalanithi, & Gluck. (2008). Basal ganglia and dopamine contributions to probabilistic category learning. Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, 32, 219–236). A necessary relationship has however only been demonstrated in patient studies. In the present study, we show for the...

  20. A cross sectional survey of urban Canadian family physicians' provision of minor office procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rungi Arne A

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A discordance exists between the proportion of Canadian family physicians that we expect should be able to perform minor office procedures and the actual provision of care. This pattern has not been extensively studied. The objective of this study was to determine the current patterns and obstacles relating to the provision of four minor office procedures by GP/FPs in a small city in Ontario, Canada. An additional goal was to determine the impact of the remuneration method on the provision of such services. Methods A survey was mailed to all GP/FPs practising in Kingston, Ontario. The main outcomes measured in the study were work setting and remuneration method, current procedural practices with respect to four procedures, reasons for not performing procedures, current skill levels, and desire to upgrade. Results Surveys were mailed to all 108 GP/FPs in the City of Kingston. Completed surveys were collected for 82 percent (89/108 and 10 were excluded leaving 79 eligible participants. The percentages of GP/FPs who reported performing the procedure were as follows: dermatological excision (63.3%, endometrial biopsy (35.4%, shoulder injection (31.6%, and knee injection (43.0%. The majority of GP/FPs who would not do the procedure themselves would refer to a specialist colleague rather than to another GP/FP. The top reason cited for not performing a specific procedure was "lack of up to date skills" followed by "lack of time". The latter was the only statistically significant difference reported between GP/FPs working in Family Health Networks and GP/FPs working in fee for service settings (26.7% vs 47.0%, χ2 = 4.191 p = 0.041. Conclusion A large number of Kingston, Ontario GP/FPs refer patients who require one of four minor office-based procedures for specialist consultation. Referral to other GP/FP colleagues appears underutilized. A perceived lack of up to date skills and a lack of time appear to be concerns. GP/FPs working

  1. Volunteer feedback and perceptions after participation in a phase I, first-in-human Ebola vaccine trial: An anonymous survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayer, Julie-Anne; Siegrist, Claire-Anne; Huttner, Angela

    2017-01-01

    The continued participation of volunteers in clinical trials is crucial to advances in healthcare. Few data are available regarding the satisfaction and impressions of healthy volunteers after participation in phase I trials, many of which lead to unexpected adverse events. We report feedback from over 100 adult volunteers who took part in a first-in-human trial conducted in a high-income country testing an experimental Ebola vaccine causing significant reactogenicity, as well as unexpected arthritis in one fifth of participants. The anonymous, internet-based satisfaction survey was sent by email to all participants upon their completion of this one-year trial; it asked 24 questions concerning volunteers’ motivations, impressions of the trial experience, and overall satisfaction. Answers were summarized using descriptive statistics. Of the 115 trial participants, 103 (90%) filled out the survey. Fifty-five respondents (53%) were male. Thirty-five respondents (34%) were healthcare workers, many of whom would deploy to Ebola-affected countries. All respondents cited scientific advancement as their chief motivation for participation, while 100/103 (97%) and 61/103 (59%) reported additional “humanitarian reasons” and potential protection from Ebolavirus, respectively. Although investigators had documented adverse events in 97% of trial participants, only 74 of 103 respondents (72%) recalled experiencing an adverse event. All reported an overall positive experience, and 93/103 (90%) a willingness to participate in future trials. Given the high level of satisfaction, no significant associations could be detected between trial experiences and satisfaction, even among respondents reporting adverse events lasting weeks or months. Despite considerable reactogenicity and unexpected vaccine-related arthritis, all survey respondents reported overall satisfaction. While this trial’s context was unique, the positive feedback is likely due at least in part to the intense

  2. The ACS Virgo Cluster Survey IV: Data Reduction Procedures for Surface Brightness Fluctuation Measurements with the Advanced Camera for Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Mei, S; Tonry, J L; Jordan, A; Peng, E W; Côté, P; Ferrarese, L; Merritt, D; Milosavljevic, M; West, M J; Mei, Simona; Blakeslee, John P.; Tonry, John L.; Jordan, Andres; Peng, Eric W.; Cote, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; Merritt, David; Milosavljevic, Milos; West, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    The Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) Virgo Cluster Survey is a large program to image 100 early-type Virgo galaxies using the F475W and F850LP bandpasses of the Wide Field Channel of the ACS instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). The scientific goals of this survey include an exploration of the three-dimensional structure of the Virgo Cluster and a critical examination of the usefulness of the globular cluster luminosity function as a distance indicator. Both of these issues require accurate distances for the full sample of 100 program galaxies. In this paper, we describe our data reduction procedures and examine the feasibility of accurate distance measurements using the method of surface brightness fluctuations (SBF) applied to the ACS Virgo Cluster Survey F850LP imaging. The ACS exhibits significant geometrical distortions due to its off-axis location in the HST focal plane; correcting for these distortions by resampling the pixel values onto an undistorted frame results in pixel correlations tha...

  3. A review and survey of policies utilized for interventional pain procedures: a need for consensus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohan, Lynn; Salajegheh, Reza; Hamill-Ruth, Robin J; Yerra, Sandeep; Butz, John

    2017-01-01

    Background Other than the newly published anticoagulation guidelines, there are currently few recommendations to assist pain medicine physicians in determining the safety parameters to follow when performing interventional pain procedures. Little information exists regarding policies for oral intake, cumulative steroid dose limits, driving restrictions with and without sedation, and routine medication use for interventional procedures. Methods A 16-question survey was developed on common policies currently in use for interventional pain procedures. The questionnaire was distributed through the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine and American Academy of Pain Medicine. We sought to statistically analyze the range of policies being used by pain medicine physicians and to determine if there are any commonly accepted standards. Results A total of 337 physicians out of 4037 members responded to our survey with a response rate of 8.4%. A total of 82% of these respondents used a sedative agent while performing an interventional pain procedure. The majority of respondents required drivers after procedures, except after trigger points. A total of 47% indicated that they have an nil per os (NPO) policy for procedures without sedation. A total of 98% reported that they had an anticoagulation policy before an interventional procedure. A total of 17% indicated that the interval between steroid doses was <2 weeks, while 53% indicated that they waited 2–4 weeks between steroid doses. Conclusion Our study has clearly demonstrated a wide variation in the current practice among physicians regarding sedation, NPO status, steroid administration, and the need for designated drivers. There was much higher endorsement of policies regarding anticoagulation. There is an obvious need for evidence-based guidelines for these aspects of interventional pain care to improve patient safety and minimize the risk of adverse events. PMID:28360531

  4. [Essential procedure and key methods for survey of traditional knowledge related to Chinese materia medica resources].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Gong; Huang, Lu-qi; Xue, Da-yuan; Zhang, Xiao-bo

    2014-12-01

    The survey of traditional knowledge related to Chinese materia medica resources is the important component and one of the innovative aspects of the fourth national survey of the Chinese materia medica resources. China has rich traditional knowledge of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and the comprehensive investigation of TCM traditional knowledge aims to promote conservation and sustainable use of Chinese materia medica resources. Building upon the field work of pilot investigations, this paper introduces the essential procedures and key methods for conducting the survey of traditional knowledge related to Chinese materia medica resources. The essential procedures are as follows. First is the preparation phrase. It is important to review all relevant literature and provide training to the survey teams so that they have clear understanding of the concept of traditional knowledge and master key survey methods. Second is the field investigation phrase. When conducting field investigations, survey teams should identify the traditional knowledge holders by using the 'snowball method', record the traditional knowledge after obtaining prior informed concerned from the traditional knowledge holders. Researchers should fill out the survey forms provided by the Technical Specification of the Fourth National Survey of Chinese Materia Medica Resources. Researchers should pay particular attention to the scope of traditional knowledge and the method of inheriting the knowledge, which are the key information for traditional knowledge holders and potential users to reach mutual agreed terms to achieve benefit sharing. Third is the data compilation and analysis phrase. Researchers should try to compile and edit the TCM traditional knowledge in accordance with intellectual property rights requirements so that the information collected through the national survey can serve as the basic data for the TCM traditional knowledge database. The key methods of the survey include regional

  5. The XMM Cluster Survey: The interplay between the brightest cluster galaxy and the intra-cluster medium via AGN feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Stott, John P; Edge, Alastair C; Collins, Chris A; Hilton, Matt; Harrison, Craig D; Romer, A Kathy; Rooney, Philip J; Kay, Scott T; Miller, Christopher J; Sahlen, Martin; Lloyd-Davies, Ed J; Mehrtens, Nicola; Hoyle, Ben; Liddle, Andrew R; Viana, Pedro T P; McCarthy, Ian G; Schaye, Joop; Booth, C M

    2012-01-01

    Using a sample of 123 X-ray clusters and groups drawn from the XMM-Cluster Survey first data release, we investigate the interplay between the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG), its black hole, and the intra-cluster/group medium (ICM). It appears that for groups and clusters with a BCG likely to host significant AGN feedback, gas cooling dominates in those with Tx > 2 keV while AGN feedback dominates below. This may be understood through the sub-unity exponent found in the scaling relation we derive between the BCG mass and cluster mass over the halo mass range 10^13 2 keV) and again co-located with an effective fuel supply of dense, cooling gas. This demonstrates that the most massive black holes appear to know more about their host cluster than they do about their host galaxy. The results lead us to propose a physically motivated, empirical definition of 'cluster' and 'group', delineated at 2 keV.

  6. Laboratory procedures for the diagnosis of tuberculosis: a survey in ten Italian Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luisa Moro

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of laboratories performing tuberculosis (TB diagnostic procedures were investigated in ten Italian Regions, through a mailed questionnaire. Three hundred and eighty laboratories answered (70.8% response rate, 250 of which performed directly at least one TB diagnostic procedure. Standard criteria concerning microscopy, culture, identification, and drug susceptibility testing were frequently not satisfied, particularly those related to the volume of activity (32% of laboratories performing microscopy examined < 10 samples and 36% of those performing culture performed < 20 cultures per week, processing time, biosafety requirements and participation to internal/external quality control programs. The survey's results highlight the need to promote the adoption of standardized procedures and to centralize the mycobacteriology testing in a reduced number of high quality laboratories, in order to improve diagnostic accuracy, resource management and quality of surveillance data.

  7. Radiological survey activities: uranium mill tailings remedial action project procedures manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, C.A.; Berven, B.A.; Carter, T.E.; Espegren, M.L.; O' Donnell, F.R.; Ramos, S.J.; Retolaza, C.D.; Rood, A.S.; Santos, F.A.; Witt, D.A.

    1986-07-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) was assigned the responsibility for conducting remedial action at 24 sites, which are located in one eastern and nine western states. The DOE's responsibilities are being met through its Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Office (UMTRA-PO) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The purpose of this Procedures Manual is to provide a standardized set of procedures that document in an auditable manner the activities performed by the Radiological Survey Activities (RASA) group in the Dosimetry and Biophysical Transport Section (DABTS) of the Health and Safety Research Division (HASRD) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), in its role as the Inclusion Survey Contractor (ISC). Members of the RASA group assigned to the UMTRA Project are headquartered in the ORNL/RASA office in Grand Junction, Colorado, and report to the ORNL/RASA Project Manager. The Procedures Manual ensures that the organizational, administrative, and technical activities of the RASA/UMTRA group conform properly to those of the ISC as described in the Vicinity Properties Management and Implementation Manual and the Summary Protocol. This manual also ensures that the techniques and procedures used by the RASA/UMTRA group and contractor personnel meet the requirements of applicable governmental, scientific, and industrial standards.

  8. Obtaining patient feedback in an outpatient lithotripsy service is facilitated by use of a touch-screen tablet (iPad™) survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turney, B W; Reynard, J M

    2014-08-01

    There is now a requirement for every doctor in the UK to obtain patient feedback for revalidation. This can be an onerous and time-consuming task. The objective of this study was to evaluate a novel electronic patient feedback method in an outpatient lithotripsy service setting. Between September 2013 and January 2014, 100 patients attending an outpatient lithotripsy service in Oxford were asked to complete a selection of pre-approved NHS questions about the service they had received. Questions were presented on a tablet device (iPad™) and answered using the touch screen. Departmental staff were unaware of the questions in the survey. Patients were asked to complete the survey by an independent research nurse. Questions were created online in a free-to-use web-based survey application and presented on the tablet device in a user-friendly format via an application. Data were uploaded via wifi™ to the online system. Data were viewed, automatically analysed and displayed graphically. The age range of the patients surveyed was 20-80 years of age. All 100 patients completed the survey without difficulty. All patients answered every question. Data could be automatically viewed, analysed and presented graphically. This method of collecting patient feedback proved to be rapid and efficient. The feedback highlighted a high patient satisfaction with the lithotripsy service. A touch screen tablet device is an efficient and effective method of collecting truly objective patient feedback. This method of patient feedback could be employed in other clinical environments to collect data for revalidation purposes.

  9. Proposals for Changes in Surveying-Legal Procedures for the Needs of Cadastre in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mika, Monika

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the need for changes of geodetic-legal procedures for the cadastre and real estate management. This problem was analyzed both in theoretical and practical terms. In order to better present the analyzed technical and legal procedures, a study of several cases of surveying documentation was made. On their example the problems associated with the surveying services were shows and the formal and legal procedures, on the basis of which described surveying works were done were verified. The problem presented is current and valid not only for the comfort of the surveyor's work, but also from the point of view of the structure and modernization of the real estate cadastre, constituting the backbone of the real estate management. The article emphasized the need to unify the databases of state registers and the digitization of the National Geodetic and Cartographic Resources (PZDGiK). Research has shown that despite the continuous changes of legislation, there are still many shortcomings and gaps, which often complicate the surveying works. The surveyor must analyze and verify all materials he uses, including those obtained from the Centre of Geodetic and Cartographic Documentation (ODGiK). The quality of the geodetic and cartographic elaboration depends largely on the work of the Centre of Geodetic and Cartographic Documentation. The need of modernization of the Land and Buildings Registry, which acts as a cadastre in Poland, has been demonstrated. Furthermore, the unification of data used as reference systems both for plane coordinates and elevation has been proposed.

  10. A Panchromatic Survey of Post-starburst Mergers: searching for feedback

    CERN Document Server

    De Propris, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    We consider the morphology, stellar populations, structure and AGN activity of 10 post-starburst (K+A) galaxies with HST observations, full spectral coverage in the optical, spectral energy distributions from 0.2 to 160 $\\mu$m, X-ray and radio data. Our results show that the PSG phenomenon is related to mergers and interactions, and that star formation was likely triggered during close passes prior to final coalescence. We performed a detailed qualitative analysis of the observed light distribution, including low-surface brightness tidal features and color profiles, in high-resolution multi-band imaging with HST. We find evidence that star formation was centrally concentrated and that quenching took place from the inside-out, consistent with the occurrence of a feedback episode. Most of our PSGs contain massive bulges and therefore should host supermassive black holes. We search for AGN activity in spectra (line ratios), optical variability, X-ray emission at 0.5--7.0 KeV and radio emission at 20cm: all four ...

  11. Mobile Access to ClinicalConnect: A User Feedback Survey on Usability, Productivity, and Quality

    OpenAIRE

    Eapen, Bell Raj; Chapman, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Background ClinicalConnect, a federated clinical viewer for South West Ontario, Canada, launched a mobile interface in June 2012. Objective The aim of the study was to assess usability of the mobile interface and the perceived impact on productivity of health care providers and quality of healthcare delivery. Methods A survey was conducted using the System Usability Scale (SUS) and questionnaires designed to measure productivity and quality based on Canada Health Infoway's Benefits Evaluation...

  12. A survey of cross-infection control procedures: knowledge and attitudes of Turkish dentists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emir Yüzbasioglu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to investigate the knowledge, attitudes and behavior of Turkish dentists in Samsun City regarding cross-infection control. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A questionnaire was designed to obtain information about procedures used for the prevention of cross-infection in dental practices and determine the attitudes and perceptions of respondent dental practitioners to their procedures. The study population included all dentists in the city of Samsun, Turkey, in April 2005 (n=184. The questionnaire collected data on sociodemographic characteristics, knowledge and practice of infection control procedures, sterilization, wearing of gloves, mask, use of rubber dam, method of storing instruments and disposal methods of contaminated material, etc. Questionnaire data was entered into a computer and analyzed by SPSS statistical software. RESULTS: From the 184 dentists to whom the questionnaires were submitted, 135 participated in the study (overall response rate of 73.36%. As much as 74.10% dentists expressed concern about the risk of cross-infection from patients to themselves and their dental assistants. Forty-three percent of the participants were able to define "cross-infection" correctly. The greatest majority of the respondents (95.60% stated that all patients have to be considered as infectious and universal precautions must apply to all of them. The overall responses to the questionnaire showed that the dentists had moderate knowledge of infection control procedures. CONCLUSIONS: Improved compliance with recommended infection control procedures is required for all dentists evaluated in the present survey. Continuing education programs and short-time courses about cross-infection and infection control procedures are suitable to improve the knowledge of dentists.

  13. A procedure for eliminating additive bias from cross-cultural survey data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholderer, Joachim; Grunert, Klaus G.; Brunsø, Karen

    2005-01-01

    additive bias from cross-cultural data. The procedure involves four steps: (1) embed a potentially biased item in a factor-analytic measurement model, (2) test for the existence of additive bias between populations, (3) use the factor-analytic model to estimate the magnitude of the bias, and (4) replace...... differences in the understanding of item wording or response category labels. However, experience suggests that additive bias can be found more often than not. Based on the concept of partial measurement invariance (Byrne, Shavelson and Muthén 1989), the present paper develops a procedure for eliminating......Measurement bias in cross-cultural surveys can seriously threaten the validity of hypothesis tests. Direct comparisons of means depend on the assumption that differences in observed variables reflect differences in the underlying constructs, and not an additive bias that may be caused by cultural...

  14. Chandra survey of nearby highly inclined disk galaxies - IV. New insights into the working of stellar feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q. Daniel; Li, Jiangtao; Jiang, Xiaochuan; Fang, Taotao

    2016-04-01

    Galaxy evolution is regulated by the interplay between galactic discs and their surrounding medium. We study this interplay by examining how the galactic coronal emission efficiency of stellar feedback depends on the (surface and specific) star formation rates (SFRs) and other parameters for a sample of 52 Chandra-observed nearby highly inclined disc galaxies. We first measure the star-forming galactic disc sizes, as well as the SFRs of these galaxies, using data from the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer, and then show that (1) the specific 0.5-2 keV luminosity of the coronal emission correlates with the specific SFR in a sub-linear fashion: on average, LX/LK∝(SFR/M*)Γ with Γ = 0.29 ± 0.12; (2) the efficiency of the emission LX/SFR decreases with increasing surface SFR (ISFR; Γ = -0.44 ± 0.12); and (3) the characteristic temperature of the X-ray-emitting plasma weakly correlates with ISFR (Γ = 0.08 ± 0.04). These results, somewhat surprising and anti-intuitive, suggest that (i) the linear correlation between LX and SFR, as commonly presented, is largely due to the correlation of these two parameters with galaxy mass; (ii) much of the mechanical energy from stellar feedback likely drives global outflows with little X-ray cooling and with a mass-loading efficiency decreasing fast with increasing ISFR (Γ ≲ -0.5); (iii) these outflows heat and inflate the medium around the galactic disks of massive galaxies, reducing its radiative cooling rate, whereas for relatively low-mass galaxies, the energy in the outflows is probably dissipated in regions far away from the galactic discs.

  15. The MAGNUM survey: Positive feedback in the nuclear region of NGC 5643 suggested by MUSE

    CERN Document Server

    Cresci, G; Zibetti, S; Risaliti, G; Carniani, S; Mannucci, F; Gallazzi, A; Maiolino, R; Balmaverde, B; Brusa, M; Capetti, A; Cicone, C; Feruglio, C; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Nagao, T; Oliva, E; Salvato, M; Sani, E; Tozzi, P; Urrutia, T; Venturi, G

    2015-01-01

    We study the ionization and kinematics of the ionized gas in the nuclear region of the barred Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC~5643 using MUSE integral field observations in the framework of the MAGNUM (Measuring Active Galactic Nuclei Under MUSE Microscope) survey. The data were used to identify regions with different ionization conditions and to map the gas density and the dust extinction. We find evidence for a double sided ionization cone, possibly collimated by a dusty structure surrounding the nucleus. At the center of the ionization cone, outflowing ionized gas is revealed as a blueshifted, asymmetric wing of the [OIII] emission line, up to projected velocity v(10)~-450 km/s. The outflow is also seen as a diffuse, low luminosity radio and X-ray jet, with similar extension. The outflowing material points in the direction of two clumps characterized by prominent line emission with spectra typical of HII regions, located at the edge of the dust lane of the bar. We propose that the star formation in the clumps is due ...

  16. 32 CFR 644.389 - Army military-modified predisposal procedures where E.O. 11954 surveys have been made.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Army military-modified predisposal procedures... (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Predisposal Action § 644.389 Army military—modified predisposal procedures where E.O. 11954 surveys have been made. (a)...

  17. National survey for bariatric procedures in adolescent: Long time follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellani, Roberto Luca; Toppino, Mauro; Favretti, Franco; Camoglio, Francesco Saverio; Zampieri, Nicola

    2017-03-14

    The role of bariatric surgery and its role in adolescent is still under discussion worldwide. The aim of this study is to report an Italian survey for bariatric procedures in adolescents and the outcome with a medium and long-term follow-up. We retrospectively analyzed consecutive data added into the Italian register of the society for bariatric surgery(period 2000-2010). We evaluated all patients treated in a 10-year period with a mean follow-up of 3 years. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were created. All patients were aged between 13 and 18 years. We evaluated and compared clinical data. After reviewing medical charts, 173 patients were considered for the study; 85 patients were treated with adjustable gastric band (AGB), 47 with intragastric balloon (IB), 26 with sleeve gastrectomy (SG) and other 15 patients with malabsorptive techniques (MT). Among clinical data, there was a statistical difference in terms of %excess weight loss (%EWL) between techniques only after 1 year post-procedure; at 5 years, considering the percentage of patients studied, sleeve gastrectomy had the best %EWL respect to other non malabsorptive techniques (p<0.05); at 5 year more than 90% resolved their comorbidities especially hypertension, dyspnea, orthopedic problems and dyspnea. This study is the first reporting a national survey in adolescent; more than 80% of patients are followed until 5 years post-op but only few patients (less than 5%) until 10 years. Our results demonstrated that sleeve gastrectomy in adolescent is safe and had a better %EWL respect to other non-malabsorptive bariatric procedures. level III. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Post-Mission Quality Assurance Procedure for Survey-Grade Mobile Mapping Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerstinga, A. P.; Friess, P.

    2016-06-01

    Mobile Mapping Systems (MMS) consist of terrestrial-based moving platforms that integrate a set of imaging sensors (typically digital cameras and laser scanners) and a Position and Orientation System (POS), designed to collect data of the surrounding environment. MMS can be classified as "mapping-grade" or "survey-grade" depending on the system's attainable accuracy. Mapping-grade MMS produce geospatial data suitable for GIS applications (e.g., asset management) while survey-grade systems should satisfy high-accuracy applications such as engineering/design projects. The delivered accuracy of an MMS is dependent on several factors such as the accuracy of the system measurements and calibration parameters. It is critical, especially for survey-grade systems, to implement a robust Quality Assurance (QA) procedure to ensure the achievement of the expected accuracy. In this paper, a new post-mission QA procedure is presented. The presented method consists of a fully-automated self-calibration process that allows for the estimation of corrections to the system calibration parameters (e.g., boresight angles and lever-arm offsets relating the lidar sensor(s) to the IMU body frame) as well as corrections to the system measurements (e.g., post-processed trajectory position and orientation, scan angles and ranges). As for the system measurements, the major challenge for MMS is related to the trajectory determination in the presence of multipath signals and GNSS outages caused by buildings, underpasses and high vegetation. In the proposed self-calibration method, trajectory position errors are properly modelled while utilizing an efficient/meaningful trajectory segmentation technique. The validity of the proposed method is demonstrated using a dataset collected under unfavorable GNSS conditions.

  19. Dynamic Feedbacks Between Flow, Erosion and Evolving River Bank Roughness Revealed Through Repeat High-Resolution Topographic Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyland, J.; Darby, S. E.; Rinaldi, M.; Teruggi, L. B.; Ostuni, D.

    2012-12-01

    Bank erosion is a key process in fluvial dynamics, with significant fractions of the total sediment load being sourced from river banks. Studies have shown that hydraulic erosion of the bank toe is a driving factor of long term rates of bank retreat. Fluvial bank erosion rates are often quantified using an excess shear stress model where the erosion rate is a function of the boundary shear stress applied by the flow above a critical threshold. Research has shown that the form roughness induced by natural topographic bank features such as slumps, spurs and embayments, is a major component of the spatially-averaged total shear stress. The skin friction component of this shear stress is typically an order of magnitude less than the total, meaning that the form roughness provides an important control on bank erosion rates. However, measuring the relative components of the total shear stress for a natural system is not straightforward. In this research we apply the method of Kean and Smith [2006, J. Geophys. Res., 111(4), F04009, doi:10.1029/2006JF000467] to partition the form and skin drag components of river bank roughness for an eroding bank of the Cecina River in central Italy. This method approximates the form drag component of the roughness along a longitudinal bank profile as a series of user defined Gaussian curves, with the skin friction component estimated through analysis of the deviations of the data from the fitted curves. For our site, a temporal sequence (2003 - 2011) of high-resolution topographic surveys has been collected through a combination of photogrammetry and Terrestrial Laser Scanning. For each survey five vertically equidistant profiles are extracted and analysed alongside DEMs of difference and associated flow data modelled using the distributed hydrological model MOBIDIC. The data are used to explore the dynamic feedbacks that exist between river discharge, bank erosion processes and bank form roughness, revealing insights into the self

  20. Chandra survey of nearby highly inclined disk galaxies -- IV: New insights into the working of stellar feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Q Daniel; Jiang, Xiaochuan; Fang, Taotao

    2015-01-01

    Galaxy evolution is regulated by the interplay between galactic disks and their surrounding medium. We study this interplay by examining how the galactic coronal emission efficiency of stellar feedback depends on the (surface and specific) star formation rates (SFRs) and other parameters for a sample of 52 Chandra-observed nearby highly inclined disk galaxies. We first measure the star forming galactic disk sizes, as well as the SFRs of these galaxies, using data from the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer, and then show that 1) the specific 0.5-2~keV luminosity of the coronal emission correlates with the specific SFR in a {\\sl sub-linear} fashion: on average, $L_X/L_K \\propto (SFR/M_*)^{\\Gamma}$ with $\\Gamma =0.29\\pm0.12$; 2) the efficiency of the emission $ L_X/SFR$ decreases with increasing surface SFR ($I_{SFR}$; $\\Gamma = -0.44\\pm0.12$); and 3) the characteristic temperature of the X-ray-emitting plasma weakly correlates with $I_{SFR}$ ($\\Gamma = 0.08\\pm0.04$). These results, somewhat surprising and ant...

  1. A statistical analysis of the Two Dimensional XMM-Newton Group Survey: The impact of feedback on group properties

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Ria; Finoguenov, Alexis

    2009-01-01

    (abridged) We present a statistical analysis of 28 nearby galaxy groups from the Two-Dimensional XMM-Newton Group Survey (2dXGS). We focus on entropy and the role of feedback, dividing the sample into cool core (CC) and non cool core (NCC) systems, the first time the latter have been studied in detail in the group regime. The coolest groups have steeper entropy profiles than the warmest systems, and NCC groups have higher central entropy and exhibit more scatter than their CC counterparts. We compare the entropy distribution of the gas in each system to the expected theoretical distribution ignoring non-gravitational processes. In all cases, the observed maximum entropy far exceeds that expected theoretically, and simple models for modifications of the theoretical entropy distribution perform poorly. Applying initial pre-heating, followed by radiative cooling, generally fails to match the low entropy behaviour, and only performs well when the difference between the maximum entropy of the observed and theoreti...

  2. Maintenance and operation procedure, and feedback controls of the J-PARC RF-driven H{sup −} ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, A., E-mail: akira.ueno@j-parc.jp; Ohkoshi, K.; Ikegami, K.; Takagi, A.; Yamazaki, S.; Oguri, H. [J-PARC Center, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan)

    2015-04-08

    In order to satisfy the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) second stage requirements of an H{sup −} ion beam of 60mA within normalized emittances of 1.5πmm•mrad both horizontally and vertically, a flat top beam duty factor of 1.25% (500μs×25Hz) and a life-time of longer than 1month, the J-PARC cesiated RF-driven H{sup −} ion source was developed by using an internal-antenna developed at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). The maintenance and operation procedure to minimize the plasma chamber (PCH) replacement time on the beam line, which is very important to maximize the J-PARC beam time especially for an antenna failure, is presented in this paper. The PCH preserved by filling argon (Ar) gas inside after pre-conditioning including pre-cesiation to produce the required beam at a test-stand successfully produced the required beam on the beam line with slight addition of cesium (Cs). The methods of the feedback controls of a 2MHz-RF-matching, an H{sup −} ion beam intensity and the addition of Cs are also presented. The RF-matching feedback by using two vacuum variable capacitors (VVCs) and RF-frequency shift produced the almost perfect matching with negligibly small reflected RF-power. The H{sup −} ion beam intensity was controlled within errors of ±0.1mA by the RF-power feedback. The amount of Cs was also controlled by remotely opening a Cs-valve to keep the RF-power lower than a settled value.

  3. Logarithmic temporal axis manipulation and its application for measuring auditory contributions in F0 control using a transformed auditory feedback procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanaga, Ryuichiro; Kawahara, Hideki

    2003-10-01

    A new parameter extraction procedure based on logarithmic transformation of the temporal axis was applied to investigate auditory effects on voice F0 control to overcome artifacts due to natural fluctuations and nonlinearities in speech production mechanisms. The proposed method may add complementary information to recent findings reported by using frequency shift feedback method [Burnett and Larson, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 112 (2002)], in terms of dynamic aspects of F0 control. In a series of experiments, dependencies of system parameters in F0 control on subjects, F0 and style (musical expressions and speaking) were tested using six participants. They were three male and three female students specialized in musical education. They were asked to sustain a Japanese vowel /a/ for about 10 s repeatedly up to 2 min in total while hearing F0 modulated feedback speech, that was modulated using an M-sequence. The results replicated qualitatively the previous finding [Kawahara and Williams, Vocal Fold Physiology, (1995)] and provided more accurate estimates. Relations with designing an artificial singer also will be discussed. [Work partly supported by the grant in aids in scientific research (B) 14380165 and Wakayama University.

  4. Water-quality sampling by the U.S. Geological Survey-Standard protocols and procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilde, Franceska D.

    2010-01-01

    Thumbnail of and link to report PDF (1.0 MB) The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) develops the sampling procedures and collects the data necessary for the accurate assessment and wise management of our Nation's surface-water and groundwater resources. Federal and State agencies, water-resource regulators and managers, and many organizations and interested parties in the public and private sectors depend on the reliability, timeliness, and integrity of the data we collect and the scientific soundness and impartiality of our data assessments and analysis. The standard data-collection methods uniformly used by USGS water-quality personnel are peer reviewed, kept up-to-date, and published in the National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data (http://pubs.water.usgs.gov/twri9A/).

  5. Evaluating a Web-Based Health Risk Assessment With Tailored Feedback: What Does an Expert Focus Group Yield Compared to a Web-Based End-User Survey?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vosbergen, Sandra; Mahieu, Guy R; Laan, Eva K; Kraaijenhagen, Roderik A; Jaspers, Monique WM

    2014-01-01

    Background Increasingly, Web-based health applications are developed for the prevention and management of chronic diseases. However, their reach and utilization is often disappointing. Qualitative evaluations post-implementation can be used to inform the optimization process and ultimately enhance their adoption. In current practice, such evaluations are mainly performed with end-user surveys. However, a review approach by experts in a focus group may be easier to administer and might provide similar results. Objective The aim of this study was to assess whether industrial design engineers in a focus group would address the same issues as end users in a Web-based survey when evaluating a commercial Web-based health risk assessment (HRA) with tailored feedback. Methods Seven Dutch companies used the HRA as part of their corporate health management strategy. Employees using the HRA (N=2289) and 10 independent industrial designers were invited to participate in the study. The HRA consisted of four components: (1) an electronic health questionnaire, (2) biometric measurements, (3) laboratory evaluation, and (4) individually tailored feedback generated by decision support software. After participating in the HRA as end users, both end users and designers evaluated the program. End users completed an evaluation questionnaire that included a free-text field. Designers participated in a focus group discussion. Constructs from user satisfaction and technology acceptance theories were used to categorize and compare the remarks from both evaluations. Results We assessed and qualitatively analyzed 294 remarks of 189 end users and 337 remarks of 6 industrial designers, pertaining to 295 issues in total. Of those, 137 issues were addressed in the end-user survey and 148 issues in the designer focus group. Only 7.3% (10/137) of the issues addressed in the survey were also addressed in the focus group. End users made more remarks about the usefulness of the HRA and prior

  6. Quality of life among women treated for breast cancer: a survey of three procedures in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Flores, Ana Olivia; Morgan-Villela, Gilberto; Zuloaga-Fernández del Valle, Carlos José; Jiménez-Tornero, Jorge; Juárez-Uzeta, Ernesto; Urias-Valdez, Diana Paola; Garcia-González, Luis-Alberto; Fuentes-Orozco, Clotilde; Chávez-Tostado, Mariana; Macías-Amezcua, Michel Dassaejv; Garcia-Renteria, Jesus; González-Ojeda, Alejandro

    2014-10-01

    This study aimed to determine the quality of life among patients treated with one of three different types of surgery for breast cancer. This cross-sectional study used a questionnaire survey completed by Mexican patients without active disease 1 year after breast cancer surgery. The 139 patients enrolled in the study included 44 (31.6 %) who had undergone mastectomy with reconstruction, 41 (29.5 %) who had undergone a quadrantectomy, and 54 (38.9 %) who had undergone radical mastectomy without reconstruction. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire, core version 30 (EORTC QLQ-C30) and EORTC Breast Quality-of-Life Questionnaire (QLQ-BR23) questionnaires were used. These instruments had a reliability greater than 0.82. Global health status (94.30 ± 12.04; p = 0.028) and role functioning (85.16 ± 17.23; p = 0.138) were highest in the quadrantectomy group. The pain score was highest in the group that had received mastectomy with reconstruction (26.13 ± 30.15; p = 0.042). The breast symptom score (22.56 ± 22.30; p = 0.009) and body image perception (85.56 ± 19.72; p = 0.025) were highest in the group that had conservative treatment. The overall health of the patients who had undergone mastectomy without reconstruction was lower (72.61 ± 20.89; p = 0.014) among the women older than 50 years than among the younger women. The quadrantectomy procedure had better acceptance, but the overall health status did not differ between the groups. The overall health status was lower among the women older than 50 years who had received a mastectomy without reconstruction.

  7. General Practitioners’ Participation in a Large, Multicountry Combined General Practitioner-Patient Survey: Recruitment Procedures and Participation Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter P. Groenewegen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The participation of general practitioners (GPs is essential in research on the performance of primary care. This paper describes the implementation of a large, multicountry study in primary care that combines a survey among GPs and a linked survey among patients that visited their practice (the QUALICOPC study. The aim is to describe the recruitment procedure and explore differences between countries in the participation rate of the GPs. Methods. Descriptive analyses were used to document recruitment procedures and to assess hypotheses potentially explaining variation in participation rates between countries. Results. The survey was implemented in 31 European countries. GPs were mainly selected through random sampling. The actual implementation of the study differed between countries. The median participation rate was 30%. Both material (such as the payment system of GPs in a country and immaterial influences (such as estimated survey pressure are related to differences between countries. Conclusion. This study shows that the participation of GPs may indeed be influenced by the context of the country. The implementation of complex data collection is difficult to realize in a completely uniform way. Procedures have to be tuned to the context of the country.

  8. Preparation of magnetic anomaly profile and contour maps from DOE-NURE aerial survey data. Volume 1: Processing procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennel, E. P.; Hinze, W. J.

    1981-09-01

    Total intensity magnetic anomaly data acquired as a supplement to radiometric data in preparing regional profile and contour maps are discussed. Survey contractor supplied magnetic anomaly data are subjected to a multiprocess, computer based procedure. This procedure is used to produce the following machine plotted maps: (1) profile map of contractor supplied magnetic anomaly data; (2) profile map of high cut filtered data with contour levels of each profile marked and annotated on the associated flight track; (3) profile map of critical point data with contour levels indicated; and (4) contour map of filtered and selected data.

  9. Supervisor Feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayman, Marilyn J.

    1981-01-01

    Investigated the effectiveness of supervisor feedback in contributing to learning counseling skills. Counselor trainees (N=64) were assigned to supervisor feedback, no supervisor feedback, or control groups for three training sessions. Results indicated counseling skills were learned best by students with no supervisor feedback but self and peer…

  10. A Study on Direct Feedback and Indirect Feedback in Graduate Students ’Writing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张志国

    2014-01-01

    Feedback plays a central role in writing development. However correcting students’writing is one of the most time-consuming tasks for our senior English teachers. By conducting a survey of direct feedback and indirect feedback in students writ⁃ing the author tries to test the influence of direct feedback and indirect feedback in graduates ’writing.

  11. The VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey - XI. A census of the hot luminous stars and their feedback in 30 Doradus

    CERN Document Server

    Doran, E I; de Koter, A; Evans, C J; McEvoy, C; Walborn, N R; Bastian, N; Bestenlehner, J M; Grafener, G; Herrero, A; Kohler, K; Apellaniz, J Maiz; Najarro, F; Puls, J; Sana, H; Schneider, F R N; Taylor, W D; van Loon, J Th; Vink, J S

    2013-01-01

    We compile the first comprehensive census of hot luminous stars in the 30 Doradus (30 Dor) star forming region of the LMC. The census extends to a radius of 10arcmin (150pc) from the central cluster, R136. Stars were selected photometrically and combined with the latest spectral types. 1145 candidate hot luminous stars were identified of which >700 were considered genuine early type stars that contribute to feedback. We assess the spectroscopic completeness to be 85% in outer regions (>5pc) but fall to 35% in the vicinity of R136, giving a total of 500 hot luminous stars with spectroscopy. Stellar calibrations and models were used to obtain their physical parameters before integrated values were compared to global observations and the population synthesis code, Starburst99. The 31 W-R and Of/WN stars made large contributions to the total ionising and wind luminosities of ~40% and ~50%, respectively. Stars with Minit>100Msun also showed high contributions to the global feedback, ~25% in both cases. Such massiv...

  12. On the Cluster Physics of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Surveys I: The Influence of Feedback, Non-thermal Pressure and Cluster Shapes on Y-M Scaling Relations

    CERN Document Server

    Battaglia, N; Pfrommer, C; Sievers, J L

    2011-01-01

    The utility of large Sunyaev Zel'dovich (SZ) surveys for determining cosmological parameters from cluster abundances is limited by the theoretical uncertainties in the integrated SZ-flux-to-mass relation, Y-M. We explore how non-thermal pressure and the anisotropic shape of the gas distribution of the intracluster medium (ICM) impacts Y-M scaling using a suite of SPH simulations of the cosmic web. We contrast results for models with different treatments of entropy injection and transport, varying radiative cooling, star formation and accompanying supernova feedback, cosmic rays, and energetic feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN). We find that the gas kinetic-to-thermal pressure ratio from internal bulk motions depends on the cluster mass, and increases in the outer-cluster due to enhanced substructure, as does the asphericity of the ICM gas. With only a ~5-10% correction to projected (observable) ellipticities, we can infer the 3D ellipticities. Our simulated Y-M-slope roughly follows the self-similar p...

  13. Barriers to Implementing Treatment Integrity Procedures in School Psychology Research: Survey of Treatment Outcome Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanetti, Lisa M. Hagermoser; DiGennaro Reed, Florence D.

    2012-01-01

    Treatment integrity data are essential to drawing valid conclusions in treatment outcome studies. Such data, however, are not always included in peer-reviewed research articles in school psychology or related fields. To gain a better understanding of why treatment integrity data are lacking in the school psychology research, we surveyed the…

  14. 78 FR 31472 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Survey, Certification and Enforcement Procedures; Extension of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-24

    ..., Attention: CMS-3255-P, Mail Stop C4-26-05, 7500 Security Boulevard, Baltimore, MD 21244-1850. 4. By hand or... & Medicaid Services 42 CFR Parts 488 and 489 [CMS-3255-N] Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Survey... Services (CMS), HHS. ACTION: Proposed rule; extension of the comment period. SUMMARY: This notice...

  15. Barriers to Implementing Treatment Integrity Procedures in School Psychology Research: Survey of Treatment Outcome Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanetti, Lisa M. Hagermoser; DiGennaro Reed, Florence D.

    2012-01-01

    Treatment integrity data are essential to drawing valid conclusions in treatment outcome studies. Such data, however, are not always included in peer-reviewed research articles in school psychology or related fields. To gain a better understanding of why treatment integrity data are lacking in the school psychology research, we surveyed the…

  16. Data Collection Procedures for School-Based Surveys among Adolescents: The Youth in Europe Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristjansson, Alfgeir Logi; Sigfusson, Jon; Sigfusdottir, Inga Dora; Allegrante, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Collection of valid and reliable surveillance data as a basis for school health promotion and education policy and practice for children and adolescence is of great importance. However, numerous methodological and practical problems arise in the planning and collection of such survey data that need to be resolved in order to ensure the…

  17. A Survey Assessment of Perceived Importance and Methods of Maintenance of Critical Procedural Skills in Pediatric Emergency Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittiga, Matthew R; FitzGerald, Michael R; Kerrey, Benjamin T

    2016-12-12

    The aim of this study was to delineate pediatric emergency medicine provider opinions regarding the importance of, and to ascertain existing processes by which practitioners maintain, the following critical procedural skills: oral endotracheal intubation, intraosseous line placement, pharmacologic and electrical cardioversion, tube thoracostomy, and defibrillation. A customized survey was administered to all members of the Listserv for the American Academy of Pediatrics Section on Emergency Medicine. Perceived importance of maintaining critical pediatric procedural skills was measured using a 5-point Likert-type scale. Secondary outcomes included presence and type of mandatory training, availability of on-site backup, and perceived barriers to maintenance of skills. Two hundred sixty-two members (25%) responded representing 106 different institutions, 70% of freestanding children's hospitals that received graduate medical education payments in 2014, and 68% of pediatric emergency medicine fellowship programs. More than 90% of respondents felt it was either very or extremely important to maintain competency for 5 of the 6 critical procedures, but no more than 49% of respondents felt that clinical care alone provided opportunity to maintain skills. The proportion of respondents indicating no mandatory training for each critical procedural skill was as follows: oral endotracheal intubation (23%), intraosseous line placement (30%), pharmacologic cardioversion (32%), electrical cardioversion (32%), tube thoracostomy (40%), and defibrillation (32%). Critical procedural skills are perceived by emergency providers who care for children as extremely important to maintain. Direct care of pediatric patients likely does not provide sufficient opportunity to maintain these skills. There are widespread deficiencies relating to mandatory maintenance of critical procedural skill training.

  18. U.S. survey of surgical capabilities and experience with surgical procedures in patients with congenital haemophilia with inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, A; Cooper, D L

    2012-05-01

    General guidelines exist for the use of recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) to maintain haemostasis during surgery in congenital haemophilia A and B patients with high responding inhibitors (CHwI). Individual surgical plans are required and based upon historical therapy response, adverse events and anticipated procedure. Surgical interventions are feasible, yet it remains unclear how many US hemophilia treatment centres (HTCs) perform procedures in this fragile population. To better understand the US HTC surgical experience in CHwI patients and the number/types of procedures performed, a 21-question survey was sent to 133 US HTCs, with follow-up for response clarification and to non-responders. 98/133 HTCs (74%) responded, with 87 currently treating CHwI patients. In the last decade, 76/85 HTCs performed 994 surgeries on CHwI patients. Sites were experienced in the following procedures: central line insertion/removal (73 HTCs), dental (58), orthopaedic (52), abdominal (23), cardiovascular (14) and otolaryngologic (11). Experience with orthopaedic surgeries included synovectomies - arthroscopic (23 HTCs), radioisotopic (22), and open (7); joint replacement (18); fracture repair (14); and arthrodesis (8). Treatment modalities included rFVIIa bolus (83 HTCs) or continuous infusions (9), plasma-derived activated prothrombin complex concentrate (pd-aPCC) (55), antifibrinolytics (51), topical haemostatic agents (29), factor VIII (16) and fibrin sealants (14). Protocols for bypassing agents were used by 31/92 (33%) HTCs. Most US HTCs surveyed care for CHwI patients (74%) and have experience in minor surgery; fewer HTCs reported complex orthopaedic surgical experience. Identification of best practices and surgical barriers is required to guide future initiatives to support these patients.

  19. Factors shaping e-feedback utilization following electronic Objective Structured Clinical Examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, Samantha E; Snodgrass, Suzanne H; Rivett, Darren A; Russell, Trevor

    2016-09-01

    The development of student-practitioners' practical clinical skills is essential in health professional education. Objective Structured Clinical Examinations are central to the assessment of students performing clinical procedures on simulated patients (actors). While feedback is considered core to learning providing timely, individualised student OSCE feedback is difficult. This study explored the perceptions of students about the multiple factors which shape the utility of e-feedback following an electronic Objective Structured Clinical Examinations, which utilized iPad and specialised software. The e-feedback was trialled in four courses within occupational therapy and physiotherapy pre-professional programs with a cohort of 204 students. Evaluation of student perceptions about feedback was collected using two surveys and eight focus groups. This data showed three factors shaped perceptions of the utility of e- Objective Structured Clinical Examinations feedback: 1) timely accessibility within one day of the assessment, 2) feedback demonstrating examiners' academic literacy and 3) feedback orientated to ways of improving future performance of clinical skills. The study found training in the provision of feedback using IPads and software is needed for examiners to ensure e-feedback meets students' needs for specific, future-oriented e-feedback and institutional requirements for justification of grades.

  20. Data Processing Procedures and Methodology for Estimating Trip Distances for the 1995 American Travel Survey (ATS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, H.-L.; Rollow, J.

    2000-05-01

    The 1995 American Travel Survey (ATS) collected information from approximately 80,000 U.S. households about their long distance travel (one-way trips of 100 miles or more) during the year of 1995. It is the most comprehensive survey of where, why, and how U.S. residents travel since 1977. ATS is a joint effort by the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS) and the U.S. Department of Commerce Bureau of Census (Census); BTS provided the funding and supervision of the project, and Census selected the samples, conducted interviews, and processed the data. This report documents the technical support for the ATS provided by the Center for Transportation Analysis (CTA) in Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), which included the estimation of trip distances as well as data quality editing and checking of variables required for the distance calculations.

  1. Technical procedures for aeromagnetic surveys in Antarctica during the Italian expeditions (1988-1992

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Damaske

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available For most of Antarctica, the geophysical data now available are those of aeromagnetic surveys performed there from 1950 to 1960. Until 1984, the inaccurate positioning and insufficient monitoring of geomagnetic time variations allowed the investigation of the geomagnetic residual field only along profiles. The Ganovex IV aeromagnetic survey, performed by BGR-USGS over the Ross Sea and the Northern Victoria Land, and the geophysical investigations of BAS on the Southern Antarctic peninsula and the Ronne ice shelf region corresponds to the recent advancement of these techniques in Antarctica. The first experiments of aeromagnetic measurements, during the Italian expeditions in Antarctica were made during the 1988-1989 field season. Some geomagnetic helicopter borne profiles were accomplished with a Proton Precession Magnetometer (PPM in the Terra Nova Bay-Gerlache Inlet area. In the 1989-1990 ItaliAntartide expedition some profiles were flown over the suture between the Wilson and Bower terranes, in Northern Victoria Land. During the 1991-1992 expedition, in cooperation with researchers of BGR (Bundesanstalt fur Geowissenschaften und Rohstoffe of Hannover, the GITARA I (German ITalian Aeromagnetic Rescarch Antarctica program, as part of the LIRA (Litospheric Investigation in the Ross Sea Area project, was carried out. The investigated area lies between the latitudes 74°18' S and 75°18' S and the longitudes 160°30' E and 164°30'E and it corresponds to a portion of the North Victoria Land, located between the Eisenhower Range and the, DrygaIski Ice Tongue. The survey was made with a Cesium vapour magnetometer. The positioning system was of the “Range-Range” type, it consisted of three transmitters (beacons, installed inside the investigated area and located with GPS measurements. The line spacing was 4.4 km, with tie lines every 22 km. The survey covered an area of 6500 km2 . Four PPM base stations for the determination of the time variation

  2. On the Atmospheric Extinction Reduction Procedure in Multiband Wide-Field Photometric Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Zakharov, A; Biryukov, A; Kroussanova, N; Prokhorov, M; Beskin, G; Karpov, S; Bondar, S; Ivanov, E; Perkov, A; Sasyuk, V

    2015-01-01

    We propose an improved method for the atmospheric extinction reduction within optical photometry. Our method is based on the simultaneous multicolor observations of photometric standards. Such data are now available within the modern wide-field sky surveys and contain a large amount of information about instant atmospheric conditions. So, it became possible to estimate the extinction parameters on the basis of a quite short observational dataset and, hence, to trace the rapid stars twinkling accurately. Having been developed for a new MiniMegaTORTORA observational system, the proposed method can be adopted for a wide range of modern observational programs.

  3. High-temperature flaw assessment procedure: A state-of-the-art survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruggles, M.B.; Takahashi, Y.

    1989-05-01

    High-temperature crack growth under cyclic, static, and combined loading is received with an emphasis on fracture mechanics aspects. Experimental studies of the effects of loading history, microstructure, temperature, and environment on crack growth behavior are described and interpreted. The experimental evidence is used to examine crack growth parameters and theoretical models for fatigue, creep, and creep-fatigue crack propagation at elevated temperatures. The limitations of both elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics for high-temperature subcritical crack growth are assessed. Existing techniques for modeling critical crack growth/ligament instability failure are also presented. Related topics of defect modeling and engineering flaw assessment procedures, nondestructive evaluation methods, and probabilistic failure analysis are briefly discussed. 142 refs., 33 figs.

  4. Physiotherapy management of patients undergoing thoracotomy procedure: A survey of current practice in Gauteng

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liezel Schwellnus

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Physiotherapy is included in the management of patients undergoing thoracic surgery. The aim of this study was to describe physiotherapy practice in the management of patients who undergo an open thoracotomy.Methods: A cross-sectional study using convenience sampling was undertaken. An electronic self-administered questionnaire was distributed via SurveyMonkey to 1389 physiotherapists registered with the South African Society of Physiotherapy in Gauteng. The data collection period was August and September 2014 and data were analysed descriptively.Results: A total of 323 physiotherapists (23.3% responded to the survey and 141 (10.2% indicated that they treated patients with open thoracotomies. Preoperative treatment was done by 65 (41.6% and consisted of teaching supported coughing (92.3%; n = 60, sustained maximal inspiration (70.8%; n = 46 and the active cycle of breathing technique (69.2%; n = 45. One hundred and sixteen (82.3% respondents treated patients during their hospital stay. Deep breathing exercises (97.6%; n = 83, coughing (95.3%; n = 81, early mobilisation (95.3%; n = 81, upper limb mobility exercises (91.8%; n = 78, chest wall vibrations (88.2%; n = 75 and trunk mobility exercises (85.9%; n = 73 were done frequently. Pain management modalities were less common, for example transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (12.9%; n = 11. Post hospital physiotherapy management was uncommon (32.6%; n = 46.Conclusion: Physiotherapy related to early mobilisation in hospital is in line with evidence-based practice, but further education is needed regarding the need for physiotherapy post hospital discharge and pain management.

  5. Formativ Feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldahl, Kirsten Kofod

    Denne bog undersøger, hvordan lærere kan anvende feedback til at forbedre undervisningen i klasselokalet. I denne sammenhæng har John Hattie, professor ved Melbourne Universitet, udviklet en model for feedback, hvilken er baseret på synteser af meta-analyser. I 2009 udgav han bogen "Visible...

  6. Feedback control and output feedback control for the stabilisation of switched Boolean networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fangfei; Yu, Zhaoxu

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the feedback control and output feedback control for the stabilisation of switched Boolean network. A necessary condition for the existence of a state feedback controller for the stabilisation of switched Boolean networks under arbitrary switching signal is derived first, and constructive procedures for feedback control and output feedback control design are provided. An example is introduced to show the effectiveness of this paper.

  7. Feedback options in nonlinear numerical finance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hugger, Jens; Mashayekhi, Sima

    2012-01-01

    Feedback options are options where information about the trading of the underlying asset is fed back into the pricing model. This results in nonlinear pricing models. A survey of the literature about feedback options in finance is presented. The pricing model for the full feedback option...

  8. Signatures of AGN feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylezalek, Dominika; Zakamska, Nadia L.; MaNGA-GMOS Team

    2017-01-01

    Feedback from actively accreting SMBHs (Active Galactic Nuclei, AGN) is now widely considered to be the main driver in regulating the growth of massive galaxies. Observational proof for this scenario has, however, been hard to come by. Many attempts at finding a conclusive observational proof that AGN may be able to quench star formation and regulate the host galaxies' growth have shown that this problem is highly complex.I will present results from several projects that focus on understanding the power, reach and impact of feedback processes exerted by AGN. I will describe recent efforts in our group of relating feedback signatures to the specific star formation rate in their host galaxies, where our results are consistent with the AGN having a `negative' impact through feedback on the galaxies' star formation history (Wylezalek+2016a,b). Furthermore, I will show that powerful AGN-driven winds can be easily hidden and not be apparent in the integrated spectrum of the galaxy. This implies that large IFU surveys, such as the SDSS-IV MaNGA survey, might uncover many previously unknown AGN and outflows that are potentially very relevant for understanding the role of AGN in galaxy evolution (Wylezalek+2016c)!

  9. Feedback and Incentives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Tor Viking; Poulsen, Anders; Villeval, Marie Claire

    2009-01-01

    This paper experimentally investigates the impact of different pay schemes and relative performance feedback policies on employee effort. We explore three feedback rules: no feedback on relative performance, feedback given halfway through the production period, and continuously updated feedback. ...

  10. Method and device for intraoperative imaging of lumpectomy specimens to provide feedback to breast surgeon for prompt re-excision during the same procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krol, Andrzej; Hemingway, Susan; Kort, Kara; de la Rosa, Gustavo; Adhikary, Ravi; Masrani, Deepa; Feiglin, David; O'Connell, Avice; Nagarajan, Mahesh; Yang, Chien-Chun; Wismüller, Axel

    2014-03-01

    Breast conserving therapy (BCT) of breast cancer is now widely accepted due to improved cosmetic outcome and improved patients' quality of life. One of the critical issues in performing breast-conserving surgery is trying to achieve microscopically clear surgical margins while maintaining excellent cosmesis. Unfortunately, unacceptably close or positive surgical margins occur in at least 20-25% of all patients undergoing BCT requiring repeat surgical excision days or weeks later, as permanent histopathology routinely takes days to complete. Our aim is to develop a better method for intraoperative imaging of non-palpable breast malignancies excised by wire or needle localization. Providing non-deformed three dimensional imaging of the excised breast tissue should allow more accurate assessment of tumor margins and consequently allow further excision at the time of initial surgery thus limiting the enormous financial and emotional burden of additional surgery. We have designed and constructed a device that allows preservation of the excised breast tissue in its natural anatomic position relative to the breast as it is imaged to assess adequate excision. We performed initial tests with needle-guided lumpectomy specimens using micro-CT and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). Our device consists of a plastic sphere inside a cylindrical holder. The surgeon inserts a freshly excised piece of breast tissue into the sphere and matches its anatomic orientation with the fiducial markers on the sphere. A custom-shaped foam is placed inside the sphere to prevent specimen deformation due to gravity. DBT followed by micro-CT images of the specimen were obtained. We confirmed that our device preserved spatial orientation of the excised breast tissue and that the location error was lower than 10mm and 10 degrees. The initial obtained results indicate that breast lesions containing microcalcifications allow a good 3D imaging of margins providing immediate intraoperative feedback for

  11. Implications of the field sampling procedure of the LUCAS Topsoil Survey for uncertainty in soil organic carbon concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lark, R. M.; Rawlins, B. G.; Lark, T. A.

    2014-05-01

    The LUCAS Topsoil survey is a pan-European Union initiative in which soil data were collected according to standard protocols from 19 967 sites. Any inference about soil variables is subject to uncertainty due to different sources of variability in the data. In this study we examine the likely magnitude of uncertainty due to the field-sampling protocol. The published sampling protocol (LUCAS, 2009) describes a procedure to form a composite soil sample from aliquots collected to a depth of between approximately 15-20. A v-shaped hole to the target depth is cut with a spade, then a slice is cut from one of the exposed surfaces. This methodology gives rather less control of the sampling depth than protocols used in other soil and geochemical surveys, this may be a substantial source of variation in uncultivated soils with strong contrasts between an organic-rich A-horizon and an underlying B-horizon. We extracted all representative profile descriptions from soil series recorded in the memoir of the 1:250 000-scale map of Northern England (Soil Survey of England and Wales, 1984) where the base of the A-horizon is less than 20 cm below the surface. The Soil Associations in which these 14 series are significant members cover approximately 17% of the area of Northern England, and are expected to be the mineral soils with the largest organic content. Soil Organic Carbon content and bulk density were extracted for the A- and B-horizons, along with the thickness of the horizons. Recorded bulk density, or prediction by a pedotransfer function, were also recorded. For any proposed angle of the v-shaped hole, the proportions of A- and B-horizon in the resulting sample may be computed by trigonometry. From the bulk density and SOC concentration of the horizons, the SOC concentration of the sample can be computed. For each Soil Series we drew 1000 random samples from a trapezoidal distribution of angles, with uniform density over the range corresponding to depths 15-20 cm and

  12. Survey of Veterinarians Using a Novel Physical Compression Squeeze Procedure in the Management of Neonatal Maladjustment Syndrome in Foals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Monica; Weich, Kalie M; Madigan, John E

    2017-09-05

    Horses are a precocious species that must accomplish several milestones that are critical to survival in the immediate post-birth period for their survival. One essential milestone is the successful transition from the intrauterine unconsciousness to an extrauterine state of consciousness or awareness. This transition involves a complex withdrawal of consciousness inhibitors and an increase in neuroactivating factors that support awareness. This process involves neuroactive hormones as well as inputs related to factors such as cold, visual, olfactory, and auditory stimuli. One factor not previously considered in this birth transition is a yet unreported direct neural reflex response to labor-induced physical compression of the fetus in the birth canal (squeezing). Neonatal maladjustment syndrome (NMS) is a disorder of the newborn foal characterized by altered behavior, low affinity for the mare, poor awareness of the environment, failure to bond to the mother, abnormal sucking, and other neurologically-based abnormalities. This syndrome has been associated with altered events during birth, and was believed to be caused exclusively by hypoxia and ischemia. However, recent findings revealed an association of the NMS syndrome with the persistence of high concentrations of in utero neuromodulating hormones (neurosteroids) in the postnatal period. Anecdotal evidence demonstrated that a novel physical compression (squeeze) method that applies 20 min of sustained pressure to the thorax of some neonatal foals with this syndrome might rapidly hasten recovery. This survey provides information about outcomes and time frames to recovery comparing neonatal foals that were given this squeeze treatment to foals treated with routine medical therapy alone. Results revealed that the squeeze procedure, when applied for 20 min, resulted in a faster full recovery of some foals diagnosed with NMS. The adjunctive use of a non-invasive squeeze method may improve animal welfare by

  13. Using Screencasts to Enhance Assessment Feedback: Students' Perceptions and Preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriott, Pru; Teoh, Lim Keong

    2012-01-01

    In the UK, assessment and feedback have been regularly highlighted by the National Student Survey as critical aspects that require improvement. An innovative approach to delivering feedback that has proved successful in non-business-related disciplines is the delivery of audio and visual feedback using screencast technology. The feedback on…

  14. A Survey of Researches on Evaluation and Feedback of EFL Writing in China (2000 -2013)%国内二语写作评估反馈研究调查(2000-2013)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱岩岩

    2014-01-01

    2000-2013年,二语写作评估反馈研究论文的总数量逐年递增,以定量、定性研究为主的实证性研究在缓慢上升,以经验式、总结式为主的非实证性研究的论文仍占多数;二语写作评估反馈研究开始借鉴多媒体技术、语料库等现代教学手段;研究内容上涵盖二语写作中的自我评估、教师反馈、同伴互评、计算机辅助评估、多级评估模式等诸多方面。%From 2000 to 2013 ,the total amount of academic publications on evaluation and feed-back of EFL is increasing ,but it occupies a small percentage in the core journals of foreign lan-guage studies .In terms of research methods ,non_material research articles are decreasing ,while empirical studies grow steadily .Meanwhile researches on evaluation and feedback of EFL start to take advantages of the development of modern teaching technologies ,such as multimedia net teaching platform and data driven language learning .The researches cover a wide range of topics , including self assessment ,teacher’s feedback ,peer feedback ,computer_assisted evaluation ,and multi_level evaluation system ,etc .Based on a comprehensive survey ,this article presents a future direction of evaluation and feedback research of EFL writing in China .

  15. Gathering Feedback for Teaching: Combining High-Quality Observations with Student Surveys and Achievement Gains. Policy and Practice Brief. MET Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Thomas J.; Staiger, Douglas O.

    2012-01-01

    Research has long been clear that teachers matter more to student learning than any other in-school factor. Improving the quality of teaching is critical to student success. Yet only recently have many states and districts begun to take seriously the importance of evaluating teacher performance and providing teachers with the feedback they need to…

  16. Gathering Feedback for Teaching: Combining High-Quality Observations with Student Surveys and Achievement Gains. Policy and Practice Summary. MET Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Research has long been clear that teachers matter more to student learning than any other in-school factor. Improving the quality of teaching is critical to student success. Yet only recently have many states and districts begun to take seriously the importance of evaluating teacher performance and providing teachers with the feedback they need to…

  17. General practitioners’ participation in a large, multicountry combined general practitioner-patient survey: recruitment procedures and participation rate.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenewegen, P.P.; Greß, S.; Schäfer, W.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Theparticipation of general practitioners (GPs) is essential in research on the performance of primary care.This paper describes the implementation of a large,multicountry study in primary care that combines a survey among GPs and a linked survey among patients that visited their practic

  18. Field Laboratory in the Osage Reservation -- Determination of the Status of Oil and Gas Operations: Task 1. Development of Survey Procedures and Protocols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, Herbert B.; Johnson, William I.

    1999-04-27

    Procedures and protocols were developed for the determination of the status of oil, gas, and other mineral operations on the Osage Mineral Reservation Estate. The strategy for surveying Osage County, Oklahoma, was developed and then tested in the field. Two Osage Tribal Council members and two Native American college students (who are members of the Osage Tribe) were trained in the field as a test of the procedures and protocols developed in Task 1. Active and inactive surface mining operations, industrial sites, and hydrocarbon-producing fields were located on maps of the county, which was divided into four more or less equal areas for future investigation. Field testing of the procedures, protocols, and training was successful. No significant damage was found at petroleum production operations in a relatively new production operation and in a mature waterflood operation.

  19. Perceiving haptic feedback in virtual reality simulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Våpenstad, Cecilie; Hofstad, Erlend Fagertun; Langø, Thomas; Mårvik, Ronald; Chmarra, Magdalena Karolina

    2013-07-01

    To improve patient safety, training of psychomotor laparoscopic skills is often done on virtual reality (VR) simulators outside the operating room. Haptic sensations have been found to influence psychomotor performance in laparoscopy. The emulation of haptic feedback is thus an important aspect of VR simulation. Some VR simulators try to simulate these sensations with handles equipped with haptic feedback. We conducted a survey on how laparoscopic surgeons perceive handles with and without haptic feedback. Surgeons with different levels of experience in laparoscopy were asked to test two handles: Xitact IHP with haptic feedback and Xitact ITP without haptic feedback (Mentice AB, Gothenburg, Sweden), connected to the LapSim (Surgical Science AB, Sweden) VR simulator. They performed two tasks on the simulator before answering 12 questions regarding the two handles. The surgeons were not informed about the differences in the handles. A total of 85 % of the 20 surgeons who participated in the survey claimed that it is important that handles with haptic feedback feel realistic. Ninety percent of the surgeons preferred the handles without haptic feedback. The friction in the handles with haptic feedback was perceived to be as in reality (5 %) or too high (95 %). Regarding the handles without haptic feedback, the friction was perceived as in reality (45 %), too low (50 %), or too high (5 %). A total of 85 % of the surgeons thought that the handle with haptic feedback attempts to simulate the resistance offered by tissue to deformation. Ten percent thought that the handle succeeds in doing so. The surveyed surgeons believe that haptic feedback is an important feature on VR simulators; however, they preferred the handles without haptic feedback because they perceived the handles with haptic feedback to add additional friction, making them unrealistic and not mechanically transparent.

  20. SURVEY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    SURVEY er en udbredt metode og benyttes inden for bl.a. samfundsvidenskab, humaniora, psykologi og sundhedsforskning. Også uden for forskningsverdenen er der mange organisationer som f.eks. konsulentfirmaer og offentlige institutioner samt marketingsafdelinger i private virksomheder, der arbejder...... med surveys. Denne bog gennemgår alle surveyarbejdets faser og giver en praktisk indføring i: • design af undersøgelsen og udvælgelse af stikprøver, • formulering af spørgeskemaer samt indsamling og kodning af data, • metoder til at analysere resultaterne...

  1. Ochratoxin A in raisins and currants: basic extraction procedure used in two small marketing surveys of the occurrence and control of the heterogeneity of the toxins in samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, T E; Nyberg, M

    2003-11-01

    A basic extraction procedure for analysis of ochratoxin A (OTA) in currants and raisins is described, as well as the occurrence of OTA and a control of heterogeneity of the toxin in samples bought for two small marketing surveys 1999/2000 and 2001/02. Most samples in the surveys were divided into two subsamples that were individually prepared as slurries and analysed separately. The limit of quantification for the method was estimated as 0.1 microg kg(-1) and recoveries of 85, 90 and 115% were achieved in recovery experiments at 10, 5 and 0.1 microg kg(-1), respectively. Of all 118 subsamples analysed in the surveys, 96 (84%) contained ochratoxin A at levels above the quantification level and five samples (4%) contained more than the European Community legislation of 10 microg kg(-1). The OTA concentrations found in the first survey were in the range Big differences were often achieved between individual subsamples of the original sample, which indicate a wide heterogeneous distribution of the toxin. Data from the repeatability test as well as recovery experiments from the same slurries showed that preparation of slurries as described here seemed to give a homogeneous and representative sample. The extraction with the basic sodium bicarbonate-methanol mixture used in the surveys gave similar or somewhat higher OTA values on some samples tested in a comparison with a weak phosphoric acid water-methanol extraction mixture.

  2. Performance Feedback and Probabilistic Bonus Contingencies among Employees in a Human Service Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Tracy; Dixon, Mark R.

    2006-01-01

    The present study examined the effects of performance feedback on the behavior of front line supervisory employees at a social service agency. A multiple baseline across three participants was used with three different feedback procedures consisting of verbal feedback, verbal plus individual comparative graphic feedback, and verbal feedback,…

  3. Diagnostic criteria and reporting procedures for pre-eclampsia: a national survey among obstetrical departments in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemmensen, Åse Kathrine; Olsen, SF; Wengel, CM

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A precondition for the rational use of obstetric databases in biomedical research is detailed knowledge on how data are being generated. We identified the diagnostic procedures and criteria for pre-eclampsia (PE) and assessed the level of obstetric training of the personnel responsible...

  4. Research on improving outpatients' satisfaction by using "Intercept survey and feedback" method%探索应用“拦截调查和反馈”法提高门诊患者满意度的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘卉; 夏春萍; 邹波; 王海银

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore approaches for improving out-patients' satisfaction and provide a scientific basis to build harmonious relationship between doctors and patients.METHODS "Intercept surveys and feedback" method was adopted and about 100 out-patients daily were randomly selected to be surveyed,timely feedback was given to relative department and rectify and reform was asked to be implemented.Indices such as satisfaction rate,satisfaction coefficient were used for analyzing.RESULTS 48 995 valid questionnaires were investigated from November 2009 to June 2011; the overall satisfaction rate was 93.70 percent.An upward trend was shown for the satisfaction rate (P =0.010 7) ; top five departments with high satisfaction rates were pediatrics,outpatient department,surgery,internal medicine,ambulatory surgery centers respectively.The attitude of medical providers was the largest proportion in the patient feedback and accounted 28.5 percents.CONCLUSION A rising trend is shown for outpatient satisfaction after using "Intercept surveys and feedback" method,quality of service is gradually improved and the management is further more perfect."Intercept surveys and feedback"method may be one effective method for improving outpatients' satisfaction.%目的 探索提高门诊患者满意度的方法,为建设和谐医患关系提供科学依据.方法 采用“拦截调查和反馈”法,每日随机抽取100名左右门诊病人开展问卷调查,并将结果及时反馈至相关部门并要求整改,分析采用满意率、满意系数等指标.结果 2009年11月~2011年6月,共调查有效问卷48 995份,总体满意率为93.70%.满意率呈波动上升趋势(P=0.010 7);满意度排在前5位的部门为儿科、门诊科室、外科、内科、日间手术中心.病人意见反馈中服务态度类比例最大,占28.5%.结论 采用“拦截调查和反馈”法后门诊病人满意度呈上升趋势,医院服务质量逐步提升,管理进一步完善.“拦截调

  5. Procedure for Surveying a Station in the U.S. Army Research Laboratory Transonic Experimental Facility Spark Shadowgraph Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    shadowgraph, survey, spark range, theodolite , fiducial system 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU 18. NUMBER OF PAGES...6 Figure 6. Theodolite mounted on tripod...7 Figure 7. Theodolite optical plummet lined up with benchmark center marks. ..............................8 Figure 8. Micrometer adjustable plates

  6. Comparison of aerial survey procedures for estimating polar bear density: Results of pilot studies in northern Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Lyman L.; Garner, Gerald W.; Garner, Gerald W.; Amstrup, Steven C.; Laake, Jeffrey L.; Manly, Bryan F.J.; McDonald, Lyman L.; Robertson, Donna G.

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA) and International Agreement on the Conservation of Polar Bears mandate that boundaries and sizes of polar bear (Ursus maritimus) populations be known so they can be managed at optimum sustainable levels. However, data to estimate polar bear numbers for the Chukchi/Bering Sea and Beaufort Sea populations in Alaska are limited. We evaluated aerial line transect methodology for assessing the size of these Alaskan polar bear populations during pilot studies in spring 1987 and summer 1994. In April and May 1987 we flew 12.239 km of transect lines in the northern Bering, Chukchi, and western Beaufort seas. In June 1994 we flew 6.244 km of transect lines in a primary survey unit using a helicopter, and 5,701 km of transect lines in a secondary survey unit using a fixed-wing aircraft in the Beaufort Sea. We examined visibility bias in aerial transect surveys, double counts by independent observers, single-season mark-resight methods, the suitability of using polar bear sign to stratify the study area, and adaptive sampling methods. Fifteen polar bear groups were observed during the 1987 study. Probability of detecting bears decreased with increasing perpendicular distance from the transect line, and probability of detecting polar bear groups likely increased with increasing group size. We estimated population density in high density areas to be 446 km2/bear. In 1994, 15 polar bear groups were observed by independent front and rear seat observers on transect lines in the primary survey unit. Density estimates ranged from 284 km2/bear to 197 km2/bear depending on the model selected. Low polar bear numbers scattered over large areas of polar ice in 1987 indicated that spring is a poor time to conduct aerial surveys. Based on the 1994 survey we determined that ship-based helicopter or land-based fixed-wing aerial surveys conducted at the ice-edge in late summer-early fall may produce robust density estimates for polar bear

  7. Sensory feedback by peripheral nerve stimulation improves task performance in individuals with upper limb loss using a myoelectric prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiefer, Matthew; Tan, Daniel; Sidek, Steven M.; Tyler, Dustin J.

    2016-02-01

    Objective. Tactile feedback is critical to grip and object manipulation. Its absence results in reliance on visual and auditory cues. Our objective was to assess the effect of sensory feedback on task performance in individuals with limb loss. Approach. Stimulation of the peripheral nerves using implanted cuff electrodes provided two subjects with sensory feedback with intensity proportional to forces on the thumb, index, and middle fingers of their prosthetic hand during object manipulation. Both subjects perceived the sensation on their phantom hand at locations corresponding to the locations of the forces on the prosthetic hand. A bend sensor measured prosthetic hand span. Hand span modulated the intensity of sensory feedback perceived on the thenar eminence for subject 1 and the middle finger for subject 2. We performed three functional tests with the blindfolded subjects. First, the subject tried to determine whether or not a wooden block had been placed in his prosthetic hand. Second, the subject had to locate and remove magnetic blocks from a metal table. Third, the subject performed the Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure (SHAP). We also measured the subject’s sense of embodiment with a survey and his self-confidence. Main results. Blindfolded performance with sensory feedback was similar to sighted performance in the wooden block and magnetic block tasks. Performance on the SHAP, a measure of hand mechanical function and control, was similar with and without sensory feedback. An embodiment survey showed an improved sense of integration of the prosthesis in self body image with sensory feedback. Significance. Sensory feedback by peripheral nerve stimulation improved object discrimination and manipulation, embodiment, and confidence. With both forms of feedback, the blindfolded subjects tended toward results obtained with visual feedback.

  8. [Sedation in surgical procedures using regional anesthesia in adult patients: results of a survey of Spanish anesthesiologists].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rama-Maceiras, P; Gomar, C; Criado, A; Arízaga, A; Rodríguez, A; Marenco, M L

    2008-04-01

    To analyze the frequency and methods of sedation used in the context of regional anesthesia in adults by means of a national survey. We carried out a survey of participants at the courses of an anesthesiology training organization (Fundación Europea de Enseñanza en Anestesiología), held in Spain in 2006. The survey questionnaires asked about indications for sedation used during surgery under regional anesthesia as well as the form of administration, follow-up, and complications. A total of 375 questionnaires were sent out and 185 responses were received (49.3%). Sedation is always used to accompany regional anesthesia by 69.2% of the respondents; 13.5% of them discuss the technique to be used with the patient and come to an agreement. The same type of sedation, regardless of the regional block performed, is used by 49.2% of respondents, and 64.3% use a scale to evaluate the level of sedation. The most favored sedation technique is continuous infusion, followed by target controlled infusion and boluses on demand. The most commonly used technique is sedation with bolus injections. Sixty percent use a single agent and 38.9% use combinations. The most commonly reported adverse effects are variability of patient response (53.5%) and respiratory complications (27%). In cases of ineffective regional blockade, 49.2% of those surveyed switch to general anesthesia. Sedation is very often used to complement regional anesthesia in adult patients. Even though continuous infusion is considered to be the most appropriate form of administration, the most commonly used form is injection of boluses. Sedation with a single drug is used more frequently than drug combinations. Variability of individual response is the complication most commonly reported by the respondents.

  9. National Economic Development Procedures Manual - Urban Flood Damage. Volume 2: Primer for Surveying Flood Damage for Residential Structures and Contents

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-10-01

    92 7 0 R8-1 October 1991 IWR Report 91-R-10 REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Sur veinaFoo I. AwUNOOR(S) Wilam3 ane n_____________ punk , f O re aw o t oallon...SAM PLE SIZE ............................................ 44 NUMERICAL QUESTIONS .............................. 45 CATEGORICAL QUESTIONS...survey is most appropriate for a particular application include the type of information to be collected, the length of the * questionnaire and the size

  10. Estimating the location of baleen whale calls using dual streamers to support mitigation procedures in seismic reflection surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadi, Shima H.; Tolstoy, Maya; Wilcock, William S. D.

    2017-01-01

    In order to mitigate against possible impacts of seismic surveys on baleen whales it is important to know as much as possible about the presence of whales within the vicinity of seismic operations. This study expands on previous work that analyzes single seismic streamer data to locate nearby calling baleen whales with a grid search method that utilizes the propagation angles and relative arrival times of received signals along the streamer. Three dimensional seismic reflection surveys use multiple towed hydrophone arrays for imaging the structure beneath the seafloor, providing an opportunity to significantly improve the uncertainty associated with streamer-generated call locations. All seismic surveys utilizing airguns conduct visual marine mammal monitoring surveys concurrent with the experiment, with powering-down of seismic source if a marine mammal is observed within the exposure zone. This study utilizes data from power-down periods of a seismic experiment conducted with two 8-km long seismic hydrophone arrays by the R/V Marcus G. Langseth near Alaska in summer 2011. Simulated and experiment data demonstrate that a single streamer can be utilized to resolve left-right ambiguity because the streamer is rarely perfectly straight in a field setting, but dual streamers provides significantly improved locations. Both methods represent a dramatic improvement over the existing Passive Acoustic Monitoring (PAM) system for detecting low frequency baleen whale calls, with ~60 calls detected utilizing the seismic streamers, zero of which were detected using the current R/V Langseth PAM system. Furthermore, this method has the potential to be utilized not only for improving mitigation processes, but also for studying baleen whale behavior within the vicinity of seismic operations. PMID:28199400

  11. Estimating the location of baleen whale calls using dual streamers to support mitigation procedures in seismic reflection surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadi, Shima H; Tolstoy, Maya; Wilcock, William S D

    2017-01-01

    In order to mitigate against possible impacts of seismic surveys on baleen whales it is important to know as much as possible about the presence of whales within the vicinity of seismic operations. This study expands on previous work that analyzes single seismic streamer data to locate nearby calling baleen whales with a grid search method that utilizes the propagation angles and relative arrival times of received signals along the streamer. Three dimensional seismic reflection surveys use multiple towed hydrophone arrays for imaging the structure beneath the seafloor, providing an opportunity to significantly improve the uncertainty associated with streamer-generated call locations. All seismic surveys utilizing airguns conduct visual marine mammal monitoring surveys concurrent with the experiment, with powering-down of seismic source if a marine mammal is observed within the exposure zone. This study utilizes data from power-down periods of a seismic experiment conducted with two 8-km long seismic hydrophone arrays by the R/V Marcus G. Langseth near Alaska in summer 2011. Simulated and experiment data demonstrate that a single streamer can be utilized to resolve left-right ambiguity because the streamer is rarely perfectly straight in a field setting, but dual streamers provides significantly improved locations. Both methods represent a dramatic improvement over the existing Passive Acoustic Monitoring (PAM) system for detecting low frequency baleen whale calls, with ~60 calls detected utilizing the seismic streamers, zero of which were detected using the current R/V Langseth PAM system. Furthermore, this method has the potential to be utilized not only for improving mitigation processes, but also for studying baleen whale behavior within the vicinity of seismic operations.

  12. Delayed feedback on tax audits affects compliance and fairness perceptions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kogler, C.; Mittone, Luigi; Kirchler, Erich

    2016-01-01

    In the present study we explore the conflicting finding that delayed feedback on tax audits apparently results in higher tax compliance, although delaying feedback is associated with lower perceptions of procedural fairness. In a repeated rounds design the timing of feedback (delayed vs. immediate)

  13. A survey on the effectiveness of using GeoGebra software towards lecturers' conceptual knowledge and procedural mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan Salleh, Masturah; Sulaiman, Hajar

    2013-04-01

    The use of technology in the teaching of mathematics at the university level has long been introduced; but many among the lecturers, especially those that have taught for many years, still opt for a traditional teaching method, that is, by lecture talk. One reason is that lecturers themselves were not exposed to the technologies available and how it can assist in the teaching and learning procedures (T&L) in mathematics. GeoGebra is a mathematical software which is open and free and has just recently been introduced in Malaysia. Compared with the software Cabri Geometry and Geometer's Sketchpad (GSP), which only focus on geometry, GeoGebra is able to connect geometry, algebra and numerical representation. Realizing this, the researchers have conducted a study to expose the university lecturers on the use of GeoGebra in T&L. The researchers chose to do the research on mathematics lecturers at the Department of Computer Science and Mathematics (JSKM), Universiti Teknologi Mara (UiTM), Penang. The objective of this study is to determine whether an exposure to GeoGebra software can affect the conceptual knowledge and procedural teaching of mathematics at the university level. This study is a combination of descriptive and qualitative. One session was conducted in an open workshop for all the 45 lecturers. From that total, four people were selected as a sample. The sample was selected by using a simple random sampling method. This study used materials in the form of modules during the workshop. In terms of conceptual knowledge, the results showed that the GeoGebra software is appropriate, relevant and highly effective for in-depth understanding of the selected topics. While the procedural aspects of teaching, it can be one of the teaching aids and considerably facilitate the lecturers.

  14. Rationale, Procedures, and Response Rates for the 2015 Administration of NCI's Health Information National Trends Survey: HINTS-FDA 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Kelly D; Portnoy, David B; Kaufman, Annette R; Lin, Chung-Tung Jordan; Lo, Serena C; Backlund, Eric; Cantor, David; Hicks, Lloyd; Lin, Amy; Caporaso, Andrew; Davis, Terisa; Moser, Richard P; Hesse, Bradford W

    2016-12-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed the Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) to monitor population trends in cancer communication practices, information preferences, health risk behaviors, attitudes, and cancer knowledge. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recognized HINTS as a unique data resource for informing its health communication endeavors and partnered with NCI to field HINTS-FDA 2015. HINTS-FDA 2015 was a self-administered paper instrument sent by mail May 29 to September 8, 2015, using a random probability-based sample of U.S. postal addresses stratified by county-level smoking rates, with an oversampling of high and medium-high smoking strata to increase the yield of current smokers responding to the survey. The response rate for HINTS-FDA 2015 was 33% (N = 3,738). The yield of current smokers (n = 495) was lower than expected, but the sampling strategy achieved the goal of obtaining more former smokers (n = 1,132). Public-use HINTS-FDA 2015 data and supporting documentation have been available for download and secondary data analyses since June 2016 at http://hints.cancer.gov . NCI and FDA encourage the use of HINTS-FDA for health communication research and practice related to tobacco-related communications, public knowledge, and behaviors as well as beliefs and actions related to medical products and dietary supplements.

  15. Investing in the Future by Learning from the Past: Developing a Survey Tool to Gather Feedback from Deployed Army Forward Surgical Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    evaluated (Esposito, Kuby , Unfred, & Gamelli, 1995) . Southern Ohio Medical Center (SOMC) uses scaled surveys to gather statistically relevant...Esposito, T., Kuby , A., Unfred, C., & Gamelli, R. (1995). General surgeons and the advanced trauma life support course: is it time to re-focus? The Journal

  16. Diagnostic criteria and reporting procedures for pre-eclampsia: a national survey among obstetrical departments in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemmensen, Åse Kathrine; Olsen, SF; Wengel, CM;

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A precondition for the rational use of obstetric databases in biomedical research is detailed knowledge on how data are being generated. We identified the diagnostic procedures and criteria for pre-eclampsia (PE) and assessed the level of obstetric training of the personnel responsible...... of pregnancy diagnoses to the National Patient Registry differed widely in training. For complicated pregnancies, departments ranged from having only specialists reporting all cases to secretaries reporting up to 50%. Cut off limits of blood pressure (BP) and protein loss used to diagnose pre-eclampsia showed...... large differences across departments. The diagnoses given to three case stories showed little correlation to the criteria the departments reported using. CONCLUSION: Even in a small country like Denmark with 34 obstetrical departments, there was little consensus on the diagnostic criteria for pre-eclampsia...

  17. Diagnostic criteria and reporting procedures for pre-eclampsia: a national survey among obstetrical departments in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klemmensen, Åse Kathrine; Olsen, SF; Wengel, CM;

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A precondition for the rational use of obstetric databases in biomedical research is detailed knowledge on how data are being generated. We identified the diagnostic procedures and criteria for pre-eclampsia (PE) and assessed the level of obstetric training of the personnel responsible...... of pregnancy diagnoses to the National Patient Registry differed widely in training. For complicated pregnancies, departments ranged from having only specialists reporting all cases to secretaries reporting up to 50%. Cut off limits of blood pressure (BP) and protein loss used to diagnose pre-eclampsia showed......-eclampsia. The findings emphasize the need for standardizing diagnostic criteria and reporting practice and may have implications on how to interpret data regarding pre-eclampsia....

  18. Accounting Students' Feedback on Feedback in Australian Universities: They're Less than Impressed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watty, Kim; de Lange, Paul; Carr, Rodney; O'Connell, Brendan; Howieson, Bryan; Jacobsen, Ben

    2013-01-01

    Undergraduate accounting students in Australian universities are dissatisfied with the feedback that they currently receive. Recent evidence from the Course Experience Questionnaire (CEQ, a national survey of Australian university graduates) suggests that the accounting discipline ranks poorly on assessment feedback when compared to other…

  19. Self-tuning Integral Force Feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holterman, J.; de Vries, Theodorus J.A.; Samali, Bijan

    2000-01-01

    A self-tuning procedure is proposed for an active structural element with collocated sensing and actuation (a so-called ‘Smart Disc’). The procedure aims at optimal active damping by means of Integral Force Feedback control. In case the behavior of the structure to be damped may be described by a

  20. Effective Instructor Feedback: Perceptions of Online Graduate Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beverley Getzlaf

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This descriptive study explored online graduate students' perceptions of effective instructor feedback. The objectives of the study were to determine the students’ perceptions of the content of effective instructor feedback (“what should be included in effective feedback?” and the process of effective instructor feedback (“how should effective feedback be provided?”. The participants were students completing health-related graduate courses offered exclusively online. Data were collected via a survey that included open ended questions inviting participants to share their perspectives regarding effective online instructor feedback. Thematic analysis revealed five major themes: student involvement/individualization, gentle guidance, being positively constructive, timeliness and future orientation. We conclude that effective instructor feedback has positive outcomes for the students. Future studies are warranted to investigate strategies to make feedback a mutual process between instructor and student that supports an effective feedback cycle.

  1. Recapturing Traditional Culture - A Survey of Uvinmi Body Tattoo as a Curative Procedure in Esanland, Edo State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatimah Mohammed Palmer

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Body tattooing in traditional Nigerian culture was basically believed to be used for identification as well as aesthetic purposes. In some cultures, such as seen amongst the traditional ethnic Hausa and Fulani people, permanent facial marks were used to identify slaves within a community and also used to enhance the beauty and appearance of the women folk especially. In the southern part of Nigeria, amongst the Yorubas, it is used as a tribal identification symbol that provides information about the individual, as well as some culturally-related beliefs. The use of tattoos among the Esan ethnic people transcends the purposes of identification and enhancement of physical appearance as discovered. Thus this study examines the use of tattoo as a curative process for the illness called Udeh among the Esan ethnic people of Edo state Nigeria. Udeh is an illness associated with infection of the spleen. Data was collected through visitation of traditional healing venues, oral interview of some traditional doctors and elders as well as direct observation of the treatment processes. Findings indicated that the practice of Uvinmi has been in existence from time immemorial and it is a familial profession inherited from generation to generation as the most effective medium for treating spleen related diseases among the Esan people. It was also discovered contemporarily modern medical anaesthesia is employed to help reduce the agony felt in the process of blade incision as practiced by one of the traditional doctors. Recommendation made include an indebt study of the herbs used during and after treatment to gauge its efficacy on Western medicinal practices as well as proper sterilisization processes on incision equipments and procedures amongst others.

  2. Feasibility of dietary assessment methods, other tools and procedures for a pan-European food consumption survey among infants, toddlers and children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ocké, Marga; Brants, Henny; Dofkova, Marcela

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To test the feasibility of tools and procedures for a pan-European food consumption survey among children 0-10 years and to recommend one of two tested dietary assessment methods. Methods Two pilot studies including 378 children were conducted in Belgium and the Czech Republic in the Pilot...... studies for Assessment of Nutrient intake and food Consumption among Kids in Europe. One protocol included a 3-day food diary which was checked with a parent, and data were entered afterwards using EPIC-Soft. The alternative protocol consisted of two non-consecutive 1-day food diaries followed by EPIC......-Soft completion interviews. Both protocols included general and food propensity questionnaires and anthropometric measurements. The protocols were compared using evaluation questionnaires among the participating parents and study personnel. Results The parents found the questionnaires and instructions for filling...

  3. Interns reflect: the effect of formative assessment with feedback during pre-internship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McKenzie S

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Susan McKenzie,1 Annette Burgess,2 Craig Mellis1 1Central Clinical School, 2Education Office, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia Background: It is widely known that the opportunity for medical students to be observed and to receive feedback on their procedural skills performance is variable in the senior years. To address this problem, we provided our Pre-Intern (PrInt students with “one-to-one” formative feedback on their ability to perform urethral catheterization (U/C and hypothesized that their future practice of U/C as interns would benefit. This study sought to evaluate the performance and practice of interns in U/C 4–5 months after having received feedback on their performance of U/C as PrInt students.Methods: Between 2013 and 2014, two cohorts of interns, (total n=66 who had received recent formative feedback on their U/C performance as PrInt students at Central Clinical School, were invited to complete an anonymous survey. The survey contained nine closed unvalidated questions and one open-ended question, designed to allow interns to report on their current practice of U/C.Results: Forty-one out of 66 interns (62% completed the survey. Thirty-five out of 41 respondents (85% reported that the assessment with feedback during their PrInt term was beneficial to their practice. Thirty of 41 (73% reported being confident to perform U/C independently. Eleven out of 41 respondents (27% reported that they had received additional training at intern orientation. Nine of the 11 interns (82% reported that they had a small, but a significant, increase in confidence to perform U/C when compared with the 30 of the 41 respondents (73% who had not (p=0.03.Conclusion: Our results substantiate our hypothesis that further education by assessment with feedback in U/C during PrInt was of benefit to interns’ performance. Additional educational reinforcement in U/C during intern orientation further improved intern

  4. From patient surveys to organizational change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jørn Flohr; Riiskjær, Erik

    2013-01-01

    the information to change procedures and increase patient satisfaction. Thus, the article analyses the local adoption of semi-customized patient surveys and actor responses to survey results. Patient survey data from 100 Danish wards are related to ex post comments from department heads/hospital managers......From a rational perspective, patient surveys should be tools for purposeful planned change. They are feedback on performance and provide input to problem-solving processes. However, in public health care there are well-documented institutional forces, including doctors’ and nurses’ norms, which...... might complicate a rational change process. To understand the dynamics, a rational perspective must include the institutional context. From this perspective, the aim of this article is to compare the use of patient surveys in different hospital units in order to understand why some units are able to use...

  5. Fault Tolerant Feedback Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Jakob; Niemann, H.

    2001-01-01

    An architecture for fault tolerant feedback controllers based on the Youla parameterization is suggested. It is shown that the Youla parameterization will give a residual vector directly in connection with the fault diagnosis part of the fault tolerant feedback controller. It turns out...... that there is a separation be-tween the feedback controller and the fault tolerant part. The closed loop feedback properties are handled by the nominal feedback controller and the fault tolerant part is handled by the design of the Youla parameter. The design of the fault tolerant part will not affect the design...... of the nominal feedback con-troller....

  6. Student Feedback or ‘Students Hit Back’: in Search of Quality Feedback for Quality Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel Rahman Abdalla Salih

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Universities and colleges often administer student feedback surveys on teaching to elicit students’ views of how a particular course is taught and learned in order to improve teaching quality by helping tutors increase opportunities for better learning. This paper reports the views of (40 English teachers and (124 General Foundation Programme (GFP students on student feedback in institutions of higher education in the Sultanate of Oman, and the implications of such perceptions on the quality of teaching and learning English language. Findings reveal variation in the views held by both teachers and students about student feedback on teaching and learning experience. The study confirms the need for consistency between the perceptions of teachers and students on student feedback, and for training students on quality feedback and reflective learning. Keywords: Quality assurance, student feedback, teacher response, quality teaching, transformative reflection, teacher perception

  7. Audio Feedback to Physiotherapy Students for Viva Voce: How Effective Is "The Living Voice"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Wendy; Hollingworth, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Assessment and feedback remains one of the categories that students are least satisfied with within the United Kingdom National Student Survey. The Student Charter promotes the use of various formats of feedback to enhance student learning. This study evaluates the use of audio MP3 as an alternative feedback mechanism to written feedback for…

  8. Audio Feedback to Physiotherapy Students for Viva Voce: How Effective Is "The Living Voice"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Wendy; Hollingworth, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Assessment and feedback remains one of the categories that students are least satisfied with within the United Kingdom National Student Survey. The Student Charter promotes the use of various formats of feedback to enhance student learning. This study evaluates the use of audio MP3 as an alternative feedback mechanism to written feedback for…

  9. Internal Medicine Residents' Perspectives on Receiving Feedback in Milestone Format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, Steven; Moriarty, John; Nardino, Robert J; Chmielewski, Amy; Rosenblum, Michael J

    2015-06-01

    In contrast to historical feedback, which was vague or provided residents' numerical scores without clear meaning, milestone-based feedback is focused on specific knowledge, skills, and behaviors that define developmental trajectory. It was anticipated that residents would welcome the more specific and actionable feedback provided by the milestone framework, but this has not been studied. We assessed internal medicine (IM) residents' perceptions of receiving feedback in the milestone framework, particularly assessing perception of the utility of milestone-based feedback compared to non-milestone-based feedback. We surveyed a total of 510 IM residents from 7 institutions. Survey questions assessed resident perception of milestone feedback in identifying strengths, weaknesses, and trajectory of professional development. Postgraduate years 2 and 3 (PGY-2 and PGY-3) residents were asked to compare milestones with prior methods of feedback. Of 510 residents, 356 (69.8%) responded. Slightly less than half of the residents found milestone-based feedback "extremely useful" or "very useful" in identifying strengths (44%), weaknesses (43%), specific areas for improvement (45%), and appropriate education progress (48%). Few residents found such feedback "not very useful" or "not at all useful" in these domains. A total of 51% of PGY-2 and PGY-3 residents agreed that receiving milestone-based feedback was more helpful than previous forms of feedback. IM residents are aware of the concepts of milestones, and half of the residents surveyed found milestone feedback more helpful than previous forms of feedback. More work needs to be done to understand how milestone-based feedback could be delivered more effectively to enhance resident development.

  10. Rateless feedback codes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jesper Hemming; Koike-Akino, Toshiaki; Orlik, Philip

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a concept called rateless feedback coding. We redesign the existing LT and Raptor codes, by introducing new degree distributions for the case when a few feedback opportunities are available. We show that incorporating feedback to LT codes can significantly decrease both...... the coding overhead and the encoding/decoding complexity. Moreover, we show that, at the price of a slight increase in the coding overhead, linear complexity is achieved with Raptor feedback coding....

  11. Preventing Feedback Fizzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookhart, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    Feedback is certainly about saying or writing helpful, learning-focused comments. But that is only part of it. What happens beforehand? What happens afterward? Feedback that is helpful and learning-focused fits into a context. Before a teacher gives feedback, students need to know the learning target so they have a purpose for using the feedback…

  12. Developing Sustainable Feedback Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carless, David; Salter, Diane; Yang, Min; Lam, Joy

    2011-01-01

    Feedback is central to the development of student learning, but within the constraints of modularized learning in higher education it is increasingly difficult to handle effectively. This article makes a case for sustainable feedback as a contribution to the reconceptualization of feedback processes. The data derive from the Student Assessment and…

  13. Obtaining patient feedback at point of service using electronic kiosks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirocco, Danae N; Day, Susan C

    2011-07-01

    Engaging patients in their healthcare is a goal of healthcare reform. Obtaining sufficient, reliable patient feedback about their experiences in an office encounter has been a challenge. To determine the feasibility of collecting feedback from patients regarding their office encounter at the point of care using touch screen kiosk technology in an urban primary care clinic. We analyzed response rate, ease of use, provider data, and condition-specific data. The study was conducted over a 45-day period at 1 internal medicine academic teaching practice. Providers, staff, and a sponsor-supported monitor directed patients to use the kiosk after an office visit. A total of 1923 surveys were completed from 3850 office visits (50%). There was no appreciable impact on office flow in terms of wait time, checkout procedures, or visit with provider. Characteristics of patients completing the surveys were similar to practice demographics of patients with an office visit during the study period in terms of sex, but differed by age and race. Small but statistically significant differences were seen among patient ratings of resident versus attending physicians. Patients with depression were less likely than patients with diabetes, chronic low back pain, or asthma to report that they had set personal goals to manage their condition. This technology represents an important advance in our ability to capture the patient's opinion regarding quality and practice improvement initiatives, and has the potential for directly engaging patients in their care.

  14. Surveys of larval sealworm (Pseudoterranova decipiens infection in various fish species sampled from Nova Scotian waters between 1988 and 1996, with an assessment of examination procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G McClelland

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Between November 1988 and October 1996, >10,000 fish from the Breton Shelf, Sable Island Bank and the northeastern Gulf of Maine were examined for larval anisakines. Larval sealworm, Pseudoterranova decipiens, occurred in 30 of 39 species surveyed, including 8 new host records, Enchelyopus cimbrius, Lycodes reticulatus, Eumesogrammus praecisus, Lumpenus lumpretaeformis, Lumpenus maculatus, Cryptacanthodes maculatus, Artediellus atlanticus and Triglops murrayi. The parasite was most prevalent and abundant in mature demersal piscivores and benthic consumers. Sealworm densities (nr kg-1 host wt., however, were greatest in small benthophagous fish including mature E. cimbrius, A. atlanticus, T. murrayi and Aspidophoroides monopterygius, and juvenile Hippoglossoides platessoides. ANOVA revealed that geographical disparities in sealworm prevalence and abundance were highly significant in 14 of 20 species tested, although significant disparities between samples from each of the three areas were evident only in H. platessoides. Almost invariably, infection parameters were greatest in fish from Sable Island Bank. ANOVA also indicated that sealworm prevalence and/or abundance increased significantly in Sable Island Bank populations of Gadus morhua, H. platessoides, and seven other species between 1985-1986 and 1989-1990. Routine examinations, in which host flesh was sliced and candled, proved as efficacious as digestion in warm (35° C pepsin-HCl for detection of larval sealworm in the flesh of large frozen fish. Procedures employing fresh (iced samples, digestion at ambient temperature and microscopy are recommended, however, for surveys of small benthic consumers. Many of the sealworm infecting the latter hosts are tiny (2 to 10 mm in length nematodes, which escape detection by routine inspection, and may not survive in warm pepsin-HCl solution.

  15. Interns reflect: the effect of formative assessment with feedback during pre-internship

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Susan; Burgess, Annette; Mellis, Craig

    2017-01-01

    Background It is widely known that the opportunity for medical students to be observed and to receive feedback on their procedural skills performance is variable in the senior years. To address this problem, we provided our Pre-Intern (PrInt) students with “one-to-one” formative feedback on their ability to perform urethral catheterization (U/C) and hypothesized that their future practice of U/C as interns would benefit. This study sought to evaluate the performance and practice of interns in U/C 4–5 months after having received feedback on their performance of U/C as PrInt students. Methods Between 2013 and 2014, two cohorts of interns, (total n=66) who had received recent formative feedback on their U/C performance as PrInt students at Central Clinical School, were invited to complete an anonymous survey. The survey contained nine closed unvalidated questions and one open-ended question, designed to allow interns to report on their current practice of U/C. Results Forty-one out of 66 interns (62%) completed the survey. Thirty-five out of 41 respondents (85%) reported that the assessment with feedback during their PrInt term was beneficial to their practice. Thirty of 41 (73%) reported being confident to perform U/C independently. Eleven out of 41 respondents (27%) reported that they had received additional training at intern orientation. Nine of the 11 interns (82%) reported that they had a small, but a significant, increase in confidence to perform U/C when compared with the 30 of the 41 respondents (73%) who had not (p=0.03). Conclusion Our results substantiate our hypothesis that further education by assessment with feedback in U/C during PrInt was of benefit to interns’ performance. Additional educational reinforcement in U/C during intern orientation further improved intern confidence. Our results indicate that extra pre- and post-graduation procedural skills training, with feedback, should be universal. PMID:28138270

  16. Quantum feedback channels

    CERN Document Server

    Bowen, G

    2002-01-01

    In classical information theory the capacity of a noisy communication channel cannot be increased by the use of feedback. In quantum information theory the no-cloning theorem means that noiseless copying and feedback of quantum information cannot be achieved. In this paper, quantum feedback is defined as the unlimited use of a noiseless quantum channel from receiver to sender. Given such quantum feedback, it is shown to provide no increase in the entanglement-assisted capacities of a noisy quantum channel, in direct analogy to the classical case. It is also shown that in various cases of non-assisted capacities, feedback can increase the capacity of many quantum channels.

  17. Situated Formative Feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukassen, Niels Bech; Wahl, Christian; Sorensen, Elsebeth Korsgaard

    2016-01-01

    This study addresses the conceptual challenge of providing students with good quality feedback to enhance student learning in an online community of practice (COP). The aim of the study is to identify feedback mechanisms in a virtual learning environment (VLE) and to create a full formative...... feedback episode (FFE) through an online dialogue. The paper argues that dialogue is crucial for student learning and that feedback is not only something the teacher gives to the student. Viewing good quality feedback as social, situated, formative, emphasis is put on the establishment of dialogue. We...... refer to this type of feedback as, Situated Formative Feedback (SFF). As a basis for exploring, identifying and discussing relevant aspects of SFF the paper analyses qualitative data from a Moodle dialogue. Data are embedded in the qualitative analytic program Nvivo and are analysed with a system...

  18. Feedback and Incentives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Tor Viking; Poulsen, Anders; Villeval, Marie Claire

    2009-01-01

    This paper experimentally investigates the impact of different pay schemes and relative performance feedback policies on employee effort. We explore three feedback rules: no feedback on relative performance, feedback given halfway through the production period, and continuously updated feedback. We...... use two pay schemes, a piece rate and a tournament. We find that overall feedback does not improve performance. In contrast to the piece-rate pay scheme there is some evidence of positive peer effects in tournaments since the underdogs almost never quit the competition even when lagging significantly...... behind, and front runners do not slack off. But in both pay schemes relative performance feedback reduces the quality of the low performers' work; we refer to this as a "negative quality peer effect"....

  19. 实习护生护患沟通程序状况的调查%A survey of nurse-patient communication procedures among nursing interns

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张可可; 李绪辉; 颜巧元; 施悦

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨实习护生护患沟通程序状况,并提出相应的对策。方法采用护患沟通程序量表对334位实习护生进行调查。结果334名实习护生护患沟通程序量表总分(22.91±2.13)分,其各维度均分由高到低依次为:沟通结束(0.98±0.08)分、沟通准备(0.97±0.07)分、尊重患者(0.91±0.18)分、信息给予(0.90±0.12)分、信息收集(0.88±0.13)分。结论护生护患沟通技能处于偏高水平,其沟通程序能够依照沟通准备、信息收集、信息给予、尊重患者、沟通结束的程序进行有效沟通,但在信息收集、信息给予阶段存在不足,应针对这两个阶段进行案例分析等针对性训练,以提高其沟通技能水平。%Objective To study the nurse-patient communication procedures among nursing interns. Method Totally 334 nursing interns were involved in the survey using the basic questionnaire and the nurse-patient communication procedure scale. Result The average score of the communication skills was 22 . 91 ± 2 . 13 , with the dimensions of communication preparation (0.97 ± 0.07), information collection (0.88 ± 0.13), information sending (0.90 ± 0.12), respecting patients (0.91 ± 0.18), ending communication (0.98 ± 0.08). Conclusions The nurse-patient communication skills of the nursing interns were at a relatively high level. They could conduct the effective communication according to the communication procedures in the sequence of communication preparation, information collection, information sending, respect patients and ending communication. But they are weak in the procedures of information collection and information sending. Therefore, some special trains, such as case analysis, can be done to improve the ability in these procedures.

  20. Haptic Feedback Control of a Smart Wheelchair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed-Amine Hadj-Abdelkader

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The haptic feedback, which is natural in assistive devices intended for visually impaired persons, has been only recently explored for people with motor disability. The aim of this work is to study its potential, particularly for assistance in the driving of powered wheelchairs. After a review of the literature for the previous related work, we present the methodology and the implementation procedure of a haptic feedback control system on a prototype of a smart wheelchair. We will also describe the approaches utilized to determine the appropriate force feedback that will ensure a cooperative behaviour of the system, and we will detail the two haptic driving modes that were developed, namely the active and passive modes. Experiments on a real prototype were carried out to study the contribution of the method in powered wheelchair driving and to evaluate the interest of the force feedback on the control joystick of the wheelchair. They are discussed on the basis of performance measures.

  1. Argumentation on Procedural Legal Consequence of the Procedural Violations---A Survey of Violations about the Investigatory Activity%程序性法律后果制度--以侦查违法行为为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李英祥; 张蕊

    2014-01-01

    程序性法律后果乃是针对程序性违法行为适用的不同程序,而非对违法行为主体的不利后果。根据程序的本质特征,程序性法律后果应该有程序继续进行、退回到违法行为产生的那个阶段、转入另一个诉讼阶段、诉讼直接终止四种形式,且适用何种后果应当与该违法行为所侵犯的权利类型相对应,与实体性法律后果相协调。%Procedural legal consequence is the procedure applied to procedural illegal act , but not the adverse consequence of illegal behavior .According to the substantive characteristics of procedure , procedural legal conse-quences can be divided into four formats:the proceeding of the existing procedure , retreating to the stage when the illegal behavior performed , shifting to another procedure and terminating the lawsuit procedure .Every format of procedural legal consequence is supposed to correspond to the right infringed and be consistent with substantive le -gal consequence .

  2. RF feedback for KEKB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezura, Eizi; Yoshimoto, Shin-ichi; Akai, Kazunori [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-08-01

    This paper describes the present status of the RF feedback development for the KEK B-Factory (KEKB). A preliminary experiment concerning the RF feedback using a parallel comb-filter was performed through a choke-mode cavity and a klystron. The RF feedback has been tested using the beam of the TRISTAN Main Ring, and has proved to be effective in damping the beam instability. (author)

  3. Neural cryptography with feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Shacham, Lanir; Kanter, Ido

    2004-04-01

    Neural cryptography is based on a competition between attractive and repulsive stochastic forces. A feedback mechanism is added to neural cryptography which increases the repulsive forces. Using numerical simulations and an analytic approach, the probability of a successful attack is calculated for different model parameters. Scaling laws are derived which show that feedback improves the security of the system. In addition, a network with feedback generates a pseudorandom bit sequence which can be used to encrypt and decrypt a secret message.

  4. Neural cryptography with feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Shacham, Lanir; Kanter, Ido

    2004-04-01

    Neural cryptography is based on a competition between attractive and repulsive stochastic forces. A feedback mechanism is added to neural cryptography which increases the repulsive forces. Using numerical simulations and an analytic approach, the probability of a successful attack is calculated for different model parameters. Scaling laws are derived which show that feedback improves the security of the system. In addition, a network with feedback generates a pseudorandom bit sequence which can be used to encrypt and decrypt a secret message.

  5. Disparities in Feedback Provision to Emergency Medical Services Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cash, Rebecca E; Crowe, Remle P; Rodriguez, Severo A; Panchal, Ashish R

    2017-06-16

    Feedback to EMS professionals is a critical component for optimizing patient care and outcomes in the prehospital setting. There is a paucity of data concerning the feedback received by prehospital providers. The objective of this study was to describe the prevalence of feedback received by EMS professionals in the past 30 days including the types, sources, modes, and utility of feedback. The secondary objective was to identify factors associated with receiving any feedback and, specifically, feedback regarding medical care provided. This was a cross-sectional survey examining currently practicing nationally certified EMS patient care providers (EMT or higher) in non-military and non-tribal settings. Data were collected on provider characteristics along with feedback received. Descriptive statistics were calculated, and multivariable logistic regression models were constructed to assess the relationship between EMS provider characteristics and receiving feedback. A non-respondent survey was administered to assess for non-response bias. Responses from 32,314 EMS providers were received (response rate = 10.4%) with 15,766 meeting inclusion criteria. In the 30 days preceding the survey, 69.4% (n = 10,924) of respondents received at least one type of feedback with 54.7% (n = 8,592) reporting receiving medical care feedback. Multivariable logistic regression modeling indicated that higher certification level, fewer years of experience in EMS, working for a hospital-based agency, air medical service, and higher weekly call volumes were significantly associated with increased odds of having received at least one type of feedback, and specifically medical care feedback. Additionally, providing primarily medical/convalescent transport and more years of EMS experience were significantly associated with decreased odds of receiving feedback. Feedback to EMS providers is critical to improving prehospital care. In this study, nearly a third of providers did not receive any

  6. Not Just Because it is Fair - The Role of Feedback Quality and Voice in Performance Evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Noeverman (Jan)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThis paper investigates the role of feedback quality and voice in performance evaluation. A model is developed and tested in which feedback quality and voice enhance procedural fairness perceptions (procedure effects), and procedural fairness perceptions in turn lead to different positiv

  7. Developing 360 degree feedback system for KINS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, In Soo; Cheon, B. M.; Kim, T. H.; Ryu, J. H. [Chungman National Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-12-15

    This project aims to investigate the feasibility of a 360 degree feedback systems for KINS and to design guiding rules and structures in implementing that systems. Literature survey, environmental analysis and questionnaire survey were made to ensure that 360 degree feedback is the right tool to improve performance in KINS. That review leads to conclusion that more readiness and careful feasibility review are needed before implementation of 360 degree feedback in KINS. Further the project suggests some guiding rules that can be helpful for successful implementation of that system in KINS. Those include : start with development, experiment with one department, tie it to a clear organization's goal, train everyone involve, make sure to try that system in an atmosphere of trust.

  8. Policy Feedback System (PFS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Policy Feedback System (PFS) is a web application developed by the Office of Disability Policy Management Information (ODPMI) team that gathers empirical data...

  9. Online User Feedback in Early Phases of the Design Process: Lessons Learnt from Four Design Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asbjørn Følstad

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Online user feedback, collected by means of internet survey tools, is a promising approach to obtain early user feedback on concepts and early prototypes. In this study, the collection and utilization of online user feedback was investigated in four design cases: all master student projects for industry clients involving seven student designers. A total of 272 user participants provided quantitative feedback. Half of these also provided qualitative feedback. One third of the qualitative feedback was perceived as useful by the student designers. The main usefulness of the feedback was related to strategic concept decisions rather than the interaction design of the early prototype. Lessons learnt are provided.

  10. Using Video Feedback to Improve Horseback-Riding Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Heather; Miltenberger, Raymond G.

    2016-01-01

    This study used video feedback to improve the horseback-riding skills of advanced beginning riders. We focused on 3 skill sets: those used in jumping over obstacles, dressage riding on the flat, and jumping position riding on the flat. Baseline consisted of standard lesson procedures. Intervention consisted of video feedback in which a recorded…

  11. Feedback Loop Gains and Feedback Behavior (1996)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampmann, Christian Erik

    2012-01-01

    Linking feedback loops and system behavior is part of the foundation of system dynamics, yet the lack of formal tools has so far prevented a systematic application of the concept, except for very simple systems. Having such tools at their disposal would be a great help to analysts in understanding...... large, complicated simulation models. The paper applies tools from graph theory formally linking individual feedback loop strengths to the system eigenvalues. The significance of a link or a loop gain and an eigenvalue can be expressed in the eigenvalue elasticity, i.e., the relative change...... of an eigenvalue resulting from a relative change in the gain. The elasticities of individual links and loops may be found through simple matrix operations on the linearized system. Even though the number of feedback loops can grow rapidly with system size, reaching astronomical proportions even for modest systems...

  12. [Have Case Loads of Radical Surgery for Prostate Cancer Been Concentrated in Hospitals with Robotic Equipment ?--Analyses with Questionnaire Survey and Diagnostic Procedure Combination (DPC) Data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Taiji; Tanaka, Shigeru

    2016-04-01

    We investigated whether installation of robot-assisted surgical equipment in hospitals resulted in concentration of the case loads of radical prostatectomy. We selected 11 areas with populations of around 1 million or more where there were one or more hospitals with robotic equipment and 4 or more without it. In addition, annual changes of case loads for prostatectomy over 4 years from 2010 to 2013 were clearly determined in these areas. The case loads were determined based on the results of a questionnaire survey for the hospitals with robots and on the Diagnostic Procedures Combination data provided by the Ministry of Health, Labor and Wealth for those without such equipment. The concentration of the case loads was principally defined as when hospitals with robots had more predominant proportion of cases than those without them in the comparison between case loads prior to instillation of robots (or in the initial year of the study) and those in the final years. The 11 selected areas included 44 hospitals with robots and 156 without them. Concentration of case loads was found in 5 areas. In 4 areas, installation of robots did not have a specific relation to the distribution pattern s of case loads in hospitals with or without the equipment. The remaining 2 areas tended to have a weak but not definite concentration of case loads. In the areas in which installation did not influence case loads the further analysis revealed that their case loads had already been concentrated in the initial year (2010) of the study. Although the current results were found in a single department of the hospital, robotic installation may result in concentration of prostatectomy case loads for such hospitals in some areas. The current results are intriguing when we consider the future roles of acute care hospitals and beds in our country where the number of aged patients having chronic diseases will increase. In conclusion, installation of robotic equipment may result in concentration

  13. Probabilistic models for feedback systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grace, Matthew D.; Boggs, Paul T.

    2011-02-01

    In previous work, we developed a Bayesian-based methodology to analyze the reliability of hierarchical systems. The output of the procedure is a statistical distribution of the reliability, thus allowing many questions to be answered. The principal advantage of the approach is that along with an estimate of the reliability, we also can provide statements of confidence in the results. The model is quite general in that it allows general representations of all of the distributions involved, it incorporates prior knowledge into the models, it allows errors in the 'engineered' nodes of a system to be determined by the data, and leads to the ability to determine optimal testing strategies. In this report, we provide the preliminary steps necessary to extend this approach to systems with feedback. Feedback is an essential component of 'complexity' and provides interesting challenges in modeling the time-dependent action of a feedback loop. We provide a mechanism for doing this and analyze a simple case. We then consider some extensions to more interesting examples with local control affecting the entire system. Finally, a discussion of the status of the research is also included.

  14. Written Corrective Feedback in Second Language Acquisition and Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitchener, John; Ferris, Dana R.

    2011-01-01

    What should language and writing teachers do about giving students written corrective feedback? This book surveys theory, research, and practice on the important and sometimes controversial issue of written corrective feedback, also known as "error/grammar correction," and its impact on second language acquisition and second language writing…

  15. Written Corrective Feedback in Second Language Acquisition and Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitchener, John; Ferris, Dana R.

    2011-01-01

    What should language and writing teachers do about giving students written corrective feedback? This book surveys theory, research, and practice on the important and sometimes controversial issue of written corrective feedback, also known as "error/grammar correction," and its impact on second language acquisition and second language writing…

  16. ASD Customer Satisfaction Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — ASD implemented a customer satisfaction survey for our products and services. This feedback will provide a better understanding of how ASD products and services can...

  17. CLIC BDS Tuning, Alignment and Feedbacks Integrated Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Dalena, B; Schulte, D; Snuverink, J; Tomas, R; Jones, J; Latina, A; Resta, J

    2010-01-01

    The CLIC BDS tuning, alignment and feedbacks studies have been typically performed independently and only over particular sections of the BDS. An effort is being put to integrate all these procedures to realistically evaluate the luminosity performance.

  18. An intensive vascular surgical skills and simulation course for vascular trainees improves procedural knowledge and self-rated procedural competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, William P; Doucet, Danielle R; Simons, Jessica P; Wyman, Allison; Aiello, Francesco A; Arous, Elias; Schanzer, Andres; Messina, Louis M

    2017-03-01

    Surgical skills and simulation courses are emerging to meet the demand for vascular simulation training for vascular surgical skills, but their educational effect has not yet been described. We sought to determine the effect of an intensive vascular surgical skills and simulation course on the procedural knowledge and self-rated procedural competence of vascular trainees and to assess participant feedback regarding the course. Participants underwent a 1.5-day course covering open and endovascular procedures on high-fidelity simulators and cadavers. Before and after the course, participants completed a written test that assessed procedural knowledge concerning index open vascular and endovascular procedures. Participants also assessed their own procedural competence in open and endovascular procedures on a 5-point Likert scale (1: no ability to perform, 5: performs independently). Scores before and after the course were compared among postgraduate year (PGY) 1-2 and PGY 3-7 trainees. Participants completed a survey to rate the relevance and realism of open and endovascular simulations. Fifty-eight vascular integrated residents and vascular fellows (PGY 1-7) completed the course and all assessments. After course participation, procedural knowledge scores were significantly improved among PGY 1-2 residents (50% correct before vs 59% after; P educational effect. Copyright © 2016 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Civil Procedure In Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werlauff, Erik

    The book contains an up-to-date survey of Danish civil procedure after the profound Danish procedural reforms in 2007. It deals with questions concerning competence and function of Danish courts, commencement and preparation of civil cases, questions of evidence and burden of proof, international...

  20. Feedback og interpersonel kommunikation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dindler, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    Som interpersonel kommunikationsform handler feedback om at observere, mærke og italesætte det, som handler om relationen mellem samtaleparterne mere end om samtaleemnet. Her er fokus på, hvad der siges og hvordan der kommunikeres sammen. Feedback er her ikke en korrigerende tilbagemelding til...

  1. "Feedback" For Instructioal Television.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Wilbur

    A number of different methods have been used by instructional television (ITV) projects to obtain audience feedback, and some of these are now being used in the ITV system in El Salvador. We know that pretesting programs on a representative sample can bring considerable gains in learning. Another feedback source can be a classroom of pupils in the…

  2. The Effect of Information Feedback in Construction Bidding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Soo

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available  With the goal to achieve efficiency in bidding competitions, many codes of bidding procedure recommend clients provide contractors with bidding feedback information. Contractors strive to bid competitively via learning based on their experiences in past bidding attempts. The level of bidding feedback information, however, varies across clients. In many cases, clients do not provide feedback or provide insufficient feedback to contractors. Focussing on two information feedback conditions (full and partial, we examine: (i the changes in bidding trend over time, and (ii the effects of bidding feedback information on bidders’ competitiveness in bidding. Data were gathered using a bidding experiment that involved student (inexperienced bidders with a construction project management background. The results show that the variations in bids over time for full information feedback condition are statistically significant, but not for bids from bidders with partial bidding feedback information. Bidders with full bidding feedback information are more competitive than those with partial bidding feedback information. The findings add to both our theoretical and empirical understanding of construction bidding: an understanding of the process of changes in the price of building work, and how the process can be manipulated through the release of bidding feedback information.

  3. Feedback i matematik

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sortkær, Bent

    2017-01-01

    Feedback bliver i litteraturen igen og igen fremhævet som et af de mest effektive midler til at fremme elevers præstationer i skolen (Hartberg, Dobson, & Gran, 2012; Hattie & Timperley, 2007; Wiliam, 2015). Dette på trods af, at flere forskere påpeger, at feedback ikke altid er læringsfremmende...... (Hattie & Gan, 2011), og nogle endda viser, at feedback kan have en negativ virkning i forhold til præstationer (Kluger & DeNisi, 1996). Artiklen vil undersøge disse tilsyneladende modstridende resultater ved at stille spørgsmålet: Under hvilke forudsætninger virker feedback i matematik læringsfremmende......? Dette gøres ved at dykke ned i forskningslitteraturen omhandlende feedback ud fra en række temaer for på den måde at besvare ovenstående spørgsmål....

  4. Feedback and Incentives:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Tor Viking; Poulsen, Anders; Villeval, Marie-Claire

    This paper experimentally investigates the impact of different pay and relative performance information policies on employee effort. We explore three information policies: No feedback about relative performance, feedback given halfway through the production period, and continuously updated feedback....... The pay schemes are a piece rate payment scheme and a winner-takes-all tournament. We find that, regardless of the pay scheme used, feedback does not improve performance. There are no significant peer effects in the piece-rate pay scheme. In contrast, in the tournament scheme we find some evidence...... of positive peer effects since the underdogs almost never quit the competition even when lagging significantly behind, and frontrunners do not slack off. Moreover, in both pay schemes information feedback reduces the quality of the low performers' work....

  5. Situated Formative Feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukassen, Niels Bech; Wahl, Christian; Sorensen, Elsebeth Korsgaard

    2016-01-01

    feedback episode (FFE) through an online dialogue. The paper argues that dialogue is crucial for student learning and that feedback is not only something the teacher gives to the student. Viewing good quality feedback as social, situated, formative, emphasis is put on the establishment of dialogue. We...... refer to this type of feedback as, Situated Formative Feedback (SFF). As a basis for exploring, identifying and discussing relevant aspects of SFF the paper analyses qualitative data from a Moodle dialogue. Data are embedded in the qualitative analytic program Nvivo and are analysed with a system...... theoretical textual analysis method. Asynchronous written dialogue from an online master’s course at Aalborg University forms the empirical basis of the study. The findings suggests in general that students play an essential role in SFF and that students and educators are equal in the COP, but holds different...

  6. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; comparison of a nitric acid in-bottle digestion procedure to other whole-water digestion procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbarino, John R.; Hoffman, Gerald L.

    1999-01-01

    A hydrochloric acid in-bottle digestion procedure is used to partially digest wholewater samples prior to determining recoverable elements by various analytical methods. The use of hydrochloric acid is problematic for some methods of analysis because of spectral interference. The inbottle digestion procedure has been modified to eliminate such interference by using nitric acid instead of hydrochloric acid in the digestion. Implications of this modification are evaluated by comparing results for a series of synthetic whole-water samples. Results are also compared with those obtained by using U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (1994) (USEPA) Method 200.2 total-recoverable digestion procedure. Percentage yields that use the nitric acid inbottle digestion procedure are within 10 percent of the hydrochloric acid in-bottle yields for 25 of the 26 elements determined in two of the three synthetic whole-water samples tested. Differences in percentage yields for the third synthetic whole-water sample were greater than 10 percent for 16 of the 26 elements determined. The USEPA method was the most rigorous for solubilizing elements from particulate matter in all three synthetic whole-water samples. Nevertheless, the variability in the percentage yield by using the USEPA digestion procedure was generally greater than the in-bottle digestion procedure, presumably because of the difficulty in controlling the digestion conditions accurately.

  7. Baseband feedback for SAFARI-SPICA using Frequency Domain Multiplexing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bounab, A.; de Korte, P.; Cros, A.; van der Kuur, J.; van Leeuwen, B. J.; Monna, B.; Mossel, R.; Nieuwenhuizen, A.; Ravera, L.

    We report on the performance of the digital baseband feedback circuit developed to readout and process signals from arrays of transition edge sensors for SPICA-SAFARI in frequency domain multiplexing (FDM). The standard procedure to readout the SQUID current amplifiers is to use a feedback loop (flux-locked loop: FLL). However the achievable FFL bandwidth is limited by the cable transport delay t_d, which makes standard feedback inconvenient. A much better approach is to use baseband feedback. We have developed a model of the electronic readout chain for SPICA-SAFARI instrument by using an Anlog-digital co-simulation based on Simulink-System Generator environment.

  8. Feedback valence affects auditory perceptual learning independently of feedback probability

    OpenAIRE

    Amitay, S.; Moore, D. R.; Molloy, K.; Halliday, L. F.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that negative feedback is more effective in driving learning than positive feedback. We investigated the effect on learning of providing varying amounts of negative and positive feedback while listeners attempted to discriminate between three identical tones; an impossible task that nevertheless produces robust learning. Four feedback conditions were compared during training: 90% positive feedback or 10% negative feedback informed the participants that they wer...

  9. Feedback som tredjeordensiagttagelse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ane Qvortrup

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Feedback tilskrives stor betydning for læring, men trods intensiv forskning på området synes det svært at fange, hvori feedbacks særlige potentiale består. I forsøgene på at gøre dette knyttes an til en række faktorer eller parametre, der fremhæves som centrale. En af disse faktorer er tid, hvor der kredses om forskellen mellem umiddelbar og forsinket feedback samt om fordele og ulemper ved hver af de to. I denne artikel knyttes der an til en forståelse af feedback som tredjeordensiagttagelse, og der sættes herfra fokus på, hvordan man i en praktisk undervisningssituation kan imødekomme tidsfaktoren knyttet til feedback. Med udgangspunkt i et undervisningsforløb på bachelorniveau, hvor der er arbejdet systematisk med feedback understøttet af Wikis, belyses det, hvordan et sådant arbejde synes at have potentiale for understøttelse af såvel læring som undervisning. En sådan teoretisk reflekteret belysning kan udgøre et refleksionsprogram for fremtidig planlægning af og løbende refleksion over undervisning.     The article investigates the effect of feedback on learning. Feedback has been shown to be one of the most powerful influences on achievement in education. But, in spite of much research on the matter, there is no agreement on how the special potential of feedback can be described, and consequently no agreement on what is good and bad feedback. This article sets out to rectify this omission by seeking a new theoretical framework that is sensitive to the complexity of the impact of feedback. The author propose a system theoretical frame and through its use identifies significant didactical issues. Although feedback is described as an internal, system-relative construction, when seen through a system theoretical lens different teaching environments create diverse conditions for feedback constructions. The final section of the paper explores this idea in relation to wikis.

  10. Feedback som tredjeordensiagttagelse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ane Qvortrup

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Feedback tilskrives stor betydning for læring, men trods intensiv forskning på området synes det svært at fange, hvori feedbacks særlige potentiale består. I forsøgene på at gøre dette knyttes an til en række faktorer eller parametre, der fremhæves som centrale. En af disse faktorer er tid, hvor der kredses om forskellen mellem umiddelbar og forsinket feedback samt om fordele og ulemper ved hver af de to. I denne artikel knyttes der an til en forståelse af feedback som tredjeordensiagttagelse, og der sættes herfra fokus på, hvordan man i en praktisk undervisningssituation kan imødekomme tidsfaktoren knyttet til feedback. Med udgangspunkt i et undervisningsforløb på bachelorniveau, hvor der er arbejdet systematisk med feedback understøttet af Wikis, belyses det, hvordan et sådant arbejde synes at have potentiale for understøttelse af såvel læring som undervisning. En sådan teoretisk reflekteret belysning kan udgøre et refleksionsprogram for fremtidig planlægning af og løbende refleksion over undervisning.  The article investigates the effect of feedback on learning. Feedback has been shown to be one of the most powerful influences on achievement in education. But, in spite of much research on the matter, there is no agreement on how the special potential of feedback can be described, and consequently no agreement on what is good and bad feedback. This article sets out to rectify this omission by seeking a new theoretical framework that is sensitive to the complexity of the impact of feedback. The author propose a system theoretical frame and through its use identifies significant didactical issues. Although feedback is described as an internal, system-relative construction, when seen through a system theoretical lens different teaching environments create diverse conditions for feedback constructions. The final section of the paper explores this idea in relation to wikis.

  11. A competency-based approach to recruiting, developing, and giving feedback to department chairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Megan; Hoffmann-Longtin, Krista; Walvoord, Emily; Bogdewic, Stephen P; Dankoski, Mary E

    2015-04-01

    Academic health centers (AHCs) are under unprecedented pressure, making strong leadership during these challenging times critical. Department chairs have tremendous influence in their AHCs, yet data indicate that--despite outstanding academic credentials--they are often underprepared to take on these important leadership roles. The authors sought to improve the approach to recruiting, developing, and giving feedback to department chairs at their institution, the Indiana University School of Medicine (IUSM), by reorganizing these processes around six key leadership competencies: leadership and team development, performance and talent management, vision and strategic planning, emotional intelligence, communication skills, and commitment to the tripartite mission. Over a two-year period (2009-2011), IUSM faculty and administrators developed standardized recruitment procedures to assess potential chairs based on the six leadership domains, and searches are now streamlined through centralized staff support in the dean's office. Additionally, IUSM offers a chair development series to support learning around these leadership competencies and to meet the stated professional development needs of the chairs. Finally, chairs receive structured feedback regarding their leadership (among other considerations) through two different assessment instruments, IUSM's Department Chair 360° Leadership Survey and IUSM's Faculty Vitality Survey--both of which the dean reviews annually. Strategically attending to the way that chairs are selected, developed, and given feedback has tremendous potential to increase the success of chairs and, in turn, to constructively shape the culture of AHCs.

  12. Penetration of Recommended Procedures for Lung Cancer Staging and Management in the United States Over 10 Years: A Quality Research in Radiation Oncology Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komaki, Ritsuko, E-mail: rkomaki@mdanderson.org [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Khalid, Najma [American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Langer, Corey J. [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Kong, Feng-Ming [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Owen, Jean B.; Crozier, Cheryl L. [American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Wilson, J. Frank [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Wei, Xiong [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Movsas, Benjamin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To document the penetration of clinical trial results, practice guidelines, and appropriateness criteria into national practice, we compared the use of components of staging and treatment for lung cancer among patients treated in 2006-2007 with those used in patients treated in 1998-1999. Methods and Materials: Patient, staging work-up, and treatment characteristics were extracted from the process survey database of the Quality Research in Radiation Oncology (QRRO), consisting of records of 340 patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA-NSCLC) at 44 institutions and of 144 patients with limited-stage small cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC) at 39 institutions. Data were compared for patients treated in 2006-2007 versus those for patients treated in 1998-1999. Results: Use of all recommended procedures for staging and treatment was more common in 2006-2007. Specifically, disease was staged with brain imaging (magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography) and whole-body imaging (positron emission tomography or bone scanning) in 66% of patients with LA-NSCLC in 2006-2007 (vs 42% in 1998-1999, P=.0001) and in 84% of patients with LS-SCLC in 2006-2007 (vs 58.3% in 1998-1999, P=.0011). Concurrent chemoradiation was used for 77% of LA-NSCLC patients (vs 45% in 1998-1999, P<.0001) and for 90% of LS-SCLC patients (vs 62.5% in 1998-1999, P<.0001). Use of the recommended radiation dose (59-74 Gy for NSCLC and 60-70 Gy as once-daily therapy for SCLC) did not change appreciably, being 88% for NSCLC in both periods and 51% (2006-2007) versus 43% (1998-1999) for SCLC. Twice-daily radiation for SCLC was used for 21% of patients in 2006-2007 versus 8% in 1998-1999. Finally, 49% of patients with LS-SCLC received prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) in 2006-2007 (vs 21% in 1998-1999). Conclusions: Although adherence to all quality indicators improved over time, brain imaging and recommended radiation doses for stage III NSCLC were used in <90% of cases. Use

  13. Strategies for effective feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritek, Patricia A

    2015-04-01

    Provision of regular feedback to trainees on clinical performance by supervising providers is increasingly recognized as an essential component of undergraduate and graduate health sciences education; however, many individuals have not been formally trained in this pedagogical skill. At the bedside or in the clinic, effective performance feedback can be accomplished by following four key steps. Begin by setting expectations that incorporate the trainee's personal goals and external objectives. Delineate how and when you will provide feedback to the learner. Next, directly observe the trainee's performance. This can be challenging while engaged on a busy clinical service, but a focus on discrete activities or interactions (e.g., family meeting, intravascular volume assessment using bedside ultrasound, or obtaining informed consent) is helpful. The third step is to plan and prioritize the feedback session. Feedback is most effective when given in a timely fashion and delivered in a safe environment. Limit the issues addressed because learners often disengage if confronted with too many deficiencies. Finally, when delivering feedback, begin by listening to the trainee's self-evaluation and then take a balanced approach. Describe in detail what the trainee does well and discuss opportunities for improvement with emphasis on specific, modifiable behaviors. The feedback loop is completed with a plan for follow-up reassessment. Through the use of these relatively simple practices, both the trainee and teacher can have a more productive learning experience.

  14. Comparative evaluation of the US Environmental Protection Agency`s and the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education`s environmental survey and site assessment program field sampling procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitkus, T.J.; Bright, T.L.; Roberts, S.A.

    1997-10-01

    At the request of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC`s) Headquarters Office, the Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program (ESSAP) of the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) compared the documented procedures that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and ESSAP use for collecting environmental samples. The project objectives were to review both organizations` procedures applicable to collecting various sample matrices, compare the procedures for similarities and differences, and then to evaluate the reason for any identified procedural differences and their potential impact on ESSAP`s sample data quality. The procedures reviewed included those for sampling surface and subsurface soil, surface and groundwater, vegetation, air, and removable surface contamination. ESSAP obtained copies of relevant EPA documents and reviewed and prepared a tabulated summary of each applicable procedure. The methods for collecting and handling each type of sample were evaluated for differences, and where these were identified, the significance and effect of the differences on analytical quality were determined. The results of the comparison showed that, overall, the procedures and methods that EPA and ESSAP use for sample collection are very similar. The number of minor differences noted were the result of restrictions or procedures necessary to ensure sample integrity and prevent the introduction of interfering compounds when samples are to be analyzed for chemical parameters. For most radio nuclide analyses, these additional procedures are not necessary. Another item noted was EPA`s inclusion of steps that reduce the potential for sample cross-contamination by preparing (dressing) a location prior to collecting a sample or removing a portion of a sample prior to containerization.

  15. Feedback og motivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerresgaard, Helle

    2016-01-01

    Feedback til elever, som enten er gået midlertidigt i stå eller i værste tilfælde oplever sig selv magtesløse, skal hjælpe dem til at etablere en tro på, at de kan øve indflydelse på og være betydningsfulde for deres omgivelser. Feedback sættes ofte i forbindelse med ’læring’. I denne artikel...... påvirket af en målrettet, individuel feedback – eller manglen på samme....

  16. Reading, Listening and Feeling: Audio Feedback as a Component of an Inclusive Learning Culture at Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knauf, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Feedback on student performance is an important part of university assessment procedures. However, effective feedback is hampered by various obstacles. The growing heterogeneity of the student body increases these barriers, particularly with regard to the reception of feedback. One strategy to overcome these obstacles can be to communicate…

  17. Surveying Humaness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Randi; Gad, Christopher

    Christopher Gad. Ph.d. Dept. of Information and Media Studies Randi Markussen. Associate Professor, Dept. of Information and Media Studies. rmark@imv.au.dk   Abstract:   Surveying humanness -politics of care improvement   For various reasons we both were subjected to a specific survey procedure...... and development of a large collection of biological and psychological symptoms and psycho-social problems. However, the surveys say nothing about how the information will be of use to the people who answer the procedure or how this scientific intervention will be put to use more specifically within the public...... be imagined as a positive end, as ‘making explicit’ (in a popular psychological perspective) is considered to be therapeutic and good in itself? We will discuss those questions from a Foucaultian and ANT perspective, where one does not accept that pre-existing subjects are exposed to survey procedures...

  18. Feedback Practices and Signature Pedagogies: What Can the Liberal Arts Learn from the Design Critique?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrand, Tom; Eliason, John

    2012-01-01

    To examine the differences between feedback practices in liberal arts courses and in design courses, we surveyed 373 students with experiences of both. Our study found that students perceived the feedback they received in design courses as more effective in advancing their learning, and that the emotional effects of feedback presented verbally and…

  19. Use of simulator-based medical procedural curriculum: the learner's perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nair Parvathy

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Simulation is increasingly used for teaching medical procedures. The goal of this study was to assess learner preferences for how simulators should be used in a procedural curriculum. Methods A 26-item survey was constructed to assess the optimal use of simulators for the teaching of medical procedures in an internal medicine residency curriculum. Survey domains were generated independently by two investigators and validated by an expert panel (n = 7. Final survey items were revised based on pilot survey and distributed to 128 internal medicine residents. Results Of the 128 residents surveyed, 106 (83% responded. Most responders felt that simulators should be used to learn technical skills (94%, refine technical skills (84%, and acquire procedural teaching skills (87%. Respondents felt that procedures most effectively taught by simulators include: central venous catheterization, thoracentesis, intubation, lumbar puncture, and paracentesis. The majority of learners felt that teaching should be done early in residency (97%. With regards to course format, 62% of respondents felt that no more than 3-4 learners per simulator and an instructor to learner ratio of 1:3-4 would be acceptable. The majority felt that the role of instructors should include demonstration of technique (92%, observe learner techniques (92%, teach evidence behind procedural steps (84% and provide feedback (89%. Commonly cited barriers to procedural teaching were limitations in time, number of instructors and simulators, and lack of realism of some simulators. Conclusions Our results suggest that residents value simulator-based procedural teaching in the form of small-group sessions. Simulators should be an integral part of medical procedural education.

  20. Proposal of a survey of radiation protection procedures during breast feeding;Proposta de um levantamento do estado da arte da radioprotecao para lactantes submetidas a procedimento com radiofarmacos e respectivos bebes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Liliane dos; Oliveira, Silvia M. Velasques de [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Monitoracao Individual Interna

    2009-07-01

    Contamination can occur by breast milk ingestion involving mothers subjected to diagnostic procedures or treatment with radiopharmaceuticals, which can reach high concentrations in milk causing significant absorbed doses to the children organs. Besides internal dose, close contact between the baby and his mother give rise to external exposures. In Brazil, 7% of diagnostic procedures use {sup 131}I or {sup 123}I for thyroid imaging and 84% of these were hold by women. For {sup 131}I, {sup 67}Ga and {sup 201}Tl, is recommended breast feeding cessation. The present work proposes a survey of the state of the art of radiation protection to breast feeding infants. It was planned interviews with nuclear medicine staff applying a questionnaire in order to assess specific procedures to women in reproductive age. This is 'on progress work'. (author)

  1. NAIP 2015 Imagery Feedback

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — The NAIP 2015 Imagery Feedback web application allows users to make comments and observations about the quality of the 2015 National Agriculture Imagery Program...

  2. NAIP 2014 Imagery Feedback

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — The NAIP 2014 Imagery Feedback map allows users to make comments and observations about the quality of the 2014 National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP)...

  3. Feedback in analog circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Ochoa, Agustin

    2016-01-01

    This book describes a consistent and direct methodology to the analysis and design of analog circuits with particular application to circuits containing feedback. The analysis and design of circuits containing feedback is generally presented by either following a series of examples where each circuit is simplified through the use of insight or experience (someone else’s), or a complete nodal-matrix analysis generating lots of algebra. Neither of these approaches leads to gaining insight into the design process easily. The author develops a systematic approach to circuit analysis, the Driving Point Impedance and Signal Flow Graphs (DPI/SFG) method that does not require a-priori insight to the circuit being considered and results in factored analysis supporting the design function. This approach enables designers to account fully for loading and the bi-directional nature of elements both in the feedback path and in the amplifier itself, properties many times assumed negligible and ignored. Feedback circuits a...

  4. Feedback and rewards, part II: formal and informal feedback reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harolds, Jay

    2013-02-01

    There are 2 major classes of feedback. One class of feedback consists of the informal, numerous conversations between various people in the organization regarding the performance, behavior, and goals of an individual. Another class of feedback consists of formal reviews held once or twice a year between a supervisor and an individual. This article discusses both types of feedback.

  5. The effectiveness of EEG-feedback on attention, impulsivity and EEG: a sham feedback controlled study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Logemann, H.N.; Lansbergen, M.M.; Os, T.W. Van; Bocker, K.B.; Kenemans, J.L.

    2010-01-01

    EEG-feedback, also called neurofeedback, is a training procedure aimed at altering brain activity, and is used as a treatment for disorders like Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Studies have reported positive effects of neurofeedback on attention and other dependent variables.

  6. The effectiveness of EEG-feedback on attention, impulsivity and EEG : A sham feedback controlled study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Logemann, H. N. Alexander; Lansbergen, Marieke M.; Van Os, Titus W. D. P.; Bocker, Koen B. E.; Kenemans, J. Leon

    2010-01-01

    EEG-feedback, also called neurofeedback, is a training procedure aimed at altering brain activity, and is used as a treatment for disorders like Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Studies have reported positive effects of neurofeedback on attention and other dependent variables.

  7. The effectiveness of EEG-feedback on attention, impulsivity and EEG: a sham feedback controlled study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Logemann, H.N.; Lansbergen, M.M.; Os, T.W. Van; Bocker, K.B.; Kenemans, J.L.

    2010-01-01

    EEG-feedback, also called neurofeedback, is a training procedure aimed at altering brain activity, and is used as a treatment for disorders like Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Studies have reported positive effects of neurofeedback on attention and other dependent variables. Howeve

  8. The effectiveness of EEG-feedback on attention, impulsivity and EEG : A sham feedback controlled study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Logemann, H. N. Alexander; Lansbergen, Marieke M.; Van Os, Titus W. D. P.; Bocker, Koen B. E.; Kenemans, J. Leon

    2010-01-01

    EEG-feedback, also called neurofeedback, is a training procedure aimed at altering brain activity, and is used as a treatment for disorders like Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Studies have reported positive effects of neurofeedback on attention and other dependent variables. Howeve

  9. Identification of potential participant scientists and development of procedures for a national inventory of selected biological monitoring programs: a mail questionnaire survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemp, H.T.; Goff, F.G.; Ross, J.W.

    1978-03-01

    Procedural details of how the National Biological Monitoring Inventory was conducted are described. Results of a nationwide telephone campaign to identify principal investigators and also of a nationwide questionnaire mailing to the investigators identified are presented. On the basis of percentage of questionnaire returns (nearly 50 percent), the Inventory was judged to be successful. The communication procedures, guidelines, and formats developed may be useful to others engaged in this type of research.

  10. Feedback and rewards, Part I: Introduction to effective feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harolds, Jay A

    2013-01-01

    This series of articles discusses conversations regarding feedback. Feedback can include input from numerous sources, including one's supervisor, peers, subordinates, suppliers, customers, patients, and/or society members. Effective feedback is very important to the operation of any organization and to the growth of the individual. However, feedback done poorly does not appear to be rare and can be highly destructive to all. A variety of tips on how to do feedback well are included in this article.

  11. Feedback: Now with Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Philip F.; Quataert, Eliot; Faucher-Giguere, Claude-Andre; Keres, Dusan; Wetzel, Andrew R.; Murray, Norman W.

    2017-01-01

    The most fundamental unsolved problems in galaxy formation revolve around "feedback" from massive stars and black holes. In the last few years, a new generation of theoretical models have emerged which combine new numerical methods and physics in an attempt to realistically model the diverse physics of the interstellar medium, star formation, and feedback from super-massive black holes and massive stars (winds, jets, SNe, and radiation). These mechanisms lead to 'self-regulated' galaxy and star formation, in which global correlations such as the Schmidt-Kennicutt law, the inefficiency of star formation, and the stellar mass function -- emerge naturally. Within galaxies, feedback regulates the structure of the interstellar medium, and many observed properties of the ISM, star formation, and galaxies can be understood as a fundamental consequence of super-sonic turbulence in a rapidly cooling, self-gravitating medium. But feedback also produces galactic super-winds that can dramatically alter the cosmological evolution of galaxies, change the nature of dark matter cores and ‘cusps’, and re-structure the circum-galactic and inter-galactic medium. These winds depend non-linearly on multiple feedback mechanisms in a way that explains why they have been so difficult to model in previous "sub-grid" approaches. This resolves long-standing problems in understanding even apparently "simple" galaxy properties like the mass-metallicity relation. Finally, I'll discuss where feedback fails, and where either additional, exotic physics, or new, previously-dismissed feedback mechanisms, may be needed to explain observations.

  12. Feedback control of quantum system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Dao-yi; CHEN Zong-hai; ZHANG Chen-bin; CHEN Chun-lin

    2006-01-01

    Feedback is a significant strategy for the control of quantum system.Information acquisition is the greatest difficulty in quantum feedback applications.After discussing several basic methods for information acquisition,we review three kinds of quantum feedback control strategies:quantum feedback control with measurement,coherent quantum feedback,and quantum feedback control based on cloning and recognition.The first feedback strategy can effectively acquire information,but it destroys the coherence in feedback loop.On the contrary,coherent quantum feedback does not destroy the coherence,but the capability of information acquisition is limited.However,the third feedback scheme gives a compromise between information acquisition and measurement disturbance.

  13. Direct observation and focused feedback for clinical skills training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Tejinder; Kundra, Shaveta; Gupta, Piyush

    2014-09-01

    Direct observation of the medical trainee by an expert assessor and providing authentic feedback is considered an important tool for development of clinical and procedural skills. Mini-clinical evaluation exercise and Direct Observation of Procedural Skills are two important tools to observe the trainee during a clinical encounter or during a procedure, make an expert standardized (though subjective) observation, and use it to provide developmental feedback. Both can be easily integrated into routine work of clinical departments, and both provide a reliable assessment if 6-8 such encounters are used.

  14. U.S. Geological Survey Noble Gas Laboratory’s standard operating procedures for the measurement of dissolved gas in water samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Andrew G.

    2015-08-12

    This report addresses the standard operating procedures used by the U.S. Geological Survey’s Noble Gas Laboratory in Denver, Colorado, U.S.A., for the measurement of dissolved gases (methane, nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon dioxide) and noble gas isotopes (helium-3, helium-4, neon-20, neon-21, neon-22, argon-36, argon-38, argon-40, kryton-84, krypton-86, xenon-103, and xenon-132) dissolved in water. A synopsis of the instrumentation used, procedures followed, calibration practices, standards used, and a quality assurance and quality control program is presented. The report outlines the day-to-day operation of the Residual Gas Analyzer Model 200, Mass Analyzer Products Model 215–50, and ultralow vacuum extraction line along with the sample handling procedures, noble gas extraction and purification, instrument measurement procedures, instrumental data acquisition, and calculations for the conversion of raw data from the mass spectrometer into noble gas concentrations per unit mass of water analyzed. Techniques for the preparation of artificial dissolved gas standards are detailed and coupled to a quality assurance and quality control program to present the accuracy of the procedures used in the laboratory.

  15. Peri-operative data on the nuss procedure in children with pectus excavatum: independent survey of the first 20 years' data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasiou Thanos

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To review the literature and assess the cumulative data on the Nuss operation in children on its twenty years' anniversary: The Nuss procedure corrects the pectus excavatum by minimal access semi-permanent insertion of metal bars in order to reduce the deformity and refashion the contour of the growing thorax. The advantage over previous techniques is avoidance of osteochondrotomies and thence allowance for normal growth of the thorax. Study design PubMed search was performed. Primary outcomes were mortality, morbidity and individual complications. Secondary outcomes were procedure time and hospital stay. Results We merged the data from 19 reports comprising 1949 children of mean age 10.6 years. No mortality was observed and the procedure was associated with morbidity of 15.4%. The commonest complications are bar-related adverse events (5.7% and pneumothorax (3.5%. The average procedure time and the average hospital stay were 68 minutes and 5.5 days respectively. Conclusion 20 years of initial evidence suggests that the Nuss group of procedures is a safe minimal access option for correction of pectus excavatum in childhood.

  16. Global climate feedbacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manowitz, B.

    1990-10-01

    The important physical, chemical, and biological events that affect global climate change occur on a mesoscale -- requiring high spatial resolution for their analysis. The Department of Energy has formulated two major initiatives under the US Global Change Program: ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurements), and CHAMMP (Computer Hardware Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics). ARM is designed to use ground and air-craft based observations to document profiles of atmospheric composition, clouds, and radiative fluxes. With research and models of important physical processes, ARM will delineate the relationships between trace gases, aerosol and cloud structure, and radiative transfer in the atmosphere, and will improve the parameterization of global circulation models. The present GCMs do not model important feedbacks, including those from clouds, oceans, and land processes. The purpose of this workshop is to identify such potential feedbacks, to evaluate the uncertainties in the feedback processes (and, if possible, to parameterize the feedback processes so that they can be treated in a GCM), and to recommend research programs that will reduce the uncertainties in important feedback processes. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases.

  17. A novel Minute Feedback System for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, David T; Leininger, Lisa; Reddy, Rishindra M; Sandhu, Gurjit; Ryszawa, Susan; Englesbe, Michael

    2017-02-01

    Medical students often report a lack of timely, useful feedback during clerkship rotations. The purpose of this study was to develop a novel Minute Feedback System and determine whether it would generate frequent, high quality, documented feedback for students during the third year surgery clerkship. The Minute Feedback System was created using the Qualtrics(©) survey software platform and piloted with surgery clerkship students. These students were surveyed about the frequency and quality of feedback and their overall rating of the surgery clerkship and compared to students who did not use the feedback system. The initial pilot of the Minute Feedback System involved 6/34 M3 surgery clerkship students and generated a total of 70 unique comments from faculty and residents over 3 weeks. When the 6 pilot students were compared to the 28 students without access to the Minute Feedback System, they respectively rated the frequency of feedback 4.50 vs 2.83 (p < 0.01); the quality of feedback 4.70 vs 3.33 (p < 0.01) and the overall rating of the surgery clerkship 4.67 vs 4.05 (p < 0.01) higher. The system was then made available to all students on the M3 surgery clerkship (n = 31) over the subsequent 2 month rotation. 354 unique feedback comments were generated from 399 student requests (89% response rate). Students using the Minute Feedback System (n = 31) compared to students in the previous academic year without (n = 170) rated the quality of feedback (3.76 vs 3.4, p < 0.01), that feedback was provided during clerkship (100% vs 90%, p < 0.01) and the overall quality of the clerkship (3.94 vs 3.87, p = 0.2) higher. The novel Minute Feedback System allows for frequent, timely, useful and documented feedback to medical students. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. TUNE FEEDBACK AT RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CAMERON,P.; CERNIGLIA,P.; CONNOLLY,R.; CUPOLO,J.; DAWSON,W.C.; DEGEN,C.; DELLAPENNA,A.; DELONG,J.; DREES,A.; HUHN,A.; KESSELMAN,M.; MARUSIC,A.; OERTER,B.; MEAD,J.; SCHULTHEISS,C.; SIKORA,R.; VAN ZEIJTS,J.

    2001-06-18

    Preliminary phase-locked loop betatron tune measurement results were obtained during RHIC 2000 with a resonant Beam Position Monitor. These results suggested the possibility of incorporating PLL tune measurement into a tune feedback system for RHIC 2001. Tune feedback is useful in a superconducting accelerator, where the machine cycle time is long and inefficient acceleration due to resonance crossing is not comfortably tolerated. This is particularly true with the higher beam intensities planned for RHIC 2001. We present descriptions of a PLL tune measurement system implemented in the DSP/FPGA environment of a RHIC BPM electronics module and the feedback system into which the measurement is incorporated to regulate tune. In addition, we present results from the commissioning of this system during RHIC 2001.

  19. Climate forcings and feedbacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, James

    1993-01-01

    Global temperature has increased significantly during the past century. Understanding the causes of observed global temperature change is impossible in the absence of adequate monitoring of changes in global climate forcings and radiative feedbacks. Climate forcings are changes imposed on the planet's energy balance, such as change of incoming sunlight or a human-induced change of surface properties due to deforestation. Radiative feedbacks are radiative changes induced by climate change, such as alteration of cloud properties or the extent of sea ice. Monitoring of global climate forcings and feedbacks, if sufficiently precise and long-term, can provide a very strong constraint on interpretation of observed temperature change. Such monitoring is essential to eliminate uncertainties about the relative importance of various climate change mechanisms including tropospheric sulfate aerosols from burning of coal and oil smoke from slash and burn agriculture, changes of solar irradiance changes of several greenhouse gases, and many other mechanisms. The considerable variability of observed temperature, together with evidence that a substantial portion of this variability is unforced indicates that observations of climate forcings and feedbacks must be continued for decades. Since the climate system responds to the time integral of the forcing, a further requirement is that the observations be carried out continuously. However, precise observations of forcings and feedbacks will also be able to provide valuable conclusions on shorter time scales. For example, knowledge of the climate forcing by increasing CFC's relative to the forcing by changing ozone is important to policymakers, as is information on the forcing by CO2 relative to the forcing by sulfate aerosols. It will also be possible to obtain valuable tests of climate models on short time scales, if there is precise monitoring of all forcings and feedbacks during and after events such as a large volcanic eruption

  20. Procedural pain in children with Cystic Fibrosis: an international survey on the methods used by CF centres to prevent and reduce it

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Festini, Filippo; Bregnballe, Vibeke

    2006-01-01

    Procedural pain is an additional burden for children with CE If not adequately prevented and treated procedural pain may result in anxiety and fear bound to the visits at the CF Centre (CFC) and it may affect patients' future compliance to treatments. Aim: To collect data on what CFCs in the world...... do to prevent pain and fear in CF children. A 14-item questionnaire in 5 languages was sent to 441 CFCs' email addresses worldwide and posted on the INSG-CF web site. It regarded the methods used by CF Centres to control pain and fear during invasive procedures (e.g.: blood drawing, vein cannulation.......g., distractiozl, relaxation) 83.3 92.8 (always or often) Parents' presence during procedure 80.5 100 Pain measurement with scales (always or often) 8.3 64.3 Although much is done, a number of effective, safe, simple measures to control pain and fear are still not used in many CFCs. Our study shows a wider use...

  1. Drug and Therapeutics (D & T) committees in Dutch hospitals : a nation-wide survey of structure, activities, and drug selection procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fijn, R; Brouwers, JRBJ; Knaap, RJ; De Jong-Van den Berg, LTW

    1999-01-01

    Aims To determine structure, activities and drug selection processes used by Dutch hospital drug and therapeutics (D & T) committees. Methods A pretested structured survey questionnaire based on the Australian process and impact indicators, previous research, and consultation of professionals was de

  2. Surveying Humaness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Randi; Gad, Christopher

    Christopher Gad. Ph.d. Dept. of Information and Media Studies Randi Markussen. Associate Professor, Dept. of Information and Media Studies. rmark@imv.au.dk   Abstract:   Surveying humanness -politics of care improvement   For various reasons we both were subjected to a specific survey procedure...... and development of a large collection of biological and psychological symptoms and psycho-social problems. However, the surveys say nothing about how the information will be of use to the people who answer the procedure or how this scientific intervention will be put to use more specifically within the public...... carried out in a Danish county in order to improve treatment of people who have suffered from long-term illnesses. The surveys concern not only feed back on how people experience their present and past interaction with the social services and health care system; they also ask people to indicate the state...

  3. Observations of Protostellar Outflow Feedback in Clustered Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamura, Fumitaka

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the role of protostellar outflow feedback in clustered star formation using the observational data of recent molecular outflow surveys toward nearby cluster-forming clumps. We found that for almost all clumps, the outflow momentum injection rate is significantly larger than the turbulence dissipation rate. Therefore, the outflow feedback is likely to maintain supersonic turbulence in the clumps. For less massive clumps such as B59, L1551, and L1641N, the outflow kinetic energy is comparable to the clump gravitational energy. In such clumps, the outflow feedback probably affects significantly the clump dynamics. On the other hand, for clumps with masses larger than about 200 M$_\\odot$, the outflow kinetic energy is significantly smaller than the clump gravitational energy. Since the majority of stars form in such clumps, we conclude that outflow feedback cannot destroy the whole parent clump. These characteristics of the outflow feedback support the scenario of slow star formation.

  4. Feedback i undervisningen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Preben Olund

    2015-01-01

    undervisningsdifferentiering, feedback på læreprocesser, formativ og summativ evaluering, observationer og analyse af undervisning samt lærernes teamsamarbejde herom. Praktikken udgør et særligt læringsrum i læreruddannelsen. Samspillet mellem studerende, praktiklærere og undervisere giver den studerende en unik mulighed...

  5. Plant–soil feedbacks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cortois, Roeland; Schröder-Georgi, Thomas; Weigelt, Alexandra; Putten, van der Wim H.; Deyn, De Gerlinde B.

    2016-01-01

    1. Plant–soil feedback (PSF), plant trait and functional group concepts advanced our understanding of plant community dynamics, but how they are interlinked is poorly known.
    2. To test how plant functional groups (FGs: graminoids, small herbs, tall herbs, legumes) and plant traits relate to PSF,

  6. Feedback and Prior Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyman, Cynthia; Tobias, Sigmund

    The hypothesis that feedback in programmed instruction is an important variable in the learning of novel, but not familiar, content was investigated. A linear, constructed response program dealing with the Sabbath rituals in the synagogue was chosen due to wide variability in student familiarity with this topic. Subjects were randomly assigned to…

  7. Review of Assessment Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinrui; De Luca, Rosemary

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews 37 empirical studies, selected from 363 articles and 20 journals, on assessment feedback published between 2000 and 2011. The reviewed articles, many of which came out of studies in the UK and Australia, reflect the most current issues and developments in the area of assessing disciplinary writing. The article aims to outline…

  8. Peer Feedback in Computer Aided College English Writing Instruction

    OpenAIRE

    Ma Zhuo

    2016-01-01

    This study is to examine the acceptability of peer feedback in computer aided college English writing instruction. For the whole writing procedure, subjects in language labs were to take preparation, writing and evaluation stages, undergoing three editions suggested by peer feedbacks. For the first time reading, peers would comment on such general scale as subject and content of drafts, and the second focuses on specific items, for example the morphological, lexical and syntactical aspects, e...

  9. Comparing the effects of positive and negative feedback in information-integration category learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedberg, Michael; Glass, Brian; Filoteo, J Vincent; Hazeltine, Eliot; Maddox, W Todd

    2017-01-01

    Categorical learning is dependent on feedback. Here, we compare how positive and negative feedback affect information-integration (II) category learning. Ashby and O'Brien (2007) demonstrated that both positive and negative feedback are required to solve II category problems when feedback was not guaranteed on each trial, and reported no differences between positive-only and negative-only feedback in terms of their effectiveness. We followed up on these findings and conducted 3 experiments in which participants completed 2,400 II categorization trials across three days under 1 of 3 conditions: positive feedback only (PFB), negative feedback only (NFB), or both types of feedback (CP; control partial). An adaptive algorithm controlled the amount of feedback given to each group so that feedback was nearly equated. Using different feedback control procedures, Experiments 1 and 2 demonstrated that participants in the NFB and CP group were able to engage II learning strategies, whereas the PFB group was not. Additionally, the NFB group was able to achieve significantly higher accuracy than the PFB group by Day 3. Experiment 3 revealed that these differences remained even when we equated the information received on feedback trials. Thus, negative feedback appears significantly more effective for learning II category structures. This suggests that the human implicit learning system may be capable of learning in the absence of positive feedback.

  10. The Panchromatic High-Resolution Spectroscopic Survey of Local Group Star Clusters - I. General Data Reduction Procedures for the VLT/X-shooter UVB and VIS arm

    CERN Document Server

    Schönebeck, Frederik; Pasquali, Anna; Grebel, Eva K; Kissler-Patig, Markus; Kuntschner, Harald; Lyubenova, Mariya; Perina, Sibilla

    2014-01-01

    Our dataset contains spectroscopic observations of 29 globular clusters in the Magellanic Clouds and the Milky Way performed with VLT/X-shooter. Here we present detailed data reduction procedures for the VLT/X-shooter UVB and VIS arm. These are not restricted to our particular dataset, but are generally applicable to different kinds of X-shooter data without major limitation on the astronomical object of interest. The packaged pipeline provided by ESO (v1.5.0) performs well and reliably for the wavelength calibration and the associated rectification procedure, yet we find several weaknesses in the reduction cascade that are addressed with additional calibration steps, such as bad pixel interpolation, flat fielding, and slit illumination corrections. Furthermore, the instrumental PSF is analytically modeled and used to reconstruct flux losses at slit transit and for optimally extracting point sources. Regular observations of spectrophotometric standard stars allow us to detect instrumental variability, which n...

  11. Peri-operative data on the nuss procedure in children with pectus excavatum: independent survey of the first 20 years' data

    OpenAIRE

    Athanasiou Thanos; Protopapas Aristotle D

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Objective To review the literature and assess the cumulative data on the Nuss operation in children on its twenty years' anniversary: The Nuss procedure corrects the pectus excavatum by minimal access semi-permanent insertion of metal bars in order to reduce the deformity and refashion the contour of the growing thorax. The advantage over previous techniques is avoidance of osteochondrotomies and thence allowance for normal growth of the thorax. Study design PubMed search was perform...

  12. Effects of sex on the incidence of cardiac tamponade after catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation: results from a worldwide survey in 34 943 atrial fibrillation ablation procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michowitz, Yoav; Rahkovich, Michael; Oral, Hakan; Zado, Erica S; Tilz, Roland; John, Silke; Denis, Arnaud; Di Biase, Luigi; Winkle, Roger A; Mikhaylov, Evgeny N; Ruskin, Jeremy N; Yao, Yan; Josephson, Mark E; Tanner, Hildegard; Miller, John M; Champagne, Jean; Della Bella, Paolo; Kumagai, Koichiro; Defaye, Pascal; Luria, David; Lebedev, Dmitry S; Natale, Andrea; Jais, Pierre; Hindricks, Gerhard; Kuck, Karl-Heinz; Marchlinski, Francis E; Morady, Fred; Belhassen, Bernard

    2014-04-01

    Cardiac tamponade is the most dramatic complication observed during atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation and the leading cause of procedure-related mortality. Female sex is a known risk factor for complications during AF ablation; however, it is unknown whether women have a higher risk of tamponade. A systematic Medline search was used to locate academic electrophysiological centers that reported cases of tamponade occurring during AF ablation. Centers were asked to provide information on cases of acute tamponade according to sex and their mode of management including any case of related mortality. Nineteen electrophysiological centers provided information on 34 943 ablation procedures involving 25 261 (72%) men. Overall, 289 (0.9%) cases of tamponade were reported: 120 (1.24%) in women and 169 (0.67%) in men (odds ratio, 1.83; Ptamponade with substantially lower risk in high-volume centers. Most cases of tamponade occurred during catheter manipulation or ablation; women tended to develop more tamponades during transseptal catheterization. No sex difference in the mode of management was observed. However, 16% cases of tamponade required surgery with lower rates in high-volume centers. Three cases of tamponade (1%) culminated in death. Tamponade during AF ablation procedures is relatively rare. Women have an ≈2-fold higher risk for developing this complication. The risk of tamponade among women decreases substantially in high-volume centers. Surgical backup and acute management skills for treating tamponade are important in centers performing AF ablation.

  13. Survey of international regional anesthesia fellowship directors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lansdown AK

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Andrew K Lansdown,1,2 Paul G McHardy,1 Sanjiv C Patel,1,3 Catherine M Nix,1 Colin JL McCartney1 1Department of Anesthesia, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; 2University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 3University College Hospital, London, UK Background: The scope of regional anesthesia fellowship programs has not been analyzed but may provide insights that could improve fellowship training and standards. Methods: Regional anesthesia fellowship directors across the world were asked to complete a comprehensive survey that detailed the range of educational and practical experience and attitudes as well as assessment procedures offered in their programs. Results: The survey response rate was 66% (45/68. Overall, the range of activities and the time and resources committed to education during fellowships is encouraging. A wide range of nerve block experience is reported with most programs also offering acute pain management, research, and teaching opportunities. Only two-thirds of fellowships provide formal feedback. This feedback is typically a formative assessment. Conclusion: This is the first survey of regional anesthesia fellowship directors, and it illustrates the international scope and continuing expansion of education and training in the field. The results should be of interest to program directors seeking to benchmark and improve their educational programs and to faculty involved in further curriculum development. Keywords: anesthesia, regional, fellowship, education

  14. Online feedback op schriftelijk werk: betere feedback in minder tijd.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, B.A.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/288125797; van der Hulst, M.E.

    2015-01-01

    Feedback is a powerful teaching technic to raise students’ performance, provided that the feedback is informative on how to improve, is given in a timely manner and students have the opportunity to act upon it. Therefore, many institutions want their students to receive feedback on their performance

  15. Online feedback op schriftelijk werk: betere feedback in minder tijd.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, B.A.M.; van der Hulst, M.E.

    2015-01-01

    Feedback is a powerful teaching technic to raise students’ performance, provided that the feedback is informative on how to improve, is given in a timely manner and students have the opportunity to act upon it. Therefore, many institutions want their students to receive feedback on their performance

  16. Univé customer survey: Pay-As-You-Drive (PAYD) insurance : Report PAYD-2. Feedback from Pay-As-You-Drive insurance, both outside and inside the car

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lewis Evans, Ben; den Heijer, Anne; Dijksterhuis, Chris; de Waard, Dick; Brookhuis, Karel; Tucha, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    On the 10th of January 2013 over 3500 Univé clients were contacted and asked to fill in an online survey via Qualtrics, a survey website company licenced by the University of Groningen, about the future of car insurance at Univé. These customers could be classified under three main headings; car ins

  17. Univé customer survey: Pay-As-You-Drive (PAYD) insurance : Report PAYD-2. Feedback from Pay-As-You-Drive insurance, both outside and inside the car

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lewis Evans, Ben; den Heijer, Anne; Dijksterhuis, Chris; de Waard, Dick; Brookhuis, Karel; Tucha, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    On the 10th of January 2013 over 3500 Univé clients were contacted and asked to fill in an online survey via Qualtrics, a survey website company licenced by the University of Groningen, about the future of car insurance at Univé. These customers could be classified under three main headings; car

  18. Looking into learning: visuospatial and psychomotor predictors of ultrasound-guided procedural performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Hugh M; Kopp, Sandra L; Johnson, Rebecca L; Long, Timothy R; Cerhan, Jane H; Hebl, James R

    2012-01-01

    Despite widespread use of ultrasound in regional anesthesia, little understanding of the psychomotor and visuospatial skills required to achieve and maintain procedural proficiency exists. Despite its procedural nature, anesthesiology lags behind other fields in assessing technical aptitude among practitioners and trainees. The goals of this study were to measure relevant visuospatial and psychomotor aptitudes of anesthesia residents-in-training and to evaluate the relationship between these skill sets and the performance of ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia. Forty residents from the Mayo Clinic Department of Anesthesiology were enrolled, and 39 (PGY-1 through PGY-4) voluntarily completed a demographic survey, 4 psychomotor and 4 visuospatial aptitude assessments, and an ultrasound-based performance assessment. The Block Design Test, a subtest of the Wechsler Adult Intelligent Scale - III, correlated with ultrasound guided skill performance (correlation coefficient, 0.47; P hand-eye coordination visual feedback (projected image) compared with direct hand-eye coordination (P hand dominance. This study reveals that visuospatial aptitude is a better predictor of ultrasound-based procedural performance than psychomotor ability. The type of real-time visual feedback (indirect versus direct) used for hand-eye coordination significantly impacts procedural performance and has implications for anesthesia and other procedural specialties. The learning effect noted during initial ultrasound skill trials suggests visuospatial assimilation and underscores the importance of early ultrasound instruction.

  19. Testing AGN feedback models in galaxy evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Min-Su

    Galaxy formation and evolution have been one of the most challenging problems in astrophysics. A single galaxy has various components (stars, atomic and molecular gas, a supermassive black hole, and dark matter) and has interacted with its cosmic environment throughout its history. A key issue in understanding galaxy evolution is to find the dominant physical processes in the interactions between the components of a galaxy and between a galaxy and its environment. AGN feedback has been proposed as a key process to suppress late star formation in massive elliptical galaxies and as a general consequence of galaxy mergers and interactions. In this thesis, I investigate feedback effects from active galactic nuclei (AGN) using a new simulation code and data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. In the first chapter, I test purely mechanical AGN feedback models via a nuclear wind around the central SMBH in elliptical galaxies by comparing simulation results to four well-defined observational constraints: the mass ratio between the SMBH and its host galaxy, the lifetime of the quasar phase, the X-ray luminosity from the hot interstellar medium, and the mass fraction of young stars. Even though purely mechanical AGN feedback is commonly assumed in cosmological simulations, I find that it is inadequate, and cannot reproduce all four observational constraints simultaneously. This result suggests that both mechanical and radiative feedback modes are important physical processes. In the second chapter, I simulate the coevolution of the SMBH and its host galaxy under different environments, represented by different amounts of gas stripping. Though the connection between environment and galaxy evolution has been well-studied, environmental effects on the growth of the SMBH have not been answered yet. I find that strong gas stripping, which satellite galaxies might experience, highly suppresses SMBH mass accretion and AGN activity. Moreover, the suppression of the SMBH growth is

  20. Engaging Students with Audio Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cann, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Students express widespread dissatisfaction with academic feedback. Teaching staff perceive a frequent lack of student engagement with written feedback, much of which goes uncollected or unread. Published evidence shows that audio feedback is highly acceptable to students but is underused. This paper explores methods to produce and deliver audio…

  1. Awareness of radiation protection and dose levels of imaging procedures among medical students, radiography students, and radiology residents at an academic hospital: Results of a comprehensive survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faggioni, Lorenzo; Paolicchi, Fabio; Bastiani, Luca; Guido, Davide; Caramella, Davide

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the awareness of radiation protection issues and the knowledge of dose levels of imaging procedures among medical students, radiology residents, and radiography students at an academic hospital. A total of 159 young doctors and students (including 60 radiology residents, 56 medical students, and 43 radiography students) were issued a questionnaire consisting of 16 multiple choice questions divided into three separated sections (i.e., demographic data, awareness about radiation protection issues, and knowledge about radiation dose levels of common radiological examinations). Medical students claimed to have at least a good knowledge of radiation protection issues more frequently than radiology residents and radiography students (94.4% vs 55% and 35.7%, respectively; Pradiological procedures was significantly worse among medical students than radiology residents and radiography students (Pradiology residents as to knowledge of radiation protection issues (PRadiology residents, radiography students and medical students have a limited awareness about radiation protection, with a specific gap of knowledge concerning real radiation doses of daily radiological examinations. Both undergraduate and postgraduate teaching needs to be effectively implemented with radiation safety courses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Scientific research on human subjects and ethics procedures at the Istituto Superiore di Sanità: a survey of the articles issued in 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosmini, Francesco; Ferrigno, Luigina; D'Angelo, Franca; Poltronieri, Elisabetta

    2006-01-01

    Principles promoting the protection of subjects involved in biomedical research are interpreted differently within the scientific community. The purpose of this paper is to describe the attitudes of researchers working at the Istituto Superiore di Sanità (ISS) regarding the ethical implications of studies involving human beings, with particular emphasis on aspects concerning informed consent (IC) and ethics committee (EC) review. In 2001, ISS researchers published a total of 733 articles, 93 (12.7%) of which were studies involving human beings. Nearly 2/3 (60/93) were epidemiological, while the remaining 35.5% were based on laboratory data. Half (47/93) reported physical or psychological interventions or treatments on study subjects. 40.9% of articles mentioned that informed consent had been obtained and only 12.9% that approval had been given by an ethics committee. The low proportion of articles on which a protocol had been submitted the EC was due in part to the type of studies, but also to the absence of an institutional EC prior to 2001. Ethical procedures were more present in laboratory than in epidemiologic studies (IC: 69.7% vs 25.0%, p ethical awareness on the part of epidemiologists. Further efforts are needed to develop and enforce clear institutional policies regarding ethical procedures.

  3. Improving the quality of written feedback using written feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Maggie; Crossley, James; McKinley, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Educational feedback is amongst the most powerful of all learning interventions. (1) Can we measure the quality of written educational feedback with acceptable metrics? (2) Based on such a measure, does a quality improvement (QI) intervention improve the quality of feedback? We developed a QI instrument to measure the quality of written feedback and applied it to written feedback provided to medical students following workplace assessments. We evaluated the measurement characteristics of the QI score using generalisability theory. In an uncontrolled intervention, QI profiles were fed back to GP tutors and pre and post intervention scores compared. A single assessor scoring 6 feedback summaries can discriminate between practices with a reliability of 0.82.The quality of feedback rose for two years after the introduction of the QI instrument and stabilised in the third year. The estimated annual cost to provide this feedback is £12 per practice. Interpretation and recommendations: It is relatively straightforward and inexpensive to measure the quality of written feedback with good reliability. The QI process appears to improve the quality of written feedback. We recommend routine use of a QI process to improve the quality of educational feedback.

  4. Positive feedback promotes oscillations in negative feedback loops.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharath Ananthasubramaniam

    Full Text Available A simple three-component negative feedback loop is a recurring motif in biochemical oscillators. This motif oscillates as it has the three necessary ingredients for oscillations: a three-step delay, negative feedback, and nonlinearity in the loop. However, to oscillate, this motif under the common Goodwin formulation requires a high degree of cooperativity (a measure of nonlinearity in the feedback that is biologically "unlikely." Moreover, this recurring negative feedback motif is commonly observed augmented by positive feedback interactions. Here we show that these positive feedback interactions promote oscillation at lower degrees of cooperativity, and we can thus unify several common kinetic mechanisms that facilitate oscillations, such as self-activation and Michaelis-Menten degradation. The positive feedback loops are most beneficial when acting on the shortest lived component, where they function by balancing the lifetimes of the different components. The benefits of multiple positive feedback interactions are cumulative for a majority of situations considered, when benefits are measured by the reduction in the cooperativity required to oscillate. These positive feedback motifs also allow oscillations with longer periods than that determined by the lifetimes of the components alone. We can therefore conjecture that these positive feedback loops have evolved to facilitate oscillations at lower, kinetically achievable, degrees of cooperativity. Finally, we discuss the implications of our conclusions on the mammalian molecular clock, a system modeled extensively based on the three-component negative feedback loop.

  5. Investigating the relationship between quality, format and delivery of feedback for written assignments in higher education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sopina, Liza Elizaveta; McNeill, Rob

    2015-01-01

    investigating the impact the format of feedback has on quality of feedback and subsequently on student learning. This study sets out to investigate the impact paper-based and electronic methods of assignment submission and return have on students’ and markers’ perceived quality of feedback. Students and markers...... on an undergraduate course were asked to complete an anonymous online survey investigating their perceptions of quality, format and timeliness of feedback delivered electronically and on paper. The results showed that marking and providing feedback electronically was an acceptable method for markers, reporting...

  6. Regenerative feedback resonant circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. Mark; Kelly, James F.; McCloy, John S.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2014-09-02

    A regenerative feedback resonant circuit for measuring a transient response in a loop is disclosed. The circuit includes an amplifier for generating a signal in the loop. The circuit further includes a resonator having a resonant cavity and a material located within the cavity. The signal sent into the resonator produces a resonant frequency. A variation of the resonant frequency due to perturbations in electromagnetic properties of the material is measured.

  7. Surface Environmental Surveillance Procedures Manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanf, RW; Dirkes, RL

    1990-02-01

    This manual establishes the procedures for the collection of environmental samples and the performance of radiation surveys and other field measurements. Responsibilities are defined for those personnel directly involved in the collection of samples and the performance of field measurements.

  8. Active Galactic Nuclei Feedback and Galactic Outflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ai-Lei

    Feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) is thought to regulate the growth of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and galaxies. The most direct evidence of AGN feedback is probably galactic outflows. This thesis addresses the link between SMBHs and their host galaxies from four different observational perspectives. First, I study the local correlation between black hole mass and the galactic halo potential (the MBH - Vc relation) based on Very Large Array (VLA) HI observations of galaxy rotation curves. Although there is a correlation, it is no tighter than the well-studied MBH - sigma* relation between the black hole mass and the potential of the galactic bulge, indicating that physical processes, such as feedback, could link the evolution of the black hole to the baryons in the bulge. In what follows, I thus search for galactic outflows as direct evidence of AGN feedback. Second, I use the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) to observe a luminous obscured AGN that hosts an ionized galactic outflow and find a compact but massive molecular outflow that can potentially quench the star formation in 10. 6 years.The third study extends the sample of known ionized outflows with new Magellan long-slit observations of 12 luminous obscured AGN. I find that most luminous obscured AGN (Lbol > 1046 ergs s-1) host ionized outflows on 10 kpc scales, and the size of the outflow correlates strongly with the luminosity of the AGN. Lastly, to capitalize on the power of modern photometric surveys, I experiment with a new broadband imaging technique to study the morphology of AGN emission line regions and outflows. With images from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), this method successfully constructs images of the [OIII]lambda5007 emission line and reveals hundreds of extended emission-line systems. When applied to current and future surveys, such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), this technique could open a new parameter space for the study of AGN outflows. In

  9. Initiatives to improve feedback culture in the final year of a veterinary program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warman, Sheena M; Laws, Emma J; Crowther, Emma; Baillie, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Despite the recognized importance of feedback in education, student satisfaction with the feedback process in medical and veterinary programs is often disappointing. We undertook various initiatives to try to improve the feedback culture in the final clinical year of the veterinary program at the University of Bristol, focusing on formative verbal feedback. The initiatives included E-mailed guidelines to staff and students, a faculty development workshop, and a reflective portfolio task for students. Following these initiatives, staff and students were surveyed regarding their perceptions of formative feedback in clinical rotations, and focus groups were held to further explore issues. The amount of feedback appeared to have increased, along with improved recognition of feedback by students and increased staff confidence and competence in the process. Other themes that emerged included inconsistencies in feedback among staff and between rotations; difficulties with giving verbal feedback to students, particularly when it relates to professionalism; the consequences of feedback for both staff and students; changes and challenges in students' feedback-seeking behavior; and the difficulties in providing accurate, personal end-of-rotation assessments. This project has helped improve the feedback culture within our clinics; the importance of sustaining and further developing the feedback culture is discussed in this article.

  10. Inspiring Teachers to Reflect and Ask for Feedback: An Interplay of Teachers' Self-Efficacy, Principals' Feedback, and Servant Leadership Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birringer-Haig, Joan I.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the study was to investigate how teachers' reflection and asking for feedback--critical aspects of teachers' professional growth--can be explained and stimulated by teachers' self-efficacy, principals' feedback, and servant leadership characteristics. A mixed-method study was conducted with data collected from surveys and interviews…

  11. Feedback on Feedback: Eliciting Learners' Responses to Written Feedback through Student-Generated Screencasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Toro, María; Furnborough, Concha

    2014-01-01

    Despite the potential benefits of assignment feedback, learners often fail to use it effectively. This study examines the ways in which adult distance learners engage with written feedback on one of their assignments. Participants were 10 undergraduates studying Spanish at the Open University, UK. Their responses to feedback were elicited by means…

  12. Feedback on Feedback: Eliciting Learners' Responses to Written Feedback through Student-Generated Screencasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Toro, María; Furnborough, Concha

    2014-01-01

    Despite the potential benefits of assignment feedback, learners often fail to use it effectively. This study examines the ways in which adult distance learners engage with written feedback on one of their assignments. Participants were 10 undergraduates studying Spanish at the Open University, UK. Their responses to feedback were elicited by means…

  13. Procedures for prevention of perinatal group B streptococcal diseases: a multicenter questionnaire survey of hospitals in the Kyoto Neonatal Disease Study Group, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Kousaku; Kawai, Masahiko; Nakahata, Tatsutoshi; Kato, Fumihide; Tsukahara, Hirokazu; Yamakawa, Masaru; Hashimoto, Kazuhiro; Shimada, Seiichi; Maeda, Shinji; Okumura, Mitsuyoshi; Kanaoka, Hiroo

    2007-02-01

    To explore clinical protocols for the prevention of early-onset group B Streptococcus (EOGBS) disease of the newborn in Japan, we conducted a multicenter questionnaire survey. Of 32 regional centers participating in the Kyoto Neonatal Study Group, 28 provided usable data concerning prevention practices undertaken between 2000 and 2004. Twenty-three (82%) of the 28 hospitals implemented bacteriological screening to identify maternal GBS carriage, and all 23 hospitals administered intrapartum antibiotics to all screening-positive pregnant women. There were no institutes that used risk-based strategies. In the 23 hospitals, bacteriological screening was conducted mostly by lower vaginal swab alone (n = 18). Eighteen hospitals performed screening once during pregnancy, either before 34 weeks' gestation (n = 6) or between 35 and 37 weeks' gestation (n = 12). Oral antepartum antibiotics, when carriage was identified, were administered at 12 (52%) hospitals. Twenty institutes used penicillins for intrapartum prophylaxis. However, the loading dose for chemoprophylaxis ranged from 0.5 to 2 g, and the interval between repeat administrations ranged from 4 to 12 h. Although the results indicated that more than 80% of the hospitals surveyed had introduced some screening-based prevention practices, the timing of the bacteriological screening during the pregnancy, the number of screenings, and the screening sites, as well as the antibiotics used, and their dosage, varied widely. Because of these highly variable methods, the efficacy of the implementation of preventive practices could not be determined. This study is the first to have described preventive practices for EOGBS disease in Japan in the era of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines. In light of the above results, a larger study under a unifying protocol would be warranted.

  14. LHC One-turn Delay Feedback Commissioning

    CERN Document Server

    Mastoridis, T; Molendijk, J

    2012-01-01

    The LHC One-Turn delay FeedBack (OTFB) is an FPGA based feedback system part of the LHC cavity controller, which produces gain only around the revolution frequency (frev = 11.245 kHz) harmonics. As such, it helps reduce the transient beam loading and effective cavity impedance. Consequently, it increases the stability margin for Longitudinal Coupled Bunch Instabilities driven by the cavity impedance at the fundamental and allows reliable operation at higher beam currents. The OTFB was commissioned on all sixteen cavities in mid-October 2011 and has been used in operation since. The commissioning procedure and algorithms for setting-up are presented. The resulting improvements in transient beam loading, beam stability, and required klystron power are analyzed. The commissioning of the OTFB reduced the cavity voltage phase modulation from approximately six degrees peak-to-peak to below one degree at 400 MHz with nominal bunch intensity of 1.1e11 protons.

  15. Feedback på arbejdspladser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holdt Christensen, Peter

    Feedback på arbejdspladser er vigtig. Men feedback er også et populært begreb mange taler med om uden dog at vide sig helt sikker på hvad det er. Formålet med denne bog er at bidrage til en bedre forståelse af hvad feedback er, hvordan det fungerer og dermed hvordan arbejdspladser bedst muligt bør...... understøtte feedback. Med udgangspunkt i forskningen identificeres centrale udfordringer ved feedback, bl.a. hvorfor det kan være svært at give præcis feedback, hvordan forholdet mellem lederen og den ansatte påvirker den feedback der gives, og hvad der kendetegner en feedback kultur. Bogen er skrevet til...... undervisere og studerende på videregående uddannelser samt praktikere der ønsker en systematisk og forskningsbaseret forståelse af feedback på arbejdspladser. Bogen er således ikke en kogebog til bedre feedback, men en analyse og diskussion af hvad forskningen ved om feedback, og bidrager med inspiration og...

  16. Students want feedback and educators need dialogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbjerg, Lars; Rask, Morten

    2015-01-01

    We discuss what we call “the interaction paradox” in Danish management education. On the one hand, the fact that students want more feedback and educators want to foster dialogue with their students should bode well for interaction in educational settings. On the other hand, both groups are left...... wanting: a survey found that only a third of students at Business and Social Science (BSS), Aarhus University (AU), think they get sufficient feedback on their work , while educators bemoan the impossibility of activating and engaging students in the substantive, theoretical and methodological discussions...... in class-room settings that are considered central for effective learning. In other words, we have a situation where students want to talk to their teachers and teachers also want to engage in dialogue, but they seem to get nowhere. Based on qualitative and quantitative data from both students...

  17. 少数民族学生汉语写作反馈有效性调查%A Survey of the Feedback Effectiveness of Chinese Writing of Minority Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐雪琴; 李少平

    2015-01-01

    The ultimate goal of Chinese as a second language teaching is to cultivate learners'actual language using ability.Writ-ten expression ability is one of the four language sKills.It is also the important content of language ability.Improving written sKills for Chinese learners whose mother tongue is Chinese is very important.Evaluation is a Key linK of the Chinese writing teaching,and the effectiveness of feedbacK in writing teaching evaluation plays a decisive role.So it is worthy of paying atten-tion to Chinese writing teaching from the perspective of evaluation in teaching Chinese as second language.The thesis bases on the Process teaching method and discusses ethnic minorities in Xinjiang from the empirical perspective for the teaching object of Chinese writing teaching evaluation of teacher's feedbacK on the impact of improving learners'writing,analyses the learner's need for feedbacK and existing problems.%汉语作为第二语言教学的最终目标是培养学习者的语言实际运用能力。书面表达能力是四项言语技能之一,也是语言能力的重要内容,那么提高书面表达能力对于汉语为非母语的汉语学习者十分重要。评价是汉语写作教学中的一个关键环节,而评价的反馈有效性在写作教学评价中起着决定性作用,因此从评价的反馈有效性的角度研究汉语写作教学是汉语作为第二语言教学中十分值得关注的论题。本文以过程教学法为基本的理论基础,从实证角度探讨了以新疆少数民族学生为教学对象的汉语写作教学评价中教师的反馈对提高学习者写作水平所产生的影响,分析了学习者对反馈的需要以及存在的问题。

  18. Influence of Force and Torque Feedback on Operator Performance in a VR-Based Suturing Task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Santos-Carreras

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of Minimally Invasive Surgery (MIS has revolutionised surgical care, considerably improving the quality of many surgical procedures. Technological advances, particularly in robotic surgery systems, have reduced the complexity of such an approach, paving the way for even less invasive surgical trends. However, the fact that haptic feedback has been progressively lost through this transition is an issue that to date has not been solved. Whereas traditional open surgery provides full haptic feedback, the introduction of MIS has eliminated the possibility of direct palpation and tactile exploration. Nevertheless, these procedures still provide a certain amount of force feedback through the rigid laparoscopic tool. Many of the current telemanipulated robotic surgical systems in return do not provide full haptic feedback, which to a certain extent can be explained by the requirement of force sensors integrated into the tools of the slave robot and actuators in the surgeon’s master console. In view of the increased complexity and cost, the benefit of haptic feedback is open to dispute. Nevertheless, studies have shown the importance of haptic feedback, especially when visual feedback is unreliable or absent. In order to explore the importance of haptic feedback for the surgeon’s master console of a novel teleoperated robotic surgical system, we have identified a typical surgical task where performance could potentially be improved by haptic feedback, and investigate performance with and without this feedback. Two rounds of experiments are performed with 10 subjects, six of them with a medical background. Results show that feedback conditions, including force feedback, significantly improve task performance independently of the operator’s suturing experience. There is, however, no further significant improvement when torque feedback is added. Consequently, it is deduced that force feedback in translations improves subject

  19. Effects of longitudinal small-group learning on delivery and receipt of communication skills feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Calvin L; Masters, Dylan E; Chang, Anna; Kruidering, Marieke; Hauer, Karen E

    2013-11-01

    Although feedback is a critical component of learning, recent data suggest that learners may discount feedback they receive. The emotional threat inherent in feedback can contribute to its ineffectiveness, particularly for sensitive topics like communication skills. Longitudinal relationships among peers may increase their sense of safety and soften the perceived threat of feedback to allow students to give, receive and potentially more effectively incorporate feedback. We studied the effects of prior shared learning experiences among medical students in the delivery and receipt of feedback on clinical (communication) skills. During a formative clinical skills examination, we divided Year 3 students at a US medical school into two subgroups comprising, respectively, small-group classmates from a 2-year longitudinal pre-clerkship clinical skills course (with prior peer-learning relationships), and peers with no prior shared small-group coursework. Students in both subgroups observed peers in a simulated clinical case and then provided feedback, which was videotaped, transcribed and coded. Feedback recipients also completed a survey on their perceptions of the feedback. Students valued the feedback they received and intended to enact it, regardless of whether they had prior peer-learning relationships. Coding of feedback revealed high specificity. Feedback providers who had prior peer-learning relationships with recipients provided more specific corrective feedback on communication skills than those with no such relationships (p = 0.014); there was no significant difference between subgroups in the provision of reinforcing feedback on communication skills. Year 3 medical student peers can deliver specific feedback on clinical skills; prior peer-learning relationships in pre-clerkship clinical skills courses enrich the provision of specific corrective feedback about communication skills. Feedback between peers with pre-existing peer-learning relationships represents

  20. The Endogenous Feedback Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Augustenborg, Claudia Carrara

    2010-01-01

    proposals, it will first be considered the extents of their reciprocal compatibility, tentatively shaping an integrated, theoretical profile of consciousness. A new theory, the Endogenous Feedback Network (EFN) will consequently be introduced which, beside being able to accommodate the main tenets...... of the reviewed theories, appears able to compensate for the explanatory gaps they leave behind. The EFN proposes consciousness as the phenomenon emerging from a distinct network of neural paths broadcasting the neural changes associated to any mental process. It additionally argues for the need to include a 5th...

  1. Portfolio, refleksion og feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ane Qvortrup

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Denne leder definerer indledningsvist begrebet portfolio og gør rede for anvendelsesmuligheder i en uddannelseskontekst. Dernæst behandles portfoliometodens kvalitet og effekt for læring og undervisning og de centrale begreber refleksion, progression og feedback præsenteres og diskuteres. Herefter listes teknologier, der understøtter portfolioens opbygning og brug og implikationerne forbundet med valg af teknologi diskuteres kort. Afslutningsvist præsenteres temanummerets 5 artikler, der endvidere er inddraget undervejs i lederen som eksemplificering af de præsenterede begreber og teknologier.

  2. Precipitation-Regulated Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voit, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Star formation in the central galaxies of galaxy clusters appears to be fueled by precipitation of cold clouds out of hot circumgalactic gas via thermal instability. I will present both observational and theoretical support for the precipitation mode in large galaxies and discuss how it can be implemented in cosmological simulations of galaxy evolution. Galaxy cluster cores are unique laboratories for studying the astrophysics of thermal instability and may be teaching us valuable lessons about how feedback works in galaxies spanning the entire mass spectrum.

  3. Models of AGN feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Combes, F

    2014-01-01

    The physical processes responsible of sweeping up the surrounding gas in the host galaxy of an AGN, and able in some circumstances to expel it from the galaxy, are not yet well known. The various mechanisms are briefly reviewed: quasar or radio modes, either momentum-conserving outflows, energy-conserving outflows, or intermediate. They are confronted to observations, to know whether they can explain the M-sigma relation, quench the star formation or whether they can also provide some positive feedback and how the black hole accretion history is related to that of star formation.

  4. Effective feedback strategies for teaching in pediatric and adolescent gynecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Paritosh; Gong, Jennifer; Guiton, Gretchen

    2014-08-01

    The clinical setting of pediatric and adolescent gynecology poses complex tasks for the physician with its numerous procedures and the communication demands of interacting with an adolescent and/or guardian. Needless to say, teaching within this setting is highly demanding. Regardless of the level of learner or the professional role (e.g., nurse, medical student, resident, physician assistant) represented, clinical teaching requires that the instructor provide feedback in ways that benefit the student. Recent research on feedback suggests a more complex understanding of feedback than in the past. This article highlights key research and its implication for effective feedback by presenting a three part framework; know your learner, understand what is to be learned, and plan for improvement.

  5. Cascading failures in congested complex networks with feedback

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Jian-Feng; Gao Zi-You; Fu Sai-Bai; Li Feng

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we investigate cascading failures in complex networks by introducing a feedback. To characterize the effect of the feedback, we define a procedure that involves a self-organization of trip distribution during the process of cascading failures. For this purpose, user equilibrium with variable demand is used as an alternative way to determine the traffic flow pattern throughout the network. Under the attack, cost function dynamics are introduced to discuss edge overload in complex networks, where each edge is assigned a finite capacity (controlled by parameter α). We find that scale-free networks without considering the effect of the feedback are expected to be very sensitive to a as compared with random networks, while this situation is largely improved after introducing the feedback.

  6. Haptic gas pedal feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, M; Mulder, M; van Paassen, M M; Abbink, D A

    2008-11-01

    Active driver support systems either automate a control task or present warnings to drivers when their safety is seriously degraded. In a novel approach, utilising neither automation nor discrete warnings, a haptic gas pedal (accelerator) interface was developed that continuously presents car-following support information, keeping the driver in the loop. This interface was tested in a fixed-base driving simulator. Twenty-one drivers between the ages of 24 and 30 years participated in a driving experiment to investigate the effects of haptic gas pedal feedback on car-following behaviour. Results of the experiment indicate that when haptic feedback was presented to the drivers, some improvement in car-following performance was achieved, while control activity decreased. Further research is needed to investigate the effectiveness of the system in more varied driving conditions. Haptics is an under-used modality in the application of human support interfaces, which usually draw on vision or hearing. This study demonstrates how haptics can be used to create an effective driver support interface.

  7. Emotional feedback for mobile devices

    CERN Document Server

    Seebode, Julia

    2015-01-01

    This book investigates the functional adequacy as well as the affective impression made by feedback messages on mobile devices. It presents an easily adoptable experimental setup to examine context effects on various feedback messages, and applies it to auditory, tactile and auditory-tactile feedback messages. This approach provides insights into the relationship between the affective impression and functional applicability of these messages as well as an understanding of the influence of unimodal components on the perception of multimodal feedback messages. The developed paradigm can also be extended to investigate other aspects of context and used to investigate feedback messages in modalities other than those presented. The book uses questionnaires implemented on a Smartphone, which can easily be adopted for field studies to broaden the scope even wider. Finally, the book offers guidelines for the design of system feedback.

  8. Utility Assessment of Specificity in Upward Feedback Instruments for Leadership Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-03-01

    the scores are reported back to that supervisor without mention of who completed the survey (London & Wohlers , 1991). Subordinates participating...has been measured in many other studies (Smither & Wohlers , 1995; Hazucha et al., 1993; Leaders reported the degree to which they took action to... Wohlers , 1991). Upward feedback is part of a wider field of study known as multi-rater feedback or 360-degree feedback where data are collected not only

  9. Theory of feedback controlled brain stimulations for Parkinson's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanzeni, A.; Celani, A.; Tiana, G.; Vergassola, M.

    2016-01-01

    Limb tremor and other debilitating symptoms caused by the neurodegenerative Parkinson's disease are currently treated by administering drugs and by fixed-frequency deep brain stimulation. The latter interferes directly with the brain dynamics by delivering electrical impulses to neurons in the subthalamic nucleus. While deep brain stimulation has shown therapeutic benefits in many instances, its mechanism is still unclear. Since its understanding could lead to improved protocols of stimulation and feedback control, we have studied a mathematical model of the many-body neural network dynamics controlling the dynamics of the basal ganglia. On the basis of the results obtained from the model, we propose a new procedure of active stimulation, that depends on the feedback of the network and that respects the constraints imposed by existing technology. We show by numerical simulations that the new protocol outperforms the standard ones for deep brain stimulation and we suggest future experiments that could further improve the feedback procedure.

  10. Finding the positive feedback loops underlying multi-stationarity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feliu, Elisenda; Wiuf, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bistability is ubiquitous in biological systems. For example, bistability is found in many reaction networks that involve the control and execution of important biological functions, such as signaling processes. Positive feedback loops, composed of species and reactions, are necessary...... for bistability, and generally for multi-stationarity, to occur. These loops are therefore often used to illustrate and pinpoint the parts of a multi-stationary network that are relevant ('responsible') for the observed multi-stationarity. However positive feedback loops are generally abundant in reaction...... networks but not all of them are important for understanding the network's dynamics. RESULTS: We present an automated procedure to determine the relevant positive feedback loops of a multi-stationary reaction network. The procedure only reports the loops that are relevant for multi-stationarity (that is...

  11. Finding the positive feedback loops underlying multi-stationarity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feliu, Elisenda; Wiuf, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bistability is ubiquitous in biological systems. For example, bistability is found in many reaction networks that involve the control and execution of important biological functions, such as signaling processes. Positive feedback loops, composed of species and reactions, are necessary...... for bistability, and generally for multi-stationarity, to occur. These loops are therefore often used to illustrate and pinpoint the parts of a multi-stationary network that are relevant ('responsible') for the observed multi-stationarity. However positive feedback loops are generally abundant in reaction...... networks but not all of them are important for understanding the network's dynamics. RESULTS: We present an automated procedure to determine the relevant positive feedback loops of a multi-stationary reaction network. The procedure only reports the loops that are relevant for multi-stationarity (that is...

  12. Audio feedback for student writing in online nursing courses: exploring student and instructor reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Kathryn A; Moskovitz, Cary; Valiga, Theresa M

    2011-09-01

    Because scientific writing is an essential skill for advanced practice nurses, it is an important component of graduate education. Faculty typically provide written feedback about student writing, but this may not be the most effective choice for the distance-learning environment. This exploratory pilot study's aim was to compare spoken, recorded feedback with written feedback in three areas: which approach do students perceive as providing more useful guidance; which approach helps students feel more connected to the course; and which approach do instructors prefer? Students enrolled in an evidence-based practice graduate-level course received asynchronous audio feedback on their written assignments instead of the written feedback they received in other courses. Results from a survey completed by 30 students at completion of the course suggest a strong preference for audio feedback. This pilot study suggests that audio feedback may be preferable to written comments for distance learning courses.

  13. Do students profit from feedback?

    OpenAIRE

    Arild Raaheim

    2006-01-01

    Undergraduate students in psychology were given the opportunity to exchange the traditional exam with portfolio assessment. The students received written feedback, by way of a standard feedback form, on two of the three essays of the portfolio. To investigate whether students attend to and act on the feedback, a comparison was made between unofficial marks on the first draft of the first essay and the official marks on the full portfolio at the end of the semester. With approximately 20% of t...

  14. Observational Signatures Of Agn Feedback Across Cosmic Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylezalek, Dominika

    2017-06-01

    While many compelling models of AGN feedback exist, there is no clear data-driven picture of how winds are launched, how they propagate through the galaxy and what impact they have on the galactic gas. Recent work suggests that AGN luminosity plays an important role. The following described projects focus on understanding the power, reach and impact of feedback processes exerted by AGN of different power. I first describe recent efforts in our group of relating feedback signatures in powerful quasars to the specific star formation rate in their host galaxies, where our results are consistent with the AGN having a `negative' impact through feedback on the galaxies' star formation history. Feedback signatures seem to be best observable in gas-rich galaxies where the coupling of the AGN-driven wind to the gas is strongest, in agreement with recent simulations. But how and where does this quenching happen? Is it accomplished through the mechanical action of jets or through nuclear winds driven by radiation pressure? Finally, I show that AGN signatures and AGN-driven winds can be easily hidden and not be apparent in the integrated spectrum of a galaxy hosting a low/intermediate-luminosity AGN. Using data from the new SDSS-IV MaNGA survey, we have developed a new AGN selection algorithm tailored to IFU data and we are uncovering a much more nuanced picture of AGN activity allowing us to discover AGN signatures at large distances from the galaxy center. This implies that large IFU surveys, such as the SDSS-IV MaNGA survey, might uncover many previously unknown AGN and feedback signatures related to them. Outflows and feedback from low- and intermediate-luminosity AGN might have been underestimated in the past but can potentially significantly contribute to the AGN/host-galaxy self-regulation.

  15. Membership Survey Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis M Bowie

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In an effort to gather feedback from Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS members, the Executive sent out a survey to the membership and received replies from approximately one-third of the membership. This was an attempt to look at the role of the CTS and what the members wanted from the CTS.

  16. FEEDBACK REALIZATION OF HAMILTONIAN SYSTEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Daizhan; XI Zairong

    2002-01-01

    This paper investigates the relationship between state feedback and Hamiltonian realizatiou. First, it is proved that a completely controllable linear system always has a state feedback state equation Hamiltonian realization. Necessary and sufficient conditions are obtained for it to have a Hamiltonian realization with natural outpnt. Then some conditions for an affine nonlinear system to have a Hamiltonian realization arc given.For generalized outputs, the conditions of the feedback, keeping Hamiltonian, are discussed. Finally, the admissible feedback controls for generalized Hamiltonian systems are considered.

  17. FEEDBACK REALIZATION OF HAMILTONIAN SYSTEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENGDaizhan; XIZairong

    2002-01-01

    This paper investigates the relationship between state feedback and Hamiltonican realization.Firest,it is proved that a completely controllable linear system always has a state feedback state equation Hamiltonian realization.Necessary and sufficient conditions are obtained for it to have a Hamiltonian realization with natural output.Then some conditions for an affine nonlinear system to have a Hamiltonian realization are given.some conditions for an affine nonlinear system to have a Hamiltonian realization are given.For generalized outputs,the conditions of the feedback,keeping Hamiltonian,are discussed.Finally,the admissible feedback controls for generalized Hamiltonian systems are considered.

  18. Feedback strategies for wireless communication

    CERN Document Server

    Ozbek, Berna

    2014-01-01

    This book explores the different strategies regarding the feedback information for wireless communication systems. The text analyzes the impact of quantization and correlation of channel state information (CSI) on the system performance. The authors show the effect of the reduced and limited feedback information and gives an overview about the feedback strategies in the standards. This volume presents theoretical analysis as well as practical algorithms for the required feedback information at the base stations to perform adaptive resource allocation efficiently and mitigate interference coming from other cells.

  19. Simultaneous exact model matching with stability by output feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiritsis, Konstadinos H.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, is studied the problem of simultaneous exact model matching by dynamic output feedback for square and invertible linear time invariant systems. In particular, explicit necessary and sufficient conditions are established which guarantee the solvability of the problem with stability and a procedure is given for the computation of dynamic controller which solves the problem.

  20. Feedback and Stimulus-Offset Timing Effects in Perceptual Category Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthy, Darrell A.; Markman, Arthur B.; Maddox, W. Todd

    2013-01-01

    We examined how feedback delay and stimulus offset timing affected declarative, rule-based and procedural, information-integration category-learning. We predicted that small feedback delays of several hundred milliseconds would lead to the best information-integration learning based on a highly regarded neurobiological model of learning in the…

  1. ESTIMATION OF ATTRACTION DOMAIN AND EXPONENTIAL CONVERGENCE RATE OF CONTINUOUS FEEDBACK ASSOCIATIVE MEMORY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周冬明; 曹进德; 李继彬

    2001-01-01

    The attraction domain of memory patterns and exponential convergence rate of the network trajectories to memory patterns for continuous feedback associative memory are estimated again by using of some analysis techniques and Liapunov method, some new re sults are obtained, that can be used for evaluation of fault-tolerance capability and the syn thesis procedures for continuous feedback associative memory neural networks.

  2. Chaos and Its Impulsive Control in Chua's Oscillator via Time-Delay Feedback

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Bin Yu; Hong-Bin Zhang; Zhu-Sheng Kang; Xiao-Feng Liao; Jue-Bang Yu

    2008-01-01

    A novel framework for chaos and its impul sive control in Chua's oscillator via time-delay feedback is presented. The exponential stability of impulsive control Chua's oscillator via time-delay feedback is considered, and some novel conditions are obtained. Then a novel impulsive controller design procedure is proposed. Simulation experiments are provided to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of our method finally.

  3. Enhancing Healthcare Provider Feedback and Personal Health Literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, Mette Kjer; Nielsen, Jesper Bo; Salkeld, Glenn

    2015-01-01

    In this protocol for a pilot study we seek to establish the feasibility of using a web-based survey to simultaneously supply healthcare organisations and agencies with feedback on a key aspect of the care experience they provide and increase the generic health decision literacy of the individuals...

  4. Written Corrective Feedback: The Perception of Korean EFL Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Bohyon

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on the perception of Korean EFL learners toward feedback types on their written errors. The survey was administered using an adopted questionnaire from previous studies (Ishii 2011; Leki, 1991). This further allows a comparison of Korean EFL learners' attitudes with the responses to an identical questionnaire by Japanese EFL…

  5. Adult Beginner Distance Language Learner Perceptions and Use of Assignment Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furnborough, Concha; Truman, Mike

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative study examines perceptions and use of assignment feedback among adult beginner modern foreign language learners on higher education distance learning courses. A survey of responses to feedback on assignments by 43 Open University students on beginner language courses in Spanish, French, and German indicated that respondents can be…

  6. Linking Failure Feedback to Individual Creativity: The Moderation Role of Goal Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yimin; Yao, Xiang; Wang, Shuhong; Caughron, Jay

    2016-01-01

    The sense-making theory of creativity is extended by identifying failure feedback as a process that shapes creative interpretations and actions. We also consider the moderating effect of goal orientation on the relationship between failure feedback and individual creativity, according to the sense-making theory. A 2-waves survey data from…

  7. Effects of Normative Feedback on Consumption among Heavy Drinking College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostinelli, Gina; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Heavy-drinking college students tend to overestimate the prevalence of heavy drinking among their peers. Twenty-six heavy-drinking students participated in a survey study of drinking. They were randomized to receive or not receive, by return mail, personal feedback of their drinking compared to population norms. Feedback subjects showed greater…

  8. Enhancing the Assessment Experience: Improving Student Perceptions, Engagement and Understanding Using Online Video Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, John; Turner, Will

    2016-01-01

    Individualised video screencasts with accompanying narration were used to provide assessment feedback to a large number (n = 299) of first-year Bachelor of Education students at Edith Cowan University in Western Australia. An anonymous online survey revealed that nearly three times as many respondents (61%) preferred video feedback to written…

  9. Student Feedback Systems in Higher Education: A Focused Literature Review and Environmental Scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderman, Lyn; Towers, Stephen; Bannah, Sylvia

    2012-01-01

    In recent times, higher education institutions have paid increasing attention to the views of students to obtain feedback on their experience of learning and teaching through internal surveys. This article reviews research in the field and reports on practices in other Australian universities. Findings demonstrate that while student feedback is…

  10. Linking Failure Feedback to Individual Creativity: The Moderation Role of Goal Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yimin; Yao, Xiang; Wang, Shuhong; Caughron, Jay

    2016-01-01

    The sense-making theory of creativity is extended by identifying failure feedback as a process that shapes creative interpretations and actions. We also consider the moderating effect of goal orientation on the relationship between failure feedback and individual creativity, according to the sense-making theory. A 2-waves survey data from…

  11. Understanding Informal Feedback Seeking in the Workplace: The Impact of the Position in the Organizational Hierarchy

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Rijt, Janine; Van den Bossche, Piet; Segers, Mien S. R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the position of employees in the organizational hierarchy is important in explaining their feedback seeking behaviour. Design/methodology/approach: This study takes a social network perspective by using an ego-centric network survey to investigate employees' feedback seeking behaviour…

  12. A Case for Direct and Indirect Feedback: The Other Side of Coin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemnezhad, Hossein; Mohammadnejad, Saeed

    2012-01-01

    The use of WCF is a striking necessity in learning of English as a foreign language. If teachers and students can manipulate well the use of written feedback, both parties will benefit. This research looked at the types of feedback given to EFL students during a 16-week study. For the purpose of the current survey eighty students enrolled freely…

  13. Efficiency at maximum power of a discrete feedback ratchet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarillo, Javier; Tangarife, Tomás; Cao, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    Efficiency at maximum power is found to be of the same order for a feedback ratchet and for its open-loop counterpart. However, feedback increases the output power up to a factor of five. This increase in output power is due to the increase in energy input and the effective entropy reduction obtained as a consequence of feedback. Optimal efficiency at maximum power is reached for time intervals between feedback actions two orders of magnitude smaller than the characteristic time of diffusion over a ratchet period length. The efficiency is computed consistently taking into account the correlation between the control actions. We consider a feedback control protocol for a discrete feedback flashing ratchet, which works against an external load. We maximize the power output optimizing the parameters of the ratchet, the controller, and the external load. The maximum power output is found to be upper bounded, so the attainable extracted power is limited. After, we compute an upper bound for the efficiency of this isothermal feedback ratchet at maximum power output. We make this computation applying recent developments of the thermodynamics of feedback-controlled systems, which give an equation to compute the entropy reduction due to information. However, this equation requires the computation of the probability of each of the possible sequences of the controller's actions. This computation becomes involved when the sequence of the controller's actions is non-Markovian, as is the case in most feedback ratchets. We here introduce an alternative procedure to set strong bounds to the entropy reduction in order to compute its value. In this procedure the bounds are evaluated in a quasi-Markovian limit, which emerge when there are big differences between the stationary probabilities of the system states. These big differences are an effect of the potential strength, which minimizes the departures from the Markovianicity of the sequence of control actions, allowing also to

  14. Glucocorticoid feedback resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Kloet, E R; Vreugdenhil, E; Oitzl, M S; Joëls, M

    1997-01-01

    Glucocorticoid feedback resistance can be inherited or locally acquired. The implications of these two forms of resistance for disease are strikingly different. The inherited form is characterized by enhanced adrenocortical function and hypercorticism to compensate for a generalized deficit in the glucocorticoid receptor gene, but these individuals lack symptoms of Cushing's syndrome. By contrast, resistance acquired at the level of the hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) neurons is linked to hypercorticism, which is not compensatory but overexposes the rest of the body and the brain to glucocorticoids. This cell-specific glucocorticoid resistance can be acquired by genetically predisposed individuals failing to cope with (early) life events and causes enhanced vulnerability to disease-specific actions of glucocorticoids. (c) 1997, Elsevier Science Inc. (Trends Endocrinol Metab 1997; 8:26-33).

  15. KEKB bunch feedback systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobiyama, M.; Kikutani, E. [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-08-01

    Design and the present status of the bunch by bunch feedback systems for KEKB rings are shown. The detection of the bunch oscillation are made with the phase detection for longitudinal plane, the AM/PM method for transverse plane. Two GHz component of the bunch signal which is extracted with an analog FIR filter is used for the detection. Hardware two-tap FIR filter systems to shift the phase of the oscillation by 90deg will be used for the longitudinal signal processing. The same system will be used with no filtering but with only digital delay for transverse system. The candidate for the kicker and the required maximum power are also estimated. (author)

  16. A laser feedback interferometer with an oscillating feedback mirror

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Zhi-Guo; Wang Fei; Xiao Guang-Zong

    2012-01-01

    A method is proposed to solve the problem of direction discrimination for laser feedback interferometers.By vibrating the feedback mirror with a small-amplitude and high-frequency sine wave,laser intensity is modulated accordingly.The modulation amplitude can be extracted using a phase sensitive detector (PSD).When the feedback mirror moves,the PSD output shows a quasi-sine waveform similar to a laser intensity interference fringe but with a phase difference of approximately ±π/2.If the movement direction of the feedback mirror changes,the phase difference sign reverses.Therefore,the laser feedback interferometer offers a potential application in displacement measurement with a resolution of 1/8 wavelength and in-time direction discrimination.Without using optical components such as polarization beam splitters and wave plates,the interferometer is very simple,easy to align,and less costly.

  17. An innovative longitudinal curriculum to increase emergency medicine residents’ exposure to rarely encountered and technically challenging procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grall KH

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Kristi H Grall,1 Lisa R Stoneking,1 Lawrence A DeLuca,1 Anna L Waterbrook,1 T Gail Pritchard,2,3 Kurt R Denninghoff1 1Department of Emergency Medicine, The College of Medicine, The University of Arizona, 2Office Medical Student Education, 3Office of Graduate Medical Education, The College of Medicine, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA Background: Procedural skills have historically been taught at the bedside. In this study, we aimed to increase resident knowledge of uncommon emergency medical procedures to increase residents’ procedural skills in common and uncommon emergency medical procedures and to integrate cognitive training with hands-on procedural instruction using high- and low-fidelity simulation. Methods: We developed 13 anatomically/physiologically-based procedure modules focusing on uncommon clinical procedures and/or those requiring higher levels of technical skills. A departmental expert directed each session with collaboration from colleagues in related subspecialties. Sessions were developed based on Manthey and Fitch’s stages of procedural competency including 1 knowledge acquisition, 2 experience/technical skill development, and 3 competency evaluation. We then distributed a brief, 10-question, online survey to our residents in order to solicit feedback regarding their perceptions of increased knowledge and ability in uncommon and common emergency medical procedures, and their perception of the effectiveness of integrated cognitive training with hands-on instruction through high- and low-fidelity simulation. Results: Fifty percent of our residents (11/22 responded to our survey. Responses indicated the procedure series helped with understanding of both uncommon (65% strongly agreed [SA], 35% agreed [A] and common (55% SA, 45% A emergency medicine procedures and increased residents’ ability to perform uncommon (55% SA, 45% A and common (45% SA, 55% A emergency medical procedures. In addition, survey results

  18. Dental Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramponi, Denise R

    2016-01-01

    Dental problems are a common complaint in emergency departments in the United States. There are a wide variety of dental issues addressed in emergency department visits such as dental caries, loose teeth, dental trauma, gingival infections, and dry socket syndrome. Review of the most common dental blocks and dental procedures will allow the practitioner the opportunity to make the patient more comfortable and reduce the amount of analgesia the patient will need upon discharge. Familiarity with the dental equipment, tooth, and mouth anatomy will help prepare the practitioner for to perform these dental procedures.

  19. Fast feedback in classroom practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emmett, K.M.; Klaassen, K.; Eijkelhof, H.

    2009-01-01

    In this article we describe one application of the fast feedback method (see Berg 2003 Aust. Sci. Teach. J. 28–34) in secondary mechanics education. Two teachers tried out a particular sequence twice, in consecutive years, once with and once without the use of fast feedback. We found the method to b

  20. Feedback on household electricity consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønhøj, Alice; Thøgersen, John

    2011-01-01

    consumption, we evaluate the effects of giving households detailed feedback about their electricity consumption on a small liquid crystal display (LCD) screen. Twenty Danish households participated in the study over a 5-month period. A new feedback system was developed in a user-involved innovation process...

  1. Designing feedback: multimodality and specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ludden, Geke Dina Simone; Sugiyama, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Now that many of us carry around devices that are equipped with sensors (e.g., smartphones with accelerometers) we can use these sensors to measure behavior. The data thus captured can be used to give someone feedback about this behavior. These feedback mechanisms are often used in so called smart

  2. Haptic feedback helps bipedal coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelofsen, Eefje G J; Bosga, Jurjen; Rosenbaum, David A; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G; Hullegie, Wim; van Cingel, Robert; Meulenbroek, Ruud G J

    2016-10-01

    The present study investigated whether special haptic or visual feedback would facilitate the coordination of in-phase, cyclical feet movements of different amplitudes. Seventeen healthy participants sat with their feet on sliding panels that were moved externally over the same or different amplitudes. The participants were asked to generate simultaneous knee flexion-extension movements, or to let their feet be dragged, resulting in reference foot displacements of 150 mm and experimental foot displacements of 150, 120, or 90 mm. Four types of feedback were given: (1) special haptic feedback, involving actively following the motions of the sliders manipulated by two confederates, (2) haptic feedback resulting from passive motion, (3) veridical visual feedback, and (4) enhanced visual feedback. Both with respect to amplitude assimilation effects, correlations and standard deviation of relative phase, the results showed that enhanced visual feedback did not facilitate bipedal independence, but haptic feedback with active movement did. Implications of the findings for movement rehabilitation contexts are discussed.

  3. Feedback traps for virtual potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Gavrilov, Momčilo

    2016-01-01

    Feedback traps are tools for trapping and manipulating single charged objects, such as molecules in solution. An alternative to optical tweezers and other single-molecule techniques, they use feedback to counteract the Brownian motion of a molecule of interest. The trap first acquires information about a molecule's position and then applies an electric feedback force to move the molecule. Since electric forces are stronger than optical forces at small scales, feedback traps are the best way to trap single molecules without "touching" them. Feedback traps can do more than trap molecules: They can also subject a target object to forces that are calculated to be the gradient of a desired potential function U(x). If the feedback loop is fast enough, it creates a virtual potential whose dynamics will be very close to those of a particle in an actual potential U(x). But because the dynamics are entirely a result of the feedback loop--absent the feedback, there is only an object diffusing in a fluid--we are free to ...

  4. Fast Feedback in Classroom Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmett, Katrina; Klaassen, Kees; Eijkelhof, Harrie

    2009-01-01

    In this article we describe one application of the fast feedback method (see Berg 2003 "Aust. Sci. Teach. J." 28-34) in secondary mechanics education. Two teachers tried out a particular sequence twice, in consecutive years, once with and once without the use of fast feedback. We found the method to be successful, and the data that we obtained…

  5. Understanding Feedback: A Learning Theory Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurlings, Marieke; Vermeulen, Marjan; Bastiaens, Theo; Stijnen, Sjef

    2013-01-01

    This article aims to review literature on feedback to teachers. Because research has hardly focused on feedback among teachers, the review's scope also includes feedback in classrooms. The review proposes that the effectiveness of feedback and feedback processes depend on the learning theory adhered to. Findings show that regardless of the…

  6. The Sound of Feedback in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savin-Baden, Maggi

    2010-01-01

    Whilst there is considerable literature on feedback for students and on the use of audio feedback, literature in the area of podcasting assignment feedback (PAF) remains sparse. Partly, this may be due to a lack of clarity about what counts as feedback, the way in which feedback is located pedagogically and the relationship between feedback…

  7. Feedback systems for linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Hendrickson, L; Himel, Thomas M; Minty, Michiko G; Phinney, N; Raimondi, Pantaleo; Raubenheimer, T O; Shoaee, H; Tenenbaum, P G

    1999-01-01

    Feedback systems are essential for stable operation of a linear collider, providing a cost-effective method for relaxing tight tolerances. In the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC), feedback controls beam parameters such as trajectory, energy, and intensity throughout the accelerator. A novel dithering optimization system which adjusts final focus parameters to maximize luminosity contributed to achieving record performance in the 1997-98 run. Performance limitations of the steering feedback have been investigated, and improvements have been made. For the Next Linear Collider (NLC), extensive feedback systems are planned as an intregal part of the design. Feedback requiremetns for JLC (the Japanese Linear Collider) are essentially identical to NLC; some of the TESLA requirements are similar but there are significant differences. For NLC, algorithms which incorporate improvements upon the SLC implementation are being prototyped. Specialized systems for the damping rings, rf and interaction point will operate at hi...

  8. Multi-bunch feedback systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lonza, M

    2008-01-01

    Coupled-bunch instabilities excited by the interaction of the particle beam with its surroundings can seriously limit the performance of circular particle accelerators. These instabilities can be cured by the use of active feedback systems based on sensors capable of detecting the unwanted beam motion and actuators that apply the feedback correction to the beam. The advances in electronic technology now allow the implementation of feedback loops using programmable digital systems. Besides important advantages in terms of flexibility and reproducibility, digital systems open the way to the use of novel diagnostic tools and additional features. The lecture will first introduce coupled-bunch instabilities analysing the equation of motion of charged particles and the different modes of oscillation of a multi-bunch beam, showing how they can be observed and measured. Different types of feedbacks systems will then be presented as examples of real implementations that belong to the history of multi-bunch feedback sy...

  9. Multi-bunch Feedback Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lonza, M.

    2014-12-19

    Coupled-bunch instabilities excited by the interaction of the particle beam with its surroundings can seriously limit the performance of circular particle accelerators. These instabilities can be cured by the use of active feedback systems based on sensors capable of detecting the unwanted beam motion and actuators that apply the feedback correction to the beam. Advances in electronic technology now allow the implementation of feedback loops using programmable digital systems. Besides important advantages in terms of flexibility and reproducibility, digital systems open the way to the use of novel diagnostic tools and additional features. We first introduce coupled-bunch instabilities, analysing the equation of motion of charged particles and the different modes of oscillation of a multi-bunch beam, showing how they can be observed and measured. Different types of feedback systems will then be presented as examples of real implementations that belong to the history of multi-bunch feedback systems. The main co...

  10. Sampling survey methodology issues of SBS- survey

    OpenAIRE

    Liljana Boci; Elona Berberi

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims at providing an insight on what is required to build an efficient and high quality business statistics from sample survey procedures, and on the effective and appropriate use of survey data in analysis. It aims at describing a general overview of what is required to have a good survey estimate. It shows in practice how to estimate characteristics of the population in SBS considering: weighting, non-response adjustments, post stratification, estimating a population totals, the ...

  11. Feedback control design for the complete synchronisation of two coupled Boolean networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fangfei

    2016-09-01

    In the literatures, to design state feedback controllers to make the response Boolean network synchronise with the drive Boolean network is rarely considered. Motivated by this, feedback control design for the complete synchronisation of two coupled Boolean networks is investigated in this paper. A necessary condition for the existence of a state feedback controller achieving the complete synchronisation is established first. Then, based on the necessary condition, the feedback control law is proposed. Finally, an example is worked out to illustrate the proposed design procedure.

  12. Feedback control of sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafaely, Boaz

    This thesis is concerned with the development an application of feedback control techniques for active sound control. Both fixed and adaptive controllers are considered. The controller design problem for active sound control is formulated as a constrained optimisation problem with an H2 performance objective, of minimising the variance of the control error, and H2 and H∞ design constraints involving control power output, disturbance enhancement, and robust stability. An Internal Model Controller with an FIR control filter is assumed. Conventional H2 design methods for feedback controllers are studied first. Although such controllers can satisfy the design constraints by employing effort terms in the quadratic cost function, they do not achieve the best possible performance, and when adapted using LMS-based algorithms, they suffer from instabilities if the plant response varies significantly. Improved H2/H∞ design methods for fixed and adaptive controllers are then developed, which achieve the best H2 performance under the design constraints, offer an improved stability when made adaptive, and in general outperform the conventional H2 controllers. The H2/H∞ design problems employ convex programming to ensure a unique solution. The Sequential Quadratic Programming methods is used for the off-line design of fixed controllers, and penalty and barrier function methods, together with frequency domain LMS-based algorithms are employed in the H2/H∞ adaptive controllers. The controllers studied and developed here were applied to three active sound control systems: a noise-reducing headset, an active headrest, and a sound radiating panel. The emphasis was put on developing control strategies that improve system performance. First, a high performance controller for the noise-reducing headset was implemented in real-time, which combines analogue and adaptive digital controllers, and can thus reject disturbances which has both broad-band and periodic components. Then

  13. Telephony user survey

    CERN Multimedia

    IT Department

    2016-01-01

    Let us know your needs to better plan the transition to a new CERN telephony system.   CERN is planning to upgrade its telephony network and replace the system with a new and modern VoIP infrastructure. We strive to make this transition as beneficial and smooth as possible for you. Please let us know more about your current working environment, expectations and suggestions by responding to this survey: https://cern.ch/tel-survey. The more answers we get, the better the new system will serve everyone in the future. The survey will take you about five minutes to complete; we are counting on your feedback!

  14. Giving Feedback: Development of Scales for the Mum Effect, Discomfort Giving Feedback, and Feedback Medium Preference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Susie S.; Marler, Laura E.; Simmering, Marcia J.; Totten, Jeff W.

    2011-01-01

    Research in organizational behavior and human resources promotes the view that it is critical for managers to provide accurate feedback to employees, yet little research addresses rater tendencies (i.e., the "mum effect") and attitudes that influence how performance feedback is given. Because technology has changed the nature of communication in…

  15. Does feedback influence patient - professional communication? Empirical evidence from Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murante, Anna Maria; Vainieri, Milena; Rojas, Diana; Nuti, Sabina

    2014-06-01

    Healthcare providers often look for feedback from patient surveys. Does health-professional awareness of patient survey results improve communication between patients and providers? To test this hypothesis, we analyzed the data of two surveys on organizational-climate and patient experience in Italy. The two surveys were conducted in 26 hospitals in the Tuscany region and involved 8942 employees and 5341 patients, respectively. Statistical analysis showed that the patient experience index significantly improved by 0.35 points (scale: 0-100) when the professionals' knowledge of the patient survey results increased by 1%. These findings suggest that the control systems should focus more on the dissemination phase of patient survey results among health professionals in order to improve the quality of services.

  16. Output Feedback Adaptive Stabilization of Uncertain Nonholonomic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the problem of output feedback adaptive stabilization control design for a class of nonholonomic chained systems with uncertainties, involving virtual control coefficients, unknown nonlinear parameters, and unknown time delays. The objective is to design a robust nonlinear output-feedback switching controller, which can guarantee the stabilization of the closed loop systems. An observer and an estimator are employed for states and parameters estimates, respectively. A constructive controller design procedure is proposed by applying input-state scaling transformation, parameter separation technique, and backstepping recursive approach. Simulation results are provided to show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  17. Output feedback controller design for uncertain piecewise linear systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianxiong ZHANG; Wansheng TANG

    2007-01-01

    This paper proposes output feedback controller design methods for uncertain piecewise linear systems based on piecewise quadratic Lyapunov function. The α-stability of closed-loop systems is also considered. It is shown that the output feedback controller design procedure of uncertain piecewise linear systems with α-stability constraint can be cast as solving a set of bilinear matrix inequalities (BMIs). The BMIs problem in this paper can be solved iteratively as a set of two convex optimization problems involving linear matrix inequalities (LMIs) which can be solved numerically efficiently. A numerical example shows the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  18. Styrket feedback gennem studerendes selvevaluering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Bo

    2016-01-01

    Studerende er ofte utilfredse med såvel kvaliteten som kvantiteten af feedback på skriftligt arbejde. Ligeledes kan det som underviser være svært at afgive feedback, der tager udgangspunkt i de studerendes respektive læringssituationer, hvis man ikke har andet afsæt end opgavetekster. Denne artikel...... beskriver derfor to eksperimenter med brug af selvevaluering som kvalificerende mellemled i ekstern feedback på skriveøvelser. Eksperimenternes formål er at styrke den formative læring ved skriftligt arbejde. I det første eksperiment bestod feedbacken af underviser-feedback, mens det andet eksperiment...... indebar peer-feedback og fælles feedback. I begge tilfælde blev selvevalueringen foretaget med udgangspunkt i en kriteriebaseret retteguide. Eksperimenterne medførte, at den eksterne feedback blev målrettet og kvalificeret i forhold til den enkelte studerende, mens selve skriveprocessen mod forventning...

  19. Revisiting and Refining the Multicultural Assessment Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridley, Charles R.; Hill, Carrie L.; Li, Lisa C.

    1998-01-01

    Reacts to critiques of the Multicultural Assessment Procedure (MAP). Discusses the definition of culture, the structure of the MAP, cultural versus idiosyncratic data, counselors' knowledge and characteristics, soliciting client feedback and perceptions, and managed care. Encourages colleagues to apply the MAP to their research, practice, and…

  20. Novel Use of Google Glass for Procedural Wireless Vital Sign Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebert, Cara A; Zayed, Mohamed A; Aalami, Oliver; Tran, Jennifer; Lau, James N

    2016-08-01

    Purpose This study investigates the feasibility and potential utility of head-mounted displays for real-time wireless vital sign monitoring during surgical procedures. Methods In this randomized controlled pilot study, surgery residents (n = 14) performed simulated bedside procedures with traditional vital sign monitors and were randomized to addition of vital sign streaming to Google Glass. Time to recognition of preprogrammed vital sign deterioration and frequency of traditional monitor use was recorded. User feedback was collected by electronic survey. Results The experimental group spent 90% less time looking away from the procedural field to view traditional monitors during bronchoscopy (P = .003), and recognized critical desaturation 8.8 seconds earlier; the experimental group spent 71% (P = .01) less time looking away from the procedural field during thoracostomy, and recognized hypotension 10.5 seconds earlier. Trends toward earlier recognition of deterioration did not reach statistical significance. The majority of participants agreed that Google Glass increases situational awareness (64%), is helpful in monitoring vitals (86%), is easy to use (93%), and has potential to improve patient safety (85%). Conclusion In this early feasibility study, use of streaming to Google Glass significantly decreased time looking away from procedural fields and resulted in a nonsignificant trend toward earlier recognition of vital sign deterioration. Vital sign streaming with Google Glass or similar platforms is feasible and may enhance procedural situational awareness.

  1. Operating procedures, Pilot polar bear survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Distance will be measured from the "center" of the sighting (polar bear, group of bears, group of walrus, etc.) to the flight line along a perpendicular projection...

  2. Balanced bridge feedback control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurie, Boris J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    In a system having a driver, a motor, and a mechanical plant, a multiloop feedback control apparatus for controlling the movement and/or positioning of a mechanical plant, the control apparatus has a first local bridge feedback loop for feeding back a signal representative of a selected ratio of voltage and current at the output driver, and a second bridge feedback loop for feeding back a signal representative of a selected ratio of force and velocity at the output of the motor. The control apparatus may further include an outer loop for feeding back a signal representing the angular velocity and/or position of the mechanical plant.

  3. 76 FR 34087 - Broad Stakeholder Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-10

    ... SECURITY Broad Stakeholder Survey AGENCY: National Protection and Programs Directorate, DHS. ACTION: 60-day... comments concerning the Broad Stakeholder Survey. DATES: Comments are encouraged and will be accepted until.... The Broad Stakeholder Survey is designed to gather stakeholder feedback on the effectiveness of...

  4. 78 FR 20119 - Broad Stakeholder Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-03

    ... SECURITY Broad Stakeholder Survey AGENCY: National Protection and Programs Directorate, DHS. ACTION: 30-day... soliciting comments concerning the Broad Stakeholder Survey. DHS previously published this ICR in the Federal... responders across the Nation. The Broad Stakeholder Survey is designed to gather stakeholder feedback on...

  5. 77 FR 50144 - Broad Stakeholder Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-20

    ... SECURITY Broad Stakeholder Survey AGENCY: National Protection and Programs Directorate, DHS. ACTION: 60-day... comments concerning the Broad Stakeholder Survey. DATES: Comments are encouraged and will be accepted until... across the Nation. The Broad Stakeholder Survey is designed to gather stakeholder feedback on...

  6. Contraceptive procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, Anitra; Schutt-Ainé, Ann

    2013-12-01

    Although most women desire to control the size and spacing of their family, the rate of unintended pregnancy in the United States remains high, with approximately half of all pregnancies being unintended. Reducing unintended pregnancy is a national public health goal, and the increased use of long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs) (intrauterine devices and implants) can help meet this goal. LARCs are among the most effective forms of contraception available. There are few contraindications to their use, and insertion and removal are straightforward procedures that are well tolerated in the outpatient office setting. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Feedback Control of Rotor Overspeed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchill, G. B.

    1984-01-01

    Feedback system for automatically governing helicopter rotor speed promises to lessen pilot's workload, enhance maneuverability, and protect airframe. With suitable modifications, concept applied to control speed of electrical generators, automotive engines and other machinery.

  8. NAIP 2015 Imagery Feedback Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — The NAIP 2015 Imagery Feedback map allows users to make comments and observations about the quality of the 2015 National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP)...

  9. Do students profit from feedback?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arild Raaheim

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Undergraduate students in psychology were given the opportunity to exchange the traditional exam with portfolio assessment. The students received written feedback, by way of a standard feedback form, on two of the three essays of the portfolio. To investigate whether students attend to and act on the feedback, a comparison was made between unofficial marks on the first draft of the first essay and the official marks on the full portfolio at the end of the semester. With approximately 20% of the first drafts being unacceptable in the end only 1.6% of the portfolios failed to reach the level of acceptance. The result is taken to indicate that the students did indeed attend to and profit from the written feedback.

  10. Full Static Output Feedback Equivalence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aristotle G. Yannakoudakis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a constructive solution to the problem of full output feedback equivalence, of linear, minimal, time-invariant systems. The equivalence relation on the set of systems is transformed to another on the set of invertible block Bezout/Hankel matrices using the isotropy subgroups of the full state feedback group and the full output injection group. The transformation achieving equivalence is calculated solving linear systems of equations. We give a polynomial version of the results proving that two systems are full output feedback equivalent, if and only if they have the same family of generalized Bezoutians. We present a new set of output feedback invariant polynomials that generalize the breakaway polynomial of scalar systems.

  11. PROVIDING FEEDBACK ON STUDENT WORK IN DISTANCE EDUCATION IN TURKEY: Practices and Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibel HISMANOGLU

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In distance education, providing feedback on student work has a key role in facilitating learning and teacher- student dialogue. This article examines the distance learning context and providing feedback in this great but challenging system. It draws on the experiences of 200 distance learners enrolled in different programs in the Open Education Faculty at Anadolu University in Turkey. Its purpose is to find out whether distance students are provided any feedback by their faculty, whether they think that feedback provision is beneficial in distance learning process, and lastly whether they would like their faculty to provide them with some feedback. The survey is based on a questionnaire including three questions to which distance learners can respond briefly as yes or no and, if desired, they can expand their ideas with their own sentences. The results of the study suggest that distance learners are , on the whole, provided no feedback. Of 200 DL, 180 % of them regard feedback provision as a beneficial part of their distance learning process and want to have some feedback mechanisms in their faculty, yet 20% of the learners think just the opposite by saying that it is not something beneficial and they do not need it. In the conclusion part, considering the high proportion in demand of feedback provision, certain feedback mechanisms will be introduced to make the distance learning process more appealing, encouraging, and fruitful for distance learners.

  12. Civil Procedure In Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werlauff, Erik

    , enforcement in Denmark of judgments pronounced by Danish or foreign courts, as well as arbitration in Danish and international arbitral cases, based on the extensive Danish arbitral reform 2005, taking the Uncitral pattern arbitration law as its model. The book is written parly based on traditional legal...... on the author's extensive personal experience as arbitrator in numerous Danish and international arbitral proceedings.......The book contains an up-to-date survey of Danish civil procedure after the profound Danish procedural reforms in 2007. It deals with questions concerning competence and function of Danish courts, commencement and preparation of civil cases, questions of evidence and burden of proof, international...

  13. Peer Feedback in Computer Aided College English Writing Instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Zhuo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is to examine the acceptability of peer feedback in computer aided college English writing instruction. For the whole writing procedure, subjects in language labs were to take preparation, writing and evaluation stages, undergoing three editions suggested by peer feedbacks. For the first time reading, peers would comment on such general scale as subject and content of drafts, and the second focuses on specific items, for example the morphological, lexical and syntactical aspects, etc. To compare students’ attitudes towards the trial, before and after the experiment, Pre-Questionnaire and Post-Questionnaire were adopted to analyze differences. From the frequency of students’ views on ten statements, it is drawn that majority of subjects accept and enjoy the innovative writing process, since peer feedback is an essential and encouraging part for writing.

  14. Collective irrationality and positive feedback.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stamatios C Nicolis

    Full Text Available Recent experiments on ants and slime moulds have assessed the degree to which they make rational decisions when presented with a number of alternative food sources or shelter. Ants and slime moulds are just two examples of a wide range of species and biological processes that use positive feedback mechanisms to reach decisions. Here we use a generic, experimentally validated model of positive feedback between group members to show that the probability of taking the best of options depends crucially on the strength of feedback. We show how the probability of choosing the best option can be maximized by applying an optimal feedback strength. Importantly, this optimal value depends on the number of options, so that when we change the number of options the preference of the group changes, producing apparent "irrationalities". We thus reinterpret the idea that collectives show "rational" or "irrational" preferences as being a necessary consequence of the use of positive feedback. We argue that positive feedback is a heuristic which often produces fast and accurate group decision-making, but is always susceptible to apparent irrationality when studied under particular experimental conditions.

  15. Innovation in healthcare team feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza, Christine; Beard, Leslie; Fonzo, Anthony Di; Tommaso, Michael Di; Mujawaz, Yaman; Serra-Julia, Marcel; Morra, Dante

    2011-01-01

    Healthcare delivery is evolving from individual, autonomous practice to collaborative team practice. However, barriers such as professional autonomy, time constraints and the perception of error as failure preclude learning behaviours that can facilitate organizational learning and improvement. Although experimentation, engaging in questions and feedback, discussing errors and reflecting on results can facilitate learning and promote effective performance, the cultural barriers within healthcare can prevent or inhibit this type of behaviour among teams. At the University Health Network's Centre for Innovation in Complex Care, we realize the need for a tool that facilitates learning behaviour and is sensitive to the risk-averse nature of the clinical environment. The vehicle for the Team Feedback Tool is a web-based application called Rypple (www.rypple.com), which allows team members to provide anonymous, rapid-fire feedback on team processes and performance. Rypple facilitates communication, elicits feedback and provokes discussion. The process enables follow-up face-to-face team discussions and encourages teams to create actionable solutions for incremental changes to enhance team health and performance. The Team Feedback Tool was implemented and piloted in general internal medicine at the University Health Network's Toronto General Hospital from early May 2009 to July 2009 to address the issues of teamwork and learning behaviour in the clinical environment. This article explores the opportunities and barriers associated with the implementation of the Team Feedback Tool.

  16. Evaluation of embedded audio feedback on writing assignments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Janet K; Goodman, Joely T; Hercinger, Maribeth; Minnich, Margo; Murcek, Christina M; Parks, Jane M; Shirley, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to compare embedded audio feedback (EAF), which faculty provided using the iPad(®) application iAnnotate(®) PDF to insert audio comments and written feedback (WF), inserted electronically on student papers in a series of writing assignments. Goals included determining whether EAF provides more useful guidance to students than WF and whether EAF promotes connectedness among students and faculty. An additional goal was to ascertain the efficiency and acceptance of EAF as a grading tool by nursing faculty. The pilot study was a quasi-experimental, cross-over, posttest-only design. The project was completed in an Informatics in Health Care course. Faculty alternated the two feedback methods on four papers written by each student. Results of surveys and focus groups revealed that students and faculty had mixed feelings about this technology. Student preferences were equally divided between EAF and WF, with 35% for each, and 28% were undecided.

  17. Radiation pressure feedback in the formation of massive stars

    CERN Document Server

    Kuiper, Rolf; Beuther, Henrik; Henning, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the radiation pressure feedback in the formation of massive stars in 1, 2, and 3D radiation hydrodynamics simulations of the collapse of massive pre-stellar cores. In contrast to previous research, we consider frequency dependent stellar radiation feedback, resolve the dust sublimation front in the vicinity of the forming star down to 1.27 AU, compute the evolution for several 10^5 yrs covering the whole accretion phase of the forming star, and perform a comprehensive survey of the parameter space. The most fundamental result is that the formation of a massive accretion disk in slowly rotating cores preserves a high anisotropy in the radiation field. The thermal radiation escapes through the optically thin atmosphere, effectively diminishing the radiation pressure feedback onto the accretion flow. Gravitational torques in the self-gravitating disk drive a sufficiently high accretion rate to overcome the residual radiation pressure. Simultaneously, the radiation pressure launches an outflow in t...

  18. Sampling survey methodology issues of SBS- survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liljana Boci

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at providing an insight on what is required to build an efficient and high quality business statistics from sample survey procedures, and on the effective and appropriate use of survey data in analysis. It aims at describing a general overview of what is required to have a good survey estimate. It shows in practice how to estimate characteristics of the population in SBS considering: weighting, non-response adjustments, post stratification, estimating a population totals, the identification and treatment of outliers, and analyses of coefficient of variation. It provides sources of errors and gives recommendations of how to improve them throw sample survey techniques.

  19. The importance of feedback for medical students’ development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin RR

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Rahul Rajesh Amin, Rohin Patel, Prashant Bamania Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London, Kensington, London, United KingdomWe read with great interest the study by McKenzie et al,1 which explores the impact of providing feedback to students on their ability to carry out a clinical procedure. This study was particularly interesting to us as fifth-year medical students at Imperial College London who have learnt several clinical skills during rotations. A noteworthy finding was that education involving providing feedback to students had a positive impact on their performance.1 Furthermore, the recommendation that clinical skills training be accompanied with feedback resonated strongly with us.Authors’ replySusan McKenzie1 Annette Burgess2 Craig Mellis11Central Clinical School, 2Education Office, Sydney Medical School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia Thank you for the opportunity to respond to the letter by Dr Amin and colleagues. We wish to thank Dr Amin and colleagues for their interest in our recent article1 and have found their feedback encouraging for our work. We find the use of electronic feedback to be of particular interest as we are currently developing a similar electronic application for the use of students’ “smart phones”. We anticipate by capturing feedback in this manner, students have a great opportunity to reflect on their procedural skills performance, and to be able to improve their skills when necessary.View the original paper by McKenzie and colleagues.

  20. Feedback traps for virtual potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilov, Momčilo; Bechhoefer, John

    2017-03-01

    Feedback traps are tools for trapping and manipulating single charged objects, such as molecules in solution. An alternative to optical tweezers and other single-molecule techniques, they use feedback to counteract the Brownian motion of a molecule of interest. The trap first acquires information about a molecule's position and then applies an electric feedback force to move the molecule. Since electric forces are stronger than optical forces at small scales, feedback traps are the best way to trap single molecules without `touching' them (e.g. by putting them in a small box or attaching them to a tether). Feedback traps can do more than trap molecules: they can also subject a target object to forces that are calculated to be the gradient of a desired potential function U(x). If the feedback loop is fast enough, it creates a virtual potential whose dynamics will be very close to those of a particle in an actual potential U(x). But because the dynamics are entirely a result of the feedback loop-absent the feedback, there is only an object diffusing in a fluid-we are free to specify and then manipulate in time an arbitrary potential U(x,t). Here, we review recent applications of feedback traps to studies on the fundamental connections between information and thermodynamics, a topic where feedback plays an even more fundamental role. We discuss how recursive maximum-likelihood techniques allow continuous calibration, to compensate for drifts in experiments that last for days. We consider ways to estimate work and heat, using them to measure fluctuating energies to a precision of ±0.03 kT over these long experiments. Finally, we compare work and heat measurements of the costs of information erasure, the Landauer limit of kT ln 2 per bit of information erased. We argue that, when you want to know the average heat transferred to a bath in a long protocol, you should measure instead the average work and then infer the heat using the first law of thermodynamics. This

  1. Feedback as Real-Time Constructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiding, Tina Bering; Qvortrup, Ane

    2014-01-01

    This article offers a re-description of feedback and the significance of time in feedback constructions based on systems theory. It describes feedback as internal, real-time constructions in a learning system. From this perspective, feedback is neither immediate nor delayed, but occurs in the very moment it takes place. This article argues for a…

  2. A Comparison of Peer and Tutor Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamer, John; Purchase, Helen; Luxton-Reilly, Andrew; Denny, Paul

    2015-01-01

    We report on a study comparing peer feedback with feedback written by tutors on a large, undergraduate software engineering programming class. Feedback generated by peers is generally held to be of lower quality to feedback from experienced tutors, and this study sought to explore the extent and nature of this difference. We looked at how…

  3. Feedback i den laegelige postgraduate uddannelse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubak, Sune; Ipsen, Merete; Sørensen, Jette

    2008-01-01

    . Feedback is essential in medical education and has great implications for the educational climate. It has been shown that a common language regarding the principles of feedback has a sustained effect on quality and frequency of feedback. Further research is needed on feedback and educational climate...

  4. Feedback as Real-Time Constructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiding, Tina Bering; Qvortrup, Ane

    2014-01-01

    This article offers a re-description of feedback and the significance of time in feedback constructions based on systems theory. It describes feedback as internal, real-time constructions in a learning system. From this perspective, feedback is neither immediate nor delayed, but occurs in the very moment it takes place. This article argues for a…

  5. Identifying Mentors' Observations for Providing Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Mentors' feedback can assist preservice teachers' development; yet feedback tends to be variable from one mentor to the next. What do mentors observe for providing feedback? In this study, 24 mentors observed a final-year preservice teacher through a professionally video-recorded lesson and provided written notes for feedback. They observed the…

  6. Multimedia as a Means to Enhance Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Michio

    2004-01-01

    Interactive feedback, the most common feedback method for oral performance, cannot be used in activities that do not allow for instructor-student interaction, such as speeches and presentations, where feedback should occur after the performance. The conventional ways of providing post-performance or delayed feedback, however, are neither efficient…

  7. Pulsed feedback defers cellular differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe H Levine

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental signals induce diverse cellular differentiation programs. In certain systems, cells defer differentiation for extended time periods after the signal appears, proliferating through multiple rounds of cell division before committing to a new fate. How can cells set a deferral time much longer than the cell cycle? Here we study Bacillus subtilis cells that respond to sudden nutrient limitation with multiple rounds of growth and division before differentiating into spores. A well-characterized genetic circuit controls the concentration and phosphorylation of the master regulator Spo0A, which rises to a critical concentration to initiate sporulation. However, it remains unclear how this circuit enables cells to defer sporulation for multiple cell cycles. Using quantitative time-lapse fluorescence microscopy of Spo0A dynamics in individual cells, we observed pulses of Spo0A phosphorylation at a characteristic cell cycle phase. Pulse amplitudes grew systematically and cell-autonomously over multiple cell cycles leading up to sporulation. This pulse growth required a key positive feedback loop involving the sporulation kinases, without which the deferral of sporulation became ultrasensitive to kinase expression. Thus, deferral is controlled by a pulsed positive feedback loop in which kinase expression is activated by pulses of Spo0A phosphorylation. This pulsed positive feedback architecture provides a more robust mechanism for setting deferral times than constitutive kinase expression. Finally, using mathematical modeling, we show how pulsing and time delays together enable "polyphasic" positive feedback, in which different parts of a feedback loop are active at different times. Polyphasic feedback can enable more accurate tuning of long deferral times. Together, these results suggest that Bacillus subtilis uses a pulsed positive feedback loop to implement a "timer" that operates over timescales much longer than a cell cycle.

  8. Baryons, Neutrinos, Feedback and Weak Gravitational Lensing

    CERN Document Server

    Harnois-Déraps, Joachim; Viola, Massimo; Heymans, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    (Abridged) The effect of baryonic feedback on the dark matter mass distribution is generally considered to be a nuisance to weak gravitational lensing. Measurements of cosmological parameters are affected as feedback alters the cosmic shear signal on angular scales smaller than a few arcminutes. Recent progress on the numerical modelling of baryon physics has shown that this effect could be so large that, rather than being a nuisance, the effect can be constrained with current weak lensing surveys, hence providing an alternative astrophysical insight on one of the most challenging questions of galaxy formation. In order to perform our analysis, we construct an analytic fitting formula that describes the effect of the baryons on the mass power spectrum. This fitting formula is based on three scenarios of the OWL hydrodynamical simulations. It is specifically calibrated for $z<1.5$, where it models the simulations to an accuracy that is better than $2\\%$ for scales $k<10 h\\mbox{Mpc}^{-1}$ and better than ...

  9. Teaching Writing as a Process and Teaching Sentence-Level Syntax: Reformulation as ESL Composition Feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Sharon

    1997-01-01

    Based on English-as-a-Second-Language (ESL) students' documented preference for error correction and the need for word usage and sentence grammar to become automatic, this article describes the rationale and procedures for using reformulation as composition feedback. The procedures are aimed at improving sentence level grammar. Discusses survey…

  10. ABCDEFG IS - the principle of constructive feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattarai, M

    2007-01-01

    Feedback is an integral part of any learning experience. Constructive feedback is a powerful instrument and facilitates the learner's professional and personal development. "ABCDEFG IS", a mnemonic for the principles of constructive feedback, stands for Amount of the information, Benefit of the trainees, Change behaviour, Descriptive language, Environment, Focused, Group check, Interpretation check, and Sharing information. The eight important steps of feedback are: Ensure prior information, Collect data, Make appropriate meeting arrangement, Begin by encouraging self assessment by the trainee, Highlight areas where the trainee is doing well, Give feedback, Handle reaction maintaining the dignity and Plan actions. Communication and reflection also share many of the principles and steps of constructive feedback and giving regular feedback, thus, helps to improve communication and reflection. The feedback provider would be able to provide genuine feedback by following the appropriate steps and principles of constructive feedback and realize how important and rewarding its role is in teaching learning activities.

  11. Navigating User Feedback Channels to Chart an Evidence Based Course for Library Redesign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Derek Halling

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives – The objective of this project was to redesign library spaces based on the user feedback obtained from a broad complement of feedback channels. The over-arching goal of this project was to develop an evidence based approach to the redesign of library spaces.Methods – Data from user-initiated and library-initiated feedback channels were collected and analyzed to determine priorities for library space changes. Online/onsite suggestions, a library onsite census survey, the LibQUAL+® survey, a whiteboard, ballot voting, and text voting were all used to gather input. A student advisory group was used as a sounding board for planned space changes before a final decision was made.Results – Data produced by different feedback channels varied both in the number of suggestions generated as well as the changes requested. Composite data from all feedback channels resulted in a total of 687 suggestions identifying 17 different types of space changes. An onsite whiteboard, the LibQUAL+® survey, and library census proved the most prolific in producing suggestions.Conclusion – Priorities for space changes were best determined through a composite of suggestions received from all feedback channels. The number of suggestions and requests received that were initiated by users was so small that it had to be supplemented with library-initiated feedback requests. The use of multiple feedback channels enhanced the number, variety, and scope of the suggestions that were received. Similar requests received through multiple feedback channels emphasized their importance to users. Focused follow-up feedback channels were effective in clarifying user suggestions for specific changes.

  12. JT-60 configuration parameters for feedback control determined by regression analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsukawa, Makoto; Hosogane, Nobuyuki; Ninomiya, Hiromasa

    1991-12-01

    The stepwise regression procedure was applied to obtain measurement formulas for equilibrium parameters used in the feedback control of JT-60. This procedure automatically selects variables necessary for the measurements, and selects a set of variables which are not likely to be picked up by physical considerations. Regression equations with stable and small multicollinearity were obtained and it was experimentally confirmed that the measurement formulas obtained through this procedure were accurate enough to be applicable to the feedback control of plasma configurations in JT-60.

  13. Current feedback operational amplifiers and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Senani, Raj; Singh, A K; Singh, V K

    2013-01-01

    This book describes a variety of current feedback operational amplifier (CFOA) architectures and their applications in analog signal processing/generation. Coverage includes a comprehensive survey of commercially available, off-the-shelf integrated circuit CFOAs, as well as recent advances made on the design of CFOAs, including design innovations for bipolar and CMOS CFOAs.  This book serves as a single-source reference to the topic, as well as a catalog of over 200 application circuits which would be useful not only for students, educators and researchers in apprising them about the recent developments in the area but would also serve as a comprehensive repertoire of useful circuits for practicing engineers who might be interested in choosing an appropriate CFOA-based topology for use in a given application.

  14. Quality Assessment Survey at the School of Civil Engineering at Aalborg University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brohus, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    As part of an improved quality assessment procedure at the School of Civil Engineering at Aalborg University, an online survey has been undertaken among all students. Due to external requirements and a wish for more structured feedback, an online questionnaire was presented to all students under...... the study board of civil engineering. The questionnaire was jointly developed for all study boards at Aalborg University. The questionnaire forms an investigation of students' satisfaction and evaluation of the overall structure of the education including self-reported performance assessment. The paper...

  15. Towards Increasing Feedbacks and Diffusion of Information in Social Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohcine Kodad

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this document is to highlight two strategies which increased feedbacks and stimulated the diffusion of information in social networks. Starting by an online survey, which assists searchers in understanding the behavior of social network users, to define the problem. The information received with this survey has been tested on validation by an analyze on the most popular type of posting on social networks. The results of this study provided two strategies as a solution for the problem of dissatisfaction among users of social networks and to increase feedbacks and diffusion of information on social network. One strategy is manual and is based on the type of publication and the second strategy is automatically and takes the concept of collaborative work in to account

  16. Discrete-Time Controllability for Feedback Quantum Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Albertini, Francesca

    2010-01-01

    Controllability properties for discrete-time, Markovian quantum dynamics are investigated. We find that, while in general the controlled system is not finite-time controllable, feedback control allows for arbitrary asymptotic state-to-state transitions. Under further assumption on the form of the measurement, we show that finite-time controllability can be achieved in a time that scales linearly with the dimension of the system, and we provide an iterative procedure to design the unitary control actions.

  17. Sensory feedback in interlimb coordination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gervasio, Sabata; Voigt, Michael; Kersting, Uwe G.

    2017-01-01

    direct communication between the two sides without the need for the involvement of higher centers. These may also exist in humans since sensory feedback elicited by tibial nerve stimulation on one side (ipsilateral) can affect the muscles activation in the opposite side (contralateral), provoking short......-latency crossed responses (SLCRs). The current study investigated whether contralateral afferent feedback contributes to the mechanism controlling the SLCR in human gastrocnemius muscle. Surface electromyogram, kinematic and kinetic data were recorded from subjects during normal walking and hybrid walking (with.......04). Moreover, estimated spindle secondary afferent and Golgi tendon organ activity were significantly different (P ≤ 0.01) when opposite responses have been observed, that is during normal (facilitation) and hybrid walking (inhibition) conditions. Contralateral sensory feedback, specifically spindle secondary...

  18. Feedback as a means of decreasing residential energy consumption. Report PU/CES 34

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seligman, C; Darley, J M

    1976-08-01

    When residential units are analyzed in human factor terms, it is apparent that the consumption level feedback (typically a bill, calculated once a month, over all appliances) is inadequate to give the resident useful information about his energy consuming actions. The present study tested the hypothesis that providing immediate feedback to homeowners concerning their daily rate of electric usage would be effective in reducing electric consumption. In the studied homes, central air-conditioning is the largest single source of electric power consumption during the summer. Accordingly, it was possible to predict the household's expected electric consumption in terms of the average daily outdoor temperature. Predicted electric consumption was derived from a previous month's modeling period during which a regression line was fitted to predict consumption from average daily temperature, for each home. Feedback was expressed as a percentage of actual consumption over predicted consumption. Feedback was displayed to homeowners four times a week for approximately one month. The results confirmed the prediction. Before feedback began, the feedback and control groups were consuming electricity at approximately equal rates. During the feedback period, the feedback group used 10.5 percent less electricity. The effectiveness of the feedback procedure was explained in terms of its cueing, motivational, and commitment functions.

  19. We're All in This Together Now: Group Performance Feedback to Increase Classroom Team Data Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellecchia, Melanie; Connell, James E.; Eisenhart, Donald; Kane, Meghan; Schoener, Christine; Turkel, Kimberly; Riley, Megan; Mandell, David S.

    2011-01-01

    This study's primary goal was to evaluate the use of performance feedback procedures delivered to a classroom team to increase daily data collection. Performance feedback (PFB) was delivered to four classroom teams responsible for the daily collection of data representing student performance during prescribed instructional activities. Using a…

  20. We're All in This Together Now: Group Performance Feedback to Increase Classroom Team Data Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellecchia, Melanie; Connell, James E.; Eisenhart, Donald; Kane, Meghan; Schoener, Christine; Turkel, Kimberly; Riley, Megan; Mandell, David S.

    2011-01-01

    This study's primary goal was to evaluate the use of performance feedback procedures delivered to a classroom team to increase daily data collection. Performance feedback (PFB) was delivered to four classroom teams responsible for the daily collection of data representing student performance during prescribed instructional activities. Using a…

  1. Pole-placement with constant gain output feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, B.; Lindorff, D. P.

    1973-01-01

    Davison (1970) has demonstrated that it is possible to assign max (m, p) poles of a linear time-invariant controllable and observable multivariable system arbitrarily close to desired locations by using constant gain output feedback. A new proof of Davison's theorem on pole placement is developed, and a system design procedure is described which offers some advantages over Davison's method. It is shown that in some cases more than max (m, p) poles can be assigned arbitrarily, and a least square design procedure is proposed to approximate the desired pole locations when it is not possible to place all the poles.

  2. High resolution survey for topographic surveying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luh, L. C.; Setan, H.; Majid, Z.; Chong, A. K.; Tan, Z.

    2014-02-01

    In this decade, terrestrial laser scanner (TLS) is getting popular in many fields such as reconstruction, monitoring, surveying, as-built of facilities, archaeology, and topographic surveying. This is due the high speed in data collection which is about 50,000 to 1,000,000 three-dimensional (3D) points per second at high accuracy. The main advantage of 3D representation for the data is that it is more approximate to the real world. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to show the use of High-Definition Surveying (HDS), also known as 3D laser scanning for topographic survey. This research investigates the effectiveness of using terrestrial laser scanning system for topographic survey by carrying out field test in Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM), Skudai, Johor. The 3D laser scanner used in this study is a Leica ScanStation C10. Data acquisition was carried out by applying the traversing method. In this study, the result for the topographic survey is under 1st class survey. At the completion of this study, a standard of procedure was proposed for topographic data acquisition using laser scanning systems. This proposed procedure serves as a guideline for users who wish to utilize laser scanning system in topographic survey fully.

  3. Linear feedback controls the essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Haidekker, Mark A

    2013-01-01

    The design of control systems is at the very core of engineering. Feedback controls are ubiquitous, ranging from simple room thermostats to airplane engine control. Helping to make sense of this wide-ranging field, this book provides a new approach by keeping a tight focus on the essentials with a limited, yet consistent set of examples. Analysis and design methods are explained in terms of theory and practice. The book covers classical, linear feedback controls, and linear approximations are used when needed. In parallel, the book covers time-discrete (digital) control systems and juxtapos

  4. 42 CFR 488.310 - Extended survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Extended survey. 488.310 Section 488.310 Public...) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION SURVEY, CERTIFICATION, AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Survey and Certification of Long-Term Care Facilities § 488.310 Extended survey. (a) Purpose of survey. The purpose of an...

  5. 42 CFR 488.7 - Validation survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Validation survey. 488.7 Section 488.7 Public...) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION SURVEY, CERTIFICATION, AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES General Provisions § 488.7 Validation survey. (a) Basis for survey. CMS may require a survey of an accredited provider or supplier...

  6. An Extended Validity Argument for Assessing Feedback Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rougas, Steven; Clyne, Brian; Cianciolo, Anna T; Chan, Teresa M; Sherbino, Jonathan; Yarris, Lalena M

    2015-01-01

    NEGEA 2015 CONFERENCE ABSTRACT (EDITED): Measuring an Organization's Culture of Feedback: Can It Be Done? Steven Rougas and Brian Clyne. CONSTRUCT: This study sought to develop a construct for measuring formative feedback culture in an academic emergency medicine department. Four archetypes (Market, Adhocracy, Clan, Hierarchy) reflecting an organization's values with respect to focus (internal vs. external) and process (flexibility vs. stability and control) were used to characterize one department's receptiveness to formative feedback. The prevalence of residents' identification with certain archetypes served as an indicator of the department's organizational feedback culture. New regulations have forced academic institutions to implement wide-ranging changes to accommodate competency-based milestones and their assessment. These changes challenge residencies that use formative feedback from faculty as a major source of data for determining training advancement. Though various approaches have been taken to improve formative feedback to residents, there currently exists no tool to objectively measure the organizational culture that surrounds this process. Assessing organizational culture, commonly used in the business sector to represent organizational health, may help residency directors gauge their program's success in fostering formative feedback. The Organizational Culture Assessment Instrument (OCAI) is widely used, extensively validated, applicable to survey research, and theoretically based and may be modifiable to assess formative feedback culture in the emergency department. Using a modified Delphi technique and several iterations of focus groups amongst educators at one institution, four of the original six OCAI domains (which each contain 4 possible responses) were modified to create a 16-item Formative Feedback Culture Tool (FFCT) that was administered to 26 residents (response rate = 55%) at a single academic emergency medicine department. The mean

  7. Influence of Feedback Levels on Polarized Optical Feedback Characteristics in Zeeman-Birefringence Dual Frequency Lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAO Wei; ZHANG Shu-Lian; ZHOU Lu-Fei; LIU Xiao-Yan; WANG Ming-Ming

    2007-01-01

    The influence of Feedback levels on the intensity and polarization properties of polarized optical feedback in a Zeeman-birefringence dual frequency laser is systematically investigated. By changing the feedback power ratio, different feedback levels are obtained. Three distinct regimes of polarized optical feedback effects are found and defined as regimes Ⅰ, Ⅱand Ⅲ. The feedback level boundaries among the regimes are acquired experimentally. The theoretical analysis is presented to be in good agreement with the experimental results.

  8. The Effect of Feedback Style on Feedback Seeking Behaviors: an Examination of Perceived Competence

    OpenAIRE

    Stimpson, Emily Carol

    1999-01-01

    Research in the area of feedback seeking behaviors (Ashford & Cummings, 1983) has failed to examine the impact of a supervisorâ s feedback style on a subordinateâ s subsequent feedback seeking. This is an important area for investigation due to the positive relationship between feedback seeking and performance. Deci and Ryanâ s cognitive evaluation theory suggests that intrinsic motivation may be an important mediator between feedback style and FSB in that feedback ...

  9. Career Goal Revision in Response to Negative Feedback: Testing a Longitudinal Cross-Lagged Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shi; Creed, Peter A; Hood, Michelle

    2017-02-06

    We tested a model based on goal-setting and self-regulation theories of the cross-lagged relationships among negative career-related feedback, negative affect (career-related stress), and career goal revision (downward goal revision and goal disengagement). Participants were 409 Chinese university/college students (Mage 19 years; 58% female), who completed a survey at 2 time points approximately 6 months apart. Consistent with our hypotheses, negative career-related feedback at T1 was related to more career goal disengagement and greater downward goal revision at T2. Career-related stress partially mediated the relationship between negative career-related feedback and downward goal revision. In addition, there were reverse relationships between negative career-related feedback and career-related stress, and between career-related stress and goal disengagement. These findings highlight important roles for negative career-related feedback and negative affect in young peoples' career goal pursuit. (PsycINFO Database Record

  10. On interconnections, control, and feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, JC

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study interconnections and control of dynamical systems in a behavioral context. We start with an extensive physical example which serves to illustrate that the familiar input-output feedback loop structure is not as universal as we have been taught to believe, This l

  11. Fishualization: a group feedback display

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schavemaker, J.G.M.; Boertjes, E.M.; Koldijk, S.J.; Wiertz, L.; Verberne, S.; Sappelli, M.; Kaptein, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    In this contribution1 we present a novel psychological intervention that maps human computer activity to a group feedback device on the basis of a combination of various types of unobtrusive, low-level sensors. The goal is to enable employees to gain insights into their working habits, to reduce str

  12. On interconnections, control, and feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, JC

    The purpose of this paper is to study interconnections and control of dynamical systems in a behavioral context. We start with an extensive physical example which serves to illustrate that the familiar input-output feedback loop structure is not as universal as we have been taught to believe, This

  13. Feedback: How to Teach How.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krovar, Susan K.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    To give definitive feedback, physical education teachers must be able to teach basic kinesiological and mechanical principles of movement and how they apply to specific sports skills. The article includes a chart with common kinesiological and mechanical principles applied to particular movements. Appropriate teaching cues are noted. (SM)

  14. Feedback, Incentives and Peer Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Tor Viking; Poulsen, Anders; Villeval, Marie Claire

    effects in the piece-rate pay scheme. In both pay schemes, interim feedback generates negative quality peer effects on the less able performers. We find however evidence of positive peer effects in the tournament scheme since the underdogs almost never quit the competition even when lagging significantly...

  15. LFSC - Linac Feedback Simulation Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Valentin; /Fermilab

    2008-05-01

    The computer program LFSC (Feedback Simulation Code>) is a numerical tool for simulation beam based feedback in high performance linacs. The code LFSC is based on the earlier version developed by a collective of authors at SLAC (L.Hendrickson, R. McEwen, T. Himel, H. Shoaee, S. Shah, P. Emma, P. Schultz) during 1990-2005. That code was successively used in simulation of SLC, TESLA, CLIC and NLC projects. It can simulate as pulse-to-pulse feedback on timescale corresponding to 5-100 Hz, as slower feedbacks, operating in the 0.1-1 Hz range in the Main Linac and Beam Delivery System. The code LFSC is running under Matlab for MS Windows operating system. It contains about 30,000 lines of source code in more than 260 subroutines. The code uses the LIAR ('Linear Accelerator Research code') for particle tracking under ground motion and technical noise perturbations. It uses the Guinea Pig code to simulate the luminosity performance. A set of input files includes the lattice description (XSIF format), and plane text files with numerical parameters, wake fields, ground motion data etc. The Matlab environment provides a flexible system for graphical output.

  16. Environmental Feedback and Spatial Conditioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Isak Worre; Poulsen, Esben Skouboe

    2010-01-01

    with structural integrity, where thermal energy flow through the prototype, to be understood as a membrane, can be controlled and the visual transparancy altered. The work shows performance based feedback systems and physical prototype models driven by information streaming, screening and application....

  17. Social incentives improve deliberative but not procedural learning in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorlick, Marissa A; Maddox, W Todd

    2015-01-01

    Age-related deficits are seen across tasks where learning depends on asocial feedback processing, however plasticity has been observed in some of the same tasks in social contexts suggesting a novel way to attenuate deficits. Socioemotional selectivity theory suggests this plasticity is due to a deliberative motivational shift toward achieving well-being with age (positivity effect) that reverses when executive processes are limited (negativity effect). The present study examined the interaction of feedback valence (positive, negative) and social salience (emotional face feedback - happy; angry, asocial point feedback - gain; loss) on learning in a deliberative task that challenges executive processes and a procedural task that does not. We predict that angry face feedback will improve learning in a deliberative task when executive function is challenged. We tested two competing hypotheses regarding the interactive effects of deliberative emotional biases on automatic feedback processing: (1) If deliberative emotion regulation and automatic feedback are interactive we expect happy face feedback to improve learning and angry face feedback to impair learning in older adults because cognitive control is available. (2) If deliberative emotion regulation and automatic feedback are not interactive we predict that emotional face feedback will not improve procedural learning regardless of valence. Results demonstrate that older adults show persistent deficits relative to younger adults during procedural category learning suggesting that deliberative emotional biases do not interact with automatic feedback processing. Interestingly, a subgroup of older adults identified as potentially using deliberative strategies tended to learn as well as younger adults with angry relative to happy feedback, matching the pattern observed in the deliberative task. Results suggest that deliberative emotional biases can improve deliberative learning, but have no effect on procedural learning.

  18. Global desertification: Drivers and feedbacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Odorico, Paolo; Bhattachan, Abinash; Davis, Kyle F.; Ravi, Sujith; Runyan, Christiane W.

    2013-01-01

    Desertification is a change in soil properties, vegetation or climate, which results in a persistent loss of ecosystem services that are fundamental to sustaining life. Desertification affects large dryland areas around the world and is a major cause of stress in human societies. Here we review recent research on the drivers, feedbacks, and impacts of desertification. A multidisciplinary approach to understanding the drivers and feedbacks of global desertification is motivated by our increasing need to improve global food production and to sustainably manage ecosystems in the context of climate change. Classic desertification theories look at this process as a transition between stable states in bistable ecosystem dynamics. Climate change (i.e., aridification) and land use dynamics are the major drivers of an ecosystem shift to a “desertified” (or “degraded”) state. This shift is typically sustained by positive feedbacks, which stabilize the system in the new state. Desertification feedbacks may involve land degradation processes (e.g., nutrient loss or salinization), changes in rainfall regime resulting from land-atmosphere interactions (e.g., precipitation recycling, dust emissions), or changes in plant community composition (e.g., shrub encroachment, decrease in vegetation cover). We analyze each of these feedback mechanisms and discuss their possible enhancement by interactions with socio-economic drivers. Large scale effects of desertification include the emigration of “environmental refugees” displaced from degraded areas, climatic changes, and the alteration of global biogeochemical cycles resulting from the emission and long-range transport of fine mineral dust. Recent research has identified some possible early warning signs of desertification, which can be used as indicators of resilience loss and imminent shift to desert-like conditions. We conclude with a brief discussion on some desertification control strategies implemented in different

  19. Standard Operating Procedures, MCSP Monarch and Plant Monitoring, 2016

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This record contains the six Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) of the initial survey instructions (ISI) developed and followed for surveys conducted as part of the...

  20. Aviation Medical Examiner 2012 Feedback Survey: Content Analysis of Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    of various types of items—single- choice (e.g., yes/no, satisfaction rating scales, demographic cat - egories), ranking (e.g., indicate top 3), mark...Since lockout times are regulated for government systems, use of a warning (pop-up or auditory ), as suggested, 26 may be the practical solution...printout to exam (2) - add capability to email application to AME (1) Form 8500-8 Items 1-20 (12) - item 19 (5) [ stress , bold and capitalize

  1. Graphical methods for analysing feedback in biological networks - A survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radde, Nicole; Bar, Nadav S.; Banaji, Murad

    2010-01-01

    Observed phenotypes usually arise from complex networks of interacting cell components. Qualitative information about the structure of these networks is often available, while quantitative information may be partial or absent. It is natural then to ask what, if anything, we can learn about the behaviour of the system solely from its qualitative structure. In this article we review some techniques which can be applied to answer this question, focussing in particular on approaches involving graphical representations of model structure. By applying these techniques to various cellular network examples, we discuss their strengths and limitations, and point to future research directions.

  2. A Critical Survey of Auto-feedback Devices in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMuth, Joyce; Hoepfner, Ralph

    In their development of curriculum for the humanizing of learning, Research for Better Schools, Inc., has required the reorganization, reordering, and creation of instrumentation for evaluation in the higher-order cognitive skills, the affective skills, and the interpersonal skills. As part of their design, a critical organization and review of…

  3. Survey of photovoltaic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-08-01

    In developing this survey of photovoltaic systems, the University of Alabama in Huntsville assembled a task team to perform an extensive telephone survey of all known photovoltaic manufacturers. Three US companies accounted for 77% of the total domestic sales in 1978. They are Solarex Corporation, Solar Power Croporation, and ARCO Solar, Inc. This survey of solar photovoltaic (P/V) manufacturers and suppliers consists of three parts: a catalog of suppliers arranged alphabetically, data sheets on specific products, and typical operating, installation, or maintenance instructions and procedures. This report does not recommend or endorse any company product or information presented within as the results of this survey.

  4. Impact of isolated clinical performance feedback on clinical productivity of an academic surgical faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, E Scott; Hamilton, Barton H; Boyd, Vivian R; Hall, Bruce L

    2006-05-01

    There is increasing financial pressure to maximize clinical productivity for academic physicians. We examined whether clinical performance feedback alone could contribute to improving the clinical productivity of surgeons in an academic department of surgery. We implemented a clinical performance feedback program in January 2003. We then compared clinical productivity in terms of relative value units (RVUs) of surgeons for 18 months before and 18 months after this intervention, using each surgeon as his or her own control. Regression was performed with dependent variable ln (monthly RVUs) and independent variables "calendar month," "pre/post" January 2003, and "surgeon." The coefficient on "pre/post" reflected average change in RVUs. We also surveyed faculty on their use of and attitudes toward this feedback. There was a 58% survey response. Ninety-two percent of responding faculty reported that they viewed and used the performance feedback, and that it affected their practice. Ninety-two percent believed the information accurately reflected their performance, 89% thought that the comparisons were useful, and 79% desired more feedback information, specifically, comparisons with external benchmarks. When RVU data were examined, the coefficient on change pre- and postintervention indicated a 7.4% increase in productivity (p increase (p=0.003) after exclusion of outliers. Performance feedback was associated with a small (6.0%) but significant improvement in productivity in this academic surgical faculty group. Performance feedback can be useful and should be used in conjunction with other management tools for this population.

  5. Feedback as real-time constructions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering; Qvortrup, Ane

    2014-01-01

    This article offers a re-description of feedback and the significance of time in feedback constructions based on systems theory. It describes feedback as internal, real-time constructions in a learning system. From this perspective, feedback is neither immediate nor delayed, but occurs in the very...... instant it takes place. This article argues for a clear distinction between the timing of communicative events, such as responses that are provided as help for feedback constructions, and the feedback construction itself as an event in a psychic system. Although feedback is described as an internal......, system-relative construction, different teaching environments offer diverse conditions for feedback constructions. The final section of this article explores this idea with the help of examples from both synchronous oral interaction and asynchronous text-based interaction mediated by digital media....

  6. Evaluative Feedback: Perspectives on Media Effects

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Watts, Stephanie A

    2007-01-01

    .... No feedback effectiveness differences were found between media conditions, although determinants of feedback effectiveness differed significantly depending on the medium. These results are generally consistent with the theoretical model.

  7. Digital Detection and feedback Fluxgate Magnetometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piil-Henriksen, J.; Merayo, José M.G.; Nielsen, Otto V;

    1996-01-01

    A new full Earth's field dynamic feedback fluxgate magnetometer is described. It is based entirely on digital signal processing and digital feedback control, thereby replacing the classical second harmonic tuned analogue electronics by processor algorithms. Discrete mathematical cross...

  8. Prospective controlled assessment of impact of feedback on gastroenterology trainees in outpatient practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harewood, Gavin C

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Previous studies have demonstrated the value of systematic feedback in enhancing endoscopic procedure performance. It remains unknown whether feedback may play a role in modifying physician performance in outpatient practice. This study aimed to assess the impact of systematic feedback on duration of office visits of gastroenterology (GI) trainees in outpatient practice. METHODS: Patients attending a GI outpatient department in an academic medical center were prospectively followed over 4 months. The duration of office visits for consecutive patients seen by five GI fellows of similar experience level were recorded for 2 months (pre-feedback); confidential feedback was then provided to each fellow on a weekly basis for 2 months detailing their individual consultation times and the comparative, anonymous times of the other fellows (post-feedback). RESULTS: Over the course of the study, 1,647 outpatients were seen by five GI fellows. Pre-feedback consultation durations differed significantly with one fellow taking 2.5 times longer than their colleague. Following feedback, times shortened significantly for all fellows, with the greatest impact observed in those trainees taking longer at baseline. There were no significant differences in satisfaction levels among patients seen by each trainee. CONCLUSIONS: There was a wide disparity in the consultation times among GI fellows. Systematic feedback shortened times among all trainees and enhanced uniformity by having the greatest impact among those fellows taking longer at baseline. Routine provision of feedback may be valuable in enhancing uniformity of outpatient practice although clinicians should ensure that shortening consultation visits does not compromise quality of patient care. Future larger studies of feedback in this setting will be enhanced by incorporating objective measures of quality of care and patient satisfaction.

  9. Prospective Controlled Assessment of Impact of Feedback on Gastroenterology Trainees in Outpatient Practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harewood, Gavin C

    2011-03-29

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Previous studies have demonstrated the value of systematic feedback in enhancing endoscopic procedure performance. It remains unknown whether feedback may play a role in modifying physician performance in outpatient practice. This study aimed to assess the impact of systematic feedback on duration of office visits of gastroenterology (GI) trainees in outpatient practice. METHODS: Patients attending a GI outpatient department in an academic medical center were prospectively followed over 4 months. The duration of office visits for consecutive patients seen by five GI fellows of similar experience level were recorded for 2 months (pre-feedback); confidential feedback was then provided to each fellow on a weekly basis for 2 months detailing their individual consultation times and the comparative, anonymous times of the other fellows (post-feedback). RESULTS: Over the course of the study, 1,647 outpatients were seen by five GI fellows. Pre-feedback consultation durations differed significantly with one fellow taking 2.5 times longer than their colleague. Following feedback, times shortened significantly for all fellows, with the greatest impact observed in those trainees taking longer at baseline. There were no significant differences in satisfaction levels among patients seen by each trainee. CONCLUSIONS: There was a wide disparity in the consultation times among GI fellows. Systematic feedback shortened times among all trainees and enhanced uniformity by having the greatest impact among those fellows taking longer at baseline. Routine provision of feedback may be valuable in enhancing uniformity of outpatient practice although clinicians should ensure that shortening consultation visits does not compromise quality of patient care. Future larger studies of feedback in this setting will be enhanced by incorporating objective measures of quality of care and patient satisfaction.

  10. Acute Internal Medicine Trainee Survey 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood, Nicholas; Conway, Nerys

    2015-01-01

    To ascertain current Acute Internal Medicine (AIM) trainees' opinions on their training programme, practical procedures, specialist skills and AIM as a specialty. This can then be used to feedback to the national training committee to help shape training priorities. Online survey sent to all AIM Higher Specialty Trainees registered on the Society for Acute Medicine database, and advertised through e-mail communication and social media. The majority of trainees (55.5%) were quite happy or very happy with their training currently, although significant difficulties were highlighted with time off for specialist skill training and difficulty achieving certain procedural skills. The majority of trainees believe ultrasound should form a core component of AIM training (82.3%). A high proportion of trainees would recommend AIM as a specialty despite these difficulties. A number of issues were highlighted causing difficulties within AIM training, despite which the vast majority of trainees would recommend AIM as a career choice. The results were fed back to the training committee in March.

  11. The Art of Giving Online Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibold, Nancyruth; Schwarz, Laura Marie

    2015-01-01

    The cultivation of providing online feedback that is positive, effective, and enhances the learning experience is a valuable educator skill. Acquisition of the art of providing feedback is through education, practice, and faculty development. This article provides information about the best practices for delivering online feedback to learners. An…

  12. The Effects of Feedback as Interpersonal Reciprocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenstein, Joseph; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Tests the hypothesis that a response to a given feedback statement will be its reciprocal. In Phase 1, a pool of feedback statements was written and scaled along dimensions of power (dominance-submission) and affect (affection-hostility). In Phase 2, these statements were used as the basis for giving feedback and replying to it. (Author)

  13. Simple Optoelectronic Feedback in Microwave Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Lute; Iltchenko, Vladimir

    2009-01-01

    A proposed method of stabilizing microwave and millimeter-wave oscillators calls for the use of feedback in optoelectronic delay lines characterized by high values of the resonance quality factor (Q). The method would extend the applicability of optoelectronic feedback beyond the previously reported class of optoelectronic oscillators that comprise two-port electronic amplifiers in closed loops with high-Q feedback circuits.

  14. Frequent external focus feedback enhances motor learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele eWulf

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined the hypothesis that feedback inducing an external focus of attention enhances motor learning if it is provided frequently (i.e., 100% rather than less frequently. Children (10-12 year olds practiced a soccer throw-in task and were provided feedback about movement form. The feedback statements, provided either after every (100% or every third (33% practice trial, were similar in content but induced either an internal focus (body-movement related or external focus (movement-effect related. The results demonstrated that learning of the movement form was enhanced by external-focus feedback after every trial (100% relative to external-focus feedback after every third trial (33% or internal-focus feedback (100%, 33%, as demonstrated by immediate and delayed transfer tests without feedback. There was no difference between the two internal-focus feedback groups. These findings indicate that the attentional focus induced by feedback is an important factor in determining the effectiveness of different feedback frequencies. We argue that the informational properties of feedback cannot sufficiently account for these and related findings, and suggest that the attentional role of feedback be given greater consideration in future studies.

  15. Why Receiving Feedback Collides with Self Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Cate, Olle Th. J.

    2013-01-01

    Providing feedback to trainees in clinical settings is considered important for development and acquisition of skill. Despite recommendations how to provide feedback that have appeared in the literature, research shows that its effectiveness is often disappointing. To understand why receiving feedback is more difficult than it appears, this paper…

  16. Effectiveness of Feedback in First Year Physics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bearden, Ian; Voigt, Karen A; Mathiasen, Helle

    How can we provide better and more effective feedback to our students? How can we encourage students to use feedback effectively? We will present results of a study of first year physics students addressing these questions and comparing the effectiveness of written and screencast feedback....

  17. Force feedback and basic laparoscopic skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chmarra, M.K.; Dankelman, J.; Van den Dobbelsteen, J.J.; Jansen, F.W.

    2008-01-01

    Background - Not much is known about the exact role offorce feedback in laparoscopy. This study aimed to determine whether force feedback influences movements of instruments during training in laparoscopic tasks and whether force feedback is required for training in basic laparoscopic force applicat

  18. Feedback Sandwiches Affect Perceptions but Not Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkes, Jay; Abercrombie, Sara; McCarty, Teresita

    2013-01-01

    The feedback sandwich technique-make positive comments; provide critique; end with positive comments-is commonly recommended to feedback givers despite scant evidence of its efficacy. These two studies (N = 20; N = 350) of written peer feedback with third-year medical students on clinical patient note-writing assignments indicate that students…

  19. The Courage to Seek Authentic Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, Alexis

    2011-01-01

    Educators assess students' work and behavior every day. They are professional feedback-givers, dispensing grades, advice, support, and red ink. They believe in the power of feedback to communicate what students are doing well and how they can do better. However, some teachers shy away from opportunities for feedback on their own work. Some don't…

  20. A Typology of Written Corrective Feedback Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Rod

    2009-01-01

    As a basis for a systematic approach to investigating the effects of written corrective feedback, this article presents a typology of the different types available to teachers and researchers. The typology distinguishes two sets of options relating to (1) strategies for providing feedback (for example, direct, indirect, or metalinguistic feedback)…

  1. Self-Appraisal Based upon Supervisory Feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Robert P.; Ovalle, Nestor K.

    1984-01-01

    Compared self-appraisals with instructions referencing supervisory feedback with conventional self-appraisals with personnel from a large institution (N=401) and two samples of military personnel (N=117). Results showed that Feedback Based Self Appraisals exhibited more agreement with superior ratings, and degree of feedback available moderated…

  2. Neuronal networks: enhanced feedback feeds forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Ronald L

    2012-09-25

    Modulatory projection neurons gate neuronal networks, such as those comprising motor central pattern generators; in turn, they receive feedback from the networks they gate. A recent study has shown that, in the crab stomatogastric ganglion, this feedback is also subject to modulation: the enhanced feedback feeds forward through the projection neurons to modify circuit output.

  3. MRI of the prostate in Germany. Online survey among radiologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller-Lisse, U.G.; Reiser, M. [Univ. Munich (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Lewerich, B. [Deutsche Roentgengesellschaft, Geschaeftsstelle, Berlin (Germany); Mueller-Lisse, U.L. [Interdisziplinaeres Onkologisches Zentrum Muenchen (IOZ) (Germany). Dept. of Urology; Scherr, M.K. [Berufsgenossenschaftliche Unfallklinik, Dept. of Radiology, Murnau (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    To assess structural, technical, and communicative aspects of dedicated MR examinations of the prostate (MRP) offered by radiologists in Germany. We conducted an eight-item online survey among members of the German Radiology Society (DRG). Radiological institutions were asked about their structure, i. e., either hospital department (HD) or private practice (PP), number of board-certified radiologists, postal regions, number of MRPs in 2011, MR technology and MR sequences applied, ways to communicate results, and feedback from referring physicians on results of subsequent tests and procedures. Submissions were cleared of redundancies and anonymized. Differences in the number of positive replies to each item were statistically significant at p < 0.05 for two-tailed testing in 2 x 2 tables. The survey represented board-certified radiologists in 128 institutions (63 HDs and 65 PPs) in 67/95 German postal regions (71 %). Almost two-thirds of institutions performed 11 to 50 MRPs in 2011, more often at 1.5 T (116/128, 91 %) than at 3.0 T (36/128, 28 %), and most frequently with surface coils (1.5 T, 88/116, 76 %; 3.0 T, 34/36, 94 %; chi-square, 1.9736, 0.1 < p < 0.25). About two-thirds of 1.5 T users and 90 % of 3.0 T users applied at least one functional MR modality (diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging, or MR spectroscopy) for MRP. Reports including graphic representations of the prostate were applied by 21/128 institutions (16 %). Clinical feedback after MRP to radiologists other than upon their own request was infrequent (HDs, 32 - 45 %, PPs, 18 - 32 %). MRP was a widely available, small-volume examination among radiologists in Germany in 2011. The technology mainstay was a 1.5 T surface coil examination including at least one functional MR modality. Dedicated reporting and feedback mechanisms for quality control were underdeveloped.

  4. Assessment of clinical feedback given to medical students via an electronic feedback system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaughness, Gabrielle; Georgoff, Patrick E; Sandhu, Gurjit; Leininger, Lisa; Nikolian, Vahagn C; Reddy, Rishindra; Hughes, David T

    2017-10-01

    The feedback medical students receive during clinical rotations, traditionally verbal and not formally captured, plays a critical role in student development. This study evaluates written daily feedback given to students through a novel web-based feedback system. A Minute Feedback System was used to collect feedback given to medical students during their surgery clerkship from May 2015-April 2016. Using qualitative content analysis, feedback comments were categorized as: encouraging, corrective, specific, and nonspecific. Effective feedback was a combination of specific and either corrective or encouraging feedback; ineffective feedback contained only nonspecific comments; mediocre feedback contained elements of both effective and ineffective comments. 3191 feedback requests were sent by medical students and 2029 faculty/resident feedback responses were received. The overall response rate was 62%. Nonspecific feedback comprised 80% of faculty, 83% of senior resident, and 78% of junior resident comments. Specific feedback was given by only 35% of faculty, 17% of senior residents, and 26% of junior residents. Faculty provided Effective feedback in only 16% of comments, senior residents 8%, and junior residents 17%. Mediocre feedback comprised 13% of faculty, 9% of senior resident, and 7% of junior resident comments. Ineffective feedback comprised 67% of all feedback: 60% of faculty, 72% of senior resident, and 68% of junior resident feedback. The majority of resident and faculty feedback to medical students using an electronic, email-based application during their surgery clerkship was nonspecific and encouraging and therefore of limited effectiveness. This presents an opportunity for resident/faculty development and education regarding optimal feedback techniques. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Random distributed feedback fibre lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turitsyn, Sergei K.; Babin, Sergey A.; Churkin, Dmitry V.; Vatnik, Ilya D.; Nikulin, Maxim; Podivilov, Evgenii V.

    2014-09-01

    The concept of random lasers exploiting multiple scattering of photons in an amplifying disordered medium in order to generate coherent light without a traditional laser resonator has attracted a great deal of attention in recent years. This research area lies at the interface of the fundamental theory of disordered systems and laser science. The idea was originally proposed in the context of astrophysics in the 1960s by V.S. Letokhov, who studied scattering with “negative absorption” of the interstellar molecular clouds. Research on random lasers has since developed into a mature experimental and theoretical field. A simple design of such lasers would be promising for potential applications. However, in traditional random lasers the properties of the output radiation are typically characterized by complex features in the spatial, spectral and time domains, making them less attractive than standard laser systems in terms of practical applications. Recently, an interesting and novel type of one-dimensional random laser that operates in a conventional telecommunication fibre without any pre-designed resonator mirrors-random distributed feedback fibre laser-was demonstrated. The positive feedback required for laser generation in random fibre lasers is provided by the Rayleigh scattering from the inhomogeneities of the refractive index that are naturally present in silica glass. In the proposed laser concept, the randomly backscattered light is amplified through the Raman effect, providing distributed gain over distances up to 100 km. Although an effective reflection due to the Rayleigh scattering is extremely small (˜0.1%), the lasing threshold may be exceeded when a sufficiently large distributed Raman gain is provided. Such a random distributed feedback fibre laser has a number of interesting and attractive features. The fibre waveguide geometry provides transverse confinement, and effectively one-dimensional random distributed feedback leads to the generation

  6. Sparsity Enhanced Decision Feedback Equalization

    CERN Document Server

    Ilic, Jovana

    2011-01-01

    For single-carrier systems with frequency domain equalization, decision feedback equalization (DFE) performs better than linear equalization and has much lower computational complexity than sequence maximum likelihood detection. The main challenge in DFE is the feedback symbol selection rule. In this paper, we give a theoretical framework for a simple, sparsity based thresholding algorithm. We feed back multiple symbols in each iteration, so the algorithm converges fast and has a low computational cost. We show how the initial solution can be obtained via convex relaxation instead of linear equalization, and illustrate the impact that the choice of the initial solution has on the bit error rate performance of our algorithm. The algorithm is applicable in several existing wireless communication systems (SC-FDMA, MC-CDMA, MIMO-OFDM). Numerical results illustrate significant performance improvement in terms of bit error rate compared to the MMSE solution.

  7. Star Cluster Formation and Feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Krumholz, Mark R; Arce, Hector G; Dale, James E; Gutermuth, Robert; Klein, Richard I; Li, Zhi-Yun; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Zhang, Qizhou

    2014-01-01

    Stars do not generally form in isolation. Instead, they form in clusters, and in these clustered environments newborn stars can have profound effects on one another and on their parent gas clouds. Feedback from clustered stars is almost certainly responsible for a number of otherwise puzzling facts about star formation: that it is an inefficient process that proceeds slowly when averaged over galactic scales; that most stars disperse from their birth sites and dissolve into the galactic field over timescales $\\ll 1$ Gyr; and that newborn stars follow an initial mass function (IMF) with a distinct peak in the range $0.1 - 1$ $M_\\odot$, rather than an IMF dominated by brown dwarfs. In this review we summarize current observational constraints and theoretical models for the complex interplay between clustered star formation and feedback.

  8. Random distributed feedback fibre lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turitsyn, Sergei K., E-mail: s.k.turitsyn@aston.ac.uk [Aston Institute of Photonic Technologies, Aston University, Birmingham B4 7ET (United Kingdom); Novosibirsk State University, 2 Pirogova str., 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Babin, Sergey A. [Novosibirsk State University, 2 Pirogova str., 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Institute of Automation and Electrometry SB RAS, 1 Ac. Koptug. ave., 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Churkin, Dmitry V. [Aston Institute of Photonic Technologies, Aston University, Birmingham B4 7ET (United Kingdom); Novosibirsk State University, 2 Pirogova str., 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Institute of Automation and Electrometry SB RAS, 1 Ac. Koptug. ave., 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Vatnik, Ilya D.; Nikulin, Maxim [Institute of Automation and Electrometry SB RAS, 1 Ac. Koptug. ave., 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Podivilov, Evgenii V. [Novosibirsk State University, 2 Pirogova str., 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Institute of Automation and Electrometry SB RAS, 1 Ac. Koptug. ave., 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-09-10

    The concept of random lasers exploiting multiple scattering of photons in an amplifying disordered medium in order to generate coherent light without a traditional laser resonator has attracted a great deal of attention in recent years. This research area lies at the interface of the fundamental theory of disordered systems and laser science. The idea was originally proposed in the context of astrophysics in the 1960s by V.S. Letokhov, who studied scattering with “negative absorption” of the interstellar molecular clouds. Research on random lasers has since developed into a mature experimental and theoretical field. A simple design of such lasers would be promising for potential applications. However, in traditional random lasers the properties of the output radiation are typically characterized by complex features in the spatial, spectral and time domains, making them less attractive than standard laser systems in terms of practical applications. Recently, an interesting and novel type of one-dimensional random laser that operates in a conventional telecommunication fibre without any pre-designed resonator mirrors–random distributed feedback fibre laser–was demonstrated. The positive feedback required for laser generation in random fibre lasers is provided by the Rayleigh scattering from the inhomogeneities of the refractive index that are naturally present in silica glass. In the proposed laser concept, the randomly backscattered light is amplified through the Raman effect, providing distributed gain over distances up to 100 km. Although an effective reflection due to the Rayleigh scattering is extremely small (∼0.1%), the lasing threshold may be exceeded when a sufficiently large distributed Raman gain is provided. Such a random distributed feedback fibre laser has a number of interesting and attractive features. The fibre waveguide geometry provides transverse confinement, and effectively one-dimensional random distributed feedback leads to the

  9. Comparing Simulations of AGN Feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Richardson, Mark L A; Devriendt, Julien; Slyz, Adrianne; Thacker, Robert J; Dubois, Yohan; Wurster, James; Silk, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    We perform adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) cosmological zoom simulations of a region around a forming galaxy cluster, comparing the ability of the methods to handle successively more complex baryonic physics. In the simplest, non-radiative case, the two methods are in good agreement with each other, but the SPH simulations generate central cores with slightly lower entropies and virial shocks at slightly larger radii, consistent with what has been seen in previous studies. The inclusion of radiative cooling, star formation, and stellar feedback leads to much larger differences between the two methods. Most dramatically, at z=5, rapid cooling in the AMR case moves the accretion shock well within the virial radius, while this shock remains near the virial radius in the SPH case, due to excess heating, coupled with poorer capturing of the shock width. On the other hand, the addition of feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) to the simulations results in much better ag...

  10. Supernova Feedback Keeps Galaxies Simple

    CERN Document Server

    Chakraborti, Sayan

    2011-01-01

    Galaxies evolve continuously under the influence of self-gravity, rotation, accretion, mergers and feedback. The currently favored cold dark matter cosmological framework, suggests a hierarchical process of galaxy formation, wherein the present properties of galaxies are decided by their individual histories of being assembled from smaller pieces. However, recent studies have uncovered surprising correlations among the properties of galaxies, to the extent of forming a one-parameter set lying on a single fundamental line. It has been argued in the literature that such simplicity is hard to explain within the paradigm of hierarchical galaxy mergers. One of the puzzling results, is the simple linear correlation between the neutral hydrogen mass and the surface area, implying that widely different galaxies share very similar neutral hydrogen surface densities. In this work we show that self-regulated star formation, driven by the competition between gravitational instabilities and mechanical feedback from supern...

  11. Students' Feedback Preferences: How Do Students React to Timely and Automatically Generated Assessment Feedback?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayerlein, Leopold

    2014-01-01

    This study assesses whether or not undergraduate and postgraduate accounting students at an Australian university differentiate between timely feedback and extremely timely feedback, and whether or not the replacement of manually written formal assessment feedback with automatically generated feedback influences students' perception of feedback…

  12. Interpreting Feedback: A Discourse Analysis of Teacher Feedback and Student Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, J. T.; Anguiano, Carlos J.

    2016-01-01

    Feedback has typically been studied as a means of improving academic performance. Few studies inquire into the processes by which feedback shapes student identity. The authors carry out a discourse analysis of written comments to explore how feedback is discursively constructed by both teachers and students. Analysis of written feedback,…

  13. Students' Feedback Preferences: How Do Students React to Timely and Automatically Generated Assessment Feedback?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayerlein, Leopold

    2014-01-01

    This study assesses whether or not undergraduate and postgraduate accounting students at an Australian university differentiate between timely feedback and extremely timely feedback, and whether or not the replacement of manually written formal assessment feedback with automatically generated feedback influences students' perception of…

  14. Designing Flight Deck Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degani, Asaf; Wiener, Earl

    2005-01-01

    Three reports address the design of flight-deck procedures and various aspects of human interaction with cockpit systems that have direct impact on flight safety. One report, On the Typography of Flight- Deck Documentation, discusses basic research about typography and the kind of information needed by designers of flight deck documentation. Flight crews reading poorly designed documentation may easily overlook a crucial item on the checklist. The report surveys and summarizes the available literature regarding the design and typographical aspects of printed material. It focuses on typographical factors such as proper typefaces, character height, use of lower- and upper-case characters, line length, and spacing. Graphical aspects such as layout, color coding, fonts, and character contrast are discussed; and several cockpit conditions such as lighting levels and glare are addressed, as well as usage factors such as angular alignment, paper quality, and colors. Most of the insights and recommendations discussed in this report are transferable to paperless cockpit systems of the future and computer-based procedure displays (e.g., "electronic flight bag") in aerospace systems and similar systems that are used in other industries such as medical, nuclear systems, maritime operations, and military systems.

  15. A Case Study of EFL Teachers’ Perceptions and Practices in Written Corrective Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussam Rajab

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on a mixed-method approach, this interpretive exploratory case study aimed to identify English as Foreign Language (EFL teachers’ perceptions and practices in Written Corrective Feedback (WCF in the Saudi context. The study analysed quantitative data gathered from an anonymous custom designed 15-question online survey and qualitative data from an open-ended question (at the end of the online survey and semi-structured interviews. Participants were one hundred and eighty-four English as a Foreign Language (EFL teachers (n =184 who responded to the online survey (113 females and 71 males and 7 participants who responded to the semi-structured interview (5 males and 2 females. The study findings indicated no significant differences between male and female teachers in considering “time” as the main factor in following a particular strategy for written corrective feedback (93%. The results from the semi-structured interviews highlighted the need for further research in written corrective feedback in the Saudi context to address serious issues related to the teachers’ work-load. Some recommendations were identified for further research in written corrective feedback. Keywords: Saudi, Mixed methods, Survey, Written corrective feedback

  16. Logistic systems with linear feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Leonid; Shulgin, Dmitry; Ogluzdina, Olga

    2016-08-01

    A wide variety of systems may be described by specific dependence, which is known as logistic curve, or S-curve, between the internal characteristic and the external parameter. Linear feedback between these two values may be suggested for a wide set of systems also. In present paper, we suggest a bifurcation behavior for systems with both features, and discuss it for two cases, which are the Ising magnet in external field, and the development of manufacturing enterprise.

  17. Comparing Simulations of AGN Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Mark L. A.; Scannapieco, Evan; Devriendt, Julien; Slyz, Adrianne; Thacker, Robert J.; Dubois, Yohan; Wurster, James; Silk, Joseph

    2016-07-01

    We perform adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) cosmological zoom simulations of a region around a forming galaxy cluster, comparing the ability of the methods to handle successively more complex baryonic physics. In the simplest, non-radiative case, the two methods are in good agreement with each other, but the SPH simulations generate central cores with slightly lower entropies and virial shocks at slightly larger radii, consistent with what has been seen in previous studies. The inclusion of radiative cooling, star formation, and stellar feedback leads to much larger differences between the two methods. Most dramatically, at z=5, rapid cooling in the AMR case moves the accretion shock to well within the virial radius, while this shock remains near the virial radius in the SPH case, due to excess heating, coupled with poorer capturing of the shock width. On the other hand, the addition of feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) to the simulations results in much better agreement between the methods. For our AGN model, both simulations display halo gas entropies of 100 keV cm2, similar decrements in the star formation rate, and a drop in the halo baryon content of roughly 30%. This is consistent with the AGN growth being self-regulated, regardless of the numerical method. However, the simulations with AGN feedback continue to differ in aspects that are not self-regulated, such that in SPH a larger volume of gas is impacted by feedback, and the cluster still has a lower entropy central core.

  18. AN OVERVIEW OF THE DEVELOPMENT OF LOW GAIN FEEDBACK AND LOW-AND-HIGH GAIN FEEDBACK

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zongli LIN

    2009-01-01

    Low gain feedback refers to certain families of stabilizing state feedback gains that are parameterized in a scalar and go to zero as the scalar decreases to zero. Low gain feedback was initially proposed to achieve semi-global stabilization of linear systems subject to input saturation. It was then combined with high gain feedback in different ways for solving various control problems. The resulting feedback laws are referred to as low-and-high gain feedback. Since the introduction of low gain feedback in the context of semi-global stabilization of linear systems subject to input saturation,there has been effort to develop alternative methods for low gain design, to characterize key features of low gain feedback, and to explore new applications of the low gain and low-and-high gain feedback.This paper reviews the developments in low gain and low-and-high gain feedback designs.

  19. Facilitated patient experience feedback can improve nursing care: a pilot study for a phase III cluster randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background England’s extensive NHS patient survey programme has not fulfilled government promises of widespread improvements in patients’ experiences, and media reports of poor nursing care in NHS hospitals are increasingly common. Impediments to the surveys’ impact on the quality of nursing care may include: the fact that they are not ward-specific, so nurses claim “that doesn’t happen on my ward”; nurses’ scepticism about the relevance of patient feedback to their practice; and lack of prompt communication of results. The surveys’ impact could be increased by: conducting ward-specific surveys; returning results to ward staff more quickly; including patients’ written comments in reports; and offering nurses an opportunity to discuss the feedback. Very few randomised trials have been conducted to test the effectiveness of patient feedback on quality improvement and there have been few, if any, published trials of ward-specific patient surveys. Methods Over two years, postal surveys of recent inpatients were conducted at four-monthly intervals in 18 wards in two NHS Trusts in England. Wards were randomly allocated to Basic Feedback (ward-specific printed patient survey results including patients’ written comments sent to nurses by letter); Feedback Plus (in addition to printed results, ward meetings to discuss results and plan improvements) or Control (no active feedback of survey results). Patient survey responses to questions about nursing care were used to compute wards’ average Nursing Care Scores at each interval. Nurses’ reactions to the patient feedback were recorded. Results Conducting ward-level surveys and delivering ward-specific results was feasible. Ward meetings were effective for engaging nurses and challenging scepticism and patients’ written comments stimulated interest. 4,236 (47%) patients returned questionnaires. Nursing Care Scores improved more for Feedback Plus than Basic Feedback or Control (difference between

  20. 360-degree feedback for medical trainees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Ellen; Holm, Kirsten; Sørensen, Jette Led

    2015-01-01

    In 360-degree feedback medical colleagues and collaborators give a trainee feedback by answering a questionnaire on behaviour of the trainee. The questionnaire may contain questions answered on a scale or/and they may contain open questions. The result from 360-degree feedback is used for formative...... feedback and assessment. In order to secure reliability 8-15 respondents are needed. It is a matter of discussion whether the respondents should be chosen by the trainee or by a third part, and if respondents should be anonymous. The process includes a feedback session with a trained supervisor....

  1. Feedback i den laegelige postgraduate uddannelse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubak, Sune Leisgaard Mørck; Ipsen, Merete; Sørensen, Jette Led

    2008-01-01

    Feedback may be described as a process comprising communication of information and reactions to such communication. It has been defined as specific information about the difference between a trainee's observed performance and a given standard with the intent of achieving performance improvement....... Feedback is essential in medical education and has great implications for the educational climate. It has been shown that a common language regarding the principles of feedback has a sustained effect on quality and frequency of feedback. Further research is needed on feedback and educational climate...

  2. Improved quality and quantity of written feedback is associated with a structured feedback proforma

    OpenAIRE

    Newton, Philip M.; Wallace, Melisa J.; Judy McKimm

    2012-01-01

    Facilitating the provision of detailed, deep and useful feedback is an important design feature of any educational programme. Here we evaluate feedback provided to medical students completing short transferable skills projects. Feedback quantity and depth were evaluated before and after a simple intervention to change the structure of the feedback-provision form from a blank free-text feedback form to a structured proforma that asked a pair of short questions for each of the six domains being...

  3. Aesthetic Surgical Crown Lengthening Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Pablo Santos; Chiarelli, Fabio; Rodrigues, José A; Shibli, Jamil A; Zizzari, Vincenzo Luca; Piattelli, Adriano; Iezzi, Giovanna; Perrotti, Vittoria

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this case report was to describe the surgical sequence of crown lengthening to apically reposition the dentogingival complex, in addition to an esthetic restorative procedure. Many different causes can be responsible for short clinical crown. In these cases, the correct execution of a restorative or prosthetic rehabilitation requires an increasing of the crown length. According to the 2003 American Academy of Periodontology (Practice Profile Survey), crown lengthening is the most habitual surgical periodontal treatment.

  4. Aesthetic Surgical Crown Lengthening Procedure

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this case report was to describe the surgical sequence of crown lengthening to apically reposition the dentogingival complex, in addition to an esthetic restorative procedure. Many different causes can be responsible for short clinical crown. In these cases, the correct execution of a restorative or prosthetic rehabilitation requires an increasing of the crown length. According to the 2003 American Academy of Periodontology (Practice Profile Survey), crown lengthening is the most h...

  5. Aesthetic Surgical Crown Lengthening Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Pablo Santos; Chiarelli, Fabio; Rodrigues, José A.; Shibli, Jamil A.; Zizzari, Vincenzo Luca; Piattelli, Adriano; Iezzi, Giovanna; Perrotti, Vittoria

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this case report was to describe the surgical sequence of crown lengthening to apically reposition the dentogingival complex, in addition to an esthetic restorative procedure. Many different causes can be responsible for short clinical crown. In these cases, the correct execution of a restorative or prosthetic rehabilitation requires an increasing of the crown length. According to the 2003 American Academy of Periodontology (Practice Profile Survey), crown lengthening is the most habitual surgical periodontal treatment. PMID:26609452

  6. Aesthetic Surgical Crown Lengthening Procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Santos de Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this case report was to describe the surgical sequence of crown lengthening to apically reposition the dentogingival complex, in addition to an esthetic restorative procedure. Many different causes can be responsible for short clinical crown. In these cases, the correct execution of a restorative or prosthetic rehabilitation requires an increasing of the crown length. According to the 2003 American Academy of Periodontology (Practice Profile Survey, crown lengthening is the most habitual surgical periodontal treatment.

  7. Feedbacks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    <正>Editor’s Note: In late 2011, when China City Planning Review (CCPR) went through five years after the resumption of its publication, a small-scale investigation was carried out among its subscribers in both China and abroad on how they review the journal from academic viewpoint, for the purpose of

  8. Extensions to PIFCGT: Multirate output feedback and optimal disturbance suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broussard, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    New control synthesis procedures for digital flight control systems were developed. The theoretical developments are the solution to the problem of optimal disturbance suppression in the presence of windshear. Control synthesis is accomplished using a linear quadratic cost function, the command generator tracker for trajectory following and the proportional-integral-filter control structure for practical implementation. Extensions are made to the optimal output feedback algorithm for computing feedback gains so that the multirate and optimal disturbance control designs are computed and compared for the advanced transport operating system (ATOPS). The performance of the designs is demonstrated by closed-loop poles, frequency domain multiinput sigma and eigenvalue plots and detailed nonlinear 6-DOF aircraft simulations in the terminal area in the presence of windshear.

  9. Pinning Lur’e Complex Networks via Output Feedback Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Without requiring the full-state information of network nodes, this paper studies the pinning synchronization in a network of Lur’e dynamical systems based on the output feedback control strategy. Some simple pinning conditions are established for both undirected and directed Lur’e networks by using M-matrix theory and S-procedure technique. With the derived stability criteria, the pinning synchronization problem of large-scale Lur’e networks can be transformed to the test of a low-dimensional linear matrix inequality. Some remarks are further given to address the selection of pinned nodes and the design of pinning feedback gains. Numerical results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the theoretical analysis.

  10. On Output Feedback Multiobjective Control for Singularly Perturbed Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Ghasem Moghadam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A new design procedure for a robust 2 and ∞ control of continuous-time singularly perturbed systems via dynamic output feedback is presented. By formulating all objectives in terms of a common Lyapunov function, the controller will be designed through solving a set of inequalities. Therefore, a dynamic output feedback controller is developed such that ∞ and 2 performance of the resulting closed-loop system is less than or equal to some prescribed value. Also, ∞ and 2 performance for a given upperbound of singular perturbation parameter ∈(0,∗] are guaranteed. It is shown that the -dependent controller is well defined for any ∈(0,∗] and can be reduced to an -independent one so long as is sufficiently small. Finally, numerical simulations are provided to validate the proposed controller. Numerical simulations coincide with the theoretical analysis.

  11. Towards optimal indexing for relevance feedback in large image databases +.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswamy, Sharadh; Rose, Kenneth

    2009-12-01

    Motivated by the need to efficiently leverage user relevance feedback in content-based retrieval from image databases, we propose a fast, clustering-based indexing technique for exact nearest-neighbor search that adapts to the Mahalanobis distance with a varying weight matrix. We derive a basic property of point-to-hyperplane Mahalanobis distance, which enables efficient recalculation of such distances as the Mahalanobis weight matrix is varied. This property is exploited to recalculate bounds on query-cluster distances via projection on known separating hyperplanes (available from the underlying clustering procedure), to effectively eliminate noncompetitive clusters from the search and to retrieve clusters in increasing order of (the appropriate) distance from the query. We compare performance with an existing variant of VA-File indexing designed for relevance feedback, and observe considerable gains.

  12. Technologies for learner-centered feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Costello

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available As the number, type, and use of technologies to support learning increases, so do the opportunities for using these technologies for feedback. Learner-centered feedback is a core to the teaching-learning process. It is related to assessment in describing how learners perform in their learning, their gain in knowledge, skills, and attitudes. Feedback, types of feedback, guidelines for effective learner-centered feedback, and feedback’s relationship to assessment are presented. Methods of providing feedback, for example, automated, audio scribe pens, digital audio, etc., and the related technologies are described. Technologies that allow instructors to make informed decisions about the use of various methods for feedback are discussed.

  13. Interference Alignment with Analog Channel State Feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Ayach, Omar El

    2010-01-01

    Interference alignment (IA) is a multiplexing gain optimal transmission strategy for the interference channel with an arbitrary number of users. While the achieved sum rate with IA is much higher than previously thought possible, the improvement comes at the cost of requiring network channel state information at the transmitters. This can be achieved by explicit feedback, a flexible yet costly approach that incurs large overhead and limits throughput. We propose using analog feedback as an alternative to limited feedback or reciprocity based alignment. We show that the full multiplexing gain observed with perfect channel knowledge is preserved by analog feedback and the mean loss in sum rate is bounded by a constant when signal-to-noise ratio is comparable in both forward and feedback channels. When such feedback quality is not quite possible, a fraction of the degrees of freedom is achieved. We consider the overhead of training and feedback and use this framework to optimize the system's effective throughput...

  14. Augmented reality in surgical procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samset, E.; Schmalstieg, D.; Vander Sloten, J.; Freudenthal, A.; Declerck, J.; Casciaro, S.; Rideng, Ø.; Gersak, B.

    2008-02-01

    Minimally invasive therapy (MIT) is one of the most important trends in modern medicine. It includes a wide range of therapies in videoscopic surgery and interventional radiology and is performed through small incisions. It reduces hospital stay-time by allowing faster recovery and offers substantially improved cost-effectiveness for the hospital and the society. However, the introduction of MIT has also led to new problems. The manipulation of structures within the body through small incisions reduces dexterity and tactile feedback. It requires a different approach than conventional surgical procedures, since eye-hand co-ordination is not based on direct vision, but more predominantly on image guidance via endoscopes or radiological imaging modalities. ARIS*ER is a multidisciplinary consortium developing a new generation of decision support tools for MIT by augmenting visual and sensorial feedback. We will present tools based on novel concepts in visualization, robotics and haptics providing tailored solutions for a range of clinical applications. Examples from radio-frequency ablation of liver-tumors, laparoscopic liver surgery and minimally invasive cardiac surgery will be presented. Demonstrators were developed with the aim to provide a seamless workflow for the clinical user conducting image-guided therapy.

  15. Dopamine dependence in aggregate feedback learning: A computational cognitive neuroscience approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentin, Vivian V; Maddox, W Todd; Ashby, F Gregory

    2016-11-01

    Procedural learning of skills depends on dopamine-mediated striatal plasticity. Most prior work investigated single stimulus-response procedural learning followed by feedback. However, many skills include several actions that must be performed before feedback is available. A new procedural-learning task is developed in which three independent and successive unsupervised categorization responses receive aggregate feedback indicating either that all three responses were correct, or at least one response was incorrect. Experiment 1 showed superior learning of stimuli in position 3, and that learning in the first two positions was initially compromised, and then recovered. An extensive theoretical analysis that used parameter space partitioning found that a large class of procedural-learning models, which predict propagation of dopamine release from feedback to stimuli, and/or an eligibility trace, fail to fully account for these data. The analysis also suggested that any dopamine released to the second or third stimulus impaired categorization learning in the first and second positions. A second experiment tested and confirmed a novel prediction of this large class of procedural-learning models that if the to-be-learned actions are introduced one-by-one in succession then learning is much better if training begins with the first action (and works forwards) than if it begins with the last action (and works backwards).

  16. Student Feedback of Career Development Workshops for Program Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBeau, J. E.; Pressley, S. N.

    2016-12-01

    A number of techniques are employed each year to evaluate the effectiveness of and to identify opportunities for improvement in the Laboratory for Atmospheric Research (LAR) REU program at Washington State University. For example, information gathered from pre-/post-surveys and pre-/post-interviews provides information regarding students' perceptions and levels of experience with the scientific process, career and academic goals, and motivation for joining the REU program. Poster session rubrics assess students' abilities to summarize their experiences in a professional setting. Alumni surveys gauge former participants' perceptions of the REU experience. One seemingly simple and highly useful, but often less documented, component of the evaluation process for program improvement is the use of workshop feedback forms. Weekly workshops are designed to provide students with enhanced knowledge and skills in the area of atmospheric chemistry as well as research design skills, academic and career guidance, and presentation skills. According to previous years' evaluation reports, workshops are largely beneficial to students for learning new skills. Yet, students suggest a number of recommendations that may benefit any REU program, such as: providing slides beforehand to provide a framework for the upcoming workshop, having instructors speak in more student-friendly language, covering higher-level topics, and including more hands-on, instructor-guided practice during the workshops. Thus, workshop feedback forms provide meaningful feedback to increase learning outcomes and enhance the REU student experience. This presentation will offer ideas gathered from over five years of workshop feedback forms that, while somewhat specific to workshops offered for the LAR REU, can offer faculty and PIs insight into the student experience, enhancing their ability to improve programming and achieve greater learning outcomes.

  17. 77 FR 36568 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request: Generic Customer Satisfaction Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-19

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request: Generic Customer Satisfaction... information: Title of Proposal: Generic--Customer Satisfaction Surveys. OMB Control Number, if applicable... our customers. HUD will conduct various customer satisfaction surveys to gather feedback and...

  18. Randomized trial of the effect of video feedback on the acquisition of surgical skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farquharson, A L; Cresswell, A C; Beard, J D; Chan, P

    2013-10-01

    Constructive feedback provides a mechanism for reinforcing learning during the acquisition of surgical skills. Feedback is usually given verbally, and sometimes documented, after direct observation by a trained assessor. The aim was to evaluate video recording as an effective modality for enhancing feedback, in comparison with standard verbal feedback alone. This was a prospective, blinded, randomized clinical trial comparing standard verbal feedback plus video with standard verbal feedback alone. Validated pro formas for assessment were used and quality control was performed by independent expert assessors. Trial participants were recorded on video performing the surgical skill, and returned the next day to perform the skill again following video and standard verbal feedback (group 1) or standard verbal feedback alone (group 2). Forty-eight participants were divided equally between the two groups. There was a significant improvement in the mean overall procedure score for group 1 of 2·875 from a maximum achievable score of 20 (P = 0·003), but not for group 2. There were significant improvements in the specific domains of instrument familiarity, needle handling, skin handling and accurate apposition, again all in group 1. The only significant improvement in group 2 was in an organized approach to the task, also observed in group 1. Knot-tying security deteriorated after feedback in group 2 but not in group 1. The addition of video feedback can improve the acquisition of surgical skills, and could be incorporated into formal surgical curricula. © 2013 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Negative Feedback for Small Capacitive Touchscreen Interfaces: A Usability Study for Data Entry Tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, S P; Esposito, J M

    2012-01-01

    Touchscreen technology has become pervasive in the consumer product arena over the last decade, offering some distinct advantages such as software reconfigurable interfaces and the removal of space consuming mice and keyboards. However, there are significant drawbacks to these devices that have limited their adoption by some users. Most notably, standard touchscreens demand the user's visual attention and require them to look at the input device to avoid pressing the wrong button. This issue is particularly important for mobile, capacitive sensing, nonstylus devices, such as the iPhone where small button sizes can generate high error rates. While previous work has shown the benefits of augmenting such interfaces with audio or vibrotactile feedback, only positive feedback (confirmation of button presses) has been considered. In this paper, we present a simple prototype interface that provides negative vibrotactile feedback. By negative, we mean feedback is generated when an inactive or ambiguous part of the screen, such as the area between two buttons, is touched. First, we present a usability study comparing positive and negative vibrotactile feedback for a benchmark numerical data entry task. The difference in performance is not statistically significant, implying negative feedback provides comparable benefits. Next, based on the experimenter's observations and the users comments, we introduce a multimodal feedback strategy-combining complementary positive audio and negative vibrotactile signals. User tests on a text entry experiment show that, with multimodal feedback, users exhibit a (statistically significant) 24 percent reduction in corrective key presses, as compared to positive audio feedback alone. Exit survey comments indicate that users favor multimodal feedback.

  20. 2016 Service Academy Gender Relations Survey: Overview Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    were constructed based on 2017 2016 Service Academy Gender Relations Survey 239 | OPA feedback from Academy focus groups and frequencies and...stop sexual harassment and sexual assault. They provided feedback on the actions of Academy senior leadership, officers, and non-commissioned...harassment after having been previously spoken to. Response categories were collapsed so that large extent represents the combination of moderate extent

  1. Policies and procedures related to testing for weak D phenotypes and administration of Rh immune globulin: results and recommendations related to supplemental questions in the Comprehensive Transfusion Medicine survey of the College of American Pathologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandler, S Gerald; Roseff, Susan D; Domen, Ronald E; Shaz, Beth; Gottschall, Jerome L

    2014-05-01

    Advances in RHD genotyping offer an opportunity to update policies and practices for testing weak D phenotypes and administration of Rh immune globulin to postpartum women. To repeat questions from a 1999 College of American Pathologists proficiency test survey, to evaluate current practices for testing for weak D and administration of Rh immune globulin, and to determine whether there is an opportunity to begin integrating RHD genotyping in laboratory practice. The College of American Pathologists Transfusion Medicine Resource Committee sent questions from the 1999 survey to laboratories that participated in the 2012 proficiency test survey. The results of the 2012 survey were compared with those from 1999. Results from published RHD genotyping studies were analyzed to determine if RHD genotyping could improve current policies and practices for serological Rh typing. More than 3100 survey participants responded to the 2012 questions. The most significant finding was a decrease in the number of transfusion services performing a serological weak D test on patients as a strategy to manage those with a weak D as Rh negative (from 58.2% to 19.8%, P Rh positive. Selective integration of RHD genotyping policies and practices could improve the accuracy of Rh typing results, reduce unnecessary administration of Rh immune globulin in women with a weak D, and decrease transfusion of Rh-negative red blood cells in most recipients with a serological weak D phenotype.

  2. Functional observer and state feedback

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, S.Y.

    1986-01-01

    In this paper, we show the relation between state space approach and transfer function approach for functional observer and state feedback design. Two approaches can be transformed into each other, based on this result. More importantly, we find that the state space approach introduces some severe, unnecessary restrictions in solving the problem. The restrictions are, however, reduced to be a trivial condition in transfer function approach. It is believed that the result presented in this paper will be useful in developing both approaches, and motivate some new results for solving the problem.

  3. AGN feedback in galaxy formation

    CERN Document Server

    Antonuccio-Delogu, Vincenzo

    2010-01-01

    During the past decade, convincing evidence has been accumulated concerning the effect of active galactic nuclei (AGN) activity on the internal and external environment of their host galaxies. Featuring contributions from well-respected researchers in the field, and bringing together work by specialists in both galaxy formation and AGN, this volume addresses a number of key questions about AGN feedback in the context of galaxy formation. The topics covered include downsizing and star-formation time scales in massive elliptical galaxies, the connection between the epochs of supermassive black h

  4. Basic Feedback Controls in Biomedicine

    CERN Document Server

    Lessard, Charles

    2009-01-01

    This textbook is intended for undergraduate students (juniors or seniors) in Biomedical Engineering, with the main goal of helping these students learn about classical control theory and its application in physiological systems. In addition, students should be able to apply the Laboratory Virtual Instrumentation Engineering Workbench (LabVIEW) Controls and Simulation Modules to mammalian physiology. The first four chapters review previous work on differential equations for electrical and mechanical systems. Chapters 5 through 8 present the general types and characteristics of feedback control

  5. Radiative feedback from ionized gas

    CERN Document Server

    Glover, S C O

    2007-01-01

    H2 formation in metal-free gas occurs via the intermediate H- or H2+ ions. Destruction of these ions by photodissociation therefore serves to suppress H2 formation. In this paper, I highlight the fact that several processes that occur in ionized primordial gas produce photons energetic enough to photodissociate H- or H2+ and outline how to compute the photodissociation rates produced by a particular distribution of ionized gas. I also show that there are circumstances of interest, such as during the growth of HII regions around the first stars, in which this previously overlooked form of radiative feedback is of considerable importance.

  6. Adaptive-feedback control algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Debin

    2006-06-01

    This paper is motivated by giving the detailed proofs and some interesting remarks on the results the author obtained in a series of papers [Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 214101 (2004); Phys. Rev. E 71, 037203 (2005); 69, 067201 (2004)], where an adaptive-feedback algorithm was proposed to effectively stabilize and synchronize chaotic systems. This note proves in detail the strictness of this algorithm from the viewpoint of mathematics, and gives some interesting remarks for its potential applications to chaos control & synchronization. In addition, a significant comment on synchronization-based parameter estimation is given, which shows some techniques proposed in literature less strict and ineffective in some cases.

  7. Social feedback processing in borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korn, C W; La Rosée, L; Heekeren, H R; Roepke, S

    2016-02-01

    Patients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) show negative and unstable self- and other-evaluations compared to healthy individuals. It is unclear, however, how they process self- and other-relevant social feedback. We have previously demonstrated a positive updating bias in healthy individuals: When receiving social feedback on character traits, healthy individuals integrate desirable more than undesirable feedback. Here, our aim was to test whether BPD patients exhibit a more negative pattern of social feedback processing. We employed a character trait task in which BPD patients interacted with four healthy participants in a real-life social interaction. Afterwards, all participants rated themselves and one other participant on 80 character traits before and after receiving feedback from their interaction partners. We compared how participants updated their ratings after receiving desirable and undesirable feedback. Our analyses included 22 BPD patients and 81 healthy controls. Healthy controls showed a positivity bias for self- and other-relevant feedback as previously demonstrated. Importantly, this pattern was altered in BPD patients: They integrated undesirable feedback for themselves to a greater degree than healthy controls did. Other-relevant feedback processing was unaltered in BPD patients. Our study demonstrates an alteration in self-relevant feedback processing in BPD patients that might contribute to unstable and negative self-evaluations.

  8. PEER FEEDBACK ON LANGUAGE FORM IN TELECOLLABORATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paige Ware

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available We performed a two-phase, year-long research project that explored the impact of peer feedback on language development. We investigated specifically how and when post-secondary learners of English and Spanish provide corrective feedback on their partners' use of the target language in weekly asynchronous discussions by assigning them to one of two conditions: e-tutoring, in which students were asked to provide peer feedback on any linguistic form they perceived as incorrect; and e-partnering, in which students were not required to provide peer feedback but could do so on their own initiative. We examined the frequency and type of language use by coding the feedback for language-related episodes (Swain & Lapkin, 1998 and for feedback strategies (Ros i Solé & Truman, 2005. The findings indicate that students in both conditions preferred an inclusion of feedback on form as part of their exchange, but such feedback only occurred when explicitly required in the e-tutoring condition. Pedagogical implications include the need to situate peer feedback on form within current models of telecollaboration and to assist students in using feedback strategies such as reformulations, which do not rely on a deep understanding of the target or native language grammar.

  9. Bariatric Surgery Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Center Access to Care Toolkit EHB Access Toolkit Bariatric Surgery Procedures Bariatric surgical procedures cause weight loss by ... Bariatric procedures also often cause hormonal changes. Most weight loss surgeries today are performed using minimally invasive techniques (laparoscopic ...

  10. Bariatric Surgery Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Center Access to Care Toolkit EHB Access Toolkit Bariatric Surgery Procedures Bariatric surgical procedures cause weight loss by restricting the ... Online Education Directory Search Patient Learning Center Bariatric Surgery ... Surgery Procedures BMI Calculator Childhood and Adolescent Obesity ...

  11. Probabilistic Category Learning in Developmental Dyslexia: Evidence from Feedback and Paired-Associate Weather Prediction Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabay, Yafit; Vakil, Eli; Schiff, Rachel; Holt, Lori L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Developmental dyslexia is presumed to arise from specific phonological impairments. However, an emerging theoretical framework suggests that phonological impairments may be symptoms stemming from an underlying dysfunction of procedural learning. Method We tested procedural learning in adults with dyslexia (n=15) and matched-controls (n=15) using two versions of the Weather Prediction Task: Feedback (FB) and Paired-associate (PA). In the FB-based task, participants learned associations between cues and outcomes initially by guessing and subsequently through feedback indicating the correctness of response. In the PA-based learning task, participants viewed the cue and its associated outcome simultaneously without overt response or feedback. In both versions, participants trained across 150 trials. Learning was assessed in a subsequent test without presentation of the outcome, or corrective feedback. Results The Dyslexia group exhibited impaired learning compared with the Control group on both the FB and PA versions of the weather prediction task. Conclusions The results indicate that the ability to learn by feedback is not selectively impaired in dyslexia. Rather it seems that the probabilistic nature of the task, shared by the FB and PA versions of the weather prediction task, hampers learning in those with dyslexia. Results are discussed in light of procedural learning impairments among participants with dyslexia. PMID:25730732

  12. Design of an optimal output feedback control system with modal insensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, K. V.; Calise, A. J.

    1984-01-01

    This paper deals with the design of an output feedback controller which results in selected modal insensitivity, and at the same time optimizes a quadratic performance index representative of desired system performance for nominal plant parameter values. The approach taken here is to characterize the class of attainable eigenvectors for a given set of eigenvalues (distinct or non-distinct) which lie in a subspace called the 'Modal Insensitivity Subspace'. A constraint is established on the feedback matrix which results in modal insensitivity. Necessary conditions for optimality subject to the constraint on the feedback matrix are given. This forms the basis for a numerical algorithm to compute the optimal feedback gain which analyzed for convergence. To illustrate the procedure, a design is carried out using the lateral dynamics of an L-1011 aircraft.

  13. Performance feedback: an exploratory study to examine the acceptability and impact for interdisciplinary primary care teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Sharon; Green, Michael; Thille, Patricia; Savage, Colleen; Roberts, Lynn; Russell, Grant; Hogg, William

    2011-03-29

    This mixed methods study was designed to explore the acceptability and impact of feedback of team performance data to primary care interdisciplinary teams. Seven interdisciplinary teams were offered a one-hour, facilitated performance feedback session presenting data from a comprehensive, previously-conducted evaluation, selecting highlights such as performance on chronic disease management, access, patient satisfaction and team function. Several recurrent themes emerged from participants' surveys and two rounds of interviews within three months of the feedback session. Team performance measurement and feedback was welcomed across teams and disciplines. This feedback could build the team, the culture, and the capacity for quality improvement. However, existing performance indicators do not equally reflect the role of different disciplines within an interdisciplinary team. Finally, the effect of team performance feedback on intentions to improve performance was hindered by a poor understanding of how the team could use the data. The findings further our understanding of how performance feedback may engage interdisciplinary team members in improving the quality of primary care and the unique challenges specific to these settings. There is a need to develop a shared sense of responsibility and agenda for quality improvement. Therefore, more efforts to develop flexible and interactive performance-reporting structures (that better reflect contributions from all team members) in which teams could specify the information and audience may assist in promoting quality improvement.

  14. Performance feedback: An exploratory study to examine the acceptability and impact for interdisciplinary primary care teams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell Grant

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This mixed methods study was designed to explore the acceptability and impact of feedback of team performance data to primary care interdisciplinary teams. Methods Seven interdisciplinary teams were offered a one-hour, facilitated performance feedback session presenting data from a comprehensive, previously-conducted evaluation, selecting highlights such as performance on chronic disease management, access, patient satisfaction and team function. Results Several recurrent themes emerged from participants' surveys and two rounds of interviews within three months of the feedback session. Team performance measurement and feedback was welcomed across teams and disciplines. This feedback could build the team, the culture, and the capacity for quality improvement. However, existing performance indicators do not equally reflect the role of different disciplines within an interdisciplinary team. Finally, the effect of team performance feedback on intentions to improve performance was hindered by a poor understanding of how the team could use the data. Conclusions The findings further our understanding of how performance feedback may engage interdisciplinary team members in improving the quality of primary care and the unique challenges specific to these settings. There is a need to develop a shared sense of responsibility and agenda for quality improvement. Therefore, more efforts to develop flexible and interactive performance-reporting structures (that better reflect contributions from all team members in which teams could specify the information and audience may assist in promoting quality improvement.

  15. Confounding factors in using upward feedback to assess the quality of medical training: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Anli Yue; Baker, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Upward feedback is becoming more widely used in medical training as a means of quality control. Multiple biases exist, thus the accuracy of upward feedback is debatable. This study aims to identify factors that could influence upward feedback, especially in medical training. A systematic review using a structured search strategy was performed. Thirty-five databases were searched. Results were reviewed and relevant abstracts were shortlisted. All studies in English, both medical and non-medical literature, were included. A simple pro-forma was used initially to identify the pertinent areas of upward feedback, so that a focused pro-forma could be designed for data extraction. A total of 204 articles were reviewed. Most studies on upward feedback bias were evaluative studies and only covered Kirkpatrick level 1-reaction. Most studies evaluated trainers or training, were used for formative purposes and presented quantitative data. Accountability and confidentiality were the most common overt biases, whereas method of feedback was the most commonly implied bias within articles. Although different types of bias do exist, upward feedback does have a role in evaluating medical training. Accountability and confidentiality were the most common biases. Further research is required to evaluate which types of bias are associated with specific survey characteristics and which are potentially modifiable.

  16. The effect of AGN feedback on the X-ray morphologies of clusters -- simulations vs. observations

    CERN Document Server

    Chon, Gayoung; Boehringer, Hans

    2016-01-01

    We study the effect of Active Nuclei Galaxy (AGN) feedback as one of the major mechanisms modifying the cluster morphology influencing scaling relations, which are the most uncertain factor in constraining cosmology with clusters of galaxies. Using cosmological hydrodynamical simulations we investigate how the AGN feedback changes the X-ray morphology of the simulated systems, and compare to the observed REXCESS (Representative XMM-Newton Cluster Structure Survey) clusters. We apply centre shifts and power ratios to characterise the cluster morphology, and find that our simulated clusters are more substructured than the observed ones. We show that the degree of this discrepancy is affected by the inclusion of AGN feedback. While the clusters simulated with the AGN feedback are in much better agreement with the REXCESS L_X-T relation, they are also more substructured, which increases the tension with observations. This suggests that not only global cluster properties such as L_X and T and radial profiles shoul...

  17. Language Trajectory through Corrective Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Saber Alavi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This quasi-experimental study was designed to investigate the effects of corrective feedback on SLA/EFL to determine the potential benefits of two different corrective feedback techniques, namely recasts and elicitation. The research hypotheses were: 1 Learners who are exposed to interactive focused task that requires CR will benefit more than those who are exposed to communicative activities only; 2 Elicitation will be more effective than recasts in leading to L2 development; Three intensive EFL classes in a language center in Songkhla province, Thailand were selected to participate in the study. Based on the study design, two class were assigned to the treatment conditions elicitation group and recasts group and the third was used as a control group. The treatment took place over a period of 9 meetings focusing on teaching third person singular –s morpheme and the provision of CF where it was necessary. The participants' knowledge of the intended syntantic point was tested before treatment and post tested after receiving the treatment. A multiple choice and focused-cloze reading grammar test was used in the pre-test and the post-test to evaluate the effects of the treatments on the learners' acquisition of third person singular morpheme. This classroom-based study showed that the two treatment groups benefited from CF strategies, but according to the study, elicitation group outperformed the recast one.

  18. Galaxy Formation and SN Feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Tissera, P B; White, S D M; Springel, V

    2006-01-01

    We present a Supernova (SN) feedback model that succeeds at describing the chemical and energetic effects of SN explosions in galaxy formation simulations. This new SN model has been coupled to GADGET-2 and works within a new multiphase scheme which allows the description of a co-spatial mixture of cold and hot interstellar medium phases. No ad hoc scale-dependent parameters are associated to these SN and multiphase models making them particularly suited to studies of galaxy formation in a cosmological framework. Our SN model succeeds not only in setting a self-regulated star formation activity in galaxies but in triggering collimated chemical-enriched galactic winds. The effects of winds vary with the virial mass of the systems so that the smaller the galaxy, the larger the fraction of swept away gas and the stronger the decrease in its star formation activity. The fact that the fraction of ejected metals exceeds 60 per cent regardless of mass, suggests that SN feedback can be the responsible mechanism of th...

  19. Autogenic-feedback training: A countermeasure for orthostatic intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowings, Patricia S.; Toscano, William B.; Kamiya, Joe; Miller, Neal E.; Pickering, Thomas G.

    1991-01-01

    NASA has identified cardiovascular deconditioning as a serious biomedical problem associated with long-duration exposure to microgravity in space. High priority has been given to the development of countermeasures for this disorder and the resulting orthostatic intolerance experienced by crewmembers upon their return to the 1g norm of Earth. The present study was designed to examine the feasibility of training human subjects to control their own cardiovascular responses to gravitational stimulation (i.e., a tilt table). Using an operant conditioning procedure, Autogenic-Feedback Training (AFT), we would determine if subjects could learn to increase their own blood pressure voluntarily.

  20. Adaptive feedback linearization applied to steering of ships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thor I. Fossen

    1993-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the application of feedback linearization to automatic steering of ships. The flexibility of the design procedure allows the autopilot to be optimized for both course-keeping and course-changing manoeuvres. Direct adaptive versions of both the course-keeping and turning controller are derived. The advantages of the adaptive controllers are improved performance and reduced fuel consumption. The application of nonlinear control theory also allows the designer in a systematic manner to compensate for nonlinearities in the control design.

  1. Anharmonic resonances with recursive delay feedback

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldobin, Denis S., E-mail: Denis.Goldobin@gmail.com [Department of Mathematics, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Institute of Continuous Media Mechanics, UB RAS, Perm 614013 (Russian Federation)

    2011-09-12

    We consider application of time-delayed feedback with infinite recursion for control of anharmonic (nonlinear) oscillators subject to noise. In contrast to the case of a single delay feedback, recursive delay feedback exhibits resonances between feedback and nonlinear harmonics, leading to a resonantly strong or weak oscillation coherence even for a small anharmonicity. Remarkably, these small-anharmonicity induced resonances can be stronger than the harmonic ones. Analytical results are confirmed numerically for van der Pol and van der Pol-Duffing oscillators. -- Highlights: → We construct general theory of noisy limit-cycle oscillators with linear feedback. → We focus on coherence and 'reliability' of oscillators. → For recursive delay feedback control the theory shows importance of anharmonicity. → Anharmonic resonances are studied both numerically and analytically.

  2. Feedback control of coupled-bunch instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, J.D.; Eisen, N.; Hindi, H.; Linscott, I.; Oxoby, G.; Sapozhnikov, L. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Serio, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Frascati (Italy). Lab. Nazionale di Frascati

    1993-05-01

    The next generation of synchrotron light sources and particle accelerators will require active feedback systems to control multi-bunch instabilities. Stabilizing hundreds or thousands of potentially unstable modes in these accelerator designs presents many technical challenges. Feedback systems to stabilize coupled-bunch instabilities may be understood in the frequency domain (mode-based feedback) or in the time domain (bunch-by-bunch feedback). In both approaches an external amplifier system is used to create damping fields that prevent coupled-bunch oscillations from growing without bound. The system requirements for transverse (betatron) and longitudinal (synchrotron) feedback are presented, and possible implementation options developed. Feedback system designs based on digital signal-processing techniques are described. Experimental results are shown from a synchrotron oscillation damper in the SSRL/SLAC storage ring SPEAR that uses digital signal-processing techniques.

  3. Exploring the value of usability feedback formats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Mie; Hornbæk, Kasper Anders Søren

    2009-01-01

    The format used to present feedback from usability evaluations to developers affects whether problems are understood, accepted, and fixed. Yet, little research has investigated which formats are the most effective. We describe an explorative study where three developers assess 40 usability findings...... presented using five feedback formats. Our usability findings comprise 35 problems and 5 positive comments. Data suggest that feedback serves multiple purposes. Initially, feedback must convince developers about the relevance of a problem and convey an understanding of this. Feedback must next be easy...... working with the feedback to address the usability problems, there were no significant differences among the developers' ratings of the value of the different formats. This suggests that all of the formats may serve equally well as reminders in later stages of working with usability problems...

  4. Galaxy-scale AGN Feedback - Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Wagner, A Y; Umemura, M; Sutherland, R S; Silk, J

    2015-01-01

    Powerful relativistic jets in radio galaxies are capable of driving strong outflows but also inducing star-formation by pressure-triggering collapse of dense clouds. We review theoretical work on negative and positive active galactic nuclei feedback, discussing insights gained from recent hydrodynamical simulations of jet-driven feedback on galaxy scales that are applicable to compact radio sources. The simulations show that the efficiency of feedback and the relative importance of negative and positive feedback depends strongly on interstellar medium properties, especially the column depth and spatial distribution of clouds. Negative feedback is most effective if clouds are distributed spherically and individual clouds have small column depths, while positive feedback is most effective if clouds are predominantly in a disc-like configuration.

  5. Information Feedback and Learning in Construction Bidding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bee Lan Oo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Information feedback condition in recurrent construction bidding is an important design variable about optimal procurement design. Contractors tend to optimize their bids in recurrent bidding with positive review of historic bids. Our experiment examines the effects of partial and no information feedback conditions on student (inexperienced bidders’ bidding trends, and the extent to which their bidding trends agree with the behavioural patterns proposed by learning direction theory. The results show that the variations in bids over time for both information feedback conditions are statistically significant. Although the bidders with partial bidding feedback information are more likely to vary their bids as indicated by learning direction theory, their bids are less competitive than those with no bidding feedback information. Construction clients would need to consider the information feedback conditions in their procurement of construction services with the goal to achieve efficiency in construction bidding.

  6. Effectiveness of Corrective Feedback on Writing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高砚

    2012-01-01

      This study aims to find out the effectiveness of corrective feedback on ESL writing. By reviewing and analyzing the previous six research studies, the author tries to reveal the most effective way to provide corrective feedback for L2 students and the factors that impact the processing of error feedback. Findings indicated that corrective feedback is helpful for students to improve ESL writing on both accuracy and fluency. Furthermore, correction and direct corrective feedbacks as well as the oral and written meta-linguistic explanation are the most effective ways to help students improving their writing. However, in⁃dividual learner’s difference has influence on processing corrective feedback. At last, limitation of present study and suggestion for future research were made.

  7. Programming generality into a performance feedback writing intervention: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hier, Bridget O; Eckert, Tanya L

    2016-06-01

    Substantial numbers of students in the United States are performing below grade-level expectations in core academic areas, and these deficits are most pronounced in the area of writing. Although performance feedback procedures have been shown to produce promising short-term improvements in elementary-aged students' writing skills, evidence of maintenance and generalization of these intervention effects is limited. The purpose of this study was to examine the immediate, generalized, and sustained effects of incorporating multiple exemplar training into the performance feedback procedures of a writing intervention using a randomized controlled trial (RCT). Results indicated that although the addition of multiple exemplar training did not improve students' writing performance on measures of stimulus and response generalization, it did result in greater maintenance of intervention effects in comparison to students who received performance feedback without generality programming and students who engaged in weekly writing practice alone.

  8. Corrective feedback, learner uptake, and feedback perception in a Chinese as a foreign language classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingfeng Fu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The role of corrective feedback in second language classrooms has received considerable research attention in the past few decades. However, most of this research has been conducted in English-teaching settings, either ESL or EFL. This study examined teacher feedback, learner uptake as well as learner and teacher perception of feedback in an adult Chinese as a foreign language classroom. Ten hours of classroom interactions were videotaped, transcribed and coded for analysis. Lyster and Ranta’s (1997 coding system involving six types of feedback was initially used to identify feedback frequency and learner uptake. However, the teacher was found to use a number of additional feedback types. Altogether, 12 types of feedback were identified: recasts, delayed recasts, clarification requests, translation, metalinguistic feedback, elicitation, explicit correction, asking a direct question, repetition, directing question to other students, re-asks, and using L1-English. Differences were noted in the frequency of some of the feedback types as well as learner uptake compared to what had been reported in some previous ESL and EFL studies. With respect to the new feedback types, some led to noticeable uptake. As for the students’ and teacher’s perceptions, they did not match and both the teacher and the students were generally not accurate in perceiving the frequency of each feedback type. The findings are discussed in terms of the role of context in affecting the provision and effectiveness of feedback and its relationship to student and teacher perception of feedback.

  9. Fuzzy cloud concepts for assessing radiation feedbacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, H. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The importance of clouds in the climate system is well-known but poorly understood. Modeling and observational studies have suggested that there may be positive feedbacks associated with certain cloud processes, but it is not known how strong these feedbacks are in the context of the overall system. Examples include ice microphysics feedback, as shown by Liou`s model, and the relationship between SST and cloud cover in the tropics, which is the focus of this research. 2 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Information, disturbance and Hamiltonian quantum feedback control

    CERN Document Server

    Doherty, A C; Jungman, G; Doherty, Andrew C.; Jacobs, Kurt; Jungman, Gerard

    2001-01-01

    We consider separating the problem of designing Hamiltonian quantum feedback control algorithms into a measurement (estimation) strategy and a feedback (control) strategy, and consider optimizing desirable properties of each under the minimal constraint that the available strength of both is limited. This motivates concepts of information extraction and disturbance which are distinct from those usually considered in quantum information theory. Using these concepts we identify an information trade-off in quantum feedback control.

  11. FORCED OSCILLATIONS IN NONLINEAR FEEDBACK CONTROL SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Since a nonlinear feedback control system may possess more than one type of forced oscillations, it is highly desirable to investigate the type of...method for finding the existence of forced oscillations and response curve characteristics of a nonlinear feedback control system by means of finding the...second order feedback control system are investigated; the fundamental frequency forced oscillation for a higher order system and the jump resonance

  12. Enhanced Negative Feedback Responses in Remitted Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Pizzagalli, Diego; Meites, Tiffany M.; Deveney, Christen M; Holmes, Avram J.; Bogdan, Ryan; Steele, Katherine T.; Santesso, Diane L.

    2008-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD)is characterized by hypersensitivity to negative feedback that might involve frontocingulate dysfunction. MDD patients exhibit enhanced electrophysiological responses to negative internal (errors) and external (feedback) cues. Whether this dysfunction extends to remitted depressed (RD) individuals with a history of MDD is currently unknown. To address this issue, we examined the feedback-related negativity in RD and control participants using a probabilistic pun...

  13. ON FEEDBACK CONTROL OF DELAYED CHAOTIC SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李丽香; 彭海朋; 卢辉斌; 关新平

    2001-01-01

    In this paper two different types of feedback control technique are discussed: the standard feedback control and the time-delay feedback control which have been successfully used in many control systems. In order to understand to what extent the two different types of control technique are useful in delayed chaotic systems, some analytic stabilization conditions for chaos control from the two types of control technique are derived based on Lyapunov stabilization arguments. Similarly, we discuss the tracking problem by applying the time-delay feedback control. Finally, numerical examples are provided.

  14. Opportunistic Relay Selection With Limited Feedback

    KAUST Repository

    Eltayeb, Mohammed E.

    2015-08-01

    Relay selection is a simple technique that achieves spatial diversity in cooperative relay networks. Generally, relay selection algorithms require channel state information (CSI) feedback from all cooperating relays to make a selection decision. This requirement poses two important challenges, which are often neglected in the literature. Firstly, the fed back channel information is usually corrupted by additive noise. Secondly, CSI feedback generates a great deal of feedback overhead (air-time) that could result in significant performance hits. In this paper, we propose a compressive sensing (CS) based relay selection algorithm that reduces the feedback overhead of relay networks under the assumption of noisy feedback channels. The proposed algorithm exploits CS to first obtain the identity of a set of relays with favorable channel conditions. Following that, the CSI of the identified relays is estimated using least squares estimation without any additional feedback. Both single and multiple relay selection cases are considered. After deriving closed-form expressions for the asymptotic end-to-end SNR at the destination and the feedback load for different relaying protocols, we show that CS-based selection drastically reduces the feedback load and achieves a rate close to that obtained by selection algorithms with dedicated error-free feedback. © 1972-2012 IEEE.

  15. Software Development and Feedback from Usability Evaluations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høegh, Rune Thaarup

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the strengths and weaknesses of written, multimedia and oral feedback from usability evaluations to developers. The strengths and weaknesses are related to how well the feedback supports the developers in addressing usability problems in a software system. The study...... of information, while still not offering the required information to address usability problems. Other forms of feedback, such as oral or multimedia feedback helps the developer in understanding the usability problems better, but are on the other hand less cost-effective than a written description....

  16. Trends in sterilization and disinfection procedures in orthodontic offices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cash, R G

    1990-10-01

    The present survey is a repetition of a 1987 survey examining the sterilization/disinfection procedures of Georgia's orthodontists. The purpose of this study is to examine the trends in orthodontic sterilization/disinfection procedures. Orthodontists in Georgia have dramatically changed their sterilization and disinfection procedures. The major changes represented are greater use of protective barrier wear by doctor and staff members; increased heat sterilization methods for instruments, pliers, and handpieces; and increased disinfection of alginate impressions.

  17. A numerical algorithm to find all feedback Nash equilibria in scalar affine quadratic differential games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engwerda, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    This note deals with solving scalar coupled algebraic Riccati equations. These equations arise in finding linear feedback Nash equilibria of the scalar N-player affine quadratic differential game. A numerical procedure is provided to compute all the stabilizing solutions. The main idea is to reformu

  18. Global stabilizer of a general class of feedback nonlinear systems and its exponential convergence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Runing MA; Jundi DIAN

    2005-01-01

    We discuss the global stabilization procedure which renders a general class of feedback nonlinear systems exponential convergent. Our stabilizer consists of a nested saturation function, which is a nonlinear combination of satrration functions. Here we prove the exponential convergence of the stabilizer for the first time and give numerical examples to illustrate the efficiency of the result given above.

  19. Increasing Physical Therapy Equipment Preparation Using Task Clarification, Feedback and Environmental Manipulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravina, Nicole; VanWagner, Michelle; Austin, John

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to increase completion of tasks related to morning preparation procedures among 2 full-time and 4 part-time employees at a physical therapy clinic. A functional assessment was conducted to aid in the development of the treatment package consisting of graphic feedback, task clarification, and equipment manipulations.…

  20. A Practical Approach for Analysis of Input and Output Impedances of Feedback Amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramovitz, A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper suggests a pedagogical approach to teaching the subject of the analysis of feedback amplifiers for electrical engineering students at the undergraduate level. Special attention is given to derivation of the input and output impedances. In order to make the procedure clear and suitable for classroom presentation an alternative proof of…

  1. Normalization Ridge Regression in Practice II: The Estimation of Multiple Feedback Linkages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulcock, J. W.

    The use of the two-stage least squares (2 SLS) procedure for estimating nonrecursive social science models is often impractical when multiple feedback linkages are required. This is because 2 SLS is extremely sensitive to multicollinearity. The standard statistical solution to the multicollinearity problem is a biased, variance reduced procedure…

  2. Once is not enough : Establishing reliability criteria for feedback and evaluative decsions based on classroom observation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Lans, Rikkert M.; van de Grift, Wim J.C.M.; van Veen, Klaas; Fokkens-Bruinsma, Marjon

    2016-01-01

    Implementation of effective teacher evaluation procedures is a global challenge in which lowering the chances that teachers receive inaccurate evaluations is a pertinent goal. This study investigates the minimum number of observations required to guarantee that teachers receive feedback with modest

  3. Feedback-based probabilistic category learning is selectively impaired in attention/hyperactivity deficit disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabay, Yafit; Goldfarb, Liat

    2017-07-01

    Although Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is closely linked to executive function deficits, it has recently been attributed to procedural learning impairments that are quite distinct from the former. These observations challenge the ability of the executive function framework solely to account for the diverse range of symptoms observed in ADHD. A recent neurocomputational model emphasizes the role of striatal dopamine (DA) in explaining ADHD's broad range of deficits, but the link between this model and procedural learning impairments remains unclear. Significantly, feedback-based procedural learning is hypothesized to be disrupted in ADHD because of the involvement of striatal DA in this type of learning. In order to test this assumption, we employed two variants of a probabilistic category learning task known from the neuropsychological literature. Feedback-based (FB) and paired associate-based (PA) probabilistic category learning were employed in a non-medicated sample of ADHD participants and neurotypical participants. In the FB task, participants learned associations between cues and outcomes initially by guessing and subsequently through feedback indicating the correctness of the response. In the PA learning task, participants viewed the cue and its associated outcome simultaneously without receiving an overt response or corrective feedback. In both tasks, participants were trained across 150 trials. Learning was assessed in a subsequent test without a presentation of the outcome or corrective feedback. Results revealed an interesting disassociation in which ADHD participants performed as well as control participants in the PA task, but were impaired compared with the controls in the FB task. The learning curve during FB training differed between the two groups. Taken together, these results suggest that the ability to incrementally learn by feedback is selectively disrupted in ADHD participants. These results are discussed in relation to both

  4. Biased Reasoning : Adaptive Responses to Health Risk Feedback

    OpenAIRE

    Renner, Britta

    2004-01-01

    The present study examined reactions toward repeated self relevant feedback. Participants in a community health screening received feedback about their cholesterol level on two separate occasions. Reactions to the first feedback were examined with regard to feedback valence and expectedness. The findings showed that negative feedback was devalued, but only when it was unexpected. Feedback consistency war incorporated into analyses of the second feedback. Again, results showed that negative fe...

  5. How does feedback and peer feedback affect collaborative writing in a virtual learning environment?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guasch, Teresa; Espasa, Anna; Alvarez, Ibis; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Guasch, T., Espasa, A., Alvarez, I., & Kirschner, P. A. (2011, 31 May). How does feedback and peer feedback affect collaborative writing in a virtual learning environment? Presentation at a Learning & Cognition meeting, Open Universiteit in the Netherlands, Heerlen, The Netherlands.

  6. Stress reduces use of negative feedback in a feedback-based learning task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, Antje; Plessow, Franziska; Goschke, Thomas; Kirschbaum, Clemens

    2010-04-01

    In contrast to the well-established effects of stress on learning of declarative material, much less is known about stress effects on reward- or feedback-based learning. Differential effects on positive and negative feedback especially have received little attention. The objective of this study, thus, was to investigate effects of psychosocial stress on feedback-based learning with a particular focus on the use of negative and positive feedback during learning. Participants completed a probabilistic selection task in both a stress and a control condition. The task allowed quantification of how much participants relied on positive and negative feedback during learning. Although stress had no effect on general acquisition of the task, results indicate that participants used negative feedback significantly less during learning after stress compared with the control condition. An enhancing effect of stress on use of positive feedback failed to reach significance. These findings suggest that stress acts differentially on the use of positive and negative feedback during learning.

  7. Improved quality and quantity of written feedback is associated with a structured feedback proforma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Philip M; Wallace, Melisa J; McKimm, Judy

    2012-01-01

    Facilitating the provision of detailed, deep and useful feedback is an important design feature of any educational programme. Here we evaluate feedback provided to medical students completing short transferable skills projects. Feedback quantity and depth were evaluated before and after a simple intervention to change the structure of the feedback-provision form from a blank free-text feedback form to a structured proforma that asked a pair of short questions for each of the six domains being assessed. Each pair of questions consisted of asking the marker 'what was done well?' and 'what changes would improve the assignment?' Changing the form was associated with a significant increase in the quantity of the feedback and in the amount and quality of feedback provided to students. We also observed that, for these double-marked projects, the marker designated as 'marker 1' consistently wrote more feedback than the marker designated 'marker 2'.

  8. Learning outcomes using video in supervision and peer feedback during clinical skills training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Henrik Hein; Toftgård, Rie Castella; Nørgaard, Cita

    supervision of clinical skills (formative assessment). Demonstrations of these principles will be presented as video podcasts during the session. The learning outcomes of video supervision and peer-feedback were assessed in an online questionnaire survey. Results Results of the supervision showed large self...

  9. Graduate Students' Needs and Preferences for Written Feedback on Academic Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manjet Kaur Mehar

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is to examine graduate students' needs and preferences for written feedback on academic writing from their lecturers and thesis supervisors. Quantitative method via survey questionnaire was used to collect data from 21 respondents. The data collection involved Master and Doctorate students at a tertiary level institution…

  10. An Analysis of School Principals' Listening Skills According to Teacher Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavuz, Mustafa

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates school principals' listening skills according to teacher feedback in terms of a number of variables. The study is conducted according to a general survey model. The sample consists of 477 elementary, general and vocational secondary school teachers working in Konya, Turkey, in the 2007-2008 education year. The sample was…

  11. Change in quality management in diabetes care groups and outpatient clinics after feedback and tailored support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campmans-Kuijpers, Marjo J.; Baan, Caroline A.; Lemmens, Lidwien C.; Rutten, Guy E.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the change in level of diabetes quality management in primary care groups and outpatient clinics after feedback and tailored support. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: This before-and-after study with a 1-year follow-up surveyed qualitymanagers on six domains of quality management. Q

  12. Assessing Postgraduate Student Perceptions and Measures of Learning in a Peer Review Feedback Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Genevieve; Clifton, Julian

    2016-01-01

    Peer review feedback, developed to assist students with increasing the quality of group reports and developing peer review skills, was added to a master's level Climate Change Policy and Planning unit. A pre- and post-survey was conducted to determine whether students found the process a valuable learning opportunity: 87% of students responding to…

  13. Goal orientations and the seeking of different types of feedback information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Onne; Prins, Jelle

    2007-01-01

    Based on the goal orientation model of feedback-seeking behaviour, goal orientations are proposed to influence employees in the type of information they seek from knowledgeable others in the work environment. As hypothesized, a survey conducted among 170 medical residents of a Dutch university hospi

  14. Goal orientations and the seeking of different types of feedback information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, Onne; Prins, Jelle

    Based on the goal orientation model of feedback-seeking behaviour, goal orientations are proposed to influence employees in the type of information they seek from knowledgeable others in the work environment. As hypothesized, a survey conducted among 170 medical residents of a Dutch university

  15. A pressure ulcer audit and feedback project across multi-hospital settings in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bours, G.J.J.W.; Halfens, J.; Candel, M.J.J.M.; Grol, R.P.T.M.; Abu-Saad, H.H.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine whether participating in a pressure ulcer prevalence survey and receiving feedback results in an improvement in quality of care. DESIGN: Cross-sectional studies from 1998 to 2002 were compared over time. SETTING: Sixty-two acute care hospitals in the Netherlands. STUDY

  16. Corrective Feedback in L2 Latvian Classrooms: Teacher Perceptions versus the Observed Actualities of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilans, Gatis

    2016-01-01

    This two-part study aims to investigate teacher perceptions about providing oral corrective feedback (CF) to minority students of Latvian as a second language and compare the perceptions to the actual provision of CF in L2 Latvian classrooms. The survey sample represents sixty-six L2 Latvian teachers while the classroom observations involved 13…

  17. User preferences for multi-device context-aware feedback in a digital coaching system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, Randy; op den Akker, Hendrikus J.A.; Lavrysen, T.; van Wissen, S.

    2013-01-01

    We present the development of the user interfaces of a multi-device digital coaching service that provides tailored feedback to users concerning their physical activity level and medication intake. We present the outcomes of a survey study of user preferences regarding the situation, device and

  18. Change in quality management in diabetes care groups and outpatient clinics after feedback and tailored support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campmans-Kuijpers, Marjo J.; Baan, Caroline A.; Lemmens, Lidwien C.; Rutten, Guy E.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the change in level of diabetes quality management in primary care groups and outpatient clinics after feedback and tailored support. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: This before-and-after study with a 1-year follow-up surveyed qualitymanagers on six domains of quality management.

  19. Education Research: New Avenues for Video Pedagogy and Feedback in Teacher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tochon, Francois Victor

    2001-01-01

    Surveys the role of video feedback in light of a new, integrated concept in teacher education called education research. Shows how shared reflection was stimulated during language teacher education to link theory with practice. Situations were created that allowed for reflective practice on the semiosis of action. (Author/VWL)

  20. From Monologue to Dialogue: Improving Written Feedback Processes in Mass Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, David

    2010-01-01

    Student surveys across the world have highlighted that students are dissatisfied with the feedback they receive on their assignments and many institutions have been putting plans in place to address this issue. Much of this work has focused on improving the quality of written comments. This paper takes a different perspective. It argues that the…