WorldWideScience

Sample records for survey feedback pilot

  1. Black Rail Pilot Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Aural surveys using tape recorded calls proved to be an efficient and effective way to survey large expanses of shallow marsh for black rails (Laterallus...

  2. Cooperative Research Pilot Flatfish Survey (Yellowtail)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — An industry-based pilot flatfish survey of Georges Bank conducted aboard the F/V Mary K and the F/V Yankee Pride. The surveyed used a two-seam, two-bridle flounder...

  3. Content Analysis of Survey Feedback Meetings: An Evaluation Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-05-01

    AD-AO10 210 CONTENT ANALYSIS OF SURVEY FEEDBACK MEETINGS: AN EVALUATION TOOL Patricia A. Pecorella Michigan University Prepared for: Office of Naval...RECIPIENIT’S CATALOG NUMSEA 4, TITLE (#wtd$4bIII*) 5.&TYJ F REPORT 6PEFlIOg COVERlEO Content Analysis of Survey Feedback Meetings: Technical Report An...Ratings Coder Re1liability Evaluation Supervisory Leadership Consultant Roles Problem-Identification Survey Feedback Content Analysis Problem-Solving

  4. Reciprocal Feedback: Closing the Loop on Postactivity Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Those who conduct feedback surveys, which follow almost every CME presentation and medical-school lecture, would do well to offer participants' reciprocal feedback. That is, the course director should provide each survey respondent, on request, a brief summary of the comments received from this survey and the extent to which the recommendations will lead to objective improvements in the future. Surveyors who provide respondents with reciprocal feedback can expect heightened credibility, more reliable feedback in the future, and an added incentive to effect significant change for the better. Feedback has not circled all the way back until we have provided a succinct summary of results to those who have offered us their comments and suggestions. Let us close the loop; let reciprocal feedback become the last word in CME surveys.

  5. Data release of the LAMOST pilot survey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A-Li Luo; Jian-Nan Zhang; Shi-Hai Yang; Zheng-Qiu Yao; Yong Yu; Hui Yuan; Chao Zhai; En-Peng Zhang; Jing Zhang; Li-Ping Zhang; Wei Zhang; Yong Zhang; Zhong-Rui Bai; Zhen-Chao Zhang; Ming Zhao; Fang Zhou; Yong-Tian Zhu; Jie Zhu; Si-Cheng Zou; Xiao-Yan Chen; Feng-Fei Wang; Yan-Xin Guo; Jian-Jun Chen; Bing Du; Xiao Kong; Ya-Juan Lei; Yin-Bi Li; Hao-Tong Zhang; Yi-Han Song; Yue Wu; Yan-Xia Zhang; Xin-Lin Zhou; Fang Zuo; Peng Du; Lin He; Wen Hou; Yi-Qiao Dong; Jian Li; Yong-Heng Zhao; Guang-Wei Li; Shuang Li; Jing Song; Yuan Tian; Meng-Xin Wang; Ke-Fei Wu; Hui-Qin Yang; Hai-Long Yuan; Shu-Yun Cao; Hai-Yuan Chen; Gang Zhao; Kun-Xin Chen; Ying Chen; Jia-Ru Chu; Lei Feng; Xue-Fei Gong; Bo-Zhong Gu; Yong-Hui Hou; Zhi-Ying Huo; Hong-Zhuan Hu; Ning-Sheng Hu; Xiang-Qun Cui; Zhong-Wen Hu; Lei Jia; Fang-Hua Jiang; Xiang Jiang; Zi-Bo Jiang; Ge Jin; Ai-Hua Li; Qi Li; Xin-Nan Li; Yan Li; Guo-Ping Li; Ye-Ping Li; Gen-Rong Liu; Guan-Qun Liu; Zhi-Gang Liu; Qi-Shuai Lu; Wen-Zhi Lu; Yu Luo; Yin-Dun Mao; Li Men; Ji-Jun Ni; Yao-Quan Chu; Yong-Jun Qi; Zhao-Xiang Qi; Huo-Ming Shi; Ding-Qiang Su; Shi-Wei Sun; Hong-Jun Su; Zheng-Hong Tang; Qing-Sheng Tao; Liang-Ping Tu; Da-Qing Wang; Jian-Rong Shi; Dan Wang; Guo-Min Wang; Hai Wang; Jia-Ning Wang; Jian Wang; Jian-Ling Wang; Jian-Ping Wang; Lei Wang; Shou-Guan Wang; Shu-Qing Wang; Gang Wang; Ya-Nan Wang; You Wang; Yue-Fei Wang; Ming-Zhi Wei; Xiang-Xiang Xue; Xiao-Zheng Xing; Ling-Zhe Xu; Xin-Qi Xu; Yan Xu; De-Hua Yang

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the data release of the LAMOST pilot survey,which includes data reduction,calibration,spectral analysis,data products and data access.The accuracy of the released data and the information about the FITS headers of spectra are also introduced.The released data set includes 319 000 spectra and a catalog of these objects.

  6. The Southern H ii Region Discovery Survey (SHRDS): Pilot Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, C.; Jordan, C.; Dickey, John M.; Anderson, L. D.; Armentrout, W. P.; Balser, Dana S.; Bania, T. M.; Dawson, J. R.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Wenger, Trey V.

    2017-07-01

    The Southern H ii Region Discovery Survey is a survey of the third and fourth quadrants of the Galactic plane that will detect radio recombination line (RRL) and continuum emission at cm-wavelengths from several hundred H ii region candidates using the Australia Telescope Compact Array. The targets for this survey come from the WISE Catalog of Galactic H ii Regions and were identified based on mid-infrared and radio continuum emission. In this pilot project, two different configurations of the Compact Array Broad Band receiver and spectrometer system were used for short test observations. The pilot surveys detected RRL emission from 36 of 53 H ii region candidates, as well as seven known H ii regions that were included for calibration. These 36 recombination line detections confirm that the candidates are true H ii regions and allow us to estimate their distances.

  7. Market factors feedback system of the pilot program of the Energy Extension Service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-04-01

    The market factors feedback system of the pilot program of the Energy Extension Service are described. The description contains the plans of the 10 pilot EES states and the DOE for operating the system between December 1977 and March 1979. Chapter one contains the planned scope of the market factors feedback system during the pilot program: the target audiences, program services, likely topics of market factors feedback, and energy decision makers. Chapter two presents how the market factors feedback system will operate over the pilot program period. Chapter three summarizes the roles and functions of DOE/EXT in supporting state EES market factors feedback operations and in evaluating the program. There are three appendices. Appendix A contains the market factors feedback plans of the pilot EES states. Appendix B describes how DOE/EXT will work with national-level energy decision makers on market factors feedback received from state EESs. Appendix C is the design for the formal evaluation of the market factors feedback component of the pilot EES program. (MCW)

  8. Pilot Evaluation of Energy Savings from Residential Energy Demand Feedback Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, Danny S. [Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States); Hoak, David [Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States); Cummings, Jamie [Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This report discusses instantaneous feedback on household electrical demand has shown promise to reduce energy consumption. This report reviews past research and describes a two year pilot evaluation of a low cost residential energy feedback system installed in twenty case study homes in FL.

  9. EURObservational Research Programme: the Heart Failure Pilot Survey (ESC-HF Pilot)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maggioni, Aldo P; Dahlström, Ulf; Filippatos, Gerasimos;

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of the new ESC-HF Pilot Survey was to describe the clinical epidemiology of outpatients and inpatients with heart failure (HF) and the diagnostic/therapeutic processes applied across 12 participating European countries. This pilot study was specifically aimed at validating...... the structure, performance, and quality of the data set, for continuing the survey into a permanent registry....

  10. On-line student feedback: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liz Barnett

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Student feedback on courses has been a standard feature of university life for several years, with a substantial research backing to it (see, for example, reviews by Marsh, 1987; Marsh and Dunkin, 1992. Most feedback systems endeavour to serve more than one purpose, with student feedback forming part of the evidence used by: • individual teachers to improve teaching • heads of departments to monitor and guide individual teachers, especially part-time teachers; • course leaders for course development; • senior managers to make decisions on probation and promotion related to teaching performance; consider changes to the wider learning environment; help with the marketing of programmes; • external agencies to assess quality of provision

  11. A pilot survey of impression materials and techniques used by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A pilot survey of impression materials and techniques used by dentists in the fabrication ... AFRICAN JOURNALS ONLINE (AJOL) · Journals · Advanced Search · USING ... Objective: To assess the choice of impression material and impression ...

  12. Electrocortical reactivity to social feedback in youth: A pilot study of the Island Getaway task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Autumn Kujawa

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Peer relationships become a major concern in adolescence, yet event-related potential (ERP measures of reactivity to social feedback in adolescence are limited. In this pilot study, we tested a novel task to elicit reactivity to social feedback in youth. Participants (10–15 years old; 57.9% male; N = 19 played a game that involved exchanging personal information with peers, voting to remove players from the game, and receiving rejection and acceptance feedback from peers. Results indicated that participants modified their voting behavior in response to peer feedback, and rejection feedback was associated with a negativity in the ERP wave compared to acceptance (i.e., the feedback negativity, FN. The FN predicted behavioral patterns, such that participants who showed greater neural reactivity to social feedback were less likely to reject co-players. Preliminary analyses suggest that the task may be a useful measure of individual differences: adolescents higher in social anxiety symptoms were less likely to reject peers and showed an enhanced FN to rejection vs. acceptance feedback, and higher depressive symptoms predicted an increased FN to rejection specifically. Results suggest that the FN elicited by social feedback may be a useful, economical neural measure of social processing across development and in clinical research.

  13. EURObservational Research Programme : The Heart Failure Pilot Survey (ESC-HF Pilot)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maggioni, Aldo P.; Dahlstrom, Ulf; Filippatos, Gerasimos; Chioncel, Ovidiu; Crespo Leiro, Marisa; Drozdz, Jaroslaw; Fruhwald, Friedrich; Gullestad, Lars; Logeart, Damien; Metra, Marco; Parissis, John; Persson, Hans; Ponikowski, Piotr; Rauchhaus, Mathias; Voors, Adriaan A.; Nielsen, Olav Wendelboe; Zannad, Faiez; Tavazzi, Luigi

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of the new ESC-HF Pilot Survey was to describe the clinical epidemiology of outpatients and inpatients with heart failure (HF) and the diagnostic/therapeutic processes applied across 12 participating European countries. This pilot study was specifically aimed at validating the

  14. Flight physiology training experiences and perspectives: survey of 117 pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrão, Luís; Zorro, Sara; Silva, Jorge; Castelo-Branco, Miguel; Ribeiro, João

    2013-06-01

    Human factors and awareness of flight physiology play a crucial role in flight safety. Even so, international legislation is vague relative to training requirements in hypoxia and altitude physiology. Based on a previously developed survey, an adapted questionnaire was formulated and released online for Portuguese pilots. Specific questions regarding the need for pilot attention monitoring systems were added to the original survey. There were 117 pilots, 2 of whom were women, who completed the survey. Most of the pilots had a light aviation license and flew in unpressurized cabins at a maximum ceiling of 10,000 ft (3048 m). The majority of the respondents never experienced hypoxic symptoms. In general, most of the individuals agreed with the importance of an introductory hypoxia course without altitude chamber training (ACT) for all pilot populations, and with a pilot monitoring system in order to increase flight safety. Generally, most of the pilots felt that hypoxia education and training for unpressurized aircraft is not extensive enough. However, almost all the respondents were willing to use a flight physiology monitoring system in order to improve flight safety.

  15. Youth Gangs: Experience from a Pilot Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salagaev, A. L.; Shashkin, A. V.

    2005-01-01

    The present article is based on the results of an expert survey and a survey of young people in the schools of two Russian cities, Moscow and Kazan (2003). The study focused on making the research problem more explicit and testing the set of instruments, which was developed with the authors' participation in the framework of the Eurogang research…

  16. 2009 S. Atlantic SPCE angler pilot survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This survey collected information to assess the economic value from an anglers perspective of saltwater charter and private boat fishing for selected species in...

  17. The LOFAR Pilot Surveys for Pulsars and Fast Radio Transients

    CERN Document Server

    Coenen, Thijs; Hessels, Jason W T; Stappers, Ben W; Kondratiev, Vladislav I; Alexov, A; Breton, R P; Bilous, A; Cooper, S; Falcke, H; Fallows, R A; Gajjar, V; Grießmeier, J -M; Hassall, T E; Karastergiou, A; Keane, E F; Kramer, M; Kuniyoshi, M; Noutsos, A; Osłowski, S; Pilia, M; Serylak, M; Schrijvers, C; Sobey, C; ter Veen, S; Verbiest, J; Weltevrede, P; Wijnholds, S; Zagkouris, K; van Amesfoort, A S; Anderson, J; Asgekar, A; Avruch, I M; Bell, M E; Bentum, M J; Bernardi, G; Best, P; Bonafede, A; Breitling, F; Broderick, J; Brüggen, M; Butcher, H R; Ciardi, B; Corstanje, A; Deller, A; Duscha, S; Eislöffel, J; Fender, R; Ferrari, C; Frieswijk, W; Garrett, M A; de Gasperin, F; de Geus, E; Gunst, A W; Hamaker, J P; Heald, G; Hoeft, M; van der Horst, A; Juette, E; Kuper, G; Law, C; Mann, G; McFadden, R; McKay-Bukowski, D; McKean, J P; Munk, H; Orru, E; Paas, H; Pandey-Pommier, M; Polatidis, A G; Reich, W; Renting, A; Röttgering, H; Rowlinson, A; Scaife, A M M; Schwarz, D; Sluman, J; Smirnov, O; Swinbank, J; Tagger, M; Tang, Y; Tasse, C; Thoudam, S; Toribio, C; Vermeulen, R; Vocks, C; van Weeren, R J; Wucknitz, O; Zarka, P; Zensus, A

    2014-01-01

    We have conducted two pilot surveys for radio pulsars and fast transients with the Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR) around 140 MHz and here report on the first low-frequency fast-radio burst limit and the discovery of two new pulsars. The first survey, the LOFAR Pilot Pulsar Survey (LPPS), observed a large fraction of the northern sky, ~1.4 x 10^4 sq. deg, with 1-hr dwell times. Each observation covered ~75 sq. deg using 7 independent fields formed by incoherently summing the high-band antenna fields. The second pilot survey, the LOFAR Tied-Array Survey (LOTAS), spanned ~600 sq. deg, with roughly a 5-fold increase in sensitivity compared with LPPS. Using a coherent sum of the 6 LOFAR "Superterp" stations, we formed 19 tied-array beams, together covering 4 sq. deg per pointing. From LPPS we derive a limit on the occurrence, at 142 MHz, of dispersed radio bursts of 107 Jy for the narrowest searched burst duration of 0.66 ms. In LPPS, we re-detected 65 previously known pulsars. LOTAS discovered two pulsars, the firs...

  18. Development and Piloting of a Classroom-Focused Measurement Feedback System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeem, Erum; Cappella, Elise; Holland, Sibyl; Coccaro, Candace; Crisonino, Gerard

    2016-05-01

    The present study used a community partnered research method to develop and pilot a classroom-focused measurement feedback system (MFS) for school mental health providers to support teachers' use of effective universal and target classroom practices related to student emotional and behavioral issues. School personnel from seven urban elementary and middle school classrooms participated. Phase I involved development and refinement of the system through a baseline needs assessment and rapid-cycle feedback. Phase II involved detailed case study analysis of pre-to-post quantitative and implementation process data. Results suggest that teachers who used the dashboard along with consultation showed improvement in observed classroom organization and emotional support. Results also suggest that MFS use was tied closely to consultation dose, and that broader support at the school level was critical. Classroom-focused MFSs are a promising tool to support classroom improvement, and warrant future research focused on their effectiveness and broad applicability.

  19. La medida del feedback laboral en las organizaciones : adaptación del cuestionario Job Feedback Survey

    OpenAIRE

    García Álvarez, Ana Isabel; Ovejero Bernal, Anastasio

    1998-01-01

    Las organizaciones utilizan el feedback laboral para la socialización, entrenamiento, mejora del desempeño y dirección de sus miembros. En el presente trabajo se examinan las investigaciones que han culminado con el desarrollo del cuestionario Job Feedback Survey (Herold y Parsons, 1985) para medir el feedback laboral y así poder estudiar su impacto sobre la conducta del trabajador. El objetivo de la investigación es la traducción y adaptación de este cuestionario a nuestro país para utilizar...

  20. A survey of the sleep status among military pilots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan-er WANG

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To investigate the sleep habit, common sleep problems, level of daytime sleepiness, and sleep quality among military pilots during nighttime before flying. Methods  Random cluster sampling survey was conducted to complete the questionnaire for 1380 military pilots. Statistical analysis of data from the 1328 participants was conducted. Results  The mean nighttime sleep duration of pilots was 6.99h and the mean sleep duration during a 24-h period was 8.10h. Approximately 4.10% of the pilots slept less than 6h in a 24-h period. The incidence of moderate and severe snoring was 22.80%. The incidence of nocturnal awakening and/or early morning awakening and difficulty in initiating sleep ≥3 times/week among the pilots was 7.65% and 5.81%, respectively. Consequently, the incidence of nocturia was 4.03%. The mean score of the Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS was 5.59±4.40. ESS scores of ≥11 were taken to represent excessive daytime sleepiness, the incidence of which was 14.99%. Further, the incidence of drowsiness during a flight was 14.20%. Among the respondents, 62.53% had changed in their normal sleep schedules and habits during the night before flying. Conclusions  Pilots have diverse sleep problems and their normal sleep habits change in the night before flying, which might affect flight safety. Therefore, proper intervention for the sleep problems is recommended in pilots.

  1. How to Make Feedback More Effective? Qualitative Findings from Pilot Testing of an Audit and Feedback Report for Endoscopists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona Webster

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Audit and feedback (A/F reports are one of the few knowledge translation activities that can effect change in physician behavior. In this study, we pilot-tested an endoscopist A/F report to elicit opinions about the proposed report’s usability, acceptability and usefulness, and implications for knowledge translation. Methods. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with eleven endoscopists in Ontario, Canada. We tested an A/F report template comprising 9 validated, accepted colonoscopy quality indicators populated with simulated data. Interview transcripts were coded using techniques such as constant comparison and themes were identified inductively over several team meetings. Results. Four interrelated themes were identified: (1 overall perceptions of the A/F report; (2 accountability and consequences for poor performance; (3 motivation to change/improve skills; and (4 training for performance enhancement and available resources. The A/F report was well received; however, participants cited some possible threats to the report’s effectiveness including the perceived threat of loss of privileges or licensing and the potential for the data to be dismissed. Conclusions. Participants agreed that A/F has the potential to improve colonoscopy performance. However, in order to be effective in changing physician behavior, A/F must be thoughtfully implemented with attention to the potential concerns of its recipients.

  2. An exploratory pilot study of mechanisms of action within normative feedback for adult drinkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis Kuerbis

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. Normative feedback (NF, or receiving information about one’s drinking compared to peer drinking norms, is one of the most widely used brief interventions for prevention and intervention for hazardous alcohol use. NF has demonstrated predominantly small but significant effect sizes for intention to change and other drinking related outcomes. Identifying mechanisms of action may improve the effectiveness of NF; however, few studies have examined NF’s mechanisms of action, particularly among adults. Objective. This study is an exploratory analysis of two theorized mechanisms of NF: discrepancy (specifically personal dissonance—the affective response to feedback and belief in the accuracy of feedback. Method. Using Amazon’s Mechanical Turk, 87 men (n = 56 and women (n = 31 completed an online survey during which they were asked about their perceptions about their drinking and actual drinking behaviors. Then participants were provided tailored NF and evaluated for their reactions. Severity of discrepancy was measured by the difference between one’s estimated percentile ranking of drinking compared to peers and actual percentile ranking. Surprise and worry reported due to the discrepancy were proxies for personal dissonance. Participants were also asked if they believed the feedback and if they had any plans to change their drinking. Mediation analyses were implemented, exploring whether surprise, worry, or belief in the accuracy of feedback mediated severity of discrepancy’s impact on plan for change. Results. Among this sample of adult drinkers, severity of discrepancy did not predict plan for change, and personal dissonance did not mediate severity of discrepancy. Severity of discrepancy was mediated by belief in the accuracy of feedback. In addition, viewing one’s drinking as a problem prior to feedback and post-NF worry both predicted plan for change independently. Conclusions. Results revealed that NF may not work to

  3. Evaluation of a visual feedback system in gait retraining: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamacher, Daniel; Bertram, Dietrich; Fölsch, Cassandra; Schega, Lutz

    2012-06-01

    Abnormal gait pattern of the frontal plane (i.e. Duchenne gait and Trendelenburg gait) may be caused by a variety of diseases. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the instantaneous effect of a visual feedback system on frontal plane pelvis and trunk movements in order to use it in patients with THR in subsequent studies. A total of 24 women (45-65 years) were included in the study. According to acute functional impairments the subjects were assigned to the control group (CG, no gait disorders, n=15, age=59±11 years, BMI=27±4) or to the intervention group (IG, n=9, age=61±4, BMI=29±5), respectively. First, in Measurement 1 (M1) kinematic reference values were captured in a standardized clinical gait analysis (MVN, XSens). Afterwards, the influence of a visual real-time feedback on gait pattern was examined while using the feedback system (M2). While there was a significant difference of IG vs. CG in M1 in the mean inclination regarding pelvis and trunk movements, this was not detected in M2. Therefore it is concluded, especially in subjects with abnormal gait pattern, that the visualization leads to an improvement of the movement pattern of pelvis and trunk in the frontal plane while using the device.

  4. 77 FR 64565 - Solicitation of Feedback and Lessons-Learned from the Pilot of the Revised Construction Reactor...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-22

    ...The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC or the Commission) is soliciting feedback and lessons-learned from members of the public, licensees, and interest groups regarding the effectiveness of the revised construction reactor oversight process (cROP) as demonstrated during the pilot program currently in progress. This solicitation will allow external stakeholder to provide insights to......

  5. 75 FR 26345 - Agency Information Collection (Ethics Consultation Feedback Tool (ECFT)) New Enrollee Survey...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-11

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Ethics Consultation Feedback Tool (ECFT)) New Enrollee Survey.... 2900-New (VA Form 10-0502).'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Ethics Consultation Feedback Tool (ECFT... experience during the Ethics Consultation Service. VA will be used the data to improve the process of...

  6. Gait Training in Chronic Stroke Using Walk-Even Feedback Device: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Krishnan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Asymmetrical gait and a reduction in weight bearing on the affected side are a common finding in chronic stroke survivors. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine the effectiveness of a shoe insole device that we developed, called Walk-Even, in correcting asymmetric gait in chronic stroke survivors. Six individuals with chronic (>6 months stroke underwent 8 weeks of intervention with 2 sessions/week, each consisting of 20 minutes of gait training and 20 minutes of lower-extremity strength training. The 2 control participants underwent conventional gait training, while 4 participants underwent gait training using the Walk-Even. Following intervention, all the participants improved on most of the gait measures: peak pressure of the foot, time of transfer of weight from heel-to-forefoot, center of pressure (COP trajectory, COP velocity, asymmetry ratio of stance, mean-force-heel, mean-force-metatarsals, Timed “Up and Go,” and Activities-specific Balance Scale. The improvement was more pronounced in the 4 participants that underwent training with Walk-Even compared to the control participants. This pilot study suggests that a combination of strength and gait training with real-time feedback may reduce temporal asymmetry and enhance weight-bearing on the affected side in chronic stroke survivors. A large randomized controlled study is needed to confirm its efficacy.

  7. Pilot aerial infrared roof top survey. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-10-15

    A summary is presented of a pilot aerial infrared roof top study conducted by the Minnesota Energy Agency. Infrared surveys of 27 Minnesota cities were conducted during the fall and winter of the 1976-1977 heating season. In addition, conventional daytime color photographs were taken of several cities. Film processing was done by the Environmental Protection Agency. The University of Minnesota conducted ground tests to verify the aerial infrared imagery. Thermograph dissemination centers were established in each city and training seminars and materials were prepared and delivered to dissemination center staff. A survey of homeowners who viewed their thermograph at a dissemination center were used to determine the energy savings resulting from the program. An Aerial Infrared Program Users Manual was prepared by the Energy Agency and the Remote Sensing Institute of Brookings, South Dakota.

  8. The VLA Sky Survey (VLASS): Technical Implementation and Pilot Survey Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Steven T.; Baum, Stefi; Chandler, Claire J.; Chatterjee, Shami; Kimball, Amy E.; Lacy, Mark; Law, Casey J.; Schinzel, Frank; Arancibia, Demian; Hiriart, R.; Medlin, Drew; VLA Sky Survey Team; Survey Science Group

    2017-01-01

    The VLA Sky Survey (VLASS) is a 5520 hour project to survey the 33885 square degrees of the sky above Declination -40 degrees from 2-4 GHz at 2.5" angular resolution using the upgraded Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA). Over the survey duration of 7 years, each area of the sky will be covered in 3 epochs spaced 32 months apart, to a depth of 0.12mJy/beam rms noise per epoch and 0.07mJy/beam for 3 epochs combined. Pilot observations were taken in mid-2016, with the full survey to start in September 2017. The raw data will be available in the NRAO archive immediately with no proprietary period and science data products will be provided to the community in a timely manner. Basic Data Products (BDP) that will be produced by the survey team include: raw and calibrated visibility data, quick-look continuum images, single-epoch images and spectral image cubes, single-epoch basic object catalogs, and cumulative "static sky" images and image cubes and basic object catalogs to the full survey depth. Single-epoch and cumulative images are in intensity and linear polarization (Stokes IQU). In addition to the BDP provided by NRAO and served through the NRAO archive, there are opportunities for Enhanced Data Products and Services that are provided by the community in partnership with the VLASS team.In this presentation we describe the survey design and the Technical Implementation Plan (TIP) for the VLASS, and report on results from the VLASS Pilot observations. The pilot survey covered 2480 unique square degrees, with 2160 square degrees within the SDSS/FIRST footprint. The pilot also covered key deep fields including COSMOS, GOODS-N, CDFS, Elais-N1, and the SDSS Stripe-82. Preliminary imaging and comparisons have been carried out for selected pilot fields as part of early science verification. We also discuss the technical issues and challenges remaining to be addressed before commencing the survey and our plans moving forward. There are also opportunities for community

  9. Just Another Student Survey?--Point-of-Contact Survey Feedback Enhances the Student Experience and Lets Researchers Gather Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Warren; Boyd, William; Boyd, Wendy; Hellmundt, Suzi

    2017-01-01

    When student surveys are conducted within university environments, one outcome of feedback to the researcher is that it provides insight into the potential ways that curriculum can be modified and how content can be better delivered. However, the benefit to the current students undertaking the survey is not always evident. By modifying Biggs'…

  10. DA WHITE DWARFS OBSERVED IN THE LAMOST PILOT SURVEY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Yueyang; Deng Licai; Liu Chao; Carrell, Kenneth; Yang Fan; Gao Shuang; Xu Yan; Li Jing; Zhang Haotong; Zhao Yongheng; Luo Ali; Bai Zhongrui; Yuan Hailong [Key Lab for Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Lepine, Sebastien [Department of Astrophysics, Division of Physical Sciences, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY (United States); Newberg, Heidi Jo; Carlin, Jeffrey L. [Department of Physics, Applied Physics and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Jin Ge [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China)

    2013-08-01

    A total of {approx}640, 000 objects from the LAMOST pilot survey have been publicly released. In this work, we present a catalog of DA white dwarfs (DAWDs) from the entire pilot survey. We outline a new algorithm for the selection of white dwarfs (WDs) by fitting Sersic profiles to the Balmer H{beta}, H{gamma}, and H{delta} lines of the spectra, and calculating the equivalent width of the Ca II K line. Two thousand nine hundred sixty-four candidates are selected by constraining the fitting parameters and the equivalent width of the Ca II K line. All the spectra of candidates are visually inspected. We identify 230 DAWDs (59 of which are already included in the Villanova and SDSS WD catalogs), 20 of which are DAWDs with non-degenerate companions. In addition, 128 candidates are classified as DAWDs/subdwarfs, which means the classifications are ambiguous. The result is consistent with the expected DAWD number estimated based on the LEGUE target selection algorithm.

  11. Facilitated patient experience feedback can improve nursing care: a pilot study for a phase III cluster randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background England’s extensive NHS patient survey programme has not fulfilled government promises of widespread improvements in patients’ experiences, and media reports of poor nursing care in NHS hospitals are increasingly common. Impediments to the surveys’ impact on the quality of nursing care may include: the fact that they are not ward-specific, so nurses claim “that doesn’t happen on my ward”; nurses’ scepticism about the relevance of patient feedback to their practice; and lack of prompt communication of results. The surveys’ impact could be increased by: conducting ward-specific surveys; returning results to ward staff more quickly; including patients’ written comments in reports; and offering nurses an opportunity to discuss the feedback. Very few randomised trials have been conducted to test the effectiveness of patient feedback on quality improvement and there have been few, if any, published trials of ward-specific patient surveys. Methods Over two years, postal surveys of recent inpatients were conducted at four-monthly intervals in 18 wards in two NHS Trusts in England. Wards were randomly allocated to Basic Feedback (ward-specific printed patient survey results including patients’ written comments sent to nurses by letter); Feedback Plus (in addition to printed results, ward meetings to discuss results and plan improvements) or Control (no active feedback of survey results). Patient survey responses to questions about nursing care were used to compute wards’ average Nursing Care Scores at each interval. Nurses’ reactions to the patient feedback were recorded. Results Conducting ward-level surveys and delivering ward-specific results was feasible. Ward meetings were effective for engaging nurses and challenging scepticism and patients’ written comments stimulated interest. 4,236 (47%) patients returned questionnaires. Nursing Care Scores improved more for Feedback Plus than Basic Feedback or Control (difference between

  12. Piloting a stress management and mindfulness program for undergraduate nursing students: student feedback and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Riet, Pamela; Rossiter, Rachel; Kirby, Dianne; Dluzewska, Teresa; Harmon, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Widespread reports of high stress levels and mental health problems among university student populations indicate the use of interventions to facilitate stress reduction and support student resilience and wellbeing. There is growing evidence that regular mindfulness practice may confer positive health benefits and reduced stress levels. The aim of this pilot project was to explore the impact of a seven-week stress management and mindfulness program as a learning support and stress reduction method for nursing and midwifery students. The program was conducted at a large regional university in Australia. Fourteen first-year undergraduate nursing and midwifery students agreed to attend the program and to participate in a follow-up focus group. A descriptive qualitative design was utilised to examine the impact of the program. A semi-structured focus group interview was conducted with a thematic analysis undertaken of the transcript and process notes. Ten students completed the research component of this project by participating in the focus group interview. Three main themes capture the participants' experience: attending to self, attending to others and attending to program related challenges. Data indicate a positive impact on sleep, concentration, clarity of thought and a reduction in negative cognitions. Participants also identified challenges related to timetabling, program structure and venue. Overall, this pilot program enhanced the participants' sense of well-being. Despite the challenges, benefits were identified on a personal and professional level. Valuable feedback was provided that will be used to further develop and expand stress management and mindfulness programs offered to students attending this university. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. A survey on delayed feedback control of chaos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuping TIAN; Jiandong ZHU; Guanrong CHEN

    2005-01-01

    This paper introduces the basic idea and provides the mathematical formulation of the delayed feedback control (DFC) methodology, which has been widely used in chaos control. Stability analysis including the well-known odd number limitation of the DFC is reviewed. Some new developments in characterizing the limitation of the DFC are presented. Various modified DFC methods, which are developed in order to overcome the odd number limitation, are also described. Finally, some open problems in this research field are discussed.

  14. Feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Barbara K

    2004-12-01

    The emergency department provides a rich environment for diverse patient encounters, rapid clinical decision making, and opportunities to hone procedural skills. Well-prepared faculty can utilize this environment to teach residents and medical students and gain institutional recognition for their incomparable role and teamwork. Giving effective feedback is an essential skill for all teaching faculty. Feedback is ongoing appraisal of performance based on direct observation aimed at changing or sustaining a behavior. Tips from the literature and the author's experience are reviewed to provide formats for feedback, review of objectives, and elements of professionalism and how to deal with poorly performing students. Although the following examples pertain to medical student education, these techniques are applicable to the education of all adult learners, including residents and colleagues. Specific examples of redirection and reflection are offered, and pitfalls are reviewed. Suggestions for streamlining verbal and written feedback and obtaining feedback from others in a fast-paced environment are given. Ideas for further individual and group faculty development are presented.

  15. Survey Says: Using Teacher Feedback to Bolster Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener, Ross; Lundy, Kasia

    2014-01-01

    Many of the leading private sector organizations have for years embraced a survey approach to improving products, services, and internal policies and processes. Like these successful private sector businesses, school systems can utilize a similar survey-based approach to improving teacher evaluation. Here, the authors provide and outline some…

  16. The LEGUE disk target selection for the LAMOST pilot survey

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Li; Yu, Jincheng; Liu, Chao; Deng, Licai; Newberg, Heidi Jo; Carlin, Jeffrey L; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Yueyang; Shen, Shiyin; Zhang, Haotong; Chen, Jianjun; Chen, Yuqing; Christlieb, Norbert; Han, Zhanwen; Lee, Hsu-Tai; Liu, Xiaowei; Pan, Kaike; Shi, Jianrong; Wang, Hongchi; Zhu, Zi

    2012-01-01

    We describe the target selection algorithm for the low latitude disk portion of the LAMOST Pilot Survey, which aims to test systems in preparation for the LAMOST spectroscopic survey. We use the PPMXL (Roeser et al. 2010) astrometric catalog, which provides positions, proper motions, B/R/I magnitudes (mostly) from USNO-B (Monet et al. 2003) and J/H/Ks from The Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS, see Skrutskie et al. 2006) as well. We chose 8 plates along the Galactic plane, in the region $0^\\circ<\\alpha<67^\\circ$ and $42^\\circ<\\delta<59^\\circ$, that cover 22 known open clusters with a range of ages. Adjacent plates may have small overlapping. Each plate covers an area $2.5^\\circ$ in radius,with central star (for Shark-Hartmann guider) brighter than $\\sim8^{\\rm th}$ magnitude. For each plate, we create an input catalog in the magnitude range $11.3

  17. The Westerbork Hydrogen Accretion in Local Galaxies (HALOGAS) Survey I. Survey Description and Pilot Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Heald, George; Serra, Paolo; Zschaechner, Laura; Rand, Richard; Fraternali, Filippo; Oosterloo, Tom; Walterbos, Rene; Juette, Eva; Gentile, Gianfranco

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a new, very deep neutral hydrogen (HI) survey being performed with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT). The Westerbork Hydrogen Accretion in LOcal GAlaxieS (HALOGAS) Survey is producing an archive of some of the most sensitive HI observations available, on the angular scales which are most useful for studying faint, diffuse gas in and around nearby galaxies. The survey data are being used to perform careful modeling of the galaxies, characterizing their gas content, morphology, and kinematics, with the primary goal of revealing the global characteristics of cold gas accretion onto spiral galaxies in the local Universe. In this paper, we describe the survey sample selection, the data acquisition, reduction, and analysis, and present the data products obtained during our pilot program, which consists of UGC 2082, NGC 672, NGC 925, and NGC 4565. The observations reveal a first glimpse of the picture that the full HALOGAS project aims to illuminate: the properties of accreting HI in diffe...

  18. Effect of position feedback during task-oriented upper-limb training after stroke: Five-case pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgit I. Molier, MSc

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Feedback is an important element in motor learning during rehabilitation therapy following stroke. The objective of this pilot study was to better understand the effect of position feedback during task-oriented reach training of the upper limb in people with chronic stroke. Five subjects participated in the training for 30 minutes three times a week for 6 weeks. During training, subjects performed reaching movements over a predefined path. When deviation from this path occurred, shoulder and elbow joints received position feedback using restraining forces. We recorded the amount of position feedback used by each subject. During pre- and posttraining assessments, we collected data from clinical scales, isometric strength, and workspace of the arm. All subjects showed improvement on one or several kinematic variables during a circular motion task after training. One subject showed improvement on all clinical scales. Subjects required position feedback between 7.4% and 14.7% of training time. Although augmented feedback use was limited, kinematic outcome measures and movement performance during training increased in all subjects, which was comparable with other studies. Emphasis on movement errors at the moment they occur may possibly stimulate motor learning when movement tasks with sufficiently high levels of difficulty are applied.

  19. Real-time force feedback during flexion-distraction procedure for low back pain: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudavalli, Maruti Ram; Cox, James M

    2014-06-01

    A form of chiropractic procedure known as Cox flexion-distraction is used by chiropractors to treat low back pain. Patient lies face down on a specially designed table having a stationery thoracic support and a moveable caudal support for the legs. The Doctor of Chiropractic (DC) holds a manual contact applying forces over the posterior lumbar spine and press down on the moving leg support to create traction effects in the lumbar spine. This paper reports on the development of real-time feedback on the applied forces during the application of the flexion-distraction procedure. In this pilot study we measured the forces applied by experienced DCs as well as novice DCs in using this procedure. After a brief training with real-time feedback novice DCs have improved on the magnitude of the applied forces. This real-time feedback technology is promising to do systematic studies in training DCs during the application of this procedure.

  20. Uncovering star formation feedback and magnetism in galaxies with radio continuum surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaei, F. S.

    2017-03-01

    Recent studies show the importance of the star formation feedback in changing the energetic and structure of galaxies. Dissecting the physics of the feedback is hence crucial to understand the evolution of galaxies. Full polarization radio continuum surveys can be ideally performed to trace not only star formation but also the energetic components of the interstellar medium (ISM), the magnetic fields and cosmic ray electrons. Using the SKA precursors, we investigate the effect of the massive star formation on the ISM energy balance in nearby galaxies. Our multi-scale and multi-frequency surveys show that cosmic rays are injected in star forming regions and lose energy propagating away from their birth place. Due to the star formation feedback, cosmic ray electron population becomes younger and more energetic. Star formation also amplifies the turbulent magnetic field inserting a high pressure which is important in energy balance in the ISM and structure formation in the host galaxy.

  1. Uncovering star formation feedback and magnetism in galaxies with radio continuum surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Tabatabaei, Fatemeh S

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies show the importance of the star formation feedback in changing the energetic and structure of galaxies. Dissecting the physics of the feedback is hence crucial to understand the evolution of galaxies. Full polarization radio continuum surveys can be ideally performed to trace not only star formation but also the energetic components of the interstellar medium (ISM), the magnetic fields and cosmic ray electrons. Using the SKA precursors, we investigate the effect of the massive star formation on the ISM energy balance in nearby galaxies. Our multi-scale and multi-frequency surveys show that cosmic rays are injected in star forming regions and lose energy propagating away from their birth place. Due to the star formation feedback, cosmic ray electron population becomes younger and more energetic. Star formation also amplifies the turbulent magnetic field inserting a high pressure which is important in energy balance in the ISM and structure formation in the host galaxy.

  2. Effects of interactive visual feedback training on post-stroke pusher syndrome: a pilot randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yea-Ru; Chen, Yi-Hua; Chang, Heng-Chih; Chan, Rai-Chi; Wei, Shun-Hwa; Wang, Ray-Yau

    2015-10-01

    We investigated the effects of a computer-generated interactive visual feedback training program on the recovery from pusher syndrome in stroke patients. Assessor-blinded, pilot randomized controlled study. A total of 12 stroke patients with pusher syndrome were randomly assigned to either the experimental group (N = 7, computer-generated interactive visual feedback training) or control group (N = 5, mirror visual feedback training). The scale for contraversive pushing for severity of pusher syndrome, the Berg Balance Scale for balance performance, and the Fugl-Meyer assessment scale for motor control were the outcome measures. Patients were assessed pre- and posttraining. A comparison of pre- and posttraining assessment results revealed that both training programs led to the following significant changes: decreased severity of pusher syndrome scores (decreases of 4.0 ± 1.1 and 1.4 ± 1.0 in the experimental and control groups, respectively); improved balance scores (increases of 14.7 ± 4.3 and 7.2 ± 1.6 in the experimental and control groups, respectively); and higher scores for lower extremity motor control (increases of 8.4 ± 2.2 and 5.6 ± 3.3 in the experimental and control groups, respectively). Furthermore, the computer-generated interactive visual feedback training program produced significantly better outcomes in the improvement of pusher syndrome (p visual feedback training program. Although both training programs were beneficial, the computer-generated interactive visual feedback training program more effectively aided recovery from pusher syndrome compared with mirror visual feedback training. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Results and recommendations from the helicopter EMS pilot safety survey 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dery, MarkAlain; Hustuit, Jack; Boschert, Greg; Wish, John

    2007-01-01

    In 2005, the Pilot Safety Study Group (PSSG), consisting of members of the Association of Air Medical Services Research Committee, wrote, distributed, and analyzed a survey of helicopter pilots regarding their knowledge, attitude, and perspectives on safety in the field of air medical transport. The Pilot Safety Survey 2005 (PSS2005) was based on another survey--one that was sponsored by Helicopter Association International (HAI) and National EMS Pilots Association (NEMSPA) and administered to pilots in 2001. The PSS2005 pared questions down so that the survey could be completed in 15 minutes on the internet, and the answers were organized in a manner to simplify analysis. An electronic link to the survey was distributed in a non-randomized fashion to HEMS pilots using the mailing lists of various operators and HEMS programs. Questions were clustered into eight groupings of safety, with a majority of responses being categorical, lending themselves to cross-tabulations. The information gathered indicated that Helicopter EMS (HEMS) pilots are very experienced, with the average pilot logging 6,625 flight hours. Collectively, they took responsibility for HEMS accidents; with 92% of total respondents citing "pushing weather minimums" and 82% citing "pilot decision making" as the main reasons for crashes. Crew resource management (CRM) was well appreciated by the pilots; there appeared to be a positive correlation with programs that offer their employees CRM and the pilots' general perspective on safety. The survey was also clear that amongst 40% of the respondents, mission-oriented training needs improvement, and 74% responded that more realistic training in flight simulators would improve safety overall. Finally, 57% of the pilots both desired night vision goggles or devices (NVG/NVD) and believed that their usage would improve safety in the field of air medical transport (55% vs 45%, P = .0025). Although the recommendations from the PSS2005 are lacking in definite

  4. Psychiatry Residents' Use of Educational Websites: A Pilot Survey Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torous, John; Franzan, Jamie; O'Connor, Ryan; Mathew, Ian; Keshavan, Matcheri; Kitts, Robert; Boland, Robert

    2015-12-01

    Psychiatry residents have numerous online educational resources readily available to them although currently there are no data regarding residents' use and perception of such websites. A survey was offered to 62 residents from all four years of training as well as recent graduates of a single psychiatry residency training program. Residents reported utilizing online resources on average 68 % of the time, in comparison to 32 % on average for printed materials. Residents reported UpToDate, PubMed, and Wikipedia as the most visited websites and ranked each highly but for different purposes. Thirty-five percent of residents felt that insufficient faculty guidance was a barrier to use of these educational websites. Pilot data indicate psychiatry residents use online resources daily for their education in various settings. Resident perceptions of individual website's trustworthiness, ease of use, and sources of clinical decision-making and personal learning suggest potential opportunities for educators to better understand the current use of these resources in residency training. Reported barriers including lack of faculty guidance suggest opportunities for academic psychiatry. Further study is necessary at multiple sites before such results may be generalized.

  5. The SMARTER pilot study: Testing feasibility of real-time feedback for dietary self-monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lora E. Burke

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Self-monitoring (SM of food intake is central to weight loss treatment. Technology makes it possible to reinforce this behavior change strategy by providing real-time feedback (FB tailored to the diary entry. To test the feasibility of providing 1–4 daily FB messages tailored to dietary recordings via a smartphone, we conducted a 12-week pilot randomized clinical trial in Pittsburgh, PA in US in 2015. We compared 3 groups: SM using the Lose It! smartphone app (Group 1; SM + FB (Group 2; and SM + FB + attending three in-person group sessions (Group 3. The sample (N = 39 was mostly white and female with a mean body mass index of 33.76 kg/m2. Adherence to dietary SM was recorded daily, weight was assessed at baseline and 12 weeks. The mean percentage of days adherent to dietary SM was similar among Groups 1, 2, and 3 (p = 0.66 at 53.50% vs. 55.86% vs. 65.33%, respectively. At 12 weeks, all groups had a significant percent weight loss (p < 0.05, with no differences among groups (−2.85% vs. −3.14% vs. −3.37% (p = 0.95; 26% of the participants lost ≥ 5% of their baseline weight. Mean retention was 74% with no differences among groups (p = 0.37. All groups adhered to SM at levels comparable to or better than other weight loss studies and lost acceptable amounts of weight, with minimal intervention contact over 12 weeks. These preliminary findings suggest this 3-group approach testing SM alone vs. SM with real-time FB messages alone or supplemented with limited in-person group sessions warrants further testing in a larger, more diverse sample and for a longer intervention period.

  6. Do 360-degree Feedback Survey Results Relate to Patient Satisfaction Measures?

    OpenAIRE

    Hageman, Michiel G. J. S.; Ring, David C.; Gregory, Paul J.; Rubash, Harry E.; Harmon, Larry

    2014-01-01

    Background There is evidence that feedback from 360-degree surveys—combined with coaching—can improve physician team performance and quality of patient care. The Physicians Universal Leadership-Teamwork Skills Education (PULSE) 360 is one such survey tool that is used to assess work colleagues’ and coworkers’ perceptions of a physician’s leadership, teamwork, and clinical practice style. The Clinician & Group-Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and System (CG-CAHPS), developed by the ...

  7. Effect of auditory feedback differs according to side of hemiparesis: a comparative pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bensmail Djamel

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Following stroke, patients frequently demonstrate loss of motor control and function and altered kinematic parameters of reaching movements. Feedback is an essential component of rehabilitation and auditory feedback of kinematic parameters may be a useful tool for rehabilitation of reaching movements at the impairment level. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of 2 types of auditory feedback on the kinematics of reaching movements in hemiparetic stroke patients and to compare differences between patients with right (RHD and left hemisphere damage (LHD. Methods 10 healthy controls, 8 stroke patients with LHD and 8 with RHD were included. Patient groups had similar levels of upper limb function. Two types of auditory feedback (spatial and simple were developed and provided online during reaching movements to 9 targets in the workspace. Kinematics of the upper limb were recorded with an electromagnetic system. Kinematics were compared between groups (Mann Whitney test and the effect of auditory feedback on kinematics was tested within each patient group (Friedman test. Results In the patient groups, peak hand velocity was lower, the number of velocity peaks was higher and movements were more curved than in the healthy group. Despite having a similar clinical level, kinematics differed between LHD and RHD groups. Peak velocity was similar but LHD patients had fewer velocity peaks and less curved movements than RHD patients. The addition of auditory feedback improved the curvature index in patients with RHD and deteriorated peak velocity, the number of velocity peaks and curvature index in LHD patients. No difference between types of feedback was found in either patient group. Conclusion In stroke patients, side of lesion should be considered when examining arm reaching kinematics. Further studies are necessary to evaluate differences in responses to auditory feedback between patients with lesions in opposite

  8. Dopaminergic medication modulates learning from feedback and error-related negativity in Parkinson’s disease: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Volpato

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine systems mediate key aspects of reward learning. Parkinson’s disease (PD represents a valuable model to study reward mechanisms because both the disease process and the anti-Parkinson medications influence dopamine neurotransmission. The aim of this pilot study was to investigate whether the level of levodopa differently modulates learning from positive and negative feedback and its electrophysiological correlate, the error related negativity (ERN, in PD. Ten PD patients and ten healthy participants performed a two-stage reinforcement learning task. In the Learning Phase they had to learn the correct stimulus within a stimulus pair on the basis of a probabilistic positive or negative feedback. Three sets of stimulus pairs were used. In the Testing Phase the participants were tested with novel combinations of the stimuli previously experienced to evaluate whether they learned more from positive or negative feedback. PD patients performed the task both ON- and OFF-levodopa in two separate sessions while they remained on stable therapy with dopamine agonists. The electroencephalogram was recorded during the task. PD patients were less accurate in negative than positive learning both OFF- and ON-levodopa. In the OFF-levodopa state they were less accurate than controls in negative learning. PD patients had a smaller ERN amplitude OFF- than ON-levodopa only in negative learning. In the OFF-levodopa state they had a smaller ERN amplitude than controls in negative learning. We hypothesize that high tonic dopaminergic stimulation due to the dopamine agonist medication, combined to the low level of phasic dopamine due to the OFF-levodopa state, could prevent phasic dopamine dips indicated by the ERN needed for learning from negative feedback.

  9. Audio Feedback -- Better Feedback?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelkel, Susanne; Mello, Luciane V.

    2014-01-01

    National Student Survey (NSS) results show that many students are dissatisfied with the amount and quality of feedback they get for their work. This study reports on two case studies in which we tried to address these issues by introducing audio feedback to one undergraduate (UG) and one postgraduate (PG) class, respectively. In case study one…

  10. Effects of Quantitative Linguistic Feedback to Caregivers of Young Children: A Pilot Study in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiwen; Xu, Xiaojuan; Jiang, Fan; Gilkerson, Jill; Xu, Dongxin; Richards, Jeffrey A.; Harnsberger, James; Topping, Keith J.

    2015-01-01

    Changes in natural language environments of families receiving quantitative language feedback in Shanghai were investigated. Volunteer parents of 22 children aged 5 to 30 months were recruited from a hospital and a learning center. Quantitative measures of adult word count and conversational turns with children were collected regularly over 6…

  11. Effects of Quantitative Linguistic Feedback to Caregivers of Young Children: A Pilot Study in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiwen; Xu, Xiaojuan; Jiang, Fan; Gilkerson, Jill; Xu, Dongxin; Richards, Jeffrey A.; Harnsberger, James; Topping, Keith J.

    2015-01-01

    Changes in natural language environments of families receiving quantitative language feedback in Shanghai were investigated. Volunteer parents of 22 children aged 5 to 30 months were recruited from a hospital and a learning center. Quantitative measures of adult word count and conversational turns with children were collected regularly over 6…

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: MALT90 pilot survey (Foster+, 2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, J. B.; Jackson, J. M.; Barnes, P. J.; Barris, E.; Brooks, K.; Cunningham, M.; Finn, S. C.; Fuller, G. A.; Longmore, S. N.; Mascoop, J. L.; Peretto, N.; Rathborne, J.; Sanhueza, P.; Schuller, F.; Wyrowski, F.

    2012-01-01

    We used six different input catalogs for selecting sources; three were lists that we produced for our pilot survey and three were based on pre-existing catalogs (Walsh et al. (2008PASA...25..105W), Beltran et al. (2006, Cat. J/A+A/447/221) and Schuller et al. (2009A&A...504..415S)). From these lists we chose 20-40 sources near integer Galactic longitudes covering the range of longitudes accessible from Mopra. We carried out observations for the MALT90 pilot survey in the austral winter of 2009 from June 15 to 24, the OTF mapping mode of Mopra. (3 data files).

  13. Do 360-degree feedback survey results relate to patient satisfaction measures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hageman, Michiel G J S; Ring, David C; Gregory, Paul J; Rubash, Harry E; Harmon, Larry

    2015-05-01

    There is evidence that feedback from 360-degree surveys-combined with coaching-can improve physician team performance and quality of patient care. The Physicians Universal Leadership-Teamwork Skills Education (PULSE) 360 is one such survey tool that is used to assess work colleagues' and coworkers' perceptions of a physician's leadership, teamwork, and clinical practice style. The Clinician & Group-Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and System (CG-CAHPS), developed by the US Department of Health and Human Services to serve as the benchmark for quality health care, is a survey tool for patients to provide feedback that is based on their recent experiences with staff and clinicians and soon will be tied to Medicare-based compensation of participating physicians. Prior research has indicated that patients and coworkers often agree in their assessment of physicians' behavioral patterns. The goal of the current study was to determine whether 360-degree, also called multisource, feedback provided by coworkers could predict patient satisfaction/experience ratings. A significant relationship between these two forms of feedback could enable physicians to take a more proactive approach to reinforce their strengths and identify any improvement opportunities in their patient interactions by reviewing feedback from team members. An automated 360-degree software process may be a faster, simpler, and less resource-intensive approach than telephoning and interviewing patients for survey responses, and it potentially could facilitate a more rapid credentialing or quality improvement process leading to greater fiscal and professional development gains for physicians. Our primary research question was to determine if PULSE 360 coworkers' ratings correlate with CG-CAHPS patients' ratings of overall satisfaction, recommendation of the physician, surgeon respect, and clarity of the surgeon's explanation. Our secondary research questions were to determine whether CG-CAHPS scores

  14. Leadership development in a professional medical society using 360-degree survey feedback to assess emotional intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Paul J; Robbins, Benjamin; Schwaitzberg, Steven D; Harmon, Larry

    2016-12-30

    The current research evaluated the potential utility of a 360-degree survey feedback program for measuring leadership quality in potential committee leaders of a professional medical association (PMA). Emotional intelligence as measured by the extent to which self-other agreement existed in the 360-degree survey ratings was explored as a key predictor of leadership quality in the potential leaders. A non-experimental correlational survey design was implemented to assess the variation in leadership quality scores across the sample of potential leaders. A total of 63 of 86 (76%) of those invited to participate did so. All potential leaders received feedback from PMA Leadership, PMA Colleagues, and PMA Staff and were asked to complete self-ratings regarding their behavior. Analyses of variance revealed a consistent pattern of results as Under-Estimators and Accurate Estimators-Favorable were rated significantly higher than Over-Estimators in several leadership behaviors. Emotional intelligence as conceptualized in this study was positively related to overall performance ratings of potential leaders. The ever-increasing roles and potential responsibilities for PMAs suggest that these organizations should consider multisource performance reviews as these potential future PMA executives rise through their organizations to assume leadership positions with profound potential impact on healthcare. The current findings support the notion that potential leaders who demonstrated a humble pattern or an accurate pattern of self-rating scored significantly higher in their leadership, teamwork, and interpersonal/communication skills than those with an aggrandizing self-rating.

  15. Musculoskeletal impairment survey in Rwanda: Design of survey tool, survey methodology, and results of the pilot study (a cross sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simms Victoria

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Musculoskeletal impairment (MSI is an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, especially in developing countries. Prevalence studies for MSI in the developing world have used varying methodologies and are seldom directly comparable. This study aimed to develop a new tool to screen for and diagnose MSI and to pilot test the methodology for a national survey in Rwanda. Methods A 7 question screening tool to identify cases of MSI was developed through literature review and discussions with healthcare professionals. To validate the tool, trained rehabilitation technicians screened 93 previously identified gold standard 'cases' and 86 'non cases'. Sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value were calculated. A standardised examination protocol was developed to determine the aetiology and diagnosis of MSI for those who fail the screening test. For the national survey in Rwanda, multistage cluster random sampling, with probability proportional to size procedures will be used for selection of a cross-sectional, nationally representative sample of the population. Households to be surveyed will be chosen through compact segment sampling and all individuals within chosen households will be screened. A pilot survey of 680 individuals was conducted using the protocol. Results: The screening tool demonstrated 99% sensitivity and 97% specificity for MSI, and a positive predictive value of 98%. During the pilot study 468 out of 680 eligible subjects (69% were screened. 45 diagnoses were identified in 38 persons who were cases of MSI. The subjects were grouped into categories based on diagnostic subgroups of congenital (1, traumatic (17, infective (2 neurological (6 and other acquired(19. They were also separated into mild (42.1%, moderate (42.1% and severe (15.8% cases, using an operational definition derived from the World Health Organisation's International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health

  16. A Pharmaceutical Bioethics Consultation Service: Six-Year Descriptive Characteristics and Results of a Feedback Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Campen, Luann E; Allen, Albert J; Watson, Susan B; Therasse, Donald G

    2015-04-03

    Background: Bioethics consultations are conducted in varied settings, including hospitals, universities, and other research institutions, but there is sparse information about bioethics consultations conducted in corporate settings such as pharmaceutical companies. The purpose of this article is to describe a bioethics consultation service at a pharmaceutical company, to report characteristics of consultations completed by the service over a 6-year period, and to share results of a consultation feedback survey. Methods: Data on the descriptive characteristics of bioethics consultations were collected from 2008 to 2013 and analyzed in Excel 2007. Categorical data were analyzed via the pivot table function, and time-based variables were analyzed via formulas. The feedback survey was administered to consultation requesters from 2009 to 2012 and also analyzed in Excel 2007. Results: Over the 6-year period, 189 bioethics consultations were conducted. The number of consultations increased from five per year in 2008 to approximately one per week in 2013. During this time, the format of the consultation service was changed from a committee-only approach to a tiered approach (tailored to the needs of the case). The five most frequent topics were informed consent, early termination of a clinical trial, benefits and risks, human biological samples, and patient rights. The feedback survey results suggest the consultation service is well regarded overall and viewed as approachable, helpful, and responsive. Conclusions: Pharmaceutical bioethics consultation is a unique category of bioethics consultation that primarily focuses on pharmaceutical research and development but also touches on aspects of clinical ethics, business ethics, and organizational ethics. Results indicate there is a demand for a tiered bioethics consultation service within this pharmaceutical company and that advice was valued. This company's experience indicates that a bioethics consultation service raises

  17. Analysis of Pilot Feedback Regarding the Use of State Awareness Technologies During Complex Situations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Emory; Young, Steven D.; Daniels, Taumi; Santiago-Espada, Yamira; Etherington, Tim

    2016-01-01

    A flight simulation study was conducted at NASA Langley Research Center to evaluate flight deck systems that (1) predict aircraft energy state and/or autoflight configuration, (2) present the current state and expected future state of automated systems, and/or (3) show the state of flight-critical data systems in use by automated systems and primary flight instruments. Four new technology concepts were evaluated vis-à-vis current state-of-the-art flight deck systems and indicators. This human-in-the-loop study was conducted using commercial airline crews. Scenarios spanned a range of complex conditions and several emulated causal factors and complexity in recent accidents involving loss of state awareness by pilots (e.g. energy state, automation state, and/or system state). Data were collected via questionnaires administered after each flight, audio/video recordings, physiological data, head and eye tracking data, pilot control inputs, and researcher observations. This paper strictly focuses on findings derived from the questionnaire responses. It includes analysis of pilot subjective measures of complexity, decision making, workload, situation awareness, usability, and acceptability.

  18. The LEGUE high latitude bright survey design for the LAMOST pilot survey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue-Yang Zhang; Shuang Gao; Norbert Christlieb; Zhan-Wen Han; Jin-Liang Hou; Hsu-Tai Lee; Xiao-Wei Liu; Kai-Ke Pan; Hong-Chi Wang; Jeffrey L.Carlin; Fan Yang; Chao Liu; Li-Cai Deng; Heidi Jo Newberg; Hao-Tong Zhang; Sébastien Lépine; Yan Xu

    2012-01-01

    We describe the footprint and input catalog for bright nights in the LAMOST Pilot Survey,which began in October 2011.Targets are selected from two stripes in the north and south Galactic Cap regions,centered at δ =29°,with 10° width in declination,covering right ascensions of 135°to 290°and-30°to 30°respectively.We selected spectroscopic targets from a combination of the SDSS and 2MASS point source catalogs.The catalog of stars defining the field centers(as required by the Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor at the center of the LAMOST field)consists of all V < 8m stars from the Hipparcos catalog.We employ a statistical selection algorithm that assigns priorities to targets based on their positions in multidimensional color/magnitude space.This scheme overemphasizes rare objects and de-emphasizes more populated regions of magnitude and color phase space,while ensuring a smooth,well-understood selection function.A demonstration of plate design is presented based on the Shack-Hartmann star catalog and an input catalog that was generated by our target selection routines.

  19. Constructing a survey over time: Audio-visual feedback and theatre sketches in rural Mali

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Véronique Hertrich

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge dissemination is an emerging issue in population studies, both in terms of ethics and data quality. The challenge is especially important in long term follow-up surveys and it requires methodological imagination when the population is illiterate. The paper presents the dissemination project developed in a demographic surveillance system implemented in rural Mali over the last 20 years. After basic experience of document transfer, the feedback strategy was developed through audiovisual shows and theatre sketches. The advantages and drawbacks of these media are discussed, in terms of scientific communication and the construction of dialogue with the target population.

  20. Integrating alcohol response feedback in a brief intervention for young adult heavy drinkers who smoke: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridberg, Daniel J; Cao, Dingcai; King, Andrea C

    2015-10-01

    More effective approaches are needed to enhance drinking and other health behavior (e.g., smoking) outcomes of alcohol brief intervention (BI). Young adult heavy drinkers often engage in other health risk behaviors and show sensitivity to alcohol's stimulating and rewarding effects, which predicts future alcohol-related problems. However, standard alcohol BIs do not address these issues. The current pilot study tested the utility of including feedback on alcohol response phenotype to improve BI outcomes among young adult heavy drinkers who smoke (HDS). Thirty-three young adult (M±SD age=23.8±2.1 years) HDS (8.7±4.3 binge episodes/month; 23.6±6.3 smoking days/month) were randomly assigned to standard alcohol BI (BI-S; n=11), standard alcohol BI with personalized alcohol response feedback (BI-ARF; n=10), or a health behavior attention control BI (AC; n=11). Alcohol responses (stimulation, sedation, reward, and smoking urge) for the BI-ARF were recorded during a separate alcohol challenge session (.8g/kg). Outcomes were past-month drinking and smoking behavior assessed at 1- and 6-months post-intervention. At 6-month follow-up, the BI-ARF produced significant reductions in binge drinking, alcohol-smoking co-use, drinking quantity and frequency, and smoking frequency, but not maximum drinks per occasion, relative to baseline. Overall, the BI-ARF produced larger reductions in drinking/smoking behaviors at follow-up than did the BI-S or AC. Including personalized feedback on alcohol response phenotype may improve BI outcomes for young adult HDS. Additional research is warranted to enhance and refine this approach in a broader sample. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Falls prevention advice and visual feedback to those at risk of falling: study protocol for a pilot randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies have shown that functional strength and balance exercises can reduce the risk of falling in older people if they are done on a regular basis. However, the repetitive nature of these exercises; combined with the inherent lack of feedback of progress may discourage seniors from exercising in the home, thereby rendering such an intervention ineffective. This study hypothesizes that the use of visual feedback and multimodal games will be more effective in encouraging adherence to home rehabilitation than standard care; thereby promoting independence and improving the quality of life in older adults at risk of falling. Methods A pllel-group pilot randomized controlled trial with 3 groups of participants will be conducted in the home for 12 weeks. Participants will include older adults who have been identified as at risk of falling (n = 48), over the age of 65, living in the community, and suitable for a home exercise intervention. The primary outcome is adherence to exercise. Secondary outcomes include: variability in stride length, stride time and double support time (DST); walking speed; Timed up and go test (TUG); Falls Efficacy Scale International (FES-I); CONFbal scale; Romberg’s test; and quality of life measures (SF-12 and EuroQol EQ-5D). Qualitative assessments on personal experiences with rehabilitation tools will be done before and after the trial. Discussion This study will investigate the use of visual feedback and engaging multimodal activities to address the problem of non-compliance to home exercises for falls rehabilitation. One of the unique qualities of this study is the adaptation of special participatory design methods through which the end users (fallers) will be involved in the design of the proposed rehabilitation tools at various stages of the design process. Trial registration ISRCTN79967470 PMID:23510162

  2. User feedback on the MSF tele-expertise service after a four-year pilot trial –- a comprehensive analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent eBONNARDOT

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We surveyed all users of the MSF tele-expertise service, approximately four years after it began operation. The survey contained 50 questions and was sent to 294 referrers and 254 specialists. There were 163 responses (response rate 30%. There were no significant differences between the responses from French and English users, so the responses were combined for subsequent analysis. Most of the responders were doctors (133 of 157 who answered that question, and most had completed field missions for MSF, i.e. both specialists and referrers. The majority stated that the system was user-friendly, and that they found it self-explanatory (i.e. they did not need to be shown how to use it. Almost all the referrers found that the telemedicine advice they received was helpful, and changed diagnosis, management and/or reassured the patient. Similar feedback came from the specialists, who also felt that there was educational value for the field doctor. Although there was general satisfaction with the service, the survey identified various problems. The main concerns -- raised by referrers was the lack of promotion of system at headquarters' level, and for specialists, the lack of feedback about patient follow up. Nonetheless, both referrers and specialists recognised the benefits of telemedicine in improving patient management, the provision of education and the reduction of isolation in the field.

  3. Working Conditions of Foreign Language Teachers: Results from a Pilot Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Gomez, Coral; Albright, Jeremy J.

    2009-01-01

    Recent research has consistently shown that teacher working conditions are highly predictive of faculty turnover and student performance. However, very little work investigates specifically the experiences of foreign-language instructors. This paper reports results from a pilot survey of language teachers in public and private schools from across…

  4. Factors influencing trainers' feedback-giving behavior: a cross-sectional survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelgrim, E.A.M.; Kramer, A.W.M.; Mokkink, H.G.A.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The literature provides some insight into the role of feedback givers, but little information about within-trainer factors influencing 'feedback-giving behaviours'. We looked for relationships between characteristics of feedback givers (self-efficacy, task perception, neuroticism,

  5. Cadence Feedback With ECE PEDO to Monitor Physical Activity Intensity: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardic, Fusun; Göcer, Esra

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the monitoring capabilities of the equipment for clever exercise pedometer (ECE PEDO) that provides audible feedback when the person exceeds the upper and lower limits of the target step numbers per minute and to compare step counts with Yamax SW-200 (YX200) as the criterion pedometer.A total of 30 adult volunteers (15 males and 15 females) were classified as normal weight (n = 10), overweight (n = 10), and obese (n = 10). After the submaximal exercise test on a treadmill, the moderate intensity for walking was determined by using YX200 pedometer and then the number of steps taken in a minute was measured. Lower and upper limits of steps per minute (cadence) were recorded in ECE PEDO providing audible feedback when the person's walking speed gets out of the limits. Volunteers walked for 30 minutes in the individual step count range by attaching the ECE PEDO and YX200 pedometer on both sides of the waist belt in the same session. Step counts of the volunteers were recorded. Wilcoxon, Spearman correlation, and Bland-Altman analyses were performed to show the relationship and agreement between the results of 2 devices.Subjects took an average of 3511 ± 426 and 3493 ± 399 steps during 30 minutes with ECE PEDO and criterion pedometer, respectively. About 3500 steps taken by ECE PEDO reflected that this pedometer has capability of identifying steps per minute to meet moderate intensity of physical activity. There was a strong correlation between step counts of both devices (P PEDO and YX200 pedometer in the Bland-Altman analysis.Although both devices showed a strong similarity in counting steps, the ECE PEDO provides monitoring of intensity such that a person can walk in a specified time with a desired speed.

  6. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site gravity survey and interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrows, L.J.; Fett, J.D.

    1983-04-01

    A portion of the WIPP site has been extensively surveyed with high-precision gravity. The main survey (in T22S, R31E) covered a rectangular area 2 by 4-1/3 mi encompassing all of WIPP site Zone II and part of the disturbed zone to the north of the site. Stations were at 293-ft intervals along 13 north-south lines 880 ft apart. The data are considered accurate to within a few hundredths of a milligal. Long-wavelength gravity anomalies correlate well with seismic time structures on horizons below the Castile Formation. Both the gravity anomalies and the seismic time structures are interpreted as resulting from related density and velocity variations within the Ochoan Series. Shorter wavelength negative gravity anomalies are interpreted as resulting from bulk density alteration in the vicinity of karst conduits. The WIPP gravity survey was unable to resolve low-amplitude, long-wavelength anomalies that should result from the geologic structures within the disturbed zone. It did indicate the degree and character of karst development within the surveyed area.

  7. The MAGNUM survey: positive feedback in the nuclear region of NGC 5643 suggested by MUSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresci, G.; Marconi, A.; Zibetti, S.; Risaliti, G.; Carniani, S.; Mannucci, F.; Gallazzi, A.; Maiolino, R.; Balmaverde, B.; Brusa, M.; Capetti, A.; Cicone, C.; Feruglio, C.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Nagao, T.; Oliva, E.; Salvato, M.; Sani, E.; Tozzi, P.; Urrutia, T.; Venturi, G.

    2015-10-01

    We study the ionization and kinematics of the ionized gas in the nuclear region of the barred Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC 5643 using MUSE integral field observations in the framework of the Measuring Active Galactic Nuclei Under MUSE Microscope (MAGNUM) survey. The data were used to identify regions with different ionization conditions and to map the gas density and the dust extinction. We find evidence for a double-sided ionization cone, possibly collimated by a dusty structure surrounding the nucleus. At the center of the ionization cone, outflowing ionized gas is revealed as a blueshifted, asymmetric wing of the [OIII] emission line, up to projected velocity v10 ~ -450 km s-1. The outflow is also seen as a diffuse, low-luminosity radio and X-ray jet, with similar extension. The outflowing material points in the direction of two clumps characterized by prominent line emission with spectra typical of HII regions, located at the edge of the dust lane of the bar. We propose that the star formation in the clumps is due to positive feedback induced by gas compression by the nuclear outflow, providing the first candidate for outflow-induced star formation in a Seyfert-like, radio-quiet AGN. This suggests that positive feedback may be a relevant mechanism in shaping the black hole-host galaxy coevolution. This work is based on observations made at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile (ESO program 60.A-9339).

  8. First Science Verification of the VLA Sky Survey Pilot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, Amy

    2017-01-01

    My research involved analyzing test images by Steve Myers for the upcoming VLA Sky Survey. This survey will cover the entire sky visible from the VLA site in S band (2-4 GHz). The VLA will be in B configuration for the survey, as it was when the test images were produced, meaning a resolution of approximately 2.5 arcseconds. Conducted using On-the-Fly mode, the survey will have a speed of approximately 20 deg2 hr-1 (including overhead). New Python imaging scripts are being developed and improved to process the VLASS images. My research consisted of comparing a continuum test image over S band (from the new imaging scripts) to two previous images of the same region of the sky (from the CNSS and FIRST surveys), as well as comparing the continuum image to single spectral windows (from the new imaging scripts and of the same sky region). By comparing our continuum test image to images from CNSS and FIRST, we tested on-the-Fly mode and the imaging script used to produce our images. Another goal was to test whether individual spectral windows could be used in combination to calculate spectral indices close to those produced over S band (based only on our continuum image). Our continuum image contained 64 sources as opposed to the 99 sources found in the CNSS image. The CNSS image also had lower noise level (0.095 mJy/beam compared to 0.119 mJy/beam). Additionally, when our continuum image was compared to the CNSS image, separation showed no dependence on total flux density (in our continuum image). At lower flux densities, sources in our image were brighter than the same ones in the CNSS image. When our continuum image was compared to the FIRST catalog, the spectral index difference showed no dependence on total flux (in our continuum image). In conclusion, the quality of our images did not completely match the quality of the CNSS and FIRST images. More work is needed in developing the new imaging scripts.

  9. Effectiveness of a perceptual - proprioceptive training with virtual visual feedback in healthy subjects: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Vando

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: the aim of this pilot study was to evaluate whether proprioceptive-motor training using the Wii Balance Board (WBB might improve postural sway in healthy subjects.Methods: twenty-five healthy subjects were trained for six weeks (two sessions per week with 5 “video games”: Wii Fit Plus (WFP program. Before and after training: Basic Balance, Single-leg Balance, Agility, Stability and Motion (lower limb: right-left and both leg were measured using the Wii Balance Board.Results: the Wilcoxon Test showed improvements at the end of the training program compared to the baseline conditions. Basic Balance increased during the WFP (33.33% and was associated with a 19.92% decrease in center of pressure (COP lenght. The Single-leg Balance results incremented after the WFP (left 29.09% vs. right 47.92% and accompanied by a decrement in COP (left 28.71% vs. right 30.45%. The values for the Agility test increased both in WFP and COP (28.57% and 58.57%, respectively. The Stability test scores increased in the WFP (66.67% along with a consequent decrease in COP (10.53%. Finally, the Motion test values increased in the WFP (73.17%, whilst COP for this test decreased (12.02%. These results indicate that 6 weeks of virtual training produced a good adaptability. Younger participants (<20 years demonstrated to be more responsive to dynamic stimulation with respect to those >20 years.Conclusions: significant improvements in all participants were observed, indicating that virtual training can influence posture and balance in healthy people. Because of its characteristics of low cost and easy availability, a portable system for balance training for everyone offers the possibility to more readily measure motor skill and to gauge improvement.

  10. The ALFALFA HI Absorption Pilot Survey: A Wide-Area Blind Damped Lyman Alpha System Survey of the Local Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Darling, Jeremy; Haynes, Martha P; Giovanelli, Riccardo

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of a pilot survey for neutral hydrogen (HI) 21 cm absorption in the Arecibo Legacy Fast Arecibo L-Band Feed Array (ALFALFA) Survey. This project is a wide-area "blind" search for HI absorption in the local universe, spanning -650 km/s = 2x10^20 cm^-2) is Delta z = 7.0 (129 objects, assuming T_s = 100 K and covering fraction unity); for super-DLAs (N_HI >= 2x10^21 cm^-2) it is Delta z= 128.2 (2353 objects). We re-detect the intrinsic HI absorption line in UGC 6081 but detect no intervening absorption line systems. We compute a 95% confidence upper limit on the column density frequency distribution function f(N_HI,X) spanning four orders of magnitude in column density, 10^19 (T_s/100 K)(1/f) cm^-2 < N_HI < 10^23 (T_s/100 K)(1/f) cm^-2, that is consistent with previous redshifted optical damped Ly alpha surveys and the aggregate HI 21 cm emission in the local universe. The detection rate is in agreement with extant observations. This pilot survey suggests that an absorption line sear...

  11. Systematic errors in the measurement of neutrino masses due to baryonic feedback processes: Prospects for stage IV lensing surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Natarajan, Aravind; Battaglia, Nicholas; Trac, Hy

    2014-01-01

    We examine the importance of baryonic feedback effects on the matter power spectrum on small scales, and the implications for the precise measurement of neutrino masses through gravitational weak lensing. Planned large galaxy surveys such as the Large Synoptic Sky Telescope (LSST) and Euclid are expected to measure the sum of neutrino masses to extremely high precision, sufficient to detect non-zero neutrino masses even in the minimal mass normal hierarchy. We show that weak lensing of galaxies while being a very good probe of neutrino masses, is extremely sensitive to baryonic feedback processes. We use publicly available results from the Overwhelmingly Large Simulations (OWLS) project to investigate the effects of active galactic nuclei feedback, the nature of the stellar initial mass function, and gas cooling rates, on the measured weak lensing shear power spectrum. Using the Fisher matrix formalism and priors from CMB+BAO data, we show that when one does not account for feedback, the measured neutrino mas...

  12. A pilot survey of junior doctors' confidence in tasks related to broad aspects of competence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Deborah J; Skaarup, Anne Marie; Ringsted, Charlotte

    2005-01-01

    Medical authorities and society are recommending that postgraduate medical education prepare physicians for broad aspects of competence. The most effective ways to prepare physicians for these are not known. The aim of this pilot study was to survey junior doctors' growth in confidence in different...... physician roles. A total of 165 junior doctors in internal medicine completed a self-administered survey of confidence levels in physician roles. Confidence levels between training levels were compared. Confidence in the roles of medical expert, communicator and collaborator increased between PRHOs and SHOs...... tracking will be important to evaluate the effect of educational interventions on patient care. Udgivelsesdato: 2005-Sep...

  13. The SDSS-IV eBOSS emission-line galaxy pilot survey

    CERN Document Server

    Comparat, J; Jouvel, S; Raichoor, A; Kneib, J-P; Yeche, C; Abdalla, F B; Cras, C Le; Maraston, C; Wilkinson, D M; Zhu, G; Jullo, E; Prada, F; Schlegel, D; Xu, Z; Zou, H; Bautista, J; Bizyaev, D; Bolton, A; Brownstein, J R; Dawson, K S; Gaulme, S Escoffier P; Kinemuchi, K; Malanushenko, E; Malanushenko, V; Mariappan, V; Newman, J A; Oravetz, D; Pan, K; Percival, W J; Prakash, A; Schneider, D P; Simmons, A; Allam, T M C Abbott S; Banerji, M; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bertin, E; Brooks, D; Capozzi, D; Rosell, A Carnero; Kind, M Carrasco; Carretero, J; Castander, F J; Cunha, C E; da Costa, L N; Desai, S; Doel, P; Eifler, T F; Estrada, J; Flaugher, B; Fosalba, P; Frieman, J; Gaztanaga, E; Gerdes, D W; Gruen, D; Gruendl, R A; Gutierrez, G; Honscheid, K; James, D J; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Lahav, O; Lima, M; Maia, M A G; March, M; Marshall, J L; Miquel, R; Plazas, A A; Reil, K; Roe, N; Romer, A K; Roodman, A; Rykoff, E S; Sako, M; Sanchez, E; Scarpine, V; Sevilla-Noarbe, I; Soares-Santos, M; Sobreira, F; Suchyta, E; Swanson, M E C; Tarle, G; Thaler, J; Thomas, D; Walker, A R; Zhang, Y

    2015-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV extended Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (SDSS-IV/eBOSS) will observe approximately 270,000 emission-line galaxies (ELGs) to measure the Baryonic Acoustic Oscillation standard ruler (BAO) at redshift 0.9. To test different ELG selection algorithms, based on data from several imaging surveys, 9,000 spectra were observed with the SDSS spectrograph as a pilot survey. First, we provide a detailed description of each target selection algorithm tested. Then, using visual inspection and redshift quality flags, we find that the automated spectroscopic redshifts assigned by the pipeline meet the quality requirements for a robust BAO measurement. Also, we show the correlations between sky emission, signal-to-noise ratio in the emission lines and redshift error. As a result, we provide robust redshift distributions for the different target selection schemes tested. Finally, we infer two optimal target selection algorithms to be applied on DECam photometry that fulfill the eBOSS ...

  14. Factors influencing trainers' feedback-giving behavior: a cross-sectional survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelgrim, E.A.M.; Kramer, A.W.M.; Mokkink, H.G.A.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The literature provides some insight into the role of feedback givers, but little information about within-trainer factors influencing 'feedback-giving behaviours'. We looked for relationships between characteristics of feedback givers (self-efficacy, task perception, neuroticism, extrav

  15. Nursing home administrators' perspectives on a study feedback report: a cross sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boström, Anne-Marie; Cranley, Lisa A; Hutchinson, Alison M; Cummings, Greta G; Norton, Peter G; Estabrooks, Carole A

    2012-09-13

    This project is part of the Translating Research in Elder Care (TREC) program of research, a multi-level and longitudinal research program being conducted in 36 nursing homes in three Canadian Prairie Provinces. The overall goal of TREC is to improve the quality of care for older persons living in nursing homes and the quality of work life for care providers. The purpose of this paper is to report on development and evaluation of facility annual reports (FARs) from facility administrators' perspectives on the usefulness, meaningfulness, and understandability of selected data from the TREC survey. A cross sectional survey design was used in this study. The feedback reports were developed in collaboration with participating facility administrators. FARs presented results in four contextual areas: workplace culture, feedback processes, job satisfaction, and staff burnout. Six weeks after FARs were mailed to each administrator, we conducted structured telephone interviews with administrators to elicit their evaluation of the FARs. Administrators were also asked if they had taken any actions as a result of the FAR. Descriptive and inferential statistics, as well as content analysis for open-ended questions, were used to summarize findings. Thirty-one facility administrators (representing thirty-two facilities) participated in the interviews. Six administrators had taken action and 18 were planning on taking action as a result of FARs. The majority found the four contextual areas addressed in FAR to be useful, meaningful, and understandable. They liked the comparisons made between data from years one and two and between their facility and other TREC study sites in their province. Twenty-two indicated that they would like to receive information on additional areas such as aggressive behaviours of residents and information sharing. Twenty-four administrators indicated that FARs contained enough information, while eight found FARs 'too short'. Administrators who reported

  16. Nursing home administrators’ perspectives on a study feedback report: a cross sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boström Anne-Marie

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This project is part of the Translating Research in Elder Care (TREC program of research, a multi-level and longitudinal research program being conducted in 36 nursing homes in three Canadian Prairie Provinces. The overall goal of TREC is to improve the quality of care for older persons living in nursing homes and the quality of work life for care providers. The purpose of this paper is to report on development and evaluation of facility annual reports (FARs from facility administrators’ perspectives on the usefulness, meaningfulness, and understandability of selected data from the TREC survey. Methods A cross sectional survey design was used in this study. The feedback reports were developed in collaboration with participating facility administrators. FARs presented results in four contextual areas: workplace culture, feedback processes, job satisfaction, and staff burnout. Six weeks after FARs were mailed to each administrator, we conducted structured telephone interviews with administrators to elicit their evaluation of the FARs. Administrators were also asked if they had taken any actions as a result of the FAR. Descriptive and inferential statistics, as well as content analysis for open-ended questions, were used to summarize findings. Results Thirty-one facility administrators (representing thirty-two facilities participated in the interviews. Six administrators had taken action and 18 were planning on taking action as a result of FARs. The majority found the four contextual areas addressed in FAR to be useful, meaningful, and understandable. They liked the comparisons made between data from years one and two and between their facility and other TREC study sites in their province. Twenty-two indicated that they would like to receive information on additional areas such as aggressive behaviours of residents and information sharing. Twenty-four administrators indicated that FARs contained enough information, while eight

  17. The LEGUE input catalog for dark night observing in the LAMOST pilot survey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Yang; Jin-Liang Hou; Xiao-Wei Liu; Norbert Christlieb; Hao-Tong Zhang; Hsu-Tai Lee; Kai-Ke Pan; Zhan-Wen Han; Hong-Chi Wang; Jeffrey L.Carlin; Chao Liu; Yue-Yang Zhang; Shuang Gao; Yan Xu; Li-Cai Deng; Heidi Jo Newberg; Sébastien Lépine

    2012-01-01

    We outline the design of the dark nights portion of the LAMOST Pilot Survey,which began observations in 2011 October.In particular,we focus on Milky Way stellar candidates that are targeted for the LEGUE(LAMOST Experiment for Galactic Understanding and Exploration)survey.We discuss the regions of sky in which spectroscopic candidates were selected,and the motivations for selecting each of these sky areas.Some limitations due to the unique design of the telescope are discussed,including the requirement that a bright(V < 8)star be placed at the center of each plate for wavefront sensing and active optics corrections.The target selection categories and scientific goals motivating them are briefly discussed,followed by a detailed overview of how these selection functions were implemented.We illustrate the difference between the overall input catalog-Sloan Digital Sky Survey(SDSS)photometry-and the final targets selected for LAMOST observations.

  18. Lessons learnt on recruitment and fieldwork from a pilot European human biomonitoring survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiddicke, Ulrike; Becker, Kerstin; Schwedler, Gerda;

    2015-01-01

    Within the European Environment and Health Action Plan an initiative to establish a coherent human biomonitoring approach in Europe was started. The project COPHES (COnsortium to Perform Human biomonitoring on a European Scale ) developed recommendations for a harmonized conduct of a human......, in autumn/winter 2011/2012. Based on the countries' experiences of conducting the pilot study, following lessons learnt were compiled: the harmonized fieldwork instruments (basic questionnaire, urine and hair sampling) turned out to be very valuable for future HBM surveys on the European scale. A school...

  19. Surviving Sudden Cardiac Arrest: A Pilot Qualitative Survey Study of Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Kelly N; Brown, Frances; Christensen, Roxanne; Damino, Colleen; Newman, Mary M; Kurz, Michael C

    2016-06-01

    Research describing survivors of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) has centered on quantifying functional ability, perceived quality of life, and neurocognitive assessment. Many gaps remain, however, regarding survivors' psychosocial perceptions of life in the aftermath of cardiac arrest. An important influence upon those perceptions is the presence of support and its role in a survivor's life. An Internet-based pilot survey study was conducted to gather data from SCA survivors and friends and/or family members (FFMs) representing their support system. The survey was distributed to members of the Sudden Cardiac Arrest Foundation (SCAF) via the Internet by SCAF leadership. Questions included both discrete multiple-choice and open-ended formats. Inductive thematic analyses were completed by three independent researchers trained in qualitative research methodology to identify primary themes consistent among study participants until thematic saturation was achieved. No statistical inferences were made. A total of 205 surveys were returned over the 5-month study period (July to November 2013); nine were received blank, leaving 196 surveys available for review. Major themes identified for survivors (N = 157) include the significance of and desire to share experiences with others; subculture identification (unique experience from those suffering a heart attack); and the need to seek a new normal, both personally and inter-personally. Major themes identified for FFMs (N = 39) include recognition of loved one's memory loss; a lack of information at discharge, including expectations after discharge; and concern for the patient experiencing another cardiac arrest. This pilot, qualitative survey study suggests several common themes important to survivors, and FFMs, of cardiac arrest. These themes may serve as a basis for future patient-centered focus groups and the development of patient-centered guidelines for patients and support persons of those surviving cardiac arrest.

  20. Differences in participation rates and lessons learned about recruitment of participants--the European Health Examination Survey Pilot Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolonen, Hanna; Ahonen, Sanna; Jentoft, Susie; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Heldal, Johan

    2015-03-01

    In the 1980s, participation rates in health interview and health examination surveys were around 80% while now they are around 50-60%. There is also evidence that non-participation is selective. Low participation rates and selective non-participation may cause bias to our survey results based on participants alone. We aim to increase knowledge on cultural differences in acceptance and feasibility of different recruitment methods. The European Health Examination Survey Pilot Project, conducted in 2009-2012, included pilot surveys in 12 countries among people aged 25-64 years. Information about recruitment methods and participation rates in these surveys was collected. Participation rates ranged from 16% to 57% for men and from 31% to 74% for women, where in most surveys women had higher participation rates than men. A variety of recruitment and promotion methods were used to obtain as high participation rates as possible. Combinations of phone calls, invitation letter and home visits were used to recruit invitees. Obtaining valid phone numbers for survey invitees was difficult in several countries. Incentives, websites and promotion in local media were used to promote the surveys. The European Health Examination Survey Pilot surveys showed that obtaining a participation rate above 50% for a representative population sample is possible but it requires hard work and a well-planned recruitment strategy. Recruitment methods used in one country may not be possible to use in another country due to cultural norms and national regulations. © 2015 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  1. SDSS-IV eBOSS emission-line galaxy pilot survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comparat, J.; Delubac, T.; Jouvel, S.; Raichoor, A.; Kneib, J.-P.; Yèche, C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Le Cras, C.; Maraston, C.; Wilkinson, D. M.; Zhu, G.; Jullo, E.; Prada, F.; Schlegel, D.; Xu, Z.; Zou, H.; Bautista, J.; Bizyaev, D.; Bolton, A.; Brownstein, J. R.; Dawson, K. S.; Escoffier, S.; Gaulme, P.; Kinemuchi, K.; Malanushenko, E.; Malanushenko, V.; Mariappan, V.; Newman, J. A.; Oravetz, D.; Pan, K.; Percival, W. J.; Prakash, A.; Schneider, D. P.; Simmons, A.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Allam, S.; Banerji, M.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Capozzi, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Cunha, C. E.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Doel, P.; Eifler, T. F.; Estrada, J.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; March, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Miquel, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Reil, K.; Roe, N.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Walker, A. R.; Zhang, Y.

    2016-08-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV extended Baryonic Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (SDSS-IV/eBOSS) will observe 195 000 emission-line galaxies (ELGs) to measure the baryonic acoustic oscillation (BAO) standard ruler at redshift 0.9. To test different ELG selection algorithms, 9000 spectra were observed with the SDSS spectrograph as a pilot survey based on data from several imaging surveys. First, using visual inspection and redshift quality flags, we show that the automated spectroscopic redshifts assigned by the pipeline meet the quality requirements for a reliable BAO measurement. We also show the correlations between sky emission, signal-to-noise ratio in the emission lines, and redshift error. Then we provide a detailed description of each target selection algorithm we tested and compare them with the requirements of the eBOSS experiment. As a result, we provide reliable redshift distributions for the different target selection schemes we tested. Finally, we determine an target selection algorithms that is best suited to be applied on DECam photometry because they fulfill the eBOSS survey efficiency requirements. The catalog is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/592/A121

  2. Pan-STARRS1 as pilot-survey for panoptic time-domain science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernitschek, Nina; Rix, Hans-Walter; Sesar, Branimir; Schlafly, Edward F.

    2017-06-01

    For examining possibilities and challenges in doing science with multi-band and non-simultaneous data from upcoming surveys like LSST, the Pan-STARRS1 (PS1) 3π can be used as a pilot survey. This is especially important to explore the possibilities in detection and classification of variable sources within the first years of LSST's 10-year baseline. We had explored the capabilities of PS1 3π for carrying out time-domain science in a variety of applications. We had used structure function fitting as well as period fitting, to search for and classify high-latitude as well as low-latitude variable sources, in particular RR Lyrae, Cepheids and QSOs.

  3. Perception of Deqi by Chinese and American acupuncturists: a pilot survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Kathleen Kks; Sporko, Tara N; Vangel, Mark G; Li, Ming; Fang, Jiliang; Lao, Lixing

    2011-01-20

    In acupuncture, deqi is the sensory experience related to clinical efficacy. As the first study taking into account cultural differences on deqi sensation, this pilot survey aims to corroborate the acupuncturists' general experience in clinical practice with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) findings. Questionnaires were distributed to acupuncturists of TCM (traditional Chinese medicine)hospitals and acupuncturists attending workshops and seminars in the United States and China. Questions covered clinical significance of deqi, patient attitude and the nature of some pain-related sensations elicited by manual needling. 47 out of a total of 86 acupuncturists agreed that dull pain was deqi and over half regarded it beneficial, while sharp pain was non-deqi and harmful instead. The patients' attitude toward deqi sensation showed a difference between US and China. There was no other dimension showing a difference. Results of this pilot survey indicate that the acupuncturists' perception is consistent with our previous fMRI findings. Results showed almost complete agreement that dull pain is considered deqi and beneficial to treatment, while sharp pain is not deqi and harmful. Particularly, dull pain was deqi and was beneficial to treatment whereas sharp pain was not. Patients in China liked the deqi experience whereas those in the US did not.

  4. Perception of Deqi by Chinese and American acupuncturists: a pilot survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Jiliang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In acupuncture, deqi is the sensory experience related to clinical efficacy. As the first study taking into account cultural differences on deqi sensation, this pilot survey aims to corroborate the acupuncturists' general experience in clinical practice with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI findings. Methods Questionnaires were distributed to acupuncturists of TCM (traditional Chinese medicinehospitals and acupuncturists attending workshops and seminars in the United States and China. Questions covered clinical significance of deqi, patient attitude and the nature of some pain-related sensations elicited by manual needling. Results 47 out of a total of 86 acupuncturists agreed that dull pain was deqi and over half regarded it beneficial, while sharp pain was non-deqi and harmful instead. The patients' attitude toward deqi sensation showed a difference between US and China. There was no other dimension showing a difference. Conclusion Results of this pilot survey indicate that the acupuncturists' perception is consistent with our previous fMRI findings. Results showed almost complete agreement that dull pain is considered deqi and beneficial to treatment, while sharp pain is not deqi and harmful. Particularly, dull pain was deqi and was beneficial to treatment whereas sharp pain was not. Patients in China liked the deqi experience whereas those in the US did not.

  5. Women's attitudes to safe-induced abortion in Iran: Findings from a pilot survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghakhani, Nader; Cleary, Michelle; Zarei, Abbas; Lopez, Violeta

    2017-07-20

    To explore attitudes to safe-induced abortion among pregnant women in Iran. In Islamic teachings, abortion is generally forbidden. However in specific circumstances, abortion may be permitted and currently, in Iran, the law allows termination of pregnancy only if three specialist physicians confirm that the pregnancy outcome may be harmful for the mother during pregnancy or after birth. Pilot, descriptive survey. A 15-item structured questionnaire focusing on attitudes to safe-induced abortion was developed and pilot tested. Participants were pregnant women who were referred to the Legal Medical Centre (July-December 2015) to obtain permission for abortion. On obtaining their informed consent, the women were asked to respond to each item if they agreed (Yes) or disagreed (No). Only their age, education, employment, marital status and religion were obtained. Of the 80 survey participants referred for a safe-induced abortion, 90% were carrying foetuses with a diagnosed congenital malformation and 10% were experiencing complications of pregnancy that endangered their health. The majority of women (85%) perceived abortion to be dangerous to health; 86% indicated that partners should be involved in decision-making about abortion, while 83% believed that public health officials should have complete control of abortion law. There is a need to improve women's and couples' awareness and practice of effective contraceptive methods. Further research is needed to better understand the complex issues that lead to unintended pregnancies and abortions considering religious beliefs and cultural and legal contexts. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Audio feedback for student writing in online nursing courses: exploring student and instructor reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Kathryn A; Moskovitz, Cary; Valiga, Theresa M

    2011-09-01

    Because scientific writing is an essential skill for advanced practice nurses, it is an important component of graduate education. Faculty typically provide written feedback about student writing, but this may not be the most effective choice for the distance-learning environment. This exploratory pilot study's aim was to compare spoken, recorded feedback with written feedback in three areas: which approach do students perceive as providing more useful guidance; which approach helps students feel more connected to the course; and which approach do instructors prefer? Students enrolled in an evidence-based practice graduate-level course received asynchronous audio feedback on their written assignments instead of the written feedback they received in other courses. Results from a survey completed by 30 students at completion of the course suggest a strong preference for audio feedback. This pilot study suggests that audio feedback may be preferable to written comments for distance learning courses.

  7. The results of a survey highlighting issues with feedback on medical training in the United Kingdom and how a Smartphone App could provide a solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Thomas G; Hood, Gill; Farrell, Tom

    2015-11-06

    Feedback drives learning in medical education. Healthcare Supervision Logbook (HSL) is a Smartphone App developed at Sheffield Teaching Hospitals for providing feedback on medical training, from both a trainee's and a supervisor's perspective. In order to establish a mandate for the role of HSL in clinical practice, a large survey was carried out. Two surveys (one for doctors undertaking specialty training and a second for consultants supervising their training) were designed. The survey for doctors-in-training was distributed to all specialty trainees in the South and West localities of the Health Education Yorkshire and the Humber UK region. The survey for supervisors was distributed to all consultants involved in educational and clinical supervision of specialty trainees at Sheffield Teaching Hospitals. The results confirm that specialty trainees provide feedback on their training infrequently-66 % do so only annually. 96 % of the specialty trainees owned a Smartphone and 45 % said that they would be willing to use a Smartphone App to provide daily feedback on the clinical and educational supervision they receive. Consultant supervisors do not receive regular feedback on the educational and clinical supervision they provide to trainees-56 % said they never received such feedback and 33 % said it was only on an annual basis. 86 % of consultants surveyed owned a Smartphone and 41 % said they would be willing to use a Smartphone App to provide feedback on the performance of trainees they were supervising. Feedback on medical training is recorded by specialty trainees infrequently and consultants providing educational and clinical supervision often do not receive any feedback on their performance in this area. HSL is a simple, quick and efficient way to collect and collate feedback on medical training to improve this situation. Good support and education needs to be provided when implementing this new technology.

  8. Enhancing Healthcare Provider Feedback and Personal Health Literacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, Mette Kjer; Nielsen, Jesper Bo; Salkeld, Glenn

    2015-01-01

    In this protocol for a pilot study we seek to establish the feasibility of using a web-based survey to simultaneously supply healthcare organisations and agencies with feedback on a key aspect of the care experience they provide and increase the generic health decision literacy of the individuals...

  9. Community environmental quality knowledge and awareness among nurses: developing and piloting an assessment survey in schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shendell, Derek G; Alexander, Melannie S; Huang, Yuqi

    2010-01-01

    About one in five Americans spends a considerable number of hours in school each week, and thus, is exposed to a variety of environmental agents. Community health nursing professionals require resources and specific training to acquire the environmental knowledge needed to raise personal and community awareness as an enhancement of their practice. Given limited resources for schools and local public health education initiatives, identifying and prioritizing environmental concerns comes before actions to prevent or reduce exposures. With the rise in prevalence of childhood asthma, of special concern are those agents within the school environment that may serve as asthma triggers. This pilot project, within a larger study in a large school district in metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia, developed and piloted an environmental health priorities survey with school nurses and other school staff about indoor and outdoor microenvironments relevant to school-aged children. Findings indicate that participants (N = 34) could prioritize environmental issues to inform future intervention activities (such as continuing education training), and distinguish predominantly indoor from typical outdoor exposure agents and their major sources.

  10. Being uninformed on informed consent: a pilot survey of medical education faculty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Rebecca C

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper describes a pilot survey of faculty involved in medical education. The questionnaire focuses on their understanding of IRB policies at their institution, specifically in relation to the use of student assessment and curriculum evaluation information for scholarship. Methods An anonymous survey was distributed to medical educators in a variety of venues. Two brief scenarios of typical student assessment or curriculum evaluation activities were presented and respondents were asked to indicate their likely course of action related to IRB approval. The questionnaire also asked respondents about their knowledge of institutional policies related to IRB approval. Results A total of 121 completed surveys were obtained; 59 (50% respondents identified themselves as from community-based medical schools. For the first scenario, 78 respondents (66% would have contact with the IRB; this increased to 97 respondents (82% for the second scenario. For both scenarios, contact with the IRB was less likely among respondents from research-intensive institutions. Sixty respondents (55% were unsure if their institutions had policies addressing evaluation data used for scholarship. Fifty respondents (41% indicated no prior discussions at their institutions regarding IRB requirements. Conclusion Many faculty members are unaware of IRB policies at their medical schools related to the use of medical student information. To the extent that policies are in place, they are highly variable across schools suggesting little standardization in faculty understanding and/or institutional implementation. Principles to guide faculty decision-making are provided.

  11. A Pilot Survey on Causes of Delay in Malaysian Construction Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tawil Norngainy Mohd

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Construction delay is a common problem in the construction industry all over the world. Many researchers seeking the causes of delay in order to reduce the probability of delay to occur. Most researcher identified causes of delay in construction to reduce the possibility of construction project to continued delay. This study is to obtain the holistic delay categories base on Drewin Open Conversion System (DOCS for the development of a theoretical framework delay and to get the most significant causes of delay in construction industries. There are three main factor of construction delay based on DOCS; input factor, internal factor and external factor. There are130 items on causes of delay and it is divided into 31 categories. This pilot survey is distributed to students and fresh graduates that have educational background in construction. The result shown the main factor that contributes to construction delay are mistakes during construction and unrealistic project durations.

  12. Cardiovascular rehabilitation soon after stroke using feedback-controlled robotics-assisted treadmill exercise: study protocol of a randomised controlled pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoller, Oliver; de Bruin, Eling D; Schuster-Amft, Corina; Schindelholz, Matthias; de Bie, Rob A; Hunt, Kenneth J

    2013-09-22

    After experiencing a stroke, most individuals also suffer from cardiac disease, are immobile and thus have low endurance for exercise. Aerobic capacity is seriously reduced in these individuals and does not reach reasonable levels after conventional rehabilitation programmes. Cardiovascular exercise is beneficial for improvement of aerobic capacity in mild to moderate stroke. However, less is known about its impact on aerobic capacity, motor recovery, and quality-of-life in severely impaired individuals. The aim of this pilot study is to explore the clinical efficacy and feasibility of cardiovascular exercise with regard to aerobic capacity, motor recovery, and quality-of-life using feedback-controlled robotics-assisted treadmill exercise in non-ambulatory individuals soon after experiencing a stroke. This will be a single-centred single blind, randomised control trial with a pre-post intervention design. Subjects will be recruited early after their first stroke (≤20 weeks) at a neurological rehabilitation clinic and will be randomly allocated to an inpatient cardiovascular exercise programme that uses feedback-controlled robotics-assisted treadmill exercise (experimental) or to conventional robotics-assisted treadmill exercise (control). Intervention duration depends on the duration of each subject's inpatient rehabilitation period. Aerobic capacity, as the primary outcome measure, will be assessed using feedback-controlled robotics-assisted treadmill-based cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Secondary outcome measures will include gait speed, walking endurance, standing function, and quality-of-life. Outcome assessment will be conducted at baseline, after each 4-week intervention period, and before clinical discharge. Ethical approval has been obtained. Whether cardiovascular exercise in non-ambulatory individuals early after stroke has an impact on aerobic capacity, motor recovery, and quality-of-life is not yet known. Feedback-controlled robotics

  13. Real-time computer-based visual feedback improves visual acuity in downbeat nystagmus - a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teufel, Julian; Bardins, S; Spiegel, Rainer; Kremmyda, O; Schneider, E; Strupp, M; Kalla, R

    2016-01-04

    Patients with downbeat nystagmus syndrome suffer from oscillopsia, which leads to an unstable visual perception and therefore impaired visual acuity. The aim of this study was to use real-time computer-based visual feedback to compensate for the destabilizing slow phase eye movements. The patients were sitting in front of a computer screen with the head fixed on a chin rest. The eye movements were recorded by an eye tracking system (EyeSeeCam®). We tested the visual acuity with a fixed Landolt C (static) and during real-time feedback driven condition (dynamic) in gaze straight ahead and (20°) sideward gaze. In the dynamic condition, the Landolt C moved according to the slow phase eye velocity of the downbeat nystagmus. The Shapiro-Wilk test was used to test for normal distribution and one-way ANOVA for comparison. Ten patients with downbeat nystagmus were included in the study. Median age was 76 years and the median duration of symptoms was 6.3 years (SD +/- 3.1y). The mean slow phase velocity was moderate during gaze straight ahead (1.44°/s, SD +/- 1.18°/s) and increased significantly in sideward gaze (mean left 3.36°/s; right 3.58°/s). In gaze straight ahead, we found no difference between the static and feedback driven condition. In sideward gaze, visual acuity improved in five out of ten subjects during the feedback-driven condition (p = 0.043). This study provides proof of concept that non-invasive real-time computer-based visual feedback compensates for the SPV in DBN. Therefore, real-time visual feedback may be a promising aid for patients suffering from oscillopsia and impaired text reading on screen. Recent technological advances in the area of virtual reality displays might soon render this approach feasible in fully mobile settings.

  14. Gathering Feedback from Early-Career Faculty: Speaking with and Surveying Agricultural Faculty Members about Research Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah C. Williams

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In spring 2013, the Life Sciences Data Services Librarian at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign gave a data management presentation to early-career, agricultural faculty members participating in a selective program designed to help them succeed in the tenure process. After the presentation, the participants were invited to complete an online survey that included questions on how well informed and prepared they feel about funding agencies’ data requirements, what data challenges they face, and how the library can help with new or improved services in this area. The presentation discussion and survey responses suggested value in offering data training specifically for agricultural graduate students and research assistants and compiling examples of data management plans from successful grant proposals. Despite the small number of participants, the feedback provides an interesting glimpse into data management from the perspective of early-career faculty.

  15. A Pilot Survey of Stellar Tidal Streams in Nearby Spiral Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Delgado, David; Gabany, R. Jay; Peñarrubia, Jorge; Rix, Hans-Walter; Majewski, Steven R.; Trujillo, Ignacio; Pohlen, Michael

    Within the hierarchical framework for galaxy formation, merging and tidal interactions are expected to shape large galaxies to this day. While major mergers are quite rare at present, minor mergers and satellite disruptions-which result in stellar streams-should be common, and are indeed seen in both the Milky Way and the Andromeda Galaxy. As a pilot study, we have carried out ultra-deep, wide-field imaging of some spiral galaxies in the Local Volume, which has revealed external views of such stellar tidal streams at unprecedented detail, with data taken at small robotic telescopes (0.1-0.5m) that provide exquisite surface brightness sensitivity. The goal of this project is to undertake the first systematic and comprehensive imaging survey of stellar tidal streams, from a sample of˜50 nearby Milky Way-like spiral galaxies within 15Mpc, that features a surface brightness sensitivity of˜30mag/arcsec2. The survey will result in estimates of the incidence, size/geometry and stellar luminosity/mass distribution of such streams. This will not only put our Milky Way and M31 in context but, for the first time, also provide an extensive statistical basis for comparison with state-of-the-art, self-consistent cosmological simulations of this phenomenon.

  16. The SAMI Pilot Survey: Stellar Kinematics of Galaxies in Abell 85, 168 and 2399

    CERN Document Server

    Fogarty, L M R; Owers, M S; Croom, S M; Bekki, K; Houghton, R C W; van de Sande, J; D'Eugenio, F; Cecil, G N; Colless, M M; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Brough, S; Cortese, L; Davies, R L; Jones, D H; Pracy, M; Allen, J T; Bryant, J J; Goodwin, M; Green, A W; Konstantopoulos, I S; Lawrence, J S; Lorente, N P F; Richards, S; Sharp, R G

    2015-01-01

    We present the SAMI Pilot Survey, consisting of integral field spectroscopy of 106 galaxies across three galaxy clusters, Abell 85, Abell 168 and Abell 2399. The galaxies were selected by absolute magnitude to have $M_r<-20.25$ mag. The survey, using the Sydney-AAO Multi-object Integral field spectrograph (SAMI), comprises observations of galaxies of all morphological types with 75\\% of the sample being early-type galaxies (ETGs) and 25\\% being late-type galaxies (LTGs). Stellar velocity and velocity dispersion maps are derived for all 106 galaxies in the sample. The $\\lambda_{R}$ parameter, a proxy for the specific stellar angular momentum, is calculated for each galaxy in the sample. We find a trend between $\\lambda_{R}$ and galaxy concentration such that LTGs are less concentrated higher angular momentum systems, with the fast-rotating ETGs (FRs) more concentrated and lower in angular momentum. This suggests that some dynamical processes are involved in transforming LTGs to FRs, though a significant ove...

  17. Physical and Morphological Properties of [O II] Emitting Galaxies in the HETDEX Pilot Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Bridge, Joanna S; Ciardullo, Robin; Hagen, Alex; Zeimann, Greg; Malz, A I; Acquaviva, Viviana; Schneider, Donald P; Drory, Niv; Gebhardt, Karl; Jogee, Shardha

    2014-01-01

    The Hobby-Eberly Dark Energy Experiment pilot survey identified 284 [O II] 3727 emitting galaxies in a 169 square-arcminute field of sky in the redshift range 0 < z < 0.57. This line flux limited sample provides a bridge between studies in the local universe and higher-redshift [O II] surveys. We present an analysis of the star formation rates (SFRs) of these galaxies as a function of stellar mass as determined via spectral energy distribution fitting. The [O II] emitters fall on the "main sequence" of star-forming galaxies with SFR decreasing at lower masses and redshifts. However, the slope of our relation is flatter than that found for most other samples, a result of the metallicity dependence of the [O II] star formation rate indicator. The mass specific SFR is higher for lower mass objects, supporting the idea that massive galaxies formed more quickly and efficiently than their lower mass counterparts. This is confirmed by the fact that the equivalent widths of the [O II] emission lines trend small...

  18. More Than 1 in 10 Pilots Suffer from Depression, Survey Finds

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... author Alex Wu, the study "hints at the prevalence of depression among pilots -- a group of professionals that is responsible for thousands of lives every day -- and underscores the importance of accurately assessing pilots' mental health and increasing ...

  19. 'Real-world' antithrombotic treatment in atrial fibrillation: The EORP-AF pilot survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lip, Gregory Y H; Laroche, Cécile; Dan, Gheorghe-Andrei; Santini, Massimo; Kalarus, Zbigniew; Rasmussen, Lars Hvilsted; Ioachim, Popescu Mircea; Tica, Otilia; Boriani, Giuseppe; Cimaglia, Paolo; Diemberger, Igor; Hellum, Camilla Fragtrup; Mortensen, Bettina; Maggioni, Aldo P

    2014-06-01

    Current guidelines strongly recommend that oral anticoagulation should be offered to patients with atrial fibrillation and ≥1 stroke risk factors. The guidelines also recommend that oral anticoagulation still should be used in the presence of stroke risk factors irrespective of rate or rhythm control. In an analysis from the dataset of the EURObservational Research Programme on Atrial Fibrillation Pilot Survey (n = 3119), we examined antithrombotic therapy prescribing, with particular focus on the risk factors determining oral anticoagulation or antiplatelet therapy use. When oral anticoagulation was used among admitted patients in whom no pharmacologic cardioversion, electrical cardioversion, or catheter ablation was performed or planned, vitamin K antagonist therapy was prescribed in the majority (72.2%), whereas novel oral anticoagulants were used in the minority (7.7%). There was no significant difference in bleeding risk factors among the patients treated with the different types of antithrombotic therapies, except for those with chronic kidney disease, in whom oral anticoagulation was less commonly used (P = .0318). Antiplatelet therapy was more commonly used in patients with a high Hypertension, Abnormal renal/liver function, Stroke, Bleeding history or predisposition, Labile international normalized ratio, Elderly (>65 years), Drugs/alcohol concomitantly score (≥2) (P < .0001). More oral anticoagulation use was associated with female gender (P = .0245). Less novel oral anticoagulant use was associated with valvular heart disease (P < .0001), chronic heart failure (P = .0010), coronary artery disease (P < .0001), and peripheral artery disease (P = .0092). Coronary artery disease was the strongest reason for combination therapy with oral anticoagulation plus antiplatelet drug (odds ratio, 8.54; P < .0001). When the Congestive heart failure, Hypertension, Age ≥75 [Doubled], Diabetes, Stroke [Doubled]-Vascular disease, Age 65-74, and Sex category [female

  20. Pilot survey of a novel incentive to promote healthy behavior among school children and their parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung-Kwang Yoo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Reversing the obesity epidemic has been a persistent global public health challenge, particularly among low socioeconomic status populations and racial/ethnic minorities. We developed a novel concept of community-based incentives to approach this problem in such communities. Applying this concept, we proposed a school intervention to promote obesity prevention in the U.S. We conducted a pilot survey to explore attitudes towards this future intervention. The survey was collected as a nonprobability sample (N = 137 school-aged children (5–12 years in northern California in July 2013. We implemented multivariable logistic regression analyses where the dependent variable indicated the intention to participate in the future intervention. The covariates included the body mass index (BMI based weight categories, demographics, and others. We found that the future intervention is expected to motivate generally-high-risk populations (such as children and parents who have never joined a past health-improvement program compared to those who have completed a past health-improvement program (the odds-ratio (OR = 5.84, p < 0.05 and children with an obese/overweight parent (OR = 2.72, p < 0.05 compared to those without one to participate in future obesity-prevention activities. Our analyses also showed that some subgroups of high-risk populations, such as Hispanic children (OR = 0.27, p < 0.05 and children eligible for a free or reduced price meal program (OR = 0.37, p < 0.06, remain difficult to reach and need an intensive outreach activity for the future intervention. The survey indicated high interest in the future school intervention among high-risk parents who have never joined a past health-improvement program or are obese/overweight. These findings will help design and implement a future intervention.

  1. Pilot Survey of Breast Cancer Management in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verna D.N.K. Vanderpuye

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To understand the current state of breast cancer management in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods: We conducted an anonymous online survey of breast cancer management among African Organization for Research and Treatment in Cancer (AORTIC members by using a 42-question structured questionnaire in both English and French in 2013. Results: Twenty members from 19 facilities in 14 countries responded to the survey. Twelve members (60% belonged to a multidisciplinary breast cancer team. Radiotherapy equipment was available in seven facilities (36%, but equipment had down time at least once a week in four facilities. Available chemotherapy drugs included methotrexate, cyclophosphamide, fluorouracil, anthracyclines, and vincristine, whereas trastuzumab, taxanes, vinorelbine, and gemcitabine were available in few facilities. Core-needle biopsy was available in 16 facilities (84%; mammogram, in 17 facilities (89%; computed tomography scan, in 15 facilities (79%; magnetic resonance imaging, in 11 facilities (58%; and bone scans, in nine facilities (47%. It took an average of 1 to 3 weeks to report histopathology. Immunohistochemistry was available locally in eight facilities (42%, outside hospitals but within the country in seven facilities (37%, and outside the country in four facilities (21%. Thirteen facilities (68% performed axillary node dissections as part of a breast protocol. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy was the most common therapy for locally advanced breast cancer in 13 facilities (68%. In three facilities (16%, receptor status did not influence the prescription of hormone treatment. Conclusion: This pilot survey suggests that AORTIC members in sub-Saharan Africa continue to make gains in the provision of access to multidisciplinary breast cancer care, but the lack of adequate pathology and radiotherapy services is a barrier. Focused attention on in-country and regional training needs and improvement of health systems deliverables is urgently

  2. A novel Minute Feedback System for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, David T; Leininger, Lisa; Reddy, Rishindra M; Sandhu, Gurjit; Ryszawa, Susan; Englesbe, Michael

    2017-02-01

    Medical students often report a lack of timely, useful feedback during clerkship rotations. The purpose of this study was to develop a novel Minute Feedback System and determine whether it would generate frequent, high quality, documented feedback for students during the third year surgery clerkship. The Minute Feedback System was created using the Qualtrics(©) survey software platform and piloted with surgery clerkship students. These students were surveyed about the frequency and quality of feedback and their overall rating of the surgery clerkship and compared to students who did not use the feedback system. The initial pilot of the Minute Feedback System involved 6/34 M3 surgery clerkship students and generated a total of 70 unique comments from faculty and residents over 3 weeks. When the 6 pilot students were compared to the 28 students without access to the Minute Feedback System, they respectively rated the frequency of feedback 4.50 vs 2.83 (p < 0.01); the quality of feedback 4.70 vs 3.33 (p < 0.01) and the overall rating of the surgery clerkship 4.67 vs 4.05 (p < 0.01) higher. The system was then made available to all students on the M3 surgery clerkship (n = 31) over the subsequent 2 month rotation. 354 unique feedback comments were generated from 399 student requests (89% response rate). Students using the Minute Feedback System (n = 31) compared to students in the previous academic year without (n = 170) rated the quality of feedback (3.76 vs 3.4, p < 0.01), that feedback was provided during clerkship (100% vs 90%, p < 0.01) and the overall quality of the clerkship (3.94 vs 3.87, p = 0.2) higher. The novel Minute Feedback System allows for frequent, timely, useful and documented feedback to medical students. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Volunteer feedback and perceptions after participation in a phase I, first-in-human Ebola vaccine trial: An anonymous survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayer, Julie-Anne; Siegrist, Claire-Anne; Huttner, Angela

    2017-01-01

    The continued participation of volunteers in clinical trials is crucial to advances in healthcare. Few data are available regarding the satisfaction and impressions of healthy volunteers after participation in phase I trials, many of which lead to unexpected adverse events. We report feedback from over 100 adult volunteers who took part in a first-in-human trial conducted in a high-income country testing an experimental Ebola vaccine causing significant reactogenicity, as well as unexpected arthritis in one fifth of participants. The anonymous, internet-based satisfaction survey was sent by email to all participants upon their completion of this one-year trial; it asked 24 questions concerning volunteers’ motivations, impressions of the trial experience, and overall satisfaction. Answers were summarized using descriptive statistics. Of the 115 trial participants, 103 (90%) filled out the survey. Fifty-five respondents (53%) were male. Thirty-five respondents (34%) were healthcare workers, many of whom would deploy to Ebola-affected countries. All respondents cited scientific advancement as their chief motivation for participation, while 100/103 (97%) and 61/103 (59%) reported additional “humanitarian reasons” and potential protection from Ebolavirus, respectively. Although investigators had documented adverse events in 97% of trial participants, only 74 of 103 respondents (72%) recalled experiencing an adverse event. All reported an overall positive experience, and 93/103 (90%) a willingness to participate in future trials. Given the high level of satisfaction, no significant associations could be detected between trial experiences and satisfaction, even among respondents reporting adverse events lasting weeks or months. Despite considerable reactogenicity and unexpected vaccine-related arthritis, all survey respondents reported overall satisfaction. While this trial’s context was unique, the positive feedback is likely due at least in part to the intense

  4. Results from a Pilot REU Program: Exploring the Cosmos Using Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanover, Nancy J.; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Holtzman, Jon A.

    2017-01-01

    In the Summer of 2016 we conducted a 10-week pilot Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program aimed at increasing the participation of underrepresented minority undergraduate students in research using data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). This program utilized a distributed REU model, whereby students worked with SDSS scientists on exciting research projects while serving as members of a geographically distributed research community. The format of this REU is similar to that of the SDSS collaboration itself, and since this collaboration structure has become a model for the next generation of large scale astronomical surveys, the students participating in the SDSS REU received early exposure and familiarity with this approach to collaborative scientific research. The SDSS REU also provided the participants with a low-risk opportunity to audition for graduate schools and to explore opportunities afforded by a career as a research scientist. The six student participants were placed at SDSS REU host sites at the Center for Astrophysics at Harvard University, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Vanderbilt University, and the University of Portsmouth. Their research projects covered a broad range of topics related to stars, galaxies, and quasars, all making use of SDSS data. At the start of the summer the REU students participated in a week-long Boot Camp at NMSU, which served as a program orientation, an introduction to skills relevant to their research projects, and an opportunity for team-building and cohort-forming. To foster a sense of community among our distributed students throughout the summer, we conducted a weekly online meeting for all students in the program via virtual meeting tools. These virtual group meetings served two purposes: as a weekly check-in to find out how their projects were progressing, and to conduct professional development seminars on topics of interest and relevance to the REU participants. We discuss the outcomes of this

  5. Real-time computer-based visual feedback improves visual acuity in downbeat nystagmus – a pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Teufel, Julian; Bardins, S; Spiegel, Rainer; Kremmyda, O.; Schneider, E.; Strupp, M; Kalla, Roger

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patients with downbeat nystagmus syndrome suffer from oscillopsia, which leads to an unstable visual perception and therefore impaired visual acuity. The aim of this study was to use real-time computer-based visual feedback to compensate for the destabilizing slow phase eye movements. METHODS The patients were sitting in front of a computer screen with the head fixed on a chin rest. The eye movements were recorded by an eye tracking system (EyeSeeCam®). We tested the vi...

  6. The XMM Cluster Survey: The interplay between the brightest cluster galaxy and the intra-cluster medium via AGN feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Stott, John P; Edge, Alastair C; Collins, Chris A; Hilton, Matt; Harrison, Craig D; Romer, A Kathy; Rooney, Philip J; Kay, Scott T; Miller, Christopher J; Sahlen, Martin; Lloyd-Davies, Ed J; Mehrtens, Nicola; Hoyle, Ben; Liddle, Andrew R; Viana, Pedro T P; McCarthy, Ian G; Schaye, Joop; Booth, C M

    2012-01-01

    Using a sample of 123 X-ray clusters and groups drawn from the XMM-Cluster Survey first data release, we investigate the interplay between the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG), its black hole, and the intra-cluster/group medium (ICM). It appears that for groups and clusters with a BCG likely to host significant AGN feedback, gas cooling dominates in those with Tx > 2 keV while AGN feedback dominates below. This may be understood through the sub-unity exponent found in the scaling relation we derive between the BCG mass and cluster mass over the halo mass range 10^13 2 keV) and again co-located with an effective fuel supply of dense, cooling gas. This demonstrates that the most massive black holes appear to know more about their host cluster than they do about their host galaxy. The results lead us to propose a physically motivated, empirical definition of 'cluster' and 'group', delineated at 2 keV.

  7. Exercise-induced bronchospasm: a pilot survey in Nairobi school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng'ang'a, L W; Odhiambo, J A; Omwega, M J; Gicheha, C M; Becklake, M R; Menzies, R; Mohammed, N; Macklem, P T

    1997-11-01

    Exercise-induced bronchospasm (EIB), a common feature of asthma in children, has been used as the outcome measure in community-based surveys of childhood asthma to circumvent difficulties arising from relative lack of objectivity in the use of questionnaires in communities with different cultural and language orientations. We report here the results of the first community-based study of childhood asthma in Kenya using EIB as the outcome measurement. The data was collected in a pilot study to develop methodology for a larger subsequent study. The survey targeted grade four children in five Nairobi City Council school each representing a neighbourhood social economic status (SES). Out of 597 eligible, 408 children took part in the study (68% participation rate). EIB defined as decline in FEV1 of 15% or more, post-exercise was found in 10.5% (95% CI; 10.3, 10.7) of the children studied, the highest rate reported so far in Africa. While boys were more likely to exhibit EIB compared to girls, the prevalence of EIB tended to decrease with age, especially among children residing in low SES neighbourhoods where the EIB prevalence rates tended to be lower compared to those among children from higher SES neighbourhoods. However, none of these differences was statistically significant. This study confirms the feasibility of undertaking exercise challenge tests in the African context and we recommend that additional studies of similar nature be carried out in other populations of Africa to explore the potential of using an exercise test as a marker of asthma in epidemiologic studies.

  8. Compliance of drugstores with a national smoke-free law: a pilot survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimpitakpong, P; Dhippayom, T; Chaiyakunapruk, N; Aromdee, J; Chotbunyong, S; Charnnarong, S

    2010-03-01

    To examine the outcome of the recent implementation of a smoke-free policy in drugstores in Thailand, comparing participants and non-participants of the 100% smoke-free drugstore campaign promoted by the Thai Pharmacy Network for Tobacco Control (TPNTC). A cross-sectional survey of 3600 drugstores in Thailand. Smoking prevalence on the premises, the number of stores displaying no-smoking signs, and the number of stores selling cigarettes were examined. In total, 1001 questionnaires were returned (27.8% response rate). Smoking prevalences inside and outside drugstores in the past month were 26.4% and 84.7%, respectively. Seven percent of drugstores had at least one staff member who smoked tobacco. Overall, 63.3% of drugstores displayed no-smoking signs, as required by law. Compared with non-participating drugstores, those which participated in the TPNTC smoke-free campaign more frequently reported that they had asked smokers to stop smoking/leave the premises, in addition to possessing and displaying no-smoking signs. Approximately one-third of drugstores in this survey did not meet the terms of the recent smoke-free regulation. The TPNTC campaign improved the compliance of drugstores with the law in various aspects. This study was considered a pilot study, and despite the low response rate, the findings suggest a need for further action to ensure that all drugstores comply with the law and are 100% smoke-free. Copyright (c) 2010 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Professional issues related to obstacles to midwifery practice in the Americas: a pilot survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCool, William; Guidera, Mamie; Reale, Barbara; Smith, Andrea; Koucoi, Jaclyn

    2013-08-01

    the WHO (2011) estimates that 350,000 newly trained midwives are needed internationally to meet Goal 5-- Improve Maternal Health--of the 8 Millennium Development Goals established by the United Nations in 2000. Recognizing the challenges in accomplishing this goal, it is also imperative to retain trained midwives in the profession. Little to date has been investigated regarding the factors that lead to experienced midwives leaving the profession prematurely, particularly in low resource countries. in an effort to initiate identification of barriers that limit midwives' ability to continue in practice, a pilot study was conducted with a convenience sample of 58 midwife attendees, representing 12 countries, at the International Confederation of Midwives - Americas Triennial Regional Meeting in 2010. A survey was distributed to midwife respondents to explore potential influences on work retention, including: encounters of adverse outcomes in practice; empowerment to make change in the work setting; and migration. sixty per cent of respondents reported encountering a maternal or newborn death or injury, and 10% had considered leaving the profession. Over 50% of the midwives listed three potential results that could occur after experiencing an adverse outcome in practice. These included: (a) an investigation by a governmental agency; (b) complaints about the midwife via available media; and (c) involvement in a lawsuit. The consequence most frequently cited for not enacting evidence-based changes in the workplace was resistance from obstetrical colleagues. while there are limitations to gathering data from attendees at a professional meeting, this is the first known international survey of midwives regarding factors that may contribute to their leaving the profession at a time when there is an increasing global awareness of the need for a skilled birth attendant at every birth. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A Pilot Deep Survey for X-Ray Emission from fuvAGB Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Sahai, R; Contreras, C Sanchez; Stute, M

    2015-01-01

    We report the results of a pilot survey for X-ray emission from a newly discovered class of AGB stars with far-ultraviolet excesses (fuvAGB stars) using XMM-Newton and Chandra. We detected X-ray emission in 3 of 6 fuvAGB stars observed -- the X-ray fluxes are found to vary in a stochastic or quasi-periodic manner on roughly hour-long times-scales, and simultaneous UV observations using the Optical Monitor on XMM for these sources show similar variations in the UV flux. These data, together with previous studies, show that X-ray emission is found only in fuvAGB stars. From modeling the spectra, we find that the observed X-ray luminosities are ~(0.002-0.2 ) Lsun, and the X-ray emitting plasma temperatures are ~(35-160) x 10^6 K. The high X-ray temperatures argue against the emission arising in stellar coronae, or directly in an accretion shock, unless it occurs on a WD companion. However, none of the detected objects is a known WD-symbiotic star, suggesting that if WD companions are present, they are relatively...

  11. Prevailing clinical practices regarding screening for retinopathy of prematurity among pediatricians in India: A pilot survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Dileep Patwardhan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To evaluate the prevailing practices for proper screening and referral scheme among Indian pediatricians for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP. Materials and Methods: Pediatricians registered with Indian Academy of Pediatrics from six states of India were selected randomly and were telephonically interviewed in accordance with a preformed questionnaire which comprised of questions regarding demographic factors, number of premature children seen per month, awareness and referral scheme to ophthalmologist; responses thus obtained were analyzed. Results: Hundred percent knowledge about ROP and need for screening in premature babies was observed among the respondents. However, only 135 (58% pediatricians always referred for ROP screening, 19 (8% referred only sometimes and 80 (34% did not refer at all. Consistent referral protocols taking into account all plausible risk factors for ROP were followed by only 25% of those who always referred. Major deterrent in ROP screening was perceived as non-availability of trained ophthalmologists. Conclusions: Only 14.5% of total pediatricians contacted were following international recommendations for ROP referral. Screening for ROP remains dismal as observed in this pilot survey as a consequence of non-availability of trained ophthalmologists as well as inconsistent screening guidelines.

  12. A Pilot Study for the SCUBA-2 'All-Sky' Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Mackenzie, Todd; Gibb, Andy G; Scott, Douglas; Jenness, Tim; Serjeant, Stephen; Thompson, Mark; Berry, David; Brunt, Christopher M; Chapin, Edward; Chrysostomou, Antonio; Clements, Dave; Coppin, Kristen; Economou, Frossie; Evans, A; Friberg, Per; Greaves, Jane; Hill, T; Holland, Wayne; Ivison, R J; Knapen, Johan H; Jackson, Neal; Joncas, Gilles; Morgan, Larry; Pearson, Chris; Pestalozzi, Michele; Pope, Alexandra; Richer, John; Urquhart, J S; Vaccari, Mattia; Weferling, Bernd; White, Glenn; Zhu, Ming

    2010-01-01

    We have carried out a pilot study for the SCUBA-2 'All-Sky' Survey, SASSy, a wide and shallow mapping project at 850 microns, designed to find rare objects, both Galactic and extragalactic. Two distinct sets of exploratory observations were undertaken, and used to test the SASSy approach and data reduction pipeline. The first was a 0.5 by 0.5 degrees map around the nearby galaxy NGC 2559. The galaxy was easily detected at 156 mJy, but no other convincing sources are present in the map. Comparison with other galaxies with similar wavelength coverage indicates that NGC 2559 has relatively warm dust. The second observations cover 1 square degree around the W5-E HII region. As well as diffuse structure in the map, a filtering approach was able to extract 27 compact sources with signal-to-noise greater than 6. By matching with data at other wavelengths we can see that the SCUBA-2 data can be used to discriminate the colder cores. Together these observations show that the SASSy project will be able to meet its orig...

  13. The pilot survey of the industry 4.0 principles penetration in the selected Czech and Polish companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Basl

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the aspects of the ICT innovation based on the development of the internet of things in industrial branches. This trend is known as the Industry 4.0, e.g. the forth industrial revolution. The article presents main results of the pilot survey done in selected Czech and Polish companies. They show the current status of the Industry 4.0 understanding and penetration in companies, incl. expected benefits and known obstacles of this trend.

  14. Text Message Feedback to Support Mindfulness Practice in People With Depressive Symptoms: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Susanne; Wolf, Markus; Klein, Thomas; Becker, Thomas; Bauer, Stephanie; Puschner, Bernd

    2017-05-02

    It has been shown that mindfulness practice can be helpful in preventing relapse from depression. However, practicing mindfulness regularly at home is often a challenge for people with depression. Mobile phone text messaging (short message service, SMS) may be a feasible approach to assist regular mindfulness home practice. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of text message-based feedback to support mindfulness practice in people with depressive symptoms after inpatient psychiatric treatment. Participants received a manualized group introduction to three mindfulness exercises during inpatient treatment and were randomized at hospital discharge. All participants were asked to practice the exercises daily during the 4-month follow-up period. Only participants allocated to the intervention group received reinforcing feedback via mobile phone text messages after reporting their mindfulness practice via text message. Participation rates and satisfaction with the interventions were evaluated, and effects on relevant outcomes were explored. Of the 176 eligible inpatients invited to participate, 65.9% (116/176) attended the introductory mindfulness group at least once, 33.0% (58/176) were willing to participate in the study, and 41 were randomized. The majority 85% (35/41) of these participants completed the study. Among the participants allocated to the intervention group (n=21), 81% (17/21) used the text message support at least once. The average number of text messages sent during the intervention period was 14 (SD 21, range 0-91). Satisfaction rates were high. Preliminary analyses of the effects of the intervention yielded mixed results. Findings indicate that text messaging following inpatient treatment is feasible for some, but not for all people with depressive symptoms. Modest use of the text messaging intervention and its mixed effects imply that dose and ingredients of the intervention should be increased for this group of patients in a future

  15. Obtaining patient feedback in an outpatient lithotripsy service is facilitated by use of a touch-screen tablet (iPad™) survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turney, B W; Reynard, J M

    2014-08-01

    There is now a requirement for every doctor in the UK to obtain patient feedback for revalidation. This can be an onerous and time-consuming task. The objective of this study was to evaluate a novel electronic patient feedback method in an outpatient lithotripsy service setting. Between September 2013 and January 2014, 100 patients attending an outpatient lithotripsy service in Oxford were asked to complete a selection of pre-approved NHS questions about the service they had received. Questions were presented on a tablet device (iPad™) and answered using the touch screen. Departmental staff were unaware of the questions in the survey. Patients were asked to complete the survey by an independent research nurse. Questions were created online in a free-to-use web-based survey application and presented on the tablet device in a user-friendly format via an application. Data were uploaded via wifi™ to the online system. Data were viewed, automatically analysed and displayed graphically. The age range of the patients surveyed was 20-80 years of age. All 100 patients completed the survey without difficulty. All patients answered every question. Data could be automatically viewed, analysed and presented graphically. This method of collecting patient feedback proved to be rapid and efficient. The feedback highlighted a high patient satisfaction with the lithotripsy service. A touch screen tablet device is an efficient and effective method of collecting truly objective patient feedback. This method of patient feedback could be employed in other clinical environments to collect data for revalidation purposes.

  16. Efficacy of Feedback-Controlled Robotics-Assisted Treadmill Exercise to Improve Cardiovascular Fitness Early After Stroke: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoller, Oliver; de Bruin, Eling D; Schindelholz, Matthias; Schuster-Amft, Corina; de Bie, Rob A; Hunt, Kenneth J

    2015-07-01

    Cardiovascular fitness is greatly reduced after stroke. Although individuals with mild to moderate impairments benefit from conventional cardiovascular exercise interventions, there is a lack of effective approaches for persons with severely impaired physical function. This randomized controlled pilot trial investigated efficacy and feasibility of feedback-controlled robotics-assisted treadmill exercise (FC-RATE) for cardiovascular rehabilitation in persons with severe impairments early after stroke. Twenty individuals (age 61 ± 11 years; 52 ± 31 days poststroke) with severe motor limitations (Functional Ambulation Classification 0-2) were recruited for FC-RATE or conventional robotics-assisted treadmill exercise (RATE) (4 weeks, 3 × 30-minute sessions/wk). Outcome measures focused on peak cardiopulmonary performance parameters, training intensity, and feasibility, with examiners blinded to allocation. All 14 allocated participants (70% of recruited) completed the intervention (7/group, withdrawals unrelated to intervention), without serious adverse events occurring. Cardiovascular fitness increased significantly in both groups, with peak oxygen uptake increasing from 14.6 to 17.7 mL · kg · min (+17.8%) after 4 weeks (45.8%-55.7% of predicted maximal aerobic capacity; time effect P = 0.01; no group-time interaction). Training intensity (% heart rate reserve) was significantly higher for FC-RATE (40% ± 3%) than for conventional RATE (14% ± 2%) (P = 0.001). Substantive overall increases in the main cardiopulmonary performance parameters were observed, but there were no significant between-group differences when comparing FC-RATE and conventional RATE. Feedback-controlled robotics-assisted treadmill exercise significantly increased exercise intensity, but recommended intensity levels for cardiovascular training were not consistently achieved. Future research should focus on appropriate algorithms within advanced robotic systems to promote optimal cardiovascular

  17. Respiratory health screening for opiate misusers in a specialist community clinic: a mixed-methods pilot study, with integrated staff and service user feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Caroline Anne; Pitt, Alice; Hulin, Joe; Lawson, Rod; Ashby, Fleur; Appelqvist, Ivan; Delaney, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Increased rates of illicit drug inhalation are thought to expose opiate misusers (OMUs) to an enhanced risk of respiratory health problems. This pilot study aimed to determine the feasibility of undertaking respiratory screening of OMUs in a community clinic. Setting Single-centre UK community substance misuse clinic. Participants All clinic attendees receiving treatment for opiate misuse were eligible to participate. 36 participants (mean age=37) were recruited over a 5-week period. The sample included 26 males and 10 females. Outcome measures Spirometry without bronchodilation; health related quality of life EQ-5D-3L; Asthma Control Test; Mini Asthma Quality of Life; Clinical COPD Questionnaire and the Treatment Outcome Profile were used to assess the respiratory health of participants. Findings were discussed with staff and service users in 2 patient and public involvement events and feedback was analysed thematically. Results 34 participants reported that they had smoked heroin. 8 participants diagnosed with asthma, scored under 13 on the Asthma Control Test, suggesting poorly controlled asthma. Participants (n=28), without a diagnosis of asthma completed the Lung Function Questionnaire. Of these, 79% produced scores under 18, indicating symptoms associated with the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Spirometry showed 14% of all participants had forced expiratory volume in 1 s/forced vital capacity <0.7 (without bronchodilator), indicating potential obstructive lung disease. Feedback from service users and staff suggested a willingness and capacity to deliver respiratory health screening programmes. Insight towards the difficulties service users have in accessing services and the burden of respiratory health was also provided. Conclusions It is feasible to undertake respiratory health screening of OMUs in a community clinic. Larger screening studies are warranted to determine the prevalence of respiratory health problems in this

  18. A Panchromatic Survey of Post-starburst Mergers: searching for feedback

    CERN Document Server

    De Propris, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    We consider the morphology, stellar populations, structure and AGN activity of 10 post-starburst (K+A) galaxies with HST observations, full spectral coverage in the optical, spectral energy distributions from 0.2 to 160 $\\mu$m, X-ray and radio data. Our results show that the PSG phenomenon is related to mergers and interactions, and that star formation was likely triggered during close passes prior to final coalescence. We performed a detailed qualitative analysis of the observed light distribution, including low-surface brightness tidal features and color profiles, in high-resolution multi-band imaging with HST. We find evidence that star formation was centrally concentrated and that quenching took place from the inside-out, consistent with the occurrence of a feedback episode. Most of our PSGs contain massive bulges and therefore should host supermassive black holes. We search for AGN activity in spectra (line ratios), optical variability, X-ray emission at 0.5--7.0 KeV and radio emission at 20cm: all four ...

  19. Mobile Access to ClinicalConnect: A User Feedback Survey on Usability, Productivity, and Quality

    OpenAIRE

    Eapen, Bell Raj; Chapman, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Background ClinicalConnect, a federated clinical viewer for South West Ontario, Canada, launched a mobile interface in June 2012. Objective The aim of the study was to assess usability of the mobile interface and the perceived impact on productivity of health care providers and quality of healthcare delivery. Methods A survey was conducted using the System Usability Scale (SUS) and questionnaires designed to measure productivity and quality based on Canada Health Infoway's Benefits Evaluation...

  20. Pilot implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Bansler, Jørgen P.; Havn, Erling C.

    2012-01-01

    A recurrent problem in information-systems development (ISD) is that many design shortcomings are not detected during development, but first after the system has been delivered and implemented in its intended environment. Pilot implementations appear to promise a way to extend prototyping from...... the laboratory to the field, thereby allowing users to experience a system design under realistic conditions and developers to get feedback from realistic use while the design is still malleable. We characterize pilot implementation, contrast it with prototyping, propose a five-element model of pilot...

  1. Effect of Above Real Time Training and Post Flight Feedback in Training of Novice Pilots in a PC-Based Flight Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M. Javed; Rossi, Marcia; Heath, Bruce E.; Ali, Syed firasat; Crane, Peter; Knighten, Tremaine; Culpepper, Christi

    2003-01-01

    The use of Post-Flight Feedback (PFFB) and Above Real-Time Training (ARTT) while training novice pilots to perform a coordinated level turn on a PC-based flight simulator was investigated. One group trained at 1.5 ARTT followed by an equal number of flights at 2.0 ARTT; the second group experienced Real Time Training (RTT). The total number of flights for both groups was equal. Each group was further subdivided into two groups one of which was provided PFFB while the other was not. Then, all participants experienced two challenging evaluation missions in real time. Performance was assessed by comparing root-mean-square error in bank-angle and altitude. Participants in the 1.512.0 ARTT No-PFFB sequence did not show improvement in performance across training sessions. An ANOVA on performance in evaluation flights found that the PFFB groups performed significantly better than those with No-PFFB. Also, the RTT groups performed significantly better than the ARTT groups. Data from two additional groups trained under a 2.011.5 ARTT PFFB and No-PFFB regimes were collected and combined with data from the previously Trainers, Real-time simulation, Personal studied groups and reanalyzed to study the computers, Man-in-the-loop simulation influence of sequence. An ANOVA on test trials found no significant effects between groups. Under training situations involving ARTT we recommend that appropriate PFFB be provided.

  2. A canine leishmaniasis pilot survey in an emerging focus of visceral leishmaniasis: Posadas (Misiones, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deschutter Jorge

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An increasing number of reports are calling our attention to the worldwide spread of leishmaniasis. The urbanization of zoonotic visceral leishmaniasis (VL has been observed in different South American countries, due to changes in demographic and ecological factors. In May 2006, VL was detected for the first time in the city of Posadas (Misiones, Argentina. This event encouraged us to conduct a clinical and parasitological pilot survey on domestic dogs from Posadas to identify their potential role as reservoirs for the disease. Methods One hundred and ten dogs from the city of Posadas were included in the study. They were selected based on convenience and availability. All dogs underwent clinical examination. Symptomatology related to canine leishmaniasis was recorded, and peripheral blood and lymph node aspirates were collected. Anti-Leishmania antibodies were detected using rK39-immunocromatographic tests and IFAT. Parasite detection was based on peripheral blood and lymph node aspirate PCR targeting the SSUrRNA gene. Molecular typing was addressed by DNA sequence analysis of the PCR products obtained by SSUrRNA and ITS-1 PCR. Results According to clinical examination, 69.1% (76/110 of the dogs presented symptoms compatible with canine leishmaniasis. Serological analyses were positive for 43.6% (48/110 of the dogs and parasite DNA was detected in 47.3% (52/110. A total of 63 dogs (57.3% were positive by serology and/or PCR. Molecular typing identified Leishmania infantum (syn. Leishmania chagasi as the causative agent. Conclusions This work confirms recent findings which revealed the presence of Lutzomyia longipalpis, the vector of L. infantum in this area of South America. This new VL focus could be well established, and further work is needed to ascertain its magnitude and to prevent further human VL cases.

  3. A Pilot Deep Survey for X-Ray Emission from fuvAGB Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahai, R.; Sanz-Forcada, J.; Sánchez Contreras, C.; Stute, M.

    2015-09-01

    We report the results of a pilot survey for X-ray emission from a newly discovered class of AGB stars with far-ultraviolet excesses (fuvAGB stars) using XMM-Newton and Chandra. We detected X-ray emission in three of six fuvAGB stars observed—the X-ray fluxes are found to vary in a stochastic or quasi-periodic manner on roughly hour-long timescales, and simultaneous UV observations using the Optical Monitor on XMM for these sources show similar variations in the UV flux. These data, together with previous studies, show that X-ray emission is found only in fuvAGB stars. From modeling the spectra, we find that the observed X-ray luminosities are ˜(0.002-0.2) L⊙ and the X-ray-emitting plasma temperatures are ˜(35-160) × 106 K. The high X-ray temperatures argue against the emission arising in stellar coronae, or directly in an accretion shock, unless it occurs on a WD companion. However, none of the detected objects is a known WD-symbiotic star, suggesting that if WD companions are present, they are relatively cool (<20,000 K). In addition, the high X-ray luminosities specifically argue against emission originating in the coronae of main-sequence companions. We discuss several models for the X-ray emission and its variability and find that the most likely scenario for the origin of the X-ray (and FUV) emission involves accretion activity around a companion star, with confinement by strong magnetic fields associated with the companion and/or an accretion disk around it.

  4. Evaluation of embedded audio feedback on writing assignments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Janet K; Goodman, Joely T; Hercinger, Maribeth; Minnich, Margo; Murcek, Christina M; Parks, Jane M; Shirley, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to compare embedded audio feedback (EAF), which faculty provided using the iPad(®) application iAnnotate(®) PDF to insert audio comments and written feedback (WF), inserted electronically on student papers in a series of writing assignments. Goals included determining whether EAF provides more useful guidance to students than WF and whether EAF promotes connectedness among students and faculty. An additional goal was to ascertain the efficiency and acceptance of EAF as a grading tool by nursing faculty. The pilot study was a quasi-experimental, cross-over, posttest-only design. The project was completed in an Informatics in Health Care course. Faculty alternated the two feedback methods on four papers written by each student. Results of surveys and focus groups revealed that students and faculty had mixed feelings about this technology. Student preferences were equally divided between EAF and WF, with 35% for each, and 28% were undecided.

  5. Pilot implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Bansler, Jørgen P.; Havn, Erling C.

    2012-01-01

    A recurrent problem in information-systems development (ISD) is that many design shortcomings are not detected during development, but first after the system has been delivered and implemented in its intended environment. Pilot implementations appear to promise a way to extend prototyping from...... the laboratory to the field, thereby allowing users to experience a system design under realistic conditions and developers to get feedback from realistic use while the design is still malleable. We characterize pilot implementation, contrast it with prototyping, propose a iveelement model of pilot...... implementation and provide three empirical illustrations of our model. We conclude that pilot implementation has much merit as an ISD technique when system performance is contingent on context. But we also warn developers that, despite their seductive conceptual simplicity, pilot implementations can be difficult...

  6. Pilot implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Bansler, Jørgen P.; Havn, Erling C.

    2012-01-01

    A recurrent problem in information-systems development (ISD) is that many design shortcomings are not detected during development, but first after the system has been delivered and implemented in its intended environment. Pilot implementations appear to promise a way to extend prototyping from...... the laboratory to the field, thereby allowing users to experience a system design under realistic conditions and developers to get feedback from realistic use while the design is still malleable. We characterize pilot implementation, contrast it with prototyping, propose a five-element model of pilot...... implementation, and provide three empirical illustrations of our model. We conclude that pilot implementation has much merit as an ISD technique when system performance is contingent on context. But we also warn developers that, despite their seductive conceptual simplicity, pilot implementations can...

  7. Managing multiple projects: a literature review of setting priorities and a pilot survey of healthcare researchers in an academic setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Robert Borden; Campbell, Kaitryn; O'Reilly, Daria; Tarride, Jean-Eric; Bowen, Jim; Blackhouse, Gord; Goerre, Ron

    2007-05-16

    To summarize and then assess with a pilot study the use of published best practice recommendations for priority setting during management of multiple healthcare research projects, in a resource-constrained environment. Medical, economic, business, and operations literature was reviewed to summarize and develop a survey to assess best practices for managing multiple projects. Fifteen senior healthcare research project managers, directors, and faculty at an urban academic institution were surveyed to determine most commonly used priority rules, ranking of rules, characteristics of their projects, and availability of resources. Survey results were compared to literature recommendations to determine use of best practices. Seven priority-setting rules were identified for managing multiple projects. Recommendations on assigning priorities by project characteristics are presented. In the pilot study, a large majority of survey respondents follow best practice recommendations identified in the research literature. However, priority rules such as Most Total Successors (MTS) and Resource Scheduling Method (RSM) were used "very often" by half of the respondents when better performing priority rules were available. Through experience, project managers learn to manage multiple projects under resource constraints. Best practice literature can assist project managers in priority setting by recommending the most appropriate priority given resource constraints and project characteristics. There is room for improvement in managing multiple projects.

  8. Pilot survey of NICU nurses' interest in the neonatal nurse practitioner role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Lynn B; Vargo, Lyn E; Reavey, Daphne A; Hunter, Kim S

    2005-02-01

    This descriptive, qualitative pilot study explored the interest and perceptions of neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) nurses regarding the neonatal nurse practitioner (NNP) role. Motivating factors to become an NNP, challenges facing NNPs, and rewards of the NNP role from the perspectives of NICU nurses were explored. The convenience sample was obtained using 2 survey techniques. The first sample group included nurses who were employed in Level III NICUs located within 2 major Midwestern cities. In order to confirm the data and to expand the scope, the second sample group was recruited from NICU nurses who were attending a regional educational conference. All participants were currently employed NICU nurses and were therefore potential NNP students. Combining the participants of both enrollment techniques resulted in a potential of 696 subjects. A simple self-administered survey was used to collect data. Narrative data were qualitatively analyzed. Demographic data and categorical items were quantified. This study achieved a total 30% response rate (n = 209). Of the total participants, only 32% of Level III NICU nurses were interested in becoming an NNP. Analysis of the data revealed 6 major categories (themes) of reasons why nurses were not interested in the NNP role. The themes most often mentioned by the participants were (1) obligations to family and/or work (46%) and (2) too much responsibility in the NNP role (30%). The data also revealed several different rewards and challenges for those in the NNP role as well as factors that may motivate nurses to become an NNP. Given the current NNP shortage, an increase in the supply of NNPs for the workforce is imperative. Current enrollment in NNP academic programs does not appear to be meeting the demand. Exploring the factors that influence enrollment in NNP programs from the perspective of potential NNP students is the first step towards increasing the supply of NNPs. The majority of participants were not interested

  9. Chandra survey of nearby highly inclined disk galaxies - IV. New insights into the working of stellar feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q. Daniel; Li, Jiangtao; Jiang, Xiaochuan; Fang, Taotao

    2016-04-01

    Galaxy evolution is regulated by the interplay between galactic discs and their surrounding medium. We study this interplay by examining how the galactic coronal emission efficiency of stellar feedback depends on the (surface and specific) star formation rates (SFRs) and other parameters for a sample of 52 Chandra-observed nearby highly inclined disc galaxies. We first measure the star-forming galactic disc sizes, as well as the SFRs of these galaxies, using data from the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer, and then show that (1) the specific 0.5-2 keV luminosity of the coronal emission correlates with the specific SFR in a sub-linear fashion: on average, LX/LK∝(SFR/M*)Γ with Γ = 0.29 ± 0.12; (2) the efficiency of the emission LX/SFR decreases with increasing surface SFR (ISFR; Γ = -0.44 ± 0.12); and (3) the characteristic temperature of the X-ray-emitting plasma weakly correlates with ISFR (Γ = 0.08 ± 0.04). These results, somewhat surprising and anti-intuitive, suggest that (i) the linear correlation between LX and SFR, as commonly presented, is largely due to the correlation of these two parameters with galaxy mass; (ii) much of the mechanical energy from stellar feedback likely drives global outflows with little X-ray cooling and with a mass-loading efficiency decreasing fast with increasing ISFR (Γ ≲ -0.5); (iii) these outflows heat and inflate the medium around the galactic disks of massive galaxies, reducing its radiative cooling rate, whereas for relatively low-mass galaxies, the energy in the outflows is probably dissipated in regions far away from the galactic discs.

  10. The MAGNUM survey: Positive feedback in the nuclear region of NGC 5643 suggested by MUSE

    CERN Document Server

    Cresci, G; Zibetti, S; Risaliti, G; Carniani, S; Mannucci, F; Gallazzi, A; Maiolino, R; Balmaverde, B; Brusa, M; Capetti, A; Cicone, C; Feruglio, C; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Nagao, T; Oliva, E; Salvato, M; Sani, E; Tozzi, P; Urrutia, T; Venturi, G

    2015-01-01

    We study the ionization and kinematics of the ionized gas in the nuclear region of the barred Seyfert 2 galaxy NGC~5643 using MUSE integral field observations in the framework of the MAGNUM (Measuring Active Galactic Nuclei Under MUSE Microscope) survey. The data were used to identify regions with different ionization conditions and to map the gas density and the dust extinction. We find evidence for a double sided ionization cone, possibly collimated by a dusty structure surrounding the nucleus. At the center of the ionization cone, outflowing ionized gas is revealed as a blueshifted, asymmetric wing of the [OIII] emission line, up to projected velocity v(10)~-450 km/s. The outflow is also seen as a diffuse, low luminosity radio and X-ray jet, with similar extension. The outflowing material points in the direction of two clumps characterized by prominent line emission with spectra typical of HII regions, located at the edge of the dust lane of the bar. We propose that the star formation in the clumps is due ...

  11. Human Papillomavirus-mediated cervical cancer awareness and Gardasil vaccination: a pilot survey among North Indian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Saumya; Chandravati

    2013-10-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV)-mediated cervical cancer is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in women worldwide, including Indian women. Cervical cancer control and prevention strategies are being adopted in developing nations to reduce the increasing burden of HPV infection in the vaccine era. The present study, therefore, aimed to evaluate cervical cancer awareness and knowledge of Gardasil vaccination in North Indian women. A pilot survey was conducted among 103 women of North Indian ethnicity residing in Lucknow/adjoining areas in state of Uttar Pradesh, during routine screening/clinic visits from June 2012 to December 2012. The study subjects were interviewed in either Hindi or English; subsequently the awareness of HPV-mediated cervical cancer and knowledge of Gardasil vaccination was assessed in terms of "yes", "no" and "no response". The study was approved by the Institutional Review Board. Written informed consent was taken from the participants. Overall, the response of participants (n = 103) in our single-centre survey-based pilot study was well-defined. The response regarding HPV-mediated cervical cancer awareness in terms of "yes", "no" and "no response" among the study subjects was 43.7, 44.7 and 11.6 %, respectively. Furthermore, in response to knowledge of HPV vaccine Gardasil, out of 103 subjects, 28.1 % answered "yes" while 37.9 and 34.0 % stated "no" and "no response", respectively. Our pilot survey may help in assessing knowledge of HPV-mediated cervical cancer and Gardasil vaccination awareness in women, and accordingly develop cost-effective cervical cancer control and prevention/public health counseling sessions in a clinical setting.

  12. Dynamic Feedbacks Between Flow, Erosion and Evolving River Bank Roughness Revealed Through Repeat High-Resolution Topographic Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyland, J.; Darby, S. E.; Rinaldi, M.; Teruggi, L. B.; Ostuni, D.

    2012-12-01

    Bank erosion is a key process in fluvial dynamics, with significant fractions of the total sediment load being sourced from river banks. Studies have shown that hydraulic erosion of the bank toe is a driving factor of long term rates of bank retreat. Fluvial bank erosion rates are often quantified using an excess shear stress model where the erosion rate is a function of the boundary shear stress applied by the flow above a critical threshold. Research has shown that the form roughness induced by natural topographic bank features such as slumps, spurs and embayments, is a major component of the spatially-averaged total shear stress. The skin friction component of this shear stress is typically an order of magnitude less than the total, meaning that the form roughness provides an important control on bank erosion rates. However, measuring the relative components of the total shear stress for a natural system is not straightforward. In this research we apply the method of Kean and Smith [2006, J. Geophys. Res., 111(4), F04009, doi:10.1029/2006JF000467] to partition the form and skin drag components of river bank roughness for an eroding bank of the Cecina River in central Italy. This method approximates the form drag component of the roughness along a longitudinal bank profile as a series of user defined Gaussian curves, with the skin friction component estimated through analysis of the deviations of the data from the fitted curves. For our site, a temporal sequence (2003 - 2011) of high-resolution topographic surveys has been collected through a combination of photogrammetry and Terrestrial Laser Scanning. For each survey five vertically equidistant profiles are extracted and analysed alongside DEMs of difference and associated flow data modelled using the distributed hydrological model MOBIDIC. The data are used to explore the dynamic feedbacks that exist between river discharge, bank erosion processes and bank form roughness, revealing insights into the self

  13. Chandra survey of nearby highly inclined disk galaxies -- IV: New insights into the working of stellar feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Q Daniel; Jiang, Xiaochuan; Fang, Taotao

    2015-01-01

    Galaxy evolution is regulated by the interplay between galactic disks and their surrounding medium. We study this interplay by examining how the galactic coronal emission efficiency of stellar feedback depends on the (surface and specific) star formation rates (SFRs) and other parameters for a sample of 52 Chandra-observed nearby highly inclined disk galaxies. We first measure the star forming galactic disk sizes, as well as the SFRs of these galaxies, using data from the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer, and then show that 1) the specific 0.5-2~keV luminosity of the coronal emission correlates with the specific SFR in a {\\sl sub-linear} fashion: on average, $L_X/L_K \\propto (SFR/M_*)^{\\Gamma}$ with $\\Gamma =0.29\\pm0.12$; 2) the efficiency of the emission $ L_X/SFR$ decreases with increasing surface SFR ($I_{SFR}$; $\\Gamma = -0.44\\pm0.12$); and 3) the characteristic temperature of the X-ray-emitting plasma weakly correlates with $I_{SFR}$ ($\\Gamma = 0.08\\pm0.04$). These results, somewhat surprising and ant...

  14. A statistical analysis of the Two Dimensional XMM-Newton Group Survey: The impact of feedback on group properties

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Ria; Finoguenov, Alexis

    2009-01-01

    (abridged) We present a statistical analysis of 28 nearby galaxy groups from the Two-Dimensional XMM-Newton Group Survey (2dXGS). We focus on entropy and the role of feedback, dividing the sample into cool core (CC) and non cool core (NCC) systems, the first time the latter have been studied in detail in the group regime. The coolest groups have steeper entropy profiles than the warmest systems, and NCC groups have higher central entropy and exhibit more scatter than their CC counterparts. We compare the entropy distribution of the gas in each system to the expected theoretical distribution ignoring non-gravitational processes. In all cases, the observed maximum entropy far exceeds that expected theoretically, and simple models for modifications of the theoretical entropy distribution perform poorly. Applying initial pre-heating, followed by radiative cooling, generally fails to match the low entropy behaviour, and only performs well when the difference between the maximum entropy of the observed and theoreti...

  15. Removing guns from batterers: findings from a pilot survey of domestic violence restraining order recipients in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vittes, Katherine A; Webster, Daniel W; Frattaroli, Shannon; Claire, Barbara E; Wintemute, Garen J

    2013-05-01

    Persons under certain domestic violence restraining orders in California are required to surrender any firearms in their possession within 24 hours of service. The California Department of Justice funded a pilot program in which Sheriff's Offices in two counties developed a system for better enforcing the firearm surrender requirement. As part of a larger process evaluation, 17 restraining order recipients were interviewed about their experiences with and feelings about the removal of firearms from their abusers. Most women surveyed wanted firearms removed and felt safer as a result of their removal. Implications of the findings are discussed.

  16. Carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in Irish critical care units: results of a pilot prevalence survey, June 2011.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burns, K

    2012-11-10

    The epidemiology of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) in Ireland is changing, with an increase in the number of reported cases in late 2010 and early 2011. Reported cases were predominantly linked to critical care units. In June 2011, a four-week national pilot survey took place in 40 Irish critical care units (37 adult and three paediatric) to examine the prevalence of rectal carriage of CPE and inform national CPE screening guidelines. A total of 760 screening swabs were taken over the study period, and CPE were not detected in any of the participating critical care units.

  17. Training symmetry of weight distribution after stroke: a randomized controlled pilot study comparing task-related reach, Bobath and feedback training approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudie, M H; Winzeler-Mercay, U; Radwan, S; Lee, L

    2002-09-01

    To determine (1) the most effective of three treatment approaches to retrain seated weight distribution long-term after stroke and (2) whether improvements could be generalized to weight distribution in standing. Inpatient rehabilitation unit. Forty asymmetrical acute stroke subjects were randomly allocated to one of four groups in this pilot study. Changes in weight distribution were compared between the 10 subjects of each of three treatment groups (task-specific reach, Bobath, or Balance Performance Monitor [BPM] feedback training) and a no specific treatment control group. One week of measurement only was followed by two weeks of daily training sessions with the treatment to which the subject was randomly allocated. Measurements were performed using the BPM daily before treatment sessions, two weeks after cessation of treatment and 12 weeks post study. Weight distribution was calculated in terms of mean balance (percentage of total body weight) or the mean of 300 balance points over a 30-s data run. In the short term, the Bobath approach was the most effective treatment for retraining sitting symmetry after stroke (p = 0.004). Training with the BPM and no training were also significant (p = 0.038 and p = 0.035 respectively) and task-specific reach training failed to reach significance (p = 0.26). At 12 weeks post study 83% of the BPM training group, 38% of the task-specific reach group, 29% of the Bobath group and 0% of the untrained group were found to be distributing their weight to both sides. Some generalization of symmetry training in sitting to standing was noted in the BPM training group which appeared to persist long term. Results should be treated with caution due to the small group sizes. However, these preliminary findings suggest that it might be possible to restore postural symmetry in sitting in the early stages of rehabilitation with therapy that focuses on creating an awareness of body position.

  18. Assessing patients’ experience of integrated care: a survey of patient views in the North West London Integrated Care Pilot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos Mastellos

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Despite the importance of continuity of care and patient engagement, few studies have captured patients’ views on integrated care. This study assesses patient experience in the Integrated Care Pilot in North West London with the aim to help clinicians and policy makers understand patients’ acceptability of integrated care and design future initiatives. Methods: A survey was developed, validated and distributed to 2029 randomly selected practice patients identified as having a care plan. Results: A total of 405 questionnaires were included for analysis. Respondents identified a number of benefits associated with the pilot, including increased patient involvement in decision-making, improved patient-provider relationship, better organisation and access to care, and enhanced inter-professional communication. However, only 22.4% were aware of having a care plan, and of these only 37.9% had a copy of the care plan. Knowledge of care plans was significantly associated with a more positive experience. Conclusions: This study reinforces the view that integrated care can improve quality of care and patient experience. However, care planning was a complex and technically challenging process that occurred more slowly than planned with wide variation in quality and time of recruitment to the pilot, making it difficult to assess the sustainability of benefits.

  19. Assessing patients’ experience of integrated care: a survey of patient views in the North West London Integrated Care Pilot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos Mastellos

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Despite the importance of continuity of care and patient engagement, few studies have captured patients’ views on integrated care. This study assesses patient experience in the Integrated Care Pilot in North West London with the aim to help clinicians and policy makers understand patients’ acceptability of integrated care and design future initiatives.Methods: A survey was developed, validated and distributed to 2029 randomly selected practice patients identified as having a care plan.Results: A total of 405 questionnaires were included for analysis. Respondents identified a number of benefits associated with the pilot, including increased patient involvement in decision-making, improved patient-provider relationship, better organisation and access to care, and enhanced inter-professional communication. However, only 22.4% were aware of having a care plan, and of these only 37.9% had a copy of the care plan. Knowledge of care plans was significantly associated with a more positive experience.Conclusions: This study reinforces the view that integrated care can improve quality of care and patient experience. However, care planning was a complex and technically challenging process that occurred more slowly than planned with wide variation in quality and time of recruitment to the pilot, making it difficult to assess the sustainability of benefits.

  20. Feedback Control of Rotor Overspeed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchill, G. B.

    1984-01-01

    Feedback system for automatically governing helicopter rotor speed promises to lessen pilot's workload, enhance maneuverability, and protect airframe. With suitable modifications, concept applied to control speed of electrical generators, automotive engines and other machinery.

  1. Productive and reproductive choices: report of a pilot survey of urban working women in Karachi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazi, S; Sathar, Z A

    1986-01-01

    The primary objective of the pilot survey of urban working women in Karachi was to collect information on women's productive and reproductive choices within the context of the conditions in their household. A sample of working women in the formal sectors was selected through procurement of lists of personnel from factories, government offices, and so forth. The sample was not chosen systematically. The intention was not only to sample but to identify commonly found occupations among women. The sample of 110 working women included respondents between 19-50 years. 93 of these women were currently married, 6 were separated or divorced, and 11 were widowed. Most of the ethnic groups living in Karachi were represented. The sample includes 3 distinct socioeconomic groups: highly educated women employed in high status jobs with earnings above the average; women of lower middle class backgrounds who work in the formal sector but in lower-status occupations as compared with those of the professional group; and mostly uneducated women who work as low-status workers and whose incomes are meager. More than 70% of the women gave financial pressure as a reason for their entering the labor force. Women for whom the important reason for work was pursuit of a career or job satisfaction were highly educated and employed in high-status, remunerative jobs. Only 20 of the sample of 110 women worked for noneconomic reasons. Of 64 women working as factory workers, domestic servants, and other miscellaneous workers in the informal sector, there were only 2 women working out of choice. Women who worked before marriage comprised nearly 51% of the sample. There was a very strong positive association between work before marriage and level of education and occupation. A much larger percentage of educated women in professional jobs worked before marriage as compared with their uneducated or less educated counterparts. The majority of women in the static, low-income occupations did not work

  2. Pilot study: Waterfowl breeding population survey: Ontario, Quebec, and New York: May 1995

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the Waterfowl Breeding Population and Habitat Survey for Ontario, Quebec, and New York during 1995. The primary purpose of the survey is to...

  3. Development and psychometric evaluation of the Primary Health Care Engagement (PHCE) Scale: a pilot survey of rural and remote nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosteniuk, Julie G; Wilson, Erin C; Penz, Kelly L; MacLeod, Martha L P; Stewart, Norma J; Kulig, Judith C; Karunanayake, Chandima P; Kilpatrick, Kelley

    2016-01-01

    To report the development and psychometric evaluation of a scale to measure rural and remote (rural/remote) nurses' perceptions of the engagement of their workplaces in key dimensions of primary health care (PHC). Amidst ongoing PHC reforms, a comprehensive instrument is needed to evaluate the degree to which rural/remote health care settings are involved in the key dimensions that characterize PHC delivery, particularly from the perspective of professionals delivering care. This study followed a three-phase process of instrument development and psychometric evaluation. A literature review and expert consultation informed instrument development in the first phase, followed by an iterative process of content evaluation in the second phase. In the final phase, a pilot survey was undertaken and item discrimination analysis employed to evaluate the internal consistency reliability of each subscale in the preliminary 60-item Primary Health Care Engagement (PHCE) Scale. The 60-item scale was subsequently refined to a 40-item instrument. The pilot survey sample included 89 nurses in current practice who had experience in rural/remote practice settings. Participants completed either a web-based or paper survey from September to December, 2013. Following item discrimination analysis, the 60-item instrument was refined to a 40-item PHCE Scale consisting of 10 subscales, each including three to five items. Alpha estimates of the 10 refined subscales ranged from 0.61 to 0.83, with seven of the subscales demonstrating acceptable reliability (α ⩾ 0.70). The refined 40-item instrument exhibited good internal consistency reliability (α=0.91). The 40-item PHCE Scale may be considered for use in future studies regardless of locale, to measure the extent to which health care professionals perceive their workplaces to be engaged in key dimensions of PHC.

  4. A pilot survey of physical activity in men with an intellectual disability

    OpenAIRE

    McKeon, Michael

    2013-01-01

    People with intellectual disability are reported as a sedentary population with increased risks of poor health due to an inactive and sedentary lifestyle. As the benefits of physical activity are acknowledged, measuring physical activity accurately is important to help identify reasons for low and high physical activity in order to assist and maintain recommended levels for optimal health. This paper reports a pilot study undertaken to validate the use of a physical activity monitor (Sensewea...

  5. The effect of the solemn oath script in hypothetical choice experiment survey: A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magistris, de T.; Pascucci, S.

    2014-01-01

    We test the effect of the solemn oath (HO) in Hypothetical CE Survey (CE). We conducted CE surveys with three treatments: (1) CE without a cognitive task, (2) CE with a CT script, and (3) CE with a HO. Results generally suggest lower WTPs values with the HO, than without the HO script.

  6. A pilot survey of junior doctors' confidence in tasks related to broad aspects of competence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaarup, Anne Marie; Davis, Deborah; Ringsted, Charlotte Vibeke

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to survey junior doctors' growth in confidence in different physician roles. A total of 165 junior doctors in internal medicine completed a self-administered survey of confidence levels in physician roles. Confidence levels between training levels were compared....

  7. Impact of nursing care in Australian general practice on the quality of care: A pilot of the Patient Enablement and Satisfaction Survey (PESS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Desborough, J.; Phillips, C.; Banfield, M.; Bagheri, N.; Mills, J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Nursing roles in general practice have undergone significant expansion, but as yet there are few tools to measure the quality of nursing care in general practice. This study piloted the Patient Enablement and Satisfaction Survey (PESS) to evaluate two aspects of quality of care in this s

  8. Evaluating a Web-Based Health Risk Assessment With Tailored Feedback: What Does an Expert Focus Group Yield Compared to a Web-Based End-User Survey?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vosbergen, Sandra; Mahieu, Guy R; Laan, Eva K; Kraaijenhagen, Roderik A; Jaspers, Monique WM

    2014-01-01

    Background Increasingly, Web-based health applications are developed for the prevention and management of chronic diseases. However, their reach and utilization is often disappointing. Qualitative evaluations post-implementation can be used to inform the optimization process and ultimately enhance their adoption. In current practice, such evaluations are mainly performed with end-user surveys. However, a review approach by experts in a focus group may be easier to administer and might provide similar results. Objective The aim of this study was to assess whether industrial design engineers in a focus group would address the same issues as end users in a Web-based survey when evaluating a commercial Web-based health risk assessment (HRA) with tailored feedback. Methods Seven Dutch companies used the HRA as part of their corporate health management strategy. Employees using the HRA (N=2289) and 10 independent industrial designers were invited to participate in the study. The HRA consisted of four components: (1) an electronic health questionnaire, (2) biometric measurements, (3) laboratory evaluation, and (4) individually tailored feedback generated by decision support software. After participating in the HRA as end users, both end users and designers evaluated the program. End users completed an evaluation questionnaire that included a free-text field. Designers participated in a focus group discussion. Constructs from user satisfaction and technology acceptance theories were used to categorize and compare the remarks from both evaluations. Results We assessed and qualitatively analyzed 294 remarks of 189 end users and 337 remarks of 6 industrial designers, pertaining to 295 issues in total. Of those, 137 issues were addressed in the end-user survey and 148 issues in the designer focus group. Only 7.3% (10/137) of the issues addressed in the survey were also addressed in the focus group. End users made more remarks about the usefulness of the HRA and prior

  9. Medication prescription: a pilot survey of Bernese doctors of chiropractic practicing in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangler, Martin; Zaugg, Beatrice; Faigaux, Eric

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this survey was to assess the use of and the attitude toward prescribing medication among doctors of chiropractic in 1 of 26 Swiss cantons. A Likert scale electronic questionnaire was sent to licensed doctors of chiropractic of the canton of Berne (n = 47). Percentages, mean values, and standard deviations were calculated. A follow-up survey was used to assess comments from the main survey. A probability value of P Bernese doctors of chiropractic perceived medications as a necessary component of their treatment, mainly using them to help patients who cannot sleep because of pain and to speed up recovery. When asked if they would be allowed to prescribe medications of the "B-list," the majority would want structured continuing education. Limited medication prescription was judged as an advantage for the chiropractic profession by this group of survey participants. Copyright 2010 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparison of aerial survey procedures for estimating polar bear density: Results of pilot studies in northern Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Lyman L.; Garner, Gerald W.; Garner, Gerald W.; Amstrup, Steven C.; Laake, Jeffrey L.; Manly, Bryan F.J.; McDonald, Lyman L.; Robertson, Donna G.

    1999-01-01

    The U.S. Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA) and International Agreement on the Conservation of Polar Bears mandate that boundaries and sizes of polar bear (Ursus maritimus) populations be known so they can be managed at optimum sustainable levels. However, data to estimate polar bear numbers for the Chukchi/Bering Sea and Beaufort Sea populations in Alaska are limited. We evaluated aerial line transect methodology for assessing the size of these Alaskan polar bear populations during pilot studies in spring 1987 and summer 1994. In April and May 1987 we flew 12.239 km of transect lines in the northern Bering, Chukchi, and western Beaufort seas. In June 1994 we flew 6.244 km of transect lines in a primary survey unit using a helicopter, and 5,701 km of transect lines in a secondary survey unit using a fixed-wing aircraft in the Beaufort Sea. We examined visibility bias in aerial transect surveys, double counts by independent observers, single-season mark-resight methods, the suitability of using polar bear sign to stratify the study area, and adaptive sampling methods. Fifteen polar bear groups were observed during the 1987 study. Probability of detecting bears decreased with increasing perpendicular distance from the transect line, and probability of detecting polar bear groups likely increased with increasing group size. We estimated population density in high density areas to be 446 km2/bear. In 1994, 15 polar bear groups were observed by independent front and rear seat observers on transect lines in the primary survey unit. Density estimates ranged from 284 km2/bear to 197 km2/bear depending on the model selected. Low polar bear numbers scattered over large areas of polar ice in 1987 indicated that spring is a poor time to conduct aerial surveys. Based on the 1994 survey we determined that ship-based helicopter or land-based fixed-wing aerial surveys conducted at the ice-edge in late summer-early fall may produce robust density estimates for polar bear

  11. Pediatric biobanking: a pilot qualitative survey of practices, rules and researcher opinions in ten European countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salvaterra, Elena; Giorda, Roberto; Bassi, Maria Teresa

    2012-01-01

    and data handling, and return of results as faced in 10 European countries. Because of the lack of comparative analyses of these topics, a pilot study was designed. Following a qualitative methodology, a questionnaire draft mostly including open-ended queries was developed, tested, and sent by e...... their own choices (n=26). Based on the collected data, dedicated recommendations are needed to govern unique ethical and regulatory issues surrounding pediatric biobanking.......Ethical, legal, and social issues related to the collection, storage, and use of biospecimens and data derived from children raise critical concerns in the international debate. So far, a number of studies have considered a variety of the individual issues crucial to pediatric biobanking...

  12. Geometry of the Kapuskasing structure from a Lithoprobe pilot reflection survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Frederick A.

    1985-05-01

    A short (˜10-km) pilot seismic reflection profile recorded in the Kapuskasing structural zone near Foleyet, Ontario, reveals reflections with travel times of at least 5.0 s (about 16-km depth). An event dipping west from about 1.7 to 3.4 s probably corresponds to the Ivanhoe Lake cataclastic zone. The true (geologic) dip on this boundary is calculated to be about 35°-38° west-northwest and is consistent with interpretations of this zone as a west-dipping, crustal-scale thrust fault. East-dipping reflections are observed with longer travel times than the fault-zone arrival and are likely from within the greenstone terrane of the Abitibi subprovince.

  13. The HETDEX Pilot Survey V: The Physical Origin of Lyman-alpha Emitters Probed by Near-infrared Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Mimi; Gebhardt, Karl; Hill, Gary J; Drory, Niv; Ashby, Matthew L N; Blanc, Guillermo A; Bridge, Joanna; Chonis, Taylor; Ciardullo, Robin; Fabricius, Maximilian; Fazio, Giovanni G; Gawiser, Eric; Gronwall, Caryl; Hagen, Alex; Huang, Jia-Sheng; Jogee, Shardha; Livermore, Rachael; Salmon, Brett; Schneider, Donald P; Willner, S P; Zeimann, Gregory R

    2014-01-01

    We present the results from a VLT/SINFONI and Keck/NIRSPEC near-infrared spectroscopic survey of 16 Lyman-alpha emitters (LAEs) at $z$ = 2.1 - 2.5 in the COSMOS and GOODS-N fields discovered from the HETDEX Pilot Survey. We detect rest-frame optical nebular lines (H$\\alpha$ and/or [OIII]$\\lambda$5007) for 10 of the LAEs and measure physical properties, including the star formation rate (SFR), gas-phase metallicity, gas-mass fraction, and Ly$\\alpha$ velocity offset. We find that LAEs may lie below the mass-metallicity relation for continuum-selected star-forming galaxies at the same redshift. The LAEs all show velocity shifts of Ly$\\alpha$ relative to the systemic redshift ranging between +85 and +296 km s$^{-1}$ with a mean of +180 km s$^{-1}$. This value is smaller than measured for continuum-selected star-forming galaxies at similar redshifts. The Ly$\\alpha$ velocity offsets show a moderate correlation with the measured star formation rate (2.5$\\sigma$), but no significant correlations are seen with the SFR...

  14. Anthropometric Survey of U.S. Army Personnel: Pilot Summary Statistics, 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-07-01

    20.27 53.28 98TH 20.98 52.06 99Th 20.49 53.75 99711 21.16 349 (D)8) CHESI --NM2 E,’YP (IUTOUAT¶L TC) I The difference between the cii -teferen~ce- of...distribution ard the actual distribution of the data. The norial distribution value for P2 is 3. 10. The coefficient of variation. A statistic that restates...Anthropcmetric Suirvey to headboard data fr= thýe 1967 and 1968 Air Force survey and the 1970 Arm-y survey of Avia-tcrs dernznstrates that the coefficients

  15. Nonimmersive virtual reality mirror visual feedback therapy and its application for the treatment of complex regional pain syndrome: an open-label pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kenji; Fukumori, Satoshi; Matsusaki, Takashi; Maruo, Tomoko; Ishikawa, Shinichi; Nishie, Hiroyuki; Takata, Ken; Mizuhara, Hiroaki; Mizobuchi, Satoshi; Nakatsuka, Hideki; Matsumi, Masaki; Gofuku, Akio; Yokoyama, Masataka; Morita, Kiyoshi

    2010-04-01

    Chronic pain conditions such as phantom limb pain and complex regional pain syndrome are difficult to treat, and traditional pharmacological treatment and invasive neural block are not always effective. Plasticity in the central nervous system occurs in these conditions and may be associated with pain. Mirror visual feedback therapy aims to restore normal cortical organization and is applied in the treatment of chronic pain conditions. However, not all patients benefit from this treatment. Virtual reality technology is increasingly attracting attention for medical application, including as an analgesic modality. An advanced mirror visual feedback system with virtual reality technology may have increased analgesic efficacy and benefit a wider patient population. In this preliminary work, we developed a virtual reality mirror visual feedback system and applied it to the treatment of complex regional pain syndrome. A small open-label case series. Five patients with complex regional pain syndrome received virtual reality mirror visual feedback therapy once a week for five to eight sessions on an outpatient basis. Patients were monitored for continued medication use and pain intensity. Four of the five patients showed >50% reduction in pain intensity. Two of these patients ended their visits to our pain clinic after five sessions. Our results indicate that virtual reality mirror visual feedback therapy is a promising alternative treatment for complex regional pain syndrome. Further studies are necessary before concluding that analgesia provided from virtual reality mirror visual feedback therapy is the result of reversing maladaptive changes in pain perception.

  16. Forest fire motives in Italy: preliminary results of a pilot survey in the most fire-affected Provinces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lovreglio R

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The percentage of forest fires of unknown origin, accounting in Italy for about 40% of the total number, hampers any attempt of efficacious prevention based on modification of causes. This work deals with the implementation of a simple though promising technique of motivation survey aimed at reducing such percentage, the Delphi method, a grouping technique using estimates from a panel of experts and feedback summaries from preceding responses for additional estimates. Sitting between knowledge and speculation, the informed deliberations of the panel of experts may be considered an informed judgment. Delphi surveys were carried out by CFS (National Forestry Service in 23 of the most affected provinces, involving several panel of experts for a total of 1000 people, all of them on duty in the Forestry Stations of the Service. Results highlighted a remarkable prevalence of involuntary versus voluntary fires (54% and 42%, respectively. The panels of experts provided fairly homogeneous and convergent answers based on few motives, the majority of fire ignitions were attributed to: (i creation or renewal of pastures; (2 residues elimination, including stubble burning; (iii increasing the yield of wild plant foods; (iv poaching probably related to limitation of hunting use and access control. The most recurrent motivations represent traditional uses of fire by rural societies. Other motivations presented less significant and negligible values. Cluster analysis clearly put in evidence that similar motivations characterize small and homogeneous groups of provinces, supporting the evidence that fire motivations are site and culture specific phenomena.

  17. Piloting a European Employer Survey on Skill Needs: Illustrative Findings. Research Paper No 36

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofroniou, Nicholas, Ed.; Zukersteinova, Alena, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    Today, information and data on skills development come mainly from household and employees surveys: trends in the labour market, demand and supply of skills, data on skill mismatch and skills obsolescence. Recurrent analysis of individual cross-sectional data and their extrapolation into the future indicates significant structural changes over…

  18. Personal Equipment and Clothing Correction Factors for the Australian Army: A Pilot Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    survey for that measurement. The results, presented in Table 11, show that for Chest Depth, Hand Thickness , Hand Breadth, Ankle Height, Abdominal...UNCLASSIFIED 80 • Circumferences, such as arm, hip, waist and chest • Skinfold thicknesses , such as upper arm and back. • 3 dimensional body...34 5.4.6 Hand Thickness (EM16) ....................................................................... 34 5.4.7

  19. Self-Reported Youth and Adult Exposure to Alcohol Marketing in Traditional and Digital Media: Results of a Pilot Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jernigan, David H; Padon, Alisa; Ross, Craig; Borzekowski, Dina

    2017-03-01

    Alcohol marketing is known to be a significant risk factor for underage drinking. However, little is known about youth and adult exposure to alcohol advertising in digital and social media. This study piloted a comparative assessment of youth and adult recall of exposure to online marketing of alcohol. From September to October 2013, a pilot survey of past 30-day exposure to alcohol advertising and promotional content in traditional and digital media was administered to a national sample of 1,192 youth (ages 13 to 20) and 1,124 adults (ages ≥21) using a prerecruited Internet panel maintained by GfK Custom Research. The weighted proportions of youth and adults who reported this exposure were compared by media type and by advertising and promotional content. Youth were more likely than adults to recall exposure to alcohol advertising on television (69.2% vs. 61.9%), radio (24.8% vs. 16.7%), billboards (54.8% vs. 35.4%), and the Internet (29.7% vs. 16.8%), but less likely to recall seeing advertising in magazines (35.7% vs. 36.4%). Youth were also more likely to recall seeing advertisements and pictures on the Internet of celebrities using alcohol (36.1% vs. 20.8%) or wearing clothing promoting alcohol (27.7% vs. 15.9%), and actively respond (i.e., like, share, or post) to alcohol-related content online. Youth report greater exposure to alcohol advertising and promotional content than adults in most media, including on the Internet. These findings emphasize the need to assure compliance with voluntary industry standards on the placement of alcohol advertising and the importance of developing better tools for monitoring youth exposure to alcohol marketing, particularly on the Internet. Copyright © 2017 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  20. Pilot CCS project in Indonesia "Gundih CCS project": Geological and geophysical surveys for site selection and monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Takeshi; Matsuoka, Toshifumi; Takahashi, Toru; Kitamura, Keigo; Onishi, Kyosuke; Yamada, Yasuhiro; Rachmat Sule, Mohammad; Kadir, Wawan Gunawan A.; Widarto, Djedi S.; Sebayang, Rio I.; Prasetyo, Agung; Priyono, Awali; Widianto, Eko; Sapiie, Benyamin

    2013-04-01

    A pilot CCS project in Indonesia will be implemented in Gundih area, Central Java Province. The Gundih area is a gas field, and gas is ready to be produced by Pertamina EP. The CO2 content within the produced gas is more than 20% in the Gundih field, so that CO2 injection near the gas production well could be effective way to avoid abundant CO2 emission. Before implementing CO2 injection, the reservoir for CO2 injection must be characterized carefully by conducting subsurface characterization and evaluation, in order to make sure that the reservoir is suitable for CCS. Here we report preliminary results of site surveys for the determination of CO2 injection site in the Gundih area. Subsurface structures imaged on seismic reflection profiles indicate that the Ngrayong formation is one of the candidates for CO2 injection. The lithology of the Ngrayong formation is sandstone, and the depth of the formation is ~1 km in the Gundih area. Since we could not find large-scale structural closure (i.e., anticline) for the Ngrayong formation, we need to consider residual trapping. To reveal hydrological properties (e.g., permeability) of the Ngrayong formation, we obtained rock samples from the outcrop of the Ngrayong formation. Using the laboratory-derived hydrological properties and subsurface structures extracted from seismic data (e.g., geometry of the Ngrayong formation), we will apply reservoir simulation in order to determine CO2 injection site. To design the geophysical monitoring survey (e.g., receiver and source position in time-lapse seismic survey), furthermore, we conduct simulation study for the constructed geological model and estimate elastic and electric responses associated with CO2 injection.

  1. A Pilot Survey of Clergy Regarding Mental Health Care for Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leigh Blalock

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Collaborations between healthcare and faith-based organizations have emerged in the drive to improve access to care. Little research has examined clergy views on collaborations in the provision of mental healthcare, particularly to children. The current paper reports survey responses of 25 clergy from diverse religious traditions concerning mental health care in children. Subjects queried include clergy referral habits, specific knowledge of childhood conditions such as depression and anxiety, past experiences with behavioral health workers, and resources available through their home institutions. Overall, surveyed clergy support collaborations to improve childhood mental health. However, they vary considerably in their confidence with recognizing mental illness in children and perceive significant barriers to collaborating with mental health providers.

  2. Detecting Foci of Malaria Transmission with School Surveys: A Pilot Study in the Gambia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebako N Takem

    Full Text Available In areas of declining malaria transmission such as in The Gambia, the identification of malaria infected individuals becomes increasingly harder. School surveys may be used to identify foci of malaria transmission in the community.The survey was carried out in May-June 2011, before the beginning of the malaria transmission season. Thirty two schools in the Upper River Region of The Gambia were selected with probability proportional to size; in each school approximately 100 children were randomly chosen for inclusion in the study. Each child had a finger prick blood sample collected for the determination of antimalarial antibodies by ELISA, malaria infection by microscopy and PCR, and for haemoglobin measurement. In addition, a simple questionnaire on socio-demographic variables and the use of insecticide-treated bed nets was completed. The cut-off for positivity for antimalarial antibodies was obtained using finite mixture models. The clustered nature of the data was taken into account in the analyses.A total of 3,277 children were included in the survey. The mean age was 10 years (SD = 2.7 [range 4-21], with males and females evenly distributed. The prevalence of malaria infection as determined by PCR was 13.6% (426/3124 [95% CI = 12.2-16.3] with marked variation between schools (range 3-25%, p<0.001, while the seroprevalence was 7.8% (234/2994 [95%CI = 6.4-9.8] for MSP119, 11.6% (364/2997 [95%CI = 9.4-14.5] for MSP2, and 20.0% (593/2973 [95% CI = 16.5-23.2 for AMA1. The prevalence of all the three antimalarial antibodies positive was 2.7% (79/2920.This survey shows that malaria prevalence and seroprevalence before the transmission season were highly heterogeneous.

  3. The LAMOST survey of background quasars in the vicinity of the Andromeda and Triangulum galaxies. II. Results from the commissioning observations and the pilot surveys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huo, Zhi-Ying; Bai, Zhong-Rui; Chen, Jian-Jun; Chen, Xiao-Yan; Du, Bing; Jia, Lei; Lei, Ya-Juan [Key Laboratory of Optical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Liu, Xiao-Wei; Yuan, Hai-Bo [Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Xiang, Mao-Sheng; Huang, Yang; Zhang, Hui-Hua [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Yan, Lin [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, MS 100-22, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Chu, Jia-Ru; Chu, Yao-Quan; Hu, Hong-Zhuan [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Cui, Xiang-Qun; Hou, Yong-Hui; Hu, Zhong-Wen; Jiang, Fang-Hua, E-mail: zhiyinghuo@bao.ac.cn [Nanjing Institute of Astronomical Optics and Technology, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210042 (China); and others

    2013-06-01

    We present new quasars discovered in the vicinity of the Andromeda and Triangulum galaxies with the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope, also named the Guoshoujing Telescope, during the 2010 and 2011 observational seasons. Quasar candidates are selected based on the available Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Kitt Peak National Observatory 4 m telescope, Xuyi Schmidt Telescope Photometric Survey optical, and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer near-infrared photometric data. We present 509 new quasars discovered in a stripe of ∼135 deg{sup 2} from M31 to M33 along the Giant Stellar Stream in the 2011 pilot survey data sets, and also 17 new quasars discovered in an area of ∼100 deg{sup 2} that covers the central region and the southeastern halo of M31 in the 2010 commissioning data sets. These 526 new quasars have i magnitudes ranging from 15.5 to 20.0, redshifts from 0.1 to 3.2. They represent a significant increase of the number of identified quasars in the vicinity of M31 and M33. There are now 26, 62, and 139 known quasars in this region of the sky with i magnitudes brighter than 17.0, 17.5, and 18.0, respectively, of which 5, 20, and 75 are newly discovered. These bright quasars provide an invaluable collection with which to probe the kinematics and chemistry of the interstellar/intergalactic medium in the Local Group of galaxies. A total of 93 quasars are now known with locations within 2.°5 of M31, of which 73 are newly discovered. Tens of quasars are now known to be located behind the Giant Stellar Stream, and hundreds are behind the extended halo and its associated substructures of M31. The much enlarged sample of known quasars in the vicinity of M31 and M33 can potentially be utilized to construct a perfect astrometric reference frame to measure the minute proper motions (PMs) of M31 and M33, along with the PMs of substructures associated with the Local Group of galaxies. Those PMs are some of the most fundamental properties of the Local

  4. Supervisor Feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayman, Marilyn J.

    1981-01-01

    Investigated the effectiveness of supervisor feedback in contributing to learning counseling skills. Counselor trainees (N=64) were assigned to supervisor feedback, no supervisor feedback, or control groups for three training sessions. Results indicated counseling skills were learned best by students with no supervisor feedback but self and peer…

  5. The LAMOST Survey of Background Quasars in the Vicinity of the Andromeda and Triangulum Galaxies -- II. Results from the Commissioning Observations and the Pilot Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Huo, Zhi-Ying; Xiang, Mao-Sheng; Yuan, Hai-Bo; Huang, Yang; Zhang, Hui-Hua; Yan, Lin; Bai, Zhong-Rui; Chen, Jian-Jun; Chen, Xiao-Yan; Chu, Jia-Ru; Chu, Yao-Quan; Cui, Xiang-Qun; Du, Bing; Hou, Yong-Hui; Hu, Hong-Zhuan; Hu, Zhong-Wen; Jia, Lei; Jiang, Fang-Hua; Lei, Ya-Juan; Li, Ai-Hua; Li, Guang-Wei; Li, Guo-Ping; Li, Jian; Li, Xin-Nan; Li, Yan; Li, Ye-Ping; Liu, Gen-Rong; Liu, Zhi-Gang; Lu, Qi-Shuai; Luo, A-Li; Luo, Yu; Men, Li; Ni, Ji-Jun; Qi, Yong-Jun; Qi, Zhao-Xiang; Shi, Jian-Rong; Shi, Huo-Ming; Sun, Shi-Wei; Tang, Zheng-Hong; Tian, Yuan; Tu, Liang-Ping; Wang, Dan; Wang, Feng-Fei; Wang, Gang; Wang, Jia-Ning; Wang, Lei; Wang, Shu-Qing; Wang, You; Wang, Yue-Fei; Wei, Ming-Zhi; Wu, Yue; Xue, Xiang-Xiang; Yao, Zheng-Qiu; Yu, Yong; Yuan, Hui; Zhai, Chao; Zhang, En-Peng; Zhang, Hao-Tong; Zhang, Jian-Nan; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Yan-Xia; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Zhen-Chao; Zhao, Gang; Zhao, Ming; Zhao, Yong-Heng; Zhou, Fang; Zhou, Xin-Lin; Zhu, Yong-Tian; Zou, Si-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    We present new quasars discovered in the vicinity of the Andromeda and Triangulum galaxies with the LAMOST during the 2010 and 2011 observational seasons. Quasar candidates are selected based on the available SDSS, KPNO 4 m telescope, XSTPS optical, and WISE near infrared photometric data. We present 509 new quasars discovered in a stripe of ~135 sq. deg from M31 to M33 along the Giant Stellar Stream in the 2011 pilot survey datasets, and also 17 new quasars discovered in an area of ~100 sq. deg that covers the central region and the southeastern halo of M31 in the 2010 commissioning datasets. These 526 new quasars have i magnitudes ranging from 15.5 to 20.0, redshifts from 0.1 to 3.2. They represent a significant increase of the number of identified quasars in the vicinity of M31 and M33. There are now 26, 62 and 139 known quasars in this region of the sky with i magnitudes brighter than 17.0, 17.5 and 18.0 respectively, of which 5, 20 and 75 are newly-discovered. These bright quasars provide an invaluable c...

  6. A Study on Direct Feedback and Indirect Feedback in Graduate Students ’Writing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张志国

    2014-01-01

    Feedback plays a central role in writing development. However correcting students’writing is one of the most time-consuming tasks for our senior English teachers. By conducting a survey of direct feedback and indirect feedback in students writ⁃ing the author tries to test the influence of direct feedback and indirect feedback in graduates ’writing.

  7. Attitudes of non-practicing chiropractors: a pilot survey concerning factors related to attrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wyatt Lawrence H

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research into attitudes about chiropractors who are no longer engaged in active clinical practice is non-existent. Yet non-practicing chiropractors (NPCs represent a valid sub-group worthy of study. Aim The purpose of this research was to assess attrition attitudes of NPCs about the chiropractic profession and develop a scale to assess such attitudes. Methods A 48 item survey was developed using the PsychData software. This survey included 35 Likert-style items assessing various aspects of the profession namely financial, educational, psychosocial and political. An internet discussion site where NPCs may be members was accessed for recruitment purposes. Results A total of 70 valid responses were received for analysis. A majority of respondents were male with 66% being in non-practice status for 3 to 5 years and less with 43% indicating that they had graduated since the year 2000. Most respondents were employed either in other healthcare professions and non-chiropractic education. A majority of NPCs believed that business ethics in chiropractic were questionable and that overhead expense and student loans were factors in practice success. A majority of NPCs were in associate practice at one time with many believing that associates were encouraged to prolong the care of patients and that associate salaries were not fair. Most NPCs surveyed believed that chiropractic was not a good career choice and would not recommend someone to become a chiropractor. From this survey, a 12 item scale was developed called the "chiropractor attrition attitude scale" for future research. Reliability analysis of this novel scale demonstrated a coefficient alpha of 0.90. Conclusion The low response rate indicates that findings cannot be generalized to the NPC population. This study nonetheless demonstrates that NPCs attrition attitudes can be assessed. The lack of a central database of NPCs is a challenge to future research. Appropriate

  8. GaLactic and Extragalactic All-Sky MWA-eXtended (GLEAM-X) survey: Pilot observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley-Walker, N.; Seymour, N.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kapinska, A.; McKinley, B.

    2017-01-01

    This proposal is a pilot study for the extension of the highly successful GaLactic and Extragalactic MWA (GLEAM) survey (Wayth et al. 2015). The aim is to test out new observing strategies and data reduction techniques suitable for exploiting the longer baselines of the extended phase 2 MWA array. Deeper and wide surveys at higher resolution will enable a legion of science capabilities pertaining to galaxy evolution, clusters and the cosmic web, whilst maintaining the advantages over LOFAR including larger field-of-view, wider frequency coverage and better sensitivity to extended emission. We will continue the successful drift scan mode observing to test the feasibility of a large-area survey in 2017-B and onward. We will also target a single deep area with a bright calibrator source to establish the utility of focussed deep observations. In both cases, we will be exploring calibrating and imaging strategies across 72-231 MHz with the new long baselines. The published extragalactic sky catalogue (Hurley-Walker et al. 2017) improves the prospects for good ionospheric calibration in this new regime, as well as trivialising flux calibration. The new Alternative Data Release of the TIFR GMRT Sky Survey (TGSS-ADR1; Intema et al. 2016), which has 30" resolution and covers the proposed observing area, allows us to test whether our calibration and imaging strategy correctly recovers the true structure of (high surface-brightness) resolved sources. GLEAM-X will have lower noise, higher surface brightness sensitivity, and have considerably wider bandwidth than TGSS. These properties will enable a wide range of science, such as: Detecting and characterising cluster relics and haloes beyond z=0.45; Accurately determining radio source counts at multiple frequencies; Measuring the low-v luminosity function to z 0.5; Performing Galactic plane science such as HII region detection and cosmic tomography; Determining the typical ionospheric diffractive scale at the MRO, feeding into

  9. Surveys of mammal populations in the areas adjacent to Forsmark and Tierp. A pilot study 2001-2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cederlund, Goeran; Hammarstroem, Angelica; Wallin, Kjell [Svensk Viltfoervaltning AB, Ramsberg (Sweden)

    2003-04-01

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co is in the process of selecting a safe and environmentally acceptable location for the deep-level repository of radioactive waste. SKB has expressed the importance of monitoring mammal species that are of interest both in biodiversity issues and for local hunting and recreational purposes. To get relevant data on the dynamics of the mammal populations it is important to estimate the abundance and variations over time. Data achieved can be used to specifically monitor endangered species (like wolf, Canis lupus, and otter, Lutra lutra), detect effects from e.g. drilling activities on populations (important to hunters) and be used for assessment programs (MKB). One of the major goals is to monitor populations over several years and to obtain information that is essential for modelling of energy/carbon flows in the biosphere and ultimately calculations of the risks of exposure to radionuclide. From late 2001 to late spring 2002 a pilot study was accomplished in the areas surrounding the suggested areas in the Tierp region and in Forsmark (Oskarshamn was not included in this pilot study). A reference area was chosen near the coast some 20 km north of Forsmark. The aim was to initiate surveys of most of the larger mammal species that were expected to be found in the region. Selected species were wolf, lynx, otter, marten, mink, red fox, beaver, wild boar, red deer, roe deer, moose, European hare and mountain hare. Several methods were used and adapted to expected habitat use and expected local density of the species. Line transects were used on snow to index (frequency of tracks crossing the transects) or calculate actual number (for example the Buffon method). Pellet counts were used in spring to calculate hare and cervid (moose and deer species) density. In mid winter an aerial (helicopter) survey was conducted along the coast to count moose. The aquatic mammals were tracked on snow along selected parts of the streams and

  10. Exploring barriers to pain management in newborn intensive care units: a pilot survey of NICU nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Patricia J; Gonzales, Irene; Parsons, Virgil

    2009-12-01

    To explore barriers that NICU nurses face when attempting to optimally manage newborn pain. Ninety California NICU nurses with current membership in the National Association of Neonatal Nurses (NANN) voluntarily participated. A descriptive survey study. A researcher-developed survey consisting of 37 questions was mailed to 300 NICU nurses; 102 were returned and 90 were usable. Probability sampling from a listing of California registered nurses with current membership in the NANN was used to obtain the study's sampling frame. Less than half of the nurses felt that newborn pain is well managed within the NICUs where they are employed. Barriers identified related to physicians' pain management practices, lack of evidence-based pain management protocols, nurses' and physicians' resistance to change practice, infant pain assessment tools, and inadequate staff training regarding pain assessment and management. A knowledge-practice gap still exists within newborn pain management. Increased caregiver education remains a necessity, but strategies that address resistance to change practice within healthcare settings must also be considered.

  11. What impact do posters have on academic knowledge transfer? A pilot survey on author attitudes and experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilic Dragan

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research knowledge is commonly facilitated at conferences via oral presentations, poster presentations and workshops. Current literature exploring the efficacy of academic posters is however limited. The purpose of this initial study was to explore the perceptions of academic poster presentation, together with its benefits and limitations as an effective mechanism for academic knowledge transfer and contribute to the available academic data. Methods A survey was distributed to 88 delegates who presented academic posters at two Releasing Research and Enterprise Potential conferences in June 2007 and June 2008 at Bournemouth University. This survey addressed attitude and opinion items, together with their general experiences of poster presentations. Descriptive statistics were performed on the responses. Results A 39% return was achieved with the majority of respondents believing that posters are a good medium for transferring knowledge and a valid form of academic publication. Visual appeal was cited as more influential than subject content, with 94% agreeing that poster imagery is most likely to draw viewer's attention. Respondents also believed that posters must be accompanied by their author in order to effectively communicate the academic content. Conclusion This pilot study is the first to explore perceptions of the academic poster as a medium for knowledge transfer. Given that academic posters rely heavily on visual appeal and direct author interaction, the medium requires greater flexibility in their design to promote effective knowledge transfer. This paper introduces the concept of the IT-based 'MediaPoster' so as to address the issues raised within published literature and subsequently enhance knowledge-transfer within the field of academic medicine.

  12. Intention to quit among Indian tobacco users: Findings from International Tobacco Control Policy evaluation India pilot survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N S Surani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tobacco users face barriers not just in quitting, but also in thinking about quitting. The aim of this study was to understand factors encouraging intention to quit from the 2006 International Tobacco Control Policy (TCP Evaluation India Pilot Study Survey. Materials and Methods: A total of 764 adult respondents from urban and rural areas of Maharashtra and Bihar were surveyed through face-to-face individual interviews, with a house-to-house approach. Dependent variable was "intention to quit tobacco." Independent variables were demographic variables, peer influence, damage perception, receiving advice to quit, and referral to cessation services by healthcare professionals and exposure to anti-tobacco messages. Logistic regression model was used with odds ratio adjusted for location, age, gender, and marital status for statistical analysis. Results: Of 493 tobacco users, 32.5% intended to quit. More numbers of users who were unaware about their friends′ tobacco use intended to quit compared to those who were aware (adjusted OR = 8.06, 95% CI = 4.58-14.19. Higher numbers of users who felt tobacco has damaged their health intended to quit compared to those who did not feel that way (adjusted OR = 5.62, 95% CI = 3.53-8.96. More numbers of users exposed to anti-tobacco messages in newspapers/magazines (adjusted OR = 1.76, 95% CI = 1.02-3.03, restaurants (adjusted OR = 2.47, 95% CI = 1.37-4.46, radio (adjusted OR=4.84, 95% CI = 3.01-7.78, cinema halls (adjusted OR = 9.22, 95% CI = 5.31-15.75, and public transportation (adjusted OR = 10.58, 95% = 5.90-18.98 intended to quit compared to unexposed users. Conclusion: Anti-tobacco messages have positive influence on user′s intentions to quit.

  13. A pilot survey of post-deployment health care needs in small community-based primary care clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pugh Mary J

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Relatively little is known regarding to what extent community-based primary care physicians are encountering post-deployment health care needs among veterans of the Afghanistan or Iraq conflicts and their family members. Methods This pilot study conducted a cross-sectional survey of 37 primary care physicians working at small urban and suburban clinics belonging to a practice-based research network in the south central region of Texas. Results Approximately 80% of the responding physicians reported caring for patients who have been deployed to the Afghanistan or Iraq war zones, or had a family member deployed. Although these physicians noted a variety of conditions related to physical trauma, mental illnesses and psychosocial disruptions such as marital, family, financial, and legal problems appeared to be even more prevalent among their previously deployed patients and were also noted among family members of deployed veterans. Conclusions Community-based primary care physicians should be aware of common post-deployment health conditions and the resources that are available to meet these needs.

  14. The HETDEX Pilot Survey. IV. The Evolution of [O II] Emitting Galaxies from z ~ 0.5 to z ~ 0

    CERN Document Server

    Ciardullo, Robin; Adams, Joshua J; Blanc, Guillermo A; Gebhardt, Karl; Finkelstein, Steven L; Jogee, Shardha; Hill, Gary J; Drory, Niv; Hopp, Ulrich; Schneider, Donald P; Zeimann, Gregory R; Dalton, Gavin B

    2013-01-01

    We present an analysis of the luminosities and equivalent widths of the 284 z < 0.56 [O II]-emitting galaxies found in the 169 square arcmin pilot survey for the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX). By combining emission-line fluxes obtained from the Mitchell spectrograph on the McDonald 2.7-m telescope with deep broadband photometry from archival data, we derive each galaxy's de-reddened [O II] 3727 luminosity and calculate its total star formation rate. We show that over the last ~5 Gyr of cosmic time there has been substantial evolution in the [O II] emission-line luminosity function, with L* decreasing by ~0.6 +/-0.2 dex in the observed function, and by ~0.9 +/-0.2 dex in the de-reddened relation. Accompanying this decline is a significant shift in the distribution of [O II] equivalent widths, with the fraction of high equivalent-width emitters declining dramatically with time. Overall, the data imply that the relative intensity of star formation within galaxies has decreased over th...

  15. The effects of a lifestyle physical activity counseling program with feedback of a pedometer during pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with COPD : A pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flokstra-de Blok, Bertine; de Greef, Mathieu; ten Hacken, Nicolaas; Sprenger, S.; Postema, Klaas; Wempe, Johan

    Objective: To study the effects of a lifestyle physical activity counseling program with feedback of a pedometer during pulmonary rehabilitation. Methods: Twenty-one chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients were randomized to an experimental group that followed a regular rehabilitation

  16. Nanotechnology and dermatology education in the United States: data from a pilot survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Adam; Nasir, Adnan

    2011-09-01

    Nanotechnology is a rapidly growing discipline with important implications for consumers, patients, physicians and investigators. In an era when nanotechnology is being both incorporated into educational requirements for medical fields such as radiology and oncology and vigorously pursued and developed by cosmeceutical companies, dermatology is falling behind. A survey was conducted to ascertain knowledge, attitudes and perception of nanotechnology in dermatology teaching programs. To ascertain baseline knowledge, attitudes and preceptions regarding nanotechnology among dermatology trainees, dermatology investigators and dermatology faculty in US academic medical centers, an online survey was sent out to random members of the dermatology community and data analyzed (100 participants, 23% response rate). Participants responded to a questionnaire on a five-point scale ranging from strongly disagree, disagree, uncertain, agree, to strongly agree. Due to the low response rate, strongly disagree/disagree and strongly agree/agree values were combined and compared to uncertain responses. Approximately equal numbers of faculty vs. chief residents responded to the survery (52% vs. 47.75%, respectively). The majority of respondents had not previously attended any educational activity on nanotechnology (69.57%). The majority of participants agreed that more education on nanotechnology for dermatologists is needed (78.26% agreed vs. 21.74% uncertain) and that it should be incorporated into the residency training curriculum (60.87% agree vs. 13.04% disagree). Participants mostly agreed that nanotechnology research can contribute to better fundamental understanding of skin disease (78.26%), to advances in the diagnosis of skin disease (73.91%) and to therapies (78.26%). Participants mostly agreed that more research is needed (82.60%) and that this research should be funded (78.26%). Not surprisingly, respondents were uncertain with respect to issues of nanotechnology safety both

  17. Results of a pilot survey study in the region of Mushash Hudruj, SE Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarawneh, Mohammad B.; al-Salameen, Zeyad M.; Abudanah, Fawzi Q.

    Survey work was carried out in the region of Mushash Hudruj near the Jordanian- Saudi borders in 2004, 2005 and 2009. The finds of this project include a north Arabian inscription, a cairn, an animal trap, stone circles, flint mines and water harvesting systems. These features demonstrate that this region was utilized by pastoral nomads who depended purely on a mobile subsistence pattern, governed by the availability of pasture and water. This pattern of seasonal movement is still practiced by modern Bedouin who move mainly within the wadi system which have become the main areas of attraction for Bedouin since prehistoric times, and have played a major role in the survival of these groups and their flocks.

  18. Oral care practices for patients in Intensive Care Units: A pilot survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Franco Miranda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the level of knowledge and difficulties concerning hospitalized patients regarding preventive oral health measures among professionals working in Intensive Care Units (ICUs. Study Population and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 71 health professionals working in the ICU. A self-administered questionnaire was used to determine the methods used, frequency, and attitude toward oral care provided to patients in Brazilian ICUs. The variables were analyzed using descriptive statistics (percentages. A one-sample t-test between proportions was used to assess significant differences between percentages. t-statistics were considered statistically significant for P < 0.05. Bonferroni correction was applied to account for multiple testing. Results: Most participants were nursing professionals (80.3% working 12-h shifts in the ICU (70.4%; about 87.3% and 66.2% reported having knowledge about coated tongue and nosocomial pneumonia, respectively (P < 0.05. Most reported using spatulas, gauze, and toothbrushes (49.3% or only toothbrushes (28.2% with 0.12% chlorhexidine (49.3% to sanitize the oral cavity of ICU patients (P < 0.01. Most professionals felt that adequate time was available to provide oral care to ICU patients and that oral care was a priority for mechanically ventilated patients (80.3% and 83.1%, respectively, P < 0.05. However, most professionals (56.4% reported feeling that the oral cavity was difficult to clean (P < 0.05. Conclusion: The survey results suggest that additional education is necessary to increase awareness among ICU professionals of the association between dental plaque and systemic conditions of patients, to standardize oral care protocols, and to promote the oral health of patients in ICUs.

  19. The VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey - XI. A census of the hot luminous stars and their feedback in 30 Doradus

    CERN Document Server

    Doran, E I; de Koter, A; Evans, C J; McEvoy, C; Walborn, N R; Bastian, N; Bestenlehner, J M; Grafener, G; Herrero, A; Kohler, K; Apellaniz, J Maiz; Najarro, F; Puls, J; Sana, H; Schneider, F R N; Taylor, W D; van Loon, J Th; Vink, J S

    2013-01-01

    We compile the first comprehensive census of hot luminous stars in the 30 Doradus (30 Dor) star forming region of the LMC. The census extends to a radius of 10arcmin (150pc) from the central cluster, R136. Stars were selected photometrically and combined with the latest spectral types. 1145 candidate hot luminous stars were identified of which >700 were considered genuine early type stars that contribute to feedback. We assess the spectroscopic completeness to be 85% in outer regions (>5pc) but fall to 35% in the vicinity of R136, giving a total of 500 hot luminous stars with spectroscopy. Stellar calibrations and models were used to obtain their physical parameters before integrated values were compared to global observations and the population synthesis code, Starburst99. The 31 W-R and Of/WN stars made large contributions to the total ionising and wind luminosities of ~40% and ~50%, respectively. Stars with Minit>100Msun also showed high contributions to the global feedback, ~25% in both cases. Such massiv...

  20. Effective multilevel teaching techniques on attending rounds: a pilot survey and systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Certain, Laura K; Guarino, A J; Greenwald, Jeffrey L

    2011-01-01

    While numerous authors acknowledge the challenge of teaching simultaneously to medical students, interns, and residents, few offer specific advice on how to meet that challenge, and none have studied which techniques are most effective. The purpose of this study was to determine whether multilevel teaching is challenging for attendings, whether trainees feel that teaching on rounds is appropriate to their level, and to define multilevel teaching techniques. We surveyed attendings and trainees on the internal medicine services at two academic medical centers. Attendings were divided about whether teaching to multiple levels posed a challenge. Trainees reported that the teaching they received was usually appropriate to their level of training. The most effective techniques for multilevel teaching were Broadening (asking "what if" questions), Targeting (directing questions at specific team members), and Novelty (teaching newly published information), while the least effective were techniques that taught advanced material unfamiliar to most or all of the team. A systematic literature review yielded no studies that focused on multilevel teaching techniques. This article is the first to define and evaluate specific techniques for multilevel instruction in a medical setting and identifies certain techniques as more effective at engaging multiple levels of learners simultaneously.

  1. Prevalence of dental problems in recreational SCUBA divers: a pilot survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranna, V; Malmstrom, H; Yunker, M; Feng, C; Gajendra, S

    2016-11-04

    Objective To determine the prevalence of dental symptoms in recreational scuba divers and describe the distribution of these symptoms on the basis of diver demographics, diving qualifications and dive conditions during the episode of dental pain.Design A survey was designed and distributed through online social media platforms dedicated to scuba diving. A convenience sample of 100 recreational divers was obtained by this method.Main outcome measures The outcome measures of interest were: diver demographics, diving characteristics (level of certification, number of dives completed), occurrence of dental problems during a dive, and details of the episode.Results Forty-one percent of the respondents experienced dental symptoms during a dive. Barodontalgia was the most frequently experienced dental symptom during a dive.Conclusion Within the limits of the small sample size and online method of recruitment, the findings of this study suggest that a high proportion of recreational divers may experience dental symptoms during a dive. It would be meaningful to ensure that dental decay and damaged restorations are addressed before a dive and that the mouthpiece design be evaluated in case of complaints of temporomandibular discomfort during a dive.

  2. On the Cluster Physics of Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Surveys I: The Influence of Feedback, Non-thermal Pressure and Cluster Shapes on Y-M Scaling Relations

    CERN Document Server

    Battaglia, N; Pfrommer, C; Sievers, J L

    2011-01-01

    The utility of large Sunyaev Zel'dovich (SZ) surveys for determining cosmological parameters from cluster abundances is limited by the theoretical uncertainties in the integrated SZ-flux-to-mass relation, Y-M. We explore how non-thermal pressure and the anisotropic shape of the gas distribution of the intracluster medium (ICM) impacts Y-M scaling using a suite of SPH simulations of the cosmic web. We contrast results for models with different treatments of entropy injection and transport, varying radiative cooling, star formation and accompanying supernova feedback, cosmic rays, and energetic feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN). We find that the gas kinetic-to-thermal pressure ratio from internal bulk motions depends on the cluster mass, and increases in the outer-cluster due to enhanced substructure, as does the asphericity of the ICM gas. With only a ~5-10% correction to projected (observable) ellipticities, we can infer the 3D ellipticities. Our simulated Y-M-slope roughly follows the self-similar p...

  3. Pilot study of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for tissue differentiation by monitoring the plume created during laser surgery — An approach on a feedback Laser control mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanawade, Rajesh, E-mail: Rajesh.Kanawade@aot.uni-erlangen.de [Clinical Photonics Lab, Erlangen Graduate School in Advanced Optical Technologies (SAOT), Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Paul-Gordan-Str. 6, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Institute of Photonics Technologies, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Paul-Gordan-Str. 3, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Mehari, Fanuel [Master Programme in Advanced Optical Technologies (MAOT), Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Paul-Gordan-Str. 6, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Knipfer, Christian; Rohde, Maximilian [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University Hospital Erlangen, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Glueckstrasse 11, 91054 Erlangen (Germany); Tangermann-Gerk, Katja [Bayerisches Laserzentrum GmbH, Konrad-Zuse-Strasse 2-6, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Schmidt, Michael [Clinical Photonics Lab, Erlangen Graduate School in Advanced Optical Technologies (SAOT), Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Paul-Gordan-Str. 6, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Institute of Photonics Technologies, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Paul-Gordan-Str. 3, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); Bayerisches Laserzentrum GmbH, Konrad-Zuse-Strasse 2-6, 91052 Erlangen (Germany); and others

    2013-09-01

    This study focuses on tissue differentiation using ‘Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy’ (LIBS) by monitoring the plasma plume created during laser surgery processes. This technique is aimed at controlling a laser surgery feedback system in real time. An Excimer laser (Ar-F 193 nm) was used for the ablation of tissue samples. Fat, muscle, nerve and skin tissue samples of bisected ex-vivo pig heads were prepared as test objects for the ablation procedure. A single fiber was used to collect emissions and deliver them to a spectrometer. The obtained LIBS spectra in the measured emissions were analyzed to determine each tissue type according to their chemical composition. The elements found in the samples and their emission spectra were in agreement with those described in literature. The collected LIBS spectra were analyzed to differentiate the tissues using statistical data analysis: Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) and Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC). The obtained preliminary results suggest a successful differentiation of the target tissues with high sensitivity and specificity. The main goal of this study was to qualitatively identify tissue types during laser ablation, which will provide a real time feedback mechanism for clinical Laser surgery applications to significantly improve the accuracy and safety of laser surgery procedures. - Graphical abstract: Skin, fat, muscle and nerve tissue differentiation. - Highlights: • Methods to differentiate tissues for the application in a laser surgery feedback control system • Successful differentiation of the target tissues with high sensitivity and specificity for laser surgery application • Real time feedback mechanism for clinical Laser surgery applications • Laser surgery requirements • Biomedical applications of LIBS.

  4. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL REGISTRY OF NEUROENDOCRINE TUMORS IN BULGARIA--A PILOT SURVEY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanov, R; Miteva-Katrandjieva, Ts; Iskrov, G; Damyanov, D; Korukov, B; Kermedchiev, M; Terziev, I; Madjov, R; Ivanov, K; Kolev, N; Chenopolski, P; Tsaneva, M; Dimitrova, V; Todorov, G; Hristova, S; Tosheva, E; Grozdev, K; Vladov, N; Mihova, A; Stoyanova, R; Cholakov, O; Haralanov, S; Draganov, K; Marinov, V; Radionov, M; Dimitrov, O; Kurtev, P; Angelova, E; Hadjiev, B; Murdjev, K; Dermendjieva, T; Deliisky, T; Valcheva-Petrova, G; Popovska, S; Julianov, A; Georgiev, I

    2014-01-01

    The National registry of patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NET) in Bulgaria was established in 2013 as a joint initiative of the Bulgarian Surgical Society and the Institute for Rare Diseases. The register aims to explore the epidemiology of NET in Bulgaria, as well as the different diagnostic and treatment approaches for the disease throughout the country. This the first of its kind retrospective study of NET in the country is covering the period January 2012 - January 2013. A total of 127 patients with NET were identified. At the time of the survey the average age of patients with NET was 58.61 ± 15.59 years. The data show almost equal distribution between the genders with a slight predominance of women. The largest relative part of NET is those of NET located in the gastrointestinal tract (54.10 ± 4.51%), followed by those located in the pancreas (12.30 ± 2.97%) and in the lungs (10.66 ± 2.79%). In 72.44 ± 3.96% of the patients a immunohistochemical diagnosis was performed. The study confirmed the leading role of the surgery method of the NET management. In 65.83 ± 4.33% of the patients a radical removal of the tumor was conducted, while the relative part of the undertaken partial resection was 7.50 ± 2.40%. A statistically significant association between the type of surgical treatment and during the follow-up of patients was found. An update of the information in the register will allow a more precise determining of the distribution and management of NET in Bulgaria.

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SED fitting results of HETDEX pilot survey (Hagen+, 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, A.; Ciardullo, R.; Gronwall, C.; Acquaviva, V.; Bridge, J.; Zeimann, G. R.; Blanc, G. A.; Bond, N. A.; Finkelstein, S. L.; Song, M.; Gawiser, E.; Fox, D. B.; Gebhardt, H.; Malz, A. I.; Schneider, D. P.; Drory, N.; Gebhardt, K.; Hill, G. J.

    2017-06-01

    The LAEs chosen for study were discovered with the George & Cynthia Mitchell Spectrograph (previously known as VIRUS-P; Hill et al. 2008SPIE.7014E..70H) on the 2.7 m Harlan J. Smith Telescope during the HPS (Adams et al. 2011, J/ApJS/192/5). This integral-field instrument, which employs an array of 246 4.2" diameter fibers, covers ~3 arcmin2 of sky at a time, and delivers 5 Å resolution spectra between the wavelengths 3500 Å and 5800 Å. The HPS itself surveyed a total of 169 arcmin2 in the COSMOS (Scoville et al. 2007ApJS..172....1S), GOODS-N (Giavalisco et al. 2004ApJ...600L..93G), MUNICS-S2 (Drory et al. 2001MNRAS.325..550D), and XMM-LSS (Pierre et al. 2004JCAP....9...11P) fields. The final HPS catalog consists of coordinates, redshifts, R-band magnitudes, line fluxes, and equivalent widths for 397 emission-line selected galaxies. Ninty-nine of these sources are non X-ray emitting LAEs with 1.920 Å, and Lyα luminosities between 2.6x1042 and 1.1x1044 erg/s (Adams et al. 2011, J/ApJS/192/5; Blanc et al. 2011, J/ApJ/736/31). A total of 74 of these HPS LAEs lie in the GOODS-N and COSMOS fields, where deep HST data is available. (1 data file).

  6. Development and pilot testing of an Internet-based survey instrument to measure the alcohol brand preferences of U.S. youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Michael; DiLoreto, Joanna; Johnson, Andrea; Fortunato, Erin K; DeJong, William

    2011-04-01

    Although we know a great deal about the percentage of youth who drink alcohol, we know very little about the specific brands they choose to drink. This information gap needs to be addressed if public health officials are to develop more effective interventions. Unfortunately, there are no national youth surveys that collect data on alcohol brand consumption. In this paper, we describe the development and pilot testing of what we believe to be the first comprehensive, Internet-based youth survey of brand-specific alcohol use. We used online advertising in 3 U.S. cities to recruit a convenience sample of 241 respondents, ages 16 to 18 years. We used Craigslist, a network of online communities that features local classified advertisements, to recruit the sample. We used SurveyGizmo, an online software program for designing Internet surveys, collecting data, and performing basic analysis, to survey these respondents about their brand-specific alcohol consumption patterns. The survey instrument assessed each respondent's 30-day drinking history, including the frequency of consumption for each alcohol brand. Using Internet survey technology, we were able to collect information on 366 brands and still have respondents complete the instrument quickly and easily. The total number of brands consumed in the past 30 days ranged from 1 to 18, with a median of 4 brands. The top 5 brands consumed were beer brands, as were eleven of the top 15 brands. The remaining 4 brands in the top 15 included 3 brands of flavored alcoholic beverages and 1 brand of mixed drink. Among the top 15 alcohol brands consumed during heavy drinking episodes were 8 brands of beer, 4 brands of flavored alcoholic beverages, 2 brands of wine, and 1 brand of mixed drink. This pilot study helps establish the feasibility of including brand-specific questions on federal or other national youth alcohol surveys. Copyright © 2011 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  7. Low-ionization galaxies and evolution in a pilot survey up to z=1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Edmond Giraud; Qiu-Sheng Gu; Jorge Melnick; Hernan Quintana; Fernando Selman; Ignacio Toledo; Paula Zelaya

    2011-01-01

    We present galactic spectroscopic data from a pencil beam of 10.75' × 7.5'centered on the X-ray cluster RXJ0054.0-2823 at z = 0.29.We study the spectral evolution of galaxies from z = 1 down to the cluster redshift in a magnitude-limited sample at R ≤ 23, for which the statistical properties of the sample are well understood.We divide emission-line galaxies into star-forming galaxies, Low Ionization Nuclear Emission line Regions (LINERs), and Seyferts by using emission-line ratios of [OⅡ], Hβ, and [OⅢ], and derive stellar fractions from population synthesis models.We focus our analysis on absorption and low-ionization galaxies.For absorption-line galaxies, we recover the well-known result that these galaxies have had no detectable evolution since z ~ 0.6 - 0.7, but we also find that in the range z = 0.65 - 1, at least 50% of the stars in bright absorption systems are younger than 2.5 Gyr.Faint absorption-line galaxies in the cluster at z = 0.29 also had significant star formation during the previous 2 - 3 Gyr, but their brighter counterparts seem to be only composed of old stars.At z ~ 0.8, our dynamically young cluster had a truncated red-sequence.This result seems to be consistent with a scenario where the final assembly of E/S0 took place at z < 1.In the volume-limited range 0.35 ≤ z ≤ 0.65,we find that 23% of the early-type galaxies have LINER-like spectra with Hβ in absorption and have a significant component of A stars.The vast majority of LINERs in our sample have significant populations of young and intermediate-aged stars and are thus not related to AGNs, but to the population of ‘retired galaxies’ recently identified by Cid Fernandes et al.in the Sioan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS).Early-type LINERs with various fractions of A stars and E+A galaxies appear to play an important role in the formation of the red sequence.

  8. Body after baby: a pilot survey of genital body image and sexual esteem following vaginal birth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zielinski R

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Ruth Zielinski,1 Lisa Kane Low,1–3 Abigail R Smith,4 Janis M Miller1,3 1Department of Health Behavior and Biological Sciences, School of Nursing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA; 2Department of Women’s Studies, College of Literature, Science and the Arts, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA; 3Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA; 4Arbor Research Collaborative for Health, Ann Arbor, MI, USA Objective: The aim of this study was to determine acceptability of the Vaginal Changes Sexual and Body Esteem (VSBE scale for women post childbirth and explore the association between childbirth events and sexual/body esteem.Design: This is a cross-sectional study within the Evaluating Maternal Recovery from Labor and Delivery study.Setting: This study was conducted in a community setting.Population: The study was conducted in women post first vaginal birth with birth events that posed risk factors for levator ani muscle tears.Methods: Survey, magnetic resonance images of levator ani, and physical examination were the data collected 8 months postpartum. Birth variables were collected by hospital chart review. Descriptive analysis of VSBE response rates and distribution of responses was conducted. An exploratory analysis of the potential association of demographic, birth, clinical, and magnetic resonance image characteristics with VSBE scores was conducted.Main outcome measures: The outcome measure used in this study is VSBE scale.Results: The majority of participants (97% completed the scale, with responses to most questions skewed toward positive sexual/body esteem, with the exception of sexual enjoyment, where 38% indicated some interference due to genital changes. The scale showed high internal consistency (alpha =0.93. In the exploratory analysis of potential characteristics associated with VSBE, women with episiotomies had lower sexual/body esteem compared to those who did not (median

  9. Mobile phone and young people. A survey pilot study to explore the controversial aspects of a new social phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimonte, M; Ricchiuto, G

    2006-08-01

    Aim of this paper is to report the results of a pilot study as a part of a program addressed to health promotion and to improve the culture of sustainability in the school. A 15-items structured questionnaire was administered to 1 011 students (aged 9-18 years) in order to explore the entity of the phenomenon of mobile telephony among the young and qualitatively esteem the level of exposure to the potential adverse health and social effects of such dominant form of electronically mediate communication. This preliminary information was then deepened by in-group interviews focused to clarify the cultural basis of the phenomenon. The survey-study confirmed that the penetration of mobile telephony among the young matches with the national trend: 96% of 14-18-teens own at least one mobile phone; 22% of them own multiple mobile phones. In addition, most of them use mobile phone all the day; a third makes calls over 6 minutes long; half is poorly informed about the potential health risks related to ''electromagnetic pollution''. Despite the most perceive mobile phone like something noxious, only 23% holds it far from body; a very small percentage uses a hands-free kit. Most declared to suffer from a sort of addiction towards mobile phone. In the light of a growing literature and of a supposed more vulnerability of children and adolescents towards toxicants than adults, we believe that health and school operators should inform parents and the young about the possible risks linked to the abuse of technology and promote a more critic and responsible approach to mobile phone.

  10. Pilot study of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy for tissue differentiation by monitoring the plume created during laser surgery — An approach on a feedback Laser control mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanawade, Rajesh; Mehari, Fanuel; Knipfer, Christian; Rohde, Maximilian; Tangermann-Gerk, Katja; Schmidt, Michael; Stelzle, Florian

    2013-09-01

    This study focuses on tissue differentiation using 'Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy' (LIBS) by monitoring the plasma plume created during laser surgery processes. This technique is aimed at controlling a laser surgery feedback system in real time. An Excimer laser (Ar-F 193 nm) was used for the ablation of tissue samples. Fat, muscle, nerve and skin tissue samples of bisected ex-vivo pig heads were prepared as test objects for the ablation procedure. A single fiber was used to collect emissions and deliver them to a spectrometer. The obtained LIBS spectra in the measured emissions were analyzed to determine each tissue type according to their chemical composition. The elements found in the samples and their emission spectra were in agreement with those described in literature. The collected LIBS spectra were analyzed to differentiate the tissues using statistical data analysis: Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) and Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC). The obtained preliminary results suggest a successful differentiation of the target tissues with high sensitivity and specificity. The main goal of this study was to qualitatively identify tissue types during laser ablation, which will provide a real time feedback mechanism for clinical Laser surgery applications to significantly improve the accuracy and safety of laser surgery procedures.

  11. Implementing and managing self-management skills training within primary care organisations: a national survey of the expert patients programme within its pilot phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogers Anne

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A key element of the United Kingdom (UK health policy reform in relation to chronic disease management is the introduction of a national programme seeking to promote self-care from within the National Health Service (NHS. The mainstay of the Expert Patients Programme (EPP is a six-week training course that provides the opportunity for anyone with a long-term condition to develop new skills to manage their condition better on a day-to-day basis. The course forms part of the NHS self-care support programme, is administered by Primary Care Trusts (PCTs and delivered by people who have personal experience of living with a long-term condition. The NHS' official Expert Patients Programme website presently states that, "Pilot EPP courses began at 26 NHS PCT sites across England in May 2002, and by May 2004 approximately 300 PCTs had either actively implemented pilot courses or had committed to joining. The majority of PCTs are now coming to the end of the pilot phase, with many implementing plans to make EPP sustainable for the long-term." The NHS website heralds the pilot "a success." A national, postal survey of PCT EPP Leads was undertaken in order to examine both the evolvement of EPP during its pilot stage and future plans for the programme. A questionnaire was sent out to the 299 PCTs known to have committed to the EPP pilot, and an excellent 100% response rate was obtained over a 3-month period (April-July 2005. One marker of success of the Expert Patients Programme implementation is the actual running of courses by the Primary Care Trusts. This paper explores the extent to which the implementation of the pilot can indeed be viewed as a "success," primarily in terms of the number of courses run, and considers the extent to which PCTs have carried out all that they were committed to do. Findings suggest that the more time an EPP Lead dedicates to the Programme, the more likely it is that EPP has run successfully in the past, and the more

  12. Glass-Cockpit Pilot Subjective Ratings of Predictive Information, Collocation, and Mission Status Graphics: An Analysis and Summary of the Future Focus of Flight Deck Research Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolone, Anthony; Trujillo, Anna

    2002-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has been researching ways to improve flight crew decision aiding for systems management. Our current investigation is how to display a wide variety of aircraft parameters in ways that will improve the flight crew's situation awareness. To accomplish this, new means are being explored that will monitor the overall health of a flight and report the current status of the aircraft and forecast impending problems to the pilots. The initial step in this research was to conduct a survey addressing how current glass-cockpit commercial pilots would value a prediction of the status of critical aircraft systems. We also addressed how this new type of data ought to be conveyed and utilized. Therefore, two other items associated with predictive information were also included in the survey. The first addressed the need for system status, alerts and procedures, and system controls to be more logically grouped together, or collocated, on the flight deck. The second idea called for the survey respondents opinions on the functionality of mission status graphics; a display methodology that groups a variety of parameters onto a single display that can instantaneously convey a complete overview of both an aircraft's system and mission health.

  13. A pilot survey of the U.S. medical waste industry to determine training needs for safely handling highly infectious waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Aurora B; Hoboy, Selin; Germain, Anne; Miller, Hal; Thompson, Richard; Herstein, Jocelyn J; Jelden, Katelyn C; Beam, Elizabeth L; Gibbs, Shawn G; Lowe, John J

    2017-09-25

    The recent Ebola outbreak led to the development of Ebola virus disease (EVD) best practices in clinical settings. However, after the care of EVD patients, proper medical waste management and disposal was identified as a crucial component to containing the virus. Category A waste-contaminated with EVD and other highly infectious pathogens-is strictly regulated by governmental agencies, and led to only several facilities willing to accept the waste. A pilot survey was administered to determine if U.S. medical waste facilities are prepared to handle or transport category A waste, and to determine waste workers' current extent of training to handle highly infectious waste. Sixty-eight percent of survey respondents indicated they had not determined if their facility would accept category A waste. Of those that had acquired a special permit, 67% had yet to modify their permit since the EVD outbreak. This pilot survey underscores gaps in the medical waste industry to handle and respond to category A waste. Furthermore, this study affirms reports a limited number of processing facilities are capable or willing to accept category A waste. Developing the proper management of infectious disease materials is essential to close the gaps identified so that states and governmental entities can act accordingly based on the regulations and guidance developed, and to ensure public safety. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Pilot Study: Survey Tools for Assessing Parenting Styles and Family Contributors to the Development of Obesity in Arab Children Ages 6 to 12 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tami, Suzan H; Reed, Debra B; Trejos, Elizabeth; Boylan, Mallory; Wang, Shu

    2015-11-05

    Our pilot study was conducted to test the reliability of the Caregiver's Feeding Styles Questionnaire (CFSQ) and the Family Nutrition and Physical Activity Assessment (FNPA) in a sample of Arab mothers. Twenty-five Arab mothers completed the CFSQ, FNPA, and the Participant Background Survey for the first administration. After 1-2 weeks, participants completed the CFSQ and the FNPA for the second administration. The two administrations of the surveys allowed for test/retest reliability of the CFSQ and the FNPA and to measure the internal consistency of the two surveys. Pearson's correlation between the first and second administrations or the 19-item scale (demandingness) and the 7-item scale (responsiveness) of the CFSQ were .95 and .86, respectively. As for the FNPA, Pearson's correlation was .80. The estimated reliabilities (Cronbach's alpha) of the CFSQ increased from .86 for the first administration to .93 for the second administration. However, the estimated reliabilities of the FNPA slightly increased from .58 for first administration to .59 for the second administration. In our pilot study of Arab mothers, the CFSQ and FNPA were shown to be promising in terms of reliability and content validity.

  15. 先导腔动压反馈比例溢流阀的动态特性分析%Dynamic Characteristic Analysis of Proportional Relief Valve with Pilot Chamber Dynamic Pressure Feedback

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙文毅; 陈淑梅; 颜滨曲; 黄彬

    2016-01-01

    比例溢流阀是保证工程机械运动稳定性的重要元件,针对普通比例先导溢流阀工作过程中响应速度慢和压力超调大的缺陷,该文设计了一款先导腔动压反馈式比例溢流阀.通过数学建模分析了溢流阀的静态和动态特性,并运用AMESim软件对所设计的比例溢流阀进行仿真分析,研究了影响溢流阀性能的结构参数,并验证了数学模型的正确性;用液压刚度替代了弹簧刚度,在结构上克服了弹簧工作过程中响应速度迟缓的缺点,有效改善了溢流阀的寿命.仿真结果表明,改进后的溢流阀较普通比例先导溢流阀的调压精度好、调压范围大,其性能上有明显的提高,对溢流阀的研究设计有一定的参考价值.%Proportional relief valves are the important components to ensure the stability of mechanical engineering movement . This paper designs a novel pilot cavity dynamic pressure feedback proportional relief valve for ordinary proportional pilot-operated relief lacking of slow response and large pressure overshoot in the working process. Theoretically the paper builds mathematical model for analyzing the static and dynamic characteristics of this relief valve, and simulates the model of the designed proportional relief valve by AMESim, which analyzes the structural parameters affecting the relief valve performance and verifies the correctness of the mathematical model. The valve uses hydraulic rigidity to replace spring stiffness, structurally overcoming the disadvantage of low response in the working process, and ef-fectively improving the life of the relief. Simulation results show that the improved relief has good precision regulator, large pressure regula-tion, and its performance has been significantly improved comparing with ordinary proportional pilot-operated relief, which has some refer-ence value for the study and design of the relief valve.

  16. Formativ Feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldahl, Kirsten Kofod

    Denne bog undersøger, hvordan lærere kan anvende feedback til at forbedre undervisningen i klasselokalet. I denne sammenhæng har John Hattie, professor ved Melbourne Universitet, udviklet en model for feedback, hvilken er baseret på synteser af meta-analyser. I 2009 udgav han bogen "Visible...

  17. Pilot Test of Survey to Assess Dental and Dental Hygiene Student Human Papillomavirus-Related Oropharyngeal Cancer Knowledge, Perceptions, and Clinical Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkoski, Holdunn; Fowler, Brynn; Mooney, Ryan; Pappas, Lisa; Dixon, Barbara L; Pinzon, Lilliam M; Winkler, James; Kepka, Deanna

    2017-01-14

    This was the first study to develop and pilot test an assessment tool for the examination of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) knowledge, perceptions, and clinical practices of oral health students. An interdisciplinary team developed the tool using surveys that examined this topic in other populations. The tool was then pilot tested at two different dental programs. Results from the pilot informed revisions to the final version of the tool. Of the 46 student participants, 18 were first-year dental hygiene and 28 were first-year dental students. The majority of participants were female (N = 29, 63%) and ages 18 to 29 years old (N = 41, 89%). Four scales used in the questionnaire were analyzed for reliability. Of these, the HPV and HPV-OPC knowledge and the HPV vaccination knowledge scales had Cronbach alphas of 0.71 and 0.79, respectively. Questions assessing HPV and the role of dental professionals had a correlation coefficient of 0.71. Questions assessing willingness to administer vaccines in the dental office had a correlation coefficient of 0.85. Assessing oral health students' HPV-OPC knowledge, perceptions, and clinical practices are important for future assessment of possible HPV-OPC cases. Dental professionals may be optimally positioned to provide HPV patient education. The tool developed and pilot tested in this study can help schools assess their students' knowledge and guide their dental curriculum to address deficiencies. Since this topic has not been effectively examined with dental health students, the results could help improve dental education and dental care.

  18. Paper Review Revolution: Screencasting Feedback for Developmental Writers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, Joni; Carlson, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Researchers from Kaplan University present findings from a media-rich feedback pilot program that targets students from developmental writing courses. One study of student reactions reveals how screencasting feedback encouraged more formative, holistic feedback and students' awareness of writing process, audience, and revision. A second study…

  19. The Structure of Dark Molecular Gas in the Galaxy - I: A Pilot Survey for 18-cm OH Emission Towards $l \\approx 105^{\\deg}, b \\approx +1^{\\deg}$

    CERN Document Server

    Allen, Ronald J; Engelke, Philip D

    2015-01-01

    We report the first results from a survey for 1665, 1667, and 1720 MHz OH emission over a small region of the Outer Galaxy centered at $l \\approx 105.0\\deg , b \\approx +1.0\\deg$ . This sparse, high-sensitivity survey ($\\Delta Ta \\approx \\Delta Tmb \\approx 3.0 - 3.5$ mK rms in 0.55 km/s channels), was carried out as a pilot project with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT, FWHM $\\approx 7.6'$) on a 3 X 9 grid at $0.5\\deg$ spacing. The pointings chosen correspond with those of the existing $^{12}$CO(1-0) CfA survey of the Galaxy (FWHM $\\approx 8.4'$). With 2-hr integrations, 1667 MHz OH emission was detected with the GBT at $\\gtrsim 21$ of the 27 survey positions ($\\geq 78\\%$ ), confirming the ubiquity of molecular gas in the ISM as traced by this spectral line. With few exceptions, the main OH lines at 1665 and 1667 MHz appear in the ratio of 5:9 characteristic of LTE at our sensitivity levels. No OH absorption features are recorded in the area of the present survey, in agreement with the low levels of continuum bac...

  20. Is Real-Time Feedback of Burn-Specific Patient-Reported Outcome Measures in Clinical Settings Practical and Useful? A Pilot Study Implementing the Young Adult Burn Outcome Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Colleen M; Lee, Austin F; Kazis, Lewis E; Shapiro, Gabriel D; Schneider, Jeffrey C; Goverman, Jeremy; Fagan, Shawn P; Wang, Chao; Kim, Julia; Sheridan, Robert L; Tompkins, Ronald G

    2016-01-01

    Long-term follow-up care of survivors after burn injuries can potentially be improved by the application of patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs). PROMs can inform clinical decision-making and foster communication between the patient and provider. There are no previous reports using real-time, burn-specific PROMs in clinical practice to track and benchmark burn recovery over time. This study examines the feasibility of a computerized, burn-specific PROM, the Young Adult Burn Outcome Questionnaire (YABOQ), with real-time benchmarking feedback in a burn outpatient practice. The YABOQ was redesigned for formatting and presentation purposes using images and transcribed to a computerized format. The redesigned questionnaire was administered to young adult burn survivors (ages 19-30 years, 1-24 months from injury) via an ipad platform in the office before outpatient visits. A report including recovery curves benchmarked to a nonburned relatively healthy age-matched population and to patients with similar injuries was produced for the domains of physical function and social function limited by appearance. A copy of the domain reports as well as a complete copy of the patient's responses to all domain questions was provided for use during the clinical visit. Patients and clinicians completed satisfaction surveys at the conclusion of the visit. Free-text responses, included in the satisfaction surveys, were treated as qualitative data adding contextual information about the assessment of feasibility. Eleven patients and their providers completed the study for 12 clinical visits. All patients found the ipad survey and report "easy" or "very easy" to use. In nine instances, patients "agreed" or "strongly agreed" that it helped them communicate their situation to their doctor/nurse practitioner. Patients "agreed" or "strongly agreed" that the report helped them understand their course of recovery in 10 visits. In 11 visits, the patients "agreed" or "strongly agreed" that

  1. Feedback options in nonlinear numerical finance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hugger, Jens; Mashayekhi, Sima

    2012-01-01

    Feedback options are options where information about the trading of the underlying asset is fed back into the pricing model. This results in nonlinear pricing models. A survey of the literature about feedback options in finance is presented. The pricing model for the full feedback option...

  2. Wide-field broad-band radio imaging with phased array feeds: a pilot multi-epoch continuum survey with ASKAP-BETA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heywood, I.; Bannister, K. W.; Marvil, J.; Allison, J. R.; Ball, L.; Bell, M. E.; Bock, D. C.-J.; Brothers, M.; Bunton, J. D.; Chippendale, A. P.; Cooray, F.; Cornwell, T. J.; De Boer, D.; Edwards, P.; Gough, R.; Gupta, N.; Harvey-Smith, L.; Hay, S.; Hotan, A. W.; Indermuehle, B.; Jacka, C.; Jackson, C. A.; Johnston, S.; Kimball, A. E.; Koribalski, B. S.; Lenc, E.; Macleod, A.; McClure-Griffiths, N.; McConnell, D.; Mirtschin, P.; Murphy, T.; Neuhold, S.; Norris, R. P.; Pearce, S.; Popping, A.; Qiao, R. Y.; Reynolds, J. E.; Sadler, E. M.; Sault, R. J.; Schinckel, A. E. T.; Serra, P.; Shimwell, T. W.; Stevens, J.; Tuthill, J.; Tzioumis, A.; Voronkov, M. A.; Westmeier, T.; Whiting, M. T.

    2016-04-01

    The Boolardy Engineering Test Array is a 6 × 12 m dish interferometer and the prototype of the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP), equipped with the first generation of ASKAP's phased array feed (PAF) receivers. These facilitate rapid wide-area imaging via the deployment of simultaneous multiple beams within an ˜30 deg2 field of view. By cycling the array through 12 interleaved pointing positions and using nine digitally formed beams, we effectively mimic a traditional 1 h × 108 pointing survey, covering ˜150 deg2 over 711-1015 MHz in 12 h of observing time. Three such observations were executed over the course of a week. We verify the full bandwidth continuum imaging performance and stability of the system via self-consistency checks and comparisons to existing radio data. The combined three epoch image has arcminute resolution and a 1σ thermal noise level of 375 μJy beam-1, although the effective noise is a factor of ˜3 higher due to residual sidelobe confusion. From this we derive a catalogue of 3722 discrete radio components, using the 35 per cent fractional bandwidth to measure in-band spectral indices for 1037 of them. A search for transient events reveals one significantly variable source within the survey area. The survey covers approximately two-thirds of the Spitzer South Pole Telescope Deep Field. This pilot project demonstrates the viability and potential of using PAFs to rapidly and accurately survey the sky at radio wavelengths.

  3. The Role of Social Media in Creating Intercultural Dialogue and Overcoming Prejudice – a Comparative Analysis of Pilot Survey Results

    OpenAIRE

    Grażyna Piechota

    2014-01-01

    Artykuł recenzowany / Peer-reviewed article Multiculturalism, as a political and social phenomenon, is more and more often perceived as a challenge in the realm of studying communication processes. New media make it possible to communicate and build relations in the global dimension with a simultaneous impact on the development of horizontal communication, creating groups and communities and active support for different forms of social participation. In this context a pilot ...

  4. A survey of the sleep status among military pilots%军队飞行人员睡眠状况调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王莞尔; 高和; 崔丽; 钟方虎; 张继东; 李嵘; 刘欣欣; 王扬

    2012-01-01

    目的 调查军队飞行人员的睡眠习惯、常见睡眠问题、白天嗜睡程度和飞行前夜睡眠情况.方法 采取整群随机抽样方法对1380名军队飞行人员进行问卷调查,对其中1328份有效问卷进行统计分析.结果 飞行人员平均夜间睡眠时间6.99h,24h平均睡眠时间8.10h.4.10%的飞行人员24h睡眠时间不足6h.中重度打鼾发生率22.80%,易醒或(和)早醒和入睡困难≥3次/周的发生率为7.65%和5.81%,夜尿患病率4.03%.平均ESS评分5.59±4.40分,以≥11分评估嗜睡发生率为14.99%.飞行中困倦发生率14.20%.62.53%的飞行人员飞行前夜较平时睡眠发生变化.结论 飞行人员中存在着多种睡眠问题,并且飞行前夜睡眠可发生变化,这些都可能影响飞行安全,应进行研究和干预.%Objective The present study was to investigate the sleep habit, common sleep problems, level of daytime sleepiness, and sleep quality among military pilots during nighttime before flying. Methods Random cluster sampling survey was conducted to complete the questionnaire for 1380 military pilots. Statistical analysis of data from the 1328 participants was conducted. Results The mean nighttime sleep duration of pilots was 6.99h and the mean sleep duration during a 24h period was 8.10h. Approximately 4.10% of the pilots slept less than 6h in a 24h period. The incidence of moderate and severe snoring was 22.80%. The prevalence of nocturnal awakening and/or early morning awakening, and difficulty in initiating sleep ≥3 times/ week among the pilots was 7.65% and 5.81%, respectively. Consequently, the incidence of nocturia was 4.03%. The mean score of the Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS) was 5.59 ± 4.40. ESS scores of =3 11 were taken to represent excessive daytime sleepiness, the prevalence of which was 14.99%. Further, the prevalence of drowsiness during a flight was 14.20%. Among the respondents, 62.53% indicated that their normal sleep schedules and habits

  5. A pilot validation in 10 European Union Member States of a point prevalence survey of healthcare-associated infections and antimicrobial use in acute hospitals in Europe, 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, J S; Price, L; Godwin, J; Cairns, S; Hopkins, S; Cookson, B; Malcolm, W; Hughes, G; Lyytikainen, O; Coignard, B; Hansen, S; Suetens, C

    2015-02-26

    We present a pilot validation study performed on 10 European Union (EU) Member States, of a point prevalence survey (PPS) of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) and antimicrobial use in Europe in 2011 involving 29 EU/European Economic Area (EEA) countries and Croatia. A total of 20 acute hospitals and 1,950 patient records were included in the pilot study, which consisted of validation and inter-rater reliability (IRR) testing using an in-hospital observation approach. In the validation, a sensitivity of 83% (95% confidence interval (CI): 79–87%) and a specificity of 98% (95% CI: 98–99%) were found for HAIs. The level of agreement between the primary PPS and validation results were very good for HAIs overall (Cohen’s κappa (κ):0.81) and across all the types of HAIs (range: 0.83 for bloodstream infections to 1.00 for lower respiratory tract infections). Antimicrobial use had a sensitivity of 94% (95% CI: 93–95%) and specificity of 97% (95% CI: 96–98%) with a very good level of agreement (κ:0.91). Agreement on other demographic items ranged from moderate to very good (κ: 0.57–0.95): age (κ:0.95), sex (κ: 0.93), specialty of physician (κ: 0.87) and McCabe score (κ: 0.57). IRR showed a very good level of agreement (κ: 0.92) for both the presence of HAIs and antimicrobial use. This pilot study suggested valid and reliable reporting of HAIs and antimicrobial use in the PPS dataset. The lower level of sensitivity with respect to reporting of HAIs reinforces the importance of training data collectors and including validation studies as part of a PPS in order for the burden of HAIs to be better estimated.

  6. Signatures of AGN feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylezalek, Dominika; Zakamska, Nadia L.; MaNGA-GMOS Team

    2017-01-01

    Feedback from actively accreting SMBHs (Active Galactic Nuclei, AGN) is now widely considered to be the main driver in regulating the growth of massive galaxies. Observational proof for this scenario has, however, been hard to come by. Many attempts at finding a conclusive observational proof that AGN may be able to quench star formation and regulate the host galaxies' growth have shown that this problem is highly complex.I will present results from several projects that focus on understanding the power, reach and impact of feedback processes exerted by AGN. I will describe recent efforts in our group of relating feedback signatures to the specific star formation rate in their host galaxies, where our results are consistent with the AGN having a `negative' impact through feedback on the galaxies' star formation history (Wylezalek+2016a,b). Furthermore, I will show that powerful AGN-driven winds can be easily hidden and not be apparent in the integrated spectrum of the galaxy. This implies that large IFU surveys, such as the SDSS-IV MaNGA survey, might uncover many previously unknown AGN and outflows that are potentially very relevant for understanding the role of AGN in galaxy evolution (Wylezalek+2016c)!

  7. Remote monitoring of inhaled bronchodilator use and weekly feedback about asthma management: an open-group, short-term pilot study of the impact on asthma control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Van Sickle

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Adequate symptom control is a problem for many people with asthma. We asked whether weekly email reports on monitored use of inhaled, short-acting bronchodilators might improve scores on composite asthma-control measures. METHODS: Through an investigational electronic medication sensor attached to each participant's inhaler, we monitored 4 months' use of inhaled, short-acting bronchodilators. Participants completed surveys, including the Asthma Control Test(TM (ACT, to assess asthma control at entry and monthly thereafter. After the first month, participants received weekly email reports for 3 months. The reports summarized inhaled bronchodilator use during the preceding week and provided suggestions derived from National Asthma Education and Prevention Program (NAEPP guidelines. Paired t-tests and random-effects mixed models were implemented to assess changes in primary asthma endpoints. RESULTS: Thirty individuals participated in the 4-month study; 29 provided complete asthma control information. Mean age was 36.8 years (range: 19-74 years; 52% of respondents were female. Mean ACT scores were 17.6 (Standard Deviation [SD]  = 3.35 at entry and 18.4 (SD = 3.60 at completion of the first month. No significant difference appeared between ACT values at entry and completion of the first month (p = 0.66; however, after participants began receiving email reports and online information about their inhaler use, mean ACT scores increased 1.40 points (95% CI: 0.61, 2.18 for each subsequent study month. Significant decreases occurred in 2-week histories of daytime symptoms (β = -1.35, 95% CI: -2.65, -0.04 and nighttime symptoms (β = -0.84, 95% CI: -1.25, -0.44; no significant change in activity limitation (β = -0.21, 95% CI: -0.69, 0.26 was observed. Participants reported increased awareness and understanding of asthma patterns, level of control, bronchodilator use (timing, location and triggers, and improved

  8. Remote monitoring of inhaled bronchodilator use and weekly feedback about asthma management: an open-group, short-term pilot study of the impact on asthma control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Sickle, David; Magzamen, Sheryl; Truelove, Shaun; Morrison, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Adequate symptom control is a problem for many people with asthma. We asked whether weekly email reports on monitored use of inhaled, short-acting bronchodilators might improve scores on composite asthma-control measures. Through an investigational electronic medication sensor attached to each participant's inhaler, we monitored 4 months' use of inhaled, short-acting bronchodilators. Participants completed surveys, including the Asthma Control Test(TM) (ACT), to assess asthma control at entry and monthly thereafter. After the first month, participants received weekly email reports for 3 months. The reports summarized inhaled bronchodilator use during the preceding week and provided suggestions derived from National Asthma Education and Prevention Program (NAEPP) guidelines. Paired t-tests and random-effects mixed models were implemented to assess changes in primary asthma endpoints. Thirty individuals participated in the 4-month study; 29 provided complete asthma control information. Mean age was 36.8 years (range: 19-74 years); 52% of respondents were female. Mean ACT scores were 17.6 (Standard Deviation [SD]  = 3.35) at entry and 18.4 (SD = 3.60) at completion of the first month. No significant difference appeared between ACT values at entry and completion of the first month (p = 0.66); however, after participants began receiving email reports and online information about their inhaler use, mean ACT scores increased 1.40 points (95% CI: 0.61, 2.18) for each subsequent study month. Significant decreases occurred in 2-week histories of daytime symptoms (β = -1.35, 95% CI: -2.65, -0.04) and nighttime symptoms (β = -0.84, 95% CI: -1.25, -0.44); no significant change in activity limitation (β = -0.21, 95% CI: -0.69, 0.26) was observed. Participants reported increased awareness and understanding of asthma patterns, level of control, bronchodilator use (timing, location) and triggers, and improved preventive practices. Weekly email reports and

  9. Feedback and Incentives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Tor Viking; Poulsen, Anders; Villeval, Marie Claire

    2009-01-01

    This paper experimentally investigates the impact of different pay schemes and relative performance feedback policies on employee effort. We explore three feedback rules: no feedback on relative performance, feedback given halfway through the production period, and continuously updated feedback. ...

  10. Delineating inflammatory and mechanical sub-types of low back pain: a pilot survey of fifty low back pain patients in a chiropractic setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riksman Janine S

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An instrument known as the Mechanical and Inflammatory Low Back Pain (MAIL Scale was drafted using the results of a previous expert opinion study. A pilot survey was conducted to test the feasibility of a larger study designed to determine the MAIL Scale's ability to distinguish two potential subgroups of low back pain: inflammatory and mechanical. Methods Patients with a primary complaint of low back pain (LBP presenting to chiropractic clinics in Perth, Western Australia were asked to fill out the MAIL Scale questionnaire. The instrument's ability to separate patients into inflammatory and mechanical subgroups of LBP was examined using the mean score of each notional subgroup as an arbitrary cut-off point. Results Data were collected from 50 patients. The MAIL Scale did not appear to separate cases of LBP into the two notionally distinct groups of inflammatory (n = 6 or mechanical (n = 5. A larger "mixed symptom" group (n = 39 was revealed. Conclusions In this pilot study the MAIL Scale was unable to clearly discriminate between what is thought to be mechanical and inflammatory LBP in 50 cases seen in a chiropractic setting. However, the small sample size means any conclusions must be viewed with caution. Further research within a larger study population may be warranted and feasible.

  11. The Role of Character in the Hiring Process: A Pilot Study Survey of College Seniors' Potential Employers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firmin, Michael; Proemmel, Elizabeth; McDivitt, Sarah; Evens, Jennifer; Gibbs, Lew

    2009-01-01

    We surveyed 31 prospective employers (65% response rate) regarding their views on character as part of the employment selection process. The results showed character qualities superordinate, relative to skills that prospective employees bring to potential jobs. We discuss survey results in light of business educators' responsibility for helping…

  12. Skill Enhancement for Health: An Evaluation of An Online Pilot Teaching Module on Epidemiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry MURPHY

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Skill Enhancement for Health: An Evaluation of An Online Pilot Teaching Module on Epidemiology Rory McGREAL, PhD Athabasca University – Canada’s Open University Athabasca AB, CANADA Sue DAVIS, MSc. New Brunswick Community College–Saint John Saint John, CANADA Terry MURPHY, PhD Consortium for Information Technology in Education (CITE Saint John, CANADA Chris SMITH, BA Consortium for Information Technology in Education (CITE Saint John, CANADA ABSTRACT The evaluation of this pilot of an epidemiology course conducted online and delivered across Canada was based on four main criteria: design, content, process and outcomes. Data was collected through seven sources: participant online survey results, post-pilot workshop feedback, four focus groups, telephone interviews with participants, interviews with course developers, examination of online materials, and analysis of log files generated by the web server. The pilot course had the following outcomes: Findings on the delivery showed that the course took much more time than estimated; the online environment was challenging/frustrating for some; there were technical glitches; discussion boards were not regularly used; interaction with instructors was minimal; feedback from instructors was slow in coming; the short development time led to errors/mismatches between content and assessment; and the high student/teacher ratio of 1:48 made it difficult to provide timely feedback.

  13. The Role of Social Media in Creating Intercultural Dialogue and Overcoming Prejudice – a Comparative Analysis of Pilot Survey Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grażyna Piechota

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Multiculturalism, as a political and social phenomenon, is more and more often perceived as a challenge in the realm of studying communication processes. New media make it possible to communicate and build relations in the global dimension with a simultaneous impact on the development of horizontal communication, creating groups and communities and active support for different forms of social participation. In this context a pilot study concerning the role of new media in overcoming schemata and prejudice of students in two different cities with different levels of multiculturalism in the local community was carried out.

  14. Toward understanding the formation of multiple systems - A pilot IRAM-PdBI survey of Class 0 objects

    CERN Document Server

    Maury, A J; Hennebelle, P; Motte, F; Stamatellos, D; Bate, M; Belloche, A; Duchene, G; Whitworth, A

    2010-01-01

    The formation process of binary stars and multiple systems is poorly understood. Here, we seek to determine the typical outcome of protostellar collapse and to constrain models of binary formation by core fragmentation during collapse, using high-resolution millimeter continuum imaging of very young (Class 0) protostars observed at the beginning of the main accretion phase. We carried out a pilot high-resolution study of 5 Class 0 objects, using the most extended (A) configuration of the IRAM PdBI at 1.3 mm, which allow us to probe the multiplicity of Class 0 protostars down to separations a ~50 AU and circumstellar mass ratios q ~0.07. We show that our PdBI observations revealed only wide (>1500 AU) protobinary systems and/or outflow-generated features. When combined with previous millimeter interferometric observations of Class 0 protostars, our pilot PdBI study tentatively suggests that the binary fraction in the ~ 75-1000 AU range increases from the Class 0 to the Class I stage. It also seems to argue aga...

  15. Innovation in healthcare team feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza, Christine; Beard, Leslie; Fonzo, Anthony Di; Tommaso, Michael Di; Mujawaz, Yaman; Serra-Julia, Marcel; Morra, Dante

    2011-01-01

    Healthcare delivery is evolving from individual, autonomous practice to collaborative team practice. However, barriers such as professional autonomy, time constraints and the perception of error as failure preclude learning behaviours that can facilitate organizational learning and improvement. Although experimentation, engaging in questions and feedback, discussing errors and reflecting on results can facilitate learning and promote effective performance, the cultural barriers within healthcare can prevent or inhibit this type of behaviour among teams. At the University Health Network's Centre for Innovation in Complex Care, we realize the need for a tool that facilitates learning behaviour and is sensitive to the risk-averse nature of the clinical environment. The vehicle for the Team Feedback Tool is a web-based application called Rypple (www.rypple.com), which allows team members to provide anonymous, rapid-fire feedback on team processes and performance. Rypple facilitates communication, elicits feedback and provokes discussion. The process enables follow-up face-to-face team discussions and encourages teams to create actionable solutions for incremental changes to enhance team health and performance. The Team Feedback Tool was implemented and piloted in general internal medicine at the University Health Network's Toronto General Hospital from early May 2009 to July 2009 to address the issues of teamwork and learning behaviour in the clinical environment. This article explores the opportunities and barriers associated with the implementation of the Team Feedback Tool.

  16. Using Screencasts to Enhance Assessment Feedback: Students' Perceptions and Preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriott, Pru; Teoh, Lim Keong

    2012-01-01

    In the UK, assessment and feedback have been regularly highlighted by the National Student Survey as critical aspects that require improvement. An innovative approach to delivering feedback that has proved successful in non-business-related disciplines is the delivery of audio and visual feedback using screencast technology. The feedback on…

  17. An International Survey of Transport Airplane Pilots’ Experiences and Perspectives of Lateral/Directional Control Events and Rudder Issues in Transport Airplanes (Rudder Survey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    Lufthansa German Airlines Midwest Express Airlines, Inc. National Transportation Safety Board Northwest Airlines, Inc. Qantas Airways , Ltd. SAS Flight Academy...with analysis of characteristics of respondents and nonrespondents, is necessary to assure that statistics among a sample generalize more broadly. We...were recognized during analysis of the survey data. Nonetheless, we can assess the representativeness of respondents relative to characteristics of

  18. Eclipsing Binary Science Via the Merging of Transit and Doppler Exoplanet Survey Data - A Case Study With the MARVELS Pilot Project and SuperWASP

    CERN Document Server

    Fleming, Scott W; Hebb, Leslie; Stassun, Keivan G; Ge, Jian; Cargile, Phillip A; Ghezzi, Luan; De Lee, Nathan M; Wisniewski, John; Gary, Bruce; de Mello, Gustavo F Porto; Ferreira, Leticia; Zhao, Bo; Anderson, David R; Wan, Xiaoke; Hellier, Coel; Guo, Pengcheng; West, Richard G; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Pollacco, Don; Lee, Brian; Cameron, Andrew Collier; van Eyken, Julian C; Skillen, Ian; Crepp, Justin R; Nguyen, Duy Cuong; Kane, Stephen R; Paegert, Martin; da Costa, Luiz Nicolaci; Maia, Marcio A G; Santiago, Basilio X

    2011-01-01

    Exoplanet transit and Doppler surveys discover many binary stars during their operation that can be used to conduct a variety of ancillary science. Specifically, eclipsing binary stars can be used to study the stellar mass-radius relationship and to test predictions of theoretical stellar evolution models. By cross-referencing 24 binary stars found in the MARVELS Pilot Project with SuperWASP photometry, we find two new eclipsing binaries, TYC 0272-00458-1 and TYC 1422-01328-1, which we use as case studies to develop a general approach to eclipsing binaries in survey data. TYC 0272-00458-1 is a single-lined spectroscopic binary for which we calculate a mass of the secondary and radii for both components using reasonable constraints on the primary mass through several different techniques. For a primary mass of M_1 = 0.92 +/- 0.1 M_solar, we find M_2 = 0.610 +/- 0.036 M_solar, R_1 = 0.932 +/- 0.076 R_solar and R_2 = 0.559 +/- 0.102 R_solar, and find that both stars have masses and radii consistent with model pr...

  19. Training and administration of epinephrine auto-injectors for anaphylaxis treatment in US schools: results from the EpiPen4Schools® pilot survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hogue SL

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Susan L Hogue,1 Diana Goss,1 Kelly Hollis,1 Suyapa Silvia,2 Martha V White3 1Health Solutions, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC, 2Education and Workforce Development, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC, 3Institute for Asthma and Allergy, Wheaton, MD, USA Background: Anaphylaxis is a serious, potentially life-threatening condition. Adequate preparation for anaphylaxis management is imperative for school personnel. This descriptive pilot study assessed preparedness of US schools to manage anaphylactic reactions. Methods: An exploratory, cross-sectional, web-based, pilot survey assessed the occurrence and characteristics of anaphylactic events, as well as training provided to school personnel for the recognition and treatment of anaphylaxis. Eligible US schools were participants in the EpiPen4Schools® program during the 2013–2014 school year. EpiPen4Schools provides EpiPen® (epinephrine injection Auto-Injectors and training materials to qualifying US schools. Survey data were parsed by US Census Bureau region and state and were evaluated using descriptive statistics. Results: Schools from all 50 states and the District of Columbia participated in the survey (N=6,019. Among schools that provided information on anaphylactic events, 11% (607/5,683 reported the occurrence of one or more events, with significant variability in incidence across census regions and among states. A total of 5,613 schools provided information regarding which staff members were trained to recognize the signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis. Thirty-six percent of schools (2,022/5,613 indicated that only the school nurse and select staff were trained in anaphylaxis recognition. The proportion of schools in which most or all school staff received such training differed by region/state (range, 13%–100%. A total of 5,578 schools provided information on which staff were permitted to administer epinephrine. The majority of schools (54%; 3

  20. Training and administration of epinephrine auto-injectors for anaphylaxis treatment in US schools: results from the EpiPen4Schools® pilot survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, Susan L; Goss, Diana; Hollis, Kelly; Silvia, Suyapa; White, Martha V

    2016-01-01

    Background Anaphylaxis is a serious, potentially life-threatening condition. Adequate preparation for anaphylaxis management is imperative for school personnel. This descriptive pilot study assessed preparedness of US schools to manage anaphylactic reactions. Methods An exploratory, cross-sectional, web-based, pilot survey assessed the occurrence and characteristics of anaphylactic events, as well as training provided to school personnel for the recognition and treatment of anaphylaxis. Eligible US schools were participants in the EpiPen4Schools® program during the 2013–2014 school year. EpiPen4Schools provides EpiPen® (epinephrine injection) Auto-Injectors and training materials to qualifying US schools. Survey data were parsed by US Census Bureau region and state and were evaluated using descriptive statistics. Results Schools from all 50 states and the District of Columbia participated in the survey (N=6,019). Among schools that provided information on anaphylactic events, 11% (607/5,683) reported the occurrence of one or more events, with significant variability in incidence across census regions and among states. A total of 5,613 schools provided information regarding which staff members were trained to recognize the signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis. Thirty-six percent of schools (2,022/5,613) indicated that only the school nurse and select staff were trained in anaphylaxis recognition. The proportion of schools in which most or all school staff received such training differed by region/state (range, 13%–100%). A total of 5,578 schools provided information on which staff were permitted to administer epinephrine. The majority of schools (54%; 3,024/5,578) permitted only the school nurse and select staff to administer epinephrine, although percentages varied by region/state (range, 4%–100%). Conclusion Schools differed substantially in their preparedness to manage anaphylaxis, with significant disparities in staff training and permission to treat. Given

  1. A Survey of Researches on Evaluation and Feedback of EFL Writing in China (2000 -2013)%国内二语写作评估反馈研究调查(2000-2013)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱岩岩

    2014-01-01

    2000-2013年,二语写作评估反馈研究论文的总数量逐年递增,以定量、定性研究为主的实证性研究在缓慢上升,以经验式、总结式为主的非实证性研究的论文仍占多数;二语写作评估反馈研究开始借鉴多媒体技术、语料库等现代教学手段;研究内容上涵盖二语写作中的自我评估、教师反馈、同伴互评、计算机辅助评估、多级评估模式等诸多方面。%From 2000 to 2013 ,the total amount of academic publications on evaluation and feed-back of EFL is increasing ,but it occupies a small percentage in the core journals of foreign lan-guage studies .In terms of research methods ,non_material research articles are decreasing ,while empirical studies grow steadily .Meanwhile researches on evaluation and feedback of EFL start to take advantages of the development of modern teaching technologies ,such as multimedia net teaching platform and data driven language learning .The researches cover a wide range of topics , including self assessment ,teacher’s feedback ,peer feedback ,computer_assisted evaluation ,and multi_level evaluation system ,etc .Based on a comprehensive survey ,this article presents a future direction of evaluation and feedback research of EFL writing in China .

  2. The Pilot Test on Multi-Survey Modes of MSM and its Applications in Unconventional Shale Gas in Sichuan, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Y.; Wu, F.; Yin, C.

    2016-12-01

    Sichuan province has been the hot spot on shale gas plays in China, and has conducted many valuable pioneering geophysical and other experiments to better explore this unconventional resource. From the year 2010 to now, we have explored and applied at least five different kinds of MSM surveys to improve the reliability and location precision. The surveys conducted include DWS, the sensors deployed in the borehole nearby the reservoir. SSS, the sensors deployed in the surface with the star-shaped receiving arms. MSWS, the sensors deployed in the shallow borehole drilled around the treatment well. SPSS, the sensors deployed in the surface with the scattered distribution, and CS, the combination of the four types of survey. However, different surveys usually result in different microseismic cloud shape. This puzzles the vendors and even makes them lose the confidence for microseismic, especially for the SSS and SPSS. In 2014, we conducted a project with four kinds of observation geometry, including the DWS, SSS, MSWS and SPSS. Compared to the conventional surveys, the new geometries show more advantages. (1) It is convenient to deploy the sensor, especially for the SPSS. (2) The DWS and SPSS are more economical than SSS and MSWS, but with the better S/N ratio because the sensors deployed in more quiet site. (3) The SSS and SPSS have the better reliability to invert the focus mechanism because the wide range of observation azimuth. (4)The DWS has the highest location precision, especially in Z direction. Different from the other examples from overseas, the microseismic clouds from those four surveys show surprising similarity. Undoubtedly, the result improves our confidence in microseismic monitoring, more specifically, the feasibility for four surveys, the reliability of our processing techniques or workflows and the locating algorithm. Moreover, this project also helps us to explore a more economical observational geometry, because the SPSS with the least sensors can

  3. Fishing for knowledge: a pilot industrial survey for associated species (met medewerking van Karin van der Reijden)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Imares,; Reijden, van der K.J.

    2015-01-01

    The EKOFISH Group, the North Sea Foundation (NSF) and WWF-Netherlands partnered up with IMARES in 2013 to explore whether an industrial survey can be used to strengthen scientific assessment of key commercial by-catch species in the North Sea flatfish fishery. The project was broken down in two cons

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SDSS-IV eBOSS emission-line galaxy pilot survey (Comparat+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comparat, J.; Delubac, T.; Jouvel, S.; Raichoor, A.; Kneib, J.-P.; Yeche, C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Le Cras, C.; Maraston, C.; Wilkinson, D. M.; Zhu, G.; Jullo, E.; Prada, F.; Schlegel, D.; Xu, Z.; Zou, H.; Bautista, J.; Bizyaev, D.; Bolton, A.; Brownstein, J. R.; Dawson, K. S.; Escoer, S.; Gaulme, P.; Kinemuchi, K.; Malanushenko, E.; Malanushenko, V.; Mariappan, V.; Newman, J. A.; Oravetz, D.; Pan, K.; Percival, W. J.; Prakash, A.; Schneider, D. P.; Simmons, A.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Allam, S.; Banerji, M.; Benoit-Levy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Capozzi, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Castander, F. J.; Cunha, C. E.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Doel, P.; Eifler, T. F.; Estrada, J.; Flaugher, B.; Fosalba, P.; Frieman, J.; Gaztanaga, E.; Gerdes, D. W.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lahav, O.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; March, M.; Marshall, J. L.; Miquel, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Reil, K.; Roe, N.; Romer, A. K.; Roodman, A.; Rykoff, E. S.; Sako, M.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thaler, J.; Thomas, D.; Walker, A. R.; Zhang, Y.

    2016-06-01

    To select targets, we used photometry coming from the following surveys: SDSS (Alam et al., 2012ApJS..203...21A), WISE (Cutri et al., 2012, Cat. II/311) and SCUSS (Zou et al., 2015AJ....150..104Z). (1 data file).

  5. Impact of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease on prognosis in atrial fibrillation: A report from the EURObservational Research Programme Pilot Survey on Atrial Fibrillation (EORP-AF) General Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proietti, Marco; Laroche, Cécile; Drozd, Marcin; Vijgen, Johan; Cozma, Dragos C; Drozdz, Jaroslaw; Maggioni, Aldo P; Boriani, Giuseppe; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2016-11-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common chronic disease, being associated with both high rates of morbidity and mortality. Similarly, atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with a higher risk of both cardiovascular (CV) events and overall mortality. The AF and COPD often coexist, but the impact of COPD on prognosis in European AF patients is unknown. We evaluated COPD prevalence in patients enrolled in the EURObservational Research Programme Pilot Survey on Atrial Fibrillation Registry Pilot Phase. Clinical factors associated with COPD and adverse outcomes at 1-year follow-up were determined. In the overall cohort, a diagnosis of COPD was recorded in 339 (11.0%) of AF patients. The AF patients with COPD were more burdened with risk factors and comorbidities, including diabetes mellitus (P < .0001) and chronic heart failure (P < .0001). β-Blockers were less likely to be prescribed to patients with COPD (P = .0007). On follow-up, AF patients with COPD had a higher risk of both CV death and all-cause death (both P < .0001), as well as for the composite outcome of any thromboembolic event/bleeding /CV death (P = .0003). Cox regression analysis found that COPD was independently associated with an increase in all-cause death (hazard ratio, 1.55; 95% CI 1.05-2.28; P = .0269). Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is highly prevalent in European AF patients, and is associated with higher rates of CV death, all-cause death, and the composite outcome of any thromboembolic event/bleeding/CV death. The presence of COPD in AF patients was independently associated with all-cause death in AF patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Transmitted drug resistance in women with intrapartum HIV-1 diagnosis: a pilot epidemiological survey in Buenos Aires, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Cecchini

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Surveillance of primary resistance to antiretroviral drugs is particularly important in pregnant population, in which infection by drug-resistant HIV has not only implications for maternal treatment, but could also jeopardize the efficacy of neonatal prophylaxis. We aim to describe the prevalence of resistance associated mutations (RAMs in pregnant women with intrapartum HIV diagnosis in a public hospital of Buenos Aires, Argentina. Materials and Methods: Prospective pilot study (period from 2008 to October 2013. Plasma samples were tested for viral load by Versant HIV-1 RNA 3.0 (bDNA and sequenced using HIV-1 TRUGENE™Genotyping Kit (Siemens. The prevalence of RAMs was analyzed according to World Health Organization (WHO criteria. Results: Of 231 HIV-infected pregnant women assisted, 6% (n=14 had intrapartum diagnosis of HIV infection. 12 patients (85.7% had previous pregnancies, 10 (71.4% had inadequate prenatal care and 3 (23.1% seroconverted during pregnancy. Maternal characteristics (expressed medians and ranges were: age 25.5 (16–35 years; gestational age at birth: 39 (30–42 weeks; CD4 count: 500 (132–925 cells/µL; viral load: 9418 (1800–55299 copies/mL. No one had hepatitis B virus (HBV or hepatitis C virus (HCV coinfection; four (33.3% had syphilis. Eight patients (57.1% had vaginal delivery and six emergency C-section (42.9%. In six cases (46.2%, membrane rupture was spontaneous; four patients (28.6% failed to receive intrapartum zidovudine (ZDV infusion. In 12 patients a genotypic resistance test was performed: two (16.7% had WHO RAMs corresponding to K103N mutation in both cases, conferring high-level resistance to nevirapine (NVP and efavirenz. Two newborns (14.3% were preterm. All received neonatal prophylaxis: ZDV in 1 case and combined prophylaxis (ZDV/3TC/NVP in the remaining 13 (92.9%. All newborns were formula-fed. Two (14.3% had congenital syphilis, one of whom died. One newborn was HIV

  7. Hurdles in tissue engineering/regenerative medicine product commercialization: a pilot survey of governmental funding agencies and the financial industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, Timothy A; Tentoff, Edward; Johnson, Peter C; Tawil, Bill; Van Dyke, Mark; Hellman, Kiki B

    2012-11-01

    The Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine International Society of the Americas (TERMIS-AM) Industry Committee conducted a semiquantitative opinion survey in 2010 to delineate potential hurdles to commercialization perceived by the TERMIS constituency groups that participate in the stream of technology commercialization (academia, start-up companies, development-stage companies, and established companies). A significant hurdle identified consistently by each group was access to capital for advancing potential technologies into development pathways leading to commercialization. A follow-on survey was developed by the TERMIS-AM Industry Committee to evaluate the financial industry's perspectives on investing in regenerative medical technologies. The survey, composed of 15 questions, was developed and provided to 37 investment organizations in one of three sectors (governmental, private, and public investors). The survey was anonymous and confidential with sector designation the only identifying feature of each respondent's organization. Approximately 80% of the survey was composed of respondents from the public (n=14) and private (n=15) sectors. Each respondent represents one investment organization with the potential of multiple participants participating to form the organization's response. The remaining organizations represented governmental agencies (n=8). Results from this survey indicate that a high percentage ($2MM into regenerative medical companies at the different stages of a company's life cycle. Investors recognized major hurdles to this emerging industry, including regulatory pathway, clinical translation, and reimbursement of these new products. Investments in regenerative technologies have been cyclical over the past 10-15 years, but investors recognized a 1-5-year investment period before the exit via Merger and Acquisition (M&A). Investors considered musculoskeletal products and their top technology choice with companies in the clinical stage

  8. Gathering Feedback for Teaching: Combining High-Quality Observations with Student Surveys and Achievement Gains. Policy and Practice Brief. MET Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Thomas J.; Staiger, Douglas O.

    2012-01-01

    Research has long been clear that teachers matter more to student learning than any other in-school factor. Improving the quality of teaching is critical to student success. Yet only recently have many states and districts begun to take seriously the importance of evaluating teacher performance and providing teachers with the feedback they need to…

  9. Gathering Feedback for Teaching: Combining High-Quality Observations with Student Surveys and Achievement Gains. Policy and Practice Summary. MET Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Research has long been clear that teachers matter more to student learning than any other in-school factor. Improving the quality of teaching is critical to student success. Yet only recently have many states and districts begun to take seriously the importance of evaluating teacher performance and providing teachers with the feedback they need to…

  10. Survey and coping strategies for job stress of new nurses in pharmacy intravenous admixture service: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng-Shuang; Jin, Ou; Feng, Hua; Wang, Feng-Hua; Ren, Chun-Hui

    2015-01-01

    To survey the nurse stress and analyze stressors in new nurses from pharmacy intravenous admixture service (PIAS). A questionnaire survey referring to the revised stressor scale was carried out on 52 new nurses of PIAS in four hospitals in Harbin. The average stress score for all participants was 2.43±0.63, as medium level of stress. The stressors were classified into 6 categories: ensuring up-to-date knowledge of professional nursing skills, increased workload and work-time, interpersonal relationship, ensuring knowledge of equipments, attending educational programs, and decreased occupational demand. The most important stressors included fear of medical accident occurrence, fear of failure in performance assessment, fear of occupational injuries, feeling fatigue and lack of sleep. Considering the various kinds of stressors in the working places, it was necessary for managers' to use appropriate strategies to cope with the job stress in new nurses of PIAS.

  11. Development and validation of a web-based survey on the use of personal communication devices by hospital registered nurses: pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Deborah L; Levasseur, Sandra A; Li, Dongmei

    2013-11-26

    The use of personal communication devices (such as basic cell phones, enhanced cell phones or smartphones, and tablet computers) in hospital units has risen dramatically in recent years. The use of these devices for personal and professional activities can be beneficial, but also has the potential to negatively affect patient care, as clinicians may become distracted by these devices. No validated questionnaire examining the impact of the use of these devices on patient care exists; thus, we aim to develop and validate an online questionnaire for surveying the views of registered nurses with experience of working in hospitals regarding the impact of the use of personal communication devices on hospital units. A 50-item, four-domain questionnaire on the views of registered nursing staff regarding the impact of personal communication devices on hospital units was developed based on a literature review and interviews with such nurses. A repeated measures pilot study was conducted to examine the psychometrics of a survey questionnaire and the feasibility of conducting a larger study. Psychometric testing of the questionnaire included examining internal consistency reliability and test-retest reliability in a sample of 50 registered nurses. The response rate for the repeated measures was 30%. Cronbach coefficient alpha was used to examine the internal consistency and reliability, and in three of the four question groups (utilization, impact, and opinions), the correlation was observed to be very high. This suggests that the questions were measuring a single underlying theme. The Cronbach alpha value for the questions in the performance group, describing the use of personal communication devices while working, was lower than those for the other question groups. These values may be an indication that the assumptions underlying the Cronbach alpha calculation may have been violated for this group of questions. A Spearman rho correlation was used to determine the test

  12. Five-year survey of medical student attrition in a medical school in Nigeria: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogugua A Egwu

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Ogugua A Egwu1, Godson E Anyanwu21Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, Ebonyi State University, Ebonyi State; 2Department of Anatomy, College of Medicine, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Nigeria, Enugu State, NigeriaBackground: Student attrition represents a waste of career opportunity and, at times, results in a holistic loss of sense of self-worth for the students involved. The aim of this study was to evaluate the nature, causes, and impact of medical student attrition in Nigeria.Method: A pilot analysis was undertaken using the records of students who failed at medical school as a result of inability to pass the second MBBS examination at Ebonyi State University, Abakaliki, Nigeria, between 2002 and 2007. Some of these students were interviewed using a structured questionnaire.Results: Data analysis showed that 58 (7.8% of the students admitted into preclinical class withdrew from their study. Thirty-six (62.1% were males and the rest were females. Thirteen of those withdrawn were interviewed, and 53.8% of them believed they had poor academic ability, while 15.4% attributed their withdrawal to family pressure. No record of guidance or counseling session programs was noted for these students either at the point of withdrawal from the faculty and on the choice of a new career path.Conclusion: As a result of the high attrition rate due to low academic ability, efforts should be made to check students for evidence of this at the point of admission to medicine training. Also, more accommodating teaching programs should be encouraged in faculties to accommodate students with such challenges. Good guidance and counseling programs should be encouraged to handle these inevitable cases of attrition when they occur, to avoid the demoralizing low self-esteem that plagues these individuals for the rest of their lives.Keywords: medical students, attrition, medical education, Nigeria

  13. Pilot Survey of Physician Assistants Regarding Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Providers Suggests Role for Workplace Nondiscrimination Policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewton, Tiffany A; Lingas, Elena O

    2015-12-01

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) medical providers in the United States have historically faced discrimination from their peers. To assess current workplace culture and attitudes, and to evaluate awareness of workplace and professional policies regarding LGBT discrimination, we sent a cross-sectional survey to 163 PAs (Physician Assistants). Respondents had an overall positive attitude towards LGBT providers, yet the majority was not aware of relevant policy statements (>60%). A significant association existed between policy awareness and LGBT inclusivity (PLGBT providers, non-discriminatory work environments for LGBT physician assistants may relate to greater awareness of specific workplace policy standards.

  14. A Non-Invasive Genetic Survey of Otters (Lutra lutra in an Urban Environment: A Pilot Study with Citizen Scientists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane White

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Acquiring reliable estimates for an elusive species' distribution and population size can be problematic. For cryptic species such as the Eurasian otter (Lutra lutra, traditional monitoring approaches rely heavily on identifying field signs that may under or overestimate population sizes. Increasingly, non-invasive genetic sampling is effectively applied to assess the abundance and population structure of otters by genotyping faeces (spraints. Here we present the results of a non-invasive survey conducted in Cork City, Ireland, which aimed to estimate otter population size, sex ratio and genetic diversity. We incorporated a citizen science approach by training members of the public in spraint collection, thus increasing our search effort and sample detection rate. From October 2011 to May 2012, 199 spraints were collected and 187 (94% were genetically identified as otter. Of these positive otter samples, 13 spraints (7% yielded genetic information identifying 11 individuals (5 female and 6 male using nine microsatellite loci. The results indicate that the urban environment does not prevent otters from using the area and we consider the implications based upon contemporary knowledge on otter spatial behaviour. This study demonstrates that non-invasive survey techniques combined with a citizen science approach can effectively reveal otter population parameters and increase urban otter awareness within the community.

  15. A pilot project of a cancer patient library in Italy: results of a customer-satisfaction survey and its products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truccolo, Ivana; Bianchet, Katia; Capello, Fabia; Russell-Edu, William; Dal Maso, Luigino; Colombatti, Alfonso; Ciolfi, Laura; Tirelli, Umberto; De Paoli, Paolo

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the degree of satisfaction of users of the Cancer Information Point section of the Library for Patients (CIP-LP), active since 1998 at the National Cancer Institute of Aviano, Italy. The CIP-LP is based on a skilled intermediary, adequate informative material and a specific location, within the Scientific Library of the Institute. A survey was developed to assess service functionality and quality from the users' viewpoint. During a 6-month period, a questionnaire was mailed to 194 patients and relatives who previously used the CIP-LP; 113 (58%) were returned and processed. Of the respondents, 91% were pleased with the CIP-LP and 95% would recommend the service to other people. The information obtained contributed to a clearer understanding of the illness and treatment (45% as first answer) and a better control of the situation (33%). Fifty-one per cent evaluated the information received as 'good', 42%'excellent' and 4%'of sufficient quality'. This survey shows the appreciation and usefulness in the users' perception of a specific hospital library for cancer patients and their relatives, providing an information service supplementary to doctor-patient communication.

  16. Eclipsing Binary Science via the Merging of Transit and Doppler Exoplanet Survey Data—A Case Study with the MARVELS Pilot Project and SuperWASP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Scott W.; Maxted, Pierre F. L.; Hebb, Leslie; Stassun, Keivan G.; Ge, Jian; Cargile, Phillip A.; Ghezzi, Luan; De Lee, Nathan M.; Wisniewski, John; Gary, Bruce; Porto de Mello, G. F.; Ferreira, Leticia; Zhao, Bo; Anderson, David R.; Wan, Xiaoke; Hellier, Coel; Guo, Pengcheng; West, Richard G.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Pollacco, Don; Lee, Brian; Collier Cameron, Andrew; van Eyken, Julian C.; Skillen, Ian; Crepp, Justin R.; Nguyen, Duy Cuong; Kane, Stephen R.; Paegert, Martin; Nicolaci da Costa, Luiz; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Santiago, Basilio X.

    2011-08-01

    Exoplanet transit and Doppler surveys discover many binary stars during their operation that can be used to conduct a variety of ancillary science. Specifically, eclipsing binary stars can be used to study the stellar mass-radius relationship and to test predictions of theoretical stellar evolution models. By cross-referencing 24 binary stars found in the MARVELS Pilot Project with SuperWASP photometry, we find two new eclipsing binaries, TYC 0272-00458-1 and TYC 1422-01328-1, which we use as case studies to develop a general approach to eclipsing binaries in survey data. TYC 0272-00458-1 is a single-lined spectroscopic binary for which we calculate a mass of the secondary and radii for both components using reasonable constraints on the primary mass through several different techniques. For a primary mass of M 1 = 0.92 ± 0.1 M sun, we find M 2 = 0.610 ± 0.036 M sun, R 1 = 0.932 ± 0.076 R sun, and R 2 = 0.559 ± 0.102 R sun, and find that both stars have masses and radii consistent with model predictions. TYC 1422-01328-1 is a triple-component system for which we can directly measure the masses and radii of the eclipsing pair. We find that the eclipsing pair consists of an evolved primary star (M 1 = 1.163 ± 0.034 M sun, R 1 = 2.063 ± 0.058 R sun) and a G-type dwarf secondary (M 2 = 0.905 ± 0.067 M sun, R 2 = 0.887 ± 0.037 R sun). We provide the framework necessary to apply this analysis to much larger data sets.

  17. Pediatrician and Parent Opinion on Nutrition in Infants Under 3 Years: Results of Pilot Survey Conducted in Central Federal District of the Russian Federation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. E. Borovik

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rational nutrition management in infants under 3 years is an important part of their adequate development at this age and in future.Objective: Our aim was to evaluate awareness of pediatricians and parents concerning rational nutrition management in infants under 3 years.Methods: 300 pediatricians and 300 parents of infants under 3 years who live in Moscow, Ivanovo, and Yaroslavl were enrolled in pilot survey.Results: Pediatricians' recommendations on child nutrition management satisfied the majority of parents (252; 84%, however, less than half of families (135; 45% followed them. In other cases the child's ration depended on mother's opinion on the matter (96; 32% and on child's food preference. «Unhealthy» food such as groceries and provision, processed food, spices, seafood, fast food, chocolate, candies, and sweets as well as soda was included in child's ration at the age of 2 and its consumption frequency increased significantly at the age of 3. Pediatricians strongly recommended special dairy for infants from the age of 1 (known as the 3rd formula. In fact, only half of children in Moscow eat them, and 27–30% of children in Ivanovo and Yaroslavl.Conclusion: Harmful breach of nutrition management in infants under 3 years is detected. Evidently, parents are not competent on the question. Optimization of educational activities performed by pediatricians, medical stuff, and mass media is required.

  18. Awareness of pro-tobacco advertising and promotion and beliefs about tobacco use: findings from the Tobacco Control Policy (TCP) India Pilot Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal-Travers, Maansi; Fong, Geoffrey T; Quah, Anne C K; Sansone, Genevieve; Pednekar, Mangesh S; Gupta, Prakash C; Sinha, Dhirendra N

    2014-12-01

    Tobacco companies are utilizing similar strategies to advertise and promote their products in developing countries as they have used successfully for over 50 years in developed countries. The present study describes how adult smokers, smokeless tobacco users, and non-users of tobacco from the Tobacco Control Project (TCP) India Pilot Survey, conducted in 2006, responded to questions regarding their perceptions and observations of pro-tobacco advertising and promotion and beliefs about tobacco use. Analyses found that 74% (n=562) of respondents reported seeing some form of pro-tobacco advertising in the last six months, with no differences observed between smokers (74%), smokeless tobacco users (74%), and nonsmokers (73%). More than half of respondents reported seeing pro-tobacco advertising on store windows or inside shops. Overall, this study found that a significant percentage of tobacco users and non-users in India report seeing some form of pro-tobacco advertising and promotion messages. Additional analyses found that smokers were more likely to perceive tobacco use as harmful to their health compared with smokeless tobacco users and non-users (padvertising and promotion of tobacco products in India.

  19. WSRT Ultra-Deep Neutral Hydrogen Imaging of Galaxy Clusters at z=0.2, a Pilot Survey of Abell 963 and Abell 2192

    CERN Document Server

    Verheijen, Marc A W; Szomoru, A; Dwarakanath, K S; Poggianti, B M; Schiminovich, D

    2007-01-01

    A pilot study with the powerful new backend of the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) of two galaxy clusters at z=0.2 has revealed neutral hydrogen emission from 42 galaxies. The WSRT probes a total combined volume of 3.4x10^4 Mpc^3 at resolutions of 54x86 kpc^2 and 19.7 km/s, surveying both clusters and the large scale structure in which they are embedded. In Abell 963, a dynamically relaxed, lensing Butcher-Oemler cluster with a high blue fraction, most of the gas-rich galaxies are located between 1 and 3 Mpc in projection, northeast from the cluster core. Their velocities are slightly redshifted with respect to the cluster, and this is likely a background group. None of the blue galaxies in the core of Abell 963 are detected in HI, although they have similar colors and luminosities as the HI detected galaxies in the cluster outskirts and field. Abell 2192 is less massive and more diffuse. Here, the gas-rich galaxies are more uniformly distributed. The detected HI masses range from 5x10^9 to 4x10^1...

  20. Perceiving haptic feedback in virtual reality simulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Våpenstad, Cecilie; Hofstad, Erlend Fagertun; Langø, Thomas; Mårvik, Ronald; Chmarra, Magdalena Karolina

    2013-07-01

    To improve patient safety, training of psychomotor laparoscopic skills is often done on virtual reality (VR) simulators outside the operating room. Haptic sensations have been found to influence psychomotor performance in laparoscopy. The emulation of haptic feedback is thus an important aspect of VR simulation. Some VR simulators try to simulate these sensations with handles equipped with haptic feedback. We conducted a survey on how laparoscopic surgeons perceive handles with and without haptic feedback. Surgeons with different levels of experience in laparoscopy were asked to test two handles: Xitact IHP with haptic feedback and Xitact ITP without haptic feedback (Mentice AB, Gothenburg, Sweden), connected to the LapSim (Surgical Science AB, Sweden) VR simulator. They performed two tasks on the simulator before answering 12 questions regarding the two handles. The surgeons were not informed about the differences in the handles. A total of 85 % of the 20 surgeons who participated in the survey claimed that it is important that handles with haptic feedback feel realistic. Ninety percent of the surgeons preferred the handles without haptic feedback. The friction in the handles with haptic feedback was perceived to be as in reality (5 %) or too high (95 %). Regarding the handles without haptic feedback, the friction was perceived as in reality (45 %), too low (50 %), or too high (5 %). A total of 85 % of the surgeons thought that the handle with haptic feedback attempts to simulate the resistance offered by tissue to deformation. Ten percent thought that the handle succeeds in doing so. The surveyed surgeons believe that haptic feedback is an important feature on VR simulators; however, they preferred the handles without haptic feedback because they perceived the handles with haptic feedback to add additional friction, making them unrealistic and not mechanically transparent.

  1. SURVEY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    SURVEY er en udbredt metode og benyttes inden for bl.a. samfundsvidenskab, humaniora, psykologi og sundhedsforskning. Også uden for forskningsverdenen er der mange organisationer som f.eks. konsulentfirmaer og offentlige institutioner samt marketingsafdelinger i private virksomheder, der arbejder...... med surveys. Denne bog gennemgår alle surveyarbejdets faser og giver en praktisk indføring i: • design af undersøgelsen og udvælgelse af stikprøver, • formulering af spørgeskemaer samt indsamling og kodning af data, • metoder til at analysere resultaterne...

  2. Pilot pathfinder survey of oral hygiene and periodontal conditions in the rural population of The Gambia (West Africa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, R A; Lucaciu, A; Fotouhi, K; Markovic, L; Gaengler, P; Zimmer, S

    2011-02-01

    To document oral hygiene and periodontal conditions in the rural population of The Gambia. Cross-sectional study according to the recommendations of the WHO for oral health surveys. Examination by two calibrated investigators in the health centres of rural communities after a public radio call. Patients were randomly allocated to the investigators.   162 patients (20-54 years old; 52.5% female, 47.5% male). Patients were interviewed for personal information and examined in a full-mouth recording. Oral Hygiene Index (OHI), Gingival Index (GI), Community Periodontal Index (CPI), and the Gingivitis-Periodontitis-Missing/Teeth Index (GPM/T). Statistical analysis was performed using the Wilcoxon-rank-sum test and Kruskal-Wallis test with statistical significance at P Africa). © 2009 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. Reliability and validity of the Brazilian version of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC): a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Cláudia Tartaglia; Laguardia, Josué; Vasconcelos, Ana Glória Godoi; Martins, Mônica

    2016-12-01

    The evaluation of the culture of patient safety in hospitals is nowadays considered as a management too, since it helps to identify problem areas and provide valuable information for planning improvements. This study explored the reliability and validity of the Brazilian version of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture, an instrument that evaluates characteristics of patient safety culture among hospital staff. The reliability of the instrument was evaluated by analyzing the internal consistency of each dimension. The validity of the tool was carried out by means of exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. The sample was made up of 322 questionnaires that were collected in two Brazilian hospitals in 2012. Cronbach's alpha ranged from 0.52 to 0.91 for the different dimensions, with the exception of two, for which it was much lower. After excluding four items, the exploratory factor analysis presented adjusted indices that were appropriate for a 10 factor model.

  4. Reliability and validity of the Brazilian version of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Tartaglia Reis

    Full Text Available Abstract: The evaluation of the culture of patient safety in hospitals is nowadays considered as a management too, since it helps to identify problem areas and provide valuable information for planning improvements. This study explored the reliability and validity of the Brazilian version of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture, an instrument that evaluates characteristics of patient safety culture among hospital staff. The reliability of the instrument was evaluated by analyzing the internal consistency of each dimension. The validity of the tool was carried out by means of exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. The sample was made up of 322 questionnaires that were collected in two Brazilian hospitals in 2012. Cronbach's alpha ranged from 0.52 to 0.91 for the different dimensions, with the exception of two, for which it was much lower. After excluding four items, the exploratory factor analysis presented adjusted indices that were appropriate for a 10 factor model.

  5. A pilot survey of socio-economic differences in child-feeding behaviours among parents of primary-school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Heather R; Goyder, Elizabeth; Bissell, Paul; Blank, Lindsay; Walters, Stephen J; Peters, Jean

    2008-10-01

    Parents food choices and weight, but little is known about the social class distribution of parent self-reported child-feeding behaviours in two socio-economically contrasting areas. A cross-sectional survey using the Parental Feeding Style Questionnaire. Mean scores were calculated for five child-feeding behaviours: control over eating, emotional feeding, encouragement/prompting, instrumental feeding and restriction. Parents behaviours that might be used to directly influence children's food intake and weight. Child-feeding behaviours differ between areas within a single city and within a largely white population, and this distribution is related to socio-economic and educational factors. Experimental and longitudinal studies are needed to further investigate the potential role of child-feeding behaviours in childhood overweight and obesity.

  6. Where’s Your Phone? A Survey of Where Women Aged 15-40 Carry Their Smartphone and Related Risk Perception: A Survey and Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Smartphones are now owned by most young adults in many countries. Installed applications regularly update while the phone is in standby. If it is kept near the body, this can lead to considerably higher exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation than occurred without internet access. Very little is known about current smartphone carrying habits of young women. This survey used an online questionnaire to ask about smartphone location under several circumstances to inform the power calculation for a women’s health study. They were also asked about risk perceptions. Data was analysed using Pearson chi square. Three age categories were made: 15–20, 21–30, 31–40. Smartphones were generally kept on standby (96% by day, 83% at night). Of all participants, in the last week the most common locations of the phone when not in use or during passive use was off-body (86%), in the hand (58%), a skirt/trouser pocket (57%), or against the breast (15%). Pocket and near-the-breast storage were significant by age (χ215.04, p = 0.001 and χ210.96, p = 0.04, respectively), both positively influenced by the youngest group. The same influence lay in the association between holding the phone (χ211.082, p = 0.004) and pocket-storage (χ219.971, prelated to health problems while 16% did not. There was no relationship between thinking RF-EMR exposure causes health problems in general and carrying the phone against the upper or lower body (p = 0.69 and p = 0.212, respectively). However, calls with the phone against the head were positively related to perception of health risk (χ2 6.695, p = 0.035). Our findings can be used in the power calculation for a case-control study. PMID:28060844

  7. The relevance of food composition data for nutrition surveys in rural Tibet: pilot study in the context of Kashin-Beck Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dermience, M.

    2013-01-01

    conclusions to be reached (insufficient number of samples by food and insufficient number of foods analyzed, it seems that the present pilot-study indicates significant discrepancies between measured and tabulated values of the mineral content of certain foods. A more complete survey would therefore seem mandatory.

  8. Pilot assessment of soil-transmitted helminthiasis in the context of transmission assessment surveys for lymphatic filariasis in Benin and Tonga.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian K Chu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mass drug administration (MDA for lymphatic filariasis (LF programs has delivered more than 2 billion treatments of albendazole, in combination with either ivermectin or diethylcarbamazine, to communities co-endemic for soil-transmitted helminthiasis (STH, reducing the prevalence of both diseases. A transmission assessment survey (TAS is recommended to determine if MDA for LF can be stopped within an evaluation unit (EU after at least five rounds of annual treatment. The TAS also provides an opportunity to simultaneously assess the impact of these MDAs on STH and to determine the frequency of school-based MDA for STH after community-wide MDA is no longer needed for LF. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Pilot studies conducted in Benin and Tonga assessed the feasibility of a coordinated approach. Of the schools (clusters selected for a TAS in each EU, a subset of 5 schools per STH ecological zone was randomly selected, according to World Health Organization (WHO guidelines, for the coordinated survey. In Benin, 519 children were sampled in 5 schools and 22 (4.2% had STH infection (A. lumbricoides, T. trichiura, or hookworm detected using the Kato-Katz method. All infections were classified as light intensity under WHO criteria. In Tonga, 10 schools were chosen for the coordinated TAS and STH survey covering two ecological zones; 32 of 232 (13.8% children were infected in Tongatapu and 82 of 320 (25.6% in Vava'u and Ha'apai. All infections were light-intensity with the exception of one with moderate-intensity T. trichiura. CONCLUSIONS: Synchronous assessment of STH with TAS is feasible and provides a well-timed evaluation of infection prevalence to guide ongoing treatment decisions at a time when MDA for LF may be stopped. The coordinated field experiences in both countries also suggest potential time and cost savings. Refinement of a coordinated TAS and STH sampling methodology should be pursued, along with further validation of

  9. Where's Your Phone? A Survey of Where Women Aged 15-40 Carry Their Smartphone and Related Risk Perception: A Survey and Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmayne, Mary

    2017-01-01

    Smartphones are now owned by most young adults in many countries. Installed applications regularly update while the phone is in standby. If it is kept near the body, this can lead to considerably higher exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation than occurred without internet access. Very little is known about current smartphone carrying habits of young women. This survey used an online questionnaire to ask about smartphone location under several circumstances to inform the power calculation for a women's health study. They were also asked about risk perceptions. Data was analysed using Pearson chi square. Three age categories were made: 15-20, 21-30, 31-40. Smartphones were generally kept on standby (96% by day, 83% at night). Of all participants, in the last week the most common locations of the phone when not in use or during passive use was off-body (86%), in the hand (58%), a skirt/trouser pocket (57%), or against the breast (15%). Pocket and near-the-breast storage were significant by age (χ215.04, p = 0.001 and χ210.96, p = 0.04, respectively), both positively influenced by the youngest group. The same influence lay in the association between holding the phone (χ211.082, p = 0.004) and pocket-storage (χ219.971, pphone against the head. More than half kept the phone 20-50 cms from their head at night (53%), while 13% kept it closer than 20 cms. Many (36%) thought RF-EMR exposure was related to health problems while 16% did not. There was no relationship between thinking RF-EMR exposure causes health problems in general and carrying the phone against the upper or lower body (p = 0.69 and p = 0.212, respectively). However, calls with the phone against the head were positively related to perception of health risk (χ2 6.695, p = 0.035). Our findings can be used in the power calculation for a case-control study.

  10. Pilot survey of HIV risk and contextual problems and issues in Mexican/Latino migrant day laborers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organista, Kurt C; Kubo, Ai

    2005-10-01

    A preliminary survey was conducted with 102 migrant day laborers (MDLs) to assess HIV risk and related contextual problems and issues. These men were primarily Mexican, of low SES background, low in acculturation to the United States, and their income ranged from $100 and $400 a week, 40% of which is sent back home. The psychosocial context of HIV risk included concerns expressed about lack of money and employment, followed by racism, social isolation, sadness and loneliness. High rates of alcohol use and binge drinking that co-occur with sexual activities were reported. While only 7% of MDLs reported illegal injection drug use, needles were frequently shared without bleach cleaning. Men generally did not carry condoms and knowledge of proper condom use was poor. For the most common form of sex reported, vaginal sex, condom use was infrequent. However, men did report confidence in being able to insist on condom use in challenging sexual situations, and they also reported fairly frequent pro-condom attitudes and behaviors within their social circles. Slightly over half of the men reported sexual activity with female partners, during the past 2 months. These female partners were almost evenly divided into regular sex partners, including spouses, and riskier partners such as one time only sex partners, prostitutes, and multiple sex partners. Results also indicated encouraging efforts by MDLs to reduce risk with risky partners (e.g., more condom use).

  11. Do adult men with untreated hypospadias have adverse outcomes? A pilot study using a social media advertised survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlomer, Bruce; Breyer, Benjamin; Copp, Hillary; Baskin, Laurence; DiSandro, Michael

    2014-08-01

    Hypospadias is usually treated in childhood. Therefore, the natural history of untreated mild hypospadias is unknown. We hypothesized that men with untreated hypospadias, especially mild, do not have adverse outcomes. Facebook was used to advertise an electronic survey to men older than 18 years. Men with untreated hypospadias identified themselves and indicated the severity of hypospadias with a series of questions. Outcomes included: Sexual Health Inventory for Men (SHIM), penile curvature and difficulty with intercourse, International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), Penile Perception Score (PPS), psychosexual milestones, paternity, infertility, sitting to urinate, and the CDC HRQOL-4 module. 736 men completed self-anatomy questions and 52 (7.1%) self-identified with untreated hypospadias. Untreated hypospadias participants reported worse SHIM (p < 0.001) and IPSS scores (p = 0.05), more ventral penile curvature (p = 0.003) and resulting difficulty with intercourse (p < 0.001), worse satisfaction with meatus (p = 0.011) and penile curvature (p = 0.048), and more sitting to urinate (p = 0.07). When stratified by mild and severe hypospadias, severe hypospadias was associated with more adverse outcomes than mild hypospadias. Men with untreated hypospadias reported worse outcomes compared with non-hypospadiac men. Mild untreated hypospadias had fewer adverse outcomes than severe hypospadias. Research is needed to determine if treatment of childhood hypospadias improves outcomes in adults, especially for mild hypospadias. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Research on improving outpatients' satisfaction by using "Intercept survey and feedback" method%探索应用“拦截调查和反馈”法提高门诊患者满意度的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘卉; 夏春萍; 邹波; 王海银

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To explore approaches for improving out-patients' satisfaction and provide a scientific basis to build harmonious relationship between doctors and patients.METHODS "Intercept surveys and feedback" method was adopted and about 100 out-patients daily were randomly selected to be surveyed,timely feedback was given to relative department and rectify and reform was asked to be implemented.Indices such as satisfaction rate,satisfaction coefficient were used for analyzing.RESULTS 48 995 valid questionnaires were investigated from November 2009 to June 2011; the overall satisfaction rate was 93.70 percent.An upward trend was shown for the satisfaction rate (P =0.010 7) ; top five departments with high satisfaction rates were pediatrics,outpatient department,surgery,internal medicine,ambulatory surgery centers respectively.The attitude of medical providers was the largest proportion in the patient feedback and accounted 28.5 percents.CONCLUSION A rising trend is shown for outpatient satisfaction after using "Intercept surveys and feedback" method,quality of service is gradually improved and the management is further more perfect."Intercept surveys and feedback"method may be one effective method for improving outpatients' satisfaction.%目的 探索提高门诊患者满意度的方法,为建设和谐医患关系提供科学依据.方法 采用“拦截调查和反馈”法,每日随机抽取100名左右门诊病人开展问卷调查,并将结果及时反馈至相关部门并要求整改,分析采用满意率、满意系数等指标.结果 2009年11月~2011年6月,共调查有效问卷48 995份,总体满意率为93.70%.满意率呈波动上升趋势(P=0.010 7);满意度排在前5位的部门为儿科、门诊科室、外科、内科、日间手术中心.病人意见反馈中服务态度类比例最大,占28.5%.结论 采用“拦截调查和反馈”法后门诊病人满意度呈上升趋势,医院服务质量逐步提升,管理进一步完善.“拦截调

  13. Rapid Response Systems Reduce In-Hospital Cardiopulmonary Arrest: A Pilot Study and Motivation for a Nationwide Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeonhee Park

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Early recognition of the signs and symptoms of clinical deterioration could diminish the incidence of cardiopulmonary arrest. The present study investigates outcomes with respect to cardiopulmonary arrest rates in institutions with and without rapid response systems (RRSs and the current level of cardiopulmonary arrest rate in tertiary hospitals. Methods This was a retrospective study based on data from 14 tertiary hospitals. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR rate reports were obtained from each hospital to include the number of cardiopulmonary arrest events in adult patients in the general ward, the annual adult admission statistics, and the structure of the RRS if present. Results Hospitals with RRSs showed a statistically significant reduction of the CPR rate between 2013 and 2015 (odds ratio [OR], 0.731; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.577 to 0.927; P = 0.009. Nevertheless, CPR rates of 2013 and 2015 did not change in hospitals without RRS (OR, 0.988; 95% CI, 0.868 to 1.124; P = 0.854. National university-affiliated hospitals showed less cardiopulmonary arrest rate than private university-affiliated in 2015 (1.92 vs. 2.40; OR, 0.800; 95% CI, 0.702 to 0.912; P = 0.001. High-volume hospitals showed lower cardiopulmonary arrest rates compared with medium-volume hospitals in 2013 (1.76 vs. 2.63; OR, 0.667; 95% CI, 0.577 to 0.772; P < 0.001 and in 2015 (1.55 vs. 3.20; OR, 0.485; 95% CI, 0.428 to 0.550; P < 0.001. Conclusions RRSs may be a feasible option to reduce the CPR rate. The discrepancy in cardiopulmonary arrest rates suggests further research should include a nationwide survey to tease out factors involved in in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest and differences in outcomes based on hospital characteristics.

  14. A search for metal-poor stars pre-enriched by pair-instability supernovae I.A pilot study for target selection from Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Ren; Norbert Christlieb; Gang Zhao

    2012-01-01

    We report on a pilot study on identifying metal-poor stars pre-enriched by Pair-Instability Supernovae (PISNe).Very massive,first generation (Population Ⅲ) stars (140 M⊙ ≤ M ≤ 260 M⊙) end their lives as PISNe,which have been predicted by theories,but no relics of PISNe have been observed yet.Among the distinct characteristics of the yields of PISNe,as predicted by theoretical calculations,are a strong odd-even effect,and a strong overabundance of Ca with respect to iron and the solar ratio.We use the latter characteristic to identify metal-poor stars in the Galactic halo that have been pre-enriched by PISNe,by comparing metallicites derived from strong,co-added Fe lines detected in low-resolution (i.e.,R = λ/Δλ ~ 2000) spectra of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS),with metallicities determined by the SDSS Stellar Parameters Pipeline (SSPP).The latter are based on the strength of the Ca Ⅱ K line and assumptions on the Ca/Fe abundance ratio.Stars are selected as candidates if their metallicity derived from Fe lines is significantly lower than the SSPP metallicities.In a sample of 12 300 stars for which SDSS spectroscopy is available,we have identified 18 candidate stars.Higher resolution and signal-to-noise ratio spectra of these candidates are being obtained with the Very Large Telescope of the European Southern Observatory and the XSHOOTER spectrograph,to determine their abundance patterns,and to verify our selection method.We plan to apply our method to the database of several million stellar spectra to be acquired with the Guo Shou Jing Telescope (LAMOST) in the next five years.

  15. An Exploratory Study of "Quantitative Linguistic Feedback": Effect of LENA Feedback on Adult Language Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suskind, Dana; Leffel, Kristin R.; Hernandez, Marc W.; Sapolich, Shannon G.; Suskind, Elizabeth; Kirkham, Erin; Meehan, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    A child's early language environment is critical to his or her life-course trajectory. Quantitative linguistic feedback utilizes the Language ENvironment Analysis (LENA) technology as a tool to analyze verbal interactions and reinforce behavior change. This exploratory pilot study evaluates the feasibility and efficacy of a novel behavior-change…

  16. Spatial Intercell Interference Cancellation with CSI Training and Feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jun; Letaief, Khaled B

    2011-01-01

    We investigate intercell interference cancellation (ICIC) with a practical downlink training and uplink channel state information (CSI) feedback model. The average downlink throughput for such a 2-cell network is derived. The user location has a strong effect on the signal-to-interference ratio (SIR) and the channel estimation error. This motivates adaptively switching between traditional (single-cell) beamforming and ICIC at low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) where ICIC is preferred only with low SIR and accurate channel estimation, and the use of ICIC with optimized training and feedback at high SNR. For a given channel coherence time and fixed training and feedback overheads, we develop optimal data vs. pilot power allocation for CSI training as well as optimal feedback resource allocation to feed back CSI of different channels. Both analog and finite-rate digital feedback are considered. With analog feedback, the training power optimization provides a more significant performance gain than feedback optimizat...

  17. Pilot Study of a Patient-Centered Radiology Process Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, J Shannon; Furtado, Vanessa F; Keller, Lisa A; Lotti, Judith Borsody; Saltalamacchia, Catherine A; Lennes, Inga T; Salazar, Gloria M

    2017-02-01

    The Radiology Process Model (RPM) was previously described in terms of its conceptual basis and proposed survey items. The current study describes the first pilot application of the RPM in the field and the results of initial psychometric analysis. We used an Institutional Review Board-approved pilot RPM survey in 100 patients having outpatient interventional radiology procedures. The 24 survey items had 4 or 5 levels of severity. We assessed for missing data, items that patients found confusing, any suggestions by patients for additional items and clarity of items from patient feedback. Factor analysis was performed and internal consistency measured. Construct validity was assessed by correlation of patient responses to the items as a summated scale with a visual analog scale (VAS) they completed indicating their interventional radiology experience. The visual analog scale and the RPM summated scale were strongly correlated (r = 0.7). Factor analysis showed four factors: interactions with facility and doctors/staff, time-sensitive aspects, pain, and anxiety. The items showed high internal consistency (alpha: 0.86) as a group and approximately 0.7 to 0.9 by the factors. Analysis shows that two items could be deleted (cost and communication between radiologist and referrers). Revision of two items and potential addition of others are discussed. The RPM shows initial evidence of psychometric validity and internal consistency reliability. Minor changes are anticipated before wider use. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of multimodal feedback effects on improving rowing competencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korman Maria

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study focused on the selection and preliminary evaluation of different types of modal and information feedback in virtual environment to facilitate acquisition and transfer of a complex motor-cognitive skill of rowing. Specifically, we addressed the effectiveness of immediate information feedback provided visually as compared to sensory haptic feedback on the improvement in hands kinematics and changes in cognitive load during the course of learning the basic rowing technique. Several pilot experiments described in this report lead to the evaluation and optimization of the training protocol, to enhance facilitatory effects of adding visual and haptic feedback during training.

  19. Investing in the Future by Learning from the Past: Developing a Survey Tool to Gather Feedback from Deployed Army Forward Surgical Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    evaluated (Esposito, Kuby , Unfred, & Gamelli, 1995) . Southern Ohio Medical Center (SOMC) uses scaled surveys to gather statistically relevant...Esposito, T., Kuby , A., Unfred, C., & Gamelli, R. (1995). General surgeons and the advanced trauma life support course: is it time to re-focus? The Journal

  20. Accounting Students' Feedback on Feedback in Australian Universities: They're Less than Impressed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watty, Kim; de Lange, Paul; Carr, Rodney; O'Connell, Brendan; Howieson, Bryan; Jacobsen, Ben

    2013-01-01

    Undergraduate accounting students in Australian universities are dissatisfied with the feedback that they currently receive. Recent evidence from the Course Experience Questionnaire (CEQ, a national survey of Australian university graduates) suggests that the accounting discipline ranks poorly on assessment feedback when compared to other…

  1. Identification of pilot-vehicle dynamics from simulation and flight test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Ronald A.

    1990-01-01

    The paper discusses an identification problem in which a basic feedback control structure, or pilot control strategy, is hypothesized. Identification algorithms are employed to determine the particular form of pilot equalization in each feedback loop. It was found that both frequency- and time-domain identification techniques provide useful information.

  2. Effective Instructor Feedback: Perceptions of Online Graduate Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beverley Getzlaf

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This descriptive study explored online graduate students' perceptions of effective instructor feedback. The objectives of the study were to determine the students’ perceptions of the content of effective instructor feedback (“what should be included in effective feedback?” and the process of effective instructor feedback (“how should effective feedback be provided?”. The participants were students completing health-related graduate courses offered exclusively online. Data were collected via a survey that included open ended questions inviting participants to share their perspectives regarding effective online instructor feedback. Thematic analysis revealed five major themes: student involvement/individualization, gentle guidance, being positively constructive, timeliness and future orientation. We conclude that effective instructor feedback has positive outcomes for the students. Future studies are warranted to investigate strategies to make feedback a mutual process between instructor and student that supports an effective feedback cycle.

  3. Pilot implementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Bansler, Jørgen P.; Havn, Erling C.;

    2012-01-01

    implementation and provide three empirical illustrations of our model. We conclude that pilot implementation has much merit as an ISD technique when system performance is contingent on context. But we also warn developers that, despite their seductive conceptual simplicity, pilot implementations can be difficult...

  4. Transient ischaemic attack and stroke risk: pilot of a primary care electronic decision support tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranta A

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Transient ischaemic attacks (TIAs indicate high risk for stroke and rapid management reduces stroke burden. Rapid specialist access to initiate timely management is often challenging to achieve. AIM: To assess the feasibility of implementing a TIA/Stroke electronic decision support (EDS tool intended to aid general practitioners (GPs in the timely management of TIAs. METHODS: An eight-week pilot provided access to the TIA/Stroke EDS to selected GPs in the MidCentral district, with subsequent patient record review and a post-pilot user satisfaction survey. RESULTS: Eleven patients from eight practices were entered into the tool and when EDS-rendered advice was followed, diagnosis was accurate and management was in accordance with New Zealand TIA guidelines. No adverse outcomes resulted and user feedback was positive. DISCUSSION: Results indicate that wider implementation of the TIA/Stroke EDS tool is feasible.

  5. THOR: The H i, OH, Recombination line survey of the Milky Way. The pilot study: H i observations of the giant molecular cloud W43

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bihr, S.; Beuther, H.; Ott, J.; Johnston, K. G.; Brunthaler, A.; Anderson, L. D.; Bigiel, F.; Carlhoff, P.; Churchwell, E.; Glover, S. C. O.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Heitsch, F.; Henning, T.; Heyer, M. H.; Hill, T.; Hughes, A.; Klessen, R. S.; Linz, H.; Longmore, S. N.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Menten, K. M.; Motte, F.; Nguyen-Luong, Q.; Plume, R.; Ragan, S. E.; Roy, N.; Schilke, P.; Schneider, N.; Smith, R. J.; Stil, J. M.; Urquhart, J. S.; Walsh, A. J.; Walter, F.

    2015-08-01

    To study the atomic, molecular, and ionized emission of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) in the Milky Way, we initiated a large program with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA): "THOR: The H i, OH, Recombination line survey of the Milky Way". We map the 21 cm H i line, 4 OH lines, up to 19 Hα recombination lines and thecontinuum from 1 to 2 GHz of a significant fraction of the Milky Way (l = 15°-67°, | b | ≤ 1°) at an angular resolution of ~ 20″. Starting in 2012, as a pilot study we mapped 4 square degrees of the GMC associated with the W43 star formation complex. The rest of the THOR survey area was observed during 2013 and 2014. In this paper, we focus on the H i emission from the W43 GMC complex. Classically, the H i 21 cm line is treated as optically thin with properties such as the column density calculated under this assumption. This approach might yield reasonable results for regions of low-mass star formation, however, it is not sufficient to describe GMCs. We analyzed strong continuum sources to measure the optical depth along the line of sight, and thus correct the H i 21 cm emission for optical depth effects and weak diffuse continuum emission. Hence, we are able to measure the H i mass of this region more accurately and our analysis reveals a lower limit for the H i mass of M = 6.6-1.8 × 106 M⊙ (vLSR = 60-120 km s-1), which is a factor of 2.4 larger than the mass estimated with the assumption of optically thin emission. The H i column densities are as high as NH i ~ 150 M⊙ pc-2 ≈ 1.9 × 1022 cm-2, which is an order of magnitude higher than for low-mass star formation regions. This result challenges theoretical models that predict a threshold for the H i column density of ~10 M⊙ pc-2, at which the formation of molecular hydrogen should set in. By assuming an elliptical layered structure for W43, we estimate the particle density profile. For the atomic gas particle density, we find a linear decrease toward the center of W43 with

  6. Pilot Implementations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manikas, Maria Ie

    tensions and negotiations are fundamental characteristics of pilot implementations. Based on the analysis of a project that is pilot implementing an electronic pre-hospital patient record for emergency medical services in Danish health care, I investigate other perceptions of pilot implementations....... The analysis is conducted by means of a theoretical framework that centres on the concept infrastructure. With infrastructure I understand the relation between organised practice and the information systems supporting this practice. Thus, infrastructure is not a thing but a relational and situated concept...... understanding of pilot implementations as enacted interventions into existing infrastructures. Moreover, being embedded in the day-to-day organisation of work pilot implementations intervenes in the conventions of practice making the taken for granted visible. This allows project participants to attend...

  7. Fault Tolerant Feedback Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Jakob; Niemann, H.

    2001-01-01

    An architecture for fault tolerant feedback controllers based on the Youla parameterization is suggested. It is shown that the Youla parameterization will give a residual vector directly in connection with the fault diagnosis part of the fault tolerant feedback controller. It turns out...... that there is a separation be-tween the feedback controller and the fault tolerant part. The closed loop feedback properties are handled by the nominal feedback controller and the fault tolerant part is handled by the design of the Youla parameter. The design of the fault tolerant part will not affect the design...... of the nominal feedback con-troller....

  8. Student Feedback or ‘Students Hit Back’: in Search of Quality Feedback for Quality Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel Rahman Abdalla Salih

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Universities and colleges often administer student feedback surveys on teaching to elicit students’ views of how a particular course is taught and learned in order to improve teaching quality by helping tutors increase opportunities for better learning. This paper reports the views of (40 English teachers and (124 General Foundation Programme (GFP students on student feedback in institutions of higher education in the Sultanate of Oman, and the implications of such perceptions on the quality of teaching and learning English language. Findings reveal variation in the views held by both teachers and students about student feedback on teaching and learning experience. The study confirms the need for consistency between the perceptions of teachers and students on student feedback, and for training students on quality feedback and reflective learning. Keywords: Quality assurance, student feedback, teacher response, quality teaching, transformative reflection, teacher perception

  9. Remote Control of an Assistive Robot using Force Feedback

    OpenAIRE

    Nadrag, Paul; Temzi, Lounis; Arioui, Hichem; Hoppenot, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    International audience; In this paper, we consider the haptic teleoperation of an assistive mobile robot, used for exploring a domestic environment. The goal of the paper is to help the remote operator to pilot the robot by giving him not only video feedback but also haptic feedback. They are both complementary as they do not require the same kind of attention from the user. The proposed haptic architecture was found to improve operator perception of the remote environment under time delay co...

  10. Audio Feedback to Physiotherapy Students for Viva Voce: How Effective Is "The Living Voice"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Wendy; Hollingworth, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Assessment and feedback remains one of the categories that students are least satisfied with within the United Kingdom National Student Survey. The Student Charter promotes the use of various formats of feedback to enhance student learning. This study evaluates the use of audio MP3 as an alternative feedback mechanism to written feedback for…

  11. Audio Feedback to Physiotherapy Students for Viva Voce: How Effective Is "The Living Voice"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Wendy; Hollingworth, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Assessment and feedback remains one of the categories that students are least satisfied with within the United Kingdom National Student Survey. The Student Charter promotes the use of various formats of feedback to enhance student learning. This study evaluates the use of audio MP3 as an alternative feedback mechanism to written feedback for…

  12. 战斗机飞行员颈痛及对飞行的影响调查研究%Survey study on the neck pain in fighter pilots and its influences to operational flying

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张胜; 周克亮; 董燕; 马金鹏; 冯晓雷

    2015-01-01

    健工作中予以体现.%Objective To investigate the prevalence of daily neck pain (DNP) and fly-related neck pain(FNP) in fighter pilots and to estimate how neck symptoms influenced operational flying in fighter pilots,so as to provide elementary data for further investigation of risk factors and preventive measure.Methods Two hundred and thirty three fighter pilots,including 94 high-performance fighter pilots and 139 conventional fighter pilots,were surveyed on self-reported prevalence of DNP and FNP in past 1-yr.The pilots were grouped into with DNP and healthy groups by prevalence of DNP,and the FNP prevalence was compared between these two groups.The prevalences of DNP and FNP were compared between high-performance fighter pilots and conventional fighter pilots.Pilots also described how FNP influenced operational flying.Results Among all pilots,32.6% had experienced DNP,59.7% had experienced FNP and 17.2% had experienced frequent FNP.DNP pilots had statistically higher FNP and frequent FNP prevalence than healthy pilots (x2=41.665,54.669,P<0.01).Comparing with conventional fighter pilots,high performance fighter pilots had no statistically different DNP and FNP prevalence,but had statistically different frequent FNP prevalence(x2 =7.753,P<0.01).Among the pilots with FNP,18.7% reported neck pain impacted flying endurance,20.1% reported impacted ability of concentration or stamina,37.4% reported impacted ability of observation or target searching,59.7% reported impacted agile operation or high G maneuvers.Among high performance fighter pilots with FNP,67.8% reported restricted air combat maneuvers resulted from FNP.Conclusions Prevalence of daily neck pain and fly-related neck pain are considerably high in fighter pilots.Pilots with daily neck pain are more easily to experience fly-related neck pain,indicating that their neck functions are steadily weakened and require prompt and effective intervention.High performance fighter pilots are more easily to experience frequent fly

  13. Health among commercial airline pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, J S; Butler, G C; Lackland, D T; Tessier, G S; Mohr, L C; Hoel, D G

    2001-09-01

    The airline pilot works within a complex exposure environment that may present physiological challenges to long-term health. This study investigated self-reported disease outcomes among a large group of active and retired commercial airline pilots in the United States and Canada. A survey methodology was used, including the collection of historical information. Of 10,678 surveys mailed, 6609 were returned (6533 men, 63 women). Given the limitations of survey methodology, increased disease rates among pilots were suggested for melanoma, motor neuron disease, and cataracts. However, rates for other diseases were in general lower than those for the U.S. population. Further study has been initiated to verify and follow reported cases, to expand the study to a larger group, and to collect more in-depth information on flight histories, occupational exposures, and lifestyle factors.

  14. Internal Medicine Residents' Perspectives on Receiving Feedback in Milestone Format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, Steven; Moriarty, John; Nardino, Robert J; Chmielewski, Amy; Rosenblum, Michael J

    2015-06-01

    In contrast to historical feedback, which was vague or provided residents' numerical scores without clear meaning, milestone-based feedback is focused on specific knowledge, skills, and behaviors that define developmental trajectory. It was anticipated that residents would welcome the more specific and actionable feedback provided by the milestone framework, but this has not been studied. We assessed internal medicine (IM) residents' perceptions of receiving feedback in the milestone framework, particularly assessing perception of the utility of milestone-based feedback compared to non-milestone-based feedback. We surveyed a total of 510 IM residents from 7 institutions. Survey questions assessed resident perception of milestone feedback in identifying strengths, weaknesses, and trajectory of professional development. Postgraduate years 2 and 3 (PGY-2 and PGY-3) residents were asked to compare milestones with prior methods of feedback. Of 510 residents, 356 (69.8%) responded. Slightly less than half of the residents found milestone-based feedback "extremely useful" or "very useful" in identifying strengths (44%), weaknesses (43%), specific areas for improvement (45%), and appropriate education progress (48%). Few residents found such feedback "not very useful" or "not at all useful" in these domains. A total of 51% of PGY-2 and PGY-3 residents agreed that receiving milestone-based feedback was more helpful than previous forms of feedback. IM residents are aware of the concepts of milestones, and half of the residents surveyed found milestone feedback more helpful than previous forms of feedback. More work needs to be done to understand how milestone-based feedback could be delivered more effectively to enhance resident development.

  15. Rateless feedback codes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jesper Hemming; Koike-Akino, Toshiaki; Orlik, Philip

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a concept called rateless feedback coding. We redesign the existing LT and Raptor codes, by introducing new degree distributions for the case when a few feedback opportunities are available. We show that incorporating feedback to LT codes can significantly decrease both...... the coding overhead and the encoding/decoding complexity. Moreover, we show that, at the price of a slight increase in the coding overhead, linear complexity is achieved with Raptor feedback coding....

  16. Preventing Feedback Fizzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookhart, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    Feedback is certainly about saying or writing helpful, learning-focused comments. But that is only part of it. What happens beforehand? What happens afterward? Feedback that is helpful and learning-focused fits into a context. Before a teacher gives feedback, students need to know the learning target so they have a purpose for using the feedback…

  17. Developing Sustainable Feedback Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carless, David; Salter, Diane; Yang, Min; Lam, Joy

    2011-01-01

    Feedback is central to the development of student learning, but within the constraints of modularized learning in higher education it is increasingly difficult to handle effectively. This article makes a case for sustainable feedback as a contribution to the reconceptualization of feedback processes. The data derive from the Student Assessment and…

  18. More confident trauma resuscitation team leaders: a novel simulation-based training curriculum utilizing video feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John L. Falcone

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available There are deficiencies in trauma leader performance. Simulation training and video-based feedback can lead to durable changes in behavior. A trauma resuscitation team leader training curriculum was developed. The curriculum consisted of eight simulated trauma scenarios with a mix of acuities and injury patterns using patient simulators. Other team members included a surgeon, an anesthesiologist, a chief resident, a trauma nurse, a medical student, and presenting emergency medicine staff. Each scenario was followed by video-based feedback. Attitudes regarding this curriculum were evaluated before and after the intervention with Likert-based surveys. Eight residents completed the curriculum. On a seven-point Likert scale, the median overall curriculum rating, the video discussion quality, the plan to apply leadership skills, and the plan to apply learned knowledge and behaviors was 7/7. A Wilcoxon Sign-Rank test showed improved confidence for leading Level 1 trauma resuscitations, improved beliefs in adequate training, and improved attitudes regarding team leader training (P<0.05. There was reduced nervousness of being the team leader (P=0.048. Qualitative analyses showed that the learners valued the feedback process and scenario realism. This pilot curriculum was well-received by trauma residents and offers insight into meta-cognition of trauma team leaders.

  19. Quantum feedback channels

    CERN Document Server

    Bowen, G

    2002-01-01

    In classical information theory the capacity of a noisy communication channel cannot be increased by the use of feedback. In quantum information theory the no-cloning theorem means that noiseless copying and feedback of quantum information cannot be achieved. In this paper, quantum feedback is defined as the unlimited use of a noiseless quantum channel from receiver to sender. Given such quantum feedback, it is shown to provide no increase in the entanglement-assisted capacities of a noisy quantum channel, in direct analogy to the classical case. It is also shown that in various cases of non-assisted capacities, feedback can increase the capacity of many quantum channels.

  20. Rating of transport and radiation source events. Draft additional guidance for the INES national officers for pilot use and feedback; Echelle de classement des incidents de radioprotection: document d'application du systeme international propose par l'AIEA pour les sources radioactives et les transports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-09-15

    The International Nuclear Event Scale (INES) is a means for promptly communicating to the public in consistent terms the safety significance of any reported event associated with radioactive material and/or radiation and to any event occurring during the transport of radioactive material. As described in the 2001 Edition of the INES User.s Manual, events are classified on the scale at seven levels: the upper levels (4-7) are termed accidents. and the lower levels (1-3) incidents. Events which have no safety significance are classified below scale at Level 0 and termed deviations. An overview of the principles for the rating under INES together with flow charts summarizing the rating process is provided in Appendix I. The 2001 Edition of the INES User.s Manual provides some guidance for the rating of transport and radiation source events. At the technical meeting held in 2002 the INES National Officers requested the IAEA/NEA Secretariat to prepare additional guidance. Progress was reported at the Technical Meeting of the INES National Officers in March 2004 where preparation of this draft additional guidance was requested for pilot use. This note provides additional guidance on the rating of transport and radiation source events. It is for pilot use and feedback and is broadly consistent with the INES User.s Manual. It provides more detailed information and an expanded approach for the rating based on actual exposure of workers and members of the public. It is designed to be used as a self-standing document with limited need for reference to the INES User Manual. (author)

  1. Situated Formative Feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukassen, Niels Bech; Wahl, Christian; Sorensen, Elsebeth Korsgaard

    2016-01-01

    This study addresses the conceptual challenge of providing students with good quality feedback to enhance student learning in an online community of practice (COP). The aim of the study is to identify feedback mechanisms in a virtual learning environment (VLE) and to create a full formative...... feedback episode (FFE) through an online dialogue. The paper argues that dialogue is crucial for student learning and that feedback is not only something the teacher gives to the student. Viewing good quality feedback as social, situated, formative, emphasis is put on the establishment of dialogue. We...... refer to this type of feedback as, Situated Formative Feedback (SFF). As a basis for exploring, identifying and discussing relevant aspects of SFF the paper analyses qualitative data from a Moodle dialogue. Data are embedded in the qualitative analytic program Nvivo and are analysed with a system...

  2. Feedback and Incentives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Tor Viking; Poulsen, Anders; Villeval, Marie Claire

    2009-01-01

    This paper experimentally investigates the impact of different pay schemes and relative performance feedback policies on employee effort. We explore three feedback rules: no feedback on relative performance, feedback given halfway through the production period, and continuously updated feedback. We...... use two pay schemes, a piece rate and a tournament. We find that overall feedback does not improve performance. In contrast to the piece-rate pay scheme there is some evidence of positive peer effects in tournaments since the underdogs almost never quit the competition even when lagging significantly...... behind, and front runners do not slack off. But in both pay schemes relative performance feedback reduces the quality of the low performers' work; we refer to this as a "negative quality peer effect"....

  3. 福建省地理国情普查试点成果建库实践%Practice of Fujian Province Geographical Condition Survey Pilot Achievements Database Construction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢小惠

    2014-01-01

    地理国情普查成果建库是地理国情监测的重要工作内容,可以有效地推动地理国情统计分析工作及地理国情监测各项业务的开展。本文在分析地理国情普查数据建库需求的基础上,设计了地理国情普查数据库的结构,以厦门为例,开发了地理国情普查数据库管理系统,实现了试点普查成果的建库和集中管理,为福建省后续地理国情普查成果的建库奠定了良好的基础。%Geographical condition survey achievements database construction is an important part of Geographical condition monito -ring, and it can effectively promote the geographical condition survey statistics and geographical condition monitoring .Based on the a-nalysis of the Geographical condition achievements database construction demands , this paper designed the database structure of geo-graphical condition survey achievements .With Xiamen pilot as an example , this paper developed a geographical condition survey data-base management system and achieved centralized management of geographical condition survey data , which lays the foundations for the management of the following geographical condition survey achievements .

  4. A study of airline pilot morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sykes, Adrian J; Larsen, Peter D; Griffiths, Robin F; Aldington, Sarah

    2012-10-01

    It has long been believed that airline pilots are healthier than the general population. There are a number of reasons why this should be the case. However, there is very little evidence to support this belief as fact. This study investigates the health of the pilot population of an Oceanic based airline compared to the health of the general population. Pilots who conducted their medical certificate renewal at the airline's medical unit between 1 November 2009 and 31 October 2010 were included. A medical questionnaire was completed by each pilot at the time of their medical certificate renewal. Data from the questionnaire was entered into a database as well as the pilot's BMI, blood pressure, lipid profile, and blood glucose level. The comparison population was the population who completed the New Zealand Health Survey (NZHS) between 2006-2007. Demographic, lifestyle characteristics, and health status data from the pilots was compared to the NZHS using a Chi-squared test. Included in the study were 595 pilots. With respect to most medical conditions, pilots had a lower prevalence when compared to the general population. Pilots had a higher prevalence of kidney disease (3.3% vs 0.6%) and melanoma skin cancer (19 per 1000 vs 0.4 per 1000). This study suggests that pilots in New Zealand are healthier than the general population with respect to most medical conditions. The two medical conditions that were identified as being overrepresented in pilots may be the result of the occupational environment.

  5. Generic Reflective Feedback: An Effective Approach to Developing Clinical Reasoning Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcikowski, K.; Brownie, S.

    2013-01-01

    Problem-based learning can be an effective tool to develop clinical reasoning skills. However, it traditionally takes place in tutorial groups, giving students little flexibility in how and when they learn. This pilot study compared the effectiveness of generic reflective feedback (GRF) with tutorial-based reflective feedback on the development of…

  6. RF feedback for KEKB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezura, Eizi; Yoshimoto, Shin-ichi; Akai, Kazunori [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-08-01

    This paper describes the present status of the RF feedback development for the KEK B-Factory (KEKB). A preliminary experiment concerning the RF feedback using a parallel comb-filter was performed through a choke-mode cavity and a klystron. The RF feedback has been tested using the beam of the TRISTAN Main Ring, and has proved to be effective in damping the beam instability. (author)

  7. Neural cryptography with feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Shacham, Lanir; Kanter, Ido

    2004-04-01

    Neural cryptography is based on a competition between attractive and repulsive stochastic forces. A feedback mechanism is added to neural cryptography which increases the repulsive forces. Using numerical simulations and an analytic approach, the probability of a successful attack is calculated for different model parameters. Scaling laws are derived which show that feedback improves the security of the system. In addition, a network with feedback generates a pseudorandom bit sequence which can be used to encrypt and decrypt a secret message.

  8. Neural cryptography with feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Shacham, Lanir; Kanter, Ido

    2004-04-01

    Neural cryptography is based on a competition between attractive and repulsive stochastic forces. A feedback mechanism is added to neural cryptography which increases the repulsive forces. Using numerical simulations and an analytic approach, the probability of a successful attack is calculated for different model parameters. Scaling laws are derived which show that feedback improves the security of the system. In addition, a network with feedback generates a pseudorandom bit sequence which can be used to encrypt and decrypt a secret message.

  9. Disparities in Feedback Provision to Emergency Medical Services Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cash, Rebecca E; Crowe, Remle P; Rodriguez, Severo A; Panchal, Ashish R

    2017-06-16

    Feedback to EMS professionals is a critical component for optimizing patient care and outcomes in the prehospital setting. There is a paucity of data concerning the feedback received by prehospital providers. The objective of this study was to describe the prevalence of feedback received by EMS professionals in the past 30 days including the types, sources, modes, and utility of feedback. The secondary objective was to identify factors associated with receiving any feedback and, specifically, feedback regarding medical care provided. This was a cross-sectional survey examining currently practicing nationally certified EMS patient care providers (EMT or higher) in non-military and non-tribal settings. Data were collected on provider characteristics along with feedback received. Descriptive statistics were calculated, and multivariable logistic regression models were constructed to assess the relationship between EMS provider characteristics and receiving feedback. A non-respondent survey was administered to assess for non-response bias. Responses from 32,314 EMS providers were received (response rate = 10.4%) with 15,766 meeting inclusion criteria. In the 30 days preceding the survey, 69.4% (n = 10,924) of respondents received at least one type of feedback with 54.7% (n = 8,592) reporting receiving medical care feedback. Multivariable logistic regression modeling indicated that higher certification level, fewer years of experience in EMS, working for a hospital-based agency, air medical service, and higher weekly call volumes were significantly associated with increased odds of having received at least one type of feedback, and specifically medical care feedback. Additionally, providing primarily medical/convalescent transport and more years of EMS experience were significantly associated with decreased odds of receiving feedback. Feedback to EMS providers is critical to improving prehospital care. In this study, nearly a third of providers did not receive any

  10. The Pediatrics Milestones Assessment Pilot: Development of Workplace-Based Assessment Content, Instruments, and Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Patricia J; Margolis, Melissa; Poynter, Sue E; Chaffinch, Christa; Tenney-Soeiro, Rebecca; Turner, Teri L; Waggoner-Fountain, Linda; Lockridge, Robin; Clyman, Stephen G; Schwartz, Alan

    2016-05-01

    To report on the development of content and user feedback regarding the assessment process and utility of the workplace-based assessment instruments of the Pediatrics Milestones Assessment Pilot (PMAP). One multisource feedback instrument and two structured clinical observation instruments were developed and refined by experts in pediatrics and assessment to provide evidence for nine competencies based on the Pediatrics Milestones (PMs) and chosen to inform residency program faculty decisions about learners' readiness to serve as pediatric interns in the inpatient setting. During the 2012-2013 PMAP study, 18 U.S. pediatric residency programs enrolled interns and subinterns. Faculty, residents, nurses, and other observers used the instruments to assess learner performance through direct observation during a one-month rotation. At the end of the rotation, data were aggregated for each learner, milestone levels were assigned using a milestone classification form, and feedback was provided to learners. Learners and site leads were surveyed and/or interviewed about their experience as participants. Across the sites, 2,338 instruments assessing 239 learners were completed by 630 unique observers. Regarding end-of-rotation feedback, 93% of learners (128/137) agreed the assessments and feedback "helped me understand how those with whom I work perceive my performance," and 85% (117/137) agreed they were "useful for constructing future goals or identifying a developmental path." Site leads identified several benefits and challenges to the assessment process. PM-based instruments used in workplace-based assessment provide a meaningful and acceptable approach to collecting evidence of learner competency development. Learners valued feedback provided by PM-based assessment.

  11. Developing 360 degree feedback system for KINS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, In Soo; Cheon, B. M.; Kim, T. H.; Ryu, J. H. [Chungman National Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-12-15

    This project aims to investigate the feasibility of a 360 degree feedback systems for KINS and to design guiding rules and structures in implementing that systems. Literature survey, environmental analysis and questionnaire survey were made to ensure that 360 degree feedback is the right tool to improve performance in KINS. That review leads to conclusion that more readiness and careful feasibility review are needed before implementation of 360 degree feedback in KINS. Further the project suggests some guiding rules that can be helpful for successful implementation of that system in KINS. Those include : start with development, experiment with one department, tie it to a clear organization's goal, train everyone involve, make sure to try that system in an atmosphere of trust.

  12. Policy Feedback System (PFS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Policy Feedback System (PFS) is a web application developed by the Office of Disability Policy Management Information (ODPMI) team that gathers empirical data...

  13. Online User Feedback in Early Phases of the Design Process: Lessons Learnt from Four Design Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asbjørn Følstad

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Online user feedback, collected by means of internet survey tools, is a promising approach to obtain early user feedback on concepts and early prototypes. In this study, the collection and utilization of online user feedback was investigated in four design cases: all master student projects for industry clients involving seven student designers. A total of 272 user participants provided quantitative feedback. Half of these also provided qualitative feedback. One third of the qualitative feedback was perceived as useful by the student designers. The main usefulness of the feedback was related to strategic concept decisions rather than the interaction design of the early prototype. Lessons learnt are provided.

  14. Feedback Loop Gains and Feedback Behavior (1996)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampmann, Christian Erik

    2012-01-01

    Linking feedback loops and system behavior is part of the foundation of system dynamics, yet the lack of formal tools has so far prevented a systematic application of the concept, except for very simple systems. Having such tools at their disposal would be a great help to analysts in understanding...... large, complicated simulation models. The paper applies tools from graph theory formally linking individual feedback loop strengths to the system eigenvalues. The significance of a link or a loop gain and an eigenvalue can be expressed in the eigenvalue elasticity, i.e., the relative change...... of an eigenvalue resulting from a relative change in the gain. The elasticities of individual links and loops may be found through simple matrix operations on the linearized system. Even though the number of feedback loops can grow rapidly with system size, reaching astronomical proportions even for modest systems...

  15. 歼击飞行员骨代谢生化指标调查%Survey of Bone Metabolism in Fighter Pilot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王萍; 周卫国; 李民; 潘世鑫; 石玉玲; 班武

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the changes of biochemical markers of bone metabolism and the possible sig⁃nificance in fighter pilots in high-altitude condition. Methods: To evaluate four biochemical markers of bone in 129 fighter pilots(male, healthy, and aged 26~48 years, with an average flight time of 1500 h±100 h): bone forma⁃tion marker N-terminal osteocalcin(N-MID), total collagen typeⅠamino-terminal propeptide(PINP), bone resorp⁃tion markers(β-crosslaps), and parathyroid hormone(PTH). The pilots were divided into two groups according to aircraft type, namely second-generation unit and three generations unit, and t test was used to compare the differ⁃ences between groups. The pilots were divided into three groups according to age, namely 20~29 year-old age group, 30~39 year-old age group, and 40~49 age group, and ANOVA was used to compare the differences among biochemical markers. Results: The bone metabolic markers differences in two generations of fighter pilots were not statistically significant. N-MID and PINP concentrations in 20~29 age group were significantly higher than those in other age groups(P0.05). Conclusion: The markers of bone formation, and bone resorption reached the peak in the 20~29 year-old pilots, suggesting that a high level of bone turnover happens in the period of peak bone mass. The bone metabolic markers were at the lowest concentration in 40~60 years-old pilots, indicating that bone resorption and bone formation are in a dynamic equilibrium, and the level of bone turnover is low. Close monitoring the changes in bone metabolism has a positive significance for maintaining bone health and ensuring flight safety of pilots.%目的:探讨高空环境歼击飞行员的骨代谢生化指标变化及意义。方法:检测空军某部129名歼击飞行员(均为男性,身体健康,年龄26~48岁,平均飞行时间1500 h±100 h)的4项骨代谢生化指标:骨形成标志物N端骨钙素(N-MID)和总Ⅰ型胶原氨

  16. Written Corrective Feedback in Second Language Acquisition and Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitchener, John; Ferris, Dana R.

    2011-01-01

    What should language and writing teachers do about giving students written corrective feedback? This book surveys theory, research, and practice on the important and sometimes controversial issue of written corrective feedback, also known as "error/grammar correction," and its impact on second language acquisition and second language writing…

  17. Written Corrective Feedback in Second Language Acquisition and Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitchener, John; Ferris, Dana R.

    2011-01-01

    What should language and writing teachers do about giving students written corrective feedback? This book surveys theory, research, and practice on the important and sometimes controversial issue of written corrective feedback, also known as "error/grammar correction," and its impact on second language acquisition and second language writing…

  18. ASD Customer Satisfaction Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — ASD implemented a customer satisfaction survey for our products and services. This feedback will provide a better understanding of how ASD products and services can...

  19. Pilot Greenhouse

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    This pilot greenhouse was built in collaboration with the "Association des Maraichers" of Geneva in the frame of the study for making use of the heat rejected as warm water by CERN accelerators and experiments. Among other improvements, more automated and precise regulation systems for heating and ventilation were developed. See also 8305598X.

  20. Feedback og interpersonel kommunikation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dindler, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    Som interpersonel kommunikationsform handler feedback om at observere, mærke og italesætte det, som handler om relationen mellem samtaleparterne mere end om samtaleemnet. Her er fokus på, hvad der siges og hvordan der kommunikeres sammen. Feedback er her ikke en korrigerende tilbagemelding til...

  1. "Feedback" For Instructioal Television.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Wilbur

    A number of different methods have been used by instructional television (ITV) projects to obtain audience feedback, and some of these are now being used in the ITV system in El Salvador. We know that pretesting programs on a representative sample can bring considerable gains in learning. Another feedback source can be a classroom of pupils in the…

  2. Feedback i matematik

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sortkær, Bent

    2017-01-01

    Feedback bliver i litteraturen igen og igen fremhævet som et af de mest effektive midler til at fremme elevers præstationer i skolen (Hartberg, Dobson, & Gran, 2012; Hattie & Timperley, 2007; Wiliam, 2015). Dette på trods af, at flere forskere påpeger, at feedback ikke altid er læringsfremmende...... (Hattie & Gan, 2011), og nogle endda viser, at feedback kan have en negativ virkning i forhold til præstationer (Kluger & DeNisi, 1996). Artiklen vil undersøge disse tilsyneladende modstridende resultater ved at stille spørgsmålet: Under hvilke forudsætninger virker feedback i matematik læringsfremmende......? Dette gøres ved at dykke ned i forskningslitteraturen omhandlende feedback ud fra en række temaer for på den måde at besvare ovenstående spørgsmål....

  3. Feedback and Incentives:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Tor Viking; Poulsen, Anders; Villeval, Marie-Claire

    This paper experimentally investigates the impact of different pay and relative performance information policies on employee effort. We explore three information policies: No feedback about relative performance, feedback given halfway through the production period, and continuously updated feedback....... The pay schemes are a piece rate payment scheme and a winner-takes-all tournament. We find that, regardless of the pay scheme used, feedback does not improve performance. There are no significant peer effects in the piece-rate pay scheme. In contrast, in the tournament scheme we find some evidence...... of positive peer effects since the underdogs almost never quit the competition even when lagging significantly behind, and frontrunners do not slack off. Moreover, in both pay schemes information feedback reduces the quality of the low performers' work....

  4. Situated Formative Feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukassen, Niels Bech; Wahl, Christian; Sorensen, Elsebeth Korsgaard

    2016-01-01

    feedback episode (FFE) through an online dialogue. The paper argues that dialogue is crucial for student learning and that feedback is not only something the teacher gives to the student. Viewing good quality feedback as social, situated, formative, emphasis is put on the establishment of dialogue. We...... refer to this type of feedback as, Situated Formative Feedback (SFF). As a basis for exploring, identifying and discussing relevant aspects of SFF the paper analyses qualitative data from a Moodle dialogue. Data are embedded in the qualitative analytic program Nvivo and are analysed with a system...... theoretical textual analysis method. Asynchronous written dialogue from an online master’s course at Aalborg University forms the empirical basis of the study. The findings suggests in general that students play an essential role in SFF and that students and educators are equal in the COP, but holds different...

  5. Feedback valence affects auditory perceptual learning independently of feedback probability

    OpenAIRE

    Amitay, S.; Moore, D. R.; Molloy, K.; Halliday, L. F.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that negative feedback is more effective in driving learning than positive feedback. We investigated the effect on learning of providing varying amounts of negative and positive feedback while listeners attempted to discriminate between three identical tones; an impossible task that nevertheless produces robust learning. Four feedback conditions were compared during training: 90% positive feedback or 10% negative feedback informed the participants that they wer...

  6. Feedback som tredjeordensiagttagelse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ane Qvortrup

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Feedback tilskrives stor betydning for læring, men trods intensiv forskning på området synes det svært at fange, hvori feedbacks særlige potentiale består. I forsøgene på at gøre dette knyttes an til en række faktorer eller parametre, der fremhæves som centrale. En af disse faktorer er tid, hvor der kredses om forskellen mellem umiddelbar og forsinket feedback samt om fordele og ulemper ved hver af de to. I denne artikel knyttes der an til en forståelse af feedback som tredjeordensiagttagelse, og der sættes herfra fokus på, hvordan man i en praktisk undervisningssituation kan imødekomme tidsfaktoren knyttet til feedback. Med udgangspunkt i et undervisningsforløb på bachelorniveau, hvor der er arbejdet systematisk med feedback understøttet af Wikis, belyses det, hvordan et sådant arbejde synes at have potentiale for understøttelse af såvel læring som undervisning. En sådan teoretisk reflekteret belysning kan udgøre et refleksionsprogram for fremtidig planlægning af og løbende refleksion over undervisning.     The article investigates the effect of feedback on learning. Feedback has been shown to be one of the most powerful influences on achievement in education. But, in spite of much research on the matter, there is no agreement on how the special potential of feedback can be described, and consequently no agreement on what is good and bad feedback. This article sets out to rectify this omission by seeking a new theoretical framework that is sensitive to the complexity of the impact of feedback. The author propose a system theoretical frame and through its use identifies significant didactical issues. Although feedback is described as an internal, system-relative construction, when seen through a system theoretical lens different teaching environments create diverse conditions for feedback constructions. The final section of the paper explores this idea in relation to wikis.

  7. Feedback som tredjeordensiagttagelse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ane Qvortrup

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Feedback tilskrives stor betydning for læring, men trods intensiv forskning på området synes det svært at fange, hvori feedbacks særlige potentiale består. I forsøgene på at gøre dette knyttes an til en række faktorer eller parametre, der fremhæves som centrale. En af disse faktorer er tid, hvor der kredses om forskellen mellem umiddelbar og forsinket feedback samt om fordele og ulemper ved hver af de to. I denne artikel knyttes der an til en forståelse af feedback som tredjeordensiagttagelse, og der sættes herfra fokus på, hvordan man i en praktisk undervisningssituation kan imødekomme tidsfaktoren knyttet til feedback. Med udgangspunkt i et undervisningsforløb på bachelorniveau, hvor der er arbejdet systematisk med feedback understøttet af Wikis, belyses det, hvordan et sådant arbejde synes at have potentiale for understøttelse af såvel læring som undervisning. En sådan teoretisk reflekteret belysning kan udgøre et refleksionsprogram for fremtidig planlægning af og løbende refleksion over undervisning.  The article investigates the effect of feedback on learning. Feedback has been shown to be one of the most powerful influences on achievement in education. But, in spite of much research on the matter, there is no agreement on how the special potential of feedback can be described, and consequently no agreement on what is good and bad feedback. This article sets out to rectify this omission by seeking a new theoretical framework that is sensitive to the complexity of the impact of feedback. The author propose a system theoretical frame and through its use identifies significant didactical issues. Although feedback is described as an internal, system-relative construction, when seen through a system theoretical lens different teaching environments create diverse conditions for feedback constructions. The final section of the paper explores this idea in relation to wikis.

  8. Strategies for effective feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritek, Patricia A

    2015-04-01

    Provision of regular feedback to trainees on clinical performance by supervising providers is increasingly recognized as an essential component of undergraduate and graduate health sciences education; however, many individuals have not been formally trained in this pedagogical skill. At the bedside or in the clinic, effective performance feedback can be accomplished by following four key steps. Begin by setting expectations that incorporate the trainee's personal goals and external objectives. Delineate how and when you will provide feedback to the learner. Next, directly observe the trainee's performance. This can be challenging while engaged on a busy clinical service, but a focus on discrete activities or interactions (e.g., family meeting, intravascular volume assessment using bedside ultrasound, or obtaining informed consent) is helpful. The third step is to plan and prioritize the feedback session. Feedback is most effective when given in a timely fashion and delivered in a safe environment. Limit the issues addressed because learners often disengage if confronted with too many deficiencies. Finally, when delivering feedback, begin by listening to the trainee's self-evaluation and then take a balanced approach. Describe in detail what the trainee does well and discuss opportunities for improvement with emphasis on specific, modifiable behaviors. The feedback loop is completed with a plan for follow-up reassessment. Through the use of these relatively simple practices, both the trainee and teacher can have a more productive learning experience.

  9. Development and Reliability of Items Measuring the Nonmedical Use of Prescription Drugs for the Youth Risk Behavior Survey: Results Froman Initial Pilot Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Melissa M.; Weiler, Robert M.; Haddox, J. David

    2009-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to develop and test the reliability of self-report survey items designed to monitor the nonmedical use of prescription drugs among adolescents. Methods: Eighteen nonmedical prescription drug items designed to be congruent with the substance abuse items in the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's…

  10. Beyond 'Inop': Logbook Communication Between Airline Mechanics and Pilots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Pamela A.; Kanki, Barbara G.; Jordan, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    When mechanical discrepancies occur on aircraft, effective communication between pilots and mechanics can facilitate identification of the problem. A survey of pilots and mechanics was conducted to determine how often they were able to discuss discrepancies directly and to identify factors that influenced the detail they provided about discrepancies in the aircraft logbook. Logistical factors such as short turn times between flights and crew schedules appeared to present barriers to face-to-face meetings between pilots and mechanics. Guidelines for pilot logbook entries. Pilots reported receiving significantly less training on writing logbook entries and spent significantly less time making individual entries than mechanics. Mechanics indicated greater concern about the Federal Aviation Administration reading their entries than pilots. Mechanics indicated they had little opportunity to follow up with pilots to clarify a logbook entry once pilots departed the aircraft.

  11. Beyond 'Inop': Logbook Communication Between Airline Mechanics and Pilots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Pamela A.; Kanki, Barbara G.; Jordan, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    When mechanical discrepancies occur on aircraft, effective communication between pilots and mechanics can facilitate identification of the problem. A survey of pilots and mechanics was conducted to determine how often they were able to discuss discrepancies directly and to identify factors that influenced the detail they provided about discrepancies in the aircraft logbook. Logistical factors such as short turn times between flights and crew schedules appeared to present barriers to face-to-face meetings between pilots and mechanics. Guidelines for pilot logbook entries. Pilots reported receiving significantly less training on writing logbook entries and spent significantly less time making individual entries than mechanics. Mechanics indicated greater concern about the Federal Aviation Administration reading their entries than pilots. Mechanics indicated they had little opportunity to follow up with pilots to clarify a logbook entry once pilots departed the aircraft.

  12. In search for coastal amplification of rock weathering in polar climates - pilot Schmidt hammer rock tests surveys from sheltered fjords of Svalbard and tsunami-affected coasts of Western Greenland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strzelecki, Matt

    2014-05-01

    Recent decade has seen the major advance in Arctic coastal geomorphology due to research progress along ice-rich permafrost coastlines of Siberia, Alaska and NW Canada. On the contrary little attention was paid to Arctic rocky coastlines and their response to the reduction of sea ice cover and increased number of storms reaching Arctic region. In this paper I present results from a pilot survey of rock resistance using Schmidt Hammer Rock Tests across rocky cliffs and shore platforms developed in: - sheltered bays of Billefjorden, Svalbard characterised by prolonged sea-ice conditions and very limited operation of wave and tidal action - Vaigat Strait and Isfjorden in W Greenland influenced by landslide-triggered tsunamis and waves induced by ice-berg roll events. The aim of a pilot study was to test the hypothesized coastal impact on the rate of rock weathering in polar climates. To do so I characterise the changes in the rock resistance on the following coastal landforms: - modern and uplifted wave-washed abrasion platforms- focusing on a relation between the degree of rock surface weathering and the distance from the shoreline as well as thickness of sediment cover on shore platform surface - modern and uplifted rocky cliffs - focusing on a relation between the degree of rock surface weathering and the distance from the shoreline as well as difference in height above the sea level and relation to rock lithology. The results present another line of argument supporting intensification of rock weathering processes in the Arctic coastal zone. This work is a contribution to the National Science Centre in Poland research project no. 2011/01/B/ST10/01553.

  13. Feedback og motivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerresgaard, Helle

    2016-01-01

    Feedback til elever, som enten er gået midlertidigt i stå eller i værste tilfælde oplever sig selv magtesløse, skal hjælpe dem til at etablere en tro på, at de kan øve indflydelse på og være betydningsfulde for deres omgivelser. Feedback sættes ofte i forbindelse med ’læring’. I denne artikel...... påvirket af en målrettet, individuel feedback – eller manglen på samme....

  14. 北京市改革试点公立医院住院患者满意度调查%Survey on satisfaction of inpatients in pilot public hospital of reform in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁素维; 高星; 刘雯薇; 杨小冉; 陶婧婧; 李志建; 曹剑涛; 张哲; 陆琳

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of reform on public hospital in Beijing by inpatients.Methods Two hundred inpatients were selected from one pilot hospital of reform (with global budget and diagnosis related groups payment reform) and non-pilot hospital (without payment reform) respectively,and the satisfaction of inpatients with reform measures was surveyed with questionnaires.Results There was no significant difference in demographic characteristics between two hospitals (P > 0.05).The total score of satisfaction of pilot hospital (4.64 ± 0.24) was significantly higher than that of nonpilot hospital (4.40 ± 0.28) (P < 0.01).Among 5 first-level indicators,the scores of hospital environment,health service providing and medical auxiliary service in polit hospital were significantly higher than those in non-pilot hospital (P < 0.01).There was no significant difference in the satisfaction rate between pilot hospital (93.18%) and non-pilot hospital (90.98%)(P > 0.05).The satisfaction rate of health service providing was the lowest among 5 indicators in these two hospitals,and were 84.00% and 79.58% respectively (P > 0.05).The satisfaction rate of medical auxiliary service in pilot hospital (97.04%) was significantly higher than that in non-pilot hospital (87.83%)(P < 0.01).Among 20 second-level indicators,except for the indicators of waiting time for admission,admission procedures,explanation of admission reason by doctor,attitude of medical technician and doctor's response to the demand of patients,the scores of satisfaction of the other 15 indicators in pilot hospital were significantly higher than those in non-pilot hospital (P < 0.01).Moreover,inpatients were most satisfied with the service attitude of nurses,and were most dissatisfied with the health care cost.Convenience of bill query,satisfaction of hospital environment and food quality of hospital were second-level indicators that significantly correlated with the total

  15. Feedback Practices and Signature Pedagogies: What Can the Liberal Arts Learn from the Design Critique?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrand, Tom; Eliason, John

    2012-01-01

    To examine the differences between feedback practices in liberal arts courses and in design courses, we surveyed 373 students with experiences of both. Our study found that students perceived the feedback they received in design courses as more effective in advancing their learning, and that the emotional effects of feedback presented verbally and…

  16. Difficulties encountered at the beginning of professional life: results of a 2003 pilot survey among undergraduate students in Paris Rene Descartes University (France).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benbelaïd, R; Dot, D; Levy, G; Eid, N

    2006-11-01

    In addition to dental hospital clinical activity, dental students at Paris Rene Descartes University have the opportunity in their final year of study to practise clinically in a dental office, as associates. This paper outlines a pilot, experimental study designed to assess student reaction to this Vocational Clinical Activity (VCA) in order to identify relevant weaknesses of the undergraduate programme. Using questionnaires, data were collected for each of the following clinical or management skills: clinical difficulty, therapeutic decision-making, patient/practitioner relationship, time management, administrative matters and technical problems. Students were asked to rank each item in order of difficulty (1, high level to 6, low level). A high response rate was observed (90%) among the 50 undergraduate VCA students. The results pointed out three main difficulties encountered by undergraduate students during the VCA: time management (90% of the students), administrative matters (85% of the students) and clinical decision-making (80% of the students). These preliminary results need further investigation. However, they give us the incentive to carry on with this type of assessment and to extend it to young, qualified colleagues' perceptions and to other French Universities.

  17. Survey of severe spatial disorientation episodes in Japan Air Self-Defense Force fighter pilots showing increased severity in night flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Yuko; Hisada, Tetsuya; Kuwada, Naruo; Sakai, Masao; Akamatsu, Tomomitsu

    2009-06-01

    Spatial disorientation (SD) is one of the most severe causative factors in aviation accidents. We analyzed the reported SD episodes to evaluate the characteristics of severe SD in fighter pilots. Three hundred seventeen cases (95.5%) of 332 total valid cases experienced SD, and the ratio of night and day SD experiences (52.7% vs. 47.3%) (p < 0.05) shows a clear prevalence of night SD events. The severity of SD episodes at night (2.23 +/- 1.09) was higher than at day (1.89 +/- 1.04) (p < 0.01). In addition, the severity of visual illusions was significantly higher at night. A significant difference was found for meteorological conditions, such as visual meteorological conditions (VMC), instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) and VMC-IMC (VI) transition, among times of days. In conclusion, the severity of the SD episodes was higher at night. This may be due to an increase in visual severe SD episodes at night.

  18. NAIP 2015 Imagery Feedback

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — The NAIP 2015 Imagery Feedback web application allows users to make comments and observations about the quality of the 2015 National Agriculture Imagery Program...

  19. NAIP 2014 Imagery Feedback

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — The NAIP 2014 Imagery Feedback map allows users to make comments and observations about the quality of the 2014 National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP)...

  20. Feedback in analog circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Ochoa, Agustin

    2016-01-01

    This book describes a consistent and direct methodology to the analysis and design of analog circuits with particular application to circuits containing feedback. The analysis and design of circuits containing feedback is generally presented by either following a series of examples where each circuit is simplified through the use of insight or experience (someone else’s), or a complete nodal-matrix analysis generating lots of algebra. Neither of these approaches leads to gaining insight into the design process easily. The author develops a systematic approach to circuit analysis, the Driving Point Impedance and Signal Flow Graphs (DPI/SFG) method that does not require a-priori insight to the circuit being considered and results in factored analysis supporting the design function. This approach enables designers to account fully for loading and the bi-directional nature of elements both in the feedback path and in the amplifier itself, properties many times assumed negligible and ignored. Feedback circuits a...

  1. Feedback and rewards, part II: formal and informal feedback reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harolds, Jay

    2013-02-01

    There are 2 major classes of feedback. One class of feedback consists of the informal, numerous conversations between various people in the organization regarding the performance, behavior, and goals of an individual. Another class of feedback consists of formal reviews held once or twice a year between a supervisor and an individual. This article discusses both types of feedback.

  2. Pilot Preferences on Displayed Aircraft Control Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Anna C.; Gregory, Irene M.

    2013-01-01

    The experiments described here explored how pilots want available maneuver authority information transmitted and how this information affects pilots before and after an aircraft failure. The aircraft dynamic variables relative to flight performance were narrowed to energy management variables. A survey was conducted to determine what these variables should be. Survey results indicated that bank angle, vertical velocity, and airspeed were the preferred variables. Based on this, two displays were designed to inform the pilot of available maneuver envelope expressed as bank angle, vertical velocity, and airspeed. These displays were used in an experiment involving control surface failures. Results indicate the displayed limitations in bank angle, vertical velocity, and airspeed were helpful to the pilots during aircraft surface failures. However, the additional information did lead to a slight increase in workload, a small decrease in perceived aircraft flying qualities, and no effect on aircraft situation awareness.

  3. Using real time patient feedback to introduce safety changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Debra; Peters, Hayley; Keast, John; Devon, Royal

    2011-10-01

    Holding regular safety briefings and debriefings has improved safety and the patient experience at one trust. The approach was piloted in an elective orthopaedic inpatient setting and includes obtaining real time patient feedback. The comments are themed, which enables staff to introduce service changes to rectify any problems. Staff using the tools have adopted the process as part of their working schedule. The authors discuss the advantages of using such an approach, which they believe can be introduced in any inpatient, outpatient and day-case setting to promote a safety culture in teams and obtain patient feedback that can be acted on promptly.

  4. A prospective survey in European Society of Cardiology member countries of atrial fibrillation management: baseline results of EURObservational Research Programme Atrial Fibrillation (EORP-AF) Pilot General Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lip, Gregory Y H; Laroche, Cécile; Dan, Gheorghe-Andrei; Santini, Massimo; Kalarus, Zbigniew; Rasmussen, Lars Hvilsted; Oliveira, Mário Martins; Mairesse, Georges; Crijns, Harry J G M; Simantirakis, Emmanouil; Atar, Dan; Kirchhof, Paulus; Vardas, Panos; Tavazzi, Luigi; Maggioni, Aldo P

    2014-03-01

    Given the advances in atrial fibrillation (AF) management and the availability of new European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines, there is a need for the systematic collection of contemporary data regarding the management and treatment of AF in ESC member countries. We conducted a registry of consecutive in- and outpatients with AF presenting to cardiologists in nine participating ESC countries. All patients with an ECG-documented diagnosis of AF confirmed in the year prior to enrolment were eligible. We enroled a total of 3119 patients from February 2012 to March 2013, with full data on clinical subtype available for 3049 patients (40.4% female; mean age 68.8 years). Common comorbidities were hypertension, coronary disease, and heart failure. Lone AF was present in only 3.9% (122 patients). Asymptomatic AF was common, particularly among those with permanent AF. Amiodarone was the most common antiarrhythmic agent used (∼20%), while beta-blockers and digoxin were the most used rate control drugs. Oral anticoagulants (OACs) were used in 80% overall, most often vitamin K antagonists (71.6%), with novel OACs being used in 8.4%. Other antithrombotics (mostly antiplatelet therapy, especially aspirin) were still used in one-third of the patients, and no antithrombotic treatment in only 4.8%. Oral anticoagulants were used in 56.4% of CHA2DS2-VASc = 0, with 26.3% having no antithrombotic therapy. A high HAS-BLED score was not used to exclude OAC use, but there was a trend towards more aspirin use in the presence of a high HAS-BLED score. The EURObservational Research Programme Atrial Fibrillation (EORP-AF) Pilot Registry has provided systematic collection of contemporary data regarding the management and treatment of AF by cardiologists in ESC member countries. Oral anticoagulant use has increased, but novel OAC use was still low. Compliance with the treatment guidelines for patients with the lowest and higher stroke risk scores remains suboptimal.

  5. Feedback and rewards, Part I: Introduction to effective feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harolds, Jay A

    2013-01-01

    This series of articles discusses conversations regarding feedback. Feedback can include input from numerous sources, including one's supervisor, peers, subordinates, suppliers, customers, patients, and/or society members. Effective feedback is very important to the operation of any organization and to the growth of the individual. However, feedback done poorly does not appear to be rare and can be highly destructive to all. A variety of tips on how to do feedback well are included in this article.

  6. Improving the care of children with advanced cancer by using an electronic patient-reported feedback intervention: results from the PediQUEST randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Joanne; Orellana, Liliana; Cook, E Francis; Ullrich, Christina; Kang, Tammy; Geyer, Jeffrey Russell; Feudtner, Chris; Weeks, Jane C; Dussel, Veronica

    2014-04-10

    This study aimed to determine whether feeding back patient-reported outcomes (PROs) to providers and families of children with advanced cancer improves symptom distress and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). This study was a parallel, multicentered pilot randomized controlled trial. At most once per week, children age ≥ 2 years old with advanced cancer or their parent completed the computer-based Pediatric Quality of Life and Evaluation of Symptoms Technology (PediQUEST) survey consisting of age- and respondent-adapted versions of the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale (MSAS), Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory 4.0 Generic Core Scales (PedsQL4.0), and an overall Sickness question. In the intervention group (n = 51), oncologists and families received printed reports summarizing PROs; e-mails were sent to oncologists and subspecialists when predetermined scores were exceeded. No feedback was provided in the control group (n = 53). Primary outcomes included linear trends of MSAS, PedsQL4.0 total and subscale scores, and Sickness scores during 20 weeks of follow-up, along with child, parent, and provider satisfaction with PediQUEST feedback. Feedback did not significantly affect average MSAS, PedsQL4.0, or Sickness score trends. Post hoc subgroup analyses among children age ≥ 8 years who survived 20 weeks showed that feedback improved PedsQL4.0 emotional (+8.1; 95% CI, 1.8 to 14.4) and Sickness (-8.2; 95% CI, -14.2 to -2.2) scores. PediQUEST reports were valued by children, parents, and providers and contributed at least sometimes to physician initiation of a psychosocial consult (56%). Although routine feedback of PROs did not significantly affect the child's symptoms or HRQoL, changes were in expected directions and improvements observed in emotional HRQoL through exploratory analyses were encouraging. Importantly, children, parents, and providers value PRO feedback.

  7. Using student, teacher and practice supervisor feedback to improve the quality of nurse education: how should we collect it and what should we do with it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, G C; Cordingley, M

    1996-11-01

    Many colleges and universities are committed to gathering feedback as a means of improving course quality. Typically student's views are sought and few institutions seek systematic feedback from both students and members of staff. We report on a pilot study employing student, teacher and practice supervisor feedback on a pre-registration, Diploma in Higher Education (Nursing) course. The paper discusses how we collected the feedback and how the gathered information will influence future planning and decision making.

  8. Free online otolaryngology educational modules: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Muffly, Cristina; Bryson, Paul C; Sykes, Kevin J; Shnayder, Yelizaveta

    2015-04-01

    Otolaryngology residents need concise, easily accessible modules to expand educational opportunities between surgical cases. These modules should be inexpensive to create and improve learning outcomes. The purpose of this pilot study was to assess whether otolaryngology residents at multiple institutions used online video modules to supplement their studying for the Otolaryngology Training Exam, whether the modules had any effect on their Otolaryngology Training Examination Scores, and to obtain survey feedback about the modules. This randomized trial was conducted in 3 academic departments of otolaryngology in the United States among 37 residents enrolled in 3 otolaryngology residency programs. Residents were randomized into 2 groups, one with access to the educational modules and the other with no access. Otolaryngology training examination scores were obtained from the year prior to the intervention (2012) and the year following module access (2013). Residents with access to the modules were also surveyed to assess use and obtain feedback about the modules. Otolaryngology training examination scores improved significantly from 2012 to 2013 among both residents who had access to the modules and those who did not in the sections of head and neck, laryngology, and sleep medicine. However, scores in the sections of pediatric otolaryngology (8% increase, P = .03), otology (7% increase, P = .02), and facial plastic surgery (10% increase, P = .02) improved from 2012 to 2013 only among residents with access to the modules. All respondents rated the videos as very helpful, with a rating of 4 of 5 on a Likert scale. Online otolaryngology educational modules are an inexpensive way to expand resident learning opportunities. Despite the lack of quantifiable improvement in otolaryngology training examination scores in this study, use of online modules sends a message to otolaryngology residents that their education is a priority; self-study outside the hospital

  9. Feedback: Now with Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Philip F.; Quataert, Eliot; Faucher-Giguere, Claude-Andre; Keres, Dusan; Wetzel, Andrew R.; Murray, Norman W.

    2017-01-01

    The most fundamental unsolved problems in galaxy formation revolve around "feedback" from massive stars and black holes. In the last few years, a new generation of theoretical models have emerged which combine new numerical methods and physics in an attempt to realistically model the diverse physics of the interstellar medium, star formation, and feedback from super-massive black holes and massive stars (winds, jets, SNe, and radiation). These mechanisms lead to 'self-regulated' galaxy and star formation, in which global correlations such as the Schmidt-Kennicutt law, the inefficiency of star formation, and the stellar mass function -- emerge naturally. Within galaxies, feedback regulates the structure of the interstellar medium, and many observed properties of the ISM, star formation, and galaxies can be understood as a fundamental consequence of super-sonic turbulence in a rapidly cooling, self-gravitating medium. But feedback also produces galactic super-winds that can dramatically alter the cosmological evolution of galaxies, change the nature of dark matter cores and ‘cusps’, and re-structure the circum-galactic and inter-galactic medium. These winds depend non-linearly on multiple feedback mechanisms in a way that explains why they have been so difficult to model in previous "sub-grid" approaches. This resolves long-standing problems in understanding even apparently "simple" galaxy properties like the mass-metallicity relation. Finally, I'll discuss where feedback fails, and where either additional, exotic physics, or new, previously-dismissed feedback mechanisms, may be needed to explain observations.

  10. Feedback control of quantum system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Dao-yi; CHEN Zong-hai; ZHANG Chen-bin; CHEN Chun-lin

    2006-01-01

    Feedback is a significant strategy for the control of quantum system.Information acquisition is the greatest difficulty in quantum feedback applications.After discussing several basic methods for information acquisition,we review three kinds of quantum feedback control strategies:quantum feedback control with measurement,coherent quantum feedback,and quantum feedback control based on cloning and recognition.The first feedback strategy can effectively acquire information,but it destroys the coherence in feedback loop.On the contrary,coherent quantum feedback does not destroy the coherence,but the capability of information acquisition is limited.However,the third feedback scheme gives a compromise between information acquisition and measurement disturbance.

  11. Infrastructure and Educational Needs of Newborn Screening Short-Term Follow-Up Programs within the Southeast Regional Newborn Screening & Genetics Collaborative: A Pilot Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecelia A. Bellcross

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Newborn screening (NBS follow-up protocols vary significantly by state, and there is a need to better understand the infrastructure and communication flow of NBS programs. In addition, assessment of the educational needs of families and providers with regard to the implications of NBS results is required to inform the development of appropriate informational resources and training opportunities. To begin to address these issues, we administered a web-based survey to state NBS coordinators within the Southeast Regional Newborn Screening & Genetics Collaborative (SERC. Fourteen coordinators responded to the survey, including at least one from each of the 10 SERC states/territories. Over one-third of respondents had never received formal training regarding the metabolic conditions identified on NBS. Most communicated results via telephone or fax, though two centers indicated use of a web-based platform. Only two programs were involved in directly reporting results to the family. Four programs reported a long-term follow-up protocol. Deficits were noted for primary care provider (PCP knowledge of metabolic disorders identified on NBS, and how to inform parents of abnormal results. Close to half indicated that the adequacy of the number of genetic counselors, dietitians, and medical/biochemical geneticists was minimal to insufficient. Respondents uniformly recognized the importance of providing additional educational and informational resources in multiple categories to NBS staff, PCPs, and families.

  12. Global climate feedbacks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manowitz, B.

    1990-10-01

    The important physical, chemical, and biological events that affect global climate change occur on a mesoscale -- requiring high spatial resolution for their analysis. The Department of Energy has formulated two major initiatives under the US Global Change Program: ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurements), and CHAMMP (Computer Hardware Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics). ARM is designed to use ground and air-craft based observations to document profiles of atmospheric composition, clouds, and radiative fluxes. With research and models of important physical processes, ARM will delineate the relationships between trace gases, aerosol and cloud structure, and radiative transfer in the atmosphere, and will improve the parameterization of global circulation models. The present GCMs do not model important feedbacks, including those from clouds, oceans, and land processes. The purpose of this workshop is to identify such potential feedbacks, to evaluate the uncertainties in the feedback processes (and, if possible, to parameterize the feedback processes so that they can be treated in a GCM), and to recommend research programs that will reduce the uncertainties in important feedback processes. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases.

  13. Pilot Implementation: Learning from Field Tests in IS Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herzum, Morten; Bansler, Jørgen P.; Havn, Erling C.

    2012-01-01

    A recurrent problem in information-systems development (ISD) is that many design shortcomings are not detected during development, but first after the system has been delivered and implemented in its intended environment. Pilot implementations appear to promise a way to extend prototyping from...... the laboratory to the field, thereby allowing users to experience a system design under realistic conditions and developers to get feedback from realistic use while the design is still malleable. We characterize pilot implementation, contrast it with prototyping, propose a fiveelement model of pilot...

  14. Prevalence of fatigue in a group of airline pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Cátia; Mestre, Catarina; Canhão, Helena

    2013-08-01

    Fatigue is a common phenomenon in airline pilots that can impair alertness and ability of crewmembers to safely operate an aircraft and perform safety related tasks. Fatigue can increase the risk of an incident or even an accident. This study provides the first prevalence values for clinically significant fatigue in Portuguese airline pilots. The hypothesis that medium/short-haul pilots may currently present different levels of fatigue than long-haul pilots was also tested. A survey was conducted by requesting Portuguese airline pilots to complete questionnaires placed in the pilots' personal lockers from 1 April until 15 May 2012. The questionnaire included the self-response Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS) to measure subjective fatigue and some additional questions concerning perception of fatigue by pilots. The prevalence values for total and mental fatigue achieved in the Portuguese airline pilots were: 89.3% (FSS > or = 4) and 94.1% (FSS > or = 4) when splitting the sample in two subsamples, long- and medium/short-haul pilots. Levels of total and mental fatigue were higher for medium/short-haul pilots. The analysis of fatigue levels in each type of aviator showed that medium/short-haul pilots presented the highest levels of total and mental fatigue. This study produced the first prevalence values of total and mental fatigue among Portuguese airline pilots, which represents a great step to understanding and addressing this critical phenomenon.

  15. A tailored multimedia nutrition education pilot program for low-income women receiving food assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, M K; Honess-Morreale, L; Farrell, D; Carbone, E; Brasure, M

    1999-04-01

    This article describes the development and pilot evaluation of a tailored multimedia program to improve dietary behavior among 378 low-income women enrolled in the Food Stamp program in Durham, North Carolina. After randomization to intervention or control groups, participants completed a baseline survey and were resurveyed 1-3 months post-intervention. Measures included dietary fat intake assessed using a brief food-frequency questionnaire, stage of change, knowledge of low-fat foods, self-efficacy and eating behavior questions. The computer-based intervention consisted of a tailored soap opera and interactive 'info-mercials' that provided individualized feedback about dietary fat intake, knowledge and strategies for lowering fat based on stage of change. At follow-up, intervention group participants had improved significantly in knowledge (P educational interventions for lower income and minority populations.

  16. TUNE FEEDBACK AT RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CAMERON,P.; CERNIGLIA,P.; CONNOLLY,R.; CUPOLO,J.; DAWSON,W.C.; DEGEN,C.; DELLAPENNA,A.; DELONG,J.; DREES,A.; HUHN,A.; KESSELMAN,M.; MARUSIC,A.; OERTER,B.; MEAD,J.; SCHULTHEISS,C.; SIKORA,R.; VAN ZEIJTS,J.

    2001-06-18

    Preliminary phase-locked loop betatron tune measurement results were obtained during RHIC 2000 with a resonant Beam Position Monitor. These results suggested the possibility of incorporating PLL tune measurement into a tune feedback system for RHIC 2001. Tune feedback is useful in a superconducting accelerator, where the machine cycle time is long and inefficient acceleration due to resonance crossing is not comfortably tolerated. This is particularly true with the higher beam intensities planned for RHIC 2001. We present descriptions of a PLL tune measurement system implemented in the DSP/FPGA environment of a RHIC BPM electronics module and the feedback system into which the measurement is incorporated to regulate tune. In addition, we present results from the commissioning of this system during RHIC 2001.

  17. Climate forcings and feedbacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, James

    1993-01-01

    Global temperature has increased significantly during the past century. Understanding the causes of observed global temperature change is impossible in the absence of adequate monitoring of changes in global climate forcings and radiative feedbacks. Climate forcings are changes imposed on the planet's energy balance, such as change of incoming sunlight or a human-induced change of surface properties due to deforestation. Radiative feedbacks are radiative changes induced by climate change, such as alteration of cloud properties or the extent of sea ice. Monitoring of global climate forcings and feedbacks, if sufficiently precise and long-term, can provide a very strong constraint on interpretation of observed temperature change. Such monitoring is essential to eliminate uncertainties about the relative importance of various climate change mechanisms including tropospheric sulfate aerosols from burning of coal and oil smoke from slash and burn agriculture, changes of solar irradiance changes of several greenhouse gases, and many other mechanisms. The considerable variability of observed temperature, together with evidence that a substantial portion of this variability is unforced indicates that observations of climate forcings and feedbacks must be continued for decades. Since the climate system responds to the time integral of the forcing, a further requirement is that the observations be carried out continuously. However, precise observations of forcings and feedbacks will also be able to provide valuable conclusions on shorter time scales. For example, knowledge of the climate forcing by increasing CFC's relative to the forcing by changing ozone is important to policymakers, as is information on the forcing by CO2 relative to the forcing by sulfate aerosols. It will also be possible to obtain valuable tests of climate models on short time scales, if there is precise monitoring of all forcings and feedbacks during and after events such as a large volcanic eruption

  18. Analysis of Pilot-Induced-Oscillation and Pilot Vehicle System Stability Using UAS Flight Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanmay K. Mandal

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the results of a Pilot-Induced Oscillation (PIO and human pilot control characterization study performed using flight data collected with a Remotely Controlled (R/C unmanned research aircraft. The study was carried out on the longitudinal axis of the aircraft. Several existing Category 1 and Category 2 PIO criteria developed for manned aircraft are first surveyed and their effectiveness for predicting the PIO susceptibility for the R/C unmanned aircraft is evaluated using several flight experiments. It was found that the Bandwidth/Pitch rate overshoot and open loop onset point (OLOP criteria prediction results matched flight test observations. However, other criteria failed to provide accurate prediction results. To further characterize the human pilot control behavior during these experiments, a quasi-linear pilot model is used. The parameters of the pilot model estimated using data obtained from flight tests are then used to obtain information about the stability of the Pilot Vehicle System (PVS for Category 1 PIOs occurred during straight and level flights. The batch estimation technique used to estimate the parameters of the quasi-linear pilot model failed to completely capture the compatibility nature of the human pilot. The estimation results however provided valuable insights into the frequency characteristics of the human pilot commands. Additionally, stability analysis of the Category 2 PIOs for elevator actuator rate limiting is carried out using simulations and the results are compared with actual flight results.

  19. Impact of pilots' biodynamic feedthrough on rotorcraft by robust stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, Giuseppe; Masarati, Pierangelo; Venrooij, Joost

    2013-09-01

    The coupling of rotorcraft dynamics with the dynamics of one of the main systems devoted to its control, the pilot, may lead to several peculiar phenomena, known as Rotorcraft-Pilot Couplings (RPCs), all characterized by an abnormal behavior that may jeopardize flight safety. Among these phenomena, there is a special class of couplings which is dominated by the biodynamic behavior of the pilot's limbs that close the loop between the vibrations and the control inceptors in the cockpit. Leveraging robust stability analysis, the inherently uncertain pilot biodynamics can be treated as the uncertain portion of a feedback system, making analytical, numerical or graphical determination of proneness to RPC possible by comparing robust stability margins of helicopter models with experimental Biodynamic Feedthrough (BDFT) data. The application of the proposed approach to collective bounce is exemplified using simple analytical helicopter and pilot models. The approach is also applied to detailed helicopter models and experimental BDFT measurement data.

  20. A Novel Pilot Expansion Approach for MIMO Channel Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Fei SIYAU

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A training-based MIMO channel estimation scheme is presented to operate in severe frequency and time selective fading channels. Besides the new pilot bits designed from the ‘Paley-Hadamard’ matrix to exploit its orthogonal and ‘Toeplitz-like’ structures and minimising its pilot length, a novel pilot expansion technique is proposed to estimate the length of the channel impulse response, by flexibly extending its pilot length as required in order to capture the number of multipath existed within the MIMO channel. The pilot expansion can also help to deduce the initial channel variation and its Doppler rate which can be subsequently applied for MIMO channel tracking using decision feedback Kalman filter during the data payload.

  1. Pilot Implementation: Learning from Field Tests in IS Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herzum, Morten; Bansler, Jørgen P.; Havn, Erling C.

    2012-01-01

    A recurrent problem in information-systems development (ISD) is that many design shortcomings are not detected during development, but first after the system has been delivered and implemented in its intended environment. Pilot implementations appear to promise a way to extend prototyping from...... the laboratory to the field, thereby allowing users to experience a system design under realistic conditions and developers to get feedback from realistic use while the design is still malleable. We characterize pilot implementation, contrast it with prototyping, propose a fiveelement model of pilot...... implementation and provide three empirical illustrations of our model. We conclude that pilot implementation has much merit as an ISD technique when system performance is contingent on context. But we also warn developers that, despite their seductive conceptual simplicity, pilot implementations can be difficult...

  2. 河北省成安县消除疟疾试点基线调查结果%Baseline survey results about pilot malaria eradication in Cheng' an County of Hebei Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高亚敏; 李雪红; 武书敏; 魏美丽; 刘一珉

    2012-01-01

    目的 了解河北省成安县消除疟疾试点工作启动初期基础能力状况、疟疾发病情况、蚊媒种类、人群疟疾防治知识知晓率,为消除疟疾提供基线数据.方法 于2010年五、六月份按河北省消除疟疾试点基线调查方案开展调查.结果 全县各级医疗机构593家无专兼职疟疾防保人员,无专用显微镜检查设备,医务人员诊治能力低;无该地感染病例;媒介调查5户,仅捕获126只淡色库蚊,未见按蚊;居民知晓疟疾流行区、传播途径和预防方法的仅占2.86%、5.71%和6.19%.结论 该县今后消除疟疾工作需完善基础能力建设、加强人员培训,提高医务人员诊治和检测能力;加强输入性病例监测;广泛开展知识宣传,提高群众知晓率.%[Objective]To understand the initial basic capabilities, malaria incidence, mosquito species, malaria prevention and treatment knowledge level of Cheng' an County at the beginning of malaria eradication pilot work, and provide baseline data for the elimination of malaria. [Methods] The investigation was based on the "Pilot Baseline Survey Program for malaria elimination in Hebei Province". [Results] There were no part-time or fulltime malaria control personnel and no special microscope in 593 medical institutions at all levels. No local infections were detected. A total of 126 Culex pipiens pallens were captured in 5 investigated families, without anopheles. The percentage of knowing malaria endemic areas, transmission and prevention methods only occupied 2. 86% , 5.71% and 6.19%. [Conclusion] Elimination of malaria work needs to be improved on the basis of capacity-building, personnel training, the diagnosis and treatment of medical personnel and detection capabilities in this county in the future. It is necessary to strengthen the monitoring of imported cases, to extensively carry out knowledge propaganda, and increase masses awareness.

  3. THOR - The HI, OH, Recombination Line Survey of the Milky Way - The pilot study: HI observations of the giant molecular cloud W43

    CERN Document Server

    Bihr, S; Ott, J; Johnston, K G; Brunthaler, A; Anderson, L D; Bigiel, F; Carlhoff, P; Churchwell, E; Glover, S C O; Goldsmith, P F; Heitsch, F; Henning, T; Heyer, M H; Hill, T; Hughes, A; Klessen, R S; Linz, H; Longmore, S N; McClure-Griffiths, N M; Menten, K M; Motte, F; Nguyen-Lu'o'ng, Q; Plume, R; Ragan, S E; Roy, N; Schilke, P; Schneider, N; Smith, R J; Stil, J M; Urquhart, J S; Walsh, A J; Walter, F

    2015-01-01

    To study the atomic, molecular and ionized emission of Giant Molecular Clouds (GMCs), we have initiated a Large Program with the VLA: 'THOR - The HI, OH, Recombination Line survey of the Milky Way'. We map the 21cm HI line, 4 OH lines, 19 H_alpha recombination lines and the continuum from 1 to 2 GHz of a significant fraction of the Milky Way (l=15-67deg, |b|<1deg) at ~20" resolution. In this paper, we focus on the HI emission from the W43 star-formation complex. Classically, the HI 21cm line is treated as optically thin with column densities calculated under this assumption. This might give reasonable results for regions of low-mass star-formation, however, it is not sufficient to describe GMCs. We analyzed strong continuum sources to measure the optical depth, and thus correct the HI 21cm emission for optical depth effects and weak diffuse continuum emission. Hence, we are able to measure the HI mass of W43 more accurately and our analysis reveals a lower limit of M=6.6x10^6 M_sun, which is a factor of 2....

  4. Self-reported changes in the professional singing voice after surgical intervention treatment for breast cancer: a survey pilot study of female professional singers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroody, Margaret M; Barnes-Burroughs, Kathryn; Rodriguez, Michael C; Sataloff, Dahlia M; Sataloff, Robert Thayer

    2013-03-01

    The effects of breast cancer surgical treatment on the professional singing voice are unknown. The purpose of this study was to discover whether there are self-perceived changes in the quality and/or process of singing experienced by professional female singers who have undergone surgical intervention for the treatment of diagnosed breast cancer-including any changes perceived from the use of radiation, chemotherapy, and other drug treatments related to those surgeries. A voluntary subject pool comprised female professional singers who have undergone surgery for breast cancer was recruited from professional singing networks. Participants underwent evaluation through an anonymous online survey, psychometrically vetted for content and instrument reliability/validity before administration. Valid participants (N=56) responded to 45 questions regarding surgical procedures, related therapies, and self-perceived vocal effects. Analysis of results produced a preliminary description of types of voice change, duration of changes, and qualitative self-perceptions. This initial report reveals that there are self-perceived singing voice changes experienced by professional singers treated for breast cancer. However, additional research is needed to determine the degree of vocal impact perceived to be attributable to individual surgical interventions and related therapies. Copyright © 2013 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The VMC survey -IX. Pilot study of the proper motion of stellar populations in the LMC from 2MASS and VISTA data

    CERN Document Server

    Cioni, M -R L; Moretti, M I; Piffl, T; Ripepi, V; Rubele, S; Scholz, R -D; Bekki, K; Clementini, G; Ivanov, V D; Oliveira, J M; van Loon, J Th

    2013-01-01

    We use multi-epoch near-infrared observations from the VISTA survey of the Magellanic Cloud system (VMC) to measure the proper motion of stars of the LMC, in one tile of 1.5 deg^2 centred at (alpha, delta) = (05:59:23.136, -66:20:28.68) and including the South Ecliptic Pole, with respect to their 2MASS position over a time baseline of ~10 years and from VMC observations only, spanning a time range of ~1 year. Stars of different ages are selected from the (J-Ks) vs. Ks diagram and their average coordinate displacement is computed from the difference between Ks band observations for stars as faint as Ks=19 mag. Proper motions are derived by averaging up to seven 2MASS-VMC combinations in the first case and from the slope of the best fit line among the seven VMC epochs in the second case. Separate proper motion values are obtained for variable stars in the field. The proper motion of ~40,000 LMC stars in the tile, with respect to ~8000 background galaxies, obtained from VMC data alone, is mu_alpha cos(delta) = +...

  6. Observations of Protostellar Outflow Feedback in Clustered Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamura, Fumitaka

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the role of protostellar outflow feedback in clustered star formation using the observational data of recent molecular outflow surveys toward nearby cluster-forming clumps. We found that for almost all clumps, the outflow momentum injection rate is significantly larger than the turbulence dissipation rate. Therefore, the outflow feedback is likely to maintain supersonic turbulence in the clumps. For less massive clumps such as B59, L1551, and L1641N, the outflow kinetic energy is comparable to the clump gravitational energy. In such clumps, the outflow feedback probably affects significantly the clump dynamics. On the other hand, for clumps with masses larger than about 200 M$_\\odot$, the outflow kinetic energy is significantly smaller than the clump gravitational energy. Since the majority of stars form in such clumps, we conclude that outflow feedback cannot destroy the whole parent clump. These characteristics of the outflow feedback support the scenario of slow star formation.

  7. Feedback i undervisningen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Preben Olund

    2015-01-01

    undervisningsdifferentiering, feedback på læreprocesser, formativ og summativ evaluering, observationer og analyse af undervisning samt lærernes teamsamarbejde herom. Praktikken udgør et særligt læringsrum i læreruddannelsen. Samspillet mellem studerende, praktiklærere og undervisere giver den studerende en unik mulighed...

  8. Plant–soil feedbacks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cortois, Roeland; Schröder-Georgi, Thomas; Weigelt, Alexandra; Putten, van der Wim H.; Deyn, De Gerlinde B.

    2016-01-01

    1. Plant–soil feedback (PSF), plant trait and functional group concepts advanced our understanding of plant community dynamics, but how they are interlinked is poorly known.
    2. To test how plant functional groups (FGs: graminoids, small herbs, tall herbs, legumes) and plant traits relate to PSF,

  9. Feedback and Prior Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyman, Cynthia; Tobias, Sigmund

    The hypothesis that feedback in programmed instruction is an important variable in the learning of novel, but not familiar, content was investigated. A linear, constructed response program dealing with the Sabbath rituals in the synagogue was chosen due to wide variability in student familiarity with this topic. Subjects were randomly assigned to…

  10. Review of Assessment Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinrui; De Luca, Rosemary

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews 37 empirical studies, selected from 363 articles and 20 journals, on assessment feedback published between 2000 and 2011. The reviewed articles, many of which came out of studies in the UK and Australia, reflect the most current issues and developments in the area of assessing disciplinary writing. The article aims to outline…

  11. An e-tool for undergraduate surveying education: design and evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazar Dib

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe an innovative e-tool for Surveying Education, report the results of a pilot study with a group of undergraduate students, and discuss lessons learned and future work. The e-tool consists of two parts: a student’s component and an instructor’s component. The students’ component is a 2D Virtual Learning Environment that can be used by students to review surveying concepts and practices and get feedback on their understanding of the subject. The instructor’s component is a summative assessment tool that measures the individual student’s cognitive and practical abilities with accuracy. Results of the pilot study show that students perceived the application as easy to use, useful for reviewing class content, and effective at providing immediate and accurate feedback on their performance. A comparison between the grades obtained by manually grading the field exercise and the grades generated by the e-tool showed a significant disagreement between the two sets of data, with the electronically generated grades being much lower. The study revealed the limitations of the current tool due to its dimensionality (i.e. 2D and suggested the need for a more realistic 3D learning environment.

  12. Alarm setting for the critically ill patient: a descriptive pilot survey of nurses' perceptions of current practice in an Australian Regional Critical Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Martin; Dodds, Andrew; Sauer, Josh; Watts, Nigel

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this survey was to assess registered nurse's perceptions of alarm setting and management in an Australian Regional Critical Care Unit. The setting and management of alarms within the critical care environment is one of the key responsibilities of the nurse in this area. However, with up to 99% of alarms potentially being false-positives it is easy for the nurse to become desensitised or fatigued by incessant alarms; in some cases up to 400 per patient per day. Inadvertently ignoring, silencing or disabling alarms can have deleterious implications for the patient and nurse. A total population sample of 48 nursing staff from a 13 bedded ICU/HDU/CCU within regional Australia were asked to participate. A 10 item open-ended and multiple choice questionnaire was distributed to determine their perceptions and attitudes of alarm setting and management within this clinical area. Two key themes were identified from the open-ended questions: attitudes towards inappropriate alarm settings and annoyance at delayed responses to alarms. A significant number of respondents (93%) agreed that alarm fatigue can result in alarm desensitisation and the disabling of alarms, whilst 81% suggested the key factors are those associated with false-positive alarms and inappropriately set alarms. This study contributes to what is known about alarm fatigue, setting and management within a critical care environment. In addition it gives an insight as to what nurses' within a regional context consider the key factors which contribute to alarm fatigue. Clearly nursing burnout and potential patient harm are important considerations for practice especially when confronted with alarm fatigue and desensitisation. Therefore, promoting and maintaining an environment of ongoing intra-professional communication and alarm surveillance are crucial in alleviating these potential problems. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Online feedback op schriftelijk werk: betere feedback in minder tijd.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, B.A.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/288125797; van der Hulst, M.E.

    2015-01-01

    Feedback is a powerful teaching technic to raise students’ performance, provided that the feedback is informative on how to improve, is given in a timely manner and students have the opportunity to act upon it. Therefore, many institutions want their students to receive feedback on their performance

  14. Online feedback op schriftelijk werk: betere feedback in minder tijd.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, B.A.M.; van der Hulst, M.E.

    2015-01-01

    Feedback is a powerful teaching technic to raise students’ performance, provided that the feedback is informative on how to improve, is given in a timely manner and students have the opportunity to act upon it. Therefore, many institutions want their students to receive feedback on their performance

  15. European multicentre pilot survey to assess vitamin D status in rheumatoid arthritis patients and early development of a new Patient Reported Outcome questionnaire (D-PRO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojinovic, Jelena; Tincani, Angela; Sulli, Alberto; Soldano, Stefano; Andreoli, Laura; Dall'Ara, Francesca; Ionescu, Ruxandra; Pasalic, Katarina Simic; Balcune, Inete; Ferraz-Amaro, Ivan; Tlustochowicz, Małgorzata; Butrimiene, Irena; Punceviciene, Egle; Toroptsova, Natalia; Grazio, Simeon; Morovic-Vergles, Jadranka; Masaryk, Pavol; Otsa, Kati; Bernardes, Miguel; Boyadzhieva, Vladimira; Salaffi, Fausto; Cutolo, Maurizio

    2017-05-01

    To collect data on vitamin D (25(OH)D) serum levels in a large number of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients from different European countries, to investigate their relation with disease activity, disability, quality of life, and possibly to construct a new Patient Reported Outcome (PRO) questionnaire in order to self-estimate if they are at risk for vitamin D insufficiency/deficiency-related clinical implications (D-PRO). This was a European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) supported cross-sectional study (project No CLI064) which involved 625 RA patients (mean age 55±11years, mean disease duration 11±9years), 276 age and sex matched healthy subjects, and rheumatologists working in academic institutions or hospital centres, as well as PARE organizations (patient representatives) from 13 European countries. Serum samples for 25(OH)D level measurement were collected during winter time and analyzed in a central laboratory using chemiluminescence immunoassay (DiaSorin). Patient past medical history was recorded. RA patients were provided with three questionnaires: the Rheumatoid Arthritis Impact Diseases score (RAID), the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), and the new D-PRO questionnaire at the time of 25(OH)D serum sampling. D-PRO questionnaire consisted of three domains, Symptom Risk Score (SRS), Habitus Risk Score (HRS) and Global Risk Score (SRS+HRS=GRS), constructed with items possibly related to vitamin D deficiency. D-PRO was correlated with both clinical and PRO scores. DAS28-CRP was also evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed by non parametric tests. Mean serum concentration of 25(OH)D in RA patients (17.62±9.76ng/ml) was found significantly lower if compared to the levels obtained in matched controls (18.95±9.45ng/ml) (p=0.01), with statistically significant differences among several European countries. Negative correlations were found between 25(OH)D serum levels and DAS28-CRP (pPRO questionnaire. This first multicentre European survey add

  16. Pilot survey of oral health-related quality of life: a cross-sectional study of adults in Benin City, Edo State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lugo R Iván

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oral health studies conducted so far in Nigeria have documented prevalence and incidence of dental disease using traditional clinical measures. However none have investigated the use of an oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL instrument to document oral health outcomes. The aims of this study are: to describe how oral health affects and impacts quality of life (QoL and to explore the association between these affects and the oral health care seeking behavior of adults in Benin City, Edo State, Nigeria. Methods A cross-sectional survey recruited 356 adults aged 18–64 years from two large hospital outpatient departments and from members of a university community. Closed-ended oral health questionnaire with "effect and impact" item-questions from OHQoL-UK© instrument was administered by trained interviewers. Collected data included sociodemographic, dental visits, and effects and impact of oral health on QoL. Univariate and bivariable analyses were done and a chi-square test was used to test differences in proportions. Multivariable analyses using ANOVA examined the association between QoL factors and visits to a dentist. Results Complete data was available for 83% of the participants. About 62% of participants perceived their oral health as affecting their QoL. Overall, 82%, 63%, and 77% of participants perceived that oral health has an effect on their eating or enjoyment of food, sleep or ability to relax, and smiling or laughing, respectively. Some 46%, 36%, and 25% of participants reported that oral health impact their daily activities, social activities, and talking to people, respectively. Dental visits within the last year was significantly associated with eating, speech, and finance (P F = 0.0111. The mean of effects sum score for those with secondary/tertiary education levels (mean = 61.8; 95% CI: 60.6, 62.9 was significantly higher than those with less than secondary level of education (mean = 57.2; 95% CI

  17. Univé customer survey: Pay-As-You-Drive (PAYD) insurance : Report PAYD-2. Feedback from Pay-As-You-Drive insurance, both outside and inside the car

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lewis Evans, Ben; den Heijer, Anne; Dijksterhuis, Chris; de Waard, Dick; Brookhuis, Karel; Tucha, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    On the 10th of January 2013 over 3500 Univé clients were contacted and asked to fill in an online survey via Qualtrics, a survey website company licenced by the University of Groningen, about the future of car insurance at Univé. These customers could be classified under three main headings; car ins

  18. Univé customer survey: Pay-As-You-Drive (PAYD) insurance : Report PAYD-2. Feedback from Pay-As-You-Drive insurance, both outside and inside the car

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lewis Evans, Ben; den Heijer, Anne; Dijksterhuis, Chris; de Waard, Dick; Brookhuis, Karel; Tucha, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    On the 10th of January 2013 over 3500 Univé clients were contacted and asked to fill in an online survey via Qualtrics, a survey website company licenced by the University of Groningen, about the future of car insurance at Univé. These customers could be classified under three main headings; car

  19. [Surgeons can learn from pilots: human factors in surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sockeel, P; Chatelain, E; Massoure, M-P; David, P; Chapellier, X; Buffat, S

    2009-06-01

    Human factors (HF) study is mandatory to get air transport pilot licences. In aviation, crew resource management (CRM) and declaration of adverse events (feedback) result in improving of air safety. Air missions and surgical procedures have similarities. Bridging the gap is tempting, despite severe warnings against simplistic adaptation. Putting HF theory into surgical practice: how to? Educational principles derived from CRM improve professional attitudes of a team. We propose to translate concepts of CRM to clinical teams. CRM training applying in surgery could allow the work environment to be restructured to reduce human error. Feedback: in aviation, the Bureau of Flight Safety deals with investigations for air events. Pilots, air traffic controllers can anonymously declare nuisance, resulting in a feedback for the whole air force. Adverse events are analysed. Usually, multilevel problems are found, rather than the only responsibility of the last operator. Understanding the mechanisms of human failure finally improves safety. In surgery, CRM and feedback would probably be helpful. Anyway, it requires time; people have to change their mind. Nevertheless people such as fighter pilots, who were very unwilling at the beginning, now consider HF as a cornerstone for security. But it is difficult to estimate the extent of HF-related morbidity and mortality. We propose as a first step to consider CRM and feedback in surgical procedure. HF deals with the mechanisms of human errors and the ways to improve safety and probably improve the surgical team's efficacy.

  20. Self-reported physical activity and major adverse events in patients with atrial fibrillation: a report from the EURObservational Research Programme Pilot Survey on Atrial Fibrillation (EORP-AF) General Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proietti, Marco; Boriani, Giuseppe; Laroche, Cécile; Diemberger, Igor; Popescu, Mircea I; Rasmussen, Lars H; Sinagra, Gianfranco; Dan, Gheorghe-Andrei; Maggioni, Aldo P; Tavazzi, Luigi; Lane, Deirdre A; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2017-04-01

    Physical activity is protective against cardiovascular (CV) events, both in general population and in high-risk CV cohorts. However, the relationship between physical activity with major adverse outcomes in atrial fibrillation (AF) is not well-established. Our aim was to analyse this relationship in a 'real-world' AF population. Second, we investigated the influence of physical activity on arrhythmia progression. We studied all patients enrolled in the EURObservational Research Programme on AF (EORP-AF) Pilot Survey. Physical activity was defined as 'none', 'occasional', 'regular', and 'intense', based on patient self-reporting. Data on physical activity were available for 2442 patients: 38.9% reported none, 34.7% occasional, 21.7% regular, and 4.7% intense physical activity. Prevalence of the principal CV risk factors progressively decreased from none to intense physical activity. Lower rates of CV death, all-cause death, and composite outcomes were found in AF patients who reported regular and intense physical activity (P < 0.0001). Increasing physical activity was inversely associated with CV death/any thromboembolic event (TE)/bleeding in the whole cohort, irrespective of gender, paroxysmal AF, elderly age, or high stroke risk. Any level of physical activity intensity was significantly associated with lower risk of CV death/any TE/bleeding at 1-year follow-up. Physical activity was not significantly associated with arrhythmia progression. Atrial fibrillation patients taking regular exercise were associated with a lower risk of all-cause death, even when we considered various subgroups, including gender, elderly age, symptomatic status, and stroke risk class. Efforts to increase physical activity among AF patients may improve outcomes in these patients.

  1. Testing AGN feedback models in galaxy evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Min-Su

    Galaxy formation and evolution have been one of the most challenging problems in astrophysics. A single galaxy has various components (stars, atomic and molecular gas, a supermassive black hole, and dark matter) and has interacted with its cosmic environment throughout its history. A key issue in understanding galaxy evolution is to find the dominant physical processes in the interactions between the components of a galaxy and between a galaxy and its environment. AGN feedback has been proposed as a key process to suppress late star formation in massive elliptical galaxies and as a general consequence of galaxy mergers and interactions. In this thesis, I investigate feedback effects from active galactic nuclei (AGN) using a new simulation code and data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. In the first chapter, I test purely mechanical AGN feedback models via a nuclear wind around the central SMBH in elliptical galaxies by comparing simulation results to four well-defined observational constraints: the mass ratio between the SMBH and its host galaxy, the lifetime of the quasar phase, the X-ray luminosity from the hot interstellar medium, and the mass fraction of young stars. Even though purely mechanical AGN feedback is commonly assumed in cosmological simulations, I find that it is inadequate, and cannot reproduce all four observational constraints simultaneously. This result suggests that both mechanical and radiative feedback modes are important physical processes. In the second chapter, I simulate the coevolution of the SMBH and its host galaxy under different environments, represented by different amounts of gas stripping. Though the connection between environment and galaxy evolution has been well-studied, environmental effects on the growth of the SMBH have not been answered yet. I find that strong gas stripping, which satellite galaxies might experience, highly suppresses SMBH mass accretion and AGN activity. Moreover, the suppression of the SMBH growth is

  2. Engaging Students with Audio Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cann, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Students express widespread dissatisfaction with academic feedback. Teaching staff perceive a frequent lack of student engagement with written feedback, much of which goes uncollected or unread. Published evidence shows that audio feedback is highly acceptable to students but is underused. This paper explores methods to produce and deliver audio…

  3. Improving the quality of written feedback using written feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Maggie; Crossley, James; McKinley, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Educational feedback is amongst the most powerful of all learning interventions. (1) Can we measure the quality of written educational feedback with acceptable metrics? (2) Based on such a measure, does a quality improvement (QI) intervention improve the quality of feedback? We developed a QI instrument to measure the quality of written feedback and applied it to written feedback provided to medical students following workplace assessments. We evaluated the measurement characteristics of the QI score using generalisability theory. In an uncontrolled intervention, QI profiles were fed back to GP tutors and pre and post intervention scores compared. A single assessor scoring 6 feedback summaries can discriminate between practices with a reliability of 0.82.The quality of feedback rose for two years after the introduction of the QI instrument and stabilised in the third year. The estimated annual cost to provide this feedback is £12 per practice. Interpretation and recommendations: It is relatively straightforward and inexpensive to measure the quality of written feedback with good reliability. The QI process appears to improve the quality of written feedback. We recommend routine use of a QI process to improve the quality of educational feedback.

  4. Positive feedback promotes oscillations in negative feedback loops.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharath Ananthasubramaniam

    Full Text Available A simple three-component negative feedback loop is a recurring motif in biochemical oscillators. This motif oscillates as it has the three necessary ingredients for oscillations: a three-step delay, negative feedback, and nonlinearity in the loop. However, to oscillate, this motif under the common Goodwin formulation requires a high degree of cooperativity (a measure of nonlinearity in the feedback that is biologically "unlikely." Moreover, this recurring negative feedback motif is commonly observed augmented by positive feedback interactions. Here we show that these positive feedback interactions promote oscillation at lower degrees of cooperativity, and we can thus unify several common kinetic mechanisms that facilitate oscillations, such as self-activation and Michaelis-Menten degradation. The positive feedback loops are most beneficial when acting on the shortest lived component, where they function by balancing the lifetimes of the different components. The benefits of multiple positive feedback interactions are cumulative for a majority of situations considered, when benefits are measured by the reduction in the cooperativity required to oscillate. These positive feedback motifs also allow oscillations with longer periods than that determined by the lifetimes of the components alone. We can therefore conjecture that these positive feedback loops have evolved to facilitate oscillations at lower, kinetically achievable, degrees of cooperativity. Finally, we discuss the implications of our conclusions on the mammalian molecular clock, a system modeled extensively based on the three-component negative feedback loop.

  5. Investigating the relationship between quality, format and delivery of feedback for written assignments in higher education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sopina, Liza Elizaveta; McNeill, Rob

    2015-01-01

    investigating the impact the format of feedback has on quality of feedback and subsequently on student learning. This study sets out to investigate the impact paper-based and electronic methods of assignment submission and return have on students’ and markers’ perceived quality of feedback. Students and markers...... on an undergraduate course were asked to complete an anonymous online survey investigating their perceptions of quality, format and timeliness of feedback delivered electronically and on paper. The results showed that marking and providing feedback electronically was an acceptable method for markers, reporting...

  6. Considerations for conducting Web-based survey research with people living with human immunodeficiency virus using a community-based participatory approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Kelly K; Solomon, Patricia; Worthington, Catherine; Ibáñez-Carrasco, Francisco; Baxter, Larry; Nixon, Stephanie A; Baltzer-Turje, Rosalind; Robinson, Greg; Zack, Elisse

    2014-03-13

    Web or Internet-based surveys are increasingly popular in health survey research. However, the strengths and challenges of Web-based surveys with people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are unclear. The aim of this article is to describe our experience piloting a cross-sectional, Web-based, self-administered survey with adults living with HIV using a community-based participatory research approach. We piloted a Web-based survey that investigated disability and rehabilitation services use with a sample of adults living with HIV in Canada. Community organizations in five provinces emailed invitations to clients, followed by a thank you/reminder one week later. We obtained survey feedback in a structured phone interview with respondents. Participant responses were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using directed content analysis. Of 30 people living with HIV who accessed the survey link, 24/30 (80%) initiated and 16/30 (53%) completed the survey instrument. A total of 17 respondents participated in post-survey interviews. Participants described the survey instrument as comprehensive, suggesting content validity. The majority (13/17, 76%) felt instruction and item wording were clear and easy to understand, and found the software easy to navigate. Participants felt having a pop-up reminder directing them to missed items would be useful. Strengths of implementing the Web-based survey included: our community-based participatory approach, ease of software use, ability for respondents to complete the questionnaire on one's own time at one's own pace, opportunity to obtain geographic variation, and potential for respondent anonymity. Considerations for future survey implementation included: respondent burden and fatigue, the potentially sensitive nature of HIV Web-based research, data management and storage, challenges verifying informed consent, varying computer skills among respondents, and the burden on community organizations. Overall, results provide

  7. Regenerative feedback resonant circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. Mark; Kelly, James F.; McCloy, John S.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2014-09-02

    A regenerative feedback resonant circuit for measuring a transient response in a loop is disclosed. The circuit includes an amplifier for generating a signal in the loop. The circuit further includes a resonator having a resonant cavity and a material located within the cavity. The signal sent into the resonator produces a resonant frequency. A variation of the resonant frequency due to perturbations in electromagnetic properties of the material is measured.

  8. Surveys: an introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubenfeld, Gordon D

    2004-10-01

    Surveys are a valuable research tool for studying the knowledge, attitudes, and behavior of a study population. This article explores quantitative analyses of written questionnaires as instruments for survey research. Obtaining accurate and precise information from a survey requires minimizing the possibility of bias from inappropriate sampling or a flawed survey instrument, and this article describes strategies to minimize sampling bias by increasing response rates, comparing responders to nonresponders, and identifying the appropriate sampling population. It is crucial that the survey instrument be valid, meaning that it actually measures what the investigator intends it to measure. In developing a valid survey instrument, it can be useful to adapt survey instruments that were developed by other researchers and to conduct extensive pilot-testing of your survey instrument.

  9. Active Galactic Nuclei Feedback and Galactic Outflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ai-Lei

    Feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) is thought to regulate the growth of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and galaxies. The most direct evidence of AGN feedback is probably galactic outflows. This thesis addresses the link between SMBHs and their host galaxies from four different observational perspectives. First, I study the local correlation between black hole mass and the galactic halo potential (the MBH - Vc relation) based on Very Large Array (VLA) HI observations of galaxy rotation curves. Although there is a correlation, it is no tighter than the well-studied MBH - sigma* relation between the black hole mass and the potential of the galactic bulge, indicating that physical processes, such as feedback, could link the evolution of the black hole to the baryons in the bulge. In what follows, I thus search for galactic outflows as direct evidence of AGN feedback. Second, I use the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) to observe a luminous obscured AGN that hosts an ionized galactic outflow and find a compact but massive molecular outflow that can potentially quench the star formation in 10. 6 years.The third study extends the sample of known ionized outflows with new Magellan long-slit observations of 12 luminous obscured AGN. I find that most luminous obscured AGN (Lbol > 1046 ergs s-1) host ionized outflows on 10 kpc scales, and the size of the outflow correlates strongly with the luminosity of the AGN. Lastly, to capitalize on the power of modern photometric surveys, I experiment with a new broadband imaging technique to study the morphology of AGN emission line regions and outflows. With images from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), this method successfully constructs images of the [OIII]lambda5007 emission line and reveals hundreds of extended emission-line systems. When applied to current and future surveys, such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), this technique could open a new parameter space for the study of AGN outflows. In

  10. Pilot Boarding Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Pilot boarding areas are locations at sea where pilots familiar with local waters board incoming vessels to navigate their passage to a destination port. Pilotage is...

  11. Initiatives to improve feedback culture in the final year of a veterinary program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warman, Sheena M; Laws, Emma J; Crowther, Emma; Baillie, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Despite the recognized importance of feedback in education, student satisfaction with the feedback process in medical and veterinary programs is often disappointing. We undertook various initiatives to try to improve the feedback culture in the final clinical year of the veterinary program at the University of Bristol, focusing on formative verbal feedback. The initiatives included E-mailed guidelines to staff and students, a faculty development workshop, and a reflective portfolio task for students. Following these initiatives, staff and students were surveyed regarding their perceptions of formative feedback in clinical rotations, and focus groups were held to further explore issues. The amount of feedback appeared to have increased, along with improved recognition of feedback by students and increased staff confidence and competence in the process. Other themes that emerged included inconsistencies in feedback among staff and between rotations; difficulties with giving verbal feedback to students, particularly when it relates to professionalism; the consequences of feedback for both staff and students; changes and challenges in students' feedback-seeking behavior; and the difficulties in providing accurate, personal end-of-rotation assessments. This project has helped improve the feedback culture within our clinics; the importance of sustaining and further developing the feedback culture is discussed in this article.

  12. Inspiring Teachers to Reflect and Ask for Feedback: An Interplay of Teachers' Self-Efficacy, Principals' Feedback, and Servant Leadership Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birringer-Haig, Joan I.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the study was to investigate how teachers' reflection and asking for feedback--critical aspects of teachers' professional growth--can be explained and stimulated by teachers' self-efficacy, principals' feedback, and servant leadership characteristics. A mixed-method study was conducted with data collected from surveys and interviews…

  13. Feedback on Feedback: Eliciting Learners' Responses to Written Feedback through Student-Generated Screencasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Toro, María; Furnborough, Concha

    2014-01-01

    Despite the potential benefits of assignment feedback, learners often fail to use it effectively. This study examines the ways in which adult distance learners engage with written feedback on one of their assignments. Participants were 10 undergraduates studying Spanish at the Open University, UK. Their responses to feedback were elicited by means…

  14. Feedback on Feedback: Eliciting Learners' Responses to Written Feedback through Student-Generated Screencasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Toro, María; Furnborough, Concha

    2014-01-01

    Despite the potential benefits of assignment feedback, learners often fail to use it effectively. This study examines the ways in which adult distance learners engage with written feedback on one of their assignments. Participants were 10 undergraduates studying Spanish at the Open University, UK. Their responses to feedback were elicited by means…

  15. Feedback på arbejdspladser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holdt Christensen, Peter

    Feedback på arbejdspladser er vigtig. Men feedback er også et populært begreb mange taler med om uden dog at vide sig helt sikker på hvad det er. Formålet med denne bog er at bidrage til en bedre forståelse af hvad feedback er, hvordan det fungerer og dermed hvordan arbejdspladser bedst muligt bør...... understøtte feedback. Med udgangspunkt i forskningen identificeres centrale udfordringer ved feedback, bl.a. hvorfor det kan være svært at give præcis feedback, hvordan forholdet mellem lederen og den ansatte påvirker den feedback der gives, og hvad der kendetegner en feedback kultur. Bogen er skrevet til...... undervisere og studerende på videregående uddannelser samt praktikere der ønsker en systematisk og forskningsbaseret forståelse af feedback på arbejdspladser. Bogen er således ikke en kogebog til bedre feedback, men en analyse og diskussion af hvad forskningen ved om feedback, og bidrager med inspiration og...

  16. Students want feedback and educators need dialogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esbjerg, Lars; Rask, Morten

    2015-01-01

    We discuss what we call “the interaction paradox” in Danish management education. On the one hand, the fact that students want more feedback and educators want to foster dialogue with their students should bode well for interaction in educational settings. On the other hand, both groups are left...... wanting: a survey found that only a third of students at Business and Social Science (BSS), Aarhus University (AU), think they get sufficient feedback on their work , while educators bemoan the impossibility of activating and engaging students in the substantive, theoretical and methodological discussions...... in class-room settings that are considered central for effective learning. In other words, we have a situation where students want to talk to their teachers and teachers also want to engage in dialogue, but they seem to get nowhere. Based on qualitative and quantitative data from both students...

  17. Visual information transfer. 1: Assessment of specific information needs. 2: The effects of degraded motion feedback. 3: Parameters of appropriate instrument scanning behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comstock, J. R., Jr.; Kirby, R. H.; Coates, G. D.

    1984-01-01

    Pilot and flight crew assessment of visually displayed information is examined as well as the effects of degraded and uncorrected motion feedback, and instrument scanning efficiency by the pilot. Computerized flight simulation and appropriate physiological measurements are used to collect data for standardization.

  18. 少数民族学生汉语写作反馈有效性调查%A Survey of the Feedback Effectiveness of Chinese Writing of Minority Students

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐雪琴; 李少平

    2015-01-01

    The ultimate goal of Chinese as a second language teaching is to cultivate learners'actual language using ability.Writ-ten expression ability is one of the four language sKills.It is also the important content of language ability.Improving written sKills for Chinese learners whose mother tongue is Chinese is very important.Evaluation is a Key linK of the Chinese writing teaching,and the effectiveness of feedbacK in writing teaching evaluation plays a decisive role.So it is worthy of paying atten-tion to Chinese writing teaching from the perspective of evaluation in teaching Chinese as second language.The thesis bases on the Process teaching method and discusses ethnic minorities in Xinjiang from the empirical perspective for the teaching object of Chinese writing teaching evaluation of teacher's feedbacK on the impact of improving learners'writing,analyses the learner's need for feedbacK and existing problems.%汉语作为第二语言教学的最终目标是培养学习者的语言实际运用能力。书面表达能力是四项言语技能之一,也是语言能力的重要内容,那么提高书面表达能力对于汉语为非母语的汉语学习者十分重要。评价是汉语写作教学中的一个关键环节,而评价的反馈有效性在写作教学评价中起着决定性作用,因此从评价的反馈有效性的角度研究汉语写作教学是汉语作为第二语言教学中十分值得关注的论题。本文以过程教学法为基本的理论基础,从实证角度探讨了以新疆少数民族学生为教学对象的汉语写作教学评价中教师的反馈对提高学习者写作水平所产生的影响,分析了学习者对反馈的需要以及存在的问题。

  19. Effects of longitudinal small-group learning on delivery and receipt of communication skills feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Calvin L; Masters, Dylan E; Chang, Anna; Kruidering, Marieke; Hauer, Karen E

    2013-11-01

    Although feedback is a critical component of learning, recent data suggest that learners may discount feedback they receive. The emotional threat inherent in feedback can contribute to its ineffectiveness, particularly for sensitive topics like communication skills. Longitudinal relationships among peers may increase their sense of safety and soften the perceived threat of feedback to allow students to give, receive and potentially more effectively incorporate feedback. We studied the effects of prior shared learning experiences among medical students in the delivery and receipt of feedback on clinical (communication) skills. During a formative clinical skills examination, we divided Year 3 students at a US medical school into two subgroups comprising, respectively, small-group classmates from a 2-year longitudinal pre-clerkship clinical skills course (with prior peer-learning relationships), and peers with no prior shared small-group coursework. Students in both subgroups observed peers in a simulated clinical case and then provided feedback, which was videotaped, transcribed and coded. Feedback recipients also completed a survey on their perceptions of the feedback. Students valued the feedback they received and intended to enact it, regardless of whether they had prior peer-learning relationships. Coding of feedback revealed high specificity. Feedback providers who had prior peer-learning relationships with recipients provided more specific corrective feedback on communication skills than those with no such relationships (p = 0.014); there was no significant difference between subgroups in the provision of reinforcing feedback on communication skills. Year 3 medical student peers can deliver specific feedback on clinical skills; prior peer-learning relationships in pre-clerkship clinical skills courses enrich the provision of specific corrective feedback about communication skills. Feedback between peers with pre-existing peer-learning relationships represents

  20. Peer Feedback in Chinese-English Paragraph Translation Practice:A Case Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓静

    2015-01-01

    This pilot research is to explore the efficacy of peer feedback in translation teaching and learning in the context where College English Test has great influence on university’s language teaching and learning through a case study.It will shed some light on pedagogical thinking in the context of Chinese ESL teaching and learning.

  1. Simple force feedback for small virtual environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiefele, Jens; Albert, Oliver; van Lier, Volker; Huschka, Carsten

    1998-08-01

    In today's civil flight training simulators only the cockpit and all its interaction devices exist as physical mockups. All other elements such as flight behavior, motion, sound, and the visual system are virtual. As an extension to this approach `Virtual Flight Simulation' tries to subsidize the cockpit mockup by a 3D computer generated image. The complete cockpit including the exterior view is displayed on a Head Mounted Display (HMD), a BOOM, or a Cave Animated Virtual Environment. In most applications a dataglove or virtual pointers are used as input devices. A basic problem of such a Virtual Cockpit simulation is missing force feedback. A pilot cannot touch and feel buttons, knobs, dials, etc. he tries to manipulate. As a result, it is very difficult to generate realistic inputs into VC systems. `Seating Bucks' are used in automotive industry to overcome the problem of missing force feedback. Only a seat, steering wheel, pedal, stick shift, and radio panel are physically available. All other geometry is virtual and therefore untouchable but visible in the output device. In extension to this concept a `Seating Buck' for commercial transport aircraft cockpits was developed. Pilot seat, side stick, pedals, thrust-levers, and flaps lever are physically available. All other panels are simulated by simple flat plastic panels. They are located at the same location as their real counterparts only lacking the real input devices. A pilot sees the entire photorealistic cockpit in a HMD as 3D geometry but can only touch the physical parts and plastic panels. In order to determine task performance with the developed Seating Buck, a test series was conducted. Users press buttons, adapt dials, and turn knobs. In a first test, a complete virtual environment was used. The second setting had a plastic panel replacing all input devices. Finally, as cross reference the participants had to repeat the test with a complete physical mockup of the input devices. All panels and

  2. 77 FR 35058 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Pilot...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-12

    ...; Pilot Surveys of Employee Voice in the Coal Mining Industry ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of... collection request (ICR) titled, ``Pilot Surveys of Employee Voice in the Coal Mining Industry,'' to the... Mining Industry. OMB ICR Reference Number: 201205-1219-001. Affected Public: Individuals or...

  3. The Endogenous Feedback Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Augustenborg, Claudia Carrara

    2010-01-01

    proposals, it will first be considered the extents of their reciprocal compatibility, tentatively shaping an integrated, theoretical profile of consciousness. A new theory, the Endogenous Feedback Network (EFN) will consequently be introduced which, beside being able to accommodate the main tenets...... of the reviewed theories, appears able to compensate for the explanatory gaps they leave behind. The EFN proposes consciousness as the phenomenon emerging from a distinct network of neural paths broadcasting the neural changes associated to any mental process. It additionally argues for the need to include a 5th...

  4. Portfolio, refleksion og feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ane Qvortrup

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Denne leder definerer indledningsvist begrebet portfolio og gør rede for anvendelsesmuligheder i en uddannelseskontekst. Dernæst behandles portfoliometodens kvalitet og effekt for læring og undervisning og de centrale begreber refleksion, progression og feedback præsenteres og diskuteres. Herefter listes teknologier, der understøtter portfolioens opbygning og brug og implikationerne forbundet med valg af teknologi diskuteres kort. Afslutningsvist præsenteres temanummerets 5 artikler, der endvidere er inddraget undervejs i lederen som eksemplificering af de præsenterede begreber og teknologier.

  5. Precipitation-Regulated Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voit, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Star formation in the central galaxies of galaxy clusters appears to be fueled by precipitation of cold clouds out of hot circumgalactic gas via thermal instability. I will present both observational and theoretical support for the precipitation mode in large galaxies and discuss how it can be implemented in cosmological simulations of galaxy evolution. Galaxy cluster cores are unique laboratories for studying the astrophysics of thermal instability and may be teaching us valuable lessons about how feedback works in galaxies spanning the entire mass spectrum.

  6. Models of AGN feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Combes, F

    2014-01-01

    The physical processes responsible of sweeping up the surrounding gas in the host galaxy of an AGN, and able in some circumstances to expel it from the galaxy, are not yet well known. The various mechanisms are briefly reviewed: quasar or radio modes, either momentum-conserving outflows, energy-conserving outflows, or intermediate. They are confronted to observations, to know whether they can explain the M-sigma relation, quench the star formation or whether they can also provide some positive feedback and how the black hole accretion history is related to that of star formation.

  7. Operating procedures, Pilot polar bear survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Distance will be measured from the "center" of the sighting (polar bear, group of bears, group of walrus, etc.) to the flight line along a perpendicular projection...

  8. 2004 Alaska highway invasive plants pilot survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — We investigated the distribution and abundance of non-native invasive plants along a section of the Alaska Highway adjacent to Tetlin National Wildlife Refuge, 20...

  9. Haptic gas pedal feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, M; Mulder, M; van Paassen, M M; Abbink, D A

    2008-11-01

    Active driver support systems either automate a control task or present warnings to drivers when their safety is seriously degraded. In a novel approach, utilising neither automation nor discrete warnings, a haptic gas pedal (accelerator) interface was developed that continuously presents car-following support information, keeping the driver in the loop. This interface was tested in a fixed-base driving simulator. Twenty-one drivers between the ages of 24 and 30 years participated in a driving experiment to investigate the effects of haptic gas pedal feedback on car-following behaviour. Results of the experiment indicate that when haptic feedback was presented to the drivers, some improvement in car-following performance was achieved, while control activity decreased. Further research is needed to investigate the effectiveness of the system in more varied driving conditions. Haptics is an under-used modality in the application of human support interfaces, which usually draw on vision or hearing. This study demonstrates how haptics can be used to create an effective driver support interface.

  10. Emotional feedback for mobile devices

    CERN Document Server

    Seebode, Julia

    2015-01-01

    This book investigates the functional adequacy as well as the affective impression made by feedback messages on mobile devices. It presents an easily adoptable experimental setup to examine context effects on various feedback messages, and applies it to auditory, tactile and auditory-tactile feedback messages. This approach provides insights into the relationship between the affective impression and functional applicability of these messages as well as an understanding of the influence of unimodal components on the perception of multimodal feedback messages. The developed paradigm can also be extended to investigate other aspects of context and used to investigate feedback messages in modalities other than those presented. The book uses questionnaires implemented on a Smartphone, which can easily be adopted for field studies to broaden the scope even wider. Finally, the book offers guidelines for the design of system feedback.

  11. Utility Assessment of Specificity in Upward Feedback Instruments for Leadership Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-03-01

    the scores are reported back to that supervisor without mention of who completed the survey (London & Wohlers , 1991). Subordinates participating...has been measured in many other studies (Smither & Wohlers , 1995; Hazucha et al., 1993; Leaders reported the degree to which they took action to... Wohlers , 1991). Upward feedback is part of a wider field of study known as multi-rater feedback or 360-degree feedback where data are collected not only

  12. Do students profit from feedback?

    OpenAIRE

    Arild Raaheim

    2006-01-01

    Undergraduate students in psychology were given the opportunity to exchange the traditional exam with portfolio assessment. The students received written feedback, by way of a standard feedback form, on two of the three essays of the portfolio. To investigate whether students attend to and act on the feedback, a comparison was made between unofficial marks on the first draft of the first essay and the official marks on the full portfolio at the end of the semester. With approximately 20% of t...

  13. Observational Signatures Of Agn Feedback Across Cosmic Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylezalek, Dominika

    2017-06-01

    While many compelling models of AGN feedback exist, there is no clear data-driven picture of how winds are launched, how they propagate through the galaxy and what impact they have on the galactic gas. Recent work suggests that AGN luminosity plays an important role. The following described projects focus on understanding the power, reach and impact of feedback processes exerted by AGN of different power. I first describe recent efforts in our group of relating feedback signatures in powerful quasars to the specific star formation rate in their host galaxies, where our results are consistent with the AGN having a `negative' impact through feedback on the galaxies' star formation history. Feedback signatures seem to be best observable in gas-rich galaxies where the coupling of the AGN-driven wind to the gas is strongest, in agreement with recent simulations. But how and where does this quenching happen? Is it accomplished through the mechanical action of jets or through nuclear winds driven by radiation pressure? Finally, I show that AGN signatures and AGN-driven winds can be easily hidden and not be apparent in the integrated spectrum of a galaxy hosting a low/intermediate-luminosity AGN. Using data from the new SDSS-IV MaNGA survey, we have developed a new AGN selection algorithm tailored to IFU data and we are uncovering a much more nuanced picture of AGN activity allowing us to discover AGN signatures at large distances from the galaxy center. This implies that large IFU surveys, such as the SDSS-IV MaNGA survey, might uncover many previously unknown AGN and feedback signatures related to them. Outflows and feedback from low- and intermediate-luminosity AGN might have been underestimated in the past but can potentially significantly contribute to the AGN/host-galaxy self-regulation.

  14. Membership Survey Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis M Bowie

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In an effort to gather feedback from Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS members, the Executive sent out a survey to the membership and received replies from approximately one-third of the membership. This was an attempt to look at the role of the CTS and what the members wanted from the CTS.

  15. FEEDBACK REALIZATION OF HAMILTONIAN SYSTEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Daizhan; XI Zairong

    2002-01-01

    This paper investigates the relationship between state feedback and Hamiltonian realizatiou. First, it is proved that a completely controllable linear system always has a state feedback state equation Hamiltonian realization. Necessary and sufficient conditions are obtained for it to have a Hamiltonian realization with natural outpnt. Then some conditions for an affine nonlinear system to have a Hamiltonian realization arc given.For generalized outputs, the conditions of the feedback, keeping Hamiltonian, are discussed. Finally, the admissible feedback controls for generalized Hamiltonian systems are considered.

  16. FEEDBACK REALIZATION OF HAMILTONIAN SYSTEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENGDaizhan; XIZairong

    2002-01-01

    This paper investigates the relationship between state feedback and Hamiltonican realization.Firest,it is proved that a completely controllable linear system always has a state feedback state equation Hamiltonian realization.Necessary and sufficient conditions are obtained for it to have a Hamiltonian realization with natural output.Then some conditions for an affine nonlinear system to have a Hamiltonian realization are given.some conditions for an affine nonlinear system to have a Hamiltonian realization are given.For generalized outputs,the conditions of the feedback,keeping Hamiltonian,are discussed.Finally,the admissible feedback controls for generalized Hamiltonian systems are considered.

  17. Feedback strategies for wireless communication

    CERN Document Server

    Ozbek, Berna

    2014-01-01

    This book explores the different strategies regarding the feedback information for wireless communication systems. The text analyzes the impact of quantization and correlation of channel state information (CSI) on the system performance. The authors show the effect of the reduced and limited feedback information and gives an overview about the feedback strategies in the standards. This volume presents theoretical analysis as well as practical algorithms for the required feedback information at the base stations to perform adaptive resource allocation efficiently and mitigate interference coming from other cells.

  18. Written Corrective Feedback: The Perception of Korean EFL Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Bohyon

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on the perception of Korean EFL learners toward feedback types on their written errors. The survey was administered using an adopted questionnaire from previous studies (Ishii 2011; Leki, 1991). This further allows a comparison of Korean EFL learners' attitudes with the responses to an identical questionnaire by Japanese EFL…

  19. 360 Derece Performans Değerlendirme ve Geri Bildirim: Bir Üniversite Mediko-Sosyal Merkezi Birim Amirlerinin Yönetsel Yetkinliklerinin Değerlendirilmesi Üzerine Pilot Uygulama Örneği(360 Degree Performance Appraisal And Feedback: “A Pilot Study Illustration in Appraising the Managerial Skills of Supervisors Working in Health Care Centre of a University”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selin Metin CAMGÖZ

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, “360 Degree Performance Appraisal” which is one of the most current and controversial issues of human resource practices is extensively examined and supported with an empirical research. The study contains 2 parts. After explaining the necessity and the general utilities of the classical performance appraisal system, the first theoretical part shifts to the emergence of 360 degree performance appraisal, discusses its distinctive benefits over the classical appraisal system and focuses its attention to the raters (superiors, subordinates, peers, self involving in the 360 degree performance appraisal.The second empirical part illustrates the development of 360 degree performance appraisal system as well as its application and sample feedback reports for feedback purposes in order to appraise the managerial skills of supervisors working in Health Care Centre of a public university.

  20. Adult Beginner Distance Language Learner Perceptions and Use of Assignment Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furnborough, Concha; Truman, Mike

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative study examines perceptions and use of assignment feedback among adult beginner modern foreign language learners on higher education distance learning courses. A survey of responses to feedback on assignments by 43 Open University students on beginner language courses in Spanish, French, and German indicated that respondents can be…

  1. Linking Failure Feedback to Individual Creativity: The Moderation Role of Goal Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yimin; Yao, Xiang; Wang, Shuhong; Caughron, Jay

    2016-01-01

    The sense-making theory of creativity is extended by identifying failure feedback as a process that shapes creative interpretations and actions. We also consider the moderating effect of goal orientation on the relationship between failure feedback and individual creativity, according to the sense-making theory. A 2-waves survey data from…

  2. Effects of Normative Feedback on Consumption among Heavy Drinking College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostinelli, Gina; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Heavy-drinking college students tend to overestimate the prevalence of heavy drinking among their peers. Twenty-six heavy-drinking students participated in a survey study of drinking. They were randomized to receive or not receive, by return mail, personal feedback of their drinking compared to population norms. Feedback subjects showed greater…

  3. Enhancing the Assessment Experience: Improving Student Perceptions, Engagement and Understanding Using Online Video Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, John; Turner, Will

    2016-01-01

    Individualised video screencasts with accompanying narration were used to provide assessment feedback to a large number (n = 299) of first-year Bachelor of Education students at Edith Cowan University in Western Australia. An anonymous online survey revealed that nearly three times as many respondents (61%) preferred video feedback to written…

  4. Student Feedback Systems in Higher Education: A Focused Literature Review and Environmental Scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderman, Lyn; Towers, Stephen; Bannah, Sylvia

    2012-01-01

    In recent times, higher education institutions have paid increasing attention to the views of students to obtain feedback on their experience of learning and teaching through internal surveys. This article reviews research in the field and reports on practices in other Australian universities. Findings demonstrate that while student feedback is…

  5. Linking Failure Feedback to Individual Creativity: The Moderation Role of Goal Orientation

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yimin; Yao, Xiang; Wang, Shuhong; Caughron, Jay

    2016-01-01

    The sense-making theory of creativity is extended by identifying failure feedback as a process that shapes creative interpretations and actions. We also consider the moderating effect of goal orientation on the relationship between failure feedback and individual creativity, according to the sense-making theory. A 2-waves survey data from…

  6. Understanding Informal Feedback Seeking in the Workplace: The Impact of the Position in the Organizational Hierarchy

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Rijt, Janine; Van den Bossche, Piet; Segers, Mien S. R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the position of employees in the organizational hierarchy is important in explaining their feedback seeking behaviour. Design/methodology/approach: This study takes a social network perspective by using an ego-centric network survey to investigate employees' feedback seeking behaviour…

  7. A Case for Direct and Indirect Feedback: The Other Side of Coin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemnezhad, Hossein; Mohammadnejad, Saeed

    2012-01-01

    The use of WCF is a striking necessity in learning of English as a foreign language. If teachers and students can manipulate well the use of written feedback, both parties will benefit. This research looked at the types of feedback given to EFL students during a 16-week study. For the purpose of the current survey eighty students enrolled freely…

  8. Energy extension service pilot program evaluation report: the first year. Volume II: pilot state reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-09-01

    Volume II of the Energy Extension Service Evaluation presents a discussion of the operations of the ten EES pilot-state programs during the period from October 1, 1977 through September 30, 1978. Each of the ten pilot states - Alabama, Connecticut, Michigan, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Washington, Wisconsin, and Wyoming - received a grant of approximately $1.1 million to develop and implement a 19-month program beginning on October 1, 1977. Volume II provides a case-study description of the operations of the pilot program in each state, with special attention given to the two programs selected in each state for more detailed study and survey research. Some survey data and analysis are presented for the emphasis programs.

  9. Glucocorticoid feedback resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Kloet, E R; Vreugdenhil, E; Oitzl, M S; Joëls, M

    1997-01-01

    Glucocorticoid feedback resistance can be inherited or locally acquired. The implications of these two forms of resistance for disease are strikingly different. The inherited form is characterized by enhanced adrenocortical function and hypercorticism to compensate for a generalized deficit in the glucocorticoid receptor gene, but these individuals lack symptoms of Cushing's syndrome. By contrast, resistance acquired at the level of the hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) neurons is linked to hypercorticism, which is not compensatory but overexposes the rest of the body and the brain to glucocorticoids. This cell-specific glucocorticoid resistance can be acquired by genetically predisposed individuals failing to cope with (early) life events and causes enhanced vulnerability to disease-specific actions of glucocorticoids. (c) 1997, Elsevier Science Inc. (Trends Endocrinol Metab 1997; 8:26-33).

  10. KEKB bunch feedback systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobiyama, M.; Kikutani, E. [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-08-01

    Design and the present status of the bunch by bunch feedback systems for KEKB rings are shown. The detection of the bunch oscillation are made with the phase detection for longitudinal plane, the AM/PM method for transverse plane. Two GHz component of the bunch signal which is extracted with an analog FIR filter is used for the detection. Hardware two-tap FIR filter systems to shift the phase of the oscillation by 90deg will be used for the longitudinal signal processing. The same system will be used with no filtering but with only digital delay for transverse system. The candidate for the kicker and the required maximum power are also estimated. (author)

  11. A laser feedback interferometer with an oscillating feedback mirror

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Zhi-Guo; Wang Fei; Xiao Guang-Zong

    2012-01-01

    A method is proposed to solve the problem of direction discrimination for laser feedback interferometers.By vibrating the feedback mirror with a small-amplitude and high-frequency sine wave,laser intensity is modulated accordingly.The modulation amplitude can be extracted using a phase sensitive detector (PSD).When the feedback mirror moves,the PSD output shows a quasi-sine waveform similar to a laser intensity interference fringe but with a phase difference of approximately ±π/2.If the movement direction of the feedback mirror changes,the phase difference sign reverses.Therefore,the laser feedback interferometer offers a potential application in displacement measurement with a resolution of 1/8 wavelength and in-time direction discrimination.Without using optical components such as polarization beam splitters and wave plates,the interferometer is very simple,easy to align,and less costly.

  12. The feasibility of introducing an adult safeguarding measure for inclusion in the Adult Social Care Outcomes Framework (ASCOF): findings from a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norrie, Caroline; Manthorpe, Jill; Cartwright, Cher; Rayat, Pritpal

    2016-06-30

    There are currently no national measures in England reporting the experiences of people who have been involved with adult safeguarding services following concerns that they may be at risk of abuse or neglect. The Health and Social Care Information Centre (HSCIC) aimed to develop a new adult safeguarding outcome measure (survey) for local authorities (LAs) that could be added to the Adult Social Care Outcomes Framework (ASCOF). The ASCOF is a national collection of social care outcomes performance indicators collected from the perspective of people receiving partial or total funding from a LA for care services. An outcome measure (a face-to-face interview based survey consisting of 7 questions) was piloted in 40 LAs with 382 adults at risk (or their representative) who had been the subject of a safeguarding investigation. The aim was to investigate the feasibility of the survey in three domains: i) if a statistically representative sample of adults at risk (or their family, friend, carer or advocate) could be recruited; ii) analysis of survey responses and its acceptability to participants iii) feedback from LAs about the survey's administration. Overall the survey results met statistical confidence; however the individual results for adults at risk did not, due to the high proportion of representatives who responded because adults at risk were unable. Responses to the survey were generally positive; 72 % of participants felt that the help received during the safeguarding investigation had made them or the adult at risk (if reporting as a proxy) feel 'quite a bit' or 'a lot safer'. These results are the most robust data collected in England on the perspectives of adults at risk and their representatives on safeguarding services. Participants reported they appreciated being asked for feedback. LAs suggested survey administration improvements. This survey is one way LAs can meet their new legal requirement under the Care Act 2014 to 'seek feedback' from adults at

  13. Classroom acoustics: Three pilot studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaldino, Joseph J.

    2005-04-01

    This paper summarizes three related pilot projects designed to focus on the possible effects of classroom acoustics on fine auditory discrimination as it relates to language acquisition, especially English as a second language. The first study investigated the influence of improving the signal-to-noise ratio on the differentiation of English phonemes. The results showed better differentiation with better signal-to-noise ratio. The second studied speech perception in noise by young adults for whom English was a second language. The outcome indicated that the second language learners required a better signal-to-noise ratio to perform equally to the native language participants. The last study surveyed the acoustic conditions of preschool and day care classrooms, wherein first and second language learning occurs. The survey suggested an unfavorable acoustic environment for language learning.

  14. Predictors of skin cancer in commercial airline pilots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swearingen, Christopher J.; Kilmer, Jeffrey B.

    2009-01-01

    Background Skin cancers among commercial airline pilots have been reported to occur at increased rates in pilot populations worldwide. The reasons for these increases are unclear, but postulated factors include ionizing radiation, circadian disruption and leisure sun exposure. Aims To investigate the potential association of these occupational and lifestyle factors, as well as medical history and skin type, with non-melanoma skin cancer in pilots. Methods Data were collected using a confidential Internet survey administered in collaboration with the Air Line Pilots Association International to all active pilots in four US commercial airlines. Pilots with non-melanoma skin cancer were compared to those without using multivariable analysis. Results The response rate was 19%. Among pilots flying <20 years prior to diagnosis, factors associated with increased odds of non-melanoma skin cancer were at-risk skin type, childhood sunburns and family history of non-melanoma skin cancer. Off-duty sunscreen use and family history of melanoma were protective. Among pilots with ≥20 years flight time prior to diagnosis, childhood sunburns and family history of non-melanoma skin cancer persisted as risk factors, with the addition of flight time at high latitude. Conclusions Further investigation regarding the potential health impact of long-term flying at high latitudes is recommended. Additionally, occupational health programmes for pilots should stress awareness of and protection against established risk factors for non-melanoma skin cancer. PMID:19465434

  15. Wastewater treatment pilot

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to investigate the functionality of the wastewater treatment pilot and produce a learning manual-handout, as well as to define the parameters of wastewater clarification by studying the nutrient removal and the effluent clarification level of the processed wastewater. As part of the Environmental Engineering studies, Tampere University of Applied Sciences has invested on a Wastewater Treatment Pilot. The pilot simulates the basic wastewater treatment practices u...

  16. Fast feedback in classroom practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emmett, K.M.; Klaassen, K.; Eijkelhof, H.

    2009-01-01

    In this article we describe one application of the fast feedback method (see Berg 2003 Aust. Sci. Teach. J. 28–34) in secondary mechanics education. Two teachers tried out a particular sequence twice, in consecutive years, once with and once without the use of fast feedback. We found the method to b

  17. Feedback on household electricity consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønhøj, Alice; Thøgersen, John

    2011-01-01

    consumption, we evaluate the effects of giving households detailed feedback about their electricity consumption on a small liquid crystal display (LCD) screen. Twenty Danish households participated in the study over a 5-month period. A new feedback system was developed in a user-involved innovation process...

  18. Designing feedback: multimodality and specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ludden, Geke Dina Simone; Sugiyama, Kazuo

    2013-01-01

    Now that many of us carry around devices that are equipped with sensors (e.g., smartphones with accelerometers) we can use these sensors to measure behavior. The data thus captured can be used to give someone feedback about this behavior. These feedback mechanisms are often used in so called smart

  19. Haptic feedback helps bipedal coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelofsen, Eefje G J; Bosga, Jurjen; Rosenbaum, David A; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G; Hullegie, Wim; van Cingel, Robert; Meulenbroek, Ruud G J

    2016-10-01

    The present study investigated whether special haptic or visual feedback would facilitate the coordination of in-phase, cyclical feet movements of different amplitudes. Seventeen healthy participants sat with their feet on sliding panels that were moved externally over the same or different amplitudes. The participants were asked to generate simultaneous knee flexion-extension movements, or to let their feet be dragged, resulting in reference foot displacements of 150 mm and experimental foot displacements of 150, 120, or 90 mm. Four types of feedback were given: (1) special haptic feedback, involving actively following the motions of the sliders manipulated by two confederates, (2) haptic feedback resulting from passive motion, (3) veridical visual feedback, and (4) enhanced visual feedback. Both with respect to amplitude assimilation effects, correlations and standard deviation of relative phase, the results showed that enhanced visual feedback did not facilitate bipedal independence, but haptic feedback with active movement did. Implications of the findings for movement rehabilitation contexts are discussed.

  20. Feedback traps for virtual potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Gavrilov, Momčilo

    2016-01-01

    Feedback traps are tools for trapping and manipulating single charged objects, such as molecules in solution. An alternative to optical tweezers and other single-molecule techniques, they use feedback to counteract the Brownian motion of a molecule of interest. The trap first acquires information about a molecule's position and then applies an electric feedback force to move the molecule. Since electric forces are stronger than optical forces at small scales, feedback traps are the best way to trap single molecules without "touching" them. Feedback traps can do more than trap molecules: They can also subject a target object to forces that are calculated to be the gradient of a desired potential function U(x). If the feedback loop is fast enough, it creates a virtual potential whose dynamics will be very close to those of a particle in an actual potential U(x). But because the dynamics are entirely a result of the feedback loop--absent the feedback, there is only an object diffusing in a fluid--we are free to ...

  1. Fast Feedback in Classroom Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmett, Katrina; Klaassen, Kees; Eijkelhof, Harrie

    2009-01-01

    In this article we describe one application of the fast feedback method (see Berg 2003 "Aust. Sci. Teach. J." 28-34) in secondary mechanics education. Two teachers tried out a particular sequence twice, in consecutive years, once with and once without the use of fast feedback. We found the method to be successful, and the data that we obtained…

  2. Explosive Formulation Pilot Plant

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Pilot Plant for Explosive Formulation supports the development of new explosives that are comprised of several components. This system is particularly beneficial...

  3. Understanding Feedback: A Learning Theory Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurlings, Marieke; Vermeulen, Marjan; Bastiaens, Theo; Stijnen, Sjef

    2013-01-01

    This article aims to review literature on feedback to teachers. Because research has hardly focused on feedback among teachers, the review's scope also includes feedback in classrooms. The review proposes that the effectiveness of feedback and feedback processes depend on the learning theory adhered to. Findings show that regardless of the…

  4. The Sound of Feedback in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savin-Baden, Maggi

    2010-01-01

    Whilst there is considerable literature on feedback for students and on the use of audio feedback, literature in the area of podcasting assignment feedback (PAF) remains sparse. Partly, this may be due to a lack of clarity about what counts as feedback, the way in which feedback is located pedagogically and the relationship between feedback…

  5. Feedback systems for linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Hendrickson, L; Himel, Thomas M; Minty, Michiko G; Phinney, N; Raimondi, Pantaleo; Raubenheimer, T O; Shoaee, H; Tenenbaum, P G

    1999-01-01

    Feedback systems are essential for stable operation of a linear collider, providing a cost-effective method for relaxing tight tolerances. In the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC), feedback controls beam parameters such as trajectory, energy, and intensity throughout the accelerator. A novel dithering optimization system which adjusts final focus parameters to maximize luminosity contributed to achieving record performance in the 1997-98 run. Performance limitations of the steering feedback have been investigated, and improvements have been made. For the Next Linear Collider (NLC), extensive feedback systems are planned as an intregal part of the design. Feedback requiremetns for JLC (the Japanese Linear Collider) are essentially identical to NLC; some of the TESLA requirements are similar but there are significant differences. For NLC, algorithms which incorporate improvements upon the SLC implementation are being prototyped. Specialized systems for the damping rings, rf and interaction point will operate at hi...

  6. Multi-bunch feedback systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lonza, M

    2008-01-01

    Coupled-bunch instabilities excited by the interaction of the particle beam with its surroundings can seriously limit the performance of circular particle accelerators. These instabilities can be cured by the use of active feedback systems based on sensors capable of detecting the unwanted beam motion and actuators that apply the feedback correction to the beam. The advances in electronic technology now allow the implementation of feedback loops using programmable digital systems. Besides important advantages in terms of flexibility and reproducibility, digital systems open the way to the use of novel diagnostic tools and additional features. The lecture will first introduce coupled-bunch instabilities analysing the equation of motion of charged particles and the different modes of oscillation of a multi-bunch beam, showing how they can be observed and measured. Different types of feedbacks systems will then be presented as examples of real implementations that belong to the history of multi-bunch feedback sy...

  7. Multi-bunch Feedback Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lonza, M.

    2014-12-19

    Coupled-bunch instabilities excited by the interaction of the particle beam with its surroundings can seriously limit the performance of circular particle accelerators. These instabilities can be cured by the use of active feedback systems based on sensors capable of detecting the unwanted beam motion and actuators that apply the feedback correction to the beam. Advances in electronic technology now allow the implementation of feedback loops using programmable digital systems. Besides important advantages in terms of flexibility and reproducibility, digital systems open the way to the use of novel diagnostic tools and additional features. We first introduce coupled-bunch instabilities, analysing the equation of motion of charged particles and the different modes of oscillation of a multi-bunch beam, showing how they can be observed and measured. Different types of feedback systems will then be presented as examples of real implementations that belong to the history of multi-bunch feedback systems. The main co...

  8. Factors shaping e-feedback utilization following electronic Objective Structured Clinical Examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, Samantha E; Snodgrass, Suzanne H; Rivett, Darren A; Russell, Trevor

    2016-09-01

    The development of student-practitioners' practical clinical skills is essential in health professional education. Objective Structured Clinical Examinations are central to the assessment of students performing clinical procedures on simulated patients (actors). While feedback is considered core to learning providing timely, individualised student OSCE feedback is difficult. This study explored the perceptions of students about the multiple factors which shape the utility of e-feedback following an electronic Objective Structured Clinical Examinations, which utilized iPad and specialised software. The e-feedback was trialled in four courses within occupational therapy and physiotherapy pre-professional programs with a cohort of 204 students. Evaluation of student perceptions about feedback was collected using two surveys and eight focus groups. This data showed three factors shaped perceptions of the utility of e- Objective Structured Clinical Examinations feedback: 1) timely accessibility within one day of the assessment, 2) feedback demonstrating examiners' academic literacy and 3) feedback orientated to ways of improving future performance of clinical skills. The study found training in the provision of feedback using IPads and software is needed for examiners to ensure e-feedback meets students' needs for specific, future-oriented e-feedback and institutional requirements for justification of grades.

  9. Marine biodiversity of the coastal area of the Berau region, East Kalimantan, Indonesia : progress report East Kalimantan program, pilot phase (October 2003) : preliminary results of a field survey performed by an Indonesian-Dutch biodiversity research team

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksema, B.W.

    2004-01-01

    The coastal waters of East Kalimantan are part of the western boundary of the Indo-West Pacific centre of maximum marine biodiversity. During the pilot phase of the East Kalimantan Program (EKP) this has been tested by various specialists who used model taxa to test this hypothesis. Emphasis has bee

  10. Marine biodiversity of the coastal area of the Berau region, East Kalimantan, Indonesia : progress report East Kalimantan program, pilot phase (October 2003) : preliminary results of a field survey performed by an Indonesian-Dutch biodiversity research team

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksema, B.W.

    2004-01-01

    The coastal waters of East Kalimantan are part of the western boundary of the Indo-West Pacific centre of maximum marine biodiversity. During the pilot phase of the East Kalimantan Program (EKP) this has been tested by various specialists who used model taxa to test this hypothesis. Emphasis has bee

  11. Using on-line altered auditory feedback treating Parkinsonian speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Emily; Verhagen, Leo; de Vries, Meinou H.

    2005-09-01

    Patients with advanced Parkinson's disease tend to have dysarthric speech that is hesitant, accelerated, and repetitive, and that is often resistant to behavior speech therapy. In this pilot study, the speech disturbances were treated using on-line altered feedbacks (AF) provided by SpeechEasy (SE), an in-the-ear device registered with the FDA for use in humans to treat chronic stuttering. Eight PD patients participated in the study. All had moderate to severe speech disturbances. In addition, two patients had moderate recurring stuttering at the onset of PD after long remission since adolescence, two had bilateral STN DBS, and two bilateral pallidal DBS. An effective combination of delayed auditory feedback and frequency-altered feedback was selected for each subject and provided via SE worn in one ear. All subjects produced speech samples (structured-monologue and reading) under three conditions: baseline, with SE without, and with feedbacks. The speech samples were randomly presented and rated for speech intelligibility goodness using UPDRS-III item 18 and the speaking rate. The results indicted that SpeechEasy is well tolerated and AF can improve speech intelligibility in spontaneous speech. Further investigational use of this device for treating speech disorders in PD is warranted [Work partially supported by Janus Dev. Group, Inc.].

  12. Increasing Performance of Professional Soccer Players and Elite Track and Field Athletes with Peak Performance Training and Biofeedback: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Rijken, Noortje H.; Soer, Remko; de Maar, Ewold; Prins, Hilco; Teeuw, Wouter B.; Peuscher, Jan; Oosterveld, Frits G. J.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the effects of an intervention consisting of mental coaching combined with either electro encephalogram (EEG) alpha power feedback or heart rate variability (HRV) feedback on HRV, EEG outcomes and self-reported factors related to stress, performance, recovery and sleep quality in elite athletes. A prospective pilot study was performed with two distinct cohorts. Soccer players were provided with four sessions of mental coaching combined with daily...

  13. Feedback control of sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafaely, Boaz

    This thesis is concerned with the development an application of feedback control techniques for active sound control. Both fixed and adaptive controllers are considered. The controller design problem for active sound control is formulated as a constrained optimisation problem with an H2 performance objective, of minimising the variance of the control error, and H2 and H∞ design constraints involving control power output, disturbance enhancement, and robust stability. An Internal Model Controller with an FIR control filter is assumed. Conventional H2 design methods for feedback controllers are studied first. Although such controllers can satisfy the design constraints by employing effort terms in the quadratic cost function, they do not achieve the best possible performance, and when adapted using LMS-based algorithms, they suffer from instabilities if the plant response varies significantly. Improved H2/H∞ design methods for fixed and adaptive controllers are then developed, which achieve the best H2 performance under the design constraints, offer an improved stability when made adaptive, and in general outperform the conventional H2 controllers. The H2/H∞ design problems employ convex programming to ensure a unique solution. The Sequential Quadratic Programming methods is used for the off-line design of fixed controllers, and penalty and barrier function methods, together with frequency domain LMS-based algorithms are employed in the H2/H∞ adaptive controllers. The controllers studied and developed here were applied to three active sound control systems: a noise-reducing headset, an active headrest, and a sound radiating panel. The emphasis was put on developing control strategies that improve system performance. First, a high performance controller for the noise-reducing headset was implemented in real-time, which combines analogue and adaptive digital controllers, and can thus reject disturbances which has both broad-band and periodic components. Then

  14. Telephony user survey

    CERN Multimedia

    IT Department

    2016-01-01

    Let us know your needs to better plan the transition to a new CERN telephony system.   CERN is planning to upgrade its telephony network and replace the system with a new and modern VoIP infrastructure. We strive to make this transition as beneficial and smooth as possible for you. Please let us know more about your current working environment, expectations and suggestions by responding to this survey: https://cern.ch/tel-survey. The more answers we get, the better the new system will serve everyone in the future. The survey will take you about five minutes to complete; we are counting on your feedback!

  15. Giving Feedback: Development of Scales for the Mum Effect, Discomfort Giving Feedback, and Feedback Medium Preference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Susie S.; Marler, Laura E.; Simmering, Marcia J.; Totten, Jeff W.

    2011-01-01

    Research in organizational behavior and human resources promotes the view that it is critical for managers to provide accurate feedback to employees, yet little research addresses rater tendencies (i.e., the "mum effect") and attitudes that influence how performance feedback is given. Because technology has changed the nature of communication in…

  16. Does feedback influence patient - professional communication? Empirical evidence from Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murante, Anna Maria; Vainieri, Milena; Rojas, Diana; Nuti, Sabina

    2014-06-01

    Healthcare providers often look for feedback from patient surveys. Does health-professional awareness of patient survey results improve communication between patients and providers? To test this hypothesis, we analyzed the data of two surveys on organizational-climate and patient experience in Italy. The two surveys were conducted in 26 hospitals in the Tuscany region and involved 8942 employees and 5341 patients, respectively. Statistical analysis showed that the patient experience index significantly improved by 0.35 points (scale: 0-100) when the professionals' knowledge of the patient survey results increased by 1%. These findings suggest that the control systems should focus more on the dissemination phase of patient survey results among health professionals in order to improve the quality of services.

  17. Styrket feedback gennem studerendes selvevaluering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars Bo

    2016-01-01

    Studerende er ofte utilfredse med såvel kvaliteten som kvantiteten af feedback på skriftligt arbejde. Ligeledes kan det som underviser være svært at afgive feedback, der tager udgangspunkt i de studerendes respektive læringssituationer, hvis man ikke har andet afsæt end opgavetekster. Denne artikel...... beskriver derfor to eksperimenter med brug af selvevaluering som kvalificerende mellemled i ekstern feedback på skriveøvelser. Eksperimenternes formål er at styrke den formative læring ved skriftligt arbejde. I det første eksperiment bestod feedbacken af underviser-feedback, mens det andet eksperiment...... indebar peer-feedback og fælles feedback. I begge tilfælde blev selvevalueringen foretaget med udgangspunkt i en kriteriebaseret retteguide. Eksperimenterne medførte, at den eksterne feedback blev målrettet og kvalificeret i forhold til den enkelte studerende, mens selve skriveprocessen mod forventning...

  18. Balanced bridge feedback control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurie, Boris J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    In a system having a driver, a motor, and a mechanical plant, a multiloop feedback control apparatus for controlling the movement and/or positioning of a mechanical plant, the control apparatus has a first local bridge feedback loop for feeding back a signal representative of a selected ratio of voltage and current at the output driver, and a second bridge feedback loop for feeding back a signal representative of a selected ratio of force and velocity at the output of the motor. The control apparatus may further include an outer loop for feeding back a signal representing the angular velocity and/or position of the mechanical plant.

  19. 76 FR 34087 - Broad Stakeholder Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-10

    ... SECURITY Broad Stakeholder Survey AGENCY: National Protection and Programs Directorate, DHS. ACTION: 60-day... comments concerning the Broad Stakeholder Survey. DATES: Comments are encouraged and will be accepted until.... The Broad Stakeholder Survey is designed to gather stakeholder feedback on the effectiveness of...

  20. 78 FR 20119 - Broad Stakeholder Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-03

    ... SECURITY Broad Stakeholder Survey AGENCY: National Protection and Programs Directorate, DHS. ACTION: 30-day... soliciting comments concerning the Broad Stakeholder Survey. DHS previously published this ICR in the Federal... responders across the Nation. The Broad Stakeholder Survey is designed to gather stakeholder feedback on...

  1. 77 FR 50144 - Broad Stakeholder Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-20

    ... SECURITY Broad Stakeholder Survey AGENCY: National Protection and Programs Directorate, DHS. ACTION: 60-day... comments concerning the Broad Stakeholder Survey. DATES: Comments are encouraged and will be accepted until... across the Nation. The Broad Stakeholder Survey is designed to gather stakeholder feedback on...

  2. Economies of Scale in Air Force Undergraduate Pilot Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    LSH Chesis Feedback), Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio 4S433. . Did this research contribute to a current Air Force project? a. Yes b. No 2. Do you believe... coefficient relating GRADS to COST. The second model tested was a quadratic relationship between average cost and graduate pilots, COST = A + B(GRADS) + C... coefficient of GRADSSQ. In this model, the independent variables were entered into the equation in a stepwise manner. In other words, the computer program

  3. Heliostat glass survey and evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lind, M. A.; Russin, J. M.

    1978-01-01

    The glass characterization and specification task included a comprehensive survey of both foreign and domestic sources of low distortion, low iron, .125 nominal flat glass for use in heliostat applications. PNL attempted to determine the availability of production lines, estimate industry interest, lead times, and costs for producing glass for second surface heliostat mirrors for the Barstow pilot plant and future commercial plants. Glass samples representative of the industry production capability were collected and characterized. The results of the survey and analysis were used to generate a specification for the Barstow Pilot Plant glass procurement.

  4. A pilot randomized controlled trial testing a minimal intervention to prepare breast cancer survivors for recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterba, Katherine Regan; Armeson, Kent; Franco, Regina; Harper, Jennifer; Patten, Rebecca; Kindall, Stacey; Bearden, James; Zapka, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Background Interventions addressing cancer survivors’ post-treatment concerns can be time-intensive and require specialized staff. Research is needed to identify feasible minimal intervention strategies to improve survivors’ quality of life after treatment. Objectives The objectives of this study were to evaluate the feasibility and short-term impact of a minimal clinic intervention on breast cancer survivors’ quality of life, unmet needs, distress and cancer worry. Interventions/Methods In this randomized controlled pilot trial, we enrolled breast cancer survivors at the end of treatment and administered baseline surveys. Participants were randomized to study arm (4-week video plus educational booklet intervention group and usual care group) and completed follow-up surveys at 10 weeks. Linear regression was used to examine intervention effects on quality of life outcomes controlling for clinical and demographic factors. Open-ended questions were used to examine program satisfaction and obtain feedback to improve the intervention. Results We enrolled 92 survivors in the trial. Participants rated the intervention highly and reported feeling less isolated and having more realistic expectations about their recovery after completing the program. Despite positive qualitative findings, no significant intervention effects were observed for quality of life, unmet needs, distress or cancer worry in unadjusted or adjusted analyses. Conclusions Future research is needed to define optimal intervention elements to prepare breast cancer survivors for the post-treatment period. Implications for Practice Effective survivorship interventions may require more intensive components such as clinical input and longer follow-up periods. PMID:24831043

  5. Workplace-based assessment of communication skills: A pilot project addressing feasibility, acceptance and reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyers, Simone; Jemi, Iman; Karger, André; Raski, Bianca; Rotthoff, Thomas; Pentzek, Michael; Mortsiefer, Achim

    2016-01-01

    Background: Imparting communication skills has been given great importance in medical curricula. In addition to standardized assessments, students should communicate with real patients in actual clinical situations during workplace-based assessments and receive structured feedback on their performance. The aim of this project was to pilot a formative testing method for workplace-based assessment. Our investigation centered in particular on whether or not physicians view the method as feasible and how high acceptance is among students. In addition, we assessed the reliability of the method. Method: As part of the project, 16 students held two consultations each with chronically ill patients at the medical practice where they were completing GP training. These consultations were video-recorded. The trained mentoring physician rated the student’s performance and provided feedback immediately following the consultations using the Berlin Global Rating scale (BGR). Two impartial, trained raters also evaluated the videos using BGR. For qualitative and quantitative analysis, information on how physicians and students viewed feasibility and their levels of acceptance was collected in written form in a partially standardized manner. To test for reliability, the test-retest reliability was calculated for both of the overall evaluations given by each rater. The inter-rater reliability was determined for the three evaluations of each individual consultation. Results: The formative assessment method was rated positively by both physicians and students. It is relatively easy to integrate into daily routines. Its significant value lies in the personal, structured and recurring feedback. The two overall scores for each patient consultation given by the two impartial raters correlate moderately. The degree of uniformity among the three raters in respect to the individual consultations is low. Discussion: Within the scope of this pilot project, only a small sample of physicians and

  6. Workplace-based assessment of communication skills: A pilot project addressing feasibility, acceptance and reliability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyers, Simone; Jemi, Iman; Karger, André; Raski, Bianca; Rotthoff, Thomas; Pentzek, Michael; Mortsiefer, Achim

    2016-01-01

    Background: Imparting communication skills has been given great importance in medical curricula. In addition to standardized assessments, students should communicate with real patients in actual clinical situations during workplace-based assessments and receive structured feedback on their performance. The aim of this project was to pilot a formative testing method for workplace-based assessment. Our investigation centered in particular on whether or not physicians view the method as feasible and how high acceptance is among students. In addition, we assessed the reliability of the method. Method: As part of the project, 16 students held two consultations each with chronically ill patients at the medical practice where they were completing GP training. These consultations were video-recorded. The trained mentoring physician rated the student's performance and provided feedback immediately following the consultations using the Berlin Global Rating scale (BGR). Two impartial, trained raters also evaluated the videos using BGR. For qualitative and quantitative analysis, information on how physicians and students viewed feasibility and their levels of acceptance was collected in written form in a partially standardized manner. To test for reliability, the test-retest reliability was calculated for both of the overall evaluations given by each rater. The inter-rater reliability was determined for the three evaluations of each individual consultation. Results: The formative assessment method was rated positively by both physicians and students. It is relatively easy to integrate into daily routines. Its significant value lies in the personal, structured and recurring feedback. The two overall scores for each patient consultation given by the two impartial raters correlate moderately. The degree of uniformity among the three raters in respect to the individual consultations is low. Discussion: Within the scope of this pilot project, only a small sample of physicians and

  7. Workplace-based assessment of communication skills: A pilot project addressing feasibility, acceptance and reliability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weyers, Simone

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Imparting communication skills has been given great importance in medical curricula. In addition to standardized assessments, students should communicate with real patients in actual clinical situations during workplace-based assessments and receive structured feedback on their performance. The aim of this project was to pilot a formative testing method for workplace-based assessment. Our investigation centered in particular on whether or not physicians view the method as feasible and how high acceptance is among students. In addition, we assessed the reliability of the method.Method: As part of the project, 16 students held two consultations each with chronically ill patients at the medical practice where they were completing GP training. These consultations were video-recorded. The trained mentoring physician rated the student’s performance and provided feedback immediately following the consultations using the Berlin Global Rating scale (BGR. Two impartial, trained raters also evaluated the videos using BGR. For qualitative and quantitative analysis, information on how physicians and students viewed feasibility and their levels of acceptance was collected in written form in a partially standardized manner. To test for reliability, the test-retest reliability was calculated for both of the overall evaluations given by each rater. The inter-rater reliability was determined for the three evaluations of each individual consultation.Results: The formative assessment method was rated positively by both physicians and students. It is relatively easy to integrate into daily routines. Its significant value lies in the personal, structured and recurring feedback. The two overall scores for each patient consultation given by the two impartial raters correlate moderately. The degree of uniformity among the three raters in respect to the individual consultations is low.Discussion: Within the scope of this pilot project, only a small sample

  8. NAIP 2015 Imagery Feedback Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — The NAIP 2015 Imagery Feedback map allows users to make comments and observations about the quality of the 2015 National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP)...

  9. Do students profit from feedback?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arild Raaheim

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Undergraduate students in psychology were given the opportunity to exchange the traditional exam with portfolio assessment. The students received written feedback, by way of a standard feedback form, on two of the three essays of the portfolio. To investigate whether students attend to and act on the feedback, a comparison was made between unofficial marks on the first draft of the first essay and the official marks on the full portfolio at the end of the semester. With approximately 20% of the first drafts being unacceptable in the end only 1.6% of the portfolios failed to reach the level of acceptance. The result is taken to indicate that the students did indeed attend to and profit from the written feedback.

  10. Full Static Output Feedback Equivalence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aristotle G. Yannakoudakis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a constructive solution to the problem of full output feedback equivalence, of linear, minimal, time-invariant systems. The equivalence relation on the set of systems is transformed to another on the set of invertible block Bezout/Hankel matrices using the isotropy subgroups of the full state feedback group and the full output injection group. The transformation achieving equivalence is calculated solving linear systems of equations. We give a polynomial version of the results proving that two systems are full output feedback equivalent, if and only if they have the same family of generalized Bezoutians. We present a new set of output feedback invariant polynomials that generalize the breakaway polynomial of scalar systems.

  11. 14 CFR 61.94 - Student pilot seeking a sport pilot certificate or a recreational pilot certificate: Operations...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Student pilot seeking a sport pilot... Student pilot seeking a sport pilot certificate or a recreational pilot certificate: Operations at... operational control tower in other airspace. (a) A student pilot seeking a sport pilot certificate or...

  12. PROVIDING FEEDBACK ON STUDENT WORK IN DISTANCE EDUCATION IN TURKEY: Practices and Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibel HISMANOGLU

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In distance education, providing feedback on student work has a key role in facilitating learning and teacher- student dialogue. This article examines the distance learning context and providing feedback in this great but challenging system. It draws on the experiences of 200 distance learners enrolled in different programs in the Open Education Faculty at Anadolu University in Turkey. Its purpose is to find out whether distance students are provided any feedback by their faculty, whether they think that feedback provision is beneficial in distance learning process, and lastly whether they would like their faculty to provide them with some feedback. The survey is based on a questionnaire including three questions to which distance learners can respond briefly as yes or no and, if desired, they can expand their ideas with their own sentences. The results of the study suggest that distance learners are , on the whole, provided no feedback. Of 200 DL, 180 % of them regard feedback provision as a beneficial part of their distance learning process and want to have some feedback mechanisms in their faculty, yet 20% of the learners think just the opposite by saying that it is not something beneficial and they do not need it. In the conclusion part, considering the high proportion in demand of feedback provision, certain feedback mechanisms will be introduced to make the distance learning process more appealing, encouraging, and fruitful for distance learners.

  13. Collective irrationality and positive feedback.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stamatios C Nicolis

    Full Text Available Recent experiments on ants and slime moulds have assessed the degree to which they make rational decisions when presented with a number of alternative food sources or shelter. Ants and slime moulds are just two examples of a wide range of species and biological processes that use positive feedback mechanisms to reach decisions. Here we use a generic, experimentally validated model of positive feedback between group members to show that the probability of taking the best of options depends crucially on the strength of feedback. We show how the probability of choosing the best option can be maximized by applying an optimal feedback strength. Importantly, this optimal value depends on the number of options, so that when we change the number of options the preference of the group changes, producing apparent "irrationalities". We thus reinterpret the idea that collectives show "rational" or "irrational" preferences as being a necessary consequence of the use of positive feedback. We argue that positive feedback is a heuristic which often produces fast and accurate group decision-making, but is always susceptible to apparent irrationality when studied under particular experimental conditions.

  14. Increasing Performance of Professional Soccer Players and Elite Track and Field Athletes with Peak Performance Training and Biofeedback : A Pilot Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijken, Noortje H.; Soer, Remko; de Maar, Ewold; Prins, Hilco; Teeuw, Wouter B.; Peuscher, Jan; Oosterveld, Frits G. J.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the effects of an intervention consisting of mental coaching combined with either electro encephalogram (EEG) alpha power feedback or heart rate variability (HRV) feedback on HRV, EEG outcomes and self-reported factors related to stress, performance, re

  15. Increasing Performance of Professional Soccer Players and Elite Track and Field Athletes with Peak Performance Training and Biofeedback : A Pilot Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijken, Noortje H.; Soer, Remko; de Maar, Ewold; Prins, Hilco; Teeuw, Wouter B.; Peuscher, Jan; Oosterveld, Frits G. J.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to investigate the effects of an intervention consisting of mental coaching combined with either electro encephalogram (EEG) alpha power feedback or heart rate variability (HRV) feedback on HRV, EEG outcomes and self-reported factors related to stress, performance,

  16. Radiation pressure feedback in the formation of massive stars

    CERN Document Server

    Kuiper, Rolf; Beuther, Henrik; Henning, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the radiation pressure feedback in the formation of massive stars in 1, 2, and 3D radiation hydrodynamics simulations of the collapse of massive pre-stellar cores. In contrast to previous research, we consider frequency dependent stellar radiation feedback, resolve the dust sublimation front in the vicinity of the forming star down to 1.27 AU, compute the evolution for several 10^5 yrs covering the whole accretion phase of the forming star, and perform a comprehensive survey of the parameter space. The most fundamental result is that the formation of a massive accretion disk in slowly rotating cores preserves a high anisotropy in the radiation field. The thermal radiation escapes through the optically thin atmosphere, effectively diminishing the radiation pressure feedback onto the accretion flow. Gravitational torques in the self-gravitating disk drive a sufficiently high accretion rate to overcome the residual radiation pressure. Simultaneously, the radiation pressure launches an outflow in t...

  17. Feedback traps for virtual potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilov, Momčilo; Bechhoefer, John

    2017-03-01

    Feedback traps are tools for trapping and manipulating single charged objects, such as molecules in solution. An alternative to optical tweezers and other single-molecule techniques, they use feedback to counteract the Brownian motion of a molecule of interest. The trap first acquires information about a molecule's position and then applies an electric feedback force to move the molecule. Since electric forces are stronger than optical forces at small scales, feedback traps are the best way to trap single molecules without `touching' them (e.g. by putting them in a small box or attaching them to a tether). Feedback traps can do more than trap molecules: they can also subject a target object to forces that are calculated to be the gradient of a desired potential function U(x). If the feedback loop is fast enough, it creates a virtual potential whose dynamics will be very close to those of a particle in an actual potential U(x). But because the dynamics are entirely a result of the feedback loop-absent the feedback, there is only an object diffusing in a fluid-we are free to specify and then manipulate in time an arbitrary potential U(x,t). Here, we review recent applications of feedback traps to studies on the fundamental connections between information and thermodynamics, a topic where feedback plays an even more fundamental role. We discuss how recursive maximum-likelihood techniques allow continuous calibration, to compensate for drifts in experiments that last for days. We consider ways to estimate work and heat, using them to measure fluctuating energies to a precision of ±0.03 kT over these long experiments. Finally, we compare work and heat measurements of the costs of information erasure, the Landauer limit of kT ln 2 per bit of information erased. We argue that, when you want to know the average heat transferred to a bath in a long protocol, you should measure instead the average work and then infer the heat using the first law of thermodynamics. This

  18. Feedback as Real-Time Constructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiding, Tina Bering; Qvortrup, Ane

    2014-01-01

    This article offers a re-description of feedback and the significance of time in feedback constructions based on systems theory. It describes feedback as internal, real-time constructions in a learning system. From this perspective, feedback is neither immediate nor delayed, but occurs in the very moment it takes place. This article argues for a…

  19. A Comparison of Peer and Tutor Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamer, John; Purchase, Helen; Luxton-Reilly, Andrew; Denny, Paul

    2015-01-01

    We report on a study comparing peer feedback with feedback written by tutors on a large, undergraduate software engineering programming class. Feedback generated by peers is generally held to be of lower quality to feedback from experienced tutors, and this study sought to explore the extent and nature of this difference. We looked at how…

  20. Feedback i den laegelige postgraduate uddannelse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubak, Sune; Ipsen, Merete; Sørensen, Jette

    2008-01-01

    . Feedback is essential in medical education and has great implications for the educational climate. It has been shown that a common language regarding the principles of feedback has a sustained effect on quality and frequency of feedback. Further research is needed on feedback and educational climate...

  1. Feedback as Real-Time Constructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiding, Tina Bering; Qvortrup, Ane

    2014-01-01

    This article offers a re-description of feedback and the significance of time in feedback constructions based on systems theory. It describes feedback as internal, real-time constructions in a learning system. From this perspective, feedback is neither immediate nor delayed, but occurs in the very moment it takes place. This article argues for a…

  2. Identifying Mentors' Observations for Providing Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Mentors' feedback can assist preservice teachers' development; yet feedback tends to be variable from one mentor to the next. What do mentors observe for providing feedback? In this study, 24 mentors observed a final-year preservice teacher through a professionally video-recorded lesson and provided written notes for feedback. They observed the…

  3. Multimedia as a Means to Enhance Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Michio

    2004-01-01

    Interactive feedback, the most common feedback method for oral performance, cannot be used in activities that do not allow for instructor-student interaction, such as speeches and presentations, where feedback should occur after the performance. The conventional ways of providing post-performance or delayed feedback, however, are neither efficient…

  4. Pulsed feedback defers cellular differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe H Levine

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental signals induce diverse cellular differentiation programs. In certain systems, cells defer differentiation for extended time periods after the signal appears, proliferating through multiple rounds of cell division before committing to a new fate. How can cells set a deferral time much longer than the cell cycle? Here we study Bacillus subtilis cells that respond to sudden nutrient limitation with multiple rounds of growth and division before differentiating into spores. A well-characterized genetic circuit controls the concentration and phosphorylation of the master regulator Spo0A, which rises to a critical concentration to initiate sporulation. However, it remains unclear how this circuit enables cells to defer sporulation for multiple cell cycles. Using quantitative time-lapse fluorescence microscopy of Spo0A dynamics in individual cells, we observed pulses of Spo0A phosphorylation at a characteristic cell cycle phase. Pulse amplitudes grew systematically and cell-autonomously over multiple cell cycles leading up to sporulation. This pulse growth required a key positive feedback loop involving the sporulation kinases, without which the deferral of sporulation became ultrasensitive to kinase expression. Thus, deferral is controlled by a pulsed positive feedback loop in which kinase expression is activated by pulses of Spo0A phosphorylation. This pulsed positive feedback architecture provides a more robust mechanism for setting deferral times than constitutive kinase expression. Finally, using mathematical modeling, we show how pulsing and time delays together enable "polyphasic" positive feedback, in which different parts of a feedback loop are active at different times. Polyphasic feedback can enable more accurate tuning of long deferral times. Together, these results suggest that Bacillus subtilis uses a pulsed positive feedback loop to implement a "timer" that operates over timescales much longer than a cell cycle.

  5. Baryons, Neutrinos, Feedback and Weak Gravitational Lensing

    CERN Document Server

    Harnois-Déraps, Joachim; Viola, Massimo; Heymans, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    (Abridged) The effect of baryonic feedback on the dark matter mass distribution is generally considered to be a nuisance to weak gravitational lensing. Measurements of cosmological parameters are affected as feedback alters the cosmic shear signal on angular scales smaller than a few arcminutes. Recent progress on the numerical modelling of baryon physics has shown that this effect could be so large that, rather than being a nuisance, the effect can be constrained with current weak lensing surveys, hence providing an alternative astrophysical insight on one of the most challenging questions of galaxy formation. In order to perform our analysis, we construct an analytic fitting formula that describes the effect of the baryons on the mass power spectrum. This fitting formula is based on three scenarios of the OWL hydrodynamical simulations. It is specifically calibrated for $z<1.5$, where it models the simulations to an accuracy that is better than $2\\%$ for scales $k<10 h\\mbox{Mpc}^{-1}$ and better than ...

  6. Pilot Weather Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Aviation weather reports relayed from pilots to FAA air traffic controllers or National Weather Service personnel. Elements include sky cover, turbulence, wind...

  7. CERN pilot greenhouse

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    This pilot installation was situated near Bld. BA6 opposite to the main entrance of the Meyrin site, with respect to Route de Meyrin. See Weekly Bulletin 3/83, and also photo 8305594X, 8505898X, 8302200.

  8. ABCDEFG IS - the principle of constructive feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattarai, M

    2007-01-01

    Feedback is an integral part of any learning experience. Constructive feedback is a powerful instrument and facilitates the learner's professional and personal development. "ABCDEFG IS", a mnemonic for the principles of constructive feedback, stands for Amount of the information, Benefit of the trainees, Change behaviour, Descriptive language, Environment, Focused, Group check, Interpretation check, and Sharing information. The eight important steps of feedback are: Ensure prior information, Collect data, Make appropriate meeting arrangement, Begin by encouraging self assessment by the trainee, Highlight areas where the trainee is doing well, Give feedback, Handle reaction maintaining the dignity and Plan actions. Communication and reflection also share many of the principles and steps of constructive feedback and giving regular feedback, thus, helps to improve communication and reflection. The feedback provider would be able to provide genuine feedback by following the appropriate steps and principles of constructive feedback and realize how important and rewarding its role is in teaching learning activities.

  9. Navigating User Feedback Channels to Chart an Evidence Based Course for Library Redesign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Derek Halling

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives – The objective of this project was to redesign library spaces based on the user feedback obtained from a broad complement of feedback channels. The over-arching goal of this project was to develop an evidence based approach to the redesign of library spaces.Methods – Data from user-initiated and library-initiated feedback channels were collected and analyzed to determine priorities for library space changes. Online/onsite suggestions, a library onsite census survey, the LibQUAL+® survey, a whiteboard, ballot voting, and text voting were all used to gather input. A student advisory group was used as a sounding board for planned space changes before a final decision was made.Results – Data produced by different feedback channels varied both in the number of suggestions generated as well as the changes requested. Composite data from all feedback channels resulted in a total of 687 suggestions identifying 17 different types of space changes. An onsite whiteboard, the LibQUAL+® survey, and library census proved the most prolific in producing suggestions.Conclusion – Priorities for space changes were best determined through a composite of suggestions received from all feedback channels. The number of suggestions and requests received that were initiated by users was so small that it had to be supplemented with library-initiated feedback requests. The use of multiple feedback channels enhanced the number, variety, and scope of the suggestions that were received. Similar requests received through multiple feedback channels emphasized their importance to users. Focused follow-up feedback channels were effective in clarifying user suggestions for specific changes.

  10. 六省市地质资料信息服务集群化产业化试点调查分析%A survey analysis of six provinces geological data information services clustering and industrization pilot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董建美

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the geological data information services clustering and industrialization pilot aims at producing multiple series of information products by clustering; building multisectoral geological data sharing mechanism and servicing more actively in social and economic development. The pilot has made some initial results. At the same time, there are some problems that need carefully study and analyze. In this paper, author discusses the pilot experiences, features, problems and revelations. The results show the successful experiences for how to geological data information services clustering and industrialization are leadership attention, professional technical support, strong capital protection and good management mechanism.%地质资料信息服务集群化、产业化(简称“两化”)试点旨在通过集群化生产出多种系列的信息产品,通过建立多部门的地质资料共享机制,更加积极主动地服务于社会经济发展.试点已经取得了一些阶段性成果,需要我们仔细研究和总结分析,以便推动试点工作顺利进行.本文分析了六省市地质“两化”试点经验、主要特点、存在问题及相关建议.结果表明,政府的高度重视、专业的技术支撑,强大的资金保障,好的管理机制是推进地质资料“两化”顺利进行的根本保障.

  11. Current feedback operational amplifiers and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Senani, Raj; Singh, A K; Singh, V K

    2013-01-01

    This book describes a variety of current feedback operational amplifier (CFOA) architectures and their applications in analog signal processing/generation. Coverage includes a comprehensive survey of commercially available, off-the-shelf integrated circuit CFOAs, as well as recent advances made on the design of CFOAs, including design innovations for bipolar and CMOS CFOAs.  This book serves as a single-source reference to the topic, as well as a catalog of over 200 application circuits which would be useful not only for students, educators and researchers in apprising them about the recent developments in the area but would also serve as a comprehensive repertoire of useful circuits for practicing engineers who might be interested in choosing an appropriate CFOA-based topology for use in a given application.

  12. Surveys on dental caries status in 122 high performance fighter pilots%122名高性能战斗机飞行员患龋状况调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈琳; 吕晶; 臧晓霞; 李冬霞; 柯杰; 王建昌

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the status of dental caries prevalence in high performance fighter pilots,so as to propose suggestions to fighter pilot's oral health care.Methods The status of dental caries and endodontic problems of 103 male and 19 female high performance fighter pilots were investigated by oral examination and panoramic radiographs,including number of dental caries,degree of dental caries,status of periapical diseases and the treatment they had been received.The severity of dental caries was decided by if the dental caries reached dental pulp.The curative effect of root canal therapy (RCT) for the caries reached dental pulp cases was analyzed.Results The dental caries prevalence rate in 122 high performance fighter pilots was 41.0%.It showed significant difference between male and female pilots (x2 =9.950,P<0.01) in where the prevalence showed 35.0% and 73.7% respectively.The rate of periapical lesion was 9.0% while in male and female pilots was 7.8% and 15.8% respectively and showed no significant difference between genders.There were 155 caries teeth found,including 63 teeth's caries reached the dental pulp and 17 dental caries teeth suffered from periapical lesion.Not all but 94.2% dental caries teeth were treated by filling restoration and only 54.0% dental pulp reached caries teeth were treated by RCT.Conclusions It is disquieting on the status of oral health in high performance fighter pilots.It is suggested to improve the current medical selection criteria of pilot's oral examination,especially for the chronic dental diseases with the potential hazard of acute inflammation,as well as to enhance the treatment and oral healthcare level for the pilots.%目的 调查高性能战斗机飞行员患龋状况,为飞行员口腔健康保健提出建议. 方法 通过口腔和全口曲面断层片检查对122名高性能战斗机飞行员(男性103名,女性19名)的患龋牙数、龋损程度、根尖周病变情况和接受治疗情况

  13. The CLIMATE BONUS - demonstrating the climate feedback service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyvoenen, K. (KTK National Consumer Reserach Centre); Perrels, A. (VATT Government Inst. for Economic Resarch); Saarinen, M. (MTT Agrifood Research Finland); Nissinen, A. (SYKE Finnish Environment Inst.); Hongisto, M.; Kallio, A.; Melin, M.; Kinnunen, T.; Soedergaard, C.

    2009-12-15

    In the Climate Bonus project, a demonstrative GHG-monitoring, reporting, consumer feedback and reward system for households was developed by the research consortium. The created application enables consumers to follow up accumulated GHG-emissions of their household's purchases and to compare results with several reference levels and other users of the system. They can also acquire 'bonus points' on the basis of a reduction of emission intensity. The demo version of the service covers foodstuffs, transport fuels and services, home energy and the 'other consumption' category, and utilises multi-approach methodology - i.e. combines several data sources and approaches (LCA, I/O, ETS-data) to seek emission factors for a very wide range of product categories. Foodstuffs were registered automatically for the service through a Nutrion Code system (www.nutritioncode.com) that uses the PLUSSA-key card and the information systems of Kesko and Tuulia International Oy. The rest of a household's purchases can be entered manually via a computer interface directly to the Service or by using the optical barcode recognition capabilities of the Nokia mobile phone. Based on the pilot tests, the authors believe that the climate-feedback system could activate notable voluntary emission reduction potentials, provided that the feedback system is widely used. (orig.)

  14. Towards Increasing Feedbacks and Diffusion of Information in Social Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohcine Kodad

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this document is to highlight two strategies which increased feedbacks and stimulated the diffusion of information in social networks. Starting by an online survey, which assists searchers in understanding the behavior of social network users, to define the problem. The information received with this survey has been tested on validation by an analyze on the most popular type of posting on social networks. The results of this study provided two strategies as a solution for the problem of dissatisfaction among users of social networks and to increase feedbacks and diffusion of information on social network. One strategy is manual and is based on the type of publication and the second strategy is automatically and takes the concept of collaborative work in to account

  15. A pilot study of an interactive web site in the workplace for reducing alcohol consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matano, Robert A; Koopman, Cheryl; Wanat, Stanley F; Winzelberg, Andrew J; Whitsell, Shelly D; Westrup, Darrah; Futa, Kristine; Clayton, Justin B; Mussman, Lisa; Taylor, C Barr

    2007-01-01

    An interactive web-site-based intervention for reducing alcohol consumption was pilot tested. Participants were 145 employees of a work site in the Silicon Valley region of California, categorized as low or moderate risk for alcohol problems. All participants were given access to a web site that provided feedback on their levels of stress and use of coping strategies. Participants randomized to the full individualized feedback condition also received individualized feedback about their risk for alcohol-related problems. Some evidence was found for greater alcohol reduction among participants who received full individualized feedback, although due to difficulties in recruiting participants, the sample size was inadequate for evaluating treatment effects on drinking. The results provide preliminary support for using an interactive web site to provide individualized feedback for persons at risk for alcohol problems. However, the low participation rate (2.7%) suggests that such an intervention must address the challenges of recruiting employees through their work site.

  16. Sensory feedback in interlimb coordination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gervasio, Sabata; Voigt, Michael; Kersting, Uwe G.

    2017-01-01

    direct communication between the two sides without the need for the involvement of higher centers. These may also exist in humans since sensory feedback elicited by tibial nerve stimulation on one side (ipsilateral) can affect the muscles activation in the opposite side (contralateral), provoking short......-latency crossed responses (SLCRs). The current study investigated whether contralateral afferent feedback contributes to the mechanism controlling the SLCR in human gastrocnemius muscle. Surface electromyogram, kinematic and kinetic data were recorded from subjects during normal walking and hybrid walking (with.......04). Moreover, estimated spindle secondary afferent and Golgi tendon organ activity were significantly different (P ≤ 0.01) when opposite responses have been observed, that is during normal (facilitation) and hybrid walking (inhibition) conditions. Contralateral sensory feedback, specifically spindle secondary...

  17. Linear feedback controls the essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Haidekker, Mark A

    2013-01-01

    The design of control systems is at the very core of engineering. Feedback controls are ubiquitous, ranging from simple room thermostats to airplane engine control. Helping to make sense of this wide-ranging field, this book provides a new approach by keeping a tight focus on the essentials with a limited, yet consistent set of examples. Analysis and design methods are explained in terms of theory and practice. The book covers classical, linear feedback controls, and linear approximations are used when needed. In parallel, the book covers time-discrete (digital) control systems and juxtapos

  18. Myrtle Bend Substrate Enhancement Pilot Project Extent, Kootenai River near Bonners Ferry, ID, 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The substrate enhancement pilot project (SEPP) extent GIS layer represents an area where an artificial substrate will be placed. The artificial substrate, consisting...

  19. Shorty's Island Substrate Enhancement Pilot Project Extent, Kootenai River near Bonners Ferry, ID, 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The substrate enhancement pilot project (SEPP) extent GIS layer represents an area where an artificial substrate will be placed. The artificial substrate, consisting...

  20. PULSE Pilot Certification Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Pape-Lindstrom

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The pilot certification process is an ambitious, nationwide endeavor designed to motivate important changes in life sciences education that are in line with the recommendations of the 2011 Vision and Change Report: A Call to Action (American Association for the Advancement of Science [AAAS], 2011.  It is the goal of the certification process to acknowledge departments that have progressed towards full implementation of the tenets of Vision and Change and to motivate departments that have not begun to adopt the recommendations to consider doing so.  More than 70 life science departments applied to be part of the pilot certification process, funded by a National Science Foundation grant, and eight were selected based on initial evidence of transformed and innovative educational practices.  The programs chosen represent a wide variety of schools, including two-year colleges, liberal-arts institutions, regional comprehensive colleges, research universities and minority serving institutions.  Outcomes from this pilot were released June 1, 2015 (www.pulsecommunity.org, with all eight programs being recognized as having progressed along a continuum of change.  Five levels of achievement were defined as PULSE Pilot Progression Levels.  Of the eight departments in the pilot, one achieved “PULSE Progression Level III: Accomplished”.  Six departments achieved “PULSE Progression Level II: Developing” and one pilot department achieved “PULSE Progression Level I: Beginning”.  All of the schools have made significant movement towards the recommendations of Vision and Change relative to a traditional life sciences curriculum.  Overall, the response from the eight pilot schools has been positive. 

  1. Do assessor comments on a multi-source feedback instrument provide learner-centred feedback?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivekananda-Schmidt, Pirashanthie; MacKillop, Lucy; Crossley, Jim; Wade, Winnie

    2013-11-01

    Free-text comments in multi-source feedback are intended to facilitate change in the assessee's practice. This study was designed to utilise a large dataset of free-text comments obtained in a national pilot study in order to investigate how helpful these free-text comments may be to assessees. We investigated: (i) which areas of performance are usually addressed by free-text comments; (ii) to what extent assessors' (doctors, nurses, allied health professionals and clerical or managerial staff) comments correspond to assessees' (career-grade doctors) self-assessments, and (iii) whether the comments contain specific behavioural evidence and suggestions for change. Initially comments were read through to identify commonly recurring themes. A strong theme was 'respondent-centredness', which refers to the extent to which comments focus on issues that are of value to the assessor rather than to the assessee's personal development. In response to this, the data were re-evaluated against predefined research questions to assess how constructive comments were for the assessee's personal development. Of 11,483 assessor forms, 4777 (42%) included free-text comments. A total of 513 forms contained at least one below average score and 286 (56%) of these forms contained the assessor's free-text feedback. Free-text comments were mostly rater-centred and addressed the effect of the assessee on the colleague's working life rather than areas of relevance to the assessee's personal development. A total of 1806 assessor/assessee pairs of comments were compared; most demonstrated clear differences of opinion or interpretation. Reliability and supportiveness were over-represented; clinical performance and personal development were under-represented. The comments were unlikely to provide specific behavioural evidence or to address how change might be initiated. Our data indicate that, in their current form, the overwhelming majority of free-text comments add little to facilitate

  2. An Extended Validity Argument for Assessing Feedback Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rougas, Steven; Clyne, Brian; Cianciolo, Anna T; Chan, Teresa M; Sherbino, Jonathan; Yarris, Lalena M

    2015-01-01

    NEGEA 2015 CONFERENCE ABSTRACT (EDITED): Measuring an Organization's Culture of Feedback: Can It Be Done? Steven Rougas and Brian Clyne. CONSTRUCT: This study sought to develop a construct for measuring formative feedback culture in an academic emergency medicine department. Four archetypes (Market, Adhocracy, Clan, Hierarchy) reflecting an organization's values with respect to focus (internal vs. external) and process (flexibility vs. stability and control) were used to characterize one department's receptiveness to formative feedback. The prevalence of residents' identification with certain archetypes served as an indicator of the department's organizational feedback culture. New regulations have forced academic institutions to implement wide-ranging changes to accommodate competency-based milestones and their assessment. These changes challenge residencies that use formative feedback from faculty as a major source of data for determining training advancement. Though various approaches have been taken to improve formative feedback to residents, there currently exists no tool to objectively measure the organizational culture that surrounds this process. Assessing organizational culture, commonly used in the business sector to represent organizational health, may help residency directors gauge their program's success in fostering formative feedback. The Organizational Culture Assessment Instrument (OCAI) is widely used, extensively validated, applicable to survey research, and theoretically based and may be modifiable to assess formative feedback culture in the emergency department. Using a modified Delphi technique and several iterations of focus groups amongst educators at one institution, four of the original six OCAI domains (which each contain 4 possible responses) were modified to create a 16-item Formative Feedback Culture Tool (FFCT) that was administered to 26 residents (response rate = 55%) at a single academic emergency medicine department. The mean

  3. Influence of Feedback Levels on Polarized Optical Feedback Characteristics in Zeeman-Birefringence Dual Frequency Lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAO Wei; ZHANG Shu-Lian; ZHOU Lu-Fei; LIU Xiao-Yan; WANG Ming-Ming

    2007-01-01

    The influence of Feedback levels on the intensity and polarization properties of polarized optical feedback in a Zeeman-birefringence dual frequency laser is systematically investigated. By changing the feedback power ratio, different feedback levels are obtained. Three distinct regimes of polarized optical feedback effects are found and defined as regimes Ⅰ, Ⅱand Ⅲ. The feedback level boundaries among the regimes are acquired experimentally. The theoretical analysis is presented to be in good agreement with the experimental results.

  4. The Effect of Feedback Style on Feedback Seeking Behaviors: an Examination of Perceived Competence

    OpenAIRE

    Stimpson, Emily Carol

    1999-01-01

    Research in the area of feedback seeking behaviors (Ashford & Cummings, 1983) has failed to examine the impact of a supervisorâ s feedback style on a subordinateâ s subsequent feedback seeking. This is an important area for investigation due to the positive relationship between feedback seeking and performance. Deci and Ryanâ s cognitive evaluation theory suggests that intrinsic motivation may be an important mediator between feedback style and FSB in that feedback ...

  5. Career Goal Revision in Response to Negative Feedback: Testing a Longitudinal Cross-Lagged Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shi; Creed, Peter A; Hood, Michelle

    2017-02-06

    We tested a model based on goal-setting and self-regulation theories of the cross-lagged relationships among negative career-related feedback, negative affect (career-related stress), and career goal revision (downward goal revision and goal disengagement). Participants were 409 Chinese university/college students (Mage 19 years; 58% female), who completed a survey at 2 time points approximately 6 months apart. Consistent with our hypotheses, negative career-related feedback at T1 was related to more career goal disengagement and greater downward goal revision at T2. Career-related stress partially mediated the relationship between negative career-related feedback and downward goal revision. In addition, there were reverse relationships between negative career-related feedback and career-related stress, and between career-related stress and goal disengagement. These findings highlight important roles for negative career-related feedback and negative affect in young peoples' career goal pursuit. (PsycINFO Database Record

  6. NSTAR Smart Grid Pilot

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabari, Anil [NSTAR Electric, Manchester, NH (United States); Fadipe, Oloruntomi [NSTAR Electric, Manchester, NH (United States)

    2014-03-31

    NSTAR Electric & Gas Corporation (“the Company”, or “NSTAR”) developed and implemented a Smart Grid pilot program beginning in 2010 to demonstrate the viability of leveraging existing automated meter reading (“AMR”) deployments to provide much of the Smart Grid functionality of advanced metering infrastructure (“AMI”), but without the large capital investment that AMI rollouts typically entail. In particular, a central objective of the Smart Energy Pilot was to enable residential dynamic pricing (time-of-use “TOU” and critical peak rates and rebates) and two-way direct load control (“DLC”) by continually capturing AMR meter data transmissions and communicating through customer-sited broadband connections in conjunction with a standardsbased home area network (“HAN”). The pilot was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (“DOE”) through the Smart Grid Demonstration program. NSTAR was very pleased to not only receive the funding support from DOE, but the guidance and support of the DOE throughout the pilot. NSTAR is also pleased to report to the DOE that it was able to execute and deliver a successful pilot on time and on budget. NSTAR looks for future opportunities to work with the DOE and others in future smart grid projects.

  7. On interconnections, control, and feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, JC

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study interconnections and control of dynamical systems in a behavioral context. We start with an extensive physical example which serves to illustrate that the familiar input-output feedback loop structure is not as universal as we have been taught to believe, This l

  8. Fishualization: a group feedback display

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schavemaker, J.G.M.; Boertjes, E.M.; Koldijk, S.J.; Wiertz, L.; Verberne, S.; Sappelli, M.; Kaptein, A.M.

    2014-01-01

    In this contribution1 we present a novel psychological intervention that maps human computer activity to a group feedback device on the basis of a combination of various types of unobtrusive, low-level sensors. The goal is to enable employees to gain insights into their working habits, to reduce str

  9. On interconnections, control, and feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, JC

    The purpose of this paper is to study interconnections and control of dynamical systems in a behavioral context. We start with an extensive physical example which serves to illustrate that the familiar input-output feedback loop structure is not as universal as we have been taught to believe, This

  10. Feedback: How to Teach How.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krovar, Susan K.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    To give definitive feedback, physical education teachers must be able to teach basic kinesiological and mechanical principles of movement and how they apply to specific sports skills. The article includes a chart with common kinesiological and mechanical principles applied to particular movements. Appropriate teaching cues are noted. (SM)

  11. Feedback, Incentives and Peer Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Tor Viking; Poulsen, Anders; Villeval, Marie Claire

    effects in the piece-rate pay scheme. In both pay schemes, interim feedback generates negative quality peer effects on the less able performers. We find however evidence of positive peer effects in the tournament scheme since the underdogs almost never quit the competition even when lagging significantly...

  12. LFSC - Linac Feedback Simulation Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Valentin; /Fermilab

    2008-05-01

    The computer program LFSC (Feedback Simulation Code>) is a numerical tool for simulation beam based feedback in high performance linacs. The code LFSC is based on the earlier version developed by a collective of authors at SLAC (L.Hendrickson, R. McEwen, T. Himel, H. Shoaee, S. Shah, P. Emma, P. Schultz) during 1990-2005. That code was successively used in simulation of SLC, TESLA, CLIC and NLC projects. It can simulate as pulse-to-pulse feedback on timescale corresponding to 5-100 Hz, as slower feedbacks, operating in the 0.1-1 Hz range in the Main Linac and Beam Delivery System. The code LFSC is running under Matlab for MS Windows operating system. It contains about 30,000 lines of source code in more than 260 subroutines. The code uses the LIAR ('Linear Accelerator Research code') for particle tracking under ground motion and technical noise perturbations. It uses the Guinea Pig code to simulate the luminosity performance. A set of input files includes the lattice description (XSIF format), and plane text files with numerical parameters, wake fields, ground motion data etc. The Matlab environment provides a flexible system for graphical output.

  13. Environmental Feedback and Spatial Conditioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Isak Worre; Poulsen, Esben Skouboe

    2010-01-01

    with structural integrity, where thermal energy flow through the prototype, to be understood as a membrane, can be controlled and the visual transparancy altered. The work shows performance based feedback systems and physical prototype models driven by information streaming, screening and application....

  14. New Community Education Program on Oceans and Global Climate Change: Results from Our Pilot Year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, B. C.; Wiener, C.

    2010-12-01

    Ocean FEST (Families Exploring Science Together) engages elementary school students and their parents and teachers in hands-on science. Through this evening program, we educate participants about ocean and earth science issues that are relevant to their local communities. In the process, we hope to inspire more underrepresented students, including Native Hawaiians, Pacific Islanders and girls, to pursue careers in the ocean and earth sciences. Hawaii and the Pacific Islands will be disproportionately affected by the impacts of global climate change, including rising sea levels, coastal erosion, coral reef degradation and ocean acidification. It is therefore critically important to train ocean and earth scientists within these communities. This two-hour program explores ocean properties and timely environmental topics through six hands-on science activities. Activities are designed so students can see how globally important issues (e.g., climate change and ocean acidification) have local effects (e.g., sea level rise, coastal erosion, coral bleaching) which are particularly relevant to island communities. The Ocean FEST program ends with a career component, drawing parallel between the program activities and the activities done by "real scientists" in their jobs. The take-home message is that we are all scientists, we do science every day, and we can choose to do this as a career. Ocean FEST just completed our pilot year. During the 2009-2010 academic year, we conducted 20 events, including 16 formal events held at elementary schools and 4 informal outreach events. Evaluation data were collected at all formal events. Formative feedback from adult participants (parents, teachers, administrators and volunteers) was solicited through written questionnaires. Students were invited to respond to a survey of five questions both before and after the program to see if there were any changes in content knowledge and career attitudes. In our presentation, we will present our

  15. Service Catalog Pilot Project Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the ServCat pilot project and offers recommendations for the full-scale implementation of the database. During the pilot project a total of...

  16. Danish Claims Data Indicators for Electronic Feedback in Oral-Health Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosing, Kasper; Christensen, Lisa Bøge; Listl, Stefan

    Objectives: As part of the “Added Value for Oral Care” (ADVOCATE) project; this subproject aims to construct a preliminary set of indicators of dental clinic service delivery profiles, to be used in a pilot “dashboard.” The dashboard will provide feedback and mirror information about dental care...... were constructed. See Table 1. Combinations of the indicators gave relative measures of the mutual preventive/diagnostic/treatment profiles. For instance ICPS/extractions =(16%/6%)=2.7. Conclusions: The indicators are considered suitable for use in an electronic feedback system for the individual oral...... and universal character. With time the feedback system maybe further developed to adjust for oral health risk status, socioeconomic factors, and patient reported oral health and treatment outcomes, to make the comparisons more relevant. The ADVOCATE project (www.advocateoralhealth.com) has received funding from...

  17. Global desertification: Drivers and feedbacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Odorico, Paolo; Bhattachan, Abinash; Davis, Kyle F.; Ravi, Sujith; Runyan, Christiane W.

    2013-01-01

    Desertification is a change in soil properties, vegetation or climate, which results in a persistent loss of ecosystem services that are fundamental to sustaining life. Desertification affects large dryland areas around the world and is a major cause of stress in human societies. Here we review recent research on the drivers, feedbacks, and impacts of desertification. A multidisciplinary approach to understanding the drivers and feedbacks of global desertification is motivated by our increasing need to improve global food production and to sustainably manage ecosystems in the context of climate change. Classic desertification theories look at this process as a transition between stable states in bistable ecosystem dynamics. Climate change (i.e., aridification) and land use dynamics are the major drivers of an ecosystem shift to a “desertified” (or “degraded”) state. This shift is typically sustained by positive feedbacks, which stabilize the system in the new state. Desertification feedbacks may involve land degradation processes (e.g., nutrient loss or salinization), changes in rainfall regime resulting from land-atmosphere interactions (e.g., precipitation recycling, dust emissions), or changes in plant community composition (e.g., shrub encroachment, decrease in vegetation cover). We analyze each of these feedback mechanisms and discuss their possible enhancement by interactions with socio-economic drivers. Large scale effects of desertification include the emigration of “environmental refugees” displaced from degraded areas, climatic changes, and the alteration of global biogeochemical cycles resulting from the emission and long-range transport of fine mineral dust. Recent research has identified some possible early warning signs of desertification, which can be used as indicators of resilience loss and imminent shift to desert-like conditions. We conclude with a brief discussion on some desertification control strategies implemented in different

  18. Aviation Medical Examiner 2012 Feedback Survey: Content Analysis of Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    of various types of items—single- choice (e.g., yes/no, satisfaction rating scales, demographic cat - egories), ranking (e.g., indicate top 3), mark...Since lockout times are regulated for government systems, use of a warning (pop-up or auditory ), as suggested, 26 may be the practical solution...printout to exam (2) - add capability to email application to AME (1) Form 8500-8 Items 1-20 (12) - item 19 (5) [ stress , bold and capitalize

  19. Graphical methods for analysing feedback in biological networks - A survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radde, Nicole; Bar, Nadav S.; Banaji, Murad

    2010-01-01

    Observed phenotypes usually arise from complex networks of interacting cell components. Qualitative information about the structure of these networks is often available, while quantitative information may be partial or absent. It is natural then to ask what, if anything, we can learn about the behaviour of the system solely from its qualitative structure. In this article we review some techniques which can be applied to answer this question, focussing in particular on approaches involving graphical representations of model structure. By applying these techniques to various cellular network examples, we discuss their strengths and limitations, and point to future research directions.

  20. A Critical Survey of Auto-feedback Devices in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMuth, Joyce; Hoepfner, Ralph

    In their development of curriculum for the humanizing of learning, Research for Better Schools, Inc., has required the reorganization, reordering, and creation of instrumentation for evaluation in the higher-order cognitive skills, the affective skills, and the interpersonal skills. As part of their design, a critical organization and review of…