WorldWideScience

Sample records for survey implications

  1. Europlat Employability Survey: Core findings and implications

    OpenAIRE

    Ježek Stanislav; Mareš Jan; Neusar Aleš

    2012-01-01

    Paper presents the core findings of the Europlat employability survey focusing on employability issues related to the post-Bologna transformations of psychology study programmes across the European Union. The objectives of the survey were to find out: (1) how relevant the employability/employment issue is; (2) what the current problems are in the employability/employment area; and (3) to explore the best practices in dealing with employability/employment issues. Findings cover both the nation...

  2. World Fertility Survey: Major Findings and Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    World Fertility Survey, London (England).

    A survey was conducted in 42 developing countries and in 20 developed countries to determine fertility practices and trends. Both individual and household questionnaires were used by interviewers to gather data. Findings concerning marriage patterns, contraception, reproductive motivation, childspacing, breastfeeding, maternal and child health,…

  3. World Fertility Survey: Major Findings and Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    World Fertility Survey, London (England).

    A survey was conducted in 42 developing countries and in 20 developed countries to determine fertility practices and trends. Both individual and household questionnaires were used by interviewers to gather data. Findings concerning marriage patterns, contraception, reproductive motivation, childspacing, breastfeeding, maternal and child health,…

  4. The North Dakota Beef Industry Survey: Implications for Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlen, Carl R.; Hadrich, Joleen C.; Lardy, Gregory P.

    2014-01-01

    A portion of the North Dakota Beef Industry Survey was developed to determine how educational programs can evolve to meet future needs of North Dakota beef producers. Of the 2,500 surveys mailed out to beef producers, 527 responses were completed and returned. Results highlight the level of education of North Dakota beef producers, anticipated use…

  5. Development of the Reasonable Accommodation Factor Survey: Results and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shengli; MacDonald-Wilson, Kim L.; Fabian, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was (a) to explore the latent factors in the "Reasonable Accommodation Factor Survey" (RAFS) instrument and (b) to compare scores on the latent factors of the RAFS by participant's role. Eight latent factors were identified through an exploratory factor analysis with orthogonal rotation. The reliability tests…

  6. Student Attitudes Regarding Ebooks: A Survey with cost savings implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Bialaszewski

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Students were surveyed regarding usage of ebooks. Findings demonstrate that their propensity to using Ebooks increases as costs decrease, Tecnological advancements have led to ebooks being more than a written text displayed in digital format as web sites provide more up to date information. Also, licensing changes such as Creative Commons allow for more data to be accessible for students allowing for more student research opportunity.

  7. Patient safety and nursing implication: Survey in Catalan hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freixas Sala, Núria; Monistrol Ruano, Olga; Espuñes Vendrell, Jordi; Sallés Creus, Montserrat; Gallardo González, Mónica; Ramón Cantón, Carme; Bueno Domínguez, María José; Llinas Vidal, Montserrat; Campo Osaba, María Antonia

    This study aims to describe the implementation of the patient safety (PS) programs in catalan hospitals and to analyze the level of nursing involvement. Multicenter cross-sectional study. To obtain the data two questionnaires were developed; one addressed to the hospital direction and another to the nurse executive in PS. The survey was distributed during 2013 to the 65 acute care hospitals in Catalonia. The questionnaire was answered by 43 nursing directors and 40 nurse executive in PS. 93% of the hospitals responded that they had a PS Program and 81.4% used a specific scoreboard with PS indicators. The referent of the hospital in PS was a nurse in 55.8% of the centres. 92.5% had a system of notification of adverse effects with an annual average of 190.3 notifications. In 86% of the centres had a nurse involved in the PS program but only in the 16% of the centres the nurse dedication was at full-time. The nurse respondents evaluate the degree of implementation of the PBS program with a note of approved and they propound as improvement increase the staff dedicated to the PS and specific academic training in PS. The degree of implementation of programs for patient safety is high in Catalan acute hospitals, while the organizational structure is highly diverse. In more than half of the hospitals the PS referent was a nurse, confirming the nurse involvement in the PS programs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Electronic Surveys: Methodological Implications for Using the World Wide Web to Collect Survey Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertot, John Carlo; McClure, Charles R.

    1996-01-01

    Focuses on a Web-based version of a national survey for the National Commission on Libraries and Information Science (NCLIS) of public library involvement with the Internet. Describes the procedures used to develop the Web-based questionnaire, identifies issues concerning Web-based research, and presents recommendations for the future…

  9. An Assessment of FY2016 Locally Developed Questions from the DEOMI Organizational Climate Survey: Recommendations and Potential Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-11

    1 An Assessment of FY2016 Locally Developed Questions from the DEOMI Organizational Climate Survey: Recommendations and Potential Implications...Equal Opportunity Management Institute (DEOMI) Organizational Climate Survey (DEOCS). The top 15 questions were ranked across a total of 180,797...Department of Equal Opportunity Management Institute Organizational Climate Survey (DEOCS) for fiscal year 2016 by commanders across the Department

  10. Experimental and Ecological Implications of Evening Bird Surveys in Stream-Riparian Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, S. Mažeika P.; Vierling, Kerri T.

    2009-10-01

    Stream-riparian ecosystems are dynamic and complex entities that can support high levels of bird assemblage abundance and diversity. The myriad patches (e.g., aquatic, floodplain, riparian) found in the riverscape habitat mosaic attract a unique mixture of aquatic, semiaquatic, riparian, and upland birds, each uniquely utilizing the river corridor. Whereas standard morning bird surveys are widely used across ecosystems, the variety of bird guilds and the temporal habitat partitioning that likely occur in stream-riparian ecosystems argue for the inclusion of evening surveys. At 41 stream reaches in Vermont and Idaho, USA, we surveyed bird assemblages using a combination of morning and evening fixed-width transect counts. Student’s paired t-tests showed that while bird abundance was not significantly different between morning and evening surveys, bird assemblage diversity (as measured by species richness, Shannon-Weiner’s index, and Simpson’s index) was significantly higher in the morning than in the evening. NMS ordinations of bird species and time (i.e., morning, evening) indicated that the structure of morning bird assemblages was different from that of evening assemblages. NMS further showed that a set of species was only found in evening surveys. The inclusion of evening counts in surveying bird assemblages in stream-riparian ecosystems has important experimental and ecological implications. Experimentally, the sole use of morning bird surveys may significantly underestimate the diversity and misrepresent the community composition of bird assemblages in these ecosystems. Ecologically, many of the birds detected in evening surveys were water-associated species that occupy high trophic levels and aerial insectivores that represent unique aquatic-terrestrial energy transfers.

  11. Survey of handwriting instruction practices of elementary teachers and educational programs: implications for occupational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donica, Denise K; Larson, Michelle H; Zinn, Abbey A

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to investigate perceptions of elementary school teachers on training in handwriting instruction received during their education, as well as their current classroom practices. The quantity and quality of training in handwriting instruction provided by baccalaureate degree-granting teacher education programs in North Carolina was also examined. An online survey was administered to each population identified to inquire about handwriting instruction practices. Results from 505 teachers and 16 professors indicated that while handwriting instruction content is valued by both teachers and professors, varied levels of training were provided to the teachers. Implications for occupational therapy practice are discussed including strategies for school-based therapists.

  12. Fitting statistical distributions to sea duck count data: implications for survey design and abundance estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipkin, Elise F.; Leirness, Jeffery B.; Kinlan, Brian P.; O'Connell, Allan F.; Silverman, Emily D.

    2014-01-01

    Determining appropriate statistical distributions for modeling animal count data is important for accurate estimation of abundance, distribution, and trends. In the case of sea ducks along the U.S. Atlantic coast, managers want to estimate local and regional abundance to detect and track population declines, to define areas of high and low use, and to predict the impact of future habitat change on populations. In this paper, we used a modified marked point process to model survey data that recorded flock sizes of Common eiders, Long-tailed ducks, and Black, Surf, and White-winged scoters. The data come from an experimental aerial survey, conducted by the United States Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS) Division of Migratory Bird Management, during which east-west transects were flown along the Atlantic Coast from Maine to Florida during the winters of 2009–2011. To model the number of flocks per transect (the points), we compared the fit of four statistical distributions (zero-inflated Poisson, zero-inflated geometric, zero-inflated negative binomial and negative binomial) to data on the number of species-specific sea duck flocks that were recorded for each transect flown. To model the flock sizes (the marks), we compared the fit of flock size data for each species to seven statistical distributions: positive Poisson, positive negative binomial, positive geometric, logarithmic, discretized lognormal, zeta and Yule–Simon. Akaike’s Information Criterion and Vuong’s closeness tests indicated that the negative binomial and discretized lognormal were the best distributions for all species for the points and marks, respectively. These findings have important implications for estimating sea duck abundances as the discretized lognormal is a more skewed distribution than the Poisson and negative binomial, which are frequently used to model avian counts; the lognormal is also less heavy-tailed than the power law distributions (e.g., zeta and Yule–Simon), which are

  13. Near-glacier surveying of a subglacial discharge plume: Implications for plume parameterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, R. H.; Shroyer, E. L.; Nash, J. D.; Sutherland, D. A.; Carroll, D.; Fried, M. J.; Catania, G. A.; Bartholomaus, T. C.; Stearns, L. A.

    2017-07-01

    At tidewater glaciers, plume dynamics affect submarine melting, fjord circulation, and the mixing of meltwater. Models often rely on buoyant plume theory to parameterize plumes and submarine melting; however, these parameterizations are largely untested due to a dearth of near-glacier measurements. Here we present a high-resolution ocean survey by ship and remotely operated boat near the terminus of Kangerlussuup Sermia in west Greenland. These novel observations reveal the 3-D structure and transport of a near-surface plume, originating at a large undercut conduit in the glacier terminus, that is inconsistent with axisymmetric plume theory, the most common representation of plumes in ocean-glacier models. Instead, the observations suggest a wider upwelling plume—a "truncated" line plume of ˜200 m width—with higher entrainment and plume-driven melt compared to the typical axisymmetric representation. Our results highlight the importance of a subglacial outlet's geometry in controlling plume dynamics, with implications for parameterizing the exchange flow and submarine melt in glacial fjord models.

  14. Paths to Lawful Immigration Status: Results and Implications from the PERSON Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom K. Wong

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Anecdotal evidence suggests that a significant percentage of unauthorized immigrants are potentially eligible for some sort of immigration relief, but they either do not know it or are not able to pursue lawful immigration status for other reasons. However, no published study that we are aware of has systematically analyzed this question. The purpose of this study is thus to evaluate and quantify the number of unauthorized immigrants who, during the course of seeking out legal services, have been determined to be potentially eligible for some sort of immigration benefit or relief that provides lawful immigration status. Using the recent implementation of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA program as a laboratory for this work, this study attempts to answer the question of the number of unauthorized immigrants who, without knowing it, may already be potentially eligible for lawful immigration status. In surveying 67 immigrant-serving organizations that provide legal services, we find that 14.3 percent of those found to be eligible for DACA were also found to be eligible for some other form of immigration relief—put otherwise, 14.3 percent of individuals that were found to be eligible for DACA, which provides temporary relief from deportation, may now be on a path towards lawful permanent residency. We find that the most common legal remedies available to these individuals are family-based petitions (25.5 percent, U-Visas (23.9 percent, and Special Immigrant Juvenile Status (12.6 percent. These findings make clear that—with comprehensive immigration reform legislation or eligibility for administrative relief —legal screening can have significant and long-lasting implications on the lives of unauthorized immigrants and their families.

  15. Intrinsic galaxy alignments from the 2SLAQ and SDSS surveys: luminosity and redshift scalings and implications for weak lensing surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Hirata, C M; Ishak, M; Seljak, U; Nichol, R; Pimbblet, K A; Ross, N P; Wake, D; Hirata, Christopher M.; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Ishak, Mustapha; Seljak, Uros; Nichol, Robert; Pimbblet, Kevin A.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Wake, David

    2007-01-01

    Correlations between intrinsic shear and the density field on large scales, a potentially important contaminant for cosmic shear surveys, have been robustly detected at low redshifts with bright galaxies in SDSS data. Here we present a more detailed characterization of this effect, which can cause anti-correlations between gravitational lensing shear and intrinsic ellipticity (GI correlations). This measurement uses 36278 Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs) from the SDSS spectroscopic sample with 0.153sigma detections of the effect for all galaxy subsamples within the SDSS LRG sample; for the 2SLAQ sample, we find a 2sigma detection for a bright subsample, and no detection for a fainter subsample. Fitting formulae are provided for the scaling of the GI correlations with luminosity, transverse separation, and redshift. We estimate contamination in the measurement of sigma_8 for future cosmic shear surveys on the basis of the fitted dependence of GI correlations on galaxy properties. We find contamination to the power...

  16. Social Media Use of Cooperative Extension Family Economics Educators: Online Survey Results and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Barbara; Zumwalt, Andrew; Bechman, Janet

    2011-01-01

    This article describes results of an online survey conducted by the eXtension Financial Security for All (FSA) Community of Practice (CoP) to determine the social media capacity and activity of its members. The survey was conducted to inform two subsequent FSA CoP programs: an archived webinar on social media programs and impact evaluation methods…

  17. Social Media Use of Cooperative Extension Family Economics Educators: Online Survey Results and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Barbara; Zumwalt, Andrew; Bechman, Janet

    2011-01-01

    This article describes results of an online survey conducted by the eXtension Financial Security for All (FSA) Community of Practice (CoP) to determine the social media capacity and activity of its members. The survey was conducted to inform two subsequent FSA CoP programs: an archived webinar on social media programs and impact evaluation methods…

  18. Teaching Non-Beginner Programmers with App Inventor: Survey Results and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Andrey; Martin, Nancy L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a survey with 40 students enrolled in an Android Application Development course offered during the spring semester of 2013 and 2014. The course used App Inventor to build the apps and required students to have an introduction to programming course as a prerequisite. The survey asked for demographic information and…

  19. A Deep Multicolor Survey; 3, Additional Spectroscopy and Implications for the Number Counts of Faint Quasars

    CERN Document Server

    Kennefick, D; Hall, P B; Green, R F; Kennefick, Julia D.; Osmer, Patrick S.; Hall, Patrick B.; Green, Richard F.

    1997-01-01

    We have made spectroscopic identifications of 39 additional quasar candidates from the Deep Multicolor Survey (DMS) of Hall et al. (1996, ApJ, 462, 614, astro-ph/9512052). We have identified 9 new quasars with 0.3 3 were found among the observed candidates selected due to their red (B-R) and (V-R) colors. As a result, there are now 55 confirmed quasars in the survey: 42 with 0.3 3 over predictions based on models by Warren, Hewett, & Osmer is less than previously suggested. We also demonstrate the success of our quasar color modeling which is important in assessing the completeness of our survey.

  20. Movements of radio-marked California Ridgway's rails during monitoring surveys: implications for population monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Thuy-Vy D.; Takekawa, John Y.; Overton, Cory T.; Schultz, Emily R.; Hull, Joshua M.; Casazza, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    The California Ridgway's rail Rallus obsoletus obsoletus (hereafter California rail) is a secretive marsh bird endemic to tidal marshes in the San Francisco Bay (hereafter bay) of California. The California rail has undergone significant range contraction and population declines due to a variety of factors, including predation and the degradation and loss of habitat. Call-count surveys, which include call playbacks, based on the standardized North American marsh bird monitoring protocol have been conducted throughout the bay since 2005 to monitor population size and distribution of the California rail. However, call-count surveys are difficult to evaluate for efficacy or accuracy. To measure the accuracy of call-count surveys and investigate whether radio-marked California rails moved in response to call-count surveys, we compared locations of radio-marked California rails collected at frequent intervals (15 min) to California rail detections recorded during call-count surveys conducted over the same time periods. Overall, 60% of radio-marked California rails within 200 m of observers were not detected during call-count surveys. Movements of radio-marked California rails showed no directional bias (P = 0.92) irrespective of whether or not playbacks of five marsh bird species (including the California rail) were broadcast from listening stations. Our findings suggest that playbacks of rail vocalizations do not consistently influence California rail movements during surveys. However, call-count surveys may underestimate California rail presence; therefore, caution should be used when relating raw numbers of call-count detections to population abundance.

  1. Web-based Survey Data Collection With Peer Support and Advocacy Organizations: Implications of Participatory Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrow, Laysha; Penney, Darby; Stuart, Elizabeth; Leaf, Phillip J

    2017-01-01

    The 2012 National Survey of Peer-Run Organizations is one of the first to survey a nationally representative sample of mental health peer-run organizations, nonprofit venues for support and advocacy which are defined by people with psychiatric histories being in positions of authority and control. This paper describes data collection methods and demonstrates how participatory strategies to involve people with psychiatric histories intersected with Internet research to achieve study aims. People with psychiatric histories were involved in designing and implementing a web-based survey to collect data on peer-run organizations' operations and views on national policy. Participatory approaches were used throughout design, data collection analysis, and dissemination. The extensive involvement of people with psychiatric histories in project design and implementation were important strategies that contributed to this study's success.

  2. Bright but slow - Type II supernovae from OGLE-IV - Implications for magnitude limited surveys

    OpenAIRE

    Poznanski, Dovi; Kostrzewa-Rutkowska, Zuzanna; Wyrzykowski, Lukasz; Blagorodnova, Nadejda

    2015-01-01

    We study a sample of 11 Type II supernovae (SNe) discovered by the OGLE-IV survey. All objects have well sampled I-band light curves, and at least one spectrum. We find that 2 or 3 of the 11 SNe have a declining light curve, and spectra consistent with other SNe II-L, while the rest have plateaus that can be as short as 70d, unlike the 100d typically found in nearby galaxies. The OGLE SNe are also brighter, and show that magnitude limited surveys find SNe that are different than usually found...

  3. Policy recommendations and cost implications for a more sustainable framework for European human biomonitoring surveys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joas, Anke; Knudsen, Lisbeth E.; Kolossa-Gehring, Marike

    2015-01-01

    The potential of Human Biomonitoring (HBM) in exposure characterisation and risk assessment is well established in the scientific HBM community and regulatory arena by many publications. The European Environment and Health Strategy as well as the Environment and Health Action Plan 2004-2010 of th......, and EFSA. An economic frame with shared cost implications for national and European institutions is suggested benefitting from the capacity building set up by COPHES/DEMOCOPHES....

  4. Children's Experiences of Completing a Computer-Based Violence Survey: Ethical Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellonen, Noora; Poso, Tarja

    2011-01-01

    This article aims to contribute to the discussion about the ethics of research on children when studying sensitive issues such as violence. The empirical analysis is based on the accounts given by children (11 377) who completed a computer-based questionnaire about their experiences of violence ("The Finnish Child Victim Survey 2008")…

  5. The Roles, Functions and Implications of Assistants in Scottish Educational Psychology Services, a National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collyer, Sam

    2012-01-01

    An exploratory survey of Assistants in Scottish educational psychology services (EPSs) was undertaken, guided by four questions: Who are Assistants? Why are they employed/not employed? What do Assistants do? How are Assistants supported and supervised? Twenty-one Assistants and 15 managers were interviewed. It was found that Assistants worked…

  6. Heterogeneous interpretation of “household expenditure” in survey reports : evidence and implications of bias

    OpenAIRE

    Comerford, David; Delaney, Liam

    2010-01-01

    This paper addresses respondents’ interpretation of the term “household expenditure” when answering survey questions. A sizeable minority of respondents do not attempt to include all transactions made by every household member, interpreting the question as eliciting individual consumption. This biases estimates of expenditure downward. Furthermore, this bias is predicted by respondent characteristics.

  7. Choice of rating scale labels: implication for minimizing patient satisfaction response ceiling effect in telemedicine surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masino, Caterina; Lam, Tony C M

    2014-12-01

    Lack of response variability is problematic in surveys because of its detrimental effects on sensitivity and consequently reliability of the responses. In satisfaction surveys, this problem is caused by the ceiling effect resulting from high satisfaction ratings. A potential solution strategy is to manipulate the labels of the rating scale to create greater discrimination of responses on the high end of the response continuum. This study examined the effects of a positive-centered scale on the distribution and reliability of telemedicine satisfaction responses in a highly positive respondent population. In total, 216 telemedicine participants were randomly assigned to one of three experimental conditions as defined by the form of Likert scale: (1) 5-point Balanced Equal-Interval, (2) 5-point Positive-Packed, and (3) 5-point Positive-Centered Equal-Interval. Although the study findings were not statistically significant, partially because of sample size, the distribution and internal consistency reliability of responses occurred in the direction hypothesized. Loading the rating scale with more positive labels appears to be a useful strategy for reducing the ceiling effect and increases the discrimination ability of survey responses. The current research provides a survey design strategy to minimize ceiling effects. Although the findings provide some evidence suggesting the benefit of using rating scales loaded with positive labels, more research is needed to confirm this, as well as extend it to examine other types of rating scales and the interaction between rating scale formats and respondent characteristics.

  8. Security Implications of Electronic Commerce: A Survey of Consumers and Businesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furnell, S. M.; Karweni, T.

    1999-01-01

    Examines general requirement for security technologies that provide a basis for trust in the electronic commerce environment. Discusses the results of two surveys that included general Internet users who are potential customers as well as commercial businesses, that considered attitudes to electronic commerce in general and options relating to…

  9. Children's Experiences of Completing a Computer-Based Violence Survey: Ethical Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellonen, Noora; Poso, Tarja

    2011-01-01

    This article aims to contribute to the discussion about the ethics of research on children when studying sensitive issues such as violence. The empirical analysis is based on the accounts given by children (11 377) who completed a computer-based questionnaire about their experiences of violence ("The Finnish Child Victim Survey 2008")…

  10. Security Implications of Electronic Commerce: A Survey of Consumers and Businesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furnell, S. M.; Karweni, T.

    1999-01-01

    Examines general requirement for security technologies that provide a basis for trust in the electronic commerce environment. Discusses the results of two surveys that included general Internet users who are potential customers as well as commercial businesses, that considered attitudes to electronic commerce in general and options relating to…

  11. Sampling effects on the identification of roadkill hotspots: Implications for survey design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Sara M; Marques, J Tiago; Lourenço, André; Medinas, Denis; Barbosa, A Márcia; Beja, Pedro; Mira, António

    2015-10-01

    Although locating wildlife roadkill hotspots is essential to mitigate road impacts, the influence of study design on hotspot identification remains uncertain. We evaluated how sampling frequency affects the accuracy of hotspot identification, using a dataset of vertebrate roadkills (n = 4427) recorded over a year of daily surveys along 37 km of roads. "True" hotspots were identified using this baseline dataset, as the 500-m segments where the number of road-killed vertebrates exceeded the upper 95% confidence limit of the mean, assuming a Poisson distribution of road-kills per segment. "Estimated" hotspots were identified likewise, using datasets representing progressively lower sampling frequencies, which were produced by extracting data from the baseline dataset at appropriate time intervals (1-30 days). Overall, 24.3% of segments were "true" hotspots, concentrating 40.4% of roadkills. For different groups, "true" hotspots accounted from 6.8% (bats) to 29.7% (small birds) of road segments, concentrating from 60% (lizards, lagomorphs, carnivores) of roadkills. Spatial congruence between "true" and "estimated" hotspots declined rapidly with increasing time interval between surveys, due primarily to increasing false negatives (i.e., missing "true" hotspots). There were also false positives (i.e., wrong "estimated" hotspots), particularly at low sampling frequencies. Spatial accuracy decay with increasing time interval between surveys was higher for smaller-bodied (amphibians, reptiles, small birds, small mammals) than for larger-bodied species (birds of prey, hedgehogs, lagomorphs, carnivores). Results suggest that widely used surveys at weekly or longer intervals may produce poor estimates of roadkill hotspots, particularly for small-bodied species. Surveying daily or at two-day intervals may be required to achieve high accuracy in hotspot identification for multiple species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. SURVEY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    SURVEY er en udbredt metode og benyttes inden for bl.a. samfundsvidenskab, humaniora, psykologi og sundhedsforskning. Også uden for forskningsverdenen er der mange organisationer som f.eks. konsulentfirmaer og offentlige institutioner samt marketingsafdelinger i private virksomheder, der arbejder...... med surveys. Denne bog gennemgår alle surveyarbejdets faser og giver en praktisk indføring i: • design af undersøgelsen og udvælgelse af stikprøver, • formulering af spørgeskemaer samt indsamling og kodning af data, • metoder til at analysere resultaterne...

  13. Spatial scales of variation in lichens: implications for sampling design in biomonitoring surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordani, Paolo; Brunialti, Giorgio; Frati, Luisa; Incerti, Guido; Ianesch, Luca; Vallone, Emanuele; Bacaro, Giovanni; Maccherini, Simona

    2013-02-01

    The variability of biological data is a main constraint affecting the quality and reliability of lichen biomonitoring surveys for estimation of the effects of atmospheric pollution. Although most epiphytic lichen bioindication surveys focus on between-site differences at the landscape level, associated with the large scale effects of atmospheric pollution, current protocols are based on multilevel sampling, thus adding further sources of variation and affecting the error budget. We test the hypothesis that assemblages of lichen communities vary at each spatial scale examined, in order to determine what scales should be included in future monitoring studies. We compared four sites in Italy, along gradients of atmospheric pollution and climate, to test the partitioning of the variance components of lichen diversity across spatial scales (from trunks to landscapes). Despite environmental heterogeneity, we observed comparable spatial variance. However, residuals often overcame between-plot variability, leading to biased estimation of atmospheric pollution effects.

  14. Cancer pain management in China: current status and practice implications based on the ACHEON survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Zhongjun

    2017-01-01

    Cancer pain can seriously impact the quality of life (QoL) of patients, and optimal management practices are therefore of paramount importance. The ACHEON survey queried physicians and patients from 10 Asian countries/regions to assess current clinical practices in cancer pain management in Asia. This study presents the data obtained for cancer pain management in mainland China, with an emphasis on practices related to opioid drugs. In several tertiary hospitals across China, 250 patients experiencing cancer pain and 100 physicians were surveyed on questions designed to assess current cancer pain management practices and cancer pain impact on QoL. The patient survey showed that 88% of patients reported moderate-to-severe cancer pain, with a median duration of 6 months. The physician survey showed that medical school/residency training with regard to cancer pain management was inadequate in ~80% of physicians. A total of 80% of physicians and 67.2% of patients reported that pain scale was used during pain assessment; 84% of physicians expressed that physician-perceived pain severity was not completely consistent with actual pain the patient experienced. Of the 147 patients who recalled the medication received, 83.7% were administered opioid prescriptions. Of the 240 patients who received treatment, 43.8% perceived the inadequacy of controlling pain. The primary barriers from physicians perceived to optimal pain management included patients' fear of side effects (58%), patients' fear of addiction (53%), patients' reluctance to report pain (43%), physicians' reluctance to prescribe (29%), physicians' inadequacy of pain assessment (27%) and excessive regulation of opioid analgesics (47%). Knowledge of cancer pain management should be strengthened among physicians. Quantitative pain assessment and principle-based pain management should be combined to achieve pain relief. Misconceptions about opioids in patients and physicians and poor report about pain should be

  15. Chronic joint symptoms and prior arthritis diagnosis in community surveys: implications for arthritis prevalence estimates.

    OpenAIRE

    Feinglass, Joe; Nelson, Cynthia; Lawther, Timothy; Chang, Rowland W.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Alternative definitions of arthritis in community surveys provide very different estimates of arthritis prevalence among older Americans. This telephone interview study examines prevalence estimates based on the current Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) arthritis case definition. METHODS: Interviews were conducted with 851 Chicago residents age 45 and older. Logistic regression was used to compare the age and sex controlled prevalence of poor health, restricted ac...

  16. Exchange Rate Forecasting Techniques, Survey Data, and Implications for the Foreign Exchange Market

    OpenAIRE

    Frankel, Jeffrey A.; Kenneth Froot

    1990-01-01

    The paper presents new empirical results that elucidate the dynamics of the foreign exchange market. The first half of the paper is an updated study of the exchange rate expectations held by market participants, as reflected in responses to surveys, and contains the following conclusions. First, the bias observed in the forward discount as a predictor of the future spot rate is not attributable to an exchange risk premium, as is conventionally believed. Second, at short horizons forecasters t...

  17. Policy Implications for Local Application of the 2009 Youth Risk Behavior Survey, Duval County, Florida

    OpenAIRE

    Livingood, William C.; Bryant, Thomas; Bowles, Kathy; Bell, Dale; LaVine, Marcy; Kane, Rick; Butterfield, Ryan; Luminita, Razaila; Filipowicz, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) data have rarely been analyzed at the subcounty level. The purpose of this study was to explore the feasibility of such analysis and its potential to inform local policy and resource allocation. Methods We administered the 2009 YRBS to 5,860 students from 46 public middle and high schools in Duval County, Florida. In addition to asking core questions, we asked a set of questions customized for local needs, including questions about zip codes. The...

  18. Photometric Redshifts for the Dark Energy Survey and VISTA and Implications for Large Scale Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Banerji, Manda; Lahav, Ofer; Lin, Huan

    2007-01-01

    We conduct a detailed analysis of the photometric redshift requirements for the proposed Dark Energy Survey (DES) using two sets of mock galaxy simulations and an artificial neural network code - ANNz. In particular, we examine how optical photometry in the DES $grizY$ bands can be complemented with near infra-red photometry from the planned VISTA Hemisphere Survey (VHS) in the $JHK_s$ bands in order to improve the photometric redshift estimate by a factor of two at $z>1$. We draw attention to the effects of galaxy formation scenarios such as reddening on the photo-z estimate and using our neural network code, calculate $A_v$ for these reddened galaxies. We also look at the impact of using different training sets when calculating photometric redshifts. In particular, we find that using the ongoing DEEP2 and VVDS-Deep spectroscopic surveys to calibrate photometric redshifts for DES, will prove effective. However we need to be aware of uncertainties in the photometric redshift bias that arise when using differe...

  19. Understanding Spanish-Language Response in a National Health Communication Survey: Implications for Health Communication Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, A Susana; Willis, Gordon; Rutten, Lila Finney

    2017-05-01

    Spanish-speaking Latinos account for 13% of the U.S. population yet are chronically under-represented in national surveys; additionally, the response quality suffers from low literacy rates and translation challenges. These are the same issues that health communicators face when understanding how best to communicate important health information to Latinos. The Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS) offers a unique opportunity to understand the health communication landscape and information needs of the U.S. We describe the challenges in recruiting Spanish-speaking HINTS respondents and strategies used to improve rates and quality of responses among Spanish-speaking Latinos. Cognitive interviewing techniques helped to better understand how Spanish-speaking Latinos were interpreting the survey questions, and the extent to which these interpretations matched English-speaking respondents' interpretations. Some Spanish-speaking respondents had difficulty with the questions because of a lack of access to health care. Additionally, Spanish-speaking respondents had a particularly hard time answering questions that were presented in a grid format. We describe the cognitive interview process, and consider the impact of format changes on Spanish-speaking people's responses and response quality. We discuss challenges that remain in understanding health information needs of non-English-speakers.

  20. Photometric redshifts for the Dark Energy Survey and VISTA and implications for large-scale structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerji, Manda; Abdalla, Filipe B.; Lahav, Ofer; Lin, Huan

    2008-05-01

    We conduct a detailed analysis of the photometric redshift requirements for the proposed Dark Energy Survey (DES) using two sets of mock galaxy simulations and an artificial neural network code - ANNZ. In particular, we examine how optical photometry in the DES grizY bands can be complemented with near-infrared photometry from the planned VISTA Hemisphere Survey (VHS) in the JHKs bands. We find that the rms scatter on the photometric redshift estimate over 1 neural network code, calculate the extinction, Av for these reddened galaxies. We also look at the impact of using different training sets when calculating photometric redshifts. In particular, we find that using the ongoing DEEP2 and VVDS-Deep spectroscopic surveys to calibrate photometric redshifts for DES, will prove effective. However, we need to be aware of uncertainties in the photometric redshift bias that arise when using different training sets as these will translate into errors in the dark energy equation of state parameter, w. Furthermore, we show that the neural network error estimate on the photometric redshift may be used to remove outliers from our samples before any kind of cosmological analysis, in particular for large-scale structure experiments. By removing all galaxies with a neural network photo-z error estimate of greater than 0.1 from our DES + VHS sample, we can constrain the galaxy power spectrum out to a redshift of 2 and reduce the fractional error on this power spectrum by ~15-20 per cent compared to using the entire catalogue. Output tables of spectroscopic redshift versus photometric redshift used to produce the results in this paper can be found at http://www.star.ucl.ac.uk/~mbanerji/DESdata.

  1. A national survey of musculoskeletal impairment in Rwanda: prevalence, causes and service implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwarantimi Atijosan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Accurate information on the prevalence and causes of musculoskeletal impairment (MSI is lacking in low income countries. We present a new survey methodology that is based on sound epidemiological principles and is linked to the World Health Organisation's International Classification of Functioning. METHODS: Clusters were selected with probability proportionate to size. Households were selected within clusters through compact segment sampling. 105 clusters of 80 people (all ages were included. All participants were screened for MSI by a physiotherapist and medical assistant. Possible cases plus a random sample of 10% of non-MSI cases were examined further to ascertain diagnosis, aetiology, quality of life, and treatment needs. FINDINGS: 6757 of 8368 enumerated individuals (80.8% were screened. There were 352 cases, giving an overall prevalence for MSI of 5.2%. (95% CI 4.5-5.9 The prevalence of MSI increased with age and was similar in men and women. Extrapolating these estimates, there are approximately 488,000 MSI diagnoses in Rwanda. Only 8.2% of MSI cases were severe, while the majority were moderate (43.7% or mild (46.3%. Diagnostic categories comprised 11.5% congenital, 31.3% trauma, 3.8% infection, 9.0% neurological, and 44.4% non-traumatic non infective acquired. The most common individual diagnoses were joint disease (13.3%, angular limb deformity (9.7% and fracture mal- and non-union (7.2%. 96% of all cases required further treatment. INTERPRETATION: This survey demonstrates a large burden of MSI in Rwanda, which is mostly untreated. The survey methodology will be useful in other low income countries, to assist with planning services and monitoring trends.

  2. A survey of community gardens in upstate New York: implications for health promotion and community development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, D

    2000-12-01

    Twenty community garden programs in upstate New York (representing 63 gardens) were surveyed to identify characteristics that may be useful to facilitate neighborhood development and health promotion. The most commonly expressed reasons for participating in gardens were access to fresh foods, to enjoy nature, and health benefits. Gardens in low-income neighborhoods (46%) were four times as likely as non low-income gardens to lead to other issues in the neighborhood being addressed; reportedly due to organizing facilitated through the community gardens. Additional research on community gardening can improve our understanding of the interaction of social and physical environments and community health, and effective strategies for empowerment, development, and health promotion.

  3. Farmers' willingness to pay for power in India. Conceptual issues, survey results and implications for pricing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dossani, Rafiq [Senior Research Scholar, Asia-Pacific Research Center, Stanford University, 616 Serra Street, Stanford, CA 94305-6055 (United States); Ranganathan, V. [Professor of Economics and Energy, Indian Institute of Management, Bangalore 560076 (India)

    2004-05-01

    The objective of this paper is to develop strategies useful for raising prices of rural power in India. Such power is currently subsidized and policymakers are eager to make the transition to more efficient prices. The traditionally used measure, willingness to pay (WTP), is shown to have no useful policy implications due to the rationing of power. Using survey data from rural Andhra Pradesh, we show that the utility's cost of power exceeds the income generated by the power. This suggests a political problem - the possibility that low power prices have led to large-scale farming of unproductive land - that will be hard to resolve. Our survey also shows that subsidies are regressive with income. We use measured WTP for higher income groups to propose a discriminatory pricing regime that will raise total revenue by 20%. When combined with removing the causes of motor burnout, such as voltage fluctuations, and eliminating rostering, subsidies can be reduced substantially but probably remain too high to be resolved without political action.

  4. Farmers' willingness to pay for power in India: conceptual issues, survey results and implications for pricing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dossani, Rafiq [Stanford Univ., Asia-Pacific Research Center, Stanford, CA (United States); Ranganathan, V. [Indian Inst. of Management, Bangalore (India)

    2004-05-01

    The objective of this paper is to develop strategies useful for raising prices of rural power in India. Such power is currently subsidized and policymakers are eager to make the transition to more efficient prices. The traditionally used measure, willingness to pay (WTP), is shown to have no useful policy implications due to the rationing of power. Using survey data from rural Andhra Pradesh, we show that the utility's cost of power exceeds the income generated by the power. This suggests a political problem - the possibility that low power prices have led to large-scale farming of unproductive land - that will be hard to resolve. Our survey also shows that subsidies are regressive with income. We use measured WTP for higher income groups to propose a discriminatory pricing regime that will raise total revenue by 20%. When combined with removing the causes of motor burnout, such as voltage fluctuations, and eliminating rostering, subsidies can be reduced substantially but probably remain too high to be resolved without political action. (Author)

  5. Heterogeneity at work: implications of the 2012 Clinical Translational Science Award evaluators survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Cathleen; Alexander, Angela; Hogle, Janice A; Parsons, Helen M; Phelps, Lauren

    2013-12-01

    The Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) program is an ambitious multibillion dollar initiative sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) organized around the mission of facilitating the improved quality, efficiency, and effectiveness of translational health sciences research across the country. Although the NIH explicitly requires internal evaluation, funded CTSA institutions are given wide latitude to choose the structure and methods for evaluating their local CTSA program. The National Evaluators Survey was developed by a peer-led group of local CTSA evaluators as a voluntary effort to understand emerging differences and commonalities in evaluation teams and techniques across the 61 CTSA institutions funded nationwide. This article presents the results of the 2012 National Evaluators Survey, finding significant heterogeneity in evaluation staffing, organization, and methods across the 58 CTSAs institutions responding. The variety reflected in these findings represents both a liability and strength. A lack of standardization may impair the ability to make use of common metrics, but variation is also a successful evolutionary response to complexity. Additionally, the peer-led approach and simple design demonstrated by the questionnaire itself has value as an example of an evaluation technique with potential for replication in other areas across the CTSA institutions or any large-scale investment where multiple related teams across a wide geographic area are given the latitude to develop specialized approaches to fulfilling a common mission.

  6. Voluntary survey completion among team members: implications of noncompliance and missing data for multilevel research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschfeld, Robert R; Cole, Michael S; Bernerth, Jeremy B; Rizzuto, Tracey E

    2013-05-01

    We explored whether voluntary survey completion by team members (in aggregate) is predictable from team members' collective evaluations of team-emergent states. In doing so, we reanalyze less-than-complete survey data on 110 teams from a published field study, using so-called traditional and modern missing data techniques to probe the sensitivity of these team-level relationships to data missingness. The multivariate findings revealed that a greater within-team participation rate was indeed related to a higher team-level (mean) score on team mental efficacy (across all four missing-data techniques) and less dispersion among team member judgments about internal cohesion (when the 2 modern methods were used). In addition, results show that a commonly used approach of retaining only those teams with high participation rates produces inflated standardized effect size (i.e., R²) estimates and decreased statistical power. Suggestions include research design considerations and a comprehensive methodology to account for team member data missingness.

  7. Clustering of Sloan Digital Sky Survey III Photometric Luminous Galaxies: The Measurement, Systematics and Cosmological Implications

    CERN Document Server

    Ho, Shirley; Seo, Hee-Jong; de Putter, Roland; Ross, Ashley J; White, Martin; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Saito, Shun; Schlegel, David J; Schlafly, Eddie; Seljak, Uros; Hernandez-Monteagudo, Carlos; Sanchez, Ariel G; Percival, Will J; Blanton, Michael; Skibba, Ramin; Schneider, Don; Reid, Beth; Mena, Olga; Viel, Matteo; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Prada, Francisco; Weaver, Benjamin; Bahcall, Neta; Bizyaev, Dimitry; Brewinton, Howard; Brinkman, Jon; da Costa, Luiz Nicolaci; Gott, John R; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Nichol, Bob; Oravetz, Daniel; Pan, Kaike; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Ross, Nicholas P; Simmons, Audrey; de Simoni, Fernando; Snedden, Stephanie; Yeche, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) surveyed 14,555 square degrees, and delivered over a trillion pixels of imaging data. We present a study of galaxy clustering using 900,000 luminous galaxies with photometric redshifts, spanning between $z=0.45$ and $z=0.65$, constructed from the SDSS using methods described in Ross et al. (2011). This data-set spans 11,000 square degrees and probes a volume of $3h^{-3} \\rm{Gpc}^3$, making it the largest volume ever used for galaxy clustering measurements. We present a novel treatment of the observational systematics and its applications to the clustering signals from the data set. In this paper, we measure the angular clustering using an optimal quadratic estimator at 4 redshift slices with an accuracy of ~15% with bin size of delta_l = 10 on scales of the Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) (at l~40-400). We derive cosmological constraints using the full-shape of the power-spectra. For a flat Lambda CDM model, when combined with Cosmic Microwave Background Wilkinson Microw...

  8. A survey into student nurses' attitudes towards mental illness: implications for nurse training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Tim; Wood, Steve; Williams, Rena

    2011-05-01

    This paper reports on a survey of attitudes to mental illness that was completed with a cohort of pre-registration nurses in 2007 in a large university in Essex. The background literature highlights the effects of attitudes on stigma, disadvantage and discrimination and presents a brief review of the literature on cultural variations in attitudes. It also briefly reviews the attitudes of health professionals to mental illness. A survey using the Community Attitudes to Mental Illness questionnaire was completed and ethnicity proved to be an important factor in accounting for variations in attitudes to mental illness. The Black and Black British group displayed less positive attitudes across all nursing branches when compared to the white group. The differences raised questions about how best nurse training can prepare nurses to practice in culturally sensitive ways that acknowledge the beliefs of patients whilst avoiding stereotyping and discrimination. Personal contact with someone with mental illness was also found to be a significant factor and the importance of user involvement in training is discussed. The paper concludes with some recommendations for nurse training that include greater use of teaching strategies that challenge beliefs and assumptions and promote a commitment to multicultural mental health practice.

  9. CLUSTERING OF SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY III PHOTOMETRIC LUMINOUS GALAXIES: THE MEASUREMENT, SYSTEMATICS, AND COSMOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Shirley; White, Martin; Schlegel, David J.; Seljak, Uros; Reid, Beth [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Rd, MS 50R-5045, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Cuesta, Antonio; Padmanabhan, Nikhil [Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Seo, Hee-Jong [Berkeley Center for Cosmological Physics, LBL and Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); De Putter, Roland [ICC, University of Barcelona (IEEC-UB), Marti i Franques 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Ross, Ashley J.; Percival, Will J. [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, Dennis Sciama Building, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Saito, Shun [Department of Astronomy, University of California Berkeley, CA (United States); Schlafly, Eddie [Department of Astronomy, Harvard University, 60 Garden St. MS 20, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Hernandez-Monteagudo, Carlos [Centro de Estudios de Fisica del Cosmos de Aragon (CEFCA), Plaza de San Juan 1, planta 2, E-44001 Teruel (Spain); Sanchez, Ariel G. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Blanton, Michael [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Skibba, Ramin [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Schneider, Don [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Mena, Olga [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Universidad de Valencia-CSIC (Spain); Viel, Matteo, E-mail: cwho@lbl.gov [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, Via G. B. Tiepolo 11, I-34131 Trieste (Italy); and others

    2012-12-10

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) surveyed 14,555 deg{sup 2}, and delivered over a trillion pixels of imaging data. We present a study of galaxy clustering using 900,000 luminous galaxies with photometric redshifts, spanning between z = 0.45 and z = 0.65, constructed from the SDSS using methods described in Ross et al. This data set spans 11,000 deg{sup 2} and probes a volume of 3 h {sup -3} Gpc{sup 3}, making it the largest volume ever used for galaxy clustering measurements. We describe in detail the construction of the survey window function and various systematics affecting our measurement. With such a large volume, high-precision cosmological constraints can be obtained given careful control and understanding of the observational systematics. We present a novel treatment of the observational systematics and its applications to the clustering signals from the data set. In this paper, we measure the angular clustering using an optimal quadratic estimator at four redshift slices with an accuracy of {approx}15%, with a bin size of {delta}{sub l} = 10 on scales of the baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs; at l {approx} 40-400). We also apply corrections to the power spectra due to systematics and derive cosmological constraints using the full shape of the power spectra. For a flat {Lambda}CDM model, when combined with cosmic microwave background Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe 7 (WMAP7) and H{sub 0} constraints from using 600 Cepheids observed by Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3; HST), we find {Omega}{sub {Lambda}} = 0.73 {+-} 0.019 and H{sub 0} to be 70.5 {+-} 1.6 s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1} km. For an open {Lambda}CDM model, when combined with WMAP7 + HST, we find {Omega}{sub K} = 0.0035 {+-} 0.0054, improved over WMAP7+HST alone by 40%. For a wCDM model, when combined with WMAP7+HST+SN, we find w = -1.071 {+-} 0.078, and H{sub 0} to be 71.3 {+-} 1.7 s{sup -1} Mpc{sup -1} km, which is competitive with the latest large-scale structure constraints from large spectroscopic

  10. Global Survey on Future Trends in Human Spaceflight: the Implications for Space Tourism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurtuna, O.; Garneau, S.

    2002-01-01

    With the much-publicized first ever space tourist flight, of Dennis Tito, and the announcement of the second space tourist flight to take place in April 2002, it is clear that an alternative motivation for human spaceflight has emerged. Human spaceflight is no longer only about meeting the priorities of national governments and space agencies, but is also about the tangible possibility of ordinary people seeing the Earth from a previously exclusive vantage point. It is imperative that major space players look beyond the existing human spaceflight rationale to identify some of the major driving forces behind space tourism, including the evolving market potential and developments in enabling technologies. In order to determine the influence of these forces on the future of commercial human spaceflight, the responses of a Futuraspace survey on future trends in human spaceflight are analyzed and presented. The motivation of this study is to identify sought-after space destinations, explore the expected trends in enabling technologies, and understand the future role of emerging space players. The survey will reflect the opinions of respondents from around the world including North America, Europe (including Russia) and Asia. The profiles of targeted respondents from space industry, government and academia are high-level executives/managers, senior researchers, as well as former and current astronauts. The survey instrument is a questionnaire which is validated by a pilot study. The sampling method is non-probabilistic, targeting as many space experts as possible who fit our intended respondent profile. Descriptive and comparative statistical analysis methods are implemented to investigate both global and regional perceptions of future commercial trends in human spaceflight. This study is not intended to be a formal market study of the potential viability of the space tourism market. Instead, the focus is on the future trends of human spaceflight, by drawing on the

  11. A Survey of Georgia Adult Protective Service Staff: Implications for Older Adult Injury Prevention and Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strasser, Sheryl

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aging population is a rapidly growing demographic. Isolation and limited autonomy render many of the elderly vulnerable to abuse, neglect and exploitation. As the population grows, so does the need for Adult Protective Services (APS. This study was conducted to examine current knowledge of older adult protection laws in Georgia among APS staff and to identify training opportunities to better prepare the APS workforce in case detection and intervention.Methods: The Georgia State University Institute of Public Health faculty developed a primary survey in partnership with the Georgia Division of Aging Services’ leadership to identify key training priority issues for APS caseworkers and investigators. A 47-item electronic questionnaire was delivered to all APS employees via work-issued email accounts. We conducted descriptive analyses, t-tests and chi-square analyses to determine APS employees’ baseline knowledge of Georgia’s elder abuse policies, laws and practices, as well as examine associations of age, ethnicity, and educational attainment with knowledge. We used a p-value of 0.05 and 95% confidence intervals to determine statistical significance of analyses performed.Result: Ninety-two out of 175 APS staff responded to the survey (53% response rate. The majority of respondents were Caucasian (56% women (92%. For over half the survey items, paired sample t-tests revealed significant differences between what APS staff reported as known and what APS staff members indicated they needed to know more about in terms of elder abuse and current policies. Chi-square tests revealed that non-Caucasians significantly preferred video conferencing as a training format (44% compared to 18%, [χ2(1 = 7.102, p < .008], whereas Caucasians preferred asynchronous online learning formats (55% compared to 28% [χ2(1 =5.951, p < .015].Conclusion: Results from this study provide the Georgia Division of Aging with insight into specific policy areas

  12. Measuring User-Created Content: Implications for the ICT Access and Use by Households and Individuals Surveys. OECD Digital Economy Papers, No. 139

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beuzekom, Brigitte

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviews recent measurement work on User-Created Content (UCC) undertaken in OECD countries. It shows that UCC is emerging as a significant area of economic and social activity worthy of consideration for official measurement and discusses the implications for the OECD Model Survey on ICT Access and Use by Households and Individuals.…

  13. A survey of parabens in commercial pharmaceuticals from China and its implications for human exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wan-Li; Zhao, Xue; Lin, Zhong-Yang; Mohammed, Mohammed O A; Zhang, Zi-Feng; Liu, Li-Yan; Song, Wei-Wei; Li, Yi-Fan

    2016-10-01

    Parabens are widely used as antimicrobial preservatives during pharmaceutical production. However, little information is available regarding the occurrence of parabens in commercial pharmaceuticals and their implications for human exposure. In this study, six commonly used parabens were analyzed by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry with 100 commercial pharmaceuticals collected from China. Almost all of the pharmaceutical samples contained at least one kind of parabens with the detection frequency of 97%. The concentrations of Σ6parabens (sum of the six parabens) ranged from below MDL to 1256ng/g, with mean and median values of 94.8 and 119ng/g, respectively. Methyl paraben (MeP), ethyl paraben (EtP) and propyl paraben (PrP) were the predominant compounds. Significant positive correlation was observed between concentrations of MeP and PrP, indicating their co-applications in pharmaceuticals. Levels of Σ6parabens varied in different categories of pharmaceuticals and increased with their shelf lives. Based on the measured concentrations and daily ingestion rates of pharmaceuticals, the estimated daily intake (EDI) of parabens was calculated. The median values of EDIpharmaceutical for male adults, female adults and children were 4.05, 4.75 and 9.73ng/kg-bw/day, respectively, which were three orders of magnitude lower than those from foodstuffs and personal care products (PCPs). It was firstly reported that the total exposure dose was 0.326mg/kg-bw/day via foodstuffs, PCPs, and pharmaceuticals for Chinese female adults.

  14. Survey on Trypanosoma spp. infection of dogs in Gabon and its epidemiological implications for sleeping sickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watier-Grillot, S; Herder, S; Marié, J-L; Bourry, O; Cuny, G; Davoust, B

    2016-05-01

    This survey screened native dogs (Canis familiaris) in Gabon (Africa) for trypanosome infection. A total of 376 apparently healthy dogs, divided into two populations, were examined. The first group included 252 semi-domesticated dogs inhabiting 16 villages of the Ogooué-Ivindo Province, a rural inland area in northeast Gabon, and the second group 124 dogs belonging to protection companies or families from Libreville (n = 113) and Port-Gentil (n = 11), in the coastal area of Gabon. Both study areas include active or former foci of sleeping sickness in Gabon. Molecular testing (polymerase chain reaction) was performed on blood samples from dogs in both groups. All dogs were negative for T. congolense ("savanna type" and "forest type"). Eighteen dogs (4.7%), however, tested positive for T. brucei s.l.: 3% (8/252) were from the Ogooué-Ivindo Province, and 8% (10/124) from the coastal area. These animals may be potential reservoirs of the parasite T. brucei gambiense, responsible for human African trypanosomiasis. This hypothesis, as well as the role of the dog as a sentinel of human infection by T. brucei gambiense, should be investigated in further studies.

  15. Survey results of the training, nutrition, and mental preparation of triathletes: practical implications of findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, Shawn H; Houston, Melinda; Martin, Scott B

    2011-07-01

    Although triathlon is growing in popularity at a remarkable rate, it has not been extensively studied. The aims of this research were to identify preparation strategies used by triathletes and to categorize these strategies according to gender and consultation with triathlon coaches. Survey data collected from 401 triathletes (207 males, 194 females) revealed training, nutritional, and mental preparation habits. Most participants engaged in strength training, consumed food and/or fluids during and after training, set training and competition goals, and applied mental preparation strategies during training and the hour before racing. Water was the most commonly consumed fluid; positive self-talk was the most used mental strategy. Participants were more likely to consult with a triathlon coach than a nutrition or sport psychology professional. Athletes with more years of experience in triathlon and those competing in longer distances were more likely to consult a triathlon coach. Female triathletes were more likely than male triathletes to train with others, use mental preparation strategies, and report feeling anxious before competitions. More male triathletes reported using nutritional supplements during training than their female counterparts. These findings add to the limited research base on triathletes' training habits, and hopefully will help guide practitioners who work with this group. The results provide guidance for collaborative efforts among training, nutrition, and mental health professionals to best support triathletes.

  16. Waterpipe Tobacco Smoking in Turkey: Policy Implications and Trends from the Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdöl, Cevdet; Ergüder, Toker; Morton, Jeremy; Palipudi, Krishna; Gupta, Prakash; Asma, Samira

    2015-12-08

    Waterpipe tobacco smoking (WTS) is an emerging tobacco product globally, especially among adolescents and young adults who may perceive WTS as a safe alternative to smoking cigarettes. Monitoring the use of WTS in Turkey in relation to the tobacco control policy context is important to ensure that WTS does not become a major public health issue in Turkey. The Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS) was conducted in Turkey in 2008 and was repeated in 2012. GATS provided prevalence estimates on current WTS and change over time. Other indicators of WTS were also obtained, such as age of initiation and location of use. Among persons aged 15 and older in Turkey, the current prevalence of WTS decreased from 2.3% in 2008 to 0.8% in 2012, representing a 65% relative decline. Among males, WTS decreased from 4.0% to 1.1% (72% relative decline). While the overall smoking prevalence decreased among females, there was no change in the rate of WTS (0.7% in 2008 vs. 0.5% in 2012), though the WTS prevalence rate was already low in 2008. Comprehensive tobacco control efforts have been successful in reducing the overall smoking prevalence in Turkey, which includes the reduction of cigarette smoking and WTS. However, it is important to continue monitoring the use of waterpipes in Turkey and targeting tobacco control efforts to certain groups that may be vulnerable to future WTS marketing (e.g., youth, women).

  17. Self-reporting bias in Chinook salmon sport fisheries in Idaho: implications for roving creel surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Joshua L.; Quist, Michael C.; Schill, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Self-reporting bias in sport fisheries of Chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in Idaho was quantified by comparing observed and angler-reported data. A total of 164 observed anglers fished for 541 h and caught 74 Chinook Salmon. Fifty-eight fish were harvested and 16 were released. Anglers reported fishing for 604 h, an overestimate of 63 h. Anglers reported catching 66 fish; four less harvested and four less released fish were reported than observed. A Monte Carlo simulation revealed that when angler-reported data were used, total catch was underestimated by 14–15 fish (19–20%) using the ratio-of-means estimator to calculate mean catch rate. Negative bias was reduced to six fish (8%) when the means-of-ratio estimator was used. Multiple linear regression models to predict reporting bias in time fished had poor predictive value. However, actual time fished and a categorical covariate indicating whether the angler fished continuously during their fishing trip were two variables that were present in all of the top a priori models evaluated. Underreporting of catch and overreporting of time fished by anglers present challenges when managing Chinook Salmon sport fisheries. However, confidence intervals were near target levels and using more liberal definitions of angling when estimating effort in creel surveys may decrease sensitivity to bias in angler-reported data.

  18. Residential energy use and conservation in Venezuela: Results and implications of a household survey in Caracas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueroa, M.J.; Ketoff, A.; Masera, O.

    1992-10-01

    This document presents the final report of a study of residential energy use in Caracas, the capital of Venezuela. It contains the findings of a household energy-use survey held in Caracas in 1988 and examines options for introducing energy conservation measures in the Venezuelan residential sector. Oil exports form the backbone of the Venezuelan economy. Improving energy efficiency in Venezuela will help free domestic oil resources that can be sold to the rest of the world. Energy conservation will also contribute to a faster recovery of the economy by reducing the need for major investments in new energy facilities, allowing the Venezuelan government to direct its financial investments towards other areas of development. Local environmental benefits will constitute an important additional by-product of implementing energy-efficiency policies in Venezuela. Caracas`s residential sector shows great potential for energy conservation. The sector is characterized by high saturation levels of major appliances, inefficiency of appliances available in the market, and by careless patterns of energy use. Household energy use per capita average 6.5 GJ/per year which is higher than most cities in developing countries; most of this energy is used for cooking. Electricity accounts for 41% of all energy use, while LPG and natural gas constitute the remainder. Specific options for inducing energy conservation and energy efficiency in Caracas`s residential sector include energy-pricing policies, fuel switching, particularly from electricity to gas, improving the energy performance of new appliances and customer information. To ensure the accomplishment of an energy-efficiency strategy, a concerted effort by energy users, manufacturers, utility companies, government agencies, and research institutions will be needed.

  19. Cancer perceptions: implications from the 2007 Health Information National Trends Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalkowski, Marc A; Hart, Stacey L; Du, Xianglin L; Baraniuk, Sarah; Latini, David M

    2012-09-01

    Research has demonstrated associations between sociodemographic characteristics and illness perceptions; however, the impact of cancer exposure through personal or family diagnoses is not well-studied. The purposes of this study were to examine different cancer beliefs and disparities in cancer beliefs across groups of individuals with distinct cancer histories and to identify whether cancer history predicts a set of cancer beliefs. Using Leventhal's Common Sense Model and data from the 2007 Health Information National Trends Survey (N = 7,172), we constructed multivariable logistic regression models to evaluate the effect of different stimuli, including cancer experience on cancer perceptions (e.g., prevention, causation, outcome, worry). Findings indicated significant associations between cancer history and cancer perceptions. Individuals with family and personal cancer histories were more likely than individuals without any cancer history to worry about getting cancer (OR = 3.55, 95 %CI = 2.53-4.99), agree they will develop cancer in the future (OR = 8.81, 95 %CI = 6.12-12.67) and disagree that cancer is most often caused by a person's behavior or lifestyle (OR = 1.24, 95 %CI = 1.01-1.52). Cancer history affects perceptions throughout the cancer continuum. Additionally, cancer history may influence coping behaviors and outcomes. Cancer education and survivorship programs should assess important variables such as cancer history to more effectively tailor services and monitor evolving needs throughout cancer care. Integrating cancer history information into patient education programs tailored to an individual's needs may better empower survivors and their family members to effectively promote informed decision-making about screening and preventive health behaviors, manage cancer worry, and enhance quality of life.

  20. Line Transect Surveys Underdetect Terrestrial Mammals: Implications for the Sustainability of Subsistence Hunting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragoso, José M V; Levi, Taal; Oliveira, Luiz F B; Luzar, Jeffrey B; Overman, Han; Read, Jane M; Silvius, Kirsten M

    2016-01-01

    hunting. Sign surveys may be the most viable method for large-scale, management-oriented studies in remote areas, particularly those focused on community-based wildlife management.

  1. Epilepsy in Cambodia-treatment aspects and policy implications: a population-based representative survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devender Bhalla

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: We tested two treatment strategies to determine: treatment (a prognosis (seizure frequency, mortality, suicide, and complications, (b safety and adherence of treatment, (c self-reported satisfaction with treatment and self-reported productivity, and policy aspects (a number of required tablets for universal treatment (NRT, (b cost of management, (c manpower-gap and requirements for scaling-up of epilepsy care. METHODS: We performed a random-cluster survey (N = 16510 and identified 96 cases (≥1 year of age in 24 villages. They were screened by using a validated instrument and diagnosed by the neurologists. International guidelines were used for defining and classifying epilepsy. All were given phenobarbital or valproate (cost-free in two manners patient's door-steps (March 2009-March 2010, primary-treatment-period, PTP and treatment through health-centers (March 2010-June 2011, treatment-continuation-period, TCP. The emphasis was to start on a minimum dosage and regime, without any polytherapy, according to the age of the recipients. No titration was done. Seizure-frequency was monthly and self-reported. RESULTS: The number of seizures reduced from 12.6 (pre-treatment to 1.2 (end of PTP, following which there was an increase to 3.4 (end of TCP. Between start of PTP and end of TCP, >60.0% became and remained seizure-free. During TCP, ∼26.0% went to health centers to collect their treatment. Complications reduced from 12.5% to 4.2% between start and end of PTP and increased to 17.2% between start and end of TCP. Adverse events reduced from 46.8% to 16.6% between start and end of PTP. Nearly 33 million phenobarbital 100 mg tablets are needed in Cambodia. CONCLUSIONS: Epilepsy responded sufficiently well to the conventional treatment, even when taken at a minimal dosage and a simple daily regimen, without any polytherapy. This is yet another confirmation that it is possible to substantially reduce direct burden of epilepsy

  2. Line Transect Surveys Underdetect Terrestrial Mammals: Implications for the Sustainability of Subsistence Hunting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Taal; Oliveira, Luiz F. B.; Luzar, Jeffrey B.; Overman, Han; Read, Jane M.

    2016-01-01

    hunting. Sign surveys may be the most viable method for large-scale, management-oriented studies in remote areas, particularly those focused on community-based wildlife management. PMID:27074025

  3. The Digital Divide and Health Disparities in China: Evidence From a National Survey and Policy Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Y Alicia; Zhou, Zi; Fang, Ya; Shi, Leiyu

    2017-09-11

    The digital divide persists despite broad accessibility of mobile tools. The relationship between the digital divide and health disparities reflects social status in terms of access to resources and health outcomes; however, data on this relationship are limited from developing countries such as China. The aim of this study was to examine the current rates of access to mobile tools (Internet use and mobile phone ownership) among older Chinese individuals (aged ≥45 years), the predictors of access at individual and community levels, and the relationship between access to mobile tools and health outcomes. We drew cross-sectional data from a national representative survey, the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS), which focused on the older population (aged ≥45 years). We used two-level mixed logistic regression models, controlling for unobserved heterogeneity at the community and individual levels for data analysis. In addition to individual-level socioeconomic status (SES), we included community-level resources such as neighborhood amenities, health care facilities, and community organizations. Health outcomes were measured by self-reported health and absence of disability based on validated scales. Among the 18,215 participants, 6.51% had used the Internet in the past month, and 83% owned a mobile phone. In the multivariate models, Internet use was strongly associated with SES, rural or urban residence, neighborhood amenities, community resources, and geographic region. Mobile phone ownership was strongly associated with SES and rural/urban residence but not so much with neighborhood amenities and community resources. Internet use was a significant predictor of self-reported health status, and mobile phone ownership was significantly associated with having disability even after controlling for potential confounders at the individual and community levels. This study is one of the first to examine digital divide and its relationship with health

  4. A Complete Survey of the Transient Radio Sky and Implications for Gamma-Ray Bursts, Supernovae, and other Relativistic Explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Gal-Yam, A; Poznanski, D; Levinson, A; Waxman, E; Frail, D A; Soderberg, A M; Nakar, E; Li, W; Filippenko, A V; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Ofek, Eran O.; Poznanski, Dovi; Levinson, Amir; Waxman, Eli; Frail, Dale A.; Soderberg, Alicia M.; Nakar, Ehud; Li, Weidong; Filippenko, Alexei V.

    2006-01-01

    We had previously reported on a survey for radio transients, used to set an upper limit on the number of orphan gamma-ray burst (GRB) radio afterglows, and thus a lower limit on the typical GRB beaming factor. Here we report radio and optical follow-up observations of these possible transients, achieving the first full characterization of the transient radio sky. We find that only two source are likely to be real radio transients, an optically obscured radio supernova (SN) in the nearby galaxy NGC 4216, and a source not associated with a bright host galaxy, which is too radio luminous to be a GRB afterglow. We speculate that this may be a flare from a peculiar active galactic nucleus, or a burst from an unusual Galactic compact object. We place an upper limit of 65 radio transients above 6 mJy over the entire sky at the 95% confidence level. The implications are as follows. First, we derive a limit on the typical beaming of GRBs; we find f_b^{-1} >~ 60, ~5 times higher than our earlier results. Second, we imp...

  5. Geophysical surveys of the Joya Honda maar (México) and surroundings; volcanic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Loera, Héctor; Aranda-Gómez, José Jorge; Arzate, Jorge A.; Molina-Garza, Roberto Stanley

    2008-03-01

    Joya Honda (JH) is a Quaternary maar excavated in Mesozoic limestone. It is located in central Mexico and belongs to the Ventura volcanic field (VVF), which is composed by cinder cones and maars made of intraplate-type mafic alkalic rocks. Volcanoes in the region form ˜ N20W lineaments, roughly parallel to a regional set of normal faults, but there is no obvious relation between these faults and vent distribution in the exposed geology around the maar. The volcanic rock volume is small in the VVF, and most volcanoes and their products are scattered in a region where outcrops are dominated by limestone. The near-vent tephra associated to the JH maar lies north of the crater. This relation suggests that the crater was formed by directed hydromagmatic explosions and may indicate an inclined volcanic conduit near the surface. The tephra stratigraphy suggests that the initial explosions were relatively dry and the amount of water increased during the maar forming eruption. Therefore, the existing model of the maar-diatreme formation may not be applicable to Joya Honda as it requires the formation of a cone of depression in the aquifer and deepening of the focii of the explosions as the crater and underlying diatreme grew. Thus, it is unlikely that there is a diatreme below Joya Honda. Aeromagnetic data shows a boundary between two regional magnetic domains near the elongated volcanic cluster of the VVF. The boundary is straight, with a distinct kink, from NE- to NW-trend, near JH. The limit between the domains is interpreted as fault contacts between mid-Tertiary volcanic rocks and marine Mesozoic sedimentary rocks. Hence, magma ascent in the area may have been facilitated by fractures near the surface. Magnetic and gravimetric ground surveys show that the anomalies associated with the maar are not centered in the crater, which could be consistent with an inclined volcanic conduit. A magnetic profile measured on exposed limestone across the volcanic lineament failed to

  6. An integrated geophysical survey of Kilbourne Hole, southern New Mexico: Implications for near surface exploration of Mars and the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksim, Nisa

    Features such as the Home Plate plateau on Mars, a suspected remnant of an ancient phreatomagmatic eruption, can reveal important information about paleohydrologic conditions. The eruption intensity of a phreatomagmatic volcano is controlled mainly by the quantity of water and magma, the internal geometry of the volcano, and the depth of the interaction zone between magma and water. In order to understand the paleohydrologic conditions at the time of eruption, we must understand all the factors that influenced the phreatomagmatic event. I conducted an integrated geophysical survey, which are magnetic and gravity surveys, and a ground-penetrating radar (GPR) surveys at Kilbourne Hole, a phreatomagmatic crater in southern New Mexico. These investigations serve an analog paleo-hydrogeological study that could be conducted on Mars and the Moon with an implication for planetary exploration. These geophysical surveys are designed to delineate the internal structure of a phreatomagmatic volcano and to define the volumes and masses of volcanic dikes and excavation unit, the depth of feeder dikes, and impacted velocity of the volcanic blocks. For the gravity and magnetic surveys at Kilbourne Hole, I collected data at a total of 171 gravity survey stations and 166 magnetics survey stations. A 2D gravity and magnetic inverse model was developed jointly to map the body of the magma intrusions and the internal structure of Kilbourne Hole. A total of 6 GPR surveys lines were also completed at Kilbourne Hole to image and to define locations of pyroclastic deposits, volcanic sags and blocks, the sizes distribution of volcanic blocks, and the impact velocity of the volcanic blocks. Using the size distribution and impact velocity of volcanic blocks from our GPR data, I derived the initial gas expansion velocity and the time duration of the gas expansion phase of the Kilbourne Hole eruption. These obtained parameters (volumes, masses, and depths of the feeder dikes and the excavation

  7. Estimating cetacean density and abundance in the Central and Western Mediterranean Sea through aerial surveys: Implications for management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panigada, Simone; Lauriano, Giancarlo; Donovan, Greg; Pierantonio, Nino; Cañadas, Ana; Vázquez, José Antonio; Burt, Louise

    2017-07-01

    Systematic, effective monitoring of animal population parameters underpins successful conservation strategy and wildlife management, but it is often neglected in many regions, including much of the Mediterranean Sea. Nonetheless, a series of systematic multispecies aerial surveys was carried out in the seas around Italy to gather important baseline information on cetacean occurrence, distribution and abundance. The monitored areas included the Pelagos Sanctuary, the Tyrrhenian Sea, portions of the Seas of Corsica and Sardinia, the Ionian Seas as well as the Gulf of Taranto. Overall, approximately 48,000 km were flown in either spring, summer and winter between 2009-2014, covering an area of 444,621 km2. The most commonly observed species were the striped dolphin and the fin whale, with 975 and 83 recorded sightings, respectively. Other sighted cetacean species were the common bottlenose dolphin, the Risso's dolphin, the sperm whale, the pilot whale and the Cuvier's beaked whale. Uncorrected model- and design-based estimates of density and abundance for striped dolphins and fin whales were produced, resulting in a best estimate (model-based) of around 95,000 striped dolphins (CV=11.6%; 95% CI=92,900-120,300) occurring in the Pelagos Sanctuary, Central Tyrrhenian and Western Seas of Corsica and Sardinia combined area in summer 2010. Estimates were also obtained for each individual study region and year. An initial attempt to estimate perception bias for striped dolphins is also provided. The preferred summer 2010 uncorrected best estimate (design-based) for the same areas for fin whales was around 665 (CV=33.1%; 95% CI=350-1260). Estimates are also provided for the individual study regions and years. The results represent baseline data to develop efficient, long-term, systematic monitoring programmes, essential to evaluate trends, as required by a number of national and international frameworks, and stress the need to ensure that surveys are undertaken regularly and

  8. Policy implications of using a household consumption and expenditures survey versus an observed-weighed food record survey to design a food fortification program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lividini, Keith; Fiedler, John L; Bermudez, Odilia I

    2013-12-01

    Observed-Weighed Food Record Surveys (OWFR) are regarded as the most precise dietary assessment methodology, despite their recognized shortcomings, which include limited availability, high cost, small samples with uncertain external validity that rarely include all household members, Hawthorne effects, and using only 1 or 2 days to identify "usual intake." Although Household Consumption and Expenditures Surveys (HCES) also have significant limitations, they are increasingly being used to inform nutrition policy To investigate differences in fortification simulations based on OWFR and HCES from Bangladesh. The pre- and postfortification nutrient intake levels from the two surveys were compared. The total population-based rank orderings of oil, wheat flour, and sugar coverage were identical for the two surveys. OWFR found differences in women's and children's coverage rates and average quantities consumed for all three foods that were not detected by HCES. Guided by the Food Fortification Formulator, we found that these differences did not result in differences in recommended fortification levels. Differences were found, however, in estimated impacts: although both surveys found that oil would be effective in reducing the prevalence of inadequate vitamin A intake among both subpopulations, only OWFR also found that sugar and wheat flour fortification would significantly reduce inadequate vitamin A intake among children. Despite the less precise measure of food consumption from HCES, the two surveys provide similar guidance for designing a fortification program. The external validity of these findings is limited. With relatively minor modifications, the precision of HCES in dietary assessment and the use ofHCES in fortification programming could be strengthened.

  9. The Best Stylists: A Survey of Editors, and Implications for the Teaching of Style in Freshman Composition Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spigelmire, Lynne

    A survey of 112 editors from magazines, newspapers, and publishing houses was conducted to obtain their judgments about prose style, the best prose stylists, and representative works by those stylists. Of the 112 editors surveyed, only 22 responded with useful data. The results indicated very little consensus among editors, and almost no…

  10. Results of the 2010 Statewide New Mexico School Social Work Survey: Implications for Evaluating the Effectiveness of School Social Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittlesey-Jerome, Wanda

    2013-01-01

    Today's school social workers are facing unique challenges in the workplace. The results of the 2009 New Mexico School Social Work Survey reinforced the idea that school social workers must be able to prove their effectiveness. Building on the school social work literature on practice outcomes evaluation, a more extensive statewide survey of…

  11. A Survey of Business Trends at BioOne Publishing Partners and its Implications for BioOne

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Todd A.; Joseph, Heather; Waltham, Mary

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a survey of BioOne participating publishers that was conducted during the fall of 2003. In that survey, BioOne collected data from 18 not-for-profit publishers on circulation levels, scholarly output in terms of pages and articles produced, revenues, and expenditures. From eight of the publishers, complete profit, loss, and…

  12. A Survey of Business Trends at BioOne Publishing Partners and its Implications for BioOne

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Todd A.; Joseph, Heather; Waltham, Mary

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a survey of BioOne participating publishers that was conducted during the fall of 2003. In that survey, BioOne collected data from 18 not-for-profit publishers on circulation levels, scholarly output in terms of pages and articles produced, revenues, and expenditures. From eight of the publishers, complete profit, loss, and…

  13. A case study using a patient satisfaction survey to improve the delivery and effectiveness of drug addiction treatment services: marketing implications and organizational impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Beth; Hershey, Lewis; Ritchey, Steven

    2007-01-01

    Drug abuse and addiction continues to negatively impact many lives in this country. The United States health care system has grappled with how to best serve this vulnerable population. Since the personal and societal costs of addiction are high, all recent iterations of the United States strategic health plans (such as Healthy People 2010) have prioritized this area for improvement. At the local level, health care providers who care for those with addictions are challenged with shrinking insurance coverage for services, a difficult patient population, lack of treatment options, growing ranks of indigent patients, as well as a plethora of additional management challenges. It is known that successful treatment is integrally linked with patient satisfaction with services. The most critical factors in successful addiction treatment (from a patient's perspective) are (1) their belief that the counselor cares about them and, (2) their belief that they can recover. This paper reports a case study in the use of a patient satisfaction survey as a quality management/service refinement tool within a methadone treatment setting. Results indicate that the use of the survey itself provides patients with a tangible cue supporting the presence of the critical success factors. Further, the use of a survey provides a baseline for future measurements and trending. The paper concludes with a discussion of the marketing and organizational implications of incorporating the patient satisfaction survey into the ongoing delivery program for addiction services.

  14. The Paranormal is (Still) Normal: The Sociological Implications of a Survey of Paranormal Experiences in Great Britain

    OpenAIRE

    Castro, MA; Burrows, R.; Wooffitt, R

    2014-01-01

    Historically, there has been limited sociological interest in the paranormal and no systematic study of reported paranormal experiences. There are also few medium-to-large-scale survey results with nationally representative populations focusing on paranormal experiences. This paper provides details of an exploratory survey conducted in 2009 with a nationally representative sample of 4,096 adults aged 16 years and over across Great Britain . Our findings show that 37 per cent of British adults...

  15. Consumption habits of pregnant women and implications for developmental biology: a survey of predominantly Hispanic women in California

    OpenAIRE

    Santiago, Sarah E; Park, Grace H; Huffman, Kelly J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Healthy post-pregnancy outcomes are contingent upon an informed regimen of prenatal care encouraging healthy maternal consumption habits. In this article, we describe aspects of maternal intake of food, drink, and medication in a population of predominantly Hispanic women in Southern California. Potential implications for unhealthy prenatal dietary choices are discussed. Methods The Food, B...

  16. Use of Bloodborne Pathogens Exposure Control Plans in Private Dental Practices: Results and Clinical Implications of a National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laramie, Angela K; Bednarsh, Helene; Isman, Beverly; Boiano, James M; McCrone, Susan H

    2016-06-01

    Dental healthcare workers (DHWs) are at risk for occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens (BBPs). The Occupational Safety and Health Administration Bloodborne Pathogens Standard requires employers to have a written exposure control plan (ECP) detailing methods and means to reduce and manage occupational BBP exposures. Because little information is available on whether ECPs are created and used, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and the Organization for Safety, Asepsis and Prevention conducted an online survey to determine if dental practices had an ECP, whether present ECPs had the necessary components, and if impediments existed to prevent having an ECP in place. Respondents were primarily from nonfranchised practices (69%) and dentists who owned the practice (63%). Seventy-two percent of survey participants had an ECP, and 20% were unaware of any federal requirements for an ECP prior to the survey. Engineering controls were used by many practices, although the type varied. Fifteen percent of practices did not offer the hepatitis B vaccine for employees. The survey revealed many dental practices were unaware of or were lacking required elements of the ECP. Findings from this survey indicate DHWs would benefit from increased education regarding methods to prevent occupational exposures to BBPs.

  17. Photometric H alpha and [O II] Luminosity Function of SDF and SXDF Galaxies: Implications for Future Baryon Oscillation Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Sumiyoshi, Masanao; Oshige, Shunsuke; Glazebrook, Karl; Akiyama, Masayuki; Morokuma, Tomoki; Motohara, Kentaro; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Hayashi, Masao; Yoshida, Makiko; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Kodama, Tadayuki

    2009-01-01

    Efficient selection of emission line galaxies at z > 1 by photometric information in wide field surveys is one of the keys for future spectroscopic surveys to constrain dark energy using the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) signature. Here we estimate the H alpha and [O II] line luminosity functions of galaxies at z = 0.5-1.7 using a novel approach where multi-wavelength imaging data is used to jointly estimate both photometric redshifts and star-formation rates. These photometric estimates of line luminosities at high-redshift use the large data sets of the Subaru Deep Field and Subaru XMM-Newton Deep Field (covering \\sim 1 deg^2) and are calibrated with the spectroscopic data of the local Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies. The derived luminosity functions (especially H alpha) are in reasonable agreement with the past estimates based on spectroscopic or narrow-band-filter surveys. This dataset is useful for examining the photometric selection of target galaxies for BAO surveys because of the large cosmologi...

  18. Prevalence of trachoma in unity state, South Sudan: results from a large-scale population-based survey and potential implications for further surveys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tansy Edwards

    Full Text Available Large parts of South Sudan are thought to be trachoma-endemic but baseline data are limited. This study aimed to estimate prevalence for planning trachoma interventions in Unity State, to identify risk factors and to investigate the effect of different sampling approaches on study conclusions.The survey area was defined as one domain of eight counties in Unity State. Across the area, 40 clusters (villages were randomly selected proportional to the county population size in a population-based prevalence survey. The simplified grading scheme was used to classify clinical signs of trachoma. The unadjusted prevalence of trachoma inflammation-follicular (TF in children aged 1-9 years was 70.5% (95% CI: 68.6-72.3. After adjusting for age, sex, county and clustering of cases at household and village level the prevalence was 71.0% (95% CI: 69.9-72.1. The prevalence of trachomatous trichiasis (TT in adults was 15.1% (95% CI: 13.4-17.0 and 13.5% (95% CI: 12.0-15.1 before and after adjustment, respectively. We estimate that 700,000 people (the entire population of Unity State require antibiotic treatment and approximately 54,178 people require TT surgery. Risk factor analyses confirmed child-level associations with TF and highlighted that older adults living in poverty are at higher risk of TT. Conditional simulations, testing the alternatives of sampling 20 or 60 villages over the same area, indicated that sampling of only 20 villages would have provided an acceptable level of precision for state-level prevalence estimation to inform intervention decisions in this hyperendemic setting.Trachoma poses an enormous burden on the population of Unity State. Comprehensive control is urgently required to avoid preventable blindness and should be initiated across the state now. In other parts of South Sudan suspected to be highly trachoma endemic, counties should be combined into larger survey areas to generate the baseline data required to initiate interventions.

  19. Using Surveys to Track Student Sexual Behavior and Attitudes in the Public Schools: Current Case Law and Future Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullis, Ronald K.

    2008-01-01

    Two recent federal court cases have addressed the constitutionality of using sexual surveys in public schools. This article compares these cases with an earlier case dealing with the same issue but reaching different results. This article also describes the constitutional rights of parents to educate their children and the school's rights to…

  20. Ocean Melting Greenland (OMG) bathymetric survey of northwest Greenland and implications for the recent evolution of its glaciers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, M.; Rignot, E. J.; Willis, J. K.; Fenty, I. G.

    2015-12-01

    Oceans Melting Greenland (OMG) is a five-year Earth Ventures Suborbital Mission funded by NASA to investigate the role of the oceans in ice loss around the margins of the Greenland Ice Sheet, which includes measurements of seafloor bathymetry from multibeam surveys and airborne gravity, glacier surface elevation from high-frequency radar interferometry, and temperature/salinity/depth from vessels and airborne-dropped probes. Here, we describe the results of the 2016 bathymetry survey of northwest Greenland that took place in the summer of 2015: july 22-August 19 and Sept 2-Sept 16 spanning from Ilulissat to Thule AFB in north Greenland, and to be complemented by a survey of southeast Greenland in 2016. We deployed a multibeam Reson 7160 with 512 beams installed on the hull of the Cape Race vessel, with enhanced capabilities for fjord wall and ice face mapping. The survey tracks were optimized based on the IBCAO3 database, recent cruises, airborne gravity data collected by NASA Operation IceBridge which indicated the presence of troughs, bed topography mapped inland using a mass conservation approach, the spatial distribution of ice discharge to locate the largest outlets and maximizing the number of major fjords sampled during the survey, with the goal to identify all troughs that are major pathways for subsurface ocean heat, and constrain as many glacier ice front thickness as permitted by time and the practicality of navigating the ice-choked fjords. The data reveal many deep, U-shaped, submarine valleys connected to the glaciers, intercut with sills and over deepened in narrower passages where former glaciers and ice streams merged into larger units; as well as fjords ending in shallow plateaus with glaciers in retreated positions. The presence of warm, salty water of Atlantic origin (AW) in the fjords is documented using CTD. Some glaciers sit on shallow plateaus in cold, fresh polar waters (PW) at the end of deep fjords, while others are deeper and standing in

  1. The z~4 Quasar Luminosity Function: Implications for supermassive black hole growth, reionization, and future time domain surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlSayyad, Yusra; Connolly, Andrew J.; McGreer, Ian D.; Ivezic, Zeljko; Fan, Xiaohui; LSST Data Management

    2017-01-01

    Upcoming time-domain imaging surveys such as the LSST will detect over a million high-redshift (z > 4) quasars, making complete spectroscopic followup unfeasible. Statistical estimates such as luminosity functions and clustering measurements will require purely photometric methods for classifying objects, estimating redshifts and estimating selection functions. We develop these methods and constrain the optical, type I quasar luminosity function (QLF) at 3.75 +60; -1.26 +1.26) known as Stripe 82, we extracted 40 million new lightcurves using the LSST data management software and selected a statistical sample of z~4 quasars based on colors and variability metrics. We confirmed these using a spectroscopically complete 55 sq. deg. sub-region augmented with 102 new spectroscopic observations of quasars at z > 3.4 with i 3.75) and constraint on the characteristic luminosity M*1450 = -26.7 from a single, uniformly-selected survey at z~4.

  2. An assessment of the Estonian investment climate: Results of a survey of foreign investors and policy implications

    OpenAIRE

    Ziacik, Terri

    2000-01-01

    Credible economic reform has played a key role in Estonia’s success in attracting significant amounts of foreign direct investment. This paper analyzes two years of data from a survey of foreign investors in Estonia to determine the major motivations to invest and the greatest problems faced by investors. Results indicate that the labour force and market-related factors are the primary motivations for investors coming to Estonia, while bureaucracy, corruption, and labour quality are the great...

  3. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Cosmological implications of the Fourier space wedges of the final sample

    CERN Document Server

    Grieb, Jan Niklas; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Scoccimarro, Román; Crocce, Martín; Vecchia, Claudio Dalla; Montesano, Francesco; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Ross, Ashley J; Beutler, Florian; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Prada, Francisco; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Cuesta, Antonio J; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Percival, Will J; Vargas-Magana, Mariana; Tinker, Jeremy L; Tojeiro, Rita; Brownstein, Joel R; Maraston, Claudia; Nichol, Robert C; Olmstead, Matthew D; Samushia, Lado; Seo, Hee-Jong; Streblyanska, Alina; Zhao, Gong-bo

    2016-01-01

    We extract cosmological information from the anisotropic power spectrum measurements from the recently completed Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), extending the concept of clustering wedges to Fourier space. Making use of new FFT-based estimators, we measure the power spectrum clustering wedges of the BOSS sample by filtering out the information of Legendre multipoles l > 4. Our modelling of these measurements is based on novel approaches to describe non-linear evolution, bias, and redshift-space distortions, which we test using synthetic catalogues based on large-volume N-body simulations. We are able to include smaller scales than in previous analyses, resulting in tighter cosmological constraints. Using three overlapping redshift bins, we measure the angular diameter distance, the Hubble parameter, and the cosmic growth rate, and explore the cosmological implications of our full shape clustering measurements in combination with CMB and SN Ia data. Assuming a {\\Lambda}CDM cosmology, we constra...

  4. The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: Power-spectrum analysis of the final dataset and cosmological implications

    CERN Document Server

    Cole, S; Peacock, J A; Norberg, P; Baugh, C M; Frenk, C S; Baldry, I K; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Bridges, T; Cannon, R; Colless, M; Collins, C; Couch, W; Cross, N J G; Dalton, G B; Eke, V R; De Propris, R; Driver, S P; Efstathiou, G P; Ellis, Richard S; Glazebrook, K; Jackson, C; Jenkins, A; Lahav, O; Lewis, I; Lumsden, S; Maddox, S; Madgwick, D; Peterson, B A; Sutherland, W; Taylor, K

    2005-01-01

    We present a power spectrum analysis of the final 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey, employing a direct Fourier method. The sample used comprises 221,414 galaxies with measured redshifts. We investigate in detail the modelling of the sample selection. A new angular mask is derived, based on revisions to the photometric calibration. The redshift selection function is determined by dividing the survey according to rest-frame colour, and deducing a self-consistent treatment of k-corrections and evolution for each population. The covariance matrix for the power-spectrum estimates is determined using two different approaches to the construction of mock surveys which are used to demonstrate that the input cosmological model can be correctly recovered. We are confident that the 2dFGRS power spectrum can be used to infer the matter content of the universe. On large scales, our estimated power spectrum shows evidence for the `baryon oscillations' that are predicted in CDM models. Fitting to a CDM model, assuming a primordial...

  5. A survey of amphibians and reptiles in Chu Mom Ray National Park, Vietnam, with implications for herpetofaunal conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Jestrzemski

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A herpetological survey was conducted in spring 2012 in the eastern part of Chu Mom Ray National Park, Kon Tum Province, southern Vietnam, to create a first inventory list of amphibians and reptiles and record threats to the local herpetocommunity. We also evaluated the efficiency of two faunistic inventory methods, drift fences and transect visual encounter surveys, in detecting reptiles and amphibians under the given circumstances. Five drift fence arrays with pitfalls and double-ended funnel traps were set up in lowland evergreen forest at elevations from 777 to 846 m a.s.l. and monitored over 40 nights. Additionally, 22 night excursions were conducted along an adjacent forest stream transect. A total of 62 species of amphibians and reptiles were recorded, comprising 24 anurans, one caecilian, 20 lizards, 16 snakes and one freshwater turtle. Because all specimens were released after capture in the field, proper identification and taxonomic revision are required for at least ten recorded amphibian and six reptile species. Four species are listed in the Vietnam Red Data Book (2007 and two species are listed in the Governmental Decree No32/2006/ND-CP (2006. In terms of distribution patterns, old-growth forest habitat harbored the highest number of recorded reptiles and amphibians (41 species, followed by open land (18 species and secondary forest (14 species. Most species were captured opportunistically (34, followed by the drift fences (29 and transect night surveys (18. Opportunistic encounters provided for most reptiles (22, while most amphibians were recorded at the drift fence arrays (15. Poaching of wildlife proved to be the major threat to the local herpetofauna, in particular large reptiles. In the study area, reptiles and amphibians are also at risk from habitat loss and degradation. Recommendations for reptile and amphibian conservation are provided.

  6. Airborne Geophysical Surveys in the North-Central Region of Goias (Brazil): Implications for Radiometric Characterization of Subtropical Soils

    CERN Document Server

    Guimarães, S N P; Justo, J S

    2011-01-01

    In this work we present progress obtained in analysis airborne geophysical survey data for the north-central region of the state of Goias (Brazil). The results obtained indicate that most of the subtropical soil types are characterized by Uranium contents of greater than one parts per million (ppm). Only ultisol and oxisol soils are found to have Uranium contents lower than one ppm. Thorium and Potassium abundances also display trends similar to those of Uranium. The K/U ratios fall in the expected range of values for common soils while the Th/U ratios are higher than normal. This latter observation may indicate a characteristic feature of subtropical soils. Alternatively it may be considered as indicative of disequilibrium conditions in radioactive series and consequent underestimation of Uranium in soil layers of the study area. In this context we point out the possibility of using results of radiometric surveys as a convenient complementary tool in identifying geochemical zoning of soils in subtropical env...

  7. The 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey: power-spectrum analysis of the final data set and cosmological implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Shaun; Percival, Will J.; Peacock, John A.; Norberg, Peder; Baugh, Carlton M.; Frenk, Carlos S.; Baldry, Ivan; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Bridges, Terry; Cannon, Russell; Colless, Matthew; Collins, Chris; Couch, Warrick; Cross, Nicholas J. G.; Dalton, Gavin; Eke, Vincent R.; De Propris, Roberto; Driver, Simon P.; Efstathiou, George; Ellis, Richard S.; Glazebrook, Karl; Jackson, Carole; Jenkins, Adrian; Lahav, Ofer; Lewis, Ian; Lumsden, Stuart; Maddox, Steve; Madgwick, Darren; Peterson, Bruce A.; Sutherland, Will; Taylor, Keith

    2005-09-01

    We present a power-spectrum analysis of the final 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS), employing a direct Fourier method. The sample used comprises 221414 galaxies with measured redshifts. We investigate in detail the modelling of the sample selection, improving on previous treatments in a number of respects. A new angular mask is derived, based on revisions to the photometric calibration. The redshift selection function is determined by dividing the survey according to rest-frame colour, and deducing a self-consistent treatment of k-corrections and evolution for each population. The covariance matrix for the power-spectrum estimates is determined using two different approaches to the construction of mock surveys, which are used to demonstrate that the input cosmological model can be correctly recovered. We discuss in detail the possible differences between the galaxy and mass power spectra, and treat these using simulations, analytic models and a hybrid empirical approach. Based on these investigations, we are confident that the 2dFGRS power spectrum can be used to infer the matter content of the universe. On large scales, our estimated power spectrum shows evidence for the `baryon oscillations' that are predicted in cold dark matter (CDM) models. Fitting to a CDM model, assuming a primordial ns= 1 spectrum, h= 0.72 and negligible neutrino mass, the preferred parameters are Ωmh= 0.168 +/- 0.016 and a baryon fraction Ωb/Ωm= 0.185 +/- 0.046 (1σ errors). The value of Ωmh is 1σ lower than the 0.20 +/- 0.03 in our 2001 analysis of the partially complete 2dFGRS. This shift is largely due to the signal from the newly sampled regions of space, rather than the refinements in the treatment of observational selection. This analysis therefore implies a density significantly below the standard Ωm= 0.3: in combination with cosmic microwave background (CMB) data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP), we infer Ωm= 0.231 +/- 0.021.

  8. College students lack knowledge of standard drink volumes: implications for definitions of risky drinking based on survey data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Aaron M; Kraus, Courtney L; Flom, Julie D; Kestenbaum, Lori A; Mitchell, Jamie R; Shah, Kunal; Swartzwelder, H Scott

    2005-04-01

    College students tend to pour single servings of beer and liquor that are larger than commonly used standards. The reasons for this are unknown. Students might overpour because they lack knowledge of standard serving sizes. Alternatively, they might know how much alcohol to pour but simply have difficulty pouring the correct amounts. Misperceptions of standard serving sizes could lead to inaccuracies in self-reported consumption. If this is the case, then the validity of students' responses on alcohol surveys and the definitions of risky drinking that are based on them would be called into question. This study examined how college students define standard drinks, whether their definitions are similar to the definitions commonly used by alcohol researchers and government agencies, and whether their definitions of standard drinks are related to the sizes of the drinks that they pour. The study also examined whether feedback regarding the accuracy of their definitions of standard drinks leads students to alter their self-reported levels of consumption. Students (N = 133) completed an alcohol survey and performed tasks that required them to free-pour a single beer, glass of wine, shot of liquor, or the amount of liquor in a mixed drink. Roughly half of the students received feedback regarding their definitions of standard drinks. All students then were resurveyed about their recent levels of consumption. With the exception of beer, students incorrectly defined the volumes of standard servings of alcohol, overestimating the appropriate volumes. They also overestimated appropriate volumes when asked to free-pour drinks. Positive relationships existed between students' definitions of standard drinks and the sizes of the drinks that they free-poured. Feedback regarding misperceptions of standard drink volumes led to an increase in levels of self-reported consumption, suggesting that students' original estimates of their alcohol consumption were too low. Despite the recent

  9. Very-low-frequency resistivity, self-potential and ground temperature surveys on Taal volcano (Philippines): Implications for future activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlotnicki, J.; Vargemezis, G.; Johnston, M. J. S.; Sasai, Y.; Reniva, P.; Alanis, P.

    2017-06-01

    Taal volcano is one of the most dangerous volcanoes in the Philippines. Thirty-three eruptions have occurred through historical time with several exhibiting cataclysmic phases. Most recent eruptions are confined to Volcano Island located within the prehistoric Taal collapse caldera that is now filled by Taal Lake. The last eruptive activity from 1965 to 1977 took place from Mt. Tabaro, about 2 km to the southwest of the Main Crater center. Since this time, episodes of seismic activity, ground deformation, gas release, surface fissuring, fumarole activity and temperature changes are recorded periodically around the main crater, but no major eruption has occurred. This period of quiescence is the third longest period without eruptive activity since 1572. In March 2010, a campaign based on Very-Low-Frequency (VLF) resistivity surveys together with repeated surveys of self-potential, ground temperature and fissure activity was intensified and the results compared to a large-scale Electrical Resistivity Tomography experiment. This work fortunately occurred before, within and after a new seismovolcanic crisis from late April 2010 to March 2011. The joint analysis of these new data, together with results from previous magnetotelluric soundings, allows a better description of the electrical resistivity and crustal structure beneath the Main Crater down to a depth of several kilometers. No indication of growth of the two geothermal areas located on both sides of the northern crater rim was apparent from 2005 to March 2010. These areas appear controlled by active fissures, opened during the 1992 and 1994 crises, that dip downward towards the core of the hydrothermal system located at about 2.5 km depth beneath the crater. Older mineralized fissures at lower elevations to the North of the geothermal areas also dip downward under the crater. Repeated self-potential and ground temperature surveys completed between 2005 and 2015 show new geothermal and hydrothermal activity in

  10. Revision total hip and knee arthroplasty implant identification: implications for use of Unique Device Identification 2012 AAHKS member survey results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Natalia A; Jehn, Megan; York, Sally; Davis, Charles M

    2014-02-01

    FDA's Unique Device Identification (UDI) Rule will mandate manufacturers to assign unique identifiers to their marketed devices. UDI use is expected to improve implant documentation and identification. A 2012 American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons membership survey explored revision total hip and knee arthroplasty implant identification processes. 87% of surgeons reported regularly using at least 3 methods to identify failed implants pre-operatively. Median surgeon identification time was 20 min; median staff time was 30 min. 10% of implants could not be identified pre-operatively. 2% could not be identified intra-operatively. UDI in TJA registry and UDI in EMR were indicated practices to best support implant identification and save time. FDA's UDI rule sets the foundation for UDI use in patient care settings as standard practice for implant documentation. © 2013.

  11. Implications of the field sampling procedure of the LUCAS Topsoil Survey for uncertainty in soil organic carbon concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lark, R. M.; Rawlins, B. G.; Lark, T. A.

    2014-05-01

    The LUCAS Topsoil survey is a pan-European Union initiative in which soil data were collected according to standard protocols from 19 967 sites. Any inference about soil variables is subject to uncertainty due to different sources of variability in the data. In this study we examine the likely magnitude of uncertainty due to the field-sampling protocol. The published sampling protocol (LUCAS, 2009) describes a procedure to form a composite soil sample from aliquots collected to a depth of between approximately 15-20. A v-shaped hole to the target depth is cut with a spade, then a slice is cut from one of the exposed surfaces. This methodology gives rather less control of the sampling depth than protocols used in other soil and geochemical surveys, this may be a substantial source of variation in uncultivated soils with strong contrasts between an organic-rich A-horizon and an underlying B-horizon. We extracted all representative profile descriptions from soil series recorded in the memoir of the 1:250 000-scale map of Northern England (Soil Survey of England and Wales, 1984) where the base of the A-horizon is less than 20 cm below the surface. The Soil Associations in which these 14 series are significant members cover approximately 17% of the area of Northern England, and are expected to be the mineral soils with the largest organic content. Soil Organic Carbon content and bulk density were extracted for the A- and B-horizons, along with the thickness of the horizons. Recorded bulk density, or prediction by a pedotransfer function, were also recorded. For any proposed angle of the v-shaped hole, the proportions of A- and B-horizon in the resulting sample may be computed by trigonometry. From the bulk density and SOC concentration of the horizons, the SOC concentration of the sample can be computed. For each Soil Series we drew 1000 random samples from a trapezoidal distribution of angles, with uniform density over the range corresponding to depths 15-20 cm and

  12. A survey of mangiferin and hydroxycinnamic acid ester accumulation in coffee (Coffea) leaves: biological implications and uses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campa, Claudine; Mondolot, Laurence; Rakotondravao, Arsene; Bidel, Luc P. R.; Gargadennec, Annick; Couturon, Emmanuel; La Fisca, Philippe; Rakotomalala, Jean-Jacques; Jay-Allemand, Christian; Davis, Aaron P.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims The phenolic composition of Coffea leaves has barely been studied, and therefore this study conducts the first detailed survey, focusing on mangiferin and hydroxycinnamic acid esters (HCEs). Methods Using HPLC, including a new technique allowing quantification of feruloylquinic acid together with mangiferin, and histochemical methods, mangiferin content and tissue localization were compared in leaves and fruits of C. pseudozanguebariae, C. arabica and C. canephora. The HCE and mangiferin content of leaves was evaluated for 23 species native to Africa or Madagascar. Using various statistical methods, data were assessed in relation to distribution, ecology, phylogeny and use. Key Results Seven of the 23 species accumulated mangiferin in their leaves. Mangiferin leaf-accumulating species also contain mangiferin in the fruits, but only in the outer (sporophytic) parts. In both leaves and fruit, mangiferin accumulation decreases with ageing. A relationship between mangiferin accumulation and UV levels is posited, owing to localization with photosynthetic tissues, and systematic distribution in high altitude clades and species with high altitude representatives. Analyses of mangiferin and HCE content showed that there are significant differences between species, and that samples can be grouped into species, with few exceptions. These data also provide independent support for various Coffea lineages, as proposed by molecular phylogenetic analyses. Sampling of the hybrids C. arabica and C. heterocalyx cf. indicates that mangiferin and HCE accumulation may be under independent parental influence. Conclusions This survey of the phenolic composition in Coffea leaves shows that mangiferin and HCE accumulation corresponds to lineage recognition and species delimitation, respectively. Knowledge of the spectrum of phenolic accumulation within species and populations could be of considerable significance for adaptation to specific environments. The potential

  13. Cultural competency in peer-run programs: results of a web survey and implications for future practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonikas, Jessica A; Kiosk, Stephen; Grey, Dennis D; Hamilton, Marie M; McNulty, James; Cook, Judith A

    2010-01-01

    The study explored perceptions of adults with psychiatric disabilities regarding cultural competency of peer-run mental health support groups and programs. Web survey respondents were recruited via mental health list-servs, web sites, newsletters, emails, and word of mouth. A total of 527 peers were surveyed about cultural competency barriers facing peer-run programs; common reasons for not using peer services; and strategies to engage diverse communities. Both multicultural and Caucasian respondents agreed that lack of funding and staff education about diversity were barriers to cultural competency in peer programs. Multicultural respondents were more likely than whites to feel that both the recognition of the need for and interest in attending cultural competency training is lacking in peer programs, as well as information about the diverse composition of peer program memberships. Among those who had never participated in peer support, people of color were more likely than whites to endorse feeling they would not belong and believing their languages would not be spoken in peer programs. Whites, on the other hand, were more likely to cite a preference for professional over peer support, while nearly half of both groups indicated that the main reason for non-attendance is a lack of knowledge about peer programs. Qualitative results highlighted successful outreach and engagement strategies. Study findings informed development of a cultural competency tool that was pilot-tested among peer-run programs. Given the importance of peer support in recovery, these findings suggest the need for additional research on cultural competency in peer programs.

  14. How long do the dead survive on the road? Carcass persistence probability and implications for road-kill monitoring surveys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara M Santos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Road mortality is probably the best-known and visible impact of roads upon wildlife. Although several factors influence road-kill counts, carcass persistence time is considered the most important determinant underlying underestimates of road mortality. The present study aims to describe and model carcass persistence variability on the road for different taxonomic groups under different environmental conditions throughout the year; and also to assess the effect of sampling frequency on the relative variation in road-kill estimates registered within a survey. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Daily surveys of road-killed vertebrates were conducted over one year along four road sections with different traffic volumes. Survival analysis was then used to i describe carcass persistence timings for overall and for specific animal groups; ii assess optimal sampling designs according to research objectives; and iii model the influence of road, animal and weather factors on carcass persistence probabilities. Most animal carcasses persisted on the road for the first day only, with some groups disappearing at very high rates. The advisable periodicity of road monitoring that minimizes bias in road mortality estimates is daily monitoring for bats (in the morning and lizards (in the afternoon, daily monitoring for toads, small birds, small mammals, snakes, salamanders, and lagomorphs; 1 day-interval (alternate days for large birds, birds of prey, hedgehogs, and freshwater turtles; and 2 day-interval for carnivores. Multiple factors influenced the persistence probabilities of vertebrate carcasses on the road. Overall, the persistence was much lower for small animals, on roads with lower traffic volumes, for carcasses located on road lanes, and during humid conditions and high temperatures during the wet season and dry seasons, respectively. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The guidance given here on monitoring frequencies is particularly relevant to provide

  15. Stability of children's insurance coverage and implications for access to care: evidence from the Survey of Income and Program Participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchmueller, Thomas; Orzol, Sean M; Shore-Sheppard, Lara

    2014-06-01

    Even as the number of children with health insurance has increased, coverage transitions--movement into and out of coverage and between public and private insurance--have become more common. Using data from 1996 to 2005, we examine whether insurance instability has implications for access to primary care. Because unobserved factors related to parental behavior and child health may affect both the stability of coverage and utilization, we estimate the relationship between insurance and the probability that a child has at least one physician visit per year using a model that includes child fixed effects to account for unobserved heterogeneity. Although we find that unobserved heterogeneity is an important factor influencing cross-sectional correlations, conditioning on child fixed effects we find a statistically and economically significant relationship between insurance coverage stability and access to care. Children who have part-year public or private insurance are more likely to have at least one doctor's visit than children who are uninsured for a full year, but less likely than children with full-year coverage. We find comparable effects for public and private insurance. Although cross-sectional analyses suggest that transitions directly between public and private insurance are associated with lower rates of utilization, the evidence of such an effect is much weaker when we condition on child fixed effects.

  16. The Australian longitudinal study on male health sampling design and survey weighting: implications for analysis and interpretation of clustered data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J. Spittal

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Australian Longitudinal Study on Male Health (Ten to Men used a complex sampling scheme to identify potential participants for the baseline survey. This raises important questions about when and how to adjust for the sampling design when analyzing data from the baseline survey. Methods We describe the sampling scheme used in Ten to Men focusing on four important elements: stratification, multi-stage sampling, clustering and sample weights. We discuss how these elements fit together when using baseline data to estimate a population parameter (e.g., population mean or prevalence or to estimate the association between an exposure and an outcome (e.g., an odds ratio. We illustrate this with examples using a continuous outcome (weight in kilograms and a binary outcome (smoking status. Results Estimates of a population mean or disease prevalence using Ten to Men baseline data are influenced by the extent to which the sampling design is addressed in an analysis. Estimates of mean weight and smoking prevalence are larger in unweighted analyses than weighted analyses (e.g., mean = 83.9 kg vs. 81.4 kg; prevalence = 18.0 % vs. 16.7 %, for unweighted and weighted analyses respectively and the standard error of the mean is 1.03 times larger in an analysis that acknowledges the hierarchical (clustered structure of the data compared with one that does not. For smoking prevalence, the corresponding standard error is 1.07 times larger. Measures of association (mean group differences, odds ratios are generally similar in unweighted or weighted analyses and whether or not adjustment is made for clustering. Conclusions The extent to which the Ten to Men sampling design is accounted for in any analysis of the baseline data will depend on the research question. When the goals of the analysis are to estimate the prevalence of a disease or risk factor in the population or the magnitude of a population-level exposure

  17. The Australian longitudinal study on male health sampling design and survey weighting: implications for analysis and interpretation of clustered data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spittal, Matthew J; Carlin, John B; Currier, Dianne; Downes, Marnie; English, Dallas R; Gordon, Ian; Pirkis, Jane; Gurrin, Lyle

    2016-10-31

    The Australian Longitudinal Study on Male Health (Ten to Men) used a complex sampling scheme to identify potential participants for the baseline survey. This raises important questions about when and how to adjust for the sampling design when analyzing data from the baseline survey. We describe the sampling scheme used in Ten to Men focusing on four important elements: stratification, multi-stage sampling, clustering and sample weights. We discuss how these elements fit together when using baseline data to estimate a population parameter (e.g., population mean or prevalence) or to estimate the association between an exposure and an outcome (e.g., an odds ratio). We illustrate this with examples using a continuous outcome (weight in kilograms) and a binary outcome (smoking status). Estimates of a population mean or disease prevalence using Ten to Men baseline data are influenced by the extent to which the sampling design is addressed in an analysis. Estimates of mean weight and smoking prevalence are larger in unweighted analyses than weighted analyses (e.g., mean = 83.9 kg vs. 81.4 kg; prevalence = 18.0 % vs. 16.7 %, for unweighted and weighted analyses respectively) and the standard error of the mean is 1.03 times larger in an analysis that acknowledges the hierarchical (clustered) structure of the data compared with one that does not. For smoking prevalence, the corresponding standard error is 1.07 times larger. Measures of association (mean group differences, odds ratios) are generally similar in unweighted or weighted analyses and whether or not adjustment is made for clustering. The extent to which the Ten to Men sampling design is accounted for in any analysis of the baseline data will depend on the research question. When the goals of the analysis are to estimate the prevalence of a disease or risk factor in the population or the magnitude of a population-level exposure-outcome association, our advice is to adopt an analysis that respects the

  18. High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Survey over the Yucatan Peninsula - Implications for Chicxulub Impact, Secondary Craters and Regional Crustal Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fucugauchi, J. U.; Lopez-Loera, H.; Rebolledo-Vieyra, M.

    2011-12-01

    We present the initial results of a low-altitude high-resolution aeromagnetic study over the Yucatan peninsula. Area surveyed extends from 86W to 91W and 18N to 21N, covering the peninsula and adjacent continental margin of Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea. Aeromagnetic surveys are integrated into a regional map, and regional and residual anomalies are separated using spectral and least-squares methods. For the study, aeromagnetic field was reduced to the pole and several data filtering techniques were used, including first and second vertical derivatives, analytical signal, and upward and downward analytical continuations. The region is characterized by large amplitude broad elongated magnetic anomalies oriented north-south in the northern sector of the continental shelf, and northwest-southeast and northeast-southwest over the western and eastern sides of the peninsula, respectively. Major regional anomalies extend from the continental shelf into the peninsula, whereas other anomaly trends in the central northern sector, at northeast limit of Chicxulub crater, are restricted to the shelf. Largest anomaly on the east extends over the Holbox fracture zone. At its southern end, south of Chetumal a parallel trend extends over the Rio Hondo fault zone between Quintana Roo and Belize. On the western peninsula the anomaly is characterized by two parallel trends offset between Yucatan and Campeche. The central zone of Chicxulub is characterized by a semi-circular anomaly pattern, surrounded by long wavelength small amplitude anomalies extending to the east on the peninsula and shelf, isolated from the regional broad anomalies. To the south of Chicxulub anomaly, there is an elongated low with a central high extending southward from the terrace zone inside the crater rim. The elongated magnetic anomaly correlates with a broad gravity low, which is apparent south of the concentric zone of anomalies. To the north of Chicxulub anomaly, a magnetic high inside the crater is

  19. Increasing availability and consumption of single cigarettes: trends and implications for smoking cessation from the ITC Mexico Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Marissa G; Fleischer, Nancy L; Reynales-Shigematsu, Luz Myriam; Arillo-Santillán, Edna; Thrasher, James F

    2015-07-01

    Determine (1) trends in single cigarette availability and purchasing in Mexico and (2) the association between neighbourhood access to singles and cessation behaviour among adult Mexican smokers. We analysed data from Wave 4 (2010), Wave 5 (2011) and Wave 6 (2012) of the Mexican International Tobacco Control Policy Evaluation Survey. We used data from all three waves to examine time trends in singles availability and purchasing. To explore the association between neighbourhood access to singles and cessation behaviour, we used data from participants who were smokers at Wave 5 and followed up at Wave 6 (n=1272). The percentage of participants who saw singles sold daily (45.2% in 2010; 51.4% in 2011; 64.9% in 2012), who bought singles at least once a week (22.3% in 2010; 29.1% in 2011; 29.1% in 2012) and whose last cigarette purchase was a single (16.6% in 2010; 20.7% in 2011; 25.8% in 2012) increased significantly from 2010 to 2012 (all pMexico and growing in availability. Future research should explore potential explanations, consequences and effective methods for reducing the availability of single cigarettes. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  20. Large Area Survey for z=7 Galaxies in SDF and GOODS-N: Implications for Galaxy Formation and Cosmic Reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Ouchi, Masami; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Ferguson, Henry C; Fall, Michael S; Ono, Yoshiaki; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Morokuma, Tomoki; Nakajima, Kimihiko; Okamura, Sadanori; Dickinson, Mark; Giavalisco, Mauro; Ohta, Kouji

    2009-01-01

    We present results of our large-area survey for z'-band dropout galaxies at z=7 in a 1568 arcmin^2 sky area covering the SDF and GOODS-N fields. Combining our ultra-deep Subaru/Suprime-Cam z'- and y-band (lambda_eff=1um) images with legacy data of Subaru and HST, we have identified 22 bright z-dropout galaxies down to y=26, one of which has a spectroscopic redshift of z=6.96 determined from Lya emission. The z=7 luminosity function (LF) yields the best-fit Schechter parameters of phi*=1.1 +2.8/-0.8 x10^(-3) Mpc^(-3), Muv*=-19.9 +/-0.7 mag, and alpha=-1.7 +/-1.3, and indicates a decrease from z=6 at the =~ 95% confidence level. This decrease is beyond the cosmic variance in our two fields, which is estimated to be a factor of ~ 3 but not larger than ~100. A comparison with the reionization models suggests either that the Universe could not be totally ionized by only galaxies at z=7, or more likely that properties of galaxies at z=7 are different from those at low redshifts having, e.g., a larger escape fractio...

  1. OTEC cold water pipe: a survey of available shell analysis computer programs and implications of hydrodynamic loadings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pompa, J.A.; Allik, H.; Webman, K.; Spaulding, M.

    1979-02-01

    The design and analysis of the cold water pipe (CWP) is one of the most important technological problems to be solved in the OTEC ocean engineering program. Analytical computer models have to be developed and verified in order to provide an engineering approach for the OTEC CWP with regards to environmental factors such as waves, currents, platform motions, etc., and for various structural configurations and materials such as rigid wall CWP, compliant CWP, stockade CWP, etc. To this end, Analysis and Technology, Inc. has performed a review and evaluation of shell structural analysis computer programs applicable to the design of an OTEC CWP. Included in this evaluation are discussions of the hydrodynamic flow field, structure-fluid interaction and the state-of-the-art analytical procedures for analysis of offshore structures. The analytical procedures which must be incorporated into the design of a CWP are described. A brief review of the state-of-the-art for analysis of offshore structures and the need for a shell analysis for the OTEC CWP are included. A survey of available shell computer programs, both special purpose and general purpose, and discussions of the features of these dynamic shell programs and how the hydrodynamic loads are represented within the computer programs are included. The hydrodynamic loads design criteria for the CWP are described. An assessment of the current state of knowledge for hydrodynamic loads is presented. (WHK)

  2. Household energy use in urban Venezuela: Implications from surveys in Maracaibo, Valencia, Merida, and Barcelona-Puerto La Cruz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueroa, M.J.; Sathaye, J.

    1993-08-01

    This report identifies the most important results of a comparative analysis of household commercial energy use in Venezuelan urban cities. The use of modern fuels is widespread among all cities. Cooking consumes the largest share of urban household energy use. The survey documents no use of biomass and a negligible use of kerosene for cooking. LPG, natural gas, and kerosene are the main fuels available. LPG is the fuel choice of low-income households in all cities except Maracaibo, where 40% of all households use natural gas. Electricity consumption in Venezuela`s urban households is remarkably high compared with the levels used in households in comparable Latin American countries and in households of industrialized nations which confront harsher climatic conditions and, therefore, use electricity for water and space heating. The penetration of appliances in Venezuela`s urban households is very high. The appliances available on the market are inefficient, and there are inefficient patterns of energy use among the population. Climate conditions and the urban built form all play important roles in determining the high level of energy consumption in Venezuelan urban households. It is important to acknowledge the opportunities for introducing energy efficiency and conservation in Venezuela`s residential sector, particularly given current economic and financial constraints, which may hamper the future provision of energy services.

  3. Very Strong Emission-Line Galaxies in the WISP Survey and Implications for High-Redshift Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Atek, H; Scarlata, C; Malkan, M; McCarthy, P; Teplitz, H; Henry, A; Colbert, J; Bridge, C; Bunker, A J; Dressler, A; Fosbury, R; Hathi, N P; Martin, C; Ross, N R; Shim, H

    2011-01-01

    The WFC3 Infrared Spectroscopic Parallel Survey (WISP) uses the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) infrared grism capabilities to obtain slitless spectra of thousands of galaxies over a wide redshift range including the peak of star formation history of the Universe. We select a population of very strong emission-line galaxies with rest-frame equivalent widths higher than 200 A. A total of 176 objects are found over the redshift range 0.35 < z < 2.3 in the 180 arcmin^2 area we analyzed so far. After estimating the AGN fraction in the sample, we show that this population consists of young and low-mass starbursts with higher specific star formation rates than normal star-forming galaxies at any redshift. After spectroscopic follow-up of one of these galaxies with Keck/LRIS, we report the detection at z = 0.7 of an extremely metal-poor galaxy with 12+Log(O/H)= 7.47 +- 0.11. The nebular emission-lines can substantially affect the broadband flux density with a median brightening of 0.3 mag, with examples producing...

  4. The Gaia-ESO Survey: Sodium and aluminium abundances in giants and dwarfs - Implications for stellar and Galactic chemical evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Smiljanic, R; Bragaglia, A; Donati, P; Magrini, L; Friel, E; Jacobson, H; Randich, S; Ventura, P; Lind, K; Bergemann, M; Nordlander, T; Morel, T; Pancino, E; Tautvaisiene, G; Adibekyan, V; Tosi, M; Vallenari, A; Gilmore, G; Bensby, T; Francois, P; Koposov, S; Lanzafame, A C; Recio-Blanco, A; Bayo, A; Carraro, G; Casey, A R; Costado, M T; Franciosini, E; Heiter, U; Hill, V; Hourihane, A; Jofre, P; Lardo, C; de Laverny, P; Lewis, J; Monaco, L; Morbidelli, L; Sacco, G G; Sbordone, L; Sousa, S G; Worley, C C; Zaggia, S

    2016-01-01

    Stellar evolution models predict that internal mixing should cause some sodium overabundance at the surface of red giants more massive than ~ 1.5--2.0 Msun. The surface aluminium abundance should not be affected. Nevertheless, observational results disagree about the presence and/or the degree of the Na and Al overabundances. In addition, Galactic chemical evolution models adopting different stellar yields lead to quite different predictions for the behavior of [Na/Fe] and [Al/Fe] versus [Fe/H]. Overall, the observed trends of these abundances with metallicity are not well reproduced. We readdress both issues, using new Na and Al abundances determined within the Gaia-ESO Survey, using two samples: i) more than 600 dwarfs of the solar neighborhood and of open clusters and ii) low- and intermediate-mass clump giants in six open clusters. Abundances of Na in giants with mass below ~2.0 Msun, and of Al in giants below ~3.0 Msun, seem to be unaffected by internal mixing processes. For more massive giants, the Na o...

  5. Olfaction variation in mouse husbandry and its implications for refinement and standardization: UK survey of animal scents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Salesansky, Noelia; Mazlan, Nur H; Whitfield, Lucy E; Wells, Dominic J; Burn, Charlotte C

    2016-10-01

    Olfaction plays a crucial role in mouse communication, providing information about genetic identity, physiological status of conspecifics and alerting mice to potential predators. Scents of animal origin can trigger physiological and behavioural responses that could affect experimental responses and impact positively or negatively on mouse welfare. Additionally, differing olfactory profiles could help explain variation in results between laboratories. A survey was sent to animal research units in the UK to investigate potential transfer of scents of animal origin during routine husbandry procedures, and responses were obtained from animal care workers and researchers using mice in 51 institutions. The results reveal great diversity between animal units regarding the relevant husbandry routines covered. Most [71%] reported housing non-breeding male and female mice in the same room, with 76% reporting that hands were not washed and gloves not changed between handling male and female mice. The most commonly reported species housed in the same facility as mice was the rat (91%), and 41% of respondents were aware that scents from rats could affect mice. Changing of gloves between handling mice and other species was reported by 79% of respondents. Depending on the aspect considered, between 18 and 33% of respondents believed human and non-human animal odours would strongly affect mouse physiology, behaviour or standardization, while approximately 32-54% believed these effects would be weak. This indicates uncertainty regarding the significance of these factors. Understanding and controlling these practices could reduce unwanted variability in experimental results and maximize welfare. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Cosmic flow from 2MASS redshift survey: The origin of CMB dipole and implications for LCDM cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Lavaux, G; Mohayaee, R; Colombi, S

    2008-01-01

    We generate the peculiar velocity field for the 2MASS Redshift Survey (2MRS) catalog using an orbit-reconstruction algorithm. The reconstructed velocities of individual objects in 2MRS are well-correlated with the peculiar velocities obtained from high-precision observed distances within 3,000 km/s. We estimate the mean matter density to be 0.31 +/- 0.05 by comparing observed to reconstructed velocities in this volume. The reconstructed motion of the Local Group in the rest frame established by distances within 3,000 km/s agrees with the observed motion and is generated by fluctuations within this volume, in agreement with observations. Then, we reconstruct the velocity field of 2MRS in successively larger radii, to study the problem of convergence towards the CMB dipole. We find that less than half of the amplitude of the CMB dipole is generated within a volume enclosing the Hydra-Centaurus-Norma supercluster at around 40 Mpc/h. Although most of the amplitude of the CMB dipole seems to be recovered by 120 Mp...

  7. Implications of Preliminary Gravity and Magnetic Surveys to the Understanding of the Bartlett Springs Fault Zone, Northern California Coast Ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenheim, V. E.; Jachens, R. C.; Morin, R. L.; McCabe, C. M.; Page, W. D.

    2007-12-01

    We use new gravity and magnetic data in the Lake Pillsbury region to help understand the geometry and character of the Bartlett Springs fault zone, one of the three main strands of the San Andreas system north of the San Francisco Bay area. We collected 153 new gravity stations in the Lake Pillsbury region that complement the sparse regional dataset and are used to estimate the thickness of Quaternary deposits in the inferred Gravelly Valley (Lake Pillsbury) pull-apart basin. We also collected 38 line-km of ground magnetic data on roads and 65 line-km by boat on the lake to supplement regional aeromagnetic surveys and to map concealed fault strands beneath the lake. The new gravity data show a significant northwest-striking gravity gradient at the base of which lies the Bartlett Springs fault zone. Superposed on this major east-facing gravity gradient is a 5 mGal low centered on Lake Pillsbury and Gravelly Valley. Inversion of the gravity field for basin thickness assuming a density contrast of 400 kg/m3 indicates the deepest part of the basin is about 400 m and located in the northern part of the valley, although the inversion lacks gravity stations within the lake. The basin is about 3 km wide and 5 km long and basin edges coincide with strands of the Bartlett Springs fault zone. Our gravity data suggest that Potter Valley, which lies between the Maacama and Bartlett Springs faults, is also as much as 400 m deep in the southern part of the valley, although additional data west of the valley would better isolate the gravity low. Geomorphologic characteristics of the valley suggest that this structure has been quiescent during the late Quaternary. Ground magnetic data are very noisy but the data in conjunction with 9.6 km-spaced NURE aeromagnetic lines suggest that regional analog aeromagnetic data flown in 1962 may suffer from location errors. The regional and NURE data show a northwest-striking magnetic high that extends across Lake Pillsbury. The northeast edge

  8. The Gaia-ESO Survey: Sodium and aluminium abundances in giants and dwarfs. Implications for stellar and Galactic chemical evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smiljanic, R.; Romano, D.; Bragaglia, A.; Donati, P.; Magrini, L.; Friel, E.; Jacobson, H.; Randich, S.; Ventura, P.; Lind, K.; Bergemann, M.; Nordlander, T.; Morel, T.; Pancino, E.; Tautvaišienė, G.; Adibekyan, V.; Tosi, M.; Vallenari, A.; Gilmore, G.; Bensby, T.; François, P.; Koposov, S.; Lanzafame, A. C.; Recio-Blanco, A.; Bayo, A.; Carraro, G.; Casey, A. R.; Costado, M. T.; Franciosini, E.; Heiter, U.; Hill, V.; Hourihane, A.; Jofré, P.; Lardo, C.; de Laverny, P.; Lewis, J.; Monaco, L.; Morbidelli, L.; Sacco, G. G.; Sbordone, L.; Sousa, S. G.; Worley, C. C.; Zaggia, S.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Stellar evolution models predict that internal mixing should cause some sodium overabundance at the surface of red giants more massive than ~1.5-2.0 M⊙. The surface aluminium abundance should not be affected. Nevertheless, observational results disagree about the presence and/or the degree of Na and Al overabundances. In addition, Galactic chemical evolution models adopting different stellar yields lead to very different predictions for the behavior of [Na/Fe] and [Al/Fe] versus [Fe/H]. Overall, the observed trends of these abundances with metallicity are not well reproduced. Aims: We readdress both issues, using new Na and Al abundances determined within the Gaia-ESO Survey. Our aim is to obtain better observational constraints on the behavior of these elements using two samples: i) more than 600 dwarfs of the solar neighborhood and of open clusters and ii) low- and intermediate-mass clump giants in six open clusters. Methods: Abundances were determined using high-resolution UVES spectra. The individual Na abundances were corrected for nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium effects. For the Al abundances, the order of magnitude of the corrections was estimated for a few representative cases. For giants, the abundance trends with stellar mass are compared to stellar evolution models. For dwarfs, the abundance trends with metallicity and age are compared to detailed chemical evolution models. Results: Abundances of Na in stars with mass below ~2.0 M⊙, and of Al in stars below ~3.0 M⊙, seem to be unaffected by internal mixing processes. For more massive stars, the Na overabundance increases with stellar mass. This trend agrees well with predictions of stellar evolutionary models. For Al, our only cluster with giants more massive than 3.0 M⊙, NGC 6705, is Al enriched. However, this might be related to the environment where the cluster was formed. Chemical evolution models that well fit the observed [Na/Fe] vs. [Fe/H] trend in solar neighborhood dwarfs

  9. Self – perceived and clinically diagnosed dental and periodontal health status among young adults and their implications for epidemiological surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sgan-Cohen Harold D

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical (normative and subjective (self-assessment evaluation of caries and periodontal diseases have been reported to demonstrate a significant disparity. The dental public health team is obligated to recognize and understand this gap. The objectives of the study were to investigate the practical values of using questionnaires (self–perceived assessment as compared to clinical examinations (normative assessment and to evaluate the implications of the results in understanding the public's perception of oral health. Methods The investigation was performed on 4920, 21 year-old Israeli adults upon release from compulsory military service between 1996 and 1998. Participants were asked to fill in a questionnaire inquiring how they would rate their personal dental and periodontal health levels. Clinical examinations, employing the DMFT and CPITN indices, were performed to determine normative oral health status. Perceived and normative assessments were compared for sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values and overall proportions using the clinical examinations as a gold standard. Results The sensitivity (disease perception for dental status was found to be 0.34, while the specificity (health perception was found to be 0.83. The positive predictive value for perceived dental status was found to be 0.68, whereas the negative predictive value was found to be 0.54. The sensitivity for perceived periodontal status was found to be 0.28, while the specificity was found to be 0.83. The positive predictive value for perceived periodontal status was found to be 0.05, whereas the negative predictive value was found to be 0.97. Regarding the overall proportions, a large discrepancy was found between self–assessment and professional assessment for both dental and periodontal health status. Conclusions Self-assessment questionnaires were of low value in evaluating oral health status both in the individual and public

  10. Legacies of stream channel modification revealed using General Land Office surveys, with implications for water temperature and aquatic life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth M. White

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Land use legacies can have a discernible influence in present-day watersheds and should be accounted for when designing conservation strategies for riverine aquatic life. We describe the environmental history of three watersheds within the Grande Ronde subbasin of the Columbia River using General Land Office survey field notes from the 19th century. In the two watersheds severely impacted by Euro-American land use, stream channel widths—a metric representing habitat simplification—increased from an average historical width of 16.8 m to an average present width of 20.8 m in large streams; 4.3 m to 5.5 m in small, confined or partly confined streams; and 3.5 m to 6.5 m in small, laterally unconfined steams. Conversely, we did not detect significant change in stream widths in an adjacent, wilderness stream with minimal human impact. Using a mechanistic water temperature model and restoration scenarios based on the historical condition, we predicted that stream restoration in the impacted watersheds could notably decrease average water temperatures—especially when channel narrowing is coupled with riparian restoration—up to a 6.6°C reduction in the upper Grande Ronde River and 3.0°C in Catherine Creek. These reductions in water temperature translated to substantial changes in the percentage of stream network habitable to salmon and steelhead migration (from 29% in the present condition to 79% in the fully restored scenario and to core juvenile rearing (from 13% in the present condition to 36% in the fully restored scenario. We conclude that land use legacies leave an important footprint on the present landscape and are critical for understanding historic habitat-forming processes as a necessary first step towards restoration.

  11. NEW MEASUREMENTS OF THE COSMIC INFRARED BACKGROUND FLUCTUATIONS IN DEEP SPITZER/IRAC SURVEY DATA AND THEIR COSMOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashlinsky, A. [SSAI, Lanham MD 20706 (United States); Arendt, R. G.; Mather, J.; Moseley, S. H. [Observational Cosmology Laboratory, Code 665, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Ashby, M. L. N.; Fazio, G. G., E-mail: alexander.kashlinsky@nasa.gov [Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    We extend previous measurements of cosmic infrared background (CIB) fluctuations to {approx}< 1 Degree-Sign using new data from the Spitzer Extended Deep Survey. Two fields with depths of {approx_equal} 12 hr pixel{sup -1} over three epochs are analyzed at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m. Maps of the fields were assembled using a self-calibration method uniquely suitable for probing faint diffuse backgrounds. Resolved sources were removed from the maps to a magnitude limit of mag{sub AB} {approx_equal} 25, as indicated by the level of the remaining shot noise. The maps were then Fourier transformed and their power spectra were evaluated. Instrumental noise was estimated from the time-differenced data, and subtracting this isolates the spatial fluctuations of the actual sky. The power spectra of the source-subtracted fields remain identical (within the observational uncertainties) for the three epochs indicating that zodiacal light contributes negligibly to the fluctuations. Comparing to 8 {mu}m power spectra shows that Galactic cirrus cannot account for the fluctuations. The signal appears isotropically distributed on the sky as required for an extragalactic origin. The CIB fluctuations continue to diverge to >10 times those of known galaxy populations on angular scales out to {approx}< 1 Degree-Sign . The low shot-noise levels remaining in the diffuse maps indicate that the large-scale fluctuations arise from the spatial clustering of faint sources well below the confusion noise. The spatial spectrum of these fluctuations is in reasonable agreement with an origin in populations clustered according to the standard cosmological model ({Lambda}CDM) at epochs coinciding with the first stars era.

  12. Disparities in Health Information Access: Results of a County-Wide Survey and Implications for Health Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Megan S; Su, Dejun; Britigan, Denise H

    2016-01-01

    Health knowledge and behavior can be shaped by the extent to which individuals have access to reliable and understandable health information. Based on data from a population-based telephone survey of 1,503 respondents of ages 18 years and older living in Douglas County, Nebraska, in 2013, this study assesses disparities in health information access and their related covariates. The two most frequently reported sources of health information are the Internet and health professionals, followed by print media, peers, and broadcast media. Relative to non-Hispanic Whites, Blacks are more likely to report health professionals as their primary source of health information (odds ratio [OR] = 2.61, p < .001) and less likely to report peers (OR = 0.39, p < .05). A comparison between Whites and Hispanics suggests that Hispanics are less likely to get their health information through the Internet (OR = 0.51, p < .05) and more likely to get it from broadcast media (OR = 4.27, p < .01). Relative to their counterparts, participants with no health insurance had significantly higher odds of reporting no source of health information (OR = 3.46, p < .05). Having no source of health information was also associated with an annual income below $25,000 (OR = 2.78, p < .05 compared to middle income range) and being born outside of the United States (OR = 5.00, p < .05). Access to health information is lowest among society's most vulnerable population groups. Knowledge of the specific outlets through which people are likely to obtain health information can help health program planners utilize the communication channels that are most relevant to the people they intend to reach.

  13. A 2-yr Mosquito Survey Focusing on Aedes koreicus (Diptera: Culicidae) in Northern Italy and Implications for Adult Trapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldacchino, F; Montarsi, F; Arnoldi, D; Barategui, C; Ferro Milone, N; Da Rold, G; Capelli, G; Rizzoli, A

    2017-05-01

    Aedes koreicus (Edwards) is an invasive mosquito species, like Aedes albopictus (Skuse) and Aedes japonicus japonicus (Theobald), that has already colonized a large part of northeastern Italy and other European countries. Despite its rapid expansion, information about adult distribution and trapping is lacking. Here, we conducted a 2-yr longitudinal survey using adult traps to investigate the spatiotemporal distribution of Ae. koreicus and evaluated the effectiveness of three trapping devices in Latin square experiments conducted in an urban site and a forested site. The following three different traps were compared: a CO2-baited Biogents (BG) Sentinel trap, a CO2-baited Centers for Disease Control and Prevention light trap (CDC trap), and a grass infusion-baited gravid trap.In northern Italy, Ae. koreicus was collected from late April to early November, with peak of abundance observed in August. Aedes koreicus was more abundant in 2015 than in 2014 because of higher temperatures during summer. Unlike Ae. albopictus, the abundance of Ae. koreicus was not related to the altitude of the sampling locations in the range 241-660 m above sea level. The BG Sentinel and gravid traps collected significantly more Ae. koreicus than the CDC trap in the urban site, whereas there was no significant difference between the three traps in the forested site. In the urban site, the BG Sentinel trap and the gravid trap were the most effective for collecting Ae. albopictus and Culex pipiens L., respectively. In the forested site, Cx. pipiens was primarily collected by the CDC trap. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Survey of childhood empyema in Asia: Implications for detecting the unmeasured burden of culture-negative bacterial disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Xuzhuang

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parapneumonic empyema continues to be a disease of significant morbidity and mortality among children despite recent advances in medical management. To date, only a limited number of studies have assessed the burden of empyema in Asia. Methods We surveyed medical records of four representative large pediatric hospitals in China, Korea, Taiwan and Vietnam using ICD-10 diagnostic codes to identify children Results During the study period, we identified 1,379 children diagnosed with empyema or pleural effusion (China, n = 461; Korea, n = 134; Taiwan, n = 119; Vietnam, n = 665. Diagnoses of pleural effusion (n = 1,074 were 3.5 times more common than of empyema (n = 305, although the relative proportions of empyema and pleural effusion noted in hospital records varied widely between the four sites, most likely because of marked differences in coding practices. Although pleural effusions were reported more often than empyema, children with empyema were more likely to have a cultured pathogen. In addition, we found that median age and gender distribution of children with these conditions were similar across the four countries. Among 1,379 empyema and pleural effusion specimens, 401 (29% were culture positive. Staphylococcus aureus (n = 126 was the most common organism isolated, followed by Streptococcus pneumoniae (n = 83, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 37 and Klebsiella (n = 35 and Acinetobacter species (n = 34. Conclusion The age and gender distribution of empyema and pleural effusion in children in these countries are similar to the US and Western Europe. S. pneumoniae was the second leading bacterial cause of empyema and pleural effusion among Asian children. The high proportion of culture-negative specimens among patients with pleural effusion or empyema suggests that culture may not be a sufficiently sensitive diagnostic method to determine etiology in the majority of cases. Future prospective studies in different countries would

  15. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Cosmological implications of the configuration-space clustering wedges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Ariel G.; Scoccimarro, Román; Crocce, Martín; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Dalla Vecchia, Claudio; Lippich, Martha; Beutler, Florian; Brownstein, Joel R.; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Percival, Will J.; Prada, Francisco; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Ross, Ashley J.; Samushia, Lado; Seo, Hee-Jong; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Wang, Yuting; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2017-01-01

    We explore the cosmological implications of anisotropic clustering measurements in configuration space of the final galaxy samples from Data Release 12 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. We implement a new detailed modelling of the effects of non-linearities, bias and redshift-space distortions that can be used to extract unbiased cosmological information from our measurements for scales s ≳ 20 h-1 Mpc. We combined the information from Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) with the latest cosmic microwave background (CMB) observations and Type Ia supernovae samples and found no significant evidence for a deviation from the Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) cosmological model. In particular, these data sets can constrain the dark energy equation-of-state parameter to wDE = -0.996 ± 0.042 when to be assumed time independent, the curvature of the Universe to Ωk = -0.0007 ± 0.0030 and the sum of the neutrino masses to ∑mν < 0.25 eV at 95 per cent confidence levels. We explore the constraints on the growth rate of cosmic structures assuming f(z) = Ωm(z)γ and obtain γ = 0.609 ± 0.079, in good agreement with the predictions of general relativity of γ = 0.55. We compress the information of our clustering measurements into constraints on the parameter combinations DV(z)/rd, FAP(z) and fσ8(z) at zeff = 0.38, 0.51 and 0.61 with their respective covariance matrices and find good agreement with the predictions for these parameters obtained from the best-fitting ΛCDM model to the CMB data from the Planck satellite. This paper is part of a set that analyses the final galaxy clustering data set from BOSS. The measurements and likelihoods presented here are combined with others by Alam et al. to produce the final cosmological constraints from BOSS.

  16. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: angular clustering tomography and its cosmological implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Crocce, Martin; Scoccimarro, Roman; Alam, Shadab; Beutler, Florian; Brownstein, Joel R.; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Percival, Will J.; Prada, Francisco; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Samushia, Lado; Tinker, Jeremy; Thomas, Daniel; Tojeiro, Rita; Wang, Yuting; Zhao, Gong-bo

    2017-07-01

    We investigate the cosmological implications of studying galaxy clustering using a tomographic approach applied to the final Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) DR12 galaxy sample, including both auto- and cross-correlation functions between redshift shells. We model the signal of the full shape of the angular correlation function, ω(θ), in redshift bins using state-of-the-art modelling of non-linearities, bias and redshift-space distortions. We present results on the redshift evolution of the linear bias of BOSS galaxies, which cannot be obtained with traditional methods for galaxy-clustering analysis. We also obtain constraints on cosmological parameters, combining this tomographic analysis with measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and Type Ia supernova (SNIa). We explore a number of cosmological models, including the standard Λ cold dark matter model and its most interesting extensions, such as deviations from wDE = -1, non-minimal neutrino masses, spatial curvature and deviations from general relativity (GR) using the growth-index γ parametrization. These results are, in general, comparable to the most precise present-day constraints on cosmological parameters, and show very good agreement with the standard model. In particular, combining CMB, ω(θ) and SNIa, we find a value of wDE consistent with -1 to a precision better than 5 per cent when it is assumed to be constant in time, and better than 6 per cent when we also allow for a spatially curved Universe.

  17. A Survey of Trypanosoma and Microfilaria Parasites Prevalence in Cattle in the Accra Plains of Southern Ghana: Implications for Trypanosomiasis Control Strategies in Ghana and Livestock Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nkegbe Emmanuel

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This survey was undertaken between September, 2010 and December, 2010 to determine Trypanosomiasis and microfilaria prevalence in cattle in the Shai Hills area of the Greater Accra Region of Southern Ghana in relation to livestock health as per PCV counts. The results showed that Trypanosoma parasites were absent, however, microfilaria parasites were present. The prevalence level of microfilaria among the cattle (Sanga was 6.5% (p<0.05. This was found among the bulls and the cows. The PCV ranges were; calves, 26-40 (p<0.05, cows, 26-34 (p<0.05 and the bulls, 21-29 (p<0.05, respectively. These results showed that the continuous monitoring and treatment of Trypanosomiasis by the Ministry of Agriculture technical officers (MoFA is effective in controlling the disease among cattle. However, the results also showed that microfilaria parasites were prevalent. This appeared to have affected the health status of the cattle with low PCV counts as observed in the bulls. The implication for health and reproduction would be weak calves and less effective mating in the adults of reproductive age.

  18. Discrimination, attribution, and racial group identification: implications for psychological distress among Black Americans in the National Survey of American Life (2001-2003).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, David H; Lincoln, Karen D; Jackson, James S

    2011-10-01

    There is increasing evidence that experiencing discrimination may contribute to poor mental health among Black Americans. However, few studies have distinguished between discrimination attributed to race versus other forms of discrimination or have compared differences in their psychological implications. Using nationally representative data on 5,191 Black Americans in the National Survey of American Life (NSAL; 2001-2003), this study examined serious psychological distress (SPD) in relation to discrimination attributed to racial versus nonracial causes and also investigated whether racial group identification may be a buffer. We found that discrimination was associated with greater odds of SPD, regardless of attribution. Racial attributions were associated with higher odds of SPD compared with attributions to nonracial causes for each level of discrimination. High racial group identification buffered the negative effect of moderate levels of both racially and nonracially attributed discrimination. Our results provide evidence for the negative influence of discrimination on SPD among Black Americans and indicate that high racial group identification may somewhat mitigate their negative mental health effects. Our study suggests that discrimination and racial group identification should be addressed to protect against psychological distress among Black Americans. © 2011 American Orthopsychiatric Association.

  19. A quality of life survey of individuals with urinary incontinence who visit a self-help website: implications for those seeking healthcare information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozensky, Ronald H; Tovian, Steven M; Gartley, Cheryle B; Nichols, Thom R; Layton, Matthew

    2013-09-01

    Urinary Incontinence (UI) affects 200 million people worldwide with annual direct costs in the US alone estimated at $16.3 billion. Those with UI have reported a decrease in general quality of life with symptoms of depression, anxiety, low self-esteem, poor body image, and social stigmatization. The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility of collecting self-reported quality of life data in a self-selected sample of individuals who visited a website providing information, education, and management suggestions regarding UI. Participants included 374 individuals with UI who responded to a solicitation for enrollment in a "Continence Comprehensive Health and Life Assessment" survey posted on The Simon Foundation for Continence website (www.simonfoundation.org). Types of problems and events associated with UI, including social connectivity and quality of life, are discussed along with limitations of the study and implications for future research. Given that 13.01% of respondents had not spoken to a healthcare provider about their UI symptoms, 24.73% had never seen a healthcare professional who "specializes in bladder problems," and 75% said they were not currently using any active approach to managing symptoms, use of such information is discussed in terms of how to construct internet healthcare information to maximize seeking appropriate healthcare services and preparing internet-based information regarding incontinence diagnosis and treatment.

  20. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: cosmological implications of the configuration-space clustering wedges

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchez, Ariel G; Crocce, Martin; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; DallaVecchia, Claudio; Lippich, Martha; Beutler, Florian; Brownstein, Joel R; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Olmstead, Matthew D; Percival, Will J; Prada, Francisco; Rodriguez-Torres, Sergio; Ross, Ashley J; Samushia, Lado; Seo, Hee-Jong; Tinker, Jeremy; Tojeiro, Rita; Vargas-Magana, Mariana; Wang, Yuting; Zhao, Gong-Bo

    2016-01-01

    We explore the cosmological implications of anisotropic clustering measurements in configuration space of the final galaxy samples from Data Release 12 of the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey. We implement a new detailed modelling of the effects of non-linearities, galaxy bias and redshift-space distortions that can be used to extract unbiased cosmological information from our measurements for scales $s \\gtrsim 20\\,h^{-1}{\\rm Mpc}$. We combined the galaxy clustering information from BOSS with the latest cosmic microwave background (CMB) observations and Type Ia supernovae samples and found no significant evidence for a deviation from the $\\Lambda$CDM cosmological model. In particular, these data sets can constrain the dark energy equation of state parameter to $w_{\\rm DE}=-0.996\\pm0.042$ when assumed time-independent, the curvature of the Universe to $\\Omega_{k}=-0.0007\\pm 0.0030$ and the sum of the neutrino masses to $\\sum m_{\

  1. An optical spectroscopic survey of the 3CR sample of radio galaxies with z < 0.3. V. Implications for the unified model for FR IIs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldi, Ranieri D.; Capetti, Alessandro; Buttiglione, Sara; Chiaberge, Marco; Celotti, Annalisa

    2013-12-01

    We explore the implications of our optical spectroscopic survey of 3CR radio sources with z edge-brightened" (FR II) radio morphology. The sample contains 33 high ionization galaxies (HIGs) and 18 broad line objects (BLOs). According to the UM, HIGs, the narrow line sources, are the nuclearly obscured counterparts of BLOs. The fraction of HIGs indicates a covering factor of the circumnuclear matter of 65% that corresponds, adopting a torus geometry, to an opening angle of 50° ± 5. No dependence on redshift and luminosity on the torus opening angle emerges. We also consider the implications for a "clumpy" torus. The distributions of total radio luminosity of HIGs and BLOs are not statistically distinguishable, as expected from the UM. Conversely, BLOs have a radio core dominance, R, more than ten times larger with respect to HIGs, as expected in case of Doppler boosting when the jets in BLOs are preferentially oriented closer to the line of sight than in HIGs. Modeling the R distributions leads to an estimate of the jet bulk Lorentz factor of Γ ~ 3-5. The test of the UM based on the radio source size is not conclusive due to the limited number of objects and because the size distribution is dominated by the intrinsic scatter rather than by projection effects. The [O II] line luminosities in HIGs and BLOs are similar but the [O III] and [O I] lines are higher in BLOs by a factor of ~2. We ascribe this effect to the presence of a line emitting region located within the walls of the obscuring torus, visible in BLOs but obscured in HIGs, with a density higher than the [O II] critical density. We find evidence that BLOs have broader [O I] and [O III] lines than HIGs of similar [O II] width, as expected in the presence of high density gas in the proximity of the central black hole. In conclusion, the radio and narrow line region (NLR) properties of HIGs and BLOs are consistent with the UM predictions when the partial obscuration of the NLR is taken into account. We

  2. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Cosmological implications of the Fourier space wedges of the final sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieb, Jan Niklas; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Scoccimarro, Román; Crocce, Martín; Dalla Vecchia, Claudio; Montesano, Francesco; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Ross, Ashley J.; Beutler, Florian; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Prada, Francisco; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Percival, Will J.; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Brownstein, Joel R.; Maraston, Claudia; Nichol, Robert C.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Samushia, Lado; Seo, Hee-Jong; Streblyanska, Alina; Zhao, Gong-bo

    2017-05-01

    We extract cosmological information from the anisotropic power-spectrum measurements from the recently completed Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), extending the concept of clustering wedges to Fourier space. Making use of new fast-Fourier-transform-based estimators, we measure the power-spectrum clustering wedges of the BOSS sample by filtering out the information of Legendre multipoles ℓ > 4. Our modelling of these measurements is based on novel approaches to describe non-linear evolution, bias and redshift-space distortions, which we test using synthetic catalogues based on large-volume N-body simulations. We are able to include smaller scales than in previous analyses, resulting in tighter cosmological constraints. Using three overlapping redshift bins, we measure the angular-diameter distance, the Hubble parameter and the cosmic growth rate, and explore the cosmological implications of our full-shape clustering measurements in combination with cosmic microwave background and Type Ia supernova data. Assuming a Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) cosmology, we constrain the matter density to Ω M= 0.311_{-0.010}^{+0.009} and the Hubble parameter to H_0 = 67.6_{-0.6}^{+0.7} km s^{-1 Mpc^{-1}}, at a confidence level of 68 per cent. We also allow for non-standard dark energy models and modifications of the growth rate, finding good agreement with the ΛCDM paradigm. For example, we constrain the equation-of-state parameter to w = -1.019_{-0.039}^{+0.048}. This paper is part of a set that analyses the final galaxy-clustering data set from BOSS. The measurements and likelihoods presented here are combined with others in Alam et al. to produce the final cosmological constraints from BOSS.

  3. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Cosmological implications of the Fourier space wedges of the final sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieb, Jan Niklas; Sánchez, Ariel G.; Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Scoccimarro, Román; Crocce, Martín; Dalla Vecchia, Claudio; Montesano, Francesco; Gil-Marín, Héctor; Ross, Ashley J.; Beutler, Florian; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Prada, Francisco; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Percival, Will J.; Vargas-Magaña, Mariana; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Brownstein, Joel R.; Maraston, Claudia; Nichol, Robert C.; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Samushia, Lado; Seo, Hee-Jong; Streblyanska, Alina; Zhao, Gong-bo

    2017-01-01

    We extract cosmological information from the anisotropic power spectrum measurements from the recently completed Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), extending the concept of clustering wedges to Fourier space. Making use of new FFT-based estimators, we measure the power spectrum clustering wedges of the BOSS sample by filtering out the information of Legendre multipoles ℓ > 4. Our modelling of these measurements is based on novel approaches to describe non-linear evolution, bias, and redshift-space distortions, which we test using synthetic catalogues based on large-volume N-body simulations. We are able to include smaller scales than in previous analyses, resulting in tighter cosmological constraints. Using three overlapping redshift bins, we measure the angular diameter distance, the Hubble parameter, and the cosmic growth rate, and explore the cosmological implications of our full shape clustering measurements in combination with CMB and SN Ia data. Assuming a ΛCDM cosmology, we constrain the matter density to Ω M= 0.311_{-0.010}^{+0.009} and the Hubble parameter to H_0 = 67.6_{-0.6}^{+0.7} km s^{-1} Mpc^{-1}, at a confidence level (CL) of 68 per cent. We also allow for non-standard dark energy models and modifications of the growth rate, finding good agreement with the ΛCDM paradigm. For example, we constrain the equation-of-state parameter to w = -1.019_{-0.039}^{+0.048}. This paper is part of a set that analyses the final galaxy clustering dataset from BOSS. The measurements and likelihoods presented here are combined with others in Alam et al. (2016) to produce the final cosmological constraints from BOSS.

  4. What Are Teenagers Reading? The Findings of a Survey of Teenagers' Reading Choices and the Implications of These for English Teachers' Classroom Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, Jacqueline; Robinson, Dennis

    2002-01-01

    Reports on the findings of a pilot study investigating the reading choices and habits of adolescents between the ages of 12 and 15 years. Sets out to understand more fully what, when, where, why and how adolescents between the ages of 12 and 15 years are reading, and the implications of this information for teachers and classroom reading pedagogy.…

  5. Metal Abundances and Kinematics of Bright Metal-Poor Giants Selected from the LSE Survey Implications for the Metal-Weak Thick Disk

    CERN Document Server

    Beers, T C; Rossi, S; Chiba, M; Rhee, J; Fuhrmeister, B; Norris, J E; Von Hippel, T; Beers, Timothy C.; Drilling, John S.; Rossi, Silvia; Chiba, Masashi; Rhee, Jaehyon; Fuhrmeister, Birgit; Norris, John E.; Hippel, Ted von

    2002-01-01

    We report medium-resolution (1-2 A) spectroscopy and broadband (UBV) photometry for a sample of 39 bright stars (the majority of which are likely to be giants) selected as metal-deficient candidates from an objective-prism survey concentrating on Galactic latitudes below |b| = 30 deg, the LSE survey of Drilling & Bergeron. Although the primary purpose of the LSE survey was to select OB stars (hence the concentration on low latitudes), the small number of bright metal-deficient giant candidates noted during this survey provide interesting information on the metal-weak thick disk (MWTD) population. The kinematics of the LSE giants indicate the presence of a rapidly rotating population, even at quite low metallicity. We consider the distribution of orbital eccentricity of the LSE giants as a function of [Fe/H], and conclude that the local fraction (i.e., within 1 kpc from the Sun) of metal-poor stars that might be associated with the MWTD is on the order of 30%-40% at abundances below [Fe/H] = -1.0. Contrary...

  6. The Relational-Behavior Survey as a Predictor of HIV-Related Parental Miscommunication: Implications for HIV, Prevention and Education at Primary Healthcare Service Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Michele Denise; Chandler, Donald S.; Chandler, Donald S., Jr.; Race, James

    2012-01-01

    The study examined the relational-behavior survey (RBS) as a predictor of HIV-related parental miscommunication (HPM) among a voluntary sample 75 African American parents at a private healthcare facility located in the southwest region of the United States. A multiple regression analysis indicated that there was significant marginal prediction of…

  7. Off-road sampling reveals a different grassland bird community than roadside sampling: implications for survey design and estimates to guide conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troy I. Wellicome

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Grassland bird species continue to decline steeply across North America. Road-based surveys such as the North American Breeding Bird Survey (BBS are often used to estimate trends and population sizes and to build species distribution models for grassland birds, although roadside survey counts may introduce bias in estimates because of differences in habitats along roadsides and in off-road surveys. We tested for differences in land cover composition and in the avian community on 21 roadside-based survey routes and in an equal number of adjacent off-road walking routes in the grasslands of southern Alberta, Canada. Off-road routes (n = 225 point counts had more native grassland and short shrubs and less fallow land and road area than the roadside routes (n = 225 point counts. Consequently, 17 of the 39 bird species differed between the two route types in frequency of occurrence and relative abundance, measured using an indicator species analysis. Six species, including five obligate grassland species, were more prevalent at off-road sites; they included four species listed under the Canadian federal Species At Risk Act or listed by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada: Sprague's Pipit (Anthus spragueii, Baird's Sparrow (Ammodramus bairdii, the Chestnut-collared Longspur (Calcarius ornatus, and McCown's Longspur (Rhynchophanes mccownii. The six species were as much as four times more abundant on off-road sites. Species more prevalent along roadside routes included common species and those typical of farmland and other human-modified habitats, e.g., the European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris, the Black-billed Magpie (Pica hudsonia, and the House Sparrow (Passer domesticus. Differences in avian community composition between roadside and off-road surveys suggest that the use of BBS data when generating population estimates or distribution models may overestimate certain common species and underestimate others of conservation

  8. The ALMA Spectroscopic Survey in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field: Implications for Spectral Line Intensity Mapping at Millimeter Wavelengths and CMB Spectral Distortions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carilli, C. L.; Chluba, J.; Decarli, R.; Walter, F.; Aravena, M.; Wagg, J.; Popping, G.; Cortes, P.; Hodge, J.; Weiss, A.; Bertoldi, F.; Riechers, D.

    2016-12-01

    We present direct estimates of the mean sky brightness temperature in observing bands around 99 and 242 GHz due to line emission from distant galaxies. These values are calculated from the summed line emission observed in a blind, deep survey for spectral line emission from high redshift galaxies using ALMA (the ALMA spectral deep field observations “ASPECS” survey). In the 99 GHz band, the mean brightness will be dominated by rotational transitions of CO from intermediate and high redshift galaxies. In the 242 GHz band, the emission could be a combination of higher order CO lines, and possibly [C ii] 158 μm line emission from very high redshift galaxies (z ˜ 6-7). The mean line surface brightness is a quantity that is relevant to measurements of spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background, and as a potential tool for studying large-scale structures in the early universe using intensity mapping. While the cosmic volume and the number of detections are admittedly small, this pilot survey provides a direct measure of the mean line surface brightness, independent of conversion factors, excitation, or other galaxy formation model assumptions. The mean surface brightness in the 99 GHZ band is: T B = 0.94 ± 0.09 μK. In the 242 GHz band, the mean brightness is: T B = 0.55 ± 0.033 μK. These should be interpreted as lower limits on the average sky signal, since we only include lines detected individually in the blind survey, while in a low resolution intensity mapping experiment, there will also be the summed contribution from lower luminosity galaxies that cannot be detected individually in the current blind survey.

  9. On the appropriate use of (input-output) coefficients to generate non-survey regional input-output tables: Implications for the determination of output multipliers

    OpenAIRE

    Lindberg, Gunnar

    2010-01-01

    Regional input-output (IO) tables are constructed as either scaled down versions of national tables or by means of surveys. In the first type, location quotients (LQ) usually use employment structures to account for differences between nation and region. A LQ is designed to scale down national (input-output) coefficients to representative regional ones that are then used to derive regional multiplier effects. In this process there are two main approaches to define regional coefficients. The f...

  10. Food is important for health and well-being. Results from a hospital survey in Norway with focus on organic food, and implications for future research needs

    OpenAIRE

    Koesling, Matthias; Solemdal, Liv; Birkeland, Liv

    2006-01-01

    A questionnaire survey was conducted at the university hospital in Trondheim, Norway in December 2005. In relation to former questionnaires conducted at the hospital, patients and guests were much more satisfied with the food served, especially potatoes and vegetables. Patients and guest express that food is important for their health and well-being. Good taste, appearance and right nutrition were understood as important qualities of food. The absence of pesticides, artificial fertilizers and...

  11. ALMA Spectroscopic Survey in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field: implications for spectral line intensity mapping at millimeter wavelengths and CMB spectral distortions

    CERN Document Server

    Carilli, C L; Decarli, R; Walter, F; Aravena, M; Wagg, J; Popping, G; Cortes, P; Hodge, J; Weiss, A; Bertoldi, F; Riechers, D

    2016-01-01

    We present direct estimates of the mean sky brightness temperature in observing bands around 99GHz and 242GHz due to line emission from distant galaxies. These values are calculated from the summed line emission observed in a blind, deep survey for specrtal line emission from high redshift galaxies using ALMA (the 'ASPECS' survey). In the 99 GHz band, the mean brightness will be dominated by rotational transitions of CO from intermediate and high redshift galaxies. In the 242GHz band, the emission could be a combination of higher order CO lines, and possibly [CII] 158$\\mu$m line emission from very high redshift galaxies ($z \\sim 6$ to 7). The mean line surface brightness is a quantity that is relevant to measurements of spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background, and as a potential tool for studying large-scale structures in the early Universe using intensity mapping. While the cosmic volume and the number of detections are admittedly small, this pilot survey provides a direct measure of the mean...

  12. Comparing Dark Energy Survey and HST-CLASH observations of the galaxy cluster RXC J2248.7-4431: implications for stellar mass versus dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmese, A.; Lahav, O.; Banerji, M.; Gruen, D.; Jouvel, S.; Melchior, P.; Aleksić, J.; Annis, J.; Diehl, H. T.; Hartley, W. G.; Jeltema, T.; Romer, A. K.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Seitz, S.; Suchyta, E.; Zhang, Y.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D'Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J.; Gerdes, D. W.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; Marshall, J. L.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Roodman, A.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Tucker, D.; Vikram, V.

    2016-12-01

    We derive the stellar mass fraction in the galaxy cluster RXC J2248.7-4431 observed with the Dark Energy Survey (DES) during the Science Verification period. We compare the stellar mass results from DES (five filters) with those from the Hubble Space Telescope Cluster Lensing And Supernova Survey (CLASH; 17 filters). When the cluster spectroscopic redshift is assumed, we show that stellar masses from DES can be estimated within 25 per cent of CLASH values. We compute the stellar mass contribution coming from red and blue galaxies, and study the relation between stellar mass and the underlying dark matter using weak lensing studies with DES and CLASH. An analysis of the radial profiles of the DES total and stellar mass yields a stellar-to-total fraction of f⋆ = (6.8 ± 1.7) × 10-3 within a radius of r200c ≃ 2 Mpc. Our analysis also includes a comparison of photometric redshifts and star/galaxy separation efficiency for both data sets. We conclude that space-based small field imaging can be used to calibrate the galaxy properties in DES for the much wider field of view. The technique developed to derive the stellar mass fraction in galaxy clusters can be applied to the ˜100 000 clusters that will be observed within this survey and yield important information about galaxy evolution.

  13. Comparing Dark Energy Survey and HST{CLASH observations of the galaxy cluster RXC J2248.7{4431: implications for stellar mass versus dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmese, A.; Lahav, O.; Banerji, M.; Gruen, D.; Jouvel, S.; Melchior, P.; Aleksic, J.; Annis, J; Diehl, H. T.; Jeltema, T.; Vikram, Vinu

    2016-12-01

    We derive the stellar mass fraction in the galaxy cluster RXC J2248.7-4431 observed with the Dark Energy Survey (DES) during the Science Verification period. We compare the stellar mass results from DES (five filters) with those from the Hubble Space Telescope Cluster Lensing And Supernova Survey (CLASH; 17 filters). When the cluster spectroscopic redshift is assumed, we show that stellar masses from DES can be estimated within 25 per cent of CLASH values. We compute the stellar mass contribution coming from red and blue galaxies, and study the relation between stellar mass and the underlying dark matter using weak lensing studies with DES and CLASH. An analysis of the radial profiles of the DES total and stellar mass yields a stellar-to-total fraction of f(star) = (6.8 +/- 1.7) x 10(-3) within a radius of r(200c) similar or equal to 2 Mpc. Our analysis also includes a comparison of photometric redshifts and star/galaxy separation efficiency for both data sets. We conclude that space-based small field imaging can be used to calibrate the galaxy properties in DES for the much wider field of view. The technique developed to derive the stellar mass fraction in galaxy clusters can be applied to the similar to 100 000 clusters that will be observed within this survey and yield important information about galaxy evolution.

  14. A stratified random survey of the proportion of poor quality oral artesunate sold at medicine outlets in the Lao PDR – implications for therapeutic failure and drug resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vongsack Latsamy

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Counterfeit oral artesunate has been a major public health problem in mainland SE Asia, impeding malaria control. A countrywide stratified random survey was performed to determine the availability and quality of oral artesunate in pharmacies and outlets (shops selling medicines in the Lao PDR (Laos. Methods In 2003, 'mystery' shoppers were asked to buy artesunate tablets from 180 outlets in 12 of the 18 Lao provinces. Outlets were selected using stratified random sampling by investigators not involved in sampling. Samples were analysed for packaging characteristics, by the Fast Red Dye test, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC, mass spectrometry (MS, X-ray diffractometry and pollen analysis. Results Of 180 outlets sampled, 25 (13.9% sold oral artesunate. Outlets selling artesunate were more commonly found in the more malarious southern Laos. Of the 25 outlets, 22 (88%; 95%CI 68–97% sold counterfeit artesunate, as defined by packaging and chemistry. No artesunate was detected in the counterfeits by any of the chemical analysis techniques and analysis of the packaging demonstrated seven different counterfeit types. There was complete agreement between the Fast Red dye test, HPLC and MS analysis. A wide variety of wrong active ingredients were found by MS. Of great concern, 4/27 (14.8% fakes contained detectable amounts of artemisinin (0.26–115.7 mg/tablet. Conclusion This random survey confirms results from previous convenience surveys that counterfeit artesunate is a severe public health problem. The presence of artemisinin in counterfeits may encourage malaria resistance to artemisinin derivatives. With increasing accessibility of artemisinin-derivative combination therapy (ACT in Laos, the removal of artesunate monotherapy from pharmacies may be an effective intervention.

  15. {sup 220}Rn measurements and implications for earlier surveys of {sup 222}Rn; Meting van {sup 220}Rn en consequenties voor eerdere {sup 222}Rn-surveys. VERA-onderzoek

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaauboer, R.O.

    2010-08-15

    The concentration of radioactive radon gas (Rn-222) encountered in newly constructed dwellings was lower than that expected from earlier surveys. An investigation into the response of the radon detectors used in these earlier surveys revealed that these were also sensitive to radioactive thoron (Rn-220), of which more appears to be present than originally assumed. This is the primary outcome of a detailed examination of the detectors that resulted from a national study on radiation exposure in Dutch dwellings constructed between 1994 and 2003. Detectors used in international radon comparison studies have only been set to test for radon, not thoron. Consequently, in practice it is not immediately evident that some detectors actually measure thoron as well, which is also reported as radon. The increasing interest shown by the Netherlands for thoron, provoked by survey results that appear to have been strongly affected by this radioactive isotope of radon, is mirrored by many other countries. The thoron found in dwellings seems to originate from a (frequently used) building material, possibly a finishing material, which has a relatively high thoron exhalation rate. It has more recently been determined that for many years a type of plaster was used in the Netherlands that contained phosphogypsum, a material known for its high radon content. However, it is possible that other materials incorporated into finishing layers also contribute to higher indoor thoron levels. A large portion of the total indoor exposure of occupants to radiation is from inhalation of radioactive decay products of radon and thoron. Radon and thoron are formed in the soil and earth-based building materials by radioactive decay and, because they are gaseous, they are able to diffuse into homes and other buildings. Exposure to ionizing radiation in the home accounts for approximately half of the average annual radiation dose received by a Dutch citizen. [Dutch] Er komt minder radioactief radongas

  16. Characteristics of the home health practice setting that attract and retain physical therapists: results of a survey and implications for home health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Tracey L

    2011-03-01

    An electronic survey of the home health (HH) section members of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) found that physical therapists (PTs) are attracted to HH for flexible work hours, the ability to work one on one with a patient, the functional setting, and salary, in that order. They continue to practice in HH because they take pride in their work, the relationships they have with their patients/caregivers, their ability to make autonomous work decisions, their control over their schedule, the relationships they have within the home health agency (HHA), salary, the relationships they have with peers, their benefits, and their ability to handle documentation demands, in that order.

  17. Policy implications and impact of household registration system on Peasants’ Willingness to return rural residential lands: Evidence from household survey in rural China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hengzhou Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite a growing body of literature on China’s household registration system and rural land transfer, few studies have examined the impact of the household registration system on peasants’ willingness to return rural residential land. This paper aims to fill this gap and uses household survey data to measure the impacts of household registration system on peasants’ willingness to return rural residential land. The results show that the household registration system reduced the farmers’ enthusiasm to exit the rural residential land, that is, household registration system had a significant negative impact on farmers’ willingness to return rural residential land.

  18. Comparison of the Treatment Implications of American Society of Hypertension and International Society of Hypertension 2013 and Eighth Joint National Committee Guidelines: an analysis of National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Venkatesh L; Shah, Ravi V; Rubenfire, Melvyn; Brook, Robert D

    2014-08-01

    Multiple guidelines and statements related to hypertension have recently been published. Much discord has arisen from discrepant treatment and target systolic blood pressure thresholds for individuals aged 60 to 79 years of Hypertension and International Society of Hypertension 2013. We sought to evaluate the public health implications of these differences using data from the 2005 to 2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) cycles. NHANES is an ongoing survey designed to allow characterization of the US population and subpopulations. We found that only .2.4% (95% confidence interval, 1.5.3.2%) of adults aged 60 to 79 years had indications for antihypertensive treatment under the more stringent American Society of Hypertension and International Society of Hypertension 2013 guideline but not under Eighth Joint National Committee. About 65.7% (95% confidence interval, 62.4.69.0%) of adults aged 60 to 79 years had indications for treatment under both guidelines. Furthermore, those with indications for treatment under American Society of Hypertension and International Society of Hypertension 2013 but not under Eighth Joint National Committee generally had higher systolic blood pressure and less favorable lipid profiles compared with those with indications for treatment under both guidelines. Importantly, a larger group, comprising 21.0% (95% confidence interval, 18.7.23.2%) of adults aged 60 to 79 years, had either untreated or inadequately treated hypertension and represents an important group for continued efforts.

  19. The clustering of galaxies in the completed SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Angular clustering tomography and its cosmological implications

    CERN Document Server

    Salazar-Albornoz, Salvador; Grieb, Jan Niklas; Crocce, Martin; Scoccimarro, Roman; Alam, Shadab; Beutler, Florian; Brownstein, Joel R; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Kitaura, Francisco-Shu; Olmstead, Matthew D; Percival, Will J; Prada, Francisco; Rodríguez-Torres, Sergio; Samushia, Lado; Tinker, Jeremy; Thomas, Daniel; Tojeiro, Rita; Wang, Yuting; Zhao, Gong-bo

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the cosmological implications of studying galaxy clustering using a tomographic approach applied to the final BOSS DR12 galaxy sample, including both auto- and cross-correlation functions between redshift shells. We model the signal of the full shape of the angular correlation function, $\\omega(\\theta)$, in redshift bins using state-of-the-art modelling of non-linearities, bias and redshift-space distortions. We present results on the redshift evolution of the linear bias of BOSS galaxies, which cannot be obtained with traditional methods for galaxy-clustering analysis. We also obtain constraints on cosmological parameters, combining this tomographic analysis with measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and type Ia supernova (SNIa). We explore a number of cosmological models, including the standard $\\Lambda$CDM model and its most interesting extensions, such as deviations from $w_\\rm{DE} = -1$, non-minimal neutrino masses, spatial curvature and deviations from general relativity u...

  20. A cross-sectional study of early identification of postpartum depression: Implications for primary care providers from The Ontario Mother & Infant Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sword Wendy

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This survey's objective was to provide planning information by examining utilization patterns, health outcomes and costs associated with existing practices in the management of postpartum women and their infants. In particular, this paper looks at a subgroup of women who score ≥ 12 on the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Survey (EPDS. Methods The design is cross-sectional with follow-up at four weeks after postpartum hospital discharge. Five Ontario hospitals, chosen for their varied size, practice characteristics, and geographic location, provided the setting for the study. The subjects were 875 women who had uncomplicated vaginal deliveries of live singleton infants. The main outcome measures were the EPDS, the Duke UNC Functional Social Support Questionnaire and the Health and Social Services Utilization Questionnaire. Results EPDS scores of ≥ 12 were found in 4.3 to 15.2% of otherwise healthy women. None of these women were being treated for postpartum depression. Best predictors of an EPDS score of ≥ 12 were lack: of confident support, lack of affective support, household income of Conclusions Primary care physicians, midwives, and public health nurses need to screen for depression at every opportunity early in the postpartum period. A mother's expression of undue concern about her own or her baby's health may be predictive of postpartum depression. Flexible, mother-focused support from community providers may decrease the prevalence of postpartum depression.

  1. Comparing Dark Energy Survey and HST-CLASH Observations of the Galaxy Cluster RXC J2248.7-4431: Implications for Stellar Mass Versus Dark Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmese, A.; et al.

    2016-01-04

    We derive the stellar mass fraction in the galaxy cluster RXC J2248.7-4431 observed with the Dark Energy Survey (DES) during the Science Verification period. We compare the stellar mass results from DES (5 filters) with those from the Hubble Space Telescope CLASH (17 filters). When the cluster spectroscopic redshift is assumed, we show that stellar masses from DES can be estimated within 25% of CLASH values. We compute the stellar mass contribution coming from red and blue galaxies, and study the relation between stellar mass and the underlying dark matter using weak lensing studies with DES and CLASH. An analysis of the radial profiles of the DES total and stellar mass yields a stellar-to-total fraction of f*=7.0+-2.2x10^-3 within a radius of r_200c~3 Mpc. Our analysis also includes a comparison of photometric redshifts and star/galaxy separation efficiency for both datasets. We conclude that space-based small field imaging can be used to calibrate the galaxy properties in DES for the much wider field of view. The technique developed to derive the stellar mass fraction in galaxy clusters can be applied to the ~100 000 clusters that will be observed within this survey. The stacking of all the DES clusters would reduce the errors on f* estimates and deduce important information about galaxy evolution.

  2. HIFLUGCS: X-ray luminosity -- dynamical mass relation and its implications for mass calibrations with the SPIDERS and 4MOST surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yu-Ying; Schneider, Peter; Clerc, Nicolas; Merloni, Andrea; Schwope, Axel; Borm, Katharina; Andernach, Heinz; Caretta, César A; Wu, Xiang-Ping

    2016-01-01

    We present the X-ray luminosity (L) versus dynamical mass (M) relation for 63 nearby clusters in the HIFLUGCS. The luminosity measurements are obtained based on ~1.3 Ms of clean XMM data and ROSAT pointed observations. The masses are estimated using optical spectroscopic redshifts of 13647 cluster galaxies in total. Given sufficient numbers of member galaxies in computing the dynamical masses, the L-M relations agree between the disturbed and undisturbed clusters. The cool-core clusters still dominate the scatter in the L-M relation even when a core corrected X-ray luminosity is used, which indicates that the scatter mainly reflects the structure formation history of the clusters. As shown by the clusters with a small number of redshifts, the dynamical masses can be underestimated leading to a biased scaling relation. To investigate the potential of spectroscopic surveys to follow up high-redshift galaxy clusters/groups observed in X-ray surveys for the identifications and mass calibrations, we carried out Mo...

  3. Equity implications of coverage and use of insecticide treated nets distributed for free or with co-payment in two districts in Tanzania: A cross-sectional comparative household survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mujinja Phares GM

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Tanzania, the distribution and coverage of insecticide-treated nets (ITNs is inequitable. Arguments about the most effective and equitable approach to distributing ITNs centre around whether to provide ITNs free of charge or continue with existing social marketing strategies. The Government has decided to provide free ITNs to all children under five in the country. It is still uncertain whether this strategy will achieve equitable coverage and use. This study examined the equity implications of ownership and use of ITNs in households from different socioeconomic quintiles in a district with free ITNs and a district without free ITN distribution. Methods A cross-sectional comparative household survey was conducted in two districts: Mpanda in Rukwa Region (with free ITN roll out and Kisarawe in Coast region (without free ITNs. Heads of 314 households were interviewed in Mpanda and Kisarawe. The concentration index was estimated and regression analysis was performed to compare socioeconomic inequalities in ownership and use of ITNs. Results Ownership of ITNs increased from 29% in the 2007/08 national survey to 90% after the roll out of free ITNs in Mpanda, and use increased from 13% to 77%. Inequality was considerably lower in Mpanda, with nearly perfect equality in use (concentration index 0.009 and ownership (concentration index 0.010. In Kisarawe, ownership of ITNs increased from 48% in the 2007/08 national survey to 53%, with a marked inequality concentration index 0.132. ITN use in Kisarawe district was 42% with a pro rich concentration index of 0.027. Conclusions The results shed some light on the possibilities of reducing inequality in ownership and use of ITNs and attaining Roll Back Malaria and Millennium Development Goals through the provision of free ITNs to all. This has the potential to decrease the burden of disease and reduce disparity in disease outcome.

  4. VERY STRONG EMISSION-LINE GALAXIES IN THE WFC3 INFRARED SPECTROSCOPIC PARALLEL SURVEY AND IMPLICATIONS FOR HIGH-REDSHIFT GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atek, H.; Colbert, J.; Shim, H. [Spitzer Science Center, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Siana, B.; Bridge, C. [Department of Astronomy, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Scarlata, C. [Department of Astronomy, University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Malkan, M.; Ross, N. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); McCarthy, P.; Dressler, A.; Hathi, N. P. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Teplitz, H. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Henry, A.; Martin, C. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Bunker, A. J. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Fosbury, R. A. E. [Space Telescope-European Coordinating Facility, Garching bei Muenchen (Germany)

    2011-12-20

    The WFC3 Infrared Spectroscopic Parallel Survey uses the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) infrared grism capabilities to obtain slitless spectra of thousands of galaxies over a wide redshift range including the peak of star formation history of the universe. We select a population of very strong emission-line galaxies with rest-frame equivalent widths (EWs) higher than 200 A. A total of 176 objects are found over the redshift range 0.35 < z < 2.3 in the 180 arcmin{sup 2} area that we have analyzed so far. This population consists of young and low-mass starbursts with high specific star formation rates (sSFR). After spectroscopic follow-up of one of these galaxies with Keck/Low Resolution Imaging Spectrometer, we report the detection at z = 0.7 of an extremely metal-poor galaxy with 12 + log(O/H) =7.47 {+-} 0.11. After estimating the active galactic nucleus fraction in the sample, we show that the high-EW galaxies have higher sSFR than normal star-forming galaxies at any redshift. We find that the nebular emission lines can substantially affect the total broadband flux density with a median brightening of 0.3 mag, with some examples of line contamination producing brightening of up to 1 mag. We show that the presence of strong emission lines in low-z galaxies can mimic the color-selection criteria used in the z {approx} 8 dropout surveys. In order to effectively remove low-redshift interlopers, deep optical imaging is needed, at least 1 mag deeper than the bands in which the objects are detected. Without deep optical data, most of the interlopers cannot be ruled out in the wide shallow HST imaging surveys. Finally, we empirically demonstrate that strong nebular lines can lead to an overestimation of the mass and the age of galaxies derived from fitting of their spectral energy distribution (SED). Without removing emission lines, the age and the stellar mass estimates are overestimated by a factor of 2 on average and up to a factor of 10 for the high-EW galaxies

  5. HIFLUGCS: X-ray luminosity-dynamical mass relation and its implications for mass calibrations with the SPIDERS and 4MOST surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Ying; Reiprich, Thomas H.; Schneider, Peter; Clerc, Nicolas; Merloni, Andrea; Schwope, Axel; Borm, Katharina; Andernach, Heinz; Caretta, César A.; Wu, Xiang-Ping

    2017-03-01

    We present the relation of X-ray luminosity versus dynamical mass for 63 nearby clusters of galaxies in a flux-limited sample, the HIghest X-ray FLUx Galaxy Cluster Sample (HIFLUGCS, consisting of 64 clusters). The luminosity measurements are obtained based on 1.3 Ms of clean XMM-Newton data and ROSAT pointed observations. The masses are estimated using optical spectroscopic redshifts of 13647 cluster galaxies in total. We classify clusters into disturbed and undisturbed based on a combination of the X-ray luminosity concentration and the offset between the brightest cluster galaxy and X-ray flux-weighted center. Given sufficient numbers (i.e., ≥45) of member galaxies when the dynamical masses are computed, the luminosity versus mass relations agree between the disturbed and undisturbed clusters. The cool-core clusters still dominate the scatter in the luminosity versus mass relation even when a core-corrected X-ray luminosity is used, which indicates that the scatter of this scaling relation mainly reflects the structure formation history of the clusters. As shown by the clusters with only few spectroscopically confirmed members, the dynamical masses can be underestimated and thus lead to a biased scaling relation. To investigate the potential of spectroscopic surveys to follow up high-redshift galaxy clusters or groups observed in X-ray surveys for the identifications and mass calibrations, we carried out Monte Carlo resampling of the cluster galaxy redshifts and calibrated the uncertainties of the redshift and dynamical mass estimates when only reduced numbers of galaxy redshifts per cluster are available. The resampling considers the SPIDERS and 4MOST configurations, designed for the follow-up of the eROSITA clusters, and was carried out for each cluster in the sample at the actual cluster redshift as well as at the assigned input cluster redshifts of 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, and 0.8. To follow up very distant clusters or groups, we also carried out the mass

  6. A Massive Galaxy Cluster At z=1.45 From The XMM Cluster Survey: Discovery, Confirmation And Implications For The L-T Relation And Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabirli, Kivanc; Romer, A. K.; Davidson, M.; Stanford, S. A.; Viana, P. T.; Hilton, M.; Collins, C. A.; Kay, S. T.; Liddle, A. R.; Mann, R. G.; Miller, C. J.; Nichol, R. C.; West, M. J.; Conselice, C. J.; Spinrad, H.; Stern, D.; XCS Collaboration

    2006-06-01

    We report the discovery of the hottest cluster known at z > 1. It was identified as an extended X-ray source in the XMM Cluster Survey (XCS, Romer et al., 2001) and optical spectroscopy shows that 6 galaxies within a 60 arcsec diameter region lie at z = 1.45 ± 0.01. Hence its redshift is the highest currently known for a spectroscopically-confirmed cluster. Analysis of the X-ray spectra yields kT = 7.9+2.8-1.8 keV (90% confidence) and suggests that it is relatively massive for such a high redshift cluster.We acknowledge financial support from NASA grant NAG-11634 (AKR, RCN, KS, MD, PTPV), The Royal Astronomical Society's Hosie Request (MD, KS), PPARC (ARL, STK, RGM), the NASA XMM program (KS), the Institute of Astronomy at the University of Edinburgh (MD), Liverpool John Moores University (MH), Carnegie Mellon University (KS, AKR), and NSF grant AST-0205960 (MJW).

  7. What’s in a Dog’s Breakfast? Considering the Social, Veterinary and Environmental Implications of Feeding Food Scraps to Pets Using Three Australian Surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirrilly Thompson

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Diverting food waste away from landfills is one way to minimise its serious environmental impact. Given that over a third of Australian households have at least one pet, the feeding of food waste to dogs constitutes one potentially significant waste diversion path. However, the proportion of dog owners that feed food waste to their pets is unknown. Moreover, there has been no investigation into any relationship between practices of feeding scraps to pets and the animals’ body condition, living arrangements (inside or outside and exercise regime. To provide some insight, this paper presents findings from three surveys across two Australian studies. The first reports both pet and dog-specific findings from two surveys within a wider food waste research project (n = 1017, establishing that 28% of respondents fed leftovers to pets as a main food waste minimization strategy, yet in only 5% of households did this constitute more than half of the household’s food scraps. This modest diversion of food scraps from landfill to feeding pets was reflected in the finding that there was no significant difference seen in the claimed level of food discards to the waste stream for households feeding food scraps to dogs and those that did not. The second—a dog owner specific study (n = 355—found that almost half (44% of respondents reported feeding table scraps to dogs. They were more likely to be females, owners of medium sized dogs, and in larger households. There was no significant difference in self-rated dogs’ body condition scores between respondents who fed table scraps to their dog and those who did not. Further multidisciplinary research is recommended to reconcile the social, veterinary and environmental risks and benefits of feeding food waste to animals.

  8. Exploring implications of Medicaid participation and wait times for colorectal screening on early detection efforts in Connecticut--a secret-shopper survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vatsal B; Nahar, Richa; Murray, Betty; Salner, Andrew L

    2013-04-01

    Routine colorectal screening, decreases in incidence, and advances in treatment have lowered colorectal cancer mortality rates over the past three decades. Nevertheless, it remains the second most common cause of cancer death amongst men and women combined in U.S. Most cases of colon cancer are diagnosed at a late stage leading to poor survival outcomes for patients. After extensive research of publically available data, it would appear that the state of Connecticut does not have available state-wide data on patient wait times for routine colonoscopy screening. Furthermore, there are no publicly available, or Connecticut-specific, reports on Medicaid participation rates for colorectal screening amongst gastroenterologists (GI) in Connecticut. In 2012, the American Cancer Society report on Colorectal Cancer Screening Rates confirmed barriers to health-care access and disparities in health outcomes and survival rates for colon cancer patients based on race, ethnicity, and low socioeconomic status. Given this information, one could conjecture that low Medicaid participation rates among GIs could potentially have a more severe impact on health-care access and outcomes for underserved populations. At present, funding and human resources are being employed across the state of Connecticut to address bottlenecks in colorectal cancer screening. More specifically, patient navigation and outreach programs are emerging and expanding to address the gaps in services for hard-to-reach populations and the medically underserved. Low Medicaid participation rates and increased wait times for colonoscopy screening may impair the efficacy of colorectal cancer patient navigation and outreach efforts and potentially funding for future interventions. In this study, we report the results of our secret-shopper telephone survey comprising of 93 group and independent gastroenterologist (GI) practices in different counties of Connecticut. Reviewing online resources and yellow pages

  9. Distribution of the Mediterranean hake populations (Merluccius merluccius smiridus Rafinesque, 1810 (Ostheichthyes: Gadiformes based on six years monitoring by trawl-surveys: some implications for management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Orsi Relini

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of trawl survey data collected during the MEDITS project (1994-1999, the distribution of Mediterranean hake populations was described in coastal areas corresponding to about three quarters of both the latitudinal and longitudinal extensions of the Mediterranean Sea, and in the 0-800 m range. Abundance and biomass indices (in terms of number and kg per km2 are presented in 15 geographical sectors and 40 subareas from the Alborán Sea to the Aegean Sea. A statistical analysis by generalized linear modelling performed on such indices per main national blocks (Greece, France, Italy and Spain, and considering the effects of the six years of sampling and the depth, showed that biomass increased from west to east, while for all areas the most significant depth effect appeared between 100 and 200 m, corresponding to the depth range that hosts most of the summer nursery areas. The overall size-frequency distributions in shelf and slope waters, average sizes and total mortality coefficient Z per sector showed that the bulk of the MEDITS samples consisted of young individuals and, with only a few exceptions (western Sardinia, central Aegean, a generalized condition of growth overfishing was apparent. However, no negative trend was found, either in biomass or in average size of fishes, during the six years of the present study. Recruitment patterns were studied by distinguishing the youngest fish as Gaussian groups (modal length from 6 to 9 cm total length in length-frequency distributions of each subarea and main stratum (shelf and slope. Considering the timing of MEDITS surveys (May-July, this approach emphasised the nurseries in the northern part of the western Mediterranean (Gulf of Lions, Ligurian Sea, northern Tyrrhenian Sea and in the northern central Mediterranean, where recruitment occurs mainly during spring. On the other hand, few recruits were found in part of the central and particularly in the eastern Mediterranean, where

  10. The Hubble Space Telescope UV Legacy Survey of Galactic Globular Clusters. VII. Implications from the Nearly Universal Nature of Horizontal Branch Discontinuities

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Thomas M; D'Antona, Francesca; Salaris, Maurizio; Milone, Antonino P; Dalessandro, Emanuele; Piotto, Giampaolo; Renzini, Alvio; Sweigart, Allen V; Bellini, Andrea; Ortolani, Sergio; Sarajedini, Ata; Aparicio, Antonio; Bedin, Luigi R; Anderson, Jay; Pietrinferni, Adriano; Nardiello, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    The UV-initiative Hubble Space Telescope Treasury survey of Galactic globular clusters provides a new window into the phenomena that shape the morphological features of the horizontal branch (HB). Using this large and homogeneous catalog of UV and blue photometry, we demonstrate that the HB exhibits discontinuities that are remarkably consistent in color (effective temperature). This consistency is apparent even among some of the most massive clusters hosting multiple distinct sub-populations (such as NGC 2808, omega Cen, and NGC 6715), demonstrating that these phenomena are primarily driven by atmospheric physics that is independent of the underlying population properties. However, inconsistencies arise in the metal-rich clusters NGC 6388 and NGC 6441, where the discontinuity within the blue HB (BHB) distribution shifts ~1,000 K to 2,000 K hotter. We demonstrate that this shift is likely due to a large helium enhancement in the BHB stars of these clusters, which in turn affects the surface convection and evo...

  11. National survey data for zoonotic schistosomiasis in the Philippines grossly underestimates the true burden of disease within endemic zones: implications for future control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olveda, Remigio M; Tallo, Veronica; Olveda, David U; Inobaya, Marianette T; Chau, Thao N; Ross, Allen G

    2016-04-01

    Zoonotic schistosomiasis has a long endemic history in the Philippines. Human mass drug administration has been the cornerstone of schistosomiasis control in the country for the past three decades. Recent publications utilizing retrospective national survey data have indicated that the national human prevalence of the disease is disease is now close to elimination. However, the evidence for such a claim is weak, given that less than a third of the human population is currently being treated annually within endemic zones and only a third of those treated actually swallow the tablets. For those who consume the drug at the single oral dose of 40mg/kg, the estimated cure rate is 52% based on a recent meta-analysis. Thus, approximately 5% of the endemic human population is in reality receiving the appropriate treatment. To compound this public health problem, most of the bovines in the endemic communities are concurrently infected but are not treated under the current national control programme. Given this evidence, it is believed that the human prevalence of schistosomiasis within endemic regions has been grossly underestimated. Inherent flaws in the reporting of national schistosomiasis prevalence data are reported here, and the problems of utilizing national retrospective data in making geographic information system (GIS) risk maps and advising policy makers of the outcomes are highlighted.

  12. National survey data for zoonotic schistosomiasis in the Philippines grossly underestimates the true burden of disease within endemic zones: implications for future control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remigio M. Olveda

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Zoonotic schistosomiasis has a long endemic history in the Philippines. Human mass drug administration has been the cornerstone of schistosomiasis control in the country for the past three decades. Recent publications utilizing retrospective national survey data have indicated that the national human prevalence of the disease is <1%, hence the disease is now close to elimination. However, the evidence for such a claim is weak, given that less than a third of the human population is currently being treated annually within endemic zones and only a third of those treated actually swallow the tablets. For those who consume the drug at the single oral dose of 40 mg/kg, the estimated cure rate is 52% based on a recent meta-analysis. Thus, approximately 5% of the endemic human population is in reality receiving the appropriate treatment. To compound this public health problem, most of the bovines in the endemic communities are concurrently infected but are not treated under the current national control programme. Given this evidence, it is believed that the human prevalence of schistosomiasis within endemic regions has been grossly underestimated. Inherent flaws in the reporting of national schistosomiasis prevalence data are reported here, and the problems of utilizing national retrospective data in making geographic information system (GIS risk maps and advising policy makers of the outcomes are highlighted.

  13. Direct Measurement of the Delay Time Distribution of Type Ia Supernovae by the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey and Implications for the Progenitor

    CERN Document Server

    Totani, Tomonori; Oda, Takeshi; Doi, Mamoru; Yasuda, Naoki

    2008-01-01

    The delay time distribution (DTD) of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) from star formation is an important clue to reveal the still unknown progenitor system of SNe Ia. Here we report a direct measurement of the SN Ia DTD by using the faint variable objects detected in the Subaru/XMM-Newton Deep Survey (SXDS) down to i' ~ 25.5. We select 65 SN candidates showing significant spatial offset from nuclei of the host galaxies having old stellar population at z ~ 0.4-1.2, out of more than 1,000 SXDS variable objects. Although spectroscopic type classification is not available for these, we quantitatively demonstrate that more than 80% of these should be SNe Ia. The DTD is derived using the stellar age estimates of the old galaxies based on 9 band photometries from optical to mid-infrared wavelength, and it is well described by a featureless power-law as f_D(t_Ia) \\propto t_Ia^alpha with alpha ~ -1 in a delay time range of t_Ia = 0.1-10 Gyr. This DTD shape is in excellent agreement with the generic prediction of the doubl...

  14. Predator Presence and Vegetation Density Affect Capture Rates and Detectability of Litoria aurea Tadpoles: Wide-Ranging Implications for a Common Survey Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Madeleine R; Clulow, Simon; Bower, Deborah S; Clulow, John; Mahony, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Trapping is a common sampling technique used to estimate fundamental population metrics of animal species such as abundance, survival and distribution. However, capture success for any trapping method can be heavily influenced by individuals' behavioural plasticity, which in turn affects the accuracy of any population estimates derived from the data. Funnel trapping is one of the most common methods for sampling aquatic vertebrates, although, apart from fish studies, almost nothing is known about the effects of behavioural plasticity on trapping success. We used a full factorial experiment to investigate the effects that two common environmental parameters (predator presence and vegetation density) have on the trapping success of tadpoles. We estimated that the odds of tadpoles being captured in traps was 4.3 times higher when predators were absent compared to present and 2.1 times higher when vegetation density was high compared to low, using odds ratios based on fitted model means. The odds of tadpoles being detected in traps were also 2.9 times higher in predator-free environments. These results indicate that common environmental factors can trigger behavioural plasticity in tadpoles that biases trapping success. We issue a warning to researchers and surveyors that trapping biases may be commonplace when conducting surveys such as these, and urge caution in interpreting data without consideration of important environmental factors present in the study system. Left unconsidered, trapping biases in capture success have the potential to lead to incorrect interpretations of data sets, and misdirection of limited resources for managing species.

  15. The application of large volume airgun sources to the onshore-offshore seismic surveys: implication of the experimental results in northern South China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIU XueLin; CHEN Yong; ZHU RiXiang; XU HuiLong; SHI XiaoBin; YE ChunMing; ZHAO MingHui; XIA ShaoHong

    2007-01-01

    Onshore-offshore seismic experiments were carried out for the first time in northern South China Sea using large volume airgun sources at sea and seismic stations on land. The experimental results indicate that seismic signals from the new airgun array of R/V Shiyan 2 can be detected as far as 255 km. The signal effective area reaches nearly 50000 km2, which covers Hong Kong and Pearl River Delta. Compared with the old airgun array, the signal amplitude, propagation distance and effective area of the new airgun array have been increased notably, which demonstrates that the upgrade of the airgun source was successful. Comparisons with previous experimental results in other regions show that the shooting effect of the new airgun array is similar to those best airgun sources in the world. Especially, it is a new breakthrough in using the permanent seismic stations onshore to record long distance airgun signals offshore, which has great significance to the realization of the "seismic radar" concept and the 3D seismic surveys of crustal structure in coastal areas.

  16. Comparing Dark Energy Survey and HST-CLASH observations of the galaxy cluster RXC J2248.7-4431: implications for stellar mass versus dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Palmese, A; Banerji, M; Gruen, D; Jouvel, S; Melchior, P; Aleksić, J; Annis, J; Diehl, H T; Jeltema, T; Romer, K; Rozo, E; Rykoff, E S; Seitz, S; Suchyta, E; Zhang, Y; Abbott, T M C; Abdalla, F B; Allam, S; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bertin, E; Brooks, D; Buckley-Geer, E; Burke, D L; Capozzi, D; Rosell, A Carnero; Kind, M Carrasco; Carretero, J; Crocce, M; Cunha, C E; D'Andrea, C B; da Costa, L N; Desai, S; Dietrich, J P; Doel, P; Estrada, J; Evrard, A E; Flaugher, B; Frieman, J; Gerdes, D W; Goldstein, D A; Gruendl, R A; Gutierrez, G; Honscheid, K; James, D J; Kuehn, K; Kuropatkin, N; Li, T S; Lima, M; Maia, M A G; Marshall, J L; Miller, C J; Miquel, R; Nord, B; Ogando, R; Plazas, A A; Roodman, A; Sanchez, E; Scarpine, V; Sevilla-Noarbe, I; Smith, R C; Soares-Santos, M; Sobreira, F; Swanson, M E C; Tarle, G; Thomas, D; Tucker, D; Vikram, V

    2016-01-01

    We derive the stellar mass fraction in the galaxy cluster RXC J2248.7-4431 observed with the Dark Energy Survey (DES) during the Science Verification period. We compare the stellar mass results from DES (5 filters) with those from the Hubble Space Telescope CLASH (17 filters). When the cluster spectroscopic redshift is assumed, we show that stellar masses from DES can be estimated within 25% of CLASH values. We compute the stellar mass contribution coming from red and blue galaxies, and study the relation between stellar mass and the underlying dark matter using weak lensing studies with DES and CLASH. An analysis of the radial profiles of the DES total and stellar mass yields a stellar-to-total fraction of f*=7.0+-2.2x10^-3 within a radius of r_200c~3 Mpc. Our analysis also includes a comparison of photometric redshifts and star/galaxy separation efficiency for both datasets. We conclude that space-based small field imaging can be used to calibrate the galaxy properties in DES for the much wider field of vie...

  17. The MOSDEF Survey: Metallicity dependence of the PAH emission at High Redshift: Implications for 24 micron-inferred IR luminosities and star formation rates at z~2

    CERN Document Server

    Shivaei, Irene; Shapley, Alice; Siana, Brian; Kriek, Mariska; Mobasher, Bahram; Coil, Alison; Freeman, William; Sanders, Ryan; Price, Sedona; Azadi, Mojegan

    2016-01-01

    We present results on the variation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) emission at 7.7 micron in galaxies spanning a wide range in metallicity at z~2. For this analysis, we use rest-frame optical spectra of 476 galaxies at 1.37$\\leq z\\leq$2.61 from the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field (MOSDEF) survey to infer metallicities and ionization states. Spitzer/MIPS 24 micron observations are used to derive rest-frame 7.7 micron luminosities (L(7.7)) and far-IR data from Herschel/PACS 100 and 160 micron to measure total IR luminosities (L(IR)). We find significant trends between the ratio of L(7.7) to L(IR) (and to dust-corrected SFR) and both metallicity and [OIII]/[OII] (O$_{32}$) emission-line ratio. The latter is an empirical proxy for the ionization parameter. These trends indicate a paucity of PAH molecules in low metallicity environments with harder and more intense radiation fields. Additionally, L(7.7)/L(IR) is significantly lower in the youngest quartile in our sample (ages of ~ 400 Myr) compared to older...

  18. Can the Misinterpretation Amendment Rate Be Used as a Measure of Interpretive Error in Anatomic Pathology?: Implications of a Survey of the Directors of Anatomic and Surgical Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkash, Vinita; Fadare, Oluwole; Dewar, Rajan; Nakhleh, Raouf; Cooper, Kumarasen

    2017-03-01

    A repeat survey of the Association of the Directors of Anatomic and Surgical Pathology, done 10 years after the original was used to assess trends and variability in classifying scenarios as errors, and the preferred post signout report modification for correcting error by the membership of the Association of the Directors of Anatomic and Surgical Pathology. The results were analyzed to inform on whether interpretive amendment rates might act as surrogate measures of interpretive error in pathology. An analyses of the responses indicated that primary level misinterpretations (benign to malignant and vice versa) were universally qualified as error; secondary-level misinterpretations or misclassifications were inconsistently labeled error. There was added variability in the preferred post signout report modification used to correct report alterations. The classification of a scenario as error appeared to correlate with severity of potential harm of the missed call, the perceived subjectivity of the diagnosis, and ambiguity of reporting terminology. Substantial differences in policies for error detection and optimal reporting format were documented between departments. In conclusion, the inconsistency in labeling scenarios as error, disagreement about the optimal post signout report modification for the correction of the error, and variability in error detection policies preclude the use of the misinterpretation amendment rate as a surrogate measure for error in anatomic pathology. There is little change in uniformity of definition, attitudes and perception of interpretive error in anatomic pathology in the last 10 years.

  19. Current observation on Aedes mosquitoes: A survey on implication of dengue infection, human lifestyle and preventive measure among Malaysia resident in urban and sub-urban areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aminodin Sumayyah

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the current knowledge level and information on Aedes mosquitoes and dengue among Penang resident in urban (Sungai Dua and sub- urban areas (Batu Maung. Methods: The questionnaire comprises of twenty-three questions, surveyed on 202 respondents regarding socio-demographic, the observation of general Aedes’ mosquito behaviour, dengue infection threat, preventive measures against mosquitoes and lifestyle (on usage of artificial light in changing the behaviour of Aedes mosquitoes. Results: The respondents in sub-urban Batu Maung showed less knowledge level regarding Aedes mosquitoes as compared to respondents in urban Sungai Dua. There was a positive association between biting frequency of mosquitoes with the lifestyle of respondents (in relation to the light use, the use of personal protection and fogging operations conducted by the Ministry of Health. There is a positive relationship between the knowledge of preferred mosquitoes resting place and the respondent aged between 17 to 24 (78.2% in sub-urban Batu Maung. Urban Sungai Dua respondents showed a significant relation between the use of lights and the resting places for Aedes mosquitoes. The preventive measures chosen by both sub-distinct areas against mosquitobites were significantly affected by the biting time and the mosquitoes biting frequency (P < 0.05. Conclusions: In this study, we concluded that there is a direct link between the knowledge of the Aedes biting frequency with dengue infection, human lifestyle on the light use and preventive measures against mosquitoes. However, the level of knowledge is poor on the subject of Aedes mosquitoes and dengue for both urban and sub-urban respondents.

  20. Intra-population variation in anemia status and its relationship to economic status and self-perceived health in the Mexican Family Life Survey: implications for bioarchaeology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piperata, Barbara A; Hubbe, Mark; Schmeer, Kammi K

    2014-10-01

    Recently scholars have advocated for the use of a critical biocultural approach in bioarchaeology, where osteological and dental markers of stress are used to understand the broader biosocial context of past populations. However, the ability to accomplish this task rests on the assumption that ultimate-level environmental stressors and well-being in the past can be reconstructed from the prevalence of pathologies in skeletal collections. Here we test this assumption using anemia prevalence in the Mexican Family Life Survey. Specifically we test three hypotheses: (1) that individuals sharing the same household are more likely to share anemia status; (2) anemia status is a predictor of economic status (a common proxy for broader environmental context); and (3) anemia status is related to self-rated health. Results demonstrate that: anemia status was not commonly shared between household members; there was a significant overlap in economic status between anemic and nonanemic individuals (i.e., anemia poorly predicted economic status) and; while anemia status was associated with self-perceived health, the majority of those who reported poor health were nonanemic while a significant number of those who reported very good health were anemic. We argue that these findings are likely related to variation in individual frailty, which is shaped by biological and cultural risk factors. Therefore, we advocate for greater incorporation of individual frailty into bioarchaeological investigations, and, in effort to overcome some of the difficulties associated with this task, increased use of data from living populations and greater collaboration between bioarchaeologists and human biologists. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Deep structure of the northern Rio Grande rift beneath the San Luis basin (Colorado) from a seismic reflection survey: implications for rift evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, Kush; Brown, Larry; Hearn, Thomas

    1999-02-01

    A seismic reflection survey by Chevron across the San Luis basin (northern Rio Grande rift) and San Juan volcanic field of southern Colorado is reprocessed with extended correlation to search for basement structure. The trace of the main bounding fault of the basin, a high-angle normal fault against the Sangre de Cristo Range, can be correlated to a wide zone of dipping reflection fabric and soles out at lower crustal depths (26-28 km). The deeper reflection fabric represent either broad extensional strain or pre-existing structure, such as a Laramide thrust system. The Sangre de Cristo bounding fault in San Luis basin does not sole out at mid-crustal depths but continues into the lower crust with a shallower dip. The basin architecture in the northern Rio Grande rift (San Luis basin) provides little if any evidence that the Sangre de Cristo bounding fault should flatten in a shallow listric fashion. This fault geometry is quite similar to the high-angle bounding fault in the Espanola basin but contrasts with less deeply-rooted faults in the Albuquerque basin in the central Rio Grande rift. Deeper soling out of the Sangre de Cristo bounding fault could be due to less extension in the northern Rio Grande rift and/or greater strength of the lithosphere compared to the central Rio Grande rift. Unequivocal Moho reflections beneath the San Luis basin cannot be identified, probably due to limited signal penetration or a gradational nature of the Moho. The majority of rift-related movement observed on the Sangre de Cristo bounding fault is post-Eocene. Either the western margin of the basin is marked by a tight monocline or a low-angle normal fault.

  2. Systematic Survey for [O ii], [O iii], and Hα Blobs at z = 0.1-1.5: The Implication for Evolution of Galactic-scale Outflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuma, Suraphong; Ouchi, Masami; Drake, Alyssa B.; Fujimoto, Seiji; Kojima, Takashi; Sugahara, Yuma

    2017-06-01

    We conduct a systematic search for galaxies at z=0.1{--}1.5 with [O ii]λ 3727, [O iii]λ 5007, or Hα λ 6563 emission lines extended over at least 30 kpc by using deep narrowband and broadband imaging in the Subaru-XMM Deep Survey field. These extended emission-line galaxies are dubbed [O ii], [O iii], or Hα blobs. Based on a new selection method that securely selects extended emission-line galaxies, we find 77 blobs at z=0.40{--}1.46 with the isophotal area of emission lines down to 1.2× {10}-18 erg s-1 cm-2 kpc-2. Four of them are spectroscopically confirmed to be [O iii] blobs at z = 0.83. We identify AGN activities in eight blobs with X-ray and radio data, and find that the fraction of AGN contribution increases with increasing isophotal area of the extended emission. With the Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) and Anderson-Darling tests, we confirm that the stellar-mass distributions of Hα and [O ii] blobs are not drawn from those of the emitters at the > 90% confidence level in that Hα and [O ii] blobs are located at the massive end of the distributions, but cannot reject a null hypothesis of being the same distributions in terms of the specific star formation rates. It is suggested that galactic-scale outflows tend to be more prominent in more massive star-forming galaxies. Exploiting our sample homogeneously selected over the large area, we derive the number densities of blobs at each epoch. The number densities of blobs decrease drastically with redshifts at a rate that is larger than that of the decrease of cosmic star formation densities.

  3. A Survey of Parents' Use of Music in the Home With Their Child with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Implications for Building the Capacity of Families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Anne Thompson

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Preschool aged children with disabilities including Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD typically receive early childhood intervention services that adopt a family-centred approach to supporting child and family outcomes. Family-centred approaches aim to build the capacity of parents to support their child’s development immediately and into the future, and therefore offer parents a variety of resources. One indication of whether these resources have been relevant and useful to the family is to consider how well they have been incorporated into everyday life. This study surveyed 11 families of children with ASD aged 3- 6 years who were receiving music therapy as part of a broader study, and asked them to keep a journal of their use of the music experiences modelled within the sessions during their typical week. It is the first study to ask parents of children with ASD to quantify the time spent in music experiences. Results showed that families can and do use music to engage with their child with ASD, with a total median time of 2.8 hours per week recorded. The total average time comprised four categories of music experiences, including singing, singing and playing instruments, improvising with instruments, and listening to music. Of these, singing and listening to music were the most popular (37% each of the total time and were best maintained at follow up. These results provide preliminary support demonstrating that music therapy could be a successful way to support capacity building in families by encouraging them to embed therapeutic music experiences into their daily life. Further and more detailed research is needed to investigate this central tenet of family-centred practice, particularly in regards to how families’ use of music experiences change over time.

  4. Tsujal Marine Survey: Crustal Characterization of the Rivera Plate-Jalisco Block Boundary and its Implications for Seismic and Tsunami Hazard Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolome, R.; Danobeitia, J.; Barba, D. C., Sr.; Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Cameselle, A. L.; Estrada, F.; Prada, M.; Bandy, W. L.

    2014-12-01

    During the spring of 2014, a team of Spanish and Mexican scientists explored the western margin of Mexico in the frame of the TSUJAL project. The two main objectives were to characterize the nature and structure of the lithosphere and to identify potential sources triggering earthquakes and tsunamis at the contact between Rivera plate-Jalisco block with the North American Plate. With these purposes a set of marine geophysical data were acquired aboard the RRS James Cook. This work is focus in the southern part of the TSUJAL survey, where we obtain seismic images from the oceanic domain up to the continental shelf. Thus, more than 800 km of MCS data, divided in 7 profiles, have been acquired with a 6km long streamer and using an air-gun sources ranging from 5800 c.i. to 3540 c.i. Furthermore, a wide-angle seismic profile of 190 km length was recorded in 16 OBS deployed perpendicular to the coast of Manzanillo. Gravity and magnetic, multibeam bathymetry and sub-bottom profiler data were recorded simultaneously with seismic data in the offshore area. Preliminary stacked MCS seismic sections reveal the crustal structure in the different domains of the Mexican margin. The contact between the Rivera and NA Plates is observed as a strong reflection at 6 s two way travel time (TWTT), in a parallel offshore profile (TS01), south of Manzanillo. This contact is also identified in a perpendicular profile, TS02, along a section of more than 100 km in length crossing the Rivera transform zone, and the plate boundary between Cocos and Rivera Plates. Northwards, offshore Pto. Vallarta, the MCS data reveals high amplitude reflections at around 7-8.5 s TWTT, roughly 2.5-3.5 s TWTT below the seafloor, that conspicuously define the subduction plane (TS06b). These strong reflections which we interpret as the Moho discontinuity define the starting bending of subduction of Rivera Plate. Another clear pattern observed within the first second of the MCS data shows evidences of a bottom

  5. Characterizing sexual histories of women before formal sex-work in south India from a cross-sectional survey: implications for HIV/STI prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mishra Sharmistha

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interventions designed to prevent HIV and STIs in female sex-workers (FSWs reach women after they formally enter the sex-trade. We aimed to characterize the pattern of sexual behaviour among FSWs from first-sex to when they identify as sex-workers (transition period in a region with traditional (historically characterized by dedication into sex-work at first-sex and non-traditional forms of sex-work. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 246 traditional and 765 non-traditional FSWs across three districts in Karnataka, India. We performed univariate and multivariate logistic regression to profile FSWs most likely to engage in a commercial first-sex before identifying as a sex-worker. Sexual life-course patterns were distinguished using univariate and multivariate linear regression based on key events associated with length of transition period. Results Overall, 266 FSWs experienced a commercial first-sex, of whom 45.9% (95% CI: 38.2,53.7 continued a long-term relationship with the first partner. In adjusted analysis, traditional FSWs were more likely to experience a commercial first-sex (AOR 52.5, 95% CI: 27.4,100.7. The average transition time was 8.8 years (SD 3.9, but there was considerable variability between respondents. Among women who experienced a commercial first-sex, a slower transition was independently associated with non-traditional sex-work, the presence of long-term partnerships during the transition period, and ongoing partnerships at time of entry into sex-work. In the absence of a commercial first-sex, a faster transition was associated with traditional sex-work and the dissolution of long-term partnerships, while a slower transition was associated with the presence of long-term partnerships and widowhood. Only 18.5% (95% CI: 12.7,26.2 and 47.3% (95% CI: 32.7,62.3 of women reported ‘always’ condom use with their long-term and occasional partners during the transition period, respectively

  6. An Evaluation of Selected Extraordinary Floods in the United States Reported by the U.S. Geological Survey and Implications for Future Advancement of Flood Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, John E.; Jarrett, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    Thirty flood peak discharges determine the envelope curve of maximum floods documented in the United States by the U.S. Geological Survey. These floods occurred from 1927 to 1978 and are extraordinary not just in their magnitude, but in their hydraulic and geomorphic characteristics. The reliability of the computed discharge of these extraordinary floods was reviewed and evaluated using current (2007) best practices. Of the 30 flood peak discharges investigated, only 7 were measured at daily streamflow-gaging stations that existed when the flood occurred, and 23 were measured at miscellaneous (ungaged) sites. Methods used to measure these 30 extraordinary flood peak discharges consisted of 21 slope-area measurements, 2 direct current-meter measurements, 1 culvert measurement, 1 rating-curve extension, and 1 interpolation and rating-curve extension. The remaining four peak discharges were measured using combinations of culvert, slope-area, flow-over-road, and contracted-opening measurements. The method of peak discharge determination for one flood is unknown. Changes to peak discharge or rating are recommended for 20 of the 30 flood peak discharges that were evaluated. Nine floods retained published peak discharges, but their ratings were downgraded. For two floods, both peak discharge and rating were corrected and revised. Peak discharges for five floods that are subject to significant uncertainty due to complex field and hydraulic conditions, were re-rated as estimates. This study resulted in 5 of the 30 peak discharges having revised values greater than about 10 percent different from the original published values. Peak discharges were smaller for three floods (North Fork Hubbard Creek, Texas; El Rancho Arroyo, New Mexico; South Fork Wailua River, Hawaii), and two peak discharges were revised upward (Lahontan Reservoir tributary, Nevada; Bronco Creek, Arizona). Two peak discharges were indeterminate because they were concluded to have been debris flows with peak

  7. On two reports associated with James Wood-Mason and Alfred William Alcock published by the Indian Museum and the Indian Marine Survey between 1890 and 1891: implications for malacostracan nomenclature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huys, Rony; Low, Martyn E Y; De Grave, Sammy; Ng, Peter K L; Clark, Paul F

    2014-01-01

    conclusively attributable to a specific author, it is considered to be written anonymously and should therefore be cited as Anonymous (1891). A number of names in Appendix No. XIII are available since they are accompanied by a brief description of the taxa they denote, and are either attributable to James Wood-Mason or remain with anonymous authorship; others are nomina nuda without a diagnosis or indication, or have been diagnosed previously in the "Natural History Notes from H.M. Indian Marine Survey Steamer Investigator". The nomenclatural implications for eight names made available in Anonymous (1891) are discussed: Glyphocrangon caeca, Glyphocrangon sculptus var. coecescens, Psalidopodidae, Psalidopus, Psalidopus mirabilis, Psathyrocaris, Psathyrocaris fragilis and Psopheticus crepitans. The nomenclatural history of various other taxa, initially denoted by unavailable names in Anonymous (1891), is also documented. The authorships of the various crustacean taxa collected by the Indian Marine Survey Steamer Investigator during the seasons 1889-1890 and 1890-1891, and published in two series of connected parts in the Annals and Magazine of Natural History, are also re-assessed and summarised. A rare document containing the list of R.I.M.S. Investigator stations for the period 1884-1913 is reproduced for the future benefit of the scientific community. 

  8. "Suntelligence" Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to the American Academy of Dermatology's "Suntelligence" sun-smart survey. Please answer the following questions to measure ... be able to view a ranking of major cities suntelligence based on residents' responses to this survey. ...

  9. Survey Says

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Susan K.

    2005-01-01

    Survey Says is a lesson plan designed to teach college students how to access Internet resources for valid data related to the sexual health of young people. Discussion questions based on the most recent available data from two national surveys, the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance-United States, 2003 (CDC, 2004) and the National Survey of…

  10. Engineering surveying

    CERN Document Server

    Schofield, W

    2001-01-01

    The aim of Engineering Surveying has always been to impart and develop a clear understanding of the basic topics of the subject. The author has fully revised the book to make it the most up-to-date and relevant textbook available on the subject.The book also contains the latest information on trigonometric levelling, total stations and one-person measuring systems. A new chapter on satellites ensures a firm grasp of this vitally important topic.The text covers engineering surveying modules for civil engineering students on degree courses and forms a reference for the engineering surveying module in land surveying courses. It will also prove to be a valuable reference for practitioners.* Simple clear introduction to surveying for engineers* Explains key techniques and methods* Details reading systems and satellite position fixing

  11. A Survey on Use of Rapid Tests and Tuberculosis Diagnostic Practices by Primary Health Care Providers in South Africa: Implications for the Development of New Point-of-Care Tests

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Davids, Malika; Dheda, Keertan; Pant Pai, Nitika; Cogill, Dolphina; Pai, Madhukar; Engel, Nora

    2015-01-01

    .... In this cross-sectional survey study, 400 primary healthcare providers in two cities in South Africa were interviewed on their use of rapid tests in general, and tuberculosis diagnostic practices...

  12. A Survey on Use of Rapid Tests and Tuberculosis Diagnostic Practices by Primary Health Care Providers in South Africa: Implications for the Development of New Point-of-Care Tests: e0141453

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Malika Davids; Keertan Dheda; Nitika Pant Pai; Dolphina Cogill; Madhukar Pai; Nora Engel

    2015-01-01

    .... Methods In this cross-sectional survey study, 400 primary healthcare providers in two cities in South Africa were interviewed on their use of rapid tests in general, and tuberculosis diagnostic...

  13. Surveying Humaness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Randi; Gad, Christopher

    Christopher Gad. Ph.d. Dept. of Information and Media Studies Randi Markussen. Associate Professor, Dept. of Information and Media Studies. rmark@imv.au.dk   Abstract:   Surveying humanness -politics of care improvement   For various reasons we both were subjected to a specific survey procedure...... and development of a large collection of biological and psychological symptoms and psycho-social problems. However, the surveys say nothing about how the information will be of use to the people who answer the procedure or how this scientific intervention will be put to use more specifically within the public...... carried out in a Danish county in order to improve treatment of people who have suffered from long-term illnesses. The surveys concern not only feed back on how people experience their present and past interaction with the social services and health care system; they also ask people to indicate the state...

  14. Surveying Humaness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Randi; Gad, Christopher

    Christopher Gad. Ph.d. Dept. of Information and Media Studies Randi Markussen. Associate Professor, Dept. of Information and Media Studies. rmark@imv.au.dk   Abstract:   Surveying humanness -politics of care improvement   For various reasons we both were subjected to a specific survey procedure...... and development of a large collection of biological and psychological symptoms and psycho-social problems. However, the surveys say nothing about how the information will be of use to the people who answer the procedure or how this scientific intervention will be put to use more specifically within the public...... be imagined as a positive end, as ‘making explicit’ (in a popular psychological perspective) is considered to be therapeutic and good in itself? We will discuss those questions from a Foucaultian and ANT perspective, where one does not accept that pre-existing subjects are exposed to survey procedures...

  15. Survey Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Cleaned and QCd data for the Fishing Effort Survey. Questions on fishing and other out are asked on weather and outdoor activity, including fishing trips. Used for...

  16. An Overview of the The Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellm, Eric Christopher; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) has conducted a range of time-domain surveys since 2013. As iPTF concludes, I will review the these goals of surveys, their on-sky performance, and implications for next-generation surveys such as the Zwicky Transient Facility and LSST. Finally, I will describe the public data products being released.

  17. Engineering surveying

    CERN Document Server

    Schofield, W

    2007-01-01

    Engineering surveying involves determining the position of natural and man-made features on or beneath the Earth's surface and utilizing these features in the planning, design and construction of works. It is a critical part of any engineering project. Without an accurate understanding of the size, shape and nature of the site the project risks expensive and time-consuming errors or even catastrophic failure.Engineering Surveying 6th edition covers all the basic principles and practice of this complex subject and the authors bring expertise and clarity. Previous editions of this classic text have given readers a clear understanding of fundamentals such as vertical control, distance, angles and position right through to the most modern technologies, and this fully updated edition continues that tradition.This sixth edition includes:* An introduction to geodesy to facilitate greater understanding of satellite systems* A fully updated chapter on GPS, GLONASS and GALILEO for satellite positioning in surveying* Al...

  18. Happiness Survey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Are Chinese people happy in today’s fast-paced, modern society? What are the sources of their happiness? In today’s rapidly developing economy, is happiness closely related to wealth or not? A recent happiness survey conducted in China gives some answers.

  19. What Are Probability Surveys?

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Aquatic Resource Surveys (NARS) use probability-survey designs to assess the condition of the nation’s waters. In probability surveys (also known as sample-surveys or statistical surveys), sampling sites are selected randomly.

  20. A Search for Fast Optical Transients in the Pan-STARRS1 Medium-Deep Survey: M-Dwarf Flares, Asteroids, Limits on Extragalactic Rates, and Implications for LSST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, E.; Leibler, C. N.; Chornock, R.; Rest, A.; Foley, R. J.; Soderberg, A. M.; Price, P. A.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Huber, M. E.; Magnier, E. A.; Metcalfe, N.; Stubbs, C. W.; Tonry, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    We present a search for fast optical transients (τ ~ 0.5 hr-1 day) using repeated observations of the Pan-STARRS1 Medium-Deep Survey (PS1/MDS) fields. Our search takes advantage of the consecutive g P1 r P1 observations (16.5 minutes in each filter), by requiring detections in both bands, with non-detections on preceding and subsequent nights. We identify 19 transients brighter than 22.5 AB mag (S/N >~ 10). Of these, 11 events exhibit quiescent counterparts in the deep PS1/MDS templates that we identify as M4-M9 dwarfs at d ≈ 0.2-1.2 kpc. The remaining eight transients lack quiescent counterparts, exhibit mild but significant astrometric shifts between the g P1 and r P1 images, colors of (g - r)P1 ≈ 0.5-0.8 mag, non-varying light curves, and locations near the ecliptic plane with solar elongations of about 130°, which are all indicative of main-belt asteroids near the stationary point of their orbits. With identifications for all 19 transients, we place an upper limit of R FOT(τ ~ 0.5 hr) factor of 30-50 times lower than previous limits; the limit for a timescale of ~1 day is R FOT events are limited to M ≈ -10 to ≈ - 14 mag for a timescale of ~0.5 hr to ~1 day, while relativistic sources (e.g., gamma-ray bursts, magnetar-powered transients) can reach much larger luminosities. The resulting volumetric rates are Motivated by the results of our search, we discuss strategies for identifying fast optical transients in the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope main survey, and reach the optimistic conclusion that the veil of foreground contaminants can be lifted with the survey data, without the need for expensive follow-up observations.

  1. The SINFONI Nearby Elliptical Lens Locator Survey: Discovery of two new low-redshift strong lenses and implications for the initial mass function in giant early-type galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Russell J; Conroy, Charlie

    2015-01-01

    We present results from a blind survey to identify strong gravitational lenses among the population of low-redshift early-type galaxies. The SINFONI Nearby Elliptical Lens Locator Survey (SNELLS) uses integral-field infrared spectroscopy to search for lensed emission line sources behind massive lens candidates at $z$300 km/s) and \\alpha-element abundances ([Mg/Fe]>0.3). From the lensing configurations we derive total J-band mass-to-light ratios of 1.8$\\pm$0.1, 2.1$\\pm$0.1 and 1.9$\\pm$0.2 within the $\\sim$2 kpc Einstein radius. Correcting for estimated dark-matter contributions, and comparing to stellar population models with a Milky Way (Kroupa) initial mass function (IMF), we determine the "mass excess factor", \\alpha. Assuming the lens galaxies have "old" stellar populations (10$\\pm$1 Gyr), the average IMF mass factor is $\\langle\\alpha\\rangle$=1.10$\\pm$0.08$\\pm$0.10, where the first error is random and the second is systematic. If we instead fit the stellar populations from 6dF optical survey spectra, all t...

  2. Survey Expectations

    OpenAIRE

    Martin Weale

    2005-01-01

    This paper focusses on survey expectations and discusses their uses for testing and modeling of expectations. Alternative models of expectations formation are reviewed and the importance of allowing for heterogeneity of expectations is emphasized. A weak form of the rational expectations hypothesis which focusses on average expectations rather than individual expectations is advanced. Other models of expectations formation, such as the adaptive expectations hypothesis, are briefly discussed. ...

  3. Survey Expectations

    OpenAIRE

    Pesaran, M.H.; Weale, M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper focuses on survey expectations and discusses their uses for testing and modeling of expectations. Alternative models of expectations formation are reviewed and the importance of allowing for heterogeneity of expectations is emphasized. A weak form of the rational expectations hypothesis which focuses on average expectations rather than individual expectations is advanced. Other models of expectations formation, such as the adaptive expectations hypothesis, are briefly discussed. Te...

  4. Survey expectations

    OpenAIRE

    Pesaran, Mohammad Hashem; Weale, Martin R.

    2005-01-01

    This paper focuses on survey expectations and discusses their uses for testing and modeling of expectations. Alternative models of expectations formation are reviewed and the importance of allowing for heterogeneity of expectations is emphasized. A weak form of the rational expectations hypothesis which focuses on average expectations rather than individual expectations is advanced. Other models of expectations formation, such as the adaptive expectations hypothesis, are briefly discussed. Te...

  5. Surveying Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Stig

    2009-01-01

    In relation to surveying education there is one big question to be asked: Is the role of the surveyors changing? In a global perspective the answer will be "Yes". There is a big swing that could be entitled "From Measurement to Management". This does not imply that measurement is no longer a rele...... on an efficient interaction between education, research, and professional practice.......In relation to surveying education there is one big question to be asked: Is the role of the surveyors changing? In a global perspective the answer will be "Yes". There is a big swing that could be entitled "From Measurement to Management". This does not imply that measurement is no longer....... In surveying education there are a range of other challenges to be faced. These relate to the focus on learning to learn; the need for flexible curriculum to deal with constant change; the move towards introducing virtual academy; the demand for creating a quality culture; and the perspective of lifelong...

  6. Statistical literacy and sample survey results

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlevey, Lynn; Sullivan, Charles

    2010-10-01

    Sample surveys are widely used in the social sciences and business. The news media almost daily quote from them, yet they are widely misused. Using students with prior managerial experience embarking on an MBA course, we show that common sample survey results are misunderstood even by those managers who have previously done a statistics course. In general, they fare no better than managers who have never studied statistics. There are implications for teaching, especially in business schools, as well as for consulting.

  7. Survey of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, polychlorinated dibenzofurans and non-ortho-polychlorinated biphenyls in US meat and poultry, 2012-13: toxic equivalency levels, patterns, temporal trends and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupton, Sara J; O'Keefe, Margaret; Muñiz-Ortiz, Jorge G; Clinch, Nelson; Basu, Pat

    2017-07-11

    The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) conducts a statistically based survey of the domestic meat supply (beef, pork, chicken and turkey) to determine current levels of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and non-ortho-polychlorinated biphenyls (no-PCBs) every 5 years. Fat samples for each slaughter class were collected from US federally licensed slaughter facilities. The samples were processed and analysed for 17 PCDD/Fs and three no-PCBs. The sum of PCDD, PCDF and no-PCB toxic equivalencies (sum-TEQ) calculated using 2005 toxic-equivalency factors for all slaughter classes ranged from non-detect (n.d.) to 6.47 pg TEQ g(-1) lipid. The median sum-TEQs, when n.d. = 0.5 LOD, for beef, pork, chicken and turkey were 0.66, 0.12, 0.13 and 0.34 pg TEQ g(-1) lipid respectively. A comparison of the current survey with the previous three surveys shows a declining trend, with decreasing differences between medians; differences between the median sum-TEQs from 2007-08 and 2012-13 were -10%, -29%, -33% and -25% for beef, pork, chicken and turkey respectively. Several beef samples underwent further characterisation and congener patterns from these beef samples suggested pentachlorophenol treated wood as the likely exposure source. US consumer exposure to these compounds is relatively low and no slaughter class contributed more than 26% to the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) chronic oral reference dose of 0.7 pg TEQ kg(-1) bw day(-1).

  8. Statistically designed survey of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, polychlorinated dibenzofurans, and co-planar polychlorinated biphenyls in U. S. meat and poultry, 2002-2003: results, trends, and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Michael K; Huwe, Janice; Deyrup, Cynthia L; Lorentzsen, Margaret; Zaylskie, Richard; Clinch, Nelson R; Saunders, Patricia; Sutton, W R

    2006-09-01

    To obtain information on dioxin levels in the human diet, the Food Safety and Inspection Service of the United States Department of Agriculture recently determined levels of dioxin-like compounds (dioxins/dibenzofurans/PCBs) in four major slaughter classes (steers and heifers, market hogs, young chickens, and young turkeys) that comprise over 90% of the meat and poultry production in the United States. The data were analyzed and compared to data from smaller surveys carried out from 1994 to 1996. These surveys were conducted by different laboratories nearly 10 years apart, so a direct comparison of the data was not straightforward. Three approaches were taken: (1) comparison with nondetects set to zero, (2) comparison with nondetects set to half the limit of detection, and (3) comparison applying the earlier surveys' limits of detection to the newer data. The data analyses indicated that dioxin levels appear to have declined in three of the four slaughter classes, with young chickens, market hogs, and young turkeys declining 20-80%, while any declines in cattle dioxin levels, if real, are less than those observed in the other slaughter classes. Further study is needed to examine factors that might explain the differences in dioxin levels and distribution profiles in the four slaughter classes. A small number of market hog and steers/ heifers samples had dioxin toxic equivalency levels (TEQs) greater than 2 pg/g lipid weight. Follow-up investigations for those samples indicated a common source for the market hog samples (a dioxin-contaminated mineral supplement), but no commonality was found for the steers/ heifers samples.

  9. Multiple Surveys of Students and Survey Fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Stephen R.; Whitcomb, Michael E.; Weitzer, William H.

    2004-01-01

    This chapter reviews the literature on survey fatigue and summarizes a research project that indicates that administering multiple surveys in one academic year can significantly suppress response rates in later surveys. (Contains 4 tables.)

  10. Comparing Dark Energy Survey and HST –CLASH observations of the galaxy cluster RXC J2248.7-4431: implications for stellar mass versus dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmese, A.; Lahav, O.; Banerji, M.; Gruen, D.; Jouvel, S.; Melchior, P.; Aleksić, J.; Annis, J.; Diehl, H. T.; Hartley, W. G.; Jeltema, T.; Romer, A. K.; Rozo, E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Seitz, S.; Suchyta, E.; Zhang, Y.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Burke, D. L.; Capozzi, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Crocce, M.; Cunha, C. E.; D' Andrea, C. B.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Dietrich, J. P.; Doel, P.; Estrada, J.; Evrard, A. E.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J.; Gerdes, D. W.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Li, T. S.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; Marshall, J. L.; Miller, C. J.; Miquel, R.; Nord, B.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Roodman, A.; Sanchez, E.; Scarpine, V.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Swanson, M. E. C.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Tucker, D.; Vikram, V.

    2016-08-20

    We derive the stellar mass fraction in the galaxy cluster RXC J2248.7-4431 observed with the Dark Energy Survey (DES) during the Science Verification period. We compare the stellar mass results from DES (5 filters) with those from the Hubble Space Telescope CLASH (17 filters). When the cluster spectroscopic redshift is assumed, we show that stellar masses from DES can be estimated within 25% of CLASH values. We compute the stellar mass contribution coming from red and blue galaxies, and study the relation between stellar mass and the underlying dark matter using weak lensing studies with DES and CLASH. An analysis of the radial profiles of the DES total and stellar mass yields a stellar-to-total fraction of f*=7.0+-2.2x10^-3 within a radius of r_200c~3 Mpc. Our analysis also includes a comparison of photometric redshifts and star/galaxy separation efficiency for both datasets. We conclude that space-based small field imaging can be used to calibrate the galaxy properties in DES for the much wider field of view. The technique developed to derive the stellar mass fraction in galaxy clusters can be applied to the ~100 000 clusters that will be observed within this survey. The stacking of all the DES clusters would reduce the errors on f* estimates and deduce important information about galaxy evolution.

  11. A search for fast optical transients in the Pan-STARRS1 medium-deep survey: M-dwarf flares, asteroids, limits on extragalactic rates, and implications for LSST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, E.; Leibler, C. N.; Chornock, R.; Foley, R. J.; Soderberg, A. M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Rest, A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Price, P. A. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H.; Huber, M. E.; Magnier, E. A.; Tonry, J. L. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Metcalfe, N. [Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Stubbs, C. W. [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-12-10

    We present a search for fast optical transients (τ ∼ 0.5 hr-1 day) using repeated observations of the Pan-STARRS1 Medium-Deep Survey (PS1/MDS) fields. Our search takes advantage of the consecutive g {sub P1} r {sub P1} observations (16.5 minutes in each filter), by requiring detections in both bands, with non-detections on preceding and subsequent nights. We identify 19 transients brighter than 22.5 AB mag (S/N ≳ 10). Of these, 11 events exhibit quiescent counterparts in the deep PS1/MDS templates that we identify as M4-M9 dwarfs at d ≈ 0.2-1.2 kpc. The remaining eight transients lack quiescent counterparts, exhibit mild but significant astrometric shifts between the g {sub P1} and r {sub P1} images, colors of (g – r){sub P1} ≈ 0.5-0.8 mag, non-varying light curves, and locations near the ecliptic plane with solar elongations of about 130°, which are all indicative of main-belt asteroids near the stationary point of their orbits. With identifications for all 19 transients, we place an upper limit of R {sub FOT}(τ ∼ 0.5 hr) ≲ 0.12 deg{sup –2} day{sup –1} (95% confidence level) on the sky-projected rate of extragalactic fast transients at ≲ 22.5 mag, a factor of 30-50 times lower than previous limits; the limit for a timescale of ∼1 day is R {sub FOT} ≲ 2.4 × 10{sup –3} deg{sup –2} day{sup –1}. To convert these sky-projected rates to volumetric rates, we explore the expected peak luminosities of fast optical transients powered by various mechanisms, and find that non-relativistic events are limited to M ≈ –10 to ≈ – 14 mag for a timescale of ∼0.5 hr to ∼1 day, while relativistic sources (e.g., gamma-ray bursts, magnetar-powered transients) can reach much larger luminosities. The resulting volumetric rates are ≲ 13 Mpc{sup –3} yr{sup –1} (M ≈ –10 mag), ≲ 0.05 Mpc{sup –3} yr{sup –1} (M ≈ –14 mag), and ≲ 10{sup –6} Mpc{sup –3} yr{sup –1} (M ≈ –24 mag), significantly above the nova, supernova

  12. The Implications of Federal Education Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Clifton; Cosand, Joseph

    The significant role of the federal government in the support of higher education is noted in a survey of the development and changing patterns of federal support, and a critical review of the directions of current federal policy is offered. Implications are drawn about the effects of this policy on such national concerns as providing equal…

  13. Tensor controlled-source audiomagnetotelluric survey over the Sulphur Springs Thermal area, Valles Caldera, New Mexico, U.S.A.; Implication for structure of the western Caldera and for CSAMT methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wannamaker, P.E.

    1994-06-01

    We have carried Out an extensive tensor CSAMT survey of the Sulphur Springs geothermal area, Valles Caldera, New Mexico. This survey, consisting of 45 high-quality sites, has been acquired by in support of Continental Scientific Drilling Program (CSDP) drillholes VC-2A and VC-2B. Two independent transmitter dipoles were energized for tensor measurements using a 30 kW generator placed approximately 13 km south of the VC-2B wellhead. The soundings in the Sulphur Springs area were arranged in four profiles to cross major structural features. The electric bipoles parallel to each profile were deployed contiguously to ensure against spatial aliasing of the impedance response corresponding to current flow across structural trends. The frequency range of acquisition was 4096 Hz down to 1 Hz for the central line, but only down to 4 Hz for most sites of the other lines. Data quality is high overall and is established by repeatability of measurements. Agreement between the CSAMT and available natural field MT data is very good over almost all the period range of overlap indicating that we are free of calibration problems and that far-field results are generally being obtained. Non plane-wave effects in the CSAMT around Sulphur Springs are apparent at 1 to 2 Hz, and perhaps slightly even at 4 Hz, however, which is near the bottom of our frequency range. CSAMT and MT data taken outside the Valles Caldera to the west were modeled in an attempt to compare resistivity structure exterior to the caldera to that within. With the availability of tensor CSAMT and MT data both inside and outside Valles Caldera, assumptions and methods of CSAMT are tested. In the Sulphur Springs area, near-coincident CSAMT and MT data near well VC -2B indicate that non-lane-wave effects in the apparent resistivity and impedance phase occure at a frequency near to that predicted from the resistivity structure local to the wester caldera.

  14. Handbook in nonresponse in household surveys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bethlehem, J.G.; Cobben, F.; Schouten, B.

    2011-01-01

    This volume presents an all-inclusive guide to the problem of nonresponse in household surveys, providing an overview of the theory while also describing practical implications. The book begins with a general overview of the nonresponse problem, outlining existing sources of error and guidelines for

  15. VLBI Surveys of Active Galactic Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalev, Y. Y.

    2009-08-01

    A review is given on the current status and selected results from large VLBI surveys of compact extragalactic radio sources made between 13 cm and 3 mm wavelengths and covering the entire sky. More than 4200 objects are observed and imaged with dynamic ranges from a hundred to several thousand at (sub)parsec scales. Implications to the VSOP-2 project are discussed.

  16. Geographical information modelling for land resource survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruin, de S.

    2000-01-01

    The increasing popularity of geographical information systems (GIS) has at least three major implications for land resources survey. Firstly, GIS allows alternative and richer representation of spatial phenomena than is possible with the traditional paper map. Secondly, digital technology has improv

  17. Infrastructure Survey 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Group of Eight (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, the Group of Eight (Go8) conducted a survey on the state of its buildings and infrastructure. The survey is the third Go8 Infrastructure survey, with previous surveys being conducted in 2007 and 2009. The current survey updated some of the information collected in the previous surveys. It also collated data related to aspects of the…

  18. Big Surveys, Big Data Centres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schade, D.

    2016-06-01

    Well-designed astronomical surveys are powerful and have consistently been keystones of scientific progress. The Byurakan Surveys using a Schmidt telescope with an objective prism produced a list of about 3000 UV-excess Markarian galaxies but these objects have stimulated an enormous amount of further study and appear in over 16,000 publications. The CFHT Legacy Surveys used a wide-field imager to cover thousands of square degrees and those surveys are mentioned in over 1100 publications since 2002. Both ground and space-based astronomy have been increasing their investments in survey work. Survey instrumentation strives toward fair samples and large sky coverage and therefore strives to produce massive datasets. Thus we are faced with the "big data" problem in astronomy. Survey datasets require specialized approaches to data management. Big data places additional challenging requirements for data management. If the term "big data" is defined as data collections that are too large to move then there are profound implications for the infrastructure that supports big data science. The current model of data centres is obsolete. In the era of big data the central problem is how to create architectures that effectively manage the relationship between data collections, networks, processing capabilities, and software, given the science requirements of the projects that need to be executed. A stand alone data silo cannot support big data science. I'll describe the current efforts of the Canadian community to deal with this situation and our successes and failures. I'll talk about how we are planning in the next decade to try to create a workable and adaptable solution to support big data science.

  19. Bright and Faint Ends of Ly$\\alpha$ Luminosity Functions at $\\textit{z} = 2$ Determined by the Subaru Survey: Implications for AGN, Magnification Bias, and ISM HI Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Konno, Akira; Nakajima, Kimihiko; Duval, Florent; Kusakabe, Haruka; Ono, Yoshiaki; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    We present the Lya luminosity functions (LFs) derived by our deep Subaru narrowband survey that identifies a total of 3,137 Lya emitters (LAEs) at $z = 2.2$ in five independent blank fields. The sample of these LAEs is the largest, to date, and covers a very wide Lya luminosity range of $\\log L_{Ly\\alpha} = 41.7-44.4$ erg s$^{-1}$. We determine the Lya LF at $z = 2.2$ with unprecedented accuracies, and obtain the best-fit Schechter parameters of $L^{*}_{Ly\\alpha} = 5.29^{+1.67}_{-1.13} \\times 10^{42}$ erg s$^{-1}$, $\\phi^{*}_{Ly\\alpha} = 6.32^{+3.08}_{-2.31} \\times 10^{-4}$ Mpc$^{-3}$, and $\\alpha = -1.75^{+0.10}_{-0.09}$ showing a steep faint-end slope. We identify a significant hump at the LF bright end ($\\log L_{Ly\\alpha} > 43.4$ erg s$^{-1}$). Because all of the LAEs in the bright-end hump have (a) bright counterpart(s) either in the X-ray, UV, or radio data, this bright-end hump is not made by gravitational lensing magnification bias but AGNs. These AGNs allow us to derive the AGN UV LF at $z \\sim 2$ dow...

  20. The MOSDEF Survey: Metallicity Dependence of PAH Emission at High Redshift and Implications for 24 μm Inferred IR Luminosities and Star Formation Rates at z ∼ 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivaei, Irene; Reddy, Naveen A.; Shapley, Alice E.; Siana, Brian; Kriek, Mariska; Mobasher, Bahram; Coil, Alison L.; Freeman, William R.; Sanders, Ryan L.; Price, Sedona H.; Azadi, Mojegan; Zick, Tom

    2017-03-01

    We present results on the variation of 7.7 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission in galaxies spanning a wide range in metallicity at z ∼ 2. For this analysis, we use rest-frame optical spectra of 476 galaxies at 1.37 ≤ z ≤ 2.61 from the MOSFIRE Deep Evolution Field (MOSDEF) survey to infer metallicities and ionization states. Spitzer/MIPS 24 μm and Herschel/PACS 100 and 160 μm observations are used to derive rest-frame 7.7 μm luminosities ({L}7.7) and total IR luminosities ({L}{IR}), respectively. We find significant trends between the ratio of {L}7.7 to {L}{IR} (and to dust-corrected star formation rate [SFR]) and both metallicity and [O iii]/[O ii] ({{{O}}}32) emission line ratio. The latter is an empirical proxy for the ionization parameter. These trends indicate a paucity of PAH emission in low-metallicity environments with harder and more intense radiation fields. Additionally, {L}7.7/{L}{IR} is significantly lower in the youngest quartile of our sample (ages of ≲500 Myr) compared to older galaxies, which may be a result of the delayed production of PAHs by AGB stars. The relative strength of {L}7.7 to {L}{IR} is also lower by a factor of ∼2 for galaxies with masses {M}* {10}10 {M}ȯ , respectively. Based on the new scaling, the SFR–M * relation has a shallower slope than previously derived. Our results also suggest a higher IR luminosity density at z ∼ 2 than previously measured, corresponding to a ∼30% increase in the SFR density.

  1. Tectonic history in the Fort Worth Basin, north Texas, derived from well-log integration with multiple 3D seismic reflection surveys: implications for paleo and present-day seismicity in the basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnani, M. B.; Hornbach, M. J.

    2016-12-01

    Oil and gas exploration and production in the Fort Worth Basin (FWB) in north Texas have accelerated in the last 10 years due to the success of unconventional gas production. Here, hydraulic fracturing wastewater is disposed via re-injection into deep wells that penetrate Ordovician carbonate formations. The rise in wastewater injection has coincided with a marked rise in earthquake rates, suggesting a causal relationship between industry practices and seismicity. Most studies addressing this relationship in intraplate regions like the FWB focus on current seismicity, which provides an a-posteriori assessment of the processes involved. 3D seismic reflection data contribute complementary information on the existence, distribution, orientation and long-term deformation history of faults that can potentially become reactivated by the injection process. Here we present new insights into the tectonic evolution of faults in the FWB using multiple 3D seismic reflection surveys in the basin, west of the Dallas Fort-Worth Metroplex, where high-volume wastewater injection wells have increased most significantly in number in the past few years. The datasets image with remarkable clarity the 3,300 m-thick sedimentary rocks of the basin, from the crystalline basement to the Cretaceous cover, with particular detail of the Paleozoic section. The data, interpreted using coincident and nearby wells to correlate seismic reflections with stratigraphic markers, allow us to identify faults, extract their orientation, length and displacements at several geologic time intervals, and therefore, reconstruct the long-term deformation history. Throughout the basin, the data show that all seismically detectable faults were active during the Mississippian and Pennsylvanian, but that displacement amounts drop below data resolution ( 7 m) in the post-Pennsylvanian deposits. These results indicate that faults have been inactive for at least the past 300 Ma, until the recent 2008 surge in

  2. Heliostat glass survey and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lind, M.A.; Rusin, J.M.

    1978-09-01

    A comprehensive survey of both foreign and domestic sources of low distortion, high transmission flat glass with a nominal thickness of 3 mm was undertaken. The purpose of the survey was to determine the characteristics, availability and cost of glass for use in second surface heliostat mirrors for the Barstow pilot plant and future commercial central receiver plants. Information obtained from the manufacturers and the results of investigations performed at Sandia Laboratories at Albuquerque and Livermore were compiled with the PNL characterization data to generate the specifications for the GFE glass to be used in the Barstow pilot plant. During the course of the survey, nine of the major glass manufacturers were contacted for information and assistance. These manufacturers were PPG, Corning, Ford, LOF, CE, ASG, Fourco, Schott, and Guardian. Eleven different flat glass samples from seven of the domestic sources and one foreign source were characterized for solar transmittance, flatness and durability. The samples were representative of four different manufacturing processes: float, fusion, rolled, and twin ground. The results and implications of these glass characterization studies and a brief summary of the manufacturer survey are presented.

  3. VISTA MILKY WAY PUBLIC SURVEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Minniti

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a public IR variability survey, named \\Vista Variables in the V a L ctea" (V V V , of the Milky Way bulge and an adjacent section of the mid-plane where star formation activity is high. This would take 1920 hours, covering 109 point sources within an area of 520 sq deg, including 33 known globular clusters and 350 open clusters. The nal products will be a deep IR atlas in 5 passbands and a catalogue of 106 variable point sources. These will produce a 3-D map of the surveyed region (unlike single-epoch surveys that only give 2-D maps using well-understood primary distance indicators such as RR Lyrae stars. It will yield important information on the ages of the populations. The observations will be combined with data from MACHO, OGLE, EROS, VST, SPITZER, HST, CHANDRA, INTEGRAL, and ALMA for a complete understanding of the variable sources in the inner Milky Way. Several important implications for the history of the Milky Way, for globular cluster evolution, for the population census of the bulge and center, and for pulsation theory would follow from this survey.

  4. Robotic Surveying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzy Cantor-McKinney; Michael Kruzic

    2007-03-01

    -actuated functions to be controlled by an onboard computer. The computer-controlled Speedrower was developed at Carnegie Mellon University to automate agricultural harvesting. Harvesting tasks require the vehicle to cover a field using minimally overlapping rows at slow speeds in a similar manner to geophysical data acquisition. The Speedrower had demonstrated its ability to perform as it had already logged hundreds of acres of autonomous harvesting. This project is the first use of autonomous robotic technology on a large-scale for geophysical surveying.

  5. WGEA的全球性环境审计调查结果:分析与借鉴%The Survey Results of Global Environmental Audit Conducted by WGEA: Analysis and Implications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李璐; 张龙平

    2012-01-01

    With a lot of public fund devoted into environment and sustainable development areas, environmental audit enters into the development strategy of Supreme Audit Institutions across the world, and will become one of the most important tools to achieve national governance and global governance in the future. This paper will analyze survey results of six questionnaires conducted by the WGEA of INTOSAI through 1993 to 2009, to identify the global development and trend of environmental audit, including the Concept, situation, subject matter, audit objectives, obstacles and international cooperation of environmental audit across world. On the basis of comparison with current situation in China, this paper will put forward suggestions and advices to promote environmental audit in China. For example, we should value the key role of environmental audit in national governance, strengthen the theoretical research of environmental audit, take the water environmental audit as the breakthrough, and pay high attention to the environmental audit cooperation study in the international context etc.%随着环境和可持续发展领域大量财政资金的投入,环境审计已纳入各国审计机关的发展规划,并将成为未来审计机关参与国家治理乃至全球治理的重要工具。本文通过分析最高审计机关国际组织下属的环境审计工作组从1993至2009年的六次全球性环境审计问卷调查结果,识别环境审计的国际动态与发展趋势,包括对环境审计的认识与理解,全球环境审计的开展情况、主题事项、审计目标、实施障碍以及国际合作。在此基础上,对比我国环境审计的发展现状,提出加快推进我国环境审计发展的意见和建议。需要重视环境审计在国家治理方面的作用、深化环境审计的理论研究,并且将水环境审计作为推动我国环境审计的突破口,高度关注国际背景下环境审计的合作问题研究等。

  6. Lesotho - Enterprise Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millennium Challenge Corporation — The 2011 MCA-Lesotho baseline enterprise survey is a national survey of enterprises. The main objective of the survey was to assess the current status of businesses...

  7. On the policy implications of changing longevity

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Our societies are witnessing a steady increase in longevity. This demographic evolution is accompanied by some convergence across countries, whereas substantial longevity inequalities persist within nations. The goal of this paper is to survey some crucial implications of changing longevity on the design of optimal public policy. For that purpose, we firstly focus on some difficulties raised by risky and varying lifetime for the represen-tation of individual and social preferences. Then, we e...

  8. Being surveyed can change later behavior and related parameter estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwane, Alix Peterson; Zinman, Jonathan; Van Dusen, Eric; Pariente, William; Null, Clair; Miguel, Edward; Kremer, Michael; Hornbeck, Richard; Giné, Xavier; Duflo, Esther; Devoto, Florencia; Crepon, Bruno; Banerjee, Abhijit

    2011-01-01

    Does completing a household survey change the later behavior of those surveyed? In three field studies of health and two of microlending, we randomly assigned subjects to be surveyed about health and/or household finances and then measured subsequent use of a related product with data that does not rely on subjects' self-reports. In the three health experiments, we find that being surveyed increases use of water treatment products and take-up of medical insurance. Frequent surveys on reported diarrhea also led to biased estimates of the impact of improved source water quality. In two microlending studies, we do not find an effect of being surveyed on borrowing behavior. The results suggest that limited attention could play an important but context-dependent role in consumer choice, with the implication that researchers should reconsider whether, how, and how much to survey their subjects. PMID:21245314

  9. Handbook of web surveys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bethlehem, J.; Biffignandi, S.

    2012-01-01

    Best practices to create and implementhighly effective web surveys Exclusively combining design and sampling issues, Handbook of Web Surveys presents a theoretical yet practical approach to creating and conducting web surveys. From the history of web surveys to various modes of data collection to ti

  10. Measurement equivalence in mixed mode surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joop J. Hox

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Surveys increasingly use mixed mode data collection (e.g., combining face-to-face and web because this controls costs and helps to maintain good response rates. However, a combination of different survey modes in one study, be it cross-sectional or longitudinal, can lead to different kinds of measurement errors. For example, respondents in a face-to-face survey or a web survey may interpret the same question differently, and might give a different answer, just because of the way the question is presented. This effect of survey mode on the question-answer process is called measurement mode effect. This study develops methodological and statistical tools to identify the existence and size of mode effects in a mixed mode survey. In addition, it assesses the size and importance of mode effects in measurement instruments using a specific mixed mode panel survey (Netherlands Kinship Panel Study. Most measurement instruments in the NKPS are multi-item scales, therefore confirmatory factor analysis (CFA will be used as the main analysis tool, using propensity score methods to correct for selection effects.The results show that the NKPS scales by and large have measurement equivalence, but in most cases only partial measurement equivalence. Controlling for respondent differences on demographic variables, and on scale scores from the previous uni-mode measurement occasion, tends to improve measurement equivalence, but not for all scales. The discussion ends with a review of the implications of our results for analyses employing these scales.

  11. Using Electronic Surveys: Advice from Survey Professionals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. Shannon

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The study reports the perceptions and recommendations of sixty-two experienced survey..researchers from the American Educational Research Association regarding the use of..electronic surveys. The most positive aspects cited for the use of electronic surveys were..reduction of costs (i.e., postage, phone charges, the use of electronic mail for pre-notification or..follow-up purposes, and the compatibility of data with existing software programs. These..professionals expressed limitations in using electronic surveys pertaining to the limited..sampling frame as well as issues of confidentiality, privacy, and the credibility of the sample...They advised that electronic surveys designed with the varied technological background and..capabilities of the respondent in mind, follow sound principles of survey construction, and be..administered to pre-notified, targeted populations with published email addresses.

  12. Sampling survey methodology issues of SBS- survey

    OpenAIRE

    Liljana Boci; Elona Berberi

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims at providing an insight on what is required to build an efficient and high quality business statistics from sample survey procedures, and on the effective and appropriate use of survey data in analysis. It aims at describing a general overview of what is required to have a good survey estimate. It shows in practice how to estimate characteristics of the population in SBS considering: weighting, non-response adjustments, post stratification, estimating a population totals, the ...

  13. Sampling survey methodology issues of SBS- survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liljana Boci

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at providing an insight on what is required to build an efficient and high quality business statistics from sample survey procedures, and on the effective and appropriate use of survey data in analysis. It aims at describing a general overview of what is required to have a good survey estimate. It shows in practice how to estimate characteristics of the population in SBS considering: weighting, non-response adjustments, post stratification, estimating a population totals, the identification and treatment of outliers, and analyses of coefficient of variation. It provides sources of errors and gives recommendations of how to improve them throw sample survey techniques.

  14. ERP in large Danish enterprises: Implications for SCM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Charles

    2004-01-01

    This paper argues that with the present state of Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) adoption by the companies, the potential benefits of Supply Chain Management (SCM) and integration is about to be unleashed. This paper presents the results and the implications of a survey on ERP adoption...... technology; (iii) ERP adoption has matured; and (iv) ERP adoption is converging towards a dominant design. Finally, the paper discusses the general implications of the surveyed state of practice on the SCM research challenges. Consequently we argue that research needs to adjust its conceptions of the ERP...

  15. Understanding peripartum pelvic pain: Implications of a patient survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M.A. Mens (Jan); A. Vleeming (Andry); R. Stoeckart (Rob); H.J. Stam (Henk); C.J. Snijders (Chris)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractStudy Design. An analysis was made of the self-reported medical histories of patients with peripartum pelvic pain. Objectives. To compile an inventory of the disabilities of patients with peripartum pelvic pain, analyze factors associated with the risk for development of the disease, and

  16. High resolution survey for topographic surveying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luh, L. C.; Setan, H.; Majid, Z.; Chong, A. K.; Tan, Z.

    2014-02-01

    In this decade, terrestrial laser scanner (TLS) is getting popular in many fields such as reconstruction, monitoring, surveying, as-built of facilities, archaeology, and topographic surveying. This is due the high speed in data collection which is about 50,000 to 1,000,000 three-dimensional (3D) points per second at high accuracy. The main advantage of 3D representation for the data is that it is more approximate to the real world. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to show the use of High-Definition Surveying (HDS), also known as 3D laser scanning for topographic survey. This research investigates the effectiveness of using terrestrial laser scanning system for topographic survey by carrying out field test in Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM), Skudai, Johor. The 3D laser scanner used in this study is a Leica ScanStation C10. Data acquisition was carried out by applying the traversing method. In this study, the result for the topographic survey is under 1st class survey. At the completion of this study, a standard of procedure was proposed for topographic data acquisition using laser scanning systems. This proposed procedure serves as a guideline for users who wish to utilize laser scanning system in topographic survey fully.

  17. Handbook of web surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Bethlehem, Jelke

    2011-01-01

    BEST PRACTICES TO CREATE AND IMPLEMENTHIGHLY EFFECTIVE WEB SURVEYS Exclusively combining design and sampling issues, Handbook of Web Surveys presents a theoretical yet practical approach to creating and conducting web surveys. From the history of web surveys to various modes of data collection to tips for detecting error, this book thoroughly introduces readers to the this cutting-edge technique and offers tips for creating successful web surveys. The authors provide a history of web surveys and go on to explore the advantages and disadvantages of this mode of dat

  18. Initial Blackbeard power survey results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, T.; Devenport, J.; Holden, D.

    1996-06-01

    The Blackbeard broadband VHF radio receiver is in low-earth orbit aboard the ALEXIS satellite. The receiver has been used to measure the transmitted power in four VHF bands (55.2-75.8, 28.0-94.8, 132.3-152.2, and 107.7-166.0 MHz) over quiet and noisy parts of the earth. The authors present the results of the survey and discuss their implications. They find that there are remote ocean areas over which the observed spectrum is largely free of man-made interference, but that the spectrum over most of the earth is dominated by broadcast VHF signals. The signal characteristics observed over a given area are quite constant when observed at different times of day and at intervals of several weeks to months. It appears that in many cases the bulk of the signal power is coming from a small number of sources.

  19. Kiso Supernova Survey (KISS): Survey Strategy

    CERN Document Server

    Morokuma, Tomoki; Tanaka, Masaomi; Mori, Kensho; Matsumoto, Emiko; Kikuchi, Yuki; Shibata, Takumi; Sako, Shigeyuki; Aoki, Tsutomu; Doi, Mamoru; Kobayashi, Naoto; Maehara, Hiroyuki; Matsunaga, Noriyuki; Mito, Hiroyuki; Miyata, Takashi; Nakada, Yoshikazu; Soyano, Takao; Tarusawa, Ken'ichi; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Nakata, Fumiaki; Okada, Norio; Sarugaku, Yuki; Richmond, Michael W; Akitaya, Hiroshi; Aldering, Greg; Arimatsu, Ko; Contreras, Carlos; Horiuchi, Takashi; Hsiao, Eric Y; Itoh, Ryosuke; Iwata, Ikuru; Koji,; Kawabata, S; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kitagawa, Yutaro; Kokubo, Mitsuru; Kuroda, Daisuke; Paolo,; Mazzali,; Misawa, Toru; Moritani, Yuki; Morrell, Nidia; Okamoto, Rina; Pavlyuk, Nikolay; Phillips, Mark M; Pian, Elena; Sahu, Devendra; Saito, Yoshihiko; Sano, Kei; Stritzinger, Maximilian D; Tachibana, Yutaro; Taddia, Francesco; Takaki, Katsutoshi; Tateuchi, Ken; Tomita, Akihiko; Tsvetkov, Dmitry; Ui, Takahiro; Ukita, Nobuharu; Urata, Yuji; Walker, Emma S; Yoshii, Taketoshi

    2014-01-01

    The Kiso Supernova Survey (KISS) is a high-cadence optical wide-field supernova (SN) survey. The primary goal of the survey is to catch the very early light of a SN, during the shock breakout phase. Detection of SN shock breakouts combined with multi-band photometry obtained with other facilities would provide detailed physical information on the progenitor stars of SNe. The survey is performed using a 2.2x2.2 deg field-of-view instrument on the 1.05-m Kiso Schmidt telescope, the Kiso Wide Field Camera (KWFC). We take a three-minute exposure in g-band once every hour in our survey, reaching magnitude g~20-21. About 100 nights of telescope time per year have been spent on the survey since April 2012. The number of the shock breakout detections is estimated to be of order of 1 during our 3-year project. This paper summarizes the KISS project including the KWFC observing setup, the survey strategy, the data reduction system, and CBET-reported SNe discovered so far by KISS.

  20. Kiso Supernova Survey (KISS): Survey strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morokuma, Tomoki; Tominaga, Nozomu; Tanaka, Masaomi; Mori, Kensho; Matsumoto, Emiko; Kikuchi, Yuki; Shibata, Takumi; Sako, Shigeyuki; Aoki, Tsutomu; Doi, Mamoru; Kobayashi, Naoto; Maehara, Hiroyuki; Matsunaga, Noriyuki; Mito, Hiroyuki; Miyata, Takashi; Nakada, Yoshikazu; Soyano, Takao; Tarusawa, Ken'ichi; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Nakata, Fumiaki; Okada, Norio; Sarugaku, Yuki; Richmond, Michael W.; Akitaya, Hiroshi; Aldering, Greg; Arimatsu, Ko; Contreras, Carlos; Horiuchi, Takashi; Hsiao, Eric Y.; Itoh, Ryosuke; Iwata, Ikuru; Kawabata, Koji S.; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kitagawa, Yutaro; Kokubo, Mitsuru; Kuroda, Daisuke; Mazzali, Paolo; Misawa, Toru; Moritani, Yuki; Morrell, Nidia; Okamoto, Rina; Pavlyuk, Nikolay; Phillips, Mark M.; Pian, Elena; Sahu, Devendra; Saito, Yoshihiko; Sano, Kei; Stritzinger, Maximilian D.; Tachibana, Yutaro; Taddia, Francesco; Takaki, Katsutoshi; Tateuchi, Ken; Tomita, Akihiko; Tsvetkov, Dmitry; Ui, Takahiro; Ukita, Nobuharu; Urata, Yuji; Walker, Emma S.; Yoshii, Taketoshi

    2014-12-01

    The Kiso Supernova Survey (KISS) is a high-cadence optical wide-field supernova (SN) survey. The primary goal of the survey is to catch the very early light of a SN, during the shock breakout phase. Detection of SN shock breakouts combined with multi-band photometry obtained with other facilities would provide detailed physical information on the progenitor stars of SNe. The survey is performed using a 2.2° × 2.2° field-of-view instrument on the 1.05-m Kiso Schmidt telescope, the Kiso Wide Field Camera (KWFC). We take a 3-min exposure in g-band once every hour in our survey, reaching magnitude g ˜ 20-21. About 100 nights of telescope time per year have been spent on the survey since 2012 April. The number of the shock breakout detections is estimated to be of the order of 1 during our three-year project. This paper summarizes the KISS project including the KWFC observing setup, the survey strategy, the data reduction system, and CBET-reported SNe discovered so far by KISS.

  1. Iowa Intensive Archaeological Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — This shape file contains intensive level archaeological survey areas for the state of Iowa. All intensive Phase I surveys that are submitted to the State Historic...

  2. SURVEY, MCLEOD COUNTY, MN

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  3. SURVEY, KENT COUNTY, MD

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The field survey data for this coastal study includes a field report that exhibits photos and transect information collected in the field survey phase of the study....

  4. SURVEY, KENT COUNTY, DE

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The field survey data for this coastal study includes a field report that exhibits photos and transect information collected in the field survey phase of the study....

  5. Patient survey (HCAHPS) - State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of the state averages for the HCAHPS survey responses. HCAHPS is a national, standardized survey of hospital patients about their experiences during a recent...

  6. Sea Scallop Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The standardized NEFSC Sea Scallop Survey began in 1980 and has covered an area from Cape Hatteras to Georges Bank. The survey aims to determine the distribution and...

  7. SURVEY, CHARLES COUNTY, MD

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The field survey data for this coastal study includes a field report that exhibits photos and transect information collected in the field survey phase of the study....

  8. NGS Survey Control Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NGS Survey Control Map provides a map of the US which allows you to find and display geodetic survey control points stored in the database of the National...

  9. SURVEY, SOLANO COUNTY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Solano County California, hydrographic survey data collected by Harned Surveying and Engineering (HSE). Data collection period January 1, 2011 through March 1, 2011.

  10. SURVEY, BARNSTABLE COUNTY, MA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  11. Survey, OCONEE COUNTY, SC

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  12. SURVEY, BENTON COUNTY, TENNESSEE

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  13. SURVEY, TUSCALOSAA COUNTY, ALABAMA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  14. SURVEY, FREMONT COUNTY, COLORADO

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  15. SURVEY, DOUGLAS COUNTY, MN

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  16. SURVEY, OCONTO COUNTY, WI

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  17. SURVEY, OSCEOLA COUNTY, FLORIDA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  18. SURVEY, SANDERS COUNTY, MT

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  19. Large Pelagics Intercept Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Large Pelagics Intercept Survey (LPIS) is a dockside survey of private and charterboat captains who have just completed fishing trips directed at large pelagic...

  20. SURVEY, CALHOUN COUNTY, TEXAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  1. SURVEY, Mathews County, VA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The field survey data for this coastal study includes a field report that exhibits photos and transect information collected in the field survey phase of the study....

  2. SURVEY, CALVERT COUNTY, MD

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The field survey data for this coastal study includes a field report that exhibits photos and transect information collected in the field survey phase of the study....

  3. SURVEY, VICTORIA COUNTY, TEXAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  4. SURVEY, Somerset COUNTY, MD

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The field survey data for this coastal study includes a field report that exhibits photos and transect information collected in the field survey phase of the study....

  5. SURVEY, BROADWATER COUNTY, MT

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  6. 1998 Harrisburg Airport Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set includes data collected in 1998 to evaluate the ability of lidar to survey airport obstructions in collaboration with NOAA National Geodetic Survey....

  7. Water Use: A Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Rose Glee; Warden, Jessie

    1976-01-01

    A survey of Florida State University students showed that their current laundry practices generate energy and water over-consumption. The survey also resulted in some concrete suggestions to the students that would improve their conservation practices. (Author/BP)

  8. SURVEY, FAIRFIELD COUNTY, CT

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  9. SURVEY, CITRUS County, FL

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  10. SURVEY, BUFFALO COUNTY, NE

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  11. SURVEY, NANTUCKET COUNTY, MA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  12. SURVEY, HONOLULU COUNTY, HI

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  13. Surveys: an introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubenfeld, Gordon D

    2004-10-01

    Surveys are a valuable research tool for studying the knowledge, attitudes, and behavior of a study population. This article explores quantitative analyses of written questionnaires as instruments for survey research. Obtaining accurate and precise information from a survey requires minimizing the possibility of bias from inappropriate sampling or a flawed survey instrument, and this article describes strategies to minimize sampling bias by increasing response rates, comparing responders to nonresponders, and identifying the appropriate sampling population. It is crucial that the survey instrument be valid, meaning that it actually measures what the investigator intends it to measure. In developing a valid survey instrument, it can be useful to adapt survey instruments that were developed by other researchers and to conduct extensive pilot-testing of your survey instrument.

  14. SURVEY, LAKE COUNTY, MT

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  15. SURVEY, MONO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  16. SURVEY, ATTALA COUNTY, MS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  17. SURVEY, NATCHITOCHES PARISH, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  18. SURVEY, CASCADE COUNTY, MT

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  19. SURVEY, POTTAWATTAMIE COUNTY, IA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  20. SURVEY, REFUGIO COUNTY, TEXAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  1. Global Land Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Global Land Survey (GLS) datasets are a collection of orthorectified, cloud-minimized Landsat-type satellite images, providing near complete coverage of the...

  2. Black Rail Pilot Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Aural surveys using tape recorded calls proved to be an efficient and effective way to survey large expanses of shallow marsh for black rails (Laterallus...

  3. SURVEY, Baltomore City, MD

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The field survey data for this coastal study includes a field report that exhibits photos and transect information collected in the field survey phase of the study....

  4. SURVEY, Poquoson City, VA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The field survey data for this coastal study includes a field report that exhibits photos and transect information collected in the field survey phase of the study....

  5. SURVEY, Caroline COUNTY, MD

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The field survey data for this coastal study includes a field report that exhibits photos and transect information collected in the field survey phase of the study....

  6. SURVEY, ATTALA COUNTY, MS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  7. SURVEY, GRAFTON COUNTY, NH

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  8. MAX and Survey Linkages

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — CMS is interested in linking MAX files with survey data, including four surveys conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) - the National Health...

  9. HCAHPS Hospital Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) Hospital Survey The intent of the HCAHPS initiative is to provide a standardized survey...

  10. National Health Care Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    This survey encompasses a family of health care provider surveys, including information about the facilities that supply health care, the services rendered, and the characteristics of the patients served.

  11. MAX and Survey Linkages

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — CMS is interested in linking MAX files with survey data, including four surveys conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) - the National Health...

  12. Patient survey (HCAHPS) - National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The national average for the HCAHPS survey categories. HCAHPS is a national, standardized survey of hospital patients about their experiences during a recent...

  13. SURVEY, Cecil County, MD

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The field survey data for this coastal study includes a field report that exhibits photos and transect information collected in the field survey phase of the study....

  14. SURVEY, Lowndes County, MS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  15. GIS Readiness Survey 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Lise; Hvingel, Line Træholt; Hansen, Henning Sten

    2014-01-01

    The GIS Readiness Survey 2014 is a follow-up to the corresponding survey that was carried out among public institutions in Denmark in 2009. The present survey thus provides an updated image of status and challenges in relation to the use of spatial information, the construction of the com- mon...

  16. China Executive Survey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENWEIXIAN

    2005-01-01

    Beiiing-based CTR Market Research recently completed a survey named China Business Executive Survey in the four Chinese dries of Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou and Shenzhen. The survey identified 340,000 senior executives in the four cities and found that around 20,000 ofthem have annual income of over 200,000yuan (US$24,000).

  17. Plane and geodetic surveying

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Aylmer

    2004-01-01

    Plane and Geodetic Surveying blends theory and practice, conventional techniques and GPS, to provide the ideal book for students of surveying.Detailed guidance is given on how and when the principle surveying instruments (theodolites, Total Stations, levels and GPS) should be used. Concepts and formulae needed to convert instrument readings into useful results are explained. Rigorous explanations of the theoretical aspects of surveying are given, while at the same time a wealth of useful advice about conducting a survey in practice is provided. An accompanying least squares adjustment program

  18. Environmental Survey preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-04-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Sandia National Laboratories conducted August 17 through September 4, 1987. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with Sandia National Laboratories-Albuquerque (SNLA). The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at SNLA, and interviews with site personnel. 85 refs., 49 figs., 48 tabs.

  19. Survey says? A primer on web-based survey design and distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenheimer, Adam J; Pannucci, Christopher J; Kasten, Steven J; Haase, Steven C

    2011-07-01

    The Internet has changed the way in which we gather and interpret information. Although books were once the exclusive bearers of data, knowledge is now only a keystroke away. The Internet has also facilitated the synthesis of new knowledge. Specifically, it has become a tool through which medical research is conducted. A review of the literature reveals that in the past year, over 100 medical publications have been based on Web-based survey data alone. Because of emerging Internet technologies, Web-based surveys can now be launched with little computer knowledge. They may also be self-administered, eliminating personnel requirements. Ultimately, an investigator may build, implement, and analyze survey results with speed and efficiency, obviating the need for mass mailings and data processing. All of these qualities have rendered telephone and mail-based surveys virtually obsolete. Despite these capabilities, Web-based survey techniques are not without their limitations, namely, recall and response biases. When used properly, however, Web-based surveys can greatly simplify the research process. This article discusses the implications of Web-based surveys and provides guidelines for their effective design and distribution.

  20. Coping with Musculoskeletal Pain: Implications for Office Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oztug, Ozhan; Cowie, Helen

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present research was to understand how office workers cope with back, neck and upper limb musculoskeletal disorders at work (and their implications for work). A small (N = 120) questionnaire survey collected information about potential participants' background and history of musculoskeletal disorders. These data were used to inform…

  1. Developing the online survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Jeffry S; McNew, Ryan

    2008-12-01

    Institutions of higher education are now using Internet-based technology tools to conduct surveys for data collection. Research shows that the type and quality of responses one receives with online surveys are comparable with what one receives in paper-based surveys. Data collection can take place on Web-based surveys, e-mail-based surveys, and personal digital assistants/Smartphone devices. Web surveys can be subscription templates, software packages installed on one's own server, or created from scratch using Web programming development tools. All of these approaches have their advantages and disadvantages. The survey owner must make informed decisions as to the right technology to implement. The correct choice can save hours of work in sorting, organizing, and analyzing data.

  2. Global Problems and College Education: A Survey of Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bybee, Rodger W.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    College students identified air quality, world hunger, and war technology as the most important of 12 global problems (presented to them during a survey) and indicated that problems will become worse by the year 2000. Implications of findings for curriculum and instruction are addressed. (JN)

  3. A Survey of Voice over IP Security Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keromytis, Angelos D.

    We present a survey of Voice over IP security research. Our goal is to provide a roadmap for researchers seeking to understand existing capabilities and, and to identify gaps in addressing the numerous threats and vulnerabilities present in VoIP systems. We also briefly discuss the implications of our findings with respect to actual vulnerabilities reported in a variety VoIP products.

  4. Ethical challenges in designing and conducting medicine quality surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabernero, Patricia; Parker, Michael; Ravinetto, Raffaella; Phanouvong, Souly; Yeung, Shunmay; Kitutu, Freddy E; Cheah, Phaik Yeong; Mayxay, Mayfong; Guerin, Philippe J; Newton, Paul N

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we discuss the main ethical challenges related to the conduct of medicine quality surveys and make suggestions on how to address them. Most evidence-based information regarding medicine quality derives from surveys. However, existing research ethical guidelines do not provide specific guidance for medicine quality surveys. Hence, those conducting surveys are often left wondering how to judge what counts as best practice. A list of the main ethical challenges in the design and conduct of surveys is presented. It is vital that the design and conduct of medicine quality surveys uphold moral and ethical obligations and analyse the ethical implications and consequences of such work. These aspects include the impact on the local availability of and access to medicines; the confidentiality and privacy of the surveyors and the surveyed; questions as to whether outlet staff personnel should be told they are part of a survey; the need of ethical and regulatory approvals; and how the findings should be disseminated. Medicine quality surveys should ideally be conducted in partnership with the relevant national Medicine Regulatory Authorities. An international, but contextually sensitive, model of good ethical practice for such surveys is needed. © 2016 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Intuitionistic implication without disjunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renardel de Lavalette, Gerard R.; Hendriks, Alex; Jongh, Dick H.J. de

    2012-01-01

    We investigate fragments of intuitionistic propositional logic containing implication but not disjunction. These fragments are finite, but their size grows superexponentially with the number of generators. Exact models are used to characterize the fragments.

  6. Dimensions of Organisational Culture in Quantity Surveying Firms in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayokunle Olubunmi Olanipekun

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The functionalist paradigm of organisational culture (OC views culture as a variable subject to conscious manipulation and control in order to solve organisational challenges. Therefore, this paper provides information on how OC is a solution to the challenges in Quantity Surveying firms (QSFs.  This was achieved by eliciting the dimensions of OC in forty two QSFs in Lagos, Nigeria, which are the business, people and external environment dimensions. The paper concludes that OC is a relevant solution to the identity and management related challenges in QSFs. Specifically, the paper informs on the implications of business and people dimensions of OC as a solution to the identity challenges, as well as on the implication of the external environment dimension of OC to the management challenges. Based on the findings, practical implications and recommendations were directed at the management and employees QSs in QSFs and Quantity Surveying researchers.

  7. ERP in large Danish enterprises: Implications for SCM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Charles

    2004-01-01

    This paper argues that with the present state of Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) adoption by the companies, the potential benefits of Supply Chain Management (SCM) and integration is about to be unleashed. This paper presents the results and the implications of a survey on ERP adoption...... in the 500 largest Danish enterprises. The study is based on telephone interviews with ERP managers in 88.4% of the "top 500" enterprises in Denmark. Based on the survey, the paper suggests the following four propositions: (i) ERP has become the pervasive infrastructure; (ii) ERP has become a contemporary...... technology; (iii) ERP adoption has matured; and (iv) ERP adoption is converging towards a dominant design. Finally, the paper discusses the general implications of the surveyed state of practice on the SCM research challenges. Consequently we argue that research needs to adjust its conceptions of the ERP...

  8. Surveying your internal customers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, V L

    1998-06-01

    Internal customers often are overlooked when business techniques are applied. By applying common external customer satisfaction survey techniques to internal business functions, one hospital identified areas for improvement.

  9. Management Satisfaction Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — The Chief Human Capital Officers' Managers' Satisfaction Survey asks managers to rate their perception of workforce planning, interaction with and levels of support...

  10. Survey of photovoltaic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-08-01

    In developing this survey of photovoltaic systems, the University of Alabama in Huntsville assembled a task team to perform an extensive telephone survey of all known photovoltaic manufacturers. Three US companies accounted for 77% of the total domestic sales in 1978. They are Solarex Corporation, Solar Power Croporation, and ARCO Solar, Inc. This survey of solar photovoltaic (P/V) manufacturers and suppliers consists of three parts: a catalog of suppliers arranged alphabetically, data sheets on specific products, and typical operating, installation, or maintenance instructions and procedures. This report does not recommend or endorse any company product or information presented within as the results of this survey.

  11. A Survey of the Innovation Surveys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hong, Shangqin; Oxley, Les; McCann, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Both theoretical and conceptual understanding of innovation has developed significantly since the early 1980s. More noticeable, however, are the major changes that have been experienced in empirically-oriented innovation research as a result of the introduction of firm level innovation surveys. Coll

  12. A Survey of the Innovation Surveys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hong, Shangqin; Oxley, Les; McCann, Philip

    Both theoretical and conceptual understanding of innovation has developed significantly since the early 1980s. More noticeable, however, are the major changes that have been experienced in empirically-oriented innovation research as a result of the introduction of firm level innovation surveys.

  13. Alumni Perspectives Survey, 2011. Survey Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Sabeen

    2011-01-01

    Since the Graduate Management Admission Council[R] (GMAC[R]) first began conducting its Alumni Perspectives Surveys 11 years ago, several "truths" about graduate business school alumni have consistently stood the test of time: They are and remain eminently employable. They constantly rate the value of the degree highly. This year's results are…

  14. IT Barometer survey, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howard, Rob

    1998-01-01

    Survey results from Danish architects, engineers, contractors and property managers in the construction industry concerning their use of computers, communications, problems and needs.......Survey results from Danish architects, engineers, contractors and property managers in the construction industry concerning their use of computers, communications, problems and needs....

  15. Survey team on

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niss, Mogens Allan; Bruder, Regina; Planas, Núria

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the outcomes of the work of the ICME 13 Survey Team on ‘Conceptualisation and the role of competencies, knowing and knowledge in mathematics education research’. It surveys a variety of historical and contemporary views and conceptualisations of what it means to master...

  16. Reflexive cacti: a survey

    OpenAIRE

    Bojana Mihailović; Marija Rašajski; Zoran Stanić

    2016-01-01

    A graph is called reflexive if its second largest eigenvalue does not exceed 2. We survey the results on reflexive cacti obtained in the last two decades. We also discuss various patterns of appearing of Smith graphs as subgraphs of reflexive cacti. In the Appendix, we survey the recent results concerning reflexive bipartite regular graphs.

  17. Sandhills native bee survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report includes the results of a bee survey conducted in Sandhills region of north and south Carolina on May 18th and 19th 2006. Part of the survey was...

  18. EHRA research network surveys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bongiorni, Maria Grazia; Chen, Jian; Dagres, Nikolaos;

    2015-01-01

    of surveys covering the controversial issues in clinical electrophysiology (EP). With this in mind, an EHRA EP research network has been created, which included EP centres in Europe among which the surveys on 'hot topic' were circulated. This review summarizes the overall experience conducting EP wires over...

  19. And the Survey Says...

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Susan C.

    2016-01-01

    Last month we highlighted our Quadrennial Survey of High School Physics Teachers. Using data from the survey, we have looked at the availability of high school physics. We report that about 95% of high school seniors attend a high school where physics is offered regularly--either every year or every other year. A U.S. Department of Education…

  20. Graduate Assessment Survey Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santa Fe Community Coll., Gainesville, FL. Office of Institutional Research and Planning.

    Determines the degree to which Santa Fe Community College (Florida) is providing quality educational programs and services to its students. Surveys outgoing students to gather their opinions and perceptions of the educational experiences and services they received while attending the college. The survey instrument is divided into three sections:…

  1. Annual HR Salary Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, Patricia

    2000-01-01

    A trainers' salary survey collected data on 1,091 companies, 31,615 employees, and 97 human resource jobs. Results show pay for human resource professionals is continuing to rise. The survey contains information on base salaries, annual bonuses and incentives, and long-term eligibility incentives. (JOW)

  2. The FLAMES Tarantula Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Markova, N; Bastian, N; Beletsky, Y; Bestenlehner, J; Brott, I; Cantiello, M; Carraro, G; Clark, J; Crowther, P; de Koter, A; de Mink, S; Doran, E; Dufton, P; Dunstall, P; Gieles, M; Graefener, G; Henault-Brunet, V; Herrero, A; Howarth, I; Langer, N; Lennon, D; Apellaniz, J Maiz; Najarro, F; Puls, J; Sana, H; Simon-Diaz, S; Smartt, S; Stroud, V; Taylor, W; van Loon, J; Vink, J; Walborn, N

    2011-01-01

    The Tarantula survey is an ESO Large Programme which has obtained multi-epochs spectroscopy of over 800 massive stars in the 30 Dor region in the Large Magelanic Cloud. Here we briefly describe the main drivers of the survey and the observational material derived.

  3. Seven Survey Sins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehlbach, Hunter

    2015-01-01

    As pressure builds to assess students, teachers, and schools, educational practitioners and policy makers are increasingly looking toward student perception surveys as a promising means to collect high-quality, useful data. For instance, the widely cited Measures of Effective Teaching study lists student perception surveys as one of the three key…

  4. Detail and survey radioautographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wainwright, Wm.W.

    1949-04-19

    The much used survey or contact type of radioautograph is indispensible for a study of the gross distribution of radioactive materials. A detail radioautograph is equally indispensible. The radioautograph makes possible the determination of plutonium with respect to cells. Outlines of survey and detail techniques are given.

  5. Constraints on Neutrino Mass from Galaxy Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta, A. J.; Niro, V.; Verde, L.

    2017-03-01

    Modern large-scale galaxy surveys, combined with measurements of the cosmic microwave background, have managed to constrain the sum of neutrino masses to an order of magnitude below the limit placed by laboratory experiments. We discuss the signature of massive neutrinos in the distribution of galaxies and the current state of the art of neutrino mass constraints, focusing on parameter degeneracies that reveal how we can improve current constraints with next-generation galaxy surveys. We also comment on how the near future cosmology experiments are an opportunity for the first measurement of the value of the sum of neutrino masses, or alternatively, to find profound implications for neutrino physics extensions beyond the Standard Model.

  6. Extragalactic HI Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Giovanelli, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    We review the results of HI line surveys of extragalactic sources in the local Universe. In the last two decades major efforts have been made in establishing on firm statistical grounds the properties of the HI source population, the two most prominent being the HI Parkes All Sky Survey (HIPASS) and the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA survey (ALFALFA). We review the choices of technical parameters in the design and optimization of spectro-photometric "blind" HI surveys, which for the first time produced extensive HI-selected data sets. Particular attention is given to the relationship between optical and HI populations, the differences in their clustering properties and the importance of HI-selected samples in contributing to the understanding of apparent conflicts between observation and theory on the abundance of low mass halos. The last section of this paper provides an overview of currently ongoing and planned surveys which will explore the cosmic evolution of properties of the HI population.

  7. Physics Survey Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-12-30

    An overview of a series of assignments of the branches of physics carried out by the Board on Physics and Astronomy of the National Research Council. It identifies further theories in physics and makes recommendations on preventive priorities. The Board on Physics and Astronomy (BPA) has conducted a new decadal survey of physics entitled ''Physics in a New Era''. The survey includes assessments of the main branches of physics as well as certain selected emerging areas. The various elements of the survey were prepared by separately-appointed National Research Council (NRC) committees. The BPA formed the Physics Survey Overview Committee (PSOVC) to complete the survey by preparing an overview of the field of physics to summarize and synthesize the results of the various assessments and to address cross-cutting issues that concern physics as a whole.

  8. Public surveys at ESO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaboldi, Magda; Delmotte, Nausicaa; Hilker, Michael; Hussain, Gaitee; Mascetti, Laura; Micol, Alberto; Petr-Gotzens, Monika; Rejkuba, Marina; Retzlaff, Jörg; Mieske, Steffen; Szeifert, Thomas; Ivison, Rob; Leibundgut, Bruno; Romaniello, Martino

    2016-07-01

    ESO has a strong mandate to survey the Southern Sky. In this article, we describe the ESO telescopes and instruments that are currently used for ESO Public Surveys, and the future plans of the community with the new wide-field-spectroscopic instruments. We summarize the ESO policies governing the management of these projects on behalf of the community. The on-going ESO Public Surveys and their science goals, their status of completion, and the new projects selected during the second ESO VISTA call in 2015/2016 are discussed. We then present the impact of these projects in terms of current numbers of refereed publications and the scientific data products published through the ESO Science Archive Facility by the survey teams, including the independent access and scientific use of the published survey data products by the astronomical community.

  9. The Deep Lens Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Wittman, D; Dell'Antonio, I P; Becker, A C; Margoniner, V E; Cohen, J; Norman, D; Loomba, D; Squires, G; Wilson, G; Stubbs, C; Hennawi, J F; Spergel, D N; Boeshaar, P C; Clocchiatti, A; Hamuy, M; Bernstein, G; González, A; Guhathakurta, R; Hu, W; Seljak, U; Zaritsky, D

    2002-01-01

    The Deep Lens Survey (DLS) is a deep BVRz' imaging survey of seven 2x2 degree fields, with all data to be made public. The primary scientific driver is weak gravitational lensing, but the survey is also designed to enable a wide array of other astrophysical investigations. A unique feature of this survey is the search for transient phenomena. We subtract multiple exposures of a field, detect differences, classify, and release transients on the Web within about an hour of observation. Here we summarize the scientific goals of the DLS, field and filter selection, observing techniques and current status, data reduction, data products and release, and transient detections. Finally, we discuss some lessons which might apply to future large surveys such as LSST.

  10. Web-Based Surveys: Not Your Basic Survey Anymore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertot, John Carlo

    2009-01-01

    Web-based surveys are not new to the library environment. Although such surveys began as extensions of print surveys, the Web-based environment offers a number of approaches to conducting a survey that the print environment cannot duplicate easily. Since 1994, the author and others have conducted national surveys of public library Internet…

  11. A New Survey for Giant Arcs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennawi, Joseph F.; Gladders, Michael D.; Oguri, Masamune; Dalal, Neal; Koester, Benjamin; Natarajan, Priyamvada; Strauss, Michael A.; Inada, Naohisa; Kayo, Issha; Lin,; Lampeitl, Hubert; Annis, James; Bahcall, Neta A.; Schneider, Donald P.

    2006-11-15

    We report on the first results of an imaging survey to detect strong gravitational lensing targeting the richest clusters selected from the photometric data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) with follow-up deep imaging observations from the Wisconsin Indiana Yale NOAO (WIYN) 3.5m telescope and the University of Hawaii 88-inch telescope (UH88). The clusters are selected from an area of 8000 deg{sup 2} using the Red Cluster Sequence technique and span the redshift range 0.1 {approx}< z {approx}< 0.6, corresponding to a comoving cosmological volume of {approx} 2Gpc{sup 3}. Our imaging survey thus targets a volume more than an order of magnitude larger than any previous search. A total of 240 clusters were imaged of which 141 had sub-arcsecond image quality. Our survey has uncovered 16 new lensing clusters with definite giant arcs, an additional 12 systems for which the lensing interpretation is very likely, and 9 possible lenses which contain shorter arclets or candidate arcs which are less certain and will require further observations to confirm their lensing origin. The number of new cluster lenses detected in this survey is likely > 30. Among these new systems are several of the most dramatic examples of strong gravitational lensing ever discovered with multiple bright arcs at large angular separation. These will likely become 'poster-child' gravitational lenses similar to Abell 1689 and CL0024+1654. The new lenses discovered in this survey will enable future systematic studies of the statistics of strong lensing and its implications for cosmology and our structure formation paradigm.

  12. A Survey of Special Educators' Awareness of, Experiences with, and Attitudes toward Nonverbal Communication Aids in the Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrewsbury, Rosemary G.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Results of surveys completed by 237 special educators indicate respondents' limited awareness, understanding, and experiences with nonverbal communication aids. Results have implications for preservice and continuing education programs for special educators. (Author/CL)

  13. Telephony user survey

    CERN Multimedia

    IT Department

    2016-01-01

    Let us know your needs to better plan the transition to a new CERN telephony system.   CERN is planning to upgrade its telephony network and replace the system with a new and modern VoIP infrastructure. We strive to make this transition as beneficial and smooth as possible for you. Please let us know more about your current working environment, expectations and suggestions by responding to this survey: https://cern.ch/tel-survey. The more answers we get, the better the new system will serve everyone in the future. The survey will take you about five minutes to complete; we are counting on your feedback!

  14. GPS satellite surveying

    CERN Document Server

    Leick, Alfred; Tatarnikov, Dmitry

    2015-01-01

    THE MOST COMPREHENSIVE, UP-TO-DATE GUIDE ON GPS TECHNOLOGY FOR SURVEYING Three previous editions have established GPS Satellite Surveying as the definitive industry reference. Now fully updated and expanded to reflect the newest developments in the field, this Fourth Edition features cutting-edge information on GNSS antennas, precise point positioning, real-time relative positioning, lattice reduction, and much more. Expert authors examine additional tools and applications, offering complete coverage of geodetic surveying using satellite technologies. The past decade has seen a major evolut

  15. EPRINT ARCHIVE USER SURVEY

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    University of Southampton invites the CERN community to participate in a survey Professor Stevan Harnad is conducting on current users and non-users of Eprint Archives. http://www.eprints.org/survey/ The findings will be used to suggest potential enhancements of the services as well as to get a deeper understanding of the very rapid developments in the on-line dissemination and use of scientific and scholarly research. (The survey is anonymous. Revealing your identity is optional and it will be kept confidential.)

  16. FLEXI Project Management Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohunen, Anna; Krzanik, Lech; Kuvaja, Pasi; Similä, Jouni; Rodriguez, Pilar; Hyysalo, Jarkko; Linna, Tommi

    FLEXI Project Management Survey (FLEXI PMS) has been established to gain detailed knowledge on how the software industry - in particular successful companies - manages agile software development. FLEXI PMS investigates the actual agile values, principles, practices and contexts. The survey is supported by a careful literature review and analysis of existing studies. Special attention is attached to large, multi-site, multi-company and distributed projects - the target area of FLEXI project. The survey is intended to provide solid data for further knowledge acquisition and project/company positioning with regard to feasible agile management practices.

  17. Plane and geodetic surveying

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Aylmer

    2014-01-01

    IntroductionAim And ScopeClassification Of SurveysThe Structure Of This BookGeneral Principles Of SurveyingErrorsRedundancyStiffnessAdjustmentPlanning And Record KeepingPrincipal Surveying ActivitiesEstablishing Control NetworksMappingSetting OutResectioningDeformation MonitoringAngle MeasurementThe Surveyor's CompassThe ClinometerThe Total StationMaking ObservationsChecks On Permanent AdjustmentsDistance MeasurementGeneralTape MeasurementsOptical Methods (Tachymetry)Electromagnetic Distance Measurement (EDM)Ultrasonic MethodsGNSSLevellingTheoryThe InstrumentTechniqueBookingPermanent Adjustmen

  18. Psoriasis : implications of biologics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lecluse, L.L.A.

    2010-01-01

    Since the end of 2004 several specific immunomodulating therapies: ‘biologic response modifiers’ or ‘biologics’ have been registered for moderate to severe psoriasis in Europe. This thesis is considering the implications of the introduction of the biologics for psoriasis patients, focusing on safety

  19. Hake Survey ADCP (2001)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Shipboard acoustic Doppler current profiler data collected during the Integrated Acoustic and Trawl Surveys of Pacific Hake. Processing by: Stephen Pierce, Oregon...

  20. Shrimp Survey Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Northern Shrimp Survey was initiated in 1983 by the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission (ASMFC) and monitors the relative abundance (number of shrimp),...

  1. National Nursing Home Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Nursing Home Survey provides includes characteristics such as size of nursing home facilities, ownership, Medicare/Medicaid certification, occupancy rate, number of days of care provided, and expenses.

  2. Eagle surveys near Valdez

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A shoreline survey of birds in Port Valdez, Sawmill Bay and Jack Bay was completed between September 14 and September 16, 1976, by Special Studies Team Mike Jacobson...

  3. Public Land Survey filled

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The 'PLSFILL' layer is a polygon coverage depicting the township, range and sections contained in the Public Land Survey System grid for the State of California....

  4. Winter Bottom Trawl Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The standardized NEFSC Winter Bottom Trawl Survey was initiated in 1992 and covered offshore areas from the Mid-Atlantic to Georges Bank. Inshore strata were covered...

  5. Spring Bottom Trawl Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The standardized NEFSC Spring Bottom Trawl Survey was initiated in 1968 and covered an area from Cape Hatteras, NC, to Nova Scotia, Canada, at depths >27m....

  6. Midwinter Bald Eagle Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of the Midwinter Bald Eagle survey is to monitor the status of Bald Eagle wintering populations in the contiguous United States by estimating national...

  7. National Health Interview Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) is the principal source of information on the health of the civilian noninstitutionalized population of the United States...

  8. American Housing Survey (AHS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — The AHS is the largest, regular national housing sample survey in the United States. The U.S. Census Bureau conducts the AHS to obtain up-to-date housing statistics...

  9. Artesian Wetlands Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Artesian Wetlands Survey includes data on the wetlands in the San Luis Valley in Colorado. Data recorded includes location, area of influence, area inundated,...

  10. Fisheries Disaster Survey, 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Responses to selected questions from the Social and Economic Survey administered in spring and summer 2000 to recipients of the second round (Round II) of financial...

  11. Wolf Population Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Snow track surveys are a common method of estimating relative abundance, estimating density, and documenting range use of furbearers and large carnivores. The...

  12. Atlantic Herring Acoustic Surveys

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NEFSC Advanced Sampling Technologies Research Group conducts annual fisheries acoustic surveys using state-of-the-art acoustic, midwater trawling, and underwater...

  13. Hake Survey ADCP (1995)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Shipboard acoustic Doppler current profiler data collected during the Integrated Acoustic and Trawl Surveys of Pacific Hake. Processing by: Stephen Pierce, Oregon...

  14. Hake Survey ADCP (2005)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Shipboard acoustic Doppler current profiler data collected during the Integrated Acoustic and Trawl Surveys of Pacific Hake. Processing by: Stephen Pierce, Oregon...

  15. IT User Community Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Peter Jones (IT-CDA-WF)

    2016-01-01

    IT-CDA is gathering information to more accurately form a snapshot of the CERN IT user community and we would appreciate you taking time to complete the following survey.   We want to use this survey to better understand how the user community uses their devices and our services, and how the delivery of those services could be improved. You will need to authenticate to complete the survey. However please note that your responses are confidential and will be compiled together and analysed as a group. You can also volunteer to offer additional information if you so wish. This survey should take no longer than 5 minutes. Thanks in advance for your collaboration.

  16. NWRS Survey Prioritization Tool

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A SMART Tool and User's Guide for aiding NWRS Station staff when prioritizing their surveys for an Inventory and Monitoring Plan. This guide describes a process and...

  17. Industry Based Monkfish Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Monkfish industry leaders expressed concerns that the NEFSC bottom trawl surveys did not sample in all monkfish habitats; particularly the deeper water outside the...

  18. ASD Customer Satisfaction Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — ASD implemented a customer satisfaction survey for our products and services. This feedback will provide a better understanding of how ASD products and services can...

  19. Hake Survey ADCP (1998)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Shipboard acoustic Doppler current profiler data collected during the Integrated Acoustic and Trawl Surveys of Pacific Hake. Processing by: Stephen Pierce, Oregon...

  20. Patient survey (ICH CAHPS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — In-Center Hemodialysis Facilites Patient evaluations from the In-Center Hemodialysis Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (ICH-CAHPS) Survey. The...

  1. Waterfowl breeding population survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Waterfowl breeding population surveys have been completed annually on the Arctic Coastal Plain of Alaska since 1986. Methods for the 2011 Arctic Coastal Plain...

  2. Waterfowl breeding population survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Waterfowl breeding population surveys have been completed annually on the Arctic Coastal Plain of Alaska since 1986. Methods for the 2010 Arctic Coastal Plain...

  3. Web surveys' hidden hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrel-Samuels, Palmer

    2003-07-01

    The same question posed on the Web and in print can yield very different answers, dramatically distorting survey results and misleading management. But, as psychologist Palmer Morrel-Samuels demonstrates, the problems are readily fixed.

  4. Billfish Angler Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Billfish Angler Survey provides estimates of billfish angling activities in the Pacific and Indian Oceans. This collection of recreational billfish catch and...

  5. 2007 Resident Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    City and County of Durham, North Carolina — The purpose of the annual City/County survey: To objectively assess citizen satisfaction with the delivery of City/County servicesTo set a baseline for future...

  6. 2013 Resident Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    City and County of Durham, North Carolina — The purpose of the annual City/County survey: To objectively assess citizen satisfaction with the delivery of City/County servicesTo set a baseline for future...

  7. 2009 Resident Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    City and County of Durham, North Carolina — The purpose of the annual City/County survey: To objectively assess citizen satisfaction with the delivery of City/County servicesTo set a baseline for future...

  8. Muskox survey, Nunivak Island

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Aerial survey completed July 1958 is presented with results. Muskox were located and plotted on a map. Animals were also classified by Adult bull, calve, cows and...

  9. Dulbi River goose survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A survey of white-fronted goose (Anser albifrons) and Canada goose (Branta canadensis) broods was conducted on 58 3/8 miles of the Dulbi River in Alaska. Four...

  10. Deep Water Survey Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The deep water biodiversity surveys explore and describe the biodiversity of the bathy- and bentho-pelagic nekton using Midwater and bottom trawls centered in the...

  11. 2011 Resident Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    City and County of Durham, North Carolina — The purpose of the annual City/County survey: To objectively assess citizen satisfaction with the delivery of City/County servicesTo set a baseline for future...

  12. Large Pelagics Telephone Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Large Pelagics Telephone Survey (LPTS) collects fishing effort information directly from captains holding Highly Migratory Species (HMS) permits (required by...

  13. Large Pelagics Biological Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Large Pelagics Biological Survey (LPBS) collects additional length and weight information and body parts such as otoliths, caudal vertebrae, dorsal spines, and...

  14. Arctic survey, 1957

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes a survey and game patrol conducted to twelve villages in the Arctic from April 24 to May 2 1957. The report covers animals take for income and...

  15. Fall Bottom Trawl Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The standardized NEFSC Fall Bottom Trawl Survey was initiated in 1963 and covered an area from Hudson Canyon, NY to Nova Scotia, Canada. Throughout the years,...

  16. Applicant Satisfaction Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — The Chief Human Capital Officers developed 3 surveys that asks applicants to assess their satisfaction with the application process on a 1-10 point scale, with 10...

  17. NMFS Reef Survey Forms

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Reef Environmental Survey Project (REEF) mission to educate and enlist divers in the conservation of marine habitats is accomplished primarily through its Fish...

  18. Fuel cells: A survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, B. J.

    1973-01-01

    A survey of fuel cell technology and applications is presented. The operating principles, performance capabilities, and limitations of fuel cells are discussed. Diagrams of fuel cell construction and operating characteristics are provided. Photographs of typical installations are included.

  19. Patient survey (HCAHPS) - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A list of hospital ratings for the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS). HCAHPS is a national, standardized survey of hospital...

  20. 2005 Resident Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    City and County of Durham, North Carolina — The purpose of the annual City/County survey: To objectively assess citizen satisfaction with the delivery of City/County servicesTo set a baseline for future...

  1. Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Characteristics and Perceptions of the Medicare Population Data from the 2010 Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey is a series of source books based on the...

  2. Use of Public Opinion Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, Susan

    2002-01-01

    Describes how to design and administer public-opinion surveys. Includes types of surveys, preparing survey questions, drawing and validating a sample, and processing the data. (Contains 16 references.) (PKP)

  3. DSM-5 field survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lochner, Christine; Grant, Jon E; Odlaug, Brian Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this multisite field survey was to examine the DSM-IV-TR criteria, proposed DSM-5 diagnostic criteria, as well as a number of possible additional diagnostic criteria, in patients with hair-pulling disorder (HPD, or trichotillomania).......The aim of this multisite field survey was to examine the DSM-IV-TR criteria, proposed DSM-5 diagnostic criteria, as well as a number of possible additional diagnostic criteria, in patients with hair-pulling disorder (HPD, or trichotillomania)....

  4. Benchmarking survey for recycling.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marley, Margie Charlotte; Mizner, Jack Harry

    2005-06-01

    This report describes the methodology, analysis and conclusions of a comparison survey of recycling programs at ten Department of Energy sites including Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM). The goal of the survey was to compare SNL/NM's recycling performance with that of other federal facilities, and to identify activities and programs that could be implemented at SNL/NM to improve recycling performance.

  5. Hong Kong Geological Survey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R J Sewell

    2007-01-01

    @@ History and objectives The Hong Kong Geological Survey(HKGS) was created on 5 May,1982,wimin the then Engineering Development Department of the Hong Kong Govemment.The initial objective was to carry out a new geological survey of the Territory at 1∶20,000 scale.This followed recognition of an urgent need to produce high quality geological maps at a large scale with sufficient detail to facilitate physical planning and land use management of Hong Kong.

  6. Retirement Applicant Satisfaction Survey Results

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — This dataset contains information about the Retirement Applicant Survey (RAS). The survey measured satisfaction results with the retirement application process. The...

  7. Supernatural impotence: historical review with anthropological and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolin, J; Witztum, E

    1989-12-01

    The historical and cultural background of the belief in supernatural impotence is presented, emphasizing its possible implications for clinical practice. A brief historical survey of the concept in Judaism and Christianity is followed by a short anthropological survey of supernatural impotence in different ethnic subcultures in Israel. A case demonstration exemplifies the connection between understanding the patient's cultural background and beliefs and the clinical competence of the therapist. The relationship between the clinical-therapeutic process in psychiatric practice and knowledge of the patient's cultural background and beliefs is stressed.

  8. Epigenetics: ambiguities and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stotz, Karola; Griffiths, Paul

    2016-12-01

    Everyone has heard of 'epigenetics', but the term means different things to different researchers. Four important contemporary meanings are outlined in this paper. Epigenetics in its various senses has implications for development, heredity, and evolution, and also for medicine. Concerning development, it cements the vision of a reactive genome strongly coupled to its environment. Concerning heredity, both narrowly epigenetic and broader 'exogenetic' systems of inheritance play important roles in the construction of phenotypes. A thoroughly epigenetic model of development and evolution was Waddington's aim when he introduced the term 'epigenetics' in the 1940s, but it has taken the modern development of molecular epigenetics to realize this aim. In the final sections of the paper we briefly outline some further implications of epigenetics for medicine and for the nature/nurture debate.

  9. Primal implication as encryption

    OpenAIRE

    Krupski, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    We propose a "cryptographic" interpretation for the propositional connectives of primal infon logic introduced by Y. Gurevich and I. Neeman and prove the corresponding soundness and completeness results. Primal implication $\\imp{\\varphi}{\\psi}$ corresponds to the encryption of $\\psi$ with a secret key $\\varphi$, primal disjunction $\\vp{\\varphi}{\\psi}$ is a group key and $\\bot$ reflects some backdoor constructions such as full superuser permissions or a universal decryption key. For the logic ...

  10. LIBRARY SURVEY 2001

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The primary role of the library is to make sure that you can do YOUR work in the most efficient way possible. To ensure that we continue to match our services to your information needs, the library regularly gathers the views and opinions of its readers in a variety of ways, [link for e-version: http://library/library_general/statistics/library_statistics_ surveys.html], including user surveys. The last survey was carried out in 1996. One of the most visible results of that survey was the extension of the library desk service until seven o'clock in the evening, to meet the demand for greater access to library materials. Now the 'electronic library' is becoming more important than the physical one, we feel it is once again time to ensure that we are providing the services and information you need, in the most effective way possible. We also want to make sure you are aware of the full range of services that the library provides. Please spare just a few minutes to fill out our survey at http://library.cern.ch/su...

  11. SURVEY AND RESTORATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Mileto

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In addition to the technological evolution over the last two centuries, survey has experienced two main conceptual leaps: the introduction of photography as a tool for an indiscriminate register for reality, and the shift from autographic to allographic survey, phenomena which can generate a distancing effect within the restoration process. Besides, this text presents the relationship between survey in its numerous forms and technologies (manual and semi-manual to more complex ones like scanner-laser and the restoration of the building, either for establishing a diagnosis, operating or valorizating, illustrating it with examples developed by the authors, as well as the criteria to be applied when documenting a building to be restored, irrespective of the means and technology available in each case.

  12. PEP Laser Surveying System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauritzen, T.; Sah, R.C.

    1979-03-01

    A Laser Surveying System has been developed to survey the beam elements of the PEP storage ring. This system provides automatic data acquisition and analysis in order to increase survey speed and to minimize operator error. Two special instruments, the Automatic Readout Micrometer and the Small Automatic Micrometer, have been built for measuring the locations of fiducial points on beam elements with respect to the light beam from a laser. These instruments automatically encode offset distances and read them into the memory of an on-line computer. Distances along the beam line are automatically encoded with a third instrument, the Automatic Readout Tape Unit. When measurements of several beam elements have been taken, the on-line computer analyzes the measured data, compared them with desired parameters, and calculates the required adjustments to beam element support stands.

  13. The Dark Energy Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, T; Annis, J; Barlow, M; Bebek, C; Bigelow, B; Beldica, C; Bernstein, R; Bridle, S; Brunner, R; Carlstrom, J; Campbell, M; Castander, F; Cunha, C; Diehl, H T; Dodelson, S; Doel, P; Efstathiou, G P; Estrada, J; Evrard, A; Fernndez, E; Flaugher, B; Fosalba, P; Frieman, J A; Gaztaaga, E; Gerdes, D; Gladders, M; Hu, W; Huterer, D; Jain, B; Karliner, I; Kent, S; Lahav, O; Levi, M; Lima, M; Lin, H; Limon, P; Martínez, M; McKay, T; McMahon, R; Merritt, W K; Miller, C; Miralda-Escudé, J; Mohr, J; Nichol, R; Oyaizu, H; Peacock, J; Peoples, John; Perlmutter, S; Plante, R; Ricker, P; Roe, N; Scarpine, V; Schubnell, M; Selen, M; Sheldon, E S; Smith, C; Stebbins, A; Stoughton, C; Suntzeff, N; Sutherland, W; Takada, M; Tarle, G; Tecchio, M; Thaler, J; Tucker, D; Viti, S; Walker, A; Wechsler, R; Weller, J; Wester, W

    2006-01-01

    We describe the Dark Energy Survey (DES), a proposed optical-near infrared survey of 5000 sq. deg of the South Galactic Cap to ~24th magnitude in SDSS griz, that would use a new 3 sq. deg CCD camera to be mounted on the Blanco 4-m telescope at Cerro Telolo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO). The survey data will allow us to measure the dark energy and dark matter densities and the dark energy equation of state through four independent methods: galaxy clusters, weak gravitational lensing tomography, galaxy angular clustering, and supernova distances. These methods are doubly complementary: they constrain different combinations of cosmological model parameters and are subject to different systematic errors. By deriving the four sets of measurements from the same data set with a common analysis framework, we will obtain important cross checks of the systematic errors and thereby make a substantial and robust advance in the precision of dark energy measurements.

  14. DSM-5 field survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lochner, Christine; Grant, Jon E; Odlaug, Brian Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    Pathologic skin picking (skin picking disorder [SPD]) is a prevalent and disabling condition, which has received increasing study. It is timely to consider including SPD in DSM-5. The aim of this field survey was to investigate possible diagnostic criteria for SPD.......Pathologic skin picking (skin picking disorder [SPD]) is a prevalent and disabling condition, which has received increasing study. It is timely to consider including SPD in DSM-5. The aim of this field survey was to investigate possible diagnostic criteria for SPD....

  15. Surveys on surgery theory

    CERN Document Server

    Cappell, Sylvain; Rosenberg, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Surgery theory, the basis for the classification theory of manifolds, is now about forty years old. There have been some extraordinary accomplishments in that time, which have led to enormously varied interactions with algebra, analysis, and geometry. Workers in many of these areas have often lamented the lack of a single source that surveys surgery theory and its applications. Indeed, no one person could write such a survey. The sixtieth birthday of C. T. C. Wall, one of the leaders of the founding generation of surgery theory, provided an opportunity to rectify the situation and produce a

  16. Surveys on surgery theory

    CERN Document Server

    Cappell, Sylvain; Rosenberg, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Surgery theory, the basis for the classification theory of manifolds, is now about forty years old. The sixtieth birthday (on December 14, 1996) of C.T.C. Wall, a leading member of the subject''s founding generation, led the editors of this volume to reflect on the extraordinary accomplishments of surgery theory as well as its current enormously varied interactions with algebra, analysis, and geometry. Workers in many of these areas have often lamented the lack of a single source surveying surgery theory and its applications. Because no one person could write such a survey, the editors ask

  17. SURVEY ON SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, H Thomas R; Rakar, Fredrik

    This report is based on a survey sent to 150 representatives of social enterprises in Sweden, out of which 47 responded. Despite not being statistically representative due to the low response rate and the fact that Sweden lacks reliable data on the number of Swedish enterprises, according...... to the knowledge and experience resulting from a three-year study on social entrepreneurship, social enterprises and social innovation, we believe that the results presented in this report depict the diversity of the social entrepreneurship sector in Sweden. This report is based on a survey of 47 representatives...

  18. ExtraHF survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piepoli, Massimo F; Binno, Simone; Corrà, Ugo

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: In heart failure (HF), exercise training programmes (ETPs) are a well-recognized intervention to improve symptoms, but are still poorly implemented. The Heart Failure Association promoted a survey to investigate whether and how cardiac centres in Europe are using ETPs in their HF patients...... of evidence on safety or benefit was cited. When implemented, an ETP was proposed to all HF patients in only 55% of the centres, with restriction according to severity or aetiology. CONCLUSIONS: With respect to previous surveys, there is evidence of increased availability of ETPs in HF in Europe, although too...

  19. Lupus Alma Disk Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansdell, Megan

    2016-07-01

    We present the first unbiased ALMA survey of both dust and gas in a large sample of protoplanetary disks. We surveyed 100 sources in the nearby (150-200 pc), young (1-2 Myr) Lupus region to constrain M_dust to 2 M_Mars and M_gas to 1 M_Jup. Most disks have masses < MMSN and gas-to-dust ratios < ISM. Such rapid gas depletion may explain the prevalence of super-Earths in the exoplanet population.

  20. Field Report - Consumer Survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kristian S.; Gwozdz, Wencke

    ). The consumer survey was conducted in four countries (Germany, Poland, Sweden, and United States) with approximately 1,000 respondents per country. The purpose of the survey was to explore consumption and psychological differences across markets and cultures. The collected data represents the empirical...... clothing consumption. One of the main results of the descriptive analyses was that the average consumer across all four countries purchased 5.74 clothing items worth €153.79 over a three-month period. Interestingly, country differences were observed in relation to consumption volume, spending, preferred...

  1. CDS User survey

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Document Service

    2011-01-01

      The CERN Document Server is launching a user survey in order to collect information relative to its search engine, submission interfaces, collaborative features and content organisation. With the view of re-shaping its collections and interfaces and to better integrate with the new INSPIRE platform that serves all HEP literature, CERN Document Server team invites you to take part in the survey. Your input is essential to provide us with useful information before setting up the new service and improve your interactions with CDS. Thanks for participating !  

  2. The implications of unintended pregnancies for mental health in later life

    OpenAIRE

    Herd, Pamela; Higgins, Jenny; Sicinski, Kamil; Merkurieva, Irina

    2016-01-01

    Despite decades of research on unintended pregnancies, we know little about the health implications for the women who experience them. Moreover, no study has examined the implications for women whose pregnancies occurred before Roe v. Wade was decided—nor whether the mental health consequences of these unintended pregnancies continue into later life. Using the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, a 60-year ongoing survey, we examined associations between unwanted and mistimed pregnancies and mental ...

  3. Conducting a Withdrawal Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, Sue; Rowley, Jennifer

    2001-01-01

    A survey at Edge Hill College of Higher Education in Canada, designed to be part of the mechanism for monitoring and evaluating the quality of the student experience, revealed that key factors influencing withdrawal were: course not as expected, traveling difficulties, institution not as expected, domestic difficulties, and financial difficulties.…

  4. Refraction corrections for surveying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lear, W. M.

    1980-01-01

    Optical measurements of range and elevation angles are distorted by refraction of Earth's atmosphere. Theoretical discussion of effect, along with equations for determining exact range and elevation corrections, is presented in report. Potentially useful in optical site surveying and related applications, analysis is easily programmed on pocket calculator. Input to equation is measured range and measured elevation; output is true range and true elevation.

  5. The Herschel Reference Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Boselli, A; Cortese, L; Bendo, G; Chanial, P; Buat, V; Davies, J; Auld, R; Rigby, E; Baes, M; Barlow, M; Bock, J; Bradford, M; Castro-Rodriguez, N; Charlot, S; Clements, D; Cormier, D; Dwek, E; Elbaz, D; Galametz, M; Galliano, F; Gear, W; Glenn, J; Gomez, H; Griffin, M; Hony, S; Isaak, K; Levenson, L; Lu, N; Madden, S; O'Halloran, B; Okumura, K; Oliver, S; Page, M; Panuzzo, P; Papageorgiou, A; Parkin, T; Perez-Fournon, I; Pohlen, M; Rangwala, N; Roussel, H; Rykala, A; Sacchi, N; Sauvage, M; Schulz, B; Schirm, M; Smith, M W L; Spinoglio, L; Stevens, J; Symeonidis, M; Vaccari, M; Vigroux, L; Wilson, C; Wozniak, H; Wright, G; Zeilinger, W

    2010-01-01

    The Herschel Reference Survey is a guaranteed time Herschel key project and will be a benchmark study of dust in the nearby universe. The survey will complement a number of other Herschel key projects including large cosmological surveys that trace dust in the distant universe. We will use Herschel to produce images of a statistically-complete sample of 323 galaxies at 250, 350 and 500 micron. The sample is volume-limited, containing sources with distances between 15 and 25 Mpc and flux limits in the K-band to minimize the selection effects associated with dust and with young high-mass stars and to introduce a selection in stellar mass. The sample spans the whole range of morphological types (ellipticals to late-type spirals) and environments (from the field to the centre of the Virgo Cluster) and as such will be useful for other purposes than our own. We plan to use the survey to investigate (i) the dust content of galaxies as a function of Hubble type, stellar mass and environment, (ii) the connection betwe...

  6. The Survey Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Lois A. Ed.; Sue, Valerie M., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    Internet-based surveys are still relatively new, and researchers are just beginning to articulate best practices for questionnaire design. Online questionnaire design has generally been guided by the principles applying to other self-administered instruments, such as paper-based questionnaires. Web-based questionnaires, however, have the potential…

  7. Galactic Archaeology: Current Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Wyse, Rosemary F G

    2016-01-01

    I present an overview of the science goals and achievements of ongoing spectroscopic surveys of individual stars in the nearby Universe. I include a brief discussion of the development of the field of Galactic Archaeology - using the fossil record in old stars nearby to infer how our Galaxy evolved and place the Milky Way in cosmological context.

  8. Qatar Exoplanet Survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alsubai, Khalid; Mislis, Dimitris; Tsvetanov, Zlatan I.

    2017-01-01

    We report the discovery of Qatar-3b, Qatar-4b, and Qatar-5b, three new transiting planets identified by the Qatar Exoplanet Survey. The three planets belong to the hot Jupiter family, with orbital periods of PQ3b=2.50792 days, PQ4b=1.80539 days, and PQ5b=2.87923 days. Follow-up spectroscopic...

  9. ATSDR Marines Health Survey

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-08-30

    This podcast gives an overview of the health survey ATSDR is conducting of more than 300,000 people who lived or worked at Camp Lejeune or Camp Pendleton in the 1970s and 1980s.  Created: 8/30/2011 by Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR).   Date Released: 8/30/2011.

  10. Interval Scheduling: A Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolen, A.W.J.; Lenstra, J.K.; Papadimitriou, C.H.; Spieksma, F.C.R.

    2007-01-01

    In interval scheduling, not only the processing times of the jobs but also their starting times are given. This article surveys the area of interval scheduling and presents proofs of results that have been known within the community for some time. We first review the complexity and approximability o

  11. The GAMA Panchromatic Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Driver, Simon P

    2013-01-01

    The Galaxy And Mass Assembly Survey (GAMA) has now been operating for almost 5 years gathering spectroscopic redshifts for five regions of sky spanning 300 sq degrees in total to a depth of r<19.8 mag. The survey has amassed over 225,000 redshifts making it the third largest redshift campaign after the SDSS and BOSS surveys. The survey has two novel features that set it apart: (1) complete and uniform sampling to a fixed flux limit (r<19.8 mag) regardless of galaxy clustering due to multiple-visits to each sky region, enabling the construction of high-fidelity catalogues of groups and pairs, (2) co-ordination with diverse imaging campaigns which together sample an extremely broad range along the electro-magnetic spectrum from the UV (GALEX) through optical (VST KIDs), near-IR (VISTA VIKING), mid-IR (WISE), far-IR (Herschel-Atlas), 1m (GMRT), and eventually 20cm continuum and rest-frame 21cm line measurements (ASKAP DINGO). Apart from the ASKAP campaign all multi-wavelength programmes are either complete...

  12. Membership Survey Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis M Bowie

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In an effort to gather feedback from Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS members, the Executive sent out a survey to the membership and received replies from approximately one-third of the membership. This was an attempt to look at the role of the CTS and what the members wanted from the CTS.

  13. IBM Small Business Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Business Machines Corp., Armonk, NY.

    A telephone survey conducted March 15-22, 1991, examined how small businesses are currently performing. Interviewees were 400 small business owners randomly selected from a Dun and Bradstreet list of companies with 50 or fewer employees. Major findings were as follows: (1) owners were survivors, highly confident in their own abilities, and…

  14. And the Survey Says ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Susan C.

    2013-01-01

    Two-Year Colleges, Physics Majors, and Diversity. As noted last month, we're taking a look at physics in two-year colleges (TYCs). We expect to have the first reports from our 2012-13 Nationwide Survey of High School Physics Teachers in the spring of 2014. Last month we noted that the high school physics experience of undergraduate physics…

  15. A call for surveys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernstein, Philip A.; Jensen, Christian S.; Tan, Kian-Lee

    2012-01-01

    The database field is experiencing an increasing need for survey papers. We call on more researchers to set aside time for this important writing activity. The database field is growing in population, scope of topics covered, and the number of papers published. Each year, thousands of new papers...

  16. 2007 Global Energy Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauzon, Jean-Claude; Preng, Richard; Sutton, Bob; Pavlovic, Bojan

    2007-06-15

    The World Energy Council (WEC), in partnership with Korn/Ferry International undertook a survey focussing on the topic ''Tackling the Three S's: Sustainability, Security and Strategy.'' More than 50 senior executives from the world's leading energy companies and their strategic suppliers were interviewed by Korn/Ferry International.

  17. An Astronomical Misconceptions Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoPresto, Michael C.; Murrell, Steven R.

    2011-01-01

    Misconceptions that students bring with them to the introductory science classroom plague every area of science and are especially prevalent in astronomy. One way to identify and possibly dispel some of these misconceptions is through the use of a misconceptions survey. The following is a report on the development, implementation, and some early…

  18. SURVEY ON SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, H. Thomas R.; Rakar, Fredrik

    2017-01-01

    This report is based on a survey sent to 150 representatives of social enterprises in Sweden, out of which 47 responded. Despite not being statistically representative due to the low response rate and the fact that Sweden lacks reliable data on the number of Swedish enterprises, according to the ...

  19. Surveys and Benchmarks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bers, Trudy

    2012-01-01

    Surveys and benchmarks continue to grow in importance for community colleges in response to several factors. One is the press for accountability, that is, for colleges to report the outcomes of their programs and services to demonstrate their quality and prudent use of resources, primarily to external constituents and governing boards at the state…

  20. A call for surveys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernstein, Philip A.; Jensen, Christian S.; Tan, Kian-Lee

    2012-01-01

    The database field is experiencing an increasing need for survey papers. We call on more researchers to set aside time for this important writing activity. The database field is growing in population, scope of topics covered, and the number of papers published. Each year, thousands of new papers ...

  1. A Rearmed Japan: Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    Japan started its initial rearmament effort. Japan’s defense expenditures have fluctuated from near 3% of GNP to as low...Klein, Donald W. " Japan 1979: The Second Oil Crisis’ Asian Survey, January 1980. Lee, William T. "Soviet Defense Expenditures in an Era of SALT." United...relationship to the options Japan can take. In very general terms, Japan has two options: to solely rely on the D.S.-Japanese Mutual Defense Treaty for

  2. Initial nonresponse and survey response mode biases in survey research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Donald L; Chen, Chao Ying

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated survey response factors (particularly initial nonresponse and survey mode) that may be associated with bias in survey research. We examined prevention-related beliefs and outcomes for initial mail survey responders (n=209), follow-up mail survey responders (n=78), and follow-up telephone survey responders (n=74). The Pearson chi-square test and analysis of variance identified beliefs and behavioral outcomes associated with survey response mode. Follow-up options to the initial mail survey improved response rates (22.0-38.0 percent). Initial mail survey responders more strongly believed topical fluoride protects teeth from cavities than others (P=0.04). A significantly larger proportion of parents completing a follow-up telephone survey (30.8 percent) refused topical fluoride for their child than those completing mail surveys (10.3-10.4 percent) (Psurveys with follow-up improve response rates. Initial nonresponse and survey response mode may be associated with biases in survey research. © 2015 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  3. Malheur NWR: Initial Survey Instructions for Trumpeter Swan - Winter Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The objective of the survey is to inform a regional effort to estimate the distribution and total number of wintering swans in Western North America. The survey...

  4. Volumetric Survey Speed: A Figure of Merit for Transient Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Bellm, Eric C

    2016-01-01

    Time-domain surveys can exchange sky coverage for revisit frequency, complicating the comparison of their relative capabilities. By using different revisit intervals, a specific camera may execute surveys optimized for discovery of different classes of transient objects. We propose a new figure of merit, the instantaneous volumetric survey speed, for evaluating transient surveys. This metric defines the trade between cadence interval and snapshot survey volume and so provides a natural means of comparing survey capability. The related metric of areal survey speed imposes a constraint on the range of possible revisit times: we show that many modern time-domain surveys are limited by the amount of fresh sky available each night. We introduce the concept of "spectroscopic accessibility" and discuss its importance for transient science goals requiring followup observing. We present an extension of the control time algorithm for cases where multiple consecutive detections are required. Finally, we explore how surv...

  5. The changing religious composition of Nigeria: causes and implications of demographic divergence

    OpenAIRE

    Stonawski, M.; Potančoková, M.; Cantele, M.; Skirbekk, V.

    2016-01-01

    At nearly 170 million inhabitants, Nigeria is Africa's most populous country by twofold and fertility levels remain higher than most other sub-Saharan African nations. Throughout the last several decades, the fertility gap between Christians and Muslims has widened with significant political implications for a nascent democracy. Where the Demographic Health Survey (DHS) survey of 1990 revealed a non-significant difference of 0·3 children, this figure had increased to 2·3 children by 2013. As ...

  6. The Princeton Variability Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Blake, C

    2002-01-01

    The Princeton Variability Survey (PVS) is a robotic survey which makes use of readily available, ``off-the-shelf'' type hardware products, in conjunction with a powerful set of commercial software products, in order to monitor and discover variable objects in the night sky. The main goal of the PVS has been to devise an automated telescope and data reduction system, requiring only moderate technical and financial resources to assemble, which may be easily replicated by the dedicated amateur, a student group, or a professional and used to study and discover a variety of variable objects, such as stars. This paper describes the hardware and software components of the PVS device, as well as observational results from the initial season of the PVS, including the discovery of a new bright variable star.

  7. Business Confidence Survey 2000

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Yan

    2009-01-01

    @@ In order to gain a better understanding about the depth and breadth of its effect on European companies'businesses,the new strategies they are adopting to cope with the crisis,and how their attitudes to towards China-including long-term plans-have changed in its aftermath,the European Union Chamber of Commerce in China today launches its sixth annual European Chamber Business Confidence Survey,which is published in partnership with Roland Berger Strategy Consultants in Beijing on June 30,2009.Drawing on the responses of more than 300 European companies active in China.the 2009 Survey highlights a European business community that remains bullish in China in most sectors and read to back up that confidence with continued investment in the local economy provided that Chinese government is committed to creating a more free,fair and competitive market.

  8. Cosmology with cluster surveys

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Subhabrata Majumdar

    2004-10-01

    Surveys of clusters of galaxies provide us with a powerful probe of the density and nature of the dark energy. The red-shift distribution of detected clusters is highly sensitive to the dark energy equation of state parameter . Upcoming Sunyaev–Zel'dovich (SZ) surveys would provide us large yields of clusters to very high red-shifts. Self-calibration of cluster scaling relations, possible for such a huge sample, would be able to constrain systematic biases on mass estimators. Combining cluster red-shift abundance with limited mass follow-up and cluster mass power spectrum can then give constraints on , as well as on 8 and to a few per cents.

  9. ARM User Survey Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roeder, LR

    2010-06-22

    The objective of this survey was to obtain user feedback to, among other things, determine how to organize the exponentially growing data within the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility, and identify users’ preferred data analysis system. The survey findings appear to have met this objective, having received approximately 300 responses that give insight into the type of work users perform, usage of the data, percentage of data analysis users might perform on an ARM-hosted computing resource, downloading volume level where users begin having reservations, opinion about usage if given more powerful computing resources (including ability to manipulate data), types of tools that would be most beneficial to them, preferred programming language and data analysis system, level of importance for certain types of capabilities, and finally, level of interest in participating in a code-sharing community.

  10. Oral syringe use survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, J N; Wedemeyer, H F

    1980-09-01

    Use of oral syringes at children's and ASHP-accredited residency hospitals in the United States was surveyed. Questionnaires were mailed to 131 hospitals; 117 (89.3%) were returned. Of the responding hospitals, 54.5% of children's hospitals and 67.1% of residency hospitals used oral syringes. There was no definite preference for a particular brand or type (glass vs. plastic) of syringe. Patients who often required liquid dosage forms, including pediatric and geriatric patients and patients with nasogastric tubes, were most frequently included in oral syringe distribution systems. Twenty-six of the 73 hospitals utilizing oral syringes used them for most unit dose liquids in all drug distribution systems. The remainder reported use for specific medications or circumstances. Expiration dating policies varied from 24 hours to one year to the manufacturer's expiration dating. The survey indicates widespread use of oral syringes and identifies a need for evaluation of medication stability in these devices.

  11. The Void Galaxy Survey

    CERN Document Server

    van de Weygaert, R; Platen, E; Beygu, B; van Gorkom, J H; van der Hulst, J M; Aragon-Calvo, M A; Peebles, P J E; Jarrett, T; Rhee, G; Kovac, K; Yip, C -W

    2011-01-01

    The Void Galaxy Survey (VGS) is a multi-wavelength program to study $\\sim$60 void galaxies. Each has been selected from the deepest interior regions of identified voids in the SDSS redshift survey on the basis of a unique geometric technique, with no a prior selection of intrinsic properties of the void galaxies. The project intends to study in detail the gas content, star formation history and stellar content, as well as kinematics and dynamics of void galaxies and their companions in a broad sample of void environments. It involves the HI imaging of the gas distribution in each of the VGS galaxies. Amongst its most tantalizing findings is the possible evidence for cold gas accretion in some of the most interesting objects, amongst which are a polar ring galaxy and a filamentary configuration of void galaxies. Here we shortly describe the scope of the VGS and the results of the full analysis of the pilot sample of 15 void galaxies.

  12. Emetophobia: preliminary results of an internet survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipsitz, J D; Fyer, A J; Paterniti, A; Klein, D F

    2001-01-01

    Through electronic mail, we surveyed members of an internet support group for emetophobia (fear of vomiting). Respondents were 50 women and 6 men with a mean age of 31 years. Results suggest that, for this sample, emetophobia is a disorder of early onset and chronic course, with highly persistent and intrusive symptoms. Emetophobia is implicated in social, home-marital, and occupational impairment and it causes significant constriction of leisure activities. Nearly half of women avoided or delayed becoming pregnant. About three quarters of respondents have eating rituals or significantly limit the foods they eat. Respondents describe other problems such as depression, panic attacks, social anxiety, compulsions, and frequent history of childhood separation anxiety.

  13. Global Management Education Graduate Survey, 2011. Survey Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Gregg

    2011-01-01

    Each year for the past 12 years, the Graduate Management Admission Council[R] (GMAC[R]) has conducted a survey of graduate management education students in their final year of business school. This Global Management Education Graduate Survey is distributed to students at participating business schools. The survey allows students to express their…

  14. 2012 Global Management Education Graduate Survey. Survey Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Each year for the past 13 years, the Graduate Management Admission Council (GMAC) has conducted a survey of graduate management education students in their final year of business school. The Global Management Education Graduate Survey is distributed to students at participating schools. The survey allows students to express their opinions about…

  15. Survey report: Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, M M

    1987-10-01

    With a population of 6.2 million, Haiti is one of the poorest, most densely populated countries in the Caribbean. According to a 1983 Contraceptive Prevalence Survey, fertility averages 6.2 children/woman compared with 6 children/woman in 1977. Moreover, the proportion of women in union practicing family planning declined from 14% in 1977 to 7% in 1983. Female sterilization increased slightly between 1977 and 1983, from 0.2 to 0.7% of women in union, but at the same time there were declines in the percentage of women using traditional methods such as withdrawal and rhythm as well as supply methods such as oral contraceptives and condoms. Concerns about health problems associated with use of the pill and the IUD were cited by many respondents in the 1983 survey as reasons for nonuse of modern methods. The increase in fertility has been created in part by a growing percentage of women in Haiti married or cohabitating. Of the 4321 respondents in the 1983 survey, 23% were married, 31% were cohabitating, and another 9% were in less stable unions. 10% of the formally married women and 7% of the women in noncohabitating unions used family planning compared with only 4% of cohabitating women. Women who had some secondary education were 2-3 times more likely to use contraception, while urban women had use rates twice those of rural residents. Another concern is the high infant mortality rate--107 deaths/1000 births in 1977--caused by poor sanitation and limited access to health services. 77% of Haitian mothers surveyed had given birth at home. 63% had received some prenatal care, but only 22% sought postnatal care. On the other hand, over 90% of the mothers breastfed their infants and over 80% of children over 5 years of age had been vaccinated against the major childhood diseases.

  16. Quality Culture Survey Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Pritesh; Baker, Denyse; Burdick, Rick; Chen, Cylia; Hill, Jonathon; Holland, Morgan; Sawant, Anil

    2015-01-01

    The Parenteral Drug Association conducted an anonymous global survey of quality culture in the pharmaceutical industry to determine whether there is a relationship between certain quality behaviors and certain quality attributes, and whether these quality attributes could be used as surrogates (or proxy variables) to assess quality culture. Other studies have shown that an unhealthy quality culture is a root cause of many quality or compliance issues seen by sites and organizations. Statistical analysis of survey data suggests that certain attributes are driving good behaviors, and the demographic data suggests that this relationship holds irrespective of the geographic location of the site. Executive survey respondents had a more optimistic view of the current state of quality culture than survey respondents at large, with cross-functional vision showing the biggest gap (P-value = 0.07, F-Test). The top five quality attributes that can serve as surrogates for quality culture were (1) Management communication that quality is everyone's responsibility, (2) Site has formal quality improvement objectives and targets, (3) Clear performance criteria for feedback and coaching, (4) Quality topics included in at least half of all-hands meetings, and (5) Collecting error prevention metrics. These identified mature quality attributes are related to management responsibility, and continual improvement of the pharmaceutical quality system sections of ICH Q10, and therefore may be amenable to be incorporated in audit programs or in regulatory inspections. Additional research and discussion is required to build a coherent approach, which the pharmaceutical industry and regulators can adopt. © PDA, Inc. 2015.

  17. Mescaline: a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, R H

    1988-04-01

    The hallucinogen mescaline is found in the peyote and San Pedro cacti, which are prevalent in Mexico and the southwestern United States. In a survey of middle-class, predominantly white adolescents in a drug treatment facility, 18 percent of the respondents indicated that they had taken mescaline. Much of the purported mescaline was probably another hallucinogen, usually LSD. The effects of equipotent doses of mescaline and LSD are almost indistinguishable.

  18. The WFCAM Transit Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hodgkin S.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The WFCAM Transit Survey (WTS has been obtaining data on the United Kingdom Infrared Telescope since 2007. The WTS targets about 8,000 M dwarfs over several square degrees of sky, and aims to find low-mass eclipsing binaries and planets, down to the size of the Earth, transiting M dwarf stars with periods up to a few days.

  19. Robotic and Survey Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woźniak, Przemysław

    Robotic telescopes are revolutionizing the way astronomers collect their dataand conduct sky surveys. This chapter begins with a discussion of principles thatguide the process of designing, constructing, and operating telescopes andobservatories that offer a varying degree of automation, from instruments remotelycontrolled by observers to fully autonomous systems requiring no humansupervision during their normal operations. Emphasis is placed on designtrade-offs involved in building end-to-end systems intended for a wide range ofscience applications. The second part of the chapter contains descriptions ofseveral projects and instruments, both existing and currently under development.It is an attempt to provide a representative selection of actual systems thatillustrates state of the art in technology, as well as important ideas and milestonesin the development of the field. The list of presented instruments spans the fullrange in size starting from small all-sky monitors, through midrange robotic andsurvey telescopes, and finishing with large robotic instruments and surveys.Explosive growth of telescope networking is enabling entirely new modesof interaction between the survey and follow-up observing. Increasingimportance of standardized communication protocols and software is stressed.These developments are driven by the fusion of robotic telescope hardware,massive storage and databases, real-time knowledge extraction, and datacross-correlation on a global scale. The chapter concludes with examplesof major science results enabled by these new technologies and futureprospects.

  20. Onychomycosis. A Mexican survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas, Roberto; Bonifaz, Alexandro; Padilla, Ma Carmen; Arce, Martín; Atoche, Carlos; Barba, José; Campos, Pablo; Fernández, Ramón; Mayorga, Jorge; Nazar, Dulce; Ocampo, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    Onychomycosis is a nail infection caused by dermatophytes, Candida and molds. We aimed to obtain an estimated frequency of onychomycosis in out-patients in private practice through a survey in ten representative cities of Mexico. 12,637 ambulatory patients voluntarily agreed to participate in this National Survey, answering 17 questions on onychomycosis, regardless if they had or did not have any clinical suspicion of onychomycosis. 53% of them were seen for the first time and their main complaint was not onychomycosis. The study was performed in the private offices of 300 physicians in different cities. 48% were clinically diagnosed with onychomycosis. Toenails were affected in 88%, fingernails in 5% and both in 7%. Onychomycosis was diagnosed more frequently in the nails of the first toes and of the thumbs. The main complaint was nail thickening and aesthetic changes. Other associated diseases were diabetes (22%) and arterial hypertension (21%). This survey showed the high frequency of onychomycosis. An intentional search with mycological confirmation is needed in out-patients attending general practice with other complaints, to detect undiagnosed cases.

  1. The VMC survey

    CERN Document Server

    Cioni, Maria-Rosa L

    2015-01-01

    The VISTA survey of the Magellanic Clouds system (VMC) is a public survey project of the European Southern Observatory. It is collecting multi-band near-infrared data across large areas of the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds, the Magellanic Bridge and a few fields in the Magellanic Stream. The combination of great sensitivity to stars below the old main sequence turn off, and the multiplicity at Ks band (at least 12 epochs) make VMC highly suitable for the determination of the spatially resolved star formation history and three-dimensional geometry, using variable stars such as Cepheids and RR Lyrae stars. The VMC observations are progressing well and will be completed in 2018. The VMC survey has a high legacy value and many science results have already been published, e.g. the most detailed star formation history map of the Small Magellanic Cloud, and others are in preparation, e.g. a comprehensive investigation of classical Cepheids and a study of the proper motion in the foreground 47 Tuc cluster.

  2. The Einstein Slew Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvis, Martin; Plummer, David; Schachter, Jonathan; Fabbiano, G.

    1992-01-01

    A catalog of 819 sources detected in the Einstein IPC Slew Survey of the X-ray sky is presented; 313 of the sources were not previously known as X-ray sources. Typical count rates are 0.1 IPC count/s, roughly equivalent to a flux of 3 x 10 exp -12 ergs/sq cm s. The sources have positional uncertainties of 1.2 arcmin (90 percent confidence) radius, based on a subset of 452 sources identified with previously known pointlike X-ray sources (i.e., extent less than 3 arcmin). Identifications based on a number of existing catalogs of X-ray and optical objects are proposed for 637 of the sources, 78 percent of the survey (within a 3-arcmin error radius) including 133 identifications of new X-ray sources. A public identification data base for the Slew Survey sources will be maintained at CfA, and contributions to this data base are invited.

  3. 2013 mask industry survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malloy, Matt

    2013-09-01

    A comprehensive survey was sent to merchant and captive mask shops to gather information about the mask industry as an objective assessment of its overall condition. 2013 marks the 12th consecutive year for this process. Historical topics including general mask profile, mask processing, data and write time, yield and yield loss, delivery times, maintenance, and returns were included and new topics were added. Within each category are multiple questions that result in a detailed profile of both the business and technical status of the mask industry. While each year's survey includes minor updates based on feedback from past years and the need to collect additional data on key topics, the bulk of the survey and reporting structure have remained relatively constant. A series of improvements is being phased in beginning in 2013 to add value to a wider audience, while at the same time retaining the historical content required for trend analyses of the traditional metrics. Additions in 2013 include topics such as top challenges, future concerns, and additional details in key aspects of mask masking, such as the number of masks per mask set per ground rule, minimum mask resolution shipped, and yield by ground rule. These expansions beyond the historical topics are aimed at identifying common issues, gaps, and needs. They will also provide a better understanding of real-life mask requirements and capabilities for comparison to the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS).

  4. Career prospects for graduating nuclear medicine residents: survey of nuclear medicine program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harolds, Jay A; Guiberteau, Milton J; Metter, Darlene F; Oates, M Elizabeth

    2013-08-01

    There has been much consternation in the nuclear medicine (NM) community in recent years regarding the difficulty many NM graduates experience in securing initial employment. A survey designed to determine the extent and root causes behind the paucity of career opportunities was sent to all 2010-2011 NM residency program directors. The results of that survey and its implications for NM trainees and the profession are presented and discussed in this article.

  5. Alaska waterfowl production survey, 1968

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the Waterfowl Production and Habitat Survey for Alaska during 1968. The primary purpose of the survey is to provide information on duck...

  6. Mid-winter Waterfowl Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Mid-winter Waterfowl Survey is a nationwide effort to survey waterfowl in areas of major concentration on their wintering grounds and provide winter distribution...

  7. Assessment of Established Survey Protocols

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A form and instructions for quickly and briefly assessing a previously (prior to 2013) reviewed or approved survey protocol for use as a National or Regional survey...

  8. Alaska duck production surveys: 1990

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the duck production survey for Alaska during 1990. The primary purpose of the survey is to provide information on duck production from the...

  9. Nowitna NWR swan surveys, 1988

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the results of aerial surveys and a ground species identification survey that was conducted on the Nowitna National Wildlife Refuge in 1988....

  10. SURVEY, HAMILTON COUNTY, FL, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  11. SURVEY, CALHOUN COUNTY, FL, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  12. SURVEY, LIBERTY COUNTY, FL, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  13. SURVEY, WASHINGTON COUNTY, FL, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  14. The WEAVE disk dynamics survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Famaey, B.; Antoja, T.; Romero-Gomez, M.; Siebert, A.; Babusiaux, C.; Di Matteo, P.; Figueras, F.; Fragkoudi, F.; Garzon-Lopez, F.; Gonzalez-Fernandez, C.; Martinez-Valpuesta, I.; Monari, G.; Mor-Crespo, R.; Hill, V.

    2016-12-01

    WEAVE is the next-generation wide-field survey facility for the William Herschel Telescope. It consists of a multi-object fibre spectrograph with a 2°-diameter field of view that can obtain ˜ 1000 spectra simultaneously. The "WEAVE Galactic Archaeology survey" is the survey focused on the Milky Way, as a complement to the Gaia space mission, and will start operating in early 2018. This survey is subdivided in four sub-surveys, among which the "WEAVE disk dynamics survey". This survey plans to measure the radial velocities (and abundances as far as possible) of ˜ 10^6 stars with magnitude 15speed? -, as well as (iii) about their influence on secular processes such as stellar radial migration are essential elements for a better understanding of the chemo-dynamical evolution of our Galaxy, and of galaxies in general. This survey is designed to answer these questions.

  15. SURVEY, CAMPBELL COUNTY, KY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  16. SURVEY, KNOX COUNTY, TN, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  17. SURVEY, SAINT MARY'S COUNTY, MD

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The field survey data for this coastal study includes a field report that exhibits photos and transect information collected in the field survey phase of the study....

  18. SURVEY, SILVER BOW COUNTY, MT

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  19. SURVEY, MASON COUNTY, KY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  20. SURVEY, MAGOFFIN COUNTY, KY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  1. SURVEY, LOS ANGELES COUNTY, CALIFORNIA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  2. SURVEY, KENTON COUNTY, KY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  3. Nowitna NWR wolf survey, 1988

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the results of an aerial wolf survey that was conducted on the Nowitna National Wildlife Refuge in April of 1988. Survey flightlines followed...

  4. SURVEY, St Lucie County, FL

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  5. SURVEY, Charles COUNTY, MD, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  6. Geodetic Survey Water Level Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Over one million images of National Coast & Geodetic Survey (now NOAA's National Geodetic Survey/NGS) forms captured from microfiche. Tabular forms and charts...

  7. SURVEY, LA PAZ COUNTY, ARIZONA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  8. SURVEY, JEFFERSON DAVIS COUNTY, MS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  9. SURVEY, NEW HAVEN COUNTY, CT

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  10. SURVEY, LEVY COUNTY, FL, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  11. FIELD SURVEY, YAVAPAI COUNTY, AZ

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  12. SURVEY, PIKE COUNTY, KY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  13. SURVEY, Virginia Beach City, VA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The field survey data for this coastal study includes a field report that exhibits photos and transect information collected in the field survey phase of the study....

  14. SURVEY, SHELBY COUNTY, TN, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  15. SURVEY, GADSDEN COUNTY, FL, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  16. SURVEY, HAMILTON COUNTY, FL, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  17. SURVEY, GREENUP COUNTY, KY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  18. SURVEY, HANCOCK COUNTY, KY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  19. SURVEY, FRANKLIN COUNTY, KY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  20. SURVEY, LEWIS COUNTY, KY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  1. SURVEY, KNOX COUNTY, TN, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  2. Sport Management Survey. Employment Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quain, Richard J.; Parks, Janet B.

    1986-01-01

    A survey of sport management positions was designed to determine projected vacancy rates in six sport management career areas. Respondents to the survey were also questioned regarding their awareness of college professional preparation programs. Results are presented. (MT)

  3. Soils - NRCS Web Soil Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — Web Soil Survey (WSS) provides soil data and information produced by the National Cooperative Soil Survey. It is operated by the USDA Natural Resources Conservation...

  4. SURVEY, TODD COUNTY, MN, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  5. SURVEY, Newport News City, VA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The field survey data for this coastal study includes a field report that exhibits photos and transect information collected in the field survey phase of the study....

  6. SURVEY, SANTA CRUZ COUNTY, AZ

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  7. FIELD SURVEY, Androscoggin, MAINE USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  8. FIELD SURVEY DUKES COUNTY, MA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  9. FIELD SURVEY, SUSQUEHANNA COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  10. SURVEY, MILLE LACS COUNTY, MN

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  11. Mount Tom Survey Summary 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report provides recommendations regarding breeding landbirds, herpetofauna, invertebrates, and rare plant surveys and which surveys should be conducted in 2005....

  12. FIELD SURVEY PROVIDENCE COUNTY, RI

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  13. Implications of recent MINER$\

    CERN Document Server

    Wolcott, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Among the most important tasks of neutrino oscillation experiments is correctly estimating the parent neutrino energy from the by-products of their interactions. Large uncertainties in our current understanding of such processes can significantly hamper this effort. We explore several recent measurements made using the \\mnv{} detector in the few-GeV NuMI muon neutrino beam at Fermilab: the differential cross-section vs. $Q^2$ for charged-current quasi-elastic scattering, the differential cross-sections vs. pion angle and pion kinetic energy for resonant single charged pion production, and the differential cross-sections vs. pion angle and kinetic energy for coherent pion production. We furthermore discuss their implications for energy reconstruction in oscillation measurements.

  14. Implications of social structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brask, Josefine Bohr

    Social systems in nature are characterised by heterogeneous social structures. The pattern of social interactions or associations between individuals within populations (i.e. their social network) is typically non-random. Such structuring may have important implications for the expression......, we investigate empirically the role of the social environment of individuals for their communication patterns. Our study species is a song bird, the black-capped chickadee (Poecile atricapillus). The results suggest that individual communication in this species is influenced by features of the local...... social environment of the individual. In the last two studies, we investigate the role of social structure for cooperation in a classic natural system for behavioural research, the Trinidadian guppy (Poecilia reticulata), by means of computer simulations. Cooperation contradicts evolutionary theory...

  15. EuroGeoSurveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demicheli, L.; Ludden, J. N.; Robida, F.

    2012-04-01

    In order to create safe, healthy and wealthy places to live in, it is vital that we understand our planet. At national level the collection of information on the state of the solid Earth and its processes is normally mandated to Geological Surveys. In fact, a Geological Survey is the national institution responsible for the geological inventory, monitoring, knowledge and research for the security, health and prosperity of the society. And EuroGeoSurveys (EGS) is the organisation representing the Geological Surveys from 33 countries around Europe. With one member for each country of the European Union and beyond, including the Russian Federation and Ukraine, the EGS network covers the whole continent. EGS'principal purpose is to provide geoscientific knowledge that underpins European policies and regulations for the benefit of society. Naturally, in our day-to-day activities, we contribute to the merging of economic, environmental and social agendas. Engaging a joint workforce of several thousands of geoscientists, also involving regional geological surveys in Germany, Italy and Spain, we strive to be the first body to be contacted when there is an international need for European geodata, or'geo-help'. For this reason we work on a daily basis with the EU institutions, and are considered the natural source of information on Earth science issues and relevant downstream applications in Europe. Our General Secretariat is based in the European Quarter of Brussels close to the European Commission, the EU Council, the European Parliament, and the political seat of NATO. Our operational strategy is based on the cooperation between national institutions, which enables to synergistically integrate both information and activities of our member organisations. This has allowed us to make significant progress over the years, permitting geology to become a topic deserving great attention on the European agenda. In order to enable a quick but high quality response to requests for

  16. Preventing pitfalls in patient surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiber, S R

    1989-05-01

    Properly conceived, customer satisfaction surveys can yield the quantitative data needed to gauge patient satisfaction. But, as the author notes, these surveys can be "a veritable mine field of surprises for the uninitiated." This article, the last in a three-part series on measuring patient satisfaction, describes potential pitfalls and discusses the merits of in-person, mail and telephone surveys.

  17. The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hynes, Robert I.; Jonker, P.G.; Bassa, C. G.; Dieball, A.; Greiss, S.; Maccarone, T. J.; Nelemans, G.; Steeghs, D.; Torres, M. A. P.; Britt, C. T.; Clem, J. L.; Gossen, L.; Grindlay, J. E.; Groot, P.J.; Kuiper, L.; Kuulkers, E.; Mendez, M.; Mikles, V. J.; Ratti, E. M.; Rea, N.; van Haaften, L.; Wijnands, R.; in't Zand, J. J. M.

    2011-01-01

    The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey (CGBS) is a shallow but wide survey of two approximately 6x1 degree strips of the Galactic Bulge about a degree above and below the plane. The survey by design targets regions where extinction and crowding are manageable and optical counterparts are accessible to de

  18. The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hynes, Robert I.; Jonker, P. G.; Bassa, C. G.; Nelemans, G.; Steeghs, D.; Torres, M. A. P.; Maccarone, T. J.; Greiss, S.; Clem, J.; Dieball, A.; Mikles, V. J.; Britt, C. T.; Gossen, L.; Collazzi, A. C.; Wijnands, R.; In't Zand, J. J. M.; Mendez, M.; Rea, N.; Kuulkers, E.; Ratti, E. M.; van Haaften, L. M.; Heinke, C.; Ozel, F.; Groot, P. J.; Verbunt, F.

    2012-01-01

    The Chandra Galactic Bulge Survey (GBS) is a shallow but wide survey of two approximately 6x1 degree strips of the Galactic Bulge about a degree above and below the plane. The survey by design targets regions where extinction and crowding are manageable and optical counterparts are accessible to det

  19. 77 FR 19032 - Geological Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-29

    ... No: 2012-7479] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Geological Survey Announcement of National Geospatial Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY: U.S. Geological Survey, Interior. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY... Arista Maher at the U.S. Geological Survey (703-648-6283, amaher@usgs.gov ). Registrations are due...

  20. Development, Evaluation and Use of a Student Experience Survey in Undergraduate Science Laboratories: The Advancing Science by Enhancing Learning in the Laboratory Student Laboratory Learning Experience Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrie, Simon C.; Bucat, Robert B.; Buntine, Mark A.; Burke da Silva, Karen; Crisp, Geoffrey T.; George, Adrian V.; Jamie, Ian M.; Kable, Scott H.; Lim, Kieran F.; Pyke, Simon M.; Read, Justin R.; Sharma, Manjula D.; Yeung, Alexandra

    2015-07-01

    Student experience surveys have become increasingly popular to probe various aspects of processes and outcomes in higher education, such as measuring student perceptions of the learning environment and identifying aspects that could be improved. This paper reports on a particular survey for evaluating individual experiments that has been developed over some 15 years as part of a large national Australian study pertaining to the area of undergraduate laboratories-Advancing Science by Enhancing Learning in the Laboratory. This paper reports on the development of the survey instrument and the evaluation of the survey using student responses to experiments from different institutions in Australia, New Zealand and the USA. A total of 3153 student responses have been analysed using factor analysis. Three factors, motivation, assessment and resources, have been identified as contributing to improved student attitudes to laboratory activities. A central focus of the survey is to provide feedback to practitioners to iteratively improve experiments. Implications for practitioners and researchers are also discussed.

  1. Dutch perfusion incident survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groenenberg, Ingrid; Weerwind, Patrick W; Everts, Peter A M; Maessen, Jos G

    2010-09-01

    Cardiopulmonary bypass procedures remain complex, involving many potential risks. Therefore, a nationwide retrospective study was conducted to gain insight into the number of incidents and accidents in Dutch adult perfusion practice. An anonymous postal survey (85 questions about hardware, disposables, fluids and medication, air emboli, anticoagulation, practice, and safety measures) was sent to all Dutch perfusionists involved in adult cardiovascular perfusion during 2006 and 2007. To guarantee complete anonymity, respondents were asked to return the survey to a notary who discarded personal information. The net response rate was 72% and covered 23,500 perfusions. Individual respondents performed 240 ± 103 perfusions during the 2-year study period and had 13.8 ± 8.7 years of practical experience. The incident rate was 1 per 15.6 perfusions and the adverse event rate was 1 per 1,236 perfusions. The three most reported incidents were: (1) persistent inability to raise the activated coagulation time above 400s during perfusion (184 incidents); (2) an allergic or anaphylactic reaction to drugs, fluids, or blood products (114 incidents); and (3) clotting formation in the extracorporeal circuit (74 incidents). Furthermore, pre-bypass safety measures showed no statistically significant association with the reported incidents. In comparison with data from the recent literature, the reported number of incidents is high. Nevertheless, the adverse outcome rate is well matched to other published surveys. The relatively high response rate conveys the impression that the Dutch perfusionist is vigilant and willing to report incidents. Hence, a web-based Dutch perfusion incident registration system is recommended.

  2. Game engines: a survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Andrade

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to hardware limitations at the origin of the video game industry, each new game was generally coded from the ground up. Years later, from the evolution of hardware and the need for quick game development cycles, spawned the concept of game engine. A game engine is a reusable software layer allowing the separation of common game concepts from the game assets (levels, graphics, etc.. This paper surveys fourteen different game engines relevant today, ranging from the industry-level to the newcomer-friendlier ones.

  3. LAMOST Quasar Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Xue-Bing

    2011-01-01

    The main objective of the Chinese LAMOST spectroscopic quasar survey is to discover 0.4 million new quasars from 1 million quasar candidates brighter than the magnitude limit i=20.5 in the next 5 years. This will hopefully provide the largest quasar sample for the further studies of AGN physics and cosmology. The improved quasar selection criteria based on the UKIDSS near-IR and SDSS optical colors are presented, and their advantages in uncovering the missing quasars in the quasar 'redshift desert' are demonstrated. In addition, some recent discoveries of new quasars during the LAMOST commissioning phase are presented.

  4. Survey of Mobile Robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-01

    STANDARDS-1963-A IMY Techical Report ND. 450-90G-1R-ODWa p. 00 SURVEY OF MOBLE ROBOTS ’ Anita N& Flym Research Scientist !; "IT Artificlal Intelligence...case of an attempt at system building before the technology for the components was available. 1.3 The Stanford Cart 1973-1981 From 1973 to 1981, work...autonomous and yet still exhibit a high level of sophistication. Rapidly changing technology , including both the advent of the home computer and

  5. Risk analysis methodology survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batson, Robert G.

    1987-01-01

    NASA regulations require that formal risk analysis be performed on a program at each of several milestones as it moves toward full-scale development. Program risk analysis is discussed as a systems analysis approach, an iterative process (identification, assessment, management), and a collection of techniques. These techniques, which range from simple to complex network-based simulation were surveyed. A Program Risk Analysis Handbook was prepared in order to provide both analyst and manager with a guide for selection of the most appropriate technique.

  6. The Hubble Space Telescope advanced camera for surveys coma cluster survey. I. Survey objectives and design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carter, David; Goudfrooij, Paul; Mobasher, Bahram; Ferguson, Henry C.; Puzia, Thomas H.; Aguerri, Alfonso L.; Balcells, Marc; Batcheldor, Dan; Bridges, Terry J.; Davies, Jonathan I.; Erwin, Peter; Graham, Alister W.; Guzmán, Rafael; Hammer, Derek; Hornschemeier, Ann; Hoyos, Carlos; Hudson, Michael J.; Huxor, Avon; Jogee, Shardha; Komiyama, Yutaka; Lotz, Jennifer; Lucey, John R.; Marzke, Ronald O.; Merritt, David; Miller, Bryan W.; Miller, Neal A.; Mouhcine, Mustapha; Okamura, Sadanori; Peletier, Reynier F.; Phillipps, Steven; Poggianti, Bianca M.; Sharples, Ray M.; Smith, Russell J.; Trentham, Neil; Tully, R. Brent; Valentijn, Edwin; Verdoes Kleijn, Gijs

    2008-01-01

    We describe the HST ACS Coma Cluster Treasury survey, a deep two-passband imaging survey of one of the nearest rich clusters of galaxies, the Coma Cluster (Abell 1656). The survey was designed to cover an area of 740 arcmin2 in regions of different density of both galaxies and intergalactic medium w

  7. Policy Implications for Using ICTs for Empowerment of Rural Women in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwapong, Olivia Adwoa Tiwaah Frimpong

    2008-01-01

    Using rural household survey data collected from 1000 female household heads selected from all the ten administrative regions in Ghana, this paper explored the policy implications for using ICTs for empowerment of rural women. A contingent valuation (CV) method was used to quantitatively estimate the influence of selected socio-economic factors on…

  8. Predominant Teaching Strategies in Schools: Implications for Curriculum Implementation in Mathematics, Science and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achuonye, Keziah Akuoma

    2015-01-01

    This descriptive survey is hinged on predominant teaching strategies in schools, implications for curriculum implementation in Mathematics, Science and Technology. Target population consisted of teachers in primary, secondary and tertiary schools. However, purposive sample of 900 respondents was drawn from the six BRACED states namely Bayelsa,…

  9. University-Industry Relations in Bolivia: Implications for University Transformations in Latin America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Jurado, Jaider; Fernandez-de-Lucio, Ignacio; Huanca, Ronald

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the implications of how academics respond to the debate on the production of knowledge and its transfer to the productive sector, for the transformation of Latin American universities. The empirical analysis is based on a survey of 349 lecturers from Bolivian public universities, which inquired into aspects of…

  10. Teens and Their Technologies in High School and College: Implications for Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Barbara; Bernhisel, Steven

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of two surveys comparing the frequency and use of various digital and communication technologies by high school and college students. Differences between populations, implications for teaching, and questions for further study are explored. Results suggest high school teens may bring facility with newer technologies…

  11. The Implications of Differences between Employer and Worker Employment/Earnings Reports for Policy Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Geoffrey L.; Haveman, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Differences in administrative (UI) and survey (S) records on employment and earnings have substantial implications for assessing the impact of a variety of public interventions, such as welfare-to-work and employment training programs, and especially the state-oriented welfare reform legislation of 1996. We use data from the 1998 and 1999 waves of…

  12. Predominant Teaching Strategies in Schools: Implications for Curriculum Implementation in Mathematics, Science and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achuonye, Keziah Akuoma

    2015-01-01

    This descriptive survey is hinged on predominant teaching strategies in schools, implications for curriculum implementation in Mathematics, Science and Technology. Target population consisted of teachers in primary, secondary and tertiary schools. However, purposive sample of 900 respondents was drawn from the six BRACED states namely Bayelsa,…

  13. Pedagogical Implications of Score Distribution Pattern and Learner Satisfaction in an Intensive TOEIC Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Che Chang

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed at investigating TOEIC score distribution patterns and learner satisfaction in an intensive TOEIC course and drew implications for pedagogical practice. A one-group pre-test post-test experiment and a survey on learner satisfaction were conducted on Taiwanese college EFL students (n = 50) in a case study. Results showed that the…

  14. Investigating Policy Implications for the Abolition of Corporal Punishment in Secondary Schools in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindiki, Jonah Nyaga

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to investigate policy implications for the abolition of corporal punishment in secondary schools in Kenya. Adopting a survey design, using questionnaires, interviews and documentation, a sample of 355 was selected from target population of 3228 teachers, students and parents. The data were analysed thematically.…

  15. Learning-Inhibiting Problems Experienced by Middle School Teachers: Implications for Staff Development

    OpenAIRE

    Dillard, Patricia Hutcherson

    2000-01-01

    Learning-Inhibiting Problems Experienced by Middle School Teachers: Implications for Staff Development Patricia H. Dillard (ABSTRACT) This study sought to determine if there were statistically significant differences between years of teaching experience and education relative to learning-inhibiting problems in the classroom. These differences were measured by responses on surveys, classroom observations, review of summative teacher appraisal instruments and focus group...

  16. Innovation for Transformation in Nigeria University Education: Implications for the Production of Critical and Creative Thinkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onu, V. C.; Eskay, M. K.; Obiyo, N. O.; Igbo, J. N.; Ezeanwu, A. B.

    2012-01-01

    This descriptive survey research studied innovation for transformation in Nigeria university education: implications for the production of critical and creative thinkers. Thus, students' perception of knowledge generation and dissemination by university lecturers were elicited. From a population of registered students in a Nigerian university, 200…

  17. Biodigester User Survey Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandararot, K.; Dannet, L.

    2007-06-15

    In May 2005, SNV and the Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (MAFF) agreed to a joint development of a National Biodigester Programme (NBP) in Cambodia as a way to create an indigenous, sustainable energy source in the country and to utilize the potential of biogas in the country. The overall objective of the first phase of the National Biodigester Programme is 'The dissemination of domestic biodigesters as an indigenous, sustainable energy source through the development of a commercial, market oriented, biodigester sector in selected provinces of Cambodia'. The program aims to support the construction of 17,500 biodigesters in at least 6 provinces over the period of 2006 to 2009. To gain insights and feedbacks on the impacts of their activities to date, NBP commissioned the Cambodia Institute of Development Study (CIDS) to carry out a Biodigester User Survey in January 2007. The purpose of the survey is to evaluate the effects of domestic biodigester installations, as supported by the program, on 100 households in 3 provinces in Cambodia- Kampong Cham, Kandal and Svay Rieng.

  18. BLAST: the Redshift Survey

    CERN Document Server

    Eales, Stephen; Devlin, Mark J; Dye, Simon; Halpern, Mark; Hughes, David H; Marsden, Gaelen; Mauskopf, Philip; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Netterfield, Calvin B; Pascale, Enzo; Patanchon, Guillaume; Raymond, Gwenifer; Rex, Marie; Scott, Douglas; Semisch, Christopher; Siana, Brian; Truch, Matthew D P; Viero, Marco P

    2009-01-01

    The Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) has recently surveyed ~=8.7 deg^2 centered on GOODS-South at 250, 350 and 500 microns. In Dye et al. (2009) we presented the catalogue of sources detected at $\\rm 5\\sigma$ in at least one band in this field and the probable counterparts to these sources in other wavebands. In this paper, we present the results of a redshift survey in which we succeeded in measuring redshifts for 83 of these counterparts. We have used the spectroscopic redshifts to carry out a test of the ability of photometric redshift methods to estimate the redshifts of dusty galaxies. We have also investigated the cases where there are two possible counterparts to the BLAST source, finding that in at least half of these there is evidence that the two galaxies are physically associated, either because they are interacting or because they are in the same large-scale structure. Finally, we have made the first direct measurements of the luminosity function in the three BLAST band...

  19. Implications of antisocial parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torry, Zachary D; Billick, Stephen B

    2011-12-01

    Antisocial behavior is a socially maladaptive and harmful trait to possess. This can be especially injurious for a child who is raised by a parent with this personality structure. The pathology of antisocial behavior implies traits such as deceitfulness, irresponsibility, unreliability, and an incapability to feel guilt, remorse, or even love. This is damaging to a child's emotional, cognitive, and social development. Parents with this personality makeup can leave a child traumatized, empty, and incapable of forming meaningful personal relationships. Both genetic and environmental factors influence the development of antisocial behavior. Moreover, the child with a genetic predisposition to antisocial behavior who is raised with a parental style that triggers the genetic liability is at high risk for developing the same personality structure. Antisocial individuals are impulsive, irritable, and often have no concerns over their purported responsibilities. As a parent, this can lead to erratic discipline, neglectful parenting, and can undermine effective care giving. This paper will focus on the implications of parents with antisocial behavior and the impact that this behavior has on attachment as well as on the development of antisocial traits in children.

  20. The relationship between marriage and family therapists and complementary and alternative medicine approaches: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Karen L; Winek, Jon L; Becvar, Dorothy S

    2006-01-01

    Respondents to a mail survey of a random sample (N = 424) of Clinical Members of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy provided information about their contexts of practice, use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), and relationships with CAM providers. Consistent with both national trends and the experience of psychologists as reported in a similar survey, the results of this survey suggest that marriage and family therapists have been affected significantly by and have a growing awareness of CAM practices. Limitations of the study and implications for the field are discussed.