WorldWideScience

Sample records for surrounding interstellar matter

  1. The Interstellar Cloud Surrounding the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, P. C.

    Ultraviolet spectral data of nearby stars indicate that the cloud surrounding the solar system has an average neutral density n(HI)~0.1 cm-3, temperature ~6800 K, and turbulence ~1.7 km/s. Comparisons between the anomalous cosmic ray data and ultraviolet data suggest that the electron density is in the range n(e-)~0.22 to 0.44 cm-3. This cloud is flowing past the Sun from a position centered in the Norma-Lupis region. The cloud properties are consistent with interstellar gas which originated as material evaporated from the surfaces of embedded clouds in the Scorpius-Centaurus Association, and which was then displaced towards the Sun by a supernova event about 4 Myrs ago. The Sun and surrounding cloud velocities are nearly perpendicular in space, and this cloud is sweeping past the Sun. The morphology of this cloud can be reconstructed by assuming that the cloud moves in a direction parallel to the surface normal. With this assumption, the Sun entered the surrounding cloud 2000 to 8000 years ago, and is now about 0.05 to 0.16 pc from the cloud surface. Prior to its recent entry into the surrounding cloud complex, the Sun was embedded in a region of space with average density lower than 0.0002 cm-3. If a denser cloud velocity component seen towards alpha Cen A,B is real, it will encounter the solar system within 50,000 yr. The nearby magnetic field seen upwind has a spatial orientation that is parallel to the cloud surface. The nearby star Sirius is viewed through the wake of the solar system, but this direction also samples the hypothetical cloud interface. Comparisons of anomalous cosmic ray and interstellar absorption line data suggest that trace elements in the surrounding cloud are in ionization equilibrium. Data towards nearby white dwarfs indicate partial helium ionization, N(N(HI)(/N(HeI)>~13.7, which is consistent with pickup ion data within the solar system if less than 40% hydrogen ionization occurs in the heliopause region. However, the white dwarfs may

  2. The interstellar cloud surrounding the Sun -- a new perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Gry, Cecile

    2014-01-01

    Aims: We offer a new, simpler picture of the local interstellar medium around the Sun (LISM) made of a single continuous cloud enveloping the Sun. This new outlook enables the description of a diffuse cloud from within and brings to light some unexpected properties. Methods: We re-examine the kinematics and abundances of the local interstellar medium, as revealed by the published results for the ultraviolet absorption lines of MgII, FeII and HI. Results: In contrast to previous representations, our new picture of the LISM consists of a single, monolithic cloud that surrounds the Sun in all directions and accounts for most of the matter present in the first 50 parsecs around the Sun. The cloud fills the space around us out to about 9 pc in most directions, although its boundary is very irregular with possibly a few extensions up to 20 pc. The cloud does not behave like a rigid body: gas within the cloud is being differentially decelerated in the direction of motion, and the cloud is expanding in directions per...

  3. The interstellar cloud surrounding the Sun: a new perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gry, Cécile; Jenkins, Edward B.

    2014-07-01

    Aims: We offer a new, simpler picture of the local interstellar medium, made of a single continuous cloud enveloping the Sun. This new outlook enables the description of a diffuse cloud from within and brings to light some unexpected properties. Methods: We re-examine the kinematics and abundances of the local interstellar gas, as revealed by the published results for the ultraviolet absorption lines of Mg II, Fe II, and H I. Results: In contrast to previous representations, our new picture of the local interstellar medium consists of a single, monolithic cloud that surrounds the Sun in all directions and accounts for most of the matter present in the first 50 parsecs around the Sun. The cloud fills the space around us out to about 9 pc in most directions, although its boundary is very irregular with possibly a few extensions up to 20 pc. The cloud does not behave like a rigid body: gas within the cloud is being differentially decelerated in the direction of motion, and the cloud is expanding in directions perpendicular to this flow, much like a squashed balloon. Average H I volume densities inside the cloud vary between 0.03 and 0.1 cm-3 over different directions. Metals appear to be significantly depleted onto grains, and there is a steady increase in depletion from the rear of the cloud to the apex of motion. There is no evidence that changes in the ionizing radiation influence the apparent abundances. Secondary absorption components are detected in 60% of the sight lines. Almost all of them appear to be interior to the volume occupied by the main cloud. Half of the sight lines exhibit a secondary component moving at about -7.2 km s-1 with respect to the main component, which may be the signature of a shock propagating toward the cloud's interior.

  4. Sh2-205: I. The surrounding interstellar medium

    CERN Document Server

    Romero, G A

    2008-01-01

    We present a study of the HII region Sh2-205 and its environs, based on data obtained from the CGPS, 12CO observations, and MSX data. We find that Sh2-205 can be separated in three independent optical structures: SH149.25--0.0, SH 148.83-0.67, and LBN 148.11-0.45. The derived spectral indices show the thermal nature of SH 148.83--0.67 and LBN 148.11--0.45. The morphology of SH 148.83--0.67, both in the optical and radio data, along with the energetic requ irements indicate that this feature is an interstellar bubble powered by the UV photons of HD 24431 (O9 III). LBN 148.11--0.45 has the morphology of a classic al HII region and their ionizing sources remain uncertain. Dust and molecular gas are found related to LBN 148.11-0.45.Particularly, a photodissociation region is detected at the interface between the ionized and molecular regions. If the proposed exciting star HD 24094 were an O8--O9 type star, as suggested by its near-infrared colors, its UV photon flux would be enough to explain the ionization of th...

  5. Detection of organic matter in interstellar grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendleton, Y J

    1997-06-01

    Star formation and the subsequent evolution of planetary systems occurs in dense molecular clouds, which are comprised, in part, of interstellar dust grains gathered from the diffuse interstellar medium (DISM). Radio observations of the interstellar medium reveal the presence of organic molecules in the gas phase and infrared observational studies provide details concerning the solid-state features in dust grains. In particular, a series of absorption bands have been observed near 3.4 microns (approximately 2940 cm-1) towards bright infrared objects which are seen through large column densities of interstellar dust. Comparisons of organic residues, produced under a variety of laboratory conditions, to the diffuse interstellar medium observations have shown that aliphatic hydrocarbon grains are responsible for the spectral absorption features observed near 3.4 microns (approximately 2940 cm-1). These hydrocarbons appear to carry the -CH2- and -CH3 functional groups in the abundance ratio CH2/CH3 approximately 2.5, and the amount of carbon tied up in this component is greater than 4% of the cosmic carbon available. On a galactic scale, the strength of the 3.4 microns band does not scale linearly with visual extinction, but instead increases more rapidly for objects near the Galactic Center. A similar trend is noted in the strength of the Si-O absorption band near 9.7 microns. The similar behavior of the C-H and Si-O stretching bands suggests that these two components may be coupled, perhaps in the form of grains with silicate cores and refractory organic mantles. The ubiquity of the hydrocarbon features seen in the near infrared near 3.4 microns throughout out Galaxy and in other galaxies demonstrates the widespread availability of such material for incorporation into the many newly forming planetary systems. The similarity of the 3.4 microns features in any organic material with aliphatic hydrocarbons underscores the need for complete astronomical observational

  6. Dark matter properties implied by gamma ray interstellar emission models

    OpenAIRE

    Balázs, Csaba; Li, Tong

    2016-01-01

    We infer dark matter properties from gamma ray residuals extracted using eight different interstellar emission scenarios proposed by the Fermi-LAT Collaboration to explain the Galactic Center gamma ray excess. Adopting the most plausible simplified ansatz, we assume that the dark matter particle is a Majorana fermion interacting with standard fermions via a scalar mediator. Using this theoretical hypothesis and the Fermi residuals we calculate Bayesian evidences, including Fermi-LAT exclusion...

  7. Dark matter properties implied by gamma ray interstellar emission models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balázs, Csaba; Li, Tong

    2017-02-01

    We infer dark matter properties from gamma ray residuals extracted using eight different interstellar emission scenarios proposed by the Fermi-LAT Collaboration to explain the Galactic Center gamma ray excess. Adopting the most plausible simplified ansatz, we assume that the dark matter particle is a Majorana fermion interacting with standard fermions via a scalar mediator. To trivially respect flavor constraints, we only couple the mediator to third generation fermions. Using this theoretical hypothesis, and the Fermi residuals, we calculate Bayesian evidences, including Fermi-LAT exclusion limits from 15 dwarf spheroidal galaxies as well. Our evidence ratios single out one of the Fermi scenarios as most compatible with the simplified dark matter model. In this scenario the dark matter (mediator) mass is in the 25-200 (1-1000) GeV range and its annihilation is dominated by bottom quark final state. Our conclusion is that the properties of dark matter extracted from gamma ray data are highly sensitive to the modeling of the interstellar emission.

  8. The interplay between the young stellar super cluster Westerlund 1, and the surrounding interstellar medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrasco L.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the multi-band (CO, HI and Spitzer maps, large-scale (150 pc gaseous structure around Westerlund 1, the most massive known superstar cluster in the Milky Way, with the intention of exploring the effect of feedback from massive stars in this young (age < 5 Myr cluster on the surrounding interstellar medium. We find no traces of the parental molecular cloud in the immediate vicinity of the cluster, instead this volume is partially filled by HI gas. On the other hand, there are two giant molecular clouds, both moving away from the cluster at 5–10 km s−1, at distances of around 50–150 pc. There are several ultra-compact HII regions associated with these giant molecular clouds. All these events suggest that the cluster has played an important role in re-structuring the ISM, in the form of ejecting the molecular gas, as well as triggering secondary star formation.

  9. The Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX): Tracing the Interaction between the Heliosphere and Surrounding Interstellar Material with Energetic Neutral Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Frisch, Priscilla C

    2010-01-01

    The Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) mission is exploring the frontiers of the heliosphere where energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) are formed from charge exchange between interstellar neutral hydrogen atoms and solar wind ions and pickup ions. The geography of this frontier is dominated by an unexpected nearly complete arc of ENA emission, now known as the IBEX 'Ribbon'. While there is no consensus agreement on the Ribbon formation mechanism, it seems certain this feature is seen for sightlines that are perpendicular to the interstellar magnetic field as it drapes over the heliosphere. At the lowest energies, IBEX also measures the flow of interstellar H, He, and O atoms through the inner heliosphere. The asymmetric helium profile suggests that a secondary flow of helium is present, such as would be expected if some fraction of helium is lost through charge exchange in the heliosheath regions. The detailed spectra characterized by the ENAs provide time-tagged samples of the energy distributions of the under...

  10. Dark matter properties implied by gamma ray interstellar emission models

    CERN Document Server

    Balázs, Csaba

    2016-01-01

    We infer dark matter properties from gamma ray residuals extracted using eight different interstellar emission scenarios proposed by the Fermi-LAT Collaboration to explain the Galactic Center gamma ray excess. Adopting the most plausible simplified ansatz, we assume that the dark matter particle is a Majorana fermion interacting with standard fermions via a scalar mediator. Using this theoretical hypothesis and the Fermi residuals we calculate Bayesian evidences, including Fermi-LAT exclusion limits from 15 dwarf spheroidal galaxies as well. Our Bayes factors single out four of the Fermi scenarios as compatible with the simplified dark matter model. In the most preferred scenario the dark matter (mediator) mass is in the 100-500 (1-200) GeV range and its annihilation is dominated by top quark final state. Less preferred but still plausible is annihilation into b\\bar{b} and tau^+tau^- final states with an order of magnitude lower dark matter mass. Our conclusion is that the properties of dark matter extracted ...

  11. A new perspective on the interstellar cloud surrounding the Sun from UV absorption line results

    CERN Document Server

    Gry, Cecile

    2014-01-01

    We offer a new, more inclusive, picture of the local interstellar medium, where it is composed of a single, monolithic cloud that surrounds the Sun in all directions. Our study of velocities based on Mg II and Fe II ultraviolet absorption lines indicates that the cloud has an average motion consistent with the velocity vector of gas impacting the heliosphere and does not behave like a rigid body: gas within the cloud is being differentially decelerated in the direction of motion, and the cloud is expanding in directions perpendicular to this flow, much like the squashing of a balloon. The outer boundary of the cloud is in average 10 pc away from us but is highly irregular, being only a few parsecs away in some directions, with possibly a few extensions up to 20 pc. Average H I volume densities vary between 0.03 and 0.1 cm-3 over different sight lines. Metals appear to be significantly depleted onto grains, and there is a steady increase in this effect from the rear of the cloud to the apex of motion. There is...

  12. Properties of interstellar wind leading to shape morphology of the dust surrounding HD 61005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pástor, P.

    2017-08-01

    Aims: A structure formed by dust particles ejected from the debris ring around HD 61005 is observed in the scattered light. The main aim here is to constrain interstellar wind parameters that lead to shape morphology in the vicinity of HD 61005 using currently available observational data for the debris ring. Methods: Equation of motion of 2 × 105 dust particles ejected from the debris ring under the action of the electromagnetic radiation, stellar wind, and interstellar wind is solved. A two-dimensional (2D) grid is placed in a given direction for accumulation of the light scattered on the dust particles in order to determine the shape morphology. The interaction of the interstellar wind and the stellar wind is considered. Results: Groups of unknown properties of the interstellar wind that create the observed morphology are determined. A relation between number densities of gas components in the interstellar wind and its relative velocity is found. Variations of the shape morphology caused by the interaction with the interstellar clouds of various temperatures are studied. When the interstellar wind velocity is tilted from debris ring axis a simple relation between the properties of the interstellar wind and an angle between the line of sight and the interstellar wind velocity exists. Dust particles that are most significantly influenced by stellar radiation move on the boundary of observed structure. Conclusions: Observed structure at HD 61005 can be explained as a result of dust particles moving under the action of the interstellar wind. Required number densities or velocities of the interstellar wind are much higher than that of the interstellar wind entering the solar system.

  13. Interstellar and Solar System Organic Matter Preserved in Interplanetary Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messenger, Scott; Nakamura-Messenger, Keiko

    2015-01-01

    Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected in the Earth's stratosphere derive from collisions among asteroids and by the disruption and outgassing of short-period comets. Chondritic porous (CP) IDPs are among the most primitive Solar System materials. CP-IDPs have been linked to cometary parent bodies by their mineralogy, textures, C-content, and dynamical histories. CP-IDPs are fragile, fine-grained (less than um) assemblages of anhydrous amorphous and crystalline silicates, oxides and sulfides bound together by abundant carbonaceous material. Ancient silicate, oxide, and SiC stardust grains exhibiting highly anomalous isotopic compositions are abundant in CP-IDPs, constituting 0.01 - 1 % of the mass of the particles. The organic matter in CP-IDPs is isotopically anomalous, with enrichments in D/H reaching 50x the terrestrial SMOW value and 15N/14N ratios up to 3x terrestrial standard compositions. These anomalies are indicative of low T (10-100 K) mass fractionation in cold molecular cloud or the outermost reaches of the protosolar disk. The organic matter shows distinct morphologies, including sub-um globules, bubbly textures, featureless, and with mineral inclusions. Infrared spectroscopy and mass spectrometry studies of organic matter in IDPs reveals diverse species including aliphatic and aromatic compounds. The organic matter with the highest isotopic anomalies appears to be richer in aliphatic compounds. These materials also bear similarities and differences with primitive, isotopically anomalous organic matter in carbonaceous chondrite meteorites. The diversity of the organic chemistry, morphology, and isotopic properties in IDPs and meteorites reflects variable preservation of interstellar/primordial components and Solar System processing. One unifying feature is the presence of sub-um isotopically anomalous organic globules among all primitive materials, including IDPs, meteorites, and comet Wild-2 samples returned by the Stardust mission.

  14. Two-component model of the interaction of an interstellar cloud with surrounding hot plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Provornikova, E. A.; Izmodenov, V. V.; Lallement, R.

    2011-01-01

    We present a two-component gasdynamic model of an interstellar cloud embedded in a hot plasma. It is assumed that the cloud consists of atomic hydrogen gas, interstellar plasma is quasineutral. Hydrogen atoms and plasma protons interact through a charge exchange process. Magnetic felds and radiative processes are ignored in the model. The influence of heat conduction within plasma on the interaction between a cloud and plasma is studied. We consider the extreme case and assume that hot plasma...

  15. Two-component model of the interaction of an interstellar cloud with surrounding hot plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Provornikova, E A; Lallement, R

    2011-01-01

    We present a two-component gasdynamic model of an interstellar cloud embedded in a hot plasma. It is assumed that the cloud consists of atomic hydrogen gas, interstellar plasma is quasineutral. Hydrogen atoms and plasma protons interact through a charge exchange process. Magnetic felds and radiative processes are ignored in the model. The influence of heat conduction within plasma on the interaction between a cloud and plasma is studied. We consider the extreme case and assume that hot plasma electrons instantly heat the plasma in the interaction region and that plasma flow can be described as isothermal. Using the two-component model of the interaction of cold neutral cloud and hot plasma, we estimate the lifetime of interstellar clouds. We focus on the clouds typical for the cluster of local interstellar clouds embedded in the hot Local Bubble and give an estimate of the lifetime of the Local interstellar cloud where the Sun currently travels. The charge transfer between highly charged plasma ions and neutr...

  16. Absorption variability as a probe of the multiphase interstellar media surrounding active galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Macquart, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    We examine a model for the variable free-free and neutral hydrogen absorption inferred towards the cores of some compact radio galaxies in which a spatially fluctuating medium drifts in front of the source. We relate the absorption-induced intensity fluctuations to the statistics of the underlying opacity fluctuations. We investigate models in which the absorbing medium consists of either discrete clouds or a power-law spectrum of opacity fluctuations. We examine the variability characteristics of a medium comprised of Gaussian-shaped clouds in which the neutral and ionized matter are co-located, and in which the clouds comprise spherical constant-density neutral cores enveloped by ionized sheaths. The cross-power spectrum indicates the spatial relationship between neutral and ionized matter, and distinguishes the two models, with power in the Gaussian model declining as a featureless power-law, but that in the ionized sheath model oscillating between positive and negative values. We show how comparison of th...

  17. Interstellar chemistry recorded in organic matter from primitive meteorites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busemann, Henner; Young, Andrea F; Alexander, Conel M O'd; Hoppe, Peter; Mukhopadhyay, Sujoy; Nittler, Larry R

    2006-05-05

    Organic matter in extraterrestrial materials has isotopic anomalies in hydrogen and nitrogen that suggest an origin in the presolar molecular cloud or perhaps in the protoplanetary disk. Interplanetary dust particles are generally regarded as the most primitive solar system matter available, in part because until recently they exhibited the most extreme isotope anomalies. However, we show that hydrogen and nitrogen isotopic compositions in carbonaceous chondrite organic matter reach and even exceed those found in interplanetary dust particles. Hence, both meteorites (originating from the asteroid belt) and interplanetary dust particles (possibly from comets) preserve primitive organics that were a component of the original building blocks of the solar system.

  18. Black holes with surrounding matter in scalar-tensor theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Vitor; Carucci, Isabella P; Pani, Paolo; Sotiriou, Thomas P

    2013-09-13

    We uncover two mechanisms that can render Kerr black holes unstable in scalar-tensor gravity, both associated with the presence of matter in the vicinity of the black hole and the fact that this introduces an effective mass for the scalar. Our results highlight the importance of understanding the structure of spacetime in realistic, astrophysical black holes in scalar-tensor theories.

  19. X-Ray Spectroscopy of diffuse Galactic Interstellar Matter with Chandra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Norbert S.; Paerels, Frits

    One of the expectations with the advent of the High Energy Transmission Grating (HETG) spectrometer onboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory was to measure precise photoelectric edges of major cosmic elements such as O, Ne, Mg, Si, S, Ar, Ca, and Fe. Early studies revealed complex absorption structures around the O K, Fe L, and Ne K edges which were identified with absorption from the various phases of the interstellar medium and which could place limits on ionization fractions in these phases. The dust content in interstellar matter as well as, for example, the fraction of how much oxygen is locked into dust are issues of importance and here resolved X-ray edges can determine significant limits. I will review predictions made by cross-sections and depletion factors and compare with current observations specifically with respect to silicon absorption in the interstellar medium. Dust grain models and in conjunction with laboratory measurements are now used to improve current interstellar X-ray absorption models.

  20. Physics of antimatter-matter reactions for interstellar propulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, D.L. Jr.

    1986-08-22

    At the stage of the antiproton-nucleon annihilation chain of events relevant to propulsion the annihilation produces energetic charged pions and gamma rays. If annihilation occurs in a complex nucleus, protons, neutrons, and other nuclear fragments are also produced. The charge, number, and energy of the annihilation products are such that annihilation rocket engine concepts involving relatively low specific impulse (I/sub sp/ approx. = 1000 to 2000 s) and very high I/sub sp/ (3 x 10/sup 7/ s) appear feasible and have efficiencies on the order of 50% for annihilation energy to propulsion energy conversion. At I/sub sp/'s of around 15,000 s, however, it may be that only the kinetic energy of the charged nuclear fragments can be utilized for propulsion in engines of ordinary size. An estimate of this kinetic energy was made from known pieces of experimental and theoretical information. Its value is about 10% of the annihilation energy. Control over the mean penetration depth of protons into matter prior to annihilation is necessary so that annihilation occurs in the proper region within the engine. Control is possible by varying the antiproton kinetic energy to obtain a suitable annihilation cross section. The annihilation cross section at low energies is on the order of or larger than atomic areas due to a rearrangement reaction, but it is very low at high energy where its value is closer to nuclear areas.

  1. Laboratory experimental simulations: Chemical evolution of the organic matter from interstellar and cometary ice analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Mrad, N.; Vinogradoff, V.; Duverney, F.; Danger, G.; Theulé, P.; Borget, F.; Chiavassa, T.

    2015-01-01

    This contribution addresses the different approaches that are developed in our laboratory to study the chemical evolution of organic matter in stellar or interplanetary environments. In the first approach, starting from interstellar or cometary ice analogs subjected to different energy processes (thermal, photochemical), we aim to explain the mechanism of formation of key molecules (RING project: Reactivity in INterstellar ice Grains) such as HMT, POM or amino acid precursors that are or may be detected in future space missions. In a second approach, we are interested in the detection of volatile molecules sublimating from ice analogs when these latter are heated and/or irradiated (VAHIIA project: Volatile Analysis from the Heating of Interstellar Ice Analogs) through an online experimental device coupling the simulation chamber where ices are formed to a GC-MS instrument. The objective is thus to simulate the effects of the ice material warming when a young star forms or when a comet becomes active. This project provides an inventory of molecules that can be found in hot corinos or in the gaseous phase of comets. In a third approach, we analyze the organic matter contained in the refractory residues that can be considered as cometary analogs (RAHIIA Project: Residue Analysis from the Heating of Interstellar Ice Analogs) using very high resolution mass spectrometry (VHRMS). The results of these analyses show that residues present an important molecular diversity. This technique gives also the possibility to determine the elementary composition of these residues that can be compared to the meteorite composition. These residues can then be a basic material to develop, in a specific planetary environment, a prebiotic chemistry.

  2. Diffuse interstellar bands (DIB): co-planar doubly excited He and metal atoms embedded in Rydberg Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Holmlid, Leif

    2011-01-01

    The interpretation of the more than 300 diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) is one of the most long-standing problems in interstellar spectra since the two first bands were reported in 1921. We now predict the frequencies of 260 diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) using the Rydberg Matter model we have developed previously. These transitions involve mainly He atoms, but other two-electron atoms like Ca and other metals can take part in the absorption processes. Approximately 70% of the total intensity of the DIBs is due to absorption in doubly excited states and 30% in singly excited He atoms. The doubly excited states are in inverted states while the He atoms are thermal. The possibilities to observe DIBs in the UV and NIR ranges are discussed and band positions are predicted.

  3. Copernicus observations of interstellar matter in the direction of HR 1099

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, R. C.; Weiler, E. J.

    1978-01-01

    Results are reported for high-resolution Copernicus U1 and V2 scans of the bright RS CVn spectroscopic binary HR 1099. The observations reveal strong UV emission lines at L-alpha and Mg II h and k from the stars as well as interstellar H I and D I L-alpha absorption lines and interstellar Mg II h and k absorption in the direction of the binary system. Column densities, bulk velocities, and temperatures are derived for the interstellar features. A comparison of the derived number density of interstellar H I with data for the nearby star Epsilon Eri indicates an inhomogeneous distribution of interstellar hydrogen along the line of sight. The range of values obtained for the D/H ratio is shown to be consistent with results of other studies. A depletion factor of at least 5 with respect to the solar abundance is estimated for the interstellar magnesium.

  4. Interstellar Extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gontcharov, G. A.

    2016-12-01

    This review describes our current understanding of interstellar extinction. This differ substantially from the ideas of the 20th century. With infrared surveys of hundreds of millions of stars over the entire sky, such as 2MASS, SPITZER-IRAC, and WISE, we have looked at the densest and most rarefied regions of the interstellar medium at distances of a few kpc from the Sun. Observations at infrared and microwave wavelengths, where the bulk of the interstellar dust absorbs and radiates, have brought us closer to an understanding of the distribution of the dust particles on scales of the Galaxy and the universe. We are in the midst of a scientific revolution in our understanding of the interstellar medium and dust. Progress in, and the key results of, this revolution are still difficult to predict. Nevertheless, (a) a physically justified model has been developed for the spatial distribution of absorbing material over the nearest few kiloparsecs, including the Gould belt as a dust container, which gives an accurate estimate of the extinction for any object just by its galactic coordinates. It is also clear that (b) the interstellar medium contains roughly half the mass of matter in the galactic vicinity of the solar system (the other half is made up of stars, their remnants, and dark matter) and (c) the interstellar medium and, especially, dust, differ substantially in different regions of space and deep space cannot be understood by only studying near space.

  5. Copernicus observations of interstellar matter toward the Orion OB1 association. I - Epsilon and Pi-5 Orionis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shull, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    Copernicus UV data on interstellar lines toward Epsilon Ori and Pi-5 Ori are analyzed to study abundances and physical conditions in both low- and intermediate-velocity components. Clouds at -8 and +5 km/s (LSR) toward Epsilon Ori show typical depletions of Fe, Ti, Mg, and Si in dense (H number density about 100 per cu cm) gas. Low-column-density intermediate-velocity clouds toward both stars, with low densities (hydrogen number density less than 1 per cu cm) and near-cosmic Si abundances, are consistent with a widespread pattern of high-velocity gas over a 15-deg area surrounding the Orion region. Such activity may be attributed to the repeated action of supernovae in a patchy low-density region of interstellar gas.

  6. Impact of Particulate Matter Exposure and Surrounding "Greenness" on Chronic Absenteeism in Massachusetts Public Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNaughton, Piers; Eitland, Erika; Kloog, Itai; Schwartz, Joel; Allen, Joseph

    2017-02-20

    Chronic absenteeism is associated with poorer academic performance and higher attrition in kindergarten to 12th grade (K-12) schools. In prior research, students who were chronically absent generally had fewer employment opportunities and worse health after graduation. We examined the impact that environmental factors surrounding schools have on chronic absenteeism. We estimated the greenness (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI)) and fine particulate matter air pollution (PM2.5) within 250 m and 1000 m respectively of each public school in Massachusetts during the 2012-2013 academic year using satellite-based data. We modeled chronic absenteeism rates in the same year as a function of PM2.5 and NDVI, controlling for race and household income. Among the 1772 public schools in Massachusetts, a 0.15 increase in NDVI during the academic year was associated with a 2.6% (p value absenteeism rates, and a 1 μg/m³ increase in PM2.5 during the academic year was associated with a 1.58% (p value absenteeism rates. Based on these percentage changes in chronic absenteeism, a 0.15 increase in NDVI and 1 μg/m³ increase in PM2.5 correspond to 25,837 fewer students and 15,852 more students chronically absent each year in Massachusetts respectively. These environmental impacts on absenteeism reinforce the need to protect green spaces and reduce air pollution around schools.

  7. The impact of a massive star cluster on its surrounding matter in the Antennae overlap region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, C. N.; Boulanger, F.

    2017-04-01

    Super star clusters (SSCs), likely the progenitors of globular clusters, are one of the most extreme forms of star formation. Understanding how SSCs form is an observational challenge. Theoretical studies establish that, to form such clusters, the dynamical timescale of their parent clouds has to be shorter than the timescale of the disruption of their parent clouds by stellar feedback. However, due to insufficient observational support, it is still unclear how feedback from SSCs acts on the matter surrounding them. Studying feedback in SSCs is essential to understanding how such clusters form. Based on ALMA and VLT observations, we study this process in a SSC in the overlap region of the Antennae galaxies (22 Mpc), a spectacular example of a burst of star formation triggered by the encounter of two galaxies. We analyze a unique massive ( 107M⊙) and young (1-3.5 Myr) SSC, still associated with compact molecular and ionized gas emission, which suggest that it may still be embedded in its parent molecular cloud. The cluster has two CO velocity components, a low-velocity one spatially associated with the cluster, and a high-velocity one distributed in a bubble-like shape around the cluster. Our results on the low-velocity component suggest that this gas did not participate in the formation of the SSC. We propose that most of the parent cloud has already been blown away, accelerated at the early stages of the SSC evolution by radiation pressure, in a timescale 1 Myr. The high-velocity component may trace outflowing molecular gas from the parent cloud. Supporting evidence is found in shock-heated H2 gas and escaping Brγ gas associated with this component. The low-velocity component may be gas that was near the SSC when it formed but not part of its parent cloud or clumps that migrated from the SGMC environment. This gas would be dispersed by stellar winds and supernova explosions. The existing data is inconclusive as to whether or not the cluster is bound and will

  8. The galactic interstellar medium

    CERN Document Server

    Burton, WB; Genzel, R

    1992-01-01

    This volume contains the papers of three extended lectures addressing advanced topics in astronomy and astrophysics. The topics discussed include the most recent observational data on interstellar matter outside our galaxy and the physics and chemistry of molecular clouds.

  9. Interstellar Ices

    CERN Document Server

    Boogert, A C A

    2003-01-01

    Currently ~36 different absorption bands have been detected in the infrared spectra of cold, dense interstellar and circumstellar environments. These are attributed to the vibrational transitions of ~17 different molecules frozen on dust grains. We review identification issues and summarize the techniques required to extract information on the physical and chemical evolution of these ices. Both laboratory simulations and line of sight studies are essential. Examples are given for ice bands observed toward high mass protostars, fields stars and recent work on ices in disks surrounding low mass protostars. A number of clear trends have emerged in recent years. One prominent ice component consists of an intimate mixture between H2O, CH3OH and CO2 molecules. Apparently a stable balance exists between low temperature hydrogenation and oxidation reactions on grain surfaces. In contrast, an equally prominent ice component, consisting almost entirely of CO, must have accreted directly from the gas phase. Thermal proc...

  10. High-resolution extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy of G191-B2B: structure of the stellar photosphere and the surrounding interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barstow, M. A.; Cruddace, R. G.; Kowalski, M. P.; Bannister, N. P.; Yentis, D.; Lapington, J. S.; Tandy, J. A.; Hubeny, I.; Schuh, S.; Dreizler, S.; Barbee, T. W.

    2005-10-01

    We have continued our detailed analysis of the high-resolution (R= 4000) spectroscopic observation of the DA white dwarf G191-B2B, obtained by the Joint Astrophysical Plasmadynamic Experiment (J-PEX) normal incidence sounding rocket-borne telescope, comparing the observed data with theoretical predictions for both homogeneous and stratified atmosphere structures. We find that the former models give the best agreement over the narrow waveband covered by J-PEX, in conflict with what is expected from previous studies of the lower resolution but broader wavelength coverage Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer spectra. We discuss the possible limitations of the atomic data and our understanding of the stellar atmospheres that might give rise to this inconsistency. In our earlier study, we obtained an unusually high ionization fraction for the ionized HeII present along the line of sight to the star. In the present paper, we obtain a better fit when we assume, as suggested by Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph results, that this HeII resides in two separate components. When one of these is assigned to the local interstellar cloud, the implied He ionization fraction is consistent with measurements along other lines of sight. However, the resolving power and signal-to-noise available from the instrument configuration used in this first successful J-PEX flight are not sufficient to clearly identify and prove the existence of the two components.

  11. Particulate matter in the indoor air of classrooms—exploratory results from Munich and surrounding area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromme, H.; Twardella, D.; Dietrich, S.; Heitmann, D.; Schierl, R.; Liebl, B.; Rüden, H.

    in humidity by 10%, by 0.5 μg m -3 per increase in CO 2 indoor concentration by 100 ppm, and a decrease by 2.8 μg m -3 in 5-7th grade classes and by 7.3 μg m -3 in class 8-11 compared to 1-4th class. During the winter period, the associations were stronger regarding class level, reverse regarding humidity (a decrease by 6.4 μg m -3 per increase in 10% humidity) and absent regarding CO 2 indoor concentration. The median PNC measured in 36 classrooms ranged between 2622 and 12,145 particles cm -3 (median: 5660 particles cm -3). The results clearly show that exposure to particulate matter in school is high. The increased PM concentrations in winter and their correlation with high CO 2 concentrations indicate that inadequate ventilation plays a major role in the establishment of poor indoor air quality. Additionally, the increased PM concentration in low level classes and in rooms with high number of pupils suggest that the physical activity of pupils, which is assumed to be more pronounced in younger children, contributes to a constant process of resuspension of sedimented particles. Further investigations are necessary to increase knowledge on predictors of PM concentration, to assess the toxic potential of indoor particles and to develop and test strategies how to ensure improved indoor air quality in schools.

  12. Using IBEX data to constrain the heliosphere's large-scale structure: interstellar neutral gas and the Warm Breeze

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bzowski, Maciej; McComas, David; Galli, Andre; Kucharek, Harald; Wurz, Peter; Sokol, Justyna M.; Schwadron, Nathan; Heirtzler, David M.; Kubiak, M. Marzena A.; Möbius, Eberhard; Fuselier, Stephen; Swaczyna, Paweł; Leonard, Trevor; Park, Jeewoo

    2016-07-01

    The large-scale structure of the heliosphere is governed by the interaction of the partly ionized, magnetized interstellar gas and the magnetized, fully ionized solar wind, structured in heliolatitude. Determining factors of this interaction are the density and flow velocity of interstellar gas relative to the Sun, the Mach number of this flow and the strength and inclination of the interstellar magnetic field to the flow vector at the interstellar side, and the magnitude of dynamic pressure of solar wind and the strength of its embedded magnetic field at the solar side. As a result of charge exchange interactions operating in the boundary region between the heliosphere and interstellar matter, a new population of neutral atoms is created, in addition to the population of unperturbed interstellar neutral gas. Both of these populations penetrate deep inside the heliosphere, where they can be sampled by the first space probe dedicated to observations of the heliosphere and its immediate surroundings by means of neutral atoms: the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX). Due to distortion of the heliosphere from axial symmetry, the secondary population of interstellar neutrals, created via charge exchange between the plasma flowing past the heliopause and the unperturbed pristine neutral interstellar gas, appears to be coming from a different direction than the unperturbed interstellar neutral flow. These two directions should be coplanar with the plane defined by the local interstellar magnetic field and the flow direction of the unperturbed gas. IBEX provides an unprecedented opportunity to study and interpret these relations. The IBEX science team have recently accomplished important milestones in researching the primary and secondary populations of interstellar gas and their relation to the local interstellar magnetic fields. First, the temperature and velocity vector of the inflowing interstellar neutral gas has been determined with unprecedented robustness based

  13. Interstellar PAHs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allamandola, Louis J.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Tremendous strides have been made in our understanding of interstellar material over the past twenty years thanks to significant, parallel developments in two closely related areas: observational astronomy and laboratory astrophysics. Twenty years ago the composition of interstellar dust was largely guessed at and the notion of abundant, gas phase, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) anywhere in the interstellar medium (ISM) considered impossible. Today the dust composition of the diffuse and dense ISM is reasonably well constrained and the spectroscopic case for interstellar PAHs, shockingly large molecules by early interstellar chemistry standards, is very strong.

  14. Impact of Particulate Matter Exposure and Surrounding “Greenness” on Chronic Absenteeism in Massachusetts Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNaughton, Piers; Eitland, Erika; Kloog, Itai; Schwartz, Joel; Allen, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Chronic absenteeism is associated with poorer academic performance and higher attrition in kindergarten to 12th grade (K-12) schools. In prior research, students who were chronically absent generally had fewer employment opportunities and worse health after graduation. We examined the impact that environmental factors surrounding schools have on chronic absenteeism. We estimated the greenness (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI)) and fine particulate matter air pollution (PM2.5) within 250 m and 1000 m respectively of each public school in Massachusetts during the 2012–2013 academic year using satellite-based data. We modeled chronic absenteeism rates in the same year as a function of PM2.5 and NDVI, controlling for race and household income. Among the 1772 public schools in Massachusetts, a 0.15 increase in NDVI during the academic year was associated with a 2.6% (p value absenteeism rates, and a 1 μg/m3 increase in PM2.5 during the academic year was associated with a 1.58% (p value absenteeism rates. Based on these percentage changes in chronic absenteeism, a 0.15 increase in NDVI and 1 μg/m3 increase in PM2.5 correspond to 25,837 fewer students and 15,852 more students chronically absent each year in Massachusetts respectively. These environmental impacts on absenteeism reinforce the need to protect green spaces and reduce air pollution around schools. PMID:28230752

  15. The Local Interstellar Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Redfield, S

    2006-01-01

    The Local Interstellar Medium (LISM) is a unique environment that presents an opportunity to study general interstellar phenomena in great detail and in three dimensions. In particular, high resolution optical and ultraviolet spectroscopy have proven to be powerful tools for addressing fundamental questions concerning the physical conditions and three-dimensional (3D) morphology of this local material. After reviewing our current understanding of the structure of gas in the solar neighborhood, I will discuss the influence that the LISM can have on stellar and planetary systems, including LISM dust deposition onto planetary atmospheres and the modulation of galactic cosmic rays through the astrosphere - the balancing interface between the outward pressure of the magnetized stellar wind and the inward pressure of the surrounding interstellar medium. On Earth, galactic cosmic rays may play a role as contributors to ozone layer chemistry, planetary electrical discharge frequency, biological mutation rates, and cl...

  16. Impact of Particulate Matter Exposure and Surrounding “Greenness” on Chronic Absenteeism in Massachusetts Public Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piers MacNaughton

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Chronic absenteeism is associated with poorer academic performance and higher attrition in kindergarten to 12th grade (K-12 schools. In prior research, students who were chronically absent generally had fewer employment opportunities and worse health after graduation. We examined the impact that environmental factors surrounding schools have on chronic absenteeism. We estimated the greenness (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI and fine particulate matter air pollution (PM2.5 within 250 m and 1000 m respectively of each public school in Massachusetts during the 2012–2013 academic year using satellite-based data. We modeled chronic absenteeism rates in the same year as a function of PM2.5 and NDVI, controlling for race and household income. Among the 1772 public schools in Massachusetts, a 0.15 increase in NDVI during the academic year was associated with a 2.6% (p value < 0.0001 reduction in chronic absenteeism rates, and a 1 μg/m3 increase in PM2.5 during the academic year was associated with a 1.58% (p value < 0.0001 increase in chronic absenteeism rates. Based on these percentage changes in chronic absenteeism, a 0.15 increase in NDVI and 1 μg/m3 increase in PM2.5 correspond to 25,837 fewer students and 15,852 more students chronically absent each year in Massachusetts respectively. These environmental impacts on absenteeism reinforce the need to protect green spaces and reduce air pollution around schools.

  17. Dark Matter Inelastic Up-Scattering with the Interstellar Plasma: An Exciting New Source of X-Ray Lines, including at 3.5 keV

    CERN Document Server

    D'Eramo, Francesco; Profumo, Stefano; Stefaniak, Tim

    2016-01-01

    We explore the phenomenology of a class of models where the dark matter particle can inelastically up-scatter to a heavier excited state via off-diagonal dipolar interactions with the interstellar plasma (gas or free electrons). The heavier particle then rapidly decays back to the dark matter particle plus a quasi-monochromatic photon. For the process to occur at appreciable rates, the mass splitting between the heavier state and the dark matter must be comparable to, or smaller than, the kinetic energy of particles in the plasma. As a result, the predicted photon line falls in the soft X-ray range, or, potentially, at arbitrarily lower energies. We explore experimental constraints from cosmology and particle physics, and present accurate calculations of the dark matter thermal relic density and of the flux of monochromatic X-rays from thermal plasma excitation. We find that the model provides a natural explanation for the observed 3.5 keV line from clusters of galaxies and from the Galactic center, and is co...

  18. Physical processes in the interstellar medium

    CERN Document Server

    Spitzer, Lyman

    2008-01-01

    Physical Processes in the Interstellar Medium discusses the nature of interstellar matter, with a strong emphasis on basic physical principles, and summarizes the present state of knowledge about the interstellar medium by providing the latest observational data. Physics and chemistry of the interstellar medium are treated, with frequent references to observational results. The overall equilibrium and dynamical state of the interstellar gas are described, with discussions of explosions produced by star birth and star death and the initial phases of cloud collapse leading to star formation.

  19. ISOTOPIC ANOMALIES IN PRIMITIVE SOLAR SYSTEM MATTER: SPIN-STATE-DEPENDENT FRACTIONATION OF NITROGEN AND DEUTERIUM IN INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirstroem, Eva S.; Cordiner, Martin A.; Charnley, Steven B.; Milam, Stefanie N., E-mail: ewirstrom@gmail.com [Astrochemistry Laboratory and Goddard Center for Astrobiology, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20770 (United States)

    2012-09-20

    Organic material found in meteorites and interplanetary dust particles is enriched in D and {sup 15}N. This is consistent with the idea that the functional groups carrying these isotopic anomalies, nitriles and amines, were formed by ion-molecule chemistry in the protosolar nebula. Theoretical models of interstellar fractionation at low temperatures predict large enrichments in both D and {sup 15}N and can account for the largest isotopic enrichments measured in carbonaceous meteorites. However, more recent measurements have shown that, in some primitive samples, a large {sup 15}N enrichment does not correlate with one in D, and that some D-enriched primitive material displays little, if any, {sup 15}N enrichment. By considering the spin-state dependence in ion-molecule reactions involving the ortho and para forms of H{sub 2}, we show that ammonia and related molecules can exhibit such a wide range of fractionation for both {sup 15}N and D in dense cloud cores. We also show that while the nitriles, HCN and HNC, contain the greatest {sup 15}N enrichment, this is not expected to correlate with extreme D enrichment. These calculations therefore support the view that solar system {sup 15}N and D isotopic anomalies have an interstellar heritage. We also compare our results to existing astronomical observations and briefly discuss future tests of this model.

  20. Isotopic Anomalies in Primitive Solar System Matter: Spin-State Dependent Fractionation of Nitrogen and Deuterium in Interstellar Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirstrom, Eva S.; Charnley, Steven B.; Cordiner, Martin A.; Milan, Stefanie N.

    2012-01-01

    Organic material found in meteorites and interplanetary dust particles is enriched in D and N-15, This is consistent with the idea that the functional groups carrying these isotopic anomalies, nitriles and amines, were formed by ion-molecule chemistry in the protosolar core. Theoretical models of interstellar fractionation at low temperatures predict large enrichments in both D and N-15 and can account for the largest isotop c enrichments measured in carbonaceous meteorites, However, more recent measurements have shown that, in some primitive samples, a large N-15 enrichment does not correlate with one in D, and that some D-enriched primitive material displays little, if any, N-15 enrichment. By considering the spin-state dependence in ion-molecule reactions involving the ortho and para forms of H2, we show that ammonia and related molecules can exhibit such a wide range of fractionation for both N-15 and D in dense cloud cores, We also show that while the nitriles, HCN and HNC, contain the greatest N-15 enrichment, this is not expected to correlate with extreme D emichment. These calculations therefore support the view that Solar System N-15 and D isotopic anomalies have an interstellar heritage, We also compare our results to existing astronomical observations and briefly discuss future tests of this model.

  1. Boundary conditions for the paleoenvironment: Chemical and physical processes in the pre-solar nebula. [molecular clouds, interstellar matter, and abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, W. M.; Schloerb, F. P.

    1985-01-01

    Two additional hyperfine components of the interstellar radical C3H were detected. In addition, methanol was discovered in interstellar clouds. The abundance of HCCN and various chemical isomers in molecular clouds was investigated.

  2. Structure and Dynamics of the Interstellar Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenorio-Tagle, Guillermo; Moles, Mariano; Melnick, Jorge

    Here for the first time is a book that treats practically all aspects of modern research in interstellar matter astrophysics. 20 review articles and 40 carefully selected and refereed papers give a thorough overview of the field and convey the flavor of enthusiastic colloquium discussions to the reader. The book includes sections on: - Molecular clouds, star formation and HII regions - Mechanical energy sources - Discs, outflows, jets and HH objects - The Orion Nebula - The extragalactic interstellar medium - Interstellar matter at high galactic latitudes - The structure of the interstellar medium

  3. Interstellar holography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walker, M. A.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Stinebring, D. R.; van Straten, W.

    2008-01-01

    The dynamic spectrum of a radio pulsar is an in-line digital hologram of the ionized interstellar medium. It has previously been demonstrated that such holograms permit image reconstruction, in the sense that one can determine an approximation to the complex electric field values as a function of Do

  4. Fermi LAT Observation of Diffuse Gamma-Rays Produced through Interactions Between Local Interstellar Matter and High Energy Cosmic Rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, A.A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Federal City Coll.; Ackermann, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Ajello, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Axelsson, M.; /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Barbiellini, G.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, D.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Baughman, B.M.; /Ohio State U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bloom, E.D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brez, A.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Bruel, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Burnett, T.H.; /Washington U., Seattle /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /IASF, Milan /Milan Polytechnic /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm /Stockholm U., OKC /DAPNIA, Saclay /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /NASA, Goddard /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /George Mason U. /NASA, Goddard /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Montpellier U. /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm /ASDC, Frascati /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /INFN, Trieste /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /CENBG, Gradignan /CENBG, Gradignan /Montpellier U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Trieste /Hiroshima U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /INFN, Bari; /more authors..

    2012-03-30

    Observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi mission of diffuse {gamma}-rays in a mid-latitude region in the third quadrant (Galactic longitude l from 200{sup o} to 260{sup o} and latitude |b| from 22{sup o} to 60{sup o}) are reported. The region contains no known large molecular cloud and most of the atomic hydrogen is within 1 kpc of the solar system. The contributions of {gamma}-ray point sources and inverse Compton scattering are estimated and subtracted. The residual {gamma}-ray intensity exhibits a linear correlation with the atomic gas column density in energy from 100 MeV to 10 GeV. The measured integrated {gamma}-ray emissivity is (1.63 {+-} 0.05) x 10{sup -26} photons s{sup -1}sr{sup -1} H-atom{sup -1} and (0.66 {+-} 0.02) x 10{sup -26} photons s{sup -1}sr{sup -1} H-atom{sup -1} above 100 MeV and above 300 MeV, respectively, with an additional systematic error of {approx}10%. The differential emissivity from 100 MeV to 10 GeV agrees with calculations based on cosmic ray spectra consistent with those directly measured, at the 10% level. The results obtained indicate that cosmic ray nuclei spectra within 1 kpc from the solar system in regions studied are close to the local interstellar spectra inferred from direct measurements at the Earth within {approx}10%.

  5. Condensed matter astrophysics: A prescription for determining the species-specific composition and quantity of interstellar dust using x-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Julia C.; Xiang, Jingen; Ravel, Bruce; Kortright, Jeffrey B; Flanagan, Kathryn

    2009-01-05

    We present a newtechnique for determining the quantity and composition of dust in astrophysical environments using<6 keV X-rays.We argue that high-resolution X-ray spectra as enabled by the Chandra and XMM-Newton gratings should be considered a powerful and viable new resource for delving into a relatively unexplored regime for directlydetermining dust properties: composition, quantity, and distribution.We present initial cross section measurements of astrophysically likely iron-based dust candidates taken at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Advanced Light Source synchrotron beamline, as an illustrative tool for the formulation of our technique for determining the quantity and composition of interstellar dust with X-rays. (Cross sections for the materials presented here will be made available for astrophysical modeling in the near future.) Focused at the 700 eV Fe LIII and LII photoelectric edges, we discuss a technique for modeling dust properties in the soft X-rays using L-edge data to complement K-edge X-ray absorption fine structure analysis techniques discussed by Lee& Ravel. The paper is intended to be a techniques paper of interest and useful to both condensed matter experimentalists andastrophysicists. For the experimentalists, we offer a new prescription for normalizing relatively low signal-to-noise ratio L-edge cross section measurements. For astrophysics interests, we discuss the use of X-ray absorption spectra for determining dust composition in cold and ionized astrophysical environments and a new method for determining species-specific gas and dust ratios. Possible astrophysical applications of interest, including relevance to Sagittarius A*, are offered. Prospects for improving on this work in future X-ray missions with higher throughput and spectral resolution are also presented in the context of spectral resolution goals for gratings and calorimeters, for proposed and planned missions such as Astro-H and the International X

  6. The formation of interstellar jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenorio-Tagle, G.; Canto, J.; Rozyczka, M.

    1988-01-01

    The formation of interstellar jets by convergence of supersonic conical flows and the further dynamical evolution of these jets are investigated theoretically by means of numerical simulations. The results are presented in extensive graphs and characterized in detail. Strong radiative cooling is shown to result in jets with Mach numbers 2.5-29 propagating to lengths 50-100 times their original widths, with condensation of swept-up interstellar matter at Mach 5 or greater. The characteristics of so-called molecular outflows are well reproduced by the simulations of low-Mach-number and quasi-adiabatic jets.

  7. Fractionation of trace elements and human health risk of submicron particulate matter (PM1) collected in the surroundings of coking plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajusz-Zubek, Elwira; Radko, Tomasz; Mainka, Anna

    2017-08-01

    Samples of PM1 were collected in the surroundings of coking plants located in southern Poland. Chemical fractionation provided information on the contents of trace elements As, Cd, Co, Cr, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sb and Se in all mobile (F1-F3) and not mobile (F4) fractions of PM1 in the vicinity of large sources of emissions related to energochemical processing of coal during the summer. The determined enrichment factors indicate the influence of anthropogenic sources on the concentration of the examined elements contained in PM1 in the areas subjected to investigation. The analysis of health risk for the assumed scenario of inhabitant exposure to the toxic effect of elements, based on the values of the hazard index, revealed that the absorption of the examined elements contained in the most mobile fractions of particulate matter via inhalation by children and adults can be considered potentially harmless to the health of people inhabiting the surroundings of coking plants during the summer (HI elements, i.e., As, Cd, Co, Cr, Ni and Pb, contained in the most mobile fractions (F1 + F2) of PM1, approximately four adults and one child out of one million people living in the vicinity of the coking plants may develop cancer.

  8. Interstellar Isotopes: Prospects with ALMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnley Steven B.

    2010-01-01

    Cold molecular clouds are natural environments for the enrichment of interstellar molecules in the heavy isotopes of H, C, N and O. Anomalously fractionated isotopic material is found in many primitive Solar System objects, such as meteorites and comets, that may trace interstellar matter that was incorporated into the Solar Nebula without undergoing significant processing. Models of the fractionation chemistry of H, C, N and O in dense molecular clouds, particularly in cores where substantial freeze-out of molecules on to dust has occurred, make several predictions that can be tested in the near future by molecular line observations. The range of fractionation ratios expected in different interstellar molecules will be discussed and the capabilities of ALMA for testing these models (e.g. in observing doubly-substituted isotopologues) will be outlined.

  9. INTERSTELLAR TURBULENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Falceta-Gonçalves

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Interstellar Medium (ISM is a complex, multi-phase system, where the history of the stars occurs. The processes of birth and death of stars are strongly coupled to the dynamics of the ISM. The observed chaotic and diffusive motions of the gas characterize its turbulent nature. Understanding turbulence is crucial for understanding the star-formation process and the energy-mass feedback from evolved stars. Magnetic fields, threading the ISM, are also observed, making this effort even more difficult. In this work, I briefly review the main observations and the characterization of turbulence from these observable quantities. Following on, I provide a review of the physics of magnetized turbulence. Finally, I will show the main results from theoretical and numerical simulations, which can be used to reconstruct observable quantities, and compare these predictions to the observations.

  10. Effect of gases and particulate matter from electricity generation process on the radial growth of teak plantations surrounding Mae Moh power plant, Lampang province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narapong Sangram

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to investigate radial growth patterns and influences of polluting gases and particulate matter on the radial growth of teak plantations surrounding the Mae Moh Power Plant. Twenty-four 32-year-old teak trees were selected from Mae Jang and Mae Moh plantations, which were 5 km and 15 km from the Mae Moe power plant, respectively. Forty-eight sample cores were collected from the 24 trees (two cores per tree. The growth patterns of all the cores were analyzed following the standard methods of dendrochronology. The relationships between the growth pattern and the amounts of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide and particulate matter were measured as average daily rates and then analyzed. The study showed that the best-fit model for the relationship between the radial current annual increment at breast height (CAIdbh and time (Y was an exponential equation. The fitted equations were: CAIdbh = 10.657e(−0.031Y for Mae Moh plantation and CAIdbh = 12.518e(−0.032Y for Mae Jang plantation. The coefficient of determination for the fitted equations was 0.410 and 0.423 for the Mae Moh and Mae Jang plantations, respectively. Moreover, carbon monoxide (CO and sulfur dioxide (SO2 had a statistically significant effect on radial teak growth (RT in the Mae Jang plantation, with a coefficient of determination of 0.69 (RTmj = 0.571 + 0.429(CO − 0.023(SO2.

  11. Educational Success and Surrounding Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Garrison

    2016-01-01

    The curriculum, instruction, and services we provide in schools, colleges, and universities matter a lot, but if we continue to ignore our students' "surrounding culture," progress toward a more educated nation will continue to be disappointing.

  12. Educational Success and Surrounding Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Garrison

    2016-01-01

    The curriculum, instruction, and services we provide in schools, colleges, and universities matter a lot, but if we continue to ignore our students' "surrounding culture," progress toward a more educated nation will continue to be disappointing.

  13. Does the media matter to suicide?: Examining the social dynamics surrounding media reporting on suicide in a suicide-prone community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Anna S

    2017-05-01

    Despite the widespread acknowledgement by public health organizations that media reporting matters to suicide, this link has been much debated and the mechanisms undergirding it poorly understood. With this study, I combine a media analysis with ethnographic data collected during 2014-2016 (N = 91) to examine the social dynamics surrounding media reporting on suicide in a community (that I call Poplar Grove, USA) with an enduring adolescent suicide problem. I illustrate how the media crafted a particular story about why youth die by suicide that emphasized academic pressure over other plausible causes. In so doing, the media may have broadened ideas about when suicide is seen as an option. However, I also provide evidence that cautions against attributing too much causal power to the media. The media coverage in Poplar Grove reflected conditions that were already present in the community; it was already a high-pressure place for youth to live with widespread mental health stigma. These factors likely shaped media reporting, while also contributing independently to the suicide problem. Finally, I found that the suicide deaths that received media coverage were those that triggered significant cognitive dissonance and thus were much discussed among youth, independent of the media reporting. This generated ample opportunities for peer role modeling of suicide. Thus, while the media may have helped solidify a certain view of suicide in the community, it was not the only social force contributing to suicide in Poplar Grove. While the findings from this study do not negate the importance of responsible reporting on suicide, they do contextualize the role of the media in suicide and suggest that researchers must take a broader view of how suicide suggestion operates in the media and in social contexts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Interstellar Fullerene Compounds and Diffuse Interstellar Bands

    CERN Document Server

    Omont, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the presence of fullerenes in the interstellar medium (ISM) has been confirmed, especially with the first confirmed identification of two strong diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) with C60+. This justifies reassesing the importance of interstellar fullerenes of various sizes with endohedral or exohedral inclusions and heterofullerenes (EEHFs). The phenomenology of fullerenes is complex. In addition to formation in shock shattering, fully dehydrogenated PAHs in diffuse interstellar (IS) clouds could perhaps efficiently transform into fullerenes including EEHFs. But it is extremely difficult to assess their expected abundance, composition and size distribution, except for C60+. As often suggested, EEHFs share many properties with C60, as regards stability, formation/destruction, chemical processes and many basic spectral features. We address the importance of various EEHFs as possible DIB carriers. Specifically, we discuss IS properties and the contributions of fullerenes of various sizes and charge su...

  15. Interstellar Molecules Their Laboratory and Interstellar Habitat

    CERN Document Server

    Yamada, Koichi M T

    2011-01-01

    This book deals with the astrophysics and spectroscopy of the interstellar molecules. In the introduction, overview and history of interstellar observations are described in order to help understanding how the modern astrophysics and molecular spectroscopy have been developed interactively. The recent progress in the study of this field, after the 4th Cologne-Bonn-Zermatt symposium 2003 is briefly summarized. Furthermore, the basic knowledge of molecular spectroscopy, which is essential to correctly comprehend the astrophysical observations, is presented in a compact form.

  16. Observational astrochemistry: The quest for interstellar molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guélin M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Over 160 molecular species, not counting isotopologues, have been identified in circumstellar envelopes and interstellar clouds. These species have revealed a wealth of familiar, as much as exotic molecules and in complex organic (and silicon compounds, that was fully unexpected in view of the harshness of surrounding conditions: vanishingly low densities, extreme temperatures and intense embedding UV radiation. They illustrate the diversity of astrochemistry and show robust prebiotic molecules may be. In this lecture, we review the quest for interstellar molecules and show how tributary it is from theoretical ideas and technology developments. A. A. Penzias, who discovered interstellar CO and the 2.7 K Cosmic Background radiation, used to joke that astronomical research is easy: the great questions have largely been formulated; one only has to wait until technological progress makes it possible to answer.

  17. Is interstellar archeology possible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrigan, Richard A.

    2012-09-01

    Searching for signatures of cosmic-scale archeological artifacts such as Dyson spheres is an interesting alternative to conventional radio SETI. Uncovering such an artifact does not require the intentional transmission of a signal on the part of the original civilization. This type of search is called interstellar archeology or sometimes cosmic archeology. A variety of interstellar archeology signatures is discussed including non-natural planetary atmospheric constituents, stellar doping, Dyson spheres, as well as signatures of stellar, and galactic-scale engineering. The concept of a Fermi bubble due to interstellar migration is reviewed in the discussion of galactic signatures. These potential interstellar archeological signatures are classified using the Kardashev scale. A modified Drake equation is introduced. With few exceptions interstellar archeological signatures are clouded and beyond current technological capabilities. However SETI for so-called cultural transmissions and planetary atmosphere signatures are within reach.

  18. Complex Organics from Laboratory Simulated Interstellar Ices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworkin, J. P.

    2003-01-01

    Many of the volatiles in interstellar dense clouds exist in ices surrounding dust grains. The low temperatures of these ices (T organics. We study the UV and proton radiation processing of interstellar ice analogs to explore links between interstellar chemistry, the organics in comets and meteorites, and the origin of life on Earth. The high D/H ratios in some interstellar species, and the knowledge that many of the organics in primitive meteorites are D-enriched, suggest that such links are plausible. Once identified, these species may serve as markers of interstellar heritage of cometary dust and meteorites. Of particular interest are our findings that UV photolysis of interstellar ice analogs produce molecules of importance in current living organisms, including quinones, amphiphiles, and amino acids. Quinones are essential in vital metabolic roles such as electron transport. Studies show that quinones should be made wherever polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons are photolyzed in interstellar ices. In the case of anthracene-containing ices, we have observed the production of 9-anthrone and 9,10 anthraquinone, both of which have been observed in the Murchison meteorite. Amphiphiles are also made when mixed molecular ices are photolyzed. These amphiphiles self-assemble into fluorescent vesicles when placed in liquid water, as do Murchison extracts. Both have the ability to trap an ionic dye. Photolysis of plausible ices can also produce alanine, serine, and glycine as well as a number of small alcohols and amines. Flash heating of the room temperature residue generated by such experiments generates mass spectral distributions similar to those of IDPs. The detection of high D/H ratios in some interstellar molecular species, and the knowledge that many of the organics, such as hydroxy and amino acids, in primitive meteorites are D-enriched provides evidence for a connection between intact organic material in the interstellar medium and in meteorites. Thus, some of the

  19. Diffuse interstellar absorption bands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIANG FuYuan; LIANG ShunLin; LI AiGen

    2009-01-01

    The diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) are a large number of absorption bands that are superposed on the interstellar extinction curve and are of interstellar origin. Since the discovery of the first two DIBs in the 1920s, the exact nature of DIBs still remains unclear. This article reviews the history of the detec-tions of DIBs in the Milky Way and external galaxies, the major observational characteristics of DIBs, the correlations or anti-correlations among DIBs or between DIBs and other interstellar features (e.g. the prominent 2175 Angstrom extinction bump and the far-ultraviolet extinction rise), and the proposed candidate carriers. Whether they are also present in circumstellar environments is also discussed.

  20. Diffuse interstellar absorption bands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The diffuse interstellar bands(DIBs) are a large number of absorption bands that are superposed on the interstellar extinction curve and are of interstellar origin. Since the discovery of the first two DIBs in the 1920s,the exact nature of DIBs still remains unclear. This article reviews the history of the detections of DIBs in the Milky Way and external galaxies,the major observational characteristics of DIBs,the correlations or anti-correlations among DIBs or between DIBs and other interstellar features(e.g. the prominent 2175 Angstrom extinction bump and the far-ultraviolet extinction rise),and the proposed candidate carriers. Whether they are also present in circumstellar environments is also discussed.

  1. Filtration of interstellar hydrogen in the two-shock heliospheric interface Inferences on the local interstellar electron density

    CERN Document Server

    Izmodenov, V V; Lallement, R; Glöckler, G; Baranov, V B; Malama, Y G

    1998-01-01

    The solar system is moving through the partially ionized local interstellar cloud (LIC). The ionized matter of the LIC interacts with the expanding solar wind forming the heliospheric interface. The neutral component (interstellar atoms) penetrates through the heliospheric interface into the heliosphere, where it is measured directly "in situ" as pick-up ions and neutral atoms (and as anomalous cosmic rays) or indirectly through resonant scattering of solar Ly-alpha. When crossing the heliospheric interface, interstellar atoms interact with the plasma component through charge exchange. This interaction leads to changes of both neutral gas and plasma properties. The heliospheric interface is also the source of radio emissions which have been detected by the Voyager since 1983. In this paper, we have used a kinetic model of the flow of the interstellar atoms with updated values of velocity, temperature, and density of the circumsolar interstellar hydrogen and calculated how all quantities which are directly ass...

  2. Interstellar organic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagan, C.

    1972-01-01

    Most of the interstellar organic molecules have been found in the large radio source Sagittarius B2 toward the galactic center, and in such regions as W51 and the IR source in the Orion nebula. Questions of the reliability of molecular identifications are discussed together with aspects of organic synthesis in condensing clouds, degradational origin, synthesis on grains, UV natural selection, interstellar biology, and contributions to planetary biology.

  3. Interstellar organic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagan, C.

    1972-01-01

    Most of the interstellar organic molecules have been found in the large radio source Sagittarius B2 toward the galactic center, and in such regions as W51 and the IR source in the Orion nebula. Questions of the reliability of molecular identifications are discussed together with aspects of organic synthesis in condensing clouds, degradational origin, synthesis on grains, UV natural selection, interstellar biology, and contributions to planetary biology.

  4. Laboratory Astrochemistry: Interstellar PAHs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Farid; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are now considered to be an important and ubiquitous component of the organic material in space. PAHs are found in a large variety of extraterrestrial materials such as interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and meteoritic materials. PAHs are also good candidates to account for the infrared emission bands (UIRs) and the diffuse interstellar optical absorption bands (DIBs) detected in various regions of the interstellar medium. The recent observations made with the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) have confirmed the ubiquitous nature of the UIR bands and their carriers. PAHs are thought to form through chemical reactions in the outflow from carbon-rich stars in a process similar to soot formation. Once injected in the interstellar medium, PAHs are further processed by the interstellar radiation field, interstellar shocks and energetic particles. A major, dedicated, laboratory effort has been undertaken to measure the physical and chemical characteristics of these complex molecules and their ions under experimental conditions that mimic the interstellar conditions. These measurements require collision-free conditions where the molecules and ions are cold and chemically isolated. The spectroscopy of PAHs under controlled conditions represents an essential diagnostic tool to study the evolution of extraterrestrial PAHs. The Astrochemistry Laboratory program will be discussed through its multiple aspects: (1) objectives, (2) approach and techniques adopted, (3) adaptability to the nature of the problem(s), and (4) results and implications for astronomy as well as for molecular spectroscopy. A review of the data generated through laboratory simulations of space environments and the role these data have played in our current understanding of the properties of interstellar PAHs will be presented. The discussion will also introduce the newest generation of laboratory experiments that are currently being developed in order to provide a

  5. Effects of sediment organic matter quality on bioaccumulation, degradation, and distribution of pyrene in two macrofaunal species and their surrounding sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granberg, Maria E.; Selck, Henriette

    2007-01-01

    organic matter (SOM) quality affects organism activity and feeding behaviour, and is therefore also likely to affect contaminant fate in benthic systems. We investigated the impact of SOM quality (enrichment with either labile Tetraselmis sp. or refractory lignin) on the accumulation and metabolism...... of sediment-associated pyrene in Nereis diversicolor (Annelida) and Amphiura filiformis (Echinodermata), as well as the combined effect of SOM quality and infaunal bioturbation on pyrene distribution and metabolism in the sediment. After 45 d of exposure, SOM quality almost doubled pyrene bioaccumulation...... in both species, while pyrene metabolism remained unaffected. Metabolites comprised 80% of the total tissue pyrene in N. diversicolor and 40% in A. filiformis. A. filiformis arms contained one fifth of the disk pyrene concentration. Approximately 20% of the pyrene found in A. filiformis arms was found...

  6. Interstellar Antifreeze: Ethylene Glycol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollis, J. M.; Lovas, F. J.; Jewell, P. R.; Coudert, L. H.

    2002-01-01

    Interstellar ethylene glycol (HOCH2CH2,OH) has been detected in emission toward the Galactic center source Sagittarius B2(N-LMH) by means of several millimeter-wave rotational torsional transitions of its lowest energy conformer. The types and kinds of molecules found to date in interstellar clouds suggest a chemistry that favors aldehydes and their corresponding reduced alcohols-e.g., formaldehyde (H2CO)/methanol (CH3OH), acetaldehyde (CH3CHO)/ethanol (CH3CH2OH). Similarly, ethylene glycol is the reduced alcohol of glycolaldehyde (CH2OHCHO), which has also been detected toward Sgr B2(N-LMH). While there is no consensus as to how any such large complex molecules are formed in the interstellar clouds, atomic hydrogen (H) and carbon monoxide (CO) could form formaldehyde on grain surfaces, but such surface chemistry beyond that point is uncertain. However, laboratory experiments have shown that the gas-phase reaction of atomic hydrogen (H) and solid-phase CO at 10-20 K can produce formaldehyde and methanol and that alcohols and other complex molecules can be synthesized from cometary ice analogs when subject to ionizing radiation at 15 K. Thus, the presence of aldehyde/ reduced alcohol pairs in interstellar clouds implies that such molecules are a product of a low-temperature chemistry on grain surfaces or in grain ice mantles. This work suggests that aldehydes and their corresponding reduced alcohols provide unique observational constraints on the formation of complex interstellar molecules.

  7. Satellite assessment of particulate matter and phytoplankton variations in the Santa Barbara Channel and its surrounding waters: Role of surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderikx Freitas, Fernanda; Siegel, David A.; Maritorena, Stéphane; Fields, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Satellite observations of chlorophyll in coastal waters are often described in terms of changes in productivity in response to regional upwelling processes while optical backscattering coefficients are more often linked to episodic inputs of suspended sediments from storm runoff. Here we show that the surface gravity wave resuspension of sediments has a larger role in controlling backscatter than previously considered. Almost 18 years of SeaWiFS, MODIS, MERIS, and VIIRS satellite imagery of the Santa Barbara Channel, California and its surrounding waters spectrally merged with the Garver-Siegel-Maritorena bio-optical model were used to assess the controls on suspended particle distributions. Analysis revealed that chlorophyll blooms in the warmer portions of the domain occur in phase with SST minima, usually in early spring, while blooms in the cooler regions lag SST minima and occur simultaneously to the strongest equatorward winds every year, often in the summer. Tight coupling between the optical variables was seen in offshore areas, as expected for productive waters. However, values of backscatter near the coast were primarily modulated by surface waves. This relationship holds throughout all seasons and is stronger within the 100 m isobath, but often extends tens of kilometers offshore. This forcing of particle resuspension by surface waves is likely a feature ubiquitous in all coastal oceans characterized by fine sediments. The implication of surface wave processes determining suspended particle loads far beyond the surf zone has large consequences for the interpretation of satellite ocean color signals in coastal waters and potentially redefines the extent of the littoral zone.

  8. Ionization of Interstellar Hydrogen Beyond the Termination Shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruntman, Mike

    2016-11-01

    Models of solar wind interaction with the surrounding interstellar medium usually disregard ionization of interstellar hydrogen atoms beyond the solar wind termination shock. If and when included, the effects of ionization in the heliospheric interface region are often obscured by complexities of the interaction. This work assesses the importance of interstellar hydrogen ionization in the heliosheath. Photoionization could be accounted for in a straightforward way. In contrast, electron impact ionization is largely unknown because of poorly understood energy transfer to electrons at the termination shock and beyond. We first estimate the effect of photoionization and then use it as a yardstick to assess the role of electron impact ionization. The physical estimates show that ionization of interstellar hydrogen may lead to significant mass loading in the inner heliosheath which would slow down plasma flowing toward the heliotail and deplete populations of nonthermal protons, with the corresponding effect on heliospheric fluxes of energetic neutral atoms.

  9. Interstellar and circumstellar fullerenes

    CERN Document Server

    Bernard-Salas, J; Jones, A P; Peeters, E; Micelotta, E R; Otsuka, M; Sloan, G C; Kemper, F; Groenewegen, M

    2014-01-01

    Fullerenes are a particularly stable class of carbon molecules in the shape of a hollow sphere or ellipsoid that might be formed in the outflows of carbon stars. Once injected into the interstellar medium (ISM), these stable species survive and are thus likely to be widespread in the Galaxy where they contribute to interstellar extinction, heating processes, and complex chemical reactions. In recent years, the fullerene species C60 (and to a lesser extent C70) have been detected in a wide variety of circumstellar and interstellar environments showing that when conditions are favourable, fullerenes are formed efficiently. Fullerenes are the first and only large aromatics firmly identified in space. The detection of fullerenes is thus crucial to provide clues as to the key chemical pathways leading to the formation of large complex organic molecules in space, and offers a great diagnostic tool to describe the environment in which they reside. Since fullerenes share many physical properties with PAHs, understand...

  10. Radiation-pressure-driven dust waves inside bursting interstellar bubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ochsendorf, B.B.; Verdolini, S.; Cox, N.L.J.; Berné, O.; Kaper, L.; Tielens, A.G.G.M.

    2014-01-01

    Massive stars drive the evolution of the interstellar medium through their radiative and mechanical energy input. After their birth, they form "bubbles" of hot gas surrounded by a dense shell. Traditionally, the formation of bubbles is explained through the input of a powerful stellar wind, even tho

  11. Combining Magnetic and Electric Sails for Interstellar Deceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Perakis, Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    The main benefit of an interstellar mission is to carry out in-situ measurements within a target star system. To allow for extended in-situ measurements, the spacecraft needs to be decelerated. One of the currently most promising technologies for deceleration is the magnetic sail which uses the deflection of interstellar matter via a magnetic field to decelerate the spacecraft. However, while the magnetic sail is very efficient at high velocities, its performance decreases with lower speeds. This leads to deceleration durations of several decades depending on the spacecraft mass. Within the context of Project Dragonfly, initiated by the Initiative of Interstellar Studies (i4is), this paper proposes a novel concept for decelerating a spacecraft on an interstellar mission by combining a magnetic sail with an electric sail. Combining the sails compensates for each technologys shortcomings: A magnetic sail is more effective at higher velocities than the electric sail and vice versa. It is demonstrated that using ...

  12. A multifrequency study of the active star-forming complex NGC 6357 - I. Interstellar structures linked to the open cluster Pis 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappa, C. E.; Barbá, R.; Duronea, N. U.; Vasquez, J.; Arnal, E. M.; Goss, W. M.; Fernández Lajús, E.

    2011-08-01

    We investigate the distribution of gas (ionized, neutral atomic and molecular) and interstellar dust in the complex star-forming region NGC 6357 with the goal of studying the interplay between the massive stars in the open cluster Pis 24 and the surrounding interstellar matter. Our study of the distribution of the ionized gas is based on narrow-band Hα, [S II]and [O III] images obtained with the Curtis-Schmidt Camera at CTIO, Chile, and on radio continuum observations at 1465 MHz taken with the VLA with a synthesized beam of 40 arcsec. The distribution of the molecular gas is analysed using 12CO(1-0) data obtained with the NANTEN radiotelescope, Chile (angular resolution = 2.7 arcmin). The interstellar dust distribution was studied using mid-infrared data from the GLIMPSE survey and far-infrared observations from IRAS. NGC 6357 consists of a large ionized shell and a number of smaller optical nebulosities. The optical, radio continuum, and near- and mid-IR images delineate the distributions of the ionized gas and interstellar dust in the H II regions and in previously unknown wind-blown bubbles linked to the massive stars in Pis 24 revealing surrounding photodissociation regions. The CO line observations allowed us to identify the molecular counterparts of the ionized structures in the complex and to confirm the presence of photodissociation regions. The action of the WR star HD 157504 on the surrounding gas was also investigated. The molecular mass in the complex is estimated to be (4 ± 2) × 105 M⊙. The mean electron densities derived from the radio data suggest electron densities >200 cm-3, indicating that NGC 6357 is a complex formed in a region of high ambient density. The known massive stars in Pis 24 and a number of newly inferred massive stars are mainly responsible for the excitation and photodissociation of the parental molecular cloud.

  13. Interstellar molecules - Formation in solar nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, E.

    1973-01-01

    Herbig's (1970) hypothesis that solar nebulae might be the principal source of interstellar grains and molecules is investigated. The investigation includes the determination of physical and chemical conditions in the early solar system. The production of organic compounds in the solar nebula is studied, and the compounds in meteorites are compared with those obtained in Miller-Urey and Fischer-Tropsch-type (FTT) reactions, taking into consideration aliphatic hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons, purines, pyrimidines, amino acids, porphyrins, and aspects of carbon-isotope fractionation. It is found that FTT reactions account reasonably well for all well-established features of organic matter in meteorites investigated. The distribution of compounds produced by FTT reactions is compared with the distribution of interstellar molecules. Biological implications of the results are considered.

  14. Interstellar Gas and a Dark Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Eric David; Randall, Lisa

    2016-10-01

    We introduce a potentially powerful method for constraining or discovering a thin dark matter disk in the Milky Way. The method relies on the relationship between the midplane densities and scale heights of interstellar gas being determined by the gravitational potential, which is sensitive to the presence of a dark disk. We show how to use the interstellar gas parameters to set a bound on a dark disk and discuss the constraints suggested by the current data. However, current measurements for these parameters are discordant, with the uncertainty in the constraint being dominated by the molecular hydrogen midplane density measurement, as well as by the atomic hydrogen velocity dispersion measurement. Magnetic fields and cosmic ray pressure, which are expected to play a role, are uncertain as well. The current models and data are inadequate to determine the disk's existence, but taken at face value, may favor its existence depending on the gas parameters used.

  15. Interstellar hydrogen sulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaddeus, P.; Kutner, M. L.; Penzias, A. A.; Wilson, R. W.; Jefferts, K. B.

    1972-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide has been detected in seven Galactic sources by observation of a single line corresponding to the rotational transition from the 1(sub 10) to the 1(sub 01) levels at 168.7 GHz. The observations show that hydrogen sulfide is only a moderately common interstellar molecule comparable in abundance to H2CO and CS, but somewhat less abundant than HCN and much less abundant than CO.

  16. Observations of interstellar helium with a gas absorption cell - Implications for the structure of the local interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, J.; Paresce, F.; Bowyer, S.; Lampton, M.

    1980-01-01

    A photometer sensitive at the 584 A line of He 1, incorporating a helium gas resonance absorption cell, was flown on the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project in July 1975. The instrument observed much of the night-time sky, and returned 42 min of usable data. The data were analyzed by fitting to a model of resonant scattering of solar 584 A flux from nearby interstellar helium. Good model fits were obtained for an interstellar gas bulk velocity vector pointing toward alpha = 72 deg, delta = +15 deg, with speed 20 km/s, with interstellar medium temperatures from 5000 to 20,000 K and with neutral interstellar helium density (8.9 plus or minus 10 to the -3rd/cu cm). In the context of theoretical studies of the interstellar medium by McKee and Ostriker (1977), the results may indicate that the sun lies in the warm, partially ionized periphery of a cold interstellar cloud, surrounded by a high-temperature gas heated by old supernova remnants.

  17. SURVIVAL OF INTERSTELLAR MOLECULES TO PRESTELLAR DENSE CORE COLLAPSE AND EARLY PHASES OF DISK FORMATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hincelin, U. [Department of Chemistry, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Wakelam, V.; Hersant, F.; Guilloteau, S. [University of Bordeaux, LAB, UMR 5804, F-33270 Floirac (France); Commerçon, B., E-mail: ugo.hincelin@virginia.edu [Laboratoire de radioastronomie, LERMA, Observatoire de Paris, Ecole Normale Supérieure (UMR 8112 CNRS), 24 rue Lhomond, F-75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2013-09-20

    An outstanding question of astrobiology is the link between the chemical composition of planets, comets, and other solar system bodies and the molecules formed in the interstellar medium. Understanding the chemical and physical evolution of the matter leading to the formation of protoplanetary disks is an important step for this. We provide some new clues to this long-standing problem using three-dimensional chemical simulations of the early phases of disk formation: we interfaced the full gas-grain chemical model Nautilus with the radiation-magnetohydrodynamic model RAMSES, for different configurations and intensities of the magnetic field. Our results show that the chemical content (gas and ices) is globally conserved during the collapsing process, from the parent molecular cloud to the young disk surrounding the first Larson core. A qualitative comparison with cometary composition suggests that comets are constituted of different phases, some molecules being direct tracers of interstellar chemistry, while others, including complex molecules, seem to have been formed in disks, where higher densities and temperatures allow for an active grain surface chemistry. The latter phase, and its connection with the formation of the first Larson core, remains to be modeled.

  18. Chemical composition of interstellar dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Ankan; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Majumdar, Liton; Sahu, Dipen

    Study of chemical evolution of interstellar medium is well recognized to be a challenging task. Interstellar medium (ISM) is a rich reservoir of complex molecules. So far, around 180 gas phase molecules and around 20 molecular species on the interstellar dust have been detected in various regions of ISM, especially in regions of star formation. In last decade, it was well established that gas phase reactions alone cannot explain molecular abundances in ISM. Chemical reactions which occur on interstellar dust grains are essential to explain formation of several molecules especially hydrogenated species including simplest and most abundant molecule H2. Interstellar grains provide surface for accreted species to meet and react. Therefore, an understanding of formation of molecules on grain surfaces is of prime importance. We concentrate mainly on water, methanol, carbon dioxide, which constitute nearly 90% of the grain mantle. These molecules are detected on grain surface due to their strong absorption bands arising out of multiple vibrational modes. Water is the most abundant species (with a surface coverage >60% ) on a grain in dense interstellar medium. CO2 is second most abundant molecule in interstellar medium with an abundance of around 20% with respect to H2O. However, this can vary from cloud to cloud. In clouds like W 33A it could be even less than 5% of water abundance. The next most abundant molecule is CO, which is well studied ice with an abundance varying between 2%\\ to 15% of water. Methanol (CH3OH) is also very abundant having abundance 2% to 30% of water. Measurement of water deuterium fractionation is a relevant tool for understanding mechanisms of water formation and evolution from prestellar phase to formation of planets and comets. We are also considering deuterated species in our simulation. We use Monte Carlo method (considering multilayer regime) to mimic the exact scenario. We study chemical evolution of interstellar grain mantle by varying

  19. A scenario for interstellar exploration and its financing

    CERN Document Server

    Bignami, Giovanni F

    2013-01-01

    This book develops a credible scenario for interstellar exploration and colonization. In so doing, it examines: • the present situation and prospects for interstellar exploration technologies; • where to go: the search for habitable planets; • the motivations for space travel and colonization; • the financial mechanisms required to fund such enterprises. The final section of the book analyzes the uncertainties surrounding the presented scenario. The purpose of building a scenario is not only to pinpoint future events but also to highlight the uncertainties that may propel the future in different directions. Interstellar travel and colonization requires a civilization in which human beings see themselves as inhabitants of a single planet and in which global governance of these processes is conducted on a cooperative basis. The key question is, then, whether our present civilization is ready for such an endeavor, reflecting the fact that the critical uncertainties are political and cultural in nature. I...

  20. Interstellar Pickup Ion Production in the Global Heliosphere and Heliosheath

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Yihong; Guo, Xiaocheng

    2016-01-01

    Interstellar Pickup ions (PUIs) play a significant part in mediating the solar wind (SW) interaction with the interstellar medium. In this paper, we examine the details of spatial variation of the PUI velocity distribution function (VDF) in the SW by solving the PUI transport equation. We assume the PUI distribution is isotropic resulting from strong pitch-angle scattering by wave-particle interaction. A three-dimensional model combining the MHD treatment of the background SW and neutrals with a kinetic treatment of PUIs throughout the heliosphere and the surrounding local interstellar medium (LISM) has been developed. The model generates PUI power law tails via second-order Fermi process. We analyze how PUIs transform across the heliospheric termination shock (TS) and obtain the PUI phase space distribution in the inner heliosheath including continuing velocity diffusion. Our simulated PUI spectra are compared with observations made by New Horizons, Ulysses, Voyager 1, 2 and Cassini, and a satisfactory agree...

  1. Probing Interstellar Dust With Space-Based Coronagraphs

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, N J; Breckinridge, J B

    2008-01-01

    We show that space-based telescopes such as the proposed Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph will be able to detect the light scattered by the interstellar grains along lines of sight passing near stars in our Galaxy. The relative flux of the scattered light within one arcsecond of a star at 100 pc in a uniform interstellar medium of 0.1 H atoms cm^-3 is about 10^-7. The halo increases in strength with the distance to the star and is unlikely to limit the coronagraphic detection of planets around the nearest stars. Grains passing within 100 AU of Sun-like stars are deflected by radiation, gravity and magnetic forces, leading to features in the scattered light that can potentially reveal the strength of the stellar wind, the orientation of the stellar magnetic field and the relative motion between the star and the surrounding interstellar medium.

  2. Visualizing Interstellar's Wormhole

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Oliver; von Tunzelmann, Eugénie; Franklin, Paul; Thorne, Kip S.

    2015-06-01

    Christopher Nolan's science fiction movie Interstellar offers a variety of opportunities for students in elementary courses on general relativity theory. This paper describes such opportunities, including: (i) At the motivational level, the manner in which elementary relativity concepts underlie the wormhole visualizations seen in the movie; (ii) At the briefest computational level, instructive calculations with simple but intriguing wormhole metrics, including, e.g., constructing embedding diagrams for the three-parameter wormhole that was used by our visual effects team and Christopher Nolan in scoping out possible wormhole geometries for the movie; (iii) Combining the proper reference frame of a camera with solutions of the geodesic equation, to construct a light-ray-tracing map backward in time from a camera's local sky to a wormhole's two celestial spheres; (iv) Implementing this map, for example, in Mathematica, Maple or Matlab, and using that implementation to construct images of what a camera sees when near or inside a wormhole; (v) With the student's implementation, exploring how the wormhole's three parameters influence what the camera sees—which is precisely how Christopher Nolan, using our implementation, chose the parameters for Interstellar's wormhole; (vi) Using the student's implementation, exploring the wormhole's Einstein ring and particularly the peculiar motions of star images near the ring, and exploring what it looks like to travel through a wormhole.

  3. Visualizing Interstellar's Wormhole

    CERN Document Server

    James, Oliver; Franklin, Paul; Thorne, Kip S

    2015-01-01

    Christopher Nolan's science fiction movie Interstellar offers a variety of opportunities for students in elementary courses on general relativity theory. This paper describes such opportunities, including: (i) At the motivational level, the manner in which elementary relativity concepts underlie the wormhole visualizations seen in the movie. (ii) At the briefest computational level, instructive calculations with simple but intriguing wormhole metrics, including, e.g., constructing embedding diagrams for the three-parameter wormhole that was used by our visual effects team and Christopher Nolan in scoping out possible wormhole geometries for the movie. (iii) Combining the proper reference frame of a camera with solutions of the geodesic equation, to construct a light-ray-tracing map backward in time from a camera's local sky to a wormhole's two celestial spheres. (iv) Implementing this map, for example in Mathematica, Maple or Matlab, and using that implementation to construct images of what a camera sees when...

  4. Correcting the record on the analysis of IBEX and STEREO data regarding variations in the neutral interstellar wind

    CERN Document Server

    Frisch, P C; Drews, C; Leonard, T; Livadiotis, G; McComas, D J; Moebius, E; Schwadron, N A; Sokol, J M

    2015-01-01

    The journey of the Sun through space carries the solar system through a dynamic interstellar environment that is presently characterized by Mach 1 motion between the heliosphere and the surrounding interstellar medium (ISM). The interaction between the heliosphere and ISM is an evolving process due to the variable solar wind and to interstellar turbulence. Frisch et al. presented a meta-analysis of the historical data on the interstellar wind flowing through the heliosphere and concluded that temporal changes in the ecliptic longitude of the wind were statistically indicated by the data available in the refereed literature at the time of that writing. Lallement and Bertaux disagree with this result, and suggested, for instance, that a key instrumental response function of IBEX-Lo was incorrect and that the STEREO pickup ion data are unsuitable for diagnosing the flow of interstellar neutrals through the heliosphere. Here we show that temporal variations in the interstellar wind through the heliosphere are con...

  5. Detection of interstellar $CH_{3}$

    CERN Document Server

    Feuchtgruber, H; Van Dishoeck, E F; Wright, C M

    2000-01-01

    Observations with the Short Wavelength Spectrometer (SWS) onboard the {\\it Infrared Space Observatory} (ISO) have led to the first detection of the methyl radical ${\\rm CH_3}$ in the interstellar medium. The $\

  6. Turbulence in the Interstellar Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Falceta-Goncalves, D; Falgarone, E; Chian, A C -L

    2014-01-01

    Turbulence is ubiquitous in the insterstellar medium and plays a major role in several processes such as the formation of dense structures and stars, the stability of molecular clouds, the amplification of magnetic fields, and the re-acceleration and diffusion of cosmic rays. Despite its importance, interstellar turbulence, alike turbulence in general, is far from being fully understood. In this review we present the basics of turbulence physics, focusing on the statistics of its structure and energy cascade. We explore the physics of compressible and incompressible turbulent flows, as well as magnetized cases. The most relevant observational techniques that provide quantitative insights of interstellar turbulence are also presented. We also discuss the main difficulties in developing a three-dimensional view of interstellar turbulence from these observations. Finally, we briefly present what could be the the main sources of turbulence in the interstellar medium.

  7. Practices Surrounding Event Photos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vyas, Dhaval; Nijholt, Antinus; van der Veer, Gerrit C.; Kotzé, P.; Marsden, G.; Lindgaard, G.; Wesson, J.; Winckler, M.

    Sharing photos through mobile devices has a great potential for creating shared experiences of social events between co-located as well as remote participants. In order to design novel event sharing tools, we need to develop indepth understanding of current practices surrounding these so called

  8. The Interstellar Conspiracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Les; Matloff, Gregory L.

    2005-01-01

    If we were designing a human-carrying starship that could be launched in the not-too-distant future, it would almost certainly not use a warp drive to instantaneously bounce around the universe, as is done in Isaac Asimov's classic Foundation series or in episodes of Star Trek or Star Wars. Sadly, those starships that seem to be within technological reach could not even travel at high relativistic speeds, as does the interstellar ramjet in Poul Anderson's Tau Zero. Warp-speeds seem to be well outside the realm of currently understood physical law; proton-fusing ramjets may never be technologically feasible. Perhaps fortunately in our terrorist-plagued world, the economics of antimatter may never be attractive for large-scale starship propulsion. But interstellar travel will be possible within a few centuries, although it will certainly not be as fast as we might prefer. If humans learn how to hibernate, perhaps we will sleep our way to the stars, as do the crew in A. E. van Vogt's Far Centaurus. However, as discussed in a landmark paper in The Journal of the British Interplanetary Society, the most feasible approach to transporting a small human population to the planets (if any) of Alpha Centauri is the worldship. Such craft have often been featured in science fiction. See for example Arthur C. Clarke's Rendezvous with Rama, and Robert A. Heinlein's Orphans of the Sky. Worldships are essentially mobile versions of the O Neill free-space habitats. Constructed mostly from lunar and/or asteroidal materials, these solar-powered, multi-kilometer-dimension structures could house 10,000 to 100,000 humans in Earth-approximating environments. Artificial gravity would be provided by habitat rotation, and cosmic ray shielding would be provided by passive methods, such as habitat atmosphere and mass shielding, or magnetic fields. A late 21st century space-habitat venture might support itself economically by constructing large solar-powered satellites to beam energy back to

  9. Discovery of Interstellar CF+

    CERN Document Server

    Neufeld, D A; Menten, K M; Wolfire, M G; Black, J H; Schuller, F; Müller, H; Thorwirth, S; Gusten, R; Philipp, S

    2006-01-01

    We discuss the first astronomical detection of the CF+ (fluoromethylidynium) ion, obtained by observations of the J=1-0 (102.6 GHz), J=2-1 (205.2 GHz) and J=3-2 (307.7 GHz) rotational transitions toward the Orion Bar region. Our search for CF+, carried out using the IRAM 30m and APEX 12m telescopes, was motivated by recent theoretical models that predict CF+ abundances of a few times 1.E-10 in UV-irradiated molecular regions where C+ is present. The CF+ ion is produced by exothermic reactions of C+ with HF. Because fluorine atoms can react exothermically with H2, HF is predicted to be the dominant reservoir of fluorine, not only in well-shielded regions but also in the surface layers of molecular clouds where the C+ abundance is large. The observed CF+ line intensities imply the presence of CF+ column densities of at least 1.E+12 cm-2 over a region of size at least ~ 1 arcmin, in good agreement with theoretical predictions. They provide support for our current theories of interstellar fluorine chemistry, whic...

  10. Interstellar molecular clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bally, J.

    1986-04-01

    The physical properties of the molecular phase of the interstellar medium are studied with regard to star formation and the structure of the Galaxy. Most observations of molecular clouds are made with single-dish, high-surface precision radio telescopes, with the best resolution attainable at 0.2 to 1 arcmin; the smallest structures that can be resolved are of order 10 to the 17th cm in diameter. It is now believed that: (1) most of the mass of the Galaxy is in the form of giant molecular clouds; (2) the largest clouds and those responsible for most massive star formation are concentrated in spiral arms; (3) the molecular clouds are the sites of perpetual star formation, and are significant in the chemical evolution of the Galaxy; (4) giant molecular clouds determine the evolution of the kinematic properties of galactic disk stars; (5) the total gas content is diminishing with time; and (6) most clouds have supersonic internal motions and do not form stars on a free-fall time scale. It is concluded that though progress has been made, more advanced instruments are needed to inspect the processes operating within stellar nurseries and to study the distribution of the molecular clouds in more distant galaxies. Instruments presently under construction which are designed to meet these ends are presented.

  11. Interstellar Solid Hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Ching Yeh; Walker, Mark A

    2011-01-01

    We consider the possibility that solid molecular hydrogen is present in interstellar space. If so cosmic-rays and energetic photons cause ionisation in the solid leading to the formation of H6+. This ion is not produced by gas-phase reactions and its radiative transitions therefore provide a signature of solid H2 in the astrophysical context. The vibrational transitions of H6+ are yet to be observed in the laboratory, but we have characterised them in a quantum-theoretical treatment of the molecule; our calculations include anharmonic corrections, which are large. Here we report on those calculations and compare our results with astronomical data. In addition to the H6+ isotopomer, we focus on the deuterated species (HD)3+ which is expected to dominate at low ionisation rates as a result of isotopic condensation reactions. We can reliably predict the frequencies of the fundamental bands for five modes of vibration. For (HD)3+ all of these are found to lie close to some of the strongest of the pervasive mid-in...

  12. Interstellar Dust Close to the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Frisch, Priscilla C

    2012-01-01

    The low density interstellar medium (ISM) close to the Sun and inside of the heliosphere provides a unique laboratory for studying interstellar dust grains. Grain characteristics in the nearby ISM are obtained from observations of interstellar gas and dust inside of the heliosphere and the interstellar gas towards nearby stars. Comparison between the gas composition and solar abundances suggests that grains are dominated by olivines and possibly some form of iron oxide. Measurements of the interstellar Ne/O ratio by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer spacecraft indicate that a high fraction of interstellar oxygen in the ISM must be depleted onto dust grains. Local interstellar abundances are consistent with grain destruction in ~150 km/s interstellar shocks, provided that the carbonaceous component is hydrogenated amorphous carbon and carbon abundances are correct. Variations in relative abundances of refractories in gas suggest variations in the history of grain destruction in nearby ISM. The large observed ...

  13. The Ionization of Nearby Interstellar Gas

    CERN Document Server

    Slavin, J D; Slavin, Jonathan D.; Frisch, Priscilla C.

    2002-01-01

    We present new calculations of the photoionization of interstellar matter within ~5 pc of the Sun (which we refer to as the Local Cloud Complex or LCC) by directly observed radiation sources including nearby hot stars and the diffuse emission of the Soft X-ray Background (SXRB). In addition, we model the important, unobserved EUV emission both from the hot gas responsible for the SXRB and from a possible evaporative boundary between the LCC and the hot gas. We carry out radiative transfer calculations and show that these radiation sources can provide the ionization and heating of the cloud required to match a variety of observations. The ionization predicted in our models shows good agreement with pickup ion results, interstellar absorption line data towards epsilon CMa, and EUV opacity measurements of nearby white dwarf stars. Including the radiation from the conductive boundary improves agreement with data on the temperature and electron density in the cloud. The presence of dust in the cloud, or at least d...

  14. Black hole solutions surrounded by perfect fluid in Rastall theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydarzade, Y.; Darabi, F.

    2017-08-01

    In this work, we obtain uncharged∖charged Kiselev-like black holes as a new class of black hole solutions surrounded by perfect fluid in the context of Rastall theory. Then, we study the specific cases of the uncharged∖charged black holes surrounded by regular matter like dust and radiation, or exotic matter like quintessence, cosmological constant and phantom fields. By comparing the Kiselev-like black hole solutions in Rastall theory with the Kiselev black hole solutions in GR, we find an effective perfect fluid behavior for the black hole's surrounding field. It is shown that the corresponding effective perfect fluid has interesting characteristic features depending on the different ranges of the parameters in Rastall theory. For instance, Kiselev-like black holes surrounded by regular matter in Rastall theory may be considered as Kiselev black holes surrounded by exotic matter in GR, or Kiselev-like black holes surrounded by exotic matter in Rastall theory may be considered as Kiselev black holes surrounded by regular matter in GR.

  15. Interaction of massive stars with their surroundings

    CERN Document Server

    Hensler, Gerhard

    2008-01-01

    Due to their short lifetimes but their enormous energy release in all stages of their lives massive stars are the major engines for the comic matter circuit. They affect not only their close environment but are also responsible to drive mass flows on galactic scales. Recent 2D models of radiation-driven and wind-blown HII regions are summarized which explore the impact of massive stars to the interstellar medium but find surprisingly small energy transfer efficiencies while an observable Carbon self-enrichment in the Wolf-Rayet phase is detected in the warm ionized gas. Finally, the focus is set on state-of-the-art modelling of HII regions and its present weaknesses with respect to uncertainties and simplifications but on a perspective of the requested art of their modelling in the 21st century.

  16. Combining Magnetic and Electric Sails for Interstellar Deceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perakis, Nikolaos; Hein, Andreas M.

    2016-07-01

    The main benefit of an interstellar mission is to carry out in-situ measurements within a target star system. To allow for extended in-situ measurements, the spacecraft needs to be decelerated. One of the currently most promising technologies for deceleration is the magnetic sail which uses the deflection of interstellar matter via a magnetic field to decelerate the spacecraft. However, while the magnetic sail is very efficient at high velocities, its performance decreases with lower speeds. This leads to deceleration durations of several decades depending on the spacecraft mass. Within the context of Project Dragonfly, initiated by the Initiative of Interstellar Studies (i4is), this paper proposes a novel concept for decelerating a spacecraft on an interstellar mission by combining a magnetic sail with an electric sail. Combining the sails compensates for each technologys shortcomings: A magnetic sail is more effective at higher velocities than the electric sail and vice versa. It is demonstrated that using both sails sequentially outperforms using only the magnetic or electric sail for various mission scenarios and velocity ranges, at a constant total spacecraft mass. For example, for decelerating from 5% c, to interplanetary velocities, a spacecraft with both sails needs about 29 years, whereas the electric sail alone would take 35 years and the magnetic sail about 40 years with a total spacecraft mass of 8250 kg. Furthermore, it is assessed how the combined deceleration system affects the optimal overall mission architecture for different spacecraft masses and cruising speeds. Future work would investigate how operating both systems in parallel instead of sequentially would affect its performance. Moreover, uncertainties in the density of interstellar matter and sail properties need to be explored.

  17. Depolarization canals and interstellar turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, A.; Shukurov, A.

    Recent radio polarization observations have revealed a plethora of unexpected features in the polarized Galactic radio background that arise from propagation effects in the random (turbulent) interstellar medium. The canals are especially striking among them, a random network of very dark, narrow regions clearly visible in many directions against a bright polarized Galactic synchrotron background. There are no obvious physical structures in the ISM that may have caused the canals, and so they have been called Faraday ghosts. They evidently carry information about interstellar turbulence but only now is it becoming clear how this information can be extracted. Two theories for the origin of the canals have been proposed; both attribute the canals to Faraday rotation, but one invokes strong gradients in Faraday rotation in the sky plane (specifically, in a foreground Faraday screen) and the other only relies on line-of-sight effects (differential Faraday rotation). In this review we discuss the physical nature of the canals and how they can be used to explore statistical properties of interstellar turbulence. This opens studies of magnetized interstellar turbulence to new methods of analysis, such as contour statistics and related techniques of computational geometry and topology. In particular, we can hope to measure such elusive quantities as the Taylor microscale and the effective magnetic Reynolds number of interstellar MHD turbulence.

  18. IBEX views the global structure of the heliosphere influenced by the Interstellar Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwadron, Nathan

    The IBEX ribbon has been separated from the surrounding globally distributed flux (GDF), revealing ENA emission largely from the inner heliosheath. The line-of-sight (LOS) integrated pressure in the GDF is quite large, requiring that the interstellar magnetic field be sufficiently strong (e.g. 3 microG) to balance the pressure of the inner heliosheath. The LOS emissions from the GDF have revealed signatures of the nose of the heliosphere, and the heliotail, which has been examined carefully. The strong interstellar magnetic field has broad implications for the structure of the heliosphere and the existence or lack of a bow shock. These global heliospheric structures also filter primary interstellar neutral atoms and lead to creation of secondary atoms through charge-exchange in the outer heliosheath. IBEX observations of H atoms from the Local Interstellar Medium reveal remarkable signatures of both filtration and the secondary component likely reflecting influences of the interstellar magnetic field on the outer heliosheath. New determinations of the LISM velocity from neutral atom measurments and the LISM magnetic field direction from the IBEX ribbon are shown to be consistent with the interstellar modulation of TeV cosmic rays revealed in global anisotropy maps of Milagro, Asgamma and IceCube. Thus, IBEX observations reveal a new picture of heliospheric structures and interactions that are strongly influenced by the interstellar magnetic field.

  19. Physics of interstellar dust

    CERN Document Server

    Krugel, Endrik

    2002-01-01

    The dielectric permeability; How to evaluate grain cross sections; Very small and very big particles; Case studies of Mie calculus; Particle statistics; The radiative transition probability; Structure and composition of dust; Dust radiation; Dust and its environment; Polarization; Grain alignment; PAHs and spectral features of dust; Radiative transport; Diffuse matter in the Milky Way; Stars and their formation; Emission from young stars. Appendices Mathematical formulae; List of symbols.

  20. Theory of interstellar medium diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahr, H. J.

    1983-01-01

    The theoretical interpretation of observed interplanetary resonance luminescence patterns is used as one of the must promising methods to determine the state of the local interstellar medium (LISM). However, these methods lead to discrepant results that would be hard to understand in the framework of any physical LISM scenario. Assuming that the observational data are reliable, two possibilities which could help to resolve these discrepancies are discussed: (1) the current modeling of resonance luminescence patterns is unsatisfactory and has to be improved, and (2) the extrapolated interstellar parameters are not indicative of the unperturbed LISM state, but rather designate an intermediate state attained in the outer regions of the solar system. It is shown that a quantitative treatment of the neutral gas-plasma interaction effects in the interface between the heliospheric and the interstellar plasmas is of major importance for the correct understanding of the whole complex.

  1. Interstellar Initiative Web Page Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Alkesh

    1999-01-01

    This summer at NASA/MSFC, I have contributed to two projects: Interstellar Initiative Web Page Design and Lenz's Law Relative Motion Demonstration. In the Web Design Project, I worked on an Outline. The Web Design Outline was developed to provide a foundation for a Hierarchy Tree Structure. The Outline would help design a Website information base for future and near-term missions. The Website would give in-depth information on Propulsion Systems and Interstellar Travel. The Lenz's Law Relative Motion Demonstrator is discussed in this volume by Russell Lee.

  2. The Warped Science of Interstellar

    CERN Document Server

    Luminet, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The science fiction film, Interstellar, tells the story of a team of astronauts searching a distant galaxy for habitable planets to colonize. Interstellar's story draws heavily from contemporary science. The film makes reference to a range of topics, from established concepts such as fast-spinning black holes, accretion disks, tidal effects, and time dilation, to far more speculative ideas such as wormholes, time travel, additional space dimensions, and the theory of everything. The aim of this article is to decipher some of the scientific notions which support the framework of the movie.

  3. Infrared emission from interstellar PAHs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allamandola, L. J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Barker, J. R.

    1987-01-01

    The mid-IR absorption and Raman spectra of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and the mechanisms determining them are reviewed, and the implications for observations of similar emission spectra in interstellar clouds are considered. Topics addressed include the relationship between PAHs and amorphous C, the vibrational spectroscopy of PAHs, the molecular emission process, molecular anharmonicity, and the vibrational quasi-continuum. Extensive graphs, diagrams, and sample spectra are provided, and the interstellar emission bands are attributed to PAHs with 20-30 C atoms on the basis of the observed 3.3/3.4-micron intensity ratios.

  4. On the question of interstellar travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    Arguments are presented which show that motives for interstellar travel by advanced technological civilizations based on an extrapolation of earth's history may be quite invalid. In addition, it is proposed that interstellar travel is so enormously expensive and perhaps so hazardous, that advanced civilizations do not engage in such practices because of the ease of information transfer via interstellar communication.

  5. Experimental interstellar organic chemistry - Preliminary findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, B. N.; Sagan, C.

    1973-01-01

    Review of the results of some explicit experimental simulation of interstellar organic chemistry consisting in low-temperature high-vacuum UV irradiation of condensed simple gases known or suspected to be present in the interstellar medium. The results include the finding that acetonitrile may be present in the interstellar medium. The implication of this and other findings are discussed.

  6. Experimental interstellar organic chemistry - Preliminary findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khare, B. N.; Sagan, C.

    1973-01-01

    Review of the results of some explicit experimental simulation of interstellar organic chemistry consisting in low-temperature high-vacuum UV irradiation of condensed simple gases known or suspected to be present in the interstellar medium. The results include the finding that acetonitrile may be present in the interstellar medium. The implication of this and other findings are discussed.

  7. Interstellar Aldehydes and their corresponding Reduced Alcohols: Interstellar Propanol?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etim, Emmanuel; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Das, Ankan; Gorai, Prasanta; Arunan, Elangannan

    2016-07-01

    There is a well-defined trend of aldehydes and their corresponding reduced alcohols among the known interstellar molecules; methanal (CH_2O) and methanol (CH_3OH); ethenone (C_2H_2O) and vinyl alcohol (CH_2CHOH); ethanal (C_2H_4O) and ethanol(C_2H_5OH); glycolaldehyde (C_2H_4O_2) and ethylene glycol(C_2H_6O_2). The reduced alcohol of propanal (CH_3CH_2CHO) which is propanol (CH_3CH_2CH_2OH) has not yet been observed but its isomer; ethyl methyl ether (CH_3CH_2OCH_3) is a known interstellar molecule. In this article, different studies are carried out in investigating the trend between aldehydes and their corresponding reduced alcohols and the deviation from the trend. Kinetically and with respect to the formation route, alcohols could have been produced from their corresponding reduced aldehydes via two successive hydrogen additions. This is plausible because of (a) the unquestionable high abundance of hydrogen, (b) presence of energy sources within some of the molecular clouds and (c) the ease at which successive hydrogen addition reaction occurs. In terms of stability, the observed alcohols are thermodynamically favorable as compared to their isomers. Regarding the formation process, the hydrogen addition reactions are believed to proceed on the surface of the interstellar grains which leads to the effect of interstellar hydrogen bonding. From the studies, propanol and propan-2-ol are found to be more strongly attached to the surface of the interstellar dust grains which affects its overall gas phase abundance as compared to its isomer ethyl methyl ether which has been observed.

  8. The stardust abundance in the local interstellar cloud at the birth of the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, Peter; Leitner, Jan; Kodolányi, János

    2017-09-01

    Primitive Solar System materials, such as certain types of meteorites, interplanetary dust particles and cometary matter, contain small quantities of refractory dust grains that are older than our Solar System. These `presolar grains' condensed in the winds of evolved stars and in the ejecta of stellar explosions, and they were part of the interstellar gas and dust cloud from which our Solar System formed 4.57 billion years ago1. Interstellar dust is not only stardust but forms in the interstellar medium as well, predominantly as silicates, and, to a lesser extent, as carbonaceous dust and iron particles2. Presolar grains represent a sample of stardust, and their abundances in primitive Solar System materials can be used to constrain the fraction of stardust among interstellar dust. Here we show that the size distribution of presolar silicates follows that observationally derived for interstellar dust, at least in the diameter range 100-500 nm, that current estimates of presolar grain abundances (mass fractions) are at least a factor of 2 too low, and that several per cent of the interstellar dust in the interstellar cloud pre-dating our Solar System was stardust, making it a minor but still important ingredient of the starting material from which our Solar System formed.

  9. Herschel observations of interstellar chloronium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neufeld, David A.; Roueff, Evelyne; Snell, Ronald L.; Lis, Dariusz; Benz, Arnold O.; Bruderer, Simon; Black, John H.; De Luca, Massimo; Gerin, Maryvonne; Goldsmith, Paul F.; Gupta, Harshal; Indriolo, Nick; Le Bourlot, Jacques; Le Petit, Franck; Larsson, Bengt; Melnick, Gary J.; Menten, Karl M.; Monje, Raquel; Nagy, Zsofia; Phillips, Thomas G.; Sandqvist, Aage; Sonnentrucker, Paule; van der Tak, Floris; Wolfire, Mark G.

    2012-01-01

    Using the Herschel Space Observatory's Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared, we have observed parachloronium (H2Cl+) toward six sources in the Galaxy. We detected interstellar chloronium absorption in foreground molecular clouds along the sight lines to the bright submillimeter continuum sourc

  10. Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination (ISPE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, A. J.; Allen, C.; Bajt, S.; Basset, R.; Bastien, R.; Bechtel, H.; Bleuet, P.; Borg, J.; Brenker F.; Bridges, J.

    2009-01-01

    In January 2006 the Stardust sample return capsule returned to Earth bearing the first solid samples from a primitive solar system body, C omet 81P/Wild2, and a collector dedicated to the capture and return o f contemporary interstellar dust. Both collectors were approximately 0.1m(exp 2) in area and were composed of aerogel tiles (85% of the co llecting area) and aluminum foils. The Stardust Interstellar Dust Col lector (SIDC) was exposed to the interstellar dust stream for a total exposure factor of 20 m(exp 2-) day during two periods before the co metary encounter. The Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination ( ISPE) is a three-year effort to characterize the collection using no ndestructive techniques. The ISPE consists of six interdependent proj ects: (1) Candidate identification through automated digital microsco py and a massively distributed, calibrated search (2) Candidate extr action and photodocumentation (3) Characterization of candidates thro ugh synchrotronbased FourierTranform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), S canning XRay Fluoresence Microscopy (SXRF), and Scanning Transmission Xray Microscopy (STXM) (4) Search for and analysis of craters in f oils through FESEM scanning, Auger Spectroscopy and synchrotronbased Photoemission Electron Microscopy (PEEM) (5) Modeling of interstell ar dust transport in the solar system (6) Laboratory simulations of h ypervelocity dust impacts into the collecting media

  11. Bounds on halo-particle interactions from interstellar calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivukula, Sekhar R.; Cohen, Andrew G.; Dimopoulos, Savas; Walker, Terry P.

    1990-01-01

    It is shown that the existence of neutral interstellar clouds constrains the interaction of any particulate dark-matter candidate with atomic hydrogen to be quite small. Even for a halo particle of mass 1 PeV (10 to the 6 GeV), it is shown that the cross section with hydrogen must be smaller than the typical atomic cross section that is expected for a positively charged particle bound to an electron. The argument presented is that if the clouds are in equilibrium, then the rate at which energy is deposited by collisions with dark-matter particles must be smaller than the rate at which the cloud can cool. This argument is used to constrain the interaction cross section of dark matter with hydrogen. Remarks are made on the general viability of charged dark matter. Comments are also made on a bound which derives from the dynamical stability of the halo.

  12. Studies of dust and gas in the interstellar medium of the Milky Way

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salgado Cambiazo, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    This thesis focus on the study of the Interstellar Medium (ISM) of the Milky Way and consists of two parts: in the first one we present a study of the dust properties in HII regions and their surrounding PDRs. We focus our studies on two compact HII regions: W3(A) and the Orion Nebula (Chapters 2 an

  13. The Sun's dusty interstellar environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterken, Veerle

    2016-07-01

    The Sun's dusty interstellar environment Interstellar dust from our immediate interstellar neighborhood travels through the solar system at speeds of ca. 26 km/s: the relative speed of the solar system with respect to the local interstellar cloud. On its way, its trajectories are altered by several forces like the solar radiation pressure force and Lorentz force. The latter is due to the charged dust particles that fly through the interplanetary magnetic field. These trajectories differ per particle type and size and lead to varying fluxes and directions of the flow inside of the solar system that depend on location but also on phase in the solar cycle. Hence, these fluxes and directions depend strongly on the configuration of the inner regions and outer regions of the heliosphere. Several missions have measured this dust in the solar system directly. The Ulysses dust detector data encompasses 16 years of intestellar dust fluxes and approximate directions, Stardust captured returned to Earth a few of these particles sucessfully, and finally the Cassini dust detector allowed for compositional information to be obtained from the impacts on the instrument. In this talk, we give an overview of the current status of interstellar dust research through the measurements made inside of the solar system, and we put them in perspective to the knowledge obtained from more classical astronomical means. In special, we focus on the interaction of the dust with the interplanetary magnetic field, and on what we learn about the dust (and the fields) by comparing the available dust data to computer simulations of dust trajectories. Finally, we synthesize the different methods of observation, their results, and give a preview on new research opportunities in the coming year(s).

  14. PAHs in Translucent Interstellar Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Farid; Galazutdinov, G.; Krelowski, J.; Biennier, L.; Beletsky, Y.; Song, I.

    2011-05-01

    We discuss the proposal of relating the origin of some of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) to neutral polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) present in translucent interstellar clouds. The spectra of several cold, isolated gas-phase PAHs have been measured in the laboratory under experimental conditions that mimic the interstellar conditions and are compared with an extensive set of astronomical spectra of reddened, early type stars. This comparison provides - for the first time - accurate upper limits for the abundances of specific PAH molecules along specific lines-of-sight. Something that is not attainable from IR observations alone. The comparison of these unique laboratory data with high resolution, high S/N ratio astronomical observations leads to two major findings: (1) a finding specific to the individual molecules that were probed in this study and, which leads to the clear and unambiguous conclusion that the abundance of these specific neutral PAHs must be very low in the individual translucent interstellar clouds that were probed in this survey (PAH features remain below the level of detection) and, (2) a general finding that neutral PAHs exhibit intrinsic band profiles that are similar to the profile of the narrow DIBs indicating that the carriers of the narrow DIBs must have close molecular structure and characteristics. This study is the first quantitative survey of neutral PAHs in the optical range and it opens the way for unambiguous quantitative searches of PAHs in a variety of interstellar and circumstellar environments. // Reference: F. Salama et al. (2011) ApJ. 728 (1), 154 // Acknowledgements: F.S. acknowledges the support of the NASA's Space Mission Directorate APRA Program. J.K. acknowledges the financial support of the Polish State (grant N203 012 32/1550). The authors are deeply grateful to the ESO archive as well as to the ESO staff members for their active support.

  15. Interstellar shock studies: the SOFIA/GREAT contribution

    CERN Document Server

    Gusdorf, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Shocks are ubiquitous in the interstellar medium of galaxies, where they contribute to the energetic balance and to the cycle of matter, and where they are thought to be the primary sites for cosmic rays acceleration. Most of the time: in jets and outflows, supernova remnants, or colliding flows, they are linked with star formation. The study of shocks is hence a powerful tool to probe the evolution of the interstellar medium and to better understand star formation. To these aims, the most precise observations must be compared with the most precise models of shocks. The SOFIA/GREAT instrument represents a powerful observational tool to support our progresses, as it allows to observe numerous shock tracers in the far-infrared range.

  16. Isotopic Fractionation in Comets: Quantifying the Contribution of Interstellar Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnley, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Anomalously fractionated isotopic material is found in many primitive Solar System objects, such as meteorites and comets. It is thought, in some cases, to trace interstellar matter that was incorporated into the Solar Nebula without undergoing significant processing. We will present the results of models of the nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon fractionation chemistry in dense molecular clouds, particularly in cares where substantial freeze-taut of molecules on to dust has occurred. The range of fractionation ratios expected in different interstellar molecules will be discussed and compared to the ratios measured in molecular clouds, comets and meteoritic material. These models make several predictions that can be tested in the near future by molecular line observations, particularly with the GBT.

  17. Interstellar dust. Evidence for interstellar origin of seven dust particles collected by the Stardust spacecraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, Andrew J; Stroud, Rhonda M; Bechtel, Hans A; Brenker, Frank E; Butterworth, Anna L; Flynn, George J; Frank, David R; Gainsforth, Zack; Hillier, Jon K; Postberg, Frank; Simionovici, Alexandre S; Sterken, Veerle J; Nittler, Larry R; Allen, Carlton; Anderson, David; Ansari, Asna; Bajt, Saša; Bastien, Ron K; Bassim, Nabil; Bridges, John; Brownlee, Donald E; Burchell, Mark; Burghammer, Manfred; Changela, Hitesh; Cloetens, Peter; Davis, Andrew M; Doll, Ryan; Floss, Christine; Grün, Eberhard; Heck, Philipp R; Hoppe, Peter; Hudson, Bruce; Huth, Joachim; Kearsley, Anton; King, Ashley J; Lai, Barry; Leitner, Jan; Lemelle, Laurence; Leonard, Ariel; Leroux, Hugues; Lettieri, Robert; Marchant, William; Ogliore, Ryan; Ong, Wei Jia; Price, Mark C; Sandford, Scott A; Sans Tresseras, Juan-Angel; Schmitz, Sylvia; Schoonjans, Tom; Schreiber, Kate; Silversmit, Geert; Solé, Vicente A; Srama, Ralf; Stadermann, Frank; Stephan, Thomas; Stodolna, Julien; Sutton, Stephen; Trieloff, Mario; Tsou, Peter; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Vekemans, Bart; Vincze, Laszlo; Von Korff, Joshua; Wordsworth, Naomi; Zevin, Daniel; Zolensky, Michael E

    2014-08-15

    Seven particles captured by the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector and returned to Earth for laboratory analysis have features consistent with an origin in the contemporary interstellar dust stream. More than 50 spacecraft debris particles were also identified. The interstellar dust candidates are readily distinguished from debris impacts on the basis of elemental composition and/or impact trajectory. The seven candidate interstellar particles are diverse in elemental composition, crystal structure, and size. The presence of crystalline grains and multiple iron-bearing phases, including sulfide, in some particles indicates that individual interstellar particles diverge from any one representative model of interstellar dust inferred from astronomical observations and theory.

  18. Depolarization canals and interstellar turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Fletcher, A; Fletcher, Andrew; Shukurov, Anvar

    2006-01-01

    Recent radio polarization observations have revealed a plethora of unexpected features in the polarized Galactic radio background that arise from propagation effects in the random (turbulent) interstellar medium. The canals are especially striking among them, a random network of very dark, narrow regions clearly visible in many directions against a bright polarized Galactic synchrotron background. There are no obvious physical structures in the ISM that may have caused the canals, and so they have been called Faraday ghosts. They evidently carry information about interstellar turbulence but only now is it becoming clear how this information can be extracted. Two theories for the origin of the canals have been proposed; both attribute the canals to Faraday rotation, but one invokes strong gradients in Faraday rotation in the sky plane (specifically, in a foreground Faraday screen) and the other only relies on line-of-sight effects (differential Faraday rotation). In this review we discuss the physical nature o...

  19. Interstellar Grains: 50 Years On

    CERN Document Server

    Wickramasinghe, N Chandra

    2011-01-01

    Our understanding of the nature of interstellar grains has evolved considerably over the past half century with the present author and Fred Hoyle being intimately involved at several key stages of progress. The currently fashionable graphite-silicate-organic grain model has all its essential aspects unequivocally traceable to original peer-reviewed publications by the author and/or Fred Hoyle. The prevailing reluctance to accept these clear-cut priorities may be linked to our further work that argued for interstellar grains and organics to have a biological provenance - a position perceived as heretical. The biological model, however, continues to provide a powerful unifying hypothesis for a vast amount of otherwise disconnected and disparate astronomical data.

  20. One Kilogram Interstellar Colony Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mole, A.

    Small interstellar colony probes based on nanotechnology will become possible long before giant multi-generation ships become affordable. A beam generator and magnetic sail can accelerate a one kg probe to .1 c, braking via the interstellar field can decelerate it, and the field in a distant solar system can allow it to maneuver to an extrasolar planet. A heat shield is used for landing and nanobots emerge to build ever-larger robots and construct colony infrastructure. Humans can then be generated from genomes stored as data in computer memory. Technology is evolving towards these capabilities and should reach the required level in fifty years. The plan appears to be affordable, with the principal cost being the beam generator, estimated at $17 billion.

  1. Ionization in nearby interstellar gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, P. C.; Welty, D. E.; York, D. G.; Fowler, J. R.

    1990-01-01

    Due to dielectric recombination, neutral magnesium represents an important tracer for the warm low-density gas around the solar system. New Mg I 2852 absorption-line data from IUE are presented, including detections in a few stars within 40 pc of the sun. The absence of detectable Mg I in Alpha CMa and other stars sets limits on the combined size and electron density of the interstellar cloud which gives rise to the local interstellar wind. For a cloud radius greater than 1 pc and density of 0.1/cu cm, the local cloud has a low fractional ionization, n(e)/n(tot) less than 0.05, if magnesium is undepleted, equilibrium conditions prevail, the cloud temperature is 11,750 K, and 80 percent of the magnesium in the sightline is Mg II.

  2. Ionization in nearby interstellar gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frisch, P.C.; Welty, D.E.; York, D.G.; Fowler, J.R. (Chicago Univ., IL (USA) New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces (USA))

    1990-07-01

    Due to dielectric recombination, neutral magnesium represents an important tracer for the warm low-density gas around the solar system. New Mg I 2852 absorption-line data from IUE are presented, including detections in a few stars within 40 pc of the sun. The absence of detectable Mg I in Alpha CMa and other stars sets limits on the combined size and electron density of the interstellar cloud which gives rise to the local interstellar wind. For a cloud radius greater than 1 pc and density of 0.1/cu cm, the local cloud has a low fractional ionization, n(e)/n(tot) less than 0.05, if magnesium is undepleted, equilibrium conditions prevail, the cloud temperature is 11,750 K, and 80 percent of the magnesium in the sightline is Mg II. 85 refs.

  3. Representing culture in interstellar messages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakoch, Douglas A.

    2008-09-01

    As scholars involved with the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) have contemplated how we might portray humankind in any messages sent to civilizations beyond Earth, one of the challenges they face is adequately representing the diversity of human cultures. For example, in a 2003 workshop in Paris sponsored by the SETI Institute, the International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) SETI Permanent Study Group, the International Society for the Arts, Sciences and Technology (ISAST), and the John Templeton Foundation, a varied group of artists, scientists, and scholars from the humanities considered how to encode notions of altruism in interstellar messages art_science/2003>. Though the group represented 10 countries, most were from Europe and North America, leading to the group's recommendation that subsequent discussions on the topic should include more globally representative perspectives. As a result, the IAA Study Group on Interstellar Message Construction and the SETI Institute sponsored a follow-up workshop in Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA in February 2005. The Santa Fe workshop brought together scholars from a range of disciplines including anthropology, archaeology, chemistry, communication science, philosophy, and psychology. Participants included scholars familiar with interstellar message design as well as specialists in cross-cultural research who had participated in the Symposium on Altruism in Cross-cultural Perspective, held just prior to the workshop during the annual conference of the Society for Cross-cultural Research . The workshop included discussion of how cultural understandings of altruism can complement and critique the more biologically based models of altruism proposed for interstellar messages at the 2003 Paris workshop. This paper, written by the chair of both the Paris and Santa Fe workshops, will explore the challenges of communicating concepts of altruism that draw on both biological and cultural models.

  4. Photodissociation of interstellar N2

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Xiaohu; Visser, Ruud; Ubachs, Wim; Lewis, Brenton R; Gibson, Stephen T; van Dishoeck, Ewine F

    2013-01-01

    Molecular nitrogen is one of the key species in the chemistry of interstellar clouds and protoplanetary disks and the partitioning of nitrogen between N and N2 controls the formation of more complex prebiotic nitrogen-containing species. The aim of this work is to gain a better understanding of the interstellar N2 photodissociation processes based on recent detailed theoretical and experimental work and to provide accurate rates for use in chemical models. We simulated the full high-resolution line-by-line absorption + dissociation spectrum of N2 over the relevant 912-1000 \\AA\\ wavelength range, by using a quantum-mechanical model which solves the coupled-channels Schr\\"odinger equation. The simulated N2 spectra were compared with the absorption spectra of H2, H, CO, and dust to compute photodissociation rates in various radiation fields and shielding functions. The effects of the new rates in interstellar cloud models were illustrated for diffuse and translucent clouds, a dense photon dominated region and a ...

  5. Interstellar Dust Models Towards Some IUE Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katyal, N.; Gupta, R.; Vaidya, D. B.

    2013-12-01

    We study the extinction properties of the composite dust grains, consisting of host silicate spheroids and graphite as inclusions, using discrete dipole approximation (DDA). We calculate the extinction cross sections of the composite grains in the ultraviolet spectral region, 1200\\AA -3200\\AA and study the variation in extinction as a function of the volume fraction of the inclusions. We compare the model extinction curves with the observed interstellar extinction curves obtained from the data given by the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) satellite. Our results for the composite grains show a distinct variation in the extinction efficiencies with the variation in the volume fraction of the inclusions. In particular, it is found that the wavelength of peak absorption at `2175\\AA' shifts towards the longer wavelength with the variation in the volume fraction of inclusions. We find that the composite grain models with the axial ratios viz. 1.33 and 2.0 fit the observed extinction reasonably well with a grain size distribution, a = 0.005-0.250$\\mu m$. Moreover, our results of the composite grains clearly indicate that the inhomogeneity in the grain structure, composition and the surrounding media modifies the extinction properties of the grains.

  6. Cometary Refractory Grains: Interstellar and Nebular Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooden, D. H.

    2008-07-01

    Comets are heterogeneous mixtures of interstellar and nebular materials. The degree of mixing of interstellar sources and nebular sources at different nuclear size scales holds the promise of revealing how cometary particles, cometesimals, and cometary nuclei accreted. We can ascribe cometary materials to interstellar and nebular sources and see how comets probe planet-forming process in our protoplanetary disk. Comets and cometary IDPs contain carbonaceous matter that appears to be either similar to poorly-graphitized (amorphous) carbon, a likely ISM source, or highly labile complex organics, with possible ISM or outer disk heritage. The oxygen fugacity of the solar nebula depends on the dynamical interplay between the inward migration of carbon-rich grains and of icy (water-rich) grains. Inside the water dissociation line, OH- reacts with carbon to form CO or CO2, consuming available oxygen and contributing to the canonical low oxygen fugacity. Alternatively, the influx of water vapor and/or oxygen rich dust grains from outer (cooler) disk regions can raise the oxygen fugacity. Low oxygen fugacity of the canonical solar nebula favors the condensation of Mg-rich crystalline silicates and Fe-metal, or the annealing of Fe-Mg amorphous silicates into Mg-rich crystals and Fe-metal via Fe-reduction. High oxygen fugacity nebular conditions favors the condensation of Fe-bearing to Fe-rich crystalline silicates. In the ISM, Fe-Mg amorphous silicates are prevalent, in stark contrast to Mg-rich crystalline silicates that are rare. Hence, cometary Mg-rich crystalline silicates formed in the hot, inner regions of the canonical solar nebula and they are the touchstone for models of the outward radial transport of nebular grains to the comet-forming zone. Stardust samples are dominated by Mg-rich crystalline silicates but also contain abundant Fe-bearing and Fe-rich crystalline silicates that are too large (≫0.1 μm) to be annealed Fe-Mg amorphous silicates. By comparison

  7. Laboratory spectroscopic studies of interstellar ice analogues

    OpenAIRE

    Puletti, F

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the molecular chemistry in interstellar environments has proven to be far more complex than was initially expected. We live in a molecular universe that is rich with molecules formed both in the gas phase and on the surface of interstellar icy dust grains. Two important classes of interstellar molecules are sulphur-bearing species and complex organic molecules, i.e., molecules containing carbon and containing more than 6 atoms. The former are relevant because of their potenti...

  8. Physics of the interstellar and intergalactic medium

    CERN Document Server

    Draine, Bruce T

    2010-01-01

    This is a comprehensive and richly illustrated textbook on the astrophysics of the interstellar and intergalactic medium--the gas and dust, as well as the electromagnetic radiation, cosmic rays, and magnetic and gravitational fields, present between the stars in a galaxy and also between galaxies themselves. Topics include radiative processes across the electromagnetic spectrum; radiative transfer; ionization; heating and cooling; astrochemistry; interstellar dust; fluid dynamics, including ionization fronts and shock waves; cosmic rays; distribution and evolution of the interstellar medium

  9. Interstellar Extinction by Spheroidal Dust Grains

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Ranjan; Mukai, Tadashi; Vaidya, D. B.; Sen, Asoke K.; Okada, Yasuhiko

    2005-01-01

    Observations of interstellar extinction and polarization indicate that the interstellar medium consists of aligned non-spherical dust grains which show variation in the interstellar extinction curve for wavelengths ranging from NIR to UV. To model the extinction and polarization, one cannot use the Mie theory which assumes the grains as solid spheres. We have used a T-matrix based method for computing the extinction efficiencies of spheroidal silicate and graphite grains of different shapes (...

  10. Dark Matter is Baryons

    CERN Document Server

    Soberman, R K; Soberman, Robert K.; Dubin, Maurice

    2001-01-01

    A comet-like, but magnitudes smaller, extremely low albedo interstellar meteoroid population of fragile aggregates with solar type composition, measured in space and terrestrially, is most probably the universal dark matter. Although non-baryonic particles cannot be excluded, only "Big Bang" cosmology predicts an appreciable fraction of such alternate forms. As more counter-physics hypotheses are added to fit observation to the expanding universe assumption, a classical physics alternative proffers dark matter interactive red shifts normally correlated with distance. The cosmic microwave background results from size-independent thermal plateau radiation that emanates from dark matter gravitationally drawn into the Galaxy.

  11. Effects of shock waves in the interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petriella, Alberto

    2013-12-01

    In this Thesis, we study the effects on the interstellar medium of shock waves produced by massive stars during different stages of their evolution. We investigate the interaction between HII regions, interstellar bubbles, and supernova remnants and the surrounding medium and we analize the star forming activity to establish if they can trigger star formation around them. We study the distribution of the molecular gas around the supernova remnants G20.0-0.2 and G24.7+0.6 and we find molecular clouds probably shocked by the remnants. These clouds host star forming regions, which suggest a connection between the birth of the new stars and the expansion of the supernova remnants. We analyze the distribution of the interstellar medium around three HII regions (an HII region complex near the supernova remnant G18.8+0.3 and the HII regions N65 and G35.673-0.847) and we find shells of molecular material swept up by their front shocks. These shells show signs of star forming activity probably triggered by the expanding HII regions. Lastly, we find evidence of the interaction between the stellar winds of the LBV stars G24.73+0.69 and G26.47+0.02 and the surrounding molecular gas. The data used in this Thesis were obtained through dedicated observations of several molecular transitions with the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment (ASTE) and through the calibration of unpublished archival observations of the Chandra X-ray telescope and the VLA interferometer. Additional data were extracted from public surveys in the radio, infrared, millimeter and submillimeter bands.

  12. Distribution and coassociations of trace elements in soft tissue and byssus of Mytilus galloprovincialis relative to the surrounding seawater and suspended matter of the southern part of the Korean Peninsula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szefer, P; Kim, B-S; Kim, C-K; Kim, E-H; Lee, C-B

    2004-05-01

    The concentrations of Cd, Co, Cu, Cr, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sn, Ti and Zn were analyzed by AAS, ICP MS and AFS in soft tissues and byssal threads of Mytilus galloprovincialis from Masan Bay and Ulsan Bay, Korea. Spatial variations in metal concentrations were found. The levels of Cd, Pb, Hg, Cu, Zn, Co and Mn were very high in the mussels from Ulsan Bay (Sts. U1, U2) and comparable with elevated concentrations of these elements in Mytilus sp. reported to date for other geographical areas. Seasonal differences in some metal concentrations were also observed. These variations may be caused by factors such as: a large difference in seawater temperature, food supply for the mussel population and/or freshwater runoff of particulate metal to the coastal water and weight changes brought about by gonadal development and the release of sexual products. Pb, Cu, Zn, Co, Ni, Fe and Mn were more enriched in byssal threads than in the soft tissues, hence the byssus seems to be more sensitive in reflecting the availabilities of trace metals in the ambient waters. Concentrations of trace metals varied with respect to the size of mussels and season, depending on many factors like sexual development, and seawater temperature, etc. The levels of some trace metals in seawater, especially in suspended matter were correlated significantly with those in soft tissues and byssal threads. There were spatial variations in metal concentrations in the soft tissue and byssus attributed to different sources of trace elements located near the sampling sites. There were significant relationships between concentrations of some metals (Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn) in mussel soft tissues and byssal threads and suspended matter. This suggests that M. galloprovincialis can be used as a sensitive biomonitor for the availabilities of trace elements in the coastal waters off Korea.

  13. Distribution and coassociations of trace elements in soft tissue and byssus of Mytilus galloprovincialis relative to the surrounding seawater and suspended matter of the southern part of the Korean Peninsula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szefer, P.; Kim, B.-S.; Kim, C.-K.; Kim, E.-H.; Lee, C.-B

    2004-05-01

    The concentrations of Cd, Co, Cu, Cr, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sn, Ti and Zn were analyzed by AAS, ICP MS and AFS in soft tissues and byssal threads of Mytilus galloprovincialis from Masan Bay and Ulsan Bay, Korea. Spatial variations in metal concentrations were found. The levels of Cd, Pb, Hg, Cu, Zn, Co and Mn were very high in the mussels from Ulsan Bay (Sts. U1, U2) and comparable with elevated concentrations of these elements in Mytilus sp. reported to date for other geographical areas. Seasonal differences in some metal concentrations were also observed. These variations may be caused by factors such as: a large difference in seawater temperature, food supply for the mussel population and/or freshwater runoff of particulate metal to the coastal water and weight changes brought about by gonadal development and the release of sexual products. Pb, Cu, Zn, Co, Ni, Fe and Mn were more enriched in byssal threads than in the soft tissues, hence the byssus seems to be more sensitive in reflecting the availabilities of trace metals in the ambient waters. Concentrations of trace metals varied with respect to the size of mussels and season, depending on many factors like sexual development, and seawater temperature, etc. The levels of some trace metals in seawater, especially in suspended matter were correlated significantly with those in soft tissues and byssal threads. There were spatial variations in metal concentrations in the soft tissue and byssus attributed to different sources of trace elements located near the sampling sites. There were significant relationships between concentrations of some metals (Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn) in mussel soft tissues and byssal threads and suspended matter. This suggests that M. galloprovincialis can be used as a sensitive biomonitor for the availabilities of trace elements in the coastal waters off Korea. - Mytilus galloprovincialis can be used as a biomonitor for trace elements in coastal waters off Korea.

  14. Clinical Application of Surrounding Puncture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Yao-jie; HAN Chou-ping

    2003-01-01

    Surrounding puncture can stop pathogenic qi from spreading, consolidate the connection between local meridians and enrich local qi and blood, which can eventually supplement anti-pathogenic qi and remove pathogenic qi, and consequently remedy diseases. The author of this article summrized and analyzed the clinical application of surrounding puncture for the purpose of studying this technique and improving the therapeutic effect.

  15. Deuterium enrichment of interstellar dusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Ankan; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Majumdar, Liton; Sahu, Dipen

    2016-07-01

    High abundance of some abundant and simple interstellar species could be explained by considering the chemistry that occurs on interstellar dusts. Because of its simplicity, the rate equation method is widely used to study the surface chemistry. However, because the recombination efficiency for the formation of any surface species is highly dependent on various physical and chemical parameters, the Monte Carlo method is best suited for addressing the randomness of the processes. We carry out Monte-Carlo simulation to study deuterium enrichment of interstellar grain mantle under various physical conditions. Based on the physical properties, various types of clouds are considered. We find that in diffuse cloud regions, very strong radiation fields persists and hardly a few layers of surface species are formed. In translucent cloud regions with a moderate radiation field, significant number of layers would be produced and surface coverage is mainly dominated by photo-dissociation products such as, C, CH_3, CH_2D, OH and OD. In the intermediate dense cloud regions (having number density of total hydrogen nuclei in all forms ˜2 × 10^4 cm^{-3}), water and methanol along with their deuterated derivatives are efficiently formed. For much higher density regions (˜10^6 cm^{-3}), water and methanol productions are suppressed but surface coverage of CO, CO_2, O_2, O_3 are dramatically increased. We find a very high degree of fractionation of water and methanol. Observational results support a high fractionation of methanol but surprisingly water fractionation is found to be low. This is in contradiction with our model results indicating alternative routes for de-fractionation of water.

  16. HERSCHEL OBSERVATIONS OF INTERSTELLAR CHLORONIUM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neufeld, David A.; Indriolo, Nick [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Roueff, Evelyne; Le Bourlot, Jacques; Le Petit, Franck [Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, LUTH UMR 8102, 5 Pl. Jules Janssen, F-92195 Meudon Cedex (France); Snell, Ronald L. [Astronomy Department, University of Massachusetts at Amherst, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Lis, Dariusz; Monje, Raquel; Phillips, Thomas G. [Astronomy Department, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Benz, Arnold O. [Institute of Astronomy, ETH Zurich, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Bruderer, Simon [Max Planck Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748, Garching (Germany); Black, John H.; Larsson, Bengt [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Onsala (Sweden); De Luca, Massimo; Gerin, Maryvonne [LERMA, UMR 8112 du CNRS, Observatoire de Paris, Ecole Normale Superieure, UPMC and UCP (France); Goldsmith, Paul F.; Gupta, Harshal [JPL, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States); Melnick, Gary J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Menten, Karl M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Nagy, Zsofia [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); and others

    2012-03-20

    Using the Herschel Space Observatory's Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared, we have observed para-chloronium (H{sub 2}Cl{sup +}) toward six sources in the Galaxy. We detected interstellar chloronium absorption in foreground molecular clouds along the sight lines to the bright submillimeter continuum sources Sgr A (+50 km s{sup -1} cloud) and W31C. Both the para-H{sup 35}{sub 2}Cl{sup +} and para-H{sup 37}{sub 2}Cl{sup +} isotopologues were detected, through observations of their 1{sub 11}-0{sub 00} transitions at rest frequencies of 485.42 and 484.23 GHz, respectively. For an assumed ortho-to-para ratio (OPR) of 3, the observed optical depths imply that chloronium accounts for {approx}4%-12% of chlorine nuclei in the gas phase. We detected interstellar chloronium emission from two sources in the Orion Molecular Cloud 1: the Orion Bar photodissociation region and the Orion South condensation. For an assumed OPR of 3 for chloronium, the observed emission line fluxes imply total beam-averaged column densities of {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2} and {approx}1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}, respectively, for chloronium in these two sources. We obtained upper limits on the para-H{sup 35}{sub 2}Cl{sup +} line strengths toward H{sub 2} Peak 1 in the Orion Molecular cloud and toward the massive young star AFGL 2591. The chloronium abundances inferred in this study are typically at least a factor {approx}10 larger than the predictions of steady-state theoretical models for the chemistry of interstellar molecules containing chlorine. Several explanations for this discrepancy were investigated, but none has proven satisfactory, and thus the large observed abundances of chloronium remain puzzling.

  17. Grain Destruction in Interstellar Shocks

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    Interstellar shock waves can erode and destroy grains present in the shocked gas, primarily as the result of sputtering and grain-grain collisions. Uncertainties in current estimates of sputtering yields are reviewed. Results are presented for the simple case of sputtering of fast grains being stopped in cold gas. An upper limit is derived for sputtering of refractory grains in C-type MHD shocks: shock speeds $v_s \\gtrsim 50 \\kms$ are required for return of more than 30\\% of the silicate to t...

  18. A Search for Interstellar Pyrimidine

    CERN Document Server

    Kuan, Y J; Charnley, S B; Kisiel, Z; Ehrenfreund, P; Huang, H C; Kuan, Yi-Jehng; Yan, Chi-Hung; Charnley, Steven B.; Kisiel, Zbigniew; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Huang, Hui-Chun

    2003-01-01

    We have searched three hot molecular cores for submillimeter emission from the nucleic acid building-block pyrimidine. We obtain upper limits to the total pyrimidine (beam-averaged) column densities towards Sgr B2(N), Orion KL and W51 e1/e2 of 1.7E+14 cm^{-2}, 2.4E+14 cm^{-2} and 3.4E+14 cm^{-2}, respectively. The associated upper limits to the pyrimidine fractional abundances lie in the range (0.3-3)E-10. Implications of this result for interstellar organic chemistry, and for the prospects of detecting nitrogen heterocycles in general, are briefly discussed.

  19. Discovery of Interstellar Heavy Water

    OpenAIRE

    Butner, H. M.; Charnley, S. B.; Ceccarelli, C.; Rodgers, S.D.; Pardo Carrión, Juan Ramón; Parise, B.; Cernicharo, José; Davis, G. R.

    2007-01-01

    We report the discovery of doubly deuterated water (D2O, heavy water) in the interstellar medium. Using the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope and the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory 10 m telescope, we detected the 1_10–1_01 transition of para-D2O at 316.7998 GHz in both absorption and emission toward the protostellar binary system IRAS 16293-2422. Assuming that the D2O exists primarily in the warm regions where water ices have been evaporated (i.e., in a "hot corino" environment), we determi...

  20. Photodissociation of OH in interstellar clouds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dishoeck, van E.F.; Dalgarno, A.

    1984-01-01

    Calculations are presented of the lifetime of OH against photodissociation by the interstellar radiation field as a function of depth into interstellar clouds containing grains of various scattering properties. The effectiveness of the different photodissociation channels changes with depth into a c

  1. Detection of interstellar hydrogen peroxide

    CERN Document Server

    Bergman, P; Liseau, R; Larsson, B; Olofsson, H; Menten, K M; Güsten, R

    2011-01-01

    The molecular species hydrogen peroxide, HOOH, is likely to be a key ingredient in the oxygen and water chemistry in the interstellar medium. Our aim with this investigation is to determine how abundant HOOH is in the cloud core {\\rho} Oph A. By observing several transitions of HOOH in the (sub)millimeter regime we seek to identify the molecule and also to determine the excitation conditions through a multilevel excitation analysis. We have detected three spectral lines toward the SM1 position of {\\rho} Oph A at velocity-corrected frequencies that coincide very closely with those measured from laboratory spectroscopy of HOOH. A fourth line was detected at the 4{\\sigma} level. We also found through mapping observations that the HOOH emission extends (about 0.05 pc) over the densest part of the {\\rho} Oph A cloud core. We derive an abundance of HOOH relative to that of H_2 in the SM1 core of about 1\\times10^(-10). To our knowledge, this is the first reported detection of HOOH in the interstellar medium.

  2. Herschel observations of interstellar chloronium

    CERN Document Server

    Neufeld, David A; Snell, Ronald L; Lis, Dariusz; Benz, Arnold O; Bruderer, Simon; Black, John H; De Luca, Massimo; Gerin, Maryvonne; Goldsmith, Paul F; Gupta, Harshal; Indriolo, Nick; Bourlot, Jacques Le; Petit, Franck Le; Larsson, Bengt; Melnick, Gary J; Menten, Karl M; Monje, Raquel; Nagy, Zsofia; Phillips, Thomas G; Sandqvist, Aage; Sonnentrucker, Paule; van der Tak, Floris; Wolfire, Mark G

    2012-01-01

    Using the Herschel Space Observatory's Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared (HIFI), we have observed para-chloronium (H2Cl+) toward six sources in the Galaxy. We detected interstellar chloronium absorption in foreground molecular clouds along the sight-lines to the bright submillimeter continuum sources Sgr A (+50 km/s cloud) and W31C. Both the para-H2-35Cl+ and para-H2-37Cl+ isotopologues were detected, through observations of their 1(11)-0(00) transitions at rest frequencies of 485.42 and 484.23 GHz, respectively. For an assumed ortho-to-para ratio of 3, the observed optical depths imply that chloronium accounts for ~ 4 - 12% of chlorine nuclei in the gas phase. We detected interstellar chloronium emission from two sources in the Orion Molecular Cloud 1: the Orion Bar photodissociation region and the Orion South condensation. For an assumed ortho-to-para ratio of 3 for chloronium, the observed emission line fluxes imply total beam-averaged column densities of ~ 2.0E+13 cm-2 and ~ 1.2E+13 cm-2, respect...

  3. On the Nature of Interstellar Grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyle, F.; Wickramasinghe, C.

    Data on interstellar extinction are interpreted to imply an identification of interstellar grains with naturally freeze-dried bacteria and algae. The total mass of such bacterial and algal cells in the galaxy is enormous, ~1040 g. The identification is based on Mie scattering calculations for an experimentally determined size distribution of bacteria. Agreement between our model calculations and astronomical data is remarkably precise over the wavelength intervals 1 μ-1 pigments. The strongest of the diffuse interstellar bands are provisionally assigned to carotenoid-chlorophyll pigment complexes such as exist in algae and pigmented bacteria. The λ2200 Å interstellar absorption feature could be due to `degraded' cellulose strands which form spherical graphitic particles, but could equally well be due to protein-lipid-nucleic acid complexes in bacteria and viruses. Interstellar extinction at wavelengths λ < 1800 Å could be due to scattering by virus particles.

  4. Realistic Detectability of Close Interstellar Comets

    CERN Document Server

    Cook, Nathaniel V; Granvik, Mikael; Stephens, Denise C

    2016-01-01

    During the planet formation process, billions of comets are created and ejected into interstellar space. The detection and characterization of such interstellar comets (also known as extra-solar planetesimals or extra-solar comets) would give us in situ information about the efficiency and properties of planet formation throughout the galaxy. However, no interstellar comets have ever been detected, despite the fact that their hyperbolic orbits would make them readily identifiable as unrelated to the solar system. Moro-Mart\\'in et al. 2009 have made a detailed and reasonable estimate of the properties of the interstellar comet population. We extend their estimates of detectability with a numerical model that allows us to consider "close" interstellar comets, e.g., those that come within the orbit of Jupiter. We include several constraints on a "detectable" object that allow for realistic estimates of the frequency of detections expected from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) and other surveys. The inf...

  5. Thermodynamics and Charging of Interstellar Iron Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Brandon S.; Draine, B. T.

    2017-01-01

    Interstellar iron in the form of metallic iron nanoparticles may constitute a component of the interstellar dust. We compute the stability of iron nanoparticles to sublimation in the interstellar radiation field, finding that iron clusters can persist down to a radius of ≃4.5 Å, and perhaps smaller. We employ laboratory data on small iron clusters to compute the photoelectric yields as a function of grain size and the resulting grain charge distribution in various interstellar environments, finding that iron nanoparticles can acquire negative charges, particularly in regions with high gas temperatures and ionization fractions. If ≳10% of the interstellar iron is in the form of ultrasmall iron clusters, the photoelectric heating rate from dust may be increased by up to tens of percent relative to dust models with only carbonaceous and silicate grains.

  6. Thermodynamics and Charging of Interstellar Iron Nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Hensley, Brandon S

    2016-01-01

    Interstellar iron in the form of metallic iron nanoparticles may constitute a component of the interstellar dust. We compute the stability of iron nanoparticles to sublimation in the interstellar radiation field, finding that iron clusters can persist down to a radius of $\\simeq 4.5\\,$\\AA, and perhaps smaller. We employ laboratory data on small iron clusters to compute the photoelectric yields as a function of grain size and the resulting grain charge distribution in various interstellar environments, finding that iron nanoparticles can acquire negative charges particularly in regions with high gas temperatures and ionization fractions. If $\\gtrsim 10\\%$ of the interstellar iron is in the form of ultrasmall iron clusters, the photoelectric heating rate from dust may be increased by up to tens of percent relative to dust models with only carbonaceous and silicate grains.

  7. New Neutral Interstellar Helium Flow Parameters Based on IBEX-Lo Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bzowski, M.; Kubiak, M. A.; Moebius, E.; Bochsler, P. A.; Leonard, T.; Heirtzler, D.; Kucharek, H.; Crew, G. B.; Sokol, J. M.; Hlond, M.; Schwadron, N. A.; Fuselier, S. A.; McComas, D. J.

    2011-12-01

    Because of its high ionization potential and weak interaction with hydrogen, Neutral Interstellar Helium (NISHe) is almost unaffected at the heliospheric interface with the interstellar medium and freely enters the solar system. This second most abundant species provides some of the best information on the characteristics of the interstellar gas in the Local Interstellar Cloud (LIC). The Interstellar Boundary Explorer is the second mission to directly detect NISHe (after Ulysses) and the first to directly detect other interstellar neutrals. We present a comparison between recent IBEX NISHe observations and simulations carried out using a well-tested quantitative simulation code. This code includes motion of the spacecraft and the Earth relative to the incident NISHe in the inner heliosphere and accounts for both major and minor interactions between NISHe and its surrounding medium. The interactions include gravitational attraction by the Sun and losses by solar photoionization, electron impact ionization, and charge exchange with solar wind protons and alphas. Simulation and observation results compare well for times when measured fluxes are dominated by NISHe (and contributions from other species are small). Differences between simulations and observations indicate previously undetected secondary population of neutral helium, likely produced by interaction of helium with plasma in the outer heliosheath. Interstellar neutral parameters are statistically different from previous results: the newly-established flow direction is ecliptic longitude 79.2°, latitude -5.1°, velocity 22.8 km/s. These new results imply a markedly lower absolute velocity of the gas and thus significantly lower dynamic pressure on the boundaries of the heliosphere and different orientation of the Hydrogen Deflection Plane (the plane that contains the inflow vectors of hydrogen and helium in the inner heliosphere) compared to prior results from Ulysses. A different orientation of this plane

  8. Consequences of the Solar System passage through dense interstellar clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Yeghikyan

    Full Text Available Several consequences of the passage of the solar system through dense interstellar molecular clouds are discussed. These clouds, dense (more than 100 cm-3, cold (10–50 K and extended (larger than 1 pc, are characterized by a gas-to-dust mass ratio of about 100, by a specific power grain size spectrum (grain radii usually cover the range 0.001–3 micron and by an average dust-to-gas number density ratio of about 10-12. Frequently these clouds contain small-scale (10–100 AU condensations with gas concentrations ranging up to 10 5 cm-3. At their casual passage over the solar system they exert pressures very much enhanced with respect to today’s standards. Under these conditions it will occur that the Earth is exposed directly to the interstellar flow. It is shown first that even close to the Sun, at 1 AU, the cloud’s matter is only partly ionized and should mainly interact with the solar wind by charge exchange processes. Dust particles of the cloud serve as a source of neutrals, generated by the solar UV irradiation of dust grains, causing the evaporation of icy materials. The release of neutral atoms from dust grains is then followed by strong influences on the solar wind plasma flow. The behavior of the neutral gas inflow parameters is investigated by a 2-D hydrodynamic approach to model the interaction processes. Because of a reduction of the heliospheric dimension down to 1 AU, direct influence of the cloud’s matter to the terrestrial environment and atmosphere could be envisaged.

    Key words. Interplanetary physics (heliopause and solar wind termination; interplanetary dust; interstellar gas

  9. Visual surround suppression in schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Samuel Tibber

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Compared to unaffected observers patients with schizophrenia show characteristic differences in visual perception, including a reduced susceptibility to the influence of context on judgements of contrast - a manifestation of weaker surround suppression. To examine the generality of this phenomenon we measured the ability of 24 individuals with schizophrenia to judge the luminance, contrast, orientation and size of targets embedded in contextual surrounds that would typically influence the target’s appearance. Individuals with schizophrenia demonstrated weaker surround suppression compared to matched controls for stimuli defined by contrast or size, but not for those defined by luminance or orientation. As perceived luminance is thought to be regulated at the earliest stages of visual processing our findings are consistent with a suppression deficit that is predominantly cortical in origin. In addition, we propose that preserved orientation surround suppression in schizophrenia may reflect the sparing of broadly tuned mechanisms of suppression. We attempt to reconcile these data with findings from previous studies.

  10. Multichannel spatial surround sound system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RAO Dan; XIE Bosun

    2004-01-01

    Based on the consideration of being compatible with 5.1 channel horizontal surround sound system, a spatial surround sound system is proposed. Theoretical and experimental results show that the system has a wide listening area. It can not only recreate stable image in the front and rear direction, but also eliminate the defect of poor lateral image of 5.1 channel system. The system can be used to reproduce special 3D sound effect and the spaciousness of hall.

  11. Polarimetry of the Interstellar Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandford, Scott; Witteborn, Fred C. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The talk will review what is known about the composition of ices and organics in the dense and diffuse interstellar media (ISM). Mixed molecular ices make up a significant fraction of the solid materials in dense molecular clouds and it is now known that thermal and radiation processing of these ices results in the production of more complex organic species, some of which may survive transport into forming stellar systems and the diffuse ISM. Molecular species identified in interstellar ices include H2O, CH3OH, CO, CH4, CO2, and somewhat surprisingly, H2. Theoretical and laboratory studies of the processing of interstellar analog ices containing these species indicate that species like HCO, H2CO, CH3, and NH3 are readily made and should also be present. The irradiation of mixed molecular ices containing these species, when followed by warming, leads to the production of a large variety of more complex species, including ethanol (CH3CH2OH), formamide (HC(=O)NH2), acetamide (CH3C(=O)NH2), nitriles or isonitriles (R-CN or R-NC hexamethylenetetramine (HMT; C6H12N4), a number of polymeric species related to polyoxymethylene [POM,(-CH2O-)n], and ketones {R-C(=O)-R'}. Spectral studies of dust in the diffuse ISM indicate the presence of fairly complex organics, some of which may be related to the organics produced in dense molecular clouds. Spectral comparisons indicate that the diffuse ISM organics may be quite similar to meteoritic kerogens, i.e. they may consist largely of aromatic moieties interlinked by short aliphatic bridges. Interestingly, recent evidence indicates that the galactic distribution of this material closely matches that of silicates, but does not correlate directly with visual extinction. This implies that a large fraction of the visual extinction is caused by a material other than these organics and silicates and that this other material has a significantly different distribution within the galaxy.

  12. Planck intermediate results XXXIII. Signature of the magnetic field geometry of interstellar filaments in dust polarization maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.

    2016-01-01

    Planck observations at 353 GHz provide the first fully sampled maps of the polarized dust emission towards interstellar filaments and their backgrounds (i.e., the emission observed in the surroundings of the filaments). The data allow us to determine the intrinsic polarization properties of the f...

  13. Planck intermediate results XXXIII. Signature of the magnetic field geometry of interstellar filaments in dust polarization maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.;

    2016-01-01

    Planck observations at 353 GHz provide the first fully sampled maps of the polarized dust emission towards interstellar filaments and their backgrounds (i.e., the emission observed in the surroundings of the filaments). The data allow us to determine the intrinsic polarization properties of the f...

  14. The Sun's Journey Through the Local Interstellar Medium: The PaleoLISM and Paleoheliosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Frisch, P C

    2006-01-01

    Over the recent past, the galactic environment of the Sun has differed substantially from today. Sometime within the past ~130,000 years, and possibly as recent as ~56,000 years ago, the Sun entered the tenuous tepid partially ionized interstellar material now flowing past the Sun. Prior to that, the Sun was in the low density interior of the Local Bubble. As the Sun entered the local ISM flow, we passed briefly through an interface region of some type. The low column densities of the cloud now surrounding the solar system indicate that heliosphere boundary conditions will vary from opacity considerations alone as the Sun moves through the cloud. These variations in the interstellar material surrounding the Sun affected the paleoheliosphere.

  15. Interstellar Dust Inside and Outside the Heliosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Krueger, Harald

    2008-01-01

    In the early 1990s, after its Jupiter flyby, the Ulysses spacecraft identified interstellar dust in the solar system. Since then the in-situ dust detector on board Ulysses continuously monitored interstellar grains with masses up to 10e-13 kg, penetrating deep into the solar system. While Ulysses measured the interstellar dust stream at high ecliptic latitudes between 3 and 5 AU, interstellar impactors were also measured with the in-situ dust detectors on board Cassini, Galileo and Helios, covering a heliocentric distance range between 0.3 and 3 AU in the ecliptic plane. The interstellar dust stream in the inner solar system is altered by the solar radiation pressure force, gravitational focussing and interaction of charged grains with the time varying interplanetary magnetic field. The grains act as tracers of the physical conditions in the local interstellar cloud (LIC). Our in-situ measurements imply the existence of a population of 'big' interstellar grains (up to 10e-13 kg) and a gas-to-dust-mass ratio i...

  16. Polarized Emission from Interstellar Dust

    CERN Document Server

    Vaillancourt, J E

    2006-01-01

    Observations of far-infrared (FIR) and submillimeter (SMM) polarized emission are used to study magnetic fields and dust grains in dense regions of the interstellar medium (ISM). These observations place constraints on models of molecular clouds, star-formation, grain alignment mechanisms, and grain size, shape, and composition. The FIR/SMM polarization is strongly dependent on wavelength. We have attributed this wavelength dependence to sampling different grain populations at different temperatures. To date, most observations of polarized emission have been in the densest regions of the ISM. Extending these observations to regions of the diffuse ISM, and to microwave frequencies, will provide additional tests of grain and alignment models. An understanding of polarized microwave emission from dust is key to an accurate measurement of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background. The microwave polarization spectrum will put limits on the contributions to polarized emission from spinning dust and vibrat...

  17. Discovery of Interstellar Hydrogen Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufeld, David A.; Zmuidzinas, Jonas; Schilke, Peter; Phillips, Thomas G.

    1997-01-01

    We report the first detection of interstellar hydrogen fluoride. Using the Long Wavelength Spectrometer of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), we have detected the 121.6973 micron J = 2-1 line of HF in absorption toward the far-infrared continuum source Sagittarius B2. The detection is statistically significant at the 13 sigma level. On the basis of our model for the excitation of HF in Sgr B2, the observed line equivalent width of 1.0 nm implies a hydrogen fluoride abundance of approximately 3 x 10(exp -10) relative to H2. If the elemental abundance of fluorine in Sgr B2 is the same as that in the solar system, then HF accounts for approximately 2% of the total number of fluorine nuclei. We expect hydrogen fluoride to be the dominant reservoir of gas-phase fluorine in Sgr B2, because it is formed rapidly in exothermic reactions of atomic fluorine with either water or molecular hydrogen; thus, the measured HF abundance suggests a substantial depletion of fluorine onto dust grains. Similar conclusions regarding depletion have previously been reached for the case of chlorine in dense interstellar clouds. We also find evidence at a lower level of statistical significance (approximately 5 sigma) for an emission feature at the expected position of the 4(sub 32)-4(sub 23) 121.7219 micron line of water. The emission-line equivalent width of 0.5 nm for the water feature is consistent with the water abundance of 5 x 10(exp -6) relative to H2 that has been inferred previously from observations of the hot core of Sgr B2.

  18. Interstellar Grains: Effect of Inclusions on Extinction

    CERN Document Server

    Katyal, Nisha; Vaidya, D B

    2011-01-01

    A composite dust grain model which simultaneously explains the observed interstellar extinction, polarization, IR emission and the abundance constraints, is required. We present a composite grain model, which is made up of a host silicate oblate spheroid and graphite inclusions. The interstellar extinction curve is evaluated in the spectral region 3.4-0.1$\\mu m$ using the extinction efficiencies of the composite spheroidal grains for three axial ratios. Extinction curves are computed using the discrete dipole approximation (DDA). The model curves are subsequently compared with the average observed interstellar extinction curve and with an extinction curve derived from the IUE catalogue data.

  19. Interstellar grains: Effect of inclusions on extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katyal, N.; Gupta, R.; Vaidya, D. B.

    2011-10-01

    A composite dust grain model which simultaneously explains the observed interstellar extinction, polarization, IR emission and the abundance constraints, is required. We present a composite grain model, which is made up of a host silicate oblate spheroid and graphite inclusions. The interstellar extinction curve is evaluated in the spectral region 3.4-0.1 μm using the extinction efficiencies of composite spheroidal grains for three axial ratios. Extinction curves are computed using the discrete dipole approximation (DDA). The model curves are subsequently compared with the average observed interstellar extinction curve and with an extinction curve derived from the IUE catalogue data.

  20. Discovery of Interstellar Anions in Cepheus and Auriga

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordiner, M. A.; Charnely, S. B.; Buckle, J. V.; Walsh, C.

    2011-01-01

    We report the detection of microwave emission lines from the hydrocarbon anion C6H(-) and its parent neutral C6H in the star-forming region LI251 A (in Cepheus), and the pre-stellar core LI512 (in Auriga). The carbon chain-bearing species C4H, HC3N, HC5N, HC7N, and C3S are also detected in large abundances. The observations of L1251A constitute the first detections of anions and long-chain polyynes and cyanopolyynes (with more than five carbon atoms) in the Cepheus Flare star-forming region, and the first detection of anions in the vicinity of a protostar outside of the Taurus molecular cloud complex, indicating a possible wider importance for anions in the chemistry of star formation. Rotational excitation temperatures have been derived from the HC3N hyperfine structure lines and are found to be 6.2 K for L1251A and 8.7 K for LI5l2. The anion-to-neutral ratios are 3.6% and 4.1%, respectively, which are within the range of values previously observed in the interstellar medium, and suggest a relative uniformity in the processes governing anion abundances in different dense interstellar clouds. This research contributes toward the growing body of evidence that carbon chain anions are relatively abundant in interstellar clouds throughout the Galaxy, but especially in the regions of relatively high density and high depletion surrounding pre-stellar cores and young, embedded protostars.

  1. THE STRUCTURE, ORIGIN, AND EVOLUTION OF INTERSTELLAR HYDROCARBON GRAINS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiar, J. E.; Ricca, A. [SETI Institute, Carl Sagan Center, 189 Bernardo Avenue, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Tielens, A. G. G. M. [Leiden Observatory, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Adamson, A. J., E-mail: jchiar@seti.org, E-mail: Alessandra.Ricca@1.nasa.gov, E-mail: tielens@strw.leidenuniv.nl, E-mail: aadamson@gemini.edu [Gemini Observatory, Northern Operations Center, 670 North A' ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96729 (United States)

    2013-06-10

    Many materials have been considered for the carrier of the hydrocarbon absorption bands observed in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM). In order to refine the model for ISM hydrocarbon grains, we analyze the observed aromatic (3.28, 6.2 {mu}m) and aliphatic (3.4 {mu}m) hydrocarbon absorption features in the diffuse ISM along the line of sight toward the Galactic center Quintuplet Cluster. Observationally, sp {sup 2} bonds can be measured in astronomical spectra using the 6.2 {mu}m CC aromatic stretch feature, whereas the 3.4 {mu}m aliphatic feature can be used to quantify the fraction of sp {sup 3} bonds. The fractional abundance of these components allows us to place the Galactic diffuse ISM hydrocarbons on a ternary phase diagram. We conclude that the Galactic hydrocarbon dust has, on average, a low H/C ratio and sp {sup 3} content and is highly aromatic. We have placed the results of our analysis within the context of the evolution of carbon dust in the ISM. We argue that interstellar carbon dust consists of a large core of aromatic carbon surrounded by a thin mantle of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H), a structure that is a natural consequence of the processing of stardust grains in the ISM.

  2. The Interstellar Medium in the Kepler Search Volume

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Marshall C; Jensen, Adam G

    2015-01-01

    The properties of the interstellar medium (ISM) surrounding a planetary system can impact planetary climate through a number of mechanisms, including changing the size of the astrosphere (one of the major shields for cosmic rays) as well as direct deposition of material into planetary atmospheres. In order to constrain the ambient ISM conditions for exoplanetary systems, we present observations of interstellar Na I and K I absorption towards seventeen early-type stars in the Kepler prime mission field of view. We identify 39 Na I and 8 K I velocity components, and attribute these to eleven ISM clouds. Six of these are detected towards more than one star, and for these clouds we put limits on the cloud properties, including distance and hydrogen number density. We identify one cloud with significant (>1.5 cm$^{-3}$) hydrogen number density located within the nominal ~100 pc boundary of the Local Bubble. We identify systems with confirmed planets within the Kepler field of view that could lie within these ISM c...

  3. Cosmocultural Evolution: Cosmic Motivation for Interstellar Travel?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupisella, M.

    Motivations for interstellar travel can vary widely from practical survival motivations to wider-ranging moral obligations to future generations. But it may also be fruitful to explore what, if any, "cosmic" relevance there may be regarding interstellar travel. Cosmocultural evolution can be defined as the coevolution of cosmos and culture, with cultural evolution playing an important and perhaps critical role in the overall evolution of the universe. Strong versions of cosmocultural evolution might suggest that cultural evolution may have unlimited potential as a cosmic force. In such a worldview, the advancement of cultural beings throughout the universe could have significant cosmic relevance, perhaps providing additional motivation for interstellar travel. This paper will explore some potential philosophical and policy implications for interstellar travel of a cosmocultural evolutionary perspective and other related concepts, including some from a recent NASA book, Cosmos and Culture: Cultural Evolution in a Cosmic Context.

  4. Physical Processes in the Interstellar Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Klessen, Ralf S

    2014-01-01

    Interstellar space is filled with a dilute mixture of charged particles, atoms, molecules and dust grains, called the interstellar medium (ISM). Understanding its physical properties and dynamical behavior is of pivotal importance to many areas of astronomy and astrophysics. Galaxy formation and evolution, the formation of stars, cosmic nucleosynthesis, the origin of large complex, prebiotic molecules and the abundance, structure and growth of dust grains which constitute the fundamental building blocks of planets, all these processes are intimately coupled to the physics of the interstellar medium. However, despite its importance, its structure and evolution is still not fully understood. Observations reveal that the interstellar medium is highly turbulent, consists of different chemical phases, and is characterized by complex structure on all resolvable spatial and temporal scales. Our current numerical and theoretical models describe it as a strongly coupled system that is far from equilibrium and where th...

  5. Silicate Composition of the Interstellar Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Fogerty, Shane; Watson, Dan M; Sargent, Benjamin A; Koch, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    The composition of silicate dust in the diffuse interstellar medium and in protoplanetary disks around young stars informs our understanding of the processing and evolution of the dust grains leading up to planet formation. Analysis of the well-known 9.7{\\mu}m feature indicates that small amorphous silicate grains represent a significant fraction of interstellar dust and are also major components of protoplanetary disks. However, this feature is typically modelled assuming amorphous silicate dust of olivine and pyroxene stoichiometries. Here, we analyze interstellar dust with models of silicate dust that include non-stoichiometric amorphous silicate grains. Modelling the optical depth along lines of sight toward the extinguished objects Cyg OB2 No. 12 and {\\zeta} Ophiuchi, we find evidence for interstellar amorphous silicate dust with stoichiometry intermediate between olivine and pyroxene, which we simply refer to as "polivene." Finally, we compare these results to models of silicate emission from the Trapez...

  6. Physical Processes in the Interstellar Medium

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Interstellar space is filled with a dilute mixture of charged particles, atoms, molecules and dust grains, called the interstellar medium (ISM). Understanding its physical properties and dynamical behavior is of pivotal importance to many areas of astronomy and astrophysics. Galaxy formation and evolution, the formation of stars, cosmic nucleosynthesis, the origin of large complex, prebiotic molecules and the abundance, structure and growth of dust grains which constitute the fundamental buil...

  7. Scouting the spectrum for interstellar travellers

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Escartin, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Advanced civilizations capable of interstellar travel, if they exist, are likely to have advanced propulsion methods. Spaceships moving at high speeds would leave a particular signature which could be detected from Earth. We propose a search based on the properties of light reflecting from objects travelling at relativistic speeds. Based on the same principles, we also propose a simple interstellar beacon with a solar sail.

  8. Observing the Interstellar Neutral He Gas Flow with a Variable IBEX Pointing Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, T.; Moebius, E.; Bzowski, M.; Fuselier, S. A.; Heirtzler, D.; Kubiak, M. A.; Kucharek, H.; Lee, M. A.; McComas, D. J.; Schwadron, N.; Wurz, P.

    2015-12-01

    The Interstellar Neutral (ISN) gas flow can be observed at Earth's orbit due to the motion of the solar system relative to the surrounding interstellar gas. Since He is minimally influenced by ionization and charge exchange, the ISN He flow provides a sample of the pristine interstellar environment. The Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) has observed the ISN gas flow over the past 7 years from a highly elliptical orbit around the Earth. IBEX is a Sun-pointing spinning spacecraft with energetic neutral atom (ENA) detectors observing perpendicular to the spacecraft spin axis. Due to the Earth's orbital motion around the Sun, it is necessary for IBEX to perform spin axis pointing maneuvers every few days to maintain a sunward pointed spin axis. The IBEX operations team has successfully pointed the spin axis in a variety of latitude orientations during the mission, including in the ecliptic during the 2012 and 2013 seasons, about 5 degrees below the ecliptic during the 2014 season, and recently about 5 degrees above the ecliptic during the 2015 season, as well as optimizing observations with the spin axis pointed along the Earth-Sun line. These observations include a growing number of measurements near the perihelion of the interstellar atom trajectories, which allow for an improved determination of the ISN He bulk flow longitude at Earth orbit. Combining these bulk flow measurements with an analytical model (Lee et al. 2012 ApJS, 198, 10) based upon orbital mechanics improves the knowledge of the narrow ISN parameter tube, obtained with IBEX, which couples the interstellar inflow longitude, latitude, speed, and temperature.

  9. The hydrogen coverage of interstellar PAHs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Allamandola, L. J.; Barker, J. R.; Cohen, M.

    1987-01-01

    The rate at which the CH bond in interstellar Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) rupture due to the absorption of a UV photon has been calculated. The results show that small PAHs (less than or equal to 25 carbon atoms) are expected to be partially dehydrogenated in regions with intense UV fields, while large PAHs (greater than or equal to 25 atoms) are expected to be completely hydrogenated in those regions. Because estimate of the carbon content of interstellar PAHs lie in the range of 20 to 25 carbon atoms, dehydrogenation is probably not very important. Because of the absence of other emission features besides the 11.3 micrometer feature in ground-based 8 to 13 micrometer spectra, it has been suggested that interstellar PAHs are partially dehydrogenated. However, IRAS 8 to 22 micrometer spectra of most sources that show strong 7.7 and 11.2 micrometer emission features also show a plateau of emission extending from about 11.3 to 14 micrometer. Like the 11.3 micrometer feature, this new feature is attributed to the CH out of plane bending mode in PAHs. This new feature shows that interstellar PAHs are not as dehydrogenated as estimated from ground-based 8 to 13 micrometer spectra. It also constrains the molecular structure of interstellar PAHs. In particular, it seems that very condensed PAHs, such as coronene and circumcoronene, dominate the interstellar PAH mixture as expected from stability arguments.

  10. Interstellar grain chemistry and organic molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allamandola, L. J.; Sandford, S. A.

    1990-01-01

    The detection of prominant infrared absorption bands at 3250, 2170, 2138, 1670 and 1470 cm(-1) (3.08, 4.61, 4.677, 5.99 and 6.80 micron m) associated with molecular clouds show that mixed molecular (icy) grain mantles are an important component of the interstellar dust in the dense interstellar medium. These ices, which contain many organic molecules, may also be the production site of the more complex organic grain mantles detected in the diffuse interstellar medium. Theoretical calculations employing gas phase as well as grain surface reactions predict that the ices should be dominated only by the simple molecules H2O, H2CO, N2, CO, O2, NH3, CH4, possibly CH3OH, and their deuterated counterparts. However, spectroscopic observations in the 2500 to 1250 cm(-1)(4 to 8 micron m) range show substantial variation from source reactions alone. By comparing these astronomical spectra with the spectra of laboratory-produced analogs of interstellar ices, one can determine the composition and abundance of the materials frozen on the grains in dense clouds. Experiments are described in which the chemical evolution of an interstellar ice analog is determined during irradiation and subsequent warm-up. Particular attention is paid to the types of moderately complex organic materials produced during these experiments which are likely to be present in interstellar grains and cometary ices.

  11. Amino Acid Formation on Interstellar Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meierhenrich, U. J.; Munoz Caro, G. M.; Barbier, B.; Brack, A.; Thiemann, W.; Goesmann, F.; Rosenbauer, H.

    2003-04-01

    In the dense interstellar medium dust particles accrete ice layers of known molecular composition. In the diffuse interstellar medium these ice layers are subjected to energetic UV-irradiation. Here, photoreactions form complex organic molecules. The interstellar processes were recently successfully simulated in two laboratories. At NASA Ames Research Center three amino acids were detected in interstellar ice analogues [1], contemporaneously, our European team reported on the identification of 16 amino acids therein [2]. Amino acids are the molecular building blocks of proteins in living organisms. The identification of amino acids on the simulated icy surface of interstellar dust particles strongly supports the assumption that the precursor molecules of life were delivered from interstellar and interplanetary space via (micro-) meteorites and/or comets to the earyl Earth. The results shall be verified by the COSAC experiment onboard the ESA cometary mission Rosetta [3]. [1] M.P. Bernstein, J.P. Dworkin, S.A. Sandford, G.W. Cooper, L.J. Allamandola: itshape Nature \\upshape 416 (2002), 401-403. [2] G.M. Muñoz Caro, U.J. Meierhenrich, W.A. Schutte, B. Barbier, A. Arcones Sergovia, H. Rosenbauer, W.H.-P. Thiemann, A. Brack, J.M. Greenberg: itshape Nature \\upshape 416 (2002), 403-406. [3] U. Meierhenrich, W.H.-P. Thiemann, H. Rosenbauer: itshape Chirality \\upshape 11 (1999), 575-582.

  12. The VLT-FLAMES Tarantula Survey. IX. The interstellar medium seen through Diffuse Interstellar Bands and neutral sodium

    CERN Document Server

    van Loon, Jacco Th; Tatton, Benjamin L; Apellaniz, Jesus Maiz; Crowther, Paul A; de Koter, Alex; Evans, Christopher J; Henault-Brunet, Vincent; Howarth, Ian D; Richter, Philipp; Sana, Hugues; Simon-Diaz, Sergio; Taylor, William; Walborn, Nolan R

    2012-01-01

    The Tarantula Nebula (30 Dor) is a spectacular star-forming region in the Large Magellanic Cloud, seen through gas in the Galactic Disc and Halo. Diffuse Interstellar Bands offer a unique probe of the diffuse, cool-warm gas in these regions. The aim is to use DIBs as diagnostics of the local interstellar conditions, whilst at the same time deriving properties of the yet-unknown carriers. Spectra of over 800 early-type stars from the VLT Flames Tarantula Survey (VFTS) were analysed. Maps were created, separately, for the Galactic and LMC absorption in the DIBs at 4428 and 6614 Ang and - in a smaller region near the central cluster R136 - neutral sodium (Na I D); we also measured the DIBs at 5780 and 5797 Ang. The maps show strong 4428 and 6614 Ang DIBs in the quiescent cloud complex to the south of 30 Dor but weak absorption in the harsher environments to the north (bubbles) and near the OB associations. The Na maps show at least five kinematic components in the LMC and a shell-like structure surrounding R136,...

  13. Interstellar dust thermal emission at millimeter and microwave wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhuohan

    Interstellar dust grains are particles of size between a few to hundreds of nanometers, mostly made up of carbon and silicon, found in the vast space between stars within a galaxy. They are important because dust plays a major role in cycling matter and energy between stars and the interstellar medium. Models for interstellar dust thermal emission are fit to a set of 214-channel dust spectra at 60--3000 GHz. Data consist of a new and improved version of dust spectra derived from the measurements of the Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer of the COsmic Background Explorer satellite, sky maps at 100 mum, 140 mum and 240 mum measured by the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment, also onboard the CUBE satellite, and the 94 GHz dust map measured by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe satellite. A single-component model with its emissivity spectral index fixed at 1.7 is the best among all dust models tested. It fits 88% of the sky with a chi2dof ≤ 1.13 at 210 degrees of freedom. Within this sky region, temperatures of the dust grains are predicted to be between 16.4 K and 25.1 K, and optical depths are between 1.3 x 10 -6 and 5.1 x 10-4. The uncertainties of the dust temperature are FIRAS frequency coverage in sky regions where these two models are valid. Currently, uncertainties of the best-fit parameters are limited by FIRAS angular resolution and noise, and the angular resolution of the model inherits that of the FIRAS. When data of better quality become available, such as from the Planck mission, this one-component alpha = 1.7 (deltaTdust/ Tdust ≤ 10%) model can be used to check future dust models.

  14. Interstellar X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Oxygen, Neon, and Iron with the Chandra LETGS Spectrum of X0614+091

    CERN Document Server

    Paerels, F B S; Van der Meer, R L J; Kaastra, J S; Kuulkers, E; Den Boggende, A J F; Predehl, P; Drake, J J; Kahn, S M; Savin, D W; McLaughlin, B M; Paerels, Frits; Drake, Jeremy J.; Kahn, Steven M.; Savin, Daniel W.; Laughlin, Brendan M. Mc

    2000-01-01

    We find resolved interstellar O K, Ne K, and Fe L absorption spectra in the Chandra Low Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer spectrum of the low mass X-ray binary X0614+091. We measure the column densities in O and Ne, and find direct spectroscopic constraints on the chemical state of the interstellar O. These measurements probably probe a low-density line of sight through the Galaxy and we discuss the results in the context of our knowledge of the properties of interstellar matter in regions between the spiral arms.

  15. Characterization of Interstellar Organic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gençaǧa, Deniz; Carbon, Duane F.; Knuth, Kevin H.

    2008-11-01

    Understanding the origins of life has been one of the greatest dreams throughout history. It is now known that star-forming regions contain complex organic molecules, known as Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs), each of which has particular infrared spectral characteristics. By understanding which PAH species are found in specific star-forming regions, we can better understand the biochemistry that takes place in interstellar clouds. Identifying and classifying PAHs is not an easy task: we can only observe a single superposition of PAH spectra at any given astrophysical site, with the PAH species perhaps numbering in the hundreds or even thousands. This is a challenging source separation problem since we have only one observation composed of numerous mixed sources. However, it is made easier with the help of a library of hundreds of PAH spectra. In order to separate PAH molecules from their mixture, we need to identify the specific species and their unique concentrations that would provide the given mixture. We develop a Bayesian approach for this problem where sources are separated from their mixture by Metropolis Hastings algorithm. Separated PAH concentrations are provided with their error bars, illustrating the uncertainties involved in the estimation process. The approach is demonstrated on synthetic spectral mixtures using spectral resolutions from the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). Performance of the method is tested for different noise levels.

  16. Interstellar Transfer of Planetary Microbiota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, Max K.; Wickramasinghe, N. C.

    Panspermia theories require the transport of micro-organisms in a viable form from one astronomical location to another. The evidence of material ejection from planetary surfaces, of dynamical orbit evolution and of potential survival on landing is setting a firm basis for interplanetary panspermia. Pathways for interstellar panspermia are less clear. We compare the direct route, whereby life-bearing planetary ejecta exit the solar system and risk radiation hazards en route to nearby stellar systems, and an indirect route whereby ejecta hitch a ride within the shielded environment of comets of the Edgeworth- Kuiper Belt that are subsequently expelled from the solar system. We identify solutions to the delivery problem. Delivery to fully-fledged planetary systems of either the direct ejecta or the ejecta borne by comets depends on dynamical capture and is of very low efficiency. However, delivery into a proto-planetary disc of an early solar-type nebula and into pre-stellar molecular clouds is effective, because the solid grains efficiently sputter the incoming material in hypervelocity collisions. The total mass of terrestrial fertile material delivered to nearby pre-stellar systems as the solar system moves through the galaxy is from kilogrammes up to a tonne. Subject to further study of bio-viability under irradiation and fragmenting collisions, a few kg of original grains and sputtered fragments could be sufficient to seed the planetary system with a wide range of solar system micro-organisms.

  17. The interstellar medium in galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    1997-01-01

    It has been more than five decades ago that Henk van de Hulst predicted the observability of the 21-cm line of neutral hydrogen (HI ). Since then use of the 21-cm line has greatly improved our knowledge in many fields and has been used for galactic structure studies, studies of the interstellar medium (ISM) in the Milky Way and other galaxies, studies of the mass distribution of the Milky Way and other galaxies, studies of spiral struc­ ture, studies of high velocity gas in the Milky Way and other galaxies, for measuring distances using the Tully-Fisher relation etc. Regarding studies of the ISM, there have been a number of instrumen­ tal developments over the past decade: large CCD's became available on optical telescopes, radio synthesis offered sensitive imaging capabilities, not only in the classical 21-cm HI line but also in the mm-transitions of CO and other molecules, and X-ray imaging capabilities became available to measure the hot component of the ISM. These developments meant that Milky Way was n...

  18. Rotational spectroscopy of interstellar PAHs

    CERN Document Server

    Ali-Haïmoud, Yacine

    2013-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have long been part of the standard model of the interstellar medium, and are believed to play important roles in its physics and chemistry. Yet, up to now it has not been possible to identify any specific molecule among them. In this paper, a new observational avenue is suggested to detect individual PAHs, using their rotational line emission at radio frequencies. Previous PAH searches based on rotational spectroscopy have only targeted the bowl-shaped corannulene molecule, with the underlying assumption that other polar PAHs are triaxial and as a consequence their rotational emission is diluted over a very large number of lines and unusable for detection purposes. In this paper the rotational spectrum of quasi-symmetric PAHs is computed analytically, as a function of the level of triaxiality. It is shown that the asymmetry of planar, nitrogen-substituted symmetric PAHs is small enough that their rotational spectrum, when observed with a resolution of about a MHz, has ...

  19. Physical Processes of Interstellar Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Vazquez-Semadeni, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    I discuss the role of self-gravity and radiative heating and cooling in shaping the nature of the turbulence in the interstellar medium (ISM) of our galaxy. The heating and cooling cause it to be highly compressible, and, in some regimes of density and temperature, to become thermally unstable, tending to spontaneously segregate into warm/diffuse and cold/dense phases. On the other hand, turbulence is an inherently mixing process, tending to replenish the density and temperature ranges that would be forbidden under thermal processes alone. The turbulence in the ionized ISM appears to be transonic (i.e, with Mach numbers $\\Ms \\sim 1$), and thus to behave essentially incompressibly. However, in the neutral medium, thermal instability causes the sound speed of the gas to fluctuate by up to factors of $\\sim 30$, and thus the flow can be highly supersonic with respect to the dense/cold gas, although numerical simulations suggest that this behavior corresponds more to the ensemble of cold clumps than to the clumps'...

  20. The small scale structure of the interstellar medium in the Orion association: The flotsam of star formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonneborn, G.; Shore, S. N.; Brown, D. N.

    1988-01-01

    The small scale dynamics and structure of the interstellar medium of the Orion OB1b, c association was studied using IUE high dispersion SWP and LWR/LWP spectra. The area surveyed centers on the Belt and encompasses the Orion Cloak. The dynamics and abundances of the ionized and warm neutral gas surrounding the central parts of the association are determined using 35 B stars. Results are compared with the picture of the Orion interstellar medium gained using COPERNICUS, especially for the structure and dynamics of the Orion Cloak.

  1. Shining light on interstellar matter : a laboratory study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paardekooper, D.M.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years it has become clear that the space in between the stars, contains a remarkable amount of highly diverse molecules, ranging from simple diatomics to large complex species. Astronomical observations and dedicated laboratory experiments show that icy dust grains play a prominent role in

  2. Visual Surround Suppression in Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibber, Marc S.; Anderson, Elaine J.; Bobin, Tracy; Antonova, Elena; Seabright, Alice; Wright, Bernice; Carlin, Patricia; Shergill, Sukhwinder S.; Dakin, Steven C.

    2013-01-01

    Compared to unaffected observers patients with schizophrenia (SZ) show characteristic differences in visual perception, including a reduced susceptibility to the influence of context on judgments of contrast – a manifestation of weaker surround suppression (SS). To examine the generality of this phenomenon we measured the ability of 24 individuals with SZ to judge the luminance, contrast, orientation, and size of targets embedded in contextual surrounds that would typically influence the target’s appearance. Individuals with SZ demonstrated weaker SS compared to matched controls for stimuli defined by contrast or size, but not for those defined by luminance or orientation. As perceived luminance is thought to be regulated at the earliest stages of visual processing our findings are consistent with a suppression deficit that is predominantly cortical in origin. In addition, we propose that preserved orientation SS in SZ may reflect the sparing of broadly tuned mechanisms of suppression. We attempt to reconcile these data with findings from previous studies. PMID:23450069

  3. The Search for Primordial Molecular Cloud Matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Kooten, Elishevah M M E

    evolution. Some of the least altered, most primitive meteorites can give us clues to the original make-up of the interstellar molecular cloud from which the Sun and its surrounding planets formed, thus, permitting us to trace Solar System formation from its most early conditions. Using state-of-the-art...

  4. Molecular Spectroscopy in Astrophysics: Interstellar PAHs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Farid; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are now considered to be an important and ubiquitous component of the organic material in space. PAHs are found in a large variety of extraterrestrial materials such as interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) and meteoritic materials. PAHs are also good candidates to account for the infrared emission bands (UIRs) and the diffuse interstellar optical absorption bands (DIBs) detected in various regions of the interstellar medium. The recent observations made with the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) have confirmed the ubiquitous nature of the UIR bands and their carriers. PAHs are thought to form through chemical reactions in the outflow from carbon-rich stars in a process similar to soot formation. Once injected in the interstellar medium, PAHs are further processed by the interstellar radiation field, interstellar shocks and energetic particles. A long-term laboratory effort has been undertaken to measure the physical and chemical characteristics of these carbon molecules and their ions under experimental conditions that mimic the interstellar conditions. These measurements require collision-free conditions where the molecules and ions are cold and chemically isolated. The spectroscopy of PAHs under controlled conditions represents an essential diagnostic tool to study the evolution of extraterrestrial PAHs. The laboratory results will be discussed as well as the implications for astronomy and for molecular spectroscopy. A review of the data generated through laboratory simulations of space environments and the role these data have played in our current understanding of the properties of interstellar PAHs will be presented. We will also present the new generation of laboratory experiments that are currently being developed in order to provide a closer simulation of space environments and a better support to space missions.

  5. Molecular anions in circumstellar envelopes, interstellar clouds and planetary atmospheres: quantum dynamics of formation and evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Carelli, Fabio

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays, it is a well known fact that most of the matter in our Solar System, in our Galaxy and, probably, within the whole Universe, exists in the form of ionized particles. For decades astronomers and astrophysicists believed that only positively charged ions were worthy of relevance in drawing the networks for possible chemical reactions in the interstellar medium, as well as in modeling the physical conditions in most of astrophysical environments. Thus, negative ions (and especially mol...

  6. Organic chemistry and biology of the interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagan, C.

    1973-01-01

    Interstellar organic chemistry is discussed as the field of study emerging from the discovery of microwave lines of formaldehyde and of hydrogen cyanide in the interstellar medium. The reliability of molecular identifications and comparisons of interstellar and cometary compounds are considered, along with the degradational origin of simple organics. It is pointed out that the contribution of interstellar organic chemistry to problems in biology is not substantive but analogical. The interstellar medium reveals the operation of chemical processes which, on earth and perhaps on vast numbers of planets throughout the universe, led to the origin of life, but the actual molecules of the interstellar medium are unlikely to play any significant biological role.

  7. Interstellar Dust in the Solar System

    CERN Document Server

    Krueger, Harald; Altobelli, Nicolas; Gruen, Eberhard

    2007-01-01

    The Ulysses spacecraft has been orbiting the Sun on a highly inclined ellipse almost perpendicular to the ecliptic plane (inclination 79 deg, perihelion distance 1.3 AU, aphelion distance 5.4 AU) since it encountered Jupiter in 1992. The in-situ dust detector on board continuously measured interstellar dust grains with masses up to 10^-13 kg, penetrating deep into the solar system. The flow direction is close to the mean apex of the Sun's motion through the solar system and the grains act as tracers of the physical conditions in the local interstellar cloud (LIC). While Ulysses monitored the interstellar dust stream at high ecliptic latitudes between 3 and 5 AU, interstellar impactors were also measured with the in-situ dust detectors on board Cassini, Galileo and Helios, covering a heliocentric distance range between 0.3 and 3 AU in the ecliptic plane. The interstellar dust stream in the inner solar system is altered by the solar radiation pressure force, gravitational focussing and interaction of charged gr...

  8. Prospective of Photon Propulsion for Interstellar Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Young K.

    Mastering photon propulsion is proposed to be the key to overcoming the limit of the current propulsion technology based on conventional rocketry and potentially opening a new space era. A perspective on photon propulsion is presented here to elucidate that interstellar manned roundtrip flight could be achievable in a century within a frame of exiting scientific principles, once the required existing technologies are further developed. It is shown that the developmental pathway towards the interstellar flight demands not only technological breakthroughs, but consistent long-term world-scale economic interest and investment. Such interest and investment will result from positive financial returns from routine interstellar commutes that can transport highly valuable commodities in a profitable manner. The Photonic Railway, a permanent energy-efficient transportation structure based on the Beamed-Laser Propulsion (BLP) by Forward and the Photonic Laser Thruster (PLT) by the author, is proposed to enable such routine interstellar commutes via Spacetrains. A four-phased evolutionary developmental pathway towards the Interstellar Photonic Railway is proposed. Each phase poses evolutionary, yet daunting, technological and financial challenges that need to be overcome within each time frame of 20 _ 30 years, and is projected to generate multitudes of applications that would lead to sustainable reinvestment into its development. If successfully developed, the Photonic Railway would bring about a quantum leap in the human economic and social interests in space from explorations to terraforming, mining, colonization, and permanent habitation in exoplanets.

  9. O vi in the local interstellar medium

    CERN Document Server

    Barstow, M A; Welsh, B Y; Lallement, R; Preval, J K Barstow A E Forbes And S

    2010-01-01

    We report the results of a search for O VI absorption in the spectra of 80 hot DA white dwarfs observed by the FUSE satellite. We have carried out a detailed analysis of the radial velocities of interstellar and (where present) stellar absorption lines for the entire sample of stars. In approximately 35% of cases (where photospheric material is detected), the velocity differences between the interstellar and photospheric components were beneath the resolution of the FUSE spectrographs. Therefore, in 65% of these stars the interstellar and photospheric contributions could be separated and the nature of the O VI component unambiguously determined. Furthermore, in other examples, where the spectra were of a high signal-to-noise, no photospheric material was found and any O VI detected was assumed to be interstellar. Building on the earlier work of Oegerle et al. (2005) and Savage & Lehner (2006), we have increased the number of detections of interstellar O VI and, for the first time, compared their locations...

  10. Communicating Concepts about Altruism in Interstellar Messages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakoch, Douglas A.

    2002-01-01

    This project identifies key principles of altruism that can be translated into interstellar messages for communication with extraterrestrial intelligence. The message contents will focus specifically on the evolution of altruism, drawing on recent insights in evolutionary biology, with particular emphasis on sociobiological accounts of kin selection and reciprocal altruism. This focus on altruism for message contents has several advantages. First, the subject can be translated into interstellar messages both via an existing formal interstellar language and via pictorial messages. For example, aspects of reciprocal altruism can be described through mathematical modeling, such as game theoretic approaches, which in turn can be described readily in the interstellar language Lincos. Second, concentrating on altruism as a message content may facilitate communications with extraterrestrial intelligence. Some scientists have argued that humans may be expected to communicate something about their moral status and development in an exchange with extraterrestrials. One of the most salient ways that terrestrial and extraterrestrial civilizations might be expected to evaluate one another is in terms of ethical motivations. Indeed, current search strategies assume some measure of altruism on the part of transmitting civilizations; with no guarantee of a response, the other civilization would be providing information to us with no direct payoff. Thus, concepts about altruism provide an appropriate content for interstellar messages, because the concepts themselves might be understood by extraterrestrial civilizations.

  11. Surround suppression and sparse coding in visual and barrel cortices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert N S Sachdev

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available During natural vision the entire retina is stimulated. Likewise, during natural tactile behaviors, spatially extensive regions of the somatosensory surface are co-activated. The large spatial extent of naturalistic stimulation means that surround suppression, a phenomenon whose neural mechanisms remain a matter of debate, must arise during natural behavior. To identify common neural motifs that might instantiate surround suppression across modalities, we review models of surround suppression and compare the evidence supporting the competing ideas that surround suppression has either cortical or sub-cortical origins in visual and barrel cortex. In the visual system there is general agreement lateral inhibitory mechanisms contribute to surround suppression, but little direct experimental evidence that intracortical inhibition plays a major role. Two intracellular recording studies of V1, one using naturalistic stimuli (Haider et al., 2010, the other sinusoidal gratings (Ozeki et al., 2009, sought to identify the causes of reduced activity in V1 with increasing stimulus size, a hallmark of surround suppression. The former attributed this effect to increased inhibition, the latter to largely balanced withdrawal of excitation and inhibition. In rodent primary somatosensory barrel cortex, multi-whisker responses are generally weaker than single whisker responses, suggesting multi-whisker stimulation engages similar surround suppressive mechanisms. The origins of suppression in S1 remain elusive: studies have implicated brainstem lateral/internuclear interactions and both thalamic and cortical inhibition. Although the anatomical organization and instantiation of surround suppression in the visual and somatosensory systems differ, we consider the idea that one common function of surround suppression, in both modalities, is to remove the statistical redundancies associated with natural stimuli by increasing the sparseness or selectivity of sensory

  12. Interstellar processes; Proceedings of the Symposium, Grand Teton National Park, WY, July 1-7, 1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollenbach, David J. (Editor); Thronson, Harley A., Jr. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The conference presents papers on the Milky Way as a galaxy; observations of components of the interstellar medium; interstellar magnetic properties; interstellar processes on a galactic scale; dynamical processes in interstellar clouds; interstellar dust grains; interstellar chemical processes; and heating, cooling, and radiative processes. Attention is given to H2 in the Galaxy, hot interstellar gas in the Galactic disk and halo, interstellar magnetic fields, cloud formation and destruction, theoretical approaches to interstellar turbulence, and infrared absorption and emission characteristics of interstellar PAHs. Other topics include gas phase chemical processes in molecular clouds, the chemical evolution of galaxies, and the atomic and molecular physics of interstellar heating and cooling.

  13. Particulate capture efficiency of a vegetative environmental buffer surrounding an animal feeding operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Particulate matter emitted from tunnel-ventilated animal feeding operations (AFOs) is known to transport malodorous compounds. As a mitigation strategy, vegetative environmental buffers (VEBs) are often installed surrounding AFOs to capture particulates and induce lofting and dispersion. Currently, ...

  14. Investigating nearby exoplanets via interstellar radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffer, Louis K.

    2014-01-01

    Interstellar radar is a potential intermediate step between passive observation of exoplanets and interstellar exploratory missions. Compared with passive observation, it has the traditional advantages of radar astronomy. It can measure surface characteristics, determine spin rates and axes, provide extremely accurate ranges, construct maps of planets, distinguish liquid from solid surfaces, find rings and moons, and penetrate clouds. It can do this even for planets close to the parent star. Compared with interstellar travel or probes, it also offers significant advantages. The technology required to build such a radar already exists, radar can return results within a human lifetime, and a single facility can investigate thousands of planetary systems. The cost, although too high for current implementation, is within the reach of Earth's economy.

  15. Long-Term Perspectives on Interstellar Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, M. A. G.

    Realizing interstellar travel by machines or living beings will require not only scientific and technological progress, but also a shared secular belief among a determined minority that this enterprise is important for the human future. Their efforts may have to extend beyond individual human lifetimes. Historical perspectives, on both the past and the future, are proposed. Interstellar probes could be a more thorough way of searching for alien forms of life and intelligence in nearby systems, particularly if there were intelligent beings there who did not employ technologies our astronomical observing devices can detect from here. Perspectives on the ethical, policy, and design issues of such close encounters with alien life and intelligence are presented. Ways of accelerating the coming of interstellar probes are suggested.

  16. Model atmospheres - Tool for identifying interstellar features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, P. C.; Slojkowski, S. E.; Rodriguez-Bell, T.; York, D.

    1993-01-01

    Model atmosphere parameters are derived for 14 early A stars with rotation velocities, from optical spectra, in excess of 80 km/s. The models are compared with IUE observations of the stars in regions where interstellar lines are expected. In general, with the assumption of solar abundances, excellent fits are obtained in regions longward of 2580 A, and accurate interstellar equivalent widths can be derived using models to establish the continuum. The fits are poorer at shorter wavelengths, particularly at 2026-2062 A, where the stellar model parameters seem inadequate. Features indicating mass flows are evident in stars with known infrared excesses. In gamma TrA, variability in the Mg II lines is seen over the 5-year interval of these data, and also over timescales as short as 26 days. The present technique should be useful in systematic studies of episodic mass flows in A stars and for stellar abundance studies, as well as interstellar features.

  17. Investigating Nearby Exoplanets via Interstellar Radar

    CERN Document Server

    Scheffer, Louis K

    2013-01-01

    Interstellar radar is a potential intermediate step between passive observation of exoplanets and interstellar exploratory missions. Compared to passive observation, it has the traditional advantages of radar astronomy. It can measure surface characteristics, determine spin rates and axes, provide extremely accurate ranges, construct maps of planets, distinguish liquid from solid surfaces, find rings and moons, and penetrate clouds. It can do this even for planets close to the parent star. Compared to interstellar travel or probes, it also offers significant advantages. The technology required to build such a radar already exists, radar can return results within a human lifetime, and a single facility can investigate thousands of planetary systems. The cost, although high, is within the reach of Earth's economy, so it is cheaper as well.

  18. Interstellar water chemistry: from laboratory to observations

    CERN Document Server

    van Dishoeck, Ewine F; Neufeld, David A

    2013-01-01

    Water is observed throughout the universe, from diffuse interstellar clouds to protoplanetary disks around young stars, and from comets in our own solar system and exoplanetary atmospheres to galaxies at high redshifts. This review summarizes the spectroscopy and excitation of water in interstellar space as well as the basic chemical processes that form and destroy water under interstellar conditions. Three major routes to water formation are identified: low temperature ion-molecule chemistry, high-temperature neutral-neutral chemistry and gas-ice chemistry. The rate coefficients of several important processes entering the networks are discussed in detail; several of them have been determined only in the last decade through laboratory experiments and theoretical calculations. Astronomical examples of each of the different chemical routes are presented using data from powerful new telescopes, in particular the Herschel Space Observatory. Basic chemical physics studies remain critically important to analyze ast...

  19. Interstellar Travel. (Latest citations from the Aerospace Database)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning travel between the stars. Topics include cost considerations, hyperspace navigation, exploration, and propulsion systems for vehicles to be used in interstellar travel. Human factor issues and social aspects of interstellar travel are also discussed.

  20. Radio observations of Supernova Remnants and the surrounding molecular gas

    CERN Document Server

    Dubner, G

    2011-01-01

    Supernova Remnants (SNRs) are believed to be the main source of Galactic cosmic rays (CR). The strong SNR shocks provide ideal acceleration sites for particles of at least 10^14 eV/nucleon. Radio continuum studies of SNRs carried out with good sensitivity and high angular resolution convey information about three main aspects of the SNRs: morphology, polarization and spectrum. Based on this information it is possible to localize sites of higher compression and particle acceleration as well as the orientation and degree of order of the magnetic fields, and in some cases even its intensity. All this information, when complemented with the study of the distribution and kinematics of the surrounding interstellar gas, results in a very useful dataset to investigate the role of SNRs as cosmic ray accelerators. In this presentation, I analyze the radio observations of SNRs and surrounding molecular clouds, showing the contribution of these studies to the understanding of the role of SNRs as factories of CRs.

  1. Problems of Interplanetary and Interstellar Trade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickman, John

    2008-01-01

    If and when interplanetary and interstellar trade develops, it will be novel in two respects. First, the distances and time spans involved will reduce all or nearly all trade to the exchange of intangible goods. That threatens the possibility of conducting business in a genuinely common currency and of enforcing debt agreements, especially those involving sovereign debt. Second, interstellar trade suggests trade between humans and aliens. Cultural distance is a probable obstacle to initiating and sustaining such trade. Such exchange also threatens the release of new and potentially toxic memes.

  2. Water in the interstellar media of galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    van der Tak, Floris

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews recent observations of water in Galactic interstellar clouds and nearby galactic nuclei. Two results are highlighted: (1) Multi-line H$_2$O mapping of the Orion Bar shows that the water chemistry in PDRs is driven by photodissociation and -desorption, unlike in star-forming regions. (2) High-resolution spectra of H$_2$O and its ions toward 5 starburst / AGN systems reveal low ionization rates, unlike as found from higher-excitation lines. We conclude that the chemistry of water strongly depends on radiation environment, and that the ionization rates of interstellar clouds decrease by at least 10 between galactic nuclei and disks.

  3. Interstellar gas in the Gum Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallerstein, G.; Jenkins, E. B.; Silk, J.

    1980-01-01

    A survey of the interstellar gas near the Gum Nebula by optical observation of 67 stars at Ca II, 42 stars at Na I, and 14 stars in the UV with the Copernicus satellite provided radial velocities and column densities for all resolved absorption components. Velocity dispersions for gas in the Gum Nebula are not significantly larger than in the general interstellar medium; the ionization structure is predominantly that of an H II region with moderately high ionization. Denser, more highly ionized clouds are concentrated toward the Gum Nebula; these clouds do not show the anomalously high ionization observed in the Vela remnant clouds.

  4. PROBING THE LOCAL BUBBLE WITH DIFFUSE INTERSTELLAR BANDS. III. THE NORTHERN HEMISPHERE DATA AND CATALOG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farhang, Amin; Khosroshahi, Habib G.; Javadi, Atefeh [School of Astronomy, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), P.O. Box 19395-5746, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Van Loon, Jacco Th., E-mail: a.farhang@ipm.ir [Astrophysics Group, Lennard-Jones Laboratories, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-01

    We present new high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) observations of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) in the Local Bubble and its surroundings. We observed 432 sightlines and obtain the equivalent widths of the λ5780 and λ5797 Å DIBs up to a distance of ∼200 pc. All of the observations were carried out using the Intermediate Dispersion Spectrograph on the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope, during three years, to reach a minimum S/N of ∼2000. All of the λ5780 and λ5797 absorptions are presented in this paper and we tabulate the observed values of the interstellar parameters, λ5780, λ5797, Na ID{sub 1}, and Na ID{sub 2}, including the uncertainties.

  5. Probing the Local Bubble with Diffuse Interstellar Bands. III. The Northern hemisphere data and catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Farhang, Amin; Javadi, Atefeh; van Loon, Jacco Th

    2014-01-01

    We present a new high signal-to-noise (S/N) observations of the Diffuse Interstellar Bands (DIBs) in the Local Bubble and its surroundings. We observed 432 sightlines and obtain the equivalent widths of $\\lambda$5780 and $\\lambda$5797 \\AA\\ DIBs up to distance of $\\sim$ 200 pc. All observations have been carried out by using Intermediate Dispersion Spectrograph (IDS) on 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope, during three years, to reach a minimum S/N ratio of $\\sim$ 2000. All $\\lambda$5780 and $\\lambda$5797 absorptions are presented in this paper and the observed values of interstellar parameter; $\\lambda$5780, $\\lambda$5797, Na I D lines including the uncertainties are tabulated.

  6. Organic matter in the universe

    CERN Document Server

    Kwok, Sun

    2012-01-01

    Authored by an experienced writer and a well-known researcher of stellar evolution, interstellar matter and spectroscopy, this unique treatise on the formation and observation of organic compounds in space includes a spectroscopy refresher, as well as links to geological findings and finishes with the outlook for future astronomical facilities and solar system exploration missions. A whole section on laboratory simulations includes the Miller-Urey experiment and the ultraviolet photolysis of ices.

  7. The Voyager Journey to Interstellar Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, E. C.

    Launched in 1977 to explore Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune, the two Voyager spacecraft continued their journeys beyond the planets as they searched for the heliopause, the boundary between the solar wind and the local interstellar medium. After traveling more than 23 billion kilometers, Voyager 1 left the heliosphere on August 25, 2012, and began returning the first in-situ observations of local interstellar space. Voyager 1 found a wall of interstellar plasma beyond the heliopause with a density forty times greater than inside and an interstellar magnetic field that is compressed and wrapped around the outside. Voyager 1 also observed the energy spectrum of low energy galactic cosmic ray protons that are excluded from the heliosphere by solar modulation, finding a peak intensity at ˜30 MeV. that is ten times the maximum intensity at 1 AU that occurs at ˜300 MeV. An overview of the journey and the new aspects of the interaction of the sun and the nearby region of the Milky Way will be discussed.

  8. Bubbles and holes in the interstellar medium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanderHulst, JM; Skillman, ED

    1996-01-01

    Studies of the HI in nearby galaxies now clearly begin to show the effects of star formation on the interstellar medium. Holes, filaments, expanding motions and other anomalous velocity signatures are clearly apparent in sensitive observations of the HI in nearby galaxies. A global relation with the

  9. The composition of circumstellar and interstellar dust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tielens, AGGM; Woodward, CE; Biscay, MD; Shull, JM

    2001-01-01

    A large number of solid dust components have been identified through analysis of stardust recovered from meteorites, and analysis of IR observations of circumstellar shells and the interstellar medium. These include graphite, hydrogenated amorphous carbon, diamond, PAHs, silicon-, iron-, and titanin

  10. Physics and chemistry of interstellar ice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guss (née Isokoski), Karoliina Marja-Riita

    2013-01-01

    The importance of ice in the interstellar medium is indisputable. Gas phase reactions relying on three-body collisions are exceedingly rare in the sparse medium between the stars. On solid surfaces, atoms and molecules can reside and rove the surface until a reaction takes place. Upon reaction, the

  11. Infrared spectroscopy of interstellar apolar ice analogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ehrenfreund, P; Boogert, ACA; Gerakines, PA; Tielens, AGGM; van Dishoeck, EF

    1997-01-01

    Apolar ices have been observed in several regions in dense clouds and are likely dominated by molecules such as CO, CO(2) and the infrared inactive molecules O(2) and N(2). Interstellar solid CO has been well characterized by ground-based high resolution measurements. Recent ISO results showed the u

  12. Abundances and Depletions of Interstellar Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, A. G.; Rachford, B. L.; Snow, T. P.

    2003-12-01

    We extend previous work on interstellar oxygen abundances with the addition of data from the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE). We report on the abundance of interstellar neutral oxygen (OI) for several sightlines, using data from FUSE, the International Spectroscopic Explorer (IUE), and the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). OI column densities are derived by measuring the equivalent widths of several ultraviolet absorption lines, and subsequently fitting those to a curve of growth. The column densities of our best-constrained sightlines show a ratio of O/H that agrees with the current best solar value if dust is considered. We do not see evidence of enhanced depletion of gas-phase oxygen that is systematically variable with respect to the physical parameters of different environments (e.g., reddening or molecular fraction). The column densities of our less well-constrained sightlines show some scatter in O/H, but many agree with the solar value to within errors. We discuss these results in the context of deriving the best methods for determining interstellar abundances, the unresolved question of the best value for O/H in the interstellar medium (ISM), the O/H ratio observed in Galactic stars, and the depletion of gas-phase oxygen onto dust grains. Financial support for this research has been provided by the National Science Foundation GK-12 Program and NASA contract NAS 5-32985.

  13. The photodissociation and chemistry of interstellar CO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dishoeck, van E.F.; Black, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    Recent work on the vacuum UV absorption spectrum of CO to the description of the photodissociation of interstellar CO and its principal isotopic varieties is discussed. The effects of line broadening, self-shielding, shielding by H and H2, and isotope-selective shielding are examined as functions of

  14. Far-infrared spectroscopy of interstellar dust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tielens, AGGM; Wilson, A

    2005-01-01

    The composition of interstellar dust is best studied using mid-infrared spectroscopy. Nevertheless, the far-infrared can make some unique contributions to this field. This includes studies on the Mg/Fe ratio and the temperature of crystalline silicates, the presence of carbonates, and the precense o

  15. A Rigorous Attempt to Verify Interstellar Glycine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, L. E.; Lovas, F. J.; Hollis, J. M.; Friedel, D. N.; Jewell, P. R.; Remijan, A.; Ilyushin, V. V.; Alekseev, E. A.; Dyubko, S. F.

    2004-01-01

    In 2003, Kuan, Charnley, and co-workers reported the detection of interstellar glycine (NH2CH2COOH) based on observations of 27 lines in 19 different spectral bands in one or more of the sources Sgr BP(N-LMH), Orion KL, and W51 e1/e2. They supported their detection report with rotational temperature diagrams for all three sources. In this paper, we present essential criteria which can be used in a straightforward analysis technique to confirm the identity of an interstellar asymmetric rotor such as glycine. We use new laboratory measurements of glycine as a basis for applying this analysis technique, both to our previously unpublished 12 m telescope data and to the previously published SEST data of Nummelin and colleagues. We conclude that key lines necessary for an interstellar glycine identification have not yet been found. We identify several common molecular candidates that should be examined further as more likely carriers of the lines reported as glycine. Finally, we illustrate that rotational temperature diagrams used without the support of correct spectroscopic assignments are not a reliable tool for the identification of interstellar molecules. Subject headings: ISM: abundances - ISM: clouds - ISM: individual (Sagittarius B2[N-

  16. The composition of circumstellar and interstellar dust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tielens, AGGM; Woodward, CE; Biscay, MD; Shull, JM

    2001-01-01

    A large number of solid dust components have been identified through analysis of stardust recovered from meteorites, and analysis of IR observations of circumstellar shells and the interstellar medium. These include graphite, hydrogenated amorphous carbon, diamond, PAHs, silicon-, iron-, and titanin

  17. TRIANGULATION OF THE INTERSTELLAR MAGNETIC FIELD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwadron, N. A.; Moebius, E. [University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Richardson, J. D. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Burlaga, L. F. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); McComas, D. J. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX 78228 (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Determining the direction of the local interstellar magnetic field (LISMF) is important for understanding the heliosphere’s global structure, the properties of the interstellar medium, and the propagation of cosmic rays in the local galactic medium. Measurements of interstellar neutral atoms by Ulysses for He and by SOHO/SWAN for H provided some of the first observational insights into the LISMF direction. Because secondary neutral H is partially deflected by the interstellar flow in the outer heliosheath and this deflection is influenced by the LISMF, the relative deflection of H versus He provides a plane—the so-called B–V plane in which the LISMF direction should lie. Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) subsequently discovered a ribbon, the center of which is conjectured to be the LISMF direction. The most recent He velocity measurements from IBEX and those from Ulysses yield a B–V plane with uncertainty limits that contain the centers of the IBEX ribbon at 0.7–2.7 keV. The possibility that Voyager 1 has moved into the outer heliosheath now suggests that Voyager 1's direct observations provide another independent determination of the LISMF. We show that LISMF direction measured by Voyager 1 is >40° off from the IBEX ribbon center and the B–V plane. Taking into account the temporal gradient of the field direction measured by Voyager 1, we extrapolate to a field direction that passes directly through the IBEX ribbon center (0.7–2.7 keV) and the B–V plane, allowing us to triangulate the LISMF direction and estimate the gradient scale size of the magnetic field.

  18. Binaural Rendering in MPEG Surround

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristofer Kjörling

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes novel methods for evoking a multichannel audio experience over stereo headphones. In contrast to the conventional convolution-based approach where, for example, five input channels are filtered using ten head-related transfer functions, the current approach is based on a parametric representation of the multichannel signal, along with either a parametric representation of the head-related transfer functions or a reduced set of head-related transfer functions. An audio scene with multiple virtual sound sources is represented by a mono or a stereo downmix signal of all sound source signals, accompanied by certain statistical (spatial properties. These statistical properties of the sound sources are either combined with statistical properties of head-related transfer functions to estimate “binaural parameters” that represent the perceptually relevant aspects of the auditory scene or used to create a limited set of combined head-related transfer functions that can be applied directly on the downmix signal. Subsequently, a binaural rendering stage reinstates the statistical properties of the sound sources by applying the estimated binaural parameters or the reduced set of combined head-related transfer functions directly on the downmix. If combined with parametric multichannel audio coders such as MPEG Surround, the proposed methods are advantageous over conventional methods in terms of perceived quality and computational complexity.

  19. Reduced surround inhibition in musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hae-Won; Kang, Suk Y; Hallett, Mark; Sohn, Young H

    2012-06-01

    To investigate whether surround inhibition (SI) in the motor system is altered in professional musicians, we performed a transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) study in 10 professional musicians and 15 age-matched healthy non-musicians. TMS was set to be triggered by self-initiated flexion of the index finger at different intervals ranging from 3 to 1,000 ms. Average motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitudes obtained from self-triggered TMS were normalized to average MEPs of the control TMS at rest and expressed as a percentage. Normalized MEP amplitudes of the abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscles were compared between the musicians and non-musicians with the primary analysis being the intervals between 3 and 80 ms (during the movement). A mixed-design ANOVA revealed a significant difference in normalized ADM MEPs during the index finger flexion between groups, with less SI in the musicians. This study demonstrated that the functional operation of SI is less strong in musicians than non-musicians, perhaps due to practice of movement synergies involving both muscles. Reduced SI, however, could lead susceptible musicians to be prone to develop task-specific dystonia.

  20. Binaural Rendering in MPEG Surround

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breebaart, Jeroen; Villemoes, Lars; Kjörling, Kristofer

    2008-12-01

    This paper describes novel methods for evoking a multichannel audio experience over stereo headphones. In contrast to the conventional convolution-based approach where, for example, five input channels are filtered using ten head-related transfer functions, the current approach is based on a parametric representation of the multichannel signal, along with either a parametric representation of the head-related transfer functions or a reduced set of head-related transfer functions. An audio scene with multiple virtual sound sources is represented by a mono or a stereo downmix signal of all sound source signals, accompanied by certain statistical (spatial) properties. These statistical properties of the sound sources are either combined with statistical properties of head-related transfer functions to estimate "binaural parameters" that represent the perceptually relevant aspects of the auditory scene or used to create a limited set of combined head-related transfer functions that can be applied directly on the downmix signal. Subsequently, a binaural rendering stage reinstates the statistical properties of the sound sources by applying the estimated binaural parameters or the reduced set of combined head-related transfer functions directly on the downmix. If combined with parametric multichannel audio coders such as MPEG Surround, the proposed methods are advantageous over conventional methods in terms of perceived quality and computational complexity.

  1. Isotopic Fractionation in Primitive Material: Quantifying the Contribution of Interstellar Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnley, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Anomalously fractionated isotopic material is found in many primitive Solar System objects, such as meteorites and comets. It is thought, in some cases, to trace interstellar matter that was incorporated into the Solar Nebula without undergoing significant processing. We will present the results of models of the nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon fractionation chemistry in dense molecular clouds, particularly in cores where substantial freeze-out of molecules on to dust has occurred. The range of fractionation ratios expected in different interstellar molecules will be discussed and compared to the ratios measured in molecular clouds, comets and meteoritic material. These models make several predictions that can be tested in the near future by molecular line observations, particularly with ALMA.

  2. Interstellar Probe: The Next Step To Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNutt, Ralph; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2016-07-01

    In the years following the discovery of the solar wind, the term "heliosphere" was coined and defined as "the region of interplanetary space where the solar wind is flowing supersonically." In June 1971, with the development of the Pioneer probes to Jupiter and beyond well underway, a session of the American Astronautical Society meeting considered scientific exploration reaching beyond the solar system and into the interstellar medium. Despite many discussions, studies, and meetings since, the most recent held under the auspices of the Keck Institute for Space Studies (8-11 September 2014 and 13-15 January 2015), such missions have been relegated to the '"future" due to the large distances and solar system escape speeds contemplated for their execution. In the meantime, the Voyager Interstellar Mission (VIM), consisting of the twin Voyager spacecraft almost 40 years since their respective launches, are making inroads into this region beyond the termination shock of the solar wind, a new region of the solid bodies of the solar system has been opened by the New Horizons flyby of the Pluto system, and the Cassini Ion and Neutral CAmera (INCA) and Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) have remotely sensed neutral atoms that have provided significant clues to the global structure of the interaction of the solar wind and interstellar medium. It is now time for a dedicated mission to the regime beyond the solar system to explore our galactic environment. A first, near-term implementation can be carried out with the near-current flight system technology. What is also clear is that the high speeds required will limit the spacecraft to a relatively small mass of no more than ~500 kg, regardless of the propulsion details. The recent success of the New Horizons mission at the Pluto system illustrates that with modern technologies, such spacecraft sizes can still accommodate the means to produce paradigm-shifting science, providing for a compelling scientific mission. The

  3. Is Interstellar Space Travel Possible?

    CERN Document Server

    Singal, Tanmay

    2013-01-01

    It is shown that space travel, even in the most distant future, will remain confined to our own planetary system, and a similar conclusion will hold forth for any other civilization, no matter how advanced it might be, unless those extra-terrestrial species have life spans order of magnitude longer than ours. Even in such a case it is unlikely that they will travel much farther than their immediate stellar neighbourhood, as each such excursion will exhaust the resources of their home planet so much that those will dwindle rather fast and there might not be much left for the further scientific and technological advancements. So the science-fiction fancy of a "Galactic Empire" may ever remain in our fantasies only. And as for the mythical UFOs, whose quiet appearances do get reported in the press once in a while, recent explorations have shown no evidence that any such thing could have an origination within our own solar system itself. And a "quiet trip" back and forth from a distant star is almost impossible a...

  4. Turbulence and the ionization of interstellar gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Alex S.

    2015-08-01

    Turbulence is widely observed in the ionized gas in the interstellar media of star-forming galaxies. Observations in the Milky Way indicate emission from that the warm ionized medium -- ionized gas far from massive stars, the most likely source of the ionization -- has a lognormal intensity distribution. This and other measurements indicate that the gas is well-described as a transonic turbulent fluid. Such a fluid can be produced by feedback from supernovae in the Galaxy. Understanding of this turbulence has also led to a natural explanation for a long-standing puzzle: how do ionizing photons travel through the largely-neutral interstellar medium and produce the ionization? In the turbulent gas, low-density pathways allow ionizing photons to propagate for kiloparsecs, with implications for radiative energy transport in star-forming galaxies.

  5. Human factors issues for interstellar spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Marc M.; Brody, Adam R.

    1991-01-01

    Developments in research on space human factors are reviewed in the context of a self-sustaining interstellar spacecraft based on the notion of traveling space settlements. Assumptions about interstellar travel are set forth addressing costs, mission durations, and the need for multigenerational space colonies. The model of human motivation by Maslow (1970) is examined and directly related to the design of space habitat architecture. Human-factors technology issues encompass the human-machine interface, crew selection and training, and the development of spaceship infrastructure during transtellar flight. A scenario for feasible instellar travel is based on a speed of 0.5c, a timeframe of about 100 yr, and an expandable multigenerational crew of about 100 members. Crew training is identified as a critical human-factors issue requiring the development of perceptual and cognitive aids such as expert systems and virtual reality.

  6. Organic Synthesis in Simulated Interstellar Ice Analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworkin, Jason P.; Bernstein, Max P.; Sandford, Scott A.; Allamandola, Louis J.; Deamer, David W.; Elsila, Jamie; Zare, Richard N.

    2001-01-01

    Comets and carbonaceous micrometeorites may have been significant sources of organic compounds on the early Earth. Ices on grains in interstellar dense molecular clouds contain a variety of simple molecules as well as aromatic molecules of various sizes. While in these clouds the icy grains are processed by ultraviolet light and cosmic radiation which produces more complex organic molecules. We have run laboratory simulations to identify the types of molecules which could have been generated photolytically in pre-cometary ices. Experiments were conducted by forming various realistic interstellar mixed-molecular ices with and without polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at approx. 10 K under high vacuum irradiated with UV light from a hydrogen plasma lamp. The residue that remained after warming to room temperature was analyzed by HPLC, and by laser desorption mass spectrometry. The residue contains several classes of compounds which may be of prebiotic significance.

  7. Interstellar Turbulence II: Implications and Effects

    CERN Document Server

    Scalo, J

    2004-01-01

    Interstellar turbulence has implications for the dispersal and mixing of the elements, cloud chemistry, cosmic ray scattering, and radio wave propagation through the ionized medium. This review discusses the observations and theory of these effects. Metallicity fluctuations are summarized, and the theory of turbulent transport of passive tracers is reviewed. Modeling methods, turbulent concentration of dust grains, and the turbulent washout of radial abundance gradients are discussed. Interstellar chemistry is affected by turbulent transport of various species between environments with different physical properties and by turbulent heating in shocks, vortical dissipation regions, and local regions of enhanced ambipolar diffusion. Cosmic rays are scattered and accelerated in turbulent magnetic waves and shocks, and they generate turbulence on the scale of their gyroradii. Radio wave scintillation is an important diagnostic for small scale turbulence in the ionized medium, giving information about the power spe...

  8. Structural Evolution of Interstellar Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammonds, Mark; Candian, Alessandra; Mori, Tamami; Usui, Fumihiko; Onaka, Takashi

    2015-08-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are an important reservoir for molecular carbon in the interstellar medium (ISM), and investigations into their chemistry and behaviour may be important to the understanding of how carbon is processed from simple forms into complex prebiotic molecules such as those detected in chondritic meteorites. In this study, infrared astronomical data from AKARI and other observatories are used together with laboratory and theoretical data to study variations in the structure of emitting PAHs in interstellar environments using spectroscopic decomposition techniques and bands arising from carbon-hydrogen bond vibrations at wavelengths from 3 - 14 microns. Results and inferences are discussed in terms of the processing of large carbonaceous molecules in astrophysical environments.

  9. Star Formation in Turbulent Interstellar Gas

    CERN Document Server

    Klessen, R S

    2003-01-01

    Understanding the star formation process is central to much of modern astrophysics. For several decades it has been thought that stellar birth is primarily controlled by the interplay between gravity and magnetostatic support, modulated by ambipolar diffusion. Recently, however, both observational and numerical work has begun to suggest that supersonic interstellar turbulence rather than magnetic fields controls star formation. Supersonic turbulence can provide support against gravitational collapse on global scales, while at the same time it produces localized density enhancements that allow for collapse on small scales. The efficiency and timescale of stellar birth in Galactic molecular clouds strongly depend on the properties of the interstellar turbulent velocity field, with slow, inefficient, isolated star formation being a hallmark of turbulent support, and fast, efficient, clustered star formation occurring in its absence.

  10. Organic Synthesis in Simulated Interstellar Ice Analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworkin, Jason P.; Bernstein, Max P.; Sandford, Scott A.; Allamandola, Louis J.; Deamer, David W.; Elsila, Jamie; Zare, Richard N.

    2001-01-01

    Comets and carbonaceous micrometeorites may have been significant sources of organic compounds on the early Earth. Ices on grains in interstellar dense molecular clouds contain a variety of simple molecules as well as aromatic molecules of various sizes. While in these clouds the icy grains are processed by ultraviolet light and cosmic radiation which produces more complex organic molecules. We have run laboratory simulations to identify the types of molecules which could have been generated photolytically in pre-cometary ices. Experiments were conducted by forming various realistic interstellar mixed-molecular ices with and without polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at approx. 10 K under high vacuum irradiated with UV light from a hydrogen plasma lamp. The residue that remained after warming to room temperature was analyzed by HPLC, and by laser desorption mass spectrometry. The residue contains several classes of compounds which may be of prebiotic significance.

  11. Local Interstellar Magnetic Field Determined from the Interstellar Boundary Explorer Ribbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirnstein, E. J.; Heerikhuisen, J.; Funsten, H. O.; Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J.; Pogorelov, N. V.

    2016-02-01

    The solar wind emanating from the Sun interacts with the local interstellar medium (LISM), forming the heliosphere. Hydrogen energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) produced by the solar-interstellar interaction carry important information about plasma properties from the boundaries of the heliosphere, and are currently being measured by NASA's Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX). IBEX observations show the existence of a “ribbon” of intense ENA emission projecting a circle on the celestial sphere that is centered near the local interstellar magnetic field (ISMF) vector. Here we show that the source of the IBEX ribbon as a function of ENA energy outside the heliosphere, uniquely coupled to the draping of the ISMF around the heliopause, can be used to precisely determine the magnitude (2.93 ± 0.08 μG) and direction (227.°28 ± 0.°69, 34.°62 ± 0.°45 in ecliptic longitude and latitude) of the pristine ISMF far (∼1000 AU) from the Sun. We find that the ISMF vector is offset from the ribbon center by ∼8.°3 toward the direction of motion of the heliosphere through the LISM, and their vectors form a plane that is consistent with the direction of deflected interstellar neutral hydrogen, thought to be controlled by the ISMF. Our results yield draped ISMF properties close to that observed by Voyager 1, the only spacecraft to directly measure the ISMF close to the heliosphere, and give predictions of the pristine ISMF that Voyager 1 has yet to sample.

  12. On the Critical Ionization Velocity Effect in Interstellar Space and Possible Detection of Related Continuum Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Verschuur, Gerrit L

    2007-01-01

    Interstellar neutral hydrogen (HI) emission spectra manifest several families of linewidths whose numerical values (34, 13 & 6 km/s) appear to be related to the critical ionization velocities (CIVs) of the most abundant interstellar atomic species. Extended new analysis of HI emission profiles shows that the 34 km/s wide component, probably corresponding to the CIV for helium, is pervasive. The 34 km/s wide linewidth family is found in low-velocity (local) neutral hydrogen (HI) profiles as well as in the so-called high-velocity clouds. In addition, published studies of HI linewidths found in the Magellanic Stream, Very-High-Velocity Clouds, and Compact High-Velocity Clouds, all of which are believed to be intergalactic, have noted that typical values are of the same order. If the critical ionization velocity effect does play a role in interstellar space it may be expected to produce locally enhanced electron densities where rapidly moving neutral gas masses interact with surrounding plasma. Evidence is pr...

  13. Separation of the Interstellar Boundary Explorer Ribbon from Globally Distributed Energetic Neutral Atom Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwadron, N. A.; Allegrini, F.; Bzowski, M.; Christian, E. R.; Crew, G. B.; Dayeh, M.; DeMajistre, R.; Frisch, P.; Funsten, H. O.; Fuselier, S. A.; Goodrich, K.; Gruntman, M.; Janzen, P.; Kucharek, H.; Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J.; Moebius, E.; Prested, C.; Reisenfeld, D.; Reno, M.; Roelof, E.; Siegel, J.; Vanderspek, R.

    2011-04-01

    The Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) observes a remarkable feature, the IBEX ribbon, which has energetic neutral atom (ENA) flux over a narrow region ~20° wide, a factor of 2-3 higher than the more globally distributed ENA flux. Here, we separate ENA emissions in the ribbon from the distributed flux by applying a transparency mask over the ribbon and regions of high emissions, and then solve for the distributed flux using an interpolation scheme. Our analysis shows that the energy spectrum and spatial distribution of the ribbon are distinct from the surrounding globally distributed flux. The ribbon energy spectrum shows a knee between ~1 and 4 keV, and the angular distribution is approximately independent of energy. In contrast, the distributed flux does not show a clear knee and more closely conforms to a power law over much of the sky. Consistent with previous analyses, the slope of the power law steepens from the nose to tail, suggesting a weaker termination shock toward the tail as compared to the nose. The knee in the energy spectrum of the ribbon suggests that its source plasma population is generated via a distinct physical process. Both the slope in the energy distribution of the distributed flux and the knee in the energy distribution of the ribbon are ordered by latitude. The heliotail may be identified in maps of globally distributed flux as a broad region of low flux centered ~44°W of the interstellar downwind direction, suggesting heliotail deflection by the interstellar magnetic field.

  14. Kinetic chemistry of dense interstellar clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graedel, T.E.; Langer, W.D.; Frerking, M.A.

    1982-03-01

    A detailed model of the time-dependent chemistry of dense interstellar clouds has been developed to study the dominant chemical processes in carbon and oxygen isotope fractionation, formation of nitrogen-containing molecules, evolution of product molecules as a function of cloud density and temperature, and other topics of interest. The full computation involves 328 individual reactions (expanded to 1067 to study carbon and oxygen isotope chemistry); photodegradation processes are unimportant in these dense clouds and are excluded.

  15. TAU as Tao. [interstellar spacecraft performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyman, P. T.; Reid, M. S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the feasibility of building and launching a truly deep-space spacecraft mission that will penetrate near interstellar space to a depth of one thousand astronomical units (TAU) within a flight time of 50 years. Particular attention is given to the mission profile and to its communications system, power system, and propulsion system. Results of experimental studies indicate that, with advanced technology, reasonable trip times can be achieved and adequate science information can be brought to earth.

  16. Building Interstellar's black hole: the gravitational renderer

    OpenAIRE

    James, Oliver; Dieckmann, Sylvan; Pabst, Simon; Roberts, Paul-George H.; Thorne, Kip S.

    2015-01-01

    Interstellar is the first feature film to attempt depicting a black hole as it would actually be seen by somebody nearby. A close collaboration between the production's Scientific Advisor and the Visual Effects team led to the development of a new renderer, DNGR (Double Negative Gravitational Renderer) which uses novel techniques for rendering in curved space-time. Following the completion of the movie, the code was adapted for scientific research, leading to new insights into gravitational l...

  17. Diffuse interstellar bands in M33

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Keith T; Evans, Christopher J; Cox, Nick L J; Sarre, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    We present the first sample of diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) in the nearby galaxy M33. Studying DIBs in other galaxies allows the behaviour of the carriers to be examined under interstellar conditions which can be quite different from those of the Milky Way, and to determine which DIB properties can be used as reliable probes of extragalactic interstellar media. Multi-object spectroscopy of 43 stars in M33 has been performed using Keck/DEIMOS. The stellar spectral types were determined and combined with literature photometry to determine the M33 reddenings E(B-V)_M33. Equivalent widths or upper limits have been measured for the {\\lambda}5780 DIB towards each star. DIBs were detected towards 20 stars, demonstrating that their carriers are abundant in M33. The relationship with reddening is found to be at the upper end of the range observed in the Milky Way. The line of sight towards one star has an unusually strong ratio of DIB equivalent width to E(B-V)_M33, and a total of seven DIBs were detected towards...

  18. Airborne and laboratory studies of interstellar PAHs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allamandola, L. J.; Sandford, S. A.; Hudgins, D. M.; Witteborn, Fred C.

    1995-01-01

    A brief history of the observations which have led to the hypothesis that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's) are the carriers of the widespread interstellar emission features near 3050, 1615, '1300' and 890 cm(exp -1) (3.29, 6.2, '7.7', and 11.2 mu m) is presented. The central role of airborne spectroscopy is stressed. The principal reason for the assignment to PAH's was the resemblance of the interstellar emission spectrum to the laboratory absorption spectra of PAH's and PAH-like materials. Since precious little information was available on the properties of PAH's in the forms that are thought to exist under interstellar conditions -isolated and ionized in the emission zones, with the smallest PAH's being dehydrogenated- there was a need for a spectral data base on PAH's taken in these states. Here, the relevant infrared spectroscopic properties of PAH's will be reviewed. These laboratory spectra show that relative band intensities are severely altered and that band frequencies shift. It is shown that these new data alleviate several of the spectroscopic criticisms previously leveled at the hypothesis.

  19. Extra-Galactic Diffuse Interstellar Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, N.; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Kaper, Lex; Spaans, Marco; Foing, Bernard

    Diffuse Interstellar Bands (DIBs) have been observed ubiquitously along many sight-lines probing the interstellar medium of the Milky Way. Despite extensive efforts, their carrier(s) have not yet been identified, although they are very likely of a carbonaceous nature and reside in the gas phase. Possible candidates include, but are not limited to, polycyclic aromatic hydro- carbons (PAHs), fullerenes and carbon chains. To advance our understanding of DIB behaviour and thus DIB carrier properties we need to study environments inherently different from those observed in the Milky Way. Only recent advances in instrumentation and telescope capabilities are providing us with new exciting possibilities for extra-galactic DIB research. We present here a selection of our recent observational results for (extra)-galactic DIBs in the Local Group and beyond. In particular, DIBs in the Magellanic Clouds and in the spiral galaxy NGC1448. These first results show surprising similarities between certain DIB profiles as well as differences in DIB behaviour. Understanding diffuse cloud chemistry, in particular with respect to complex (carbonaceous) molecules, is crucial to any DIB carrier identification. In this respect, external galaxies offer a unique window as they exhibit local interstellar conditions (such as metallicity, UV-field and gas-to-dust ratio) very different from those observed in the Milky Way. We discuss briefly the effect of metallicity and the gas-to-dust ratio on the physi-chemical properties of diffuse clouds and the subsequent effects on the PAH charge state distribution and the DIB carriers.

  20. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of CO2 Formation in Interstellar Ices

    CERN Document Server

    Arasa, Carina; van Dishoeck, Ewine F; Kroes, Geert-Jan

    2013-01-01

    CO2 ice is one of the most abundant components in ice-coated interstellar ices besides H2O and CO, but the most favorable path to CO2 ice is still unclear. Molecular dynamics calculations on the ultraviolet photodissociation of different kinds of CO-H2O ice systems have been performed at 10 K in order to demonstrate that the reaction between CO and an OH molecule resulting from H2O photodissociation through the first excited state is a possible route to form CO2 ice. However, our calculations, which take into account different ice surface models, suggest that there is another product with a higher formation probability ((3.00+-0.07)x10-2), which is the HOCO complex, whereas the formation of CO2 has a probability of only (3.6+-0.7)x10-4. The initial location of the CO is key to obtain reaction and form CO2: the CO needs to be located deep into the ice. The HOCO complex becomes trapped in the cold ice surface in the trans-HOCO minimum because it quickly loses its internal energy to the surrounding ice, preventi...

  1. The Possibility of Forming Propargyl Alcohol in the Interstellar Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorai, Prasanta; Das, Ankan; Majumdar, Liton; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Sivaraman, Bhalamurugan; Herbst, Eric

    2017-03-01

    Propargyl alcohol (HC2CH2OH, PA) has yet to be observed in the interstellar medium (ISM) although one of its stable isomers, propenal (CH2CHCHO), has already been detected in Sagittarius B2(N) with the 100-meter Green Bank Telescope in the frequency range 18 - 26 GHz. In this paper, we investigate the formation of propargyl alcohol along with one of its deuterated isotopomers, HC2CH2OD (OD-PA), in a dense molecular cloud. Various pathways for the formation of PA in the gas and on ice mantles surrounding dust particles are discussed. We use a large gas-grain chemical network to study the chemical evolution of PA and its deuterated isotopomer. Our results suggest that gaseous HC2CH2OH can most likely be detected in hot cores or in collections of hot cores such as the star-forming region Sgr B2(N). A simple LTE (Local thermodynamic equilibrium) radiative transfer model is employed to check the possibility of detecting PA and OD-PA in the millimeter-wave regime. In addition, we have carried out quantum chemical calculations to compute the vibrational transition frequencies and intensities of these species in the infrared for perhaps future use in studies with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST).

  2. Probing the Local Bubble with Diffuse Interstellar Bands (DIBs)

    CERN Document Server

    van Loon, Jacco Th; Javadi, Atefeh; Bailey, Mandy; Khosroshahi, Habib

    2015-01-01

    The Sun lies in the middle of an enormous cavity of a million degree gas, known as the Local Bubble. The Local Bubble is surrounded by a wall of denser neutral and ionized gas. The Local Bubble extends around 100 pc in the plane of Galaxy and hundreds of parsecs vertically, but absorption-line surveys of neutral sodium and singly-ionized calcium have revealed a highly irregular structure and the presence of neutral clouds within an otherwise tenuous and hot gas. We have undertaken an all-sky, European-Iranian survey of the Local Bubble in the absorption of a number of diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) to offer a novel view of our neighbourhood. Our dedicated campaigns with ESO's New Technology Telescope and the ING's Isaac Newton Telescope comprise high signal-to-noise, medium-resolution spectra, concentrating on the 5780 and 5797 \\AA\\ bands which trace ionized/irradiated and neutral/shielded environments, respectively; their carriers are unknown but likely to be large carbonaceous molecules. With about 660 s...

  3. New Large Interstellar Molecules Detected with the GBT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollis, Jan M.

    2005-01-01

    At present, more than 135 different molecules have been identified in interstellar clouds. The newest instrument in the interstellar molecule search arsenal is the recently commissioned Green Bank Telescope (GBT). In 2004, the large aldehydes propenal (CH2CHCHO) and propanal (CH3CH2CHO) were the first new interstellar molecules discovered with the GBT. At the same time, the GBT was used to observe interstellar glycolaldehyde (CH2OHCHO), which is the simplest possible aldehyde sugar; interstellar ethylene glycol (HOCH2CH2OH), which is the sugar alcohol of glycolaldehyde; and interstellar methylcyanodiacetylene (CH3C5N). These new GBT observations suggest that successive atomic addition reactions are common in the formation of larger related species. The observations will be presented and discussed.

  4. The Ingenious Theory of Interstellar Trade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Arun; Ganapathy, Rohan M.

    This paper extends interplanetary trade theory to an interstellar setting. It is chiefly concerned with the following question: How should interest charges on goods in transit be computed when the goods travel at speeds close to the actual speed of light? This is a problem because the time taken in transit will appear less to an observer travelling with the goods than to a stationary observer. An innovative and ingenious solution is derived from the economic theory, and two useless but TRUE theorems are proved. The interstellar trade would happen in such a way that two time frames must be considered namely that of the stationary observer whose time runs faster compared to the time frame of the observer in transit The interest in a given trade is purely based on the time taken for the debtor to pay the amount, once the goods have been delivered by the seller. But, in case of interstellar trade, the interest to be calculated in between two time frames would lead to the question of which time frame to be considered and moreover, the time taken for the goods to reach the destination is signicantly prolonged compared to the interplanetary trade, which means, even the slightest variations in the interest rate would be magnied. Apart from this, various new factors arise while calculating the interest. The factors include the time value of money, and the risk of variation in demand for goods, the risk of interspace accidents causing loss of the goods and the rate of perish-ability in case of organic goods. The first two factors considered, for which the time frame of the stationary observer is considered and the factors such as the risk of accidents and the rate of perish-ability of the goods are considered based on the time frame of the observer in transit's point of view. The reasons for such considerations and various assumptions on these concepts are dealt in this paper. The theorems that are formulated in this paper would provide the interstellar traders a basic

  5. Chemical evolution of interstellar dust, comets and the origins of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, J M; Zhao, N; Hage, J

    1989-04-01

    It now appears that the chemical evolution of the pre-solar system interstellar dust ensures that a major fraction of comets is in the form of complex organic molecules at least partially of a prebiotic nature and that the submicron interstellar dust preserves its chemical integrity as result of forming a very tenuous low density comet structure whose solid matter occupies approximately 1/5 of the total volume. This low density micro structure further provides a physical basis for comets bringing a significant fraction of the original interstellar organic molecules to the earth unmodified by the impact event. Finally, the evidence for a large number of comet collisions with the early earth ensured that the major organic molecular budget on the earth's surface was "continuously" supplied along with water well before 3.8 billion years ago which is the earliest date for life. The chemistry and morphological structure of a comet nucleus as an aggregate of interstellar dust is used to provide comparisons with a variety of comet Halley results: the density of the nucleus and of the dust; the dust cloud model and its consequences on the production of C+ and CN in the coma by small organic grains; the surface albedo and the low nucleus heat conductivity and high surface temperature; the appearance of 10(-14) g and 10(-17) g dust particles along with higher masses; the mass spectra of dust and infrared spectroscopy as evidence for complex organic grain mantles and of very small (approximately 0.01 micrometer) carbonaceous and silicate grains; the appearance of small grains resulting from breakup of larger grains. The cosmic ray dosage of a comet nucleus during its 4.5 billion years in the Oort cloud appears to be many orders of magnitude less than the dosage of the preaggregated interstellar dust by ultraviolet photons except perhaps in the outer few meters of the nucleus of a new comet. The heat conductivity calculated for aggregated dust is certainly less than 10(-4) that

  6. Analysis of "Midnight" Tracks in the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector: Possible Discovery of a Contemporary Interstellar Dust Grain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, A. J.; Allen, C.; Bajit, S.; Bastien, R.; Bechtel, H.; Bleuet, P.; Borg, J.; Brenker, F.; Bridges, J.; Brownlee, D. E.; Burchell, M.; Burghammer, M.; Butterworth, A. L.; Cloetens, P.; Cody, G.; Ferrior, T.; Floss, C.; Flynn, G. J.; Frank, D.; Gainsforth, Z.; Grun, E.; Hoppe, P.; Hudson, B.; Kearsley, A.; Lai, B.

    2010-01-01

    In January 2006, the Stardust sample return capsule returned to Earth bearing the first solid samples from a primitive solar system body, Comet 81P/Wild2, and a collector dedicated to the capture and return of contemporary interstellar dust. Both collectors were approximately 0.1m(exp 2) in area and were composed of aerogel tiles (85% of the collecting area) and aluminum foils. The Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector (SIDC) was exposed to the interstellar dust stream for a total exposure factor of 20 m(exp 2) day. The Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination (ISPE) is a three-year effort to characterize the collection using nondestructive techniques.

  7. Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination IV: Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy analyses of impact features in the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterworth, Anna L.; Westphal, Andrew J.; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Gainsforth, Zack; Stodolna, Julien; Frank, David R.; Allen, Carlton; Anderson, David; Ansari, Asna; Bajt, SašA.; Bastien, Ron K.; Bassim, Nabil; Bechtel, Hans A.; Borg, Janet; Brenker, Frank E.; Bridges, John; Brownlee, Donald E.; Burchell, Mark; Burghammer, Manfred; Changela, Hitesh; Cloetens, Peter; Davis, Andrew M.; Doll, Ryan; Floss, Christine; Flynn, George; Grün, Eberhard; Heck, Philipp R.; Hillier, Jon K.; Hoppe, Peter; Hudson, Bruce; Huth, Joachim; Hvide, Brit; Kearsley, Anton; King, Ashley J.; Lai, Barry; Leitner, Jan; Lemelle, Laurence; Leroux, Hugues; Leonard, Ariel; Lettieri, Robert; Marchant, William; Nittler, Larry R.; Ogliore, Ryan; Ong, Wei Ja; Postberg, Frank; Price, Mark C.; Sandford, Scott A.; Tresseras, Juan-Angel Sans; Schmitz, Sylvia; Schoonjans, Tom; Silversmit, Geert; Simionovici, Alexandre S.; Solé, Vicente A.; Srama, Ralf; Stadermann, Frank J.; Stephan, Thomas; Sterken, Veerle J.; Stroud, Rhonda M.; Sutton, Steven; Trieloff, Mario; Tsou, Peter; Tsuchiyama, Akira; Vekemans, Bart; Vincze, Laszlo; von Korff, Joshua; Wordsworth, Naomi; Zevin, Daniel; Zolensky, Michael E.

    2014-09-01

    We report the quantitative characterization by synchrotron soft X-ray spectroscopy of 31 potential impact features in the aerogel capture medium of the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector. Samples were analyzed in aerogel by acquiring high spatial resolution maps and high energy-resolution spectra of major rock-forming elements Mg, Al, Si, Fe, and others. We developed diagnostic screening tests to reject spacecraft secondary ejecta and terrestrial contaminants from further consideration as interstellar dust candidates. The results support an extraterrestrial origin for three interstellar candidates: I1043,1,30 (Orion) is a 3 pg particle with Mg-spinel, forsterite, and an iron-bearing phase. I1047,1,34 (Hylabrook) is a 4 pg particle comprising an olivine core surrounded by low-density, amorphous Mg-silicate and amorphous Fe, Cr, and Mn phases. I1003,1,40 (Sorok) has the track morphology of a high-speed impact, but contains no detectable residue that is convincingly distinguishable from the background aerogel. Twenty-two samples with an anthropogenic origin were rejected, including four secondary ejecta from impacts on the Stardust spacecraft aft solar panels, nine ejecta from secondary impacts on the Stardust Sample Return Capsule, and nine contaminants lacking evidence of an impact. Other samples in the collection included I1029,1,6, which contained surviving solar system impactor material. Four samples remained ambiguous: I1006,2,18, I1044,2,32, and I1092,2,38 were too dense for analysis, and we did not detect an intact projectile in I1044,3,33. We detected no radiation effects from the synchrotron soft X-ray analyses; however, we recorded the effects of synchrotron hard X-ray radiation on I1043,1,30 and I1047,1,34.

  8. Contour detection by surround suppression of texture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petkov, Nicolai; Tavares, JMRS; Jorge, RMN

    2007-01-01

    Based on a keynote lecture at Complmage 2006, Coimbra, Oct. 20-21, 2006, an overview is given of our activities in modelling and using surround inhibition for contour detection. The effect of suppression of a line or edge stimulus by similar surrounding stimuli is known from visual perception studie

  9. Influence of the Gould Belt on Interstellar Extinction

    CERN Document Server

    Gontcharov, George

    2016-01-01

    A new analytical 3D model of interstellar extinction within 500 pc of the Sun as a function of the Galactic spherical coordinates is suggested. This model is physically more justified than the widely used Arenou model, since it takes into account the presence of absorbing matter both in the layer along the equatorial Galactic plane and in the Gould Belt. The extinction in the equatorial layer varies as the sine of the Galactic longitude and in the Gould Belt as the sine of twice the longitude in the Belt plane. The extinction across the layers varies according to a barometric law. It has been found that the absorbing layers intersect at an angle of 17 deg and that the Sun is located near the axial plane of the absorbing layer of the Gould Belt and is probably several parsecs below the axial plane of the equatorial absorbing layer but above the Galactic plane. The model has been tested using the extinction of real stars from three catalogs.

  10. Cometary Materials Originating from Interstellar Ices: Clues from Laboratory Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresneau, A.; Abou Mrad, N.; d’Hendecourt, L. LS; Duvernay, F.; Flandinet, L.; Orthous-Daunay, F.-R.; Vuitton, V.; Thissen, R.; Chiavassa, T.; Danger, G.

    2017-03-01

    We use laboratory experiments to derive information on the chemistry occurring during the evolution of astrophysical ices from dense molecular clouds to interplanetary objects. Through a new strategy that consists of coupling very high resolution mass spectrometry and infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), we investigate the molecular content of the organic residues synthesized from different initial ice compositions. We also obtain information on the evolution of the soluble part of the residues after their over-irradiation. The results give insight into the role of water ice as a trapping and diluting agent during the chemical evolution. They also give information about the importance of the amount of ammonia in such ices, particularly regarding its competition with the carbon chemistry. All of these results allow us to build a first mapping of the evolution of soluble organic matter based on its chemical and physical history. Furthermore, our results suggest that interstellar ices should lead to organic materials enriched in heteroatoms that present similarities with cometary materials but strongly differ from meteoritic organic material, especially in their C/N ratios.

  11. Solar lens mission concept for interstellar exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brashears, Travis; Lubin, Philip; Turyshev, Slava; Shao, Michael; Zhang, Qicheng

    2015-09-01

    The long standing approach to space travel has been to incorporate massive on-board electronics, probes and propellants to achieve space exploration. This approach has led to many great achievements in science, but will never help to explore the interstellar medium. Fortunately, a paradigm shift is upon us in how a spacecraft is constructed and propelled. This paper describes a mission concept to get to our Sun's Gravity Lens at 550AU in less than 10 years. It will be done by using DE-STAR, a scalable solar-powered phased-array laser in Earth Orbit, as a directed energy photon drive of low-mass wafersats. [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] With recent technologies a complete mission can be placed on a wafer including, power from an embedded radio nuclear thermal generator (RTG), PV, laser communications, imaging, photon thrusters for attitude control and other sensors. As one example, a futuristic 200 MW laser array consisting of 1 - 10 kw meter scale sub elements with a 100m baseline can propel a 10 gram wafer scale spacecraft with a 3m laser sail to 60AU/Year. Directed energy propulsion of low-mass spacecraft gives us an opportunity to capture images of Alpha Centauri and its planets, detailed imaging of the cosmic microwave background, set up interstellar communications by using gravity lenses around nearby stars to boost signals from interstellar probes, and much more. This system offers a very large range of missions allowing hundreds of wafer scale payload launches per day to reach this cosmological data reservoir. Directed Energy Propulsion is the only current technology that can provide a near-term path to utilize our Sun's Gravity Lens.

  12. Magnetic Fields in the Interstellar Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Susan

    2017-01-01

    The Milky Way is magnetized. Invisible magnetic fields thread the Galaxy on all scales and play a vital but still poorly understood role in regulating flows of gas in the interstellar medium and the formation of stars. I will present highlights from my thesis work on magnetic fields in the diffuse interstellar gas and in accretion disks. At high Galactic latitudes, diffuse neutral hydrogen is organized into an intricate network of slender linear features. I will show that these neutral hydrogen “fibers” are extremely well aligned with the ambient magnetic field as traced by both starlight polarization (Clark et al. 2014) and Planck 353 GHz polarized dust emission (Clark et al. 2015). The structure of the neutral interstellar medium is more tightly coupled to the magnetic field than previously known. Because the orientation of neutral hydrogen is an independent predictor of the local dust polarization angle, our work provides a new tool in the search for inflationary gravitational wave B-mode polarization in the cosmic microwave background, which is currently limited by dust foreground contamination. Magnetic fields also drive accretion in astrophysical disks via the magnetorotational instability (MRI). I analytically derive the behavior of this instability in the weakly nonlinear regime and show that the saturated state of the instability depends on the geometry of the background magnetic field. The analytical model describes the behavior of the MRI in a Taylor-Couette flow, a set-up used by experimentalists in the ongoing quest to observe MRI in the laboratory (Clark & Oishi 2016a, 2016b).

  13. High-velocity interstellar gas in the lines of sight to the Wolf-Rayet stars HD 97152 and HD 96548

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols-Bohlin, Joy; Fesen, Robert A.

    1990-01-01

    The interstellar medium was studied in the direction to the WR stars HD 96548 and HD 97152, and the results are reported. New observational data on the UV spectra of several field stars near both these WR stars are presented. The high-velocity gas seen in the spectra of these stars suggests that the detected expanding interstellar gas structure consists of two OB cluster supershells. The presence of high-velocity absorption components in one of five field star spectra in the direction of the more isolated WR star HD 96548 suggests that this expanding gas does not originate from the optical ring nebula RCW 58 surrounding HD 96548, as previously believed, but instead indicates the detection of a previously unknown expanding interstellar shell in this line of sight.

  14. Interstellar extinction by fractal polycrystalline graphite clusters?

    CERN Document Server

    Andersen, A C; Pustovit, V N; Niklasson, G A

    2001-01-01

    Certain dust particles in space are expected to appear as clusters of individual grains. The morphology of these clusters could be fractal or compact. To determine how these structural features would affect the interpretation of the observed interstellar extinction peak at $\\sim 4.6~\\mu$m, we have calculated the extinction by compact and fractal polycrystalline graphite clusters consisting of touching identical spheres. We compare three general methods for computing the extinction of the clusters, namely, a rigorous solution and two different discrete-dipole approximation methods.

  15. Diffuse Interstellar Bands and Their Families

    CERN Document Server

    Wszolek, B

    2006-01-01

    Diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) still await an explanation. One expects that some progress in this field will be possible when all the known DIBs are divided into families in such a way that only one carrier is responsible for all bands belonging to the given family. Analysing high resolution optical spectra of reddened stars we try to find out spectroscopic families for two prominent DIBs, at 5780 and 5797 angstroms. Among the DIBs, observed in the spectral range from 5590 to 6830 angstroms, we have found 8 candidates to belong to 5780 spectroscopic family and the other 12 DIBs candidating to family of 5797 structure.

  16. The 2014 KIDA network for interstellar chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Wakelam, V; Herbst, E; Pavone, B; Bergeat, A; Béroff, K; Chabot, M; Faure, A; Galli, D; Geppert, W D; Gerlich, D; Gratier, P; Harada, N; Hickson, K M; Honvault, P; Klippenstein, S J; Picard, S D Le; Nyman, G; Ruaud, M; Schlemmer, S; Sims, I R; Talbi, D; Tennyson, J; Wester, R

    2015-01-01

    Chemical models used to study the chemical composition of the gas and the ices in the interstellar medium are based on a network of chemical reactions and associated rate coefficients. These reactions and rate coefficients are partially compiled from data in the literature, when available. We present in this paper kida.uva.2014, a new updated version of the kida.uva public gas-phase network first released in 2012. In addition to a description of the many specific updates, we illustrate changes in the predicted abundances of molecules for cold dense cloud conditions as compared with the results of the previous version of our network, kida.uva.2011.

  17. Formation of Interstellar OH and CH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Kyujin; Yoon, Jeongkwan; Hong, Seungyeong

    2017-01-01

    From the absorption spectra of bright UV-emitting stars, column densities of interstellar OH (3078 and 3082 Å) and CH (3886 and 3890 Å) have been measured simultaneously along about 20 sightlines. In order to understand the physical and chemical environments in which these two molecules exist, we perform numerical simulations by using Astrochem, a publically available astrochemical reaction code. We investigate the effect of cosmic ray, grain, environmental photon, and initial composition on the formation of these two molecules. We also compare our simulated results with observations of molecule-forming objects such as supernova remnants, molecular clouds, and evolved stars along the observed sightlines.

  18. Can spores survive in interstellar space?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, P.; Greenberg, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental evidence is presented for the effects of very low temperature and UV radiation, characteristic of the interstellar medium, on the survival of bacteria. In the most general space environment, 10 percent survival times are only of the order of hundreds of years, too short for panspermia to work. In a substantial fraction of space within dark clouds, however, it is shown that, even with conservative figures, survival times as long as millions to tens of millions of years are attainable. In such conditions, clouds could transport organisms from one solar system to another in times significantly shorter than the mean survival time. This occurs with significant probability.

  19. Ambient Interstellar Pressure and Superbubble Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Oey, M S

    2004-01-01

    High ambient interstellar pressure is suggested as a possible factor to explain the ubiquitous observed growth-rate discrepancy for supernova-driven superbubbles and stellar wind bubbles. Pressures of P/k ~ 1e5 cm-3 K are plausible for regions with high star formation rates, and these values are intermediate between the estimated Galactic mid-plane pressure and those observed in starburst galaxies. High-pressure components also are commonly seen in Galactic ISM localizations. We demonstrate the sensitivity of shell growth to the ambient pressure, and suggest that superbubbles ultimately might serve as ISM barometers.

  20. Interstellar nomads: The problem of detecting comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Eric M.; Newman, William I.; Campbell, Donald B.

    1993-01-01

    This paper shows that, using only a modest extrapolation of current phased-array radar and massively parallel processor computer technologies, radar transmitter in the outer solar system or in interstellar space could be used to detect comets passing within 1 or 2 AU of the transmitter. It discusses how this potential development could be instrumental to the colonisation of the outer solar system and beyond. This development is germane to contemporary investigations of the population of the Oort cloud as well as to the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) question.

  1. LOCAL INTERSTELLAR MAGNETIC FIELD DETERMINED FROM THE INTERSTELLAR BOUNDARY EXPLORER RIBBON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zirnstein, E. J.; Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX 78228 (United States); Heerikhuisen, J.; Pogorelov, N. V. [Department of Space Science, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Funsten, H. O., E-mail: ezirnstein@swri.edu [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2016-02-10

    The solar wind emanating from the Sun interacts with the local interstellar medium (LISM), forming the heliosphere. Hydrogen energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) produced by the solar-interstellar interaction carry important information about plasma properties from the boundaries of the heliosphere, and are currently being measured by NASA's Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX). IBEX observations show the existence of a “ribbon” of intense ENA emission projecting a circle on the celestial sphere that is centered near the local interstellar magnetic field (ISMF) vector. Here we show that the source of the IBEX ribbon as a function of ENA energy outside the heliosphere, uniquely coupled to the draping of the ISMF around the heliopause, can be used to precisely determine the magnitude (2.93 ± 0.08 μG) and direction (227.°28 ± 0.°69, 34.°62 ± 0.°45 in ecliptic longitude and latitude) of the pristine ISMF far (∼1000 AU) from the Sun. We find that the ISMF vector is offset from the ribbon center by ∼8.°3 toward the direction of motion of the heliosphere through the LISM, and their vectors form a plane that is consistent with the direction of deflected interstellar neutral hydrogen, thought to be controlled by the ISMF. Our results yield draped ISMF properties close to that observed by Voyager 1, the only spacecraft to directly measure the ISMF close to the heliosphere, and give predictions of the pristine ISMF that Voyager 1 has yet to sample.

  2. The shape and composition of interstellar silicate grains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Min, M.; Waters, L.B.F.M.; de Koter, A.; Hovenier, J.W.; Keller, L.P.; Markwick-Kemper, F.

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the composition and shape distribution of silicate dust grains in the interstellar medium. The effects of the amount of magnesium and iron in the silicate lattice are studied in detail. We fit the spectral shape of the interstellar 10 mu m extinction feature as observed towards the ga

  3. Interstellar gas, dust and diffuse bands in the SMC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cox, N.L.J.; Cordiner, M.A.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Kaper, L.; Sarre, P.J.; Foing, B.H.; Spaans, M.; Cami, J.; Sofia, U.J.; Clayton, G.C.; Gordon, K.D.; Salama, F.

    2007-01-01

    Aims.In order to gain new insight into the unidentified identity of the diffuse interstellar band (DIB) carriers, this paper describes research into possible links between the shape of the interstellar extinction curve (including the 2175 Å bump and far-UV rise), the presence or absence of DIBs, and

  4. The shape and composition of interstellar silicate grains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Min, M.; Waters, L.B.F.M.; de Koter, A.; Hovenier, J.W.; Keller, L.P.; Markwick-Kemper, F.

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the composition and shape distribution of silicate dust grains in the interstellar medium. The effects of the amount of magnesium and iron in the silicate lattice are studied in detail. We fit the spectral shape of the interstellar 10 mu m extinction feature as observed towards the

  5. Editorial: Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX): Direct Sampling of the Interstellar Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComas, D. J.

    2012-02-01

    This special supplement issue of the Astrophysical Journal comprises six coordinated papers that provide the first detailed analyses of the direct sampling of interstellar neutral atoms by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX). Interstellar atoms are the detritus of older stars—their stellar winds, novae, and supernovae—spread across the galaxy, which fill the vast interstellar space between the stars. The very local interstellar medium around the Sun is filled with both ionized and neutral atoms with approximately equal numbers, and occasional ionization, charge exchange, and recombination makes them a single interacting material over large distances. IBEX (McComas et al. 2009a) is a NASA Small Explorer mission with the sole, focused science objective to discover the global interaction between the solar wind and the interstellar medium; this objective has primarily been achieved by taking the first global energetic neutral atom (ENA) images, which provide detailed ENA fluxes and energy spectra over all look directions in space. IBEX was launched 2008 October 19 and subsequently maneuvered into a high-altitude, highly elliptical (~15,000 × 300,000 km), roughly week-long orbit. The payload comprises two very high sensitivity, single-pixel ENA cameras: IBEX-Hi (Funsten et al. 2009a), which measures ENAs from ~300 eV to 6 keV, and IBEX-Lo (Fuselier et al. 2009a), which measures ENAs from ~10 eV to 2 keV. The initial IBEX ENA results were published together in a special issue of Science magazine (McComas et al. 2009b; Funsten et al. 2009b; Fuselier et al. 2009b; Schwadron et al. 2009). Since then there have been numerous additional studies of the IBEX ENA observations of the heliosphere, as well as ENAs from the Moon and Earth's magnetosphere (see recent review by McComas et al. 2011 and references therein). Prior to IBEX, the only interstellar neutral atoms to be directly sampled were He, observed by the Ulysses spacecraft a decade ago (Witte et al. 1996

  6. Graphene Solar Photon Sails and Interstellar Arks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matloff, G. L.

    2014-06-01

    A review of conceptual interstellar generation ships is followed by a presentation of optical and thermal properties of graphene and a discussion of kinematics/thermal-aspects of the solar-acceleration phase of a starship propelled by a graphene hollowbody solar-photon sail. The spacecraft departs from an initially parabolic solar orbit and the sail is oriented normal to the Sun during solar-acceleration. Perihelion is constrained to 0.1 AU because humans can tolerate ~3g for several hours without lasting effects. The 5 × 106 kg payload mass and 9.16 × 106 kg sail mass are applied as cosmic-ray shielding for the ship's 20-50 person population during the ~1,400-year cruise phase. Artificial gravity, the Coriolis Effect, closed-environment agriculture, illumination, on-board energy requirements, thermal dissipation, and hygiene/recreation are considered in a discussion of habitat design. Many concepts for mid-course trajectory correction are discussed including a new one that expels mass collected by a Cassenti toroidal ion scoop in a direction normal to the ship's trajectory. Although acceleration is affected by the unfurled sail, other options are discussed, as is the problem of protection from interstellar-dust erosion. As well as presenting the total mass budget, the conclusion reviews published variations and modifications on the generation-ship theme.

  7. Galactic civilizations - Population dynamics and interstellar diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, W. I.; Sagan, C.

    1981-01-01

    A model is developed of the interstellar diffusion of galactic civilizations which takes into account the population dynamics of such civilizations. The problem is formulated in terms of potential theory, with a family of nonlinear partial differential and difference equations specifying population growth and diffusion for an organism with advantageous genes that undergoes random dispersal while increasing in population locally, and a population at zero population growth. In the case of nonlinear diffusion with growth and saturation, it is found that the colonization wavefront from the nearest independently arisen galactic civilization can have reached the earth only if its lifetime exceeds 2.6 million years, or 20 million years if discretization can be neglected. For zero population growth, the corresponding lifetime is 13 billion years. It is concluded that the earth is uncolonized not because interstellar spacefaring civilizations are rare, but because there are too many worlds to be colonized in the plausible colonization lifetime of nearby civilizations, and that there exist no very old galactic civilizations with a consistent policy of the conquest of inhabited worlds.

  8. Temperature fluctuations of interstellar dust grains

    CERN Document Server

    Horn, Kobi; Biham, Ofer

    2007-01-01

    The temperatures of interstellar dust grains are analyzed using stochastic simulations, taking into account the grain composition and size and the discreteness of the photon flux. [...] The distribution of grain temperatures is calculated for a broad range of grain sizes and for different intensities of the interstellar radiation field, relevant to diffuse clouds and to PDRs. The dependence of the average grain temperature on its size is shown for different irradiation intensities. It is found that the average temperatures of grains with radii smaller than about 0.02 $\\mu$m are reduced due to the fluctuations. The average temperatures of grains of radii larger than about 0.35 $\\mu$m are also slightly reduced due to their more efficient emission of infrared radiation, particularly when exposed to high irradiation intensities. The average temperatures of silicate and carbonaceous grains are found to depend on the radiation field intensity X_MMP according to ~X_MMP^gamma, where the exponent gamma depends on the...

  9. Interstellar Clouds Near the Sun, III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisch, Priscilla C.

    We propose to continue a study of interstellar sight-lines with low total column densities in order to determine the nature (temperature, density, fractional ionization) of the low density gas near the Sun and within the interior of the local superbubble. IUE data, combined with previous Copernicus observations, can be used to delimit the filling factor of nearby low density warm gas, and by default restrict the filling factor of 10^6 K plasma. In the proposed program, observations of MgI and ZnII(and in one region CIV) are combined with cloud maps and ground-based NaI observations (from a separate program) to restrict gas temperature, spatial and electron densities. The Welty et al. (1986) technique for removing fixed pattern noise through observations of a template star (used to flat-field the target stars on a pixel-by-pixel basis) is used to enable 3sigma absorption line detections at the 6-9 mA level, depending on the number of exposures involved. The ultimate goal of both the IUE and ground-based program is to map out the local interstellar medium. Apart from the intrinsic interest of this problem, it will help define regions where ultraviolet sources can be observed with FUSE/Lyman at lambda<912 A.

  10. Interstellar sulfur isotopes and stellar oxygen burning

    CERN Document Server

    Chin, Y N; Whiteoak, J B; Langer, N; Churchwell, E B; Chin, Y N

    1995-01-01

    A 12C32S, 13C32S, 12C34S, and 12C33S J = 2 - 1 line survey has been made to study interstellar 32S/34S and 34S/33S ratios from the galactic disk. The four CS isotopomers were detected in 20 star forming regions with galactocentric distances between 3 and 9 kpc. From a comparison of line velocities, the C33S J = 2 - 1 rest frequency is about 250 kHz below the value given in the Lovas (1992) catalog. Taking 12C/13C ratios from Wilson & Rood (1994) and assuming equal 12C32S and 13C32S excitation temperatures and beam filling factors, 12C32S opacities are in the range 3 to 15; average 32S/34S and 34S/33S isotope ratios are 24.4 +/- 5.0 and 6.27 +/- 1.01, respectively. While no systematic variation in the 34S/33S isotope ratio is found, the 32S/34S ratio increases with galactocentric distance when accounting for the 12C/13C gradient of the galactic disk. A fit to the unweighted data yields 32S/34S = 3.3 +/- 0.5 (dGC/kpc) + 4.1 +/- 3.1 with a correlation coefficient of 0.84. Since the interstellar sulfur (S) is...

  11. Prospects for the Detection of Interstellar Cyanovinylidene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kołos, Robert; Gronowski, Marcin; Dobrowolski, Jan Cz.

    2009-08-01

    Prospects for the presence and detection of interstellar cyanovinylidene, CC(H)CN, a Y-shaped isomer of cyanoacetylene, are discussed. It is proposed that CC(H)CN can arise in interstellar clouds as one of the HC3NH+ + e - dissociative recombination products, by rearrangements of the neutral chain radical HC3NH into branched species HCCC(H)N, CC(H)C(H)N, and/or HCC(H)CN, and by the subsequent elimination of a hydrogen atom. It is deduced that the abundance of cyanovinylidene in molecular clouds should be confined between the abundances of its chain isomers HNCCC and HCNCC. Quantum chemical predictions regarding cyanovinylidene geometry, ground-state rotational constants, centrifugal distortion constants, spin-orbit coupling, IR absorption spectroscopy, and electric dipole moment are given. The spectroscopically observed molecules formyl cyanide, NC2(H)O, and propynal, HC3(H)O, with structures qualitatively resembling cyanovinylidene, served to prove the adequacy of the calculational procedures employed.

  12. Facts and Artifacts in Interstellar Diamond Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutschke, H.; Dorschner, J.; Henning, T.; Jager, C.; Ott, U.

    1995-12-01

    Absorption spectra of presolar diamonds extracted from the Murchison meteorite have been measured in the extended wavelength range 0.2--500 mu m in order to make available optical properties of this supposed component of interstellar carbon dust. In contrast to terrestrial natural and synthetic diamonds, spectra of the meteoritic diamonds show prominent bands in the middle-IR. In this Letter, experimental evidence is presented that the OH band at 3200 cm-1 and the CH bands in the 2800--3000 cm-1 range are not intrinsic features of the diamonds and that the band at 1100 cm-1 contains an artificial component due to the extraction procedure. In addition, in our spectra a conspicuous band at 120 cm-1 was found. If the intrinsic character of this band, which, up to now, is unidentified, is confirmed, it would offer a chance to observe interstellar diamonds, e.g., by the ISO satellite. We encourage laboratory astrophysicists and observers to study this promising possibility.

  13. A Search for Interstellar Monohydric Thiols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorai, Prasanta; Das, Ankan; Das, Amaresh; Sivaraman, Bhalamurugan; Etim, Emmanuel E.; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.

    2017-02-01

    It has been pointed out by various astronomers that a very interesting relationship exists between interstellar alcohols and the corresponding thiols (sulfur analog of alcohols) as far as the spectroscopic properties and chemical abundances are concerned. Monohydric alcohols such as methanol and ethanol are widely observed and 1-propanol was recently claimed to have been seen in Orion KL. Among the monohydric thiols, methanethiol (chemical analog of methanol) has been firmly detected in Orion KL and Sgr B2(N2) and ethanethiol (chemical analog of ethanol) has been observed in Sgr B2(N2), though the confirmation of this detection is yet to come. It is very likely that higher order thiols could be observed in these regions. In this paper, we study the formation of monohydric alcohols and their thiol analogs. Based on our quantum chemical calculation and chemical modeling, we find that the Tg conformer of 1-propanethiol is a good candidate of astronomical interest. We present various spectroscopically relevant parameters of this molecule to assist in its future detection in the interstellar medium.

  14. Elemental nitrogen partitioning in dense interstellar clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Daranlot, Julien; Bergeat, Astrid; Costes, Michel; Loison, Jean-Christophe; Wakelam, Valentine; Hickson, Kevin M

    2012-01-01

    Many chemical models of dense interstellar clouds predict that the majority of gas-phase elemental nitrogen should be present as N2, with an abundance approximately five orders of magnitude less than that of hydrogen. As a homonuclear diatomic molecule, N2 is difficult to detect spectroscopically through infrared or millimetre-wavelength transitions so its abundance is often inferred indirectly through its reaction product N2H+. Two main formation mechanisms each involving two radical-radical reactions are the source of N2 in such environments. Here we report measurements of the low temperature rate constants for one of these processes, the N + CN reaction down to 56 K. The effect of the measured rate constants for this reaction and those recently determined for two other reactions implicated in N2 formation are tested using a gas-grain model employing a critically evaluated chemical network. We show that the amount of interstellar nitrogen present as N2 depends on the competition between its gas-phase format...

  15. The Interstellar Production of Biologically Important Organics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandford, Scott A.; Bernstein, Max P.; Dworkin, Jason; Allamandola, Louis J.

    2000-01-01

    One of the primary tasks of the Astrochemistry Laboratory at Ames Research Center is to use laboratory simulations to study the chemical processes that occur in dense interstellar clouds. Since new stars are formed in these clouds, their materials may be responsible for the delivery of organics to new habitable planets and may play important roles in the origin of life. These clouds are extremely cold (less than 50 kelvin), and most of the volatiles in these clouds are condensed onto dust grains as thin ice mantles. These ices are exposed to cosmic rays and ultraviolet (UV) photons that break chemical bonds and result in the production of complex molecules when the ices are warmed (as they would be when incorporated into a star-forming region). Using cryovacuum systems and UV lamps, this study simulates the conditions of these clouds and studies the resulting chemistry. Some of the areas of progress made in 1999 are described below. It shows some of the types of molecules that may be formed in the interstellar medium. Laboratory simulations have already confirmed that many of these compounds are made under these conditions.

  16. Streaming of interstellar grains in the solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, B. A. S.; Misconi, N. Y.

    1979-01-01

    Results of a theoretical study of the interactions between interstellar grains streaming through the solar system and the solar wind are presented. It is shown that although elongated core-mantle interstellar particles of a characteristic radius of about 0.12 microns are subject to a greater force due to radiation pressure than to gravitational attraction, they are still able to penetrate deep inside the solar system. Calculations of particle trajectories within the solar system indicate substantial effects of the solar activity cycle as reflected in the interplanetary magnetic field on the distribution of 0.12- and 0.0005-micron interstellar grains streaming through the solar system, leading to a 50-fold increase in interstellar grain densities 3 to 4 AU ahead of the sun during years 8 to 17 of the solar cycle. It is noted that during the Solar Polar Mission, concentrations are expected which will offer the opportunity of detecting interstellar grains in the solar system.

  17. Interstellar neutral flow characteristics, composition, and interaction with the heliosphere - neutral gas and pickup ion analysis from ongoing observations and perspectives for IMAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moebius, E.; Bzowski, M.; Drews, C.; Frisch, P. C.; Fuselier, S. A.; Galli, A.; Gloeckler, G.; Kubiak, M. A.; Kucharek, H.; Lee, M. A.; Leonard, T.; McComas, D. J.; Park, J.; Schwadron, N.; Swaczyna, P.; Sokol, J. M.; Wood, B. E.; Wurz, P.

    2015-12-01

    The Sun's motion relative to the surrounding interstellar medium leads to an interstellar neutral (ISN) wind through the heliosphere that is moderately depleted by ionization. This situation allows remote sensing of the ISN through resonant scattering of solar UV and in-situ sampling, first via pickup ions (PUI) and most recently with direct neutral atom imaging. PUI observations have revealed the gravitational focusing cone of interstellar He and Ne as well as the composition of high ionization potential elements. After the first direct ISN He observations with Ulysses GAS, the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) observes with high collecting power the ISN flow trajectories very close to their perihelion in Earth's orbit for H, He, O, and Ne from December through March. Meanwhile, IBEX has recorded seven years of ISN observations, with changing solar activity and varying viewing strategies. These recurring and remarkably repeatable observations allow us to consolidate the derived physical parameters and some key compositional aspects of the interstellar medium. IBEX observations provide a very precise relation between ISN flow longitude and speed via the hyperbolic trajectory equation, but with larger uncertainties separately for longitude and speed. Recent concerted studies have led to a velocity vector that is consistent between IBEX and Ulysses, with a substantially higher temperature than found previously. The fact that the IBEX He and O ISN observations contain a substantial secondary neutral contribution adds complexity to the quantitative analysis of the physical interstellar medium parameters. However, their discovery also provides invaluable insight into the interstellar plasma interaction in the outer heliosheath, which is shaped strongly by the interstellar magnetic field. The longitude range of the IBEX observations limits the precision of the ISN velocity vector. The IBEX collection power and its sensitivity to the Earth's magnetosphere limit

  18. Hydrocarbons on Saturns Satellites: Relationship to Interstellar Dust and the Solar Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruikshank, D. P.

    2012-01-01

    To understand the origin and evolution of our Solar System, and the basic components that led to life on Earth, we study interstellar and planetary spectroscopic signatures. The possible relationship of organic material detected in carbonaceous meteorites, interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), comets and the interstellar medium have been the source of speculation over the years as the composition and processes that governed the early solar nebula have been explored to understand the extent to which primitive material survived or became processed. The Cassini VIMS has provided new data relevant to this problem. Three of Saturn's satellites, Phoebe, Iapetus, and Hyperion, are found to have aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons on their surfaces. The aromatic hydrocarbon signature (C-H stretching mode at 3.28 micrometers) is proportionally significantly stronger (relative to the aliphatic bands) than that seen in other Solar System bodies (e.g., comets) and materials (Stardust samples, IDPs, meteorites) and the distinctive sub-features of the 3.4 micrometer aliphatic band (CH2 and CH3 groups) are reminiscent of those widely detected throughout the diffuse ISM. Phoebe may be a captured object that originated in the region beyond the present orbit of Neptune, where the solar nebula contained a large fraction of original interstellar ice and dust that was less processed than material closer to the Sun. Debris from Phoebe now resident on Iapetus and Hyperion, as well as o Phoebe itself, thus presents a unique blend of hydrocarbons, amenable to comparisons with interstellar hydrocarbons and other Solar System materials. The dust ring surrounding Saturn, in which Phoebe is embedded, probably originated from a collision with Phoebe. Dust ring particles are the likely source of the organic-bearing materials, and perhaps the recently identified small particles of Fe detected on Saturn's satellites. Lab measurements of the absolute band strengths of representative aliphatic and

  19. Agroforestry practice in villages surrounding Nyamure former ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cntaganda

    Key words: Agroforestry, fuel wood, tree products, woodlot, forest plantation. INTRODUCTION ... The study area included three administrative cells in the surroundings of Nyamure ..... Table 6: Distance and time spent on firewood collection.

  20. Explaining preferences for home surroundings and locations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Skifter Andersen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on a survey carried out in Denmark that asked a random sample of the population about their preferences for home surroundings and locations. It shows that the characteristics of social surroundings are very important and can be divided into three independent dimensions: avoiding social nuisances, preferring social homogeneity and living close to one’s social network and place of origin. The study shows that most people have many detailed preferences, whereas some have very few. This confirms an earlier theory that some people are very connected to certain places with given characteristics and thus do not have priorities regarding home surroundings and locations. For others, mostly young people and singles, home is just a place to sleep and relax, whereas life is lived elsewhere. For this group, there are only preferences for location and there are few specific preferences for surroundings.

  1. 3D maps of the local interstellar medium: searching for the imprints of past events

    CERN Document Server

    Lallement, Rosine

    2014-01-01

    Inversion of interstellar gas or dust columns measured along the path to stars distributed in distance and direction allows reconstructing the distribution of interstellar matter (ISM) in 3D. A low resolution IS dust map based on the reddening of 23,000 stars illustrates the potential of future maps. It reveals the location of the main IS clouds within $\\sim$1kpc and, owing to biases towards weakly reddened targets, regions devoid of IS matter. It traces the Local Bubble and neighboring cavities, including a giant, $\\geq$1000 pc long cavity located beyond the so-called $\\beta$CMa tunnel, bordered by the main constituents of the Gould belt (GB), the rotating and expanding ring of clouds and young stars, inclined by $\\sim$ 20$^{\\circ}$ to the galactic plane. From comparison with diffuse X-ray background and absorption data it appears that the giant cavity is filled with warm, ionized and dust-poor gas in addition to million K gas. This set of structures must reflect the main events that occurred in the past. It...

  2. Surround-Masking Affects Visual Estimation Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastrzebski, Nicola R.; Hugrass, Laila E.; Crewther, Sheila G.; Crewther, David P.

    2017-01-01

    Visual estimation of numerosity involves the discrimination of magnitude between two distributions or perceptual sets that vary in number of elements. How performance on such estimation depends on peripheral sensory stimulation is unclear, even in typically developing adults. Here, we varied the central and surround contrast of stimuli that comprised a visual estimation task in order to determine whether mechanisms involved with the removal of unessential visual input functionally contributes toward number acuity. The visual estimation judgments of typically developed adults were significantly impaired for high but not low contrast surround stimulus conditions. The center and surround contrasts of the stimuli also differentially affected the accuracy of numerosity estimation depending on whether fewer or more dots were presented. Remarkably, observers demonstrated the highest mean percentage accuracy across stimulus conditions in the discrimination of more elements when the surround contrast was low and the background luminance of the central region containing the elements was dark (black center). Conversely, accuracy was severely impaired during the discrimination of fewer elements when the surround contrast was high and the background luminance of the central region was mid level (gray center). These findings suggest that estimation ability is functionally related to the quality of low-order filtration of unessential visual information. These surround masking results may help understanding of the poor visual estimation ability commonly observed in developmental dyscalculia.

  3. Introduction to astrochemistry chemical evolution from interstellar clouds to star and planet formation

    CERN Document Server

    Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

    This important book describes the basic principles of astrochemistry—an interdisciplinary field combining astronomy, physics, and chemistry—with particular emphasis on its physical and chemical background. Chemical processes in diffuse clouds, dense quiescent molecular clouds, star-forming regions, and protoplanetary disks are discussed. A brief introduction to molecular spectroscopy and observational techniques is also presented. These contents provide astronomers with a comprehensive understanding of how interstellar matter is evolved and brought into stars and planets, which is ultimately related to the origin of the solar system. The subject matter will also be understandable and useful for physical chemists who are interested in exotic chemical processes occurring in extreme physical conditions. The book is a valuable resource for all researchers beginning at the graduate level.

  4. Interstellar Mapping and Acceleration Probe (IMAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwadron, N. A.; Opher, M.; Kasper, J.; Mewaldt, R.; Moebius, E.; Spence, H. E.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2016-11-01

    Our piece of cosmic real estate, the heliosphere, is the domain of all human existence - an astrophysical case history of the successful evolution of life in a habitable system. By exploring our global heliosphere and its myriad interactions, we develop key physical knowledge of the interstellar interactions that influence exoplanetary habitability as well as the distant history and destiny of our solar system and world. IBEX is the first mission to explore the global heliosphere and in concert with Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 is discovering a fundamentally new and uncharted physical domain of the outer heliosphere. In parallel, Cassini/INCA maps the global heliosphere at energies (˜5-55 keV) above those measured by IBEX. The enigmatic IBEX ribbon and the INCA belt were unanticipated discoveries demonstrating that much of what we know or think we understand about the outer heliosphere needs to be revised. This paper summarizes the next quantum leap enabled by IMAP that will open new windows on the frontier of Heliophysics at a time when the space environment is rapidly evolving. IMAP with 100 times the combined resolution and sensitivity of IBEX and INCA will discover the substructure of the IBEX ribbon and will reveal, with unprecedented resolution, global maps of our heliosphere. The remarkable synergy between IMAP, Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 will remain for at least the next decade as Voyager 1 pushes further into the interstellar domain and Voyager 2 moves through the heliosheath. Voyager 2 moves outward in the same region of sky covered by a portion of the IBEX ribbon. Voyager 2’s plasma measurements will create singular opportunities for discovery in the context of IMAP's global measurements. IMAP, like ACE before, will be a keystone of the Heliophysics System Observatory by providing comprehensive measurements of interstellar neutral atoms and pickup ions, the solar wind distribution, composition, and magnetic field, as well as suprathermal ion, energetic

  5. Diffuse interstellar bands as probes of small-scale interstellar structure

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Keith T; Sarre, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    We present observations which probe the small-scale structure of the interstellar medium using diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs). Towards HD 168075/6 in the Eagle Nebula, significant differences in DIB absorption are found between the two lines of sight, which are separated by 0.25 pc, and {\\lambda}5797 exhibits a velocity shift. Similar data are presented for four stars in the {\\mu} Sgr system. We also present a search for variations in DIB absorption towards {\\kappa} Vel, where the atomic lines are known to vary on scales of ~10 AU. Observations separated by ~9 yr yielded no evidence for changes in DIB absorption strength over this scale, but do reveal an unusual DIB spectrum.

  6. Dark Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Einasto, Jaan

    2013-01-01

    I give a review of the development of the concept of dark matter. The dark matter story passed through several stages from a minor observational puzzle to a major challenge for theory of elementary particles. Modern data suggest that dark matter is the dominant matter component in the Universe, and that it consists of some unknown non-baryonic particles. Dark matter is the dominant matter component in the Universe, thus properties of dark matter particles determine the structure of the cosmic...

  7. Use of Mini-Mag Orion and superconducting coils for near-term interstellar transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenard, Roger X.; Andrews, Dana G.

    2007-06-01

    Interstellar transportation to nearby star systems over periods shorter than the human lifetime requires speeds in the range of 0.1-0.15 c and relatively high accelerations. These speeds are not attainable using rockets, even with advanced fusion engines because at these velocities, the energy density of the spacecraft approaches the energy density of the fuel. Anti-matter engines are theoretically possible but current physical limitations would have to be suspended to get the mass densities required. Interstellar ramjets have not proven practicable, so this leaves beamed momentum propulsion or a continuously fueled Mag-Orion system as the remaining candidates. However, deceleration is also a major issue, but part of the Mini-Mag Orion approach assists in solving this problem. This paper reviews the state of the art from a Phases I and II SBIT between Sandia National Laboratories and Andrews Space, applying our results to near-term interstellar travel. A 1000 T crewed spacecraft and propulsion system dry mass at .1c contains ˜9×1021J. The author has generated technology requirements elsewhere for use of fission power reactors and conventional Brayton cycle machinery to propel a spacecraft using electric propulsion. Here we replace the electric power conversion, radiators, power generators and electric thrusters with a Mini-Mag Orion fission-fusion hybrid. Only a small fraction of fission fuel is actually carried with the spacecraft, the remainder of the propellant (macro-particles of fissionable material with a D-T core) is beamed to the spacecraft, and the total beam energy requirement for an interstellar probe mission is roughly 1020J, which would require the complete fissioning of 1000 ton of Uranium assuming 35% power plant efficiency. This is roughly equivalent to a recurring cost per flight of 3.0 billion dollars in reactor grade enriched uranium using today's prices. Therefore, interstellar flight is an expensive proposition, but not unaffordable, if the

  8. Can Composite Fluffy Dust Particles Solve the Interstellar Carbon Crisis?

    CERN Document Server

    Dwek, E

    1997-01-01

    Interstellar dust models are facing a "carbon crisis", so called because recent observations suggest that the abundance of carbon available for dust in the interstellar medium is less than half of the amount required to be tied up in graphite grains in order to explain the interstellar extinction curve. This paper presents an detailed assessment of a newly-proposed dust model (Mathis 1996), in which the majority of the interstellar carbon is contained in composite and fluffy dust (CFD) grains. Per unit mass, these grains produce more UV extinction, and can therefore account for the interstellar extinction curve with about half the carbon required in traditional dust models. The results of our analysis show that the CFD model falls short in solving the carbon crisis, in providing a fit to the UV-optical interstellar extinction curve. It also predicts a far-infrared emissivity in excess of that observed with the COBE/DIRBE and FIRAS instruments from the diffuse interstellar medium. The failure of the new model ...

  9. The interstellar dust reservoir: SPICA's view on dust production and the interstellar medium in galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kemper, F; Jones, O C; Srinivasan, S

    2016-01-01

    Typical galaxies emit about one third of their energy in the infrared. The origin of this emission reprocessed starlight absorbed by interstellar dust grains and reradiated as thermal emission in the infrared. In particularly dusty galaxies, such as starburst galaxies, the fraction of energy emitted in the infrared can be as high as 90%. Dust emission is found to be an excellent tracer of the beginning and end stages of a star's life, where dust is being produced by post-main-sequence stars, subsequently added to the interstellar dust reservoir, and eventually being consumed by star and planet formation. This work reviews the current understanding of the size and properties of this interstellar dust reservoir, by using the Large Magellanic Cloud as an example, and what can be learned about the dust properties and star formation in galaxies from this dust reservoir, using SPICA, building on previous work performed with the Herschel and Spitzer Space Telescopes, as well as the Infrared Space Observatory.

  10. Comparisons of the Interstellar Magnetic Field Directions obtained from the IBEX Ribbon and Interstellar Polarizations

    CERN Document Server

    Frisch, Priscilla C; Berdyugin, Andrei; Funsten, Herbert O; Magalhaes, Mario; McComas, David J; Piirola, Vilppu; Schwadron, Nathan A; Slavin, Jonathan D; Wiktorowicz, Sloane J

    2010-01-01

    Variations in the spatial configuration of the interstellar magnetic field (ISMF) near the Sun can be constrained by comparing the ISMF direction at the heliosphere found from the Interstellar Boundary Explorer spacecraft (IBEX) observations of a 'Ribbon' of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs), with the ISMF direction derived from optical polarization data for stars within ~40 pc. Using interstellar polarization observations towards ~30 nearby stars within 90 deg of the heliosphere nose, we find that the best fits to the polarization position angles are obtained for a magnetic pole directed towards ecliptic coordinates of lambda, beta 263 deg, 37 deg (or galactic coordinates of L,B 38 deg, 23deg), with uncertainties of +/- 35 deg, based on the broad minimum of the best fits and the range of data quality. This magnetic pole is 33 deg from the magnetic pole that is defined by the center of the arc of the ENA Ribbon. The IBEX ENA ribbon is seen in sightlines that are perpendicular to the ISMF as it drapes over the he...

  11. The Centauri project: Manned interstellar travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciesla, Thomas M.

    1990-01-01

    The development of antimatter engines for spacecraft propulsion will allow man to expand to the nearest stellar neighbors such as the Alpha Centuri system. Compared to chemically powered rockets like the Apollo mission class which would take 50,000 years to reach the Centauri system, antimatter propulsion would reduce one way trip time to 30 years or less. The challenges encountered by manned interstellar travel are formidable. The spacecraft must be a combination of sublight speed transportation system and a traveling microplanet serving an expanding population. As the population expands from the initial 100 people to approximately 300, the terraformed asteroid, enclosed by a man-made shell will allow for expansion over its surface in the fashion of a small terrestrial town. All aspects of human life - birth; death; physical, emotional, and educational needs; and government and law must be met by the structure, systems, and institutions on-board.

  12. Supernova Feedback and Multiphase Interstellar Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Miao; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Cen, Renyue; Bryan, Greg; Naab, Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    Without feedback, galaxies in cosmological simulations fail to generate outflows and tend to be too massive and too centrally concentrated, in contrast to the prominent disks observed ubiquitously in our universe. The nature of supernova (SN) feedback remains, however, highly uncertain, and most galaxy simulations so far adopt ad hoc models. Here we perform parsec-resolution simulations of a patch of the interstellar medium (ISM), and show that the unresolved multiphase gas in cosmological simulations can greatly affect the SN feedback by allowing blastwaves to travel in-between the clouds. We also show how ISM clumping varies with the mean gas density and SN rate encountered in real galactic environments. We emphasize that the inhomogeneity of the ISM must be considered in coarse-resolution simulations. We discuss how the gas pressure maintained by SN explosions can help to launch the galactic winds, and compare our results with the sub-grid models adopted in current cosmological simulations.

  13. Ritual, meaningfulness, and interstellar message construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traphagan, John W.

    2010-10-01

    In this paper, I am interested in exploring the potential of ritual performance as a means of communication with ETI. I argue that the study of ritual and ritualized behavior, understood as a technique for representation of meaning and meaningfulness about the world, has potential to inform how scientists think about the construction and interpretation of interstellar messages. I do not suggest that ritual activities themselves provide more than limited potential for communication with ETI. However, the structural elements of ritual and the manner in which meaning is conveyed through the formality and repetition of ritual is at least to some extent decipherable cross-culturally and provides one way to think about how to express important aspects of humans and their cultures to ETI and to represent, if not specific meanings themselves, the fact that a message is meaningful.

  14. Supernova Feedback in an Inhomogeneous Interstellar Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Martizzi, Davide; Quataert, Eliot

    2014-01-01

    Supernova (SN) feedback is one of the key processes shaping the interstellar medium (ISM) of galaxies. SNe contribute to (and in some cases may dominate) driving turbulence in the ISM and accelerating galactic winds. Modern cosmological simulations have sufficient resolution to capture the main structures in the ISM of galaxies, but are typically still not capable of explicitly resolving all of the small-scale stellar feedback processes, including the expansion of supernova remnants (SNRs). We perform a series of controlled three-dimensional hydrodynamic (adaptive mesh refinement, AMR) simulations of single SNRs expanding in an inhomogeneous density field with statistics motivated by those of the turbulent ISM. We use these to quantify the momentum and thermal energy injection from SNe as a function of spatial scale and the density, metallicity, and structure of the ambient medium. Using these results, we develop an analytic sub-resolution model for SN feedback for use in galaxy formation simulations. We then...

  15. Interstellar Dust models towards some IUE stars

    CERN Document Server

    Katyal, Nisha; Vaidya, D B

    2013-01-01

    We study the extinction properties of the composite dust grains, consisting of host silicate spheroids and graphite as inclusions, using discrete dipole approximation (DDA). We calculate the extinction cross sections of the composite grains in the ultraviolet spectral region, 1200\\AA -3200\\AA and study the variation in extinction as a function of the volume fraction of the inclusions. We compare the model extinction curves with the observed interstellar extinction curves obtained from the data given by the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) satellite. Our results for the composite grains show a distinct variation in the extinction efficiencies with the variation in the volume fraction of the inclusions. In particular, it is found that the wavelength of peak absorption at `2175\\AA' shifts towards the longer wavelength with the variation in the volume fraction of inclusions. We find that the composite grain models with the axial ratios viz. 1.33 and 2.0 fit the observed extinction reasonably well with a g...

  16. Modelling Study of Interstellar Ethanimine Isomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Donghui; Herbst, Eric; Corby, Joanna F.; Durr, Allison; Hassel, George

    2016-06-01

    Ethanimine (CH3CHNH) , including both the E- and Z- isomers, were detected towards the star-forming region Sgr B2(N) using the GBT PRIMOS data (Loomis et al 2013), and were recently imaged by the ACTA (Corby et al. 2015). These aldimines can serve as precursors of biological molecules such as amino acids thus are considered prebiotic molecules in interstellar medium. In this study, we present chemical simulations of ethanimine with various physical conditions. From models for Sgr B2(N) and environs, calculated ethanimine abundances show reasonable agreement with observed values, while the translucent cloud models yield much lower abundances. These results agree with locations suggested by observations that ethanimine isomers were detected in the foreground of the shells of the hot core.

  17. Formation of Cyanoformaldehyde in the interstellar space

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Ankan; Chakrabarti, Sandip K; Saha, Rajdeep; Chakrabarti, Sonali

    2013-01-01

    Cyanoformaldehyde (HCOCN) molecule has recently been suspected towards the Sagittarius B2(N) by the Green Bank telescope, though a confirmation of this observation has not yet been made. In and around a star forming region, this molecule could be formed by the exothermic reaction between two abundant interstellar species, H$_2$CO and CN. Till date, the reaction rate coefficient for the formation of this molecule is unknown. Educated guesses were used to explain the abundance of this molecule by chemical modeling. In this paper, we carried out quantum chemical calculations to find out empirical rate coefficients for the formation of HCOCN and different chemical properties during the formation of HCOCN molecules. Though HCOCN is stable against unimolecular decomposition, this gas phase molecule could be destroyed by many other means, like: ion-molecular reactions or by the effect of cosmic rays. Ion-molecular reaction rates are computed by using the capture theories. We have also included the obtained rate coef...

  18. The kinetic chemistry of dense interstellar clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graedel, T. E.; Langer, W. D.; Frerking, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    A model of the time-dependent chemistry of dense interstellar clouds is formulated to study the dominant chemical processes in carbon and oxygen isotope fractionation, the formation of nitrogen-containing molecules, and the evolution of product molecules as a function of cloud density and temperature. The abundances of the dominant isotopes of the carbon- and oxygen-bearing molecules are calculated. The chemical abundances are found to be quite sensitive to electron concentration since the electron concentration determines the ratio of H3(+) to He(+), and the electron density is strongly influenced by the metals abundance. For typical metal abundances and for H2 cloud density not less than 10,000 molecules/cu cm, nearly all carbon exists as CO at late cloud ages. At high cloud density, many aspects of the chemistry are strongly time dependent. Finally, model calculations agree well with abundances deduced from observations of molecular line emission in cold dense clouds.

  19. Calculating Cross Sections of Composite Interstellar Grains

    CERN Document Server

    Voshchinnikov, N V; Voshchinnikov, Nikolai V.; Mathis, John S.

    1999-01-01

    Interstellar grains may be composite collections of particles of distinct materials, including voids, agglomerated together. We determine the various optical cross sections of such composite grains, given the optical properties of each constituent, using an approximate model of the composite grain. We assume it consists of many concentric spherical layers of the various materials, each with a specified volume fraction. In such a case the usual Mie theory can be generalized and the extinction, scattering, and other cross sections determined exactly. We find that the ordering of the materials in the layering makes some difference to the derived cross sections, but averaging over the various permutations of the order of the materials provides rapid convergence as the number of shells (each of which is filled by all of the materials proportionately to their volume fractions) is increased. Three shells, each with one layer of a particular constituent material, give a very satisfactory estimate of the average cross...

  20. SPIRE spectroscopy of the interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habart, E.; Dartois, E.; Abergel, A.; Baluteau, J.-P.; Naylor, D.; Polehampton, E.; Joblin, C.

    2010-12-01

    The SPIRE Fourier Transform Spectrometer on-board Herschel allows us, for the first time, to simultaneously measure the complete far-infrared spectrum from 194 to 671 μm. A wealth of rotational lines of CO (and its isotopologues), fine structure lines of C^0 and N^+, and emission lines from radicals and molecules has been observed towards several galactic regions and nearby galaxies. The strengths of the atomic and molecular lines place fundamental constraints on the physical conditions but also the chemistry of the interstellar medium. FTS mapping capabilities are also extremely powerful in characterizing the spatial morphology of the extended region and understand how the gas properties vary within the studied region. Here, we present a first analysis of SPIRE spectroscopic observations of the prototypical Orion Bar photodissociation region.

  1. Atom addition reactions in interstellar ice analogues

    CERN Document Server

    Linnartz, Harold; Fedoseev, Gleb

    2015-01-01

    This review paper summarizes the state-of-the-art in laboratory based interstellar ice chemistry. The focus is on atom addition reactions, illustrating how water, carbon dioxide and methanol can form in the solid state at astronomically relevant temperatures, and also the formation of more complex species such as hydroxylamine, an important prebiotic molecule, and glycolaldehyde, the smallest sugar, is discussed. These reactions are particularly relevant during the dark ages of star and planet formation, i.e., when the role of UV light is restricted. A quantitative characterization of such processes is only possible through dedicated laboratory studies, i.e., under full control of a large set of parameters such as temperature, atom-flux, and ice morphology. The resulting numbers, physical and chemical constants, e.g., barrier heights, reaction rates and branching ratios, provide information on the molecular processes at work and are needed as input for astrochemical models, in order to bridge the timescales t...

  2. Radio search for interstellar phosphorus compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollis, J.M.; Snyder, L.E.; Lovas, F.J.; Ulich, B.L.

    1980-10-01

    The J=1--0 and 3--2 transitions of phosphorus nitride, PN, with resolvable hyperfine components at 46.99 GHz and blended components at 140.97 GHz, and transitions of phosphine, PH/sub 3/, at 47.39 and 46.94 GHz, arising from a small induced dipole moment, have been searched for but not found in interstellar molecular clouds. The J=3/2--1/2, F=3/2--3/2 transition of nitric oxide, NO, and the J/sub K/-K+=16/sub 4,12/15/sub 5,11/ transition of sulfur dioxide, SO/sub 2/, have been detected in Orion and Sagittarius B2. An unidentified emission line, U140921.8 MHz, has been observed in IRC+10216.

  3. A radio search for interstellar phosphorus compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollis, J. M.; Snyder, L. E.; Lovas, F. J.; Ulich, B. L.

    1980-01-01

    The J = 1-0 and 3-2 transitions of phosphorus nitride, PN, with resolvable hyperfine components at 46.99 GHz and blended components at 140.97 GHz, and transitions of phosphine, PH3, at 47.39 and 46.94 GHz, arising from a small induced dipole moment, have been searched for but not found in interstellar molecular clouds. The J = 3/2-1/2, F - 3/2-3/2 transition of nitric oxide, NO, and the J(K-K+) = 16(4, 12) -15(5, 11) transition of sulfur dioxide, SO2, have been detected in Orion and Sagittarius B2. An unidentified emission line, U140921.8 MHz, has been observed in IRC + 10216.

  4. A speckle hologram of the interstellar plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, K. M.; Gwinn, C. R.; Reynolds, J.; King, E. A.; Jauncey, D.; Flanagan, C.; Nicolson, G.; Preston, R. A.; Jones, D. L.

    1992-01-01

    Observations of a speckle hologram of scattering material along the line of sight to the Vela pulsar indicate that this material is concentrated in the Vela supernova remnant, deep within the Gum Nebula. The speckle hologram is observed through the amplitude and phase variations of the interferometric cross-power spectrum with time and frequency. These variations describe the density fluctuations of the interstellar plasma, in a holographic fashion. The decorrelation due to the phase variations of the speckles yields the angular size of the scattering disk; comparison with the bandwidth of their amplitude variations yields a characteristic distance from earth to the scattering material of 0.81 +/- 0.03 of the distance from earth to the pulsar. This result is consistent with theories of irregularities associated with particle acceleration in shocks in supernova remnants.

  5. Thermal instability in the interstellar medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ghanbari

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available   This study demonstrates how thermal structures in the interstellar medium can emerge as a result of thermal instability. For a two-dimensional case, the steady state thermal structures was investigeted and it was shown that a large class of solutions exist. For a one –dimensional case the conductivity was found to be negligible. The effects of to cal cooling on the thermal instability were explored in some depth. In this case analytical results for time-dependent cooling function were presented, too. We studied nonlinear wave phenomena in thermal fluid systems, with a particular emphasis on presenting analytical results. When conductivity is proportional to temperature, the beliavior of thermal waves is soliton like. For slow thermal waves, approximate analytical results were presented. Extensions of this work are discussed briefly, together with possible astrophysical applications.

  6. Scattering by interstellar graphite dust analog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Gazi A.; Gogoi, Ankur

    2014-10-01

    The analysis of optical scattering data of interstellar carbonaceous graphite dust analog at 543.5 nm, 594.5 nm and 632.8 nm laser wavelengths by using an original laboratory light scattering setup is presented. The setup primarily consisted of a laser source, optical units, aerosol sprayer, data acquisition system and associated instrumentation. The instrument measured scattered light signals from 10° to 170° in steps of 1°. The results of the measurements of the volume scattering function β(θ) and degree of linear polarization P(θ) of the carbonaceous graphite dust particles that were sprayed in front of the laser beam by using an aerosol sprayer were subsequently compared with theoretically generated Mie plots with estimated parameters.

  7. Molecular hydrogen formation in the interstellar medium

    CERN Document Server

    Cazaux, S

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a model for molecular hydrogen formation under astrophysically relevant conditions. This model takes fully into account the presence of both physisorbed and chemisorbed sites on the surface, allows quantum mechanical diffusion as well as thermal hopping for absorbed H-atoms, and has been benchmarked versus recent laboratory experiments on H2 formation on silicate surfaces. The results show that H2 formation on grain surface is efficient in the interstellar medium up to some 300K. At low temperatures (<100K), H2 formation is governed by the reaction of a physisorbed H with a chemisorbed H. At higher temperatures, H2 formation proceeds through reaction between two chemisorbed H atoms. We present simple analytical expressions for H2 formation which can be adopted to a wide variety of surfaces once their surfaces characteristics have been determined experimentally.

  8. Experimental Limit to Interstellar 244Pu Abundance

    CERN Document Server

    Paul, M; Ahmad, I; Berkovits, D; Bordeanu, C; Ghelberg, S; Hashimoto, Y; Hershcovitch, A I; Jiang, S; Nakanishi, T; Sakamoto, K

    2001-01-01

    Short-lived nuclides, now extinct in the solar system, are expected to be present in the interstellar medium (ISM). Grains of ISM origin were recently discovered in the inner solar system and at Earth orbit and may accrete onto Earth after ablation in the atmosphere. A favorable matrix for detection of such extraterrestrial material is presented by deep open-sea sediments with very low sedimentation rates (0.8-3 mm/kyr). We report here on the measurement of Pu isotopic abundances in a 1-kg deep-sea dry sediment collected in 1992 in the North Pacific. Our measured value of (3+-3)x10^5 244Pu atoms in the Pu-separated fraction of the sample shows no excess over the expected stratospheric nuclear fallout content and under reasonable assumptions we derive a limit of 2x10^-11 g-244Pu/g-ISM for the abundance of 244Pu in ISM.

  9. Predicted profiles of ultraviolet interstellar absorption lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welty, D.E.; Hobbs, L.M.; York, D.G. (Chicago, University, IL (USA))

    1991-02-01

    In this paper, values of the column density, line width parameter, and velocity are determined for as many components derived from optical interstellar absorption-line profiles of Na I and K I as needed to reproduce the observed high-resolution optical profiles of the D lines of Na I toward eight lightly reddened stars and of the 7698 A line of K I toward six moderately reddened stars. The derived component structures are then used to predict UV absorption-line profiles due to C I, Mg I, S I, Si I, and Fe I along the same lines of sight. Comparison of the predicted profiles with existing lower resolution line profiles and equivalent width data suggests that this simple scaling procedure can in many cases fairly reliably predict the UV profiles from the observed optical ones. 64 refs.

  10. From Interstellar PAHs and Ices to the Origin of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allamandola, Louis J.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Tremendous strides have been made in our understanding of interstellar material over the past twenty years thanks to significant, parallel developments in observational astronomy and laboratory astrophysics. Twenty years ago the composition of interstellar dust was largely guessed at, the concept of ices in dense molecular clouds ignored, and the notion of large, abundant, gas phase, carbon rich molecules widespread throughout the interstellar medium (ISM) considered impossible. Today the composition of dust in the diffuse ISM is reasonably well constrained to micron-sized cold refractory materials comprised of amorphous and crystalline silicates mixed with an amorphous carbonaceous material containing aromatic structural units and short, branched aliphatic chains. In dense molecular clouds, the birthplace of stars and planets, these cold dust particles are coated with mixed molecular ices whose composition is very well constrained. Lastly, the signature of carbon-rich polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), shockingly large molecules by earlier interstellar chemistry standards, is widespread throughout the Universe. The first part of this lecture will describe how infrared studies of interstellar space, combined with laboratory simulations, have revealed the composition of interstellar ices (the building blocks of comets) and the high abundance and nature of interstellar PAHs. The laboratory database has now enabled us to gain insight into the identities, concentrations, and physical state of many interstellar materials. Within a dense molecular cloud, and especially in the solar nebula during the star and planet formation stage, the materials frozen into interstellar/precometary ices are photoprocessed by ultraviolet light, producing more complex molecules. The remainder of the presentation will focus on the photochemical evolution of these materials and the possible role of these compounds on the early Earth. As these materials are thought to be the building

  11. Realistic Detectability of Close Interstellar Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Nathaniel V.; Ragozzine, Darin; Granvik, Mikael; Stephens, Denise C.

    2016-07-01

    During the planet formation process, billions of comets are created and ejected into interstellar space. The detection and characterization of such interstellar comets (ICs) (also known as extra-solar planetesimals or extra-solar comets) would give us in situ information about the efficiency and properties of planet formation throughout the galaxy. However, no ICs have ever been detected, despite the fact that their hyperbolic orbits would make them readily identifiable as unrelated to the solar system. Moro-Martín et al. have made a detailed and reasonable estimate of the properties of the IC population. We extend their estimates of detectability with a numerical model that allows us to consider “close” ICs, e.g., those that come within the orbit of Jupiter. We include several constraints on a “detectable” object that allow for realistic estimates of the frequency of detections expected from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) and other surveys. The influence of several of the assumed model parameters on the frequency of detections is explored in detail. Based on the expectation from Moro-Martín et al., we expect that LSST will detect 0.001-10 ICs during its nominal 10 year lifetime, with most of the uncertainty from the unknown number density of small (nuclei of ˜0.1-1 km) ICs. Both asteroid and comet cases are considered, where the latter includes various empirical prescriptions of brightening. Using simulated LSST-like astrometric data, we study the problem of orbit determination for these bodies, finding that LSST could identify their orbits as hyperbolic and determine an ephemeris sufficiently accurate for follow-up in about 4-7 days. We give the hyperbolic orbital parameters of the most detectable ICs. Taking the results into consideration, we give recommendations to future searches for ICs.

  12. TRES survey of variable diffuse interstellar bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Charles J.; Milisavljevic, Dan; Crabtree, Kyle N.; Johansen, Sommer L.; Patnaude, Daniel J.; Margutti, Raffaella; Parrent, Jerod T.; Drout, Maria R.; Sanders, Nathan E.; Kirshner, Robert P.; Latham, David W.

    2017-09-01

    Diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) are absorption features commonly observed in optical/near-infrared spectra of stars and thought to be associated with polyatomic molecules that comprise a significant reservoir of organic material in the Universe. However, the central wavelengths of almost all DIBs do not correspond with electronic transitions of known atomic or molecular species and the specific physical nature of their carriers remains inconclusive despite decades of observational, theoretical and experimental research. It is well established that DIB carriers are located in the interstellar medium, but the recent discovery of time-varying DIBs in the spectra of the extragalactic supernova SN 2012ap suggests that some may be created in massive star environments. Here, we report evidence of short time-scale (∼10-60 d) changes in DIB absorption line substructure towards 3 of 17 massive stars observed as part of a pathfinder survey of variable DIBs conducted with the 1.5-m Tillinghast telescope and Tillinghast Reflector Echelle Spectrograph (TRES) at Fred L. Whipple Observatory. The detections are made in high-resolution optical spectra (R ∼ 44 000) having signal-to-noise ratios of 5-15 around the 5797 and 6614 Å features, and are considered significant but requiring further investigation. We find that these changes are potentially consistent with interactions between stellar winds and DIB carriers in close proximity. Our findings motivate a larger survey to further characterize these variations and may establish a powerful new method for probing the poorly understood physical characteristics of DIB carriers.

  13. Applications of the Electrodynamic Tether to Interstellar Travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matloff, Gregory L.; Johnson, Les

    2005-01-01

    After considering relevant properties of the local interstellar medium and defining a sample interstellar mission, this paper considers possible interstellar applications of the electrodynamic tether, or EDT. These include use of the EDT to provide on-board power and affect trajectory modifications and direct application of the EDT to starship acceleration. It is demonstrated that comparatively modest EDTs can provide substantial quantities of on-board power, if combined with a large-area electron-collection device such as the Cassenti toroidal-field ramscoop. More substantial tethers can be used to accomplish large-radius thrustless turns. Direct application of the EDT to starship acceleration is apparently infeasible.

  14. Experiment on mass-stripping of interstellar cloud following shock passage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, J F; Robey, H F; Klein, R I; Miles, A R

    2006-10-17

    The interaction of supernova shocks and interstellar clouds is an important astrophysical phenomenon which can lead to mass-stripping (transfer of material from cloud to surrounding flow, ''mass-loading'' the flow) and possibly increase the compression in the cloud to high enough densities to trigger star formation. Our experiments attempt to simulate and quantify the mass-stripping as it occurs when a shock passes through interstellar clouds. We drive a strong shock using 5 kJ of the 30 kJ Omega laser into a cylinder filled with low-density foam with an embedded 120 {micro}m Al sphere simulating an interstellar cloud. The density ratio between Al and foam is {approx} 9. Time-resolved x-ray radiographs show the cloud getting compressed by the shock (t {approx} 5 ns), undergoing a classical Kelvin-Helmholtz roll-up (12 ns) followed by a Widnall instability (30 ns), an inherently 3d effect that breaks the 2d symmetry of the experiment. Material is continuously being stripped from the cloud at a rate which is shown to be inconsistent with laminar models for mass-stripping (the cloud is fully stripped by 80 ns-100 ns, ten times faster than the laminar model). We present a new model for turbulent mass-stripping that agrees with the observed rate and which should scale to astrophysical conditions, which occur at even higher Reynolds numbers than the current experiment. The new model combines the integral momentum equations, potential flow past a sphere, flat plate skin friction coefficients, and Spalding's law of the wall for turbulent boundary layers.

  15. Formation of interstellar filaments: the role of magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntormousi, Evangelia; Hennebelle, Patrick

    2014-07-01

    The filamentary structure of interstellar matter and its potential link to star formation has been brought back into focus recently by high resolution observational surveys. The densest of these filaments host pre-stellar and star forming cores, so explaining their properties is tightly correlated to revealing the initial conditions for star formation. To that end, in this work we employ high-resolution, 3D MHD simulations performed with the AMR code RAMSES to investigate two filament formation mechanisms: turbulence and sheet fragmentation. The first series of simulations has as a particular aim to address the origin of the characteristic filament thickness found in observations. Starting from the hypothesis that diffusive processes are responsible, our numerical experiments consist of (driven or decaying) ideal and non-ideal MHD turbulence, at a resolution that greatly exceeds the reported 0.1pc thickness. The comparison points to ion-neutral friction as an excellent candidate for setting a characteristic scale. In this picture dense filaments are the diffusive end of the turbulent cascade, an interpretation with important implications for our understanding of the dynamical behavior of the ISM. A second series of simulations investigates filament formation by the fragmentation of supershells, a scenario inspired by the analytical work of Nagai (1998). We find a striking difference between hydrodynamical and MHD runs as in the first case the sheets fragment into small cores, while in the latter they produce large filaments. In addition though, we see that low-density filaments preferentially form along the dominant component of the magnetic field. In this scenario filaments are prominent features in the ISM, but their fate is still determined by the local magnetic field. A detailed comparison of the filament properties between the two runs is work in progress and will reveal the physical mechanisms responsible for shaping the ISM and setting the initial conditions

  16. PRESSURE EQUILIBRIUM BETWEEN THE LOCAL INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS AND THE LOCAL HOT BUBBLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snowden, S. L.; Chiao, M.; Collier, M. R.; Porter, F. S.; Thomas, N. E. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Cravens, T.; Robertson, I. P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kansas, 1251 Wescoe Hall Drive, Lawrence, KS 66045 (United States); Galeazzi, M.; Uprety, Y.; Ursino, E. [Department of Physics, University of Miami, 1320 Campo Sano Drive, Coral Gables, FL 33146 (United States); Koutroumpa, D. [Université Versailles St-Quentin, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ. Paris 06, CNRS/INSU, LATMOS-IPSL, 11 Boulevard d' Alembert, F-78280 Guyancourt (France); Kuntz, K. D. [The Henry A. Rowland Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Lallement, R.; Puspitarini, L. [GEPI, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS UMR8111, Université Paris Diderot, 5 Place Jules Janssen, F-92190 Meudon (France); Lepri, S. T. [University of Michigan, 2455 Hayward Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); McCammon, D.; Morgan, K. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Walsh, B. M., E-mail: steven.l.snowden@nasa.gov [Space Sciences Laboratory, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2014-08-10

    Three recent results related to the heliosphere and the local interstellar medium (ISM) have provided an improved insight into the distribution and conditions of material in the solar neighborhood. These are the measurement of the magnetic field outside of the heliosphere by Voyager 1, the improved mapping of the three-dimensional structure of neutral material surrounding the Local Cavity using extensive ISM absorption line and reddening data, and a sounding rocket flight which observed the heliospheric helium focusing cone in X-rays and provided a robust estimate of the contribution of solar wind charge exchange emission to the ROSAT All-Sky Survey 1/4 keV band data. Combining these disparate results, we show that the thermal pressure of the plasma in the Local Hot Bubble (LHB) is P/k = 10, 700 cm{sup –3} K. If the LHB is relatively free of a global magnetic field, it can easily be in pressure (thermal plus magnetic field) equilibrium with the local interstellar clouds, eliminating a long-standing discrepancy in models of the local ISM.

  17. Multiphase turbulent interstellar medium: some recent results from radio astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Nirupam

    2015-01-01

    The radio frequency 1.4 GHz transition of the atomic hydrogen is one of the important tracers of the diffuse neutral interstellar medium. Radio astronomical observations of this transition, using either a single dish telescope or an array interferometer, reveal different properties of the interstellar medium. Such observations are particularly useful to study the multiphase nature and turbulence in the interstellar gas. Observations with multiple radio telescopes have recently been used to study these two closely related aspects in greater detail. Using various observational techniques, the density and the velocity fluctuations in the Galactic interstellar medium was found to have a Kolmogorov-like power law power spectra. The observed power law scaling of the turbulent velocity dispersion with the length scale can be used to derive the true temperature distribution of the medium. Observations from a large ongoing atomic hydrogen absorption line survey have also been used to study the distribution of gas at d...

  18. Photochemistry and Astrochemistry: Photochemical Pathways to Interstellar Complex Organic Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öberg, Karin I

    2016-09-14

    The interstellar medium is characterized by a rich and diverse chemistry. Many of its complex organic molecules are proposed to form through radical chemistry in icy grain mantles. Radicals form readily when interstellar ices (composed of water and other volatiles) are exposed to UV photons and other sources of dissociative radiation, and if sufficiently mobile the radicals can react to form larger, more complex molecules. The resulting complex organic molecules (COMs) accompany star and planet formation and may eventually seed the origins of life on nascent planets. Experiments of increasing sophistication have demonstrated that known interstellar COMs as well as the prebiotically interesting amino acids can form through ice photochemistry. We review these experiments and discuss the qualitative and quantitative kinetic and mechanistic constraints they have provided. We finally compare the effects of UV radiation with those of three other potential sources of radical production and chemistry in interstellar ices: electrons, ions, and X-rays.

  19. The Interstellar Medium in External Galaxies: Summaries of contributed papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollenbach, David J. (Editor); Thronson, Harley A., Jr. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The Second Wyoming Conference entitled, The Interstellar Medium in External Galaxies, was held on July 3 to 7, 1989, to discuss the current understanding of the interstellar medium in external galaxies and to analyze the basic physical processes underlying interstellar phenomena. The papers covered a broad range of research on the gas and dust in external galaxies and focused on such topics as the distribution and morphology of the atomic, molecular, and dust components; the dynamics of the gas and the role of the magnetic field in the dynamics; elemental abundances and gas depletions in the atomic and ionized components; cooling flows; star formation; the correlation of the nonthermal radio continuum with the cool component of the interstellar medium; the origin and effect of hot galactic halos; the absorption line systems seen in distant quasars; and the effect of galactic collisions.

  20. The crystalline fraction of interstellar silicates in starburst galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kemper, F; Woods, Paul M

    2010-01-01

    We present a model using the evolution of the stellar population in a starburst galaxy to predict the crystallinity of the silicates in the interstellar medium of this galaxy. We take into account dust production in stellar ejecta, and amorphisation and destruction in the interstellar medium and find that a detectable amount of crystalline silicates may be formed, particularly at high star formation rates, and in case supernovae are efficient dust producers. We discuss the effect of dust destruction and amorphisation by supernovae, and the effect of a low dust-production efficiency by supernovae, and find that when taking this into account, crystallinity in the interstellar medium becomes hard to detect. Levels of 6.5-13% crystallinity in the interstellar medium of starburst galaxies have been observed and thus we conclude that not all these crystalline silicates can be of stellar origin, and an additional source of crystalline silicates associated with the Active Galactic Nucleus must be present.

  1. In situ observations of interstellar plasma with Voyager 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnett, D A; Kurth, W S; Burlaga, L F; Ness, N F

    2013-09-27

    Launched over 35 years ago, Voyagers 1 and 2 are on an epic journey outward from the Sun to reach the boundary between the solar plasma and the much cooler interstellar medium. The boundary, called the heliopause, is expected to be marked by a large increase in plasma density, from about 0.002 per cubic centimeter (cm(-3)) in the outer heliosphere, to about 0.1 cm(-3) in the interstellar medium. On 9 April 2013, the Voyager 1 plasma wave instrument began detecting locally generated electron plasma oscillations at a frequency of about 2.6 kilohertz. This oscillation frequency corresponds to an electron density of about 0.08 cm(-3), very close to the value expected in the interstellar medium. These and other observations provide strong evidence that Voyager 1 has crossed the heliopause into the nearby interstellar plasma.

  2. Tentative Identification of Interstellar Dust in Heliosphere Nose

    CERN Document Server

    Frisch, P C

    2005-01-01

    Observations of polarization toward nearby stars in the upwind direction made by (Tinbergen, 1982) are consistent with an origin associated with interstellar dust grains entrained in interstellar magnetic fields wrapped around the heliosphere nose. The region of maximum polarization is centered around ecliptic coordinates (295 deg,0 deg). The direction of maximum polarization is offset along the ecliptic longitude by about 35 deg from the heliosphere nose. An offset is also seen between the region with the best aligned dust grains (ecliptic longitudes 281 deg to 330 deg) and inflowing interstellar dust grains observed by Ulysses and Galileo, and in this region polarization strength anti-correlates with ecliptic latitude. These offsets support an interpretation whereby the maximum polarization occurs in a direction perpendicular to the interstellar field lines, the region of consistent polarization angle shows the deflection of small grains, and the inflow of larger grains shows the undeflected grain populatio...

  3. Starry Messages: Searching for Signatures of Interstellar Archaeology

    CERN Document Server

    Carrigan, Richard A

    2010-01-01

    Searching for signatures of cosmic-scale archaeological artifacts such as Dyson spheres or Kardashev civilizations is an interesting alternative to conventional SETI. Uncovering such an artifact does not require the intentional transmission of a signal on the part of the original civilization. This type of search is called interstellar archaeology or sometimes cosmic archaeology. The detection of intelligence elsewhere in the Universe with interstellar archaeology or SETI would have broad implications for science. For example, the constraints of the anthropic principle would have to be loosened if a different type of intelligence was discovered elsewhere. A variety of interstellar archaeology signatures are discussed including non-natural planetary atmospheric constituents, stellar doping with isotopes of nuclear wastes, Dyson spheres, as well as signatures of stellar and galactic-scale engineering. The concept of a Fermi bubble due to interstellar migration is introduced in the discussion of galactic signatu...

  4. The prebiotic synthesis of amino acids - interstellar vs. atmospheric mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meierhenrich, U. J.; Muñoz Caro, G. M.; Schutte, W. A.; Barbier, B.; Arcones Segovia, A.; Rosenbauer, H.; Thiemann, W. H.-P.; Brack, A.

    2002-11-01

    Until very recently, prebiotic amino acids were believed to have been generated in the atmosphere of the early Earth, as successfully simulated by the Urey-Miller experiments. Two independent studies now identified ice photochemistry in the interstellar medium as a possible source of prebiotic amino acids. Ultraviolet irradiation of ice mixtures containing identified interstellar molecules (such as H2O, CO2, CO, CH3OH, and NH3) in the conditions of vacuum and low temperature found in the interstellar medium generated amino acid structures including glycine, alanine, serine, valine, proline, and aspartic acid. After warmup, hydrolysis and derivatization, our team was able to identify 16 amino acids as well as furans and pyrroles. Enantioselective analyses of the amino acids showed racemic mixtures. A prebiotic interstellar origin of amino acid structures is now discussed to be a plausible alternative to the Urey-Miller mechanism.

  5. Dark Matter detection via lepton cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Lineros, Roberto A

    2010-01-01

    Recent observations of lepton cosmic rays, coming from the PAMELA and FERMI experiments, have pushed our understanding of the interstellar medium and cosmic rays sources to unprecedented levels. The imprint of dark matter on lepton cosmic rays is the most exciting explanation of both PAMELA's positron excess and FERMI's total flux of electrons. Alternatively, supernovae are astrophysical objects with the same potential to explain these observations. In this work, we present an updated study of the astrophysical sources of lepton cosmic rays and the possible trace of a dark matter signal on the positron excess and total flux of electrons.

  6. Reconciling dark matter, solar and atmospheric neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Peltoniemi, J T

    1993-01-01

    We present models that can reconcile the solar and atmospheric neutrino data with the existence of a hot dark matter component in the universe. This dark matter is a quasi-Dirac neutrino whose mass $m_{DM}$ arises at the one-loop level. The solar neutrino deficit is explained via nonadiabatic conversions of electron neutrino to a sterile neutrino and the atmospheric neutrino data via maximal muon neutrino to tau neutrino oscillations generated by higher order loop diagrams. For $m_{DM} \\sim 30$ eV the radiative neutrino decay can lead to photons that can ionize interstellar hydrogen. In one of the models one can have observable $\

  7. Casimir Effect in the Kerr Spacetime Surrounded by Quintessence

    CERN Document Server

    Bezerra, V B; Freitas, L F F; Muniz, C R

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the Casimir energy of a massless scalar field in a cavity formed by nearby parallel plates orbiting a rotating spherical body surrounded by quintessence, investigating the influence of the gravitational field on that energy, at zero temperature. This influence includes the effects due to the spacetime dragging caused by the source rotation as well as those ones due to the quintessence. We show that the energy depends on all the involved parameters, as source mass, angular momentum and quintessence state parameter, for any radial coordinate and polar angle. We show that at the north pole the Casimir energy is not influenced by the quintessential matter. At the equatorial plane, when the quintessence is canceled, the result obtained in the literature is recovered. Finally, constraints in the quintessence parameters are obtained from the uncertainty in the current measurements of Casimir effect.

  8. On the maximum sufficient range of interstellar vessels

    CERN Document Server

    Cartin, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers the likely maximum range of space vessels providing the basis of a mature interstellar transportation network. Using the principle of sufficiency, it is argued that this range will be less than three parsecs for the average interstellar vessel. This maximum range provides access from the Solar System to a large majority of nearby stellar systems, with total travel distances within the network not excessively greater than actual physical distance.

  9. Refractive Interstellar Scintillation for Flux Density Variations of Two Pulsars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周爱芝; 吴鑫基; 艾力·伊沙木丁

    2003-01-01

    The flux density structure functions of PSRs B0525+21 and B2111+46 are calculated with the refractive interstellar scintillation (RISS) theory. The theoretical curves are in good agreement with observations [Astrophys.J. 539 (2000) 300] (hereafter S2000). The spectra of the electron density fluctuations both are of Kolmogorov spectra. We suggest that the flux density variations observed for these two pulsars are attributed to refractive interstellar scintillation, not to intrinsic variability.

  10. The interaction of the solar wind with the interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axford, W. I.

    1972-01-01

    The expected characteristics of the solar wind, extrapolated from the vicinity of the earth are described. Several models are examined for the interaction of the solar wind with the interstellar plasma and magnetic field. Various aspects of the penetration of neutral interstellar gas into the solar wind are considered. The dynamic effects of the neutral gas on the solar wind are described. Problems associated with the interaction of cosmic rays with the solar wind are discussed.

  11. Smart Chips for Smart Surroundings - 4S

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuler, Eberhard; König, Ralf; Becker, Jürgen; Rauwerda, Gerard; Burgwal, van de Marcel; Smit, Gerard J.M.; Cardoso, João M.P.; Hübner, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The overall mission of the 4S project (Smart Chips for Smart Surroundings) was to define and develop efficient flexible, reconfigurable core building blocks, including the supporting tools, for future Ambient System Devices. Reconfigurability offers the needed flexibility and adaptability, it provid

  12. Interaction of a magnetized pulsar wind with its surroundings. MHD simulations of Pulsar Wind Nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    Van der Swaluw, E

    2003-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamical simulations are presented of a magnetized pulsar wind interacting directly with the interstellar medium, or, in the case of a surrounding supernova remnant, with the associated freely expanding ejecta of the progenitor star. In both cases the simulations show that the pulsar wind nebula will be elongated due to the dynamical influence of the toroidal magnetic fields, which confirm predictions from a semi-analytical model presented by Begelman & Li. The simulations follow the expansion of the pulsar wind nebula when the latter is bounded by a strong shock and show that the expansion can be modeled with a standard power-law expansion rate. By performing different simulations with different magnetization parameters, I show that the latter weakly correlates with the elongation of the pulsar wind nebula. The results from the simulations are applied to determine the nature of the expansion rate of the pulsar wind nebula 3C58. It is shown that there is both observational and theoretical evi...

  13. Starry messages: Searching for signatures of interstellar archaeology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrigan, Richard A., Jr.; /Fermilab

    2009-12-01

    Searching for signatures of cosmic-scale archaeological artifacts such as Dyson spheres or Kardashev civilizations is an interesting alternative to conventional SETI. Uncovering such an artifact does not require the intentional transmission of a signal on the part of the original civilization. This type of search is called interstellar archaeology or sometimes cosmic archaeology. The detection of intelligence elsewhere in the Universe with interstellar archaeology or SETI would have broad implications for science. For example, the constraints of the anthropic principle would have to be loosened if a different type of intelligence was discovered elsewhere. A variety of interstellar archaeology signatures are discussed including non-natural planetary atmospheric constituents, stellar doping with isotopes of nuclear wastes, Dyson spheres, as well as signatures of stellar and galactic-scale engineering. The concept of a Fermi bubble due to interstellar migration is introduced in the discussion of galactic signatures. These potential interstellar archaeological signatures are classified using the Kardashev scale. A modified Drake equation is used to evaluate the relative challenges of finding various sources. With few exceptions interstellar archaeological signatures are clouded and beyond current technological capabilities. However SETI for so-called cultural transmissions and planetary atmosphere signatures are within reach.

  14. Matrix isolation as a tool for studying interstellar chemical reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, David W.; Ortman, Bryan J.; Hauge, Robert H.; Margrave, John L.

    1989-01-01

    Since the identification of the OH radical as an interstellar species, over 50 molecular species were identified as interstellar denizens. While identification of new species appears straightforward, an explanation for their mechanisms of formation is not. Most astronomers concede that large bodies like interstellar dust grains are necessary for adsorption of molecules and their energies of reactions, but many of the mechanistic steps are unknown and speculative. It is proposed that data from matrix isolation experiments involving the reactions of refractory materials (especially C, Si, and Fe atoms and clusters) with small molecules (mainly H2, H2O, CO, CO2) are particularly applicable to explaining mechanistic details of likely interstellar chemical reactions. In many cases, matrix isolation techniques are the sole method of studying such reactions; also in many cases, complexations and bond rearrangements yield molecules never before observed. The study of these reactions thus provides a logical basis for the mechanisms of interstellar reactions. A list of reactions is presented that would simulate interstellar chemical reactions. These reactions were studied using FTIR-matrix isolation techniques.

  15. VUV spectroscopy of carbon dust analogs: contribution to interstellar extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavilan, L.; Alata, I.; Le, K. C.; Pino, T.; Giuliani, A.; Dartois, E.

    2016-02-01

    Context. A full spectral characterization of carbonaceous dust analogs is necessary to understand their potential as carriers of observed astronomical spectral signatures such as the ubiquitous UV bump at 217.5 nm and the far-ultraviolet (FUV) rise common to interstellar extinction curves. Aims: Our goal is to study the spectral properties of carbonaceous dust analogs from the FUV to the mid-infrared (MIR) domain. We seek in particular to understand the spectra of these materials in the FUV range, for which laboratory studies are scarce. Methods: We produced analogs to carbonaceous interstellar dust encountered in various phases of the interstellar medium: amorphous hydrogenated carbons (a-C:H), for carbonaceous dust observed in the diffuse interstellar medium, and soot particles, for the polyaromatic component. Analogs to a-C:H dust were produced using a radio-frequency plasma reactor at low pressures, and soot nanoparticles films were produced in an ethylene (C2H4) flame. We measured transmission spectra of these thin films (thickness Kronig inversion. We used these constants for comparison to existing interstellar extinction curves. Conclusions: We extend the spectral measurements of these types of carbonaceous analogs into the VUV and link the spectral features in this range to the 3.4 μm band. We suggest that these two materials might contribute to different classes of interstellar extinction curves.

  16. Starry Messages - Searching for Signatures of Interstellar Archaeology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrigan, R. A., Jr.

    Searching for signatures of cosmic-scale archaeological artefacts such as Dyson spheres or Kardashev civilizations is an interesting alternative to conventional SETI. Uncovering such an artifact does not require the intentional transmission of a signal on the part of the originating civilization. This type of search is called interstellar archaeology or sometimes cosmic archaeology . The detection of intelligence elsewhere in the Universe with interstellar archaeology or SETI would have broad implications for science. For example, the constraints of the anthropic principle would have to be loosened if a different type of intelligence was discovered elsewhere. A variety of interstellar archaeology signatures are discussed including non-natural planetary atmospheric constituents, stellar doping with isotopes of nuclear wastes, Dyson spheres, as well as signatures of stellar and galactic-scale engineering. The concept of a Fermi bubble due to interstellar migration is introduced in the discussion of galactic signatures. These potential interstellar archaeological signatures are classified using the Kardashev scale. A modified Drake equation is used to evaluate the relative challenges of finding various sources. With few exceptions interstellar archaeological signatures are clouded and beyond current technological capabilities. However SETI for so-called cultural transmissions and planetary atmosphere signatures are within reach.

  17. Interstellar Medium and Star Formation Studies with the Square Kilometre Array

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P. Manoj; S. Vig; G. Maheswar; U. S. Kamath; A. Tej

    2016-12-01

    Stars and planetary systems are formed out of molecular clouds in the interstellar medium. Although the sequence of steps involved in star formation are generally known, a comprehensive theory which describes the details of the processes that drive formation of stars is still missing. The Square Kilometre Array (SKA), with its unprecedented sensitivity and angular resolution, will play a major role in filling these gaps in our understanding. In this article, we present a few science cases that the Indian star formation community is interested in pursuing with SKA, which include investigation of AU-sized structures in the neutral ISM, the origin of thermal and non-thermal radio jets from protostars and the accretion history of protostars, and formation of massive stars and their effect on the surrounding medium.

  18. Interstellar medium and star formation studies with the Square Kilometre Array

    CERN Document Server

    Manoj, P; Mahewar, G; Kamath, U S; Tej, A

    2016-01-01

    Stars and planetary systems are formed out of molecular clouds in the interstellar medium. Although the sequence of steps involved in star formation are generally known, a comprehensive theory which describes the details of the processes that drive formation of stars is still missing. The Square Kilometre Array (SKA), with its unprecedented sensitivity and angular resolution, will play a major role in filling these gaps in our understanding. In this article, we present a few science cases that the Indian star formation community is interested in pursuing with SKA, which include investigation of AU-sized structures in the neutral ISM, the origin of thermal and non-thermal radio jets from protostars and the accretion history of protostars, and formation of massive stars and their effect on the surrounding medium.

  19. Detection of Interstellar Urea with Carma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, H.-L.; Snyder, L. E.; Friedel, D. N.; Looney, L. W.; McCall, B. J.; Remijan, A. J.; Lovas, F. J.; Hollis, J. M.

    2010-06-01

    Urea, a molecule discovered in human urine by H. M. Rouelle in 1773, has a significant role in prebiotic chemistry. Previous BIMA observations have suggested that interstellar urea [(NH_2)_2CO] is a compact hot core molecule such as other large molecules, e.g. methyl formate and acetic acid (2009, 64th OSU Symposium On Molecular Spectroscopy, WI05). We have conducted an extensive search for urea toward the high mass hot molecular core Sgr B2(N-LMH) using CARMA and the IRAM 30 m. Because the spectral lines of heavy molecules like urea tend to be weak and hot cores display lines from a wide range of molecules, a major problem in identifying urea lines is confusion with lines of other molecules. Therefore, it is necessary to detect a number of urea lines and apply sophisticated statistical tests before having confidence in an identification. The 1 mm resolution of CARMA enables favorable coupling of the source size and synthesized beam size, which was found to be essential for the detection of weak signals. The 2.5^"×2^" synthesized beam of CARMA significantly resolves out the contamination by extended emission and reveals the eight weak urea lines that were previously blended with nearby transitions. Our analysis indicates that these lines are likely to be urea since the resulting observed line frequencies are coincident with a set of overlapping connecting urea lines, and the observed line intensities are consistent with the expected line strengths of urea. In addition, we have developed a new statistical approach to examine the spatial correlation between the observed lines by applying the Student T-test to the high resolution channel maps obtained from CARMA. The T-test shows similar spatial distributions from all eight candidate lines, suggesting a common molecular origin, urea. Our T-test method could have a broad impact on the next generation of arrays, such as ALMA, because the new arrays will require a method to systematically determine the credibility of

  20. Interstellar Mapping and Acceleration Probe (IMAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwadron, Nathan

    2016-04-01

    Our piece of cosmic real-estate, the heliosphere, is the domain of all human existence - an astrophysical case-history of the successful evolution of life in a habitable system. By exploring our global heliosphere and its myriad interactions, we develop key physical knowledge of the interstellar interactions that influence exoplanetary habitability as well as the distant history and destiny of our solar system and world. IBEX was the first mission to explore the global heliosphere and in concert with Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 is discovering a fundamentally new and uncharted physical domain of the outer heliosphere. In parallel, Cassini/INCA maps the global heliosphere at energies (~5-55 KeV) above those measured by IBEX. The enigmatic IBEX ribbon and the INCA belt were unanticipated discoveries demonstrating that much of what we know or think we understand about the outer heliosphere needs to be revised. The next quantum leap enabled by IMAP will open new windows on the frontier of Heliophysics at a time when the space environment is rapidly evolving. IMAP with 100 times the combined resolution and sensitivity of IBEX and INCA will discover the substructure of the IBEX ribbon and will reveal in unprecedented resolution global maps of our heliosphere. The remarkable synergy between IMAP, Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 will remain for at least the next decade as Voyager 1 pushes further into the interstellar domain and Voyager 2 moves through the heliosheath. The "A" in IMAP refers to acceleration of energetic particles. With its combination of highly sensitive pickup and suprathermal ion sensors, IMAP will provide the species and spectral coverage as well as unprecedented temporal resolution to associate emerging suprathermal tails with interplanetary structures and discover underlying physical acceleration processes. These key measurements will provide what has been a critical missing piece of suprathermal seed particles in our understanding of particle acceleration to high

  1. Information and Energy/Matter

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    What can we hope for from studies of information related to energy/matter (as it appears for us in space/time)? Information is a concept known for its ambiguity in both common, everyday use and in its specific technical applications throughout different fields of research and technology. However, most people are unaware that matter/energy today is also a concept surrounded by a disquieting uncertainty. What for Democritus were building blocks of the whole universe appear today to constitute o...

  2. Constraining the Properties of Cold Interstellar Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spraggs, Mary Elizabeth; Gibson, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    Since the interstellar medium (ISM) plays an integral role in star formation and galactic structure, it is important to understand the evolution of clouds over time, including the processes of cooling and condensation that lead to the formation of new stars. This work aims to constrain and better understand the physical properties of the cold ISM by utilizing large surveys of neutral atomic hydrogen (HI) 21cm spectral line emission and absorption, carbon monoxide (CO) 2.6mm line emission, and multi-band infrared dust thermal continuum emission. We identify areas where the gas may be cooling and forming molecules using HI self-absorption (HISA), in which cold foreground HI absorbs radiation from warmer background HI emission.We are developing an algorithm that uses total gas column densities inferred from Planck and other FIR/sub-mm data in parallel with CO and HISA spectral line data to determine the gas temperature, density, molecular abundance, and other properties as functions of position. We can then map these properties to study their variation throughout an individual cloud as well as any dependencies on location or environment within the Galaxy.Funding for this work was provided by the National Science Foundation, the NASA Kentucky Space Grant Consortium, the WKU Ogden College of Science and Engineering, and the Carol Martin Gatton Academy for Mathematics and Science in Kentucky.

  3. Hydrogenation reactions in interstellar CO ice analogues

    CERN Document Server

    Fuchs, G W; Ioppolo, S; Romanzin, C; Bisschop, S E; Andersson, S; Van Dishoeck, E F; Linnartz, H

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogenation reactions of CO in inter- and circumstellar ices are regarded as an important starting point in the formation of more complex species. Previous laboratory measurements by two groups on the hydrogenation of CO ices resulted in controversial results on the formation rate of methanol. Our aim is to resolve this controversy by an independent investigation of the reaction scheme for a range of H-atom fluxes and different ice temperatures and thicknesses. Reaction rates are determined by using a state-of-the-art ultra high vacuum experimental setup to bombard an interstellar CO ice analog with room temperature H atoms. The reaction of CO + H into H2CO and subsequently CH3OH is monitored by a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer in a reflection absorption mode. In addition, after each completed measurement a temperature programmed desorption experiment is performed to identify the produced species. Different H-atom fluxes, morphologies, and ice thicknesses are tested. The formation of both formaldeh...

  4. DYNAMIC SPECTRAL MAPPING OF INTERSTELLAR PLASMA LENSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuntsov, Artem V.; Walker, Mark A. [Manly Astrophysics, 3/22 Cliff Street, Manly 2095 (Australia); Koopmans, Leon V. E. [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 800, NL-9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands); Bannister, Keith W.; Stevens, Jamie; Johnston, Simon [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping NSW 1710 (Australia); Reynolds, Cormac; Bignall, Hayley E., E-mail: Artem.Tuntsov@manlyastrophysics.org, E-mail: Mark.Walker@manlyastrophysics.org, E-mail: koopmans@astro.rug.nl [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research—Curtin University, Perth (Australia)

    2016-02-01

    Compact radio sources sometimes exhibit intervals of large, rapid changes in their flux density, due to lensing by interstellar plasma crossing the line of sight. A novel survey program has made it possible to discover these “Extreme Scattering Events” (ESEs) in real time, resulting in a high-quality dynamic spectrum of an ESE observed in PKS 1939–315. Here we present a method for determining the column-density profile of a plasma lens, given only the dynamic radio spectrum of the lensed source, under the assumption that the lens is either axisymmetric or totally anisotropic. Our technique relies on the known, strong frequency dependence of the plasma refractive index in order to determine how points in the dynamic spectrum map to positions on the lens. We apply our method to high-frequency (4.2–10.8 GHz) data from the Australia Telescope Compact Array of the PKS 1939–315 ESE. The derived electron column-density profiles are very similar for the two geometries we consider, and both yield a good visual match to the data. However, the fit residuals are substantially above the noise level, and deficiencies are evident when we compare the predictions of our model to lower-frequency (1.6–3.1 GHz) data on the same ESE, thus motivating future development of more sophisticated inversion techniques.

  5. Interstellar Contact - A Thousand-Year Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tough, A.

    Rapid progress is already being made in space exploration and the scientific search for intelligent life. By the year 3000, humankind will likely be sending extraordinarily smart probes and even staffed spaceships to explore nearby stars and planetary systems. Because any other civilizations in our galaxy are likely much older than humankind, their technology likely became capable long ago of exploring their galactic neighbourhood. Their motivation to do so is probably very strong, according to three sets of disciplined speculation: some role-playing exercises; a set of four universal values shared by all civilizations; and Vulpetti's Conscious-Life Expansion Principle. If other civilizations (or their intelligent probes) are already traveling throughout the galaxy, and if we do the same by the year 3000, it seems highly probable that contact will be made one way or another. Indeed, during the next 1000 years, we may experience contact in various ways (telescopes, probes, or staffed spacecraft) and with various civilizations. Of all the positive events that humanity will experience over the next 1000 years, interstellar contact will likely have the highest impact. Humanity's major benefits will likely include practical information, answers to major questions, changes in our view of ourselves, and cooperation in joint galactic projects.

  6. Dynamic spectral mapping of interstellar plasma lenses

    CERN Document Server

    Tuntsov, Artem V; Koopmans, Leon V E; Bannister, Keith W; Stevens, Jamie; Johnston, Simon; Reynolds, Cormac; Bignall, Hayley E

    2015-01-01

    Compact radio sources sometimes exhibit intervals of large, rapid changes in their flux-density, due to lensing by interstellar plasma crossing the line-of-sight. A novel survey program has made it possible to discover these "Extreme Scattering Events" (ESEs) in real time, resulting in a high-quality dynamic spectrum of an ESE observed in PKS 1939-315. Here we present a method for determining the column-density profile of a plasma lens, given only the dynamic radio spectrum of the lensed source, under the assumption that the lens is either axisymmetric or totally anisotropic. Our technique relies on the known, strong frequency dependence of the plasma refractive index in order to determine how points in the dynamic spectrum map to positions on the lens. We apply our method to high-frequency (4.2-10.8 GHz) data from the Australia Telescope Compact Array of the PKS 1939-315 ESE. The derived electron column-density profiles are very similar for the two geometries we consider, and both yield a good visual match t...

  7. Interstellar HOCN in the Galactic center region

    CERN Document Server

    Bruenken, S; Martin, S; Verheyen, L; Menten, K M

    2010-01-01

    Aims. Our aim is to confirm the interstellar detection of cyanic acid, HOCN, in the Galactic center clouds. It has previously been tentatively detected only in Sgr B2(OH). Methods. We used a complete line survey of the hot cores Sgr B2(N) and (M) in the 3 mm range, complemented by additional observations carried out with the IRAM 30 m telescope at selected frequencies in the 2 mm band and towards four additional positions in the Sgr B2 cloud complex in the 2 and 3 mm bands. The spectral survey was analysed in the local thermodynamical equilibrium approximation (LTE) by modeling the emission of all identified molecules simultaneously. This allowed us to distinguish weak features of HOCN from the rich line spectrum observed in Sgr B2(N) and (M). Lines of the more stable (by 1.1 eV) isomer isocyanic acid, HNCO, in these sources, as well as those of HOCN and HNCO towards the other positions, were analysed in the LTE approximation as well. Results. Four transitions of HOCN were detected in a quiescent molecular cl...

  8. Deuterium enrichment of the interstellar grain mantle

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Ankan; Chakrabarti, Sandip K

    2015-01-01

    We carry out Monte-Carlo simulation to study deuterium enrichment of interstellar grain mantles under various physical conditions. Based on the physical properties, various types of clouds are considered. We find that in diffuse cloud regions, very strong radiation fields persists and hardly a few layers of surface species are formed. In translucent cloud regions with a moderate radiation field, significant number of layers would be produced and surface coverage is mainly dominated by photo-dissociation products such as, C,CH_3,CH_2D,OH and OD. In the intermediate dense cloud regions (having number density of total hydrogen nuclei in all forms ~ 2 x 10^4 cm^-3), water and methanol along with their deuterated derivatives are efficiently formed. For much higher density regions (~ 10^6 cm^-3), water and methanol productions are suppressed but surface coverage of CO,CO_2,O_2,O_3 are dramatically increased. We find a very high degree of fractionation of water and methanol. Observational results support a high frac...

  9. Dusting off the Diffuse Interstellar Bands

    CERN Document Server

    Baron, Dalya; Watson, Darach; Yao, Yushu; Prochaska, J Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Using over a million and a half extragalactic spectra we study the properties of the mysterious Diffuse Interstellar Bands (DIBs) in the Milky Way. These data provide us with an unprecedented sampling of the skies at high Galactic-latitude and low dust-column-density. In this first paper we present our method, study the correlation of the equivalent width of 12 DIBs with dust extinction and with a few atomic species, and the distribution of four DIBs over nearly 15,000 square degrees. As previously found, DIBs strengths correlate with extinction and therefore inevitably with each other. However, we find that DIBs can exist even in dust free areas. Furthermore, we find that the DIBs correlation with dust varies significantly over the sky. DIB under- or over-densities, relative to the expectation from dust, are often spread over hundreds of square degrees. These patches are different for the four DIBs, showing that they are unlikely to originate from the same carrier.

  10. Interstellar Bubbles in Two Young HII Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Naze, Y; Points, S D; Danforth, C W; Rosado, M; Chen, C H R; Naze, Yael; Chu, You-Hua; Points, Sean D.; Danforth, Charles W.; Rosado, Margarita

    2001-01-01

    Massive stars are expected to produce wind-blown bubbles in the interstellar medium; however, ring nebulae, suggesting the existence of bubbles, are rarely seen around main-sequence O stars. To search for wind-blown bubbles around main-sequence O stars, we have obtained high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope WFPC2 images and high-dispersion echelle spectra of two pristine HII regions, N11B and N180B, in the Large Magellanic Cloud. These HII regions are ionized by OB associations that still contain O3 stars, suggesting that the HII regions are young and have not hosted any supernova explosions. Our observations show that wind-blown bubbles in these HII regions can be detected kinematically but not morphologically because their expansion velocities are comparable to or only slightly higher than the isothermal sound velocity in the HII regions. Bubbles are detected around concentrations of massive stars, individual O stars, and even an evolved red supergiant (a fossil bubble). Comparisons between the observed bu...

  11. Porphyrins in the interstellar medium (in grains)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Fred M.

    1994-05-01

    Spectral sensitivity of the chromophores to their immediate chemical environment establishes some of the chemical constituents of the grains in which they reside. These are: (1) Paraffins, such as, octane, nonane, decane, and others...(needed for Shpolskii matrices and producing quasi-lines); and (2) Pyridine. The presence of pyridine is required not only to produce the spectral DIB matching, but also to produce the 36 cm-1 crystal field splitting of the S1 electronic state. The presence of pyridine in the grains can be confirmed spectroscopically. Pyridine produces a transmission window at 2175 A, matching exactly the well known UV hump. On grain reflection, some of the incoming UV radiation is absorbed into the grain's outer layers. Spikes in the lab and in the astronomical data are due to vibronic transitions in pyridine. The lab spectroscopy reported here clearly establishes the presence of MgTBP, H2TPB, and pyridine in the interstellar grains. The high fluorescence efficiency of MgTBP (being optically pumped in the visible) apparently accounts for all the observed UIR emissions.

  12. Electron Irradiation of Interstellar Ice Analogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, B. G.; Mason, N. J.

    2011-05-01

    Molecular synthesis in the Universe primarily occurs in the icy mantles on dust grains in dense interstellar dust clouds. The interaction of photons, electrons and cosmic rays with these ice mantles triggers complex chemical synthesis leading to the formation of complex molecules. Such molecular reactions can only be understood by systematic laboratory studies. In our experiments astrophysical environments are recreated in the laboratory using an ultra high vacuum chamber (UHV) capable of reaching pressures of the order of 10 -10 mBar containing a liquid helium cryostat capable of attaining a temperature of 20 K. Ice films are deposited on a ZnSe substrate (cooled by cryostat) by background deposition and irradiated with electrons of 1KeV energy. Chemical changes induced by electron irradiation were monitored by an infrared spectrometer. By varying the temperature, we also investigate the temperature dependence on the kinetics of the reactions. In this poster we will present the first results of electron irradiation of simple organic molecules like formamide (HCONH2) and allyl alcohol (CH2CHCH2OH).

  13. Interstellar Medium Absorption Profile Spectrograph (IMAPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, E. B.

    1985-08-01

    The design and fabrication of an objective-grating echelle spectrograph to fly on sounding rockets and record spectra of stars from approximately 920 to 1120A with a resolving power lambda/delta lambda = 200,000 is discussed. The scientific purpose of the program is to observe, with ten times better velocity resolution than before, the plentiful absorption lines in this spectral region produced by atoms, ions and molecules in the interstellar medium. In addition, an important technical goal is to develop and flight-quality a new ultraviolet, photon-counting image sensor which has a windowless, opaque photocathode and a CCD bombarded directly by the accelerated photoelectrons. Except for some initial difficulties with the performance of CCDs, the development of the payload instrument is relatively straightforward and our overall design goals are satisfied. The first flight occurred in late 1984, but no data were obtained because of an inrush of air degraded the instrument's vacuum and caused the detector's high voltage to arc. A second flight in early 1985 was a complete success and obtained a spectrum of pi Sco. Data from this mission are currently being reduced; quick-look versions of the spectra indicate that excellent results will be obtained. Currently, the payload is being reconfigured to fly on a Spartan mission in 1988.

  14. Puzzling Phenomenon of Diffuse Interstellar Bands

    CERN Document Server

    Wszolek, B

    2007-01-01

    The discovery of the first diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) dates back to the pioneering years of stellar spectroscopy. Today, we know about 300 absorption structures of this kind. There exists a great variety of the profiles and intensities of DIBs, so they can not be readily described, classified or characterized. To the present day no reliable identification of the DIBs' carriers has been found. Many carriers of DIBs have been proposed over the years. They ranged from dust grains to free molecules of different kinds, and to more exotic specimens, like hydrogen negative ion. Unfortunately, none of them is responsible for observed DIBs. Furthermore, it was shown that a single carrier cannot be responsible for all known DIBs. It is hard to estimate how many carriers can participate in producing these bands. The problem is further complicated by the fact that to this day it is still impossible to find any laboratory spectrum of any substance which would match the astrophysical spectra. Here, a historical outl...

  15. The turbulent life of dust grains in the supernova-driven, multi-phase interstellar medium

    CERN Document Server

    Peters, Thomas; Naab, Thorsten; Girichidis, Philipp; Walch, Stefanie; Glover, Simon C O; Klessen, Ralf S; Clark, Paul C; Seifried, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Dust grains are an important component of the interstellar medium (ISM) of galaxies. We present the first direct measurement of the residence times of interstellar dust in the different ISM phases, and of the transition rates between these phases, in realistic hydrodynamical simulations of the multi-phase ISM. Our simulations include a time-dependent chemical network that follows the abundances of H^+, H, H_2, C^+ and CO and take into account self-shielding by gas and dust using a tree-based radiation transfer method. Supernova explosions are injected either at random locations, at density peaks, or as a mixture of the two. For each simulation, we investigate how matter circulates between the ISM phases and find more sizeable transitions than considered in simple mass exchange schemes in the literature. The derived residence times in the ISM phases are characterised by broad distributions, in particular for the molecular, warm and hot medium. The most realistic simulations with random and mixed driving have m...

  16. The turbulent life of dust grains in the supernova-driven, multiphase interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Thomas; Zhukovska, Svitlana; Naab, Thorsten; Girichidis, Philipp; Walch, Stefanie; Glover, Simon C. O.; Klessen, Ralf S.; Clark, Paul C.; Seifried, Daniel

    2017-06-01

    Dust grains are an important component of the interstellar medium (ISM) of galaxies. We present the first direct measurement of the residence times of interstellar dust in the different ISM phases, and of the transition rates between these phases, in realistic hydrodynamical simulations of the multiphase ISM. Our simulations include a time-dependent chemical network that follows the abundances of H+, H, H2, C+ and CO and take into account self-shielding by gas and dust using a tree-based radiation transfer method. Supernova explosions are injected either at random locations, at density peaks, or as a mixture of the two. For each simulation, we investigate how matter circulates between the ISM phases and find more sizeable transitions than considered in simple mass exchange schemes in the literature. The derived residence times in the ISM phases are characterized by broad distributions, in particular for the molecular, warm and hot medium. The most realistic simulations with random and mixed driving have median residence times in the molecular, cold, warm and hot phase around 17, 7, 44 and 1 Myr, respectively. The transition rates measured in the random driving run are in good agreement with observations of Ti gas-phase depletion in the warm and cold phases in a simple depletion model. ISM phase definitions based on chemical abundance rather than temperature cuts are physically more meaningful, but lead to significantly different transition rates and residence times because there is no direct correspondence between the two definitions.

  17. Exploring the Potential Formation of Organic Solids in Chondrites and Comets through Polymerization of Interstellar Formaldehyde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebukawa, Yoko; Kilcoyne, A. L. David; Cody, George D.

    2013-07-01

    Polymerization of interstellar formaldehyde, first through the formose reaction and then through subsequent condensation reactions, provides a plausible explanation for how abundant and highly chemically complex organic solids may have come to exist in primitive solar system objects. In order to gain better insight on the reaction, a systematic study of the relationship of synthesis temperature with resultant molecular structure was performed. In addition, the effect of the presence of ammonia on the reaction rate and molecular structure of the product was studied. The synthesized formaldehyde polymer is directly compared to chondritic insoluble organic matter (IOM) isolated from primitive meteorites using solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared, and X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy. The molecular structure of the formaldehyde polymer is shown to exhibit considerable similarity at the functional group level with primitive chondritic IOM. The addition of ammonia to the solution enhances the rate of polymerization reaction at lower temperatures and results in substantial incorporation of nitrogen into the polymer. Morphologically, the formaldehyde polymer exists as submicron to micron-sized spheroidal particles and spheroidal particle aggregates that bare considerable similarity to the organic nanoglobules commonly observed in chondritic IOM. These spectroscopic and morphological data support the hypothesis that IOM in chondrites and refractory organic carbon in comets may have formed through the polymerization of interstellar formaldehyde after planetesimal accretion, in the presence of liquid water, early in the history of the solar system.

  18. Persistent Confusion and Controversy Surrounding Gene Patents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrini, Christi J.; Majumder, Mary A.; McGuire, Amy L.

    2016-01-01

    There is persistent confusion and controversy surrounding basic issues of patent law relevant to the genomics industry. Uncertainty and conflict can lead to the adoption of inefficient practices and exposure to liability. The development of patent-specific educational resources for industry members, as well as the prompt resolution of patentability rules unsettled by recent U.S. Supreme Court decisions, are therefore urgently needed. PMID:26849516

  19. Dark matter

    OpenAIRE

    Einasto, J.

    2011-01-01

    I give a review of the development of the concept of dark matter. The dark matter story passed through several stages from a minor observational puzzle to a major challenge for theory of elementary particles. Modern data suggest that dark matter is the dominant matter component in the Universe, and that it consists of some unknown non-baryonic particles. Properties of dark matter particles determine the structure of the cosmic web.

  20. Perspectives of dark matter searches with antideuterons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vittino, A., E-mail: vittino.andrea@gmail.com [Department of Physics, University of Torino, via P. Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, via P. Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Fornengo, N., E-mail: fornengo@to.infn.it [Department of Physics, University of Torino, via P. Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, via P. Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Maccione, L., E-mail: luca.maccione@lmu.de [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Theresienstraße 37, D-80333 München (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut für Physik (Werner Heisenberg Institut), Föhringer Ring 6, D-80805 München (Germany)

    2014-04-01

    The search for an excess of antideuterons in the cosmic rays flux has been proposed as a very promising channel for dark matter indirect detection, especially for WIMPs with a low or an intermediate mass. With the development of the AMS experiment and the proposal of a future dedicated experiment, i.e. the General Antiparticle Spectrometer (GAPS), there are exciting possibilities for a dark matter detection in the near future. We give an overview on the principal issues related both to the antideuterons production in dark matter annihilation reactions and to their propagation through the interstellar medium and the heliosphere, with a particular focus on the impact of various solar modulation models on the flux at Earth. Lastly, we provide an updated calculation of the reaching capabilities for current and future experiments compatible with the constraints on the dark matter annihilation cross-section imposed by the antiproton measurements of PAMELA.

  1. Small-scale structure in the interstellar medium: time-varying interstellar absorption towards {\\kappa} Velorum

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Keith T; Cordiner, Martin A; Sarre, Peter J; Smith, Arfon M; Bell, Tom A; Viti, Serena

    2012-01-01

    Ultra-high spectral resolution observations of time-varying interstellar absorption towards {\\kappa} Vel are reported, using the Ultra-High Resolution Facility on the Anglo-Australian Telescope. Detections of interstellar Ca I, Ca II, K I, Na I and CH are obtained, whilst an upper limit on the column density is reported for C_2. The results show continued increases in column densities of K I and Ca I since observations ~ 4 yr earlier, as the transverse motion of the star carried it ~ 10 AU perpendicular to the line of sight. Line profile models are fitted to the spectra and two main narrow components (A & B) are identified for all species except CH. The column density N(K I) is found to have increased by 82 +10-9 % between 1994 and 2006, whilst N(Ca I) is found to have increased by 32 +- 5 % over the shorter period of 2002-2006. The line widths are used to constrain the kinetic temperature to T_k,A 7 * 10^3 cm^-3 and n_B > 2 * 10^4 cm^-3. Calcium depletions are estimated from the Ca I / K I ratio. Compar...

  2. Precondensed matter - Key to the early solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, D. D.

    1978-01-01

    Explicit astrophysical details are developed for the hypothesis that chemical and isotopic anomalies in primitive solar-system samples reflect routine initial chemical conditions within precondensed matter. The central feature of this theory concerns the chemical state of presolar dust, which is regarded as never having been vaporized in the region where the most chemically primitive samples (carbonaceous meteorites) accumulated. It is suggested that the initial chemical state of heavy atoms during meteorite and planetary accumulation was distributed between a refractory-mineral component from high-temperature condensation and a volatile component resulting from cold matter adhering to preexisting grains. Thermal conditions in the solar nebula are considered along with the existence of supernova condensates and other thermal condensates in the interstellar dust. Fractionation into volatile and refractory elements is idealized in terms of four distinct interstellar components, and the fractionated precondensed matter is described.

  3. 16 Years of Ulysses Interstellar Dust Measurements in the Solar System: I. Mass Distribution and Gas-to-Dust Mass Ratio

    CERN Document Server

    Krüger, Harald; Gruen, Eberhard; Sterken, Veerle J

    2015-01-01

    In the early 1990s, contemporary interstellar dust (ISD) penetrating deep into the heliosphere was identified with the in-situ dust detector on board the Ulysses spacecraft. Between 1992 and the end of 2007 Ulysses monitored the ISD stream. The interstellar grains act as tracers of the physical conditions in the local interstellar medium surrounding our solar system. Earlier analyses of the Ulysses ISD data measured between 1992 and 1998 implied the existence of 'big' ISD grains [up to 10^-13kg]. The derived gas-to-dust-mass ratio was smaller than the one derived from astronomical observations, implying a concentration of ISD in the very local interstellar medium. We analyse the entire data set from 16 yr of Ulysses ISD measurements in interplanetary space. This paper concentrates on the overall mass distribution of ISD. An accompanying paper investigates time-variable phenomena in the Ulysses ISD data, and in a third paper we present the results from dynamical modelling of the ISD flow applied to Ulysses. We...

  4. Identification of -SiC surrounded by relatable surrounding diamond medium using weak Raman surface phonons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mohan Kumar Kuntumalla; Harish Ojha; Vadali Venkata Satya Siva Srikanth

    2013-11-01

    It is difficult to detect -SiC using micro-Raman scattering, if it is surrounded by carbon medium. Here, -SiC is identified in the presence of a relatable surrounding diamond medium using subtle, but discernible Raman surface phonons. In this study, diamond/-SiC nanocomposite thin film system is considered in which nanosized -SiC crystallites are surrounded by a relatable nanodiamond medium that leads to the appearance of a weak Raman surface phonon band at about 855 cm-1. Change in the nature of the surrounding material structure and its volume content when relatable, will affect the resultant Raman response of -SiC phase as seen in the present case of diamond/-SiC nanocomposite thin films.

  5. Surfatron accelerator in the local interstellar cloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loznikov, V. M., E-mail: vloznikov@yandex.ru; Erokhin, N. S.; Zol’nikova, N. N.; Mikhailovskaya, L. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Space Research Institute (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    Taking into account results of numerous experiments, the variability of the energy spectra of cosmic rays (protons and helium nuclei) in the energy range of 10 GeV to ~10{sup 7} GeV is explained on the basis of a hypothesis of the existence of two variable sources close to the Sun. The first (soft) surfatron source (with a size of ~100 AU) is located at the periphery of the heliosphere. The second (hard) surfatron source (with a size of ~1 pc) is situated in the Local Interstellar Cloud (LIC) at a distance of <1 pc. The constant background is described by a power-law spectrum with a slope of ~2.75. The variable heliospheric surfatron source is described by a power-law spectrum with a variable amplitude, slope, and cutoff energy, the maximum cutoff energy being in the range of E{sub CH}/Z < 1000 GeV. The variable surfatron source in the LIC is described by a power-law spectrum with a variable amplitude, slope, and cut-off energy, the maximum cut-off energy being E{sub Ð}¡{sub L}/Z ≤ 3 × 10{sup 6} GeV. The proposed model is used to approximate data from several experiments performed at close times. The energy of each cosmic-ray component is calculated. The possibility of surfatron acceleration of Fe nuclei (Z = 26) in the LIC up to an energy of E{sub CL} ~ 10{sup 17} eV and electron and positrons to the “knee” in the energy spectrum is predicted. By numerically solving a system of nonlinear equations describing the interaction between an electromagnetic wave and a charged particle with an energy of up to E/Z ~ 3 × 10{sup 6} GeV, the possibility of trapping, confinement, and acceleration of charged cosmic-ray particles by a quasi-longitudinal plasma wave is demonstrated.

  6. The Interstellar Vision: Principles and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilster, P. A.

    The ambitious title of the 100 Year Starship study will resonate with the public, a fact that requires the recipient of the DARPA grant to use communicators who can follow a careful strategy as they bring this vision to the Internet and other outlets. It will be necessary to spur public engagement and sustain the `buzz' that will help the organization develop its ideas. This paper examines these issues in the context of the author's long involvement with Centauri Dreams, a Web site devoted to presenting interstellar flight to a broad, general audience. Central to the presentation of the starship idea is the advocacy of long-term thinking and the value of spin-off research by placing the goal of a starship in the context of other human activities that have transcended the lifetime of individual participants. Teaching cross-generational responsibility will invoke issues of history, economics and philosophy in addition to the technology issues raised by a journey of this magnitude. The best communicators for this role will be generalists who can connect such widely dispersed disciplines. Key to the study is the development of a Web presence that uses the Internet with caution. Certain Internet myths including `the wisdom of crowds' and resistance to top-down editing will compromise the project. The benefits and drawbacks of social networking will be discussed in this context. A strong editorial voice willing to cull public responses to maintain high standards in the resulting discussions is essential. Furthermore, a high standard of reporting demands the presentation of research without associated hype and a level of discourse that educates but does not patronize its audience. Careful citation of relevant research and a willingness to set the bar of discussion high will result in feedback from researchers and the public that, with the help of strenuous moderation, will build a database of thirdparty ideas that will engage interest and add materially to the value of

  7. SOLAR RADIATION PRESSURE AND LOCAL INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM FLOW PARAMETERS FROM INTERSTELLAR BOUNDARY EXPLORER LOW ENERGY HYDROGEN MEASUREMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwadron, N. A.; Moebius, E.; Kucharek, H.; Lee, M. A.; French, J. [University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Saul, L.; Wurz, P. [University of Bern, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Bzowski, M. [Space Research Centre of the Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland); Fuselier, S. A.; Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX 78228 (United States); Frisch, P. [University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Gruntman, M. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States); Mueller, H. R. [Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Neutral hydrogen atoms that travel into the heliosphere from the local interstellar medium (LISM) experience strong effects due to charge exchange and radiation pressure from resonant absorption and re-emission of Lyα. The radiation pressure roughly compensates for the solar gravity. As a result, interstellar hydrogen atoms move along trajectories that are quite different than those of heavier interstellar species such as helium and oxygen, which experience relatively weak radiation pressure. Charge exchange leads to the loss of primary neutrals from the LISM and the addition of new secondary neutrals from the heliosheath. IBEX observations show clear effects of radiation pressure in a large longitudinal shift in the peak of interstellar hydrogen compared with that of interstellar helium. Here, we compare results from the Lee et al. interstellar neutral model with IBEX-Lo hydrogen observations to describe the distribution of hydrogen near 1 AU and provide new estimates of the solar radiation pressure. We find over the period analyzed from 2009 to 2011 that radiation pressure divided by the gravitational force (μ) has increased slightly from μ = 0.94 ± 0.04 in 2009 to μ = 1.01 ± 0.05 in 2011. We have also derived the speed, temperature, source longitude, and latitude of the neutral H atoms and find that these parameters are roughly consistent with those of interstellar He, particularly when considering the filtration effects that act on H in the outer heliosheath. Thus, our analysis shows that over the period from 2009 to 2011, we observe signatures of neutral H consistent with the primary distribution of atoms from the LISM and a radiation pressure that increases in the early rise of solar activity.

  8. The Local Interstellar Magnetic Field Determined from the IBEX Ribbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirnstein, E.; Funsten, H. O.; Heerikhuisen, J.; Livadiotis, G.; McComas, D. J.; Pogorelov, N. V.

    2015-12-01

    As the solar wind plasma flows away from the Sun, it eventually collides with the local interstellar medium, creating the heliosphere. Neutral atoms from interstellar space travel inside the heliosphere and charge-exchange with the solar wind plasma, creating energetic neutral atoms (ENAs). Some of these ENAs travel outside the heliosphere, undergo two charge-exchange events, and travel back inside the heliosphere towards Earth, with the strongest intensity in directions perpendicular to the interstellar magnetic field (IMF). It is widely believed that this process generates the "ribbon" of enhanced ENA intensity observed by the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX), and has been shown to explain many key features of the observations. IBEX observations of the ribbon are composed of a complex, line-of-sight integration of ENAs that come from different distances beyond the heliopause, and thus the ENAs detected by IBEX over a wide range of energies are uniquely coupled to the IMF draped around the heliosphere. We present a detailed analysis of the IBEX ribbon measurements using 3D simulations of the heliosphere and computations of the ribbon flux at Earth based on IBEX capabilities, and derive the magnitude and direction of the IMF required to reproduce the position of the IBEX ribbon in the sky. These results have potentially large implications for our understanding of the solar-interstellar environment.

  9. Infrared absorption and emission characteristics of interstellar PAHs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, J. R.; Allamandola, Louis J.; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Barker, J. R.; Barker, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    The mid-infrared interstellar emission spectrum with features at 3.28, 6.2, 7.7, 8.7 and 11.3 microns is discussed in terms of the Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) hypothesis, which is based on the suggestive, but inconclusive comparison between the interstellar emission spectrum with the infrared absorption and Raman spectra of a few PAHs. The fundamental vibrations of PAHs and PAH-like species which determine the IR and Raman properties are discussed. Interstellar IR band emission is due to relaxation from highly vibrationally excited PAHs excited by ultraviolet photons. The excitation/emission process is described and the IR fluorescence from one PAH, chrysene, is traced. Generally, there is sufficient energy to populate several vibrational levels in each mode. Molecular vibrational potentials are anharmonic and emission from these higher levels will fall at lower frequencies and produce weak features to the red of the stronger fundamentals. This process is also described and can account for some spectroscopic details of the interstellar emission spectra previously unexplained. Analysis of the interstellar spectrum shows that PAHs contain between 20 and 30 carbon atoms are responsible for the emission.

  10. Detection of diffuse interstellar bands in M31

    CERN Document Server

    Cordiner, M A; Trundle, C; Evans, C J; Hunter, I; Przybilla, N; Bresolin, F; Salama, F

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the diffuse interstellar band (DIB) spectrum in the interstellar medium of M31. The DEIMOS spectrograph of the W. M. Keck observatory was used to make optical spectroscopic observations of two supergiant stars, MAG 63885 and MAG 70817, in the vicinity of the OB78 association in M31 where the metallicity is approximately equal to solar. The 5780, 5797, 6203, 6283 and 6613 DIBs are detected in both sightlines at velocities matching the M31 interstellar Na I absorption. The spectra are classified and interstellar reddenings are derived for both stars. Diffuse interstellar band (DIB) equivalent widths and radial velocities are presented. The spectrum of DIBs observed in M31 towards MAG 63885 is found to be similar to that observed in the Milky Way. Towards MAG 70817 the DIB equivalent widths per unit reddening are about three times the Galactic average. Compared to observations elsewhere in the Universe, relative to reddening the M31 ISM in the vicinity of OB78 is apparently a highly favourable env...

  11. Potential formation of three pyrimidine bases in interstellar regions

    CERN Document Server

    Majumdar, Liton; Das, Ankan; Chakrabarti, Sandip K

    2015-01-01

    Work on the chemical evolution of pre-biotic molecules remains incomplete since the major obstacle is the lack of adequate knowledge of rate coefficients of various reactions which take place in interstellar conditions. In this work, we study the possibility of forming three pyrimidine bases, namely, cytosine, uracil and thymine in interstellar regions. Our study reveals that the synthesis of uracil from cytosine and water is quite impossible under interstellar circumstances. For the synthesis of thymine, reaction between uracil and :CH2 is investigated. Since no other relevant pathways for the formation of uracil and thymine were available in the literature, we consider a large gas-grain chemical network to study the chemical evolution of cytosine in gas and ice phases. Our modeling result shows that cytosine would be produced in cold, dense interstellar conditions. However, presence of cytosine is yet to be established. We propose that a new molecule, namely, C4N3OH5 could be observable in the interstellar ...

  12. Solid Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Angelo, Joseph A

    2011-01-01

    Supported by a generous quantity of full-color illustrations and interesting sidebars, Solid Matter introduces the basic characteristics and properties of solid matter. It briefly describes the cosmic connection of the elements, leading readers through several key events in human pre-history that resulted in more advanced uses of matter in the solid state. Chapters include:. -Solid Matter: An Initial Perspective. -Physical Behavior of Matter. -The Gravity of Matter. -Fundamentals of Materials Science. -Rocks and Minerals. -Metals. -Building Materials. -Carbon Earth's Most Versatile Element. -S

  13. Explaining preferences for home surroundings and locations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Hans Skifter

    2011-01-01

    : avoiding social nuisances, preferring social homogeneity and living close to one’s social network and place of origin. The study shows that most people have many detailed preferences, whereas some have very few. This confirms an earlier theory that some people are very connected to certain places...... with given characteristics and thus do not have priorities regarding home surroundings and locations. For others, mostly young people and singles, home is just a place to sleep and relax, whereas life is lived elsewhere. For this group, there are only preferences for location and there are few specific...

  14. Interstellar hydroxyl near Sagittarius B2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venger, A.; Gosachinskii, I.; Grachev, V.; Egorova, T.; Prozorov, V.; Ryzhkov, N.; Khersonskii, V.; Yudaeva, N.

    1981-05-01

    The 1665-, 1667-MHz OH absorption lines near the radio source Sgr B2 have been observed with the RATAN-600 radio telescope at 2'.2 x 47' x 5.4 km/sec resolution. Physical parameters are determined for the five OH clouds observed in this direction at positive radial velocities. Evidently only one of these clouds can have any connection with the Sgr B2 source; it is located at the edge of the gas envelope surrounding that source.

  15. 黄土高原及周边地区土壤有机质对现代土壤磁化率的影响%Impact of soil organic matter on modern soil magnetic susceptibility in Loess Plateau and its surrounding areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张博; 刘卫国

    2016-01-01

    Background, aim, and scope Magnetic susceptibility of soils can provide paleoclimatic information. In Chinese Loess Plateau, susceptibility enhancement is usually considered as a proxy of monsoon intensity. Several hypotheses were used to explain variations of this proxy. Here, we present a study on how soil magnetic susceptibility is related with soil organic matters. We analyzed magnetic susceptibility, organic carbon content, organic carbon isotopic composition, and C/N ratio of modern soils from Chinese Loess Plateau, in order to obtain the relationship between soil magnetic susceptibility and other parameters, as well as how soil organic matters affect soil magnetic susceptibility. Materials and methods Fifty modern soil samples were collected from the Loess Platform, forest areas at the Huangling and Huanglong Mount, and loess-desert area near the Tengger Desert. These soil samples represent modern soil types in the Loess Plateau. Samples were collected 2—3 cm below the surface. The sampling sites are at least 40 km away from any industrialized centers that could generate artificial, air-borne magnetic material. In this way, we minimized the effect of human and livestock activity. We tested magnetic susceptibility (χlf), organic carbon isotopic composition (δ13C), and organic carbon and nitrogen contents of these samples. Results The magnetic susceptibility varied from 26.6×10−8 m3∙kg−1 to 61.4×10−8 m3∙kg−1 for soils from the loess platform, and from 68.6×10−8 m3∙kg−1 to 107.5×10−8 m3∙kg−1 for soils from forest areas. The value of soil from forest areas is apparently higher than that from the loess platform. The magnetic susceptibility of soil samples from loess-desert area varied from 8.5×10−8 m3∙kg−1 to 44.4×10−8 m3∙kg−1.δ13C values of soil samples from the loess platform varied from−22‰to−24.4‰.δ13C values of soil samples from loess-desert area varied from−20.66‰to−24.69‰, whose range is

  16. Observations of interstellar helium with a gas absorption cell - Limits on the bulk velocity of the interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, J.; Paresce, F.; Bowyer, S.; Lampton, M.

    1976-01-01

    Results are reported for observations of solar 584-A flux resonantly scattered by the 1s(2)-1s2p transition of neutral interstellar helium. A photometer equipped with a helium gas-absorption cell and flown aboard a sounding rocket to a peak altitude of 185 km was employed to observe the sky in Perseus. The data reduction procedure is described, including subtraction of the terrestrial atmospheric background, calculation of the solar flux, and reduction of the number density of scatters to a function of phase-space parameters of the local interstellar medium. The ratio of 584-A fluxes observed with the gas cell full and empty is computed and compared with numerical models of the interstellar-helium flow through the solar system. The results show that the bulk speed of the distant interstellar medium with respect to the sun is unlikely to be less than 10 to 15 km/s, at the 2-sigma level. Since this value is inconsistent with results obtained from Lyman-alpha observations, it is suggested that either the total ionization rate for helium is variable or present models of the behavior of the local interstellar medium need further refinement.

  17. Interstellar Refractive Scintillation and Intraday Polarization Angle Swings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shan-Jie Qian; Xi-Zhen Zhang; A. Kraus

    2005-01-01

    Intraday polarization angle swings of ~180° observed in two sources (QSO 0917+624 and QSO 1150+812) are discussed in the framework of refractive interstellar scintillation by a continuous interstellar medium. Model-fits to the I-,Q- and U- light curves were made for both sources. It is shown that for the case of 0917+624 both the intraday intensity variations and the polarization angle swing of ~180° could be explained consistently in terms of a four-component model, which comprises one steady and two scintillating polarized components and one further non-polarized scintillating component. The polarization angle swing of ~180° observed in 1150+812, which occurred when the polarized flux density was almost constant, could not be explained in terms of refractive scintillation by a continuous medium and might be due to other mechanisms (e.g., scintillation by interstellar clouds).

  18. Mapping the interstellar medium in galaxies with Herschel/SPIRE

    CERN Document Server

    Eales, S A; Wilson, C D; Bendo, G J; Cortese, L; Pohlen, M; Boselli, A; Gomez, H L; Auld, R; Baes, M; Barlow, M J; Bock, J J; Bradford, M; Buat, V; Castro-Rodriguez, N; Chanial, P; Charlot, S; Ciesla, L; Clements, D L; Cooray, A; Cormier, D; Davies, J I; Dwek, E; Elbaz, D; Galametz, M; Galliano, F; Gear, W K; Glenn, J; Griffin, M; Hony, S; Isaak, K G; Levenson, L R; Lu, N; Madden, S; O'Halloran, B; Okumura, K; Oliver, S; Page, M J; Panuzzo, P; Papageorgiou, A; Parkin, T J; Perez-Fournon, I; Rangwala, N; Rigby, E E; Roussel, H; Rykala, A; Sacchi, N; Sauvage, M; Schulz, B; Schirm, M R P; Spinoglio, L; Srinivasan, S; Stevens, J A; Symeonidis, M; Trichas, M; Vaccari, M; Vigroux, L; Wozniak, H; Wright, G S; Zeilinger, W W

    2010-01-01

    The standard method of mapping the interstellar medium in a galaxy, by observing the molecular gas in the CO 1-0 line and the atomic gas in the 21-cm line, is largely limited with current telescopes to galaxies in the nearby universe. In this letter, we use SPIRE observations of the galaxies M99 and M100 to explore the alternative approach of mapping the interstellar medium using the continuum emission from the dust. We have compared the methods by measuring the relationship between the star-formation rate and the surface density of gas in the galaxies. We find the two methods give relationships with a similar dispersion, confirming that observing the continuum emission from the dust is a promising method of mapping the interstellar medium in galaxies.

  19. A new model of composite interstellar dust grains

    CERN Document Server

    Voshchinnikov, N V; Henning, T; Dubkova, D N; Henning, Th.

    2003-01-01

    The approach to model composite interstellar dust grains, using the exact solution to the light scattering problem for multi-layered spheres as suggested by Voshchinnikov & Mathis (1999), is further developed. Heterogeneous scatteres are represented by particles with very large number of shells, each including a homogeneous layer per material considered (amorphous carbon, astronomical silicate and vacuum). The applicability of the effective medium theory (EMT) mostly utilized earlier to approximate inhomogeneous interstellar grains is examined on the basis of the new model. It is shown that the EMT rules generally have an accuracy of several percent in the whole range of particle sizes provided the porosity does not exceed about 50%. For larger porosity, the EMT rules give wrong results. Using the model, we reanalyze various basic features of cosmic dust -- interstellar extinction, scattered radiation, infrared radiation, radiation pressure, etc. As an example of the potential of the model, it is applied ...

  20. Photochemistry and astrochemistry: photochemical pathways to interstellar complex organic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Oberg, Karin I

    2016-01-01

    The interstellar medium is characterized by a rich and diverse chemistry. Many of its complex organic molecules are proposed to form through radical chemistry in icy grain mantles. Radicals form readily when interstellar ices (composed of water and other volatiles) are exposed to UV photons and other sources of dissociative radiation, and, if sufficiently mobile, the radicals can react to form larger, more complex molecules. The resulting complex organic molecules (COMs) accompany star and planet formation, and may eventually seed the origins of life on nascent planets. Experiments of increasing sophistication have demonstrated that known interstellar COMs as well as the prebiotically interesting amino acids can form through ice photochemistry. We review these experiments and discuss the qualitative and quantitative kinetic and mechanistic constraints they have provided. We finally compare the effects of UV radiation with those of three other potential sources of radical production and chemistry in interstell...

  1. The feedback of massive stars on interstellar astrochemical processes

    CERN Document Server

    De Becker, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Astrochemistry is a discipline that studies physico-chemical processes in astrophysical environments. Such environments are characterized by conditions that are substantially different from those existing in usual chemical laboratories. Models which aim to explain the formation of molecular species in interstellar environments must take into account various factors, including many that are directly, or indirectly related to the populations of massive stars in galaxies. The aim of this paper is to review the influence of massive stars, whatever their evolution stage, on the physico-chemical processes at work in interstellar environments. These influences include the ultraviolet radiation field, the production of high energy particles, the synthesis of radionuclides and the formation of shocks that permeate the interstellar medium.

  2. Reaction Networks For Interstellar Chemical Modelling: Improvements and Challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Wakelam, V; Herbst, E; Troe, J; Geppert, W; Linnartz, H; Oberg, K; Roueff, E; Agundez, M; Pernot, P; Cuppen, H M; Loison, J C; Talbi, D

    2010-01-01

    We survey the current situation regarding chemical modelling of the synthesis of molecules in the interstellar medium. The present state of knowledge concerning the rate coefficients and their uncertainties for the major gas-phase processes -- ion-neutral reactions, neutral-neutral reactions, radiative association, and dissociative recombination -- is reviewed. Emphasis is placed on those reactions that have been identified, by sensitivity analyses, as 'crucial' in determining the predicted abundances of the species observed in the interstellar medium. These sensitivity analyses have been carried out for gas-phase models of three representative, molecule-rich, astronomical sources: the cold dense molecular clouds TMC-1 and L134N, and the expanding circumstellar envelope IRC +10216. Our review has led to the proposal of new values and uncertainties for the rate coefficients of many of the key reactions. The impact of these new data on the predicted abundances in TMC-1 and L134N is reported. Interstellar dust p...

  3. Experimental evidence of water formation on interstellar dust grains

    CERN Document Server

    Dulieu, F; Fillion, J-H; Matar, E; Momeni, A; Pirronello, V; Lemaire, J L

    2009-01-01

    The synthesis of water is one necessary step in the origin and development of life. It is believed that pristine water is formed and grows on the surface of icy dust grains in dark interstellar clouds. Until now, there has been no experimental evidence whether this scenario is feasible or not. We present here the first experimental evidence of water synthesis under interstellar conditions. After D and O deposition on a water ice substrate (HO) held at 10 K, we observe production of HDO and DO. The water substrate itself has an active role in water formation, which appears to be more complicated than previously thought. Amorphous water ice layers are the matrices where complex organic prebiotic species may be synthesized. This experiment opens up the field of a little explored complex chemistry that could occur on interstellar dust grains, believed to be the site of key processes leading to the molecular diversity and complexity observed in our universe.

  4. Laboratory production of complex organics in simulated interstellar ices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dworkin, J.; Bernstein, M.; Ashbourn, S.; Iraci, L.; Cooper, G.; Sandford, S.; Allamandola, L.

    1 see www.astrochem.org for more information. Bernstein, M., Dworkin, J., Sandford, S., &Allamandola, L. (2001). Ultraviolet Ir- radiation of Naphthalene in H2O Ice: Implications for Meteorites and Biogenesis. Meteoritics and Planetary Science36, 351-358. Bernstein, M., Dworkin, J., Sandford, S., Cooper, G. &Allamandola, L. (2002) The Formation of Racemic Amino Acids byUltraviolet Photolysis of Interstellar Ice Analogs. Nature, 416, 401U403 Dworkin, J., Deamer, D., Sandford, S., &Allamandola, L. (2001). Self-Assembling Amphiphilic Molecules: Synthesis in Simulated Interstellar/Precometary Ices. Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA 98, 815-819. Krishnamurthy, R., Epstein, S., Cronin, J., Pizzarello, S. &Yuen, G. (1992) Isotopic and molecular analyses of hydrocarbons and monocarboxylic acids of the Murchison meteorite. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 56, 4045-4058. Sandford, S. A., Bernstein, M. P., &Dworkin, J. P. (2001). Assessment of the interstellar processes leading to deuterium enrichment in meteoritic organics. Meteoritics and Planetary Sci- ence36, 1117-1133.

  5. IS VOYAGER 1 INSIDE AN INTERSTELLAR FLUX TRANSFER EVENT?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwadron, N. A. [University of New Hampshire, 105 Main Street, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); McComas, D. J., E-mail: n.schwadron@unh.edu [Southwest Research Institute, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, TX 78238-5166 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Plasma wave observations from Voyager 1 have recently shown large increases in plasma density, to about 0.1 cm{sup –3}, consistent with the density of the local interstellar medium. However, corresponding magnetic field observations continue to show the spiral magnetic field direction observed throughout the inner heliosheath. These apparently contradictory observations may be reconciled if Voyager 1 is inside an interstellar flux transfer event—similar to flux transfer events routinely seen at the Earth's magnetopause. If this were the case, Voyager 1 remains inside the heliopause and based on the Voyager 1 observations we can determine the polarity of the interstellar magnetic field for the first time.

  6. Dehydrogenation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the diffuse interstellar medium

    CERN Document Server

    Foing, B H

    2000-01-01

    We present a model for the hydrogenation states of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the diffuse interstellar medium. First, we study the abundance of hydrogenation and charge states of PAHs due to photo-ionization, photo-dissociation in the interstellar UV field, electron recombination and chemical reactions between PAH cations and H or H_2. For PAH cations, we find that the dehydrogenation effects are dominant. The hydrogenation state of PAHs depends strongly on the H density, the size of the molecule and UV field. In diffuse clouds with low H density and normal UV radiation, PAHs containing less than 40 C are completely or strongly dehydrogenated whereas at high H density, they are normally hydrogenated. The partially dehydrogenated species dominate in intermediate density clouds. PAHs above 40 C are quite stable and are fully hydrogenated, which would favor their spectroscopic search in near IR surveys of Diffuse Interstellar Bands (DIBs).

  7. The Relation between Interstellar Turbulence and Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Klessen, R S

    2004-01-01

    (ABBREVIATED) Understanding the formation of stars in galaxies is central to much of modern astrophysics. In this review the relation between interstellar turbulence and star formation is discussed. Supersonic turbulence can provide support against gravitational collapse on global scales, while at the same time it produces localized density enhancements that allow for collapse on small scales. The efficiency and timescale of stellar birth in Galactic gas clouds strongly depend on the properties of the interstellar turbulent velocity field, with slow, inefficient, isolated star formation being a hallmark of turbulent support, and fast, efficient, clustered star formation occurring in its absence. Star formation on scales of galaxies as a whole is expected to be controlled by the balance between gravity andturbulence, just like star formation on scales of individual interstellar gas clouds, but may be modulated by additional effects like cooling and differential rotation. The dominant mechanism for driving inte...

  8. Radiative torques on interstellar grains; 1, superthermal spinup

    CERN Document Server

    Draine, B T; Weingartner, Joseph C

    1996-01-01

    Irregular dust grains are subject to radiative torques when irradiated by interstellar starlight. It is shown how these radiative torques may be calculated using the discrete dipole approximation. Calculations are carried out for one irregular grain geometry, and three different grain sizes. It is shown that radiative torques can play an important dynamical role in spinup of interstellar dust grains, resulting in rotation rates which may exceed even those expected from H_2 formation on the grain surface. Because the radiative torque on an interstellar grain is determined by the overall grain geometry rather than merely the state of the grain surface, the resulting superthermal rotation is expected to be long-lived. By itself, long-lived superthermal rotation would permit grain alignment by normal paramagnetic dissipation on the "Davis-Greenstein" timescale. However, radiative torques arising from anisotropy of the starlight background can act directly to alter the grain alignment on much shorter timescales, a...

  9. Speech Matters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasse Jørgensen, Stina

    2011-01-01

    About Speech Matters - Katarina Gregos, the Greek curator's exhibition at the Danish Pavillion, the Venice Biannual 2011.......About Speech Matters - Katarina Gregos, the Greek curator's exhibition at the Danish Pavillion, the Venice Biannual 2011....

  10. Memory Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Emergency Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Memory Matters KidsHealth > For Kids > Memory Matters A A ... of your complex and multitalented brain. What Is Memory? When an event happens, when you learn something, ...

  11. Structure analysis of interstellar clouds: II. Applying the Delta-variance method to interstellar turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Ossenkopf, V; Stutzki, J

    2008-01-01

    The Delta-variance analysis is an efficient tool for measuring the structural scaling behaviour of interstellar turbulence in astronomical maps. In paper I we proposed essential improvements to the Delta-variance analysis. In this paper we apply the improved Delta-variance analysis to i) a hydrodynamic turbulence simulation with prominent density and velocity structures, ii) an observed intensity map of rho Oph with irregular boundaries and variable uncertainties of the different data points, and iii) a map of the turbulent velocity structure in the Polaris Flare affected by the intensity dependence on the centroid velocity determination. The tests confirm the extended capabilities of the improved Delta-variance analysis. Prominent spatial scales were accurately identified and artifacts from a variable reliability of the data were removed. The analysis of the hydrodynamic simulations showed that the injection of a turbulent velocity structure creates the most prominent density structures are produced on a sca...

  12. Hydrostatic equilibrium of interstellar gas and magnetic fields in the 6 kpc region of the galaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuchs, B.; Spreckels, H.; Thielheim, K.O.

    1980-01-01

    A two-component gas model is applied to the vertical hydrogen distribution in the 6 kpc region of the Galaxy. Galactic gravitational field and interstellar magnetic field determination of the dynamics of interstellar gas is reviewed.

  13. Interstellar Propulsion Research: Realistic Possibilities and Idealistic Dreams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Les

    2009-01-01

    Though physically possible, interstellar travel will be exceedingly difficult. Both the known laws of physics and the limits of our current understanding of engineering place extreme limits on what may actually be possible. Our remote ancestors looked at the night sky and assumed those tiny points of light were campfires around which other tribes were gathered -- and they dreamed of someday making the trip to visit them. In our modern era, we've grown accustomed to humans regularly traveling into space and our robots voyaging ever-deeper into the outer edges of our solar system. Traveling to those distant campfires (stars) has been made to look easy by the likes of Captains Kirk and Picard as well as Han Solo and Commander Adama. Our understanding of physics and engineering has not kept up with our imaginations and many are becoming frustrated with the current pace at which we are exploring the universe. Fortunately, there are ideas that may one day lead to new physical theories about how the universe works and thus potentially make rapid interstellar travel possible -- but many of these are just ideas and are not even close to being considered a scientific theory or hypothesis. Absent any scientific breakthroughs, we should not give up hope. Nature does allow for interstellar travel, albeit slowly and requiring an engineering capability far beyond what we now possess. Antimatter, fusion and photon sail propulsion are all candidates for relatively near-term interstellar missions. The plenary lecture will discuss the dreams and challenges of interstellar travel, our current understanding of what may be possible and some of the "out of the box" ideas that may allow us to become an interstellar species someday in the future.

  14. The existence and nature of the interstellar bow shock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Jaffel, Lotfi [UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR7095, Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, F-75014, Paris (France); Strumik, M.; Ratkiewicz, R.; Grygorczuk, J., E-mail: bjaffel@iap.fr [Space Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, Bartycka 18A, 00-716 Warsaw (Poland)

    2013-12-20

    We report a new diagnosis of two different states of the local interstellar medium (LISM) near our solar system by using a sensitivity study constrained by several distinct and complementary observations of the LISM, solar wind, and inner heliosphere. Assuming the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) He flow parameters for the LISM, we obtain a strength of ∼2.7 ± 0.2 μG and a direction pointing away from galactic coordinates (28, 52) ± 3° for the interstellar magnetic field as a result of fitting Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 in situ plasma measurements and IBEX energetic neutral atoms ribbon. When using Ulysses parameters for the LISM He flow, we recently reported the same direction but with a strength of 2.2 ± 0.1 μG. First, we notice that with Ulysses He flow, our solution is in the expected hydrogen deflection plane (HDP). In contrast, for the IBEX He flow, the solution is ∼20° away from the corresponding HDP plane. Second, the long-term monitoring of the interplanetary H I flow speed shows a value of ∼26 km s{sup –1} measured upwind from the Doppler shift in the strong Lyα sky background emission line. All elements of the diagnosis seem therefore to support Ulysses He flow parameters for the interstellar state. In that frame, we argue that reliable discrimination between superfast, subfast, or superslow states of the interstellar flow should be based on most existing in situ and remote observations used together with global modeling of the heliosphere. For commonly accepted LISM ionization rates, we show that a fast interstellar bow shock should be standing off upstream of the heliopause.

  15. Ultraviolet spectroscopy of the hot interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indebetouw, Remy

    I study the hot phase of the interstellar medium (ISM) in our Galaxy. The lithium-like ions of common metals are a powerful tracer of gas between the hot (106 K) and cooler (104 K) phases of the ISM, and are particularly sensitive to dynamical processes because gas at several 105 K cools very rapidly. These ions are usually produced in nonequilibrium processes such as shocks, evaporative interfaces, or rapidly cooling gas. There are two different approaches to studying the hot ISM via Li-like ions---analysis of the microphysics in a well-defined location in the Galaxy, and observation of a large part of the Galaxy searching for global trends. This thesis describes two experiments which follow these two approaches. Chapter 2 describes a sounding rocket experiment which could perform simultaneous ultra-high spectroscopy of C IV, N V, and O VI. In particular, it was to study the interface between the local bubble, a diffuse region of the Galaxy in which the Sun is located, and denser neighboring gas. I redesigned, integrated, and directed the flight of the payload, which in addition to its scientific goals was the first space demonstration of a low-order echelle spectrograph. Chapter 3 describes a survey of N V, O VI, and C IV in the Galactic halo using data from the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer and the Hubble Space Telescope. Searching for global trends, I found a general trend of higher ionization (lower N V/O VI column density ratio) at larger positive line-of-sight velocities. I modeled the various physical situations in which Li-like ions are produced, and found that the observed trend is qualitatively consistent with a cooling Galactic fountain flow which rises, cools, and recombines as it returns to the disk. The observed trend is also consistent with shocks moving towards the observer, and with observing through a conductive interface, looking from the hot gas into cooler gas. The latter geometry is consistent with the solar system being inside a hot

  16. The Interstellar Ethics of Self-Replicating Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, K.

    Robotic spacecraft have been our primary means of exploring the Universe for over 50 years. Should interstellar travel become reality it seems unlikely that humankind will stop using robotic probes. These probes will be able to replicate themselves ad infinitum by extracting raw materials from the space resources around them and reconfiguring them into replicas of themselves, using technology such as 3D printing. This will create a colonising wave of probes across the Galaxy. However, such probes could have negative as well as positive consequences and it is incumbent upon us to factor self-replicating probes into our interstellar philosophies and to take responsibility for their actions.

  17. Efficient simulations of gas-grain chemistry in interstellar clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Lipshtat, A; Lipshtat, Azi; Biham, Ofer

    2004-01-01

    Chemical reactions on dust grains are of crucial importance in interstellar chemistry because they produce molecular hydrogen and various organic molecules. Due to the submicron size of the grains and the low flux, the surface populations of reactive species are small and strongly fluctuate. Under these conditions rate equations fail and the master equation is needed for modeling these reactions. However, the number of equations in the master equation grows exponentially with the number of reactive species, severely limiting its feasibility. Here we present a method which dramatically reduces the number of equations, thus enabling the incorporation of the master equation in models of interstellar chemistry.

  18. Interstellar Scintillation and Scattering of Micro-arc-second AGN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. Jauncey

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of the first quasar 3C 273 led directly to the discovery of their variability at optical and radio wavelengths. We review the radio variability observations, in particular the variability found at frequencies below 1 GHz, as well as those exhibiting intra-day variability (IDV at cm wavelengths. Observations have shown that IDV arises principally from scintillation caused by scattering in the ionized interstellar medium of our Galaxy. The sensitivity of interstellar scintillation towards source angular sizes has provided a powerful tool for studying the most compact components of radio-loud AGN at microarcsecond and milliarcsecond scale resolution.

  19. Observations of several new transitions of interstellar HCO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, L. E.; Schenewerk, M. S.; Hollis, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    Four new transitions of the interstellar formyl radical, HCO have been detected. Five transitions are now known for interstellar HCO, and thus its identification is secure. The column density found by assuming NGC 2024 is an extended source is N subT(HCO) = (8.5 + or - 4.0) x 10 to the 12th/sq cm. This gives a fractional abundance (abundance relative to hydrogen) for NGC 2024 which agrees quite well with some theoretical predictions. Several unidentified lines were detected and are reported here. Tentative identification for some of the unidentified lines are suggested.

  20. UV IRRADIATION OF AROMATIC NITROGEN HETEROCYCLES IN INTERSTELLAR ICE ANALOGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsila, J. E.; Bernstein, M. P.; Sanford, S. A.

    2005-01-01

    Here, we present information on the properties of the ANH quinoline frozen in interstellar water-ice analogs. Quinoline is a two-ring compound structurally analogous to the PAH naphthalene. In this work, binary mixtures of water and quinoline were frozen to create interstellar ice analogs, which were then subjected to ultraviolet photolysis. We will present the infrared spectra of the resulting ices at various temperatures, as well as chromatographic analysis of the residues remaining upon warm-up of these ices to room temperature.

  1. Protonated acetylene - An important circumstellar and interstellar ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassgold, A. E.; Omont, A.; Guelin, M.

    1992-01-01

    In a circumstellar envelope, a substantial amount of acetylene is transported in a wind to the outer envelope, where it can be photoionized by interstellar radiation and then converted into C2H3(+) by a low-temperature reaction with H2. New chemical modeling calculations indicate that sufficient C2H3(+) may be produced in the outer envelope of IRC + 10216 to be observable. Similar considerations suggest that C2H3(+) should also be detectable in interstellar clouds, provided its rotational spectrum has been measured accurately in the laboratory.

  2. The interstellar carbon abundance. II - Rho Ophiuchi and Beta Scorpii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welty, D. E.; York, D. G.; Hobbs, L. M.

    1986-01-01

    A procedure designed to obtain increased sensitivity from high-dispersion IUE spectra by using a flat-field spectrum to remove nonrandom noise due to the response pattern of the SEC vidicon detector is described. Application of this procedure to spectra of Rho Oph and Beta(1) Sco near the spin-forbidden interstellar 2325 line of C II yields 2 sigma upper limits on absorption of W (lambda) not greater than about 4 mA. The resulting depletion of carbon from the interstellar gas toward Rho Oph exceeds a factor of 1.4.

  3. A Tale of Two Mysteries in Interstellar Astrophysics: The 2175 Angstrom Extinction Bump and Diffuse Interstellar Bands

    CERN Document Server

    Xiang, F Y; Zhong, J X

    2012-01-01

    The diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) are ubiquitous absorption spectral features arising from the tenuous material in the space between stars -- the interstellar medium (ISM). Since their first detection nearly nine decades ago, over 400 DIBs have been observed in the visible and near-infrared wavelength range in both the Milky Way and external galaxies, both nearby and distant. However, the identity of the species responsible for these bands remains as one of the most enigmatic mysteries in astrophysics. An equally mysterious interstellar spectral signature is the 2175 Angstrom extinction bump, the strongest absorption feature observed in the ISM. Its carrier also remains unclear since its first detection 46 years ago. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules have long been proposed as a candidate for DIBs as their electronic transitions occur in the wavelength range where DIBs are often found. In recent years, the 2175 Angstrom extinction bump is also often attributed to the \\pi--\\pi* transition in ...

  4. Characterizing the Microenvironment Surrounding Phosphorylated Protein Sites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi-Cai Fan; Xue-Gong Zhang

    2005-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation plays an important role in various cellular processes. Due to its high complexity, the mechanism needs to be further studied. In the last few years, many methods have been contributed to this field, but almost all of them investigated the mechanism based on protein sequences around protein sites. In this study, we implement an exploration by characterizing the microenvironment surrounding phosphorylated protein sites with a modified shell model, and obtain some significant properties by the rank-sum test, such as the lack of some classes of residues, atoms, and secondary structures. Furthermore, we find that the depletion of some properties affects protein phosphorylation remarkably. Our results suggest that it is a meaningful direction to explore the mechanism of protein phosphorylation from microenvironment and we expect further findings along with the increasing size of phosphorylation and protein structure data.

  5. Opportunity's Surroundings After Sol 1820 Drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity used its navigation camera to take the images combined into this full-circle view of the rover's surroundings during the 1,820th to 1,822nd Martian days, or sols, of Opportunity's surface mission (March 7 to 9, 2009). South is at the center; north at both ends. The rover had driven 20.6 meters toward the northwest on Sol 1820 before beginning to take the frames in this view. Tracks from that drive recede southwestward. For scale, the distance between the parallel wheel tracks is about 1 meter (about 40 inches). The terrain in this portion of Mars' Meridiani Planum region includes dark-toned sand ripples and small exposures of lighter-toned bedrock. This view is presented as a cylindrical projection with geometric seam correction.

  6. Exploiting Surrounding Text for Retrieving Web Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Noah

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Web documents contain useful textual information that can be exploited for describing images. Research had been focused on representing images by means of its content (low level description such as color, shape and texture, little research had been directed to exploiting such textual information. The aim of this research was to systematically exploit the textual content of HTML documents for automatically indexing and ranking of images embedded in web documents. A heuristic approach for locating and assigning weight surrounding web images and a modified tf.idf weighting scheme was proposed. Precision-recall measures of evaluation had been conducted for ten queries and promising results had been achieved. The proposed approach showed slightly better precision measure as compared to a popular search engine with an average of 0.63 and 0.55 relative precision measures respectively.

  7. Energetic neutral helium atoms as a tool to study the heliosphere and the local interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaczyna, Pawel; Grzedzielski, Stan; Bzowski, Maciej

    2015-04-01

    The aim of our study is to determine the utility of helium energetic neutral atoms (ENA) in the studies of the outer heliosphere, its boundary region, and the nearby interstellar medium, and to assess the requirements for future instruments to enable them to observe He ENA fluxes. Presently, studying these regions is rendered possible mostly by combining the in-situ measurements by the plasma and cosmic-ray instruments on Voyagers and the remote-sensing observations of H ENA from IBEX. Helium as the second most abundant species in the universe could potentially enable further extension of our knowledge about nearest surroundings of the Sun. We assessed the expected emission of the heliospheric He ENA and of He ENA from the nearby interstellar medium. To estimate the heliospheric emission of He ENA we used a simple model of the heliosphere and performed numerical simulations to determine the distribution of various populations of helium ions in the inner heliosphere. Based on this model, we calculated fluxes of He ENA created by charge exchange between helium ions and neutral atoms over a wide energy range from 0.5 keV/nuc up to 1 MeV/nuc. We included binary interactions between various combinations of hydrogen and helium ions and atoms. We also included the signal from the vicinity of the heliosphere produced via the secondary ENA mechanism, which is most likely the source for the observed IBEX Ribbon. The mean free path against ionization of He ENA in the local interstellar medium reaches about 8000 AU for atoms with an energy of a few keV. This is about 10 times more than the mean free path against ionization for hydrogen atoms at the same energy. Thus emission of helium ENA from hypothetic extraheliospheric sources could be detectable from larger distances than the hydrogen atoms. This could provide a novel method of sounding the sources of suprathermal ions that might operate in the surrounding of the heliosphere. The He ENA produced by charge-exchange could

  8. A New View on Interstellar Dust - High Fidelity Studies of Interstellar Dust Analogue Tracks in Stardust Flight Spare Aerogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolensky, Michael E.; Postberg F.; Allen, C.; Bajt, S.; Bechtel, H. A.; Borg, J.; Brenker, F.; Bridges, J.; Brownlee, D. E.; Bugiel, S.; Burchell, M.; Burghammer, M.; Butterworth, A. L.; Cloetens, P.; Davis, A. M.; Floss, C.; Flynn, G. J.; Frank, D.; Gainsforth, Z.

    2011-01-01

    In 2000 and 2002 the Stardust Mission exposed aerogel collector panels for a total of about 200 days to the stream of interstellar grains sweeping through the solar system. The material was brought back to Earth in 2006. The goal of this work is the laboratory calibration of the collection process by shooting high speed [5 - 30km/s] interstellar dust (ISD) analogues onto Stardust aerogel flight spares. This enables an investigation into both the morphology of impact tracks as well as any structural and chemical modification of projectile and collector material. First results indicate a different ISD flux than previously assumed for the Stardust collection period.

  9. Systematic Theoretical Study on the Interstellar Carbon Chain Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etim, Emmanuel E.; Gorai, Prasanta; Das, Ankan; Chakrabarti, Sandip K.; Arunan, Elangannan

    2016-12-01

    In an effort to further our interest in understanding the basic chemistry of interstellar molecules, here we carry out an extensive investigation of the stabilities of interstellar carbon chains; C n , H2C n , HC n N and C n X (X = N, O, Si, S, H, P, H-, N-). These sets of molecules account for about 20% of all the known interstellar and circumstellar molecules. Their high abundances, therefore, demand serious attention. High-level ab initio quantum chemical calculations are employed to accurately estimate the enthalpy of formation, chemical reactivity indices, global hardness and softness, and other chemical parameters of these molecules. Chemical modeling of the abundances of these molecular species has also been performed. Of the 89 molecules considered from these groups, 47 have been astronomically observed, and these observed molecules are found to be more stable with respect to other members of the group. Of the 47 observed molecules, 60% are odd-numbered carbon chains. Interstellar chemistry is not actually driven by thermodynamics, but it is primarily dependent on various kinetic parameters. However, we found that the detectability of the odd-numbered carbon chains could be correlated due to the fact that they are more stable than the corresponding even-numbered carbon chains. Based on this aspect, the next possible carbon chain molecule for astronomical observation in each group is proposed. The effect of kinetics in the formation of some of these carbon chain molecules is also discussed.

  10. The interstellar medium towards the Ara OB1 region

    CERN Document Server

    Henderson, Christopher D; Hearnshaw, John B

    2008-01-01

    We present high resolution (R ~ 4 km/s) absorption measurements of the interstellar NaI and CaII lines measured towards 14 early-type stars of distance 123 pc - 1650 pc, located in the direction of the Ara OB1 stellar cluster. The line profiles can broadly be split into four distinct groupings of absorption component velocity, and we have attempted to identify an origin and distance to each of these interstellar features. For gas with absorption covering the velocity range -10 km/s < V_helio < +10 km/s, we can identify the absorbing medium with local gas belonging to the Lupus-Norma interstellar cavity located between 100 and 485 pc in this galactic direction. Gas with velocities spanning the range -20 km/s < V_helio < +20 km/s is detected towards stars with distances of 570-800 pc. We identify a wide-spread interstellar feature at V_helio ~ -15 km/s with the expanding HI shell called GSH 337+00-05, which is now placed at a distance of ~530 pc.

  11. Rapid interstellar scintillation of quasar PKS 1257-326

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bignall, Hayley E.; Jauncey, David L.; Lovell, James E. J.; Tzioumis, Anastasios K.; Macquart, Jean-Pierre; Kedziora-Chudczer, Lucyna; Engvold, O

    2005-01-01

    PKS 1257-326 is one of three quasars known to show unusually large and rapid, intra-hour intensity variations, as a result of scintillation in the turbulent Galactic interstellar medium. We have measured time delays in the variability pattern arrival times at the VLA and the ATCA, as well as an

  12. Searches for interstellar molecules of potential prebiotic importance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuan, Y.-J.; Charnley, S.B.; Huang, H.-C.; Kisiel, Z.; Ehrenfreund, P.; Tseng, W.-L.; Yan, C.-H.

    2004-01-01

    Interstellar chemistry leads to the formation of many prebiologically important molecules and is therefore of the fundamental interest to Astrobiology. Many organics can be produced in the gas phase where they can be detected. Molecules formed by reactions on the surfaces of dust grains are also bes

  13. Evidence for an interstellar dust filament in the outer heliosheath

    CERN Document Server

    Frisch, P C; Berdyugin, A; Funsten, H O; Magalhaes, A M; McComas, D J; Piirola, V; Schwadron, N A; Seriacopi, D B; Slavin, J D; Wiktorowicz, S J

    2015-01-01

    A recently discovered filament of polarized starlight that traces a coherent magnetic field is shown to have several properties that are consistent with an origin in the outer heliosheath of the heliosphere: (1) The magnetic field that provides the best fit to the polarization position angles is directed within 6.7+-11 degrees of the observed upwind direction of the flow of interstellar neutral helium gas through the heliosphere. (2) The magnetic field is ordered; the component of the variation of the polarization position angles that can be attributed to magnetic turbulence is small. (3) The axis of the elongated filament can be approximated by a line that defines an angle of 80+/-14 degrees with the plane that is formed by the interstellar magnetic field vector and the vector of the inflowing neutral gas (the "BV" plane). We propose that this polarization feature arises from aligned interstellar dust grains in the outer heliosheath where the interstellar plasma and magnetic field are deflected around the he...

  14. The shape and composition of interstellar silicate grains

    CERN Document Server

    Min, M; De Koter, A; Hovenier, J W; Keller, L P; Markwick-Kemper, F

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the composition and shape distribution of silicate dust grains in the interstellar medium. The effect of the amount of magnesium in the silicate lattice is studied. We fit the spectral shape of the interstellar 10 mu extinction feature as observed towards the galactic center. We use very irregularly shaped coated and non-coated porous Gaussian Random Field particles as well as a statistical approach to model shape effects. For the dust materials we use amorphous and crystalline silicates with various composition and SiC. The results of our analysis of the 10 mu feature are used to compute the shape of the 20 mu silicate feature and to compare this with observations. By using realistic particle shapes we are, for the first time, able to derive the magnesium fraction in interstellar silicates. We find that the interstellar silicates are highly magnesium rich (Mg/(Fe+Mg)>0.9) and that the stoichiometry lies between pyroxene and olivine type silicates. This composition is not consistent with that o...

  15. Three-Component Dust Models for Interstellar Extinction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C. Muthumariappan

    2010-03-01

    Interstellar extinction curves obtained from the ‘extinction without standard’ method were used to constrain the dust characteristics in the mean ISM (V = 3.1), along the lines of sight through a high latitude diffuse molecular cloud towards HD 210121 (V = 2.1) and in a dense interstellar environment towards the cluster NGC 1977 (V = 6.42). We have used three-component dust models comprising silicate, graphite and very small carbonaceous grains (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) following the grain size distributions introduced by Li & Draine in 2001. It is shown that oxygen, carbon and silicon abundances derived from our models are closer with the available elemental abundances for the dust grains in the ISM if F & G type stars atmospheric abundances are taken for the ISM than the solar. The importance of very small grains in modelling the variation of interstellar extinction curves has been investigated. Grain size distributions and elemental abundances locked up in dust are studied and compared at different interstellar environments using these three extinction curves. We present the albedo and the scattering asymmetry parameter evaluated from optical to extreme-UV wavelengths for the proposed dust models.

  16. VUV spectroscopy of carbon dust analogs: contribution to interstellar extinction

    CERN Document Server

    Gavilan, L; Le, K C; Pino, T; Giuliani, A; Dartois, E

    2016-01-01

    A full spectral characterization of carbonaceous dust analogs is necessary to understand their potential as carriers of observed astronomical spectral signatures such as the ubiquitous UV bump at 217.5 nm and the far-ultraviolet (FUV) rise common to interstellar extinction curves. Our goal is to study the spectral properties of carbonaceous dust analogs from the FUV to the mid-infrared (MIR) domain. We seek in particular to understand the spectra of these materials in the FUV range, for which laboratory studies are scarce. We produced analogs to carbonaceous interstellar dust encountered in various phases of the interstellar medium: amorphous hydrogenated carbons (a-C:H), for carbonaceous dust observed in the diffuse interstellar medium, and soot particles, for the polyaromatic component. Analogs to a-C:H dust were produced using a radio-frequency plasma reactor at low pressures, and soot nanoparticles films were produced in an ethylene (C$_2$H$_4$) flame. We measured transmission spectra of these thin films ...

  17. Systematic Theoretical Study on the Interstellar Carbon Chain Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Etim, Emmanuel E; Das, Ankan; Chakrabarti, Sandip K; Arunan, Elangannan

    2016-01-01

    In an effort to further our interest in understanding basic chemistry of interstellar molecules, we carry out here an extensive investigation of the stabilities of interstellar carbon chains; Cn, H2Cn, HCnN and CnX (X=N, O, Si, S, H, P, H-, N-). These sets of molecules accounts for about 20% of all the known interstellar and circumstellar molecules, their high abundances therefore demand a serious attention. High level ab initio quantum chemical calculations are employed to accurately estimate enthalpy of formation, chemical reactivity indices; global hardness and softness; and other chemical parameters of these molecules. Chemical modeling of the abundances of these molecular species has also been performed. Of the 89 molecules considered from these groups, 47 have been astronomically observed, these observed molecules are found to be more stable with respect to other members of the group. Of the 47 observed molecules, 60% are odd number carbon chains. Interstellar chemistry is not actually driven by the the...

  18. A study of the hot local interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Ryan

    2000-10-01

    Material synthesized in stellar furnaces and supernova explosions recycles through a hot phase of the interstellar medium (ISM) before it condenses into new stellar systems. I have studied the hot phase of the interstellar medium using ISM absorption line spectra of hot gas. O VI, N V and C IV each have resonance absorption lines at ultraviolet wavelength and are the most cosmically abundant elements other than hydrogen and helium. Two sounding rocket experiments built at the University of Colorado observed hot gas in the interstellar medium of galaxies. The Hot Carbon Oxygen Nitrogen Echelle Spectrograph ( HotCONES) made observations of O VI, N V and C IV in the local interstellar medium and the Wadsworth High-resolution Instrument (WHI) observed O VI in both the ISM of our galaxy and in the ISM of the Large Magellanic Cloud. I have discovered evidence for O VI components moving at speeds of up to 750 km s-1 along the line of sight. These high velocity components may be indicative of an extended supernova remnant.

  19. CO$_2$ Infrared Phonon Modes in Interstellar Ice Mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Cooke, Ilsa R; Öberg, Karin I

    2016-01-01

    CO$_2$ ice is an important reservoir of carbon and oxygen in star and planet forming regions. Together with water and CO, CO$_2$ sets the physical and chemical characteristics of interstellar icy grain mantles, including desorption and diffusion energies for other ice constituents. A detailed understanding of CO$_2$ ice spectroscopy is a prerequisite to characterize CO$_2$ interactions with other volatiles both in interstellar ices and in laboratory experiments of interstellar ice analogs. We report laboratory spectra of the CO$_2$ longitudinal optical (LO) phonon mode in pure CO$_2$ ice and in CO$_2$ ice mixtures with H$_2$O, CO, O$_2$ components. We show that the LO phonon mode position is sensitive to the mixing ratio of various ice components of astronomical interest. In the era of JWST, this characteristic could be used to constrain interstellar ice compositions and morphologies. More immediately, LO phonon mode spectroscopy provides a sensitive probe of ice mixing in the laboratory and should thus enabl...

  20. The interstellar abundances of tin and four other heavy elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, L. M.; Welty, D. E.; Morton, D. C.; Spitzer, L.; York, D. G.

    1993-01-01

    Spectra recorded at 1150-1600 A with an instrumental resolution near 16 km/s were obtained with the Goddard High-Resolution Spectrograph on board the HST. The gaseous interstellar abundances of five heavy elements along the light paths to 23 Ori, 15 Mon, 1 Sco, Pi Sco, and Pi Aqr were determined from the observations. The 1400.450 A line of Sn II was detected and identified toward three stars; at Z = 50, tin is the first element from the fifth row of the periodic table to be identified in the interstellar medium. One spectral line of each of Cu II (Z = 29) and Ga II (Z = 31), three lines of Ge II (Z = 32), and two lines of Kr I (Z = 36) were also detected toward some or all of the five stars. The depletions of these five heavy elements generally decrease monotonically with increasing atomic number toward each of the six stars, and tin is generally undepleted within the observational errors. The depletions of 26 elements from the interstellar gas in an average dense interstellar cloud appear to correlate with the elemental 'nebular' condensation temperatures more closely than with the first ionization potentials.

  1. Near-infrared absorption spectroscopy of interstellar hydrocarbon grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendleton, Y. J.; Sandford, S. A.; Allamandola, L. J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Sellgren, K.

    1994-01-01

    We present new 3600 - 2700/cm (2.8 - 3.7 micrometer) spectra of objects whose extinction is dominated by dust in the diffuse interstellar medium. The observations presented here augment an ongoing study of the organic component of the diffuse interstellar medium. These spectra contain a broad feature centered near 3300/cm (3.0 micrometers) and/or a feature with a more complex profile near 2950/cm (3.4 micrometers), the latter of which is attributed to saturated aliphatic hydrocarbons in interstellar grains and is the primary interest of this paper. As in our earlier work, the similarity of the absorption bands near 2950/cm (3.4 micrometers) along different lines of sight and the correlation of these features with interstellar extinction reveal that the carrier of this band lies in the dust in the diffuse interstellar medium (DISM). At least 2.5% of the cosmic carbon in the local interstellar medium and 4% toward the Galactic center is tied up in the carrier of the 2950/cm (3.4 micrometer) band. The spectral structure of the diffuse dust hydrocarbon C-H stretch absorption features is reasonably similar to UV photolyzed laboratory ice residues and is quite similar to the carbonaceous component of the Murchison meteorite. The similarity between the DISM and the meteoritic spectrum suggests that some of the interstellar material originally incorporated into the solar nebula may have survived relatively untouched in primitive solar system bodies. Comparisons of the DISM spectrum to hydrogenated amorphous carbon and quenched carbonaceous composite are also presented. The A(sub V)/tau ratio for the 2950/cm (3.4 micrometer) feature is lower toward the Galactic center than toward sources in the local solar neighborhood (approximately 150 for the Galactic center sources vs. approximately 250 for the local ISM sources). A similar trend has been observed previously for silicates in the diffuse medium by Roche & Aitken, suggesting that (1) the silicate and carbonaceous

  2. Surrounding the Void: Samuel Beckett and Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José-Francisco Fernández Sánchez

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A study of the relationship between Samuel Beckett and Spain poses some striking questions which are relevant in understanding the cultural inclinations of one of the most important dramatists of the 20th century. Beckett consciously abstained from having direct contact with Spanish culture and never visited Spain, despite showing an interest in the politics of the country at different periods of his life. As a result of this state of affairs a no-go area emerges which calls for a reconceptualization of Beckett’s ideas on travel, politics and even his own country. This article tries to approach the matter of Beckett and Spain from different angles, in an attempt to achieve a full panoramic view. The opinions of one of Beckett’s Spanish friends, Manolo Fandos, are recorded here for the first time.

  3. MAPPING THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM WITH NEAR-INFRARED DIFFUSE INTERSTELLAR BANDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zasowski, G.; Ménard, B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Bizyaev, D. [Apache Point Observatory, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); García-Hernández, D. A. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Pérez, A. E. García; Majewski, S. R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Hayden, M. R.; Holtzman, J.; Kinemuchi, K. [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Johnson, J. A.; Wilson, J. C. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Nidever, D. L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48104 (United States); Shetrone, M., E-mail: gail.zasowski@gmail.com [The University of Texas at Austin, McDonald Observatory, McDonald Observatory, TX 79734 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    We map the distribution and properties of the Milky Way's interstellar medium as traced by diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) detected in near-infrared stellar spectra from the SDSS-III/APOGEE survey. Focusing exclusively on the strongest DIB in the H band, at λ ∼ 1.527 μm, we present a projected map of the DIB absorption field in the Galactic plane, using a set of about 60,000 sightlines that reach up to 15 kpc from the Sun and probe up to 30 mag of visual extinction. The strength of this DIB is linearly correlated with dust reddening over three orders of magnitude in both DIB equivalent width (W {sub DIB}) and extinction, with a power law index of 1.01 ± 0.01, a mean relationship of W {sub DIB}/A{sub V} = 0.1 Å mag{sup –1} and a dispersion of ∼0.05 Å mag{sup –1} at extinctions characteristic of the Galactic midplane. These properties establish this DIB as a powerful, independent probe of dust extinction over a wide range of A{sub V} values. The subset of about 14,000 robustly detected DIB features have a W {sub DIB} distribution that follows an exponential trend. We empirically determine the intrinsic rest wavelength of this transition to be λ{sub 0} = 15 272.42 Å  and use it to calculate absolute radial velocities of the carrier, which display the kinematical signature of the rotating Galactic disk. We probe the DIB carrier distribution in three dimensions and show that it can be characterized by an exponential disk model with a scale height of about 100 pc and a scale length of about 5 kpc. Finally, we show that the DIB distribution also traces large-scale Galactic structures, including the Galactic long bar and the warp of the outer disk.

  4. The life cycle of the Interstellar Medium in other galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, G. R.

    1995-01-01

    Gas in spiral galaxies cycles between the diffuse and dense phases as clouds collapse, form stars and are dispersed back into the ISM. Far infrared observations of continuum emission from interstellar dust and line emission from interstellar gas have revealed a wealth of information on the state of the ISM in galaxies of different morphological types. The analysis of these observations gives us information about the processes of star formation and about the evolution of the ISM. Star formation rates vary widely from galaxy to galaxy, with the rates in starburst galaxies being 10 - 100 times those in quiescent spiral galaxies. Far infrared spectroscopy of star-forming galaxies shows that the interstellar pressure increases with star formation rate. The structure of the interstellar medium in starburst galaxies is quite different from that of quiescent galaxies - much of the mass and volume are in HII regions and photodissociation regions. The size distribution of dust grains seems to depend on environment; small grains are abundant in the diffuse interstellar medium but not in dense molecular star forming regions. Quiescent spiral and elliptical galaxies contain a significant population of small grains, but starburst galaxies do not. Dwarf irregular galaxies also seem to contain few small grains; this may be the result of the higher UV flux in these galaxies. The star forming regions in dwarf irregulars also have a higher ratio of atomic to molecular gas than do those in the Galaxy. These results show that the ISM in galaxies of different morphological types reaches different equilibria, resulting in different modes of star formation and global galaxy evolution.

  5. The lithosphere-asthenosphere Italy and surroundings

    CERN Document Server

    Panza, G F; Chimera, G; Pontevivo, A; Raykova, R

    2003-01-01

    The velocity-depth distribution of the lithosphere-asthenosphere in the Italian region and surroundings is imaged, with a lateral resolution of about 100 km, by surface wave velocity tomography and non-linear inversion. Maps of the Moho depth, of the thickness of the lithosphere and of the shear-wave velocities, down to depths of 200 km and more, are constructed. A mantle wedge, identified in the uppermost mantle along the Apennines and the Calabrian Arc, underlies the principal recent volcanoes, and partial melting can be relevant in this part of the uppermost mantle. In Calabria a lithospheric doubling is seen, in connection with the subduction of the Ionian lithosphere. The asthenosphere is shallow in the Southern Tyrrhenian Sea. High velocity bodies, cutting the asthenosphere, outline the Adria-lonian subduction in the Tyrrhenian Sea and the deep-reaching lithospheric root in the Western Alps. Less deep lithospheric roots are seen in the Central Apennines. The lithosphere-asthenosphere properties delineat...

  6. The lithosphere-asthenosphere: Italy and surroundings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GiulianoF.Panza; AntonellaPontevivo; GiordanoChimera; RenetaRaykova; AbdelkrimAoudia

    2003-01-01

    The velocity-depth distribution of the lithosphere-asthenosphere in the Italian region and surroundings is imaged, with a lateral resolution of about 100 km, by sur-face wave velocity tomography and non-linear inversion.Maps of the Moho depth, of the thickness of the lithos-phere and of the shear-wave velocities, down to depths of 200 km and more, are constructed. A mantle wedge, iden-tified in the uppermost mantle along the Apennines and the Calabrian Arc, underlies the prmctpat recent votca-noes, and partial melting can be relevant in this part of the uppermost mantle. In Calabria, a lithospheric dou-bling is seen, in connection with the subduction of the Ionian lithosphere. The asthenosphere is shallow in the Southern Tyrrhenian Sea. High velocity bodies, cutting the asthenosphere, outline the Adria-lonian subduction in the Tyrrhenian Sea and the deep-reaching lithospheric root in the Western Alps. Less deep lithospheric roots are seen in the Central Apennines. The lithosphere-asthenos-phere properties delineate a differentiation between the northern and the southern sectors of the Adriatic Sea,likely attesting the fragmentation of Adria.

  7. Preliminary design of surrounding heliostat fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collado, Francisco J. [Zaragoza University, Dpto. de Ingenieria Mecanica, CPS-B, Maria de Luna 3, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2009-05-15

    Recently, the author has shown elsewhere a simplified model that allows quick evaluations of the annual overall energy collected by a surrounding heliostat field. This model is the combination of an analytical flux density function produced by a heliostat, developed by the own author, and an optimized mirror density distribution developed by University of Houston for the Solar One Project. As main conclusion of this previous work, it was recognized that such pseudo-continuous simplified model should not substitute much more accurate discrete evaluations, which manage thousands of individual heliostat coordinates. Here in this work, the difficulty of generating a preliminary discrete layout of a large number of heliostats is addressed. The main novelty is the direct definition of thousands of heliostat coordinates through basically two parameters i.e. a simplified blocking factor and an additional security distance. Such procedure, which was formerly theoretically suggested by the author, is put into practice here, showing examples and commenting their problems and advantages. Getting a previous set of thousands of heliostat coordinates would be a major first step in the complex process of designing solar power tower (SPT). (author)

  8. The Birth of Matter

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    To mark the World Year of Physics, the Physics Section of the University of Geneva is organising a series of lectures for the uninitiated. Each lecture will begin with a demonstration in the auditorium of the detection of cosmic rays and, in collaboration with Professor E. Ellberger of the Conservatoire de Musique de Genève, of how these signals from the farthest reaches of the Universe can be used to create 'cosmic music'. The fourth lecture in the series, entitled 'The Birth of Matter', will take place on Tuesday 3 May 2005 and will be given by CERN's theoretical physicist, John Ellis. Where does matter come from? Where do the structures that surround us, such as galaxies, come from? Are we living in a world of invisible matter? Why is the universe so old and so big? John Ellis will show how elementary particle physics and, in particular, the LHC under construction at CERN, can answer these questions. The Birth of Matter Professor John Ellis Tuesday 3 May, starting 8.00 p.m. Main Auditorium...

  9. The Birth of Matter

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    To mark the World Year of Physics, the Physics Section of the University of Geneva is organising a series of lectures for the uninitiated. Each lecture will begin with a demonstration in the auditorium of the detection of cosmic rays and, in collaboration with Professor E. Ellberger of the Conservatoire de Musique de Genève, of how these signals from the farthest reaches of the Universe can be used to create "cosmic music". The fourth lecture in the series, entitled "The Birth of Matter", will take place on Tuesday 3 May 2005 and will be given by CERN's theoretical physicist, John Ellis. Where does matter come from? Where do the structures that surround us, such as galaxies, come from? Are we living in a world of invisible matter? Why is the universe so old and so big? John Ellis will show how elementary particle physics and, in particular, the LHC under construction at CERN, can answer these questions. The Birth of Matter Professor John Ellis Tuesday 3 May, starting 8.00 p.m. Main Audito...

  10. High-molecular-weight organic matter in the particles of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fray, Nicolas; Bardyn, Anaïs; Cottin, Hervé; Altwegg, Kathrin; Baklouti, Donia; Briois, Christelle; Colangeli, Luigi; Engrand, Cécile; Fischer, Henning; Glasmachers, Albrecht; Grün, Eberhard; Haerendel, Gerhard; Henkel, Hartmut; Höfner, Herwig; Hornung, Klaus; Jessberger, Elmar K.; Koch, Andreas; Krüger, Harald; Langevin, Yves; Lehto, Harry; Lehto, Kirsi; Le Roy, Léna; Merouane, Sihane; Modica, Paola; Orthous-Daunay, François-Régis; Paquette, John; Raulin, François; Rynö, Jouni; Schulz, Rita; Silén, Johan; Siljeström, Sandra; Steiger, Wolfgang; Stenzel, Oliver; Stephan, Thomas; Thirkell, Laurent; Thomas, Roger; Torkar, Klaus; Varmuza, Kurt; Wanczek, Karl-Peter; Zaprudin, Boris; Kissel, Jochen; Hilchenbach, Martin

    2016-10-01

    The presence of solid carbonaceous matter in cometary dust was established by the detection of elements such as carbon, hydrogen, oxygen and nitrogen in particles from comet 1P/Halley. Such matter is generally thought to have originated in the interstellar medium, but it might have formed in the solar nebula—the cloud of gas and dust that was left over after the Sun formed. This solid carbonaceous material cannot be observed from Earth, so it has eluded unambiguous characterization. Many gaseous organic molecules, however, have been observed; they come mostly from the sublimation of ices at the surface or in the subsurface of cometary nuclei. These ices could have been formed from material inherited from the interstellar medium that suffered little processing in the solar nebula. Here we report the in situ detection of solid organic matter in the dust particles emitted by comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko the carbon in this organic material is bound in very large macromolecular compounds, analogous to the insoluble organic matter found in the carbonaceous chondrite meteorites. The organic matter in meteorites might have formed in the interstellar medium and/or the solar nebula, but was almost certainly modified in the meteorites’ parent bodies. We conclude that the observed cometary carbonaceous solid matter could have the same origin as the meteoritic insoluble organic matter, but suffered less modification before and/or after being incorporated into the comet.

  11. Neutral interstellar helium parameters based on IBEX-Lo observations and test particle calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Bzowski, M; Moebius, E; Bochsler, P; Leonard, T; Heirtzler, D; Kucharek, H; Sokol, J M; Hlond, M; Crew, G B; Schwadron, N A; Fuselier, S A; McComas, D J; 10.1088/0067--0049/198/2/12

    2012-01-01

    Neutral Interstellar Helium (NISHe) is almost unaffected at the heliospheric interface with the interstellar medium and freely enters the solar system. It provides some of the best information on the characteristics of the interstellar gas in the Local Interstellar Cloud. The Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) is the second mission to directly detect NISHe. We present a comparison between recent IBEX NISHe observations and simulations carried out using a well-tested quantitative simulation code. Simulation and observation results compare well for times when measured fluxes are dominated by NISHe (and contributions from other species are small). Differences between simulations and observations indicate a previously undetected secondary population of neutral helium, likely produced by interaction of interstellar helium with plasma in the outer heliosheath. Interstellar neutral parameters are statistically different from previous in situ results obtained mostly from the GAS/Ulysses experiment, but they do agr...

  12. Polysulfanes on interstellar grains as a possible reservoir of interstellar sulphur

    CERN Document Server

    Druard, C

    2012-01-01

    The form of depleted sulphur in dense clouds is still unknown. Until now, only two molecules, OCS and SO2, have been detected in interstellar ices but cannot account for the elemental abundance of sulphur observed in diffuse medium. Chemical models suggest that solid H2S is the main form of sulphur in denser sources but observational constraints exist that infirm this hypothesis. We have used the Nautilus gas-grain code in which new chemical reactions have been added, based on recent experiments of H2S ice irradiation with UV photons and high energy protons. In particular, we included the new species Sn, H2Sn and C2S. We found that at the low temperature observed in dense clouds, i.e. 10 K, these new molecules are not efficiently produced and our modifications of the network do not change the previous pre- dictions. At slightly higher temperature, 20 K in less dense clouds or in the proximity of protostars, H2S abundance on the surfaces is strongly decreased in favor of the polysulfanes H2S3. Such a result ca...

  13. Stardust Interstellar Preliminary Examination VIII: Identification of crystalline material in two interstellar candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainsforth, Zack; Brenker, Frank E.; Simionovici, Alexandre S.; Schmitz, Sylvia; Burghammer, Manfred; Butterworth, Anna L.; Cloetens, Peter; Lemelle, Laurence; Tresserras, Juan-Angel Sans; Schoonjans, Tom; Silversmit, Geert; Solé, Vicente A.; Vekemans, Bart; Vincze, Laszlo; Westphal, Andrew J.; Allen, Carlton; Anderson, David; Ansari, Asna; Bajt, SašA.; Bastien, Ron K.; Bassim, Nabil; Bechtel, Hans A.; Borg, Janet; Bridges, John; Brownlee, Donald E.; Burchell, Mark; Changela, Hitesh; Davis, Andrew M.; Doll, Ryan; Floss, Christine; Flynn, George; Fougeray, Patrick; Frank, David; Grün, Eberhard; Heck, Philipp R.; Hillier, Jon K.; Hoppe, Peter; Hudson, Bruce; Huth, Joachim; Hvide, Brit; Kearsley, Anton; King, Ashley J.; Lai, Barry; Leitner, Jan; Leroux, Hugues; Leonard, Ariel; Lettieri, Robert; Marchant, William; Nittler, Larry R.; Ogliore, Ryan; Ong, Wei Ja; Postberg, Frank; Price, Mark C.; Sandford, Scott A.; Srama, Ralf; Stephan, Thomas; Sterken, Veerle; Stodolna, Julien; Stroud, Rhonda M.; Sutton, Steven; Trieloff, Mario; Tsou, Peter; Tsuchiyama, Akira; Tyliszczak, Tolek; von Korff, Joshua; Zevin, Daniel; Zolensky, Michael E.

    2014-09-01

    Using synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction measurements, we identified crystalline material in two particles of extraterrestrial origin extracted from the Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector. The first particle, I1047,1,34 (Hylabrook), consisted of a mosaiced olivine grain approximately 1 µm in size with internal strain fields up to 0.3%. The unit cell dimensions were a = 4.85 ± 0.08 Å, b = 10.34 ± 0.16 Å, c = 6.08 ± 0.13 Å (2σ). The second particle, I1043,1,30 (Orion), contained an olivine grain ≈ 2 µm in length and >500 nm in width. It was polycrystalline with both mosaiced domains varying over ≈ 20° and additional unoriented domains, and contained internal strain fields Fo65 (2σ). Orion also contained abundant spinel nanocrystals of unknown composition, but unit cell dimension a = 8.06 ± 0.08 Å (2σ). Two additional crystalline phases were present and remained unidentified. An amorphous component appeared to be present in both these particles based on STXM and XRF results reported elsewhere.

  14. Primordial Planets Explain Interstellar Dust, the Formation of Life; and Falsify Dark Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Carl H.; Wickramasinghe, N. Chandra; Schild, Rudolph E.

    2011-12-01

    Hydrogravitional-dynamics (HGD) cosmology of Gibson/Schild 1996 predicts proto-globular-star- cluster clumps of Earth-mass planets fragmented from plasma at 300 Kyr. Stars promptly formed from mergers of these gas planets, and chemicals C, N, O, Fe etc. were created by the stars and their supernovae. Seeded gas planets reduced the oxides to hot water oceans. Water oceans at critical temperature 647 K then hosted the first organic chemistry and the first life, distributed to the 1080 planets of the cosmological big bang by comets produced by the new (HGD) planet-merger star formation mechanism. This biological big bang began at 2 Myr when liquid oceans condensed. Life distributed by Hoyle/Wickramasinghe cometary panspermia evolved in a cosmological primordial soup of the merging planets throughout the universe. A primordial astrophysical basis is provided for astrobiology by HGD cosmology. Concordance ΛCDMHC cosmology is rendered obsolete by the observation of complex life on Earth, falsifying the dark energy and cold dark matter concepts. The dark matter of galaxies is mostly primordial planets in protoglobularstarcluster clumps, 30,000,000 planets per star (not 8!). Complex organic chemicals of the interstellar dust is formed by life on these planets, and distributed by their comets.

  15. Laboratory Astrophysics Studies with the COSmIC Facility: Interstellar and Planetary Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Farid; Contreras, Cesar S.; Sciamma-O'Brien, Ella; Bejaoui, Salma

    2015-08-01

    We present and discuss the characteristics and the capabilities of the laboratory facility, COSmIC, that was developed at NASA Ames to generate, process and analyze interstellar, circumstellar and planetary analogs in the laboratory [1]. COSmIC stands for “Cosmic Simulation Chamber” and is dedicated to the study of neutral and ionized molecules and nano particles under the low temperature and high vacuum conditions that are required to simulate space environments. COSmIC integrates a variety of state-of-the-art instruments that allow forming, processing and monitoring simulated space conditions for planetary, circumstellar and interstellar materials in the laboratory. COSmIC is composed of a Pulsed Discharge Nozzle (PDN) expansion that generates a plasma in free supersonic jet expansion coupled to two high-sensitivity, complementary in situ diagnostics: a Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) systems for photonic detection and a Reflectron Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ReTOF-MS) for mass detection [2].Recent laboratory astrophysics results that were obtained using COSmIC will be presented, in particular the progress that has been achieved in the domain of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) and in monitoring, in the laboratory, the formation of dust grains and aerosols from their gas-phase molecular precursors in environments as varied as stellar/circumstellar outflows [3] and planetary atmospheres [4]. Plans for future, next generation, laboratory experiments on cosmic molecules and grains in the growing field of laboratory astrophysics will also be addressed as well as the implications of the current studies for astronomy.References:[1] Salama F., In Organic Matter in Space, IAU Symposium 251, Kwok & Sandford Eds.Cambridge University Press, Vol. 4, S251, p. 357 (2008) and references therein.[2] Ricketts C., Contreras C., Walker, R., Salama F., Int. J. Mass Spec, 300, 26 (2011)[3] Cesar Contreras and Farid Salama, The

  16. Fullerenes, Organics and the Diffuse Interstellar Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foing, Bernard H.

    2016-07-01

    The status of DIB research has strongly advanced since 20 years [1], as well as the quest for fullerenes, PAHs and large organics in space. In 1994 we reported the discovery of two near IR diffuse bands coincident with C60+, confirmed in subsequent years [2-6] and now by latest laboratory experiments. A number of DIB observational studies have been published, dealing with: DIB surveys [1,7-10]; measurements of DIB families, correlations and environment dependences [11-14]; extragalactic DIBs [15, 16]. Resolved substructures were detected [17,18] and compared to predicted rotational contours by large molecules [19]. Polarisation studies provided upper limits constraints [20, 21]. DIBs carriers have been linked with organic molecules observed in the interstellar medium [22-25] such as IR bands (assigned to PAHs), Extended Red Emission or recently detected Anomalous Microwave Emission (AME, assigned to spinning dust) and with spectroscopic IR emission bands measured with ISO or Spitzer. Fullerenes and PAHs have been proposed to explain some DIBs and specific molecules were searched in DIB spectra [eg 2-6, 26-31]. These could be present in various dehydrogenation and ionisation conditions [32,33]. Experiments in the laboratory and in space [eg 34-36] allow to measure the survival and by-products of these molecules. We review DIB observational results and their interpretation, and discuss the presence of large organics, fullerenes, PAHs, graphenes in space. References [1] Herbig, G. 1995 ARA&A33, 19; [2] Foing, B. & Ehrenfreund, P. 1994 Natur 369, 296; [3] Foing, B. & Ehrenfreund, P. 1997 A&A317, L59; [4] Foing, B. & Ehrenfreund, P. 1995 ASSL202, 65; [5] Ehrenfreund, P., Foing, B. H. 1997 AdSpR19, 1033; [6] Galazutdinov, G. A. et al. 2000 MNRAS317, 750; [7] Jenniskens, P., Desert, F.-X. 1994 A&AS106, 39; [8] Ehrenfreund, P. et al. 1997 A&A318, L28; [9] Tuairisg, S. Ó. et al. 2000 A&AS142, 225; [10] Cox, N. et al. 2005 A&A438, 187; [11] Cami, J. et al. 1997A&A.326, 822

  17. Grain destruction in shocks in the interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. P.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Hollenbach, D. J.; McKee, C. F.

    1994-10-01

    Destruction of interstellar dust occurs predominantly in supernova shock waves in the warm neutral/ionized medium (density approximately = 0.25/cu cm, temperature approximately = 104 K). Recent theoretical developments and laboratory data for sputtering processes and grain-grain collisional vaporization allows us to better evaluate the grain destruction rate in interstellar shocks in the warm medium. We find that, independent of composition, grain destruction in supernova blast waves is dominated by nonthermal sputtering for shock velocities greater than 50 km/s and less than or equal to 150 km/s and thermal sputtering at higher shock velocities. We use a detailed scheme for the vaporization of grains colliding at high velocities (vs greater than or equal to 20 km/s) and show that the grain-grain collision destruction process is only dominant for shock velocities of less than or equal to 50-80 km/s and is less important than previously assumed. Nevertheless, the grain-grain destruction rates are of order 30%-90% of the sputtering rates at vs greater than 100 km/s and less than 200 km/s and are important in vaporizing the cores of grains. Detailed results for grain destruction as a function of grain size and composition are presented. We also present results for silicon carbide, iron, ice, and porous test particles. For carbonaceous grains we find that the fractional destruction is less than or equal to 0.29, and for silicate it is less than or equal to 0.45, for vs less than or equal to 200 km/s. We have calculated grain lifetimes, using the three-phase model of the interstellar medium, and find lifetimes of 4 x 108 yr for carbonaceous grains and 2.2 x 108 yr for silicate grains. Given that the typical stardust injection timescale of 2.5 x 109 yr, we conclude that efficient mechanisms for grain growth in the interstellar medium must exist in order that a significant fraction of the refractory elements be incorporated in dust, as observed. Therefore, although our

  18. Facts at your fingertips introducing physics : matter, energy, and heat

    CERN Document Server

    Bateman, Graham

    2011-01-01

    This series explains and illustrates the science of physics and its everyday applications. Physics is concerned with matter - the stuff from which everything is made - and with energy in all its forms. Matter is everything that surrounds us and this book looks at the different states of matter (solid, liquid, or gas) and how matter behaves under various conditions. Explanatory diagrams, key science words, and simple practical experiments to try at home help to provide a perfect introduction to this fascinating subject.

  19. Invisible matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolgov, A. D.

    These lectures have been given to particle physicists, mostly experimentalists and very briefly and at a pedestrian level review the problems of dark matter. The content of the lectures is the following: 1. Introduction. 2. Cosmological background. 3. Luminous matter. 4. Primordial nucleosynthesis and the total amount of baryons. 5. Gravitating invisible matter. 6. Baryonic crisis. 7. Inflationary omega. 8. Intermediate summary. 9. Possible forms of dark matter. 10. Structure formation: basic assumptions. 11. Structure formations: basics of the theory. 12. Evolution of perturbations with different forms of dark matter. 13. Conclusion. The presentation and conclusion reflect personal view of the author that a considerable amount of invisible energy in the universe is in the form of vacuum energy (cosmological constant) and possibly in the form of a classical field which adjusts vacuum energy to the value permitted and requested by astronomical data.

  20. The nearby interstellar medium towards alpha Leo -- UV observations and modeling of a warm cloud within hot gas

    CERN Document Server

    Gry, Cecile

    2016-01-01

    We analyze interstellar absorption features in the full UV spectrum of the nearby (d = 24 pc) B8 IVn star alpha Leo (Regulus) obtained at high resolution and high S/N by the HST ASTRAL Treasury program. We derive column densities for many key atomic species and interpret their partial ionizations. The gas in front of alpha Leo exhibits two absorption components, one of which coincides in velocity with the local interstellar cloud (LIC) that surrounds the Sun. The second, smaller, component is shifted by +5.6 km/s relative to the main component, in agreement with results for other lines of sight in this region of the sky. The excitation of the C II fine-structure levels and the ratio of Mg I to Mg II reveal a temperature T = 6500 (+750,-600)K and electron density n(e) = 0.11 (+0.025,-0.03) cm^-3. Our investigation of the ionization balance of all the available species indicates that about 1/3 of the hydrogen atoms are ionized and that metals are significantly depleted onto grains. We infer that N(H I) = 1.9 (+...

  1. Impacts of Artificial Reefs on Surrounding Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoukian, Sarine

    Artificial reefs are becoming a popular biological and management component in shallow water environments characterized by soft seabed, representing both important marine habitats and tools to manage coastal fisheries and resources. An artificial reef in the marine environment acts as an open system with exchange of material and energy, altering the physical and biological characteristics of the surrounding area. Reef stability will depend on the balance of scour, settlement, and burial resulting from ocean conditions over time. Because of the unstable nature of sediments, they require a detailed and systematic investigation. Acoustic systems like high-frequency multibeam sonar are efficient tools in monitoring the environmental evolution around artificial reefs, whereas water turbidity can limit visual dive and ROV inspections. A high-frequency multibeam echo sounder offers the potential of detecting fine-scale distribution of reef units, providing an unprecedented level of resolution, coverage, and spatial definition. How do artificial reefs change over time in relation to the coastal processes? How accurately does multibeam technology map different typologies of artificial modules of known size and shape? How do artificial reefs affect fish school behavior? What are the limitations of multibeam technology for investigating fish school distribution as well as spatial and temporal changes? This study addresses the above questions and presents results of a new approach for artificial reef seafloor mapping over time, based upon an integrated analysis of multibeam swath bathymetry data and geoscientific information (backscatter data analysis, SCUBA observations, physical oceanographic data, and previous findings on the geology and sedimentation processes, integrated with unpublished data) from Senigallia artificial reef, northwestern Adriatic Sea (Italy) and St. Petersburg Beach Reef, west-central Florida continental shelf. A new approach for observation of fish

  2. The interstellar medium in Andromeda's dwarf spheroidal galaxies - I. Content and origin of the interstellar dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Looze, Ilse; Baes, Maarten; Bendo, George J.; Fritz, Jacopo; Boquien, Médéric; Cormier, Diane; Gentile, Gianfranco; Kennicutt, Robert C.; Madden, Suzanne C.; Smith, Matthew W. L.; Young, Lisa

    2016-07-01

    Dwarf spheroidal galaxies are among the most numerous galaxy population in the Universe, but their main formation and evolution channels are still not well understood. The three dwarf spheroidal satellites (NGC 147, NGC 185, and NGC 205) of the Andromeda galaxy are characterized by very different interstellar medium properties, which might suggest them being at different galaxy evolutionary stages. While the dust content of NGC 205 has been studied in detail in an earlier work, we present new Herschel dust continuum observations of NGC 147 and NGC 185. The non-detection of NGC 147 in Herschel SPIRE maps puts a strong constraint on its dust mass (≤128^{+124}_{-68} M⊙). For NGC 185, we derive a total dust mass Md = 5.1±1.0 × 103 M⊙, which is a factor of ˜2-3 higher than that derived from ISO and Spitzer observations and confirms the need for longer wavelength observations to trace more massive cold dust reservoirs. We, furthermore, estimate the dust production by asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and supernovae (SNe). For NGC 147, the upper limit on the dust mass is consistent with expectations of the material injected by the evolved stellar population. In NGC 185 and NGC 205, the observed dust content is one order of magnitude higher compared to the estimated dust production by AGBs and SNe. Efficient grain growth, and potentially longer dust survival times (3-6 Gyr) are required to account for their current dust content. Our study confirms the importance of grain growth in the gas phase to account for the current dust reservoir in galaxies.

  3. Wanted! Nuclear Data for Dark Matter Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondolo, P.

    2014-06-01

    Astronomical observations from small galaxies to the largest scales in the universe can be consistently explained by the simple idea of dark matter. The nature of dark matter is however still unknown. Empirically it cannot be any of the known particles, and many theories postulate it as a new elementary particle. Searches for dark matter particles are under way: production at high-energy accelerators, direct detection through dark matter-nucleus scattering, indirect detection through cosmic rays, gamma rays, or effects on stars. Particle dark matter searches rely on observing an excess of events above background, and a lot of controversies have arisen over the origin of observed excesses. With the new high-quality cosmic ray measurements from the AMS-02 experiment, the major uncertainty in modeling cosmic ray fluxes is in the nuclear physics cross sections for spallation and fragmentation of cosmic rays off interstellar hydrogen and helium. The understanding of direct detection backgrounds is limited by poor knowledge of cosmic ray activation in detector materials, with order of magnitude differences between simulation codes. A scarcity of data on nucleon spin densities blurs the connection between dark matter theory and experiments. What is needed, ideally, are more and better measurements of spallation cross sections relevant to cosmic rays and cosmogenic activation, and data on the nucleon spin densities in nuclei.

  4. The Gaia-ESO Survey: Tracing interstellar extinction

    CERN Document Server

    Schultheis, M; Recio-Blanco, A; de Laverny, P; Hill, V; Gilmore, G; Alfaro, E J; Costado, M T; Bensby, T; Damiani, F; Feltzing, S; Flaccomio, E; Lardo, C; Jofre, P; Prisinzano, L; Zaggia, S; Jimenez-Esteban, F; Morbidelli, L; Lanzafame, A C; Hourihane, A; Worley, C; Francois, P

    2015-01-01

    Large spectroscopic surveys have enabled in the recent years the computation of three-dimensional interstellar extinction maps thanks to accurate stellar atmospheric parameters and line-of-sight distances. Such maps are complementary to 3D maps extracted from photometry, allowing a more thorough study of the dust properties. Our goal is to use the high-resolution spectroscopic survey Gaia-ESO in order to obtain with a good distance resolution the interstellar extinction and its dependency as a function of the environment and the Galactocentric position. We use the stellar atmospheric parameters of more than 5000 stars, obtained from the Gaia-ESO survey second internal data release, and combine them with optical (SDSS) and near-infrared (VISTA) photometry as well as different sets of theoretical stellar isochrones, in order to calculate line-of-sight extinction and distances. The extinction coefficients are then compared with the literature to discuss their dependancy on the stellar parameters and position in ...

  5. Energetic Processing of Interstellar Silicate Grains by Cosmic Rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bringa, E M; Kucheyev, S O; Loeffler, M J; Baragiola, R A; Tielens, A G Q M; Dai, Z R; Graham, G; Bajt, S; Bradley, J; Dukes, C A; Felter, T E; Torres, D F; van Breugel, W

    2007-03-28

    While a significant fraction of silicate dust in stellar winds has a crystalline structure, in the interstellar medium nearly all of it is amorphous. One possible explanation for this observation is the amorphization of crystalline silicates by relatively 'low' energy, heavy ion cosmic rays. Here we present the results of multiple laboratory experiments showing that single-crystal synthetic forsterite (Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) amorphizes when irradiated by 10 MeV Xe{sup ++} ions at large enough fluences. Using modeling, we extrapolate these results to show that 0.1-5.0 GeV heavy ion cosmic rays can rapidly ({approx}70 Million yrs) amorphize crystalline silicate grains ejected by stars into the interstellar medium.

  6. Detection of buckminsterfullerene emission in the diffuse interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berné, O.; Cox, N. L. J.; Mulas, G.; Joblin, C.

    2017-08-01

    Emission of fullerenes in their infrared vibrational bands has been detected in space near hot stars. The proposed attribution of the diffuse interstellar bands at 9577 and 9632 Å to electronic transitions of the buckminsterfullerene cation (i.e. C) was recently supported by new laboratory data, confirming the presence of this species in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM). In this Letter, we present the detection, also in the diffuse ISM, of the 17.4 and 18.9 μm emission bands commonly attributed to vibrational bands of neutral C60 . According to classical models that compute the charge state of large molecules in space, C60 is expected to be mostly neutral in the diffuse ISM. This is in agreement with the abundances of diffuse C60 we derive here from observations.

  7. Determining the Fractal Dimension of the Interstellar Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Sanchez, Nestor; Perez, Enrique

    2008-01-01

    The Interstellar Medium seems to have an underlying fractal structure, which can be characterized through its fractal dimension (Df). However, several factors may affect the determination of Df, such as distortions due to projection, low image resolution, opacity of the cloud, and low signal-to-noise ratio. Here we use both simulated clouds and real molecular cloud maps to study these effects in order to estimate Df in a reliable way. Our results indicate in a self-consistent way that the fractal dimension of the Interstellar Medium is in the range 2.6 < Df < 2.8, which is significantly higher than the value Df = 2.3 usually assumed in the literature.

  8. Abundance of atomic carbon /C I/ in dense interstellar clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, T. G.; Huggins, P. J.

    1981-01-01

    The abundance of interstellar neutral atomic carbon is investigated by means of its ground state fine-structure line emission at 492 GHz using the 91.5 cm telescope of NASAs Kuiper Airborne Observatory. Atomic carbon is found to be very abundant in dense interstellar molecular clouds with column densities of about 10 to the 19th per sq cm. Because the observations have considerably greater column densities than current theories of carbon chemistry, it is suggested that the physical conditions of these clouds are not as simple as assumed in the models. Various situations are discussed which would lead to large C I abundances, including the possibility that the chemical lifetimes of the clouds are relatively short.

  9. Restructuring and destruction of hydrocarbon dust in the interstellar medium

    CERN Document Server

    Murga, M S; Wiebe, D S

    2016-01-01

    A model of key processes influencing the evolution of a hydrocarbon grain of an arbitrary size under astrophysical conditions corresponding to ionized hydrogen regions (HII regions) and supernova remnants is presented. The considered processes include aromatization and photodestruction, sputtering by electrons and ions, and shattering due to collisions between grains. The model can be used to simulate the grain size distribution and the aromatization degree during the evolution of HII regions and supernova remnants for a specified radiation field, relative velocity of gas and dust, etc. The contribution of various processes to the evolution of hydrocarbon dust grains for parameters typical for the interstellar medium of our Galaxy is presented. Small grains (less than 50 carbon atoms) should be fully aromatized in the general interstellar medium. If larger grains initially have an aliphatic structure, it is preserved to a substantial extent. Variations in the size distribution of the grains due to their mutua...

  10. Trans-cis molecular photoswitching in interstellar Space*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuadrado, S.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Roncero, O.; Aguado, A.; Tercero, B.; Cernicharo, J.

    2016-01-01

    As many organic molecules, formic acid (HCOOH) has two conformers (trans and cis). The energy barrier to internal conversion from trans to cis is much higher than the thermal energy available in molecular clouds. Thus, only the most stable conformer (trans) is expected to exist in detectable amounts. We report the first interstellar detection of cis-HCOOH. Its presence in ultraviolet (UV) irradiated gas exclusively (the Orion Bar photodissociation region), with a low trans-to-cis abundance ratio of 2.8 ± 1.0, supports a photoswitching mechanism: a given conformer absorbs a stellar photon that radiatively excites the molecule to electronic states above the interconversion barrier. Subsequent fluorescent decay leaves the molecule in a different conformer form. This mechanism, which we specifically study with ab initio quantum calculations, was not considered in Space before but likely induces structural changes of a variety of interstellar molecules submitted to UV radiation. PMID:28003686

  11. The Origin of Radio Scintillation In the Local Interstellar Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Linsky, Jeffrey L; Redfield, Seth

    2007-01-01

    We study three quasar radio sources (B1257-326, B1519-273, and J1819+385) that show large amplitude intraday and annual scintillation variability produced by the Earth's motion relative to turbulent-scattering screens located within a few parsecs of the Sun. We find that the lines of sight to these sources pass through the edges of partially ionized warm interstellar clouds where two or more clouds may interact. From the gas flow vectors of these clouds, we find that the relative radial and transverse velocities of these clouds are large and could generate the turbulence that is responsible for the observed scintillation. For all three sight lines the flow velocities of nearby warm local interstellar clouds are consistent with the fits to the transverse flows of the radio scintillation signals.

  12. X-Ray Absorption and Scattering by Interstellar Grains

    CERN Document Server

    Hoffman, John A

    2015-01-01

    Interstellar abundance determinations from fits to X-ray absorption edges often rely on the following false assumptions: (1) the grains are "optically thin" at the observed X-ray wavelengths, and (2) scattering is insignificant and can be ignored. We show instead that scattering contributes significantly to the attenuation of X-rays for realistic dust grain size distributions and substantially modifies the spectrum near absorption edges of elements present in grains. The dust attenuation modules used in major X-ray spectral fitting programs do not take this into account. We show that the consequences of neglecting scattering on the determination of interstellar elemental abundances are modest; however, scattering (along with uncertainties in the grain size distribution) must be taken into account when near-edge extinction fine structure is used to infer dust mineralogy. We advertise the benefits and accuracy of anomalous diffraction theory for both X-ray halo analysis and near edge absorption studies. An open...

  13. Tholins - Organic chemistry of interstellar grains and gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagan, C.; Khare, B. N.

    1979-01-01

    The paper discusses tholins, defined as complex organic solids formed by the interaction of energy - for example, UV light or spark discharge - with various mixtures of cosmically abundant gases - CH4, C2H6, NH3, H2O, HCHO, and H2S. It is suggested that tholins occur in the interstellar medium and are responsible for some of the properties of the interstellar grains and gas. Additional occurrences of tholins are considered. Tholins have been produced experimentally; 50 or so pyrolytic fragments of the brown, sometimes sticky substances have been identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and the incidence of these fragments in tholins produced by different procedures is reported.

  14. Trans-cis molecular photoswitching in interstellar Space

    CERN Document Server

    Cuadrado, S; Roncero, O; Aguado, A; Tercero, B; Cernicharo, J

    2016-01-01

    As many organic molecules, formic acid (HCOOH) has two conformers (trans and cis). The energy barrier to internal conversion from trans to cis is much higher than the thermal energy available in molecular clouds. Thus, only the most stable conformer (trans) is expected to exist in detectable amounts. We report the first interstellar detection of cis-HCOOH. Its presence in ultraviolet (UV) irradiated gas exclusively (the Orion Bar photodissociation region), with a low trans-to-cis abundance ratio of 2.8+-1.0, supports a photoswitching mechanism: a given conformer absorbs a stellar photon that radiatively excites the molecule to electronic states above the interconversion barrier. Subsequent fluorescent decay leaves the molecule in a different conformer form. This mechanism, which we specifically study with ab initio quantum calculations, was not considered in Space before but likely induces structural changes of a variety of interstellar molecules submitted to UV radiation.

  15. A review of the theory of interstellar communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billingham, J.; Wolfe, J. H.; Oliver, B. M.

    1975-01-01

    The probability is analyzed that intelligent civilizations capable of interstellar communication exist in the galaxy. Drake's (1960) equation for the prevalence of communicative civilization is used in the calculations, and attempts are made to place limits on the search range that must be covered to contact other civilizations, the longevity of the communicative phase of such civilizations, and the possible number of two-way exchanges between civilizations in contact with each other. The minimum estimates indicate that some 100,000 civilizations probably coexist within several tens of astronomical units of each other and that some 1,000,000 probably coexist within 10 light years of each other. Attempts to detect coherent signals characteristic of intelligent life are briefly noted, including Projects Ozma and Cyclops as well as some Soviet attempts. Recently proposed American and Soviet programs for interstellar communication are outlined.

  16. The effect of selective desorption mechanisms during interstellar ice formation

    CERN Document Server

    Kalvans, Juris

    2015-01-01

    Major components of ices on interstellar grains in molecular clouds - water and carbon oxides - occur at various optical depths. This implies that selective desorption mechanisms are at work. An astrochemical model of a contracting low-mass molecular cloud core is presented. Ice was treated as consisting of the surface and three subsurface layers (sublayers). Photodesorption, reactive desorption, and indirect reactive desorption were investigated. The latter manifests itself through desorption from H+H reaction on grains. Desorption of shallow subsurface species was included. Modeling results suggest the existence of a "photon-dominated ice" during the early phases of core contraction. Subsurface ice is chemically processed by interstellar photons, which produces complex organic molecules. Desorption from the subsurface layer results in high COM gas-phase abundances at Av = 2.4...10mag. This may contribute towards an explanation for COM observations in dark cores. It was found that photodesorption mostly gove...

  17. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons and the Diffuse Interstellar Bands: a Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, F.; Galazutdinov, G. A.; Krelowski, J.; Allamandola, L. J.; Musaev, F. A.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    We discuss the proposal relating the origin of some of the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) to neutral and ionized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) present in interstellar clouds. Laboratory spectra of several PAHs, isolated at low temperature in inert gas matrices, are compared with an extensive set of astronomical spectra of reddened, early type stars. From this comparison, it is concluded that PAN ions are good candidates to explain some of the DIBs. Unambiguous assignments are difficult, however, due to the shift in wavelengths and the band broadening induced in the laboratory spectra by the solid matrix. Definitive band assignments and, ultimately, the test of the of the proposal that PAH ions carry some of the DIB must await the availability of gas-phase measurements in the laboratory. The present assessment offers a guideline for future laboratory experiments by allowing the preselection of promising PAH molecules to be studied in jet expansions.

  18. Models of Veritcal Disturbances in the Interstellar Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Walters, M A; Walters, Michael A.; cox, Donald P.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes some interesting properties of waves in, and oscillations of, the interstellar medium in the direction normal to the plane of the Galaxy. Our purpose is to examine possible reasons for four observed phenomena: the falling sky in the northern hemisphere; the apparent presence of clouds in absorption spectra when a sightline is occupied primarily only by warm intercloud gas; the peculiar structuring of spiral arms involving clumps, spurs, and feathering; and the existence of an abundance of high stage ions far off the plane of the Galaxy. We explored the reaction of the interstellar medium - in the vertical direction only - to large imposed disturbances (initial displacements, expansive velocities, and compressions), and to the introduction of small amplitude waves via oscillation of the midplane. Our findings included: 1) the anticipated growth in amplitude of high frequency waves with height; 2) the four lowest normal modes for the oscillation of the atmosphere as a whole, as functions of...

  19. Tsallis statistics as a tool for studying interstellar turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Esquivel, A

    2009-01-01

    We used magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of interstellar turbulence to study the probability distribution functions (PDFs) of increments of density, velocity, and magnetic field. We found that the PDFs are well described by a Tsallis distribution, following the same general trends found in solar wind and Electron MHD studies. We found that the PDFs of density are different in subsonic and supersonic turbulence. In order to extend this work to ISM observations we studied maps of column density obtained from 3D MHD simulations. From the column density maps we found the parameters that fit to Tsallis distributions and demonstrated that these parameters vary with the Mach and Alfvenic Mach numbers of turbulence. This opens avenues for using Tsallis distributions to study the dynamical and magnetic states of interstellar gas.

  20. Redshifted Diffuse Interstellar Bands in Orion OB1 association

    CERN Document Server

    Krełowski, J; Mulas, G; Maszewska, M; Cecchi-Pestellini, C

    2015-01-01

    The wavelength displacement of the Diffuse Interstellar Bands at 4502, 5705, 5780, 6284, and 7224 \\AA\\ with respect to the well known, narrow atomic/molecular interstellar lines (of Ca{\\sc ii} and Na{\\sc i}) have been measured in the spectra of the 2 Orion Trapezium stars HD 37022 and HD 37020, using the HARPS\\textendash N spectrograph, fed with the 3.5 m Telescopio Nazionale Galileo, and the BOES spectrograph, fed with the 1.8m Korean telescope. The red shift is $\\sim$25 km/s for all these DIBs. We discuss the various possible origins of this very peculiar wavelength shift in the light of the particular physical conditions in the Orion Trapezium. The above mentioned shift is seemingly absent in the DIBs at 6196 and 6993 \\AA.

  1. $H_{2}$ Formation on Interstellar Grains in Different Physical Regimes

    CERN Document Server

    Biham, O; Katz, N; Pirronello, V; Vidali, G

    1998-01-01

    An analysis of the kinetics of H2 formation on interstellar dust grains is presented using rate equations. It is shown that semi-empirical expressions that appeared in the literature represent two different physical regimes. In particular, it is shown that the expression given by Hollenbach, Werner and Salpeter [ApJ, 163, 165 (1971)] applies when high flux, or high mobility, of H atoms on the surface of a grain, makes it very unlikely that H atoms evaporate before they meet each other and recombine. The expression of Pirronello et al.\\ [ApJ, 483, L131 (1997)] -- deduced on the basis of accurate measurements on realistic dust analogue -- applies to the opposite regime (low coverage and low mobility). The implications of this analysis for the understanding of the processes dominating in the Interstellar Medium are discussed.

  2. Chemical Evolution in the Interstellar Medium: From Astrochemistry to Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allamandola, Louis J.

    2009-01-01

    Great strides have been made in our understanding of interstellar material thanks to advances in infrared astronomy and laboratory astrophysics. Ionized polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), shockingly large molecules by earlier astrochemical standards, are widespread and very abundant throughout much of the Universe. In cold molecular clouds, the birthplace of planets and stars, interstellar molecules freeze onto dust and ice particles forming mixed molecular ices dominated by simple species such as water, methanol, ammonia, and carbon monoxide. Within these clouds, and especially in the vicinity of star and planet forming regions, these ices and PAHs are processed by ultraviolet light and cosmic rays forming hundreds of far more complex species, some of biogenic interest. Eventually, these are delivered to primordial planets by comets and meteorites. Astrochemical evolution, highlights of this field from a chemist's perspective, and the astronomer's infrared toolbox will be reviewed.

  3. Dynamical evolution and molecular abundances of interstellar clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Sheo S.; Heere, Karen R.; Tarafdar, Shankar P.

    1991-01-01

    Dynamical models are presented that start with interstellar gas in an initial diffuse state and consider their gravitational collapse and the formation of dense cores. Frozen-in tangled magnetic fields are included to mimic forces that might oppose gravitational contraction and whose effectiveness may increase with increasing core densities. Results suggest the possibility that dense cloud cores may be dynamically evolving ephemeral objects, such that their lifespan at a given core density decreases as that density increases.

  4. The interstellar chemistry of H2C3O isomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loison, Jean-Christophe; Agúndez, Marcelino; Marcelino, Núria; Wakelam, Valentine; Hickson, Kevin M.; Cernicharo, José; Gerin, Maryvonne; Roueff, Evelyne; Guélin, Michel

    2016-01-01

    We present the detection of two H2C3O isomers, propynal and cyclopropenone, toward various starless cores and molecular clouds, together with upper limits for the third isomer propadienone. We review the processes controlling the abundances of H2C3O isomers in interstellar media showing that the reactions involved are gas-phase ones. We show that the abundances of these species are controlled by kinetic rather than thermodynamic effects. PMID:27013768

  5. X-Ray Absorption and Scattering by Interstellar Grains

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffman, John A.; Draine, Bruce T.

    2015-01-01

    Interstellar abundance determinations from fits to X-ray absorption edges often rely on the incorrect assumption that scattering is insignificant and can be ignored. We show instead that scattering contributes significantly to the attenuation of X-rays for realistic dust grain size distributions and substantially modifies the spectrum near absorption edges of elements present in grains. The dust attenuation modules used in major X-ray spectral fitting programs do not take this into account. W...

  6. A Survey of Interstellar Gas Inside the 3 KPC Arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, Derck L.

    We are requesting 5 US1 shifts to obtain high dispersion spectra Of B stars in the direction of the 3 kpc arm. The interstellar absorption along these lines of sight will be compared to models for the absorbing gas in order to determine whether additional absorption is present inside the 3 kpc arm. This information will help to distinguish between the two competing theories for the formation of the arm.

  7. Interstellar Extinction and Polarization by Graphite-Silicate Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, E. T.; Draine, B. T.

    2004-12-01

    The geometry of interstellar dust continues to be uncertain. In some models, intertellar grains are assumed to homogeneous spheres, with a suitable mixture of sizes and compositions in order to reproduce observations of of absorption and scattering (e.g., Weingartner & Draine 2001, or Zubko et al. 2004). However, it is often thought that the larger interstellar grains may be formed by agglomeration of smaller particles, with the resulting ``cluster'' being of nonuniform composition and having a ``fluffy'' geometry. The optical properties of such ``fluffy'' grains have sometimes been estimated using ``effective medium theory'' or other approximations, but it is now possible to directly calculate scattering and absorption using the discrete dipole approximation (Draine & Flatau 1994). We construct candidate clusters by random ballistic agglomeration of small graphite and silicate spheres, and calculate their scattering and absorption cross sections using the discrete dipole approximation code DDSCAT 6.x (Draine & Flatau 2004). We consider a model for interstellar dust consisting of very small grains plus clusters built by ballistic agglomeration with a suitable size distribution, and we test the model by trying to reproduce the observed wavelength dependence of interstellar extinction and polarization. This research was supported in part by NSF grants AST-0216105 and AST-0406883. References: Draine, B.T., & Flatau, P.J. 1994, JOSA, A11, 1491l Draine, B.T., & Flatau, P.J. 2004, http://arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0409262l Weingartner, J.C., & Draine, B.T. 2001, ApJ, 548, 296l Zubko, V., Dwek, E., & Arendt, R.G. 2004, ApJS, 152, 211l

  8. Gaseous Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Angelo, Joseph A

    2011-01-01

    aseous Matter focuses on the many important discoveries that led to the scientific interpretation of matter in the gaseous state. This new, full-color resource describes the basic characteristics and properties of several important gases, including air, hydrogen, helium, oxygen, and nitrogen. The nature and scope of the science of fluids is discussed in great detail, highlighting the most important scientific principles upon which the field is based. Chapters include:. Gaseous Matter An Initial Perspective. Physical Characteristics of Gases. The Rise of the Science of Gases. Kinetic Theory of

  9. Moment equations for chemical reactions on interstellar dust grains

    CERN Document Server

    Lipshtat, A; Lipshtat, Azi; Biham, Ofer

    2003-01-01

    While most chemical reactions in the interstellar medium take place in the gas phase, those occurring on the surfaces of dust grains play an essential role. Chemical models based on rate equations including both gas phase and grain surface reactions have been used in order to simulate the formation of chemical complexity in interstellar clouds. For reactions in the gas phase and on large grains, rate equations, which are highly efficient to simulate, are an ideal tool. However, for small grains under low flux, the typical number of atoms or molecules of certain reactive species on a grain may go down to order one or less. In this case the discrete nature of the opulations of reactive species as well as the fluctuations become dominant, thus the mean-field approximation on which the rate equations are based does not apply. Recently, a master equation approach, that provides a good description of chemical reactions on interstellar dust grains, was proposed. Here we present a related approach based on moment equ...

  10. Evolution of interstellar dust and stardust in the solar neighbourhood

    CERN Document Server

    Zhukovska, Svitlana; Trieloff, Mario

    2007-01-01

    The abundance evolution of interstellar dust species originating from stellar sources and from condensation in molecular clouds in the local interstellar medium of the Milky Way is studied and the input of dust material to the Solar System is determined. A one-zone chemical evolution model of the Milky Way for the elemental composition of the disk combined with an evolution model for its interstellar dust component similar to that of Dwek (1998) is developed. The dust model considers dust-mass return from AGB stars as calculated from synthetic AGB models combined with models for dust condensation in stellar outflows. Supernova dust formation is included in a simple parameterized form which is gauged by observed abundances of presolar dust grains with supernova origin. For dust growth in the ISM a simple method is developed for coupling this with disk and dust evolution models. The time evolution of the abundance of the following dust species is followed in the model: silicate, carbon, silicon carbide, and iro...

  11. H2-rich interstellar grain mantles: An equilibrium description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dissly, Richard W.; Allen, Mark; Anicich, Vincent G.

    1994-01-01

    Experiments simulating the codeposition of molecular hydrogen and water ice on interstellar grains demonstrate that amorphous water ice at 12 K can incorporate a substantial amount of H2, up to a mole ratio of H2/H2O = 0.53. We find that the physical behavior of approximately 80% of the hydrogen can be explained satisfactorily in terms of an equilibrium population, thermodynamically governed by a wide distribution of binding site energies. Such a description predicts that gas phase accretion could lead to mole fractions of H2 in interstellar grain mantles of nearly 0.3; for the probable conditions of WL5 in the rho Ophiuchi cloud, an H2 mole fraction of between 0.05 and 0.3 is predicted, in possible agreement with the observed abundance reported by Sandford, Allamandola, & Geballe. Accretion of gas phase H2 onto grain mantles, rather than photochemical production of H2 within the ice, could be a general explanation for frozen H2 in interstellar ices. We speculate on the implications of such a composition for grain mantle chemistry and physics.

  12. The chemistry of interstellar HnO+ beyond the Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    van der Tak, Floris

    2010-01-01

    The astrochemistry of the HnO+ (n=1..3) ions is important as the main gas-phase formation route for water, and as tracer of the interstellar ionization rate by cosmic rays and other processes. While interstellar H3O+ has been known since the early 1990's, interstellar OH+ and H2O+ have only recently been detected using the Herschel space observatory and also from the ground. This paper reviews detections of HnO+ toward external galaxies and compares with ground-based work. The similarities and differences of the HnO+ chemistry within the Galaxy and beyond are discussed. Special attention is given to the low H2O/H3O+ ratio in M82 of only 3.3, suggesting rapid H2O photodissociation, and the high apparent OH+ and H2O+ abundances in Mrk 231, suggesting radiative excitation and/or formation pumping. Photodissociation rates for H3O+ and collisional cross-sections for OH+ and H2O+ with H, He and electrons are needed to test these interpretations.

  13. Dark Matter remains obscure

    CERN Multimedia

    Fabio Capello

    2011-01-01

    It is one of the hidden secrets that literally surround the Universe. Experiments have shown no result so far because trying to capture particles that do not seem to interact with ordinary matter is no trivial exercise. The OSQAR experiment at CERN is dedicated to the search for axions, one of the candidates for Dark Matter. For its difficult challenge, OSQAR counts on one of the world’s most powerful magnets borrowed from the LHC. In a recent publication, the OSQAR collaboration was able to confirm that no axion signal appears out of the background. In other words: the quest is still on.   The OSQAR experiment installed in the SM18 hall. (Photo by F. Capello) The OSQAR “Light Shining Through a Wall” experiment was officially launched in 2007 with the aim of detecting axions, that is, particles that might be the main components of Dark Matter. OSQAR uses the powerful LHC dipole magnet to intensify the predicted photon-axion conversions in the presence of strong m...

  14. The Emission Nebula Sh 2-174: A Radio Investigation of the Surrounding Region

    CERN Document Server

    Ransom, R R; Geisbuesch, J; Reich, W; Landecker, T L

    2014-01-01

    Sh 2-174 is believed to be either a planetary nebula (PN) or ionized, ambient interstellar medium (ISM). We present in this paper 1420 MHz polarization, 1420 MHz total intensity (Stokes-I), and neutral hydrogen (HI) images of the region around Sh 2-174. The radio images address not only the nature of the object, but also the history of the relationship between Sh 2-174 and its surrounding environment. The HI images show that Sh 2-174 sits presently at the center of a 1.2 deg x 0.4 deg cloud. The Stokes-I image shows thermal emission peaks coincident with the R-band optical nebula, as well as low-surface-brightness emission from an ionized "halo" around Sh 2-174 and from an ionized "plateau" extending southeast from the cloud. The polarization images reveal Faraday-rotation structures along the projected trajectory of Sh 2-174, including a high-contrast structure with "arms" that run precisely along the eastern edge of the HI cloud and a wide central region which merges with the downstream edge of Sh 2-174. Th...

  15. Variable Ly alpha sheds light on the environment surrounding GRB 090426

    CERN Document Server

    Thöne, C C; Lazzati, D; Postigo, A de Ugarte; Fynbo, J P U; Christensen, L; Levan, A J; Aloy, M A; Hjorth, J; Jakobsson, P; Levesque, E M; Malesani, D; Milvang-Jensen, B; Roming, P W A; Tanvir, N R; Wiersema, K; Gladders, M; Wuyts, E; Dahle, H

    2011-01-01

    Long duration gamma-ray bursts are commonly associated with the deaths of massive stars. Spectroscopic studies using the afterglow as a light source provide a unique opportunity to unveil the medium surrounding it, probing the densest region of their galaxies. This material is usually in a low ionisation state and at large distances from the burst site, hence representing the normal interstellar medium in the galaxy. Here we present the case of GRB 090426 at z=2.609, whose optical spectrum indicates an almost fully ionised medium together with a low column density of neutral hydrogen. For the first time, we also observe variations in the Ly alpha absorption line. Photoionisation modeling shows that we are probing material from the vicinity of the burst (~80 pc). The host galaxy is a complex of two luminous interacting galaxies, which might suggest that this burst could have occurred in an isolated star-forming region outside its host galaxy created in the interaction of the two galaxies.

  16. Antimatter Matters

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN

    2016-01-01

    This video is a teaser-introduction to the Antimatter Matters exhibtion at the Royal Society's Summer Science exhibition July 4-10 2016. The exhibition is jointly organised and hosted by UK members of the ALPHA and LHCb collaborations.

  17. Dirac matter

    CERN Document Server

    Rivasseau, Vincent; Fuchs, Jean-Nöel

    2017-01-01

    This fifteenth volume of the Poincare Seminar Series, Dirac Matter, describes the surprising resurgence, as a low-energy effective theory of conducting electrons in many condensed matter systems, including graphene and topological insulators, of the famous equation originally invented by P.A.M. Dirac for relativistic quantum mechanics. In five highly pedagogical articles, as befits their origin in lectures to a broad scientific audience, this book explains why Dirac matters. Highlights include the detailed "Graphene and Relativistic Quantum Physics", written by the experimental pioneer, Philip Kim, and devoted to graphene, a form of carbon crystallized in a two-dimensional hexagonal lattice, from its discovery in 2004-2005 by the future Nobel prize winners Kostya Novoselov and Andre Geim to the so-called relativistic quantum Hall effect; the review entitled "Dirac Fermions in Condensed Matter and Beyond", written by two prominent theoreticians, Mark Goerbig and Gilles Montambaux, who consider many other mater...

  18. A Stellar Stream Surrounds the Whale Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-10-01

    The -cold dark matter cosmological model predicts that galaxies are assembled through the disruption and absorption of small satellite dwarf galaxies by their larger hosts. A recent study argues that NGC 4631, otherwise known as the Whale galaxy, shows evidence of such a recent merger in the form of an enormous stellar stream extending from it.Stream SignaturesAccording to the -CDM model, stellar tidal streams should be a ubiquitous feature among galaxies. When satellite dwarf galaxies are torn apart, they spread out into such streams before ultimately feeding the host galaxy. Unfortunately, these streams are very faint, so were only recently starting to detect these features.Stellar tidal streams have been discovered around the Milky Way and Andromeda, providing evidence of these galaxies growth via recent (within the last 8 Gyr) mergers. But discovering stellar streams around other Milky Way-like galaxies would help us to determine if the model of hierarchical galaxy assembly applies generally.To this end, the Stellar Tidal Stream Survey, led by PI David Martnez-Delgado (Center for Astronomy of Heidelberg University), is carrying out the first systematic survey of stellar tidal streams. In a recent study, Martnez-Delgado and collaborators present their detection of a giant (85 kpc long!) stellar tidal stream extending into the halo of NGC 4631, the Whale galaxy.Modeling a SatelliteThe top image is a snapshot from an N-body simulation of a single dwarf satellite, 3.5 Gyr after it started interacting with the Whale galaxy. The satellite has been torn apart and spread into a stream that reproduces observations, which are shown in the lower image (scale is not the same). [Martnez-Delgado et al. 2015]The Whale galaxy is a nearby edge-on spiral galaxy interacting with a second spiral, NGC 4656. But the authors dont believe that the Whale galaxys giant tidal stellar stream is caused by its interactions with NGC 4656. Instead, based on their observations, they believe

  19. PROBING THE LOCAL BUBBLE WITH DIFFUSE INTERSTELLAR BANDS. II. THE DIB PROPERTIES IN THE NORTHERN HEMISPHERE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farhang, Amin; Khosroshahi, Habib G.; Javadi, Atefeh; Molaeinezhad, Alireza; Tavasoli, Saeed; Habibi, Farhang; Kourkchi, Ehsan; Rezaei, Sara; Saberi, Maryam [School of Astronomy, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), PO Box 19395-5746 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Van Loon, Jacco Th.; Bailey, Mandy [Astrophysics Group, Lennard-Jones Laboratories, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Hardy, Liam, E-mail: a.farhang@ipm.ir [Isaac Newton Group, Apartado 321, E-38700 Santa Cruz de La Palma (Spain)

    2015-02-10

    We present a new high signal-to-noise ratio spectroscopic survey of the Northern hemisphere to probe the Local Bubble and its surroundings using the λ5780 Å and λ5797 Å diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs). We observed 432 sightlines to a distance of 200 pc over a duration of three years. In this study, we establish the λ5780 and λ5797 correlations with Na I, Ca II and E {sub B-V}, for both inside and outside the Local Bubble. The correlations show that among all neutral and ionized atoms, the correlation between Ca II and λ5780 is stronger than its correlation with λ5797, suggesting that λ5780 is more associated with regions where Ca{sup +} is more abundant. We study the λ5780 correlation with λ5797, which shows a tight correlation within and outside the Local Bubble. In addition, we investigate the DIB properties in UV irradiated and UV shielded regions. We find that, within and beyond the Local Bubble, λ5797 is located in denser parts of clouds, protected from UV irradiation, while λ5780 is located in the low-density regions of clouds.

  20. Dark Matter Annihilation at the Galactic Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linden, Timothy Ryan [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Observations by the WMAP and PLANCK satellites have provided extraordinarily accurate observations on the densities of baryonic matter, dark matter, and dark energy in the universe. These observations indicate that our universe is composed of approximately ve times as much dark matter as baryonic matter. However, e orts to detect a particle responsible for the energy density of dark matter have been unsuccessful. Theoretical models have indicated that a leading candidate for the dark matter is the lightest supersymmetric particle, which may be stable due to a conserved R-parity. This dark matter particle would still be capable of interacting with baryons via weak-force interactions in the early universe, a process which was found to naturally explain the observed relic abundance of dark matter today. These residual annihilations can persist, albeit at a much lower rate, in the present universe, providing a detectable signal from dark matter annihilation events which occur throughout the universe. Simulations calculating the distribution of dark matter in our galaxy almost universally predict the galactic center of the Milky Way Galaxy (GC) to provide the brightest signal from dark matter annihilation due to its relative proximity and large simulated dark matter density. Recent advances in telescope technology have allowed for the rst multiwavelength analysis of the GC, with suitable e ective exposure, angular resolution, and energy resolution in order to detect dark matter particles with properties similar to those predicted by the WIMP miracle. In this work, I describe ongoing e orts which have successfully detected an excess in -ray emission from the region immediately surrounding the GC, which is di cult to describe in terms of standard di use emission predicted in the GC region. While the jury is still out on any dark matter interpretation of this excess, I describe several related observations which may indicate a dark matter origin. Finally, I discuss the

  1. Kinetic vs. multi-fluid approach for interstellar neutrals in the heliosphere: exploration of the interstellar magnetic field effects

    CERN Document Server

    Alouani-Bibi, Fathallah; Alexashov, Dimitry; Izmodenov, Vladislav; Toth, Gabor

    2011-01-01

    We present a new 3d self-consistent two-component (plasma and neutral hydrogen) model of the solar wind interaction with the local interstellar medium (LISM). This model (K-MHD) combines the MHD treatment of the solar wind and the ionized LISM component, with a kinetic model of neutral interstellar hydrogen (LISH). The local interstellar magnetic field (BLISM) intensity and orientation are chosen based on an early analysis of the heliosheath flows (Opher et al. 2009). The properties of the plasma and neutrals obtained using the (K-MHD) model are compared to previous multi-fluid (Opher et al. 2009) and kinetic models (Izmodenov et al. 2005). The new treatment of LISH revealed important changes in the heliospheric properties not captures by the multi-fluid model. These include a decrease in the heliocentric distance to the termination shock (TS), a thinner heliosheath and a reduced deflection angle ({\\theta}) of the heliosheath flows. The asymmetry of the termination shock, however, seems to be unchanged by the...

  2. STRUCTURE OF THE INTERSTELLAR BOUNDARY EXPLORER RIBBON FROM SECONDARY CHARGE-EXCHANGE AT THE SOLAR–INTERSTELLAR INTERFACE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zirnstein, E. J.; McComas, D. J. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX 78228 (United States); Heerikhuisen, J., E-mail: ezirnstein@swri.edu, E-mail: dmccomas@swri.edu, E-mail: jacob.heerikhuisen@uah.edu [Department of Space Science and Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States)

    2015-05-01

    In 2009, the Interstellar Boundary Explorer discovered a bright “ribbon” of energetic neutral atom (ENA) flux in the energy range ≤0.4–6 keV, encircling a large portion of the sky. This observation was not previously predicted by any models or theories, and since its discovery, it has been the subject of numerous studies of its origin and properties. One of the most studied mechanisms for its creation is the “secondary ENA” process. Here, solar wind ions, neutralized by charge-exchange with interstellar atoms, propagate outside the heliopause; experience two charge-exchange events in the dense outer heliosheath; and then propagate back inside the heliosphere, preferentially in the direction perpendicular to the local interstellar magnetic field. This process has been extensively analyzed using state-of-the-art modeling and simulation techniques, but it has been difficult to visualize. In this Letter, we show the three-dimensional structure of the source of the ribbon, providing a physical picture of the spatial and energy scales over which the secondary ENA process occurs. These results help us understand how the ribbon is generated and further supports a secondary ENA process as the leading ribbon source mechanism.

  3. Interstellar scintillation as the origin of the rapid radio variability of the quasar J1819+3845.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennett-Thorpe, J; de Bruyn, A G

    2002-01-03

    The liberation of gravitational energy as matter falls onto a supermassive black hole at the centre of a galaxy is believed to explain the high luminosity of quasars. The variability of this emission from quasars and other types of active galactic nuclei can provide information on the size of the emitting regions and the physical process of fuelling the black hole. Some active galactic nuclei are variable at optical (and shorter) wavelengths, and display radio outbursts over years and decades. These active galactic nuclei often also show faster intraday variability at radio wavelengths. The origin of this rapid variability has been extensively debated, but a correlation between optical and radio variations in some sources suggests that both are intrinsic. This would, however, require radiation brightness temperatures that seem physically implausible, leading to the suggestion that the rapid variations are caused by scattering of the emission by the interstellar medium inside our Galaxy. Here we show that the rapid variations in the extreme case of quasar J1819+3845 (ref. 10) indeed arise from interstellar scintillation. The transverse velocity of the scattering material reveals the presence of plasma with a surprisingly high velocity close to the Solar System.

  4. Planck intermediate results. XXXII. The relative orientation between the magnetic field and structures traced by interstellar dust

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, R; Aghanim, N; Alves, M I R; Arnaud, M; Arzoumanian, D; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartolo, N; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bonaldi, A; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Bracco, A; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Calabrese, E; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Chamballu, A; Chiang, H C; Christensen, P R; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Couchot, F; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Ducout, A; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Elsner, F; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Falgarone, E; Ferrière, K; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Frejsel, A; Galeotta, S; Galli, S; Ganga, K; Ghosh, T; Giard, M; Gjerløw, E; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gregorio, A; Gruppuso, A; Guillet, V; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D L; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Holmes, W A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Jaffe, A H; Jaffe, T R; Jones, W C; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Kneissl, R; Knoche, J; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Lawrence, C R; Leonardi, R; Levrier, F; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maffei, B; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Marshall, D J; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; Mazzotta, P; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Natoli, P; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Oppermann, N; Oxborrow, C A; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paoletti, D; Pasian, F; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Pettorino, V; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Popa, L; Pratt, G W; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reach, W T; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Roudier, G; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Savini, G; Scott, D; Soler, J D; Spencer, L D; Stolyarov, V; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Wehus, I K; Wiesemeyer, H; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2014-01-01

    The role of the magnetic field in the formation of the filamentary structures observed in the interstellar medium (ISM) is a debated topic. The Planck all-sky maps of linearly polarized emission from dust at 353GHz provide the required combination of imaging and statistics to study the correlation between the structures of the Galactic magnetic field and of interstellar matter, both in the diffuse ISM and in molecular clouds. The data reveal structures, or ridges, in the intensity map with counterparts in the Stokes Q and/or U maps. We focus on structures at intermediate and high Galactic latitudes with column density from $10^{20}$ to $10^{22}$ cm$^{-2}$. We measure the magnetic field orientation on the plane of the sky from the polarization data, and present an algorithm to estimate the orientation of the ridges from the dust intensity map. We use analytical models to account for projection effects. Comparing polarization angles on and off the structures, we estimate the mean ratio between the strengths of ...

  5. Urea, glycolic acid, and glycerol in an organic residue produced by ultraviolet irradiation of interstellar/pre-cometary ice analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuevo, Michel; Bredehöft, Jan Hendrik; Meierhenrich, Uwe J; d'Hendecourt, Louis; Thiemann, Wolfram H-P

    2010-03-01

    More than 50 stable organic molecules have been detected in the interstellar medium (ISM), from ground-based and onboard-satellite astronomical observations, in the gas and solid phases. Some of these organics may be prebiotic compounds that were delivered to early Earth by comets and meteorites and may have triggered the first chemical reactions involved in the origin of life. Ultraviolet irradiation of ices simulating photoprocesses of cold solid matter in astrophysical environments have shown that photochemistry can lead to the formation of amino acids and related compounds. In this work, we experimentally searched for other organic molecules of prebiotic interest, namely, oxidized acid labile compounds. In a setup that simulates conditions relevant to the ISM and Solar System icy bodies such as comets, a condensed CH(3)OH:NH(3) = 1:1 ice mixture was UV irradiated at approximately 80 K. The molecular constituents of the nonvolatile organic residue that remained at room temperature were separated by capillary gas chromatography and identified by mass spectrometry. Urea, glycolic acid, and glycerol were detected in this residue, as well as hydroxyacetamide, glycerolic acid, and glycerol amide. These organics are interesting target molecules to be searched for in space. Finally, tentative mechanisms of formation for these compounds under interstellar/pre-cometary conditions are proposed.

  6. The nearby interstellar medium toward α Leo. UV observations and modeling of a warm cloud within hot gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gry, Cecile; Jenkins, Edward B.

    2017-02-01

    Aims: Our aim is to characterize the conditions in the nearest interstellar cloud. Methods: We analyze interstellar absorption features in the full UV spectrum of the nearby (d = 24 pc) B8 IVn star α Leo (Regulus). Observations were obtained with STIS at high resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio by the HST ASTRAL Treasury program. We derive column densities for many key atomic species and interpret their partial ionizations. Results: The gas in front of α Leo exhibits two absorption components. The main one is kinematically identified as the local interstellar cloud (LIC) that surrounds the Sun. The second component is shifted by +5.6 km s-1 relative to the main component, in agreement with results for other lines of sight in this region of the sky, and shares its ionization and physical conditions. The excitation of the C II fine-structure levels and the ratio of Mg I to Mg II reveal a temperature T = 6500 (+750, -600) K and electron density n(e) = 0.11 (+0.025, -0.03) cm-3. Our investigation of the ionization balance yields the ion fractions for 10 different atoms and indicates that about 1/3 of the hydrogen atoms are ionized. Metals are significantly depleted onto grains, with sulfur showing [S/H] -0.27. N(H I) = 1.9 (+0.9, -0.6) × 1018 cm-3, which indicates that this partly neutral gas occupies only 2 to 8 parsecs (about 13%) of the space toward the star, with the remaining volume being filled with a hot gas that emits soft X-rays. We do not detect any absorption features from the highly ionized species that could be produced in an interface between the warm medium and the surrounding hot gas, possibly because of non-equilibrium conditions or a particular magnetic field orientation that reduces thermal conduction. Finally, the radial velocity of the LIC agrees with that of the Local Leo Cold Cloud, indicating that they may be physically related.

  7. On the morphology of $\\gamma-$ray emission induced by $e^{\\pm}$ from annihilating self-interacting dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Cui, Ming-Yang; Zong, Hong-Shi

    2016-01-01

    With the Fermi-LAT data quite a few research groups have reported a spatially extended GeV $\\gamma$-ray excess surrounding the Galactic Center (GC). The physical origin of such a GeV excess is still unclear and one interesting possibility is the inverse Compton scattering of the electrons/positrons from annihilation of self-interacting dark matter (SIDM) particles with the interstellar optical photons. In this work we calculate the morphology of such a kind of $\\gamma$-ray emission. For the annihilation channel of $\\bar{\\chi}\\chi\\rightarrow \\phi\\phi\\rightarrow e^{+}e^{-}e^{+}e^{-}$, the inverse Compton scattering (ICS) dominates over the bremsstrahlung on producing the GeV $\\gamma$-ray emission. For the SIDM particles with a rest mass $m_\\chi \\sim $ tens GeV that may be favored by the modeling of the Galactic GeV excess, the ICS radiation at GeV energies concentrates along the Galactic plane. The degrees of asymmetry high up to $\\geq 0.3$ are found in some regions of interest, which in turn proposes a plausib...

  8. Interstellar C2 Molecule as Seen in HST/STIS Data

    CERN Document Server

    Dyrka, M; Pawlikowski, M; Dyrka, Marcin; Wszo{\\l}ek, Bogdan; Pawlikowski, Micha l

    2006-01-01

    Carbon chains are sometimes considered as possible carriers of some diffuse interstellar bands. Spectroscopic observations in UV band carried by spectrometer STIS fed with HST, give us the possibility to detect many interstellar molecules. We focused our attention on C2 molecule and we detected it in spectra of three reddened stars (HD27778, HD147933, HD207198). Interstellar molecule C2 was detected as a set of absorption lines around 2313 angstroms.

  9. Chemical Evolution of Interstellar Dust into Planetary Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomenkova, M. N.; Chang, S.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Comets are believed to retain some interstellar materials, stored in fairly pristine conditions since-their formation. The composition and properties of cometary dust grains should reflect those of grains in the outer part of the protosolar nebula which, at least in part, were inherited from the presolar molecular cloud. However, infrared emission features in comets differ from their interstellar counterparts. These differences imply processing of interstellar material on its way to incorporation in comets, but C and N appear to be retained. Overall dust evolution from the interstellar medium (ISM) to planetary materials is accompanied by an increase in proportion of complex organics and a decrease in pure carbon phases. The composition of cometary dust grains was measured in situ during fly-by missions to comet Halley in 1986. The mass spectra of about 5000 cometary dust grains with masses of 5 x 10(exp -17) - 5 x 10(exp -12) g provide data about the presence and relative abundances of the major elements H, C, N, O,Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni. The bulk abundances of major rock-forming elements integrated over all spectra were found to be solar within a factor of 2, while the volatile elements H, C, N, O in dust are depleted in respect to their total cosmic abundances. The abundances of C and N in comet dust are much closer to interstellar than to meteoritic and are higher than those of dust in the diffuse ISM. In dense molecular clouds dust grains are covered by icy mantles, the average composition of which is estimated to be H:C:N:O = 96:14:1:34. Up to 40% of elemental C and O may be sequestered in mantles. If we use this upper limit to add H, C, N and O as icy mantle material to the abundances residing in dust in the diffuse ISM, then the resulting values for H. C, and N match cometary abundances. Thus, ice mantles undergoing chemical evolution on grains in the dense ISM appear to have been transformed into less volatile and more complex organic

  10. THE CLASSIFICATION OF THE SURROUNDINGS OF COAL MINING ROADWAYS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹喜正; 侯朝炯; 李华祥

    1996-01-01

    This introduces the calculation of opaper the deformationg .the Surroundings of coaowaysand the divisi of surroundings into 5 levels by means or !fuzzy integral assess mairrx, wnlcnserves-asthe scientific basis for selecting supporting pattern of roadways and determining the, pa-rameters of support.

  11. Extraterrestrial Organic Chemistry: From the Interstellar Medium to the Origins of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Extraterrestrially delivered organics in the origin of cellular life. Various processes leading to the emergence of cellular life from organics delivered from space to earth or other planetary bodies in the solar system will be reviewed. The focus will be on: (1) self-assembly of amphiphilic material to vesicles and other structures, such as micelles and multilayers, and its role in creating environments suitable for chemical catalysis, (2) a possible role of extraterrestrial delivery of organics in the formation of the simplest bioenergetics (3) mechanisms leading from amino acids or their precursors to simple peptides and, subsequently, to the evolution of metabolism. These issues will be discussed from two opposite points of view: (1) Which molecules could have been particularly useful in the protobiological evolution; this may provide focus for searching for these molecules in interstellar media. (2) Assuming that a considerable part of the inventory of organic matter on the early earth was delivered extraterrestrially, what does relative abundance of different organics in space tell us about the scenario leading to the origin of life.

  12. Interstellar medium structure and the slope of the radio $\\Sigma-D$ relation of supernova remnants

    CERN Document Server

    Kostić, Petar; Urošević, Dejan; Arbutina, Bojan; Prodanović, Tijana

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the influence of fractal structure of the interstellar matter (ISM) density on the parameter values for the radio surface brightness to diameter ($\\Sigma-D$) relation for supernovae remnants (SNRs). We model a dense ISM as a molecular cloud with fractal density structure. SNRs are modelled as spheres of different radius scattered in the modelled ISM. The surface brightness of the SNRs is calculated from the simple relation $\\Sigma \\propto \\rho^{0.5}D^{-3.5}$ and also from the parametrized more general form $\\Sigma \\propto \\rho^{\\eta}D^{-\\beta_0}$. Our results demonstrate that empirical $\\Sigma-D$ slopes that are steeper than the ones derived from theory, might be partly explained with the fractal structure of the ambient medium into which SNRs expand. The slope of the $\\Sigma-D$ relation steepens if the density of the regions where SNRs are formed is higher. The simple geometrical effects combined with the fractal structure of the ISM can contribute to a steeper empirical $\\Sigma-D$ slopes, especia...

  13. Solar Modulation of the Local Interstellar Spectrum with Voyager 1, AMS-02, PAMELA, and BESS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corti, C.; Bindi, V.; Consolandi, C.; Whitman, K.

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, the increasing precision of direct cosmic rays measurements opened the door to high-sensitivity indirect searches of dark matter and to more accurate predictions for radiation doses received by astronauts and electronics in space. The key ingredients in the study of these phenomena are the knowledge of the local interstellar spectrum (LIS) of galactic cosmic rays and the understanding of how the solar modulation affects the LIS inside the heliosphere. Voyager 1, AMS-02, PAMELA, and BESS measurements of proton and helium fluxes provide valuable information, allowing us to shed light on the shape of the LIS and the details of the solar modulation during solar cycles 22-24. A new parametrization of the LIS is presented, based on the latest data from Voyager 1 and AMS-02. Using the framework of the force-field approximation, the solar modulation parameter is extracted from the time-dependent fluxes measured by PAMELA and BESS. A modified version of the force-field approximation with a rigidity-dependent modulation parameter is introduced, yielding better fits than the force-field approximation. The results are compared with the modulation parameter inferred by neutron monitors.

  14. Spatial structure of several diffuse interstellar band carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kos, Janez

    2017-07-01

    Diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) hold a lot of information about the state and the structure of the interstellar medium (ISM). Structure can most directly be observed by extensive spectroscopic surveys, including surveys of stars where DIBs are especially important, as they are conveniently found in all observed bands. Large surveys lack the quality of spectra to detect weak DIBs, so many spectra from small regions on the sky have to be combined before a sufficient signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is achieved. However, the clumpiness of the DIB clouds is unknown, which poses a problem, as the measured properties can end up being averaged over a too large area. We use a technique called Gaussian processes to accurately measure profiles of interstellar absorption lines in 145 high SNR and high-resolution spectra of hot stars. Together with Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo approach, we also get reliable estimates of the uncertainties. We derive scales at which column densities of 18 DIBs, CH, CH+, Ca I and Ca II show some spatial correlation. This correlation scale is associated with the size of the ISM clouds. Scales expressed as the angle on the sky vary significantly from DIB to DIB between ∼0.23° for the DIB at 5512 Å and 3.5° for the DIB at 6196 Å, suggesting that different DIB carriers have different clumpiness but occupy the same general space. Our study includes lines of sight all over the northern Milky Way, as well as out of the Galactic plane, covering regions with different physical conditions. The derived correlation scales therefore represent a general image of the Galactic ISM on the scales of ∼5-100 pc.

  15. Effects of turbulent dust grain motion to interstellar chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, J. X.; He, J. H.; Yan, H. R.

    2016-02-01

    Theoretical studies have revealed that dust grains are usually moving fast through the turbulent interstellar gas, which could have significant effects upon interstellar chemistry by modifying grain accretion. This effect is investigated in this work on the basis of numerical gas-grain chemical modelling. Major features of the grain motion effect in the typical environment of dark clouds (DC) can be summarized as follows: (1) decrease of gas-phase (both neutral and ionic) abundances and increase of surface abundances by up to 2-3 orders of magnitude; (2) shifts of the existing chemical jumps to earlier evolution ages for gas-phase species and to later ages for surface species by factors of about 10; (3) a few exceptional cases in which some species turn out to be insensitive to this effect and some other species can show opposite behaviours too. These effects usually begin to emerge from a typical DC model age of about 105 yr. The grain motion in a typical cold neutral medium (CNM) can help overcome the Coulomb repulsive barrier to enable effective accretion of cations on to positively charged grains. As a result, the grain motion greatly enhances the abundances of some gas-phase and surface species by factors up to 2-6 or more orders of magnitude in the CNM model. The grain motion effect in a typical molecular cloud (MC) is intermediate between that of the DC and CNM models, but with weaker strength. The grain motion is found to be important to consider in chemical simulations of typical interstellar medium.

  16. Tracking Interstellar Space Weather Toward Timing-Array Millisecond Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, N. D. R.; Ord, S. M.; Tremblay, S. E.; Shannon, R. M.; van Straten, W.; Kaplan, D. L.; Macquart, J.-P.; Kirsten, F.

    2017-01-01

    The recent LIGO detection of milli-Hertz gravitational wave (GW) signals from black-hole merger events has further reinforced the important role of Pulsar timing array (PTA) experiments in the GW astronomy. PTAs exploit the clock-like stability of fast-spinning millisecond pulsars (MSPs) to make a direct detection of ultra-low frequency (nano-Hertz) gravitational waves, and this is a key science objective for the SKA. The science enabled by PTAs is highly complementary to that possible with LIGO-like detectors. PTA efforts of the past few years clearly suggest that interstellar propagation effects on pulsar signals may ultimately limit the detection sensitivity of PTAs if they are not accurately measured and corrected for in timing measurements. Interstellar medium (ISM) effects are much stronger at lower radio frequencies and therefore the MWA presents an exciting and unique opportunity to calibrate interstellar propagation delays. This will potentially lead to enhanced sensitivity and scientific impact of PTA projects. Since our demonstration early this year of our ability to form a coherent (tied-array) beam by re-processing the recorded VCS data (Bhat et al. 2016), we have successfully ported the full processing pipeline on to the Galaxy cluster of Pawsey and also demonstrated the value of high-sensitivity multi-band pulsar observations that are now possible with the MWA. Here we propose further observations of three most promising PTA pulsars that will be nightly objects in the 2017A period. The main science driver is to characterise the nature of the turbulent ISM through high-quality scintillation and dispersion studies including the investigation of chromatic (frequency-dependent) DMs. Success of these efforts will define the breadth and scope of a more ambitious program in the future, bringing in a new science niche for MWA and SKA-low.

  17. Trajectories for a Near Term Mission to the Interstellar Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Nitin; Strange, Nathan; Alkalai, Leon

    2015-01-01

    Trajectories for rapid access to the interstellar medium (ISM) with a Kuiper Belt Object (KBO) flyby, launching between 2022 and 2030, are described. An impulsive-patched-conic broad search algorithm combined with a local optimizer is used for the trajectory computations. Two classes of trajectories, (1) with a powered Jupiter flyby and (2) with a perihelion maneuver, are studied and compared. Planetary flybys combined with leveraging maneuvers reduce launch C3 requirements (by factor of 2 or more) and help satisfy mission-phasing constraints. Low launch C3 combined with leveraging and a perihelion maneuver is found to be enabling for a near-term potential mission to the ISM.

  18. Spectroscopy of the earth's atmosphere and interstellar medium

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, KN

    1992-01-01

    Spectroscopy of the Earth's Atmosphere and Interstellar Medium focuses on the characteristics of the electromagnetic spectrum of the Earth's atmosphere in the far-infrared and microwave regions. It discusses the modes of observation in field measurements and reviews the two techniques used in the spectral region. Organized into six chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the effect of water-vapor absorption, followed by a discussion on the two frequently used method for deriving atmospheric parameters from high-resolution infrared atmospheric spectra, namely, the equivalent width

  19. Physical conditions in CaFe interstellar clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Gnacinski, P

    2007-01-01

    Interstellar clouds that exhibit strong Ca I and Fe I lines were called CaFe clouds. The ionisation equilibrium equations were used to model the column densities of Ca II, Ca I, K I, Na I, Fe I and Ti II in CaFe clouds. The chemical composition of CaFe clouds is that of the Solar System and no depletion of elements onto dust grains is seen. The CaFe clouds have high electron densities n=1 cm^-3 that leads to high column densities of neutral Ca and Fe.

  20. Strategic Roadmap for the Development of an Interstellar Space Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gifra, M.; Peeters, W.

    Recent technological advances and scientific discoveries, particularly in astronomy and space technology, are opening our minds into the deepest realms of the universe, and also they are bringing a new era of space exploration and development. This sense of entering into a new era of space exploration is being boosted by the permanent discovery of new planets - to date, there are 684 confirmed extrasolar planets [1] - outside our solar system. The possibility that astronomers may soon find a habitable extrasolar planet near Earth and the recent advances in space propulsion that could reduce travel times have stimulated the space community to consider the development of an interstellar manned mission. But this scenario of entering into a new era of space development is ultimately contingent on the outcome of the actual world's economic crisis. The current financial crisis, on top of recent national and sovereign debts problems, could have serious consequences for space exploration and development as the national budgets for space activities are to freeze [2].This paper proposes a multi-decade space program for an interstellar manned mission. It designs a roadmap for the achievement of interstellar flight capability within a timeframe of 40 years, and also considers different scenarios where various technological and economical constraints are taken into account in order to know if such a space endeavour could be viable. It combines macro-level scenarios with a strategic roadmap to provide a framework for condensing all information in one map and timeframe, thus linking decision-making with plausible scenarios. The paper also explores the state of the art of space technologies 20 to 40 years in the future and its potential economic impact. It estimates the funding requirements, possible sources of funds, and the potential returns.The Interstellar Space Program proposed in this paper has the potential to help solve the global crisis by bringing a new landscape of