WorldWideScience

Sample records for surgery systematic review

  1. Robotic bariatric surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourman, Matthew M; Saber, Alan A

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is a nationwide epidemic, and the only evidence-based, durable treatment of this disease is bariatric surgery. This field has evolved drastically during the past decade. One of the latest advances has been the increased use of robotics within this field. The goal of our study was to perform a systematic review of the recent data to determine the safety and efficacy of robotic bariatric surgery. The setting was the University Hospitals Case Medical Center (Cleveland, OH). A PubMed search was performed for robotic bariatric surgery from 2005 to 2011. The inclusion criteria were English language, original research, human, and bariatric surgical procedures. Perioperative data were then collected from each study and recorded. A total of 18 studies were included in our review. The results of our systematic review showed that bariatric surgery, when performed with the use of robotics, had similar or lower complication rates compared with traditional laparoscopy. Two studies showed shorter operative times using the robot for Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, but 4 studies showed longer operative times in the robotic arm. In addition, the learning curve appears to be shorter when robotic gastric bypass is compared with the traditional laparoscopic approach. Most investigators agreed that robotic laparoscopic surgery provides superior imaging and freedom of movement compared with traditional laparoscopy. The application of robotics appears to be a safe option within the realm of bariatric surgery. Prospective randomized trials comparing robotic and laparoscopic outcomes are needed to further define the role of robotics within the field of bariatric surgery. Longer follow-up times would also help elucidate any long-term outcomes differences with the use of robotics versus traditional laparoscopy. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery. All rights reserved.

  2. Minimal invasive gastric surgery: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirti Bushan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: As an alternate to open surgery, laparoscopic gastrectomy (LG is currently being performed in many centers, and has gained a wide clinical acceptance. The aim of this review article is to compare oncologic adequacy and safety of LG with open surgery for gastric adenocarcinomas with respect to lymphadenectomy, short-term outcomes (postoperative morbidity and mortality and long-term outcome (5 years overall survival and disease-free survival. Materials and Methods: PubMed was searched using query “LG” for literature published in English from January 2000 to April 2014. A total of 875 entries were retrieved. These articles were screened and 59 manuscripts ultimately formed the basis of current review. Results: There is high-quality evidence to support short-term efficacy, safety and feasibility of LG for gastric adenocarcinomas, although accounts on long-term survivals are still infrequent.

  3. Bariatric surgery in elderly patients: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Giordano S; Victorzon M

    2015-01-01

    Salvatore Giordano,1 Mikael Victorzon2,3 1Department of Plastic and General Surgery, Turku University Hospital, Turku, 2Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Vaasa Central Hospital, Vaasa, 3University of Turku, Turku, Finland Abstract: Controversy exists regarding the effectiveness and safety of bariatric/metabolic surgery in elderly patients. We performed a systematic review on this issue in patients aged 60 years or older. MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, Embase, Scopus, and...

  4. Fasting abbreviation among patients submitted to oncologic surgery: systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    PINTO, Andressa dos Santos; GRIGOLETTI, Shana Souza; MARCADENTI, Aline

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The abbreviation of perioperative fasting among candidates to elective surgery have been associated with shorter hospital stay and decreased postoperative complications. OBJECTIVE: To conduct a systematic review from randomized controlled trials to detect whether the abbreviation of fasting is beneficial to patients undergoing cancer surgery compared to traditional fasting protocols. METHOD: A literature search was performed in electronic databases: MEDLINE (PubMed), SciELO...

  5. Single-port laparoscopic rectal surgery - a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lolle, Ida; Rosenstock, Steffen; Bulut, Orhan

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Single-port laparoscopic surgery (SPLS) for colonic disease has been widely described, whereas data for SPLS rectal resection are sparse. This review aimed to evaluate the feasibility, safety and complication profile of SPLS for rectal diseases. METHODS: A systematic literature search...

  6. Volume-outcome association in bariatric surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zevin, Boris; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Grantcharov, Teodor P

    2012-07-01

    To systematically examine the association between annual hospital and surgeon case volume and patient outcomes in bariatric surgery. Bariatric surgery remains a technically demanding field with significant risk for morbidity and mortality. To mitigate this risk, minimum annual hospital and surgeon case volume requirements are being set and certain hospitals are being designated as "Bariatric Surgery Centers of Excellence." The effects of these interventions on patient outcomes remain unclear. A comprehensive systematic review on volume-outcome association in bariatric surgery was conducted by searching MEDLINE, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Evidence Based Medicine Reviews databases. Abstracts of identified articles were reviewed and pertinent full-text versions were retrieved. Manual search of bibliographies was performed and relevant studies were retrieved. Methodological quality assessment and data extraction were completed in a systematic fashion. Pooling of results was not feasible due to the heterogeneity of the studies. A qualitative summary of results is presented. From a total of 2928 unique citations, 24 studies involving a total of 458,032 patients were selected for review. Two studies were prospective cohorts (level of evidence [LOE] 1), 3 were retrospective cohorts (LOE 3), 2 were retrospective case controls (LOE 3), and 17 were retrospective case series (LOE 4). The overall methodological quality of the reviewed studies was fair. A positive association between annual surgeon volume and patient outcomes was reported in 11 of 13 studies. A positive association between annual hospital volume and patient outcomes was reported in 14 of 17 studies. There is strong evidence of improved patient outcomes in the hands of high-volume surgeons and high-volume centers. This study supports the concept of "Bariatric Surgery Center of Excellence" accreditation; however, future research into the quality of care characteristics of successful bariatric

  7. Sham Surgery in Orthopedics: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louw, Adriaan; Diener, Ina; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Puentedura, Emilio J

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the evidence for the effectiveness of sham surgery in orthopedics by conducting a systematic review of literature. Systematic searches were conducted on Biomed Central, BMJ.com, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library, NLM Central Gateway, OVID, ProQuest (Digital Dissertations), PsycInfo, PubMed/Medline, ScienceDirect and Web of Science. Secondary searching (PEARLing) was undertaken, whereby reference lists of the selected articles were reviewed for additional references not identified in the primary search. All randomized controlled trials comparing surgery versus sham surgery in orthopedics were included. Data were extracted and methodological quality was assessed by two reviewers using the Critical Review Form-Quantitative Studies. Levels of scientific evidence, based on the direction of outcomes of the trials, were established following the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Hierarchy of Evidence (Australian National Health and Medical Research Council, 1999). This review includes six randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving 277 subjects. All six studies were rated as very good on methodological quality. Heterogeneity across the studies, with respect to participants, interventions evaluated, and outcome measures used, prevented meta-analyses. Narrative synthesis of results, based on effect size, demonstrated that sham surgery in orthopedics was as effective as actual surgery in reducing pain and improving disability. This review suggests that sham surgery has shown to be just as effective as actual surgery in reducing pain and disability; however, care should be taken to generalize findings because of the limited number of studies. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  8. Systematic Review of Endoscopic Middle Ear Surgery Outcomes

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    Kozin, Elliott D.; Gulati, Shawn; Lehmann, Ashton; Remenschneider, Aaron K.; Kaplan, Alyson; Landegger, Lukas D.; Cohen, Michael S.; Lee, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Middle ear surgery increasingly employs endoscopes as an adjunct to or replacement for the operative microscope. Superior visualization and transcanal access to disease normally managed with a transmastoid approach are touted as advantages with the endoscope. No study, however, has systemically reviewed the literature to evaluate outcomes of endoscopic ear surgery (EES). We provide a systematic review of endoscope applications in middle ear surgery with an emphasis on outcomes. Data Sources PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Methods A literature review was performed using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis recommendations. Articles were categorized based on study design, indication, and use of an endoscope either as an adjunct to or as a replacement for a microscope. Quantitative and descriptive analyses were performed. Results Ninety-one articles published between 1967 and 2014 met inclusion and exclusion criteria. The main indication for the use of an endoscope was cholesteatoma or myringoplasty. Of the identified articles, 40 provided a discrete discussion of outcomes. In cholesteatoma surgery, the endoscope has been mainly employed as an adjunct to the microscope, and although outcomes assessments vary across studies, the endoscope identified residual cholesteatoma in up to 50% of cases. Conclusion Endoscopes have been predominately used as an observational adjunct to the microscope to improve visualization of the tympanic cavity. Recent reports utilize the endoscope exclusively during surgical dissection; however, data comparing patient outcomes following the use of an operative endoscope versus a microscope are lacking. Areas in need of additional research are highlighted. PMID:25418475

  9. Antibiotic prophylaxis in orthognathic surgery: A complex systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultin, Margareta; Klinge, Anna; Klinge, Björn; Tranæus, Sofia; Lund, Bodil

    2018-01-01

    Objective In orthognathic surgery, antibiotics are prescribed to reduce the risk of postoperative infection. However, there is lack of consensus over the appropriate drug, the dose and duration of administration. The aim of this complex systematic review was to assess the effect of antibiotics on postoperative infections in orthognathic surgery. Methods Both systematic reviews and primary studies were assessed. Medline (OVID), The Cochrane Library (Wiley) and EMBASE (embase.com), PubMed (non-indexed articles) and Health Technology Assessment (HTA) publications were searched. The primary studies were assessed using GRADE and the systematic reviews by AMSTAR. Results Screening of abstracts yielded 6 systematic reviews and 36 primary studies warranting full text scrutiny. In total,14 primary studies were assessed for risk of bias. Assessment of the included systematic reviews identified two studies with a moderate risk of bias, due to inclusion in the meta-analyses of primary studies with a high risk of bias. Quality assessment of the primary studies disclosed one with a moderate risk of bias and one with a low risk. The former compared a single dose of antibiotic with 24 hour prophylaxis using the same antibiotic; the latter compared oral and intravenous administration of antibiotics. Given the limited number of acceptable studies, no statistical analysis was undertaken, as it was unlikely to contribute any relevant information. Conclusion With respect to antibiotic prophylaxis in orthognathic surgery, most of the studies to date have been poorly conducted and reported. Thus scientific uncertainty remains as to the preferred antibiotic and the optimal duration of administration. PMID:29385159

  10. Enhanced recovery after vascular surgery: protocol for a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gotlib Conn Lesley

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS programme is a multimodal evidence-based approach to surgical care which begins in the preoperative setting and extends through to patient discharge in the postoperative period. The primary components of ERAS include the introduction of preoperative patient education; reduction in perioperative use of nasogastric tubes and drains; the use of multimodal analgesia; goal-directed fluid management; early removal of Foley catheter; early mobilization, and early oral nutrition. The ERAS approach has gradually evolved to become the standard of care in colorectal surgery and is presently being used in other specialty areas such as vascular surgery. Currently there is little evidence available for the implementation of ERAS in this field. We plan to conduct a systematic review of this literature with a view to incorporating ERAS principles into the management of major elective vascular surgery procedures. Methods We will search EMBASE (OVID, 1947 to June 2012, Medline (OVID, 1948 to June 2012, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Wiley, Issue 1, 2012. Searches will be performed with no year or language restrictions. For inclusion, studies must look at adult patients over 18 years. Major elective vascular surgery includes carotid, bypass, aneurysm and amputation procedures. Studies must have evaluated usual care against an ERAS intervention in the preoperative, perioperative or postoperative period of care. Primary outcome measures are length of stay, decreased complication rate, and patient satisfaction or expectations. Only randomized controlled trials will be included. Discussion Most ERAS approaches have been considered in the context of colorectal surgery. Given the increasing use of multiple yet different aspects of this pathway in vascular surgery, it is timely to systematically review the evidence for their independent or combined outcomes, with a view to implementing

  11. Systematic review on reoperative bariatric surgery: American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery Revision Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brethauer, Stacy A; Kothari, Shanu; Sudan, Ranjan; Williams, Brandon; English, Wayne J; Brengman, Matthew; Kurian, Marina; Hutter, Matthew; Stegemann, Lloyd; Kallies, Kara; Nguyen, Ninh T; Ponce, Jaime; Morton, John M

    2014-01-01

    Reoperative bariatric surgery has become a common practice in many bariatric surgery programs. There is currently little evidence-based guidance regarding specific indications and outcomes for reoperative bariatric surgery. A task force was convened to review the current evidence regarding reoperative bariatric surgery. The aim of the review was to identify procedure-specific indications and outcomes for reoperative procedures. Literature search was conducted to identify studies reporting indications for and outcomes after reoperative bariatric surgery. Specifically, operations to treat complications, failed weight loss, and weight regain were evaluated. Abstract and manuscript reviews were completed by the task force members to identify, grade, and categorize relevant studies. A total of 819 articles were identified in the initial search. After review for inclusion criteria and data quality, 175 articles were included in the systematic review and analysis. The majority of published studies are single center retrospective reviews. The evidence supporting reoperative surgery for acute and chronic complications is described. The evidence regarding reoperative surgery for failed weight loss and weight regain generally demonstrates improved weight loss and co-morbidity reduction after reintervention. Procedure-specific outcomes are described. Complication rates are generally reported to be higher after reoperative surgery compared to primary surgery. The indications and outcomes for reoperative bariatric surgery are procedure-specific but the current evidence does support additional treatment for persistent obesity, co-morbid disease, and complications. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Outcome of surgery for chronic patellar tendinopathy: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, W S; Smart, A

    2016-09-01

    There is no consensus on how to best surgically treat chronic patellar tendinopathy. This systematic review investigates the surgical treatment for chronic patellar tendinopathy, and the outcomes. A database search was performed to identify all relevant articles, to which exclusion criteria were then applied. Data was extracted from 24 studies, and the outcomes were then systematically reviewed. The results showed that the success rate of surgery for patellar tendinopathy is generally over 77%. Return to sports rates are better for proximal tendon patients who undergo bony procedures. Patients return to sports faster if they undergo arthroscopic procedures, and fewer complications are described. Studies that did not involve any procedure on the proximal tendon did not produce a different result to studies where the tendon was operated on. We found no effect of post-operative immobilisation on outcome. Based on the included studies, surgery gives satisfactory results in the treatment of patellar tendinopathy. There is a lack of high-quality evidence on the effects of surgery and post-operative rehabilitation regime on chronic patellar tendinopathy, as well as lack of objective outcome measures.

  13. Teaching ethics and professionalism in plastic surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Blacam, Catherine; Vercler, Christian J

    2014-04-01

    Maintenance of the highest ethical and professional standards in plastic surgery is in the best interests of our profession and the public whom we serve. Both the American Board of Medical Specialties and the Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education mandate training in ethics and professionalism for all residents. Presently there is no gold standard in ethics and professionalism education. A systematic review on teaching ethics and professionalism in plastic surgery was performed for all articles from inception to May 23, 2013 in MEDLINE, Scopus, EMBASE, CENTRAL, and ERIC. References of relevant publications were searched for additional papers. Key journals were hand searched and relevant conference proceedings were also reviewed. Duplicate and non-English articles were excluded. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were applied to find articles that described a curriculum in ethics and/or professionalism in plastic surgery. Two hundred twenty-seven relevant articles were identified. One hundred seventy-four did not meet inclusion criteria based on screening of the title, and 39 of those did not meet inclusion criteria based on screening of the abstract or introductory paragraph. Of the 14 identified for full text review, only 2 articles described a set curriculum in ethics and/or professionalism in plastic surgery training and reported outcomes. A paucity of data exists regarding the structure, content, or relevant measures that can be applied to assess outcomes of a curriculum to teach ethics and professionalism to plastic surgery trainees. Endeavors to teach ethics and professionalism to plastic surgery trainees must rigorously document the process and outcomes to facilitate the maintenance of our profession.

  14. Bariatric surgery in elderly patients: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giordano S

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Salvatore Giordano,1 Mikael Victorzon2,3 1Department of Plastic and General Surgery, Turku University Hospital, Turku, 2Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Vaasa Central Hospital, Vaasa, 3University of Turku, Turku, Finland Abstract: Controversy exists regarding the effectiveness and safety of bariatric/metabolic surgery in elderly patients. We performed a systematic review on this issue in patients aged 60 years or older. MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, Embase, Scopus, and Google Scholar were searched until August 2015 for studies on outcomes of bariatric surgery in elderly patients. The results were expressed as pooled proportions (% with 95% confidence intervals. Heterogeneity across the studies was evaluated by the I2 test, and a random-effects model was used. Twenty-six articles encompassing 8,149 patients were pertinent with this issue and included data on bariatric surgery outcomes in elderly population. Fourteen patients died during the 30-day postoperative period, with a pooled mortality of 0.01%. Pooled overall complication rate was 14.7%. At 1-year follow-up, pooled mean excess weight loss was 53.77%, pooled diabetes resolution was 54.5%, and pooled hypertension resolution was 42.5%, while pooled lipid disorder resolution was 41.2%. Outcomes and complication rates of bariatric surgery in patients older than 60 years are comparable to those in a younger population, independent of the type of procedure performed. Patients should not be denied bariatric surgery because of their age alone. Keywords: morbid obesity, bariatric surgery, elderly, gastric bypass, weight loss, laparoscopy

  15. Oncoplastic breast conserving surgery and oncological outcome: Systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiannakopoulou, E C; Mathelin, C

    2016-05-01

    Oncoplastic surgery consists a new approach for extending breast conserving surgery possibilities This manuscript aimed to systematically review data on the oncological outcome of oncoplastic breast surgery. Electronic databases were searched with the appropriate search term up to and included April 2013. full publications including at least 10 patients and providing evidence on at least one of the following outcomes: margin involvement, local recurrence, metastatic disease, death number. Forty studies including 2830 patients, met inclusion criteria; twenty one studies investigated volume displacement techniques; fifteen studies investigated volume replacement techniques; four studies presented data on various oncoplastic techniques. Study quality was low. The majority of studies were observational studies. The length of follow up was relatively short, with only two studies reporting a median duration longer than 60 months. Only seven studies including more than 100 patients. There was great variation in the frequency of margin involvement ranging between 0% and 36% of patients. Local recurrence was observed in 0-10.8% of patients. Distant metastasis was observed in 0-18.9% of patients. In conclusion, long term oncological outcome of oncoplastic surgery for breast cancer is not adequately investigated. Further research efforts should focus on Level I evidence on oncological outcome of oncoplastic surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Outcomes of nonsurgical retreatment and endodontic surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torabinejad, Mahmoud; Corr, Robert; Handysides, Robert; Shabahang, Shahrokh

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to compare the clinical and radiographic outcomes of nonsurgical retreatment with those of endodontic surgery to determine which modality offers more favorable outcomes. The study began with targeted electronic searches of MEDLINE, PubMed, and Cochrane databases, followed with exhaustive hand searching and citation mining for all articles reporting clinical and/or radiographic outcomes for at least a mean follow-up of 2 years for these procedures. Pooled and weighted success rates were determined from a meta-analysis of the data abstracted from the articles. A significantly higher success rate was found for endodontic surgery at 2-4 years (77.8%) compared with nonsurgical retreatment for the same follow-up period (70.9%; P retreatment showing a higher success rate of 83.0% compared with 71.8% for endodontic surgery (P Endodontic surgery studies showed a statistically significant decrease in success with each increasing follow-up interval (P retreatment success rates demonstrated a statistically significant increase in weighted success from 2-4 years (70.9%) to 4-6 years (83.0%; P endodontic surgery offers more favorable initial success, but nonsurgical retreatment offers a more favorable long-term outcome.

  17. Bariatric surgery in elderly patients: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Salvatore; Victorzon, Mikael

    2015-01-01

    Controversy exists regarding the effectiveness and safety of bariatric/metabolic surgery in elderly patients. We performed a systematic review on this issue in patients aged 60 years or older. MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, Embase, Scopus, and Google Scholar were searched until August 2015 for studies on outcomes of bariatric surgery in elderly patients. The results were expressed as pooled proportions (%) with 95% confidence intervals. Heterogeneity across the studies was evaluated by the I (2) test, and a random-effects model was used. Twenty-six articles encompassing 8,149 patients were pertinent with this issue and included data on bariatric surgery outcomes in elderly population. Fourteen patients died during the 30-day postoperative period, with a pooled mortality of 0.01%. Pooled overall complication rate was 14.7%. At 1-year follow-up, pooled mean excess weight loss was 53.77%, pooled diabetes resolution was 54.5%, and pooled hypertension resolution was 42.5%, while pooled lipid disorder resolution was 41.2%. Outcomes and complication rates of bariatric surgery in patients older than 60 years are comparable to those in a younger population, independent of the type of procedure performed. Patients should not be denied bariatric surgery because of their age alone.

  18. Laser for bone healing after oral surgery: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noba, Claudio; Mello-Moura, Anna Carolina Volpi; Gimenez, Thais; Tedesco, Tamara Kerber; Moura-Netto, Cacio

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to perform a systematic review on the use of lasers in oral surgery for bone healing. Selection of articles was carried out by two evaluators in Pubmed and Web of Science databases for published articles and OpenGray for gray literature. Search strategy was developed based on the PICO Question "Does the use of lasers after oral surgery improve bone healing?". Eligibility criteria were: being on laser; evaluate bone healing; involve oral surgery; do not be about implant, periodontics, orthodontics, osteonecrosis or radiotherapy, nor revisions, clinical cases, etc. Data were collected from each article in a structured spreadsheet and a descriptive analysis was performed. Risk assessment of bias of the articles was carried out through the tool elaborated by the Cochrane collaboration. A total of 827 potentially relevant references were identified. No articles were found in OpenGray. Eleven articles met the eligibility criteria and were included in the systematic review. Most of studies were in vivo and in jaw, being conducted with low-power lasers which were applied immediately after the surgical procedure of extraction. Neoformation and bone density were the outcomes of choice and there was a tendency of increase in bone density, neoformation, regeneration, mineralization, or bone condensation when laser was applied. Regarding the bias risk assessment, studies were not clear in reporting most of the parameters. Low-power laser therapy seems to reduce time of bone healing in oral surgery, although there are no defined protocols and the level of evidence is still considered weak.

  19. Adolescent bariatric surgery: a systematic review of recommendation documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childerhose, Janet E; Alsamawi, Amal; Mehta, Tanvi; Smith, Judith E; Woolford, Susan; Tarini, Beth A

    2017-10-01

    Bariatric surgery has been performed on adolescents since the 1970s, but little is known about the guidance offered to providers in recommendation documents published in the United States. A systematic review was conducted to generate a complete record of all US recommendation documents and describe variability across the documents. This study had 3 aims: to identify the developers, examine selection criteria, and document reasons why developers have recommended this intervention for adolescents. Four databases (MEDLINE, National Guidelines Clearinghouse, Trip, and Embase) ertr searched, followed by a hand search. Documents were eligible for inclusion if they satisfied 5 criteria: written in the English language; developed and published by a US organization; comprised a clinical practice guideline, position statement, or consensus statement; offered a minimum 1-sentence recommendation on bariatric surgery for the treatment of obesity or related co-morbidities; and offered a minimum 1-sentence recommendation on bariatric surgery for children, adolescents, or both. No date limits were applied. Sixteen recommendation documents published between 1991 and 2013 met our inclusion criteria: 10 clinical practice guidelines, 4 position statements, and 2 consensus statements. Nine were produced by medical organizations, 3 by surgical organizations, and 4 by public health/governmental bodies. One document recommended against bariatric surgery for minors, and 15 endorsed the intervention for this population. Body mass index (a measure of obesity calculated by dividing weight in kilograms by the square of height in meters) thresholds were the selection criteria most often provided. Minimum age varied widely. Of the 15 endorsing documents, 10 provided a reason for performing bariatric surgery on minors, most often to treat obesity-related co-morbidities that threaten the health of the adolescent. We make 3 suggestions to improve the quality of future recommendation documents

  20. Personality characteristics and bariatric surgery outcomes: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordignon, Suelen; Aparício, Mayra Juliana Galvis; Bertoletti, Juliana; Trentini, Clarissa Marceli

    2017-01-01

    Numerous studies have focused on psychological assessment of bariatric surgery candidates, aiming to identify which psychological variables, including personality characteristics, are related to successful surgical prognosis. To analyze, by means of a systematic literature review, longitudinal studies that investigated personality traits and disorders as possible predictors of outcomes in bariatric surgery. PsycInfo, PubMed, and Scopus databases were searched for studies published between 2005 and 2015, using the keywords "bariatric" AND "personality." Quantitative longitudinal studies in English, Portuguese, or Spanish were selected for review if they assessed personality as an outcome predictor of BS in people aged 18 years or older. Sixteen articles were analyzed. The results of this review suggest that externalizing dysfunctions might be associated with less weight reduction, while internalizing dysfunctions appear to be associated with somatic concerns and psychological distress. The persistence dimension (of temperament in Cloninger's model) was positively associated with greater weight loss, while neuroticism (Five Factor Model) and the occurrence of personality disorders were not predictive of weight loss. Furthermore, the results indicate a tendency towards a reduction in personality disorders and neuroticism scores, and an increase in extroversion scores, after BS. Assessment of personality characteristics, whether to identify their predictive power or to detect changes during the BS process, is important since it can provide grounds for estimating surgical prognosis and for development of interventions targeting this population.

  1. Personality characteristics and bariatric surgery outcomes: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suelen Bordignon

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Numerous studies have focused on psychological assessment of bariatric surgery candidates, aiming to identify which psychological variables, including personality characteristics, are related to successful surgical prognosis. Objective: To analyze, by means of a systematic literature review, longitudinal studies that investigated personality traits and disorders as possible predictors of outcomes in bariatric surgery. Method: PsycInfo, PubMed, and Scopus databases were searched for studies published between 2005 and 2015, using the keywords “bariatric” AND “personality.” Quantitative longitudinal studies in English, Portuguese, or Spanish were selected for review if they assessed personality as an outcome predictor of BS in people aged 18 years or older. Results: Sixteen articles were analyzed. The results of this review suggest that externalizing dysfunctions might be associated with less weight reduction, while internalizing dysfunctions appear to be associated with somatic concerns and psychological distress. The persistence dimension (of temperament in Cloninger's model was positively associated with greater weight loss, while neuroticism (Five Factor Model and the occurrence of personality disorders were not predictive of weight loss. Furthermore, the results indicate a tendency towards a reduction in personality disorders and neuroticism scores, and an increase in extroversion scores, after BS. Conclusions: Assessment of personality characteristics, whether to identify their predictive power or to detect changes during the BS process, is important since it can provide grounds for estimating surgical prognosis and for development of interventions targeting this population.

  2. Single-port laparoscopic rectal surgery - a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lolle, Ida; Rosenstock, Steffen; Bulut, Orhan

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Single-port laparoscopic surgery (SPLS) for colonic disease has been widely described, whereas data for SPLS rectal resection are sparse. This review aimed to evaluate the feasibility, safety and complication profile of SPLS for rectal diseases. METHODS: A systematic literature search.......5%. Length of hospital stay was 1-16 days. No 30-day mortality was reported. CONCLUSION: Short-term results suggest that SPLS for rectal disease is feasible and safe with an acceptable complication rate when performed by experienced surgeons in selected patients. Oncological safety and the possible benefits......-term oncological outcome and early complication profile. RESULTS: No randomised studies or controlled clinical studies were identified. All studies were case series or case reports. Only five studies included more than ten patients operated with SPLS, comprising a total of 120 patients. These studies formed...

  3. Single-port laparoscopic rectal surgery - a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lolle, Ida; Rosenstock, Steffen; Bulut, Orhan

    2014-01-01

    .5%. Length of hospital stay was 1-16 days. No 30-day mortality was reported. CONCLUSION: Short-term results suggest that SPLS for rectal disease is feasible and safe with an acceptable complication rate when performed by experienced surgeons in selected patients. Oncological safety and the possible benefits......INTRODUCTION: Single-port laparoscopic surgery (SPLS) for colonic disease has been widely described, whereas data for SPLS rectal resection are sparse. This review aimed to evaluate the feasibility, safety and complication profile of SPLS for rectal diseases. METHODS: A systematic literature search...... of PubMed and Embase was performed in September 2013 according to the PRISMA guidelines. Original reports on the use of SPLS in high and low anterior resection, Hartmann's operation and abdominoperineal resection were included. Outcome measures were intra-operative details and complications, short...

  4. Endometrial preparation with Dienogest before hysteroscopic surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laganà, Antonio Simone; Vitale, Salvatore Giovanni; Muscia, Vincenzo; Rossetti, Paola; Buscema, Massimo; Triolo, Onofrio; Rapisarda, Agnese Maria Chiara; Giunta, Loretta; Palmara, Vittorio; Granese, Roberta; Frangež, Helena Ban; Romano, Andrea

    2017-03-01

    Hysteroscopic surgery is considered the gold standard for the minimal invasive treatment of many endouterine diseases such as endometrial polyps or submucous myomas. Recently, many studies have evaluated the effect of preoperative administration of a number of drugs to reduce endometrial thickness and achieve important intraoperative advantages. The purpose of this systematic review is to summarize the available evidence about the use of Dienogest, an orally administrable progestin, for endometrial preparation before hysteroscopic surgery. All studies published on this topic and indexed on PubMed/MEDLINE, Embase or Google scholar databases were retrieved and analysed. We retrieved five studies about this topic. Considered together, the published data analyses allow us to conclude that Dienogest is effective in reducing the thickness of the endometrium, the severity of bleeding and also of operative time, with a lower number of side effects compared with other pharmacological preparations or no treatment. Administration of Dienogest may be an effective and safe treatment for endometrial thinning before operative hysteroscopy. However, this conclusion is based on few reports and further studies to prove or disprove it are warranted.

  5. A systematic review of left ventricular cardio-endoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soylu, Erdinc; Kidher, Emaddin; Ashrafian, Hutan; Stavridis, George; Harling, Leanne; Athanasiou, Thanos

    2017-05-25

    Better visualisation, accurate resection and avoidance of ventriculotomy associated with use of endoscopic devices during intracardiac surgery has led to increasing interest in their use. The possibility of combining a cardio-endoscopic technique with either minimally invasive or totally endoscopic cardiac surgery provides an incentive for its further development. Several devices have been used, however their uptake has been limited due to uncertainty around their impact on patient outcomes. A systematic review of the literature identified 34 studies, incorporating 54 subjects undergoing treatment of left ventricular tumours, thrombus or hypertrophic myocardium using a cardio-endoscopic technique. There were no mortalities (0%; 0/47). In 12 studies, the follow-up period was longer than 30 days. There were no post-operative complications apart from one case of atrial fibrillation (2.2%; 1/46). Complete resection of left ventricular lesion was achieved in all cases (100%; 50/50). These successful results demonstrate that the cardio-endoscopic technique is a useful adjunct in resection of left ventricular tumours, thrombus and hypertrophic myocardium. This approach facilitates accurate resection of pathological tissue from left ventricle whilst avoiding exposure related valvular damage and adverse effects associated with ventriculotomy. Future research should focus on designing adequately powered comparative randomised trials focusing on major cardiac and cerebrovascular morbidity outcomes in both the short and long-term. In this way, we may have a more comprehensive picture of both the safety and efficacy of this technique and determine whether such devices could be safely adopted for routine use in minimal access or robotic intra-cardiac surgery.

  6. Robotic colorectal surgery: hype or new hope? A systematic review of robotics in colorectal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirnezami, A H; Mirnezami, R; Venkatasubramaniam, A K; Chandrakumaran, K; Cecil, T D; Moran, B J

    2010-11-01

    Robotic colorectal surgery is an emerging field and may offer a solution to some of the difficulties inherent to conventional laparoscopic surgery. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive and critical analysis of the available literature on the use of robotic technology in colorectal surgery. Studies reporting outcomes of robotic colorectal surgery were identified by systematic searches of electronic databases. Outcomes examined included operating time, length of stay, blood loss, complications, cost, oncological outcome, and conversion rates. Seventeen Studies (nine case series, seven comparative studies, one randomized controlled trial) describing 288 procedures were identified and reviewed. Study heterogeneity precluded a meta-analysis of the data. Robotic procedures tend to take longer and cost more, but may reduce the length of stay, blood loss, and conversion rates. Complication profiles and short-term oncological outcomes are similar to laparoscopic surgery. Robotic colorectal surgery is a promising field and may provide a powerful additional tool for optimal management of more challenging pathology, including rectal cancer. Further studies are required to better define its role. © 2010 The Authors. Colorectal Disease © 2010 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  7. Pregnancy and fertility following bariatric surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggard, Melinda A; Yermilov, Irina; Li, Zhaoping; Maglione, Margaret; Newberry, Sydne; Suttorp, Marika; Hilton, Lara; Santry, Heena P; Morton, John M; Livingston, Edward H; Shekelle, Paul G

    2008-11-19

    Use of bariatric surgery has increased dramatically during the past 10 years, particularly among women of reproductive age. To estimate bariatric surgery rates among women aged 18 to 45 years and to assess the published literature on pregnancy outcomes and fertility after surgery. Search of the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (1998-2005) and multiple electronic databases (Medline, EMBASE, Controlled Clinical Trials Register Database, and the Cochrane Database of Reviews of Effectiveness) to identify articles published between 1985 and February 2008 on bariatric surgery among women of reproductive age. Search terms included bariatric procedures, fertility, contraception, pregnancy, and nutritional deficiencies. Information was abstracted about study design, fertility, and nutritional, neonatal, and pregnancy outcomes after surgery. Of 260 screened articles, 75 were included. Women aged 18 to 45 years accounted for 49% of all patients undergoing bariatric surgery (>50,000 cases annually for the 3 most recent years). Three matched cohort studies showed lower maternal complication rates after bariatric surgery than in obese women without bariatric surgery, or rates approaching those of nonobese controls. In 1 matched cohort study that compared maternal complication rates in women after laparoscopic adjustable gastric band surgery with obese women without surgery, rates of gestational diabetes (0% vs 22.1%, P bariatric surgery group. Findings were supported by 13 other bariatric cohort studies. Neonatal outcomes were similar or better after surgery compared with obese women without laparoscopic adjustable gastric band surgery (7.7% vs 7.1% for premature delivery; 7.7% vs 10.6% for low birth weight, P nutrition, fertility, cesarean delivery, and contraception were limited. Rates of many adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes may be lower in women who become pregnant after having had bariatric surgery compared with rates in pregnant women who are obese; however, further data

  8. Venous thromboembolism prevention in gynecologic cancer surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einstein, M Heather; Pritts, Elizabeth A; Hartenbach, Ellen M

    2007-06-01

    Advanced age, pelvic surgery, and the presence of malignancy place gynecologic oncology patients at high risk for venous thromboembolism (VTE). This study was designed to systematically analyze the world's literature on VTE in these patients and determine the optimal prophylaxis regimen. Computerized searches of Pubmed, Ovid, DARE, ACP Journal Club, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Cochrane Controlled Trials Registry 1966-2005 were performed, as well as EMBASE 1980-2005. Major conferences and target references were hand-searched. Inclusion criteria were randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating VTE prophylaxis with heparin, low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH), and sequential compression devices (SCD). The search yielded 278 articles; 11 met inclusion criteria. Data were abstracted by one author and analyzed with the Mantel-Haenszel method. The analysis of heparin-versus-control revealed a significant decrease in DVT in patients receiving heparin (RR=0.58, 95% CI 0.35-0.95). There were no significant differences in EBL or transfusions between the two groups. In the 320 patients in the heparin vs. LMWH studies, there was no significant difference in DVT (RR 0.91, 95% CI 0.38-2.17), although power analysis demonstrated insufficient numbers to show a difference. No patient in either group required re-exploration for bleeding. All gynecologic cancer patients should receive VTE prophylaxis. Although heparin, LMWH, and SCD have been shown to be safe and effective, due to the paucity of data in the gynecologic oncology literature, no one prevention modality can be considered superior at this time. Adequately powered RCTs are urgently needed to determine the optimal regimen in these high-risk patients.

  9. A systematic review of the quality of conduct and reporting of systematic reviews and meta-analyses in paediatric surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Stephen Cullis

    Full Text Available Our objective was to evaluate quality of conduct and reporting of published systematic reviews and meta-analyses in paediatric surgery. We also aimed to identify characteristics predictive of review quality.Systematic reviews summarise evidence by combining sources, but are potentially prone to bias. To counter this, the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA was published to aid in reporting. Similarly, the Assessing the Methodological Quality of Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR measurement tool was designed to appraise methodology. The paediatric surgical literature has seen an increasing number of reviews over the past decade, but quality has not been evaluated.Adhering to PRISMA guidelines, we performed a systematic review with a priori design to identify systematic reviews and meta-analyses of interventions in paediatric surgery. From 01/2010 to 06/2016, we searched: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane, Centre for Reviews and Dissemination, Web of Science, Google Scholar, reference lists and journals. Two reviewers independently selected studies and extracted data. We assessed conduct and reporting using AMSTAR and PRISMA. Scores were calculated as the sum of reported items. We also extracted author, journal and article characteristics, and used them in exploratory analysis to determine which variables predict quality.112 articles fulfilled eligibility criteria (53 systematic reviews; 59 meta-analyses. Overall, 68% AMSTAR and 56.8% PRISMA items were reported adequately. Poorest scores were identified with regards a priori design, inclusion of structured summaries, including the grey literature, citing excluded articles and evaluating bias. 13 reviews were pre-registered and 6 in PRISMA-endorsing journals. The following predicted quality in univariate analysis:, word count, Cochrane review, journal h-index, impact factor, journal endorses PRISMA, PRISMA adherence suggested in author guidance, article mentions PRISMA

  10. A systematic review of the factors predicting the interest in cosmetic plastic surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Milothridis, Panagiotis; Pavlidis, Leonidas; Haidich, Anna-Bettina; Panagopoulou, Efharis

    2016-01-01

    Background: A systematic review of the literature was performed to clarify the psychosocial characteristics of patients who have an interest in cosmetic plastic surgery. Methods: Medical literature was reviewed by two independent researchers, and a third reviewer evaluated their results. Results: Twelve studies addressing the predictors of interest in cosmetic surgery were finally identified and analysed. Interest in cosmetic surgery was associated with epidemiological factors, their social n...

  11. Surgery for adult spondylolisthesis: a systematic review of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Tobias L; Ringel, Florian; Quante, Markus; Eicker, Sven O; Muche-Borowski, Cathleen; Kothe, Ralph

    2016-08-01

    Surgery for isthmic and degenerative spondylolisthesis (SL) in adults is carried out very frequently in everyday practice. However, it is still unclear whether the results of surgery are better than those of conservative treatment and whether decompression alone or instrumented fusion with decompression should be recommended. In addition, the role of reduction is unclear. Four clinically relevant key questions were addressed in this study: (1) Is surgery more successful than conservative treatment in relation to pain and function in adult patients with isthmic SL? (2) Is surgery more successful than conservative treatment in relation to pain and function in adult patients with degenerative SL? (3) Is instrumented fusion with decompression more successful in relation to pain and function than decompression alone in adult patients with degenerative SL and spinal canal stenosis? (4) Is instrumented fusion with reduction more successful in relation to pain and function than instrumented fusion without reduction in adult patients with isthmic or degenerative SL? A systematic PubMed search was carried out to identify randomized and nonrandomized controlled trials on these topics. Papers were analyzed systematically in a search for the best evidence. A total of 18 studies was identified and analyzed: two for question 1, eight for question 2, four for question 3, and four for question 4. Surgery appears to be better than conservative treatment in adults with isthmic SL (poor evidence) and also in adults with degenerative SL (good evidence). Instrumented fusion with decompression appears to be more successful than decompression alone in adults with degenerative SL and spinal stenosis (poor evidence). Reduction and instrumented fusion does not appear to be more successful than instrumented fusion without reduction in adults with isthmic or degenerative SL (moderate evidence).

  12. Sexual abuse in bariatric surgery candidates: impact on weight loss after surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinig, J; Wagner, B; Shang, E; Dölemeyer, R; Kersting, A

    2012-10-01

    Bariatric surgery is becoming more and more influential as efficient weight loss therapy for the morbidly obese. As many studies propose a relationship between sexual abuse and obesity in general, but especially with regard to weight regain after successful weight loss, sexual abuse might also have a crucial impact on the outcome of the surgical procedures. This review examines the literature comparing weight loss after bariatric surgery in sexually abused and non-abused individuals. We conducted a systematic electronic literature search covering PubMed/Medline, ScienceDirect, PsychInfo and Web of Science. While 13 studies examined prevalence rates of sexual abuse among bariatric patients, eight studies explicitly investigated the effect of sexual abuse on surgery outcome. We hypothesized that individuals with a history of sexual abuse lose less weight compared to individuals with no such abuse history. At first glance, only three out of eight studies demonstrated significantly reduced weight loss in the sexually abused patients. However, a closer investigation of all studies revealed that patients with abuse experiences may indeed tend to lose less weight initially. Still, this sub-population apparently benefits from the surgical procedure, as revealed by increased weight loss over time. Reasons for these mixed results are discussed, as well as the clinical implications that can be drawn from these studies. © 2012 The Authors. obesity reviews © 2012 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  13. Combined Anterior-Posterior Surgery Versus Posterior Surgery for Thoracolumbar Burst Fractures: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.P. Oprel (Pim); W.E. Tuinebreijer (Wim); P. Patka (Peter); D. den Hartog (Dennis)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractAbstract: Study Design: A systematic quantitative review of the literature. Objective: To compare combined anterior-posterior surgery versus posterior surgery for thoracolumbar fractures in order to identify better treatments. Summary of Background Data: Axial load of the anterior and

  14. DOES BARIATRIC SURGERY AFFECT SEXUALITY: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilek Aygin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Obesity affects sexual health negatively due to several reasons such as impaired body image, psychological disorders and hormonal changes. Bariatric surgery is frequently used in the treatment of obesity. Besides positive effects such as an increase in physical activity due to weight loss and hormonal changes after surgery, there are some adverse effects of bariatric surgery such as sagging and wrinkling of skin due to rapid weight loss. The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of bariatric surgery on sexual function. The literature between 2004 and 2015 was reviewed by searching Scopus, Science Direct, PubMed, Ebsco, Coochrane, Medline Complete, Ovid, Springer Link, Google Scholar, Taylor & Francis, PsychInfo databases, national thesis center and Ulakbim databases; ten studies appropriate to the criteria were included in the study. A total of 524 patients (152 males underwent bariatric surgery were included in study. Sexual function has been found to improve in all the studies. Also weight loss has been shown to have positive effects on reproductive hormones in both sexes. Bariatric surgery has positive effects on weight-loss and consequently on sexual function and reproductive hormones. [J Contemp Med 2017; 7(3.000: 284-296

  15. Surgery for extra-articular trismus : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouman, M. A.; Dijkstra, P. U.; Reintsema, H.; Roodenburg, J. L. N.; Werkera, P. M. N.

    The aim of this systematic review was to identify operations that are used to improve mouth opening in patients with extra-articular trismus (caused by cancer and its treatment, oral submucous fibrosis, or noma) and to find out if they work. We searched the electronic databases PubMed, Embase,

  16. [Body dysmorphic disorder and aesthetic surgery: A systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerfant, N; Henry, A-S; Ta, P; Trimaille, A; Philandrianos, C; Hu, W

    2015-12-01

    Patients suffering from body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) are preoccupied with an imagined or minor defect in appearance that causes significant distress and impairment in social and occupational functioning. Despite a rate of up to 15% of BDD patients reported in cosmetic surgery settings, there is no consensus on the best management for these patients. The main purpose of this article was to conduct a literature review on BDD and cosmetic surgery. Properly trained healthcare professionals in recognizing and diagnosing this pathology is essential for the delivery of quality psychiatric care while taking into account the high prevalence of body dysmorphic disorder patients in cosmetic surgery and the poor outcome of these patients following cosmetic procedures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Current status of robotic bariatric surgery: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Bariatric surgery is an effective treatment to obtain weight loss in severely obese patients. The feasibility and safety of bariatric robotic surgery is the topic of this review. Methods A search was performed on PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, BioMed Central, and Web of Science. Results Twenty-two studies were included. Anastomotic leak rate was 8.51% in biliopancreatic diversion. 30-day reoperation rate was 1.14% in Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and 1.16% in sleeve gastrectomy. Major complication rate in Roux-en-Y gastric bypass resulted higher than in sleeve gastrectomy ( 4,26% vs. 1,2%). The mean hospital stay was longer in Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (range 2.6-7.4 days). Conclusions The major limitation of our analysis is due to the small number and the low quality of the studies, the small sample size, heterogeneity of the enrolled patients and the lack of data from metabolic and bariatric outcomes. Despite the use of the robot, the majority of these cases are completed with stapled anastomosis. The assumption that robotic surgery is superior in complex cases is not supported by the available present evidence. The major strength of the robotic surgery is strongly facilitating some of the surgical steps (gastro-jejunostomy and jejunojejunostomy anastomosis in the robotic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass or the vertical gastric resection in the robotic sleeve gastrectomy). PMID:24199869

  18. Maternal Micronutrient Deficiencies and Related Adverse Neonatal Outcomes after Bariatric Surgery: A Systematic Review12

    OpenAIRE

    Jans, Goele; Matthys, Christophe; Bogaerts, Annick; Lannoo, Matthias; Verhaeghe, Johan; Van der Schueren, Bart; Devlieger, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Pregnant and postpartum women with a history of bariatric surgery are at risk of micronutrient deficiencies as a result of the combination of physiologic changes related to pregnancy and iatrogenic postoperative alterations in the absorption and metabolism of crucial nutrients. This systematic review investigates micronutrient deficiencies and related adverse clinical outcomes in pregnant and postpartum women after bariatric surgery. A systematic approach involving critical appraisal was cond...

  19. Role of corticosteroids in Functional Endoscopic Sinus Surgery--a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pundir, Vishal; Pundir, Jyotsna; Lancaster, Gillian; Baer, Simon; Kirkland, Paul; Cornet, Marjolein; Lourijsen, E. S.; Georgalas, Christos; Fokkens, W. J.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of our study is to systematically review the existing evidence on the role of corticosteroids in patients undergoing functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS). Systematic search of MEDLINE (1950- 2014), EMBASE (1980-2014), metaRegister, Cochrane Library and ISI conference proceedings was

  20. The role of perioperative warming in surgery: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Shafique Sajid

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The objective of this review was to systematically analyze the trials on the effectiveness of perioperative warming in surgical patients. METHODS: A systematic review of the literature was undertaken. Clinical trials on perioperative warming were selected according to specific criteria and analyzed to generate summative data expressed as standardized mean difference (SMD. RESULTS: Twenty-five studies encompassing 3,599 patients in various surgical disciplines were retrieved from the electronic databases. Nineteen randomized trials on 1785 patients qualified for this review. The no-warming group developed statistically significant hypothermia. In the fixed effect model, the warming group had significantly less pain and lower incidence of wound infection, compared with the no-warming group. In the random effect model, the warming group was also associated with lower risk of post-anesthetic shivering. Both in the random and the fixed effect models, the warming group was associated with significantly less blood loss. However, there was significant heterogeneity among the trials. CONCLUSION: Perioperative warming of surgical patients is effective in reducing postoperative wound pain, wound infection and shivering. Systemic warming of the surgical patient is also associated with less perioperative blood loss through preventing hypothermia-induced coagulopathy. Perioperative warming may be given routinely to all patients of various surgical disciplines in order to counteract the consequences of hypothermia.

  1. Systematic review of tonsil surgery quality registers and introduction of the Nordic Tonsil Surgery Register Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruohoalho, Johanna; Østvoll, Eirik; Bratt, Mette; Bugten, Vegard; Bäck, Leif; Mäkitie, Antti; Ovesen, Therese; Stalfors, Joacim

    2018-03-27

    Surgical quality registers provide tools to measure and improve the outcome of surgery. International register collaboration creates an opportunity to assess and critically evaluate national practices, and increases the size of available datasets. Even though millions of yearly tonsillectomies and tonsillotomies are performed worldwide, clinical practices are variable and inconsistency of evidence regarding the best clinical practice exists. The need for quality improvement actions is evident. We aimed to systematically investigate the existing tonsil surgery quality registers found in the literature, and to provide a thorough presentation of the planned Nordic Tonsil Surgery Register Collaboration. A systematic literature search of MEDLINE and EMBASE databases (from January 2016, to December 2016) was conducted to identify registers, databases, quality improvement programs or comprehensive audit programs addressing tonsil surgery. We identified two active registers and three completed audit programs focusing on tonsil surgery quality registration. Recorded variables were fairly similar, but considerable variation in coverage, number of operations included and length of time period for inclusion was discovered. Considering tonsillectomies and tonsillotomies being among the most commonly performed surgical procedures in otorhinolaryngology, it is surprising that only two active registers could be identified. We present a Nordic Tonsil Surgery Register Collaboration-an international tonsil surgery quality register project aiming to provide accurate benchmarks and enhance the quality of tonsil surgery in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden.

  2. Core Professionalism Education in Surgery: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akile Sarıoğlu Büke

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Professionalism education is one of the major elements of surgical residency education. Aims: To evaluate the studies on core professionalism education programs in surgical professionalism education. Study Design: Systematic review. Methods: This systematic literature review was performed to analyze core professionalism programs for surgical residency education published in English with at least three of the following features: program developmental model/instructional design method, aims and competencies, methods of teaching, methods of assessment, and program evaluation model or method. A total of 27083 articles were retrieved using EBSCOHOST, PubMed, Science Direct, Web of Science, and manual search. Results: Eight articles met the selection criteria. The instructional design method was presented in only one article, which described the Analysis, Design, Development, Implementation, and Evaluation model. Six articles were based on the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education criterion, although there was significant variability in content. The most common teaching method was role modeling with scenario- and case-based learning. A wide range of assessment methods for evaluating professionalism education were reported. The Kirkpatrick model was reported in one article as a method for program evaluation. Conclusion: It is suggested that for a core surgical professionalism education program, developmental/instructional design model, aims and competencies, content, teaching methods, assessment methods, and program evaluation methods/models should be well defined, and the content should be comparable.

  3. Core Professionalism Education in Surgery: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarıoğlu Büke, Akile; Karabilgin Öztürkçü, Özlem Sürel; Yılmaz, Yusuf; Sayek, İskender

    2018-03-15

    Professionalism education is one of the major elements of surgical residency education. To evaluate the studies on core professionalism education programs in surgical professionalism education. Systematic review. This systematic literature review was performed to analyze core professionalism programs for surgical residency education published in English with at least three of the following features: program developmental model/instructional design method, aims and competencies, methods of teaching, methods of assessment, and program evaluation model or method. A total of 27083 articles were retrieved using EBSCOHOST, PubMed, Science Direct, Web of Science, and manual search. Eight articles met the selection criteria. The instructional design method was presented in only one article, which described the Analysis, Design, Development, Implementation, and Evaluation model. Six articles were based on the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education criterion, although there was significant variability in content. The most common teaching method was role modeling with scenario- and case-based learning. A wide range of assessment methods for evaluating professionalism education were reported. The Kirkpatrick model was reported in one article as a method for program evaluation. It is suggested that for a core surgical professionalism education program, developmental/instructional design model, aims and competencies, content, teaching methods, assessment methods, and program evaluation methods/models should be well defined, and the content should be comparable.

  4. E-learning in orthopedic surgery training: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarpada, Sandip P; Morris, Matthew T; Burton, Denver A

    2016-12-01

    E-learning is the use of internet-based resources in education. In the field of surgical education, this definition includes the use of virtual patient cases, digital modeling, online tutorials, as well as video recordings of surgical procedures and lectures. In recent years, e-learning has increasingly been considered a viable alternative to traditional teaching within a number of surgical fields. Here we present (1) a systematic review of literature assessing the efficacy of e-learning modules for orthopedic education and (2) a discussion of their relevance. A systematic search of PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library was conducted according to the guidelines defined in the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement (PRISMA). The search yielded a total of 255 non-duplicate citations that were screened using predetermined inclusion/exclusion criteria. A total of 9 full text articles met inclusion criteria, which included the use of an objective outcome measure to evaluate an orthopedic e-learning module. Six studies assessed knowledge using a multiple-choice test and 4 assessed skills using a clinical exam. All studies showed positive score improvement pre- to post-intervention, and a majority showed greater score improvement than standard teaching methods in both knowledge (4/6 studies) and clinical skills (3/4 studies). E-learning represents an effective supplement or even alternative to standard teaching techniques within orthopedic education for both medical students and residents. Future work should focus on validating specific e-learning programs using standardized outcome measures and assessing long-term knowledge retention using e-learning platforms.

  5. Revision Surgery for "Real" Recurrent Lumbar Disk Herniation: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihara, Hiroyuki; Chatterjee, Dipal; Paulino, Carl B; Errico, Thomas J

    2016-04-01

    A systematic review. To systematically review the previous literature regarding revision surgery for real recurrent lumbar disk herniation. "Real" recurrent lumbar disk herniation means the presence of herniated disk material at the same level and side as the primary disk herniation. If conservative treatment fails, revision surgery, a major concern, is indicated. It is important for both patients and spine surgeons to understand epidemiology trends and outcomes of revision surgery for real recurrent lumbar disk herniation (real-RLDH). The electronic databases PubMed, the Cochrane library, and EMBASE were queried for English articles regarding revision surgery for real-RLDH, published between January 1980 and May 2014. The incidence, interval between primary and revision surgery, risk factors, surgery type, complications, and clinical outcomes of revision surgery for real-RLDH were summarized. The reported incidence of revision surgery, specifically for real-RLDH, lies between 1.4% and 11.4%. The complication rate is reported between 0% and 34.6%, with dural tear being the most common complication. Previous studies revealed that satisfactory or successful clinical outcome was achieved in 60%-100% of patients after revision surgery for real-RLDH. Several studies reported similar clinical outcomes between primary and revision surgery. The incidence of revision surgery for real-RLDH is relatively low. It is essential to pay careful attention to prevent a dural tear. Patients may expect clinical outcomes similar to those following primary discectomy.

  6. Systematic review of robotic surgery in gynecology: robotic techniques compared with laparoscopy and laparotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gala, Rajiv B; Margulies, Rebecca; Steinberg, Adam; Murphy, Miles; Lukban, James; Jeppson, Peter; Aschkenazi, Sarit; Olivera, Cedric; South, Mary; Lowenstein, Lior; Schaffer, Joseph; Balk, Ethan M; Sung, Vivian

    2014-01-01

    The Society of Gynecologic Surgeons Systematic Review Group performed a systematic review of both randomized and observational studies to compare robotic vs nonrobotic surgical approaches (laparoscopic, abdominal, and vaginal) for treatment of both benign and malignant gynecologic indications to compare surgical and patient-centered outcomes, costs, and adverse events associated with the various surgical approaches. MEDLINE and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched from inception to May 15, 2012, for English-language studies with terms related to robotic surgery and gynecology. Studies of any design that included at least 30 women who had undergone robotic-assisted laparoscopic gynecologic surgery were included for review. The literature yielded 1213 citations, of which 97 full-text articles were reviewed. Forty-four studies (30 comparative and 14 noncomparative) met eligibility criteria. Study data were extracted into structured electronic forms and reconciled by a second, independent reviewer. Our analysis revealed that, compared with open surgery, robotic surgery consistently confers shorter hospital stay. The proficiency plateau seems to be lower for robotic surgery than for conventional laparoscopy. Of the various gynecologic applications, there seems to be evidence that renders robotic techniques advantageous over traditional open surgery for management of endometrial cancer. However, insofar as superiority, conflicting data are obtained when comparing robotics vs laparoscopic techniques. Therefore, the specific method of minimally invasive surgery, whether conventional laparoscopy or robotic surgery, should be tailored to patient selection, surgeon ability, and equipment availability. Copyright © 2014 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A systematic review of the factors predicting the interest in cosmetic plastic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis Milothridis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A systematic review of the literature was performed to clarify the psychosocial characteristics of patients who have an interest in cosmetic plastic surgery. Methods: Medical literature was reviewed by two independent researchers, and a third reviewer evaluated their results. Results: Twelve studies addressing the predictors of interest in cosmetic surgery were finally identified and analysed. Interest in cosmetic surgery was associated with epidemiological factors, their social networks, their psychological characteristics, such as body image, self-esteem and other personality traits and for specific psychopathology and found that these may either positively or negatively predict their motivation to seek and undergo a cosmetic procedure. Conclusions: The review examined the psychosocial characteristics associated with an interest in cosmetic surgery. Understanding cosmetic patients' characteristics, motivation and expectation for surgery is an important aspect of their clinical care to identify those patients more likely to benefit most from the procedure.

  8. A systematic review of the factors predicting the interest in cosmetic plastic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milothridis, Panagiotis; Pavlidis, Leonidas; Haidich, Anna-Bettina; Panagopoulou, Efharis

    2016-01-01

    A systematic review of the literature was performed to clarify the psychosocial characteristics of patients who have an interest in cosmetic plastic surgery. Medical literature was reviewed by two independent researchers, and a third reviewer evaluated their results. Twelve studies addressing the predictors of interest in cosmetic surgery were finally identified and analysed. Interest in cosmetic surgery was associated with epidemiological factors, their social networks, their psychological characteristics, such as body image, self-esteem and other personality traits and for specific psychopathology and found that these may either positively or negatively predict their motivation to seek and undergo a cosmetic procedure. The review examined the psychosocial characteristics associated with an interest in cosmetic surgery. Understanding cosmetic patients' characteristics, motivation and expectation for surgery is an important aspect of their clinical care to identify those patients more likely to benefit most from the procedure.

  9. Surgery for extra-articular trismus: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouman, M A; Dijkstra, P U; Reintsema, H; Roodenburg, J L N; Werker, P M N

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to identify operations that are used to improve mouth opening in patients with extra-articular trismus (caused by cancer and its treatment, oral submucous fibrosis, or noma) and to find out if they work. We searched the electronic databases PubMed, Embase, Cinahl, and the Cochrane collaboration, and then systematically selected papers before we assessed their quality, extracted the data, and did a meta-analysis. We analysed 32 studies that included 651 patients, the median (IQR) size of which was 11 (7-26). The quality of the methods used and of reporting were relatively low. Median (IQR) duration of follow-up was 12 (8-22) months. Operations resulted in a weighted mean (SD) increase in mouth opening of 19.3 (6.3) mm. None of the operations was better than the others for the improvement of mouth opening. We conclude that operations can improve mouth opening in extra-articular trismus, but the evidence is of moderate quality and there is a need for further research. Copyright © 2015 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. 3D Printing in Liver Surgery: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witowski, Jan Sylwester; Coles-Black, Jasamine; Zuzak, Tomasz Zbigniew; Pędziwiatr, Michał; Chuen, Jason; Major, Piotr; Budzyński, Andrzej

    2017-12-01

    Rapid growth of three-dimensional (3D) printing in recent years has led to new applications of this technology across all medical fields. This review article presents a broad range of examples on how 3D printing is facilitating liver surgery, including models for preoperative planning, education, and simulation. We have performed an extensive search of the medical databases Ovid/MEDLINE and PubMed/EMBASE and screened articles fitting the scope of review, following previously established exclusion criteria. Articles deemed suitable were analyzed and data on the 3D-printed models-including both technical properties and desirable application-and their impact on clinical proceedings were extracted. Fourteen articles, presenting unique utilizations of 3D models, were found suitable for data analysis. A great majority of articles (93%) discussed models used for preoperative planning and intraoperative guidance. PolyJet was the most common (43%) and, at the same time, most expensive 3D printing technology used in the development process. Many authors of reviewed articles reported that models were accurate (71%) and allowed them to understand patient's complex anatomy and its spatial relationships. Although the technology is still in its early stages, presented models are considered useful in preoperative planning and patient and student education. There are multiple factors limiting the use of 3D printing in everyday healthcare, the most important being high costs and the time-consuming process of development. Promising early results need to be verified in larger randomized trials, which will provide more statistically significant results.

  11. Efficacy of surgery for rotator cuff tendinopathy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toliopoulos, Panagiota; Desmeules, François; Boudreault, Jennifer; Roy, Jean-Sébastien; Frémont, Pierre; MacDermid, Joy C; Dionne, Clermont E

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to review randomized controlled trials evaluating the efficacy of surgery for the treatment of rotator cuff (RC) tendinopathy. Studies up to August 2013 were located in the PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, and PEDro databases using relevant keywords. Studies were included if: (1) participants had rotator cuff tendinopathy, (2) the trials were conducted on an adult population (≥18 years old), (3) at least one of the interventions studied was a surgical procedure, (4) study design was a randomized controlled trial (RCT), and (5) the article was written in English or French. Characteristics of the included studies were extracted using a standardized form. Two independent raters reviewed the methodological quality of the studies using the Risk of Bias Assessment tool developed by the Cochrane Collaboration Group. Differences were resolved by consensus. Fifteen trials met our inclusion criteria. After consensus, the mean methodological quality for all studies was 58.9 ± 10.8 %. In three out of four RCTs of moderate or low methodological quality, no significant difference in treatment effectiveness was observed between open or arthroscopic acromioplasty compared to exercises in the treatment of RC tendinopathy. Based on two studies of low or moderate methodological quality, no difference in treatment effectiveness was observed between arthroscopic and open acromioplasty. Two other RCTs of low to moderate quality, however, found that arthroscopic acromioplasty yielded better results in the short-term for shoulder range of motion in flexion but that both procedures were comparable in the long-term. One additional study favored open acromioplasty over arthroscopic acromioplasty for the treatment of RC tendinopathy. Based on low- to moderate-quality evidence, acromioplasty, be it open or arthroscopic, is no more effective than exercises for the treatment of RC tendinopathy. Low-grade evidence also suggests that arthroscopic acromioplasty may

  12. Patient safety improvement interventions in children's surgery: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Alexander L; Sevdalis, Nick

    2017-03-01

    Adult surgical patient safety literature is plentiful; however, there is a disproportionate paucity of published safety work in the children's surgical literature. We sought to systematically evaluate the nature and quality of patient safety evidence pertaining to pediatric surgical practice. Systematic search of MEDLINE and EMBASE databases and gray literature identified 1399 articles. Data pertaining to demographics, methodology, interventions, and outcomes were extracted. Study quality was assessed utilizing formal criteria. 20 studies were included. 14 (70%) comprised peer-reviewed articles. 18 (90%) were published in the last 4years. 13 (65%) described a novel intervention, and 7 (35%) described a modification of an existing intervention. Median patient sample size was 79 (29-1210). A large number (n=55) and variety (n=35) of measures were employed to evaluate the effect of interventions on patient safety. 15 (75%) studies utilized a checklist tool as a component of their intervention. 9 (45%) studies [comprising handoff tools (n=7); checklists (n=1); and multidimensional quality improvement initiatives (n=1)] reported a positive effect on patient safety. Quality assessment was undertaken on 14 studies. Quantitative studies had significantly higher quality scores than qualitative studies (61 [0-89] vs 44 [11-78], p=0.03). Pediatric surgical patient safety evidence is in its early stages. Successful interventions that we identified were typically handoff tools. There now ought to be an onus on pediatric surgeons to develop and apply bespoke pediatric surgical safety interventions and generate an evidence base to parallel the adult literature. Level IV, Case series with no comparison group. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Methods to improve rehabilitation of patients following breast cancer surgery: a review of systematic reviews

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loh SY

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Siew Yim Loh, Aisya Nadia Musa Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Context: Breast cancer is the most prevalent cancer amongst women but it has the highest survival rates amongst all cancer. Rehabilitation therapy of post-treatment effects from cancer and its treatment is needed to improve functioning and quality of life. This review investigated the range of methods for improving physical, psychosocial, occupational, and social wellbeing in women with breast cancer after receiving breast cancer surgery. Method: A search for articles published in English between the years 2009 and 2014 was carried out using The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, PubMed, and ScienceDirect. Search terms included: ‘breast cancer’, ‘breast carcinoma’, ‘surgery’, ‘mastectomy’, ‘lumpectomy’, ‘breast conservation’, ‘axillary lymph node dissection’, ‘rehabilitation’, 'therapy’, ‘physiotherapy’, ‘occupational therapy’, ‘psychological’, ‘psychosocial’, ‘psychotherapy’, ‘exercise’, ‘physical activity’, ‘cognitive’, ‘occupational’, ‘alternative’, ‘complementary’, and ‘systematic review’. Study selection: Systematic reviews on the effectiveness of rehabilitation methods in improving post-operative physical, and psychological outcomes for breast cancer were selected. Sixteen articles met all the eligibility criteria and were included in the review. Data extraction: Included review year, study aim, total number of participants included, and results. Data synthesis: Evidence for exercise rehabilitation is predominantly in the improvement of shoulder mobility and limb strength. Inconclusive results exist for a range of rehabilitation methods (physical, psycho-education, nutritional, alternative-complementary methods for addressing the domains of psychosocial, cognitive, and

  14. Oncoplastic breast-conserving surgery in breast cancer treatment Systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanikolaou, Ioannis G.

    2016-01-01

    Oncoplastic breast-conserving surgery (OPBS) is a rapidly emerging field. Various oncoplastic techniques have been proposed and are increasingly adopted to facilitate breast conservation and preserve breast aesthetics. This systematic review seeks to assess the oncological and cosmetic outcomes of OPBS. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using specific inclusion and exclusion criteria, for articles published up to July 31th, 2015. Relevant studies were identified using computerized bibliographic searches of MEDLINE database. The keywords that were used in various combinations were: "Oncoplastic surgery", "oncological results", "cosmetic results", "cosmesis", "immediate reconstruction" and "breast conserving surgery". A total of 106 articles were identified for potential inclusion and reviewed in detail. No randomized controlled trials were identified. This study was initially designed to identify and review after a strict selection process, published articles with the highest level of evidence on OPBS. Systematic reviews and metanalyses were not included in this systematic review for methodological reasons. Ten prospective studies fulfilled strict inclusion criteria and were included. Local relapse using OPBS did not exceed 7%. Tumor free margins were retrieved in 86% of cases. Good cosmetic results were obtained in 86% of patients. Most studies showed significant weaknesses, including absence of robust design and methodological limitations, influencing negatively generalizability. This systematic review proves that current evidence supporting efficacy of OPBS in based on poorly designed and underpowered studies. Further studies and particularly RCTs, are required to assess oncological safety and cosmetic results of OPBS, reporting evidence on long-term oncological results, cosmetic outcomes and survival rates of patients treated with this technique. Oncoplastic surgery, Oncological results, Cosmetic results, Cosmesis, Immediate reconstruction

  15. Relation between hospital volume and outcome of elective surgery for abdominal aortic aneurysm: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henebiens, M.; van den Broek, Th A. A.; Vahl, A. C.; Koelemay, M. J. W.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Our aim was to analyse the relation between hospital volume and peri-operative mortality in abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery. DESIGN: Systematic review. METHOD: The Medline, Embase and Cochrane databases were searched to identify all population based studies reporting on the volume

  16. Application of Indocyanine Green in Flap Surgery: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ke; Zhang, Zheng; Nicoli, Fabio; D'Ambrosia, Christopher; Xi, Wenjing; Lazzeri, Davide; Feng, Shaoqing; Su, Weijie; Li, Hua; Ciudad, Pedro; Tremp, Mathias; Zhang, Yi Xin

    2018-02-01

     The vascularization of the distal portions of transferred tissue represents the most critical factor in the success of reconstructive surgery. In recent years, indocyanine green (ICG) fluorescence imaging techniques have been applied during surgery to evaluate flap perfusion. However, this investigation has found that there is little consensus regarding the standard dose of ICG as well as the pre-operative requirements of ICG allergy testing. The aim of this study is to summarize the applications of ICG to tissue transfers and safe dosing practices and to provide insight to the possible adverse effects of ICG on flap surgery with the goal of helping clinicians apply ICG safely and efficiently to tissue transfer procedures.  A literature search was performed using, Wiley InterScience, and Springer with the key words, 'Flap,' 'indocyanine green,' 'surgery,' and related mesh words for all publications between 2005 and 2015. Title and abstract screening was performed using predefined in- and exclusion criteria.  Seventy-three articles were included. These were classified as "application of ICG in flap surgery" and "the security of applying ICG in flap surgery".  ICG fluorescence imaging preoperatively facilitates the detection of perforators in tissue flaps with thickness <20 mm, aids in the evaluation of flap microcirculation and perfusion, and allows surgeons to select dominant cutaneous nerves while evaluating the quality of vascular anastomoses and locating thromboses. The literature also concluded that potential allergic reactions to ICG should be taken into consideration. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  17. Information retrieval for the Cochrane systematic reviews: the case of breast cancer surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaetana Cognetti

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Systematic reviews are fundamental sources of knowledge on the state-of-the-art interventions for various clinical problems. One of the essential components in carrying out a systematic review is that of developing a comprehensive literature search. Materials and methods. Three Cochrane systematic reviews published in 2012 were retrieved using the MeSH descriptor breast neoplasms/surgery, and analyzed with respect to the information sources used and the search strategies adopted. In March 2014, an update of one of the reviews retrieved was also considered in the study. Results. The number of databases queried for each review ranged between three and seven. All the reviews reported the search strategies adopted, however some only partially. All the reviews explicitly claimed that the searches applied no language restriction although sources such as the free database Lilacs (in Spanish and Portuguese was not consulted. Conclusion. To improve the quality it is necessary to apply standards in carrying out systematic reviews (as laid down in the MECIR project. To meet these standards concerning literature searching, professional information retrieval specialist staff should be involved. The peer review committee in charge of evaluating the publication of a systematic review should also include specialists in information retrieval for assessing the quality of the literature search.

  18. Information retrieval for the Cochrane systematic reviews: the case of breast cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cognetti, Gaetana; Grossi, Laura; Lucon, Antonio; Solimini, Renata

    2015-01-01

    Systematic reviews are fundamental sources of knowledge on the state-of-the-art interventions for various clinical problems. One of the essential components in carrying out a systematic review is that of developing a comprehensive literature search. Three Cochrane systematic reviews published in 2012 were retrieved using the MeSH descriptor breast neoplasms/surgery, and analyzed with respect to the information sources used and the search strategies adopted. In March 2014, an update of one of the reviews retrieved was also considered in the study. The number of databases queried for each review ranged between three and seven. All the reviews reported the search strategies adopted, however some only partially. All the reviews explicitly claimed that the searches applied no language restriction although sources such as the free database Lilacs (in Spanish and Portuguese) was not consulted. To improve the quality it is necessary to apply standards in carrying out systematic reviews (as laid down in the MECIR project). To meet these standards concerning literature searching, professional information retrieval specialist staff should be involved. The peer review committee in charge of evaluating the publication of a systematic review should also include specialists in information retrieval for assessing the quality of the literature search.

  19. Robot-assisted pancreatic surgery: a systematic review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strijker, Marin; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C; Besselink, Marc G; van Hillegersberg, Richard; Borel Rinkes, Inne HM; Vriens, Menno R; Molenaar, I Quintus

    2013-01-01

    Background To potentially improve outcomes in pancreatic resection, robot-assisted pancreatic surgery has been introduced. This technique has possible advantages over laparoscopic surgery, such as its affordance of three-dimensional vision and increased freedom of movement of instruments. A systematic review was performed to assess the safety and feasibility of robot-assisted pancreatic surgery. Methods The literature published up to 30 September 2011 was systematically reviewed, with no restrictions on publication date. Studies reporting on over five patients were included. Animal studies, studies not reporting morbidity and mortality, review articles and conference abstracts were excluded. Data were extracted and weighted means were calculated. Results A total of 499 studies were screened, after which eight cohort studies reporting on a total of 251 patients undergoing robot-assisted pancreatic surgery were retained for analysis. Weighted mean operation time was 404 ± 102 min (510 ± 107 min for pancreatoduodenectomy only). The rate of conversion was 11.0% (16.4% for pancreatoduodenectomy only). Overall morbidity was 30.7% (n = 77), most frequently involving pancreatic fistulae (n = 46). Mortality was 1.6%. Negative surgical margins were obtained in 92.9% of patients. The rate of spleen preservation in distal pancreatectomy was 87.1%. Conclusions Robot-assisted pancreatic surgery seems to be safe and feasible in selected patients and, in left-sided resections, may increase the rate of spleen preservation. Randomized studies should compare the respective outcomes of robot-assisted, laparoscopic and open pancreatic surgery. PMID:23216773

  20. Regional analgesia for video-assisted thoracic surgery – a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Julia Steinthorsdottir, Kristin; Wildgaard, Lorna; Jessen Hansen, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) is emerging as the standard surgical procedure for both minor and major oncologic lung surgery. Thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) and paravertebral block (PVB) are established analgesic golden standards for open surgery such as thoracotomy; however there is ......Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) is emerging as the standard surgical procedure for both minor and major oncologic lung surgery. Thoracic epidural analgesia (TEA) and paravertebral block (PVB) are established analgesic golden standards for open surgery such as thoracotomy; however...... there is no gold standard for regional analgesia for VATS. This systematic review aimed to assess different regional techniques in regards to effect on acute post-operative pain following VATS, with emphasis on VATS lobectomy. The systematic review of the PubMed, Cochrane Library and Embase databases yielded...... unique 1542 abstracts, 17 articles were included for qualitative assessment, of which 3 were studies on VATS lobectomy. The analgesic techniques included TEA, multilevel- and single PVB, paravertebral catheter, intercostal catheter, interpleural infusion and long thoracic nerve block. Overall the studies...

  1. Minimally Invasive Surgery Versus Open Surgery Spinal Fusion for Spondylolisthesis: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Victor M; Kerezoudis, Panagiotis; Gilder, Hannah E; McCutcheon, Brandon A; Phan, Kevin; Bydon, Mohamad

    2017-02-01

    Systematic review and meta-analysis. Compare minimally invasive surgery (MIS) and open surgery (OS) spinal fusion outcomes for the treatment of spondylolisthesis. OS spinal fusion is an interventional option for patients with spinal disease who have failed conservative therapy. During the past decade, MIS approaches have increasingly been used, with potential benefits of reduced surgical trauma, postoperative pain, and length of hospital stay. However, current literature consists of single-center, low-quality studies with no review of approaches specific to spondylolisthesis only. This first systematic review of the literature regarding MIS and OS spinal fusion for spondylolisthesis treatment was performed using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines for article identification, screening, eligibility, and inclusion. Electronic literature search of Medline/PubMed, Cochrane, EMBASE, and Scopus databases yielded 2489 articles. These articles were screened against established criteria for inclusion into this study. A total of five retrospective and five prospective articles with a total of 602 patients were found. Reported spondylolisthesis grades were I and II only. Overall, MIS was associated with less intraoperative blood loss (mean difference [MD], -331.04 mL; 95% confidence interval [CI], -490.48 to -171.59; P spondylolisthesis. Moreover, although prospective trials associate MIS with better functional outcomes, longer-term and randomized trials are warranted to validate any association found in this study. 2.

  2. Depression and anxiety in patients undergoing herniated disc surgery: relevant but underresearched - a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zieger, M; Schwarz, R; König, H-H; Härter, M; Riedel-Heller, S G

    2010-02-01

    An association between depression and anxiety and musculoskeletal disorders has been consistently reported in the past years. This article provides a systematic overview of the literature on the prevalence rates of depression and anxiety in patients undergoing surgery for a herniated disc. A systematic literature search was conducted in the following electronic databases: PubMed, PsycINFO, Web of Science, Cochrane Library and PSYNDEXplus. The identified articles were evaluated for prevalence rates of depression and anxiety, methodological issues, change of depression and anxiety over time, and major findings on the impact of depression and anxiety on patients undergoing disc surgery. Fourteen studies were identified. Prevalence rates for depression and anxiety in patients undergoing disc surgery varied between 21.5% and 49.3% before and between 4.1% and 79.6% after disc surgery. The study designs, the use of assessment instruments and cut-off values varied greatly. Depression and anxiety decreased within the population of disc surgery patients over time. Depression and anxiety were found to have a great impact on the postoperative outcome of surgery, return to work, analgesia abuse, pain experience, and abnormal illness behaviour. Little research has been done to investigate depression and anxiety in patients undergoing surgery for a herniated disc. Evidently disc surgery patients are at higher risk of suffering from depression and anxiety than the general population. The review outlines the importance for clinicians to be more sensitive to psychological concerns in patients undergoing disc surgery. Psychological assessment and assistance from mental health professionals should be considered during the hospital stay and rehabilitation period, depending on local feasibility. Further investigations are necessary to examine whether the implementation of a multidisciplinary in-patient treatment program will improve postoperative outcome in patients undergoing

  3. The efficacy of post-operative devices following knee arthroscopic surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatewood, Corey T; Tran, Andrew A; Dragoo, Jason L

    2017-02-01

    There is a wide array of device modalities available for post-operative treatment following arthroscopic knee surgery; however, it remains unclear which types and duration of modality are the most effective. This systematic review aimed to investigate the efficacy of device modalities used following arthroscopic knee surgery. A systematic search of the literature was performed on: PubMed; Scopus; MEDLINE; EMBASE; PEDro; SportDiscus; and CINAHL databases (1995-2015) for clinical trials using device modalities following arthroscopic knee surgery: cryotherapy, continuous passive motion (CPM), neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES), surface electromyographic (sEMG) biofeedback and shockwave therapy (ESWT). Only level 1 and 2 studies were included and the methodological quality of studies was evaluated using Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scores. Outcome measures included: muscle strength, range of motion, swelling, blood loss, pain relief, narcotic use, knee function evaluation and scores, patient satisfaction and length of hospital stay. Twenty-five studies were included in this systematic review, nineteen of which found a significant difference in outcomes. For alleviating pain and decreasing narcotic consumption following arthroscopic knee surgery, cryocompression devices are more effective than traditional icing alone, though not more than compression alone. CPM does not affect post-operative outcomes. sEMG biofeedback and NMES improve quadriceps strength and overall knee functional outcomes following knee surgery. There is limited evidence regarding the effects of ESWT. Cryotherapy, NMES and sEMG are recommended for inclusion into rehabilitation protocols following arthroscopic knee surgery to assist with pain relief, recovery of muscle strength and knee function, which are all essential to accelerate recovery. CPM is not warranted in post-operative protocols following arthroscopic knee surgery because of its limited effectiveness in returning knee

  4. Oncoplastic breast surgery in the setting of breast-conserving therapy: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer J. Yoon, BA

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Breast-conserving therapy (BCT, or breast-conserving surgery with adjuvant radiation therapy, has become a standard treatment alternative to mastectomy for women with early-stage breast cancer after many long-term studies have reported comparable rates of overall survival and local control. Oncoplastic breast surgery in the setting of BCT consists of various techniques that allow for an excision with a wider margin and a simultaneous enhancement of cosmetic sequelae, making it an ideal breast cancer surgery. Because of the parenchymal rearrangement that is routinely involved in oncoplastic techniques, however, the targeted tissue can be relocated, thus posing a challenge to localize the tumor bed for radiation planning. The goals of this systematic review are to address the challenges, outcomes, and cosmesis of oncoplastic breast surgery in the setting of BCT.

  5. Quality of Life and Aesthetic Plastic Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Dreher, Rodrigo; Blaya, Carolina; Ten?rio, Juliana L.C.; Saltz, Renato; Ely, Pedro B.; Ferr?o, Ygor A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Quality of life (QoL) is an important outcome in plastic surgery. However, authors use different scales to address this subject, making it difficult to compare the outcomes. To address this discrepancy, the aim of this study was to perform a systematic review and a random effect meta-analysis. Methods: The search was made in two electronic databases (LILACS and PUBMED) using Mesh and non-Mesh terms related to aesthetic plastic surgery and QoL. We performed qualitative and quantita...

  6. The timing of surgery in lumbar disc prolapse: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashutosh B Sabnis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Herniation of nucleus pulposus leading to leg pain is the commonest indication for lumbar spine surgery. However, there is no consensus when to stop conservative treatment and when to consider for surgery. A systematic review of literature was done to find a consensus on the issue of when should surgery be performed for herniation of nucleus pulposus in lumbar spine was conducted. Electronic database searches of Medline, Embase and Pubmed Central were performed to find articles relating to optimum time to operate in patients with herniation of nucleus pulposus in lumbar spine, published between January 1975 and 10 December 2012. The studies were independently screened by two reviewers. Disagreements between reviewers were settled at a consensus meeting. A scoring system based on research design, number of patients at final followup, percentage of patients at final followup, duration of followup, journal impact factor and annual citation index was devised to give weightage to Categorize (A, B or C each of the articles. Twenty one studies fulfilled the criteria. Six studies were of retrospective design, 13 studies were of Prospective design and two studies were randomized controlled trials. The studies were categorized as: Two articles in category A (highest level of evidence, 12 articles in category B (moderate level of evidence while seven articles in Category C (poor level of evidence. Category A studies conclude that duration of sciatica prior to surgery made no difference to the outcome of surgery in patients with herniation of nucleus pulposus in the lumbar spine. Ten out of 12 studies in Category B revealed that longer duration of sciatica before surgery leads to poor results while 2 studies conclude that duration of sciatica makes no difference to outcome. In category C, five studies conclude that longer duration of sciatica before surgery leads to poor outcome while two studies find no difference in outcome with regards to duration of

  7. Clinical applications of dynamic infrared thermography in plastic surgery: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Hannah Eliza; Niumsawatt, Vachara; Whitaker, Iain S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Infrared thermography (IRT) has become an increasingly utilized adjunct to more expensive and/or invasive investigations in a range of surgical fields, no more so than in plastic surgery. The combination of functional assessment, flow characteristics and anatomical localization has led to increasing applications of this technology. This article aims to perform a systematic review of the clinical applications of IRT in plastic surgery. Methods A systematic literature search using the keywords ‘IRT’ and ‘dynamic infrared thermography (DIRT)’ has been accomplished. A total of 147 papers were extracted from various medical databases, of which 34 articles were subjected to a full read by two independent reviewers, to ensure the papers satisfied the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Studies focusing on the use of IRT in breast cancer diagnosis were excluded. Results A systematic review of 29 publications demonstrated the clinical applications of IRT in plastic surgery today. They include preoperative planning of perforators for free flaps, post operative monitoring of free flaps, use of IRT as an adjunct in burns depth analysis, in assessment of response to treatment in hemangioma and as a diagnostic test for cutaneous melanoma and carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Conclusions Modern infrared imaging technology with improved standardization protocols is now a credible, useful non-invasive tool in clinical practice. PMID:27047781

  8. Virtual reality-based simulators for spine surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfandler, Michael; Lazarovici, Marc; Stefan, Philipp; Wucherer, Patrick; Weigl, Matthias

    2017-09-01

    Virtual reality (VR)-based simulators offer numerous benefits and are very useful in assessing and training surgical skills. Virtual reality-based simulators are standard in some surgical subspecialties, but their actual use in spinal surgery remains unclear. Currently, only technical reviews of VR-based simulators are available for spinal surgery. Thus, we performed a systematic review that examined the existing research on VR-based simulators in spinal procedures. We also assessed the quality of current studies evaluating VR-based training in spinal surgery. Moreover, we wanted to provide a guide for future studies evaluating VR-based simulators in this field. This is a systematic review of the current scientific literature regarding VR-based simulation in spinal surgery. Five data sources were systematically searched to identify relevant peer-reviewed articles regarding virtual, mixed, or augmented reality-based simulators in spinal surgery. A qualitative data synthesis was performed with particular attention to evaluation approaches and outcomes. Additionally, all included studies were appraised for their quality using the Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument (MERSQI) tool. The initial review identified 476 abstracts and 63 full texts were then assessed by two reviewers. Finally, 19 studies that examined simulators for the following procedures were selected: pedicle screw placement, vertebroplasty, posterior cervical laminectomy and foraminotomy, lumbar puncture, facet joint injection, and spinal needle insertion and placement. These studies had a low-to-medium methodological quality with a MERSQI mean score of 11.47 out of 18 (standard deviation=1.81). This review described the current state and applications of VR-based simulator training and assessment approaches in spinal procedures. Limitations, strengths, and future advancements of VR-based simulators for training and assessment in spinal surgery were explored. Higher-quality studies with

  9. Immediate Sequential Bilateral Cataract Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Line Kessel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present systematic review was to examine the benefits and harms associated with immediate sequential bilateral cataract surgery (ISBCS with specific emphasis on the rate of complications, postoperative anisometropia, and subjective visual function in order to formulate evidence-based national Danish guidelines for cataract surgery. A systematic literature review in PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane central databases identified three randomized controlled trials that compared outcome in patients randomized to ISBCS or bilateral cataract surgery on two different dates. Meta-analyses were performed using the Cochrane Review Manager software. The quality of the evidence was assessed using the GRADE method (Grading of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation. We did not find any difference in the risk of complications or visual outcome in patients randomized to ISBCS or surgery on two different dates. The quality of evidence was rated as low to very low. None of the studies reported the prevalence of postoperative anisometropia. In conclusion, we cannot provide evidence-based recommendations on the use of ISBCS due to the lack of high quality evidence. Therefore, the decision to perform ISBCS should be taken after careful discussion between the surgeon and the patient.

  10. Prescription Opioid Analgesics Commonly Unused After Surgery: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicket, Mark C; Long, Jane J; Pronovost, Peter J; Alexander, G Caleb; Wu, Christopher L

    2017-11-01

    Prescription opioid analgesics play an important role in the treatment of postoperative pain; however, unused opioids may be diverted for nonmedical use and contribute to opioid-related injuries and deaths. To quantify how commonly postoperative prescription opioids are unused, why they remain unused, and what practices are followed regarding their storage and disposal. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched from database inception to October 18, 2016, for studies describing opioid oversupply for adults after a surgical procedure. The primary outcome-opioid oversupply-was defined as the number of patients with either filled but unused opioid prescriptions or unfilled opioid prescriptions. Two reviewers independently screened studies for inclusion, extracted data, and assessed the study quality. Six eligible studies reported on a total of 810 unique patients (range, 30-250 patients) who underwent 7 different types of surgical procedures. Across the 6 studies, 67% to 92% of patients reported unused opioids. Of all the opioid tablets obtained by surgical patients, 42% to 71% went unused. Most patients stopped or used no opioids owing to adequate pain control, and 16% to 29% of patients reported opioid-induced adverse effects. In 2 studies examining storage safety, 73% to 77% of patients reported that their prescription opioids were not stored in locked containers. All studies reported low rates of anticipated or actual disposal, but no study reported US Food and Drug Administration-recommended disposal methods in more than 9% of patients. Postoperative prescription opioids often go unused, unlocked, and undisposed, suggesting an important reservoir of opioids contributing to nonmedical use of these products, which could cause injuries or even deaths.

  11. Maternal micronutrient deficiencies and related adverse neonatal outcomes after bariatric surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jans, Goele; Matthys, Christophe; Bogaerts, Annick; Lannoo, Matthias; Verhaeghe, Johan; Van der Schueren, Bart; Devlieger, Roland

    2015-07-01

    Pregnant and postpartum women with a history of bariatric surgery are at risk of micronutrient deficiencies as a result of the combination of physiologic changes related to pregnancy and iatrogenic postoperative alterations in the absorption and metabolism of crucial nutrients. This systematic review investigates micronutrient deficiencies and related adverse clinical outcomes in pregnant and postpartum women after bariatric surgery. A systematic approach involving critical appraisal was conducted independently by 2 researchers to examine deficiencies of phylloquinone, folate, iron, calcium, zinc, magnesium, iodide, copper, and vitamins A, D, and B-12 in pregnant and postpartum women after bariatric surgery, together with subsequent outcomes in the neonates. The search identified 29 relevant cases and 8 cohort studies. The quality of reporting among the case reports was weak according to the criteria based on the CARE (CAse REporting) guidelines as was that for the cohort studies based on the criteria from the Cohort Study Quality Assessment list of the Dutch Cochrane Center. The most common adverse neonatal outcomes related to maternal micronutrient deficiencies include visual complications (vitamin A), intracranial hemorrhage (phylloquinone), neurological and developmental impairment (vitamin B-12), and neural tube defects (folate). On the basis of the systematically collected information, we conclude that the evidence on micronutrient deficiencies in pregnant and postpartum women after bariatric surgery and subsequent adverse neonatal outcomes remains weak and inconclusive. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  12. Maternal Micronutrient Deficiencies and Related Adverse Neonatal Outcomes after Bariatric Surgery: A Systematic Review12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jans, Goele; Matthys, Christophe; Bogaerts, Annick; Lannoo, Matthias; Verhaeghe, Johan; Van der Schueren, Bart; Devlieger, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Pregnant and postpartum women with a history of bariatric surgery are at risk of micronutrient deficiencies as a result of the combination of physiologic changes related to pregnancy and iatrogenic postoperative alterations in the absorption and metabolism of crucial nutrients. This systematic review investigates micronutrient deficiencies and related adverse clinical outcomes in pregnant and postpartum women after bariatric surgery. A systematic approach involving critical appraisal was conducted independently by 2 researchers to examine deficiencies of phylloquinone, folate, iron, calcium, zinc, magnesium, iodide, copper, and vitamins A, D, and B-12 in pregnant and postpartum women after bariatric surgery, together with subsequent outcomes in the neonates. The search identified 29 relevant cases and 8 cohort studies. The quality of reporting among the case reports was weak according to the criteria based on the CARE (CAse REporting) guidelines as was that for the cohort studies based on the criteria from the Cohort Study Quality Assessment list of the Dutch Cochrane Center. The most common adverse neonatal outcomes related to maternal micronutrient deficiencies include visual complications (vitamin A), intracranial hemorrhage (phylloquinone), neurological and developmental impairment (vitamin B-12), and neural tube defects (folate). On the basis of the systematically collected information, we conclude that the evidence on micronutrient deficiencies in pregnant and postpartum women after bariatric surgery and subsequent adverse neonatal outcomes remains weak and inconclusive. PMID:26178026

  13. Quality-of-Life after Anterior Skull Base Surgery: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkman, Matthew A; Borg, Anouk; Al-Mousa, Alaa; Haliasos, Nikolaos; Choi, David

    2014-04-01

    Background Improved treatment and survival of patients with skull base tumors has made the assessment of quality-of-life (QoL) in this population increasingly important. This article provides a comprehensive systematic review pertaining to QoL assessment in adults undergoing anterior skull base surgery. Methods We performed a literature search using the electronic databases of Ovid Medline and Embase. Additional articles were identified through a search using the phrase anterior skull base. Further articles were sought through hand-searching relevant journals and reference lists of identified articles. Results Our search strategy identified 29 articles for inclusion in our systematic review, with considerable variation between studies in population characteristics, methodological design and quality, follow-up length, and outcome assessment. The most commonly used QoL tools were the Karnofsky Performance Status and the Anterior Skull Base Questionnaire. QoL following anterior skull base surgery appears to improve beyond preoperative levels in the months after surgery. For patients undergoing endoscopic skull base surgery, the gain in QoL appears to be greater and may manifest earlier, with no clear long-term deleterious effect on sinonasal outcomes compared with open surgery. Conclusions QoL after anterior skull base surgery in adults appears to improve within several months of surgery, but earlier and to a larger extent if the endoscopic approach is used. Given the relative paucity and heterogeneity of anterior skull base tumors, large-scale prospective multicentre studies utilizing valid and reliable multidimensional QoL tools are required. This may result in improved patient care, by understanding patients' needs better and facilitating the provision of reliable outcome data for clinical trials.

  14. Bariatric surgery for obese children and adolescents: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, J A; White, B; Viner, R M; Simmons, R K

    2013-08-01

    The number of obese young people continues to rise, with a corresponding increase in extreme obesity and paediatric-adolescent bariatric surgery. We aimed to (i) systematically review the literature on bariatric surgery in children and adolescents; (ii) meta-analyse change in body mass index (BMI) 1-year post-surgery and (iii) report complications, co-morbidity resolution and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). A systematic literature search (1955-2013) was performed to examine adjustable gastric band, sleeve gastrectomy, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass or biliopancreatic diversions operations among obese children and adolescents. Change in BMI a year after surgery was meta-analysed using a random effects model. In total, 637 patients from 23 studies were included in the meta-analysis. There were significant decreases in BMI at 1 year (average weighted mean BMI difference: -13.5 kg m(-2) ; 95% confidence interval [CI] -14.1 to -11.9). Complications were inconsistently reported. There was some evidence of co-morbidity resolution and improvements in HRQol post-surgery. Bariatric surgery leads to significant short-term weight loss in obese children and adolescents. However, the risks of complications are not well defined in the literature. Long-term, prospectively designed studies, with clear reporting of complications and co-morbidity resolution, alongside measures of HRQol, are needed to firmly establish the harms and benefits of bariatric surgery in children and adolescents. © 2013 The Authors. obesity reviews © 2013 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  15. Preoperative inspiratory muscle training prevents pulmonary complications after cardiac surgery - a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thybo Karanfil, Emil Osman; Møller, Ann Merete

    2018-03-01

    Post-operative pulmonary complications are a common cause of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing heart surgery. The aim of this systematic review was to determine if preoperative inspiratory muscle training could prevent the development of pneumonia and atelectasis in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) or heart valve surgery. Systematic searches were performed in MEDLINE, Embase and the Cochrane Library. The included studies compared the development of pneumonia and atelectasis in CABG patients or heart valve surgery patients who were prescribed either preoperative inspiratory muscle training or usual care. The quality of the studies was assessed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool. The search yielded 2,479 records. The inclusion criteria were fulfilled by five studies. All the studies were randomised controlled trials. We found that the development of both pneumonia and atelectasis was significantly reduced among patients who received inspiratory muscle training preoperatively compared with patients treated with usual care. Preoperative inspiratory muscle training may reduce the risk of developing pneumonia and atelectasis. However, more trials are needed to support and strengthen the evidence found in this systematic review before routine implementation of this kind of training preoperatively. Articles published in the DMJ are “open access”. This means that the articles are distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial License, which permits any non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author(s) and source are credited.

  16. Systematic review of near-infrared spectroscopy determined cerebral oxygenation during non-cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henning Bay Nielsen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS is used to monitor regional cerebral oxygenation (rScO2 during cardiac surgery but is less established during non-cardiac surgery. This systematic review aimed i to determine the non-cardiac surgical procedures that provoke a reduction in rScO2 and ii to evaluate whether an intraoperative reduction in rScO2 influences postoperative outcome. The PubMed and Embase database were searched from inception until April 30, 2013 and inclusion criteria were intraoperative NIRS determined rScO2 in adult patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery. The type of surgery and number of patients included were recorded. There was included 113 articles and evidence suggests that rScO2 is reduced during thoracic surgery involving single lung ventilation, major abdominal surgery, hip surgery, and laparascopic surgery with the patient placed in anti-Tredelenburg’s position. Shoulder arthroscopy in the beach chair and carotid endarterectomy with clamped internal carotid artery also cause pronounced cerebral desaturation. A >20% reduction in rScO2 coincides with indices of regional and global cerebral ischemia during carotid endarterectomy. Following thoracic surgery, major orthopedic and abdominal surgery the occurrence of postoperative cognitive dysfunction might be related to intraoperative cerebral desaturation. In conclusion, certain non-cardiac surgical procedures is associated with an increased risk for the occurrence of regional cerebral oxygenation. Evidence for an association between cerebral desaturation and postoperative outcome parameters other than cognitive dysfunction needs to be established.

  17. Treatment modalities of neurosensory deficit after lower third molar surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Yiu Yan; Fung, Polly Pok-Lam; Cheung, Lim Kwong

    2012-04-01

    To conduct a systematic review to answer the clinical question, "What are the available treatment modalities and their outcomes of neurosensory deficit after lower third molar surgery?" A systematic search, including a computer search of several databases with specific keywords, a reference search, and a manual search of 3 key maxillofacial journals were performed. Relevant articles were then evaluated and those that fulfilled the 6 predetermined criteria were chosen to enter the final review. The various treatment modalities and their outcomes of neurosensory deficit after lower third molar surgery, in the selected studies in the final review, were analyzed. Ten articles entered the final review. Six treatment modalities of lingual nerve or inferior alveolar nerve deficit after lower third molar surgery were identified. External neurolysis, direct suturing, autogenous vein graft, and a Gore-Tex tube as a conduit were the 4 surgical treatments. Significant improvement after surgical treatment ranged from 25% to 66.7%. Acupuncture and low-level laser therapy were 2 available nonsurgical treatment modalities that were found to have produced significant improvement in sensation after treatment in more than 50% of subjects. There was insufficient information to determine the best timing of treatment of nerve injury after third molar surgery. Four surgical treatments and 2 nonsurgical treatments were identified in the management of neurosensory disturbance after lower third molar surgery. Most treatments showed an improvement in sensation but the outcomes were variable. Complete recovery was uncommon in all kinds of available treatments. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Abdominal binders may reduce pain and improve physical function after major abdominal surgery - a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothman, Josephine Philip; Gunnarsson, Ulf; Bisgaard, Thue

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Evidence for the effect of post-operative abdominal binders on post-operative pain, seroma formation, physical function, pulmonary function and increased intra-abdominal pressure among patients after surgery remains largely un-investigated. METHODS: A systematic review was conducted....... The PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane databases were searched for studies on the use of abdominal binders after abdominal surgery or abdominoplasty. All types of clinical studies were included. Two independent assessors evaluated the scientific quality of the studies. The primary outcomes were pain, seroma...... to reduce seroma formation after laparoscopic ventral herniotomy and a non-significant reduction in pain. Physical function was improved, whereas evidence supports a beneficial effect on psychological distress after open abdominal surgery. Evidence also supports that intra-abdominal pressure increases...

  19. Efficacy, safety, and economics of bracing after spine surgery: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mary P; Tetreault, Lindsay A; Sorefan-Mangou, Fatimah; Garwood, Philip; Wilson, Jefferson R

    2018-01-31

    Bracing is often used after spinal surgery to immobilize the spine, improve fusion, and relieve pain. However, controversy exists regarding the efficacy, necessity, and safety of various bracing techniques in the postsurgical setting. In this systematic review, we aimed to compare the effectiveness, safety, and cost-effectiveness of postoperative bracing versus no postoperative bracing after spinal surgery in patients with several common operative spinal pathologies. A systematic review was carried out to compare postoperative bracing and no postoperative bracing. A systematic search was conducted of MEDLINE, Embase, and the Cochrane Collaboration Library from 1970 to May 2017, supplemented by manual searching of the reference list of relevant studies and previously published reviews. Studies were included if they compared disability, quality of life, functional impairment, radiographic outcomes, cost-effectiveness, or complications between patients treated with postoperative bracing and patients not receiving any postoperative bracing. Each article was critically appraised independently by two reviewers, and the overall body of evidence was rated using guidelines outlined by the Grading of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) Working Group. Of the 858 retrieved citations, 5 studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in this review, consisting of 4 randomized controlled trials and 1 prospective cohort study. Low to moderate evidence suggests that there are no significant differences in most measures of disability, pain, quality of life, functional impairment, radiographic outcomes, and safety between groups. Isolated studies reported statistically significant and inconsistent differences between groups with respect to Neck Disability Index at 6 weeks postoperatively or Short Form-36 Physical Component Score at 1.5, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Based on limited evidence, postoperative bracing does not result in improved

  20. Outcomes of pregnancy following surgery for stress urinary incontinence: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Matthew E; Morrisroe, Shelby; Anger, Jennifer T

    2012-06-01

    Although few data have been published on the safety of childbearing after surgery for stress urinary incontinence, a large proportion of physicians recommend that women wait to complete childbearing before pursuing surgical treatment for stress urinary incontinence. We systematically reviewed the available literature to examine the safety of pregnancy after stress urinary incontinence surgery, and to measure the effect of such pregnancy on continence outcomes. The review was conducted according to the recommendations of the MOOSE (Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies in Epidemiology) group. We performed a systematic review to identify articles published before January 2011 on pregnancy after incontinence surgery. Databases searched include PubMed®, EMBASE® and the Cochrane Review. Our literature search identified 592 titles, of which 20 articles were ultimately included in the review. Data were tabulated from case reports, case series and physician surveys. The final analysis in each category included 32, 19 and 67 patients, respectively. Urinary retention developed during pregnancy in 2 women, 1 of whom was treated with a sling takedown and the other with intermittent catheterization. Of these 2 women 1 also had an episode of pyelonephritis during pregnancy, possibly related to the intermittent catheterization. The incidence of postpartum stress urinary incontinence ranged from 5% to 18% after cesarean delivery and from 20% to 30% after vaginal delivery. Although the data on outcomes in the literature are limited and further studies need to be performed on the subject, the current data suggests that any increase in risks for pregnancy after surgery for stress incontinence may be small. A low risk of urinary retention during pregnancy may exist. Although some data suggest that cesarean deliveries may result in a lower rate of recurrent stress urinary incontinence than vaginal deliveries, a formal analysis could not be performed with the available data

  1. Surgical Navigation: A Systematic Review of Indications, Treatments, and Outcomes in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarmehr, Iman; Stokbro, Kasper; Bell, R Bryan; Thygesen, Torben

    2017-09-01

    This systematic review investigates the most common indications, treatments, and outcomes of surgical navigation (SN) published from 2010 to 2015. The evolution of SN and its application in oral and maxillofacial surgery have rapidly developed over recent years, and therapeutic indications are discussed. A systematic search in relevant electronic databases, journals, and bibliographies of the included articles was carried out. Clinical studies with 5 or more patients published between 2010 and 2015 were included. Traumatology, orthognathic surgery, cancer and reconstruction surgery, skull-base surgery, and foreign body removal were the areas of interests. The search generated 13 articles dealing with traumatology; 5, 6, 2, and 0 studies were found that dealt with the topics of orthognathic surgery, cancer and reconstruction surgery, skull-base surgery, and foreign body removal, respectively. The average technical system accuracy and intraoperative precision reported were less than 1 mm and 1 to 2 mm, respectively. In general, SN is reported to be a useful tool for surgical planning, execution, evaluation, and research. The largest numbers of studies and patients were identified in the field of traumatology. Treatment of complex orbital fractures was considerably improved by the use of SN compared with traditionally treated control groups. SN seems to be a very promising addition to the surgical toolkit. Planning details of the surgical procedure in a 3-dimensional virtual environment and execution with real-time guidance can significantly improve precision. Among factors to be considered are the financial investments necessary and the learning curve. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. All rights reserved.

  2. Patient experiences of outcomes of bariatric surgery: a systematic review and qualitative synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulman, Karen D; MacKichan, Fiona; Blazeby, Jane M; Owen-Smith, Amanda

    2017-05-01

    Although bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for severe and complex obesity, less is known about its psychosocial impact. This systematic review synthesizes qualitative studies investigating the patient perspective of living with the outcomes of surgery. A total of 2,604 records were screened, and 33 studies were included. Data extraction and thematic synthesis yielded three overarching themes: control, normality and ambivalence. These were evident across eight organizing sub-themes describing areas of life impacted by surgery: weight, activities of daily living, physical health, psychological health, social relations, sexual life, body image and eating behaviour and relationship with food. Throughout all these areas, patients were striving for control and normality. Many of the changes experienced were positive and led to feeling more in control and 'normal'. Negative changes were also experienced, as well as changes that were neither positive nor negative but were nonetheless challenging and required adaptation. Thus, participants continued to strive for control and normality in some aspects of their lives for a considerable time, contributing to a sense of ambivalence in accounts of life after surgery. These findings demonstrate the importance of long-term support, particularly psychological and dietary, to help people negotiate these challenges and maintain positive changes achieved after bariatric surgery. © 2017 The Authors. Obesity Reviews published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of World Obesity Federation.

  3. Modulation of the gut microbiome: a systematic review of the effect of bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yan; Huang, Zhi-Ping; Liu, Chao-Qian; Qi, Lin; Sheng, Yuan; Zou, Da-Jin

    2018-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is recommended for patients with obesity and type 2 diabetes. Recent evidence suggested a strong connection between gut microbiota and bariatric surgery. Systematic review. The PubMed and OVID EMBASE were used, and articles concerning bariatric surgery and gut microbiota were screened. The main outcome measures were alterations of gut microbiota after bariatric surgery and correlations between gut microbiota and host metabolism. We applied the system of evidence level to evaluate the alteration of microbiota. Modulation of short-chain fatty acid and gut genetic content was also investigated. Totally 12 animal experiments and 9 clinical studies were included. Based on strong evidence, 4 phyla (Bacteroidetes, Fusobacteria, Verrucomicrobia and Proteobacteria) increased after surgery; within the phylum Firmicutes, Lactobacillales and Enterococcus increased; and within the phylum Proteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, Enterobacteriales Enterobacteriaceae and several genera and species increased. Decreased microbial groups were Firmicutes, Clostridiales, Clostridiaceae, Blautia and Dorea. However, the change in microbial diversity is still under debate. Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, Lactobacillus and Coprococcus comes are implicated in many of the outcomes, including body composition and glucose homeostasis. There is strong evidence to support a considerable alteration of the gut microbiome after bariatric surgery. Deeper investigations are required to confirm the mechanisms that link the gut microbiome and metabolic alterations in human metabolism. © 2018 European Society of Endocrinology.

  4. The risk of kidney stones following bariatric surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongprayoon, Charat; Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Vijayvargiya, Priya; Anthanont, Pimjai; Erickson, Stephen B

    2016-01-01

    With rising prevalence of morbid obesity, the number of bariatric surgeries performed each year has been increasing worldwide. The objective of this meta-analysis was to assess the risk of kidney stones following bariatric surgery. A literature search was performed using MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from inception through July 2015. Only studies reporting relative risks, odd ratios or hazard ratios (HRs) to compare risk of kidney stones in patients who underwent bariatric surgery versus no surgery were included. Pooled risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated using a random-effect, generic inverse variance method. Four studies (One randomized controlled trial and three cohort studies) with 11,348 patients were included in analysis to assess the risk of kidney stones following bariatric surgery. The pooled RR of kidney stones in patients undergoing bariatric surgery was 1.22 (95% CI, 0.63-2.35). The type of bariatric surgery subgroup analysis demonstrated an increased risk of kidney stones in patients following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) with the pooled RR of 1.73 (95% CI, 1.30-2.30) and a decreased risk of kidney stones in patients following restrictive procedures including laparoscopic banding or sleeve gastrectomy with the pooled RR of 0.37 (95% CI, 0.16-0.85). Our meta-analysis demonstrates an association between RYGB and increased risk of kidney stones. Restrictive bariatric surgery, on the other hand, may decrease kidney stone risk. Future study with long-term follow-up data is needed to confirm this potential benefit of restrictive bariatric surgery.

  5. A Systematic Review of Smartphone Applications for Plastic Surgery Providers: Target Audience, Uses, and Cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reusche, Ryan; Buchanan, Patrick J; Kozlow, Jeffrey H; Vercler, Christian J

    2016-01-01

    The growth and acceptance of smartphones among clinicians has been remarkable over the last decade. Over 87% of doctors use a smartphone or tablet capable of running third-party software known as applications (apps). In the field of plastic surgery, apps have been designed for personal practice development, education, clinical tools and guidelines, and entertainment. This study reviews the literature on apps related to plastic surgery and determines the number and types of apps available. A systematic review of the literature was performed to find articles written about plastic surgery applications. Queries were run in the Apple iPhone iOS App store and Google Play using the term "plastic surgery." Apps were reviewed for ratings, downloads, and cost. In addition, apps were categorized based on purpose. Categories include practice development, media/literature, clinical tool and guideline apps, or recreation. The literature search yielded 8 articles for review, 2 articles focused on categorizing apps and 6 articles focused on describing useful apps. Searching Apple's iTunes (iOS) store identified 273 and Google Play identified 250 apps related to plastic surgery; since 2013, a 62%, and 580% increase, respectively. The iOS store included practice development (46%), recreation (26%), media/literature (14%), and clinical tool and guideline (11%). Google Play store included recreation apps (44%), practice development (24%), clinical tools and guidelines (11%), and media and literature (9%). Apps related to the field of plastic surgery are increasing in prevalence. The content of these apps are variable, and the majority are intended for marketing and development of private practices. Apps linking to literature, texts, study materials, and clinical tools and guidelines are developed for both practicing plastic surgeons and surgical trainees. Finding "useful" apps takes time because searches are often complicated by a variety of apps.

  6. Prevalence of Musculoskeletal Disorders Among Surgeons Performing Minimally Invasive Surgery: A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alleblas, C.C.J.; Man, A.M. de; Haak, L. van den; Vierhout, M.E.; Jansen, F.W.; Nieboer, T.E.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to review musculoskeletal disorder (MSD) prevalence among surgeons performing minimally invasive surgery. BACKGROUND: Advancements in laparoscopic surgery have primarily focused on enhancing patient benefits. However, compared with open surgery, laparoscopic

  7. Anti-inflammatory steroid use in impacted third molar surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varvara, G; Bernardi, S; Cutilli, T; Bianchi, S; Sinjari, B; Piattelli, M

    2017-01-01

    Oral surgery procedures involve traumatization of mucosal and bony tissues, and lengthy interventions can lead to inflammatory post-operative sequelae. In the bony tissues in particular, the inflammatory processes can affect healing. Modern drug therapies provide valid support for lowering the risk of occurrence of post-operative inflammatory signs. The two main types of agents used are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and/or corticosteroids, which act on two different molecular pathways in the inflammatiory process. The aim of this systematic review is to examine the different corticosteroids used in oral surgery procedures, their indications for use, and their route of administration, to provide the clinician with a useful scheme for correct pharmacological management of post-operative inflammation. To identify studies eligible for inclusion in this systematic review, we performed a literature search up to April 2017 of the electronic databases, considering published papers from 2007 to 2017. The search terms included steroids, third molar, oral surgery, RCT [randomized controlled trial], human, and clinical trial. Only articles in English language were considered.

  8. Risk Factors Associated With Pressure Ulcer Formation in Critically Ill Cardiac Surgery Patients: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Aditi D; Preston, Ave M; Strauss, Robyn; Stamm, Rebecca; Zalman, Demetra C

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac surgery patients are among those most at risk for developing pressure ulcers (PUs), with a reported incidence as high as 29.5%. Although numerous studies documenting PU risk factors and prevention strategies exist, the availability of literature examining risk factors specific to the cardiac surgery population is limited. A systematic review was completed that aimed to identify the risk factors associated with PU development in critically ill, adult, cardiac surgery patients. The MEDLINE, CINAHL, and Cochrane databases were searched. Studies that focused on PU risk factors in critical care, surgical intensive care, or cardiac surgery populations and used PU occurrences as an outcome variable were included in the review. Twelve high-quality studies were retrieved and included in the review; they revealed 30 potential PU risk factors. Current evidence is limited in 2 important ways. First, the impact of intraoperative factors, such as cardiopulmonary bypass time or body temperature, appears to be underexplored. Second, a substantive discussion of the risk factors associated specifically with deep tissue injuries, a unique PU category, is absent. The relatively high PU incidence among cardiac surgery patients suggests that typical PU prevention methods are insufficient for this population. Targeted prevention measures must be developed and implemented. Completion of this task required identification of risk factors unique to this population. Specific risk factors likely to increase risk among cardiac surgery patients include prolonged exposure to pressure during long surgical procedures, vascular disease, and/or vasopressor use postoperatively. Additional research concerning risk factors specific to this population is urgently needed.

  9. Safety of continuing aspirin therapy during spinal surgery: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chenggui; Wang, Guodong; Liu, Xiaoyang; Li, Yang; Sun, Jianmin

    2017-11-01

    Questions whether to continue or discontinue aspirin administration in the perioperative period of spinal surgery has not been systematically evaluated. The present systematic review is carried out to assess the impact of continuing aspirin administration on the bleeding and cardiovascular events in perispinal surgery period. Studies were retrieved through MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Springer Link Databases (search terms, aspirin, continue or discontinue, and spinal fusion), bibliographies of the articles retrieved, and the authors' reference files. We included studies that enrolled patients who underwent spinal surgery who were anticoagulated with aspirin alone and that reported bleeding or cardiovascular events as an outcome. Study quality was assessed using a validated form. 95% confidence interval (95% CI) was pooled to give summary estimates of bleeding and cardiovascular risk. We identified 4 studies assessing bleeding risk associated with aspirin continuation or cardiovascular risk with aspirin discontinuation during spinal surgery. The continuation of aspirin will not increase the risk of blood loss during the spinal surgery (95% CI, -111.72 to -0.59; P = .05). Also, there was no observed increase in the operative time (95% CI, -33.29 to -3.89; P = .01) and postoperative blood transfusion (95% CI, 0.00-0.27; P = .05). But as for the cardiovascular risk without aspirin continuation and mean hospital length of stay with aspirin continuation, we did not get enough samples to make an accurate decision about their relations with aspirin. Patients undergoing spinal surgery with continued aspirin administration do not have an increased risk for bleeding. In addition, there is no observed increase in the operation time and postoperative blood transfusion.

  10. Systematic review of the surgery-first approach in orthognathic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiung Shing Huang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The surgery-first approach in orthognathic surgery has recently created a broader interest in completely eliminating time-consuming preoperative orthodontic treatment. Available evidence on the surgery-first approach should be appraised to support its use in orthognathic surgery. A MEDLINE search using the keywords "surgery first" and "orthognathic surgery" was conducted to select studies using the surgery-first approach. We also manually searched the reference list of the selected keywords to include articles not selected by the MEDLINE search. The search identified 18 articles related to the surgery-first approach. There was no randomized controlled clinical trial. Four papers were excluded as the content was only personal opinion or basic scientific research. Three studies were retrospective cohort studies in nature. The other 11 studies were case reports. For skeletal Class III surgical correction, the final long-term outcomes for maxillofacial and dental relationship were not significantly different between the surgery-first approach and the orthodontics-first approach in transverse (e.g., intercanine or intermolar width dimension, vertical (e.g., anterior open bite, lower anterior facial height dimension, and sagittal (e.g., anterior-posterior position of pogonion and lower incisors dimension. Total treatment duration was substantially shorter in cases of surgery-first approach use. In conclusion, most published studies related to the surgery-first approach were mainly on orthognathic correction of skeletal Class III malocclusion. Both the surgery-first approach and orthodontics-first approach had similar long-term outcomes in dentofacial relationship. However, the surgery-first approach had shorter treatment time.

  11. Current applications of robotics in spine surgery: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Jacob R; Smith, Brandon W; Liu, Xilin; Park, Paul

    2017-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Surgical robotics has demonstrated utility across the spectrum of surgery. Robotics in spine surgery, however, remains in its infancy. Here, the authors systematically review the evidence behind robotic applications in spinal instrumentation. METHODS This systematic review was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) guidelines. Relevant studies (through October 2016) that reported the use of robotics in spinal instrumentation were identified from a search of the PubMed database. Data regarding the accuracy of screw placement, surgeon learning curve, radiation exposure, and reasons for robotic failure were extracted. RESULTS Twenty-five studies describing 2 unique robots met inclusion criteria. Of these, 22 studies evaluated accuracy of spinal instrumentation. Although grading of pedicle screw accuracy was variable, the most commonly used method was the Gertzbein and Robbins system of classification. In the studies using the Gertzbein and Robbins system, accuracy (Grades A and B) ranged from 85% to 100%. Ten studies evaluated radiation exposure during the procedure. In studies that detailed fluoroscopy usage, overall fluoroscopy times ranged from 1.3 to 34 seconds per screw. Nine studies examined the learning curve for the surgeon, and 12 studies described causes of robotic failure, which included registration failure, soft-tissue hindrance, and lateral skiving of the drill guide. CONCLUSIONS Robotics in spine surgery is an emerging technology that holds promise for future applications. Surgical accuracy in instrumentation implanted using robotics appears to be high. However, the impact of robotics on radiation exposure is not clear and seems to be dependent on technique and robot type.

  12. Use of autologous fat grafting for reconstruction postmastectomy and breast conserving surgery: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agha, Riaz A; Goodacre, Tim; Orgill, Dennis P

    2013-10-22

    There is growing interest in the potential use of autologous fat grafting (AFG) for the purposes of breast reconstruction. However, concerns have been raised regarding the technique's clinical effectiveness, safety and interference with screening mammography. The objective of this systematic review was to determine the oncological, clinical, aesthetic and functional, patient reported, process and radiological outcomes for AFG. All original studies, including randomised controlled trials, cohorts studies, case-control studies, case series and case reports involving women undergoing breast reconstruction. All AFG techniques performed for the purposes of reconstruction in the postmastectomy or breast conserving surgery setting will be considered. Outcomes are defined within this protocol along; oncological, clinical, aesthetic and functional, patient reported, process and radiological domains. The search strategy has been devised to find papers about 'fat grafting and breast reconstruction' and is outlined within the body of this protocol. The full search strategy is outlined within the body of the protocol. The following electronic databases will be searched from 1 January 1986 to 6 June 2013: PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, SCOPUS, CINAHL, PsycINFO, SciELO, The Cochrane Library, including the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effect (DARE), the Cochrane Methodology Register, Health Technology Assessment Database, the NHS Economic Evaluation Databases and Cochrane Groups, ClinicalTrials.gov, Current Controlled Trials Database, the World Health Organisation (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, UpToDate.com, NHS Evidence and the York Centre for Reviews and Dissemination. Grey literature searches will also be conducted as detailed in our review protocol. Eligibility assessment occurred in two stages, title and abstract screening and then full text

  13. Patient experiences of outcomes of bariatric surgery: a systematic review and qualitative synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKichan, Fiona; Blazeby, Jane M.; Owen‐Smith, Amanda

    2017-01-01

    Summary Although bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for severe and complex obesity, less is known about its psychosocial impact. This systematic review synthesizes qualitative studies investigating the patient perspective of living with the outcomes of surgery. A total of 2,604 records were screened, and 33 studies were included. Data extraction and thematic synthesis yielded three overarching themes: control, normality and ambivalence. These were evident across eight organizing sub‐themes describing areas of life impacted by surgery: weight, activities of daily living, physical health, psychological health, social relations, sexual life, body image and eating behaviour and relationship with food. Throughout all these areas, patients were striving for control and normality. Many of the changes experienced were positive and led to feeling more in control and ‘normal’. Negative changes were also experienced, as well as changes that were neither positive nor negative but were nonetheless challenging and required adaptation. Thus, participants continued to strive for control and normality in some aspects of their lives for a considerable time, contributing to a sense of ambivalence in accounts of life after surgery. These findings demonstrate the importance of long‐term support, particularly psychological and dietary, to help people negotiate these challenges and maintain positive changes achieved after bariatric surgery. PMID:28273694

  14. Hyaluronic acid for post sinus surgery care: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, E; Garcia, M; Woods, C M; Ooi, E

    2017-01-01

    Wound healing after endoscopic sinus surgery may result in adhesion formation. Hyaluronic acid may prevent synechiae development. A systematic review was performed to evaluate the current evidence on the clinical efficacy of hyaluronic acid applied to the nasal cavity after sinus surgery. Studies using hyaluronic acid as an adjunct treatment following endoscopic sinus surgery for chronic rhinosinusitis were identified. The primary outcome was adhesion formation rates. A meta-analysis was performed on adhesion event frequency. Secondary outcome measures included other endoscopic findings and patient-reported outcomes. Thirteen studies (501 patients) met the selection criteria. A meta-analysis of adhesion formation frequency on endoscopy demonstrated a lower risk ratio in the hyaluronic acid intervention group (42 out of 283 cases) compared to the control group (81 out of 282) of 0.52 (95 per cent confidence interval = 0.37-0.72). Hyaluronic acid use was not associated with any significant adverse events. Hyaluronic acid appears to be clinically safe and well tolerated, and may be useful in the early stages after sinus surgery to limit adhesion rate. Further research, including larger randomised controlled trials, is required to evaluate patient- and clinician-reported outcomes of hyaluronic acid post sinus surgery.

  15. Preoperative Methods to Reduce Liver Volume in Bariatric Surgery: a Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wissen, J; Bakker, N; Doodeman, H J; Jansma, E P; Bonjer, H J; Houdijk, A P J

    2016-02-01

    Patients qualified for gastric bypass surgery have an enlarged and fatty liver. An essential step in gastric bypass surgery is elevation of the left liver lobe to expose the gastroesophageal junction. An enlarged and fatty liver complicates the surgical procedure and increases the risk for laceration of the liver. The aim of our study was to evaluate methods to reduce liver volume in patients prior to gastric bypass surgery. A systematic literature search of multiple databases, including PubMed, EMBASE.com, and the Cochrane Library and a hand search of reference lists, was performed. We used the search terms morbid obesity and liver, including their synonyms and controlled terms. Inclusion criteria were as follows: patients with morbid obesity who qualified for bariatric surgery, the use of a preoperative treatment to reduce liver volume, and the use of imaging techniques before and after treatment. In total, 281 patients in 11 different studies were included. Preoperative diets reduced liver size by an average of 14%, alternative methods including nutritional supplements, reduced liver size between 20 and 43%, and an intragastric balloon by 32%. This review showed that nutritional supplements and intragastric balloon are more effective than low calorie diets in reducing liver volume prior to gastric bypass surgery. However, low calorie diet is the preferable method to reduce liver volume, considering the level of evidence and practical applicability. There is a need for well-designed randomized studies with sufficient power in order to confirm the effectiveness of preoperative methods to reduce liver volume.

  16. Economic evaluation of da Vinci-assisted robotic surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turchetti, Giuseppe; Palla, Ilaria; Pierotti, Francesca; Cuschieri, Alfred

    2012-03-01

    Health technology assessment (HTA) is frequently used when a new and expensive technology is being introduced into clinical practice. This certainly is the case with the da Vinci surgical robot, with costs ranging from $1 to $2.5 million for each unit. This systematic review documents major variability in the reported cost evaluation studies of da Vinci robot-assisted operations compared with those performed by the direct manual laparoscopic approach. Published studies in the English language related to the period 2000-2010 were searched using economic and clinical electronic databases. All 11 reports included some form of cost analysis, which made it possible for the authors to extract information on certain specific economic outcomes: operating room time, hospital stay, and total costs. With the exception of two studies, the reported operating room time was higher with the robotic approach than with manual laparoscopic surgery, and the hospital stay was the same for the two techniques. Robotic surgery is significantly more expensive if the purchase and maintenance costs of the robot system are included in the total costs. Only 3 of the 11 publications included these costs. The disadvantage of robotic surgery is its higher costs related to purchase and maintenance of technology and its longer operating room time. However, emerging evidence shows that operating room time decreases with experience using the robot. From the HTA viewpoint, the result of this review is that the jury still is out on the HTA of da Vinci-assisted robotic surgery.

  17. A Systematic Review of Patient-Reported Outcome Measures Following Transsexual Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, M; Cogliandro, A; Di Stefano, N; Tambone, V; Persichetti, P

    2017-06-01

    The aims of our study were to identify studies that evaluated patient satisfaction after transsexual surgery, analyze existing questionnaires, and summarize their development, psychometric properties, and content. A systematic review of the English-language literature was performed. Patient-reported outcome measures designed to assess patient satisfaction and quality of life following transsexual surgery were identified. Qualifying instruments were assessed for content and adherence to international guidelines for development and validation. From 796 articles, 19 studies had sufficient data and met the inclusion criteria. Included were a total of 2299 patients and 17 patient-reported outcome measures: 10 generic instruments that assessed quality of life, 4 specific for female genital or sexual satisfaction, 2 specific for transsexual body image or gender dysphoria, and 1 specific for plastic surgery. The questionnaires were analyzed by reviewers to assess the adherence to the rules of the US FDA and the Scientific Advisory Committee of the Medical Outcomes Trust. We identified 17 individual questionnaires that were included. All measures were limited by either their development, their validation, or their content. There is a need for a new self-assessment tool, which should include functional, psychorelational, and cosmetic components, to measure satisfaction and quality of life of patients who have undergone transsexual surgery. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  18. Pacemaker Dependency after Cardiac Surgery: A Systematic Review of Current Evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyers, Curtis M; Khera, Rohan; Bhave, Prashant

    2015-01-01

    Severe postoperative conduction disturbances requiring permanent pacemaker implantation frequently occur following cardiac surgery. Little is known about the long-term pacing requirements and risk factors for pacemaker dependency in this population. We performed a systematic review of the literature addressing rates and predictors of pacemaker dependency in patients requiring permanent pacemaker implantation after cardiac surgery. Using a comprehensive search of the Medline, Web of Science and EMBASE databases, studies were selected for review based on predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria. A total of 8 studies addressing the endpoint of pacemaker-dependency were identified, while 3 studies were found that addressed the recovery of atrioventricular (AV) conduction endpoint. There were 10 unique studies with a total of 780 patients. Mean follow-up ranged from 6-72 months. Pacemaker dependency rates ranged from 32%-91% and recovery of AV conduction ranged from 16%-42%. There was significant heterogeneity with respect to the definition of pacemaker dependency. Several patient and procedure-specific variables were found to be independently associated with pacemaker dependency, but these were not consistent between studies. Pacemaker dependency following cardiac surgery occurs with variable frequency. While individual studies have identified various perioperative risk factors for pacemaker dependency and non-resolution of AV conduction disease, results have been inconsistent. Well-conducted studies using a uniform definition of pacemaker dependency might identify patients who will benefit most from early permanent pacemaker implantation after cardiac surgery.

  19. Systematic review of 3D printing in spinal surgery: the current state of play.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Ben; Mobbs, Ralph J; Wu, Ai-Min; Phan, Kevin

    2017-09-01

    Three-dimensional printing (3DP), also known as "Additive Manufacturing", is a rapidly growing industry, particularly in the area of spinal surgery. Given the complex anatomy of the spine and delicate nature of surrounding structures, 3DP has the potential to aid surgical planning and procedural accuracy. We perform a systematic review of current literature on the applications of 3DP in spinal surgery. Six electronic databases were searched for original published studies reporting cases or outcomes for 3DP surgical models, guides or implants for spinal surgery. The findings of these studies were synthesized and summarized. These searches returned a combined 2,411 articles. Of these, 54 were included in this review. 3DP is currently used for surgical planning, intra-operative surgical guides, customised prostheses as well as "Off-the-Shelf" implants. The technology has the potential for enhanced implant properties, as well as decreased surgical time and better patient outcomes. The majority of the data thus far is from low-quality studies with inherent biases linked with the excitement of a new field. As the body of literature continues to expand, larger scale studies to evaluate advantages and disadvantages, and longer-term follow up will enhance our knowledge of the effect 3DP has in spinal surgery. In addition, issues such as financial impact, time to design and print, materials selection and bio-printing will evolve as this rapidly expanding field matures.

  20. Ischemic Conditioning as a Hemostatic Intervention in Surgery and Cardiac Procedures: A Systematic Review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, Andreas Engel; Hvas, Anne-Mette

    2017-01-01

    Ischemic conditioning induced by nonlethal cycles of tissue ischemia and reperfusion attenuates ischemia–reperfusion injury. The objective of this study is to systematically review the effects of local and remote ischemic conditioning on laboratory parameters of hemostasis and the clinical outcomes...... of thromboembolism or bleeding in patients undergoing surgery or cardiac procedures. PubMed and Embase were searched for relevant human trials published in English between January 1, 1986, and September 7, 2016, and additional studies were identified from reference lists. Data on laboratory parameters of hemostasis...

  1. Medical student experience in surgery influences their career choices: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Dominic C; Salciccioli, Justin D; Walton, Sarah-Jane; Pitkin, Joan; Shalhoub, Joseph; Malietzis, George

    2015-01-01

    Student experiences during surgical rotations may dictate interest in future surgical careers. The objective of this study was to systematically examine the effect of surgical experience (SE) on student attitudes toward surgical careers and also to identify variables influencing the educational value of SE. A systematic review of the available literature was conducted by 2 independent researchers searching Medline, EMBASE, Google Scholar, and Cochrane databases, in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses recommendations. Studies assessing SE during the students' surgical rotations were identified. The quality of the included studies was assessed using a validated quality index. Factors affecting student surgical rotation experience and perceptions of surgical careers were recorded. Overall, 204 studies were identified; 20 unique studies met the inclusion criteria with a median cohort size of 169 (interquartile range: 107-262) respondents. Most were cross-sectional surveys (n = 16/20) and administered to clinical students (n = 16/20). All studies investigating the effect of SE on career choices (n = 8) found that positive experiences during the surgical placement were associated with an increased interest in surgical careers. The operating theater experience was identified as a defining feature of overall SE. Involvement in operative procedures, a welcoming environment, and avoidance of syncopal events positively influenced the SE, particularly in those who actively sought educational opportunities. Study limitations included single-center and single-year cohort designs (70%) with the use of nonvalidated research tools (95%). A systematic review of the literature highlights a number of factors associated with a positive surgical rotation, which may lead to more students deciding to pursue a career in surgery. Understanding the factors that contribute to these decisions through multicenter studies using validated research

  2. The 100 Most-Cited Articles in Visceral Surgery: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Martin; Gloor, Beat; Candinas, Daniel; Malinka, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Even though citation analysis has several limitations, it is a commonly used tool to determine the impact of scientific articles in different research fields. The study aims to identify and systematically review the 100 most cited articles in the field of visceral surgery focusing on papers that modified therapeutic concepts and influenced the surgeons' decision making. The 100 most cited clinical articles in visceral surgery were identified using Journal Citation Reports and Science Citation Index Expanded of the Web of Science (Thomson Reuters, Philadelphia, Pa., USA). Data for characterization of the articles were determined: Number of citations, research topic, journal, publication time, authorship, country of origin, type of article and level of evidence if reasonable. The 100 most cited articles were published in 17 journals; 72 articles were found in the 3 journals: New England Journal of Medicine (38), Annals of Surgery (21) and Lancet (13). The oldest article was published in 1908 in Annals of Surgery (ranked 76th) and the most recent in 2012 in Lancet (65th). Eighty articles were published between 1990 and 2010. The number of citations ranged from 667 to 4,666 (median 925). The leading country of origin was the United States with 39 articles, followed by articles originating from more than one country (30). There were 45 interventional studies (27 randomized controlled trials), 32 observational studies, 19 reviews and 4 guidelines, definitions or classifications. The level of evidence was low (IV) in 42 articles and high in 35 articles (Ia or Ib). A high number of citations did not reflect a high level of evidence. The topics and research questions of the identified articles covered a large area of visceral surgery. Some of the milestones in visceral surgery were identified. The high impact measured by citations did not reflect a high quality of research (level of evidence) in a considerable number of publications. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. The Value of Postconditioning in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Weidong; Zhang, Feng; Lineaweaver, William C; Gao, Weiyang; Yan, Hede

    2016-05-01

    Background Ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury by abrupt restoration of circulation after prolonged ischemia has still been an unsolved problem in plastic and reconstructive surgery. The concept of postconditioning (post-con), which has been well described in cardiovascular surgery, has been recently introduced in plastic and reconstructive surgery. As an "after-injury strategy," post-con may be a promising approach to reduce I/R injury and improve flap survival after ischemia. Methods A systematic review was performed by searching electronic databases of PubMed and web of science to identify all the studies regarding the application of the post-con technique in plastic and reconstructive surgery between 1950 and 2015. Inclusion criteria were English articles with clear reporting the post-con techniques and detailed outcomes. Results In total, 476 articles were identified and 18 studies reporting post-con in plastic and reconstructive surgery met the inclusion criteria in this review, including 11 studies of mechanical post-con, 3 studies of pharmacological post-con, 1 study of both mechanical and pharmacological post-con, and 3 studies of remote post-con. All these studies reported protective effects of any kind of post-con techniques in I/R injuries and could improve flap survivals. Conclusion In general, the strategy of post-con may effectively reduce I/R injury and improve the survival of flaps after ischemia in animal studies, yet no consensus regarding the exact technical details (intervention timing, cycles, intermittent duration, etc.) has been reached. Further studies aiming to explore its mechanisms as well as specific methodology are required before clinical application in plastic and reconstructive surgery. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  4. Bariatric surgery as a risk factor in the development of dental caries: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado-Peralvo, A O; Mateos-Moreno, M V; Arriba-Fuente, L; García-Sánchez, Á; Salgado-García, A; Peralvo-García, V; Millán-Yanes, M

    2018-02-01

    Obesity is one of the most prevalent chronic pathologies in the world and has become a public health problem. At the present time, bariatric surgery (BS) is considered the best option and the only effective method of treatment, but it can occasionally result in a series of alterations at the oral level. This study aims to review the current literature to establish the possible association of patients who have undergone BS and a greater risk of dental caries. This study is a systematic review of the literature. A search was made in the database of Medline (via PubMed), over the last 10 years, using the keywords 'bariatric surgery' OR 'gastrectomy' OR 'obesity surgery,' combined independently with the terms 'saliva' and 'dental caries' by means of the connector 'AND.' The criteria used were those described in the PRISMA® Declaration for performing systematic reviews. Inclusion criteria and study selection: (a) studies done with humans; (b) articles published in English and Spanish; (c) series of cases; and (d) clinical trials. The risk of bias was assessed independently by two authors. In both data extraction and risk of bias assessment, disagreements were resolved through discussion with a third author. Two independent reviewers read the titles and summaries of the 79 articles found. Finally, nine of them were included in the study. In the various articles, the parameters that had clinical relevance to the risk of dental caries were evaluated. Within the limitations of this study, it is plausible to think that patients who have undergone BS have a greater risk of dental caries. The oral complications associated with BS could be prevented or minimized by including in the multidisciplinary treatment of these patients a team of odontologists who would be responsible for prevention and oral assessment. Copyright © 2017 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Increased Need for Gastrointestinal Surgery and Increased Risk of Surgery-Related Complications in Patients with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulas Søborg, Marie-Louise; Leganger, Julie; Rosenberg, Jacob; Burcharth, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndromes (EDSs) constitute a rare group of inherited connective tissue diseases, characterized by multisystemic manifestations and general tissue fragility. Most severe complications include vascular and gastrointestinal (GI) emergencies requiring acute surgery. The purpose of this systematic review was to assess the causes of GI-related surgery and related mortality and morbidity in patients with EDSs. A systematic search was conducted in PubMed, Embase, and Scopus to identify relevant studies. Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis guidelines for systematic reviews were followed. According to eligibility criteria, data were extracted and systematically screened by 2 authors. Screening process identified 11 studies with a total of 1,567 patients. Findings indicated that patients with EDSs had a higher occurrence of surgery demanding GI manifestations, including perforation, hemorrhage, rupture of intra-abdominal organs, and rectal prolapse. Most affected was the vascular subtype, of which up to 33% underwent GI surgery and suffered from a lowered average life expectancy of 48 years (range 6-78). Secondary complications of surgery were common in all patients with EDSs. Studies suggested that patients with EDSs present an increased need for GI surgery, but also an increased risk of surgery-related complications, most predominantly seen in the vascular subtype. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Abdominal binders may reduce pain and improve physical function after major abdominal surgery - a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothman, Josephine Philip; Gunnarsson, Ulf; Bisgaard, Thue

    2014-01-01

    with the use of abdominal binders. Reduction of pulmonary function during use of abdominal binders has not been revealed. CONCLUSION: Abdominal binders reduce post-operative psychological distress, but their effect on post-operative pain after laparotomy and seroma formation after ventral hernia repair remains......INTRODUCTION: Evidence for the effect of post-operative abdominal binders on post-operative pain, seroma formation, physical function, pulmonary function and increased intra-abdominal pressure among patients after surgery remains largely un-investigated. METHODS: A systematic review was conducted....... The PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane databases were searched for studies on the use of abdominal binders after abdominal surgery or abdominoplasty. All types of clinical studies were included. Two independent assessors evaluated the scientific quality of the studies. The primary outcomes were pain, seroma...

  7. Single Stage Knee Arthroplasty Revision Surgery: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, E; Khan, W S; Agarwal, S; Morgan-Jones, R

    2015-01-01

    Total Knee Arthroplasty is an increasingly common procedure and revision surgery, particularly for infection, is associated with significant morbidity and healthcare costs. The current gold standard is a two stage revision procedure but single stage revision is increasingly being used in some departments to improve patient outcomes. We conducted a systematic review of the literature to determine the up-to-date evidence underlying the use of a single stage knee approach in revision surgery. A total of 12 studies were included in this review amounting to 433 revision surgeries. This is the largest review of single stage knee revision surgery. The procedures described were heterogenous and included the 'two-in-one' technique as well as other single stage revision procedures. There were also differences in implants and antibiotic regimens. The mean re-infection rates described in 10 studies was 9.4% (range 0-19.2%) after a mean follow-up of 40.3 months (range 7-180 months). The re-infection rates in the studies published over the last 30 years are falling, and this is not accounted for by any significant change in duration of follow-up during this period. The outcome scores varied, but patients generally showed an improvement. The Knee Society Score and the Oxford Knee Score were the most commonly used in five and three studies respectively. We conclude that the current evidence for single stage revision is variable and there is a lack of good quality evidence to address whether single stage revisions is thorough enough to eradicate deep infection and is able to restore adequate function. There is a need for larger prospective studies with standardised procedures and protocol, and with adequate follow-up. Till then, patients considered for a single stage approach should be thoroughly assessed and the surgery should be performed by a senior surgeon with experience in single stage knee revisions.

  8. The Quality of Systematic Reviews in Head and Neck Microsurgery: A Perspective from Plastic Surgery and Otolaryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Beatrice J; Tijerina, Jonathan; Nazerali, Rahim S; Lee, Gordon K

    2018-05-01

    In recent years, there has been a push to publish higher level of evidence studies in medicine, particularly in plastic surgery. Well-conducted systematic reviews are considered the strongest level of evidence in medicine, recently becoming the key process indicators for quality delivery. A varying quality of systematic reviews, however, has led to concerns of their validity in clinical decision-making. We perform a quality analysis of systematic reviews published in head and neck microsurgery by the surgical specialties of plastic surgery and otolaryngology. An evaluation of systematic reviews published on microsurgery in 13 high-impact surgical journals was conducted by searching PubMed and Scopus. Two authors independently performed searches, screened for eligibility, and extracted data from included articles. Discrepancies were resolved by discussion and consensus. Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) criteria were used to assess methodological quality. The initial database search retrieved 166 articles. After removing duplicates, screening titles and abstracts, 26 articles remained for full text review. Seven did not focus on head and neck microsurgery and were further excluded, leaving 19 systematic reviews for final analysis. Of those, 10 systematic reviews were published by otolaryngology, and 9 were published by plastic surgery. Median AMSTAR score was 8 for otolaryngology, 7 for plastic surgery, and 8 overall, reflecting "fair to good" quality. The number of systematic reviews on head and neck microsurgery markedly increased over time. Of note, both the AMSTAR score and the number of systematic reviews published by plastic surgery have steadily increased from 2014 to 2016, whereas those published by otolaryngology have remained relatively stable since 2010. Our review shows a trend toward publishing more systematic reviews. The increasing quantity and quality of systematic reviews published by plastic surgeons indicates recognition in the

  9. Surgery or physical activity in the management of sciatica: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Matthew; Ferreira, Manuela L; Refshauge, Kathryn M; Hartvigsen, Jan; Silva, Isabela R C; Maher, Chris G; Koes, Bart W; Ferreira, Paulo H

    2016-11-01

    Previous reviews have compared surgical to non-surgical management of sciatica, but have overlooked the specific comparison between surgery and physical activity-based interventions. Systematic review using MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase and PEDro databases was conducted. Randomised controlled trials comparing surgery to physical activity, where patients were experiencing the three most common causes of sciatica-disc herniation, spondylolisthesis and spinal stenosis. Two independent reviewers extracted pain and disability data (converted to a common 0-100 scale) and assessed methodological quality using the PEDro scale. The size of the effects was estimated for each outcome at three different time points, with a random effects model adopted and the GRADE approach used in summary conclusions. Twelve trials were included. In the short term, surgery provided better outcomes than physical activity for disc herniation: disability [WMD -9.00 (95 % CI -13.73, -4.27)], leg pain [WMD -16.01 (95 % CI -23.00, -9.02)] and back pain [WMD -12.44 (95 % CI -17.76, -7.09)]; for spondylolisthesis: disability [WMD -14.60 (95 % CI -17.12, -12.08)], leg pain [WMD -35.00 (95 % CI -39.66, -30.34)] and back pain [WMD -20.00 (95 % CI -24.66, -15.34)] and spinal stenosis: disability [WMD -11.39 (95 % CI -17.31, -5.46)], leg pain [WMD, -27.17 (95 % CI -35.87, -18.46)] and back pain [WMD -20.80 (95 % CI -25.15, -16.44)]. Long-term and greater than 2-year post-randomisation results favoured surgery for spondylolisthesis and stenosis, although the size of the effects reduced with time. For disc herniation, no significant effect was shown for leg and back pain comparing surgery to physical activity. There are indications that surgery is superior to physical activity-based interventions in reducing pain and disability for disc herniation at short-term follow-up only; but high-quality evidence in this field is lacking (GRADE). For spondylolisthesis and spinal stenosis, surgery is superior to physical

  10. Effectiveness of nurse-led preoperative assessment services for elective surgery: a systematic review update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Sonia; Munday, Judy; Kynoch, Kate

    2015-07-17

    Nurse-led preadmission clinics or services have been implemented in many health services as a strategy to facilitate the admission and assessment of booked surgical cases. In order to provide the most recent available evidence, this systematic review is an update of our previous review published in 2010. The objective of this review was to integrate recent research with a previously published systematic review on the effectiveness of nurse-led elective surgery preoperative assessment clinics or services on patient outcomes. The review considered studies that included adult or pediatric patients who were undergoing any type of elective surgical procedure, either as a day-only case or as an inpatient. The review considered studies that evaluated the effect of attending or receiving the services of a nurse-led elective surgery outpatient preadmission or preoperative assessment clinic. TYPES OF OUTCOMES: This review considered studies that included the following outcome measures: length of stay, cancellation of surgery, incidence of non-attendance for scheduled surgery, mortality, morbidity, adverse surgical events, preoperative preparation, recognition and fulfilment of postoperative care needs, patient anxiety and patient or parent satisfaction. TYPES OF STUDIES: The review update considered any randomized controlled trials published after 2009; in the absence of randomized controlled trials other research designs, such as non-randomized controlled trials and before and after studies, were considered for inclusion in a narrative summary to enable the identification of current best evidence regarding the effectiveness of nurse-led preoperative assessment services. The search strategy aimed to find both published and unpublished studies. A three-step search strategy was utilized in each component of this review. Methodological validity was assessed by two reviewers prior to inclusion in the review using standardized critical appraisal instruments from the Joanna Briggs

  11. Preoperative exercise therapy for elective major abdominal surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouwels, Sjaak; Stokmans, Rutger A; Willigendael, Edith M; Nienhuijs, Simon W; Rosman, Camiel; van Ramshorst, Bert; Teijink, Joep A W

    2014-01-01

    The impact of postoperative complications after Major Abdominal Surgery (MAS) is substantial, especially when socio-economical aspects are taken into account. This systematic review focuses on the effects of preoperative exercise therapy (PEXT) on physical fitness prior to MAS, length of hospital admission and postoperative complications in patients eligible for MAS, and on what is known about the most effective kind of exercise regime. A systematic search identified randomised controlled trials on exercise therapy and pulmonary physiotherapy prior to MAS. The methodological quality of the included studies was rated using the 'Delphi List For Quality Assessment of Randomised Clinical Trials'. The level of agreement between the two reviewers was estimated with Cohen's kappa. A total of 6 studies were included, whose methodological quality ranged from moderate to good. Cohen's kappa was 0.90. Three studies reported on improving physical fitness prior to MAS with the aid of PEXT. Two studies reported on the effect of training on postoperative complications, showing contradictory results. Three studies focused on the effect of preoperative chest physiotherapy on postoperative lung function parameters after MAS. While the effects seem positive, the optimal training regime is still unclear. Preoperative exercise therapy might be effective in improving the physical fitness of patients prior to major abdominal surgery, and preoperative chest physiotherapy seems effective in reducing pulmonary complications. However consensus on training method is lacking. Future research should focus on the method and effect of PEXT before high-risk surgical procedures. Copyright © 2013 Surgical Associates Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The Role of Surgery in Metastatic Bladder Cancer: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abufaraj, Mohammad; Dalbagni, Guido; Daneshmand, Siamak; Horenblas, Simon; Kamat, Ashish M; Kanzaki, Ryu; Zlotta, Alexandre R; Shariat, Shahrokh F

    2017-11-06

    The role of surgery in metastatic bladder cancer (BCa) is unclear. In this collaborative review article, we reviewed the contemporary literature on the surgical management of metastatic BCa and factors associated with outcomes to support the development of clinical guidelines as well as informed clinical decision-making. A systematic search of English language literature using PubMed-Medline and Scopus from 1999 to 2016 was performed. The beneficial role of consolidation surgery in metastatic BCa is still unproven. In patients with clinically evident lymph node metastasis, data suggest a survival advantage for patients undergoing postchemotherapy radical cystectomy with lymphadenectomy, especially in those with measurable response to chemotherapy (CHT). Intraoperatively identified enlarged pelvic lymph nodes should be removed. Anecdotal reports of resection of pulmonary metastasis as part of multimodal approach suggest possible improved survival in well-selected patients. Cytoreductive radical cystectomy as local treatment has also been explored in patients with metastatic disease, although its benefits remain to be assessed. Consolidative extirpative surgery may be considered in patients with clinically evident pelvic or retroperitoneal lymph nodal metastases but only if they have had a response to CHT. Surgery for limited pulmonary metastases may also be considered in very selected cases. Best candidates are those with resectable disease who demonstrate measurable response to CHT with good performance status. In the absence of data from prospective randomized studies, each patient should be evaluated on an individual basis and decisions made together with the patient and multidisciplinary teams. Surgical resection of metastases is technically feasible and can be safely performed. It may help improve cancer control and eventually survival in very selected patients with limited metastatic burden. In a patient who is motivated to receive chemotherapy and to undergo

  13. A Systematic Review of Internet Decision-Making Resources for Patients Considering Surgery for Ulcerative Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Daniel M; Marshall, Jack H; Lee, Matthew J; Jones, Georgina L; Brown, Steven R; Lobo, Alan J

    2017-08-01

    Guidance from the Royal College of Surgeons advocates patient use of on-line resources to assist in decision making. Our aim was to assess the quality of on-line resources to facilitate decision making for patients considering surgery for ulcerative colitis (UC). We undertook a systematic review based on PRISMA guidelines. This was registered on the PROSPERO database (CRD42016047177). We searched Google and repositories using several lay search terms for patient information discussing surgery for UC, published in English. Quality of content on websites was assessed using the validated DISCERN instrument and by minimum standards for decision aids (IPDASi v4.0 checklist). Decision aids were also assessed by the IPDAS checklist. Readability of written content was ascertained using the Flesch-Kincaid score. Our searches identified 175 websites and one decision aid-119 results were excluded at initial screen and 32 were excluded at full text assessment, leaving 25 sources for review. The mean Flesch-Kincaid score for websites was 44.9 (±9.73, range 28.1-61.4), suggesting material was difficult to read. No websites compared surgery to medical management or traded off patient preferences. The median IPDAS score was 5/12 (range 1-7). The median global score based on the DISCERN rating was 1/5 (range 1-5), identifying most websites as poor quality. The decision aid scored 9/12 on the IPDAS checklist, not meeting minimum standards. Available information for patients considering surgery for UC is generally low quality. The development of a new decision aid to support patients considering surgery for UC is recommended.

  14. The use of study registration and protocols in plastic surgery research: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pidgeon, Thomas Edward; Limb, Christopher; Agha, Riaz A; Whitehurst, Katharine; Chandrakumar, Charmilie; Wellstead, Georgina; Fowler, Alexander J; Orgill, Dennis P

    2017-08-01

    In 2013, the Declaration of Helsinki changed to mandate that all research studies involving human subjects, rather than just clinical trials alone, must have a protocol registered in a publicly accessible database prior to the enrolment of the first patient. The objective of this work was to assess the number of research studies involving human participants published in leading journals of plastic surgery that had either published a protocol or registered a protocol with a publicly accessible database. This systematic review examined all research articles involving human participants published in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, The Journal of Plastic Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery and The Annals of Plastic Surgery from 1st April 2014-31st March 2015. The primary outcome measure was whether each study had either published or registered a protocol with any mainstream registry database. ClinicalTrials.gov, the International Standard Randomized Control Trial Number (ISRCTN) registry, the WHO (World Health Organisation) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, The Cochrane Collaboration, the Research Registry, PROSPERO and PubMed were all reviewed. Of 595 included articles, the most common study designs were case series (n = 185, 31.1%). There were 24 randomized controlled trials (RCTs, 4.0%). A total of 24 studies had a protocol registered (4.0%). The most common database to register a protocol was with ClinicalTrials.gov (n = 17). The study design that most commonly had a registered protocol was the RCT (n = 8 of 24, 33.3% of RCTs). Three studies published a protocol in a journal (0.6%). Publication or registration of protocols for recent studies involving human participants in major plastic surgery journals is low. There is considerable scope to improve this and guidance is provided. Copyright © 2017 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Outcomes after bariatric surgery according to large databases: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balla, Andrea; Batista Rodríguez, Gabriela; Corradetti, Santiago; Balagué, Carmen; Fernández-Ananín, Sonia; Targarona, Eduard M

    2017-09-01

    The rapid development of technological tools to record data allows storage of enormous datasets, often termed "big data". In the USA, three large databases have been developed to store data regarding surgical outcomes: the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP), the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) National Inpatient Sample (NIS) and the Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery Accreditation and Quality Improvement Program (MBSAQIP). We aimed to evaluate the clinical impact of studies found in these databases concerning outcomes of bariatric surgery. We performed a systematic review using the Meta-analysis of Observational Studies in Epidemiology guidelines. Research carried out using the PubMed database identified 362 papers. All outcomes related to bariatric surgery were analysed. Fifty-four studies, published between 2005 and February 2017, were included. These articles were divided into (1) outcomes related to surgical techniques (12 articles), (2) morbidity and mortality (12), (3) 30-day hospital readmission (10), (4) outcomes related to specific diseases (11), (5) training (2) and (6) socio-economic and ethnic observations in bariatric surgery (7). Forty-two papers were based on data from ACS-NSQIP, nine on data from NIS and three on data from MBSAQIP. This review provides an overview of surgical management and outcomes of bariatric surgery in the USA. Large databases offer useful complementary information that could be considered external validation when strong evidence-based medicine data are lacking. They also allow us to evaluate infrequent situations for which randomized control trials are not feasible and add specific information that can complement the quality of surgical knowledge.

  16. Prevalence of Musculoskeletal Disorders Among Surgeons Performing Minimally Invasive Surgery: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alleblas, Chantal C J; de Man, Anne Marie; van den Haak, Lukas; Vierhout, Mark E; Jansen, Frank Willem; Nieboer, Theodoor E

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to review musculoskeletal disorder (MSD) prevalence among surgeons performing minimally invasive surgery. Advancements in laparoscopic surgery have primarily focused on enhancing patient benefits. However, compared with open surgery, laparoscopic surgery imposes greater ergonomic constraints on surgeons. Recent reports indicate a 73% to 88% prevalence of physical complaints among laparoscopic surgeons, which is greater than in the general working population, supporting the need to address the surgeons' physical health. To summarize the prevalence of MSDs among surgeons performing laparoscopic surgery, we performed a systematic review of studies addressing physical ergonomics as a determinant, and reporting MSD prevalence. On April 15 2016, we searched Pubmed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, Web of Science, CINAHL, and PsychINFO. Meta-analyses were performed using the Hartung-Knapp-Sidik-Jonkman method. We identified 35 articles, including 7112 respondents. The weighted average prevalence of complaints was 74% [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 65-83]. We found high inconsistency across study results (I = 98.3%) and the overall response rate was low. If all nonresponders were without complaints, the prevalence would be 22% (95% CI 16-30). From the available literature, we found a 74% prevalence of physical complaints among laparoscopic surgeons. However, the low response rates and the high inconsistency across studies leave some uncertainty, suggesting an actual prevalence of between 22% and 74%. Fatigue and MSDs impact psychomotor performance; therefore, these results warrant further investigation. Continuous changes are enacted to increase patient safety and surgical care quality, and should also include efforts to improve surgeons' well-being.

  17. A systematic review of lung-sparing extirpative surgery for pleural mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Elaine; Fiorentino, Francesca; Tan, Carol; Treasure, Tom

    2011-02-01

    There is a resurgence of interest in lung-sparing extirpative surgery for malignant pleural mesothelioma with recent reports of better survival and fewer adverse consequences than with extrapleural pneumonectomy. However, these operations are not well-characterized and to offer evidence-based clinical recommendations and to plan future trials a summary of what is already known is required. A formal literature search was performed and all recovered titles were sequentially sifted by title, abstract and full-text reading according to prespecified criteria. Papers were selected if they contained data relevant to the area of enquiry. Quantitative synthesis and textual analysis, appropriate to the material, were performed. Follow-up studies of patients undergoing surgery for malignant pleural mesothelioma in specialist thoracic or cardiothoracic units. Among the operated patients described in these papers, a total of 1270 patients had undergone lung-sparing surgery for mesothelioma. There were no randomized trials or other forms of controlled studies. From 464 titles, 26 papers contained sufficient data on 1270 patients to be included in the systematic review. Operative descriptions for all series were extracted and tabulated and variation was found in the nature of surgery within and between series, and the degree of detail with which it was described. There was more operative detail in recent papers. All available numerical data were extracted, tabulated and summarized using quantitative methods. The average survival at 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 years was 51%, 26%, 16%, 11% and 9%, respectively. There were no data on patients' performance status, symptomatic change, or other patient reported outcomes. In the absence of any form of control data, no conclusions can be drawn concerning survival differences or symptomatic benefits attributable to surgery. As mesothelioma surgery is restricted to a selected minority of patients who often have multiple therapies, future research

  18. Recurrences of surgery for antrochoanal polyps in children: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galluzzi, Francesca; Pignataro, Lorenzo; Maddalone, Marcello; Garavello, Werner

    2018-03-01

    The main purpose was to evaluate the recurrence rate after surgery for antrochoanal polyps (ACPs) in children; secondly, we have analyzed the rate of recurrence for different types of surgery and the risk factors involved. We performed a systematic review searching PubMed and MEDLINE databases including English-language published studies from June 1989 to October 2017 regarding surgical treatment of ACPs in children. We included thirteen studies, eight were retrospective and five prospective, with 285 participants, the mean rate of recurrence after ACPs surgery was 15.0% (95% CI:11.0-20.0). Functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) was the main type of surgery used for primary cases (75.4%) followed by the combined approach i.e. FESS with a transcanine sinusoscopy or mini Caldwell-Luc (14%), the Caldwell-Luc (CWL) (8%) and simple polypectomy (SP) (2.8%). Our analysis has demonstrated a significant reduction of recurrences using the combined approach 0% (95% CI: 0.0-8.0) compared with FESS 17.7% (95% CI: 12.8-23.4) or SP 50% (95% CI:15.7-84.3) (p  .05). The analysis of the possible risk factors involved in recurrences are inconclusive. Recurrences of ACPs in children are still high. The endoscopic sinus surgery is considered the first choice for primary treatment, whilst the external approach may be a valid option in case of recurrence. It seems that the combined approach could reduce recurrence rates in selected patients that cannot be completely managed with endoscopy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Systematic review of a patient care bundle in reducing staphylococcal infections in cardiac and orthopaedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ning; Cameron, Alun; Tivey, David; Grae, Nikki; Roberts, Sally; Morris, Arthur

    2017-04-01

    Surgical site infections (SSIs) are serious adverse events hindering surgical patients' recovery. In Australia and New Zealand, SSIs are a huge burden to patients and healthcare systems. A bundled approach, including pre-theatre nasal and/or skin decolonization has been used to reduce the risk of staphylococcal infection. The aim of this review is to assess the effectiveness of the bundle in preventing SSIs for cardiac and orthopaedic surgeries. The review was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. Published literature was searched in PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Library of Systematic reviews. Identified articles were selected and extracted based on a priori defined Population-Intervention-Comparator-Outcome and eligibility criteria. Data of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and comparative observational studies were synthesized by meta-analyses. Quality appraisal tools were used to assess the evidence quality. The review included six RCTs and 19 observational studies. The bundled treatment regimens varied substantially across all studies. RCTs showed a trend of Staphylococcus aureus SSIs reduction due to the bundle (relative risk = 0.59, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.33, 1.06) with moderate heterogeneity. Observational studies showed statistically significant reduction in all-cause and S. aureus SSIs, with 51% (95% CI = 0.41, 0.59) and 47% (95% CI = 0.35, 0.65), respectively. No publication biases were detected. SSIs in major cardiac and orthopaedic surgeries can be effectively reduced by approximately 50% with a pre-theatre patient care bundle approach. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  20. Robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery versus conventional laparoscopic surgery in randomized controlled trials: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Hyunsuk Frank; Nam, Seung Hyuk; Kim, Jung Mogg

    2018-01-01

    This review provides a comprehensive comparison of treatment outcomes between robot-assisted laparoscopic surgery (RLS) and conventional laparoscopic surgery (CLS) based on randomly-controlled trials (RCTs). We employed RCTs to provide a systematic review that will enable the relevant community to weigh the effectiveness and efficacy of surgical robotics in controversial fields on surgical procedures both overall and on each individual surgical procedure. A search was conducted for RCTs in PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases from 1981 to 2016. Among a total of 1,517 articles, 27 clinical reports with a mean sample size of 65 patients per report (32.7 patients who underwent RLS and 32.5 who underwent CLS), met the inclusion criteria. CLS shows significant advantages in total operative time, net operative time, total complication rate, and operative cost (p < 0.05 in all cases), whereas the estimated blood loss was less in RLS (p < 0.05). As subgroup analyses, conversion rate on colectomy and length of hospital stay on hysterectomy statistically favors RLS (p < 0.05). Despite higher operative cost, RLS does not result in statistically better treatment outcomes, with the exception of lower estimated blood loss. Operative time and total complication rate are significantly more favorable with CLS.

  1. Evaluation of Postoperative Infections in Patients Undergoing Abdominal Surgery: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidreza Naderi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Postoperative infectious complications impose substantial costs on patients, increase the length of hospitalization and adversely affect patient outcomes. Several predisposing factors have been suggested for the development of infections after elective surgeries. This study aimed to evaluate the rate of infectious complications following elective abdominal surgery. Materials and Methods: This systematic review was performed via searching in databases such as Cochrane Library and MEDLINE until December 2014, and articles with available abstracts were included in the study. In addition, manual search was conducted within the reference lists of selected articles. Inclusion criteria and quality of related articles were evaluated by two reviewers independently, and required data were extracted.  Results: Among related studies, the earliest article was published in 1988, and the most recent one was published in 2013. All studies were performed on adult patients. Surgical Site Infections (SSIs were reported to be the third most frequent hospital-acquired infections, with the prevalence rate of 4.7-25% in patients undergoing elective colorectal surgery. Conclusions: According to the results of this study, postoperative infections are a global issue, leading to several health consequences and increased morbidity and mortality among different patients. Patient factors are considered as the main predisposing factors associated with these infections.

  2. Systematic review of psychological and social outcomes of adolescents undergoing bariatric surgery, and predictors of success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, B; Doyle, J; Colville, S; Nicholls, D; Viner, R M; Christie, D

    2015-12-01

    The psychological and social outcomes of bariatric surgery in adolescents, together with psychological and social predictors of success, were systematically reviewed. PubMed, EMBASE, ISI Web of Science and PsychInfo were searched on July 2014. Existing data were sparse; 15 were suitable for qualitative review and six for meta-analysis (four quality of life [QOL], two depression). One study was a randomized controlled trial. A total of 139 subjects underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, 202 underwent adjustable gastric band and 64 underwent sleeve gastrectomy. Overall QOL improved after bariatric surgery, regardless of surgical type with peak improvement at 6-12 months. Meta-analysis of four studies showed changed in overall QOL at latest follow-up of 2.80 standard deviation (SD) (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.23-4.37). Depression improved across all studies, regardless of procedure (effect size -0.47 SD [95% CI -0.76, -0.18] at 4-6 months). Two cohorts reported changes in both overall QOL and depression following a quadratic trajectory, with overall improvement over 2 years and deterioration in the second post-operative year. There were limited data on other psychological and social outcomes. There were insufficient data on psychosocial predictors of outcome to form evidence-based recommendations for patient selection for bariatric surgery at this time. © 2015 World Obesity.

  3. An overview and methodological assessment of systematic reviews and meta-analyses of enhanced recovery programmes in colorectal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Duncan; Paton, Fiona; Wilson, Paul; Eastwood, Alison; Craig, Dawn; Fox, Dave; Jayne, David; McGinnes, Erika

    2014-05-30

    To identify and critically assess the extent to which systematic reviews of enhanced recovery programmes for patients undergoing colorectal surgery differ in their methodology and reported estimates of effect. Review of published systematic reviews. We searched the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE) and Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database from 1990 to March 2013. Systematic reviews of enhanced recovery programmes for patients undergoing colorectal surgery were eligible for inclusion. The primary outcome was length of hospital stay. We assessed changes in pooled estimates of treatment effect over time and how these might have been influenced by decisions taken by researchers as well as by the availability of new trials. The quality of systematic reviews was assessed using the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (CRD) DARE critical appraisal process. 10 systematic reviews were included. Systematic reviews of randomised controlled trials have consistently shown a reduction in length of hospital stay with enhanced recovery compared with traditional care. The estimated effect tended to increase from 2006 to 2010 as more trials were published but has not altered significantly in the most recent review, despite the inclusion of several unique trials. The best estimate appears to be an average reduction of around 2.5 days in primary postoperative length of stay. Differences between reviews reflected differences in interpretation of inclusion criteria, searching and analytical methods or software. Systematic reviews of enhanced recovery programmes show a high level of research waste, with multiple reviews covering identical or very similar groups of trials. Where multiple reviews exist on a topic, interpretation may require careful attention to apparently minor differences between reviews. Researchers can help readers by acknowledging existing reviews and through clear reporting of key decisions

  4. [Intraoperative goal directed hemodynamic therapy in noncardiac surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripollés, Javier; Espinosa, Angel; Martínez-Hurtado, Eugenio; Abad-Gurumeta, Alfredo; Casans-Francés, Rubén; Fernández-Pérez, Cristina; López-Timoneda, Francisco; Calvo-Vecino, José María

    2016-01-01

    The goal directed hemodynamic therapy is an approach focused on the use of cardiac output and related parameters as end-points for fluids and drugs to optimize tissue perfusion and oxygen delivery. Primary aim: To determine the effects of intraoperative goal directed hemodynamic therapy on postoperative complications rates. A meta-analysis was carried out of the effects of goal directed hemodynamic therapy in adult noncardiac surgery on postoperative complications and mortality using Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses methodology. A systematic search was performed in Medline PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library (last update, October 2014). Inclusion criteria were randomized clinical trials in which intraoperative goal directed hemodynamic therapy was compared to conventional fluid management in noncardiac surgery. Exclusion criteria were trauma and pediatric surgery studies and that using pulmonary artery catheter. End-points were postoperative complications (primary) and mortality (secondary). Those studies that fulfilled the entry criteria were examined in full and subjected to quantifiable analysis, predefined subgroup analysis (stratified by type of monitor, therapy, and hemodynamic goal), and predefined sensitivity analysis. 51 RCTs were initially identified, 24 fulfilling the inclusion criteria. 5 randomized clinical trials were added by manual search, resulting in 29 randomized clinical trials in the final analysis, including 2654 patients. A significant reduction in complications for goal directed hemodynamic therapy was observed (RR: 0.70, 95% CI: 0.62-0.79, p<0.001). No significant decrease in mortality was achieved (RR: 0.76, 95% CI: 0.45-1.28, p=0.30). Quality sensitive analyses confirmed the main overall results. Intraoperative goal directed hemodynamic therapy with minimally invasive monitoring decreases postoperative complications in noncardiac surgery, although it was not able to show a significant decrease in

  5. Intraoperative goal directed hemodynamic therapy in noncardiac surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Ripollés

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: The goal directed hemodynamic therapy is an approach focused on the use of cardiac output and related parameters as end-points for fluids and drugs to optimize tissue perfusion and oxygen delivery. Primary aim: To determine the effects of intraoperative goal directed hemodynamic therapy on postoperative complications rates. Methods: A meta-analysis was carried out of the effects of goal directed hemodynamic therapy in adult noncardiac surgery on postoperative complications and mortality using Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses methodology. A systematic search was performed in Medline PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library (last update, October 2014. Inclusion criteria were randomized clinical trials in which intraoperative goal directed hemodynamic therapy was compared to conventional fluid management in noncardiac surgery. Exclusion criteria were trauma and pediatric surgery studies and that using pulmonary artery catheter. End-points were postoperative complications (primary and mortality (secondary. Those studies that fulfilled the entry criteria were examined in full and subjected to quantifiable analysis, predefined subgroup analysis (stratified by type of monitor, therapy, and hemodynamic goal, and predefined sensitivity analysis. Results: 51 RCTs were initially identified, 24 fulfilling the inclusion criteria. 5 randomized clinical trials were added by manual search, resulting in 29 randomized clinical trials in the final analysis, including 2654 patients. A significant reduction in complications for goal directed hemodynamic therapy was observed (RR: 0.70, 95% CI: 0.62-0.79, p < 0.001. No significant decrease in mortality was achieved (RR: 0.76, 95% CI: 0.45-1.28, p = 0.30. Quality sensitive analyses confirmed the main overall results. Conclusions: Intraoperative goal directed hemodynamic therapy with minimally invasive monitoring decreases postoperative complications in noncardiac

  6. Intraoperative goal directed hemodynamic therapy in noncardiac surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripollés, Javier; Espinosa, Angel; Martínez-Hurtado, Eugenio; Abad-Gurumeta, Alfredo; Casans-Francés, Rubén; Fernández-Pérez, Cristina; López-Timoneda, Francisco; Calvo-Vecino, José María

    2016-01-01

    The goal directed hemodynamic therapy is an approach focused on the use of cardiac output and related parameters as end-points for fluids and drugs to optimize tissue perfusion and oxygen delivery. Primary aim: To determine the effects of intraoperative goal directed hemodynamic therapy on postoperative complications rates. A meta-analysis was carried out of the effects of goal directed hemodynamic therapy in adult noncardiac surgery on postoperative complications and mortality using Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses methodology. A systematic search was performed in Medline PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library (last update, October 2014). Inclusion criteria were randomized clinical trials in which intraoperative goal directed hemodynamic therapy was compared to conventional fluid management in noncardiac surgery. Exclusion criteria were trauma and pediatric surgery studies and that using pulmonary artery catheter. End-points were postoperative complications (primary) and mortality (secondary). Those studies that fulfilled the entry criteria were examined in full and subjected to quantifiable analysis, predefined subgroup analysis (stratified by type of monitor, therapy, and hemodynamic goal), and predefined sensitivity analysis. 51 RCTs were initially identified, 24 fulfilling the inclusion criteria. 5 randomized clinical trials were added by manual search, resulting in 29 randomized clinical trials in the final analysis, including 2654 patients. A significant reduction in complications for goal directed hemodynamic therapy was observed (RR: 0.70, 95% CI: 0.62-0.79, p<0.001). No significant decrease in mortality was achieved (RR: 0.76, 95% CI: 0.45-1.28, p=0.30). Quality sensitive analyses confirmed the main overall results. Intraoperative goal directed hemodynamic therapy with minimally invasive monitoring decreases postoperative complications in noncardiac surgery, although it was not able to show a significant decrease in

  7. Virtual reality training in laparoscopic surgery: A systematic review & meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaker, Medhat; Wynn, Greg R; Arulampalam, Tan

    2016-05-01

    Laparoscopic surgery requires a different and sometimes more complex skill set than does open surgery. Shortened working hours, less training times, and patient safety issues necessitates that these skills need to be acquired outside the operating room. Virtual reality simulation in laparoscopic surgery is a growing field, and many studies have been published to determine its effectiveness. This systematic review and meta-analysis aims to evaluate virtual reality simulation in laparoscopic abdominal surgery in comparison to other simulation models and to no training. A systematic literature search was carried out until January 2014 in full adherence to PRISMA guidelines. All randomised controlled studies comparing virtual reality training to other models of training or to no training were included. Only studies utilizing objective and validated assessment tools were included. Thirty one randomised controlled trials that compare virtual reality training to other models of training or to no training were included. The results of the meta-analysis showed that virtual reality simulation is significantly more effective than video trainers, and at least as good as box trainers. The use of Proficiency-based VR training, under supervision with prompt instructions and feedback, and the use of haptic feedback, has proven to be the most effective way of delivering the virtual reality training. The incorporation of virtual reality training into surgical training curricula is now necessary. A unified platform of training needs to be established. Further studies to assess the impact on patient outcomes and on hospital costs are necessary. (PROSPERO Registration number: CRD42014010030). Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Neuraxial anesthesia for orthopedic surgery: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials

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    Fabiano Timbó Barbosa

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Taking the outcome of mortality into consideration, there is controversy about the beneficial effects of neuraxial anesthesia for orthopedic surgery. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness and safety of neuraxial anesthesia versus general anesthesia for orthopedic surgery. DESIGN AND SETTING: Systematic review at Universidade Federal de Alagoas. METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Issue 10, 2012, PubMed (1966 to November 2012, Lilacs (1982 to November 2012, SciELO, EMBASE (1974 to November 2012 and reference lists of the studies included. Only randomized controlled trials were included. RESULTS: Out of 5,032 titles and abstracts, 17 studies were included. There were no statistically significant differences in mortality (risk difference, RD: -0.01; 95% confidence interval, CI: -0.04 to 0.01; n = 1903, stroke (RD: 0.02; 95% CI: -0.04 to 0.08; n = 259, myocardial infarction (RD: -0.01; 95% CI: -0.04 to 0.02; n = 291, length of hospitalization (mean difference, -0.05; 95% CI: -0.69 to 0.58; n = 870, postoperative cognitive dysfunction (RD: 0.00; 95% CI: -0.04 to 0.05; n = 479 or pneumonia (odds ratio, 0.61; 95% CI: 0.25 to 1.49; n = 167. CONCLUSION: So far, the evidence available from the studies included is insufficient to prove that neuraxial anesthesia is more effective and safer than general anesthesia for orthopedic surgery. However, this systematic review does not rule out clinically important differences with regard to mortality, stroke, myocardial infarction, length of hospitalization, postoperative cognitive dysfunction or pneumonia.

  9. Current status of validation for robotic surgery simulators - a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboudi, Hamid; Khan, Mohammed S; Aboumarzouk, Omar; Guru, Khurshid A; Challacombe, Ben; Dasgupta, Prokar; Ahmed, Kamran

    2013-02-01

    To analyse studies validating the effectiveness of robotic surgery simulators. The MEDLINE(®), EMBASE(®) and PsycINFO(®) databases were systematically searched until September 2011. References from retrieved articles were reviewed to broaden the search. The simulator name, training tasks, participant level, training duration and evaluation scoring were extracted from each study. We also extracted data on feasibility, validity, cost-effectiveness, reliability and educational impact. We identified 19 studies investigating simulation options in robotic surgery. There are five different robotic surgery simulation platforms available on the market. In all, 11 studies sought opinion and compared performance between two different groups; 'expert' and 'novice'. Experts ranged in experience from 21-2200 robotic cases. The novice groups consisted of participants with no prior experience on a robotic platform and were often medical students or junior doctors. The Mimic dV-Trainer(®), ProMIS(®), SimSurgery Educational Platform(®) (SEP) and Intuitive systems have shown face, content and construct validity. The Robotic Surgical SimulatorTM system has only been face and content validated. All of the simulators except SEP have shown educational impact. Feasibility and cost-effectiveness of simulation systems was not evaluated in any trial. Virtual reality simulators were shown to be effective training tools for junior trainees. Simulation training holds the greatest potential to be used as an adjunct to traditional training methods to equip the next generation of robotic surgeons with the skills required to operate safely. However, current simulation models have only been validated in small studies. There is no evidence to suggest one type of simulator provides more effective training than any other. More research is needed to validate simulated environments further and investigate the effectiveness of animal and cadaveric training in robotic surgery. © 2012 BJU

  10. Measurement of disordered eating in bariatric surgery candidates: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Katrina; Brennan, Leah

    2015-01-01

    Symptoms of disordered eating are common among patients seeking bariatric surgery, and assessment of eating pathology is typical in pre-surgical evaluations. A systematic review was conducted to evaluate the definitions, diagnostic criteria and measures used to assess disordered eating in adults seeking bariatric surgery. The review identified 147 articles featuring 34 questionnaires and 45 interviews used in pre-surgical assessments. The Questionnaire on Eating and Weight Patterns Revised and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM were the most frequently used questionnaire and interview respectively. Variations to pre-surgical diagnostic criteria included changes to the frequency and duration criteria for binge eating, and inconsistent use of disordered eating definitions (e.g., grazing). Results demonstrate a paucity of measures designed specifically for an obese sample, and only 24% of questionnaires and 4% of interviews used had any reported psychometric evaluation in bariatric surgery candidates. The psychometric data available suggest that interview assessments are critical for accurately identifying binge episodes and other diagnostic information, while self-report questionnaires may be valuable for providing additional information of clinical utility (e.g., severity of eating, shape and weight-related concerns). Findings highlight the need for consensus on disordered eating diagnostic criteria and psychometric evaluation of measures to determine whether existing measures provide a valid assessment of disordered eating in this population. Consistent diagnosis and the use of validated measures will facilitate accurate identification of disordered eating in the pre-surgical population to enable assessment of suitability for surgery and appropriate targeting of treatment for disordered eating to optimise treatment success. Copyright © 2014 Asian Oceanian Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Use of autologous fat grafting in reconstruction following mastectomy and breast conserving surgery: An updated systematic review protocol

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    Riaz A. Agha

    2017-01-01

    Ethics and dissemination: The systematic review will be published in a peer-reviewed journal and presented at national and international meetings within fields of plastic, reconstructive and aesthetic surgery, and surgical oncology. The work will be disseminated electronically and in print. Brief reports of the review and findings will be disseminated to interested parties through email and direct communication. The review aims to guide healthcare practice and policy.

  12. Surgery for Peptic Ulcer Disease in sub-Saharan Africa: Systematic Review of Published Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickard, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    Peptic ulcer disease is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, with a significant burden in low- and middle-income countries. However, there is limited information regarding management of peptic ulcer disease in these countries. This study describes surgical interventions for peptic ulcer disease in sub-Saharan Africa. A systematic review was performed using PubMed, EMBASE, and African Index Medicus for studies describing surgical management of peptic ulcer disease in sub-Saharan Africa. From 55 published reports, 6594 patients underwent surgery for peptic ulcer disease. Most ulcers (86%) were duodenal with the remainder gastric (14%). Thirty-five percent of operations were performed for perforation, 7% for bleeding, 30% for obstruction, and 28% for chronic disease. Common operations included vagotomy (60%) and primary repair (31%). The overall case fatality rate for peptic ulcer disease was 5.7% and varied with indication for operation: 13.6% for perforation, 11.5% for bleeding, 0.5% for obstruction, and 0.3% for chronic disease. Peptic ulcer disease remains a significant indication for surgery in sub-Saharan Africa. Recognizing the continued role of surgery for peptic ulcer disease in sub-Saharan Africa is important for strengthening surgical training programs and optimizing allocation of resources.

  13. Effect of Grazing Behavior on Weight Regain Post-Bariatric Surgery: A Systematic Review

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    Nathalia Pizato

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Grazing, a type of maladaptive eating behavior, has been associated with poor weight outcomes in bariatric patients. The purpose of this study was to conduct a systematic review of the association between grazing behavior and weight regain post-bariatric surgery. Literature searches, study selection, design of the method, and quality appraisal were carried out by two independent authors. The search strategy was performed until October 2017 in Medline, Embase, Cochrane, Lilacs, Scopus, Web of Science, Google Scholar, ProQuest Dissertation & Theses, and Open Grey. Of a total of 3764 articles, five papers met the inclusion criteria (four original articles and one thesis, comprising 994 subjects, mostly women. The prevalence of grazing behavior ranged from 16.6 to 46.6%, and the highest prevalence of significant weight regain was 47%. The association between grazing and weight regain was observed in four of the five evaluated studies. Our findings support an association between grazing behavior and weight regain after bariatric surgery, regardless of surgery type and contextual concept of grazing. Further studies are needed to confirm the clarity of the real prevalence and interfering factors related to grazing behavior and weight outcomes.

  14. Psychosocial Status and Mental Health in Adolescents before and after Bariatric Surgery: A Systematic Literature Review

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    Sabine Herget

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: As long-term results of conservative treatment for obesity are discouraging, bariatric surgery is becoming a treatment option for extremely obese adolescents. However, mental and behavioral problems need to be respected when treating this vulnerable target group. Methods: A detailed systematic literature review on pre- and post-operative depressive, anxiety and eating disorder symptoms of adolescent patients was performed in PsychINFO, PubMed and Medline electronic databases. Results: Twelve studies met the inclusion criteria. Although strength of evidence was limited, results suggested that pre-operatively a third of adolescents suffered from moderate to severe depressive disorder symptoms and a quarter from anxiety disorder symptoms, while a substantial number showed eating disorder symptoms. Post-operatively, levels of depressive disorder symptoms significantly improved. Original articles on outcomes of eating and anxiety disorder symptoms after weight loss surgery were not found. Conclusions: Further attention is needed on consistent clinical assessment of mental health disturbances and their consecutive treatment in adolescents. Future research should also focus on psychological and psychosocial predictors of weight loss after bariatric surgery.

  15. Psychosocial Status and Mental Health in Adolescents before and after Bariatric Surgery: A Systematic Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herget, Sabine; Rudolph, Almut; Hilbert, Anja; Blüher, Susann

    2014-01-01

    Objective As long-term results of conservative treatment for obesity are discouraging, bariatric surgery is becoming a treatment option for extremely obese adolescents. However, mental and behavioral problems need to be respected when treating this vulnerable target group. Methods A detailed systematic literature review on pre- and post-operative depressive, anxiety and eating disorder symptoms of adolescent patients was performed in PsychINFO, PubMed and Medline electronic databases. Results Twelve studies met the inclusion criteria. Although strength of evidence was limited, results suggested that pre-operatively a third of adolescents suffered from moderate to severe depressive disorder symptoms and a quarter from anxiety disorder symptoms, while a substantial number showed eating disorder symptoms. Post-operatively, levels of depressive disorder symptoms significantly improved. Original articles on outcomes of eating and anxiety disorder symptoms after weight loss surgery were not found. Conclusions Further attention is needed on consistent clinical assessment of mental health disturbances and their consecutive treatment in adolescents. Future research should also focus on psychological and psychosocial predictors of weight loss after bariatric surgery. PMID:25059420

  16. Synthetic devices for reconstructive surgery of the cruciate ligaments: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batty, Lachlan M; Norsworthy, Cameron J; Lash, Nicholas J; Wasiak, Jason; Richmond, Anneka K; Feller, Julian A

    2015-05-01

    The role of synthetic devices in the management of the cruciate ligament-injured knee remains controversial. The aim of this systematic review was to assess the safety and efficacy of synthetic devices in cruciate ligament surgery. A systematic review of the electronic databases Medline, Embase, and The Cochrane Library (issue 1, 2014) on January 13, 2014, was performed to identify controlled and uncontrolled trials. Trials that assessed the safety and efficacy of synthetic devices for cruciate ligament surgery were included. The main variables assessed included rates of failure, revision, and noninfective effusion and synovitis. Patient-reported outcome assessments and complications were also assessed where reported. From 511 records screened, we included 85 articles published between 1985 and 2013 reporting on 6 synthetic devices (ligament augmentation and reconstruction system [Ligament Augmentation and Reconstruction System (LARS; Surgical Implants and Devices, Arc-sur-Tille, France)]; Leeds-Keio [Xiros (formerly Neoligaments), Leeds, England]; Kennedy ligament augmentation device [3M, St Paul, MN]; Dacron [Stryker, Kalamazoo, MI]; Gore-Tex [W.L. Gore and Associates, Flagstaff, AZ]; and Trevira [Telos (limited liability company), Marburg, Germany]). The heterogeneity of the included studies precluded meta-analysis. The results were analyzed by device and then type of reconstruction (anterior cruciate ligament [ACL]/posterior cruciate ligament [PCL]/combined ACL and PCL). The lowest cumulative rates of failure were seen with the LARS device (2.6% for ACL and 1% for PCL surgery). The highest failure rate was seen in the Dacron ACL group (cumulative rate, 33.6%). Rates of noninfective synovitis and effusion ranged from 0.2% in the LARS ACL group to 27.6% in the Gore-Tex ACL group. Revision rates ranged from 2.6% (LARS) to 11.8% (Trevira-Hochfest; Telos). Recent designs, specifically the LARS, showed good improvement in the outcome scores. The mean preoperative and

  17. Anatomy of anterior talofibular ligament and calcaneofibular ligament for minimally invasive surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Kentaro; Takao, Masato; Tochigi, Yuki; Ozeki, Satoru; Glazebrook, Mark

    2017-06-01

    To gain a better understanding of the precise anatomy of the lateral ligaments of the ankle through a systematic review of published cadaveric studies in order to improve anatomical minimally invasive surgery (MIS) for treatment of chronic ankle instability (CAI). A systematic review of the literature was performed using the PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane databases and Web of Science on June 2015 with the two search concepts: "lateral ligament of the ankle" and "anatomy". Anatomical studies that reported gross anatomy of the anterior talar fibular ligament (ATFL) and calcaneal fibular ligament (CFL) in English were included to assess the morphology and origins and insertions of the ligaments. All records found in the literature search were screened by title and abstract. Potentially relevant articles were selected for full-text review. Each of the identified articles was reviewed and included in qualitative synthesis. The following data were abstracted from the included articles: authors, date of publication, sample size, mean age, the length and the width of the each ligament, number of bundle of the ATFL and the location and the footprint of the origins and insertions for the ATFL and CFL. Sixteen studies were identified indicating the length of the ATFL and CFL was 12-24.8 and 18.5-35.8 mm, respectively, while the width was 5-11.1 and 4.6-7.6 mm, respectively. Fibular origins of the ATFL and CFL were located on the anterior border of distal fibula at a distance of 10-13.8 and 5.3-8.5 mm proximal to the tip of the fibula, respectively. The talar insertion of the ATFL was located 14.2-18.1 mm to the subtalar joint or 11.3-14.8 mm to the anterolateral corner of the talar body. The calcaneal insertion of the CFL was located 12.1-13 mm to the subtalar joint or 13.2-27.1 mm to the peroneal tubercle on the lateral wall of calcaneus. Systematic review of the literature of the research for the ATFL and CFL has identified the morphology of the ligaments and their

  18. Systematic Review: Audiovisual Interventions for Reducing Preoperative Anxiety in Children Undergoing Elective Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lieshout, Ryan J.; Schmidt, Louis A.; Dobson, Kathleen G.; Buckley, Norman

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the effectiveness of Audiovisual (AV) interventions at reducing preoperative anxiety and its associated outcomes in children undergoing elective surgery. Methods A systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and nonrandomized studies where the primary outcome was children’s preoperative anxiety was conducted. Secondary outcomes included postoperative pain, behavioral changes, recovery, induction compliance, satisfaction, and cost-effectiveness. The risk of bias of each study was assessed. Results In all, 18 studies were identified. A meta-analytic approach and narrative synthesis of findings were used to summarize the results of the studies. Conclusions This systematic review suggests that AV interventions can be effective in reducing children’s preoperative anxiety. Videos, multi-faceted programs, and interactive games appear to be most effective, whereas music therapy and Internet programs are less effective. While AV interventions appear potentially useful, adequately powered RCTs are required to conclusively pinpoint the components and mechanisms of the most effective AV interventions and guide practice. PMID:26476281

  19. Breast edema in breast cancer patients following breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbelen, Hanne; Gebruers, Nick; Beyers, Tinne; De Monie, Anne-Caroline; Tjalma, Wiebren

    2014-10-01

    Breast-conserving surgery (BCS) is commonly used in breast cancer treatment. Despite its benefits, some women will be troubled by breast edema. Breast edema may cause an unsatisfactory cosmetic result, influencing the quality of life. The purpose of this systematic review is to investigate the incidence of breast edema and to identify risk factors of breast edema in breast cancer patients following BCS and radiotherapy. A systematic literature search was performed using different electronic databases (PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane, Embase) until June 2014. Inclusion criteria were as follows: (1) research studies that included female breast cancer patients who were treated with BCS and radiotherapy and (2) studies that investigated the incidence of breast edema and/or risk factors of breast edema. Exclusion criteria were (1) reviews or case studies and (2) studies published before 1995. We identified in total 28 papers which represented 4,011 patients. There was a great variation in the incidence of breast edema (0-90.4 %). We identified several possible risk factors for breast edema namely increasing irradiated breast volume, increasing boost volume, the use of a photon boost, increasing breast separation, a higher density of the breast tissue, a large tumor, a higher specimen weight, postoperative infection, acute postoperative toxicity, and diabetes mellitus. However, their prognostic value remains uncertain. Breast edema is a common complaint after BCS and radiotherapy. A number of possible risk factors associated with breast edema were identified, but further research is warranted.

  20. Smoking and plastic surgery, part II. Clinical implications: a systematic review with meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluvy, I; Panouillères, M; Garrido, I; Pauchot, J; Saboye, J; Chavoin, J P; Tropet, Y; Grolleau, J L; Chaput, B

    2015-02-01

    Tobacco addiction is a risk factor for complication in plastic surgery. The authors have assembled concrete arguments detailing the risks of perioperative and postoperative complication that are incurred by a patient with continued tobacco intoxication who wishes to undergo a surgical intervention. Through application of the PRISMA criteria, we have carried out a systematic review of the literature, in which we explored five databases while using predefined keywords. We selected randomized, controlled observational studies on the perioperative and postoperative complications related to tobacco use in actively smoking, abstinent and non-smoking patients. The levels of evidence for each article were evaluated. Risk of bias was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Incidence parameters including the Odds Ratio and relative risk were calculated for each complication of which the number of occurrences had been indicated. Meta-analysis of the results was carried out. We included 60 observational studies. In the cosmetic surgery group, we calculated a combined Odds Ratio of 2.3 [1.51-3.54] Pbariatric surgery sequelae group, we found a combined Odds Ratio of 3.3 [1.90-5.64] Psuccess rate of free flap microsurgery, but it is difficult to extrapolate results on the latter to digital reimplantation. The review underlines the fact that patients with smoking habits run a significantly heightened risk of cutaneous necrosis, particularly in the event of major detachment (cervico-facial lift, skin-sparing mastectomy, abdominoplasty), of additionally delayed wound healing and of addition surgical site infections. Rigorous preoperative evaluation of smokers could help to diminish these risks. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of paediatric bariatric surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikenhead, A; Knai, C; Lobstein, T

    2011-02-01

    Strong evidence for successful and cost-effective obesity management strategies is still generally lacking, leading the medical profession to rely increasingly on surgical options to treat obesity in children and adolescents. We performed a systematic review to examine the effectiveness of surgical interventions to treat obese children and adolescents, and whether they are cost-effective. We searched PubMed, ISI Web of Science, Embase and the Cochrane Library to 6 September 2010, and hand-searched bibliographies. We included articles with English abstracts if they examined subjects ≤19 years of age, reported at least one postoperative weight loss measure and at least 1 year of postoperative follow-up. Thirty-seven relevant papers on bariatric surgery effectiveness in 831 children or adolescents were included, spanning 36 years. Thirteen studies examined gastric banding, with mean body mass index (BMI) reductions ranging from 8.5 to 43 kg m(-2) . Weight gain was reported in one case study. Eight papers examined Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, with mean BMI reductions ranging from 9 to 25 kg m(-2) . Fourteen publications studied other forms of bariatric surgery: sleeve gastrectomies, vertical banded gastroplasty, biliopancreatic diversion or a combination of procedures. Mean BMI reductions ranged from 9 to 24 kg m(-2) . Three surgery-related mortalities were reported, as was weight regain in several cases. The majority of studies reported resolution or improvement of comorbid conditions. A range of postoperative complications were identified across surgery types, including: ulcers, intestinal leakage, wound infection, anastomotic stricture, nutritional deficiencies, bowel obstruction, pulmonary embolism, disrupted staple lines, band slippage, psychological intolerance and repeated vomiting. Evidence on cost-effectiveness was limited to one Australian modelling project, which deemed laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding cost-effective for adolescents

  2. The effects of perioperative music interventions in pediatric surgery: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J.E. Van Der Heijden (Marianne J. E.); S.O. Araghi (Sadaf Oliai); M. Van Dijk (Monique); J. Jeekel (Johannes); M.G.M. Hunink (Myriam)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjective: Music interventions are widely used, but have not yet gained a place in guidelines for pediatric surgery or pediatric anesthesia. In this systematic review and meta-analysis we examined the effects of music interventions on pain, anxiety and distress in children undergoing

  3. Acupuncture for acute postoperative pain after back surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young-Hun; Kim, Chang-Kyu; Heo, Kwang-Ho; Lee, Myeong Soo; Ha, In-Hyuk; Son, Dong Wuk; Choi, Byung Kwan; Song, Geun-Sung; Shin, Byung-Cheul

    2015-03-01

    Acupuncture is commonly used as a complimentary treatment for pain management. However, there has been no systematic review summarizing the current evidence concerning the effectiveness of acupuncture for acute postoperative pain after back surgery. This systematic review aimed at evaluating the effectiveness of acupuncture treatment for acute postoperative pain (≤1 week) after back surgery. We searched 15 electronic databases without language restrictions. Two reviewers independently assessed studies for eligibility and extracted data, outcomes, and risk of bias. Random effect meta-analyses and subgroup analyses were performed. Five trials, including 3 of high quality, met our inclusion criteria. The meta-analysis showed positive results for acupuncture treatment of pain after surgery in terms of the visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain intensity 24 hours after surgery, when compared to sham acupuncture (standard mean difference -0.67 (-1.04 to -0.31), P = 0.0003), whereas the other meta-analysis did not show a positive effect of acupuncture on 24-hour opiate demands when compared to sham acupuncture (standard mean difference -0.23 (-0.58 to 0.13), P = 0.21). Our systematic review finds encouraging but limited evidence for the effectiveness of acupuncture treatment for acute postoperative pain after back surgery. Further rigorously designed clinical trials are required. © 2014 The Authors. Pain Practice published by Wiley periodicals, Inc. on behalf of World Institute of Pain.

  4. Transoral robotic surgery of the parapharyngeal space: a case series and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Jason Y K; Tsang, Raymond K; Eisele, David W; Richmon, Jeremy D

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the current use of transoral robotic surgery (TORS) in the treatment of parapharyngeal space (PPS) neoplasms through a case series and systematic analysis. A case series review of 4 patients was combined with a PubMed, Web of Science, and Scopus search that identified 82 reports. Fifty-three articles remained after screening for duplicates, finally, 8 reports with adequate patient data were included. Statistical analyses and graphical representations were performed with Microsoft Excel (Redmond, WA) and GraphPad Prism software (La Jolla, CA). Forty-four patients had TORS resection of PPS neoplasms. Overall, mean length of stay was 3.0 days with mean time to oral diet of 1.0 day. There were no recurrences but there was a mean follow-up time of only 18.5 months. Twenty-nine of these neoplasms (65.9%) were pleomorphic adenomas of which 7 (24%) had unintended capsule violation or tumor fragmentation during surgery and 2 patients had pharyngeal dehiscence that was managed conservatively. There were no neurovascular complications. TORS is a viable approach to resection of neoplasms of the PPS with minimal surgical morbidity. However, further long-term evaluation, especially for pleomorphic adenomas, is needed to define patient selection and the role of TORS for PPS salivary gland neoplasms. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Is cosmetic surgery an effective psychotherapeutic intervention? A systematic review of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Sharon A; Rosser, Robert; Salmon, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Elective cosmetic surgery (ECS) in the absence of physical indications is often performed to improve psychosocial function. Third-party funders need evidence of its effectiveness if they are to respond in an evidence-based way to increasing demand in the context of constrained resources. Our first aim was to review recent evidence of psychosocial outcome in a way that was systematic with respect to study inclusion and methodological evaluation. Our second aim was to review evidence for the validity of currently used selection criteria. Electronic and manual literature and database search identified prospective cohort or controlled studies of psychosocial outcomes of surgery performed for appearance reasons reported in English from 1992 to 2004. Data were extracted to describe outcomes and evaluate methodological quality. Twenty-three reports of 22 separate studies were reviewed. All were prospective observational studies and most provided low standards of evidence because of the absence of comparison groups, short follow-up periods and loss to follow-up. The evidence suggests that breast reduction improves health-related quality of life, but does not indicate enduring improvement in quality of life after other procedures, or enduring improvement in mental health, self-esteem or body image after any procedure. Similarly, there was insufficient evidence for the validity of criteria for patient selection. The negative conclusions reflect, not the existence of negative evidence, but methodological limitations of published research. The problem for third-party funders is that, although evidence does not justify the continued general provision of ECS in the absence of physical need, it is not strong enough to justify withholding such treatment. Even though randomised controlled trials are probably impractical, we identify several improvements in design whereby future prospective cohort studies could provide higher standards of evidence.

  6. Use of boost radiotherapy in oncoplastic breast-conserving surgery - a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaverien, M V; Stallard, S; Dodwell, D; Doughty, J C

    2013-11-01

    The use of local boost radiotherapy to the tumour bed has been demonstrated in randomised-controlled trials to reduce local recurrence rates following breast-conserving surgery (BCS) and is the standard of care. Oncoplastic BCS techniques with parenchymal rearrangement present new challenges to the localisation of the tumour bed and therefore delivery of local boost radiotherapy. The aim of this review was to evaluate the reporting of boost radiotherapy in the oncoplastic BCS literature. Pubmed, Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were searched for studies reporting oncoplastic BCS using volume displacement techniques. 24 studies met the inclusion criteria (n = 1933 patients). Use of boost radiotherapy was reported in 11 studies, in 2 of which it was for the treatment of incomplete or close margins, and marking of the tumour bed was only reported in 8 studies. None of the studies reported the number of patients where the tumour bed could not be localised. The use of local boost radiotherapy and tumour bed marking was not reported in the majority of studies of oncoplastic BCS. Future studies need to provide detailed information regarding the use of boost radiotherapy and difficulties determining the target volume so that current radiotherapy approaches can be reviewed and improved for these advanced techniques. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Team interaction during surgery: a systematic review of communication coding schemes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiferes, Judith; Bisantz, Ann M; Guru, Khurshid A

    2015-05-15

    Communication problems have been systematically linked to human errors in surgery and a deep understanding of the underlying processes is essential. Although a number of tools exist to assess nontechnical skills, methods to study communication and other team-related processes are far from being standardized, making comparisons challenging. We conducted a systematic review to analyze methods used to study events in the operating room (OR) and to develop a synthesized coding scheme for OR team communication. Six electronic databases were accessed to search for articles that collected individual events during surgery and included detailed coding schemes. Additional articles were added based on cross-referencing. That collection was then classified based on type of events collected, environment type (real or simulated), number of procedures, type of surgical task, team characteristics, method of data collection, and coding scheme characteristics. All dimensions within each coding scheme were grouped based on emergent content similarity. Categories drawn from articles, which focused on communication events, were further analyzed and synthesized into one common coding scheme. A total of 34 of 949 articles met the inclusion criteria. The methodological characteristics and coding dimensions of the articles were summarized. A priori coding was used in nine studies. The synthesized coding scheme for OR communication included six dimensions as follows: information flow, period, statement type, topic, communication breakdown, and effects of communication breakdown. The coding scheme provides a standardized coding method for OR communication, which can be used to develop a priori codes for future studies especially in comparative effectiveness research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Single-event multilevel surgery for children with cerebral palsy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinley, Jennifer L; Dobson, Fiona; Ganeshalingam, Rekha; Shore, Benjamin J; Rutz, Erich; Graham, H Kerr

    2012-02-01

    To conduct a systematic review of single-event multilevel surgery (SEMLS) for children with cerebral palsy, with the aim of evaluating the quality of the evidence and developing recommendations for future research. The systematic review was conducted using standard search and extraction methods in Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, and Cochrane electronic databases. For the purposes of this review, SEMLS was defined as two or more soft-tissue or bony surgical procedures at two or more anatomical levels during one operative procedure, requiring only one hospital admission and one period of rehabilitation. Studies were included if: (1) the primary focus was to examine the effect of SEMLS in children with cerebral palsy; (2) the results focused on multiple anatomic levels and reported findings of one or more World Health Organization International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) domains. Studies that focused on a single intervention or level, or on the utility of a specific outcome measure were excluded. Study quality was appraised with the Methodological Index for Non-Randomized Studies (MINORS) and the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine scale. The review also examined the reporting of surgery, adverse events, and rehabilitation. Thirty-one studies fulfilled the criteria for inclusion, over the period 1985 to October 2010. The MINORS score for these studies varied from 4 to 19, with marked variation in the quality of reporting. Study quality has improved over recent years. Valid measures of gait and function have been introduced and several of the most recent studies have addressed multiple dimensions of the ICF. A statistical synthesis of the outcome data was not conducted, although a trend towards favourable outcomes in gait was evident. Caution is advised with interpretation owing to the variable study quality. Uncontrolled studies may have resulted in an overestimation of treatment efficacy. The design and reporting of studies of SEMLS are

  9. Outcomes After Oncoplastic Breast-Conserving Surgery in Breast Cancer Patients: A Systematic Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Cruz, Lucy; Blankenship, Stephanie A; Chatterjee, Abhishek; Geha, Rula; Nocera, Nadia; Czerniecki, Brian J; Tchou, Julia; Fisher, Carla S

    2016-10-01

    Surgeons have increasingly performed breast-conserving surgery (BCS) utilizing oncoplastic techniques in place of standard lumpectomy for early-stage breast cancer. We assess oncologic outcomes after oncoplastic BCS for T1-T2 breast cancer. A systematic literature review identified peer-reviewed articles in PubMed evaluating BCS with oncoplastic reconstruction. Selected studies reported on positive margin rate (PMR), re-excision rate (RR), conversion to mastectomy rate (CMR), overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), local recurrence (LR), distant recurrence (DR), complication rate, and/or cosmetic outcomes. The search yielded 474 articles; 55 met the inclusion criteria and collectively evaluated 6011 patients with a mean age 54.6 years over a mean follow-up 50.5 months. T1 (43.8 %) and T2 (39.3 %) invasive ductal carcinoma were the most common tumor histopathologies. PMR, RR, and CMR were 10.8, 6.0, and 6.2 %, respectively, while OS, DFS, LR and DR were 95.0, 90.0, 3.2, and 8.7 %, respectively. Margin widths were heterogeneously defined in studies that included margin assessment. The PMR was not significantly different when positive margins were defined as tumor oncoplastic BCS. Our systematic review reveals high rates of OS and DFS with low LR, DR, PMR, RR, CMR and complication rates, thereby confirming the oncologic safety of this procedure in patients with T1-T2 invasive breast cancer.

  10. Preadmission interventions to prevent postoperative complications in older cardiac surgery patients: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettema, Roelof G A; Van Koeven, Heleen; Peelen, Linda M; Kalkman, Cor J; Schuurmans, Marieke J

    2014-02-01

    The literature on postoperative complications in cardiac surgery patients shows high incidences of postoperative complications such as delirium, depression, pressure ulcer, infection, pulmonary complications and atrial fibrillation. These complications are associated with functional and cognitive decline and a decrease in the quality of life after discharge. Several studies attempted to prevent one or more postoperative complications by preoperative interventions. Here we provide a comprehensive overview of both single and multiple component preadmission interventions designed to prevent postoperative complications. We systematically reviewed the literature following the PRISMA statement guidelines. Of 1335 initial citations, 31 were subjected to critical appraisal. Finally, 23 studies were included, of which we derived a list of interventions that can be applied in the preadmission period to effectively reduce postoperative depression, infection, pulmonary complications, atrial fibrillation, prolonged intensive care unit stay and hospital stay in older elective cardiac surgery patients. No high quality studies were found describing effective interventions to prevent postoperative delirium. We did not find studies specifically targeting the prevention of pressure ulcers in this patient population. Multi-component approaches that include different single interventions have the strongest effect in preventing postoperative depression, pulmonary complications, prolonged intensive care unit stay and hospital stay. Postoperative infection can be best prevented by disinfection with chlorhexidine combined with immune-enhancing nutritional supplements. Atrial fibrillation might be prevented by ingestion of N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. High quality studies are urgently needed to evaluate preadmission preventive strategies to reduce postoperative delirium or pressure ulcers in older elective cardiac surgery patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The use of Lean and Six Sigma methodologies in surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, S E; Nicolay, C R; Darzi, A

    2015-04-01

    Lean and Six Sigma are improvement methodologies developed in the manufacturing industry and have been applied to healthcare settings since the 1990 s. They use a systematic and reproducible approach to provide Quality Improvement (QI), with a flexible process that can be applied to a range of outcomes across different patient groups. This review assesses the literature with regard to the use and utility of Lean and Six Sigma methodologies in surgery. MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database, British Nursing Index, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Health Business Elite and the Health Management Information Consortium were searched in January 2014. Experimental studies were included if they assessed the use of Lean or Six Sigma on the ability to improve specified outcomes in surgical patients. Of the 124 studies returned, 23 were suitable for inclusion with 11 assessing Lean, 6 Six Sigma and 6 Lean Six Sigma. The broad range of outcomes can be collated into six common aims: to optimise outpatient efficiency, to improve operating theatre efficiency, to decrease operative complications, to reduce ward-based harms, to reduce mortality and to limit unnecessary cost and length of stay. The majority of studies (88%) demonstrate improvement; however high levels of systematic bias and imprecision were evident. Lean and Six Sigma QI methodologies have the potential to produce clinically significant improvement for surgical patients. However there is a need to conduct high-quality studies with low risk of systematic bias in order to further understand their role. Copyright © 2014 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Systematic review of interventions on antibiotic prophylaxis in surgery in Chinese hospitals during 2000-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jing

    2013-08-01

    To systematically review intervention studies on antibiotic prophylaxis in clean or clean-contaminated surgery in Chinese hospitals from 2000 to 2012. Published peer reviewed articles, unpublished documents and reports, and gray literature were identified through searching CNKI, CBM, VIP, PubMed (MEDLINE), WHO database, and the official websites of the Ministry of Health of China, provincial health authorities and medical university internal publications. Eighty-two studies were identified. Circulation and localization of central rules, regulations and guidelines; clinical pharmacists' involvement; technical, administrative, and managerial strategies were the mostly adopted interventions. Except one study, all claimed effectiveness of interventions. Limited effects were observed for non-indicated clean surgery. Huge gaps still existed between the international agreed guidelines and the claimed best performance following interventions. The following were critical to have more effective interventions: recognition, acceptance, and enforcement strategies of rules, regulations, and guidelines; intervention persistence and intensity; health information system; removal of health system perverse incentives; patient-doctor relationship; public education; and access to unbiased medicines information. A total 4 of 82 studies were pre-post studies with control; all others were simple pre-post studies without control. Simple measurement of the outcome indicators as an average for pre-post intervention groups and changes in between failed to distinguish the real intervention effect from confounding factors, and failed to adjust underlying trends. Interventions on surgical antibiotic prophylaxis in Chinese hospitals during 2000-2012 brought limited positive effects. There are still huge gaps between the Chinese situation and internationally agreed standards. More advanced study methodologies are needed to have better documentation of evidence of the most effective interventions

  13. Iatrogenic Vertebral Artery Injury During Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Qing; Chen, Long; Long, Ye; Xiang, Zhou

    2017-10-01

    Iatrogenic vertebral artery injury (VAI) during anterior cervical surgery is rare but potentially catastrophic. Causes, presentation, diagnosis, management, prognosis, and prevention of VAI were reviewed following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. English language studies and case reports published from 1980 to 2017 were retrieved. Data on diagnosis, surgical procedures and approach, site and cause of VAI, management, outcomes, and vertebral artery (VA) status were extracted. In 25 articles including 54 patients, VAI was diagnosed during or after surgery commonly indicated for cervical degenerative diseases (64%), tumors (14%), and trauma (9%). The incidence of VAI for each side was similar regardless of approach. Common presentations were unexpected copious surgical bleeding, delayed hemorrhage of pseudoaneurysm with neck swelling, dyspnea, hypotension, and cervical bruits caused by arteriovenous fistula. Causes included drilling (61%), instrumentation (16%), and soft tissue retraction (8%). Direct exposure or angiography confirmed VAI. Ten patients had VA anomalies; collateral status was verified in 9 before definitive treatment. Tamponade was adopted for urgent hemostasis in most cases but with a high incidence of pseudoaneurysm (48%). Unknown VA status increased occlusion risk and neurologic sequelae (41%). VA repair and stent placement had excellent outcomes. Extensive lateral decompression, loss of landmarks, and anatomic variations or pathologic status of VA increased VAI risk. Evaluation of collateral vessels before definitive treatment helped determine appropriate management and avoid neurologic sequelae. Tamponade was not recommended as definitive treatment. Meticulous preoperative evaluation, cautious intraoperative manipulation, and real-time radiographic guidance reduced VAI risk. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Non-pharmacological interventions to promote the sleep of patients after cardiac surgery: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda de Souza Machado

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to analyze evidence available in the literature concerning non-pharmacological interventions that are effective to treat altered sleep patterns among patients who underwent cardiac surgery. Method: systematic review conducted in the National Library of Medicine-National Institutes of Health, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature, Scopus, Embase, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature and PsycINFO databases, and also grey literature. Results: ten controlled, randomized clinical trials were included in this review. Non-pharmacological interventions were grouped into three main categories, namely: relaxation techniques, devices or equipment to minimize sleep interruptions and/or induce sleep, and educational strategies. Significant improvement was found in the scores assessing sleep quality among studies testing interventions such as earplugs, sleeping masks, muscle relaxation, posture and relaxation training, white noise, and educational strategies. In regard to the studies’ methodological quality, high quality studies as established by Jadad scoring were not found. Conclusion: significant improvement was found among the scores assessing sleep in the studies testing interventions such as earplugs, sleeping masks, muscle relaxation, posture and relaxation training, white noise and music, and educational strategies.

  15. A Systematic Review of the Effects of Resident Duty Hour Restrictions in Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devitt, Katharine S.; Keshet, Itay; Spicer, Jonathan; Imrie, Kevin; Feldman, Liane; Cools-Lartigue, Jonathan; Kayssi, Ahmed; Lipsman, Nir; Elmi, Maryam; Kulkarni, Abhaya V.; Parshuram, Chris; Mainprize, Todd; Warren, Richard J.; Fata, Paola; Gorman, M. Sean; Feinberg, Stan; Rutka, James

    2014-01-01

    Background: In 2003, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) mandated 80-hour resident duty limits. In 2011 the ACGME mandated 16-hour duty maximums for PGY1 (post graduate year) residents. The stated goals were to improve patient safety, resident well-being, and education. A systematic review and meta-analysis were performed to evaluate the impact of resident duty hours (RDH) on clinical and educational outcomes in surgery. Methods: A systematic review (1980–2013) was executed on CINAHL, Cochrane Database, Embase, Medline, and Scopus. Quality of articles was assessed using the GRADE guidelines. Sixteen-hour shifts and night float systems were analyzed separately. Articles that examined mortality data were combined in a random-effects meta-analysis to evaluate the impact of RDH on patient mortality. Results: A total of 135 articles met the inclusion criteria. Among these, 42% (N = 57) were considered moderate-high quality. There was no overall improvement in patient outcomes as a result of RDH; however, some studies suggest increased complication rates in high-acuity patients. There was no improvement in education related to RDH restrictions, and performance on certification examinations has declined in some specialties. Survey studies revealed a perception of worsened education and patient safety. There were improvements in resident wellness after the 80-hour workweek, but there was little improvement or negative effects on wellness after 16-hour duty maximums were implemented. Conclusions: Recent RDH changes are not consistently associated with improvements in resident well-being, and have negative impacts on patient outcomes and performance on certification examinations. Greater flexibility to accommodate resident training needs is required. Further erosion of training time should be considered with great caution. PMID:24662409

  16. The effect of shunt surgery on neuropsychological performance in normal pressure hydrocephalus: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, Katie; Savulich, George Joseph; Jackson, Dan; Killikelly, Clare; Pickard, John Douglas; Sahakian, Barbara Jacquelyn

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We conducted a systematic review of the literature and used meta-analytic techniques to evaluate the impact of shunt surgery on neuropsychological performance in patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). Methods: Twenty-three studies with 1,059 patients were identified for review using PubMed, Web of Science, Google scholar and manual searching. Inclusion criteria were prospective, within-subject investigations of cognitive outcome using neuropsychological assessment b...

  17. Reoperative Bariatric Surgery: a Systematic Review of the Reasons for Surgery, Medical and Weight Loss Outcomes, Relevant Behavioral Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto-Bastos, Ana; Conceição, Eva M; Machado, Paulo P P

    2017-10-01

    Reoperative surgery following the failure of primary bariatric surgery is increasing due to the significant rates of patients experiencing poor weight loss or medical complications. This literature review was conducted to organize the emerging, but scattered, literature regarding the reasons for undergoing surgery, the best available options, the predictors of success, and the psychological characteristics of patients submitted to reoperative surgeries. Reoperative procedures are technically challenging, but the possible benefits of reoperation supplant the increased risks associated with these procedures. The etiology of reasons for undergoing a second surgery includes medical (e.g., fistula, ulcer disease) and behavioral aspects. Factors that may compromise outcomes have not been much studied. Particular attention should be paid to candidates with a history of difficulties in engaging in healthy eating patterns.

  18. Training and learning robotic surgery, time for a more structured approach: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, H. W. R.; Wolswijk, R.; Zweemer, R. P.; Schijven, M. P.; Verheijen, R. H. M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Robotic assisted laparoscopic surgery is growing rapidly and there is an increasing need for a structured approach to train future robotic surgeons. Objectives To review the literature on training and learning strategies for robotic assisted laparoscopic surgery. Search strategy A

  19. Risk of aspirin continuation in spinal surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goes, Rik; Muskens, Ivo S; Smith, Timothy R; Mekary, Rania A; Broekman, Marike L D; Moojen, Wouter A

    2017-12-01

    Aspirin is typically discontinued in spinal surgery because of increased risk of hemorrhagic complications. The risk of perioperative continuation of aspirin in neurosurgery needed to be evaluated. This study aimed to evaluate all available evidence about continuation of aspirin and to compare peri- and postoperative blood loss and complication rates between patients that continued aspirin and those who discontinued aspirin perioperatively in spinal surgery. Systematic review and meta-analysis were carried out. A meta-analysis was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Studies comparing aspirin continuation with discontinuation were included. Studies using a combination of anticlotting agents or non-spinal procedures were excluded. Operative outcomes (blood loss and operative length) and different complications (surgical site infection [SSI]), stroke, myocardial infarction within 30 days postoperatively) were extracted. Overall prevalence and means were calculated for the reported outcomes in fixed-effects models with heterogeneity (I-squared [I 2 ]) and effect modification (P-interaction) assessment. Out of 1,339 studies, three case series were included in the meta-analysis. No significant differences in mean operating time were seen between the aspirin-continuing group (mean=201.8 minutes, 95% confidence interval [CI]=193.3; 210.3; I 2 =95.4%; 170 patients) and the aspirin-discontinuing group (mean=178.4 minutes, 95% CI=119.1; 237.6; I 2 =93.5%; 200 patients); (P-interaction=0.78). No significant differences in mean perioperative blood loss were seen between the aspirin-continuing group (mean=553.9 milliliters, 95% CI=468.0; 639.9; I 2 =83.4%; 170 patients) and the aspirin-discontinuing group (mean=538.7 milliliters, 95% CI=427.6; 649.8; I 2 =985.5%; 200 patients); (P-interaction=0.96). Similar non-significant differences between the two groups were found for cardiac events, stroke, and

  20. Suprapubic compared with transurethral bladder catheterization for gynecologic surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Eibhlín F; Walsh, Colin A; Cotter, Amanda M; Walsh, Stewart R

    2012-09-01

    Suprapubic catheterization is commonly used for postoperative bladder drainage after gynecologic procedures. However, recent studies have suggested an increased rate of complications compared with urethral catheterization. We undertook a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing suprapubic catheterization and urethral catheterization in gynecologic populations. PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Google Scholar, and trial registries were searched from 1966 to March 2012 for eligible randomized controlled trials comparing postoperative suprapubic catheterization and urethral catheterization in gynecologic patients. We used these search terms: "catheter," "supra(-)pubic catheter," "urinary catheter," "gyn(a)ecological," "catheterization techniques gyn(a)ecological surgery," "transurethral catheter," and "bladder drainage." No language restrictions were applied. METHODS AND STUDY SELECTION: The primary outcome was urinary tract infection. Secondary outcomes were the need for recatheterization, duration of catheterization, catheter-related complications, and duration of hospital stay. Pooled effect size estimates were calculated using the random effects model from DerSimonian and Laird. In total, 12 eligible randomized controlled trials were included in the analysis (N=1,300 patients). Suprapubic catheterization was associated with a significant reduction in postoperative urinary tract infections (20% compared with 31%, pooled odds ratio [OR] 0.31, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.185-0.512, Pgynecologic patients is clearly superior. The reduced rate of infective morbidity with suprapubic catheterization is offset by a higher rate of catheter-related complications and crucially does not translate into reduced hospital stay. As yet, there are insufficient data to determine which route is most appropriate for catheterization; therefore, cost and patient-specific factors should be paramount in the decision. Minimally invasive surgery may alter the

  1. The use of preoperative aspirin in cardiac surgery: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboul-Hassan, Sleiman Sebastian; Stankowski, Tomasz; Marczak, Jakub; Peksa, Maciej; Nawotka, Marcin; Stanislawski, Ryszard; Kryszkowski, Bartosz; Cichon, Romuald

    2017-12-01

    Despite the fact that aspirin is of benefit to patients following coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), continuation or administration of preoperative aspirin before CABG or any cardiac surgical procedure remains controversial. Therefore, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the influence of preoperative aspirin administration on patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Medline database was searched using OVID SP interface. Similar searches were performed separately in EMBASE, PubMed, and Cochrane Central Registry of Controlled Trials. Twelve randomized controlled trials and 28 observational studies met our inclusion criteria and were included in the meta-analysis. The use of preoperative aspirin in patients undergoing CABG at any dose is associated with reduced early mortality as well as a reduced incidence of postoperative acute kidney injury (AKI). Low-dose aspirin (≤160 mg/d) is associated with a decreased incidence of perioperative myocardial infarction (MI). Administration of preoperative aspirin at any dose in patients undergoing cardiac surgery increases postoperative bleeding. Despite this effect of preoperative aspirin, it did not increase the rates of surgical re-exploration due to excessive postoperative bleeding nor did it increase the rates of packed red blood cell transfusions (PRBC) when preoperative low-dose aspirin (≤160 mg/d) was administered. Preoperative aspirin increases the risk for postoperative bleeding. However, this did not result in an increased need for chest re-exploration and did not increase the rates of PRBC transfusion when preoperative low-dose (≤160 mg/d) aspirin was administered. Aspirin at any dose is associated with decreased mortality and AKI and low-dose aspirin (≤160 mg/d) decreases the incidence of perioperative MI. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The impact of improving teamwork on patient outcomes in surgery: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Rosa; Marshall, Dominic C; Sykes, Mark C; Maruthappu, Mahiben; Shalhoub, Joseph

    2018-03-22

    The aviation industry pioneered formalised crew training in order to improve safety and reduce consequences of non-technical error. This formalised training has been successfully adapted and used to in the field of surgery to improve post-operative patient outcomes. The need to implement teamwork training as an integral part of a surgical programme is increasingly being recognised. We aim to systematically review the impact of surgical teamwork training on post-operative outcomes. Two independent researchers systematically searched MEDLINE and Embase in accordance with PRISMA guidelines. Studies were screened and subjected to inclusion/exclusion criteria. Study characteristics and outcomes were reported and analysed. Our initial search identified 2720 articles. Following duplicate removal, title and abstract screening, 107 full text articles were analysed. Eight articles met our inclusion criteria. Overall, three articles supported a positive effect of good teamwork on post-operative patient outcomes. We identified key areas in study methodology that can be improved upon, including small cohort size, lack of unified training programme, and short training duration, should future studies be designed and implemented in this field. At present, there is insufficient evidence to support the hypothesis that teamwork training interventions improve patient outcomes. We believe that non-significant and conflicting results can be attributed to flaws in methodology and non-uniform training methods. With increasing amounts of evidence in this field, we predict a positive association between teamwork training and patient outcomes will come to light. Copyright © 2018 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Limited Evidence for Robot-assisted Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broholm, Malene; Onsberg Hansen, Iben; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate available evidence on robot-assisted surgery compared with open and laparoscopic surgery. The databases Medline, Embase, and Cochrane Library were systematically searched for randomized controlled trials comparing robot-assisted surgery with open and laparoscopic surgery regardless of surgical procedure. Meta-analyses were performed on each outcome with appropriate data material available. Cochrane Collaboration's tool for assessing risk of bias was used to evaluate risk of bias on a study level. The GRADE approach was used to evaluate the quality of evidence of the meta-analyses. This review included 20 studies comprising 981 patients. The meta-analyses found no significant differences between robot-assisted and laparoscopic surgery regarding blood loss, complication rates, and hospital stay. A significantly longer operative time was found for robot-assisted surgery. Open versus robot-assisted surgery was investigated in 3 studies. A lower blood loss and a longer operative time were found after robot-assisted surgery. No other difference was detected. At this point there is not enough evidence to support the significantly higher costs with the implementation of robot-assisted surgery.

  4. Effectiveness of Sclerotherapy, Surgery, and Laser Therapy in Patients With Venous Malformations: A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vleuten, C.J.M. van der; Kater, A.; Wijnen, M.H.W.A.; Schultze Kool, L.J.; Rovers, M.M.

    2014-01-01

    Because the best possible treatment for venous malformations is unclear, this study systematically reviews the available literature regarding the effectiveness of different treatment options for the patient group. Venous malformations result from incorrect development of the veins during

  5. Systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enggaard, Helle

    Title: Systematic review a method to promote nursing students skills in Evidence Based Practice Background: Department of nursing educate students to practice Evidence Based Practice (EBP), where clinical decisions is based on the best available evidence, patient preference, clinical experience...... and resources available. In order to incorporate evidence in clinical decisions, nursing students need to learn how to transfer knowledge in order to utilize evidence in clinical decisions. The method of systematic review can be one approach to achieve this in nursing education. Method: As an associate lecturer...... I have taken a Comprehensive Systematic Review Training course provide by Center of Clinical Guidelines in Denmark and Jonna Briggs Institute (JBI) and practice in developing a systematic review on how patients with ischemic heart disease experiences peer support. This insight and experience...

  6. Weight loss after bariatric surgery in obese adolescents: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedroso, Felipe E; Angriman, Federico; Endo, Atsushi; Dasenbrock, Hormuzdiyar; Storino, Alessandra; Castillo, Ricardo; Watkins, Ammara A; Castillo-Angeles, Manuel; Goodman, Julie E; Zitsman, Jeffrey L

    2018-03-01

    Of adolescents in the United States, 20% have obesity and current treatment options prioritize intensive lifestyle interventions that are largely ineffective. Bariatric surgery is increasingly being offered to obese adolescent patients; however, large-scale effectiveness data is lacking. We used MEDLINE, Embase, and Cochrane databases, and a manual search of references to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis on overall weight loss after gastric band, gastric sleeve, and gastric bypass in obese adolescent patients (age ≤19) and young adults (age ≤21) in separate analyses. We provided estimates of absolute change in body mass index (BMI, kg/m 2 ) and percent excess weight loss across 4 postoperative time points (6, 12, 24, and 36 mo) for each surgical subgroup. Study quality was assessed using a 10 category scoring system. Data were extracted from 24 studies with 4 having multiple surgical subgroups (1 with 3, and 3 with 2 subgroups), totaling 29 surgical subgroup populations (gastric band: 16, gastric sleeve: 5, gastric bypass: 8), and 1928 patients (gastric band: 1010, gastric sleeve: 139, gastric bypass: 779). Mean preoperative BMI (kg/m 2 ) was 45.5 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 44.7, 46.3) in gastric band, 48.8 (95%CI: 44.9, 52.8) in gastric sleeve, and 53.3 (95%CI: 50.2, 56.4) in gastric bypass patients. The short-term weight loss, measured as mean (95%CI) absolute change in BMI (kg/m 2 ) at 6 months, was -5.4 (-3.0, -7.8) after gastric band, -11.5 (-8.8, -14.2) after gastric sleeve, and -18.8 (-10.9, -26.6) after gastric bypass. Weight loss at 36 months, measured as mean (95%CI) absolute change in BMI (kg/m 2 ) was -10.3 (-7.0, -13.7) after gastric band, -13.0 (-11.0, -15.0) after gastric sleeve, and -15.0 (-13.5, -16.5) after gastric bypass. Bariatric surgery in obese adolescent patients is effective in achieving short-term and sustained weight loss at 36 months; however, long-term data remains necessary to better understand its long

  7. Patient and Referring Provider Characteristics Associated With the Likelihood of Undergoing Bariatric Surgery: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Luke M.; Jolles, Sally; Fischer, Laura E.; Voils, Corrine I

    2016-01-01

    Importance Although bariatric surgery is the most cost-effective treatment for severe obesity, less than 1% of severely obese patients undergo it. Reasons for low utilization are unclear. Objectives To identify patient and referring provider characteristics associated with the likelihood of undergoing bariatric surgery. Evidence Review PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and the Cochrane databases were searched for reports published between January 1, 1998, and December 31, 2014. Reports were eligible if they presented descriptive data regarding facilitators or barriers to bariatric surgery or if they reported statistical associations between patient or provider characteristics and referral to or receipt of bariatric surgery. Frequency effect sizes were calculated as the proportion of studies reporting a finding. Findings Of the 7,212 reports identified in the initial search, 53 were included in full-text review. Nine reports met our inclusion criteria and were included in analyses. Of those, four included descriptive findings, six reported statistical associations, and one included both. One report included providers as study participants, whereas eight included patients. Four of nine studies identified an association between female gender and a greater willingness to undergo bariatric surgery. Lack of knowledge about bariatric surgery was a barrier in two studies. Five of nine cited patient concerns about the outcomes and safety of bariatric surgery as a barrier to undergoing it. Patients were more likely to pursue bariatric surgery when it was recommended by referring providers. Providers who believed that obesity treatment should be covered by insurance were more likely to recommend bariatric surgery. Conclusions and Relevance Limited patient and referring provider knowledge about the safety and effectiveness of bariatric surgery are important barriers to bariatric surgery utilization. Future efforts focused on improving knowledge and identification of the critical

  8. The impact of nontechnical skills on technical performance in surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Louise; Arora, Sonal; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Darzi, Ara; Vincent, Charles; Sevdalis, Nick

    2012-02-01

    Failures in nontechnical and teamwork skills frequently lie at the heart of harm and near-misses in the operating room (OR). The purpose of this systematic review was to assess the impact of nontechnical skills on technical performance in surgery. MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO databases were searched, and 2,041 articles were identified. After limits were applied, 341 articles were retrieved for evaluation. Of these, 28 articles were accepted for this review. Data were extracted from the articles regarding sample population, study design and setting, measures of nontechnical skills and technical performance, study findings, and limitations. Of the 28 articles that met inclusion criteria, 21 articles assessed the impact of surgeons' nontechnical skills on their technical performance. The evidence suggests that receiving feedback and effectively coping with stressful events in the OR has a beneficial impact on certain aspects of technical performance. Conversely, increased levels of fatigue are associated with detriments to surgical skill. One article assessed the impact of anesthesiologists' nontechnical skills on anesthetic technical performance, finding a strong positive correlation between the 2 skill sets. Finally, 6 articles assessed the impact of multiple nontechnical skills of the entire OR team on surgical performance. A strong relationship between teamwork failure and technical error was empirically demonstrated in these studies. Evidence suggests that certain nontechnical aspects of performance can enhance or, if lacking, contribute to deterioration of surgeons' technical performance. The precise extent of this effect remains to be elucidated. Copyright © 2012 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. COST-EFFECTIVENESS OF PERIOPERATIVE IMMUNONUTRITION IN GASTROINTESTINAL ONCOLOGIC SURGERY: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Audrey Machado Dos; Kabke, Geórgia Brum; Fruchtenicht, Ana Valéria Gonçalves; Barreiro, Taiane Dias; Moreira, Luis Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Costs, length of hospital staying and morbidity are frequently and significantly increased as a result of infections and other complications following surgical procedure for gastrointestinal tract cancer. Recently, improving host defence mechanisms have become a target of interest. Immunonutrition aims at improving immunity, most likely providing key nutrients to maintain T-lymphocyte and other host defence. To evaluate the immunonutrition in cancer patients who are operated by digestive diseases and assess the cost-effectiveness of this supplementation. This study consisted of a systematic review of the literature based on reference analyses retrieved from current databases such as PubMed, Lilacs and SciELO. The search strategy was defined by terms related to immunonutrition [immunonutrition, arginine, omega-3 and nucleotides] in combination with [costs, cost-effective and cost-effectiveness] as well as [gastrointestinal cancer surgery, oesophageal, gastric or pancreatic surgery] in English, Portuguese or Spanish language. For cost analyses, currencies used in the manuscripts were all converted to American dollars (US$) in order to uniform and facilitate comparison. Six prospective randomized studies were included in this review. The cost-effectiveness was positive in most of studies, demonstrating that this diet can significantly reduce hospital costs in the North hemisphere. However, similar studies needed to be carried to determine such results among us. Custos, tempo de hospitalização e morbidade estão frequentemente aumentados na presença de infecções e outras complicações decorrentes de procedimentos cirúrgicos para o câncer gastrointestinal. Recentemente, a melhora de mecanismos de defesa do hospedeiro tem se tornado um alvo de interesse. Nutrição adequada está fortemente relacionada com competência imune e redução de infeções. Imunonutrição objetiva a melhora da imunidade, principalmente para manutenção de linfócitos-T e outras

  10. A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of the Effect of Gastric Bypass Surgery on Plasma Lipid Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carswell, Kirstin A; Belgaumkar, Ajay P; Amiel, Stephanie A; Patel, Ameet G

    2016-04-01

    Obesity-related dyslipidaemia comprises hypercholesterolaemia, hypertriglyceridaemia, low HDL-cholesterol and normal to raised LDL-cholesterol levels. 40% of morbidly obese surgical patients have dyslipidaemia. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery has many beneficial metabolic effects, but the full impact on plasma lipids has not been clearly defined. A systematic review of electronic databases (Ovid; Medline; PubMed; Embase) between 1960 and March 2012 was performed using search terms including the following: obesity surgery, bariatric surgery, gastric bypass, cholesterol, lipids, triglycerides and non-esterified fatty acids. A total of 2442 manuscripts were screened. Papers with paired plasma lipid levels around RYGB surgery were included. Exclusions included the following: editorials, dual publications, n effect of RYGB surgery upon plasma lipids at different time points up to 4 years following surgery, using a random effects model. Paired data were available for 7815 subjects around RYGB surgery for morbid obesity with a baseline BMI 48 kg/m(2) (n = 2331). There was a reduction in plasma total cholesterol and LDL-C from 1 month up to 4 years post-RYGB (p RYGB, HDL-C increased from 1 year onwards (p RYGB surgery reverses the dyslipidaemia of obesity. These findings support the use of RYGB in the management of high cardiovascular risk lipid profiles in morbid obesity.

  11. Bariatric surgery versus non-surgical treatment for obesity: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

    OpenAIRE

    Gloy, Viktoria L; Briel, Matthias; Bhatt, Deepak L; Kashyap, Sangeeta R; Schauer, Philip R; Mingrone, Geltrude; Bucher, Heiner C; Nordmann, Alain J

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To quantify the overall effects of bariatric surgery compared with non-surgical treatment for obesity. Design: Systematic review and meta-analysis based on a random effects model. Data sources Searches of Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Library from their inception to December 2012 regardless of language or publication status. Eligibility criteria Eligible studies were randomised controlled trials with ≥6 months of follow-up that included individuals with a body mass index ≥30, c...

  12. The Prevalence of Body Dysmorphic Disorder in Patients Undergoing Cosmetic Surgery: a Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panayi, Andreana

    2015-09-01

    Body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is a somatoform disorder characterised by a distressing obsession with an imagined or slight appearance defect, which can significantly impair normal day-to-day functioning. Patients with BDD often first present, and are hence diagnosed, in cosmetic surgery settings. Several studies have investigated the prevalence rate of BDD in the general population or have done so for patients referring to cosmetic medical centers. To date, however, no review has been undertaken to compare the prevalence in the general community versus in a cosmetic surgery setting. Despite the lack of such a review it is a commonly held belief that BDD is more common in patients seeking cosmetic surgery. The current study aims to review the available literature in order to investigate whether BDD is indeed more prevalent in patients requesting cosmetic surgery, and if that is the case, to provide possible reasons for the difference in prevalence. In addition this review provides evidence on the effectiveness of cosmetic surgery as a treatment of BDD.

  13. Perioperative Antibiotics to Prevent Acute Endophthalmitis after Ophthalmic Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinzhu Huang

    Full Text Available Post-operative endophthalmitis is a rare and dreaded complication in ophthalmic operations because it often induces irreparable vision loss. Although many ophthalmological studies aimed at reducing the rate of endophthalmitis have been performed around the world, controversy continues to surround some issues, including the choice of antimicrobials and their route of administration, duration and timing. The aim of this study is to investigate some of these unresolved issues.A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials and observational studies was performed. The PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library and Clinical Trials databases were searched to identify studies published until Feb. 2016. The relative risk (RR for each clinical outcome data is presented with 95% confidence intervals (CIs. Pooled estimates of effects were calculated using random-effect models.Thirty-four studies from twenty-four reports involving 1264797 eyes were included in this analysis. Endophthalmitis occurred, on average, in one out of 6177 eyes when intracameral vancomycin/moxifloxacin were used and in one out of 1517 eyes when intracameral vancomycin/moxifloxacin were not used. The relative risk (95% CI of endophthalmitis was reduced to 0.20 (0.10, 0.42 when intracameral antibiotics were used (p<0.0001. The subconjunctival injection of antibiotics was not superior to other administration routes included in this study (RR = 1.67, 95% CI (0.55, 5.05, p = 0.36. A statistically significant difference was found in the rate of endophthalmitis between the use and lack of use of topical antibiotics (RR = 0.65, 95% CI (0.43, 0.99, p = 0.04. However, no statistically significant difference was found in microbial isolation rates between these groups (RR = 0.77, 95% CI (0.34, 1.75, p = 0.53. When long-term and short-term use of topical antibiotics before surgery were compared, a statistically significant difference was found in microbial isolation rates (RR = 0

  14. Does surgery for deep infiltrating bowel endometriosis improve fertility? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iversen, Maja L; Seyer-Hansen, Mikkel; Forman, Axel

    2017-06-01

    Reduced fertility is a major concern in women with endometriosis. The influence of surgery of deep infiltrating endometriosis (DIE) affecting the bowel wall on fertility is controversial and the literature on this field is heterogeneous. In this review we addressed whether surgery for bowel DIE improves the spontaneous pregnancy rate, and the results of in vitro fertilization (IVF), and the potential risk of such surgery. We conducted a literature search including the terms "deep", "deep infiltrating", "bowel", rectovaginal", "endometriosis", "fertility", "infertility" and "IVF" in PubMed. No randomized controlled studies were found. Other publications of relevance included four retrospective and three prospective observational studies. Moreover, one retrospective study compared results of IVF treatment with or without previous surgery for bowel DIE. All studies reported detailed data on surgical complications. The poor data quality precluded firm conclusions. The results indicate, however, the possibility that surgery for bowel DIE may improve the spontaneous pregnancy rate, and positive effects on IVF outcome cannot be excluded. Such surgery will be associated with risk of major complications. The lack of proper data precludes conclusions on the potential role for bowel DIE surgery to improve the spontaneous pregnancy rate and results of IVF treatment. Positive effects cannot be excluded, but the definite risk of major complications must be taken into account. © 2017 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  15. Rate of complications in scoliosis surgery – a systematic review of the Pub Med literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goodall Deborah

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spinal fusion surgery is currently recommended when curve magnitude exceeds 40–45 degrees. Early attempts at spinal fusion surgery which were aimed to leave the patients with a mild residual deformity, failed to meet such expectations. These aims have since been revised to the more modest goals of preventing progression, restoring 'acceptability' of the clinical deformity and reducing curvature. In view of the fact that there is no evidence that health related signs and symptoms of scoliosis can be altered by spinal fusion in the long-term, a clear medical indication for this treatment cannot be derived. Knowledge concerning the rate of complications of scoliosis surgery may enable us to establish a cost/benefit relation of this intervention and to improve the standard of the information and advice given to patients. It is also hoped that this study will help to answer questions in relation to the limiting choice between the risks of surgery and the "wait and see – observation only until surgery might be recommended", strategy widely used. The purpose of this review is to present the actual data available on the rate of complications in scoliosis surgery. Materials and methods Search strategy for identification of studies; Pub Med and the SOSORT scoliosis library, limited to English language and bibliographies of all reviewed articles. The search strategy included the terms; 'scoliosis'; 'rate of complications'; 'spine surgery'; 'scoliosis surgery'; 'spondylodesis'; 'spinal instrumentation' and 'spine fusion'. Results The electronic search carried out on the 1st February 2008 with the key words "scoliosis", "surgery", "complications" revealed 2590 titles, which not necessarily attributed to our quest for the term "rate of complications". 287 titles were found when the term "rate of complications" was used as a key word. Rates of complication varied between 0 and 89% depending on the aetiology of the entity investigated

  16. Role of corticosteroids in Functional Endoscopic Sinus Surgery--a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pundir, Vishal; Pundir, Jyotsna; Lancaster, Gillian; Baer, Simon; Kirkland, Paul; Cornet, Marjolein; Lourijsen, E S; Georgalas, Christos; Fokkens, W J

    2016-03-01

    The aim of our study is to systematically review the existing evidence on the role of corticosteroids in patients undergoing functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS). Systematic search of MEDLINE (1950- 2014), EMBASE (1980-2014), metaRegister, Cochrane Library and ISI conference proceedings was carried out. Eighteen randomised controlled trials with 1309 patients were included. Use of local and/or systemic corticosteroids with FESS was reported in four categories; operative, anaesthesia related, post-operative outcomes and risk of recurrence. Meta-analysis for operative outcomes demonstrated that, mean operative time (MD -10.70 minutes; 95% CI -15.86, -5.55; P <0.0001) and mean estimated blood loss (MD -28.32 mls; 95% CI -40.93, -15.72; P <0.0001) was significantly lower; and surgical field quality (MD -0.81; 95% CI -1.32, -0.30; P = 0.002) was significantly better in corticosteroid group. Meta-analysis showed that post-operative endoscopic scores (SMD -0.39; 95% CI -0.60, -0.17; P = 0.0004) were significantly better in corticosteroid group compared to no corticosteroid group. There was no increase in risk of sinusitis (RR 0.64; 95% CI 0.32, 1.30; P = 0.22) between use of corticosteroids and no corticosteroids; There was no significant difference in recurrence risk of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) in mixed population studies (RR 0.77; 95% CI 0.35, 1.70; P = 0.52) between the two groups but analysis of studies reporting on chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) (RR 0.64;95% CI 0.45,0.91;P=0.01) showed significant difference in favour of the corticosteroid group. Pre-operative use of local and/or systemic corticosteroids in FESS, results in significantly reduced blood loss, shorter operative time and improved surgical field quality. Studies are limited on the intra-operative use of corticosteroids to reduce postoperative pain. Postoperative corticosteroids improve postoperative endoscopic scores in CRS and recurrence rates in cases of CRSwNP.

  17. The Ethics of Sharing Plastic Surgery Videos on Social Media: Systematic Literature Review, Ethical Analysis, and Proposed Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfman, Robert G; Vaca, Elbert E; Fine, Neil A; Schierle, Clark F

    2017-10-01

    Recent videos shared by plastic surgeons on social media applications such as Snapchat, Instagram, and YouTube, among others, have blurred the line between entertainment and patient care. This has left many in the plastic surgery community calling for the development of more structured oversight and guidance regarding video sharing on social media. To date, no official guidelines exist for plastic surgeons to follow. Little is known about the ethical implications of social media use by plastic surgeons, especially with regard to video sharing. A systematic review of the literature on social media use in plastic surgery was performed on October 31, 2016, with an emphasis on ethics and professionalism. An ethical analysis was conducted using the four principles of medical ethics. The initial search yielded 87 articles. Thirty-four articles were included for analyses that were found to be relevant to the use of social media in plastic surgery. No peer-reviewed articles were found that mentioned Snapchat or addressed the ethical implications of sharing live videos of plastic surgery on social media. Using the four principles of medical ethics, it was determined that significant ethical concerns exist with broadcasting these videos. This analysis fills an important gap in the plastic surgery literature by addressing the ethical issues concerning live surgery broadcasts on social media. Plastic surgeons may use the guidelines proposed here to avoid potential pitfalls.

  18. What is the evidence for chemical thromboprophylaxis in foot and ankle surgery? Systematic review of the English literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangwani, Jitendra; Sheikh, Nomaan; Cichero, Matthew; Williamson, David

    2015-09-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a well documented complication following lower limb trauma and surgery. The incidence of VTE in hip and knee surgery has been well studied, whereas the incidence in foot and ankle surgery is less clear. There is debate as to which cases require prophylaxis and what is the most effective means by which this is achieved. We performed a systematic review of the published English literature on VTE prophylaxis in foot and ankle surgery using MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINHAL, Cochrane Library, without date restrictions up to December 2012. From 988 citations, 25 papers fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Conclusions were drawn on the incidence (symptomatic and asymptomatic VTE), location (distal vs. proximal), associated risk factors, timing of VTE, role of mechanical and pharmacological prophylaxis and cost effectiveness of the treatment. Our review showed that the overall incidence of symptomatic VTE in foot and ankle surgery is low (0-0.55%). There is increased incidence in foot and ankle trauma patients with the highest incidence reported in tendo-achilles surgery. The reported risk factors include previous history of VTE, immobilisation, high BMI, age, co morbidities, contraceptive pill, and air-travel. There is a cumulative effect resulting in higher risk when two or more risk factors are present. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The Effectiveness of Nurse-Led Preoperative Assessment Clinics for Patients Receiving Elective Orthopaedic Surgery: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sau-Man Conny, Chan; Wan-Yim, Ip

    2016-12-01

    Nurse-led preoperative assessment clinics (POAC) have been introduced in different specialty areas to assess and prepare patients preoperatively in order to avoid last-minute surgery cancellations. Not all patients are referred to POACs before surgery, and the benefits of nurse-led POACs are not well documented in Hong Kong. The purpose of this systemic review was to identify the best available research evidence to inform current clinical practice, guide health care decision making and promote better care. The Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) approach for conducting systematic review of quantitative research was used. Data bases searched included all published and unpublished studies in Chinese and English. All studies with adult patients who required elective orthopaedic surgery e.g. total knee replacement, total hip replacement, reduction of fracture or reconstruction surgery etc. in a hospital or day surgery center and attended a nurse-led POAC before surgery were included. Ten studies were critically appraised. Results showed that nurse-led POACs can reduce surgery cancellation rates. These studies suggested a reduction in the rate of postoperative mortality and length of hospital stay. In addition, the level of satisfaction towards services provided was significantly high. Although POACs are being increasingly implemented worldwide, the development of clinical guidelines, pathways and protocols was advocated. The best available evidence asserted that nurses in the POAC could serve as effective coordinators, assessors and educators. The nurse-led practice optimized patients' condition before surgery and hence minimized elective surgery cancellations. Copyright © 2016 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Incidence, prognostic factors and impact of postoperative delirium after major vascular surgery: A meta-analysis and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, Sarah Joy; Blyth, Fiona M; Naganathan, Vasi

    2017-10-01

    Although postoperative delirium is a common complication and increases patient care needs, little is known about the predictors and outcomes of delirium in patients having vascular surgery. This review aimed to determine the incidence, prognostic factors and impact of postoperative delirium in vascular surgical patients. MEDLINE and EMBASE were systematically searched for articles published between January 2000 and January 2016 on delirium after vascular surgery. The primary outcome was the incidence of delirium. Secondary outcomes were contributing prognostic factors and impact of delirium. Study quality and risk of bias was assessed using the QUIPS tool for systematic reviews of prognostic studies, and MOOSE guidelines for reviews of observational studies. Quantitative analyses of extracted data were conducted using meta-analysis where possible to determine incidence of delirium and prognostic factors. A qualitative review of outcomes was performed. Fifteen articles were eligible for inclusion. Delirium incidence ranged between 5% and 39%. Meta-analysis found that patients with delirium were older than those without delirium (OR 3.6, pdelirium included increased age (OR 1.04, pdelirium. Data were limited on the impact of procedure complexity, endovascular compared to open surgery or type of anaesthetic. Postoperative delirium occurs frequently, resulting in major morbidity for vascular patients. Improved quality of prognostic studies may identify modifiable peri-operative factors to improve quality of care for vascular surgical patients.

  1. Psychiatric morbidity after surgery for inflammatory bowel disease: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zangenberg, Marie Strøm; El-Hussuna, Alaa

    2017-12-28

    To examine the evidence about psychiatric morbidity after inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)-related surgery. PRISMA guidelines were followed and a protocol was published at PROSPERO (CRD42016037600). Inclusion criteria were studies describing patients with inflammatory bowel disease undergoing surgery and their risk of developing psychiatric disorder. Twelve studies (including 4340 patients) were eligible. All studies were non-randomized and most had high risk of bias. Patients operated for inflammatory bowel disease had an increased risk of developing depression, compared with surgical patients with diverticulitis or inguinal hernia, but not cancer. In addition, patients with Crohn's disease had higher risk of depression after surgery compared with non-surgical patients. Patients with ulcerative colitis had higher risk of anxiety after surgery compared with surgical colorectal cancer patients. Charlson comorbidity score more than three and female gender were independent predictors for depression and anxiety following surgery. The review cannot give any clear answer to the risks of psychiatric morbidity after surgery for IBD studies with the lowest risk of bias indicated an increased risk of depression among surgical patients with Crohn's disease and increased risk of anxiety among patients with ulcerative colitis.

  2. A systematic review of musculoskeletal pain among bariatric surgery patients: implications for physical activity and exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speck, Rebecca M; Bond, Dale S; Sarwer, David B; Farrar, John T

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) can play an integral role in protecting the success of bariatric surgery by promoting weight loss and preventing weight regain. Although engagement in PA before surgery predicts postoperative PA levels, this may be undermined by weight-related co-morbidities. The importance of preoperative and postoperative musculoskeletal pain as a limitation to PA is unknown. The objective of this study was to review evidence on preoperative and postoperative pain in bariatric surgery patients, summarize the relationship between musculoskeletal pain and PA, and discuss areas of future research. The MEDLINE database was searched for published articles on musculoskeletal pain in bariatric surgery patients from January 1946 through December 2012. Outcomes of interest included preoperative pain prevalence, postoperative pain prevalence and incidence, and preoperative to postoperative changes in pain. Preoperative musculoskeletal pain is highly common among candidates for bariatric surgery. Most individuals with presurgical pain experience significant improvement postoperatively. However, the characteristics of pain sufferers vary and few risk factors have been identified. New pain issues that present postsurgically are limited primarily to neurologic complications and are not common. To date, no study has tested the hypothesis that pain is a barrier to PA levels in bariatric surgery patients. Gaps in knowledge regarding pain in bariatric surgery patients may present challenges for clinicians and exercise professionals on how to best advise patients about increasing their PA. Future research should include prospective evaluation of musculoskeletal pain via validated measures at multiple time points. This data will inform the time course of pain resolution, potential onset, and correlation with surgical weight loss. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Enhanced recovery programs in lung cancer surgery: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li S

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Shuangjiang Li,1 Kun Zhou,1 Guowei Che,1 Mei Yang,1 Jianhua Su,2 Cheng Shen,1 Pengming Yu2 1Department of Thoracic Surgery, 2Department of Rehabilitation, Rehabilitation Medicine Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China Background: Enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS program is an effective evidence-based multidisciplinary protocol of perioperative care, but its roles in thoracic surgery remain unclear. This systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs aims to investigate the efficacy and safety of the ERAS programs for lung cancer surgery. Materials and methods: We searched the PubMed and EMBASE databases to identify the RCTs that implemented an ERAS program encompassing more than four care elements within at least two phases of perioperative care in lung cancer surgery. The heterogeneity levels between studies were estimated by the Cochrane Collaborations. A qualitative review was performed if considerable heterogeneity was revealed. Relative risk (RR and weighted mean difference served as the summarized statistics for the meta-analyses. Additional analyses were also performed to perceive potential bias risks. Results: A total of seven RCTs enrolling 486 patients were included. The meta-analysis indicated that the ERAS group patients had significantly lower morbidity rates (RR=0.64; p<0.001, especially the rates of pulmonary (RR=0.43; p<0.001 and surgical complications (RR=0.46; p=0.010, than those of control group patients. No significant reduction was found in the in-hospital mortality (RR=0.70; p=0.58 or cardiovascular complications (RR=1.46; p=0.25. In the qualitative review, most of the evidence reported significantly shortened length of hospital and intensive care unit stay and decreased hospitalization costs in the ERAS-treated patients. No significant publication bias was detected in the meta-analyses. Conclusion: Our review demonstrates that the implementation of an ERAS program for lung cancer

  4. Robotic Versus Laparoscopic Bariatric Surgery: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun; Zou, Jianan; Tang, Jianxiong; Di, Jianzhong; Han, Xiaodong; Zhang, Pin

    2016-12-01

    We aim to summarize the available literature on patients treated with robotic bariatric surgery (RBS) or laparoscopic bariatric surgery (LBS) and compare the clinical outcomes between RBS and LBS. A systematic literature was conducted in accordance with the PRISMA guidelines. Thirty-four observational studies met our inclusion criteria, and 27 studies of 27,997 patients were included in the meta-analysis. There were no significant differences between RBS and LBS regarding overall postoperative complications, major complications, the length of hospital stay, reoperation, conversion, and mortality. Nevertheless, RBS was burdened by longer operative times and higher hospital costs when compared with LBS. On the contrary, the incidence of anastomotic leak was lower in RBS than in LBS. Further studies with a longer follow-up are recommended.

  5. Systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, Palle; Chauhan, Usha; Greveson, Kay

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Advice lines for patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) have been introduced internationally. However, only a few publications have described the advice line service and evaluated the efficiency of it with many results presented as conference posters. A systematic synthesis...... of evidence is needed and the aim of this article was to systematically review the evidence of IBD advice lines. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A broad systematic literature search was performed to identify relevant studies addressing the effect of advice lines. The process of selection of the retrieved studies...... congress abstracts were included in the review. The studies were heterogeneous both in scientific quality and in the focus of the study. No rigorous evidence was found to support that advice lines improve disease activity in IBD and correspondingly no studies reported worsening in disease activity. Advice...

  6. Preoperative Nutrition Status and Postoperative Outcome in Elderly General Surgery Patients: A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Stijn, Mireille F. M.; Korkic-Halilovic, Ines; Bakker, Marjan S. M.; van der Ploeg, Tjeerd; van Leeuwen, Paul A. M.; Houdijk, Alexander P. J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Poor nutrition status is considered a risk factor for postoperative complications in the adult population. In elderly patients, who often have a poor nutrition status, this relationship has not been substantiated. Thus, the aim of this systematic review was to assess the merit of

  7. Minimally invasive surgery for lumbar disc herniation: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamper, S.J.; Ostelo, R.W.J.G.; Rubinstein, S.M.; Nellensteijn, J.M.; Peul, W.C.; Arts, M.P.; van Tulder, M.W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Assessing the benefits of surgical treatments for sciatica is critical for clinical and policy decision-making. To compare minimally invasive (MI) and conventional microdiscectomy (MD) for patients with sciatica due to lumbar disc herniation. Methods: A systematic review and meta-analysis

  8. Efficacy and safety of biodegradable osteofixation devices in oral and maxillofacial surgery : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijs, G. J.; Stegenga, B.; Bos, R. R. M.

    2006-01-01

    The use of osteofixation devices should be evidence-based if uncomplicated bone healing is to be achieved. Numerous studies describe and claim the advantages of biodegradable over titanium devices as a bone fixation method. Here, we systematically review the available literature to determine the

  9. Suprapubic compared with transurethral bladder catheterization for gynecologic surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Healy, Eibhlín F

    2012-09-01

    Suprapubic catheterization is commonly used for postoperative bladder drainage after gynecologic procedures. However, recent studies have suggested an increased rate of complications compared with urethral catheterization. We undertook a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing suprapubic catheterization and urethral catheterization in gynecologic populations.

  10. Systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lødrup, Anders Bergh; Reimer, Christina; Bytzer, Peter

    2013-01-01

    in getting off acid-suppressive medication and partly explain the increase in long-term use of PPI. A number of studies addressing this issue have been published recently. The authors aimed to systematically review the existing evidence of clinically relevant symptoms caused by acid rebound following PPI...

  11. Quality of life among adults following bariatric and body contouring surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmartin, Jo; Bath-Hextall, Fiona; Maclean, Joan; Stanton, Wendy; Soldin, Mark

    2016-11-01

    Weight loss following bariatric surgery is associated with significant improvements in obesity-related comorbidities, body satisfaction and psychosocial outcomes, at least in the short term. However, in the context of extreme weight loss, body image and appearance may worsen again because the "excess" or "loose" skin can lead to both functional and profound dissatisfaction with appearance. These concerns have led to an increasing uptake of post-bariatric surgery, "body-contouring" procedures but the implications for quality of life (QoL) have not been thoroughly considered. The objective was to identify the best available evidence regarding the QoL outcomes for adults following bariatric and body contouring surgery. The review considered studies involving people aged 18 years and beyond who underwent bariatric surgery and body contouring surgery. The review considered studies that evaluated bariatric surgery as well as body contouring surgery. The review considered both experimental and epidemiological study designs. The primary outcomes were QoL as measured by validated tools at less than two years, two to five years and more than five years following body contouring surgery. The secondary outcomes were adverse events, unsatisfactory aesthetic appearance and weight gain. Six databases were searched, including Cochrane Central, MEDLINE, Embase, Web of Science, PsycINFO and CINAHL. Studies published from 1954 to 2014 were considered. Additional searches for unpublished studies were undertaken in BIOSIS citation index, Register of Current Controlled Trials and Global Health Observatory. The methodological quality of eligible studies was assessed independently by two reviewers using the Joanna Briggs Institute quality assessment tool. Data extraction from the included studies was undertaken and summarized independently by two reviewers using the standardized Joanna Briggs Institute data extraction tool. Studies were too heterogeneous and could not be pooled in

  12. Bariatric surgery: an updated systematic review and meta-analysis, 2003–2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Su-Hsin; Stoll, Carolyn R.T.; Song, Jihyun; Varela, J. Esteban; Eagon, Christopher J.; Colditz, Graham A.

    2013-01-01

    Importance The prevalence of obesity and outcomes of bariatric surgery are well established. However, analyses of the surgery impact have not been updated and comprehensively investigated since 2003. Objective Up-to-date, comprehensive data and appropriate meta-analytic techniques were used to examine effectiveness and risks of bariatric surgery. Data Sources Literature searches of Medline, Embase, Scopus, Current Contents, Cochrane Library, and Clinicaltrials.gov between 2003 and 2012 were performed. Study Selection Exclusion criteria included publication of abstracts only, case reports, letters, comments, or reviews; animal studies; languages other than English; duplicate studies; no surgical intervention; and no population of interest. Inclusion criteria were at least one outcome of interest resulting from the studied surgery was reported – comorbidities, mortality, complications, reoperations, or weight loss. Of the 25,060 initially identified articles, 24,023 studies met the exclusion criteria, and 259 met the inclusion criteria. Data Extraction A review protocol was followed throughout. Three reviewers independently reviewed studies, abstracted data, and resolved disagreements by consensus. Studies were evaluated for quality. Results A total of 164 studies were included (37 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and 127 observational studies). Analyses included 161,756 patients with mean age 45 years and body mass index (BMI) 46 kg/m2. We conducted random-effects and fixed-effect meta-analyses and meta-regression. In RCTs, ≤30 days mortality rate was 0.08% [95%CI, 0.01%–0.24%]; >30 days mortality rate was 0.31% [95%CI, 0.01%–0.75%]. BMI loss at the post-surgery five years was 12–17 kg/m2. The complication rate was 17% [95%CI, 11%–23%], and the reoperation rate was 7% [95%CI, 3%–12%]. Gastric bypass (GB) was more effective in weight loss but associated with more complications. Adjustable gastric banding (AGB) had lower mortality and complication

  13. Stereotactic anatomical localization in complex sinus surgery: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vreugdenburg, Thomas D; Lambert, Robyn S; Atukorale, Yasoba N; Cameron, Alun L

    2016-01-01

    It is recognized that stereotactic anatomical localization (SAL) is a useful tool in endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS), but it may be most beneficial for complex rather than routine sinus procedures. This review sought to determine the safety and efficacy of SAL in complex indications for ESS. PubMed, EMBASE, Centre for Reviews and Dissemination, and the Cochrane Library were searched from inception up to April 4, 2014. English studies comparing ESS with and without SAL in complex cases were included. Complex surgery included revision surgery, inverted papilloma, extensive sinus disease, or biopsy of tumors that are not exophytic. Safety outcomes included total, major, minor, orbital, dural, and major hemorrhage complications. Efficacy outcomes included operation completion, revision surgery, and patient-reported outcomes. Meta-analysis generated fixed-effects Mantel-Haenszel odds ratios (OR) and confidence intervals (CI). A total of 2,381 studies were identified, of which nine met the inclusion criteria. Meta-analyses indicated a reduction in the likelihood of total (OR = 0.58; 95% CI, 0.37-0.92), major (OR = 0.36; 95% CI, 0.18-0.75), and orbital complications (OR = 0.38; 95% CI, 0.17-0.83). There was no demonstrated benefit of SAL at reducing revision surgery (OR = 0.64; 95% CI, 0.38-1.08), major hemorrhage (OR = 0.77; 95% CI, 0.29-2.06), or minor complications (OR = 0.85; 95% CI, 0.48-1.50). Due to the rare outcomes under investigation, the included primary studies largely lacked the power to identify a statistically meaningful effect of SAL in ESS. However, meta-analyses of primary studies demonstrated a decreased likelihood of total, major, and orbital complications in complex ESS with the use of SAL. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  14. Persistent postoperative pain after cardiac surgery: a systematic review with meta-analysis regarding incidence and pain intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães-Pereira, Luís; Reis, Pedro; Abelha, Fernando; Azevedo, Luís Filipe; Castro-Lopes, José Manuel

    2017-10-01

    Persistent postoperative pain (PPP) has been described as a complication of cardiac surgery (CS). We aimed to study PPP after CS (PPPCS) by conducting a systematic review of the literature regarding its incidence, intensity, location, and the presence of neuropathic pain, according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses. The review comprised 3 phases: a methodological assessment of 6 different databases identifying potential articles and screening for inclusion criteria by 2 independent reviewers; data extraction; and study quality assessment. Meta-analysis was used to estimate the pooled incidence rates using a random effects model. We have identified 442 potentially relevant studies through database searching. A total of 23 studies (involving 11,057 patients) met our inclusion criteria. Persistent postoperative pain affects 37% patients in the first 6 months after CS, and it remains present more than 2 years after CS in 17%. The reported incidence of PPP during the first 6 months after CS increased in recent years. Globally, approximately half of the patients with PPPCS reported moderate to severe pain. Chest is the main location of PPPCS followed by the leg; neuropathic pain is present in the majority of the patients. This is the first systematic review and meta-analysis to provide estimates regarding incidence and intensity of PPPCS, which elucidates its relevance. There is an urgent need for adequate treatment and follow-up in patients with PPPCS.

  15. Incisional Hernia Rates After Laparoscopic or Open Abdominal Surgery-A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kössler-Ebs, Julia B; Grummich, Kathrin; Jensen, Katrin; Hüttner, Felix J; Müller-Stich, Beat; Seiler, Christoph M; Knebel, Phillip; Büchler, Markus W; Diener, Markus K

    2016-10-01

    Incisional hernias are one of the most common long-term complications associated with open abdominal surgery. The aim of this review and meta-analysis was to systematically assess laparoscopic versus open abdominal surgery as a general surgical strategy in all available indications in terms of incisional hernia occurrence. A systematic literature search was performed to identify randomized controlled trials comparing incisional hernia rates after laparoscopic versus open abdominal surgery in all indications. Random effects meta-analyses were calculated and presented as risk differences (RD) with their corresponding 95 % confidence intervals (CI). 24 trials (3490 patients) were included. Incisional hernias were significantly reduced in the laparoscopic group (RD -0.06, 95 % CI [-0.09, -0.03], p = 0.0002, I (2) = 75). The advantage of the laparoscopic procedure persisted in the subgroup of total-laparoscopic interventions (RD -0.14, 95 % CI [-0.22, -0.06], p = 0.001, I (2) = 87 %), whereas laparoscopically assisted procedures did not show a significant reduction of incisional hernias compared to open surgery (RD -0.01, 95 % CI [-0.03, 0.01], p = 0.31, I (2) = 35 %). Wound infections were significantly reduced in the laparoscopic group (RD -0.06, 95 % CI [-0.09, -0.03], p abdominal surgery showed a significantly longer hospital stay compared to laparoscopy (RD -1.92, 95 % CI [-2.67, -1.17], p hernias are less frequent using the total-laparoscopic approach instead of open abdominal surgery. Whenever possible, the less traumatic access should be chosen.

  16. Enhanced Recovery after Bariatric Surgery: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Małczak, Piotr; Pisarska, Magdalena; Piotr, Major; Wysocki, Michał; Budzyński, Andrzej; Pędziwiatr, Michał

    2017-01-01

    Enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) protocol is well established in many surgical disciplines and leads to a decrease in the length of hospital stay and morbidity. Multimodal protocols have also been introduced to bariatric surgery. This review aims to evaluate the current literature on ERAS in obesity surgery and to conduct a meta-analysis of primary and secondary outcomes. MEDLINE, Embase, Scopus and Cochrane Library were searched for eligible studies. Key journals were hand-searched. We analysed data up to May 2016. Eligible studies had to contain four described ERAS protocol elements. The primary outcome was the length of hospital stay; the secondary outcomes included overall morbidity, specific complications, mortality, readmissions and costs. Random effect meta-analyses were undertaken. The initial search yielded 1151 articles. Thorough evaluation resulted in 11 papers, which were analysed. The meta-analysis of the length of stay presented a significant reduction standard mean difference (Std. MD) = -2.39 (-3.89, -0.89), p = 0.002. The analysis of overall morbidity, specific complications and Clavien-Dindo classification showed no significant variations among the study groups. ERAS protocol in bariatric surgery leads to the reduction of the length of hospital stay while maintaining no or low influence on morbidity.

  17. The Impact of Osseous Malalignment and Realignment Procedures in Knee Ligament Surgery: A Systematic Review of the Clinical Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischer, Thomas; Paul, Jochen; Pape, Dietrich; Hirschmann, Michael T.; Imhoff, Andreas B.; Hinterwimmer, Stefan; Feucht, Matthias J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Failure rates of knee ligament surgery may be high, and the impact of osseous alignment on surgical outcome remains controversial. Basic science studies have demonstrated that osseous malalignment can negatively affect ligament strain and that realignment procedures may improve knee joint stability. Hypothesis/Purpose: The purpose of this review was to summarize the clinical evidence concerning the impact of osseous malalignment and realignment procedures in knee ligament surgery. The hypotheses were that lower extremity malalignment would be an important contributor to knee ligament surgery failure and that realignment surgery would contribute to increased knee stability and improved outcome in select cases. Study Design: Systematic review; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: According to the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines, a systematic electronic search of the PubMed database was performed in November 2015 to identify clinical studies investigating (A) the influence of osseous alignment on postoperative stability and/or failure rates after knee ligament surgery and (B) the impact of osseous realignment procedures in unstable knees with or without additional knee ligament surgery on postoperative knee function and stability. Methodological quality of the studies was assessed using the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine Levels of Evidence and the Coleman Methodological Score (CMS). Results: Of the 1466 potentially relevant articles, 28 studies fulfilled the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Average study quality was poor (CMS, 40). For part A, studies showed increased rerupture rate after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) replacement in patients with increased tibial slope. Concerning the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL)/posterolateral corner (PLC)/lateral collateral ligament (LCL), varus malalignment was considered a significant risk factor for failure. For part B, studies showed decreased

  18. Hypovitaminosis D in bariatric surgery: A systematic review of observational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakhtoura, Marlene Toufic; Nakhoul, Nancy N; Shawwa, Khaled; Mantzoros, Christos; El Hajj Fuleihan, Ghada A

    2016-04-01

    Obesity is a public health problem that carries global and substantial social and economic burden. Relative to non-surgical interventions, bariatric surgery has the most substantial and lasting impact on weight loss. However, it leads to a number of nutritional deficiencies requiring long term supplementation. The aims of this paper are to review 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] status pre and post bariatric surgery, describe the dose response of vitamin D supplementation, and assess the effect of the surgical procedure on 25(OH)D level following supplementation. We searched Medline, PubMed, the Cochrane Library and EMBASE, for relevant observational studies published in English, from 2000 to April 2015. The identified references were reviewed, in duplicate and independently, by two reviewers. We identified 51 eligible observational studies assessing 25(OH)D status pre and/or post bariatric surgery. Mean pre-surgery 25(OH)D level was below 30ng/ml in 29 studies, and 17 of these studies showed mean 25(OH)D levels ≤20ng/ml. Mean 25(OH)D levels remained below 30ng/ml following bariatric surgery, despite various vitamin D replacement regimens, with only few exceptions. The increase in post-operative 25(OH)D levels tended to parallel increments in vitamin D supplementation dose but varied widely across studies. An increase in 25(OH)D level by 9-13ng/ml was achieved when vitamin D deficiency was corrected using vitamin D replacement doses of 1100-7100IU/day, in addition to the usual maintenance equivalent daily dose of 400-2000IU (total equivalent daily dose 1500-9100IU). There was no difference in mean 25(OH)D level following supplementation between malabsorptive/combination procedures and restrictive procedures. Hypovitaminosisis D persists in obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery, despite various vitamin D supplementation regimens. Further research is needed to determine the optimal vitamin D dose to reach desirable 25(OH)D levels in this population, and to

  19. The efficacy of low-level laser treatment in reducing pain and swelling after endodontic surgery: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshari, Amirabbas; Vatanpour, Mehdi; Zakershahrak, Mehrsa

    2016-03-01

    Introduction: LLLT in oral cavity believed to reduce pain after endodontic surgery and wisdom tooth removal, to accelerate wound healing and to have an anti-inflammatory and regenerative effect. The aim of this systematic review therefore was to assess the proof available for the efficacy of low-level laser treatment in reducing pain and swelling after endodontic surgery. Methods: The PubMed service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine was searched with applicable search strategies. No language restriction was applied. The last electronic search was accomplished on August 31, 2015. All randomized clinical trials on the efficiency of low-level laser treatment in reducing pain and swelling after endodontic surgery was considered for the Meta-analysis. Quality consideration of the included randomized clinical trials was appraised according to CONSORT guidelines. Results: Only two randomized clinical trials were attained. These studies clarified that laser treatment could reduce pain and swelling, but the results were not significant. Conclusions: Low-level laser therapy can be advantageous for the reduction of postoperative pain but there is no strong confirmation for its efficiency. Its clinical utility and applicability relating to endodontic surgery, Along with the optimal energy dosage and the number of laser treatments needed after surgery, still, demand further research and experiment.

  20. Risks and benefits of pre-operative dexmedetomidine in oral and maxillofacial surgeries: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoudi, Amin; Movahedian Attar, Bijan; Shadmehr, Elham

    2017-06-01

    Oral and maxillofacial surgeries might induce anxiety and pain to the patients. Sedative agents are one of the best ways for eliminating such consequences. Dexmedetomidine (DEX) is a recent sedative agent which presents higher sedative quality with greater specificity than other drugs. The aim of present paper is to evaluate the risks and benefits of administrating DEX during oral and maxillofacial surgeries by reviewing high quality released articles. Areas covered: Searches on PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science databases were completed with focus on randomized controlled trials (RCT). Related articles, from 2000 to 2015, were selected based on inclusion criteria and quality assessments factors. Full texts of the selected articles were screened and their significant information were gathered for judgments. Expert opinion: 17 RCTs on a total of 765 patients were screened. Some of the difficulties during reviewing the articles were: different pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics of drugs when combined with DEX, different time spots and method of monitoring, including studies on both minor and major surgeries for better data collection. Recent researches are going to focus on application of DEX for in-office procedures because of its desirable properties. Nevertheless, the analgesic and amnesic features of DEX are still questionable.

  1. Memory assessment in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy to predict memory impairment after surgery: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra-Díaz, P; García-Casares, N

    2017-04-19

    Given that surgical treatment of refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy may cause memory impairment, determining which patients are eligible for surgery is essential. However, there is little agreement on which presurgical memory assessment methods are best able to predict memory outcome after surgery and identify those patients with a greater risk of surgery-induced memory decline. We conducted a systematic literature review to determine which presurgical memory assessment methods best predict memory outcome. The literature search of PubMed gathered articles published between January 2005 and December 2015 addressing pre- and postsurgical memory assessment in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy patients by means of neuropsychological testing, functional MRI, and other neuroimaging techniques. We obtained 178 articles, 31 of which were included in our review. Most of the studies used neuropsychological tests and fMRI; these methods are considered to have the greatest predictive ability for memory impairment. Other less frequently used techniques included the Wada test and FDG-PET. Current evidence supports performing a presurgical assessment of memory function using both neuropsychological tests and functional MRI to predict memory outcome after surgery. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. A systematic review of laparoscopic port site hernias in gastrointestinal surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Owens, M

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Port site hernia is an important yet under-recognised complication of laparoscopic surgery, which carries a high risk of strangulation due to the small size of the defect involved. The purpose of this study was to examine the incidence, classification, and pathogenesis of this complication, and to evaluate strategies to prevent and treat it. METHODS: Medline was searched using the words "port site hernia", "laparoscopic port hernia" "laparoscopic complications" and "trocar site hernias". The search was limited to articles on cholecystectomy, colorectal, bariatric or anti-reflux surgery published in English. A total of 42 articles were analysed and of these 35 were deemed eligible for review. Inclusion criteria were laparoscopic gastrointestinal surgery in English only with reported incidence of port site herniation. Studies were excluded if insufficient data was provided. Eligible studies were also cross-referenced. RESULTS: Analysis of 11,699 patients undergoing laparoscopic gastrointestinal procedures demonstrated an incidence of port site hernias of 0.74% with a mean follow-up of 23.9 months. The lowest incidence of port site herniation was for bariatric surgery with 0.57% in 2644 patients with a mean follow-up of 67.4 months while the highest incidence was for laparoscopic colorectal surgery with an incidence of 1.47% in 477 patients with a mean follow-up of 71.5 months. CONCLUSION: All fascial defects larger than or equal to 10mm should be closed with peritoneum, while smaller defects may require closure in certain circumstances to prevent herniation. Laparoscopic port site herniation is a completely preventable cause of morbidity that requires a second surgical procedure to repair.

  3. Surgery for diverticulitis in the 21st century: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regenbogen, Scott E; Hardiman, Karin M; Hendren, Samantha; Morris, Arden M

    2014-03-01

    Diverticulitis of the sigmoid colon is an increasingly common disease. Patterns of care and management guidelines have significantly evolved in recent years. To review and classify the primary data published since 2000 that are guiding decision making, technical considerations, and the outcomes of surgery for sigmoid diverticulitis. We searched the National Guideline Clearinghouse, PubMed, and Cochrane databases for studies pertaining to the diagnosis and management of chronic and recurrent diverticulitis from January 1, 2000, to March 31, 2013. We supplemented this automated search with references drawn from included studies and PubMed. We rated the level of evidence according to American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines. We identified 68 studies meeting inclusion criteria for final review. The studies were almost exclusively observational and had limited certainty of treatment effect. We found that complicated recurrence after recovery from an uncomplicated episode of diverticulitis is rare (recurrences do not increase the risk of complications. Chronic symptoms may persist even after resection in 5% to 22% of patients. Prophylactic surgery is generally not recommended for average-risk patients with diverticulitis, irrespective of the number of episodes of acute, noncomplicated disease. Decisions to proceed with colon resection should be based instead on the patient-reported frequency and severity of diverticulitis symptoms. The prior standard for proceeding with elective colectomy following 2 episodes of diverticulitis is no longer accepted. Decisions to proceed with colectomy should be made based on consideration of the risks of recurrent diverticulitis, the morbidity of surgery, ongoing symptoms, the complexity of disease, and operative risk. Laparoscopic surgery is preferred to open approaches. Recent evidence suggests that existing guidelines should be updated.

  4. Accuracy of Guided Surgery via Stereolithographic Mucosa-Supported Surgical Guide in Implant Surgery for Edentulous Patient: a Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheongbeom Seo

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of the present study is to systematically review the accuracy of implant placement with mucosa-supported stereolithographic surgical guide and to find out what factors can influence the accuracy. Material and Methods: An electronic literature search was performed through the MEDLINE (PubMed and EMBASE databases. The articles are including human studies published in English from October 2008 to October, 2017. From the examination of selected articles, deviations between virtual planning and actual implant placement were analysed regarding the global apical, global coronal, and angulation position. Results: A total of 119 articles were reviewed, and 6 of the most relevant articles that are suitable to the criteria were selected. The present data included 572 implants and 93 patients. The result in the present systematic review shows that mean apical global deviation ranges from 0.67 (SD 0.34 mm to 2.19 (SD 0.83 mm, mean coronal global deviation ranges from 0.6 (SD 0.25 mm to 1.68 (SD 0.25 mm and mean angular deviation - from 2.6° (SD 1.61° to 4.67° (SD 2.68°. Conclusions: It’s clearly shown from most of the examined studies that the mucosa-supported stereolithographic surgical guide, showed not exceeding in apically 2.19 mm, in coronally 1.68 mm and in angular deviation 4.67°. Surgeons should be aware of the possible linear and angular deviations of the system. Accuracy can be influenced by bone density, mucosal thickness, surgical techniques, type of jaw, smoking habits and implant length. Further studies should be performed in order to find out which jaw can have better accuracy and how the experience can influence the accuracy.

  5. Liberal or restrictive fluid management during elective surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schol, Pim B B; Terink, Ivon M; Lancé, Marcus D; Scheepers, Hubertina C J

    2016-12-01

    This article reviews if a restrictive fluid management policy reduces the complication rate if compared to liberal fluid management policy during elective surgery. The PubMed database was explored by 2 independent researchers. We used the following search terms: "Blood transfusion (MESH); transfusion need; fluid therapy (MESH); permissive hypotension; fluid management; resuscitation; restrictive fluid management; liberal fluid management; elective surgery; damage control resuscitation; surgical procedures, operative (MESH); wounds (MESH); injuries (MESH); surgery; trauma patients." A secondary search in the Medline, EMBASE, Web of Science, and Cochrane library revealed no additional results. We selected randomized controlled trials performed during elective surgeries. Patients were randomly assigned to a restrictive fluid management policy or to a liberal fluid management policy during elective surgery. The patient characteristics and the type of surgery varied. All but 3 studies reported American Society of Anaesthesiologists groups 1 to 3 as the inclusion criterion. The primary outcome of interest is total number of patients with a complication and the complication rate. Secondary outcome measures are infection rate, transfusion need, postoperative rebleeding, hospital stay, and renal function. In total, 1397 patients were analyzed (693 restrictive protocol, 704 liberal protocol). Meta-analysis showed that in the restrictive group as compared with the liberal group, fewer patients experienced a complication (relative risk [RR], 0.65; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.55-0.78). The total complication rate (RR, 0.57; 95% CI, 0.52-0.64), risk of infection (RR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.48-0.79), and transfusion rate (RR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.66-0.99) were also lower. The postoperative rebleeding did not differ in both groups: RR, 0.76 (95% CI, 0.28-2.06). We conclude that compared with a liberal fluid policy, a restrictive fluid policy in elective surgery results in a 35% reduction

  6. Systematic reviews of observational studies of risk of thrombosis and bleeding in urological surgery (ROTBUS): introduction and methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikkinen, Kari A O; Agarwal, Arnav; Craigie, Samantha; Cartwright, Rufus; Gould, Michael K; Haukka, Jari; Naspro, Richard; Novara, Giacomo; Sandset, Per Morten; Siemieniuk, Reed A; Violette, Philippe D; Guyatt, Gordon H

    2014-12-23

    Pharmacological thromboprophylaxis in the peri-operative period involves a trade-off between reduction in venous thromboembolism (VTE) and an increase in bleeding. Baseline risks, in the absence of prophylaxis, for VTE and bleeding are known to vary widely between urological procedures, but their magnitude is highly uncertain. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses addressing baseline risks are uncommon, needed, and require methodological innovation. In this article, we describe the rationale and methods for a series of systematic reviews of the risks of symptomatic VTE and bleeding requiring reoperation in urological surgery. We searched MEDLINE from January 1, 2000 until April 10, 2014 for observational studies reporting on symptomatic VTE or bleeding after urological procedures. Additional studies known to experts and studies cited in relevant review articles were added. Teams of two reviewers, independently assessed articles for eligibility, evaluated risk of bias, and abstracted data. We derived best estimates of risk from the median estimates among studies rated at the lowest risk of bias. The primary endpoints were 30-day post-operative risk estimates of symptomatic VTE and bleeding requiring reoperation, stratified by procedure and patient risk factors. This series of systematic reviews will inform clinicians and patients regarding the trade-off between VTE prevention and bleeding. Our work advances standards in systematic reviews of surgical complications, including assessment of risk of bias, criteria for arriving at best estimates of risk (including modeling of timing of events and dealing with suboptimal data reporting), dealing with subgroups at higher and lower risk of bias, and use of the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach to rate certainty in estimates of risk. The results will be incorporated in the upcoming European Association Urology Guideline on Thromboprophylaxis. PROSPERO CRD42014010342.

  7. Systematic review of percutaneous adhesiolysis and management of chronic low back pain in post lumbar surgery syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epter, Richard S; Helm, Standiford; Hayek, Salim M; Benyamin, Ramsin M; Smith, Howard S; Abdi, Salahadin

    2009-01-01

    Post lumbar surgery syndrome or failed back surgery syndrome with persistent pain continues to increase over the years. The speculated causes of post lumbar laminectomy syndrome include acquired stenosis, epidural fibrosis, arachnoiditis, radiculopathy, and recurrent disc herniation. Epidural fibrosis may account for as much as 20% to 36% of all cases of failed back surgery syndrome. Percutaneous epidural adhesiolysis has been employed in interventional pain management in the treatment of chronic, refractory low back and lower extremity pain after back surgery. A systematic review of randomized trials and observational studies. To evaluate the effectiveness of percutaneous adhesiolysis in managing chronic low back and lower extremity pain due to post lumbar surgery syndrome. A comprehensive literature search was conducted utilizing electronic databases, as well as systematic reviews and cross references from 1966 through December 2008. The quality of individual articles used in this analysis was assessed by modified Cochrane review criteria for randomized trials and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) criteria for assessment of observational studies. Clinical relevance was evaluated using 5 questions according to the criteria recommended by the Cochrane Review Back Group. Analysis was conducted using 5 levels of evidence, ranging from Level I to III, with 3 subcategories in Level II. The primary outcome measure was pain relief (short-term relief of at least 6 months and long-term relief of more than 6 months). Secondary outcome measures were improvement in functional status, psychological status, return to work, and change in opioid intake. Of the 13 studies considered for inclusion, 3 randomized trials and 4 observational studies met the inclusion criteria for methodologic quality assessment and evidence synthesis based on methodologic quality scores of 50 or more. Evidence of percutaneous adhesiolysis in the management of chronic low back pain

  8. The Effects of Perioperative Music Interventions in Pediatric Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne J E van der Heijden

    Full Text Available Music interventions are widely used, but have not yet gained a place in guidelines for pediatric surgery or pediatric anesthesia. In this systematic review and meta-analysis we examined the effects of music interventions on pain, anxiety and distress in children undergoing invasive surgery.We searched 25 electronic databases from their first available date until October 2014.Included were all randomized controlled trials with a parallel group, crossover or cluster design that included pediatric patients from 1 month to 18 years old undergoing minimally invasive or invasive surgical procedures, and receiving either live music therapy or recorded music.4846 records were retrieved from the searches, 26 full text reports were evaluated and data was extracted by two independent investigators.Pain was measured with the Visual Analogue Scale, the Coloured Analogue Scale and the Facial Pain Scale. Anxiety and distress were measured with an emotional index scale (not validated, the Spielberger short State Trait Anxiety Inventory and a Facial Affective Scale.Three RCTs were eligible for inclusion encompassing 196 orthopedic, cardiac and day surgery patients (age of 1 day to 18 years receiving either live music therapy or recorded music. Overall a statistically significant positive effect was demonstrated on postoperative pain (SMD -1.07; 95%CI-2.08; -0.07 and on anxiety and distress (SMD -0.34 95% CI -0.66; -0.01 and SMD -0.50; 95% CI -0.84; - 0.16.This systematic review and meta-analysis indicates that music interventions may have a statistically significant effect in reducing post-operative pain, anxiety and distress in children undergoing a surgical procedure. Evidence from this review and other reviews suggests music therapy may be considered for clinical use.

  9. [The Body Dysmorphic Disorder in Plastic Surgery - A Systematic Review of Screening Methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houschyar, K S; Philipps, H M; Duscher, D; Rein, S; Weissenberg, K; Nietzschmann, I; Maan, Z N; Pyles, M N; Siemers, F

    2017-12-01

    The body dysmorphic disorder (BDD) is considered to be a sub-form of somatoform disorders. BDD can express itself in a delirious experience, an excessive evaluation and employment of the external appearance, in particular the face. Preliminary results suggest that individuals with BDD do not benefit from plastic surgery, so that aesthetic surgery often results in aggravation of their symptoms. Thus, the identification of signs for a BDD is crucial, whether a patient should be operated plastically-aesthetically. This overview explains the often difficult diagnostics of the BDD by summarizing the current literature on its screening. Systematic overview METHODS: An electronic search was conducted in the German and English-language literature in order to identify all screening instruments for the BDD. The specific development and validation processes are assessed whether the screening instruments have a positive predictive value for the BDD. Six different screening instruments were identified for the BDD. Only two of these were evaluated in a cosmetic setting: the "Body Dysmorphic Disorder Questionnaire Dermatology Version" (BDDQ-DV) and the "Dysmorphic Concern Questionnaire" (DCQ). The influence on the subjective results after a plastic-aesthetic procedure was measured only for the DCQ. The limited availability of validated screening instruments for BDD in plastic surgery is markedly in contrast to the supposedly high prevalence of the disease of 2.4 %. Among the currently used screening tools, the BDDQ-DV and the DCQ appear to be most suitable. Further research efforts are needed to establish better screening methods for the BDD in the plastic surgical patient population and to examine the effects of BDD on treatment results. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Blinding in randomized controlled trials in general and abdominal surgery: protocol for a systematic review and empirical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst, Pascal; Grummich, Kathrin; Heger, Patrick; Zaschke, Steffen; Knebel, Phillip; Ulrich, Alexis; Büchler, Markus W; Diener, Markus K

    2016-03-24

    Blinding is a measure in randomized controlled trials (RCT) to reduce detection and performance bias. There is evidence that lack of blinding leads to overestimated treatment effects. Because of the physical component of interventions, blinding is not easily applicable in surgical trials. This is a protocol for a systematic review and empirical study about actual impact on outcomes and future potential of blinding in general and abdominal surgery RCT. A systematic literature search in CENTRAL, MEDLINE and Web of Science will be conducted to locate RCT between 1996 and 2015 with a surgical intervention. General study characteristics and information on blinding methods will be extracted. The risk of performance and detection bias will be rated as low, unclear or high according to the Cochrane Collaboration's tool for assessing risk of bias. The main outcome of interest will be the association of a high risk of performance or detection bias with significant trial results and will be tested at a level of significance of 5 %. Further, trials will be meta-analysed in a Mantel-Haenszel model comparing trials with high risk of bias to other trials at a level of significance of 5 %. Detection and performance bias distort treatment effects. The degree of such bias in general and abdominal surgery is unknown. Evidence on influence of missing blinding would improve critical appraisal and conduct of general and abdominal surgery RCT. PROSPERO 2015: CRD42015026837.

  11. A systematic review of the factors affecting choice of surgery as a career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peel, John K; Schlachta, Christopher M; Alkhamesi, Nawar A

    2018-02-01

    Interest in surgical careers among medical students has declined over the past decade. Multiple explanations have been offered for why top students are deterred or rejected from surgical programs, though no consensus has emerged. We conducted a review of the literature to better characterize what factors affect the pursuit of a surgical career. We searched PubMed and EMBASE and performed additional reference checks. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) and Newcastle-Ottawa Education scores were used to evaluate the included data. Our search identified 122 full-text, primary articles. Analysis of this evidence identified 3 core concepts that impact surgical career decision-making: gender, features of surgical education, and student "fit" in the culture of surgery. Real and perceived gender discrimination has deterred female medical students from entering surgical careers. In addition, limited exposure to surgery during medical school and differences between student and surgeon personality traits and values may deter students from entering surgical careers. We suggest that deliberate and visible effort to include women and early-career medical students in surgical settings may enhance their interest in carreers in surgery.

  12. A systematic review of the factors affecting choice of surgery as a career

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peel, John K.; Schlachta, Christopher M.; Alkhamesi, Nawar A.

    2018-01-01

    Background Interest in surgical careers among medical students has declined over the past decade. Multiple explanations have been offered for why top students are deterred or rejected from surgical programs, though no consensus has emerged. Methods We conducted a review of the literature to better characterize what factors affect the pursuit of a surgical career. We searched PubMed and EMBASE and performed additional reference checks. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) and Newcastle–Ottawa Education scores were used to evaluate the included data. Results Our search identified 122 full-text, primary articles. Analysis of this evidence identified 3 core concepts that impact surgical career decision-making: gender, features of surgical education, and student “fit” in the culture of surgery. Conclusion Real and perceived gender discrimination has deterred female medical students from entering surgical careers. In addition, limited exposure to surgery during medical school and differences between student and surgeon personality traits and values may deter students from entering surgical careers. We suggest that deliberate and visible effort to include women and early-career medical students in surgical settings may enhance their interest in carreers in surgery. PMID:29368678

  13. Current Evidence for Clinical Efficacy of Platelet Rich Plasma in Aesthetic Surgery: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frautschi, Russell S; Hashem, Ahmed M; Halasa, Brianna; Cakmakoglu, Cagri; Zins, James E

    2017-03-01

    Platelet rich plasma (PRP) has attracted attention in a number of surgical fields due to a wide variety of potential clinical benefits. Yet PRP has not gained wide popularity in aesthetic surgery as a result of uncertainty surrounding objective clinical evidence. We aim to describe the current applications, define preparation and activation, explore effectiveness, and propose a classification system to facilitate comparisons across studies. A comprehensive review of the literature regarding the use of platelet rich plasma in aesthetic surgery was performed. Data gathered included: PRP application, study type, subject number, centrifugation, anticoagulation, activation, PRP composition, and outcomes. Thirty-eight reports were identified. Applications included injection into aging skin (29%), scalp alopecia (26%), lipofilling (21%), fractional laser (13%), and facial surgery (11%). The majority of studies (53%) were case series without controls. Leucocytes were sparsely defined (32%). The concentration of injected and/or baseline platelets was rarely clarified (18%). The mechanism of activation was described in 27 studies (71%), while anticoagulation was uncommonly elucidated (47%). While most studies (95%) claim effectiveness, objective measures were only utilized in 17 studies (47%). Current studies produce context-dependent results with a lack of consistent reporting of PRP preparation, composition, and activation in aesthetic applications, making meaningful meta-analysis unrealistic. Thus the method of PRP preparation warrants increased attention. We recommend a set of descriptors, FIT PAAW (described below), to produce scientifically grounded conclusions, facilitating a clearer understanding of the situations in which PRP is effective. 4 © 2016 The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Inc. Reprints and permission: journals.permissions@oup.com

  14. Clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of laparoscopic surgery for colorectal cancer: systematic reviews and economic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, A; Lourenco, T; de Verteuil, R; Hernandez, R; Fraser, C; McKinley, A; Krukowski, Z; Vale, L; Grant, A

    2006-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of laparoscopic, laparoscopically assisted (hereafter together described as laparoscopic surgery) and hand-assisted laparoscopic surgery (HALS) in comparison with open surgery for the treatment of colorectal cancer. Electronic databases were searched from 2000 to May 2005. A review of economic evaluations was undertaken by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence in 2001. This review was updated from 2000 until July 2005. Data from selected studies were extracted and assessed. Dichotomous outcome data from individual trials were combined using the relative risk method and continuous outcomes were combined using the Mantel-Haenszel weighted mean difference method. Summaries of the results from individual patient data (IPD) meta-analyses were also presented. An economic evaluation was also carried out using a Markov model incorporating the data from the systematic review. The results were first presented as a balance sheet for comparison of the surgical techniques. It was then used to estimate cost-effectiveness measured in terms of incremental cost per life-year gained and incremental cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) for a time horizon up to 25 years. Forty-six reports on 20 studies [19 randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and one IPD meta-analysis] were included in the review of clinical effectiveness. The RCTs were of generally moderate quality with the number of participants varying between 16 and 1082, with 10 having less than 100 participants. The total numbers of trial participants who underwent laparoscopic or open surgery were 2429 and 2139, respectively. A systematic review of four papers suggested that laparoscopic surgery is more costly than open surgery. However, the data they provided on effectiveness was poorer than the evidence from the review of effectiveness. The estimates from the systematic review of clinical effectiveness were

  15. Local hemostatic measures in anticoagulated patients undergoing oral surgery: a systematized literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Wildson Gurgel Costa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To conduct a systematized review of the literature about the main local hemostatic measures to control postoperative bleeding in anticoagulated patients. METHODS: A systematized review of literature was performed in the electronic database Medline (PubMed without restriction of the publication date. The eligibility criteria were studies involving maintenance of the anticoagulant therapy, prospective studies, retrospective studies, randomized clinical trials, controlled clinical studies, comparative studies, multicentric studies or case-control studies. Studies discontinuing anticoagulant therapy, case reports, literature reviews, in vitro studies, animal experiments and articles written in language not compatible with the search strategy adopted in this work were excluded. RESULTS: Twenty-four articles that met the adopted eligibility criteria were selected, enrolling 3891 subjects under anticoagulant therapy. A total of 171 cases of hemorrhage was observed. Tranexamic acid was the main local hemostatic measure used to controlling of postoperative bleeding. CONCLUSION: The local hemostatic measures proved to be effective according to previously published studies. Nevertheless, further clinical studies should be conducted to confirm this effectiveness.

  16. Systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Troels Dreier; Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm; Palshof, Jesper Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background: Brain metastases (BM) from colorectal cancer (CRC) are a rare event. However, the implications for affected patients are severe, and the incidence has been reported to be increasing. For clinicians, knowledge about the characteristics associated with BM is important and could lead...... to earlier diagnosis and improved survival. Method: In this paper, we describe the incidence as well as characteristics associated with BM based on a systematic review of the current literature, following the PRISMA guidelines. Results: We show that the incidence of BM in CRC patients ranges from 0.6 to 3...... of brain involvement in patients with these characteristics is necessary....

  17. Systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup, H; Kirkeskov, L; Hanskov, Dorte Jessing Agerby

    2017-01-01

    : To assess the occurrence of COPD among construction workers. Methods: We performed a systematic search in PubMed and Embase between 1 January 1990 and 31 August 2016 in order to identify epidemiological studies with a risk estimate for either COPD morbidity/mortality or a spirometry-based definition....... Conclusions: This review suggests that COPD occurs more often among construction workers than among workers who are not exposed to construction dust. It is not possible to draw any conclusions on specific subgroups as most studies analysed construction workers as one united group. In addition, no potential...

  18. Robot-assisted minimally invasive surgery for pediatric solid tumors: a systematic review of feasibility and current status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cundy, Thomas P; Marcus, Hani J; Clark, James; Hughes-Hallett, Archie; Mayer, Erik K; Najmaldin, Azad S; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Darzi, Ara

    2014-04-01

    Open surgery remains the primary technique for resection of pediatric solid tumors despite the popularity of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) for oncological indications in adults and nononcological indications in children. Robot-assisted surgery offers technical and ergonomic advantages that might make MIS more achievable in this setting, permitting benefits for both the patient and surgeon. The aim of this study is to critically appraise the current status of robot-assisted MIS for pediatric solid tumors. A systematic search of multiple electronic literature databases was undertaken, supplemented by several relevant secondary sources. A total of 23 publications met eligibility criteria, reporting 40 cases overall. Indications for surgery were widely varied, with over 20 different pathologies described. One-third of tumors were classified as malignant. Most procedures involved abdominal or retroperitoneal located tumors in adolescent patients (age range, 1-18 years). The collective complication and conversion rates were 10% and 12.5%, respectively. Oncological adverse events involved two isolated events of tumor spillage and residual disease. The evidence is limited to case reports and small case series only. For the diverse and highly selective cases in this review, robot-assisted MIS seems safe and feasible. Current status is low volume, in a relatively static state of adoption, and without any apparent index pathology or procedure. The benefits of robot assistance seem well suited but remain unsubstantiated by evidence. Higher quality studies are needed to determine true safety and efficacy. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Role of statins in delirium prevention in critical ill and cardiac surgery patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallabhajosyula, Saraschandra; Kanmanthareddy, Arun; Erwin, Patricia J; Esterbrooks, Dennis J; Morrow, Lee E

    2017-02-01

    The data evaluating the role of statins in delirium prevention in the intensive care unit are conflicting and limited. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of literature from 1975 to 2015. All English-language adult studies evaluating delirium incidence in statin and statin nonusers were included and studies without a control group were excluded. Mantel-Haenszel model was used to calculate pooled risk ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Statistical significance was defined as CI not including unity and P value less than .05. Of a total 57 identified studies, 6 were included. The studies showed high heterogeneity (I 2 = 73%) for all and moderate for cardiac surgery studies (I 2 = 55%). Of 289 773 patients, statins were used in 22 292 (7.7%). Cardiac surgery was performed in 4382 (1.5%) patients and 2321 (53.0%) used statins. Delirium was noted in 710 (3.2%) and 3478 (1.3%) of the patients in the statin and nonstatin groups, respectively, with no difference between groups in the total cohort (RR, 1.05 [95% CI, 0.85-1.29]; P = .56) or in cardiac surgery patients (RR, 1.03 [95% CI, 0.68-1.56]; P = .89). In critically ill and cardiac surgery patients, this meta-analysis did not show a benefit with statin therapy in the prevention of delirium. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Deep neuromuscular block to optimize surgical space conditions during laparoscopic surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruintjes, M H; van Helden, E V; Braat, A E; Dahan, A; Scheffer, G J; van Laarhoven, C J; Warlé, M C

    2017-06-01

    Neuromuscular block (NMB) is frequently used in abdominal surgery to improve surgical conditions by relaxation of the abdominal wall and prevention of sudden muscle contractions. The evidence supporting routine use of deep NMB is still under debate. We aimed to provide evidence for the superiority of routine use of deep NMB during laparoscopic surgery. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies comparing the influence of deep vs moderate NMB during laparoscopic procedures on surgical space conditions and clinical outcomes. Trials were identified from Medline, Embase, and Central databases from inception to December 2016. We included randomized trials, crossover studies, and cohort studies. Our search yielded 12 studies on the effect of deep NMB on the surgical space conditions. Deep NMB during laparoscopic surgeries improves the surgical space conditions when compared with moderate NMB, with a mean difference of 0.65 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.47-0.83) on a scale of 1-5, and it facilitates the use of low-pressure pneumoperitoneum. Furthermore, deep NMB reduces postoperative pain scores in the postanaesthesia care unit, with a mean difference of - 0.52 (95% CI: -0.71 to - 0.32). Deep NMB improves surgical space conditions during laparoscopic surgery and reduces postoperative pain scores in the postanaesthesia care unit. Whether this leads to fewer intraoperative complications, an improved quality of recovery, or both after laparoscopic surgery should be pursued in future studies. The review methodology was specified in advance and registered at Prospero on July 27, 2016, registration number CRD42016042144. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. What indication, morbidity and mortality for central pancreatectomy in oncological surgery? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santangelo, Michele; Esposito, Anna; Tammaro, Vincenzo; Calogero, Armando; Criscitiello, Carmen; Roberti, Giuseppe; Candida, Maria; Rupealta, Niccolò; Pisani, Antonio; Carlomagno, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    Conventional pancreatic resections for pancreatic neck and body diseases include pancreaticoduodenectomy, distal pancreatectomy with or without splenectomy, and total pancreatectomy. Recent studies have reported encouraging results of non-traditional pancreatic resections, including central pancreatectomy (CP), for central pancreatic disease. This surgical approach offers the potentials of low postoperative morbidity and preservation of metabolic functions. This study performs a systematic review on CP. A comprehensive literature search was conducted, for the period 1992-2015, on three worldwide databases: PubMed, Scopus, ISI-Web of Knowledge. We focused on indications, morbidity and mortality of this surgical procedure. The review shows that CP is particularly suitable for small-medium size diseases localized into the pancreatic body. This procedure is associated with an increased postoperative morbidity but an excellent postoperative pancreatic function. CP is a safe and effective procedure when performed following the right indications. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Radiologically Determined Sarcopenia Predicts Morbidity and Mortality Following Abdominal Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Keaton; Gordon-Weeks, Alex; Coleman, Claire; Silva, Michael

    2017-09-01

    Individualised risk prediction is crucial if targeted pre-operative risk reduction strategies are to be deployed effectively. Radiologically determined sarcopenia has been shown to predict outcomes across a range of intra-abdominal pathologies. Access to pre-operative cross-sectional imaging has resulted in a number of studies investigating the predictive value of radiologically assessed sarcopenia over recent years. This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to determine whether radiologically determined sarcopenia predicts post-operative morbidity and mortality following abdominal surgery. CENTRAL, EMBASE and MEDLINE databases were searched using terms to capture the concept of radiologically assessed sarcopenia used to predict post-operative complications in abdominal surgery. Outcomes included 30 day post-operative morbidity and mortality, 1-, 3- and 5-year overall and disease-free survival and length of stay. Data were extracted and meta-analysed using either random or fixed effects model (Revman ® 5.3). A total of 24 studies involving 5267 patients were included in the review. The presence of sarcopenia was associated with a significant increase in major post-operative complications (RR 1.61 95% CI 1.24-4.15 p = sarcopenia predicted 1-, 3- and 5-year survival (RR 1.61 95% CI 1.36-1.91 p = sarcopenia may benefit patients undergoing abdominal surgery.

  3. Endodontics, Endodontic Retreatment, and Apical Surgery Versus Tooth Extraction and Implant Placement: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chércoles-Ruiz, Anna; Sánchez-Torres, Alba; Gay-Escoda, Cosme

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to answer the following clinical question: Which is the best treatment option for a pulpally involved tooth? An electronic search was conducted in the Cochrane, PubMed (MEDLINE), and ScienceDirect databases between December 2015 and February 2016. A manual search was also performed. The inclusion criteria were randomized clinical trials, prospective or retrospective cohort studies, and cross-sectional studies performed on humans with at least 1 year of follow-up and published within the last 10 years. Two researchers independently screened the title and abstract of every article identified in the search in order to establish its eligibility. The selected articles were classified into different levels of evidence by means of the Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy criteria. Sixty articles met the inclusion criteria for this systematic review. The survival rate of single-tooth implants was greater than the success rate of the distinct conservative treatments. However, among comparative studies, no important differences between both treatments were observed until at least 8 years later. The endodontic treatment and the implant placement are both valid and complementary options for planning oral rehabilitation. Although a level B recommendation can be stated, these results come from retrospective comparative studies because there is a lack of randomized clinical studies comparing both types of therapeutic options. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Risk factors for mesh erosion after female pelvic floor reconstructive surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Tuo; Liao, Banghua; Luo, Deyi; Shen, Hong; Wang, Kunjie

    2016-02-01

    To explore the risk factors for mesh erosion after female pelvic floor reconstructive surgery based on published literature. A systematic literature search of the PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, Chinese Biomedical Literature (CBM), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) and Chinese Science and Technology Periodical (VIP) databases was performed to identify studies related to the risk factors for mesh erosion after female pelvic floor reconstruction published before December 2014. Summary unadjusted odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to assess the strength of associations between the factors and mesh erosion. In all, 25 studies containing 7,084 patients were included in our systematic review and meta-analysis. Statistically significant differences in mesh erosion after female pelvic floor reconstruction were found in older vs younger patients (OR 0.96, 95% CI 0.94-0.98), more parities vs less parities (OR 1.27, 95% CI 1.07-1.51), the presence of premenopausal/oestrogen replacement therapy (ERT) (OR 1.36, 95% CI 1.03-1.79), diabetes mellitus (OR 1.87, 95% CI 1.35-2.57), smoking (OR 2.35, 95% CI 1.80-3.08), concomitant pelvic organ prolapse (POP) surgery (OR 0.37, 95% CI 0.16-0.84), concomitant hysterectomy (OR 1.46, 95% CI 1.03-2.07), preservation of the uterus at surgery (OR 0.22, 95% CI 0.08-0.63), and surgery performed by senior vs junior surgeons (OR 0.42, 95% CI 0.30-0.58). Our study indicates that younger age, more parities, premenopausal/ERT, diabetes mellitus, smoking, concomitant hysterectomy, and surgery performed by a junior surgeon were significant risk factors for mesh erosion after female pelvic floor reconstructive surgery. Moreover, concomitant POP surgery and preservation of the uterus may be the potential protective factors for mesh erosion. © 2015 The Authors BJU International © 2015 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Non-pharmacological interventions to promote the sleep of patients after cardiac surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Fernanda de Souza; Souza, Regina Claudia da Silva; Poveda, Vanessa Brito; Costa, Ana Lucia Siqueira

    2017-09-12

    to analyze evidence available in the literature concerning non-pharmacological interventions that are effective to treat altered sleep patterns among patients who underwent cardiac surgery. systematic review conducted in the National Library of Medicine-National Institutes of Health, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature, Scopus, Embase, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature and PsycINFO databases, and also grey literature. ten controlled, randomized clinical trials were included in this review. Non-pharmacological interventions were grouped into three main categories, namely: relaxation techniques, devices or equipment to minimize sleep interruptions and/or induce sleep, and educational strategies. Significant improvement was found in the scores assessing sleep quality among studies testing interventions such as earplugs, sleeping masks, muscle relaxation, posture and relaxation training, white noise, and educational strategies. In regard to the studies' methodological quality, high quality studies as established by Jadad scoring were not found. significant improvement was found among the scores assessing sleep in the studies testing interventions such as earplugs, sleeping masks, muscle relaxation, posture and relaxation training, white noise and music, and educational strategies. analisar as evidências disponíveis, na literatura, sobre as intervenções não farmacológicas, efetivas para o tratamento da alteração do padrão do sono em pacientes submetidos à cirurgia cardíaca. revisão sistemática realizada por meio de busca nas bases de dados National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde, Scopus, Embase, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature e PsycINFO, e na literatura cinzenta. dez ensaios clínicos controlados e randomizados

  6. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in cardiac surgery patients: An updated systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlois, Pascal L; Hardy, Gil; Manzanares, William

    2017-06-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFA) supplementation is an attractive therapeutic option for patients undergoing open-heart surgery due to their anti-inflammatory and anti-arrhythmic properties. Several randomized controlled trials (RCT) have found contradictory results for perioperative ω-3 PUFA administration. Therefore, we conducted an updated systematic review and meta-analysis evaluating the effects of perioperative ω-3 PUFA on some clinically important outcomes for cardiac surgery. A systematic literature search was conducted to find RCT evaluating clinical outcomes after ω-3 PUFA therapy in adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Intensive care unit (ICU) length of stay (LOS) was the primary outcome; secondary outcomes were hospital LOS, postoperative atrial fibrillation (POAF), mortality and duration of mechanical ventilation (MV). Predefined subgroup analysis and sensibility analysis were performed. A total of 19 RCT including 4335 patients met inclusion criteria. No effect of ω-3 PUFA on ICU LOS was found (weighted mean difference WMD -2.95, 95% confidence interval, CI -10.28 to 4.39, P = 0.43). However, ω-3 PUFA reduced hospital LOS (WMD -1.37, 95% CI -2.41 to -0.33; P = 0.010) and POAF incidence (Odds Ratio OR = 0.78, 95% CI 0.68 to 0.90; P = 0.004). No effects were found on mortality or MV duration. Heterogeneity remained in subgroup analysis and we found a significant POAF reduction when ω-3 PUFA doses were administered to patients exposed to extra-corporeal circulation. Oral/enteral administration seemed to further reduce POAF. In patients undergoing cardiac surgery, ω-3 PUFA supplementation by oral/enteral and parenteral route reduces hospital LOS and POAF. Nonetheless considerable clinical and statistical heterogeneity weaken our findings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  7. Depression Induced by Total Mastectomy, Breast Conserving Surgery and Breast Reconstruction: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chengjiao; Hu, Guangfu; Biskup, Ewelina; Qiu, Xiaochun; Zhang, Hongwei; Zhang, Haiyin

    2018-02-09

    To carry out a systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature to determine whether different type of surgery induces different depression occurrence in female breast cancer at mean time more than 1-year term postoperatively. A systematic literature search of PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE, OvidSP, EBSCO and PsycARTICLES was conducted. Observational clinical studies that compared the depression incidence in different surgery groups and presented empirical findings were selected. Sixteen studies met the inclusion criteria, including 5, 4, 2 and 5 studies compared depression between total mastectomy (TM) and breast conserving therapy (BCS), TM and breast reconstruction (BR), BCS and BR, or among all three groups (TM, BCS and BR), respectively. Only 1 of 5 studies, which subjected to multivariate analysis of depression in female breast cancer, reported a statistically significant effect of type of surgery on depression occurrence. Our meta-analysis showed no significant differences among the three types of surgery, with BCS patients versus TM patients (relative risk [RR] = 0.89, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.78-1.01; P = 0.06), BR patients versus TM patients (RR = 0.87, 95% CI 0.71-1.06; P = 0.16) and BCS patients versus BR patients (RR = 1.10; 95% CI 0.89-1.35; P = 0.37), respectively. Our study showed that there were no statistically significant differences concerning the occurrence of depressive symptoms in breast cancer patients as a consequence of TM, BCS or BR at mean time more than 1-year term postoperatively.

  8. Value in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery: A Systematic Review of Economic Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler, Benjamin P; Ji, Yisi D; Peacock, Zachary S

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the state of economic analyses in the field of oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMS). A systematic search of published literature up to 2016 was performed. The inclusion criteria were as follows: English-language articles on economic analyses pertaining to OMS including anesthesia and pain management; dentoalveolar surgery; orthognathic, cleft, and/or obstructive sleep apnea treatment; pathology; reconstruction; temporomandibular disorders; trauma; and other. The exclusion criteria were as follows: opinion or perspective articles, studies unrelated to OMS, nonhuman research, and implant-related studies. Cost-effectiveness analyses (CEAs), cost-utility analyses, and cost-minimization analyses (CMAs) were evaluated with the original Consolidated Health Economic Evaluation Reporting Standards (CHEERS) checklist or a modified CHEERS checklist. The search yielded 798 articles, 77 of which met the inclusion criteria (published from 1980 to 2016, 48 from the United States). There were an increasing number of studies over time (P for trend surgery (20.7%); 15 studies on orthognathic, cleft, and/or obstructive sleep apnea treatment (19.4%); 1 study on pathology (1.3%); 6 studies on reconstruction (7.8%); no studies on temporomandibular joint disorders and/or facial pain (0%); 20 studies on trauma (25.9%); and 12 studies categorized as other (15.5%). CEAs made up 11.7% of studies, and CMAs comprised 58.4%. Of the 9 CEAs, 55.6% were published in 2010 or later. Of the 45 CMAs, 88.6% were published in 2000 or later and 61.4% in 2010 or later. CEAs met 56.0% (range, 29.2 to 87.5%) of the CHEERS criteria, whereas CMA studies met 45.1% (range, 23.9 to 76.1%) of the modified CHEERS criteria. Only 1 study succeeded in estimating costs and health outcomes (value) of an OMS procedure. There is an increasing trend in the number of economic studies in the field of OMS. More high-quality economic evaluations are needed to demonstrate the value

  9. Long-term complications and side effects of bariatric surgery: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Enrique Martínez-Núñez

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: Bariatric surgery is a procedure that has gained popularity in the last decades as a treatment for obesity and is generally regarded as safe and effective in the short term, though the complications on the long term have been poorly described. We aim to review studies with long term follow-up reporting complications after a bariatric procedure. Method: A search was conducted on the data bases MEDLINE, EBSCO, Cochrane Library, and Google Scholar, and also scanning through references list in publications. We included cohort studies and clinical trials published from January 1st 2014 to April 15th 2017 with a follow up ≥ 5 years, retention rate above 50%, written in the following languages; English, Spanish, or Portuguese. We conducted qualitative bias assessment and analysis of heterogeneity. Result: Only four studies met the inclusion criteria, all of them were conducted with different bariatric procedures (vertical sleeve gastrectomy, laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy, laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding, and billiopancreatic diversion with or without duodenal shift. Study design, outcome assessment, and complication definition were highly heterogeneous. The most frequent long term complications were gastroesophageal reflux disease, several nutritional deficits, incisional hernias, and failure to weight loss. Conclusions: There is insufficient evidence to ensure the quantity and severity of long-term complications of bariatric surgery.

  10. Early elective versus delayed elective surgery in acute recurrent diverticulitis: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Rao Muhammad Asaf; Hajibandeh, Shahin; Hajibandeh, Shahab

    2017-10-01

    To investigate outcomes of early versus delayed surgery in patients with acute recurrent diverticulitis. We performed a systematic review in accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement standards. We conducted a search of electronic information sources, including MEDLINE; EMBASE; CINAHL; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry; ClinicalTrials.gov; and ISRCTN Register, and bibliographic reference lists to identify all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies investigating outcomes of early versus delayed surgery in patients with acute recurrent diverticulitis. We used the Newcastle-Ottawa scale to assess the risk of bias of included studies. Random-effects models were applied to calculate pooled outcome data. We identified three retrospective and one prospective cohort studies enrolling a total of 1046 patients. The included patients were comparable in terms of age, ASA score and Hinchey classifications (Hinchey I and II). The results of our analyses suggested that there was no difference between two groups in surgical site infection [Odds ratio (OR) 1.61, 95% CI 0.79-3.27, P = 0.19], intra-abdominal abscess (OR 0.92, 95% CI 0.21-4.00, P = 0.91), anastomotic leak (OR1.27, 95% CI 0.50-3.25, P = 0.61), 30-day mortality [Risk difference (RD) 0.00 95% CI -0.01-0.01, P = 0.80], postoperative ileus (OR 1.35, 95% CI 0.50-3.66, P = 0.55), postoperative bleeding (OR 0.93, 95% CI 0.32-2.69, P = 0.89), ureteric injury (OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.08-5.07, P = 0.65), and overall morbidity (OR 1.42 95% CI 0.76-2.66, P = 0.27). The early surgery was associated with longer operative time [Mean Difference (MD) 12.8, 95% CI 5.08-20.53, P = 0.001] and length of stay (MD 4.41, 95% CI -0.34-8.53, P = 0.03). Among those undergoing laparoscopic surgery, conversion to open surgery was higher in the early surgery group (OR

  11. Challenges of management and outcome of neonatal surgery in Africa: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekenze, Sebastian O; Ajuzieogu, Obinna V; Nwomeh, Benedict C

    2016-03-01

    Disparity still exists in the outcome of neonatal surgery between high-income countries and low-income and middle-income countries. This study reviews publications on neonatal surgery in Africa over 20 years with a focus on challenges of management, trends in outcome, and potential interventions to improve outcome. We did a literature review by searching PubMed and African Index Medicus for original articles published in any language between January 1995 and September 2014. A data extraction sheet was used to collect information, including type of study, demographics, number of cases, outcome, challenges, and suggestions to improve outcome. A total of 51 studies from 11 countries met the inclusion criteria. The 16 studies in the first 10 years (1995-2004; group A) were compared with the 35 in the last 10 years (2005-2014; group B). Nigeria (n = 32; 62.7 %), South Africa (n = 7; 13.7 %), Tanzania (n = 2; 3.9 %), and Tunisia (n = 2; 3.9 %) were the predominant sources of the publications, which were retrospective in 38 (74.5 %) studies and prospective in 13 (25.5 %) studies. The mean sample size of the studies was 95.1 (range 5-640). Overall, 4849 neonates were studied, with median age of 6 days (range 1-30 days). Common neonatal conditions reported were intestinal atresia in 28 (54.9 %) studies, abdominal wall defects in 27 (52.9 %), anorectal malformations 25 in (49.0 %), and Hirschsprung's disease, necrotising enterocolitis, and volvulus neonatorum in 23 (45.1 %) each. Mortality was lowest (50 %) in emergency neonatal surgeries involving bowel perforation, bowel resection, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, oesophageal atresia, and ruptured omphalocele or gastroschisis. Overall average mortality rate was higher in group A than group B (36.9 vs 29.1 %; p challenges were delayed presentation and inadequate facilities in 39 (76.5 %) studies, dearth of trained support personnel in 32 (62.7 %), and absence of neonatal intensive care in 29 (56

  12. The Effects of Bariatric Surgery on Cardiac Structure and Function: a Systematic Review of Cardiac Imaging Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Ravi; Harling, Leanne; Efthimiou, Evangelos; Darzi, Ara; Athanasiou, Thanos; Ashrafian, Hutan

    2016-05-01

    Obesity is associated with cardiac dysfunction, atherosclerosis, and increased cardiovascular risk. It can be lead to obesity cardiomyopathy and severe heart failure, which in turn raise morbidity and mortality while carrying a negative impact on quality of life. There is increasing clinical and mechanistic evidence on the metabolic and weight loss effects of bariatric surgery on improving cardiac structure and function in obese patients. The objective of this study was to quantify the effects of bariatric surgery on cardiac structure and function by appraising cardiac imaging changes before and after metabolic operations. This is a comprehensive systematic review of studies reporting pre-operative and post-operative echocardiographic or magnetic resonance cardiac indices in obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery. Studies were quality scored, and data were meta-analyzed using random effects modeling. Bariatric surgery is associated with significant improvements in the weighted incidence of a number of cardiac indices including a decrease in left ventricular mass index (11.2%, 95% confidence intervals (CI) 8.2-14.1%), left ventricular end-diastolic volume (13.28 ml, 95% CI 5.22-21.34 ml), and left atrium diameter (1.967 mm, 95% CI 0.980-2.954). There were beneficial increases in left ventricular ejection fraction (1.198%, 95%CI -0.050-2.347) and E/A ratio (0.189%, 95%CI -0.113-0.265). Bariatric surgery offers beneficial cardiac effects on diastolic function, systolic function, and myocardial structure in obese patients. These may derive from surgical modulation of an enterocardiac axis. Future studies must focus on higher evidence levels to better identify the most successful bariatric approaches in preventing and treating the broad spectrum of obesity-associated heart disease while also enhancing treatment strategies in the management of obesity cardiomyopathy.

  13. Prevalence of adjacent segment disease following cervical spine surgery: A PRISMA-compliant systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lingde; Cao, Junming; Wang, Linfeng; Shen, Yong

    2016-07-01

    Prevalence estimates of adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) following cervical spine surgery varied greatly in current studies. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to summarize the point prevalence of ASD after cervical spine surgery. Comprehensive electronic searches of PubMed, Embase, Web of Knowledge, and Cochrane Library databases were conducted to identify any study published from initial state to January 2016. Those reporting the prevalence of ASD after cervical surgery were included. A random-effects model was used to estimate the prevalence of radiographic ASD, symptomatic ASD, and reoperation ASD. Univariate meta-regression analyses were conducted to explore the potential associations between prevalence and length of follow-up. All analyses were performed using R version 3.2.3 (R Foundation for Statistical Computing). A total of 83 studies were included in the meta-analysis. The prevalence of radiographic ASD, symptomatic ASD, and reoperation ASD after cervical surgery was 28.28% (95% confidence interval [CI], 20.96-36.96), 13.34% (95% CI, 11.06-16.00), and 5.78% (95% CI, 4.99-6.69), respectively, in a general analysis. It was found 2.79%, 1.43%, and 0.24% additions per year of follow-up in the incidence of radiographic ASD, symptomatic ASD, and reoperation ASD, respectively. This meta-analysis provides some details about the prevalence of radiographic ASD, symptomatic ASD, and reoperation ASD after cervical spine surgery. However, the results of this meta-analysis should be interpreted with caution because of the heterogeneity among the studies.

  14. The Effects of Massage Therapy on Pain and Anxiety after Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukimoto, Yukiko; Ooe, Noriko; Ideguchi, Norio

    2017-12-01

    Pain management is critical for patients after surgery, but current pain management methods are not always adequate. Massage therapy may be a therapeutic complementary therapy for pain. Many researchers have investigated the effects of massage therapy on post-operative pain, but there have been no systematic reviews and meta-analysis of its efficacy for post-operative patients. Our objective was to assess the effects of massage therapy on pain management among post-operative patients by conducting a systematic review and meta-analysis. The databases searched included MEDLINE, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library's CENTRAL. To assess the effects of massage therapy on post-operative pain and anxiety, we performed a meta-analysis and calculated standardized mean difference with 95% CIs (Confidential Intervals) as a summary effect. Ten randomized controlled trials were selected (total sample size = 1,157). Meta-analysis was conducted using subgroup analysis. The effect of single dosage massage therapy on post-operative pain showed significant improvement (-0.49; 95% confidence intervals -0.64, -0.34; p massage therapy may alleviate post-operative pain, although there are limits on generalization of these findings due to low methodological quality in the reviewed studies. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Colchicine in prevention of atrial fibrillation following cardiac surgery: Systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Chintan; Sadadia, Mihir

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Inflammation is one of the predictors of atrial fibrillation (AF) following surgical or interventional cardiac procedures. Recent evidence suggests that colchicine may represent a new strategy to prevent AF following cardiac procedures. This study aims to assess the antiinflammatory efficacy of colchicine in prevention of early AF event (EAFE). Materials and Methods: We reviewed all available studies that assessed the effectiveness of colchicine therapy on the occurrence of AF in patients undergoing cardiac procedures. Meta-analysis was performed by random effect inverse variance-weighted method by entering AF events and the total population from each study. Results: After thorough review of the databases, we found three studies comparing colchicine and placebo which had EAFE as the outcome. Of 584 patients, 286 patients were on colchicine and 298 on placebo. All the three studies were randomized. After pooled analysis, colchicine was associated with significant reduction in AF events compared to placebo (odds ratio = 0.44 [0.29, 0.66], P Colchicine may prove beneficial in the prevention of AF following cardiac surgery. Further research is warranted. PMID:25538328

  16. Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Anal Transitional Zone after Ileal Pouch Surgery for Ulcerative Colitis: Systematic Review and Treatment Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Pellino

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Few cases of pouch-related cancers have been reported in ulcerative colitis (UC, and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC is very rare. Method: A systematic review of the literature was performed to identify all unequivocal cases of pouch-related SCC in UC patients. Results: Eight cases of SCC developing after ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA have been observed since 1978. Two arose from the pouch mucosa and 6 from below. The pooled cumulative incidence of SCC is below 0.06% after IPAA. Many patients had neoplasia on the preoperative specimen, but squamous metaplasia of the pouch or anorectal mucosa may have an important role in SCC. These patients are rarely offered chemoradiation therapy and the outcome is poor. Selected patients with SCC located close to the pouch outlet can be treated with chemoradiation prior to consideration of surgery and salvage their pouch. A chemoradiation regimen is suggested to avoid pouch excision in these patients. Conclusions: SCC is rare after pouch surgery but associated with extremely poor survival. Very low SCC can be managed with chemoradiation treatment, preserving the pouch and avoiding surgery, even in older patients. The role of pouch metaplasia, surveillance frequency, and treatment modalities after IPAA need further studying.

  17. Systematic review of near-infrared spectroscopy determined cerebral oxygenation during non-cardiac surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henning B

    2014-01-01

    and number of patients included were recorded. There was included 113 articles and evidence suggests that rScO2 is reduced during thoracic surgery involving single lung ventilation, major abdominal surgery, hip surgery, and laparoscopic surgery with the patient placed in anti-Tredelenburg's position....... Shoulder arthroscopy in the beach chair and carotid endarterectomy with clamped internal carotid artery (ICA) also cause pronounced cerebral desaturation. A >20% reduction in rScO2 coincides with indices of regional and global cerebral ischemia during carotid endarterectomy. Following thoracic surgery...

  18. Safety of Perioperative Glucocorticoids in Elective Noncardiac Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toner, Andrew J; Ganeshanathan, Vyhunthan; Chan, Matthew T; Ho, Kwok M; Corcoran, Tomas B

    2017-02-01

    Glucocorticoids are increasingly used perioperatively, principally to prevent nausea and vomiting. Safety concerns focus on the potential for hyperglycemia and increased infection. The authors hypothesized that glucocorticoids predispose to such adverse outcomes in a dose-dependent fashion after elective noncardiac surgery. The authors conducted a systematic literature search of the major medical databases from their inception to April 2016. Randomized glucocorticoid trials in adults specifically reporting on a safety outcome were included and meta-analyzed with Peto odds ratio method or the quality effects model. Subanalyses were performed according to a dexamethasone dose equivalent of low (less than 8 mg), medium (8 to 16 mg), and high (more than 16 mg). The primary endpoints of any wound infection and peak perioperative glucose concentrations were subject to meta-regression. Fifty-six trials from 18 countries were identified, predominantly assessing dexamethasone. Glucocorticoids did not impact on any wound infection (odds ratio, 0.8; 95% CI, 0.6 to 1.2) but did result in a clinically unimportant increase in peak perioperative glucose concentration (weighted mean difference, 20.0 mg/dl; CI, 11.4 to 28.6; P Glucocorticoids reduced peak postoperative C-reactive protein concentrations (weighted mean difference, -22.1 mg/l; CI, -31.7 to -12.5; P glucocorticoids and subsequent infection, hyperglycemia, or other adverse outcomes. Nevertheless, collated trials lacked sufficient surveillance and power to detect clinically important differences in complications such as wound infection.

  19. Evaluating Simulation in Training for Arthroscopic Knee Surgery: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hetaimish, Bandar; Elbadawi, Hussein; Ayeni, Olufemi R

    2016-06-01

    , systematic review of Level I, II, and IV studies. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. All rights reserved.

  20. Dacron vs. PTFE as bypass materials in peripheral vascular surgery--systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roll, Stephanie; Müller-Nordhorn, Jacqueline; Keil, Thomas; Scholz, Hans; Eidt, Daniela; Greiner, Wolfgang; Willich, Stefan N

    2008-12-19

    In peripheral vascular bypass surgery different synthetic materials are available for bypass grafting. It is unclear which of the two commonly used materials, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) or polyester (Dacron(R)) grafts, is to be preferred. Thus, the aim of this meta-analysis and systematic review was to compare the effectiveness of these two prosthetic bypass materials (Dacron and PTFE). We performed a systematic literature search in MEDLINE, Cochrane-Library - CENTRAL, EMBASE and other databases for relevant publications in English and German published between 1999 and 2008. Only randomized controlled trials were considered for inclusion. We assessed the methodological quality by means of standardized checklists. Primary patency was used as the main endpoint. Random-effect meta-analysis as well as pooling data in life table format was performed to combine study results. Nine randomized controlled trials (RCT) were included. Two trials showed statistically significant differences in primary patency, one favouring Dacron and one favouring PTFE grafts, while 7 trials did not show statistically significant differences between the two materials. Meta-analysis on the comparison of PTFE vs. Dacron grafts yielded no differences with regard to primary patency rates (hazard ratio 1.04 (95% confidence interval [0.85;1.28]), no significant heterogeneity (p = 0.32, I2 = 14%)). Similarly, there were no significant differences with regard to secondary patency rates. Systematic evaluation and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing Dacron and PTFE as bypass materials for peripheral vascular surgery showed no evidence of an advantage of one synthetic material over the other.

  1. Dacron® vs. PTFE as bypass materials in peripheral vascular surgerysystematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eidt Daniela

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In peripheral vascular bypass surgery different synthetic materials are available for bypass grafting. It is unclear which of the two commonly used materials, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or polyester (Dacron® grafts, is to be preferred. Thus, the aim of this meta-analysis and systematic review was to compare the effectiveness of these two prosthetic bypass materials (Dacron® and PTFE. Methods We performed a systematic literature search in MEDLINE, Cochrane-Library – CENTRAL, EMBASE and other databases for relevant publications in English and German published between 1999 and 2008. Only randomized controlled trials were considered for inclusion. We assessed the methodological quality by means of standardized checklists. Primary patency was used as the main endpoint. Random-effect meta-analysis as well as pooling data in life table format was performed to combine study results. Results Nine randomized controlled trials (RCT were included. Two trials showed statistically significant differences in primary patency, one favouring Dacron® and one favouring PTFE grafts, while 7 trials did not show statistically significant differences between the two materials. Meta-analysis on the comparison of PTFE vs. Dacron® grafts yielded no differences with regard to primary patency rates (hazard ratio 1.04 (95% confidence interval [0.85;1.28], no significant heterogeneity (p = 0.32, I2 = 14%. Similarly, there were no significant differences with regard to secondary patency rates. Conclusion Systematic evaluation and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing Dacron® and PTFE as bypass materials for peripheral vascular surgery showed no evidence of an advantage of one synthetic material over the other.

  2. Dacron® vs. PTFE as bypass materials in peripheral vascular surgerysystematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roll, Stephanie; Müller-Nordhorn, Jacqueline; Keil, Thomas; Scholz, Hans; Eidt, Daniela; Greiner, Wolfgang; Willich, Stefan N

    2008-01-01

    Background In peripheral vascular bypass surgery different synthetic materials are available for bypass grafting. It is unclear which of the two commonly used materials, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) or polyester (Dacron®) grafts, is to be preferred. Thus, the aim of this meta-analysis and systematic review was to compare the effectiveness of these two prosthetic bypass materials (Dacron® and PTFE). Methods We performed a systematic literature search in MEDLINE, Cochrane-Library – CENTRAL, EMBASE and other databases for relevant publications in English and German published between 1999 and 2008. Only randomized controlled trials were considered for inclusion. We assessed the methodological quality by means of standardized checklists. Primary patency was used as the main endpoint. Random-effect meta-analysis as well as pooling data in life table format was performed to combine study results. Results Nine randomized controlled trials (RCT) were included. Two trials showed statistically significant differences in primary patency, one favouring Dacron® and one favouring PTFE grafts, while 7 trials did not show statistically significant differences between the two materials. Meta-analysis on the comparison of PTFE vs. Dacron® grafts yielded no differences with regard to primary patency rates (hazard ratio 1.04 (95% confidence interval [0.85;1.28]), no significant heterogeneity (p = 0.32, I2 = 14%)). Similarly, there were no significant differences with regard to secondary patency rates. Conclusion Systematic evaluation and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing Dacron® and PTFE as bypass materials for peripheral vascular surgery showed no evidence of an advantage of one synthetic material over the other. PMID:19099583

  3. Uterine preservation vs hysterectomy in pelvic organ prolapse surgery: a systematic review with meta-analysis and clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meriwether, Kate V; Antosh, Danielle D; Olivera, Cedric K; Kim-Fine, Shunaha; Balk, Ethan M; Murphy, Miles; Grimes, Cara L; Sleemi, Ambereen; Singh, Ruchira; Dieter, Alexis A; Crisp, Catrina C; Rahn, David D

    2018-01-17

    We aimed to systematically review the literature on apical pelvic organ prolapse surgery with uterine preservation compared with prolapse surgeries including hysterectomy and provide evidence-based guidelines. The sources for our data were MEDLINE, Cochrane, and clinicaltrials.gov databases from inception to January 2017. We accepted randomized and nonrandomized studies of uterine-preserving prolapse surgeries compared with those involving hysterectomy. Studies were extracted for participant information, intervention, comparator, efficacy outcomes, and adverse events, and they were individually and collectively assessed for methodological quality. If 3 or more studies compared the same surgeries and reported the same outcome, a meta-analysis was performed. We screened 4467 abstracts and identified 94 eligible studies, 53 comparing uterine preservation to hysterectomy in prolapse surgery. Evidence was of moderate quality overall. Compared with hysterectomy plus mesh sacrocolpopexy, uterine preservation with sacrohysteropexy reduces mesh exposure, operative time, blood loss, and surgical cost without differences in prolapse recurrence. Compared with vaginal hysterectomy with uterosacral suspension, uterine preservation in the form of laparoscopic sacrohysteropexy improves the C point and vaginal length on the pelvic organ prolapse quantification exam, estimated blood loss, postoperative pain and functioning, and hospital stay, but open abdominal sacrohysteropexy worsens bothersome urinary symptoms, operative time, and quality of life. Transvaginal mesh hysteropexy (vs with hysterectomy) decreases mesh exposure, reoperation for mesh exposure, postoperative bleeding, and estimated blood loss and improves posterior pelvic organ prolapse quantification measurement. Transvaginal uterosacral or sacrospinous hysteropexy or the Manchester procedure compared with vaginal hysterectomy with native tissue suspension both showed improved operative time and estimated blood loss

  4. Bariatric surgery versus non-surgical treatment for obesity: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloy, Viktoria L; Briel, Matthias; Bhatt, Deepak L; Kashyap, Sangeeta R; Schauer, Philip R; Mingrone, Geltrude; Bucher, Heiner C; Nordmann, Alain J

    2013-10-22

    To quantify the overall effects of bariatric surgery compared with non-surgical treatment for obesity. Systematic review and meta-analysis based on a random effects model. Searches of Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Library from their inception to December 2012 regardless of language or publication status. Eligible studies were randomised controlled trials with ≥ 6 months of follow-up that included individuals with a body mass index ≥ 30, compared current bariatric surgery techniques with non-surgical treatment, and reported on body weight, cardiovascular risk factors, quality of life, or adverse events. The meta-analysis included 11 studies with 796 individuals (range of mean body mass index at baseline 30-52). Individuals allocated to bariatric surgery lost more body weight (mean difference -26 kg (95% confidence interval -31 to -21)) compared with non-surgical treatment, had a higher remission rate of type 2 diabetes (relative risk 22.1 (3.2 to 154.3) in a complete case analysis; 5.3 (1.8 to 15.8) in a conservative analysis assuming diabetes remission in all non-surgically treated individuals with missing data) and metabolic syndrome (relative risk 2.4 (1.6 to 3.6) in complete case analysis; 1.5 (0.9 to 2.3) in conservative analysis), greater improvements in quality of life and reductions in medicine use (no pooled data). Plasma triglyceride concentrations decreased more (mean difference -0.7 mmol/L (-1.0 to -0.4) and high density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations increased more (mean difference 0.21 mmol/L (0.1 to 0.3)). Changes in blood pressure and total or low density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations were not significantly different. There were no cardiovascular events or deaths reported after bariatric surgery. The most common adverse events after bariatric surgery were iron deficiency anaemia (15% of individuals undergoing malabsorptive bariatric surgery) and reoperations (8%). Compared with non-surgical treatment of obesity, bariatric

  5. Incidence of sternal wound infection after tracheostomy in patients undergoing cardiac surgery: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toeg, Hadi; French, Daniel; Gilbert, Sebastien; Rubens, Fraser

    2017-06-01

    This systematic review and meta-analysis was performed to determine whether timing or type of tracheostomy was associated with superficial or deep sternal wound infections after cardiac surgery. All studies reporting the incidence of sternal wound infection after tracheostomy in patients undergoing cardiac surgery were collected and analyzed. Subgroup analyses determined a priori included timing of tracheostomy and type of procedure (open vs percutaneous). All analyses used the random effects model. A meta-regression analysis was performed on the proportion of sternal wound infection and number of days between tracheostomy and initial cardiac surgery. A total of 13 studies met inclusion criteria. The incidence of sternal wound infection across all studies reported was 7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 4-10). The percutaneous tracheostomy group had a sternal wound infection proportion of 3% (95% CI, 1-8), and the open tracheostomy group had a sternal wound infection proportion of 9% (95% CI, 5-14). The incidence of sternal wound infection with early (<14 days) (7%; 95% CI, 3-11) versus late (≥14 days) (7%; 95% CI, 4-10) tracheostomy was similar. Meta-regression demonstrated no significant relationship between incidence of sternal wound infection and number of days between tracheostomy and initial cardiac surgery (R 2  = 6.13%, P = .72). Reported secondary outcomes included 30-day and 1-year mortality, which were high at 23% (95% CI, 19-28) and 63% (95% CI, 43-80), respectively. The incidence of sternal wound infection after tracheostomy in patients undergoing cardiac surgery remains high at 7% (95% CI, 4-10). Open or percutaneous tracheostomy after cardiac surgery is a feasible option because the incidence of sternal wound infection and short-term mortality are comparable. Moreover, the timing of tracheostomy (early or late) had comparable rates of sternal wound infection and short-term mortality. Copyright © 2016 The American Association for Thoracic

  6. Aspects of Exercise before or after Bariatric Surgery: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sjaak Pouwels

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bariatric surgery has a considerable effect on weight loss. A positive relation of exercise and weight loss has been described before. However, the mode of exercise and its timing pre- or postoperatively or a combination remains unclear. Methods: A multi-database search was conducted. Identified articles were reviewed on description of exercise, timing around a bariatric intervention, and outcome. Methodological quality of the included studies was rated using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database scale. A Cohen's kappa score assessed the level of agreement. Outcome measurements were improvement of anthropometric and physical fitness variables, operation related complications, weight regain, and quality of life. Results: A total of 8 prospective studies were included. Four focused on training before and 4 on training after a bariatric procedure. Details of exercises varied from 45 min treadmill up to full descriptive programs. Supervision was frequently included. Significant improvement was encountered for biometric results physical fitness variables. Conclusion: In the majority of reports on exercising in a (future bariatric population, positive effects on anthropometrics, cardiovascular risk factors and physical fitness were described. However, the results were not unanimous, with a wide range of exercise programs and perioperative timing, therefore hampering adequate practical guidance.

  7. The benefits of Quercitin for dentistry and maxillofacial surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corega, C; Vaida, L; Festila, D G; Rigoni, G; Albanese, M; D'Agostino, A; De Santis, D; Pardo, A; Nocini, P F; Bertossi, D

    2014-01-14

    Quercetin (3,3',4',5,7-pentahydroxyflavone) is the major bioflavonoid in the human diet and belongs to an extensive class of polyphenolic flavonoid compounds almost ubiquitous in plants and plant food sources. The estimated average daily dietary intake of quercetin by an individual in the United States is 25 mg. In recent years, research about quercetin has evolved from animal studies to in vitro and in vivo studies and to human clinical studies and trials in order to establish its real properties and effects. In oral medicine, quercetin has been extensively studied, as a real increase in major diseases like cancers, periodontal disease, oral lesions, tooth decay and infections have been reported worldwide by health providers.It has been thus established that quercetin exhibits beneficial effects on oral health with its broad pharmacological properties, as preventive and therapeutic agent in dental caries with anti-inflammatory effect against oral pathogens, as well as an antioxidant and anti-cancer agent .The aim of the review is to present evidence-based aspect of treatment with quercetin in order to validate its tremendous role in dentistry and maxillofacial surgery.

  8. A systematic review of online resources to support patient decision-making for full-thickness rectal prolapse surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, G E; Baker, D M; Lee, M J; Brown, S R

    2017-11-01

    The internet is becoming an increasingly popular resource to support patient decision-making outside of the clinical encounter. The quality of online health information is variable and largely unregulated. The aim of this study was to assess the quality of online resources to support patient decision-making for full-thickness rectal prolapse surgery. This systematic review was registered on the PROSPERO database (CRD42017058319). Searches were performed on Google and specialist decision aid repositories using a pre-defined search strategy. Sources were analysed according to three measures: (1) their readability using the Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease score, (2) DISCERN score and (3) International Patient Decision Aids Standards (IPDAS) minimum standards criteria score (IPDASi, v4.0). Overall, 95 sources were from Google and the specialist decision aid repositories. There were 53 duplicates removed, and 18 sources did not meet the pre-defined eligibility criteria, leaving 24 sources included in the full-text analysis. The mean Flesch-Kincaid Reading Ease score was higher than recommended for patient education materials (48.8 ± 15.6, range 25.2-85.3). Overall quality of sources supporting patient decision-making for full-thickness rectal prolapse surgery was poor (median DISCERN score 1/5 ± 1.18, range 1-5). No sources met minimum decision-making standards (median IPDASi score 5/12 ± 2.01, range 1-8). Currently, easily accessible online health information to support patient decision-making for rectal surgery is of poor quality, difficult to read and does not support shared decision-making. It is recommended that professional bodies and medical professionals seek to develop decision aids to support decision-making for full-thickness rectal prolapse surgery.

  9. Information requirements of young women with breast cancer treated with mastectomy or breast conserving surgery: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recio-Saucedo, Alejandra; Gerty, Sue; Foster, Claire; Eccles, Diana; Cutress, Ramsey I

    2016-02-01

    Young women with breast cancer have poorer prognosis, greater lifetime risk of local recurrence, contralateral recurrence, and distant disease, regardless of surgery received. Here we systematically review published evidence relating to the information requirements and preferences of young women diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer offered a choice between mastectomy and Breast Conservation Surgery (BCS). Findings will inform the development of a surgical decision aid for young women. Eight databases were searched to identify research examining information requirements of young women facing breast oncological surgery treatment decisions (MESH headings). Twelve studies met the inclusion criteria. Data were extracted and summarised in a narrative synthesis. Findings indicate that young women prefer greater and more detailed information regarding treatment side effects, sexuality, and body image. Younger age of diagnosis leads to an increased risk perception of developing a second breast cancer. Young women's choices are influenced by factors associated with family and career. Information is required in a continuum throughout the treatment experience and not only at diagnosis when treatment decisions are made. Young women show differing levels of participation preferences. Young women find decision-making challenging when the characteristics of diagnosis provide a surgical choice between mastectomy and breast conservation surgery. Efforts should be made to provide information regarding sexuality, body image, reconstruction, fertility and likelihood of familial predisposition. Further research is needed to identify the specific level and information requirements of this young-onset group. The low number of studies indicate a need to design studies targeting specifically this age group of breast cancer patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Intra-operative wound irrigation to reduce surgical site infections after abdominal surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Tara C; Loos, Martin; Haller, Bernhard; Mihaljevic, André L; Nitsche, Ulrich; Wilhelm, Dirk; Friess, Helmut; Kleeff, Jörg; Bader, Franz G

    2015-02-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) remains to be one of the most frequent infectious complications following abdominal surgery. Prophylactic intra-operative wound irrigation (IOWI) before skin closure has been proposed to reduce bacterial wound contamination and the risk of SSI. However, current recommendations on its use are conflicting especially concerning antibiotic and antiseptic solutions because of their potential tissue toxicity and enhancement of bacterial drug resistances. To analyze the existing evidence for the effect of IOWI with topical antibiotics, povidone-iodine (PVP-I) solutions or saline on the incidence of SSI following open abdominal surgery, a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was carried out according to the recommendations of the Cochrane Collaboration. Forty-one RCTs reporting primary data of over 9000 patients were analyzed. Meta-analysis on the effect of IOWI with any solution compared to no irrigation revealed a significant benefit in the reduction of SSI rates (OR = 0.54, 95 % confidence Interval (CI) [0.42; 0.69], p < 0.0001). Subgroup analyses showed that this effect was strongest in colorectal surgery and that IOWI with antibiotic solutions had a stronger effect than irrigation with PVP-I or saline. However, all of the included trials were at considerable risk of bias according to the quality assessment. These results suggest that IOWI before skin closure represents a pragmatic and economical approach to reduce postoperative SSI after abdominal surgery and that antibiotic solutions seem to be more effective than PVP-I solutions or simple saline, and it might be worth to re-evaluate their use for specific indications.

  11. A systematic review of the role of re-laparoscopy in the management of complications following laparoscopic colorectal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, K H; Bourke, M G; Kavanagh, D O; Neary, P C; O'Riordan, J M

    2016-10-01

    The benefits of laparoscopic versus open surgery for patients with both benign and malignant colorectal disease have been well established. Re-laparoscopy in patients who develop complications following laparoscopic colorectal surgery has recently been reported by some groups and the aim of this systematic review was to summarise this literature. A literature search of PubMed, Medline and EMBASE identified a total of 11 studies that reported laparoscopic re-intervention for complications in 187 patients following laparoscopic colorectal surgery. The majority of these patients required re-intervention in the immediate postoperative period (i.e. less than seven days). Anastomotic leakage was the commonest complication requiring re-laparoscopy reported (n = 139). Other complications included postoperative hernia (n = 12), bleeding (n = 9), adhesions (n = 7), small bowel obstruction (n = 4), colonic ischaemia (n = 4), bowel and ureteric injury (n = 3 respectively) and colocutaneous fistula (n = 1). Ninety-seven percent of patients (n = 182) who underwent re-laparoscopy had their complications successfully managed by re-laparoscopy, maintaining the benefits of the laparoscopic approach and avoiding a laparotomy. We conclude that re-laparoscopy for managing complications following laparoscopic colorectal surgery appears to be safe and effective in highly selected patients. Copyright © 2015 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Risk prediction models for delirium in the intensive care unit after cardiac surgery: a systematic review and independent external validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, A; Mu, J L; Joynt, G M; Chiu, C H; Lai, V K W; Gin, T; Underwood, M J

    2017-03-01

    Numerous risk prediction models are available for predicting delirium after cardiac surgery, but few have been directly compared with one another or been validated in an independent data set. We conducted a systematic review to identify validated risk prediction models of delirium (using the Confusion Assessment Method-Intensive Care Unit tool) after cardiac surgery and assessed the transportability of the risk prediction models on a prospective cohort of 600 consecutive patients undergoing cardiac surgery at a university hospital in Hong Kong from July 2013 to July 2015. The discrimination (c-statistic), calibration (GiViTI calibration belt), and clinical usefulness (decision curve analysis) of the risk prediction models were examined in a stepwise manner. Three published high-quality intensive care unit delirium risk prediction models (n=5939) were identified: Katznelson, the original PRE-DELIRIC, and the international recalibrated PRE-DELIRIC model. Delirium occurred in 83 patients (13.8%, 95% CI: 11.2-16.9%). After updating the intercept and regression coefficients in the Katznelson model, there was fair discrimination (0.62, 95% CI: 0.58-0.66) and good calibration. As the original PRE-DELIRIC model was already validated externally and recalibrated in six countries, we performed a logistic calibration on the recalibrated model and found acceptable discrimination (0.75, 95% CI: 0.72-0.79) and good calibration. Decision curve analysis demonstrated that the recalibrated PRE-DELIRIC risk model was marginally more clinically useful than the Katznelson model. Current models predict delirium risk in the intensive care unit after cardiac surgery with only fair to moderate accuracy and are insufficient for routine clinical use. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Which antibiotic regimen prevents implant failure or infection after dental implant surgery? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Sánchez, Fabio; Rodríguez Andrés, Carlos; Arteagoitia, Iciar

    2018-04-01

    To assess which antibiotic regimen prevents dental implant failures or postoperative infections following dental implant placement. Systematic review and meta-analysis. Pubmed, Cochrane, Science Direct, and EMBASE via OVID were searched up to August 2017. Only randomized controlled clinical trials (RCT) using antibiotics were included. Outcome measures were set on dental implant failures or postoperative infection incidence after dental implant surgery. Three reviewers independently undertook risk of bias assessment and data extraction. Stratified meta-analyses of binary data using fixed-effects models were performed using Stata 14.0. The risk ratio (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were estimated. Nine articles were included corresponding to 15 RCTs. All RCTs tested only oral amoxicillin. Implant-failure analysis: overall RR = 0.53 (P = .005, 95% CI: 0.34-0.82) and overall NNT = 55 (95% CI, 33-167). Single-dose oral amoxicillin preoperatively (SDOAP) is beneficial (RR = 0.50, CI: 0.29-0.86. P = .012), when compared to postoperative oral amoxicillin (POA): RR = 0.60, CI: 0.28-1.30. P = .197. Postoperative-infection analysis: overall RR = 0.76 (P = 0.250, 95% CI: 0.47-1.22). Neither SDOAP (RR = 0.82, CI = 0.46-1.45, P = .488) nor POA (RR = 0.64, CI = 0.27-1.51, P = .309) are beneficial. I 2  = 0.0%, chi-squared tests P ≈ 1. Only SDOAP is effective and efficacious at preventing implant failures, but it was not significant for postoperative infections following dental implant surgeries. Copyright © 2018 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Intramuscular Local Anesthetic Infiltration at Closure for Postoperative Analgesia in Lumbar Spine Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Andrea P; Chari, Aswin; Kostusiak, Milosz; Khan, Akbar Ali; Luoma, Astri Mv; Casey, Adrian T H

    2017-07-15

    Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis OBJECTIVE.: To identify whether intramuscular local anesthetic infiltration prior to wound closure was effective in reducing postoperative pain and facilitating early discharge following lumbar spine surgery. Local anesthetic infiltration prior to wound closure may form part of the multimodal strategy for postoperative analgesia, facilitating early mobilization and discharge. Although there are a number of small studies investigating its utility, a quantitative meta-analysis of the data has never been performed. This review was conducted according the PRISMA statement and was registered with the PROSPERO database. Only randomized controlled trials were eligible for inclusion. Key outcomes of interest included time to first analgesic demand, total postoperative opiate usage in the first 24 hours, visual analogue score (VAS) at 1, 12 and 24 hours and postoperative length of stay. Eleven publications fulfilled the inclusion criteria. A total of 438 patients were include; 212 in the control group and 226 in the intervention group. Local anesthetic infiltration resulted in a prolonged time to first analgesic demand (mean difference (MD) 65.88 minutes, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 23.70 to 108.06, P.0.002) as well as a significantly reduced postoperative opiate demand (M.D. -9.71 mg, 95% CI -15.07, -4.34, p = 0.0004). There was a small but statistically significant reduction in postoperative visual analogue score (VAS) at 1 hour (M.D. -0.87 95%CI -1.55, -0.20, p = 0.01), but no significant reduction at 12 or 24 hours (p = 0.93 and 0.85 respectively). This systematic review and meta-analysis provides evidence that postoperative intramuscular local anaesthetic infiltration reduces postoperative analgesic requirements and the time to first analgesic demands for patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery. Key research priorities include optimization of the choice and strength of local anaesthetic agent and health

  15. Maternal and neonatal outcomes in women undergoing bariatric surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galazis, Nicolas; Docheva, Nikolina; Simillis, Constantinos; Nicolaides, Kypros H

    2014-10-01

    Obese women are at increased risk for many pregnancy complications, and bariatric surgery (BS) before pregnancy has shown to improve some of these. To review the current literature and quantitatively assess the obstetric and neonatal outcomes in pregnant women who have undergone BS. MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane databases were searched using relevant keywords to identify studies that reported on pregnancy outcomes after BS. Pregnancy outcome in firstly, women after BS compared to obese or BMI-matched women with no BS and secondly, women after BS compared to the same or different women before BS. Only observational studies were included. Two investigators independently collected data on study characteristics and outcome measures of interest. These were analysed using the random effects model. Heterogeneity was assessed and sensitivity analysis was performed to account for publication bias. The entry criteria were fulfilled by 17 non-randomised cohort or case-control studies, including seven with high methodological quality scores. In the BS group, compared to controls, there was a lower incidence of preeclampsia (OR 0.45, 95% CI 0.25-0.80; P=0.007), GDM (OR 0.47, 95% CI 0.40-0.56; Pneonates (OR 0.46, 95% CI 0.34-0.62; Pneonates (OR 1.93, 95% CI 1.52-2.44; Pneonatal intensive care (OR 1.33, 95% CI 1.02-1.72; P=0.03) and maternal anaemia (OR 3.41, 95% CI 1.56-7.44, P=0.002). BS as a whole improves some pregnancy outcomes. Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding does not appear to increase the rate of small neonates that was seen with other BS procedures. Obese women of childbearing age undergoing BS need to be aware of these outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of Bariatric Surgery on Renal Function in Obese Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun; Zou, Jianan; Ye, Zhibin; Di, Jianzhong; Han, Xiaodong; Zhang, Hongwei; Liu, Weijie; Ren, Qinggui; Zhang, Pin

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is an independent risk factor of development and progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Data on the benefits of bariatric surgery in obese patients with impaired kidney function have been conflicting. To explore whether there is improvement in glomerular filtration rate (GFR), proteinuria or albuminuria after bariatric surgery. We comprehensively searched the databases of MEDLINE, Embase, web of science and Cochrane for randomized, controlled trials and observational studies that examined bariatric surgery in obese subjects with impaired kidney function. Outcomes included the pre- and post-bariatric surgery GFR, proteinuria and albuminuria. In obese patients with hyperfiltration, we draw conclusions from studies using measured GFR (inulin or iothalamate clearance) unadjusted for BSA only. Study quality was evaluated using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. 32 observational studies met our inclusion criteria, and 30 studies were included in the meta-analysis. No matter in dichotomous data or in dichotomous data, there were statistically significant reduction in hyperfiltration, albuminuria and proteinuria after bariatric surgery. The main limitation of this meta-analysis is the lack of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Another limitation is the lack of long-term follow-up. Bariatric surgery could prevent further decline in renal function by reducing proteinuria, albuminuria and improving glomerular hyperfiltration in obese patients with impaired renal function. However, whether bariatric surgery reverses CKD or delays ESRD progression is still in question, large, randomized prospective studies with a longer follow-up are needed.

  17. The Impact of Bariatric Surgery on Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skubleny, Daniel; Switzer, Noah J; Gill, Richdeep S; Dykstra, Mark; Shi, Xinzhe; Sagle, Margaret A; de Gara, Christopher; Birch, Daniel W; Karmali, Shahzeer

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric surgery has been proven to be a successful management strategy for morbid obesity, but limited studies exist on its effect on polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). A comprehensive search of electronic databases was completed. Meta-analysis was performed on PCOS, hirsutism, and menstrual irregularity outcomes following bariatric surgery. Thirteen primary studies involving a total of 2130 female patients were identified. The incidence of PCOS preoperatively was 45.6 %, which significantly decreased to 6.8 % (P Bariatric surgery effectively attenuates PCOS and its clinical symptomatology including hirsutism and menstrual irregularity in severely obese women.

  18. n-3 PUFAs in cancer, surgery, and critical care: a systematic review on clinical effects, incorporation, and washout of oral or enteral compared with parenteral supplementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meij, B.; van Bokhorst-de van der Schueren, M.A.E.; Langius, J.A.E.; Brouwer, I.A.; van Leeuwen, P.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: n-3 (omega-3) Fatty acids (FAs) may have beneficial effects in patients with cancer or in patients who undergo surgery or critical care. Objective: Our aim was to systematically review the effects of oral or enteral and parenteral n-3 FA supplementation on clinical outcomes and to

  19. Is There an Increased Risk of Post-Operative Surgical Site Infection after Orthopaedic Surgery in HIV Patients? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kigera, James W. M.; Straetemans, Masja; Vuhaka, Simplice K.; Nagel, Ingeborg M.; Naddumba, Edward K.; Boer, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    Background: There is dilemma as to whether patients infected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) requiring implant orthopaedic surgery are at an increased risk for post-operative surgical site infection (SSI). We conducted a systematic review to determine the effect of HIV on the risk of

  20. What Evidence Underlies Clinical Practice in Paediatric Surgery? A Systematic Review Assessing Choice of Study Design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Allin

    Full Text Available Identify every paediatric surgical article published in 1998 and every paediatric surgical article published in 2013, and determine which study designs were used and whether they were appropriate for robustly assessing interventions in surgical conditions.A systematic review was conducted according to a pre-specified protocol (CRD42014007629, using EMBASE and Medline. Non-English language studies were excluded. Studies were included if meeting population criteria and either condition or intervention criteria.Children under the age of 18, or adults who underwent intervention for a condition managed by paediatric surgeons when they were under 18 years of age.One managed by general paediatric surgeons.Used for treatment of a condition managed by general paediatric surgeons.Studies were classified according to whether the IDEAL collaboration recommended their design for assessing surgical interventions or not. Change in proportions between 1998 and 2013 was calculated.1581 paediatric surgical articles were published in 1998, and 3453 in 2013. The most commonly used design, accounting for 45% of studies in 1998 and 46.8% in 2013, was the retrospective case series. Only 1.8% of studies were RCTs in 1998, and 1.9% in 2013. Overall, in 1998, 9.8% of studies used a recommended design. In 2013, 11.9% used a recommended design (proportion increase 2.3%, 95% confidence interval 0.5% increase to 4% increase, p = 0.017.A low proportion of published paediatric surgical manuscripts utilise a design that is recommended for assessing surgical interventions. RCTs represent fewer than 1 in 50 studies. In 2013, 88.1% of studies used a less robust design, suggesting the need for a new way of approaching paediatric surgical research.

  1. Early post-operative psychosocial and weight predictors of later outcome in bariatric surgery: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindle, A; de la Piedad Garcia, X; Brennan, L

    2017-03-01

    This is the first systematic review to synthesize the evidence concerning early post-operative variables predictive of later weight and psychosocial outcomes in bariatric surgery. Eight electronic databases for empirical studies were searched (1954 to 2016). Most of the 39 included studies reported solely on weight outcomes; eating and psychosocial outcomes were less common. A better early weight loss trajectory was the most consistent predictor of more successful medium-term weight outcome (≤24 months); however, its relationship to longer term weight loss maintenance is less certain. Early eating adaptation may be associated with later weight loss, but further research is needed. Evidence is lacking for associations between early adherence or early psychosocial variables and later outcome. In particular, the relationship between early post-operative depression and later weight remains unclear. Little research has considered early prediction of later eating or psychosocial outcomes. Consideration of mediating or moderating relationships is lacking. The body of evidence is limited, and synthesis is hampered by heterogeneity in the type and time at which predictors and outcomes are measured and quality of statistical reporting. Further research on prospective prediction of bariatric surgery outcome is needed to guide early post-operative intervention for those at greatest risk of poor outcomes. © 2017 World Obesity Federation.

  2. Wound infiltration with local anesthetics for post-operative pain relief in lumbar spine surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjærgaard, M; Møiniche, S; Olsen, K S

    2012-03-01

    In this systematic review, we evaluated double-blind, randomized and controlled trials on the effect of wound infiltration with local anesthetics compared with the effect of placebo on post-operative pain after lumbar spine surgery. Medline, the Cochrane Library and Google Scholar were searched for appropriate trials. Qualitative analysis of post-operative effectiveness was evaluated by assessment of significant difference (P local anesthetic infiltration was observed averaging between 8 and 40 mm on a 100 mm visual analog scale. In six out of 12 comparisons, the local anesthetic infiltration significantly reduced the supplemental opioid consumption after surgery. Observed reductions in analgesic consumption over the first 24 h averaged between 2.5 mg and approximately 15 mg of morphine. Data on opioid-related adverse effects were incomplete and difficult to interpret. Interpretation of the results was difficult because of diversity of the studies. However, clinical significance was in general questionable, with only a few trials showing a small or a modest reduction in pain intensity, which was observed mainly immediately after the operation. Similarly, although more frequently observed, only a minor and probably not clinically relevant reduction in opioid consumption was shown. © 2012 The Authors. Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica © 2012 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  3. Prevalence of Body Dysmorphic Disorder in Plastic Surgery and Dermatology Patients: A Systematic Review with Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Rafael Vilela Eiras

    2017-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence of body dysmorphic disorder in plastic surgery and dermatology patients, by performing a systematic review of the literature and meta-analysis. The most relevant studies published originally in any language were analyzed. The literature search was performed using the PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), and Scielo databases. The final sample comprised 33 publications that were submitted to meta-analysis. The study verified that 15.04% of plastic surgery patients had body dysmorphic disorder (range 2.21-56.67%); patient mean age was 34.54 ± 12.41 years, and most were women (74.38%). Among dermatology patients, 12.65% (range 4.52-35.16%) had body dysmorphic disorder; patient mean age was 27.79 ± 9.03 years, and most were women (76.09%). Both plastic surgeons and dermatologists must adequately assess their patients to identify those with a higher likelihood of body dysmorphic disorder and should arrange multidisciplinary care for such individuals. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  4. The Role of Hemosiderin Excision in Seizure Outcome in Cerebral Cavernous Malformation Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Di; Yu, Xiao-Bo; Shrestha, Sudeep; Wang, Lin; Chen, Gao

    2015-01-01

    Whether the excision of hemosiderin surrounding cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) is necessary to achieve a seizure-free result has been the subject of debate. Here, we report a systematic review of related literature up to Jan 1, 2015 including 594 patients to assess the effect of hemosiderin excision on seizure outcome in patients with CCMs by meta-analysis. Ten studies comparing extended hemosiderin excision with only lesion resection were identified by searching the English-language literature. Meta-analyses, subgroup analyses and sensitivity analysis were conducted to determine the association between hemosiderin excision and seizure outcome after surgery. Seizure outcome was significantly improved in the patients who underwent an extended excision of the surrounding hemosiderin (OR, 0.62; 95% CI: 0.42-0.91; P = 0.01). In subgroup analysis, studies from Asia (OR, 0.42; 95% CI: 0.25-0.71; P = 0.001), male-majority (female ratio 1 year) before surgery (OR, 0.43; 95% CI: 0.22-0.84; P = 0.01), lesion diameter > 2 cm (OR, 0.41; 95% CI: 0.19-0.87; P = 0.02) and short-term (hemosiderin excision could exhibit significantly improved seizure outcomes compared to patients without hemosiderin excision. However, further well-designed prospective multiple-center RCT studies are still needed.

  5. Preadmission interventions to prevent postoperative complications in older cardiac surgery patients : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ettema, Roelof G A; Van Koeven, Heleen; Peelen, Linda M.; Kalkman, Cor J.; Schuurmans, Marieke J.

    Objective(s): The literature on postoperative complications in cardiac surgery patients shows high incidences of postoperative complications such as delirium, depression, pressure ulcer, infection, pulmonary complications and atrial fibrillation. These complications are associated with functional

  6. Systematic review and meta-analysis of wound drains after thyroid surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Woods, R S R

    2014-04-01

    Drainage after routine thyroid and parathyroid surgery remains controversial. However, there is increasing evidence from a number of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) suggesting no benefit from the use of drains.

  7. Negative predictors for satisfaction in patients seeking facial cosmetic surgery: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herruer, J.M.; Prins, J.B.; Heerbeek, N. van; Verhage-Damen, G.W.; Ingels, K.J.A.O.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Facial cosmetic surgery is becoming more popular. Patients generally indicate they are satisfied with the results. Certain patient characteristics, however, have been described as negative predictors for satisfaction. Psychopathology such as body dysmorphic disorder and personality

  8. The use of robotics in plastic and reconstructive surgery: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Nehme

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions: Robot-assisted plastic and reconstructive surgery provides clinical outcomes comparable to conventional techniques. Advantages include reported improved cosmesis, functional outcomes and greater surgeon comfort. Disadvantages included longer operating and set-up times, a learning curve, breaking of microneedles, high monetary costs and authors consistently recommended improved end-effectors. All authors were optimistic about the use of robotics in plastic and reconstructive surgery.

  9. Toolbox of assessment tools of technical skills in otolaryngology-head and neck surgery: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labbé, Mathilde; Young, Meredith; Nguyen, Lily H P

    2017-10-08

    To support the development of programs of assessment of technical skills in the operating room (OR), we systematically reviewed the literature to identify assessment tools specific to otolaryngology-head and neck surgery (OTL-HNS) core procedures and summarized their characteristics. We systematically searched Embase, MEDLINE, PubMed, and Cochrane to identify and report on assessment tools that can be used to assess residents' technical surgical skills in the operating room for OTL-HNS core procedures. Of the 736 unique titles retrieved, 16 articles met inclusion criteria, covering 11 different procedures (in otology, rhinology, laryngology, head and neck, and general otolaryngology). The tools were composed of a task-specific checklist and/or global rating scale and were developed in the OR, on human cadavers, or in a simulation setting. Our study reports on published tools for assessing technical skills for OTL-HNS residents during core procedures conducted in the OR. These assessment tools could facilitate the provision of timely feedback to trainees including specific goals for improvement. However, the paucity of publications suggests little agreement on how to best perform work-based direct-observation assessment for core surgical procedures in OTL-HNS. The sparsity of tools specific to OTL-HNS may become a barrier to a fluid transition to competency-based medical education. Laryngoscope, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  10. Re: Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy Versus Retrograde Intrarenal Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De S

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Debate still goes on about minimally invasive treatment of urolithiasis. Meta-analysis is very important in decision-making; the level of evidence 1a represents evidence obtained from meta-analysis of randomized trials. This meta-analysis represented by De et al. reviewed the results of ten studies comparing minimicro percutaneous nephrolithotomy (mmPNL with retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS. A subgroup analysis was performed comparing standard PCNL and minimally invasive percutaneous procedures (MIPPs including mini-PCNL and micro-PCNL with RIRS, separately. Half of the studies were from Turkey. All stone burdens in these studies were lower than 2 cm except in two studies. Similarly, single stone was treated in all except for two studies. There were major differences between studies in terms of surgical techniques, follow-up procedure and imaging and definition of stone free or, in other words, clinically insignificant residual fragment. Operation time was same for RIRS and sPNL which might be because of the smaller size of stones for PNL, a debatable point. In patients with single stone about 2 cm, not surprisingly, sPNL was the leading one in stone free rates. There was a statistical confusion for other methods. According to original paper, RIRS was second one but if searched again; we can see the ‘corrigendum’ which reflected that stone free rate of mmPNL was higher than RIRS due to the correction of statistical mistake. In a special comparison between mmPNL and RIRS; RIRS had lower morbidity with lower stone free rates. Thus, as a conclusion, if the question is stone free rate, sPNL should be chosen but RIRS had the lowest morbidity with very close stone free rates to mmPNL. Although this type of studies are very important; this study did not meet expectations in decision making. It should be better to follow the European Association of Urology guidelines recommendations with evaluating whole criteria, such as comorbidities of the

  11. Reducing Surgical Site Infections in Abdominal Surgery: Are Ring Retractors Effective? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Khalid; Bashar, Khalid; Connelly, Tara T M; Fahey, Tom; Walsh, Stewart R

    2016-04-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is one of the main causes of morbidity and death after surgical intervention. The use of physical barriers, including gloves, drapes, and gowns to reduce SSI after abdominal surgery is long-standing practice. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to determine the efficacy of ring incision retractors in reducing the risk of SSI in abdominal surgery. PubMed, CINAHL, the Cochrane randomized controlled trials (RCTs) Central Register, and the ISRCTN registry were searched for RCTs in which ring retractors were utilized to reduce SSI in abdominal surgery. The PRISMA guidelines and RevMan 5.3 were used for study selection and analysis. Additional subgroup analyses were performed, including trials using incision class (clean, clean-contaminated contaminated, and dirty) and trials that used the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's SSI definition in their protocol. A total of 19 RCTs inclusive of 4,229 patients were included. The utility of ring retractors in reducing SSI was suggested by an overall risk ratio of 0.62 (95% confidence interval 0.48-0.81). However, study heterogeneity caused by differences in effect size between individual RCTs, the non-standardized utilization of concomitant measures to reduce SSI, and an overall lack of high-quality trials was found. A reduction in SSI incidence with the use of ring retractors is suggested by the findings. However, this result must be treated with caution because in addition to some old trials poor quality and the large number of factors affecting SSI, there were substantial differences between trials in effect sizes in statistical heterogeneity. Further RCTs are needed to confirm this provisional finding.

  12. Tongue surgeries for pediatric obstructive sleep apnea: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, Macario; Noller, Michael W; Zaghi, Soroush; Reckley, Lauren K; Fernandez-Salvador, Camilo; Ho, Erika; Dunn, Brandyn; Chan, Dylan

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the international literature for studies reporting outcomes for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in children undergoing isolated tongue surgeries. Two authors searched from inception through November 14, 2016 in four databases including PubMed/MEDLINE. 351 studies were screened. Eleven studies (116 children) met criteria. Most children were syndromic and had craniofacial disorders, co-morbidities, or other serious medical issues. Surgeries included base-of-tongue (BOT) reduction (n = 114), tongue suspension (n = 1), and hypoglossal nerve stimulation (n = 1). The pre- and post-BOT reduction surgeries decreased apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) from a mean (M) and standard deviation (SD) of 16.9 ± 12.2/h to 8.7 ± 10.6/h (48.5% reduction) in 114 patients. Random effects modeling (109 patients) demonstrated a standardized mean difference for AHI of -0.78 (large magnitude of effect) [95% CI -1.06, -0.51], p value tongue-base suspension are limited to case reports. Most children undergoing tongue surgeries in the literature were syndromic and had craniofacial disorders, co-morbidities, or other serious medical issues. Children with a body mass index <25 kg/m 2 and non-syndromic children have had the most improvement in AHI. The specific type of surgery must be tailored to the patient. Patients with co-morbidities should undergo treatment in centers that are equipped to provide appropriate perioperative care.

  13. Gastric Band Removal in Revisional Bariatric Surgery, One-Step Versus Two-Step: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Jerry T; Switzer, Noah J; Wu, Jeremy; Gill, Richdeep S; Shi, Xinzhe; Thereaux, Jérémie; Birch, Daniel W; de Gara, Christopher; Karmali, Shahzeer

    2016-04-01

    We aimed to systematically review the literature comparing the safety of one-step versus two-step revisional bariatric surgery from laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) or sleeve gastrectomy (SG). There is debate on the safety of removing the gastric band and performing revisional surgery immediately or in a delayed, two-step fashion due to potential higher complications in one-step revisions. A systematic and comprehensive search of the literature was conducted. Included studies directly compared one-step and two-step revisional surgery. Eleven studies were included with 1370 patients. Meta-analysis found comparable rates of complications, morbidity, and mortality between one-step and two-step revisions for both RYGB and SG groups. This suggests that immediate or delayed revisional bariatric surgeries are both safe options for LAGB revisions.

  14. Effect of preoperative education of patients before hip or knee replacement surgery: A systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aydin, Dogu; Klit, Jakob; Husted, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Background Total hip (THA) and knee arthroplasty (TKA) are standard procedures for treatment of end stage osteoarthritis, and much is done to optimize results. It is usually hypothesized that education of patients before surgery reduces anxiety, secures more realistic patient expectations...... and enhances postoperative outcomes. Objectives To determine whether results reported in the literature proves an effect of preoperative education on postoperative outcomes in replacement surgery patients regarding anxiety, pain, length of hospital stay, patient satisfaction, postoperative complications...... visual) given by health professionals to patients were included. Results Seven studies involving 677 participants met the inclusion criteria. Two studies involved patients undergoing THA replacement, while five studies involved patients undergoing both THA and TKA replacement surgery. Mean number...

  15. Surgery or Peroral Esophageal Myotomy for Achalasia: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marano, Luigi; Pallabazzer, Giovanni; Solito, Biagio; Santi, Stefano; Pigazzi, Alessio; De Luca, Raffaele; Biondo, Francesco Giuseppe; Spaziani, Alessandro; Longaroni, Maurizio; Di Martino, Natale; Boccardi, Virginia; Patriti, Alberto

    2016-03-01

    To date very few studies with small sample size have compared peroral esophageal myotomy (POEM) with the current surgical standard of care, laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM), in terms of efficacy and safety, and no recommendations have been proposed.To investigate the efficacy and safety of POEM compared with LHM, for the treatment of achalasia.The databases of Pubmed, Medline, Cochrane, and Ovid were systematically searched between January 1, 2005 and January 31, 2015, with the medical subject headings (MeSH) and keywords "achalasia," "POEM," "per oral endoscopic myotomy," and "peroral endoscopic myotomy," "laparoscopic Heller myotomy" (LHM), "Heller myotomy."All types of study designs including adult patients with diagnosis of achalasia were selected. Studies that did not report the comparison between endoscopic and surgical treatment, experimental studies in animal models, single case reports, technical reports, reviews, abstracts, and editorials were excluded.The total number of included patients was 486 (196 in POEM group and 290 in LHM group).There were no differences between POEM and LHM in reduction in Eckardt score (MD = -0.659, 95% CI: -1.70 to 0.38, P = 0.217), operative time (MD = -0.354, 95% CI: -1.12 to 0.41, P = 0.36), postoperative pain scores (MD = -1.86, 95% CI: -5.17 to 1.44, P = 0.268), analgesic requirements (MD = -0.74, 95% CI: -2.65 to 1.16, P = 0.445), and complications (OR = 1.11, 95% CI: 0.5-2.44, P = 0.796). Length of hospital stay was significantly lower for POEM (MD = -0.629, 95% CI: -1.256 to -0.002, P = 0.049). There was a trend toward significant reduction in symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux rate in favors of LHM compared to POEM group (OR = 1.81, 95% CI: 1.11-2.95, P = 0.017).All included studied were not randomized. Furthermore all selected studies did not report the results of follow-up longer than 1 year and most of them included patients who were both treatment naive and

  16. Effect of preoperative education of patients before hip or knee replacement surgery: A systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aydin, Dogu; Klit, Jakob; Husted, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Background Total hip (THA) and knee arthroplasty (TKA) are standard procedures for treatment of end stage osteoarthritis, and much is done to optimize results. It is usually hypothesized that education of patients before surgery reduces anxiety, secures more realistic patient expectations...... and enhances postoperative outcomes. Objectives To determine whether results reported in the literature proves an effect of preoperative education on postoperative outcomes in replacement surgery patients regarding anxiety, pain, length of hospital stay, patient satisfaction, postoperative complications...... of participants was 180 (range 35 to 320) and mean age ranged from 58-71 years....

  17. The underreporting of cost perspective in cost-analysis research: A systematic review of the plastic surgery literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Madeleine M; Chen, Lilian; Papageorge, Marianna; Driscoll, Daniel; Graham, Roger; Chatterjee, Abhishek

    2018-03-01

    Cost-analysis research can influence healthcare policies and practices. There is inherent bias depending on the chosen cost perspective (hospital, third-party payer, societal), and conclusions can change based on the perspective used. These perspectives may or may not be well declared or justified when performing cost-analysis research. The goal of this study was to perform a literature review of cost-analysis research in the Plastic Surgery literature to determine the prevalence of studies declaring and justifying their perspective, and to inform the reader on why such declarations are important in understanding potential bias. A systematic review was completed to retrieve cost-utility and cost-effectiveness research within the scope of Plastic Surgery. The search was limited to English-language studies in North America and Europe published between 2006 and 2016. Articles were selected using predefined data fields and specific inclusion criteria. A total of 2304 abstracts were identified, of which 47 met inclusion criteria. Seventy-two percent of studies (n = 34) declared a cost perspective. Of the studies that identified a cost perspective, 32% incorrectly identified the cost perspective. Only 49% of all studies (n = 23) both accurately declared and justified their chosen perspective. Only half of studies correctly declare their cost perspective and justify why the perspective was chosen. Not doing so potentially hides bias from the reader. Future efforts when performing cost-analysis studies should require a clear declaration and justification of the cost perspective taken. A table of our recommendations for reporting cost perspective is provided. Copyright © 2017 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. A systematic review of laparoscopic port site hernias in gastrointestinal surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Owens, M

    2011-08-01

    Port site hernia is an important yet under-recognised complication of laparoscopic surgery, which carries a high risk of strangulation due to the small size of the defect involved. The purpose of this study was to examine the incidence, classification, and pathogenesis of this complication, and to evaluate strategies to prevent and treat it.

  19. Systematic review of the use of bone cement in ossicular chain reconstruction and revision stapes surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegner, Inge; van den Berg, Jelle W G; Smit, Adriana L; Grolman, Wilko

    OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: To evaluate the effectiveness of bone cement on mean postoperative air-bone gap (ABG) and the proportion of ABG closure to within 20 dB in patients undergoing ossicular chain reconstruction or revision stapes surgery. DATA SOURCES: PubMed, Embase, and Central. METHODS: A

  20. Prediction Models for Prolonged Intensive Care Unit Stay after Cardiac Surgery: Systematic Review and Validation Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linda Peelen; Karel Moons; Cor Kalkman; Prof. Dr. Marieke J. Schuurmans; Roelof G.A. Ettema; Arno Nierich

    2010-01-01

    Several models have been developed to predict prolonged stay in the intensive care unit (ICU) after cardiac surgery. However, no extensive quantitative validation of these models has yet been conducted. This study sought to identify and validate existing prediction models for prolonged ICU length of

  1. Suprascapular and Interscalene Nerve Block for Shoulder Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Nasir; Goldar, Ghazaleh; Ragina, Neli; Banfield, Laura; Laffey, John G; Abdallah, Faraj W

    2017-12-01

    Interscalene block provides optimal shoulder surgery analgesia, but concerns over its associated risks have prompted the search for alternatives. Suprascapular block was recently proposed as an interscalene block alternative, but evidence of its comparative analgesic effect is conflicting. This meta-analysis compares the analgesic effect and safety of suprascapular block versus interscalene block for shoulder surgery. Databases were searched for randomized trials comparing interscalene block with suprascapular block for shoulder surgery. Postoperative 24-h cumulative oral morphine consumption and the difference in the area under curve for pooled rest pain scores were designated as primary outcomes. Analgesic and safety outcomes, particularly block-related and respiratory complications, were evaluated as secondary outcomes. Results were pooled using random-effects modeling. Data from 16 studies (1,152 patients) were analyzed. Interscalene block and suprascapular block were not different in 24-h morphine consumption. The difference in area under the curve of pain scores for the 24-h interval favored interscalene block by 1.1 cm/h, but this difference was not clinically important. Compared with suprascapular block, interscalene block reduced postoperative pain but not opioid consumption during recovery room stay by a weighted mean difference (95% CI) of 1.5 cm (0.6 to 2.5 cm; P shoulder surgery.

  2. Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis on Incidence of Altered Sensation of Mandibular Implant Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Shu; Wu, Shih-Yun; Huang, Hsin-Yi; Lai, Yu-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Altered sensation (including paresthesia, dysesthesia and hypoesthesia) after mandibular implant surgery may indicate transient or permanent injury of the inferior alveolar nerve and the mental branch, and considerably lower patients’ satisfaction about the therapy. Previous studies have shown a great degree of variability on the incidence of altered sensation. We here reported the incidence of altered sensation after mandibular implant surgery based on a meta-analysis of 26 articles published between 1990.1.1 and 2016.1.1. Study quality and risk of bias was assessed and the studies with a lower score were excluded in the meta-analysis. Data synthesis was performed using the logistic-normal random-effect model. The meta-analyses revealed that the short-term (10 days after implant placement) and long-term (1 year after implant placement) incidence was 13% (95% CI, 6%-25%) and 3% (95% CI, 1%-7%), respectively. (2) For the patients who initially reported altered sensation, 80% (95% CI, 52%-94%) of them would return to normal sensation within 6 months after surgery, and 91% (95% CI, 78%-96%) of them would return to normal sensation one year after surgery. We concluded that dentist-patient communication about the risk of altered sensation is critical to treatment planning, since the short-term incidence of altered sensation is substantial (13%). When a patient reports altered sensation, regular assessment for 6 months would help tracing the changes of symptoms. In terms of long-term follow-up (1 year after surgery), the incidence is much lower (3%) and most patients (91%) would return to normal sensation. PMID:27100832

  3. Hyperbaric Versus Isobaric Bupivacaine for Spinal Anesthesia: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis for Adult Patients Undergoing Noncesarean Delivery Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppal, Vishal; Retter, Susanne; Shanthanna, Harsha; Prabhakar, Christopher; McKeen, Dolores M

    2017-11-01

    It is widely believed that the choice between isobaric bupivacaine and hyperbaric bupivacaine formulations alters the block characteristics for the conduct of surgery under spinal anesthesia. The aim of this study was to systematically review the comparative evidence regarding the effectiveness and safety of the 2 formulations when used for spinal anesthesia for adult noncesarean delivery surgery. Key electronic databases were searched for randomized controlled trials, excluding cesarean delivery surgeries under spinal anesthesia, without any language or date restrictions. The primary outcome measure for this review was the failure of spinal anesthesia. Two independent reviewers selected the studies and extracted the data. Results were expressed as relative risk (RR) or mean differences (MDs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Seven hundred fifty-one studies were identified between 1946 and 2016. After screening, there were 16 randomized controlled clinical trials, including 724 participants, that provided data for the meta-analysis. The methodological reporting of most studies was poor, and appropriate judgment of their individual risk of bias elements was not possible. There was no difference between the 2 drugs regarding the need for conversion to general anesthesia (RR, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.08-4.41; P = .62; I = 0%), incidence of hypotension (RR, 1.15; 95% CI, 0.69-1.92; P = .58; I = 0%), nausea/vomiting (RR, 0.29; 95% CI, 0.06-1.32; P = .11; I = 7%), or onset of sensory block (MD = 1.7 minutes; 95% CI, -3.5 to 0.1; P = .07; I = 0%). The onset of motor block (MD = 4.6 minutes; 95% CI, 7.5-1.7; P = .002; I = 78%) was significantly faster with hyperbaric bupivacaine. Conversely, the duration of motor (MD = 45.2 minutes; 95% CI, 66.3-24.2; P < .001; I = 87%) and sensory (MD = 29.4 minutes; 95% CI, 15.5-43.3; P < .001; I = 73%) block was longer with isobaric bupivacaine. Both hyperbaric bupivacaine and isobaric bupivacaine provided effective anesthesia with no

  4. Wound healing and infection in surgery: the pathophysiological impact of smoking, smoking cessation, and nicotine replacement therapy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Lars Tue

    2012-06-01

    The aim was to clarify how smoking and nicotine affects wound healing processes and to establish if smoking cessation and nicotine replacement therapy reverse the mechanisms involved. Smoking is a recognized risk factor for healing complications after surgery, but the pathophysiological mechanisms remain largely unknown. Pathophysiological studies addressing smoking and wound healing were identified through electronic databases (PubMed, EMBASE) and by hand-search of articles' bibliography. Of the 1460 citations identified, 325 articles were retained following title and abstract reviews. In total, 177 articles were included and systematically reviewed. Smoking decreases tissue oxygenation and aerobe metabolism temporarily. The inflammatory healing response is attenuated by a reduced inflammatory cell chemotactic responsiveness, migratory function, and oxidative bactericidal mechanisms. In addition, the release of proteolytic enzymes and inhibitors is imbalanced. The proliferative response is impaired by a reduced fibroblast migration and proliferation in addition to a downregulated collagen synthesis and deposition. Smoking cessation restores tissue oxygenation and metabolism rapidly. Inflammatory cell response is reversed in part within 4 weeks, whereas the proliferative response remains impaired. Nicotine does not affect tissue microenvironment, but appears to impair inflammation and stimulate proliferation. Smoking has a transient effect on the tissue microenvironment and a prolonged effect on inflammatory and reparative cell functions leading to delayed healing and complications. Smoking cessation restores the tissue microenvironment rapidly and the inflammatory cellular functions within 4 weeks, but the proliferative response remain impaired. Nicotine and nicotine replacement drugs seem to attenuate inflammation and enhance proliferation but the effect appears to be marginal.

  5. Safety of gelatin solutions for the priming of cardiopulmonary bypass in cardiac surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghijselings, Idris; Himpe, Dirk; Rex, Steffen

    2017-07-01

    This systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the safety of gelatin versus hydroxyethyl starches (HES) and crystalloids when used for cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB)-priming in cardiac surgery. MEDLINE (Pubmed), Embase and CENTRAL were searched. We included only randomized, controlled trials comparing CPB-priming with gelatin with either crystalloids or HES-solutions of the newest generation. The primary endpoint was the blood loss during the first 24 hours. Secondary outcomes included perioperative transfusion requirements, postoperative kidney function, postoperative ventilation times and length of stay on the intensive care unit. Sixteen studies were identified, of which only ten met the inclusion criteria, representing a total of 824 adult patients: 4 studies compared gelatin with crystalloid, and 6 studies gelatin with HES priming. Only 2 of the studies comparing HES and gelatin reported postoperative blood loss after 24 hours. No significant difference in postoperative blood loss was found when results of both studies were pooled (SMD -0.12; 95% CI: -0.49, 0.25; P=0.52). Likewise, the pooled results of 3 studies comparing gelatin and crystalloids as a priming solution could not demonstrate significant differences in postoperative bleeding after 24 hours (SMD -0.07; 95% CI: -0.40, 0.26; P=0.68). No differences regarding any of the secondary outcomes could be identified. This systematic review suggests gelatins to have a safety profile which is non-inferior to modern-generation tetrastarches or crystalloids. However, the grade of evidence is rated low owing to the poor methodological quality of the included studies, due to inconsistent outcome reporting and lack of uniform endpoint definitions.

  6. The reporting quality of parallel randomised controlled trials in ophthalmic surgery in 2011: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, A C; Khajuria, A; Camm, C F; Edison, E; Agha, R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) represent a gold standard for evaluating therapeutic interventions. However, poor reporting clarity can prevent readers from assessing potential bias that can arise from a lack of methodological rigour. The Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials statement for non-pharmacological interventions 2008 (CONSORT NPT) was developed to aid reporting. RCTs in ophthalmic surgery pose particular challenges in study design and implementation. We aim to provide the first assessment of the compliance of RCTs in ophthalmic surgery to the CONSORT NPT statement. Method In August 2012, the Medline database was searched for RCTs in ophthalmic surgery reported between 1 January 2011 and 31 December 2011. Results were searched by two authors and relevant papers selected. Papers were scored against the 23-item CONSORT NPT checklist and compared against surrogate markers of paper quality. The CONSORT score was also compared between different RCT designs. Results In all, 186 papers were retrieved. Sixty-five RCTs, involving 5803 patients, met the inclusion criteria. The mean CONSORT score was 8.9 out of 23 (39%, range 3.0–14.7, SD 2.49). The least reported items related to the title and abstract (1.6%), reporting intervention adherence (3.1%), and interpretation of results (4.7%). No significant correlation was found between CONSORT score and journal impact factor (R=0.14, P=0.29), number of authors (R=0.01, P=0.93), or whether the RCT used paired-eye, one-eye, or two-eye designs in their randomisation (P=0.97). Conclusions The reporting of RCTs in ophthalmic surgery is suboptimal. Further work is needed by trial groups, funding agencies, authors, and journals to improve reporting clarity. PMID:25214001

  7. Patients’ Experiences of Enhanced Recovery after Surgery: A systematic review of qualitative studies

    OpenAIRE

    Sibbern, Tonje; Sellevold, Vibeke Bull; Steindal, Simen Alexander; Dale, Craig; Watt-Watson, Judy; Dihle, Alfhild

    2017-01-01

    Aim To aggregate, interpret and synthesise findings from qualitative studies to further our knowledge regarding patients’ pre- and postoperative experiences when participating in an enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) program. Background Numerous quantitative studies have documented benefits of participation in ERAS programs. Randomised control trials show that ERAS programs reduce patient morbidity and shorten hospital length of stay. However, we presently have only sparse knowl...

  8. Patients’ Experiences of Enhanced Recovery after Surgery: A systematic review of qualitative studies

    OpenAIRE

    Sibbern, Tonje; Sellevold, Vibeke Bull; Steindal, Simen Alexander; Dale, Craig; Watt-Watson, Judy; Dihle, Alfhild

    2017-01-01

    Aim To aggregate, interpret and synthesise findings from qualitative studies to further our knowledge regarding patients’ pre- and postoperative experiences when participating in an enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) program. Background Numerous quantitative studies have documented benefits of participation in ERAS programs. Randomised control trials show that ERAS programs reduce patient morbidity and shorten hospital length of stay. However, we presently have only sparse knowledge regar...

  9. Oral Nutrition as a Form of Pre-Operative Enhancement in Patients Undergoing Surgery for Colorectal Cancer: A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruns, Emma R. J.; Argillander, Tanja E.; van den Heuvel, Baukje; Buskens, Christianne J.; van Duijvendijk, Peter; Winkels, Renate M.; Kalf, Annette; van der Zaag, Edwin S.; Wassenaar, Eelco B.; Bemelman, Willem A.; van Munster, Barbara C.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Nutritional status has major impacts on the outcome of surgery, in particular in patients with cancer. The aim of this review was to assess the merit of oral pre-operative nutritional support as a part of prehabilitation in patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer. Methods: A

  10. Reporting Quality of Observational Studies in Plastic Surgery Needs Improvement: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agha, Riaz Ahmed; Lee, Seon-Young; Jeong, Kyung Jin Lee; Fowler, Alexander J; Orgill, Dennis P

    2016-05-01

    Our objective was to determine the compliance of observational studies in plastic surgery with the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) statement checklist. All cohort, cross-sectional, and case-control studies published in five major plastic surgery journals in 2013 were assessed for their compliance with the STROBE statement. One hundred thirty-six studies were identified initially and 94 met the inclusion criteria. The average STROBE score was 12.4 (range, 2-20.1) with a standard deviation of 3.36. The most frequent reporting deficiencies were not reporting the study design in the title and abstract 30% compliance; describing the setting, locations, and relevant dates, including periods of recruitment, exposure, follow-up, and data collection (24%); describing efforts to address sources of bias (20%); reporting numbers of individuals at each stage of the study (20%); and discussing limitations (40%). The reporting quality of observational studies in Plastic Surgery needs improvement. We suggest ways this could be improved including better education, awareness among all stakeholders, and hardwiring compliance through electronic journal submission systems.

  11. Influence of dietary protein and its amino acid composition on postoperative outcomes after gastric bypass surgery : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, Merel; de Heide, Loek J. M.; Veeger, Nic J. G. M.; van der Wal-Oost, Alies M.; van Beek, Andre P.

    2016-01-01

    CONTEXT: Bariatric surgery is an effective method to reduce morbid obesity. Nutritional counseling is essential to achieve maximal treatment success and to avoid long-term complications. Increased dietary protein intake may improve various postoperative results. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this systematic

  12. Is peritoneal drainage essential after pancreatic surgery?: A meta-analysis and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huan, Lu; Fei, Qilin; Lin, Huapeng; Wan, Lun; Li, Yue

    2017-12-01

    Our objective is to assess the function of peritoneal drainage, which is placed after pancreatic surgery. With the medical advancement some study put forward that peritoneal drainage is not the necessary after pancreatic surgery; it cannot improve the complications of postoperation even leading to more infection and so on. However, there is no one study can clear and definite whether omitting the drainage after surgery or not. Searching databases consist of all kinds of searching tools, such as Medline, The Cochrane Library, Embase, PubMed, etc. All the included studies should meet our demand of this meta-analysis. In the all interest outcomes blow we take the full advantage of RevMan5 to assess, the main measure is odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence, the publication bias are assessed by Egger test and Begg test. The rate of postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF) in no drainage group is much lower than that in routine drainage group (OR = 0.47, I = 43%, P drainage can increase the morbidity (OR = 0.71, I = 15%, P = .0002) after pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD), but reduce the mortality (OR = 1.92, I = 8%, P = .03) after PD. In distal pancreatectomy (DP) the rate of POPF and clinically relevant pancreatic fistula (CR-PF) is lower without drainage; there is no significant difference in the CR-PF, hospital stay, intra-abdominal abscess, radiologic invention, and the reoperation. In the current meta-analysis, we cannot make a clear conclusion whether to abandon the routine drainage or not, but from the subgroup we can see something is safer than nothing to routine peritoneal drainage. And the patients who underwent DP can attempt to omit the drainage. But it still needs more RCTs to assess the necessity of drainage. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The Role of Hemosiderin Excision in Seizure Outcome in Cerebral Cavernous Malformation Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Ruan

    Full Text Available Whether the excision of hemosiderin surrounding cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs is necessary to achieve a seizure-free result has been the subject of debate. Here, we report a systematic review of related literature up to Jan 1, 2015 including 594 patients to assess the effect of hemosiderin excision on seizure outcome in patients with CCMs by meta-analysis.Ten studies comparing extended hemosiderin excision with only lesion resection were identified by searching the English-language literature. Meta-analyses, subgroup analyses and sensitivity analysis were conducted to determine the association between hemosiderin excision and seizure outcome after surgery.Seizure outcome was significantly improved in the patients who underwent an extended excision of the surrounding hemosiderin (OR, 0.62; 95% CI: 0.42-0.91; P = 0.01. In subgroup analysis, studies from Asia (OR, 0.42; 95% CI: 0.25-0.71; P = 0.001, male-majority (female ratio 1 year before surgery (OR, 0.43; 95% CI: 0.22-0.84; P = 0.01, lesion diameter > 2 cm (OR, 0.41; 95% CI: 0.19-0.87; P = 0.02 and short-term (< 3 years follow-up (OR, 0.48; 95% CI: 0.29-0.80; P = 0.005 tended to correlate with a significantly favorable outcome.Patients who underwent extended surrounding hemosiderin excision could exhibit significantly improved seizure outcomes compared to patients without hemosiderin excision. However, further well-designed prospective multiple-center RCT studies are still needed.

  14. [Nutrient Deficiencies after Bariatric Surgery - Systematic Literature Review and Suggestions for Diagnostics and Treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroh, C; Benedix, F; Meyer, F; Manger, T

    2015-08-01

    The increasing prevalence of morbid obesity in Germany is associated with an increasing number of metabolic surgical interventions. Short-term surgical and long-term metabolic complications such as nutrient deficiencies can be considered the main risks of metabolic surgery and its restrictive and malabsorbant surgical procedures. The aim of this compact short overview based on a selective literature search and our own clinical experience is to characterise the long-term metabolic complications, which are specific for the various bariatric procedures, and to refine the published guidelines for supplementation. Restrictive bariatric procedures can be associated with well-known surgical problems such as pouch dilatation or band migration, e.g., after gastric banding. After sleeve gastrectomy, emerging reflux disease can become a substantial problem. The most frequent deficiencies after restrictive procedures are related to B-vitamins whereas iron, folate, vitamin B1 and B12 and vitamin D deficiencies are associated with the malabsorptive procedure such as biliopancreatic diversion, duodenal switch and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Due to possible metabolic and surgical complications after bariatric surgery, patients need to undergo life-long medical follow-up investigations. The currently available guidelines of German Society of Treatment of Obesity (CAADIP) of DGAV for supplementation should be known and followed, in particular, by the physicians who i) are exceptionally involved in medical care of obese people and ii) do it in full awareness of the obligatory postoperative clinical observation. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Touchless interaction with software in interventional radiology and surgery: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mewes, André; Hensen, Bennet; Wacker, Frank; Hansen, Christian

    2017-02-01

    In this article, we systematically examine the current state of research of systems that focus on touchless human-computer interaction in operating rooms and interventional radiology suites. We further discuss the drawbacks of current solutions and underline promising technologies for future development. A systematic literature search of scientific papers that deal with touchless control of medical software in the immediate environment of the operation room and interventional radiology suite was performed. This includes methods for touchless gesture interaction, voice control and eye tracking. Fifty-five research papers were identified and analyzed in detail including 33 journal publications. Most of the identified literature (62 %) deals with the control of medical image viewers. The others present interaction techniques for laparoscopic assistance (13 %), telerobotic assistance and operating room control (9 % each) as well as for robotic operating room assistance and intraoperative registration (3.5 % each). Only 8 systems (14.5 %) were tested in a real clinical environment, and 7 (12.7 %) were not evaluated at all. In the last 10 years, many advancements have led to robust touchless interaction approaches. However, only a few have been systematically evaluated in real operating room settings. Further research is required to cope with current limitations of touchless software interfaces in clinical environments. The main challenges for future research are the improvement and evaluation of usability and intuitiveness of touchless human-computer interaction and the full integration into productive systems as well as the reduction of necessary interaction steps and further development of hands-free interaction.

  16. The surgical safety checklist and patient outcomes after surgery: a prospective observational cohort study, systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, T E F; Ahmad, T; Phull, M K; Fowler, A J; Hewson, R; Biccard, B M; Chew, M S; Gillies, M; Pearse, R M

    2018-01-01

    The surgical safety checklist is widely used to improve the quality of perioperative care. However, clinicians continue to debate the clinical effectiveness of this tool. Prospective analysis of data from the International Surgical Outcomes Study (ISOS), an international observational study of elective in-patient surgery, accompanied by a systematic review and meta-analysis of published literature. The exposure was surgical safety checklist use. The primary outcome was in-hospital mortality and the secondary outcome was postoperative complications. In the ISOS cohort, a multivariable multi-level generalized linear model was used to test associations. To further contextualise these findings, we included the results from the ISOS cohort in a meta-analysis. Results are reported as odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals. We included 44 814 patients from 497 hospitals in 27 countries in the ISOS analysis. There were 40 245 (89.8%) patients exposed to the checklist, whilst 7508 (16.8%) sustained ≥1 postoperative complications and 207 (0.5%) died before hospital discharge. Checklist exposure was associated with reduced mortality [odds ratio (OR) 0.49 (0.32-0.77); Ppatients including the ISOS cohort. Checklist exposure was associated with both reduced postoperative mortality [OR 0.75 (0.62-0.92); PPatients exposed to a surgical safety checklist experience better postoperative outcomes, but this could simply reflect wider quality of care in hospitals where checklist use is routine. Copyright © 2017 British Journal of Anaesthesia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. IMPACT OF VITAMIN D AND CALCIUM DEFICIENCY IN THE BONES OF PATIENTS UNDERGOING BARIATRIC SURGERY: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Jefry Alberto Vargas; Souza, Gabriela Pereira de; Nascimento, Juliana de Almeida; Simoneti, Luis Fernando; Marchese, Carolina; Sales-Peres, Silvia Helena de Carvalho

    Bariatric surgery is considered the most effective tool in the control and treatment of severe obesity, but patients undergoing this procedure are at increased risk of developing nutritional deficiencies by limiting the intake and absorption of many nutrients. To assess the impact of vitamin D deficiency and calcium in bone in patients after gastric bypass in Roux-en-Y, pointing directly at the type of administration, doses and effects after surgery. Was conducted a systematic review with articles related to the topic of the last 10 years searched in PubMed (US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, Medline, Lilacs, Scielo and Cochrane using the headings "bariatric surgery", "bone", "obesity", "vitamin D '', "calcium" AND "absorption". Exclusion criteria to research on animals, smokers, pregnant women and patient treated with bisphosphonates. Five articles were included in this review. All refer that bariatric surgery can lead to nutritional deficiencies and poor absorption of fats and fat-soluble vitamins and other micronutrients such as calcium. Patients submitted to RYGB should make use of multivitamins and minerals especially vitamin D and calcium to prevent bone fractures. Monitoring, treatment and control of risk factors are essential to prevent complications after this operation. A cirurgia bariátrica é considerada o tratamento mais eficaz no controle e tratamento da obesidade severa; porém, indivíduos submetidos a este procedimento apresentam maior risco de desenvolver deficiências nutricionais pela limitação na ingestão e absorção de muitos nutrientes. Avaliar o impacto da deficiência de vitamina D e do cálcio ósseo de pacientes após gastroplastia em Y-de-Roux, relacionando tipo de administração, dose e efeito pós-cirúrgico. Realizou-se revisão sistemática com artigos relacionados ao tema dos últimos 10 anos e pesquisados na PubMed (US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health, Medline, Lilacs

  18. Respiratory physiotherapy to prevent pulmonary complications after abdominal surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquina, Patrick; Tramèr, Martin R; Granier, Jean-Max; Walder, Bernhard

    2006-12-01

    To examine the efficacy of respiratory physiotherapy for prevention of pulmonary complications after abdominal surgery. We searched in databases and bibliographies for articles in all languages through November 2005. Randomized trials were included if they investigated prophylactic respiratory physiotherapy and pulmonary outcomes, and if the follow-up was at least 2 days. Efficacy data were expressed as risk differences (RDs) and number needed to treat (NNT), with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Thirty-five trials tested respiratory physiotherapy treatments. Of 13 trials with a "no intervention" control group, 9 studies (n = 883) did not report on significant differences, and 4 studies (n = 528) did: in 1 study, the incidence of pneumonia was decreased from 37.3 to 13.7% with deep breathing, directed cough, and postural drainage (RD, 23.6%; 95% CI, 7 to 40%; NNT, 4.3; 95% CI, 2.5 to 14); in 1 study, the incidence of atelectasis was decreased from 39 to 15% with deep breathing and directed cough (RD, 24%; 95% CI, 5 to 43%; NNT, 4.2; 95% CI, 2.4 to 18); in 1 study, the incidence of atelectasis was decreased from 77 to 59% with deep breathing, directed cough, and postural drainage (RD, 18%; 95% CI, 5 to 31%; NNT, 5.6; 95% CI, 3.3 to 19); in 1 study, the incidence of unspecified pulmonary complications was decreased from 47.7% to 21.4 to 22.2% with intermittent positive pressure breathing, or incentive spirometry, or deep breathing with directed cough (RD, 25.5 to 26.3%; NNT, 3.8 to 3.9). Twenty-two trials (n = 2,734) compared physiotherapy treatments without no intervention control subjects; no conclusions could be drawn. There are only a few trials that support the usefulness of prophylactic respiratory physiotherapy. The routine use of respiratory physiotherapy after abdominal surgery does not seem to be justified.

  19. Characteristics of meningitis following transsphenoidal endoscopic surgery: a case series and a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliano, Pasquale; Caggiano, Chiara; Ascione, Tiziana; Solari, Domenico; Di Flumeri, Giusy; Cavallo, Luigi Maria; Tortora, Fabio; Cappabianca, Paolo

    2017-12-01

    Meningitis occurs in 0.8-1.5% of patients undergoing neurosurgery. The aim of the study was to evaluate the characteristics of meningitis after endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery (EETS) comparing the findings retrieved to those highlighted by literature search. Patients treated by EETS during an 18-year period in the Department of Neurosurgery of 'Federico II' University of Naples were evaluated and included in the study if they fulfilled criteria for meningitis. Epidemiological, demographic, laboratory, and microbiological findings were evaluated. A literature research according to PRISMA methodology completed the study. EETS was performed on 1450 patients, 8 of them (0.6%) had meningitis [median age 46 years (range 33-73)]. Endoscopic surgery was performed 1-15 days (median 4 days) before diagnosis. Meningeal signs were always present. CSF examination revealed elevated cells [median 501 cells/μL (range 30-5728)], high protein [median 445 mg/dL (range 230-1210)], and low glucose [median 10 mg/dL (range 1-39)]. CSF culture revealed Gram-negative bacteria in four cases (Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Alcaligenes spp., and Haemophilus influenzae), Streptococcus pneumoniae in two cases, Aspergillus fumigatus in one case. An abscess occupying the surgical site was observed in two cases. Six cases reported a favorable outcome; two died. Incidence of meningitis approached to 2%, as assessed by the literature search. Incidence of meningitis after EETS is low despite endoscope goes through non-sterile structures; microorganisms retrieved are those present within sinus microenvironment. Meningitis must be suspected in patients with persistent fever and impaired conscience status after EETS.

  20. Systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helgstrand, John Thomas; Berg, Kasper Drimer; Lippert, Solvej

    2016-01-01

    trials have challenged this dogma. The aim of this study was to evaluate how endocrine therapy (ET) affects survival in different clinical settings of PCa. Materials and methods A review of published phase II, III and IV studies evaluating the effect of ET on survival was performed. Results In localized...

  1. Pancreas-related complications following gastrectomy: systematic review and meta-analysis of open versus minimally invasive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Francesco; Giuliani, Giuseppe; Iacobone, Martina; Bianchi, Paolo Pietro; Coratti, Andrea

    2017-11-01

    Postoperative pancreas-related complications are quite uncommon but potentially life-threatening occurrences that may occasionally complicate the postoperative course of gastrectomy. A number of reports have described such conditions after both standard open and minimally invasive surgery. Our study has the purpose to systematically determine the pooled incidence of pancreatic events following radical gastrectomy. We also aimed to elucidate whether any difference in incidence exists between patients operated via conventional open or minimally invasive surgery. PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library were systematically searched for randomized or well-matched studies comparing conventional with minimally invasive oncological gastrectomy and reporting pancreas-related postoperative complications. We evaluated possible differences in outcomes between open and minimally invasive surgery. A meta-analysis of relevant comparisons was performed using RevMan 5.3. A total of 20 studies, whereby 6 randomized and 14 non-randomized comparative studies including a total of 7336 patients, were considered eligible for data extraction. Globally, more than 1% of patients experienced some pancreatic occurrences during the postoperative course. The use of minimally invasive surgery showed a trend toward increased overall pancreatic morbidity (OR 1.39), pancreatitis (OR 2.69), and pancreatic fistula (OR 1.13). Although minimally invasive radical gastrectomy is currently established as a valid alternative to open surgery for the treatment of gastric cancer, a higher risk of pancreas-related morbidity should be taken into account.

  2. Is There a Cosmetic Advantage to Single-Incision Laparoscopic Surgical Techniques Over Standard Laparoscopic Surgery? A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Luke; Manley, Kate

    2016-06-01

    Single-incision laparoscopic surgery represents an evolution of minimally invasive techniques, but has been a controversial development. A cosmetic advantage is stated by many authors, but has not been found to be universally present or even of considerable importance by patients. This systematic review and meta-analysis demonstrates that there is a cosmetic advantage of the technique regardless of the operation type. The treatment effect in terms of cosmetic improvement is of the order of 0.63.

  3. Possible benefits of robot-assisted rectal cancer surgery regarding urological and sexual dysfunction: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broholm, M; Pommergaard, H-C; Gögenür, I

    2015-05-01

    Robot-assisted surgery for rectal cancer may result in lower rates of urogenital dysfunction compared with laparoscopic surgery. A systematic review was conducted of studies reporting urogenital dysfunction after robot-assisted rectal cancer surgery. PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane Library were systematically searched in February 2014. All studies investigating urogenital function after robot-assisted rectal cancer surgery were identified. The inclusion criteria for meta-analysis studies required comparison of robot-assisted with laparoscopic surgery and the evaluation of urological and sexual function by validated questionnaire. The outcome was evaluated using the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) and the Female Sexual Function Index. Ten studies including 689 patients were included. For the meta-analysis this fell to four including 152 patients in the robotic group and 161 in the laparoscopic group, without heterogeneity. The IPSS score at 3 and 12 months favoured robot-assisted surgery [mean difference (MD) -1.58; 95% CI (-3.1, -0.0), [P = 0.04; and MD -0.90 (-1.81, -0.02), P = 0.05]. IIEF scores at 3 months' follow-up [MD -2.59 (-4.25, -0.94),] P = 0.002] and 6 months' follow-up [MD -3.06 (-4.53, -1.59), P = 0.0001] were better after robot-assisted than laparoscopic surgery. Although there were few data and no randomized controlled trials the results of the review suggested that robot-assisted surgery resulted in improved urogenital function than after laparoscopy. Colorectal Disease © 2014 The Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  4. A systematic review of neuropsychological outcomes following posterior fossa tumor surgery in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanzlik, Emily; Woodrome, Stacey E; Abdel-Baki, Mohamed; Geller, Thomas J; Elbabaa, Samer K

    2015-10-01

    Central nervous system tumors are the most common solid tumors in the pediatric population. As children with central nervous system (CNS) tumors are surviving into adolescence and adulthood, more research is being focused on the long-term cognitive outcomes of the survivors. This review examines the literature on different cognitive outcomes of survivors of different childhood posterior fossa CNS tumor types. The authors reviewed the literature for articles published from 2000 to 2012 about long-term neuropsychological outcomes of children diagnosed with posterior fossa brain tumors before the age of 18, which distinguished between histological tumor types, and had a minimum follow-up of 3 years. The literature search returned 13 articles, and a descriptive analysis was performed comparing intelligence quotient (IQ), attention/executive function, and memory components of 456 survivors of childhood posterior fossa tumors. Four articles directly compared astrocytoma and medulloblastoma survivors and showed medulloblastoma survivors fared worse in IQ, attention/executive function, and memory measurements. Five articles reporting medulloblastomas found IQ, attention, and memory scores to be significantly below the standardized means. Articles examining astrocytoma survivors found IQ scores within the normal range for the population. Survivors of ependymomas reported 2/23 survivors impaired on IQ scores, while a second study reported a significant number of ependymoma survivors lower than the expected population norm. Tumor histopathology and the type of postoperative adjuvant therapy seem to have a significant impact on the long-term neuropsychological complications of pediatric posterior fossa CNS tumor survivors. Age at diagnosis and treatment factors are important variables that affect the outcomes of the survivors.

  5. Mesh complications in female pelvic floor reconstructive surgery and their management: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemendra N Shah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We reviewed the incidence, predisposing factors, presentation and management of complications related to the use of synthetic mesh in the management of stress urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse repair. Immediate complications, such as bleeding, hematoma, injury to adjacent organs during placement of mesh and complication of voiding dysfunction are not discussed in this review, since they are primarily related to technique. A PubMed search of related articles published in English was done from April 2008 to March 2011. Key words used were urinary incontinence, mesh, complications, midurethral sling, anterior prolapse, anterior vaginal repair, pelvic organ prolapse, transvaginal mesh, vault prolapse, midurethral slings, female stress urinary incontinence, mesh erosion, vaginal mesh complications, and posterior vaginal wall prolapse. Since there were very few articles dealing with the management of mesh-related complications in the period covered in the search we extended the search from January 2005 onwards. Articles were selected to fit the scope of the topic. In addition, landmark publications and Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE data (FDA website were included on the present topic. A total of 170 articles were identified. The use of synthetic mesh in sub-urethral sling procedures is now considered the standard for the surgical management of stress urinary incontinence. Synthetic mesh is being increasingly used in the management of pelvic organ prolapse. While the incidence of extrusion and erosion with mid-urethral sling is low, the extrusion rate in prolapse repair is somewhat higher and the use in posterior compartment remains controversial. When used through the abdominal approach the extrusion and erosion rates are lower. The management of mesh complication is an individualized approach. The choice of the technique should be based on the type of mesh complication, location of the extrusion and/or erosion

  6. The Efficacy and Clinical Safety of Various Analgesic Combinations for Post-Operative Pain after Third Molar Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Alvin Ho Yeung; Choi, Siu Wai; Cheung, Chi Wai; Leung, Yiu Yan

    2015-01-01

    To run a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials aiming to answer the clinical question "which analgesic combination and dosage is potentially the most effective and safe for acute post-operative pain control after third molar surgery?". A systematic search of computer databases and journals was performed. The search and the evaluations of articles were performed by 2 independent reviewers in 3 rounds. Randomized clinical trials related to analgesic combinations for acute post-operative pain control after lower third molar surgery that matched the selection criteria were evaluated to enter in the final review. Fourteen studies with 3521 subjects, with 10 groups (17 dosages) of analgesic combinations were included in the final review. The analgesic efficacy were presented by the objective pain measurements including sum of pain intensity at 6 hours (SPID6) and total pain relief at 6 hours (TOTPAR6). The SPID6 scores and TOTPAR6 scores of the reported analgesic combinations were ranged from 1.46 to 6.44 and 3.24 - 10.3, respectively. Ibuprofen 400mg with oxycodone HCL 5mg had superior efficacy (SPID6: 6.44, TOTPAR6: 9.31). Nausea was the most common adverse effect, with prevalence ranging from 0-55%. Ibuprofen 200mg with caffeine 100mg or 200mg had a reasonable analgesic effect with fewer side effects. This systematic review and meta-analysis may help clinicians in their choices of prescribing an analgesic combination for acute post-operative pain control after lower third molar surgery. It was found in this systematic review Ibuprofen 400mg combined with oxycodone HCL 5mg has superior analgesic efficacy when compared to the other analgesic combinations included in this study.

  7. The Efficacy and Clinical Safety of Various Analgesic Combinations for Post-Operative Pain after Third Molar Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvin Ho Yeung Au

    Full Text Available To run a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials aiming to answer the clinical question "which analgesic combination and dosage is potentially the most effective and safe for acute post-operative pain control after third molar surgery?".A systematic search of computer databases and journals was performed. The search and the evaluations of articles were performed by 2 independent reviewers in 3 rounds. Randomized clinical trials related to analgesic combinations for acute post-operative pain control after lower third molar surgery that matched the selection criteria were evaluated to enter in the final review.Fourteen studies with 3521 subjects, with 10 groups (17 dosages of analgesic combinations were included in the final review. The analgesic efficacy were presented by the objective pain measurements including sum of pain intensity at 6 hours (SPID6 and total pain relief at 6 hours (TOTPAR6. The SPID6 scores and TOTPAR6 scores of the reported analgesic combinations were ranged from 1.46 to 6.44 and 3.24 - 10.3, respectively. Ibuprofen 400mg with oxycodone HCL 5mg had superior efficacy (SPID6: 6.44, TOTPAR6: 9.31. Nausea was the most common adverse effect, with prevalence ranging from 0-55%. Ibuprofen 200mg with caffeine 100mg or 200mg had a reasonable analgesic effect with fewer side effects.This systematic review and meta-analysis may help clinicians in their choices of prescribing an analgesic combination for acute post-operative pain control after lower third molar surgery. It was found in this systematic review Ibuprofen 400mg combined with oxycodone HCL 5mg has superior analgesic efficacy when compared to the other analgesic combinations included in this study.

  8. MIS lateral spine surgery: a systematic literature review of complications, outcomes, and economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmen, Jeff A; Gerber, Edward J

    2015-04-01

    Over the past decade, the minimally disruptive lateral transpsoas approach for lumbar interbody fusion (MI-LIF) is increasingly being used as an alternative to conventional surgical approaches. The purpose of this review was to evaluate four primary questions as they relate to MI-LIF: (1) Is there an anatomical justification for MI-LIF at L4-5? (2) What are the complication and outcome profiles of MI-LIF and are they acceptable with respect to conventional approaches? (3) Given technical and neuromonitoring differences between various MI-LIF procedures, are there any published clinical differences? And, (4) are modern minimally disruptive procedures (e.g., MI-LIF) economically viable? Through a MEDLINE and Google Scholar search, a total of 237 articles that discussed MI-LIF were identified. Of those, topical areas included anatomy (22), biomechanics/testing (17), technical descriptions (11), case reports (40), complications (30), clinical and radiographic outcomes (43), deformity (23), trauma or thoracic applications (10), and review articles (41). In answer to the questions posed, (1) there is a high strength of evidence showing MI-LIF to be anatomically justified at all levels of the lumbar spine from L1-2 to L4-5. The evidence also supports the use of advanced neuromonitoring modalities. (2) There is moderate strength evidence in support of reproducible and reasonable complication, side effect, and outcome profiles following MI-LIF which may be technique dependent. (3) There is low-strength evidence that shows elevated neural complication rates in non-traditional (e.g., shallow-docking approaches and/or those without specialized neuromonitoring) MI-LIF, and (4) there is low- to moderate-strength evidence that modern minimally disruptive surgical approaches are cost-effective. There is considerable published evidence to support MI-LIF in spinal fusion and advanced applications, though the results of some reports, especially concerning complications, vary greatly

  9. Systematic Reviews in Sports Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiSilvestro, Kevin J; Tjoumakaris, Fotios P; Maltenfort, Mitchell G; Spindler, Kurt P; Freedman, Kevin B

    2016-02-01

    The number of systematic reviews published in the orthopaedic literature has increased, and these reviews can help guide clinical decision making. However, the quality of these reviews can affect the reader's ability to use the data to arrive at accurate conclusions and make clinical decisions. To evaluate the methodological and reporting quality of systematic reviews and meta-analyses in the sports medicine literature to determine whether such reviews should be used to guide treatment decisions. The hypothesis was that many systematic reviews in the orthopaedic sports medicine literature may not follow the appropriate reporting guidelines or methodological criteria recommended for systematic reviews. Systematic review. All clinical sports medicine systematic reviews and meta-analyses from 2009 to 2013 published in The American Journal of Sports Medicine (AJSM), The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (JBJS), Arthroscopy, Sports Health, and Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy (KSSTA) were reviewed and evaluated for level of evidence according to the guidelines from the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine, for reporting quality according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement, and for methodological quality according to the Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) tool. Analysis was performed by year and journal of publication, and the levels of evidence included in the systematic reviews were also analyzed. A total of 200 systematic reviews and meta-analyses were identified over the study period. Of these, 53% included evidence levels 4 and 5 in their analyses, with just 32% including evidence levels 1 and 2 only. There were significant differences in the proportion of articles with high levels of evidence (P Sports Health and KSSTA on the PRISMA and AMSTAR. The average PRISMA score by year varied from 85% to 89%, and the average AMSTAR score varied from 70% to 76%. Systematic reviews

  10. Gene Therapy for Bone Defects in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Animal Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliefel, Riham; Kühnisch, Jan; Ehrenfeld, Michael; Otto, Sven

    2017-02-15

    Craniofacial bone defects are challenging problems for maxillofacial surgeons over the years. With the development of cell and molecular biology, gene therapy is a breaking new technology with the aim of regenerating tissues by acting as a delivery system for therapeutic genes in the craniofacial region rather than treating genetic disorders. A systematic review was conducted summarizing the articles reporting gene therapy in maxillofacial surgery to answer the question: Was gene therapy successfully applied to regenerate bone in the maxillofacial region? Electronic searching of online databases was performed in addition to hand searching of the references of included articles. No language or time restrictions were enforced. Meta-analysis was done to assess significant bone formation after delivery of gene material in the surgically induced maxillofacial defects. The search identified 2081 articles, of which 57 were included with 1726 animals. Bone morphogenetic proteins were commonly used proteins for gene therapy. Viral vectors were the universally used vectors. Sprague-Dawley rats were the frequently used animal model in experimental studies. The quality of the articles ranged from excellent to average. Meta-analysis results performed on 21 articles showed that defects favored bone formation by gene therapy. Funnel plot showed symmetry with the absence of publication bias. Gene therapy is on the top list of innovative strategies that developed in the last 10 years with the hope of developing a simple chair-side protocol in the near future, combining improvement of gene delivery as well as knowledge of the molecular basis of oral and maxillofacial structures.

  11. Holmium:YAG Laser Ablation for the Management of Lower Urinary Tract Foreign Bodies Following Incontinence Surgery: A Case Series and Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Garson; Mamut, Adiel; Martin, Paul; Welk, Blayne

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the outcomes associated with the endoscopic removal of foreign bodies (such as mesh or permanent suture) in the lower urinary tract after female stress incontinence surgery with the Holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG) laser, and to systematically review the literature on this topic. A retrospective chart review of 18 consecutive women found to have mesh or suture exposure was performed. All patients underwent Ho:YAG laser ablation. A systematic review was performed to identify literature addressing the endoscopic management of mesh/suture exposure after stress incontinence surgery. Between November 2011 and February 2016, 18 women underwent Ho:YAG laser ablation of exposed mesh or suture. Presenting symptoms included lower urinary tract symptoms, pelvic pain, incontinence, or recurrent urinary tract infections. Thirteen women had a previous synthetic midurethral sling and five had a prior retropubic suspension. The median age was 58 years (interquartile range [IQR] 50-60) and median follow-up was 2 years (IQR 1-2). Four patients (22%) had residual mesh after the first procedure, requiring a repeat endoscopic procedure. Only one patient had a small amount of asymptomatic residual mesh on cystoscopy after the final procedure. Only minor postoperative complications were observed. Eight patients had stress incontinence and four underwent operative treatment for this. In our systematic review, we identified 16 case series, which described a total of 158 patients. Women most commonly presented with voiding symptoms or incontinence. Based on the synthesis of these data, repeat procedures were necessary in 16% and vesicovaginal fistula occurred in 2%. Recurrent/persistent stress incontinence was present in 20%, and of these patients, 3/4 underwent a new stress incontinence procedure. Both our case series and the systematic review of the literature demonstrated that endoscopic treatment of lower urinary tract foreign bodies after stress

  12. Corticosteroid administration in oral and orthognathic surgery: a systematic review of the literature and meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dan, Anne E B; Thygesen, Torben H; Pinholt, Else M

    2010-01-01

    was made. The primary predictor variable was CS administration and the outcome variables were edema, pain, and infection. A meta-analysis was performed. The risk of other side effects was evaluated through a simple review. RESULTS: In oral surgery, most clinical trials showed a significant decrease...... toward a neuroregeneration effect, but no statistical analysis could be performed. Regarding the risk of other side effects, in oral surgery, a minimal risk of chronic adrenal suppression was seen; in orthognathic surgery, an elevated risk of avascular osteonecrosis, steroid-induced psychosis......, and adrenal suppression was seen. There were no reports of decreased healing. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that the administration of CS in oral surgery decreases edema and pain significantly, with no higher risk of infection and with a minimum risk of other side effects....

  13. Looking at plastic surgery through Google Glass: part 1. Systematic review of Google Glass evidence and the first plastic surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Christopher R; Rosenfield, Lorne K

    2015-03-01

    Google Glass has the potential to become a ubiquitous and translational technological tool within clinical plastic surgery. Google Glass allows clinicians to remotely view patient notes, laboratory results, and imaging; training can be augmented via streamed expert master classes; and patient safety can be improved by remote advice from a senior colleague. This systematic review identified and appraised every Google Glass publication relevant to plastic surgery and describes the first plastic surgical procedures recorded using Google Glass. A systematic review was performed using PubMed National Center for Biotechnology Information, Ovid MEDLINE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, following modified Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. Key search terms "Google" and "Glass" identified mutually inclusive publications that were screened for inclusion. Eighty-two publications were identified, with 21 included for review. Google Glass publications were formal articles (n = 3), editorial/commentary articles (n = 7), conference proceedings (n = 1), news reports (n = 3), and online articles (n = 7). Data support Google Glass' positive impact on health care delivery, clinical training, medical documentation, and patient safety. Concerns exist regarding patient confidentiality, technical issues, and limited software. The first plastic surgical procedure performed using Google Glass was a blepharoplasty on October 29, 2013. Google Glass is an exciting translational technology with the potential to positively impact health care delivery, medical documentation, surgical training, and patient safety. Further high-quality scientific research is required to formally appraise Google Glass in the clinical setting.

  14. Do lumbar motion preserving devices reduce the risk of adjacent segment pathology compared with fusion surgery? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jeffrey C; Arnold, Paul M; Hermsmeyer, Jeffrey T; Norvell, Daniel C

    2012-10-15

    A systematic review of the literature. To compare total disc replacement (TDR) with fusion, other motion-sparing devices with fusion, and motion-sparing devices with other motion-sparing devices to determine which devices may be associated with a lower risk of radiographical or clinical adjacent segment pathology (ASP). Adjacent segment pathology, also termed adjacent segment disease (ASD) or adjacent segment degeneration, is a controversial phenomenon that can occur after a spinal fusion; it is thought to be either related to the altered mechanics or loss of motion from the fusion or to be part of the natural history of progressive arthritis. Motion preservation devices theoretically may decrease or prevent ASP from occurring. A systematic search was conducted in PubMed and the Cochrane Library for literature published between January 1990 and February 2012. For all key questions, we identified all cohort studies and randomized controlled trials, making the comparison of interest independent of the outcomes measured. We searched each full-text article to determine whether it reported any type of structural or degenerative condition specifically occurring at an adjacent segment. We included articles reporting adult lumbar patients who had degenerative disc disease, disc herniation, radiculopathy, kyphosis, scoliosis, and spondylolisthesis, and who were treated with TDR, other motion-sparing procedures, or fusion. The overall strength of the evidence for each key question was rated using the Grades of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) criteria. There is moderate evidence to suggest that patients who undergo fusion may be nearly 6 times more likely to be treated for ASP than those who undergo TDR. From 2 randomized trials, the pooled risk of clinical ASP treated surgically was 1.2% and 7.0% in the TDR and fusion groups, respectively (P = 0.009). The increased risk of clinical ASP treated surgically associated with fusion is 5.8%. For every

  15. Effectiveness of massage therapy on post-operative outcomes among patients undergoing cardiac surgery: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Ramesh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The incidence and prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD are increasing rapidly in developing countries. Most patients with CVD do not respond to medical treatment and have to undergo cardiac surgery. This highly stressful experience results in increased levels of anxiety for patients. The objective of this review was to evaluate the efficacy of massage therapy on postoperative outcomes among patients undergoing cardiac surgery. A comprehensive literature search was made on PubMed-Medline, CINAHL, Science Direct, Scopus, Web of Science and the Cochrane library databases for original research articles published between 2000 and 2015. Original articles that reported the efficacy of massage therapy in patients undergoing cardiac surgery were included. The Cochrane data extraction form was used to extract data. A total of 297 studies were identified in the literature search. However, only seven studies were eligible for analysis. Of the seven studies, six studies demonstrated the effects of massage therapy on improving post-operative outcomes of patients, while one study found no evidence of improvement. Although the methods varied considerably, most of the studies included in this review reported positive results. Therefore, there is some evidence that massage therapy can lead to positive postoperative outcomes. Evidence of the effectiveness of massage therapy in patients undergoing cardiac surgery remains inconclusive. Additional research is needed to provide a strong evidence base for the use of massage therapy to improve post-operative outcomes and recovery among cardiac surgery patients

  16. Pain and disability following first-time lumbar fusion surgery for degenerative disorders: a systematic review protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenders, N.H.J.; Rushton, A.; Heneghan, N.; Verra, M.L.; Willems, P.; Hoogeboom, T.J.; Staal, J.B.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Lumbar spinal fusion for degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine is frequently used, despite current research presenting inconclusive evidence. This study aims to systematically review and meta-analyse the natural course of pain and disability in patients with degenerative disorders

  17. A systematic review of the effect of piston diameter in stapes surgery for otosclerosis on hearing results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegner, Inge; Verhagen, Jessica J; Stegeman, Inge; Vincent, Robert; Grolman, Wilko

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of piston diameter in primary stapedotomy for otosclerosis patients measured by hearing outcome. DATA SOURCES: PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library. REVIEW METHODS: A systematic search was conducted. Studies reporting original data on the effect of piston

  18. Colorectal cancer with synchronous hepatic metastases: Systematic review of reports comparing synchronous surgery with sequential bowel-first or liver-first approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltatzis, M; Chan, A K C; Jegatheeswaran, S; Mason, J M; Siriwardena, A K

    2016-02-01

    The management of colorectal cancer with synchronous liver-limited metastases currently lacks randomised trial evidence to inform case selection for any of the bowel-first, liver-first or synchronous surgery routes. We examine the literature to report outcome data from reports utilising all three approaches. A systematic review was conducted using OvidSP (including Embase, EBM Reviews and MEDLINE databases) to find articles reporting discrete peri-operative and long-term outcomes for patients undergoing sequential bowel-first, liver-first surgery or synchronous liver and bowel surgery. Of 223 unique citations, 3 cohort studies were identified comprising a pooled population of 1203 patients who completed treatment protocols between 1982 and 2011. Patients were allocated to bowel-first surgery (748 patients, 62.2%), liver-first surgery (75, 6.2%) or synchronous liver/bowel surgery (380, 31.6%). Minor complications were similar between procedures. Major complications were consistent with a pooled fixed estimate of 9.1% (95%CI: 7.6%-10.8%, I(2) = 48%). Post-operative death was rare and consistent with a pooled fixed effect estimate of 3.1% (95%CI: 2.2%-4.3%, I(2) = 0%). Median follow-up ranged from 25.1 to 40.0 months, with a pooled underlying 5-year survival fixed effect estimate of 44% (I(2) = 39%). This review assesses outcomes of patients with colorectal cancer with synchronous liver metastases managed by either synchronous, sequential liver-first or bowel-first surgery. Overall treatment-related mortality is low and survival is similar among the three groups. These findings provide support for the continued use of all three pathways until better evidence to guide selection of an individual treatment option is available. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Does the piezoelectric surgical technique produce fewer postoperative sequelae after lower third molar surgery than conventional rotary instruments? A systematic review and meta analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Moraissi, E A; Elmansi, Y A; Al-Sharaee, Y A; Alrmali, A E; Alkhutari, A S

    2016-03-01

    A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted to answer the clinical question "Does the piezoelectric surgical technique produce fewer postoperative sequelae after lower third molar surgery than conventional rotary instruments?" A systematic and electronic search of several databases with specific key words, a reference search, and a manual search were performed from respective dates of inception through November 2014. The inclusion criteria were clinical human studies, including randomized controlled trials (RCTs), controlled clinical trials (CCTs), and retrospective studies, with the aim of comparing the piezoelectric surgical osteotomy technique to the standard rotary instrument technique in lower third molar surgery. Postoperative sequelae (oedema, trismus, and pain), the total number of analgesics taken, and the duration of surgery were analyzed. A total of nine articles were included, six RCTs, two CCTs, and one retrospective study. Six studies had a low risk of bias and three had a moderate risk of bias. A statistically significant difference was found between piezoelectric surgery and conventional rotary instrument surgery for lower third molar extraction with regard to postoperative sequelae (oedema, trismus, and pain) and the total number of analgesics taken (P=0.0001, P=0.0001, Psurgery time was required in the piezoelectric osteotomy group (Psurgery significantly reduced the occurrence of postoperative sequelae (oedema, trismus, and pain) and the total number of analgesics taken compared to the conventional rotary instrument technique in lower third molar surgery, but required a longer surgery time. Copyright © 2015 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The effect of nasal surgery on continuous positive airway pressure device use and therapeutic treatment pressures: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, Macario; Riaz, Muhammad; Capasso, Robson; Ruoff, Chad M; Guilleminault, Christian; Kushida, Clete A; Certal, Victor

    2015-02-01

    The relationship between nasal surgery and its effect on continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) device therapeutic treatment pressures and CPAP device use has not been previously systematically examined. To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis evaluating the effect of isolated nasal surgery on therapeutic CPAP device pressures and use in adults with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). MEDLINE, Scopus, Web of Science, and The Cochrane Library were searched through July 15, 2014. The MOOSE consensus statement and PRISMA statement were followed. Eighteen studies (279 patients) reported CPAP data after isolated nasal surgery. Seven studies (82 patients) reported preoperative and postoperative mean therapeutic CPAP device pressures and standard deviations (SD), which reduced from 11.6 ± 2.2 to 9.5 ± 2.0 centimeters of water pressure (cwp) after nasal surgery. Pooled random effects analysis demonstrated a statistically significant pressure reduction, with a mean difference (MD) of -2.66 cwp (95% confidence interval (CI), -3.65 to -1.67); P CPAP use; and a subgroup analysis demonstrated that 89.1% (57 of 64 patients) who were not using CPAP prior to nasal surgery subsequently accepted, adhered to, or tolerated it after nasal surgery. Objective, device meter-based hours of use increased in 33 patients from 3.0 ± 3.1 to 5.5 ± 2.0 h in the short term (nasal surgery in patients with OSA and nasal obstruction reduces therapeutic CPAP device pressures and the currently published literature's objective and subjective data consistently suggest that it also increases CPAP use in select patients. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  1. Robot-assisted surgery in gynecological oncology: current status and controversies on patient benefits, cost and surgeon conditions - a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Steffen E; Mosgaard, Berit J; Rosendahl, Mikkel; Dalsgaard, Tórur; Bjørn, Signe F; Frøding, Ligita P; Kehlet, Henrik; Høgdall, Claus K; Lajer, Henrik

    2017-03-01

    Robot-assisted surgery has become more widespread in gynecological oncology. The purpose of this systematic review is to present current knowledge on robot-assisted surgery, and to clarify and discuss controversies that have arisen alongside the development and deployment. A database search in PubMed and EMBASE was performed up until 4 March 2016. The search strategy was developed in collaboration with an information specialist, and by application of the PRISMA guidelines. Human participants and English language were the only restrictive filters applied. Selection was performed by screening of titles and abstracts, and by full text scrutiny. From 2001 to 2016, a total of 76 references were included. Robot-assisted surgery in gynecological oncology has increased, and current knowledge supports that the oncological safety is similar, compared with previous surgical methods. Controversies arise because current knowledge does not clearly document the benefit of robot-assisted surgery, on perioperative outcome compared with the increased costs of the acquisition and application. The rapid development in robot-assisted surgery calls for long-term detailed prospective cohorts or randomized controlled trials. The costs associated with acquisition, application, and maintenance have an unfavorable impact on cost-benefit evaluations, especially when compared with laparoscopy. Future developments in robot-assisted surgery will hopefully lead to competition in the market, which will decrease costs. © 2016 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  2. Is laparoscopic surgery the best treatment in fistulas complicating diverticular disease of the sigmoid colon? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirocchi, Roberto; Arezzo, Alberto; Renzi, Claudio; Cochetti, Giovanni; D'Andrea, Vito; Fingerhut, Abe; Mearini, Ettore; Binda, Gian Andrea

    2015-12-01

    Laparoscopic surgery is considered in the treatment of diverticular fistula for the possible reduction of overall morbidity and complication rate if compared to open surgery. Aim of this review is to assess the possible advantages deriving from a laparoscopic approach in the treatment of diverticular fistulas of the colon. Studies presenting at least 10 adult patients who underwent laparoscopic surgery for sigmoid diverticular fistula were reviewed. Fistula recurrence, reintervention, Hartmann's procedure or proximal diversion, conversion to laparotomy were the outcomes considered. 11 non randomized studies were included. Rates of fistula recurrence (0.8%), early reintervention (30 days) (2%) and need for Hartmann's procedure or proximal diversion (1.4%) did not show significant difference between laparoscopy and open technique. there is still concern about which surgery in complicated diverticulitis should be preferred. Laparoscopic approach has led to less postoperative pain, shorter hospital stay, faster recovery and better cosmetic results. Laparoscopic resection and primary anastomosis is a possible approach to sigmoid fistulas but its advantages in terms of lower mortality rate and postoperative stay after colon resection with primary anastomosis should be interpreted with caution. When there is firm evidence supporting it, it is likely that minimally invasive surgery should become the standard approach for diverticular fistulas, thus achieving adequate exposure and better visualization of the surgical field. The lack of RCTs, the small sample size, the heterogeneity of literature do not allow to draw statistically significant conclusions on the laparoscopic surgery for fistulas despite this approach is considered safe. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Systematic review automation technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Systematic reviews, a cornerstone of evidence-based medicine, are not produced quickly enough to support clinical practice. The cost of production, availability of the requisite expertise and timeliness are often quoted as major contributors for the delay. This detailed survey of the state of the art of information systems designed to support or automate individual tasks in the systematic review, and in particular systematic reviews of randomized controlled clinical trials, reveals trends that see the convergence of several parallel research projects. We surveyed literature describing informatics systems that support or automate the processes of systematic review or each of the tasks of the systematic review. Several projects focus on automating, simplifying and/or streamlining specific tasks of the systematic review. Some tasks are already fully automated while others are still largely manual. In this review, we describe each task and the effect that its automation would have on the entire systematic review process, summarize the existing information system support for each task, and highlight where further research is needed for realizing automation for the task. Integration of the systems that automate systematic review tasks may lead to a revised systematic review workflow. We envisage the optimized workflow will lead to system in which each systematic review is described as a computer program that automatically retrieves relevant trials, appraises them, extracts and synthesizes data, evaluates the risk of bias, performs meta-analysis calculations, and produces a report in real time. PMID:25005128

  4. Pain and disability following first-time lumbar fusion surgery for degenerative disorders: a systematic review protocol

    OpenAIRE

    Koenders, N.H.J.; Rushton, A.; Heneghan, N.; Verra, M.L.; Willems, P.; Hoogeboom, T.J.; Staal, J.B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Lumbar spinal fusion for degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine is frequently used, despite current research presenting inconclusive evidence. This study aims to systematically review and meta-analyse the natural course of pain and disability in patients with degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine such as spinal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, disc herniation, or discogenic low back pain to improve lumbar spinal fusion management. Methods/design An electronic database search w...

  5. Effects of bariatric surgery on the central nervous system and eating behavior in humans: a systematic review on the neuroimaging studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio Tonelli

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Neuroimaging studies suggest that obese people might show hyperactivity of brain areas regarding reward processing, and hypoactivity of brain areas concerning cognitive control, when exposed to food cues. Although the effects of bariatric surgery on the central nervous system and eating behavior are well known, few studies have used neuroimage techniques with the aim of investigating the central effects of bariatric surgery in humans. OBJECTIVES: This paper systematically and critically reviews studies using functional neuroimaging to investigate changes on the patterns of activation of central areas related to the regulation of eating behavior after bariatric surgery. METHOD: A search on the databases Medline, Web of Science, Lilacs and Science Direct on Line, was conducted in February 2013, using the keywords "Neuroimaging", "Positron-Emission Tomography", "Magnetic Resonance Imaging", "Gastric Bypass", "Gastroplasty", "Jejunoileal Bypass", "Bariatric Surgery". RESULTS: Seven manuscripts were included; the great majority studied the central effects of Roux en Y gastric bypass, using positron emission tomography or functional magnetic resonance. CONCLUSIONS: Bariatric surgery might normalize the activity of central areas concerned with reward and incentive salience processing, as the nucleus accumbens and mesencephalic tegmental ventral area, as well as circuitries processing behavioral inhibition, as the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex.

  6. Bilateral Postoperative Cyst after Maxillary Sinus Surgery: Report of a Case and Systematic Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris-Mark Niederquell

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. We present a case of a bilateral postoperative maxillary cyst (PMC and discuss this with a systemic review. Case Report and Literature Review. A 68-year-old female with pain and swelling on the right side of the face. MRI and CT showed a cystic tumors of the right and left maxillary sinus. Radical maxillary surgery via a Caldwell-Luc procedure had been performed 55 years ago and bilateral PMC was diagnosed. The PubMed database was searched for PMC within the last 30 years. Results. Together with the current case, we found 23 reports including 284 patients describing PMC. It was diagnosed at a mean time of 22 years after causal surgery at a mean age of 47 years. Initial symptoms were mostly pain with or without swelling. The main radiological sign was a unilocular radiolucency with a slight preference for the left side. Discussion. PMC is a long-term complication that can occur after maxillary sinus surgery and a second surgical approach is required in order to stop cystic expansion. Therefore, patients’ informed consent on this complication as well as a prolonged follow-up is recommended. Simple paranasal ultrasound or paranasal sinus plain radiography may lead to an earlier detection reducing interventional morbidity.

  7. Three-dimensional laparoscopy vs 2-dimensional laparoscopy with high-definition technology for abdominal surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fergo, Charlotte; Burcharth, Jakob; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Kildebro, Niels; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    This systematic review investigates newer generation 3-dimensional (3D) laparoscopy vs 2-dimensional (2D) laparoscopy in terms of error rating, performance time, and subjective assessment as early comparisons have shown contradictory results due to technological shortcomings. This systematic review was performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing newer generation 3D-laparoscopy with 2D-laparoscopy were included through searches in Pubmed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials database. Of 643 articles, 13 RCTs were included, of which 2 were clinical trials. Nine of 13 trials (69%) and 10 of 13 trials (77%) found a significant reduction in performance time and error, respectively, with the use of 3D-laparoscopy. Overall, 3D-laparoscopy was found to be superior or equal to 2D-laparoscopy. All trials featuring subjective evaluation found a superiority of 3D-laparoscopy. More clinical RCTs are still awaited for the convincing results to be reproduced. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Use of self-expandable stents in the treatment of bariatric surgery leaks: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puli, Srinivas R; Spofford, Inbar S; Thompson, Christopher C

    2012-02-01

    Bariatric surgery leaks can result in significant morbidity and mortality. Endoscopic placement of self-expandable stents (SESs) is emerging as a less-invasive alternative to surgery for the treatment of leaks. To evaluate the success of SESs in the treatment of bariatric surgery leaks. Studies using SESs in the management of bariatric surgery leaks were selected. Success of SES treatment was defined as radiographic evidence of leak closure after stent removal. Articles were searched in MEDLINE, PubMed, Ovid, and Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials. Pooled proportions were calculated by using fixed- and random-effects models. Publication bias was calculated by using the Begg-Mazumdar and Harbord bias estimators. A total of 189 relevant articles were reviewed of which 7 studies (67 patients with leaks) met inclusion criteria. The pooled proportion of successful leak closures by using SESs was 87.77% (95% CI, 79.39%-94.19%). The pooled proportion of successful endoscopic stent removal was 91.57% (95% CI, 84.22%-96.77%). Stent migration was noted in 16.94% (95% CI, 9.32%-26.27%). Test of heterogeneity gave a P value >.10. There was no publication bias. Small retrospective studies, different types of stents used. Endoscopic placement of SESs is a minimally invasive, safe, and effective alternative in the management of leaks after bariatric surgery. The use of SESs can minimize the need for surgical revision and improve patient outcomes. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. How Can Smoking Cessation Be Induced Before Surgery? A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Behavior Change Techniques and Other Intervention Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestwich, Andrew; Moore, Sally; Kotze, Alwyn; Budworth, Luke; Lawton, Rebecca; Kellar, Ian

    2017-01-01

    Background: Smokers who continue to smoke up to the point of surgery are at increased risk of a range of complications during and following surgery. Objective: To identify whether behavioral and/or pharmacological interventions increase the likelihood that smokers quit prior to elective surgery and which intervention components are associated with larger effects. Design: Systematic review with meta-analysis. Data sources: MEDLINE, Embase, and Embase Classic, CINAHL, CENTRAL. Study selection: Studies testing the effect of smoking reduction interventions delivered at least 24 h before elective surgery were included. Study appraisal and synthesis: Potential studies were independently screened by two people. Data relating to study characteristics and risk of bias were extracted. The effects of the interventions on pre-operative smoking abstinence were estimated using random effects meta-analyses. The association between specific intervention components (behavior change techniques; mode; duration; number of sessions; interventionist) and smoking cessation effect sizes were estimated using meta-regressions. Results: Twenty-two studies comprising 2,992 smokers were included and 19 studies were meta-analyzed. Interventions increased the proportion of smokers who were abstinent or reduced smoking by surgery relative to control: g = 0.56, 95% CI 0.32-0.80, with rates nearly double in the intervention (46.2%) relative to the control (24.5%). Interventions that comprised more sessions, delivered face-to-face and by nurses, as well as specific behavior change techniques (providing information on consequence of smoking/cessation; providing information on withdrawal symptoms; goal setting; review of goals; regular monitoring by others; and giving options for additional or later support) were associated with larger effects. Conclusion: Rates of smoking can be halved prior to surgery and a number of intervention characteristics can increase these effects. There was, however, some

  10. Effects of bariatric surgery on glycemic and lipid metabolism, surgical complication and quality of life in adolescents with obesity: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Lin; Guo, Yan; Liu, Chao-Qian; Huang, Zhi-Ping; Sheng, Yuan; Zou, Da-Jin

    2017-12-01

    Obesity in adolescents is associated with numerous health risks and co-morbidities, including type 2 diabetes and dyslipidemia. Bariatric surgery on adolescents induces weight loss, but little is known about metabolic effects of these operations. To explore weight loss and metabolic effects of bariatric surgery on young people. A systematic review and meta-analysis. University Hospital, China. PubMed and EMBASE were searched for relevant studies up to July 2017. The related studies in adolescents after operation were included. A total of 49 studies with 3007 patients were included. The average preoperative age ranged from 13.9 to 19.9 years. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (n = 1216), laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (n = 1028), and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (n = 665) were the most common bariatric surgeries performed. At the longest follow-up (range, 12-120 mo), bariatric surgery led to an overall 16.43 kg/m 2 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 14.84-18.01) and 31% (95% CI: 28%-34%) reduction in body mass index. There were significant improvements in glycemic and lipid profiles including glycosylated hemoglobin A1C, fasting blood insulin, fasting blood glucose, total cholesterol, triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, postoperatively at 12 months. The remission rate of dyslipidemia was 55% (95% CI: 34%-76%), 70% (95% CI: 55%-82%), and 95% (95% CI: 80%-100%) at 1, 3, and>5 years after surgery. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass produced better improvements than other surgical procedures. Bariatric surgery in adolescents may achieve significant weight loss, and glycemic and lipid control. Further well-designed studies with longer follow-up are warranted to provide more reliable evidence. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The Effectiveness of Public Simulated Oral Examinations in Preparation for the American Board of Surgery Certifying Examination: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennell, Christopher; McCulloch, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether American Board of Surgery Certifying Examination (CE) performance is improved among residents who prepare using simulated oral examinations (SOEs). EMBASE and MEDLINE were searched using predefined search terms. No language restrictions were imposed and the latest search date was in November 2014. Included studies must have reported on residents training in a general surgery residency in the United States who used SOEs to prepare for the CE and have measured their performance against those without exposure to SOEs. Studies meeting inclusion criteria were qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed and a fixed effects meta-analysis was performed to determine the net effect of SOEs on CE performance. Overall, 4 of 25 abstracts reviewed met inclusion criteria and are included in this review. The most common simulation format included public examinations in front of resident peers during scheduled education sessions. All 4 included studies trended toward improved performance with SOEs and in 2 of these studies the improvement was statistically significant. Overall, 3 studies were of adequate quality to perform a meta-analysis and demonstrated a relative risk for first-attempt CE success of 1.22 (95% CI: 1.07-1.39, p = 0.003) for residents preparing with SOEs compared to those without SOEs. The published literature evaluating SOEs is limited and generally of fair quality. A modest improvement in CE performance was identified when public SOEs were used as an educational tool aimed to improve professionalism and communication skills, encourage reading at home, and provide a regular review of clinically relevant topics. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Systematic review of bariatric surgery liver biopsies clarifies the natural history of liver disease in patients with severe obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedossa, Pierre; Tordjman, Joan; Aron-Wisnewsky, Judith; Poitou, Christine; Oppert, Jean-Michel; Torcivia, Adriana; Bouillot, Jean-Luc; Paradis, Valerie; Ratziu, Vlad; Clément, Karine

    2017-09-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a frequent complication of morbid obesity, but its severity varies greatly and thus there is a strong need to better define its natural history in these patients. Liver biopsies were systematically performed in 798 consecutive patients with severe obesity undergoing bariatric surgery. Histology was compared with clinical, biological, anthropometrical and body composition characteristics. Patients with presumably normal liver (n=179, 22%) were significantly younger at bariatric surgery than patients with NAFLD (37.0 vs 44.4 years, pliver reported the onset of obesity at a significantly younger age than those with NAFLD (14.8 vs 20.0 year, pliver disease severity (presumably normal liver: 1.00, steatosis: 1.21, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH): 1.34, pliver: 50%, steatosis: 49.1%, NASH: 47.4%, pliver disease but only in female patients (presumably normal liver: 8543 picolitres, steatosis: 9156 picolitres, NASH: 9996 picolitres). These results suggest that young adults are more prone to store fat in subcutaneous tissue and reach the threshold of bariatric surgery indication before their liver is damaged. A shift of fat storage from subcutaneous to visceral adipose tissue compartment is associated with liver damages. Liver might also be targeted by subcutaneous hypertrophic adipocytes in females since hypertrophic adipocytes are more exposed to lipolysis and to the production of inflammatory mediators. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  13. Outcomes after corrective surgery for congenital dextro-transposition of the great arteries using the arterial switch technique: a protocol for a scoping systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbuagbaw, Lawrence; Forlemu-Kamwa, Doris; Chu, Angela; Thabane, Lehana; Dillenberg, Rejane

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Dextro-transposition of the great arteries (d-TGA) is a life-threatening congenital health defect that requires rapid surgery. The most widely used approach is the arterial switch operation (ASO) developed by Jatene in the 1970s. The first set of children who received this intervention are now adults. The objective of this scoping review of the literature was to document the short-term (less than 1 year), medium-term (1–20 years) and long-term (more than 20 years) outcomes in children who underwent the ASO. Our primary income is survival, but we will explore other secondary surgical, cardiovascular, reproductive and quality-of-life outcomes. Methods and analyses Using a systematic scoping review approach, we will conduct a systematic search of the published literature for experimental and observational studies published on children who received the ASO intervention for classic d-TGA. We will search MEDLINE, Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE), Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) and Literatura Latino Americana em Ciências da Saúde (LILACS) from 1973 (date of the first successful ASO) to February 2014. Identified articles will be screened in duplicate and full text for selected articles will be retrieved. Data extraction will be carried out in duplicate. Discrepancies will be resolved by consensus or by consulting a third author. Where possible, proportions will be pooled using the inverse variance method. Our findings will be reported according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) and Meta-analysis Of Observational studies in Epidemiology (MOOSE) guidelines. Ethics and dissemination The results of this paper will be disseminated as peer-reviewed publications, at conferences and at clinical rounds. Our findings may answer important questions for surgeons who perform the ASO intervention and for clinicians who take care of patients after surgery and throughout their

  14. The comprehensive therapeutic effects of rectal surgery are better in laparoscopy: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jiabin; Feng, Xingyu; Yang, Zifeng; Hu, Weixian; Luo, Yuwen; Li, Yong

    2017-02-21

    Laparoscopic-assisted radical resection of rectal cancer was reported as advantageous compared to laparotomy resection. However, this finding remains controversial, especially given the two recent randomized controlled trials published on The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). To perform a meta-analysis that compares the short-term and long-term outcomes of laparoscopic and open surgery for rectal cancer. To identify clinical trials comparing laparoscopic and open surgery for rectal cancer published by August 2016, we searched the PubMed, Cochrane Library, Springer Link and Clinicaltrials.gov databases by combining various key words. Data were extracted from every identified study to perform a meta-analysis using the Review Manager 5.3 software. A total of 43 articles from 38 studies with a total of 13408 patients were included. Although laparoscopic radical rectectomy increased operation time (MD = 37.23, 95% CI: 28.88 to 45.57, P CRM positive rate (OR = 0.64, 95% CI: 0.55 to 0.75, P benefits in short-term outcomes and trending benefits in long-term outcomes that were observed, we recommend laparoscopic surgery be used for rectal cancer resection.

  15. Preoperative Risk Factors for Conversion of Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy to Open Surgery - A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothman, Josephine Philip; Burcharth, Jakob; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Preoperative risk factors for the conversion of laparoscopic cholecystectomy to open surgery have been identified, but never been explored systematically. Our objective was to systematically present the evidence of preoperative risk factors for conversion of laparoscopic cholecystecto...... cholecystitis were risk factors for the conversion of laparoscopic cholecystectomy to open surgery. Furthermore, there was no association between diabetes mellitus or white blood cell count and conversion to open surgery....

  16. Neonatal surgery in Africa: a systematic review and meta-analysis of challenges of management and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekenze, Sebastian O; Ajuzieogu, Obinna V; Nwomeh, Benedict C

    2015-04-27

    Advances in diagnostic techniques and perioperative care have greatly improved the outcome of neonatal surgery. Despite this, disparity still exists in the outcome of neonatal surgery between high-income countries and low-income and middle-income countries. This study reviews publications on neonatal surgery in Africa over 20 years with a focus on challenges of management, trends in outcome, and potential interventions to improve outcome. We did a literature review by searching PubMed and African Index Medicus for original articles published in any language between January, 1995, and September, 2014, with the search terms "neonatal surgery" and "Africa", further supplemented by "(surgery OR anaesthesia) AND (neonatal OR newborn) AND (developing countries OR Africa)". A data extraction sheet was used to collect information, including type of study, demographics, number of cases, outcome, challenges, and suggestions to improve outcome. For the meta-analysis, data were analysed by χ(2) test or Student's t-test as appropriate. In all, the significance level was set to pstudies from 11 countries met the inclusion criteria. The 16 studies in the first 10 years (before 2005; group A) were compared with the 35 in the last 10 years (2005-14; group B). Nigeria (n=32; 62·7%), South Africa (n=7; 13·7%), Tanzania (n=2; 3·9%), and Tunisia (n=2; 3·9%) were the predominant source of the publications, of which were retrospective in 38 (74·5%) studies and prospective in 13 (25·5%) studies. The mean sample size of the studies was 97·8 (range 5-640). Overall, 4989 neonates were studied, with median age of 6 days (range 1-30). Common neonatal conditions reported were intestinal atresia in 28 (54·9%) studies, abdominal wall defects in 27 (52·9%), anorectal malformations in 24 (47·1%), and Hirschsprung's disease, necrotising enterocolitis, and volvulus neonatorum in 23 (45·1%) each. Mortality was lowest (50%) in emergency neonatal surgeries involving bowel perforation, bowel

  17. What Are the Real Procedural Costs of Bariatric Surgery? A Systematic Literature Review of Published Cost Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doble, Brett; Wordsworth, Sarah; Rogers, Chris A; Welbourn, Richard; Byrne, James; Blazeby, Jane M

    2017-08-01

    This review aims to evaluate the current literature on the procedural costs of bariatric surgery for the treatment of severe obesity. Using a published framework for the conduct of micro-costing studies for surgical interventions, existing cost estimates from the literature are assessed for their accuracy, reliability and comprehensiveness based on their consideration of seven 'important' cost components. MEDLINE, PubMed, key journals and reference lists of included studies were searched up to January 2017. Eligible studies had to report per-case, total procedural costs for any type of bariatric surgery broken down into two or more individual cost components. A total of 998 citations were screened, of which 13 studies were included for analysis. Included studies were mainly conducted from a US hospital perspective, assessed either gastric bypass or adjustable gastric banding procedures and considered a range of different cost components. The mean total procedural costs for all included studies was US$14,389 (range, US$7423 to US$33,541). No study considered all of the recommended 'important' cost components and estimation methods were poorly reported. The accuracy, reliability and comprehensiveness of the existing cost estimates are, therefore, questionable. There is a need for a comparative cost analysis of the different approaches to bariatric surgery, with the most appropriate costing approach identified to be micro-costing methods. Such an analysis will not only be useful in estimating the relative cost-effectiveness of different surgeries but will also ensure appropriate reimbursement and budgeting by healthcare payers to ensure barriers to access this effective treatment by severely obese patients are minimised.

  18. A systematic review of randomised controlled trials of the effects of warmed irrigation fluid on core body temperature during endoscopic surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yinghui; Tian, Jinhui; Sun, Mei; Yang, Kehu

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to establish whether warmed irrigation fluid temperature could decrease the drop of body temperature and incidence of shivering and hypothermia. Irrigation fluid, which is used in large quantities during endoscopic surgeries at room temperature, is considered to be associated with hypothermia and shivering. It remains controversial whether using warmed irrigation fluid to replace room-temperature irrigation fluid will decrease the drop of core body temperature and the occurrence of hypothermia. A comprehensive search (computerised database searches, footnote chasing, citation chasing) was undertaken to identify all the randomised controlled trials that explored temperature of irrigation fluid in endoscopic surgery. An approach involving meta-analysis was used. We searched PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, SCI, China academic journals full-text databases, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database, Chinese scientific journals databases and Chinese Medical Association Journals for trials that meet the inclusion criteria. Study quality was assessed using standards recommended by Cochrane Library Handbook 5.0.1. Disagreement was resolved by consensus. Thirteen randomised controlled trials including 686 patients were identified. The results showed that room-temperature irrigation fluid caused a greater drop of core body temperature in patients, compared to warmed irrigation fluid (p temperature fluid. In endoscopic surgeries, irrigation fluid is recommended to be warmed to decrease the drop of core body temperature and the risk of perioperative shivering and hypothermia. Warming irrigating fluid should be considered standard practice in all endoscopic surgeries. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Effects of Positive Airway Pressure and Mechanical Ventilation of the Lungs During Cardiopulmonary Bypass on Pulmonary Adverse Events After Cardiac Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Chia; Huang, Chi-Hsiang; Tu, Yu-Kang

    2018-04-01

    To investigate whether different ventilation strategies during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) can improve outcomes in adult cardiac surgery patients. Systematic review of randomized controlled trials with meta-analyses. Clinical trials for human studies up to July 2016 were obtained from electronic databases (Medline, Embase, PubMed, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials) and reference lists of relevant randomized trials and review articles. Adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Patients who underwent cardiac surgery with CPB and ventilation or continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Fifteen randomized controlled trials with 748 patients were analyzed. In cardiac surgery, CPAP use during CPB was associated with an improved alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient difference compared with no CPAP (weighted mean difference [WMD] = 4.11 kPa; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.85-7.37; I 2 = 28.8%). Ventilation during CPB did not improve the postoperative hypoxemia score (WMD = 30.94; 95% CI = -20.76 to 82.63; I 2 = 61%) or diffusion capacity compared with the apnea group (WMD = 2.59 kPa; 95% CI = -2.49 to 7.67; I 2 = 81.3%). Neither CPAP nor ventilation during CPB was associated with a shorter mechanical ventilation time or hospital stay. CPAP during CPB improved the alveolar-arterial oxygen gradient difference compared with apnea, but ventilation during CPB did not. Neither CPAP nor ventilation during CPB demonstrated evidence of improving clinical outcomes in low- or intermediate-risk patients for elective cardiac surgery. The findings are inconclusive because of heterogeneity and small sample sizes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Pre- and postoperative inspiratory muscle training in patients undergoing cardiac surgery: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes Neto, Mansueto; Martinez, Bruno P; Reis, Helena Fc; Carvalho, Vitor O

    2017-04-01

    To determine the effects of pre- and postoperative inspiratory muscle training on length of postoperative hospital stay and pulmonary function in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. We conducted a systematic search using databases (MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, PEDro and the Cochrane) to find controlled trials evaluating the effects of pre- and postoperative inspiratory muscle training. Eight studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Four were about preoperative inspiratory muscle training (416 patients), three about postoperative inspiratory muscle training (115 patients) and one study about pre- and postoperative inspiratory muscle training (43 patients). Preoperative inspiratory muscle training resulted in improvement in: Reduction in length of postoperative hospital stay of -2 days (95% CI -3.4, -0.7, N = 302), inspiratory pressure of 16.7 cm H 2 O (95% CI 13.8, 19.5, N = 386), forced expiratory volume in one second of 3% predicted (95% CI 0.1, 6, N = 140), forced vital capacity of 4.6% predicted (95% CI 1.9, 7.4, N = 140). Patients that received preoperative training had an inspiratory muscle training reduced risk of postoperative pulmonary complications, (RR = 0.6; 95% CI 0.5 to 0.8; P = 0.0004, N = 386). Postoperative inspiratory muscle training resulted in improvement in inspiratory pressure of 16.5 cm H2O (95% CI 4.9, 27.8, N = 115), and tidal volume of 185 ml (95% CI 19.7, 349.8, N = 85). Pre- and postoperative inspiratory muscle training showed to be a beneficial intervention in the treatment of patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

  1. Prolapse surgery with or without stress incontinence surgery for pelvic organ prolapse: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ploeg, J. M.; van der Steen, A.; Oude Rengerink, K.; van der Vaart, C. H.; Roovers, J. P.

    2014-01-01

    The combination of prolapse surgery with an incontinence procedure can reduce the incidence of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) after surgery, but may increase adverse events. We compared the effectiveness and safety of prolapse surgery versus combined prolapse and incontinence surgery in women

  2. Benefits of post-operative oral protein supplementation in gastrointestinal surgery patients: A systematic review of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crickmer, Mike; Dunne, Colum P; O'Regan, Andrew; Coffey, J Calvin; Dunne, Suzanne S

    2016-07-27

    To evaluate published trials examining oral post-operative protein supplementation in patients having undergone gastrointestinal surgery and assessment of reported results. Database searches (MEDLINE, BIOSIS, EMBASE, Cochrane Trials, Cinahl, and CAB), searches of reference lists of relevant papers, and expert referral were used to identify prospective randomized controlled clinical trials. The following terms were used to locate articles: "oral'' or "enteral'' and "postoperative care'' or "post-surgical'' and "proteins'' or "milk proteins'' or "dietary proteins'' or "dietary supplements'' or "nutritional supplements''. In databases that allowed added limitations, results were limited to clinical trials that studied humans, and publications between 1990 and 2014. Quality of collated studies was evaluated using a qualitative assessment tool and the collective results interpreted. Searches identified 629 papers of which, following review, 7 were deemed eligible for qualitative evaluation. Protein supplementation does not appear to affect mortality but does reduce weight loss, and improve nutritional status. Reduction in grip strength deterioration was observed in a majority of studies, and approximately half of the studies described reduced complication rates. No changes in duration of hospital stay or plasma protein levels were reported. There is evidence to suggest that protein supplementation should be routinely provided post-operatively to this population. However, despite comprehensive searches, clinical trials that varied only the amount of protein provided via oral nutritional supplements (discrete from other nutritional components) were not found. At present, there is some evidence to support routinely prescribed oral nutritional supplements that contain protein for gastrointestinal surgery patients in the immediate post-operative stage. The optimal level of protein supplementation required to maximise recovery in gastrointestinal surgery patients is

  3. Benefits of post-operative oral protein supplementation in gastrointestinal surgery patients: A systematic review of clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crickmer, Mike; Dunne, Colum P; O’Regan, Andrew; Coffey, J Calvin; Dunne, Suzanne S

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate published trials examining oral post-operative protein supplementation in patients having undergone gastrointestinal surgery and assessment of reported results. METHODS: Database searches (MEDLINE, BIOSIS, EMBASE, Cochrane Trials, Cinahl, and CAB), searches of reference lists of relevant papers, and expert referral were used to identify prospective randomized controlled clinical trials. The following terms were used to locate articles: “oral’’ or “enteral’’ and “postoperative care’’ or “post-surgical’’ and “proteins’’ or “milk proteins’’ or “dietary proteins’’ or “dietary supplements’’ or “nutritional supplements’’. In databases that allowed added limitations, results were limited to clinical trials that studied humans, and publications between 1990 and 2014. Quality of collated studies was evaluated using a qualitative assessment tool and the collective results interpreted. RESULTS: Searches identified 629 papers of which, following review, 7 were deemed eligible for qualitative evaluation. Protein supplementation does not appear to affect mortality but does reduce weight loss, and improve nutritional status. Reduction in grip strength deterioration was observed in a majority of studies, and approximately half of the studies described reduced complication rates. No changes in duration of hospital stay or plasma protein levels were reported. There is evidence to suggest that protein supplementation should be routinely provided post-operatively to this population. However, despite comprehensive searches, clinical trials that varied only the amount of protein provided via oral nutritional supplements (discrete from other nutritional components) were not found. At present, there is some evidence to support routinely prescribed oral nutritional supplements that contain protein for gastrointestinal surgery patients in the immediate post-operative stage. CONCLUSION: The optimal level of protein

  4. Role of preoperative intravenous iron therapy to correct anemia before major surgery: study protocol for systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhenawy, Abdelsalam M; Meyer, Steven R; Bagshaw, Sean M; MacArthur, Roderick G; Carroll, Linda J

    2015-03-15

    Preoperative anemia is a common and potentially serious hematological problem in elective surgery and increases the risk for perioperative red blood cell (RBC) transfusion. Transfusion is associated with postoperative morbidity and mortality. Preoperative intravenous (IV) iron therapy has been proposed as an intervention to reduce perioperative transfusion; however, studies are generally small, limited, and inconclusive. We propose performing a systematic review and meta-analysis. We will search MEDLINE, EMBASE, EBM Reviews, Cochrane-controlled trial registry, Scopus, registries of health technology assessment and clinical trials, Web of Science, ProQuest Dissertations and Theses, and conference proceedings in transfusion, hematology, and surgery. We will contact our study drug manufacturer for unpublished trials. Titles and abstracts will be identified and assessed by two reviewers for potential relevance. Eligible studies are: randomized or quasi-randomized clinical trials comparing preoperative administration of IV iron with placebo or standard of care to reduce perioperative blood transfusion in anemic patients undergoing major surgery. Screening, data extraction, and quality appraisal will be conducted independently by two authors. Data will be presented in evidence tables and in meta-analytic forest plots. Primary efficacy outcomes are change in hemoglobin concentration and proportion of patients requiring RBC transfusion. Secondary outcomes include number of units of blood or blood products transfused perioperatively, transfusion-related acute lung injury, neurologic complications, adverse events, postoperative infections, cardiopulmonary complications, intensive care unit (ICU) admission/readmission, length of hospital stay, acute kidney injury, and mortality. Dichotomous outcomes will be reported as pooled relative risks and 95% confidence intervals. Continuous outcomes will be reported using calculated weighted mean differences. Meta-regression will be

  5. KNOWLEDGE GAPS IN ORAL AND MAXILLOFACIAL SURGERY: A SYSTEMATIC MAPPING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Österberg, Marie; Holmlund, Anders; Sunzel, Bo; Tranæus, Sofia; Twetman, Svante; Lund, Bodil

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate available knowledge and identify knowledge gaps within the field of oral and maxillofacial surgery, by systematically collecting and evaluating systematic reviews. Twelve specific domains were selected: surgical removal of teeth, antibiotic and corticosteroid prophylaxis, orofacial infections, dental and facial trauma, orthognathic surgery, reconstructive surgery, benign tumors, cysts, premalignant lesions, oral complications of treatment of malignant tumors, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, temporomandibular joint surgery, cost effectiveness of different surgical treatments, and ethics. The literature search, covering four databases, was conducted during September 2014: PubMed, The Cochrane library, Centre for Reviews and Dissemination and EBSCO dentistry and oral science source. Retrieved systematic reviews were quality assessed by AMSTAR. In all, 1,778 abstracts were identified, of which 200 met the inclusion criteria. Forty-five systematic reviews were assessed as of high to moderate quality. The results disclosed some existing evidence in a few domains, such as surgical removal of teeth and implant survival after sinus lifts. However, in all domains, the search revealed a large number of knowledge gaps. Also of concern was the lack of data regarding health economics and ethics. In conclusion, there is a need for well-conducted clinical research in the fields of oral and maxillofacial surgery.

  6. Surgical Anatomy of the Superior Mesenteric Vessels Related to Colon and Pancreatic Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negoi, Ionut; Beuran, Mircea; Hostiuc, Sorin; Negoi, Ruxandra Irina; Inoue, Yosuke

    2018-03-08

    The surgeon dissecting the base of the mesenterium, around the superior mesenteric vein (SMV) and artery, is facing a complex tridimensional vascular anatomy and should be aware of the anatomical variants in this area. The aim of this systematic review is to propose a standardized terminology of the superior mesenteric vessels, with impact in colon and pancreatic resections. We conducted a systematic search in PubMed/MEDLINE and Google Scholar databases up to March 2017. Forty-five studies, involving a total of 6090 specimens were included in the present meta-analysis. The pooled prevalence of the ileocolic, right colic and middle colic arteries was 99.8%, 60.1%, and 94.6%, respectively. The superior right colic vein and Henle trunk were present in 73.9%, and 89.7% of specimens, respectively. In conclusion, the infra-pancreatic anatomy of the superior mesenteric vessels is widely variable. We propose the term Henle trunk to be used for any venous confluence between gastric, pancreatic and colic veins, which drains between the inferior border of the pancreas and up to 20 mm downward on the right-anterior aspect of the SMV. The term gastrocolic trunk should not be synonymous, but a subgroup of the Henle trunk, together with to gastropancreatocolic, gastropancreatic, or colopancreatic trunk.

  7. Bariatric Surgery or Non-Surgical Weight Loss for Obstructive Sleep Apnoea? A Systematic Review and Comparison of Meta-analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafian, Hutan; Toma, Tania; Rowland, Simon P; Harling, Leanne; Tan, Alan; Efthimiou, Evangelos; Darzi, Ara; Athanasiou, Thanos

    2015-07-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a well-recognised complication of obesity. Non-surgical weight loss (medical, behavioural and lifestyle interventions) may improve OSA outcomes, although long-term weight control remains challenging. Bariatric surgery offers a successful strategy for long-term weight loss and symptom resolution. To comparatively appraise bariatric surgery vs. non-surgical weight loss interventions in OSA treatment utilising body mass index (BMI) and apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) as objective measures of weight loss and apnoea severity. A systematic literature review revealed 19 surgical (n = 525) and 20 non-surgical (n = 825) studies reporting the primary endpoints of BMI and AHI before and after intervention. Data were meta-analysed using random effects modelling. Subgroup analysis, quality scoring and risk of bias were assessed. Surgical patients had a mean pre-intervention BMI of 51.3 and achieved a significant 14 kg/m(2) weighted decrease in BMI (95%CI [11.91, 16.44]), with a 29/h weighted decrease in AHI (95%CI [22.41, 36.74]). Non-surgical patients had a mean pre-intervention BMI of 38.3 and achieved a significant weighted decrease in BMI of 3.1 kg/m(2) (95%CI [2.42, 3.79]), with a weighted decrease in AHI of 11/h (95%CI [7.81, 14.98]). Heterogeneity was high across all outcomes. Both bariatric surgery and non-surgical weight loss may have significant beneficial effects on OSA through BMI and AHI reduction. However, bariatric surgery may offer markedly greater improvement in BMI and AHI than non-surgical alternatives. Future studies must address the lack of randomised controlled and comparative trials in order to confirm the exact relationship between metabolic surgery and non-surgical weight loss interventions in OSA resolution.

  8. A New Classification of Three-Dimensional Printing Technologies: Systematic Review of Three-Dimensional Printing for Patient-Specific Craniomaxillofacial Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Carly A; Lin, Alexander Y

    2017-05-01

    Three-dimensional printing technology has been advancing in surgical applications. This systematic review examines its patient-specific applications in craniomaxillofacial surgery. Terms related to "three-dimensional printing" and "surgery" were searched on PubMed on May 4, 2015; 313 unique articles were returned. Inclusion and exclusion criteria concentrated on patient-specific surgical applications, yielding 141 full-text articles, of which 33 craniomaxillofacial articles were analyzed. Thirty-three articles included 315 patients who underwent three-dimensional printing-assisted operations. The most common modeling software was Mimics, the most common printing software was 3D Systems, the average time to create a printed object was 18.9 hours (range, 1.5 to 96 hours), and the average cost of a printed object was $1353.31 (range, $69.75 to $5500). Surgical procedures were divided among 203 craniofacial patients (205 three-dimensional printing objects) and 112 maxillofacial patients (137 objects). Printing technologies could be classified as contour models, guides, splints, and implants. For craniofacial patients, 173 contour models (84 percent), 13 guides (6 percent), two splints (1 percent), and 17 implants (8 percent) were made. For maxillofacial patients, 41 contour models (30 percent), 48 guides (35 percent), 40 splints (29 percent), and eight implants (6 percent) were made. These distributions were significantly different (p technology in craniomaxillofacial surgery can be classified into contour models (type I), guides (type II), splints (type III), and implants (type IV). These four methods vary in their use between craniofacial and maxillofacial surgery, reflecting their different goals. This understanding may help advance and predict three-dimensional printing applications for other types of plastic surgery and beyond.

  9. Systematic literature review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barnard, K. D.; Lloyd, C. E.; Skinner, T. C.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To review systematically the published literature addressing whether continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) provides any quality of life benefits to people with Type 1 diabetes. Methods: Electronic databases and published references were searched and a consultation with two professi...

  10. Postoperative outcomes following preoperative inspiratory muscle training in patients undergoing open cardiothoracic or upper abdominal surgery: protocol for a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mans Christina M

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In patients undergoing open cardiothoracic and upper abdominal surgery, postoperative pulmonary complications remain an important cause of postoperative morbidity and mortality, impacting upon hospital length of stay and health care resources. Adequate preoperative respiratory muscle strength may help protect against the development of postoperative pulmonary complications and therefore preoperative inspiratory muscle training has been suggested to be of potential value in improving postoperative outcomes. Methods/Design A systematic search of electronic databases will be undertaken to identify randomized trials of preoperative inspiratory muscle training in patients undergoing elective open cardiothoracic and upper abdominal surgery. From these trials, we will extract available data for a list of predefined outcomes, including postoperative pulmonary complications, hospital length of stay and respiratory muscle strength. We will meta-analyze comparable results where possible, and report a summary of the available pool of evidence. Discussion This review will provide the most comprehensive answer available to the question of whether preoperative inspiratory muscle training is clinically useful in improving postoperative outcomes in patients undergoing cardiothoracic and upper abdominal surgery. It will help inform clinicians working in the surgical arena of the likely effectiveness of instituting preoperative inspiratory muscle training programs to improve postoperative outcomes.

  11. Psychological adjustment and quality of life in children and adolescents following open-heart surgery for congenital heart disease: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bauersfeld Urs

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children with congenital heart defects (CHD requiring open-heart surgery are a group at high risk for health-related sequelae. Little consensus exists regarding their long-term psychological adjustment (PA and health-related quality of life (QoL. Thus, we conducted a systematic review to determine the current knowledge on long-term outcome in this population. Methods We included randomized controlled trials, case control, or cohort studies published between 1990–2008 evaluating self- and proxy-reported PA and QoL in patients aged between two and 17 years with a follow-up of at least two years after open heart surgery for CHD. Results Twenty-three studies assessing psychological parameters and 12 studies assessing QoL were included. Methodological quality of the studies varied greatly with most studies showing a moderate quality. Results were as follows: (a A considerable proportion of children experienced psychological maladjustment according to their parents; (b studies on self-reported PA indicate a good outcome; (c the studies on QoL suggest an impaired QoL for some children in particular for those with more severe cardiac disease; (d parental reports of psychological maladjustment were related to severity of CHD and developmental delay. Conclusion A significant proportion of survivors of open-heart surgery for CHD are at risk for psychological maladjustment and impaired QoL. Future research needs to focus on self-reports, QoL data and adolescents.

  12. The impact of intraoperative vascular occlusion during liver surgery on postoperative peak ALT levels: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tao; Xiao, Yusha; Liu, Zhisu; Liu, Quanyan

    2016-03-01

    Intraoperative vascular occlusion techniques during liver surgeries have been performed and refined for decades. However, the impact of these techniques on postoperative peak ALT levels remains uncertain. Thus, we performed a literature review and meta-analysis to determine the impact of intraoperative vascular occlusion during liver surgery on postoperative peak ALT levels. A systematic literature search of the PubMed database was conducted to discover relevant controlled clinical trials. Studies that reported postoperative peak ALT values for both an observation group and a control group were included. The Q statistic and the I(2) index statistic were used to assess heterogeneity. Publication bias was evaluated using Egger's test and Orwin's fail-safe N test. Of the 281 retrieved articles, 10 articles fulfilled the inclusion criteria. These 10 articles involved 12 randomized controlled trials with a total of 1443 records. The pooled estimation results indicated that intraoperative vascular occlusion significantly elevated postoperative peak ALT levels (test for SMD: Z = 4.09, P ALT values than non-occlusion procedures for liver surgeries. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Systematic review and meta-analysis of the role of mental training in the acquisition of technical skills in surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Ahsan; Tait, Ian; Alijani, Afshin

    2015-09-01

    Mental training is rehearsal of mental imagery without physically performing the task. The aim of the study was to perform systematic review and meta-analysis on all the available data to evaluate the role of mental training in the acquisition of surgical technical skills. The following search databases were used: EMBASE, MEDLINE, Web of Science, Clinicaltrials.gov.uk, SIGN guidelines, NICE guidelines, and Cochrane review register. Meta-analysis was performed using Revman 5.2 statistical software. There were a total of 9 randomized controlled trials with 474 participants, of which 189 participants received mental training. Five randomized controlled trials concluded positive impact of mental training. Mental training group did not show any significant improvement in overall performance of the task carried in each study (P = .06). Mental training can be used as an important supplementary tool in learning surgical skills when run in parallel with physical training and applied to trainees with some experience of the skill. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Dabigatran: A new oral anticoagulant. Guidelines to follow in oral surgery procedures. A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Corcuera, M; Ramírez-Martínez-Acitores, L; López-Pintor, R-M; Casañas-Gil, E; Hernández-Vallejo, G

    2016-11-01

    Dabigatran is a newly commercialized drug that is replacing other anticoagulants in the prevention of venous thromboembolism, stroke and systemic arterial valve embolism. It acts directly on thrombin presenting in a dynamic and predictable way, which does not require monitoring these patients. Therefore, we consider the need to assess whether their use increases the risk of bleeding involved before any dental treatment. We performed a systematic review with a bibliographic search in PubMed/Medline along with the Cochrane Library. We excluded articles dealing with all anticoagulants other than dabigatran, and works about surgical treatments in anatomical locations other than the oral cavity. We included a total of 13 papers of which 1 was a randomized clinical trial, 9 narrative literature reviews, 1 case series, 2 clinical cases and 1 expert opinion. Because we did not obtain any properly designed clinical trials, we were unable to conduct a meta-analysis. Currently, there is no consensus on the procedure to be followed in patients taking dabigatran. However, all authors agree to treat each case individually in accordance to the risk of embolism, postoperative bleeding and renal function. Also, it is necessary to perform minimally invasive interventions, and take the appropriate local anti-hemolytic measures.

  15. Use of α2-Adrenergic Agonists to Improve Surgical Field Visibility in Endoscopy Sinus Surgery: A Systematic Review of Randomised Controlled Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quijada-Manuitt, Maria Angeles; Escamilla, Yolanda; Vallano, Antonio; Cardesín, Alda; Bernal-Sprekelsen, Manuel; Pontes, Caridad

    2018-01-01

    We assessed the evidence for the use of α 2 -adrenergic agonists (A2AAs) in bleeding control and field quality in endoscopic sinus surgery. We systematically reviewed randomized clinical trials (RCTs) assessing A2AAs in endoscopic sinus surgery. Abstracts were reviewed by 2 investigators for eligibility, and selected articles were fully reviewed. Data on study design, population, A2AA drug and control groups, bleeding and surgical field quality outcomes, and adverse effects were extracted and synthesized. A total of 13 RCTs that included 896 individuals (7 double-blind trials, 5 single-blind trials, and 1 open-label trial) were selected that assessed the efficacy of clonidine (6 RCTs, 407 patients), dexmedetomidine (6 RCT, 423 patients), or both (1 RCT, 66 patients). Clonidine was compared with placebo (3 RCTs), midazolam (1 RCT), and remifentanil (2 RCTs). Dexmedetomidine was compared with esmolol (2 RCTs), remifentanil (2 RCTs), nitroglycerin and esmolol (1 RCT), and magnesium sulfate (1 RCT). Clonidine and dexmedetomidine were compared in 1 RCT. Clonidine reduced the proportion of individuals with an impaired surgical field by 23% vs placebo (number needed to treat = 4). Clonidine was better than midazolam and remifentanil in 2 trials, and dexmedetomidine was better than magnesium sulfate and esmolol in 2 trials but was not superior to esmolol, remifentanil, or nitroglycerin in 4 trials. Dexmedetomidine produced significantly better differences in bleeding outcomes versus clonidine. Adverse events were infrequent and mainly caused by hypotension or bradycardia. RCTs consistently report that A2AAs reduce bleeding and improve surgical field quality during endoscopic sinus surgery. Adverse event reporting was often omitted in RCTs. Well-designed RCTs with appropriate sample sizes are desirable to identify the best A2AAs and confirm their potential effects on clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Does preoperative urodynamics improve outcomes for women undergoing surgery for stress urinary incontinence? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachaneni, S; Latthe, P

    2015-01-01

    Urodynamics is widely used in the investigation of urinary incontinence. The existing evidence questions its add-on value in improving the outcome of surgical treatment for stress urinary incontinence (SUI). To compare the surgical outcomes in women with SUI or stress-predominant mixed urinary incontinence (MUI) based on urodynamic diagnoses compared with diagnoses based on office evaluation without urodynamics. We searched Cochrane, MedLine, Embase, CINAHL, LILACS, metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) and Google Scholar databases from inception until March 2013. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing surgical outcomes in women investigated by urodynamics and women who had office evaluation only. Two independent reviewers (S.R. and P.L.) extracted the data and analysed it using review manager (revman) 5.2 software. Of the 388 articles identified, only four RCTs met our criteria. The data from one study are as yet unpublished. In the other three RCTs, the women with SUI or stress-predominant MUI were randomised either to office evaluation and urodynamics (n = 388) or to office evaluation only (n = 387). There was no statistical difference in the risk ratio (RR) of subjective cure in the two groups (RR 1.02, 95%CI 0.90-1.15, P = 0.79, I(2) = 45%), objective cure (RR 1.01, 95%CI 0.93-1.11, P = 0.28, I(2) = 20%) or complications such as voiding dysfunction (RR 1.54, 95%CI 0.61-3.89, P = 0.27, I(2) = 18%) or urinary urgency (RR 0.80, 95%CI 0.28-2.3, P = 0.19, I(2) = 40%). In women undergoing primary surgery for SUI or stress-predominant MUI without voiding difficulties, urodynamics does not improve outcomes - as long as the women undergo careful office evaluation. © 2014 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  17. A systematic review and meta-analysis of the effect of prophylactic tranexamic acid treatment in major benign uterine surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topsoee, Märta F; Settnes, Annette; Ottesen, Bent

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The value of tranexamic acid (TA) treatment as bleeding prophylaxis in major uterine surgery is unclear. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the antihemorrhagic effect of prophylactic TA treatment in major benign uterine surgery. SEARCH STRATEGY: PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, and Web of Science...... were searched from 1980 to 2015 without language restriction using search terms related to major uterine surgery combined with TA. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomized controlled trials comparing prophylactic TA with placebo or no intervention in women undergoing elective major benign uterine surgery. DATA...

  18. The impact of frailty and sarcopenia on postoperative outcomes in older patients undergoing gastrectomy surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yanjiao; Hao, Qiukui; Zhou, Jianghua; Dong, Birong

    2017-08-21

    Gastric cancer is a major health problem, and frailty and sarcopenia will affect the postoperative outcomes in older people. However, there is still no systematic review to determine the role of frailty and sarcopenia in predicting postoperative outcomes among older patients with gastric cancer who undergo gastrectomy surgery. We searched Embase, Medline through the Ovid interface and PubMed websites to identify potential studies. All the search strategies were run on August 24, 2016. We searched the Google website for unpublished studies on June 1, 2017. The data related to the endpoints of gastrectomy surgery were extracted. Odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were pooled to estimate the association between sarcopenia and adverse postoperative outcomes by using Stata version 11.0. PRISMA guidelines for systematic reviews were followed. After screening 500 records, we identified eight studies, including three prospective cohort studies and five retrospective cohort studies. Only one study described frailty, and the remaining seven studies described sarcopenia. Frailty was statistically significant for predicting hospital mortality (OR 3.96; 95% CI: 1.12-14.09, P = 0.03). Sarcopenia was also associated with postoperative outcomes (pooled OR 3.12; 95% CI: 2.23-4.37). No significant heterogeneity was observed across these pooled studies (Chi 2  = 3.10, I 2  = 0%, P = 0.685). Sarcopenia and frailty seem to have significant adverse impacts on the occurrence of postoperative outcomes. Well-designed prospective cohort studies focusing on frailty and quality of life with a sufficient sample are needed.

  19. Association of industry sponsorship and positive outcome in randomised controlled trials in general and abdominal surgery: protocol for a systematic review and empirical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst, Pascal; Grummich, Kathrin; Ulrich, Alexis; Büchler, Markus W; Knebel, Phillip; Diener, Markus K

    2014-11-27

    Industry sponsorship has been identified as a factor correlating with positive research findings in several fields of medical science. To date, the influence of industry sponsorship in general and abdominal surgery has not been fully studied. This protocol describes the rationale and planned conduct of a systematic review to determine the association between industry sponsorship and positive outcome in randomised controlled trials in general and abdominal surgery. A literature search in the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE and EMBASE and additional hand searches in relevant citations will be conducted. In order to cover all relevant areas of general and abdominal surgery, a new literature search strategy called multi-PICO search strategy (MPSS) has been developed. No language restriction will be applied. The search will be limited to publications between January 1985 and July 2014. Information on funding source, outcome, study characteristics and methodological quality will be extracted.The association between industry sponsorship and positive outcome will be tested by a chi-squared test. A multivariate logistic regression analysis will be performed to control for possible confounders, such as number of study centres, multinational trials, methodological quality, journal impact factor and sample size. This study was designed to clarify whether industry-sponsored trials report more positive outcomes than non-industry trials. It will be the first study to evaluate this topic in general and abdominal surgery. The findings of this study will enable surgical societies, in particular, to give advice about cooperation with the industry and disclosure of funding source based on empirical evidence. PROSPERO CRD42014010802.

  20. Systematic reviews on leptospirosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GUIDUGLI Fabio

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To find the existing clinical evidence on interventions for leptospirosis. The objective is to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of any intervention on leptospirosis through systematic reviews of randomized controlled trials (RCTs. DATA SOURCE: The sources of studies used (where there were no limitations concerning language, date, or other restrictions were: EMBASE, LILACS, MEDLINE, the Cochrane Controlled Clinical Trials Database, and the Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Randomized Trials register. SELECTION OF STUDIES: Type of Study: All systematic reviews of randomized controlled trials. Participants: patients with clinical and/or laboratorial diagnosis of leptospirosis, and subjects potencially exposed to leptospirosis as defined by the authors Interventions: any intervention for leptospirosis (as antibiotics or vaccines for prevention or treatment. DATA COLLECTION: The assessment will be independently made by the reviewers and cross-checked. The external validity was assessed by analysis of: studies, interventions, and outcomes. DATA SYNTHESIS: Located 163 studies using the search strategy described above, at the electronic databases above. Only 2 hits were selected, which are protocols of systematic reviews of Cochrane Collaboration, and not full reviews. One of the protocols evaluates antibiotics for treatment, and the other evaluates antibiotics for prevention of leptospirosis. CONCLUSIONS: There were not complete systematic reviews on interventions for leptospirosis. Any interventions for leptospirosis, such as prevention and treatment remains unclear for guidelines and practice.

  1. Adjacent segment pathology following cervical motion-sparing procedures or devices compared with fusion surgery: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrod, Christopher Chambliss; Hilibrand, Alan S; Fischer, Dena J; Skelly, Andrea C

    2012-10-15

    A systematic review. To critically review and summarize the literature comparing motion preservation devices to fusion in the cervical spine to determine whether the use of these devices decreases the development of radiographical (RASP) or clinical adjacent segment pathology (CASP) compared with fusion. Historically, surgical treatment of symptomatic cervical disc disease presenting as radiculopathy and/or myelopathy with anterior cervical decompression and fusion has yielded excellent results. Controversy remains whether RASP and CASP requiring treatment is due to fusion-altered biomechanics and kinematics versus natural history. We conducted a systematic search in MEDLINE and the Cochrane Collaboration Library for literature published through February 2012 on human randomized control trials or cohort studies published in the English language containing abstracts to answer the following key questions: (1) Is there evidence that total disc replacement (TDR) is associated with a lower risk of RASP or CASP compared with fusion? (2) Is there evidence that other procedures that do not involve arthrodesis or other motion-sparing devices are associated with a lower risk of RASP or CASP compared with fusion? (3)Is one type of motion preservation device or procedure associated with a lower risk of RASP or CASP compared with others? The initial literature search yielded 276 citations, of which 73 unique, potentially relevant citations that were evaluated against the inclusion/exclusion criteria set a priori. A total of 14 studies were selected for inclusion. For question 1, RASP was variably reported in studies that compared total disc replacement (TDR) to anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF), and risk differences for reoperation due to CASP ranged from 1.0% to 4.8%, with no statistically significant differences between groups. For question 2, no studies comparing motion preservation devices to ACDF met our inclusion criteria. For question 3, one study

  2. Long-Term Outcome of Bariatric Surgery in Morbidly Obese Adolescents : A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of 950 Patients with a Minimum of 3 years Follow-Up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shoar, Saeed; Mahmoudzadeh, Habibollah; Naderan, Mohammad; Bagheri-Hariri, Shahram; Wong, Catherine; Shahabeddin Parizi, Ahmad; Shoar, Nasrin

    2017-01-01

    Background: Obesity in pediatric and adolescent population has reached a universal pandemic. This study aimed to summarize the literature on the longest available outcome of bariatric surgery in morbidly obese adolescents. Methods :A systematic review was conducted to pool available data on the

  3. Robotic Transnasal Endoscopic Skull Base Surgery: Systematic Review of the Literature and Report of a Novel Prototype for a Hybrid System (Brescia Endoscope Assistant Robotic Holder).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolzoni Villaret, Andrea; Doglietto, Francesco; Carobbio, Andrea; Schreiber, Alberto; Panni, Camilla; Piantoni, Enrico; Guida, Giovanni; Fontanella, Marco Maria; Nicolai, Piero; Cassinis, Riccardo

    2017-09-01

    Although robotics has already been applied to several surgical fields, available systems are not designed for endoscopic skull base surgery (ESBS). New conception prototypes have been recently described for ESBS. The aim of this study was to provide a systematic literature review of robotics for ESBS and describe a novel prototype developed at the University of Brescia. PubMed and Scopus databases were searched using a combination of terms, including Robotics OR Robot and Surgery OR Otolaryngology OR Skull Base OR Holder. The retrieved papers were analyzed, recording the following features: interface, tools under robotic control, force feedback, safety systems, setup time, and operative time. A novel hybrid robotic system has been developed and tested in a preclinical setting at the University of Brescia, using an industrial manipulator and readily available off-the-shelf components. A total of 11 robotic prototypes for ESBS were identified. Almost all prototypes present a difficult emergency management as one of the main limits. The Brescia Endoscope Assistant Robotic holder has proven the feasibility of an intuitive robotic movement, using the surgeon's head position: a 6 degree of freedom sensor was used and 2 light sources were added to glasses that were therefore recognized by a commercially available sensor. Robotic system prototypes designed for ESBS and reported in the literature still present significant technical limitations. Hybrid robot assistance has a huge potential and might soon be feasible in ESBS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. IMPACT OF VITAMIN D AND CALCIUM DEFICIENCY IN THE BONES OF PATIENTS UNDERGOING BARIATRIC SURGERY: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    CABRAL, Jefry Alberto Vargas; de SOUZA, Gabriela Pereira; NASCIMENTO, Juliana de Almeida; SIMONETI, Luis Fernando; MARCHESE, Carolina; SALES-PERES, Silvia Helena de Carvalho

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Bariatric surgery is considered the most effective tool in the control and treatment of severe obesity, but patients undergoing this procedure are at increased risk of developing nutritional deficiencies by limiting the intake and absorption of many nutrients. Objective: To assess the impact of vitamin D deficiency and calcium in bone in patients after gastric bypass in Roux-en-Y, pointing directly at the type of administration, doses and effects after surgery. Metho...

  5. Cardiovascular and renal effects of carperitide and nesiritide in cardiovascular surgery patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Mitaka, Chieko; Kudo, Toshifumi; Haraguchi, Go; Tomita, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Acute kidney injury (AKI) following cardiovascular surgery is a common disease process and is associated with both morbidity and mortality. The aim of our study was to evaluate the cardiovascular and renal effects of an atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP, carperitide) and a B-type (or brain) natriuretic peptide (BNP, nesiritide) for preventing and treating AKI in cardiovascular surgery patients. Methods Electronic databases, including PubMed, EMBASE and references from identified ar...

  6. The quality of systematic reviews about interventions for refractive error can be improved: a review of systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo-Wilson, Evan; Ng, Sueko Matsumura; Chuck, Roy S; Li, Tianjing

    2017-09-05

    Systematic reviews should inform American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO) Preferred Practice Pattern® (PPP) guidelines. The quality of systematic reviews related to the forthcoming Preferred Practice Pattern® guideline (PPP) Refractive Errors & Refractive Surgery is unknown. We sought to identify reliable systematic reviews to assist the AAO Refractive Errors & Refractive Surgery PPP. Systematic reviews were eligible if they evaluated the effectiveness or safety of interventions included in the 2012 PPP Refractive Errors & Refractive Surgery. To identify potentially eligible systematic reviews, we searched the Cochrane Eyes and Vision United States Satellite database of systematic reviews. Two authors identified eligible reviews and abstracted information about the characteristics and quality of the reviews independently using the Systematic Review Data Repository. We classified systematic reviews as "reliable" when they (1) defined criteria for the selection of studies, (2) conducted comprehensive literature searches for eligible studies, (3) assessed the methodological quality (risk of bias) of the included studies, (4) used appropriate methods for meta-analyses (which we assessed only when meta-analyses were reported), (5) presented conclusions that were supported by the evidence provided in the review. We identified 124 systematic reviews related to refractive error; 39 met our eligibility criteria, of which we classified 11 to be reliable. Systematic reviews classified as unreliable did not define the criteria for selecting studies (5; 13%), did not assess methodological rigor (10; 26%), did not conduct comprehensive searches (17; 44%), or used inappropriate quantitative methods (3; 8%). The 11 reliable reviews were published between 2002 and 2016. They included 0 to 23 studies (median = 9) and analyzed 0 to 4696 participants (median = 666). Seven reliable reviews (64%) assessed surgical interventions. Most systematic reviews of interventions for

  7. [The Pain-Relief Efficacy of Passive Music-Based Interventions in Cancer Patients Undergoing Diagnostic Biopsies and Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Tsai-Tzu; Liu, Yu-Chen; Tsai, Pei-Cheng; Lin, Mei-Feng

    2018-02-01

    Music-based intervention is commonly used as a non-pharmacological strategy to reduce pain in hospitalized patients. To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to examine the effects of passive music-based interventions on pain relief in cancer patients undergoing diagnostic biopsies and surgeries and to identify the moderating variables in order to identify clinically validated interventional strategies and related suggestions. Studies using an RCT (randomized clinical trial) design that were published before 2016 were collected from the following databases: Cochrane Library/Trials, PubMed, PsycINFO, CINHAL, and Index to Taiwan Periodical Literature System. The high-quality studies, defined as those earning a modified Jadad scale score >3, were then analyzed using comprehensive meta-analysis software. The passive music-based interventions had a small-to-moderate overall effect (g = -.42, p = .02) on pain relief in the subjects undergoing diagnostic biopsies and surgery in the analyzed studies (n = 12). Subgroup analysis identified the moderating variables affecting pain reduction as the type of anesthesia administered and the settings, frequency, and music therapist that were used in the intervention. Passive music-based interventions have a significant pain reduction effect and may be used as an effective, non-pharmacologic intervention for cancer patients undergoing diagnostic biopsies and surgery. Delivering 2-3 intervention sessions daily, using a certificated music therapist to deliver/guide the sessions, holding the sessions in waiting-room or ward settings, and administering a general anesthesia were identified as the crucial factors impacting the effectiveness of music intervention on pain relief.

  8. Cardiovascular and renal effects of carperitide and nesiritide in cardiovascular surgery patients: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitaka, Chieko; Kudo, Toshifumi; Haraguchi, Go; Tomita, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) following cardiovascular surgery is a common disease process and is associated with both morbidity and mortality. The aim of our study was to evaluate the cardiovascular and renal effects of an atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP, carperitide) and a B-type (or brain) natriuretic peptide (BNP, nesiritide) for preventing and treating AKI in cardiovascular surgery patients. Electronic databases, including PubMed, EMBASE and references from identified articles were used for a literature search. Data on the infusion of ANP or BNP in cardiovascular surgery patients was collected from fifteen randomized controlled trials and combined. The infusion of ANP or BNP increased the urine output and creatinine clearance or glomerular filtration rate, and reduced the use of diuretics and the serum creatinine levels. A meta-analysis showed that ANP infusion significantly decreased peak serum creatinine levels, incidence of arrhythmia and renal replacement therapy. The meta-analysis also showed that ANP or BNP infusion significantly decreased the length of ICU stay and hospital stay compared with controls. However, the combined data were insufficient to determine how ANP or BNP infusion during the perioperative period influences long-term outcome in cardiovascular surgery patients. The infusion of ANP or BNP may preserve postoperative renal function in cardiovascular surgery patients. A large, multicenter, prospective, randomized controlled trial will have to be performed to assess the therapeutic potential of ANP or BNP in preventing and treating AKI in the cardiovascular surgical setting.

  9. Failure of the Obesity Surgery Mortality Risk Score (OS-MRS) to Predict Postoperative Complications After Bariatric Surgery. A Single-Center Series and Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-García, Maria Luisa; Martín-Lorenzo, Juan Gervasio; Lirón-Ruiz, Ramón; Torralba-Martínez, José Antonio; García-López, José Antonio; Aguayo-Albasini, José Luis

    2017-06-01

    The obesity surgery mortality risk score (OS-MRS) was developed to determine the risk of postoperative mortality in patients undergoing bariatric surgery. The aim of the present study is to assess the utility of this score for preventing the risk of postoperative complications from bariatric surgery. Prospective study of 321 patients undergoing bariatric surgery to whom the OS-MRS was applied. Postoperative complications were classified according to the Clavien-Dindo system. The relation between the OS-MRS and the appearance of complications and mortality was analyzed. A Medline/Embase search was conducted using bariatric surgery, mortality, and complications as key words. Studies using the OS-MRS to predict morbidity and mortality were included. Of the 321 patients, 303 (94.3%) underwent gastric bypass and the remaining 18 (5.6%) a sleeve gastrectomy. The OS-MRS classified 178 patients as class A (55.5%), 129 as class B (40.2%), and 14 as class C (4.4%). According to the Clavien-Dindo system, 10.4% of the complications were ≥III. There was one death (class B). No significant association was found between the OS-MRS and the rate of complications. In our study, the OS-MRS is not correlated with the appearance of early complications or mortality. Future studies must focus on systems for predicting the appearance and severity of postoperative complications classified according to the Clavien-Dindo system, and not only on mortality.

  10. Swaddling: A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Sleuwen, Bregje E.; Engelberts, Adèle C.; Boere-Boonekamp, Magdalena M.; Kuis, Wietse; Schulpen, Tom W.J.

    2007-01-01

    Swaddling was an almost universal child-care practice before the 18th century. It is still tradition in certain parts of the Middle East and is gaining popularity in the United Kingdom, the United States, and the Netherlands to curb excessive crying. We have systematically reviewed all articles on

  11. Swaddling : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Sleuwen, Bregje E.; Engelberts, Adele C.; Boere-Boonekamp, Magda M.; Kuis, Wietse; Schulpen, Tom W. J.; L'Hoir, Monique P.

    2007-01-01

    Swaddling was an almost universal child-care practice before the 18th century. It is still tradition in certain parts of the Middle East and is gaining popularity in the United Kingdom, the United States, and the Netherlands to curb excessive crying. We have systematically reviewed all articles on

  12. Predictors of Pain Relief Following Spinal Cord Stimulation in Chronic Back and Leg Pain and Failed Back Surgery Syndrome: A Systematic Review and Meta-Regression Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Rod S; Desai, Mehul J; Rigoard, Philippe; Taylor, Rebecca J

    2014-01-01

    We sought to assess the extent to which pain relief in chronic back and leg pain (CBLP) following spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is influenced by patient-related factors, including pain location, and technology factors. A number of electronic databases were searched with citation searching of included papers and recent systematic reviews. All study designs were included. The primary outcome was pain relief following SCS, we also sought pain score (pre- and post-SCS). Multiple predictive factors were examined: location of pain, history of back surgery, initial level of pain, litigation/worker's compensation, age, gender, duration of pain, duration of follow-up, publication year, continent of data collection, study design, quality score, method of SCS lead implant, and type of SCS lead. Between-study association in predictive factors and pain relief were assessed by meta-regression. Seventy-four studies (N = 3,025 patients with CBLP) met the inclusion criteria; 63 reported data to allow inclusion in a quantitative analysis. Evidence of substantial statistical heterogeneity (P pain relief following SCS was noted. The mean level of pain relief across studies was 58% (95% CI: 53% to 64%, random effects) at an average follow-up of 24 months. Multivariable meta-regression analysis showed no predictive patient or technology factors. SCS was effective in reducing pain irrespective of the location of CBLP. This review supports SCS as an effective pain relieving treatment for CBLP with predominant leg pain with or without a prior history of back surgery. Randomized controlled trials need to confirm the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of SCS in the CLBP population with predominant low back pain. PMID:23834386

  13. Computerised insulin dosing calculators for the management of continuous insulin infusions after cardiac surgery: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgs, Megan H; Fernandez, Ritin S

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of computerised insulin dosing calculators for the management of continuous insulin infusions in adult patients who underwent cardiac surgery. A systematic review was conducted. The CINAHL, MEDLINE and Cochrane databases were searched for primary studies that compared a computerised insulin dosing calculator to a paper protocol. The main outcome measures were mean Blood Glucose Level (BGL), time to achieve BGL target range, time spent within BGL target range, the incidence of hyperglycaemia and the incidence of hypoglycaemia. Five studies were included in the final review. Pooled data demonstrated significant improvements in mean BGL (MD -14.24, 95% CI -26.93 to -1.55), p=0.03 and significantly lower rates of hypoglycaemia (OR 0.038, 95% CI: 0.16-0.90), p=0.03 amongst the computer calculator groups in comparison to the paper protocol groups. No significant difference in the incidence of severe hypoglycaemia was demonstrated (OR 0.21, 95% CI 0.02-1.79), p=0.15. No difference was found in time (hours) to reach target blood glucose range (MD -1.47, 95% CI -3.75 to 0.81), p=0.21. There is some evidence to support the use of computerised insulin dosing calculators for insulin infusion management within critical care environments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. How to write a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Joshua D; Quatman, Carmen E; Manring, M M; Siston, Robert A; Flanigan, David C

    2014-11-01

    The role of evidence-based medicine in sports medicine and orthopaedic surgery is rapidly growing. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses are also proliferating in the medical literature. To provide the outline necessary for a practitioner to properly understand and/or conduct a systematic review for publication in a sports medicine journal. Review. The steps of a successful systematic review include the following: identification of an unanswered answerable question; explicit definitions of the investigation's participant(s), intervention(s), comparison(s), and outcome(s); utilization of PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses) guidelines and PROSPERO registration; thorough systematic data extraction; and appropriate grading of the evidence and strength of the recommendations. An outline to understand and conduct a systematic review is provided, and the difference between meta-analyses and systematic reviews is described. The steps necessary to perform a systematic review are fully explained, including the study purpose, search methodology, data extraction, reporting of results, identification of bias, and reporting of the study's main findings. Systematic reviews or meta-analyses critically appraise and formally synthesize the best existing evidence to provide a statement of conclusion that answers specific clinical questions. Readers and reviewers, however, must recognize that the quality and strength of recommendations in a review are only as strong as the quality of studies that it analyzes. Thus, great care must be used in the interpretation of bias and extrapolation of the review's findings to translation to clinical practice. Without advanced education on the topic, the reader may follow the steps discussed herein to perform a systematic review. © 2013 The Author(s).

  15. Application of carbon nanoparticles in lymph node dissection and parathyroid protection during thyroid cancer surgeries: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang L

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Lun Wang, Dong Yang, Jun-Yuan Lv, Dan Yu, Shi-Jie Xin Department of Vascular and Thyroid Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang, People’s Republic of China Purpose: To investigate whether carbon nanoparticles (CNs are helpful in identifying lymph nodes and metastatic lymph nodes and in parathyroid protection during thyroid cancer surgery. Methods: English and Chinese literature in PubMed, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, EMBASE, ClinicalTrials.gov, China Biology Medicine Database, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, China Master’s and Doctoral Theses Full-Text Database, Wanfang database, and Cqvip database were searched (till March 22, 2016. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs that compared the use of CNs with a blank control in patients undergoing thyroid cancer surgery were included. Quality assessment and data extraction were performed, and a meta-analysis was conducted using RevMan 5.1 software. The primary outcomes were the number of retrieved central lymph nodes and metastatic lymph nodes, and the rate of accidental parathyroid removal. Results: We obtained 149 relevant studies, and only 47 RCTs with 4,605 patients (CN group: n=2,197; blank control group: n=2,408 met the inclusion criteria. Compared with the control group, the CN group was associated with more retrieved lymph nodes/patient (weighted mean difference [WMD]: 3.39, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.73–4.05, more retrieved metastatic lymph nodes (WMD: 0.98, 95% CI: 0.61–1.35, lower rate of accidental parathyroid removal, and lower rates of hypoparathyroidism and hypocalcemia. However, the total metastatic rate of the retrieved lymph nodes did not differ between the groups (odds ratio: 1.13, 95% CI: 0.87–1.47, P=0.35. Conclusion: CNs can improve the extent of neck dissection and protect the parathyroid glands during thyroid cancer surgery. And the number of identified metastatic lymph nodes can be simultaneously increased

  16. Minimally-invasive glaucoma surgeries (MIGS) for open angle glaucoma: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavia, Carlo; Dallorto, Laura; Maule, Milena; Ceccarelli, Manuela; Fea, Antonio Maria

    2017-01-01

    MIGS have been developed as a surgical alternative for glaucomatous patients. To analyze the change in intraocular pressure (IOP) and glaucoma medications using different MIGS devices (Trabectome, iStent, Excimer Laser Trabeculotomy (ELT), iStent Supra, CyPass, XEN, Hydrus, Fugo Blade, Ab interno canaloplasty, Goniscopy-assisted transluminal trabeculotomy) as a solo procedure or in association with phacoemulsification. Randomized control trials (RCT) and non-RCT (non randomized comparative studies, NRS, and before-after studies) were included. Studies with at least one year of follow-up in patients affected by primary open angle glaucoma, pseudoexfoliative glaucoma or pigmentary glaucoma were considered. Risk of Bias assessment was performed using the Cochrane Risk of Bias and the ROBINS-I tools. The main outcome was the effect of MIGS devices compared to medical therapy, cataract surgery, other glaucoma surgeries and other MIGS on both IOP and use of glaucoma medications 12 months after surgery. Outcomes measures were the mean difference in the change of IOP and glaucoma medication compared to baseline at one and two years and all ocular adverse events. The current meta-analysis is registered on PROSPERO (reference n° CRD42016037280). Over a total of 3,069 studies, nine RCT and 21 case series with a total of 2.928 eyes were included. Main concerns about risk of bias in RCTs were lack of blinding, allocation concealment and attrition bias while in non-RCTs they were represented by patients' selection, masking of participants and co-intervention management. Limited evidence was found based on both RCTs and non RCTs that compared MIGS surgery with medical therapy or other MIGS. In before-after series, MIGS surgery seemed effective in lowering both IOP and glaucoma drug use. MIGS showed a good safety profile: IOP spikes were the most frequent complications and no cases of infection or BCVA loss due to glaucoma were reported. Although MIGS seem efficient in the

  17. Current evidence on the role of smoking in plastic surgery elective procedures: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theocharidis, Vasileios; Katsaros, Ioannis; Sgouromallis, Emmanouil; Serifis, Nikolaos; Boikou, Vasileios; Tasigiorgos, Sotirios; Kokosis, George; Economopoulos, Konstantinos P

    2018-02-06

    Smoking is considered to be a significant risk factor for the development of postoperative complications after various surgical procedures, mainly by limiting oxygen delivery to tissues. Evidence on the collective impact of smoking in aesthetic procedure outcomes is scarce. The aim of this study is to evaluate the current evidence on the association between smoking and postoperative outcomes in patients who underwent common elective procedures in plastic surgery. PubMed and Cochrane bibliographical databases were searched from January 1950 to October 2016 for studies reporting on patients who underwent facelift, abdominoplasty, breast reduction and breast reconstruction and for studies with included data on smoking history of treated patients. Fifty-three studies reporting on postoperative complications in tobacco users undergoing facelift, abdominoplasty, breast reduction and reconstruction were identified. Tobacco use is found to significantly increase the total number of postoperative complications as far as abdominoplasty (OR: 5.43; 95% CI = 2.92-10.10), breast reduction (OR: 2.36; 95% CI = 1.64-3.39) and breast reconstruction (OR: 1.91; 95% CI = 1.69-2.17) are concerned. Smoking history does not significantly affect total postoperative complications after facelift procedures (OR: 3.36; 95% CI = 0.92-12.30). Smoking predisposes to surgical site infections, delayed wound healing and skin necrosis in patients undergoing the most common aesthetic procedures in plastic surgery. More rigorous and detailed reporting on the history of tobacco use and surgical outcomes following plastic surgery procedures is needed to better quantify the impact of smoking on the overall postoperative care for this patient population. Copyright © 2018 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Prevention of Bleeding in Orthognathic Surgery--A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jesper J; Skov, Jane; Ingerslev, Janne

    2016-01-01

    and operating time. This review is registered at PROSPERO (CRD42014014840). RESULTS: Eleven trials were included for review. The individual trials demonstrated the effects on IOB from hypotensive anesthetic regimens, the use of aprotinin, and the herbal medicine Yunnan Baiyao. Six studies of tranexamic acid...

  19. Postoperative outcomes following preoperative inspiratory muscle training in patients undergoing cardiothoracic or upper abdominal surgery: a systematic review and meta analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mans, Christina M; Reeve, Julie C; Elkins, Mark R

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate whether preoperative inspiratory muscle training is effective in preventing postoperative pulmonary complications and reducing length of hospital stay in people undergoing cardiothoracic or upper abdominal surgery. Medline, CINAHL, AMED, PsychINFO, Scopus, PEDro, and the Cochrane Library. A systematic review and meta analysis of randomized controlled trials (or quasi-randomized controlled trials) investigating a form of preoperative inspiratory muscle training, compared with sham or no inspiratory muscle training. Participants were adults (16 years and over) awaiting elective open cardiac, thoracic, or upper abdominal surgery. Methodological quality was assessed using the PEDro scale. Eight studies involving 295 participants were eligible for inclusion. The trained group had significantly higher maximal inspiratory pressure at the end of the preoperative training period (mean difference: 15 cm H2O, 95% confidence interval (CI): 9 to 21). This benefit was maintained through the early postoperative period, when lung function also recovered significantly more quickly in the trained group. Inspiratory muscle training also substantially reduced postoperative pulmonary complications (relative risk 0.48, 95% CI 0.26 to 0.89). Although not statistically significant, length of hospital stay also tended to favour the trained group. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups for the remaining outcomes. Participant satisfaction with inspiratory muscle training was high. Preoperative inspiratory muscle training significantly improves respiratory (muscle) function in the early postoperative period, halving the risk of pulmonary complications. The training does not increase length of stay, but more data are required to confirm whether it reduces length of stay. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Systematic review and meta-analysis of surgical outcomes in Marfan patients undergoing aortic root surgery by composite-valve graft or valve sparing root replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Campbell D; Tian, David H; Wilson-Smith, Ashley; David, Tirone; Matalanis, George; Misfeld, Martin; Mastrobuoni, Stefano; El Khoury, Gebrine; Yan, Tristan D

    2017-11-01

    A major, life-limiting feature of Marfan syndrome (MFS) is the presence of aneurysmal disease. Cardiovascular intervention has dramatically improved the life expectancy of Marfan patients. Traditionally, the management of aortic root disease has been undertaken with composite-valve graft replacing the aortic valve and proximal aorta; more recently, valve sparing procedures have been developed to avoid the need for anticoagulation. This meta-analysis assesses the important surgical outcomes of the two surgical techniques. A systematic review and meta-analysis of 23 studies reporting the outcomes of aortic root surgery in Marfan patients with data extracted for outcomes of early and late mortality, thromboembolic events, late bleeding complications and surgical reintervention rates. The outcomes of 2,976 Marfan patients undergoing aortic root surgery were analysed, 1,624 patients were treated with composite valve graft (CVG) and 1,352 patients were treated with valve sparing root replacement (VSRR). When compared against CVG, VSRR was associated with reduced risk of thromboembolism (OR =0.32; 95% CI, 0.16-0.62, P=0.0008), late hemorrhagic complications (OR =0.18; 95% CI, 0.07-0.45; P=0.0003) and endocarditis (OR =0.27; 95% CI, 0.10-0.68; P=0.006). Importantly there was no significant difference in reintervention rates between VSRR and CVG (OR =0.89; 95% CI, 0.35-2.24; P=0.80). There is an increasing body of evidence that VSRR can be reliably performed in Marfan patients, resulting in a durable repair with no increased risk of re-operation compared to CVG, thus avoiding the need for systemic anticoagulation in selected patients.

  1. Laparoscopic versus open surgery following neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Zhao, Liying; An, Shengli; Wu, Jiaming; Zou, Zhenhong; Liu, Hao; Li, Guoxin

    2014-03-01

    This meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the short-term and pathological outcomes of laparoscopic surgery (LS) versus open surgery (OS) following neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (NCRT) for rectal cancer. PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, and Chinese Biomedicine Literature databases were searched for eligible studies published up to July 2013. The rates of postoperative complication, positive circumferential resection margin (CRM), and the number of lymph nodes harvested were evaluated. Three randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and five non-RCTs enrolling 953 patients were included. Compared to OS, LS had similar rate of postoperative complication [odds ratio (OR) 0.86; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.60 to 1.22], comparable rate of positive CRM (OR 0.41; 95% CI, 0.16 to 1.02), and smaller number of lymph nodes (weighted mean difference -0.8; 95% CI, -1.1 to -0.5). LS also had significantly less blood loss, faster bowel movement recovery, and shorter postoperative hospitalization than those of OS. LS is associated with favorable short-term benefits, similar postoperative complication rate, and comparable pathological outcomes for rectal cancer after NCRT compared to OS despite a slight difference in the number of lymph nodes. Additional high-quality studies are needed to validate long-term outcomes of LS following NCRT.

  2. Minimally Invasive Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy versus Retrograde Intrarenal Surgery for Upper Urinary Stones: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyang Jiang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Minimally invasive percutaneous nephrolithotomy (mini-PCNL and retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS are both alternatives for PCNL to treat renal calculi. This study is aimed at comparing the stone-free rate (SFR and other surgery parameters of two approaches for treating upper urinary calculi. We performed this meta-analysis in September 2016 by searching studies about mini-PCNL and RIRS for treating upper urinary calculi in various databases, and RevMan v.5.3 was applied. Three randomized controlled trials and ten nonrandomized trials were included, involving a total of 1317 patients. Meta-analysis showed that mini-PCNL group led to a higher SFR [odds ratio: 1.96; 95% confidence interval: 1.46–2.64; P<0.00001] but brought a larger postoperative decrease in hemoglobin levels compared with RIRS. RIRS provided a shorter hospital time. There was no significant difference in operation time. Higher postoperative complications were detected in the mini-PCNL, but the difference was not significant. Grade I and III complications did not vary between two procedures, but grade II complications were of lower incidence in RIRS group. In the light of these results, compared with RIRS, mini-PCNL provided significantly higher SFR and efficiency quotient for managing calculi; however, it resulted in higher incidence of postoperative complications, larger hemoglobin drops, and longer hospital stay.

  3. Systematic reviews on leptospirosis

    OpenAIRE

    Guidugli, Fabio; Castro, Aldemar Araujo [UNIFESP; Atallah, Álvaro Nagib [UNIFESP

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To find the existing clinical evidence on interventions for leptospirosis. The objective is to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of any intervention on leptospirosis through systematic reviews of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). DATA SOURCE: The sources of studies used (where there were no limitations concerning language, date, or other restrictions) were: EMBASE, LILACS, MEDLINE, the Cochrane Controlled Clinical Trials Database, and the Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group Ra...

  4. Diagnostic value of urodynamic bladder outlet obstruction to select patients for transurethral surgery of the prostate: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myong Kim

    Full Text Available To investigate the diagnostic value of urodynamic bladder outlet obstruction (BOO in the selection of patients for transurethral surgery of the prostate.We systematically searched online PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library databases from January 1989 to June 2014.A total of 19 articles met the eligibility criteria for this systematic review. The eligible studies included a total of 2321 patients with a median number of 92 patients per study (range: 12-437. Of the 19 studies, 15 conducted conventional transurethral prostatectomy (TURP, and 7 used other or multiple modalities. In urodynamic bladder outlet obstruction (BOO positive patients, the pooled mean difference (MD was significant for better improvement of the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS (pooled MD, 3.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.72-5.24; p < 0.01; studies, 16; participants, 1726, quality of life score (QoL (pooled MD, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.14-1.02; p = 0.010; studies, 9; participants, 1052, maximal flow rate (Qmax (pooled MD, 3.86; 95% CI, 2.17-5.54; p < 0.01; studies, 17; participants, 1852, and post-void residual volume (PVR (pooled MD, 32.46; 95% CI, 23.34-41.58; p < 0.01; studies, 10; participants, 1219 compared with that in non-BOO patients. Some comparisons showed between-study heterogeneity despite the strict selection criteria of the included studies. However, there was no clear evidence of publication bias in this meta-analysis.Our meta-analysis results showed a significant association between urodynamic BOO and better improvements in all treatment outcome parameters. Preoperative UDS may add insight into postoperative outcomes after surgical treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

  5. Systematic review and meta-analysis to compare success rates of retrograde intrarenal surgery versus percutaneous nephrolithotomy for renal stones >2 cm: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sung Ku; Cho, Kang Su; Kang, Dong Hyuk; Jung, Hae Do; Kwon, Jong Kyou; Lee, Joo Yong

    2017-12-01

    We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis comparing stone-free rates between retrograde intrarenal surgery (RIRS) and percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL), using updated, more reliable evidence. Randomized controlled trials comparing RIRS and PCNL for >2 cm stones were identified from electronic databases. Stone-free rates for the procedures were compared by qualitative and quantitative syntheses (meta-analyses). Outcome variables are shown as risk ratios (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Eleven articles were included in this study. Most recently published studies exhibited relatively low quality during quality assessment. For the meta-analysis comparing success (stone-free) rates between PCNL and RIRS, the forest plot using the random-effects model showed an RR of 1.11 (95% CI 1.02-1.21, P stone-free rate of PCNL was superior to that of RIRS using a fixed-effect model (RR 1.07, 95% CI 1.01-1.14, P stones. However, in this meta-analysis, the postoperative stone-free rate of PCNL was higher than that of RIRS in patients with >2 cm renal stones.

  6. Baseline and postoperative levels of C-reactive protein and interleukins as inflammatory predictors of atrial fibrillation following cardiac surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weymann, Alexander; Popov, Aron-Frederik; Sabashnikov, Anton; Ali-Hasan-Al-Saegh, Sadeq; Ryazanov, Mikhail; Tse, Gary; Mirhosseini, Seyed Jalil; Liu, Tong; Lotfaliani, Mohammadreza; Sedaghat, Meghdad; Baker, William L; Ghanei, Azam; Yavuz, Senol; Zeriouh, Mohamed; Izadpanah, Payman; Dehghan, Hamidreza; Testa, Luca; Nikfard, Maryam; Sá, Michel Pompeu Barros de Oliveira; Mashhour, Ahmed; Nombela-Franco, Luis; Rezaeisadrabadi, Mohammad; D'Ascenzo, Fabrizio; Zhigalov, Konstantin; Benedetto, Umberto; Aminolsharieh Najafi, Soroosh; Szczechowicz, Marcin; Roever, Leonardo; Meng, Lei; Gong, Mengqi; Deshmukh, Abhishek J; Palmerini, Tullio; Linde, Cecilia; Filipiak, Krzysztof J; Stone, Gregg W; Biondi-Zoccai, Giuseppe; Calkins, Hugh

    2018-01-01

    Postoperative atrial fibrillation (POAF) is a leading arrhythmia with high incidence and serious clinical implications after cardiac surgery. Cardiac surgery is associated with systemic inflammatory response including increase in cytokines and activation of endothelial and leukocyte responses. This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to determine the strength of evidence for evaluating the association of inflammatory markers, such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukins (IL), with POAF following isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), isolated valvular surgery, or a combination of these procedures. We conducted a meta-analysis of studies evaluating measured baseline (from one week before surgical procedures) and postoperative levels (until one week after surgical procedures) of inflammatory markers in patients with POAF. A compre-hensive search was performed in electronic medical databases (Medline/PubMed, Web of Science, Embase, Science Direct, and Google Scholar) from their inception through May 2017 to identify relevant studies. A comprehensive subgroup analysis was performed to explore potential sources of heterogeneity. A literature search of all major databases retrieved 1014 studies. After screening, 42 studies were analysed including a total of 8398 patients. Pooled analysis showed baseline levels of CRP (standard mean difference [SMD] 0.457 mg/L, p < 0.001), baseline levels of IL-6 (SMD 0.398 pg/mL, p < 0.001), postoperative levels of CRP (SMD 0.576 mg/L, p < 0.001), postoperative levels of IL-6 (SMD 1.66 pg/mL, p < 0.001), postoperative levels of IL-8 (SMD 0.839 pg/mL, p < 0.001), and postoperative levels of IL-10 (SMD 0.590 pg/mL, p < 0.001) to be relevant inflammatory parameters significantly associated with POAF. Perioperative inflammation is proposed to be involved in the pathogenesis of POAF. Therefore, perioperative assessment of CRP, IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10 can help clinicians in terms of predicting and monitoring for POAF.

  7. Effectiveness of interspinous implant surgery in patients with intermittent neurogenic claudication : a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moojen, Wouter A.; Arts, Mark P.; Bartels, Ronald H. M. A.; Jacobs, Wilco C. H.; Peul, Wilco C.

    2011-01-01

    Despite an increasing implantation rate of interspinous process distraction (IPD) devices in the treatment of intermittent neurogenic claudication (INC), definitive evidence on the clinical effectiveness of implants is lacking. The main objective of this review was to perform a meta-analysis of all

  8. Health-related quality of life in congenital heart disease surgery in children and young adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladak, Laila Akbar; Hasan, Babar Sultan; Gullick, Janice; Gallagher, Robyn

    2018-03-23

    As survival improves in the congenital heart disease (CHD) population, health-related quality of life (HRQOL) outcomes become increasingly important. While surgery improves survival, poor HRQOL occurs postoperatively and cardiac-related HRQOL outcomes are rarely reported. To conduct a systematic review and meta-analyses of general and cardiac-related HRQOL in CHD surgical children and young adults. Medline, CINAHL and EMBASE were searched. Quantitative designs with a minimum of 80% CHD surgical patients and mean age ≤18 years compared with healthy controls were included in the review. Data were analysed in RevMan V.5.3 using a random effects model. General and cardiac-related HRQOL. Studies (n=20) were conducted in high-income countries and included 3808 patients plus 2951 parental reports of patients. HRQOL was worse in postoperative patients with CHD versus healthy controls in all domains with the largest difference seen for physical function (standard mean difference (SMD) of -0.56, 95% CI -0.82 to -0.30). Cardiac-related HRQOL was worse in complex compared with simple CHD with the largest SMD (-0.60, 95% CI -0.80 to -0.40) for symptoms. Heterogeneity ranged from 0% to 90%. CHD surgical patients have substantially worse HRQOL compared with age-matched healthy controls. Strategies should focus on improving HRQOL in this subgroup. Results may not be applicable to low/middle-income countries given the dearth of relevant research. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. Is there an increased risk of post-operative surgical site infection after orthopaedic surgery in HIV patients? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kigera, James W M; Straetemans, Masja; Vuhaka, Simplice K; Nagel, Ingeborg M; Naddumba, Edward K; Boer, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    There is dilemma as to whether patients infected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) requiring implant orthopaedic surgery are at an increased risk for post-operative surgical site infection (SSI). We conducted a systematic review to determine the effect of HIV on the risk of post-operative SSI and sought to determine if this risk is altered by antibiotic use beyond 24 hours. We searched electronic databases, manually searched citations from relevant articles, and reviewed conference proceedings. The risk of postoperative SSI was pooled using Mantel-Haenszel method. We identified 18 cohort studies with 16 mainly small studies, addressing the subject. The pooled risk ratio of infection in the HIV patients when compared to non-HIV patients was 1.8 (95% Confidence Interval [CI] 1.3-2.4), in studies in Africa this was 2.3 (95% CI 1.5-3.5). In a sensitivity analysis the risk ratio was reduced to 1.4 (95% CI 0.5-3.8). The risk ratio of infection in patients receiving prolonged antibiotics compared to patients receiving antibiotics for up to 24 hours was 0.7 (95% CI 0.1-4.2). The results may indicate an increased risk in HIV infected patients but these results are not robust and inconclusive after conducting the sensitivity analysis removing poor quality studies. There is need for larger good quality studies to provide conclusive evidence. To better develop surgical protocols, further studies should determine the effect of reduced CD4 counts, viral load suppression and prolonged antibiotics on the risk for infection.

  10. A systematic review of outcomes in patients with staged carotid artery stenting and coronary artery bypass graft surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, Luis A; Costa, Marco A; Angiolillo, Dominick J; Zenni, Martin; Wludyka, Peter; Silliman, Scott; Bass, Theodore A

    2008-02-01

    Although current guidelines state that carotid endarterectomy is probably recommended before or concomitant to coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) in patients with carotid stenosis, significant controversies to this recommendation still persist. Carotid artery stenting has been recently introduced as an alternative revascularization modality in high-risk patients. The aim of this study was to define, based on the published information, if carotid artery stenting is beneficial in this setting. A search of MEDLINE and a manual search of the literature from selected articles were performed. A total of 6 studies with 277 patients reporting carotid stenting followed by staged CABG were available for this clinical outcome analysis. All were retrospective and single-center studies. The mean age was 69 years; 78% were males. Asymptomatic carotid stenosis was present in 76% of patients. The mean time to CABG was 32 days. The incidence of stroke and death associated with the stent procedure was 4.7%. Only 6 patients (2.2%) developed stroke associated with CABG. The overall combined 30-day event rate after CABG, including all events during carotid artery stenting, were as follows: minor stroke, 2.9%; major stroke, 3.2%; mortality, 7.6%; and combined death and any stroke, 12.3%. In this pooled analysis, the combined incidence of death and stroke in patients undergoing carotid artery stenting and staged CABG remains elevated. These results confirm that the presence of carotid stenosis is per se a marker of risk that might persists independent of its treatment. A systematic or randomized evaluation appears warranted.

  11. Surgery for constipation: systematic review and practice recommendations: Results II: Hitching procedures for the rectum (rectal suspension).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossi, U; Knowles, C H; Mason, J; Lacy-Colson, J; Brown, S R

    2017-09-01

    To assess the outcomes of rectal suspension procedures (forms of rectopexy) in adults with chronic constipation. Standardised methods and reporting of benefits and harms were used for all CapaCiTY reviews that closely adhered to PRISMA 2016 guidance. Main conclusions were presented as summary evidence statements with a summative Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine (2009) level. Eighteen articles were identified, providing data on outcomes in 1238 patients. All studies reported only on laparoscopic approaches. Length of procedures ranged between 1.5 to 3.5 h, and length of stay between 4 to 5 days. Data on harms were inconsistently reported and heterogeneous, making estimates of harm tentative and imprecise. Morbidity rates ranged between 5-15%, with mesh complications accounting for 0.5% of patients overall. No mortality was reported after any procedures in a total of 1044 patients. Although inconsistently reported, good or satisfactory outcome occurred in 83% (74-91%) of patients; 86% (20-97%) of patients reported improvements in constipation after laparoscopic ventral mesh rectopexy (LVMR). About 2-7% of patients developed anatomical recurrence. Patient selection was inconsistently documented. As most common indication, high grade rectal intussusception was corrected in 80-100% of cases after robotic or LVMR. Healing of prolapse-associated solitary rectal ulcer syndrome occurred in around 80% of patients after LVMR. Evidence supporting rectal suspension procedures is currently derived from poor quality studies. Methodologically robust trials are needed to inform future clinical decision making. © 2017 The Authors. Colorectal Disease published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland.

  12. The influence of prosthesis diameter in stapes surgery: a meta-analysis and systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laske, Roman D; Röösli, Christof; Chatzimichalis, Michail Vasileios; Sim, Jae Hoon; Huber, Alexander M

    2011-06-01

    To analyze the influence of stapes prosthesis diameter on postoperative hearing results after stapedotomy without interposition in otosclerotic patients. PubMed search from 1970 to 2009 using the key words stapedotomy or stapedectomy or otosclerosis or stapesplasty. Inclusion criteria to select articles and patient groups for meta-analysis and statistical analyses were as follows: otosclerosis as diagnosis, clear description of technique and prosthesis size, calibrated stapedotomy, and complete report of functional results. Five controlled studies were found analyzing the influence of prosthesis diameter and reporting the results in a comparable way for meta-analysis (n = 590). Sixty-two studies not analyzing the influence of prosthesis diameter contained comparable subgroups with a total of 9,536 cases. These cases were pooled according to their diameter (0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 0.6,and 0.8 mm). The results of air conduction, bone conduction, air-bone gap (ABG), and success rate (closure of the ABG within 10 dB as percentage of the total cases) for all groups and frequency-specific ABG results were gathered. Furthermore, 12 clinical and experimental studies were reviewed that did not contribute to the statistical analysis. A meta-analysis performed for success rate of the 5 controlled studies showed favorable results for 0.6-mm over 0.4-mm prostheses (success rate, 67% versus 58%, p = 0.05). In the statistical analysis of the pooled data, the 0.6-mm prosthesis showed better results compared with 0.4 mm (p prosthesis in the high frequencies. There was no difference in postoperative change of bone conduction in the 0.6- and 0.4-mm groups. Statistically significant results could not be assessed for other prosthesis diameters because of the small number of cases reported. A 0.6-mm diameter piston prosthesis is associated with significantly better results than a 0.4-mm prosthesis and should be used if the surgical conditions allow it.

  13. Near-infrared fluorescence imaging for real-time intraoperative anatomical guidance in minimally invasive surgery: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schols, Rutger M; Connell, Niels J; Stassen, Laurents P S

    2015-05-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging, using contrast agents with fluorescent characteristics in the near-infrared (NIR: 700-900 nm) window, is considered to possess great potential for clinical practice in the future of minimally invasive surgery (MIS), given its capacity for intraoperative, real-time anatomical navigation, and identification. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the literature concerning the current and potential future applications of fluorescence imaging in supporting anatomical guidance during MIS, and thereby guiding future research. A systematic literature search was performed in the PubMed and Embase databases. All identified articles were screened and checked for eligibility by two authors. In addition, literature was sought by screening references of eligible articles. After administration of a fluorescent dye (e.g., indocyanine green), NIRF imaging can be helpful to improve the visualization of vital anatomical structures during MIS. Extra-hepatic bile ducts, arteries, ureters, sentinel lymph nodes, and lymph vessels have successfully been identified using NIRF imaging. A uniform approach regarding timing and route of dye administration has not yet been established. Optimization of both imaging systems and fluorescent dyes is needed to improve current shortcomings. New preclinical dyes are considered for optimization of NIRF imaging. Future implementation of new intraoperative optical methods, such as NIRF, could significantly contribute to intraoperative anatomy navigation and facilitate critical decision-making in MIS. Further research (i.e., large multi-center randomized controlled trials) is needed to establish the true value of this innovative optical imaging technique in standard clinical practice.

  14. Cavity Shaving plus Lumpectomy versus Lumpectomy Alone for Patients with Breast Cancer Undergoing Breast-Conserving Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Wang

    Full Text Available The margin status is a well-established prognostic predictor for patients undergoing breast-conserving surgery (BCS. Recent data suggested that cavity shaving in addition to lumpectomy might be a promising approach for improving the clinical outcomes. We aimed to compare the efficacy and safety between cavity shaving plus lumpectomy and lumpectomy alone with a systematic review and meta-analysis. We searched the PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane CENTRAL databases for studies comparing cavity shaving with lumpectomy before June 10, 2016. Both comparative studies and self-control studies were included. A random-effects model was used to estimate the odds ratios (ORs for positive margin rate, reoperation rate, recurrence rate, and weighted mean difference (WMD for excised tissue volume. Twenty-six studies were included in the meta-analysis. The cavity shaving group had a significantly lower positive margin rate than the BCS-alone group (16.4% vs. 31.9%; OR = 0.41, 95% CI 0.32-0.53, P < 0.05. Cavity shaving was associated with a significantly decreased rate of reoperation (OR = 0.42, 95% CI 0.30-0.59, P < 0.05. The overall locoregional rate was low for cavity shaving and BCS-alone (3% vs. 4%. Cavity shaving had no significant effect on the risk of locoregional recurrence (OR = 0.86, 95% CI 0.32-2.35; P = 0.78. The excised tissue volume did not differ substantially between cavity shaving and BCS alone (WMD = -23.88, 95% CI -55.20 to 7.44, P = 0.14. For patients undergoing BCS, additional cavity shaving was an effective method to decrease the positive margin rate and avoid reoperation. The addition of cavity shaving did not appear to have excessive excised tissue volume compared with partial mastectomy alone.

  15. Reading, writing and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandelowski, Margarete

    2008-10-01

    This paper offers a discussion of the reading and writing practices that define systematic review. Although increasingly popular, systematic review has engendered a critique of the claims made for it as a more objective method for summing up research findings than other kinds of reviews. An alternative understanding of systematic review is as a highly subjective, albeit disciplined, engagement between resisting readers and resistant texts. Reviewers of research exemplify the resisting reader when they exclude reports on grounds of relevance, quality, or methodological difference. Research reports exemplify resistant texts as they do not simply yield their findings, but rather must be made docile to review. These acts of resistance make systematic review possible, but challenge claims of its greater capacity to control bias. An understanding of the reading and writing practices that define systematic review still holds truth and objectivity as regulative ideals, but is aware of the reading and writing practices that both enable and challenge those ideals.

  16. Gynecomastia: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagerlund, Anders; Lewin, Richard; Rufolo, Guglielmo; Elander, Anna; Santanelli di Pompeo, Fabio; Selvaggi, Gennaro

    2015-01-01

    Gynecomastia is a common medical problem presenting in nearly a third of the male population. Treatment for gynecomastia can be either pharmacological or surgical. Patients with gynecomastia often experience affected quality-of-life. The aim of this systematic review was to analyze the quality of evidence of the current literature in relation to different treatment modalities and Quality-of-Life in patients with gynecomastia. A systematic search of the literature was performed in PubMed, Medline, Scopus, The Cochrane Library, and SveMed+ in accordance with the PRISMA statement. All searches were undertaken between September-November 2014. The PICOS (patients, intervention, comparator, outcomes, and study design) approach was used to specify inclusion criteria. Methodological quality was graded according to MINORS. Quality of evidence was rated according to GRADE. Data from the included studies were extracted based on study characteristics, participants specifics, type of intervention/treatment, and type of outcome measures into data extraction forms. A total of 134 abstracts were identified in the literature search. Seventeen studies met inclusion criteria, 14 concerning treatment and three concerning Quality-of-Life. All studies were non-randomised with a high risk of bias and very low quality of evidence according to GRADE. Several different surgical methods have been described with good results, minimal scars, and various levels of complications. Traditional surgical excision of glandular tissue combined with liposuction provides most consistent results and a low rate of complications. Pubertal gynecomastia may safely be managed by pharmacological anti-oestrogen treatment.

  17. Diagnostic value of C-reactive protein to rule out infectious complications after major abdominal surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gans, Sarah L; Atema, Jasper J; van Dieren, Susan; Groot Koerkamp, Bas; Boermeester, Marja A

    2015-07-01

    Infectious complications occur frequently after major abdominal surgery and have a major influence on patient outcome and hospital costs. A marker that can rule out postoperative infectious complications (PICs) could aid patient selection for safe and early hospital discharge. C-reactive protein (CRP) is a widely available, fast, and cheap marker that might be of value in detecting PIC. Present meta-analysis evaluates the diagnostic value of CRP to rule out PIC following major abdominal surgery, aiding patient selection for early discharge. A systematic literature search of Medline, PubMed, and Cochrane was performed identifying all prospective studies evaluating the diagnostic value of CRP after abdominal surgery. Meta-analysis was performed according to the PRISMA statement. Twenty-two studies were included for qualitative analysis of which 16 studies were eligible for meta-analysis, representing 2215 patients. Most studies analyzed the value of CRP in colorectal surgery (eight studies). The pooled negative predictive value (NPV) improved each day after surgery up to 90% at postoperative day (POD) 3 for a pooled CRP cutoff of 159 mg/L (range 92-200). Maximum predictive values for PICs were reached on POD 5 for a pooled CRP cutoff of 114 mg/L (range 48-150): a pooled sensitivity of 86% (95% confidence interval (CI) 79-91%), specificity of 86% (95% CI 75-92%), and a positive predictive value of 64% (95% CI 49-77%). The pooled sensitivity and specificity were significantly higher on POD 5 than on other PODs (p < 0.001). Infectious complications after major abdominal surgery are very unlikely in patients with a CRP below 159 mg/L on POD 3. This can aid patient selection for safe and early hospital discharge and prevent overuse of imaging.

  18. Acute resection versus bridge to surgery with diverting colostomy for patients with acute malignant left sided colonic obstruction : Systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amelung, Femke J.; Mulder, C.L.J.; Verheijen, P.M.; Draaisma, W. A.; Siersema, P.D.; Consten, E. C J

    2015-01-01

    Background Currently, no consensus exists on the best treatment strategy for acute malignant left-sided colonic obstruction. This systematic review and meta-analysis aims to compare the outcomes following the two surgical treatment options; primary resection versus colostomy creation as bridge to

  19. Effect of restrictive versus liberal transfusion strategies on outcomes in patients with cardiovascular disease in a non-cardiac surgery setting: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docherty, Annemarie B; O'Donnell, Rob; Brunskill, Susan; Trivella, Marialena; Doree, Carolyn; Holst, Lars; Parker, Martyn; Gregersen, Merete; Pinheiro de Almeida, Juliano; Walsh, Timothy S; Stanworth, Simon J

    2016-03-29

    To compare patient outcomes of restrictive versus liberal blood transfusion strategies in patients with cardiovascular disease not undergoing cardiac surgery. Systematic review and meta-analysis. Randomised controlled trials involving a threshold for red blood cell transfusion in hospital. We searched (to 2 November 2015) CENTRAL, Medline, Embase, CINAHL, PubMed, LILACS, NHSBT Transfusion Evidence Library, ClinicalTrials.gov, WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, ISRCTN Register, and EU Clinical Trials Register. Authors were contacted for data whenever possible. Published and unpublished randomised controlled trials comparing a restrictive with liberal transfusion threshold and that included patients with cardiovascular disease. Data extraction was completed in duplicate. Risk of bias was assessed using Cochrane methods. Relative risk ratios with 95% confidence intervals were presented in all meta-analyses. Mantel-Haenszel random effects models were used to pool risk ratios. 30 day mortality, and cardiovascular events. 41 trials were identified; of these, seven included data on patients with cardiovascular disease. Data from a further four trials enrolling patients with cardiovascular disease were obtained from the authors. In total, 11 trials enrolling patients with cardiovascular disease (n=3033) were included for meta-analysis (restrictive transfusion, n=1514 patients; liberal transfusion, n=1519). The pooled risk ratio for the association between transfusion thresholds and 30 day mortality was 1.15 (95% confidence interval 0.88 to 1.50, P=0.50), with little heterogeneity (I(2)=14%). The risk of acute coronary syndrome in patients managed with restrictive compared with liberal transfusion was increased (nine trials; risk ratio 1.78, 95% confidence interval 1.18 to 2.70, P=0.01, I(2)=0%). The results show that it may not be safe to use a restrictive transfusion threshold of less than 80 g/L in patients with ongoing acute coronary syndrome or

  20. Robotic surgery: disruptive innovation or unfulfilled promise? A systematic review and meta-analysis of the first 30 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Alan; Ashrafian, Hutan; Scott, Alasdair J; Mason, Sam E; Harling, Leanne; Athanasiou, Thanos; Darzi, Ara

    2016-10-01

    Robotic surgery has been in existence for 30 years. This study aimed to evaluate the overall perioperative outcomes of robotic surgery compared with open surgery (OS) and conventional minimally invasive surgery (MIS) across various surgical procedures. MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, and ClinicalTrials.gov were searched from 1990 up to October 2013 with no language restriction. Relevant review articles were hand-searched for remaining studies. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and prospective comparative studies (PROs) on perioperative outcomes, regardless of patient age and sex, were included. Primary outcomes were blood loss, blood transfusion rate, operative time, length of hospital stay, and 30-day overall complication rate. We identified 99 relevant articles (108 studies, 14,448 patients). For robotic versus OS, 50 studies (11 RCTs, 39 PROs) demonstrated reduction in blood loss [ratio of means (RoM) 0.505, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.408-0.602], transfusion rate [risk ratio (RR) 0.272, 95 % CI 0.165-0.449], length of hospital stay (RoM 0.695, 0.615-0.774), and 30-day overall complication rate (RR 0.637, 0.483-0.838) in favour of robotic surgery. For robotic versus MIS, 58 studies (21 RCTs, 37 PROs) demonstrated reduced blood loss (RoM 0.853, 0.736-0.969) and transfusion rate (RR 0.621, 0.390-0.988) in favour of robotic surgery but similar length of hospital stay (RoM 0.982, 0.936-1.027) and 30-day overall complication rate (RR 0.988, 0.822-1.188). In both comparisons, robotic surgery prolonged operative time (OS: RoM 1.073, 1.022-1.124; MIS: RoM 1.135, 1.096-1.173). The benefits of robotic surgery lacked robustness on RCT-sensitivity analyses. However, many studies, including the relatively few available RCTs, suffered from high risk of bias and inadequate statistical power. Our results showed that robotic surgery contributed positively to some perioperative outcomes but longer operative times remained a shortcoming. Better quality evidence is needed to

  1. Aromatherapy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, B; Ernst, E

    2000-01-01

    Aromatherapy is becoming increasingly popular; however there are few clear indications for its use. To systematically review the literature on aromatherapy in order to discover whether any clinical indication may be recommended for its use, computerised literature searches were performed to retrieve all randomised controlled trials of aromatherapy from the following databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, British Nursing Index, CISCOM, and AMED. The methodological quality of the trials was assessed using the Jadad score. All trials were evaluated independently by both authors and data were extracted in a pre-defined, standardised fashion. Twelve trials were located: six of them had no independent replication; six related to the relaxing effects of aromatherapy combined with massage. These studies suggest that aromatherapy massage has a mild, transient anxiolytic effect. Based on a critical assessment of the six studies relating to relaxation, the effects of aromatherapy are probably not strong enough for it to be considered for the treatment of anxiety. The hypothesis that it is effective for any other indication is not supported by the findings of rigorous clinical trials. PMID:10962794

  2. Patients with sciatica still experience pain and disability 5 years after surgery: A systematic review with meta-analysis of cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, G C; Witzleb, A J; Fritsch, C; Maher, C G; Ferreira, P H; Ferreira, M L

    2016-11-01

    The clinical course of patients with sciatica is believed to be favourable, but there is conflicting evidence on the postoperative course of this condition. We aimed to investigate the clinical course of sciatica following surgery. An electronic search was conducted on MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL from inception to April 2015. We screened for prospective cohort studies investigating pain or disability outcomes for patients with sciatica treated surgically. Fractional polynomial regression analysis was used to generate pooled means and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of pain and disability up to 5 years after surgery. Estimates of pain and disability (converted to a 0-100 scale) were plotted over time, from inception to last available follow-up time. Forty records (39 cohort studies) were included with a total of 13,883 patients with sciatica. Before surgery, the pooled mean leg pain score was 75.2 (95% CI 68.1-82.4) which reduced to 15.3 (95% CI 8.5-22.1) at 3 months. Patients were never fully recovered in the long-term and pain increased to 21.0 (95% CI 12.5-29.5) at 5 years. The pooled mean disability score before surgery was 55.1 (95% CI 52.3-58.0) and this decreased to 15.5 (95% CI 13.3-17.6) at 3 months, and further reduced to 13.1 (95% CI 10.6-15.5) at 5 years. Although surgery is followed by a rapid decrease in pain and disability by 3 months, patients still experience mild to moderate pain and disability 5 years after surgery. WHAT DOES THIS REVIEW ADD?: This review provides a quantitative summary of the postoperative course of patients with sciatica. Patients with sciatica experienced a rapid reduction in pain and disability in the first 3 months, but still had mild to moderate symptoms 5 years after surgery. Although no significant differences were found, microdiscectomy showed larger improvements compared to other surgical techniques. © 2016 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  3. Systematic reviews informing occupational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Sally; Hoffmann, Tammy; McCluskey, Annie; Coghlan, Nicole; Tooth, Leigh

    2013-01-01

    We sought to identify and describe the number, topics, and publishing trends of systematic reviews relevant to occupational therapy indexed in the OTseeker database. We performed a cross-sectional survey of the systematic reviews contained in OTseeker in December 2011. Of the 1,940 systematic reviews indexed in OTseeker, only 53 (2.7%) were published in occupational therapy journals. The most common diagnostic categories were stroke (n = 195, 10.1%) and affective disorders (n = 204, 10.5%). The most common intervention categories were consumer education (n = 644, 33.2%) and psychosocial techniques (n = 571, 29.4%). Only 390 (20.1%) of the 1,940 systematic reviews specifically involved occupational therapy. Occupational therapists need to search broadly to locate relevant systematic reviews or, alternatively, to use databases such as OTseeker. Clarity about the involvement of occupational therapy in reports of future research will improve the ability to identify occupational therapy research for all stakeholders. Finally, occupational therapy practitioners need to read systematic reviews critically to determine whether review conclusions are justified. Copyright © 2013 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  4. Systematic Review Workshop (August 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal for this workshop is to receive scientific input regarding approaches for different steps within a systematic review, such as evaluating individual studies, synthesizing evidence within a particular discipline, etc.

  5. Investigation of the effect of Acute Normovolemic Hemodilution and Tranexamic Acid on the amount of bleeding during off-pump coronary artery bypass graft surgery: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Jalaeian Taghadoomi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Postoperative bleeding and transfusion remain a source of morbidity and cost after open heart operations . To evaluate the effect of ANH method and tranexamic acid on blood transfusion requirements and blood loss after off pump coronary artery bypass surgery (OPCAB. Materials and Methods: The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, and EMBASE from inception to December 2014; reference lists of published guidelines, reviews, and associated articles, as well as conference proceedings.We included articles with available abstract in English language. Manual searching was done within the reference list of articles. Three reviewers independently reviewed and assessed eligibility criteria, assessed quality, and extracted data. Results: Bleeding and hemorrhagic complications and the consequent need for allogeneic transfusion are still major problems after off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery that can reduced in combination of ANH method and tranexamic acid. Conclusion: Tranexamic acid and ANH appear to be effective in reducing postoperative bleeding and the need for allogeneic blood products.

  6. Laryngeal Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchiano, Emily; Chin, Oliver Y; Fang, Christina H; Park, Richard Chan; Baredes, Soly; Eloy, Jean Anderson

    2016-03-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma is a malignant minor salivary gland tumor that represents laryngeal tumors. The submucosal location of laryngeal adenoid cystic carcinoma (LACC) results in delayed presentation. Here, we present the first systematic review of reported cases of LACC to determine trends in presentation, diagnostic and treatment modalities, and patient outcome. PubMed, Web of Science, MEDLINE, and EMBASE databases. A search of the above databases was done to identify articles reporting cases of LACC. The variables included in the analysis were patient demographics, presenting symptoms, tumor location, imaging, treatment, follow-up time, recurrence, and outcome. A total of 50 articles and 120 cases were included in the review. The most common presenting symptom was dyspnea (48.8%), followed by hoarseness (43.9%). LACC arose most frequently from the subglottis (56.7%). At presentation, 14.6% (13 of 89) of patients had regional disease. The average follow-up time was 54.0 months. At follow-up, distant metastasis was reported in 30 cases (33.3%). Surgery alone (43.3%) and surgery with radiotherapy (43.3%) were used most frequently and resulted in 57.1% and 55.3% of patients alive with no evidence disease at follow-up, respectively. LACC was most often located in the subglottis. Patients commonly presented with dyspnea and hoarseness. In this systematic review, surgery with radiotherapy and surgery alone were the most commonly employed treatment modalities, and both resulted in slightly more than 50% of patients alive with no evidence of disease at follow-up. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  7. Physiotherapy Commenced Within the First Four Weeks Post-Spinal Surgery Is Safe and Effective: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowdon, Megan; Peiris, Casey L

    2016-02-01

    To determine whether physiotherapy commenced within the first 4 weeks post-spinal surgery is safe and effective. Electronic databases CINAHL, MEDLINE, AMED, PubMed, Embase, and PEDro were searched from the earliest date possible through May 2015. An additional trial was identified through reference list scanning. Controlled trials evaluating comprehensive physiotherapy rehabilitation commenced within 4 weeks postoperatively compared with a control group receiving no physiotherapy, standard postoperative care, rest, less active physiotherapy, or sham physiotherapy after spinal surgery of a musculoskeletal etiology. Two reviewers independently applied inclusion and exclusion criteria, with disagreements discussed until consensus could be reached. Searching identified 3162 potentially relevant articles, of which 4 trials with 250 participants met the inclusion criteria. Data were extracted using a predefined data extraction form. Methodological quality of trials was assessed independently by 2 reviewers using the Downs and Black checklist. Pooled analyses were performed using a random-effects model with inverse variance methods to calculate risk differences and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) (dichotomous outcomes), and standardized mean differences (SMDs) and 95% CIs (continuous outcomes). When compared with no or sham physiotherapy, early comprehensive physiotherapy did not increase the risk of adverse events (risk difference, -.01; 95% CI, -.07 to .05; I(2)=0%). In addition, there is moderate-quality evidence demonstrating a reduction in pain by a moderate and significant amount at 12 weeks (SMD=-.38; 95% CI, -.66 to -.10; I(2)=0%) and at 12+ months (SMD=-.30; 95% CI, -.59 to -.02; I(2)=0%). Early comprehensive physiotherapy commenced within the first 4 weeks post-spinal surgery does not increase the potential for an adverse event and leads to a moderate, statistically significant reduction in pain when compared with a control group. Copyright © 2016 American

  8. Long-Term Outcome of Bariatric Surgery in Morbidly Obese Adolescents: a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of 950 Patients with a Minimum of 3 years Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoar, Saeed; Mahmoudzadeh, Habibollah; Naderan, Mohammad; Bagheri-Hariri, Shahram; Wong, Catherine; Parizi, Ahmad Shahabeddin; Shoar, Nasrin

    2017-12-01

    Obesity in pediatric and adolescent population has reached a universal pandemic. This study aimed to summarize the literature on the longest available outcome of bariatric surgery in morbidly obese adolescents. A systematic review was conducted to pool available data on the longest available (>3 years) weight loss and comorbidity resolution outcome in adolescent bariatric surgery. A total of 14 studies reporting the result of bariatric surgery after 3 years in 950 morbidly obese adolescents were included. Preoperative age and BMI ranged from 12 to 19 years and from 26 to 91 kg/m 2 , respectively. Females were the predominant gender (72.8%). Laparoscopic roux-en-Y gastric bypass (n = 453) and adjustable gastric banding (n = 265) were the most common bariatric procedure performed. The number of patients at the latest follow-up was 677 (range from 2 to 23 years). On average, patients lost 13.3 kg/m 2 of their BMI. Among comorbidities, only diabetes mellitus resolved or improved dramatically. Of 108 readmissions, 91 led to reoperation. There was a weight regain adolescents who underwent a bariatric procedure. Although bariatric surgery is a safe and effective procedure in the treatment of adolescent morbid obesity, long-term data is scarce regarding its nutritional and developmental complication in this growing population of patients.

  9. The difficulties of systematic reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westgate, Martin J; Lindenmayer, David B

    2017-10-01

    The need for robust evidence to support conservation actions has driven the adoption of systematic approaches to research synthesis in ecology. However, applying systematic review to complex or open questions remains challenging, and this task is becoming more difficult as the quantity of scientific literature increases. We drew on the science of linguistics for guidance as to why the process of identifying and sorting information during systematic review remains so labor intensive, and to provide potential solutions. Several linguistic properties of peer-reviewed corpora-including nonrandom selection of review topics, small-world properties of semantic networks, and spatiotemporal variation in word meaning-greatly increase the effort needed to complete the systematic review process. Conversely, the resolution of these semantic complexities is a common motivation for narrative reviews, but this process is rarely enacted with the rigor applied during linguistic analysis. Therefore, linguistics provides a unifying framework for understanding some key challenges of systematic review and highlights 2 useful directions for future research. First, in cases where semantic complexity generates barriers to synthesis, ecologists should consider drawing on existing methods-such as natural language processing or the construction of research thesauri and ontologies-that provide tools for mapping and resolving that complexity. These tools could help individual researchers classify research material in a more robust manner and provide valuable guidance for future researchers on that topic. Second, a linguistic perspective highlights that scientific writing is a rich resource worthy of detailed study, an observation that can sometimes be lost during the search for data during systematic review or meta-analysis. For example, mapping semantic networks can reveal redundancy and complementarity among scientific concepts, leading to new insights and research questions. Consequently

  10. Expanding the field of acute care surgery: a systematic review of the use of resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta (REBOA) in cases of morbidly adherent placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzano-Nunez, R; Escobar-Vidarte, M F; Naranjo, M P; Rodriguez, F; Ferrada, P; Casallas, J D; Ordoñez, C A

    2017-09-19

    Prophylactic placement of endovascular balloon occlusion catheters has grown to be part of the surgical plans to control intraoperative hemorrhage in cases of abnormal placentation. We performed a systematic literature review to investigate the safety and effectiveness of the use of REBOA during cesarean delivery in pregnant woman with morbidly adherent placenta. A systematic review was performed. Relevant case reports and nonrandomized studies were identified by the literature search in MEDLINE. We included studies involving pregnant woman with diagnosis of abnormal placentation who underwent cesarean delivery with REBOA placed for hemorrhage control. MINORS' criteria were used to evaluate the risk of bias of included studies. A formal meta-analysis was not performed. Eight studies were included in cumulative results. These studies included a total of 392 patients. Overall, REBOA was deployed in 336 patients. Six studies reported the use of REBOA as an adjunct for prophylactic hemorrhage control in pregnant woman with diagnosis of morbidly adherent placenta undergoing elective cesarean delivery. In two studies, REBOA was deployed in patients already in established hemorrhagic shock at the moment of cesarean delivery. REBOA was deployed primarily by interventional radiologists; however, one study reported a surgeon as the REBOA provider. The results from our qualitative synthesis indicate that the use of REBOA during cesarean delivery resulted in less blood loss with a low rate complications occurrence. REBOA is a feasible, safe, and effective means of prophylactic and remedial hemorrhage control in pregnant women with abnormal placentation undergoing cesarean delivery.

  11. Coronary surgery is superior to drug eluting stents in multivessel disease. Systematic review and meta-analysis of contemporary randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetto, Umberto; Gaudino, Mario; Ng, Colin; Biondi-Zoccai, Giuseppe; D'Ascenzo, Fabrizio; Frati, Giacomo; Girardi, Leonard N; Angelini, Gianni D; Taggart, David P

    2016-05-01

    Current randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing percutaneous coronary intervention with drug eluting stent (DES-PCI) with coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) in multivessel disease are underpowered to detect a difference in hard clinical end-points such as mortality, myocardial infarction and stroke. We aimed to overcome this limitation by conducting a meta-analysis of contemporary RCTs. A systematic literature search was conducted for all RCTs comparing DES-PCI versus CABG in multivessel disease published through May 2015. Inverse variance weighting was used to pool data from individual studies (DES-PCI and >1 CABG favouring surgery). A total of five randomized trials including 4563 subjects were analysed. After an average follow-up of 3.4 years, DES-PCI was associated with a significantly increased risk of overall mortality (HR 1.51; 95%CI 1.23-1.84; PDES-PCI. In patients with multivessel coronary disease, CABG was found to be superior to DES-PCI by reducing the risk of mortality and subsequent myocardial infarction at the expense of a marginally increased risk of stroke. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Robot-assisted vs freehand pedicle screw fixation in spine surgery - a systematic review and a meta-analysis of comparative studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lingjia; Chen, Xi; Margalit, Adam; Peng, Huiming; Qiu, Guixing; Qian, Wenwei

    2018-02-19

    Medical robotics has progressively become more compelling in modern orthopaedic surgery. Several studies comparing robot-assisted (RA) and freehand (FH) conventional techniques for pedicle screw fixation have been published, but the results are unclear. Here, we assessed current evidence regarding the efficiency, safety and accuracy of RA compared with FH techniques. A literature search of PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Library and Web of Science was performed to compare the differences between RA and FH in spine surgery. Two reviewers independently reviewed included studies, conducted a risk of bias assessment, and extracted data. Three randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and six retrospective comparative studies included a total of 750 patients (3625 pedicle screws). No significant differences were noted between RA and FH in pedicle screw accuracy (95.5% compared with 92.9%; odds ratio: 1.35; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.55 to 3.30; P=0.51), overall complication rate (1.33% compared with 3.45%; odds ratio: 0.46; 95% CI, 0.15 to 1.43; P=0.18) and radiation exposure time (weighted mean difference [WMD]:8.49; 95% CI, -15.43 to 32.40; P=0.49). While RA was associated with a longer operative time (WMD: 39.63; 95% CI, 5.27 to 73.99; P= 0.02), percutaneous or minimal robot-assisted pedicle screw fixation (M-RA) had a shorter radiation exposure time than FH (WMD: -33.10; 95% CI, -38.18 to -28.02; P=0.00) CONCLUSIONS: The current literature did not prove that RA supersedes FH, although several studies are more optimistic about this procedure. Future well-designed RCTs assessing RA and FH are needed to confirm and update the findings of this analysis. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. The impact of spinal cord stimulation on physical function and sleep quality in individuals with failed back surgery syndrome: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, G A; Blake, C; Power, C K; O'Keeffe, D; Fullen, B M

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this review was to determine the impact of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) on physical function and sleep quality in individuals with failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS). This review comprised three phases: an electronic database search (PubMed, Cinahl Plus, EMBASE, PsychInfo, Pedro, Cochrane Library) identified potential papers; these were screened for inclusion criteria, with extraction of data from accepted papers and rating of internal validity by two independent reviewers using the Effective Public Health Practice Project quality assessment tool, a tool designed to assess non-RCTs (randomized controlled trials) as well as RCTs. Strength of the evidence was rated using the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research guidelines. The search generated 13 quantitative papers that fulfilled the inclusion criteria; all 13 studies investigated the impact of SCS on physical function, and nine studies investigated the impact of SCS on sleep quality. Consistent evidence (level C) found that SCS positively affected physical function, with improvements in participation in activities of daily living, leisure, social and work-related activities. Similarly, consistent evidence (level C) found improvements in sleep quality following SCS. Improvements in sleep quantity, a reduction in awakenings and a decrease in sleep medication use were also noted (level D). The impact of SCS on cognitive function, i.e., memory and concentration, was also assessed using the same search strategy, no papers fulfilled the inclusion criteria for this study. Spinal cord stimulation effectively addressed many physical function and sleep problems associated with FBSS; however, there is a need for further high-quality objective investigations to support this. © 2011 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters.

  14. The Effectiveness of High-Energy Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy Versus Ultrasound-Guided Needling Versus Arthroscopic Surgery in the Management of Chronic Calcific Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louwerens, Jan K G; Veltman, Ewout S; van Noort, Arthur; van den Bekerom, Michel P J

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this comprehensive quantitative review of the treatment of calcific tendinopathy of the rotator cuff were to investigate if there is a sustainable positive effect on outcomes after treatment with high-energy extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) or ultrasound (US)-guided needling and to compare these results with those of treatment with arthroscopic surgery. The PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) guidelines were followed to conduct this review. A systematic literature search was conducted in December 2014 to identify relevant clinical articles in peer-reviewed journals with at least 6 months' follow-up. Each article was scored using the Coleman Methodology Score. The primary endpoints were functional outcome and radiologic change in the size of the calcific deposit. Twenty-two studies were included (1,258 shoulders). The mean Coleman Methodology Score for the included studies was 77.1 ± 9.1. Overall, good to excellent clinical outcomes were achieved after treatment with either high-energy ESWT, US-guided needling, or arthroscopic surgery, with an improvement in the Constant-Murley score ranging between 26.3 and 41.5 points after 1 year. No severe side effects or long-term complications were encountered. Patients can achieve good to excellent clinical outcomes after high-energy ESWT, US-guided needling, and arthroscopy for calcific tendinopathy of the shoulder. Side effects and post-treatment complications should be taken into account when a decision is being made for each individual patient. Physicians should consider high-energy ESWT and US-guided needling as minimally invasive treatment options when primary conservative treatment fails. Arthroscopy can safely be used as a very effective but more invasive secondary option, although the extent of deposit removal and the additional benefit of subacromial decompression remain unclear. Level IV, systematic review of Level I, II, and IV studies. Copyright

  15. Pregnancy after bariatric surgery - a review of benefits and risks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Mette Karie Mandrup; Nilas, Lisbeth

    2013-01-01

    Background. When other weight loss attempts have failed, bariatric surgery offers a successful alternative against obesity. Since operations are performed during women´s reproductive years, the number of pregnant women with prior bariatric surgery is increasing. Bariatric surgery results...... in restriction of food intake and/or malabsorption leading to weight loss, but may induce a risk for malnutrition and pregnancy complications. Method. Systematically conducted review addressing pregnancy after bariatric surgery using the PubMed and Cochrane databases. Main Outcome Measures. Birthweight......, gestational age, birth defects, preeclampsia, gestational diabetes mellitus, and mode of delivery. Results. We included 17 articles in English, comparing pregnancies in women with prior bariatric surgery to pregnancies in a control group without this. There was considerable heterogeneity in study design...

  16. Papillomaviruses: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Pinheiro Araldi

    Full Text Available Abstract In the last decades, a group of viruses has received great attention due to its relationship with cancer development and its wide distribution throughout the vertebrates: the papillomaviruses. In this article, we aim to review some of the most relevant reports concerning the use of bovines as an experimental model for studies related to papillomaviruses. Moreover, the obtained data contributes to the development of strategies against the clinical consequences of bovine papillomaviruses (BPV that have led to drastic hazards to the herds. To overcome the problem, the vaccines that we have been developing involve recombinant DNA technology, aiming at prophylactic and therapeutic procedures. It is important to point out that these strategies can be used as models for innovative procedures against HPV, as this virus is the main causal agent of cervical cancer, the second most fatal cancer in women.

  17. Papillomaviruses: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araldi, Rodrigo Pinheiro; Assaf, Suely Muro Reis; de Carvalho, Rodrigo Franco; de Carvalho, Márcio Augusto Caldas Rocha; de Souza, Jacqueline Mazzuchelli; Magnelli, Roberta Fiusa; Módolo, Diego Grando; Roperto, Franco Peppino; Stocco, Rita de Cassia; Beçak, Willy

    2017-01-01

    Abstract In the last decades, a group of viruses has received great attention due to its relationship with cancer development and its wide distribution throughout the vertebrates: the papillomaviruses. In this article, we aim to review some of the most relevant reports concerning the use of bovines as an experimental model for studies related to papillomaviruses. Moreover, the obtained data contributes to the development of strategies against the clinical consequences of bovine papillomaviruses (BPV) that have led to drastic hazards to the herds. To overcome the problem, the vaccines that we have been developing involve recombinant DNA technology, aiming at prophylactic and therapeutic procedures. It is important to point out that these strategies can be used as models for innovative procedures against HPV, as this virus is the main causal agent of cervical cancer, the second most fatal cancer in women. PMID:28212457

  18. Patient-related risk factors for urinary retention following ambulatory general surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Sam E; Scott, Alasdair J; Mayer, Erik; Purkayastha, Sanjay

    2016-06-01

    Postoperative urinary retention (POUR) is a source of avoidable patient harm. The aim of this review is to identify and quantify the role of patient-related risk factors in the development of POUR following ambulatory general surgery. Studies published until December 2014 were identified by searching MEDLINE, EMBASE, and PsycINFO databases. Risk factors assessed in 3 or more studies were meta-analyzed. Twenty-one studies were suitable for inclusion consisting of 7,802 patients. The incidence of POUR was 14%. Increased age and the presence of lower urinary tract symptoms significantly increased risk with odds ratios [ORs] of 2.11 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.15 to 3.86) and 2.83 (1.57 to 5.08), respectively. Male sex was not associated with developing POUR (OR .96, 95% CI .62 to 1.50). Preoperative α-blocker use significantly decreased the incidence of POUR with an OR of .37 (95% CI .15 to .91). Increased age and the presence of lower urinary tract symptoms increase the risk of POUR, while α-blocker use confers protection. Male sex was not associated with POUR. These findings assist in preoperative identification of patients at high risk of POUR. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Risk of wound infection and safety profile of amoxicillin in healthy patients which required third molar surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isiordia-Espinoza, M A; Aragon-Martinez, O H; Martínez-Morales, J F; Zapata-Morales, J R

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to assess the risk of surgical wound infection and the adverse effects of amoxicillin in healthy patients who required excision of third molars. We identified eligible reports from searches of PubMed, Medline®, the Cochrane Library, Imbiomed, LILACS, and Google Scholar. Studies that met our minimum requirements were evaluated using inclusion and exclusion criteria and the Oxford Quality Scale. Those with a score of 3 or more on this Scale were included and their data were extracted and analysed. For evaluation of th