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  1. Oral Contraceptives after Bariatric Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joël Schlatter

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Bariatric surgery offers a highly effective mode of treatment for obese patients. Some procedures such as bypass cause an alteration in normal gastrointestinal tract with possible consequences for the uptake of orally administered drugs. Methods: We assessed the literature to ascertain whether the use of oral drugs and especially oral contraceptives is effective and adequate after bariatric surgery. Results: The bioavailability of drugs could be affected by the solubility and pH of the modified medium after bariatric surgery and by the loss of gastrointestinal transporters. Bariatric surgery could potentially result in a transient change in the absorption of drugs such as analgesics, antibiotics, antiarrhythmics, anticoagulants, psychotropic, and oral contraceptive drugs. Effective contraception is especially critical in the postoperative period, and implants might be representing a safe contraceptive method in women undergoing bariatric surgery. Conclusion: Each drug will have to be evaluated with respect to its site of absorption and its mechanism of absorption, with special attention on parameters influencing the effectiveness of the absorption processes.

  2. Preventing Wrong-Site Surgery in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assael, Leon A

    2017-05-01

    This article discusses the risk for wrong-site surgery in oral and maxillofacial surgery and the development and utility of checklists. The intent of checklists and the specific applicability of each of them to ambulatory oral and maxillofacial surgery are presented. Checklists and other considerations to mitigate the risk of wrong-site surgery are evaluated. The role of interprofessional teams in improving patient care outcomes with the checklist as a vehicle is evaluated. Recommendations for the use of checklists and related methods in the ambulatory oral and maxillofacial surgery setting are made. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Application of Laser in Oral Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asnaashari, Mohammad; Zadsirjan, Saeede

    2014-01-01

    In this review collected from the literature on usage of laser in oral minor surgery based on a Medline search in the time period between the years: 2008 and 2013, the most current evidence on laser-assisted oral minor surgery is going to be surveyed. PMID:25653807

  4. Piezosurgery in oral and maxillofacial surgery

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavlíková, G.; Foltán, R.; Horká, M.; Hanzelka, T.; Borunská, H.; Šedý, Jiří

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 5 (2011), s. 451-457 ISSN 0901-5027 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390703 Keywords : piezosurgery * oral surgery * maxillofacial surgery Subject RIV: FJ - Surgery incl. Transplants; FH - Neurology (UEM-P) Impact factor: 1.506, year: 2011

  5. Amniotic membrane in oral and maxillofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesting, Marco Rainer; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Nobis, Christopher Philipp; Rohleder, Nils Hagen

    2014-06-01

    Following its renaissance in ophthalmology during the 1990s, preserved human amniotic membrane (HAM) has become an attractive biomaterial for all surgical disciplines. This article reviews the current and potential use of HAM in oral and maxillofacial surgery, its postulated properties and common preservation techniques. Literature was identified by an electronic search of PubMed in July 2012; this was supplemented from the reference lists of the consulted papers. HAM has been used in the field of oral and maxillofacial surgery from 1969 onwards because of its immunological preference and its pain-reducing, antimicrobial, mechanical and side-dependent adhesive or anti-adhesive properties. The effects of HAM on dermal and mucosal re-epithelialisation have been highlighted. Typically, HAM is applied after being banked in a glycerol-preserved, DMSO-preserved or freeze-dried and irradiated state. Whereas the use of HAM in flap surgery and in intra-oral and extra-oral lining is reported frequently, novel HAM applications in post-traumatic orbital surgery and temporomandibular joint surgery have been added since 2010. Tissue engineering with HAM is a fast-expanding field with a high variety of future options. Preserved HAM is considered to be a safe and sufficient biomaterial in all fields of oral and maxillofacial wound healing. Recently published novel indications for HAM application lack a high level of evidence and need to be studied further.

  6. Smartphone photography in oral and maxillofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, F

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of staff in oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMFS) departments take clinical photographs with their personal phones. We report the results of a survey on the use of smartphone photography in OMFS departments in the United Kingdom, and highlight the guidelines that govern their use and the associated ethical and medicolegal implications. Copyright © 2015 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Value of microvascular surgery in academic oral and maxillofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattahi, Tirbod; Fernandes, Rui

    2013-01-01

    The specialty of oral and maxillofacial surgery has witnessed a large trend of inclusion of maxillofacial oncology and microvascular reconstructive surgery within its scope of practice in recent years. The purpose of this report is to describe the authors' experience with a very active oncologic and microvascular reconstructive surgical service within an academic oral and maxillofacial surgical program at a large university teaching hospital. The operative log from July 1, 2010, to June 30, 2011, of 325 operations devoted to head and neck oncology and reconstruction was examined. Thirty-nine patients (group A) received a pedicled flap for head and neck reconstruction. Sixty-three patients (group B) received a microvascular free tissue transfer for head and neck reconstruction. Financial records of 20 consecutive patients who underwent simultaneous ablative and reconstructive procedures in each group were then reviewed for total hospital charges, including direct (surgical fees) and indirect (hospital stay, operating room expenses, and ancillary services) charges, and length of stay. Total hospital charges and direct surgical fees, were higher for the microvascular reconstruction group (group B). Length of hospital stay was not statistically different between the two groups. Microvascular reconstructive surgery performed within an academic oral and maxillofacial surgical program has many financial and intangible benefits within a medical center. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Regenerative nanotechnology in oral and maxillofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakib, Kaveh; Tan, Aaron; Soskic, Vukic; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2014-12-01

    Regenerative nanotechnology is at the forefront of medical research, and translational medicine is a challenge to both scientists and clinicians. Although there has been an exponential rise in the volume of research generated about it for both medical and surgical uses, key questions remain about its actual benefits. Nevertheless, some people think that therapeutics based on its principles may form the core of applied research for the future. Here we give an account of its current use in oral and maxillofacial surgery, and implications and challenges for the future. Copyright © 2014 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Lasers in oral surgery and implantology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vescovi, Paolo

    2016-03-01

    The usefulness of laser for oral hard tissue procedure such as caries treatment, impacted teeth extraction, periodontal therapy, peri-implantitis management, sinus lifting is reported by several Authors [1]. Conventionally, mechanical rotary instruments and hand instruments are employed for bone surgery. Rotary instruments have better accessibility and cutting efficiency, but there is a risk of excessive heating of bone tissue and caution must be exercised to avoid the bur becoming entangled with surrounding soft tissues and the reflected flap. The main clinical advantages of the lasers are represented by minimal patient discomfort, good recovery with decreased or absent post-operative pain. In the last ten years are described in the international literature great advantages of Laser Surgery and Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) performed with different wavelength in addition to traditional surgical techniques to improve bone and soft tissue healing and for pain and infection control.

  10. Computer-assisted oral and maxillofacial surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassfeld, S.; Brief, J.; Muehling, J.; Krempien, R.; Mende, U.; Raczkowsky, J.; Muenchenberg, J.; Woern, H.; Giess, H.; Meinzer, H.P.

    2000-01-01

    Background: Methods from the area of virtual reality are used in oral and maxillofacial surgery for the planning and three-dimensional individual simulation of surgeries. Simulation: In order to simulate complex surgeries with the aid of a computer, the diagnostic image data and especially various imaging modalities (CT, MRT, US) must be arranged in relation to each other, thus enabling rapid switching between the various modalities as well as the viewing of mixed images. Segmenting techniques for the reconstruction of three-dimensional representations of soft-tissue and osseous areas are required. We must develop ergonomic and intuitively useable interaction methods for the surgeon, thus allowing for precise and fast entry of the planned surgical intervention in the planning and simulation phase. Surgery: During the surgical phase, instrument navigation tools offer the surgeon interactive support through operation guidance and control of potential dangers. This feature is already available today. Future intraoperative assistance will take the form of such passive tools for the support of intraoperative orientation as well as so-called tracking systems (semi-active systems) which accompany and support the surgeons' work. The final form are robots which execute specific steps completely autonomously. Discussion: The techniques of virtual reality keep gaining in importance for medical applications. Many applications are still being developed or are still in the form of a prototype. However, it is already clear that developments in this area will have a considerable effect on the surgeon's routine work. (orig.) [de

  11. Endoscopic techniques in oral and maxillofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedroletti, Fred; Johnson, Brad S; McCain, Joseph P

    2010-02-01

    Oral and maxillofacial surgery is entering a new era. Surgeons can use the latest technological advances in equipment in an attempt to improve patient outcomes. Minimally invasive surgery with the use of the endoscope has improved in recent years because of technological advancements in optics and associated instrumentation. Trauma, orthognathic, sialoendoscopy, and temporomandibular joint surgery are commonly performed with the assistance of the endoscope. From an educational standpoint, surgical anatomy and various other principles can easily be taught to trainees with the assistance of the endoscope. The operating surgeon can visualize an area via the endoscope, and instruct regarding the surgical maneuvers on the monitor, without obstructions to view. This technique also allows others in and out of the room to view the image. Endoscopically assisted surgery is gaining popularity and is becoming a tool frequently used by surgeons to assist in and simplify some of the more difficult techniques that often require more extensive surgical exposure for visualization. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluation of Drug Prescriptions in Oral Surgery | Ehigiator ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of Drug Prescriptions in Oral Surgery. ... To evaluate the pattern of medication prescription in an oral surgery outpatient clinic. A questionnaire was distributed to Resident doctord ... This however buttresses that the management of the orofacial pain and dental infection is inherent in dental practice. Keywords: Drig ...

  13. Controversies in Anesthesia for Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Brett J; Levine, Adam

    2017-11-01

    The future of office-based anesthesia for oral and maxillofacial surgery is at risk. Oral and maxillofacial surgeons have been on the forefront of providing safe and effective outpatient anesthesia for decades. Recent changes in Medicare policies have had, and will continue to have, a significant effect on the training of oral and maxillofacial surgery residents regarding anesthesia. The outcome of these changes can have a major effect on the specialty of oral and maxillofacial surgery and a cornerstone of the profession. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Risk of surgical glove perforation in oral and maxillofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroyanagi, N; Nagao, T; Sakuma, H; Miyachi, H; Ochiai, S; Kimura, Y; Fukano, H; Shimozato, K

    2012-08-01

    Oral and maxillofacial surgery, which involves several sharp instruments and fixation materials, is consistently at a high risk for cross-contamination due to perforated gloves, but it is unclear how often such perforations occur. This study aimed to address this issue. The frequency of the perforation of surgical gloves (n=1436) in 150 oral and maxillofacial surgeries including orthognathic surgery (n=45) was assessed by the hydroinsufflation technique. Orthognathic surgery had the highest perforation rate in at least 1 glove in 1 operation (91.1%), followed by cleft lip and palate surgery (55.0%), excision of oral soft tumour (54.5%) and dental implantation (50.0%). The perforation rate in scrub nurses was 63.4%, followed by 44.4% in surgeons and first assistants, and 16.3% in second assistants. The odds ratio for the perforation rate in orthognathic surgery versus other surgeries was 16.0 (95% confidence interval: 5.3-48.0). The protection rate offered by double gloving in orthognathic surgery was 95.2%. These results suggest that, regardless of the surgical duration and blood loss in all fields of surgery, orthognathic surgery must be categorized in the highest risk group for glove perforation, following gynaecological and open lung surgery, due to the involvement of sharp objects. Copyright © 2012 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Role of nutrition in oral and maxillofacial surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giridhar, V Usha

    2016-01-01

    Diet, nutrition, and dental health are closely related and have multidirectional impacts. Any oral diseases, may it be congenital, infective, traumatic, inflammatory, or neoplastic, affect routine functions of the oral cavity and even after corrective surgeries done to improve may adversely affect the food and fluid intake and further compromises nutritional status. Unlike other general surgeries, the surgeries done in oral and maxillofacial region impairs normal food intake, especially by mouth which is the preferred commonly used route. This oral cavity being harbored by multiple organisms makes it prone to further infection which again hampers the healing. Oral surgeries include the dentoalveolar region for the treatment of fracture or prosthetic reasons, for maxillofacial trauma, orthognathic surgeries, tumors, cleft lip and palate correction, etc., Nutrition plays a major role in the postoperative recovery and healing. Malnutrition in the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (OMFS) patients increases the postoperative morbidity and mortality rate. Nutrition in jaw fractures treated with intermaxillary fixation is more compromised. Healing is impaired in malnourished, critically ill, elderly, and patients with prolonged stay in hospital and hence nutrition in the form of enteral, parenteral, and oral sip feeding plays a major role in providing nutritional care. Preoperative nutrition and perioperative nutrition influence the postoperative outcome and hence metabolic and nutritional care is important for the uneventful healing. This article provides a basic review of the role of nutrition in the postoperative outcome of OMFS patients based on the search through articles in journal and internet.

  16. ON THE NECESSITY OF MINOR ORAL SURGERY PRETREATMENT ORTHODONTICS

    OpenAIRE

    Georgeta Zegan; Daniela Anistoroaei; Loredana Golovcencu

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to establish the frequency of some minor oral surgery performed on both teeth and on the soft tissues, before any orthodontic treatment. The sample group included 587 patients (240 boys and 347 girls), divided into 3 categories. The data base was created wtih patient records, the statistical analyses being performed with the SPSS 17.0 software for Windows. The frequency of malocclusions with minor oral surgery pretreatment orthodontics was of 2...

  17. Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery: Why the double degree? | Oji ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The oral and maxillofacial surgeon routinely treats patients with systemic diseases such as acute and chronic alcoholism, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, cardiovascular and pulmonary disease, neurological problems, as well as drug abusers. The new requirement for oral and maxillofacial surgery training programmes is ...

  18. Fear and anxiety in patients undergoing minor oral surgery | Saheeb ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This study was carried out to determine the causes of fear and anxiety in consecutive patients who attended the University of Benin Teaching Hospital for minor oral surgical treatment. Method: All consenting consecutive patients referred for minor oral surgery were studied. Information on all the patients was ...

  19. Perception of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery in a University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A questionnaire was designed to assess the knowledge of the community of the specialties of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Ear, Nose and Throat (ENT), and plastic Surgery. They were asked some questions on their choice of surgeon to treat them if they or a member of their families had an identified surgical problem.

  20. Laser tumor treatment in oral and maxillofacial surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neukam, F. W.; Stelzle, F.

    Cancer treatment is an integral part of oral and maxillofacial surgery. Oral cancer in particular is a highly prevalent neoplasm. Standard treatment for most of the tumors is radical surgery combined with stage-based neo-/adjuvant therapy. Laser surgery has become a reliable treatment option for oral cancer as well as for precancerous lesions. Widely used lasers in oral and maxillofacial tumor surgery are the CO2 laser, the Er:YAG laser, the Nd:YAG laser and the KTM laser. The use of lasers in tumor surgery has several advantages: remote application, precise cutting, hemostasis, low cicatrization, reduced postoperative pain and swelling, can be combined with endoscopic, microscopic and robotic surgery. However, laser surgery has some major drawbacks: In contrast to conventional incisions with scalpels, the surgeon gets no feedback during laser ablation. There is no depth sensation and no tissue specificity with a laser incision, increasing the risk of iatrogenic damage to nerves and major blood vessels. Future prospects may solve these problems by means of an optical feedback mechanism that provides a tissue-specific laser ablation. First attempts have been made to perform remote optical tissue differentiation. Additionally, real time optical tumor detection during laser surgery would allow for a very precise and straight forward cancer resection, enhancing organ preservation and hence the quality of life for patients with cancer in the head and neck region.

  1. [A survey of oral and maxillofacial surgery in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    To understand the current status of the discipline and work out the developmental tactics of oral and maxillofacial surgery in China. A questionnaire on the status of oral and maxillofacial surgery was designed and dispatched to the departments of stomatology in general hospitals at the level of prefecture or higher, stomatological hospitals and schools of stomatology. The contents of the questionnaire included the scale, manpower, professional extent, amount of clinical work and professional training of oral and maxillofacial surgery. The current status was compared with the previous status 5 and 10 years ago. In the most institutions which were surveyed, the number of oral and maxillofacial surgeons, beds and out-patients increased, the professional extent enlarged, and the clinical level improved. However, the above-mentioned clinical parameters decreased in some basic level institutions. The number of graduate students and trainees of oral and maxillofacial surgery decreased in one-third of institutions. The discipline of oral and maxillofacial surgery is continuously developing, but it is weakened in some basic level institutions. An effective developmental tactics should be carried on to improve the competition capability of the discipline.

  2. Risk factors for postoperative complications following oral surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigeishi, Hideo; Ohta, Kouji; Takechi, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to clarify significant risk factors for postoperative complications in the oral cavity in patients who underwent oral surgery, excluding those with oral cancer. This study reviewed the records of 324 patients who underwent mildly to moderately invasive oral surgery (e.g., impacted tooth extraction, cyst excision, fixation of mandibular and maxillary fractures, osteotomy, resection of a benign tumor, sinus lifting, bone grafting, removal of a sialolith, among others) under general anesthesia or intravenous sedation from 2012 to 2014 at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Reconstructive Surgery, Hiroshima University Hospital. Univariate analysis showed a statistical relationship between postoperative complications (i.e., surgical site infection, anastomotic leak) and diabetes (p=0.033), preoperative serum albumin level (p=0.009), and operation duration (p=0.0093). Furthermore, preoperative serum albumin level (complications in multiple logistic regression analysis results (odds ratio 3.82, p=0.0074; odds ratio 2.83, p=0.0086, respectively). Our results indicate that a low level of albumin in serum and prolonged operation duration are important risk factors for postoperative complications occurring in the oral cavity following oral surgery.

  3. Oral and cranio-maxillofacial surgery in Byzantium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mylonas, Anastassios I; Poulakou-Rebelakou, Eleftheria-Fotini; Androutsos, Georgios I; Seggas, Ioannis; Skouteris, Christos A; Papadopoulou, Evangelia Chr

    2014-03-01

    Byzantine physicians (4th-7th and 8th-12th centuries A.D.), especially those interested in Surgery, developed a number of interesting concepts, views and opinions referring to the field now recognized as Oral and Cranio-maxillofacial Surgery and Pathology. The original texts of Byzantine physicians, written in ancient Greek, and now preserved in the electronic platform Thesaurus Linguae Graecae, at the University of California, Irvine, CA, USA, were investigated in relation to Oral and Cranio-maxillofacial Surgery and Pathology. The most eminent physicians of the Early (4th-7th century A.D.) and Middle (8th-12th century A.D.) Byzantine Period, in particular Oribasius Pergamenus, Aëtius Amidenus, Alexander Trallianus, Theophilus Protospatharius, Paulus Aegineta, Meletius Monachos, and Leo Medicus, in their works deal with topographic and surgical anatomy of the head and neck, and a large list of related topics, including dentoalveolar surgery, oral and cervicofacial infections, trauma of viscerocranium and neurocranium as well as the biomechanics of traumatic brain injuries, temporomandibular joints dysfunction as a consequence of mandibular dislocation, surgical oncology and reconstructive surgery of the head and neck, oral pathology, surgical pathology of salivary glands, therapeutic management of facial nerve dysfunction, preprosthetic surgery, craniofacial surgery, and deformities of the facial skeleton involving anthropologic and craniometric observations. Clinical examination of patients presenting corresponding functional and esthetic problems is considered, using recognizable orthodontic and orthognathic surgical approaches. Finally, specific bandages of the head and neck are described, for treating traumatic injuries of the viscerocranium and neurocranium, diastasis of the cranial sutures, dislocations of the mandible (unilateral and bilateral), as well as inflammatory diseases of the parotids and the neck. Byzantine physicians had been particularly

  4. Oral and maxillofacial surgery: what are the French specificities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herlin, Christian; Goudot, Patrick; Jammet, Patrick; Delaval, Christophe; Yachouh, Jacques

    2011-05-01

    Oral and maxillofacial surgery has expanded rapidly over the past century. Recognition in France has grown since the first face transplantation in the world performed by Professor Bernard Devauchelle. This speciality, which seems to correspond to a narrow scope of services, actually involves oral, plastic, reconstructive, and cosmetic surgeries of the face. French training for maxillofacial surgeons differs from the Anglo-Saxon course of study. After examining surveys carried out in Great Britain, the United States, and Brazil, the perception of this speciality in the general public and among regular correspondents (general practitioners and dental practitioners) was ascertained. More than 4,000 questionnaires were sent to health care workers and patients attending dental practices. The returned questionnaires concerning recognition of this profession in France were analyzed. Evaluating awareness of maxillofacial surgery among practitioners and the public was of particular interest because it can overlap with several other specialities (ear, nose, and throat; plastic surgery; odontology). The questionnaire included the 20 items used in other similar studies so the results could be compared. Several fields of expertise were identified in maxillofacial surgery, in particular traumatology, surgery for facial birth defects, and orthognathic surgery. Moreover, dental practitioners were found to be the most regular correspondents of maxillofacial surgeons compared with general practitioners. Compared with Anglo-Saxon and Brazilian peers, French recognition of maxillofacial surgery was better. Despite encouraging results, maxillofacial surgery remains a somewhat obscure speciality for health care workers and the general public. Better awareness is necessary for this speciality to become the reference in facial surgery. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. KNOWLEDGE GAPS IN ORAL AND MAXILLOFACIAL SURGERY: A SYSTEMATIC MAPPING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Österberg, Marie; Holmlund, Anders; Sunzel, Bo; Tranæus, Sofia; Twetman, Svante; Lund, Bodil

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate available knowledge and identify knowledge gaps within the field of oral and maxillofacial surgery, by systematically collecting and evaluating systematic reviews. Twelve specific domains were selected: surgical removal of teeth, antibiotic and corticosteroid prophylaxis, orofacial infections, dental and facial trauma, orthognathic surgery, reconstructive surgery, benign tumors, cysts, premalignant lesions, oral complications of treatment of malignant tumors, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, temporomandibular joint surgery, cost effectiveness of different surgical treatments, and ethics. The literature search, covering four databases, was conducted during September 2014: PubMed, The Cochrane library, Centre for Reviews and Dissemination and EBSCO dentistry and oral science source. Retrieved systematic reviews were quality assessed by AMSTAR. In all, 1,778 abstracts were identified, of which 200 met the inclusion criteria. Forty-five systematic reviews were assessed as of high to moderate quality. The results disclosed some existing evidence in a few domains, such as surgical removal of teeth and implant survival after sinus lifts. However, in all domains, the search revealed a large number of knowledge gaps. Also of concern was the lack of data regarding health economics and ethics. In conclusion, there is a need for well-conducted clinical research in the fields of oral and maxillofacial surgery.

  6. Psychological issues in oral and maxillofacial reconstructive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sousa, Avinash

    2008-12-01

    Many psychological problems affect patients who have oral and maxillofacial operations. This article reviews these problems among patients with craniofacial conditions, facial injuries, facial cancer, and those having orthognathic surgery. Facial cosmetic surgery is not addressed. Problems such as depression, anxiety, low self-esteem, poor social relationships, and changes in body image are considered. The roles of mental health professionals is emphasised to enhance postoperative satisfaction and to provide a better quality of life for these patients.

  7. KNOWLEDGE GAPS IN ORAL AND MAXILLOFACIAL SURGERY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Österberg, Marie; Holmlund, Anders; Sunzel, Bo

    2017-01-01

    surgical treatments, and ethics. METHODS: The literature search, covering four databases, was conducted during September 2014: PubMed, The Cochrane library, Centre for Reviews and Dissemination and EBSCO dentistry and oral science source. Retrieved systematic reviews were quality assessed by AMSTAR...

  8. Patients` compliance with instructions after oral surgery in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To prospectively study the behaviour of oral surgery patients given verbal and written instructions, verbal instructions alone and written instructions alone after minor surgical procedures to return for review visits, remember correctly form of instruction given, compliance and level of satisfaction with treatment.

  9. Risk of bias in research in oral and maxillofacial surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomens, M.A.E.M.; Heymans, M.W.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2013-01-01

    The risk of bias is important in the interpretation of the results of research. The aim of this review was to evaluate the risk of bias in randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMFS) over a 10-year period. We searched databases of publications for RCTs published

  10. Application of additive manufacturing in oral and maxillofacial surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farré-Guasch, E.; Wolff, J.; Helder, M.N.; Schulten, E.A.J.M.; Forouzanfar, T.; Klein-Nulend, J.

    2015-01-01

    Additive manufacturing is the process of joining materials to create objects from digital 3-dimensional (3D) model data,which is a promising technology in oral andmaxillofacial surgery. The management of lost craniofacial tissues owing to congenital abnormalities, trauma, or cancer treatment poses a

  11. Laser applications in oral surgery and implant dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deppe, Herbert; Horch, Hans-Henning

    2007-11-01

    Lasers have been used for many years in oral surgery and implant dentistry. In some indications, laser treatment has become state of the art as compared to conventional techniques. This article is a comprehensive review of new laser applications in oral surgery and implant dentistry. One of the most interesting developments over the last years was the introduction of the 9.6-microm CO(2) laser. It has been shown in the recent literature that the use of this new device can preserve tissue with almost no adverse effects at the light microscopic level. In contrast, modifications of approved CO(2) laser therapies of premalignant lesions resulted in higher recurrence rates than the conventional defocused laser technique. However, several studies indicate that other wavelengths such as Nd-YAG (lambda = 1,064 nm) or diode lasers (lambda = 810 nm) may be also of value in this field. In many other indications, the use of lasers is still experimental. Intraoperatively used photodynamic therapy or peri-implant care of ailing implants with the CO(2) laser seems to be more of value than conventional methods. However, further studies are required to assess standard protocols. Over the past years, research identified some new indications for laser treatment in oral surgery and implant dentistry. Moreover, well-known laser applications were defined as state of the art. Nevertheless, further studies are required for laser treatment in oral surgery and implant dentistry.

  12. Improving access to oral surgery services in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Nick

    2009-10-01

    This paper describes the innovative use of National Health Service (NHS) dental commissioning powers to develop specialist primary care based oral surgery services. The outcomes, after one full year of the scheme, have been substantial improvement in access and reduced waiting times for patients, further development of NHS primary care dental services through commissioning processes, increased use and engagement of oral surgery specialists outside of a hospital setting, and considerable ongoing savings to the NHS. Collaborative working between hospital consultants and managers, Primary Care Trust dental commissioners, general dental practice providers, specialist oral surgeons and a dental public health consultant has resulted in sustainable benefits to patients and the NHS within the World Class Commissioning framework.

  13. Racial diversity in American oral and maxillofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Shahid R

    2010-08-01

    Health care disparity in the United States is a significant problem. Part of the solution is to improve the diversity of health care providers. The purpose of this study is to review the racial demographic of American oral and maxillofacial surgery as it compares with the racial demographic of the United States. Additionally, the racial demographic of the American dental and medical professions are reviewed. Databases from the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, American Dental Association, and Association of American Medical Colleges were analyzed, specifically reviewing racial demographic data of academic oral and maxillofacial surgery, dentistry, and medicine. Of the 349 full-time faculty, 248 were white (71.1%), 24 black (6.9%), 18 Hispanic (5.1%), 30 Asian (8.6%), and 29 other/unknown (8.3%); there were no full-time faculty of American Indian or Alaska Native descent. Of the 991 oral and maxillofacial surgery residents, whites comprised 701 (70.7%), blacks 43 (4.3%), Hispanics 42 (4.2%), Asians 197 (19.9%), and unknown 8 (0.8%). There are currently no residents of American Indian/Alaska Native origin. A 2006 American Dental Association survey of the distribution of race among the 179,594 professionally active dentists in the United States revealed 86.2% white, 3.4% black, 3.4% Hispanic, 6.9% Asian, and 0.12% American Indian. In 2004, whites comprised 36.7% (344,821) of US physicians, blacks 3.3% (30,598), Hispanics 2.8% (26,094), and Asians 5.7% (53,799); 27.6% (258,950) of US physicians were listed as unknown, and 23.6% (221,633) were listed as international medical graduates without demographic information. American oral and maxillofacial surgery's racial demographic (just as dentistry and medicine) does not remotely resemble the racial demographic of the United States. To improve health care disparity in this nation, diversifying the health care professional workforce is essential. Oral and maxillofacial surgery, a unique surgical

  14. PEDICLE TONGUE FLAP SURGERY IN ORAL SUBMUCOUS FIBROSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthubabu K

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Oral submucous fibrosis is a disease of unknown aetiology and is a legacy of Indians. It has been variously treated both medically and surgically but neither has been found to be rewarding. Various groups have been studying the therapy schedules and aetiological association, but the conclusions have remained unclear. AIM The study aims to focus on newer surgical therapy stressing on the mechanics and use of pedicle tongue flap in the management of this condition. METHODS AND MATERIALS The study comprised of 40 patients from our outpatient department suffering from oral submucous fibrosis in the age group of 11 to 70 years. The contributory factors of oral submucous fibrosis and the symptoms of the disease were evaluated and the role of pedicle tongue flap surgery in the management of this disease which is a premalignant condition is discussed. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION Pedicle tongue flap surgery has given promising results in the treatment of trismus due to oral submucous fibrosis. After the surgery, none of our patients developed any malignant change.

  15. [Intraoperative adverse events in minor oral surgery. Risk analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, W; Maurer, P; Schubert, J

    2005-11-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate oral surgical procedures performed as day surgery under local anesthesia. We examined patients' general condition, and besides checking for intraoperative complications we analyzed postoperative bleeding in patients with hemostatic disorders. The patient population consisted of 1540 patients (797 female, 743 male), who underwent a total of 2055 minor oral surgical procedures over a 5-year period (1998-2002). Before the treatment started a data file was made for each patient, which contained information on his or her past medical history, concomitant medication, why the operation was indicated, premedication, anesthetic and surgical techniques applied, and postoperative treatment. Systemic pathologies influencing surgical decisions were found in 316 patients (20.5%), affecting 676 interventions (32.9%). In 109 patients (5.3% of the 2055) altered hemostasis was found. The surgical procedures recorded were: (operative) tooth extraction (n=394), interventions for surgical conservation of teeth (n=272), treatment for cysts (n=140), surgical revisions (n=46) and preprosthetic surgery (n=19). Passing complications, mostly systemic in nature, occurred during 27 sessions of local anesthesia (1.3%). There were 87 adverse events intraoperatively (4,2%), most of which were confined to the surgical field; specifically 15% of these complications took the form of hemorrhage. We observed no significant correlation between the occurrence of intraoperative complications and patients' gender, predisposing systemic pathologies including bleeding disorders, or age. Postoperative hemorrhage was observed significantly more frequently in patients with impaired hemostasis and required admission to hospital for inpatient treatment in 2 cases. According to our investigation, oral surgery can be performed in patients with compromised general condition with as few intraoperative complications as in patients with no general medical problems

  16. The Australian litigation landscape - oral and maxillofacial surgery and general dentistry (oral surgery procedures): an analysis of litigation cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badenoch-Jones, E K; White, B P; Lynham, A J

    2016-09-01

    There are persistent concerns about litigation in the dental and medical professions. These concerns arise in a setting where general dentists are more frequently undertaking a wider range of oral surgery procedures, potentially increasing legal risk. Judicial cases dealing with medical negligence in the fields of general dentistry (oral surgery procedure) and oral and maxillofacial surgery were located using the three main legal databases. Relevant cases were analysed to determine the procedures involved, the patients' claims of injury, findings of negligence and damages awarded. A thematic analysis of the cases was undertaken to determine trends. Fifteen cases over a 20-year period were located across almost all Australian jurisdictions (eight cases involved general dentists; seven cases involved oral and maxillofacial surgeons). Eleven of the 15 cases involved determinations of whether or not the practitioner had failed in their duty of care; negligence was found in six cases. Eleven of the 15 cases related to molar extractions (eight specifically to third molar). Dental and medical practitioners wanting to manage legal risk should have regard to circumstances arising in judicial cases. Adequate warning of risks is critical, as is offering referral in appropriate cases. Preoperative radiographs, good medical records and processes to ensure appropriate follow-up are also important. © 2015 Australian Dental Association.

  17. Evolution and applications of lasers in oral and maxillofacial surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Nandu Kale

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of new and developing technology into the field of dentistry, it becomes increasingly important for dentists to become familiar with these developing techniques. The use of lasers in oral and maxillofacial surgery has seen a substantial increase in both, applications of lasers for different techniques, and also the number of surgeons opting to use them on a regular basis. This article serves to update practitioners on the development and current applications of these modern tools in regular practice so as to efficiently perform dental treatment and minimize complications associated with conventional techniques. The authors have reviewed articles on the subject from PubMed, Science Direct, and relevant textbooks so as to compile an accurate history of the evolution of lasers, its introduction to the field of dentistry and also its current applications in the field of oral and maxillofacial surgery.

  18. Laser for bone healing after oral surgery: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noba, Claudio; Mello-Moura, Anna Carolina Volpi; Gimenez, Thais; Tedesco, Tamara Kerber; Moura-Netto, Cacio

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to perform a systematic review on the use of lasers in oral surgery for bone healing. Selection of articles was carried out by two evaluators in Pubmed and Web of Science databases for published articles and OpenGray for gray literature. Search strategy was developed based on the PICO Question "Does the use of lasers after oral surgery improve bone healing?". Eligibility criteria were: being on laser; evaluate bone healing; involve oral surgery; do not be about implant, periodontics, orthodontics, osteonecrosis or radiotherapy, nor revisions, clinical cases, etc. Data were collected from each article in a structured spreadsheet and a descriptive analysis was performed. Risk assessment of bias of the articles was carried out through the tool elaborated by the Cochrane collaboration. A total of 827 potentially relevant references were identified. No articles were found in OpenGray. Eleven articles met the eligibility criteria and were included in the systematic review. Most of studies were in vivo and in jaw, being conducted with low-power lasers which were applied immediately after the surgical procedure of extraction. Neoformation and bone density were the outcomes of choice and there was a tendency of increase in bone density, neoformation, regeneration, mineralization, or bone condensation when laser was applied. Regarding the bias risk assessment, studies were not clear in reporting most of the parameters. Low-power laser therapy seems to reduce time of bone healing in oral surgery, although there are no defined protocols and the level of evidence is still considered weak.

  19. Evolution and applications of lasers in oral and maxillofacial surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Luke Nandu Kale; Janardan Bhagwat Garde; Swapnil Shivdas Garde; Preetika Gupta

    2017-01-01

    With the advent of new and developing technology into the field of dentistry, it becomes increasingly important for dentists to become familiar with these developing techniques. The use of lasers in oral and maxillofacial surgery has seen a substantial increase in both, applications of lasers for different techniques, and also the number of surgeons opting to use them on a regular basis. This article serves to update practitioners on the development and current applications of these modern to...

  20. ON THE NECESSITY OF MINOR ORAL SURGERY PRETREATMENT ORTHODONTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgeta Zegan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to establish the frequency of some minor oral surgery performed on both teeth and on the soft tissues, before any orthodontic treatment. The sample group included 587 patients (240 boys and 347 girls, divided into 3 categories. The data base was created wtih patient records, the statistical analyses being performed with the SPSS 17.0 software for Windows. The frequency of malocclusions with minor oral surgery pretreatment orthodontics was of 24%, out of which the surgical interventions on teeth represented 85.41% (serial extractions – 21.87%, orthodontic extractions – 41.66%, enucleation of third molars – 18.75%, discovery of impacted teeth – 2.08% and teeth enucleation – 1.04% and the surgical interventions on the soft tissues represented 14.59% (labial frenectomy: 12.60%, lingual frenectomy: 1.04% and discovery of pericoronal tissues: 1.04% The minor oral surgery pretreatment orthodontics upon both teeth and soft tissues are not quite frequent, yet they are necessary for a partial preparation of the patient for orthodontic therapy.

  1. Role of plasma-rich fibrin in oral surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Retna Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF is a fibrin meshwork, in which platelet cytokines, growth factors, and cells are entrapped and discharged after a period and can serve as a resorbable film. PRF is the next generation of platelet concentrates equipped to improve arrangement without biochemical blood handling; PRF is an evolution of the fibrin adhesive, which is widely used in the oral surgery. The guidelines of this innovation depend on concentrating platelets and growth factors in a plasma medium, and initiating them in a fibrin gel, keeping in mind the end goal to enhance the healing of wounds. Maxillary bone loss requires numerous regenerative techniques: as a supplement to the procedures of tissue regeneration, a platelet concentrate called PRF was tested for the 1st time in France by Dr. Choukroun. This article enriches the benefits and role of plasma-rich fibrin in oral surgery. Platelet-concentrate fibrin is an evolution of the fibrin glue, which is widely used in the oral surgery.

  2. Risk Factors for Postoperative Shivering After Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Masanori; Hitosugi, Takashi; Esaki, Kanako; Yokoyama, Takeshi

    2016-12-01

    Postoperative shivering is a frequent complication of anesthesia. However, there are few reports about postoperative shivering in oral and maxillofacial surgery. Postoperative shivering in patients after osteotomy was observed from April 2008 to September 2015. This retrospective study investigated the risk factors of postoperative shivering in oral and maxillofacial surgery. Anesthesia records of patients who underwent an osteotomy of the maxilla or mandible were checked. A patient's background (gender, age, height, and weight), anesthesia time, operative time, fentanyl, remifentanil, fluid volume, urine volume, blood loss volume, agent for anesthetic maintenance, rectal temperature at the end of surgery, and type of surgery were recorded in addition to the occurrence of postoperative shivering. In the univariate analysis, the Fisher exact test and the χ 2 test were used, and a multivariable analysis was performed using stepwise logistic regression to determine risk factors of postoperative shivering. In this study, 233 cases were investigated, and 24 patients (11.5%) had postoperative shivering. The occurrence of postoperative shivering was correlated with blood loss volume (shivering group, 633.9 ± 404.8 mL; nonshivering group, 367.0 ± 312.6 mL; P shivering group, 37.2 ± 0.6°C; nonshivering group, 37.5 ± 0.5°C; P shivering. Rectal temperature at the end of surgery was the highest risk factor (odds ratio = 2.560277; 95% confidence interval, 1.236774-5.327362), and blood loss volume was the next highest risk factor (odds ratio = 0.997733; 95% confidence interval, 0.999-0998). Clinicians should pay attention to postoperative shivering not only in patients with hypothermia but also in patients with substantial blood loss. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The Use of Telemedicine in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Eric W; Strauss, Robert A; Janus, Charles; Carrico, Caroline K

    2016-04-01

    To determine the perceived utility and demand for the application of telemedicine for improved patient care between nonsurgical dental practitioners (GPs) and oral and maxillofacial surgeons (OMS). Two distinct questionnaires were made, one for GPs and one for OMSs. The GP questionnaire was sent to practicing Virginia Dental Association members on an e-mail list (approximately 2,200). The OMS questionnaire was sent by the Virginia Society of Oral Maxillofacial Surgery to members on an e-mail list (approximately 213). Questionnaires included questions about access to care, benefits of telemedicine consultations, reliability of telemedicine consultations, and perceived barriers against and opportunities for the implementation of telemedicine. The questionnaire was completed by 226 GP and 41 OMS respondents. There was a significant difference among responses of GPs based on practice location: rural patients had a longer average time from referral to OMS consultation (P = .003), rural patients traveled longer distances (P oral and maxillofacial surgery. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Are people aware of oral and maxillofacial surgery in India?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Krishna; Adalarasan, S; Mohan, Shanker; Sreenivasan, P; Thangavelu, A

    2011-09-01

    Maxillofacial surgery is one of the most rapidly expanding specialities in India. There is however a very poor understanding of the scope of the speciality. This paper attempts to find out the awareness of the speciality in India. A questionnaire was given to 50 medical, dental undergraduate students, 50 medical and dental practitioners, and 50 lay persons giving us a total of 250 responses. 10 common anomalies were chosen and they were asked to choose the most appropriate speciality which they would ask to treat the problem. While trauma and facial deformity correction were recognised to be mainly treated by maxillofacial surgeons, the other maxillofacial problems were poorly recognised to be treated by our speciality. This study highlights the need to promote our speciality among the dentists, doctors and general public. and if need be even change the name of our speciality from oral and maxillofacial surgery to a more simple but more easily understood facial surgery.

  5. Application of Additive Manufacturing in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farré-Guasch, Elisabet; Wolff, Jan; Helder, Marco N; Schulten, Engelbert A J M; Forouzanfar, Tim; Klein-Nulend, Jenneke

    2015-12-01

    Additive manufacturing is the process of joining materials to create objects from digital 3-dimensional (3D) model data, which is a promising technology in oral and maxillofacial surgery. The management of lost craniofacial tissues owing to congenital abnormalities, trauma, or cancer treatment poses a challenge to oral and maxillofacial surgeons. Many strategies have been proposed for the management of such defects, but autogenous bone grafts remain the gold standard for reconstructive bone surgery. Nevertheless, cell-based treatments using adipose stem cells combined with osteoconductive biomaterials or scaffolds have become a promising alternative to autogenous bone grafts. Such treatment protocols often require customized 3D scaffolds that fulfill functional and esthetic requirements, provide adequate blood supply, and meet the load-bearing requirements of the head. Currently, such customized 3D scaffolds are being manufactured using additive manufacturing technology. In this review, 2 of the current and emerging modalities for reconstruction of oral and maxillofacial bone defects are highlighted and discussed, namely human maxillary sinus floor elevation as a valid model to test bone tissue-engineering approaches enabling the application of 1-step surgical procedures and seeding of Good Manufacturing Practice-level adipose stem cells on computer-aided manufactured scaffolds to reconstruct large bone defects in a 2-step surgical procedure, in which cells are expanded ex vivo and seeded on resorbable scaffolds before implantation. Furthermore, imaging-guided tissue-engineering technologies to predetermine the surgical location and to facilitate the manufacturing of custom-made implants that meet the specific patient's demands are discussed. The potential of tissue-engineered constructs designed for the repair of large oral and maxillofacial bone defects in load-bearing situations in a 1-step surgical procedure combining these 2 innovative approaches is

  6. Evidence of aerosolised floating blood mist during oral surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihama, K; Koizumi, H; Wada, T; Iida, S; Tanaka, S; Yamanishi, T; Enomoto, A; Kogo, M

    2009-04-01

    Dental surgery performed with high speed instruments, such as a dental turbine, air motor, or micro-engine handpiece, produces a large amount of splattering and particles, which can be contaminated by micro-organisms from the oral cavity. It has been speculated that such particulate mists contain blood-based elements. In the present study, we investigated whether blood-contaminated aerosol was present in a room where oral surgery was performed with high speed instruments. An extra-oral evacuator system was used for sample collection (N=132). For the experiment, a non-woven towel was set on the nozzle of the evacuator as a filter and invisible mist was collected at distances of 20, 60 and 100 cm from the surgical site. A leucomalachite green presumptive test was performed with each filter after every tooth extraction. At locations 20 and 100 cm from the surgical site, 76% and 57%, respectively, of the particulates were positive in blood presumptive tests. Based on our results, we consider that blood-contaminated materials have the potential to be suspended in air as blood-contaminated aerosol. These results indicate the risk of cross-infection at the dental practice for immunocompromised patients as well as healthy personnel.

  7. Laser-assisted oral surgery in general practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, Mark C.

    1995-04-01

    This presentation will demonstrate and discuss any surgical applications of the Argon dental laser. This presentation will also increase the awareness and basic understanding of the physical principals of the Argon laser. The wavelength of the Argon laser is specifically absorbed by red pigments such a hemoglobin which is abundant in oral soft tissue. The result is a sharp clean incision with minimal thermal damage to adjacent healthy tissue. Preprosthetic procedures such as full arch vestibuloplasty, labial and lingual frenectomy, and epulis fissuratum removal will be demonstrated. Other soft tissue management procedures such as minor periodontal pocket elimination surgery (gingivectomy), removal of hyperplastic granulation tissue from around poorly maintained implants, and the removal of granulation and/or cystic tissue from the apex of teeth undergoing endodontic (apicoec-tomy) surgery will also be demonstrated and discussed. Provided basic oral surgery protocol is followed, surgical procedures utilizing the Argon laser can be accomplished with minimal bleeding, minimal trauma and with minimal post-operative discomfort.

  8. Prevention of Oral Candidiasis After Free Flap Surgery: Role of 3% Sodium Bicarbonate Saline in Oral Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yue; Zhang, Fang; Lyu, Xin; Yan, Zhimin; Hua, Hong; Peng, Xin

    2017-03-01

    Relevant reports about oral candidiasis status and prevention measures after free flap surgery for the oral and maxillofacial region are limited. The present study explored oral candidiasis status after free flap surgery and its prevention through a prospective comparative study. One hundred four patients were randomized to a control group (n = 54) and an experimental group (n = 50). Compared with the control group, the experimental group was provided an additional 3% sodium bicarbonate saline solution for oral care after free flap surgery. The incidence of oral candidiasis was evaluated by objective examination (saliva culture and salivary pH measurement) and subjective evaluation (clinical signs of oral candidiasis) at admission and from postoperative days 1 to 14. The salivary pH values of the 2 groups were lower than the normal salivary pH, and postoperative salivary pH values were always lower than the active range of oral lysozymes in the control group. The salivary pH values of the experimental group were higher than those of the control group from postoperative days 6 to 14 (P oral candidiasis was 13.0% in the control group, which was higher than that in the experimental group (2.0%; P oral candidiasis. Oral candidiasis was common in patients after free flap reconstruction surgery, and the use of 3% sodium bicarbonate saline solution for oral care effectively prevented it. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Otto Ulmgren--a distinguished pioneer in oral surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordenram, Ake

    2006-01-01

    Otto Ulmgren (1844-1932) was graduated in 1874 as medical doctor. During sex months in 1875-76 he studied the diseases of teeth, mouth and neck at "Erste Wiener Zahntechnische Schule" in Wien. Then he auscultated at some prominent dental practitionars in Berlin. After that he practised further as dental surgeon in Stockholm. He was strongly engaged to improve dental education and contributed actively for starting the School of Dentistry in Stockholm in 1898. He appointed director of the school and chief of the Department of oral surgery. Otto Ulmgren's doctor's thesis was "Ofversigt af tandläkarekonstens historia" (Survey of the History of Dentistry) in 1877. He also published about 60 scientific articles especially dealing with dental education and oral surgery. Otto Ulmgren was one of the founders of Odontologiska Sällskapet i Stockholm (Dental Society in Stockholm) in 1901 and was its president during the period 1901-21. He was also one of the founders of Sveriges Tandläkareförbund (Dental Association of Sweden) in 1908. He was honorary member of many dental associations. Otto Ulmgren was regarded as a man of principle, an eminent teacher, a skilful clinician and scientist and a strong pioneer of dentistry, particularly in oral surgery. In leisure hours Otto Ulmgren devoted himself to singing and he was a member of the famous men's choir "Orphei drängar". He was also very interested in hunting and had a kennel with hunting dogs. He was appointed honorary member of the Swedish Kennel Club.

  10. Oral mucosal melanoma: conservative treatment including laser surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna-Ortiz, Kuauhyama; Campos-Ramos, Eunice; Pasche, Philippe; Mosqueda-Taylor, Adalberto

    2011-05-01

    To discuss the convenience of laser surgery as optimal treatment for melanoma of the oral mucosa. A retrospective evaluation of four patients with primary oral melanomas treated at a single Cancer Institution in Mexico City. Two patients were treated with resection of the melanoma with CO2 laser together with extraction of the involved dental organs and curettage of the alveolar walls. These two cases had melanoma in situ with multiple isolated foci. The third patient had a lesion with vertical growth, who was submitted to partial maxillectomy along with selective dissection of bilateral neck levels I-V with a negative report and the fourth patient had a history of oral nodular melanoma and presented with lymph node metastasis. According to follow-up status, there was no distant metastasis in any of the patients reported here. In our experience, conservative management with CO2 laser is adequate for melanomas of the oral mucosa with extraction of the dental organs and curettage of the alveoli to achieve complete surgical resection microscopically without sacrifice of the quality of life. Management of the neck is controversial. We recommend selective therapeutic resection of the neck only if it is found to be clinically positive. Elective dissection has not shown to have an impact in overall survival.

  11. Oral and maxillofacial surgery with computer-assisted navigation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawachi, Homare; Kawachi, Yasuyuki; Ikeda, Chihaya; Takagi, Ryo; Katakura, Akira; Shibahara, Takahiko

    2010-01-01

    Intraoperative computer-assisted navigation has gained acceptance in maxillofacial surgery with applications in an increasing number of indications. We adapted a commercially available wireless passive marker system which allows calibration and tracking of virtually every instrument in maxillofacial surgery. Virtual computer-generated anatomical structures are displayed intraoperatively in a semi-immersive head-up display. Continuous observation of the operating field facilitated by computer assistance enables surgical navigation in accordance with the physician's preoperative plans. This case report documents the potential for augmented visualization concepts in surgical resection of tumors in the oral and maxillofacial region. We report a case of T3N2bM0 carcinoma of the maxillary gingival which was surgically resected with the assistance of the Stryker Navigation Cart System. This system was found to be useful in assisting preoperative planning and intraoperative monitoring.

  12. Complications of local anesthesia used in oral and maxillofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, David R; Yamashita, Dennis-Duke R; McAndrews, James P

    2011-08-01

    Local anesthetics are used routinely in oral and maxillofacial surgery. Local anesthetics are safe and effective drugs but do have risks that practitioners need to be aware of. This article reviews the complications of local anesthesia. A brief history is provided and the regional and systemic complications that can arise from using local anesthesia are discussed. These complications include paresthesia, ocular complications, allergies, toxicity, and methemoglobinemia. Understanding the risks involved with local anesthesia decreases the chances of adverse events occurring and ultimately leads to improved patient care. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The impact of case reports in oral and maxillofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabil, S; Samman, N

    2012-07-01

    This review examines the effect of publishing case reports on journal impact factor and future research. All case reports published in the four major English language oral and maxillofacial surgery journals in the two year period, 2007-2008, were searched manually. The citation data of each case report were retrieved from the ISI online database. The number, percentage and mean citations received by case reports and their relation to the 2009 journal impact factor were analysed. Case reports which received more than 5 citations were also identified and all of the citing articles retrieved and analysed. Thirty-one percent of all articles published in major oral and maxillofacial journals in 2007-2008 were case reports. Case reports had a low citation rate with a mean citation of less than 1. There were 38 (7.2%) case reports with more than 5 citations and 30% of the citing articles were also case reports. The publication of case reports negatively affected journal impact factor which correlated directly with the percentage of case reports published within a journal. Case reports reporting recent topics, describing new treatment/diagnosis method and with a literature review were more likely to receive citations. Copyright © 2012 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Systemic consequences of bariatric surgery and its repercussions on oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura-Grec, Patrícia Garcia; Assis, Vivian Helena; Cannabrava, Vanessa Pavoni; Vieira, Vanessa Maira; Siqueira, Thalissa Laís Donalonso; Anaguizawa, Wellington Hideaki; Sales-Peres, Silvia Helena de Carvalho

    2012-01-01

    Morbid obesity control can be done by bariatric surgery that restricts or reduces the amount of food absorption. The objective of this review was to identify the consequences of bariatric surgery and its repercussions on oral health. It was used the Virtual Library of Health, which included articles that had any direct or indirect connection between bariatric surgery and oral health, and published in the last ten years. Some complications of the surgery are chronicle reflux and nutritional deficiency, which may bring repercussions on the oral cavity, such as tooth erosion, bone loss and dental caries. On the other hand, there are also positive impacts, such as the decrease of diabetes, apnea and improvement on self-esteem, that makes the patients less vulnerable to complications regarding oral health, for example xerostomy and periodontal disease. Maintaining proper oral health in patients undergoing bariatric surgery contributes to success after surgery protecting benefits and minimizing side effects.

  15. [Current Nomina Anatomica for oral and maxillofacial surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trost, O; Hardy, H; Péron, J-M; Trouilloud, P

    2014-11-01

    Using the international organonymy is mandatory as well for daily clinical practice as for research and teaching our students. The international organonymy, Nomina Anatomica, is in Latin. A rather unsuccessful attempt at using a French version of the international organonymy in clinical practice has been made in France. Eponyms have been systematically contraindicated; the definitions of general anatomy are applied, as well as a systematic Gallicization of the Latin terminology. Despite a stringent observance of these rules, some terms remain inappropriate because they are misleading or inaccurate. Furthermore, using this language used worldwide remains uneasy in daily clinical practice. We had for objective to focus on the main anatomical terms used routinely in oral and maxillofacial surgery, and to justify their use in clinical practice, research, and education. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Curriculum Planning for Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Assistant Program. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Mary Ann

    This project was conducted to develop a curriculum for dental auxiliary training in the dental specialty field of oral and maxillofacial surgery. Research was conducted to identify the major functions performed by an oral surgery assistant and then to organize these functions into an educational program that would provide adequate didactic and…

  17. The analgesic efficacy of intravenous versus oral tramadol for preventing postoperative pain after third molar surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ong, Cliff K. S.; Lirk, Phillip; Tan, Juliana M. H.; Sow, Belle W. Y.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the analgesic efficacy of single-dose preoperative intravenous versus oral tramadol for preventing pain after third molar surgery. Seventy-two patients undergoing elective third molar surgery were randomized to receive either intravenous (n = 36) or oral (n = 36)

  18. [Oral and maxillofacial surgery in The Netherlands: from Esser until today

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visscher, J.G. de; Smitt, J.H.; Stoelinga, P.J.W.; Baat, C. de; Vissink, A.

    2007-01-01

    In 2006, it was 50 years ago that the oral and maxillofacial surgery was officially recognized as a dental speciality in The Netherlands. During those five decades, oral and maxillofacial surgery significantly evolved, which is nicely reflected by the changes in the name of the scientific society

  19. Oral Anticoagulant Use After Bariatric Surgery: A Literature Review and Clinical Guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Karlyn A; Lee, Craig R; Farrell, Timothy M; Moll, Stephan

    2017-05-01

    Bariatric surgery may alter the absorption, distribution, metabolism, or elimination (disposition) of orally administered drugs via changes to the gastrointestinal tract anatomy, body weight, and adipose tissue composition. As some patients who have undergone bariatric surgery will need therapeutic anticoagulation for various indications, appropriate knowledge is needed regarding anticoagulant drug disposition and resulting efficacy and safety in this population. We review general considerations about oral drug disposition in patients after bariatric surgery, as well as existing literature on oral anticoagulation after bariatric surgery. Overall, available evidence on therapeutic anticoagulation is very limited, and individual drug studies are necessary to learn how to safely and effectively use the direct oral anticoagulants. Given the sparsity of currently available data, it appears most prudent to use warfarin with international normalized ratio monitoring, and not direct oral anticoagulants, when full-dose anticoagulation is needed after bariatric surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Management of novel oral anticoagulants in emergency and trauma surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho-Gomes, Ana-Catarina; Hague, Adam; Ghosh, Jonathan

    2016-08-01

    The compelling safety, efficacy and predictable effect of novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) is driving a rapid expansion in their therapeutic indications. Management of the increasing number of patients on those new agents in the setting of emergency or trauma surgery can be challenging and the absence of specific reversal agents has been a matter of concern. This review summarises the key principles that underpin the management of those patients with a particular emphasis on the recent development of specific antidotes. As of 2015, a new line of antidotes, specific for these drugs, are at different stages of their development with their release imminent. However, as NOACs are innately reversible due to their short half-life, the use of reversal agents will probably be restricted to a few exceptional cases. Post-marketing surveillance will be paramount to better clarify the role of these promising drugs. Management of patients on NOACs in the context of emergency or trauma surgery relies on best supportive care in combination with the blood products and/or specific antidotes as required. Familiarity with the new reversal agents is essential but further evidence on their indications, safety and efficacy as well as consensus guidelines are warranted prior to widespread adoption. Copyright © 2016 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Social demand for oral surgery in third age patients and its association with systemic pathologies

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez González, José María; Martín López, Félix; Barona Dorado, Cristina; Martínez Rodríguez, Natalia; Calvo Guirado, José Luis

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the frequency of systemic pathologies in patients aged 65 years or more, who require oral care and possibly oral surgery. Study Design: We carried out a cross-sectional descriptive study reviewing 3,388 medical histories for patients from the Department of Medicine and Oral Surgery of the School of Dentistry at the Complutense University of Madrid, who had requested surgical treatment. Those selected were at least 65 years of age or more, and were grouped accordi...

  2. Knowledge and Awareness of Medical Practitioners of Jazan City towards Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery as a Specialty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fareedi Mukram Ali

    2018-03-01

    CONCLUSION: There is low awareness toward the scope of oral and maxillofacial surgery in the medical community. Knowledge and awareness of the scope of oral and maxillofacial surgery can improve the success and promptness of delivery of health services.

  3. The role of oral antibiotics prophylaxis in prevention of surgical site infection in colorectal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koullouros, Michalis; Khan, Nadir; Aly, Emad H

    2017-01-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) continues to be a challenge in colorectal surgery. Over the years, various modalities have been used in an attempt to reduce SSI risk in elective colorectal surgery, which include mechanical bowel preparation before surgery, oral antibiotics and intravenous antibiotic prophylaxis at induction of surgery. Even though IV antibiotics have become standard practice, there has been a debate on the exact role of oral antibiotics. The primary aim was to identify the role of oral antibiotics in reduction of SSI in elective colorectal surgery. The secondary aim was to explore any potential benefit in the use of mechanical bowel preparation (MBP) in relation to SSI in elective colorectal surgery. Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Library were searched. Any randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or cohort studies after 1980, which investigated the effectiveness of oral antibiotic prophylaxis and/or MBP in preventing SSIs in elective colorectal surgery were included. Twenty-three RCTs and eight cohorts were included. The results indicate a statistically significant advantage in preventing SSIs with the combined usage of oral and systemic antibiotic prophylaxis. Furthermore, our analysis of the cohort studies shows no benefits in the use of MBP in prevention of SSIs. The addition of oral antibiotics to systemic antibiotics could potentially reduce the risk of SSIs in elective colorectal surgery. Additionally, MBP does not seem to provide a clear benefit with regard to SSI prevention.

  4. [Contribution of Perioperative Oral Health Care and Management for Patients who Underwent General Thoracic Surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Hajime; Minamiya, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Due to the recent advances in radiological diagnostic technology, the role of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery in thoracic disease has expanded, surgical indication extended to the elderly patients. Cancer patients receiving surgery, radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy may encounter complications in conjunction with the oral cavity such as aspiration pneumonia, surgical site infection and various type of infection. Recently, it is recognized that oral health care management is effective to prevent the postoperative infectious complications, especially pneumonia. Therefore, oral management should be scheduled before start of therapy to prevent these complications as supportive therapy of the cancer treatment. In this background, perioperative oral function management is highlighted in the remuneration for dental treatment revision of 2012,and the importance of oral care has been recognized in generally. In this manuscript, we introduce the several opinions and evidence based on the recent previous reports about the perioperative oral health care and management on thoracic surgery.

  5. Trans-oral robotic surgery in oropharyngeal carcinoma - A guide for general practitioners and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wendy Sijia; Limmer, Alex; Jabbour, Joe; Clark, Jonathan

    Trans-oral robotic surgery (TORS) is emerging as a minimally invasive alternative to open surgery, or trans-oral laser surgery, for the treatment of some head and neck pathologies, particularly oropharyngeal carcinoma, which is rapidly increasing in incidence. In this article we review current evidence regarding the use of TORS in head and neck surgery in a manner relevant to general practice. This information may be used to facilitate discussion with patients. Compared with open surgery or trans-oral laser surgery, TORS has numerous advantages, including no scarring, less blood loss, fewer complications, lower rates of admission to the intensive care unit, and reduced length of hospitalisation. The availability of TORS in Australia is currently limited and, therefore, public awareness about TORS is lacking. Details regarding the role of TORS and reliable, up-to-date, patient-friendly information sources are discussed in this article.

  6. [The risk factors and analysis of complications after regenerative interventions in surgery of oral cavity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avetikov, D S; Krynychko, L P; Stavyts'kyĭ, S A; Raskalupa, A A; Boĭko, I V

    2014-11-01

    Most spreaded risk factors in reconstructive and plastic surgery of oral cavity were analyzed. Trustworthy monitoring of rate of the complications occurrence in augmentation of the jaws bones was conducted, depending on the risk factor.

  7. Nasoendotracheal tube obstruction by a nasal polyp in emergency oral surgery: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milic Morena

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nasal polyps can make nasoendotracheal intubation difficult. We present a case of complete obstruction of a nasoendotracheal tube by a nasal polyp during a blind nasoendotracheal intubation in emergency oral surgery.

  8. A systematic approach to improve oral and maxillofacial surgery education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosén, A; Fors, U; Zary, N; Sejersen, R; Lund, B

    2011-11-01

    To improve teaching quality and student satisfaction, a new curriculum in Oral Surgery was implemented at Karolinska Institutet in 2007. This paper describes the curriculum change as well as the results regarding quality, satisfaction, cost-effectiveness and workload for teachers and staff. To design the new curriculum, all members of the teaching staff participated in a series of group discussions where problems with the previous curriculum were identified and ideas on how to improve the curriculum were discussed. Cost-effectiveness was evaluated by comparing the number of teaching sessions between the new and the old curriculum. A questionnaire was used to investigate the staffs' perceived change in workload and teaching quality. The students' satisfaction and attitudes to learning was screened for by on-line questionnaires. The large amount of passive observational teaching was considered as the main problem with the old curriculum. Half of these sessions were replaced by either clinical seminars or demonstrations performed in an interactive form. Students rated the new curriculum as a clear improvement. Analyses of time and cost-effectiveness showed a decrease in teaching sessions by almost 50%. Generally, the teachers were more positive towards the changes compared to the non-teaching staff. The students rated the new type of learning activities relatively high, whilst the traditional observational teaching was seen as less satisfactory. They preferred to learn in a practical way and few indicated analytic or emotional preferences. The majority of the students reported a good alignment between the new course curriculum and the final exam. 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  9. Have Smartphones Contributed in the Clinical Progress of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhuvad, Jigar M; Dhuvad, Mukesh M; Kshirsagar, Rajesh A

    2015-09-01

    Dental surgeons who encounter complex situations, such as those in unscheduled care, often have limited resources to provide a structured and specialty care. Therefore, there is always a need for cost-effective, easy to handle, easy to carry "Smartphones". The purpose of this paper was to undertake a review of literature on "Smartphone in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery" online data-base and discuss the case series with emphasis on the role of attending dental surgeon and the maxillofacial surgeon. The available literature relevant to oral and maxillofacial surgery in online data-base of the United States National Library of Medicine: PubMed (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/) was searched. The inclusion criterion was to review the published clinical papers, abstracts and evidence based reviews on 'Uses of Smartphone in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery'. Six articles were found with the search term "Smartphone in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery" in the literature searched. Five articles met the inclusion criteria for the study. The relevant data was extracted, tabulated, and reviewed to draw evidence-based conclusions for uses of smartphone in oral and maxillofacial surgery. Utilization of smartphones in oral and maxillofacial surgery facilitate in differential diagnosis, treatment, follow up, prevention of the disease further and thereby improve the quality of patient care without requiring the presence of the maxillofacial surgeon in remote areas.

  10. Which Factors Affect Citation Rates in the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Literature?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Kristie L; Dodson, Thomas B; Egbert, Mark A; Susarla, Srinivas M

    2017-07-01

    Citation rate is one of several tools to measure academic productivity. The purposes of this study were to estimate and identify factors associated with citation rates in the oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMS) literature. This was a retrospective longitudinal study of publications in the Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (JOMS), International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (IJOMS), and Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, and Oral Radiology (OOOO) from January through December 2012. The predictor variables were author- and article-specific factors. The outcome variable was the citation rate, defined as the total number of citations for each article over a 4-year period. Descriptive, bivariate, and multiple regression statistics were computed. The authors identified 993 articles published during 2012. The mean number of citations at 4 years after publication was 5.6 ± 5.3 (median, 4). In bivariate analyses, several author- and article-specific factors were associated with citation rates. In a multiple regression model adjusting for potential confounders and effect modifiers, first author H-index, number of authors, journal, OMS focus area, and Oxford level of evidence were significantly associated with citation rate (P ≤ .002). The authors identified 5 factors associated with citation rates in the OMS literature. These factors should be considered in context when evaluating citation-based metrics for OMS. Studies that focus on core OMS procedures (eg, dentoalveolar surgery, dental implant surgery), are published in specialty-specific journals (eg, JOMS or IJOMS), and have higher levels of evidence are more likely to be cited. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Advances in bone surgery: the Er:YAG laser in oral surgery and implant dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Stübinger

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Stefan StübingerCompetence Center for Applied Biotechnology and Molecular Medicine, University of Zürich, Zürich, SwitzerlandAbstract: The erbium-doped yttrium aluminium garnet (Er:YAG laser has emerged as a possible alternative to conventional methods of bone ablation because of its wavelength of 2.94 μm, which coincides with the absorption peak of water. Over the last decades in several experimental and clinical studies, the widespread initial assumption that light amplification for stimulated emission of radiation (laser osteotomy inevitably provokes profound tissue damage and delayed wound healing has been refuted. In addition, the supposed disadvantage of prolonged osteotomy times could be overcome by modern short-pulsed Er:YAG laser systems. Currently, the limiting factors for a routine application of lasers for bone ablation are mainly technical drawbacks such as missing depth control and a difficult and safe guidance of the laser beam. This article gives a short overview of the development process and current possibilities of noncontact Er:YAG laser osteotomy in oral and implant surgery.Keywords: carbonization, laser osteotomy, ablation, dental implants

  12. CARBON-DIOXIDE LASER-SURGERY OF ORAL LEUKOPLAKIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ROODENBURG, JLN; PANDERS, AK; VERMEY, A

    Oral leukoplakia is a precancerous lesion of the oral mucosa. The risk of malignant transformation depends on the clinical and histologic classification and the location of the lesion. For a nonhomogeneous leukoplakia, this risk is 23.4% to 38.0%. In the presence of epithelial dysplasia, the

  13. Duplicate publications and related problems in published papers on oral and maxillofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, A; Moran, C M P; Bezuhly, M; Hong, P

    2015-07-01

    As duplicate publication is unethical, our aim was to find out how common it is among published papers on oral and maxillofacial surgery. We used PubMed to identify index articles published in 2010 in the Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, the British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, and the European Journal of Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery, and searched for possible duplicate publications from 2008 to 2012 using the first or second and last authors' names. Suspected duplicates were categorised into "non-duplicate" (no overlap), "duplicate" (identical results and conclusions), or "salami-sliced" publications (part of the index article repeated or continued). Of the 589 index articles, 17 (3%) had some form of duplication, but specifically, we found 3 duplicate, and 15 salami-sliced publications. Most redundant articles originated from China (n=4), followed by Italy, Japan, and Germany (3 from each) and the United States and Denmark (2 each). Of the 18 redundant publications, 9 did not reference the related index article. Duplicate material is still being published, and salami-slicing is relatively common among publications on oral and maxillofacial surgery. Further research is required into the extent and impact of this finding. Copyright © 2015 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Thiel embalming technique: a valuable method for teaching oral surgery and implantology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölzle, Frank; Franz, Eric-Peter; Lehmbrock, Jutta; Weihe, Stephan; Teistra, Christian; Deppe, Herbert; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich

    2012-03-01

    Because of its high requirements on surgical experience and the need of complete understanding of the anatomy, oral surgery and especially implantology belong to the most demanding procedures in dentistry. Therefore, hands-on courses for oral surgery and implantology are considered a prerequisite to prepare for clinical practice. To achieve teaching conditions as realistic as possible, we used a novel human cadaver embalming method enabling tissue dissection comparable with the living body. Thirty cadavers which were offered by the Institute of Anatomy for the purpose of running oral surgery and implantology courses were embalmed in the technique described by Thiel. On each cadaver, dissection of soft and hard tissue and implantological procedures were performed according to a structured protocol by each course participant. The conservation of fine anatomical structures and the suitability of the embalmed tissue for dissecting, drilling, and suturing were observed and photographically documented. By means of the Thiel embalming technique, oral surgery and implantological procedures could be performed under realistic conditions similar to the living body. Due to the conservation procedure, preparations could be carried out without any time limit, always maintaining the same high quality of the tissue. The maxillary sinus membrane, mucosa, bone, and nerves could be exposed and allowed dissecting, drilling, and suturing even after weeks like fresh specimens. The Thiel embalming method is a unique technique which is ideally suited to practice and teach oral surgery and implantology on human material. © 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Diode Laser in Minor Oral Surgery: A Case Series of Laser Removal of Different Benign Exophytic Lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Sotoode, Somaye Mazarei; Azimi, Somayyeh; Taheri, Sayed Alinaghi; Asnaashari, Mohammad; Khalighi, Hamidreza; Rahmani, Somayeh; Jafari, Soudeh; Elmi Rankohi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The role of laser in conservative management of oral disease is well established. Laser procedures are common in the fields of oral surgery, implant dentistry, endodontic, and periodontic therapy.

  16. The role of perioperative oral nutritional supplementation in elderly patients after hip surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming; Yang, Jing; Yu, Xi; Huang, Xiao; Vaidya, Sushan; Huang, Fuguo; Xiang, Zhou

    2015-01-01

    The effect of perioperative oral nutritional supplementation (ONS) on elderly patients after hip surgery remains controversial. This study intended to ascertain whether perioperative ONS is beneficial for the rehabilitation of elderly patients after hip surgery. We searched databases including PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials for articles published up to May 2014. Randomized controlled trials of ONS for elderly patients after hip surgery were included. The combined trials showed that ONS had a positive effect on the serum total protein (Pelderly patients recover after hip surgery and reduce complications.

  17. Tourniquet-induced cardiovascular responses in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery under general anesthesia: Effect of preoperative oral amantadine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Abd Elmawgood

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Preoperative oral amantadine reduced tourniquet induced hypertension and postoperative analgesic requirements in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery under general anesthesia.

  18. Oral candidal colonization in cleft patients as a function of age, gender, surgery, type of cleft, and oral health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawashdeh, Ma'amon A; Ayesh, Jafar A M; Darwazeh, Azmi M-G

    2011-04-01

    To assess the colonization rate of oral Candida species and the influence of age, gender, oral health status, number of surgeries, and type of cleft. A prospective study of 60 patients with cleft and 60 control subjects was carried out at the Cleft Centre at King Abdullah University Hospital and the Maxillofacial Unit at Jordan University of Science and Technology between October 2007 and June 2008. Oral health was assessed using the Gingival, Plaque, and Decayed, Missing, and Filled (DMFT/dmft) indexes using World Health Organization criteria. A culture swab was obtained from the tongue and buccal and palatal mucosae. Candida albicans and other Candida species were identified using the germ tube test and the automated biochemical test panel VITEK. The colonization rate of Candida in patients with cleft (63.3%) was significantly higher than in healthy control subjects (18.3%). The colonization rate of Candida and the distribution of C albicans varied with age but were not significantly associated with gender in patients with cleft and healthy controls. The candidal colonization rate was highest in patients with cleft who had at least 3 surgeries (78.2%) and in patients with bilateral clefts (77.7%). Patients with cleft had a significantly poorer health status than healthy controls; however, this was not influenced by the type of the cleft or the number of surgeries. Patients with cleft had a significantly higher rate of oral candidal colonization compared with control subjects, which varied with age, type of cleft, and the number of surgical interventions. Oral health status was significantly poorer in patients with cleft. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Use of 3-d stereolithographic models in oral and maxillofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehra, Pushkar; Miner, Jeremey; D'Innocenzo, Richard; Nadershah, Mohammed

    2011-03-01

    To assess the feasibility of the use of 3-dimensional (3-D) stereolithographic (SLA) technology in complex maxillofacial reconstructive surgery. 3-D SLA technology was used in the treatment planning of complex maxillofacial procedures performed by the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at Boston University. Specialized 3-D models were ordered and utilized for surgical treatment of a variety of indications including trauma surgery, temporomandibular joint surgery, orthognathic surgery, secondary correction of facial and skull deformities, and extensive jaw pathology. This technology was also used in one patient for jaw reconstruction using novel bone and tissue engineering techniques. The use of 3-D models in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery significantly improved predictability of clinical outcomes when compared to similar treatments without its use. Total operating time was reduced which had the benefit of decreasing the duration of general anesthesia and reducing wound exposure time. They allowed for assessment of extensive traumatic and pathologic defects in three-dimensions prior to surgical reconstruction. The models were also useful in the design and fabrication of custom prostheses, sizing of bone grafts and allowed for manufacturing of scaffolds for bone regeneration. 3-D SLA models can be very effectively used in oral and maxillofacial surgery for multiple indications and diverse clinical scenarios. Successful incorporation of this technology for jaw bone regeneration using tissue engineering techniques offers exciting new prospects for the future.

  20. [Oral and maxillofacial surgery residency training in the United States: what can we learn].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Y F

    2017-04-09

    China is currently in the process of establishing formal residency training programs in oral and maxillofacial surgery and other medical and dental specialties. Regulatory agencies, and educational and academic institutions in China are exploring mechanisms, goals and standards of residency training that meet the needs of the Chinese healthcare system. This article provides an introduction of residency training in oral and maxillofacial surgery in the United States, with emphasis on the accreditation standard by the Commission on Dental Accreditation. As there are fundamental differences in the medical and dental education systems between China and United States, the training standards in the United States may not be entirely applicable in China. A competency-based training model that focus on overall competencies in medical knowledge, clinical skills and values at the time of graduation should be taken into consideration in a Chinese residency training program in oral and maxillofacial surgery.

  1. Antifibrinolytic therapy for preventing oral bleeding in patients with haemophilia or Von Willebrand disease undergoing minor oral surgery or dental extractions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Galen, Karin Pm; Engelen, Eveline T; Mauser-Bunschoten, Evelien P; van Es, Robert Jj; Schutgens, Roger Eg

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Minor oral surgery or dental extractions (oral or dental procedures) are widely performed and can be complicated by hazardous oral bleeding, especially in people with an inherited bleeding disorder such as haemophilia or Von Willebrand disease. The amount and severity of singular

  2. Portfolio: A Comprehensive Method of Assessment for Postgraduates in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Kadagad, Poornima; Kotrashetti, S. M.

    2012-01-01

    Post graduate learning and assessment is an important responsibility of an academic oral and maxillofacial surgeon. The current method of assessment for post graduate training include formative evaluation in the form of seminars, case presentations, log books and infrequently conducted end of year theory exams. End of the course theory and practical examination is a summative evaluation which awards the degree to the student based on grades obtained. Oral and maxillofacial surgery is mainly a...

  3. Publication bias in oral and maxillofacial surgery journals: an observation on published controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitak-Arnnop, Poramate; Sader, Robert; Rapidis, Alexander D; Dhanuthai, Kittipong; Bauer, Ute; Herve, Chistian; Hemprich, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Publication bias (PB) diminishes the full distribution of research, distorts and discredits the scientific record, and thus compromises evidence-based practice. The objective of this study was to analyse published controlled trials with regard to PB in leading oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMS) journals. All controlled trials published in the International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Journal of Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery, Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, and British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery in 2008 were analysed for a primary outcome, country of authors, sample size, gender of the first author, funding source and location of the study. Of 952 published articles, 53 controlled trials (5.7%) were identified. The OMS journals preferentially published controlled trials with a positive outcome (77.4%) and from high-income countries (73.6%). Single-centred trials (86.8%) with low sample size (njournals should establish measures to eliminate PB to uphold scientific integrity. However, this study was an observation based on the published articles. An analysis of all submitted manuscripts would provide more accurate estimates of PB. Ethical considerations on PB are also discussed.

  4. Reporting of ethical protection in recent oral and maxillofacial surgery research involving human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitak-Arnnop, P; Sader, R; Hervé, C; Dhanuthai, K; Bertrand, J-Ch; Hemprich, A

    2009-07-01

    This retrospective observational study investigated the frequency of reporting ethical approval and informed consent in recently published oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMS) research involving human subjects. All research involving human subjects published in the International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, and Journal of Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery during January to June 2005-2007 were analysed for disclosure of ethical approval by a local ethical committee and obtaining informed consent from the subjects. 534 articles were identified; ethical approval was documented in 118 (22%) and individual patient consent in 135 (25%). 355 reports (67%) did not include a statement on ethical approval or informed consent and only 74 reports (14%) disclosed statements of both. Ethical documentation in retrospective and observational studies was scant; 12% of randomised controlled trials and 38% of non-random trials did not report both of ethical protections. Most recent OMS publications involving humans failed to mention ethical review or subjects' consent. Authors must adhere to the international research ethics guidelines and journal instructions, while editors should play a gatekeeper role to protect research participants, uphold scientific integrity and maintain public trust in the experimental process and OMS profession.

  5. Public and professional perception of oral and maxillofacial surgery (a pilot study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adewole, R A; Akinwande, J A

    2007-01-01

    In the advanced countries, the awareness of Oral and maxillofacial surgery by both the public and medical specialties has led to rapid development and expansion of Oral and Maxillofacial surgery specialty with management of diverse and complex problems within a well defined anatomical region. In the developing countries like Nigeria, the trends are slow and this explains why majority of our patients present at very late stage when only palliative measures are the option. The study aims to assess the level of public and professional (GMP and GDP) knowledge and awareness of oral and Maxillofacial surgery specialty. A questionnaire was devised to assess the knowledge and awareness about the specialty of oral and maxillofacial surgery . Ninety one members of the public who were office workers, civil servants, hospital worker in Yaba local government area of Lagos state were the public respondents. The inclusion criteria was that all respondents had attained at least secondary school educational level. They were randomly chosen and had the questionnaires applied to them. Additionally, 40 General medical practitioners and 40 General dental practitioners were picked randomly from 7 local government areas of Lagos state (Yaba, Ebutte Meta, Surulere, Lagos Island, Shomolu, Kosofe and Ikeja) and the questionnaire was applied to them. Only 5.4% of the public had heard of oral and maxillofacial surgeon before. By comparison, the corresponding figures for ENT and plastic surgeons were 40.0% and 23.1% respectively. Only 4.4% of the public had a prior treatment by an oral and maxillofacial surgeon while 86.2% did not know what a maxillofacial surgeon does. The professionals (GMP and GDP) are quite aware of who a maxillofacial surgeon is, but are less knowledgeable of new areas/subspecialties of maxillofacial surgery such as cleft lip and palate surgery, cosmetic and orthognathic surgery, implantology, craniofacial surgery. Also general Medical Practitioners (60%) views of

  6. Physician Assistants Improve Efficiency and Decrease Costs in Outpatient Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Cory M; Daniels, Kimberly M; Flath-Sporn, Susan J; Doyle, Michael; Heald, Ronald; Padwa, Bonnie L

    2016-11-01

    To determine the effects on time, cost, and complication rates of integrating physician assistants (PAs) into the procedural components of an outpatient oral and maxillofacial surgery practice. This is a prospective cohort study of patients from the Department of Plastic and Oral Surgery at Boston Children's Hospital who underwent removal of 4 impacted third molars with intravenous sedation in our outpatient facility. Patients were separated into the "no PA group" and PA group. Process maps were created to capture all activities from room preparation to patient discharge, and all activities were timed for each case. A time-driven activity-based costing method was used to calculate the average times and costs from the provider's perspective for each group. Complication rates were calculated during the periods for both groups. Descriptive statistics were calculated, and significance was set at P oral and maxillofacial surgeon was directly involved in the procedure decreased by an average of 19.2 minutes after the introduction of PAs (P oral and maxillofacial surgery practice resulted in decreased costs whereas complication rates remained constant. The increased availability of the oral and maxillofacial surgeon after the incorporation of PAs allows for more patients to be seen during a clinic session, which has the potential to further increase efficiency and revenue. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Retrospective analysis of oral and maxillofacial surgery cases in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method: This was a retrospective study conducted at the Oral Dental Health Centre, Akure, Ondo state, Nigeria covering the period September, 2000 and April, 2004. ... Conclusion: A wide variety of cases were seen but socioeconomic, human resource and infrastructural problems limited the scope of practice. Keywords: ...

  8. Extubation criteria for oral and maxillofacial surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulian, M A; Chisum, J W; Mosby, E L; Hiatt, W R

    1989-06-01

    An overview is presented of some of the factors that should be considered before extubating a patient who has undergone an oral and maxillofacial surgical procedure. A discussion of the possible preoperative assessment of the patient, complications of intubation, effects of narcotics and muscle relaxants, assessment of airway edema, and criteria for extubation is included.

  9. Does examiner bias in undergraduate oral and clinical surgery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. Oral and long case clinical examinations are open to subjective influences to some extent, and students may be marked unfairly as a result of gender or racial bias or language problems. These concerns are of topical relevance in South Africa. The purpose of this study was to assess whether these factors ...

  10. Surgical management in dentistry: the interdisciplinary relationship between periodontology and oral and maxillofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Darryl C

    2017-06-01

    Surgical procedures of the oral cavity can be performed by a number of dental specialists and clinicians. Because of the limited number of surgical procedures that can be performed inside the oral cavity, the boundaries between specialties may become indistinct and lead to confusion for general dentists in terms of patient referrals. In this article, what the two surgical specialties of dentistry (i.e. periodontology and oral and maxillofacial surgery) have to offer is highlighted, together with clinical examples to illustrate the interdisciplinary relationship between them. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Racial disparities in being recommended to surgery for oral and oropharyngeal cancer in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Yanqiu; Korte, Jeffrey E

    2012-02-01

    To investigate the impact of race on the likelihood of patients being recommended for surgery after a diagnosis of oral and oropharyngeal cancer. A total of 68,445 cases of oral and oropharyngeal cancer were extracted from the 1988 to 2005 Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. County-level rurality data and income data were merged using the US Department of Agriculture Rural-Urban Continuum Codes dataset and US Census Bureau Small Area Income & Poverty Estimates dataset. We used logistic regression analyses to investigate the impact of race on being recommended to surgery for oral and oropharyngeal cancer, adjusting for demographic, socioeconomic, and clinical factors. Stratified analyses were further conducted by tumor site and rural/urban status. Recommendation to surgery varied significantly by race, with black patients less likely than white patients to be recommended to surgery for their oral and oropharyngeal cancer. The racial difference in recommendation to surgery varied significantly by age, geography, and tumor subsite. Racial disparities are most evident in lip and buccal cancer from rural areas (OR, 4.4; 95% CI, 2.6-7.5); and least evident in oropharyngeal cancer from urban areas (OR, 1.2; 95% CI, 1.1-1.3). The magnitude of the racial disparity is attenuated with increasing age. We observed substantial racial disparities in surgery recommendation for oral and oropharyngeal cancer in the United States. Our results suggest the need to improve accessibility to better health care in racial minority groups, particularly in rural areas, and call for individual and institutional efforts to avoid physician bias related to the patient's sociodemographic characteristics in healthcare service. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Comparison of multi-modal early oral nutrition for the tolerance of oral nutrition with conventional care after major abdominal surgery: a prospective, randomized, single-blind trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Da-Li; Li, Wei-Ming; Li, Shu-Min; Cen, Yun-Yun; Xu, Qing-Wen; Li, Yi-Jun; Sun, Yan-Bo; Qi, Yu-Xing; Lin, Yue-Ying; Yang, Ting; Lu, Qi-Ping; Xu, Peng-Yuan

    2017-02-10

    Early oral nutrition (EON) has been shown to improve recovery of gastrointestinal function, length of stay and mortality after abdominal surgery; however, early oral nutrition often fails during the first week after surgery. Here, a multi-modal early oral nutrition program is introduced to promote recovery of gastrointestinal function and tolerance of oral nutrition. Consecutive patients scheduled for abdominal surgery were randomized to the multimodal EON group or a group receiving conventional care. The primary endpoint was the time of first defecation. The secondary endpoints were outcomes and the cost-effectiveness ratio in treating infectious complications. The rate of infectious-free patients was regarded as the index of effectiveness. One hundred seven patients were randomly assigned to groups. Baseline characteristics were similar for both groups. In intention-to-treat analysis, the success rate of oral nutrition during the first week after surgery in the multimodal EON group was 44 (83.0%) versus 31 (57.4%) in the conventional care group (P = 0.004). Time to first defecation, time to flatus, recovery time of bowel sounds, and prolonged postoperative ileus were all less in the multimodal EON group (P oral nutrition group (P oral nutrition program was an effective way to improve tolerance of oral nutrition during the first week after surgery, decrease the length of stay and improve cost-effectiveness after abdominal surgery. Registration number: ChiCTR-TRC-14004395 . Registered 15 March 2014.

  13. Towards virtual surgery in oral cancer to predict postoperative oral functions preoperatively

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Alphen, M. J. A.; Kreeft, A. M.; van der Heijden, F.; Smeele, L. E.; Balm, A. J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Our aim was to develop a dynamic virtual model of the oral cavity and oropharynx so that we could incorporate patient-specific factors into the prediction of functional loss after advanced resections for oral cancer. After a virtual resection, functional consequences can be assessed, and a more

  14. How to manage new oral anticoagulants in case of surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Imberti

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available When a patient receiving new oral anticoagulants (NOACs requires an invasive procedure, the consequences of bleeding if anticoagulation is continued and the risk of thrombosis if it is omitted need to be carefully considered. In addition to the bleeding risk of the procedure, it is of paramount importance to evaluate the renal function, especially for dabigatran that is eliminated predominantly via the renal pathway. NOAC therapy should be stopped for at least 24 h before the intervention, and a longer interruption should be considered in cases of high bleeding risk procedures and/or renal failure. A base-line assessment of coagulation should be performed and intervention should be postponed (if possible if high levels of anticoagulation parameters are found. In the post-surgical period, if oral anticoagulant therapy cannot be re-started, patients should temporarily receive low molecular weight heparins and re-start NOACs as soon as possible.

  15. A randomized trial of preoperative oral carbohydrates in abdominal surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Sada, Fatos; Krasniqi, Avdyl; Hamza, Astrit; Gecaj-Gashi, Agreta; Bicaj, Besnik; Kavaja, Floren

    2014-01-01

    Background Carbohydrate-rich liquid drinks (CRLDs) have been recommended to attenuate insulin resistance by shortening the preoperative fasting interval. The aim of our study the effect of preoperative oral administration of CRLDs on the well-being and clinical status of patients. Methods A randomized, double blind, prospective study of patients undergoing open colorectal operations (CR) and open cholecyctectomy (CH) was conducted. Patients were divided into three groups: study, placebo, and ...

  16. Incidence and types of complications after ablative oral cancer surgery with primary microvascular free flap reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lodders, J.N.; Parmar, S.; Stienen, N.L.M.; Martin, T.J.; Karagozoglu, K.H.; Heymans, M.W.; Nandra, B.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aims of the study were 1) to evaluate the incidence and types of postoperative complications after ablative oral cancer surgery with primary free flap reconstruction and 2) identify prognostic variables for postoperative complications. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Desired data was retrieved

  17. Treatment outcome of advance staged oral cavity cancer: concurrent chemoradiotherapy compared with primary surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangthongkum, Manupol; Kirtsreesakul, Virat; Supanimitjaroenporn, Pasawat; Leelasawatsuk, Peesit

    2017-06-01

    Concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) has been reported as effective and has become an acceptable treatment in advanced oral cancer. However, to date there is insufficient data to conclude that CCRT provides a good survival outcome. The purpose of this study was to compare survival rates and complications in patients with resectable advanced oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma treated with either CCRT or surgery with adjuvant radiotherapy (RT)/chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Stage III or IVa oral cavity carcinoma patients treated with curative intent by either CCRT or surgery with adjuvant RT were identified over a 7-year period (2009-2015). Survival rates and treatment complications were analyzed and compared between the two groups. 61 patients underwent CCRT and 128 patients underwent surgical excision and received postoperative RT. There was no statistically significant difference in survival outcome between the two treatment groups. 5-year overall survival rates (OS) were 33 versus 24% (P = 0.191) and the disease-specific survival rates (DSS) were 27 versus 25% (P = 0.857) when comparing the CCRT group and surgery with adjuvant RT/CRT group, respectively. Long-term complications were comparable between the two groups. CCRT has comparable survival outcome and complications for the treatment of advanced oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma, compared to surgery with adjuvant RT/CRT.

  18. A STUDY OF EFFECTS OF ORAL CLONIDINE ON PREMEDICATION AND HAEMODYNAMIC CHANGES DURING LAPAROSCOPIC SURGERY

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    Sanjeev Rao

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Use of Clonidine as a premedicant started incidentally. Clonidine is a potent antihypertensive drug that suppresses RAAS. Clonidine may be beneficial during laparoscopy in patients with hypertension, cardiovascular and/or renal diseases. AIM OF STUDY To determine the effects of Oral Clonidine on premedication and haemodynamic changes during Laparoscopic surgery. MATERIAL AND METHODS Study was conducted on 60 adult patients belonging to ASA physical status I & II. They were randomly assigned to 2 groups of 30 each. Group C received oral clonidine 150 mcg 90 minutes before surgery and group P received oral ranitidine 150 mg 90 minutes before surgery. Sedation score was noted on arrival to operation theatre. All vital parameters were recorded at regular intervals intra-operatively. RESULTS Clonidine premedication was able to achieve haemodynamic stability during pneumoperitoneum. CONCLUSION Premedication with 150mcg oral Clonidine has been found to be relatively safe as well as effective method that provides stable haemodynamics and protection against stress response triggered by pneumoperitoneum in patients undergoing laparoscopic surgeries.

  19. [Evaluation of flipped classroom teaching model in undergraduates education of oral and maxillofacial surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Ming; Cao, Xia; Fang, Xiao; Wang, Xu-dong; Zhang, Li-li; Zheng, Jia-wei; Shen, Guo-fang

    2015-12-01

    Flipped classroom is a new teaching model which is different from the traditional teaching method. The history and characteristics of flipped classroom teaching model were introduced in this paper. A discussion on how to establish flipped classroom teaching protocol in oral and maxillofacial surgery education was carried out. Curriculum transformation, construction of education model and possible challenges were analyzed and discussed.

  20. Incidence and types of complications after ablative oral cancer surgery with primary microvascular free flap reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lodders, J.N.; Parmar, S.; Stienen, N.-L.M.; Martin, T.J.; Karagozoglu, K.H.; Heymans, M.W.; Nandra, B.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aims of the study were 1) to evaluate the incidence and types of postoperative complications after ablative oral cancer surgery with primary free flap reconstruction and 2) identify prognostic variables for postoperative complications. Material and Methods: Desired data was retrieved

  1. The biology of platelet-rich plasma and its application in oral surgery: literature review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikolidakis, D.; Jansen, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a new approach in tissue regeneration and a developing area for clinicians and researchers. It is used in various surgical fields, including oral and maxillofacial surgery. PRP is prepared from the patient's own blood and contains growth factors that influence wound

  2. Preemptive analgesic effectiveness of oral ketorolac plus local tramadol after impacted mandibular third molar surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isiordia-Espinoza, Mario A; Pozos-Guillén, Amaury J; Martínez-Rider, Ricardo; Herrera-Abarca, Jorge E; Pérez-Urizar, José

    2011-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare preemptive analgesia of oral ketorolac plus submucous local placebo with oral ketorolac plus submucous local tramadol after impacted mandibular third molar surgery. A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted. Patients were randomized into two treatment groups (n = 15 per group): group A, oral ketorolac 10 mg, 30 minutes before surgery plus submucous local placebo (1 mL saline solution); group B, oral ketorolac 10 mg, 30 minutes before surgery plus submucous local tramadol (50 mg diluted in 1 mL saline solution). We evaluated the intensity of pain, time for the first analgesic rescue medication, and total analgesic consumption. Pain intensity, number of patients requiring analgesic rescue medication, number of patients in each group not requiring analgesic rescue medication, and total analgesic consumption showed statistical significance. Preemptive use of oral ketorolac plus submucous local tramadol is an alternative treatment for acute pain after surgical removal of an impacted mandibular third molar.

  3. Accessibility to editorial information in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery journals: The authors' point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelo-Baz, Pablo; Leira-Feijoo, Yago; Seoane-Romero, Juan Manuel; Varela-Centelles, Pablo; Seoane, Juan

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the accessibility to editorial information in Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery journals. A cross-sectional study using the WOS-Web of Science database in three categories: "Surgery," "Otorhinolaryngology," and "Dentistry, Oral Surgery & Medicine" was designed. Journals were filtered by title and classified under three headings: OMFS specialty; OMFS subspecialty and related sciences; and multidisciplinary journals. Specialty scope (OMFS vs. other); impact factor; path for the manuscript; blinding policy; accessibility to reviewers' criteria; and percentage of acceptance. Only 46 of 330 journals met the inclusion criteria. All OMFS journals provided comprehensive information about the review process, compared to 5 of 27 (18.5%) of Oral Surgery and related sciences periodicals. Most specialty journals do not inform about the blind review mode used (20 of 33; 60.6%). Generally, information about the reviewers' assessment criteria is scarce, but is available from all OMFS journals, which also state the percentage of manuscript acceptance (100% vs. 14.8%). OMFS JCR journals provide adequate information about their editorial process in terms of path for the manuscript, accessibility to reviewers' criteria, and percentage of acceptance. Additional efforts are needed to increase accessibility to information about blinding policy and average time from submission to acceptance. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The case for advanced physics topics in oral and maxillofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, Rahul; Herford, Alan S

    2014-10-01

    Research in oral and maxillofacial surgery has focused mainly on principles founded in the biological and chemical sciences, which have provided excellent answers to many questions. However, recent technologic advances have begun to gain prominence in many of the medical sciences, providing clinicians with more effective tools for diagnosis and treatment. The era of modern physics has led to the development of diagnostic techniques that could provide information at a more basic level than many of the current biochemical methods used. The goal of this report is to introduce 2 of these methods and describe how they can be applied to oral and maxillofacial surgery. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Deep vein thrombosis: A rare complication in oral and maxillofacial surgery: A review of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Ramesh Babu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Deep vein thrombosis (DVT is caused by obstruction of blood flow of deep veins in upper and lower limb. One of the precipitating factors for DVT is surgery under general anesthesia exceeding 30 min. However, there are very few reports of DVT associated with surgery of oral and maxillofacial region. In this paper we report two cases of DVT involving left ilio-femoropopliteal deep vein in one patient treated for fractured left angle of mandible and left peroneal vein in the other patient treated for oral sub mucous fibrosis. Clinical and color Doppler examination were performed to diagnose the condition and were referred to vascular surgical unit of higher institute for further management. These cases illustrates any surgery of maxillofacial region is not free from risk of DVT, which can cause fatal pulmonary thromboembolism.

  6. Use of different surgical lasers in oral soft-tissue surgery and dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, Lajos

    1994-12-01

    There have been 4,032 laser surgical operations for the last 7 years with available first generation lasers (CO2, Nd:YAG, argon, combo (CO2 + Nd:YAG). The most important experience, the advantages and disadvantages of application are shown by the evaluation of results and complications. In oral soft tissue surgery the most important indicational circles of the use of first generation lasers have been established. The clinical introduction of a second generation of surgical lasers (Ho:YAG, Er:YAG, excimer, etc.) brings new possibilities in not only hard tissue surgery, but it also widens the advantages of the use of surgical lasers in the surgery of oral soft tissues.

  7. Evaluation of the use of four different lasers in oral soft tissue surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspar, Lajos

    1995-04-01

    There have been 4032 laser surgical operations for the last 7 years with first generation lasers available CO2, Nd:YAG, Argon, Combo (CO2 + $Nd:YAG). The most important experience, the advantages and disadvantages of application are shown by the evaluation of the results and complications. In oral soft tissue surgery there have been established the most important indicational circles of the use of first generation lasers. The clinical introduction of a second generation of surgical lasers Ho:YAG, ER:YAG, Excimer etc. brings new possibilities in not only hard tissue surgery, but it also widens the advantages of the use of surgical lasers in the surgery of oral soft tissues.

  8. A review of computer-aided oral and maxillofacial surgery: planning, simulation and navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaojun; Xu, Lu; Sun, Yi; Politis, Constantinus

    2016-11-01

    Currently, oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMFS) still poses a significant challenge for surgeons due to the anatomic complexity and limited field of view of the oral cavity. With the great development of computer technologies, he computer-aided surgery has been widely used for minimizing the risks and improving the precision of surgery. Areas covered: The major goal of this paper is to provide a comprehensive reference source of current and future development of computer-aided OMFS including surgical planning, simulation and navigation for relevant researchers. Expert commentary: Compared with the traditional OMFS, computer-aided OMFS overcomes the disadvantage that the treatment on the region of anatomically complex maxillofacial depends almost exclusively on the experience of the surgeon.

  9. Deep vein thrombosis: A rare complication in oral and maxillofacial surgery: A review of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, M R Ramesh; Ramesh, C; Thirumurugan, K; Prasad, G Arun

    2013-04-01

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is caused by obstruction of blood flow of deep veins in upper and lower limb. One of the precipitating factors for DVT is surgery under general anesthesia exceeding 30 min. However, there are very few reports of DVT associated with surgery of oral and maxillofacial region. In this paper we report two cases of DVT involving left ilio-femoropopliteal deep vein in one patient treated for fractured left angle of mandible and left peroneal vein in the other patient treated for oral sub mucous fibrosis. Clinical and color Doppler examination were performed to diagnose the condition and were referred to vascular surgical unit of higher institute for further management. These cases illustrates any surgery of maxillofacial region is not free from risk of DVT, which can cause fatal pulmonary thromboembolism.

  10. [Evaluation of children's emotional profile for ambulatory dental and oral surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlea, L; Voroneanu, Maria

    2008-01-01

    Oral surgery interventions are for a child patient a stressfull moment, full of strangers, with large mental load and neuro-vegetative dystonia. 236 patients with oral surgery problems treated in the Maxilo-facial Surgery Clinic in the 1.10.2006 - 1.01. 2008 were investigated for emotional items based on assessment scales. Perception surgical act is associated by the small patients in 100% with painful phenomenon. Dental anxiety is associated mainly with a negativist behavior and its primary source is a pain or fear of pain, pain being an experience that every person--adult or child, living a more or less frequently, with greater or lesser intensity. Moreover, intensely anxious patients are most sensitive to pain.

  11. Implementation of a Web-Based Patient Simulation Program to Teach Dental Students in Oral Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Carina Kruger; Skålén, Maya; Harju-Jeanty, Dick; Heymann, Robert; Rosén, Annika; Fors, Uno; Lund, Bodil

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a web-based simulation of patients (Web-SP) program on learning skills in clinical reasoning and patient evaluation in the oral surgery education of third-year dental students. A secondary aim was to investigate the program's effect on students' learning, knowledge, and attitudes towards virtual patient simulations. Authentic virtual oral surgery patient cases were created at a dental school in Sweden using the Web-SP platform. The Web-SP program was introduced in a two-hour seminar. A 20-minute pre-seminar test (test A) was administered to assess the students' knowledge of oral surgery prior to experiencing the Web-SP program. Ten days after the seminar, another test (test B) was administered to evaluate the increase in oral surgery knowledge as a result of using the program, and an emailed survey of the students was conducted. Of 70 students in the course, 67 (95.7%) agreed to participate in the study and took test A; of these, 59 (88%) took test B. Of the 59 students who took both tests, 28 (42%) completed the survey. The results of the two tests showed a statistically significant increase in knowledge, which was in accordance with the learning goals (pstudents had a positive attitude towards the teaching method. In this study, Web-SP was found to be a valuable tool for teaching clinical reasoning and patient evaluation in an undergraduate oral surgery education setting by improving learning outcomes in comparison with traditional teaching alone.

  12. Analysis of Risk Factors for Pneumonia in 482 Patients Undergoing Oral Cancer Surgery With Tracheotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Yuan, Weijun; Zhang, Shilei; Wang, Kewei; Ruan, Hong

    2016-02-01

    Elective tracheostomy is a common procedure used in patients with oral cancer. However, secondary tracheotomy-associated pneumonia (TAP) is an important complication after surgery. This study investigated the risk factors related to postoperative TAP complications in patients with oral cancer. A retrospective study was performed from January 2012 to October 2013. Data on patients who had oral cancer and underwent neck dissection or reconstructive surgery with tracheotomy were collected from the Hospital Information System. The predictive variables were age, gender, alcohol history, smoking history, basic disease (including diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease), tumor location, and duration of tracheotomy, which were extracted from electronic medical records. The outcome variable was TAP. Descriptive single factors and bivariate statistics were computed and the P value was set at .05. Four hundred eighty-two patients who received tracheotomy after oral cancer surgery were included in this study and 95 (19.7%) developed TAP. Univariate analysis showed that male gender (odds ratio [OR] = 1.853; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.083-3.17; P = .024 to risk factors for TAP. Then, 2 variables independently related to an increased risk of postoperative TAP were found by multivariate regression analysis, which were male gender (OR = 1.945; P = .018) and long duration of tracheotomy (OR = 1.694; P = .0001). The present findings indicate that male gender and tracheotomy duration are important risk factors for TAP in patients undergoing major oral cancer surgery. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Oral surgery in patients under antithrombotic therapy. Narrative review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anggelo Carrizo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Population aging and the increasing rates of cardiovascular diseases have raised the number of patients receiving antithrombotic therapy in elective or emergency dental care, including surgical procedures. The aim of this article is to review the evidence and clinical guidelines for management of patients on antithrombotic therapy published in the past five years. The American Antithrombotic Therapy Guideline - 2012 - generally recommends not to suspend antiplatelet or anticoagulant treatment in dental procedures since they are considered to have low bleeding risk and easy resolution. In the dental field, there is ample published evidence regarding oral surgical procedure management, especially by maxillofacial surgeons, showing a low number of complications associated with extractions or other minor oral surgical procedures without suspending antithrombotic drugs and only taking some minimum safeguards, such as healing by first intention or the use of some local hemostatic agents. In general, patients under chronic antithrombotic therapy should keep their medication when undergoing low and medium complexity dental procedures, since complications are minor and easy to handle. Due to interactions between them, particular care should be taken with patients using more than one drug.

  14. Oral triiodothyronine for the prevention of thyroid hormone reduction in adult valvular cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.P.A. Magalhães

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of non-thyroidal illness by intravenous triiodothyronine (T3 after cardiac surgery causes a disproportional elevation of hormone levels. The administration of oral T3, which has never been studied in this context, could cause physiological hormone levels. The aim of this study was to test oral T3 for the prevention of T3 reduction during the postoperative period of valvular cardiac surgery in adults. Eighteen patients who underwent cardiac surgery for valvular disease with invasive hemodynamic monitoring were randomly assigned to 2 groups: the T group received oral T3 (N = 8, 25 µg three times/day, initiated 24 h before surgery and maintained for 48 h and the NT group (N = 10 received placebo. Serum T3, thyroxine and thyrotropin were determined at baseline, 1 h before surgery, within 30 min of cardiopulmonary bypass and 6, 12, 24, and 48 h after removal of the aortic cross-clamp. Baseline T3 was similar in both groups (T: 119 ± 13; NT: 131 ± 9 ng/dL. Serum T3 increased during the first 24 h in the T group compared to the NT group (232 ± 18 vs 151 ± 13 ng/dL; P < 0.001. In the NT group, T3 was reduced by 24% (P = 0.007 6 h after removal of the aortic cross-clamp, confirming the non-thyroidal illness syndrome. There were no differences in clinical or hemodynamic parameters between groups. Administration of oral T3 prevented its serum reduction after valvular cardiac surgery in adults, with normal serum levels for 48 h without disproportional elevations.

  15. [Remifentanil does not increase urine output during oral surgery, contrary to its effect during other surgeries - a cohort study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouchi, Kentaro; Sugiyama, Kazuna

    An increase in urine output by remifentanil injection during laparoscopic procedures and surgeries such as cardiac and gynecological procedures, due to suppression of the stress response to surgery, has been reported. The aim of our prospective, observational, cohort study was to assess the effect of remifentanil analgesia on urine output during dental and minor oral surgery by comparing intraoperative urine output under defined infusion volumes with and without the use of remifentanil. Dental patients aged 16 years or older, American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status 1, with no renal diseases or abnormal blood values of serum creatinine and BUN, not on treatment with diuretic drugs, and undergoing minor oro-maxillofacial surgery or dental treatment under inhalation general anesthesia were included in this study. Urethral catheterization was performed after anesthesia induction, and urine output was measured every 30minutes. We measured urine volume (mL) and rate of urine output (mL.kg -1 .h -1 ) intraoperatively, and compared these parameters between patients who did and did not receive remifentanil during the intraoperative period. Eighty-seven patients were categorized into the remifentanil group (n=43) or remifentanil non-use group (n=44). Both volume of urine (mL) and rate of urine output (mL.kg -1 .h -1 ) were not significantly different between the two groups (remifentanil group, 372.3±273.5mL, 1.8±1.1mL.kg -1 .h -1 ; remifentanil non-use group, 343.3±283.3mL, 1.9±1.2mL.kg -1 .h -1 ; p=0.63; 0.57). Our results show that use of remifentanil during dental and minor oral surgeries does not increase urine output. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. Postoperative bleeding risk for oral surgery under continued rivaroxaban anticoagulant therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanken, Henning; Gröbe, Alexander; Heiland, Max; Smeets, Ralf; Kluwe, Lan; Wikner, Johannes; Koehnke, Robert; Al-Dam, Ahmed; Eichhorn, Wolfgang

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the risk of postoperative bleeding complications after oral procedures performed under continued mono or dual anticoagulation therapy with rivaroxaban (and aspirin). This retrospective single-center observational study included 52 oral procedures performed under continued oral anticoagulant therapy with rivaroxaban (20 mg/day). Among them, two procedures were performed under continued dual therapy with aspirin (100 mg/day) added to the regimen. Postoperative bleeding events were compared with 285 oral procedures in patients without any anticoagulation/antiplatelet therapy. Postoperative bleeding complications after oral surgery occurred significantly more often in patients under continued rivaroxaban therapy (11.5 %) than in the control cases without anticoagulation/antiplatelet medication (0.7 %). All of the bleeding events were manageable: Two of them were treated with local compression, three by applying new fibrin glue with (one case) or without (two cases) secondary sutures, one occurred during a weekend and was therefore treated under inpatient conditions with suture replacement. All postoperative bleeding episodes occurred during the first postoperative week. According to our data, continued anticoagulation therapy with rivaroxaban significantly increases postoperative bleeding risk for oral surgical procedures, although the bleeding events were manageable. Oral surgeons, cardiologists, general physicians, and patients should be aware of the increased bleeding risk after oral surgical procedures. Close observation up to 1 week postoperatively is advisable to prevent excessive bleeding.

  17. Assessment of Aerobic Bacterial Ccontamination on Mtal Instruments Before Oral Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ramezaninan

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Infection control, in all surgery operations, is of high importance. Although a lot of advances have been made, but it is still necessary to observe methods for the prevention of spreading infection, especially for dentists who perform several minor surgeries in the office. As a result, investigating aerobic bacterial contamination of metal instruments, before application, should be paid special attention. The aim of this study was to investigate the aerobic bacterial contamination on metal instrument before oral surgery. Metal instruments, used in surgery and non surgery operations in 4 departments of dental faculty-oral and maxillofacial surgery, endodontics, periodontics, autoclave room with the sampling volume of 80 were selected randomly. After sterilization of all samples under specific conditions, they were transferred to microbiological laboratory of hygiene faculty and were cultured and incubated under 37° temperature for 24 hours. According to the results of culturing, just one case, affected with staphylococcus epidermis, was observed. Sterilization condition, in hygiene faculty, comparing to previous studies, shows 20% progress.

  18. [Renaissance of pedicled flaps in oral and maxillofacial surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twieg, M; Reich, W; Dempf, R; Eckert, A W

    2014-06-01

    A retrospective analysis in the period 2007 to 2011 included 71 surgically treated patients for carcinoma of the head and neck region and subsequent reconstruction with 36 pedicled distant flaps and 47 free flaps. Patient specific parameters of data collection with SPSS 17.0 were age and sex distribution, TNM stage and treatment. The specific type of flap reconstruction, duration of surgery, complications, intensive care and inpatient treatment were recorded. The results showed that the healing process was uneventful in 26 (72.2 %) pedicled flaps, 14 (38.9 %) pedicled flaps were transplanted in a preoperatively irradiated area of the head and neck region and in 86.0 % with a positive healing process. Tumor stage, general physical condition of the patient and type of therapy are the key parameters for the choice of reconstruction.

  19. One Year Audit of In Patient Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Dhaka Dental College Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Ariful; Haider, Ismat Ara; Uzzaman, Md Helal; Tymur, Fazla Rubby; Ali, Md Shahjahan

    2016-06-01

    The world wide pattern of oral and maxillofacial surgical conditions has rarely been reported despite its significance in ensuring quality of care. A large number of patients are managed surgically in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery department of Dhaka Dental College Hospital but there has been no surgical audit to identify the potential problems in patient care. The aim of this study was to identify the pattern of oral and maxillofacial conditions in patients of maxillofacial surgery of Dhaka Dental College Hospital, which would provide valuable information to build up the focus of attention, to develop a future strategy plan, to improve its clinical care and extend the academic and research field. A retrospective survey of oral and maxillofacial surgical cases managed at the inpatient Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Dhaka Dental College Hospital. All admitted patients from 1st January, 2012 to 31st December, 2012 were included in this study. The patients' data were retrieved from the wards registers and patient records. The data were recorded as age, sex, occupation, geographic distribution, diagnosis, treatment done and operation name. These were studied to assess the prevalence of age, sex, diseases and the name of the treatment offered. Analysis of major groups of diagnosis on the basis of age and sex was also studied. Mortality was also recorded. Between 1st January, 2012 and 31st December, 2012 a total of 768 patients were treated. Among them 494 patients were male while 274 were female, male female ratio was 1.80:1. The majority of the patients were from Dhaka division. The mean age of the patients was 33.20 years; peak age group was 15-30 years. The most common diagnosis was maxillofacial injuries (35 %), followed by oral squamous cell carcinoma (22 %) and odontogenic tumours and hamartomas (11 %). Maxillo-mandibular fixation or wiring was the main modality of treatment. The mortality rate was 0.26 % of total patients. The department of

  20. An analysis of oral biopsies extracted from 1995 to 2009, in an oral medicine and surgery unit in Galicia (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sixto-Requeijo, Raquel; Diniz-Freitas, Marco; Torreira-Lorenzo, Juan-Carlos; García-García, Abel; Gándara-Rey, José M

    2012-01-01

    To conduct an analysis of the frequency of oral lesions in biopsies over a 14-year period in the Oral Medicine, Oral Surgery and Implantology Unit. We conducted a retrospective study of biopsies removed from 1995-2009, recording data regarding age, sex, location of the lesions, biopsy types, anatomical and pathological diagnosis and definitive diagnosis. Of the 562 patients studied, the average age was 51.8 years, with a standard deviation of 18.5 (range 5-96). The distribution by sex was 318 (56.6%) women and 244 (43.4%) men. The most common diagnostic category was mucosal pathologies in 37.9% of cases, followed by odontogenic cysts in 27.8%. Malignant tumors accounted for 3.9% of cases, oral squamous cell carcinomas were the most frequent malignancy, appearing in 22 cases. Bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaws was the most common injury within the bone lesions group. Following the performance of 647 biopsies on 562 patients, we can say that the most common injury was radicular cysts (appearing in 108 cases), having found statistical differences in relation to the patients' sex and age.

  1. Complications following interventional laser surgery for oral cancer and precancerous lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodson, M L; Sugden, K; Kometa, S; Thomson, P J

    2012-10-01

    Interventional carbon dioxide laser surgery is the preferred method to treat oral precancerous lesions and early invasive squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). Little is known, however, about the complications that patients experience after such treatment. We retrospectively reviewed the hospital records of 82 patients with new dysplastic oral lesions or early invasive oral SCCs treated by laser surgery in the maxillofacial unit at Newcastle General Hospital. The most common postoperative complications were pain for more than two weeks after operation (n=28), bleeding (n=4), difficulties with speech (n=5), paraesthesia of the lingual nerve (n=17), difficulty swallowing (n=2), obstructive swelling of the submandibular gland (n=22), and tethering of the tongue (n=10). Overall, 78% of patients had one or more complication. In the absence of randomised controlled trials, this study provides the best available evidence for complication rates following interventional surgery. In addition to aiding in the preoperative counselling of patients, the data will help to inform and advise patients particularly during the immediate postoperative period. Copyright © 2011 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The effect of standardization on the reliability of the Philippine Board of Surgery oral examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisostomo, Armando C

    2011-01-01

    Cognizant of potential problems with validity and reliability, the Philippine Board of Surgery (PBS) undertook standardization of its oral examination procedures. This retrospective analytic study was conducted to determine and compare the reliability of the Philippine Board of Surgery oral examinations before and after standardization. The records of oral examinations from June 29, 2003 to March 28, 2010 were reviewed and measures of reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient and kappa agreement) were computed and compared between the time periods before and after standardization and among different case content modules administered. The proportion of passers between time periods and different content areas were also compared. All measures of interrater reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient and kappa agreement) increased significantly overall and in all content areas and regardless of examinee outcome. There was also a trend to increased proportion of passers overall and significant improvement in passing rate in 4 out of 6 content areas. This study validates the role of standardization of the content and scoring in improving the reliability of the oral examination, which is crucial for high stakes certifying examinations. Copyright © 2011 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Review of orthognathic surgery and related papers published in the British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery 2011-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodson, Alexander M C; Payne, Karl F B; Tahim, Arpan; Colbert, Serryth; Brennan, Peter A

    2015-04-01

    This review summarises all orthognathic and related papers published between January 2011 and December 2012 in the British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (BJOMS). A total of 36 articles were published, a high proportion of which (78%) were full-length papers. The remainder consisted of short communications and technical notes. The topics included operative planning and postoperative outcomes, and there was a strong focus on distraction osteogenesis. There were fewer orthognathic articles published in BJOMS than articles on other subspecialties such as trauma or head and neck oncology. Only 8 (29%) of the full-length articles were prospective studies or randomised trials, which highlights a need for well-designed clinical studies in orthognathic research. Copyright © 2013 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Osteomark: a surgical navigation system for oral and maxillofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, C; Magill, J C; Nikonovskiy, V; Byl, M; Murphy, B A; Kaban, L B; Troulis, M J

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this project was to test a surgical navigation tool designed to help execute a surgical treatment plan. It consists of an electromagnetically tracked pencil that is used to mark bone intraoperatively. The device was tested on a precision block, an ex vivo pig mandible and during performance of six endoscopic vertical ramus osteotomies on pig cadavers. The difference between actual pencil position and that displayed by the computer was measured three times each at ten 2mm holes on the block (n=30 observations) and on the ex vivo mandible (n=11 measurements). Errors between planned and actual osteotomy locations for the cadaver procedures were measured. The mean distance between known and displayed locations was 1.55 ± 0.72 mm on the precision block and 2.10 ± 0.88 mm on the pig mandible. The error measured marking the same point on the block multiple (n=5) times was 0.58 ± 0.37 mm. The mean error on the simulated osteotomies was 2.35 ± 1.35 mm. Osteomark was simple to use and permitted localisation of holes and osteotomies with acceptable accuracy. In the future, the device and algorithms will be revised to further decrease error and the system will be tested on live animals. Copyright © 2011 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of third molar surgery on oral health-related quality of life in the first postoperative week using Dutch version of Oral Health Impact Profile-14

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wijk, Arjen; Kieffer, Jacobien M.; Lindeboom, Jerome H.

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigated the effect of third molar surgery on oral health-related quality of life, related to pain and clinical variables, in the first postoperative week using the Dutch version of the 14-item Oral Health Impact Profile. A total of 50 patients, referred to the Department of

  6. Effect of third molar surgery on oral health-related quality of life in the first postoperative week using Dutch version of oral health impact profile-14

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wijk, A.; Kieffer, J.M.; Lindeboom, J.H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The present study investigated the effect of third molar surgery on oral health-related quality of life, related to pain and clinical variables, in the first postoperative week using the Dutch version of the 14-item Oral Health Impact Profile. Materials and Methods: A total of 50 patients,

  7. Estimation of oral leukoplakia treatment records in the research of the Department of Maxillofacial and Oral Surgery, Medical University of Gdansk

    OpenAIRE

    Starzy?ska, Anna; Paw?owska, Anita; Renkielska, Dorota; Michaj?owski, Igor; Sobjanek, Micha?; B?a?ewicz, Izabela; W?odarkiewicz, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Oral leukoplakia (OL) is the most common potentially malignant lesion of the oral cavity. Aim The purpose of the study was clinical and epidemiological analysis of patients with OL diagnosed and treated in the Department of Maxillofacial and Oral Surgery, Medical University of Gdansk, comparison of effectiveness of treatment methods, defining whether van der Waal level of OL influences treatment effectiveness, correlation between localization of OL and treatment effectiveness, an...

  8. Dissociated incretin response to oral glucose at 1 year after restrictive vs. malabsorptive bariatric surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldstrand, M; Ahrén, B; Näslund, E

    2009-01-01

    AIM: Compare the response to oral glucose of the two incretin hormones, glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) at 1 year after restrictive vs. malabsorptive bariatric surgery. METHODS: Vertical banded gastroplasty (VBG, n = 7) or jejunoileal bypass...... = 0.007). CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that at 1 year after bariatric surgery, the two incretins show dissociated responses in that the GIP secretion is higher after VBG whereas GLP-1 secretion is higher after JIB. This dissociated incretin response is independent from reduction in body weight, glucose...

  9. Oral health-related quality of life following third molar surgery with either oral administration or submucosal injection of prednisolone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibikunle, Adebayo Aremu; Adeyemo, Wasiu Lanre; Ladeinde, Akinola Ladipo

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes in oral health-related Quality of Life (QoL) following third molar surgery with either oral administration or submucosal injection of prednisolone. Subjects were randomly distributed into three groups of 62 subjects each: Group A consisted of subjects who received 40 mg oral prednisolone; group B received 40 mg submucosal injection of prednisolone, while group C did not receive prednisolone. Preoperative and postoperative quality of life evaluations of all subjects were done using the 14-item Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14) questionnaire. Postoperatively, quality of life evaluation was done on postoperative days 1, 3, and 7. Subjects were categorized as either affected (OHIP score ≤28) or not affected (OHIP score >28). Mean OHIP scores between preoperative and postoperative periods, as well as between the three groups, were compared. A significant increase in the mean total and subscale scores was found in all the groups postoperatively. This was most marked on the first postoperative day, and it gradually improved throughout the immediate postoperative period. Subjects who received prednisolone experienced a statistically significant better quality of life than those who did not. Subjects who received submucosal injection of prednisolone showed statistically significant less deterioration in QoL than those who received oral prednisolone (P = 0.001). Administration of prednisolone was significantly associated with less deterioration in quality of life and earlier recovery when compared with subjects who did not receive prednisolone. Submucosal injection of prednisolone 40 mg (which offers a simple, safe, painless, and cost-effective therapeutic option) is an effective therapeutic strategy for improving the quality of life after surgical removal of impacted lower third molars.

  10. Use of a botulinum toxin A in dentistry and oral and maxillofacial surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung-Soo; Lee, Chi-Heun

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (BT) was the first toxin to be used in the history of human medicine. Among the eight known serotypes of this toxin, those currently used in medicine are types A and B. This review article mainly discusses BT type A (BTA) because it is usually used in dentistry including dental anesthesiology and oral and maxillofacial surgery. BTA has been used mainly in the treatment of temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) and hypertrophy and hyperactivity of the masticatory muscles, along with being a therapeutic option to relieve pain and help in functional recovery from dental and oral and maxillofacial surgery. However, it is currently used broadly for cosmetic purposes such as reducing facial wrinkles and asymmetry. Although the therapeutic effect of BTA is temporary and relatively safe, it is essential to have knowledge about related anatomy, as well as the systemic and local adverse effects of medications that are applied to the face. PMID:28884147

  11. Surgical Navigation: A Systematic Review of Indications, Treatments, and Outcomes in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarmehr, Iman; Stokbro, Kasper; Bell, R Bryan; Thygesen, Torben

    2017-09-01

    This systematic review investigates the most common indications, treatments, and outcomes of surgical navigation (SN) published from 2010 to 2015. The evolution of SN and its application in oral and maxillofacial surgery have rapidly developed over recent years, and therapeutic indications are discussed. A systematic search in relevant electronic databases, journals, and bibliographies of the included articles was carried out. Clinical studies with 5 or more patients published between 2010 and 2015 were included. Traumatology, orthognathic surgery, cancer and reconstruction surgery, skull-base surgery, and foreign body removal were the areas of interests. The search generated 13 articles dealing with traumatology; 5, 6, 2, and 0 studies were found that dealt with the topics of orthognathic surgery, cancer and reconstruction surgery, skull-base surgery, and foreign body removal, respectively. The average technical system accuracy and intraoperative precision reported were less than 1 mm and 1 to 2 mm, respectively. In general, SN is reported to be a useful tool for surgical planning, execution, evaluation, and research. The largest numbers of studies and patients were identified in the field of traumatology. Treatment of complex orbital fractures was considerably improved by the use of SN compared with traditionally treated control groups. SN seems to be a very promising addition to the surgical toolkit. Planning details of the surgical procedure in a 3-dimensional virtual environment and execution with real-time guidance can significantly improve precision. Among factors to be considered are the financial investments necessary and the learning curve. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. All rights reserved.

  12. Plasma Beta-Endorphin Levels in Oral Surgery Patients Following Diazepam, Fentanyl or Placebo1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargreaves, Kenneth M.

    1984-01-01

    Plasma beta-endorphin, pain and anxiety were measured in patients before, during, and 1 and 3 hours following oral surgery. Diazepam and fentanyl blocked the stress induced increase in plasma beta-endorphin experienced by patients administered placebo. Moreover, intra-operative anxiety and post-operative pain appear to constitute independent and possibly equipotent stimuli for release of pituitary beta-endorphin in humans. PMID:6089614

  13. Gender trends in authorship in oral and maxillofacial surgery literature: A 30-year analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkenke, Emeka; Seemann, Rudolf; Vairaktaris, Elefterios; Schaller, Hans-Günter; Rohde, Maximilian; Stelzle, Florian; Knipfer, Christian

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to perform a bibliometric analysis of the gender distribution of first and senior authorships in important oral and maxillofacial journals over the 30-year period from 1980 to 2010. Articles published in three representative oral and maxillofacial surgery journals were selected. The years 1980, 1990, 2000, and 2010 were chosen as representative points in time for article selection. Original research, case reports, technical notes, and reviews were included in the analysis. Case reports and technical notes were pooled in one group. For each article, the gender of the first author as well as that of the senior author was determined, based on the inspection of their first name. The type of article was determined and the country of origin of the article was documented. A total 1412 articles were subjected to the data analysis. A significant increase in female authorship in oral and maxillofacial surgery could be identified over the chosen 30-year period. However, the number of publications by male authors was still significantly higher at all points of time, exceeding those of female authors by at least 3.8 fold in 2010. As there is a trend towards feminization of medicine and dentistry, the results of the present study may serve as the basis for further analysis of the current situation, and the identification of necessary actions to accelerate the closure of the gender gap in publishing in oral and maxillofacial surgery. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Variability in blood pressure in normotensive patients undergoing outpatient oral surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Núñez Mendieta, Heriberto Atanacio; Di Tore Aquino, Rubén; Mico, Guillermo Antonio; Pratt Giosa, Wilma Paola; Pratt Giosa, Julio Cesar; Keim Meden, Liz Violeta

    2015-01-01

    Background: A dental appointment can be stressful for patients, especially if this involves a surgical procedure. Factors such as pain and catecholamines present in local anesthesia can cause a change of values of blood pressure (BP). The hypertensive peak is a sudden rise in BP and can occur even in a person usually normotensive by a stressful situation. Objective: To determine the variability of BP in normotensive patients attending the Department of Oral Surgery III Course of the Faculty o...

  15. Description of odontogenic infection cases at the Oral Surgery Polyclinic of Hasan Sadikin Hospital Bandung, Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Ravitha Savitri; Tis Karasutisna; Agus Nurwiadh

    2018-01-01

    One of the most difficult cases to be managed in dentistry is an odontogenic infection. The study was aimed to finding the description of the odontogenic infection cases at the Oral Surgery Polyclinic of Hasan Sadikin Hospital, Bandung, Indonesia, according to the odontogenic infection types, genders, ages, sources of infection, and type of treatment given. This study was a retrospective-descriptive study with a survey method conducted from January 2009 to December 2010. The results of this s...

  16. Maxillofacial prosthetic treatment factors affecting oral health-related quality of life after surgery for patients with oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagio, Miki; Ishizaki, Ken; Ryu, Masahiro; Nomura, Takeshi; Takano, Nobuo; Sakurai, Kaoru

    2017-09-06

    After oral cancer surgery, tissue defects can cause deformity and limited mobility, complicating many essential functions. For patients with mandibular, tongue, and oral floor defects, evidence regarding the effects of maxillofacial prosthetics on their oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) is lacking. Therefore, maxillofacial prosthetic reconstruction has been implemented with no clear treatment goals. The purpose of this study was to identify factors affecting the improvement of OHRQoL by using maxillofacial prosthetic treatment after surgery to repair maxillary, mandibular, tongue, and oral floor defects. All individuals who agreed to maxillofacial prosthetics after surgery for oral cancer were enrolled. Oral function and OHRQoL were evaluated before maxillofacial prosthesis placement and 1 month after final adjustments. The oral functions evaluated included masticatory function, swallowing function, and articulatory function. The Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-J54) was used to evaluate OHRQoL. Factors affecting changes in the OHIP-J54 score for participants' background and oral functions before and after treatment were analyzed through logistic regression analysis (stepwise method). Participants included 34 men and 16 women with an average age of 72.4 ±8.7 years. "Psychological discomfort" was correlated with the patient's sex and masticatory function. "Physical disability" was related to articulatory function. "Handicap" was related to the swallowing function. "Additional Japanese questions" were related to the patient's sex. Participants' sex and their oral functions, including masticatory, swallowing, and articulatory functions, were associated with improved OHRQoL because of maxillofacial prosthetics after surgery for oral cancer. Copyright © 2017 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Oral surgery undergraduate teaching and experience in the United Kingdom: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macluskey, M; Durham, J

    2009-02-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the structure, mode of delivery, mode of assessment and staffing of the oral surgery undergraduate curriculum within UK dental schools. A questionnaire was distributed by e-mail in January 2006 to each of the 15 dental schools with undergraduate dental degree programmes in Ireland and the UK. Those providing feedback then met to clarify any areas as required. Thirteen completed questionnaires were returned. There were a total of 55 academics involved in the teaching of oral surgery at these 13 institutions. Over the three clinical years the mean number of clinical sessions was 51. The mean staff student ratio for supervision of forceps exodontia was 1:5. On average 51 teeth were extracted by each student in the clinical years. The mean staff student ratio for surgical extractions was 1:2. The mean number of surgical extractions for each student was 6. All schools formatively assessed competency in forceps exodontia and 9 of 13 assessed surgical extractions. Summative assessment of exodontia was done in six schools and surgical extractions in 4 of 13 schools. All 13 schools deliver teaching programmes designed to meet the requirements of the frameworks governing the central curriculum. There were, however, variations between individual schools in the content and delivery of the oral surgery clinical teaching programmes. There were dramatic variations in the numbers of academic staff involved and some institutions relied on their NHS colleagues to deliver the clinical teaching.

  18. An audit of the use of the CO2 laser in oral and maxillofacial surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.; Santos de Almeida, Darcy

    2004-09-01

    The use of the Carbon dioxide Laser to perform surgical procedures in the oral cavity has been described as a successful method for the treatment of several conditions affecting the maxillofacial region. Several benefits of the use of the CO2 Laser have been reported and includes reduction of postoperative pain and edema, local hemosthasis, reduction of scaring and wound contraction and infection. The aim of this work is to present our clinical experience in performing several surgical procedures using the CO2 Laser to treat soft tissue pathologies of both benign and malign origin as well as on performing pre-prosthetic surgery, apical surgery and on the treatment of pre-malignancies. Our experience demonstrate that the use of the Carbon dioxide Laser in treating oral soft-tissue pathology presents advantages over conventional techniques and local discomfort and pain are the most common complaints after Laser surgery. The Carbon dioxide Laser does not offer any enhanced cure-rate for oral pathology, but rather it is a precise means of removing soft tissue lesions with little upset afterwards.

  19. Presurgical motivations, self-esteem, and oral health of orthognathic surgery patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dedong; Wang, Fang; Wang, Xudong; Fang, Bing; Shen, Steve Guofang

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate motivations, self-esteem, and oral health for undergoing orthognathic patients by gender in China before orthognathic surgery. Using a prospective and control study design, 429 subjects in China were collected from December 2010 to May 2011. The patient group consisted of 210 consecutive healthy patients, and 219 young individuals comprised the control group. All the subjects filled out a questionnaire and were assessed by Self-esteem Scale and Oral Health Impact Profile validated for Chinese patients before surgery. To measure the discrepancy, the Student t test was computed. P motivations for orthognathic surgery are to improve facial appearance (83.33%), occlusion (50%), and self-confidence (48.1%). Females expect to improve facial appearance (83.87%), self-confidence (43.55%), and occlusion (41.94%). Males are for the improvement of facial appearance (82.56%), occlusion (63.95%), and self-confidence (54.65%). Self-esteem in the patient group is obviously lower (P self-esteem in female groups (P motivation. Self-confidence has been more frequently mentioned, while headache far less than other countries. (2) Female patients have less self-esteem than females in the control group. (3) Patients' oral health are worse than those in the control group.

  20. Perceptions of Teaching Methods for Preclinical Oral Surgery: A Comparison with Learning Styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Esam

    2017-01-01

    Dental extraction is a routine part of clinical dental practice. For this reason, understanding the way how students' extraction knowledge and skills development are important. To date, there is no accredited statement about the most effective method for the teaching of exodontia to dental students. Students have different abilities and preferences regarding how they learn and process information. This is defined as learning style. In this study, the effectiveness of active learning in the teaching of preclinical oral surgery was examined. The personality type of the groups involved in this study was determined, and the possible effect of personality type on learning style was investigated. This study was undertaken over five years from 2011 to 2015. The sample consisted of 115 students and eight staff members. Questionnaires were submitted by 68 students and all eight staff members involved. Three measures were used in the study: The Index of Learning Styles (Felder and Soloman, 1991), the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), and the styles of learning typology (Grasha and Hruska-Riechmann). Findings indicated that demonstration and minimal clinical exposure give students personal validation. Frequent feedback on their work is strongly indicated to build the cognitive, psychomotor, and interpersonal skills needed from preclinical oral surgery courses. Small group cooperative active learning in the form of demonstration and minimal clinical exposure that gives frequent feedback and students' personal validation on their work is strongly indicated to build the skills needed for preclinical oral surgery courses.

  1. Indications for Elective Tracheostomy in Reconstructive Surgery in Patients With Oral Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiser, Yoav; Barak, Michal; Ghantous, Yasmine; Yehudai, Noam; Abu El-Naaj, Imad

    2017-01-01

    Oral cancer surgery carries a high risk of upper airway obstruction; yet optimal airway management approach remains controversial. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the use of tracheostomy in oncological patients undergoing oral cancer surgery with intra oral flap reconstruction. The study cohort included 75 patients with oral cancer, who underwent major intraoral resections and reconstruction with vascularized flaps. Thirty-six percent of the patients received elective tracheostomy (27 patients). Mean hospital stay of the patients with tracheostomy was 28.4 ± 12.5 days compared with 9.7 ± 2.1 days in the nontracheostomy patients. A scoring system rendered from this study suggests that patients with a total scoring at or above 8 should be considered for elective tracheostomy. With appropriate postoperative monitoring, selected patients can be managed without routine elective tracheostomy, yet, patients with comorbidities, mostly elderly patients, which undergo surgical resection and reconstruction in high-risk areas that can result in a bulky flap that pose danger to the postoperative airway, should receive elective tracheostomy.

  2. Health-related quality of life outcome for oral cancer survivors after surgery and postoperative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Fu-Min; Chien, Chih-Yen; Wang, Chong-Jong; Tsai, Wen-Ling; Chiu, Herng-Chia

    2004-01-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQL) data are becoming an important supplement to information pertaining to treatment outcome for cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the HRQL outcome for oral cancer survivors after surgery plus postoperative radiotherapy (RT) and to investigate the variables associated with their HRQL. Sixty-six oral cancer patients with cancer-free survival after surgery plus postoperative RT of >2 years were enrolled. The Short Form-36 (SF-36) questionnaire in the Taiwan Chinese version was self-reported by all participants at the clinics. The linear regression model was used to analyze the socio-demographic and medical-related variables correlated with the physical component summary (PCS) and mental component summary (MCS) in SF-36. The mean scores of the eight functional domains in the SF-36 were markedly lower for oral cancer survivors compared with the Taiwanese and US norms. Those with older age, lower annual family income, more advanced cancer stage and flap reconstruction had significantly worse PCS, and those with lower annual family income, unemployment and more advanced cancer stage reported significantly worse MCS. This model accounts for 63% of variance in PCS, and 51% in MCS. These results provided patient-reported evidence that oral cancer survivors lived with a worse HRQL compared with the general Taiwanese population. Socio-economic factors and cancer stage were important factors correlated with their HRQL. (authors)

  3. Development and application of stent-based image guided navigation system for oral and maxillofacial surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Woo Jin; Kim, Dae Seung [Interdisciplinary Program in Radiation Applied Life Science, Dental Research Institute and BK21, College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Won Jin; Lee, Sam Sun; Choi, Soon Chul; Heo, Min Suk; Huh, Kyung Hoe; Kim, Myung Jin; Lee, Jee Ho [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Dental Research Institute, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to develop a stent-based image guided surgery system and to apply it to oral and maxillofacial surgeries for anatomically complex sites. We devised a patient-specific stent for patient-to-image registration and navigation. Three dimensional positions of the reference probe and the tool probe were tracked by an optical camera system and the relative position of the handpiece drill tip to the reference probe was monitored continuously on the monitor of a PC. Using 8 landmarks for measuring accuracy, the spatial discrepancy between CT image coordinate and physical coordinate was calculated for testing the normality. The accuracy over 8 anatomical landmarks showed an overall mean of 0.56 {+-} 0.16 mm. The developed system was applied to a surgery for a vertical alveolar bone augmentation in right mandibular posterior area and possible interior alveolar nerve injury case of an impacted third molar. The developed system provided continuous monitoring of invisible anatomical structures during operation and 3D information for operation sites. The clinical challenge showed sufficient accuracy and availability of anatomically complex operation sites. The developed system showed sufficient accuracy and availability in oral and maxillofacial surgeries for anatomically complex sites.

  4. Development and application of stent-based image guided navigation system for oral and maxillofacial surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Woo Jin; Kim, Dae Seung; Yi, Won Jin; Lee, Sam Sun; Choi, Soon Chul; Heo, Min Suk; Huh, Kyung Hoe; Kim, Myung Jin; Lee, Jee Ho

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a stent-based image guided surgery system and to apply it to oral and maxillofacial surgeries for anatomically complex sites. We devised a patient-specific stent for patient-to-image registration and navigation. Three dimensional positions of the reference probe and the tool probe were tracked by an optical camera system and the relative position of the handpiece drill tip to the reference probe was monitored continuously on the monitor of a PC. Using 8 landmarks for measuring accuracy, the spatial discrepancy between CT image coordinate and physical coordinate was calculated for testing the normality. The accuracy over 8 anatomical landmarks showed an overall mean of 0.56 ± 0.16 mm. The developed system was applied to a surgery for a vertical alveolar bone augmentation in right mandibular posterior area and possible interior alveolar nerve injury case of an impacted third molar. The developed system provided continuous monitoring of invisible anatomical structures during operation and 3D information for operation sites. The clinical challenge showed sufficient accuracy and availability of anatomically complex operation sites. The developed system showed sufficient accuracy and availability in oral and maxillofacial surgeries for anatomically complex sites.

  5. The advantages of carbon dioxide laser applications in paediatric oral surgery. A prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, R; Parker, S

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate and demonstrate the advantages of the carbon dioxide laser in paediatric oral surgery patients in terms of less post-operative complications, healing without scaring, functional benefits, positive patient perception and acceptance of the treatment. One hundred fit and healthy paediatric patients (aged 4-15 years) were recruited to undergo laser surgery for different soft tissue conditions. The outcome of these laser treatments was examined. The Wong-Baker Faces Pain Rating Scale was employed to evaluate the pain before, immediately after laser treatment in the clinic and 1 day after post-operatively at home. Post-operative complications and patients' perception and satisfaction were self-reported during a review telephone call the day after treatment. The patients were reviewed 2 weeks after surgery. Laser parameter was 1.62 W, measured by power meter, continuous wave mode with 50 % emission cycle. The beam spot size at the target tissue was 0.8 mm. The pain score pre-operative, during and immediately after laser treatment was rated 0. Whilst the pain score 1 day after surgery was rated between 0 and 2, the healing time was measured over 2 weeks. None of the patients reported post-operative complications after surgery. Patients' perception and acceptance were rated very good. Laser dentistry is a promising field in modern minimally invasive dentistry, which enables provision of better care for children and adolescents. In this cohort study, the use of the carbon dioxide laser therapy offers a desirable, acceptable and minimally invasive technique in the surgical management of soft tissues in paediatric oral surgery with minimal post-operative complications.

  6. Evaluation of the scope and practice of oral and maxillofacial surgery in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinmoladun, V I; Gbolahan, O O; Akadiri, O A; Akinyamoju, C A

    2015-01-01

    Oral and maxillofacial surgery is still evolving, with the scope of practice in Nigeria inadequately determined. This study aims to ascertain the level of practice in various parts of the country vis-a-vis the global trend and factors influencing the scope in Nigeria. Cross-sectional. The study was carried out at the University of Ibadan. Participants included all the maxillofacial surgeons on the mailing list of the Nigerian Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons and Practicing in Nigeria as at December, 2012. Structured questionnaires were delivered to all on the mailing list of the Nigerian Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Respondents were asked to provide information about their demographics, years of practice, areas of practice and factors influencing the choice of practice among others. Nonresponders were reminded a month after initial contact. Data were entered into a personal computer and variables analyzed using descriptive statistical analysis. Thirty-two (56%) of the 57 questionnaires were returned. Most respondents were aged 41-45 years ( n = 11, 34.4%). Twenty-six (81.3%) were males, whereas 6 (18.8%) were females. Twenty respondents (62.5%) practiced in the teaching hospitals. Eighteen respondents (56.3%) practiced in the south-west geopolitical region. Twelve respondents (37.5%) were the only maxillofacial surgeons in their centers. 81.3% routinely practiced traumatology against 15.6% for implantology. Seventy-eight percent ( n = 25) had satisfactory facilities for traumatology, dentoalveolar surgery, and cleft repair surgery, while facilities were least satisfactory in implantology and orthognathic surgery (15.6% and 12.5%, respectively). The highest single factor influencing choice/area of practice was financial reward (100% of respondents). Fifty percent ( n = 16) claimed not to have had adequate training in their area of interest. Most respondents (93.8%) believe the greatest challenge facing oncological maxillofacial

  7. Mandibular Reconstruction with Lateral Tibial Bone Graft: An Excellent Option for Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miceli, Ana Lucia Carpi; Pereira, Livia Costa; Torres, Thiago da Silva; Calasans-Maia, Mônica Diuana; Louro, Rafael Seabra

    2017-12-01

    Autogenous bone grafts are the gold standard for reconstruction of atrophic jaws, pseudoarthroses, alveolar clefts, orthognathic surgery, mandibular discontinuity, and augmentation of sinus maxillary. Bone graft can be harvested from iliac bone, calvarium, tibial bone, rib, and intraoral bone. Proximal tibia is a common donor site with few reported problems compared with other sites. The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of proximal tibia as a donor area for maxillofacial reconstructions, focusing on quantifying the volume of cancellous graft harvested by a lateral approach and to assess the complications of this technique. In a retrospective study, we collected data from 31 patients, 18 women and 13 men (mean age: 36 years, range: 19-64), who were referred to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at the Servidores do Estado Federal Hospital. Patients were treated for sequelae of orthognathic surgery, jaw fracture, nonunion, malunion, pathology, and augmentation of bone volume to oral implant. The technique of choice was lateral access of proximal tibia metaphysis for graft removal from Gerdy tubercle under general anesthesia. The mean volume of bone harvested was 13.0 ± 3.7 mL (ranged: 8-23 mL). Only five patients (16%) had minor complications, which included superficial infection, pain, suture dehiscence, and unwanted scar. However, none of these complications decreases the result and resolved completely. We conclude that proximal tibia metaphysis for harvesting cancellous bone graft provides sufficient volume for procedures in oral and maxillofacial surgery with minimal postoperative morbidity.

  8. Oral Nutrition as a Form of Pre-Operative Enhancement in Patients Undergoing Surgery for Colorectal Cancer: A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruns, Emma R. J.; Argillander, Tanja E.; van den Heuvel, Baukje; Buskens, Christianne J.; van Duijvendijk, Peter; Winkels, Renate M.; Kalf, Annette; van der Zaag, Edwin S.; Wassenaar, Eelco B.; Bemelman, Willem A.; van Munster, Barbara C.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Nutritional status has major impacts on the outcome of surgery, in particular in patients with cancer. The aim of this review was to assess the merit of oral pre-operative nutritional support as a part of prehabilitation in patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer. Methods: A

  9. Oral Nutrition as a Form of Pre-Operative Enhancement in Patients Undergoing Surgery for Colorectal Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruns, Emma R.J.; Argillander, Tanja E.; Heuvel, Van Den Baukje; Buskens, Christianne J.; Duijvendijk, Van Peter; Winkels, Renate M.; Kalf, Annette; Zaag, Van Der Edwin S.; Wassenaar, Eelco B.; Bemelman, Willem A.; Munster, Van Barbara C.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Nutritional status has major impacts on the outcome of surgery, in particular in patients with cancer. The aim of this review was to assess the merit of oral pre-operative nutritional support as a part of prehabilitation in patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer. Methods: A

  10. End Stage Renal Disease: Not a Contraindication for Minor Oral Surgery-Protocol for the Management of Oral Surgery patients with ESRD on Hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendem, Sneha; Lakshmi Narayana, G; Ravi, Poornima

    2017-06-01

    To describe a safe and effective protocol for the management of patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) undergoing minor oral surgery. A prospective cohort study was conducted on all patients with ESRD who were referred for dental consultation. A definite protocol was designed in consultation with the nephrologist to minimize the risk of bleeding and wound healing complications during and after the minor surgical procedures. 36 patients consented for the protocol to be followed while 4 patients did not comply with the protocol and in 2 cases the protocol could be followed. The intra operative, post operative bleeding, and the wound healing were assessed in these patients. 36 patients had uneventful extractions as the blood pressure was brought down to pre hypertensive stage following the protocol. 4 patients who did not comply with the protocol had episodes of bleeding in the post operative period. There were two special scenarios where additional precautions had to be taken have been discussed. The wound healing was satisfactory in all these patients. The protocol discussed in this article helps us provide safe minor oral surgical treatment in patients with ESRD.

  11. Efficacy and feasibility of frontozygomatic angle approach for extra oral maxillary nerve block in oral surgery: a descriptive clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radder, Kiran; Shah, Ashwin; Fatima, Shereen; Kothari, Chaitanya; Zakaullah, Syed; Siddiqua, Aaisha

    2014-09-01

    Pain control is an integral part of minor oral surgery and maxillary/mandibular nerve blocks have proved promising in achieving the same. Although intra oral techniques of maxillary nerve block are common and are widely used, there are certain inherent disadvantages and potential complications. Less commonly described in the literature, the extra oral techniques have a wide spectrum of indications as well as can be more advantageous than the intra oral approach. This prospective clinical trial is an attempt to evaluate the feasibility and the efficacy of the extra oral frontozygomatic approach to the foramen rotundum to block the maxillary nerve. Sample size was 100 patients and the inclusion criteria were patients of ASA I or II category who needed extraction of a minimum of 4 maxillary teeth in the same quadrant in a single sitting while exclusion criteria were patients with a history of allergy to local anesthesia, medically compromised patients in whom dental extraction was contraindicated. Mean age was 71.9 years and 56 patients were males while 44 were females. Only a single quadrant (first or second) was chosen as the operative site in each patient and local anaesthesia was secured using a 21 gauge 89 mm long spinal needle with frontozygomatic angle approach and the parameters used were pain experienced during the injection, onset of subjective symptoms, time required for the peak effect (objective symptoms), pain during extraction and the duration of anesthesia. All the parameters were expressed as mean values with standard deviations. A successful anesthesia was secured in first attempt in 98 patients while in 2 patients, the procedure had to be repeated owing to the difficulty in reaching the target site. A majority of the patients i.e., 71 % scored 0-2 (no pain) on visual analogue scale (VAS) while only 2 patients experienced a moderate degree of pain. Subjective symptoms were reported in 27.24 s (mean value) and 12.93 s (mean value) in the palate

  12. Effect of oral contraceptive use on reoperation following surgery for Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, L R; Ramcharan, S; Bryant, H; Fick, G

    1992-09-01

    The influence of oral contraceptive (OCP) use as a risk factor for the development of Crohn's disease is disputed. We wished to determine if OCP use affected the risk of recurrence (defined as need for a second surgery) in women who had already undergone a resection for Crohn's disease. We hypothesized that if contraceptive use was a risk factor for disease development, it could influence recurrence. Using a mail questionnaire, we surveyed 138 women regarding their OCP use following surgery for Crohn's disease. All participants were between ages 16 and 35 at the time of their initial surgery which occurred between 1966 and 1984. Ninety-seven women (70%) responded. Mean follow-up was 9.9 years (range 4-27). Forty-six women required a second surgery. The recurrence rate as determined by actuarial analysis, was 27.2% (95% confidence intervals (CI95 16.5-38.1) and 58.0% (CI95 37.8-78.2) at 5 and 10 years, respectively. Thirty-two women took OCP in the first year following surgery. Eleven OCP users (34.4%) required additional surgery compared to 34 (53.1%) of nonusers. Using life table analysis, the percentage requiring a second surgery was 25.0% (CI95 6.9-43.1) and 40.7% (CI95 1.5-80%) at 5 and 10 years, respectively, for users compared to 28.4% (CI95 6.9-43.1) and 64.0% (CI95 40.5-87.5) for nonusers (Lee Desu, P greater than 0.05). When surveyed about their reasons for using OCP, most women stated that their disease did not affect their decision to use contraceptives.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Social demand for oral surgery in third age patients and its association with systemic pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-González, José-María; Martín-López, Félix; Barona-Dorado, Cristina; Martínez-Rodríguez, Natalia; Calvo-Guirado, Jose-Luis

    2010-11-01

    To determine the frequency of systemic pathologies in patients aged 65 years or more, who require oral care and possibly oral surgery. We carried out a cross-sectional descriptive study reviewing 3,388 medical histories for patients from the Department of Medicine and Oral Surgery of the School of Dentistry at the Complutense University of Madrid, who had requested surgical treatment. Those selected were at least 65 years of age or more, and were grouped according to their medical histories into categories of pathologies, which include: systemic, cardiovascular, digestive, respiratory, endocrine-metabolic, genitourinary, osteoarticular, nervous system and the sensory organs. Patients over the age of 65 most commonly present cardiovascular and digestive pathologies, which represent values of 30.8% and 13.75%, respectively. The rest of the systemic pathologies analyzed were categorized according to frequency, as follows: endocrino-metabolic pathologies 6.66%, respiratory pathologies 6.25%, genitourinary pathologies 3.75%, osteoarticular pathologies 2.91%, and pathologies of the nervous system and sensory organs 2.08%. The demand for surgical treatments by third age patients was relatively low, representing 2.18%. However, the presence of systemic pathologies was constant, and therefore, the anamnesis and patient medical history are fundamental for any surgical treatment.

  14. Incidence and types of complications after ablative oral cancer surgery with primary microvascular free flap reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodders, Johannes N; Parmar, Satyesh; Stienen, Niki L M; Martin, Timothy J; Karagozoglu, K Hakki; Heymans, Martijn W; Nandra, Baljeet; Forouzanfar, Tymour

    2015-11-01

    The aims of the study were 1) to evaluate the incidence and types of postoperative complications after ablative oral cancer surgery with primary free flap reconstruction and 2) identify prognostic variables for postoperative complications. Desired data was retrieved from a computer database at the department of Oral and Maxillofacial Department, Queen Elisabeth hospital Birmingham, United Kingdom, between June 2007 and October 2012. Logistic regression was used to study relationships between preoperative variables and postoperative outcomes. The study population consisted 184 patients, comprising 189 composite resections with reconstruction. Complications developed in 40.2% of the patients. Three patients (1.6%) died, 11.1% returned to the operating room, 5.3% developed donor site complications and 6.9% flap complications of which 3.2% total flap failure. In the multivariable analysis systemic complications were associated with anaesthesia time and hospital stay with red cell transfusion. A significant proportion of the patients with primary free flap reconstructions after oral cancer surgery develops postoperative complications. Prolonged anaesthesia time and red cell transfusion are possible predictors for systemic complications and hospital stay respectively. Preoperative screening for risk factors is advocated for patient selection and to have realistic information and expectations.

  15. Combination of Oral Antibiotics and Mechanical Bowel Preparation Reduces Surgical Site Infection in Colorectal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohman, Kerri A; Wan, Leping; Guthrie, Tracey; Johnston, Bonnie; Leinicke, Jennifer A; Glasgow, Sean C; Hunt, Steven R; Mutch, Matthew G; Wise, Paul E; Silviera, Matthew L

    2017-10-01

    Surgical site infections (SSI) are a common complication after colorectal surgery. An infection prevention bundle (IPB) was implemented to improve outcomes. A standardized IPB that included the administration of oral antibiotics with a mechanical bowel preparation, preoperative shower with chlorhexidine, hair removal and skin preparation in holding, antibiotic wound irrigation, and a "clean-closure" protocol was implemented in January 2013. Data from the American College of Surgeons NSQIP were analyzed at a single academic institution to compare pre-IPB and post-IPB SSI rates. In January 2014, a prospective database was implemented to determine compliance with individual IPB elements and their effect on outcomes. For the 24 months pre-IPB, the overall SSI rate was 19.7%. During the 30 months after IPB implementation, the SSI rate decreased to 8.2% (p preparation (4.4% vs 14.3%; p = 0.008). Patients who received a full bowel preparation of both oral antibiotics and a mechanical bowel preparation had a 2.7% SSI rate compared with 15.8% for all others (p preparation was independently associated with significantly fewer SSI (adjusted odds ratio 0.2; 95% CI 0.1 to 0.9; p = 0.006). Implementation of an IPB was successful in decreasing SSI rates in colorectal surgery patients. The combination of oral antibiotics with a mechanical bowel preparation was the strongest predictor of decreased SSI. Copyright © 2017 American College of Surgeons. All rights reserved.

  16. Free-flap failures and complications in an American oral and maxillofacial surgery unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, A R; McClure, S A; Ord, R A; Pazoki, A E

    2009-10-01

    Free tissue transfer is a reliable surgical technique that enables primary reconstruction following ablative surgery. Widely practised in many European units, acceptance into mainstream oral and maxillofacial surgery in the USA has been slow. The authors reviewed free flap practice patterns and outcomes in a US oral and maxillofacial surgery training program with specific emphasis on failures and complications to illustrate obstacles encountered during the initial phase of practice implementation. The demographic and clinical data of 71 consecutive patients who underwent microvascular reconstruction over 3 years (2002-2005) were reviewed. The study group included 48 males and 23 females who underwent 72 free tissue transfer procedures. Fourteen patients required operative exploration in the perioperative period. Six patients were explored for clinically compromised flaps. Thrombotic events occurred in 4 patients; 1 flap was successfully salvaged. There were 4 flap failures and 9 complications related to the donor site. Two perioperative deaths occurred from non-flap-related complications. Prolonged hospital stay and ICU utilization was observed in patients with surgical complications. Complications in this study did not affect the overall success rates of free-flaps. Salvage rates from thrombotic events were unaffected despite rigid flap monitoring protocols.

  17. Oral magnesium supplementation reduces the incidence of gastrointestinal complications following cardiac surgery: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradian, Seyed Tayeb; Ghiasi, Mohammad Saeid; Mohamadpour, Alireza; Siavash, Yadollah

    2017-02-01

    Gastrointestinal complications are common after coronary artery bypass graft surgery. These complications are ranged from nausea and vomiting to mesenteric ischemia and liver failure. It seems that nausea, vomiting, and constipation are related to magnesium deficiency. This study was designed to examine the effect of oral magnesium supplementation on the incidence of gastrointestinal complications in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. In a single blinded randomized clinical trial, 102 patients who were undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery were randomly allocated into two groups, 52 patients in the intervention and 50 patients in control group. Patients in the experimental group received 800 milligram magnesium oxide (2 tablets each of them containing 240 mg elemental magnesium) daily from the admission to discharge from hospital. The incidence of post-operative nausea and vomiting, constipation, and atrial fibrillation was compared between the groups. Our results showed that postoperative hypomagnesemia is present in 41.20 and 70.80 percent of the patients in the intervention and control group patients, respectively. The overall incidence of constipation was 62%. Patients who received magnesium supplementation experienced less atrial fibrillation, nausea, vomiting, and constipation. Our data showed that oral magnesium supplementation could reduce the postoperative complications. Despite the better status in the intervention group, the hypomagnesemia was present in many of intervention group patients. It seems that supplementation with higher doses is needed.

  18. Risks and benefits of pre-operative dexmedetomidine in oral and maxillofacial surgeries: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoudi, Amin; Movahedian Attar, Bijan; Shadmehr, Elham

    2017-06-01

    Oral and maxillofacial surgeries might induce anxiety and pain to the patients. Sedative agents are one of the best ways for eliminating such consequences. Dexmedetomidine (DEX) is a recent sedative agent which presents higher sedative quality with greater specificity than other drugs. The aim of present paper is to evaluate the risks and benefits of administrating DEX during oral and maxillofacial surgeries by reviewing high quality released articles. Areas covered: Searches on PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science databases were completed with focus on randomized controlled trials (RCT). Related articles, from 2000 to 2015, were selected based on inclusion criteria and quality assessments factors. Full texts of the selected articles were screened and their significant information were gathered for judgments. Expert opinion: 17 RCTs on a total of 765 patients were screened. Some of the difficulties during reviewing the articles were: different pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics of drugs when combined with DEX, different time spots and method of monitoring, including studies on both minor and major surgeries for better data collection. Recent researches are going to focus on application of DEX for in-office procedures because of its desirable properties. Nevertheless, the analgesic and amnesic features of DEX are still questionable.

  19. Optical Nerve Detection by Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy for Feedback Controlled Oral and Maxillofacial Laser Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Laser surgery lacks haptic feedback, which is accompanied by the risk of iatrogenic nerve damage. It was the aim of this study to investigate diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for tissue differentiation as the base of a feedback control system to enhance nerve preservation in oral and maxillofacial laser surgery. Methods Diffuse reflectance spectra of nerve tissue, salivary gland and bone (8640 spectra) of the mid-facial region of ex vivo domestic pigs were acquired in the wavelength range of 350-650 nm. Tissue differentiation was performed using principal component (PC) analysis followed by linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Specificity and sensitivity were calculated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and the area under curve (AUC). Results Five PCs were found to be adequate for tissue differentiation with diffuse reflectance spectra using LDA. Nerve tissue could be differed from bone as well as from salivary gland with AUC results of greater than 88%, sensitivity of greater than 83% and specificity in excess of 78%. Conclusions Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy is an adequate technique for nerve identification in the vicinity of bone and salivary gland. The results set the basis for a feedback system to prevent iatrogenic nerve damage when performing oral and maxillofacial laser surgery. PMID:21310023

  20. Swallowing Disorders after Oral Cavity and Pharyngolaryngeal Surgery and Role of Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Giannitto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma is the sixth most common cancer diagnosed worldwide and the eighth most common cause of cancer death. Malignant tumors of the oral cavity, oropharynx, and larynx can be treated by surgical resection or radiotheraphy with or without chemotheraphy and have a profound impact on quality of life functions, including swallowing. When surgery is the chosen treatment modality, the patient may experience swallowing impairment in the oral and pharyngeal phases of deglutition. A videofluoroscopic study of swallow enables the morphodynamics of the pharyngeal-esophageal tract to be accurately examined in patients with prior surgery. These features allow an accurate tracking of the various phases of swallowing in real time, identifying the presence of functional disorders and of complications during the short- and long-term postoperative recovery. The role of imaging is fundamental for the therapist to plan rehabilitation. In this paper, the authors aim to describe the videofluoroscopic study of swallow protocol and related swallowing impairment findings in consideration of different types of surgery.

  1. Optical nerve detection by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for feedback controlled oral and maxillofacial laser surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelzle, Florian; Zam, Azhar; Adler, Werner; Tangermann-Gerk, Katja; Douplik, Alexandre; Nkenke, Emeka; Schmidt, Michael

    2011-02-10

    Laser surgery lacks haptic feedback, which is accompanied by the risk of iatrogenic nerve damage. It was the aim of this study to investigate diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for tissue differentiation as the base of a feedback control system to enhance nerve preservation in oral and maxillofacial laser surgery. Diffuse reflectance spectra of nerve tissue, salivary gland and bone (8640 spectra) of the mid-facial region of ex vivo domestic pigs were acquired in the wavelength range of 350-650 nm. Tissue differentiation was performed using principal component (PC) analysis followed by linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Specificity and sensitivity were calculated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and the area under curve (AUC). Five PCs were found to be adequate for tissue differentiation with diffuse reflectance spectra using LDA. Nerve tissue could be differed from bone as well as from salivary gland with AUC results of greater than 88%, sensitivity of greater than 83% and specificity in excess of 78%. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy is an adequate technique for nerve identification in the vicinity of bone and salivary gland. The results set the basis for a feedback system to prevent iatrogenic nerve damage when performing oral and maxillofacial laser surgery.

  2. Corticosteroid administration in oral and orthognathic surgery: a systematic review of the literature and meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dan, Anne E B; Thygesen, Torben H; Pinholt, Else M

    2010-01-01

    was made. The primary predictor variable was CS administration and the outcome variables were edema, pain, and infection. A meta-analysis was performed. The risk of other side effects was evaluated through a simple review. RESULTS: In oral surgery, most clinical trials showed a significant decrease...... toward a neuroregeneration effect, but no statistical analysis could be performed. Regarding the risk of other side effects, in oral surgery, a minimal risk of chronic adrenal suppression was seen; in orthognathic surgery, an elevated risk of avascular osteonecrosis, steroid-induced psychosis......, and adrenal suppression was seen. There were no reports of decreased healing. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that the administration of CS in oral surgery decreases edema and pain significantly, with no higher risk of infection and with a minimum risk of other side effects....

  3. Knowledge, attitude and awareness of speciality of oral and maxillofacial surgery amongst medical consultants of vadodara district in gujarat state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Navin; Patel, Nameeta; Mahajan, Amit; Shah, Rishabh

    2015-03-01

    Aim of this study was to survey the knowledge, attitude and awareness of the subject of oral and maxillofacial surgery speciality amongst the consultants and practitioners of medicine in district of Vadodara. List of members of various specialities in medical faculty were obtained from Indian Medical Association, Baroda branch and staff members of medical colleges of Vadodara district. A questionnaire survey was made which was distributed and their options were noted. Surgical removal of third molar, oral submucous fibrosis and implants were the problems where oral surgeons were preferred. For maxillofacial trauma plastic surgeons and orthopaedic surgeons were preferred than oral surgeons. For maxillofacial pathology E.N.T surgeons were mostly preferred. There is low awareness regarding oral and maxillofacial surgery amongst the general practitioners and medical consultants in Vadodara district. Survey shows that our training needs to be upgraded and revamped so that our trainees (post graduates in oral surgery) and have a greater "hands-on" exposure during their postgraduate training. They will then be able to handle increasingly complex cases in a multispecialty setup when they graduate and earn the mutual respect of the medical and dental fraternity and also the general public. MBBS students during their dental postings should be made aware of the depth and scope of oral surgery branch.

  4. [Quality of oral surgery and patients' satisfaction in state and municipal clinics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayalov, R M; Abakarov, S I; Grinin, V M

    The aim of the multicenter study was to assess quality of oral surgical procedures and patients' satisfaction in state and municipal clinics in different regions of Russian Federation. A questionnaire survey was conducted in 3 regions of Russian Federation: European (Moscow, Tula, Tambov, Kaluga, Volgograd), North (Saint-Petersburg, Novgorod, Tver) and South (Armavir, Derbent, Kaspiysk, Kislovodsk, Makhachkala, Pyatigorsk, Rostov, Sochi, Stavropol). Sixty-six males and 34 females undergoing surgical dental treatment in public and municipal dental clinics (total number - 100 patients) at the age of 20 to 70 years (an average age was 36,3 and 39.5, respectively) were included in the study. Comparative analysis of patients' satisfaction rates in relation with expert evaluated quality of oral surgery is presented.

  5. Reputation of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery in the UK: the patients' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Serriah, M; Dhariwal, D; Martin, G

    2015-04-01

    Our intention is to shed theoretical and practical light on the professional reputation of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (OMFS) in the UK by drawing on theories from management literature, particularly concerning reputation. Since professional reputation is socially constructed by stakeholders, we used interpretivist methods to conduct a qualitative study of patients (stakeholders) to gain an insight into their view of the profession. Findings from our focus groups highlighted the importance of "soft-wired skills" and showed a perception - reality gap in the interaction between patients and doctors. They also highlighted the importance of consistency, relational coordination, mechanisms to enable transparent feedback, and professional processes of governance. To help understand how best to manage the reputation of the specialty, we also explored how this is affected by the media and the Internet. Copyright © 2015 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Tissue engineering technology and its possible applications in oral and maxillofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Karl F B; Balasundaram, Indran; Deb, Sanjukta; Di Silvio, Lucy; Fan, Kathleen F M

    2014-01-01

    Tissue engineering is a rapidly advancing discipline that combines the attributes of biochemical and biomaterial engineering with cell transplantation to create bio-artificial tissues and organs. For the oral and maxillofacial surgeon, the reconstruction of maxillofacial defects in hard and soft tissues is an ongoing challenge. While autologous grafts and vascularised free flaps are the current gold standard, they are not without complications at both the donor and reconstructed sites. Tissue engineering, which aims to create tissue-matched, prefabricated, prevascularised bony or soft tissue composite grafts, or both, therefore has the potential to revolutionise practice in maxillofacial surgery. We review the technology of tissue engineering and its current and future applications within the specialty, and discuss contemporary obstacles yet to be overcome. Copyright © 2013 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Tape recorded hypnosis in oral and maxillofacial surgery--basics and first clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermes, Dirk; Truebger, Daniel; Hakim, Samer George; Sieg, Peter

    2005-04-01

    Surgical treatment of diseases of the oral and maxillofacial region under local anaesthesia is quite commonly restricted by limited patient compliance. 'Medical Hypnosis' could be an alternative to treatment under pharmacological sedation. With this method, both autosuggestive and other suggestive procedures are used for anxiolysis, relaxation, sedation and analgesia of the patient. The purpose of this paper was to see whether there could be any potential for this treatment when operating on oral and maxillofacial patients. During a 1-year-trial period, 209 operations under combined local anaesthesia/medical hypnosis were carried out on 174 non-preselected patients between the ages of 13 and 87 years. The surgical range covered oral, plastic and reconstructive, oncological, septic and trauma operations. Medical hypnosis turned out to be a reliable and standardizable method with high patient compliance. Remarkable improvements in treatment conditions for both patient and surgeons were achieved in 93% of cases. Controlled clinical studies are now necessary to obtain objective data on the effectiveness of hypnosis-induced intraoperative effects in oral and maxillofacial surgery.

  8. Knowledge and Awareness of Medical Practitioners of Jazan City towards Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery as a Specialty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Fareedi Mukram; Al-Iryani, Ghassan M; Namis, Sultan Mohammed; Hezam, Asma Ali; Swaid, Salma Abdu; Alomar, Anas Esam

    2018-03-15

    In many health services communities the scope of oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMFS) as a discipline is frequently not probably understood. Good awareness towards OMFS among different branches of health services providers is essential for better referral strategies and will be for the benefit of the patient. The cross-sectional study was done using a specially prepared questionnaire distributed randomly to 125 general medical practitioners working in Jazan province. In this questionnaire, there were also some close-ended questions to evaluate awareness regarding a variety of conditions treated by the oral and maxillofacial surgeons. Out of 125 participants, 105 (84%) were aware of the oral and maxillofacial surgery as a speciality branch of dentistry. Only 52 (41.6%) participants were aware of the different treatment modalities coming under the scope of oral and maxillofacial surgery. Also in the referral of cases to the oral and maxillofacial surgeon, 50 (40%) participants referred their oral and maxillofacial region cases to OMS. Tooth removal was the only procedure where most of the medical practitioners knew it is a speciality procedure of the oral and maxillofacial surgeon. For facial fractures, 76 medical practitioners believe it comes under the scope of the orthopaedic surgeon. Similarly, for facial abscesses, 81 and 36 practitioners responded that it is a job of a general surgeon and OMS respectively. There is low awareness toward the scope of oral and maxillofacial surgery in the medical community. Knowledge and awareness of the scope of oral and maxillofacial surgery can improve the success and promptness of delivery of health services.

  9. Applying aviation factors to oral and maxillofacial surgery--the human element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seager, Leonie; Smith, Dave W; Patel, Anish; Brunt, Howard; Brennan, Peter A

    2013-01-01

    There are many similarities between flying commercial aircraft and surgery, particularly in relation to minimising risk, and managing potentially fatal or catastrophic complications, or both. Since 1979, the development of Crew Resource Management (CRM) has improved air safety significantly by reducing human factors that are responsible for error. Similar developments in the operating theatre have, to a certain extent, lagged behind aviation, and it is well recognised that we can learn much from the industry. An increasing number of publications on aviation factors relate to surgery but to our knowledge there is a lack of research in our own specialty. We discuss how aviation principles related to human factors can be translated to the operating theatre to improve teamwork and safety for patients. Clinical research is clearly needed to develop this fascinating area more fully. Copyright © 2011 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Therapeutic decision making and planning in veterinary dentistry and oral surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, John R

    2013-05-01

    Veterinary dentistry is an exacting science, in which decisions are made not only for an individual patient, but also for individual teeth, which may vary in severity of disease. Multiple therapeutic decisions and treatment plans may be necessary for a single patient. Veterinary dental patients must be anesthetized to receive thorough treatment, which results in additional decisions that may not be necessary for human dental patients. This article discusses considerations and approaches toward therapeutic decision making and treatment planning in veterinary dentistry and oral surgery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. 3D printed optical phantoms and deep tissue imaging for in vivo applications including oral surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentz, Brian Z.; Costas, Alfonso; Gaind, Vaibhav; Garcia, Jose M.; Webb, Kevin J.

    2017-03-01

    Progress in developing optical imaging for biomedical applications requires customizable and often complex objects known as "phantoms" for testing, evaluation, and calibration. This work demonstrates that 3D printing is an ideal method for fabricating such objects, allowing intricate inhomogeneities to be placed at exact locations in complex or anatomically realistic geometries, a process that is difficult or impossible using molds. We show printed mouse phantoms we have fabricated for developing deep tissue fluorescence imaging methods, and measurements of both their optical and mechanical properties. Additionally, we present a printed phantom of the human mouth that we use to develop an artery localization method to assist in oral surgery.

  12. African Americans in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery: Factors Affecting Career Choice, Satisfaction, and Practice Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criddle, Thalia-Rae; Gordon, Newton C; Blakey, George; Bell, R Bryan

    2017-12-01

    There are few data available on the experience of minority surgeons in the field of oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMS). Therefore, the purpose of this study was to 1) explore factors that contribute to African Americans choosing OMS as a career, 2) examine satisfaction among minority oral and maxillofacial surgeons with the residency application and training process, 3) report on practice patterns among minority oral and maxillofacial surgeons, and 4) identify perceived bias for or against minority oral and maxillofacial surgeons in an attempt to aid the efforts of OMS residency organizations to foster diversity. A 19-item survey was sent to 80 OMS practitioners by use of information from the mailing list of the National Society of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, an American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons-affiliated organization. All surveys were sent by mail and were followed by a reminder mailing after 8 weeks. Responses returned within 16 weeks were accepted for analysis. Of the 80 mailed surveys, 41 were returned within the 16-week parameter, representing a return rate of 51%. Most of the minority surgeon respondents were married men with a mean age of 60 years who worked as private practitioners. Most respondents practiced on the eastern and western coasts of the United States. Exposure in dental school was the most important factor in selecting OMS as a specialty. Location and prestige were the most important factors in selecting a residency program. Most respondents reported that race did not affect the success of their application to a residency program and did not currently affect the success of their practice. However, 25 to 46% of participants experienced race-related harassment, and 48 to 55% of participants believed there was a bias against African Americans in OMS. Our data suggest that a substantial number of minority oral and maxillofacial surgeons subjectively perceive race-based bias in their career, although it does not

  13. Proceedings of the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon's 2017 Clinical and Scientific Innovations in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (CSIOMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cillo, Joseph E; Aghaloo, Tara; Basi, David; Bouloux, Gary F; Campbell, Joshua A; Chou, Joli; Dodson, Thomas; Edwards, Sean P; Kademani, Deepak; Peacock, Zachary

    2018-02-01

    The sixth biennial Clinical and Scientific Innovations in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, formerly the Research Summit, of the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons and its Committee on Research Planning and Technology Assessment was held in Rosemont, Illinois from April 28 to 30, 2017. The goal of the symposium is to provide a forum for the latest clinical and scientific advances to be brought to the specialty. It also nurtures collaboration and the development of relationships between oral and maxillofacial surgeons and researchers to bridge the gap between clinical and basic science. The goal is to improve the care of oral and maxillofacial surgical patients through the advancement of translational and clinical research. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. COMPLICATIONS OF ORAL AND MAXILLOFACIAL SURGERY UNDER GENERAL ANESTHESIA IN TUBE-FED CHILDREN: A RETROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Trang D; Freilich, Marshall M; Macpherson, Bruce A

    2016-06-01

    To assess morbidity and mortality associated with oral and maxillofacial surgery procedures requiring general anesthesia among children with aspiration tendency requiring enteral feeding. A retrospective chart review was conducted of children surgically treated under general anesthesia by the oral and maxillofacial surgery service at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Canada. Medical and dental records over a 9-year period (January 1, 2000 to January 1, 2010) were reviewed. Data were collected on demographics, primary illness, coexisting medical conditions, procedures performed, medications administered, type of airway management used, duration of general anesthesia, American Society of Anesthesiologists' physical status classification and adverse events. During the period reviewed, 28 children underwent 35 oral and maxillofacial surgery procedures under general anesthesia. The mean patient age was 12 years (range 4-17 years). No deaths occurred. Of the 35 surgeries, 10 (29%) were associated with at least 1adverse event. Adverse events included 1incident of respiratory distress, 2incidents of fever, 5incidents of bleeding, 1incident of seizure and 4incidents of oxygen saturation below 90% for more than 30s. Children with a history of aspiration tendency that necessitates enteral feeding, who undergo oral and maxillofacial surgery under general anesthesia, are at increased risk of morbidity. Before initiating treatment, the surgeon and parents or guardians of such children should carefully consider these risks compared with the anticipated benefit of surgery.

  15. [Perioperative management of direct oral anticoagulant in emergency surgery and bleeding. Haemostasis monitoring and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, F; Gómez-Luque, A; Ferrandis, R; Llau, J V; de Andrés, J; Gomar, C; Sierra, P; Castillo, J; Torres, L M

    2015-10-01

    There is an almost unanimous consensus on the management of the direct new oral anticoagulants, dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban in elective surgery. However, this general consensus does not exist in relation with the direct new oral anticoagulants use in emergency surgery, especially in the bleeding patient. For this reason, a literature review was performed using the MEDLINE-PubMed. An analysis was made of the journal articles, reviews, systematic reviews, and practices guidelines published between 2000 and 2014 using the terms "monitoring" and "reversal". From this review, it was shown that the routine tests of blood coagulation, such as the prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time, have a limited efficacy in the perioperative control of blood coagulation in these patients. There is currently no antidote to reverse the effects of these drugs, although the possibility of using concentrated prothrombin complex and recombinant activated factor vii has been suggested for the urgent reversal of the anticoagulant effect. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. A randomized controlled trial evaluating early versus traditional oral feeding after colorectal surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Dag

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This prospective randomized clinical study was conducted to evaluate the safety and tolerability of early oral feeding after colorectal operations. METHODS: A total of 199 patients underwent colorectal surgery and were randomly assigned to early feeding (n = 99 or a regular diet (n = 100. Patients’ characteristics, diagnoses, surgical procedures, comorbidity, bowel movements, defecation, nasogastric tube reinsertion, time of tolerance of solid diet, complications, and length of hospitalization were assessed. RESULTS: The two groups were similar in terms of gender, age, diagnosis, surgical procedures, and comorbidity. In the early feeding group, 85.9% of patients tolerated the early feeding schedule. Bowel movements (1.7±0.89 vs. 3.27±1.3, defecation (3.4±0.77 vs. 4.38±1.18 and time of tolerance of solid diet (2.48±0.85 vs. 4.77±1.81 were significantly earlier in the early feeding group. There was no change between the groups in terms of nasogastric tube reinsertion, overall complication or anastomotic leakage. Hospitalization (5.55±2.35 vs. 9.0±6.5 was shorter in the early feeding group. CONCLUSIONS: The present study indicated that early oral feeding after elective colorectal surgery was not only well tolerated by patients but also affected the postoperative outcomes positively. Early postoperative feeding is safe and leads to the early recovery of gastrointestinal functions.

  17. [Contribution of platelet concentrates to oral and maxillo-facial surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettega, G; Schir, E

    2012-09-01

    We evaluated the clinical contribution of platelet concentrates to oral and maxillo-facial surgery. This bibliographic research was made using the PubMed MeSH database with the following keywords: "platelet rich fibrin" (PRF), "platelet rich plasma" (PRP), "bone", "facial bone", "dental implant", and "blood platelet". The research was made without any date or language limitation since English summaries were available. All summaries were read to evaluate the relevance of the article. Only original articles and case reports were considered. The articles were classified as "in vitro studies", "animal experiments", or "clinical studies". The research was stopped on March 22, 2012. One hundred and sixty-nine articles were validated after excluding irrelevant articles, reviews, technical notes, and articles without English or French summaries. Seventeen were in vitro studies, 61 animal experiments, and 91 clinical studies. One hundred and ten complete articles were read to complete summary data. The data of in vitro studies univocally supports of using platelet concentrates. The data from animal experiment studies was less consensual and the validity of animal models was contested. The disparity of clinical study designs and the lack of rigorous methodology did not allow clearly determining platelet concentrate benefits for oral and maxillo-facial surgery. PRF or PRP clinical benefit has not been clearly demonstrated yet. French regulations relative to their use should be clarified. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  18. Open Access Publishing: A Study of Current Practice in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahim, Arpan; Bansal, Hitesh; Goodson, Alexander M C; Payne, Karl F B; Sabharwal, Sanjeeve

    2016-12-01

    Open access (OA) publication has become an increasingly common route for dissemination of scientific research findings. However, it remains a contentious issue with continued debate as to its impact on the peer-review process and a potential change in the quality of subsequent evidence published. There is little research that looks into OA in oral and maxillofacial surgery. We investigated the OA policy in the 30 relevant journals listed in the Institute for Scientific Information Web of Knowledge journal citation report, comparing bibliometric data and quality of evidence produced in journals offering OA and those with subscription-only policies. 3474 articles were graded for evidence level and the results correlated to journal OA status. 76.7 % of journals offered authors OA services. There was no difference between impact factor, self-citation rate, total citations or quality of evidence between OA and subscription journals. These findings should send clear messages to both clinicians and researchers and should re- assure readers that scientific findings that are disseminated in open access form do not differ in quality to those in subscription-only format. It should reinforce that open access formats are a credible way to display research findings in oral and maxillofacial surgery.

  19. Complications and mortality following surgery for oral cavity cancer: analysis of 408 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwam, Zachary G; Sosa, Julie A; Roman, Sanziana; Judson, Benjamin L

    2015-08-01

    To analyze the postoperative complications and mortality for oral cavity cancers, their time course, and to identify modifiable risk factors associated with their occurrence. Retrospective cohort study. Patients undergoing surgery for oral cavity cancer were identified in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Participant Use Data File (2005-2010). Overall and disease-specific complication and mortality data were analyzed using chi-square and multivariate regression analysis. There were 408 cases identified. The overall 30-day complication and mortality rates were 20.3% and 1.0%, respectively. The most common adverse events were reoperation (9.6%), infectious (6.6%), and respiratory (5.1%) complications. Twenty patients (4.9%) experienced postdischarge complications. Fifty-two percent of postdischarge wound dehiscences and 67% of postdischarge surgical-site infections occurred by postdischarge day 7, and 91% of all postdischarge complications occurred by postdischarge day 14. Smoking was independently associated with respiratory (odds ratio [OR] 3.59, P = .008) and surgical site complications (OR 5.13, P =.004). Neck dissection was independently associated with respiratory (OR 6.17, P = .001), surgical site (OR 6.30, P = .003), and infectious (OR 3.83, P = .003) complications. Current smokers and those undergoing neck dissection are at high risk of postoperative complications after oral cavity cancer surgery. Less than 5% of patients experienced postdischarge complications, nearly all of which occurred by postdischarge day 14. Most early postdischarge complications occurred at the surgical site. In order to mitigate postdischarge complications and their sequelae, early clinical follow-up should be sought for high-risk patients. 4. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  20. Assessment of pre and postoperative anxiety in patients undergoing ambulatory oral surgery in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Gilabert, E; Luque-Romero, L-G; Bejarano-Avila, G; Garcia-Palma, A; Rollon-Mayordomo, A; Infante-Cossio, P

    2017-11-01

    To analyze the pre- and postoperative anxiety level in patients undergoing ambulatory oral surgery (AOS) in a primary healthcare center (PHC). Prospective and descriptive clinical study on 45 patients who underwent AOS procedures in the dental clinic of a public PHC of Spain between April and September 2015. Anxiety analysis was carried out with pre- and postoperative anxiety-state (STAI-S), anxiety-trait (STAI-T) and dental anxiety (MDAS) questionnaires. A descriptive, inferential and binary logistic regression analysis were performed for the variables age, sex, educational level, previous experience of oral treatment, type of oral surgery, degree of third molar impaction, surgical time, intraoperative complications, postoperative complications, and pain score with a visual analogue scale (VAS). The majority were female (57.8%) with a mean age of 33.5±9.6 years. The most frequent procedure was the lower third molar removal (82.2%). The mean pain score on the VAS was 1.6±1.8. The incidence of complications was low (7.8%). There was a statistically significant association between post- and preoperative anxiety (r=0.56, p<0.001) and a correlation between pain score and postoperative anxiety (Rho= -0.35, p=0.02). The likelihood of postoperative anxiety was related to preoperative anxiety (OR=1.3, p=0.03). AOS in a PHC is safe and should be more encouraged in the public primary care. The emotional impact on users was relatively low, highlighting that the preoperative anxiety levels were higher than the postoperative ones. Psychological factors related to pre- and postoperative anxiety should be considered in the AOS carried out in PC.

  1. Portfolio: a comprehensive method of assessment for postgraduates in oral and maxillofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadagad, Poornima; Kotrashetti, S M

    2013-03-01

    Post graduate learning and assessment is an important responsibility of an academic oral and maxillofacial surgeon. The current method of assessment for post graduate training include formative evaluation in the form of seminars, case presentations, log books and infrequently conducted end of year theory exams. End of the course theory and practical examination is a summative evaluation which awards the degree to the student based on grades obtained. Oral and maxillofacial surgery is mainly a skill based specialty and deliberate practice enhances skill. But the traditional system of assessment of post graduates emphasizes their performance on the summative exam which fails to evaluate the integral picture of the student throughout the course. Emphasis on competency and holistic growth of the post graduate student during training in recent years has lead to research and evaluation of assessment methods to quantify students' progress during training. Portfolio method of assessment has been proposed as a potentially functional method for post graduate evaluation. It is defined as a collection of papers and other forms of evidence that learning has taken place. It allows the collation and integration of evidence on competence and performance from different sources to gain a comprehensive picture of everyday practice. The benefits of portfolio assessment in health professions education are twofold: it's potential to assess performance and its potential to assess outcomes, such as attitudes and professionalism that are difficult to assess using traditional instruments. This paper is an endeavor for the development of portfolio method of assessment for post graduate student in oral and maxillofacial surgery.

  2. Dental student perceptions of oral and maxillofacial surgery as a specialty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarosz, Krystian F; Ziccardi, Vincent B; Aziz, Shahid R; Sue-Jiang, Shuying

    2013-05-01

    The specialty of oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMS) encompasses the diagnosis and surgical management of a variety of pathologic, functional, and esthetic conditions of the oral and maxillofacial region. Despite the specialty's prominent role in the field of dentistry, a lack of complete understanding still remains among dental and medical health professionals as to the exact scope and expertise of the oral and maxillofacial surgeon. The present study aimed to analyze a population of dental students' perceptions of OMS as a specialty with respect to treatment rendered, referral patterns, and a general opinion of the specialty as a whole. A survey consisting of 10 multiple-choice questions was compiled and distributed to dental students through an on-line polling service (SurveyMonkey). A total of 5 dental student classes at a single dental school were polled using school-based electronic mail, including the graduating seniors. All answers were kept confidential, and no individual students were identified. The students were not able to retake the survey once completed. The final tallies of the survey results were compiled and submitted for statistical analysis. Statistically significant associations between the year of dental education and student perceptions of OMS were determined. As dental students progress through their undergraduate studies, their perceptions change with regard to the referral of dental implants. Periodontists were found to have statistically significantly greater rates of referral than oral and maxillofacial surgeons from dental students in the fourth year and recent graduates compared with younger dental students from the first, second, and third years for placement of dental implants. Statistically insignificant in terms of a changing dental student perception was the finding that third molar removal was within the domain of the oral and maxillofacial surgeon, as well as the management of cleft lip and palate deformities and mandibular

  3. Chilean patients' perception of oral health-related quality of life after third molar surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravena, Pedro Christian; Delgado, Felipe; Olave, Hugo; Ulloa-Marin, Carolina; Perez-Rojas, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    To describe the perception of the quality of life in oral health based on the Health-Related Quality of Life instrument in its Spanish version (HRQOL-sp) in Chilean patients with third molar extraction surgery. A cross-sectional study. The HRQOL-sp was administered to dental patients at the Public Hospital in Rio Bueno in southern Chile treated for unilateral third molar extraction between March and June 2014. The instrument was applied by phone survey on the first, third, fifth, and seventh days after surgery. For the ordinal scale, the response was considered interference in the quality of life when patients selected the options "quite a bit of trouble" or "lots of trouble" for oral function and general activity; and selected complications-related signs and symptoms, a pain level score with a Verbal Rating Scale (range 0 to 7), and worst pain perceived. The patient's sociodemographic data, type of surgery, and the quality of life level were analyzed according to the domains of the HRQOL-sp instrument. A total of 106 patients were selected (age: 20.4±7.39 years; 71.7% women) and a total of 127 extracted third molars. On the first day of follow-up, most patients reported interference in their quality of life. The main problems were difficulty opening the mouth (50.94%) and swelling (83.02%). The worst symptom perceived was "bad breath" (>31%) and the worst pain felt was a mean of 4.31±1.62 on the Verbal Rating Scale. All items gradually reduced until the seventh day. The HRQOL-sp revealed substantial interference in the quality of life on the first postoperative day. It is suggested that the risk factors associated with quality of life be analyzed and the instrument in Spanish be validated.

  4. Management of Antithrombotic Agents in Oral Surgery Maria Martinez and Dimitrios A. Tsakiris *

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Martinez

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Systemic anticoagulation with intravenous or oral anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents is an efficient treatment against thromboembolic or cardiovascular disease. Invasive dental procedures or oral surgery might be associated with bleeding complications if carried out under anticoagulants. Patients on vitamin K antagonists, new direct anticoagulants or antiplatelet agents having dental interventions with low-risk for bleeding do not need interruption of anticoagulation. In case of bleeding complications local hemostatic measures, such as local surgical sutures, fibrin glue, local antifibrinolytic treatment with tranexamic acid, or e-aminocaproic acid suffice to stop bleeding. In patients with high risk of bleeding an individual assessment of the benefit/risk ratio of interrupting anticoagulation should be carried out. Bridging the long-term anticoagulation with short-term anticoagulants should be planned according to national or international guidelines. The introduction of the newer direct oral anticoagulants having more flexible pharmacokinetic properties has facilitated bridging, allowing short-term interruption without increasing the risk of relapsing thrombotic or cardiovascular events.

  5. Accuracy of administrative and clinical registry data in reporting postoperative complications after surgery for oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Mahmoud I; Shuman, Andrew G; Montero, Pablo H; Palmer, Frank L; Shah, Jatin P; Patel, Snehal G

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe and compare how postoperative complications after oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) surgery are reported in medical records, institutional billing claims, and national clinical registries. The medical records of 355 previously untreated patients who underwent surgery for oral cavity SCC at our institution were retrospectively reviewed for postoperative complications. Information was compared with claims and National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) data. We identified 219 patients (62%) experiencing 544 complications (10% major). Billing claims identified 29% of these patients, 36% of overall complications, and 98% of major complications. Of overlapping patients, NSQIP identified 27% of patients, 33% of overall complications, and 100% of major complications noted on chart abstraction. The incidence of minor postoperative complications after oral cavity SCC surgery is relatively high. Both claims data and NSQIP accurately recorded major complications, but were suboptimal compared to chart abstraction in capturing minor complications. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Improvement of nutritional care after colon surgery: the impact of early oral nutrition in the postanesthesia care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grode, Louise Bang; Søgaard, Anette

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of implementing early oral nutritional supplements in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU) after colon surgery. A randomized controlled intervention study. Patients admitted for elective colon surgery were randomly assigned to either a group receiving early oral nutritional supplements (n=24) or traditional treatment with water or lemonade (n=22) in the PACU. On the second postoperative day, patients in the early nutritional supplement group had a higher cumulative intake of energy (P=.019) and protein (P=.015) compared with the traditional treatment. Postoperative nausea and vomiting, pain, length of stay in the PACU, and need of a nasogastric tube did not differ significantly between the groups. The nutritional course for patients undergoing colon surgery can be improved by implementing early oral nutritional supplements in the PACU. Copyright © 2014 American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Emergency correction of coagulation before major surgery in two elderly patients on oral anticoagulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pechlaner Christoph

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recommendations for urgent reversal of oral anticoagulation with vitamin K1 antagonists are largely derived from case series employing empirical dosing regimens with vitamin K1 and prothrombin complex concentrates. Data on the use of prothrombin complex concentrates in this indication are scarce in the elderly who are at high risk of both hemorrhagic and thrombotic complications. The two cases presented here describe patients older than 75 years who underwent rapid International Normalized Ratio (INR reversal with prothrombin complex concentrates for surgical treatment of a bleeding ruptured spleen and for emergency surgery of a dissecting aorta. Both patients had their INRs rapidly corrected to ≤ 1.6 and underwent operation without complications. Evidence on treatment of patients who present with elevated INR and who have major bleeding or need to undergo emergency surgery is based mainly on observational studies. The two elderly patients presented here underwent successful emergency surgery after their INRs had been corrected with the intravenous use of vitamin K1 in combination with prothrombin complex concentrate that was administered according to current guideline recommendations.

  8. Effects of oral contraceptives on the prevalence of alveolar osteitis after mandibular third molar surgery: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, L E; Pierce, S; Klar, K; Sherman, K

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of oral contraceptives on the incidence rate of alveolar osteitis (AO) following the surgical extraction of both impacted mandibular third molars. This retrospective study reviewed the clinical records of patients who presented to the oral surgery clinic of a university school of dentistry for the extraction of impacted mandibular third molars. Using a database search, all patients were categorized by sex, age, occurrence of AO, and whether the females were taking oral contraceptives at the time of surgery. The patient was considered positive for AO if either one or both sockets developed AO. The incidence of AO among women taking oral contraceptives at the time of impacted mandibular third molar extraction differed significantly from that in the other patient groups. AO occurred in 37.9% (11/29) of females taking oral contraceptives, while only 8.9% (16/179) of females who were not taking oral contraceptives at the time of extraction developed AO. The total incidence of AO among females was 13.0% (27/208). The total incidence of AO among the 363 males and females presenting for mandibular third molar extractions was 13.8%. Females who are taking oral contraceptives at the time of impacted mandibular third molar extraction are at a higher risk of developing AO following extraction. Copyright © 2016 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Trends in oral drug bioavailability following bariatric surgery: examining the variable extent of impact on exposure of different drug classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwich, Adam S; Henderson, Kathryn; Burgin, Angela; Ward, Nicola; Whittam, Janet; Ammori, Basil J; Ashcroft, Darren M; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin

    2012-11-01

    Changes to oral drug bioavailability have been observed post bariatric surgery. However, the magnitude and the direction of changes have not been assessed systematically to provide insights into the parameters governing the observed trends. Understanding these can help with dose adjustments. Analysis of drug characteristics based on a biopharmaceutical classification system is not adequate to explain observed trends in altered oral drug bioavailability following bariatric surgery, although the findings suggest solubility to play an important role. To identify the most commonly prescribed drugs in a bariatric surgery population and to assess existing evidence regarding trends in oral drug bioavailability post bariatric surgery. A retrospective audit was undertaken to document commonly prescribed drugs amongst patients undergoing bariatric surgery in an NHS hospital in the UK and to assess practice for drug administration following bariatric surgery. The available literature was examined for trends relating to drug permeability and solubility with regards to the Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) and main route of elimination. No significant difference in the 'post/pre surgery oral drug exposure ratio' (ppR) was apparent between BCS class I to IV drugs, with regards to dose number (Do) or main route of elimination. Drugs classified as 'solubility limited' displayed an overall reduction as compared with 'freely soluble' compounds, as well as an unaltered and increased ppR. Clinical studies establishing guidelines for commonly prescribed drugs, and the monitoring of drugs exhibiting a narrow therapeutic window or without a readily assessed clinical endpoint, are warranted. Using mechanistically based pharmacokinetic modelling for simulating the multivariate nature of changes in drug exposure may serve as a useful tool in the further understanding of postoperative trends in oral drug exposure and in developing practical clinical guidance. © 2012 The Authors

  10. [Application of flexible laryngeal mask airway in oral & maxillofacial day surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Na; Guan, Ming; Li, Xi; Li, Shuai; Wang, En-bo

    2015-12-18

    To access the feasibility and safety of application of flexible laryngeal mask airway (FLMA) in oral & maxillofacial day surgery. Retrospective study was conducted of 40 oral & maxillofacial day surgery patients (3 to 61 years of age) using FLMA under general anaesthesia in Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology. All the patients were with American Society of Anesthesiologists(ASA) physical status I-II,including 19 males and 21 females. The patients'vital signs were recorded at five different time points: baseline before anesthesia (T0), time right after the FLMA insertion (T1), time at incision (T2), 15 min after incision (T3) and time at the end of the operation (T4). The first attempted FLMA insertion successful rate and the number of timed of changing to endotracheal intubation were recorded. During operation, frequencies of movement, hypoxia and obstruction of airway were noted and the operation time, anesthesia time, time from the end of the operation to extubation, movement and coughing following extubation and sore throat within 24 h were taken down. Operation-related complications of bleeding, hematoma and injury of local nerves were recorded within 24 h as well. The operations of all the 40 patients were successfully done under general anaesthesia. The 36(90%, 36/40)patients using FLMA successfully were under steady process, including 16 males and 20 females. The first attempted successful rate of FLMA insertion was 80% (32/40), and the second 50% (4/8). Three out of the 4 failed FLMA patients were changed to endotracheal intubation after the second attempt failed. The other patient was changed to endotracheal intubation before operation because of leak. The average operation time was (46.58 ± 22.57) min, the anesthesia time was (77.97 ± 26.82) min and the time from the end of operation to extubation was (8.31 ± 3.33) min. All the patients were recorded without obvious body movement during the

  11. Outcome following curative-intent surgery for oral melanoma in dogs: 70 cases (1998-2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuohy, Joanne L; Selmic, Laura E; Worley, Deanna R; Ehrhart, Nicole P; Withrow, Stephen J

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the outcome in terms of progression-free interval (PFI) and overall survival time (ST) after curative-intent resection of oral melanoma in dogs. Retrospective case series. 70 client-owned dogs. An electronic medical record search and review was performed for dogs that underwent curative-intent resection of oral melanoma (May 1, 1998, to December 31, 2011). Information gathered included signalment, oral location of tumor, staging results, type of surgery, type of adjuvant therapy, findings on histologic evaluation, and outcome. 36 (51.4%), 16 (22.9%), 13 (18.6%), and 1 (1.4%) of 70 dogs had tumors classified as stage I, II, III, and IV, respectively; tumor stage could not be determined for 4 (5.7%) dogs because of the lack of tumor size information. Fifty-one (72.9%) dogs had tumors completely excised. Twenty-nine (41.4%) dogs received adjuvant therapy. Median PFI and ST were 508 and 723 days, respectively. Thirty-two (45.7%) dogs had disease progression. Significant associations with PFI or ST were found for administration of adjuvant therapy, presence of metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis, higher tumor stage (III or IV), increased tumor size (> 3 cm), and sexually intact female dogs. Administration of adjuvant treatment was associated with a 130% increased hazard (hazard ratio, 2.3; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.0 to 5.0) of disease progression; the presence of metastases at the time of diagnosis was associated with a 281% increased hazard (hazard ratio, 3.8; 95% CI, 1.5 to 9.6) of death. Results indicated that dogs with oral melanoma can have a long PFI and ST after resection with wide margins.

  12. Markerless laser registration in image-guided oral and maxillofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmulla, Rüdiger; Lüth, Tim; Mühling, Joachim; Hassfeld, Stefan

    2004-07-01

    The use of registration markers in computer-assisted surgery is combined with high logistic costs and efforts. Markerless patient registration using laser scan surface registration techniques is a new challenging method. The present study was performed to evaluate the clinical accuracy in finding defined target points within the surgical site after markerless patient registration in image-guided oral and maxillofacial surgery. Twenty consecutive patients with different cranial diseases were scheduled for computer-assisted surgery. Data set alignment between the surgical site and the computed tomography (CT) data set was performed by markerless laser scan surface registration of the patient's face. Intraoral rigidly attached registration markers were used as target points, which had to be detected by an infrared pointer. The Surgical Segment Navigator SSN++ has been used for all procedures. SSN++ is an investigative product based on the SSN system that had previously been developed by the presenting authors with the support of Carl Zeiss (Oberkochen, Germany). SSN++ is connected to a Polaris infrared camera (Northern Digital, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada) and to a Minolta VI 900 3D digitizer (Tokyo, Japan) for high-resolution laser scanning. Minimal differences in shape between the laser scan surface and the surface generated from the CT data set could be detected. Nevertheless, high-resolution laser scan of the skin surface allows for a precise patient registration (mean deviation 1.1 mm, maximum deviation 1.8 mm). Radiation load, logistic costs, and efforts arising from the planning of computer-assisted surgery of the head can be reduced because native (markerless) CT data sets can be used for laser scan-based surface registration.

  13. PREOPERATIVE ORAL CODEINE EFFECT ON POSTOPERATIVE CAUGH CONTROL IN CATARACT SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H SOLTANI NEZHAD

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: cataract surgery is .one of the most common operation in ophthalmology. Post operative caught can lead to anterior chamber hemmorage and dehiscence of suture so we were going to finding a way to overcome to this problem. Method: This study is a clinical trial one which was done on 150 ASA 1, 2 patient that were over 45 years old age. These patient have cataract surgery under GA in Farabi Hospital of Esfahan medical university. All of the patient were intubated under direct laryngoscopy. Patients that have more of one laryngoscope, difficult intubation, thraceal intubation prolonged more than 15 seconds and those which have opiate addiction. We divided the patients into two 75 patient group by randomized selection. This study is double blind and 30mg codeine phosphate and placebo has given to the patient one hour preoperatively. Heart rate and systolic and diastolic, blood pressure has been recorded preoperatively, three minutes after intubation and three minutes after extubation respectively. Caught has been counted and recorded immediately. Five minutes and 30 minutes after extubation and results in contorol group are compared with the results in another group. Discussion: According to the statistical analysis t-student test, chi-square and non parametric test and Pvalue only changes in heart rate after extubation has been different in two groups and other findings make no difference in two groups. There was not any significant difference between two groups about age, sex, duration of surgery, preoperative mean heart rate and blood pressure. There was not any difference about mean number of coughs between two groups and according to this study oral codeine phosphate has administered preoperatively has not any effect on reducing postoperative caught in patients who have GA and tracheal incubation for cataract surgery.

  14. Most cited publications in oral and maxillofacial surgery: a bibliometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam-Pervez, Nawaf; Lubek, Joshua E

    2018-03-01

    Citation is one of the most important forms of acknowledgment and recognition received by our peers in academia. This study identifies and characterizes the current topmost highly cited publications in journals specifically dedicated to the specialty. The purpose of this study is to identify, using the citation count, works that have made key contributions in the field and to provide insight into the direction the specialty has taken in the last 30 years. Four journals that were dedicated to the field of oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMFS) were selected. The SCOPUS database was utilized to perform a citation analysis on the top 200 publications in the month of May, 2017. Each publication was individually reviewed for the number of citations, the source journal of the manuscript, its year of publications, the article type, the country of origin, the study type, and the level of evidence. We categorized every manuscript within a subspecialty. The number of citations ranged from 2824 to 118 over the last four decades. The majority of the manuscripts were published in the Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (60.5%) followed by the International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (25%). Only 3% of these publications were of level I evidence. The most frequent field of publication was benign pathology (18.5%) followed by dental implantology (19%) and then craniomaxillofacial trauma (12%) and craniomaxillofacial deformities (12%). The majority of the publications were articles, of which 59.5% were case-control, case series, or cohort studies. Nine of the top 20 most cited articles and 12.5% of all the most cited papers were related to osteoradionecrosis, osteochemonecrosis, and bisphosphonates. The majority of these publications originated in the USA (44%), followed by Sweden (9.20%), the Netherlands and UK (7.76%), and Germany (5.82%). Despite considerable advances in the quality of both clinical and laboratory research, only six level I studies were

  15. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Other Oral Surgeries Extractions and Other Oral Surgeries Oral and maxillofacial surgeons surgically treat the soft tissues of the ... and Other Oral Surgeries Extractions and Other Oral Surgeries Oral and maxillofacial surgeons surgically treat the soft tissues of the ...

  16. Clinical indications and perspectives for intraoperative cone-beam computed tomography in oral and maxillofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlenz, Philipp; Blessmann, Marco; Blake, Felix; Heinrich, Sven; Schmelzle, Rainer; Heiland, Max

    2007-03-01

    Intraoperative cone-beam computerized tomography (CBCT) imaging has been introduced in oral and maxillofacial surgery. Using midfacial fractures as the pioneer model, this study describes the spectrum of further promising clinical indications for intraoperative CBCT and a clinical combination with intraoperative navigation. One hundred seventy-nine patients admitted for surgical treatment of the facial skeleton were included in the study. Intraoperatively, 3-dimensional images were generated with the mobile CBCT scanner Arcadis Orbic 3D, obtained from Siemens Medical Solutions, in a variety of indications. The acquisition of the data sets was uncomplicated, and image quality was sufficient to assess the postoperative result in all cases. In the example of a facial gunshot injury, a navigation system for intraoperative localization of the metal foreign bodies was used.

  17. Surface analysis methods of biomaterials used in oral surgery: literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suba, Csongor; Velich, Norbert; Turi, Csaba; Szabó, György

    2005-01-01

    Titanium is the most frequently used biomaterial in oral surgery because of its positive physical and chemical properties. Clinical studies proved that the properties of titanium can be improved by surface modification techniques. To study the surface of biomaterials, the positive effects of the coatings, the response of the organism (corrosion resistance, physical and chemical stability, the thickness of various coatings, biocompatibility), one must choose and use the adequate analytical method for one's goal. In this article, the authors present the most frequently used analytical methods for the study of the surface morphology and composition of biomaterials. Also, they outline the advantages and disadvantages of specific analytical methods and the field where they are used.

  18. Perturbation of cobalt 60 radiation doses by metal objects implanted during oral and maxillofacial surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatcher, M.; Kuten, A.; Helman, J.; Laufer, D.

    1984-01-01

    The influence on cobalt 60 dose distributions of typical metal parts used in oral and maxillofacial surgery was studied. Relative doses were determined by exposing x-ray films in a polystyrene phantom set-up containing samples of vitallium, titanium, and stainless steel. Optical densities were converted to doses with the aid of sensitometric curves. The results show that for normal incidence there is a 25% to 40% increase in dose at the entrance side of the metal and a 20% to 25% decrease in dose at the exit side. The enhancement effect falls off rapidly and becomes negligible at about 1 mm from the interface. The reduction effect decreases more gradually and is still evident at distances of a few centimeters. These dose perturbations should be taken into account in the planning of radiation therapy for patients in whom metal objects have been implanted

  19. A technical note about flap fixation technique to prevent salivary fistulas in reconstructive oral cavity surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondo, Luca; Germano, Silvia; Garzaro, Massimiliano; Bocchiotti, Maria Alessandra; Tos, Pierluigi; Pecorari, Giancarlo

    2014-05-01

    Salivary fistulas are frequent complications in oral oncological reconstructive surgery by means of pedicled or free flaps. The most common risk factors are malnutrition, advanced disease, and healing alterations due to radiation therapy or infections. However, they can be observed also in healthy patients where the flap suture breakdown is the only cause. During the reconstructive phase, flaps are anchored to the remnant tongue, hyoid bone, and residual gingival mucosa; the last structure often does not offer suitable margins for a strong suture. The aim of this study was to propose a transmandibular fixation of the flap that allows, in a safe, efficient, and unexpensive way, the creation of a saliva-proof neofloor of the mouth, independently from the quality and thickness of residual gingival mucosa.

  20. Biologic and clinical aspects of integration of different bone substitutes in oral surgery: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zizzari, Vincenzo Luca; Zara, Susi; Tetè, Giulia; Vinci, Raffaele; Gherlone, Enrico; Cataldi, Amelia

    2016-10-01

    Many bone substitutes have been proposed for bone regeneration, and researchers have focused on the interactions occurring between grafts and host tissue, as the biologic response of host tissue is related to the origin of the biomaterial. Bone substitutes used in oral and maxillofacial surgery could be categorized according to their biologic origin and source as autologous bone graft when obtained from the same individual receiving the graft; homologous bone graft, or allograft, when harvested from an individual other than the one receiving the graft; animal-derived heterologous bone graft, or xenograft, when derived from a species other than human; and alloplastic graft, made of bone substitute of synthetic origin. The aim of this review is to describe the most commonly used bone substitutes, according to their origin, and to focus on the biologic events that ultimately lead to the integration of a biomaterial with the host tissue. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Per-oral endoscopic myotomy: major advance in achalasia treatment and in endoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedel, David; Modayil, Rani; Stavropoulos, Stavros N

    2014-12-21

    Per-oral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) represents a natural orifice endoscopic surgery (NOTES) approach to laparoscopy Heller myotomy (LHM). POEM is arguably the most successful clinical application of NOTES. The growth of POEM from a single center in 2008 to approximately 60 centers worldwide in 2014 with several thousand procedures having been performed attests to the success of POEM. Initial efficacy, safety and acid reflux data suggest at least equivalence of POEM to LHM, the previous gold standard for achalasia therapy. Adjunctive techniques used in the West include impedance planimetry for real-time intraprocedural luminal assessment and endoscopic suturing for challenging mucosal defect closures during POEM. The impact of POEM extends beyond the realm of esophageal motility disorders as it is rapidly popularizing endoscopic submucosal dissection in the West and spawning offshoots that use the submucosal tunnel technique for a host of new indications ranging from resection of tumors to pyloromyotomy for gastroparesis.

  2. Training Pathways in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Across the Globe-A Mini Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sanjeev

    2017-09-01

    Due to historical reasons, many different training pathways exist across countries that lead to a degree in oral and maxillofacial surgery. Although it is generally accepted to be a specialty of dentistry, the complex nature of procedures being performed by OMF surgeons today, has necessitated extensive general surgical training. Many countries have thus made dual qualification mandatory, while others have extended training programs in OMFS with integrated medical teaching. In India, frequent contact with foriegn experts, availability of world-class equipment and efforts of individual surgeons has ensured that the full scope of OMFS is practised in select centres of learning. However, the MDS curriculum dictated by DCI has not conformed to the requirements of the specialty as practiced today. This brief mini-review of the various training pathways aims at comparing our system with other countries and attempts to draw lessons which could help improve future OMFS training in India.

  3. Dental foundation year 2 training in oral and maxillofacial surgery units - the trainees' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildan, T; Amin, J; Bowe, D; Gerber, B; Saeed, N R

    2013-10-01

    Most dental foundation year 2 (DF2) training takes place in oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMFS) units. We did a survey of DF2 trainees in these units by telephone interviews and an online questionnaire to find out about their experience of training and their career aspirations. A total of 123 responded, which is roughly 41% of the total estimated number of trainees. Trainees applied for these posts mainly to improve their dentoalveolar skills (50%), and this was cited as the best aspect of the training. Most (81%) were on-call at night and this was generally thought to be a valuable training experience (77%), but 20% thought that it was the worst aspect of the job. Most did not regret taking up the post although the experience had caused 75% to alter their intentions about their future career; general dental practice was the commonest choice. In conclusion, trainees are generally satisfied with their training and these positions have guided their choices about future careers. Copyright © 2012 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of Fibrin Sealants and Tissue Adhesives in Oral Surgery for Patients with Bleeding Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülsüm Ak

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of two local haemostatic agents administered together with preoperative dose of replacement therapy for oral surgical procedures in patients with bleeding disorders METHODS: Twenty-one patients were divided into three groups randomly. Patients in Group 1 (n=7 received preoperative replacement therapy with postoperative fibrin sealant application in the surgical site. Patients in Group 2 (n=7 received preoperative replacement therapy with postoperative tissue adhesive application in the surgical site. Patients in Group 3 (n=7 were given total dose of replacement therapy pre- and postoperatively. RESULTS: No postoperative bleeding was observed in 17 patients including five patients in Group 1 (71.42%, six patients in Group 2 (85.71% and six patients in Group 3 (85.71%. Haemorrhagic complication was observed in only four patients among all groups. CONCLUSION: We conclude that utilization of fibrin sealants and tissue adhesives in oral surgery is beneficial due to the lessened amount of factor concentrates used for replacement therapy and the rapid haemostasis at the operation side to perform serial surgical procedures in the same session.

  5. Variability in blood pressure in normotensive patients undergoing outpatient oral surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heriberto Atanacio Núñez Mendieta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: A dental appointment can be stressful for patients, especially if this involves a surgical procedure. Factors such as pain and catecholamines present in local anesthesia can cause a change of values of blood pressure (BP. The hypertensive peak is a sudden rise in BP and can occur even in a person usually normotensive by a stressful situation. Objective: To determine the variability of BP in normotensive patients attending the Department of Oral Surgery III Course of the Faculty of Dentistry at the National University of Asuncion. Methods: Descriptive observational study design. The PA was obtained by auscultation method by members of the Department of Physiology of the Faculty of Dentistry at the National University of Asuncion during different stages of the surgical procedure, in 109 patients aged 18 to 67 years who presented indicating teeth extraction. Results: 95.4% (104 of the patients showed variation in the values of BP during the surgical procedure. In 77% of the variation thereof within 5 minutes after local anesthesia, in 18% immediately after tooth extraction and 5% in the immediate postoperative period was observed. Conclusions: In most patients, BP variation was observed during the oral outpatient surgical procedure and surgical stage more often variation was within 5 minutes after administering local anesthesia.

  6. Early and late physical and psychosocial effects of primary surgery in patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Annelise; Jarden, Mary

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this systematic review is to explore early and late physical and psychosocial effects of primary surgery for oral and oropharyngeal cancers and to investigate the factors that influence these effects. PubMed, Cinahl, and PsycInfo were searched for studies concerning patients...

  7. A Clinical Audit of Escorts' Awareness And Patients' Safety Following Intravenous Sedation In Adult Oral Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licheri, Luca; Erriu, Matteo; Bryant, Vincenzo; Piras, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate current level of safety under the care of an escort following intravenous sedation, post-sedation arrangements and to identify potential risk levels. Information and post-sedation arrangements are important to patients'safety following surgery but although there is a general consensus over what is recommended for patients and their escorts, there is little, if any, literature on the escorts' awareness of sedation and accordance to post-sedation arrangement and recommendations. Escorts of 113 consecutive patients treated in oral surgery under sedation (midazolam) completed a questionnaire composed of 27 questions divided into seven sections including demographics, awareness of sedation, source of information and post-operative arrangement. From the data collected, two scores were calculated representative of the escorts' Safety and Reliability. Data were then analysed by ANOVA. Safety scores were statistically correlated with instruction source while Reliability correlated to a wider variety of parameters including gender, age as well as information source. Provision of clear written information to escorts is recommended as likely to improve patients' safety. Assessment of escorts' Safety and Reliability could provide a means for improving quality and safety of sedation service.

  8. Continuous versus cyclic use of oral contraceptives after surgery for symptomatic endometriosis: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahos, Nikos; Vlachos, Athanasios; Triantafyllidou, Olga; Vitoratos, Nikolaos; Creatsas, George

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of continuous oral contraceptive (OC) use versus the usual cyclic fashion in the recurrence of endometriosis-related symptoms after surgery. Prospective cohort trial involving patients in two tertiary care units. Academic institution in collaboration with a private hospital. 356 patients underwent surgical treatment by laparoscopy for symptomatic endometriosis. After surgical treatment for endometriosis, patients offered 6-month course of cyclic OC (including a 7-day pill-free period) or continuous OC. Recurrence rate of endometriosis-related symptoms and endometriomas after fertility-sparing surgery. Out of 356 patients, 167 were placed on the usual cyclic OC course and 85 on continuous OC for a minimum of 6 months. The continuous OC group experienced a statistically significant reduction in recurrence rates for endometrioma, dysmenorrhea, and non-menstrual pelvic pain as compared with the cyclic OC group. There was no reduction in the recurrence of dyspareunia between the two groups. After surgical treatment of endometriosis, the use of both cyclic and continuous OC improves pain symptoms when compared with preoperative scores. Continuous OC appears to be associated with a reduced recurrence rate for dysmenorrhea, non-menstrual pelvic pain, and endometrioma but not for dyspareunia as compared with cyclic OC. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Myocardial protection with prophylactic oral metoprolol during coronary artery bypass grafting surgery: evaluation by troponin I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Manoel Rossi Neto

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Biochemical markers of myocardial injury are frequently altered after cardiac surgery. So far there is no evidence whether oral beta-blockers may reduce myocardial injury after coronary artery bypass grafting. OBJECTIVE: To determine if oral administration of prophylactic metoprolol reduces the release of cardiac troponin I in isolated coronary artery bypass grafting, not complicated by new Q waves. METHODS: A prospective randomized study, including 68 patients, divided in 2 groups: Group A (n=33, control and B (n=35, beta-blockers. In group B, metoprolol tartrate was administered 200 mg/day. The myocardial injury was assessed by troponin I with 1 hour and 12 hours after coronary artery bypass grafting. RESULTS: No significant difference between groups regarding pre-surgical, surgical, complication in intensive care (15% versus 14%, P=0.92 and the total number of hospital events (21% versus 14%, P=0.45 was observed. The median value of troponin I with 12 hours in the study population was 3.3 ng/ml and was lower in group B than in group A (2.5 ng/ml versus 3.7 ng/ml, P<0,05. In the multivariate analysis, the variables that have shown to be independent predictors of troponin I release after 12 hours were: no beta-blockers administration and number of vessels treated. CONCLUSION: The results of this study in uncomplicated coronary artery bypass grafting, comparing the postoperative release of troponin I at 12 hours between the control group and who used oral prophylactic metoprolol for at least 72 hours, allow to conclude that there was less myocardial injury in the betablocker group, giving some degree of myocardial protection.

  10. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) in dental and oral surgery: from the wound healing to bone regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanese, Antonino; Licata, Maria E; Polizzi, Bianca; Campisi, Giuseppina

    2013-06-13

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a new approach to tissue regeneration and it is becoming a valuable adjunct to promote healing in many procedures in dental and oral surgery, especially in aging patients. PRP derives from the centrifugation of the patient's own blood and it contains growth factors that influence wound healing, thereby playing an important role in tissue repairing mechanisms. The use of PRP in surgical practice could have beneficial outcomes, reducing bleeding and enhancing soft tissue healing and bone regeneration. Studies conducted on humans have yielded promising results regarding the application of PRP to many dental and oral surgical procedures (i.e. tooth extractions, periodontal surgery, implant surgery). The use of PRP has also been proposed in the management of bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (BRONJ) with the aim of enhancing wound healing and bone maturation. The aims of this narrative review are: i) to describe the different uses of PRP in dental surgery (tooth extractions and periodontal surgery) and oral surgery (soft tissues and bone tissue surgery, implant surgery and BRONJ surgery); and ii) to discuss its efficacy, efficiency and risk/benefit ratio. This review suggests that the use of PRP in the alveolar socket after tooth extractions is certainly capable of improving soft tissue healing and positively influencing bone regeneration but the latter effect seems to decrease a few days after the extraction. PRP has produced better results in periodontal therapy in association with other materials than when it is used alone. Promising results have also been obtained in implant surgery, when PRP was used in isolation as a coating material. The combination of necrotic bone curettage and PRP application seem to be encouraging for the treatment of refractory BRONJ, as it has proven successful outcomes with minimal invasivity. Since PRP is free from potential risks for patients, not difficult to obtain and use, it can be employed

  11. Efficacy assessment of two antibiotic prophylaxis regimens in oral and maxillofacial trauma surgery: preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Giordano BP; Lucena, Eudes ES; da Silva, José Sandro P; Gomes, Petrus P; Germano, Adriano R

    2015-01-01

    The study set out to evaluate the efficacy of two antibiotic prophylaxis regimens in patients with facial fractures admitted to the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Traumatology services of the Onofre Lopes University Hospital attached to the Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte in the period from December 2011 to December 2012. The sample consisted of 74 patients divided into two groups, GI with forty-three patients and GII with 32. Both groups received 2 g of cefazolin, 20 minutes before surgery. The postoperative protocol for each group was randomly determined; group I (single dose) received no antibiotics after surgery but group II (24 h dosage) received 1 g of cefazolin every 6 hours for 24 hours. Postoperative infection incidence was 9.3% (seven patients), six patients in Group I and one in Group II. 85% of the infections were in mandibular fractures. Results were presented qualitatively and quantitatively and the Chi square test (taking the value for p to be < 0.05) showed no statistically significant differences in the efficacies of the two regimens in the comparisons made between the cases of fractures in the upper and middle thirds of the face with those in the lower third (mandibular fractures). Considering mandibular fractures alone, Group II proved to be more efficacious with a p value of 0.02. However, to confirm the tendency shown in the mandibular fracture treatments whereby prolonging antibiotic administration for 24 hours appeared to be beneficial, research needs to be done with much larger sample groups. PMID:25932244

  12. Perioperative risk factors for postoperative pneumonia after major oral cancer surgery: A retrospective analysis of 331 cases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jieyun Xu

    Full Text Available Postoperative pneumonia (POP is common and results in prolonged hospital stays, higher costs, increased morbidity and mortality. However, data on the incidence and risk factors of POP after oral and maxillofacial surgery are rare. This study aims to identify perioperative risk factors for POP after major oral cancer (OC surgery.Perioperative data and patient records of 331 consecutive subjects were analyzed in the period of April 2014 to March 2016. We individually traced each OC patient for a period to discharge from the hospital or 45 days after surgery, whichever occur later.The incidence of POP after major OC surgery with free flap construction or major OC surgery was 11.6% or 4.5%, respectively. Patient-related risk factors for POP were male sex, T stage, N stage, clinical stage and preoperative serum albumin level. Among the investigated procedure-related variables, incision grade, mandibulectomy, free flap reconstruction, tracheotomy, intraoperative blood loss, and the length of the operation were shown to be associated with the development of POP. Postoperative hospital stay was also significantly related to increased incidence of POP. Using a multivariable logistic regression model, we identified male sex, preoperative serum albumin level, operation time and postoperative hospital stay as independent risk factors for POP.Several perioperative risk factors can be identified that are associated with POP. At-risk oral cancer patients should be subjected to intensified postoperative pulmonary care.

  13. Perioperative risk factors for postoperative pneumonia after major oral cancer surgery: A retrospective analysis of 331 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jieyun; Hu, Jing; Yu, Pei; Wang, Weiwang; Hu, Xingxue; Hou, Jinsong; Fang, Silian; Liu, Xiqiang

    2017-01-01

    Postoperative pneumonia (POP) is common and results in prolonged hospital stays, higher costs, increased morbidity and mortality. However, data on the incidence and risk factors of POP after oral and maxillofacial surgery are rare. This study aims to identify perioperative risk factors for POP after major oral cancer (OC) surgery. Perioperative data and patient records of 331 consecutive subjects were analyzed in the period of April 2014 to March 2016. We individually traced each OC patient for a period to discharge from the hospital or 45 days after surgery, whichever occur later. The incidence of POP after major OC surgery with free flap construction or major OC surgery was 11.6% or 4.5%, respectively. Patient-related risk factors for POP were male sex, T stage, N stage, clinical stage and preoperative serum albumin level. Among the investigated procedure-related variables, incision grade, mandibulectomy, free flap reconstruction, tracheotomy, intraoperative blood loss, and the length of the operation were shown to be associated with the development of POP. Postoperative hospital stay was also significantly related to increased incidence of POP. Using a multivariable logistic regression model, we identified male sex, preoperative serum albumin level, operation time and postoperative hospital stay as independent risk factors for POP. Several perioperative risk factors can be identified that are associated with POP. At-risk oral cancer patients should be subjected to intensified postoperative pulmonary care.

  14. The effectiveness of systematic perioperative oral hygiene in reduction of postoperative respiratory tract infections after elective thoracic surgery in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Preben Ulrich; Larsen, Palle; Håkonsen, Sasja Jul

    2016-01-01

    to increase patients' risk for nosocomial respiratory tract infection. OBJECTIVES: To identify, appraise and synthesize the best available evidence on the effectiveness of systematic perioperative oral hygiene in the reduction of postoperative respiratory airway infections in adult patients undergoing...... elective thoracic surgery. INCLUSION CRITERIA: Patients over the age of 18 years who had been admitted for elective thoracic surgery, regardless of gender, ethnicity, diagnosis severity, co-morbidity or previous treatment.Perioperative systematic oral hygiene (such as mechanical removal of dental biofilm......% confidence interval [CI] 0.55-0.78) for respiratory tract infections RR 0.48 (95%CI: 0.36-0.65) and for deep surgical site infections RR 0.48 (95%CI 0.27-0.84). CONCLUSIONS: Systematic perioperative oral hygiene reduces postoperative nosocomial, lower respiratory tract infections and surgical site infections...

  15. Value in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery: A Systematic Review of Economic Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler, Benjamin P; Ji, Yisi D; Peacock, Zachary S

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the state of economic analyses in the field of oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMS). A systematic search of published literature up to 2016 was performed. The inclusion criteria were as follows: English-language articles on economic analyses pertaining to OMS including anesthesia and pain management; dentoalveolar surgery; orthognathic, cleft, and/or obstructive sleep apnea treatment; pathology; reconstruction; temporomandibular disorders; trauma; and other. The exclusion criteria were as follows: opinion or perspective articles, studies unrelated to OMS, nonhuman research, and implant-related studies. Cost-effectiveness analyses (CEAs), cost-utility analyses, and cost-minimization analyses (CMAs) were evaluated with the original Consolidated Health Economic Evaluation Reporting Standards (CHEERS) checklist or a modified CHEERS checklist. The search yielded 798 articles, 77 of which met the inclusion criteria (published from 1980 to 2016, 48 from the United States). There were an increasing number of studies over time (P for trend surgery (20.7%); 15 studies on orthognathic, cleft, and/or obstructive sleep apnea treatment (19.4%); 1 study on pathology (1.3%); 6 studies on reconstruction (7.8%); no studies on temporomandibular joint disorders and/or facial pain (0%); 20 studies on trauma (25.9%); and 12 studies categorized as other (15.5%). CEAs made up 11.7% of studies, and CMAs comprised 58.4%. Of the 9 CEAs, 55.6% were published in 2010 or later. Of the 45 CMAs, 88.6% were published in 2000 or later and 61.4% in 2010 or later. CEAs met 56.0% (range, 29.2 to 87.5%) of the CHEERS criteria, whereas CMA studies met 45.1% (range, 23.9 to 76.1%) of the modified CHEERS criteria. Only 1 study succeeded in estimating costs and health outcomes (value) of an OMS procedure. There is an increasing trend in the number of economic studies in the field of OMS. More high-quality economic evaluations are needed to demonstrate the value

  16. Validation of Universal Scale in Oral Surgery (USOS) for Patient’s Psycho-emotional Status Rating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinchasov, Ginnady; Gervickas, Albinas; Sakavicius, Dalius; Juodzbalys, Gintaras

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives There aren’t any objective methods that may help in standard evaluation of oral surgery patient’s psycho-emotional status. Without any standardized evaluation, two main problems appear: heterogeneity between studies and ineffective patient’s evaluation. Therefore, Universal Scale in Oral Surgery (USOS) for patient’s psycho-emotional status rating has previously been proposed by authors. The aim of present study is to assess the clinical effectivity and validate the Universal Scale in Oral Surgery in case of outpatient tooth extraction for adult healthy patients. Material and Methods Clinical trial to validate the USOS for patient’s psycho-emotional status rating was performed. In total 90 patients, that came for outpatient dental extraction to Lithuanian University of Health Sciences Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Department ambulatory, were enrolled in clinical trial. Patients filled self-reported questionnaires before the procedure. Operating surgeon rated USOS for patient’s psycho-emotional status rating doctor’s part questionnaire after the procedure. 4 - 6 weeks later all patients were asked to fill USOS for patient’s psycho-emotional status rating questionnaire retrospectively. Results According to the statistical analysis, the final composition of USOS for patient’s psycho-emotional status rating that would fit to reliability coefficient should be composed from 6 patient part questions and 3 general doctor part questions. Conclusions Universal Scale in Oral Surgery for patient’s psycho-emotional status rating is a novel, doctor and patient rated scale which is suitable for clinical and scientific usage. PMID:29435204

  17. Factors associated to post-operative nausea and vomiting following oral and maxillofacial surgery: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, Assis Filipe Medeiros; Queiroz, Salomão Israel Monteiro Lourenço; Germano, Adriano Rocha; da Silva, José Sandro Pereira

    2017-03-01

    This study aims to address and assess possible factors associated with nausea and vomiting (NV) following oral and maxillofacial surgery. A prospective study was carried out in the period from December 2013 to January 2016 targeting all attended cases in that period. For statistical analysis, Pearson chi-square and Fisher tests were used to verify association and ANOVA and Student's t tests to test for significant difference, p was defined as ≤0.05. The sample group consisted of 207 patients with an average age of 33.56 years (±13.23), and 70.5% of subjects were male. Calculations based on the predictive model showed that a female patient with prior history of nausea and vomiting who used opioids and had intra-oral surgical access would have a 96% chance of experiencing a nausea and vomiting episode. Other factors like age, being overweight, anesthesia, surgery duration, and duration of hospital stay also contribute so that these aspects must be paid careful attention prior to surgery to ensure a suitably orientated treatment that will avoid disturbances caused by post-operative nausea and vomiting. The occurrence of post-operative nausea and vomiting after oral and maxillofacial surgery was found to be more higher incidence associated to female patients who used opioids, who had a prior history of NV, whose surgery involved intra-oral access, who were in the second or third decades of their lives, who have above average weight, and who have long anesthesia when undergoing surgery, resulting in a long hospital stays.

  18. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Oral Surgeries Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Injury / Trauma Surgery Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Oral, Head and Neck Pathology TMJ and Facial Pain Wisdom Teeth Management Procedures Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are ...

  19. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Other Oral Surgeries Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Injury / Trauma Surgery Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Oral, Head and Neck Pathology TMJ and Facial Pain Wisdom Teeth Management Procedures Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons ...

  20. Computer-assisted oral and maxillofacial surgery; Computerunterstuetzte Mund-, Kiefer- und Gesichtschirurgie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassfeld, S.; Brief, J.; Muehling, J. [Mund-, Kiefer- und Gesichtschirurgie, Heidelberg Univ. (Germany); Krempien, R.; Mende, U. [Radiologie, Heidelberg Univ. (Germany); Raczkowsky, J.; Muenchenberg, J.; Woern, H. [IPR Institut fuer Prozessrechentechnik und Robotik, Karlsruhe Univ. (Germany); Giess, H.; Meinzer, H.P. [DKFZ, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2000-03-01

    Background: Methods from the area of virtual reality are used in oral and maxillofacial surgery for the planning and three-dimensional individual simulation of surgeries. Simulation: In order to simulate complex surgeries with the aid of a computer, the diagnostic image data and especially various imaging modalities (CT, MRT, US) must be arranged in relation to each other, thus enabling rapid switching between the various modalities as well as the viewing of mixed images. Segmenting techniques for the reconstruction of three-dimensional representations of soft-tissue and osseous areas are required. We must develop ergonomic and intuitively useable interaction methods for the surgeon, thus allowing for precise and fast entry of the planned surgical intervention in the planning and simulation phase. Surgery: During the surgical phase, instrument navigation tools offer the surgeon interactive support through operation guidance and control of potential dangers. This feature is already available today. Future intraoperative assistance will take the form of such passive tools for the support of intraoperative orientation as well as so-called tracking systems (semi-active systems) which accompany and support the surgeons' work. The final form are robots which execute specific steps completely autonomously. Discussion: The techniques of virtual reality keep gaining in importance for medical applications. Many applications are still being developed or are still in the form of a prototype. However, it is already clear that developments in this area will have a considerable effect on the surgeon's routine work. (orig.) [German] Hintergrund: Methoden der Virtuellen Realitaet werden in der Mund-, Kiefer- und Gesichtschirurgie zur Planung und dreidimensionalen individuellen Simulation operativer Eingriffe genutzt. Simulation: Um komplexe Eingriffe mit Hilfe des Computers simulieren zu koennen, muessen die diagnostischen Bilddaten, insbesondere verschiedene

  1. Periimplant changes in different transplanted soft tissues around loaded endosseous implants in patients after oral tumor surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Adorján F; Wallowy, Phillip; Stefenelli, Ulrich; Landau, Stephan

    2013-12-01

    To examine periimplant reaction of transplanted soft tissues foreign to oral cavity when compared with local gingiva. In 58 oral cancer patients, 210 dental implants were inserted mainly in the mandible after radical surgery and reconstruction. Ninety-six implants penetrated transplants (split skin, mucosal, platysma, pectoralis major, and intestinal) and were compared with 114 implants penetrating local gingiva. Prosthetic treatment consisted of telescopic or bar-retained overdentures or (in case of intestinal grafts) implant-supported fixed prostheses. Follow-up lasted between 30 and 60 months. Plaque index, sulcus bleeding index, pocket probing depth, and width of vestibular-/oral attached mucosa were measured. Plaque index (before second year; P gingiva, showing no detrimental effect on periimplant health in oral cancer patients. Split skin and mucosal grafts had worst performance.

  2. Photodynamic Therapy Using Temoporfin Before Surgery in Treating Patients With Recurrent Oral Cavity or Oropharyngeal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-02

    Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Recurrent Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Recurrent Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  3. Medical students' understanding of oral and maxillofacial surgery: an Irish perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kielty, P G C; O'Connor, B R; Cotter, C J; Goodson, A M C; Payne, K F B; Tahim, A

    2017-05-01

    Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (OMFS) remains an enigmatic specialty in Irish medicine and many students are unaware of its scope and the unique career pathway involved. We completed a multicentre cross-sectional study to identify their ability to identify the requirements for entry to specialty training year 3 (ST3) in OMFS, to assess their awareness of OMFS surgeons, and their general awareness of, and exposure to, the specialty. Data were collected through an electronic questionnaire. Participants were asked to select the most suitable surgical specialty to treat a number of common conditions in the head and neck, and to choose the requirements they deemed essential for specialist training. Knowledge was measured by the number of correct responses. A total of 443 medical students participated (University College Cork (UCC) n=328, 74%; Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI) n=113, 26%). A total of 318/374 (85%) had had no previous experience of OMFS, 38/374 (10%) had had theoretical teaching only, and 18/374 (5%) had had clinical experience. A total of 212/329 (64%) wished for greater exposure as a student, but only 34/329 (9%) would consider a career in the specialty. The median (IQR) number of correct responses for OMFS procedures was 3.0/10 (2.0), with women, direct entrants, and RCSI students scoring highest. Only 11/367 (3%) could identify the minimum entry requirements for a post of specialist registrar. This study has identified a potential gap in the undergraduate curriculum. Although medical students are rarely taught about OMFS, they show an interest in learning more. Copyright © 2016 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of Oral Administration of Bromelain on Postoperative Discomfort After Third Molar Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghensi, Paolo; Cucchi, Alessandro; Creminelli, Luca; Tomasi, Cristiano; Zavan, Barbara; Maiorana, Carlo

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this prospective randomized controlled clinical trial was to evaluate the effect of oral administration of bromelain on discomfort after mandibular third molar surgery. Eighty-four consecutive patients requiring surgical removal of a single mandibular impacted third molar under local anesthesia were randomly assigned to receiving no drug (control group, Group A), postoperative 40 mg bromelain every 6 hours for 6 days (Group B), preoperative 4 mg dexamethasone sodium phosphate as a submucosal injection (Group C), and preoperative 4 mg dexamethasone sodium phosphate as a submucosal injection plus postoperative 40 mg bromelain every 6 hours for 6 days (Group D). Standardized surgical and analgesic protocols were adopted. Maximum interincisal distance and facial contours were measured at baseline and on postoperative days 2 and 7. Pain was measured objectively by counting the number of analgesic tablets required. Patient perception of the severity of symptoms was assessed with a follow-up questionnaire (PoSSe scale). On postoperative day 2, there was a statistically significant reduction in facial edema in both Groups C and D compared with the control group, but no statistically significant differences were observed between Group B and the control group. At evaluation on postoperative day 7, Group D showed a statistically significant reduction in postoperative swelling compared with the control group. The combined use of bromelain and dexamethasone (Group D) induced a statistically significant reduction in the total number of analgesic tablets taken after surgery compared with the control group. The treatment groups had a limited, nonsignificant effect on trismus when compared with the control group. Bromelain used singly showed moderate anti-inflammatory efficacy, reducing postoperative swelling, albeit not to any significant extent compared with no drug administration. The combined use of bromelain and dexamethasone sodium phosphate yielded

  5. Are oral and maxillofacial surgery residents being adequately trained to care for pediatric patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramowicz, Shelly; Kaban, Leonard B; Wurtzel, Andrew S; Roser, Steven M

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate whether current oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMS) residents are receiving adequate training and experience to perform specific surgical procedures and anesthesia for pediatric patients. A 17-question survey was sent electronically to fellows of the American Academy of Craniomaxillofacial Surgeons. Descriptive data for individual surgeons, their associated residency programs, and the quantity of specific pediatric procedures they performed were collected. Resident case load for inpatient and outpatient procedures and overall experience in medical, surgical, and anesthetic management of pediatric OMS patients were explored. Surveys were sent to 110 active fellows; 64 completed the questionnaire (58%). There were 59 male fellows and 5 female fellows, with a mean age of 50.4 years. Of those, 68.8% practice in an academic setting. Specifically, 93.8% take after-hours emergency calls covering adult and pediatric patients and 98.4% have admitting privileges at a children's hospital or a pediatric unit in an adult hospital. Their affiliated residency programs include required rotations in pediatrics or pediatric subspecialties. In their opinion, >90% of graduating OMS residents have the appropriate skill set to perform dentoalveolar procedures, outpatient anesthesia, orthognathic procedures, and alveolar bone grafts. However, residents have limited ability to reconstruct pediatric ramus-condyle unit with a costochondral graft. Results of this study indicate that, in the opinion of the respondents, graduates of OMS residency programs have adequate training to perform dentoalveolar procedures, outpatient anesthesia, orthognathic surgery, and alveolar bone grafts in pediatric procedures, but have limited experience with reconstruction of pediatric ramus-condyle unit via costochondral graft. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Oral mask ventilation is more effective than face mask ventilation after nasal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazicioğlu, Dilek; Baran, Ilkay; Uzumcugil, Filiz; Ozturk, Ibrahim; Utebey, Gulten; Sayın, M Murat

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate and compare the face mask (FM) and oral mask (OM) ventilation techniques during anesthesia emergence regarding tidal volume, leak volume, and difficult mask ventilation (DMV) incidence. Prospective, randomized, crossover study. Operating room, training and research hospital. American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I and II adult patients scheduled for nasal surgery. Patients in group FM-OM received FM ventilation first, followed by OM ventilation, and patients in group OM-FM received OM ventilation first, followed by FM ventilation, with spontaneous ventilation after deep extubation. The FM ventilation was applied with the 1-handed EC-clamp technique. The OM was placed only over the mouth, and the 1-handed EC-clamp technique was used again. A child's size FM was used for the OM ventilation technique, the mask was rotated, and the inferior part of the mask was placed toward the nose. The leak volume (MVleak), mean airway pressure (Pmean), and expired tidal volume (TVe) were assessed with each mask technique for 3 consecutive breaths. A mask ventilation grade ≥3 was considered DMV. DMV occurred more frequently during FM ventilation (75% with FM vs 8% with OM). In the FM-first sequence, the mean TVe was 249±61mL with the FM and 455±35mL with the OM (P=.0001), whereas in the OM-first sequence, it was 276±81mL with the FM and 409±37mL with the OM (P=.0001). Regardless of the order used, the OM technique significantly decreased the MVleak and increased the TVe when compared to the FM technique. During anesthesia emergence after nasal surgery the OM may offer an effective ventilation method as it decreases the incidence of DMV and the gas leak around the mask and provides higher tidal volume delivery compared with FM ventilation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Augmented reality system for oral surgery using 3D auto stereoscopic visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Huy Hoang; Suenaga, Hideyuki; Kuwana, Kenta; Masamune, Ken; Dohi, Takeyoshi; Nakajima, Susumu; Liao, Hongen

    2011-01-01

    We present an augmented reality system for oral and maxillofacial surgery in this paper. Instead of being displayed on a separated screen, three-dimensional (3D) virtual presentations of osseous structures and soft tissues are projected onto the patient's body, providing surgeons with exact knowledge of depth information of high risk tissues inside the bone. We employ a 3D integral imaging technique which produce motion parallax in both horizontal and vertical direction over a wide viewing area in this study. In addition, surgeons are able to check the progress of the operation in real-time through an intuitive 3D based interface which is content-rich, hardware accelerated. These features prevent surgeons from penetrating into high risk areas and thus help improve the quality of the operation. Operational tasks such as hole drilling, screw fixation were performed using our system and showed an overall positional error of less than 1 mm. Feasibility of our system was also verified with a human volunteer experiment.

  8. Oral surgery in a patient with cirrhosis and thrombocytopenia: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Seena; Perry, Maureen Munnelly; Spolarich, Ann Eshenaur

    2016-01-01

    While most oral surgical procedures can be safely performed in an outpatient setting, certain medical conditions may present a higher chance of postoperative complications. In particular, those predisposing the patient to bleeding abnormalities pose a potential risk when performing such treatments. The authors report a case involving full-mouth extractions in a patient with cirrhosis and thrombocytopenia after obtaining a platelet transfusion. A 62-year-old Caucasian female presented to a university special care dental clinic requiring extractions. Her pertinent medical history was remarkable for cirrhosis and thrombocytopenia, with a platelet count of 32,000/uL. Upon medical consultation, the patient was appointed for a prophylactic platelet transfusion. The surgery was rendered uneventfully, and the patient achieved adequate hemostasis without hospitalization. Patients with cirrhosis pose a potential bleeding risk with dental surgical procedures. Pre-operative medical consultation, review of pertinent laboratory values, and prophylactic platelet transfusion allow these patients to be managed safely in an outpatient setting. © 2015 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Bleeding complications after oral surgery in outpatients with compromised haemostasis: incidence and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Waldemar; Kriwalsky, Marcus S; Wolf, Hans H; Schubert, Johannes

    2009-06-01

    PURPOSE AND RESULTS: The aim of this prospective study was to determine the incidence of postoperative bleeding after oral surgery under local anaesthesia performed in outpatients with haemostatic disorders within a 5-year period (2003-2007). One hundred twenty one (70 males, 51 females) out of 2,056 outpatients with different haemostatic disorders (acquired or hereditary) were included in this study. The following data were recorded: medical history and general condition; medications; indication for the surgical procedure; specification of local anaesthesia; applied surgical techniques, considering the kind of haemostatic disorder; and peri- or postoperative bleeding complications. Postoperative bleeding was observed in 12 patients (9.9%). In three cases, inpatient treatment became necessary. The management of two patients with a haemostatic disorder (von Willebrand s disease and haemophilia A) is presented in short case reports. In a heterogeneous group of 121 outpatients with known haemostatic disorders, a combination of a few haemostatic agents with appropriate operative technique enables an effective wound management. In cases of failed local interventions after postoperative bleeding, further diagnostic investigations are required.

  10. Postoperative nausea and vomiting after general anesthesia for oral and maxillofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apipan, Benjamas; Rummasak, Duangdee; Wongsirichat, Natthamet

    2016-12-01

    Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) is one of the most common postoperative complications. Despite this, few papers have reported the incidence and independent risk factors associated with PONV in the context of oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMFS). Therefore, we sought to determine the incidence of PONV, as well as to identify risk factors for the condition in patients who had undergone OMFS under general anesthesia. A total of 372 patients' charts were reviewed, and the following potential risk factors for PONV were analyzed: age, sex, body mass index, smoking status, history of PONV and/or motion sickness, duration of anesthesia, amount of blood loss, nasogastric tube insertion and retention and postoperative opioid used. Univariate analysis was performed, and variables with a P-value less than 0.1 were entered into a multiple logistic regression analysis, wherein P-values 4 h. Furthermore, the number of risk factors was proportional to the incidence of PONV. The incidence of PONV in patients who have undergone OMFS varies from center to center depending on patient characteristics, as well as on anesthetic and surgical practice. Identifying the independent risk factors for PONV will allow physicians to optimize prophylactic, antiemetic regimens.

  11. Description of odontogenic infection cases at the Oral Surgery Polyclinic of Hasan Sadikin Hospital Bandung, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravitha Savitri

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most difficult cases to be managed in dentistry is an odontogenic infection. The study was aimed to finding the description of the odontogenic infection cases at the Oral Surgery Polyclinic of Hasan Sadikin Hospital, Bandung, Indonesia, according to the odontogenic infection types, genders, ages, sources of infection, and type of treatment given. This study was a retrospective-descriptive study with a survey method conducted from January 2009 to December 2010. The results of this study showed that there were total 8 types of odontogenic infection cases. The periapical abscess was the most frequent abscess found in 89 patients (30.6%. Male patients were having more often cases than women with the ratio of 53:47. The most frequent age group was the 21-30 years old age group in 57 patients (22.7%. The highest number of patients from 8 different cases of odontogenic infection (30.2%. The source of odontogenic infection was found most commonly by the mandibular first molar teeth, with as much as 26.6%.

  12. Simulation training for dental foundation in oral and maxillofacial surgery - a new benchmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalsi, A S; Higham, H; McKnight, M; Dhariwal, D K

    2013-12-01

    Simulation training involves reproducing the management of real patients in a risk-free environment. This study aims to assess the use of simulation training in the management of acutely ill patients for those in second year oral and maxillofacial surgery dental foundation training (DF2s). DF2s attended four full day courses on the recognition and treatment of acutely ill patients. These incorporated an acute life-threatening events: recognition and treatment (ALERT(™)) course, simulations of medical emergencies and case-based discussions on management of surgical inpatients. Pre- and post-course questionnaires were completed by all candidates. A maximum of 11 DF2s attended the course. The questionnaires comprised 1-10 rating scales and Likert scores. All trainees strongly agreed that they would recommend this course to colleagues and all agreed or strongly agreed that it met their learning requirements. All DF2s perceived an improvement in personal limitations, recognition of critical illness, communication, assessing acutely ill patients and initiating treatment. All participants felt their basic resuscitation skills had improved and that they had learned new skills to improve delivery of safety-critical messages. These techniques could be implemented nationwide to address the more complex educational needs for DF2s in secondary care. A new benchmark for simulation training for DF2 has been established.

  13. Comparing disciplines: outcomes of non melanoma cutaneous malignant lesions in oral and maxillofacial surgery and dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thavarajah, M; Szamocki, S; Komath, D; Cascarini, L; Heliotis, M

    2015-01-01

    300 cases of non-melanoma cutaneous lesion procedures carried out by the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Dermatology departments in a North West London hospital over a 6 month period between September 2011 and February 2012 were included in a retrospective case control study. The results from each speciality were compared. The mean age of the OMFS group was 75.8 years compared to 69.9 years in the dermatology group. There was no statistically significant difference in gender between the 2 groups. The OMFS group treated a higher proportion of atypical (17%) and malignant (64.9%) cases compared to the dermatology group (11.3% and 50.5% respectively). This could also account for the fact that the OMFS group carried out a higher number of full excisions compared to dermatology. Both groups had a similar number of false positives (a benign lesion initially diagnosed as malignant) and a similar proportion of false negatives (a malignant lesion initially diagnosed as benign). Overall, the results show that both specialities had similar outcomes when managing non-melanoma cutaneous lesions. Both groups adhere to the guidelines set out by the British Association of Dermatologists and the National Institute of Clinical Excellence when managing such lesions. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison of surgical conditions following premedication with oral clonidine versus oral diazepam for endoscopic sinus surgery: A randomized, double-blinded study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohini V Bhat Pai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS provides a challenge and an opportunity to the anesthesiologists to prove their mettle and give the surgeons a surgical field which can make their delicate surgery safer,more precise and faster. The aim of the study was to evaluate the surgical field and the rate of blood loss in patients premedicated with oral clonidine versus oral diazepam for endoscopic sinus surgery. Material and Methods: ASA I or II patients who were scheduled to undergo ESS were randomly allocated to group D (n = 30 or group C (n = 30. The patients′ vital parameters, propofol infusion rate, and rate of blood loss were observed and calculated. The surgeon, who was blinded, rated the visibility of the surgical field from grade 0-5. Results: In the clonidine group, the rate of blood loss, the surgical time, propofol infusion rate was found to be statistically lower as compared to the diazepam group. Also a higher number of patients in the clonidine group had a better surgical score (better surgical field than the diazepam group and vice versa. Conclusions: Premedication with clonidine as compared to diazepam, provides a better surgical field with less blood loss in patients undergoing ESS.

  15. Dental students’ perceptions of undergraduate clinical training in oral and maxillofacial surgery in an integrated curriculum in Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Dajani, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim was to understand dental students’ experiences with oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMS) teaching, their confidence levels in performing routine dento-alveolar operations, and the relationship between the students’ confidence level and the number of teeth extracted during the clinical practice. Methods: The survey questionnaire was distributed to 32 students at Aljouf University College of Dentistry, Saudi Arabia during their fourth and fifth year in 2015. Respondents were as...

  16. Midline submental intubation might be the preferred alternative to oral and nasal intubation in elective oral and craniomaxillofacial surgery when indicated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Huijun; Patil, Pavan Manohar

    2015-01-01

    No consensus exists to date regarding the best method of controlling the airway for oral or craniomaxillofacial surgery when orotracheal and nasotracheal intubations are unsuccessful or contraindicated. The most commonly used method of tracheostomy has been associated with a high degree of morbidity. Therefore, the present study was conducted to determine the indications, safety, efficacy, time required, drawbacks, complications, and costs of the midline submental intubation (SMI) approach in elective oral and craniomaxillofacial surgical procedures. A retrospective case series study was used to evaluate the surgical, financial, and photographic records of all patients who had undergone oral or craniomaxillofacial operations at Sharda University School of Dental Sciences, Greater Noida, from April 2006 to March 2014. The indications, drawbacks, time required for the procedure, ability to provide a secure airway, intra- and postoperative complications, and additional costs associated with SMI were analyzed. Of the 2,823 patients treated, the present study included 120 patients (97 men and 23 women, aged 19 to 60 years). The average time required for SMI was 10 ± 2 minutes. No episode of intraoperative oxygen desaturation was noted. One intraoperative complication, an injury to the ventral surface of the tongue, was encountered. Two patients developed infection at the skin incision site. No significant additional cost was incurred with the use of SMI. SMI has been successfully used in elective oral and craniomaxillofacial surgical procedures for which oral and nasal intubations were either not indicated or not possible. The advantages include a quick procedure, insignificant complications, the ability to provide a stable airway, and no added costs, making SMI a quick, safe, efficient, and cost-effective alternative in such cases. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Estimation of oral leukoplakia treatment records in the research of the Department of Maxillofacial and Oral Surgery, Medical University of Gdansk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starzyńska, Anna; Pawłowska, Anita; Renkielska, Dorota; Michajłowski, Igor; Sobjanek, Michał; Błażewicz, Izabela; Włodarkiewicz, Adam

    2015-04-01

    Oral leukoplakia (OL) is the most common potentially malignant lesion of the oral cavity. The purpose of the study was clinical and epidemiological analysis of patients with OL diagnosed and treated in the Department of Maxillofacial and Oral Surgery, Medical University of Gdansk, comparison of effectiveness of treatment methods, defining whether van der Waal level of OL influences treatment effectiveness, correlation between localization of OL and treatment effectiveness, and defining the optimal OL therapeutic method. Among 55 911 patients diagnosed and treated in the Department in the years 1999-2009, 204 people with OL were selected (104 women, 100 men, average age: 58.1 years). Treatment and observation period of 6 months was completed by 178 (87.25%) patients. Seventy-four patients were treated with cream containing 0.05% tretinoin. Sixty-three patients underwent cryosurgery, and 41 surgery. Control visits were made in week 2, 4, 6 and 8 and 6 months after completed treatment. Three hundred and twenty lesions of OL were diagnosed. According to van der Waal classification, the largest group of patients was classified into stage I and II. The percentage of totally cured patients was 90.07%. There were no statistic differences in effectiveness between surgical and cryosurgical treatment. Evaluation of OL treatment methods depends on localization of the lesions and its stage of progression. The effectiveness of treatment with locally applied tretinoin is smaller in comparison to surgery and cryosurgery. It allows to reduce the number and size of OL lesions, what makes it possible to reduce the number of ablative procedures.

  18. Tissue differentiation by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for automated oral and maxillofacial laser surgery: ex vivo pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zam, Azhar; Stelzle, Florian; Tangermann-Gerk, Katja; Adler, Werner; Nkenke, Emeka; Schmidt, Michael; Douplik, Alexandre

    2010-02-01

    Remote laser surgery lacks of haptic feedback during the laser ablation of tissue. Hence, there is a risk of iatrogenic damage or destruction of anatomical structures like nerves or salivary glands. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy provides a straightforward and simple approach for optical tissue differentiation. We measured diffuse reflectance from seven various tissue types ex vivo. We applied Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) to differentiate the seven tissue types and computed the area under the ROC curve (AUC). Special emphasis was taken on the identification of nerves and salivary glands as the most crucial tissue for maxillofacial surgery. The results show a promise for differentiating tissues as guidance for oral and maxillofacial laser surgery by means of diffuse reflectance.

  19. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Other Oral Surgeries Extractions and Other Oral Surgeries Oral and maxillofacial surgeons surgically treat the soft tissues of the ... and Other Oral Surgeries Extractions and Other Oral Surgeries Oral and maxillofacial surgeons surgically treat the soft tissues of the ...

  20. Decision making in third molar surgery: a survey of Brazilian oral and maxillofacial surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Igor Batista; Melo, Auremir Rocha; Fernandes, André Vajgel; Cunningham, Larry L; Laureano Filho, José R; Van Sickels, Joseph E

    2015-08-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the variations in decision making among Brazilian oral and maxillofacial surgeons (OMFS) and trainees in relation to third molar surgery. A survey on 18 diverse clinical situations related to the assessment and treatment of the third molar surgeries was conducted during the 20th Brazilian National OMFS meeting. Participants were divided into three groups according to their level of training. Another variable studied was length of experience. Correlation between the question answers and the variables was analysed using the chi-square test and the f test. The mean age of participants was 32.68 years, and their mean length of experience was 5.24 years. There were no statistical differences between the level of training and number of years of experience and the responses to 15 of the 18 questions on clinical situations. However, differences were found in responses to prophylactic extraction of asymptomatic third molars, use of non-steriodal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) during the preoperative surgical period and the use of additional imaging to plan extractions. The group with shorter time of experience (3.8 ± 3.94 years) tended to recommend extractions of asymptomatic third molars more frequently compared with the more experienced surgeons (P = 0.041). More experienced surgeons used NSAIDs in the preoperative surgical period, whereas the majority of the youngest surgeons (4.1 ± 5.96 years of experience) did not (P = 0.0042). The certificated trained and in practice group tended to treat deep lower third molar impactions based on the findings of a panoramic radiograph, without obtaining additional imaging [cone beam computed tomography (CBCT)] before treatment (P = 0.0132). Decision making regarding third molar treatment differs according to the level of training and is influenced by the number of years of experience. Therefore, further continuous education programmes in this area are warranted to make recommendations regarding

  1. A baseline audit of referral and treatment delivered to patients in the intermediate minor oral surgery service in Croydon PCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Eunan; Gallagher, Jennifer E; Kendall, Nick

    2012-01-01

    Patients attending for primary dental care may require oral surgery procedures beyond the capability of a generalist and thus need to be treated by a dentist with greater expertise. In the United Kingdom, it is increasingly accepted that such care may be provided in primary care settings by specialists or dentists with a special interest. In response to local pressures, an intermediate minor oral surgery (IMOS) service has been established in Croydon, south west London, to provide oral surgery treatment for non-urgent patients on referral. To audit the appropriateness and quality of oral surgery referrals after triage to an IMOS service in Croydon and to set standards for future audits on this topic. An audit tool was developed in line with the local referral guidelines and agreed with local stakeholders. Information on 501 (10%) triaged referrals to IMOS practices over a 24-month period was obtained through the referral management centre. A 10% sample of referrals per month to each practice was calculated and IMOS providers randomly selected the relevant patient records. Using an agreed audit pro forma, information on the indications for referral, treatment provided, and dates relating to patient management, in addition to the age and sex of patients, was collected from the IMOS providers by one investigator. Descriptive analysis of the data was performed. Of the 501 patient records that were examined, 99% of patients were treated in IMOS practices, with only three (less than 1%) patients being referred on to hospital consultant services. The largest proportion (237; 40%) of referrals was for the extraction of teeth considered to have special difficulty, followed by lower third molars (154; 26%). Almost one-third (159; 32%) of patients were referred for more than one procedure. One in eight (72; 13%) teeth removed by the IMOS providers were recorded as a simple extraction without medical complications. In general, patients were referred appropriately to the

  2. The results of CO2 laser surgery in patients with oral leukoplakia : a 25 year follow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Hem, PS; Nauta, JM; van der Wal, JE; Roodenburg, JLN

    Oral leukoplakia, is an important premalignant Lesion of the oral mucosa. We treat this Lesion prophylactically with CO2 laser evaporation. In the period from 1976 to 2001, a group of 200 patients with 282 oral leukoplakias were treated by CO2 laser evaporation. In a follow up period of 1-219 months

  3. Is There a Role for Oral Antibiotic Preparation Alone Before Colorectal Surgery? ACS-NSQIP Analysis by Coarsened Exact Matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfinkle, Richard; Abou-Khalil, Jad; Morin, Nancy; Ghitulescu, Gabriela; Vasilevsky, Carol-Ann; Gordon, Philip; Demian, Marie; Boutros, Marylise

    2017-07-01

    Recent studies demonstrated reduced postoperative complications using combined mechanical bowel and oral antibiotic preparation before elective colorectal surgery. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of these 2 interventions on surgical site infections, anastomotic leak, ileus, major morbidity, and 30-day mortality in a large cohort of elective colectomies. This is a retrospective comparison of 30-day outcomes using the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program colectomy-targeted database with coarsened exact matching. Interventions were performed in hospitals participating in the national surgical database. Adult patients who underwent elective colectomy from 2012 to 2014 were included. Preoperative bowel preparations were evaluated. The primary outcomes measured were surgical site infections, anastomotic leak, postoperative ileus, major morbidity, and 30-day mortality. A total of 40,446 patients were analyzed: 13,219 (32.7%), 13,935 (34.5%), and 1572 (3.9%) in the no-preparation, mechanical bowel preparation alone, and oral antibiotic preparation alone groups, and 11,720 (29.0%) in the combined preparation group. After matching, 9800, 1461, and 8819 patients remained in the mechanical preparation, oral antibiotic preparation, and combined preparation groups for comparison with patients without preparation. On conditional logistic regression of matched patients, oral antibiotic preparation alone was protective of surgical site infection (OR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.45-0.87), anastomotic leak (OR, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.34-0.97), ileus (OR, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.59-0.98), and major morbidity (OR, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.55-0.96), but not mortality (OR, 0.32; 95% CI, 0.08-1.18), whereas a regimen of combined oral antibiotics and mechanical bowel preparation was protective for all 5 major outcomes. When directly compared with oral antibiotic preparation alone, the combined regimen was not associated with any difference in any of the 5 postoperative

  4. Benefits of post-operative oral protein supplementation in gastrointestinal surgery patients: A systematic review of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crickmer, Mike; Dunne, Colum P; O'Regan, Andrew; Coffey, J Calvin; Dunne, Suzanne S

    2016-07-27

    To evaluate published trials examining oral post-operative protein supplementation in patients having undergone gastrointestinal surgery and assessment of reported results. Database searches (MEDLINE, BIOSIS, EMBASE, Cochrane Trials, Cinahl, and CAB), searches of reference lists of relevant papers, and expert referral were used to identify prospective randomized controlled clinical trials. The following terms were used to locate articles: "oral'' or "enteral'' and "postoperative care'' or "post-surgical'' and "proteins'' or "milk proteins'' or "dietary proteins'' or "dietary supplements'' or "nutritional supplements''. In databases that allowed added limitations, results were limited to clinical trials that studied humans, and publications between 1990 and 2014. Quality of collated studies was evaluated using a qualitative assessment tool and the collective results interpreted. Searches identified 629 papers of which, following review, 7 were deemed eligible for qualitative evaluation. Protein supplementation does not appear to affect mortality but does reduce weight loss, and improve nutritional status. Reduction in grip strength deterioration was observed in a majority of studies, and approximately half of the studies described reduced complication rates. No changes in duration of hospital stay or plasma protein levels were reported. There is evidence to suggest that protein supplementation should be routinely provided post-operatively to this population. However, despite comprehensive searches, clinical trials that varied only the amount of protein provided via oral nutritional supplements (discrete from other nutritional components) were not found. At present, there is some evidence to support routinely prescribed oral nutritional supplements that contain protein for gastrointestinal surgery patients in the immediate post-operative stage. The optimal level of protein supplementation required to maximise recovery in gastrointestinal surgery patients is

  5. The Benefit of the Smartphone in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery: Smartphone Use Among Maxillofacial Surgery Trainees and iPhone Apps for the Maxillofacial Surgeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Elinor; Payne, Karl Frederick Braekkan; Ahmed, Nabeela; Goodson, Alexander

    2015-06-01

    The use of smartphones has soared among healthcare professionals in recent years, with estimated figures reporting that the majority of clinicians own and use smartphones in the workplace. Smartphones allow the clinician to carry textbooks in their pocket, write documents on the move and use email and internet to enhance productivity and clinical decision making. These advances in smartphone technology have enabled access to healthcare information for the clinician and transfer of data between team members, giving rise to the phenomenon of telemedicine. With the ability to instantly transfer clinical data to the off-site surgeon, combined with purpose-built medical apps, the smartphone is rapidly becoming an invaluable tool for the modern surgeon. Many studies have linked the benefits of smartphones and apps in other surgical specialities, but no article to date has highlighted the merits and full scope of this technology to the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeon. We report that 94 % of British maxillofacial surgery trainees own a smartphone, with 61 % owning an iPhone. 89 % of trainees questioned had downloaded medical apps and used them regularly during clinical activities. We discuss the clinical application of the smartphone in the field of oral and maxillofacial surgery and review a list of useful and relevant apps for the modern maxillofacial surgeon using the iPhone as an example platform.

  6. Hipnosis como complemento en la cirugía oral del adulto mayor Hypnosis as a complement to oral surgery in elderly persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elina Muñiz Manzano

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: el envejecimiento poblacional es un fenómeno mundial y la cirugía oral es compleja en los adultos mayores, por lo que la preparación preoperatoria es de vital importancia para una evolución satisfactoria. Este trabajo tiene como objetivo demostrar la eficacia de la hipnosis en pacientes con temor en la cirugía oral del adulto mayor. Métodos: se realizó un estudio descriptivo, transversal, con muestra de 20 pacientes de 60 años o más, atendidos en la consulta de Cirugía Maxilofacial del Hospital Universitario "Comandante Manuel Fajardo", en el año 2011, donde se analizaron las variables edad, sexo, número de sesiones de hipnosis, antecedentes patológicos, diagnósticos más frecuentes y temor. Resultados: el mayor número de pacientes se encontró entre 60-69 años de edad, (70 % y el menor en 70-79, (30 %. El sexo femenino prevaleció con 70 %. El número de sesiones fue en el grupo de 60-69 con 58, con un promedio total de 4 por pacientes. En los antecedentes patológicos más frecuentes fue la hipertensión arterial en 14 (70 % y le siguió la diabetes tipo II en 2 (10 % En los diagnósticos más frecuentes fue la caries de cuarto grado con 10 (50 % seguido por los dientes parodontósicos con 4 (20 %. El temor se midió en una escala confeccionada, en la que los pacientes con cifras de l0, 8 y 7 se redujeron a 4 y 5. Conclusiones: Se demuestra la efectividad de la terapia de hipnosis para disminuir el temor y realizar la cirugía oral en el adulto mayor.Introduction: population aging is a worldwide phenomenon, and oral surgery is complex in elderly patients. Therefore, preoperative preparation is vital to their satisfactory evolution. The purpose of the present paper is to show the efficacy of hypnosis in elderly patients who fear oral surgery. Methods: a descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted with a sample of 20 patients aged 60 or over, cared for at the maxillofacial surgery service of Comandante Manuel

  7. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for optical nerve identification. Preliminary ex vivo results for feedback controlled oral and maxillofacial laser surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelzle, Florian; Zam, Azhar; Adler, Werner; Douplik, Alexandre; Tangermann-Gerk, Katja; Nkenke, Emeka; Neukam, Friedrich Wilhelm; Schmidt, Michael

    Objective: Laser surgery has many advantages. However, due to a lack of haptic feedback it is accompanied by the risk of iatrogenic nerve damage. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possibilities of optical nerve identification by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy to set the base for a feedback control system to enhance nerve preservation in oral and maxillofacial laser surgery. Materials and Methods: Diffuse reflectance spectra of nerve tissue, skin, mucosa, fat tissue, muscle, cartilage and bone (15120 spectra) of ex vivo pig heads were acquired in the wavelength range of 350-650 nm. Tissue differentiation was performed by principal components analysis (PCA) followed by linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Specificity and sensitivity were calculated by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and the area under curve (AUC). Results: Nerve tissue could correctly be identified and differed from skin, mucosa, fat tissue, muscle, cartilage and bone in more than 90% of the cases (AUC results) with a specificity of over 78% and a sensitivity of more than 86%. Conclusion: Nerve tissue can be identified by diffuse reflectance spectroscopy with high precision and reliability. The results may set the base for a feedback system to prevent iatrogenic nerve damage performing oral and maxillofacial laser surgery.

  8. Venous thromboembolism after oral and maxillofacial oncologic surgery: Report and analysis of 14 cases in Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Liu, J; Yin, X; Hu, J; Kalfarentzos, E; Zhang, C; Xu, L

    2017-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) including deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) is a leading cause of death in cancer patients. The aim of this study was to explore the potential risk factor of VTE in oral and maxillofacial oncological surgery. The data of patients who received operation in our institution were gathered in this retrospective study. A diagnosis of VTE was screened and confirmed by computer tomography angiography (CTA) of pulmonary artery or ultrasonography examination of lower extremity. Medical history and all perioperative details were analyzed. 14 patients were diagnosed as VTE, including 6 cases of PE, 7 cases of DVT, 1case of DVT and PE. The mean age of these patients was 62.07 years. Reconstruction was performed in 12 patients of these cases, most of which were diagnosed as malignance. Mean length of surgery was 8.74 hours, and lower extremity deep venous cannula (DVC) was performed in all these patients. We analyzed several characters of oral and maxillofacial surgery and suggested pay attention to lower extremity DVC which had a high correlation with DVT according to our data.

  9. Outcome and prognostic factors following curative-intent surgery for oral tumours in dogs: 234 cases (2004 to 2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarowitz, B N; Davis, G J; Kim, S

    2017-03-01

    To describe the long-term outcomes and prognostic factors associated with curative-intent surgery for oral tumours in a large series of dogs. Retrospective review of records for dogs with oral tumours treated with curative-intent surgery. Data collected included signalment, weight, surgical procedure, lymph node staging results, computed tomography results, tumour size, histopathology results including margin evaluation, complications, adjunctive therapies, local recurrence or metastasis, date and cause of death and owner satisfaction. Median cause-specific survival was shortest for malignant melanoma (206 days) and osteosarcoma (209 days). Local recurrence rate was highest for fibrosarcoma (54·2%) and distant metastatic rate was highest for malignant melanoma (30%). Curative-intent surgery resulted in complete surgical margins in 85·2% of cases. Results suggest tumour type, completeness of excision, tumour size, and age may affect disease-free interval and cause-specific survival. Fibrosarcoma had a higher risk of recurrence compared to other tumour types. © 2017 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  10. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Oral Surgeries Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Injury / Trauma Surgery Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Oral, Head and Neck Pathology TMJ and Facial Pain Wisdom Teeth Management Procedures Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are ...

  11. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Other Oral Surgeries Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Injury / Trauma Surgery Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Oral, Head and Neck Pathology TMJ and Facial Pain Wisdom Teeth Management Procedures Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons ...

  12. Why Do Women Choose to Enter Academic Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolokythas, Antonia; Miloro, Michael

    2016-05-01

    To determine why women choose to enter an academic career in oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMS). An online questionnaire was developed and e-mailed to female OMS surgeons to assess the reasons women choose to pursue an academic career, the perceived positive and negative features of academia for women, and proposed measures to increase the percentage of women choosing to specialize in OMS and pursue an academic career. Thirty-one female OMS surgeons completed the questionnaire; 1 additional participant accessed the survey but did not respond to any of the questions. There were 25 full-time academics and 6 part-time academics (≥50% time commitment). Of the responders, 72% were married, and of these, 72% were married before entering academics. Forty-seven percent of the women had children, all during their academic tenure. Among the full-time academicians with children, only 2 (7.7%) reported moderate difficulty finding the time for childbirth and maternity leave, whereas 3 of the 5 part-time academics with children reported moderate or significant difficulty with childbirth and maternity leave. Factors associated with choosing and enjoying an academic career are involvement in resident-student teaching (78%), followed by colleague camaraderie and collaboration (65.6%), research potential (50%), time flexibility, and not having to deal with excessive "business" practice issues (33%). The main reason for considering leaving an academic OMS career and/or among the least enjoyable aspects of being in academics was the potential for a higher income in private practice (56%). Less significant reasons for considering leaving an academic OMS career were a more flexible work schedule in the private sector and less institutional red tape (37.5%), as well as independence/being in control and more family time (22%). Engaging residents and students by female OMS surgeons, better mentorship from academic OMS surgeons, and increasing the number of women serving in leadership

  13. In vitro studies of nanosilver-doped titanium implants for oral and maxillofacial surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pokrowiecki R

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Rafał Pokrowiecki,1,2 Tomasz Zaręba,3 Barbara Szaraniec,4 Krzysztof Pałka,5 Agnieszka Mielczarek,6 Elżbieta Menaszek,7 Stefan Tyski3,8 1Center for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery, Voivodeship Children’s Hospital, Olsztyn, 2Department of Oral Surgery, Jagiellonian Medical University, Kraków, 3Department of Antibiotics and Microbiology, National Medicines Institute, Warsaw, 4Faculty of Material Science and Ceramics, AGH University of Science and Technology, Kraków, 5Department of Materials Engineering, Lublin University of Technology, Lublin, 6Department of Conservative Dentistry, Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, 7Department of Cytobiology, Collegium Medicum, Jagiellonian University, Kraków, 8Department of Pharmaceutical Microbiology, Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland Abstract: The addition of an antibacterial agent to dental implants may provide the opportunity to decrease the percentage of implant failures due to peri-implantitis. For this purpose, in this study, the potential efficacy of nanosilver-doped titanium biomaterials was determined. Titanium disks were incorporated with silver nanoparticles over different time periods by Tollens reaction, which is considered to be an eco-friendly, cheap, and easy-to-perform method. The surface roughness, wettability, and silver release profile of each disc were measured. In addition, the antibacterial activity was also evaluated by using disk diffusion tests for bacteria frequently isolated from the peri-implant biofilm: Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus sanguis, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli. Cytotoxicity was evaluated in vitro in a natural human osteoblasts cell culture. The addition of nanosilver significantly increased the surface roughness and decreased the wettability in a dose-dependent manner. These surfaces were significantly toxic to all the tested bacteria following a 48-hour exposure

  14. oral

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chlorhexidine 0,2% gluconate is used as a mouth rinse and is an effective antibacterial agent. Its primary side- effects are staining of the teeth and the oral mucosa, particularly the dorsal surface of the tongue. However, this is transient. It has been shown to be effective as a prophylactic agent in preventing oral candidosis in ...

  15. Dental students’ perceptions of undergraduate clinical training in oral and maxillofacial surgery in an integrated curriculum in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dajani, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim was to understand dental students’ experiences with oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMS) teaching, their confidence levels in performing routine dento-alveolar operations, and the relationship between the students’ confidence level and the number of teeth extracted during the clinical practice. Methods: The survey questionnaire was distributed to 32 students at Aljouf University College of Dentistry, Saudi Arabia during their fourth and fifth year in 2015. Respondents were asked to rate 19 items, which represent a student’s confidence in performing routine surgical interventions, using a four-point Likert scale (1=very little confidence, 4=very confident). A multivariate regression was computed between average confidence and the variables: weekly hours devoted to studying oral and maxillofacial surgery, college grade point average, and the total number of teeth extracted. Results: The response rate was 100%. Students revealed the highest level of confidence in giving local anesthesia (96.9%), understanding extraction indications (93.8%), and performing simple extractions (90.6%). Less confidence was shown with handling difficult extractions (50.0%), extracting molars with separation (50.0%) or extracting third molars (56.3%). The average confidence in performing surgical procedures was 2.88 (SD=0.55), ranging from 1.79 to 3.89. A given student’s confidence increased with an increase in the total number of teeth extracted (P=0.003). Conclusion: It reveals a significant impact of undergraduate clinical training on students’ confidence in performing oral and maxillofacial surgery clinical procedures: The more clinical experience the students had, the more confidence they reported. PMID:26442715

  16. Benefits of post-operative oral protein supplementation in gastrointestinal surgery patients: A systematic review of clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crickmer, Mike; Dunne, Colum P; O’Regan, Andrew; Coffey, J Calvin; Dunne, Suzanne S

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate published trials examining oral post-operative protein supplementation in patients having undergone gastrointestinal surgery and assessment of reported results. METHODS: Database searches (MEDLINE, BIOSIS, EMBASE, Cochrane Trials, Cinahl, and CAB), searches of reference lists of relevant papers, and expert referral were used to identify prospective randomized controlled clinical trials. The following terms were used to locate articles: “oral’’ or “enteral’’ and “postoperative care’’ or “post-surgical’’ and “proteins’’ or “milk proteins’’ or “dietary proteins’’ or “dietary supplements’’ or “nutritional supplements’’. In databases that allowed added limitations, results were limited to clinical trials that studied humans, and publications between 1990 and 2014. Quality of collated studies was evaluated using a qualitative assessment tool and the collective results interpreted. RESULTS: Searches identified 629 papers of which, following review, 7 were deemed eligible for qualitative evaluation. Protein supplementation does not appear to affect mortality but does reduce weight loss, and improve nutritional status. Reduction in grip strength deterioration was observed in a majority of studies, and approximately half of the studies described reduced complication rates. No changes in duration of hospital stay or plasma protein levels were reported. There is evidence to suggest that protein supplementation should be routinely provided post-operatively to this population. However, despite comprehensive searches, clinical trials that varied only the amount of protein provided via oral nutritional supplements (discrete from other nutritional components) were not found. At present, there is some evidence to support routinely prescribed oral nutritional supplements that contain protein for gastrointestinal surgery patients in the immediate post-operative stage. CONCLUSION: The optimal level of protein

  17. Dental students’ perceptions of undergraduate clinical training in oral and maxillofacial surgery in an integrated curriculum in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Al-Dajani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim was to understand dental students’ experiences with oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMS teaching, their confidence levels in performing routine dento-alveolar operations, and the relationship between the students’ confidence level and the number of teeth extracted during the clinical practice. Methods: The survey questionnaire was distributed to 32 students at Aljouf University College of Dentistry, Saudi Arabia during their fourth and fifth year in 2015. Respondents were asked to rate 19 items, which represent a student’s confidence in performing routine surgical interventions, using a four-point Likert scale (1=very little confidence, 4=very confident. A multivariate regression was computed between average confidence and the variables: weekly hours devoted to studying oral and maxillofacial surgery, college grade point average, and the total number of teeth extracted. Results: The response rate was 100%. Students revealed the highest level of confidence in giving local anesthesia (96.9%, understanding extraction indications (93.8%, and performing simple extractions (90.6%. Less confidence was shown with handling difficult extractions (50.0%, extracting molars with separation (50.0% or extracting third molars (56.3%. The average confidence in performing surgical procedures was 2.88 (SD=0.55, ranging from 1.79 to 3.89. A given student’s confidence increased with an increase in the total number of teeth extracted (P=0.003. Conclusion: It reveals a significant impact of undergraduate clinical training on students’ confidence in performing oral and maxillofacial surgery clinical procedures: The more clinical experience the students had, the more confidence they reported.

  18. Submental intubation in paediatric oral and maxillofacial surgery: Review of the literature and report of four cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taiwo, Olanrewaju Abdurrazaq; Ibikunle, Adebayo Aremu; Braimah, Ramat Oyebunmi; Suleiman, Musa Kallamu

    2015-01-01

    Several oral and maxillofacial surgery procedures require the simultaneous use of the oropharyngeal space by both the surgeons and the anaesthetists. This poses a lot of challenges especially in optimally securing the airway. Nasotracheal intubation or tracheostomy with their significant morbidity might even be contraindicated in these scenarios owing to several factors elucidated in the literature. Submental endotracheal intubation might be the last resort in adequately protecting the airway without interfering with the surgery. It also permits concurrent access to the dental occlusion and nasal pyramid without the risk associated with nasal intubation and morbidity of tracheostomy. Contraindications include patients who require long periods of assisted ventilation and a severe traumatic wound on the floor of the mouth. Complications include localised infection and sepsis, poor wound healing or scarring, and post-operative salivary fistula. The rationale for this study is to describe the indications, contraindications and the technique of submental endotracheal intubation as performed in our hospital. PMID:26712300

  19. Longitudinal evaluation of restricted mouth opening (trismus) in patients following primary surgery for oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, B; D'Souza, J; Perinparajah, N; Lowe, D; Rogers, S N

    2011-03-01

    Trismus is a serious problem for some patients after oral and oropharyngeal cancer, and it has a detrimental impact on quality of life and function. We know of few published papers that include preoperative assessment in reports on the longitudinal outcomes of mouth opening after oral and oropharyngeal surgery. We prospectively measured mouth opening in patients who had primary surgery for oral and oropharyngeal cancer from baseline to six months to find out the characteristics at baseline and at discharge of those who develop trismus at six months. Ninety-eight patients were eligible between February 2007 and March 2008, and 64 (65%) were recruited into the study. The range of mouth opening was measured on three occasions: before operation, on the ward before discharge from hospital, and at follow-up six months after operation. Using a criterion of 35 mm or less as an indication of trismus, 30% (19/63) had trismus before operation, 65% (37/57) at hospital discharge, and 54% (26/48) at six month follow-up. Patients at high risk of trismus were those with T stage 3 or 4 cancers who required free flap reconstruction and adjuvant radiotherapy; radiotherapy was the most significant factor at six months. Trismus at discharge was a prediction of trismus at six months. Interventions such as spatulas or a passive jaw mobiliser should be targeted at patients at high risk early in the postoperative phase. The efficacy of such interventions needs further research. Copyright © 2010 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. H-classic: a new method to identify classic articles in Implant Dentistry, Periodontics, and Oral Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Flor-Martínez, Maria; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; Sánchez-Fernández, Elena; Piattelli, Adriano; Cobo, Manuel Jesus; Herrera-Viedma, Enrique

    2016-10-01

    The study of classic papers permits analysis of the past, present, and future of a specific area of knowledge. This type of analysis is becoming more frequent and more sophisticated. Our objective was to use the H-classics method, based on the h-index, to analyze classic papers in Implant Dentistry, Periodontics, and Oral Surgery (ID, P, and OS). First, an electronic search of documents related to ID, P, and OS was conducted in journals indexed in Journal Citation Reports (JCR) 2014 within the category 'Dentistry, Oral Surgery & Medicine'. Second, Web of Knowledge databases were searched using Mesh terms related to ID, P, and OS. Finally, the H-classics method was applied to select the classic articles in these disciplines, collecting data on associated research areas, document type, country, institutions, and authors. Of 267,611 documents related to ID, P, and OS retrieved from JCR journals (2014), 248 were selected as H-classics. They were published in 35 journals between 1953 and 2009, most frequently in the Journal of Clinical Periodontology (18.95%), the Journal of Periodontology (18.54%), International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Implants (9.27%), and Clinical Oral Implant Research (6.04%). These classic articles derived from the USA in 49.59% of cases and from Europe in 47.58%, while the most frequent host institution was the University of Gothenburg (17.74%) and the most frequent authors were J. Lindhe (10.48%) and S. Socransky (8.06%). The H-classics approach offers an objective method to identify core knowledge in clinical disciplines such as ID, P, and OS. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Ethical issues in instructions to authors of journals in oral-craniomaxillofacial/facial plastic surgery and related specialties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitak-Arnnop, Poramate; Bauer, Ute; Dhanuthai, Kittipong; Brückner, Martin; Herve, Christian; Meningaud, Jean-Paul; Hemprich, Alexander

    2010-12-01

    Ethical standards of biomedical publications are associated with editorial leadership, such as contents of instructions to authors and journal's mechanisms for research and publication ethics. To compare ethical issues in the guidelines for authors in oral-craniomaxillofacial/facial plastic surgery (OCM-FPS) journals with those in plastic surgery and otorhinolaryngology/head and neck surgery (ORL-HNS) journals, and to evaluate the relationship between journal's impact factor (IF) and ethical issues in the instructions to authors. This study used a cross-sectional study design. The predictor variables were journal's specialty and IF. The outcome variable was the presence of seven ethical issues in the online versions of journal's instructions to authors in October 2009. We included only journals with identifiable IF for 2008, published in English, French, German and Thai. Appropriate descriptive and univariate statistics were computed for all study variables. The level of statistical significance was set at Pjournals: seven OCM-FPS (14.6%), 14 plastic surgery (29.2%) and 27 ORL-HNS (56.2%) journals. Only four journals (8.3%) mentioned all ethical issues in their guidelines for authors. Neither journal's specialty nor IF was linked to completeness of the ethical requirements. The results of this study suggest that ethical issues in the instructions to authors of most IF-indexed journals in OCM-FPS, plastic surgery and ORL-HNS are incomplete, regardless of specialty and IF. There is room for substantial improvement to uphold scientific integrity of these surgical specialties. Copyright © 2010 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Outbreak of bacterial endocarditis associated with an oral surgery practice: New Jersey public health surveillance, 2013 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Kathleen M; Mehr, Jason S; Greeley, Rebecca D; Montoya, Lindsay A; Kulkarni, Prathit A; Frontin, Sonya; Weigle, Trevor J; Giles, Helen; Montana, Barbara E

    2018-03-01

    In October and November 2014, the New Jersey Department of Health received reports of 3 patients who developed Enterococcus faecalis endocarditis after undergoing surgical procedures at the same oral surgery practice in New Jersey. Bacterial endocarditis is an uncommon but life-threatening condition; 3 patients with enterococcal endocarditis associated with a single oral surgery practice is unusual. An investigation was initiated because of the potential ongoing public health risk. Public health officials conducted retrospective surveillance to identify additional patients with endocarditis associated with the practice. They interviewed patients using a standardized questionnaire. An investigative public health team inspected the office environment, interviewed staff, and reviewed medical records. Public health officials identified 15 confirmed patients with enterococcal endocarditis of those patients who underwent procedures from December 2012 through August 2014. Among these patients, 12 (80%) underwent cardiac surgery. One (7%) patient died from complications of endocarditis and subsequent cardiac surgery. Breaches of recommended infection prevention practices were identified that might have resulted in transmission of enterococci during the administration of intravenous sedation, including failure to perform hand hygiene and failure to maintain aseptic technique when performing procedures and handling medications. This investigation highlights the importance of adhering to infection prevention recommendations in dental care settings. No additional patients with endocarditis were identified after infection prevention and control recommendations were implemented. Infection prevention training should be emphasized at all levels of professional dental training. All dental health care personnel establishing intravenous treatment and administering intravenous medications should be trained in safe injection practices. Copyright © 2018 American Dental Association

  3. Effect of perioperative oral care on prevention of postoperative pneumonia associated with esophageal cancer surgery: A multicenter case-control study with propensity score matching analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soutome, Sakiko; Yanamoto, Souichi; Funahara, Madoka; Hasegawa, Takumi; Komori, Takahide; Yamada, Shin-Ichi; Kurita, Hiroshi; Yamauchi, Chika; Shibuya, Yasuyuki; Kojima, Yuka; Nakahara, Hirokazu; Oho, Takahiko; Umeda, Masahiro

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of oral care in prevention of postoperative pneumonia associated with esophageal cancer surgery.Postoperative pneumonia is a severe adverse event associated with esophageal cancer surgery. It is thought to be caused by aspiration of oropharyngeal fluid containing pathogens. However, the relationship between oral health status and postoperative pneumonia has not been well investigated.This study included 539 patients with esophageal cancer undergoing surgery at 1 of 7 university hospitals. While 306 patients received perioperative oral care, 233 did not. Various clinical factors as well as occurrence of postoperative pneumonia were retrospectively evaluated. Propensity-score matching was performed to minimize selection biases associated with comparison of retrospective data between the oral care and control groups. Factors related to postoperative pneumonia were analyzed by logistic regression analysis.Of the original 539 patients, 103 (19.1%) experienced postoperative pneumonia. The results of multivariate analysis of the 420 propensity score-matched patients revealed longer operation time, postoperative dysphagia, and lack of oral care intervention to be significantly correlated with postoperative pneumonia.The present findings demonstrate that perioperative oral care can reduce the risk of postoperative pneumonia in patients undergoing esophageal cancer surgery.

  4. Early oral feeding after elective abdominal surgery--what are the issues?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, Thue; Kehlet, Henrik

    2002-01-01

    This review analyzes the literature and the historical concerns (restrictions, traditions, nasogastric tube) and pathophysiologic factors (postoperative ileus, risk of anastomotic dehiscence, nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite) invoked for not instituting early oral feeding after major abdominal...

  5. Randomized clinical trial of laxatives and oral nutritional supplements within an enhanced recovery after surgery protocol following liver resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, P O; van Dam, R M; Bukkems, S F F W; McKeown, D W; Parks, R W; Preston, T; Dejong, C H C; Garden, O J; Fearon, K C H

    2010-08-01

    Routine laxatives may expedite gastrointestinal recovery and early tolerance of food within an enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) programme. Combined with carbohydrate loading and oral nutritional supplements (ONS), it may further enhance recovery of gastrointestinal function and promote earlier overall recovery. Seventy-four patients undergoing liver resection were randomized in a two-by-two factorial design to receive either postoperative magnesium hydroxide as a laxative, preoperative carbohydrate loading and postoperative ONS, their combination or a control group. Patients were managed within an ERAS programme of care. The primary outcome measure was time to first passage of stool. Secondary outcome measures were gastric emptying, postoperative oral calorie intake, time to functional recovery and length of hospital stay. Sixty-eight patients completed the trial. The laxative group had a significantly reduced time to passage of stool: median (interquartile range) 4 (3-5) versus 5 (4-6) days (P = 0.034). The ONS group showed a trend towards a shorter time to passage of stool (P = 0.076) but there was no evidence of interaction in patients randomized to the combination regimen. Median length of hospital stay was 6 (4-7) days. There were no differences in secondary outcomes between groups. Within an ERAS protocol for patients undergoing liver resection, routine postoperative laxatives result in an earlier first passage of stool but the overall rate of recovery is unaltered. Copyright (c) 2010 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Dabigatran: A new oral anticoagulant. Guidelines to follow in oral surgery procedures. A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Corcuera, M; Ramírez-Martínez-Acitores, L; López-Pintor, R-M; Casañas-Gil, E; Hernández-Vallejo, G

    2016-11-01

    Dabigatran is a newly commercialized drug that is replacing other anticoagulants in the prevention of venous thromboembolism, stroke and systemic arterial valve embolism. It acts directly on thrombin presenting in a dynamic and predictable way, which does not require monitoring these patients. Therefore, we consider the need to assess whether their use increases the risk of bleeding involved before any dental treatment. We performed a systematic review with a bibliographic search in PubMed/Medline along with the Cochrane Library. We excluded articles dealing with all anticoagulants other than dabigatran, and works about surgical treatments in anatomical locations other than the oral cavity. We included a total of 13 papers of which 1 was a randomized clinical trial, 9 narrative literature reviews, 1 case series, 2 clinical cases and 1 expert opinion. Because we did not obtain any properly designed clinical trials, we were unable to conduct a meta-analysis. Currently, there is no consensus on the procedure to be followed in patients taking dabigatran. However, all authors agree to treat each case individually in accordance to the risk of embolism, postoperative bleeding and renal function. Also, it is necessary to perform minimally invasive interventions, and take the appropriate local anti-hemolytic measures.

  7. The Assessment of Oral Microflora Exposed to 3% Ethanolic Extract of Brazilian Green Propolis Preparation Used for Hygiene Maintenance following Minor Oral Surgeries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morawiec, Tadeusz; Wojtyczka, Robert D.; Niedzielska, Iwona; Bubiłek-Bogacz, Anna; Wróbel, Jacek; Tanasiewicz, Marta; Wesołowski, Piotr; Król, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of a topically administered hygienic preparation containing a 3% ethanolic extract of Brazilian green propolis (EEP-B) on oral microflora spectrum changes in a group of patients who underwent common oral surgery procedures. Two gel samples were compared: the tested gel containing an active ingredient, that is, a 3% EEP-B (gel GA), and a placebo as the negative control (gel GC). The collection of microbiological material included 14 patients requiring surgical extraction of wisdom molars and short endosseous implant installation. Clinical examinations were carried out as follow-up, that is, baseline and after 5-6 weeks' time. During the first and subsequent assessment, swabs were taken from the mucosal surface. The number of microorganism species was found to have increased following the application of GC gel over the period of 5-6 weeks. This mainly affected Gram-positive rods and bacilli as well as Gram-negative rods. Application of the GA gel enriched with 3% EEP-B caused a profound reduction in the amount of Neisseria spp. and Bifidobacterium spp. strains. Elimination of seven species of microorganisms was observed: Streptococcus acidominimus, Streptococcus oralis, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Veillonella parvula, Bifidobacterium breve, Bifidobacterium longum, and Lactobacillus acidophilus. PMID:26380300

  8. Incidence of venous thromboembolism in oral and maxillofacial surgery: a retrospective analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forouzanfar, T.; Heymans, M.W.; van Schuilenburg, A.; Zweegman, S.; Schulten, E.A.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    This study retrospectively investigates the incidence and risk factors for venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients undergoing maxillofacial surgery. Data were obtained from patients treated between January 2005 and June 2006. Patients’ records were reviewed for complaints and information relating

  9. Incidence of venous thromboembolism in oral and maxillofacial surgery: a retrospective analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forouzanfar, T.; Heijmans, M.W.; van Schuilenburg, A.; Zweegman, S.; Schulten, E.A.

    2010-01-01

    This study retrospectively investigates the incidence and risk factors for venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients undergoing maxillofacial surgery. Data were obtained from patients treated between January 2005 and June 2006. Patients' records were reviewed for complaints and information relating

  10. [Correlations of plasma concentrations of β-amyloid peptide and S-100β with postoperative cognitive dysfunction in patients undergoing oral and maxillofacial cancer surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Bing; Sun, Yuan-Qing; Jiang, Jue; Xu, Hui

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the changes of perioperative plasma concentrations of Aβ 1-40 and S-100β to determine the relationship with postoperative cognitive dysfunction in elderly patients undergoing oral and maxillofacial cancer surgeries. One hundred and fifteen patients aged at least 60 years undergoing oral and maxillofacial tumor resection were investigated between May 2014 to December 2014.Neuropsychological tests for detecting postoperative cognitive dysfunction(POCD) were performed one day before surgery and 7 days postoperatively. According to the results of neuropsychological tests on day 7, patients were divided into POCD group and non-POCD group.Plasma values of Aβ 1-40 and S-100β were determined with enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) before anesthesia induction, 24 h and 7 days after surgery. The data were analyzed using SPSS 19.0 software package. According to the definition, POCD was present in 37 of 115 (32.3%) patients 1 week after surgery. Compared with pre-anesthesia, S-100β levels in POCD group were significantly increased (Psurgery (Poral and maxillofacial surgeries with general anesthesia. The increasing levels of Aβ 1-40 , S-100β may be associated with the occurence of POCD. Patients with long-lasting operation and high concentrations of Aβ 1-40 and S-100β after surgeries were at a higher risk of POCD. The clinical values of Aβ 1-40 and S-100 as predictive measurements of POCD after oral and maxillofacial cancer surgery appear to be reasonable.

  11. Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and sterile gloves. Before the surgery begins, a time out is held during which the surgical team confirms ... the Consumer Version. DOCTORS: Click here for the Professional Version What Participants Need to Know About Clinical ...

  12. Surveillance of antibiotic and analgesic use in the Oral Surgery Department of the University Dentistry Clinical Center of Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haliti NR

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Naim R Haliti,1 Fehim R Haliti,2 Ferit K Koçani,3 Ali A Gashi,4 Shefqet I Mrasori,3 Valon I Hyseni,5 Samir I Bytyqi,5 Lumnije L Krasniqi,2 Ardiana F Murtezani,5 Shaip L Krasniqi5 1Department of Forensic Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Prishtina “Hasan Prishtina”, 2Department of Children Dentistry, University Dentistry Clinical Center of Kosovo, 3Department of Oral Disease, University Dentistry Clinical Center of Kosovo, 4Department of Oral Surgery, University Dentistry Clinical Center of Kosovo, 5Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology and Clinical Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Prishtina “Hasan Prishtina”, Prishtina, Kosovo Background: Because Kosovo has no reliable information on antimicrobial and analgesic use in dental practice, the survey reported here evaluated the antibiotic and analgesic prescriptions in the Oral Surgery Department of the University Dentistry Clinical Center of Kosovo (UDCCK.Methods: The data of 2,442 registered patients for a 1-year period were screened and analyzed concerning antibiotic and analgesic use as per standards of rational prescription.Results: Dentistry doctors prescribed antibiotics significantly more often than analgesics. Antibiotics were prescribed in 8.11% of all cases, while only 1.35% of total prescriptions were for analgesics. The total consumption of antibiotic drugs in the UDCCK was 4.53 Defined Daily Doses [DDD]/1,000 inhabitants/day, compared with only 0.216 DDD/1,000 inhabitants/day for analgesics. From a total number of 117 patients, 32 patients received combinations of two antibiotics.Conclusion: Pharmacotherapy analysis showed that the prescription rates of antibiotics and analgesics in the UDCCK are not rational in terms of the qualitative aspects of treatment. For the qualitative improvement of prescription of these drug groups, we recommend the implementation of treatment guidelines following rational standards. Keywords: antibiotic, analgesics

  13. Applications of Cone-Beam Computed Tomography in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery: An Overview of Published Indications and Clinical Usage in United States Academic Centers and Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Jeffrey B; Stone, Jeffrey D; Clark, Robert S; Mercer, James E

    2016-04-01

    The American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons appointed a task force to study the indications, safety, and clinical practice patterns of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMS). The charge was to review the published applications of CBCT in OMS, identify the current position of academic thought leaders in the field, and research the adoption and usage of the technology at the clinical practitioner level. This study reviewed the CBCT world literature and summarized published indications for the modality. A nationwide survey of academic thought leaders and practicing oral and maxillofacial surgeons was compiled to determine how the modality is currently being used and adopted by institutions and practices. This report summarizes published applications of CBCT that have been vetted by the academic and practicing OMS community to define current indications. The parameters of patient safety, radiation exposure, accreditation, and legal issues are reviewed. An overview of third-party adoption of CBCT is presented. CBCT is displacing 2-dimensional imaging in the published literature, academia, and private practice. Best practices support reading the entire scan volume with a written report defining results, patient exposure, and field of view. Issues of patient safety, ALARA ("as low as reasonably achievable"), accreditation, and the legal and regulatory environment are reviewed. Third-party patterns for reimbursements vary widely and seem to lack consistency. There is much confusion within the provider community about indications, authorizations, and payment policies. The current medical and dental indications for CBCT in the clinical practice of OMS are reviewed and an industry guideline is proposed. These guidelines offer a clear way of differentiating consensus medical indications and common dental uses for clinicians. This matrix should bring a predictable logic to third-party authorizations, billing, and predictable

  14. Oral health-related quality of life following third molar surgery with or without application of ice pack therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibikunle, Adebayo A; Adeyemo, Wasiu L

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the effect of ice pack therapy on oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) following third molar surgery. All consecutive subjects who required surgical extraction of lower third molars and satisfied the inclusion criteria were randomly allocated into two groups. Subjects in group A were instructed to apply ice packs directly over the masseteric region on the operated side intermittently after third molar surgery. This first application was supervised in the clinic and was repeated at the 24-h postoperative review. Subjects in group A were further instructed to apply the ice pack when at home every one and a half hours on postoperative days 0 and 1 while he/she was awake as described. Group B subjects did not apply ice pack therapy. Facial swelling, pain, trismus, and quality of life (using Oral Health Impact Profile-14 (OHIP-14) instrument) were evaluated both preoperatively and postoperatively. Postoperative scores in both groups were compared. A significant increase in the mean total and subscale scores of OHIP-14 was found in both groups postoperatively when compared with preoperative value. Subjects who received ice pack therapy had a better quality of life than those who did not. Subjects whose postoperative QoL were affected were statistically significantly higher in group B than in group A at all postoperative evaluation points (P third molar surgery was significantly better in subjects who had cryotherapy after third molar than those who did not have cryotherapy. Cryotherapy is a viable alternative or adjunct to other established modes of improving the quality of life of patients following surgical extraction of third molars.

  15. Oral/Head and Neck Oncologic and Reconstructive Surgery Fellowship Training Programs: Transformation of the Specialty From 2005 to 2015: Report from the AAOMS Committee on Maxillofacial Oncology and Reconstructive Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kademani, Deepak; Woo, Brian; Ward, Brent; Fernandes, Rui; Carlson, Eric; Helman, Joseph; Ghali, Ghali E; Lambert, Paul

    2016-11-01

    Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons have increasing opportunities to train in head and neck oncologic and reconstructive surgery. The development of a fellowship training programs within our speciality has had a transformative effect on the speciality. This survey by the commitee on Maxillofacial Oncology and Reconstructive is aimed to evaluate the impact of fellowship training on the careers of the fellows and speciality from 2005-2015. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Convalescence and hospital stay after colonic surgery with balanced analgesia, early oral feeding, and enforced mobilisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møiniche, S; Bülow, Steffen; Hesselfeldt, Peter

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the combined effects of pain relief by continuous epidural analgesia, early oral feeding and enforced mobilisation on convalescence and hospital stay after colonic resection. DESIGN: Uncontrolled pilot investigation. SETTING: University hospital, Denmark. SUBJECTS: 17...... unselected patients (median age 69 years) undergoing colonic resection. INTERVENTIONS: Patients received combined epidural and general anaesthesia during operations and after operation were given continuous epidural bupivacaine 0.25%, 4 ml hour and morphine 0.2 mg hour, for 96 hours and oral paracetamol 4 g...... weight loss. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that a combined approach of optimal pain relief with balanced analgesia, enforced early mobilisation, and oral feeding, may reduce the length of convalescence and hospital stay after colonic operations....

  17. Tattoos: could they be used to advantage as a medical alert in oral and maxillofacial surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colbert, S D; Brennan, P A

    2017-04-01

    Many publications have addressed the medical complications of tattoos, but to our knowledge there are no reports of their use to alert people in our field of potentially dangerous conditions. We present a new way to inform oral and maxillofacial colleagues about patients with a history of malignant hyperthermia (or any other life-threatening medical problem) and discuss the potential advantages and disadvantages of medical alert tattoos. Copyright © 2016 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Antifibrinolytic therapy for preventing oral bleeding in patients with haemophilia or Von Willebrand disease undergoing minor oral surgery or dental extractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Galen, Karin P M; Engelen, Eveline T; Mauser-Bunschoten, Evelien P; van Es, Robert J J; Schutgens, Roger E G

    2015-12-24

    Minor oral surgery or dental extractions (oral or dental procedures) are widely performed and can be complicated by hazardous oral bleeding, especially in people with an inherited bleeding disorder such as haemophilia or Von Willebrand disease. The amount and severity of singular bleedings depend on disease-related factors, such as the severity of the haemophilia, both local and systemic patient factors (such as periodontal inflammation, vasculopathy or platelet dysfunction) and intervention-related factors (such as the type and number of teeth extracted or the dimension of the wound surface). Similar to local haemostatic measures and suturing, antifibrinolytic therapy is a cheap, safe and potentially effective treatment to prevent bleeding complications in individuals with bleeding disorders undergoing oral or dental procedures. However, a systematic review of trials reporting outcomes after oral surgery or a dental procedure in people with an inherited bleeding disorder, with or without, the use of antifibrinolytic agents has not been performed to date. The primary objective was to assess the efficacy of local or systemic use of antifibrinolytic agents to prevent bleeding complications in people with haemophilia or Von Willebrand disease undergoing oral or dental procedures. Secondary objectives were to assess if antifibrinolytic agents can replace or reduce the need for clotting factor concentrate therapy in people with haemophilia or Von Willebrand disease and to further establish the effects of these agents on bleeding in oral or dental procedures for each of these populations. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group's Coagulopathies Trials Register, compiled from electronic database searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), of MEDLINE and from handsearching of journals and conference abstract books. We additionally searched the reference lists of relevant articles and reviews. We searched Pub

  19. Comparison of the analgesic efficacy of oral ketorolac versus intramuscular tramadol after third molar surgery: A parallel, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isiordia-Espinoza, M-A; Pozos-Guillen, A; Martinez-Rider, R; Perez-Urizar, J

    2016-09-01

    Preemptive analgesia is considered an alternative for treating the postsurgical pain of third molar removal. The aim of this study was to evaluate the preemptive analgesic efficacy of oral ketorolac versus intramuscular tramadol after a mandibular third molar surgery. A parallel, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial was carried out. Thirty patients were randomized into two treatment groups using a series of random numbers: Group A, oral ketorolac 10 mg plus intramuscular placebo (1 mL saline solution); or Group B, oral placebo (similar tablet to oral ketorolac) plus intramuscular tramadol 50 mg diluted in 1 mL saline solution. These treatments were given 30 min before the surgery. We evaluated the time of first analgesic rescue medication, pain intensity, total analgesic consumption and adverse effects. Patients taking oral ketorolac had longer time of analgesic covering and less postoperative pain when compared with patients receiving intramuscular tramadol. According to the VAS and UAC results, this study suggests that 10 mg of oral ketorolac had superior analgesic effect than 50 mg of tramadol when administered before a mandibular third molar surgery.

  20. Convalescence and hospital stay after colonic surgery with balanced analgesia, early oral feeding, and enforced mobilisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møiniche, S; Bülow, Steffen; Hesselfeldt, Peter

    1995-01-01

    /daily. No patient had a nasogastric tube, and oral feeding with normal food and protein enriched solutions (1000 Kcal (4180 KJ/day) was instituted 24 hours postoperatively together with intensive mobilisation. RESULTS: Median visual analogue pain scores were zero at rest and minimal during coughing and mobilisation...

  1. The Partnership of Medical Genetics and Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery When Evaluating Craniofacial Anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Angela E

    2015-12-01

    A medical geneticist who has an interest in craniofacial anomalies forms a natural partnership with an oral and maxillofacial surgeon, which facilitates patient care. Using complementary diagnostic and therapeutic skills, the search for a recognizable pattern can lead to a syndrome diagnosis. After the initial examination, there is usually genetic testing to confirm the clinical diagnosis. Once established, care coordination and genetic counseling can be provided for the parents and the patient. Enrolling the patient into a research study could be helpful to understand the diagnosis but, in some circumstances, might not have immediate clinical relevance. A multidisciplinary craniofacial team is generally necessary for long-term management. This article discusses illustrative patients evaluated from 2007 through 2011 with the senior oral and maxillofacial surgeon at the Massachusetts General Hospital (Leonard B. Kaban, DMD, MD). These include single patients with the Nablus mask-like facies syndrome and auriculo-condylar syndrome and a series of 20 patients with Gorlin syndrome followed by a multispecialty team. A successful collaboration between a medical geneticist and an oral and maxillofacial surgeon optimizes the treatment of patients with craniofacial anomalies. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. IPSILATERAL IRRADIATION FOR ORAL AND OROPHARYNGEAL CARCINOMA TREATED WITH PRIMARY SURGERY AND POSTOPERATIVE RADIOTHERAPY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vergeer, Marije R.; Doornaert, Patricia A. H.; Jonkman, Anja; Kaanders, Johannes H. A. M.; van den Ende, Piet L. A.; de Jong, Martin A.; Leemans, C. Rene; Slotman, Ben J.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose was to evaluate the contralateral nodal control (CLNC) in postoperative patients with oral and oropharyngeal cancer treated with ipsilateral irradiation of the neck and primary site. Late radiation-induced morbidity was also evaluated. Methods and Materials: The study included

  3. Preoperative oral nutritional interventions in surgery, including arginine- and glutamine-enhanced supplements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkmann, S.J.H.; Buijs, N.; Luttikhold, J.; Mahdavian Delavary, B.; Niessen, F.B.; van Leeuwen, P.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    The patients' condition prior to surgery is of major importance for clinical outcome. It is believed nowadays that artificial nutrition in the form of a preoperative drink may improve postoperative outcome. Until now, a clear overview concerning the effects of preoperative supplementation on

  4. Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... surgery has several common causes, including the following: Infections at the operative site Lung problems such as pneumonia or collapsed lung ... the trauma of an operation. The risk of infections at the operative site, DVTs, and UTIs can be decreased by meticulous ...

  5. Five months of surgery in the multinational field hospital in Afghanistan with an emphasis on oral and maxillofacial injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breeze, J; Monaghan, A M; Williams, M D; Clark, R N W; Gibbons, A J

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this review was to assess the workload of theatres in the role 3 Multinational Field Hospital in Kandahar, Afghanistan and to identify what period of day most emergency admissions arrived. During the period 05 August 2006 to 21 December 2006, 288 operations were performed on 259 patients and comprised 393 individually quantifiable procedures. 98% of these operations were to treat acute injuries. Oral and Maxillofacial surgeons were involved in 24% of operations. 63% of procedures done at these operations involved upper or lower limbs, 19% the head and neck and 18% involved the torso. An analysis of emergency admissions in November 2006 showed that most occurred between 18.00 and midnight. Although theatre timetabling made provision for this, whenever possible, elective surgery was scheduled for the following morning when emergency injury admissions were at their lowest.

  6. Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy Followed by Surgery in Treating Patients With Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-15

    Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  7. Convalescence and hospital stay after colonic surgery with balanced analgesia, early oral feeding, and enforced mobilisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møiniche, S; Bülow, Steffen; Hesselfeldt, Peter

    1995-01-01

    /daily. No patient had a nasogastric tube, and oral feeding with normal food and protein enriched solutions (1000 Kcal (4180 KJ/day) was instituted 24 hours postoperatively together with intensive mobilisation. RESULTS: Median visual analogue pain scores were zero at rest and minimal during coughing and mobilisation...... unselected patients (median age 69 years) undergoing colonic resection. INTERVENTIONS: Patients received combined epidural and general anaesthesia during operations and after operation were given continuous epidural bupivacaine 0.25%, 4 ml hour and morphine 0.2 mg hour, for 96 hours and oral paracetamol 4 g......, which allowed early mobilisation for up to 11 hours on the third postoperative day. Gastrointestinal function with defaecation had returned to normal in 12 patients within the first two postoperative days. Median hospital stay was five days with minimal increase in fatigue and without postoperative...

  8. Marketing the oral and maxillofacial surgery practice through positive employee relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niamtu, Joe

    2008-02-01

    This article is about marketing. Having superlative acumen on employee relations is much more important to all oral and maxillofacial surgeons than "how to take a referring doc to lunch." Keep a copy of this article handy and distribute it to all new employees. Review the hiring and firing tenets and "Rules of the Game" each time you hire a new employee, fire an established one, or face trying times with staff or partners.

  9. Do Quantitative Measures of Research Productivity Correlate with Academic Rank in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susarla, Srinivas M; Dodson, Thomas B; Lopez, Joseph; Swanson, Edward W; Calotta, Nicholas; Peacock, Zachary S

    2015-08-01

    Academic promotion is linked to research productivity. The purpose of this study was to assess the correlation between quantitative measures of academic productivity and academic rank among academic oral and maxillofacial surgeons. This was a cross-sectional study of full-time academic oral and maxillofacial surgeons in the United States. The predictor variables were categorized as demographic (gender, medical degree, research doctorate, other advanced degree) and quantitative measures of academic productivity (total number of publications, total number of citations, maximum number of citations for a single article, I-10 index [number of publications with ≥ 10 citations], and h-index [number of publications h with ≥ h citations each]). The outcome variable was current academic rank (instructor, assistant professor, associate professor, professor, or endowed professor). Descriptive, bivariate, and multiple regression statistics were computed to evaluate associations between the predictors and academic rank. Receiver-operator characteristic curves were computed to identify thresholds for academic promotion. The sample consisted of 324 academic oral and maxillofacial surgeons, of whom 11.7% were female, 40% had medical degrees, and 8% had research doctorates. The h-index was the most strongly correlated with academic rank (ρ = 0.62, p research activity.

  10. Career and Professional Satisfaction of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Residents, Academic Surgeons, and Private Practitioners: Does Gender Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, Kyriaki C; Lanzon, Jesse; Edwards, Sean P; Inglehart, Marita R

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine whether male vs. female oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMS) residents, academic surgeons (i.e., faculty members), and private practitioners in the U.S. differed in their general career satisfaction and job/professional satisfaction. Survey data were collected in 2011-12 from 267 OMS residents (response rate 55%), 271 OMS academic surgeons (response rate 31%), and 417 OMS private practitioners (response rates 13% web-based survey and 29% postal mail survey). The results showed that while the male vs. female OMS private practitioners and academic surgeons did not differ in their career satisfaction, the female residents had a lower career satisfaction than the male residents (on four-point scale with 4=most satisfied: 3.03 vs. 3.65; pmaxillofacial surgeon, were less satisfied with their career, and were more likely to consider a career change in the next five years than the male residents. While these male and female oral and maxillofacial surgeons in private practice and academia did not differ in their career and job satisfaction, the male and female residents differed significantly, with female residents reporting a significantly poorer career and job satisfaction than male residents. Future research needs to explore ways to improve career and professional satisfaction of female OMS residents.

  11. [Efficacy of bFGF atomization inhalation on postoperative sore throat following oral and maxillofacial surgery under general anesthesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Jiang, Yin-Hua; Xiao, Jian; Li, Xiao-Kun

    2016-08-01

    To observe the effect of recombinant human basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) atomization inhalation on postoperative sore throat following oral and maxillofacial operation under general anethesia. Forty patients in whom oral and maxillofacial operation trachea was removed under general anesthesia were randomly divided into treatment and control groups; the treatment group received bFGF 35000IU + normal saline 20 mL, compression inhalation, day 1, every 20min, continued for 3 d; the control group was given normal saline 5 mL + dexamethasone 5 mg + gentamicin 80000 U + chymotrypsin 4000 U, compression inhalation, twice a day, every 20 min, continued for 3 d. Occurrence of postoperative sore throat 12 h after operation was recorded and visual analog scale (VAS) of sore throat (swallowing) 12,24,48,72 h after operation was measured. SPSS l4.0 software package was used for statistical analysis. The incidence of sore throat in the treatment group was significantly lower than that in the control group (Poral and maxillofacial surgery after endotracheal intubation.

  12. n-3 PUFAs in cancer, surgery, and critical care: a systematic review on clinical effects, incorporation, and washout of oral or enteral compared with parenteral supplementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meij, B.; van Bokhorst-de van der Schueren, M.A.E.; Langius, J.A.E.; Brouwer, I.A.; van Leeuwen, P.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: n-3 (omega-3) Fatty acids (FAs) may have beneficial effects in patients with cancer or in patients who undergo surgery or critical care. Objective: Our aim was to systematically review the effects of oral or enteral and parenteral n-3 FA supplementation on clinical outcomes and to

  13. Predicting 3D lip movement using facial sEMG: a first step towards estimating functional and aesthetic outcome of oral cancer surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eskes, Merijn; van Alphen, M.J.A.; Smeele, Ludi E.; Brandsma, Dieta; Balm, Alfons J.M.; Balm, Alfonsus Jacobus Maria; van der Heijden, Ferdinand

    2016-01-01

    In oral cancer, loss of function due to surgery can be unacceptable, designating the tumour as functionally inoperable. Other curative treatments can then be considered. Currently, predictions of these functional consequences are subjective and unreliable. We want to create patient-specific models

  14. Costs and clinical outcomes of implant placement during ablative surgery and postponed implant placement in curative oral oncology : A five-year retrospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wetzels, Jan Willem G H; Meijer, Gert J.; Koole, Ron; Adang, Eddy M.; Merkx, Matthias A W; Speksnijder, Caroline M.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare costs and clinical outcomes of two protocols for implant placement in edentulous oral cancer patients: implant placement during ablative surgery and postponed implant placement. Material and methods: All edentulous patients who underwent curative

  15. Single dose of diclofenac or meloxicam for control of pain, facial swelling, and trismus in oral surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco-Solís, Mariana; García-Ávalos, Yazmín; Pichardo-Ramírez, Celeste; Tobías-Azúa, Francisco; Zapata-Morales, Juan-Ramón; Aragon-Martínez, Othoniel-Hugo; Isiordia-Espinoza, Mario-Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative pain associated with removal of mandibular third molars has been documented from moderate to severe during the first 24 hours after surgery, with pain peaking between 6 and 8 hours when a conventional local anesthetic is used. Dental pain is largely inflammatory, and evidence-based medicine has shown that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are the best analgesics for dental pain. The aim of this study was to compare the analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-trismus effect of a single dose of diclofenac and meloxicam after mandibular third molar extraction. A total of 36 patients were randomized into two treatment groups, each with 18 patients, using a series of random numbers: Group A, was administered 100 mg of diclofenac; and Group B, 15 mg of meloxicam. Drugs were administered orally 1 hour prior to surgery. We evaluated pain intensity, analgesic consumption, swelling, as well as trismus. The results of this study showed that patients receiving 15 mg of meloxicam had less postoperative pain (P=0.04) and better aperture than those receiving 100 mg of diclofenac (P=0.03). The meloxicam group presented less swelling than diclofenac group; however, significant statistical differences were not observed. Data of this double-blind, randomized, parallel-group clinical trial demonstrated that patients receiving 15 mg of preoperative meloxicam had a better postoperative analgesia and anti-trismus effect compared with who were given 100 mg of diclofenac after third molar extractions.

  16. Efficacy and Safety of Transdermal Buprenorphine versus Oral Tramadol/Acetaminophen in Patients with Persistent Postoperative Pain after Spinal Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Hyup Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Control of persistent pain following spinal surgery is an unmet clinical need. This study compared the efficacy and safety of buprenorphine transdermal system (BTDS to oral tramadol/acetaminophen (TA in Korean patients with persistent, moderate pain following spinal surgery. Methods. Open-label, interventional, randomized multicenter study. Adults with persistent postoperative pain (Numeric Rating Scale [NRS] ≥ 4 at 14–90 days postsurgery were enrolled. Patients received once-weekly BTDS (n=47; 5 μg/h titrated to 20 μg/h or twice-daily TA (n=40; tramadol 37.5 mg/acetaminophen 325 mg, one tablet titrated to 4 tablets for 6 weeks. The study compared pain reduction with BTDS versus TA at week 6. Quality of life (QoL, treatment satisfaction, medication compliance, and adverse events (AEs were assessed. Findings. At week 6, both groups reported significant pain reduction (mean NRS change: BTDS −2.02; TA −2.76, both P<0.0001 and improved QoL (mean EQ-5D index change: BTDS 0.10; TA 0.19, both P<0.05. The BTDS group achieved better medication compliance (97.8% versus 91.0%. Incidence of AEs (26.1% versus 20.0% and adverse drug reactions (20.3% versus 16.9% were comparable between groups. Implications. For patients with persistent pain following spinal surgery, BTDS is an alternative to TA for reducing pain and supports medication compliance. This trial is registered with Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01983111.

  17. The Effectiveness of Public Simulated Oral Examinations in Preparation for the American Board of Surgery Certifying Examination: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennell, Christopher; McCulloch, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether American Board of Surgery Certifying Examination (CE) performance is improved among residents who prepare using simulated oral examinations (SOEs). EMBASE and MEDLINE were searched using predefined search terms. No language restrictions were imposed and the latest search date was in November 2014. Included studies must have reported on residents training in a general surgery residency in the United States who used SOEs to prepare for the CE and have measured their performance against those without exposure to SOEs. Studies meeting inclusion criteria were qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed and a fixed effects meta-analysis was performed to determine the net effect of SOEs on CE performance. Overall, 4 of 25 abstracts reviewed met inclusion criteria and are included in this review. The most common simulation format included public examinations in front of resident peers during scheduled education sessions. All 4 included studies trended toward improved performance with SOEs and in 2 of these studies the improvement was statistically significant. Overall, 3 studies were of adequate quality to perform a meta-analysis and demonstrated a relative risk for first-attempt CE success of 1.22 (95% CI: 1.07-1.39, p = 0.003) for residents preparing with SOEs compared to those without SOEs. The published literature evaluating SOEs is limited and generally of fair quality. A modest improvement in CE performance was identified when public SOEs were used as an educational tool aimed to improve professionalism and communication skills, encourage reading at home, and provide a regular review of clinically relevant topics. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Buprenorphine with bupivacaine for intraoral nerve blocks to provide postoperative analgesia in outpatients after minor oral surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Mancy; Rastogi, Sanjay; Kumar, Ashish

    2009-12-01

    The demonstration that opioid receptors exist in the peripheral nervous system offers the possibility of providing postoperative analgesia in the ambulatory surgical patient. Over the previous decade, many investigators have studied this approach and have compared the efficacy of various opioids added to the local anesthetic near the brachial plexus; and it appears from several of these studies that buprenorphine provides the longest duration of analgesia, the most important parameter of postoperative analgesia in outpatients. One of these studies indicated that the agonist-antagonist, buprenorphine, added to bupivacaine provided a longer period of postoperative analgesia than the traditional opiates, but none of the studies was performed in patients undergoing minor oral surgery to check the efficacy of buprenorphine to provide postoperative analgesia in dental patients. The present study was undertaken to ascertain the efficacy of buprenorphine in providing prolonged postoperative analgesia when added to 0.5% bupivacaine with epinephrine 1:200,000. Fifty healthy, consenting adult patients scheduled for upper extremity surgery were enrolled in the study. Patients were assigned randomly to 1 of 2 equal groups based on the agents used for the blocks. Patients in group I received 40 mL of a local anesthetic alone, and those in group II received the same local anesthetic plus buprenorphine 0.3 mg. The study was kept double-blind by having one dentist prepare the solutions, a second dentist perform the blocks, and a third dentist monitor the anesthesia and analgesia thereafter, up to and including the time of the first request for an analgesic medication. The data were reported as means +/- standard errors of the mean, and differences between groups were determined using t test. A P value less than .01 was considered statistically significant. The mean duration of postoperative pain relief after injection of the local anesthetic alone was 8.34 +/- 0.11 hours compared

  19. Oral surgery: part 4. Minimising and managing nerve injuries and other complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renton, T

    2013-10-01

    Many post-operative complications can be avoided with good patient selection, training and surgical planning. Obtaining explicit patient consent is also an essential component of treatment. The most significant complications from oral surgical interventions are iatrogenic trigeminal nerve injuries, which can result in permanent altered sensation and pain, causing considerable functional and psychological disability. This paper provides some useful suggestions on minimising the risks of these injuries. By understanding the risk factors and modifying the resulting intervention, more of these injuries may be prevented.

  20. Experimental model for bone regeneration in oral and cranio-maxillo-facial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardas, Nikos; Dereka, Xanthippi; Donos, Nikolaos; Dard, Michel

    2014-02-01

    Bone and tooth loss, as a result of trauma, anatomical or congenital reasons, cancer, and periodontal disease, is a common therapeutic problem in the fields of cranio-maxillo-facial surgery and periodontics. The proposed techniques for the treatment of various bone defects encountered include bone grafts, bone substitutes, guided tissue regeneration, and distraction osteogenesis as well as their combinations. In addition, dental implants have been successfully utilized for the restoration of full or partial edentulism. The introduction and development of new therapeutic approaches and devices demand the use of appropriate animal models that present bone anatomy and healing comparable to human. Among other animal models, the pig is extensively documented in several biomedical areas and has been largely used in maxillo-facial surgery and implants dentistry-related research. Anatomical and physiological similarities with human in size, physiology, and bone biology contribute to a successful involvement of this animal to understand and treat various osseous lesions. However, improvements and standardization are requested with respect to consistency and discrimination abilities. The aim of this review is to provide a critical appraisal of the literature related to swine models for the evaluation of cranio-maxillo-facial osseous defect healing, regeneration, and bone-implant interface. This review should assist researchers in the field to select the most appropriate model for each dedicated purpose and also contribute to stimulate an innovative thinking on the use of porcine models.

  1. Is Formal Research Training Associated With Academic Success in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jesse T; Egbert, Mark A; Dodson, Thomas B; Susarla, Srinivas M

    2018-01-01

    Pursuing promotion in academic rank and seeking funded research opportunities are core elements of academic practice. Our purpose was to assess whether formal research training influences academic rank or National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding among full-time academic oral and maxillofacial surgeons (OMSs). We performed a cross-sectional study of full-time academic OMSs in the United States. The primary predictor variable was completion of formal research training, defined as a research fellowship or advanced non-clinical doctoral research degree (PhD, DMSc, DPH, DPhil, ScD). The outcomes measures were current academic rank and successful acquisition of NIH funding (yes vs no). Other study variables included MD degree, clinical fellowship training, years since training completion, and Hirsch index (H-index), a measure of academic productivity. We computed the descriptive, bivariate, and multiple regression models and set P ≤ .05 as significant. A total of 299 full-time academic OMSs were included in the study sample. Of the 299 OMSs, 41 (13.7%) had had formal research training. Surgeons with formal research training had a greater mean interval since completion of training (P = 0.01) and had a greater mean H-index (P = 0.02). Formal research training was not associated with academic rank (P = .10) but was associated with an increased likelihood of receiving NIH funding (P research training was associated with an increased likelihood of obtaining NIH funding (odds ratio, 3.22; 95% confidence interval, 1.15 to 9.00; P = .03). Among academic OMSs, those with formal research training had greater success with obtaining NIH funding. However, formal research training did not appear to influence an OMS's current academic rank. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Alternatives for OSAHS treatment: selection of patients for upper airway surgery and oral appliances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Boudewyns

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Although continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP is considered to represent the standard treatment for patients with moderate-to-severe obstructive sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS, poor treatment compliance and/or refusal is an issue in 20–30% of these patients. As an alternative to life-long CPAP treatment, conservative procedures exist with dental appliances for mandibular advancement, as well as curative surgical techniques. Surgical treatment of OSAHS can be divided into the following two main groups: 1 upper airway surgery by soft tissue resection (uvulopalatopharyngoplasty, etc., and 2 skeletal procedures, such as maxillo-mandibular advancement. Proper selection of patients for the different treatment modalities is the key for full treatment success. Patient-related factors, such as the site of upper airway collapse, craniofacial characteristics, dental health, obesity, age, profession and positional dependence, as well as treatment-related factors, should be evaluated before a final proposal for these treatment alternatives is formulated.

  3. Freeze-Dried Black Raspberries in Preventing Oral Cancer Recurrence in High-Risk Appalachian Patients Previously Treated With Surgery For Oral Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-04

    Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage I Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage I Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage II Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage II Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage III Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage III Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVA Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVA Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVB Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVB Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lip and Oral Cavity; Stage IVC Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx; Stage IVC Verrucous Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity; Tongue Cancer

  4. Postoperative abnormal response of C-reactive protein as an indicator for infectious complications after oral oncologic surgery with primary reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akashi, Masaya; Furudoi, Shungo; Hashikawa, Kazunobu; Sakakibara, Akiko; Hasegawa, Takumi; Shigeta, Takashi; Minamikawa, Tsutomu; Komori, Takahide

    2015-04-02

    C-reactive protein (CRP) screening has been reported to be reliable for detection of infectious complications. Postoperative abnormal response of CRP can predict wound infection in colorectal surgery. This study aimed to determine the efficacy of CRP monitoring to detect infectious complications in oral oncologic surgery. One hundred patients who underwent oral cancer resection with primary reconstruction were enrolled. Postoperative kinetics of CRP were classified into a normal or abnormal response. A normal CRP response after surgery was observed in 61 patients and an abnormal response was observed in 39. There were postoperative infectious complications in 21 patients, with surgical site infections in 13 patients (early onset in six and late onset in seven). Non-wound infections were found in nine patients. Sensitivity, specificity, the positive predictive value, and the negative predictive value for abnormal CRP response as a predictor for early infectious complications were 100%, 70.1%, 35.9%, and 100%, respectively. Postoperative serial CRP screening is a useful test as an indicator of infectious complications in oral oncologic surgery. Normal CRP responses can rule out almost all early infectious complications.

  5. Retrograde intubation through nasal route in patients with limited mouth opening undergoing oral and maxillofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadepally, Ashwant Kumar; Sinha, Ramen; Kumar, A V S S Subramanya

    2018-01-01

    Patients with limited mouth opening (LMO) often associated with difficult intubation. Retrograde intubation is an alternative technique of establishing definitive airway in these patients when blind nasal intubation fails and fiberoptic bronchoscope is not available. We tested the retrograde intubation through nasal route in patients with LMO less than 2 cm. The procedure was performed with some modification with regard to retrograde guide on 18 patients requiring maxillofacial surgical procedures to increase mouth opening. Indications for this technique were mandibular fracture (n = 6), oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF; n = 6), temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis (n = 4) and internal derangement of TMJ (n = 2). All patients were assessed for preoperative interincisal opening; during intubation through specific parameters and; also postoperative findings were observed. Mean time taken for successful intubation was 5.6 min ± 1.66. One patient had subcutaneous emphysema which was managed conservatively. Postoperatively, four patients had sore throat which resolved in few days. No other complications were encountered. In conclusion, retrograde nasotracheal intubation is an effective and useful technique for airway control in patients with LMO and with only a small risk potential.

  6. What causes trainees to leave oral and maxillofacial surgery? A questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, C; Kent, S; Magennis, P; Cleland, J

    2017-01-01

    Understanding what causes trainees to leave OMFS is essential if we are to retain them within the specialty. Although these factors have been defined for medicine, we know of no previous study for OMFS. An online survey was distributed to roughly 1500 people who had registered an interest in OMFS during the past seven years. Personal information and details of education and employment were gathered along with personal factors that attracted them to OMFS. Of 251 trainees who responded, 50 (30%) were no longer interested. Factors that significantly correlated with an interest in OMFS included male sex (p=0.020), dual qualification (p=0.024), and (only for women) being single (p=0.024) and having no dependants (p=0.005). We used qualitative analysis to identify work-life balance, duration of training, and financial implications, as significant factors. Identification of key factors that affect OMFS trainees allows us to develop ways to keep them in the specialty. The predominant factor is work-life balance, and for women this included having children and being married. Financial issues related to the junior doctors' contract and competition ratios to second degrees, are also factors for both sexes. Also important are the "sunk costs" fallacy that causes some trainees to stay in training. This information can be used to help develop higher training, in negotiations of contracts, and to attract and retain future OMFS trainees. Copyright © 2016 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Which route of antibiotic administration should be used for third molar surgery? A split-mouth study to compare intramuscular and oral intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crincoli, V; Di Comite, M; Di Bisceglie, M B; Petruzzi, M; Fatone, L; De Biase, C; Tecco, S; Festa, F

    2014-01-01

    To compare the effectiveness of two different routes of antibiotic administration in preventing septic complications in patients undergoing third molar extraction. Twenty-four healthy patients requiring bilateral surgical removal of impacted mandibular third molars were successfully enrolled for this study. Depth of impaction, angulation, and relationship of the lower third molars with the mandibular branch had to be overlapping on both sides. A split-mouth design was chosen, so each patient underwent both the first and second surgeries, having for each extraction a different antibiotic route of administration. The second extraction was carried out 1 month later. To compare the effects of the two routes of antibiotic administration, inflammatory parameters, such as edema, trismus, pain, fever, dysphagia and lymphadenopathy were evaluated 2 and 7 days after surgery. Side effects of each therapy were evaluated 48 h after surgery. Oral and intramuscular antibiotic therapies overlap in preventing post-operative complications in dental surgery (p>0.05), even if the oral intake, seems to promote the onset of significant gastrointestinal disorders (p=0.003). This study could help dentists in their ordinary practice to choose the right route of antibiotic administration in the third molar surgery. At the same effectiveness, the higher cost and the minor compliance of the patient seem not to justify a routine antibiotic intramuscular therapy, reserving it for patients with gastrointestinal disorders.

  8. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Obstructive Sleep Apnea TMJ and Facial Pain Treatment of Facial Injury Wisdom Teeth Management Procedures ...

  9. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Do Who We Are News Videos Contact Find a Surgeon What We Do Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and ... Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require one or more surgeries ...

  10. A novel rotational matrix and translation vector algorithm: geometric accuracy for augmented reality in oral and maxillofacial surgeries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugesan, Yahini Prabha; Alsadoon, Abeer; Manoranjan, Paul; Prasad, P W C

    2018-02-19

    Augmented reality-based surgeries have not been successfully implemented in oral and maxillofacial areas due to limitations in geometric accuracy and image registration. This paper aims to improve the accuracy and depth perception of the augmented video. The proposed system consists of a rotational matrix and translation vector algorithm to reduce the geometric error and improve the depth perception by including 2 stereo cameras and a translucent mirror in the operating room. The results on the mandible/maxilla area show that the new algorithm improves the video accuracy by 0.30-0.40 mm (in terms of overlay error) and the processing rate to 10-13 frames/s compared to 7-10 frames/s in existing systems. The depth perception increased by 90-100 mm. The proposed system concentrates on reducing the geometric error. Thus, this study provides an acceptable range of accuracy with a shorter operating time, which provides surgeons with a smooth surgical flow. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Surveillance of antibiotic and analgesic use in the Oral Surgery Department of the University Dentistry Clinical Center of Kosovo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haliti, Naim R; Haliti, Fehim R; Koçani, Ferit K; Gashi, Ali A; Mrasori, Shefqet I; Hyseni, Valon I; Bytyqi, Samir I; Krasniqi, Lumnije L; Murtezani, Ardiana F; Krasniqi, Shaip L

    2015-01-01

    Background Because Kosovo has no reliable information on antimicrobial and analgesic use in dental practice, the survey reported here evaluated the antibiotic and analgesic prescriptions in the Oral Surgery Department of the University Dentistry Clinical Center of Kosovo (UDCCK). Methods The data of 2,442 registered patients for a 1-year period were screened and analyzed concerning antibiotic and analgesic use as per standards of rational prescription. Results Dentistry doctors prescribed antibiotics significantly more often than analgesics. Antibiotics were prescribed in 8.11% of all cases, while only 1.35% of total prescriptions were for analgesics. The total consumption of antibiotic drugs in the UDCCK was 4.53 Defined Daily Doses [DDD]/1,000 inhabitants/day, compared with only 0.216 DDD/1,000 inhabitants/day for analgesics. From a total number of 117 patients, 32 patients received combinations of two antibiotics. Conclusion Pharmacotherapy analysis showed that the prescription rates of antibiotics and analgesics in the UDCCK are not rational in terms of the qualitative aspects of treatment. For the qualitative improvement of prescription of these drug groups, we recommend the implementation of treatment guidelines following rational standards. PMID:26491336

  12. The application of 3-dimensional printing for preoperative planning in oral and maxillofacial surgery in dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winer, Jenna N; Verstraete, Frank J M; Cissell, Derek D; Lucero, Steven; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A; Arzi, Boaz

    2017-10-01

    To describe the application of 3-dimensional (3D) printing in advanced oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMFS) and to discuss the benefits of this modality in surgical planning, student and resident training, and client education. Retrospective case series. Client-owned dogs (n = 28) and cats (n = 4) with 3D printing models of the skulls. The medical records of 32 cases with 3D printing prior to major OMFS were reviewed. Indications for 3D printing included preoperative planning for mandibular reconstruction after mandibulectomy (n = 12 dogs) or defect nonunion fracture (n = 6 dogs, 2 cats), mapping of ostectomy location for temporomandibular joint ankylosis or pseudoankylosis (n = 4 dogs), assessment of palatal defects (n = 2 dogs, 1 cat), improved understanding of complex anatomy in cases of neoplasia located in challenging locations (n = 2 dogs, 1 cat), and in cases of altered anatomy secondary to trauma (n = 2 dogs). In the authors' experience, 3D printed models serve as excellent tools for OMFS planning and resident training. Furthermore, 3D printed models are a valuable resource to improve clients' understanding of the pet's disorder and the recommended treatment. Three-dimensional printed models should be considered viable tools for surgical planning, resident training, and client education in candidates for complex OMFS. © 2017 The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  13. Oral health-related quality of life following third molar surgery in an African population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adebayo Aremu Ibikunle

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Surgical extraction of impacted mandibular third molars is often associated with sequelae such as postoperative pain, facial edema, and limitation in mouth opening ability. These sequelae may result in changes in the patients' lifestyle and quality of life (QoL. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of surgical extraction of impacted mandibular third molars on patients' QoL in the immediate postoperative period (7 days. Materials and Methods: Ethical approval for this study was obtained from the Health Research and Ethics committee of the Lagos University Teaching Hospital. A total of 124 individuals with impacted mandibular third molars, who satisfied the inclusion criteria and consented to participate in this study, were included. The Oral Health Impact Profile-14 (OHIP-14 QoL questionnaire was used to assess QoL. QoL was assessed preoperatively (baseline and on postoperative days (PODs 1, 3, and 7. Maximal interincisal mouth opening, facial width, and pain were also reviewed at all evaluation points. Data analysis was done using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS for Windows (version 16.0, Chicago, IL, USA. Results: A total of 124 individuals were included in the final analysis. An age range of 18–51 years with a mean (±standard deviation of 28.5 (7.4 years was observed. A male to female ratio of 1:1.5 was observed. The most frequently encountered type of impaction was the mesioangular impaction 51 (41.1% and recurrent pericoronitis was the principal reason for extraction 53 (42.7%. The severity of the sequelae (pain, trismus, and facial edema was maximal on the first POD. Patients' overall QoL deteriorated sharply on the first POD and subsequently improved. Conclusion: Surgical extraction of mandibular third molars is associated with worsening of patients' postoperative QoL in the immediate postoperative period. Prospective patients should be informed about this, and ways of reducing this

  14. An audit of the quality of referral letters received by the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Dublin Dental School and Hospital.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moloney, Justin

    2010-11-01

    One hundred consecutive referral letters, sent by dental practitioners to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Dublin Dental School and Hospital, were audited in terms of quality. The audit was based on the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) recommendations of 1998. The audit demonstrated that in general referral letters required modification and did not give the clinician the required information. This paper sets out the results of the audit and suggests a template that should be used for future referrals.

  15. An audit of the quality of referral letters received by the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Dublin Dental School and Hospital.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moloney, Justin

    2010-10-01

    One hundred consecutive referral letters, sent by dental practitioners to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Dublin Dental School and Hospital, were audited in terms of quality. The audit was based on the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) recommendations of 1998. The audit demonstrated that in general referral letters required modification and did not give the clinician the required information. This paper sets out the results of the audit and suggests a template that should be used for future referrals.

  16. What Surgical Education the Speciality Offers? Perception of Role of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery by 1200 Healthcare Professionals, Students and the General Public in Hyderabad, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadepally, Ashwant Kumar; Sinha, Ramen

    2018-06-01

    To investigate the perception of Oral and maxillofacial surgery by healthcare professionals, students and general public. A questionnaire form was created that listed ten clinical situations, and given by hand to 1200 individuals, divided into six groups: group 1, medical professionals; group 2, Specialties of dentistry; group 3, general dentists; group 4, medical students; group 5, dental students; and group 6, general public, each comprising 200 individuals. Respondents were asked to indicate who they would expect to treat them if they had one of the specified conditions listed in the questionnaire. We present the results and current awareness levels of this simple questionnaire. The present study addresses the common issue raised by many authors, 'What surgical education the speciality offers?' especially to medical professionals, medical students and general public to enhance an appropriate referral. Most of the respondents in groups 2, 3 and 5 agreed that specific conditions listed in the questionnaire were within the domain of oral and maxillofacial surgery, but such response was not seen in groups 1, 4 and 6 ( p  maxillofacial surgery was found to be 50.2%. The onus of creating and improving the awareness and perception of our specialty lies on oral and maxillofacial surgeon. Unified efforts at individual as well as global level will help achieve this goal.

  17. Perioperative risk factors for postoperative pulmonary complications after major oral and maxillofacial surgery with microvascular reconstruction: A retrospective analysis of 648 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffelbein, Denys J; Julinek, Annette; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Kochs, Eberhard; Haller, Bernhard; Haseneder, Rainer

    2016-08-01

    Postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs) are common and result in prolonged hospital stays, higher costs and increased mortality. However, data on the incidence and predictors of PPCs after major oral and maxillofacial surgery with microvascular reconstruction are rare. This retrospective analysis identifies perioperative risk factors for postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs) after major oral and maxillofacial surgery with microvascular reconstruction. Perioperative data and patient records of 648 subjects were analyzed in the period of June 2007 to May 2013. PPCs were defined as pneumonia, atelectasis, pleural effusions, pulmonary embolism, pulmonary oedema, pneumothorax or respiratory failure. 18.8% of all patients developed PPCs. Patient-related risk factors for PPCs were male sex, advanced age, smoking, alcohol abuse, a body mass index >30, American Society of Anaesthesiologists grade higher than 2, pre-existent pulmonary diseases and preoperative antihypertensive medication. Among the investigated procedure-related variables, the length of the operation, the amount of fluid administration and blood transfusion and an impaired oxygenation index during surgery were shown to be associated with the development of PPCs. Using a multivariable logistic regression model, we identified a body mass index >30, American Society of Anaesthesiologists grade higher than 2 and alcohol abuse as independent risk factors for PPCs. Several perioperative factors can be identified that are associated with the development of PPCs. Patients having one or more of these conditions should be subjected to intensified postoperative pulmonary care. Copyright © 2016 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effectiveness of Oral N-acetyl-cystein in Reduction of Pulmonary Complications in Smokers Undergoing Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SJ Mir Hoseini

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Up to 12% of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft have pulmonary complications. Smoking can cause a six-time increase in pulmonary complication after major surgery. The most common pulmonary changes after CABG are decrease in FRC, VC and atelectasis. In this study, the effect of oral N-acetyl-cystein in reduction of severity of hypoxemia and atelectasis in current smokers who smoked more than 10 packs/year and had undergone CABG was evaluated. Methods: In the study, 54 current smoker patients were selected randomly and allocated to two drug and placebo groups. In the study group, 300mg N-acetyl-cystein (ACC long containing vitamin C was prescribed two times a day from 4 days before operation up to 3 days after surgery and in control group, effervescent vitamin C tablet was prescribed as placebo. Patients with body mass index more than 35, NYHA class IV, those who needed intra aortic balloon pump and those who needed reoperation due to bleeding were excluded from the study. In all patients, spirometry was done in the preoperative visit and FEV1/FVC was determined. Induction and maintenance of anesthesia was similar in all patients. Arterial blood gas samples were obtained immediately after anesthesia induction and 4 to 6 hours after extubation. Chest X ray was taken before, 6 to 10 hours after extubation and 3rd postoperative day. Severity of atelectasis was also measured. Quantitative & qualitative data was analyzed by ANOVA and Chi-square tests, respectively. Pvalue<0.05 was considered as statistically significant. Results: Both groups were similar with respect to demographic data including ejection fraction, NYHA class, FEV1/FVC, cigarette smoking and Lima harvesting. The ratio of arterial oxygen pressure to fraction of inspiratory oxygen Pao2/FIo2 was not significantly different after induction but this difference was strongly significant (Pvalue<0.005 after extubation. Duration of mechanical ventilation was

  19. Joint Dictionary Learning-Based Non-Negative Matrix Factorization for Voice Conversion to Improve Speech Intelligibility After Oral Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Szu-Wei; Li, Pei-Chun; Lai, Ying-Hui; Yang, Cheng-Chien; Hsieh, Li-Chun; Tsao, Yu

    2017-11-01

    Objective: This paper focuses on machine learning based voice conversion (VC) techniques for improving the speech intelligibility of surgical patients who have had parts of their articulators removed. Because of the removal of parts of the articulator, a patient's speech may be distorted and difficult to understand. To overcome this problem, VC methods can be applied to convert the distorted speech such that it is clear and more intelligible. To design an effective VC method, two key points must be considered: 1) the amount of training data may be limited (because speaking for a long time is usually difficult for postoperative patients); 2) rapid conversion is desirable (for better communication). Methods: We propose a novel joint dictionary learning based non-negative matrix factorization (JD-NMF) algorithm. Compared to conventional VC techniques, JD-NMF can perform VC efficiently and effectively with only a small amount of training data. Results: The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed JD-NMF method not only achieves notably higher short-time objective intelligibility (STOI) scores (a standardized objective intelligibility evaluation metric) than those obtained using the original unconverted speech but is also significantly more efficient and effective than a conventional exemplar-based NMF VC method. Conclusion: The proposed JD-NMF method may outperform the state-of-the-art exemplar-based NMF VC method in terms of STOI scores under the desired scenario. Significance: We confirmed the advantages of the proposed joint training criterion for the NMF-based VC. Moreover, we verified that the proposed JD-NMF can effectively improve the speech intelligibility scores of oral surgery patients. Objective: This paper focuses on machine learning based voice conversion (VC) techniques for improving the speech intelligibility of surgical patients who have had parts of their articulators removed. Because of the removal of parts of the articulator, a patient

  20. Gene Therapy for Bone Defects in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Animal Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliefel, Riham; Kühnisch, Jan; Ehrenfeld, Michael; Otto, Sven

    2017-02-15

    Craniofacial bone defects are challenging problems for maxillofacial surgeons over the years. With the development of cell and molecular biology, gene therapy is a breaking new technology with the aim of regenerating tissues by acting as a delivery system for therapeutic genes in the craniofacial region rather than treating genetic disorders. A systematic review was conducted summarizing the articles reporting gene therapy in maxillofacial surgery to answer the question: Was gene therapy successfully applied to regenerate bone in the maxillofacial region? Electronic searching of online databases was performed in addition to hand searching of the references of included articles. No language or time restrictions were enforced. Meta-analysis was done to assess significant bone formation after delivery of gene material in the surgically induced maxillofacial defects. The search identified 2081 articles, of which 57 were included with 1726 animals. Bone morphogenetic proteins were commonly used proteins for gene therapy. Viral vectors were the universally used vectors. Sprague-Dawley rats were the frequently used animal model in experimental studies. The quality of the articles ranged from excellent to average. Meta-analysis results performed on 21 articles showed that defects favored bone formation by gene therapy. Funnel plot showed symmetry with the absence of publication bias. Gene therapy is on the top list of innovative strategies that developed in the last 10 years with the hope of developing a simple chair-side protocol in the near future, combining improvement of gene delivery as well as knowledge of the molecular basis of oral and maxillofacial structures.

  1. Effect of a Perioperative Nutritional Supplementation with Oral Impact® in Patients undergoing Hepatic Surgery for Liver Cancer: A Prospective, Placebo-Controlled, Randomized, Double-Blind Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seguin, Philippe; Locher, Clara; Boudjema, Karim; Hamon, Catherine; Mouchel, Catherine; Malledant, Yannick; Bellissant, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Perioperative nutrition with supplements containing L-arginine, ω3-polyunsaturated fatty acids, and nucleotides could boost liver function recovery, immune response, and resistance to infection after hepatic resection. We conducted a placebo-controlled, randomized, double-blind study to assess the effect of a perioperative nutritional supplementation with Oral Impact® in patients undergoing hepatic surgery for liver cancer. Treatment was given three times daily for 7 days before and 3 days after surgery. Primary outcome was factor V, 3 days after surgery. Thirty-five patients (placebo: 17; Oral Impact: 18) were included. Five patients (placebo: three; Oral Impact: two) were not operated and five (placebo: two; Oral Impact: three) did not undergo hepatic resection. Factor V (mean ± SD) was 70 ± 27% and 79 ± 25% (P = 0.409) 3 days after surgery and 90 ± 30% and 106 ± 16% (P = 0.066) 5 days after surgery, in placebo and Oral Impact groups, respectively. There were no significant differences between groups on other outcomes assessing liver function recovery (bile production, γ-glutamyl transferase, α-fetoprotein), immune response (CD3, CD4, CD8 cells, CD4/CD8 ratio, natural killer cells, B lymphocytes), number of infections, and tolerance. A 10-day perioperative nutritional supplementation with Oral Impact does not improve hepatic function, immune response, and resistance to infection in patients undergoing hepatic surgery for liver cancer.

  2. Oral health related quality of life (OHRQoL) following third molar surgery in Sub-Saharan Africans: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braimah, Ramat Oyebunmi; Ndukwe, Kizito Chioma; Owotade, Foluso John; Aregbesola, Stephen Babatunde

    2016-01-01

    Surgical extraction of the impacted third molar is one of the commonest minor oral surgical procedures carried out in oral surgery. Problems created by the disturbances in post-extraction wound healing and physiologic sequelae of third molar surgery can significantly affect the patient's quality of life. The study population consisted of 135 subjects that required surgical extraction of mandibular third molar under local anesthesia and met the inclusion criteria. Patients were assessed pre-operatively and post-operatively on days 1,3,5,7, and 14 using the United Kingdom Oral Health related Quality of Life questionnaire (UK-OHRQoL). This study also showed that surgical removal of impacted teeth exerted a negative influence on patient's Quality of life (QoL) across various physical, social, psychological aspects of life. UK-OHRQoL-16 mean scores showed that severe difficulty in eating was experienced by 106 (78%) patients on postoperative day (POD) 1. The symptom however improved within the first week with only 16 (11.9%) experiencing this symptom by POD 7 and none by POD 14. There was a deterioration in oral health related quality of life in the immediate postoperative period particularly POD 1 and 3 following third molar surgery, which slowly returned to preoperative level by 7th day. Routines such as eating, laughing and smiling, work and speech were also affected. Patients need to be informed of these symptoms after third molar removal so as to enable them prepare very well for the procedure and its sequelae.

  3. Influence of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery on vitamin C, myeloperoxidase, and oral clinical manifestations: a 2-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netto, Bárbara Dal Molin; Moreira, Emilia Addison Machado; Patiño, Juliana Sedrez Reis; Benincá, Jucélia Pizzetti; Jordão, Alceu Afonso; Fröde, Tânia Silvia

    2012-02-01

    Bariatric surgery influences the intake and absorption of nutrients, which, when associated with vomiting, can damage the oral cavity. The serum concentrations of vitamin C and myeloperoxidase (MPO) and oral clinical manifestations were examined in patients 2 years after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). Clinical prospective study with control group (CG; n = 26), assessed only once, and the bariatric group (BG; n = 26), assessed in the basal period and at 12 and 24 months after surgery. The mean ages in the CG and BG were 37.8 ± 1.51 and 39.6 ± 1.93 years, respectively, and their body mass indices were 22.07 ± 0.29 and 45.62 ± 1.46 kg/m(2), respectively. At 12 months after surgery, increased episodes of vomiting (P saliva-buffering capacity of 21.3% ± 2.9% (P = .004). At 24 months after RYGB, a significant reduction in serum vitamin C was detected (32.9% ± 5.3%, P MPO values were higher than in the basal period (P = .032). With regard to oral hygiene habits, 92.3% of patients reported frequent tooth brushing and 96.1% used fluoride, which were similar across the 2 years. However, dental hypersensitivity (P = .048) was significantly increased than baseline. The results demonstrated that vitamin C deficiency and increased vomiting after gastric bypass for morbid obesity may contribute to increased periodontal disease. The fact that it is impossible to determine which factor or factors (diet, poor compliance with supplementation, vomiting, poor oral hygiene) contributed to the dental problems in these patients is a shortcoming of the report.

  4. Surgical site infections among high-risk patients in clean-contaminated head and neck reconstructive surgery: concordance with preoperative oral flora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ching-Hsiang; Chew, Khong-Yik; Solomkin, Joseph S; Lin, Pao-Yuan; Chiang, Yuan-Cheng; Kuo, Yur-Ren

    2013-12-01

    Salivary contamination of surgical wounds in clean-contaminated head and neck surgery with free flap reconstruction remains a major cause of infection and leads to significant morbidity. This study investigates the correlation between intraoral flora and surgical site infections (SSIs) among high-risk head and neck cancer patients undergoing resection and free flap reconstruction. One hundred twenty-nine patients were identified as being at high risk for infective complications based on cancer stage, tumor size, comorbid factors, and extent of reconstruction. All patients had intraoral swab cultures before surgery. Patients with culture-confirmed SSI after surgery were chosen for analysis, using the κ index and its 95% confidence interval for concordance analysis. All patients received clindamycin and gentamicin for antibiotic prophylaxis for 5 days. Antibiotic susceptibility testing of all isolates was obtained and analyzed. Thirty-seven patients experienced SSI, or an infection rate of 28.3%, occurring at a mean of 9.3 postoperative days. The overall concordance between oral flora and SSI was fair to moderate (κ index of 0.25), but detailed analysis shows a higher concordance for known and opportunistic pathogens, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterococcus faecalis, compared to typical oral commensals. Antibiotic susceptibility tests show rapid and significant increases in resistance to clindamycin, indicating a need for a more effective alternative. Predicting pathogens in SSI using preoperative oral swabs did not demonstrate a good concordance in general for patients undergoing clean-contaminated head and neck surgery, although concordance for certain pathogenic species seem to be higher than for typical intraoral commensals. The rapid development of resistance to clindamycin precludes its use as a prophylactic agent.

  5. Self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems ameliorate the oral delivery of silymarin in rats with Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen CH

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Chun-Han Chen,1,2 Cheng-Chih Chang,1 Tsung-Hsien Shih,2 Ibrahim A Aljuffali,3 Ta-Sen Yeh,4,5 Jia-You Fang6–8 1Division of General Surgery, Department of Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chiayi, 2Graduate Institute of Clinical Medical Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Kweishan, Taoyuan, Taiwan; 3Department of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 4Department of Surgery, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, 5School of Medicine, College of Medicine, 6Pharmaceutics Laboratory, Graduate Institute of Natural Products, 7Chinese Herbal Medicine Research Team, Healthy Aging Research Center, Chang Gung University, 8Research Center for Industry of Human Ecology, Chang Gung University of Science and Technology, Kweishan, Taoyuan, Taiwan Abstract: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB is a popular surgery to reduce the body weight of obese patients. Although food intake is restricted by RYGB, drug absorption is also decreased. The purpose of this study was to develop novel self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery systems (SNEDDS for enhancing the oral delivery of silymarin, which has poor water solubility. The SNEDDS were characterized by size, zeta potential, droplet number, and morphology. A technique of RYGB was performed in Sprague-Dawley rats. SNEDDS were administered at a silymarin dose of 600 mg/kg in normal and RYGB rats for comparison with silymarin aqueous suspension and polyethylene glycol (PEG 400 solution. Plasma silibinin, the main active ingredient in silymarin, was chosen for estimating the pharmacokinetic parameters. SNEDDS diluted in simulated gastric fluid exhibited a droplet size of 190 nm with a spherical shape. The nanocarriers promoted silibinin availability via oral ingestion in RYGB rats by 2.5-fold and 1.5-fold compared to the suspension and PEG 400 solution, respectively. A significant double-peak concentration of silibinin was detected for RYGB rats receiving SNEDDS. Fluorescence

  6. Treatment of naturally occuring hemangiopericytoma and oral squamous cell carcinoma in dogs using surgery and photodynamic therapy with HPPH as a photosensitizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, John T.; McCaw, Dudley L.; Rogers, Kevin J.; Tompson, Robert V.

    1995-05-01

    Pyropheophorbide-a-hexyl ether (HPPH) is a new photosensitizer for use with photodynamic therapy (PDT) that has shown promise in laboratory animals. PDT, using this drug, is being used to treat canine patients afflicted with hemangiopericytoma and oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) at the University of Missouri-Columbia College of Veterinary Medicine. To date, 11 dogs with hemangiopericytoma and 5 dogs with oral SCC have been treated using a combination of surgery and PDT. Thus far, there have been no serious complications attributable to the treatment. Two dogs have had recurrences of the hemangiopericytoma and there have been no recurrences of SCC with a median follow time of 5 months. Both recurrent hemangiopericytomas were in patients with large tumors that had previous surgery. This study is ongoing and no conclusions have been reached; however several observations are noted. It appears that PDT using HPPH is safe is dogs, and may decrease the recurrence rate of Hemangiopericytomas. In dogs with oral SCC, the treatment is effective is causing necrosis and sloughing of the tumor tissue, and recurrences have not been noted on follow-ups up to 6 months.

  7. Clinical outcomes for T1-2N0-1 oral tongue cancer patients underwent surgery with and without postoperative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Su Jung; Cha, Jihye; Koom, Woong Sub; Kim, Gwi Eon; Lee, Chang Geol; Choi, Eun Chang; Keum, Ki Chang

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the results of curative surgery with and without radiotherapy in patients with T 1-2 N 0-1 oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and to evaluate survival and prognostic factors. Retrospective analysis of 86 patients with T 1-2 N 0-1 OSCC who received surgery between January 2000 and December 2006. Fourteen patients (16.3%) received postoperative radiotherapy (PORT). Patient characteristics, tumor characteristics, treatment modality, failure patterns, and survival rates were analyzed. The median follow-up was 45 months. The five-year overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) rates were 80.8% and 80.2%, respectively. Higher tumor grade and invasion depth ≥ 0.5 cm were the significant prognostic factors affecting five-year OS and DFS (OS rate; 65% vs. 91%, p = 0.001 for grade; 66% vs. 92%, p = 0.01 for invasion depth: DFS rate; 69% vs. 88%, p = 0.005 for grade; 66% vs. 92%, p = 0.013 for invasion depth). In the risk group, there was no local failure in patients with postoperative radiotherapy. In T 1-2 N 0-1 OSCC, factors that affected prognosis after primary surgery were higher tumor grade and deep invasion depth over 0.5 cm. Postoperative radiotherapy should be considered in early oral tongue cancer patients with these high-risk pathologic features

  8. A retrospective review of outcome and survival following surgery and adjuvant xenogeneic DNA vaccination in 32 dogs with oral malignant melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treggiari, Elisabetta; Grant, Jessica Pauline; North, Susan Margaret

    2016-06-01

    A xenogeneic DNA vaccination has been licensed for use in dogs with locally controlled stage II and III oral malignant melanoma (OMM). At present, there are limited outcome data for dogs with OMM treated with surgery and immunotherapy. The aim of this study is to retrospectively review the outcome and survival of 32 dogs affected by OMM that were treated with a combination of surgery and the xenogeneic DNA vaccination (with the addition of radiotherapy in some cases) and to determine the influence of surgical margins and delay in receiving vaccination. The overall median survival time (MST) was 335 days (95% CI: 301-540 days), and the overall median progression-free survival (PFS) was 160 days (mean 182 days, 95% CI: 132-232 days). Stage, completeness of surgical margins and delay in administration of the vaccine did not appear to statistically influence survival or PFS, although these results may reflect the low statistical power of the study due to small numbers. Further studies are required to assess whether the addition of any adjuvant treatment to surgery, including immunotherapy, is able to significantly prolong survival in cases of canine oral melanoma.

  9. Clinical outcomes for T1-2N0-1 oral tongue cancer patients underwent surgery with and without postoperative radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Eun

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to assess the results of curative surgery with and without radiotherapy in patients with T1-2N0-1 oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC and to evaluate survival and prognostic factors. Methods Retrospective analysis of 86 patients with T1-2N0-1 OSCC who received surgery between January 2000 and December 2006. Fourteen patients (16.3% received postoperative radiotherapy (PORT. Patient characteristics, tumor characteristics, treatment modality, failure patterns, and survival rates were analyzed. Results The median follow-up was 45 months. The five-year overall survival (OS and disease-free survival (DFS rates were 80.8% and 80.2%, respectively. Higher tumor grade and invasion depth ≥ 0.5 cm were the significant prognostic factors affecting five-year OS and DFS (OS rate; 65% vs. 91%, p = 0.001 for grade; 66% vs. 92%, p = 0.01 for invasion depth: DFS rate; 69% vs. 88%, p = 0.005 for grade; 66% vs. 92%, p = 0.013 for invasion depth. In the risk group, there was no local failure in patients with postoperative radiotherapy. Conclusions In T1-2N0-1 OSCC, factors that affected prognosis after primary surgery were higher tumor grade and deep invasion depth over 0.5 cm. Postoperative radiotherapy should be considered in early oral tongue cancer patients with these high-risk pathologic features.

  10. Evaluation of Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging for the Assessment of Oral Mucosal Blood Flow following Periodontal Plastic Surgery: An Exploratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnár, Eszter; Molnár, Bálint; Lohinai, Zsolt; Tóth, Zsuzsanna; Benyó, Zoltán; Hricisák, Laszló; Windisch, Péter; Vág, János

    2017-01-01

    The laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) is proved to be a reliable tool in flap monitoring in general surgery; however, it has not been evaluated in oral surgery yet. We applied the LSCI to compare the effect of a xenogeneic collagen matrix (Geistlich Mucograft®) to connective tissue grafts (CTG) on the microcirculation of the modified coronally advanced tunnel technique (MCAT) for gingival recession coverage. Gingival microcirculation and wound fluid were measured before and after surgery for six months at twenty-seven treated teeth. In males, the flap microcirculation was restored within 3 days for both grafts followed by a hyperemic response. During the first 8 days the blood flow was higher at xenogeneic graft comparing to the CTG. In females, the ischemic period lasted for 7-12 days depending on the graft and no hyperemic response was observed. Females had more intense and prolonged wound fluid production. The LSCI method is suitable to capture the microcirculatory effect of the surgical intervention in human oral mucosa. The application of xenogeneic collagen matrices as a CTG substitute does not seem to restrain the recovery of graft bed circulation. Gender may have an effect on postoperative circulation and inflammation.

  11. Evaluation of Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging for the Assessment of Oral Mucosal Blood Flow following Periodontal Plastic Surgery: An Exploratory Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eszter Molnár

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI is proved to be a reliable tool in flap monitoring in general surgery; however, it has not been evaluated in oral surgery yet. We applied the LSCI to compare the effect of a xenogeneic collagen matrix (Geistlich Mucograft® to connective tissue grafts (CTG on the microcirculation of the modified coronally advanced tunnel technique (MCAT for gingival recession coverage. Gingival microcirculation and wound fluid were measured before and after surgery for six months at twenty-seven treated teeth. In males, the flap microcirculation was restored within 3 days for both grafts followed by a hyperemic response. During the first 8 days the blood flow was higher at xenogeneic graft comparing to the CTG. In females, the ischemic period lasted for 7–12 days depending on the graft and no hyperemic response was observed. Females had more intense and prolonged wound fluid production. The LSCI method is suitable to capture the microcirculatory effect of the surgical intervention in human oral mucosa. The application of xenogeneic collagen matrices as a CTG substitute does not seem to restrain the recovery of graft bed circulation. Gender may have an effect on postoperative circulation and inflammation.

  12. Future of bone pathology, bone grafting, and osseointegration in oral and maxillofacial surgery: how applying optical advancements can help both fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, Rahul; Herford, Alan S.

    2013-03-01

    Introduction: In recent years, advances in technology are propelling the field of oral and maxillofacial surgery into new realms. With a relatively thin alveolar mucosa overlying the underlying bone, significant diagnostic and therapeutic advantages are present. However, there remains an enormous gap between advancements in physics, in particular optics, and oral and maxillofacial surgery. Bone Pathology: Improvements in diagnosis, classification, and treatment of the various bone pathologies are still being sought after as advancements in technology continue to progress. Combining the clinical, histological, and pathological characteristics with these advancements, patients with debilitating pathologies may have more promising treatment options and prognosis. Bone Grafting: Defects in the facial bones, in particular the jaws, may be due to a number of reasons: pathology, trauma, infections, congenital deformities, or simply due to atrophy. Bone grafting is commonly employed to correct such defects, and allows new bone formation through tissue regeneration. Osseointegration: Growing use of dental implants has focused attention on osseointegration and its process. Osseointegration refers to the actual process of the direct contact between bone and implant, without an intervening soft tissue layer. The theories proposed regarding this process are many, yet there lacks a clear, unified stance on the actual process and its mechanisms. Further investigation using optical probes could provide that unifying answer. Conclusion: The primary goal of this lecture is to introduce pioneers in the field of optics to the field of oral and maxillofacial surgery. With a brief introduction into the procedures and techniques, we are hopeful to bridge the ever-widening gap between the clinical science and the basic sciences.

  13. Laser ablation in temporomandibular joint disorders and a case report involving an ossifying fibroma: how optics could potentially advance treatments in oral and maxillofacial surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandon, Rahul; Stevens, Timothy W.; Stringer, Dale E.; Dean, Jeff S.; Herford, Alan S.

    2013-03-01

    Introduction: In the field of oral and maxillofacial surgery, there are many applications for lasers and optics. The first part of this manuscript is to discuss laser therapy and garner suggestions on how it can be improved. The second part is to present a case in which complications of a bone graft delayed healing and a return to normalcy for the patient. It is the goal of this paper to utilize the new advancements in optics so that patient care can be improved. Laser Therapy: Laser ablation and low-level laser therapy have been used in a variety of joint adhesion cases, including arthritis of the hand and foot. In the field of oral and maxillofacial surgery, this method has been used to treat pain and mobility dysfunction in patients with temporomandibular joint disease. While the outcomes have been promising, lack of familiarity with the device or doubt about its effects have reduced its use. This reduction in use has left the actual process of laser therapy relatively unchanged. Case Presentation: A 28 year-old female presented for a mandibular resection due to an ossifying fibroma. In the next several months her reconstructed area displayed significant signs of infection, as well as graft failure. X-rays, unfortunately, did not display the actual metabolic activity. Although the patient was reconstructed successfully thereafter, with more advanced technology available the patient could have endured a more comfortable treatment. Conclusion: While there are many more areas of oral and maxillofacial surgery that could potentially benefit from advances in optical technology, we have chosen to highlight these two areas due to their prevalence within our community.

  14. Risk factors for insufficient perioperative oral nutrition after hip fracture surgery within a multi-modal rehabilitation programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai B; Jensen, Pia S; Kehlet, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    To examine oral nutritional intake in the perioperative phase in elderly hip fracture patients treated according to a well-defined multi-modal rehabilitation program, including unselected oral nutritional supplementation, and to identify independent risk factors for insufficient nutritional intake....

  15. Quality assurance review of training in oral and maxillofacial surgery by the General Medical Council: areas of good practice, requirements, and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandhu, Davinder P S; Dover, Michael Stephen; Lay, Sarah

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this paper is to disseminate the outcome of the 2012/13 UK-wide quality assurance review of postgraduate training in oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMFS) by the General Medical Council (GMC), as part of its review of small specialties. OMF surgeons need to be aware of the evidence on which the conclusions are based, and to know about the strengths of the specialty and the areas for future development so that postgraduate training, and ultimately the outcomes for patients, can be improved. This paper, by the authors involved in the review, summarises the salient points and is not a verbatim report. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Effects of intraoperative administration of carbohydrates during long-duration oral and maxillofacial surgery on the metabolism of carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Toru; Yoshida, Mitsuhiro; Watanabe, Seiji; Kawahara, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    Insulin resistance in patients undergoing invasive surgery impairs glucose and lipid metabolism and increases muscle protein catabolism, which may result in delayed recovery and prolonged hospital stay. We examined whether intraoperative administration of carbohydrates during long-duration oral and maxillofacial surgery under general anesthesia affects carbohydrate, proteins, and lipid metabolism and the length of hospital stay. We studied 16 patients with normal liver, kidney, and endocrine functions, and ASA physical status I or II, but without diabetes. Patients were randomly assigned to receive 0.1 g/kg/h of (n = 8) or lactated Ringer's solution (n = 8). Blood was collected before (T0) and 4 h after (T1) the start of surgery. We analyzed the plasma levels of glucose, ketone bodies, 3-methylhistidine (3-MH), and the length of hospital stay. At T0, no statistically significant differences were observed in the levels of glucose, ketone bodies, and 3-MH between the groups. At T1, no statistically significant difference in glucose levels was found between the groups. However, ketone bodies were significantly lower, and the changes in 3-MH levels were significantly less pronounced in the glucose-treated group compared with controls. No significant differences were observed between the groups in terms of length of hospital stay. The administration of low doses of glucose during surgery was safe, did not cause hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia, and inhibited lipid metabolism and protein catabolism. Additional experiments with larger cohorts will be necessary to investigate whether intraoperative management with glucose facilitates postoperative recovery of patients with oral cancer.

  17. Gum chewing combined with oral intake of a semi-liquid diet in the postoperative care of patients after gynaecologic laparoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yuping; Chen, Li; Zhong, Xiaorong; Feng, Suwen

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the effects of gum chewing combined with a semi-liquid diet on patients after gynaecologic laparoscopic surgery. Previous studies suggested that chewing gum before traditional postoperative care promotes the postoperative recovery of bowel motility and function after open and laparoscopic surgery. However, gum chewing combined with a semi-liquid diet has not been reported in postoperative care of patients following gynaecologic laparoscopic surgery. A prospective randomised study. Total 234 patients were randomly assigned after elective gynaecologic laparoscopic surgery to a gum chewing and semi-liquid diet group, a semi-liquid only diet group or a liquid diet group. The gum chewing and semi-liquid diet group chewed sugar-free gum with an oral intake of a semi-liquid diet six hours postoperatively. The semi-liquid only diet and liquid diet groups received a semi-liquid diet or a liquid diet, respectively. The time to first bowel sounds, time to first regular postoperative bowel sounds, time to first passage of flatus, time to first defecation, serum gastrin and incidences of hunger, nausea, vomiting and abdominal distension were recorded. Hunger and gastrointestinal sensations were assessed using a four-point scale. Serum gastrin was assayed pre- and postoperatively using a gastrin radioimmunoassay kit. The gum chewing and semi-liquid diet group had first bowel sounds, first regular bowel sounds, first passage of flatus and first defecation earlier than the semi-liquid only and liquid groups. Increased serum gastrin was observed in the gum chewing and semi-liquid diet group. Incidences of nausea, vomiting and abdominal distention were not significantly different between these groups. Chewing gum combined with an oral intake of a semi-liquid diet is safe and accelerates the postoperative recovery of bowel function. It might be recommended as a better postoperative care regimen for patients after gynaecologic laparoscopic surgery. This study developed a

  18. A Retrospective Radiographic Survey of Pathology Associated with Impacted Third Molars among Patients Seen in Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery Clinic of College of Dentistry, Riyadh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khawaja, Naveed Ahmad; Khalil, Hesham; Parveen, Kauser; Al-Mutiri, Abdulmajeed; Al-Mutiri, Saif; Al-Saawi, Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study is to determine the type and frequency of pathological conditions around third molar teeth among randomly selected patient’s records in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, College of Dentistry, King Saud University, Riyadh. Materials and Methods: Totally, 281 patient panoramic radiographs were selected with detectable pathology among 570 files of patients seen in oral and maxillofacial surgery clinics 2 years retrospectively. Almost 17-55 years age (mean age 25.43) was selected. The following radiographs were analyzed for all pathology associated impacted teeth; dental caries, bone resorption, periodontitis, and apical pathology. Results: The study found caries, external bone resorption and periodontitis are highly frequent to mesioangular and horizontal in mandibular impacted third molar compared to maxillary impacted third molar. Overall result evaluated that tooth #28 related periodontitis is significant (P = 0.021), and tooth #38 related bone resorption, tooth #48 related root caries, bone resorption and apical pathology are highly significant (P = 0.000) comparing to others. This study also concluded the high frequency of root caries, bone resorption and apical pathology reported in relation to mandibular impacted third teeth. Significant results were also achieved with periodontitis in relation to mesiangular and vertical angulation of left impacted maxillary third molars. Conclusion: Prophylactic removal of impacted third molars is recommended in many studies to avoid future risk of associated pathology. Retained asymptomatic impacted third molars imply pathology that could be difficult in later ages as less morbidity in younger ages. PMID:25954064

  19. The 100 Most-Cited Human Cleft Lip and Palate-Related Articles Published in Dentistry, Oral Surgery, and Medicine Journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christou, Panagiotis; Antonarakis, Gregory S

    2015-07-01

    To identify the 100 most-cited articles pertaining to human cleft lip and palate research published in dentistry, oral surgery, and medicine journals and to identify their principal bibliometric characteristics. Web-based bibliometric analysis. The Web of Science was searched to identify the 100 most-cited clinical articles related to cleft lip and/or palate. Information was extracted with regard to total number of citations, number of authors, affiliations, year, and journal of publication, Medical Subject Headings, type of study, specific area of study. Trends in citations were assessed. The 100 most-cited articles identified received between 437 and 58 citations. The oldest was published in 1954 and the most recent in 2008. The number of authors ranged from 1 to 12, with an average of three authors per article. Most of the first authors were affiliated with institutions in the United States, with the most prolific institution being the University of Iowa. More than 70% of the studies appeared in The Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal. There was a significant negative correlation between average citations per year and time since publication (P articles in human cleft lip and palate research published in dentistry, oral surgery, and medicine journals are listed and characterized. This can be used as a potential knowledge base for specialists in training or to produce relevant knowledge defining the direction of future research.

  20. Current knowledge and perspectives for the use of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) in oral and maxillofacial surgery part 2: Bone graft, implant and reconstructive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonpieri, Alain; Del Corso, Marco; Vervelle, Alain; Jimbo, Ryo; Inchingolo, Francesco; Sammartino, Gilberto; Dohan Ehrenfest, David M

    2012-06-01

    Platelet concentrates for surgical use are innovative tools of regenerative medicine, and were widely tested in oral and maxillofacial surgery. Unfortunately, the literature on the topic is contradictory and the published data are difficult to sort and interpret. In bone graft, implant and reconstructive surgery, the literature is particularly dense about the use of the various forms of Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) - Pure Platelet-Rich Plasma (P-PRP) or Leukocyte- and Platelet-Rich Plasma (L-PRP) - but still limited about Platelet-Rich Fibrin (PRF) subfamilies. In this second article, we describe and discuss the current published knowledge about the use of PRP and PRF during implant placement (particularly as surface treatment for the stimulation of osseointegration), the treatment of peri-implant bone defects (after peri-implantitis, during implantation in an insufficient bone volume or during immediate post-extraction or post-avulsion implantation), the sinuslift procedures and various complex implant-supported treatments. Other potential applications of the platelet concentrates are also highlighted in maxillofacial reconstructive surgery, for the treatment of patients using bisphosphonates, anticoagulants or with post-tumoral irradiated maxilla. Finally, we particularly insist on the perspectives in this field, through the description and illustration of the use of L-PRF (Leukocyte- and Platelet-Rich Fibrin) clots and membranes during the regeneration of peri-implant bone defects, during the sinus-lift procedure and during complex implant-supported rehabilitations. The use of L-PRF allowed to define a new therapeutic concept called the Natural Bone Regeneration (NBR) for the reconstruction of the alveolar ridges at the gingival and bone levels. As it is illustrated in this article, the NBR principles allow to push away some technical limits of global implant-supported rehabilitations, particularly when combined with other powerful biotechnological tools

  1. The effects of oral pregabalin on post-operative pain of lower limb orthopedic surgery: A double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godrat Akhavanakbari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Post-operative pain is one of the problems, wherein lack of control on it has many side-effects such as tachycardia, hypertension, myocardial ischemia, decreased alveolar ventilation, and poor wound healing. Aims: In this study, we evaluated the pre-operative administration of pregabalin sufficiency and security in relieving post-operative pain after lower limb orthopedic surgery and reducing the need for opioids and their possible side-effects. Materials and Methods: This study is a randomized, double-blind clinical trial. It was performed on 60 patients under lower limb surgery by spinal anesthesia. Patients were randomly allocated to two groups, one group has received a 150 mg pregabalin capsule 2 h before surgery and the other group has received placebo as a control. In both groups at 2, 6, 12, and 24 h after surgery, the patients were evaluated and the pain score, the score of sedation, incidence of nausea and vomiting was recorded in the checklists. Then, the data were analyzed by SPSS v16. Results: Visual analog pain scores at all hours in pregabalin group significantly reduced compared to the placebo group ( P < 0.0001. Also, in the pregabalin group nausea and vomiting scores at all hours, sedation levels at 2 h and 6 h post-operatively, and pethidine consumption in all hours have significantly been reduced. Conclusion: A single pre-operative oral dose of pregabalin 150 mg is an effective method for reducing post-operative pain and pethidine consumption in patients undergoing orthopedic surgery.

  2. Oral appliances and maxillomandibular advancement surgery : An alternative treatment protocol for the obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekema, A; de Lange, J; Stegenga, B; de Bont, LGM

    Purpose: The present study comprises a retrospective evaluation of the potential application of mandibular repositioning appliance (MRA) therapy preceding maxillomandibular advancement (MMA) surgery in the treatment of the Obstructive Sleep Apnea-Hypopnea Syndrome (OSAHS). Our initial experiences

  3. Oral Rehabilitation With Orthognathic Surgery After Dental Implant Placement for Class III Malocclusion With Skeletal Asymmetry and Posterior Bite Collapse.

    OpenAIRE

    Ohba, Seigo; Nakatani, Yuya; Kawasaki, Takako; Tajima, Nobutaka; Tobita, Takayoshi; Yoshida, Noriaki; Sawase, Takashi; Asahina, Izumi

    2015-01-01

    Increasing numbers of older patients are seeking orthognathic surgery to treat jaw deformity. However, orthodontic and orthognathic surgical treatment is difficult in cases without occlusal vertical stop. A 55-year-old man presented with Class III malocclusion and mandibular protrusion including esthetic problems and posterior bite collapse. He underwent dental implant treatment to reconstruct an occlusal vertical stop before orthognathic surgery. His occlusal function and esthetic problems i...

  4. Efficacy of chlorhexidine, dexpanthenol, allantoin and chitosan gel in comparison with bicarbonate oral rinse in controlling post-interventional inflammation, pain and cicatrization in subjects undergoing dental surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Lopez, Jose; Lope-Lopez, Jose; Jan-Pallí, Enric; lez-Navarro, Beatriz Gonzá; González-Navarro, Beatriz; Jané-Salas, Enric; Estrugo-Devesa, Albert; Milani, Massimo

    2015-12-01

    Reducing post-interventional inflammation and pain in odontostomatological surgery procedures, such as tooth extractions, implants or oral biopsies is a relevant clinical goal. Chlorhexidine oral rinse is commonly used with this aim. Recently a new product containing chlorhexidine, dexpanthenol, allantoin and chitosan (Bexident Post [BP]) in a gel formulation has been developed. We evaluated the efficacy of BP in controlling postsurgical inflammation and pain and in promoting cicatrization in subjects undergoing molar extractions. We conducted a prospective sequential cross-over, randomized controlled study in patients undergoing surgical removal of at least two impacted mandibular third molars (teeth numbers 38 and 48) (numbers 17 and 32 in the Universal Tooth Numbering System), in two separate sessions, to determine the effect of BP in comparison with bicarbonate (BC) oral rinse (one spoonful in 200 ml of water), both used three times daily. Each subject utilized both products in a randomized sequential manner after each tooth extraction. Primary outcomes of the study were post-procedure pain and inflammation. Secondary outcomes were analgesic pill rescue use (metamizole 1 cap every 8 hours if needed) and an assessor-blinded evaluation of cicatrization with a semi-quantitative scale (good, satisfactory and insufficient). Post-procedure pain was assessed 6 hours after tooth extraction and for seven consecutive days by means of a 10 cm visual analogue scale (VAS) (from 0: no pain to 10: extreme pain). The extent of inflammation was evaluated through metric measurements of facial perimeter using standardized anatomical reference points. A total of 47 patients (22 men and 25 women; mean age 34 years) were enrolled with a total of 94 molars extracted. Nineteen subjects applied BC as the first sequential treatment and 28 BP as the first. Before surgery no mean differences in the two treatments in inflammation measurements were observed. After surgery mean VAS pain

  5. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... It can also invite bacteria that lead to gum disease. Click here to find out more. Who We Are Find a Surgeon News Videos Contact Anesthesia Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Corrective Jaw Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Extractions and Other Oral Surgeries Facial Cosmetic ...

  6. Microvascular reconstruction of the mouth, jaws, and face: experience of an Australian oral and maxillofacial surgery unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Gary R; Islam, Shofiq; Eisenberg, Robert L

    2012-05-01

    Microvascular reconstruction of oncologic surgical and traumatic defects has been globally practiced by plastic and orthopedic surgical disciplines since the early 1970s. During the past 20 years, reconstructive techniques have been progressively incorporated into the purview of oral and maxillofacial and otolaryngology-head and neck surgeons, particularly those practicing in Europe, the United Kingdom, and China. There has also been a steady increase in the adoption of these techniques in North America, South America, and Japan. We reviewed our experience (during a 5-year period) with microvascular reconstruction of postablative defects in the oral and maxillofacial region. To our knowledge, resection and neck dissection (or neck exploration in benign free tissue transfer); undertaken by an oral and maxillofacial surgeon), and free tissue transfer reconstruction (undertaken by otolaryngology head and neck and oral and maxillofacial surgeons) of ablative defects of the mouth, jaws, and face (managed within an Australian head and neck cancer multidisciplinary care team) have not been previously reported. The study cohort comprised 107 patients who underwent 109 microvascularly anastomosed free tissue transfers. Of the 107 patients, 79 were males and 38 were females. The median age was 62 years (range 15 to 87). The clinicodemographic analyses and the range of complications observed in this patient cohort are reported. The overall flap success rate in our study was 97%. The surgical outcomes of our study compare favorably with those previously reported. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparison of the analgesic efficacy of preoperative/postoperative oral dexketoprofen trometamol in third molar surgery: A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esparza-Villalpando, Vicente; Chavarria-Bolaños, Daniel; Gordillo-Moscoso, Antonio; Masuoka-Ito, David; Martinez-Rider, Ricardo; Isiordia-Espinoza, Mario; Pozos-Guillen, Amaury

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of preoperative and postoperative dexketoprofen trometamol for pain control after third molar surgery. Sixty subjects indicated for impacted mandibular third molar surgery were randomly assigned to two groups: preoperative (group 1, n = 30) and postoperative (group 2, n = 30) administration. Group 1 received 25 mg of dexketoprofen trometamol 30 min before surgery and 1 placebo capsule (same color and size with active drug) immediately after surgery. Group 2 received the placebo capsule 30 min before surgery and 25 mg of dexketoprofen trometamol immediately after surgery. Pain intensity was assessed using a numeric rating scale (NRS) during the first 8 h. The time of the need for a second dose of dexketoprofen trometamol, after the first administration, was recorded. The data were analyzed using mixed-model repeated-measures (MMRM), Wilcoxon rank-sum, and Kaplan-Meier analysis. After the 8 h period, no statistically significant difference was observed in the intensity of pain (MMRM, p = 0.41); and no significant difference in the time for a second dose (p = 0.956). In conclusion, preoperative administration of dexketoprofen trometamol is a reasonable clinical approach that is as effective as conventional postoperative pharmacological treatment, with the advantage of allowing early analgesia before pain develops. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02380001). Copyright © 2016 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of deep sedation under mechanical ventilation on cognitive outcome in patients undergoing surgery for oral and maxillofacial cancer and microvascular reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Y; Inoue, S; Konda, M; Egawa, J; Ueda, J; Kirita, T; Kawaguchi, M

    2017-12-16

    Cognitive impairment after intensive care unit (ICU) admission is becoming increasingly recognized. High-dose deep sedation has been suggested to play an important role in the development of cognitive impairment. However, the impact of heavy sedation as a single cause in the development of cognitive impairment in ICU patients remains unclear. In this study we investigated whether a three-day deep sedation protocol could reduce cognitive function in mechanically ventilated non-critical patients. A prospective observational study was carried out. A total of 17 surgical patients were studied. None. Cognitive function before and after ICU admission. Thirty-one patients requiring three days of sedation after microvascular reconstruction were initially enrolled in the study. Sedation in the ICU was maintained with propofol and dexmedetomidine combined with fentanyl. Cognitive function was assessed using a battery of 6 neuropsychological tests two days before surgery and three weeks after surgery. Finally, a total of 17 patients were included in the analysis. Cognitive impairment (defined as a decline of >20% from the pre-admission cognitive evaluation scores in at least two of 6 tests) was observed in 5 of the 17 patients (29%). However, there were no significant differences between the pre- and post-admission cognitive evaluations in 6 tests. Middle-term cognitive function can be impaired in some patients subjected to deep sedation during several days following maxillary-mandibular oral surgery with microvascular reconstruction. Copyright © 2017. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  9. Perioperative oral nutritional supplements in normally or mildly undernourished geriatric patients submitted to surgery for hip fracture: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botella-Carretero, José I; Iglesias, Borja; Balsa, José A; Arrieta, Francisco; Zamarrón, Isabel; Vázquez, Clotilde

    2010-10-01

    Oral nutritional supplements have been recommended after orthopedic surgery in geriatric patients. This has been shown to be effective even in normally nourished or mildly undernourished geriatric patients. Whether perioperative administration of these products is also effective and suitable is not known. Randomized, controlled, open, paralleled two-arms clinical trial, comparing energy-protein supplements (40 g of protein and 400 kcal per day), with no intervention in normally nourished or mildly undernourished patients. Outcomes were serum proteins, body mass index, postoperative complications among others. 60 Elderly patients were included. Patients in the intervention group (n = 30) ingested 52.2 ± 12.1% of the prescribed supplements per day for 5.8 ± 1.8 days before surgery and until hospital discharge. There was a significant change in serum albumin at follow-up (F = 22.536, P supplemented proteins per day (OR[95%CI] = 0.925[0.869-0.985]) were associated with less postoperative complications (R(2) = 0.323, χ(2) = 11.541, P = 0.003). Perioperative supplements in geriatric patients with hip fracture submitted to surgery showed better recovery of plasma proteins. Higher daily protein intakes were associated with less postoperative complications. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  10. A Study of the Management of Patients Taking Novel Oral Antiplatelet or Direct Oral Anticoagulant Medication Undergoing Dental Surgery in a Rural Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Johnston

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Novel oral antiplatelet (NOAP (prasugrel and ticagrelor and direct oral anticoagulant drugs (DOAC (dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban have emerged in the last decade. This study was undertaken to determine current approaches taken to the management of patients taking these agents in dental practice in a remote and rural setting. Methods: A small retrospective study was carried out in a small island population that identified patients taking one of the above drugs. All national health service and private dental records were examined to determine the type of treatment carried out and whether drug therapy, treatment plans or actual treatment were modified as a result of NOAP or DOAC therapy. In addition other outcomes such as referral to another service for advice or treatment and any adverse bleeding events were noted. Results: 156 dental encounters for 95 patients taking one of the drugs were identified. Significant events were identified in sixteen encounters and the management of patients taking each drug type differed significantly between cases but no patients returned with troublesome post-operative bleeding. Conclusions: The approaches taken by dental surgeons in Orkney in the management of the NOAPs and DOACs varied and this is likely to be a reflection of the limited literature available.

  11. Association between funding, risk of bias, and outcome of randomised controlled trials in oral and maxillofacial surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomens, M.A.E.M.; Lazzari, S.; Heymans, M.W.; Forouzanfar, T.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of funding on the main outcome of a random control trial (RCT) is important, as it could potentially lead to bias towards industry, and results that are too optimistic. We investigated the association between funding, the published outcome, and the risk of bias in trials in oral and

  12. Professional dental and oral surgery liability in Italy: a comparative analysis of the insurance products offered to health workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Lorenzo Pierpaolo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In Italy there has been an increase in claims for damages for alleged medical malpractice. A study was therefore conducted that aimed at assessing the content of the coverage of insurance policy contracts offered to oral health professionals by the insurance market.

  13. A 2-year retrospective analysis of facial injuries in patients treated at department of oral and maxillofacial surgery, IGGDC, Jammu, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lone, Parveen; Singh, Amrit Pal; Kour, Indumeet; Kumar, Misha

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The incidence of maxillofacial injuries is on the rise due to motor vehicle accidents and increased incidence of violence in recent times. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the incidence, etiology, and the pattern of fractures in the maxillofacial region. Materials and Methods: After obtaining permission from the concerned authorities, a predesigned questionnaire was used to collect the necessary data from the department. A retrospective analysis of 787 patients, who suffered trauma and were managed in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Indira Gandhi Government Dental College (IGGDC), Jammu over a period of 2 years was carried out. Results: Road traffic accident (RTA) was the common cause of maxillofacial injuries. Men sustained more injuries as compared to women. Injuries were most commonly sustained in the age group of 11-40 years, constituting about 76% of all injuries, mandibular fractures were the most common. Conclusion: RTAs were the commonest cause for the maxillofacial injuries. PMID:25937724

  14. [Treatment-refractory-dental-extraction-associated pyothorax involving infection by 2 species of oral originated bacteria requires surgical debridement by video assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Kammei; Matsuo, Kiyoshi; Yonei, Toshiro; Sato, Toshio

    2008-09-01

    Cases of septic pulmonary embolism (SPE) diagnosed clinically by CT after dental extraction rarely include verification of bacteria from the local infection site. We report the case of a 70-year-old man without background disease suffering severe pyothrax after dental extraction. We detected two species of oral bacteria from his pleural effusion. Treatment was so difficult that it required surgical debridement by video assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS), even after the appropriate administration of antibiotics. According to the American Heart Association (AHA) prophylaxis guidelines for preventing infective endocarditis indicate that it is uncommon to prescribe antibiotics to patients without background disease after dental extraction. No appropriate Japanese guidelines exist considering the prevention of SPE causing severe pyothorax as in our case. The hematogenous spread of bacteria such as SPE caused by sepsis after tooth extraction thus requires more attended careful consideration in clinical practice if patients are to be properly protected against potentially serious complications.

  15. Reducing Trismus After Surgery and Radiotherapy in Oral Cancer Patients: Results of Alternative Operation Versus Traditional Operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chiang-Chin; Wu, Shang-Liang; Lin, Shang-Lun; Ko, Shun-Yao; Chiang, Wei-Fan; Yang, Jung-Wu

    2016-05-01

    In patients with oral cancer, trismus (maximum interincisal opening [MIO] trismus. In our retrospective cohort study of oral cancer patients who underwent operations during 2010 to 2014, the predictor variable was the type of operation (alternative operation or traditional operation) and the outcome variable was MIO. All of the cases were allocated by 2 periods: the traditional operations were performed from 2010 to 2011, and the alternative operations were performed from 2011 to 2014. All patients received marginal mandibulectomy, anterolateral thigh free flap, and adjuvant radiotherapy or concurrent chemoradiotherapy. In addition to traditional marginal mandibulectomy, the alternative operation included ipsilateral coronoidectomy and myotomy of the temporalis muscle insertion, masseter muscle, and medial pterygoid muscle. MIO was measured at 10 time points. The adjusted variables included demographic data, diagnostic parameters, treatment, and response. Of the 36 male patients with oral cancer, 16 were placed in the alternative operation group (AOG; mean age, 53.5 ± 11.9 years) and 20 were placed in the traditional operation group (TOG; mean age, 50.7 ± 7.1 years). Regarding the outcome indicator of patient MIO, the preoperative MIO in the AOG was on average 7.5 mm shorter than that in the TOG (P trismus. The alternative operation exhibited superior postoperative MIO values and similar postoperative complication rates. For the prevention of trismus, it is practical to perform the combined operation simultaneously, cutting all ipsilateral jaw closing muscles and the coronoid process and eradicating the tumor. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Efficacy and safety of oral robenacoxib (tablet) for the treatment of pain associated with soft tissue surgery in client-owned dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friton, Gabriele; Thompson, Caryn Marie; Karadzovska, Daniela; King, Stephen; King, Jonathan N

    2017-06-26

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been proven to be effective in controlling peri-operative pain in dogs. Robenacoxib is an NSAID with high selectivity for the cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 isoform. The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of an oral tablet formulation of robenacoxib in client-owned dogs undergoing soft tissue surgery. The study was a prospective, multi-center, randomized, masked, placebo-controlled, parallel-group clinical trial. A total of 239 dogs were included and randomly allocated in a 1:1 ratio to receive either robenacoxib or placebo. Each dog received an oral tablet administration of either robenacoxib, at a target dose of 2 mg/kg, or placebo once prior to surgery and for two additional days post-operatively. All dogs also received a pre-anesthetic dose of 0.2 mg/kg butorphanol (intravenous or intramuscular). Pain assessments were performed using the short form of the Glasgow Composite Measure Pain Scale. Robenacoxib was compared to the placebo group on a success/failure basis. Treatment failure was defined as the need for rescue therapy to control post-operative pain. Significantly (P = 0.019) more dogs administered robenacoxib were considered treatment successes (89 of 116, 76.72%) compared to dogs given placebo (74 of 115, 64.35%). The percentage of treatment failure was therefore 23.28% in the robenacoxib and 35.65% in the placebo group. The least squares mean total pain scores were significantly different between groups and in favor of robenacoxib at 3 and 5 hours (P dogs receiving robenacoxib versus placebo (P dogs.

  17. Effects of oral nutritional supplements in normally nourished or mildly undernourished geriatric patients after surgery for hip fracture: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botella-Carretero, José I; Iglesias, Borja; Balsa, José A; Zamarrón, Isabel; Arrieta, Francisco; Vázquez, Clotilde

    2008-01-01

    Oral nutritional supplements have been recommended after orthopedic surgery in geriatric patients to reduce postoperative complications. However, tolerability of supplements could be a limitation, and their universal use is not supported by the heterogeneity of previous studies, especially in patients without malnutrition. This study is a randomized, controlled, open, parallel, 3-arm clinical trial comparing supplementation with protein powder dissolved in liquids to aim at 36 g of protein per day, energy and protein supplements to aim at 37.6 g of protein and 500 kcal per day, or no intervention in normally nourished or mildly undernourished patients. Outcomes were serum albumin, prealbumin, retinol-binding globulin, and body mass index, among others. Postoperative complications were also recorded. Ninety patients aged 83.8 +/- 6.6 years were included. The mean ingested amount of supplements was 41.1% +/- 20.6% in the protein powder supplement group and 51.4% +/- 13.2% in the energy protein supplement group (t = 2.278, P = .027). Postoperative supplements had no effect on the nutrition status during in-hospital follow-up, as assessed by serum albumin (P = .251), prealbumin (P = .530), retinol-binding globulin (P = .552), or body mass index (P = .582). Multivariate analysis showed that length of hospital stay with an established complication until its resolution (beta = .230, P = .031), total hospital stay (beta = .450, P Oral nutritional supplements in normally nourished or only mildly undernourished geriatric patients with hip fracture submitted to surgery may be of interest for patients with postoperative complications and long hospital stays.

  18. Seven-year review of dental foundation year 2/senior house officer training at the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Unit in Oxford.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, M; Wong, L; Dhariwal, D

    2017-10-01

    The dental senior house officer (SHO)/dental foundation year 2 (DF2) posts in Oxford have provided hospital-based training for dentists, but in 2013 the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (OMFS) Unit withdrew from DF2 training because persistent negative feedback from the dental deanery varied from that obtained internally. We sent questionnaires to a consecutive group of 62 dentists who had worked at the John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford, between 2006 and 2013 to find out about their experience of the posts. Forty responded (65% response rate). We analysed their expectations, the support provided, their experience of teaching and training, the opportunities available, and free-text feedback about the post and their current posts. They had all found the job helpful, and had gained generic, dental, medical, and surgical skills. The overall mean (SD) score for the post was 8 (2) on a Likert scale of 1-10 (with 10 being excellent). When they completed the questionnaire between December 2013 and July 2014, 18 respondents were working as general dental practitioners and four were training for a career in OMFS. The study showed that work as a dental SHO or DF2 has multiple benefits. We hope that our findings will help to improve OMFS training posts for dental core trainees in Oxford. Copyright © 2017 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Prevalence evaluation of ocular injuries of different kinds as zygomatic fractures consequences in patients referring to department of oral and maxillofacial surgery, Shariati Hospital (Oct 2004-Oct 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Hashemi H.

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Aim: Zygomatic fractures are common among oral and maxillofacial problems and ocular injuries are of great importance, the prevalence of ocular problems following zygomatic fractures in Iran is not clear so we performed this study to evaluate this problem in patients referring to Shariati Hospital. "nMaterials and Methods: In this descriptive, cross-sectional study, we evaluated the patients who referred to department of oral and maxillofacial surgery of Shariati hospital for ocular complains following zygomatic fractures. The evaluation was performed both clinically and historically. "nResults: 115 patients were examined (87 males and 28 females with the mean age of 26 for males and 32 for females. The prevalence of ocular injuries were as follows: subconjunctival ecchymosis: 23.07% for males and 21.05% for females. Displacement of palpebral fissure: 26.5% for males and 27.6% for females. Unequal papillary levels: 18.37% for males and 15.78% for females. Diplopia: 8.9% for males and 10.5% for females. Enophthalmos: 23.1% for males and 25% for females. "nConclusion: It is strongly recommended to refer patients with zygomatic fracture for an ophthalmologic consultation.

  20. Verrucous carcinoma of the oral mucosa: an epidemiological and follow-up study of patients treated with surgery in 5 last years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candau-Alvarez, Alberto; Dean-Ferrer, Alicia; Alamillos-Granados, Francisco-Jesús; Heredero-Jung, Susana; García-García, Blas; Ruiz-Masera, Juan-José; Arévalo-Arévalo, Rafael; Zafra-Camacho, Francisco; Valenzuela-Salas, Borja

    2014-09-01

    Oral Verrucous Carcinoma (OVC) is described apart of the Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC) due to its specific properties. The objective of our study is to show our series of cases of OVC and to compare with the SCC in terms of clinical manifestations, epidemiology, histopathology, treatment and follow-up. This is a retrospective study of all the OVC treated in our department between January-2007 and December-2011. The analyzed variables were sex, age, localization in the oral cavity, histopathology, number of biopsies needed to diagnose OVC, TNM classification, treatment and recurrences during follow-up. Our sample was composed by n=14 patients, 57% female, with a mean age of 69.14 years. The most common localization was buccal mucosa (n=5). Seven patients were diagnosed of OVC with the first biopsy. TNM classification was: pT1: 7 patients, pT2: 3 patients, pT3: 3 patients, pT4: 1 patient. No cervical metastases were observed either in cervical neck dissection or during the follow-up of the patients. The treatment was surgery with clinical resection margins up to 1 cm in all cases, followed by radiotherapy in selected cases. Only n=1 patient (7.69%) presented a recurrence after 34 months of follow-up. The overall survival rate was 92.85%. In our population, OVC represents the 6.16% of all oral cavity and oropharynx cancer, and is more frequent in female patients above 70 years old. It uses to rise over a previous lesion, and usually affects the buccal mucosa. In patients with high suspicious lesions, more than one biopsy may be needed to diagnose OVC. No patient showed cervical dissemination. In our experience, treatment based on local resection, without cervical neck dissection, could be a good option for these patients.

  1. A comparison of effect of preemptive use of oral gabapentin and pregabalin for acute post-operative pain after surgery under spinal anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bafna, Usha; Rajarajeshwaran, Krishnamoorthy; Khandelwal, Mamta; Verma, Anand Prakash

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims: Preemptive analgesia is an antinociceptive treatment that prevents establishment of altered processing of afferent input. Pregabalin has been claimed to be more effective in preventing neuropathic component of acute nociceptive pain of surgery. We conducted a study to compare the effect of oral gabapentin and pregabalin with control group for post-operative analgesia Materials and Methods: A total of 90 ASA grade I and II patients posted for elective gynecological surgeries were randomized into 3 groups (group A, B and C of 30 patients each). One hour before entering into the operation theatre the blinded drug selected for the study was given with a sip of water. Group A- received identical placebo capsule, Group B- received 600mg of gabapentin capsule and Group C — received 150 mg of pregabalin capsule. Spinal anesthesia was performed at L3-L4 interspace and a volume of 3.5 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine heavy injected over 30sec through a 25 G spinal needle. VAS score at first rescue analgesia, mean time of onset of analgesia, level of sensory block at 5min and 10 min interval, onset of motor block, total duration of analgesia and total requirement of rescue analgesia were observed as primary outcome. Hemodynamics and side effects were recorded as secondary outcome in all patients. Results: A significantly longer mean duration of effective analgesia in group C was observed compared with other groups (P < 0.001). The mean duration of effective analgesia in group C was 535.16 ± 32.86 min versus 151.83 ± 16.21 minutes in group A and 302.00 ± 24.26 minutes in group B. The mean numbers of doses of rescue analgesia in the first 24 hours in group A, B and C was 4.7 ± 0.65, 4.1 ±0.66 and 3.9±0.614. (P value <0.001). Conclusion: We conclude that preemptive use of gabapentin 600mg and pregabalin 150 mg orally significantly reduces the postoperative rescue analgesic requirement and increases the duration of postoperative analgesia in patients undergoing

  2. 9. Challenges Associated with Learning Oral Diagnostic Sciences, A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Harcourt, Nigeria. 4Department of Oral Maxillofacial Surgery and Oral Pathology, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile Ife, Nigeria. 5Department of Oral Surgery and Pathology, University of Benin, Benin, Nigeria. Corresponding author: Dr A.O Adisa.

  3. Molecular, Cellular and Pharmaceutical Aspects of Biomaterials in Dentistry and Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. An Internationalization of Higher Education and Research Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewska, Lidia M; Dohan Ehrenfest, David M; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; Segovia, Jesus D; Inchingolo, Francesco; Wang, Hom-Lay; Fernandes-Cruz, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    In dentistry and oral and maxillofacial surgery, the development of implantable biomaterials and the understanding of their molecular, cellular and pharmaceutical aspects are currently major fields of research and education, with a considerable impact on the daily clinical practice and the evolution of therapeutic strategies. In the era of globalized economy of knowledge and science, this scientific domain needs the development of global cooperation and a paradigm evolution in the organizational culture of the dental sciences and related dental industry. Despite political pressure and theoretical efforts, the internationalization of higher education and research today in dentistry and biomaterials remains in general quite superficial and mostly dependent on the efforts of a few leaders of internationalization working through their personal networks, as it was assessed through the FAST scores (Fast Assessment Screening Test) calculated in various dental schools and groups worldwide through the ISAIAS program (Intercultural Sensitivity Academic Index &Advanced Standards). Cooperation in a multipolar multicultural community requires the development of strong intercultural competences, and this process remains limited in most institutions. These limits of international scientific cooperation can be observed through different markers, particularly the difficult and limited production of ISO standards (International Organization for Standardization) and the relatively low SCIENTI scores (Scientific Cooperation Internationalization Effort &Network Test &Index) of the specialized dental literature, particularly in comparison to the most significant medical literature. However, as an analytical tool to assess the scientific international cooperation effort between fields and periods, the SCIENTI screening system also highlighted a significant increase of the internationalization effort in the last years in the best dental biomaterials publications. Finally, an

  4. Intraoperative cone-beam computed tomography in oral and maxillofacial surgery using a C-arm prototype: first clinical experiences after treatment of zygomaticomaxillary complex fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlenz, Philipp; Blake, Felix; Blessmann, Marco; Smeets, Ralf; Habermann, Christian; Begemann, Philipp; Schmelzle, Rainer; Heiland, Max

    2009-03-01

    To describe the first clinical applications of intraoperative cone-beam computed tomography with an integrated flat-panel detector in oral and maxillofacial surgery after surgical treatment of zygomaticomaxillary complex fractures Nine cone-beam computed tomography datasets of patients with zygomaticomaxillary complex fractures were intraoperatively acquired using a mobile isocentric C-arm (PowerMobil; Siemens Medical Solutions, Erlangen, Germany), including a flat-panel detector. Datasets based on 400, 200, and 100 fluoroscopic images were performed with different tube currents (4.6 mA, 3.3 mA, 2.3 mA, 1.2 mA, and 0.5 mA) and a current tube voltage of 100 kV. Postprocessing resulted in 15 different datasets available for comparison with corresponding preoperative computed tomography datasets. Four oral and maxillofacial surgeons and 2 experienced radiologists evaluated each dataset regarding noise, transition, and the delimitation of landmarks. All examinations were successfully performed. Reconstructed datasets showed high-resolution images of all midfacial osseous structures in near-computed tomography quality. Regarding high-contrast structures, detailed analyses of datasets acquired in this study suggest that the parameters 400 projections, 1.2 mA, and 100 kV are sufficient. In terms of soft-tissue visualization, a higher level of mA seems preferable. The tested prototype predicts a new era in cone-beam computed tomography imaging. The integration of a flat-panel detector will overcome the limitations of current available systems. The size of the field of view is increased allowing regularly the visualization of the whole facial skeleton. Particularly in cases of open reduction of unilateral fractures, the assessment of symmetry is of clinical value.

  5. Reduction of postoperative complication rate with the use of early oral feeding in gynecologic oncologic patients undergoing a major surgery: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minig, Lucas; Biffi, Roberto; Zanagnolo, Vanna; Attanasio, Anna; Beltrami, Carmen; Bocciolone, Luca; Botteri, Edoardo; Colombo, Nicoletta; Iodice, Simona; Landoni, Fabio; Peiretti, Michele; Roviglione, Giovanni; Maggioni, Angelo

    2009-11-01

    A randomized controlled trial was performed to assess the outcome of early oral postoperative feeding (EOF) compared with traditional oral feeding (TOF) in gynecologic oncology patients undergoing a complex laparotomy, including upper abdominal surgery. Patients aged 18-75 years, undergoing an elective laparotomy and with a preoperative suspicion of gynecologic malignancy, were eligible. Exclusion criteria included infectious conditions, intestinal obstruction, severe malnutrition, American Society of Anesthesiologists score C4, intestinal resection, and postoperative stay in the intensive care unit lasting 24 h. Patients allocated to EOF received liquid diet in the first postoperative day and then regular diet. Patients received traditional feeding scheme until resolution of postoperative ileus to start liquid diet. The primary end-point of the trial was length of hospital stay. Between January 1, 2007, and November 17, 2007, a total of 143 patients were randomized to receive either EOF or TOF. Hospital stay for patients who received EOF (n=71) was 4.7 vs. 5.8 days for the TOF group (n=72) (P=0.006). The mean level of postoperative satisfaction was significantly higher in the EOF group (82.8 vs. 71.7 mm, P B 0.001). Patients who received the TOF scheme had significantly higher overall postoperative complications (39 vs. 17% in EOF group, P=0.003) and infective complications (14% in TOF group vs. 3% in EOF group, P=0.017). Variables such as nausea and vomiting, analgesic and antiemetic requirement as well as level of pain and quality of life were not different between groups. On the basis of these findings, the policy of EOF should be used after a complex gynecologic oncologic laparotomy.

  6. Consequências sistêmicas da cirurgia bariátrica e suas repercussões na saúde bucal Systemic consequences of bariatric surgery and its repercussions on oral health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Garcia Moura-Grec

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: O controle da obesidade mórbida pode ser realizado através da cirurgia bariátrica que leva à restrição e/ou à má-absorção de alimentos. O objetivo dessa revisão foi identificar consequências desse procedimento e suas repercussões na saúde bucal. MÉTODO: Foi realizada busca na Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde, sendo incluídos artigos com relação direta ou indireta entre cirurgia bariátrica e saúde bucal e publicados nos últimos dez anos. RESULTADOS: Verificaram-se algumas complicações decorrentes dessa operação, como regurgitação crônica e deficiências nutricionais, que podem trazer repercussões na cavidade bucal como erosão dentária, perda óssea e cárie dentária. Por outro lado, existem consequências positivas como controle da diabetes, da apnéia e melhora da auto-estima, que tornam os pacientes menos susceptíveis à complicações na cavidade oral, como xerostomia e doença periodontal. CONCLUSÃO: A manutenção da saúde bucal adequada em pacientes submetidos à cirurgia bariátrica contribui para o sucesso após a operação, resguardando os benefícios e minimizando os efeitos colaterais.INTRODUCTION: Morbid obesity control can be done by bariatric surgery that restricts or reduces the amount of food absorption. The objective of this review was to identify the consequences of bariatric surgery and its repercussions on oral health. METHOD: It was used the Virtual Library of Health, which included articles that had any direct or indirect connection between bariatric surgery and oral health, and published in the last ten years. RESULTS: Some complications of the surgery are chronicle reflux and nutritional deficiency, which may bring repercussions on the oral cavity, such as tooth erosion, bone loss and dental caries. On the other hand, there are also positive impacts, such as the decrease of diabetes, apnea and improvement on self-esteem, that makes the patients less vulnerable to complications

  7. Evaluation of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Residents' Operative Skills: Feasibility and Engagement Study Using SIMPL Software for a Mobile Phone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaban, Leonard B; Cappetta, Alyssa; George, Brian C; Lahey, Edward T; Bohnen, Jordan D; Troulis, Maria J

    2017-10-01

    data. Additional prospective trials to assess this tool further are planned. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Efficacy of oral transmucosal and intravenous administration of buprenorphine before surgery for postoperative analgesia in dogs undergoing ovariohysterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jeff C; Freeman, Lynetta J; Barletta, Michele; Weil, Ann B; Payton, Mark E; Johnson, Brenda M; Inoue, Tomohito

    2011-02-01

    To compare the efficacy of preoperative administration of buprenorphine (via oral transmucosal [OTM] and IV routes) for postoperative analgesia in dogs undergoing ovariohysterectomy. Prospective, randomized, blinded study. 18 dogs undergoing routine ovariohysterectomy. Dogs were allocated to 3 groups (6 dogs/group) and were assigned to receive buprenorphine (20 μg/kg [9.09 μg/lb], IV; a low dose [20 μg/kg] via OTM administration [LOTM]; or a high dose [120 μg/kg [54.54 μg/lb] via OTM administration [HOTM]) immediately before anesthetic induction with propofol and maintenance with isoflurane for ovariohysterectomy. Postoperative pain was assessed by use of a dynamic interactive pain scale. Dogs were provided rescue analgesia when postoperative pain exceeded a predetermined threshold. Blood samples were collected, and liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry was used to determine plasma concentrations of buprenorphine and its metabolites. Data were analyzed with an ANOVA. Body weight, surgical duration, propofol dose, isoflurane concentration, and cardiorespiratory variables did not differ significantly among treatment groups. Number of dogs requiring rescue analgesia did not differ significantly for the HOTM (1/6), IV (3/6), and LOTM (5/6) treatments. Similarly, mean ± SEM duration of analgesia did not differ significantly for the HOTM (20.3 ± 3.7 hours), IV (16.0 ± 3.8 hours), and LOTM (7.3 ± 3.3 hours) treatments. Plasma buprenorphine concentration was ≤ 0.60 ng/mL in 7 of 9 dogs requiring rescue analgesia. Buprenorphine (HOTM) given immediately before anesthetic induction can be an alternative for postoperative pain management in dogs undergoing ovariohysterectomy.

  9. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

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    Full Text Available ... It can also invite bacteria that lead to gum disease. Click here to find out more. Who We Are Find a Surgeon News Videos Contact Anesthesia Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery Corrective Jaw Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Extractions and Other Oral Surgeries Facial Cosmetic ...

  10. [Problems in the admission to in-hospital oral surgical care from the patient's viewpoint--results of patient interviews in the hospital for dental and maxillo-facial surgery of the Karl Marx University, Leipzig].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erpenbeck, F; Birnbaum, K; Langanke, B; Niemand, B; Thomzyk, I

    1979-06-01

    The author deals with the results from the interviewing of oral surgery patients on their problems concerning the sending and the admission to the hospital, with special attention to the problems of waiting for admission, the familiarization with the clinical environment and the improvement suggestions of the patients. The conclusions concern tasks arising from the medical and dental care for inpatients as well as for outpatients.

  11. Empleo de la oxigenoterapia mediante cámara hiperbárica en cirugía oral y maxilofacial The use of oxygen therapy by means of the hyperbaric chamber in oral and maxillofacial surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.I. Iriarte Ortabe

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available La oxigenoterapia hiperbárica (OHB es una modalidad de terapéutica física que se fundamenta en la obtención de presiones parciales de oxígeno elevadas, al respirar oxígeno puro en el interior de una cámara a una presión superior a la atmosférica. El objetivo de esta revisión es clarificar los mecanismos de acción y los efectos de esta terapéutica física, los problemas que puede plantear y sobre todo las indicaciones actuales. En cirugía oral y maxilofacial, la OHB se utiliza como tratamiento complementario en procesos de osteítis y osteomielitis maxilo-mandibular, en infecciones necrotizantes de partes blandas (a nivel cervical, periodontal, gingival,…, en la prevención (muy importante y el tratamiento de la osteradionecrosis, en los retrasos de cicatrización (de fracturas, de implantes dentales, de injertos/colgajos de difícil viabilidad, en la rehabilitación implantológica de pacientes oncológicos irradiados. Es preciso utilizar los protocolos establecidos y generar estudios que sostengan científicamente su utilización; de este modo se podría paliar la poca consistencia de los estudios publicados que hemos encontrado.Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO is a physical therapeutic modality based on obtaining high partial pressures of oxygen, on breathing pure oxygen inside a chamber at a pressure that is greater than that of the atmosphere. The object of this revision is to clarify the action mechanisms and the effects of the physical therapy, the problems that may arise and more especially the current indications for its use. In oral and maxillofacial surgery, HBO is used as complementary treatment for maxillo-mandibular osteitis and osteomyelitis, for necrotizing infections of soft tissue (on a cervical, periodontal, gingival... level, for the prevention (very important and treatment of osteoradionecrosis, for healing delays (fractures, dental implants, grafts/flaps with difficult viability, for implantological

  12. Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Foundation Research and Fellowship Awards: A 26-Year Review at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard School of Dental Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inverso, Gino; Chuang, Sung-Kiang; Kaban, Leonard B

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to review outcomes of the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (OMS) Foundation's funding awards to members of the OMS department at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) in terms of projects completed, abstracts presented, peer-reviewed publications, and career trajectories of recipients. Data were collected from MGH and OMS Foundation records and interviews with award recipients. Primary outcome variables included 1) number of awards and award types, 2) funding amount, 3) project completion, 4) number of presented abstracts, 5) conversion from abstracts to publications, 6) number of peer-reviewed publications, 7) career trajectories of awardees, and 8) additional extramural funding. Eleven Student Research Training Awards provided $135,000 for 39 projects conducted by 37 students. Of these, 34 (87.2%) were completed. There were 30 student abstracts presented, 21 peer-reviewed publications, and a publication conversion rate of 58.8%. Faculty research awards comprised $1,510,970 for 22 research projects by 12 faculty members and two research fellows. Of the 22 funded projects, 21 (95.5%) were completed. There were 110 faculty and research fellow abstracts presented and 113 peer-reviewed publications, for a publication conversion rate of 93.8%. In the student group, 17 of 37 (45.9%) are enrolled in or are applying for OMS residencies. Of the 10 students who have completed OMS training, 3 (30%) are in full-time academic positions. Of the 12 faculty recipients, 9 (75%) remain in OMS academic practice. During this time period, the department received $9.9 million of extramural foundation or National Institutes of Health funding directly or indirectly related to the OMS Foundation grants. The results of this study indicate that 90.2% of projects funded by the OMS Foundation have been completed. Most projects resulted in abstracts and publications in peer-reviewed journals. These grants encouraged students to pursue OMS careers and aided OMS

  13. Corrective Jaw Surgery

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    Full Text Available ... can also invite bacteria that lead to gum disease. Click here to find out more. Who We ... Injury / Trauma Surgery Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Oral, Head and Neck Pathology TMJ ...

  14. Corrective Jaw Surgery

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    Full Text Available ... in face, mouth and jaw surgery.™ What We Do Who We Are News Videos Contact Find a Surgeon What We Do Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are extensively ...

  15. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available AAOMS - Oral and maxillofacial surgeons. The experts in face, mouth and jaw surgery.™ What We Do Who ... surgeons surgically treat the soft tissues of the face, mouth and gums to improve function, appearance and ...

  16. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available AAOMS - Oral and maxillofacial surgeons. The experts in face, mouth and jaw surgery.™ What We Do Who We Are News Videos Contact Find ... Surgeon What We Do Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are extensively trained to appropriately administer local ...

  17. Safety and efficacy of transdermal buprenorphine versus oral tramadol for the treatment of post-operative pain following surgery for fracture neck of femur: A prospective, randomised clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer N Desai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Transdermal buprenorphine, which is used in chronic pain management, has rarely been studied for use in acute pain management. The aim of this study was to compare the safety and efficacy of transdermal buprenorphine patch to oral tramadol for post-operative analgesia, following proximal femur surgeries. Methodology: Fifty adult patients undergoing surgery for hip fracture under spinal anaesthesia were included in this study. One group (Group TDB received transdermal buprenorphine 10 mcg/h patch applied a day before the surgery and other group received oral tramadol 50 mg three times a day for analgesia (Group OT. They were allowed to take diclofenac and paracetamol tablets for rescue analgesia. Pain scores at rest, on movement, rescue analgesic requirement and side effects were compared between the groups over 7 days. Chi-square and independent sample t-test were used for categorical and continuous variables, respectively. Results: Resting pain scores and pain on movement were significantly lower in TDB Group on all 7 days starting from 24 h post-operatively. Rescue analgesic requirement was significantly lower in TDB Group compared to OT Group. All the patients needed rescue analgesic in OT Group whereas 68% of the patients needed the same in TDB Group. Incidence of vomiting was less and satisfaction scores were much higher in TDB Group as compared to OT Group (79% vs. 66%, P < 0.001. Conclusion: Transdermal buprenorphine can be safely used for post-operative analgesia and is more efficacious in reducing post-operative pain after 24 hours, with fewer side effects when compared to oral tramadol.

  18. Revisión bibliográfica de los artículos publicados de cirugía bucal en el año 2005 Literature review of oral surgery articles published in 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Larrazábal Morón

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Introducción. El objetivo de este trabajo es revisar los artículos de cirugía oral publicados en el año 2005. Material y método. Tres revisores han realizado una búsqueda en las revistas indexadas en Medline, clasificando los artículos de acuerdo a diferentes temas. Los criterios de búsqueda fueron: artículos de especial interés publicados en revistas de impacto nacional e internacional, que actualizaran cualquiera de los temas señalados. Resultados. Los artículos más interesantes sobre cirugía bucal publicados en el año 2005 son: 11 artículos sobre quistes, 35 de tumores de los maxilares y tejidos blandos, 4 de infecciones de los maxilares, 11 de cirugía periapical, 15 de patología del tercer molar, 5 de inclusiones dentarias, 11 de transplantes y reimplantes dentarios, 5 de fármacos y 3 artículos de otros temas. Conclusión. Aportar a otros investigadores una rápida identificación de los artículos más importantes de cirugía bucal publicados en el año 2005.Introduction. Oral surgery articles published in 2005 were reviewed. Material and method. Three reviewers searched journals indexed in Medline and classified the articles by topic. The search criteria were: articles of special interest, published in national and international impact journals, that updated any of the topics selected. Results. The most interesting articles on oral surgery published in 2005 were: 11 articles on cysts, 35 on jaw and soft tissues tumors, 4 jaw infections, 11 periapical surgery, 15 third molar pathology, 5 dental impaction, 11 dental transplantation and reimplantation, 5 drugs, and 3 articles on other topics. Conclusion. The authors offer other researchers a quick overview of the most important articles in oral surgery published in 2005.

  19. Robotic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robot-assisted surgery; Robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery; Laparoscopic surgery with robotic assistance ... Robotic surgery is similar to laparoscopic surgery. It can be performed through smaller cuts than open surgery. ...

  20. Oral Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... section Home A-Z Health Topics Oral health Oral health > A-Z Health Topics Oral health (PDF, 154 ... To receive Publications email updates Enter email Submit Oral health Women have unique oral health concerns. Changing hormone ...

  1. Full-mouth rehabilitation with immediate loading of implants inserted with computer-guided flap-less surgery: a 3-year multicenter clinical evaluation with oral health impact profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Roberto; Acocella, Alessandro; Rispoli, Alessandra; Sacco, Roberto; Ganz, Scott D; Blasi, Andrea

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the clinical outcomes and patients' satisfaction of full-mouth rehabilitation using computer-aided flapless implant placement and immediate loading of a prefabricated prosthesis. The study included 30 consecutive fully edentulous patients who received 312 implants. Mandible and maxilla were treated in the same surgical session with computer-guided flapless approach using the NobelGuide protocol. Prefabricated screw-retained fixed prostheses were inserted at the end of surgery. Clinical and radiographic evaluations were assessed at 6, 12, and 36 months. At baseline and 6 months after surgery, patients answered Oral Health Impact Profile in Edentulous Adults questionnaire to assess satisfaction. The implant survival rate was 97.9%, whereas the average marginal bone loss was 1.9 ± 1.3 mm after 3 years. At 6 months, patients showed significantly greater satisfaction with their fixed rehabilitation when compared with conventional dentures. The results of this study confirm that rehabilitation with a prefabricated fixed prosthesis supported by implants placed with NobelGuide protocol is a viable and predictable treatment and increases patients' satisfaction and improves oral health-related quality of life.

  2. Rehabilitative treatment of cleft lip and palate: experience of the Hospital for Rehabilitation of Craniofacial Anomalies - USP (HRAC-USP - part 3: Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alberto de Souza Freitas

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the treatment protocol of maxillofacial surgery in the rehabilitation process of cleft lip and palate patients adopted at HRAC-USP. Maxillofacial surgeons are responsible for the accomplishment of two main procedures, alveolar bone graft surgery and orthognathic surgery. The primary objective of alveolar bone graft is to provide bone tissue for the cleft site and then allow orthodontic movements for the establishment of an an adequate occlusion. When performed before the eruption of the maxillary permanent canine, it presents high rates of success. Orthognathic surgery aims at correcting maxillomandibular discrepancies, especially anteroposterior maxillary deficiencies, commonly observed in cleft lip and palate patients, for the achievement of a functional occlusion combined with a balanced face.

  3. Prevention of severe infectious complications after colorectal surgery using preoperative orally administered antibiotic prophylaxis (PreCaution) : study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, Tessa; Kluytmans-van den Bergh, Marjolein F Q; de Smet, Anne Marie G A; van 't Veer, Nils E; Roos, Daphne; Nikolakopoulos, Stavros; Bonten, Marc J M; Kluytmans, Jan A J W

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Colorectal surgery is frequently complicated by surgical site infections (SSIs). The most important consequences of SSIs are prolonged hospitalization, an increased risk of surgical reintervention and an increase in mortality. Perioperative intravenously administered antibiotic

  4. A intervenção fonoaudiológica no pós-operatório da hipertrofia benigna do músculo masseter The miofunctional oral intervention in the surgery treatment for the masseter muscle hipertrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Davison Mangilli

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: descrever a abordagem fonoaudiológica no pós-operatório de pacientes que realizaram correção cirúrgica da hipertrofia do músculo masseter. METODOLOGIA: foram coletados dados referentes à avaliação e ao tratamento fonoaudiológico de 4 prontuários de sujeitos de ambos os gêneros, com faixa etária entre 16 e 24 anos, com hipertrofia benigna do músculo masseter, tratados cirurgicamente. RESULTADOS: as principais queixas pós-cirúrgicas estiveram relacionadas à limitação da abertura da boca, à dor na região da cirurgia, à rigidez muscular e a estalo em região da ATM. A terapia fonoaudiológica baseou-se em orientação quanto à retirada de hábitos deletérios; termoterapia na região do músculo masseter; manipulação da musculatura envolvida extra e intrabucais; alongamento da musculatura facial e cervical; alavanca de abertura forçada de boca e exercícios de órgãos fonoarticulatórios. CONCLUSÕES: a terapia fonoaudiológica apresenta-se como uma possibilidade de complementação ao tratamento cirúrgico, na adequação da amplitude dos movimentos mandibulares, assim como na eliminação dos sintomas presentes no pós-cirúrgico e na conscientização dos hábitos deletérios, que são apontados pela literatura como possíveis fatores desencadeantes.AIM: the aim of this study was to describe miofunctional oral intervention in patients with Masseter muscle hipertrophy treated by surgery. METHODS: the sample consisted of 4 patients, male and female, with ages between 16 and 24 years, with Masseter muscle hipertrophy treated by surgery. RESULTS: the main complains on the postoperative were related to trismus, muscle rigidity, and clicking in the temporomandibular joint. The myofunctional oral therapy was based on orientation in the abnormal habits (bruxism, clenching elimination, hyperthermia induced in the masseter muscle, oral muscles massage, facial and cervical muscles stretching, miofunctional exercises and

  5. Comparison of ease of administration of intranasal midazolam spray and oral midazolam syrup by parents as premedication to children undergoing elective surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoj, Milthi; Satya Prakash, M V S; Swaminathan, Srinivasan; Kamaladevi, Rithu Krishna

    2017-06-01

    The efficacy of midazolam as premedication in children for providing pre-operative sedation and reducing parental separation anxiety has been well established. Many studies have compared the effectiveness and medication acceptance of midazolam via oral and intranasal routes. In this study, we have compared the ease of administration of oral midazolam syrup and intranasal midazolam spray as premedication, administered by parents to children. Ninety children were randomly allocated into one of the two groups: group N received nasal midazolam spray 0.2 mg/kg and group O received oral midazolam syrup 0.5 mg/kg administered by the parent. The parent recorded ease of administration score and facial hedonic score. The observer recorded modified medication acceptance score. Vitals and sedation scores were assessed at specific intervals. Thirty minutes after drug administration the child was separated from the parent, and parental separation anxiety score was recorded. Mask acceptance score was recorded after application of mask upon arrival in the OT. Oral midazolam syrup was found to have better ease of administration than intranasal midazolam spray as felt by the parent. Medication acceptance was better for oral midazolam. Both the groups had similar sedation scores at 15 and 30 min. Children in the oral group had a better reduction in parental separation anxiety at 30 min after drug administration and better mask acceptance than the nasal group. Oral midazolam syrup is easier for parents to administer and has better medication acceptance in children when compared to intranasal midazolam spray.

  6. Cosmetic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Body Looking and feeling your best Cosmetic surgery Cosmetic surgery Teens might have cosmetic surgery for a number ... about my body? What are the risks of cosmetic surgery? top People who have cosmetic surgery face many ...

  7. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... one of your body's most important early warning systems. Don't ignore any suspicious lumps or sores. ... and maxillofacial surgeon. Oral and maxillofacial surgeons: The experts in face, mouth and jaw surgery Contact Us ...

  8. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... can also invite bacteria that lead to gum disease. Click here to find out more. Who We ... Injury / Trauma Surgery Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) Oral, Head and Neck Pathology TMJ ...

  9. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in face, mouth and jaw surgery.™ What We Do Who We Are News Videos Contact Find a Surgeon What We Do Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are extensively ...

  10. [Management of major bleeding complications and emergency surgery in patients on long-term treatment with direct oral anticoagulants, thrombin or factor-Xa inhibitors. Proposals of the Working Group on Perioperative Haemostasis (GIHP) - March 2013].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernod, G; Albaladejo, P; Godier, A; Samama, C M; Susen, S; Gruel, Y; Blais, N; Fontana, P; Cohen, A; Llau, J V; Rosencher, N; Schved, J F; de Maistre, E; Samama, M M; Mismetti, P; Sié, P

    2013-10-01

    New direct oral anticoagulants (NOAC), inhibitors of factor IIa or Xa, are expected to be widely used for the treatment of venous thromboembolic disease, or in case of atrial fibrillation. Such anticoagulant treatments are known to be associated with haemorrhagic complications. Moreover, it is likely that such patients on long-term treatment with NOAC will be exposed to emergency surgery or invasive procedures. Due to the present lack of experience in such conditions, we cannot make recommendations, but only propose management for optimal safety as regards the risk of bleeding in such emergency conditions. In this article, only dabigatran and rivaroxaban were discussed. For emergency surgery at risk of bleeding, we propose to dose the plasmatic concentration of drug. Levels inferior or equal to 30ng/mL for both dabigatran and rivaroxaban, should enable the realization of a high bleeding risk surgery. For higher concentration, it was proposed to postpone surgery by monitoring the evolution of the drug concentration. Action is then defined by the kind of NOAC and its concentration. If the dosage of the drug is not immediately available, proposals only based on the usual tests, PT and aPTT, also are presented. However, these tests do not really assess drug concentration or bleeding risk. In case of severe haemorrhage in a critical organ, it is proposed to reduce the effect of anticoagulant therapy using a nonspecific procoagulant drug (activated prothrombin concentrate, FEIBA, 30-50U/kg, or non-activated 4-factors prothrombin concentrates 50U/kg). For any other type of severe haemorrhage, the administration of such a procoagulant drug, potentially thrombogenic in these patients, will be discussed regarding concentration of NACO and possibilities for mechanical haemostasis. Copyright © 2013 Société française d’anesthésie et de réanimation (Sfar). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of oral pregabalin for relief of shoulder pain after laparoscopic gynecologic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutthachote, Pattiya; Sirayapiwat, Porntip; Wisawasukmongchol, Wirach; Charuluxananan, Somrat

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the efficacy of pregabalin for the relief of postoperative shoulder pain after laparoscopic gynecologic surgery. Prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial (Canadian Task Force classification I). Tertiary referral center, university hospital. Fifty-six women undergoing elective laparoscopic gynecologic surgery between June 2012 and March 2013. Women in the study group received 75 mg pregabalin 2 hours before surgery and then every 12 hours for 2 doses, and women in the control group received an identical capsule and the same dosage of placebo. Visual analog scale (VAS) scores for shoulder pain and surgical pain at 24 and 48 hours after surgery were evaluated as primary outcome. Postoperative analgesics used and drug-related adverse events were also monitored. Patients in the pregabalin group had significantly lower postoperative VAS scores for shoulder pain at 24 hours, compared with the placebo group (median, 23.14 [range, 13.67-32.61] vs. 37.22 [27.75-46.64]; p = .04), and required less analgesic (p = .01). There were no significant differences in VAS scores for surgical pain and adverse events between the 2 groups (p = .56). Perioperative administration of 75 mg pregabalin significantly reduced postoperative laparoscopic shoulder pain and amount of analgesic used. Copyright © 2014 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Preoperative oral polymeric diet enriched with transforming growth factor-beta 2 (Modulen) could decrease postoperative morbidity after surgery for complicated ileocolonic Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaupel, Nathan; Brouquet, Antoine; Abdalla, Solafah; Carbonnel, Franck; Penna, Christophe; Benoist, Stéphane

    2017-01-01

    Exclusive polymeric diet enriched with transforming growth factor-beta 2 (ANS-TGF-β2) has been used for remission induction and maintenance in pediatric Crohn's disease (CD). Its use in the preoperative setting has never been evaluated. The aim of this study was to evaluate preoperative ANS-TGF-β2 to decrease postoperative complications after surgery for complicated ileocolonic CD. From 2011 to 2015, data of all consecutive patients who underwent elective surgery for ileocolonic CD were collected prospectively. Preoperative, exclusive ANS-TGF-β2 was administered in high-risk patients with complicated CD. Complicated CD was defined by the presence of obstructive symptoms, and/or steroid treatment, and/or preoperative weight loss >10% and/or perforating CD. Outcomes of high-risk patients receiving preoperative ANS-TGF-β2 were compared to those of low-risk patients with no complicated CD who underwent upfront surgery. Fifty-six patients underwent surgery for ileocolonic CD. Among them, 35 high-risk patients received preoperative ANS-TGF-β2 and 21 low-risk patients underwent upfront surgery. Preoperative full-dose ANS-TGF-β2 was feasible in 34/35 high-risk patients. Discontinuation of steroids during preoperative ANS-TGF-β2 could be achieved in 10/16 patients (62.5%). Postoperative complications rates were 8/35 (23.8%) and 5/21 (22.9%) in high-risk and low-risk patients, respectively (p = 1). Temporary ileocolostomy rates in high-risk patients and in low-risk patients were 4/35 (11%) and 0/21, respectively (p = 0.286) Conclusion: Preoperative ANS-TGF-β2 is feasible in most high-risk patients with complicated ileocolonic CD and could limit the deleterious effects of risk factors of postoperative morbidity. These results need to be confirmed in a large randomized controlled trial.

  13. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available AAOMS - Oral and maxillofacial surgeons. The experts in face, mouth and jaw surgery.™ What We Do Who We Are News Videos Contact Find ... Surgeon What We Do Anesthesia Anesthesia Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are extensively trained to appropriately administer local ...

  14. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available AAOMS - Oral and maxillofacial surgeons. The experts in face, mouth and jaw surgery.™ What We Do Who We Are News Videos Contact Find a Surgeon What We ... may require one or more surgeries depending on the extent of the repair needed. Click here to ...

  15. Maze Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Center > Maze Surgery Menu Topics Topics FAQs Maze Surgery Article Info En español Electrical impulses in your ... called an arrhythmia. Why do I need Maze surgery? Maze surgery is also called the Maze procedure. ...

  16. Oral Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oral cancer can form in any part of the mouth. Most oral cancers begin in the flat cells that cover the ... your mouth, tongue, and lips. Anyone can get oral cancer, but the risk is higher if you are ...

  17. High-dose oral colecalciferol loading in obesity: impact of body mass index and its utility prior to bariatric surgery to treat vitamin D deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, R J; Chandrajay, D; Abbas, A; Orme, S M; Barth, J H

    2017-04-01

    Obesity is associated with lower vitamin D levels compared with normal weight subjects, and if levels are not replaced prior to bariatric surgery, this can increase fracture risk as bone density typically falls post-operatively. We analysed the effect of body mass index (BMI) on vitamin D levels in response to 300 000 IU of colecalciferol in patients with vitamin D deficiency (35 kg m -2 ). The records were retrospectively analysed to investigate the effects of BMI on vitamin D (total 25-hydroxy vitamin D [25(OH)D]), serum Ca 2+ and parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels at 6, 12, 26 and 52 weeks compared with baseline. Compared with normal weight subjects, overweight and obese patients achieved lower mean peak total 25(OH)D levels (6 weeks post-loading), which was most significant in the class II and above group (mean total 25(OH)D levels 96.5 ± 24.2 nmol L -1 and 72.42 ± 24.9 nmol L -1 , respectively; P = 0.003). By 26 weeks, total 25(OH)D levels fell in all groups; however, there was now a significant difference between the normal weight subjects and all other groups (mean total 25(OH)D levels 84.1 ± 23.7 nmol L -1 ; 58 ± 20 nmol L -1 , P = 0.0002; 62.65 ± 19.2 nmol L -1 , P = 0.005; 59.2 ± 21 nmol L -1 , P = 0.005, respectively). Far fewer patients in the overweight and obese groups maintained levels above the recommended level of 75 nmol L -1 52 weeks post-loading (93%; 20%, P = 0.0003; 23%, P = 0.01; and 14%, P = 0.001, respectively). Alternative regimes for the treatment of vitamin D deficiency are needed in overweight and obese patients, especially those in whom bariatric surgery is planned. © 2017 World Obesity Federation.

  18. [Pregnancy after bariatric surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepe, Franco; DE Luca, Francesco; Stracquadanio, Mariagrazia; Garraffo, Claudia; Santonocito, Veronica C; Privitera, Agata

    2017-04-01

    Pregnancy after bariatric surgery has some peculiarities related to obesity, type of surgery, amount of weight loss, time elapsed from the surgery and adherence to medical prescriptions. Pregnant woman is at risk of nutritional deficiencies and it is unclear whether there is an increased incidence of intestinal complications during pregnancy after bariatric surgery and whether this kind of complications are more frequent during cesarean section. The fetus is at high risk of prematurity and fetal growth restriction, but they seem not at increased risk of birth defects (DTN) except in individual cases of folic acid deficiency (DTN) or vitamin K defect (similar abnormalities in patients receiving oral anticoagulants). In addition, the incidence of gestational diabetes and hypertension results to be decreased. Other postnatal outcomes from possible epigenetic modifications need to be evaluated in the long-term postnatal follow-up.

  19. Canine oral melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Philip J

    2007-05-01

    Melanoma is the most common oral malignancy in the dog. Oral and/or mucosal melanoma has been routinely considered an extremely malignant tumor with a high degree of local invasiveness and high metastatic propensity. Primary tumor size has been found to be extremely prognostic. The World Health Organization staging scheme for dogs with oral melanoma is based on size, with stage I = or = 4cm tumor and/or lymph node metastasis, and stage IV = distant metastasis. Median survival times for dogs with oral melanoma treated with surgery are approximately 17 to 18, 5 to 6, and 3 months with stage I, II, and III disease, respectively. Significant negative prognostic factors include stage, size, evidence of metastasis, and a variety of histologic criteria. Standardized treatments such as surgery, coarse-fractionation radiation therapy, and chemotherapy have afforded minimal to modest stage-dependent clinical benefits and death is usually due to systemic metastasis. Numerous immunotherapeutic strategies have been employed to date with limited clinical efficacy; however, the use of xenogeneic DNA vaccines may represent a leap forward in clinical efficacy. Oral melanoma is a spontaneous syngeneic cancer occurring in outbred, immunocompetent dogs and appears to be a more clinically faithful therapeutic model for human melanoma; further use of canine melanoma as a therapeutic model for human melanoma is strongly encouraged. In addition, the development of an expanded but clinically relevant staging system incorporating the aforementioned prognostic factors is also strongly encouraged.

  20. Early-stage squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx: Radiotherapy vs. Trans-Oral Robotic Surgery (ORATOR) – study protocol for a randomized phase II trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, Anthony C; Kuruvilla, Sara; Chen, Jeff; Corsten, Martin; Odell, Michael; Eapen, Libni; Theurer, Julie; Doyle, Philip C; Wehrli, Bret; Kwan, Keith; Palma, David A; Yoo, John; Hammond, J Alex; Fung, Kevin; Winquist, Eric; Read, Nancy; Venkatesan, Varagur; MacNeil, S Danielle; Ernst, D Scott

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) has markedly increased over the last three decades due to newly found associations with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Primary radiotherapy (RT) is the treatment of choice for OPSCC at most centers, and over the last decade, the addition of concurrent chemotherapy has led to a significant improvement in survival, but at the cost of increased acute and late toxicity. Transoral robotic surgery (TORS) has emerged as a promising alternative treatment, with preliminary case series demonstrating encouraging oncologic, functional, and quality of life (QOL) outcomes. However, comparisons of TORS and RT in a non-randomized fashion are susceptible to bias. The goal of this randomized phase II study is to compare QOL, functional outcomes, toxicity profiles, and survival following primary RT (± chemotherapy) vs. TORS (± adjuvant [chemo] RT) in patients with OPSCC. The target patient population comprises OPSCC patients who would be unlikely to require chemotherapy post-resection: Tumor stage T1-T2 with likely negative margins at surgery; Nodal stage N0-2, ≤3 cm in size, with no evidence of extranodal extension on imaging. Participants will be randomized in a 1:1 ratio between Arm 1 (RT ± chemotherapy) and Arm 2 (TORS ± adjuvant [chemo] RT). In Arm 1, patients with N0 disease will receive RT alone, whereas N1-2 patients will receive concurrent chemoradiation. In Arm 2, patients will undergo TORS along with selective neck dissections, which may be staged. Pathologic high-risk features will be used to determine the requirement for adjuvant radiotherapy +/- chemotherapy. The primary endpoint is QOL score using the M.D. Anderson Dysphagia Inventory (MDADI), with secondary endpoints including survival, toxicity, other QOL outcomes, and swallowing function. A sample of 68 patients is required. This study, if successful, will provide a much-needed randomized comparison of the conventional strategy of primary RT

  1. Common-law principles in consent for patients in oral and maxillofacial surgery who lack mental capacity: do we know them all?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekar, V; Jabbar, J; Mitchell, D A; Brennan, P A

    2015-11-01

    Over the last 5 years, the medical profession has relied on the Bolam test for their defence in cases of clinical negligence. While still a matter of controversy between health professionals and legal experts, the Bolam test has been tried and criticised not only by the English courts but also in the United States, Canada, and Australia. In the medical profession the concept of the law of consent has moved away from a doctrine of professional paternalism towards patient-focused paternalism, and has increased the emphasis on human rights and the autonomy and choice of the patient. These changes present a challenge to health professionals, and a lack of effective recognition and interpretation can result in non-compliance. We review the developments in the law of consent since Bolam and discuss how they affect patients with incapacity, and highlight the importance of being familiar with them. Copyright © 2015 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2.  Evaluation of the reasons for the extraction among patients referred to the Oral Surgery Department,Faculty of Dentistry, Tehran University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramezanian M.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Tooth extraction is always considered as the final treatment option in dentistry."nConsidering the numerous advances in dentistry, nowadays the preservation of the permanent teeth until old"nage is common. However, in most economically poor countries or those without security service insurance,"nthe high rate of extraction, particularly among restorable teeth, is regrettable."nPurpose: The aim of the present study was to determine the reasons for tooth extraction among patients"nreferred to the faculty of Dentistry, Tehran University of Medical Sciences in 2002."nMaterials and Methods: This descriptive and cross-sectional study was conducted on 320 patients. The"ninformation about patient's general knowledge, oral health status, tooth location and causes of extraction were"ncollected and recorded in a questionnaire. The data were submitted to statistical Chi-Square test."nResults: No statistically significant difference was found between two genders in their mentioned causes for"nextraction. The most prevalent reasons were as follows: Caries (50%, Periodontal diseases (16.6%. Absence"nof an acceptable occlusion, prosthetic problems, patient's request, etc... make up the remaining 33.4% of the"nreasons."nConclusion: According to this study, it is suggested to investigate extraction etiology at the society level and"nif similar results are obtained, necessary steps should be taken to prevent caries and periodontal problems as"nthe major mentioned causes for tooth extraction.

  3. Turbinate surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turbinectomy; Turbinoplasty; Turbinate reduction; Nasal airway surgery; Nasal obstruction - turbinate surgery ... There are several types of turbinate surgery: Turbinectomy: All or ... This can be done in several different ways, but sometimes a ...

  4. Epidemiological study of facial fractures at the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Service, Santa Casa de Misericordia Hospital Complex, Porto Alegre - RS - Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamboni, Rodrigo Andrighetti; Wagner, João Carlos Birnfeld; Volkweis, Maurício Roth; Gerhardt, Eduardo Luis; Buchmann, Elissa Muller; Bavaresco, Caren Serra

    2017-01-01

    to investigate the incidence and etiology of face trauma with diagnosis of facial fracture treated at the Buccomaxillofacial Surgery and Traumatology Service of the Santa Casa de Misericórdia Hospital Complex in Porto Alegre. we conducted a cross-sectional, retrospective epidemiological study of 134 trauma victims with 153 facial fractures. the male gender was the most affected (86.6%) and the incidence was higher in the age group from 21 to 30 years. The main etiology was assault (38.8%), followed by motor vehicle accidents (14.2%), motorcycle accidents (13.4%), falls (9%), road accidents (6.7%), sports accidents (5.2%), work accidents (5.2%), firearm injuries (4.5%) and cycling accidents (3%). The most frequent fractures were those of the zygomatic complex (44.5%), followed by fractures of the mandible (42.5%), maxillary bone (5.2%), nasal bones (4.5%) and zygomatic arch (3.3%). the fractures of the zygomatic complex and the mandible were the ones with the highest incidence in the facial traumas, having physical assaults as their main cause.

  5. Epidemiological study of facial fractures at the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Service, Santa Casa de Misericordia Hospital Complex, Porto Alegre - RS - Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Andrighetti Zamboni

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objectives: to investigate the incidence and etiology of face trauma with diagnosis of facial fracture treated at the Buccomaxillofacial Surgery and Traumatology Service of the Santa Casa de Misericórdia Hospital Complex in Porto Alegre. Methods: we conducted a cross-sectional, retrospective epidemiological study of 134 trauma victims with 153 facial fractures. Results: the male gender was the most affected (86.6% and the incidence was higher in the age group from 21 to 30 years. The main etiology was assault (38.8%, followed by motor vehicle accidents (14.2%, motorcycle accidents (13.4%, falls (9%, road accidents (6.7%, sports accidents (5.2%, work accidents (5.2%, firearm injuries (4.5% and cycling accidents (3%. The most frequent fractures were those of the zygomatic complex (44.5%, followed by fractures of the mandible (42.5%, maxillary bone (5.2%, nasal bones (4.5% and zygomatic arch (3.3%. Conclusion: the fractures of the zygomatic complex and the mandible were the ones with the highest incidence in the facial traumas, having physical assaults as their main cause.

  6. Management of major bleeding complications and emergency surgery in patients on long-term treatment with direct oral anticoagulants, thrombin or factor-Xa inhibitors: proposals of the working group on perioperative haemostasis (GIHP) - March 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernod, Gilles; Albaladejo, Pierre; Godier, Anne; Samama, Charles M; Susen, Sophie; Gruel, Yves; Blais, Normand; Fontana, Pierre; Cohen, Ariel; Llau, Juan V; Rosencher, Nadia; Schved, Jean-François; de Maistre, Emmanuel; Samama, Meyer M; Mismetti, Patrick; Sié, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Direct new oral anticoagulants (NOACs) - inhibitors of thrombin or factor Xa - are intended to be used largely in the treatment of venous thromboembolic disease or the prevention of systematic embolism in atrial fibrillation, instead of vitamin K antagonists. Like any anticoagulant treatment, they are associated with spontaneous or provoked haemorrhagic risk. Furthermore, a significant proportion of treated patients are likely to be exposed to emergency surgery or invasive procedures. Given the absence of a specific antidote, the action to be taken in these situations must be defined. The lack of data means that it is only possible to issue proposals rather than recommendations, which will evolve according to accumulated experience. The proposals presented here apply to dabigatran (Pradaxa(®)) and rivaroxaban (Xarelto(®)); data for apixaban and edoxaban are still scarce. For urgent surgery with haemorrhagic risk, the drug plasma concentration should be less or equal to 30ng/mL for dabigatran and rivaroxaban should enable surgery associated with a high bleeding risk. Beyond that, if possible, the intervention should be postponed by monitoring the drug concentration. The course to follow is then defined according to the NOAC and its concentration. If the anticoagulant dosage is not immediately available, worse propositions, based on the usual tests (prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time), are presented. However, these tests do not really assess drug concentration or the risk of bleeding that depends on it. In case of serious bleeding in a critical organ, the effect of anticoagulant therapy should be reduced using a non-specific procoagulant drug as a first-line approach: activated prothrombin complex concentrate (aPCC) (FEIBA(®) 30-50U/kg) or non-activated PCC (50U/kg). In addition, for any other type of severe haemorrhage, the administration of a procoagulant drug, which is potentially thrombogenic in these patients, is discussed according

  7. Reconstructive Surgery in the Thermally Injured Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    the same or Conflicts of interest: The authors disclose no conflicts. a Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery , Dental and Trauma Research...Reconstructive Surgery in the Thermally Injured Patient Davin Mellus, DMDa,* Rodney K. Chan, MDb KEYWORDS • Microvascular free-tissue transfer...Pedicle flaps • Reconstructive Surgery • Thermal injury • Z-plasties • Skin grafting AN INCREASED NEED FOR RECONSTRUCTIVE SURGERY Reconstruction is a

  8. An unusual complication of late onset allergic contact dermatitis to povidone iodine in oral & maxillofacial surgery - a report of 2 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyazulla, M A; Gopinath, A L; Vaibhav, N; Raut, R P

    2014-07-01

    Povidone iodine (PVP-I) is a chemical complex of polyvinylpyrrolidone (also known as povidone or PVP) and elemental iodine. Iodine containing compounds are widely and commonly used as antiseptics and disinfectants. They are available in various forms like aqueous solution, tincture, aerosol, ointment, or foam. Skin irritation to them is due to the oxidative effects of iodine. Because of the low free iodine concentration in povidone-iodine, skin irritation is less frequent from short contact (1). We report two cases, both with no history of allergy to any drugs, who developed an allergic reaction 24 hours after the usage of povidone iodine as a pre-operative antiseptic to prepare (scrub) the lower third of face before surgical removal of third molars. This case report was granted an exemption by the ethical committee of our institution review board. The Helsinki declaration doesn't apply to this case presentation. PVP-1 is the most commonly used antiseptic scrubbing solution prior to most surgeries. However, allergic contact dermatitis due to PVP-I has not been extensively documented or reported and hence under evaluated, compared to other commonly encountered allergens. There is almost general agreement to the proposition that PVP-I is a very rare sensitizer (2,3) though there are some conflicting reports on the matter. However, sometimes when prolonged skin contact with PVP-I occurs when used as a pre-operative antiseptic agent, it can cause allergic dermatitis (4,5). Does this finding make pre-operative testing for allergies to PVP-1 necessary in all patients? A point to ponder.

  9. In Vivo Optical Imaging for Targeted Drug Kinetics and Localization for Oral Surgery and Super-Resolution, Facilitated by Printed Phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentz, Brian Z.

    Many human cancer cell types over-express folate receptors, and this provides an opportunity to develop targeted anti-cancer drugs. For these drugs to be effective, their kinetics must be well understood in vivo and in deep tissue where tumors occur. We demonstrate a method for imaging these parameters by incorporating a kinetic compartment model and fluorescence into optical diffusion tomography (ODT). The kinetics were imaged in a live mouse, and found to be in agreement with previous in vitro studies, demonstrating the validity of the method and its feasibility as an effective tool in preclinical drug development studies. Progress in developing optical imaging for biomedical applications requires customizable and often complex objects known as "phantoms" for testing and evaluation. We present new optical phantoms fabricated using inexpensive 3D printing methods with multiple materials, allowing for the placement of complex inhomogeneities in heterogeneous or anatomically realistic geometries, as opposed to previous phantoms which were limited to simple shapes formed by molds or machining. Furthermore, we show that Mie theory can be used to design the optical properties to match a target tissue. The phantom fabrication methods are versatile, can be applied to optical imaging methods besides diffusive imaging, and can be used in the calibration of live animal imaging data. Applications of diffuse optical imaging in the operating theater have been limited in part due to computational burden. We present an approach for the fast localization of arteries in the roof of the mouth that has the potential to reduce complications. Furthermore, we use the extracted position information to fabricate a custom surgical guide using 3D printing that could protect the arteries during surgery. The resolution of ODT is severely limited by the attenuation of high spatial frequencies. We present a super-resolution method achieved through the point localization of fluorescent

  10. Development of the foremost light-curable calcium-silicate MTA cement as root-end in oral surgery. Chemical-physical properties, bioactivity and biological behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandolfi, Maria Giovanna; Taddei, Paola; Siboni, Francesco; Modena, Enrico; Ciapetti, Gabriela; Prati, Carlo

    2011-07-01

    An innovative light-curable calcium-silicate cement containing a HEMA-TEGDMA-based resin (lc-MTA) was designed to obtain a bioactive fast setting root-end filling and root repair material. lc-MTA was tested for setting time, solubility, water absorption, calcium release, alkalinizing activity (pH of soaking water), bioactivity (apatite-forming ability) and cell growth-proliferation. The apatite-forming ability was investigated by micro-Raman, ATR-FTIR and ESEM/EDX after immersion at 37°C for 1-28 days in DPBS or DMEM+FBS. The marginal adaptation of cement in root-end cavities of extracted teeth was assessed by ESEM/EDX, and the viability of Saos-2 cell on cements was evaluated. lc-MTA demonstrated a rapid setting time (2min), low solubility, high calcium release (150-200ppm) and alkalinizing power (pH 10-12). lc-MTA proved the formation of bone-like apatite spherulites just after 1 day. Apatite precipitates completely filled the interface porosities and created a perfect marginal adaptation. lc-MTA allowed Saos-2 cell viability and growth and no compromising toxicity was exerted. HEMA-TEGDMA creates a polymeric network able to stabilize the outer surface of the cement and a hydrophilic matrix permeable enough to allow water absorption. SiO(-)/Si-OH groups from the mineral particles induce heterogeneous nucleation of apatite by sorption of calcium and phosphate ions. Oxygen-containing groups from poly-HEMA-TEGDMA provide additional apatite nucleating sites through the formation of calcium chelates. The strong novelty was that the combination of a hydraulic calcium-silicate powder and a poly-HEMA-TEGDMA hydrophilic resin creates the conditions (calcium release and functional groups able to chelate Ca ions) for a bioactive fast setting light-curable material for clinical applications in dental and maxillofacial surgery. The first and unique/exclusive light-curable calcium-silicate MTA cement for endodontics and root-end application was created, with a potential

  11. Oral myiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thalaimalai Saravanan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Myiasis is a pathologic condition in humans occurring because of parasitic infestation. Parasites causing myiasis belong to the order Diptera. Oral myiasis is seen secondary to oral wounds, suppurative lesions, and extraction wounds, especially in individuals with neurological deficit. In such cases, neglected oral hygiene and halitosis attracts the flies to lay eggs in oral wounds resulting in oral myiasis. We present a case of oral myiasis in 40-year-old male patient with mental disability and history of epilepsy.

  12. Oral pregnancy tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailesh M Gondivkar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyogenic granuloma is one of the inflammatory hyperplasias seen in the oral cavity. This term is a misnomer because the lesion is unrelated to infection and in reality arises in response to various stimuli such as low-grade local irritation, traumatic injury, or hormonal factors. It predominantly occurs in the second decade of life in young females, possibly because of the vascular effects of female hormones. Clinically, oral pyogenic granuloma is a smooth or lobulated exophytic lesion manifesting as small, red erythematous growth on a pedunculated or sometimes sessile base, which is usually hemorrhagic. Although excisional surgery is the treatment of choice , some other treatment protocols such as the use of Nd:YAG laser, flash lamp pulsed dye laser, cryosurgery, intralesional injection of ethanol or corticosteroids, and sodium tetradecyl sulfate sclerotherapy have been proposed. We present the case of a 25-year-old pregnant woman with large oral pyogenic granuloma.

  13. Imaging in oral cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supreeta Arya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral cavity squamous cell cancers form a significant percentage of the cancers seen in India. While clinical examination allows direct visualization, it cannot evaluate deep extension of disease. Cross-sectional imaging has become the cornerstone in the pretreatment evaluation of these cancers and provides accurate information about the extent and depth of disease that can help decide the appropriate management strategy and indicate prognosis. Early cancers are treated with a single modality, either surgery or radiotherapy while advanced cancers are offered a combination of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Imaging can decide resectability, help plan the precise extent of resection, and indicate whether organ conservation therapy should be offered. Quality of life issues necessitate preservation of form and function and pretreatment imaging helps plan appropriate reconstruction and counsel patients regarding lifestyle changes. Oral cavity has several subsites and the focus of the review is squamous cancers of the gingivobuccal region, oral tongue and retromolar trigone as these are most frequently encountered in the subcontinent. References for this review were identified by searching Medline and PubMed databases. Only articles published in English language literature were selected. This review aims to familiarize the radiologist with the relevant anatomy of the oral cavity, discuss the specific issues that influence prognosis and management at the above subsites, the optimal imaging methods, the role of imaging in accurately staging these cancers and in influencing management. A checklist for reporting will emphasize the information to be conveyed by the radiologist.

  14. Dental Implant Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ...

  15. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ...

  16. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ... to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ...

  17. The life quality after third molar surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Dimova, Cena

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The aims of this retrospective study were: first of all, to evaluate the patients’ perception of changes in oral health–related quality of life over a 2-month period after third molar surgery. Second aim was to compare the clinical outcome of performed oral surgery with evaluation the influence of factors affecting outcome. Material and Methods. A total of 30 consecutive healthy patients who presented with unilaterally or bilaterally impacted mandible third molar were included in this...

  18. Metástasis cervical contralateral en el carcinoma epidermoide de la cavidad oral: Estudio clínico analítico retrospectivo en 315 pacientes primariamente tratados con cirugía Contralateral neck metastasis in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity: An analytical retrospective clinical study of 315 patients primarily treated with surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. González-García

    2008-06-01

    carcinoma epidermoide de lengua. El tiempo de supervivencia medio libre de enfermedad fue 147± 6 meses. Veintinueve (9,1% pacientes desarrollaron recurrencia cervical ipsilateral, mientras que 18 (5,69% mostraron recurrencia cervical contralateral. Para los pacientes con carcinoma epidermoide de lengua, y considerando los porcentajes en relación a los 203 pacientes con esta entidad, estas cifras fueron de 20 (9,8% y 9 (4,4%, respectivamente. El tiempo medio de aparición de las metástasis cervicales desde la cirugía fue de 12,52 meses (rango: 3-49, algo menor para el subgrupo de pacientes con carcinoma epidermoide de lengua (11,4 meses, rango: 3-27. Dieciocho de los 29 pacientes con recurrencia cervical ipsilateral murieron finalmente de la enfermedad. Siete de 18 pacientes con metástasis contralateral murieron igualmente de la enfermedad. En el subgrupo de pacientes con carcinoma epidermoide de lengua, estas cifras fueron: catorce de 20 pacientes con metástasis cervical ipsilateral y ocho de 9 pacientes con metástasis cervical contralateral. Varios factores clínicopatológicos mostraron asociación estadísticamente significativa (pObjectives. There are numerous studies in the literature on the prognostic factors involved in the appearance of ipsilateral neck metastasis in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity. However, there are no extensive clinical studies on the association of clinicopathological factors and the appearance of contralateral neck metastasis after the surgical resection of the primary tumor. The object of this study is to analyze the factors implied in the appearance of contralateral neck metastasis in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity treated primarily with surgery. Patients and methods. A series of 315 consecutive patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity, who had not been treated previously, were analyzed. A complementary study of a subgroup of 203 patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the lateral

  19. Hemorrhoid surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... surgery. Hemorrhoid surgery may involve: Putting a small rubber band around a hemorrhoid to shrink it by blocking blood flow. Stapling a hemorrhoid to block blood flow, causing it to shrink. Using a ...

  20. Emprego de altas doses de amiodarona via oral na reversão da fibrilação atrial no pós-operatório de cirurgia cardíaca High dose amiodarone for the reversion of atrial fibrillation during the postoperative period of cardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Carlos Vieira da Costa Guaragna

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Relatar a experiência no emprego de altas doses de amiodarona via oral (1800mg/d na reversão da fibrilação atrial (FA em pacientes submetidos à cirurgia cardíaca. MÉTODOS: Analisados, retrospectivamente, 80 pacientes que apresentaram FA no pós operatório de cirurgia cardíaca, constituindo 2 grupos: grupo A com 28 pacientes em uso de amiodarona e grupo B recebendo digital, sendo que este grupo foi subdividido no grupo C com 21 pacientes onde foi associada amiodarona, quando não houvesse reversão da arritmia em 48h. As diferenças foram consideradas significativas para um valor de PPURPOSE: To report our experience using high dose oral amiodarone (1,800mg/day for the reversion of atrial fibrillation to sinus rhythm in patients submitted to cardiac surgery. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed the records of 80 patients who had atrial fibrillation during the postoperative period after cardiac surgery, initially divided in two groups: group A, 28 patients that used amiodarone, and group B composed of patients receiving digoxin. The latter group was divided further in a third group (C, with 21 patients in which amiodarone was associated with digoxin if there was no reversion of the arrhythmia after 48 hours of treatment. The observed differences were considered significant at P<0.05. RESULTS: Atrial fibrillation occurred in 19.4% of the patients submitted to surgery, predominating in males, 60 to 69 years-old. In group A there was reversion to sinus rhythm in 78.6% of the cases. In group B digoxin succeeded in 60%, and in group C 90% of the patients reverted to sinus rhythm. CONCLUSION: High dose oral amiodarone, alone or combined to digoxin, can be safe and effective for the treatment of atrial fibrillation after cardiac surgery.

  1. Plastic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... idea for teens? As with everything, there are right and wrong reasons to have surgery. Cosmetic surgery is unlikely to change your life. Most board-certified plastic surgeons spend a lot of time ... the right reasons. Many plastic surgery procedures are just that — ...

  2. Surgery-first accelerated orthognathic surgery: orthodontic guidelines and setup for model surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Eric J W; Chen, Po-Hsung; Wang, Yu-Chih; Yu, Chung-Chih; Huang, C S; Chen, Yu-Ray

    2011-03-01

    The surgery-first approach indicates that the orthognathic surgery precedes the orthodontic treatment, whereas the orthodontics-first approach indicates that the orthodontic treatment precedes the orthognathic surgery. The conventional approach is an orthodontics-first approach. The purposes of this article are to introduce the concept of the surgery-first approach and to report the guidelines for orthodontic management and model surgery without presurgical orthodontic decompensation. The surgery-first approach treats facial esthetics first and then occlusion, whereas the conventional approach treats occlusion first and then facial esthetics. The surgery-first approach uses osteotomy to solve both skeletal problems and dental compensation, and a "transitional" occlusion is set up postoperatively. Orthodontics in the surgery-first approach is a postoperatively adjunctive treatment to transfigure the transitional occlusion into the solid final occlusion. The advantages of the surgery-first approach are that 1) the patient's chief complaint, dental function, and facial esthetics are achieved and improved in the beginning of the treatment; 2) the entire treatment period is shortened to 1 to 1.5 years or fewer depending on the complexity of orthodontic treatment; and 3) the phenomenon of postoperatively accelerated orthodontic tooth movement reduces the difficulty and treatment time of orthodontic management in the surgery-first approach. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Mesenchymal stem cells in oral reconstructive surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, C; Sørensen, J A; Kassem, M

    2013-01-01

    of large bony defects and six studies on ridge augmentation and healing of alveolar sockets after third molar extraction. The findings suggest that MSCs are capable of producing in vivo bone, re-establishing lost tissue and facilitating placement of dental implants. Use of MSCs would reduce patient...

  4. Oral histoplasmosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patil Karthikeya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Histoplasmosis is a systemic fungal disease that takes various clinical forms, among which oral lesions are rare. The disseminated form of the disease that usually occurs in association with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV is one of the AIDS-defining diseases. Isolated oral histoplasmosis, without systemic involvement, with underlying immunosuppression due to AIDS is very rare. We report one such case of isolated oral histoplasmosis in a HIV-infected patient.

  5. LIHNCS - Lugol's iodine in head and neck cancer surgery: a multicentre, randomised controlled trial assessing the effectiveness of Lugol's iodine to assist excision of moderate dysplasia, severe dysplasia and carcinoma in situ at mucosal resection margins of oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaul, James A; Cymerman, James A; Hislop, Stuart; McConkey, Chris; McMahon, Jeremy; Mehanna, Hisham; Shaw, Richard; Sutton, David N; Dunn, Janet

    2013-09-24

    Oral cavity and oropharynx cancer are increasing in incidence worldwide but survival outcomes have not significantly improved over the last three decades. The presence of dysplasia or carcinoma in situ at surgical margins following resection of squamous carcinoma of the mucosal surfaces of the head and neck has been shown to be associated with a higher incidence of local recurrence and reduced survival. While invasive carcinoma in mucosal surfaces can usually be distinguished from adjacent normal mucous membrane, pre-malignant disease is much less readily distinguished at operation. We describe a protocol for a randomised, controlled trial in which we will assess the effectiveness of Lugol's iodine staining in allowing visualisation and excision of cancer margin dysplasia at time of primary surgery. We will recruit 300 patients diagnosed with oral cavity or oropharynx squamous cell carcinoma. All participants will be planned for primary surgery with curative intent. After completion of baseline assessment participants will be randomised into either a standard surgical treatment arm or surgical treatment including Lugol's iodine staining. This paper describes the rationale and design of a unique trial in head and neck surgical oncology. If margin dysplasia visualisation with Lugol's iodine allows complete excision of high-risk, pre-cancer mucosa at time of primary surgery, this may lead to a reduction in local recurrence and improved survival. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN03712770.

  6. LIHNCS - Lugol’s iodine in head and neck cancer surgery: a multicentre, randomised controlled trial assessing the effectiveness of Lugol’s iodine to assist excision of moderate dysplasia, severe dysplasia and carcinoma in situ at mucosal resection margins of oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Oral cavity and oropharynx cancer are increasing in incidence worldwide but survival outcomes have not significantly improved over the last three decades. The presence of dysplasia or carcinoma in situ at surgical margins following resection of squamous carcinoma of the mucosal surfaces of the head and neck has been shown to be associated with a higher incidence of local recurrence and reduced survival. While invasive carcinoma in mucosal surfaces can usually be distinguished from adjacent normal mucous membrane, pre-malignant disease is much less readily distinguished at operation. We describe a protocol for a randomised, controlled trial in which we will assess the effectiveness of Lugol’s iodine staining in allowing visualisation and excision of cancer margin dysplasia at time of primary surgery. Methods/Design We will recruit 300 patients diagnosed with oral cavity or oropharynx squamous cell carcinoma. All participants will be planned for primary surgery with curative intent. After completion of baseline assessment participants will be randomised into either a standard surgical treatment arm or surgical treatment including Lugol’s iodine staining. Discussion This paper describes the rationale and design of a unique trial in head and neck surgical oncology. If margin dysplasia visualisation with Lugol’s iodine allows complete excision of high-risk, pre-cancer mucosa at time of primary surgery, this may lead to a reduction in local recurrence and improved survival. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN03712770. PMID:24063578

  7. Trends of oral cancer in University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The aim of this study was to describe the trend and recent pattern of oral cancer in the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria. Method: A retrospective analysis of all cases of oral cancer (excluding lymphoid cancers) documented in the records of the Departments of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and ...

  8. Oral cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dios, Pedro Diz; Lestón, Juan Seoane

    2010-06-01

    Pain may be the initial symptom in oral cancer, and is a common complaint both in patients awaiting treatment and in those already in treatment. However, little has been published in the literature on the management of oral cancer pain. Effective pain control requires a multimodal approach in which pharmacological management based on the World Health Organization (WHO) analgesic ladder continues to play an essential role. Although different routes are available for the administration of analgesics, oral delivery continues to be the principal route for pain control in the first instance. Interventional approaches include blockade of a peripheral nerve or of the relevant ganglion, and the use of central neuraxial blockade. The intraventricular or intrathecal administration of opioids, with or without local anaesthetics, has been indicated for severe intractable pain. The development of new treatment modalities provides additional options, though further clinical research is required. There is no evidence of the efficacy of non-pharmacological methods such as acupuncture or transcutaneous nerve stimulation in the management of oral cancer pain. Surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy have also been suggested, but their results have not been quantified. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. PAEDIATRIC SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    3 Department of Paediatric Surgery, Sophia's Children Hospital/Erasmus Medical Centre, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. 4 Department of Paediatric Surgery, Emma's Children Hospital/Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. 5 Department of Radiology, Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital, ...

  10. PAEDIATRIC SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gastroschisis in a developing country: poor resuscitation is a more significant predictor of mortality than postnatal transfer time. PAEDIATRIC SURGERY. P Stevens,1 E Muller,1 P Becker2. 1 Department of Paediatric Surgery, Steve Biko Academic Hospital, University of Pretoria. 2 South African Medical Research Council.

  11. Oral Hygiene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Marie Toftdahl; Villadsen, Dorte Buxbom

    The aim of the study was to explore how adults with schizo- phrenia describe their lived experiences with oral hygiene. 23 adults with schizophrenia were interviewed within a period of four months in late 2015. Transcriptions of the interviews were analysed using the Reflective Lifeworld Research...... phenomenological approach of Dahlberg, Dahlberg, and Nyström. The essence of the phenomenon, oral hygiene, is described as a challenge: a mixture of ability and assigning priority; a challenge in which significant others, for better or worse, play an important role. We recommend a systematic cooperation between...... health care professionals and adults with schizophrenia in order to improve oral health, well-being and recovery....

  12. Oral Hygiene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Dorte Buxbom; Sørensen, Marie Toftdahl

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study is to explore how adults with schizophrenia describe their lived experiences with oral hygiene. 23 adults with schizophrenia were interviewed within a period of four months in late 2015. Transcriptions of the interviews were analysed using the Reflective Lifeworld Research...... phenomenological approach of Dahlberg, Dahlberg, and Nyström. The essence of the phenomenon, oral hygiene, is described as a challenge: a mixture of ability and assigning priority; a challenge in which significant others, for better or worse, play an important role. We recommend a systematic cooperation between...... health care professionals and adults with schizophrenia in order to improve oral health, well-being and recovery....

  13. Oral Histoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folk, Gillian A; Nelson, Brenda L

    2017-12-01

    A 44-year-old female presented to her general dentist with the chief complaint of a painful mouth sore of 2 weeks duration. Clinical examination revealed an irregularly shaped ulcer of the buccal and lingual attached gingiva of the anterior mandible. A biopsy was performed and microscopic evaluation revealed histoplasmosis. Histoplasmosis, caused by Histoplasma capsulate, is the most common fungal infection in the United States. Oral lesions of histoplasmosis are generally associated with the disseminated form of histoplasmosis and may present as a fungating or ulcerative lesion of the oral mucosa. The histologic findings and differential diagnosis for oral histoplasmosis are discussed.

  14. Oral heparin (Emisphere).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, A

    2000-07-01

    Emisphere (formerly in collaboration with Elan) is developing an oral heparin formulation for the potential treatment of deep vein thrombosis (DVT). The formulation uses Emisphere's proprietary carrier molecule, P-414, and had started phase III trials by January 2000 [353372]. The protocol for the trials was finalized in December 1999, and aims to demonstrate the safety and superior efficacy of oral heparin dosed for 30 days post-operatively compared to injectable enoxaparin sodium for 10 days, in the prevention of DVT following hip-replacement surgery. The studies will take place in 95 centers in the US, UK and Canada, and are expected to enroll 2250 patients [350778]. The two trials involved are expected to be completed by mid-2001 [353372]. In May 1998, Emisphere initiated a phase II study for its oral heparin product for the prevention of DVT. The study had three arms of approximately 40 patients each, who had undergone surgery for hip replacement, and was conducted at approximately 20 sites in the US and Canada. Two different doses of oral heparin were compared to subcutaneous heparin. The objective was to demonstrate that the orally administered heparin is well tolerated and comparable to subcutaneous heparin in preventing DVT [288267]. Positive preliminary results were reported in January 1999, showing that the oral formulations were comparable to injectable heparin [311218]. Final results, reported in August 1999, demonstrated that heparin administered orally via a novel carrier system (P-414; SNAC) was comparable, in both safety and activity, to subcutaneous heparin when used to prevent venous thromboembolic events following elective hip arthroplasty [337262,337712]. The heparin formulation was developed as part of a collaboration between Emisphere and Elan investigating oral formulations of heparin and heparinoids. By January 1998, the lead product had completed four phase I trials in patients following knee and hip surgery [274905]. Results from phase I

  15. Oral submucous fibrosis: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wollina U

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Uwe Wollina,1 Shyam B Verma,2 Fareedi Mukram Ali,3 Kishor Patil4 1Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Academic Teaching Hospital Dresden-Friedrichstadt, Dresden, Germany; 2Nirvana Skin Clinic, Vadodara, Gujarat, India; 3Departments of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, SMBT Dental College, Sangamner, Maharashtra, India; 4Departments of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, SMBT Dental College, Sangamner, Maharashtra, India Abstract: Oral submucous fibrosis (OSF is a premalignant condition caused by betel chewing. It is very common in Southeast Asia but has started to spread to Europe and North America. OSF can lead to squamous cell carcinoma, a risk that is further increased by concomitant tobacco consumption. OSF is a diagnosis based on clinical symptoms and confirmation by histopathology. Hypovascularity leading to blanching of the oral mucosa, staining of teeth and gingiva, and trismus are major symptoms. Major constituents of betel quid are arecoline from betel nuts and copper, which are responsible for fibroblast dysfunction and fibrosis. A variety of extracellular and intracellular signaling pathways might be involved. Treatment of OSF is difficult, as not many large, randomized controlled trials have been conducted. The principal actions of drug therapy include antifibrotic, anti-inflammatory, and antioxygen radical mechanisms. Potential new drugs are on the horizon. Surgery may be necessary in advanced cases of trismus. Prevention is most important, as no healing can be achieved with available treatments. Keywords: betel nut, betel quid, oral disease, squamous cell carcinoma, tobacco, fibrosis

  16. Herpes - oral

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... virus type 2 (HSV-2) most often causes genital herpes . However, sometimes HSV-2 is spread to the ... the virus to the genitals. Both oral and genital herpes viruses can sometimes be spread, even when you ...

  17. Survey response of oral and maxillofacial surgeons on invasive procedures in patients using antithrombotic medication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Diermen, D.E.; van der Waal, I.; Hoogvliets, M.W.; Ong, F.N.; Hoogstraten, J.

    2013-01-01

    The aim was to evaluate the management strategies of Dutch oral and maxillofacial surgeons when performing invasive dental or oral surgery in patients using oral antithrombotic medication (OAM). In November 2009 a survey was mailed to all 213 members of the Dutch Society for Oral and Maxillofacial

  18. [Oral contraceptives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenbaum, H

    1976-10-23

    The author presents an alphabetical list of oral contraceptives. To classify the commercial names of oral contraceptives all over the world is practically impossible for the following reasons: some agents are discontinued without the medical profession being aware of it; the same product can have various names depending on the country and the laboratory. Some products exist in different forms (21 pills including 7 inactive tablets). Finally, some laboratories change the posology of a product without changing its name.

  19. Disparities in Oral Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2020: Oral Health Objectives Site Map Disparities in Oral Health Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Oral health ... to get and keep dental insurance. Disparities in Oral Health Some of the oral health disparities that exist ...

  20. Mucoadhesive Oral Wound Rinse in Preventing and Treating Stomatitis in Patients With ER- or PR-Positive Metastatic or Locally Recurrent Breast Cancer That Cannot be Removed by Surgery Receiving Everolimus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-25

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Oral Complications; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  1. Rodding Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... usually undertaken as a scheduled elective procedure. An optimal age for a first rodding surgery has not ... which may prevent or postpone the need for replacement. The smallest diameter expanding rods are still too ...

  2. Lung surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the pulmonary artery ( pulmonary embolism ) Treat complications of tuberculosis Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery can be used to ... Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center-Shreveport, Shreveport, LA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed ...

  3. Bariatric Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... action of certain hormones, such as ghrelin —“the hunger hormone.” People have these types of surgery if ... organizations to further patient education on hormone related issues. Network Sponsors The Hormone Health Network is supported ...

  4. Epilepsy Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and the portion of your brain that's involved: Memory problems. The temporal lobe handles memory and language functions, so surgery on this part ... computerized tomography (SPECT). The scan image varies in color depending on the amount of blood flow in ...

  5. After Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    After any operation, you'll have some side effects. There is usually some pain with surgery. There ... anesthesia, or accidental injury. Some people have a greater risk of complications because of other medical conditions. ...

  6. Brain surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craniotomy; Surgery - brain; Neurosurgery; Craniectomy; Stereotactic craniotomy; Stereotactic brain biopsy; Endoscopic craniotomy ... Barnett J, Mohanty A, Desai SK, Patterson JT. Neurosurgery. In: Townsend CM Jr, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, ...

  7. Chemoprevention of oral cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogesh Chhaparwal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral cancer is one among the ten most common cancers in the world and shows a marked geographic variation in occurrence. It causes considerable morbidity and is associated with a 5-year survival rate of less than 50%. Current treatment primarily consists of surgery and radiotherapy and improvement in long-term cure rates with these modalities has reached a plateau. As, curative therapy available for oral cancer often results in debilitating changes in appearance, speech, swallowing and breathing, preventive strategies are desirable. Cancer chemoprevention is the use of natural, synthetic or biologic chemical agents to reverse, suppress, or prevent carcinogenic progression. Chemoprevention has been an extensively-studied strategy and continues to hold promise in the management of oral cancer. Many agents have been evaluated as possible chemopreventive agents including vitamin A and retinoids, betacarotene, vitamin E and dietary agents. Recently, molecularly targeted approach has generated interest among researchers worldwide which includes cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 inhibitors, EGFR inhibitors and adenovirus vectors. This article reviews the various aspects of chemoprevention and describes important chemopreventive agents and design of chemopreventive trials.

  8. Bariatric surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmali, Shahzeer; Stoklossa, Carlene Johnson; Sharma, Arya; Stadnyk, Janet; Christiansen, Sandra; Cottreau, Danielle; Birch, Daniel W.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To review the management of bariatric surgical patients. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases were searched, as well as PubMed US National Library, from January 1950 to December 2009. Evidence was levels I, II, and III. MAIN MESSAGE Bariatric surgery should be considered for obese patients at high risk of morbidity and mortality who have not achieved adequate weight loss with lifestyle and medical management and who are suffering from the complications of obesity. Bariatric surgery can result in substantial weight loss, resolution of comorbid conditions, and improved quality of life. The patient’s weight-loss history; his or her personal accountability, responsibility, and comprehension; and the acceptable level of risk must be taken into account. Complications include technical failure, bleeding, abdominal pain, nausea or vomiting, excess loose skin, bowel obstruction, ulcers, and anastomotic stricture. Lifelong monitoring by a multidisciplinary team is essential. CONCLUSION Limited long-term success of behavioural and pharmacologic therapies in severe obesity has led to renewed interest in bariatric surgery. Success with bariatric surgery is more likely when multidisciplinary care providers, in conjunction with primary care providers, assess, treat, monitor, and evaluate patients before and after surgery. Family physicians will play a critical role in counseling patients about bariatric surgery and will need to develop skills in managing these patients in the long-term. PMID:20841586

  9. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, and is ... to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, and is ...

  10. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Craniofacial Surgery Cleft Lip/Palate and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require one or more ... find out more. Corrective Jaw Surgery Corrective Jaw Surgery Orthognathic surgery is performed to correct the misalignment ...

  11. Mohs micrographic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skin cancer - Mohs surgery; Basal cell skin cancer - Mohs surgery; Squamous cell skin cancer - Mohs surgery ... Mohs surgery usually takes place in the doctor's office. The surgery is started early in the morning and is ...

  12. Oral health assessment practices and perceptions of North American paediatric cardiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Kelly J; Casas, Michael J; Judd, Peter L; Russell, Jennifer L

    2017-09-01

    Children with cardiac defects should have good oral health, particularly prior to cardiac surgery to minimize risks of infective endocarditis. The aim of the study was to examine the oral health assessment practices of North American cardiologists. Online surveys were e-mailed to 1409 cardiologists. Cardiologists without paediatric patients or practicing in centres without cardiac surgical care were excluded. Surveys addressed oral health assessment practices for paediatric cardiac patients, and perceptions of the impact of oral health on cardiac care. The centre response rate was 69%, individual response rate 20%. Most cardiologists (96%) reported oral health was assessed as part of cardiac care. The most common time for assessment was prior to cardiac surgery (44%), with a quarter assessing by age 1 (28%). While most oral assessments involved a dentist (59%), 17% of cardiologists performed the oral assessment without the aid of a dentist. Four-fifths of cardiologists (83%) reported cancellation of cardiac surgery due to oral disease. Cardiologists who deferred assessment until prior to surgery had the highest experience of cancellation (96%). Assessments were delayed despite the common belief (89%) that children on pre-surgical high-calorie diets are at increased risk of oral disease. Assessments of oral health status were often deferred until immediately prior to cardiac surgery despite the cardiologist's perception that children with cardiac defects were at increased risk of oral disease and prior experience of surgical cancellation due to oral disease. Paediatricians may need to facilitate early oral assessment for these children.

  13. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ... here to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ...

  14. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ... to find out more. Dental Implant Surgery Dental Implant Surgery Dental implant surgery is, of course, surgery, ...

  15. Oral candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millsop, Jillian W; Fazel, Nasim

    2016-01-01

    Oral candidiasis (OC) is a common fungal disease encountered in dermatology, most commonly caused by an overgrowth of Candida albicans in the mouth. Although thrush is a well-recognized presentation of OC, it behooves clinicians to be aware of the many other presentations of this disease and how to accurately diagnose and manage these cases. The clinical presentations of OC can be broadly classified as white or erythematous candidiasis, with various subtypes in each category. The treatments include appropriate oral hygiene, topical agents, and systemic medications. This review focuses on the various clinical presentations of OC and treatment options. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Oral myiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Treville Pereira

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Myiasis is a relatively rare condition arising from the invasion of body tissues or cavities of living animals or humans by maggots or larvae of certain species of flies. It is an uncommon clinical condition, being more frequent in underdeveloped countries and hot climate regions, and is associated with poor hygiene, suppurative oral lesions; alcoholism and senility. Its diagnosis is made basically by the presence of larvae. The present article reports a case of oral myiasis involving 20 larvae in a patient with neurological deficiency.

  17. Oral chlorhexidine and microbial contamination during endoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donatsky, Anders Meller; Holzknecht, Barbara Juliane; Arpi, Magnus

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: One of the biggest concerns associated with transgastric surgery is contamination and risk of intra-abdominal infection with microbes introduced from the access route. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of oral decontamination with chlorhexidine on microbial contamin......BACKGROUND: One of the biggest concerns associated with transgastric surgery is contamination and risk of intra-abdominal infection with microbes introduced from the access route. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of oral decontamination with chlorhexidine on microbial...... contamination of the endoscope. METHODS: In a prospective, randomized, single-blinded, clinical trial the effect of chlorhexidine mouth rinse was evaluated. As a surrogate for the risk of intra-abdominal contamination during transgastric surgery, microbial contamination of the endoscope during upper endoscopy...... microbial contamination of the endoscope, but micro-organisms with abscess forming capabilities were still present. PPI treatment significantly increased CFU and should be discontinued before transgastric surgery....

  18. Oral symptoms and functional outcome related to oral and oropharyngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamstra, Jolanda I; Jager-Wittenaar, Harriet; Dijkstra, Pieter U; Huisman, Paulien M; van Oort, Rob P; van der Laan, Bernard F A M; Roodenburg, Jan L N

    2011-09-01

    This study aimed to assess: (1) oral symptoms of patients treated for oral or oropharyngeal cancer; (2) how patients rank the burden of oral symptoms; (3) the impact of the tumor, the treatment, and oral symptoms on functional outcome. Eighty-nine patients treated for oral or oropharyngeal cancer were asked about their oral symptoms related to mouth opening, dental status, oral sensory function, tongue mobility, salivary function, and pain. They were asked to rank these oral symptoms according to the degree of burden experienced. The Mandibular Function Impairment Questionnaire (MFIQ) was used to assess functional outcome. In a multivariate linear regression analyses, variables related to MFIQ scores (p≤0.10) were entered as predictors with MFIQ score as the outcome. Lack of saliva (52%), restricted mouth opening (48%), and restricted tongue mobility (46%) were the most frequently reported oral symptoms. Lack of saliva was most frequently (32%) ranked as the most burdensome oral symptom. For radiated patients, an inability to wear a dental prosthesis, a T3 or T4 stage, and a higher age were predictive of MFIQ scores. For non-radiated patients, a restricted mouth opening, an inability to wear a dental prosthesis, restricted tongue mobility, and surgery of the mandible were predictive of MFIQ scores. Lack of saliva was not only the most frequently reported oral symptom after treatment for oral or oropharyngeal cancer, but also the most burdensome. Functional outcome is strongly influenced by an inability to wear a dental prosthesis in both radiated and non-radiated patients.

  19. Cancer of the oral cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.C.

    1987-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinomas of the oral cavity are curable. When early tumor (T1 and T2) is diagnosed and treated, cure rates by surgery or irradiation are high. The choice of therapeutic modalities for these lesions is complex and depends on the site of origin and size of the tumor, the presence or absence of nodal metastases, and the age, physical, medical, and socioeconomic status of the patient. Other factors include the willingness of the patient to return for a protracted course of radiation therapy, the skill of the physician, and the relative morbidity and cosmesis of the two forms of treatment. In general, surgery may be considered for early (T1) lesions if the deformity resulting from surgery is minimal. If resection involves major morbidity, such as a deformity that alters cosmesis or the function of the speech and swallowing mechanisms, then radiation therapy is preferred. For medium-sized (T2) tumors, superficial radiation therapy is the treatment of choice, for it controls the disease and preserves normal function and anatomy. Surgery is reserved for radiation failures. Extensive disease (T3 and T4) often associated with bone and muscle involvement and cervical lymph node metastases is rarely curable by radiation therapy or surgery alone; a combined approach using radiation therapy and surgery is therefore the procedure of choice

  20. Oral cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cancers tend to spread quickly. Smoking and other tobacco use are linked to most cases of oral cancer. Heavy alcohol use also increases the risk for ... cancer greatly increases the chance of survival. Prevention ... Avoiding smoking or other tobacco use Having dental problems corrected Limiting or avoiding alcohol ...

  1. Oral leukoplakia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmstrup, Palle; Dabelsteen, Erik

    2016-01-01

    nature is oral leukoplakia, and for decades it has been discussed how to treat these lesions. Various treatment modalities, such as systemic therapies and surgical removal, have been suggested. The systemic therapies tested so far include retinoids, extracts of green tea, inhibitors of cyclooxygenase-2...

  2. Oral leukoplakia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard Larsen, Marie; Sorensen, J. A.; Godballe, C.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Oral leukoplakia (OL) is a common premalignant lesion. The possible benefits of specific interventions in preventing a malignant transformation of OL are not well understood. This review assesses different invasive treatment techniques for OL and evaluate the optimal treatment...

  3. Oral calcitonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdy RC

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Ronald C Hamdy,1,2 Dane N Daley11Osteoporosis Center, College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, 2Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Johnson City, TN, USAAbstract: Calcitonin is a hormone secreted by the C-cells of the thyroid gland in response to elevations of the plasma calcium level. It reduces bone resorption by inhibiting mature active osteoclasts and increases renal calcium excretion. It is used in the management of postmenopausal osteoporosis, Paget's disease of bone, and malignancy-associated hypercalcemia. Synthetic and recombinant calcitonin preparations are available; both have similar pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles. As calcitonin is a peptide, the traditional method of administration has been parenteral or intranasal. This hinders its clinical use: adherence with therapy is notoriously low, and withdrawal from clinical trials has been problematic. An oral formulation would be more attractive, practical, and convenient to patients. In addition to its effect on active osteoclasts and renal tubules, calcitonin has an analgesic action, possibly mediated through β-endorphins and the central modulation of pain perception. It also exerts a protective action on cartilage and may be useful in the management of osteoarthritis and possibly rheumatoid arthritis. Oral formulations of calcitonin have been developed using different techniques. The most studied involves drug-delivery carriers such as Eligen® 8-(N-2hydroxy-5-chloro-benzoyl-amino-caprylic acid (5-CNAC (Emisphere Technologies, Cedar Knolls, NJ. Several factors affect the bioavailability and efficacy of orally administered calcitonin, including amount of water used to take the tablet, time of day the tablet is taken, and proximity to intake of a meal. Preliminary results looked promising. Unfortunately, in two Phase III studies, oral calcitonin (0.8 mg with 200 mg 5-CNAC, once a day for postmenopausal osteoporosis and twice a day for osteoarthritis failed to

  4. Bariatric surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alojz Pleskovič

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: In almost six decades different surgical techniques have been developed to treat patients with morbid obesity. Various surgical techniques are generally divided with respect to their effect into restrictive, malabsorbtive and humoral and a combination of these. Surgically modified human metabolism ameliorates metabolic diseases, particularly diabetes, even in nonobese patients. The understanding of metabolic effects changed the traditional paradigm of bariatric surgery from simple weight-loss procedure to metabolic surgery affecting whole-body metabolism. Proper surgical technique for individual patient is the most important factor influencing long- term results, comorbidities and quality of life. Recommendations for patient selection, surgical methods and pre- and postoperative patient management are to be respected. Metabolic surgery principles and current concepts are presented.

  5. Accessory Mental Foramen and Maxillofacial Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahpeyma, Amin; Khajehahmadi, Saeedeh

    2017-10-26

    Accessory mental foramens should be considered in surgical procedures performed in mandibular body and symphysis. Location and content of these foramina has significant impact on the result of surgery.Lip numbness is the catastrophic result if these foramina are violated while their content is nerves that carry sensory inputs from lower lip. Examples of interferences with dental implant, orthognathic, and periapical surgeries are presented and it is discussed in which conditions they complicate oral surgical procedures.

  6. Prevention of one-year vein-graft occlusion after aortocoronary-bypass surgery : a comparison of low-dose aspirin, low-dose aspirin plus dipyridamole, and oral anticoagulants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, J; Hillege, H. L.; Kootstra, G. J.; Ascoop, C. A. P. L.; Pfisterer, M.; van Gilst, W. H.; Lie, K. I.

    1993-01-01

    Aspirin, alone or in combination with dipyridamole, is known to prevent occlusion of aortocoronary vein grafts. The benefit of dipyridamole in addition to aspirin remains controversial, and the efficacy and safety of oral anticoagulants for prevention of vein-graft occlusion have not been

  7. Higher powered magnification improved endodontic surgery outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenson, David

    2012-01-01

    Medline, Embase and PubMed databases were searched together with hand-searches of a range of journals (Journal of Endodontics, International Endodontic Journal, Oral Surgery Oral Medicine Oral Pathology Oral Radiology and Endodontics, Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery). Clinical studies in several languages (English, French, German, Italian and Spanish) with a minimum follow-up of six months evaluated using clinical and radiographic examination included. Assessment and data abstraction were carried out independently. Weighted pooled success rates and relative risk assessment between TRS and EMS were calculated and a meta-analysis was carried out using a random effects model. Fourteen studies met the inclusion criteria. Weighted pooled success rates calculated from extracted raw data showed an 88% positive outcome for CRS (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.8455-0.9164) and 94% for EMS (95% CI, 0.8889-0.9816). This difference was statistically significant (P magnification rendered by the dental operating microscope or the endoscope.

  8. maxillofacial surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The history of maxillofacial and oral injuries, including mandibular fractures, from 1650 BC to the present, is the topic of two publications.1,2 To summarise: the Greek. 'Father of Medicine' Hippocrates was the first to describe fracture treatment – he recommended bandages and single jaw fixation. Celsus, a Roman (30 BC ...

  9. Cosmetic surgery.

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, D. L.

    1989-01-01

    The psychotherapeutic nature of cosmetic surgery is emphasised by outlining the range of symptoms from which patients suffer and by explaining the sequence of psychological reactions which cause them. The principles which govern the selection of patients are defined. A brief account of each of the main cosmetic operations is given together with notes on their limitations and risks.

  10. PLASTIC SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    surgery or subcutaneous mastectomy utilizing a periareolar or circumareolar ... old. Informed consent was obtained. The height of the patients was measured from heel to vertex with a standard height measuring device. The chest circumference was ... The procedure was followed with liposuction 3-6 months later if required.

  11. GENERAL SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Summary: The multidisciplinary management of Breast Cancer (BC) has evolved over the past 50 years: the patient is offered a choice of .... Choice of procedure. – For women with early BC, there is essentially a choice between 2 procedures: mastectomy or breast conserving surgery with radiation (BCT). The standard.

  12. GENERAL SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Schwab , using a three-phase approach.5 In 1998, Moore et al. extended the concept and described the five-stage approach.6. The aim of damage control surgery is to prevent severely injured patients from developing the “lethal triad” of hypothermia, coagulopathy and worsening acidosis, as this confers a dismal prognosis ...

  13. GENERAL SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We plan to protocolise earlier surgery and blood conservation strategies intraoperatively in addition to a restrictive strategy in ..... Marshall JC. Review Transfusion trigger: when to transfuse? Crit Care. 2004;8(Suppl 2):S31-3. 11. Hofmann A, Farmer S, Towler SC. Strategies to preempt and reduce the use of blood products: ...

  14. Cosmetic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/cosmetic-surgery/SN00006 Medical Tourism (Copyright © American Society of Plastic Surgeons) — People considering ... in exotic vacation spots. This publication talks about "medical tourism" and whether it's safe. http://www.plasticsurgery.org/ ...

  15. GENERAL SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Surgery, University of Cape Town Health Sciences Faculty, Groote Schuur Hospital, Observatory, Cape Town,. South Africa ... included all district, regional and tertiary hospitals in the nine provinces. Clinics and so-called ..... large contingency of senior general surgeons from countries such as Cuba, who have ...

  16. GENERAL SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    after pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. J Surg Oncol. 2016;113(2):188-193. http:// dx.doi.org/10.1002/jso.24125. 2. Wente MN, Veit JA, Bassi C, et al. Postpancreatectomy hemorrhage (PPH): An international study group of pancreatic surgery (ISGPS) definition. Surg. 2007;142(1):20-25. http://.

  17. Metabolic Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pareek, Manan; Schauer, Philip R; Kaplan, Lee M

    2018-01-01

    the superiority of surgery over medical treatment alone in achieving improved glycemic control, as well as a reduction in cardiovascular risk factors. The mechanisms seem to extend beyond the magnitude of weight loss alone and include improvements in incretin profiles, insulin secretion, and insulin sensitivity...

  18. TRAUMA SURGERY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    deaths due to other trauma types (gunshot wounds, road traffic fatalities and assault) ... the axillary artery was ligated during surgery. Type of ... Left axillary artery. Ischaemic left upper limb. 3. Fifth intercostal space on the left. Bilateral pneumothorax and haemothorax still present at autopsy. (intercostal drain only inserted on ...

  19. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... out more. Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans ... out more. Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans ...

  20. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed with oral or ... Pathology Oral, Head and Neck Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed with oral or ...

  1. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Neck and Oral Pathology Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ... Neck and Oral Pathology Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Close to 49,750 Americans will be diagnosed ...

  2. Carotid artery surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carotid endarterectomy; CAS surgery; Carotid artery stenosis - surgery; Endarterectomy - carotid artery ... through the catheter around the blocked area during surgery. Your carotid artery is opened. The surgeon removes ...

  3. Oral Histoplasmosis

    OpenAIRE

    Folk, Gillian A.; Nelson, Brenda L.

    2017-01-01

    A 44-year-old female presented to her general dentist with the chief complaint of a painful mouth sore of 2 weeks duration. Clinical examination revealed an irregularly shaped ulcer of the buccal and lingual attached gingiva of the anterior mandible. A biopsy was performed and microscopic evaluation revealed histoplasmosis. Histoplasmosis, caused by Histoplasma capsulate, is the most common fungal infection in the United States. Oral lesions of histoplasmosis are generally associated with the...

  4. Cochlear implant revision surgeries in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Maria Stella Arantes do; Reis, Ana Cláudia Mirândola B; Massuda, Eduardo T; Hyppolito, Miguel Angelo

    2018-02-16

    The surgery during which the cochlear implant internal device is implanted is not entirely free of risks and may produce problems that will require revision surgeries. To verify the indications for cochlear implantation revision surgery for the cochlear implant internal device, its effectiveness and its correlation with certain variables related to language and hearing. A retrospective study of patients under 18 years submitted to cochlear implant Surgery from 2004 to 2015 in a public hospital in Brazil. Data collected were: age at the time of implantation, gender, etiology of the hearing loss, audiological and oral language characteristics of each patient before and after Cochlear Implant surgery and any need for surgical revision and the reason for it. Two hundred and sixty-five surgeries were performed in 236 patients. Eight patients received a bilateral cochlear implant and 10 patients required revision surgery. Thirty-two surgeries were necessary for these 10 children (1 bilateral cochlear implant), of which 21 were revision surgeries. In 2 children, cochlear implant removal was necessary, without reimplantation, one with cochlear malformation due to incomplete partition type I and another due to trauma. With respect to the cause for revision surgery, of the 8 children who were successfully reimplanted, four had cochlear calcification following meningitis, one followed trauma, one exhibited a facial nerve malformation, one experienced a failure of the cochlear implant internal device and one revision surgery was necessary because the electrode was twisted. The incidence of the cochlear implant revision surgery was 4.23%. The period following the revision surgeries revealed an improvement in the subject's hearing and language performance, indicating that these surgeries are valid in most cases. Copyright © 2018 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. reactive localised inflammatory hyperplasia of the oral mucosa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-02-02

    Feb 2, 2009 ... Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Dental Sciences, University of Nairobi, P. O. Box 19676- 00202, Nairobi, Kenya. Request for reprints to: Dr. D.O. Awange, Department of Oral Pathology and Oral Medicine, School of Dental Sciences,. University ..... the preparation of the histopathological material for analysis.

  6. The types, incidence and demographic distribution of benign oral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: In this retrospective study, data on histological results of lesions of the oral and maxillofacial region were retrieved from the archives at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery of Muhimbili National Hospital were analysed. The tumour type, age, sex, file number and histopathological diagnosis of the ...

  7. Validity of Self Completed Health Questionnaire among Oral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective of this study is to determine the degree of validity of self completed health questionnaire among oral surgery patient at the Capitol Dental when compared with a structured oral interview. A prospective random selection method was applied using a standardized questionnaire. The cohorts are patients attending ...

  8. Function after oral oncological intervention, reconstruction and rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speksnijder, C.M.

    2011-01-01

    In the Netherlands, the incidence of oral cancer is increasing. Progress in (reconstructive) surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, however, has improved survival and loco-regional control while trying to preserve or restore oral function and quality of life. Despite the progress in treatment,

  9. Comparison of antibacterial-coated and non-coated suture material in intraoral surgery by isolation of adherent bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Pelz

    2015-09-01

    In terms of the total number of oral bacteria, and especially oral pathogens, that adhered to suture material, no reduction was demonstrated for Vicryl Plus. The use of triclosan-coated suture material offers no advantage in intraoral surgery.

  10. Oral lipomas: A report of two cases

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    McRoy

    2014-03-30

    Mar 30, 2014 ... CASE ONE. A 70 year old woman reported to the. Dental/Maxillofacial Surgery Unit of Barau. Dikko Specialist Hospital, Kaduna with a large intra oral, painless, slow growing mass of five years duration. She complained of difficulty with swallowing, speech, mastication and occasionally respiratory distress.

  11. Problems associated with basic oral surgical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapatkin, A.S.; Marretta, S.M.; Schloss, A.J.

    1990-01-01

    The veterinarian must be able to diagnose several types of dental problems. History, physical examination, clinical pathology, and radiography are important in making an accurate diagnosis. Basic oral surgery includes various extraction techniques and management of their associated complications. Knowledge of dental anatomy and proper surgical technique can make an extraction curative rather than a frustrating procedure with multiple complications

  12. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require one or more surgeries depending on the extent of ... and Craniofacial Surgery A cleft lip may require one or more surgeries depending on the extent of ...

  13. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures ... to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures ...

  14. Tennis elbow surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lateral epicondylitis surgery - discharge; Lateral tendinosis surgery - discharge; Lateral tennis elbow surgery - discharge ... Soon after surgery, severe pain will decrease, but you may have mild soreness for 3 to 6 months.

  15. Corrective Jaw Surgery

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures involving ... to find out more. Facial Cosmetic Surgery Facial Cosmetic Surgery Extensive education and training in surgical procedures involving ...

  16. Orthognathic Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard Larsen, Marie; Thygesen, Torben Henrik

    2016-01-01

    on the level of satisfaction was studied. The social-networking web site Facebook was used to identify the study population. An online questionnaire was performed using the website SurveyMonkey. In all, 105 (9%) respondents from the Danish Facebook group about OS, called Kaebeoperation (jaw surgery), were......The literature shows that the indications for orthognathic surgery (OS) are often functional problems and unsatisfactory facial esthetics. This study investigated the esthetic outcomes and overall satisfaction following OS. Somatosensory change is a relatively common complication and its influence...... to sex, age, and somatosensory change. High satisfaction and improvement in facial esthetic after OS were seen. Young patients (16-25 years) and men indicated a higher degree of satisfaction than old (>25 years) patients and women. The use of social media seems to be an interesting platform...

  17. Radiotherapy for Oral Cavity Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Jae Won

    1993-01-01

    Eighty five patients of oral cavity cancer, treated with radiation at the Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, during the period from March 1985 to September 1990 were analyzed retrospectively. Among 85 patients, 37 patients were treated with radiation only and 48 patients were treated with radiation following surgery And 70 patients received external irradiation only by 60 Co with or without electron, the others were 7 patients for external irradiation plus interstitial implantation and 8 patients for external irradiation plus oral cone electron therapy. Primary sites were mobile tongue for 40 patients, mouth floor for 17 patients, palate for 12 patients, gingiva including retromolar trigone for 10 patients, buccal mucosa for 5 patients, and lip for 1 patient. According to pathologic classification, squamous cell carcinoma was the most common (77 patients). According to AJC TNM stage, stage I + II were 28 patients and stage III + IV were 57 patients. Acturial overall survival rate at 3 years was 43.9%, 3 year survival rates were 60.9% for stage I + II, and 23.1% for stage III + IV, respectively. As a prognostic factor, primary T stage was a significant factor (p<0.01). The others, age, location, lymph node metastasis, surgery, radiation dose, and cell differentiation were not statistically significant. Among those factors, radiation plus surgery was more effective than radiation only in T3 + T4 or in any N stage although it was not statistically sufficient(p<0.1). From those results, it was conclusive that definitive radiotherapy was more effective than surgery especially in the view of pertaining of anatomical integrity and function in early stage, and radiation plus surgery was considered to be better therapeutic tool in advanced stage

  18. Guided Surgery in de implantologie: een overzicht

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tahmaseb, A.; Wismeijer, D.; Derksen, W.D.C.

    2015-01-01

    Het gebruik van Guided Surgery (computergeleide chirurgie) staat binnen de orale implantologie al jaren in de belangstelling van tandartsen en onderzoekers. Met betrekking tot de nauwkeurigheid van deze systemen lopen de klinische en wetenschappelijke resultaten uiteen. Ook zijn in de literatuur

  19. Oral Thrush (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Parents / Oral Thrush Print en español Muguet (candidiasis oral) What Is Oral Thrush? Oral thrush is a ... Candida overgrowth also causes diaper rash and vaginal yeast infections . Babies can have oral thrush and a diaper rash at the same ...

  20. Towards understanding oral health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zaura, E.; ten Cate, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    During the last century, dental research has focused on unraveling the mechanisms behind various oral pathologies, while oral health was typically described as the mere absence of oral diseases. The term ‘oral microbial homeostasis' is used to describe the capacity of the oral ecosystem to maintain