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Sample records for surfactants luminescence weakly

  1. Experimental Study of Enhancing Oil Recovery with Weak Base Alkaline/Surfactant/Polymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dandan Yin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Na2CO3 was used together with surfactant and polymer to form the Alkaline/Surfactant/Polymer (ASP flooding system. Interfacial tension (IFT and emulsification of Dagang oil and chemical solutions were studied in the paper. The experiment results show that the ASP system can form super-low interfacial tension with crude oil and emulsified phase. The stability of the emulsion is enhanced by the Na2CO3, surfactant, and the soap generated at oil/water contact. Six core flooding experiments are conducted in order to investigate the influence of Na2CO3 concentration on oil recovery. The results show the maximum oil recovery can be obtained with 0.3 wt% surfactant, 0.6 wt% Na2CO3, and 2000 mg/L polymer. In a heterogeneous reservoir, the ASP flooding could not enhance the oil recovery by reducing IFT until it reaches the critical viscosity, which indicates expanding the sweep volume is the premise for reducing IFT to enhance oil recovery. Reducing or removing the alkali from ASP system to achieve high viscosity will reduce oil recovery because of the declination of oil displacement efficiency. Weak base ASP alkali can ensure that the whole system with sufficient viscosity can start the medium and low permeability layers and enhance oil recovery even if the IFT only reaches 10−2 mN/m.

  2. Weak and saturable protein-surfactant interactions in the denaturation of apo-alpha-lactalbumin by acidic and lactonic sophorolipid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kell K Andersen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Biosurfactants are of growing interest as sustainable alternatives to fossil-fuel-derived chemical surfactants, particularly for the detergent industry. To realize this potential, it is necessary to understand how they affect proteins which they may encounter in their applications. However knowledge of such interactions is limited. Here we present a study of the interactions between the model protein apo-alpha-lactalbumin and the biosurfactant sophorolipid (SL produced by the yeast Starmerella bombicola. SL occurs both as an acidic and a lactonic form; the lactonic form (lactSL is sparingly soluble and has a lower critical micelle concentration than the acidic form (acidSL. We show that acidSL affects apo-aLA in a similar way to the related glycolipid biosurfactant rhamnolipid (RL, with the important difference that RL is also active below the cmc in contrast to acidSL. Using isothermal titration calorimetry data, we show that acidSL has weak and saturable interactions with apo-aLA at low concentrations; due to the relatively low cmc of acidSL (which means that the monomer concentration is limited to ca. 0-1 mM SL, it is only possible to observe interactions with monomeric acidSL at high apo-aLA concentrations. However, the denaturation kinetics of apo-aLA in the presence of acidSL are consistent with a collaboration between monomeric and micellar surfactant species, similar to RL and nonionic or zwitterionic surfactants. Inclusion of lactSL as mixed micelles with acidSL lowers the cmc and this effectively reduces the rate of unfolding, emphasizing that SL like other biosurfactants is a gentle anionic surfactant. Our data highlight the potential of these biosurfactants for future use in the detergent industry.

  3. Application of upconversion luminescent-magnetic microbeads with weak background noise and facile separation in ochratoxin A detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Zhenyu, E-mail: liaozy08@163.com [Tianjin Product Quality Inspection Technology Research Institute, The National Center of Supervision and Inspection for Quality of Food (China); Zhang, Ying [Tianjin University, School of Life Sciences, Tianjin Engineering Center of Micro-Nano Biomaterials and Detection-Treatment Technology (China); Su, Lin [Tianjin Medical University Eye Hospital, Eye Institute and School of Optometry and Ophthalmology (China); Chang, Jin; Wang, Hanjie, E-mail: wanghj@tju.edu.cn [Tianjin University, School of Life Sciences, Tianjin Engineering Center of Micro-Nano Biomaterials and Detection-Treatment Technology (China)

    2017-02-15

    Ochratoxin A (OTA), the most harmful and abundant ochratoxin, is chemically stable and commonly existed in foodstuffs. In this work, upconversion luminescent-magnetic microbeads (UCLMMs) -based cytometric bead array for OTA detection with a less reagent consumption and high sensitivity has been established and optimized. In UCLMMs, upconversion nanocrystals (UCNs) for optical code present a weak background noise and no spectral cross talk between the encoding signals and target labels under two excitation conditions to improve detection sensitivity. While the superparamagnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs) aim for rapid analysis. The results show that the developed method has a sensitivity of 9.553 ppt below HPLC with a 50-μL sample and can be completed in <2 h with good accuracy and high reproducibility. Therefore, different colors of UCLMMs will become a promising assay platform for multiple mycotoxins after further improvement.

  4. Application of upconversion luminescent-magnetic microbeads with weak background noise and facile separation in ochratoxin A detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, Zhenyu; Zhang, Ying; Su, Lin; Chang, Jin; Wang, Hanjie

    2017-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA), the most harmful and abundant ochratoxin, is chemically stable and commonly existed in foodstuffs. In this work, upconversion luminescent-magnetic microbeads (UCLMMs) -based cytometric bead array for OTA detection with a less reagent consumption and high sensitivity has been established and optimized. In UCLMMs, upconversion nanocrystals (UCNs) for optical code present a weak background noise and no spectral cross talk between the encoding signals and target labels under two excitation conditions to improve detection sensitivity. While the superparamagnetic Fe_3O_4 nanoparticles (Fe_3O_4 NPs) aim for rapid analysis. The results show that the developed method has a sensitivity of 9.553 ppt below HPLC with a 50-μL sample and can be completed in <2 h with good accuracy and high reproducibility. Therefore, different colors of UCLMMs will become a promising assay platform for multiple mycotoxins after further improvement.

  5. Investigation on the use of graphene oxide as novel surfactant to stabilize weakly charged graphene nanoplatelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazi, Salim Newaz; Badarudin, Ahmad; Zubir, Mohd Nashrul Mohd; Ming, Huang Nay; Misran, Misni; Sadeghinezhad, Emad; Mehrali, Mohammad; Syuhada, Nur Ily

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a unique synergistic behavior between a graphene oxide (GO) and graphene nanoplatelet (GnP) composite in an aqueous medium. The results showed that GO stabilized GnP colloid near its isoelectric point and prevented rapid agglomeration and sedimentation. It was considered that a rarely encountered charge-dependent electrostatic interaction between the highly charged GO and weakly charged GnP particles kept GnP suspended at its rapid coagulation and phase separation pH. Sedimentation and transmission electron microscope (TEM) micrograph images revealed the evidence of highly stable colloidal mixtures while zeta potential measurement provided semi-quantitative explanation on the mechanism of stabilization. GnP suspension was confirmed via UV-vis spectral data while contact angle measurement elucidated the close resemblance to an aqueous solution indicating the ability of GO to mediate the flocculation prone GnP colloids. About a tenfold increase in viscosity was recorded at a low shear rate in comparison to an individual GO solution due to a strong interaction manifested between participating colloids. An optimum level of mixing ratio between the two constituents was also obtained. These new findings related to an interaction between charge-based graphitic carbon materials would open new avenues for further exploration on the enhancement of both GO and GnP functionalities particularly in mechanical and electrical domains.

  6. Hydrothermal synthesis of Gd2O3:Eu3+ nanophosphors: Effect of surfactant on structural and luminescence properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhananjaya, N.; Nagabhushana, H.; Sharma, S.C.; Rudraswamy, B.; Shivakumara, C.; Nagabhushana, B.M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Gd(OH) 3 :Eu 3+ , GdOOH:Eu 3+ and Gd 2 O 3 :Eu 3+ phases were prepared by hydrothermal method. • Phosphors were well characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM, Raman, UV–Vis, FT-IR. • Cubic Gd 2 O 3 :Eu 3+ show intense red emission, which was highly useful for photonics application. • HDA surfactant plays an important role in conversion of cubic to hexagonal phases. -- Abstract: Various morphologies of Eu 3+ activated gadolinium oxide have been prepared by hydrothermal method using hexadecylamine (HDA) as surfactant at different experimental conditions. The powder X-ray diffraction studies reveal as-formed product is hexagonal Gd(OH) 3 :Eu 3+ phase and subsequent heat treatment at 350 and 600 °C transforms to monoclinic GdOOH:Eu 3+ and cubic Gd 2 O 3 :Eu 3+ phases respectively. SEM pictures of without surfactant show irregular shaped rods along with flakes. However, in the presence of HDA surfactant, the particles are converted into rods of various sizes. The temperature dependent morphological evolution of Gd 2 O 3 :Eu 3+ without and with HDA surfactant is studied. TEM micrographs of Gd(OH) 3 :Eu 3+ sample with HDA confirms smooth nanorods with various diameters in the range 20–100 nm. FTIR studies reveal that HDA surfactant plays an important role in conversion of cubic to hexagonal phases. Among these three phases, cubic phase Gd 2 O 3 :Eu 3+ (λ ex = 254 nm) show red emission at 612 nm corresponding to 5 D 0 → 7 F 2 and is more efficient host than the monoclinic counterpart. The band gap for hexagonal Gd(OH) 3 :Eu 3+ is more when compared to monoclinic GdOOH:Eu 3+ and cubic Gd 2 O 3 :Eu 3+

  7. Preparation and photophysical properties of luminescent nanoparticles based on lanthanide doped fluorides (LaF3:Ce3+, Gd3+, Eu3+), obtained in the presence of different surfactants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Runowski, Marcin; Lis, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Synthesis of nanocrystalline lanthanide fluorides doped with Eu 3+ ions. • Inorganic nanomaterials exhibiting bright red luminescence. • Luminescence enhancement by energy transfer (ET) from Ce 3+ → Gd 3+ to Eu 3+ ions. • Decreased agglomeration and morphology control using organic modifiers/surfactants. • Absolute and relative quantum yield (QY) comparison. - Abstract: A series of nanomaterials composed of LaF 3 :Ce 3+ 10%, Gd 3+ 30%, Eu 3+ 1% was synthesized via a facile co-precipitation approach. The reaction between appropriate lanthanide (Ln 3+ ) and fluoride ions resulted in the formation of crystalline, Ln 3+ doped fluorides and was performed in the presence of a series of organic modifiers, acting as surfactants and anti-agglomeration agents. Modifiers such as polyacrylic acid (PAA), ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), citric acid and oleylamine most significantly influenced the morphology and spectroscopic properties of the products. The product obtained in the presence of PAA was composed of the smallest nanoparticles (ca. 5–6 nm), with narrow size/shape distribution. All fluorides synthesized exhibited intensive, bright red luminescence under UV irradiation (λ ex ≈ 250 nm), because of the presence of Eu 3+ ions in their structure. The efficient intensity of luminescence was a result of indirect excitation, via energy transfer (ET) phenomena occurring in the system (Ce 3+ → Gd 3+ → Eu 3+ ). The structure and morphology of the obtained nanomaterials were established by powder X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) measurements. Optical properties of the obtained compounds were studied and discussed on the basis of excitation emission spectra and luminescence decay curves. On the basis of the performed measurements, luminescence quantum yield (absolute and relative) and radiative lifetimes were calculated and analyzed. FT-IR spectroscopy was applied to examine the presence of molecules of

  8. Synthesis of low-oxide blue luminescent alkyl-functionalized silicon nanoparticles with no nitrogen containing surfactant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Jason A.; Ashby, Shane P.; Huld, Frederik; Pennycook, Timothy J.; Chao, Yimin

    2015-01-01

    Of ever growing interest in the fields of physical chemistry and materials science, silicon nanoparticles show a great deal of potential. Methods for their synthesis are, however, often hazardous, expensive or otherwise impractical. In the literature, there is a safe, fast and cheap inverse micelle-based method for the production of alkyl-functionalized blue luminescent silicon nanoparticles, which nonetheless found limitations, due to undesirable Si-alkoxy and remaining Si–H functionalization. In the following work, these problems are addressed, whereby an optimisation of the reaction mechanism encourages more desirable capping, and the introduction of alcohol is replaced by the use of anhydrous copper (II) chloride. The resulting particles, when compared with their predecessors through a myriad of spectroscopic techniques, are shown to have greatly reduced levels of ‘undesirable’ capping, with a much lower surface oxide level; whilst also maintaining long-term air stability, strong photoluminescence and high yields

  9. Synthesis of low-oxide blue luminescent alkyl-functionalized silicon nanoparticles with no nitrogen containing surfactant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Jason A.; Ashby, Shane P.; Huld, Frederik [University of East Anglia, School of Chemistry (United Kingdom); Pennycook, Timothy J. [SuperSTEM Laboratory, STFC Daresbury Campus (United Kingdom); Chao, Yimin, E-mail: y.chao@uea.ac.uk [University of East Anglia, School of Chemistry (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-15

    Of ever growing interest in the fields of physical chemistry and materials science, silicon nanoparticles show a great deal of potential. Methods for their synthesis are, however, often hazardous, expensive or otherwise impractical. In the literature, there is a safe, fast and cheap inverse micelle-based method for the production of alkyl-functionalized blue luminescent silicon nanoparticles, which nonetheless found limitations, due to undesirable Si-alkoxy and remaining Si–H functionalization. In the following work, these problems are addressed, whereby an optimisation of the reaction mechanism encourages more desirable capping, and the introduction of alcohol is replaced by the use of anhydrous copper (II) chloride. The resulting particles, when compared with their predecessors through a myriad of spectroscopic techniques, are shown to have greatly reduced levels of ‘undesirable’ capping, with a much lower surface oxide level; whilst also maintaining long-term air stability, strong photoluminescence and high yields.

  10. Surfactant mediated hydrothermal synthesis, characterization and luminescent properties of GdPO{sub 4}: Ce{sup 3+}/Tb{sup 3+} @ GdPO{sub 4} core shell nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khajuria, Heena; Ladol, Jigmet; Khajuria, Sonika; Shah, Mohd Syed; Sheikh, H.N., E-mail: hnsheikh@rediffmail.com

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Core shell nanorods were synthesised by surfactant assisted hydrothermal method. • Morphology of core shell nanorods resembles those of core nanorods indicating coating of shell on cores. • More uniform and non-aggregated core shell nanorods were prepared in presence of surfactants. • Surfactant assisted prepared core shell nanorods show intense emission as compared to uncoated core nanorods. - Abstract: Core shell GdPO{sub 4}: Ce{sup 3+}/Tb{sup 3+} @ GdPO{sub 4} nanorods were synthesized via hydrothermal route in the presence of different surfactants [cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) and Sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS)]. The nanorods were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and photoluminescence (PL) studies. The X-ray diffraction results indicate good crystallinity and effective doping in core and core shell nanorods. SEM and TEM micrographs show that all of the as prepared gadolinium phosphate products have rod like shape. The compositional analysis of GdPO{sub 4}: Ce{sup 3+}/Tb{sup 3+} core was done by EDS. The emission intensity of the GdPO{sub 4}: Ce{sup 3+}/Tb{sup 3+} @ GdPO{sub 4} core shell increased significantly with respect to those of GdPO{sub 4}: Ce{sup 3+}/Tb{sup 3+} core nanorods. The effect of surfactant on the uniformity, thickness and luminescence of the core shell nanorods was investigated.

  11. Hydrothermal synthesis of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+} nanophosphors: Effect of surfactant on structural and luminescence properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhananjaya, N., E-mail: dhanu.siri@yahoo.co.in [B.S. Narayan Centre of Excellence for Advanced Materials, B.M.S. Institute of Technology, Bangalore 560 064 (India); Department of Physics, B.M.S. Institute of Technology, Bangalore 560 064 (India); Nagabhushana, H., E-mail: bhushanvlc@gmail.com [Prof. C.N.R. Rao Centre for Advanced Materials, Tumkur University, Tumkur 572 103 (India); Sharma, S.C. [B.S. Narayan Centre of Excellence for Advanced Materials, B.M.S. Institute of Technology, Bangalore 560 064 (India); Department of Mechanical Engineering, B.M.S. Institute of Technology, Bangalore 560 064 (India); Rudraswamy, B. [Department of Physics, J.B. Campus, Bangalore University, Bangalore 560 056 (India); Shivakumara, C. [Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India); Nagabhushana, B.M. [Department of Chemistry, M.S. Ramaiah Institute of Technology, Bangalore 560 054 (India)

    2014-02-25

    Highlights: • Gd(OH){sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+}, GdOOH:Eu{sup 3+} and Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+} phases were prepared by hydrothermal method. • Phosphors were well characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM, Raman, UV–Vis, FT-IR. • Cubic Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+} show intense red emission, which was highly useful for photonics application. • HDA surfactant plays an important role in conversion of cubic to hexagonal phases. -- Abstract: Various morphologies of Eu{sup 3+} activated gadolinium oxide have been prepared by hydrothermal method using hexadecylamine (HDA) as surfactant at different experimental conditions. The powder X-ray diffraction studies reveal as-formed product is hexagonal Gd(OH){sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+} phase and subsequent heat treatment at 350 and 600 °C transforms to monoclinic GdOOH:Eu{sup 3+} and cubic Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+} phases respectively. SEM pictures of without surfactant show irregular shaped rods along with flakes. However, in the presence of HDA surfactant, the particles are converted into rods of various sizes. The temperature dependent morphological evolution of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+} without and with HDA surfactant is studied. TEM micrographs of Gd(OH){sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+} sample with HDA confirms smooth nanorods with various diameters in the range 20–100 nm. FTIR studies reveal that HDA surfactant plays an important role in conversion of cubic to hexagonal phases. Among these three phases, cubic phase Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+} (λ{sub ex} = 254 nm) show red emission at 612 nm corresponding to {sup 5}D{sub 0} → {sup 7}F{sub 2} and is more efficient host than the monoclinic counterpart. The band gap for hexagonal Gd(OH){sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+} is more when compared to monoclinic GdOOH:Eu{sup 3+} and cubic Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+}.

  12. Nonionic surfactant-assisted hydrothermal synthesis of YVO4:Eu3+ powders in a wide pH range and their luminescent properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Juan; Hojamberdiev, Mirabbos; Xu Yunhua; Peng Jianhong

    2011-01-01

    YVO 4 :Eu 3+ powders with different morphologies were fabricated by a simple hydrothermal method at 180 deg. C for 24 h in a wide pH range with the assistance of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as a nonionic surfactant. The as-synthesized samples were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL). The obtained results showed that the pH value of synthesis solution played a key role in the formation of final products with different morphologies, such as, microspheres, irregular microspheres with grain-like nanoparticles, stone-like structures with regular short nanorods, and smooth rhombohedrons. The PL measurements revealed that the emission intensity of the samples was first decreased, and then increased with increasing the pH value due mainly to the increase in crystallinity and decrease in surface defects.

  13. Surfactant-assisted sacrificial template-mediated synthesis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopyand photoluminescence studies. Influence of surfactant and solvents on morphology and luminescence of the final product in sacrificial template-assisted method has been investigated in detail.

  14. Silica nanoparticles with a substrate switchable luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bochkova, O D; Mustafina, A R; Fedorenko, S V; Konovalov, A I

    2011-01-01

    Silica nanoparticles with visible (Tb and Ru doped), near IR (Yb doped) and dual visible-near IR luminescence (Ru-Yb doped) were obtained by reverse w/o microemulsion procedure. Plenty of luminescent complexes (from 4900 to 10000) encapsulated into each nanoparticle ensures the intensive luminescence of nanoparticles and their applicability as biomarkers. The silica surface decoration by definite anchor groups is the required step for the gaining to these nanoparticles marking and sensing functions. Thus covalent and non-covalent surface modification of these nanoparticles was developed to provide the binding with biotargets and sensing of anions. The dicationic surfactant coating of negatively charged Tb(III)-TCAS doped silica nanoparticles was chosen as the basis for the anion responsible system. The reversible insertion of the quenching anions (namely phenol red) into the surfactant based layer at the surface of luminescent nanoparticles switches off the Tb-centered luminescence. In turn the reversible reestablishment of the luminescence results from the competitive insertion of the non-quenching anions into the surfactant layer at the silica/water interface. The hydrophobic anions exemplified by dodecylsulfates versus hydrophilic ones (hydrophosphates) are preferable in the competition with phenol red anions.

  15. Luminescence nanothermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaque, Daniel; Vetrone, Fiorenzo

    2012-07-01

    The current status of luminescence nanothermometry is reviewed in detail. Based on the main parameters of luminescence including intensity, bandwidth, bandshape, polarization, spectral shift and lifetime, we initially describe and compare the different classes of luminescence nanothermometry. Subsequently, the various luminescent materials used in each case are discussed and the mechanisms at the root of the luminescence thermal sensitivity are described. The most important results obtained in each case are summarized and the advantages and disadvantages of these approaches are discussed.The current status of luminescence nanothermometry is reviewed in detail. Based on the main parameters of luminescence including intensity, bandwidth, bandshape, polarization, spectral shift and lifetime, we initially describe and compare the different classes of luminescence nanothermometry. Subsequently, the various luminescent materials used in each case are discussed and the mechanisms at the root of the luminescence thermal sensitivity are described. The most important results obtained in each case are summarized and the advantages and disadvantages of these approaches are discussed. This work was supported by the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid and Comunidad Autónoma de Madrid (Project S2009/MAT-1756), by the Spanish Ministerio de Educacion y Ciencia (MAT2010-16161) and by Caja Madrid Foundation.

  16. Luminescence dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieser, U.

    2009-01-01

    The luminescence techniques have evolved over the last 40 years to a powerful dating instrument in archaeology and geoscience. Depending on how the luminescence is stimulated, one distinguishes the phenomena of thermoluminescence (TL), optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL). Each of these phenomena has its specific potential for dating various archaeological materals in the time range from medieval back to palaeolithic periods, or, speaking in geological terms, for dating of Holocene and late Pleistocene objects. The OSL and IRSL techniques are sometimes treated together as 'optical dating'. The luminescence techniques differ from other major dating techniques, such as 14 C, essentially by their applicability to inorganic materials, their wide age-range from about 100 years to more than 100,000 years and the kind of datable events which are the last exposure to heat or to light. (author). 10 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Luminescence dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieser, U.

    2008-01-01

    The luminescence techniques have evolved over the last 40 years to a powerful dating instrument in archaeology and geoscience. Depending on how the luminescence is stimulated, one distinguishes the phenomena of thermoluminescence (TL), optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL). Each of these phenomena has its specific potential for dating various archaeological materals in the time range from medieval back to palaeolithic periods, or, speaking in geological terms, for dating of Holocene and late Pleistocene objects. The OSL and IRSL techniques are sometimes treated together as 'optical dating'. The luminescence techniques differ from other major dating techniques, such as 14 C, essentially by their applicability to inorganic materials, their wide age-range from about 100 years to more than 100,000 years and the kind of datable events which are the last exposure to heat or to light. (author). 10 refs., 3 figs

  18. Luminescence dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieser, U.

    2012-01-01

    The luminescence techniques have evolved over the last 40 years to a powerful dating instrument in archaeology and geoscience. Depending on how the luminescence is stimulated, one distinguishes the phenomena of thermoluminescence (TL), optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL). Each of these phenomena has its specific potential for dating various archaeological materials in the time range from medieval back to palaeolithic periods, or, speaking in geological terms, for dating of Holocene and late Pleistocene objects. The OSL and IRSL techniques are sometimes treated together as 'optical dating'. The luminescence techniques differ from other major dating techniques, such as 14 C, essentially by their applicability to inorganic materials, their wide age-range from about 100 years to more than 100,000 years and the kind of datable events which are the last exposure to heat or to light. (author). 10 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Luminescence dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieser, U.

    2009-01-01

    The luminescence techniques have evolved over the last 40 years to a powerful dating instrument in archaeology and geoscience. Depending on how the luminescence is stimulated, one distinguishes the phenomena of thermoluminescence (TL), optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL). Each of these phenomena has its specific potential for dating various archaeological materals in the time range from medieval back to palaeolithic periods, or, speaking in geological terms, for dating of Holocene and late Pleistocene objects. The OSL and IRSL techniques are sometimes treated together as 'optical dating'. The luminescence techniques differ from other major dating techniques, such as 14 C, essentially by their applicability to inorganic materials, their wide age-range from about 100 years to more than 100,000 years and the kind of datable events which are the last exposure to heat or to light. (author). 10 refs., 3 figs

  20. Luminescence dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieser, U.

    2013-01-01

    The luminescence techniques have evolved over the last 40 years to a powerful dating instrument in archaeology and geoscience. Depending on how the luminescence is stimulated, one distinguishes the phenomena of thermoluminescence (TL), optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL). Each of these phenomena has its specific potential for dating various archaeological materials in the time range from medieval back to palaeolithic periods, or, speaking in geological terms, for dating of Holocene and late Pleistocene objects. The OSL and IRSL techniques are sometimes treated together as 'optical dating'. The luminescence techniques differ from other major dating techniques, such as 14 C, essentially by their applicability to inorganic materials, their wide age-range from about 100 years to more than 100,000 years and the kind of datable events which are the last exposure to heat or to light. (author). 10 refs., 3 figs.

  1. Silica micro- and nanoparticles reduce the toxicity of surfactant solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos, Francisco; Fernández-Arteaga, Alejandro; Fernández-Serrano, Mercedes; Jurado, Encarnación; Lechuga, Manuela

    2018-04-20

    In this work, the toxicity of hydrophilic fumed silica micro- and nanoparticles of various sizes (7 nm, 12 nm, and 50 μm) was evaluated using the luminescent bacteria Vibrio fischeri. In addition, the toxicity of an anionic surfactant solution (ether carboxylic acid), a nonionic surfactant solution (alkyl polyglucoside), and a binary (1:1) mixture of these solutions all containing these silica particles was evaluated. Furthermore, this work discusses the adsorption of surfactants onto particle surfaces and evaluates the effects of silica particles on the surface tension and critical micellar concentration (CMC) of these anionic and nonionic surfactants. It was determined that silica particles can be considered as non-toxic and that silica particles reduce the toxicity of surfactant solutions. Nevertheless, the toxicity reduction depends on the ionic character of the surfactants. Differences can be explained by the different adsorption behavior of surfactants onto the particle surface, which is weaker for nonionic surfactants than for anionic surfactants. Regarding the effects on surface tension, it was found that silica particles increased the surface activity of anionic surfactants and considerably reduced their CMC, whereas in the case of nonionic surfactants, the effects were reversed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Uranyl fluoride luminescence in acidic aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beitz, J.V.; Williams, C.W.

    1996-01-01

    Luminescence emission spectra and decay rates are reported for uranyl species in acidic aqueous solutions containing HF or added NaF. The longest luminescence lifetime, 0.269 ± 0.006 ms, was observed from uranyl in 1 M HF + 1 M HClO 4 at 296 K and decreased with increasing temperature. Based on a luminescence dynamics model that assumes equilibrium among electronically excited uranyl fluoride species and free fluoride ion, this long lived uranyl luminescence in aqueous solution is attributed primarily to UO 2 F 2 . Studies on the effect of added LiNO 3 or Na 2 WO 4 ·2H 2 O showed relatively weak quenching of uranyl fluoride luminescence which suggests that high sensitivity determination of the UF 6 content of WF 6 gas should be feasible via uranyl luminescence analysis of hydrolyzed gas samples of impure WF 6

  3. luminescence properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1Faculty of Science and Arts, Department of Chemistry, Bozok University, Yozgat 66900, Turkey. 2Faculty of Science, Department of Chemistry, Erciyes ... synthesized by the conventional solid-state reaction method, their crystal structures and luminescence properties were investigated. X-ray diffraction patterns (XRD) ...

  4. Luminescence enhancement of uranyl ion by benzoic acid in acetonitrile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satendra Kumar; Maji, S.; Joseph, M.; Sankaran, K.

    2014-01-01

    Uranyl ion is known for its characteristic green luminescence and therefore luminescence spectroscopy is a suitable technique for characterizing different uranyl species. In aqueous medium, luminescence of uranyl ion is generally weak due to its quenching by water molecules and therefore in order to enhance the luminescence of uranyl ion in aqueous medium, luminescence enhancing reagents such as H 3 PO 4 , H 2 SO 4 , HCIO 4 have been widely used. The other method to enhance the uranyl luminescence is by ligand sensitized luminescence, a method well established for lanthanides. In this work, luminescence of uranyl ion is found to be enhanced by benzoic acid in acetonitrile medium. In aqueous medium benzoic acid does not enhance the uranyl luminescence although it forms 1:1 and 1:2 complexes with uranyl ion. Luminescence spectra of uranyl benzoate revealed that enhancement is due to sensitization of uranyl luminescence by benzoate ions. UV-Vis spectroscopy has been utilized to characterize the specie formed in the in acetonitrile medium. UV-Vis spectroscopy along with luminescence spectra revealed that the specie to be tribenzoate complex of uranyl (UO 2 (C 6 H 5 COO) 3 ) - having D 3 h symmetry. (author)

  5. Luminescent screens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, C.-I.

    1982-01-01

    Luminescent screens which are useful for such purposes as intensifying screens for radiographs are comprised of a support bearing a layer of finely divided particles of a phosphor dispersed in a cross-linked polymeric matrix formed by heat-curing of a coating composition comprising an unsaturated cross-linkable polymer, a polymerizable acrylic monomer, a thermoplastic polyurethane elastomer, and a heat-activatable polymerization initiator. The phosphor layer includes voids formed by evaporation of an evaporable component which is present in the coating composition from which such layer is formed. (author)

  6. Microemulsion mediated synthesis of triangular shape SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles: Luminescence application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luwang, Meitram Niraj, E-mail: mn.luwang@ncl.res.in

    2014-01-30

    The triangular prism shapes of SnO{sub 2}·xH{sub 2}O nanoparticles are prepared using microemulsion route. The effect of variation of water pool value on the formation of SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles was studied. There is the quantum size effect in absorption study of SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles. With the increase of the water pool value, there is a decrease in the band edge absorption energy suggesting the weak quantum confinement effect (QCE) in SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles. Quenching effect increases with increase of water to surfactant ratio in luminescence. There is no significant effect in lifetime values for SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles in both microemulsion and powder form. SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles show green emission due to oxygen vacancy. SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles when doped with Eu{sup 3+} ions give the enhanced luminescence of Eu{sup 3+} due to the surface mediated energy transfer from SnO{sub 2} to Eu{sup 3+} ion.

  7. Microemulsion mediated synthesis of triangular shape SnO2 nanoparticles: Luminescence application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luwang, Meitram Niraj

    2014-01-01

    The triangular prism shapes of SnO 2 ·xH 2 O nanoparticles are prepared using microemulsion route. The effect of variation of water pool value on the formation of SnO 2 nanoparticles was studied. There is the quantum size effect in absorption study of SnO 2 nanoparticles. With the increase of the water pool value, there is a decrease in the band edge absorption energy suggesting the weak quantum confinement effect (QCE) in SnO 2 nanoparticles. Quenching effect increases with increase of water to surfactant ratio in luminescence. There is no significant effect in lifetime values for SnO 2 nanoparticles in both microemulsion and powder form. SnO 2 nanoparticles show green emission due to oxygen vacancy. SnO 2 nanoparticles when doped with Eu 3+ ions give the enhanced luminescence of Eu 3+ due to the surface mediated energy transfer from SnO 2 to Eu 3+ ion.

  8. Gemini surfactant for fluorescent and stable quantum dots in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Haibing [Key Laboratory of Pesticide and Chemical Biology (CCNU), Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Wang Xiaoqiong [Key Laboratory of Pesticide and Chemical Biology (CCNU), Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Gao Zhinong [Department of Chemistry, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); He Zhike [Department of Chemistry, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2007-05-23

    Highly fluorescent and stable CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots (QDs) coated with gemini surfactant are successfully synthesized in aqueous media. Analyses of luminescence spectrometry, ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectrophotometry, and transmission electron micrographs (TEMs) indicate that the water-soluble QDs are monodisperse and have a luminescence enhancement compared with the original hydrophobic QDs. The water-soluble QDs coated with gemini surfactant are shown to be biocompatible, photostable, and have been proven to be suitable for live cell imaging.

  9. Gemini surfactant for fluorescent and stable quantum dots in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Haibing; Wang Xiaoqiong; Gao Zhinong; He Zhike

    2007-01-01

    Highly fluorescent and stable CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots (QDs) coated with gemini surfactant are successfully synthesized in aqueous media. Analyses of luminescence spectrometry, ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectrophotometry, and transmission electron micrographs (TEMs) indicate that the water-soluble QDs are monodisperse and have a luminescence enhancement compared with the original hydrophobic QDs. The water-soluble QDs coated with gemini surfactant are shown to be biocompatible, photostable, and have been proven to be suitable for live cell imaging

  10. Feldspar, Infrared Stimulated Luminescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Mayank

    2014-01-01

    This entry primarily concerns the characteristics and the origins of infrared-stimulated luminescence in feldspars.......This entry primarily concerns the characteristics and the origins of infrared-stimulated luminescence in feldspars....

  11. Surfactants in tribology

    CERN Document Server

    Biresaw, Girma

    2014-01-01

    Surface science and tribology play very critical roles in many industries. Manufacture and use of almost all consumer and industrial products rely on the application of advanced surface and tribological knowledge. The fourth in a series, Surfactants in Tribology, Volume 4 provides an update on research and development activities connecting surfactants and tribological phenomena. Written by renowned subject matter experts, the book demonstrates how improved design of surfactants can be harnessed to control tribological phenomena. Profusely illustrated and copiously referenced, the chapters also

  12. Co-precipitation synthesis and upconversion luminescence ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... light: strong green (539 nm), weak red (670 nm) and near-infrared (760 nm). The upconversion luminescence is based on two-photon absorption by the energy transfer from the donor (Yb3+) to the acceptor (Ho3+). All the results indicate that ZrO2:Yb3+-Ho3+ phosphors could be a promising biological labelling material.

  13. Europium enabled luminescent nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syamchand, S.S., E-mail: syamchand.ss@gmail.com; Sony, G., E-mail: emailtosony@gmail.com

    2015-09-15

    Lanthanide based nanoparticles are receiving great attention ought to their excellent luminescent and magnetic properties and find challenging biomedical applications. Among the luminescent lanthanide NPs, europium based NPs (Eu-NPs) are better candidates for immunoassay and imaging applications. The Eu-NPs have an edge over quantum dots (QDs) by means of their stable luminescence, long fluorescence lifetime, sharp emission peaks with narrow band width, lack of blinking and biocompatibility. This review surveys the synthesis and properties of a variety of Eu-NPs consolidated from different research articles, for their applications in medicine and biology. The exquisite luminescent properties of Eu-NPs are explored for developing biomedical applications such as immunoassay and bioimaging including multimodal imaging. The biomedical applications of Eu-NPs are mostly diagnostic in nature and mainly focus on various key analytes present in biological systems. The luminescent properties of europium enabled NPs are influenced by a number of factors such as the site symmetry, the metal nanoparticles, metal ions, quantum dots, surfactants, morphology of Eu-NPs, crystal defect, phenomena like antenna effect and physical parameters like temperature. Through this review we explore and assimilate all the factors which affect the luminescence in Eu-NPs and coil a new thread of parameters that control the luminescence in Eu-NPs, which would provide further insight in developing Eu-based nanoprobes for future biomedical prospects. - Highlights: • The review describes 14 major factors that influence the luminescence properties of europium enabled luminescent nanoparticles (Eu-NPs). • Surveys different types of europium containing nanoparticles that have been reported for their biomedical applications. • Eu-NPs are conveniently divided into four different categories, based on the type of the substrates involved. The four categories are (1) virgin Eu-substrate based NPs; (2

  14. Europium enabled luminescent nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syamchand, S.S.; Sony, G.

    2015-01-01

    Lanthanide based nanoparticles are receiving great attention ought to their excellent luminescent and magnetic properties and find challenging biomedical applications. Among the luminescent lanthanide NPs, europium based NPs (Eu-NPs) are better candidates for immunoassay and imaging applications. The Eu-NPs have an edge over quantum dots (QDs) by means of their stable luminescence, long fluorescence lifetime, sharp emission peaks with narrow band width, lack of blinking and biocompatibility. This review surveys the synthesis and properties of a variety of Eu-NPs consolidated from different research articles, for their applications in medicine and biology. The exquisite luminescent properties of Eu-NPs are explored for developing biomedical applications such as immunoassay and bioimaging including multimodal imaging. The biomedical applications of Eu-NPs are mostly diagnostic in nature and mainly focus on various key analytes present in biological systems. The luminescent properties of europium enabled NPs are influenced by a number of factors such as the site symmetry, the metal nanoparticles, metal ions, quantum dots, surfactants, morphology of Eu-NPs, crystal defect, phenomena like antenna effect and physical parameters like temperature. Through this review we explore and assimilate all the factors which affect the luminescence in Eu-NPs and coil a new thread of parameters that control the luminescence in Eu-NPs, which would provide further insight in developing Eu-based nanoprobes for future biomedical prospects. - Highlights: • The review describes 14 major factors that influence the luminescence properties of europium enabled luminescent nanoparticles (Eu-NPs). • Surveys different types of europium containing nanoparticles that have been reported for their biomedical applications. • Eu-NPs are conveniently divided into four different categories, based on the type of the substrates involved. The four categories are (1) virgin Eu-substrate based NPs; (2

  15. Dynamic covalent surfactants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minkenberg, C.B.

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis the development of surfactant aggregates with fast exchange dynamics between the aggregated and non-aggregated state is described. Dynamic surfactant exchange plays an important role in natural systems, for instance in cell signaling, cell division, and uptake and release of cargo.

  16. Rupture luminescence from natural fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W.; Haneman, D.

    1999-12-01

    Fibers of cotton and wool, and samples of paper, have been ruptured in tension in vacuum and in air, and give detectable luminescence in the visible range. All have a common emission peak at around 2.0 eV, which is ascribed to the deexcitation of states excited by the rupture of organic chain molecule bonds. Rubber bands give stronger emission in air, but no emission in vacuum, suggesting the material breaks only at weak interchain bonds. Mohair, cat, and horse hair also give emission in air. The phenomena reveal effects that would occur widely in nature.

  17. Weak currents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite Lopes, J.

    1976-01-01

    A survey of the fundamental ideas on weak currents such as CVC and PCAC and a presentation of the Cabibbo current and the neutral weak currents according to the Salam-Weinberg model and the Glashow-Iliopoulos-Miami model are given [fr

  18. Luminescence and energy transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasse, G; Bleijenberg, K C; Powell, R C

    1980-01-01

    This paper deals with the luminescence of uranate centres in solids. The luminescence properties are influenced by the coordination number of the hexavalent uranium ion and by the crystallographic surroundings of the uranate centre. Transitions playing a role in the luminescence processes within the octahedral UO/sub 6//sup 6 -/ group are discussed using the results from both theoretical and experimental studies on another octahedral uranium complex: UF/sub 6/. The luminescence of the octahedral uranate group in oxidic compounds is discussed. Attention is paid to the vibrational structure, which is observed in the luminescence spectra at low temperatures and to the temperature quenching of the luminescence. The temperature quenching of the uranate luminescence in uranium-doped tungstates with ordered perovskite structure can be described in terms of a three state single configurational coordinate diagram. The complicated luminescence spectra of uranium-activated sodium fluoride (NaF-U) crystals have been unraveled using chemical variation of the crystal compositions and using site selective laser excitation techniques. Four different luminescent uranate centres have been observed in NaF-U. A model for the configurations of the luminescent centres has been deduced using the results from ionic conductivity experiments.

  19. Pulmonary surfactant and lung transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erasmus, Michiel Elardus

    1997-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant lowers the surface tension at the air-water interface inside the alveolus. This is achieved by adsorption of surfactant phospholipids at the air-water interface, a process controlled by surfactant-associated proteins, such as SP-A. In this way, surfactant prevents collapse of

  20. Acute toxicity of anionic and non-ionic surfactants to aquatic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechuga, M; Fernández-Serrano, M; Jurado, E; Núñez-Olea, J; Ríos, F

    2016-03-01

    The environmental risk of surfactants requires toxicity measurements. As different test organisms have different sensitivity to the toxics, it is necessary to establish the most appropriate organism to classify the surfactant as very toxic, toxic, harmful or safe, in order to establish the maximum permissible concentrations in aquatic ecosystems. We have determined the toxicity values of various anionic surfactants ether carboxylic derivatives using four test organisms: the freshwater crustacean Daphnia magna, the luminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri, the microalgae Selenastrum capricornutum (freshwater algae) and Phaeodactylum tricornutum (seawater algae). In addition, in order to compare and classify the different families of surfactants, we have included a compilation of toxicity data of surfactants collected from literature. The results indicated that V. fischeri was more sensitive to the toxic effects of the surfactants than was D. magna or the microalgae, which was the least sensitive. This result shows that the most suitable toxicity assay for surfactants may be the one using V. fischeri. The toxicity data revealed considerable variation in toxicity responses with the structure of the surfactants regardless of the species tested. The toxicity data have been related to the structure of the surfactants, giving a mathematical relationship that helps to predict the toxic potential of a surfactant from its structure. Model-predicted toxicity agreed well with toxicity values reported in the literature for several surfactants previously studied. Predictive models of toxicity is a handy tool for providing a risk assessment that can be useful to establish the toxicity range for each surfactant and the different test organisms in order to select efficient surfactants with a lower impact on the aquatic environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Weak decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojcicki, S.

    1978-11-01

    Lectures are given on weak decays from a phenomenological point of view, emphasizing new results and ideas and the relation of recent results to the new standard theoretical model. The general framework within which the weak decay is viewed and relevant fundamental questions, weak decays of noncharmed hadrons, decays of muons and the tau, and the decays of charmed particles are covered. Limitation is made to the discussion of those topics that either have received recent experimental attention or are relevant to the new physics. (JFP) 178 references

  2. Goldenphilicity: Luminescent gold compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sansores, L.E.

    2002-01-01

    In the solids and molecules different types of bonds are presented depending on the involved atoms, covalent bonds are common among elements of open shell, where more bond orbitals are filled than anti bond orbitals. It is expected that ionic bonds among closed shell atoms which have charges of opposite sign. Bonds type Van der Waals are presented among molecules which have a bipolar moment. It would not be expected bonds among zero charge species, or more generally with the same nominal charge and in any case the attractive forces would be very small. In fact it is expected that two metallic cations to be repelled each other. There recently is evidence that in organic or organometallic compounds could exist attractive interactions between two cations of the d 8 -d 10 -s 2 families. These bonds are weak but stronger than those of Van der Waals. They are compared with the hydrogen bonds. In this work it was reviewed some examples in which the goldenphilicity plays an important role in the luminescence that the gold complexes present. Examples of mono, bi and trinuclear and the structures that these organometallic compounds could take are examined. (Author)

  3. Weak interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogava, S.; Savada, S.; Nakagava, M.

    1983-01-01

    The problem of the use of weak interaction laws to study models of elementary particles is discussed. The most typical examples of weak interaction is beta-decay of nucleons and muons. Beta-interaction is presented by quark currents in the form of universal interaction of the V-A type. Universality of weak interactions is well confirmed using as examples e- and μ-channels of pion decay. Hypothesis on partial preservation of axial current is applicable to the analysis of processes with pion participation. In the framework of the model with four flavours lepton decays of hadrons are considered. Weak interaction without lepton participation are also considered. Properties of neutral currents are described briefly

  4. Weak interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanda, R.

    1981-01-01

    The theoretical and experimental evidences to form a basis for Lagrangian Quantum field theory for Weak Interactions are discussed. In this context, gauge invariance aspects of such interactions are showed. (L.C.) [pt

  5. Luminescent beam stop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, Diane; Morton, Simon A.

    2017-10-25

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to beam stops. In one aspect, a device comprises a luminescent material, a beam stop plate, and an optical fiber. The luminescent material is a parallelepiped having a first side and a second side that are squares and having a third side that is a rectangle or a square. The first side and the second side are perpendicular to the third side. The beam stop plate is attached to the first side of the luminescent material. The optical fiber has a first end and a second end, with the first end of the optical fiber attached to the third side of the luminescent material.

  6. Luminescence detection of shellfish

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanderson, D.C.W.; Carmichael, L.A.; Spencer, J.Q.; Naylor, J.D.

    1996-01-01

    The Scottish Universities Research and Reactor Centre (SURRC) has been active in the development and application of luminescence techniques in the detection of irradiated foods, in support of UK legislation. Thermoluminescence (TL), photostimulated luminescence (PSL) and photo-transfer luminescence (PTTL) are radiation-specific phenomena which arise due to energy stored by trapped charge carriers following irradiation. The energy released following stimulation is accompanied by detectable luminescence. The TL method involves preparation of pure silicate extracts from the sample and subsequent TL analysis, whereas PSL uses stimulation by electromagnetic radiation (visible, or near visible wavelengths) thus avoiding heating the sample. (author)

  7. Sub-ppb level detection of uranium using ligand sensitized luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Satendra; Maji, S.; Joseph, M.; Sankaran, K.

    2015-01-01

    Uranyl ion (UO 2 2+ ) is known to exhibit weak luminescence in aqueous medium due to poor molar absorptivity and low quantum yield. In order to enhance the luminescence of uranyl ion in aqueous medium, luminescence enhancing reagents such as H 3 PO 4 , H 2 SO 4 , HClO 4 have been widely used. Like lanthanides, uranyl luminescence can also be sensitized by using some organic ligands. Pyridine 2,6-dicarboxylic acid (PDA) has shown enhancement of luminescence of uranyl in aqueous medium. Enhancement in intensity is due to sensitization of uranyl luminescence by PDA. In order to see the effect of non-aqueous medium, in this work, luminescence of uranyl-PDA complex has been studied in acetonitrile medium. More than one order luminescence enhancement has been observed compared to UO 2 2+ - PDA complex in aqueous medium. The lifetime of uranyl luminescence of the complex in acetonitrile medium is 90 μs which is very high compared to 10 μs in aqueous medium, suggesting that the luminescence enhancement is a result of reduction in non-radiative decay channels in acetonitrile medium. The large enhancement of uranyl luminescence of uranyl-PDA complex in acetonitrile medium can be used for ultra-trace level detection of uranium. Linearity in the luminescence intensity has been observed over the uranium concentration range of 5 to 80 ppb and the detection limit calculated using the criterion of 3 σ is ~ 0.2 ppb. (author)

  8. Weak interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1978-01-01

    Weak interactions are studied from a phenomenological point of view, by using a minimal number of theoretical hypotheses. Charged-current phenomenology, and then neutral-current phenomenology are discussed. This all is described in terms of a global SU(2) symmetry plus an electromagnetic correction. The intermediate-boson hypothesis is introduced and lower bounds on the range of the weak force are inferred. This phenomenology does not yet reconstruct all the predictions of the conventional SU(2)xU(1) gauge theory. To do that requires an additional assumption of restoration of SU(2) symmetry at asymptotic energies

  9. Persistence length of wormlike micelles composed of ionic surfactants: self-consistent-field predictions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lauw, Y.; Leermakers, F.A.M.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    The persistence length of a wormlike micelle composed of ionic surfactants CnEmXk in an aqueous solvent is predicted by means of the self-consistent-field theory where CnEm is the conventional nonionic surfactant and X-k is an additional sequence of k weakly charged (pH-dependent) segments. By

  10. Ecotoxicological characterization of polyoxyethylene glycerol ester non-ionic surfactants and their mixtures with anionic and non-ionic surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos, Francisco; Fernández-Arteaga, Alejandro; Lechuga, Manuela; Fernández-Serrano, Mercedes

    2017-04-01

    This paper reports on a study that investigated the aquatic toxicity of new non-ionic surfactants derived from renewable raw materials, polyoxyethylene glycerol ester (PGE), and their binary mixtures with anionic and non-ionic surfactants. Toxicity of pure PGEs was determined using representative organisms from different trophic levels: luminescent bacteria (Vibrio fischeri), microalgae (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata), and freshwater crustaceans (Daphnia magna). Relationships between toxicity and the structural parameters such as unit of ethylene oxide (EO) and hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB) were evaluated. Critical micellar concentration (CMC) in the conditions of the toxicity test was also determined. It was found that the toxicity of the aqueous solutions of PGE decreased when the number of EO units in the molecule, HLB, and CMC increased. PGEs showed lower CMC in marine medium, and the toxicity to V. ficheri is lower when the CMC was higher. Given their non-polar nature, narcosis was expected to be the primary mode of toxic action of PGEs. For the mixture of surfactants, we observed that the mixtures with PGE that had the higher numbers of EO units were more toxic than the aqueous solutions of pure surfactants. Moreover, we found that concentration addition was the type of action more likely to occur for mixtures of PGE with lower numbers of EO units with non-ionic surfactants (alkylpolyglucoside and fatty alcohol ethoxylate), whereas for the mixture of PGE with lower EO units and anionic surfactant (ether carboxylic derivative), the most common response type was response addition. In case of mixtures involving amphoteric surfactants and PGEs with the higher numbers of EO units, no clear pattern with regard to the mixture toxicity response type could be observed.

  11. Durability and photophysical properties of surfactant-covered porous silicon particles in aqueous suspensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balaguer, M.; Pastor, E.; Matveeva, E.; Chirvony, V.S. [Nanophotonics Technology Center, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Cami de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Bychto, L. [Nanophotonics Technology Center, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Cami de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain); Department of Electronics and Computer Sciences, Koszalin University of Technology, Sniadeckich 2, 75-453 Koszalin (Poland); Atienzar, P.; Miranda, M.A. [Instituto de Tecnologia Quimica CSIC-UPV, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Av. de los Naranjos s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain)

    2008-11-15

    With the aim to impart hydrophilic properties to porous silicon (PSi) containing luminescent Si nanocrystals the PSi surface has been modified by a non-ionic surfactant (undecylenic acid) either physically (by physisorption) or chemically (through Si-C bond). PSi luminescence spectra and reversible quenching of the luminescence by molecular oxygen have been studied as a function of time elapsed after PSi surface immersion in water. The data obtained indicate that Si nanocrystal surface oxidation, which is realized in water, is accompanied by an appearance of a new type of luminescence centres, which are quenched by molecular oxygen differently than free excitons. SiO-related surface states are suggested to be responsible for the observed effect. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  12. Weak light emission of soft tissues induced by heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinelli, Antonello E.; Durando, Giovanni; Boschi, Federico

    2018-04-01

    The main goal of this work is to show that soft tissue interaction with high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) or direct heating leads to a weak light emission detectable using a small animal optical imaging system. Our results show that the luminescence signal is detectable after 30 min of heating, resembling the time scale of delayed luminescence. The imaging of a soft tissue after heating it using an HIFU field shows that the luminescence pattern closely matches the shape of the cone typical of the HIFU beam. We conclude that heating a soft tissue using two different sources leads to the emission of a weak luminescence signal from the heated region with a decay half-life of a few minutes (4 to 6 min). The origin of such light emission needs to be further investigated.

  13. Gemini (dimeric) Surfactants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    is in turn bonded to an identical hydrocarbon tail; alternatively,. ~. Tail spacer ... formed is dependent on surfactant structure, temperature, ionic strength and pH. The models of GS are .... micelle to the air/water interface. Moreover, GS can be ...

  14. Positron-Induced Luminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenson, E. V.; Hergenhahn, U.; Stoneking, M. R.; Pedersen, T. Sunn

    2018-04-01

    We report on the observation that low-energy positrons incident on a phosphor screen produce significantly more luminescence than electrons do. For two different wide-band-gap semiconductor phosphors (ZnS:Ag and ZnO:Zn), we compare the luminescent response to a positron beam with the response to an electron beam. For both phosphors, the positron response is significantly brighter than the electron response, by a factor that depends strongly on incident energy (0-5 keV). Positrons with just a few tens of electron-volts of energy (for ZnS:Ag) or less (for ZnO:Zn) produce as much luminescence as is produced by electrons with several kilo-electron-volts. We attribute this effect to valence band holes and excited electrons produced by positron annihilation and subsequent Auger processes. These results demonstrate a valuable approach for addressing long-standing questions about luminescent materials.

  15. Weak relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Selleri, Franco

    2015-01-01

    Weak Relativity is an equivalent theory to Special Relativity according to Reichenbach’s definition, where the parameter epsilon equals to 0. It formulates a Neo-Lorentzian approach by replacing the Lorentz transformations with a new set named “Inertial Transformations”, thus explaining the Sagnac effect, the twin paradox and the trip from the future to the past in an easy and elegant way. The cosmic microwave background is suggested as a possible privileged reference system. Most importantly, being a theory based on experimental proofs, rather than mutual consensus, it offers a physical description of reality independent of the human observation.

  16. Surfactants from petroleum paraffin wax

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassem, T.M.; Hussein, M.H.; El Sayed, A.S.

    Paraffin wax from Egyptian petroleum was purified and then oxidized to fatty acids which were esterified to form their methyl esters, fractionated and then hydrolysed. The obtained fatty acids were converted into the corresponding primary amines which were converted with ethylene oxide to form nonionic surfactants. The prepared primary amines were also converted into tertiary amines and then converted into cationic surfactants through condensation with benzyl chloride or 1-chloromethylnaphthalene. Also, amine oxide surfactants were prepared by oxidation of the tertiary amines with hydrogen peroxide. The surface active properties of all the prepared surfactants were determined, and the effect of their chemical structure on the surfactant properties are discussed in this paper.

  17. Evaluation of bacterial surfactant toxicity towards petroleum degrading microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Tânia M S; Procópio, Lorena C; Brandão, Felipe D; Leão, Bruna A; Tótola, Marcos R; Borges, Arnaldo C

    2011-02-01

    The acute toxicity of bacterial surfactants LBBMA111A, LBBMA155, LBBMA168, LBBMA191 and LBBMA201 and the synthetic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) on the bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri was evaluated by measuring the reduction of light emission (EC(20)) by this microorganism when exposed to different surfactant concentrations. Moreover, the toxic effects of different concentrations of biological and synthetic surfactants on the growth of pure cultures of isolates Acinetobacter baumannii LBBMA04, Acinetobacter junni LBBMA36, Pseudomonas sp. LBBMA101B and Acinetobacter baumanni LBBMAES11 were evaluated in mineral medium supplemented with glucose. The EC(20) values obtained confirmed that the biosurfactants have a significantly lower toxicity to V. fischeri than the SDS. After 30 min of exposure, bacterial luminescence was almost completely inhibited by SDS at a concentration of 4710 mg L(-1). Growth reduction of pure bacterial cultures caused by the addition of biosurfactants to the growth medium was lower than that caused by SDS. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Photoactivation and perturbation of photoluminescent properties of aqueous ZnS nanoparticles: Probing the surfactant-semiconductor interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, S.K.; Kumar, Sanjay

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The variation in PL emission intensity of growing ZnS NPs during first hour of their growth depends upon the nature of surfactants used for their stabilization. Highlights: ► Photoluminescence (PL) intensity of growing ZnS NPs increases linearly with time. ► Significant PL enhancement in anionic surfactant stabilized ZnS NPs on irradiation. ► PL decay with delay time after removing from UV-irradiation in all the surfactants. ► Better PL stability of ZnS NPs stabilized in anionic surfactants than cationic ones. - Abstract: The in situ photochemistry of aqueous colloidal ZnS has been studied in relation to variety of the surfactants as surface passivating agents. The photoluminescence (PL) intensity of ZnS nanoparticles (NPs) has been drastically enhanced as compared to their bare counterparts due to surface passivation by surfactants depending upon their molecular structure. Cationic surfactants of alkyltrimethylammonium bromide series with different chain lengths (C 16 , C 14 and C 12 ) have been tested. The PL emission of ZnS NPs decreases with decrease in chain length because of ineffective stabilization and passivation of surface because the larger sized NPs were produced in the surfactant with smaller chain length. On the other hand, three anionic surfactants with C 12 chain length with different head groups have been capable of comparatively effective passivation to produce stable NPs with better luminescence. The changing nature of surface states during growth and long time ripening of ZnS NPs has also been monitored by comparing time evolution PL emission in different surfactants. The influence of UV-light irradiation in enhancing the PL emission has been found to be surfactant structure dependent with maximum enhancement observed with the surfactants having π-electrons in their head group functionalities. The anionic surfactants also display better tendency to retain the enhanced PL of ZnS NPs for longer time durations.

  19. Effect of various surfactants on changes in the emission color chromaticity in upconversion YVO4: Yb3+, Er3+ nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woźny, Przemysław; Szczeszak, Agata; Lis, Stefan

    2018-02-01

    YVO4: Yb3+,Er3+ upconverting nanocrystals were synthesized via a hydrothermal method using different compounds as surfactants. Structure and morphology of the nanocrystals were investigated by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Tetragonal crystal structure of the nanocrystals appeared irrespective of the type of surfactant used. The average crystallite size was estimated by TEM images. The obtained products were composed of small nanoparticles, in the size range of 10-60 nm, depending on the surfactant used. The morphology of the nanoparticles was also regulated by the type of surfactant. Spectroscopic analysis of the materials obtained was carried out by measuring the emission and excitation spectra and the intensity of luminescence as a function of laser energy and luminescence decays. The nanocrystals prepared exhibited a green upconversion emission attributed to the 2H11/2 → 4I15/2 and 4S3/2 → 4I15/2 transitions of Er3+, under NIR (985 nm) pulse laser irradiation, and their emission lifetimes were in the range 3.84-4.90 μs. On the basis of the spectroscopic investigation, the upconversion mechanism was proposed and chromaticity coordinates were calculated. Surfactants were found to influence on chromaticity of luminescence.

  20. Dust as a surfactant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignatov, A M; Schram, P P J M; Trigger, S A

    2003-01-01

    We argue that dust immersed in a plasma sheath acts as a surfactant. By considering the momentum balance in a plasma sheath, we evaluate the dependence of the plasma surface pressure on the dust density. It is shown that the dust may reduce the surface pressure, giving rise to a sufficiently strong tangential force. The latter is capable of confining the dust layer inside the sheath in the direction perpendicular to the ion flow

  1. MICROBIAL SURFACTANTS. I. GLYCOLIPIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirog T. Р.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The review is devoted to surface-active glycolipids. The general characteristics, the physiological role of the rhamnolipids, trehalose lipids, sophorolipids, mannosylerythritol lipids and their traditional producers — the representatives of the genera Pseudozyma, Pseudomonas, Rhodococcus and Candida are given. The detailed analysis of the chemical structure, the stages of the biosynthesis and the regulation of some low molecular glycolipids are done. The own experimental data concerning the synthesis intensification, the physiological role and the practical use of Rhodococcus erythropolis IMV Ac-5017, Acinetobacter calcoaceticus IMV B-7241 and Nocardia vaccinii IMV B-7405 surfactants, which are a complex of the glyco-, phospho-, amino- and neutral lipids (glycolipids of all strains are presented by trehalose mycolates are summarized. It was found that R. erythropolis IMV Ac-5017, A. calcoaceticus IMV B-7241 and N. vaccinii IMV B-7405 surfactants have protective, antimicrobial and antiadhesive properties. It was shown that R. erythropolis IMV Ac-5017, A. calcoaceticus IMV B-7241 and N. vaccinii IMV B-7405 surfactants preparation of cultural liquid intensified the degradation of oil in water due to the activation of the natural petroleum-oxidizing microflora.

  2. Biodegradability of bacterial surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Tânia M S; Procópio, Lorena C; Brandão, Felipe D; Carvalho, André M X; Tótola, Marcos R; Borges, Arnaldo C

    2011-06-01

    This work aimed at evaluating the biodegradability of different bacterial surfactants in liquid medium and in soil microcosms. The biodegradability of biosurfactants by pure and mixed bacterial cultures was evaluated through CO(2) evolution. Three bacterial strains, Acinetobacter baumanni LBBMA ES11, Acinetobacter haemolyticus LBBMA 53 and Pseudomonas sp. LBBMA 101B, used the biosurfactants produced by Bacillus sp. LBBMA 111A (mixed lipopeptide), Bacillus subtilis LBBMA 155 (lipopeptide), Flavobacterium sp. LBBMA 168 (mixture of flavolipids), Dietzia Maris LBBMA 191(glycolipid) and Arthrobacter oxydans LBBMA 201(lipopeptide) as carbon sources in minimal medium. The synthetic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was also mineralized by these microorganisms, but at a lower rate. CO(2) emitted by a mixed bacterial culture in soil microcosms with biosurfactants was higher than in the microcosm containing SDS. Biosurfactant mineralization in soil was confirmed by the increase in surface tension of the soil aqueous extracts after incubation with the mixed bacterial culture. It can be concluded that, in terms of biodegradability and environmental security, these compounds are more suitable for applications in remediation technologies in comparison to synthetic surfactants. However, more information is needed on structure of biosurfactants, their interaction with soil and contaminants and scale up and cost for biosurfactant production.

  3. Comparison of rSP-C surfactant with natural and synthetic surfactants after late treatment in a rat model of the acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häfner, Dietrich; Germann, Paul-Georg; Hauschke, Dieter

    1998-01-01

    In a previous paper we showed that an SP-C containing surfactant preparation has similar activity as bovine-derived surfactants in a rat lung lavage model of the adult respiratory distress syndrome. In this study surfactant was given ten minutes after the last lavage (early treatment). In the present investigation we were interested how different surfactant preparations behave when they are administered 1 h after the last lavage (late treatment). Four protein containing surfactants (rSP-C surfactant, bLES, Infasurf and Survanta) were compared with three protein-free surfactants (ALEC, Exosurf and the phospholipid (PL) mixture of the rSP-C surfactant termed PL surfactant) with respect to their ability to improve gas exchange in this more stringent model when surfactant is given one hour after the last lavage. For better comparison of the surfactants the doses were related to phospholipids. The surfactants were given at doses of 25, 50 and 100 mg kg−1 body weight. The surfactants were compared to an untreated control group that was only ventilated for the whole experimental period. Tracheotomized rats (8–12 per dose and surfactant) were pressure-controlled ventilated (Siemens Servo Ventilator 900C) with 100% oxygen at a respiratory rate of 30 breaths min−1, inspiration expiration ratio of 1 : 2, peak inspiratory pressure of 28 cmH2O at positive endexpiratory pressure (PEEP) of 8 cmH2O. Animals were ventilated for one hour after the last lavage and thereafter the surfactants were intratracheally instilled. During the whole experimental period the ventilation was not changed. Partial arterial oxygen pressures (PaO2, mmHg) at 30 min and 120 min after treatment were used for statistical comparison. All protein containing surfactants caused a dose-dependent increase of the reduced PaO2 values at 30 min after treatment. The protein-free surfactants showed only weak dose-dependent increase in PaO2 values at this time. This difference between the

  4. Surfactant-Mediated Growth Revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyerheim, H. L.; Sander, D.; Popescu, R.; Pan, W.; Kirschner, J.; Popa, I.

    2007-01-01

    The x-ray structure analysis of the oxygen-surfactant-mediated growth of Ni on Cu(001) identifies up to 0.15 monolayers of oxygen in subsurface octahedral sites. This questions the validity of the general view that surfactant oxygen floats on top of the growing Ni film. Rather, the surfactant action is ascribed to an oxygen-enriched zone extending over the two topmost layers. Surface stress measurements support this finding. Our results have important implications for the microscopic understanding of surfactant-mediated growth and the change of the magnetic anisotropy of the Ni films

  5. Surfactant phosphatidylcholine metabolism and surfactant function in preterm, ventilated lambs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jobe, A.H.; Ikegami, M.; Seidner, S.R.; Pettenazzo, A.; Ruffini, L.

    1989-01-01

    Preterm lambs were delivered at 138 days gestational age and ventilated for periods up to 24 h in order to study surfactant metabolism and surfactant function. The surfactant-saturated phosphatidylcholine pool in the alveolar wash was 13 +/- 4 mumol/kg and did not change from 10 min to 24 h after birth. Trace amounts of labeled natural sheep surfactant were mixed with fetal lung fluid at birth. By 24 h, 80% of the label had become lung-tissue-associated, yet there was no loss of label from phosphatidylcholine in the lungs when calculated as the sum of the lung tissue plus alveolar wash. De novo synthesized phosphatidylcholine was labeled with choline given by intravascular injection at 1 h of age. Labeled phosphatidylcholine accumulated in the lung tissue linearly to 24 h, and the labeled phosphatidylcholine moved through lamellar body to alveolar pools. The turnover time for alveolar phosphatidylcholine was estimated to be about 13 h, indicating an active metabolic pool. A less surface-active surfactant fraction recovered as a supernatant after centrifugation of the alveolar washes at 40,000 x g increased from birth to 10 min of ventilation, but no subsequent changes in the distribution of surfactant phosphatidylcholine in surfactant fractions occurred. The results were consistent with recycling pathway(s) that maintained surface-active surfactant pools in preterm ventilated lambs

  6. Growth Mechanism of Gold Nanorods in Binary Surfactant System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bo-Mi; Seo, Sun-Hwa; Joe, Ara; Shim, Kyu-Dong; Jang, Eue-Soon [Kumoh National Institute of Technology, Gumi (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    In order to reveal the growth mechanism of gold nanorods (GNRs) in a binary surfactant system, we synthesized various GNRs by changing the concentration of the surfactants, AgNO{sub 3}, and HBr in the growth solution. We found that the benzyldime thylhexadecylammoniumchloride surfactant had weak interaction with the gold ions, but it could reduce the membrane fluidity. In addition, we could dramatically decrease the cetyltrimethylammonium bromide concentration required for GNR growth by adding an HBr solution. Notably, Ag{sup +} ions were necessary to break the symmetry of the seed crystals for GNR growth, but increasing the concentration of Ag{sup +} and Br{sup -} ions caused a decrease in the template size.

  7. Luminescence study of spodumene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotani, S.; Fujii, A.T.; Antonini, R.; Pontuschka, W.M.; Rabani, S.R.; Furtado, W.W.

    1990-02-01

    A comparative study is made of the luminescence of five kinds of spodumene from Minas Gerais, Brazil, studied previously by optical absorption spectroscopy. Natural gemstones are used which, in the course of the experiments, were irradiated with X-rays. (L.C.) [pt

  8. Silicon: electrochemistry and luminescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, Ernst Stefan

    1997-01-01

    The electrochemistry of crystalline and porous silicon and the luminescence from porous silicon has been studied. One chapter deals with a model for the anodic dissolution of silicon in HF solution. In following chapters both the electrochemistry and various ways of generating visible

  9. ADSORPTION OF SURFACTANT ON CLAYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surfactants used to enhance remediation of soils by soil washing are often lost in the process. Neither the amount nor the cause of this loss is known. It is assumed that clays present in the soil are responsible for the loss of the surfactant. In this papere, adsorption prope...

  10. Atrazine and Diuron partitioning within a soil-water-surfactant system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, P.; Keller, A.

    2006-12-01

    The interaction between pesticide and soil and water is even more complex in the presence of surfactants. In this study, batch equilibrium was employed to study the sorption of surfactants and the partitioning behaviors of Atrazine and Diuron within a soil-water-surfactant system. Five soils and four surfactants (nonionic Triton- 100, cationic Benzalkonium Chloride (BC), anionic Linear Alkylbenzenesulfonate (LAS), and anionic Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS)) were used. All surfactant sorption isotherms exhibited an initial linear increase at low surfactant concentrations but reached an asymptotic value as the surfactant concentrations increased. Among the surfactants, BC had the highest sorption onto all soils, followed by Triton-100 and then by LAS and SDS, implying that the nature of the charge significantly influences surfactant sorption. Sorption of either Triton-100 or BC was highly correlated with soil Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC) while that of LAS and SDS was complicated by the presence of Ca2+ and Mg2+ in the aqueous phase and the CEC sites. Both LAS and SDS formed complexes with Ca2+ and Mg2+, resulting in a significant decrease in the detergency of the surfactants. At high surfactant concentrations and with micelles present in the aqueous phase, the micelles formed a more competitive partitioning site for the pesticides, resulting in less pesticide sorbed to the soil. At low Triton-100 and BC concentration, the sorption of the surfactants first resulted in less Atrazine sorption but more Diuron sorption, implying competition between the surfactants and Atrazine, which serves as an indirect evidence that there is a different sorption mechanism for Atrazine. Atrazine is a weak base and it protonates and becomes positively charged near particle surfaces where the pH is much lower than in the bulk solution. The protonated Atrazine may then be held on the CEC sites via electrostatic attraction. Triton-100, LAS and SDS sorbed on the soil showed similar

  11. Effects of surfactant micelles on viscosity and conductivity of poly(ethylene glycol) solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shun-Cheng; Wei, Tzu-Chien; Chen, Wun-Bin; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2004-03-01

    The neutral polymer-micelle interaction is investigated for various surfactants by viscometry and electrical conductometry. In order to exclude the well-known necklace scenario, we consider aqueous solutions of low molecular weight poly(ethylene glycol) (2-20)×103, whose radial size is comparable to or smaller than micelles. The single-tail surfactants consist of anionic, cationic, and nonionic head groups. It is found that the viscosity of the polymer solution may be increased several times by micelles if weak attraction between a polymer segment and a surfactant exists, ɛsurfactant concentration is therefore attributed to the considerable cross links among micelles and polymers (transient network). In addition to substantial alteration of the transport properties, this weak interaction also influences the onset point of thermodynamic instability associated with polymer-surfactant solutions. The examples include the decrease of critical aggregation concentration for ionic surfactant and clouding point for nonionic surfactant due to PEG addition.

  12. MICROBIAL SURFACTANTS IN ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. P. Pirog

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available It was shown literature and own experimental data concerning the use of microbial surface active glycolipids (rhamno-, sophoro- and trehalose lipids and lipopeptides for water and soil purification from oil and other hydrocarbons, removing toxic heavy metals (Cu2+, Cd2+, Ni2+, Pb2+, degradation of complex pollution (oil and other hydrocarbons with heavy metals, and the role of microbial surfactants in phytoremediation processes. The factors that limit the use of microbial surfactants in environmental technologies are discussed. Thus, at certain concentrations biosurfactant can exhibit antimicrobial properties and inhibit microorganisms destructing xenobiotics. Microbial biodegradability of surfactants may also reduce the effectiveness of bioremediation. Development of effective technologies using microbial surfactants should include the following steps: monitoring of contaminated sites to determine the nature of pollution and analysis of the autochthonous microbiota; determining the mode of surfactant introduction (exogenous addition of stimulation of surfactant synthesis by autochthonous microbiota; establishing an optimal concentration of surfactant to prevent exhibition of antimicrobial properties and rapid biodegradation; research both in laboratory and field conditions.

  13. In situ SAXS study on cationic and non-ionic surfactant liquid crystals using synchrotron radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritscher, C; Hüsing, N; Bernstorff, S; Brandhuber, D; Koch, T; Seidler, S; Lichtenegger, H C

    2005-11-01

    In situ synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering was used to investigate various surfactant/water systems with hexagonal and lamellar structures regarding their structural behaviour upon heating and cooling. Measurements of the non-ionic surfactant Triton X-45 (polyethylene glycol 4-tert-octylphenyl ether) at different surfactant concentrations show an alignment of the lamellar liquid-crystalline structure close to the wall of the glass capillaries and also a decrease in d-spacing following subsequent heating/cooling cycles. Additionally, samples were subjected to a weak magnetic field (0.3-0.7 T) during heating and cooling, but no influence of the magnetic field was observed.

  14. Studies of the ionizing radiation effects on the effluents acute toxicity due to anionic surfactants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes, Maria Cristina Franco de

    2004-01-01

    Several studies have shown the negative effects of surfactants, as detergents active substance, when discharged on biological sewage wastewater treatment plants. High toxicity may represent a lower efficiency for biological treatment. When surfactants are in aquatic environment they may induce a loss of grease revetment on birds (feather). Depending on the surfactant concentration, several damages to all biotic systems can happen. Looking for an alternative technology for wastewater treatment, efficient for surfactant removal, the present work applied ionizing radiation as an advanced oxidation process for affluents and effluents from Suzano Treatment Station. Such wastewater samples were submitted to radiation using an electron beam from a Dynamic Electron Beam Accelerator from Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares. In order to assess this proposed treatment efficacy, it was performed acute toxicity evaluation with two test-organisms, the crustacean Daphnia similis and the luminescent bacteria Vibrio fischeri. The studied effluents were: one from a chemical industry (IND), three from sewage plant (affluents - GG, GM and Guaio) and the last biologically treated secondary effluent (EfF), discharged at Tiete river. The applied radiation doses varied from 3 kGy to 50 kGy, being 50 kGy enough for surfactant degradation contained at industrial effluent. For GG, GM and Guaio samples, doses of 6 kGy and 10 kGy were efficient for surfactant and toxicity reduction, representing an average removal that varied from 71.80% to 82.76% and toxicity from 30% to 91% for most the effluents. The final effluent was less toxic than the others and the radiation induced an average 11% removal for anionic surfactant. The industrial effluents were also submitted to an aeration process in order to quantify the contribution of surfactant to the whole sample toxicity, once it was partially removed as foam and several fractions were evaluated for toxicity. (author)

  15. Surfactant Membrane Phases Containing Mixtures of Hydrocarbon and Fluorocarbon Surfactants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Campo, Liliana; Warr, G.G.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: We describe the structure and stability of sponge and lamellar phases comprising mixtures of hydrocarbon and fluorocarbon surfactants. Such mixtures can show limited miscibility with each other, forming for example coexisting populations of hydrocarbon rich and fluorocarbon rich micelles under some circumstances. Our system is based on the well-characterised lamellar and sponge phases of cetylpyridinium chloride, hexanol and 0.2M brine, into which the partially fluorinated surfactant N-1H,1H,2H,2H-tridecafluorooctylpyridinium chloride is incorporated. By probing the structures with SAXS (small angle x-ray scattering) and SANS (small angle neutron scattering) using contrast variation, and by characterizing the dynamic properties with dynamic light scattering, we will describe the effect of incorporating the fluorinated surfactant on the phase equilibria and properties of the surfactant membrane structures. (authors)

  16. Luminescent solar concentrator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tugce Tosun

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Luminescent solar concentrator (LSC is a device that has luminescent molecules embedding or topping polymeric or glass waveguide to generate electricity from sunlight with a photovoltaic cell attachment. LSCs can be employed both in small and large scale projects, independent on the direction or angle of the surface with respect to the sun, promising more freedom for integration in urban environments compared to the traditional PV systems. The aim of the SEB&C PDEng project is to investigate the applicability of this innovative technology in the built environment and to bridge the gap of knowledge linking societal, design and technological aspects. The final goal is to exhibit potential application concepts of LSC developed by co-creative methods at SPARK campus which is a hub for open innovation in built environment. Necessity of a paradigm shift towards sustainable and smart cities came into being due to the significant increase in energy demand of the buildings. The challenge is to increase renewable sources in the energy mix while designing aesthetic environments. Thus, building integrated renewable energy technologies represent a great opportunity to help overcome this current challenge. Smart energy, energy efficiency and use of renewable sources are key aspects to be considered nowadays and many innovative technologies need further exploitation to be commercially viable, such as luminescent solar concentrator.

  17. Quantitative luminescence imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, David N.; Kiel, Johnathan L.; Batishko, Charles R.; Stahl, Kurt A.

    1990-01-01

    The QLIS images and quantifies low-level chemiluminescent reactions in an electromagnetic field. It is capable of real time nonperturbing measurement and simultaneous recording of many biochemical and chemical reactions such as luminescent immunoassays or enzyme assays. The system comprises image transfer optics, a low-light level digitizing camera with image intensifying microchannel plates, an image process or, and a control computer. The image transfer optics may be a fiber image guide with a bend, or a microscope, to take the light outside of the RF field. Output of the camera is transformed into a localized rate of cumulative digitalized data or enhanced video display or hard-copy images. The system may be used as a luminescent microdosimetry device for radiofrequency or microwave radiation, as a thermal dosimeter, or in the dosimetry of ultra-sound (sonoluminescence) or ionizing radiation. It provides a near-real-time system capable of measuring the extremely low light levels from luminescent reactions in electromagnetic fields in the areas of chemiluminescence assays and thermal microdosimetry, and is capable of near-real-time imaging of the sample to allow spatial distribution analysis of the reaction. It can be used to instrument three distinctly different irradiation configurations, comprising (1) RF waveguide irradiation of a small Petri-dish-shaped sample cell, (2) RF irradiation of samples in a microscope for the microscopie imaging and measurement, and (3) RF irradiation of small to human body-sized samples in an anechoic chamber.

  18. Reconstructing weak values without weak measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansen, Lars M.

    2007-01-01

    I propose a scheme for reconstructing the weak value of an observable without the need for weak measurements. The post-selection in weak measurements is replaced by an initial projector measurement. The observable can be measured using any form of interaction, including projective measurements. The reconstruction is effected by measuring the change in the expectation value of the observable due to the projector measurement. The weak value may take nonclassical values if the projector measurement disturbs the expectation value of the observable

  19. Micellar solubilization in strongly interacting binary surfactant systems. [Binary surfactant systems of: dodecyltrimethylammonium chloride + sodium dodecyl sulfate; benzyldimethyltetradecylammonium chloride + tetradecyltrimethylammonium chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Treiner, C. (Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France)); Nortz, M.; Vaution, C. (Faculte de Pharmacie de Paris-sud, Chatenay-Malabry (France))

    1990-07-01

    The apparent partition coefficient P of barbituric acids between micelles and water has been determined in mixed binary surfactant solutions from solubility measurements in the whole micellar composition range. The binary systems chosen ranged from the strongly interacting system dodecyltrimethylammonium chloride + sodium dodecyl sulfate to weakly interacting systems such as benzyldimethyltetradecylammonium chloride + tetradecyltrimethyammonium chloride. In all cases studied, mixed micelle formation is unfavorable to micellar solubilization. A correlation is found between the unlike surfactants interaction energy, as measured by the regular solution parameter {beta} and the solute partition coefficient change upon surfactant mixing. By use of literature data on micellar solubilization in binary surfactant solutions, it is shown that the change of P for solutes which are solubilized by surface adsorption is generally governed by the sign and amplitude of the interaction parameter {beta}.

  20. Biodegradation of surfactant bearing wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitra, S.; Chandran, S.; Sasidhar, P.; Lal, K.B.; Amalraj, R.V.

    1991-01-01

    In nuclear industry, during decontamination of protective wears and contaminated materials, detergents are employed to bring down the level of radioactive contamination within safe limits. However, the surfactant present in these wastes interferes in the chemical treatment process, reducing the decontamination factor. Biodegradation is an efficient and ecologically safe method for surfactant removal. A surfactant degrading culture was isolated and inoculated separately into simulated effluents containing 1% yeast extract and 5-100 ppm sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS) and 1% yeast extract and 5-100 ppm of commercial detergent respectively. The growth of the bacterial culture and the degradation characteristics of the surfactant in the above effluents were monitored under both dynamic and static conditions. (author). 6 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  1. Spectral-luminescent investigation of polymers doped with europium trisphenoyltrifluoroacetonate compound with 1,10-phenanthroline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karasev, V.E.; Mirochnik, A.G.; Shchelokov, R.N.

    1983-01-01

    Spectral-luminescent characteristics of europium tristhenoyltrifluoroacetonate with 1.10-phenanthpoline in polystyrepe and polyvinyl chloride are investigated. E 4 (TTA) 3 phen during introduction into polymers preserves its composition and structure. Weak temperature dependence of half-Width of luminescent lines qualitatively different from the case of crystal chelate is characteristic for polymers doped with E 4 (TTA) 3 xphen. Investigation into temperature dependence of E 4 3+ luminescent intensity in chelate doped polymers proves the conclusion on weakening processes of excitation energy relaxation by vibration constituents of close and far environment during chelate introduction into polymers

  2. Treatment with exogenous surfactant stimulates endogenous surfactant synthesis in premature infants with respiratory distress syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunt, JEH; Carnielli, VP; Janssen, DJ; Wattimena, JLD; Hop, WC; Sauer, PJ; Zimmermann, LJI

    2000-01-01

    Objective: Treatment of preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) with exogenous surfactant has greatly improved clinical outcome. Some infants require multiple doses, and it has not been studied whether these large amounts of exogenous surfactant disturb endogenous surfactant

  3. Salt effects in surfactant-free microemulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöttl, Sebastian; Horinek, Dominik

    2018-06-01

    The weakly associated micellar aggregates found in the so-called "pre-ouzo region" of the surfactant-free microemulsion water/ethanol/1-octanol are sensitive to changes in the system composition and also to the presence of additives like salt. In this work, we study the influence of two salts, sodium iodide and lithium chloride, on aggregates in water/ethanol/1-octanol by molecular dynamics simulations. In both cases, ethanol concentration in the nonpolar phase and at the interface is increased due to a salting out effect on ethanol in the aqueous pseudo-phase. In addition, minor charging of the interface as a consequence of differential adsorption of anions and cations occurs. However, this charge separation is overall weakened by the erratic surface of octanol aggregates, where polar hydroxyl groups and hydrophobic patches are both present. Furthermore, ethanol at the interface shields hydrophobic patches and reduces the preferential adsorption of iodide and lithium.

  4. Luminescence dating of Netherland's sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wallinga, J.; Davids, F.; Dijkmans, J.W.A.

    2007-01-01

    Over the last decades luminescence dating techniques have been developed that allow earth scientists to determine the time of deposition of sediments. In this contribution we revity: 1) the development of the methodology, 2) tests of the reliability of luminescence dating on Netherlands' sediments;

  5. Biomimicry of surfactant protein C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Nathan J; Johansson, Jan; Barron, Annelise E

    2008-10-01

    Since the widespread use of exogenous lung surfactant to treat neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, premature infant survival and respiratory morbidity have dramatically improved. Despite the effectiveness of the animal-derived surfactant preparations, there still remain some concerns and difficulties associated with their use. This has prompted investigation into the creation of synthetic surfactant preparations. However, to date, no clinically used synthetic formulation is as effective as the natural material. This is largely because the previous synthetic formulations lacked analogues of the hydrophobic proteins of the lung surfactant system, SP-B and SP-C, which are critical functional constituents. As a result, recent investigation has turned toward the development of a new generation of synthetic, biomimetic surfactants that contain synthetic phospholipids along with a mimic of the hydrophobic protein portion of lung surfactant. In this Account, we detail our efforts in creating accurate mimics of SP-C for use in a synthetic surfactant replacement therapy. Despite SP-C's seemingly simple structure, the predominantly helical protein is extraordinarily challenging to work with given its extreme hydrophobicity and structural instability, which greatly complicates the creation of an effective SP-C analogue. Drawing inspiration from Nature, two promising biomimetic approaches have led to the creation of rationally designed biopolymers that recapitulate many of SP-C's molecular features. The first approach utilizes detailed SP-C structure-activity relationships and amino acid folding propensities to create a peptide-based analogue, SP-C33. In SP-C33, the problematic and metastable polyvaline helix is replaced with a structurally stable polyleucine helix and includes a well-placed positive charge to prevent aggregation. SP-C33 is structurally stable and eliminates the association propensity of the native protein. The second approach follows the same design

  6. Luminescence from metals and insulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, O.H.

    1985-01-01

    The term luminescence is normally applied to light emission that is not explainable by the mechanisms discussed by the other speakers in this meeting. Specifically, it is not transition radiation, surface plasmon radiation, or bremsstrahlung. One normally thinks of luminescence as arising from one-electron transitions within a medium. This talk consists of an overview of luminescence from condensed matter under irradiation by either energetic particles or photons. The author begins with organic molecules, where luminescence is best understood, and then discusses inorganic insulators and metals. Finally, the dependence of yield upon projectile species and velocity is discussed, and predictions are made concerning the relative effectiveness of electrons, protons, and hydrogen atoms in exciting luminescence

  7. A luminescent nisin biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immonen, Nina; Karp, Matti

    2006-02-01

    Nisin is a lantibiotic, an antibacterial peptide produced by certain Lactococcus lactis strains that kills or inhibits the growth of other bacteria. Nisin is widely used as a food preservative, and its long-time use suggests that it can be generally regarded as safe. We have developed a method for determining the amount of nisin in food samples that is based on luminescent biosensor bacteria. Bacterial luciferase operon luxABCDE was inserted into plasmid pNZ8048, and the construct was transformed by electroporation into Lc. lactis strain NZ9800, whose ability to produce nisin has been erased by deletion of the gene nisA. The operon luxABCDE has been modified to be functional in gram-positive bacteria to confer a bioluminescent phenotype without the requirement of adding an exogenous substrate. In the plasmid pNZ8048, the operon was placed under control of the nisin-inducible nisA promoter. The chromosomal nisRK genes of Lc. lactis NZ9800 allow it to sense nisin in the environment and relay this signal via signal transduction proteins NisK and NisR to initiate transcription from nisA promoter. In the case of our sensor bacteria, this leads to production of luciferase and, thus, luminescence that can be directly measured from living bacteria. Luminescence can be detected as early as within minutes of induction. The nisin assay described here provides a detection limit in the sub-picogram level per ml, and a linear area between 1 - 1000 pg/ml. The sensitivity of this assay exceeds the performance of all previously published methods.

  8. LUMINESCENCE DETERMINATION OF ETODOLAC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Yegorova

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A highly sensitive, simple and rapid method for determination of non-steroidal anti- inflammatory drug – etodolac (Et in washings from surfaces of pharmaceutical equipment have been proposed. The intensity of native luminescence of water-n-propanol solutions of etodolac (λex= 274 nm; λlum= 350 nm was used as the analytical signal. The calibration graph is linear in the concentration range 0.014-2.3 μg/ml, the limit of detection is 0.5 ng/ml.

  9. Surfactant flooding of diesel-contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, R.W.; Montemagno, C.D.; Shem, L.; Lewis, B.A.

    1991-01-01

    At one installation, approximately 60,000 gallons of No. 2 diesel fuel leaked into the subsurface environment, with contamination at depths of 6 to 34 m below the surface. Argonne National Laboratory was contracted to perform treatability studies for site remediation. The treatability studies focused on four separate phases: (1) leachability studies on the various contaminated soil borings, (2) air stripping studies, (3) bioremediation studies, and (4) surfactant screening/surfactant flooding studies. This paper summarizes the fourth phase of this research program after initial surfactant screening of 21 surfactants. Three of the surfactants were used for the surfactant flooding studies; the results from that phase of the research program are described

  10. Luminescence dating in archaeology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wintle, A.G.

    2001-01-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) dating is routinely applied to burnt lithic material. Simple fires are capable of enabling stones weighing a few hundred grams to reach 450 o C, thus zeroing the TL signal. TL dates have been obtained for Upper and Lower Paleolithic sites in Europe and the Near East. TL dating continues to be used for dating pottery and for authentification of ceramic works of art. Some recent studies report the use of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) (also know as photoluminescence) for dating very small samples of quartz, e.g. from small pieces of pottery or frm metallurgical slag The major recent advance has been in the development of a reliable laboratory procedure for using the OSL signal from quartz to obtain the past radiation exposure. The quartz OSL signal is extremely sensitive to light and is reduced to a negligible level on exposure to direct sunlight for radionuclides during burial, signal to date san.sized quartz grains extracted from sediments, The OSL signal is stimulated by 470 nm light from emitting diodes and the detected using flirters centred on 340 nm A similar signal can be obtained from feldspar grain when are exposed to infrared wavelengths around 880 nm. The infrared stimulated luminescence (IRSL) signals is also rapidly depleted by exposure to sunlight, and dating of colluvial deposits from archaeological sites has been reported

  11. Surfactant-thermal method to prepare two new cobalt metal-organic frameworks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Xianglin [School of Materials Science and Engineering and School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Process of Ministry of Education, School of Chemical Engineering and Pharmacy, Wuhan Institute of Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Toh, Yong Siang [School of Materials Science and Engineering and School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Zhao, Jun [College of Materials and Chemical Engineering, Hubei Provincial Collaborative Innovation Center for New Energy Microgrid, China Three Gorges University, Yichang 443002 (China); Nie, Lina [School of Materials Science and Engineering and School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Ye, Kaiqi; Wang, Yue [State Key Laboratory of Supramolecular Structure and Materials, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Li, Dongsheng [College of Materials and Chemical Engineering, Hubei Provincial Collaborative Innovation Center for New Energy Microgrid, China Three Gorges University, Yichang 443002 (China); Zhang, Qichun, E-mail: qczhang@ntu.edu.sg [School of Materials Science and Engineering and School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Division of Chemistry and Biological Chemistry, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637371 (Singapore)

    2015-12-15

    Employing surfactants as reaction media, two new metal-organic frameworks (MOFs):(HTEA){sub 3}[Co{sub 3}(BTC){sub 3}] (NTU-Z33) and (HTEA)[Co{sub 3}(HBTC){sub 2}(BTC)] (NTU-Z34) (H{sub 3}BTC=1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylic acid, TEA=trimethylamine, and NTU=Nanyang Technological University), have been successfully synthesized and fully characterized. Note that NTU-Z33 has an unusual trimeric [Co{sub 3}(COO){sub 9}] secondary building unit (SBU). Magnetic characterization suggests that both compounds have weak antiferromagnetic behaviors. Our success in preparing new crystalline Co-BTC based MOFs under different surfactant media could provide a new road to prepare new diverse MOFs through various combinations of surfactants. - Graphical abstract: Employing surfactants as reaction media, two new metal-organic frame-works (MOFs) have been successfully synthesized and magnetic study suggests that both compounds have weak antiferromagnetic behaviors. - Highlights: • Two novel metal-organic frame-works (MOFs). • Synthesis through surfactant-thermal condition. • weak antiferromagnetic behaviors for both compounds.

  12. Surfactant-thermal method to prepare two new cobalt metal-organic frameworks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Xianglin; Toh, Yong Siang; Zhao, Jun; Nie, Lina; Ye, Kaiqi; Wang, Yue; Li, Dongsheng; Zhang, Qichun

    2015-01-01

    Employing surfactants as reaction media, two new metal-organic frameworks (MOFs):(HTEA)_3[Co_3(BTC)_3] (NTU-Z33) and (HTEA)[Co_3(HBTC)_2(BTC)] (NTU-Z34) (H_3BTC=1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylic acid, TEA=trimethylamine, and NTU=Nanyang Technological University), have been successfully synthesized and fully characterized. Note that NTU-Z33 has an unusual trimeric [Co_3(COO)_9] secondary building unit (SBU). Magnetic characterization suggests that both compounds have weak antiferromagnetic behaviors. Our success in preparing new crystalline Co-BTC based MOFs under different surfactant media could provide a new road to prepare new diverse MOFs through various combinations of surfactants. - Graphical abstract: Employing surfactants as reaction media, two new metal-organic frame-works (MOFs) have been successfully synthesized and magnetic study suggests that both compounds have weak antiferromagnetic behaviors. - Highlights: • Two novel metal-organic frame-works (MOFs). • Synthesis through surfactant-thermal condition. • weak antiferromagnetic behaviors for both compounds.

  13. Synthesis of carbohydrate-based surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pemberton, Jeanne E.; Polt, Robin L.; Maier, Raina M.

    2016-11-22

    The present invention provides carbohydrate-based surfactants and methods for producing the same. Methods for producing carbohydrate-based surfactants include using a glycosylation promoter to link a carbohydrate or its derivative to a hydrophobic compound.

  14. Thermo-luminescent dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reither, M; Schorn, B; Schneider, E

    1981-01-01

    The development of paediatric radiology which began in the late 195O's has been characterised by the need to limit the dose of ionising radiation to which the child is subjected. The aim has been to keep radiation exposure as low as possible by the introduction of suitable techniques and by the development of new methods. It is therefore surprising that studies in dosimetry in the paediaytric age range have only been carried out in recent years. One reason for this may have been the fact that a suitable technique of measurement was not available at the time. The introduction of solid state dosimetry based on thermo-luminescence, first into radiotherapy (1968) and subsequently into radiodiagnosis, has made it possible to abandon the previously widely used ionisation chamber. The purpose of the present paper is to indicate the suitability of this form of dose measurement for paediatric radiological purposes and to stimulate its application in this field.

  15. Persistent luminescence nanothermometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín Rodríguez, Emma; López-Peña, Gabriel; Montes, Eduardo; Lifante, Ginés; García Solé, José; Jaque, Daniel; Diaz-Torres, Luis Armando; Salas, Pedro

    2017-08-01

    Persistent phosphorescence nanoparticles emitting in the red and near-infrared spectral regions are strongly demanded as contrast nanoprobes for autofluorescence free bioimaging and biosensing. In this work, we have developed Sr4Al14O25:Eu2+, Cr3+, Nd3+ nanopowders that produce persistent red phosphorescence peaking at 694 nm generated by Cr3+ ions. This emission displays temperature sensitivity in the physiological temperature range (20-60 °C), which makes these nanoparticles potentially useful as fluorescence (contactless) nanothermometers operating without requiring optical excitation. Nd3+ ions, which act as shallow electron traps for the red Cr3+ persistent emission, also display infrared emission bands, extending the fluorescence imaging capability to the second biological window. This unique combination of properties makes these nanoparticles multifunctional luminescent probes with great potential applications in nanomedicine.

  16. Binding of cationic surfactants to humic substances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ishiguro, M.; Tan, W.; Koopal, L.K.

    2007-01-01

    Commercial surfactants are introduced into the environment either through waste products or site-specific contamination. The amphiphilic nature of both surfactants and humic substances (HS) leads to their mutual attraction especially when surfactant and HS are oppositely charged. Binding of the

  17. Delayed Luminescence and Biophotons from Biological Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoesel, Ernst; Hann, Patrick; Garzon, Maria; Pfeiffer, Erik; Lofland, Samuel

    2008-03-01

    There has recently been increased interest in the field of biophotonics, since it is a non-invasive technique. Many biological systems, such as yeast, bacteria, leaves, seeds, and algae display the unusual phenomenon of a weak, delayed luminescence on the timescale of seconds to minutes after transient illumination. It is also observed that the time decay of the biophotonic emission is not exponential, even after the delay, and that there can be oscillations in intensity with time, which depend on the duration of the illumination. Results from two types of yeast, i.e. bread yeast, and saccharomyces, as well as those from several types of algae are presented. Possible mechanisms for the source of the ultraweak photon emission are discussed.

  18. Reflection measurements for luminescent powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroon, R. E.

    2018-04-01

    Luminescent materials are useful in applications varying from lighting and display technologies to document security features and medical research, amongst many others. Measurement of the excitation range is an important consideration, and absorption bands are often determined from a decrease in the measured diffuse reflectance of the material using a ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere. Such a system may provide questionable results when used to measure the reflectance of a luminescence material, which is demonstrated for a Tb doped silica phosphor, because the system cannot differentiate between the reflected light and luminescence. It is shown that more reliable results are achieved for this phosphor by measuring the reflectance using a synchronous zero-offset scan in a fluorescence spectrometer equipped with an integrating sphere. This method is therefore recommended instead of traditional reflectance measurements using a UV-vis spectrophotometer for luminescent powders.

  19. Sacrificial adsorbate for surfactants utilized in chemical floods of enhanced oil recovery operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jr., James S.; Westmoreland, Clyde G.

    1982-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a sacrificial or competitive adsorbate for surfactants contained in chemical flooding emulsions for enhanced oil recovery operations. The adsorbate to be utilized in the method of the present invention is a caustic effluent from the bleach stage or the weak black liquor from the digesters and pulp washers of the kraft pulping process. This effluent or weak black liquor is injected into an oil-bearing subterranean earth formation prior to or concurrent with the chemical flood emulsion and is adsorbed on the active mineral surfaces of the formation matrix so as to effectively reduce adsorption of surfactant in the chemical flood. Alternatively, the effluent or liquor can be injected into the subterranean earth formation subsequent to a chemical flood to displace the surfactant from the mineral surfaces for the recovery thereof.

  20. Luminescence enhancement in irradiated polyethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlesby, A.; Owen, G.P.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented for the luminescence decay in polyethylene following irradiation at liquid nitrogen temperature and its enhancement on application of an electric field. It is found that both the luminescence enhancement and its subsequent decay may be described by a model involving electron tunnelling from a monoenergetic trap distribution to the parent positive ion. The possible nature of the trap is briefly discussed. (author)

  1. Persurf, a new method to improve surfactant delivery: a study in surfactant depleted rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfram Burkhardt

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Exogenous surfactant is not very effective in adults with ARDS, since surfactant does not reach atelectatic alveoli. Perfluorocarbons (PFC can recruit atelectatic areas but do not replace impaired endogenous surfactant. A surfactant-PFC-mixture could combine benefits of both therapies. The aim of the proof-of-principal-study was to produce a PFC-in-surfactant emulsion (Persurf and to test in surfactant depleted Wistar rats whether Persurf achieves I. a more homogenous pulmonary distribution and II. a more homogenous recruitment of alveoli when compared with surfactant or PFC alone. METHODS: Three different PFC were mixed with surfactant and phospholipid concentration in the emulsion was measured. After surfactant depletion, animals either received 30 ml/kg of PF5080, 100 mg/kg of stained (green dye Curosurf™ or 30 ml/kg of Persurf. Lungs were fixated after 1 hour of ventilation and alveolar aeration and surfactant distribution was estimated by a stereological approach. RESULTS: Persurf contained 3 mg/ml phospholipids and was stable for more than 48 hours. Persurf-administration improved oxygenation. Histological evaluation revealed a more homogenous surfactant distribution and alveolar inflation when compared with surfactant treated animals. CONCLUSIONS: In surfactant depleted rats administration of PFC-in-surfactant emulsion leads to a more homogenous distribution and aeration of the lung than surfactant alone.

  2. Reactive surfactants in heterophase polymerization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guyot, A.; Tauer, K.; Asua, J.M.; Es, van J.J.G.S.; Gauthier, C.; Hellgren, A.C.; Sherrington, D.C.; Montoya-Goni, A.; Sjöberg, M.; Sindt, O.; Vidal, F.F.M.; Unzue, M.; Schoonbrood, H.A.S.; Schipper, E.T.W.M.; Lacroix-Desmazes, P.

    1999-01-01

    This paper summarizes the work carried out during 3 years in a Network of the program "Human Capital and Mobility" of the European Union CHRX 93-0159 entitled "Reactive surfactants in heterophase polymerization for high performance polymers". A series of about 25 original papers will be published in

  3. Red, green, and blue lanthanum phosphate phosphors obtained via surfactant-controlled hydrothermal synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sousa Filho, Paulo C. de; Serra, Osvaldo A.

    2009-01-01

    A new solution route for the obtainment of highly pure luminescent rare-earth orthophosphates in hydrothermal conditions was developed. By starting from soluble precursors (lanthanide tripolyphosphato complexes, i.e. with P 3 O 10 5- as a complexing agent and as an orthophosphate source) and by applying surfactants in a water/toluene medium, the precipitations are confined to reverse micelle structures, thus yielding nanosized and homogeneous orthophosphates. The method was employed to obtain lanthanide-activated lanthanum phosphates, which can be applied as red (LaPO 4 :Eu 3+ ), green (LaPO 4 :Ce 3+ ,Tb 3+ ) and blue (LaPO 4 :Tm 3+ ) phosphors. The produced materials were analyzed by powder X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy and luminescence spectroscopy (emission, excitation, lifetimes and chromaticity coordinates).

  4. Surfactant screening of diesel-contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, R.W.; Montemagno, C.D.; Shem, L.; Lewis, B.-A.

    1992-01-01

    At one installation in California, approximately 60,000 gal of No. 2 diesel fuel leaked into the subsurface environment, resulting in contamination at depths from 6 to 34 m below the surface. Argonne National Laboratory was contracted to perform treatability studies for site remediation. This paper summarizes a surfactant screening/surfactant flooding research program in which 22 surfactants were screened for their effectiveness in mobilizing the organics from the contaminated soil prior to bioremediation. Anionic surfactants resulted in the greatest degree of diesel mobilization. The most promising surfactants will be employed on contaminated soil samples obtained from the site

  5. Surfactant gene polymorphisms and interstitial lung diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantelidis Panagiotis

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pulmonary surfactant is a complex mixture of phospholipids and proteins, which is present in the alveolar lining fluid and is essential for normal lung function. Alterations in surfactant composition have been reported in several interstitial lung diseases (ILDs. Furthermore, a mutation in the surfactant protein C gene that results in complete absence of the protein has been shown to be associated with familial ILD. The role of surfactant in lung disease is therefore drawing increasing attention following the elucidation of the genetic basis underlying its surface expression and the proof of surfactant abnormalities in ILD.

  6. Surfactant -- Where Are We in 2003?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JF Lewis

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Surfactant research has progressed over the past several years to the extent that exogenous surfactant administration in patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is now being evaluated. Unfortunately, clinical responses have been variable, and we now need to take a look at how surfactant is altered in this disease so that more effective treatment strategies can be developed. This review briefly discusses the biophysical and host defense properties of surfactant, the impact of mechanical ventilation (MV on the endogenous surfactant system and the most recent clinical data involving exogenous surfactant administration in patients with ARDS. Discussions regarding future directions of surfactant research both in ARDS and diseases other than acute lung injury are included.

  7. Effect of surfactant concentration on the size of one-pot synthesized Si nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Su Jung; Kim, Tae Woo; Lee, Myong Euy [Dept. of Chemistry and Medical Chemistry, College of Science and Technology, Research and EducationCenter for Advanced Silicon Materials, Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Hyeon Mo [University College, Yonsei University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Sang Woong [Youngchang Chemical Co., LTD, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Ryou, Joon Sung [Advanced Technology R and D Center, SKC, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    The effect of surfactant concentration on the synthesis of Si nanoparticles (NPs) was studied. Hexyl Si NPs were synthesized using one-pot synthetic methodology with different ratios of SiCl{sub 4}:HexylSiCl{sub 3} (1:1, 1:2, 1:3, 1:6) to observe the effect of surfactant concentration on the size of Si NPs. In Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis, the Si–H stretching band and the characteristic Si–O–Si bands decreased and eventually disappeared with increasing hexyltrichlorosilane concentration. This suggests that the level of oxidation decreased with excess amounts of hexyltrichlorosilane because the surface area of exposed Si NPs without hexyl capping groups was reduced. Results of transmission electron microscopy and particle size analysis showed that the average diameter of hexyl Si NPs increased slightly from low surfactant concentration (SiCl{sub 4}:HexylSiCl{sub 3} = 1:1) to high concentration (1:6). This might be caused due to the relationship between the surfactant concentration effect and the core material part effect of hexyltrichlorosilane. Agglomerated Si NPs were observed and their luminescence bands were not shifted because the Si NPs were capped by alkyl groups to prevent aggregation.

  8. Weakly clopen functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Mi Jung; Park, Jin Han; Lim, Ki Moon

    2007-01-01

    We introduce a new class of functions called weakly clopen function which includes the class of almost clopen functions due to Ekici [Ekici E. Generalization of perfectly continuous, regular set-connected and clopen functions. Acta Math Hungar 2005;107:193-206] and is included in the class of weakly continuous functions due to Levine [Levine N. A decomposition of continuity in topological spaces. Am Math Mon 1961;68:44-6]. Some characterizations and several properties concerning weakly clopenness are obtained. Furthermore, relationships among weak clopenness, almost clopenness, clopenness and weak continuity are investigated

  9. Weak value controversy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidman, L.

    2017-10-01

    Recent controversy regarding the meaning and usefulness of weak values is reviewed. It is argued that in spite of recent statistical arguments by Ferrie and Combes, experiments with anomalous weak values provide useful amplification techniques for precision measurements of small effects in many realistic situations. The statistical nature of weak values is questioned. Although measuring weak values requires an ensemble, it is argued that the weak value, similarly to an eigenvalue, is a property of a single pre- and post-selected quantum system. This article is part of the themed issue `Second quantum revolution: foundational questions'.

  10. Role of Marangoni stress during breakup of surfactant-covered liquid threads: Reduced rates of thinning and microthread cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamat, Pritish M.; Wagoner, Brayden W.; Thete, Sumeet S.; Basaran, Osman A.

    2018-04-01

    Adsorption onto and lowering of surface tension σ of fluid interfaces by surfactants is exploited in drop formation (e.g., inkjet printing) where a thinning liquid thread (radius h ) connects an about-to-form drop to the liquid that remains hanging from the nozzle when the former falls from it. Surfactants can affect thread pinch-off in two ways: first, by lowering σ , they lower capillary pressure (σ /h ), and second, as surfactant concentration along the interface can be nonuniform, they cause the interface to be subjected to a surface tension gradient or Marangoni stress. Recent studies show that the location where the thread breaks is devoid of surfactant, and others assert that the influence of Marangoni stress on pinch-off is negligible. We demonstrate by simulations and experiments that surfactants play a major role in drop formation and that Marangoni stresses acting near but not at the pinch point give rise to reduced rates of thread thinning and formation of multiple microthreads that distinguish pinch-off of surfactant-covered threads from surfactant-free ones. Thinning at finite Reynolds and Peclet numbers, Re and Pe, is shown to exhibit intermediate scaling regimes that have heretofore only been observed during pinch-off of threads undergoing creeping flow (Re=0 ) while convection of surfactant is weak compared to its diffusion (Pe<1 ).

  11. Surfactant controlled low-temperature thermal decomposition route to zinc oxide nanorods from zinc(II) acetylacetonate monohydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purkayastha, Debraj Dhar; Sarma, Bedabrat; Bhattacharjee, Chira R., E-mail: crbhattacharjee@rediffmail.com

    2014-10-15

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods were synthesized via a low-temperature thermal decomposition of zinc(II) acetylacetonate monohydrate, [Zn(C{sub 5}H{sub 7}O{sub 2}){sub 2}].H{sub 2}O. A relatively inexpensive surfactant, octadecylamine (C{sub 18}H{sub 37}NH{sub 2}) served both as a reaction solvent and a capping agent during the synthesis of ZnO nanorods. The synthesized nanorods were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), FT-IR, UV–visible, and photoluminescence (PL) studies. The XRD spectrum furnished evidence for the hexagonal wurtzite structure of ZnO. TEM images revealed the material to be rod shaped having diameter 30 nm and length 200 nm. The HRTEM image showed that the lattice fringes between the two adjacent planes are 0.244 nm apart, which corresponds to the interplanar separation of the (1 0 1) plane of hexagonal ZnO. The electron diffraction (ED) pattern confirmed the single crystalline nature of the nanorods. The PL spectrum showed two UV emissions at 356 nm (∼3.48 eV) and 382 nm (∼3.25 eV). ZnO nanorods also showed very weak blue bands at 445, 453 and 470 nm. - Highlights: Low temperature thermal decomposition of zinc(II) acetylacetonate monohydrate gave zinc oxide nanorods. Powder XRD showed hexagonal wurtzite structure of ZnO having average diameter about 24 nm. TEM images revealed the material to be of rod shape having diameter 30 nm and length 200 nm. ZnO showed band gap luminescence at 356 nm, excitonic emission at 382 nm and defect related blue bands. The synthesis is simple and can act as a paradigm for obtaining various metal oxide nanomaterials.

  12. Luminescence sensitivity changes in quartz

    CERN Document Server

    Wintle, A G

    1999-01-01

    In the luminescence dating of sedimentary or heated quartz, some heat treatment is usually applied to the sample immediately prior to the measurement of the optically stimulated luminescence. In this paper we report experiments on a 30,000-year-old sedimentary quartz, in which we use the luminescence response to a test dose to monitor the changes in sensitivity that are caused by holding the quartz at temperatures from 160 to 280 deg. C for times from 10 s to 22 h. For an optically bleached sample, the monitoring is by both optically stimulated luminescence and the 110 deg. C TL peak; both luminescence signals are shown to have the same sensitisation (i.e. activation energy) characteristics. For natural or laboratory irradiated samples only the 110 deg. C TL peak can be used; sensitivity increases of up to a factor of 1.3 and 3 are observed for the natural and laboratory irradiated aliquots, respectively. Up to four exponential components are used to deconvolve the sensitivity change data; the dominant compon...

  13. Luminescence in medical image science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandarakis, I.S., E-mail: kandarakis@teiath.gr

    2016-01-15

    Radiation detection in Medical Imaging is mostly based on the use of luminescent materials (scintillators and phosphors) coupled to optical sensors. Materials are employed in the form of granular screens, structured (needle-like) crystals and single crystal transparent blocks. Storage phosphors are also incorporated in some x-ray imaging plates. Description of detector performance is currently based on quality metrics, such as the Luminescence efficiency, the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), the Noise Power Spectrum (NPS) and the Detective Quantum Efficiency (DQE) can be defined and evaluated. The aforementioned metrics are experimental evaluated for various materials in the form of screens. A software was designed (MINORE v1) to present image quality measurements in a graphical user interface (GUI) environment. Luminescence efficiency, signal and noise analysis are valuable tools for the evaluation of luminescent materials as candidates for medical imaging detectors. - Highlights: • Luminescence based medical imaging detectors. • Image science: MTF, NPS, DQE. • Phosphors screens light emission efficiency experimental evaluation. • Theoretical models for estimation of phosphor screen properties. • Software for medical image quality metrics.

  14. Adsorption of dimeric surfactants in lamellar silicates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balcerzak, Mateusz; Pietralik, Zuzanna [Department of Macromolecular Physics, Faculty of Physics, A. Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Domka, Ludwik [Department of Metalorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, A. Mickiewicz University, Grunwaldzka 6, 60-780 Poznań (Poland); Skrzypczak, Andrzej [Institute of Chemical Technology, Poznań University of Technology, Berdychowo 4, 60-965 Poznań (Poland); Kozak, Maciej, E-mail: mkozak@amu.edu.pl [Department of Macromolecular Physics, Faculty of Physics, A. Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • The intercalation of dimeric surfactants changed the morphology of MMT samples. • XRD indicated structures formed by surfactant molecules in interlayer space. • The four-step thermal decomposition of dimeric surfactant, confirms intercalation. - Abstract: The adsorption of different types of cationic surfactants in lamellar silicates changes their surface character from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. This study was undertaken to obtain lamellar silicates modified by a series of novel dimeric (gemini) surfactants of different length alkyl chains and to characterise these organophilised materials. Synthetic sodium montmorillonite SOMASIF® ME 100 (M) and enriched bentonite of natural origin (Nanoclay – hydrophilic bentonite®) were organophilised with dimeric (gemini) surfactants (1,1′-(1,4-butanediyl)bis(alkoxymethyl)imidazolium dichlorides). As a result of surfactant molecule adsorption in interlamellar space, the d-spacing (d{sub 001}) increased from 0.97 nm (for the anhydrous structure) to 2.04 nm. A Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis of the modified systems reveals bands assigned to the stretching vibrations of the CH{sub 2} and CH{sub 3} groups and the scissoring vibrations of the NH group from the structure of the dimeric surfactants. Thermogravimetric (TG) and derivative thermogravimetric (DTG) studies imply a four-stage process of surfactant decomposition. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images provide information on the influence of dimeric surfactant intercalation into the silicate structures. Particles of the modified systems show a tendency toward the formation of irregularly shaped agglomerates.

  15. ONE STEP SYNTHESIS OF MAGNETIC PARTICLES COVERED WITH CASEIN SURFACTANT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeaneth Patricia Urquijo Morales

    Full Text Available The one-step coprecipitation method is used to obtain magnetic nanoparticles controlling the pH (10 and 12, and casein surfactant (CS concentrations (1 % and 3 % (m/m. CS has not been used so far for stabilizing magnetic iron oxide ferrofluids. The magnetic nanoparticles have a magnetite core with maghemite in surface, and a shell of polymer. The transmission electron images confirm the crystallinity, particle size distribution in the range of 5-10 nm, and the spinel structure of the nanoparticles. Mössbauer results at 80 K showed line shapes dominated by magnetic relaxation effects with sextets and combinations of sextets and doublets. The interactions of the surfactant with the nanoparticle surface are strong showing at least two surfactant layers. The magnetic behavior was evaluated by moment versus temperature and magnetic field measurements. The nanoparticles showed superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature and blocked (irreversible behavior at 5 K. The saturation magnetization presented lower values than reported bulk systems due to the presence of a large layer of maghemite. The FC/ZFC magnetization vs. temperature curves confirmed the superparamagnetic nature of the iron oxide particles and the strong interactions for pH 12 samples and weak interactions for pH 10 samples. The particle growth was dominated by the surface properties of the nanoparticles.

  16. Understanding the Impact of Model Surfactants on Cloud Condensation Nuclei Activity of Sea Spray Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forestieri, S.; Cappa, C. D.; Ruehl, C. R.; Bertram, T. H.; Staudt, S.; Kuborn, T.

    2017-12-01

    Aerosol impacts on cloud properties, also known as indirect effects, remain a major source of uncertainty in modeling global radiative forcing. Reducing this uncertainty necessitates better understanding of how aerosol chemical composition impacts the cloud-forming ability of aerosols. The presence of surfactants in aerosols can decrease the surface tension of activating droplets relative to water and lead to more efficient activation. The importance of this effect has been debated, but recent surface tension measurements of microscopic droplets indicate that surface tension is substantially depressed relative to water for lab-generated particles consisting of salt and a single organic species and for complex mixtures of organic matter. However, little work has been done on understanding how chemical complexity (i.e. interaction between different surfactant species) impacts surface tension for particles containing mixtures of surfactants. In this work, we quantified the surface tension of lab-generated aerosols containing surfactants that are commonly found in nascent sea spray aerosol (SSA) at humidities close to activation using a continuous flow stream-wise thermal gradient chamber (CFSTGC). Surface tension was quantified for particles containing single surfactant species and mixtures of these surfactants to investigate the role of chemical complexity on surface tension and molecular packing at the air-water interface. For all surfactants tested in this study, substantial surface tension depression (20-40 mN/m) relative to water was observed for particles containing large fractions of organic matter at humidities just below activation. However, the presence of these surfactants only weakly depressed surface tension at activation. Kinetic limitations were observed for particles coated with just palmitic acid, since palmitic acid molecules inhibit water uptake through their ability to pack tightly at the surface. However, these kinetic limitations disappeared when

  17. Luminescent lanthanide coordination polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, L.; Evans, O.R.; Foxman, B.M.; Lin, W.

    1999-12-13

    One-dimensional lanthanide coordination polymers with the formula Ln(isonicotinate){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} (Ln = Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Tb; 1a-f) were synthesized by treating nitrate or perchlorate salts of Ln(III) with 4-pyridinecarboxaldehyde under hydro(solvo)thermal conditions. Single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction studies indicate that these lanthanide coordination polymers adopt two different structures. While Ce(III), Pr(III), and Nd(III) complexes adopt a chain structure with alternating Ln-(carboxylate){sub 2}-Ln and Ln-(carboxylate){sub 4}-Ln linkages, Sm(III), Eu(III), and Tb(III) complexes have a doubly carboxylate-bridged infinite-chain structure with one chelating carboxylate group on each metal center. In both structures, the lanthanide centers also bind to two water molecules to yield an eight-coordinate, square antiprismatic geometry. The pyridine nitrogen atoms of the isonicotinate groups do not coordinate to the metal centers in these lanthanide(III) complexes; instead, they direct the formation of Ln(III) coordination polymers via hydrogen bonding with coordinated water molecules. Photoluminescence measurements show that Tb(isonicotinate){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} is highly emissive at room temperature with a quantum yield of {approximately}90%. These results indicate that highly luminescent lanthanide coordination polymers can be assembled using a combination of coordination and hydrogen bonds. Crystal data for 1a: monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}/c, a = 9.712(2) {angstrom}, b = 19.833(4) {angstrom}, c = 11.616(2) {angstrom}, {beta} = 111.89(3){degree}, Z = 4. Crystal data for 1f: monoclinic space group C2/c, a = 20.253(4) {angstrom}, b = 11.584(2) {angstrom}, c = 9.839(2) {angstrom}, {beta} = 115.64(3){degree}, Z = 8.

  18. Phase transitions in surfactant monolayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casson, B.D.

    1998-01-01

    Two-dimensional phase transitions have been studied in surfactant monolayers at the air/water interface by sum-frequency spectroscopy and ellipsometry. In equilibrium monolayers of medium-chain alcohols C n H 2n+1 OH (n = 9-14) a transition from a two-dimensional crystalline phase to a liquid was observed at temperatures above the bulk melting point. The small population of gauche defects in the solid phase increased only slightly at the phase transition. A model of the hydrocarbon chains as freely rotating rigid rods allowed the area per molecule and chain tilt in the liquid phase to be determined. The area per molecule, chain tilt and density of the liquid phase all increased with increasing chain length, but for each chain length the density was higher than in a bulk liquid hydrocarbon. In a monolayer of decanol adsorbed at the air/water interface a transition from a two-dimensional liquid to a gas was observed. A clear discontinuity in the coefficient of ellipticity as a function of temperature showed that the transition is first-order. This result suggests that liquid-gas phase transitions in surfactant monolayers may be more widespread than once thought. A solid-liquid phase transition has also been studied in mixed monolayers of dodecanol with an anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulphate) and with a homologous series of cationic surfactants (alkyltrimethylammonium bromides: C n TABs, n = 12, 14, 16). The composition and structure of the mixed monolayers was studied above and below the phase transition. At low temperatures the mixed monolayers were as densely packed as a monolayer of pure dodecanol in its solid phase. At a fixed temperature the monolayers under-went a first-order phase transition to form a phase that was less dense and more conformationally disordered. The proportion of ionic surfactant in the mixed monolayer was greatest in the high temperature phase. As the chain length of the C n TAB increased the number of conformational defects

  19. On luminescence lifetimes in quartz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chithambo, M.L.; Galloway, R.B.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we present results of investigations concerning the time dependence of luminescence emission relative to the time of stimulation in quartz. Measurements of time-resolved spectra were performed on a new versatile pulsed light emitting diode system using 525 nm stimulation, an 11 μs duration pulse, a repetition rate of 11 kHz and a 64 μs dynamic range. Effects on luminescence lifetime resulting from sample treatments such as optical stimulation, irradiation, and preheating, are reported

  20. Luminescent materials and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Virk, Hardev Singh

    2015-01-01

    It is pertinent to note that Luminescence phenomenon has once again occupied a central stage with the announcement of Nobel Prize in October 2014 to three Japanese scientists. The discovery of Galium Nitride proved to be a revolutionary step forward in creation of Blue LEDs. With the advent of LED lamps we now have more long-lasting and more efficient alternatives to older light sources. The Volume under reference consists of 9 Chapters, written by experts in the area of Luminescent Materials. First 5 Chapters are contributed as Review Papers and the last 4 are based on Research Papers.Chapter

  1. Synthesis of hydrophobic gold nanoclusters: growth mechanism study, luminescence property and catalytic application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selvam, Tamil Selvi; Chi, Kai-Ming

    2011-01-01

    One-pot synthesis of well dispersed, size-controlled gold nanoparticles with the average size of 10–15 nm and luminescent gold nanoclusters with average size of 1.7–2.0 nm were successfully achieved by thermal decomposition of gold organometallic precursor CH 3 AuPPh 3 in the presence of thiol surfactants in o-xylene. Only difference between the preparations of two types of Au nanoparticles is the amount of thiol surfactant employed. The mechanistic study of formation of gold nanoparticles was carried out by analyzing the samples at different reaction time intervals and revealed that two-staged growth process was involved. The nanoclusters showed strong red emission with the maximum intensity at about 600 nm. The maximum room temperature photoluminescence quantum yield was measured as 1.2%. The catalytic ability of the Au nanoclusters to promote Suzuki–Miyaura coupling involving the C–C bond formation was also investigated.

  2. The Molecular Era of Surfactant Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Whitsett, Jeffrey A.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in the physiology, biochemistry, molecular and cell biology of the pulmonary surfactant system transformed the clinical care and outcome of preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. The molecular era of surfactant biology provided genetic insights into the pathogenesis of pulmonary disorders, previously termed “idiopathic” that affect newborn infants, children and adults. Knowledge related to the structure and function of the surfactant proteins and their roles in alveolar ...

  3. The Biophysical Function of Pulmonary Surfactant

    OpenAIRE

    Rugonyi, Sandra; Biswas, Samares C.; Hall, Stephen B.

    2008-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant lowers surface tension in the lungs. Physiological studies indicate two key aspects of this function: that the surfactant film forms rapidly; and that when compressed by the shrinking alveolar area during exhalation, the film reduces surface tension to very low values. These observations suggest that surfactant vesicles adsorb quickly, and that during compression, the adsorbed film resists the tendency to collapse from the interface to form a three-dimensional bulk phase....

  4. The effect of thermal oxidation on the luminescence properties of nanostructured silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lijia; Sham, Tsun-Kong

    2012-08-06

    Herein is reported a detailed study of the luminescence properties of nanostructured Si using X-ray excited optical luminescence (XEOL) in combination with X-ray absorption near-edge structures (XANES). P-type Si nanowires synthesized via electroless chemical etching from Si wafers of different doping levels and porous Si synthesized using electrochemical method are examined under X-ray excitation across the Si K-, L(3,2) -, and O K-edges. It is found that while as-prepared Si nanostructures are weak light emitters, intense visible luminescence is observed from thermally oxidized Si nanowires and porous Si. The luminescence mechanism of Si upon oxidation is investigated by oxidizing nanostructured Si at different temperatures. Interestingly, the two luminescence bands observed show different response with the variation of absorption coefficient upon Si and O core-electron excitation in elemental silicon and silicon oxide. A correlation between luminescence properties and electronic structures is thus established. The implications of the finding are discussed in terms of the behavior of the oxygen deficient center (OCD) and non-bridging oxygen hole center (NBOHC). Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Detection of food irradiation with luminescence methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderle, H.

    1997-06-01

    Food irradiation is applied as method for the preservation of foods, the prevention of food spoilage and the inhibition of food-borne pathogens. Doses exceeding 10 kGy (10 kJ/kg) are not recommended by the WHO. The different legislation requires methods for the detection and the closimetry of irradiated foods. Among the physical methods based on the radiation-induced changes in inorganic, nonhygroscopic crystalline solids are thermoluminescence (TL), photostimulated luminescence (PSL) and lyoluminescence (LL) measurement. The luminescence methods were tested on natural minerals. Pure quartz, feldspars, calcite, aragonite and dolomite of known origin were irradiated, read out and analyzed to determine the influence of luminescence-activators and deactivators. Carbonate minerals show an orange-red TL easily detectable by blue-sensitive photomultiplier tubes. TIL-inactive carbonate samples may be identified by a lyoluminescence method using the reaction of trapped irradiation-generated charge carriers with the solvent during crystal-lattice breakup. The fine-ground mineral is dissolved in an alkaline complexing agent/chemiluminescence sensitizer/chemiluminescence catalyst (EDTA/luminol/hemin) reagent mixture. The TL and PSL of quartz is too weak to contribute a significant part for the corresponding signals in polymineral dust. Alkali and soda feldspar show intense TL and PSL. The temperature maxima in the TL glow curves allow a clear distinction. PSL does not give this additional information, it suffers from bleaching by ambient light and requires light-protection. Grain disinfestated with low irradiation doses (500 Gy) may not identified by both TL and PSL measurement. The natural TL of feldspar particles may be overlap with the irradiation-induced TL of other minerals. As a routine method, irradiated spices are identified with TL measurement. The dust particles have to be enriched by heavy-liquid flotation and centrifugation. The PSL method allows a clear

  6. Acute Pathophysiological Effects of Intratracheal Instillation of Budesonide and Exogenous Surfactant in a Neonatal Surfactant-depleted Piglet Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Feng Yang

    2010-08-01

    Conclusions: Intratracheal instillation of surfactant or surfactant plus budesonide can improve oxygenation and pulmonary histologic outcome in neonatal surfactant-depleted lungs. The additional use of budesonide does not disturb the function of the exogenous surfactant. Intratracheal administration of a corticosteroid combined with surfactant may be an effective method for alleviating local pulmonary inflammation in severe RDS.

  7. Advantages and disadvantages of luminescence dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olko, Pawel, E-mail: Pawel.Olko@ifj.edu.p [Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish Academy of Science (IFJ PAN), Krakow (Poland)

    2010-03-15

    Owing to their excellent dosimetric properties, luminescence detectors of ionizing radiation are now extensively applied in individual dosimetry services. The most frequently used personal dosemeters are based on Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL), radiophotoluminescence (RPL) or thermoluminescence (TL). Luminescence detectors have also found several applications in clinical dosimetry, especially around new radiation modalities in radiotherapy, such as Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) or ion beam radiotherapy. Requirements of luminescence detectors applied in individual and clinical dosimetry and some recent developments in luminescence of detectors and techniques leading to significant improvements of the functionality and accuracy of dosimetry systems are reviewed and discussed.

  8. Solubilization of Hydrophobic Dyes in Surfactant Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Reza Tehrani-Bagha

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the use of surfactants for solubilization of hydrophobic organic dyes (mainly solvent and disperse dyes has been reviewed. The effect of parameters such as the chemical structures of the surfactant and the dye, addition of salt and of polyelectrolytes, pH, and temperature on dye solubilization has been discussed. Surfactant self-assemble into micelles in aqueous solution and below the concentration where this occurs—the critical micelle concentration (CMC—there is no solubilization. Above the CMC, the amount of solubilized dye increases linearly with the increase in surfactant concentration. It is demonstrated that different surfactants work best for different dyes. In general, nonionic surfactants have higher solubilization power than anionic and cationic surfactants. It is likely that the reason for the good performance of nonionic surfactants is that they allow dyes to be accommodated not only in the inner, hydrocarbon part of the micelle but also in the headgroup shell. It is demonstrated that the location of a dye in a surfactant micelle can be assessed from the absorption spectrum of the dye-containing micellar solution.

  9. Remediation using trace element humate surfactant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riddle, Catherine Lynn; Taylor, Steven Cheney; Bruhn, Debra Fox

    2016-08-30

    A method of remediation at a remediation site having one or more undesirable conditions in which one or more soil characteristics, preferably soil pH and/or elemental concentrations, are measured at a remediation site. A trace element humate surfactant composition is prepared comprising a humate solution, element solution and at least one surfactant. The prepared trace element humate surfactant composition is then dispensed onto the remediation site whereby the trace element humate surfactant composition will reduce the amount of undesirable compounds by promoting growth of native species activity. By promoting native species activity, remediation occurs quickly and environmental impact is minimal.

  10. Fluorescent visualization of a spreading surfactant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fallest, David W; Lichtenberger, Adele M; Fox, Christopher J; Daniels, Karen E, E-mail: kdaniel@ncsu.ed [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States)

    2010-07-15

    The spreading of surfactants on thin films is an industrially and medically important phenomenon, but the dynamics are highly nonlinear and visualization of the surfactant dynamics has been a long-standing experimental challenge. We perform the first quantitative, spatiotemporally resolved measurements of the spreading of an insoluble surfactant on a thin fluid layer. During the spreading process, we directly observe both the radial height profile of the spreading droplet and the spatial distribution of the fluorescently tagged surfactant. We find that the leading edge of a spreading circular layer of surfactant forms a Marangoni ridge in the underlying fluid, with a trough trailing the ridge as expected. However, several novel features are observed using the fluorescence technique, including a peak in the surfactant concentration that trails the leading edge, and a flat, monolayer-scale spreading film that differs from concentration profiles predicted by current models. Both the Marangoni ridge and the surfactant leading edge can be described to spread as R{approx}t{sup {delta}}. We find spreading exponents {delta}{sub H}{approx}0.30 and {delta}{sub {Gamma}}{approx}0.22 for the ridge peak and surfactant leading edge, respectively, which are in good agreement with theoretical predictions of {delta}=1/4. In addition, we observe that the surfactant leading edge initially leads the peak of the Marangoni ridge, with the peak later catching up to the leading edge.

  11. Second class weak currents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delorme, J.

    1978-01-01

    The definition and general properties of weak second class currents are recalled and various detection possibilities briefly reviewed. It is shown that the existing data on nuclear beta decay can be consistently analysed in terms of a phenomenological model. Their implication on the fundamental structure of weak interactions is discussed [fr

  12. Weak C* Hopf Symmetry

    OpenAIRE

    Rehren, K. -H.

    1996-01-01

    Weak C* Hopf algebras can act as global symmetries in low-dimensional quantum field theories, when braid group statistics prevents group symmetries. Possibilities to construct field algebras with weak C* Hopf symmetry from a given theory of local observables are discussed.

  13. Bagging Weak Predictors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukas, Manuel; Hillebrand, Eric

    Relations between economic variables can often not be exploited for forecasting, suggesting that predictors are weak in the sense that estimation uncertainty is larger than bias from ignoring the relation. In this paper, we propose a novel bagging predictor designed for such weak predictor variab...

  14. Surfactant nebulisation : lung function, surfactant distribution and pulmonary blood flow distribution in lung lavaged rabbits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, Peter H.; Heikamp, A; Bambang Oetomo, Sidarto

    1997-01-01

    Objective: Surfactant nebulisation is a promising alternative to surfactant instillation in newborns with the respiratory distress syndrome. Although less surfactant is deposited in the lung, it improves gas exchange, probably due to a superior distribution. We hypothesize that a more uniform

  15. Hydrothermal synthesis, characterization and luminescent ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 39; Issue 4. Hydrothermal synthesis, characterization and luminescent properties of lanthanide-doped NaLaF 4 nanoparticles. JIGMET LADOL HEENA KHAJURIA SONIKA KHAJURIA ... Keywords. Citric acid; X-ray diffraction; down-conversion emission; energy transfer.

  16. Hydrothermal synthesis, characterization and luminescent ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    that nanoparticles have cylindrical shape and crystalline nature of nanoparticles was confirmed by SAED patterns. Down- conversion (DC) luminescent properties of doped NaLaF4 were also .... Figure 1 shows the XRPD patterns of undoped NaLaF4 and .... which can be assigned to the transitions from the 7F6 ground.

  17. A portable luminescence dating instrument

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kook, M.H.; Murray, A.S.; Lapp, Torben

    2011-01-01

    We describe a portable luminescence reader suitable for use in remote localities in the field. The instrument weighs about 8kg and is based around a 30mm bialkali photomultiplier detecting signals through a glass filter centered on 340nm. Stimulation is by 470nm blue LEDs (24W in total) operating...

  18. Advances in luminescence instrument systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Bulur, E.; Duller, G.A.T.

    2000-01-01

    We report on recent advances in the development of luminescence measurement systems and techniques at Riso. These include: (1) optical stimulation units based on new-generation powerful blue light (470 nm) emitting diodes providing up to 28 mW/cm(2) for OSL measurements; (2) an infrared (830 nm...

  19. Electro-weak theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deshpande, N.G.

    1980-01-01

    By electro-weak theory is meant the unified field theory that describes both weak and electro-magnetic interactions. The development of a unified electro-weak theory is certainly the most dramatic achievement in theoretical physics to occur in the second half of this century. It puts weak interactions on the same sound theoretical footing as quantum elecrodynamics. Many theorists have contributed to this development, which culminated in the works of Glashow, Weinberg and Salam, who were jointly awarded the 1979 Nobel Prize in physics. Some of the important ideas that contributed to this development are the theory of beta decay formulated by Fermi, Parity violation suggested by Lee and Yang, and incorporated into immensely successful V-A theory of weak interactions by Sudarshan and Marshak. At the same time ideas of gauge invariance were applied to weak interaction by Schwinger, Bludman and Glashow. Weinberg and Salam then went one step further and wrote a theory that is renormalizable, i.e., all higher order corrections are finite, no mean feat for a quantum field theory. The theory had to await the development of the quark model of hadrons for its completion. A description of the electro-weak theory is given

  20. Surfactant-induced layered growth in homoepitaxy of Fe on Fe(100)-c(2 x 2)O reconstruction surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamiko, Masao; Mizuno, Hiroyuki; Chihaya, Hiroaki; Xu, Junhua; Kojima, Isao; Yamamoto, Ryoichi

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the effects of several surfactants (Pb, Bi, and Ag) on the homoepitaxial growth of Fe(100) were studied and compared. The reflection high-energy electron diffraction measurements clearly reveal that these surfactants enhance the layer-by-layer growth of Fe on an Fe(100)-c(2 x 2)O reconstruction surface. The dependence of growth on the surfactant layer thickness suggests that there exists a suitable amount of surfactant layer that induces a smoother layer-by-layer growth. Comparisons between the atomic force microscopy images reveal that the root-mean-square surface roughness of Fe films mediated by Pb and Bi surfactants are considerably smaller than those of the films mediated by Ag surfactant. The Auger electron spectra show that Pb and Bi segregate at the top of the surface. It has been concluded that Pb and Bi are effective surfactants for enhancing layer-by-layer growth in Fe homoepitaxy. Ag has the same effect, but it is less efficient due to the weak surface segregation of Ag

  1. The role of additives in the recombination luminescence mechanism of irradiated 2-methyltetrahydrofuran glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krauss, K.H.; Boes, J.

    1981-01-01

    The radiothermoluminescence (RTL) of γ-irradiated pure glassy 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (2-MTHF) and of 2-MTHF glasses containing additives was measured. For pure 2-MTHF a very weak luminescence peak at 93 K (heating rate 0,05 K/s) was found which in the presence of certain additives was enhanced by several orders of magnitude. Using data of radiothermoluminescence, absorption and phosphorescence measurements and bleaching experiments an attempt was made to derive a reaction mechanism. It was found to exist different possibilities for activation the ionic species to give recombination luminescence. (author)

  2. The First Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Luminescent Multiferroic: (Pyrrolidinium)MnBr3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Liao, Wei-Qiang; Fu, Da-Wei; Ye, Heng-Yun; Liu, Cai-Ming; Chen, Zhong-Ning; Xiong, Ren-Gen

    2015-07-08

    A hybrid organic-inorganic compound, (pyrrolidinium)MnBr3 , distinguished from rare earth (RE)-doped inorganic perovskites, is discovered as a new member of the ferroelectrics family, having excellent luminescent properties and relatively large spontaneous polarization of 6 μC cm(-2) , as well as a weak ferromagnetism at about 2.4 K. With a quantum yield of >28% and emission lifetime >0.1 ms, such multiferroic photoluminescence is a suitable candidate for future applications in luminescence materials, photovoltaics, and magneto-optoelectronic devices. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Production of a biological surfactant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Gladys Rosero

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes the scale up work performed at the Colombian Petroleum Institute on a process to produce at pilot plant level a biosurfactant of the rhamnolipid type. By examination of both the activation conditions of the microorganism and design aspects of the broth, a stable condition was achieved which consistently triggers the production mechanisms and thus it was obtained a significant increment in biosurfactant productivity. The biological surfactant exhibited high efficiency in applications such as hydrocarbon biodegradation in saline environments, corrosion inhibition, and crude oil recovery from storage tank bottom sludges.

  4. Weak interactions with nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walecka, J.D.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclei provide systems where the strong, electomagnetic, and weak interactions are all present. The current picture of the strong interactions is based on quarks and quantum chromodynamics (QCD). The symmetry structure of this theory is SU(3)/sub C/ x SU(2)/sub W/ x U(1)/sub W/. The electroweak interactions in nuclei can be used to probe this structure. Semileptonic weak interactions are considered. The processes under consideration include beta decay, neutrino scattering and weak neutral-current interactions. The starting point in the analysis is the effective Lagrangian of the Standard Model

  5. Surfactant protein D in newborn infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Marianne; Juvonen, Pekka Olavi; Holmskov, Uffe

    2005-01-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is a collectin that plays an important role in the innate immune system. The role of SP-D in the metabolism of surfactant is as yet quite unclear. The aims of this study were to establish normal values of SP-D in the umbilical cord blood and capillary blood of mature...

  6. History of Weak Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, T. D.

    1970-07-01

    While the phenomenon of beta-decay was discovered near the end of the last century, the notion that the weak interaction forms a separate field of physical forces evolved rather gradually. This became clear only after the experimental discoveries of other weak reactions such as muon-decay, muon-capture, etc., and the theoretical observation that all these reactions can be described by approximately the same coupling constant, thus giving rise to the notion of a universal weak interaction. Only then did one slowly recognize that the weak interaction force forms an independent field, perhaps on the same footing as the gravitational force, the electromagnetic force, and the strong nuclear and sub-nuclear forces.

  7. Hunting the weak bosons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    The possibility of the production of weak bosons in the proton-antiproton colliding beam facilities which are currently being developed, is discussed. The production, decay and predicted properties of these particles are described. (W.D.L.).

  8. Charged weak currents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turlay, R.

    1979-01-01

    In this review of charged weak currents I shall concentrate on inclusive high energy neutrino physics. There are surely still things to learn from the low energy weak interaction but I will not discuss it here. Furthermore B. Tallini will discuss the hadronic final state of neutrino interactions. Since the Tokyo conference a few experimental results have appeared on charged current interaction, I will present them and will also comment on important topics which have been published during the last past year. (orig.)

  9. Weakly oval electron lense

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daumenov, T.D.; Alizarovskaya, I.M.; Khizirova, M.A.

    2001-01-01

    The method of the weakly oval electrical field getting generated by the axially-symmetrical field is shown. Such system may be designed with help of the cylindric form coaxial electrodes with the built-in quadrupole duplet. The singularity of the indicated weakly oval lense consists of that it provides the conducting both mechanical and electronic adjustment. Such lense can be useful for elimination of the near-axis astigmatism in the electron-optical system

  10. Increased p-type conductivity through use of an indium surfactant in the growth of Mg-doped GaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, Erin C. H.; Kaun, Stephen W.; Young, Erin C.; Speck, James S.

    2015-06-01

    We have examined the effect of an indium surfactant on the growth of p-type GaN by ammonia-based molecular beam epitaxy. p-type GaN was grown at temperatures ranging from 700 to 780 °C with and without an indium surfactant. The Mg concentration in all films in this study was 4.5-6 × 1019 cm-3 as measured by secondary ion mass spectroscopy. All p-type GaN films grown with an indium surfactant had higher p-type conductivities and higher hole concentrations than similar films grown without an indium surfactant. The lowest p-type GaN room temperature resistivity was 0.59 Ω-cm, and the highest room temperature carrier concentration was 1.6 × 1018 cm-3. Fits of the temperature-dependent carrier concentration data showed a one to two order of magnitude lower unintentional compensating defect concentration in samples grown with the indium surfactant. Samples grown at higher temperature had a lower active acceptor concentration. Improvements in band-edge luminescence were seen by cathodoluminescence for samples grown with the indium surfactant, confirming the trends seen in the Hall data.

  11. Increased p-type conductivity through use of an indium surfactant in the growth of Mg-doped GaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyle, Erin C. H., E-mail: erinkyle@engineering.ucsb.edu; Kaun, Stephen W.; Young, Erin C.; Speck, James S. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2015-06-01

    We have examined the effect of an indium surfactant on the growth of p-type GaN by ammonia-based molecular beam epitaxy. p-type GaN was grown at temperatures ranging from 700 to 780 °C with and without an indium surfactant. The Mg concentration in all films in this study was 4.5–6 × 10{sup 19} cm{sup −3} as measured by secondary ion mass spectroscopy. All p-type GaN films grown with an indium surfactant had higher p-type conductivities and higher hole concentrations than similar films grown without an indium surfactant. The lowest p-type GaN room temperature resistivity was 0.59 Ω-cm, and the highest room temperature carrier concentration was 1.6 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup −3}. Fits of the temperature-dependent carrier concentration data showed a one to two order of magnitude lower unintentional compensating defect concentration in samples grown with the indium surfactant. Samples grown at higher temperature had a lower active acceptor concentration. Improvements in band-edge luminescence were seen by cathodoluminescence for samples grown with the indium surfactant, confirming the trends seen in the Hall data.

  12. Surfactant screening of diesel-contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, R.W.; Shem, L.; Montemagno, C.D.; Lewis, B.

    1991-01-01

    At one installation, approximately 60,000 gal of No. 2 diesel fuel leaked into the subsurface environment, with contamination at depths of 6 to 34 m below the surface. Argonne National Laboratory was contracted to perform treatability studies for site remediation. The treatability studies focused on four separate phases: (1) leachability studies on the various contaminated soil borings, (2) air stripping studies, (3) bioremediation studies, and (4) surfactant screening/surfactant flooding studies. This paper summarizes the fourth phase of the research program in which 21 surfactants were screened for possible use to mobilize the organics from the contaminated soil prior to bioremediation. Anionic surfactants resulted in the greatest degree of diesel mobilization. The most promising surfactants will be employed on actual contaminated soil samples obtained from the site

  13. Surfactant adsorption study in sandstone for enhanced oil recovery; Estudo da adsorcao de tensoativos em arenitos para recuperacao avancada de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curbelo, Fabiola D.S.; Santanna, Vanessa C.; Barros Neto, Eduardo L. de; Dutra Junior, Tarcilio V.; Dantas Neto, Afonso A. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica; Garnica, Alfredo I.C. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil). Dept. de Tecnologia Quimica e de Alimentos; Lucena Neto, Marciano [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil); Dantas, Tereza N.C. [Faculdade Natalense para o Desenvolvimento do RN (FARN), Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    Adsorption of surfactants from aqueous solutions in porous media is very important in Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) of oil reservoirs because surfactant loss due to adsorption on the reservoir rocks weakens the effectiveness of the injected chemical slug in reducing oil-water tension (IFT) and makes the process uneconomical. In this paper, two nonionic surfactants, such as alkyl phenol polyoxyethylene, with different ethoxylation degrees were studied, ENP95 and ENP150. The results of flow experiments of surfactant solutions in porous media showed that adsorption was higher for ENP95 because it has smaller ethoxylation degree than ENP150. This occurs what with increasing length of the head group, the molecules become more hydrophilic and, in associated structures, the steric hindrance between the head groups increases. Generally speaking, adsorption appears to be a cooperative process involving lateral interaction between surfactant and weak interaction with the solid surface. (author)

  14. Application of pulse spectro- zonal luminescent method for the rapid method of material analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisitsin, V.M.; Oleshko, V.I.; Yakovlev, A.N.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The scope of luminescent methods of the analysis covers enough a big around of substances as the luminescence can be excited in overwhelming majority of nonmetals. Analytical opportunities of luminescent methods can be essentially expanded by use of pulse excitation and registration of spectra of a luminescence with the time resolved methods. The most perspective method is to use pulses of high-current electron beams with the nanosecond duration for excitation from the following reasons: excitation is carried out ionizing, deeply enough by a penetrating radiation; the pulse of radiation has high capacity, up to 10 8 W, but energy no more than 1 J; the pulse of radiation has the nanosecond duration. Electrons with energy in 300-400 keV will penetrate on depth into some tenth shares of mm, i.e. they create volumetric excitation of a sample. Therefore the luminescence raised by an electronic beam has the information about volumetric properties of substance. High density of excitation allow to find out and study the centers (defects) having a small yield of a luminescence, to analyze the weakly luminescent objects. Occurrence of the new effects is possible useful to analyze of materials. There is an opportunity of reception of the information from change of spectral structure of a luminescence during the time after the ending of a pulse of excitation and kinetic characteristics of attenuation of luminescence. The matter is the energy of radiation is absorbed mainly by a matrix, then electronic excitations one is transferred the centers of a luminescence (defects) of a lattice. Therefore during the time after creation electronic excitations the spectrum of a luminescence can repeatedly change, transferring the information on the centers (defects) which are the most effective radiators at present time. Hence, the study of change of spectra of radiation during the time allows providing an additional way of discrimination of the information on the centers of a

  15. Role of a non-ionic surfactant in direct electron transfer-type bioelectrocatalysis by fructose dehydrogenase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Shota; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Matsushita, Kazunobu; Kitazumi, Yuki; Shirai, Osamu; Kano, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Addition of Triton ® X-100 (1%) completely quenches the FDH-catalyzed current at hydrophobic electrode, but causes only small competitive effect at hydrophilic electrode. • Quartz crystal microbalance measurements support the adsorption of FDH and Triton ® X-100 on both of the electrodes. • The surfactant forms a monolayer on the hydrophobic electrode and FDH adsorbs on the surfactant monolayer. • The surfactant forms a bilayer on the hydrophilic electrode and FDH is embedded in the bilayer to communicate with the electrode. - ABSTRACT: A heterotrimeric membrane-bound fructose dehydrogenase (FDH) from Gluconobacter japonicus NBRC3260 contains FAD in subunit I and three heme C moieties in subunit II as the redox centers, and is one of the direct electron transfer (DET)-type redox enzymes. FDH-catalyzed current density of fructose oxidation at hydrophilic mercaptoethanol (MEtOH)-modified Au electrode is much larger than that at hydrophobic mercaptoethane (MEtn)-modified Au electrode. Addition of a non-ionic surfactant Triton ® X-100 (1%) completely quenches the catalytic current at the MEtn-modified Au electrode, while only small competitive effect is observed at the MEtOH-modified Au electrode. Quartz crystal microbalance measurements support the adsorption of FDH and Triton ® X-100 on both of the modified electrodes. We propose a model to explain the phenomenon as follows. The surfactant forms a monolayer on the hydrophobic MEtn-modified electrode with strong hydrophobic interaction, and FDH adsorbs on the surface of the surfactant monolayer. The monolayer inhibits the electron transfer from FDH to the electrode. On the other hand, the surfactant forms a bilayer on the hydrophilic MEtOH-modified electrode. The interaction between the surfactant bilayer and the hydrophilic electrode is relatively weak so that FDH replaces the surfactant and is embedded in the bilayer to communicate electrochemically with the hydrophilic electrode

  16. Surfactant replacement therapy--economic impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pejaver, R K; al Hifzi, I; Aldussari, S

    2001-06-01

    Surfactant replacement is an effective treatment for neonatal respiratory distress syndrome. (RDS). As widespread use of surfactant is becoming a reality, it is important to assess the economic implications of this new form of therapy. A comparison study was carried out at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) of Northwest Armed Forces Hospital, Saudi Arabia. Among 75 infants who received surfactant for RDS and similar number who were managed during time period just before the surfactant was available, but by set criteria would have made them eligible for surfactant. All other management modalities except surfactant were the same for all these babies. Based on the intensity of monitoring and nursing care required by the baby, the level of care was divided as: Level IIIA, IIIB, Level II, Level I. The cost per day per bed for each level was calculated, taking into account the use of hospital immovable equipment, personal salaries of nursing, medical, ancillary staff, overheads and maintenance, depreciation and replacement costs. Medications used, procedures done, TPN, oxygen, were all added to individual patient's total expenditure. 75 infants in the Surfactant group had 62 survivors. They spent a total of 4300 days in hospital. (av 69.35) Out of which 970 d (av 15.65 per patient) were ventilated days. There were 56 survivors in the non-surfactant group of 75. They had spent a total of 5023 days in the hospital (av 89.69/patient) out of which 1490 were ventilated days (av 26.60 d). Including the cost of surfactant (two doses), cost of hospital stay for each infant taking the average figures of stay would be SR 118, 009.75 per surfactant treated baby and SR 164, 070.70 per non-surfactant treated baby. The difference of 46,061 SR is 39.03% more in non-surfactant group. One Saudi rial = 8 Rs (approx at the time study was carried out.) Medical care cost varies from place to place. However, it is definitely cost-effective where surfactant is concerned. Quality adjusted

  17. Luminescence of LiH(D):Ru monocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabirzyanov, A.A.; Oparin, D.V.; Pilipenko, G.I.; Gavrilov, F.F.

    1993-01-01

    Luminescence of lithium hydride (deuteride) activated by ruthenium is recorded for the first time. The features connected with the structure and oscillations of the basic lattice are detected in luminescence spectrum. The qualitative model of luminescence spectrum is suggested

  18. Luminescence centers in bismuth orthogermanate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordun, O.M.

    2001-01-01

    The luminescence and photoexcitation spectra of single crystals,ceramics,and thin films of Bi 4 Ce 3 O 1 2 are studied.The decomposition of the luminescence spectra into elementary components by the Alentsev-Fock method showed that they consist of three bands with maxima at 2.7,2.4,and 2.05 eV.The bands with maxima at 2.7 and 2.4 eV are assigned to the emission of self-trapped Frenkel excitons describing the excited state of a (BiO 6 ) 9- molecular ion. Emission bands with maxima at 2.0 5 eV are assigned to recombination on traps caused by structural defects

  19. X-ray luminescent glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, T.; Yamada, O.

    1981-01-01

    X-ray luminescent glasses comprising a divalent cation such as an alkaline earth metal or other divalent cations such as pb, cd, or zn, and certain rare earth metaphosphates are suitable as vitreous, x-ray phosphors or x-ray luminescent glass fibers in an x-ray intensifying screen. The glasses have the composition n(Mo X p2o5)((1-y)tb2o3 X yce2o3 X 3p2o5) wherein N is greater than zero but less than or equal to 16, M is an alkaline earth metal or other divalent cation such as pb, cd, or zn, and Y is greater than or equal to zero but less than one

  20. Rhamnolipids--next generation surfactants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Markus Michael; Kügler, Johannes H; Henkel, Marius; Gerlitzki, Melanie; Hörmann, Barbara; Pöhnlein, Martin; Syldatk, Christoph; Hausmann, Rudolf

    2012-12-31

    The demand for bio-based processes and materials in the petrochemical industry has significantly increased during the last decade because of the expected running out of petroleum. This trend can be ascribed to three main causes: (1) the increased use of renewable resources for chemical synthesis of already established product classes, (2) the replacement of chemical synthesis of already established product classes by new biotechnological processes based on renewable resources, and (3) the biotechnological production of new molecules with new features or better performances than already established comparable chemically synthesized products. All three approaches are currently being pursued for surfactant production. Biosurfactants are a very promising and interesting substance class because they are based on renewable resources, sustainable, and biologically degradable. Alkyl polyglycosides are chemically synthesized biosurfactants established on the surfactant market. The first microbiological biosurfactants on the market were sophorolipids. Of all currently known biosurfactants, rhamnolipids have the highest potential for becoming the next generation of biosurfactants introduced on the market. Although the metabolic pathways and genetic regulation of biosynthesis are known qualitatively, the quantitative understanding relevant for bioreactor cultivation is still missing. Additionally, high product titers have been exclusively described with vegetable oil as sole carbon source in combination with Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. Competitive productivity is still out of reach for heterologous hosts or non-pathogenic natural producer strains. Thus, on the one hand there is a need to gain a deeper understanding of the regulation of rhamnolipid production on process and cellular level during bioreactor cultivations. On the other hand, there is a need for metabolizable renewable substrates, which do not compete with food and feed. A sustainable bioeconomy approach should

  1. Apparatus for reducing solvent luminescence background emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Affleck, Rhett L. (Los Alamos, NM); Ambrose, W. Patrick (Los Alamos, NM); Demas, James N. (Charlottesville, VA); Goodwin, Peter M. (Jemez Springs, NM); Johnson, Mitchell E. (Pittsburgh, PA); Keller, Richard A. (Los Alamos, NM); Petty, Jeffrey T. (Los Alamos, NM); Schecker, Jay A. (Sante Fe, NM); Wu, Ming (Los Alamos, NM)

    1998-01-01

    The detectability of luminescent molecules in solution is enhanced by reducing the background luminescence due to impurity species also present in the solution. A light source that illuminates the solution acts to photolyze the impurities so that the impurities do not luminesce in the fluorescence band of the molecule of interest. Molecules of interest may be carried through the photolysis region in the solution or may be introduced into the solution after the photolysis region.

  2. Modern luminescence spectroscopy of minerals and materials

    CERN Document Server

    Gaft, Michael; Panczer, Gerard

    2005-01-01

    Luminescence Spectroscopy of Minerals and Materials presents an overview of the general concepts in luminescence spectroscopy as well as experimental methods and their interpretation. Special emphasis is laid on the fluorescence lifetime and the determination of time-resolved spectra. This method enables the exposure of new luminescence in minerals previously hidden by more intensive centers. Specialists in the fields of solid state physics, chemistry and spectroscopy will find a wealth of new information in this unique book.

  3. Material for a luminescent solar concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, L.J.

    1984-01-01

    A material for use in a luminescent solar concentrator, formed by ceramitizing the luminescent ion Cr/sup 3 +/ with a transparent ceramic glass containing mullite. The resultant material has tiny Cr/sup 3 +/-bearing crystallites dispersed uniformly through an amorphous glass. The invention combines the high luminescent efficiency of Cr/sup 3 +/ in the crystalline phase with the practical and economical advantages of glass technology.

  4. Handbook of luminescent semiconductor materials

    CERN Document Server

    Bergman, Leah

    2011-01-01

    Photoluminescence spectroscopy is an important approach for examining the optical interactions in semiconductors and optical devices with the goal of gaining insight into material properties. With contributions from researchers at the forefront of this field, Handbook of Luminescent Semiconductor Materials explores the use of this technique to study semiconductor materials in a variety of applications, including solid-state lighting, solar energy conversion, optical devices, and biological imaging. After introducing basic semiconductor theory and photoluminescence principles, the book focuses

  5. Electrostatic probes in luminescent discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha Raposo, C. da.

    1980-01-01

    A system to produce luminescent type plasma by continuos discharge and ionization by high frequency was constructed. The ionization was done in the air and in the argon under pressures from 3 to 10 mmHg. The parameters of a non magnetized collisional plasma and the parameters of a magnetized plasma such as, density, eletron temperature and potential, using a Langmuir probe with plane geometry, were determined. (M.C.K.) [pt

  6. Luminescence studies on phosphor screens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panayiotakis, G.; Nomikos, C.; Bakas, A.; Proimos, B.

    1994-01-01

    We report our results on x-ray phosphor screens prepared of some new materials focusing attention on their efficiency under fluoroscopy conditions, on optimization conditions and on comparisons among the various materials. All data are presented in absolute values. A theoretical model is presented, that takes into account the granular structure of the screens, permitting the explanation and prediction of the luminescence properties of the screens. (authors)

  7. Luminescence studies on phosphor screens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panayiotakis, G; Nomikos, C; Bakas, A; Proimos, B [Medical Physics Department, University of Patras, 265 00 Patras, Greece (Greece)

    1994-12-31

    We report our results on x-ray phosphor screens prepared of some new materials focusing attention on their efficiency under fluoroscopy conditions, on optimization conditions and on comparisons among the various materials. All data are presented in absolute values. A theoretical model is presented, that takes into account the granular structure of the screens, permitting the explanation and prediction of the luminescence properties of the screens. (authors). 12 refs, 3 figs.

  8. Highly efficient upconversion luminescence in hexagonal NaYF4:Yb3+, Er3+ nanocrystals synthesized by a novel reverse microemulsion method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunaseelan, M.; Yamini, S.; Kumar, G. A.; Senthilselvan, J.

    2018-01-01

    A new reverse microemulsion system is proposed for the first time to synthesize NaYF4:Yb,Er nanocrystals, which demonstrated high upconversion emission in 550 and 662 nm at 980 nm diode laser excitation. The reverse microemulsion (μEs) system is comprised of CTAB and oleic acid as surfactant and 1-butanol co-surfactant and isooctane oil phase. The surfactant to water ratio is able to tune the microemulsion droplet size from 14 to 220 nm, which eventually controls the crystallinity and particulate morphology of NaYF4:Yb,Er. Also, the microemulsion precursor and calcination temperature plays certain role in transforming the cubic NaYF4:Yb,Er to highly luminescent hexagonal crystal structured upconversion material. Single phase hexagonal NaYF4:YbEr nanorod prepared by water-in-oil reverse microemulsion (μEs) gives intense red upconversion emission. Both nanosphere and nanorod shaped NaYF4:Yb,Er was obtained, but nanorod morphology resulted an enhanced upconversion luminescence. The structural, morphological, thermal and optical luminescence properties of the NaYF4:Yb,Er nanoparticles are discussed in detail by employing powder X-ray diffraction, dynamic light scattering, high resolution electron microscopy, TGA-DTA, UV-DRS, FTIR and photoluminescence spectroscopy. Intense upconversion emission achieved in the microemulsion synthesized NaYF4:Yb3+,Er3+ nanocrystal can make it as useful optical phosphor for solar cell applications.

  9. Optical stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, D.

    1999-01-01

    Since the pioneering work by Huntley et al. (1985), optical dating is being increasingly recognised as an important technique for establishing a time frame of deposition of sediments (Aitken, 1998). Optical dating differs from thermoluminescence (TL) dating in that visible/infrared light from lasers or LEDs (light-emitting-diodes) is used as a means of stimulation, in contrast to thermal stimulation. It has several advantages over TL dating: (i) the resetting of the OSL (optically stimulated luminescence) clock is more effective than that of TL clock; for sediments transported under water or in other situations where the sediment grains have undergone inhomogeneous bleaching, this property ensures that ages based on optical dating are generally more reliable than TL ages, (ii) the optical dating technique is non-destructive, and multiple readouts of the optical signal is possible; this feature has resulted in the development of single-aliquot and single-grain protocols (Murray and Wintle, 1999; Banerjee et al. 1999), (iii) the sample is not heated as in TL; thus, spurious luminescence is avoided and there is a significant reduction in blackbody radiation. Dating of materials which change phase on heating is also practical, and finally, (iv) thermal quenching of luminescence is negligible, allowing accurate estimation of kinetic parameters using standard techniques and providing access to deep OSL traps. This characteristic may be helpful in extending the limits of optical dating beyond the last 150 ka from a global point of view

  10. Methods of producing luminescent images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broadhead, P.; Newman, G.A.

    1977-01-01

    A method is described for producing a luminescent image in a layer of a binding material in which is dispersed a thermoluminescent material. The layer is heated uniformly to a temperature of 80 to 300 0 C and is exposed to luminescence inducing radiation whilst so heated. The preferred exposing radiation is X-rays and preferably the thermoluminescent material is insensitive to electromagnetic radiation of wavelength longer than 300 mm. Information concerning preparation of the luminescent material is given in BP 1,347,672; this material has the advantage that at elevated temperatures it shows increased sensitivity compared with room temperature. At temperatures in the range 80 to 150 0 C the thermoluminescent material exhibits 'afterglow', allowing the image to persist for several seconds after the X-radiation has ceased, thus allowing the image to be retained for visual inspection in this temperature range. At higher temperatures, however, there is negligible 'afterglow'. The thermoluminescent layers so produced are particularly useful as fluoroscopic screens. The preferred method of heating the thermoluminescent material is described in BP 1,354,149. An example is given of the application of the method. (U.K.)

  11. Resonance-shifting luminescent solar concentrators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giebink, Noel Christopher; Wiederrecht, Gary P.; Wasielewski, Michael R.

    2018-01-23

    An optical system and method to overcome luminescent solar concentrator inefficiencies by resonance-shifting, in which sharply directed emission from a bi-layer cavity into a glass substrate returns to interact with the cavity off-resonance at each subsequent reflection, significantly reducing reabsorption loss en route to the edges. In one embodiment, the system comprises a luminescent solar concentrator comprising a transparent substrate, a luminescent film having a variable thickness; and a low refractive index layer disposed between the transparent substrate and the luminescent film.

  12. Discuss on luminescence dose data analysis technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Xinhua; Xiao Wuyun; Ai Xianyun; Shi Zhilan; Liu Ying

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the development of luminescence dose data measurement and processing technology. General design planning of luminescence dose data measurement and processing technology is put forward with the diverse demands. The emphasis is focused on dose data processing method, luminescence curve analysis method, using of network, mechanics of communication among computers, data base management system of individual dose in this paper. The main methods and skills used in this technology as well as their advantages are also discussed. And it offers general design references for development luminescence dose data processing software. (authors)

  13. Surfactants tailored by the class Actinobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes H Kügler

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Gloablly, the drive towards the establishment of a bio-based economy has resulted in an increased need for bio-based applications. This, in turn, has served as a driving force for the discovery and application of novel biosurfactants. The class Actinobacteria represents a vast group of microorganisms with the ability to produce a diverse range of secondary metabolites, including surfactants. Understanding the extensive nature of the biosurfactants produced by actinobacterial strains can assist in finding novel biosurfactants with new potential applications. This review therefore presents a comprehensive overview of the knowledge available on actinobacterial surfactants, the chemical structures that have been completely or partly elucidated, as well as the identity of the biosurfactant-producing strains. Producer strains of not yet elucidated compounds are discussed, as well as the original habitats of all the producer strains, which seems to indicate that biosurfactant production is environmentally driven. Methodology applied in the isolation, purification and structural elucidation of the different types of surface active compounds, as well as surfactant activity tests, are also discussed. Overall, actinobacterial surfactants can be summarized to include the dominantly occurring trehalose-comprising surfactants, other non-trehalose containing glycolipids, lipopeptides and the more rare actinobacterial surfactants. The lack of structural information on a large proportion of actinobacterial surfactants should be considered as a driving force to further explore the abundance and diversity of these compounds. This would allow for a better understanding of actinobacterial surface active compounds and their potential for biotechnological application.

  14. Surfactants tailored by the class Actinobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kügler, Johannes H.; Le Roes-Hill, Marilize; Syldatk, Christoph; Hausmann, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    Globally the change towards the establishment of a bio-based economy has resulted in an increased need for bio-based applications. This, in turn, has served as a driving force for the discovery and application of novel biosurfactants. The class Actinobacteria represents a vast group of microorganisms with the ability to produce a diverse range of secondary metabolites, including surfactants. Understanding the extensive nature of the biosurfactants produced by actinobacterial strains can assist in finding novel biosurfactants with new potential applications. This review therefore presents a comprehensive overview of the knowledge available on actinobacterial surfactants, the chemical structures that have been completely or partly elucidated, as well as the identity of the biosurfactant-producing strains. Producer strains of not yet elucidated compounds are discussed, as well as the original habitats of all the producer strains, which seems to indicate that biosurfactant production is environmentally driven. Methodology applied in the isolation, purification and structural elucidation of the different types of surface active compounds, as well as surfactant activity tests, are also discussed. Overall, actinobacterial surfactants can be summarized to include the dominantly occurring trehalose-comprising surfactants, other non-trehalose containing glycolipids, lipopeptides and the more rare actinobacterial surfactants. The lack of structural information on a large proportion of actinobacterial surfactants should be considered as a driving force to further explore the abundance and diversity of these compounds. This would allow for a better understanding of actinobacterial surface active compounds and their potential for biotechnological application. PMID:25852670

  15. Tunable, antibacterial activity of silicone polyether surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Madiha F; Zepeda-Velazquez, Laura; Brook, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    Silicone surfactants are used in a variety of applications, however, limited data is available on the relationship between surfactant structure and biological activity. A series of seven nonionic, silicone polyether surfactants with known structures was tested for in vitro antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli BL21. The compounds varied in their hydrophobic head, comprised of branched silicone structures with 3-10 siloxane linkages and, in two cases, phenyl substitution, and hydrophilic tail of 8-44 poly(ethylene glycol) units. The surfactants were tested at three concentrations: below, at, and above their Critical Micelle Concentrations (CMC) against 5 concentrations of E. coli BL21 in a three-step assay comprised of a 14-24h turbidometric screen, a live-dead stain and viable colony counts. The bacterial concentration had little effect on antibacterial activity. For most of the surfactants, antibacterial activity was higher at concentrations above the CMC. Surfactants with smaller silicone head groups had as much as 4 times the bioactivity of surfactants with larger groups, with the smallest hydrophobe exhibiting potency equivalent to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Smaller PEG chains were similarly associated with higher potency. These data link lower micelle stability and enhanced permeability of smaller silicone head groups to antibacterial activity. The results demonstrate that simple manipulation of nonionic silicone polyether structure leads to significant changes in antibacterial activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. DNA compaction by azobenzene-containing surfactant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakrevskyy, Yuriy; Kopyshev, Alexey; Lomadze, Nino; Santer, Svetlana; Morozova, Elena; Lysyakova, Ludmila; Kasyanenko, Nina

    2011-01-01

    We report on the interaction of cationic azobenzene-containing surfactant with DNA investigated by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, and atomic force microscopy. The properties of the surfactant can be controlled with light by reversible switching of the azobenzene unit, incorporated into the surfactant tail, between a hydrophobic trans (visible irradiation) and a hydrophilic cis (UV irradiation) configuration. The influence of the trans-cis isomerization of the azobenzene on the compaction process of DNA molecules and the role of both isomers in the formation and colloidal stability of DNA-surfactant complexes is discussed. It is shown that the trans isomer plays a major role in the DNA compaction process. The influence of the cis isomer on the DNA coil configuration is rather small. The construction of a phase diagram of the DNA concentration versus surfactant/DNA charge ratio allows distancing between three major phases: colloidally stable and unstable compacted globules, and extended coil conformation. There is a critical concentration of DNA above which the compacted globules can be hindered from aggregation and precipitation by adding an appropriate amount of the surfactant in the trans configuration. This is because of the compensation of hydrophobicity of the globules with an increasing amount of the surfactant. Below the critical DNA concentration, the compacted globules are colloidally stable and can be reversibly transferred with light to an extended coil state.

  17. Influence of surfactants in forced dynamic dewetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrich, Franziska; Fell, Daniela; Truszkowska, Dorota; Weirich, Marcel; Anyfantakis, Manos; Nguyen, Thi-Huong; Wagner, Manfred; Auernhammer, Günter K; Butt, Hans-Jürgen

    2016-09-20

    In this work we show that the forced dynamic dewetting of surfactant solutions depends sensitively on the surfactant concentration. To measure this effect, a hydrophobic rotating cylinder was horizontally half immersed in aqueous surfactant solutions. Dynamic contact angles were measured optically by extrapolating the contour of the meniscus to the contact line. Anionic (sodium 1-decanesulfonate, S-1DeS), cationic (cetyl trimethylammonium bromide, CTAB) and nonionic surfactants (C 4 E 1 , C 8 E 3 and C 12 E 5 ) with critical micelle concentrations (CMCs) spanning four orders of magnitude were used. The receding contact angle in water decreased with increasing velocity. This decrease was strongly enhanced when adding surfactant, even at surfactant concentrations of 10% of the critical micelle concentration. Plots of the receding contact angle-versus-velocity almost superimpose when being plotted at the same relative concentration (concentration/CMC). Thus the rescaled concentration is the dominating property for dynamic dewetting. The charge of the surfactants did not play a role, thus excluding electrostatic effects. The change in contact angle can be interpreted by local surface tension gradients, i.e. Marangoni stresses, close to the three-phase contact line. The decrease of dynamic contact angles with velocity follows two regimes. Despite the existence of Marangoni stresses close to the contact line, for a dewetting velocity above 1-10 mm s -1 the hydrodynamic theory is able to describe the experimental results for all surfactant concentrations. At slower velocities an additional steep decrease of the contact angle with velocity was observed. Particle tracking velocimetry showed that the flow profiles do not differ with and without surfactant on a scales >100 μm.

  18. Weak radiative hyperon decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, B.L.; Booth, E.C.; Gall, K.P.; McIntyre, E.K.; Miller, J.P.; Whitehouse, D.A.; Bassalleck, B.; Hall, J.R.; Larson, K.D.; Wolfe, D.M.; Fickinger, W.J.; Robinson, D.K.; Hallin, A.L.; Hasinoff, M.D.; Measday, D.F.; Noble, A.J.; Waltham, C.E.; Hessey, N.P.; Lowe, J.; Horvath, D.; Salomon, M.

    1990-01-01

    New measurements of the Σ + and Λ weak radiative decays are discussed. The hyperons were produced at rest by the reaction K - p → Yπ where Y = Σ + or Λ. The monoenergetic pion was used to tag the hyperon production, and the branching ratios were determined from the relative amplitudes of Σ + → pγ to Σ + → pπ 0 and Λ → nγ to Λ → nπ 0 . The photons from weak radiative decays and from π 0 decays were detected with modular NaI arrays. (orig.)

  19. Small angle neutron scattering study of doxorubicin–surfactant ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The binding affinity of doxorubicin within the micelle carrier is enhanced through complex formation of drug and anionic surfactant, aerosol OT (AOT). Electrostatic binding of doxorubicin with negatively charged surfactants leads to the formation of hydrophobic drug–surfactant complexes. Surfactant-induced partitioning of ...

  20. Mitochondria Targetable Time-Gated Luminescence Probe for Singlet Oxygen Based on a β-Diketonate-Europium Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jingyan; Song, Bo; Ye, Zhiqiang; Yuan, Jingli

    2015-12-21

    Singlet oxygen ((1)O2) plays a key role in the photodynamic therapy (PDT) technique of neoplastic diseases. In this work, by using a 9,10-dimethyl-2-anthryl-containing β-diketone, 1,1,1,2,2-pentafluoro-5-(9',10'-dimethyl-2'-anthryl)-3,5-pentanedione (Hpfdap), as a (1)O2-recognition ligand, a novel β-diketonate-europium(III) complex that can act as a luminescence probe for (1)O2, [Eu(pfdap)3(tpy)] (tpy = 2,2',2″-terpyridine), has been designed and synthesized for the time-gated luminescence detection of (1)O2 in living cells. The complex is weakly luminescent due to the quenching effect of 9,10-dimethyl-2-anthryl groups. After reaction with (1)O2, accompanied by the formation of endoperoxides of 9,10-dimethyl-2-anthryl groups, the luminescence quenching disappears, so that the long-lived luminescence of the europium(III) complex is switched on. The complex showed highly selective luminescence response to (1)O2 with a remarkable luminescence enhancement. Combined with the time-gated luminescence imaging technique, the complex was successfully used as a luminescent probe for the monitoring of the time-dependent generation of (1)O2 in 5-aminolevulinic acid (a PDT drug) loaded HepG2 cells during the photodynamic process. In addition, by coloading the complex and a mitochondrial indicator, Mito-Tracker Green, into HepG2 cells, the specific localization of [Eu(pfdap)3(tpy)] molecules in mitochondria of HepG2 cells was demonstrated by confocal fluorescence imaging measurements.

  1. A CMOS Luminescence Intensity and Lifetime Dual Sensor Based on Multicycle Charge Modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Guoqing; Sonkusale, Sameer R

    2018-06-01

    Luminescence plays an important role in many scientific and industrial applications. This paper proposes a novel complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) sensor chip that can realize both luminescence intensity and lifetime sensing. To enable high sensitivity, we propose parasitic insensitive multicycle charge modulation scheme for low-light lifetime extraction benefiting from simplicity, accuracy, and compatibility with deeply scaled CMOS process. The designed in-pixel capacitive transimpedance amplifier (CTIA) based structure is able to capture the weak luminescence-induced voltage signal by accumulating photon-generated charges in 25 discrete gated 10-ms time windows and 10-μs pulsewidth. A pinned photodiode on chip with 1.04 pA dark current is utilized for luminescence detection. The proposed CTIA-based circuitry can achieve 2.1-mV/(nW/cm 2 ) responsivity and 4.38-nW/cm 2 resolution at 630 nm wavelength for intensity measurement and 45-ns resolution for lifetime measurement. The sensor chip is employed for measuring time constants and luminescence lifetimes of an InGaN-based white light-emitting diode at different wavelengths. In addition, we demonstrate accurate measurement of the lifetime of an oxygen sensitive chromophore with sensitivity to oxygen concentration of 7.5%/ppm and 6%/ppm in both intensity and lifetime domain. This CMOS-enabled oxygen sensor was then employed to test water quality from different sources (tap water, lakes, and rivers).

  2. Controlled synthesis of gold nanostars by using a zwitterionic surfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casu, Alberto; Cabrini, Elisa; Donà, Alice; Falqui, Andrea; Diaz-Fernandez, Yuri; Milanese, Chiara; Taglietti, Angelo; Pallavicini, Piersandro

    2012-07-23

    By replacing cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) with the zwitterionic lauryl sulfobetaine (LSB) surfactant in the classical seed-growth synthesis, monocrystalline gold nanostars (m-NS) and pentatwinned gold asymmetric nanostars (a-NS) were obtained instead of nanorods. The main product under all synthetic conditions was a-NS, which have branches with high aspect ratios (AR), thus leading to LSPR absorptions in the 750-1150 nm range. The percentage of m-NS versus a-NS, the aspect ratio of the a-NS branches, and consequently the position of their LSPR absorption can be finely tuned simply by regulating the concentration of reductant, the concentration of surfactant, or the concentration of the "catalytic" Ag(+) cation. The m-NS have instead shorter and larger branches, the AR of which is poorly influenced by synthetic conditions and displays an LSPR positioned around 700 nm. A growth mechanism that involves the direct contact of the sulfate moiety of LSB on the surface of the nano-object is proposed, thereby implying preferential coating of the {111} Au faces with weak interactions. Consistent with this, we also observed the straightforward complete displacement of the LSB surfactant from the surface of the nanostars. This was obtained by the simple addition of thiols in aqueous solution to yield extremely stable coated a-NS and m-NS that are resistant to highly acidic, basic, and in similar to in vivo conditions. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Startpoints via weak contractions

    OpenAIRE

    Agyingi, Collins Amburo; Gaba, Yaé Ulrich

    2018-01-01

    Startpoints (resp. endpoints) can be defined as "oriented fixed points". They arise naturally in the study of fixed for multi-valued maps defined on quasi-metric spaces. In this article, we give a new result in the startpoint theory for quasi-pseudometric spaces. The result we present is obtained via a generalized weakly contractive set-valued map.

  4. Weakly Coretractable Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, Inaam M. A.; Al-aeashi, Shukur N.

    2018-05-01

    If R is a ring with identity and M is a unitary right R-module. Here we introduce the class of weakly coretractable module. Some basic properties are investigated and some relationships between these modules and other related one are introduced.

  5. Luminescence investigation of Yb3+/Er3+ codoped single LiYF4 microparticle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Wei; Zheng, Hairong; He, Enjie; Lu, Ying; Gao, Fangqi

    2014-01-01

    Tetragonal phase LiYF 4 :Yb 3+ /Er 3+ microparticles are synthesized via facile hydrothermal method. Single LiYF 4 microparticle is excited with IR laser at 980 nm in a confocal setup, and strong green and weak red emissions are observed. It is found that single LiYF 4 :Yb 3+ /Er 3+ microparticle with sub-structure presents stronger upconversion luminescence emission and smaller intensity ratio of red to green emission than that from LiYF 4 :Yb 3+ /Er 3+ microparticle with no sub-structure. The possible mechanism, the influence of particle size and the existence of EDTA on the upconversion luminescence emission are investigated. The current study suggests that the luminescence observation with single micropaticle can effectively avoid the influence of environment and neighbor particles, which is important for investigating the luminescence properties of micro- or nano-crystals and for extending their application. - Highlights: • Single LiYF 4 microparticle is excited with IR laser at 980 nm in a confocal setup, and strong green and weak red emissions are observed. • Single LiYF 4 microparticle with different morphology exhibits different fluorescence emission intensity and intensity ratio of red to green emission. • The possible mechanism, the influence of particle size and the existence of EDTA on the upconversion emission are investigated

  6. Lung surfactant levels are regulated by Ig-Hepta/GPR116 by monitoring surfactant protein D.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taku Fukuzawa

    Full Text Available Lung surfactant is a complex mixture of lipids and proteins, which is secreted from the alveolar type II epithelial cell and coats the surface of alveoli as a thin layer. It plays a crucial role in the prevention of alveolar collapse through its ability to reduce surface tension. Under normal conditions, surfactant homeostasis is maintained by balancing its release and the uptake by the type II cell for recycling and the internalization by alveolar macrophages for degradation. Little is known about how the surfactant pool is monitored and regulated. Here we show, by an analysis of gene-targeted mice exhibiting massive accumulation of surfactant, that Ig-Hepta/GPR116, an orphan receptor, is expressed on the type II cell and sensing the amount of surfactant by monitoring one of its protein components, surfactant protein D, and its deletion results in a pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and emphysema-like pathology. By a coexpression experiment with Sp-D and the extracellular region of Ig-Hepta/GPR116 followed by immunoprecipitation, we identified Sp-D as the ligand of Ig-Hepta/GPR116. Analyses of surfactant metabolism in Ig-Hepta(+/+ and Ig-Hepta(-/- mice by using radioactive tracers indicated that the Ig-Hepta/GPR116 signaling system exerts attenuating effects on (i balanced synthesis of surfactant lipids and proteins and (ii surfactant secretion, and (iii a stimulating effect on recycling (uptake in response to elevated levels of Sp-D in alveolar space.

  7. The Accelerated Late Adsorption of Pulmonary Surfactant

    OpenAIRE

    Loney, Ryan W.; Anyan, Walter R.; Biswas, Samares C.; Rananavare, Shankar B.; Hall, Stephen B.

    2011-01-01

    Adsorption of pulmonary surfactant to an air−water interface lowers surface tension (γ) at rates that initially decrease progressively, but which then accelerate close to the equilibrium γ. The studies here tested a series of hypotheses concerning mechanisms that might cause the late accelerated drop in γ. Experiments used captive bubbles and a Wilhelmy plate to measure γ during adsorption of vesicles containing constituents from extracted calf surfactant. The faster fall in γ reflects faster...

  8. Poly(ethylene oxide) surfactant polymers

    OpenAIRE

    VACHEETHASANEE, KATANCHALEE; WANG, SHUWU; QIU, YONGXING; MARCHANT, ROGER E.

    2004-01-01

    We report on a series of structurally well-defined surfactant polymers that undergo surface-induced self-assembly on hydrophobic biomaterial surfaces. The surfactant polymers consist of a poly(vinyl amine) backbone with poly(ethylene oxide) and hexanal pendant groups. The poly(vinyl amine) (PVAm) was synthesized by hydrolysis of poly(N-vinyl formamide) following free radical polymerization of N-vinyl formamide. Hexanal and aldehyde-terminated poly (ethyleneoxide) (PEO) were simultaneously att...

  9. Luminescent converter of neodymium laser radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryba-Romanowski, W.; Golab, S.

    1992-01-01

    The new luminescent converter of neodymium laser radiation has been worked out. Activated inorganic compounds of ytterbium and erbium ions has been used as luminescent agent. The multi-component inorganic glass containing tellurium oxide as well as boron, sodium, magnesium and zinc oxides has been applied as a converter matrix

  10. Receptor-Targeted Luminescent Silver Bionanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunschoten, Anton; Chin, Patrick T.K.; Buckle, Tessa; Linden, van der Marte; Barendregt, Arjan; Verheijen, Marcel A.; Leeuwen, van Fijs W.B.

    2016-01-01

    Luminescent Ag nanoclusters (Ag-NC) provide the next generation in bionanoparticles, wherein the luminescence (650 nm) and large Stokes shift of these inorganic nanoclusters are favorable for biological imaging. By combining these characteristics with those of human serum albumin (HSA; a protein

  11. Kinetics of infrared stimulated luminescence from feldspars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jain, Mayank; Sohbati, Reza; Guralnik, Benny

    2015-01-01

    thermal and optical, of the infrared stimulated luminescence signal from feldspar. Based on the application of this model, it is concluded that different infra-red stimulated luminescence emissions (UV, blue, yellow and far-red) follow the same kinetics, and, therefore, involve participation of the same...

  12. Application of luminescence techniques in retrospective dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Jungner, H.

    1999-01-01

    Luminescence signals measured from minerals within bricks or ceramic samples can provide information about the absorbed radiation dose. This feature has for several years been used in dating archaeological and geological samples and recently luminescence techniques have been intensively used far ...

  13. Surfactant properties of human meibomian lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudgil, Poonam; Millar, Thomas J

    2011-03-25

    Human meibomian lipids are the major part of the lipid layer of the tear film. Their surfactant properties enable their spread across the aqueous layer and help maintain a stable tear film. The purpose of this study was to investigate surfactant properties of human meibomian lipids in vitro and to determine effects of different physical conditions such as temperature and increased osmolarity, such as occur in dry eye, on these properties. Human meibomian lipids were spread on an artificial tear solution in a Langmuir trough. The lipid films were compressed and expanded to record the surface pressure-area (Π-A) isocycles. The isocycles were recorded under different physical conditions such as high pressure, increasing concentration and size of divalent cations, increasing osmolarity, and varying temperature. Π-A isocycles of meibomian lipids showed that they form liquid films that are compressible and multilayered. The isocycles were unaffected by increasing concentration or size of divalent cations and increasing osmolarity in the subphase. Temperature had a marked effect on the lipids. Increase in temperature caused lipid films to become fluid, an expected feature, but decrease in temperature unexpectedly caused expansion of lipids and an increase in pressure suggesting enhanced surfactant properties. Human meibomian lipids form highly compressible, non-collapsible, multilayered liquid films. These lipids have surfactants that allow them to spread across an aqueous subphase. Their surfactant properties are unaffected by increasing divalent cations or hyperosmolarity but are sensitive to temperature. Cooling of meibomian lipids enhances their surfactant properties.

  14. Time-resolved measurements of luminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collier, Bradley B. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, 408 Mechanical Engineering Office Building, Spence Street, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); McShane, Michael J., E-mail: mcshane@tamu.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, 408 Mechanical Engineering Office Building, Spence Street, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Program, 408 Mechanical Engineering Office Building, Spence Street, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Luminescence sensing and imaging has become more widespread in recent years in a variety of industries including the biomedical and environmental fields. Measurements of luminescence lifetime hold inherent advantages over intensity-based response measurements, and advances in both technology and methods have enabled their use in a broader spectrum of applications including real-time medical diagnostics. This review will focus on recent advances in analytical methods, particularly calculation techniques, including time- and frequency-domain lifetime approaches as well as other time-resolved measurements of luminescence. -- Highlights: • Developments in technology have led to widespread use of luminescence lifetime. • Growing interest for sensing and imaging applications. • Recent advances in approaches to lifetime calculations are reviewed. • Advantages and disadvantages of various methods are weighed. • Other methods for measurement of luminescence lifetime also described.

  15. Time-resolved measurements of luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collier, Bradley B.; McShane, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Luminescence sensing and imaging has become more widespread in recent years in a variety of industries including the biomedical and environmental fields. Measurements of luminescence lifetime hold inherent advantages over intensity-based response measurements, and advances in both technology and methods have enabled their use in a broader spectrum of applications including real-time medical diagnostics. This review will focus on recent advances in analytical methods, particularly calculation techniques, including time- and frequency-domain lifetime approaches as well as other time-resolved measurements of luminescence. -- Highlights: • Developments in technology have led to widespread use of luminescence lifetime. • Growing interest for sensing and imaging applications. • Recent advances in approaches to lifetime calculations are reviewed. • Advantages and disadvantages of various methods are weighed. • Other methods for measurement of luminescence lifetime also described

  16. Metal plasmon enhanced europium complex luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Feng; Aldea, Gabriela; Nunzi, Jean-Michel

    2010-01-01

    The plasmon enhanced luminescence of a rare-earth complex Tris(6, 6, 7, 7, 8, 8, 8-heptafluoro-2, 2-dimethyl-3, 5-octanedionato) europium (Eu(fod) 3 ) was investigated. A polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) thin film was successfully adopted as a spacer to separate the Eu complex from the silver island film (SIF), and five-fold enhancement of the radiative decay rate of the Eu complex on SIF was demonstrated based on the luminescence intensity and lifetime measurement. Investigation of the distance dependent luminescence indicates that 7 nm is an optimal distance for SIF enhanced Eu luminescence. Plasmon enhanced rare-earth luminescence based on an organic film spacer would find potential applications in plasmon enhanced organic light emitting diode (OLED) devices.

  17. Introduction to weak interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite Lopes, J.

    An account is first given of the electromagnetic interactions of complex, scalar, vector and spinor fields. It is shown that the electromagnetic field may be considered as a gauge field. Yang-Mills fields and the field theory invariant with respect to the non-Abelian gauge transformation group are then described. The construction, owing to this invariance principle, of conserved isospin currents associated with gauge fields is also demonstrated. This is followed by a historical survey of the development of the weak interaction theory, established at first to describe beta disintegration processes by analogy with electrodynamics. The various stages are mentioned from the discovery of principles and rules and violation of principles, such as those of invariance with respect to spatial reflection and charge conjugation to the formulation of the effective current-current Lagrangian and research on the structure of weak currents [fr

  18. Thermodynamics of non-ionic surfactant Triton X-100-cationic surfactants mixtures at the cloud point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batigoec, Cigdem; Akbas, Halide; Boz, Mesut

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Non-ionic surfactants are used as emulsifier and solubilizate in such as textile, detergent and cosmetic. → Non-ionic surfactants occur phase separation at temperature as named the cloud point in solution. → Dimeric surfactants have attracted increasing attention due to their superior surface activity. → The positive values of ΔG cp 0 indicate that the process proceeds nonspontaneous. - Abstract: This study investigates the effects of gemini and conventional cationic surfactants on the cloud point (CP) of the non-ionic surfactant Triton X-100 (TX-100) in aqueous solutions. Instead of visual observation, a spectrophotometer was used for measurement of the cloud point temperatures. The thermodynamic parameters of these mixtures were calculated at different cationic surfactant concentrations. The gemini surfactants of the alkanediyl-α-ω-bis (alkyldimethylammonium) dibromide type, on the one hand, with different alkyl groups containing m carbon atoms and an ethanediyl spacer, referred to as 'm-2-m' (m = 10, 12, and 16) and, on the other hand, with -C 16 alkyl groups and different spacers containing s carbon atoms, referred to as '16-s-16' (s = 6 and 10) were synthesized, purified and characterized. Additions of the cationic surfactants to the TX-100 solution increased the cloud point temperature of the TX-100 solution. It was accepted that the solubility of non-ionic surfactant containing polyoxyethylene (POE) hydrophilic chain was a maximum at the cloud point so that the thermodynamic parameters were calculated at this temperature. The results showed that the standard Gibbs free energy (ΔG cp 0 ), the enthalpy (ΔH cp 0 ) and the entropy (ΔS cp 0 ) of the clouding phenomenon were found positive in all cases. The standard free energy (ΔG cp 0 ) increased with increasing hydrophobic alkyl chain for both gemini and conventional cationic surfactants; however, it decreased with increasing surfactant concentration.

  19. Weak states and security

    OpenAIRE

    Rakipi, Albert

    2006-01-01

    Cataloged from PDF version of article. Although the weak 1 failing states have often been deseribed as the single most important problem for the international order s ince the en d of Cold W ar (F .Fukuyaına 2004:92) several dimensions of this phenomenon still remain unexplored. While this phenomenon has been present in the international politics even earlier, only the post Cold W ar period accentuated its relationship with security issues. Following the Cold W ar' s "peacef...

  20. Composite weak bosons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, M.

    1988-04-01

    Dynamical mechanism of composite W and Z is studied in a 1/N field theory model with four-fermion interactions in which global weak SU(2) symmetry is broken explicitly by electromagnetic interaction. Issues involved in such a model are discussed in detail. Deviation from gauge coupling due to compositeness and higher order loop corrections are examined to show that this class of models are consistent not only theoretically but also experimentally.

  1. Luminescence detection of irradiated foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanderson, D.C.W.

    1990-01-01

    The need for forensic tests to identify irradiated foods has been widely recognised at a time of growing international trade in such products and impending changes in UK and EEC legislation to control the process. This paper outlines the requirements for and of such tests, and discusses recent developments in luminescence approaches aimed at meeting the needs of public analysts, retailers and consumers. Detecting whether or not food has been irradiated, and if so to what dose, is one of the challenges which food irradiation poses to the scientist. (author)

  2. Survival and weak chaos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nee, Sean

    2018-05-01

    Survival analysis in biology and reliability theory in engineering concern the dynamical functioning of bio/electro/mechanical units. Here we incorporate effects of chaotic dynamics into the classical theory. Dynamical systems theory now distinguishes strong and weak chaos. Strong chaos generates Type II survivorship curves entirely as a result of the internal operation of the system, without any age-independent, external, random forces of mortality. Weak chaos exhibits (a) intermittency and (b) Type III survivorship, defined as a decreasing per capita mortality rate: engineering explicitly defines this pattern of decreasing hazard as 'infant mortality'. Weak chaos generates two phenomena from the normal functioning of the same system. First, infant mortality- sensu engineering-without any external explanatory factors, such as manufacturing defects, which is followed by increased average longevity of survivors. Second, sudden failure of units during their normal period of operation, before the onset of age-dependent mortality arising from senescence. The relevance of these phenomena encompasses, for example: no-fault-found failure of electronic devices; high rates of human early spontaneous miscarriage/abortion; runaway pacemakers; sudden cardiac death in young adults; bipolar disorder; and epilepsy.

  3. Degradation of surfactants by sono-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashokkumar, M.; Grieser, F.; Vinodgopal, K.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: The ultrasound induced decomposition of a commercially available polydisperse nonylphenol ethoxylate surfactant (Teric GN9) has been investigated. Nearly 90% mineralization and/or degradation into volatile products of the surfactant is achieved after sonication for 24 hours. Ultrasound has been found to be a useful tool to achieve a number of chemical processes. Linear and branched alkyl benzene sulfonates and alkyl nonylphenol ethoxylates are widely used surfactants which accumulated in the environment and contribute to a well-recognised pollution problem. We have investigated the use of ultrasound in the degradation of both types of surfactants with the aim of understanding the mechanism of degradation in order to optimise the decomposition process. In this presentation, we report on the sonochemical degradation of Teric GN9- polydisperse, a nonylphenol ethoxylate with an average of 9 ethylene oxide units. The ultrasound unit used for the degradation studies of the surfactant solutions was an Allied Signal (ELAC Nautik) RF generator and transducer with a plate diameter of 54.5 mm operated at 363 kHz in continuous wave mode at an intensity of 2 W/cm 2 . Ultrasound induced cavitation events generate primary radicals inside gas/vapour filled bubbles. Due to the extreme conditions (T ∼ 5000 K; P ∼ 100 atm) generated within the collapsing bubble, H and OH radicals are produced by the homolysis of water molecules, if water is the medium of sonication. These primary radicals attack the surfactant molecules adsorbed at the bubble/water interface. The initial rate of reaction of the surfactant was found to be dependent on the monomer concentration in solution below and above the critical micelle concentration of the surfactants. This result strongly suggests that the initial radical attack on the surfactants occurs at the cavitation bubble/solution interface, followed by oxidative decomposition and pyrolysis of volatile fragments of the surfactant within

  4. Surfactant nebulization versus instillation during high frequency ventilation in surfactant-deficient rabbits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, Peter H.; Heikamp, A; Bambang Oetomo, Sidarto

    Surfactant nebulization improves lung function at low alveolar doses of surfactant. However, efficiency of nebulization is low, and lung deposition seems to depend on lung aeration. High frequency ventilation (HFV) has been shown to improve lung aeration. We hypothesize that the combination of HFV

  5. Open lung ventilation preserves the response to delayed surfactant treatment in surfactant-deficient newborn piglets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veenendaal, Mariëtte B.; van Kaam, Anton H.; Haitsma, Jack J.; Lutter, René; Lachmann, Burkhard

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Delayed surfactant treatment (>2 hrs after birth) is less effective than early treatment in conventionally ventilated preterm infants with respiratory distress syndrome. The objective of this study was to evaluate if this time-dependent efficacy of surfactant treatment is also present

  6. Dilute Surfactant Methods for Carbonate Formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2006-02-01

    There are many fractured carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). The process of using dilute anionic surfactants in alkaline solutions has been investigated in this work for oil recovery from fractured oil-wet carbonate reservoirs both experimentally and numerically. This process is a surfactant-aided gravity drainage where surfactant diffuses into the matrix, lowers IFT and contact angle, which decrease capillary pressure and increase oil relative permeability enabling gravity to drain the oil up. Anionic surfactants have been identified which at dilute concentration of 0.05 wt% and optimal salinity can lower the interfacial tension and change the wettability of the calcite surface to intermediate/water-wet condition as well or better than the cationic surfactant DTAB with a West Texas crude oil. The force of adhesion in AFM of oil-wet regions changes after anionic surfactant treatment to values similar to those of water-wet regions. The AFM topography images showed that the oil-wetting material was removed from the surface by the anionic surfactant treatment. Adsorption studies indicate that the extent of adsorption for anionic surfactants on calcite minerals decreases with increase in pH and with decrease in salinity. Surfactant adsorption can be minimized in the presence of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. Laboratory-scale surfactant brine imbibition experiments give high oil recovery (20-42% OOIP in 50 days; up to 60% in 200 days) for initially oil-wet cores through wettability alteration and IFT reduction. Small (<10%) initial gas saturation does not affect significantly the rate of oil recovery in the imbibition process, but larger gas saturation decreases the oil recovery rate. As the core permeability decreases, the rate of oil recovery reduces

  7. Hypernuclear weak decay puzzle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbero, C.; Horvat, D.; Narancic, Z.; Krmpotic, F.; Kuo, T.T.S.; Tadic, D.

    2002-01-01

    A general shell model formalism for the nonmesonic weak decay of the hypernuclei has been developed. It involves a partial wave expansion of the emitted nucleon waves, preserves naturally the antisymmetrization between the escaping particles and the residual core, and contains as a particular case the weak Λ-core coupling formalism. The extreme particle-hole model and the quasiparticle Tamm-Dancoff approximation are explicitly worked out. It is shown that the nuclear structure manifests itself basically through the Pauli principle, and a very simple expression is derived for the neutron- and proton-induced decays rates Γ n and Γ p , which does not involve the spectroscopic factors. We use the standard strangeness-changing weak ΛN→NN transition potential which comprises the exchange of the complete pseudoscalar and vector meson octets (π,η,K,ρ,ω,K * ), taking into account some important parity-violating transition operators that are systematically omitted in the literature. The interplay between different mesons in the decay of Λ 12 C is carefully analyzed. With the commonly used parametrization in the one-meson-exchange model (OMEM), the calculated rate Γ NM =Γ n +Γ p is of the order of the free Λ decay rate Γ 0 (Γ NM th congruent with Γ 0 ) and is consistent with experiments. Yet the measurements of Γ n/p =Γ n /Γ p and of Γ p are not well accounted for by the theory (Γ n/p th p th > or approx. 0.60Γ 0 ). It is suggested that, unless additional degrees of freedom are incorporated, the OMEM parameters should be radically modified

  8. Measurement of weak radioactivity

    CERN Document Server

    Theodorsson , P

    1996-01-01

    This book is intended for scientists engaged in the measurement of weak alpha, beta, and gamma active samples; in health physics, environmental control, nuclear geophysics, tracer work, radiocarbon dating etc. It describes the underlying principles of radiation measurement and the detectors used. It also covers the sources of background, analyzes their effect on the detector and discusses economic ways to reduce the background. The most important types of low-level counting systems and the measurement of some of the more important radioisotopes are described here. In cases where more than one type can be used, the selection of the most suitable system is shown.

  9. On Weak Markov's Principle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kohlenbach, Ulrich Wilhelm

    2002-01-01

    We show that the so-called weak Markov's principle (WMP) which states that every pseudo-positive real number is positive is underivable in E-HA + AC. Since allows one to formalize (atl eastl arge parts of) Bishop's constructive mathematics, this makes it unlikely that WMP can be proved within...... the framework of Bishop-style mathematics (which has been open for about 20 years). The underivability even holds if the ine.ective schema of full comprehension (in all types) for negated formulas (in particular for -free formulas) is added, which allows one to derive the law of excluded middle...

  10. Weak interaction rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugarbaker, E.

    1995-01-01

    I review available techniques for extraction of weak interaction rates in nuclei. The case for using hadron charge exchange reactions to estimate such rates is presented and contrasted with alternate methods. Limitations of the (p,n) reaction as a probe of Gamow-Teller strength are considered. Review of recent comparisons between beta-decay studies and (p,n) is made, leading to cautious optimism regarding the final usefulness of (p,n)- derived GT strengths to the field of astrophysics. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  11. Investigation into scanning tunnelling luminescence microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manson-Smith, S.K.

    2001-01-01

    This work reports on the development of a scanning tunnelling luminescence (STL) microscope and its application to the study of Ill-nitride semiconductor materials used in the production of light emitting devices. STL microscopy is a technique which uses the high resolution topographic imaging capabilities of the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) to generate high resolution luminescence images. The STM tunnelling current acts as a highly localised source of electrons (or holes) which generates luminescence in certain materials. Light generated at the STM tunnelling junction is collected concurrently with the height variation of the tunnelling probe as it is scanned across a sample surface, producing simultaneous topographic and luminescence images. Due to the very localised excitation source, high resolution luminescence images can be obtained. Spectroscopic resolution can be obtained by using filters. Additionally, the variation of luminescence intensity with tunnel current and with bias voltage can provide information on recombination processes and material properties. The design and construction of a scanning tunnelling luminescence microscope is described in detail. Operating under ambient conditions, the microscope has several novel features, including a new type of miniature inertial slider-based approach motor, large solid-angle light collection optical arrangement and a tip-height regulation system which requires the minimum of operator input. (author)

  12. Weakly Supervised Dictionary Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Zeyu; Raich, Raviv; Fern, Xiaoli Z.; Kim, Jinsub

    2018-05-01

    We present a probabilistic modeling and inference framework for discriminative analysis dictionary learning under a weak supervision setting. Dictionary learning approaches have been widely used for tasks such as low-level signal denoising and restoration as well as high-level classification tasks, which can be applied to audio and image analysis. Synthesis dictionary learning aims at jointly learning a dictionary and corresponding sparse coefficients to provide accurate data representation. This approach is useful for denoising and signal restoration, but may lead to sub-optimal classification performance. By contrast, analysis dictionary learning provides a transform that maps data to a sparse discriminative representation suitable for classification. We consider the problem of analysis dictionary learning for time-series data under a weak supervision setting in which signals are assigned with a global label instead of an instantaneous label signal. We propose a discriminative probabilistic model that incorporates both label information and sparsity constraints on the underlying latent instantaneous label signal using cardinality control. We present the expectation maximization (EM) procedure for maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) of the proposed model. To facilitate a computationally efficient E-step, we propose both a chain and a novel tree graph reformulation of the graphical model. The performance of the proposed model is demonstrated on both synthetic and real-world data.

  13. History of surfactant up to 1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obladen, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Remarkable insight into disturbed lung mechanics of preterm infants was gained in the 18th and 19th century by the founders of obstetrics and neonatology who not only observed respiratory failure but also designed devices to treat it. Surfactant research followed a splendid and largely logical growth curve. Pathological changes in the immature lung were characterized in Germany by Virchow in 1854 and by Hochheim in 1903. The Swiss physiologist von Neergard fully understood surfactant function in 1929, but his paper was ignored for 25 years. The physical properties of surfactant were recognized in the early 1950s from research on warfare chemicals by Pattle in Britain and by Radford and Clements in the United States. The causal relationship of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) and surfactant deficiency was established in the USA by Avery and Mead in 1959. The Australian obstetrician Liggins induced lung maturity with glucocorticoids in 1972, but his discovery was not fully believed for another 20 years. A century of basic research was rewarded when Fujiwara introduced surfactant substitution in Japan in 1980 for treatment and prevention of RDS. Copyright 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel

  14. Poly(ethylene oxide) surfactant polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacheethasanee, Katanchalee; Wang, Shuwu; Qiu, Yongxing; Marchant, Roger E

    2004-01-01

    We report on a series of structurally well-defined surfactant polymers that undergo surface-induced self-assembly on hydrophobic biomaterial surfaces. The surfactant polymers consist of a poly(vinyl amine) backbone with poly(ethylene oxide) and hexanal pendant groups. The poly(vinyl amine) (PVAm) was synthesized by hydrolysis of poly(N-vinyl formamide) following free radical polymerization of N-vinyl formamide. Hexanal and aldehyde-terminated poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) were simultaneously attached to PVAm via reductive amination. Surfactant polymers with different PEO:hexanal ratios and hydrophilic/hydrophobic balances were prepared, and characterized by FT-IR, 1H-NMR and XPS spectroscopies. Surface active properties at the air/water interface were determined by surface tension measurements. Surface activity at a solid surface/water interface was demonstrated by atomic force microscopy, showing epitaxially molecular alignment for surfactant polymers adsorbed on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. The surfactant polymers described in this report can be adapted for simple non-covalent surface modification of biomaterials and hydrophobic surfaces to provide highly hydrated interfaces.

  15. Surfactant use with nitrate-based bioremediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, B.H.; Hutchins, S.R.; West, C.C.

    1995-01-01

    This study presents results of an initial survey on the effect of six surfactants on the biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in bioremediation applications using nitrate as the electron acceptor. Aquifer material from Park City, Kansas, was used for the study. The three atomic surfactants chosen were Steol CS-330, Dowfax 8390 and sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS); the three nonionic surfactants were T-MAZ-60, Triton X-100, and Igepal CO-660. Both Steol CS-330 and T-MAZ-60 biodegraded under denitrifying conditions. The Steol inhibited biodegradation of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes, and trimethylbenzenes (BTEXTMB). Only toluene was rapidly degraded in the presence of T-MAZ-60. Biodegradation of all compounds, including toluene, appears to be inhibited by Dowfax 8390 and SDBS. No biodegradation of Dowfax 8390 or SDBS was observed. SDBS inhibited denitrification, but Dowfax 8390 did not. For the microcosms containing Triton X-100 or Igepal CO-660, removal of toluene, ethylbenzene, m-xylene, 1,3,5-TMB, and 1,2,4-TMB were similar to their removals in the no-surfactant treatment. These two surfactants did not biodegrade, did not inhibit biodegradation of the alkylbenzenes, and did not inhibit denitrification. Further studies are continuing with aquifer material from Eglin Air Force Base

  16. Recovering hydrocarbons with surfactants from lignin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naae, D.G.; Whittington, L.E.; Ledoux, W.A.; Debons, F.E.

    1988-11-29

    This patent describes a method of recovering hydrocarbons from an underground hydrocarbon formation penetrated by at least one injection well and at least one production well, which comprises: injecting into the formation through an injection well a surfactant slug comprising about 0.1% to about 10% by weight of surfactants produced from lignin, the surfactants produced by placing lignin in contact with water, converting the lignin into low molecular weight lignin phenols by reducing the lignin in the presence of a reducing agent of carbon monoxide or hydrogen creating a reduction reaction mixture comprising oil soluble lignin phenols, the reduction occurring at a temperature greater than about 200/sup 0/C and a pressure greater than about 100 psi, recovering the oil soluble lignin phenols from the reduction mixture, and converting the lignin phenols into lignin surfactants by a reaction selected from the group consisting of alkoxylation, sulfonation, sulfation, aklylation, sulfomethylation, and alkoxysulfation; injecting into the formation through the injection well a drive fluid to push the surfactant slug towards a production well; and recovering hydrocarbons at the production well.

  17. Foaming behaviour of polymer-surfactant solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervantes-MartInez, Alfredo; Maldonado, Amir

    2007-01-01

    We study the effect of a non-ionic amphiphilic polymer (PEG-100 stearate also called Myrj 59) on the foaming behaviour of aqueous solutions of an anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate or SDS). The SDS concentration was kept fixed while the Myrj 59 concentration was varied. Measurements of foamability, surface tension and electrical conductivity were carried out. The results show two opposite effects depending on the polymer concentration: foamability is higher when the Myrj 59 concentration is low; however, it decreases considerably when the polymer concentration is increased. This behaviour is due to the polymer adsorption at the air/liquid interface at lower polymer concentrations, and to the formation of a polymer-surfactant complex in the bulk at higher concentrations. The results are confirmed by surface tension and electrical conductivity measurements, which are interpreted in terms of the microstructure of the polymer-surfactant solutions. The observed behaviour is due to the amphiphilic nature of the studied polymer. The increased hydrophobicity of Myrj 59, compared to that of water-soluble polymers like PEG or PEO, increases its 'reactivity' towards SDS, i.e. the strength of its interaction with this anionic surfactant. Our results show that hydrophobically modified polymers have potential applications as additives in order to control the foaming properties of surfactant solutions

  18. Polymeric Luminescent Compositions Doped with Beta-Diketonates Boron Difluoride as Material for Luminescent Solar Concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrebtov, A. A.; Fedorenko, E. V.; Reutov, V. A.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper we investigated polymeric luminescent compositions based on polystyrene doped with beta diketonates boron difluoride. Transparent films with effective absorption in the ultraviolet and blue regions of the spectrum were obtained. Polymeric luminescent compositions based on the mixture of dyes allow expanding the absorption region and increase the radiation shift. A luminescent solar concentrator consisting of a glass plate coated with such film can be used for photovoltaic window application.

  19. Enhanced Oil Recovery with Surfactant Flooding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandersen, Sara Bülow

    , thus reducing the interfacial tension (IFT) to ultra low (0.001 mN/m), which consequently will mobilize the residual oil and result in improved oil recovery. This EOR technology is, however, made challenging by a number of factors, such as the adsorption of surfactant and co-surfactant to the rock...... be resistant to and remain active at reservoir conditions such as high temperatures, pressures and salinities. Understanding the underlying mechanisms of systems that exhibit liquid-liquid equilibrium (e.g. oil-brine systems) at reservoir conditions is an area of increasing interest within EOR. This is true...... studied. The effect of increased pressure became more significant when combined with increasing temperature. The experiments performed on the oil/ seawater systems were similar to the high pressure experiments for the surfactant system discussed above. Oil was contacted with different brine solutions...

  20. Surfactant mediated liquid phase exfoliation of graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Rekha; Kim, Sang Ouk

    2015-10-01

    Commercialization of graphene based applications inevitably requires cost effective mass production. From the early days of research on graphene, direct liquid phase exfoliation (LPE) of graphite has been considered as the most promising strategy to produce high-quality mono or few-layer graphene sheets in solvent dispersion forms. Substantial success has been achieved thus far in the LPE of graphene employing numerous solvent systems and suitable surfactants. This invited review article principally showcase the recent research progress as well as shortcomings of surfactant assisted LPE of graphene. In particular, a comprehensive assessment of the quality and yield of the graphene sheets produced by different categories of the surfactants are summarized. Future direction of LPE methods is also proposed for the eventual success of commercial applications.

  1. Synthesis of mesoporous nano-hydroxyapatite by using zwitterions surfactant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesoporous nano-hydroxyapatite (mn-HAP) was successfully synthesized via a novel micelle-templating method using lauryl dimethylaminoacetic acid as zwitterionic surfactant. The systematic use of such a surfactant in combination with microwave energy inputenables the precise contr...

  2. Early surfactant therapy and nasal continuous positive airways ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) receiving nasal continuous positive airways ... required FiO2 was allowed to rise above 0.4 before surfactant was administered. ... group received surfactant immediately and the high-threshold group ...

  3. The influence of nonionic surfactant Brij 30 on biodegradation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-09-06

    Sep 6, 2010 ... polluted air stream using biological process is highly efficient and has low ... Brij 30 was the most biodegradable surfactant among Brij 30, Tween 80 and ... The filter material contained surfactants that would enhance the ...

  4. Fullerene surfactants and their use in polymer solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jen, Kwan-Yue; Yip, Hin-Lap; Li, Chang-Zhi

    2015-12-15

    Fullerene surfactant compounds useful as interfacial layer in polymer solar cells to enhance solar cell efficiency. Polymer solar cell including a fullerene surfactant-containing interfacial layer intermediate cathode and active layer.

  5. The photophysics of luminescence in multilayered organic nanofibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavares, Luciana; Quochi, Francesco; Simbrunner, Clemens

    different organic molecules (para-hexaphenyl (p6P) donor and α-sexithiophene (6T) acceptor materials). The excited donor (p6P) is able to sensitize the acceptor (6T) via resonance energy transfer (Förster) as a consequence of the overlap between the p6P photo emission spectrum and the 6T absorption spectrum......Multilayered crystalline nanofibers are exemplary model system for the study of exciton dynamics and lasing in organic materials due to their well-defined morphology, high luminescence efficiencies, and color tunability. The multi-layered nanofibers are composed of alternating layers of two...... to extract the activation energy for exciton diffusion in crystalline p6P (19 meV). The weak PL temperature dependence of the acceptor material (6T) and hence its high quantum yield in combination with the small activation energy for exciton diffusion of the donor material (p6P) explain the high efficiency...

  6. Luminescence properties of uranyl-acetate species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinkmann, Hannes; Moll, Henry [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology; Stumpf, Thorsten [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Biogeochemistry

    2017-06-01

    Time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) was applied to characterize uranium(VI)- acetate species based on their luminescence properties. In contrast to previous interpretations, no indications were detected for the existence of the 1: 3 complex.

  7. Calibration beads containing luminescent lanthanide ion complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The reliability of lanthanide luminescence measurements, by both flow cytometry and digital microscopy, will be enhanced by the availability of narrow-band emitting lanthanide calibration beads. These beads can also be used to characterize spectrographic instruments, including mi...

  8. Towards Luminescence Dating Of Mosaic Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, A.; Martini, M.; Sibila, E.; Villa, I.

    The possibility of dating archaeological glass by means of luminescent techniques has been investigated in recent years, despite the difficulties of this application, mainly linked to the amorphous structure of the material. We focused in particular on mosaic glass, after the encouraging results obtained on byzantine and medieval samples. Further studies were devoted to the comprehension of the luminescent mechanisms in silica glasses, and to the investigation of the relationships between luminescence, colouring or opacifier ions and crystalline phase of the vitreous matrix. The results of a study on the dosimetric characteristics of thermoluminescence (TL) and Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) of a few medieval blue-green mosaic glasses from the San Lorenzo church (Milan) are presented, and the experimental protocols established to identify their suitability for dating are discussed.

  9. Controlled fabrication of luminescent and magnetic nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yingxin; Zhong, Yucheng; Fan, Jing; Huang, Weiren

    2018-03-01

    Luminescent and magnetic multifunctional nanocomposite is in high demand and widely used in many scales, such as drug delivery, bioseparation, chemical/biosensors, and so on. Although lots of strategies have been successfully developed for the demand of multifunctional nanocomposites, it is not easy to prepare multifunctional nanocomposites by using a simple method, and satisfy all kinds of demands simultaneously. In this work, via a facile and versatile method, luminescent nanocrystals and magnetic nanoparticles were successfully synthesized through self-assembly under vigorous stirring and ultrasonic treatment. These multifunctional nanocomposites are not only water stable but also find wide application such as magnetic separation and concentration with a series of moderate speed, multicolor fluorescence at different emission wavelength, high efficiency of the excitation and emission, and so on. By changing different kinds of luminescent nanocrystals and controlling the amount of luminescent and magnetic nanoparticles, a train of multifunctional nanocomposites was successfully fabricated via a versatile and robust method.

  10. Synthesis, crystal structure, theoretical study and luminescence ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and Material Engineering, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122, P. R. China. cChina-Australia Joint ... School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210093, P. R. China e-mail: ..... The title complex is luminescent.

  11. Recent developments in luminescent solar concentrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Sark, W. G. J. H. M.

    2014-10-01

    High efficiency photovoltaic devices combine full solar spectrum absorption and effective generation and collection of charge carriers, while commercial success depends on cost effectiveness in manufacturing. Spectrum modification using down shifting has been demonstrated in luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) since the 1970s, as a cheap alternative for standard c-Si technology. LSCs consist of a highly transparent plastic plate, in which luminescent species are dispersed, which absorb incident light and emit light at a red-shifted wavelength, with high quantum efficiency. Material issues have hampered efficiency improvements, in particular re-absorption of light emitted by luminescent species and stability of these species. In this contribution, approaches are reviewed on minimizing re-absorption, which should allow surpassing the 10% luminescent solar concentrator efficiency barrier.

  12. Surfactant therapy in late preterm infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Yurdakök

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Late preterm (LPT neonates are at a high risk for respiratory distress soon after birth due to respiratory distress syndrome (RDS, transient tachypnea of the newborn, persistent pulmonary hypertension, and pneumonia along with an increased need for surfactant replacement therapy, continuous positive airway pressure, and ventilator support when compared with the term neonates. In the past, studies on outcomes of infants with respiratory distress have primarily focused on extremely premature infants, leading to a gap in knowledge and understanding of the developmental biology and mechanism of pulmonary diseases in LPT neonates. Surfactant deficiency is the most frequent etiology of RDS in very preterm and moderately preterm infants, while cesarean section and lung infection play major roles in RDS development in LPT infants. The clinical presentation and the response to surfactant therapy in LPT infants may be different than that seen in very preterm infants. Incidence of pneumonia and occurrence of pneumothorax are significantly higher in LPT and term infants. High rates of pneumonia in these infants may result in direct injury to the type II alveolar cells of the lung with decreasing synthesis, release, and processing of surfactant. Increased permeability of the alveolar capillary membrane to both fluid and solutes is known to result in entry of plasma proteins into the alveolar hypophase, further inhibiting the surface properties of surfactant. However, the oxygenation index value do not change dramatically after ventilation or surfactant administration in LPT infants with RDS compared to very preterm infants. These finding may indicate a different pathogenesis of RDS in late preterm and term infants. In conclusion, surfactant therapy may be of significant benefit in LPT infants with serious respiratory failure secondary to a number of insults. However, optimal timing and dose of administration are not so clear in this group. Additional

  13. Surfactant-Polymer Interaction for Improved Oil Recovery; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabitto, Jorge; Mohanty, Kishore K.

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this research was to use the interaction between a surfactant and a polymer for efficient displacement of tertiary oil by improving slug integrity, oil solubility in the displacing fluid and mobility control. Surfactant-polymer flooding has been shown to be highly effective in laboratory-scale linear floods. The focus of this proposal is to design an inexpensive surfactant-polymer mixture that can efficiently recover tertiary oil by avoiding surfactant slug degradation and viscous/heterogeneity fingering

  14. Ultrasonic/surfactant assisted of CdS nano hollow sphere synthesis and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafati, Amir Abbas; Borujeni, Ahmad Reza Afraz; Najafi, Mojgan; Bagheri, Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    CdS hollow nanospheres with diameters ranging from 40 to 150 nm have been synthesized by a surfactant-assisted sonochemical route. The successful vesicle templating indicates that the outer leaflet of the bilayer is the receptive surface in the controlled growth of CdS nanoparticles which provide the unique reactor for the nucleation and mineralization growth of CdS nanoparticles. The CdS nanostructures obtained were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy. Structural characterization of hollow CdS nanospheres indicates that these products packed with square subunits having sizes between 5 and 7 nm in diameter. The formation of the hollow nanostructure was explained by a vesicle template mechanism, in which sonication and surfactant play important roles. The band-edge emission and surface luminescence of the CdS nanoparticles were observed. -Research Highlights: → CdS hollow nanospheres with diameters of 40-150 nm were synthesized. → Nanoparticles were characterized by UV/Vis and photoluminescence. → Nanospheres are composed of smaller nanocrystals with the average size of 6.8 nm. → The band gap energy of the CdS nanoparticles is higher than its bulk value.

  15. Luminescence basic concepts, applications and instrumentation

    CERN Document Server

    Virk, Hardev Singh

    2014-01-01

    The word luminescence was first used by a German physicist, Eilhardt Wiedemann, in 1888. He also classified luminescence into six kinds according to the method of excitation. No better basis of classification is available today. He recognized photoluminescence, thermoluminescence, electroluminescence, crystalloluminescence, triboluminescence, and chemiluminescence. The designations are obvious, characterized by the prefix. This Volume consists of 9 Chapters, including 8 Review Papers and one Case Study. The first two papers are based on OLEDs. Organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) have been th

  16. Recent advances of cerium oxide nanoparticles in synthesis, luminescence and biomedical studies:a review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何立莹; 苏玉民; 蒋兰宏; 石士考

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructured cerium oxide (CeO2) commonly known as nanoceria is a rare earth metal oxide, which plays a technologi-cally important role due to its versatile applications as automobile exhaust catalysts, oxide ion conductors in solid oxide fuel cells, electrode materials for gas sensors, ultraviolet absorbents and glass-polishing materials. However, nanoceria has little or weak lumi-nescence, and therefore its uses in high-performance luminescent devices and biomedical areas are limited. In this review, we present the recent advances of nanoceria in the aspects of synthesis, luminescence and biomedical studies. The CeO2 nanoparticles can be synthesized by solution-based methods including co-precipitation, hydrothermal, microemulsion process, sol-gel techniques, combus-tion reaction and so on. Achieving controlled morphologies and enhanced luminescence efficiency of nanoceria particles are quite es-sential for its potential energy- and environment-related applications. Additionally, a new frontier for nanoceria particles in biomedi-cal research has also been opened, which involves low toxicity, retinopathy, biosensors and cancer therapy aspects. Finally, the sum-mary and outlook on the challenges and perspectives of the nanoceria particles are proposed.

  17. Synergistically Enhanced Performance of Ultrathin Nanostructured Silicon Solar Cells Embedded in Plasmonically Assisted, Multispectral Luminescent Waveguides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung-Min; Dhar, Purnim; Chen, Huandong; Montenegro, Angelo; Liaw, Lauren; Kang, Dongseok; Gai, Boju; Benderskii, Alexander V.; Yoon, Jongseung

    2017-04-12

    Ultrathin silicon solar cells fabricated by anisotropic wet chemical etching of single-crystalline wafer materials represent an attractive materials platform that could provide many advantages for realizing high-performance, low-cost photovoltaics. However, their intrinsically limited photovoltaic performance arising from insufficient absorption of low-energy photons demands careful design of light management to maximize the efficiency and preserve the cost-effectiveness of solar cells. Herein we present an integrated flexible solar module of ultrathin, nanostructured silicon solar cells capable of simultaneously exploiting spectral upconversion and downshifting in conjunction with multispectral luminescent waveguides and a nanostructured plasmonic reflector to compensate for their weak optical absorption and enhance their performance. The 8 μm-thick silicon solar cells incorporating a hexagonally periodic nanostructured surface relief are surface-embedded in layered multispectral luminescent media containing organic dyes and NaYF4:Yb3+,Er3+ nanocrystals as downshifting and upconverting luminophores, respectively, via printing-enabled deterministic materials assembly. The ultrathin nanostructured silicon microcells in the composite luminescent waveguide exhibit strongly augmented photocurrent (~40.1 mA/cm2) and energy conversion efficiency (~12.8%) than devices with only a single type of luminescent species, owing to the synergistic contributions from optical downshifting, plasmonically enhanced upconversion, and waveguided photon flux for optical concentration, where the short-circuit current density increased by ~13.6 mA/cm2 compared with microcells in a nonluminescent medium on a plain silver reflector under a confined illumination.

  18. Generation of transverse waves in a liquid layer with insoluble surfactant subjected to temperature gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikishev, Alexander B; Friedman, Barry A [Department of Physics, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, TX 77341 (United States); Nepomnyashchy, Alexander A, E-mail: amik@shsu.edu, E-mail: phy_baf@shsu.edu, E-mail: nepom@technion.ac.il [Department of Mathematics, Technion—Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa 32000 (Israel)

    2016-12-15

    The formation of Faraday waves (FWs) at the surfactant-covered free surface of a vertically vibrated liquid layer is considered. The layer is subjected to a vertical temperature gradient. The surfactant is insoluble. Linear stability analysis and the Floquet method are used for disturbances with arbitrary wave numbers to find the regions of critical vibration amplitude where FWs are generated. The problem is considered for the semi-infinite liquid layer, as well as for the layer of a finite depth. It is shown numerically, that in the semi-infinite case the critical tongue of a neutral stability curve corresponding to the lowest value of the forcing amplitude is related to the subharmonic instability mode. It changes to the harmonic one in the case of finite depth. The influence of thermocapillary Marangoni number on the critical amplitude of FWs is studied. The growth of that number stabilizes the system, however, this effect is very weak. (paper)

  19. Polyoxyethylene alkyl ether carboxylic acids: An overview of a neglected class of surfactants with multiresponsive properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiappisi, Leonardo

    2017-12-01

    In this work, an overview on aqueous solutions of polyoxyethylene alkyl ether carboxylic acids is given. Unique properties arise from the combination of the nonionic, temperature-responsive polyoxyethylene block with the weakly ionic, pH-responsive carboxylic acid termination in a single surfactant headgroup. Accordingly, this class of surfactant finds broad application across very different sectors. Despite their large use on an industrial and a technical scale, the literature lacks a systematic and detailed characterization of their physico-chemical properties which is provided herein. In addition, a comprehensive overview is given of their self-assembly and interfacial behavior, of their use as colloidal building blocks and for large-scale applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Adsorption of anionic surfactant on porous and nonporous polyethylene terephthalate films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamauchi, Yu.; Apel, P.Yu.

    2016-01-01

    We study the adsorption of anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl diphenyloxide disulfonate (SDDD) on three types of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates from aqueous solutions of SDDD of different concentrations. Neutral electrolyte (KCl) was added to the solutions to vary the ionic strength. Three types of substrates were used: 1) original PET film; 2) etched nonporous film, obtained from pristine film by chemical etching and bearing negative charge on the surface; 3) etched porous membranes, fabricated from pristine film by ion irradiation and subsequent chemical etching. The membranes have negative charge on the flat surface and on the inner pore walls. The comparison shows that the negative charge on the flat surface has weak effect on adsorption of the anionic surfactant, and the SDDD adsorption on the inner walls of pores is much weaker than on flat surface, even if the pore radius is significantly larger than the Debye length. This «exclusion» effect strongly depends on ionic strength of solution. [ru

  1. Adsorption of anionic surfactants in limestone medium during oil recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canbolat, Serhat; Bagci, Suat [Middle East Technical Univ., Dept. of Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering, Ankara (Turkey)

    2004-07-15

    Foam-forming surfactant performance was evaluated by several experimental methods (interfacial tension, foam stability, corefloods) using commercial surfactants. There is considerable interest in the use of foam-forming surfactants for mobility control in water flood. To provide effective mobility control, the injected surfactant must propagate from the injection well toward the production well. One of the important parameters affecting propagation of foam-forming surfactant through the reservoir is the retention of surfactant due to its adsorption on reservoir rock. The determination of the adsorption of foam-forming surfactants in limestone reservoirs is important for the residual oil recovery efficiency. Adsorption measurements, recovery efficiencies, and surfactant and alkaline flooding experiments carried out with the representative of the selected surfactants alkaline solutions, linear alkyl benzene sulphonic acid (LABSA), sodium lauryl ether sulfate (SLES), and NaOH in a limestone medium. These surfactants were selected with respect to their foaming ability. Calibration curves formed by pH measurements were used to determine the correct adsorption amount of the used surfactants and recovery efficiency of these surfactants compared with base waterflooding. The results showed that LABSA adsorbed more than SLES in limestone reservoirs. The recovery efficiency of SLES was higher than the recovery efficiency of LABSA, and they decreased the recovery efficiency with respect to only the water injection case. (Author)

  2. The Inhibiting or Accelerating Effect of Different Surfactants on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The course of differential capacity curves of the electric double layer at the mercury electrode/surfactant solution interface was described for three different surfactants from different groups. Using square-wave voltammetry (SWV) it was found that the surfactants had a varying effect on the kinetics of electroreduction of Zn2+ ...

  3. Review of present trends in luminescence research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, F.; Delaware Univ., Newark

    1981-01-01

    The difficulties of a comprehensive review of the broad and diverse branches of molecular and solid-state luminescence research are noted. This review is thus limited to selective topics. Some general concepts and trends are then introduced, including: luminescence excitation as a collective excitation of a many-body problem, encompassing in some cases the source and probe in its formulation; continuing trends towards extremal conditions of experiments and towards inhomogeneous and structured materials, from man-made superlattices to biological materials; and increased attention to applications of luminescence research to lamps, displays, solar devices and biological research. Representative recent and new specific research areas include: site selection spectroscopy and 'hole burning'; picosecond delayed coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering; computer simulation of dynamical processes in luminescence; electron-hole expansion from the Fermi pressure of e-h plasmas; and hot electron phenomena and hot luminescence. Finally some pending problems in luminescence research, such as reconciling the configuration coordinate model and the electronic band theory and clarifying multi-phonon non-radiative processes, are discussed. (orig.)

  4. Plasmon-enhanced optically stimulated luminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guidelli, E. J.; Baffa, O. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto, Departamento de Fisica, Av. Bandeirantes 3900, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Ramos, A. P., E-mail: ederguidelli@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto, Departamento de Quimica, Av. Bandeirantes 3900, 14040-901 Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Optically Stimulated Luminescence dosimeters (OSLD) have been largely used for personal, medical, and industrial radiation dosimetry. Developing highly sensitive and small-sized radiation detectors and dosimeters is essential for improving spatial resolution and consequently diagnosis quality and treatment efficacy in the case of applications in radiodiagnosis and radiation therapy, for instance. Conventional methods to improve the OSLD sensitivity consist of doping and co-doping the host materials with atoms of other elements, thereby increasing the amount of trapping and/or luminescent centers. Our group is researching on the use of the plasmon properties of noble metal nanoparticles to increase OSL intensity. Upon incidence of a light beam with appropriate resonant wavelengths, the oscillation of the free electrons at the nanoparticle surface originates the Localized Surface Plasmons (LSP) and the consequent plasmon resonance band. The interaction between the LSP and the surrounding luminescent material leads to new optical properties largely employed for enhancing several luminescent processes. Here we will show our results regarding the use of LSP to increase OSLD sensitivity. The interaction between the traps/luminescent centers and the plasmons depends on the distance between them, on the plasmon resonance band intensity and position, as well as on the surrounding medium. Therefore, the plasmon-enhanced luminescence is a promising tool to develop more sensitive and miniaturized OSLD. (Author)

  5. Plasmon-enhanced optically stimulated luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guidelli, E. J.; Baffa, O.; Ramos, A. P.

    2015-10-01

    Full text: Optically Stimulated Luminescence dosimeters (OSLD) have been largely used for personal, medical, and industrial radiation dosimetry. Developing highly sensitive and small-sized radiation detectors and dosimeters is essential for improving spatial resolution and consequently diagnosis quality and treatment efficacy in the case of applications in radiodiagnosis and radiation therapy, for instance. Conventional methods to improve the OSLD sensitivity consist of doping and co-doping the host materials with atoms of other elements, thereby increasing the amount of trapping and/or luminescent centers. Our group is researching on the use of the plasmon properties of noble metal nanoparticles to increase OSL intensity. Upon incidence of a light beam with appropriate resonant wavelengths, the oscillation of the free electrons at the nanoparticle surface originates the Localized Surface Plasmons (LSP) and the consequent plasmon resonance band. The interaction between the LSP and the surrounding luminescent material leads to new optical properties largely employed for enhancing several luminescent processes. Here we will show our results regarding the use of LSP to increase OSLD sensitivity. The interaction between the traps/luminescent centers and the plasmons depends on the distance between them, on the plasmon resonance band intensity and position, as well as on the surrounding medium. Therefore, the plasmon-enhanced luminescence is a promising tool to develop more sensitive and miniaturized OSLD. (Author)

  6. Impacts of Natural Surfactant Soybean Phospholipid on Wettability of High-rank Coal Reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, S.; Xiao, Y.; Yuan, M.; Wang, S.

    2017-12-01

    It is significant to change the surface wettability of coal rock with the surfactant in coal mining and coalbed methane exploitation. Soybean phospholipid (SP) is a kind of natural zwitterionic surfactant which is non-toxic and degradable. In order to study the effects of soybean phospholipid on wettability of high-rank coal in Qinshui Basin, some experiments including surface tension test, contact angle measurement on the coal surface, coal fines imbibition, observation of dispersion effect and gas permeability test were carried out, and water locking mechanism of fracturing fluid in micro fractures of coal reservoir was analyzed. The results show that the surface of high-rank coal was negatively charged in solution and of weak hydrophilicity. The soybean phospholipid with the mass fraction of 0.1% reduced the surface tension of water by 69%, and increased the wettability of coal. Meanwhile, the soybean phospholipid helped coal fines to disperse by observation of the filter cake with the scanning electron microscope. The rising rate of soybean phospholipid solution in the pipe filled with coal fines was lower than that of anionic and cationic surfactant, higher than that of clean water and non-ionic surfactant. Composite surfactant made up of soybean phospholipid and OP-10 at the ratio of 1:3 having a low surface tension and large contact angle, reduced the capillary force effectively, which could be conducive to discharge of fracturing fluid from coal reservoir micro fracture and improve the migration channels of gas. Therefore it has a broad application prospect.

  7. Surfactant-Modified Ultrafine Gold Nanoparticles with Magnetic Responsiveness for Reversible Convergence and Release of Biomacromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lu; Dong, Shuli; Hao, Jingcheng; Cui, Jiwei; Hoffmann, Heinz

    2017-03-28

    It is difficult to synthesize magnetic gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with ultrafine sizes (coating AuNPs using magnetic particles, compounds, or ions. Here, magnetic cationic surfactants C 16 H 33 N + (CH 3 ) 3 [CeCl 3 Br] - (CTACe) and C 16 H 33 N + (CH 3 ) 3 [GdCl 3 Br] - (CTAGd) are prepared by a one-step coordination reaction, i.e., C 16 H 33 N + (CH 3 ) 3 Br - (CTABr) + CeCl 3 or GdCl 3 → CTACe or CTAGd. A simple strategy for fabricate ultrafine (gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) via surface modification with weak oxidizing paramagnetic cationic surfactants, CTACe or CTAGd, is developed. The resulting AuNPs can highly concentrate the charges of cationic surfactants on their surfaces, thereby presenting strong electrostatic interaction with negatively charged biomacromolecules, DNA, and proteins. As a consequence, they can converge DNA and proteins over 90% at a lower dosage than magnetic surfactants or existing magnetic AuNPs. The surface modification with these cationic surfactants endows AuNPs with strong magnetism, which allows them to magnetize and migrate the attached biomacromolecules with a much higher efficiency. The native conformation of DNA and proteins can be protected during the migration. Besides, the captured DNA and proteins could be released after adding sufficient inorganic salts such as at c NaBr = 50 mmol·L -1 . Our results could offer new guidance for a diverse range of systems including gene delivery, DNA transfection, and protein delivery and separation.

  8. Effect of luminescence transport through adipose tissue on measurement of tissue temperature by using ZnCdS nanothermometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkova, Elena K.; Yanina, Irina Yu.; Sagaydachnaya, Elena; Konyukhova, Julia G.; Kochubey, Vyacheslav I.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2018-02-01

    The spectra of luminescence of ZnCdS nanoparticles (ZnCdS NPs) were measured and analyzed in a wide temperature range: from room to human body and further to a hyperthermic temperature resulting in tissue morphology change. The results show that the signal of luminescence of ZnCdS NPs placed within the tissue is reasonably good sensitive to temperature change and accompanied by phase transitions of lipid structures of adipose tissue. It is shown that the presence of a phase transition in adipose tissue upon its heating (polymorphic transformations of lipids) leads to a nonmonotonic temperature dependence of the intensity of luminescence for the nanoparticles introduced into adipose tissue. This is due to a change in the light scattering by the tissue. The light scattering of adipose tissue greatly distorts the results of temperature measurements. The application of these nanoparticles is possible for temperature measurements in very thin or weakly scattering samples.

  9. Surfactants, interfaces and pores : a theoretical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huinink, H.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the behavior of surfactants in porous media by theoretical means. The influence of curvature of a surface on the adsorption has been studied with a mean field lattice (MFL) model, as developed by Scheutjens and Fleer. An analytical theory has been

  10. Influence of surfactant concentration on nanohydroxyapatite growth

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nanohydroxyapatite particles with different morphologies were synthesized through a microwave coupled hydrothermal method using CTAB as a template. A successful synthesis of nanosized HAP spheres, rods and fibres is achieved through this method by controlling the concentration of the surfactant. The concentration ...

  11. of surfactant replacement therapy at Johannesburg Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To assess the impact of surfactant replacement therapy (SRl) on the outcome of ... oxygen requirements) was compared with that of a historical control group of ... The use of SRT added to the total cost of treating a patient ventilated for HMD.

  12. Surfactant protein D is proatherogenic in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, G. L.; Madsen, J.; Kejling, K.

    2006-01-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is an important innate immune defense molecule that mediates clearance of pathogens and modulates the inflammatory response. Moreover, SP-D is involved in lipid homeostasis, and pulmonary accumulation of phospholipids has previously been observed in SP-D-deficient (Spd...

  13. Topological transformation of a surfactant bilayer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le, T.D.; Olsson, U.; Mortensen, K.

    2000-01-01

    Surfactant lamellar phases are often complicated by the formation of multilamellar (onions) under shear, which can originate simply by shaking the sample. A systematic study has been performed on the C10E3-D2O system in which different bilayer structures under a steady shear flow were investigated...

  14. Surfactant enhanced non-classical extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szymanowski, J.

    2000-01-01

    Surfactant enhanced non-classical extractions are presented and discussed. They include micellar enhanced ultrafiltration and cloud point extraction. The ideas of the processes are given and the main features are presented. They are compared to the classical solvent extraction. The fundamental of micellar solutions and their solubilisation abilities are also discussed. (author)

  15. Lung Surfactant - The Indispensable Component of Respiratory ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 10; Issue 8. Lung Surfactant - The Indispensable Component of Respiratory Mechanics. Shweta Saxena. Research News Volume 10 Issue 8 August 2005 pp 91-96. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  16. Surfactant-aided size exclusion chromatography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horneman, D.A.; Wolbers, M.; Zomerdijk, M.; Ottens, M.; Keurentjes, J.T.F.; Wielen, van der L.A.M.

    2004-01-01

    The flexibility and selectivity of size exclusion chromatog. (SEC) for protein purifn. can be modified by adding non-ionic micelle-forming surfactants to the mobile phase. The micelles exclude proteins from a liq. phase similar to the exclusion effect of the polymer fibers of the size exclusion

  17. Surfactant enhanced non-classical extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szymanowski, J.

    1999-01-01

    Surfactant enhanced non-classical extractions are presented and discussed. They include micellar enhanced ultrafiltration and cloud point extraction. The ideas of the processes are given and the main features are presented. They are compared to the classical solvent extraction. The fundamental of micellar solutions and their solubilization abilities are also discussed. (author)

  18. Adsorption of surfactants and polymers at interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Orlando Jose

    Surface tension and high-resolution laser light scattering experiments were used to investigate the adsorption of isomeric sugar-based surfactants at the air/liquid interface in terms of surfactant surface packing and rheology. Soluble monolayers of submicellar surfactant solutions exhibited a relatively viscous behavior. It was also proved that light scattering of high-frequency thermally-induced capillary waves can be utilized to study surfactant exchange between the surface and the bulk solution. Such analysis revealed the existence of a diffusional relaxation mechanism. A procedure based on XPS was developed for quantification, on an absolute basis, of polymer adsorption on mica and Langmuir-Blodgett cellulose films. The adsorption of cationic polyelectrolytes on negatively-charged solid surfaces was highly dependent on the polymer ionicity. It was found that the adsorption process is driven by electrostatic mechanisms. Charge overcompensation (or charge reversal) of mica occurred after adsorption of polyelectrolytes of ca. 50% charge density, or higher. It was demonstrated that low-charge-density polyelectrolytes adsorb on solid surfaces with an extended configuration dominated by loops and tails. In this case the extent of adsorption is limited by steric constraints. The conformation of the polyelectrolyte in the adsorbed layer is dramatically affected by the presence of salts or surfactants in aqueous solution. The phenomena which occur upon increasing the ionic strength are consistent with the screening of the electrostatic attraction between polyelectrolyte segments and solid surface. This situation leads to polyelectrolyte desorption accompanied by both an increase in the layer thickness and the range of the steric force. Adsorbed polyelectrolytes and oppositely charged surfactants readily associate at the solid/liquid interface. Such association induces polyelectrolyte desorption at a surfactant concentration which depends on the polyelectrolyte charge

  19. Dimeric Surfactants: Promising Ingredients of Cosmetics and Toiletries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Kumar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Surfactants are an essential ingredient for cosmetic, toiletries and personal care products for enhancing their performance. Dimeric surfactants demonstrate superiority compared to conventional surfactants in all areas of application. Dimeric surfactants are extremely promising for utilization in various cosmetic formulations viz. shampoo, lotions, creams, conditioners etc. These surfactants possess extremely unique surface properties viz. lower surface tension, unique micellization, low critical micelle concentration (CMC and antimicrobial activity, higher solubilization etc. Dimerics enhance the performances of cosmetics in an extraordinary manner and provide eco-friendly preparations for human epidermis.

  20. Structural study of surfactant-dependent interaction with protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehan, Sumit; Aswal, Vinod K., E-mail: vkaswal@barc.gov.in [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kohlbrecher, Joachim [Laboratory for Neutron Scattering, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 PSI Villigen (Switzerland)

    2015-06-24

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been used to study the complex structure of anionic BSA protein with three different (cationic DTAB, anionic SDS and non-ionic C12E10) surfactants. These systems form very different surfactant-dependent complexes. We show that the structure of protein-surfactant complex is initiated by the site-specific electrostatic interaction between the components, followed by the hydrophobic interaction at high surfactant concentrations. It is also found that hydrophobic interaction is preferred over the electrostatic interaction in deciding the resultant structure of protein-surfactant complexes.

  1. Physicochemical characteristics of PFC surfactants for dry decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Won Jin; Lee, Chi Woo [Korea University, Seoul (Korea)

    2001-04-01

    Even the trace amount of the used nuclear fuels of high radioactivity are hazardous to the earth and humans. Perfluorocarbons and perfluorocarbon surfactants are emerging to be efficient chemicals in the dry decontamination process of the used fuels of high radioactivity. The theme was undertaken to increase the knowledge on perfluorocarbon surfactants to develop the perfluorocarbon system in the dry decontamination process in Korea. Several cationic and anionic pfc surfactants were synthesized. Effects of pfc surfactants on electrochemical etching of silicon were investigated to form porous silicons. Forces were measured between silicon surfaces and AFM tip in the absence and presence of pfc surfactants. 7 refs., 10 figs. (Author)

  2. Surfactant Sensors in Biotechnology; Part 1 – Electrochemical Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Sak-Bosnar

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available An overview on electrochemical surfactant sensors is given with special attention to papers published since 1993. The importance of surfactants in modern biotechnology is stressed out. Electrochemical sensors are usually divided according to the measured physical quantity to potentiometric, amperometric, conductometric and impedimetric surfactant sensors. The last ones are very few. Potentiometric surfactant sensors are the most numerous due to their simplicity and versatility. They can be used either as end-point titration sensors or as direct EMF measurement sensors, in batch or flow-through mode. Some amperometric surfactant sensors are true biosensors that use microorganisms or living cells.

  3. Critical role for cross-linking of trimeric lectin domains of surfactant protein D in antiviral activity against influenza A virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tecle, Tesfaldet; White, Mitchell R; Sørensen, Grith Lykke

    2008-01-01

    binding activity for some ligands and mediate some functional activities. The lung collectin SP-D (surfactant protein D) has strong neutralizing activity for IAVs (influenza A viruses) in vitro and in vivo, however, the NCRD derived from SP-D has weak viral-binding ability and lacks neutralizing activity...

  4. Luminescence studies of molecular materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, P.F.

    2000-01-01

    Molecular materials have been widely studied for their potential uses in novel semiconductor devices. They occupy the intellectually interesting area between molecular and bulk descriptions of matter, and as such often have unique and useful characteristics. The design and engineering of these structures is inter-disciplinary in its nature, embracing the fields of physics, electrical engineering and both synthetic and physical chemistry. In this thesis luminescence studies of molecular materials will be presented that probe the nature of the excited states in two promising semiconductor systems. Luminescence techniques provide a powerful and sensitive tool in the investigation of kinetic pathways of radiative and non-radiative emission from these samples. This is particularly appropriate here, as the materials being studied are of potential use in electroluminescent devices. The suitability of photoluminescence techniques comes from both the electroluminescence and photoluminescence sharing the same emitting state. The first class of material studied here is an organic semiconducting polymer, cyano-substituted polyphenylenevinylene (CN-PPV). Conjugated polymers combine semiconducting electronic properties with favourable processing properties and offer the possibility of tuning their optical and electronic properties chemically. The cyanosubstitution increases the electron affinity of the polymer backbone, facilitating electron injection in light-emitting diodes. The polymers are soluble in solvents such as toluene and chloroform due the presence of alkoxy sidegroups. CdSe semiconductor nanocrystals are the other class of material characterised in this work. Semiconductor nanocrystals exhibit interesting size-tunable optical properties due to the confinement of the electronic wave functions. Characterisation of samples produced by different synthetic routes has been carried out to demonstrate the advantages of a novel synthetic method in terms of physical and

  5. Development of a ratiometric time-resolved luminescence sensor for pH based on lanthanide complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingjing; Ye, Zhiqiang; Xin, Chenglong; Yuan, Jingli

    2013-01-25

    Time-resolved luminescence bioassay technique using lanthanide complexes as luminescent probes/sensors has shown great utilities in clinical diagnostics and biotechnology discoveries. In this work, a novel terpyridine polyacid derivative that can form highly stable complexes with lanthanide ions in aqueous media, (4'-hydroxy-2,2':6',2''-terpyridine-6,6''-diyl) bis(methylenenitrilo) tetrakis(acetic acid) (HTTA), was designed and synthesized for developing time-resolved luminescence pH sensors based on its Eu(3+) and Tb(3+) complexes. The luminescence characterization results reveal that the luminescence intensity of HTTA-Eu(3+) is strongly dependent on the pH values in weakly acidic to neutral media (pK(a) = 5.8, pH 4.8-7.5), while that of HTTA-Tb(3+) is pH-independent. This unique luminescence response allows the mixture of HTTA-Eu(3+) and HTTA-Tb(3+) (the HTTA-Eu(3+)/Tb(3+) mixture) to be used as a ratiometric luminescence sensor for the time-resolved luminescence detection of pH with the intensity ratio of its Tb(3+) emission at 540 nm to its Eu(3+) emission at 610 nm, I(540 nm)/I(610 nm), as a signal. Moreover, the UV absorption spectrum changes of the HTTA-Eu(3+)/Tb(3+) mixture at different pHs (pH 4.0-7.0) also display a ratiometric response to the pH changes with the ratio of absorbance at 290 nm to that at 325 nm, A(290 nm)/A(325 nm), as a signal. This feature enables the HTTA-Eu(3+)/Tb(3+) mixture to have an additional function for the pH detection with the absorption spectrometry technique. For loading the complexes into the living cells, the acetoxymethyl ester of HTTA was synthesized and used for loading HTTA-Eu(3+) and HTTA-Tb(3+) into the cultured HeLa cells. The luminescence imaging results demonstrated the practical utility of the new sensor for the time-resolved luminescence cell imaging application. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Use of a highly sensitive two-dimensional luminescence imaging system to monitor endogenous bioluminescence in plant leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flor-Henry Michel

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background All living organisms emit spontaneous low-level bioluminescence, which can be increased in response to stress. Methods for imaging this ultra-weak luminescence have previously been limited by the sensitivity of the detection systems used. Results We developed a novel configuration of a cooled charge-coupled device (CCD for 2-dimensional imaging of light emission from biological material. In this study, we imaged photon emission from plant leaves. The equipment allowed short integration times for image acquisition, providing high resolution spatial and temporal information on bioluminescence. We were able to carry out time course imaging of both delayed chlorophyll fluorescence from whole leaves, and of low level wound-induced luminescence that we showed to be localised to sites of tissue damage. We found that wound-induced luminescence was chlorophyll-dependent and was enhanced at higher temperatures. Conclusions The data gathered on plant bioluminescence illustrate that the equipment described here represents an improvement in 2-dimensional luminescence imaging technology. Using this system, we identify chlorophyll as the origin of wound-induced luminescence from leaves.

  7. Effects of Surfactant on Geotechnical Characteristics of Silty Soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahman, Z.A.; Sahibin, A.R.; Lihan, T.; Idris, W.M.R.; Sakina, M.

    2013-01-01

    Surfactants are often used as a cleaning agent for restoration of oil-contaminated soil. However the effect of surfactant on the geotechnical properties of soil is not clearly understood. In this study, the effects of surfactant on silty soil were investigated for consistency index, compaction, permeability and shear strength. Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was used in this study to prepare the surfactant-treated soil. Our results showed that the soil with added surfactant exhibited a decrease in liquid and plastic limit values. Maximum dry densities increased and optimum moisture contents decreased as contents of added surfactant were increased. The presence of surfactant assists the soil to achieve maximum density at lower water content. The addition of surfactant decreased the permeability of soil from 6.29 x 10 -4 to 1.15 x 10 -4 ms -1 . The shear strength of soil with added surfactant was examined using the undrained unconsolidated triaxial tests. The results showed that the undrained shear strength, Cu was significantly affected, decreased from 319 kPa to 50 kPa for soil with 20 % of added surfactant. The results of this study showed that the presence of surfactant in soil can modify the mechanical behaviour of the soil. (author)

  8. Synthesis and properties evaluation of sulfobetaine surfactant with double hydroxyl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ming; Luo, Gang; Zhang, Ze; Li, Sisi; Wang, Chengwen

    2017-09-01

    A series of sulfobetaine surfactants {N-[(3-alkoxy-2-hydroxyl)propoxy] ethyl-N,N-dimethyl-N-(2-hydroxyl)propyl sulfonate} ammonium chloride were synthesized with raw materials containing linear saturated alcohol, N,N-dimethylethanolamine, sodium 3-chloro-2-hydroxyl propane sulfonic acid and epichlorohydrin. The molecule structures of sulfobetaine surfactants were characterized by FTIR, 1HNMR and elemental analysis. Surface tension measurements can provide us information about the surface tension at the CMC (γCMC), pC20, Γmax and Amin. The pC20 values of sulfobetaine surfactants increase with the hydrophobic chain length increasing. Amin values of the surfactants decrease with increasing hydrophobic chain length from 10 to 14. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) and surface tension (γCMC) values of the sulfobetaine surfactants decrease with increasing hydrophobic chain length from 10 to 16. The lipophilicity of surfactant was enhanced with the increase of the carbon chain, however, the ability of anti-hard water was weakened. The minimum oil/water interfacial tension of four kinds of sulfobetaine surfactants is 10-2-10-3 mN/m magnitude, which indicates that the synthesized bis-hydroxy sulfobetaine surfactants have a great ability to reduce interfacial tension in the surfactant flooding system. The surface tension (γCMC) values of synthesized surfactants were lower compared with conventional anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfonate.

  9. Charging and Screening in Nonpolar Solutions of Nonionizable Surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Sven

    2010-03-01

    Nonpolar liquids do not easily accommodate electric charges, but surfactant additives are often found to dramatically increase the solution conductivity and promote surface charging of suspended colloid particles. Such surfactant-mediated electrostatic effects have been associated with equilibrium charge fluctuations among reverse surfactant micelles and in some cases with the statistically rare ionization of individual surfactant molecules. Here we present experimental evidence that even surfactants without any ionizable group can mediate charging and charge screening in nonpolar oils, and that they can do so at surfactant concentrations well below the critical micelle concentration (cmc). Precision conductometry, light scattering, and Karl-Fischer titration of sorbitan oleate solutions in hexane, paired with electrophoretic mobility measurements on suspended polymer particles, reveal a distinctly electrostatic action of the surfactant. We interpret our observations in terms of a charge fluctuation model and argue that the observed charging processes are likely facilitated, but not limited, by the presence of ionizable impurities.

  10. Status of surfactants as penetration enhancers in transdermal drug delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iti Som

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Surfactants are found in many existing therapeutic, cosmetic, and agro-chemical preparations. In recent years, surfactants have been employed to enhance the permeation rates of several drugs via transdermal route. The application of transdermal route to a wider range of drugs is limited due to significant barrier to penetration across the skin which is associated with the outermost stratum corneum layer. Surfactants have effects on the permeability characteristics of several biological membranes including skin. They have the potential to solubilize lipids within the stratum corneum. The penetration of the surfactant molecule into the lipid lamellae of the stratum corneum is strongly dependent on the partitioning behavior and solubility of surfactant. Surfactants ranging from hydrophobic agents such as oleic acid to hydrophilic sodium lauryl sulfate have been tested as permeation enhancer to improve drug delivery. This article reviews the status of surfactants as permeation enhancer in transdermal drug delivery of various drugs.

  11. Surfactant modified clays’ consistency limits and contact angles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Akbulut

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed at preparing a surfactant modified clay (SMC and researching the effect of surfactants on clays' contact angles and consistency limits; clay was thus modified by surfactants formodifying their engineering properties. Seven surfactants (trimethylglycine, hydroxyethylcellulose  octyl phenol ethoxylate, linear alkylbenzene sulfonic acid, sodium lauryl ether sulfate, cetyl trimethylammonium chloride and quaternised ethoxylated fatty amine were used as surfactants in this study. The experimental results indicated that SMC consistency limits (liquid and plastic limits changedsignificantly compared to those of natural clay. Plasticity index and liquid limit (PI-LL values representing soil class approached the A-line when zwitterion, nonionic, and anionic surfactant percentageincreased. However, cationic SMC became transformed from CH (high plasticity clay to MH (high plasticity silt class soils, according to the unified soil classification system (USCS. Clay modifiedwith cationic and anionic surfactants gave higher and lower contact angles than natural clay, respectively.

  12. Influence of stability of polymer surfactant on oil displacement mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Li, Chengliang; Pi, Yanming; Wu, Di; He, Ying; Geng, Liang

    2018-02-01

    At present, most of the oilfields of China have entered the late stage of high water-cut development, and three oil recovery technique has become the leading technology for improving oil recovery. With the improvement of three oil recovery techniques, the polymer surfactant flooding technology has been widely promoted in oil fields in recent years. But in the actual field experiment, it has been found that the polymer surfactant has chromatographic separation at the extraction end, which indicates that the property of the polymer surfactant has changed during the displacement process. At present, there was few literature about how the stability of polymer surfactant affects the oil displacement mechanism. This paper used HuaDing-I polymer surfactant to conduct a micro photolithography glass flooding experiment, and then compared the oil displacement law of polymer surfactant before and after static setting. Finally, the influence law of stability of polymer surfactant on the oil displacement mechanism is obtained by comprehensive analysis.

  13. Intense upconversion luminescence in ytterbium-sensitized thulium-doped oxychloride germanate glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Hongtao; Zhanga Liyan; Zhang Junjie; Wen Lei; Yu Chunlei; Duan Zhongchao; Dai Shixun; Hu Lili; Jiang Zhonghong

    2005-01-01

    Structural and upconversion fluorescence properties in ytterbium-sensitized thulium-doped oxychloride germanate glass have been studied. The structure of oxychloride germanate glass was investigated by peak-deconvolution of Raman spectrum, and the structural information was obtained from the peak wavenumbers. The Raman spectrum investigation indicates that PbCl 2 plays an important role in the formation of glass network, and has an important influence on the upconversion luminescence. Intense blue and weak red emissions centered at 477 and 650 nm, corresponding to the transitions 1 G 4 → 3 H 6 and 1 G 4 → 3 H 4 , respectively, were observed at room temperature. The possible upconversion mechanisms are discussed and estimated. Intense upconversion luminescence indicates that oxychloride germanate glass can be used as potential host material for upconversion lasers

  14. Luminescence properties of oxide films formed by anodization of aluminum in 12-tungstophosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stojadinovic, S.; Vasilic, R.; Petkovic, M.; Nedic, Z.; Kasalica, B.; Belca, I.; Zekovic, Lj.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we have investigated luminescence properties of oxide films formed by anodization of aluminum in 12-tungstophosphoric acid. For the first time we have measured weak luminescence during anodization of aluminum in this electrolyte (so-called galvanoluminescence GL) and showed that there are wide GL bands in the visible region of the spectrum and observed two dominant spectral peaks. The first one is at about 425 nm, and the second one shifts with anodization voltage. As the anodization voltage approaches the breakdown voltage, a large number of sparks appear superimposed on the anodic GL. Several intensive band peaks were observed under breakdown caused by electron transitions in W, P, Al, O, H atoms. Furthermore, photoluminescence (PL) of anodic oxide films and anodic-spark formed oxide coatings were performed. In both cases wide PL bands in the range from 320 nm to 600 nm were observed.

  15. Luminescence investigation of Yb{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+} codoped single LiYF{sub 4} microparticle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Wei; Zheng, Hairong, E-mail: hrzheng@snnu.edu.cn; He, Enjie; Lu, Ying; Gao, Fangqi

    2014-08-01

    Tetragonal phase LiYF{sub 4}:Yb{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+} microparticles are synthesized via facile hydrothermal method. Single LiYF{sub 4} microparticle is excited with IR laser at 980 nm in a confocal setup, and strong green and weak red emissions are observed. It is found that single LiYF{sub 4}:Yb{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+} microparticle with sub-structure presents stronger upconversion luminescence emission and smaller intensity ratio of red to green emission than that from LiYF{sub 4}:Yb{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+} microparticle with no sub-structure. The possible mechanism, the influence of particle size and the existence of EDTA on the upconversion luminescence emission are investigated. The current study suggests that the luminescence observation with single micropaticle can effectively avoid the influence of environment and neighbor particles, which is important for investigating the luminescence properties of micro- or nano-crystals and for extending their application. - Highlights: • Single LiYF{sub 4} microparticle is excited with IR laser at 980 nm in a confocal setup, and strong green and weak red emissions are observed. • Single LiYF{sub 4} microparticle with different morphology exhibits different fluorescence emission intensity and intensity ratio of red to green emission. • The possible mechanism, the influence of particle size and the existence of EDTA on the upconversion emission are investigated.

  16. Endoscopic Cerenkov luminescence imaging: in vivo small animal tumor model validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Tianming; Bao, Chengpeng; Hu, Zhenhua; Wang, Kun; Liu, Xia; Tian, Jie

    2015-03-01

    Background: Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) provides a great potential for clinical translation of optical molecular imaging techniques through using clinical approved radiotracers. However, it is difficult to obtain the Cerenkov luminescence signal of deeper biological tissues due to the small magnitude of the signal. To efficiently acquire the weak Cerenkov luminescence, we developed an endoscopic Cerenkov luminescence imaging (ECLI) system to reduce the in vivo imaging depth with minimum invasion, and validated the system on small animal tumor models. Methods: For the ECLI system, the laparoscope was connected to a high sensitive charge-couple device (CCD) camera (DU888+, Andor, UK) by a custom made adapter. We conducted a series of in vitro and in vivo experiments by use of the system. In the in vitro experiment, the endoscopic luminescence images of the 18F-FDG with various activities in EP tubes were acquired using ECLI system, and the sensitivity was compared with conventional CLI system. In the in vivo tumor experiment, 18F-FDG with the activity of 200μCi were intravenously injected into 3 tumor mice. Then the ECLI system was used to acquire the optical images for both non-invasive and invasive conditions. Conclusion: Experimental data showed the ECLI system could detect the 18F-FDG with the activity as low as 1μCi. Furthermore, our preliminary results indicated the possibility of ECLI technique for detecting Cerenkov signals inside the tumor tissue with deeper depth and guiding the surgical operation of tumor excision. We believe that this technique can help to accelerate the clinical translation of CLI.

  17. Luminescence dating at Rose cottage cave: a progress report

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Woodborne, S

    1997-10-01

    Full Text Available Deal with infrared-stimulated luminescence and thermoluminescence dates from Rose Cottage Cave in South Africa. Discrepancy between luminescence and radiocarbon dates; Concentration of radioactive elements in sediments before and after leaching...

  18. Standard and Null Weak Values

    OpenAIRE

    Zilberberg, Oded; Romito, Alessandro; Gefen, Yuval

    2013-01-01

    Weak value (WV) is a quantum mechanical measurement protocol, proposed by Aharonov, Albert, and Vaidman. It consists of a weak measurement, which is weighed in, conditional on the outcome of a later, strong measurement. Here we define another two-step measurement protocol, null weak value (NVW), and point out its advantages as compared to WV. We present two alternative derivations of NWVs and compare them to the corresponding derivations of WVs.

  19. Luminescent polymethyl methacrylate modified by gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morais, Guilherme F. [Faculdade de Tecnologia de Sao Paulo (FATEC-ZL), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Forster, Pedro L.; Marchini, Leonardo G.; Lugao, Ademar B.; Parra, Duclerc F., E-mail: dfparra@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Thin films of PMMA (polymethyl methacrylate) doped with luminescent complexes have been studied and developed for applications in advanced technologies. The problem of stability of these films is focused in this study. Films stabilization by reaction with fluorinated monomers is a recent study that aims to increase its luminescence properties for long time. The films were prepared by dilution of PMMA in chloroform with addition of europium complex, at proportion of 5% by weight of polymer. The luminescent polymer films were obtained by casting. Thin layer slides of the film were separated in three parts. One was reacted with fluorinated monomers (C{sub 2}F{sub 4}) in closed reactor for 48 hours. A second part was reacted with C{sub 2}F{sub 4} after irradiation in gamma source at 5 kGy in simultaneous process. The last part was used as obtained. The luminescent polymer matrices were characterized using the techniques of infrared (FTIR) and thermogravimetry (TGA/DTG). Samples of the films were, in presence of fluorine monomers, exposed to ionizing radiation in dose of 5 kGy, for react with monomers in the doped polymer surface. In this case the effects of radiation were evaluated on the luminescent films. (author)

  20. Luminescent polymethyl methacrylate modified by gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morais, Guilherme F.; Forster, Pedro L.; Marchini, Leonardo G.; Lugao, Ademar B.; Parra, Duclerc F.

    2011-01-01

    Thin films of PMMA (polymethyl methacrylate) doped with luminescent complexes have been studied and developed for applications in advanced technologies. The problem of stability of these films is focused in this study. Films stabilization by reaction with fluorinated monomers is a recent study that aims to increase its luminescence properties for long time. The films were prepared by dilution of PMMA in chloroform with addition of europium complex, at proportion of 5% by weight of polymer. The luminescent polymer films were obtained by casting. Thin layer slides of the film were separated in three parts. One was reacted with fluorinated monomers (C 2 F 4 ) in closed reactor for 48 hours. A second part was reacted with C 2 F 4 after irradiation in gamma source at 5 kGy in simultaneous process. The last part was used as obtained. The luminescent polymer matrices were characterized using the techniques of infrared (FTIR) and thermogravimetry (TGA/DTG). Samples of the films were, in presence of fluorine monomers, exposed to ionizing radiation in dose of 5 kGy, for react with monomers in the doped polymer surface. In this case the effects of radiation were evaluated on the luminescent films. (author)

  1. Weak openness and almost openness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Rose

    1984-01-01

    Full Text Available Weak openness and almost openness for arbitrary functions between topological spaces are defined as duals to the weak continuity of Levine and the almost continuity of Husain respectively. Independence of these two openness conditions is noted and comparison is made between these and the almost openness of Singal and Singal. Some results dual to those known for weak continuity and almost continuity are obtained. Nearly almost openness is defined and used to obtain an improved link from weak continuity to almost continuity.

  2. Weak measurements and quantum weak values for NOON states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales-Zárate, L.; Opanchuk, B.; Reid, M. D.

    2018-03-01

    Quantum weak values arise when the mean outcome of a weak measurement made on certain preselected and postselected quantum systems goes beyond the eigenvalue range for a quantum observable. Here, we propose how to determine quantum weak values for superpositions of states with a macroscopically or mesoscopically distinct mode number, that might be realized as two-mode Bose-Einstein condensate or photonic NOON states. Specifically, we give a model for a weak measurement of the Schwinger spin of a two-mode NOON state, for arbitrary N . The weak measurement arises from a nondestructive measurement of the two-mode occupation number difference, which for atomic NOON states might be realized via phase contrast imaging and the ac Stark effect using an optical meter prepared in a coherent state. The meter-system coupling results in an entangled cat-state. By subsequently evolving the system under the action of a nonlinear Josephson Hamiltonian, we show how postselection leads to quantum weak values, for arbitrary N . Since the weak measurement can be shown to be minimally invasive, the weak values provide a useful strategy for a Leggett-Garg test of N -scopic realism.

  3. Phase transformation, morphology evolution and luminescence property variation in Y2O3: Eu hollow microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Qin; Guo, Jing; Jia, Wenjing; Liu, Baocang; Zhang, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We report a general and facile method for the synthesis of Y 2 O 3 : Eu hollow microspheres. ► This method may be of great significance in the synthesis of many other hollow spherical materials. ► Phase, morphology and luminescence property were found to be strongly dependent on temperature and pH. ► The evolution process under various temperatures and pH values were discussed. ► The sample shows a strong red emission under short UV irradiation, and the lifetime is determined to be 7.0 ms. - Abstract: Y 2 O 3 : Eu hollow microspheres with average size of 500–600 nm have been successfully synthesized via a solvothermal method in the presence of sodium citrate as surfactant followed by a subsequent heat treatment process. High polymer F127(EO 106 PO 70 EO 106 ) served as a soft template in the formation of as prepared hollow microspheres. It is found that the pH values and the reaction temperature are two crucial factors in determining the phase, morphology and luminescence properties of the Y 2 O 3 : Eu hollow microspheres. Morphology evolution can be achieved by changing the pH and the reaction temperature. The properties of the Eu 3+ -doped Y 2 O 3 : Eu nanocrystals were characterized by XRD, FE-SEM, HR-TEM and UV–vis spectroscopy.

  4. A Terbium Sensitized Luminescence Method for the Assay of Flubiprofen in Pharmaceutical Formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salma M.Z. Al-Kindy

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A sensitive time-resolved luminescence method for the determination of flubiprofen (FLP in methanol and in aqueous solution is described. The method is based on the luminescence sensitization of terbium (Tb3+ by the formation of a ternary complex with FLP in the presence of 4,7 diphenyl 1,10 phenanthroline (DPP as co-ligand, and Tween-20 as surfactant. The signal for Tb-FLP-DPP was monitored at λex  = 285 nm and λem  = 552 nm. Optimum conditions for the formation of the complex in an aqueous system were TRIS buffer, pH 8.0, DPP (2.5Å~10−7  M, Tween-20 (0.30% and 4Å~10-5  mol L-1  of Tb3+  which allowed the determination of 20–1000 ng mL-1  of FLP with a limit of detection (LOD of 10 ng mL-1 . The relative standard deviations of the method ranged between 0.6 and 1.4% indicating excellent reproducibility of the method. The proposed method was successfully applied for the assays of FLP in pharmaceutical formulations and spiked tap water samples with average recoveries of 87% – 95%.

  5. Determination of piroxicam in pharmaceutical formulations and urine samples using europium-sensitized luminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Kindy, Salma M.Z. [Department of Chemistry, College of Science, P.O. Box 36, Al-Khod 123, Sultan Qaboos University (Oman)], E-mail: alkindy@squ.edu.om; Suliman, Fakhr Eldin O.; Al-Wishahi, Aisha A.; Al-Lawati, Haidar A.J.; Aoudia, Muhammed [Department of Chemistry, College of Science, P.O. Box 36, Al-Khod 123, Sultan Qaboos University (Oman)

    2007-12-15

    A simple, selective and sensitive luminescence method for the assay of piroxicam (PX) in aqueous solution is developed. The method is based on the luminescence sensitization of europium (Eu{sup 3+}) by formation of ternary complex with PX in the presence of TOPO and Tween-80 as surfactant. The signal for Eu-PX-TOPO is monitored at {lambda}{sub ex}=359 nm and {lambda}{sub em}=615 nm. Optimum conditions for the formation of the complex in sequential injection analysis (SIA) were 0.01 M Tris buffer, pH 7.5, TOPO 5.0x10{sup -5} M, Tween-80 0.15% and 1.5 mM of Eu{sup 3+}, which allows the determination of 100-1000 ppb of PX with limit of detection (LOD) of 29 ppb. The relative standard deviations of the method range between 0.5% and 3.9% indicating excellent reproducibility of the method. The proposed method was successfully applied for the assay of PX in pharmaceutical formulations and in urine samples. Average recoveries of 100.8{+-}1.7% was obtained in tablet, whereas a recovery of 97.5{+-}2.0% was obtained for the total PX (PX+hydoxy-PX) in urine sample.

  6. Determination of piroxicam in pharmaceutical formulations and urine samples using europium-sensitized luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Kindy, Salma M.Z.; Suliman, Fakhr Eldin O.; Al-Wishahi, Aisha A.; Al-Lawati, Haidar A.J.; Aoudia, Muhammed

    2007-01-01

    A simple, selective and sensitive luminescence method for the assay of piroxicam (PX) in aqueous solution is developed. The method is based on the luminescence sensitization of europium (Eu 3+ ) by formation of ternary complex with PX in the presence of TOPO and Tween-80 as surfactant. The signal for Eu-PX-TOPO is monitored at λ ex =359 nm and λ em =615 nm. Optimum conditions for the formation of the complex in sequential injection analysis (SIA) were 0.01 M Tris buffer, pH 7.5, TOPO 5.0x10 -5 M, Tween-80 0.15% and 1.5 mM of Eu 3+ , which allows the determination of 100-1000 ppb of PX with limit of detection (LOD) of 29 ppb. The relative standard deviations of the method range between 0.5% and 3.9% indicating excellent reproducibility of the method. The proposed method was successfully applied for the assay of PX in pharmaceutical formulations and in urine samples. Average recoveries of 100.8±1.7% was obtained in tablet, whereas a recovery of 97.5±2.0% was obtained for the total PX (PX+hydoxy-PX) in urine sample

  7. Development of a ratiometric time-resolved luminescence sensor for pH based on lanthanide complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Mingjing; Ye Zhiqiang; Xin Chenglong; Yuan Jingli

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A lanthanide complex-based ratiometric luminescent pH sensor was developed. ► The sensor can luminously respond to pH in weakly acidic to neutral media. ► The sensor can be used for monitoring pH with time-resolved luminescence mode. ► The sensor can be also used for monitoring pH with absorbance mode. ► The utility of the sensor for the luminescent cell imaging was demonstrated. - Abstract: Time-resolved luminescence bioassay technique using lanthanide complexes as luminescent probes/sensors has shown great utilities in clinical diagnostics and biotechnology discoveries. In this work, a novel terpyridine polyacid derivative that can form highly stable complexes with lanthanide ions in aqueous media, (4′-hydroxy-2,2′:6′,2′′-terpyridine-6,6′′-diyl) bis(methylenenitrilo) tetrakis(acetic acid) (HTTA), was designed and synthesized for developing time-resolved luminescence pH sensors based on its Eu 3+ and Tb 3+ complexes. The luminescence characterization results reveal that the luminescence intensity of HTTA–Eu 3+ is strongly dependent on the pH values in weakly acidic to neutral media (pK a = 5.8, pH 4.8–7.5), while that of HTTA–Tb 3+ is pH-independent. This unique luminescence response allows the mixture of HTTA–Eu 3+ and HTTA–Tb 3+ (the HTTA–Eu 3+ /Tb 3+ mixture) to be used as a ratiometric luminescence sensor for the time-resolved luminescence detection of pH with the intensity ratio of its Tb 3+ emission at 540 nm to its Eu 3+ emission at 610 nm, I 540nm /I 610nm , as a signal. Moreover, the UV absorption spectrum changes of the HTTA–Eu 3+ /Tb 3+ mixture at different pHs (pH 4.0–7.0) also display a ratiometric response to the pH changes with the ratio of absorbance at 290 nm to that at 325 nm, A 290nm /A 325nm , as a signal. This feature enables the HTTA–Eu 3+ /Tb 3+ mixture to have an additional function for the pH detection with the absorption spectrometry technique. For loading the complexes into the

  8. A novel 3D nanoarchitecture of PrVO4 phosphor: Selective synthesis, characterization, and luminescence behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirumalai, J.; Chandramohan, R.; Vijayan, T.A.

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Nanostructures of tetragonal PrVO 4 with novel 3D hierarchical architectures self-assembled nanorods were successfully synthesized by a hydrothermal method in ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) mediated processes are ideal functional components for next generation luminescent devices. Research highlights: → Synthesis of self-assembled 3D nanoarchitecture of PrVO 4 phosphor. → Using template-free hydrothermal method. → pH, temperature and capping molecules control morphology of the products. → Detailed structural, morphology and luminescence were studied. - Abstract: Nanostructures of tetragonal PrVO 4 with novel 3D hierarchical architectures self-assembled nanorods were successfully synthesized by a hydrothermal method in ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) mediated processes. Comprehensive structural, morphological studies like X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy were employed to characterize the as-obtained products. In the hydrothermal process, EDTA not only acts as a chelating reagent to facilitate the formation of PrVO 4 , but also acts as a surface capping agent to adhere to the newly created surface and to promote the crystal splitting. The formation mechanisms of nanorods to hierarchical architectures were proposed on the basis of a series of surfactant and time-dependent experiments. Photoluminescence (PL) studies of PrVO 4 showed strong red emission upon UV illumination, and this implied potential application in the luminescent field. A possible growth mechanism of the sheaf-like PrVO 4 hierarchical nanocrystals is proposed and discussed.

  9. Evaluation of acute and chronic toxicity of DSS and LAS surfactants undergoing the irradiation with electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanelli, Maria Fernanda

    2004-01-01

    Surfactants are synthetic organic compounds widely used in cosmetic, food, textile, dyers and paper production industries and in particular detergents and others cleaning products industries. The world consumption is nearly 8 million tons per year. One of the main environmental issues coming from the use of these compounds is their toxicity that compromises the biological treatment of effluents and the quality of receiving waters. The objective of this work was the application of ionizing radiation by electron beam in the degradation and reduction of acute and chronic toxicities of surfactants sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS), dodecyl p-benzenesulfonate acid (LAS) and sodium dodecyl p-benzenesulfonate (LAS). This treatment technology has been studied as a pre-treatment for effluents containing toxic and non-biodegradable compounds, before the biological treatment. Two acute toxicity assays were employed, one with the micro-crustacean Daphnia similis and the other with the luminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri along with a chronic toxicity assay with the micro-crustacean Ceriodaphnia dubia (just for SDS and acid LAS) for the non-irradiated and irradiated samples and radiation doses 3.0 kGy, 6.0 kGy, 9.0 kGy and 12.0 kGy. Physical-chemical parameters were evaluated for the following up the degradation of the surfactant molecules. The reductions of acute toxicity varied between 72.49% and 90.98% for SDS, 18.22% and 78.98% for acid LAS and 82.66% and 94.26% for sodium LAS. For the chronic toxicity, the reduction percentages varied between 64.03% and 83.01% for SDS and 47.48% and 64.91% for acid LAS. When one considers the application of the electron beam as a pre-treatment of effluents containing high concentrations of surfactants, the toxicity is an essential parameter allowing the further biological treatment of these effluents. (author)

  10. Effect of antimony incorporation on the density, shape, and luminescence of InAs quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J. F.; Chiang, C. H.; Wu, Y. H.; Chang, L.; Chi, J. Y.

    2008-07-01

    This work investigates the surfactant effect on exposed and buried InAs quantum dots (QDs) by incorporating Sb into the QD layers with various Sb beam equivalent pressures (BEPs). Secondary ion mass spectroscopy shows the presence of Sb in the exposed and buried QD layers with the Sb intensity in the exposed layer substantially exceeding that in the buried layer. Incorporating Sb can reduce the density of the exposed QDs by more than two orders of magnitude. However, a high Sb BEP yields a surface morphology with a regular periodic structure of ellipsoid terraces. A good room-temperature photoluminescence (PL) at ˜1600 nm from the exposed QDs is observed, suggesting that the Sb incorporation probably improves the emission efficiency by reducing the surface recombination velocity at the surface of the exposed QDs. Increasing Sb BEP causes a blueshift of the emission from the exposed QDs due to a reduction in the dot height as suggested by atomic force microscopy. Increasing Sb BEP can also blueshift the ˜1300 nm emission from the buried QDs by decreasing the dot height. However, a high Sb BEP yields a quantum well-like PL feature formed by the clustering of the buried QDs into an undulated planar layer. These results indicate a marked Sb surfactant effect that can be used to control the density, shape, and luminescence of the exposed and buried QDs.

  11. Study of the liquid water luminescence induced by charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rusu, Mircea; Stere, Oana; Haiduc, Maria; Caramete, Laurentiu

    2004-01-01

    Many observations suggested that liquid water (with impurities) could give a luminescence output when irradiated with charged particles. We investigate theoretical and practical possibility of detecting such luminescence. Preliminary results on this possibility are presented, and a layout of the device proposed for measuring luminescence is given. (authors)

  12. Cleavage Luminescence from Cleaved Indium Phosphide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong-Guang, Li

    2008-01-01

    We outline the experiments performed to gain further information about the structure and properties of cleaved InP surfaces. The experiments involved detecting the luminescence produced after cleaving thin InP plates within a high vacuum, by a process of converting the luminescence to an electrical signal which could be amplified and measured accurately. The experimental results show that the detected luminescence durations from cleaved InP are usually only about 10μs. It is believed that this time represents the time of travel of the crack with the actual recombination time being much shorter. Strong signals could also be picked up from cleaved InP in air

  13. [Synthesis of reserve polyhydroxyalkanoates by luminescent bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiandin, A N; Kalacheva, G S; Rodicheva, E K; Volova, T G

    2008-01-01

    The ability of marine luminescent bacteria to synthesize polyesters of hydroxycarboxylic acids (polyhydroxyalkanoates, PHA) as reserve macromolecules was studied. Twenty strains from the collection of the luminescent bacteria CCIBSO (WDSM839) of the Institute of Biophysics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, assigned to different taxa (Photobacterium leiognathi, Ph. phosphoreum, Vibrio harveyi, and V. fischeri) were analyzed. The most productive strains were identified, and the conditions ensuring high polymer yields in batch culture (40-70% of the cell dry mass weight) were determined. The capacity of synthesizing two- and three-component polymers containing hydroxybutyric acid as the main monomer and hydroxyvaleric and hydroxyhexanoic acids was revealed in Ph. leiognathi and V. harveyi strains. The results allow luminescent microorganisms to be regarded as new producers of multicomponent polyhydroxyalkanoates.

  14. Process for obtaining luminescent glass layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heindi, R.; Robert, A.

    1984-01-01

    Process for obtaining luminescent glass layers, application to the production of devices provided with said layers and to the construction of photoscintillators. The process comprises projecting onto a support, by cathodic sputtering, the material of at least one target, each target including silica and at least one chemical compound able to give luminescent centers, such as a cerium oxide, so as to form at least one luminescent glass layer of the said support. The layer or layers formed preferably undergo a heat treatment such as annealing in order to increase the luminous efficiency thereof. It is in this way possible to form a scintillating glass layer on the previously frosted entrance window of a photomultiplier in order to obtain an integrated photoscintillator

  15. Cerium luminescence in nd0 perovskites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setlur, A.A.; Happek, U.

    2010-01-01

    The luminescence of Ce 3+ in perovskite (ABO 3 ) hosts with nd 0 B-site cations, specifically Ca(Hf,Zr)O 3 and (La,Gd)ScO 3 , is investigated in this report. The energy position of the Ce 3+ excitation and emission bands in these perovskites is compared to those of typical Al 3+ perovskites; we find a Ce 3+ 5d 1 centroid shift and Stokes shift that are larger versus the corresponding values for the Al 3+ perovskites. It is also shown that Ce 3+ luminescence quenching is due to Ce 3+ photoionization. The comparison between these perovskites shows reasonable correlations between Ce 3+ luminescence quenching, the energy position of the Ce 3+ 5d 1 excited state with respect to the host conduction band, and the host composition. - Graphical abstract: Ce 3+ decay times versus temperature for perovskites with nd 0 B-site cations.

  16. ASSOCIATION OF BRANCHED POLYETHYLENE IMINE WITH SURFACTANTS IN AQUEOUS SOLUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismael C. Bellettini

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Three polymer-surfactant systems comprised of branched polyethylene imine (PEI with an anionic surfactant (sodium dodecylsulfate; SDS, a cationic surfactant (tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide; TTAB, and a zwitterionic surfactant (N-tetradecyl-N,N-dimethyl-3-ammonio-1-propanesulfonate; SB3-14 were studied based on the properties of surface tension, pyrene fluorescence emission, dynamic light scattering, pH, and zeta potential measurements. The critical aggregation concentration (cac and polymer saturation point (psp were determined for all three systems. The effect of these surfactants on the physico-chemical characteristics (diameter and surface charge of the complexes formed was determined. Polymer-surfactant interactions occurred in all of the systems studied, with the strongest interactions, electrostatic in nature, occurring in the SDS-PEI system. After the neutralization of the polymer charges with the addition of the surfactant, the hydrophobic effect started to control the interlacing of the polymer chains. For the PEI-TTAB system, a very dense film was formed at surfactant concentrations above 2.0 mmol L-1. In this case, the bromide counter-ion interacted with both the positively-charged PEI and the head of the surfactant, which is responsible for the formation of double layer coordination complexes. For the system composed of PEI and the zwitterionic surfactant, less cooperative associations occurred in comparison with the other systems.

  17. Next Generation Surfactants for Improved Chemical Flooding Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laura Wesson; Prapas Lohateeraparp; Jeffrey Harwell; Bor-Jier Shiau

    2012-05-31

    The principle objective of this project was to characterize and test current and next generation high performance surfactants for improved chemical flooding technology, focused on reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian-aged (Penn) sands. In order to meet this objective the characteristic curvatures (Cc) of twenty-eight anionic surfactants selected for evaluation for use in chemical flooding formulations were determined. The Cc values ranged from -6.90 to 2.55 with the majority having negative values. Crude oil samples from nine Penn sand reservoirs were analyzed for several properties pertinent to surfactant formulation for EOR application. These properties included equivalent alkane carbon numbers, total acid numbers, and viscosity. The brine samples from these same reservoirs were analyzed for several cations and for total dissolved solids. Surfactant formulations were successfully developed for eight reservoirs by the end of the project period. These formulations were comprised of a tertiary mixture of anionic surfactants. The identities of these surfactants are considered proprietary, but suffice to say the surfactants in each mixture were comprised of varying chemical structures. In addition to the successful development of surfactant formulations for EOR, there were also two successful single-well field tests conducted. There are many aspects that must be considered in the development and implementation of effective surfactant formulations. Taking into account these other aspects, there were four additional studies conducted during this project. These studies focused on the effect of the stability of surfactant formulations in the presence of polymers with an associated examination of polymer rheology, the effect of the presence of iron complexes in the brine on surfactant stability, the potential use of sacrificial agents in order to minimize the loss of surfactant to adsorption, and the effect of electrolytes on surfactant adsorption. In these last four studies

  18. Weak decays of stable particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.M.

    1988-09-01

    In this article we review recent advances in the field of weak decays and consider their implications for quantum chromodynamics (the theory of strong interactions) and electroweak theory (the combined theory of electromagnetic and weak interactions), which together form the ''Standard Model'' of elementary particles. (author)

  19. Permaflood, formation in situ of surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapo, G

    1972-01-01

    The present paper described a new process to produce surfactants in situ in which advantage is taken of the chemical reaction of oxidation in the liquid phase. This process consists of injecting a front of oxidizing agents and reaction compounds, in order to avoid the precipitation of the reaction products and to avoid the interaction between the surfactants produced and the calcium and magnesium in the connate water. Many different types of oxidizing agents as sodium dichromate, hydrogen peroxide, potassium permanganate, sodium hypochlorite, etc., are used. Also, there is considered the use of catalyzers with these oxidizing agents and the variation of the pH of the oxidizing front (permanaganate was the first oxidant used to check the technical and economic possibilities of this process in the laboratory). The process is called Permaflood, so named because potassium permanganate was the first oxidant used to check the technical and economic possibilities of this process in the laboratory.

  20. Microemulsion-based lycopene extraction: Effect of surfactants, co-surfactants and pretreatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri-Rigi, Atefeh; Abbasi, Soleiman

    2016-04-15

    Lycopene is a potent antioxidant that has received extensive attention recently. Due to the challenges encountered with current methods of lycopene extraction using hazardous solvents, industry calls for a greener, safer and more efficient process. The main purpose of present study was application of microemulsion technique to extract lycopene from tomato pomace. In this respect, the effect of eight different surfactants, four different co-surfactants, and ultrasound and enzyme pretreatments on lycopene extraction efficiency was examined. Experimental results revealed that application of combined ultrasound and enzyme pretreatments, saponin as a natural surfactant, and glycerol as a co-surfactant, in the bicontinuous region of microemulsion was the optimal experimental conditions resulting in a microemulsion containing 409.68±0.68 μg/glycopene. The high lycopene concentration achieved, indicates that microemulsion technique, using a low-cost natural surfactant could be promising for a simple and safe separation of lycopene from tomato pomace and possibly from tomato industrial wastes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Co-assembly in chitosan-surfactant mixtures: thermodynamics, structures, interfacial properties and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiappisi, Leonardo; Gradzielski, Michael

    2015-06-01

    In this review, different aspects characterizing chitosan-surfactant mixtures are summarized and compared. Chitosan is a bioderived cationic polysaccharide that finds wide-ranged applications in various field, e.g., medical or food industry, in which synergistic effects with surfactant can play a fundamental role. In particular, the behavior of chitosan interacting with strong and weak anionic, nonionic as well as cationic surfactants is reviewed. We put a focus on oppositely charged systems, as they exhibit the most interesting features. In that context, we discuss the thermodynamic description of the interaction and in particular the structural changes as they occur as a function of the mixed systems and external parameters. Moreover, peculiar properties of chitosan coated phospholipid vesicles are summarized. Finally, their co-assembly at interfaces is briefly reviewed. Despite the behavior of the mentioned systems might strongly differ, resulting in a high variety of properties, few general rules can be pointed out which improve the understanding of such complex systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Electromagnetic current in weak interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, E.

    1983-01-01

    In gauge models which unify weak and electromagnetic interactions, the weak neutral-current interaction also involves the electromagnetic current. The exact nature of such a component can be explored using e + e - experimental data. In recent years, the existence of a new component of the weak interaction has become firmly established, i.e., the neutral-current interaction. As such, it competes with the electromagnetic interaction whenever the particles involved are also charged, but at a very much lower rate because its effective strength is so small. Hence neutrino processes are best for the detection of the neutral-current interaction. However, in any gauge model which unifies weak and electromagnetic interactions, the weak neutral-current interaction also involves the electromagnetic current

  3. Weak values in collision theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, Leonardo Andreta; Brasil, Carlos Alexandre; Napolitano, Reginaldo de Jesus

    2018-05-01

    Weak measurements have an increasing number of applications in contemporary quantum mechanics. They were originally described as a weak interaction that slightly entangled the translational degrees of freedom of a particle to its spin, yielding surprising results after post-selection. That description often ignores the kinetic energy of the particle and its movement in three dimensions. Here, we include these elements and re-obtain the weak values within the context of collision theory by two different approaches, and prove that the results are compatible with each other and with the results from the traditional approach. To provide a more complete description, we generalize weak values into weak tensors and use them to provide a more realistic description of the Stern-Gerlach apparatus.

  4. The Equilibrium Spreading Tension of Pulmonary Surfactant

    OpenAIRE

    Dagan, Maayan P.; Hall, Stephen B.

    2015-01-01

    Monomolecular films at an air/water interface coexist at the equilibrium spreading tension (γe) with the bulk phase from which they form. For individual phospholipids, γe is single-valued, and separates conditions at which hydrated vesicles adsorb from tensions at which overcompressed monolayers collapse. With pulmonary surfactant, isotherms show that monolayers compressed on the surface of bubbles coexist with the three-dimensional collapsed phase over a range of surface tensions. γe therefo...

  5. PLUNC: a multifunctional surfactant of the airways

    OpenAIRE

    Bartlett, Jennifer; Gakhar, Lokesh; Penterman, Jon; Singh, Pradeep; Mallampalli, Rama K.; Porter, Edith; McCray, Paul B.

    2011-01-01

    PLUNC (palate, lung and nasal epithelium clone) protein is an abundant secretory product of epithelia throughout the mammalian conducting airways. Despite its homology with the innate immune defence molecules BPI (bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein) and LBP (lipopolysaccharide-binding protein), it has been difficult to define the functions of PLUNC. Based on its marked hydrophobicity and expression pattern, we hypothesized that PLUNC is an airway surfactant. We found that purified r...

  6. Thermal quenching of luminescence processes in feldspars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poolton, N.R.J.; Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Duller, G.A.T.

    1995-01-01

    , which display very different behaviour. The first involves the internal transitions of common transition metal ions. The second is typical of centres not displaying excited states within the band gap that are likely to arise from direct recombination between the conduction band and the ground state......The technique of optically stimulated luminescence has important uses in the dose evaluation of irradiated feldspars. The luminescence process involves the eviction of electrons from donor traps, charge transfer through the conduction band, and recombination at acceptor sites; each...

  7. The Accelerated Late Adsorption of Pulmonary Surfactant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Adsorption of pulmonary surfactant to an air−water interface lowers surface tension (γ) at rates that initially decrease progressively, but which then accelerate close to the equilibrium γ. The studies here tested a series of hypotheses concerning mechanisms that might cause the late accelerated drop in γ. Experiments used captive bubbles and a Wilhelmy plate to measure γ during adsorption of vesicles containing constituents from extracted calf surfactant. The faster fall in γ reflects faster adsorption rather than any feature of the equation of state that relates γ to surface concentration (Γ). Adsorption accelerates when γ reaches a critical value rather than after an interval required to reach that γ. The hydrophobic surfactant proteins (SPs) represent key constituents, both for reaching the γ at which the acceleration occurs and for producing the acceleration itself. The γ at which rates of adsorption increase, however, is unaffected by the Γ of protein in the films. In the absence of the proteins, a phosphatidylethanolamine, which, like the SPs, induces fusion of the vesicles with the interfacial film, also causes adsorption to accelerate. Our results suggest that the late acceleration is characteristic of adsorption by fusion of vesicles with the nascent film, which proceeds more favorably when the Γ of the lipids exceeds a critical value. PMID:21417351

  8. Alveolar Thin Layer Flows and Surfactant Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roumie, Ahmad; Jbaily, Abdulrahman; Szeri, Andrew J.

    2017-11-01

    Pulmonary surfactants play a vital role in everyday respiration. They regulate surface tension in the lungs by diffusing through the hypophase, a liquid layer that lines the interior surface of the alveoli, and adsorbing to the existing air-fluid interface. This decreases the equilibrium surface tension value by as much as a factor of 3, minimizing breathing effort and preventing lung collapse at the end of exhalation. Given that the hypophase thickness h lies within the range 0.1 μm < h <0.5 μm , and that the average alveolar radius R is 100 μm , for some purposes the hypophase may usefully be modeled as a fluid layer on a flat sheet representing the alveolar wall. Moreover, because of the large aspect ratio, the lubrication approximation can be applied. The aim of the present work is to study the interaction between the straining of the alveolar wall and the fluid flow in the hypophase. The analysis is governed by the relative magnitudes of the time scales of surfactant diffusion, adsorption, desorption, viscous dissipation and sheet straining. Cases of particular interest include non-uniform surfactant concentration at the interface, leading to Marangoni flows and a non-uniform hypophase thickness profile. The analytical formulation and numerical simulations are presented. This work is motivated by a need to understand alveolar deformation during breathing, and to do so in a way that derives from improved understanding of the fluid mechanics of the problem.

  9. Surfactant protein A and surfactant protein D variation in pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Grith Lykke; Husby, Steffen; Holmskov, Uffe

    2007-01-01

    Surfactant proteins A (SP-A) and D (SP-D) have been implicated in pulmonary innate immunity. The proteins are host defense lectins, belonging to the collectin family which also includes mannan-binding lectin (MBL). SP-A and SP-D are pattern-recognition molecules with the lectin domains binding...... lavage and blood have indicated associations with a multitude of pulmonary inflammatory diseases. In addition, accumulating evidence in mouse models of infection and inflammation indicates that recombinant forms of the surfactant proteins are biologically active in vivo and may have therapeutic potential...... in controlling pulmonary inflammatory disease. The presence of the surfactant collectins, especially SP-D, in non-pulmonary tissues, such as the gastrointestinal tract and genital organs, suggest additional actions located to other mucosal surfaces. The aim of this review is to summarize studies on genetic...

  10. Hartman effect and weak measurements that are not really weak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolovski, D.; Akhmatskaya, E.

    2011-01-01

    We show that in wave packet tunneling, localization of the transmitted particle amounts to a quantum measurement of the delay it experiences in the barrier. With no external degree of freedom involved, the envelope of the wave packet plays the role of the initial pointer state. Under tunneling conditions such ''self-measurement'' is necessarily weak, and the Hartman effect just reflects the general tendency of weak values to diverge, as postselection in the final state becomes improbable. We also demonstrate that it is a good precision, or a 'not really weak' quantum measurement: no matter how wide the barrier d, it is possible to transmit a wave packet with a width σ small compared to the observed advancement. As is the case with all weak measurements, the probability of transmission rapidly decreases with the ratio σ/d.

  11. Estimation hydrophilic-lipophilic balance number of surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pawignya, Harsa, E-mail: harsa-paw@yahoo.co.id [Chemical Engineering Department Diponegoro University (Indonesia); Chemical Engineering Departement University of Pembangunan Nasional Yogyakarta (Indonesia); Prasetyaningrum, Aji, E-mail: ajiprasetyaningrum@gmail.com; Kusworo, Tutuk D.; Pramudono, Bambang, E-mail: Pramudono2004@yahoo.com [Chemical Engineering Department Diponegoro University (Indonesia); Dyartanti, Endah R. [Chemical Engineering Department Diponegoro University (Indonesia); Chemical Enginering Departement Sebelas Maret University (Indonesia)

    2016-02-08

    Any type of surfactant has a hydrophilic-lipophilic balance number (HLB number) of different. There are several methods for determining the HLB number, with ohysical properties of surfactant (solubility cloud point and interfacial tension), CMC methods and by thermodynamics properties (Free energy Gibbs). This paper proposes to determined HLB numbers from interfelation methods. The result of study indicated that the CMC method described by Hair and Moulik espesially for nonionic surfactant. The application of exess Gibbs free energy and by implication activity coefficient provides the ability to predict the behavior of surfactants in multi component mixtures of different concentration. Determination of HLB number by solubility and cloud point parameter is spesific for anionic and nonionic surfactant but this methods not available for cationic surfactants.

  12. Influence of metacide - surfactant complexes on agricultural crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orynkul Esimova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The complexes based on surfactants and polyhexamethyleneguanidine hydrochloride (metacide are important for agriculture. This paper considers compositions of known bactericidal metacide with different surfactants: anionic surfactant sodium dodecylsulphate (DDSNa and nonionic surfactant Tween 80 (monooleate of oxyethylenated anhydrosorbitols. The effect of individual components and associates of metacide and surfactants on productivity and infection of cereals was studied. According to the study, the highest productivity and infection rate were shown by the associate of metacide and Tween-80. At concentration of Tween-80 in aqueous solution equal to 0.001% in combination with metacide, efficiency was 98% at 0% infection. The surface tension and the wetting of metacide, DDSNa, Tween-80, and associates of metacide with surfactants were studied. In comparison with individual components, metacide-DDSNa and metacide-Tween-80 associates have higher surface activity.

  13. Fabrication of luminescent porous silicon with stain etches and evidence that luminescence originates in amorphous layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathauer, R. W.; George, T.; Ksendzov, A.; Lin, T. L.; Pike, W. T.; Vasquez, R. P.; Wu, Z.-C.

    1992-01-01

    Simple immersion of Si in stain etches of HF:HNO3:H2O or NaNO2 in aqueous HF was used to produce films exhibiting luminescence in the visible similar to that of anodically-etched porous Si. All of the luminescent samples consist of amorphous porous Si in at least the near surface region. No evidence was found for small crystalline regions within these amorphous layers.

  14. Luminescent properties of fluorophosphate glasses with lead chalcogenides molecular clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolobkova, E.V.; Kukushkin, D.S.; Nikonorov, N.V.; Shakhverdov, T.A.; Sidorov, A.I.; Vasiliev, V.N.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorophosphate glasses containing lead, selenium, and sulfur exhibit an intense luminescence in the 400–620 nm spectral region when excited by the 240–420 nm radiation. This luminescence is due to the presence of (PbSe) n and/or (PbS) n molecular clusters in the glasses, which appear in the as-prepared glasses before quantum dots formation. The thermal treatment at temperatures less than the glass transition temperature results in the red-shift of the luminescence bands and in an increase in the luminescence intensity. Heating the thermally treated glass samples leads to the reversible thermal quenching of the luminescence. - Highlights: • Fluorophosphate glasses with Pb, Se, and S ions contain (PbSe) n or (PbS) n molecular clusters. • (PbSe) n and (PbS) n molecular clusters possess luminescence in the visible with UV excitation. • Heating the glass leads to the reversible thermal quenching of the luminescence

  15. Enhancing and quenching luminescence with gold nanoparticle films: the influence of substrate on the luminescent properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guidelli, Eder José; Baffa, Oswaldo; Ramos, Ana Paula

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticle (AuNP) films were sputtered over glass and aluminum substrates to enhance optically stimulated luminescence (OSL), a luminescent technique employed for radiation detection, from x-ray irradiated NaCl nanocrystals. The AuNP films deposited over glass led to enhanced-OSL emission, whereas the AuNP films deposited on aluminum substrates quenched the OSL emission. The enhanced-OSL intensity is proportional to the optical density of the film's plasmon resonance band at the stimulation wavelength. For the case of the AuNP/aluminum films, the luminescence quenching diminishes, and OSL intensity partially recovers upon increasing the distance between the AuNPs and the aluminum substrates, and between the luminescent nanocrystals and the AuNP films. These results suggest that plasmonic interactions between the emitter nanocrystals, the localized surface plasmons (LSP) of the AuNPs, and the substrate are responsible for the OSL enhancement and quenching. In this sense, the substrate dictates whether LSP relaxation occurs by radiative or non-radiative transisitions, leading to enhanced or quenched OSL, respectively. Therefore, besides showing that AuNP films can enhance and/or tune the sensitivity of luminescent radiation detectors, and demonstrating OSL as a new technique to investigate mechanisms of plasmon-enhanced luminescence, these results bring insights on how substrates strongly modify the optical properties of AuNP films. (paper)

  16. Multistate Luminescent Solar Concentrator "Smart" Windows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sol, Jeroen A.H.P.; Timmermans, Gilles H.; Breugel, van Abraham J.; Schenning, Albertus P.H.J.; Debije, Michael G.

    2018-01-01

    A supertwist liquid crystalline luminescent solar concentrator (LSC) "smart" window is fabricated which can be switched electrically between three states: one designed for increased light absorption and electrical generation (the "dark" state), one for transparency (the "light" state), and one for

  17. Luminescent Solar Concentrators with Fibre Geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edelenbosch, O.Y.; Fisher, M.; Patrignani, L.; Sark, W.G.J.H.M. van; Chatten, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    The potential of a fibre luminescent solar concentrator has been explored by means of both analytical and ray-tracing techniques. Coated fibres have been found to be more efficient than homogeneously doped fibres, at low absorption. For practical fibres concentration is predicted to be linear

  18. Co-precipitation synthesis and upconversion luminescence ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Introduction. Researches of rare-earth-doped upconversion (UC) materials as fluorescent labels, temperature-sensing probes, solid-state lasers and new generation television screens have recently started to be considered1,2 due to their enhanced luminescent properties induced by the small size. UC process is the gener-.

  19. Holographic patterning of luminescent photopolymer nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakhno, Oksana V.; Smirnova, Tatiana N.; Goldenberg, Leonid M.; Stumpe, Joachim

    2008-01-01

    Volume phase gratings in the photopolymerisable composites, containing luminescent nanoparticles have been fabricated for the first time. Nanoparticles of LaPO 4 , doped by Ce 3+ and Tb 3+ ions (the trade name is REN-X-green) with high luminescence quantum yield were used as a luminescent inorganic additive. The holographic gratings in such materials are formed as a result of the diffusion distribution of the nanoparticles during exposure of photopolymerisable composites to interference pattern. The influence of the pre-polymer formulation and the holographic patterning parameters on the grating formation is comprehensively investigated. The use of the optimised pre-polymer syrup containing two monomers with sufficiently different polymerisation rates allows fabrication of gratings with diffraction efficiency up to 80% at low optical losses (< 5%) (20 μm film thickness). To obtain maximum diffraction efficiency the intensity and the period of the interference pattern were optimised for each formulation. In addition maximum diffraction efficiency was achieved with the nanocomposites containing 30-32 wt.% of nanoparticles. On the other hand the highest possible modulation of the nanoparticles' concentration was obtained for the concentration of about 20 wt.%. In this case maximum ordering of the nanoparticles in the polymer matrix is achieved. The photoluminescence of the nanoparticles within the homogeneous polymer film and within the grating has been measured. The example application of the photopolymerisable composite containing luminescence inorganic nanoparticles in holographic security technology has been demonstrated

  20. Probing luminescence centers in Na rich feldspar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prasad, Amit Kumar; Lapp, Torben; Kook, Myung Ho

    2016-01-01

    our understanding of the luminescence mechanisms and recombination sites, in a sample of Na rich plagioclase feldspar (oligoclase). Both the UV and violet–blue emissions show resonant excitations arising from a distribution of energy levels. We propose, contrary to the general understanding...

  1. Studies of positron induced luminescence from polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, J.; Hulett, L.D. Jr.; Lewis, T.A.; Tolk, N.H.

    1994-01-01

    Light emission from polymers (anthracene dissolved in polystryrene) induced by low-energy positrons and electrons has been studied. Results indicate a clear difference between optical emissions under positron and electron bombardment. The positron-induced luminescence spectrum is believed to be generated by both collisional and annihilation processes

  2. Combustion synthesis and preliminary luminescence studies of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The polycrystalline sample of LiBaPO4 : Tb3+ (LBPT) was successfully synthesized by solution combustion synthesis and studied for its luminescence characteristics. The thermoluminescence (TL) glow curve of LBPT material consists of two peaks at 204.54 and 251.21°C. The optimum concentration was 0.005 mol to ...

  3. Biosynthesis of myristic acid in luminescent bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byers, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    In vivo pulse-label studies have demonstrated that luminescent bacteria can provide myritic acid (14:0) required for the synthesis of the luciferase substrate myristyl aldehyde. Luminescent wild type Vibrio harveyi incubated with [ 14 C] acetate in a nutrient-depleted medium accumulated substantial tree [ 14 C]fatty acid (up to 20% of the total lipid label). Radio-gas chromatography revealed that > 75% of the labeled fatty acid is 14:0. No free fatty acid was detected in wild type cells labeled prior to the development of bioluminescence in the exponential growth phase, or in a dark mutant of V. harveyi (mutant M17) that requires exogenous 14:0 for light emission. The preferential accumulation of 14:0 was not observed when wild type cells were labeled with [ 14 C]acetate in regular growth medium. Moreover, all V. harveyi strains exhibited similar fatty acid mass compositions regardless of the state of bioluminescence. Since earlier work has shown that a luminescence-related acyltransferase (defective in the M17 mutant) can catalyze the deacylation of fatty acyl-acyl carrier protein in vitro, the present results are consistent with a model in which this enzyme diverts 14:0 to the luminescence system during fatty acid biosynthesis. Under normal conditions, the supply of 14:0 by this pathway is tightly regulated such that bioluminescence development does not significantly alter the total fatty acid composition

  4. Luminescence of porous silicon doped by erbium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondarenko, V.P.; Vorozov, N.N.; Dolgij, L.N.; Dorofeev, A.M.; Kazyuchits, N.M.; Leshok, A.A.; Troyanova, G.N.

    1996-01-01

    The possibility of the 1.54 μm intensive luminescence in the silicon dense porous layers, doped by erbium, with various structures is shown. Low-porous materials of both porous type on the p-type silicon and porous silicon with wood-like structure on the n + type silicon may be used for formation of light-emitting structures

  5. Nanoparticle-enabled delivery of surfactants in porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourafkan, Ehsan; Hu, Zhongliang; Wen, Dongsheng

    2018-06-01

    The adsorption of surfactants on the reservoir rocks surface is a serious issue in many energy and environment related areas. Learning from the concept of drug delivery in the nano-medicine field, this work proposes and validates the concept of using nanoparticles to deliver a mixture of surfactants into a porous medium. TiO 2 nanoparticles (NPs) are used as carriers for a blend of surfactants mixtures including anionic alkyl aryl sulfonic acid (AAS) and nonionic alcohol ethoxylated (EA) at the optimum salinity and composition conditions. The transport of NPs through a core sample of crushed sandstone grains and the adsorption of surfactants are evaluated. By using TiO 2 NPs, the adsorption of surfactant molecules can be significantly reduced, i.e. half of the initial adsorption value. The level of surfactant adsorption reduction is related to the NPs transport capability through the porous medium. An application study shows that comparing to surfactant flooding alone, the total oil recovery can be increased by 7.81% of original oil in place (OOIP) by using nanoparticle bonded surfactants. Such work shows the promise of NP as an effective surfactant carrier for sandstone reservoirs, which could have many potential applications in enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and environmental remediation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Strongly Enhanced Free-Exciton Luminescence in Microcrystalline CsPbBr3 Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Shin-ichi; Kakuchi, Mitsugu; Masaki, Atsushi; Saito, Tadaaki

    2003-07-01

    The luminescence properties of CsPbBr3 films prepared via the amorphous phase by crystallization are dominated by free-exciton emission, and only a weak trace of emission due to trapped excitons was observed, in contrast to the case of bulk CsPbBr3 crystals. In particular, the films in the microcrystalline state show by more than an order of magnitude stronger free-exciton emission than in the polycrystalline state. The enhanced free-exciton emission is suggestive of excitonic superradiance.

  7. Weak Measurement and Quantum Correlation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arun Kumar Pati

    Entanglement: Two quantum systems can be in a strongly correlated state even if .... These are resources which can be used to design quantum computer, quantum ...... Weak measurements have found numerous applications starting from the ...

  8. Weakly infinite-dimensional spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorchuk, Vitalii V

    2007-01-01

    In this survey article two new classes of spaces are considered: m-C-spaces and w-m-C-spaces, m=2,3,...,∞. They are intermediate between the class of weakly infinite-dimensional spaces in the Alexandroff sense and the class of C-spaces. The classes of 2-C-spaces and w-2-C-spaces coincide with the class of weakly infinite-dimensional spaces, while the compact ∞-C-spaces are exactly the C-compact spaces of Haver. The main results of the theory of weakly infinite-dimensional spaces, including classification via transfinite Lebesgue dimensions and Luzin-Sierpinsky indices, extend to these new classes of spaces. Weak m-C-spaces are characterised by means of essential maps to Henderson's m-compacta. The existence of hereditarily m-strongly infinite-dimensional spaces is proved.

  9. Weak interactions and presupernova evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aufderheide, M.B.; State Univ. of New York

    1991-01-01

    The role of weak interactions, particularly electron capture and β - decay, in presupernova evolution is discussed. The present uncertainty in these rates is examined and the possibility of improving the situation is addressed. 12 refs., 4 figs

  10. Weak Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ales Psaker; Wolodymyr Melnitchouk; Anatoly Radyushkin

    2006-01-01

    We extend the analysis of the deeply virtual Compton scattering process to the weak interaction sector in the generalized Bjorken limit. The virtual Compton scattering amplitudes for the weak neutral and charged currents are calculated at the leading twist within the framework of the nonlocal light-cone expansion via coordinate space QCD string operators. Using a simple model, we estimate cross sections for neutrino scattering off the nucleon, relevant for future high intensity neutrino beam facilities

  11. Weakly compact operators and interpolation

    OpenAIRE

    Maligranda, Lech

    1992-01-01

    The class of weakly compact operators is, as well as the class of compact operators, a fundamental operator ideal. They were investigated strongly in the last twenty years. In this survey, we have collected and ordered some of this (partly very new) knowledge. We have also included some comments, remarks and examples. The class of weakly compact operators is, as well as the class of compact operators, a fundamental operator ideal. They were investigated strongly in the last twenty years. I...

  12. Enhanced oil recovery with surfactant flooding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buelow Sandersen, S.

    2012-05-15

    Understanding the underlying mechanisms of systems that exhibit liquid-liquid equilibrium (e.g. oil-brine systems) at reservoir conditions is an area of increasing interest within EOR. This is true both for complex surfactant systems as well as for oil and brine systems. It is widely accepted that an increase in oil recovery can be obtained through flooding, whether it is simple waterflooding, waterflooding where the salinity has been modified by the addition or removal of specific ions (socalled ''smart'' waterflooding) or surfactant flooding. High pressure experiments have been carried out in this work on a surfactant system (surfactant/ oil/ brine) and on oil/ seawater systems (oil/ brine). The high pressure experiments were carried out on a DBR JEFRI PVT cell, where a glass window allows observation of the phase behavior of the different systems at various temperatures and pressures inside the high pressure cell. Phase volumes can also be measured visually through the glass window using precision equipment. The surfactant system for which an experimental study was carried out consisted of the mixture heptane, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)/ 1-butanol/ NaCl/ water. This system has previously been examined at ambient pressures and temperatures but this has been extended here to pressures up to 400 bar and to slightly higher temperatures (40 deg. C, 45 deg. C and 50 deg. C). Experiments were performed at constant salinity (6.56 %), constant surfactant-alcohol ratio (SAR) but with varying water-oil ratios (WOR). At all temperatures it was very clear that the effect of pressure was significant. The system changed from the two phase region, Winsor II, to the three phase region, Winsor III, as pressure increased. Increasing pressures also caused a shift from the three phase region (Winsor III), to a different two phase region, (Winsor I). These changes in equilibrium phase behavior were also dependent on the composition of the system. A number of

  13. Paper-based biodetection using luminescent nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Qiang; Noor, M Omair; Krull, Ulrich J

    2016-05-10

    Point-of-care and in-field technologies for rapid, sensitive and selective detection of molecular biomarkers have attracted much interest. Rugged bioassay technology capable of fast detection of markers for pathogens and genetic diseases would in particular impact the quality of health care in the developing world, but would also make possible more extensive screening in developed countries to tackle problems such as those associated with water and food quality, and tracking of infectious organisms in hospitals and clinics. Literature trends indicate an increasing interest in the use of nanomaterials, and in particular luminescent nanoparticles, for assay development. These materials may offer attributes for development of assays and sensors that could achieve improvements in analytical figures of merit, and provide practical advantages in sensitivity and stability. There is opportunity for cost-efficiency and technical simplicity by implementation of luminescent nanomaterials as the basis for transduction technology, when combined with the use of paper substrates, and the ubiquitous availability of cell phone cameras and associated infrastructure for optical detection and transmission of results. Luminescent nanoparticles have been described for a broad range of bioanalytical targets including small molecules, oligonucleotides, peptides, proteins, saccharides and whole cells (e.g., cancer diagnostics). The luminescent nanomaterials that are described herein for paper-based bioassays include metal nanoparticles, quantum dots and lanthanide-doped nanocrystals. These nanomaterials often have broad and strong absorption and narrow emission bands that improve opportunity for multiplexed analysis, and can be designed to provide emission at wavelengths that are efficiently processed by conventional digital cameras. Luminescent nanoparticles can be embedded in paper substrates that are designed to direct fluid flow, and the resulting combination of technologies can offer

  14. Acute muscular weakness in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Pablo Javier Erazo Torricelli

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Acute muscle weakness in children is a pediatric emergency. During the diagnostic approach, it is crucial to obtain a detailed case history, including: onset of weakness, history of associated febrile states, ingestion of toxic substances/toxins, immunizations, and family history. Neurological examination must be meticulous as well. In this review, we describe the most common diseases related to acute muscle weakness, grouped into the site of origin (from the upper motor neuron to the motor unit. Early detection of hyperCKemia may lead to a myositis diagnosis, and hypokalemia points to the diagnosis of periodic paralysis. Ophthalmoparesis, ptosis and bulbar signs are suggestive of myasthenia gravis or botulism. Distal weakness and hyporeflexia are clinical features of Guillain-Barré syndrome, the most frequent cause of acute muscle weakness. If all studies are normal, a psychogenic cause should be considered. Finding the etiology of acute muscle weakness is essential to execute treatment in a timely manner, improving the prognosis of affected children.

  15. Quenching methods for background reduction in luminescence-based probe-target binding assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Hong [Los Alamos, NM; Goodwin, Peter M [Los Alamos, NM; Keller, Richard A [Los Alamos, NM; Nolan, Rhiannon L [Santa Fe, NM

    2007-04-10

    Background luminescence is reduced from a solution containing unbound luminescent probes, each having a first molecule that attaches to a target molecule and having an attached luminescent moiety, and luminescent probe/target adducts. Quenching capture reagent molecules are formed that are capable of forming an adduct with the unbound luminescent probes and having an attached quencher material effective to quench luminescence of the luminescent moiety. The quencher material of the capture reagent molecules is added to a solution of the luminescent probe/target adducts and binds in a proximity to the luminescent moiety of the unbound luminescent probes to quench luminescence from the luminescent moiety when the luminescent moiety is exposed to exciting illumination. The quencher capture reagent does not bind to probe molecules that are bound to target molecules and the probe/target adduct emission is not quenched.

  16. TOXICITY COMPARISON OF BIOSURFACTANTS AND SYNTHETIC SURFACTANTS USED IN OIL SPILL REMEDIATION TO TWO ESTUARINE SPECIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The relative environmental toxicities of synthetic and biogenic surfactants used in oil spill remediation efforts are not well understood. Acute and chronic toxicities of three synthetic surfactants and three microbially produced surfactants were determined and compared in this s...

  17. Influence of pulmonary surfactant on in vitro bactericidal activities of amoxicillin, ceftazidime, and tobramycin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. van 't Veen (Annemarie); J.W. Mouton (Johan); D.A.M.P.J. Gommers (Diederik); J.A.J.W. Kluytmans (Jan); P. Dekkers; B.F. Lachmann (Burkhard)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractThe influence of a natural pulmonary surfactant on antibiotic activity was investigated to assess the possible use of exogenous surfactant as a vehicle for antibiotic delivery to the lung. The influence of surfactant on the bactericidal activity of

  18. Luminescence properties of Y3Al5O12:Ce nanoceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zorenko, Yu.; Voznyak, T.; Gorbenko, V.; Zych, E.; Nizankovski, S.; Dan'ko, A.; Puzikov, V.

    2011-01-01

    Comparative analysis of the luminescent properties of Y 3 Al 5 O 12 :Ce (YAG:Ce) transparent optical ceramics (OS) with those of single crystal (SC) and single crystalline film (SCF) analogues has been performed under excitation by pulsed synchrotron radiation in the fundamental absorption range of YAG host. It has been shown that the properties of YAG:Ce OC are closer to the properties of the SCF counterpart, where Y Al antisite defects are completely absent, rather than to the properties of SC of this garnet with large concentration of Y Al antisite defects. At the same time, the luminescence spectra of YAG:Ce OC show weak emission bands in the 200-470 nm range related to Y Al antisite defects and charged oxygen vacancies (F + and F centers). YAG:Ce OS also possesses significantly larger contribution of slow components in the Ce 3+ luminescence decay under high-energy excitation in comparison with SC and SCF of this garnet due to the involvement of antisite defects, charged oxygen vacancies as well as boundaries of grains in the energy transfer processes from the host to the Ce 3+ ions.

  19. Enhanced UV luminescence from InAlN quantum well structures using two temperature growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubialevich, Vitaly Z.; Sadler, Thomas C.; Dinh, Duc V.; Alam, Shahab N.; Li, Haoning; Pampili, Pietro; Parbrook, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    InAlN/AlGaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs) emitting between 300 and 350 nm have been prepared by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition on planar AlN templates. To obtain strong room temperature luminescence from InAlN QWs a two temperature approach was required. The intensity decayed weakly as the temperature was increased to 300 K, with ratios I PL (300 K)/I PL (T) max up to 70%. This high apparent internal quantum efficiency is attributed to the exceptionally strong carrier localization in this material, which is also manifested by a high Stokes shift (0.52 eV) of the luminescence. Based on these results InAlN is proposed as a robust alternative to AlGaN for ultraviolet emitting devices. - Highlights: • InAlN quantum wells with AlGaN barriers emitting in near UV successfully grown using quasi-2T approach. • 1 nm AlGaN capping of InAlN quantum wells used to avoid In desorption during temperature ramp to barrier growth conditions. • Strong, thermally resilient luminescence obtained as a result of growth optimization. • Promise of InAlN as an alternative active region for UV emitters demonstrated

  20. Identifying the Imprint of Surfactant Stabilisation in Whitecap Foam Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaghan, A. H.; Deane, G. B.; Stokes, D.

    2016-02-01

    Surfactants are ubiquitous in the world's oceans and can affect climatically-relevant processes such as air-sea gas exchange, sea spray aerosol (SSA) flux, and air-sea momentum transfer. Surfactants are amphiphilic and help form the physically and chemically distinct ocean surface microlayer (SML), however, the spatial distribution, concentration and composition of the SML is not well understood, especially under conditions of vigorous wave breaking. Like the SML, breaking waves also influence physical exchange processes at the air-sea interface, and oceanic whitecap foam coverage is commonly used to quantify bubble-mediated exchange processes. However, surfactants can increase the lifetime of foam over clean water conditions, potentially complicating the use of whitecap coverage to parameterise air-sea gas exchange and SSA production flux. A better understanding of how surfactants affect the evolution of whitecap foam is needed to improve whitecap parameterisations of bubble-mediated processes, and may also provide a remote sensing approach to map the spatial distribution of surfactants at the water surface. Here we present results from a laboratory study that looked at whitecap foam evolution in "clean" and "surfactant-added" seawater regimes. We find that the whitecap foam area growth timescale is largely insensitive to the presence of surfactants, but that surfactant stabilization of whitecap foam becomes important during the whitecap foam area decay phase. The timescale at which this occurs appears to be consistent for breaking waves of different scale and intensity. A simple method is then used to isolate the surfactant signal and derive an equivalent "clean" seawater foam decay time for the whitecaps in the "surfactant-added" regime. The method is applied to oceanic whitecaps and results compared to the laboratory whitecaps from the "clean" and "surfactant-added" regimes.

  1. Surfactant-enhanced control of track-etch pore morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apel', P.Yu.; Blonskaya, I.V.; Didyk, A.Yu.; Dmitriev, S.N.; Orelovich, O.L.; Samojlova, L.I.; Vutsadakis, V.A.; Root, D.

    2000-01-01

    The influence of surfactants on the process of chemical development of ion tracks in polymers is studied. Based on the experimental data, a mechanism of the surfactant effect on the track-etch pore morphology is proposed. In the beginning of etching the surfactant is adsorbed on the surface and creates a layer that is quasi-solid and partially protects the surface from the etching agent. However, some etchant molecules diffuse through the barrier and react with the polymer surface. This results in the formation of a small hole at the entrance to the ion track. After the hole has attained a few annometers in diameter, the surfactant molecules penetrate into the track and cover its walls. Further diffusion of the surfactant into the growing pore is hindered. The adsorbed surfactant layer is not permeable for large molecules. In contrast, small alkali molecules and water molecules diffuse into the track and provide the etching process enlarging the pore. At this stage the transport of the surfactant into the pore channel can proceed only due to the lateral diffusion in the adsorbed layer. The volume inside the pore is free of surfactant molecules and grows at a higher rate than pore entrance. After a more prolonged etching the bottle-like (or 'cigar-like') pore channels are formed. The bottle-like shape of the pore channels depends on the etching conditions such as alkali and surfactant concentration, temperature, and type of the surfactant. The use of surfactants enables one to produce track-etch membranes with improved flow rate characteristics compared with those having cylindrical pores with the same nominal pore diameters

  2. Neonatal varicella pneumonia, surfactant replacement therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousa Ahmadpour-kacho

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chickenpox is a very contagious viral disease that caused by varicella-zoster virus, which appears in the first week of life secondary to transplacental transmission of infection from the affected mother. When mother catches the disease five days before and up to two days after the delivery, the chance of varicella in neonate in first week of life is 17%. A generalized papulovesicular lesion is the most common clinical feature. Respiratory involvement may lead to giant cell pneumonia and respiratory failure. The mortality rate is up to 30% in the case of no treatment, often due to pneumonia. Treatment includes hospitalization, isolation and administration of intravenous acyclovir. The aim of this case report is to introduce the exogenous surfactant replacement therapy after intubation and mechanical ventilation for respiratory failure in neonatal chickenpox pneumonia and respiratory distress. Case Presentation: A seven-day-old neonate boy was admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Amirkola Children’s Hospital, Babol, north of Iran, with generalized papulovesicular lesions and respiratory distress. His mother has had a history of Varicella 4 days before delivery. He was isolated and given supportive care, intravenous acyclovir and antibiotics. On the second day, he was intubated and connected to mechanical ventilator due to severe pneumonia and respiratory failure. Because of sever pulmonary involvement evidenced by Chest X-Ray and high ventilators set-up requirement, intratracheal surfactant was administered in two doses separated by 12 hours. He was discharged after 14 days without any complication with good general condition. Conclusion: Exogenous surfactant replacement therapy can be useful as an adjunctive therapy for the treatment of respiratory failure due to neonatal chickenpox.

  3. Comparison of the orogenic displacement of sodium caseinate with the caseins from the air-water interface by nonionic surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, N C; Gunning, A P; Mackie, A R; Wilde, P J; Morris, V J

    2009-06-16

    Displacement of sodium caseinate from the air-water interface by nonionic surfactants Tween 20 and Tween 60 was observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The interfacial structure was sampled by Langmuir-Blodgett deposition onto freshly cleaved mica substrates. Protein displacement occurred through an orogenic mechanism: it involved the nucleation and growth of surfactant domains within the protein network, followed by failure of the protein network. The surface pressure at which failure of the protein network occurred was essentially independent of the type of surfactant. The major component of sodium caseinate is beta-casein, and previous studies at the air-water interface have shown that beta-casein networks are weak, failing at surface pressures below that observed for sodium caseinate. The other components of sodium caseinate are alpha(s)- and kappa-caseins. Studies of the displacement of alpha(s)-caseins from air-water interfaces show that these proteins also form weak networks that fail at surface pressures below that observed for sodium caseinate. However, kappa-casein was found to form strong networks that resisted displacement and failed at surface pressures comparable to those observed for sodium caseinate. The AFM images of the displacement suggest that, despite kappa-casein being a minor component, it dominates the failure of sodium caseinate networks: alpha(s)-casein and beta-casein are preferentially desorbed at lower surface pressures, allowing the residual kappa-casein to control the breakdown of the sodium caseinate network at higher surface pressures.

  4. Weakness

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... by a slipped disk in the spine) Stroke MUSCLE DISEASES Becker muscular dystrophy Dermatomyositis Muscular dystrophy (Duchenne) Myotonic dystrophy POISONING Botulism Poisoning ( insecticides , nerve gas) ...

  5. Porcine lung surfactant protein B gene (SFTPB)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cirera Salicio, Susanna; Fredholm, Merete

    2008-01-01

    The porcine surfactant protein B (SFTPB) is a single copy gene on chromosome 3. Three different cDNAs for the SFTPB have been isolated and sequenced. Nucleotide sequence comparison revealed six nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), four synonymous SNPs and an in-frame deletion of 69...... bp in the region coding for the active protein. Northern analysis showed lung-specific expression of three different isoforms of the SFTPB transcript. The expression level for the SFTPB gene is low in 50 days-old fetus and it increases during lung development. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain...

  6. Molecular dynamics of surfactant protein C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramírez, Eunice; Santana, Alberto; Cruz, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    Surfactant protein C (SP-C) is a membrane-associated protein essential for normal respiration. It has been found that the alpha-helix form of SP-C can undergo, under certain conditions, a transformation from an alpha-helix to a beta-strand conformation that closely resembles amyloid fibrils, which...... are possible contributors to the pathogenesis of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. Molecular dynamics simulations using the NAMD2 package were performed for systems containing from one to seven SP-C molecules to study their behavior in water. The results of our simulations show that unfolding of the protein...

  7. Site symmetry and crystal field of Ce{sup 3+} luminescent centres in KMgF{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaga, M. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Gifu University, Gifu (Japan); Honda, M.; Kawamata, N. [Faculty of Science, Naruto University of Education, Naruto (Japan); Fujita, T.; Shimamura, K.; Fukuda, T. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan)

    2001-04-09

    The electron-spin resonance (ESR) spectra of Ce{sup 3+} in KMgF{sub 3} observed at low temperatures (<20 K) show that two tetragonal and two orthorhombic Ce{sup 3+} centres exist in the absence of a cubic centre. These Ce{sup 3+} centres are strongly associated with substitution of Ce{sup 3+} ions for K{sup +} ions with K{sup +}-ion vacancies at three different sites and for a Mg{sup 2+} ion with a vacancy of the nearest neighbour Mg{sup 2+} ion along the [101] direction as charge compensators. The optical absorption spectrum of Ce{sup 3+} in KMgF{sub 3} measured at room temperature consists of two intense broadbands with peaks at 229 and 237 nm, and two weak bands with peaks at 203 and 211 nm corresponding to the transition from the ground state {sup 2}F{sub 5/2} to the 5d{sup 1} excited states of Ce{sup 3+}. The Ce{sup 3+} luminescence spectrum excited at 229 or 237 nm at room temperature is composed of broadbands with double peaks at 265 and 282 nm, which are due to the ground-state splitting between {sup 2}F{sub 5/2} and {sup 2}F{sub 7/2}. The peak of the weak luminescence band excited at a tail (250-280 nm) of the intense absorption bands is shifted to lower energy. The intense and weak Ce{sup 3+} luminescence bands are assigned to Ce{sup 3+} ions substituting for K{sup +} ions away from and near to K{sup +}-ion vacancies, respectively. The luminescence from Ce{sup 3+} ions substituting for Mg{sup 2+} ions could not be observed at room temperature. (author)

  8. Cosmology with weak lensing surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munshi, Dipak; Valageas, Patrick; Waerbeke, Ludovic van; Heavens, Alan

    2008-01-01

    Weak gravitational lensing is responsible for the shearing and magnification of the images of high-redshift sources due to the presence of intervening matter. The distortions are due to fluctuations in the gravitational potential, and are directly related to the distribution of matter and to the geometry and dynamics of the Universe. As a consequence, weak gravitational lensing offers unique possibilities for probing the Dark Matter and Dark Energy in the Universe. In this review, we summarise the theoretical and observational state of the subject, focussing on the statistical aspects of weak lensing, and consider the prospects for weak lensing surveys in the future. Weak gravitational lensing surveys are complementary to both galaxy surveys and cosmic microwave background (CMB) observations as they probe the unbiased non-linear matter power spectrum at modest redshifts. Most of the cosmological parameters are accurately estimated from CMB and large-scale galaxy surveys, so the focus of attention is shifting to understanding the nature of Dark Matter and Dark Energy. On the theoretical side, recent advances in the use of 3D information of the sources from photometric redshifts promise greater statistical power, and these are further enhanced by the use of statistics beyond two-point quantities such as the power spectrum. The use of 3D information also alleviates difficulties arising from physical effects such as the intrinsic alignment of galaxies, which can mimic weak lensing to some extent. On the observational side, in the next few years weak lensing surveys such as CFHTLS, VST-KIDS and Pan-STARRS, and the planned Dark Energy Survey, will provide the first weak lensing surveys covering very large sky areas and depth. In the long run even more ambitious programmes such as DUNE, the Supernova Anisotropy Probe (SNAP) and Large-aperture Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) are planned. Weak lensing of diffuse components such as the CMB and 21 cm emission can also

  9. Cosmology with weak lensing surveys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munshi, Dipak [Institute of Astronomy, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 OHA (United Kingdom); Astrophysics Group, Cavendish Laboratory, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 OHE (United Kingdom)], E-mail: munshi@ast.cam.ac.uk; Valageas, Patrick [Service de Physique Theorique, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Waerbeke, Ludovic van [University of British Columbia, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Heavens, Alan [SUPA - Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom)

    2008-06-15

    Weak gravitational lensing is responsible for the shearing and magnification of the images of high-redshift sources due to the presence of intervening matter. The distortions are due to fluctuations in the gravitational potential, and are directly related to the distribution of matter and to the geometry and dynamics of the Universe. As a consequence, weak gravitational lensing offers unique possibilities for probing the Dark Matter and Dark Energy in the Universe. In this review, we summarise the theoretical and observational state of the subject, focussing on the statistical aspects of weak lensing, and consider the prospects for weak lensing surveys in the future. Weak gravitational lensing surveys are complementary to both galaxy surveys and cosmic microwave background (CMB) observations as they probe the unbiased non-linear matter power spectrum at modest redshifts. Most of the cosmological parameters are accurately estimated from CMB and large-scale galaxy surveys, so the focus of attention is shifting to understanding the nature of Dark Matter and Dark Energy. On the theoretical side, recent advances in the use of 3D information of the sources from photometric redshifts promise greater statistical power, and these are further enhanced by the use of statistics beyond two-point quantities such as the power spectrum. The use of 3D information also alleviates difficulties arising from physical effects such as the intrinsic alignment of galaxies, which can mimic weak lensing to some extent. On the observational side, in the next few years weak lensing surveys such as CFHTLS, VST-KIDS and Pan-STARRS, and the planned Dark Energy Survey, will provide the first weak lensing surveys covering very large sky areas and depth. In the long run even more ambitious programmes such as DUNE, the Supernova Anisotropy Probe (SNAP) and Large-aperture Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) are planned. Weak lensing of diffuse components such as the CMB and 21 cm emission can also

  10. Peripheral facial weakness (Bell's palsy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basić-Kes, Vanja; Dobrota, Vesna Dermanović; Cesarik, Marijan; Matovina, Lucija Zadro; Madzar, Zrinko; Zavoreo, Iris; Demarin, Vida

    2013-06-01

    Peripheral facial weakness is a facial nerve damage that results in muscle weakness on one side of the face. It may be idiopathic (Bell's palsy) or may have a detectable cause. Almost 80% of peripheral facial weakness cases are primary and the rest of them are secondary. The most frequent causes of secondary peripheral facial weakness are systemic viral infections, trauma, surgery, diabetes, local infections, tumor, immune disorders, drugs, degenerative diseases of the central nervous system, etc. The diagnosis relies upon the presence of typical signs and symptoms, blood chemistry tests, cerebrospinal fluid investigations, nerve conduction studies and neuroimaging methods (cerebral MRI, x-ray of the skull and mastoid). Treatment of secondary peripheral facial weakness is based on therapy for the underlying disorder, unlike the treatment of Bell's palsy that is controversial due to the lack of large, randomized, controlled, prospective studies. There are some indications that steroids or antiviral agents are beneficial but there are also studies that show no beneficial effect. Additional treatments include eye protection, physiotherapy, acupuncture, botulinum toxin, or surgery. Bell's palsy has a benign prognosis with complete recovery in about 80% of patients, 15% experience some mode of permanent nerve damage and severe consequences remain in 5% of patients.

  11. Quantum discord with weak measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Uttam; Pati, Arun Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Weak measurements cause small change to quantum states, thereby opening up the possibility of new ways of manipulating and controlling quantum systems. We ask, can weak measurements reveal more quantum correlation in a composite quantum state? We prove that the weak measurement induced quantum discord, called as the “super quantum discord”, is always larger than the quantum discord captured by the strong measurement. Moreover, we prove the monotonicity of the super quantum discord as a function of the measurement strength and in the limit of strong projective measurement the super quantum discord becomes the normal quantum discord. We find that unlike the normal discord, for pure entangled states, the super quantum discord can exceed the quantum entanglement. Our results provide new insights on the nature of quantum correlation and suggest that the notion of quantum correlation is not only observer dependent but also depends on how weakly one perturbs the composite system. We illustrate the key results for pure as well as mixed entangled states. -- Highlights: •Introduced the role of weak measurements in quantifying quantum correlation. •We have introduced the notion of the super quantum discord (SQD). •For pure entangled state, we show that the SQD exceeds the entanglement entropy. •This shows that quantum correlation depends not only on observer but also on measurement strength

  12. Detecting infrared luminescence and non-chemical signaling of living cells: single cell mid-IR spectroscopy in cryogenic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereverzev, Sergey

    2017-02-01

    Many life-relevant interaction energies are in IR range, and it is reasonable to believe that some biochemical reactions inside cells can results in emission of IR photons. Cells can use this emission for non-chemical and non-electrical signaling. Detecting weak infrared radiation from live cells is complicated because of strong thermal radiation background and absorption of radiation by tissues. A microfluidic device with live cells inside a vacuum cryogenic environment should suppress this background, and thereby permit observation of live cell auto-luminescence or signaling in the IR regime. One can make IR-transparent windows not emitting in this range, so only the cell and a small amount of liquid around it will emit infrared radiation. Currently mid-IR spectroscopy of single cells requires the use of a synchrotron source to measure absorption or reflection spectra. Decreasing of thermal radiation background will allow absorption and reflection spectroscopy of cells without using synchrotron light. Moreover, cell auto-luminescence can be directly measured. The complete absence of thermal background radiation for cryogenically cooled samples allows the use IR photon-sensitive detectors and obtaining single molecule sensitivity in IR photo-luminescence measurements. Due to low photon energies, photo-luminescence measurements will be non-distractive for pressures samples. The technique described here is based upon US patent 9366574.

  13. Anodic luminescence, structural, photoluminescent, and photocatalytic properties of anodic oxide films grown on niobium in phosphoric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stojadinović, Stevan, E-mail: sstevan@ff.bg.ac.rs [University of Belgrade, Faculty of Physics, Studentski trg 12-16, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Tadić, Nenad [University of Belgrade, Faculty of Physics, Studentski trg 12-16, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Radić, Nenad [University of Belgrade, Institute of Chemistry, Technology and Metallurgy, Department of Catalysis and Chemical Engineering, Njegoševa 12, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Stefanov, Plamen [Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Acad. G. Bonchev Str., Block 11, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Grbić, Boško [University of Belgrade, Institute of Chemistry, Technology and Metallurgy, Department of Catalysis and Chemical Engineering, Njegoševa 12, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Vasilić, Rastko [University of Belgrade, Faculty of Physics, Studentski trg 12-16, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2015-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Anodic luminescence is correlated to the existence of morphological defects in the oxide. • Spectrum under spark discharging reveals only oxygen and hydrogen lines. • Oxide films formed under spark discharging are crystallized and composed of Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}. • Photocatalytic activity and photoluminescence of Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} films increase with time. - Abstract: This article reports on properties of oxide films obtained by anodization of niobium in phosphoric acid before and after the dielectric breakdown. Weak anodic luminescence of barrier oxide films formed during the anodization of niobium is correlated to the existence of morphological defects in the oxide layer. Small sized sparks generated by dielectric breakdown of formed oxide film cause rapid increase of luminescence intensity. The luminescence spectrum of obtained films on niobium under spark discharging is composed of continuum radiation and spectral lines caused by electronic spark discharging transitions in oxygen and hydrogen atoms. Oxide films formed before the breakdown are amorphous, while after the breakdown oxide films are partly crystalline and mainly composed of Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} hexagonal phase. The photocatalytic activity of obtained oxide films after the breakdown was investigated by monitoring the degradation of methyl orange. Increase of the photocatalytic activity with time is related to an increase of oxygen vacancy defects in oxide films formed during the process. Also, higher concentration of oxygen vacancy defects in oxide films results in higher photoluminescence intensity.

  14. The Effect of Surfactants on Gas-Liquid Pipe Flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Nimwegen, A.T.

    2015-01-01

    Liquid loading is a major problem in the natural gas industry, in which gas production is limited by the accumulation of liquids in the well tubing. Liquid loading can be prevented by the injection of surfactants at the bottom of the well. The surfactants cause the liquid in the well to foam,

  15. Surface rheology of surfactant solutions close to equilibrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baets, P.J.M.; Stein, H.N.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper the authors present surface rheol. measurements of various surfactant solns. close to equil. in a Langmuir trough. The authors find that the storage modulus is, in the systems investigated, higher than the loss modulus. The rheol. behavior depends strongly on the surfactant concn.,

  16. Surfactant induced flows in thin liquid films : an experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinz, D.K.N.

    2012-01-01

    The topic of the experimental work summarized in my thesis is the flow in thin liquid films induced by non-uniformly distributed surfactants. The flow dynamics as a consequence of the deposition of a droplet of an insoluble surfactant onto a thin liquid film covering a solid substrate where

  17. Radioactive slurry waste treatment (2) - surfactants dose effects on filtration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, K. H.; Park, S. K.; Jung, W. S.; Baek, S. T.; Jung, K. J.

    1999-01-01

    The influence of anionic flocculants on the dewatering of radioactive slurries has been investigated in a laboratory-scale vacuum filtration unit. Simultaneously the influence of certain surfactants has also been investigated. Test results show that the flocculated filter cake generally contains higher residual water than the unflocculated cake. The non-ionic surfactant was effective in reducing the moisture content of the cake

  18. Marangoni flows induced by non-uniform surfactant distributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanyak, M.

    2012-01-01

    The spreading dynamics of surfactants is of crucial importance for numerous technological applications ranging from printing and coating processes, pulmonary drug delivery to crude oil recovery. In the area of inkjet printing surfactants are necessary for lowering surface tension of water-based ink

  19. Effect of Gemini-type surfactant on methane hydrate formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, K.E.; Park, J.M.; Kim, C.U.; Chae, H.J.; Jeong, S.Y. [Korea Research Inst. of Chemical Technology, Jang-Dong, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    Natural gas hydrates are formed from water and natural gas molecules at particular temperatures and pressures that become ice-like inclusion compounds. Gas hydrates offer several benefits such as energy resource potential and high storage capacity of natural gas in the form of hydrates. However, the application of natural gas hydrates has been deterred by its low formation rate and low conversion ratio of water into hydrate resulting in low actual storage capacity. This paper presented an experimental study to determine the effect of adding a novel Gemini-type surfactant on methane hydrate formation. The experimental study was described with reference to the properties of prepared diols and properties of prepared disulfonates. Gemini surfactant is the family of surfactant molecules possessing more than one hydrophobic tail and hydrophilic head group. They generally have better surface-active properties than conventional surfactants of equal chain length. The paper presented the results of the study in terms of the reactions of diols with propane sultone; storage capacity of hydrate formed with and without surfactant; and methane hydrate formation with and without disulfonate. It was concluded that the methane hydrate formation was accelerated by the addition of novel anionic Gemini-type surfactants and that hydrate formation was influenced by the surfactant concentration and alkyl chain length. For a given concentration, the surfactant with the highest chain length demonstrated the highest formation rate and storage capacity. 5 refs., 3 tabs., 4 figs.

  20. The effect of nanoparticle aggregation on surfactant foam stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlYousef, Zuhair A; Almobarky, Mohammed A; Schechter, David S

    2018-02-01

    The combination of nanoparticles (NPs) and surfactant may offer a novel technique of generating stronger foams for gas mobility control. This study evaluates the potential of silica NPs to enhance the foam stability of three nonionic surfactants. Results showed that the concentration of surfactant and NPs is a crucial parameter for foam stability and that there is certain concentrations for strong foam generation. A balance in concentration between the nonionic surfactants and the NPs can enhance the foam stability as a result of forming flocs in solutions. At fixed surfactant concentration, the addition of NPs at low to intermediate concentrations can produce a more stable foam compared to the surfactant. The production of small population of flocs as a result of mixing the surfactant and NPs can enhance the foam stability by providing a barrier between the gas bubbles and delaying the coalescence of bubbles. Moreover, these flocs can increase the solution viscosity and, therefore, slow the drainage rate of thin aqueous film (lamellae). The measurements of foam half-life, bubble size, and mobility tests confirmed this conclusion. However, the addition of more solid particles or surfactant might have a negative impact on foam stability and reduce the maximum capillary pressure of coalescence as a result of forming extensive aggregates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Binding of alkylpyridinium chloride surfactants to sodium polystyrene sulfonate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ishiguro, M.; Koopal, L.K.

    2009-01-01

    Binding of cationic surfactants to anionic polymers is well studied. However, the surfactant binding characteristics at very low concentration near the start of binding and at high concentration, where charge compensation may Occur. are less well known. Therefore, the binding characteristics of

  2. Adsorption and intercalation of anionic surfactants onto layered ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Layered double hydroxides (LDH) with brucite like structure was modified with various anionic surfactants containing sulfonate, carboxyl, phosphonate and sulfate end group through ion-exchange method. XRD reports indicated that the sulfonate group containing surfactants led to an adsorption process whereas the sulfate ...

  3. Effect of Surfactants on Plasmid DNA Stability and Release from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of surfactants on plasmid DNA during preparation and release from polylactic glycolide (PLGA) microspheres. Methods: Various surfactants, both ionic and non-ionic (Span, Tween, Triton X100, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and sodium dodecyl sulphate), were added during the ...

  4. Photoisomerization of merocyanine 540 in polymer-surfactant ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Photoisomerization of merocyanine 540 (MC540) in a polymer-surfactant aggregate is studied using picosecond time resolved emission spectroscopy. The aggregate consists of the polymer, poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) and the surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS). With increase in the concentration of SDS in an ...

  5. Small-angle neutron scattering studies of nonionic surfactant: Effect

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Micellar solution of nonionic surfactant -dodecyloligo ethyleneoxide surfactant, decaoxyethylene monododecyl ether [CH3(CH2)11(OCH2CH2)10OH], C12E10 in D2O solution have been analysed by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) at different temperatures (30, 45 and 60°C) both in the presence and absence of ...

  6. Polymeric surfactants for enhanced oil recovery : A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raffa, Patrizio; Broekhuis, Antonius A.; Picchioni, Francesco

    Chemical enhanced oil recovery (EOR) is surely a topic of interest, as conventional oil resources become more scarce and the necessity of exploiting heavy and unconventional oils increases. EOR methods based on polymer flooding, surfactant-polymer flooding and alkali-surfactant-polymer flooding are

  7. Nonionic surfactant Brij35 effects on toluene biodegradation in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nonionic surfactant effects on the toluene dissolved in the water phase and biodegradation kinetic behaviors of toluene in a composite bead biofilter were investigated. The toluene dissolved in the water phase was enhanced by the addition of surfactant into aqueous solution and the enhancing effect was more pronounced ...

  8. Weak-interacting holographic QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gazit, D.; Yee, H.-U.

    2008-06-01

    We propose a simple prescription for including low-energy weak-interactions into the frame- work of holographic QCD, based on the standard AdS/CFT dictionary of double-trace deformations. As our proposal enables us to calculate various electro-weak observables involving strongly coupled QCD, it opens a new perspective on phenomenological applications of holographic QCD. We illustrate efficiency and usefulness of our method by performing a few exemplar calculations; neutron beta decay, charged pion weak decay, and meson-nucleon parity non-conserving (PNC) couplings. The idea is general enough to be implemented in both Sakai-Sugimoto as well as Hard/Soft Wall models. (author)

  9. Plane waves with weak singularities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, Justin R.

    2003-03-01

    We study a class of time dependent solutions of the vacuum Einstein equations which are plane waves with weak null singularities. This singularity is weak in the sense that though the tidal forces diverge at the singularity, the rate of divergence is such that the distortion suffered by a freely falling observer remains finite. Among such weak singular plane waves there is a sub-class which does not exhibit large back reaction in the presence of test scalar probes. String propagation in these backgrounds is smooth and there is a natural way to continue the metric beyond the singularity. This continued metric admits string propagation without the string becoming infinitely excited. We construct a one parameter family of smooth metrics which are at a finite distance in the space of metrics from the extended metric and a well defined operator in the string sigma model which resolves the singularity. (author)

  10. Pulmonary Surfactants for Acute and Chronic Lung Diseases (Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Rozenberg

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Part 2 of the review considers the problem of surfactant therapy for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS in adults and young and old children. It gives information on the results of surfactant therapy and prevention of ARDS in patients with severe concurrent trauma, inhalation injuries, complications due to complex expanded chest surgery, or severe pneumonias, including bilateral pneumonia in the presence of A/H1N1 influenza. There are data on the use of a surfactant in obstetric care and prevention of primary graft dysfunction during lung transplantation. The results of longterm use of surfactant therapy in Russia, suggesting that death rates from ARDS may be substantially reduced (to 20% are discussed. Examples of surfactant therapy for other noncritical lung diseases, such as permanent athelectasis, chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases, and asthma, as well tuberculosis, are also considered.

  11. Indication of critical micelle concentration of nonionic surfactants with large emission change using water-soluble conjugated polymer as molecular light switch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Lilin, E-mail: sunlilin126@126.com [Anhui Key Laboratory of Chemo-Biosensing, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Anhui Normal University, Wuhu 241000 (China); Hao, Dan; Zhang, Ping; Qian, Zhangsheng; Shen, Weili [Anhui Key Laboratory of Chemo-Biosensing, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Anhui Normal University, Wuhu 241000 (China); Shao, Taili [Anhui Key Laboratory of Chemo-Biosensing, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Anhui Normal University, Wuhu 241000 (China); Department of Pharmacy, Wannan Medical College, Wuhu 241000 (China); Zhu, Changqing, E-mail: zhucq@mail.ahnu.edu.cn [Anhui Key Laboratory of Chemo-Biosensing, College of Chemistry and Materials Science, Anhui Normal University, Wuhu 241000 (China)

    2013-02-15

    A new near-infrared water-soluble conjugated polymer, i.e. poly [2,5-di (propyloxysulfonate)-1,4-phenylene-ethynylene-9,10-anthrylene] (PPEASO3) was synthesized to investigate its interaction with surfactants. It was found that PPEASO3 has only a weak fluorescence emission at about 670 nm due to its self-aggregation in water and in aqueous solution containing a low concentration of nonionic surfactants, i.e. below their critical micelle concentration (CMC). However, a dramatic fluorescence enhancement with a large emission blue-shift (>40 nm) was found once the concentration of nonionic surfactants reached the CMC (especially for Triton X-100). An orange fluorescence could be observed even with naked-eyes under UV-lamp, which gave a direct indication for the micelle forming process and provided a simple method for the CMC determination of the nonionic surfactants. The CMC values determined by this method were in good agreement with those obtained by other techniques. The dramatic emission change observed could be ascribed to the intensive hydrophobic interaction between PPEASO3 and surfactants micelle, which greatly disrupts the aggregation of the polymer and increase the fluorescence efficiency of PPEASO3. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Investigated the interaction of a new water-soluble conjugated polymer with surfactants. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dramatic fluorescence enhancement and emission blue-shift were observed at the CMC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The obvious emission color change could be observed with naked-eyes under UV-lamp. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gave a direct indication for the micelle forming process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Provided a simple method for the CMC determination of the nonionic surfactants.

  12. Investigations into surfactant/gas hydrate relationship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, Rudy; Zhang, Guochang; Dearman, Jennifer; Woods, Charles [Swalm School of Chemical Engineering, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762 (United States)

    2007-03-15

    Gas hydrates have unique physical properties portending useful industrial applications of gas storage, gas separation, or water desalination. When gas hydrates were found in the early 1990s to occur naturally and abundantly in seafloors, three other primary interests and concerns emerged: potential new energy source, climate threat from their greenhouse gases, and seafloor instabilities. This paper presents research showing how anionic synthetic surfactants helped develop an industrial gas hydrate storage process for natural gas and how naturally-occurring in-situ anionic biosurfactants influence the formation and placement of gas hydrates in ocean sediments. The catalytic effects, mechanisms, and surface specificities imparted by synthetic surfactants in the gas storage process and imparted by biosurfactants in porous media are discussed. The Bacillus subtilis bacterium that is indigenous to gas hydrate mounds in the Gulf of Mexico was cultured in the laboratory. Its biosurfactant was separated and found to catalyze gas hydrates in porous media. The experiments indicate that seafloor-biosurfactants can be produced rapidly in-situ to achieve threshold concentrations whereby hydrates are promoted. The biosurfactants accumulate and promote hydrate formation on specific mineral surfaces such as sodium montmorillonite. (author)

  13. Reversal of multidrug resistance by surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodcock, D. M.; Linsenmeyer, M. E.; Chojnowski, G.; Kriegler, A. B.; Nink, V.; Webster, L. K.; Sawyer, W. H.

    1992-01-01

    Cremophor EL, a pharmacologically inactive solubilising agent, has been shown to reverse multidrug resistance (MDR). Using flow cytometric evaluation of equilibrium intracellular levels of daunorubicin (DNR), we found that eight other surface active agents will also reverse MDR. All the active detergents contain polyethoxylated moieties but have no similarities in their hydrophobic components. The properties of three polyethoxylated surfactants that showed the lowest toxicities, Cremophor, Tween 80 and Solutol HS15, were examined in more detail. The concentrations of Tween 80 and Solutol required to reverse DNR exclusion were 10-fold lower than for Cremophor. However while concentrations greater than or equal to 1:10(2) of the former two surfactants resulted in breakdown of cells, even 1:10 of Cremophor did not lyse cells. Studies of the effects of Cremophor on the uptake and efflux of DNR in normal and MDR cell types showed that Cremophor increases intracellular DNR primarily by locking the rapid efflux from the cells. This blockage of drug efflux may be mediated by a substantial alteration in the fluidity of cell membranes induced by Cremophor, as shown by decreased fluorescence anisotropy of a membrane probe. Consistent with these data, coinjection of adriamycin plus Cremophor into mice carrying a multidrug resistant P388 transplantable tumour significantly increased the survival time of the mice compared with adriamycin treatment alone. PMID:1637678

  14. 3D Model of Surfactant Replacement Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotberg, James; Tai, Cheng-Feng; Filoche, Marcel

    2015-11-01

    Surfactant Replacement Therapy (SRT) involves instillation of a liquid-surfactant mixture directly into the lung airway tree. Though successful in neonatal applications, its use in adults had early success followed by failure. We present the first mathematical model of 3D SRT where a liquid plug propagates through the tree from forced inspiration. In two separate modeling steps, the plug first deposits a coating film on the airway wall which subtracts from its volume, a ``coating cost''. Then the plug splits unevenly at the airway bifurcation due to gravity. The steps are repeated until a plug ruptures or reaches the tree endpoint alveoli/acinus. The model generates 3D images of the resulting acinar distribution and calculates two global indexes, efficiency and homogeneity. Simulating published literature, the earlier successful adult SRT studies show comparatively good index values, while the later failed studies do not. Those unsuccessful studies used smaller dose volumes with higher concentration mixtures, apparently assuming a well mixed compartment. The model shows that adult lungs are not well mixed in SRT due to the coating cost and gravity effects. Returning to the higher dose volume protocols could save many thousands of lives annually in the US. Supported by NIH Grants HL85156, HL84370 and Agence Nationale de la Recherche, ANR no. 2010-BLAN-1119-05.

  15. Surfactant secretion and clearance in the newborn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, P.A.; Wright, J.R.; Clements, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Pregnant rabbits (30 days) were injected intravenously with [3H]choline 8 h before delivery. The fetuses were delivered, and lung lavage and lamellar body phospholipids (PL) were analyzed. Some newborns also received radioactively labeled surfactant intratracheally on delivery and were permitted to breathe. With time, intratracheal label decreased in lavage and appeared in the lamellar body fraction, and intravenous label accumulated in both pools. Using a tracer analysis for non-steady state, we calculated surfactant secretion and clearance rates for the newborn period. Before birth, both rates rose slightly from 1.8 micrograms PL.g body wt-1.h-1 at 6 h before birth to 7.3 at birth. Immediately after birth, secretion rate rose to 37.7 micrograms PL.g body wt-1.h-1. Between 1.5 and 2 h after birth it fell to a minimum of 1.8 micrograms PL.g body wt-1.h-1 and then rose slowly to 6.0 at 12 h. After birth, clearance rate increased less than secretion rate (maximum 24.7 micrograms PL.g body wt-1.h-1 shortly after birth) then followed the same pattern but did not balance secretion rate in the 1st day

  16. Luminescent amine sensor based on europium(III) chelate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrochenkova, Nataliya V; Mirochnik, Anatolii G; Emelina, Tatyana B; Sergeev, Alexander A; Leonov, Andrei A; Voznesenskii, Sergey S

    2018-07-05

    The effect of methylamine vapor on luminescence of Eu(III) tris-benzoylacetonate (I) immobilized in thin-layer chromatography plates has been investigated. It has been revealed that interaction of I with analyte vapor results in increase of the intensity of Eu(III) luminescence. The mechanism of the effect of methylamine vapors on intensification of the Eu(III) luminescence has been suggested using the data of IR spectroscopy and quantum chemistry calculations. The mechanism of luminescence sensitization consists in bonding of an analyte molecule with a water molecule into the coordination sphere of Eu(III). As a result, the bond of a water molecule with the luminescence centre weakens, rigid structural fragment including europium ion, water and methylamine molecules forms. The presence of such fragment must naturally promote decrease of influence of OH-vibrations on luminescence of the complex I. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Cosmology and the weak interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schramm, D.N. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA)):(Chicago Univ., IL (USA))

    1989-12-01

    The weak interaction plays a critical role in modern Big Bang cosmology. This review will emphasize two of its most publicized cosmological connections: Big Bang nucleosynthesis and Dark Matter. The first of these is connected to the cosmological prediction of Neutrino Flavours, N{sub {nu}} {approximately} 3 which is now being confirmed at SLC and LEP. The second is interrelated to the whole problem of galaxy and structure formation in the universe. This review will demonstrate the role of the weak interaction both for dark matter candidates and for the problem of generating seeds to form structure. 87 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Cosmology and the weak interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schramm, D.N.

    1989-12-01

    The weak interaction plays a critical role in modern Big Bang cosmology. This review will emphasize two of its most publicized cosmological connections: Big Bang nucleosynthesis and Dark Matter. The first of these is connected to the cosmological prediction of Neutrino Flavours, N ν ∼ 3 which is now being confirmed at SLC and LEP. The second is interrelated to the whole problem of galaxy and structure formation in the universe. This review will demonstrate the role of the weak interaction both for dark matter candidates and for the problem of generating seeds to form structure. 87 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs

  19. Nonlinear waves and weak turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Zakharov, V E

    1997-01-01

    This book is a collection of papers on dynamical and statistical theory of nonlinear wave propagation in dispersive conservative media. Emphasis is on waves on the surface of an ideal fluid and on Rossby waves in the atmosphere. Although the book deals mainly with weakly nonlinear waves, it is more than simply a description of standard perturbation techniques. The goal is to show that the theory of weakly interacting waves is naturally related to such areas of mathematics as Diophantine equations, differential geometry of waves, Poincaré normal forms, and the inverse scattering method.

  20. Weak disorder in Fibonacci sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Naim, E [Theoretical Division and Center for Nonlinear Studies, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Krapivsky, P L [Department of Physics and Center for Molecular Cybernetics, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2006-05-19

    We study how weak disorder affects the growth of the Fibonacci series. We introduce a family of stochastic sequences that grow by the normal Fibonacci recursion with probability 1 - {epsilon}, but follow a different recursion rule with a small probability {epsilon}. We focus on the weak disorder limit and obtain the Lyapunov exponent that characterizes the typical growth of the sequence elements, using perturbation theory. The limiting distribution for the ratio of consecutive sequence elements is obtained as well. A number of variations to the basic Fibonacci recursion including shift, doubling and copying are considered. (letter to the editor)

  1. Weak interactions at high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, J.

    1978-08-01

    Review lectures are presented on the phenomenological implications of the modern spontaneously broken gauge theories of the weak and electromagnetic interactions, and some observations are made about which high energy experiments probe what aspects of gauge theories. Basic quantum chromodynamics phenomenology is covered including momentum dependent effective quark distributions, the transverse momentum cutoff, search for gluons as sources of hadron jets, the status and prospects for the spectroscopy of fundamental fermions and how fermions may be used to probe aspects of the weak and electromagnetic gauge theory, studies of intermediate vector bosons, and miscellaneous possibilities suggested by gauge theories from the Higgs bosons to speculations about proton decay. 187 references

  2. Neutron dosimetry using optically stimulated luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, S.D.; Eschbach, P.A.

    1991-06-01

    The addition of thermoluminescent (TL) materials within hydrogenous matrices to detect neutron-induced proton recoils for radiation dosimetry is a well-known concept. Previous attempts to implement this technique have met with limited success, primarily due to the high temperatures required for TL readout and the low melting temperatures of hydrogen-rich plastics. Research in recent years at Pacific Northwest laboratories (PNL) has produced a new Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) technique known as the Cooled Optically Stimulated Luminescence (COSL) that offers, for the first time, the capability of performing extremely sensitive radiation dosimetry at low temperatures. In addition to its extreme sensitivity, the COSL technique offers multiple readout capability, limited fading in a one-year period, and the capability of analyzing single grains within a hydrogenous matrix. 4 refs., 10 figs

  3. Luminescence properties of a nanoporous freshwater diatom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Bondita; Choudhury, Amarjyoti; Buragohain, Alak K

    2012-01-01

    Freshwater diatom frustules show special optical properties. In this paper we observed luminescence properties of the freshwater diatom Cyclotella meneghiniana. To confirm the morphological properties we present scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies were carried out to visualize the structural properties of the frustules, confirming that silica present in diatom frustules crystallizes in an α-quartz structure. Study of the optical properties of the silica frustules of diatoms using ultra-violet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy confirmed that the diatom C. meneghiniana shows luminescence in the blue region of the electromagnetic spectrum when irradiated with UV light. This property of diatoms can be exploited to obtain many applications in day-to-day life. Also, using time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy (TRPL) it was confirmed that this species of diatom shows bi-exponential decay. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. New luminescence measurement facilities in retrospective dosimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lapp, Torben; Jain, Mayank; Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov

    2012-01-01

    ), this facility has been used to measure natural doses in feldspar using the decaying NIR RL signal.Secondly, we present a method for mapping radiation field of the built-in 90Sr/90Y β-source and estimating grain-location specific dose-rates. This is important for the accuracy of single grain results, when......This paper gives a review of recent developments in luminescence measurement facilities on the Risø TL/OSL reader including radio-luminescence (RL), exo-electron and violet stimulation attachments, and a method for characterising and if necessary correcting for beta irradiation source non...... radiation field is spatially non-uniform across the sample area. We document the effect of this correction method and further investigate on the effect of lifting the source to achieve a better dose-rate uniformity.Finally we summarise two recently-developed novel facilities to help investigate (i) the time...

  5. The double luminescence of Color Centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldacchini, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    An experiment on the luminescence of Color Centers (CCs) carried out in 1987 at the ENEA Laboratories in Frascati had a negative result, but subsequent investigations showed that it was not a failure but rather a discovery of a new phenomenon. Since the coming of lasers, CCs in alkali halides have been successfully used as optically active materials, in particular FA Centers. One of these centers, well known for its medium infrared laser emission at 77 K, cooled further to 2 K emitted in the near infrared and without laser effect. Further investigations showed that the double luminescence was a fundamental property unknown until that time. This important discovery was achieved in Frascati because of the existence since 1973 of a solid and extensive expertise in the field of CCs, which continued over time and later on applied to the modern miniaturized photonic devices [it

  6. Anomalous enhancement of nanodiamond luminescence upon heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khomich, A. A.; Kudryavtsev, O. S.; Dolenko, T. A.; Shiryaev, A. A.; Fisenko, A. V.; Konov, V. I.; Vlasov, I. I.

    2017-02-01

    Characteristic photoluminescence (PL) of nanodiamonds (ND) of different origin (detonation, HPHT, extracted from meteorite) was studied in situ at high temperatures in the range 20-450 °C. Luminescence was excited using 473 nm laser and recorded in the range 500-800 nm. In contrast to decrease of point defect PL in bulk diamond with temperature, we found that the ND luminescence related to ND surface defects increases almost an order of magnitude upon heating to 200-250 °C. The observed effect reveals that water adsorbed on ND surfaces efficiently quenches PL; water desorption on heating leads to dramatic increase of the radiative de-excitation.

  7. NMR study of the dynamics of cationic gemini surfactant 14-2-14 in mixed solutions with conventional surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yan; Lu, Xing-Yu; Chen, Hong; Mao, Shi-Zhen; Liu, Mai-Li; Luo, Ping-Ya; Du, You-Ru

    2009-06-18

    Three kinds of conventional surfactants, namely, two nonionic surfactants [polyethylene glycol (23) lauryl ether (Brij-35) and Triton X-100 (TX-100)], one cationic surfactant [n-tetradecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (TTAB)], and an anionic surfactant [sodium n-dodecyl sulfate (SDS)}, were mixed into the quaternary ammonium gemini surfactant [C(14)H(29)N(+)(CH(3))(2)](2)(CH(2))(2).2Br(-) (14-2-14) in aqueous solution. The exchange rate constants between 14-2-14 molecules in the mixed micelles and those in the bulk solution were detected using two nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods: one-dimensional (1D) line shape analysis and two-dimensional (2D) exchange spectroscopy (EXSY). The results obtained from these two methods were consistent. Both showed that mixing a nonionic conventional surfactant, either Brij-35 or TX-100, enhanced the exchange process between the 14-2-14 molecules in the mixed micelles and those in the bulk solution. In contrast, the anionic surfactant SDS and the cationic surfactant TTAB slowed the process slightly.

  8. A multicenter, randomized trial comparing synthetic surfactant with modified bovine surfactant extract in the treatment of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adams, E; Vollman, J; Giebner, D; Maurer, M; Dreyer, G; Bailey, L; Anderson, M; Mefford, L; Beaumont, E; Sutton, D; Puppala, B; Mangurten, HH; Secrest, J; Lewis, WJ; Carteaux, P; Bednarek, F; Welsberger, S; Gosselin, R; Pantoja, AF; Belenky, A; Campbell, P; Patole, S; Duenas, M; Kelly, M; Alejo, W; Lewallen, P; DeanLieber, S; Hanft, M; Ferlauto, J; Newell, RW; Bagwell, J; Levine, D; Lipp, RW; Harkavy, K; Vasa, R; Birenbaum, H; Broderick, KA; Santos, AQ; Long, BA; Gulrajani, M; Stern, M; Hopgood, G; Hegyi, T; Alba, J; Christmas, L; McQueen, M; Nichols, N; Brown, M; Quissell, BJ; Rusk, C; Marks, K; Gifford, K; Hoehn, G; Pathak, A; Marino, B; Hunt, P; Fox, [No Value; Sharpstein, C; Feldman, B; Johnson, N; Beecham, J; Balcom, R; Helmuth, W; Boylan, D; Frakes, C; Magoon, M; Reese, K; Schwersenski, J; Schutzman, D; Soll, R; Horbar, JD; Leahy, K; Troyer, W; Juzwicki, C; Anderson, P; Dworsky, M; Reynolds, L; Urrutia, J; Gupta, U; Adray, C

    Objective. To compare the efficacy of a synthetic surfactant (Exosurf Neonatal, Burroughs-Wellcome Co) and a modified bovine surfactant extract (Survanta, Ross Laboratories) in the treatment of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). Design. Multicenter, randomized trial. Setting. Thirty-eight

  9. Uranyl(VI) luminescence spectroscopy at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steudtner, Robin; Franzen, Carola; Brendler, Vinzenz [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Div. Surface Processes; Haubitz, Toni [Brandenburg Univ. of Technology, Cottbus-Senftenberg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    We studied the influence of temperature and ionic strength on the luminescence characteristics (band position, decay time and intensity) of the free uranyl ion (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) in acidic aqueous solution. Under the chosen conditions an increasing temperature reduced both intensity and luminescence decay time of the UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} luminescence, but the individual U(VI) emission bands did not change.

  10. Method and apparatus for reducing solvent luminescence background emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Affleck, Rhett L. (Los Alamos, NM); Ambrose, W. Patrick (Los Alamos, NM); Demas, James N. (Charlottesville, VA); Goodwin, Peter M. (Jemez Springs, NM); Johnson, Mitchell E. (Pittsburgh, PA); Keller, Richard A. (Los Alamos, NM); Petty, Jeffrey T. (Los Alamos, NM); Schecker, Jay A. (Santa Fe, NM); Wu, Ming (Los Alamos, NM)

    1998-01-01

    The detectability of luminescent molecules in solution is enhanced by reducing the background luminescence due to impurity species also present in the solution. A light source that illuminates the solution acts to photolyze the impurities so that the impurities do not luminesce in the fluorescence band of the molecule of interest. Molecules of interest may be carried through the photolysis region in the solution or may be introduced into the solution after the photolysis region.

  11. Ab initio calculations of cross luminescence materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanchana, V.

    2016-01-01

    Abintio calculations have been performed to study the structural, electronic, and optical properties of ABX 3 (A=alkali, B=alkaline-earth, and X=halide) compounds. The ground state properties are calculated using the pseudopotential method with the inclusion of van der Waals interaction, which we find inevitable in reproducing the experimental structure properties in alkali iodides because of its layered structure. All calculations were performed using the Full-Potential Linearized Augmented Plane Wave method. The band structures are plotted with various functionals and we find the newly developed Tran and Blaha modified Becke-Johnson potential to improve the band gap significantly. The optical properties such as complex dielectric function, refractive index, and absorption spectra are calculated which clearly reveal the optically isotropic nature of these materials though being structurally anisotropic, which is the key requirement for ceramic scintillators. Cross luminescence materials are very interesting because of its fast decay. One of the major criteria for the cross luminescence to happen is the energy difference between valence band and next deeper core valence band being lesser when compared to energy gap of the compound, so that radiative electronic transition may occur between valence band and core valence band. We found this criteria to be satisfied in all the studied compounds leading to cross luminescence except for KSrI 3 , RbSrI 3 . The present study suggest that among the six compounds studied, CsSrI 3 , CsMgCl 3 , CsCaCl 3 , and CsSrCl 3 compounds are cross luminescence materials, which is well explained from the band structure, optical properties calculations. Chlorides are better scintillators that iodides and CsMgCl 3 is found to be promising one among the studied compounds. Apart from these materials we have also discussed electronic structure and optical properties of other scintillator compounds. (author)

  12. Thermally stimulated luminescence of KDP activated crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagaeva, B.S.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this work is the study of recombination luminescence pure and doped by the ions Tl, Se, Pb and Cu of crystals double potassium phosphates (KDP) at irradiation by X-rays. It is established that in the given crystals mechanisms for under-threshold defect formation are realize. The impurity ions results the basic crystal light sum redistribution in the TL peaks. Explanations for some phenomena are given. (author)

  13. Thermal History Using Microparticle Trap Luminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    the size and shape of bacterial or viral agents and dispersed in a burst vessel . After the test, luminescence from the microparticles is measured to...platinum resistor sputtered on 1 nm adhesion layer of chrome, in turn on a 200nm LPCVD nitride; silicon wet -etching makes this a platform suspended...increased to 500°C until combustion occurred (- 7 min). The remaining powder was collected, crushed in a agate mortar, and annealed (typically at 900

  14. Process for producing a self luminescent material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, E

    1962-01-28

    A self luminescent material is produced by a process comprising applying a hydroxide or fluoride of promethium-147 suspended in a medium of paraffinic acid to the surface of a fluorescent body. Promethium-147 decays with a half-life of 2.6 years and emits beta-rays but not alpha- and gamma-rays so that it is suitable for manufacturing self luminescent materials. A chloride of promethium-147 cannot be employed because its structure is destroyed by acids. Although fluorides and hydroxides of promethium-147 are difficult to mix with the fluorescent body material, they become mixable when paraffinic acids containing from 12 to 20 carbon atoms, (for example, steric acid, palmitic acid and margaric acid) are used as a medium. In embodiments, the self luminescent materials are prepared by either neutralization of a promethium-147 chloride solution having a specific radioactivity of 1.2 c/cc. with an ammonium hydroxide solution to form gelatinous hydroxide, or the reaction of a promethium-147 chloride solution with H/sub 2/SiF/sub 6/ by heating at 80/sup 0/C to form a fluoride of promethium-147. The products have a specific radioactivity of 8 to 12 mc/g. These products are suspended in vehicles of polystyrene and methacrylic resin to produce the self luminescent coating materials. Tests show that the initical brightness is comparatively high, the decreasing rate of brightness is small, no blackening effects by alpha-rays occur and costs are low. The brightness of the coating containing promethium-147 is 82-85 after 5 days, 100-105 after 100 days and 82-92 after 180 days. With respect to the coating containing radium the values are 31-70 after 5 days, 28-49 after 100 days and 19-31 after 180 days.

  15. Broadband luminescence in liquid-solid transition

    CERN Document Server

    Achilov, M F; Trunilina, O V

    2002-01-01

    Broadband luminescence (BBL) intensity behavior in liquid-solid transition in polyethyleneglycol-600 has been established. Oscillation of BBL intensity observed in liquid-polycrystal transition are not found to observed in liquid-amorphous solid transition. It is shown that application of the theory of electron state tails to interpretation of BBL spectral properties in liquids demands restriction. BBL spectroscopy may be applied for optimization of preparation of polymers with determined properties. (author)

  16. Luminescent Metal Nanoclusters for Potential Chemosensor Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthaiah Shellaiah

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies of metal nanocluster (M-NCs-based sensors for specific analyte detection have achieved significant progress in recent decades. Ultra-small-size (<2 nm M-NCs consist of several to a few hundred metal atoms and exhibit extraordinary physical and chemical properties. Similar to organic molecules, M-NCs display absorption and emission properties via electronic transitions between energy levels upon interaction with light. As such, researchers tend to apply M-NCs in diverse fields, such as in chemosensors, biological imaging, catalysis, and environmental and electronic devices. Chemo- and bio-sensory uses have been extensively explored with luminescent NCs of Au, Ag, Cu, and Pt as potential sensory materials. Luminescent bi-metallic NCs, such as Au-Ag, Au-Cu, Au-Pd, and Au-Pt have also been used as probes in chemosensory investigations. Both metallic and bi-metallic NCs have been utilized to detect various analytes, such as metal ions, anions, biomolecules, proteins, acidity or alkalinity of a solution (pH, and nucleic acids, at diverse detection ranges and limits. In this review, we have summarized the chemosensory applications of luminescent M-NCs and bi-metallic NCs.

  17. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and some other luminescence images from granite slices exposed with radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, T.; Notoya, S.; Ojima, T.; Hoteida, M.

    1995-01-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) images of some X- and γ-irradiated granite slices were obtained using photon detection through a 570 nm bandpass filter with diode-laser excitation of 910 nm. Alternative photo-induced phosphorescence (PIP) images, which were colour photographed immediately after the sunlight exposure of slice samples, were also found to be helpful in the observation of the luminescence properties and to filter selection for OSL measurements. These OSL and PIP images were compared with some other colour luminescence images, including thermoluminescence images (TLCI) and after-glow images (AGCI). It was obvious that there exists a variety of coloured emissions derived mainly from feldspar constituents and these were found to be dependent on the geological history or metamorphism of the granites. (Author)

  18. Near-Infrared Quantum Cutting Long Persistent Luminescence

    OpenAIRE

    Zou, Zehua; Feng, Lin; Cao, Cheng; Zhang, Jiachi; Wang, Yuhua

    2016-01-01

    By combining the unique features of the quantum cutting luminescence and long persistent luminescence, we design a new concept called ?near-infrared quantum cutting long persistent luminescence (NQPL)?, which makes it possible for us to obtain highly efficient (>100%) near-infrared long persistent luminescence in theory. Guided by the NQPL concept, we fabricate the first NQPL phosphor Ca2Ga2GeO7:Pr3+,Yb3+. It reveals that both the two-step energy transfer of model (I) and the one-step energy ...

  19. Weak localization of seismic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larose, E.; Margerin, L.; Tiggelen, B.A. van; Campillo, M.

    2004-01-01

    We report the observation of weak localization of seismic waves in a natural environment. It emerges as a doubling of the seismic energy around the source within a spot of the width of a wavelength, which is several tens of meters in our case. The characteristic time for its onset is the scattering mean-free time that quantifies the internal heterogeneity

  20. On Weak-BCC-Algebras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomys, Janus; Zhang, Xiaohong

    2013-01-01

    We describe weak-BCC-algebras (also called BZ-algebras) in which the condition (x∗y)∗z = (x∗z)∗y is satisfied only in the case when elements x, y belong to the same branch. We also characterize ideals, nilradicals, and nilpotent elements of such algebras. PMID:24311983

  1. Voltage Weak DC Distribution Grids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hailu, T.G.; Mackay, L.J.; Ramirez Elizondo, L.M.; Ferreira, J.A.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the behavior of voltage weak DC distribution systems. These systems have relatively small system capacitance. The size of system capacitance, which stores energy, has a considerable effect on the value of fault currents, control complexity, and system reliability. A number of

  2. The structure of weak interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zee, A.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of introducing righthanded currents on the structure of weak interaction is discussed. The ΔI=1/2 rule is in the spotlight. The discussion provides an interesting example in which the so-called Iizuka-Okubo-Zweing rule is not only evaded, but completely negated

  3. Coverings, Networks and Weak Topologies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dow, A.; Junnila, H.; Pelant, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 2 (2006), s. 287-320 ISSN 0025-5793 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/97/0216 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : Banach spaces * weak topologies * networks topologies Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics

  4. Weak differentiability of product measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heidergott, B.F.; Leahu, H.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we study cost functions over a finite collection of random variables. For these types of models, a calculus of differentiation is developed that allows us to obtain a closed-form expression for derivatives where "differentiation" has to be understood in the weak sense. The technique

  5. Weak lensing and dark energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huterer, Dragan

    2002-01-01

    We study the power of upcoming weak lensing surveys to probe dark energy. Dark energy modifies the distance-redshift relation as well as the matter power spectrum, both of which affect the weak lensing convergence power spectrum. Some dark-energy models predict additional clustering on very large scales, but this probably cannot be detected by weak lensing alone due to cosmic variance. With reasonable prior information on other cosmological parameters, we find that a survey covering 1000 sq deg down to a limiting magnitude of R=27 can impose constraints comparable to those expected from upcoming type Ia supernova and number-count surveys. This result, however, is contingent on the control of both observational and theoretical systematics. Concentrating on the latter, we find that the nonlinear power spectrum of matter perturbations and the redshift distribution of source galaxies both need to be determined accurately in order for weak lensing to achieve its full potential. Finally, we discuss the sensitivity of the three-point statistics to dark energy

  6. Weak pion production from nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    effect of Pauli blocking, Fermi motion and renormalization of weak ∆ properties ... Furthermore, the angular distribution and the energy distribution of ... Here ψα(p ) and u(p) are the Rarita Schwinger and Dirac spinors for ∆ and nucleon.

  7. Weak transitions in 44Ca

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tauhata, L.; Marques, A.

    1972-01-01

    Energy levels and gamma radiation transitions of Ca 44 are experimentally determined, mainly the weak transition at 564 KeV and 728 KeV. The decay scheme and the method used (coincidence with Ge-Li detector) are also presented [pt

  8. Luminescence of water or ice as a new detection method for magnetic monopoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pollmann Anna Obertacke

    2017-01-01

    We present analysis techniques to use luminescence in neutrino telescopes and discuss experimental setups to measure the light yield of luminescence for the particular conditions in neutrino detectors.

  9. The effect of surfactant on pollutant biosorption of Trametes versicolor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gül, Ülküye Dudu; Silah, Hülya; Akbaş, Halide; Has, Merve

    2016-04-01

    The major problem concerning industrial wastewater is treatment of dye and heavy metal containing effluents. Industrial effluents are also contained surfactants that are used as levelling, dispersing and wetting agents. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of surfactant on textile dye biosorption properties of a white rot fungus named Trametes versicolor. Reactive dyes are commonly used in textile industry because of their advantages such as brightness and excellent color fastness. A recative textile dye, called Everzol Black, was used in this study. The low-cost mollasses medium is used for fungal growth. The usage of mollases, the sugar refinery effluent as a source of energy and nutrients, gained importance because of reducing the cost and also reusing another waste. In biosorption process the effect of surfactant on dye removal properties of T. versicolor was examined as a function of pH, dye consentration and surfactant concentration. The results of this study showed that the surfactant enhanced the dye removal capacity of Trametes versicolor. The dye and surfactant molecules were interacted electrostatically and these electrostatic interactions improved dye removal properties of filamentous fungus T. versicolor. The results of this study recommended the use of surfactants as an inducer in textile wastewater treatment technologies.

  10. Contribution of Seawater Surfactants to Generated Primary Marine Aerosol Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frossard, A. A.; Gerard, V.; Duplessis, P.; Kinsey, J. D.; Lu, X.; Zhu, Y.; Bisgrove, J.; Maben, J. R.; Long, M. S.; Chang, R.; Beaupre, S. R.; Kieber, D. J.; Keene, W. C.; Noziere, B.; Cohen, R. C.

    2017-12-01

    Surfactants account for minor fractions of total organic carbon in the ocean but may have major impacts on the surface tension of bursting bubbles at the sea surface that drive the production of primary marine aerosol particles (PMA). Surfactants associated with marine aerosol may also significantly reduce the surface tension of water thereby increasing the potential for cloud droplet activation and growth. During September and October 2016, PMA were produced from bursting bubbles in seawater using a high capacity generator at two biologically productive and two oligotrophic stations in the western North Atlantic, as part of a cruise on the R/V Endeavor. Surfactants were extracted from paired PMA and seawater samples, and their ionic compositions, total concentrations, and critical micelle concentrations (CMC) were quantified and compared for the four hydrographic stations. Higher surfactant concentrations were determined in the aerosol produced from biologically productive seawater compared to oligotrophic seawater, and the surfactants extracted from productive seawater were stronger (had lower CMCs) than those in the oligotrophic seawater. Surfactants associated with PMA and seawater in productive regions also varied over diel cycles, whereas those in the oligotrophic regions did not. This work demonstrates a direct link between surfactants in seawater and those in PMA.

  11. A simplified treatment of surfactant effects on cloud drop activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Raatikainen

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Dissolved surface active species, or surfactants, have a tendency to partition to solution surface and thereby decrease solution surface tension. Activating cloud droplets have large surface-to-volume ratios, and the amount of surfactant molecules in them is limited. Therefore, unlike with macroscopic solutions, partitioning to the surface can effectively deplete the droplet interior of surfactant molecules.

    Surfactant partitioning equilibrium for activating cloud droplets has so far been solved numerically from a group of non-linear equations containing the Gibbs adsorption equation coupled with a surface tension model and an optional activity coefficient model. This can be a problem when surfactant effects are examined by using large-scale cloud models. Namely, computing time increases significantly due to the partitioning calculations done in the lowest levels of nested iterations.

    Our purpose is to reduce the group of non-linear equations to simple polynomial equations with well known analytical solutions. In order to do that, we describe surface tension lowering using the Szyskowski equation, and ignore all droplet solution non-idealities. It is assumed that there is only one surfactant exhibiting bulk-surface partitioning, but the number of non-surfactant solutes is unlimited. It is shown that the simplifications cause only minor errors to predicted bulk solution concentrations and cloud droplet activation. In addition, computing time is decreased at least by an order of magnitude when using the analytical solutions.

  12. Single well surfactant test to evaluate surfactant floods using multi tracer method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheely, Clyde Q.

    1979-01-01

    Data useful for evaluating the effectiveness of or designing an enhanced recovery process said process involving mobilizing and moving hydrocarbons through a hydrocarbon bearing subterranean formation from an injection well to a production well by injecting a mobilizing fluid into the injection well, comprising (a) determining hydrocarbon saturation in a volume in the formation near a well bore penetrating formation, (b) injecting sufficient mobilizing fluid to mobilize and move hydrocarbons from a volume in the formation near the well bore, and (c) determining the hydrocarbon saturation in a volume including at least a part of the volume of (b) by an improved single well surfactant method comprising injecting 2 or more slugs of water containing the primary tracer separated by water slugs containing no primary tracer. Alternatively, the plurality of ester tracers can be injected in a single slug said tracers penetrating varying distances into the formation wherein the esters have different partition coefficients and essentially equal reaction times. The single well tracer method employed is disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 3,623,842. This method designated the single well surfactant test (SWST) is useful for evaluating the effect of surfactant floods, polymer floods, carbon dioxide floods, micellar floods, caustic floods and the like in subterranean formations in much less time and at much reduced cost compared to conventional multiwell pilot tests.

  13. Adsorption kinetics of surfactants on activated carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnelli; Aditama, WP; Fikriani, Z.; Astuti, Y.

    2018-04-01

    A study on the adsorption of both cationic and anionic surfactants using activated carbon as well as the investigation of the adsorption isotherms and adsorption kinetics has been conducted. The results showed that the adsorption of sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) by activated carbon was Langmuir’s adsorption isotherm while its adsorption kinetics showed pseudo-second order with an adsorption rate constant of 2.23 x 103 g mg-1 hour-1. Meanwhile, the adsorption of HDTMA-Br by activated carbon showed that the isotherm adsorption tended to follow Freundlich’s isotherm and was pseudo-second order with an adsorption rate constant of 89.39 g mg-1 hour-1.

  14. Surfactant protein D is proatherogenic in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Grith L; Madsen, Jens; Kejling, Karin

    2006-01-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is an important innate immune defense molecule that mediates clearance of pathogens and modulates the inflammatory response. Moreover, SP-D is involved in lipid homeostasis, and pulmonary accumulation of phospholipids has previously been observed in SP-D-deficient (Spd......-/-) mice. Atherogenesis involves both inflammation and lipid deposition, and we investigated the role of SP-D in the development of atherosclerosis. SP-D synthesis was localized to vascular endothelial cells. Atherosclerotic lesion areas were 5.6-fold smaller in the aortic roots in Spd-/- mice compared...... with wild-type C57BL/6N mice on an atherogenic diet. HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) was significantly elevated in Spd-/- mice. Treatment of Spd-/- mice with a recombinant fragment of human SP-D resulted in decreases of HDL-C (21%) as well as total cholesterol (26%), and LDL cholesterol (28%). Plasma TNF...

  15. Surfactant selection for a liquid foam-bed photobioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janoska, Agnes; Vázquez, María; Janssen, Marcel; Wijffels, René H; Cuaresma, María; Vílchez, Carlos

    2018-02-01

    A novel liquid foam-bed photobioreactor has been shown to hold potential as an innovative technology for microalgae production. In this study, a foam stabilizing agent has been selected which fits the requirements of use in a liquid foam-bed photobioreactor. Four criteria were used for an optimal surfactant: the surfactant should have good foaming properties, should not be rapidly biodegradable, should drag up microalgae in the foam formed, and it should not be toxic for microalgae. Ten different surfactants (nonionic, cationic, and anionic) and two microalgae genera (Chlorella and Scenedesmus) were compared on the above-mentioned criteria. The comparison showed the following facts. Firstly, poloxameric surfactants (Pluronic F68 and Pluronic P84) have acceptable foaming properties described by intermediate foam stability and liquid holdup and small bubble size. Secondly, the natural surfactants (BSA and Saponin) and Tween 20 were easily biodegraded by bacteria within 3 days. Thirdly, for all surfactants tested the microalgae concentration is reduced in the foam phase compared to the liquid phase with exception of the cationic surfactant CTAB. Lastly, only BSA, Saponin, Tween 20, and the two Pluronics were not toxic at concentrations of 10 CMC or higher. The findings of this study indicate that the Pluronics (F68 and P84) are the best surfactants regarding the above-mentioned criteria. Since Pluronic F68 performed slightly better, this surfactant is recommended for application in a liquid foam-bed photobioreactor. © 2018 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 2018. © 2018 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  16. Is surfactant a promising additive drug in ALI/ARDS-patients?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schultz, MJ; Kesecioglu, J

    The rationale for surfactant replacement therapy in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is to restore the normal composition of the surfactant system, as well as to overcome ongoing inactivation of present surfactant. Indeed, surfactant replacement therapy call normalize the

  17. Serum and sputum surfactants -A and -D in multidrug-resistant and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abnormal production and function of surfactants are associated with pulmonary diseases. Also, pulmonary infections alter surfactant metabolism. Due to lack of information on the levels of surfactants A (SP-A) and D (SP-D) in Nigerian tuberculosis (TB) patients, this study assessed these surfactants in both sputum and ...

  18. Is surfactant a promising additive drug in ALI/ARDS-patients?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schultz, Marcus J.; Kesecioglu, Jozef

    2004-01-01

    The rationale for surfactant replacement therapy in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is to restore the normal composition of the surfactant system, as well as to overcome ongoing inactivation of present surfactant. Indeed, surfactant replacement therapy call normalize the

  19. Cold pearl surfactant-based blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crombie, R L

    1997-10-01

    Pearlizing agents have been used for many years in cosmetic formulations to add a pearlescent effect. Cold pearl surfactant-based blends are mixtures of glycol stearates and surfactants which can be blended in the cold into a wide range of personal-care formulations to create a pearlescent lustre effect. Under controlled manufacturing conditions constant viscosities and crystalline characteristics can be obtained. The development of these blends has been driven by efforts to improve the economics of adding solid pearlizing agents directly into a hot mix formulation. This paper summarizes the history of pearlizers, describes their advantages and physical chemistry of the manufacturing process. Finally some suggestions for applications are given. Les agents nacrants sont utilises depuis de nombreuses annees dans les formulations cosmetiques pour ajouter un effet nacre. Les melanges a froid a base de tensioactif nacre sont des melanges de stearates de glycol et de tensioactifs qui peuvent etre melanges a froid dans une large gamme de formulations d'hygiene personnelle pour creer un effet de lustre nacre. On peut obtenir des viscosites et des proprietes cristallines constantes avec des conditions de fabrication maitrisees. Le developpement de ces melanges a ete porte par les efforts pour ameliorer les couts de l'ajout d'agents nacrants solides directement dans une formulation melangee de l'ajout d'agents nacrants solides directement dans une formulation melangee a chaud. Cet article resume l'histoire des agents nacrants, decrit leurs avantages et al physico-chimie du procede de fabrication. On emet a la fin cetaines suggestions d'applications.

  20. Decontamination by cleaning with fluorocarbon surfactant solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, R.; Benson, C.E.; Meyers, E.S.; Vaughen, V.C.A.

    1994-02-01

    In the nuclear industry, facilities and their components inevitably become contaminated with radioactive materials. This report documents the application of a novel particle-removal process developed by Entropic Systems, Inc. (ESI), to decontaminate critical instruments and parts that are contaminated with small radioactive particles that adhere to equipment surfaces. The tests were performed as a cooperative effort between ESI and the Chemical Technology Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). ESI developed a new, environmentally compatible process to remove small particles from solid surfaces that is more effective than spraying or sonicating with CFC-113. This process uses inert perfluorinated liquids as working media; the liquids have zero ozone-depleting potential, are nontoxic and nonflammnable, and are generally recognized as nonhazardous materials. In the ESI process, parts to be cleaned are first sprayed or sonicated with a dilute solution of a high-molecular-weight fluorocarbon surfactant in an inert perfluorinated liquid to effect particle removal. The parts are then rinsed with the perfluorinated liquid to remove the fluorocarbon surfactant applied in the first step, and the residual rinse liquid is then evaporated from the parts into an air or nitrogen stream from which it is recovered. Nuclear contamination is inherently a surface phenomenon. The presence of radioactive particles is responsible for all ''smearable'' contamination and, if the radioactive particles are small enough, for some of the fixed contamination. Because radioactivity does not influence the physical chemistry of particle adhesion, the ESI process should be just as effective in removing radioactive particles as it is in removing nonradioactive particles

  1. Luminescent Afterglow Behavior in the M2Si5N8: Eu Family (M = Ca, Sr, Ba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koen Van den Eeckhout

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Persistent luminescent materials are able to emit light for hours after being excited. The majority of persistent phosphors emit in the blue or green region of the visible spectrum. Orange- or red-emitting phosphors, strongly desired for emergency signage and medical imaging, are scarce. We prepared the nitrido-silicates Ca2Si5N8:Eu (orange, Sr2Si5N8:Eu (reddish, Ba2Si5N8:Eu (yellowish orange, and their rare-earth codoped variants (R = Nd, Dy, Sm, Tm through a solid state reaction, and investigated their luminescence and afterglow properties. In this paper, we describe how the persistent luminescence is affected by the type of codopant and the choice and ratio of the starting products. All the materials exhibit some form of persistent luminescence, but for Sr2Si5N8:Eu,R this is very weak. In Ba2Si5N8:Eu the afterglow remains visible for about 400 s, and Ca2Si5N8:Eu,Tm shows the brightest and longest afterglow, lasting about 2,500 s. For optimal persistent luminescence, the dopant and codopant should be added in their fluoride form, in concentrations below 1 mol%. A Ca3N2 deficiency of about 5% triples the afterglow intensity. Our results show that Ba2Si5N8:Eu(,R and Ca2Si5N8:Eu(,R are promising persistent phosphors for applications requiring orange or red light.

  2. Complex phase behavior in solvent-free nonionic surfactants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillmyer, M.A.; Bates, F.S.; Almdal, K.

    1996-01-01

    Unsolvated block copolymers and surfactant solutions are ''soft materials'' that share a common set of ordered microstructures, A set of polyethyleneoxide-polyethylethylene (PEG-PEE) block copolymers that are chemically similar to the well-known alkane-oxyethylene (C(n)EO(m)) nonionic surfactants...... was synthesized here. The general phase behavior in these materials resembles that of both higher molecular weight block copolymers and lower molecular weight nonionic surfactant solutions. Two of the block copolymers exhibited thermally induced order-order transitions and were studied in detail by small...

  3. Effect of surfactant for magnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haracz, S. [Faculty of Chemistry, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 89B, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Hilgendorff, M. [Freie Universität Berlin, Fachbereich Physik, Arnimalle 14, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Rybka, J.D. [Faculty of Chemistry, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 89B, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Giersig, M. [Faculty of Chemistry, Adam Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 89B, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Freie Universität Berlin, Fachbereich Physik, Arnimalle 14, 14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • Dynamic behavior of magnetic nanoparticles. • Synthesis of iron oxide nanoparticles. • Effect of surfactant for magnetic properties. - Abstract: For different medical applications nanoparticles (NPs) with well-defined magnetic properties have to be used. Coating ligand can change the magnetic moment on the surface of nanostructures and therefore the magnetic behavior of the system. Here we investigated magnetic NPs in a size of 13 nm conjugated with four different kinds of surfactants. The surface anisotropy and the magnetic moment of the system were changed due to the presence of the surfactant on the surface of iron oxide NPs.

  4. Light weakly interacting massive particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelmini, Graciela B.

    2017-08-01

    Light weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are dark matter particle candidates with weak scale interaction with the known particles, and mass in the GeV to tens of GeV range. Hints of light WIMPs have appeared in several dark matter searches in the last decade. The unprecedented possible coincidence into tantalizingly close regions of mass and cross section of four separate direct detection experimental hints and a potential indirect detection signal in gamma rays from the galactic center, aroused considerable interest in our field. Even if these hints did not so far result in a discovery, they have had a significant impact in our field. Here we review the evidence for and against light WIMPs as dark matter candidates and discuss future relevant experiments and observations.

  5. (Weakly) three-dimensional caseology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomraning, G.C.

    1996-01-01

    The singular eigenfunction technique of Case for solving one-dimensional planar symmetry linear transport problems is extended to a restricted class of three-dimensional problems. This class involves planar geometry, but with forcing terms (either boundary conditions or internal sources) which are weakly dependent upon the transverse spatial variables. Our analysis involves a singular perturbation about the classic planar analysis, and leads to the usual Case discrete and continuum modes, but modulated by weakly dependent three-dimensional spatial functions. These functions satisfy parabolic differential equations, with a different diffusion coefficient for each mode. Representative one-speed time-independent transport problems are solved in terms of these generalised Case eigenfunctions. Our treatment is very heuristic, but may provide an impetus for more rigorous analysis. (author)

  6. History of the weak interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, T.D.

    1987-01-01

    At the 'Jackfest' marking the 65th birthday of Jack Steinberger (see July/August 1986 issue, page 29), T.D. Lee gave an account of the history of the weak interactions. This edited version omits some of Lee's tributes to Steinberger, but retains the impressive insight into the subtleties of a key area of modern physics by one who played a vital role in its development. (orig./HSI).

  7. Weak neutral-current interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, R.M.

    1978-08-01

    The roles of each type of experiment in establishing uniquely the values of the the neutral-current couplings of u and d quarks are analyzed together with their implications for gauge models of the weak and electromagnetic interactions. An analysis of the neutral-current couplings of electrons and of the data based on the assumption that only one Z 0 boson exists is given. Also a model-independent analysis of parity violation experiments is discussed. 85 references

  8. Submanifolds weakly associated with graphs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A CARRIAZO, L M FERN ´ANDEZ and A RODRÍGUEZ-HIDALGO. Department of Geometry and Topology, ..... by means of trees (connected graphs without cycles) and forests (disjoint unions of trees, see [6]) given in [3], by extending it to weak ... CR-submanifold. In this case, every tree is a K2. Finally, Theorem 3.8 of [3] can ...

  9. Synthesis of in-situ luminescent ZnS nanoparticles facile with CTAB micelles and their properties study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukla, Vaishali [Centre for Nanoscience, Central University of Gujarat, Gandhinagar (India); Singh, Man [School of Chemical Sciences, Central University of Gujarat, Gandhinagar, India Telephone: 079-23260210, fax: 079-23260076 (India)

    2016-04-13

    Currently, the development of micelles route is thrust area of research in nanoscience for the control particle size and remarkable properties through chemical co-precipitation method. A 0.9 mM aqueous CTAB micellar solution plays a role as capping agent in the homogeneous solution of 0.5 M ZnSO{sub 4} and 0.5 M Na{sub 2}S for synthesis, further precipitates purified with centrifugation in cold ethanol and millipore water to remove unreacted reagents and ionic salt particles. A resultant, white colored luminescent ZnS nanoparticle out with ∼95% yield is reported. The ZnS nanoparticles have been examined by their luminescence properties, optical properties and crystal structure. The mean particle size of ZnS nanoparticles is found to be ∼10 nm in various technical results and UV-absorption was 80 nm blue shifts moved from 345 nm (bulk material) to 265 nm, showing a quantum size impact. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern shows the immaculate cubic phase. Photoluminescence (PL) investigates the recombination mechanism with blue emission from shallow electron traps at 490 nm in ZnS nanoparticles. An FTIR spectrum and Thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) gives confirmation of CTAB – cationic surfactant on surface of ZnS nanoparticle as capping agent as well thermal stability of CTAB capped ZnS nanoparticles with respect to temperature.

  10. Structure and Conformational Dynamics of DMPC/Dicationic Surfactant and DMPC/Dicationic Surfactant/DNA Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Kozak

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Amphiphilic dicationic surfactants, known as gemini surfactants, are currently studied for gene delivery purposes. The gemini surfactant molecule is composed of two hydrophilic “head” groups attached to hydrophobic chains and connected via molecular linker between them. The influence of different concentrations of 1,5-bis (1-imidazolilo-3-decyloxymethyl pentane chloride (gemini surfactant on the thermotropic phase behaviour of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC bilayers with and without the presence of DNA was investigated using Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR and circular dichroism (CD spectroscopies, small angle scattering of synchrotron radiation and differential scanning calorimetry. With increasing concentration of surfactant in DMPC/DNA systems, a disappearance of pretransition and a decrease in the main phase transition enthalpy and temperature were observed. The increasing intensity of diffraction peaks as a function of surfactant concentration also clearly shows the ability of the surfactant to promote the organisation of lipid bilayers in the multilayer lamellar phase.

  11. Biosurfactants and surfactants interacting with membranes and proteins: Same but different?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otzen, Daniel E

    2017-04-01

    Biosurfactants (BS) are surface-active molecules produced by microorganisms. For several decades they have attracted interest as promising alternatives to current petroleum-based surfactants. Aside from their green profile, they have remarkably low critical micelle concentrations, reduce the air/water surface tension to very low levels and are excellent emulsifiers, all of which make them comparable or superior to their synthetic counterparts. These remarkable physical properties derive from their more complex chemical structures in which hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions are not as clearly separated as chemical surfactants but have a more mosaic distribution of polarity as well as branched or circular structures. This allows the lipopeptide surfactin to adopt spherical structures to facilitate dense packing at interfaces. They are also more complex. Glycolipid BS, e.g. rhamnolipids (RL) and sophorolipids, are produced biologically as mixtures which vary in the size and saturation of the hydrophobic region as well as modifications in the hydrophilic headgroup, such as the number of sugar groups and different levels of acetylation, leading to variable surface-active properties. Their amphiphilicity allows RL to insert easily into membranes at sub-cmc concentrations to modulate membrane structure and extract lipopolysaccharides, leading to extensive biofilm remodeling in vivo, sometimes in collaboration with hydrophobic RL precursors. Thanks to their mosaicity, even anionic BS like RL only bind weakly to proteins and show much lower denaturing potency, even supporting membrane protein refolding. Nevertheless, they can promote protein degradation by proteases e.g. by neutralizing positive charges, which together with their biofilm-combating properties makes them very promising detergent surfactants. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid order/lipid defects and lipid-control of protein activity edited by Dirk Schneider. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B

  12. Surfactant media to grow new crystalline cobalt 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylate metal-organic frameworks

    KAUST Repository

    Lu, Haisheng

    2014-08-18

    In this report, three new metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), [Co 3(μ3-OH)(HBTC)(BTC)2Co(HBTC)]·(HTEA) 3·H2O (NTU-Z30), [Co(BTC)] ·HTEA·H2O (NTU-Z31), [Co3(BTC) 4]·(HTEA)4 (NTU-Z32), where H3BTC = 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylic acid, TEA = triethylamine, and NTU = Nanyang Technological University, have been successfully synthesized under surfactant media and have been carefully characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, powder X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, and IR spectromtry. NTU-Z30 has an unusual trimeric [Co3(μ3-OH)(COO) 7] secondary building unit (SBU), which is different from the well-known trimeric [Co3O(COO)6] SBU. The topology studies indicate that NTU-Z30 and NTU-Z32 possess two new topologies, 3,3,6,7-c net and 2,8-c net, respectively, while NTU-Z31 has a known topology rtl type (3,6-c net). Magnetic analyses show that all three materials have weak antiferromagnetic behavior. Furthermore, NTU-Z30 has been selected as the heterogeneous catalyst for the aerobic epoxidation of alkene, and our results show that this material exhibits excellent catalytic activity as well as good stability. Our success in growing new crystalline cobalt 1,3,5- benzenetricarboxylate MOFs under surfactant media could pave a new road to preparing new diverse crystalline inorganic materials through a surfactant-thermal method. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  13. Investigation of the luminescent properties of terbium-anthranilate complexes and application to the determination of anthranilic acid derivatives in aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnaud, N.; Georges, J

    2003-01-10

    The luminescent properties of terbium complexes with furosemide (FR), flufenamic (FF) acid, tolfenamic (TF) acid and mefenamic (MF) acid have been investigated in aqueous solutions. For all four compounds, complexation occurs when the carboxylic acid of the aminobenzoic group is dissociated and is greatly favoured in the presence of trioctylphosphine oxide as co-ligand and Triton X-100 as surfactant. Under optimum conditions, luminescence of the lanthanide ion is efficiently sensitised and the lifetime of the {sup 5}D{sub 4} resonance level of terbium in the complex is ranging between 1 and 1.9 ms, against 0.4 ms for the aqua ion. The sensitivity of the method for the determination of anthranilic acid derivatives is improved by one to two orders of magnitude with respect to that achieved using native fluorescence or terbium-sensitised luminescence in methanol. The limits of detection are 2x10{sup -10}, 5x10{sup -10} and 2x10{sup -9} mol l{sup -1} for flufenamic acid, furosemide and tolfenamic acid, and mefenamic acid, respectively, with within-run RSD values of less than 1%. The method has been applied to the determination of flufenamic acid in spiked calf sera with and without sample pretreatment. Depending on the method and the analyte concentration, the recovery was ranging between 83 and 113% and the lowest concentration attainable in serum samples was close to 1x10{sup -7} mol l{sup -1}.

  14. Surfactant-assisted sacrificial template-mediated synthesis ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Heena Khajuria

    Lanthanide ion based nanomaterials have gained much attention due to their ... A number of studies on the synthesis .... cum Steady State Luminescence Spectrometer, Edinburgh ..... and their application in lithium-ion batteries Adv. Mater.

  15. Luminescent properties of terbium complex with phenylanthranilic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alakaeva, L.A.; Kalazhokova, I.A.; Naurzhanova, F.Kh.

    1990-01-01

    Existence of terbium luminescence reaction in complex with phenanthranilic acid (FAA) is ascertained. The optimal conditions of terbium complexing with FAA are found. The ratio of components in the complex is 1:1. The influence of foreign rare earth in terbium luminescence intensity in complex with FAA is studied

  16. Luminescence properties of some food dye-stuffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astanov, S.Kh.; Muminova, Z.A.; Urunov, R.G.

    2004-01-01

    The luminescence properties of the natural food dye-stuffs and vitamins in temperature range of 300-5.2 K are studied. On the basis of experimental data on quantum yields of the fluorescence, trans-cis-isomerization and luminescence of the molecular oxygen the main ways of the inactivation of electronic excitations in researching compounds have been defined. (author)

  17. Doped luminescent materials and particle discrimination using same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, F. Patrick; Allendorf, Mark D; Feng, Patrick L

    2014-10-07

    Doped luminescent materials are provided for converting excited triplet states to radiative hybrid states. The doped materials may be used to conduct pulse shape discrimination (PSD) using luminescence generated by harvested excited triplet states. The doped materials may also be used to detect particles using spectral shape discrimination (SSD).

  18. Integrated light in direct excitation and energy transfer luminescence

    OpenAIRE

    Chimczak, Eugeniusz

    2007-01-01

    Integrated light in direct excitation and energy transfer luminescence has been investigated. In the investigations reported here, monomolecular centers were taken into account. It was found that the integrated light is equal to the product of generation rate and time of duration of excitation pulse for both direct excitation and energy transfer luminescence.

  19. Luminescence imaging using radionuclides: a potential application in molecular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jeong Chan; Il An, Gwang; Park, Se-Il; Oh, Jungmin; Kim, Hong Joo; Su Ha, Yeong; Wang, Eun Kyung; Min Kim, Kyeong; Kim, Jung Young; Lee, Jaetae; Welch, Michael J.; Yoo, Jeongsoo

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Nuclear and optical imaging are complementary in many aspects and there would be many advantages when optical imaging probes are prepared using radionuclides rather than classic fluorophores, and when nuclear and optical dual images are obtained using single imaging probe. Methods: The luminescence intensities of various radionuclides having different decay modes have been assayed using luminescence imaging and in vitro luminometer. Radioiodinated Herceptin was injected into a tumor-bearing mouse, and luminescence and microPET images were obtained. The plant dipped in [ 32 P]phosphate solution was scanned in luminescence mode. Radio-TLC plate was also imaged in the same imaging mode. Results: Radionuclides emitting high energy β + /β - particles showed higher luminescence signals. NIH3T6.7 tumors were detected in both optical and nuclear imaging. The uptake of [ 32 P]phosphate in plant was easily followed by luminescence imaging. Radio-TLC plate was visualized and radiochemical purity was quantified using luminescence imaging. Conclusion: Many radionuclides with high energetic β + or β - particles during decay were found to be imaged in luminescence mode due mainly to Cerenkov radiation. 'Cerenkov imaging' provides a new optical imaging platform and an invaluable bridge between optical and nuclear imaging. New optical imaging probes could be easily prepared using well-established radioiodination methods. Cerenkov imaging will have more applications in the research field of plant science and autoradiography.

  20. Luminescence spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation: History, highlights, future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerer, Georg

    2006-01-01

    Luminescence spectroscopy and the investigation of dynamical processes with synchrotron radiation (SR) started about 35 years ago in nearly all SR laboratories existing at that time. In the present paper, the pioneering experiments are particularly emphasized. The exciting development is illustrated presenting highlights for the whole period from the beginning to the present day. The highlights are taken from fields like exciton self-trapping, inelastic electron-electron scattering, optically stimulated desorption, cross luminescence, or probing of cluster properties with luminescence spectroscopic methods. More technological aspects play a role in present day's experiments, like quantum cutting in rare-earth-doped insulators. Promising two-photon excitation and light amplification experiments with SR will be included, as well as the first results obtained in a luminescence experiment with selective Vaccum ultraviolet-free electron laser excitation. Finally, a few ideas concerning the future development of luminescence spectroscopy with SR will be sketched

  1. Magnetic-luminescent spherical particles synthesized by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel, Norma L; Hirata, Gustavo A; Flores, Dora L

    2015-01-01

    The combination of magnetic and luminescent properties in a single particle system, opens-up a wide range of potential applications in biotechnology and biomedicine. In this work, we performed the synthesis of magnetic-luminescent Gd 2 O 3 :Eu 3+ @Fe 2 O 3 particles by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis performed in a tubular furnace. In order to achieve the composite formation, commercial superparamagnetic Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles were coated with a luminescent Eu 3+ -doped Gd 2 O 3 shell in a low-cost one-step process. The spray pyrolysis method yields deagglomerated spherical shape magneto/luminescent particles. The photoluminescence spectra under UV excitation (λ Exc = 265 nm) of the magnetic Gd 2 O 3 :Eu 3+ @Fe 2 O 3 compound showed the characteristic red emission of Eu 3+ (λ Em = 612 nm). This magneto/luminescent system will find applications in biomedicine and biotechnology. (paper)

  2. Synthesis and Surface Activity of Cationic Amino Acid-Based Surfactants in Aqueous Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greber, Katarzyna E

    2017-01-01

    I studied the possibility of using amino acid-based surfactants as emulsifiers at the same time as preservatives. Fourteen lipopeptides were synthesized employing a solid phase peptide synthesis procedure. All compounds were designed to be positively charged from +1 to +4 and acylated with fatty acid chain-palmitic and miristic. The surface activity of the obtained lipopeptides was tested using a semi-automatic tensiometer to calculate parameters describing the behavior of lipopeptides in the air/water interface. Such parameters as CMC, surface tension at the CMC point ( σ CMC ), effectiveness ( π CMC ), and efficiency (pC20) were measured. Emulsifying properties of all lipopeptides were also examined. The studies reveal that the surface active properties of synthesized compounds strongly depend on the length of alkyl chains as well as on the composition of amino acid polar heads. The critical micelle concentration decreases with increasing alkyl chain length of lipopeptides with the same polar head. The effectiveness and efficiency decrease when the number of amino acids in the polar head increases. All lipopeptides established a very weak emulsification power and created unstable water/Miglyol 812 and water/paraffin oil emulsions. Results suggest that lipopeptides cannot be used as emulsifiers; nonetheless, it is possible to use them as auxiliary surfactants with disinfectant properties in combination with more potent emulsifiers.

  3. Correlating contact line capillarity and dynamic contact angle hysteresis in surfactant-nanoparticle based complex fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harikrishnan, A. R.; Dhar, Purbarun; Agnihotri, Prabhat K.; Gedupudi, Sateesh; Das, Sarit K.

    2018-04-01

    Dynamic wettability and contact angle hysteresis can be correlated to shed insight onto any solid-liquid interaction. Complex fluids are capable of altering the expected hysteresis and dynamic wetting behavior due to interfacial interactions. We report the effect of capillary number on the dynamic advancing and receding contact angles of surfactant-based nanocolloidal solutions on hydrophilic, near hydrophobic, and superhydrophobic surfaces by performing forced wetting and de-wetting experiments by employing the embedded needle method. A segregated study is performed to infer the contributing effects of the constituents and effects of particle morphology. The static contact angle hysteresis is found to be a function of particle and surfactant concentrations and greatly depends on the nature of the morphology of the particles. An order of estimate of line energy and a dynamic flow parameter called spreading factor and the transient variations of these parameters are explored which sheds light on the dynamics of contact line movement and response to perturbation of three-phase contact. The Cox-Voinov-Tanner law was found to hold for hydrophilic and a weak dependency on superhydrophobic surfaces with capillary number, and even for the complex fluids, with a varying degree of dependency for different fluids.

  4. The interactions between ionic surfactants and phosphatidylcholine vesicles: Conductometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Heng-Kwong; Tseng, Wen Liang

    2001-11-01

    The interaction between ionic surfactants and phosphatidylcholine vesicles, which are prepared without addition of buffer and salt, is investigated by conductivity measurements. On the basis of the vesicle acting as a trap of charge carriers, the bilayer/aqueous phase partition coefficient K and the surfactant/lipid molar ratio Re of nine surfactants are determined. The thermodynamic consistency is satisfied by the measured parameters. The effects of the alkyl chain length (C10-C16) and ionic head group are then studied. The inverse partition coefficient K-1 is linearly related to the critical micelle concentration. The solubilizing ability Reb is a consequence of the competition between the surfactant incorporation into the bilayer and the formation of micelles. Consequently, the K parameter rises whereas the Reb parameter declines as the chain length is increased. The influence due to addition of salt is also discussed.

  5. Nanocomposites of PP and bentonite clay modified with different surfactants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Andre W.B.; Agrawal, Pankaj; Araujo, Edcleide M.; Melo, Tomas J.A.; Ueki, Marcelo M.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work was the development of nano composites of polypropylene (PP) and national bentonite clay modified with different surfactants. The results of X-Ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) showed that the organophilization process was effective. The surfactants led to a significant increase in the basal spacing of Brasgel PA clay. XRD results of the mixture PP/Brasgel PA clay modified with Praepagem WB surfactant indicated that a nanocomposite with intercalated structure was formed. When the Brasgel PA clay was modified with Praepagem HY surfactant, DRX results indicated that a micro composite was formed. Screw speed, clay content and PP viscosity had no influence on the XRD pattern of the obtained materials. (author)

  6. Nonionic surfactant Brij35 effects on toluene biodegradation in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-19

    Oct 19, 2009 ... Nonionic surfactants are usually used in the bioavailability studies due to their rela- ..... Leson G, Winer AM (1991) Biofiltration: an innovative air pollution control technology for ... thermodynamics and kinetics. Lewis publishers ...

  7. MICROEMULSION OF MIXED CHLORINATED SOLVENTS USING FOOD GRADE (EDIBLE) SURFACTANTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ground water contamination frequently consists of mixed chlorinated solvents [e.g., tetrachloroethylene (PCE), trichloroethylene (TCE), and trans-1,2- dichloroethylene (DCE)]. In this research, mixtures of the food grade (edible) surfactants bis(2-ethylhexyl) sodium sulfosuccinat...

  8. Polyelectrolyte surfactant aggregates and their deposition on macroscopic surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voisin, David

    2002-01-01

    Oppositely charged surfactant and polyelectrolyte are present in hair shampoos and conditioners, together with particles (e.g. anti-dandruff agents for scalp) and droplets (e.g. silicone oil for the hair). These are normally formulated at high surfactant concentrations, beyond the flocculation region for the polyelectrolyte concentration used. However, on dilution with water, during application, flocs are formed which carry the particles and droplets to the scalp and hair. The addition of an anionic surfactant to an aqueous solution of cationic polyelectrolyte, at a given concentration, can lead to the formation of polyelectrolyte-surfactant 'particles', in which the surfactant 'binds' to the polyelectrolyte. This occurs from the critical association concentration (CAC), up to the surfactant concentration corresponding to maximum binding. Within this range of surfactant concentrations, the surfactant bound to the polyelectrolyte is thought to associate to form what might be termed 'internal micelles'. Each polyelectrolyte-surfactant particle in the region of the CAC, and just beyond, contains many polyelectrolyte chains, held together essentially by micelle bridges. These particles, however, remain net positively charged, and therefore stable. At the other end of the binding range of the surfactant, so many internal micelles are present that the polymer-surfactant particles are now net negatively charged. Indeed binding stops since no further micelles can be accommodated. Again, the particles are stable. However, there exists a range of surfactant concentrations, lying within the range referred to above, where the net charge is reduced sufficiently that the polymer-surfactant particles will flocculate to form much larger structures. The onset of this second range might be termed the 'critical flocculation concentration' (CFC), and the end, the 'critical stabilisation concentration' (CSC). In this work, the CFC and the CSC have been determined for mixtures of

  9. Polyelectrolyte surfactant aggregates and their deposition on macroscopic surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voisin, David

    2002-07-01

    Oppositely charged surfactant and polyelectrolyte are present in hair shampoos and conditioners, together with particles (e.g. anti-dandruff agents for scalp) and droplets (e.g. silicone oil for the hair). These are normally formulated at high surfactant concentrations, beyond the flocculation region for the polyelectrolyte concentration used. However, on dilution with water, during application, flocs are formed which carry the particles and droplets to the scalp and hair. The addition of an anionic surfactant to an aqueous solution of cationic polyelectrolyte, at a given concentration, can lead to the formation of polyelectrolyte-surfactant 'particles', in which the surfactant 'binds' to the polyelectrolyte. This occurs from the critical association concentration (CAC), up to the surfactant concentration corresponding to maximum binding. Within this range of surfactant concentrations, the surfactant bound to the polyelectrolyte is thought to associate to form what might be termed 'internal micelles'. Each polyelectrolyte-surfactant particle in the region of the CAC, and just beyond, contains many polyelectrolyte chains, held together essentially by micelle bridges. These particles, however, remain net positively charged, and therefore stable. At the other end of the binding range of the surfactant, so many internal micelles are present that the polymer-surfactant particles are now net negatively charged. Indeed binding stops since no further micelles can be accommodated. Again, the particles are stable. However, there exists a range of surfactant concentrations, lying within the range referred to above, where the net charge is reduced sufficiently that the polymer-surfactant particles will flocculate to form much larger structures. The onset of this second range might be termed the 'critical flocculation concentration' (CFC), and the end, the 'critical stabilisation concentration' (CSC). In this work, the CFC and

  10. Use of surfactants in cleaning paraffin from oil wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liebold, G; Rehberg, W

    1969-05-01

    The use of surfactants is described especially oxethylated alkylphenols, in the cleaning of oil wells from paraffin. Aqueous 1 or 10% solutions of the surfactant were injected into the well through the annulus, partially in combination with demulsifiers (for example Separol-brands of BASF). Injection was accomplished continuously or in intervals; in the beginning of 50 ppm surfactant, afterward 15 to 30 ppm as related to the wet crude was necessary. Efficiency of the treatment could be proved by the decrease of pressure in the pipes, the loosening of paraffin shells, and considerably prolonged operation periods in wells which otherwise would have come to a standstill. In quite a number of wells, treatment with hot oil and electric heating could be completely replaced by injection of surfactants. (11 refs.)

  11. Mathematical Modelling of Surfactant Self-assembly at Interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Morgan, C. E.; Breward, C. J. W.; Griffiths, I. M.; Howell, P. D.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics. We present a mathematical model to describe the distribution of surfactant pairs in a multilayer structure beneath an adsorbed monolayer. A mesoscopic model comprising a set of ordinary

  12. Kinetics of Surfactant Desorption at an Air–Solution Interface

    KAUST Repository

    Morgan, C. E.; Breward, C. J. W.; Griffiths, I. M.; Howell, P. D.; Penfold, J.; Thomas, R. K.; Tucker, I.; Petkov, J. T.; Webster, J. R. P.

    2012-01-01

    The kinetics of re-equilibration of the anionic surfactant sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate at the air-solution interface have been studied using neutron reflectivity. The experimental arrangement incorporates a novel flow cell in which the subphase

  13. Nonlinear vibrational spectroscopy of surfactants at liquid interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, Paulo B. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1998-12-14

    Surfactants are widely used to modify physical and chemical properties of interfaces. They play an important role in many technological problems. Surfactant monolayer are also of great scientific interest because they are two-dimensional systems that may exhibit a very rich phase transition behavior and can also be considered as a model system for biological interfaces. In this Thesis, we use a second-order nonlinear optical technique (Sum-Frequency Generation - SFG) to obtain vibrational spectra of surfactant monolayer at Iiquidhapor and solid/liquid interfaces. The technique has several advantages: it is intrinsically surface-specific, can be applied to buried interfaces, has submonolayer sensitivity and is remarkably sensitive to the confirmational order of surfactant monolayers.

  14. Micellization of a Cationic Surfactant in Mixed Aqueous and Non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reception

    Department of Chemistry, Rivers State University of Science and Technology, Port ... surfactants in water-organic mixed-solvent systems is ... MATERIALS AND METHODS .... Journal of Applied ... Journal of Chemical and Engineering Data, 54,.

  15. The cost and effectiveness of surfactant replacement therapy at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    S Atr Med J 1995; 85; 646-649. Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, Johannesburg Hospital ..... infants is small - of the order of 1% - as in this study. ... effects of surfactant therapy for neonatal respiratory distress syndrome. J Pediatr.

  16. Gossip and Distributed Kalman Filtering: Weak Consensus Under Weak Detectability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Soummya; Moura, José M. F.

    2011-04-01

    The paper presents the gossip interactive Kalman filter (GIKF) for distributed Kalman filtering for networked systems and sensor networks, where inter-sensor communication and observations occur at the same time-scale. The communication among sensors is random; each sensor occasionally exchanges its filtering state information with a neighbor depending on the availability of the appropriate network link. We show that under a weak distributed detectability condition: 1. the GIKF error process remains stochastically bounded, irrespective of the instability properties of the random process dynamics; and 2. the network achieves \\emph{weak consensus}, i.e., the conditional estimation error covariance at a (uniformly) randomly selected sensor converges in distribution to a unique invariant measure on the space of positive semi-definite matrices (independent of the initial state.) To prove these results, we interpret the filtered states (estimates and error covariances) at each node in the GIKF as stochastic particles with local interactions. We analyze the asymptotic properties of the error process by studying as a random dynamical system the associated switched (random) Riccati equation, the switching being dictated by a non-stationary Markov chain on the network graph.

  17. Synthesis of high luminescent carbon nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvozdyuk, Alina A.; Petrova, Polina S.; Goryacheva, Irina Y.; Sukhorukov, Gleb B.

    2017-03-01

    In this article we report an effective and simple method for synthesis of high luminescent carbon nanodots (CDs). In our work as a carbon source sodium dextran sulfate (DS) was used because it is harmless, its analogs are used in medicine as antithrombotic compounds and blood substitutes after hemorrhage. was used as a substrate We investigated the influence of temperature parameters of hydrothermal synthesis on the photoluminescence (PL) intensity and position of emission maxima. We discovered that the PL intensity can be tuned by changing of synthesis temperature and CD concentration.

  18. Circularly polarized luminescence of syndiotactic polystyrene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Paola; Abbate, Sergio; Longhi, Giovanna; Guerra, Gaetano

    2017-11-01

    Syndiotactic polystyrene (s-PS) films, when crystallized from the amorphous state by temporary sorption of non-racemic guest molecules (like carvone) not only exhibit unusually high optical activity, both in the UV-Visible and Infrared ranges, but also present circularly polarized luminescence (CPL) with high dissymmetry ratios (g = ΔI/I values in the range 0.02-0.03). Experimental evidences provide support, rather than to the usual molecular circular dichroism, to a supramolecular chiral optical response being extrinsic to the site of photon absorption and emission, possibly associated with a helical morphology of s-PS crystallites.

  19. Luminescent properties of praseodymium in some fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potapov, A.S.; Rodnyj, P.A.; Mikhrin, S.B.; Magunov, I.R.

    2005-01-01

    Influence of diverse factors on efficiency of the Pr 3+ cascade emission in BaF 2 : Pr and SrAlF 5 : Pr. The effect of the environment of the luminescence center on the mutual position of the lowest 5d and the 4f level 1 S 0 of Pr 3+ ion is considered. PrF 3 clustering in BaF 2 is observed at a high praseodymium concentration. The promising potential of magnesium as a charge compensator for praseodymium in SrAlF 5 is demonstrated [ru

  20. Luminescent solar concentrators with fiber geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelenbosch, Oreane Y; Fisher, Martyn; Patrignani, Luca; van Sark, Wilfried G J H M; Chatten, Amanda J

    2013-05-06

    The potential of a fibre luminescent solar concentrator has been explored by means of both analytical and ray-tracing techniques. Coated fibres have been found to be more efficient than homogeneously doped fibres, at low absorption. For practical fibres concentration is predicted to be linear with fibre length. A 1 m long, radius 1 mm, fibre LSC doped with Lumogen Red 305 is predicted to concentrate the AM1.5 g spectrum up to 1100 nm at normal incidence by ~35 x. The collection efficiency under diffuse and direct irradiance in London has been analysed showing that, even under clear sky conditions, in winter the diffuse contribution equals the direct.

  1. Research Update: Luminescence in lead halide perovskites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Ram Srimath Kandada

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Efficiency and dynamics of radiative recombination of carriers are crucial figures of merit for optoelectronic materials. Following the recent success of lead halide perovskites in efficient photovoltaic and light emitting technologies, here we review some of the noted literature on the luminescence of this emerging class of materials. After outlining the theoretical formalism that is currently used to explain the carrier recombination dynamics, we review a few significant works which use photoluminescence as a tool to understand and optimize the operation of perovskite based optoelectronic devices.

  2. Optically stimulated luminescence dating of rock surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sohbati, Reza

    There are many examples of rock surfaces, rock art and stone structures whose ages are of great importance to the understanding of various phenomena in geology, climatology and archaeology. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating is a well-established chronological tool that has successfully...... to include the effects of the environmental dose rate. By fitting the model to the dose-depth variation from a single clast, four events (two light exposures of different durations each followed by a burial period) in the history of a single cobble are identified and quantified. However, the use of model...

  3. Surfactant nebulisation prevents the adverse effects of surfactant therapy on blood pressure and cerebral blood flow in rabbits with severe respiratory failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, Peter H.; Heikamp, A; Bambang Oetomo, Sidarto

    1997-01-01

    Objective: Surfactant replacement therapy for the neonatal respiratory distress syndrome has shown beneficial effects on lung function and survival. Recently, rapid fluctuations of haemodynamics and cerebral perfusion following surfactant instillation have beer, described and an association with the

  4. Luminescence at the end of the tunnelling - Investigating charge transfer mechanisms and luminescence dating methods for feldspar minerals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kars, R.H.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis comprises analyses of mineral physics with an application in geology and archeology. The thesis contributes to the development of feldspar luminescence dating methods in order to extend the applicable age range of feldspar luminescence dating in the Quaternary (last 2.6 Ma). The research

  5. Dispersion of nanoparticulate suspensions using self-assembled surfactant aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pankaj Kumar

    The dispersion of particles is critical for several industrial applications such as paints, inks, coatings, and cosmetics. Several emerging applications such as abrasives for precision polishing, and drug delivery systems are increasingly relying on nanoparticulates to achieve the desired performance. In the case of nanoparticles, the dispersion becomes more challenging because of the lack of fundamental understanding of dispersant adsorption and interparticle force prediction. Additionally, many of these processes use severe processing environments such as high normal forces (>100 mN/m), high shear forces (>10,000 s -1), and high ionic strengths (>0.1 M). Under such processing conditions, traditionally used dispersants based on electrostatics, and steric force repulsion mechanism may not be adequate. Hence, the development of optimally performing dispersants requires a fundamental understanding of the dispersion mechanism at the atomic/molecular scale. This study explores the use of self-assembled surfactant aggregates at the solid-liquid interface for dispersing nanoparticles in severe processing environments. Surfactant molecules can provide a feasible alternative to polymeric or inorganic dispersants for stabilizing ultrafine particles. The barrier to aggregation in the presence of surfactant molecules was measured using atomic force microscopy. The barrier heights correlated to suspension stability. To understand the mechanism for nanoparticulate suspension stability in the presence of surfactant films, the interface was characterized using zeta potential, contact angle, adsorption, and FT-IR (adsorbed surfactant film structure measurements). The effect of solution conditions such as pH and ionic strength on the suspension stability, and the self-assembled surfactant films was also investigated. It was determined that a transition from a random to an ordered orientation of the surfactant molecules at the interface was responsible for stability of

  6. Effects of Surfactants on the Rate of Chemical Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Samiey

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Surfactants are self-assembled compounds that depend on their structure and electric charge can interact as monomer or micelle with other compounds (substrates. These interactions which may catalyze or inhibit the reaction rates are studied with pseudophase, cooperativity, and stoichiometric (classical models. In this review, we discuss applying these models to study surfactant-substrate interactions and their effects on Diels-Alder, redox, photochemical, decomposition, enzymatic, isomerization, ligand exchange, radical, and nucleophilic reactions.

  7. Nanoparticle decoration with surfactants: Molecular interactions, assembly, and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Hendrik; Pramanik, Chandrani; Heinz, Ozge; Ding, Yifu; Mishra, Ratan K.; Marchon, Delphine; Flatt, Robert J.; Estrela-Lopis, Irina; Llop, Jordi; Moya, Sergio; Ziolo, Ronald F.

    2017-02-01

    Nanostructures of diverse chemical nature are used as biomarkers, therapeutics, catalysts, and structural reinforcements. The decoration with surfactants has a long history and is essential to introduce specific functions. The definition of surfactants in this review is very broad, following its lexical meaning ;surface active agents;, and therefore includes traditional alkyl modifiers, biological ligands, polymers, and other surface active molecules. The review systematically covers covalent and non-covalent interactions of such surfactants with various types of nanomaterials, including metals, oxides, layered materials, and polymers as well as their applications. The major themes are (i) molecular recognition and noncovalent assembly mechanisms of surfactants on the nanoparticle and nanocrystal surfaces, (ii) covalent grafting techniques and multi-step surface modification, (iii) dispersion properties and surface reactions, (iv) the use of surfactants to influence crystal growth, as well as (v) the incorporation of biorecognition and other material-targeting functionality. For the diverse materials classes, similarities and differences in surfactant assembly, function, as well as materials performance in specific applications are described in a comparative way. Major factors that lead to differentiation are the surface energy, surface chemistry and pH sensitivity, as well as the degree of surface regularity and defects in the nanoparticle cores and in the surfactant shell. The review covers a broad range of surface modifications and applications in biological recognition and therapeutics, sensors, nanomaterials for catalysis, energy conversion and storage, the dispersion properties of nanoparticles in structural composites and cement, as well as purification systems and classical detergents. Design principles for surfactants to optimize the performance of specific nanostructures are discussed. The review concludes with challenges and opportunities.

  8. Use of surfactants to control island size and density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrell, Jason; Liu, Feng; Stringfellow, Gerald B.

    2017-08-15

    Methods of controlling island size and density on an OMVPE growth film may comprise adding a surfactant at a critical concentration level, allowing a growth phase for a first period of time, and ending the growth phase when desired island size and density are achieved. For example, the island size and density of an OMVPE grown InGaN thin film may be controlled by adding an antimony surfactant at a critical concentration level.

  9. Liquid crystalline states of surfactant solutions of isotropic micelles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagdassarian, C.; Gelbart, W.M.; Ben-Shaul, A.

    1988-01-01

    We consider micellar solutions whose surfactant molecules prefer strongly to form small, globular aggregates in the absence of intermicellar interactions. At sufficiently high volume fraction of surfactant, the isotropic phase of essentially spherical micelles is shown to be unstable with respect to an orientationally ordered (nematic) state of rodlike aggregates. This behavior is relevant to the phase diagrams reported for important classes of aqueous amphiphilic solutions

  10. Why is gravity so weak?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goradia, S.G.

    2006-01-01

    Why is gravity weak? Gravity is plagued with this and many other questions. After decades of exhausting work we do not have a clear answer. In view of this fact it will be shown in the following pages that there are reasons for thinking that gravity is just a composite force consisting of the long-range manifestations of short range nuclear forces that are too tiny to be measured at illuminated or long ranges by particle colliders. This is consistent with Einstein's proposal in 1919

  11. Weak decays of heavy quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaillard, M.K.

    1978-08-01

    The properties that may help to identify the two additional quark flavors that are expected to be discovered. These properties are lifetime, branching ratios, selection rules, and lepton decay spectra. It is also noted that CP violation may manifest itself more strongly in heavy particle decays than elsewhere providing a new probe of its origin. The theoretical progress in the understanding of nonleptonic transitions among lighter quarks, nonleptonic K and hyperon decay amplitudes, omega minus and charmed particle decay predictions, and lastly the Kobayashi--Maskawa model for the weak coupling of heavy quarks together with the details of its implications for topology and bottomology are treated. 48 references

  12. Weak consistency and strong paraconsistency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Robles

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In a standard sense, consistency and paraconsistency are understood as, respectively, the absence of any contradiction and as the absence of the ECQ (“E contradictione quodlibet” rule that allows us to conclude any well formed formula from any contradiction. The aim of this paper is to explain the concepts of weak consistency alternative to the standard one, the concepts of paraconsistency related to them and the concept of strong paraconsistency, all of which have been defined by the author together with José M. Méndez.

  13. Electromagnetic weak turbulence theory revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, P. H. [IPST, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Ziebell, L. F. [Instituto de Fisica, UFRGS, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Gaelzer, R.; Pavan, J. [Instituto de Fisica e Matematica, UFPel, Pelotas, RS (Brazil)

    2012-10-15

    The statistical mechanical reformulation of weak turbulence theory for unmagnetized plasmas including fully electromagnetic effects was carried out by Yoon [Phys. Plasmas 13, 022302 (2006)]. However, the wave kinetic equation for the transverse wave ignores the nonlinear three-wave interaction that involves two transverse waves and a Langmuir wave, the incoherent analogue of the so-called Raman scattering process, which may account for the third and higher-harmonic plasma emissions. The present paper extends the previous formalism by including such a term.

  14. Physicochemical treatments of anionic surfactants wastewater: Effect on aerobic biodegradability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloui, Fathi; Kchaou, Sonia; Sayadi, Sami

    2009-05-15

    The effect of different physicochemical treatments on the aerobic biodegradability of an industrial wastewater resulting from a cosmetic industry has been investigated. This industrial wastewater contains 11423 and 3148mgL(-1) of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and anionic surfactants, respectively. The concentration of COD and anionic surfactants were followed throughout the diverse physicochemical treatments and biodegradation experiments. Different pretreatments of this industrial wastewater using chemical flocculation process with lime and aluminium sulphate (alum), and also advanced oxidation process (electro-coagulation (Fe and Al) and electro-Fenton) led to important COD and anionic surfactants removals. The best results were obtained using electro-Fenton process, exceeding 98 and 80% of anionic surfactants and COD removals, respectively. The biological treatment by an isolated strain Citrobacter braakii of the surfactant wastewater, as well as the pretreated wastewater by the various physicochemical processes used in this study showed that the best results were obtained with electro-Fenton pretreated wastewater. The characterization of the treated surfactant wastewater by the integrated process (electro-coagulation or electro-Fenton)-biological showed that it respects Tunisian discharge standards.

  15. Respiratory Mechanics and Gas Exchange: The Effect of Surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jbaily, Abdulrahman; Szeri, Andrew J.

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of the lung is to exchange gases, primarily oxygen and carbon dioxide, between the atmosphere and the circulatory system. To enable this exchange, the airways in the lungs terminate in some 300 million alveoli that provide adequate surface area for transport. During breathing, work must be done to stretch various tissues to accommodate a greater volume of gas. Considerable work must also be done to expand the liquid lining (hypophase) that coats the interior surfaces of the alveoli. This is enabled by a surface active lipo-protein complex, known as pulmonary surfactant, that modifies the surface tension at the hypophase-air interface. Surfactants also serve as physical barriers that modify the rate of gas transfer across interfaces. We develop a mathematical model to study the action of pulmonary surfactant and its determinative contributions to breathing. The model is used to explore the influence of surfactants on alveolar mechanics and on gas exchange: it relates the work of respiration at the level of the alveolus to the gas exchange rate through the changing influence of pulmonary surfactant over the breathing cycle. This work is motivated by a need to develop improved surfactant replacement therapies to treat serious medical conditions.

  16. Surfactant Effect on the Average Flow Generation Near Curved Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimenko, Lyudmila; Lyubimov, Dmitry

    2018-02-01

    The present work is devoted to the average flow generation near curved interface with a surfactant adsorbed on the surface layer. The investigation was carried out for a liquid drop embedded in a viscous liquid with a different density. The liquid flows inside and outside the drop are generated by small amplitude and high frequency vibrations. Surfactant exchange between the drop surface and the surrounding liquid is limited by the process of adsorption-desorption. It was assumed that the surfactant is soluble in the surrounding liquid, but not soluble in the liquid drop. Surrounding liquid and the liquid in the drop are considered incompressible. Normal and shear viscous stresses balance at the interface is performed under the condition that the film thickness of the adsorbed surfactant is negligible. The problem is solved under assumption that the shape of the drop in the presence of adsorbed surfactant remains spherical symmetry. The effective boundary conditions for the tangential velocity jump and shear stress jump, describing the above generation have been obtained by matched asymptotic expansions method. The conditions under which the drop surface can be considered as a quasi-solid are determined. It is shown that in the case of the significant effect of surfactant on the surface tension, the dominant mechanism for the generation is the Schlichting mechanisms under vibrations.

  17. Separation of oil and grease from oil sludge using surfactant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ainon Abdul Aziz; Syed Hakimi Sakuma Syed Ahmad; Zalina Laili

    2005-01-01

    The objective of the experiments was to observe the efficiency of the surfactant to remove oil and grease from oil sludges using various surfactant concentration ranging from 10 %, 15 %, 20 % and 30 %. The surfactant solution consists of two mixtures of Aqua 2000 and D Bond. The oil sludge were subjected to heating and surfactant treatment process. Remaining oil and grease concentration were observed on the oil sludges after treatment. Small scale experiments were conducted by heating process, without heating process and heating process with addition of sodium chloride. Surfactant solution was added in each process. Results shows that there is separation of oil and grease from the oil sludges. There were formation of mini emulsions (oil in water). The higher the concentration of surfactant used, the higher the concentrations of mini emulsion formed as observed. Solid remains after the treatment process were found to contain lesser oil concentration with presence of bitumen, sediment, organic and inorganic materials. After a washing process using distilled water, the solid was still black but less oily than before the treatment. There is no separation of oil occurred in aqueous solution for the control experiment. (Author)

  18. Splash Dynamics of Falling Surfactant-Laden Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Nur; Buitrago, Lewis; Pereyra, Eduardo

    2017-11-01

    Splashing dynamics is a common issue in oil and gas separation technology. In this study, droplet impact of various surfactant concentrations onto solid and liquid surfaces is studied experimentally using a high-speed imaging analysis. Although this area has been widely studied in the past, there is still not a good understanding of the role of surfactant over droplet impact and characterization of resulting splash dynamics. The experiments are conducted using tap water laden with anionic surfactant. The effects of system parameters on a single droplet impingement such as surfactant concentration (no surfactant, below, at and above critical micelle concentration), parent drop diameter (2-5mm), impact velocity and type of impact surface (thin and deep pool) are investigated. Image analysis technique is shown to be an effective technique for identification of coalescence to splashing transition. In addition, daughter droplets size distributions are analyzed qualitatively in the events of splashing. As expected, it is observed that the formation of secondary droplets is affected by the surfactant concentration. A summary of findings will be discussed.

  19. Seismic Moment and Recurrence using Luminescence Dating Techniques: Characterizing brittle fault zone materials suitable for luminescence dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsakalos, E.; Lin, A.; Bassiakos, Y.; Kazantzaki, M.; Filippaki, E.

    2017-12-01

    During a seismic-geodynamic process, frictional heating and pressure are generated on sediments fragments resulting in deformation and alteration of minerals contained in them. The luminescence signal enclosed in minerals crystal lattice can be affected and even zeroed during such an event. This has been breakthrough in geochronological studies as it could be utilized as a chronometer for the previous seismic activity of a tectonically active area. Although the employment of luminescence dating has in some cases been successfully described, a comprehensive study outlining and defining protocols for routine luminescence dating applied to neotectonic studies has not been forthcoming. This study is the experimental investigation, recording and parameterization of the effects of tectonic phenomena on minerals luminescence signal and the development of detailed protocols for the standardization of the luminescence methodology for directly dating deformed geological formations, so that the long-term temporal behaviour of seismically active faults could be reasonably understood and modeled. This will be achieved by: a) identifying and proposing brittle fault zone materials suitable for luminescence dating using petrological, mineralogical and chemical analyses and b) investigating the "zeroing" potential of the luminescence signal of minerals contained in fault zone materials by employing experimental simulations of tectonic processes in the laboratory, combined with luminescence measurements on samples collected from real fault zones. For this to be achieved, a number of samples collected from four faults of four different geographical regions will be used. This preliminary-first step of the study presents the microstructural, and mineralogical analyses for the characterization of brittle fault zone materials that contain suitable minerals for luminescence dating (e.g., quartz and feldspar). The results showed that the collected samples are seismically deformed fault

  20. Weak interactions at the SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1986-03-01

    Prospects for the study of standard model weak interactions at the SSC are reviewed, with emphasis on the unique capability of the SSC to study the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking whether the associated new quanta are at the TeV scale or higher. Symmetry breaking by the minimal Higgs mechanism and by related strong interaction dynamical variants is summarized. A set of measurements is outlined that would calibrate the proton structure functions and the backgrounds to new physics. The ability to measure the three weak gauge boson vertex is found to complement LEP II, with measurements extending to larger Q 2 at a comparable statistical level in detectable decays. B factory physics is briefly reviewed as one example of a possible broad program of high statistics studies of sub-TeV scale phenomena. The largest section of the talk is devoted to the possible manifestations of symmetry breaking in the WW and ZZ production cross sections. Some new results are presented bearing on the ability to detect high mass WW and ZZ pairs. The principal conclusion is that although nonstandard model scenarios are typically more forgiving, the capability to study symmetry breaking in the standard model (and in related strong interaction dynamical variants) requires achieving the SSC design goals of √ s,L = 40Tev, 10 33 cm -2 sec -1 . 28 refs., 5 figs

  1. Probing supervoids with weak lensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Yuichi; Inoue, Kaiki Taro

    2018-05-01

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) has non-Gaussian features in the temperature fluctuations. An anomalous cold spot surrounded with a hot ring, called the Cold Spot, is one of such features. If a large underdense region (supervoid) resides towards the Cold Spot, we would be able to detect a systematic shape distortion in the images of background source galaxies via weak lensing effect. In order to estimate the detectability of such signals, we used the data of N-body simulations to simulate full-sky ray-tracing of source galaxies. We searched for a most prominent underdense region using the simulated convergence maps smoothed at a scale of 20° and obtained tangential shears around it. The lensing signal expected in a concordant Λ cold dark matter model can be detected at a signal-to-noise ratio S/N ˜ 3. If a supervoid with a radius of ˜200 h-1 Mpc and a density contrast δ0 ˜ -0.3 at the centre resides at a redshift z ˜ 0.2, on-going and near-future weak gravitational lensing surveys would detect a lensing signal with S/N ≳ 4 without resorting to stacking. From the tangential shear profile, we can obtain a constraint on the projected mass distribution of the supervoid.

  2. Pulmonary clearance of {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA in experimental surfactant dysfunction treated with surfactant installation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, K.; John, J.; Lachmann, B.; Robertson, B.; Wollmer, P.

    1997-02-01

    Background: Breakdown of the alveolo-capillary barrier is a characteristic feature of respiratory distress syndrome. Restoration of alveolo-capillary barrier function may be an important aspect of surfactant replacement therapy. We examined the effect of surfactant installation on alveolo-capillary barrier function in an experimental model of surfactant dysfunction by measuring pulmonary clearance of {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA. Methods: Nineteen rabbits were tracheotomized and mechanically ventilated. Surfactant dysfunction was induced by administration of a synthetic detergent in aerosol form. Detergent was given to 13 rabbits; seven rabbits were then treated with installation of natural surfactant, whereas six rabbits received saline. Six rabbits were used as untreated controls. An aerosol of {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA was administered to all animals and the pulmonary clearance was measured with a gamma camera. Results: {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA cleared from the lungs with a half-life of 71{+-}22 min in the control animals, 21.4{+-}7.4 min in the surfactant-treated animals and 5.8{+-}1.5 min in the saline-treated animals. The difference in half-life between groups was highly significant (P<0.001). There was no change in arterial oxygenation or compliance in controls or in animals treated with saline. In animals treated with surfactant, a small transient reduction in arterial oxygen tension and a more long-standing reduction in compliance were observed. Conclusion: Surfactant treatment thus significantly attenuated the effect of detergent treatment but did not restore alveolo-capillary transfer of {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA to normal. (AU) 26 refs.

  3. Effect of double-tailed surfactant architecture on the conformation, self-assembly, and processing in polypeptide-surfactant complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junnila, Susanna; Hanski, Sirkku; Oakley, Richard J; Nummelin, Sami; Ruokolainen, Janne; Faul, Charl F J; Ikkala, Olli

    2009-10-12

    This work describes the solid-state conformational and structural properties of self-assembled polypeptide-surfactant complexes with double-tailed surfactants. Poly(L-lysine) was complexed with three dialkyl esters of phosphoric acid (i.e., phosphodiester surfactants), where the surfactant tail branching and length was varied to tune the supramolecular architecture in a facile way. After complexation with the branched surfactant bis(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate in an aqueous solution, the polypeptide chains adopted an alpha-helical conformation. These rod-like helices self-assembled into cylindrical phases with the amorphous alkyl tails pointing outward. In complexes with dioctyl phosphate and didodecyl phosphate, which have two linear n-octyl or n-dodecyl tails, respectively, the polypeptide formed antiparallel beta-sheets separated by alkyl layers, resulting in well-ordered lamellar self-assemblies. By heating, it was possible to trigger a partial opening of the beta-sheets and disruption of the lamellar phase. After repeated heating/cooling, all of these complexes also showed a glass transition between 37 and 50 degrees C. Organic solvent treatment and plasticization by overstoichiometric amount of surfactant led to structure modification in poly(L-lysine)-dioctyl phosphate complexes, PLL(diC8)(x) (x = 1.0-3.0). Here, the alpha-helical PLL is surrounded by the surfactants and these bottle-brush-like chains self-assemble in a hexagonal cylindrical morphology. As x is increased, the materials are clearly plasticized and the degree of ordering is improved: The stiff alpha-helical backbones in a softened surfactant matrix give rise to thermotropic liquid-crystalline phases. The complexes were examined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering, transmission electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, polarized optical microscopy, and circular dichroism.

  4. Viscosity of the oil-in-water Pickering emulsion stabilized by surfactant-polymer and nanoparticle-surfactant-polymer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Tushar; Kumar, G. Suresh; Chon, Bo Hyun; Sangwai, Jitendra S.

    2014-11-01

    Information on the viscosity of Pickering emulsion is required for their successful application in upstream oil and gas industry to understand their stability at extreme environment. In this work, a novel formulation of oil-in-water (o/w) Pickering emulsion stabilized using nanoparticle-surfactant-polymer (polyacrylamide) system as formulated in our earlier work (Sharma et al., Journal of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry, 2014) is investigated for rheological stability at high pressure and high temperature (HPHT) conditions using a controlled-strain rheometer. The nanoparticle (SiO2 and clay) concentration is varied from 1.0 to 5.0 wt%. The results are compared with the rheological behavior of simple o/w emulsion stabilized by surfactant-polymer system. Both the emulsions exhibit non-Newtonian shear thinning behavior. A positive shift in this behavior is observed for surfactant-polymer stabilized emulsion at high pressure conditions. Yield stress is observed to increase with pressure for surfactant-polymer emulsion. In addition, increase in temperature has an adverse effect on the viscosity of emulsion stabilized by surfactant-polymer system. In case of nanoparticle-surfactant-polymer stabilized o/w emulsion system, the viscosity and yield stress are predominantly constant for varying pressure and temperature conditions. The viscosity data for both o/w emulsion systems are fitted by the Herschel-Bulkley model and found to be satisfactory. In general, the study indicates that the Pickering emulsion stabilized by nanoparticle-surfactant-polymer system shows improved and stable rheological properties as compared to conventional emulsion stabilized by surfactant-polymer system indicating their successful application for HPHT environment in upstream oil and gas industry.

  5. Luminescence optically stimulated: theory and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera M, T.; Azorin N, J.

    2002-01-01

    The thermally stimulated luminescence (Tl) has occupied an important place in the Solid state physics (FES) by the flexibility of the phenomena, mainly for its applications in the fields of Radiation Physics (FR) and Medical Physics (MF). The reason of this phenomena lies in the fact of the electrons release by the action of heat. Under that same reason, it can be used the action of another stimulant agent for releasing the trapped electrons in the metastable states (EM), this agent is the light which has the same effect that the heat, giving as result the production of light photons at using light in the visible spectra, of different wavelength that the excitation light. This phenomena is called Luminescence optically stimulated (LOE). The LOE has a great impact in the Solid State Physics (FES), dating and now in the use of the phenomena as a dosimetric method, alternate to the Tl, for its use in the ionizing and non-ionizing radiations fields. (Author)

  6. Nervous control of photophores in luminescent fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccone, Giacomo; Abelli, Luigi; Salpietro, Lorenza; Zaccone, Daniele; Macrì, Battesimo; Marino, Fabio

    2011-07-01

    Functional studies of the autonomic innervation in the photophores of luminescent fishes are scarce. The majority of studies have involved either the stimulation of isolated photophores or the modulatory effects of adrenaline-induced light emission. The fish skin is a highly complex organ that performs a wide variety of physiological processes and receives extensive nervous innervations. The latter includes autonomic nerve fibers of spinal sympathetic origin having a secretomotor function. More recent evidence indicates that neuropeptide-containing nerve fibers, such as those that express tachykinin and its NK1 receptor, neuropeptide Y, or nitric oxide, may also play an important role in the nervous control of photophores. There is no anatomical evidence that shows that nNOS positive (nitrergic) neurons form a population distinct from the secretomotor neurons with perikarya in the sympathetic ganglia. The distribution and function of the nitrergic nerves in the luminous cells, however, is less clear. It is likely that the chemical properties of the sympathetic postganglionic neurons in the ganglia of luminescent fishes are target-specific, such as observed in mammals. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Plasmon-resonant nanorods as multimodal agents for two-photon luminescent imaging and photothermal therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Terry B.; Hansen, Matthew N.; Tong, Ling; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Haifeng; Zweifel, Daniel A.; Cheng, Ji-Xin; Wei, Alexander

    2007-02-01

    Plasmon-resonant gold nanorods have outstanding potential as multifunctional agents for image-guided therapies. Nanorods have large absorption cross sections at near-infrared (NIR) frequencies, and produce two-photon luminescence (TPL) when excited by fs-pulsed laser irradiation. The TPL signals can be detected with single-particle sensitivity, enabling nanorods to be imaged in vivo while passing through blood vessels at subpicomolar concentrations. Furthermore, cells labeled with nanorods become highly susceptible to photothermal damage when irradiated at plasmon resonance, often resulting in a dramatic blebbing of the cell membrane. However, the straightforward application of gold nanorods for cell-specific labeling is obstructed by the presence of CTAB, a cationic surfactant carried over from nanorod synthesis which also promotes their nonspecific uptake into cells. Careful exchange and replacement of CTAB can be achieved by introducing oligoethyleneglycol (OEG) units capable of chemisorption onto nanorod surfaces by in situ dithiocarbamate formation, a novel method of surface functionalization. Nanorods with a dense coating of methyl-terminated OEG chains are shielded from nonspecific cell uptake, whereas nanorods functionalized with folate-terminated OEG chains accumulate on the surface of tumor cells overexpressing their cognate receptor, with subsequent delivery of photoinduced cell damage at low laser fluence.

  8. Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-assisted hydrothermal synthesis of luminescent YVO4:Eu3+ microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Juan; Xu Yunhua; Hojamberdiev, Mirabbos; Wang Mingqiong; Zhu Gangqiang

    2010-01-01

    Spherical YVO 4 :Eu 3+ microstructures were hydrothermally synthesized by the reaction of NH 4 VO 3 , Y 2 O 3 , and Eu 2 O 3 at 180 deg. C for 24 h with the assistance of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as a surfactant. The resulting products were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The experimental results showed that ball-like YVO 4 :Eu 3+ microspheres with a diameter of about 4-5 μm, corresponding to the SEM observations, formed at 180 deg. C for 24 h using 0.2 g PVP with the molecular weight of 20,000 g mol -1 . The amount of PVP and the reaction time of hydrothermal processing were found to play a key role in the formation of YVO 4 :Eu 3+ microspheres. It has been observed that the relative luminescence intensities of the as-synthesized samples increased with increasing hydrothermal reaction times due mainly to the increase of crystallinity.

  9. Model Lung Surfactant Films: Why Composition Matters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selladurai, Sahana L.; Miclette Lamarche, Renaud; Schmidt, Rolf; DeWolf, Christine E.

    2016-10-18

    Lung surfactant replacement therapies, Survanta and Infasurf, and two lipid-only systems both containing saturated and unsaturated phospholipids and one containing additional palmitic acid were used to study the impact of buffered saline on the surface activity, morphology, rheology, and structure of Langmuir monolayer model membranes. Isotherms and Brewster angle microscopy show that buffered saline subphases induce a film expansion, except when the cationic protein, SP-B, is present in sufficient quantities to already screen electrostatic repulsion, thus limiting the effect of changing pH and adding counterions. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction results indicate an expansion not only of the liquid expanded phase but also an expansion of the lattice of the condensed phase. The film expansion corresponded in all cases with a significant reduction in the viscosity and elasticity of the films. The viscoelastic parameters are dominated by liquid expanded phase properties and do not appear to be dependent on the structure of the condensed phase domains in a phase separated film. The results highlight that the choice of subphase and film composition is important for meaningful interpretations of measurements using model systems.

  10. Use of surfactants for the remediation of contaminated soils: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xuhui; Jiang, Rui; Xiao, Wei; Yu, Jiaguo

    2015-03-21

    Due to the great harm caused by soil contamination, there is an increasing interest to apply surfactants to the remediation of a variety of contaminated soils worldwide. This review article summarizes the findings of recent literatures regarding remediation of contaminated soils/sites using surfactants as an enhancing agent. For the surfactant-based remedial technologies, the adsorption behaviors of surfactants onto soil, the solubilizing capability of surfactants, and the toxicity and biocompatibility of surfactants are important considerations. Surfactants can enhance desorption of pollutants from soil, and promote bioremediation of organics by increasing bioavailability of pollutants. The removal of heavy metals and radionuclides from soils involves the mechanisms of dissolution, surfactant-associated complexation, and ionic exchange. In addition to the conventional ionic and nonionic surfactants, gemini surfactants and biosurfactants are also applied to soil remediation due to their benign features like lower critical micelle concentration (CMC) values and better biocompatibility. Mixed surfactant systems and combined use of surfactants with other additives are often adopted to improve the overall performance of soil washing solution for decontamination. Worldwide the field studies and full-scale remediation using surfactant-based technologies are yet limited, however, the already known cases reveal the good prospect of applying surfactant-based technologies to soil remediation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Principal and secondary luminescence lifetime components in annealed natural quartz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chithambo, M.L.; Ogundare, F.O.; Feathers, J.

    2008-01-01

    Time-resolved luminescence spectra from quartz can be separated into components with distinct principal and secondary lifetimes depending on certain combinations of annealing and measurement temperature. The influence of annealing on properties of the lifetimes related to irradiation dose and temperature of measurement has been investigated in sedimentary quartz annealed at various temperatures up to 900 deg. C. Time-resolved luminescence for use in the analysis was pulse stimulated from samples at 470 nm between 20 and 200 deg. C. Luminescence lifetimes decrease with measurement temperature due to increasing thermal effect on the associated luminescence with an activation energy of thermal quenching equal to 0.68±0.01eV for the secondary lifetime but only qualitatively so for the principal lifetime component. Concerning the influence of annealing temperature, luminescence lifetimes measured at 20 deg. C are constant at about 33μs for annealing temperatures up to 600 0 C but decrease to about 29μs when the annealing temperature is increased to 900 deg. C. In addition, it was found that lifetime components in samples annealed at 800 deg. C are independent of radiation dose in the range 85-1340 Gy investigated. The dependence of lifetimes on both the annealing temperature and magnitude of radiation dose is described as being due to the increasing importance of a particular recombination centre in the luminescence emission process as a result of dynamic hole transfer between non-radiative and radiative luminescence centres

  12. Increasing lanthanide luminescence by use of the RETEL effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leif, Robert C; Vallarino, Lidia M; Becker, Margie C; Yang, Sean

    2006-08-01

    Luminescent lanthanide complexes produce emissions with the narrowest-known width at half maximum; however, their significant use in cytometry required an increase in luminescence intensity. The companion review, Leif et al., Cytometry 2006;69A:767-778, described a new technique for the enhancement of lanthanide luminescence, the Resonance Energy Transfer Enhanced Luminescence (RETEL) effect, which increases luminescence and is compatible with standard slide microscopy. The luminescence of the europium ion macrocyclic complex, EuMac, was increased by employing the RETEL effect. After adding the nonluminescent gadolinium ion complex of the thenoyltrifluoroacetonate (TTFA) ligand or the sodium salt of TTFA in ethanol solution, the EuMac-labeled sample was allowed to dry. Both a conventional arc lamp and a time-gated UV LED served as light sources for microscopic imaging. The emission intensity was measured with a CCD camera. Multiple time-gated images were summed with special software to permit analysis and effective presentation of the final image. With the RETEL effect, the luminescence of the EuMac-streptavidin conjugate increased at least six-fold upon drying. Nuclei of apoptotic cells were stained with DAPI and tailed with 5BrdUrd to which a EuMac-anti-5BrdU conjugate was subsequently attached. Time-gated images showed the long-lived EuMac luminescence but did not show the short-lived DAPI fluorescence. Imaging of DNA-synthesizing cells with an arc lamp showed that both S phase and apoptotic cells were labeled, and that their labeling patterns were different. The images of the luminescent EuMac and fluorescent DAPI were combined to produce a color image on a white background. This combination of simple chemistry, instrumentation, and presentation should make possible the inexpensive use of the lanthanide macrocycles, Quantum Dyes, as molecular diagnostics for cytological and histopathological microscopic imaging. (c) 2006 International Society for Analytical

  13. Luminescence imaging of water during alpha particle irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Komori, Masataka; Koyama, Shuji; Toshito, Toshiyuki

    2016-05-01

    The luminescence imaging of water using the alpha particle irradiation of several MeV energy range is thought to be impossible because this alpha particle energy is far below the Cerenkov-light threshold and the secondary electrons produced in this energy range do not emit Cerenkov-light. Contrary to this consensus, we found that the luminescence imaging of water was possible with 5.5 MeV alpha particle irradiation. We placed a 2 MBq of 241Am alpha source in water, and luminescence images of the source were conducted with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. We also carried out such imaging of the alpha source in three different conditions to compare the photon productions with that of water, in air, with a plastic scintillator, and an acrylic plate. The luminescence imaging of water was observed from 10 to 20 s acquisition, and the intensity was linearly increased with time. The intensity of the luminescence with the alpha irradiation of water was 0.05% of that with the plastic scintillator, 4% with air, and 15% with the acrylic plate. The resolution of the luminescence image of water was better than 0.25 mm FWHM. Alpha particles of 5.5 MeV energy emit luminescence in water. Although the intensity of the luminescence was smaller than that in air, it was clearly observable. The luminescence of water with alpha particles would be a new method for alpha particle detection and distribution measurements in water.

  14. Luminescence imaging of water during alpha particle irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi, E-mail: s-yama@met.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Komori, Masataka; Koyama, Shuji [Radiological and Medical Laboratory Sciences, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Toshito, Toshiyuki [Department of Proton Therapy Physics, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Nagoya City West Medical Center (Japan)

    2016-05-21

    The luminescence imaging of water using the alpha particle irradiation of several MeV energy range is thought to be impossible because this alpha particle energy is far below the Cerenkov-light threshold and the secondary electrons produced in this energy range do not emit Cerenkov-light. Contrary to this consensus, we found that the luminescence imaging of water was possible with 5.5 MeV alpha particle irradiation. We placed a 2 MBq of {sup 241}Am alpha source in water, and luminescence images of the source were conducted with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. We also carried out such imaging of the alpha source in three different conditions to compare the photon productions with that of water, in air, with a plastic scintillator, and an acrylic plate. The luminescence imaging of water was observed from 10 to 20 s acquisition, and the intensity was linearly increased with time. The intensity of the luminescence with the alpha irradiation of water was 0.05% of that with the plastic scintillator, 4% with air, and 15% with the acrylic plate. The resolution of the luminescence image of water was better than 0.25 mm FWHM. Alpha particles of 5.5 MeV energy emit luminescence in water. Although the intensity of the luminescence was smaller than that in air, it was clearly observable. The luminescence of water with alpha particles would be a new method for alpha particle detection and distribution measurements in water.

  15. Use of surfactants for the remediation of contaminated soils: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Xuhui, E-mail: clab@whu.edu.cn [School of Resource and Environmental Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Jiang, Rui; Xiao, Wei [School of Resource and Environmental Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Yu, Jiaguo, E-mail: jiaguoyu@yahoo.com [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Material Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2015-03-21

    Highlights: • The recent advances in use of surfactant for soil remediation are reviewed. • The mechanisms of surfactant-based soil remediation are discussed. • A review on the application of different types of surfactants is made. • The future research direction of surfactant-based technologies is suggested. - Abstract: Due to the great harm caused by soil contamination, there is an increasing interest to apply surfactants to the remediation of a variety of contaminated soils worldwide. This review article summarizes the findings of recent literatures regarding remediation of contaminated soils/sites using surfactants as an enhancing agent. For the surfactant-based remedial technologies, the adsorption behaviors of surfactants onto soil, the solubilizing capability of surfactants, and the toxicity and biocompatibility of surfactants are important considerations. Surfactants can enhance desorption of pollutants from soil, and promote bioremediation of organics by increasing bioavailability of pollutants. The removal of heavy metals and radionuclides from soils involves the mechanisms of dissolution, surfactant-associated complexation, and ionic exchange. In addition to the conventional ionic and nonionic surfactants, gemini surfactants and biosurfactants are also applied to soil remediation due to their benign features like lower critical micelle concentration (CMC) values and better biocompatibility. Mixed surfactant systems and combined use of surfactants with other additives are often adopted to improve the overall performance of soil washing solution for decontamination. Worldwide the field studies and full-scale remediation using surfactant-based technologies are yet limited, however, the already known cases reveal the good prospect of applying surfactant-based technologies to soil remediation.

  16. Use of surfactants for the remediation of contaminated soils: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, Xuhui; Jiang, Rui; Xiao, Wei; Yu, Jiaguo

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The recent advances in use of surfactant for soil remediation are reviewed. • The mechanisms of surfactant-based soil remediation are discussed. • A review on the application of different types of surfactants is made. • The future research direction of surfactant-based technologies is suggested. - Abstract: Due to the great harm caused by soil contamination, there is an increasing interest to apply surfactants to the remediation of a variety of contaminated soils worldwide. This review article summarizes the findings of recent literatures regarding remediation of contaminated soils/sites using surfactants as an enhancing agent. For the surfactant-based remedial technologies, the adsorption behaviors of surfactants onto soil, the solubilizing capability of surfactants, and the toxicity and biocompatibility of surfactants are important considerations. Surfactants can enhance desorption of pollutants from soil, and promote bioremediation of organics by increasing bioavailability of pollutants. The removal of heavy metals and radionuclides from soils involves the mechanisms of dissolution, surfactant-associated complexation, and ionic exchange. In addition to the conventional ionic and nonionic surfactants, gemini surfactants and biosurfactants are also applied to soil remediation due to their benign features like lower critical micelle concentration (CMC) values and better biocompatibility. Mixed surfactant systems and combined use of surfactants with other additives are often adopted to improve the overall performance of soil washing solution for decontamination. Worldwide the field studies and full-scale remediation using surfactant-based technologies are yet limited, however, the already known cases reveal the good prospect of applying surfactant-based technologies to soil remediation

  17. Surfactant-assisted dispersion of carbon nanotubes: mechanism of stabilization and biocompatibility of the surfactant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Raman Preet; Jain, Sanyog; Ramarao, Poduri

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are thermodynamically unstable system and tend to aggregate to reduce free energy. The aggregation property of NPs results in inhomogeneous exposure of cells to NPs resulting in variable cellular responses. Several types of surfactants are used to stabilize NP dispersions and obtain homogenous dispersions. However, the effects of these surfactants, per se, on cellular responses are not completely known. The present study investigated the application of Pluronic F68 (PF68) for obtaining stable dispersion of NPs using carbon nanotubes as model NPs. PF68-stabilized NP suspensions are stable for long durations and do not show signs of aggregation or settling during storage or after autoclaving. The polyethylene oxide blocks in PF68 provide steric hindrance between adjacent NPs leading to stable NP dispersions. Further, PF68 is biocompatible in nature and does not affect integrity of mitochondria, lysosomes, DNA, and nuclei. Also, PF68 neither induce free radical or cytokine production nor does it interfere with cellular uptake mechanisms. The results of the present study suggest that PF68-assisted dispersion of NPs produced suspensions, which are stable after autoclaving. Further, PF68 does not interfere with normal physiological functions suggesting its application in nanomedicine and nanotoxicity evaluation

  18. Surfactant-assisted dispersion of carbon nanotubes: mechanism of stabilization and biocompatibility of the surfactant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Raman Preet; Jain, Sanyog; Ramarao, Poduri

    2013-10-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are thermodynamically unstable system and tend to aggregate to reduce free energy. The aggregation property of NPs results in inhomogeneous exposure of cells to NPs resulting in variable cellular responses. Several types of surfactants are used to stabilize NP dispersions and obtain homogenous dispersions. However, the effects of these surfactants, per se, on cellular responses are not completely known. The present study investigated the application of Pluronic F68 (PF68) for obtaining stable dispersion of NPs using carbon nanotubes as model NPs. PF68-stabilized NP suspensions are stable for long durations and do not show signs of aggregation or settling during storage or after autoclaving. The polyethylene oxide blocks in PF68 provide steric hindrance between adjacent NPs leading to stable NP dispersions. Further, PF68 is biocompatible in nature and does not affect integrity of mitochondria, lysosomes, DNA, and nuclei. Also, PF68 neither induce free radical or cytokine production nor does it interfere with cellular uptake mechanisms. The results of the present study suggest that PF68-assisted dispersion of NPs produced suspensions, which are stable after autoclaving. Further, PF68 does not interfere with normal physiological functions suggesting its application in nanomedicine and nanotoxicity evaluation.

  19. Surfactant-assisted dispersion of carbon nanotubes: mechanism of stabilization and biocompatibility of the surfactant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Raman Preet, E-mail: ramanpreetsingh@hotmail.com [Evalueserve SEZ (Gurgaon) Pvt. Ltd. (India); Jain, Sanyog [National Institute of Pharmaceutical Education and Research, Centre for Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology, Department of Pharmaceutics (India); Ramarao, Poduri, E-mail: ramaraop@yahoo.com [Central University of Punjab, School of Basic and Applied Sciences (India)

    2013-10-15

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are thermodynamically unstable system and tend to aggregate to reduce free energy. The aggregation property of NPs results in inhomogeneous exposure of cells to NPs resulting in variable cellular responses. Several types of surfactants are used to stabilize NP dispersions and obtain homogenous dispersions. However, the effects of these surfactants, per se, on cellular responses are not completely known. The present study investigated the application of Pluronic F68 (PF68) for obtaining stable dispersion of NPs using carbon nanotubes as model NPs. PF68-stabilized NP suspensions are stable for long durations and do not show signs of aggregation or settling during storage or after autoclaving. The polyethylene oxide blocks in PF68 provide steric hindrance between adjacent NPs leading to stable NP dispersions. Further, PF68 is biocompatible in nature and does not affect integrity of mitochondria, lysosomes, DNA, and nuclei. Also, PF68 neither induce free radical or cytokine production nor does it interfere with cellular uptake mechanisms. The results of the present study suggest that PF68-assisted dispersion of NPs produced suspensions, which are stable after autoclaving. Further, PF68 does not interfere with normal physiological functions suggesting its application in nanomedicine and nanotoxicity evaluation.

  20. Weak KAM for commuting Hamiltonians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zavidovique, M

    2010-01-01

    For two commuting Tonelli Hamiltonians, we recover the commutation of the Lax–Oleinik semi-groups, a result of Barles and Tourin (2001 Indiana Univ. Math. J. 50 1523–44), using a direct geometrical method (Stoke's theorem). We also obtain a 'generalization' of a theorem of Maderna (2002 Bull. Soc. Math. France 130 493–506). More precisely, we prove that if the phase space is the cotangent of a compact manifold then the weak KAM solutions (or viscosity solutions of the critical stationary Hamilton–Jacobi equation) for G and for H are the same. As a corollary we obtain the equality of the Aubry sets and of the Peierls barrier. This is also related to works of Sorrentino (2009 On the Integrability of Tonelli Hamiltonians Preprint) and Bernard (2007 Duke Math. J. 136 401–20)